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  1. Curcumin suppresses human papillomavirus oncoproteins, restores p53, Rb, and PTPN13 proteins and inhibits benzo[a]pyrene-induced upregulation of HPV E7.

    PubMed

    Maher, Diane M; Bell, Maria C; O'Donnell, Emmylu A; Gupta, Brij K; Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C

    2011-01-01

    Curcumin has great potential as a chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agent; however, its effects on human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated molecular events are inadequately explored. This study examined the effects of curcumin on HPV-associated pathways involved in developing cervical cancer. We demonstrate for the first time that curcumin treatment suppresses cervical cancer cell growth in a three-dimensional raft culture system. Curcumin also inhibits tumorigenic characteristics as shown by decreases in both clonogenic potential and cell motility. Additionally, our findings show that curcumin treatment inhibits the transcription of HPV16 E6/E7 as early as 6?h posttreatment and restores the expression of tumor suppressor proteins p53, retinoblastoma protein, and PTPN13. While smoking is a recognized risk factor for cervical cancer, the molecular effects of smoke carcinogens on the expression of HPV E6/E7 oncogenes are not well known. We show for the first time that exposure to benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), a tobacco carcinogen, increases the expression of HPV E7 oncoprotein suggesting a molecular link between smoking and cervical cancer. Importantly, curcumin decreases the BaP induced increase in the expression of HPV E7 oncoprotein. The results of this study clearly demonstrate that curcumin alters HPV-associated molecular pathways in cervical cancer cells. These novel findings imply that curcumin may be an effective chemopreventive and therapeutic agent for cervical cancer prevention and treatment. PMID:21061268

  2. The human papillomavirus type 16 E7 oncoprotein induces a transcriptional repressor complex on the Toll-like receptor 9 promoter.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Uzma A; Zannetti, Claudia; Parroche, Peggy; Goutagny, Nadège; Malfroy, Marine; Roblot, Guillaume; Carreira, Christine; Hussain, Ishraq; Müller, Martin; Taylor-Papadimitriou, Joyce; Picard, Didier; Sylla, Bakary S; Trinchieri, Giorgio; Medzhitov, Ruslan; Tommasino, Massimo

    2013-07-01

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) and other oncogenic viruses have been reported to deregulate immunity by suppressing the function of the double-stranded DNA innate sensor TLR9. However, the mechanisms leading to these events remain to be elucidated. We show that infection of human epithelial cells with HPV16 promotes the formation of an inhibitory transcriptional complex containing NF-?Bp50-p65 and ER? induced by the E7 oncoprotein. The E7-mediated transcriptional complex also recruited the histone demethylase JARID1B and histone deacetylase HDAC1. The entire complex bound to a specific region on the TLR9 promoter, which resulted in decreased methylation and acetylation of histones upstream of the TLR9 transcriptional start site. The involvement of NF-?B and ER? in the TLR9 down-regulation by HPV16 E7 was fully confirmed in cervical tissues from human patients. Importantly, we present evidence that the HPV16-induced TLR9 down-regulation affects the interferon response which negatively regulates viral infection. Our studies highlight a novel HPV16-mediated mechanism that combines epigenetic and transcriptional events to suppress a key innate immune sensor. PMID:23752229

  3. The Human papillomavirus type 16 E7 oncoprotein induces a transcriptional repressor complex on the Toll-like receptor 9 promoter

    PubMed Central

    Zannetti, Claudia; Parroche, Peggy; Goutagny, Nadège; Malfroy, Marine; Roblot, Guillaume; Carreira, Christine; Hussain, Ishraq; Müller, Martin; Taylor-Papadimitriou, Joyce; Picard, Didier; Sylla, Bakary S.; Trinchieri, Giorgio; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) and other oncogenic viruses have been reported to deregulate immunity by suppressing the function of the double-stranded DNA innate sensor TLR9. However, the mechanisms leading to these events remain to be elucidated. We show that infection of human epithelial cells with HPV16 promotes the formation of an inhibitory transcriptional complex containing NF-?Bp50–p65 and ER? induced by the E7 oncoprotein. The E7-mediated transcriptional complex also recruited the histone demethylase JARID1B and histone deacetylase HDAC1. The entire complex bound to a specific region on the TLR9 promoter, which resulted in decreased methylation and acetylation of histones upstream of the TLR9 transcriptional start site. The involvement of NF-?B and ER? in the TLR9 down-regulation by HPV16 E7 was fully confirmed in cervical tissues from human patients. Importantly, we present evidence that the HPV16-induced TLR9 down-regulation affects the interferon response which negatively regulates viral infection. Our studies highlight a novel HPV16-mediated mechanism that combines epigenetic and transcriptional events to suppress a key innate immune sensor. PMID:23752229

  4. Oncoprotein E7 from Beta Human Papillomavirus 38 Induces Formation of an Inhibitory Complex for a Subset of p53-Regulated Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Saidj, Djamel; Cros, Marie-Pierre; Hernandez-Vargas, Hector; Guarino, Francesca; Sylla, Bakary S.; Tommasino, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Our previous studies on cutaneous beta human papillomavirus 38 (HPV38) E6 and E7 oncoproteins highlighted a novel activity of I?B kinase beta (IKK?) in the nucleus of human keratinocytes, where it phosphorylates and stabilizes ?Np73?, an antagonist of p53/p73 functions. Here, we further characterize the role of the IKK? nuclear form. We show that IKK? nuclear translocation and ?Np73? accumulation are mediated mainly by HPV38 E7 oncoprotein. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)/Re-ChIP experiments showed that ?Np73? and IKK? are part, together with two epigenetic enzymes DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) and the enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2), of a transcriptional regulatory complex that inhibits the expression of some p53-regulated genes, such as PIG3. Recruitment to the PIG3 promoter of EZH2 and DNMT1 resulted in trimethylation of histone 3 on lysine 27 and in DNA methylation, respectively, both events associated with gene expression silencing. Decreases in the intracellular levels of HPV38 E7 or ?Np73? strongly affected the recruitment of the inhibitory transcriptional complex to the PIG3 promoter, with consequent restoration of p53-regulated gene expression. Finally, the ?Np73?/IKK?/DNMT1/EZH2 complex appears to bind a subset of p53-regulated promoters. In fact, the complex is efficiently recruited to several promoters of genes encoding proteins involved in DNA repair and apoptosis, whereas it does not influence the expression of the prosurvival factor Survivin. In summary, our data show that HPV38 via E7 protein promotes the formation of a multiprotein complex that negatively regulates the expression of several p53-regulated genes. PMID:24006445

  5. Oncoprotein E7 from beta human papillomavirus 38 induces formation of an inhibitory complex for a subset of p53-regulated promoters.

    PubMed

    Saidj, Djamel; Cros, Marie-Pierre; Hernandez-Vargas, Hector; Guarino, Francesca; Sylla, Bakary S; Tommasino, Massimo; Accardi, Rosita

    2013-11-01

    Our previous studies on cutaneous beta human papillomavirus 38 (HPV38) E6 and E7 oncoproteins highlighted a novel activity of I?B kinase beta (IKK?) in the nucleus of human keratinocytes, where it phosphorylates and stabilizes ?Np73?, an antagonist of p53/p73 functions. Here, we further characterize the role of the IKK? nuclear form. We show that IKK? nuclear translocation and ?Np73? accumulation are mediated mainly by HPV38 E7 oncoprotein. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)/Re-ChIP experiments showed that ?Np73? and IKK? are part, together with two epigenetic enzymes DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) and the enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2), of a transcriptional regulatory complex that inhibits the expression of some p53-regulated genes, such as PIG3. Recruitment to the PIG3 promoter of EZH2 and DNMT1 resulted in trimethylation of histone 3 on lysine 27 and in DNA methylation, respectively, both events associated with gene expression silencing. Decreases in the intracellular levels of HPV38 E7 or ?Np73? strongly affected the recruitment of the inhibitory transcriptional complex to the PIG3 promoter, with consequent restoration of p53-regulated gene expression. Finally, the ?Np73?/IKK?/DNMT1/EZH2 complex appears to bind a subset of p53-regulated promoters. In fact, the complex is efficiently recruited to several promoters of genes encoding proteins involved in DNA repair and apoptosis, whereas it does not influence the expression of the prosurvival factor Survivin. In summary, our data show that HPV38 via E7 protein promotes the formation of a multiprotein complex that negatively regulates the expression of several p53-regulated genes. PMID:24006445

  6. Human papillomavirus type 16 E7 oncoprotein mediates CCNA1 promoter methylation

    PubMed Central

    Chalertpet, Kanwalat; Pakdeechaidan, Watcharapong; Patel, Vyomesh; Mutirangura, Apiwat; Yanatatsaneejit, Pattamawadee

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) oncoproteins drive distinctive promoter methylation patterns in cancer. However, the underlying mechanism remains to be elucidated. Cyclin A1 (CCNA1) promoter methylation is strongly associated with HPV-associated cancer. CCNA1 methylation is found in HPV-associated cervical cancers, as well as in head and neck squamous cell cancer. Numerous pieces of evidence suggest that E7 may drive CCNA1 methylation. First, the CCNA1 promoter is methylated in HPV-positive epithelial lesions after transformation. Second, the CCNA1 promoter is methylated at a high level when HPV is integrated into the human genome. Finally, E7 has been shown to interact with DNA methyltransferase 1 (Dnmt1). Here, we sought to determine the mechanism by which E7 increases methylation in cervical cancer by using CCNA1 as a gene model. We investigated whether E7 induces CCNA1 promoter methylation, resulting in the loss of expression. Using both E7 knockdown and overexpression approaches in SiHa and C33a cells, our data showed that CCNA1 promoter methylation decreases with a corresponding increase in expression in E7 siRNA-transfected cells. By contrast, CCNA1 promoter methylation was augmented with a corresponding reduction in expression in E7-overexpressing cells. To confirm whether the binding of the E7–Dnmt1 complex to the CCNA1 promoter induced methylation and loss of expression, ChIP assays were carried out in E7-, del CR3-E7 and vector control-overexpressing C33a cells. The data showed that E7 induced CCNA1 methylation by forming a complex with Dnmt1 at the CCNA1 promoter, resulting in the subsequent reduction of expression in cancers. It is interesting to further explore the genome-wide mechanism of E7 oncoprotein-mediated DNA methylation. PMID:26250467

  7. Human papillomavirus type 16 E7 oncoprotein upregulates the retinoic acid receptor-beta expression in cervical cancer cell lines and K14E7 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Jorge; García-Villa, Enrique; Ocadiz-Delgado, Rodolfo; Cortés-Malagón, Enoc M; Vázquez, Juan; Roman-Rosales, Alejandra; Alvarez-Rios, Elizabeth; Celik, Haydar; Romano, Marta C; Üren, Aykut; Lambert, Paul F; Gariglio, Patricio

    2015-10-01

    Persistent infection with high-risk human papillomaviruses is the main etiological factor in cervical cancer (CC). The human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) E7 oncoprotein alters several cellular processes, regulating the expression of many genes in order to avoid cell cycle control. Retinoic acid receptor beta (RARB) blocks cell growth, inducing differentiation and apoptosis. This tumor suppressor gene is gradually silenced in late passages of foreskin keratinocytes immortalized with HPV16 and in various tumors, including CC, mainly by epigenetic modifications. We investigated the effect of E7 oncoprotein on RARB gene expression. We found that HPV16 E7 increases RARB mRNA and RAR-beta protein expression both in vitro and in the cervix of young K14E7 transgenic mice. In E7-expressing cells, RARB overexpression is further increased in the presence of the tumor suppressor p53 (TP53) R273C mutant. This effect does not change when either C33-A or E7-expressing C33-A cell line is treated with Trichostatin A, suggesting that E7 enhances RARB expression independently of histone deacetylases inhibition. These findings indicate that RARB overexpression is part of the early molecular events induced by the E7 oncoprotein. PMID:26173416

  8. Identification of the nuclear localization and export signals of high risk HPV16 E7 oncoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, Alixandra A.; McManus, Patrick M.; Bockstall, Katy; Moroianu, Junona

    2009-01-05

    The E7 oncoprotein of high risk human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) binds and inactivates the retinoblastoma (RB) family of proteins. Our previous studies suggested that HPV16 E7 enters the nucleus via a novel Ran-dependent pathway independent of the nuclear import receptors (Angeline, M., Merle, E., and Moroianu, J. (2003). The E7 oncoprotein of high-risk human papillomavirus type 16 enters the nucleus via a nonclassical Ran-dependent pathway. Virology 317(1), 13-23.). Here, analysis of the localization of specific E7 mutants revealed that the nuclear localization of E7 is independent of its interaction with pRB or of its phosphorylation by CKII. Fluorescence microscopy analysis of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and 2xEGFP fusions with E7 and E7 domains in HeLa cells revealed that E7 contains a novel nuclear localization signal (NLS) in the N-terminal domain (aa 1-37). Interestingly, treatment of transfected HeLa cells with two specific nuclear export inhibitors, Leptomycin B and ratjadone, changed the localization of 2xEGFP-E7{sub 38-98} from cytoplasmic to mostly nuclear. These data suggest the presence of a leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES) and a second NLS in the C-terminal domain of E7 (aa 38-98). Mutagenesis of critical amino acids in the putative NES sequence ({sub 76}IRTLEDLLM{sub 84}) changed the localization of 2xEGFP-E7{sub 38-98} from cytoplasmic to mostly nuclear suggesting that this is a functional NES. The presence of both NLSs and an NES suggests that HPV16 E7 shuttles between the cytoplasm and nucleus which is consistent with E7 having functions in both of these cell compartments.

  9. Expression of the human papillomavirus type 16 E7 oncoprotein induces an autophagy-related process and sensitizes normal human keratinocytes to cell death in response to growth factor deprivation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Xiaobo; Muenger, Karl

    2009-03-01

    Expression of oncogenes, such as the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) E7 oncoprotein, promotes aberrant cell proliferation. In the absence of concurrent mitogenic stimuli, this triggers a cell-intrinsic defense mechanism, the 'trophic sentinel response', which eliminates such aberrant cells. The molecular pathways that elicit this response, however, remain obscure. We set up an experimental system to investigate the trophic sentinel pathway triggered by HPV16 E7 expression in normal human keratinocytes, the natural host cells of HPVs. Keratinocytes expressing HPV16 E7 cultured in E-medium undergo cell death and show increased sub-G1 DNA content when grown to confluence or under conditions of serum deprivation. Moreover, HPV16 E7 expressing human keratinocytes express higher levels of the autophagy marker, LC3-II, which can be abrogated by 3-methyladenine, an autophagy inhibitor. These findings indicate that even under normal culture conditions, HPV16 E7 expression triggers metabolic stress that may result in autophagy, a pathway implicated in carcinogenesis.

  10. Bridging Links between Long Noncoding RNA HOTAIR and HPV Oncoprotein E7 in Cervical Cancer Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sweta; Mandal, Paramita; Sadhukhan, Tamal; Roy Chowdhury, Rahul; Ranjan Mondal, Nidhu; Chakravarty, Biman; Chatterjee, Tanmay; Roy, Sudipta; Sengupta, Sharmila

    2015-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 oncoprotein E7 plays a major role in cervical carcinogenesis by interacting with and functionally inactivating various host regulatory molecules. Long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) HOTAIR is one such regulator that recruits chromatin remodelling complex PRC2, creating gene silencing H3K27?me3 marks. Hence, we hypothesized that HOTAIR could be a potential target of E7, in HPV16 related cervical cancers (CaCx). We identified significant linear trend of progressive HOTAIR down-regulation through HPV negative controls, HPV16 positive non-malignants and CaCx samples. Majority of CaCx cases portrayed HOTAIR down-regulation in comparison to HPV negative controls, with corresponding up-regulation of HOTAIR target, HOXD10, and enrichment of cancer related pathways. However, a small subset had significantly higher HOTAIR expression, concomitant with high E7 expression and enrichment of metastatic pathways. Expression of HOTAIR and PRC2-complex members (EZH2 and SUZ12), showed significant positive correlation with E7 expression in CaCx cases and E7 transfected C33A cell line, suggestive of interplay between E7 and HOTAIR. Functional inactivation of HOTAIR by direct interaction with E7 could also be predicted by in silico analysis and confirmed by RNA-Immunoprecipitation. Our study depicts one of the causal mechanisms of cervical carcinogenesis by HPV16 E7, through modulation of HOTAIR expression and function. PMID:26152361

  11. Regulation of the Wnt/?-Catenin Signaling Pathway by Human Papillomavirus E6 and E7 Oncoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz Bello, Jesus Omar; Olmedo Nieva, Leslie; Contreras Paredes, Adriana; Fuentes Gonzalez, Alma Mariana; Rocha Zavaleta, Leticia; Lizano, Marcela

    2015-01-01

    Cell signaling pathways are the mechanisms by which cells transduce external stimuli, which control the transcription of genes, to regulate diverse biological effects. In cancer, distinct signaling pathways, such as the Wnt/?-catenin pathway, have been implicated in the deregulation of critical molecular processes that affect cell proliferation and differentiation. For example, changes in ?-catenin localization have been identified in Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancers as the lesion progresses. Specifically, ?-catenin relocates from the membrane/cytoplasm to the nucleus, suggesting that this transcription regulator participates in cervical carcinogenesis. The E6 and E7 oncoproteins are responsible for the transforming activity of HPV, and some studies have implicated these viral oncoproteins in the regulation of the Wnt/?-catenin pathway. Nevertheless, new interactions of HPV oncoproteins with cellular proteins are emerging, and the study of the biological effects of such interactions will help to understand HPV-related carcinogenesis. This review addresses the accumulated evidence of the involvement of the HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins in the activation of the Wnt/?-catenin pathway. PMID:26295406

  12. Human papillomavirus type 16 E7 oncoprotein engages but does not abrogate the mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yueyang; Munger, Karl

    2012-10-10

    The mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) ensures faithful chromosome segregation during mitosis by censoring kinetochore-microtubule interactions. It is frequently rendered dysfunctional during carcinogenesis causing chromosome missegregation and genomic instability. There are conflicting reports whether the HPV16 E7 oncoprotein drives chromosomal instability by abolishing the SAC. Here we report that degradation of mitotic cyclins is impaired in cells with HPV16 E7 expression. RNAi-mediated depletion of Mad2 or BubR1 indicated the involvement of the SAC, suggesting that HPV16 E7 expression causes sustained SAC engagement. Mutational analyses revealed that HPV16 E7 sequences that are necessary for retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein binding as well as sequences previously implicated in binding the nuclear and mitotic apparatus (NuMA) protein and in delocalizing dynein from the mitotic spindle contribute to SAC engagement. Importantly, however, HPV16 E7 does not markedly compromise the SAC response to microtubule poisons.

  13. Human Papillomavirus 16 Oncoprotein E7 Stimulates UBF1-Mediated rDNA Gene Transcription, Inhibiting a p53-Independent Activity of p14ARF

    PubMed Central

    Dichamp, Isabelle; Séité, Paule; Agius, Gérard; Barbarin, Alice; Beby-Defaux, Agnès

    2014-01-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus oncoproteins E6 and E7 play a major role in HPV-related cancers. One of the main functions of E7 is the degradation of pRb, while E6 promotes the degradation of p53, inactivating the p14ARF-p53 pathway. pRb and p14ARF can repress ribosomal DNA (rDNA) transcription in part by targeting the Upstream Binding Factor 1 (UBF1), a key factor in the activation of RNA polymerase I machinery. We showed, through ectopic expression and siRNA silencing of p14ARF and/or E7, that E7 stimulates UBF1-mediated rDNA gene transcription, partly because of increased levels of phosphorylated UBF1, preventing the inhibitory function of p14ARF. Unexpectedly, activation of rDNA gene transcription was higher in cells co-expressing p14ARF and E7, compared to cells expressing E7 alone. We did not find a difference in P-UBF1 levels that could explain this data. However, p14ARF expression induced E7 to accumulate into the nucleolus, where rDNA transcription takes place, providing an opportunity for E7 to interact with nucleolar proteins involved in this process. GST-pull down and co-immunoprecipitation assays showed interactions between p14ARF, UBF1 and E7, although p14ARF and E7 are not able to directly interact. Co-expression of a pRb-binding-deficient mutant (E7C24G) and p14ARF resulted in EC24G nucleolar accumulation, but not in a significant higher activation of rDNA transcription, suggesting that the inactivation of pRb is involved in this phenomenon. Thus, p14ARF fails to prevent E7-mediated UBF1 phosphorylation, but could facilitate nucleolar pRb inactivation by targeting E7 to the nucleolus. While others have reported that p19ARF, the mouse homologue of p14ARF, inhibits some functions of E7, we showed that E7 inhibits a p53-independent function of p14ARF. These results point to a mutually functional interaction between p14ARF and E7 that might partly explain why the sustained p14ARF expression observed in most cervical pre-malignant lesions and malignancies may be ineffective. PMID:24798431

  14. Activation of Src, Fyn and Yes non-receptor tyrosine kinases in keratinocytes expressing human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 E7 oncoprotein

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Src family tyrosine kinases (SFK) are cellular regulatory proteins that influence cell adhesion, proliferation, invasion and survival during tumor development. Elevated activity of Src was associated with increased cell proliferation and invasivity in human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated malignancies; therefore, transduced human foreskin keratinocytes (HFK) were used to investigate whether SFK activation is a downstream effect of papillomaviral oncoproteins. Activation of ubiquitously expressed SFKs, namely Src, Yes and Fyn, was investigated in both proliferating and differentiating keratinocytes. Results In proliferating keratinocytes, Src, Yes and Fyn mRNA levels were not affected by HPV 16 E6 or E7 oncoproteins, while at the protein level as detected by western blot, the presence of both E6 and E7 resulted in substantial increase in Src and Yes expression, but did not alter the high constitutive level of Fyn. Phospo-kinase array revealed that all ubiquitously expressed SFKs are activated by phosphorylation in the presence of HPV 16 E7 oncoprotein. Keratinocyte differentiation led to increased Yes mRNA and protein levels in all transduced cell lines, while it did not influence the Src transcription but resulted in elevated Src protein level in HPV16 E7 expressing lines. Conclusions This study revealed that HPV 16 oncoproteins upregulate Src family kinases Src and Yes via posttranscriptional mechanisms. A further effect of HPV 16 E7 oncoprotein is to enhance the activating phosphorylation of SFKs expressed in keratinocytes. PMID:23497302

  15. Inducing Oncoprotein Degradation to Improve Targeted Cancer Therapy1

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Dipankar; Cuneo, Kyle C.; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Nyati, Mukesh K.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, inhibition of the kinase activities of oncogenic proteins using small molecules and antibodies has been a mainstay of our anticancer drug development effort, resulting in several Food and Drug Administration–approved cancer therapies. The clinical effectiveness of kinase-targeted agents has been inconsistent, mostly because of the development of resistance. The expression and function of oncoproteins and tumor suppressors are regulated by numerous posttranslational protein modifications including phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and acetylation; hence, targeting specific posttranslational protein modifications provides for an attractive strategy for anticancer drug development. The present review discusses the hypothesis that targeted degradation of an oncoprotein may overcome many of the shortcomings seen with kinase inhibitors and that the approach would enable targeted inhibition of oncogenic proteins previously thought to be undruggable. PMID:26476077

  16. The human papillomavirus (HPV) E7 protein antagonises an Imiquimod-induced inflammatory pathway in primary human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Richards, Kathryn H; Wasson, Christopher W; Watherston, Oliver; Doble, Rosella; Eric Blair, G; Wittmann, Miriam; Macdonald, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPV) are the etiological pathogen of cervical and a number of ano-genital cancers. How HPVs overcome the significant barriers of the skin immune system has been the topic of intensive research. The E6 and E7 oncoproteins have emerged as key players in the deregulation of host innate immune pathways that are required for the recruitment of effector cells of the immune response. Here we demonstrate that E7, and to a lesser extend E6, strongly reduce NF?B activation in response to the inflammatory mediator imiquimod. Moreover, we establish that undifferentiated keratinocytes do not express the putative receptor for imiquimod, TLR7, and as such are stimulated by imiquimod through a novel pathway. Inhibition of imiquimod induced cytokine production required residues in the CR1 and CR3 regions of E7 and resulted in reduced nuclear translocation and acetylation of the p65 sub-unit of NF?B. The results provide further evidence for a TLR7-independent role of imiquimod in the epithelial immune response and reinforce the ability of the HPV oncoproteins to disrupt the innate immune response, which may have important consequences for establishment of a chronic infection. PMID:26268216

  17. The human papillomavirus (HPV) E7 protein antagonises an Imiquimod-induced inflammatory pathway in primary human keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Kathryn H.; Wasson, Christopher W.; Watherston, Oliver; Doble, Rosella; Eric Blair, G.; Wittmann, Miriam; Macdonald, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPV) are the etiological pathogen of cervical and a number of ano-genital cancers. How HPVs overcome the significant barriers of the skin immune system has been the topic of intensive research. The E6 and E7 oncoproteins have emerged as key players in the deregulation of host innate immune pathways that are required for the recruitment of effector cells of the immune response. Here we demonstrate that E7, and to a lesser extend E6, strongly reduce NF?B activation in response to the inflammatory mediator imiquimod. Moreover, we establish that undifferentiated keratinocytes do not express the putative receptor for imiquimod, TLR7, and as such are stimulated by imiquimod through a novel pathway. Inhibition of imiquimod induced cytokine production required residues in the CR1 and CR3 regions of E7 and resulted in reduced nuclear translocation and acetylation of the p65 sub-unit of NF?B. The results provide further evidence for a TLR7-independent role of imiquimod in the epithelial immune response and reinforce the ability of the HPV oncoproteins to disrupt the innate immune response, which may have important consequences for establishment of a chronic infection. PMID:26268216

  18. Human papillomavirus oncoproteins and apoptosis (Review)

    PubMed Central

    JIANG, PEIYUE; YUE, YING

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review the literature and identify the association between human papillomavirus (HPV) oncoproteins and apoptosis. HPV-associated apoptosis may be primarily blocked by a number of oncoproteins, including E5, E6 and E7. E5 protein protects cells from tumor necrosis factor-associated apoptosis; the oncoprotein E6 predominantly inhibits apoptosis through the p53 pathway; and oncoprotein E7 is involved in apoptosis activation and inhibition. In addition, HPV oncoproteins are involved in activating or repressing the transcription of E6/E7. In conclusion, HPV oncoproteins, including E5, E6 and E7 protein, may interfere with apoptosis via certain regulatory principles. PMID:24348754

  19. A Chlamydomonas-Derived Human Papillomavirus 16 E7 Vaccine Induces Specific Tumor Protection

    PubMed Central

    Demurtas, Olivia C.; Massa, Silvia; Ferrante, Paola; Venuti, Aldo; Franconi, Rosella; Giuliano, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Background The E7 protein of the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) type 16, being involved in malignant cellular transformation, represents a key antigen for developing therapeutic vaccines against HPV-related lesions and cancers. Recombinant production of this vaccine antigen in an active form and in compliance with good manufacturing practices (GMP) plays a crucial role for developing effective vaccines. E7-based therapeutic vaccines produced in plants have been shown to be active in tumor regression and protection in pre-clinical models. However, some drawbacks of in whole-plant vaccine production encouraged us to explore the production of the E7-based therapeutic vaccine in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, an organism easy to grow and transform and fully amenable to GMP guidelines. Methodology/Principal Findings An expression cassette encoding E7GGG, a mutated, attenuated form of the E7 oncoprotein, alone or as a fusion with affinity tags (His6 or FLAG), under the control of the C. reinhardtii chloroplast psbD 5? UTR and the psbA 3? UTR, was introduced into the C. reinhardtii chloroplast genome by homologous recombination. The protein was mostly soluble and reached 0.12% of total soluble proteins. Affinity purification was optimized and performed for both tagged forms. Induction of specific anti-E7 IgGs and E7-specific T-cell proliferation were detected in C57BL/6 mice vaccinated with total Chlamydomonas extract and with affinity-purified protein. High levels of tumor protection were achieved after challenge with a tumor cell line expressing the E7 protein. Conclusions The C. reinhardtii chloroplast is a suitable expression system for the production of the E7GGG protein, in a soluble, immunogenic form. The production in contained and sterile conditions highlights the potential of microalgae as alternative platforms for the production of vaccines for human uses. PMID:23626690

  20. The HPV-16 E7 oncogene sensitizes malignant cells to IFN-alpha-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yisong

    2005-10-01

    Interferons (IFNs) exert antitumor effects in several human malignancies, but their mechanism of action is unclear. There is a great variability in sensitivity to IFN treatment depending on both tumor type and the individual patient. The reason for this variable sensitivity is not known. The fact that several IFN-induced anticellular effects are exerted through modulation of proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes may indicate that the malignant genotype may be decisive in the cell's sensitivity to IFN. To determine if a deregulated oncogene could alter the cellular response to IFN, a mouse lymphoma cell line (J3D) was stably transfected with the viral human papillomavirus-16 (HPV-16) E7 oncogene. The E7-transfected cells and their respective mock-transfected sister clones were treated with IFN-{alpha} and examined for possible IFN-induced anticellular effects. We found that the E7-transfected clones were greatly sensitized to IFN-{alpha}-induced apoptosis compared with their mock-transfected counterparts. Induction of apoptosis in the transfected cells correlated with the ability of IFN to activate parts of the proapoptotic machinery specifically in these cells, including activation of caspases and the proapoptotic protein Bak. In summary, our data suggest that transfection of malignant cells with the E7 oncogene can sensitize them to IFN-{alpha}-induced apoptosis. This demonstrates that an oncogenic event may alter the cellular sensitivity to IFN and might also have implications for treatment of HPV related diseases with IFN.

  1. The retroviral oncoprotein Tax targets the coiled-coil centrosomal protein TAX1BP2 to induce centrosome overduplication.

    PubMed

    Ching, Yick-Pang; Chan, Shing-Fai; Jeang, Kuan-Teh; Jin, Dong-Yan

    2006-07-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that supernumerary centrosomes drive genome instability and oncogenesis. Human T-cell leukaemia virus type I (HTLV-I) is etiologically associated with adult T-cell leukaemia (ATL). ATL cells are aneuploid, but the causes of aneuploidy are incompletely understood. Here, we show that centrosome amplification is frequent in HTLV-I-transformed cells and that this phenotype is caused by the viral Tax oncoprotein. We also show that the fraction of Tax protein that localizes to centrosomes interacts with TAX1BP2, a novel centrosomal protein composed almost entirely of coiled-coil domains. Overexpression of TAX1BP2 inhibited centrosome duplication, whereas depletion of TAX1BP2 by RNAi resulted in centrosome hyperamplification. Our findings suggest that the HTLV-I Tax oncoprotein targets TAX1BP2 causing genomic instability and aneuploidy. PMID:16767081

  2. Inhibition of the MUC1-C oncoprotein induces multiple myeloma cell death by down-regulating TIGAR expression and depleting NADPH.

    PubMed

    Yin, Li; Kosugi, Michio; Kufe, Donald

    2012-01-19

    The MUC1-C oncoprotein is aberrantly expressed in most multiple myeloma cells. However, the functional significance of MUC1-C expression in multiple myeloma is not known. The present studies demonstrate that treatment of multiple myeloma cells with a MUC1-C inhibitor is associated with increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS), oxidation of mitochondrial cardiolipin, and loss of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential. The MUC1-C inhibitor-induced increases in ROS were also associated with down-regulation of the p53-inducible regulator of glycolysis and apoptosis (TIGAR). In concert with the decrease in TIGAR expression, which regulates the pentose phosphate pathway, treatment with the MUC1-C inhibitor reduced production of NADPH, and in turn glutathione (GSH) levels. TIGAR protects against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. The suppression of TIGAR and NADPH levels thus contributed to ROS-mediated late apoptosis/necrosis of multiple myeloma cells. These findings indicate that multiple myeloma cells are dependent on MUC1-C and TIGAR for maintenance of redox balance and that targeting MUC1-C activates a cascade involving TIGAR suppression that contributes to multiple myeloma cell death. PMID:22117045

  3. Oncoprotein metastasis disjoined

    E-print Network

    Razvan Tudor Radulescu

    2007-12-18

    As the past decade barely dawned, a fundamentally novel view of cancer relating to signal transduction through intracellular hormones/growth factors and their subunits began to unfold. Further along, it gained additional substance with the advent of the interdisciplinary fields of particle biology and peptide strings which explain (onco)protein dynamics in spacetime, for instance insulin-driven sub- and trans-cellular carcinogenesis, by physical principles. Here, this new understanding is expanded to introduce the concept of "oncoprotein metastasis" preceding cancer cell spread and, thereby, a particular emphasis is placed on its potential role in the emergence of the pre-metastatic niche. Consistent with this perception, yet unlike currently advocated treatments that target cancer cells only, future antineoplastic strategies should aim to mimic natural tumor suppressors as well as involve both (morphologically) normal and malignant cells. If validated in human patients with advanced cancer disease, its otherwise frequently lethal course may be halted and reversed just in time.

  4. Cutaneous Human Papillomavirus Type 38 E7 Regulates Actin Cytoskeleton Structure for Increasing Cell Proliferation through CK2 and the Eukaryotic Elongation Factor 1A?†

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Jiping; Shukla, Ruchi; Accardi, Rosita; Zanella-Cleon, Isabelle; Siouda, Maha; Cros, Marie-Pierre; Krutovskikh, Vladimir; Hussain, Ishraq; Niu, Yamei; Hu, Shiqiong; Becchi, Michel; Jurdic, Pierre; Tommasino, Massimo; Sylla, Bakary S.

    2011-01-01

    We previously reported that the oncoproteins E6 and E7 from cutaneous human papillomavirus type 38 (HPV38) can immortalize primary human keratinocytes in vitro and sensitize transgenic mice to develop skin cancer in vivo. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that human keratinocytes immortalized by HPV38 E6 and E7 display fewer actin stress fibers than do control primary keratinocyte cells, raising the possibility of a role of the viral oncoproteins in the remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. In this study, we show that HPV38 E7 induces actin stress fiber disruption and that this phenomenon correlates with its ability to downregulate Rho activity. The downregulation of Rho activity by HPV38 E7 is mediated through the activation of the CK2–MEK–extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. In addition, HPV38 E7 is able to induce actin fiber disruption by binding directly to eukaryotic elongation factor 1A (eEF1A) and abolishing its effects on actin fiber formation. Finally, we found that the downregulation of Rho activity by HPV38 E7 through the CK2-MEK-ERK pathway facilitates cell growth proliferation. Taken together, our data support the conclusion that HPV38 E7 promotes keratinocyte proliferation in part by negatively regulating actin cytoskeleton fiber formation through the CK2-MEK-ERK-Rho pathway and by binding to eEF1A and inhibiting its effects on actin cytoskeleton remodeling. PMID:21697493

  5. Codon Optimization of the Human Papillomavirus E7 Oncogene Induces a CD8+ T Cell Response to a Cryptic Epitope Not Harbored by Wild-Type E7

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Felix K. M.; Wilde, Susanne; Voigt, Katrin; Kieback, Elisa; Mosetter, Barbara; Schendel, Dolores J.; Uckert, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Codon optimization of nucleotide sequences is a widely used method to achieve high levels of transgene expression for basic and clinical research. Until now, immunological side effects have not been described. To trigger T cell responses against human papillomavirus, we incubated T cells with dendritic cells that were pulsed with RNA encoding the codon-optimized E7 oncogene. All T cell receptors isolated from responding T cell clones recognized target cells expressing the codon-optimized E7 gene but not the wild type E7 sequence. Epitope mapping revealed recognition of a cryptic epitope from the +3 alternative reading frame of codon-optimized E7, which is not encoded by the wild type E7 sequence. The introduction of a stop codon into the +3 alternative reading frame protected the transgene product from recognition by T cell receptor gene-modified T cells. This is the first experimental study demonstrating that codon optimization can render a transgene artificially immunogenic through generation of a dominant cryptic epitope. This finding may be of great importance for the clinical field of gene therapy to avoid rejection of gene-corrected cells and for the design of DNA- and RNA-based vaccines, where codon optimization may artificially add a strong immunogenic component to the vaccine. PMID:25799237

  6. DNA vaccine encoding HPV-16 E7 with mutation in L-Y-C-Y-E pRb-binding motif induces potent anti-tumor responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Armina Alagheband; Ghaemi, Amir; Tabarraei, Alijan; Sajadian, Azadeh; Gorji, Ali; Soleimanjahi, Hoorieh

    2014-09-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women worldwide and remains a clinical problem despite improvements in early detection and therapy. The human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 (HPV16) E7 oncoprotein expressed in cervical carcinoma cells are considered as attractive tumor-specific antigen targets for immunotherapy. Since the transformation potential of the oncogenes, vaccination based of these oncogenes is not safe. In present study, DNA vaccine expressing the modified variant with mutation in pRb-binding motif of the HPV-16 E7 oncoprotein was generated. A novel modified E7 gene with mutation in LYCYE motif was designed and constructed and the immunogenicity and antitumor effect of therapeutic DNA vaccines encoding the mutant and wild type of E7 gene were investigated. The L-Y-C-Y-E pRb-binding motif of E7 proteins has been involved in the immortalization and transformation of the host cell. The results showed that the mutant and wild type HPV-16 E7 vectors expressed the desired protein. Furthermore, the immunological mechanism behind mutant E7 DNA vaccine can be attributed at least partially to increased cytotoxic T lymphocyte, accompanied by the up-regulation of Th1-cytokine IFN-? and TNF-? and down-regulation of Th3-cytokine TGF-?. Immunized mice with mutant plasmid demonstrated signi?cantly stronger cell immune responses and higher levels of tumor protection than wild-type E7 DNA vaccine. The results exhibit that modified E7 DNA vaccine may be a promising candidate for development of therapeutic vaccine against HPV-16 cancers. PMID:24880067

  7. A20/TNFAIP3 inhibits NF-?B activation induced by the Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus vFLIP oncoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Sakakibara, S; Espigol-Frigole, G; Gasperini, P; Uldrick, TS; Yarchoan, R; Tosato, G

    2012-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) K13/vFLIP (viral Flice-inhibitory protein) induces transcription of numerous genes through NF-?B activation, including pro-inflammatory cytokines, which contribute to the pathogenesis of Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS). In this study, we report that KSHV vFLIP induces the expression of the NF-?B regulatory proteins A20, ABIN-1 and ABIN-3 (A20-binding NF-?B inhibitors) in primary human endothelial cells, and that KS spindle cells express A20 in KS tissue. In reporter assays, A20 strongly impaired vFLIP-induced NF-?B activation in 293T cells, but ABIN-1 and ABIN-3 did not. Mutational analysis established that the C-terminal domain (residues 427–790) is critical for A20 modulation of NF-?B, but the ubiquitin-editing OTU (ovarian tumor) domain is not. In functional assays, A20 inhibited vFLIP-induced expression of the chemokine IP-10, reduced vFLIP-induced cell proliferation and increased IKK1 protein levels. Thus, we demonstrate that A20 negatively regulates NF-?B activation directly induced by KSHV vFLIP. By attenuating excessive and prolonged vFLIP-induced NF-?B activation that could be harmful to KSHV-infected cells, A20 likely has an important role in the pathogenesis of KSHV-associated diseases, in which vFLIP is expressed. PMID:22525270

  8. Andrographolide downregulates the v-Src and Bcr-Abl oncoproteins and induces Hsp90 cleavage in the ROS-dependent suppression of cancer malignancy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sheng-Hung; Lin, Chao-Hsiung; Liang, Fong-Ping; Chen, Pei-Fen; Kuo, Cheng-Deng; Alam, Mohd Mujahid; Maiti, Barnali; Hung, Shih-Kai; Chi, Chin-Wen; Sun, Chung-Ming; Fu, Shu-Ling

    2014-01-15

    Andrographolide is a diterpenoid compound isolated from Andrographis paniculata that exhibits anticancer activity. We previously reported that andrographolide suppressed v-Src-mediated cellular transformation by promoting the degradation of Src. In the present study, we demonstrated the involvement of Hsp90 in the andrographolide-mediated inhibition of Src oncogenic activity. Using a proteomics approach, a cleavage fragment of Hsp90? was identified in andrographolide-treated cells. The concentration- and time-dependent induction of Hsp90 cleavage that accompanied the reduction in Src was validated in RK3E cells transformed with either v-Src or a human truncated c-Src variant and treated with andrographolide. In cancer cells, the induction of Hsp90 cleavage by andrographolide and its structural derivatives correlated well with decreased Src levels, the suppression of transformation, and the induction of apoptosis. Moreover, the andrographolide-induced Hsp90 cleavage, Src degradation, inhibition of transformation, and induction of apoptosis were abolished by a ROS inhibitor, N-acetyl-cysteine. Notably, Hsp90 cleavage, decreased levels of Bcr-Abl (another known Hsp90 client protein), and the induction of apoptosis were also observed in human K562 leukemia cells treated with andrographolide or its active derivatives. Together, we demonstrated a novel mechanism by which andrographolide suppressed cancer malignancy that involved inhibiting Hsp90 function and reducing the levels of Hsp90 client proteins. Our results broaden the molecular basis of andrographolide-mediated anticancer activity. PMID:24161787

  9. Characterization of Epithelial Progenitors in Normal Human Palatine Tonsils and Their HPV16 E6/E7-Induced Perturbation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sung Yoon Catherine; Kannan, Nagarajan; Zhang, Lewei; Martinez, Victor; Rosin, Miriam P; Eaves, Connie J

    2015-12-01

    Human palatine tonsils are oropharyngeal lymphoid tissues containing multiple invaginations (crypts) in which the continuity of the outer surface epithelium is disrupted and the isolated epithelial cells intermingle with other cell types. We now show that primitive epithelial cells detectable in vitro in 2D colony assays and in a 3D culture system are CD44(+)NGFR(+) and present in both surface and crypt regions. Transcriptome analysis indicated a high similarity between CD44(+)NGFR(+) cells in both regions, although those isolated from the crypt contained a higher proportion of the most primitive (holo)clonogenic cells. Lentiviral transduction of CD44(+)NGFR(+) cells from both regions with human papillomavirus 16-encoded E6/E7 prolonged their growth in 2D cultures and caused aberrant differentiation in 3D cultures. Our findings therefore reveal a shared, site-independent, hierarchical organization, differentiation potential, and transcriptional profile of normal human tonsillar epithelial progenitor cells. They also introduce a new model for investigating the mechanisms of their transformation. PMID:26527383

  10. Characterization of Epithelial Progenitors in Normal Human Palatine Tonsils and Their HPV16 E6/E7-Induced Perturbation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sung Yoon Catherine; Kannan, Nagarajan; Zhang, Lewei; Martinez, Victor; Rosin, Miriam P.; Eaves, Connie J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Human palatine tonsils are oropharyngeal lymphoid tissues containing multiple invaginations (crypts) in which the continuity of the outer surface epithelium is disrupted and the isolated epithelial cells intermingle with other cell types. We now show that primitive epithelial cells detectable in vitro in 2D colony assays and in a 3D culture system are CD44+NGFR+ and present in both surface and crypt regions. Transcriptome analysis indicated a high similarity between CD44+NGFR+ cells in both regions, although those isolated from the crypt contained a higher proportion of the most primitive (holo)clonogenic cells. Lentiviral transduction of CD44+NGFR+ cells from both regions with human papillomavirus 16-encoded E6/E7 prolonged their growth in 2D cultures and caused aberrant differentiation in 3D cultures. Our findings therefore reveal a shared, site-independent, hierarchical organization, differentiation potential, and transcriptional profile of normal human tonsillar epithelial progenitor cells. They also introduce a new model for investigating the mechanisms of their transformation. PMID:26527383

  11. E6 and E7 from Human Papillomavirus Type 16 Cooperate To Target the PDZ Protein Na/H Exchange Regulatory Factor 1 ?

    PubMed Central

    Accardi, Rosita; Rubino, Rosa; Scalise, Mariafrancesca; Gheit, Tarik; Shahzad, Naveed; Thomas, Miranda; Banks, Lawrence; Indiveri, Cesare; Sylla, Bakary S.; Cardone, Rosa A.; Reshkin, Stephan J.; Tommasino, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the PDZ-binding motif of the E6 oncoprotein from the mucosal high-risk (HR) human papillomavirus (HPV) types plays a key role in HPV-mediated cellular transformation in in vitro and in vivo experimental models. HR HPV E6 oncoproteins have the ability to efficiently degrade members of the PDZ motif-containing membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) family; however, it is possible that other PDZ proteins are also targeted by E6. Here, we describe a novel interaction of HPV type 16 (HPV16) E6 with a PDZ protein, Na+/H+ exchange regulatory factor 1 (NHERF-1), which is involved in a number of cellular processes, including signaling and transformation. HPV16 E6 associates with and promotes the degradation of NHERF-1, and this property is dependent on the C-terminal PDZ-binding motif of E6. Interestingly, HPV16 E7, via the activation of the cyclin-dependent kinase complexes, promoted the accumulation of a phosphorylated form of NHERF-1, which is preferentially targeted by E6. Thus, both oncoproteins appear to cooperate in targeting NHERF-1. Notably, HPV18 E6 is not able to induce NHERF-1 degradation, indicating that this property is not shared with E6 from all HR HPV types. Downregulation of NHERF-1 protein levels was also observed in HPV16-positive cervical cancer-derived cell lines, such as SiHa and CaSki, as well as HPV16-positive cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). Finally, our data show that HPV16-mediated NHERF-1 degradation correlates with the activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3?-OH kinase (PI3K)/AKT signaling pathway, which is known to play a key role in carcinogenesis. PMID:21680517

  12. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor AR-42 Enhances E7-Specific CD8+ T Cell-Mediated Antitumor Immunity Induced by Therapeutic HPV DNA Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Yong; Huang, Zhuomin; Kang, Tae Heung; Soong, Ruey-Shyang; Knoff, Jayne; Axenfeld, Ellen; Wang, Chenguang; Alvarez, Ronald D.; Chen, Ching-Shih; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T.-C.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously created a potent DNA vaccine encoding calreticulin linked to the HPV oncogenic protein E7 (CRT/E7). While treatment of the CRT/E7 DNA vaccine generates significant tumor-specific immune responses in vaccinated mice, the potency of the DNA vaccine could potentially be improved by co-administration of a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) as HDACi have been shown to increase the expression of MHC class I and II molecules. Thus, we aimed to determine whether co-administration of a novel HDACi, AR-42, with therapeutic HPV DNA vaccines could improve activation of HPV antigen-specific CD8+ T cells resulting in potent therapeutic antitumor effects. To do so, HPV-16 E7-expressing murine TC-1 tumor-bearing mice were treated orally with AR-42 and/or CRT/E7 DNA vaccine via gene gun. Mice were monitored for E7-specific CD8+ T cell immune responses and antitumor effects. TC-1 tumor-bearing mice treated with AR-42 and CRT/E7 DNA vaccine experienced longer survival, decreased tumor growth, and enhanced E7-specific immune response compared to mice treated with AR-42 or CRT/E7 DNA vaccine alone. Additionally, treatment of TC-1 cells with AR-42 increased surface expression of MHC class I molecules and increased the susceptibility of tumor cells to the cytotoxicity of E7-specific T cells. This study indicates the ability of AR-42 to significantly enhance the potency of the CRT/E7 DNA vaccine by improving tumor-specific immune responses and antitumor effects. Both AR-42 and CRT/E7 DNA vaccine have been used in independent clinical trials and the current study serves as foundation for future clinical trials combining both treatments in cervical cancer therapy. PMID:23715898

  13. Skin Hyperproliferation and Susceptibility to Chemical Carcinogenesis in Transgenic Mice Expressing E6 and E7 of Human Papillomavirus Type 38

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Wen; Kloz, Ulrich; Accardi, Rosita; Caldeira, Sandra; Tong, Wei-Min; Wang, Zhao-Qi; Jansen, Lars; Dürst, Matthias; Sylla, Bakary S.; Gissmann, Lutz; Tommasino, Massimo

    2005-01-01

    The oncoproteins E6 and E7 of human papillomavirus type 38 (HPV38) display several transforming activities in vitro, including immortalization of primary human keratinocytes. To evaluate the oncogenic activities of the viral proteins in an in vivo model, we generated transgenic mice expressing HPV38 E6 and E7 under the control of the bovine homologue of the human keratin 10 (K10) promoter. Two distinct lines of HPV38 E6/E7-expressing transgenic mice that express the viral genes at different levels were obtained. In both lines, HPV38 E6 and E7 induced cellular proliferation, hyperplasia, and dysplasia in the epidermis. The rate of occurrence of these events was proportional to the levels of HPV38 E6 and E7 expression in the two transgenic lines. Exposure of the epidermis of nontransgenic mice to UV led to p21WAF1 accumulation and cell cycle arrest. In contrast, keratinocytes from transgenic mice continued to proliferate and were not positive for p21WAF1, indicating that cell cycle checkpoints are altered in keratinocytes expressing the viral genes. Although the HPV38 E6/E7-expressing transgenic mice did not develop spontaneous tumors during their life span, two-stage carcinogen treatment led to a high incidence of papillomas, keratoacanthomas, and squamous-cell carcinomas in HPV38 mice compared with nontransgenic animals. Together, these data show that HPV38 E6 and E7 display transforming properties in vivo, providing further support for the role of HPV38 in carcinogenesis. PMID:16282489

  14. Structural Insights into a Wildtype Domain of the Oncoprotein E6 and Its Interaction with a PDZ Domain

    PubMed Central

    Mischo, André; Ohlenschläger, Oliver; Hortschansky, Peter; Ramachandran, Ramadurai; Görlach, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    The high-risk human papilloma virus (HPV) oncoproteins E6 and E7 interact with key cellular regulators and are etiological agents for tumorigenesis and tumor maintenance in cervical cancer and other malignant conditions. E6 induces degradation of the tumor suppressor p53, activates telomerase and deregulates cell polarity. Analysis of E6 derived from a number of high risk HPV finally yielded the first structure of a wild-type HPV E6 domain (PDB 2M3L) representing the second zinc-binding domain of HPV 51 E6 (termed 51Z2) determined by NMR spectroscopy. The 51Z2 structure provides clues about HPV-type specific structural differences between E6 proteins. The observed temperature sensitivity of the well-folded wild-type E6 domain implies a significant malleability of the oncoprotein in vivo. Hence, the structural differences between individual E6 and their malleability appear, together with HPV type-specific surface exposed side-chains, to provide the structural basis for the different interaction networks reported for individual E6 proteins. Furthermore, the interaction of 51Z2 with a PDZ domain of hDlg was analyzed. Human Dlg constitutes a prototypic representative of the large family of PDZ proteins regulating cell polarity, which are common targets of high-risk HPV E6. Nine C-terminal residues of 51Z2 interact with the second PDZ domain of hDlg2. Surface plasmon resonance in conjunction with the NMR spectroscopy derived complex structure (PDB 2M3M) indicate that E6 residues N-terminal to the canonical PDZ-BM of E6 significantly contribute to this interaction and increase affinity. The structure of the complex reveals how residues outside of the classical PDZ-BM enhance the affinity of E6 towards PDZ domains. Such mechanism facilitates successful competition of E6 with cellular PDZ-binding proteins and may apply to PDZ-binding proteins of other viruses as well. PMID:23638119

  15. Oncoprotein metastasis and its suppression revisited

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The past two decades have witnessed an increasing appreciation of the role of the tumor microenvironment, of genetic and epigenetic alterations in normal cells adjacent to tumors and of the migration of normal cells with aberrant intrinsic properties in cancer pathophysiology. Aside from these insights, a novel concept termed "oncoprotein metastasis" (OPM) has recently been advanced and proposed to reflect protein-based neoplastic phenomena that might occur even before any modifications relating to the morphology, location or (epi)genetic outfit of cells during the malignant process. Here, evidence is presented that supports the OPM perception and thus should contribute not only to further rethink the definition of a normal cell, but also the treatment of cancer disease in the years to come. PMID:20380702

  16. Attenuated Recombinant Influenza A Virus Expressing HPV16 E6 and E7 as a Novel Therapeutic Vaccine Approach

    PubMed Central

    Jindra, Christoph; Huber, Bettina; Shafti-Keramat, Saeed; Wolschek, Markus; Ferko, Boris; Muster, Thomas; Brandt, Sabine; Kirnbauer, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types, most often HPV16 and HPV18, causes all cervical and most anal cancers, and a subset of vulvar, vaginal, penile and oropharyngeal carcinomas. Two prophylactic virus-like particle (VLPs)-based vaccines, are available that protect against vaccine type-associated persistent infection and associated disease, yet have no therapeutic effect on existing lesions or infections. We have generated recombinant live-attenuated influenza A viruses expressing the HPV16 oncogenes E6 and E7 as experimental immunotherapeutic vaccine candidates. The influenza A virus life cycle lacks DNA intermediates as important safety feature. Different serotypes were generated to ensure efficient prime and boost immunizations. The immune response to vaccination in C57BL/6 mice was characterized by peptide ELISA and IFN-? ELISpot, demonstrating induction of cell-mediated immunity to HPV16 E6 and E7 oncoproteins. Prophylactic and therapeutic vaccine efficacy was analyzed in the murine HPV16-positive TC-1 tumor challenge model. Subcutaneous (s.c.) prime and boost vaccinations of mice with recombinant influenza A serotypes H1N1 and H3N2, followed by challenge with TC-1 cells resulted in complete protection or significantly reduced tumor growth as compared to control animals. In a therapeutic setting, s.c. vaccination of mice with established TC-1 tumors decelerated tumor growth and significantly prolonged survival. Importantly, intralesional vaccine administration induced complete tumor regression in 25% of animals, and significantly reduced tumor growth in 50% of mice. These results suggest recombinant E6E7 influenza viruses as a promising new approach for the development of a therapeutic vaccine against HPV-induced disease. PMID:26381401

  17. Attenuated Recombinant Influenza A Virus Expressing HPV16 E6 and E7 as a Novel Therapeutic Vaccine Approach.

    PubMed

    Jindra, Christoph; Huber, Bettina; Shafti-Keramat, Saeed; Wolschek, Markus; Ferko, Boris; Muster, Thomas; Brandt, Sabine; Kirnbauer, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types, most often HPV16 and HPV18, causes all cervical and most anal cancers, and a subset of vulvar, vaginal, penile and oropharyngeal carcinomas. Two prophylactic virus-like particle (VLPs)-based vaccines, are available that protect against vaccine type-associated persistent infection and associated disease, yet have no therapeutic effect on existing lesions or infections. We have generated recombinant live-attenuated influenza A viruses expressing the HPV16 oncogenes E6 and E7 as experimental immunotherapeutic vaccine candidates. The influenza A virus life cycle lacks DNA intermediates as important safety feature. Different serotypes were generated to ensure efficient prime and boost immunizations. The immune response to vaccination in C57BL/6 mice was characterized by peptide ELISA and IFN-? ELISpot, demonstrating induction of cell-mediated immunity to HPV16 E6 and E7 oncoproteins. Prophylactic and therapeutic vaccine efficacy was analyzed in the murine HPV16-positive TC-1 tumor challenge model. Subcutaneous (s.c.) prime and boost vaccinations of mice with recombinant influenza A serotypes H1N1 and H3N2, followed by challenge with TC-1 cells resulted in complete protection or significantly reduced tumor growth as compared to control animals. In a therapeutic setting, s.c. vaccination of mice with established TC-1 tumors decelerated tumor growth and significantly prolonged survival. Importantly, intralesional vaccine administration induced complete tumor regression in 25% of animals, and significantly reduced tumor growth in 50% of mice. These results suggest recombinant E6E7 influenza viruses as a promising new approach for the development of a therapeutic vaccine against HPV-induced disease. PMID:26381401

  18. Karyopherin {beta}3: A new cellular target for the HPV-16 E5 oncoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Krawczyk, Ewa; Hanover, John A.; Schlegel, Richard; Suprynowicz, Frank A.

    2008-07-11

    Epidemiological and experimental studies have shown that high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are the causative agents of cervical cancer worldwide, and that HPV-16 is associated with more than half of these cases. In addition to the well-characterized E6 and E7 oncoproteins of HPV-16, recent evidence increasingly has implicated the HPV-16 E5 protein (16E5) as an important mediator of oncogenic transformation. Since 16E5 has no known intrinsic enzymatic activity, its effects on infected cells are most likely mediated by interactions with various cellular proteins and/or its documented association with lipid rafts. In the present study, we describe a new cellular target that binds to 16E5 in COS cells and in stable human ectocervical cell lines. This target is karyopherin {beta}3, a member of the nuclear import receptor family with critical roles in the nuclear import of ribosomal proteins and in the secretory pathway.

  19. The epithelial-mesenchymal transition induced by keratinocyte growth conditions is overcome by E6 and E7 from HPV16, but not HPV8 and HPV38: Characterization of global transcription profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Azzimonti, Barbara; Dell'Oste, Valentina; Borgogna, Cinzia; Mondini, Michele; Gugliesi, Francesca; De Andrea, Marco; Chiorino, Giovanna; Scatolini, Maria; Ghimenti, Chiara; Landolfo, Santo; Gariglio, Marisa

    2009-06-05

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the growth properties of primary human keratinocytes expressing E6 and E7 proteins, which are from either the beta- or alpha-genotypes, under different culture conditions. We demonstrated that keratinocytes expressing E6 and E7, from both HPV8 and 38, irreversibly underwent the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) when grown on plastic with FAD medium (F12/DMEM/5%FBS). Expression of E6/E7 from HPV16 was capable of fully overcoming the FAD-induced EMT. Immortalization was only observed in HPV16-transduced cell lines, while the more proliferating phenotype of both KerHPV8 and 38 was mainly related to FAD-induced EMT. Microarray analysis of exponentially growing cells identified 146 cellular genes that were differentially regulated in HPV16 compared to HPV8- and 38-transduced cells. A large accumulation of transcripts associated with epidermal development and differentiation was observed in HPV16-transduced cells, whereas transcripts of genes involved in the extracellular matrix, multicellular organismal processes, and inflammatory response were affected in HPV8 and 38-transduced cells.

  20. High-Risk Human Papillomavirus E6 Oncoproteins Interact with 14-3-3? in a PDZ Binding Motif-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Boon, Siaw Shi

    2013-01-01

    Cervical cancer develops through the combined activities of the human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 and E7 oncoproteins. A defining characteristic of E6 oncoproteins derived from cancer-causing HPV types is the presence of a PDZ binding motif (PBM) at the extreme carboxy terminus of the protein which is absent from E6 proteins derived from the so-called low-risk HPV types. Within this PBM is also a protein kinase A (PKA) phospho-acceptor site, which is thought to negatively regulate the association of E6 with its PDZ domain-containing substrates. We can now show that phosphorylation of E6 by PKA and/or AKT confers the ability to interact with 14-3-3?. The interaction is direct and specific for the high-risk HPV E6 oncoproteins, although there are significant differences in the efficiencies with which HPV-16, HPV-18, and HPV-31 E6 oncoproteins can associate with 14-3-3?; this correlates directly with their respective susceptibilities to phosphorylation by PKA and/or AKT. We demonstrate here that the interaction between E6 and 14-3-3? also requires integrity of the E6 PBM, and downregulation of 14-3-3? results in a marked reduction in the levels of HPV-18 E6 expression in HeLa cells. Using phospho-specific anti-E6 antibodies, we also demonstrate significant levels of E6 phosphorylation in vivo. These studies redefine the potential relevance of the E6 PBM in the development of cervical cancer, suggesting that interaction with 14-3-3?, as well as the more well-established interactions with PDZ domain-containing substrates, is likely to be responsible for the biological activities attributed to this region of the high-risk HPV E6 oncoproteins. PMID:23175360

  1. E5 and E6/E7 of high-risk HPVs cooperate to enhance cancer progression through EMT initiation.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Ala-Eddin Al

    2015-09-01

    It is estimated that 10-20% of human carcinogenesis is linked to virus infection including papillomaviruses (HPVs). Moreover, since metastatic cancer disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in cancer patients, the role of onco-viruses in cancer progression to a metastatic form is of particular interest. Recent studies reported that E5 and E6/E7 onco-proteins of high-risk HPVs could enhance cancer progression via the initiation of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) event. Herein, we discuss the association between E5 as well as E6/E7 of high-risk HPV and cancer progression. PMID:26177717

  2. Comparative Analysis of Transforming Properties of E6 and E7 from Different Beta Human Papillomavirus Types

    PubMed Central

    Cornet, Iris; Bouvard, Véronique; Campo, Maria Saveria; Thomas, Miranda; Banks, Lawrence; Gissmann, Lutz; Lamartine, Jérôme; Sylla, Bakary S.; Accardi, Rosita

    2012-01-01

    The cutaneous beta human papillomavirus (beta HPV) types appear to be involved in skin carcinogenesis. However, only a few beta HPVs have been investigated so far. Here, we compared the properties of E6 and E7 oncoproteins from six uncharacterized beta HPVs (14, 22, 23, 24, 36, 49). Only HPV49 E6 and E7 immortalized primary human keratinocytes and efficiently deregulated the p53 and pRb pathways. Furthermore, HPV49 E6, similarly to E6 from the oncogenic HPV16, promoted p53 degradation. PMID:22171257

  3. Oncogenic Human Papillomavirus 16E7 modulates SUMOylation of FoxM1b.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Neha; John, Rince; Chand, Vaibhav; Nag, Alo

    2015-01-01

    The oncogenic transcription factor Forkhead box M1b (FoxM1b), a key regulator of cell cycle, is often overexpressed in many human cancers. Interestingly, posttranslational modifications are known to play important role in regulating the levels and activity of FoxM1b. The purpose of the present study was to characterize the SUMOylation of FoxM1b and identify the functional consequences including viral pathogenesis. Here, we report that FoxM1b interacts with SUMOylating enzymes Ubc9 and PIAS1 and acts as a substrate for SUMOylation. We also show that SUMOylation facilitates FoxM1b protein destabilization and nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. More importantly, we provide the first evidence for a role of E7 oncoprotein in high risk human papillomavirus (HPV) mediated upregulation of FoxM1b. The elevated expression of FoxM1 was determined to be posttranscriptional and was attributed to decreased SUMOylation of FoxM1b in the E7-expressing cells. Moreover, we demonstrate the involvement of SUMOylation in regulation of FoxM1 and present biochemical evidence that HPV16 E7 oncoprotein can modulate SUMOylation of FoxM1b by impairing its interaction with Ubc9. Together, these results provide a novel connection between SUMOylation of FoxM1b and HPV carcinogenesis. The findings may have important implications in the discovery of future anti-cancer therapeutics. PMID:25462159

  4. The Natural Product Avrainvillamide Binds to the Oncoprotein Nucleophosmin

    E-print Network

    The Natural Product Avrainvillamide Binds to the Oncoprotein Nucleophosmin Jeremy E. Wulff, Romain) is a natural product of fungal origin with antiproliferative effects in a number of different cultured human by (+)-avrainvillamide. Here, in studies using a series of molecules that more closely mimics the natural product 1 both

  5. The Msi Family of RNA-Binding Proteins Function Redundantly as Intestinal Oncoproteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Yousefi, Maryam; Nakauka-Ddamba, Angela; Li, Fan; Vandivier, Lee; Parada, Kimberly; Woo, Dong-Hun; Wang, Shan; Naqvi, Ammar S; Rao, Shilpa; Tobias, John; Cedeno, Ryan J; Minuesa, Gerard; Y, Katz; Barlowe, Trevor S; Valvezan, Alexander; Shankar, Sheila; Deering, Raquel P; Klein, Peter S; Jensen, Shane T; Kharas, Michael G; Gregory, Brian D; Yu, Zhengquan; Lengner, Christopher J

    2015-12-22

    Members of the Msi family of RNA-binding proteins have recently emerged as potent oncoproteins in a range of malignancies. MSI2 is highly expressed in hematopoietic cancers, where it is required for disease maintenance. In contrast to the hematopoietic system, colorectal cancers can express both Msi family members, MSI1 and MSI2. Here, we demonstrate that, in the intestinal epithelium, Msi1 and Msi2 have analogous oncogenic effects. Further, comparison of Msi1/2-induced gene expression programs and transcriptome-wide analyses of Msi1/2-RNA-binding targets reveal significant functional overlap, including induction of the PDK-Akt-mTORC1 axis. Ultimately, we demonstrate that concomitant loss of function of both MSI family members is sufficient to abrogate the growth of human colorectal cancer cells, and Msi gene deletion inhibits tumorigenesis in several mouse models of intestinal cancer. Our findings demonstrate that MSI1 and MSI2 act as functionally redundant oncoproteins required for the ontogeny of intestinal cancers. PMID:26673327

  6. Curcumin counteracts the proliferative effect of estradiol and induces apoptosis in cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mayank; Singh, Neeta

    2011-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the most common cancer in Indian females and is associated with infection with high-risk Human papilloma viruses (HPVs) which encode viral oncoprotein E6 and E7. Estradiol has been established as a risk factor for cervical cancer and has been shown to play a synergistic role with viral oncoproteins. Curcumin (Diferuloyl methane), a chemopreventive agent, is a natural compound extracted from Curcuma longa that allows suppression and retardation of carcinogenesis in many types of cancer and is currently being tested in various human clinical trials as it has been found to be well tolerated at higher doses with a relatively well established safety profile. The objective of this study was to test the effect of curcumin on HPV-positive and negative cervical cancer cell lines HeLa, SiHa, CaSki, and C33A pretreated with estradiol. It was found that HPV-positive cells pretreated with estradiol show reduced apoptosis as compared to curcumin by itself. However, curcumin was able to counteract the proliferative response of estradiol, and induce apoptosis. There was no difference in percentage apoptosis as compared to estradiol pretreatment in HPV-negative cell line C33A. Molecular studies showed elevation of Telomerase, viral oncoproteins E6 and E7, PCNA, p16, Cyclin D1 in HPV-positive cell lines on treatment with estradiol but after treatment with curcumin the level of E7, PCNA, and Cyclin D1 was reduced but the level of E6, Telomerase, and p16 was unaltered. Furthermore, estradiol-pretreated HPV-negative cell line C33A showed reduction in level of Telomerase, PCNA, p16, and activation of both p53 and p73 tumor suppressor proteins, thus, demonstrating the importance of E6 in estradiol-mediated protective effect. PMID:20941532

  7. The multiple cellular functions of the oncoprotein Golgi phosphoprotein 3

    PubMed Central

    Belloni, Giorgio; Colotti, Gianni; Giansanti, Maria Grazia

    2015-01-01

    The highly conserved Golgi phosphoprotein 3 (GOLPH3) protein, a component of Trans-Golgi Network (TGN), has been defined as a “first-in-class Golgi oncoprotein” and characterized as a Phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate [PI(4)P] effector at the Golgi. GOLPH3 is commonly amplified in several solid tumors. Furthermore this protein has been associated with poor prognosis in many cancers. Highly conserved from yeast to humans, GOLPH3 provides an essential function in vesicle trafficking and Golgi structure. Recent data have also implicated this oncoprotein in regulation of cytokinesis, modulation of mitochondrial mass and cellular response to DNA damage. A minute dissection of the molecular pathways that require GOLPH3 protein will be helpful to develop new therapeutic cancer strategies. PMID:25691054

  8. Intravaginal HPV DNA vaccination with electroporation induces local CD8+ T-cell immune responses and antitumor effects against cervicovaginal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Y; Peng, S; Qiu, J; Miao, J; Yang, B; Jeang, J; Hung, C-F; Wu, T-C

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines have the potential to inhibit the progression of an established HPV infection to precancer and cancer lesions by targeting HPV oncoproteins. We have previously developed a therapeutic DNA vaccine encoding calreticulin (CRT) linked to E7, CRT/E7 DNA vaccine, for use in the treatment of HPV-associated lesions. Since the transfection efficiency of DNA vaccines administered in vivo is typically low, we examined the use of electroporation as well as different routes of administration to enhance antigen-specific tumor control. We tested the effects of the CRT/E7 DNA vaccine administered intramuscularly or intravaginally, with or without electroporation, on the generation of CD8+ T-cell immunity and therapeutic antitumor effects in HPV16 E7-expressing cervicovaginal tumor-bearing mice. We found that intravaginal vaccination of CRT/E7 DNA followed by electroporation-induced potent E7-specific CD8+ T-cell responses in the cervicovaginal tract, compared with intramuscular injection followed by electroporation. Furthermore, tumor-bearing mice vaccinated intravaginally followed by electroporation had an enhanced survival, antitumor effects and local production of IFN-?+CD8+ T cells compared with those vaccinated intramuscularly with electroporation. Thus, we show that intravaginal CRT/E7 DNA vaccination followed by electroporation generates the most potent therapeutic antitumor effects against an orthotopic E7-expressing tumor model. The current study will have significant clinical implications once a clinically applicable electroporation device for intravaginal use becomes available. PMID:25786869

  9. The EMBO Journal Vol.18 No.9 pp.24492458, 1999 The E7 oncoprotein associates with Mi2 and histone

    E-print Network

    Miska, Eric

    attributed to its interaction with the retinoblastoma (Rb) tumour suppressor. However, Rb binding deacetylase in vitro and in vivo, via its zinc finger domain. Using a genetic screen, we identify Mi2 to immortalize human keratinocytes, the natural host cells of HPV (Hawley- Nelson et al., 1989; Jewers et al

  10. The viral oncoprotein tax sequesters DNA damage response factors by tethering MDC1 to chromatin.

    PubMed

    Belgnaoui, S Mehdi; Fryrear, Kimberly A; Nyalwidhe, Julius O; Guo, Xin; Semmes, O John

    2010-10-22

    Infection with human T-cell leukemia virus induces cellular genomic instability mediated through the viral oncoprotein Tax. Here we present evidence that Tax undermines the cellular DNA damage response by sequestration of damage response factors. We show by confocal microscopy that Tax forms damage-independent nuclear foci that contain DNA-PK, BRCA1, and MDC1. Tax sequesters MDC1 to chromatin sites distinct from classic ionizing radiation-induced foci. The recruitment of MDC1 is competitive between the two foci. The N-terminal region of Tax is sufficient for foci localization, and the C-terminal half is critical for binding to MDC1 and recruitment of additional response factors. Tax expression and DNA damage response factor recruitment repressed the formation of ionizing radiation-induced Nbs1-containing foci. The Tax-induced "pseudo" DNA damage response results in phosphorylation and monoubiquitylation of H2AX, which is ablated by siRNA suppression of MDC1. These data support a model for virus-induced genomic instability in which viral oncogene-induced damage-independent foci compete with normal cellular DNA damage response. PMID:20729195

  11. The Viral Oncoprotein Tax Sequesters DNA Damage Response Factors by Tethering MDC1 to Chromatin*

    PubMed Central

    Belgnaoui, S. Mehdi; Fryrear, Kimberly A.; Nyalwidhe, Julius O.; Guo, Xin; Semmes, O. John

    2010-01-01

    Infection with human T-cell leukemia virus induces cellular genomic instability mediated through the viral oncoprotein Tax. Here we present evidence that Tax undermines the cellular DNA damage response by sequestration of damage response factors. We show by confocal microscopy that Tax forms damage-independent nuclear foci that contain DNA-PK, BRCA1, and MDC1. Tax sequesters MDC1 to chromatin sites distinct from classic ionizing radiation-induced foci. The recruitment of MDC1 is competitive between the two foci. The N-terminal region of Tax is sufficient for foci localization, and the C-terminal half is critical for binding to MDC1 and recruitment of additional response factors. Tax expression and DNA damage response factor recruitment repressed the formation of ionizing radiation-induced Nbs1-containing foci. The Tax-induced “pseudo” DNA damage response results in phosphorylation and monoubiquitylation of H2AX, which is ablated by siRNA suppression of MDC1. These data support a model for virus-induced genomic instability in which viral oncogene-induced damage-independent foci compete with normal cellular DNA damage response. PMID:20729195

  12. MUC1 oncoprotein suppresses activation of the ARF-MDM2-p53 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Raina, Deepak; Ahmad, Rehan; Chen, Dongshu; Kumar, Shailendra; Kharbanda, Surender; Kufe, Donald

    2011-01-01

    The MUC1 oncoprotein interacts with the c-Abl tyrosine kinase and blocks nuclear targeting of c-Abl in the apoptotic response to DNA damage. Mutation of the MUC1 cytoplasmic domain at Tyr-60 disrupts the MUC1-c-Abl interaction. The present results demonstrate that the MUC1(Y60F) mutant is a potent inducer of the ARF tumor suppressor. MUC1(Y60F) induces transcription of the ARF locus by a c-Abl-dependent mechanism that promotes CUL-4A-mediated nuclear export of the replication protein Cdc6. The functional significance of these findings is that MUC1(Y60F)-induced ARF expression and thereby inhibition of MDM2 results in the upregulation of p53 and the homeodomain interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) serine/threonine kinase. HIPK2-mediated phosphorylation of p53 on Ser-46 was further associated with a shift from expression of the cell cycle arrest-related p21 gene to the apoptosis-related PUMA gene. We also show that the MUC1(Y60F) mutant functions as dominant negative inhibitor of tumorigenicity. These findings indicate that the oncogenic function of MUC1 is conferred by suppressing activation of the ARF-MDM2-p53 pathway. PMID:18981727

  13. The HBx oncoprotein of hepatitis B virus engages nucleophosmin to promote rDNA transcription and cellular proliferation.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Richa; Kapoor, Neetu Rohit; Kumar, Vijay

    2015-08-01

    The pleiotropic HBx oncoprotein of hepatitis B virus is well known to promote the expression of ribosomal RNAs and several host proteins that are known to support the development and progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). While overexpression of the nucleolar phosphoprotein, nucleophosmin (NPM), correlates with HCC progression, its upregulation by viral HBx and the resulting impact on perturbed nucleolar functions remain enigmatic. The present study shows that HBx up-regulates NPM levels and hijacks its functions to promote cellular proliferation. We found that HBx expression stabilizes NPM through post-translational modifications. Enhanced CDK2-mediated phosphorylation of NPM at Thr199 upon HBx expression prevented its proteolytic cleavage and provided resistance to apoptosis. Further, HBx directly interacted with the C-terminal domain of NPM and got translocated into the nucleolus where it facilitated the recruitment of RNA polymerase I transcriptional machinery onto the rDNA promoter. Our results indicate that HBx enhances rDNA transcription via a novel regulatory mechanism involving acetylation of NPM and the subsequent depletion of histones from the rDNA promoter. Enhanced production of ribosomal RNA resulting from co-expression of HBx and NPM promoted ribosome biogenesis, cellular proliferation and transformation. Taken together, our study strongly suggests an important role of NPM in mediating the oncogenic effects of HBx and the corresponding nucleolar perturbations induced by this viral oncoprotein. PMID:25918010

  14. Therapeutic bispecific T-cell engager antibody targeting the intracellular oncoprotein WT1.

    PubMed

    Dao, Tao; Pankov, Dmitry; Scott, Andrew; Korontsvit, Tatyana; Zakhaleva, Victoriya; Xu, Yiyang; Xiang, Jingyi; Yan, Su; de Morais Guerreiro, Manuel Direito; Veomett, Nicholas; Dubrovsky, Leonid; Curcio, Michael; Doubrovina, Ekaterina; Ponomarev, Vladimir; Liu, Cheng; O'Reilly, Richard J; Scheinberg, David A

    2015-10-01

    Intracellular tumor antigens presented on the cell surface in the context of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules have been targeted by T cell-based therapies, but there has been little progress in developing small-molecule drugs or antibodies directed to these antigens. Here we describe a bispecific T-cell engager (BiTE) antibody derived from a T-cell receptor (TCR)-mimic monoclonal antibody (mAb) ESK1, which binds a peptide derived from the intracellular oncoprotein WT1 presented on HLA-A*02:01. Despite the very low density of the complexes at the cell surface, ESK1-BiTE selectively activated and induced proliferation of cytolytic human T cells that killed cells from multiple leukemias and solid tumors in vitro and in mice. We also discovered that in an autologous in vitro setting, ESK1-BiTE induced a robust secondary CD8 T-cell response specific for tumor-associated antigens other than WT1. Our study provides an approach that targets tumor-specific intracellular antigens without using cell therapy and suggests that epitope spreading could contribute to the therapeutic efficacy of this BiTE. PMID:26389576

  15. The Curcumin Analogue 1,5-Bis(2-hydroxyphenyl)-1,4-pentadiene-3-one Induces Apoptosis and Downregulates E6 and E7 Oncogene Expression in HPV16 and HPV18-Infected Cervical Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Paulraj, Felicia; Abas, Faridah; Lajis, Nordin H; Othman, Iekhsan; Hassan, Sharifah Syed; Naidu, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to study curcumin analogues as an alternative to improve the therapeutic efficacy of curcumin, we screened the cytotoxic potential of four diarylpentanoids using the HeLa and CaSki cervical cancer cell lines. Determination of their EC50 values indicated relatively higher potency of 1,5-bis(2-hydroxyphenyl)-1,4-pentadiene-3-one (MS17, 1.03 ± 0.5 ?M; 2.6 ± 0.9 ?M) and 1,5-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1,4-pentadiene-3-one (MS13, 2.8 ± 0.4; 6.7 ± 2.4 ?M) in CaSki and HeLa, respectively, with significantly greater growth inhibition at 48 and 72 h of treatment compared to the other analogues or curcumin. Based on cytotoxic and anti-proliferative activity, MS17 was selected for comprehensive apoptotic studies. At 24 h of treatment, fluorescence microscopy detected that MS17-exposed cells exhibited significant morphological changes consistent with apoptosis, corroborated by an increase in nucleosomal enrichment due to DNA fragmentation in HeLa and CaSki cells and activation of caspase-3 activity in CaSki cells. Quantitative real-time PCR also detected significant down-regulation of HPV18- and HPV16-associated E6 and E7 oncogene expression following treatment. The overall data suggests that MS17 treatment has cytotoxic, anti-proliferative and apoptosis-inducing potential in HPV-positive cervical cancer cells. Furthermore, its role in down-regulation of HPV-associated oncogenes responsible for cancer progression merits further investigation into its chemotherapeutic role for cervical cancer. PMID:26132907

  16. E7 properties of mucosal human papillomavirus types 26, 53 and 66 correlate with their intermediate risk for cervical cancer development

    SciTech Connect

    Mansour, Mariam; Touka, Majid; Hasan, Uzma; Bellopede, Angelica; Smet, Anouk; Accardi, Rosita; Gabet, Anne-Sophie; Sylla, Bakary S.; Tommasino, Massimo

    2007-10-10

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that 15 different mucosal human papillomavirus (HPV) types of the genus alpha of the HPV phylogetic tree are classified as high risk for cervical cancer development. Three additional HPV types of the same genus, HPV26, 53 and 66, are classified as probable high-risk types. In this study, we have characterized the biological properties of the E7 oncoproteins from these three HPV types. All of the corresponding E7 proteins were able to associate with retinoblastoma protein (pRb) and up-regulated the expression of several positive cell cycle regulators, i.e. CDK2, cyclin A and cylin E. However, HPV26 E7 appears to be more efficient than HPV53 and 66 E7 in up-regulating the transcription of cyclin A. Unlike E7 from the high-risk type HPV16 protein, HPV26, 53 and 66 did not efficiently promote pRb degradation. In addition, E7 from these viruses was able to promote proliferation of primary human keratinocytes and circumvent G1 arrest imposed by overexpression of p16{sup INK4a}, but with less efficiency than the high-risk HPV16 E7. Together, our data show that in vitro properties of these E7 proteins correlate with the epidemiological classification of HPV26, 53 and 66 as HPV types with an intermediate risk for cervical cancer development.

  17. Expressions of E2 and E7-HPV16 proteins in pre-malignant and malignant lesions of the uterine cervix.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, N; Guerra, F; Camporeale, G; Quintana, S; Diaz, L B; Cuneo, N; Villacorta Hidalgo, J; Tatti, S A; Alonso, L G; Borkosky, S S; Prat Gay, G; Palaoro, L

    2015-12-01

    Continuous production of the E7 protein from different types of high risk human papilloma virus (HPV) is required for progression of malignancy. We developed antibodies against HPV type 16 E7 and E2 proteins to evaluate their utility as markers for diagnosis during early stages of cervical cancer. Forty biopsies from uterine cervices were diagnosed as low grade intraepithelial lesion (LSIL), high grade intraepithelial lesion (HSIL), squamous carcinoma (SC), in situ adenocarcinoma (ISA) and invasive adenocarcinoma (AC), all of which were infected with HPV 16. Immunohistochemistry was used to investigate the expressions of E7 and E2 (both from HPV 16) and p16. P16 was expressed in eight of 12 LSILs, in all HSILs, in 16 of 18 SC and in all ACs. E2 was expressed in six of 12 LSILs. E7 was positive in eight of 12 LSILs and in all HSIL and carcinomas. The expressions of E2 and E7 of HPV16 related to p16 expression confirmed the value of the viral oncogenic proteins as complementary to histology and support the carcinogenic model of the uterine cervix, because HPVDNA integration into cellular DNA implies the destruction of the gene encoding E2, which suppresses the expression of the E6 and E7 oncoproteins. E2 from HPV16 could be marker for LSILs, while E7 could be a marker for progression of LSILs to HSILs in patients infected by HPV16, because viral typing has little positive predictive value. PMID:26052817

  18. Mutual reinforcement of inflammation and carcinogenesis by the Helicobacter pylori CagA oncoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Nobumi; Murata-Kamiya, Naoko; Yanagiya, Kohei; Suda, Wataru; Hattori, Masahira; Kanda, Hiroaki; Bingo, Atsuhiro; Fujii, Yumiko; Maeda, Shin; Koike, Kazuhiko; Hatakeyama, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori cagA-positive strain delivers the CagA oncoprotein into gastric epithelial cells and at the same time elicits stomach inflammation. To experimentally investigate the pathophysiological interplay between CagA and inflammation, transgenic mice systemically expressing the bacterial cagA gene were treated with a colitis inducer, dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). Compared with control mice, DSS-induced colitis was markedly deteriorated in cagA-transgenic mice. In the colonic epithelia of cagA-transgenic mice, there was a substantial decrease in the level of I?B, which binds and sequesters NF-?B in the cytoplasm. This I?B reduction was due to CagA-mediated inhibition of PAR1, which may stimulate I?B degradation by perturbing microtubule stability. Whereas the CagA-mediated I?B reduction did not automatically activate NF-?B, it lowered the threshold of NF-?B activation by inflammogenic insults, thereby contributing to colitis exacerbation in cagA-transgenic mice. CagA also activates inflammasomes independently of NF-?B signaling, which further potentiates inflammation. The incidence of colonic dysplasia was elevated in DSS-treated cagA-transgenic mice due to a robust increase in the number of pre-cancerous flat-type dysplasias. Thus, CagA deteriorated inflammation, whereas inflammation strengthened the oncogenic potential of CagA. This work revealed that H. pylori CagA and inflammation reinforce each other in creating a downward spiral that instigates neoplastic transformation. PMID:25944120

  19. Functional characterization of human oncoprotein gankyrin in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Kim, So Yeon; Hur, Wonhee; Choi, Jung-Eun; Kim, Daniel; Wang, Jin Sang; Yoon, Hye-Yeon; Piao, Lian-Shu

    2009-01-01

    Gankyrin is an oncoprotein containing seven ankyrin repeats that is overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Gankyrin binds to Mdm2, which results in accelerated ubiquitylation via degradation of p53, and it also plays an important role in cell proliferation. However, little is known about the relationships between p53 levels, cell proliferation, and gankyrin over-expression. In order to investigate the influence of gankyrin protein on p53 and Mdm2 in a zebrafish model, we injected human gankyrin (hgankyrin) containing expression vectors (pCS2-hgankyrin, pCS2-hgankyrin-EGFP) into zebrafish embryos. To measure p53 and Mdm2 expression in hgankyrin-injected embryos, RT-PCR, Northern blot and in-situ hybridization and BrdU immunostaining were used. In addition, to know the effect of hgankyrin on cell proliferation in vitro, cell viability assays such as MTT, trypan blue staining and RT-PCR following transfection of hgankyrin-containing vector into HEK 293 cell line were performed. In vivo results indicated that p53 mRNA levels decreased but those of Mdm2 were not decreased in the presence of hgankyrin. These results suggest that gankyrin downregulates p53 expression and not Mdm2 expression. In the study of cell proliferation, BrdU-positive cells were predominantly increased in the head and tail regions in hgankyrin-injected zebrafish. Additional in vitro studies using trypan blue staining and MTT assay showed that gankyrin-expressing HEK 293 cells proliferated at a faster rate, indicating that gankyrin promotes cell proliferation. Our results demonstrate that hgankyrin overexpression downregulates p53 expression and promotes cell proliferation in zebrafish. Gankyrin may play an important role in tumorigenesis via its effects on p53 and cell proliferation. PMID:19287195

  20. ERG oncoprotein expression in prostate carcinoma patients of different ethnicities

    PubMed Central

    KELLY, GREGORY M.; KONG, YINK HEAY; DOBI, ALBERT; SRIVASTAVA, SHIV; SESTERHENN, ISABELL A.; PATHMANATHAN, RAJADURAI; TAN, HUI MENG; TAN, SHYH-HAN; CHEONG, SOK CHING

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of the erythroblast transformation-specific-related gene (ERG) oncoprotein due to transmembrane protease, serine 2 (TMPRSS2)-ERG fusion, the most prevalent genomic alteration in prostate cancer (CaP), is more frequently observed among Caucasian patients compared to patients of African or Asian descent. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the prevalence of ERG alterations in a multiethnic cohort of CaP patients. A total of 191 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections of transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy specimens, collected from 120 patients treated at the Sime Darby Medical Centre, Subang Jaya, Malaysia, were analyzed for ERG protein expression by immunohistochemistry using the anti-ERG monoclonal antibody 9FY as a surrogate for the detection of ERG fusion events. The overall frequency of ERG protein expression in the population evaluated in this study was 39.2%. Although seemingly similar to rates reported in other Asian communities, the expression of ERG was distinct amongst different ethnic groups (P=0.004). Malaysian Indian (MI) patients exhibited exceedingly high expression of ERG in their tumors, almost doubling that of Malaysian Chinese (MC) patients, whereas ERG expression was very low amongst Malay patients (12.5%). When collectively analyzing data, we observed a significant correlation between younger patients and higher ERG expression (P=0.04). The prevalence of ERG expression was significantly different amongst CaP patients of different ethnicities. The higher number of ERG-expressing tumors among MI patients suggested that the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion may be particularly important in the pathogenesis of CaP amongst this group of patients. Furthermore, the more frequent expression of ERG among the younger patients analyzed suggested an involvement of ERG in the early onset of CaP. The results of this study underline the value of using ERG status to better understand the differences in the etiology of CaP initiation and progression between ethnic groups. PMID:25469265

  1. Artificial transmembrane oncoproteins smaller than the2 bovine papillomavirus E5 protein redefine sequence requirements3

    E-print Network

    Gerstein, Mark

    KTS 1 1 Artificial transmembrane oncoproteins smaller than the2 bovine papillomavirus E5 protein; bovine papillomavirus21 Word count: Abtract = 190; Text = 8,63722 * Corresponding author: Tel: 203.asm.orgDownloadedfrom #12;KTS 2 ABSTRACT24 The bovine papillomavirus E5 protein (BPV E5) is a 44-amino acid homodimeric25

  2. express the receptor tyrosine kinase oncopro-teins RET or NTRK1 (2), follicular carcinomas

    E-print Network

    the transcription factor oncoprotein PAX8-PPAR 1. This may account, at least in part, for the phenotypic and clinical differences between these two tumors. PAX8-PPAR 1 may aid in the differential diagnosis promyelogeneous leukemia (21). It will therefore be important to determine wheth- er ligands involving PPAR

  3. Problem-Solving Test: The Mechanism of Action of a Human Papilloma Virus Oncoprotein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2009-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: human papilloma virus; cervical cancer; oncoproteins; malignant transformation; retinoblastoma protein; cell cycle; quiescent and cycling cells; cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) complexes; E2F; S-phase genes; enhancer element; proto-oncogenes; tumor suppressor genes; radioactive…

  4. GENETIC ANALYSYS OF THE IN VIVO FUNCTION AND REGULATION OF THE ONCOPROTEIN CDK8 IN DROSOPHILA 

    E-print Network

    Park, Gee Yoon

    2012-05-09

    Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 8 (CDK8) has recently emerged as an oncoprotein that is amplified in both colorectal and melanoma cancers. The importance of CDK8 and its regulatory partner Cyclin C (CycC) is highlighted by the clinical observations showing...

  5. Targeting the Two Oncogenic Functional Sites of the HPV E6 Oncoprotein with a High-Affinity Bivalent Ligand.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Juan; Poirson, Juline; Foltz, Clémence; Chebaro, Yassmine; Schrapp, Maxime; Meyer, Amandine; Bonetta, Anaëlle; Forster, Anne; Jacob, Yves; Masson, Murielle; Deryckère, François; Travé, Gilles

    2015-06-26

    The E6 oncoproteins of high-risk mucosal (hrm) human papillomaviruses (HPVs) contain a pocket that captures LxxLL motifs and a C-terminal motif that recruits PDZ domains, with both functions being crucial for HPV-induced oncogenesis. A chimeric protein was built by fusing a PDZ domain and an LxxLL motif, both known to bind E6. NMR spectroscopy, calorimetry and a mammalian protein complementation assay converged to show that the resulting PDZ-LxxLL chimera is a bivalent nanomolar ligand of E6, while its separated PDZ and LxxLL components are only micromolar binders. The chimera binds to all of the hrm-HPV E6?proteins tested but not to low-risk mucosal or cutaneous HPV?E6. Adenovirus-mediated expression of the chimera specifically induces the death of HPV-positive cells, concomitant with increased levels of the tumour suppressor P53, its transcriptional target p21, and the apoptosis marker cleaved caspase?3. The bifunctional PDZ-LxxLL chimera opens new perspectives for the diagnosis and treatment of HPV-induced cancers. PMID:26014966

  6. Ubiquitination and degradation of the hominoid-specific oncoprotein TBC1D3 is regulated by protein palmitoylation

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Chen; Lange, Jeffrey J.; Samovski, Dmitri; Su, Xiong; Liu, Jialiu; Sundaresan, Sinju; Stahl, Philip D.

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: •Hominoid-specific oncogene TBC1D3 is targeted to plasma membrane by palmitoylation. •TBC1D3 is palmitoylated on two cysteine residues: 318 and 325. •TBC1D3 palmitoylation governs growth factors-induced TBC1D3 degradation. •Post-translational modifications may regulate oncogenic properties of TBC1D3. -- Abstract: Expression of the hominoid-specific oncoprotein TBC1D3 promotes enhanced cell growth and proliferation by increased activation of signal transduction through several growth factors. Recently we documented the role of CUL7 E3 ligase in growth factors-induced ubiquitination and degradation of TBC1D3. Here we expanded our study to discover additional molecular mechanisms that control TBC1D3 protein turnover. We report that TBC1D3 is palmitoylated on two cysteine residues: 318 and 325. The expression of double palmitoylation mutant TBC1D3:C318/325S resulted in protein mislocalization and enhanced growth factors-induced TBC1D3 degradation. Moreover, ubiquitination of TBC1D3 via CUL7 E3 ligase complex was increased by mutating the palmitoylation sites, suggesting that depalmitoylation of TBC1D3 makes the protein more available for ubiquitination and degradation. The results reported here provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms that govern TBC1D3 protein degradation. Dysregulation of these mechanisms in vivo could potentially result in aberrant TBC1D3 expression and promote oncogenesis.

  7. The high-risk HPV E6 oncoprotein preferentially targets phosphorylated nuclear forms of hDlg

    SciTech Connect

    Narayan, Nisha; Subbaiah, Vanitha Krishna; Banks, Lawrence

    2009-04-25

    High-risk mucosal HPV E6 oncoproteins target a number of PDZ domain-containing substrates for proteasome mediated degradation. One of these, Discs Large (Dlg), is involved in the regulation of cell polarity and proliferation control. Previous studies had suggested that Dlg when hyperphosphorylated by osmotic shock, or when present in the nucleus could be preferentially targeted by E6. In this study we use phospho-specific antibodies directed against Dlg phosphorylated at residues S158 and S442 to show that these two observations are, in fact, linked. Dlg, when phosphorylated on S158 and S442 by CDK1 or CDK2, shows a preferential nuclear accumulation. However, these forms of Dlg are absent in cells derived from HPV-induced cervical cancers. Upon either proteasome inhibition or siRNA ablation of E6 expression, we see specific rescue of these phosphorylated forms of Dlg. These results demonstrate that nuclear forms of Dlg phosphorylated on its CDK phospho-acceptor sites has enhanced susceptibility to E6-induced degradation and place previous studies on the stress-induced phosphorylation of Dlg into a relevant biological context.

  8. Combination of hTERT and bmi-1, E6, or E7 Induces Prolongation of the Life Span of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells from an Elderly Donor without Affecting Their Neurogenic Potential†

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Taisuke; Kiyono, Tohru; Imabayashi, Hideaki; Takeda, Yukiji; Tsuchiya, Kohei; Miyoshi, Shunichirou; Makino, Hatsune; Matsumoto, Kenji; Saito, Hirohisa; Ogawa, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Michiie; Hata, Jun-Ichi; Umezawa, Akihiro

    2005-01-01

    Murine bone marrow stromal cells differentiate not only into mesodermal derivatives, such as osteocytes, chondrocytes, adipocytes, skeletal myocytes, and cardiomyocytes, but also into neuroectodermal cells in vitro. Human bone marrow stromal cells are easy to isolate but difficult to study because of their limited life span. To overcome this problem, we attempted to prolong the life span of bone marrow stromal cells and investigated whether bone marrow stromal cells modified with bmi-1, hTERT, E6, and E7 retained their differentiated capability, or multipotency. In this study, we demonstrated that the life span of bone marrow stromal cells derived from a 91-year-old donor could be extended and that the stromal cells with an extended life span differentiated into neuronal cells in vitro. We examined the neuronally differentiated cells morphologically, physiologically, and biologically and compared the gene profiles of undifferentiated and differentiated cells. The neuronally differentiated cells exhibited characteristics similar to those of midbrain neuronal progenitors. Thus, the results of this study support the possible use of autologous-cell graft systems to treat central nervous system diseases in geriatric patients. PMID:15923633

  9. Epstein - Barr Virus Transforming Protein LMP-1 Alters B Cells Gene Expression by Promoting Accumulation of the Oncoprotein ?Np73?

    PubMed Central

    Accardi, Rosita; Fathallah, Ikbal; Gruffat, Henri; Mariggiò, Giuseppe; Le Calvez-Kelm, Florence; Voegele, Catherine; Bartosch, Birke; Hernandez-Vargas, Hector; McKay, James; Sylla, Bakary S.; Manet, Evelyne; Tommasino, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have proved that oncogenic viruses develop redundant mechanisms to alter the functions of the tumor suppressor p53. Here we show that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), via the oncoprotein LMP-1, induces the expression of ?Np73?, a strong antagonist of p53. This phenomenon is mediated by the LMP-1 dependent activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase 1 (JNK-1) which in turn favours the recruitment of p73 to ?Np73? promoter. A specific chemical inhibitor of JNK-1 or silencing JNK-1 expression strongly down-regulated ?Np73? mRNA levels in LMP-1-containing cells. Accordingly, LMP-1 mutants deficient to activate JNK-1 did not induce ?Np73? accumulation. The recruitment of p73 to the ?Np73? promoter correlated with the displacement of the histone-lysine N-methyltransferase EZH2 which is part of the transcriptional repressive polycomb 2 complex. Inhibition of ?Np73? expression in lymphoblastoid cells (LCLs) led to the stimulation of apoptosis and up-regulation of a large number of cellular genes as determined by whole transcriptome shotgun sequencing (RNA-seq). In particular, the expression of genes encoding products known to play anti-proliferative/pro-apoptotic functions, as well as genes known to be deregulated in different B cells malignancy, was altered by ?Np73? down-regulation. Together, these findings reveal a novel EBV mechanism that appears to play an important role in the transformation of primary B cells. PMID:23516355

  10. Immunohistochemically detectable p53 and mdm-2 oncoprotein expression in colorectal carcinoma: prognostic significance

    PubMed Central

    Öfner, D; Maier, H; Riedmann, B; Holzberger, P; Nogler, M; Tötsch, M; Bankfalvi, A; Winde, G; Böcker, W; Schmid, K W

    1995-01-01

    Aims—To investigate the correlation between the expression of the p53 and mdm-2 oncoproteins and to assess their prognostic value in colorectal cancer. Methods—Using a polyclonal (CM1) and a monoclonal antibody directed against p53 and mdm-2, respectively, these oncoproteins were stained immunohistochemically in 109 colorectal adenocarcinomas. Results—p53 was detected in less than 10% of tumour cells in 11 of 109 adenocarcinomas, in 10-50% of tumour cells, in 17 of 109 adenocarcinomas, and in more than 50% of tumour cells in 32 of 109 adenocarcinomas. Expression of mdm-2 was detected in 22 of 109 (20%) cases investigated, of which 19 showed concomitant p53 expression. In most cases mdm-2 immunoreactivity was strongly associated with a small proportion of p53 positive tumour cells. Both p53 and mdm-2 expression lacked statistical significance when correlated with common staging and grading parameters. Conclusions—Detection of p53 and mdm-2 oncoprotein expression, detected using immunohistochemistry, is of no prognostic value in colorectal cancer. However, the close correlation between mdm-2 immunoreactivity and the proportion of p53 positive cells provides further evidence that the mdm-2 gene product interacts with p53 protein. PMID:16695968

  11. HTLV-1 Tax Oncoprotein Subverts the Cellular DNA Damage Response via Binding to DNA-dependent Protein Kinase*S?

    PubMed Central

    Durkin, Sarah S.; Guo, Xin; Fryrear, Kimberly A.; Mihaylova, Valia T.; Gupta, Saurabh K.; Belgnaoui, S. Mehdi; Haoudi, Abdelali; Kupfer, Gary M.; Semmes, O. John

    2008-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 is the causative agent for adult T-cell leukemia. Previous research has established that the viral oncoprotein Tax mediates the transformation process by impairing cell cycle control and cellular response to DNA damage. We showed previously that Tax sequesters huChk2 within chromatin and impairs the response to ionizing radiation. Here we demonstrate that DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a member of the Tax·Chk2 nuclear complex. The catalytic subunit, DNA-PKcs, and the regulatory subunit, Ku70, were present. Tax-containing nuclear extracts showed increased DNA-PK activity, and specific inhibition of DNA-PK prevented Tax-induced activation of Chk2 kinase activity. Expression of Tax induced foci formation and phosphorylation of H2AX. However, Tax-induced constitutive signaling of the DNA-PK pathway impaired cellular response to new damage, as reflected in suppression of ionizing radiation-induced DNA-PK phosphorylation and ?H2AX stabilization. Tax co-localized with phospho-DNA-PK into nuclear speckles and a nuclear excluded Tax mutant sequestered endogenous phospho-DNA-PK into the cytoplasm, suggesting that Tax interaction with DNA-PK is an initiating event. We also describe a novel interaction between DNA-PK and Chk2 that requires Tax. We propose that Tax binds to and stabilizes a protein complex with DNA-PK and Chk2, resulting in a saturation of DNA-PK-mediated damage repair response. PMID:18957425

  12. Genomic instability driven by the human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) oncoprotein, Tax.

    PubMed

    Lemoine, Francene J; Marriott, Susan J

    2002-10-17

    The importance of maintaining genomic stability is evidenced by the fact that transformed cells often contain a variety of chromosomal abnormalities such as euploidy, translocations, and inversions. Gene amplification is a well-characterized hallmark of genomic instability thought to result from recombination events following the formation of double-strand, chromosomal breaks. Therefore, gene amplification frequency serves as an indicator of genomic stability. The PALA assay is designed to measure directly the frequency with which a specific gene, CAD, is amplified within a cell's genome. We have used the PALA assay to analyse the effects of the human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) oncoprotein, Tax, on genomic amplification. We demonstrate that Tax-expressing cells are five-times more likely to undergo gene amplification than control cells. Additionally, we show that Tax alters the ability of cells to undergo the typical PALA-mediated G(1) phase cell cycle arrest, thereby allowing cells to replicate DNA in the absence of appropriate nucleotide pools. This effect is likely the mechanism by which Tax induces gene amplification. These data suggest that HTLV-I Tax alters the genomic stability of cells, an effect that may play an important role in Tax-mediated, HTLV-I associated cellular transformation. PMID:12370813

  13. The splicing factor SRSF6 is amplified and is an oncoprotein in lung and colon cancers.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Eliav, Michal; Golan-Gerstl, Regina; Siegfried, Zahava; Andersen, Claus L; Thorsen, Kasper; Ørntoft, Torben F; Mu, David; Karni, Rotem

    2013-03-01

    An increasing body of evidence connects alterations in the process of alternative splicing with cancer development and progression. However, a direct role of splicing factors as drivers of cancer development is mostly unknown. We analysed the gene copy number of several splicing factors in colon and lung tumours, and found that the gene encoding for the splicing factor SRSF6 is amplified and over-expressed in these cancers. Moreover, over-expression of SRSF6 in immortal lung epithelial cells enhanced proliferation, protected them from chemotherapy-induced cell death and converted them to be tumourigenic in mice. In contrast, knock-down of SRSF6 in lung and colon cancer cell lines inhibited their tumourigenic abilities. SRSF6 up- or down-regulation altered the splicing of several tumour suppressors and oncogenes to generate the oncogenic isoforms and reduce the tumour-suppressive isoforms. Our data suggest that the splicing factor SRSF6 is an oncoprotein that regulates the proliferation and survival of lung and colon cancer cells. PMID:23132731

  14. Feasibility study of a human papillomavirus E6 oncoprotein test for diagnosis of cervical precancer and cancer.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, Johannes; Lu, Peter S; Mahoney, Charles W; Berard-Bergery, Marthe; Ho, Minh; Ramasamy, Valli; Silver, Jon E; Bisht, Arnima; Labiad, Yassine; Peck, Roger B; Lim, Jeanette; Jeronimo, Jose; Howard, Roslyn; Gravitt, Patti E; Castle, Philip E

    2010-12-01

    In a feasibility study using a prototype, lateral-flow test for human papillomavirus type 16, 18, and/or 45 (HPV16/18/45) E6 oncoproteins, 51 of 75 (68%; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] of 56 to 78%) of HPV16/18/45 DNA-positive specimens from women with a diagnosis of CIN3+ (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3+ or cervical cancer) tested positive for HPV16/18/45 E6 oncoprotein. None of 16 (95% CI of 0 to 37%) HPV16/18/45 DNA-positive cervical specimens from women with a negative or CIN1 diagnosis tested positive for HPV16/18/45 E6 oncoprotein. PMID:20926711

  15. Fusion of CTLA-4 with HPV16 E7 and E6 Enhanced the Potency of Therapeutic HPV DNA Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Lili; Jia, Rong; Zhou, Lili; Guo, Jihua; Fan, Mingwen

    2014-01-01

    Preventive anti-HPV vaccines are effective against HPV infection but not against existing HPV-associated diseases, including cervical cancer and other malignant diseases. Therefore, the development of therapeutic vaccines is urgently needed. To improve anti-tumor effects of therapeutic vaccine, we fused cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) with HPV16 E7 and E6 as a fusion therapeutic DNA vaccine (pCTLA4-E7E6). pCTLA4-E7E6 induced significantly higher anti-E7E6 specific antibodies and relatively stronger specific CTL responses than the nonfusion DNA vaccine pE7E6 in C57BL/6 mice bearing with TC-1 tumors. pCTLA4-E7E6 showed relatively stronger anti-tumor effects than pE7E6 in therapeutic immunization. These results suggest that fusing CTLA-4 with E7E6 is a useful strategy to develop therapeutic HPV DNA vaccines. In addition, fusing the C-terminal of E7 with the N-terminal of E6 impaired the functions of both E7 and E6. PMID:25265018

  16. Role of ubiquitin and the HPV E6 oncoprotein in E6AP-mediated ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Franziska; Schneider, Daniel; Barbic, Tanja; Sladewska-Marquardt, Anna; Kühnle, Simone; Marx, Andreas; Scheffner, Martin

    2015-08-11

    Deregulation of the ubiquitin ligase E6 associated protein (E6AP) encoded by the UBE3A gene has been associated with three different clinical pictures. Hijacking of E6AP by the E6 oncoprotein of distinct human papillomaviruses (HPV) contributes to the development of cervical cancer, whereas loss of E6AP expression or function is the cause of Angelman syndrome, a neurodevelopmental disorder, and increased expression of E6AP has been involved in autism spectrum disorders. Although these observations indicate that the activity of E6AP has to be tightly controlled, only little is known about how E6AP is regulated at the posttranslational level. Here, we provide evidence that the hydrophobic patch of ubiquitin comprising Leu-8 and Ile-44 is important for E6AP-mediated ubiquitination, whereas it does not affect the catalytic properties of the isolated catalytic HECT domain of E6AP. Furthermore, we show that the HPV E6 oncoprotein rescues the disability of full-length E6AP to use a respective hydrophobic patch mutant of ubiquitin for ubiquitination and that it stimulates E6AP-mediated ubiquitination of Ring1B, a known substrate of E6AP, in vitro and in cells. Based on these data, we propose that E6AP exists in at least two different states, an active and a less active or latent one, and that the activity of E6AP is controlled by noncovalent interactions with ubiquitin and allosteric activators such as the HPV E6 oncoprotein. PMID:26216987

  17. A Humanized Mouse Model of HPV-Associated Pathology Driven by E7 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Buitrago-Pérez, Águeda; Hachimi, Mariam; Dueñas, Marta; Lloveras, Belén; Santos, Almudena; Holguín, Almudena; Duarte, Blanca; Santiago, Juan Luis; Akgül, Baki; Rodríguez-Peralto, José L.; Storey, Alan; Ribas, Catalina; Larcher, Fernando; del Rio, Marcela; Paramio, Jesús M.; García-Escudero, Ramón

    2012-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the causative agent of human cervical cancer and has been associated with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma development. Although prophylactic vaccines have been developed, there is a need to develop new targeted therapies for individuals affected with malignant infected lesions in these locations, which must be tested in appropriate models. Cutaneous beta HPV types appear to be involved in skin carcinogenesis. Virus oncogenicity is partly achieved by inactivation of retinoblastoma protein family members by the viral E7 gene. Here we show that the E7 protein of cutaneous beta HPV5 binds pRb and promotes its degradation. In addition, we described an in vivo model of HPV-associated disease in which artificial human skin prepared using primary keratinocytes engineered to express the E7 protein is engrafted onto nude mice. Expression of E7 in the transplants was stably maintained for up to 6 months, inducing the appearance of lesions that, in the case of HPV16 E7, histologically resembled human anogenital lesions caused by oncogenic HPVs. Moreover, it was confirmed through biomarker expression analysis via immunodetection and/or quantitative PCR from mRNA and miRNA that the 16E7-modified engrafted skin shares molecular features with human HPV-associated pretumoral and tumoral lesions. Finally, our findings indicate a decrease of the in vitro capacity of HPV5 E7 to reduce pRb levels in vivo, possibly explaining the phenotypical differences when compared with 16E7-grafts. Our model seems to be a valuable platform for basic research into HPV oncogenesis and preclinical testing of HPV-associated antitumor therapies. PMID:22911850

  18. Unique potential of 4-1BB agonist antibody to promote durable regression of HPV+ tumors when combined with an E6/E7 peptide vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Bartkowiak, Todd; Singh, Shailbala; Yang, Guojun; Galvan, Gloria; Haria, Dhwani; Ai, Midan; Allison, James P.; Sastry, K. Jagannadha; Curran, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Antibody modulation of T-cell coinhibitory (e.g., CTLA-4) or costimulatory (e.g., 4-1BB) receptors promotes clinical responses to a variety of cancers. Therapeutic cancer vaccination, in contrast, has produced limited clinical benefit and no curative therapies. The E6 and E7 oncoproteins of human papilloma virus (HPV) drive the majority of genital cancers, and many oropharyngeal tumors. We discovered 15–19 amino acid peptides from HPV-16 E6/E7 for which induction of T-cell immunity correlates with disease-free survival in patients treated for high-grade cervical neoplasia. We report here that intranasal vaccination with these peptides and the adjuvant alpha-galactosylceramide elicits systemic and mucosal T-cell responses leading to reduced HPV+ TC-1 tumor growth and prolonged survival in mice. We hypothesized that the inability of these T cells to fully reject established tumors resulted from suppression in the tumor microenvironment which could be ameliorated through checkpoint modulation. Combining this E6/E7 peptide vaccine with checkpoint blockade produced only modest benefit; however, coadministration with a 4-1BB agonist antibody promoted durable regression of established genital TC-1 tumors. Relative to other therapies tested, this combination of vaccine and ?4-1BB promoted the highest CD8+ versus regulatory FoxP3+ T-cell ratios, elicited 2- to 5-fold higher infiltration by E7-specific CTL, and evoked higher densities of highly cytotoxic TcEO (T cytotoxic Eomesodermin) CD8 (>70-fold) and ThEO (T helper Eomesodermin) CD4 (>17-fold) T cells. These findings have immediate clinical relevance both in terms of the direct clinical utility of the vaccine studied and in illustrating the potential of 4-1BB antibody to convert therapeutic E6/E7 vaccines already in clinical trials into curative therapies. PMID:26351680

  19. Human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 E7 protein bodies cause tumour regression in mice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are the causative agents of cervical cancer in women, which results in over 250 000 deaths per year. Presently there are two prophylactic vaccines on the market, protecting against the two most common high-risk HPV types 16 and 18. These vaccines remain very expensive and are not generally affordable in developing countries where they are needed most. Additionally, there remains a need to treat women that are already infected with HPV, and who have high-grade lesions or cervical cancer. Methods In this paper, we characterize the immunogenicity of a therapeutic vaccine that targets the E7 protein of the most prevalent high-risk HPV - type 16 – the gene which has previously been shown to be effective in DNA vaccine trials in mice. The synthetic shuffled HPV-16 E7 (16E7SH) has lost its transforming properties but retains all naturally-occurring CTL epitopes. This was genetically fused to Zera®, a self-assembly domain of the maize ?-zein able to induce the accumulation of recombinant proteins into protein bodies (PBs), within the endoplasmic reticulum in a number of expression systems. Results High-level expression of the HPV 16E7SH protein fused to Zera® in plants was achieved, and the protein bodies could be easily and cost-effectively purified. Immune responses comparable to the 16E7SH DNA vaccine were demonstrated in the murine model, with the protein vaccine successfully inducing a specific humoral as well as cell mediated immune response, and mediating tumour regression. Conclusions The fusion of 16E7SH to the Zera® peptide was found to enhance the immune responses, presumably by means of a more efficient antigen presentation via the protein bodies. Interestingly, simply mixing the free PBs and 16E7SH also enhanced immune responses, indicating an adjuvant activity for the Zera® PBs. PMID:24885328

  20. Oncoprotein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael (San Diego, CA); Hibi, Masahiko (San Diego, CA); Lin, Anning (La Jolla, CA)

    2001-02-27

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD or 55 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and theonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  1. Deconstruction of the SS18-SSX Fusion Oncoprotein Complex: Insights into Disease Etiology and Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Su, Le; Sampaio, Arthur V.; Jones, Kevin B.; Pacheco, Marina; Goytain, Angela; Lin, Shujun; Poulin, Neal; Yi, Lin; Rossi, Fabio M.; Kast, Juergen; Capecchi, Mario R.; Underhill, T. Michael; Nielsen, Torsten O.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Synovial sarcoma is a translocation-associated sarcoma where the underlying chromosomal event generates SS18-SSX fusion transcripts. In vitro and in vivo studies have shown that the SS18-SSX fusion oncoprotein is both necessary and sufficient to support tumorigenesis; however, its mechanism of action remains poorly defined. We have purified a core SS18-SSX complex and discovered that SS18-SSX serves as a bridge between activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) and transducin-like enhancer of split 1 (TLE1), resulting in repression of ATF2 target genes. Disruption of these components by siRNA knockdown or treatment with HDAC inhibitors rescues target gene expression, leading to growth suppression and apoptosis. Together, these studies define a fundamental role for aberrant ATF2 transcriptional dysregulation in the etiology of synovial sarcoma. PMID:22439931

  2. Natural variant of the Helicobacter pylori CagA oncoprotein that lost the ability to interact with PAR1.

    PubMed

    Hashi, Kana; Murata-Kamiya, Naoko; Varon, Christine; Mégraud, Francis; Dominguez-Bello, Maria Gloria; Hatakeyama, Masanori

    2014-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori strains carrying the cagA gene are associated with severe disease outcomes, most notably gastric cancer. CagA protein is delivered into gastric epithelial cells by a type IV secretion system. The translocated CagA undergoes tyrosine phosphorylation at the C-terminal EPIYA motifs by host cell kinases. Tyrosine-phosphorylated CagA acquires the ability to interact with and activate SHP2, thereby activating mitogenic signaling and inducing cell morphological transformation (hummingbird phenotype). CagA also interacts with PAR1b via the CM sequence, resulting in induction of junctional and polarity defects. Furthermore, CagA-PAR1b interaction stabilizes the CagA-SHP2 complex. Because transgenic mice systemically expressing CagA develop gastrointestinal and hematological malignancies, CagA is recognized as a bacterium-derived oncoprotein. Interestingly, the C-terminal region of CagA displays a large diversity among H. pylori strains, which influences the ability of CagA to bind to SHP2 and PAR1b. In the present study, we investigated the biological activity of v225d CagA, an Amerindian CagA of H. pylori isolated from a Venezuelan Piaroa Amerindian subject, because the variant CagA does not possess a canonical CM sequence. We found that v225d CagA interacts with SHP2 but not PAR1b. Furthermore, SHP2-binding activity of v225d CagA was much lower than that of CagA of H. pylori isolated from Western countries (Western CagA). v225d CagA also displayed a reduced ability to induce the hummingbird phenotype than that of Western CagA. Given that perturbation of PAR1b and SHP2 by CagA underlies the oncogenic potential of CagA, the v225d strain is considered to be less oncogenic than other well-studied cagA-positive H. pylori strains. PMID:24354359

  3. An RNA Aptamer Targets the PDZ-Binding Motif of the HPV16 E6 Oncoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Belyaeva, Tamara A.; Nicol, Clare; Cesur, Özlem; Travé, Gilles; Blair, George Eric; Stonehouse, Nicola J.

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) is a high-risk DNA tumour virus which is the primary causative agent of cervical cancer. Cell transformation arises from deregulated expression of the E6 and E7 oncogenes. E6 has been shown to bind a number of cellular proteins, including p53 and proteins containing a PDZ domain. This study reports the first RNA aptamers to E6. These have been employed as molecular tools to further investigate E6-p53 and E6-PDZ interactions. This study is focussed on two aptamers (termed F2 and F4) which induced apoptosis in cells derived from an HPV16-transformed cervical carcinoma. The molecules were able to inhibit the interaction between E6 and PDZ1 from Magi1, with F2 being the most effective inhibitor. Neither of the aptamers inhibited E6-p53 interaction or p53 degradation. This study shows the specificity of this approach and highlights the potential benefits of the E6 aptamers as potential therapeutic or diagnostic agents in the future. PMID:25062098

  4. Human T-cell leukemia virus oncoprotein tax represses nuclear receptor-dependent transcription by targeting coactivator TAX1BP1.

    PubMed

    Chin, King-Tung; Chun, Abel C S; Ching, Yick-Pang; Jeang, Kuan-Teh; Jin, Dong-Yan

    2007-02-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 oncoprotein Tax is a transcriptional regulator that interacts with a large number of host cell factors. Here, we report the novel characterization of the interaction of Tax with a human cell protein named Tax1-binding protein 1 (TAX1BP1). We show that TAX1BP1 is a nuclear receptor coactivator that forms a complex with the glucocorticoid receptor. TAX1BP1 and Tax colocalize into intranuclear speckles that partially overlap with but are not identical to the PML oncogenic domains. Tax binds TAX1BP1 directly, induces the dissociation of TAX1BP1 from the glucocorticoid receptor-containing protein complex, and represses the coactivator function of TAX1BP1. Genetic knockout of Tax1bp1 in mice abrogates the influence of Tax on the activation of nuclear receptors. We propose that Tax-TAX1BP1 interaction mechanistically explains the previously reported repression of nuclear receptor activity by Tax. PMID:17283140

  5. Elucidation of Ligand-Dependent Modulation of Disorder-Order Transitions in the Oncoprotein MDM2

    PubMed Central

    Bueren-Calabuig, Juan A.; Michel, Julien

    2015-01-01

    Numerous biomolecular interactions involve unstructured protein regions, but how to exploit such interactions to enhance the affinity of a lead molecule in the context of rational drug design remains uncertain. Here clarification was sought for cases where interactions of different ligands with the same disordered protein region yield qualitatively different results. Specifically, conformational ensembles for the disordered lid region of the N-terminal domain of the oncoprotein MDM2 in the presence of different ligands were computed by means of a novel combination of accelerated molecular dynamics, umbrella sampling, and variational free energy profile methodologies. The resulting conformational ensembles for MDM2, free and bound to p53 TAD (17-29) peptide identify lid states compatible with previous NMR measurements. Remarkably, the MDM2 lid region is shown to adopt distinct conformational states in the presence of different small-molecule ligands. Detailed analyses of small-molecule bound ensembles reveal that the ca. 25-fold affinity improvement of the piperidinone family of inhibitors for MDM2 constructs that include the full lid correlates with interactions between ligand hydrophobic groups and the C-terminal lid region that is already partially ordered in apo MDM2. By contrast, Nutlin or benzodiazepinedione inhibitors, that bind with similar affinity to full lid and lid-truncated MDM2 constructs, interact additionally through their solubilizing groups with N-terminal lid residues that are more disordered in apo MDM2. PMID:26046940

  6. Akt Pathway Activation by Human T-cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 Tax Oncoprotein.

    PubMed

    Cherian, Mathew A; Baydoun, Hicham H; Al-Saleem, Jacob; Shkriabai, Nikoloz; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Green, Patrick; Ratner, Lee

    2015-10-23

    Human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV) type 1, the etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia, expresses the viral oncoprotein Tax1. In contrast, HTLV-2, which expresses Tax2, is non-leukemogenic. One difference between these homologous proteins is the presence of a C-terminal PDZ domain-binding motif (PBM) in Tax1, previously reported to be important for non-canonical NF?B activation. In contrast, this study finds no defect in non-canonical NF?B activity by deletion of the Tax1 PBM. Instead, Tax1 PBM was found to be important for Akt activation. Tax1 attenuates the effects of negative regulators of the PI3K-Akt-mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN), and PHLPP. Tax1 competes with PTEN for binding to DLG-1, unlike a PBM deletion mutant of Tax1. Forced membrane expression of PTEN or PHLPP overcame the effects of Tax1, as measured by levels of Akt phosphorylation, and rates of Akt dephosphorylation. The current findings suggest that Akt activation may explain the differences in transforming activity of HTLV-1 and -2. PMID:26324707

  7. Identification and characterization of the herpesvirus saimiri oncoprotein STP-C488.

    PubMed Central

    Jung, J U; Desrosiers, R C

    1991-01-01

    The protein encoded by herpesvirus saimiri transforming gene STP-C488 was identified and characterized. Antibodies were produced in rabbits by immunization with keyhole limpet hemocyanin-conjugated synthetic peptides specific for the predicted sequence of STP-C488. STP-C488-encoded protein was detected in recombinant Escherichia coli, transformed Rat-1 cells, transfected COS-1 cells, and in common marmoset T lymphocytes immortalized by herpesvirus saimiri strain 488. STP-C488 protein was sensitive to treatment by bacterial collagenase, consistent with the 18 uninterrupted collagenlike repeats predicted by the DNA sequence. The apparent molecular size of STP-C488 in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gels (20 to 22 kDa) was considerably larger than that predicted from the DNA sequence (9.9 kDa). Using indirect immunofluorescence tests and subcellular fractionation, STP-C488 was found to be membrane bound, primarily in perinuclear compartments. The 18 uninterrupted collagenlike repeats, sensitivity to collagenase, location in the cell, and anomalous migration through SDS-polyacrylamide gels suggest an unusual, membrane-associated, fibrous structure for this transforming herpesvirus oncoprotein. Images PMID:1658384

  8. Engineering the First Chimeric Antibody in Targeting Intracellular PRL-3 Oncoprotein for Cancer Therapy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Al-Aidaroos, Abdul Qader O.; Hong, Cheng William; Tan, Cheng Peow Bobby; Park, Jung Eun; Varghese, Leyon; Feng, Zhiwei; Zhou, Jianbiao; Chng, Wee Joo; Zeng, Qi

    2012-01-01

    Antibodies are considered as ‘magic bullets’ because of their high specificity. It is believed that antibodies are too large to routinely enter the cytosol, thus antibody therapeutic approach has been limited to extracellular or secreted proteins expressed by cancer cells. However, many oncogenic proteins are localized within the cell. To explore the possibility of antibody therapies against intracellular targets, we generated a chimeric antibody targeting the intracellular PRL-3 oncoprotein to assess its antitumor activities in mice. Remarkably, we observed that the PRL-3 chimeric antibody could efficiently and specifically reduce the formation of PRL-3 expressing metastatic tumors. We further found that natural killer (NK) cells were important in mediating the therapeutic effect, which was only observed in a nude mouse model (T-cell deficient), but not in a Severe Combined Immunodeficiency’ (scid) mouse model (B- and T-cell deficient), indicating the anticancer effect also depends on host B-cell activity. Our study involving 377 nude and scid mice suggests that antibodies targeting intracellular proteins can be developed to treat cancer. PMID:22374986

  9. Role of the YAP Oncoprotein in Priming Ras-Driven Rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Slemmons, Katherine K.; Crose, Lisa E. S.; Rudzinski, Erin; Bentley, Rex C.; Linardic, Corinne M.

    2015-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), a cancer characterized by features of skeletal muscle histogenesis, is the most common soft tissue sarcoma of childhood and adolescence. Survival for high-risk groups is less than 30% at 5 years. RMS also occurs during adulthood, with a lower incidence but higher mortality. Recently, mutational profiling has revealed a correlation between activating Ras mutations in the embryonal (eRMS) and pleomorphic (pRMS) histologic variants of RMS, and a poorer outcome for those patients. Independently, the YAP transcriptional coactivator, an oncoprotein kept in check by the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway, is upregulated in eRMS. Here we show that YAP promotes cell proliferation and antagonizes apoptosis and myogenic differentiation of human RMS cells bearing oncogenic Ras mutations in cell culture studies in vitro and in murine xenografts in vivo. Pharmacologic inhibition of YAP by the benzoporphyrin derivative verteporfin decreased cell proliferation and tumor growth in vivo. To interrogate the temporal contribution of YAP in eRMS tumorigenesis, we used a primary human cell-based genetic model of Ras-driven RMS. Constitutively active YAP functioned as an early genetic lesion, permitting bypass of senescence and priming myoblasts to tolerate subsequent expression of hTERT and oncogenic Ras, which were necessary and sufficient to generate murine xenograft tumors mimicking RMS in vivo. This work provides evidence for cooperation between YAP and oncogenic Ras in RMS tumorigenesis, laying the foundation for preclinical co-targeting of these pathways. PMID:26496700

  10. Role of the YAP Oncoprotein in Priming Ras-Driven Rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Slemmons, Katherine K; Crose, Lisa E S; Rudzinski, Erin; Bentley, Rex C; Linardic, Corinne M

    2015-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), a cancer characterized by features of skeletal muscle histogenesis, is the most common soft tissue sarcoma of childhood and adolescence. Survival for high-risk groups is less than 30% at 5 years. RMS also occurs during adulthood, with a lower incidence but higher mortality. Recently, mutational profiling has revealed a correlation between activating Ras mutations in the embryonal (eRMS) and pleomorphic (pRMS) histologic variants of RMS, and a poorer outcome for those patients. Independently, the YAP transcriptional coactivator, an oncoprotein kept in check by the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway, is upregulated in eRMS. Here we show that YAP promotes cell proliferation and antagonizes apoptosis and myogenic differentiation of human RMS cells bearing oncogenic Ras mutations in cell culture studies in vitro and in murine xenografts in vivo. Pharmacologic inhibition of YAP by the benzoporphyrin derivative verteporfin decreased cell proliferation and tumor growth in vivo. To interrogate the temporal contribution of YAP in eRMS tumorigenesis, we used a primary human cell-based genetic model of Ras-driven RMS. Constitutively active YAP functioned as an early genetic lesion, permitting bypass of senescence and priming myoblasts to tolerate subsequent expression of hTERT and oncogenic Ras, which were necessary and sufficient to generate murine xenograft tumors mimicking RMS in vivo. This work provides evidence for cooperation between YAP and oncogenic Ras in RMS tumorigenesis, laying the foundation for preclinical co-targeting of these pathways. PMID:26496700

  11. Abrogation of growth arrest signals by human papillomavirus type 16 E7 is mediated by sequences required for transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Demers, G W; Espling, E; Harry, J B; Etscheid, B G; Galloway, D A

    1996-01-01

    Cells arrest in the G1 or G0 phase of the cell cycle in response to a variety of negative growth signals that induce arrest by different molecular pathways. The ability of human papillomavirus (HPV) oncogenes to bypass these signals and allow cells to progress into the S phase probably contributes to the neoplastic potential of the virus. The E7 protein of HPV-16 was able to disrupt the response of epithelial cells to three different negative growth arrest signals: quiescence imposed upon suprabasal epithelial cells, G1 arrest induced by DNA damage, and inhibition of DNA synthesis caused by treatment with transforming growth factor beta. The same set of mutated E7 proteins was able to abrogate all three growth arrest signals. Mutant proteins that failed to abrogate growth arrest signals were transformation deficient and included E7 proteins that bound retinoblastoma protein in vitro. In contrast, HPV-16 E6 was able to bypass only DNA damage-induced G1 arrest, not suprabasal quiescence or transforming growth factor beta-induced arrest. The E6 and E7 proteins from the low-risk virus HPV-6 were not able to bypass any of the growth arrest signals. PMID:8794328

  12. Amino-functionalized poly(l-lactide) lamellar single crystals as a valuable substrate for delivery of HPV16-E7 tumor antigen in vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    Di Bonito, Paola; Petrone, Linda; Casini, Gabriele; Francolini, Iolanda; Ammendolia, Maria Grazia; Accardi, Luisa; Piozzi, Antonella; D’Ilario, Lucio; Martinelli, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Background Poly(l-lactide) (PLLA) is a biodegradable polymer currently used in many biomedical applications, including the production of resorbable surgical devices, porous scaffolds for tissue engineering, nanoparticles and microparticles for the controlled release of drugs or antigens. The surfaces of lamellar PLLA single crystals (PLLAsc) were provided with amino groups by reaction with a multifunctional amine and used to adsorb an Escherichia coli-produced human papillomavirus (HPV)16-E7 protein to evaluate its possible use in antigen delivery for vaccine development. Methods PLLA single crystals were made to react with tetraethylenepentamine to obtain amino-functionalized PLLA single crystals (APLLAsc). Pristine and amino-functionalized PLLAsc showed a two-dimensional microsized and one-dimensional nanosized lamellar morphology, with a lateral dimension of about 15–20 ?m, a thickness of about 12 nm, and a surface specific area of about 130 m2/g. Both particles were characterized and loaded with HPV16-E7 before being administered to C57BL/6 mice for immunogenicity studies. The E7-specific humoral-mediated and cell-mediated immune response as well as tumor protective immunity were analyzed in mice challenged with TC-1 cancer cells. Results Pristine and amino-functionalized PLLAsc adsorbed similar amounts of E7 protein, but in protein-release experiments E7-PLLAsc released a higher amount of protein than E7-APLLAsc. When the complexes were dried for observation by scanning electron microscopy, both samples showed a compact layer, but E7-APLLAsc showed greater roughness than E7-PLLAsc. Immunization experiments in mice showed that E7-APLLAsc induced a stronger E7-specific immune response when compared with E7-PLLAsc. Immunoglobulin G isotyping and interferon gamma analysis suggested a mixed Th1/Th2 immune response in both E7-PLLAsc-immunized and E7-APLLAsc-immunized mice. However, only the mice receiving E7-APLLAsc were fully protected from TC-1 tumor growth after three doses of vaccine. Conclusion Our results show that APLLA single crystals improve the immunogenicity of HPV16-E7 and indicate that E7-APLLAsc could be used for development of an HPV16 therapeutic vaccine against HPV16-related tumors. PMID:26056443

  13. The HPV16 E6 oncoprotein and UVB irradiation inhibit the tumor suppressor TGF? pathway in the epidermis of the K14E6 transgenic mouse.

    PubMed

    Popoca-Cuaya, Marco; Diaz-Chavez, Jose; Hernandez-Monge, Jesus; Alvarez-Rios, Elizabeth; Lambert, Paul F; Gariglio, Patricio

    2015-06-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPVs) are the causative agents of cervical cancer, and they are also associated with a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. In addition, HPVs have also been postulated in the development of non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC). In these cancers, the oncogene E6 is best known for its ability to inactivate the tumor suppressor p53 protein. Interestingly, in transgenic mice for HPV16 E6 (K14E6), it was reported that E6 alone induced epithelial hyperplasia and delay in differentiation in skin epidermis independently of p53 inactivation. Transforming growth factor ? (TGF?) is an important regulator of cell growth/differentiation and apoptosis, and this pathway is often lost during tumorigenesis. Ultraviolet radiation B (UVB) exposure activates diverse cellular responses, including DNA damage and apoptosis. In this study, we investigated whether the E6 oncogene alone or in combination with UVB dysregulate some components of the TGF? pathway in the epidermis of K14E6 mice. We used 8-day-old K14E6 and non-transgenic mice irradiated and unirradiated with a single dose of UVB. We found that the E6 oncogene and UVB irradiation impair the TGF? pathway in epidermis of K14E6 mice by downregulation of the TGF? type II receptor (T?RII). This loss of T?RII prevents downstream activation of Smad2 and target genes as p15, an important regulator of cell cycle progression. In summary, the TGF? signalling in cells of the epidermis is downregulated in our mouse model by both the E6 oncoprotein and the UVB irradiation. PMID:25776923

  14. Alteration of a single amino acid in the basic domain of Marek's disease virus Meq oncoprotein plays an important role in T-cell transformation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease virus encoded oncoprotein, Meq, has been shown to play a major role in transformation of T-lymphocytes. We have earlier shown that replacement of the meq gene in the very virulent strain Md5 with that of vaccine strain CVI988/Rispens resulted in virus attenuation in chickens. To dete...

  15. The Transactivation Domain of Marek's Disease Virus (MDV) Meq Oncoprotein Does Not Affect Tumor Incidence But Plays a Role in Tumor Phenotype

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease virus encoded oncoprotein, Meq, is responsible for the tumorigenic phenotype of the virus. We have previously shown that replacement of the meq gene in the very virulent strain Md5 with that of vaccine strain CVI988/Rispens results in virus attenuation in chickens. To determine the...

  16. N=8 Counterterms and E7(7) Current Conservation

    E-print Network

    Renata Kallosh

    2011-04-28

    We examine conservation of the E7(7) Noether-Gaillard-Zumino current in the presence of N=8 supergravity counterterms using the momentum space helicity formalism, which significantly simplifies the calculations. The main result is that the 4-point counterterms at any loop order L are forbidden by the E7(7) current conservation identity. We also clarify the relation between linearized and full non-linear superinvariants as candidate counterterms. This enables us to show that all n-point counterterms at L=7, 8 are forbidden since they provide a non-linear completions of the 4-point ones. This supports and exemplifies our general proof in arXiv:1103.4115 of perturbative UV finiteness of N=8 supergravity.

  17. Human cytomegalovirus mtrII oncoprotein binds to p53 and down-regulates p53-activated transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Muralidhar, S; Doniger, J; Mendelson, E; Araujo, J C; Kashanchi, F; Azumi, N; Brady, J N; Rosenthal, L J

    1996-01-01

    The 79-amino-acid (79-aa) open reading frame (UL111a) gene within morphological transforming region II (mtrII) of human cytomegalovirus strain Towne has been shown to transform rodent cells in vitro (J. Thompson, J. Doniger, and L. J. Rosenthal, Arch. Virol. 136:161-172, 1994). Moreover, a translation termination linker (TTL) mutant of mtrII that coded for the first 49 aa of mtrII oncoprotein (designated TTL49) was sufficient for malignant transformation, whereas a TTL mutant that coded for the first 24 aa (designated TTL24) was not. The current study demonstrates the binding of mtrII oncoprotein to the tumor suppressor protein p53 both in vivo using transiently transfected cells and in vitro using labeled proteins. Furthermore, the C-terminally truncated mtrII protein TTL49, but not truncated protein TTL24, bound to p53. The mtrII binding domain mapped to the N-terminal region of p53, residues 1 to 106, with a critical region from aa 27 to 44, whereas the p53 binding domain of mtrII protein was the first 49 aa. Furthermore, mtrII inhibited p53-activated transcription, indicating its ability to alter p53-directed cellular regulatory mechanisms. mtrII oncoprotein was detected both in stably transfected NIH 3T3 cell lines and human cytomegalovirus-infected HEL 299 cells (as early as 12 h after infection) in the perinuclear region and in the nucleus. mtrII-transformed cell lines, at both early and late passage, exhibited high levels of p53 with a 15-fold-extended half-life. However, p53-activated transcription was suppressed in these cells in spite of the increased p53 levels. Finally, the results with wild-type mtrII and its TTL mutants with respect to p53 binding, p53-activated transcription, and transforming ability suggest that the mechanism of mtrII transformation is linked to both p53 binding and disruption of p53 cell regulation. PMID:8970996

  18. Generating HPV specific T helper cells for the treatment of HPV induced malignancies using TCR gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Infection with high risk Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is associated with cancer of the cervix, vagina, penis, vulva, anus and some cases of head and neck carcinomas. The HPV derived oncoproteins E6 and E7 are constitutively expressed in tumor cells and therefore potential targets for T cell mediated adoptive immunotherapy. Effective immunotherapy is dependent on the presence of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. However, low precursor frequencies of HPV16 specific T cells in patients and healthy donors hampers routine isolation of these cells for adoptive transfer purposes. An alternative to generate HPV specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells is TCR gene transfer. Methods HPV specific CD4+ T cells were generated using either a MHC class I or MHC class II restricted TCR (from clones A9 and 24.101 respectively) directed against HPV16 antigens. Functional analysis was performed by interferon-? secretion, proliferation and cytokine production assays. Results Introduction of HPV16 specific TCRs into blood derived CD4+ recipient T cells resulted in recognition of the relevant HPV16 epitope as determined by IFN-? secretion. Importantly, we also show recognition of the endogenously processed and HLA-DP1 presented HPV16E6 epitope by 24.101 TCR transgenic CD4+ T cells and recognition of the HLA-A2 presented HPV16E7 epitope by A9 TCR transgenic CD4+ T cells. Conclusion Our data indicate that TCR transfer is feasible as an alternative strategy to generate human HPV16 specific CD4+ T helper cells for the treatment of patients suffering from cervical cancer and other HPV16 induced malignancies. PMID:21892941

  19. A novel MLL5 isoform that is essential to activate E6 and E7 transcription in HPV16/18-associated cervical cancers.

    PubMed

    Yew, Chow Wenn; Lee, Pei; Chan, Wai Keong; Lim, Vania Kai Jun; Tay, Sun Kuie; Tan, Theresa M C; Deng, Lih-Wen

    2011-11-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the primary cause of human cervical cancer. The viral proteins E6 and E7 are essential to transform noncancerous epithelial cells into cancerous carcinomas by targeting key tumor suppressors p53 and retinoblastoma (Rb) proteins, respectively, but the cellular factors involved in E6 and E7 transcription themselves are incompletely understood. In this study, we defined a novel isoform of the mixed lineage leukemia 5 gene (MLL5?) as a specific and critical regulator of E6 and E7 transcription in cervical carcinoma cells. MLL5? is present in HPV16/18-positive cells including human primary cervical carcinoma specimens. Interaction of MLL5? with the AP-1-binding site at the distal region of the HPV18 long control region led to activation of E6/E7 transcription. Conversely, RNA interference-mediated knockdown of MLL5? downregulated both E6 and E7 expression. MLL5? downregulation was sufficient to restore p53 protein levels and reduce Rb phosphorylation, thereby reactivating apoptosis and cell-cycle checkpoints. By defining this novel MLL5? isoform and its specific critical role in activating E6/E7 gene transcription in HPV16/18-induced cervical cancers, our work highlights the potential of MLL5? as a biomarker and new therapeutic target in primary HPV-induced cervical cancers. PMID:21908553

  20. HPV-E7 delivered by engineered exosomes elicits a protective CD8? T cell-mediated immune response.

    PubMed

    Di Bonito, Paola; Ridolfi, Barbara; Columba-Cabezas, Sandra; Giovannelli, Andrea; Chiozzini, Chiara; Manfredi, Francesco; Anticoli, Simona; Arenaccio, Claudia; Federico, Maurizio

    2015-03-01

    We developed an innovative strategy to induce a cytotoxic T cell (CTL) immune response against protein antigens of choice. It relies on the production of exosomes, i.e., nanovesicles spontaneously released by all cell types. We engineered the upload of huge amounts of protein antigens upon fusion with an anchoring protein (i.e., HIV-1 Nefmut), which is an inactive protein incorporating in exosomes at high levels also when fused with foreign proteins. We compared the immunogenicity of engineered exosomes uploading human papillomavirus (HPV)-E7 with that of lentiviral virus-like particles (VLPs) incorporating equivalent amounts of the same antigen. These exosomes, whose limiting membrane was decorated with VSV-G, i.e., an envelope protein inducing pH-dependent endosomal fusion, proved to be as immunogenic as the cognate VLPs. It is noteworthy that the immunogenicity of the engineered exosomes remained unaltered in the absence of VSV-G. Most important, we provide evidence that the inoculation in mouse of exosomes uploading HPV-E7 induces production of anti-HPV E7 CTLs, blocks the growth of syngeneic tumor cells inoculated after immunization, and controls the development of tumor cells inoculated before the exosome challenge. These results represent the proof-of-concept about both feasibility and efficacy of the Nefmut-based exosome platform for the induction of CD8+ T cell immunity. PMID:25760140

  1. HPV-E7 Delivered by Engineered Exosomes Elicits a Protective CD8+ T Cell-Mediated Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Di Bonito, Paola; Ridolfi, Barbara; Columba-Cabezas, Sandra; Giovannelli, Andrea; Chiozzini, Chiara; Manfredi, Francesco; Anticoli, Simona; Arenaccio, Claudia; Federico, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    We developed an innovative strategy to induce a cytotoxic T cell (CTL) immune response against protein antigens of choice. It relies on the production of exosomes, i.e., nanovesicles spontaneously released by all cell types. We engineered the upload of huge amounts of protein antigens upon fusion with an anchoring protein (i.e., HIV-1 Nefmut), which is an inactive protein incorporating in exosomes at high levels also when fused with foreign proteins. We compared the immunogenicity of engineered exosomes uploading human papillomavirus (HPV)-E7 with that of lentiviral virus-like particles (VLPs) incorporating equivalent amounts of the same antigen. These exosomes, whose limiting membrane was decorated with VSV-G, i.e., an envelope protein inducing pH-dependent endosomal fusion, proved to be as immunogenic as the cognate VLPs. It is noteworthy that the immunogenicity of the engineered exosomes remained unaltered in the absence of VSV-G. Most important, we provide evidence that the inoculation in mouse of exosomes uploading HPV-E7 induces production of anti-HPV E7 CTLs, blocks the growth of syngeneic tumor cells inoculated after immunization, and controls the development of tumor cells inoculated before the exosome challenge. These results represent the proof-of-concept about both feasibility and efficacy of the Nefmut-based exosome platform for the induction of CD8+ T cell immunity. PMID:25760140

  2. A novel dithiocarbamate derivative induces cell apoptosis through p53-dependent intrinsic pathway and suppresses the expression of the E6 oncogene of human papillomavirus 18 in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanhong; Qi, Hongxue; Li, Xiaobo; Hou, Xueling; Lu, Xueying; Xiao, Xiangwen

    2015-06-01

    Dithiocarbamates (DTCs) exhibit a broad spectrum of antitumor activities, however, their molecular mechanisms of antitumor have not yet been elucidated. Previously, we have synthesized a series of novel dithiocarbamate derivatives. These DTCs were examined for cytotoxic activities against five human cancer cell lines. In this study, one of dithiocarbamate (DTC1) with higher potential for HeLa cells was chosen to investigate molecular mechanisms for its anti-tumor activities. DTC1 could inhibit proliferation, and highly induce apoptosis in HeLa cells by activating caspase-3, -6 and -9; moreover, activities of caspase-3, -6 and -9 were inhibited by pan-caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-FMK. Furthermore, DTC1 decreased the levels of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, and increased expression of cytosol cytochrome c, Bak, Bax and p53 in a time-dependent manner but had no effect on the level of Rb. It was shown that DTC1 induced HeLa cells apoptosis through a p53-dependent pathway as tested by the wild type p53 inhibitor, pifithrin-?. Additionally, the relative expression of E6 and E7 were evaluated in HPV18-positive (HeLa cells) by real-time PCR and western blotting. The results firstly demonstrated that DTC1 suppressed both expression of E6 mRNA and E6 oncoprotein, but had no effect on the expression of E7 mRNA and protein in HPV18. Our results suggested that DTC1 may serve as novel chemotherapeutic agents in the treatment of cervical cancer and potential anti-HPV virus candidates that merit further studies. PMID:25772545

  3. E(7(7)) and d=11 supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillmann, Christian

    2009-02-01

    This thesis firstly investigates whether D=11 supergravity can be lifted to a higher dimensional theory without introducing additional bosonic fields by interpreting the E(7(7))-symmetry of N=8 d=4 supergravity as part of a coordinate symmetry acting in a 60 dimensional restricted or exceptional geometry. It is proved that the supersymmetry variations of D=11 supergravity, truncated to d=7, can be reproduced from this exceptional geometry in the expected manner. Secondly, Borisov's and Ogievetsky's procedure to construct a theory with diffeomorphism covariance from the joint non-linear realization of the affine linear subgroup of diffeomorphisms with the conformal one is reviewed in detail, which is then extended by discussing torsion in this context.

  4. 42 CFR 52e.7 - What are the terms and conditions of awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...7 Section 52e.7 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE GRANTS FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROJECTS § 52e.7 What are the terms and conditions of...

  5. 42 CFR 52e.7 - What are the terms and conditions of awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...7 Section 52e.7 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE GRANTS FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROJECTS § 52e.7 What are the terms and conditions of...

  6. 42 CFR 52e.7 - What are the terms and conditions of awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Section 52e.7 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE GRANTS FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROJECTS § 52e.7 What are the terms and conditions of...

  7. 42 CFR 52e.7 - What are the terms and conditions of awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Section 52e.7 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE GRANTS FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROJECTS § 52e.7 What are the terms and conditions of...

  8. 42 CFR 52e.7 - What are the terms and conditions of awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Section 52e.7 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE GRANTS FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROJECTS § 52e.7 What are the terms and conditions of...

  9. Human papillomavirus 16 E7 inactivator of retinoblastoma family proteins complements

    E-print Network

    Human papillomavirus 16 E7 inactivator of retinoblastoma family proteins complements human tested whether the human papillomavirus type 16 E7 protein, which inactivates pRb family proteins papillomavirus (HPV), of which certain subtypes cause cervical cancer (2). The HPV16 E7 protein binds

  10. Human Papillomavirus Type 8 E6 Oncoprotein Inhibits Transcription of the PDZ Protein Syntenin-2

    PubMed Central

    Lazi?, Daliborka; Hufbauer, Martin; Zigrino, Paola; Buchholz, Stephanie; Kazem, Siamaque; Feltkamp, Mariet C. W.; Mauch, Cornelia; Steger, Gertrud; Pfister, Herbert

    2012-01-01

    The E6 proteins from high-risk alpha human papillomavirus (HPV) types (e.g., HPV16) are characterized by the presence of a PDZ-binding motif through which they interact with a number of cellular PDZ domain-containing substrates and cooperate in their degradation. The ability of these E6 proteins to bind to PDZ domain proteins correlates with the oncogenic potential of the virus. The E6 proteins of oncogenic HPV from the genus Betapapillomavirus (betaPV, e.g., HPV8) do not encode a PDZ-binding motif. We found that the PDZ domain protein syntenin-2 is transcriptionally downregulated in primary human epidermal keratinocytes (PHEK) by HPV8 E6. The mRNA levels of the known HPV16 E6 PDZ protein targets Dlg, Scribble, Magi-1, Magi-3, PSD95, and Mupp1 were not changed by HPV8 E6. Decreased protein levels of syntenin-2 were observed in cell extracts from PHEK expressing HPV5, -8, -16, -20, and -38 E6 but not in HPV1 and -4 E6-positive keratinocytes. Surprisingly, HPV16 E6 also repressed transcription of syntenin-2 but with a much lower efficiency than HPV8 E6. In healthy human skin, syntenin-2 expression is localized in suprabasal epidermal layers. In organotypic skin cultures, the differentiation-dependent expression of syntenin-2 was absent in HPV8 E6- and E6E7-expressing cells. In basal cell carcinomas of the skin, syntenin-2 was not detectable, whereas in squamous cell carcinomas, expression was located in differentiated areas. Short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown of syntenin-2 led to an inhibition of differentiation and an increase in the proliferation capacity in PHEK. These results identified syntenin-2 as the first PDZ domain protein controlled by HPV8 and HPV16 at the mRNA level. PMID:22623796

  11. Interplay Between Oncoproteins and Antioxidant Enzymes in Esophageal Carcinoma Treated Without and With Chemoradiotherapy: A Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Tranum; Gupta, Rajesh; Vaiphei, Kim; Kapoor, Rakesh; Gupta, N.M.; Khanduja, K.L.

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To analyze p53, bcl-2, c-myc, and cyclooxygenase-2 protein expression changes and examine their relationship with various antioxidant enzymes in esophageal carcinoma patients. Methods and Materials: Patients in Group 1 underwent transhiatal esophagectomy and those in Group 2 were administered chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery after 4 weeks of neoadjuvant therapy. Results: The relationship analysis among the various protein markers and antioxidant enzymes showed an inverse correlation between bcl-2 and superoxide dismutase/catalase in tumor tissues, irrespective of the treatment arm followed. An important positive association was observed between bcl-2 and reduced glutathione levels in the tumor tissue of patients receiving neoadjuvant therapy. Another apoptosis-modulating marker, c-myc, in the tumor tissue of Group 2 patients showed similar pattern levels (high and low) as that of superoxide dismutase/catalase. The association of cyclooxygenase-2 and p53 with various antioxidant enzymes showed a significant positive correlation between cyclooxygenase-2 expression and catalase activity and an inverse trend between p53 expression and superoxide dismutase and catalase activity in the tumor tissue of patients given neoadjuvant therapy. In addition, patients with overexpressed p53 protein levels had lower glutathione peroxidase enzyme levels and vice versa in the tumor tissue of patients who had undergone surgery as their main mode of treatment. Conclusion: The results of this study broaden the insight into the relationships shared among oncoproteins and the antioxidant defense system, and this could be helpful in the clinical management of esophageal carcinoma.

  12. The role of oncoprotein NM23 gene from Exopalaemon carinicauda is response to pathogens challenge and ammonia-N stress.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yafei; Li, Jitao; Zhang, Zhe; Li, Jian; Ge, Qianqian; Liu, Ping

    2015-12-01

    Oncoprotein NM23, as a family of genes encoding the nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) kinase, plays important roles in bioenergetics, DNA replication, differentiation and tumor metastasis. In this study, a full-length cDNA of NM23 (designated EcNM23) was cloned from Exopalaemon carinicauda by using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) approaches. The full-length cDNA of EcNM23 was 755 bp, which contains an open reading frame (ORF) of 518 bp, encoding a 175 amino-acid polypeptide with the predicted molecular weight of 19.60 kDa and estimated isoelectric point of 7.67. The deduced amino acid sequence of EcNM23 shared high identity (86%-93%) with that of other crustaceans. a NDP kinase super family signature was identified in E. carinicauda EcNM23. Quantitative real-time RT-qPCR analysis indicated that EcNM23 was expressed in all the examined tissues with the high expression level in hemocytes and ovary. The EcNM23 expression in immune-related tissues changed rapidly and reached peak at different time after pathogens (Vibrio parahaemolyticus and WSSV) challenge and ammonia-N stress treatment. The results suggested that EcNM23 might be associated with the immune defenses to pathogens infection and ammonia-N stress in E. carinicauda. PMID:26314522

  13. Expression of Mad, an antagonist of Myc oncoprotein function, in differentiating keratinocytes during tumorigenesis of the skin.

    PubMed Central

    Lymboussaki, A.; Kaipainen, A.; Hatva, E.; Västrik, I.; Jeskanen, L.; Jalkanen, M.; Werner, S.; Stenbäck, F.; Alitalo, R.

    1996-01-01

    The Myc oncoprotein is associated with cell proliferation and is often down-regulated during cell differentiation. The related Mad transcription factor, which antagonises Myc activity, is highly expressed in epidermal keratinocytes. Mad also inhibits cell proliferation in vitro. To study Mad expression in keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation, we have analysed Mad RNA expression in regenerating and hyperproliferative epidermal lesions and epidermal tumours of varying degrees of differentiation using the RNA in situ hybridisation and RNAase protection techniques. Mad was strongly expressed in differentiating suprabasal keratinocytes in healing dermal wounds and in benign hyperproliferative conditions, but also in squamous cell carcinomas, in which the keratinocytes retain their differentiation potential. However, Mad expression was lost in palisading basal carcinoma cells and poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinomas, which lacked the epithelial differentiation marker syndecan-1. We therefore suggest that Mad expression is closely associated with epithelial cell differentiation, and that this association is retained in epithelial tumours of the skin. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8645578

  14. The oncoprotein HBXIP upregulates PDGFB via activating transcription factor Sp1 to promote the proliferation of breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yingyi; Zhao, Yu; Li, Leilei; Shen, Yu; Cai, Xiaoli; Zhang, Xiaodong; Ye, Lihong

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: •HBXIP is able to upregulate the expression of PDGFB in breast cancer cells. •HBXIP serves as a coactivator of activating transcription factor Sp1. •HBXIP stimulates the PDGFB promoter via activating transcription factor Sp1. •HBXIP promotes the proliferation of breast cancer cell via upregulating PDGFB. -- Abstract: We have reported that the oncoprotein hepatitis B virus X-interacting protein (HBXIP) acts as a novel transcriptional coactivator to promote proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells. Previously, we showed that HBXIP was able to activate nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B) in breast cancer cells. As an oncogene, the platelet-derived growth factor beta polypeptide (PDGFB) plays crucial roles in carcinogenesis. In the present study, we found that both HBXIP and PDGFB were highly expressed in breast cancer cell lines. Interestingly, HBXIP was able to increase transcriptional activity of NF-?B through PDGFB, suggesting that HBXIP is associated with PDGFB in the cells. Moreover, HBXIP was able to upregulate PDGFB at the levels of mRNA, protein and promoter in the cells. Then, we identified that HBXIP stimulated the promoter of PDGFB through activating transcription factor Sp1. In function, HBXIP enhanced the proliferation of breast cancer cells through PDGFB in vitro. Thus, we conclude that HBXIP upregulates PDGFB via activating transcription factor Sp1 to promote proliferation of breast cancer cells.

  15. The Catalytic Efficiency of Lipin 1? Increases by Physically Interacting with the Proto-oncoprotein c-Fos.

    PubMed

    Cardozo Gizzi, Andres M; Prucca, Cesar G; Gaveglio, Virginia L; Renner, Marianne L; Pasquaré, Susana J; Caputto, Beatriz L

    2015-12-01

    Phosphatidic acid (PA) is a central precursor for membrane phospholipid biosynthesis. The lipin family is a magnesium-dependent type I PA phosphatase involved in de novo synthesis of neutral lipids and phospholipids. The regulation of lipin activity may govern the pathways by which these lipids are synthesized and control the cellular levels of important signaling lipids. Moreover, the proto-oncoprotein c-Fos has an emerging role in glycerolipid synthesis regulation; by interacting with key synthesizing enzymes it is able to increase overall phospho- and glycolipid synthesis. We studied the lipin 1? enzyme activity in a cell-free system using PA/Triton X-100 mixed micelles as substrate, analyzing it in the presence/absence of c-Fos. We found that lipin 1? kcat value increases around 40% in the presence of c-Fos, with no change in the lipin 1? affinity for the PA/Triton X-100 mixed micelles. We also probed a physical interaction between both proteins. Although the c-Fos domain involved in lipin activation is its basic domain, the interaction domain is mapped to the N-terminal c-Fos. In conclusion, we provide evidence for a novel positive regulator of lipin 1? PA phosphatase activity that is not achieved via altering its subcellular localization or affinity for membranes but rather through directly increasing its catalytic efficiency. PMID:26475860

  16. Interaction of Marek's Disease Virus (MDV) Oncoprotein Meq with Host Proteins: A Proteomic Approach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s Disease is a T cell lymphoma disease of chicken induced by an oncogenic, cell associated alpha herpes virus. Oncogenicity in the Marek’s disease is mostly attributed to a transcription factor termed as Meq. To understand the mechanisms of oncogenicity of Meq, it is necessary to understand it...

  17. A DNA vaccine encoding mutated HPV58 mE6E7-Fc-GPI fusion antigen and GM-CSF and B7.1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, He; Yu, Jiyun; Li, Li

    2015-01-01

    Background Persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is a predominant cause of cervical cancer, and HPV58 is the third most common virus detected in the patients with cervical cancer in Asia. E6 and E7 are the viral oncogenes which are constitutively expressed in HPV-associated tumor cells and can be used as target antigens for related immunotherapy. In this study, we modified the HPV58 E6 and E7 oncogenes to eliminate their oncogenic potential and constructed a recombinant DNA vaccine that coexpresses the sig-HPV58 mE6E7-Fc-GPI fusion antigen in addition to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and B7.1 as molecular adjuvants (PVAX1-HPV58 mE6E7FcGB) for the treatment of HPV58 (+) cancer. Methods PVAX1-HPV58 mE6E7FcGB recombinant DNA vaccine was constructed to express a fusion protein containing a signal peptide, a modified HPV58 mE6E7 gene, and human IgG Fc and glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchoring sequences using the modified DNA vaccine vector PVAX1-IRES-GM/B7.1 that coexpresses GM-CSF, and B7.1. C57BL/6 mice were challenged by HPV58 E6E7-expressing B16-HPV58 E6E7 cells, followed by immunization by PVAX1-HPV58 mE6E7FcGB vaccine on days 7, 14, 21 after tumor challenge. The cellular immune responses in immunized mice were assessed by measuring IFN-? production in splenocytes upon stimulation by HPV58 E6E7-GST protein and the lysis of B16-HPV58 E6E7 target cells by splenocytes after restimulation with HPV58 E6E7-GST protein. The antitumor efficacy was evaluated by monitoring the growth of the tumor. Results PVAX1-HPV58 mE6E7FcGB elicited varying levels of IFN-lsgdB58onn T-cell immune responses and lysis of target cell in mice in response to the recombinant antigen HPV58 E6E7-GST. Furthermore, the vaccine also induced antitumor responses in the HPV58 (+) B16-HPV58 E6E7 tumor challenge model as evidenced by delayed tumor development. Conclusion The recombinant DNA vaccine PVAX1-HPV58 mE6E7FcGB efficiently generates cellular immunity and antitumor efficacy in immunized mice. These data provide a basis for the further study of this recombinant vaccine as a potential candidate vaccine. PMID:26604780

  18. Low- and high-risk human papillomavirus E7 proteins regulate p130 differently

    SciTech Connect

    Barrow-Laing, Lisa; Chen Wei; Roman, Ann

    2010-05-10

    The E7 protein of high-risk human papillomaviruses (HR HPVs) targets pRb family members (pRb, p107 and p130) for degradation; low-risk (LR) HPV E7 only targets p130 for degradation. The effect of HR HPV 16 E7 and LR HPV 6 E7 on p130 intracellular localization and half-life was examined. Nuclear/cytoplasmic fractionation and immunofluorescence showed that, in contrast to control and HPV 6 E7-expressing cells, a greater amount of p130 was present in the cytoplasm in the presence of HPV 16 E7. The half-life of p130, relative to control cells, was decreased in the cytoplasm in the presence of HPV 6 E7 or HPV 16 E7, but only decreased by HPV 6 E7 in the nucleus. Inhibition of proteasomal degradation extended the half-life of p130, regardless of intracellular localization. These results suggest that there may be divergent mechanisms by which LR and HR HPV E7 target p130 for degradation.

  19. Transforming properties of the cottontail rabbit papillomavirus oncoproteins Le6 and SE6 and of the E8 protein.

    PubMed Central

    Harry, J B; Wettstein, F O

    1996-01-01

    Cottontail rabbit papillomavirus induces on cottontail and domestic rabbits papillomas which progress at a high frequency to carcinoma. The virus encodes three transforming proteins; one is translated from open reading frame (ORF) E7 and binds the retinoblastoma protein, and two, LE6 and SE6, are translated from the first and second ATGs of ORF E6, respectively. Here we show that neither of the E6 proteins coprecipitated with p53 in vitro, nor did they bind to a recently identified E6-binding protein (J. J. Chen, C. E. Reid, V. Band, and E. Androphy, Science 269:529-531, 1995). This protein was shown to bind to the E6 proteins of the high-risk human papillomairus types 16 and 18 but not to the low-risk human papillomavirus types VI and II. In-frame deletions cloned into the pZipNeo vector were used to identify structural features of SE6 and LE6 important for transformation of NIH 3T3 cells. Three deletions covering the amino-terminal half of SE6 did not transform cells. In two of the three deletions, two Cys-X-X-Cys motifs were deleted, each deletion preventing the formation of one of the potential small Zn fingers of SE6. Among the LE6 deletions, only one had a reduced transformation efficiency, while seven transformed cells at least as efficiently as wild-type LE6. In each of three of these seven mutants, two Cys-X-X-Cys motifs were deleted. None of the three amino acid deletions which abolished transformation by SE6 reduced transformation by LE6. Furthermore, transformation did not correlate with the level of SE6 or LE6 proteins detectable. ORF E8 colinear with ORF E6, which could generate a 50-amino-acid protein with a hydrophobic segment, did not transform cells when cloned into the pZipNeo vector. However, mutation of the E8 ATG, which did not alter the amino acid sequence of LE6, increased transformation by LE6 without affecting the level of LE6 expression. The data suggest that transformation by the E6 proteins is not mediated by interfering with p53 function or through binding to the E6-binding protein. Furthermore, different structural features are important to maintain transformation functions and protein stability of LE6 and SE6. Finally, E8 seems not to be a transforming protein but rather appears to modulate transformation bv LE6. PMID:8648665

  20. Identification of target genes of synovial sarcoma-associated fusion oncoprotein using human pluripotent stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hayakawa, Kazuo; Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto; Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya ; Ikeya, Makoto; Fukuta, Makoto; Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto; Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya ; Woltjen, Knut; Tamaki, Sakura; Takahara, Naoko; Kato, Tomohisa; Sato, Shingo; Otsuka, Takanobu; Toguchida, Junya; Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto; Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto

    2013-03-22

    Highlights: ? We tried to identify targets of synovial sarcoma (SS)-associated SYT–SSX fusion gene. ? We established pluripotent stem cell (PSC) lines with inducible SYT–SSX gene. ? SYT–SSX responsive genes were identified by the induction of SYT–SSX in PSC. ? SS-related genes were selected from database by in silico analyses. ? 51 genes were finally identified among SS-related genes as targets of SYT–SSX in PSC. -- Abstract: Synovial sarcoma (SS) is a malignant soft tissue tumor harboring chromosomal translocation t(X; 18)(p11.2; q11.2), which produces SS-specific fusion gene, SYT–SSX. Although precise function of SYT–SSX remains to be investigated, accumulating evidences suggest its role in gene regulation via epigenetic mechanisms, and the product of SYT–SSX target genes may serve as biomarkers of SS. Lack of knowledge about the cell-of-origin of SS, however, has placed obstacle in the way of target identification. Here we report a novel approach to identify SYT–SSX2 target genes using human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) containing a doxycycline-inducible SYT–SSX2 gene. SYT–SSX2 was efficiently induced both at mRNA and protein levels within three hours after doxycycline administration, while no morphological change of hPSCs was observed until 24 h. Serial microarray analyses identified genes of which the expression level changed more than twofold within 24 h. Surprisingly, the majority (297/312, 95.2%) were up-regulated genes and a result inconsistent with the current concept of SYT–SSX as a transcriptional repressor. Comparing these genes with SS-related genes which were selected by a series of in silico analyses, 49 and 2 genes were finally identified as candidates of up- and down-regulated target of SYT–SSX, respectively. Association of these genes with SYT–SSX in SS cells was confirmed by knockdown experiments. Expression profiles of SS-related genes in hPSCs and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were strikingly different in response to the induction of SYT–SSX, and more than half of SYT–SSX target genes in hPSCs were not induced in hMSCs. These results suggest the importance of cellular context for correct understanding of SYT–SSX function, and demonstrated how our new system will help to overcome this issue.

  1. Human Papillomavirus E7 Repression in Cervical Carcinoma Cells Initiates a Transcriptional Cascade Driven by the Retinoblastoma Family, Resulting in Senescence? †

    PubMed Central

    Johung, Kimberly; Goodwin, Edward C.; DiMaio, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    This work demonstrates a central role for the retinoblastoma (Rb) family in driving the transcriptional program of induced and replicative senescence. HeLa cervical carcinoma cells rapidly undergo senescence when the human papillomavirus (HPV) type 18 E7 gene in these cells is repressed by the bovine papillomavirus (BPV) E2 protein. This senescence response requires the endogenous Rb pathway but not the p53 pathway. Microarray analysis 6 days after BPV E2 introduction into HeLa cells identified 224 cellular genes induced by E7 repression and 354 repressed genes. Many repressed genes were involved in cell cycle progression, and numerous induced genes encoded lysosomal proteins. These gene expression changes were blocked by constitutive expression of the wild-type HPV16 E7 or adenovirus E1A gene, but not by E7 or E1A mutants defective for Rb binding. Short hairpin RNAs targeting the Rb family also inhibited these gene expression changes and blocked senescence. Therefore, surprisingly, the transcriptional response to BPV E2 expression was entirely dependent on E7 repression and activation of the Rb family, and the BPV E2 protein did not directly affect the expression of cellular genes. Activation of the Rb family repressed E2F-responsive genes and stimulated transcriptional activators, thereby mobilizing multiple signals, such as repression of B-MYB and DEK, that were independently sufficient to induce senescence. There was extensive overlap between the transcriptional profiles of senescent, late-passage primary human fibroblasts and senescent cervical carcinoma cells, suggesting that this Rb family-mediated transcriptional cascade also plays a central role in replicative senescence. PMID:17182682

  2. An Intrinsically Disordered Region in the Proapoptotic ASPP2 Protein Binds to the Helicobacter pylori Oncoprotein CagA.

    PubMed

    Reingewertz, Tali H; Iosub-Amir, Anat; Bonsor, Daniel A; Mayer, Guy; Amartely, Hadar; Friedler, Assaf; Sundberg, Eric J

    2015-06-01

    The leading risk factor for gastric cancer in humans is infection by Helicobacter pylori strains that express and translocate the oncoprotein CagA into host epithelial cells. Once inside host cells, CagA interacts with ASPP2, which specifically stimulates p53-mediated apoptosis and reverses its pro-apoptotic function to promote ASPP2-dependent degradation of p53. The X-ray crystal structure of a complex between the N-terminal domain of CagA and a 56-residue fragment of ASPP2, of which 22 residues were resolved, was recently described. Here, we present biochemical and biophysical analyses of the interaction between the additional regions of CagA and ASPP2 potentially involved in this interaction. Using size exclusion chromatography-multiangle laser light scattering, circular dichroism, and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses, we observed that the ASPP2 region spanning residues 331-692, which was not part of the ASPP2 fragment used for crystallization, is intrinsically disordered in its unbound state. By surface plasmon resonance analysis and isothermal titration calorimetry, we found that a portion of this disordered region in ASPP2, residues 448-692, binds to the N-terminal domain of CagA. We also measured the affinity of the complex between the ASPP2 fragment composed of residues 693-918 and inclusive of the fragment used for crystallization and CagA. Additionally, we mapped the binding regions between ASPP2 and CagA using peptide arrays, demonstrating interactions between CagA and numerous peptides distributed throughout the ASPP2 protein sequence. Our results identify previously uncharacterized regions distributed throughout the protein sequence of ASPP2 as determinants of CagA binding, providing mechanistic insight into apoptosis reprogramming by CagA and potential new drug targets for H. pylori-mediated gastric cancer. PMID:25963096

  3. The Meq oncoprotein of Marek's disease virus interacts with p53 and inhibits its transcriptional and apoptotic activities

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Marek's disease virus (MDV) is an oncogenic herpesvirus, which causes malignant lymphoma in chickens. The Meq protein of MDV, which is expressed abundantly in MDV-infected cells and in Marek's disease (MD) tumor cells, functions as a transcriptional activator and has been proposed to play an important role in oncogenic transformation. Preliminary studies demonstrated that Meq is able to bind p53 in vitro, as demonstrated using a protein-binding assay. This observation prompted us to examine whether the interaction between Meq and p53 occurs in cells, and to investigate the biological significance of this interaction. Results We confirmed first that Meq interacted directly with p53 using a yeast two-hybrid assay and an immunoprecipitation assay, and we investigated the biological significance of this interaction subsequently. Exogenous expression of Meq resulted in the inhibition of p53-mediated transcriptional activity and apoptosis, as analyzed using a p53 luciferase reporter assay and a TUNEL assay. The inhibitory effect of Meq on transcriptional activity mediated by p53 was dependent on the physical interaction between these two proteins, because a Meq deletion mutant that lacked the p53-binding region lost the ability to inhibit p53-mediated transcriptional activity and apoptosis. The Meq variants L-Meq and S-Meq, but not VS-Meq and ?Meq, which were expressed in MD tumor cells and MDV-infected cells, exerted an inhibitory effect on p53 transcriptional activity. In addition, ?Meq was found to act as a negative regulator of Meq. Conclusions The Meq oncoprotein interacts directly with p53 and inhibits p53-mediated transcriptional activity and apoptosis. These findings provide valuable insight into the molecular basis for the function of Meq in MDV oncogenesis. PMID:21110861

  4. Attenuated CagA Oncoprotein in Helicobacter pylori from Amerindians in Peruvian Amazon*

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masato; Kiga, Kotaro; Kersulyte, Dangeruta; Cok, Jaime; Hooper, Catherine C.; Mimuro, Hitomi; Sanada, Takahito; Suzuki, Shiho; Oyama, Masaaki; Kozuka-Hata, Hiroko; Kamiya, Shigeru; Zou, Quan-Ming; Gilman, Robert H.; Berg, Douglas E.; Sasakawa, Chihiro

    2011-01-01

    Population genetic analyses of bacterial genes whose products interact with host tissues can give new understanding of infection and disease processes. Here we show that strains of the genetically diverse gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori from Amerindians from the remote Peruvian Amazon contain novel alleles of cagA, a major virulence gene, and reveal distinctive properties of their encoded CagA proteins. CagA is injected into the gastric epithelium where it hijacks pleiotropic signaling pathways, helps Hp exploit its special gastric mucosal niche, and affects the risk that infection will result in overt gastroduodenal diseases including gastric cancer. The Amerindian CagA proteins contain unusual but functional tyrosine phosphorylation motifs and attenuated CRPIA motifs, which affect gastric epithelial proliferation, inflammation, and bacterial pathogenesis. Amerindian CagA proteins induced less production of IL-8 and cancer-associated Mucin 2 than did those of prototype Western or East Asian strains and behaved as dominant negative inhibitors of action of prototype CagA during mixed infection of Mongolian gerbils. We suggest that Amerindian cagA is of relatively low virulence, that this may have been selected in ancestral strains during infection of the people who migrated from Asia into the Americas many thousands of years ago, and that such attenuated CagA proteins could be useful therapeutically. PMID:21757722

  5. Human papillomavirus type 18 E6 and E7 antibodies in human sera: increased anti-E7 prevalence in cervical cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Bleul, C; Müller, M; Frank, R; Gausepohl, H; Koldovsky, U; Mgaya, H N; Luande, J; Pawlita, M; ter Meulen, J; Viscidi, R

    1991-01-01

    Antibody-reactive regions on the human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV-18) E6 and E7 proteins were identified with rabbit polyclonal anti-fusion protein sera by screening of an fd phage expression library containing subgenomic HPV-18 DNA fragments and by testing of overlapping decapeptides representing the E6 and E7 open reading frames. Peptides comprising the delineated regions (designated E6/1 to E6/4 and E7/1) were synthesized and used in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect anti-HPV-18 antibodies in human sera. A total of 232 human serum samples (identical numbers of cervical cancer patients and age-matched controls) collected in Tanzania were tested. Similar prevalences (between 0.8 and 4.3%) of antibodies recognizing the different E6 peptides were found in the sera from tumor patients and controls. With a synthetic 28-mer peptide (designated pepE701) comprising the E7/1 region, a significant difference was found: 10 of 116 tumor serum samples but 0 of 116 control serum samples showed a specific reaction (P less than 0.001). This observation confirms earlier results with HPV-16 E7 fusion proteins (I. Jochmus-Kudielka, A. Schneider, R. Braun, R. Kimmig, U. Koldovsky, K. E. Schneweis, K. Seedorf, and L. Gissmann, J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 81:1698-1704, 1989). A lower prevalence of anti-HPV-18 E7 antibodies was observed when 188 human serum samples collected in Germany from tumor patients and controls were tested (3 of 94 positive in the cancer group; 0 of 94 positive in the control group). The type specificity of anti-HPV-18 E7 antibodies was demonstrated when the HPV type found by Southern hybridization in the cervical cancer biopsies was compared with seroreactivity: 4 of 8 serum samples obtained from HPV-18 DNA-positive but 0 of 16 serum samples from HPV-18 DNA-negative tumor patients reacted in the HPV-18 E7 ELISA. In addition, HPV-18-positive sera failed to react in a peptide ELISA with the homologous HPV-16 E7 region (M. Müller, H. Gausepohl, G. de Martinoff, R. Frank, R. Brasseur, and L. Gissmann, J. Gen. Virol. 71:2709-2717, 1990) and vice versa. PMID:1722219

  6. Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 oncoprotein tax promotes unscheduled degradation of Pds1p/securin and Clb2p/cyclin B1 and causes chromosomal instability.

    PubMed

    Liu, Baoying; Liang, Min-Hui; Kuo, Yu-liang; Liao, Wei; Boros, Imre; Kleinberger, Tami; Blancato, Jan; Giam, Chou-Zen

    2003-08-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia. The HTLV-1 transactivator, Tax, is implicated as the viral oncoprotein. Naïve cells expressing Tax for the first time develop severe cell cycle abnormalities that include increased DNA synthesis, mitotic arrest, appearance of convoluted nuclei with decondensed DNA, and formation of multinucleated cells. Here we report that Tax causes a drastic reduction in Pds1p/securin and Clb2p/cyclin B levels in yeast, rodent, and human cells and a loss of cell viability. With a temperature-sensitive mutant of the CDC23 subunit of the anaphase-promoting complex (APC), cdc23(ts); a temperature-sensitive mutant of cdc20; and a cdh1-null mutant, we show that the diminution of Pds1p and Clb2p brought on by Tax is mediated via the Cdc20p-associated anaphase-promoting complex, APC(Cdc20p). This loss of Pds1p/securin and Clb2p/cyclin B1 occurred before cellular entry into mitosis, caused a G(2)/M cell cycle block, and was accompanied by severe chromosome aneuploidy in both Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells and human diploid fibroblasts. Our results support the notion that Tax aberrantly targets and activates APC(Cdc20p), leading to unscheduled degradation of Pds1p/securin and Clb2p/cyclin B1, a delay or failure in mitotic entry and progression, and faulty chromosome transmission. The chromosomal instability resulting from a Tax-induced deficiency in securin and cyclin B1 provides an explanation for the highly aneuploid nature of adult T-cell leukemia cells. PMID:12861013

  7. Radiosensitization of Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells by Human Papillomavirus 16 Oncoprotein E6*I

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Ervinna; Delic, Naomi C.; Hong, Angela; Zhang Mei; Rose, Barbara R.; Lyons, J. Guy

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: Patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) whose disease is associated with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection have a significantly better outcome than those with HPV-negative disease, but the reasons for the better outcome are not known. We postulated that they might relate to an ability of HPV proteins to confer a better response to radiotherapy, a commonly used treatment for OSCC. Methods and Materials: We stably expressed the specific splicing-derived isoforms, E6*I and E6*II, or the entire E6 open reading frame (E6total), which gives rise to both full length and E6*I isoforms, in OSCC cell lines. Radiation resistance was measured in clonogenicity assays, p53 activity was measured using transfected reporter genes, and flow cytometry was used to analyze cell cycle and apoptosis. Results: E6*I and E6total sensitized the OSCC cells to irradiation, E6*I giving the greatest degree of radiosensitization (approximately eightfold lower surviving cell fraction at 10 Gy), whereas E6*II had no effect. In contrast to radiosensitivity, E6*I was a weaker inhibitor than E6total of tumor suppressor p53 transactivator activity in the same cells. Flow cytometric analyses showed that irradiated E6*I expressing cells had a much higher G2M:G1 ratio than control cells, indicating that, after G2, cells were diverted from the cell cycle to programmed cell death. Conclusion: This study supports a role for E6*I in the enhanced responsiveness of HPV-positive oropharyngeal carcinomas to p53-independent radiation-induced death.

  8. Detection of JC virus DNA sequence and expression of the viral oncoprotein, tumor antigen, in brain of immunocompetent patient with oligoastrocytoma.

    PubMed Central

    Rencic, A; Gordon, J; Otte, J; Curtis, M; Kovatich, A; Zoltick, P; Khalili, K; Andrews, D

    1996-01-01

    We describe molecular and clinical findings in an immunocompetent patient with an oligoastrocytoma and the concomitant presence of the human papovavirus, JC virus (JCV), which is the etiologic agent of the subacute, debilitating demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Histologic review revealed a glial neoplasm consisting primarily of a moderately cellular oligodendroglioma with distinct areas of a fibrillary astrocytoma. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed nuclear staining of tumor cells with antibodies against the viral oncoprotein [tumor antigen (T antigen)], the proliferation marker (Ki67), and the cellular proliferation regulator (p53). Using primers specific to the JCV control region, PCR yielded amplified DNA that was identical to the control region of the Mad-4 strain of the virus. PCR analysis demonstrated the presence of the genome for the viral oncoprotein, T antigen, and results from primer extension studies revealed synthesis of the viral early RNA for T antigen in the tumor tissues. The presence of viral T antigen in the tumor tissue was further demonstrated by immunoblot assay. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the presence of JCV DNA, RNA, and T antigen in tissue in which viral T antigen is localized to tumor cell nuclei and suggests the possible association of JCV with some glial neoplasms. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8692997

  9. Hydrophobic Effect Drives Oxygen Uptake in Myoglobin via Histidine E7*

    PubMed Central

    Boechi, Leonardo; Arrar, Mehrnoosh; Martí, Marcelo A.; Olson, John S.; Roitberg, Adrián E.; Estrin, Darío A.

    2013-01-01

    Since the elucidation of the myoglobin (Mb) structure, a histidine residue on the E helix (His-E7) has been proposed to act as a gate with an open or closed conformation controlling access to the active site. Although it is believed that at low pH, the His-E7 gate is in its open conformation, the full relationship between the His-E7 protonation state, its conformation, and ligand migration in Mb is hotly debated. We used molecular dynamics simulations to first address the effect of His-E7 protonation on its conformation. We observed the expected shift from the closed to the open conformation upon protonation, but more importantly, noted a significant difference between the conformations of the two neutral histidine tautomers. We further computed free energy profiles for oxygen migration in each of the possible His-E7 states as well as in two instructive Mb mutants: Ala-E7 and Trp-E7. Our results show that even in the closed conformation, the His-E7 gate does not create a large barrier to oxygen migration and permits oxygen entry with only a small rotation of the imidazole side chain and movement of the E helix. We identify, instead, a hydrophobic site in the E7 channel that can accommodate an apolar diatomic ligand and enhances ligand uptake particularly in the open His-E7 conformation. This rate enhancement is diminished in the closed conformation. Taken together, our results provide a new conceptual framework for the histidine gate hypothesis. PMID:23297402

  10. Oncogenic and nononcogenic human genital papillomaviruses generate the E7 mRNA by different mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Smotkin, D; Prokoph, H; Wettstein, F O

    1989-01-01

    A new promoter located within E6 was mapped in human papillomavirus type 6b (HPV6b)- and HPV11-containing benign genital condylomata (genital warts). The RNA transcribed from this promoter represented the major RNA species colinear with open reading frames E6 and E7 and can encode the E7 protein. No equivalent promoter was active in HPV16-containing cancers and cancer-derived cell lines. In those, the major transcripts contained one of two different introns within E6 and the RNAs could encode two different E6 proteins and E7. Images PMID:2536845

  11. Functional Assessment of ?E?7/E-cadherin Interactions in the Steady State Postnatal Thymus

    PubMed Central

    Prockop, Susan E.; Petrie, Howard T.

    2004-01-01

    T cell differentiation in the thymus depends on sequential interactions between lymphoid progenitors and stromal cells in discrete regions of the cortex. Here, we show that despite ?E?7 expression by a subset of the earliest intrathymic precursors (and E-cadherin expression by thymic stroma), interaction of these elements is not required for proper localization of early progenitors into the cortex, or for successful steady state differentiation. These findings indicate that despite in vitro data demonstrating ?E?7 mediated adhesion and proliferation of intrathymic T cell precursor populations, T lymphocyte development can proceed independently of ?E?7/E-cadherin interactions. PMID:15330449

  12. 42 CFR 52e.7 - What are the terms and conditions of awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... by subpart Q of 45 CFR part 74. (b) The Director may permit unobligated grant funds remaining in the... HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE GRANTS FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROJECTS § 52e.7 What are the...

  13. 42 CFR 52e.7 - What are the terms and conditions of awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... by subpart Q of 45 CFR part 74. (b) The Director may permit unobligated grant funds remaining in the... HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE GRANTS FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROJECTS § 52e.7 What are the...

  14. 42 CFR 52e.7 - What are the terms and conditions of awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... by subpart Q of 45 CFR part 74. (b) The Director may permit unobligated grant funds remaining in the... HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE GRANTS FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROJECTS § 52e.7 What are the...

  15. 42 CFR 52e.7 - What are the terms and conditions of awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... by subpart Q of 45 CFR part 74. (b) The Director may permit unobligated grant funds remaining in the... HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE GRANTS FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROJECTS § 52e.7 What are the...

  16. 42 CFR 52e.7 - What are the terms and conditions of awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... by subpart Q of 45 CFR part 74. (b) The Director may permit unobligated grant funds remaining in the... HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE GRANTS FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROJECTS § 52e.7 What are the...

  17. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, M.; Hibi, M.; Lin, A.

    1997-02-25

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE is disclosed. The polypeptide has serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences. The method of detection of JNK is also provided. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites. 44 figs.

  18. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael (2565 Chalcedony, San Diego, CA 92122); Hibi, Masahiko (7528 Charmant Dr., No. 418, San Diego, CA 92122); Lin, Anning (8655 Via Mallorca Dr., Apt. 93, La Jolla, CA 92093)

    1997-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  19. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael (San Diego, CA); Hibi, Masahiko (San Diego, CA); Lin, Anning (La Jolla, CA)

    1997-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  20. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael (San Diego, CA); Hibi, Masahiko (San Diego, CA); Linn, Anning (La Jolla, CA)

    1996-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK.

  1. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael (San Diego, CA); Hibi, Masahiko (San Diego, CA); Lin, Anning (La Jolla, CA)

    2002-01-29

    The present invention provides an isolated polynucleotide encoding a c-Jun peptide consisting of about amino acid residues 33 to 79 as set fort in SEQ ID NO: 10 or conservative variations thereof. The invention also provides a method for producing a peptide of SEQ ID NO:1 comprising (a) culturing a host cell containing a polynucleotide encoding a c-Jun peptide consisting of about amino acid residues 33 to 79 as set forth in SEQ ID NO: 10 under conditions which allow expression of the polynucleotide; and (b) obtaining the peptide of SEQ ID NO:1.

  2. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael (San Diego, CA); Hibi, Masahiko (San Diego, CA); Lin, Anning (La Jolla, CA); Davis, Roger (Princeton, MA); Derijard, Benoit (Shrewsbury, MA)

    2003-02-04

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  3. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning; Davis, Roger; Derijard, Benoit

    2005-03-08

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  4. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Roger; Derijard, Benoit; Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    2005-01-25

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  5. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael (San Diego, CA); Hibi, Masahiko (San Diego, CA); Lin, Anning (La Jolla, CA)

    1999-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD or 55 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and theonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  6. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael (San Diego, CA); Hibi, Masahiko (San Diego, CA); Lin, Anning (La Jolla, CA)

    1998-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  7. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    2004-03-16

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  8. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael (San Diego, CA); Lin, Anning (La Jolla, CA)

    1999-11-30

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD or 55 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and theonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  9. SIRT3 inhibits prostate cancer by destabilizing oncoprotein c-MYC through regulation of the PI3K/Akt pathway.

    PubMed

    Quan, Yizhou; Wang, Naitao; Chen, Qianqian; Xu, Jin; Cheng, Wei; Di, Meijuan; Xia, Weiliang; Gao, Wei-Qiang

    2015-09-22

    SIRT3 is involved in aging-related diseases including cancer, but its role in prostate cancer and detailed regulatory function are not known. We found that SIRT3 was moderately down-regulated in prostate carcinomas. Overexpression of SIRT3 by lentiviral transfection inhibited prostate cancer growth both in vitro and in vivo, whereas knockdown of SIRT3 increased prostate tumor growth. Mechanistically, the tumor suppression effect of SIRT3 was achieved via its inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway. Notably, upregulation of SIRT3 suppressed the phosphorylation of Akt, leading to the ubiquitination and degradation of oncoprotein c-MYC; this could be attenuated by constitutive activation of PI3K/Akt signaling. Collectively, our results unveiled SIRT3's tumor suppressive function and the underlying mechanism in prostate cancer, which might provide therapeutic implications for the disease. PMID:26317998

  10. A carboxy-terminal region required by the adenovirus type 9 E4 ORF1 oncoprotein for transformation mediates direct binding to cellular polypeptides.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, R S; Javier, R T

    1997-01-01

    Human adenovirus type 9 (Ad9) is unique among oncogenic adenoviruses in that it elicits exclusively mammary tumors in rats and requires the viral E4 region open reading frame 1 (9ORF1) gene for tumorigenicity. The 9ORF1 oncogenic determinant codes for a 14-kDa transforming protein, and three separate regions of this polypeptide, including one at the extreme C terminus, are necessary for transforming activity. In this study, we investigated whether the 9ORF1 transforming protein interacts with cellular factors. Following incubation with cell extracts, a glutathione S-transferase (GST)-9ORF1 fusion protein associated with several cellular phosphoproteins (p220, p180, p160, p155), whereas GST fusion proteins of transformation-defective 9ORF1 C-terminal mutants did not. Similar interactions requiring the 9ORF1 C terminus were revealed with protein-blotting assays, in which a GST-9ORF1 protein probe reacted specifically with cellular polypeptides having gel mobilities resembling those of the 9ORF1-associated cellular phosphoproteins, as well as with additional cellular polypeptides designated p140/p130. In addition, GST fusion proteins containing 9ORF1 C-terminal fragments associated with some of the 9ORF1-associated cellular polypeptides, as did GST fusion proteins of full-length wild-type Ad5 and Ad12 E4 ORF1 transforming proteins. Significantly, the results of coimmunoprecipitation analyses suggested that the same cellular polypeptides also associate with wild-type but not C-terminal-mutant 9ORF1 proteins in vivo. Together, these findings suggest that the 9ORF1 C terminus, which is essential for transformation, participates in specific and direct binding of the 9ORF1 oncoprotein to multiple cellular polypeptides. We propose that interactions with these cellular factors may be responsible, at least in part, for the transforming activity of the 9ORF1 viral oncoprotein. PMID:9311876

  11. Ligand binding to synthetic mutant myoglobin (His-E7----Gly): role of the distal histidine.

    PubMed Central

    Braunstein, D; Ansari, A; Berendzen, J; Cowen, B R; Egeberg, K D; Frauenfelder, H; Hong, M K; Ormos, P; Sauke, T B; Scholl, R

    1988-01-01

    Low-temperature flash photolysis with IR and visible spectroscopy was used to probe the influence of the distal histidine His-64(E7) of sperm-whale myoglobin (Mb) on the orientation of bound carbon monoxide (CO) and on the kinetics of CO rebinding. The synthesis and high-level expression of a sperm-whale myoglobin gene in Escherichia coli permits the efficient substitution of the distal histidine through site-directed mutagenesis. Substitution of His-E7 with glycine [GlyE7]Mb bound with CO (CO[GlyE7]Mb) results in one broad bound-CO IR stretch band, v(C-O), centered at 1973 cm-1 at 10 K, in contrast to three distinct bands for native and synthetic wild-type MbCO at 1966, 1945, and 1929 cm-1. After flash photolysis at 10 K, the unbound state of CO[GlyE7]Mb exhibits two CO stretch bands, whereas MbCO has three. Fourier transform IR spectroscopy measurements of the linear dichroism after photoselective flash photolysis of CO bound to [GlyE7]Mb at 10 K reveals the bound CO to be oriented at an angle of alpha = 20 degrees +/- 2 degrees with respect to the heme normal. Flash photolysis data from 10 to 300 K provide evidence for a larger distal pocket and a smaller enthalpy barrier (by approximately 4 kJ/mol) for [GlyE7]MbCO as compared with wild-type MbCO. These results reinforce the notion that the dominant control of the binding step at the heme iron comes from the proximal side through the protein structure. PMID:3186740

  12. NF-?B Protects Human Papillomavirus Type 38 E6/E7-Immortalized Human Keratinocytes against Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha and UV-Mediated Apoptosis?

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Ishraq; Fathallah, Ikbal; Accardi, Rosita; Yue, Jiping; Saidj, Djamel; Shukla, Ruchi; Hasan, Uzma; Gheit, Tarik; Niu, Yamei; Tommasino, Massimo; Sylla, Bakary S.

    2011-01-01

    Constitutive activation of NF-?B signaling is a key event in virus- and non-virus-induced carcinogenesis. We have previously reported that cutaneous human papillomavirus type 38 (HPV38) displays transforming properties in in vitro and in vivo experimental models. However, the involvement of NF-?B signaling in HPV38-induced cell growth transformation remains to be determined. In this study, we showed that HPV38 E6 and E7 activate NF-?B and that inhibition of the pathway with the I?B? superrepressor sensitizes HPV38E6E7-immortalized human keratinocytes to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?)- and UVB radiation-mediated apoptosis. Accordingly, inhibition of NF-?B signaling resulted in the downregulation of NF-?B-regulated antiapoptotic genes, including cIAP1, cIAP2, and xIAP genes. These findings demonstrate a critical role of NF-?B activity in the survival of HPV38E6E7-immortalized human keratinocytes exposed to cytokine or UV radiation. Our data provide additional evidence for cooperation between beta HPV infection and UV irradiation in skin carcinogenesis. PMID:21715489

  13. Enriques surfaces and root systems --Enriques surfaces of type E7 --

    E-print Network

    Mukai, Shigeru

    of S of type E7 is the same as that of a curve of genus two y2 = g1(x)g2(x)g3(x) with a G¨opel subgroup, where g1, g2, g3 are quadratic polynomials. An Enriques surface S of type E7 is birationally equivalent, the coefficients A1, A2, A3 are equal to D(g1)R(g2, g3), D(g2)R(g1, g3), D(g3)R(g1, g2) and D = {det(g1, g2, g3

  14. Minimal representations of E6, E7, and E8 and the generalized Capelli identity.

    PubMed Central

    Brylinski, R; Kostant, B

    1994-01-01

    We explicitly construct, in a uniform fashion, the (unique) minimal and spherical representation pi0 of the split real Lie group of exceptional type E6, E7, or E8. We obtain several algebraic and analytic results about pi0. PMID:11607467

  15. Molecular mobility of nematic E7 confined to molecular sieves with a low filling degree.

    PubMed

    Brás, A R; Frunza, S; Guerreiro, L; Fonseca, I M; Corma, A; Frunza, L; Dionísio, M; Schönhals, A

    2010-06-14

    The nematic liquid crystalline mixture E7 was confined with similar filling degrees to molecular sieves with constant composition but different pore diameters (from 2.8 to 6.8 nm). Fourier transform infrared analysis proved that the E7 molecules interact via the cyanogroup with the pore walls of the molecular sieves. The molecular dynamics of the system was investigated by broadband dielectric spectroscopy (10(-2)-10(9) Hz) covering a wide temperature range of approximately 200 K from temperatures well above the isotropic-nematic transition down to the glass transition of bulk E7. A variety of relaxation processes is observed including two modes that are located close to the bulk behavior in its temperature dependence. For all confined samples, two relaxation processes, at frequencies lower than the processes observed for the bulk, were detected. At lower temperatures, their relaxation rates have different temperature dependencies whereas at higher temperatures, they seem to collapse into one chart. The temperature dependence of the slowest process (S-process) obeys the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann law indicating a glassy dynamics of the E7 molecules anchored to the pore surface. The pore size dependence of both the Vogel temperature and fragility revealed a steplike transition around 4 nm pore size, which indicates a transition from a strong to a fragile behavior. The process with a relaxation rate in between the bulklike and the S-process (I-process) shows no dependence on the pore size. The agreement of the I-process with the behavior of a 5CB surface layer adsorbed on nonporous silica leads to the assignment of E7 molecules anchored at the outer surface of the microcrystals of the molecular sieves. PMID:20550409

  16. 1H and 15N resonance assignment, secondary structure and dynamic behaviour of the C-terminal domain of human papillomavirus oncoprotein E6.

    PubMed

    Nominé, Yves; Charbonnier, Sebastian; Miguet, Laurent; Potier, Noelle; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Atkinson, R Andrew; Travé, Gilles; Kieffer, Bruno

    2005-02-01

    E6 is a viral oncoprotein implicated in cervical cancers, produced by human papillomaviruses (HPVs). E6 contains two putative zinc-binding domains of about 75 residues each. The difficulty in producing recombinant E6 has long hindered the obtention of structural data. Recently, we described the expression and purification of E6-C 4C/4S, a stable, folded mutant of the C-terminal domain of HPV16 E6. Here, we have produced 15N-labelled samples of E6-C 4C/4S for structural studies by NMR. We have assigned most 1H and 15N resonances and identified the elements of secondary structure of the domain. The domain displays an original alpha/beta topology with roughly equal proportions of alpha-helix and beta-sheet. The PDZ-binding region of E6, located at the extreme C-terminus of the domain, is in a random conformation. Mass spectrometry demonstrated the presence of one zinc ion per protein molecule. Kinetics of replacement of zinc by cadmium followed by 1H,15N-HSQC experiments revealed specific frequency changes for the zinc-binding cysteines and their immediate neighbours. NMR spectra were affected by severe line-broadening effects which seriously hindered the assignment work. Investigation of these effects by 15N relaxation experiments showed that they are due to heterogeneous dynamic behaviour with mus-ms time scale motions occurring in localised regions of the monomeric domain. PMID:15772752

  17. Stabilization of SIRT7 deacetylase by viral oncoprotein HBx leads to inhibition of growth restrictive RPS7 gene and facilitates cellular transformation.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Vijaya; Kumar, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Sirtuin-7 (SIRT7) deacetylase exhibits a high selectivity for acetylated H3K18 and has been implicated in the maintenance of malignant phenotype. However, it remains unclear if SIRT7 and H3K18ac play a role in the tumorigenic program driven by oncogenic viruses. We show that ectopically expressed HBx oncoprotein of hepatitis B virus promoted intracellular stability of SIRT7 by salvaging it from ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation. HBx-dependent accumulation of SIRT7 favored H3K18 deacetylation and down-regulated the small ribosomal protein gene, RPS7, involved in cell death and DNA damage response. HBx facilitated the recruitment of SIRT7 to RPS7 promoter thus impeding H3K18ac occupancy and hindering RPS7 transcription. The antagonistic relationship between SIRT7 and RPS7 was also observed in the HBx transgenic mice, where elevated levels of SIRT7 protein were coincident with low levels of H3K18ac and RPS7. Strikingly, inhibition of cellular deubiquitinase activity restored RPS7 gene transcription. Further, depletion of endogenous SIRT7 led to decreased cell viability and transformation. The biological relevance of RPS7 suppression by HBx-SIRT7 axis was evident from ectopic expression of RPS7 which attenuated clonogenicity of cells. Thus, our findings suggest that SIRT7 is a critical regulator of HBx-driven oncogenic program, through its antagonistic impact on growth restrictive ribosomal protein RPS7. PMID:26442981

  18. Stabilization of SIRT7 deacetylase by viral oncoprotein HBx leads to inhibition of growth restrictive RPS7 gene and facilitates cellular transformation

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Vijaya; Kumar, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Sirtuin-7 (SIRT7) deacetylase exhibits a high selectivity for acetylated H3K18 and has been implicated in the maintenance of malignant phenotype. However, it remains unclear if SIRT7 and H3K18ac play a role in the tumorigenic program driven by oncogenic viruses. We show that ectopically expressed HBx oncoprotein of hepatitis B virus promoted intracellular stability of SIRT7 by salvaging it from ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation. HBx-dependent accumulation of SIRT7 favored H3K18 deacetylation and down-regulated the small ribosomal protein gene, RPS7, involved in cell death and DNA damage response. HBx facilitated the recruitment of SIRT7 to RPS7 promoter thus impeding H3K18ac occupancy and hindering RPS7 transcription. The antagonistic relationship between SIRT7 and RPS7 was also observed in the HBx transgenic mice, where elevated levels of SIRT7 protein were coincident with low levels of H3K18ac and RPS7. Strikingly, inhibition of cellular deubiquitinase activity restored RPS7 gene transcription. Further, depletion of endogenous SIRT7 led to decreased cell viability and transformation. The biological relevance of RPS7 suppression by HBx-SIRT7 axis was evident from ectopic expression of RPS7 which attenuated clonogenicity of cells. Thus, our findings suggest that SIRT7 is a critical regulator of HBx-driven oncogenic program, through its antagonistic impact on growth restrictive ribosomal protein RPS7. PMID:26442981

  19. Chitosan nanoparticles as a potential nonviral gene delivery for HPV-16 E7 into mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Tahamtan, Alireza; Tabarraei, Alijan; Moradi, Abdolvahab; Dinarvand, Meshkat; Kelishadi, Mishar; Ghaemi, Amir; Atyabi, Fatemeh

    2015-12-01

    Chitosan nanoparticles (CS NPs) were prepared as a carrier for Human papillomavirus type 16 HPV-16) E7 gene and their gene transfection ability were evaluated in vitro. The plasmid expressing green fluorescent protein (pEGFP) was used as a reporter gene. Gel electrophoresis demonstrated full binding of CS NPs with the pDNA. The transfection of CS-pEGFP NPs was efficient in CHO cells and the expression of green fluorescent proteins was well observed. The expression of E7 proteins was confirmed under SDS-PAGE and western blot analysis. As a conclusion CS NPs may serve as an effective nonviral carrier for delivery of nucleotides into eukaryotic cells. PMID:24641772

  20. Tyrosine B10 triggers a heme propionate hydrogen bonding network loop with glutamine E7 moiety

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos-Santana, Brenda J.; Lopez-Garriga, Juan

    2012-08-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H-bonding network loop by PheB10Tyr mutation is proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The propionate group H-bonding network restricted the flexibility of the heme. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The hydrogen bonding interaction modulates the electron density of the iron. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Propionate H-bonding network loop explains the heme-ligand stabilization. -- Abstract: Propionates, as peripheral groups of the heme active center in hemeproteins have been described to contribute in the modulation of heme reactivity and ligand selection. These electronic characteristics prompted the question of whether the presence of hydrogen bonding networks between propionates and distal amino acids present in the heme ligand moiety can modulate physiological relevant events, like ligand binding association and dissociation activities. Here, the role of these networks was evaluated by NMR spectroscopy using the hemoglobin I PheB10Tyr mutant from Lucina pectinata as model for TyrB10 and GlnE7 hemeproteins. {sup 1}H-NMR results for the rHbICN PheB10Tyr derivative showed chemical shifts of TyrB10 OH{eta} at 31.00 ppm, GlnE7 N{sub {epsilon}1}H/N{sub {epsilon}2}H at 10.66 ppm/-3.27 ppm, and PheE11 C{sub {delta}}H at 11.75 ppm, indicating the presence of a crowded, collapsed, and constrained distal pocket. Strong dipolar contacts and inter-residues crosspeaks between GlnE7/6-propionate group, GlnE7/TyrB10 and TyrB10/CN suggest that this hydrogen bonding network loop between GlnE7, TyrB10, 6-propionate group, and the heme ligand contribute significantly to the modulation of the heme iron electron density as well as the ligand stabilization mechanism. Therefore, the network loop presented here support the fact that the electron withdrawing character of the hydrogen bonding is controlled by the interaction of the propionates and the nearby electronic environments contributing to the modulation of the heme electron density state. Thus, we hypothesize that in hemeproteins with similar electrostatic environment the flexibility of the heme-6-propionate promotes a hydrogen bonding network loop between the 6-propionate, the heme ligand and nearby amino acids, tailoring in this way the electron density in the heme-ligand moiety.

  1. Lack of the canonical pRB-binding domain in the E7 ORF of artiodactyl papillomaviruses

    E-print Network

    DeSalle, Rob

    Lack of the canonical pRB-binding domain in the E7 ORF of artiodactyl papillomaviruses of papillomavirus (PV) E7 proteins has been implicated in the immortalization and transformation of the host cell. However, sequencing of the complete genomes of bovine papillomavirus type 3 (BPV-3), bovine papillomavirus

  2. 17 CFR 240.14e-7 - Unlawful tender offer practices in connection with roll-ups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Unlawful tender offer practices in connection with roll-ups. 240.14e-7 Section 240.14e-7 Commodity and Securities Exchanges... tender offer practices in connection with roll-ups. In order to implement section 14(h) of the Act (15...

  3. 17 CFR 240.14e-7 - Unlawful tender offer practices in connection with roll-ups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Unlawful tender offer practices in connection with roll-ups. 240.14e-7 Section 240.14e-7 Commodity and Securities Exchanges... tender offer practices in connection with roll-ups. In order to implement section 14(h) of the Act (15...

  4. 17 CFR 240.14e-7 - Unlawful tender offer practices in connection with roll-ups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Unlawful tender offer practices in connection with roll-ups. 240.14e-7 Section 240.14e-7 Commodity and Securities Exchanges... tender offer practices in connection with roll-ups. In order to implement section 14(h) of the Act (15...

  5. 17 CFR 240.14e-7 - Unlawful tender offer practices in connection with roll-ups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Unlawful tender offer practices in connection with roll-ups. 240.14e-7 Section 240.14e-7 Commodity and Securities Exchanges... tender offer practices in connection with roll-ups. In order to implement section 14(h) of the Act (15...

  6. 17 CFR 240.14e-7 - Unlawful tender offer practices in connection with roll-ups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Unlawful tender offer practices in connection with roll-ups. 240.14e-7 Section 240.14e-7 Commodity and Securities Exchanges... tender offer practices in connection with roll-ups. In order to implement section 14(h) of the Act (15...

  7. Bovine Papillomavirus Type 2 (BPV-2) E5 Oncoprotein Binds to the Subunit D of the V1-ATPase Proton Pump in Naturally Occurring Urothelial Tumors of the Urinary Bladder of Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Roperto, Sante; Russo, Valeria; Borzacchiello, Giuseppe; Urraro, Chiara; Lucà, Roberta; Esposito, Iolanda; Riccardi, Marita Georgia; Raso, Cinzia; Gaspari, Marco; Ceccarelli, Dora Maria; Galasso, Rocco; Roperto, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Background Active infection by bovine papillomavirus type 2 (BPV-2) was documented for fifteen urinary bladder tumors in cattle. Two were diagnosed as papillary urothelial neoplasm of low malignant potential (PUNLMP), nine as papillary and four as invasive urothelial cancers. Methods and Findings In all cancer samples, PCR analysis revealed a BPV-2-specific 503 bp DNA fragment. E5 protein, the major oncoprotein of the virus, was shown both by immunoprecipitation and immunohistochemical analysis. E5 was found to bind to the activated (phosphorylated) form of the platelet derived growth factor ? receptor. PDGF?R immunoprecipitation from bladder tumor samples and from normal bladder tissue used as control revealed a protein band which was present in the pull-down from bladder cancer samples only. The protein was identified with mass spectrometry as “V1-ATPase subunit D”, a component of the central stalk of the V1-ATPase vacuolar pump. The subunit D was confirmed in this complex by coimmunoprecipitation investigations and it was found to colocalize with the receptor. The subunit D was also shown to be overexpressed by Western blot, RT-PCR and immunofluorescence analyses. Immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence also revealed that E5 oncoprotein was bound to the subunit D. Conclusion For the first time, a tri-component complex composed of E5/PDGF?R/subunit D has been documented in vivo. Previous in vitro studies have shown that the BPV-2 E5 oncoprotein binds to the proteolipid c ring of the V0-ATPase sector. We suggest that the E5/PDGF?R/subunit D complex may perturb proteostasis, organelle and cytosol homeostasis, which can result in altered protein degradation and in autophagic responses. PMID:24586417

  8. The N-Myc oncoprotein is associated in vivo with the phosphoprotein Max(p20/22) in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, A; Cziepluch, C; Hamann, U; Schürmann, J; Schwab, M

    1991-01-01

    Proteins encoded by the proto-oncogenes c-myc, L-myc, and N-myc contain at their carboxy-terminus a tripartite segment comprising a basic DNA binding region (BR), a helix-loop-helix (HLH) and a leucine zipper motif (Zip), that are believed to be involved in DNA binding and protein-protein interaction. The N-Myc oncoprotein is overexpressed in certain human tumors that share neuroectodermal features due to amplification of the N-myc gene. Using a monoclonal antibody directed against an N-terminal epitope of the N-Myc protein in immunoprecipitations performed with extracts of neuroblastoma cells, two nuclear phosphoprotein, p20/22, forming a hetero-oligomeric complex with N-Myc are identified. Both proteins are phosphorylated by casein kinase II in vitro. By partial proteolytic maps we show that p20 and p22 are structurally related to each other and that p20 is identical with Max, a recently described in vitro binding partner of myc proteins. Time course experiments show the presence of the complex in cellular extracts immunoprecipitated within a 5 min interval after the preparation of the cell extract. While the expression of N-myc is restricted, expression of both Max(p20/22) and the murine homolog Myn(p20/22) was observed in cells of diverse human and murine embryonal lineages as detected by heterologous complex formation. By introduction of expression vectors containing the wild type N-myc gene or N-myc genes with in frame deletions or point mutations into recipient cells and subsequent immunoprecipitation of the resulting N-Myc proteins we show that the HLH-Zip region is essential to the formation of the N-Myc-p20/22 complex. Images PMID:1935896

  9. c-erbB-2 oncoprotein detected by automated quantitative immunocytochemistry in breast carcinomas correlates with patients' overall and disease-free survival.

    PubMed Central

    Charpin, C.; Garcia, S.; Bouvier, C.; Martini, F.; Lavaut, M. N.; Allasia, C.; Bonnier, P.; Andrac, L.

    1997-01-01

    The prognostic significance of c-erbB-2 oncoprotein overexpression detected in tumours by immunocytochemical assays (ICAs) was investigated in 148 breast carcinomas. ICAs were performed under optimal technical conditions with frozen tissue sections and included automated immunoperoxidase technique and computer-assisted analysis (densitometry) of digitized coloured microscopic images. Results of quantitative ICAs (expressed in percentages of c-erbB-2-positive surfaces and mean optical densities) were correlated with the patients' follow-up in axillary lymph node-positive (N+) and node-negative (N-) subgroups of patients. Patients' follow-up ranged from 9 months (for the first death) to 101 months (for the 121 alive patients) with a 62.5 months mean overall follow-up. It was shown that marked c-erbB-2 immunocytochemical expression in tumours (cut-off point 35%) significantly correlated with the patients' poor overall survival in N+ and in N- patients (Kaplan-Meier, log-rank test, P = 0.045 and P = 0.015). Also, marked c-erbB-2 immunohistochemical expression correlates with short disease-free (P = 0.005), recurrence-free (P = 0.048) and metastasis-free survival (P = 0.05) (Kaplan-Meier, log-rank test) in N+, but not in N- subgroups. It is concluded that in optimal conditions (automated and quantitative ICAs on frozen sections) c-erbB immunohistochemical expression is a significant prognostic indicator in terms of overall and disease-free survival. The c-erbB-2 protein prognostic significance is independent of node status in terms of overall survival, but not of disease-free survival. Images Figure 1 PMID:9184184

  10. Immunohistochemical demonstration of c-erbB-2 oncoprotein in gastric adenocarcinoma: comparison of cryostat and paraffin wax sections and effect of fixation.

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, K Y; Loke, S L; Ho, F C

    1994-01-01

    AIMS--To investigate the effects of fixation on the immunohistochemical demonstration of c-erbB-2 oncoprotein using paraffin wax and cryostat sections; to compare c-erbB-2 expression in non-neoplastic and neoplastic gastric tissues. METHODS--Adjacent blocks of tumour and non-neoplastic tissue from four gastrectomy specimens were put into a panel of 10 fixatives including acetone, B5, Bouin's fluid, Carnoy's fluid, buffered formalin, formol dichromate, zinc formalin, 4% paraformaldehyde, periodate-lysine-paraformaldehyde (PLP) and periodate-lysine-paraformaldehyde-dichromate (PLPD) before embedding in paraffin wax for sectioning. Similar tissue blocks were snap frozen and cryostat sections were postfixed in these fixatives, either alone or in combination, before immunostaining. RESULTS--In paraffin wax embedded sections the best fixative was PLP, and in frozen tissues the best results were obtained after fixation of cryostat sections in buffered formalin followed by cold methanol and acetone. Applying these fixatives to samples from a further 16 gastrectomy specimens, strong membrane staining of c-erbB-2 protein was found in the tumour in eight of 16 cases (50%) using paraffin wax sections, and staining was stronger in the better differentiated carcinomas. For frozen tissues, positive membrane staining was found in all gastric adenocarcinomas, but differential staining intensity associated with tumour differentiation could not be detected. CONCLUSIONS--These results indicate that fixation and paraffin wax embedding affect the results of immunohistochemical demonstration of c-erbB-2 in gastric cancer. The choice of fixative is critical in the demonstration and evaluation of c-erbB-2 protein expression by immunohistochemistry in gastric carcinomas. Staining results also vary depending on whether frozen or paraffin wax embedded tissues are studied. Images PMID:7907612

  11. Establishment of immunoassay for detecting HPV16 E6 and E7 RNA

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Sen; Qian, Steven Y.; Zhang, Yang; Wu, Wenlei; Lu, Gensheng; Lu, Yan; Feng, Xiujing; Li, Li; Shen, Pingping

    2015-01-01

    Cervical carcinoma is the most prevalent malignancy second only to breast cancer among women worldwide. Since more than 99% of cervical cancers are caused by human papilloma virus (HPV), measurement of HPV (HPV test) was commonly used in screening risk and/or early stage of cervical cancer as well as assessing the efficacies of the treatments that can decrease the incidence of cervical cancer. Many approaches that diagnose HPV infections have been developed, while most of them have distinct shortcomings. We here established a novel immunoassay method in which the pairs of unlabeled DNA probes firstly bind to HPV16 E6 and E7 RNAs to form the DNA-RNA hybrids, and the hybrids will subsequently be identified by S9.6 antibody. The sensitivity of this highly specific method can reach ~0.923?pg/mL and ~0.424?pg/mL of in vitro transcribed HPV16 E6 and E7 RNA, respectively, and reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification were no longer needed. Thus, our immunoassay approaches can precisely reflect the actually viral load that is related to the course of HPV infection. In addition, it has also fast and low cost characteristic feature. PMID:26333509

  12. The Hippo/YAP pathway interacts with EGFR signaling and HPV oncoproteins to regulate cervical cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    He, Chunbo; Mao, Dagan; Hua, Guohua; Lv, Xiangmin; Chen, Xingcheng; Angeletti, Peter C; Dong, Jixin; Remmenga, Steven W; Rodabaugh, Kerry J; Zhou, Jin; Lambert, Paul F; Yang, Peixin; Davis, John S; Wang, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The Hippo signaling pathway controls organ size and tumorigenesis through a kinase cascade that inactivates Yes-associated protein (YAP). Here, we show that YAP plays a central role in controlling the progression of cervical cancer. Our results suggest that YAP expression is associated with a poor prognosis for cervical cancer. TGF-? and amphiregulin (AREG), via EGFR, inhibit the Hippo signaling pathway and activate YAP to induce cervical cancer cell proliferation and migration. Activated YAP allows for up-regulation of TGF-?, AREG, and EGFR, forming a positive signaling loop to drive cervical cancer cell proliferation. HPV E6 protein, a major etiological molecule of cervical cancer, maintains high YAP protein levels in cervical cancer cells by preventing proteasome-dependent YAP degradation to drive cervical cancer cell proliferation. Results from human cervical cancer genomic databases and an accepted transgenic mouse model strongly support the clinical relevance of the discovered feed-forward signaling loop. Our study indicates that combined targeting of the Hippo and the ERBB signaling pathways represents a novel therapeutic strategy for prevention and treatment of cervical cancer. PMID:26417066

  13. c-Myc induces cellular susceptibility to the cytotoxic action of TNF-alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Klefstrom, J; Västrik, I; Saksela, E; Valle, J; Eilers, M; Alitalo, K

    1994-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) is a multifunctional cytokine which is cytotoxic for some tumor cells and transformed cells. The molecular mechanisms which render transformed and tumor cells sensitive to the cytotoxic action of TNF are unclear. We show here that an increased expression of the c-Myc oncoprotein strongly increases cellular sensitivity to TNF cytotoxicity. In Rat1A fibroblasts, which are resistant to TNF, the addition of TNF with a concomitant activation of a hormone-inducible c-Myc-estrogen receptor chimera (MycER) resulted in apoptotic cell death. Similarly, c-Myc overexpression enhanced the sensitivity of NIH3T3 fibroblasts to TNF-induced death. The c-Myc and TNF-induced apoptosis was inhibited by ectopic expression of the Bcl2 oncoprotein and by the free oxygen radical scavenging enzyme Mn superoxide dismutase. Furthermore, in highly TNF-sensitive fibrosarcoma cells, antisense c-myc oligodeoxynucleotides caused a specific inhibition of TNF cytotoxicity. Our results suggest that the deregulation of c-Myc, which is common in human tumors and tumor cell lines is one reason why these cells are TNF sensitive. Images PMID:7957110

  14. Ponatinib inhibits polyclonal drug-resistant KIT oncoproteins and shows therapeutic potential in heavily pretreated gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) patients

    PubMed Central

    Anjum, Rana; Vodala, Sadanand; Schrock, Alexa; Zhou, Tianjun; Serrano, Cesar; Eilers, Grant; Zhu, Meijun; Ketzer, Julia; Wardwell, Scott; Ning, Yaoyu; Song, Youngchul; Kohlmann, Anna; Wang, Frank; Clackson, Tim; Heinrich, Michael C.; Fletcher, Jonathan A.; Bauer, Sebastian; Rivera, Victor M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose KIT is the major oncogenic driver of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). Imatinib, sunitinib and regorafenib are approved therapies; however, efficacy is often limited by the acquisition of polyclonal secondary resistance mutations in KIT, with those located in the activation (A) loop (exons 17/18) being particularly problematic. Here we explored the KIT inhibitory activity of ponatinib in preclinical models and describe initial characterization of its activity in GIST patients. Experimental Design The cellular and in vivo activities of ponatinib, imatinib, sunitinib and regorafenib against mutant KIT were evaluated using an accelerated mutagenesis assay and a panel of engineered and GIST-derived cell lines. The ponatinib-KIT co-structure was also determined. The clinical activity of ponatinib was examined in three GIST patients previously treated with all 3 FDA-approved agents. Results In engineered and GIST-derived cell lines, ponatinib potently inhibited KIT exon 11 primary mutants and a range of secondary mutants, including those within the A-loop. Ponatinib also induced regression in engineered and GIST-derived tumor models containing these secondary mutations. In a mutagenesis screen, 40 nM ponatinib was sufficient to suppress outgrowth of all secondary mutants except V654A, which was suppressed at 80 nM. This inhibitory profile could be rationalized based on structural analyses. Ponatinib (30 mg daily) displayed encouraging clinical activity in two of three GIST patients. Conclusion Ponatinib possesses potent activity against most major clinically-relevant KIT mutants, and has demonstrated preliminary evidence of activity in patients with refractory GIST. These data strongly support further evaluation of ponatinib in GIST patients. PMID:25239608

  15. The E7 protein of the cottontail rabbit papillomavirus immortalizes normal rabbit keratinocytes and reduces pRb levels, while E6 cooperates in immortalization but neither degrades p53 nor binds E6AP

    SciTech Connect

    Ganzenmueller, Tina; Matthaei, Markus; Muench, Peter; Scheible, Michael; Iftner, Angelika; Hiller, Thomas; Leiprecht, Natalie; Probst, Sonja; Stubenrauch, Frank; Iftner, Thomas

    2008-03-15

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) cause cervical cancer and are associated with the development of non-melanoma skin cancer. A suitable animal model for papillomavirus-associated skin carcinogenesis is the infection of domestic rabbits with the cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV). As the immortalizing activity of CRPV genes in the natural target cells remains unknown, we investigated the properties of CRPV E6 and E7 in rabbit keratinocytes (RK) and their influence on the cell cycle. Interestingly, CRPV E7 immortalized RK after a cellular crisis but showed no such activity in human keratinocytes. Co-expressed CRPV E6 prevented cellular crisis. The HPV16 or CRPV E7 protein reduced rabbit pRb levels thereby causing rabbit p19{sup ARF} induction and accumulation of p53 without affecting cellular proliferation. Both CRPV E6 proteins failed to degrade rabbit p53 in vitro or to bind E6AP; however, p53 was still inducible by mitomycin C. In summary, CRPV E7 immortalizes rabbit keratinocytes in a species-specific manner and E6 contributes to immortalization without directly affecting p53.

  16. Detection of Immunoglobulin G against E7 of Human Papillomavirus in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Joh, Joongho; Kwon, Amy; Jenson, A. Bennett; Ghim, Shin-je; Kloecker, Goetz H.

    2013-01-01

    Background. A significant number of non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLC) have human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA integrated in their genome. This study sought to further establish HPV's possible etiologic link to NSCLC by evaluating an immune response to HPV's oncogene, E7, in patients with NSCLC. Patients and Methods. Antibodies (IgG) in serum against E7 for HPV 16 and 18 in 100 patients with NSCLC were examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results. Sixteen NSCLC patients were found to have a high titration of IgG for HPV oncogenic E7 protein. 23.5% of adenocarcinomas (AC,) and 15.4% of squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) were positive for IgG against HPV E7. HPV-18 (11%) had a slightly higher frequency than HPV-16 (6%). Of the six positive cases for HPV-16, 3 were AC, 2 SCC, and 1 NOS (not otherwise specified). For the 11 HPV-18 positives, 7 were AC, and 4 SCC. The one case with IgG against HPV 16 and 18 was AC. One case had high cross-reactive levels against E7 of HPV 16 and 18. Two (28%) of 7 patients who reported never smoking were positive for HPV, and 12 (13.6%) of 88 smokers were HPV positive. Conclusions. The study detected high levels of IgG against E7 in 16% of NSCLC patients. This adds evidence to a potential role of HPV in the pathogenesis of NSCLC. PMID:23533408

  17. Re: Account 2155-E7P10 -Deepwater Oil Spill sand-berm report Jack L Kindinger 0 Rebecca J Deckard 05/26/201006:08 PM

    E-print Network

    Re: Account 2155-E7P10 - Deepwater Oil Spill sand-berm report t Jack L Kindinger 0 Rebecca J Re: Account 2155-E7P10 -- Deepwater Oil spill sand-berm >, kcrutch > > > > > > > > Hey, Kim. > OS/26/2010 12:55 PM Re: Account 21SS-E7PIO -- Deepwater Oil Spill sand-berm > Just wanted

  18. Suppression of HPV E6 and E7 expression by BAF53 depletion in cervical cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kiwon; Lee, Ah-Young; Kwon, Yunhee Kim; Kwon, Hyockman

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} Integration of HPV into host genome critical for activation of E6 and E7 oncogenes. {yields} BAF53 is essential for higher-order chromatin structure. {yields} BAF53 knockdown suppresses E6 and E7 from HPV integrants, but not from episomal HPVs. {yields} BAF53 knockdown decreases H3K9Ac and H4K12Ac on P105 promoter of integrated HPV 18. {yields} BAF53 knockdown restores the p53-dependent signaling pathway in HeLa and SiHa cells. -- Abstract: Deregulation of the expression of human papillomavirus (HPV) oncogenes E6 and E7 plays a pivotal role in cervical carcinogenesis because the E6 and E7 proteins neutralize p53 and Rb tumor suppressor pathways, respectively. In approximately 90% of all cervical carcinomas, HPVs are found to be integrated into the host genome. Following integration, the core-enhancer element and P105 promoter that control expression of E6 and E7 adopt a chromatin structure that is different from that of episomal HPV, and this has been proposed to contribute to activation of E6 and E7 expression. However, the molecular basis underlying this chromatin structural change remains unknown. Previously, BAF53 has been shown to be essential for the integrity of higher-order chromatin structure and interchromosomal interactions. Here, we examined whether BAF53 is required for activated expression of E6 and E7 genes. We found that BAF53 knockdown led to suppression of expression of E6 and E7 genes from HPV integrants in cervical carcinoma cell lines HeLa and SiHa. Conversely, expression of transiently transfected HPV18-LCR-Luciferase was not suppressed by BAF53 knockdown. The level of the active histone marks H3K9Ac and H4K12Ac on the P105 promoter of integrated HPV 18 was decreased in BAF53 knockdown cells. BAF53 knockdown restored the p53-dependent signaling pathway in HeLa and SiHa cells. These results suggest that activated expression of the E6 and E7 genes of integrated HPV is dependent on BAF53-dependent higher-order chromatin structure or nuclear motor activity.

  19. Sensitivity to myc-induced apoptosis is retained in spontaneous and transplanted lymphomas of CD2-mycER mice.

    PubMed

    Blyth, K; Stewart, M; Bell, M; James, C; Evan, G; Neil, J C; Cameron, E R

    2000-02-10

    To study the effects of the Myc oncoprotein in a regulatable in vivo system, we generated lines of transgenic mice in which a tamoxifen inducible Myc fusion protein (c-mycER) is expressed under the control of the CD2 locus control region. Activation of the Myc oncoprotein resulted in both proliferation and apoptosis in vivo. Lines with a high transgene copy number developed spontaneous lymphomas at low frequency, but the tumour incidence was significantly increased with tamoxifen treatment. Surprisingly, we found that cellular sensitivity to Myc-induced apoptosis was retained in tumours from these mice and in most lymphoma cell lines, even when null for p53. Resistance to Myc-induced apoptosis could be conferred on these cells by co-expression of Bcl-2. However, acquired resistance is clearly not an obligatory progression event as sensitivity to apoptosis was retained in transplanted tumours in athymic mice. In conclusion, lymphomas arising in CD2-mycER mice retain the capacity to undergo apoptosis in response to Myc activation and show no phenotypic evidence of the presence of an active dominant inhibitor. PMID:10698495

  20. Velocity dispersions in galaxies. I - The E7 galaxy NGC 7332.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morton, D. C.; Chevalier, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    A coude spectrum of the E7 galaxy NGC 7332 with 0.9 A-resolution from 4186 to 4364 A was obtained with the Princeton SEC vidicon television camera and the Hale telescope. Comparisons with spectra of G and K giant stars, numerically broadened for various Maxwellian velocity distributions, give a dispersion velocity in the line of sight of 160 (plus or minus 20) km/sec with the best fit at G8 III. The dispersion appears to be constant within plus or minus 35 km/sec out to 1.4 kpc. After correction for projection, the rotation curve has a slope of 0.18 km/sec per pc at the center and a velocity of 130 km/sec at 1.4 kpc where it is still increasing. For an estimated effective radius of 3.5 kpc enclosing half the light, the virial theorem gives a mass of 140 billion solar masses if the mass-to-light ratio is constant throughout the galaxy.

  1. Creation of Matter in the Universe and Groups of Type E7

    E-print Network

    Sergio Ferrara; Renata Kallosh

    2011-11-26

    We relate the mechanism of matter creation in the universe after inflation to a simple and universal mathematical property of extended N > 1 supergravities and related compactifications of superstring theory. We show that in all such models, the inflaton field may decay into vector fields due to a nonminimal scalar-vector coupling. This coupling is compulsory for all scalars except N=2 hyperscalars. The proof is based on the fact that all extended supergravities described by symmetric coset spaces G/H have duality groups G of type E7, with exception of U(p,n) models. For N=2 we prove separately that special geometry requires a non-minimal scalar-vector coupling. Upon truncation to N=1 supergravity, extended models generically preserve the non-minimal scalar-vector coupling, with exception of U(p,n) models and hyperscalars. For some string theory/supergravity inflationary models, this coupling provides the only way to complete the process of creation of matter in the early universe.

  2. The nuclear localization of low risk HPV11 E7 protein mediated by its zinc binding domain is independent of nuclear import receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Piccioli, Zachary; McKee, Courtney H.; Leszczynski, Anna; Onder, Zeynep; Hannah, Erin C.; Mamoor, Shahan; Crosby, Lauren; Moroianu, Junona

    2010-11-10

    We investigated the nuclear import of low risk HPV11 E7 protein using 1) transfection assays in HeLa cells with EGFP fusion plasmids containing 11E7 and its domains and 2) nuclear import assays in digitonin-permeabilized HeLa cells with GST fusion proteins containing 11E7 and its domains. The EGFP-11E7 and EGFP-11cE7{sub 39-98} localized mostly to the nucleus. The GST-11E7 and GST-11cE7{sub 39-98} were imported into the nuclei in the presence of either Ran-GDP or RanG19V-GTP mutant and in the absence of nuclear import receptors. This suggests that 11E7 enters the nucleus via a Ran-dependent pathway, independent of nuclear import receptors, mediated by a nuclear localization signal located in its C-terminal domain (cNLS). This cNLS contains the zinc binding domain consisting of two copies of Cys-X-X-Cys motif. Mutagenesis of Cys residues in these motifs changed the localization of the EGFP-11cE7/-11E7 mutants to cytoplasmic, suggesting that the zinc binding domain is essential for nuclear localization of 11E7.

  3. Oncoprotein protein kinase antibody kit

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael (San Diego, CA); Hibi, Masahiko (San Diego, CA); Lin, Anning (La Jolla, CA)

    2008-12-23

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  4. Why there are no elliptical galaxies more flattened than E7: thirty years later

    E-print Network

    R. Caimmi

    2007-04-24

    Elliptical galaxies are modelled as homeoidally striated Jacobi ellipsoids where the peculiar velocity distribution is anisotropic, or equivalently as their adjoints configurations i.e. classical Jacobi ellipsoids of equal mass and axes, in real or imaginary rotation. Reasons for the coincidence of bifurcation points from axisymmetric to triaxial configurations in both the sequences, contrary to earlier findings, are presented and discussed. The effect of centrifugal support at the ends of the major equatorial axis, is briefly outlined. The existence of a lower limit to the flattening of elliptical galaxies is investigated in dealing with a number of limiting situations. More specifically, (i) elliptical galaxies are considered as isolated systems, and an allowed region within Ellipsoidland, related to the occurrence of bifurcation points from ellipsoidal to pear-shaped configurations, is shown to be consistent with observations; (ii) elliptical galaxies are considered as embedded within dark matter haloes and, under reasonable assumptions, it is shown that tidal effects from hosting haloes have little influence on the above mentioned results; (iii) dark matter haloes and embedded elliptical galaxies, idealized as a single homeoidally striated Jacobi ellipsoid, are considered in connection with the cosmological transition from expansion to relaxation, by generalizing an earlier model, and the existence of a lower limit to the flattening of relaxed (oblate-like) configurations, is established. On the other hand, no lower limit is found to the elongation of relaxed (prolate-like) configurations, and the observed lack of elliptical galaxies more elongated than E7 needs a different physical interpretation, such as the fully investigated bending instabilities.

  5. FALL SPRING FALL SPRING FALL E7 ME 40 ME 106 EE 16A ME 102B DESIGN COURSES

    E-print Network

    Frenklach, Michael

    FALL SPRING FALL SPRING FALL E7 ME 40 ME 106 EE 16A ME 102B DESIGN COURSES 4 3 3 4 4 E 117 E128 (E # UNITS Prerequisite IMPORTANT NOTES: · Math 53 & 54 must be completed prior to entering an upper div ME

  6. FALL SPRING FALL SPRING FALL E7 ME 40 ME 106 ME 102A ME 102B DESIGN COURSES

    E-print Network

    Frenklach, Michael

    FALL SPRING FALL SPRING FALL E7 ME 40 ME 106 ME 102A ME 102B DESIGN COURSES 4 3 3 4 4 E 117 E128 (E # UNITS Prerequisite IMPORTANT NOTES: · Math 53 & 54 must be completed prior to entering an upper div ME

  7. Neocarzinostatin induces an effective p53-dependent response in human papillomavirus-positive cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bañuelos, Adriana; Reyes, Elba; Ocadiz, Rodolfo; Alvarez, Elizabeth; Moreno, Martha; Monroy, Alberto; Gariglio, Patricio

    2003-08-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 viral oncoprotein plays an important role during cervical carcinogenesis. This oncoprotein binds the tumor suppressor protein p53, leading to its degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Therefore, it is generally assumed that in HPV-positive cancer cells p53 function is completely abolished. Nevertheless, recent findings suggest that p53 activity can be recovered in cells expressing endogenous E6 protein. To investigate whether p53-dependent functions controlling genome integrity, cell proliferation, and apoptosis can be reactivated in cervical cancer cells, we examined the capacity of HeLa, INBL, CaSki, C33A, and ViBo cell lines to respond to neocarzinostatin (NCS), a natural product which induces single- and double-strand breaks in DNA. We found that NCS treatment inhibits cellular proliferation through G2 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction. This effect was preceded by nuclear accumulation of p53 protein and by an increase of p21 transcripts. Although apoptosis was blocked in ViBo cells (HPV-negative), nuclear accumulation of transcriptionally active p53 and inhibition of cell proliferation are observed after NCS treatment. These results suggest that HPV-positive cervical cancer cells are capable of responding efficiently to DNA damage provoked by NCS treatment through a p53-dependent pathway in spite of the presence of E6 protein. PMID:12750435

  8. Dose-dependent effects of selenite (Se4+) on arsenite (As3+)-induced apoptosis and differentiation in acute promyelocytic leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, S; Geng, Z; Shi, N; Li, X; Wang, Z

    2015-01-01

    To enhance the therapeutic effects and decrease the adverse effects of arsenic on the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia, we investigated the co-effects of selenite (Se4+) and arsenite (As3+) on the apoptosis and differentiation of NB4 cells and primary APL cells. A 1.0-?M concentration of Se4+ prevented the cells from undergoing As3+-induced apoptosis by inhibiting As3+ uptake, eliminating As3+-generated reactive oxygen species, and repressing the mitochondria-mediated intrinsic apoptosis pathway. However, 4.0??M Se4+ exerted synergistic effects with As3+ on cell apoptosis by promoting As3+ uptake, downregulating nuclear factor-?B, and activating caspase-3. In addition to apoptosis, 1.0 and 3.2??M Se4+ showed contrasting effects on As3+-induced differentiation in NB4 cells and primary APL cells. The 3.2??M Se4+ enhanced As3+-induced differentiation by promoting the degradation of promyelocytic leukemia protein–retinoic acid receptor-? (PML–RAR?) oncoprotein, but 1.0??M Se4+ did not have this effect. Based on mechanistic studies, Se4+, which is similar to As3+, might bind directly to Zn2+-binding sites of the PML RING domain, thus controlling the fate of PML–RAR? oncoprotein. PMID:25590806

  9. Chemo-immunotherapy using saffron and its ingredients followed by E7-NT (gp96) DNA vaccine generates different anti-tumor effects against tumors expressing the E7 protein of human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Khavari, Afshin; Bolhassani, Azam; Alizadeh, Fatemeh; Bathaie, S Zahra; Balaram, Prabha; Agi, Elnaz; Vahabpour, Rouhollah

    2015-02-01

    Saffron and its components have been suggested as promising candidates for cancer prevention. Carotenoids and monoterpene aldehydes are two potent ingredients of saffron. The goal of the current study was to investigate the anti-tumor effect of chemo-immunotherapy using saffron and its ingredients followed by E7-NT (gp96) DNA vaccine against tumors expressing the E7 protein of human papillomavirus. The in vitro cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of aqueous saffron extract and its components were evaluated in malignant TC-1 and non-malignant COS-7 cell lines. Then, multimodality treatments using E7-NT (gp96) DNA vaccine combined with saffron extract and its ingredients as well as single-modality treatments were tested for their efficacy in inhibiting large and bulky tumor growth. Saffron and its components exerted a considerable anti-tumor effect through prevention of cell growth and stimulation of programmed cell death. Furthermore, 100 % of mice treated with crocin were tumor-free, in contrast to DNA vaccine alone (~66.7 %) and DNA + crocin (~33.3 %) indicating the high potency of crocin as a chemotherapeutic agent. Interestingly, the multimodality treatment using DNA vaccine along with picrocrocin augmented the anti-tumor effects of picrocrocin. Thus, the combination of DNA vaccine with saffron extract and crocin at certain concentrations did not potentiate protective and therapeutic effects compared to mono-therapies for the control of TC-1 tumors. PMID:25395243

  10. Rational R-matrices, centralizer algebras and tensor identities for e6 and e7 exceptional families of Lie algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKay, N. J.; Taylor, A.

    2007-10-01

    We use Cvitanovi?'s [Group Theory (Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ, in press) (http://www.nbi.dk/GroupTheory/); Phys. Rev. D 14, 1536 (1976)] diagrammatic techniques to construct the rational solutions of the Yang-Baxter equation [Yang-Baxter Equation in Integrable Systems, edited by M. Jimbo, Advanced Series in Mathematical Physics Vol. 10 (World scientific, Singapore, 1990)] associated with the e6 and e7 families of Lie algebras, and thus explain Westbury's [J. Phys. A 36, 2857 (2003)] observations about their uniform spectral decompositions. In doing so, we explore the extensions of the Brauer and symmetric group algebras to the centralizer algebras of e7 and e6 on their lowest-dimensional representations and (up to threefold) tensor products thereof, giving bases for them and a range of identities satisfied by the algebras' defining invariant tensors.

  11. Primary human cervical carcinoma cells require human papillomavirus E6 and E7 expression for ongoing proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Magaldi, Thomas G.; Almstead, Laura L.; Bellone, Stefania; Prevatt, Edward G.; Santin, Alessandro D.; Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center, P.O. Box 208028, New Haven, CT 06520-8028 ; DiMaio, Daniel; Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, P.O. Box 208040, New Haven, CT 06520-8040; Department of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry, Yale School of Medicine, P.O. Box 208024; Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center, P.O. Box 208028, New Haven, CT 06520-8028

    2012-01-05

    Repression of human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 and E7 oncogenes in established cervical carcinoma cell lines causes senescence due to reactivation of cellular tumor suppressor pathways. Here, we determined whether ongoing expression of HPV16 or HPV18 oncogenes is required for the proliferation of primary human cervical carcinoma cells in serum-free conditions at low passage number after isolation from patients. We used an SV40 viral vector expressing the bovine papillomavirus E2 protein to repress E6 and E7 in these cells. To enable efficient SV40 infection and E2 gene delivery, we first incubated the primary cervical cancer cells with the ganglioside GM1, a cell-surface receptor for SV40 that is limiting in these cells. Repression of HPV in primary cervical carcinoma cells caused them to undergo senescence, but the E2 protein had little effect on HPV-negative primary cells. These data suggest that E6 and E7 dependence is an inherent property of human cervical cancer cells.

  12. O2 and Water Migration Pathways between the Solvent and Heme Pockets of Hemoglobin with Open and Closed Conformations of the Distal HisE7.

    PubMed

    Shadrina, Maria S; Peslherbe, Gilles H; English, Ann M

    2015-09-01

    Hemoglobin transports O2 by binding the gas at its four hemes. Hydrogen bonding between the distal histidine (HisE7) and heme-bound O2 significantly increases the affinity of human hemoglobin (HbA) for this ligand. HisE7 is also proposed to regulate the release of O2 to the solvent via a transient E7 channel. To reveal the O2 escape routes controlled by HisE7 and to evaluate its role in gating heme access, we compare simulations of O2 diffusion from the distal heme pockets of the T and R states of HbA performed with HisE7 in its open (protonated) and closed (neutral) conformations. Irrespective of HisE7's conformation, we observe the same four or five escape routes leading directly from the ?- or ?-distal heme pockets to the solvent. Only 21-53% of O2 escapes occur via these routes, with the remainder escaping through routes that encompass multiple internal cavities in HbA. The conformation of the distal HisE7 controls the escape of O2 from the heme by altering the distal pocket architecture in a pH-dependent manner, not by gating the E7 channel. Removal of the HisE7 side chain in the GlyE7 variant exposes the distal pockets to the solvent, and the percentage of O2 escapes to the solvent directly from the ?- or ?-distal pockets of the mutant increases to 70-88%. In contrast to O2, the dominant water route from the bulk solvent is gated by HisE7 because protonation and opening of this residue dramatically increase the rate of influx of water into the empty distal heme pockets. The occupancy of the distal heme site by a water molecule, which functions as an additional nonprotein barrier to binding of the ligand to the heme, is also controlled by HisE7. Overall, analysis of gas and water diffusion routes in the subunits of HbA and its GlyE7 variant sheds light on the contribution of distal HisE7 in controlling polar and nonpolar ligand movement between the solvent and the hemes. PMID:26226401

  13. HBx protein modulates PI3K/Akt pathway to overcome genotoxic stress-induced destabilization of cyclin D1 and arrest of cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Mukherji, A; Janbandhu, V C; Kumar, V

    2009-02-01

    Growth arrest represents an innate barrier to carcinogenesis. DNA damage and replicational stress are known to induce growth arrest and apoptotic death to avert genomic instability and consequently carcinogenesis. In this study, working on the genotoxic stress induced by hydroxyurea and methylmethanesulfone, we observed a growth arrest at G1/S-phase that was mediated by destabilization of cyclin D1. The growth arrest was independent of the stability of cdc25A and preceded transcriptional up-regulation of p21(waf1). Cyclin D1 destabilization involved its phosphorylation by GSK-3beta at threonine-286, since overexpression of the kinase-dead mutant of GSK-3beta or cyclin D1T(286A) Inutant conferred stability to cyclin D1. Further, overexpression of cyclin D1(T286A) also helped in bypassing G1/S phase growth arrest. We also observed a rapid inactivation of Akt/PKB kinase in the presence of hydroxyurea. Enforced expression of the constitutively active Akt or viral oncoprotein HBx (Hepatitis B virus X protein) was sufficient to overcome growth arrest, independent of ATR signaling and stabilized cyclin D1. Thus, the present work not only establishes cyclin D1 to be a novel mediator of genotoxic stress signaling, but also explains how a deregulated mitogenic signaling or a viral oncoprotein can help bypass growth arrest. PMID:19374252

  14. Regulation of the tumor marker Fascin by the viral oncoprotein Tax of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) depends on promoter activation and on a promoter-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Caroline F; Gross, Christine; Bros, Matthias; Reske-Kunz, Angelika B; Biesinger, Brigitte; Thoma-Kress, Andrea K

    2015-11-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma is a highly infiltrative neoplasia of CD4(+) T-lymphocytes that occurs in about 5% of carriers infected with the deltaretrovirus human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1). The viral oncoprotein Tax perturbs cellular signaling pathways leading to upregulation of host cell factors, amongst them the actin-bundling protein Fascin, an invasion marker of several types of cancer. However, transcriptional regulation of Fascin by Tax is poorly understood. In this study, we identified a triple mode of transcriptional induction of Fascin by Tax, which requires (1) NF-?B-dependent promoter activation, (2) a Tax-responsive region in the Fascin promoter, and (3) a promoter-independent mechanism sensitive to the Src family kinase inhibitor PP2. Thus, Tax regulates Fascin by a multitude of signals. Beyond, using Tax-expressing and virus-transformed lymphocytes as a model system, our study is the first to identify the invasion marker Fascin as a novel target of PP2, an inhibitor of metastasis. PMID:26363219

  15. Rearrangement of the distal pocket accompanying E7 His yields Gln substitution in elephant carbonmonoxy- and oxymyoglobin: sup 1 H NMR identification of a new aromatic residue in the heme pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, L.P.; La Mar, G.N. ); Mizukami, H. )

    1990-03-13

    Two-dimensional {sup 1}H NMR methods have been used to assign side-chain resonances for the residues in the distal heme pocket of elephant carbonmonoxymyoglobin (MbCO) and oxymyoglobin (MbO{sub 2}). It is shown that, while the other residues in the heme pocket are minimally perturbed, the Phe CD4 residue in elephant MbCO and MbO{sub 2} resonates considerably upfield compared to the corresponding residue in sperm whale MbCO. The new NOE connectivities to Val E11 and heme-induced ring current calculations indicate that Phe CD4 has been inserted into the distal heme pocket by reorienting the aromatic side chain and moving the CD corner closer to the heme. The C{zeta}H proton of the Phe CD4 was found to move toward the iron of the heme by {approximately}4 {angstrom} relative to the position in sperm whale MbCO, requiring minimally a 3-{angstrom} movement of the CD helical backbone. The significantly altered distal conformation in elephant myoglobin, rather than the single distal E7 substitution, forms a plausible basis for its altered functional properties of lower autoxidation rate, higher redox potential, and increased affinity for CO ligand. These results demonstrate that one-to-one interpretation of amino acid residue substitution (E7 His {yields} Gln) is oversimplified and that conformational changes of substituted proteins which are not readily predicted have to be considered for interpretation of their functional properties.

  16. A C-terminal Hydrophobic, Solvent-protected Core and a Flexible N-terminus are Potentially Required for Human Papillomavirus 18 E7 Protein Functionality

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.; Tian, Y; Greenaway, F; Sun, M

    2010-01-01

    The oncogenic potential of the high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) relies on the expression of genes specifying the E7 and E6 proteins. To investigate further the variation in oligomeric structure that has been reported for different E7 proteins, an HPV-18 E7 cloned from a Hispanic woman with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia was purified to homogeneity most probably as a stable monomeric protein in aqueous solution. We determined that one zinc ion is present per HPV-18 E7 monomer by amino acid and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy analysis. Intrinsic fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopic results indicate that the zinc ion is important for the correct folding and thermal stability of HPV-18 E7. Hydroxyl radical mediated protein footprinting coupled to mass spectrometry and other biochemical and biophysical data indicate that near the C-terminus, the four cysteines of the two Cys-X{sub 2}-Cys motifs that are coordinated to the zinc ion form a solvent inaccessible core. The N-terminal LXCXE pRb binding motif region is hydroxyl radical accessible and conformationally flexible. Both factors, the relative flexibility of the pRb binding motif at the N-terminus and the C-terminal metal-binding hydrophobic solvent-protected core, combine together and facilitate the biological functions of HPV-18 E7.

  17. The c-MYC oncoprotein, the NAMPT enzyme, the SIRT1-inhibitor DBC1, and the SIRT1 deacetylase form a positive feedback loop.

    PubMed

    Menssen, Antje; Hydbring, Per; Kapelle, Karsten; Vervoorts, Jörg; Diebold, Joachim; Lüscher, Bernhard; Larsson, Lars-Gunnar; Hermeking, Heiko

    2012-01-24

    Silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1) represents an NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase that inhibits proapoptotic factors including p53. Here we determined whether SIRT1 is downstream of the prototypic c-MYC oncogene, which is activated in the majority of tumors. Elevated expression of c-MYC in human colorectal cancer correlated with increased SIRT1 protein levels. Activation of a conditional c-MYC allele induced increased levels of SIRT1 protein, NAD(+), and nicotinamide-phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) mRNA in several cell types. This increase in SIRT1 required the induction of the NAMPT gene by c-MYC. NAMPT is the rate-limiting enzyme of the NAD(+) salvage pathway and enhances SIRT1 activity by increasing the amount of NAD(+). c-MYC also contributed to SIRT1 activation by sequestering the SIRT1 inhibitor deleted in breast cancer 1 (DBC1) from the SIRT1 protein. In primary human fibroblasts previously immortalized by introduction of c-MYC, down-regulation of SIRT1 induced senescence and apoptosis. In various cell lines inactivation of SIRT1 by RNA interference, chemical inhibitors, or ectopic DBC1 enhanced c-MYC-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, SIRT1 directly bound to and deacetylated c-MYC. Enforced SIRT1 expression increased and depletion/inhibition of SIRT1 reduced c-MYC stability. Depletion/inhibition of SIRT1 correlated with reduced lysine 63-linked polyubiquitination of c-Myc, which presumably destabilizes c-MYC by supporting degradative lysine 48-linked polyubiquitination. Moreover, SIRT1 enhanced the transcriptional activity of c-MYC. Taken together, these results show that c-MYC activates SIRT1, which in turn promotes c-MYC function. Furthermore, SIRT1 suppressed cellular senescence in cells with deregulated c-MYC expression and also inhibited c-MYC-induced apoptosis. Constitutive activation of this positive feedback loop may contribute to the development and maintenance of tumors in the context of deregulated c-MYC. PMID:22190494

  18. Nonlinear optical refraction of the dye-doped E7 thermotropic liquid crystal at the nematic-isotropic phase transition

    E-print Network

    Vinicius M. Lenart; Gerson K. da Cruz; Sergio L. Gómez; Rozane F. Turchiello; Ivan H. Bechtold; Andre A. Vieira; Hugo Gallardo

    2013-04-16

    It is known that the doping of liquid crystal with dyes usually changes the physical properties of the host, like the transition temperatures and the optical absorption among others. In this work we report a study of the nonlinear optical refraction of a dye doped sample of the E7 thermotropic liquid crystal by the Z-scan technique. It was found that the nonlinear refraction of the sample is higher than the undoped one, diverging at the clearing point. Close to the N-I transition, the nonlinear birefringence is characterized by a critical exponent that seams to confirm the tricritical hypothesis of the nature of the N-I phase transition, being independent of the doping.

  19. 1E7-03, a low MW compound targeting host protein phosphatase-1, inhibits HIV-1 transcription

    PubMed Central

    Ammosova, Tatyana; Platonov, Maxim; Ivanov, Andrei; Kont, Yasemin Saygide?er; Kumari, Namita; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Jerebtsova, Marina; Kulkarni, Amol A; Üren, Aykut; Kovalskyy, Dmytro; Nekhai, Sergei

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose HIV-1 transcription is activated by the Tat protein which recruits the cyclin-dependent kinase CDK9/cyclin T1 to TAR RNA. Tat binds to protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) through the Q35VCF38 sequence and translocates PP1 to the nucleus. PP1 dephosphorylates CDK9 and activates HIV-1 transcription. We have synthesized a low MW compound 1H4, that targets PP1 and prevents HIV-1 Tat interaction with PP1 and inhibits HIV-1 gene transcription. Here, we report our further work with the 1H4-derived compounds and analysis of their mechanism of action. Experimental Approach Using the 1H4-PP1 complex as a model, we iteratively designed and synthesized follow-up libraries that were analysed for the inhibition of HIV-1 transcription and toxicity. We also confirmed the mechanism of action of the PP1-targeting molecules by determining the affinity of binding of these molecules to PP1, by analysing their effects on PP1 activity, disruption of PP1 binding to Tat and shuttling of PP1 to the nucleus. Key Results We identified a tetrahydroquinoline derivative, compound 7, which disrupted the interaction of Tat with PP1. We further optimized compound 7 and obtained compound 7c, renamed 1E7-03, which inhibited HIV-1 with low IC50 (fivefold lower than the previously reported compound, 1H4), showed no cytotoxicity and displayed a plasma half-life greater than 8 h in mice. 1E7-03 bound to PP1?in vitro and prevented shuttling of PP1 into the nucleus. Conclusions and Implications Our study shows that low MW compounds that functionally mimic the PP1-binding RVxF peptide can inhibit HIV-1 transcription by deregulating PP1. PMID:25073485

  20. A natural HIV p17 protein variant up-regulates the LMP-1 EBV oncoprotein and promotes the growth of EBV-infected B-lymphocytes: implications for EBV-driven lymphomagenesis in the HIV setting.

    PubMed

    Martorelli, Debora; Muraro, Elena; Mastorci, Katy; Dal Col, Jessica; Faè, Damiana Antonia; Furlan, Chiara; Giagulli, Cinzia; Caccuri, Francesca; Rusnati, Marco; Fiorentini, Simona; Carbone, Antonino; Caruso, Arnaldo; Dolcetti, Riccardo

    2015-09-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus p17 matrix protein is released by infected cells and may accumulate within lymphoid tissues where it may deregulate the biological activities of different cell populations by binding to CXCR1 and CXCR2 cellular receptors. S75X, a natural p17 variant, was recently shown to enhance the malignant properties of lymphoma cells. We investigated a reference p17 protein and the S75X variant for their ability to bind to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected primary and fully transformed B-lymphocytes and trigger downstream effects of potential pathogenic relevance. We demonstrate that EBV infection of primary B-lymphocytes or the ectopic expression of the latent membrane protein-1 viral oncoprotein in EBV-negative B-cells up-regulates CXCR2, but not CXCR1. Multispectral imaging flow cytometry showed that EBV-infected primary B-cells more efficiently bind and internalize p17 proteins as compared with activated B-lymphocytes. The S75X variant bound more efficiently to EBV-infected primary and fully transformed B-lymphocytes compared with reference p17, because of a higher affinity to CXCR2, and enhanced the proliferation of these cells, an effect associated with cyclin D2 and D3 up-regulation and increased interleukin-6 production. Notably, the S75X variant markedly up-regulated latent membrane protein-1 expression at both mRNA and protein levels and enhanced the activation of Akt, ERK1/2 and STAT3 signaling, thereby contributing to EBV(+) B-cell growth promotion. These results indicate that EBV infection sensitizes B-lymphocytes to CXCR2-mediated effects of p17 proteins and provide evidence supporting a possible contribution of natural p17 variants to EBV-driven lymphomagenesis in the human immunodeficiency virus setting. PMID:25704763

  1. Development of a Multiplex PCR Test with Automated Genotyping Targeting E7 for Detection of Six High-Risk Human Papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    de Assis, Angela Maria

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is caused by high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPV) and viral detection tests aid in the diagnosis of precursor lesions. In the present study, a molecular test for detection of high-risk HPV DNA, called E7-HPV, was standardized and assessed in samples from women with pre-cancerous lesions. The development of the E7-HPV test for detection and genotyping of six high-risk HPV (types 16, 18, 31, 33, 45 and 52), consisted of evaluating primer quality and adjusting the multiplex PCR conditions. Primer design was based on the E7 region of each HPV, and the fluorochrome 6-FAM was added to PCR primers. Viral detection was performed by capillary electrophoresis in automated sequencer in samples obtained from 60 women (55 with ASC-H/HSIL cytology) from August to September 2013. A non-inferiority analysis was conducted with the cobas HPV test as a reference and following international guidelines for the development of new tests. The two tests had a high concordance rate in HPV16 detection (kappa=0.972), with only one discordant case (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3, negaive with cobas and positive for HPV16 by E7-HPV) and complete agreement in HPV18 detection. When comparing detection of all high-risk HPV, three cases were positive with cobas but negative with E7-HPV, and another three cases were negative with cobas but positive with E7-HPV (HPV16, 31 and 52). When we evaluate the cases initially suspected by cytology, the two tests had the same sensitivity in detection CIN2 or worse. In conclusion, the E7-HPV test has satisfactory initial results, and its development can be continued. PMID:26087285

  2. Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor Signaling Dramatically Accelerates Tumorigenesis and Enhances Oncoprotein Translation in the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus–Wnt-1 Mouse Model of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pond, Adam C.; Herschkowitz, Jason I.; Schwertfeger, Kathryn L.; Welm, Bryan; Zhang, Yiqun; York, Brian; Cardiff, Robert D.; Hilsenbeck, Susan; Perou, Charles M.; Creighton, Chad J.; Lloyd, Richard E.; Rosen, Jeffrey M.

    2010-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) cooperates with the Wnt/?-catenin pathway to promote mammary tumorigenesis. To investigate the mechanisms involved in FGF/Wnt cooperation, we genetically engineered a model of inducible FGF receptor (iFGFR) signaling in the context of the well-established mouse mammary tumor virus–Wnt-1 transgenic mouse. In the bigenic mice, iFGFR1 activation dramatically enhanced mammary tumorigenesis. Expression microarray analysis did not show transcriptional enhancement of Wnt/?-catenin target genes but instead showed a translational gene signature that also correlated with elevated FGFR1 and FGFR2 in human breast cancer data sets. Additionally, iFGFR1 activation enhanced recruitment of RNA to polysomes, resulting in a marked increase in protein expression of several different Wnt/?-catenin target genes. FGF pathway activation stimulated extracellular signal-regulated kinase and the phosphorylation of key translation regulators both in vivo in the mouse model and in vitro in a human breast cancer cell line. Our results suggest that cooperation of the FGF and Wnt pathways in mammary tumorigenesis is based on the activation of protein translational pathways that result in, but are not limited to, increased expression of Wnt/?-catenin target genes (at the level of protein translation). Further, they reveal protein translation initiation factors as potential therapeutic targets for human breast cancers with alterations in FGF signaling. PMID:20501844

  3. Tattoo Delivery of a Semliki Forest Virus-Based Vaccine Encoding Human Papillomavirus E6 and E7

    PubMed Central

    van de Wall, Stephanie; Walczak, Mateusz; van Rooij, Nienke; Hoogeboom, Baukje-Nynke; Meijerhof, Tjarko; Nijman, Hans W.; Daemen, Toos

    2015-01-01

    The skin is an attractive organ for immunization because of the presence of antigen-presenting cells. Intradermal delivery via tattooing has demonstrated superior vaccine immunogenicity of DNA vaccines in comparison to conventional delivery methods. In this study, we explored the efficacy of tattoo injection of a tumor vaccine based on recombinant Semliki Forest virus replicon particles (rSFV) targeting human papillomavirus (HPV). Tattoo injection of rSFV particles resulted in antigen expression in both the skin and draining lymph nodes. In comparison with intramuscular injection, the overall antigen expression determined at the site of administration and draining lymph nodes was 10-fold lower upon tattoo injection. Delivery of SFV particles encoding the E6 and E7 antigens of human papillomavirus type 16 (SFVeE6,7) via tattooing resulted in HPV-specific cytotoxic T cells and in vivo therapeutic antitumor response. Strikingly, despite the observed lower overall transgene expression, SFVeE6,7 delivered via tattoo injection resulted in higher or equal levels of immune responses as compared to intramuscular injection. The intrinsic immunogenic potential of tattooing provides a benefit for immunotherapy based on an alphavirus. PMID:26343186

  4. Dependence of Intracellular and Exosomal microRNAs on Viral E6/E7 Oncogene Expression in HPV-positive Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Honegger, Anja; Schilling, Daniela; Bastian, Sandra; Sponagel, Jasmin; Kuryshev, Vladimir; Sültmann, Holger; Scheffner, Martin; Hoppe-Seyler, Karin; Hoppe-Seyler, Felix

    2015-01-01

    Specific types of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) cause cervical cancer. Cervical cancers exhibit aberrant cellular microRNA (miRNA) expression patterns. By genome-wide analyses, we investigate whether the intracellular and exosomal miRNA compositions of HPV-positive cancer cells are dependent on endogenous E6/E7 oncogene expression. Deep sequencing studies combined with qRT-PCR analyses show that E6/E7 silencing significantly affects ten of the 52 most abundant intracellular miRNAs in HPV18-positive HeLa cells, downregulating miR-17-5p, miR-186-5p, miR-378a-3p, miR-378f, miR-629-5p and miR-7-5p, and upregulating miR-143-3p, miR-23a-3p, miR-23b-3p and miR-27b-3p. The effects of E6/E7 silencing on miRNA levels are mainly not dependent on p53 and similarly observed in HPV16-positive SiHa cells. The E6/E7-regulated miRNAs are enriched for species involved in the control of cell proliferation, senescence and apoptosis, suggesting that they contribute to the growth of HPV-positive cancer cells. Consistently, we show that sustained E6/E7 expression is required to maintain the intracellular levels of members of the miR-17~92 cluster, which reduce expression of the anti-proliferative p21 gene in HPV-positive cancer cells. In exosomes secreted by HeLa cells, a distinct seven-miRNA-signature was identified among the most abundant miRNAs, with significant downregulation of let-7d-5p, miR-20a-5p, miR-378a-3p, miR-423-3p, miR-7-5p, miR-92a-3p and upregulation of miR-21-5p, upon E6/E7 silencing. Several of the E6/E7-dependent exosomal miRNAs have also been linked to the control of cell proliferation and apoptosis. This study represents the first global analysis of intracellular and exosomal miRNAs and shows that viral oncogene expression affects the abundance of multiple miRNAs likely contributing to the E6/E7-dependent growth of HPV-positive cancer cells. PMID:25760330

  5. Some Novel Insights on HPV16 Related Cervical Cancer Pathogenesis Based on Analyses of LCR Methylation, Viral Load, E7 and E2/E4 Expressions

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Indranil; Chowdhury, Rahul Roy; Roy, Sudipta; Sengupta, Sharmila

    2012-01-01

    This study was undertaken to decipher the interdependent roles of (i) methylation within E2 binding site I and II (E2BS-I/II) and replication origin (nt 7862) in the long control region (LCR), (ii) expression of viral oncogene E7, (iii) expression of the transcript (E7-E1?E4) that encodes E2 repressor protein and (iv) viral load, in human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) related cervical cancer (CaCx) pathogenesis. The results revealed over-representation (p<0.001) of methylation at nucleotide 58 of E2BS-I among E2-intact CaCx cases compared to E2-disrupted cases. Bisulphite sequencing of LCR revealed overrepresentation of methylation at nucleotide 58 or other CpGs in E2BS-I/II, among E2-intact cases than E2-disrupted cases and lack of methylation at replication origin in case of both. The viral transcript (E7-E1?E4) that produces the repressor E2 was analyzed by APOT (amplification of papillomavirus oncogenic transcript)-coupled-quantitative-RT-PCR (of E7 and E4 genes) to distinguish episomal (pure or concomitant with integrated) from purely integrated viral genomes based on the ratio, E7 CT/E4 CT. Relative quantification based on comparative CT (theshold cycle) method revealed 75.087 folds higher E7 mRNA expression in episomal cases over purely integrated cases. Viral load and E2 gene copy numbers were negatively correlated with E7 CT (p?=?0.007) and E2 CT (p<0.0001), respectively, each normalized with ACTB CT, among episomal cases only. The k-means clustering analysis considering E7 CT from APOT-coupled-quantitative-RT-PCR assay, in conjunction with viral load, revealed immense heterogeneity among the HPV16 positive CaCx cases portraying integrated viral genomes. The findings provide novel insights into HPV16 related CaCx pathogenesis and highlight that CaCx cases that harbour episomal HPV16 genomes with intact E2 are likely to be distinct biologically, from the purely integrated viral genomes in terms of host genes and/or pathways involved in cervical carcinogenesis. PMID:22970286

  6. The oncoprotein NPM-ALK of anaplastic large-cell lymphoma induces JUNB transcription via ERK1/2 and JunB translation via mTOR signaling.

    PubMed

    Staber, Philipp B; Vesely, Paul; Haq, Naznin; Ott, Rene G; Funato, Kotaro; Bambach, Isabella; Fuchs, Claudia; Schauer, Silvia; Linkesch, Werner; Hrzenjak, Andelko; Dirks, Wilhelm G; Sexl, Veronika; Bergler, Helmut; Kadin, Marshall E; Sternberg, David W; Kenner, Lukas; Hoefler, Gerald

    2007-11-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphomas (ALCLs) are highly proliferating tumors that commonly express the AP-1 transcription factor JunB. ALK fusions occur in approximately 50% of ALCLs, and among these, 80% have the t(2;5) translocation with NPM-ALK expression. We report greater activity of JunB in NPM-ALK-positive than in NPM-ALK-negative ALCLs. Specific knockdown of JUNB mRNA using small interfering RNA and small hairpin RNA in NPM-ALK-expressing cells decreases cellular proliferation as evidenced by a reduced cell count in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Expression of NPM-ALK results in ERK1/2 activation and transcriptional up-regulation of JUNB. Both NPM-ALK-positive and -negative ALCL tumors demonstrate active ERK1/2 signaling. In contrast to NPM-ALK-negative ALCL, the mTOR pathway is active in NPM-ALK-positive lymphomas. Pharmacological inhibition of mTOR in NPM-ALK-positive cells down-regulates JunB protein levels by shifting JUNB mRNA translation from large polysomes to monosomes and ribonucleic particles (RNPs), and decreases cellular proliferation. Thus, JunB is a critical target of mTOR and is translationally regulated in NPM-ALK-positive lymphomas. This is the first study demonstrating translational control of AP-1 transcription factors in human neoplasia. In conjunction with NPM-ALK, JunB enhances cell cycle progression and may therefore represent a therapeutic target. PMID:17690253

  7. Immortalization of Human Fetal Hepatocyte by Ectopic Expression of Human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase, Human Papilloma Virus (E7) and Simian Virus 40 Large T (SV40 T) Antigen Towards Bioartificial Liver Support

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Shibashish; Bader, Augustinus

    2014-01-01

    Background Generation of genetically stable and non-tumoric immortalization cell line from primary cells would be enormously useful for research and therapeutic purposes, but progress towards this goal has so far been limited. It is now universal acceptance that immortalization of human fetal hepatocytes based on recent advances of telomerase biology and oncogene, lead to unlimited population doubling could be the possible source for bioartificial liver device. Methods Immortalization of human fetal hepatocytes cell line by ectopic expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), human papilloma virus gene (E7) and simian virus 40 large T (SV40 T) antigens is main goal of present study. We used an inducible system containing human telomerase and E7, both of which are cloned into responder constructs controlled by doxycycline transactivator. We characterized the immortalized human fetal hepatocyte cells by analysis of green fluorescent cells (GFP) positive cells using flow cytometry (FACs) cell sorting and morphology, proliferative rate and antigen expression by immunohistochemical analysis. In addition to we analysized lactate formation, glucose consumption, albumin secretion and urea production of immortalized human fetal hepatocyte cells. Results After 25 attempts for transfection of adult primary hepatocytes by human telomerase and E7 to immortalize them, none of the transfection systems resulted in the production of a stable, proliferating cell line. Although the transfection efficiency was more than 70% on the first day, the vast majority of the transfected hepatocytes lost their signal within the first 5–7 days. The remaining transfected hepatocytes persisted for 2–4 weeks and divided one or two times without forming a clone. After 10 attempts of transfection human fetal hepatocytes using the same transfection system, we obtained one stable human fetal hepatocytes cell line which was able albumin secretion urea production and glucose consumption. Conclusion We established a conditional human fetal hepatocytes cell line with mesenchymal characteristics. Thus immortalization of human fetal hepatocytes cell line by telomerase biology offers a great challenge to examine basic biological mechanisms which are directly related to human and best cell source having unlimited population doubling for bioartificial support without any risk of replicative senescence and pathogenic risks. PMID:25755560

  8. Explicit computations of low-lying eigenfunctions for the quantum trigonometric Calogero-Sutherland model related to the exceptional algebra E 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández Núñez, J.; García Fuertes, W.; Perelomov, A. M.

    2008-02-01

    In a previous paper, we studied the characters and Clebsch-Gordan series for the exceptional Lie algebra E7 by relating them to the quantum trigonometric Calogero-Sutherland Hamiltonian with the coupling constant ? = 1. We now extend that approach to the case of an arbitrary coupling constant.

  9. Influence of chromosomal integration on glucocorticoid-regulated transcription of growth-stimulating papillomavirus genes E6 and E7 in cervical carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Von Knebel Doeberitz, M.; Bauknecht, T.; Bartsch, D.; Zur Hausen, H. )

    1991-02-15

    In most cervical carcinoma cells the E6 and E7 genes of specific human papillomaviruses are transcribed from viral sequences integrated into host cell chromosomes. Glucocorticoids activate the promoter elements of various human papillomaviruses in transient-expression assays. The authors have analyzed the effect of dexamethasone on the transcription rate of human papillomaviruses 18 E6 and E7 genes integrated at different chromosomal sites in four cervical cancer cell lines. Dexamethasone led to an increase in the transcription rate of the integrated E6-E7 sequences in C4-1 and C4-2 cells but led to a decrease in SW 756 cells and did not affect the transcription rate in HeLa cells. It thus appears that dominant regulatory mechanisms presumably depending on the chromosomal integration site are able to override the response of the viral promoter to steroid hormones. The growth rate of all dexamethasone-treated cell lines correlated consistently with the expression of the papillomavirus E6 and E7 genes, supporting their role in the maintenance of the proliferative phenotype of cervical carcinoma cells. Since human papillomaviruses are integrated into the host cell genome at variable, presumably randomly selected chromosomal loci, regulatory mechanisms that influence viral gene expression, and hence cell growth, may differ among cancers of independent clonal origin.

  10. Honeybee venom possesses anticancer and antiviral effects by differential inhibition of HPV E6 and E7 expression on cervical cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Wan; Chaturvedi, Pankaj Kumar; Chun, Sung Nam; Lee, Yang Gu; Ahn, Woong Shick

    2015-04-01

    Bee venom (BV) therapy is a type of alternative medical treatment used to treat various diseases in oriental medicine. The mechanisms underlying the effects of BV remain poorly understood. In the present study, we evaluated the antiviral effect of BV on cervical carcinoma cell lines (CaSki, HeLa, C33A and TC-1). BV treatments resulted in a more significant suppression of cell growth in HPV 16-infected cells (CaSki) and a lesser suppression in HPV 18-infected cells (HeLa). However, less suppression was observed in HPV-negative C33A cells. In 10 µg/ml BV-treated CaSki cells, the mRNA expression and protein levels of HPV16 E6 and E7 were significantly decreased by BV, while HPV18 E6 and E7 mRNA expression levels were not significantly altered by 10 µg/ml BV-treated HeLa cells. The antitumor effects of BV were in accordance with in vitro data, in restricting tumor growth in vivo and were much more effective on the suppression of tumor growth. Furthermore, the mRNA and protein expression levels of HPV16 E6 and E7 were decreased by BV in TC-1 tumors. These findings demonstrated the antiviral effects of BV in HPV-infected cervical cancer cells and the anticancer effects of BV in HPV16 E6/E7-expressed TC-1 tumors. Collectively, BV plays a differential role in suppressing HPV16-infected cells (CaSki cells) and HPV18-infected cells (HeLa cells) by the downregulation of E6/E7 protein of HPV16/18. PMID:25633640

  11. HPV E6/E7 mRNA versus HPV DNA biomarker in cervical cancer screening of a group of Macedonian women.

    PubMed

    Duvlis, Sotirija; Popovska-Jankovic, Katerina; Arsova, Zorica Sarafinovska; Memeti, Shaban; Popeska, Zaneta; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana

    2015-09-01

    High risk types of human papillomaviruses E6/E7 oncogenes and their association with tumor suppressor genes products are the key factors of cervical carcinogenesis. This study proposed them as specific markers for cervical dysplasia screening. The aim of the study is to compare the clinical and prognostic significance of HPV E6/E7 mRNA as an early biomarker versus HPV DNA detection and cytology in triage of woman for cervical cancer. The study group consists of 413 women: 258 NILM, 26 ASC-US, 81 LSIL, 41 HSIL, and 7 unsatisfactory cytology. HPV4AACE screening, real-time multiplex PCR and MY09/11 consensus PCR primers methods were used for the HPV DNA detection. The real-time multiplex nucleic acid sequence-based assay (NucliSENS EasyQ HPV assay) was used for HPV E6/E7 mRNA detection of the five most common high risk HPV types in cervical cancer (16, 18, 31, 33, and 45). The results show that HPV E6/E7 mRNA testing had a higher specificity 50% (95% CI 32-67) and positive predictive value (PPV) 62% (95% CI 46-76) for CIN2+ compared to HPV DNA testing that had specificity of 18% (95% CI 7-37) and PPV 52% (95% CI 39-76) respectively. The higher specificity and PPV of HPV E6/E7 mRNA testing are valuable in predicting insignificant HPV DNA infection among cases with borderline cytological finding. It can help in avoiding aggressive procedures (biopsies and over-referral of transient HPV infections) as well as lowering patient's anxiety and follow up period. PMID:25880030

  12. Targeting MUC1-C is synergistic with bortezomib in downregulating TIGAR and inducing ROS-mediated myeloma cell death.

    PubMed

    Yin, Li; Kufe, Turner; Avigan, David; Kufe, Donald

    2014-05-01

    The proteosome inhibitor bortezomib (BTZ) induces endoplasmic reticulum and oxidative stress in multiple myeloma (MM) cells. The mucin 1 C-terminal subunit (MUC1-C) oncoprotein is aberrantly expressed in most MM cells, and targeting MUC1-C with GO-203, a cell-penetrating peptide inhibitor of MUC1-C homodimerization, is effective in inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated MM cell death. The present results demonstrate that GO-203 and BTZ synergistically downregulate expression of the p53-inducible regulator of glycolysis and apoptosis (TIGAR), which promotes shunting of glucose-6-phosphate into the pentose phosphate pathway to generate reduced glutathione (GSH). In turn, GO-203 blocks BTZ-induced increases in GSH and results in synergistic increases in ROS and MM cell death. The results also demonstrate that GO-203 is effective against BTZ-resistant MM cells. We show that BTZ resistance is associated with BTZ-induced increases in TIGAR and GSH levels, and that GO-203 resensitizes BTZ-resistant cells to BTZ treatment by synergistically downregulating TIGAR and GSH. The GO-203/BTZ combination is thus highly effective in killing BTZ-resistant MM cells. These findings support a model in which targeting MUC1-C is synergistic with BTZ in suppressing TIGAR-mediated regulation of ROS levels and provide an experimental rationale for combining GO-203 with BTZ in certain settings of BTZ resistance. PMID:24632713

  13. Intercellular trafficking of the nuclear oncoprotein DEK

    E-print Network

    Ploegh, Hidde

    DEK is a biochemically distinct, conserved nonhistone protein that is vital to global heterochromatin integrity. In addition, DEK can be secreted and function as a chemotactic, proinflammatory factor. Here we show that ...

  14. Synthetic lipopeptide inhibitors of RAS oncoproteins

    Cancer.gov

    It is well known that overactive Ras signaling is linked to many forms of cancer, and despite intensive efforts worldwide to develop effective inhibitors of Ras, to date there is no anti-Ras inhibitor in clinical use.

  15. Metformin induces differentiation in acute promyelocytic leukemia by activating the MEK/ERK signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Huai, Lei; Wang, Cuicui; Zhang, Cuiping; Li, Qihui; Chen, Yirui; Jia, Yujiao; Li, Yan; Xing, Haiyan; Tian, Zheng; Rao, Qing; Wang, Min; Wang, Jianxiang

    2012-06-08

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metformin induces differentiation in NB4 and primary APL cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metformin induces activation of the MEK/ERK signaling pathway in APL cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metformin synergizes with ATRA to trigger maturation of NB4 and primary APL cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metformin induces the relocalization and degradation of the PML-RAR{alpha} fusion protein. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The study may be applicable for new differentiation therapy in cancer treatment. -- Abstract: Recent studies have shown that metformin, a widely used antidiabetic agent, may reduce the risk of cancer development. In this study, we investigated the antitumoral effect of metformin on both acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cells. Metformin induced apoptosis with partial differentiation in an APL cell line, NB4, but only displayed a proapoptotic effect on several non-M3 AML cell lines. Further analysis revealed that a strong synergistic effect existed between metformin and all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) during APL cell maturation and that metformin induced the hyperphosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in APL cells. U0126, a specific MEK/ERK activation inhibitor, abrogated metformin-induced differentiation. Finally, we found that metformin induced the degradation of the oncoproteins PML-RAR{alpha} and c-Myc and activated caspase-3. In conclusion, these results suggest that metformin treatment may contribute to the enhancement of ATRA-induced differentiation in APL, which may deepen the understanding of APL maturation and thus provide insight for new therapy strategies.

  16. Alteration of the lipid profile in lymphomas induced by MYC overexpression

    PubMed Central

    Eberlin, Livia S.; Gabay, Meital; Fan, Alice C.; Gouw, Arvin M.; Tibshirani, Robert J.; Felsher, Dean W.; Zare, Richard N.

    2014-01-01

    Overexpression of the v-myc avian myelocytomatosis viral oncogene homolog (MYC) oncogene is one of the most commonly implicated causes of human tumorigenesis. MYC is known to regulate many aspects of cellular biology including glucose and glutamine metabolism. Little is known about the relationship between MYC and the appearance and disappearance of specific lipid species. We use desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI-MSI), statistical analysis, and conditional transgenic animal models and cell samples to investigate changes in lipid profiles in MYC-induced lymphoma. We have detected a lipid signature distinct from that observed in normal tissue and in rat sarcoma-induced lymphoma cells. We found 104 distinct molecular ions that have an altered abundance in MYC lymphoma compared with normal control tissue by statistical analysis with a false discovery rate of less than 5%. Of these, 86 molecular ions were specifically identified as complex phospholipids. To evaluate whether the lipid signature could also be observed in human tissue, we examined 15 human lymphoma samples with varying expression levels of MYC oncoprotein. Distinct lipid profiles in lymphomas with high and low MYC expression were observed, including many of the lipid species identified as significant for MYC-induced animal lymphoma tissue. Our results suggest a relationship between the appearance of specific lipid species and the overexpression of MYC in lymphomas. PMID:24994904

  17. Stereoselective chemo-enzymatic oxidation routes for (1R,3E,7E,11S,12S)-3,7,18-dolabellatriene

    PubMed Central

    Görner, Christian; Hirte, Max; Huber, Stephanie; Schrepfer, Patrick; Brück, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The diterpene (1R,3E,7E,11S,12S)-3,7,18-dolabellatriene from the marine brown alga Dilophus spiralis belongs to the dolabellanes natural product family and has antimicrobial activity against multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Recently, we generated a CotB2 diterpene synthase mutant (W288G), which instead of its native product cyclooctat-9-en-7-ol, generates (1R,3E,7E,11S,12S)-3,7,18-dolabellatriene. In vivo CotB2 W288G reconstitution in an Escherichia coli based terpene production system, allowed efficient production of this olefinic macrocycle. To diversify the 3,7,18-dolabellatriene bioactivity we evaluated chemical and enzymatic methods for selective oxidation. Epoxidation by acetic peracid, which was formed in situ by a lipase catalyzed reaction of acetic acid with H2O2, provided efficient access to two monooxidized dolabellanes and to a novel di-epoxidated dolabellane species. These compounds could act as synthons en-route to new dolabellanes with diversified bioactivities. Furthermore, we demonstrate the almost quantitative 3,7,18-dolabellatriene conversion into the new, non-natural compound (1R,3E,7E,11S,12S,18R)-dolabella-3,7-diene-20-ol by hydroboration–oxidation with an enantiomeric excess of 94%, for the first time. PMID:26528263

  18. HPV16-E2 induces prophase arrest and activates the cellular DNA damage response in vitro and in precursor lesions of cervical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yuezhen; Toh, Shen Yon; He, Pingping; Lim, Thimothy; Lim, Diana; Pang, Chai Ling; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Thierry, Françoise

    2015-10-27

    Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) is caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and is the precursor to cervical carcinoma. The completion of the HPV productive life cycle depends on the expression of viral proteins which further determines the severity of the cervical neoplasia. Initiation of the viral productive replication requires expression of the E2 viral protein that cooperates with the E1 viral DNA helicase. A decrease in the viral DNA replication ability and increase in the severity of cervical neoplasia is accompanied by simultaneous elevated expression of E6 and E7 oncoproteins. Here we reveal a novel and important role for the HPV16-E2 protein in controlling host cell cycle during malignant transformation. We showed that cells expressing HPV16-E2 in vitro are arrested in prophase alongside activation of a sustained DDR signal. We uncovered evidence that HPV16-E2 protein is present in vivo in cells that express both mitotic and DDR signals specifically in CIN3 lesions, immediate precursors of cancer, suggesting that E2 may be one of the drivers of genomic instability and carcinogenesis in vivo. PMID:26474276

  19. Functional inactivation of Rb sensitizes cancer cells to TSC2 inactivation induced cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Danos, Arpad M.; Liao, Yang; Li, Xuan; Du, Wei

    2012-01-01

    We showed previously that inactivation of TSC2 induces death in cancer cells lacking the Retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor under stress conditions, suggesting that inactivation of TSC2 can potentially be used as an approach to specifically kill cancers that have lost WT Rb. As Rb is often inactivated in cancers by overexpression of cyclin D1, loss of p16ink4a cdk inhibitor, or expression of viral oncoproteins, it will be interesting to determine if such functional inactivation of Rb would similarly sensitize cancer cells to TSC2 inactivation induced cell death. In addition, many cancers lack functional Pten, resulting in increased PI3K/Akt signaling that has been shown to modulate E2F-induced cell death. Therefore it will be interesting to test whether loss of Pten will affect TSC2 inactivation induced killing of Rb mutant cancer cells. Here, we show that overexpression of Cyclin D1 or the viral oncogene E1a sensitizes cancer cells to TSC2 knockdown induced cell death and growth inhibition. On the other hand, knockdown of p16ink4a sensitizes cancer cells to TSC2 knockdown induced cell death in a manner that is likely dependant on serum induction of Cyclin D1 to inactivate the Rb function. Additionally, we demonstrate that loss of Pten does not interfere with TSC2 knockdown induced cell death in Rb mutant cancer cells. Together, these results suggest that TSC2 is potentially a useful target for a large spectrum of cancer types with an inactivated Rb pathway. PMID:23022476

  20. A basal-like breast cancer-specific role for SRF-IL6 in YAP-induced cancer stemness.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tackhoon; Yang, Suk-Jin; Hwang, Daehee; Song, Jinhoi; Kim, Minchul; Kyum Kim, Sang; Kang, Keunsoo; Ahn, Jaebum; Lee, Daeyoup; Kim, Mi-Young; Kim, Seyun; Seung Koo, Ja; Seok Koh, Sang; Kim, Seon-Young; Lim, Dae-Sik

    2015-01-01

    The switch between stem/progenitor cell expansion and differentiation is critical for organ homeostasis. The mammalian Hippo pathway effector and oncoprotein YAP expands undifferentiated stem/progenitor cells in various tissues. However, the YAP-associated transcription factors and downstream targets underlying this stemness-promoting activity are poorly understood. Here we show that the SRF-IL6 axis is the critical mediator of YAP-induced stemness in mammary epithelial cells and breast cancer. Specifically, serum response factor (SRF)-mediated binding and recruitment of YAP to mammary stem cell (MaSC) signature-gene promoters induce numerous MaSC signature genes, among which the target interleukin (IL)-6 is critical for YAP-induced stemness. High SRF-YAP/TAZ expression is correlated with IL6-enriched MaSC/basal-like breast cancer (BLBC). Finally, we show that this high SRF expression enables YAP to more efficiently induce IL6 and stemness in BLBC compared with luminal-type breast cancer. Collectively, our results establish the importance of SRF-YAP-IL6 signalling in promoting MaSC-like properties in a BLBC-specific manner. PMID:26671411

  1. Methylated arsenic metabolites bind to PML protein but do not induce cellular differentiation and PML-RAR? protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian Qian; Zhou, Xin Yi; Zhang, Yan Fang; Bu, Na; Zhou, Jin; Cao, Feng Lin; Naranmandura, Hua

    2015-09-22

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) is one of the most effective therapeutic agents used for patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). The probable explanation for As2O3-induced cell differentiation is the direct targeting of PML-RAR? oncoprotein by As2O3, which results in initiation of PML-RAR? degradation. However, after injection, As2O3 is rapidly methylated in body to different intermediate metabolites such as trivalent monomethylarsonous acid (MMAIII) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMAIII), therefore, it remains unknown that which arsenic specie is actually responsible for the therapeutic effects against APL. Here we have shown the role of As2O3 (as iAsIII) and its intermediate metabolites (i.e., MMAIII/DMAIII) in NB4 cells. Inorganic iAsIII predominantly showed induction of cell differentiation, while MMAIII and DMAIII specifically showed to induce mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum-mediated apoptosis, respectively. On the other hand, in contrast to iAsIII, MMAIII showed stronger binding affinity for ring domain of PML recombinant protein, however, could not induce PML protein SUMOylation and ubiquitin/proteasome degradation. In summary, our results suggest that the binding of arsenicals to the ring domain of PML proteins is not associated with the degradation of PML-RAR? fusion protein. Moreover, methylated arsenicals can efficiently lead to cellular apoptosis, however, they are incapable of inducing NB4 cell differentiation. PMID:26213848

  2. MINI REVIEW MECHANISMS OF GENOMIC INSTABILITY IN HUMAN CANCER: INSIGHTS

    E-print Network

    Dever, Jennifer A.

    PAPILLOMAVIRUS ONCOPROTEINS Stefan DUENSING 1 * and Karl M¨UNGER 2 * 1 Molecular Virology Program, University-risk human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated anogenital neoplasia. The two HPV-encoded oncoproteins, E6 and E7 carcinogenesis. © 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are small DNA tumor viruses that cause

  3. Pokemon (FBI-1) interacts with Smad4 to repress TGF-?-induced transcriptional responses.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yutao; Cui, Jiajun; Xue, Feng; Zhang, Chuanfu; Mei, Zhu; Wang, Yue; Bi, Mingjun; Shan, Dapeng; Meredith, Alex; Li, Hui; Xu, Zhi-Qing David

    2015-03-01

    Pokemon, an important proto-oncoprotein, is a transcriptional repressor that belongs to the POK (POZ and Krüppel) family. Smad4, a key component of TGF-? pathway, plays an essential role in TGF-?-induced transcriptional responses. In this study, we show that Pokemon can interact directly with Smad4 both in vitro and in vivo. Overexpression of Pokemon decreases TGF-?-induced transcriptional activities, whereas knockdown of Pokemon increases these activities. Interestingly, Pokemon does not affect activation of Smad2/3, formation of Smads complex, or DNA binding activity of Smad4. TGF-?1 treatment increases the interaction between Pokemon and Smad4, and also enhances the recruitment of Pokemon to Smad4-DNA complex. In addition, we also find that Pokemon recruits HDAC1 to Smad4 complex but decreases the interaction between Smad4 and p300/CBP. Taken together, all these data suggest that Pokemon is a new partner of Smad4 and plays a negative role in TGF-? pathway. PMID:25514493

  4. The Bmi-1 oncogene induces telomerase activity and immortalizes human mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dimri, Goberdhan P; Martinez, Jose-Luis; Jacobs, Jacqueline J L; Keblusek, Petra; Itahana, Koji; Van Lohuizen, Maarten; Campisi, Judith; Wazer, David E; Band, Vimla

    2002-08-15

    The vast majority of breast cancers are carcinomas that arise from mammary epithelial cells (MECs). One of the key early events in tumorigenic transformation is the ability of cells to overcome replicative senescence. However, the precise genetic changes that are responsible for this event in MECs is largely unknown. Here, we report that Bmi-1, originally identified as a c-Myc cooperating oncoprotein, can bypass senescence, extend the replicative life span, and immortalize MECs. Furthermore, Bmi-1 was overexpressed in immortal MECs and several breast cancer cell lines. Overexpression of Bmi-1 in MECs led to activation of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) transcription and induction of telomerase activity. Telomerase induction by Bmi-1 was an early event in the extension of the replicative life span and immortalization. Bmi-1 was not overexpressed in hTERT-immortalized MECs, suggesting that Bmi-1 functions upstream of hTERT. Although, c-Myc has been reported to induce telomerase in MECs, Bmi-1 appeared to act independently of c-Myc binding sequences in the hTERT promoter. Deletion analysis of the Bmi-1 protein suggested that the RING finger, as well as a conserved helix-turn-helix-turn domain, were required for its ability to induce telomerase and immortalize MECs. These data suggest that Bmi-1 regulates telomerase expression in MECs and plays a role in the development of human breast cancer. PMID:12183433

  5. Tricritical-like behavior of the nonlinear optical refraction at the nematic-isotropic transition in the E7 thermotropic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Lenart, V M; Gómez, S L; Bechtold, I H; Figueiredo Neto, A M; Salinas, S R

    2012-01-01

    We use Z-scan technique to investigate the nonlinear optical response of the thermotropic liquid crystal E7 in the neighborhood of the nematic-isotropic phase transition. The analysis of the data for the nonlinear optical birefringence is compatible with an effective critical exponent of the order parameter, ? = 0.28 ± 0.03, which is close to the classical value, ? = 0.25 , for a tricritical point. The nonlinear optical absorption in the nematic range depends on the geometrical configuration of the nematic director with respect to the polarization beam, and vanishes in the isotropic phase. PMID:22270454

  6. Ligand binding to heme proteins: III. FTIR studies of His-E7 and Val-E11 mutants of carbonmonoxymyoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    Braunstein, D. P.; Chu, K.; Egeberg, K. D.; Frauenfelder, H.; Mourant, J. R.; Nienhaus, G. U.; Ormos, P.; Sligar, S. G.; Springer, B. A.; Young, R. D.

    1993-01-01

    Fouier-transform infrared (FTIR) difference spectra of several His-E7 and Val-E11 mutants of sperm whale carbonmonoxymyoglobin were obtained by photodissociation at cryogenic temperatures. The IR absorption of the CO ligand shows characteristic features for each of the mutants, both in the ligand-bound (A) state and in the photodissociated (B) state. For most of the mutants, a single A substate band is observed, which points to the crucial role of the His-E7 residue in determining the A substrate spectrum of the bound CO in the native structure. The fact that some of the mutants show more than one stretch band of the bound CO indicates that the appearance of multiple A substates is not exclusively connected to the presence of His-E7. In all but one mutant, multiple stretch bands of the CO in the photodissociated state are observed; these B substates are thought to arise from discrete positions and/or orientations of the photodissociated ligand in the heme pocket. The red shifts of the B bands with respect to the free-gas frequency indicate weak binding in the heme pocket. The observation of similar red shifts in microperoxidase (MP-8), where there is no residue on the distal side, suggests that the photodissociated ligand is still associated with the heme iron. Photoselection experiments were performed to determine the orientation of the bound ligand with respect to the heme normal by photolyzing small fractions of the sample with linearly polarized light at 540 nm. The resulting linear dichroism in the CO stretch spectrum yielded angles alpha > 20 degrees between the CO molecular axis and the heme normal for all of the mutants. We conclude that the off-axis position of the CO ligand in the native structure does not arise from steric constraints imposed by the distal histidine. There is no clear correlation between the size of the distal residue and the alpha of the CO ligand. PMID:8312483

  7. Induced Abortion

    MedlinePLUS

    ... AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ043 SPECIAL PROCEDURES Induced Abortion • What is an induced abortion? • What is a first-trimester abortion? • How is a first-trimester surgical abortion performed? • ...

  8. Neoplastic Transformation of Human Small Airway Epithelial Cells Induced by Arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Gengyun; Calaf, Gloria M; Partridge, Michael A; Echiburú-Chau, Carlos; Zhao, Yongliang; Huang, Sarah; Chai, Yunfei; Li, Bingyan; Hu, Burong; Hei, Tom K

    2008-01-01

    Human small airway epithelial cells (SAECs) previously immortalized with human telomerase reverse transcriptase (h-TERT) were continuously treated with sodium arsenite at a dose of 0.5 ?g/mL in culture for up to 6 months. Arsenic-treated cells progressively displayed an increase in transformed phenotype including enhanced growth saturation density, plating efficiency, and anchorage-independent growth and invasion capability compared with their nontreated control cells. To determine whether arsenic-induced cell transformation was associated with genomic instability, treated and control cells were also analyzed for micronuclei formation. A 4.8-fold increase in micronuclei incidence in arsenic-treated cells was detected in conjunction with increased N-phosphonacetyl-l-aspartate (PALA)-resistant characteristics. In addition, arsenic-treated cells showed an increase in c-H-ras, c-myc, and c-fos protein expression relative to controls. The change in oncoprotein expression correlated with a decrease in wild-type p53 expression and hyperphosphorylated retinoblastoma. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that h-TERT immortalized human small airway epithelial cells underwent step-wise transformation after inorganic arsenic treatment. PMID:18037969

  9. Histone deacetylase 2 and N-Myc reduce p53 protein phosphorylation at serine 46 by repressing gene transcription of tumor protein 53-induced nuclear protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi, Jeyran; Scarlett, Christopher J.; Norris, Murray D.; Liu, Bing; Haber, Michelle; Tee, Andrew E.; Carrier, Alice; Biankin, Andrew V.; London, Wendy B.; Marshall, Glenn M.; Lock, Richard B.; Liu, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Myc oncoproteins and histone deacetylases (HDACs) exert oncogenic effects by modulating gene transcription. Paradoxically, N-Myc induces p53 gene expression. Tumor protein 53-induced nuclear protein 1 (TP53INP1) phosphorylates p53 protein at serine 46, leading to enhanced p53 activity, transcriptional activation of p53 target genes and programmed cell death. Here we aimed to identify the mechanism through which N-Myc overexpressing p53 wild-type neuroblastoma cells acquired resistance to apoptosis. TP53INP1 was found to be one of the genes most significantly repressed by HDAC2 and N-Myc according to Affymetrix microarray gene expression datasets. HDAC2 and N-Myc reduced TP53INP1 gene expression by direct binding to the TP53INP1 gene promoter, leading to transcriptional repression of TP53INP1, p53 protein de-phosphorylation at serine 46, neuroblastoma cell proliferation and survival. Moreover, low levels of TP53INP1 expression in human neuroblastoma tissues correlated with high levels of N-Myc expression and poor patient outcome, and the BET bromodomain inhibitors JQ1 and I-BET151 reduced N-Myc expression and reactivated TP53INP1 expression in neuroblastoma cells. These findings identify TP53INP1 repression as an important co-factor for N-Myc oncogenesis, and provide further evidence for the potential application of BET bromodomain inhibitors in the therapy of N-Myc-induced neuroblastoma. PMID:24952595

  10. Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Small T Antigen Induces Cancer and Embryonic Merkel Cell Proliferation in a Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Xuehui; Shuda, Yoko; Ostrowski, Stephen M.; Lukianov, Stefan; Jenkins, Frank J.; Honda, Kord; Maricich, Stephen M.; Moore, Patrick S.; Chang, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) causes the majority of human Merkel cell carcinomas (MCC) and encodes a small T (sT) antigen that transforms immortalized rodent fibroblasts in vitro. To develop a mouse model for MCV sT-induced carcinogenesis, we generated transgenic mice with a flox-stop-flox MCV sT sequence homologously recombined at the ROSA locus (ROSAsT), allowing Cre-mediated, conditional MCV sT expression. Standard tamoxifen (TMX) administration to adult UbcCreERT2; ROSAsT mice, in which Cre is ubiquitously expressed, resulted in MCV sT expression in multiple organs that was uniformly lethal within 5 days. Conversely, most adult UbcCreERT2; ROSAsT mice survived low-dose tamoxifen administration but developed ear lobe dermal hyperkeratosis and hypergranulosis. Simultaneous MCV sT expression and conditional homozygous p53 deletion generated multi-focal, poorly-differentiated, highly anaplastic tumors in the spleens and livers of mice after 60 days of TMX treatment. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts from these mice induced to express MCV sT exhibited anchorage-independent cell growth. To examine Merkel cell pathology, MCV sT expression was also induced during mid-embryogenesis in Merkel cells of Atoh1CreERT2/+; ROSAsT mice, which lead to significantly increased Merkel cell numbers in touch domes at late embryonic ages that normalized postnatally. Tamoxifen administration to adult Atoh1CreERT2/+; ROSAsT and Atoh1CreERT2/+; ROSAsT; p53flox/flox mice had no effects on Merkel cell numbers and did not induce tumor formation. Taken together, these results show that MCV sT stimulates progenitor Merkel cell proliferation in embryonic mice and is a bona fide viral oncoprotein that induces full cancer cell transformation in the p53-null setting. PMID:26544690

  11. Performance of the HPV-16 L1 methylation assay and HPV E6/E7 mRNA test for the detection of squamous intraepithelial lesions in cervical cytological samples.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Cui; Zhi, Yanfang; Shen, Yong; Gong, Jiaomei; Li, Ya; Rong, Shouhua; Okunieff, Paul; Zhang, Lulu; Li, Xiaofu

    2015-11-01

    HPV-16 L1 methylation and E6/E7 mRNA have suggested that they had close relationship with cervical neoplastic progression. This study aimed to evaluate the clinical performance of the HPV-16 L1 methylation assay and E6/E7 mRNA test for detecting high-grade cervical lesions (CIN2+). A total of 81 women with liquid-based cytology (LBC) samples, histological results, and positive HPV-DNA test for HPV type 16 only were included in this study. HPV-16 L1 methylation and E6/E7 mRNA levels were measured using methylation-sensitive high resolution melting (MS-HRM) analysis and Quantivirus®HPV E6/E7 RNA 3.0 assay (bDNA), respectively, in the same residue of LBC samples. The current date showed a positive correlation between the HPV-16 L1 methylation and the E6/E7 mRNA levels. The L1 methylation and mRNA levels both increased with disease severity. The mRNA test method showed higher sensitivity and NPV (98.0 and 91.7% vs. 89.8 and 80.8%), while lower specificity and PPV (34.4 and 69.6% vs. 65.6 and 80.0%), than the L1 methylation assay for detecting histology-confirmed CIN2+. When using the detection method of mRNA test combined with L1 methylation assay, we obtained a sensitivity of 89.8% and a specificity of 71.9%. These findings suggest that assessment of HPV-16 L1 methylation testing combined with E6/E7 mRNA testing may be a promising method for the triage of women with HPV type 16 only. PMID:26297960

  12. Crystal Diagnostics Xpress™ E7 STEC Kit for the Rapid Multiplex Detection of E. coli O157 and non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Fernandez, Maria Cristina; Ziemer, Wayne

    2015-12-01

    The Crystal Diagnostics (CDx) Xpress E7 STEC kit is a rapid and sensitive detection assay for the detection of Escherichia coli O157 and six non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (serogroups O26, O45, O1O3, O111, O121, and O145, collectively referred to as STEC) at 1 CFU/325 g of raw ground beef and raw beef trim, or 200 g of spinach. The system comprises an automatic Crystal Diagnostics Xpress System Reader that integrates immunochemical and optical processes for the liquid crystal-based detection of microorganisms, a CDx BioCassette that incorporates antibody-coupled microspheres and liquid crystal for selective identification of the intended microbe, and additional commercially available components. The Crystal Diagnostics Xpress System(TM) combines proprietary liquid crystal technology with antibody-coated paramagnetic microspheres to selectively capture and detect STEC from food matrixes. The Xpress System expeditiously (9.5 h enrichment) provides the sensitivity and specificity of the U. S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service and the U. S. Food and Drug Administration reference methods in screening as low as 1 STEC CFU/test portion. The inclusivity validation demonstrated detection of 53 of 54 STEC test strains. Shelf life testing of the antibody-coated microspheres and other Crystal Diagnostic consumables indicated that all materials were stable for a minimum of 3 months (ongoing), and lot-to-lot testing demonstrated consistent results between lots (data not shown). The internal and independent laboratory tests demonstrate that the method is rapid and sensitive for screening of the target STEC. PMID:26651567

  13. MUC4, a multifunctional transmembrane glycoprotein, induces oncogenic transformation of NIH3T3 mouse fibroblast cells

    PubMed Central

    Bafna, Sangeeta; Singh, Ajay P; Moniaux, Nicolas; Eudy, James D; Meza, Jane L; Batra, Surinder K.

    2008-01-01

    Numerous studies have established the association of MUC4 with the progression of cancer and metastasis. An aberrant expression of MUC4 is reported in precancerous lesions indicating its early involvement in the disease process; however, its precise role in cellular transformation has not been explored. MUC4 contains many unique domains and is proposed to impact on cell signaling pathways and behavior of the tumor cells. In the present study, to decipher its oncogenic potential of MUC4, we stably expressed the MUC4 mucin in NIH3T3 mouse fibroblast cells. Stable ectopic expression of MUC4 resulted in increased growth, colony formation and motility of NIH3T3 cells in vitro and tumor formation in nude mice, when cells were injected subcutaneously. Microarray analysis demonstrated increased expression of several growth- and mitochondrial energy production-associated genes in MUC4-expressing NIH3T3 cells. In addition, expression of MUC4 in NIH3T3 cells resulted in enhanced levels of oncoprotein ErbB2 and its phosphorylated form (pY1248-ErbB2). In conclusion, our studies provide the first evidence that MUC4 alone induces cellular transformation and indicates a novel role of MUC4 in cancer biology. PMID:19010895

  14. Inducing labor

    MedlinePLUS

    ... surrounds your baby in the womb. It contains membranes or layers of tissue. One method of inducing ... break the bag of waters" or rupture the membranes. Your health care provider will do a pelvic ...

  15. [Induced acne].

    PubMed

    Humbert, Philippe

    2002-04-15

    Induced acne belongs to the clinical forms of acne. Some dermatoses present with acne-like patterns. They can be induced or perpetuated by non physiological factors. Among these factors, medicines must always be considered, taken either topically (dermocorticoids, sulfur, anti-acneic topics) or generally (androgens, oral corticoids, ACTH, anti-epileptics, anti-depressive drugs, anti-tuberculosis medications). Halogens (iodine, bromine) found in inhaled or orally taken pharmaceutical products, or associated with occupational contact, can also induce acne. Acne of exogenous origin has been described in some specific occupations, and are induced by exposure to chlorine, industrial oils, tar. Sun exposure, PUVA therapy and ionizing radiation are potentially acneigenous. Finally acne caused by cosmetics includes acne cosmetica, brilliantine and oily creams acne and detergent acne. PMID:12053790

  16. Association of human papillomavirus with Fanconi anemia promotes carcinogenesis in Fanconi anemia patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guang Bin; Chen, Jiezhong; Wu, Zhan He; Zhao, Kong-Nan

    2015-11-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare recessive disorder associated with chromosomal fragility. FA patients are at very high risk of cancers, especially head and neck squamous cell carcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas caused by infection of human papillomaviruses (HPVs). By integrating into the host genome, HPV oncogenes E6 and E7 drive the genomic instability to promote DNA damage and gene mutations necessary for carcinogenesis in FA patients. Furthermore, E6 and E7 oncoproteins not only inhibit p53 and retinoblastoma but also impair the FANC/BRCA signaling pathway to prevent DNA damage repair and alter multiple signals including cell-cycle checkpoints, telomere function, cell proliferation, and interference of the host immune system leading to cancer development in FA patients. In this review, we summarize recent advances in unraveling the molecular mechanisms of FA susceptibility to HPV-induced cancers, which facilitate rational preventive and therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25776992

  17. Inhibitory Mechanism of FAT4 Gene Expression in Response to Actin Dynamics during Src-Induced Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Takao; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Fukagai, Kousuke; Okamuro, Shota; Kobayashi, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenic transformation is characterized by morphological changes resulting from alterations in actin dynamics and adhesive activities. Emerging evidence suggests that the protocadherin FAT4 acts as a tumor suppressor in humans, and reduced FAT4 gene expression has been reported in breast and lung cancers and melanoma. However, the mechanism controlling FAT4 gene expression is poorly understood. In this study, we show that transient activation of the Src oncoprotein represses FAT4 mRNA expression through actin depolymerization in the immortalized normal human mammary epithelial cell line MCF-10A. Src activation causes actin depolymerization via the MEK/Erk/Cofilin cascade. The MEK inhibitor U0126 blocks the inhibitory effect of Src on FAT4 mRNA expression and Src-induced actin depolymerization. To determine whether actin dynamics act on the regulation of FAT4 mRNA expression, we treated MCF-10A cells with the ROCK inhibitor Y-27632. Y-27632 treatment decreased FAT4 mRNA expression. This suppressive effect was blocked by siRNA-mediated knockdown of Cofilin1. Furthermore, simultaneous administration of Latrunculin A (an actin depolymerizing agent), Y-27632, and Cofilin1 siRNA to the cells resulted in a marked reduction of FAT4 mRNA expression. Intriguingly, we also found that FAT4 mRNA expression was reduced under both low cell density and low stiffness conditions, which suggests that mechanotransduction affects FAT4 mRNA expression. Additionally, we show that siRNA-mediated FAT4 knockdown induced the activity of the Hippo effector YAP/TAZ in MCF-10A cells. Taken together, our results reveal a novel inhibitory mechanism of FAT4 gene expression through actin depolymerization during Src-induced carcinogenesis in human breast cells. PMID:25679223

  18. Human papillomavirus 16 E5 induces bi-nucleated cell formation by cell-cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Lulin; Plafker, Kendra; Vorozhko, Valeriya; Zuna, Rosemary E.; Hanigan, Marie H.; Gorbsky, Gary J.; Plafker, Scott M.; Angeletti, Peter C.; Ceresa, Brian P.

    2009-02-05

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) 16 is a DNA virus encoding three oncogenes - E5, E6, and E7. The E6 and E7 proteins have well-established roles as inhibitors of tumor suppression, but the contribution of E5 to malignant transformation is controversial. Using spontaneously immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells), we demonstrate that expression of HPV16 E5 is necessary and sufficient for the formation of bi-nucleated cells, a common characteristic of precancerous cervical lesions. Expression of E5 from non-carcinogenic HPV6b does not produce bi-nucleate cells. Video microscopy and biochemical analyses reveal that bi-nucleates arise through cell-cell fusion. Although most E5-induced bi-nucleates fail to propagate, co-expression of HPV16 E6/E7 enhances the proliferation of these cells. Expression of HPV16 E6/E7 also increases bi-nucleated cell colony formation. These findings identify a new role for HPV16 E5 and support a model in which complementary roles of the HPV16 oncogenes lead to the induction of carcinogenesis.

  19. Diagnostic performance of HPV E6/E7, hTERT, and Ki67 mRNA RT-qPCR assays on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded cervical tissue specimens from women with cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hye-Young; Kim, Geehyuk; Cho, Hyemi; Kim, Sunghyun; Lee, Dongsup; Park, Sunyoung; Park, Kwang Hwa; Lee, Hyeyoung

    2015-06-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a major cause of cervical cancer, which is the third most common cancer in women. Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) and Ki67 are tumor cell markers indicating cancer cell proliferation in cancer patients, and activation of hTERT and Ki67 leads to progressive cervical carcinogenesis. In the present study, we evaluated the CervicGen HPVE6/E7 mRNA RT-qDx assay, which detects 16 HPV high-risk (HR) genotypes (HPV 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 53, 56, 58, 59, 66, 68 and 69), and the CervicGen hTERT and Ki67 mRNA RT-qDx assay using 117 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) cervical cancer tissue samples. The diagnostic validity of the CervicGen HPV RT-qDx assay for detecting histologically proven prevalent squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) was 94% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 77.8% positive predictive value (PPV), and 78.9% negative predictive value (NPV). The most common HPV genotypes detected in FFPE cervical cancer tissue samples were HPV 16 (56%) and HPV 18 (10%). The positivity rate of hTERT and Ki67 mRNA expressions in FFPE cervical cancer tissue samples on RT-qPCR was 65% and 93% respectively. Moreover, the positivity rates were 92% for a combination of HPV E6/E7 and hTERT mRNA expressions, 97% for HPV E6/E7 and Ki67 mRNA expressions, and 99% (99/100) for the combination of HPV E6/E7, hTERT, and Ki67 mRNA expressions. These data showed that SSC FFPE cervical cancer tissue samples correlated more strongly with high Ki67 mRNA expressions than with hTERT mRNA expressions. Notably, hTERT and Ki67 mRNA expression level was increased in high-grade cervical lesions, but was very low in normal samples. Our findings suggest that the combination of HPV E6/E7, hTERT, and Ki67 mRNA expression levels could be used in a complementary manner in diagnosing high-grade cervical lesions. Further studies are required to evaluate these assays as a useful predictive tool for screening low-grade cervical lesions. PMID:25835783

  20. Activating c-KIT mutations confer oncogenic cooperativity and rescue RUNX1/ETO-induced DNA damage and apoptosis in human primary CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors.

    PubMed

    Wichmann, C; Quagliano-Lo Coco, I; Yildiz, Ö; Chen-Wichmann, L; Weber, H; Syzonenko, T; Döring, C; Brendel, C; Ponnusamy, K; Kinner, A; Brandts, C; Henschler, R; Grez, M

    2015-02-01

    The RUNX1/ETO (RE) fusion protein, which originates from the t(8;21) chromosomal rearrangement, is one of the most frequent translocation products found in de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In RE leukemias, activated forms of the c-KIT tyrosine kinase receptor are frequently found, thereby suggesting oncogenic cooperativity between these oncoproteins in the development and maintenance of t(8;21) malignancies. In this report, we show that activated c-KIT cooperates with a C-terminal truncated variant of RE, REtr, to expand human CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors ex vivo. CD34+ cells expressing both oncogenes resemble the AML-M2 myeloblastic cell phenotype, in contrast to REtr-expressing cells which largely undergo granulocytic differentiation. Oncogenic c-KIT amplifies REtr-depended clonogenic growth and protects cells from exhaustion. Activated c-KIT reverts REtr-induced DNA damage and apoptosis. In the presence of activated c-KIT, REtr-downregulated DNA-repair genes are re-expressed leading to an enhancement of DNA-repair efficiency via homologous recombination. Together, our results provide new mechanistic insight into REtr and c-KIT oncogenic cooperativity and suggest that augmented DNA repair accounts for the increased chemoresistance observed in t(8;21)-positive AML patients with activated c-KIT mutations. This cell-protective mechanism might represent a new therapeutic target, as REtr cells with activated c-KIT are highly sensitive to pharmacological inhibitors of DNA repair. PMID:24897507

  1. Tobacco exposure results in increased E6 and E7 oncogene expression, DNA damage and mutation rates in cells maintaining episomal human papillomavirus 16 genomes

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Lanlan; Griego, Anastacia M.; Chu, Ming; Ozbun, Michelle A.

    2014-01-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infections are necessary but insufficient agents of cervical and other epithelial cancers. Epidemiological studies support a causal, but ill-defined, relationship between tobacco smoking and cervical malignancies. In this study, we used mainstream tobacco smoke condensate (MSTS-C) treatments of cervical cell lines that maintain either episomal or integrated HPV16 or HPV31 genomes to model tobacco smoke exposure to the cervical epithelium of the smoker. MSTS-C exposure caused a dose-dependent increase in viral genome replication and correspondingly higher early gene transcription in cells with episomal HPV genomes. However, MSTS-C exposure in cells with integrated HR-HPV genomes had no effect on genome copy number or early gene transcription. In cells with episomal HPV genomes, the MSTS-C-induced increases in E6 oncogene transcription led to decreased p53 protein levels and activity. As expected from loss of p53 activity in tobacco-exposed cells, DNA strand breaks were significantly higher but apoptosis was minimal compared with cells containing integrated viral genomes. Furthermore, DNA mutation frequencies were higher in surviving cells with HPV episomes. These findings provide increased understanding of tobacco smoke exposure risk in HPV infection and indicate tobacco smoking acts more directly to alter HR-HPV oncogene expression in cells that maintain episomal viral genomes. This suggests a more prominent role for tobacco smoke in earlier stages of HPV-related cancer progression. PMID:25064354

  2. The proto-oncogene Bcl3, induced by Tax, represses Tax-mediated transcription via p300 displacement from the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 promoter.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Mi; Sharma, Neelam; Nyborg, Jennifer K

    2008-12-01

    The etiology of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-induced adult T-cell leukemia is linked to the expression of the viral oncoprotein Tax. Although the mechanism of retroviral transformation is unknown, Tax interferes with fundamental cellular processes, including proliferation and apoptosis, and these events may directly link Tax to early steps in malignant progression. In this study, we examined the interplay between Tax and the potent proto-oncogene B-cell chronic leukemia protein 3 (Bcl3). Bcl3 is a critical regulator of cell survival and proliferation and is overexpressed in HTLV-1-infected cells. We found that Tax induced Bcl3 expression through stimulation of the NF-kappaB pathway. An intronic NF-kappaB binding site within the Bcl3 gene served as the primary target of Tax-induced NF-kappaB activation. We next considered the consequence of Bcl3 overexpression on Tax function. Interestingly, we found that Bcl3 formed a stable complex with Tax and that this complex potently inhibited Tax-dependent HTLV-1 transcription. Importantly, Bcl3 associated with the HTLV-1 promoter in a Tax-dependent manner and inhibited the binding of the critical cellular coactivator p300. The conserved ankyrin repeat domain of Bcl3 mediated both Tax binding and inhibition of p300 recruitment to the HTLV-1 promoter. Together, these data suggest that Tax-induced Bcl3 overexpression benefits the virus in two important ways. First, Bcl3 may promote cell division and thus clonal proliferation of the virus. Second, Bcl3 may attenuate virion production, facilitating immune evasion. One consequence of this regulatory loop may be Bcl3-induced malignant transformation of the host cell. PMID:18815299

  3. Transformation with Oncogenic Ras and the Simian Virus 40 T Antigens Induces Caspase-Dependent Sensitivity to Fatty Acid Biosynthetic Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shihao; Spencer, Cody M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oncogenesis is frequently accompanied by the activation of specific metabolic pathways. One such pathway is fatty acid biosynthesis, whose induction is observed upon transformation of a wide variety of cell types. Here, we explored how defined oncogenic alleles, specifically the simian virus 40 (SV40) T antigens and oncogenic Ras12V, affect fatty acid metabolism. Our results indicate that SV40/Ras12V-mediated transformation of fibroblasts induces fatty acid biosynthesis in the absence of significant changes in the concentration of fatty acid biosynthetic enzymes. This oncogene-induced activation of fatty acid biosynthesis was found to be mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) dependent, as it was attenuated by rapamycin treatment. Furthermore, SV40/Ras12V-mediated transformation induced sensitivity to treatment with fatty acid biosynthetic inhibitors. Pharmaceutical inhibition of acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) carboxylase (ACC), a key fatty acid biosynthetic enzyme, induced caspase-dependent cell death in oncogene-transduced cells. In contrast, isogenic nontransformed cells were resistant to fatty acid biosynthetic inhibition. This oncogene-induced sensitivity to fatty acid biosynthetic inhibition was independent of the cells' growth rates and could be attenuated by supplementing the medium with unsaturated fatty acids. Both the activation of fatty acid biosynthesis and the sensitivity to fatty acid biosynthetic inhibition could be conveyed to nontransformed breast epithelial cells through transduction with oncogenic Ras12V. Similar to what was observed in the transformed fibroblasts, the Ras12V-induced sensitivity to fatty acid biosynthetic inhibition was independent of the proliferative status and could be attenuated by supplementing the medium with unsaturated fatty acids. Combined, our results indicate that specific oncogenic alleles can directly confer sensitivity to inhibitors of fatty acid biosynthesis. IMPORTANCE Viral oncoproteins and cellular mutations drive the transformation of normal cells to the cancerous state. These oncogenic alterations induce metabolic changes and dependencies that can be targeted to kill cancerous cells. Here, we find that the cellular transformation resulting from combined expression of the SV40 early region with an oncogenic Ras allele is sufficient to induce cellular susceptibility to fatty acid biosynthetic inhibition. Inhibition of fatty acid biosynthesis in these cells resulted in programmed cell death, which could be rescued by supplementing the medium with nonsaturated fatty acids. Similar results were observed with the expression of oncogenic Ras in nontransformed breast epithelial cells. Combined, our results suggest that specific oncogenic alleles induce metabolic dependencies that can be exploited to selectively kill cancerous cells. PMID:25855740

  4. Prognostic significance of cytoplasmic p53 oncoprotein in colorectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sun, X F; Carstensen, J M; Zhang, H; Stål, O; Wingren, S; Hatschek, T; Nordenskjöld, B

    1992-12-01

    Mutation of p53, a tumour-suppressor protein, leads to overexpression of the protein and loss of its tumour-suppressive properties. In some tumours (eg, breast) p53 expression is related to well-known prognostic factors, but findings in colorectal tumours are equivocal. We have used the polyclonal antibody CM1 to investigate nuclear and cytoplasmic p53 expression in colorectal tumours and to assess their relations with prognosis. Of 293 colorectal adenocarcinomas, 71 (24%) showed p53 expression in the nucleus alone, 30 (10%) showed p53 in the cytoplasm alone, and 43 (15%) showed both nuclear and cytoplasmic expression. Nuclear p53 expression showed no relation with survival or Dukes' stage of the tumour. However, the frequency of cytoplasmic expression increased with advancing Dukes' stage (chi 2 for trend 11.18, 1 df, p = 0.0008) and cytoplasmic expression was associated with poor survival (rate ratio 2.3 [95% CI 1.6-3.3], p < 0.0001). Among tumours of Dukes' stage A-C, cytoplasmic expression showed prognostic value independent of nuclear staining, grade of differentiation, and Dukes' stage (2.3 [1.4-3.7], p = 0.0021). We conclude that cytoplasmic expression of p53 may be a useful biological indicator of prognosis in colorectal adenocarcinoma. PMID:1360088

  5. The roles and clinical significance of microRNAs in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fenfen; Li, Baohua; Xie, Xing

    2016-02-01

    Cervical carcinogenesis induced by persistent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection represents a stepwise progression from precursors to invasive cervical cancer. Accumulated evidence has shown aberrant expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) in cervical cancer tissues and cells. Further studies reveal that miRNAs play key roles in the initiation and progression of cervical cancer, via specific signaling pathways, including E6-p53, E7-pRb, phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K)-Akt, Notch, Wnt/?-catenin, and Hedgehog pathways. Some studies demonstrate that miRNAs might serve as biomarkers or therapeutic targets, presenting a potential prospect in clinical practice. All results provide new insights into the function of miRNAs and the pathogenesis of cervical cancer induced by viral oncoproteins. New approaches for miRNA-based prevention and management for cervical cancer will be developed in the future. PMID:26356641

  6. Chronic cadmium exposure in vitro induces cancer cell characteristics in human lung cells

    SciTech Connect

    Person, Rachel J.; Tokar, Erik J.; Xu, Yuanyuan; Orihuela, Ruben; Ngalame, Ntube N. Olive; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2013-12-01

    Cadmium is a known human lung carcinogen. Here, we attempt to develop an in vitro model of cadmium-induced human lung carcinogenesis by chronically exposing the peripheral lung epithelia cell line, HPL-1D, to a low level of cadmium. Cells were chronically exposed to 5 ?M cadmium, a noncytotoxic level, and monitored for acquired cancer characteristics. By 20 weeks of continuous cadmium exposure, these chronic cadmium treated lung (CCT-LC) cells showed marked increases in secreted MMP-2 activity (3.5-fold), invasion (3.4-fold), and colony formation in soft agar (2-fold). CCT-LC cells were hyperproliferative, grew well in serum-free media, and overexpressed cyclin D1. The CCT-LC cells also showed decreased expression of the tumor suppressor genes p16 and SLC38A3 at the protein levels. Also consistent with an acquired cancer cell phenotype, CCT-LC cells showed increased expression of the oncoproteins K-RAS and N-RAS as well as the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition marker protein Vimentin. Metallothionein (MT) expression is increased by cadmium, and is typically overexpressed in human lung cancers. The major MT isoforms, MT-1A and MT-2A were elevated in CCT-LC cells. Oxidant adaptive response genes HO-1 and HIF-1A were also activated in CCT-LC cells. Expression of the metal transport genes ZNT-1, ZNT-5, and ZIP-8 increased in CCT-LC cells culminating in reduced cadmium accumulation, suggesting adaptation to the metal. Overall, these data suggest that exposure of human lung epithelial cells to cadmium causes acquisition of cancer cell characteristics. Furthermore, transformation occurs despite the cell's ability to adapt to chronic cadmium exposure. - Highlights: • Chronic cadmium exposure induces cancer cell characteristics in human lung cells. • This provides an in vitro model of cadmium-induced human lung cell transformation. • This occurred with general and lung specific changes typical for cancer cells. • These findings add insight to the relationship between cadmium and lung cancer.

  7. Extreme optomechanically induced transparency

    E-print Network

    Bodiya, Timothy Paul

    2015-01-01

    This thesis describes the theory and experimental implementation optomechanically induced transparency utilizing ultra low loss mechanical oscillators and high laser power to achieve extremely strong optical induced ...

  8. Epstein–Barr virus-transforming protein latent infection membrane protein 1 activates transcription factor NF-?B through a pathway that includes the NF-?B-inducing kinase and the I?B kinases IKK? and IKK?

    PubMed Central

    Sylla, Bakary S.; Hung, Siu Chun; Davidson, David M.; Hatzivassiliou, Eudoxia; Malinin, Nikolai L.; Wallach, David; Gilmore, Thomas D.; Kieff, Elliott; Mosialos, George

    1998-01-01

    The Epstein–Barr virus oncoprotein latent infection membrane protein 1 (LMP1) is a constitutively aggregated pseudo-tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) that activates transcription factor NF-?B through two sites in its C-terminal cytoplasmic domain. One site is similar to activated TNFRII in associating with TNFR-associated factors TRAF1 and TRAF2, and the second site is similar to TNFRI in associating with the TNFRI death domain interacting protein TRADD. TNFRI has been recently shown to activate NF-?B through association with TRADD, RIP, and TRAF2; activation of the NF-?B-inducing kinase (NIK); activation of the I?B? kinases (IKK? and IKK?); and phosphorylation of I?B?. I?B? phosphorylation on Ser-32 and Ser-36 is followed by its degradation and NF-?B activation. In this report, we show that NF-?B activation by LMP1 or by each of its effector sites is mediated by a pathway that includes NIK, IKK?, and IKK?. Dominant negative mutants of NIK, IKK?, or IKK? substantially inhibited NF-?B activation by LMP1 or by each of its effector sites. PMID:9707608

  9. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons—Induced ROS Accumulation Enhances Mutagenic Potential of T-Antigen From Human Polyomavirus JC

    PubMed Central

    WILK, ANNA; RSKI, PIOTR WALIGÓ; LASSAK, ADAM; VASHISTHA, HIMANSHU; LIRETTE, DAVID; TATE, DAVID; ZEA, ARNOLD H.; KOOCHEKPOUR, SHAHRIAR; RODRIGUEZ, PAULO; MEGGS, LEONARD G.; ESTRADA, JOHN J.; OCHOA, AUGUSTO; REISS, KRZYSZTOF

    2014-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are the products of incomplete combustion of organic materials, which are present in cigarette smoke, deep-fried food, and in natural crude oil. Since PAH-metabolites form DNA adducts and cause oxidative DNA damage, we asked if these environmental carcinogens could affect transforming potential of the human Polyomavirus JC oncoprotein, T-antigen (JCV T-antigen). We extracted DMSO soluble PAHs from Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico (oil-PAHs), and detected several carcinogenic PAHs. The oil-PAHs were tested in exponentially growing cultures of normal mouse fibroblasts (R508), and in R508 stably expressing JCV T-antigen (R508/T). The oil-PAHs were cytotoxic only at relatively high doses (1:50–1:100 dilution), and at 1:500 dilution the growth and cell survival rates were practically unaffected. This non-toxic dose triggered however, a significant accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), caused oxidative DNA damage and the formation of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). Although oil-PAHs induced similar levels of DNA damage in R508 and R508/T cells, only T-antigen expressing cells demonstrated inhibition of high fidelity DNA repair by homologous recombination (HRR). In contrast, low-fidelity repair by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) was unaffected. This potential mutagenic shift between DNA repair mechanisms was accompanied by a significant increase in clonal growth of R508/T cells chronically exposed to low doses of the oil-PAHs. Our results indicate for the first time carcinogenic synergy in which oil-PAHs trigger oxidative DNA damage and JCV T-antigen compromises DNA repair fidelity. PMID:23558788

  10. Constitutive Phosphorylation of Aurora-A on Ser51 Induces Its Stabilization and Consequent Overexpression in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Ikuko; Tatsuka, Masaaki; Kawai, Hidehiko; Pagano, Michele; Takata, Takashi

    2007-01-01

    Background The serine/threonine kinase Aurora-A (Aur-A) is a proto-oncoprotein overexpressed in a wide range of human cancers. Overexpression of Aur-A is thought to be caused by gene amplification or mRNA overexpression. However, recent evidence revealed that the discrepancies between amplification of Aur-A and overexpression rates of Aur-A mRNA were observed in breast cancer, gastric cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, and ovarian cancer. We found that aggressive head and neck cancers exhibited overexpression and stabilization of Aur-A protein without gene amplification or mRNA overexpression. Here we tested the hypothesis that aberration of the protein destruction system induces accumulation and consequently overexpression of Aur-A in cancer. Principal Findings Aur-A protein was ubiquitinylated by APCCdh1 and consequently degraded when cells exited mitosis, and phosphorylation of Aur-A on Ser51 was observed during mitosis. Phosphorylation of Aur-A on Ser51 inhibited its APCCdh1-mediated ubiquitylation and consequent degradation. Interestingly, constitutive phosphorylation on Ser51 was observed in head and neck cancer cells with protein overexpression and stabilization. Indeed, phosphorylation on Ser51 was observed in head and neck cancer tissues with Aur-A protein overexpression. Moreover, an Aur-A Ser51 phospho-mimetic mutant displayed stabilization of protein during cell cycle progression and enhanced ability to cell transformation. Conclusions/Significance Broadly, this study identifies a new mode of Aur-A overexpression in cancer through phosphorylation-dependent inhibition of its proteolysis in addition to gene amplification and mRNA overexpression. We suggest that the inhibition of Aur-A phosphorylation can represent a novel way to decrease Aur-A levels in cancer therapy. PMID:17895985

  11. Tumor suppressor p16INK4A is necessary for survival of cervical carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin-Drubin, Margaret E; Park, Donglim; Munger, Karl

    2013-10-01

    The tumor suppressor p16(INK4A) inhibits formation of enzymatically active complexes of cyclin-dependent kinases 4 and 6 (CDK4/6) with D-type cyclins. Oncogenic stress induces p16(INK4A) expression, which in turn triggers cellular senescence through activation of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor. Subversion of oncogene-induced senescence is a key step during cancer development, and many tumors have lost p16(INK4A) activity by mutation or epigenetic silencing. Human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated tumors express high levels of p16(INK4A) in response to E7 oncoprotein expression. Induction of p16(INK4A) expression is not a consequence of retinoblastoma tumor suppressor inactivation but is triggered by a cellular senescence response and is mediated by epigenetic derepression through the H3K27-specific demethylase (KDM)6B. HPV E7 expression causes an acute dependence on KDM6B expression for cell survival. The p16(INK4A) tumor suppressor is a critical KDM6B downstream transcriptional target and its expression is critical for cell survival. This oncogenic p16(INK4A) activity depends on inhibition of CDK4/CDK6, suggesting that in cervical cancer cells where retinoblastoma tumor suppressor is inactivated, CDK4/CDK6 activity needs to be inhibited in order for cells to survive. Finally, we note that HPV E7 expression creates a unique cellular vulnerability to small-molecule KDM6A/B inhibitors. PMID:24046371

  12. Tumor suppressor p16INK4A is necessary for survival of cervical carcinoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin-Drubin, Margaret E.; Park, Donglim; Munger, Karl

    2013-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p16INK4A inhibits formation of enzymatically active complexes of cyclin-dependent kinases 4 and 6 (CDK4/6) with D-type cyclins. Oncogenic stress induces p16INK4A expression, which in turn triggers cellular senescence through activation of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor. Subversion of oncogene-induced senescence is a key step during cancer development, and many tumors have lost p16INK4A activity by mutation or epigenetic silencing. Human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated tumors express high levels of p16INK4A in response to E7 oncoprotein expression. Induction of p16INK4A expression is not a consequence of retinoblastoma tumor suppressor inactivation but is triggered by a cellular senescence response and is mediated by epigenetic derepression through the H3K27-specific demethylase (KDM)6B. HPV E7 expression causes an acute dependence on KDM6B expression for cell survival. The p16INK4A tumor suppressor is a critical KDM6B downstream transcriptional target and its expression is critical for cell survival. This oncogenic p16INK4A activity depends on inhibition of CDK4/CDK6, suggesting that in cervical cancer cells where retinoblastoma tumor suppressor is inactivated, CDK4/CDK6 activity needs to be inhibited in order for cells to survive. Finally, we note that HPV E7 expression creates a unique cellular vulnerability to small-molecule KDM6A/B inhibitors. PMID:24046371

  13. Measurements of prompt radiation induced conductivity of alumina and sapphire.

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, E. Frederick; Zarick, Thomas Andrew; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Preston, Eric F.

    2011-04-01

    We performed measurements of the prompt radiation induced conductivity in thin samples of Alumina and Sapphire at the Little Mountain Medusa LINAC facility in Ogden, UT. Five mil thick samples were irradiated with pulses of 20 MeV electrons, yielding dose rates of 1E7 to 1E9 rad/s. We applied variable potentials up to 1 kV across the samples and measured the prompt conduction current. Analysis rendered prompt conductivity coefficients between 1E10 and 1E9 mho/m/(rad/s), depending on the dose rate and the pulse width for Alumina and 1E7 to 6E7 mho/m/(rad/s) for Sapphire.

  14. Serum antibody response to Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections detected by a novel ELISA technique based on denatured recombinant HPV16 L1, L2, E4, E6 and E7 proteins

    PubMed Central

    Di Bonito, Paola; Grasso, Felicia; Mochi, Stefania; Accardi, Luisa; Donà, Maria Gabriella; Branca, Margherita; Costa, Silvano; Mariani, Luciano; Agarossi, Alberto; Ciotti, Marco; Syrjänen, Kari; Giorgi, Colomba

    2006-01-01

    Background Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are the primary etiological agents of cervical cancer and are also involved in the development of other tumours (skin, head and neck). Serological survey of the HPV infections is important to better elucidate their natural history and to disclose antigen determinants useful for vaccine development. At present, the analysis of the HPV-specific antibodies has not diagnostic value for the viral infections, and new approaches are needed to correlate the antibody response to the disease outcome. The aim of this study is to develop a novel ELISA, based on five denatured recombinant HPV16 proteins, to be used for detection HPV-specific antibodies. Methods The HPV16 L1, L2, E4, E6 and E7 genes were cloned in a prokaryotic expression vector and expressed as histidine-tagged proteins. These proteins, in a denatured form, were used in ELISA as coating antigens. Human sera were collected from women with abnormal PAP smear enrolled during an ongoing multicenter HPV-PathogenISS study in Italy, assessing the HPV-related pathogenetic mechanisms of progression of cervical cancer precursor lesions. Negative human sera were collected from patients affected by other infectious agents. All the HPV-positive sera were also subjected to an avidity test to assess the binding strength in the antigen-antibody complexes. Results Most of the sera showed a positive reactivity to the denatured HPV16 proteins: 82% of the sera from HPV16 infected women and 89% of the sera from women infected by other HPV genotypes recognised at least one of the HPV16 proteins. The percentages of samples showing reactivity to L1, L2 and E7 were similar, but only a few serum samples reacted to E6 and E4. Most sera bound the antigens with medium and high avidity index, suggesting specific antigen-antibody reactions. Conclusion This novel ELISA, based on multiple denatured HPV16 antigens, is able to detect antibodies in women infected by HPV16 and it is not genotype-specific, as it detects antibodies also in women infected by other genital HPVs. The assay is easy to perform and has low cost, making it suitable for monitoring the natural history of HPV infections as well as for detecting pre-existing HPV antibodies in women who receive VLP-based HPV vaccination. PMID:17150135

  15. Human papillomavirus 16-specific T cell responses in classic HPV-related vulvar intra-epithelial neoplasia. Determination of strongly immunogenic regions from E6 and E7 proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bourgault Villada, I; Moyal Barracco, M; Berville, S; Bafounta, M L; Longvert, C; Prémel, V; Villefroy, P; Jullian, E; Clerici, T; Paniel, B; Maillère, B; Choppin, J; Guillet, J G

    2010-01-01

    Cell-mediated immunity directed against human papillomavirus 16 (HPV-16) antigens was studied in 16 patients affected with classic vulvar intra-epithelial neoplasia (VIN), also known as bowenoid papulosis (BP). Ten patients had blood lymphocyte proliferative T cell responses directed against E6/2 (14–34) and/or E6/4 (45–68) peptides, which were identified in the present study as immunodominant among HPV-16 E6 and E7 large peptides. Ex vivo enzyme-linked immunospot–interferon (IFN)-? assay was positive in three patients who had proliferative responses. Twelve months later, proliferative T cell responses remained detectable in only six women and the immunodominant antigens remained the E6/2 (14–34) and E6/4 (45–68) peptides. The latter large fragments of peptides contained many epitopes able to bind to at least seven human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules and were strong binders to seven HLA-DR class II molecules. In order to build a therapeutic anti-HPV-16 vaccine, E6/2 (14–34) and E6/4 (45–68) fragments thus appear to be good candidates to increase HPV-specific effector T lymphocyte responses and clear classic VIN (BP) disease lesions. PMID:19843089

  16. Allosteric regulation of MDM2 protein 

    E-print Network

    Wawrzynów, Bartosz

    2010-01-01

    The diverse functions of the MDM2 oncoprotein in growth control and tumourigenesis are managed through coordinated regulation of its discrete domains induced by both extrinsic and intrinsic stimuli. A picture of MDM2 ...

  17. Curcumin-induced Aurora-A suppression not only causes mitotic defect and cell cycle arrest but also alters chemosensitivity to anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Ke, Ching-Shiun; Liu, Hsiao-Sheng; Yen, Cheng-Hsin; Huang, Guan-Cheng; Cheng, Hung-Chi; Huang, Chi-Ying F; Su, Chun-Li

    2014-05-01

    Overexpression of oncoprotein Aurora-A increases drug resistance and promotes lung metastasis of breast cancer cells. Curcumin is an active anticancer compound in turmeric and curry. Here we observed that Aurora-A protein and kinase activity were reduced in curcumin-treated human breast chemoresistant nonmetastatic MCF-7 and highly metastatic cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. Curcumin acts in a similar manner to Aurora-A small interfering RNA (siRNA), resulting in monopolar spindle formation, S and G2/M arrest, and cell division reduction. Ectopic Aurora-A extinguished the curcumin effects. The anticancer effects of curcumin were enhanced by Aurora-A siRNA and produced additivity and synergism effects in cell division and monopolar phenotype, respectively. Combination treatment with curcumin overrode the chemoresistance to four Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved anticancer drugs (ixabepilone, cisplatin, vinorelbine, or everolimus) in MDA-MB-231 cells, which was characterized by a decrease in cell viability and the occurrence of an additivity or synergy effect. Ectopic expression of Aurora-A attenuated curcumin-enhanced chemosensitivity to these four tested drugs. A similar benefit of curcumin was observed in MCF-7 cells treated with ixabepilone, the primary systemic therapy to patients with invasive breast cancer (stages IIA-IIIB) before surgery. Antagonism effect was observed when MCF-7 cells were treated with curcumin plus cisplatin, vinorelbine or everolimus. Curcumin-induced enhancement in chemosensitivity was paralleled by significant increases (additivity or synergy effect) in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at S and G2/M phases, the consequences of Aurora-A inhibition. These results suggest that a combination of curcumin with FDA-approved anticancer drugs warrants further assessment with a view to developing a novel clinical treatment for breast cancer. PMID:24613085

  18. Flow-induced vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Blevins, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    This book reports on dimensional analysis; ideal fluid models; vortex-induced vibration; galloping and flutter; instability of tube and cylinder arrays; vibrations induced by oscillating flow; vibration induced by turbulence and sound; damping of structures; sound induced by vortex shedding; vibrations of a pipe containing a fluid flow; indices. It covers the analysis of the vibrations of structures exposed to fluid flows; explores applications for offshore platforms and piping; wind-induced vibration of buildings, bridges, and towers; and acoustic and mechanical vibration of heat exchangers, power lines, and process ducting.

  19. Cavitation-resistant inducer

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, C.; Subbaraman, M.R.

    1989-06-13

    An improvement in an inducer for a pump is disclosed wherein the inducer includes a hub, a plurality of radially extending substantially helical blades and a wall member extending about and encompassing an outer periphery of the blades. The improvement comprises forming adjacent pairs of blades and the hub to provide a substantially rectangular cross-sectional flow area which cross-sectional flow area decreases from the inlet end of the inducer to a discharge end of the inducer, resulting in increased inducer efficiency improved suction performance, reduced susceptibility to cavitation, reduced susceptibility to hub separation and reduced fabrication costs. 11 figs.

  20. 4/14/2014 TEDxUTA speakers inspire innovation -The Shorthorn : News http://www.theshorthorn.com/news/tedxuta-speakers-inspire-innovation/article_1c554e7a-b242-11e3-a6a2-001a4bcf6878.html 1/4

    E-print Network

    Chiao, Jung-Chih

    ://www.theshorthorn.com/news/tedxuta-speakers-inspire-innovation/article_1c554e7a-b242-11e3-a6a2-001a4bcf6878.html 2/4 More RECENT ACTIVITY Students protest Pro-Life statement, add to conversation Pro-Life Mavericks make a visual statement Protesters fight pro-life display://www.theshorthorn.com/news/tedxuta-speakers-inspire-innovation/article_1c554e7a-b242-11e3-a6a2-001a4bcf6878.html 1/4 45° Overcast NEWS OPINION LIFE+ENTERTAINMENT SPORTS

  1. Human papillomavirus type 16 E6 activates NF-kappaB, induces cIAP-2 expression, and protects against apoptosis in a PDZ binding motif-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    James, Michael A; Lee, John H; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J

    2006-06-01

    Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is a critical factor in the pathogenesis of most cervical cancers and some aerodigestive cancers. The HPV E6 oncoprotein from high-risk HPV types contributes to the immortalization and transformation of cells by multiple mechanisms, including degradation of p53, transcriptional activation of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), and degradation of several proteins containing PDZ domains. The ability of E6 to bind PDZ domain-containing proteins is independent of p53 degradation or hTERT activation but does correlate with oncogenic potential (R. A. Watson, M. Thomas, L. Banks, and S. Roberts, J. Cell Sci. 116:4925-4934, 2003) and is essential for induction of epithelial hyperplasia in vivo (M. L. Nguyen, M. M. Nguyen, D. Lee, A. E. Griep, and P. F. Lambert, J. Virol. 77:6957-6964, 2003). In this study, we found that HPV type 16 E6 was able to activate NF-kappaB in airway epithelial cells through the induction of nuclear binding activity of p52-containing NF-kappaB complexes in a PDZ binding motif-dependent manner. Transcript accumulation for the NF-kappaB-responsive antiapoptotic gene encoding cIAP-2 and binding of nuclear factors to the proximal NF-kappaB binding site of the cIAP-2 gene promoter are induced by E6 expression. Furthermore, E6 is able to protect cells from TNF-induced apoptosis. All of these E6-dependent phenotypes are dependent on the presence of the PDZ binding motif of E6. Our results imply a role for targeting of PDZ proteins by E6 in NF-kappaB activation and protection from apoptosis in airway epithelial cells. PMID:16699010

  2. Bryostatin 1 induces ubiquitination and proteasome degradation of Bcl-2 in the human acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line, Reh.

    PubMed

    Wall, N R; Mohammad, R M; Reddy, K B; Al-Katib, A M

    2000-02-01

    The ubiquitin-mediated proteolytic system has been implicated in the turnover of a number of intracellular proteins. In the present study, we investigated the novelty and potential role of bryostatin 1, a macrocyclic lactone isolated from the marine bryozoan, Bugula neritina, in inducing the ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis of the oncoprotein Bcl-2. Immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting analyses revealed that Bcl-2 is ubiquitinated following exposure of the acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cell line Reh to 1 nM bryostatin 1. Bcl-2 protein rapidly decreases to 50% of that recorded in the control after 24 h of bryostatin 1 treatment. In the subsequent 24 h, Bcl-2 protein again rapidly decreases to 6% of its pre-bryostatin 1 level at which time a plateau is reached and maintained for another 72 h. Furthermore, ubiquitin-Bcl-2 conjugates are detected in untreated as well as bryostatin 1 treated cells, indicating that ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis plays a role in the normal turnover of Bcl-2. However, ubiquitin-Bcl-2 conjugates increase in a time-dependent manner following bryostatin 1 treatment. Lactacystin, which inhibits the proteinase activities of the proteasome, inhibited the bryostatin 1-induced decrease of Bcl-2 protein. The effect of bryostatin 1 on the proteolytic efficiency of the 26S proteasome in Reh cell extracts was also investigated and shown to increase following 1 h of bryostatin 1 treatment. Proteolytic activity reached its highest point by 3 h, and subsequently returned to control levels by 12 h, post-bryostatin 1 treatment. In addition, bryostatin 1 treatment of the Reh cell line decreased expression of bcl-2 mRNA within 3 h. However, bcl-2 mRNA expression returned after 24 h. We speculate that this decrease in mRNA together with increased 26S proteolytic activity accounts for the initial rapid decrease recorded in Bcl-2 protein. These findings indicate that bryostatin 1 treatment of Reh ALL cells decreases Bcl-2 expression through two processes: a) enhanced Bcl-2 protein degradation through the activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and b) decreased bcl-2 mRNA expression. PMID:10639596

  3. Intrinsically Disordered Energy Landscapes

    E-print Network

    Chebaro, Yassmine C.; Ballard, Andrew J.; Chakraborty, Debayan; Wales, David J.

    2015-05-22

    . Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 105, 5762–5767 (2008). 6. Uversky, V. N., Roman, A., Oldfield, C. J. & Dunker, A. K. Protein intrinsic disorder and human papillomaviruses: increased amount of disorder in e6 and e7 oncoproteins from high risk hpvs. J...

  4. Stress-induced flowering

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Kaede C

    2010-01-01

    Many plant species can be induced to flower by responding to stress factors. The short-day plants Pharbitis nil and Perilla frutescens var. crispa flower under long days in response to the stress of poor nutrition or low-intensity light. Grafting experiments using two varieties of P. nil revealed that a transmissible flowering stimulus is involved in stress-induced flowering. The P. nil and P. frutescens plants that were induced to flower by stress reached anthesis, fruited and produced seeds. These seeds germinated, and the progeny of the stressed plants developed normally. Phenylalanine ammonialyase inhibitors inhibited this stress-induced flowering, and the inhibition was overcome by salicylic acid (SA), suggesting that there is an involvement of SA in stress-induced flowering. PnFT2, a P. nil ortholog of the flowering gene FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) of Arabidopsis thaliana, was expressed when the P. nil plants were induced to flower under poor-nutrition stress conditions, but expression of PnFT1, another ortholog of FT, was not induced, suggesting that PnFT2 is involved in stress-induced flowering. PMID:20505356

  5. Induced pluripotency with endogenous and inducible genes

    SciTech Connect

    Duinsbergen, Dirk; Eriksson, Malin; Hoen, Peter A.C. 't; Frisen, Jonas; Mikkers, Harald

    2008-10-15

    The recent discovery that two partly overlapping sets of four genes induce nuclear reprogramming of mouse and even human cells has opened up new possibilities for cell replacement therapies. Although the combination of genes that induce pluripotency differs to some extent, Oct4 and Sox2 appear to be a prerequisite. The introduction of four genes, several of which been linked with cancer, using retroviral approaches is however unlikely to be suitable for future clinical applications. Towards developing a safer reprogramming protocol, we investigated whether cell types that express one of the most critical reprogramming genes endogenously are predisposed to reprogramming. We show here that three of the original four pluripotency transcription factors (Oct4, Klf4 and c-Myc or MYCER{sup TAM}) induced reprogramming of mouse neural stem (NS) cells exploiting endogenous SoxB1 protein levels in these cells. The reprogrammed neural stem cells differentiated into cells of each germ layer in vitro and in vivo, and contributed to mouse development in vivo. Thus a combinatorial approach taking advantage of endogenously expressed genes and inducible transgenes may contribute to the development of improved reprogramming protocols.

  6. Tal Carmon Radiation pressure induced

    E-print Network

    Tal Carmon Radiation pressure induced vibrations Tal Carmon RP induced vibrations RP induced #12;Tal Carmon Radiation pressure induced vibrations Tal Carmon RP induced vibrations · First proposed radiation pressure to be the reason. Who is interested in radiation pressure? #12;Tal Carmon Radiation

  7. Space Station Induced Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, James F. (editor); Torr, Marsha R. (editor)

    1988-01-01

    This report contains the results of a conference convened May 10-11, 1988, to review plans for monitoring the Space Station induced environment, to recommend primary components of an induced environment monitoring package, and to make recommendations pertaining to suggested modifications of the Space Station External Contamination Control Requirements Document JSC 30426. The contents of this report are divided as Follows: Monitoring Induced Environment - Space Station Work Packages Requirements, Neutral Environment, Photon Emission Environment, Particulate Environment, Surface Deposition/Contamination; and Contamination Control Requirements.

  8. The FGFR1 inhibitor PD173074 induces mesenchymal–epithelial transition through the transcription factor AP-1

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, P T; Tsunematsu, T; Yanagisawa, S; Kudo, Y; Miyauchi, M; Kamata, N; Takata, T

    2013-01-01

    Background: Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a crucial process in cancer progression that provides cancer cells with the ability to escape from the primary focus, invade stromal tissues and migrate to distant regions. Cell lines that lack E-cadherin show increased tumorigenesis and metastasis, and the expression levels of E-cadherin and Snail correlate inversely with the prognosis of patients suffering from breast cancer or oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Moreover, recent studies have shown that most EMT cases are regulated by soluble growth factors or cytokines. Among these factors, fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) execute diverse functions by binding to and activating members of the FGF receptor (FGFR) family, including FGFR1–4. Fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 is an oncoprotein that is involved in tumorigenesis, and PD173074 is known to be a selective inhibitor of FGFR1. However, the roles of FGFR1 and FGFR1 inhibitors have not yet been examined in detail. Methods: Here, we investigated the expression of FGFR1 in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and the role of the FGFR1 inhibitor PD173074 in carcinogenesis and the EMT process. Results: Fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 was highly expressed in 54% of HNSCC cases and was significantly correlated with malignant behaviours. Nuclear FGFR1 expression was also observed and correlated well with histological differentiation, the pattern of invasion and abundant nuclear polymorphism. Fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 was also overexpressed in EMT cell lines compared with non-EMT cell lines. Furthermore, treatment of HOC313 cells with PD173074 suppressed cellular proliferation and invasion and reduced ERK1/2 and p38 activation. These cells also demonstrated morphological changes, transforming from spindle- to cobble stone-like in shape. In addition, the expression levels of certain matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), whose genes contain activator protein-1 (AP-1) promoter sites, as well as Snail1 and Snail2 were reduced following PD173074 treatment. Conclusion: Taken together, these data suggest that PD173074 inhibits the MAPK pathway, which regulates the activity of AP-1 and induces MET. Furthermore, this induction of MET likely suppresses cancer cell growth and invasion. PMID:24045665

  9. Drug-induced hepatitis

    MedlinePLUS

    Toxic hepatitis ... to get liver damage. Some drugs can cause hepatitis with small doses, even if the liver breakdown ... liver. Many different drugs can cause drug-induced hepatitis. Painkillers and fever reducers that contain acetaminophen are ...

  10. Vitiligo, drug induced (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... this person's face have resulted from drug-induced vitiligo. Loss of melanin, the primary skin pigment, occasionally ... is the case with this individual. The typical vitiligo lesion is flat (macular) and depigmented, but maintains ...

  11. Statin induced myotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Sathasivam, Sivakumar

    2012-06-01

    Statins are an effective treatment for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases and used extensively worldwide. However, myotoxicity induced by statins is a common adverse event and a major barrier to maximising cardiovascular risk reduction. The clinical spectrum of statin induced myotoxicity includes asymptomatic rise in creatine kinase concentration, myalgia, myositis and rhabdomyolysis. In certain cases, the cessation of statin therapy does not result in the resolution of muscular symptoms or the normalization of creatine kinase, raising the possibility of necrotizing autoimmune myopathy. There is increasing understanding and recognition of the pathophysiology and risk factors of statin induced myotoxicity. Careful history and physical examination in conjunction with selected investigations such as creatine kinase measurement, electromyography and muscle biopsy in appropriate clinical scenario help diagnose the condition. The management of statin induced myotoxicity involves statin cessation, the use of alternative lipid lowering agents or treatment regimes, and in the case of necrotizing autoimmune myopathy, immunosuppression. PMID:22560377

  12. Amiodarone induced optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nagra, P K; Foroozan, R; Savino, P J; Castillo, I; Sergott, R C

    2003-01-01

    Aim: To determine the clinical features of amiodarone induced optic neuropathy, which may help distinguish it from non-arteritic anterior ischaemic optic neuropathy. Methods: Retrospective observational case series of patients diagnosed with amiodarone induced optic neuropathy at the neuro-ophthalmology service from March 1998 to February 2001. Amiodarone was discontinued after discussion with the patient's cardiologist. Visual acuity, colour vision, automated perimetry, and funduscopy were performed on initial and follow up examinations. Results: Three patients with amiodarone induced optic neuropathy presented with mildly decreased vision, visual field defects, and bilateral optic disc swelling. Upon discontinuing the medication, visual function and optic disc swelling slowly improved in all three patients. Conclusion: Amiodarone induced optic neuropathy can present with visual dysfunction, and is typically a bilateral process. Upon discontinuation of amiodarone, slow resolution of optic disc swelling occurs and visual function improves in some patients. PMID:12642303

  13. Reversal of resistance towards cisplatin by curcumin in cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Roy, Madhumita; Mukherjee, Sutapa

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic regulators like histone deacetylases (1 and 2), and viral onco-proteins (E6/E7) are known to be overexpressed in cervical cancer cells. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of curcumin on HDACs (1 and 2) and HPV E6/E7 in the cervical cancer cell line SiHa and a drug resistant clone SiHaR (derived from SiHa). It was further intended to investigate whether curcumin could sensitize the cells towards cisplatin induced cell killing by modulation of multi drug resistant proteins like MRP1 and Pgp1. Curcumin inhibited HDACs, HPV expression and differentially increased acetylation and up-regulation of p53 in SiHa and SiHaR, leading to cell cycle arrest at G1-S phase. Up-regulation of pRb, p21, p27 and corresponding inhibition of cyclin D1 and CDK4 were observed. Cisplatin resistance in SiHaR due to over-expression of MRP1 and Pgp1 was overcome by curcumin. Curcumin also sensitized both the cervical cancer cells towards cisplatin induced cell killing. Inhibition of HDACs and HPVs led to cell cycle arrest at G1/S phase by alteration of cell cycle regulatory proteins. Suppression of MRP1 and Pgp1 by curcumin resulted in sensitization of cervical cancer cells, lowering the chemotherapeutic dose of the drug cisplatin. PMID:24606473

  14. Lorazepam-induced diplopia.

    PubMed

    Lucca, Jisha M; Ramesh, Madhan; Parthasarathi, Gurumurthy; Ram, Dushad

    2014-01-01

    Diplopia - seeing double - is a symptom with many potential causes, both neurological and ophthalmological. Benzodiazepine induced ocular side-effects are rarely reported. Lorazepam is one of the commonly used benzodiazepine in psychiatric practice. Visual problems associated with administration of lorazepam are rarely reported and the frequency of occurrence is not established. We report a rare case of lorazepam-induced diplopia in a newly diagnosed case of obsessive compulsive disorder. PMID:24741200

  15. Tumor-induced alterations in lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Notarnicola, M; Tutino, V; Caruso, M G

    2014-01-01

    Alterations of lipid metabolism have been increasingly recognized as a hallmark of cancer cells. Cancer cells esterify fatty acids predominantly to phospholipids, an essential component of cell membranes. The main pathway along which proliferating cells gain lipids for membrane synthesis is the endogenous mevalonate pathway. Increased synthesis of mevalonate and mevalonate-derived isoprenoids supports increased cell proliferation through activating growth-regulatory proteins and oncoproteins and promoting DNA synthesis. The importance of a better knowledge of metabolic changes in lipogenic enzymes pathways, as well as of the role of each biochemical pathway in carcinogenesis, provides the rationale for in-depth study of the oncogenic signaling important for the initiation and progression of tumors. The dependence of tumor cells on a dysregulated lipid metabolism suggests that the proteins involved in this process may be excellent chemotherapeutic targets for cancer treatment. Here, we confirm the vital link between lipogenesis and cell proliferation, and our recent findings suggest that nutritional intervention is an effective and safe way to reduce cell proliferation in experimental models of carcinogenesis. The olive oil diet significantly reduces the protein activities of lipogenic enzymes associated with cell growth. The use of natural dietary components could potentially assist in the management of subjects with metabolic disorders-related tumors. PMID:24606524

  16. Induced polarization response of microbial induced sulfideprecipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Williams, Kenneth Hurst; Slater, Lee; Hubbard, Susan

    2004-06-04

    A laboratory scale experiment was conducted to examine the use of induced polarization and electrical conductivity to monitor microbial induced sulfide precipitation under anaerobic conditions in sand filled columns. Three columns were fabricated; one for electrical measurements, one for geochemical sampling and a third non-inoculated column was used as a control. A continual upward flow of nutrients and metals in solution was established in each column. Desulfovibrio vulgaris microbes were injected into the middle of the geochemical and electrical columns. Iron and zinc sulfides precipitated along a microbial action front as a result of sulfate reduction due by Desulfovibrio vulgaris. The precipitation front initially developed near the microbial injection location, and subsequently migrated towards the nutrient inlet, as a result of chemotaxis by Desulfovibrio vulgaris. Sampling during and subsequent to the experiment revealed spatiotemporal changes in the biogeochemical measurements associated with microbial sulfate reduction. Conductivity measurements were insensitive to all biogeochemical changes occurred within the column. Changes in the IP response (of up to 14 mrad)were observed to coincide in place and in time with the active microbe respiration/sulfide precipitation front as determined from geochemical sampling. The IP response is correlated with the lactate concentration gradient, an indirect measurement of microbial metabolism, suggesting the potential of IP as a method for monitoring microbial respiration/activity. Post experimental destructive sample analysis and SEM imaging verified the geochemical results and supported our hypothesis that microbe induced sulfide precipitation is directly detectable using electrical methods. Although the processes not fully understood, the IP response appears to be sensitive to this anaerobic microbial precipitation, suggesting a possible novel application for the IP method.

  17. Cell culture attenuation eliminates rMd5deltaMeq-induced bursal and thymic atrophy and renders the mutant virus as an effective and safe vaccine against Marek's disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease virus (MDV) encodes a basic leucine zipper oncoprotein, meq, which structurally resembles jun/fos family of transcriptional activators. It has been clearly demonstrated that deletion of meq results in loss of transformation and oncogenic capacity of MDV. The rMd5'meq virus provided s...

  18. Radiation-induced gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Gautam; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation-induced gliomas represent a relatively rare but well-characterized entity in the neuro-oncologic literature. Extensive retrospective cohort data in pediatric populations after therapeutic intracranial radiation show a clearly increased risk in glioma incidence that is both patient age- and radiation dose/volume-dependent. Data in adults are more limited but show heightened risk in certain groups exposed to radiation. In both populations, there is no evidence linking increased risk associated with routine exposure to diagnostic radiation. At the molecular level, recent studies have found distinct genetic differences between radiation-induced gliomas and their spontaneously-occurring counterparts. Clinically, there is understandable reluctance on the part of clinicians to re-treat patients due to concern for cumulative neurotoxicity. However, available data suggest that aggressive intervention can lead to improved outcomes in patients with radiation-induced gliomas. PMID:19831840

  19. Cetirizine-induce cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Fong, D G; Angulo, P; Burgart, L J; Lindor, K D

    2000-10-01

    Cetirizine, a human metabolite of hydroxyzine, is a selective H1-receptor antagonist currently approved for the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis, perennial allergic rhinitis, and chronic urticaria. In U.S. clinical trials, transient reversible hepatic transaminase elevations were observed in <2% of patients during cetirizine therapy. We report a case of cetirizine-induced cholestasis in a 28-year-old man with no previous hepatobiliary disease after a 2-year period of taking cetirizine on a daily basis. The treatment of this patient included the use of ursodeoxycholic acid, as well as hydroxyzine, for symptomatic relief of pruritus. In light of the patient's clinical and biochemical improvement while using hydroxyzine, it appears that the hepatic metabolism of hydroxyzine to metabolites, including cetirizine, is not involved in the pathogenesis of this particular case of drug-induced hepatotoxicity. Cetirizine should be considered as a potential cause of drug-induced cholestasis. PMID:11034010

  20. Tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Umana, Ernesto; Solares, C Arturo; Alpert, Martin A

    2003-01-01

    Systolic dysfunction associated with chronic tachyarrhythmias, known as tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy, is a reversible form of heart failure characterized by left ventricular dilatation that is usually reversible once the tachyarrhythmia is controlled. Its development is related to both atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. The diagnosis is usually made following observation of a marked improvement in systolic function after normalization of heart rate. Clinicians should be aware that patients with unexplained systolic dysfunction may have tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy, and that controlling the arrhythmia may result in improvement and even complete normalization of systolic function. PMID:12543289

  1. The induced magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Islas, Rafael; Heine, Thomas; Merino, Gabriel

    2012-02-21

    Aromaticity is indispensable for explaining a variety of chemical behaviors, including reactivity, structural features, relative energetic stabilities, and spectroscopic properties. When interpreted as the spatial delocalization of ?-electrons, it represents the driving force for the stabilization of many planar molecular structures. A delocalized electron system is sensitive to an external magnetic field; it responds with an induced magnetic field having a particularly long range. The shape of the induced magnetic field reflects the size and strength of the system of delocalized electrons and can have a large influence on neighboring molecules. In 2004, we proposed using the induced magnetic field as a means of estimating the degree of electron delocalization and aromaticity in planar as well as in nonplanar molecules. We have since tested the method on aromatic, antiaromatic, and nonaromatic compounds, and a refinement now allows the individual treatment of core-, ?-, and ?-electrons. In this Account, we describe the use of the induced magnetic field as an analytical probe for electron delocalization and its application to a large series of uncommon molecules. The compounds include borazine; all-metal aromatic systems Al(4)(n-); molecular stars Si(5)Li(n)(6-n); electronically stabilized planar tetracoordinate carbon; planar hypercoordinate atoms inside boron wheels; and planar boron wheels with fluxional internal boron cluster moieties. In all cases, we have observed that planar structures show a high degree of electron delocalization in the ?-electrons and, in some examples, also in the ?-framework. Quantitatively, the induced magnetic field has contributions from the entire electronic system of a molecule, but at long range the contributions arising from the delocalized electronic ?-system dominate. The induced magnetic field can only indirectly be confirmed by experiment, for example, through intermolecular contributions to NMR chemical shifts. We show that calculating the induced field is a useful method for understanding any planar organic or inorganic system, as it corresponds to the intuitive Pople model for explaining the anomalous proton chemical shifts in aromatic molecules. Indeed, aromatic, antiaromatic, and nonaromatic molecules show differing responses to an external field; that is, they reduce, augment, or do not affect the external field at long range. The induced field can be dissected into different orbital contributions, in the same way that the nucleus-independent chemical shift or the shielding function can be separated into component contributions. The result is a versatile tool that is particularly useful in the analysis of planar, densely packed systems with strong orbital contributions directly atop individual atoms. PMID:21848282

  2. Cadmium-induced hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Dudley, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    Time-course and dose-response studies in rats were conducted to evaluate Cd-induced hepatotoxicty. Morphological and biochemical evidence of liver injury occurred soon after a high dose of Cd and by ten hr severe hepatic necrosis was evident. Plasma enzyme activities of alanine (ALT) and aspartate (AST) aminotransferase paralleled morphological changes. Data indicate the liver is a major target organ of chronic Cd-poisoning and suggest that Cd-induced liver injury may play an important role in the nephrotoxicity observed after chronic exposure to Cd.

  3. Neutron-induced nucleosynthesis

    E-print Network

    H. Oberhummer; H. Herndl; T. Rauscher; H. Beer

    1996-08-20

    Neutron--induced nucleosynthesis plays an important role in astrophysical scenarios like in primordial nucleosynthesis in the early universe, in the s--process occurring in Red Giants, and in the $\\alpha$--rich freeze--out and r--process taking place in supernovae of type II. A review of the three important aspects of neutron--induced nucleosynthesis is given: astrophysical background, experimental methods and theoretical models for determining reaction cross sections and reaction rates at thermonuclear energies. Three specific examples of neutron capture at thermal and thermonuclear energies are discussed in some detail.

  4. Geomagnetism and induced voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Razzaq, W.; Biller, R. D.

    2010-07-01

    Introductory physics laboratories have seen an influx of conceptual integrated science over time in their classrooms with elements of other sciences such as chemistry, biology, Earth science, and astronomy. We describe a laboratory to introduce this development, as it attracts attention to the voltage induced in the human brain as it is initiated by the change in the magnetic flux due to the Earth's magnetic field and movement. This simple and enjoyable experiment will demonstrate how basic concepts in physics and geology can help us think about possible health effects due to the induced voltage.

  5. Optically induced 'negative forces'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogariu, Aristide; Sukhov, Sergey; Sáenz, José

    2013-01-01

    Attracting objects with optical beams may seem like science fiction, but various schemes already do this, albeit with some caveats and limitations. The most recent progress in this emerging field is reviewed, with particular emphasis on manipulation of small objects by optically induced 'negative forces'.

  6. Pregnancy-Induced Hypertension

    MedlinePLUS

    MENU Return to Web version Pregnancy-induced Hypertension Overview What is blood pressure? Blood pressure is the pressure in the blood vessels in ... The cause of PIH isn't known. Diagnosis & Tests What tests can show if I have PIH? ...

  7. Bacteriocin Inducer Peptides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel peptides produced by bacteriocin-producing bacteria stimulate the production of bacteriocins in vitro. The producer bacteria are cultured in the presence of a novel inducer bacteria and a peptide having a carboxy terminal sequence of VKGLT in order to achieve an increase in bacteriocin produc...

  8. Shrouded inducer pump

    DOEpatents

    Meng, S.Y.

    1989-08-08

    An improvement in a pump is described including a shrouded inducer, the improvement comprising first and second sealing means which cooperate with a first vortex cell and a series of secondary vortex cells to remove any tangential velocity components from the recirculation flow. 3 figs.

  9. Shrouded inducer pump

    DOEpatents

    Meng, Sen Y. (Reseda, CA)

    1989-01-01

    An improvement in a pump including a shrouded inducer, the improvement comprising first and second sealing means 32,36 which cooperate with a first vortex cell 38 and a series of secondary vortex cells 40 to remove any tangential velocity components from the recirculation flow.

  10. Injection-induced earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Ellsworth, William L

    2013-07-12

    Earthquakes in unusual locations have become an important topic of discussion in both North America and Europe, owing to the concern that industrial activity could cause damaging earthquakes. It has long been understood that earthquakes can be induced by impoundment of reservoirs, surface and underground mining, withdrawal of fluids and gas from the subsurface, and injection of fluids into underground formations. Injection-induced earthquakes have, in particular, become a focus of discussion as the application of hydraulic fracturing to tight shale formations is enabling the production of oil and gas from previously unproductive formations. Earthquakes can be induced as part of the process to stimulate the production from tight shale formations, or by disposal of wastewater associated with stimulation and production. Here, I review recent seismic activity that may be associated with industrial activity, with a focus on the disposal of wastewater by injection in deep wells; assess the scientific understanding of induced earthquakes; and discuss the key scientific challenges to be met for assessing this hazard. PMID:23846903

  11. Irradiation-Induced Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Birtcher, R.C.; Ewing, R.C.; Matzke, Hj.; Meldrum, A.; Newcomer, P.P.; Wang, L.M.; Wang, S.X.; Weber, W.J.

    1999-08-09

    This paper summarizes the results of the studies of the irradiation-induced formation of nanostructures, where the injected interstitials from the source of irradiation are not major components of the nanophase. This phenomena has been observed by in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in a number of intermetallic compounds and ceramics during high-energy electron or ion irradiations when the ions completely penetrate through the specimen. Beginning with single crystals, electron or ion irradiation in a certain temperature range may result in nanostructures composed of amorphous domains and nanocrystals with either the original composition and crystal structure or new nanophases formed by decomposition of the target material. The phenomenon has also been observed in natural materials which have suffered irradiation from the decay of constituent radioactive elements and in nuclear reactor fuels which have been irradiated by fission neutrons and other fission products. The mechanisms involved in the process of this nanophase formation are discussed in terms of the evolution of displacement cascades, radiation-induced defect accumulation, radiation-induced segregation and phase decomposition, as well as the competition between irradiation-induced amorphization and recrystallization.

  12. Does formaldehyde induce aneuploidy?

    PubMed

    Speit, Günter; Kühner, Stefanie; Linsenmeyer, Regina; Schütz, Petra

    2011-11-01

    Formaldehyde (FA) was tested for a potential aneugenic activity in mammalian cells. We employed tests to discriminate between aneugenic and clastogenic effects in accordance with international guidelines for genotoxicity testing. The cytokinesis-block micronucleus test (CBMNT) in combination with fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) with a pan-centromeric probe was performed with cultured human lymphocytes and the human A549 lung cell line. FA induced micronuclei (MN) in binuclear cells of both cell types under standard in vitro test conditions following the OECD guideline 487. FISH analysis revealed that the vast majority of induced MN were centromere negative, thus indicating a clastogenic effect. A similar result was obtained for MN induced by ?-irradiation, whereas the typical aneugens colcemid (COL) and vincristine (VCR) predominantly induced centromere-positive MN. Furthermore, COL and VCR clearly enhanced the MN frequency in mononuclear lymphocytes in the CBMNT, whereas such an effect was not observed for ?-irradiation and FA. In experiments with the Chinese hamster V79 cell line, the aneugens COL and VCR clearly increased the frequency of tetraploid second division metaphases, whereas FA did not cause such an effect. Altogether, our results confirm the clastogenicity of FA in cultured mammalian cells but exclude a significant aneugenic activity. PMID:21804075

  13. Effects of Induced Astigmatism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schubert, Delwyn G.; Walton, Howard N.

    1968-01-01

    The relationship of astigmatism to reading and the possible detrimental effects it might have on reading were investigated. The greatest incidence of astigmatism was for the with-the-rule type ranging from .50 to 1.00 diopter. This type of astigmatism was induced in 35 seniors from the Los Angeles College of Optometry by placing cylindrical lenses…

  14. Geomagnetism and Induced Voltage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdul-Razzaq, W.; Biller, R. D.

    2010-01-01

    Introductory physics laboratories have seen an influx of "conceptual integrated science" over time in their classrooms with elements of other sciences such as chemistry, biology, Earth science, and astronomy. We describe a laboratory to introduce this development, as it attracts attention to the voltage induced in the human brain as it is…

  15. Glucocorticoid-induced Osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Whittier, Xena; Saag, Kenneth G

    2016-02-01

    Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIOP) is one of the most common and serious adverse effects associated with glucocorticoid use. This article highlights GIOP pathophysiology, epidemiologic associations, effective treatment, and lifestyle modifications that can reduce fracture risk for long-term glucocorticoid users and additionally emphasizes the importance of early intervention. PMID:26611558

  16. Drug-induced myopathies.

    PubMed

    Le Quintrec, J S; Le Quintrec, J L

    1991-04-01

    Myopathies are not an unusual complication of drug therapy. The major symptoms in drug-induced myopathies are proximal muscle weakness, increased muscle enzyme levels, electromyographic changes and histological lesions. Some drug-induced myopathies are associated with neuropathy. Drug-induced myopathies can be classified according to the presence or absence of muscular pain and associated neuropathy. Among painless myopathies, we can distinguish myopathies without neuropathy (corticosteroids), myopathies with neuropathy (colchicine, chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine) and myasthenic syndromes (D-penicillamine, antibiotics, beta-blockers). Among painful myopathies, the classification is similar: painful myopathies may or may not be associated with neuropathies. Painful myopathies include polymyositis (D-penicillamine, cimetidine, zidovudine) and other myopathies without polymyositis (clofibrate, statines, cyclosporin). Among the painful neuromyopathies, eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome is a recently described disorder associated with the use of L-tryptophan. Combinations of drugs (for example, a fibrate and a statine or cyclosporin and colchicine) can induce severe myopathies. If such drugs are used together a vigorous surveillance to detect any sign of myopathy is warranted. Instead of classifying drug-induced myopathies according to clinical features, a histological classification can be proposed. Many drugs can induce vacuolar myopathy (colchicine, chloroquine, amiodarone, cyclosporin, drugs causing hypokalaemia and lipid-lowering agents), some others cause a mitochondrial myopathy (zidovudine) or a necrotizing myopathy as seen with vincristine. Overall, several criteria for reporting drug-induced myopathy can be recommended: lack of pre-existent muscular symptoms, a free period between the beginning of the treatment and the appearance of symptoms, lack of another cause accounting for the myopathy, and complete or incomplete resolution after withdrawal of the treatment. Rechallenge of the treatment is not advisable because of the risk of a serious relapse. The exact mechanisms by which drugs cause myopathies are unknown. Some cases may be due to metabolic changes, whereas others may be immune mediated. Nevertheless, the aspect these conditions have in common is the regression of the myopathy with the discontinuation of the drug. PMID:2070426

  17. Liquid Crystal Alignment Induced by a Magnetic Field and the Associated Surface Memory Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Rui; Wang, Qingbing; Kumar, Satyendra; Reznikov, Yuri

    2006-03-01

    Nematic liquid crystals, 4, 4'-n-pentylcyanobiphenyl (5CB) and a commercial mixture, E7, have been found to align in thin cells prepared by cooling from the isotropic phase in the presence of a strong magnetic field parallel to the ITO coated glass substrates. The field induced alignment is very stable and possesses surface memory effect [1]. Surprisingly, the azimuthal anchoring energy is as high as 10-3erg/cm^2 and comparable to that obtained for rubbed polymer alignment layers. The surface memory effect is thermally stable and cannot be erased even after holding the cell more than 40K above the clearing point for up to two hours.^ We believe that the magnetic field directed rearrangement of the LC molecules adsorbed [2] at the substrate is responsible for the observed behavior. ------ [1]. N. A. Clark, Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 292 (1985). [2]. Y. shi, B. Cull, and S. Kumar, Phys. Rev. Lett. 71, 2773 (1993).

  18. Radioadaptive Response Induced by Alpha-Particle-Induced Stress

    E-print Network

    Yu, Peter K.N.

    of radioadaptive response (RAR) by com- munication of radiation-induced bystander signals. RAR is a kind of lowRadioadaptive Response Induced by Alpha-Particle-Induced Stress Communicated in Vivo between and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong, and Department

  19. Proteomic analysis of trichloroethylene-induced alterations in expression, distribution, and interactions of SET/TAF-I? and two SET/TAF-I?-binding proteins, eEF1A1 and eEF1A2, in hepatic L-02 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Wen-Xu; Yang, Liang; Chen, Moutong; Yang, Xifei; Ren, Xiaohu; Fang, Shisong; Ye, Jinbo; Huang, Haiyan; Peng, Chaoqiong; Zhou, Li; Huang, Xinfeng; Yang, Fan; Wu, Desheng; Zhuang, Zhixiong; Liu, Jianjun

    2012-09-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that trichloroethylene (TCE) exposure causes severe hepatotoxicity. However, the mechanisms of TCE hepatotoxicity remain unclear. Recently, we reported that TCE exposure up-regulated the expression of the oncoprotein SET/TAF-I? and SET knockdown attenuated TCE-induced cytotoxicity in hepatic L-02 cells. To decipher the function of SET/TAF-I? and its contributions to TCE-induced hepatotoxicity, we employed a proteomic analysis of SET/TAF-I? with tandem affinity purification to identify SET/TAF-I?-binding proteins. We identified 42 novel Gene Ontology co-annotated SET/TAF-I?-binding proteins. The identifications of two of these proteins (eEF1A1, elongation factor 1-alpha 1; eEF1A2, elongation factor 1-alpha 2) were confirmed by Western blot analysis and co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP). Furthermore, we analyzed the effects of TCE on the expression, distribution and interactions of eEF1A1, eEF1A2 and SET in L-02 cells. Western blot analysis reveals a significant up-regulation of eEF1A1, eEF1A2 and two isoforms of SET, and immunocytochemical analysis reveals that eEF1A1 and SET is redistributed by TCE. SET is redistributed from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, while eFE1A1 is translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Moreover, we find by Co-IP that TCE exposure significantly increases the interaction of SET with eEF1A2. Our data not only provide insights into the physiological functions of SET/TAF-I? and complement the SET interaction networks, but also demonstrate that TCE exposure induces alterations in the expression, distribution and interactions of SET and its binding partners. These alterations may constitute the mechanisms of TCE cytotoxicity. -- Highlights: ? Identify 62 SET/TAF-I?-associated proteins in human L-02 cells ? Trichloroethylene (TCE) alters the interaction of SET with eEF1A1 and eEF1A2. ? TCE induces the translocation and up-regulation of SET. ? TCE induces the translocation and up-regulation of eEF1A.

  20. Modeling microbially induced calcite precipitation

    E-print Network

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    Modeling microbially induced calcite precipitation Erlangen, November 27th 2014 Johannes Hommel Induced Calcite Precipitation (MICP) is investigated as sealing technology. It is used as an exemplary / detachment · Urea hydrolysis · Precipitation / dissolution of calcite · Clogging calcite precipitate CO2

  1. Drug-induced pulmonary disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... induced lung disease improves. Anti-inflammatory medicines called steroids are sometimes used to quickly reverse the lung ... you have known drug reactions. Stay away from illegal drugs to prevent many drug-induced lung diseases.

  2. Drug-induced thrombocytopenic purpura

    PubMed Central

    Sathiasekar, Anisha Cynthia; Deepthi, D. Angeline; Sathia Sekar, G. Suresh

    2015-01-01

    Drug-induced thrombocytopenic purpura is a skin condition result from a low platelet count due to drug-induced anti-platelet antibodies caused by drugs. Drug-induced thrombocytopenic purpura should be suspected when a patient, child or adult, has sudden, severe thrombocytopenia. Drug-induced thrombocytopenic purpura is even more strongly suspected when a patient has repeated episodes of sudden, severe thrombocytopenia PMID:26538982

  3. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    LIBS-1 Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy LIBS ANALYSIS OF METAL SURFACES Last updated: June 17, 2014 #12;LIBS-2 Laser­Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) LIBS ANALYSIS OF METAL SURFACES of species at a distance or in hard­to­reach or hazardous environments. Laser­Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

  4. Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    McCluskey, James; Bourgeois, Marie; Harbison, Raymond

    2014-04-01

    Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity is a persistent allergic contact dermatitides documented in floral workers exposed to Alstroemeria and its cultivars.[1] The causative allergen is tulipalin A, a toxic glycoside named for the tulip bulbs from which it was first isolated.[2] The condition is characterized by fissured acropulpitis, often accompanied by hyperpigmentation, onychorrhexis, and paronychia. More of the volar surface may be affected in sensitized florists. Dermatitis and paronychia are extremely common conditions and diagnostic errors may occur. A thorough patient history, in conjunction with confirmatory patch testing with a bulb sliver and tuliposide A exposure, can prevent misdiagnosis. We report a case of Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity misdiagnosed as an unresolved tinea manuum infection in a patient evaluated for occupational exposure. PMID:25024947

  5. Electromagnetically induced invisibility cloaking

    E-print Network

    Darran F. Milne; Natalia Korolkova

    2012-06-18

    Invisibility cloaking imposes strict conditions on the refractive index profiles of cloaking media that must be satisfied to successfully hide an object. The first experimental demonstrations of cloaking used artificial metamaterials to respond to this challenge. In this work we show how a much simpler technique of electromagnetically induced transparency can be used to achieve a partial, {\\it carpet} cloaking at optical frequencies in atomic vapours or solids. To generate a desired combination of low absorption with strong modifications of the refractive index, we use chiral media with an induced magneto-electrical cross-coupling. We demonstrate that high-contrast positive refractive indices can be attained by fine tuning the material with a gradient magnetic field and calculate the parameters required to construct a carpet cloak.

  6. Sepsis-induced Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Bermejo, Francisco J; Ruiz-Bailen, Manuel; Gil-Cebrian, Julián; Huertos-Ranchal, María J

    2011-01-01

    Myocardial dysfunction is one of the main predictors of poor outcome in septic patients, with mortality rates next to 70%. During the sepsis-induced myocardial dysfunction, both ventricles can dilate and diminish its ejection fraction, having less response to fluid resuscitation and catecholamines, but typically is assumed to be reversible within 7-10 days. In the last 30 years, It´s being subject of substantial research; however no explanation of its etiopathogenesis or effective treatment have been proved yet. The aim of this manuscript is to review on the most relevant aspects of the sepsis-induced myocardial dysfunction, discuss its clinical presentation, pathophysiology, etiopathogenesis, diagnostic tools and therapeutic strategies proposed in recent years. PMID:22758615

  7. Electromagnetically Induced Entanglement

    E-print Network

    Xihua Yang; Min Xiao

    2015-05-18

    We present a novel quantum phenomenon named electromagnetically induced entanglement in the conventional Lambda-type three-level atomic system driven by a strong pump field and a relatively weak probe field. Nearly perfect entanglement between the pump and probe fields can be achieved with a low coherence decay rate between the two lower levels, high pump-field intensity, and large optical depth of the atomic ensemble. The physical origin is quantum coherence between the lower doublet produced by the pump and probe fields, similar to the well-known electromagnetically induced transparency. This method would greatly facilitate the generation of nondegenerate narrow-band continuous-variable entanglement between bright light beams by using only coherent laser fields, and may find potential and broad applications in realistic quantum information processing.

  8. Use of Human Papillomavirus DNA, E6/E7 mRNA, and p16 Immunocytochemistry to Detect and Predict anal High-Grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions in HIV-Positive and HIV-Negative Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Phanuphak, Nittaya; Teeratakulpisarn, Nipat; Keelawat, Somboon; Pankam, Tippawan; Barisri, Jiranuwat; Triratanachat, Surang; Deesua, Amornrat; Rodbamrung, Piyanee; Wongsabut, Jiratchaya; Tantbirojn, Patou; Numto, Saranya; Ruangvejvorachai, Preecha; Phanuphak, Praphan; Palefsky, Joel M.; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Kerr, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Men who have sex with men (MSM) are at high risk of having anal cancer. Anal high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) is the precursor of anal cancer. We explored the use of different biomarkers associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and HPV-mediated cell transformation to detect and predict HSIL among HIV-positive and HIV-negative MSM. Methodology/Principal Findings A total of 123 HIV-positive and 123 HIV-negative MSM were enrolled and followed for 12 months. High-resolution anoscopy (HRA) with biopsies were performed at every visit along with anal sample collection for cytology, high-risk HPV DNA genotyping, HPV E6/E7 mRNA, and p16 immunocytochemistry. Performance characteristics and area under the receiver operator characteristics curve were calculated for these biomarkers at baseline, and Cox regression compared the usefulness of these biomarkers in predicting incident HSIL. High-risk HPV DNA, E6/E7 mRNA, and p16 immunocytochemistry each identified 43–46% of MSM whose baseline test positivity would trigger HRA referral. E6/E7 mRNA had the highest sensitivity (64.7%) and correctly classified the highest number of prevalent HSIL cases. With the exception of p16 immunochemistry, most tests showed significant increases in sensitivity but decreases specificity versus anal cytology, while the overall number of correctly classified cases was not significantly different. Baseline or persistent type 16 and/or 18 HPV DNA was the only test significantly predicting incident histologic HSIL within 12 months in models adjusted for HIV status and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions at baseline. Conclusions/Significance Countries with a high HIV prevalence among MSM and limited HRA resources may consider using biomarkers to identify individuals at high risk of HSIL. E6/E7 mRNA had the highest sensitivity for prevalent HSIL detection regardless of HIV status, whereas type 16 and/or 18 HPV DNA performed best in predicting development of incident HSIL within 12 months. PMID:24265682

  9. Lime-induced phytophotodermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Hankinson, Andrew; Lloyd, Benjamin; Alweis, Richard

    2014-01-01

    This case describes a scenario of lime-induced phytophotodermatitis. Phytophotodermatitis is a dermatitis caused after the skin is exposed to photosensitizing compounds in plants and then exposed to sunlight. Many common plants including citrus fruits, celery, and wild parsnip contain these photosensitizing compounds which cause phytophotodermatitis. It is important for a physician to be aware of phytophotodermatitis because it may often be misdiagnosed as other skin conditions including fungal infection, cellulitis, allergic contact dermatitis, and even child abuse. PMID:25317269

  10. Radiation-induced schwannomas

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, A.B.; Reichenthal, E.; Borohov, H.

    1989-06-01

    The histopathology and clinical course of three patients with schwannomas of the brain and high cervical cord after therapeutic irradiation for intracranial malignancy and for ringworm of the scalp are described. Earlier reports in the literature indicated that radiation of the scalp may induce tumors in the head and neck. It is therefore suggested that therapeutic irradiation in these instances was a causative factor in the genesis of these tumors.

  11. Levetiracetam-induced pancytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Alzahrani, Talal; Kay, Dana; Alqahtani, Saeed A.; Makke, Yamane; Lesky, Linda; Koubeissi, Mohamad Z.

    2015-01-01

    Pancytopenia is a rare side effect of levetiracetam (LEV) that is associated with severe morbidity that requires hospitalization. Here, we report a patient with a right temporoparietal tumor who underwent a temporal craniotomy with resection of the mass and was started on LEV for seizure prophylaxis per the neurosurgery local protocol. The patient developed LEV-induced pancytopenia, which was successfully managed by discontinuation of this medication. Our report aims to increase awareness of this rare cause of pancytopenia among clinicians.

  12. Remotely induced atmospheric lasing

    SciTech Connect

    Sprangle, Phillip; Penano, Joseph; Gordon, Daniel; Hafizi, Bahman; Scully, Marlan

    2011-05-23

    We propose and analyze a remote atmospheric lasing configuration which utilizes a combination of an ultrashort pulse laser to form a plasma filament (seed electrons) by tunneling ionization and a heater pulse which thermalizes the seed electrons. Electrons collisionally excite nitrogen molecules and induce lasing in the ultraviolet. The lasing gain is sufficiently high to reach saturation within the length of the plasma filament. A remotely generated ultraviolet source may have applications for standoff detection of biological and chemical agents.

  13. Glycerol-induced hyperhydration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedesel, Marvin L.; Lyons, Timothy P.; Mcnamara, M. Colleen

    1991-01-01

    Maintenance of euhydration is essential for maximum work performance. Environments which induce hypohydration reduce plasma volume and cardiovascular performance progressively declines as does work capacity. Hyperhydration prior to exposure to dehydrating environments appears to be a potential countermeasure to the debilitating effects of hypohydration. The extravascular fluid space, being the largest fluid compartment in the body, is the most logical space by which significant hyperhydration can be accomplished. Volume and osmotic receptors in the vascular space result in physiological responses which counteract hyperhydration. Our hypothesis is that glycerol-induced hyperhydration (GIH) can accomplish extravascular fluid expansion because of the high solubility of glycerol in lipid and aqueous media. A hypertonic solution of glycerol is rapidly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, results in mild increases in plasma osmolality and is distributed to 65 percent of the body mass. A large volume of water ingested within minutes after glycerol intake results in increased total body water because of the osmotic action and distribution of glycerol. The resulting expanded extravascular fluid space can act as a reservoir to maintain plasma volume during exposure to dehydrating environments. The fluid shifts associated with exposure to microgravity result in increased urine production and is another example of an environment which induces hypohydration. Our goal is to demonstrate that GIH will facilitate maintenance of euhydration and cardiovascular performance during space flight and upon return to a 1 g environment.

  14. Ethanol-induced analgesia

    SciTech Connect

    Pohorecky, L.A.; Shah, P.

    1987-09-07

    The effect of ethanol (ET) on nociceptive sensitivity was evaluated using a new tail deflection response (TDR) method. The IP injection of ET (0.5 - 1.5 g/kg) produced raid dose-dependent analgesia. Near maximal effect (97% decrease in TDR) was produced with the 1.5 g/kg dose of ET ten minutes after injection. At ninety minutes post-injection there was still significant analgesia. Depression of ET-induced nociceptive sensitivity was partially reversed by a 1 mg/kg dose of naloxone. On the other hand, morphine (0.5 or 5.0 mg/kg IP) did not modify ET-induced analgesia, while 3.0 minutes of cold water swim (known to produce non-opioid mediated analgesia) potentiated ET-induced analgesic effect. The 0.5 g/kg dose of ET by itself did not depress motor activity in an open field test, but prevented partially the depression in motor activity produced by cold water swim (CWS). Thus, the potentiation by ET of the depression of the TDR produced by CWS cannot be ascribed to the depressant effects of ET on motor activity. 21 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  15. [Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yasuo

    2015-10-01

    Osteoporosis is the most common and important adverse effect of glucocorticoid (GC) therapy. Since GC-induced bone loss is most rapid during the initial 3-6 months and primary prevention of bone loss is especially important, guidelines for management of GC-induced osteoporosis have been published overseas and in Japan. The Japanese Society for Bone and Mineral Research (JSBMR) has updated the Guidelines on the Management and Treatment of Glucocorticoid-induced Osteoporosis(GIO) and has incorporated a new scoring method. By analyzing five Japanese GIO cohorts from primary and secondary prevention studies, age, GC dose, lumbar BMD, and prior fragility fractures were identified as factors predicting future fracture and the fracture risk for an individual can be calculated as the sum of the scores for each risk factor. The guidelines were updated on the basis of a score of 3 as the optimal cut-off score for pharmacological intervention. Among these agents approved for the treatment of osteoporosis in Japan, the committee comprehensively reviewed validity for both primary and secondary prevention and assessed the benefit for both BMD and fracture prevention based on the results of clinical studies. Both alendronate and risedronate are recommended as first-line treatment. Ibandronate, teriparatide, and active vitamin D3 derivatives are recommended as alternative option. PMID:26529939

  16. Allergen-induced asthma

    PubMed Central

    Cockcroft, Donald W

    2014-01-01

    It was only in the late 19th century that specific allergens, pollen, animal antigens and, later, house dust mite, were identified to cause upper and lower airway disease. Early allergen challenge studies, crudely monitored before measurement of forced expiratory volume in 1 s became widespread in the 1950s, focused on the immediate effects but noted in passing prolonged and/or recurrent asthma symptoms. The late asthmatic response, recurrent bronchoconstriction after spontaneous resolution of the early responses occurring 3 h to 8 h or more postchallenge, has been identified and well characterized over the past 50 years. The associated allergen-induced airway hyper-responsiveness (1977) and allergen-induced airway inflammation (1985) indicate that these late sequelae are important in the mechanism of allergen-induced asthma. Allergens are now recognized to be the most important cause of asthma. A standardized allergen inhalation challenge model has been developed and is proving to be a valuable research tool in the investigation of asthma pathophysiology and of potential new pharmacological agents for the treatment of asthma. PMID:24791256

  17. Epstein-Barr Virus LMP2A Reduces Hyperactivation Induced by LMP1 to Restore Normal B Cell Phenotype in Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Vrazo, Alexandra C.; Chauchard, Maria; Raab-Traub, Nancy; Longnecker, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latently infects most of the human population and is strongly associated with lymphoproliferative disorders. EBV encodes several latency proteins affecting B cell proliferation and survival, including latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A) and the EBV oncoprotein LMP1. LMP1 and LMP2A signaling mimics CD40 and BCR signaling, respectively, and has been proposed to alter B cell functions including the ability of latently-infected B cells to access and transit the germinal center. In addition, several studies suggested a role for LMP2A modulation of LMP1 signaling in cell lines by alteration of TRAFs, signaling molecules used by LMP1. In this study, we investigated whether LMP1 and LMP2A co-expression in a transgenic mouse model alters B cell maturation and the response to antigen, and whether LMP2A modulates LMP1 function. Naïve LMP1/2A mice had similar lymphocyte populations and antibody production by flow cytometry and ELISA compared to controls. In the response to antigen, LMP2A expression in LMP1/2A animals rescued the impairment in germinal center generation promoted by LMP1. LMP1/2A animals produced high-affinity, class-switched antibody and plasma cells at levels similar to controls. In vitro, LMP1 upregulated activation markers and promoted B cell hyperproliferation, and co-expression of LMP2A restored a wild-type phenotype. By RT-PCR and immunoblot, LMP1 B cells demonstrated TRAF2 levels four-fold higher than non-transgenic controls, and co-expression of LMP2A restored TRAF2 levels to wild-type levels. No difference in TRAF3 levels was detected. While modulation of other TRAF family members remains to be assessed, normalization of the LMP1-induced B cell phenotype through LMP2A modulation of TRAF2 may be a pathway by which LMP2A controls B cell function. These findings identify an advance in the understanding of how Epstein-Barr virus can access the germinal center in vivo, a site critical for both the genesis of immunological memory and of virus-associated tumors. PMID:22536156

  18. Study of cavitating inducer instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, W. E.; Murphy, R.; Reddecliff, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    An analytic and experimental investigation into the causes and mechanisms of cavitating inducer instabilities was conducted. Hydrofoil cascade tests were performed, during which cavity sizes were measured. The measured data were used, along with inducer data and potential flow predictions, to refine an analysis for the prediction of inducer blade suction surface cavitation cavity volume. Cavity volume predictions were incorporated into a linearized system model, and instability predictions for an inducer water test loop were generated. Inducer tests were conducted and instability predictions correlated favorably with measured instability data.

  19. Radiation Induced Genomic Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, William F.

    2011-03-01

    Radiation induced genomic instability can be observed in the progeny of irradiated cells multiple generations after irradiation of parental cells. The phenotype is well established both in vivo (Morgan 2003) and in vitro (Morgan 2003), and may be critical in radiation carcinogenesis (Little 2000, Huang et al. 2003). Instability can be induced by both the deposition of energy in irradiated cells as well as by signals transmitted by irradiated (targeted) cells to non-irradiated (non-targeted) cells (Kadhim et al. 1992, Lorimore et al. 1998). Thus both targeted and non-targeted cells can pass on the legacy of radiation to their progeny. However the radiation induced events and cellular processes that respond to both targeted and non-targeted radiation effects that lead to the unstable phenotype remain elusive. The cell system we have used to study radiation induced genomic instability utilizes human hamster GM10115 cells. These cells have a single copy of human chromosome 4 in a background of hamster chromosomes. Instability is evaluated in the clonal progeny of irradiated cells and a clone is considered unstable if it contains three or more metaphase sub-populations involving unique rearrangements of the human chromosome (Marder and Morgan 1993). Many of these unstable clones have been maintained in culture for many years and have been extensively characterized. As initially described by Clutton et al., (Clutton et al. 1996) many of our unstable clones exhibit persistently elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (Limoli et al. 2003), which appear to be due dysfunctional mitochondria (Kim et al. 2006, Kim et al. 2006). Interestingly, but perhaps not surprisingly, our unstable clones do not demonstrate a “mutator phenotype” (Limoli et al. 1997), but they do continue to rearrange their genomes for many years. The limiting factor with this system is the target – the human chromosome. While some clones demonstrate amplification of this chromosome and thus lend themselves to prolonged study, many tend to eliminate or rearrange the target chromosome until it is too small for further rearrangement. The observed frequency of induced instability by low and high linear-energy-transfer radiations greatly exceeds that observed for nuclear gene mutations at similar doses; hence, mutation of a gene or gene family is unlikely to be the initiating mechanism. Once initiated however, there is evidence in the GM10115 model system that it can be perpetuated over time by dicentric chromosome formation followed by bridge breakage fusion cycles (Marder and Morgan 1993), as well as recombinational events involving interstitial telomere like repeat sequences (Day et al. 1998). There is also increasing evidence that inflammatory type reactions (Lorimore et al. 2001, Lorimore and Wright 2003), presumably involving reactive oxygen and nitrogen species as well as cytokines and chemokines might be involved in driving the ustable phenotype (Liaikis et al. 2007, Hei et al. 2008). To this end there is very convincing evidence for such reactions being involved in another non-targeted effect associated with ionizing radiation, the bystander effect (Hei et al. 2008). Clearly the link between induced instability and bystander effects suggests common processes and inflammatory type reactions will likely be the subject of future investigation.

  20. Arsenic-induced Aurora-A activation contributes to chromosome instability and tumorigenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chin-Han; Tseng, Ya-Shih; Yang, Chao-Chun; Kao, Yu-Ting; Sheu, Hamm-Ming; Liu, Hsiao-Sheng

    2013-11-01

    Arsenic may cause serious environmental pollution and is a serious industrial problem. Depending on the dosage, arsenic may trigger the cells undergoing either proliferation or apoptosis-related cell death. Because of lack of the proper animal model to study arsenic induced tumorigenesis, the accurate risk level of arsenic exposure has not been determined. Arsenic shows genotoxic effect on human beings who uptake water contaminated by arsenic. Chromosome aberration is frequently detected in arsenic exposure-related diseases and is associated with increased oxidative stress and decreased DNA repairing activity, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Aurora-A is a mitotic kinase, over-expression of Aurora-A leads to centrosome amplification, chromosomal instability and cell transformation. We revealed that Aurora-A is over-expressed in the skin and bladder cancer patients from blackfoot-disease endemic areas. Our cell line studies reveal that arsenic exposure between 0.5 ?M and 1 ?M for 2-7 days are able to induce Aurora-A expression and activation based on promoter activity, RNA and protein analysis. Aurora-A overexpression further increases the frequency of unsymmetrical chromosome segregation through centrosome amplification followed by cell population accumulated at S phase in immortalized keratinocyte (HaCaT) and uroepithelial cells (E7). Furthermore, Aurora-A over-expression was sustained for 1-4 weeks by chronic treatment of immortalized bladder and skin cells with NaAsO2. Aurora-A promoter methylation and gene amplification was not detected in the long-term arsenic treated E7 cells. Furthermore, the expression level of E2F1 transcription factor (E2F1) is increased in the presence of arsenic, and arsenic-related Aurora-A over-expression is transcriptionally regulated by E2F1. We further demonstrated that overexpression of Aurora-A and mutant Ha-ras or Aurora-A and mutant p53 may act additively to trigger arsenic-related bladder and skin cancer formation, respectively. It indicates that from chromosome instability proceeding to tumorigenesis, the simultaneous action of Aurora-A with activated oncogenic factor or inactivated tumor suppressor is required. In summary, we hypothesize that low concentration (0.5-1 ?M) of arsenic-induced E2F1-Aurora-A signaling pathway results in aberrant chromosome distribution during cell mitosis, the abnormal mitotic cells proceed to cancer cells only after acquiring additional tumorigenic factors. Our studies suggest that inhibition of low concentration of arsenic induced Aurora-A expression may provide a new theraputical strategy for the prevention and treatment of arsenic-related cancers.

  1. Inducing Pluripotency in Cattle.

    PubMed

    Malaver-Ortega, Luis F; Taheri-Ghahfarokhi, Amir; Sumer, Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear reprogramming technologies in general and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) in particular have opened the door to a vast number of practical applications in regenerative medicine and biotechnology. It also represents a possible alternative to the still evasive achievement of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) isolation from refractory species such as Bos. taurus. Herein, we described a protocol for bovine iPSCs (biPSCs) generation and characterization. The protocol is based on the overexpression of the exogenous transcription factors NANOG, OCT4, SOX2, KLF4 and c-MYC, using a pantropic retroviral system. PMID:26621589

  2. [Neuroleptic induced deficit syndrome].

    PubMed

    Szafra?ski, T

    1995-01-01

    Increasing interest in subjective aspects of therapy and rehabilitation focused the attention of psychiatrists, psychologists and psychopharmacologists on the mental side effects of neuroleptics. For the drug-related impairment of affective, cognitive and social function the name of neuroleptic-induced deficit syndrome (NIDS) is proposed. Patients with NIDS appear to be indifferent to the environmental stimuli, retarded and apathetic. They complain of feeling drugged and drowsy, weird, they suffer from lack of motivation, feel like "zombies". The paper presents description of NIDS and its differentiation from negative and depressive symptoms in schizophrenia and subjective perceiving of extrapyramidal syndromes. PMID:7652089

  3. Method for inducing hypothermia

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Lance B. (Chicago, IL); Hoek, Terry Vanden (Chicago, IL); Kasza, Kenneth E. (Palos Park, IL)

    2003-04-15

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  4. Method for inducing hypothermia

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Lance B.; Hoek, Terry Vanden; Kasza, Kenneth E.

    2005-11-08

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  5. Method for inducing hypothermia

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Lance B. (Chicago, IL); Hoek, Terry Vanden (Chicago, IL); Kasza, Kenneth E. (Palos Park, IL)

    2008-09-09

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  6. Transient Uncoupling Induces Synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Malte; Mannattil, Manu; Dutta, Debabrata; Chakraborty, Sagar; Timme, Marc

    2015-07-01

    Finding conditions that support synchronization is a fertile and active area of research with applications across multiple disciplines. Here we present and analyze a scheme for synchronizing chaotic dynamical systems by transiently uncoupling them. Specifically, systems coupled only in a fraction of their state space may synchronize even if fully coupled they do not. While for many standard systems coupling strengths need to be bounded to ensure synchrony, transient uncoupling removes this bound and thus enables synchronization in an infinite range of effective coupling strengths. The presented coupling scheme therefore opens up the possibility to induce synchrony in (biological or technical) systems whose parameters are fixed and cannot be modified continuously.

  7. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Greinacher, Andreas; Fürll, Birgitt; Selleng, Sixten

    2013-01-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is caused by platelet-activating immunoglobulin (Ig) G antibodies that recognize multimolecular complexes of platelet factor 4 (PF4) bound to heparin or other polyanions. Most laboratory assays for HIT have a high sensitivity for anti-PF4/heparin antibodies and a negative test generally excludes HIT (high negative predictive value), especially in a setting of a low pretest probability. The magnitude of a positive test result correlates with greater likelihood of HIT. Therefore, a combined diagnostic approach that considers the clinical picture and the magnitude of a positive test result is recommended for accurate diagnosis of HIT. PMID:23546723

  8. Steam Condensation Induced Waterhammer 

    E-print Network

    Kirsner, W.

    2000-01-01

    stream_source_info ESL-IE-00-04-29.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 33804 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name ESL-IE-00-04-29.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Steam Condensation... mer-- i.e. fast moving steam picking up a slug of condensate and hurling it downstream against an elbow or a valve. Condensation Induced Waterham mer can be 100 times more powerful than this type of waterhammer. Because it does not require flowing...

  9. Neutron Induced Beta Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Shaikh, A. M.; Shylaja, D.

    2011-07-15

    In the present paper we give a new methodology named, 'neutron induced beta radiography-NIBR' which makes use of neutron activated Dy or In foils as source of (3-radiation. Radiographs are obtained with an aluminium cassette containing image plate, a sample under inspection and the activated Dy or In foil kept in tight contact. The sensitivity of the technique to thickness was evaluated for different materials in the form of step wedges. Some radiographs are presented to demonstrate potential of method to inspect thin samples.

  10. Transient Uncoupling Induces Synchronization.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Malte; Mannattil, Manu; Dutta, Debabrata; Chakraborty, Sagar; Timme, Marc

    2015-07-31

    Finding conditions that support synchronization is a fertile and active area of research with applications across multiple disciplines. Here we present and analyze a scheme for synchronizing chaotic dynamical systems by transiently uncoupling them. Specifically, systems coupled only in a fraction of their state space may synchronize even if fully coupled they do not. While for many standard systems coupling strengths need to be bounded to ensure synchrony, transient uncoupling removes this bound and thus enables synchronization in an infinite range of effective coupling strengths. The presented coupling scheme therefore opens up the possibility to induce synchrony in (biological or technical) systems whose parameters are fixed and cannot be modified continuously. PMID:26274420

  11. Electromagnetically induced holographic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Tianhui; Xia, Lixin; Ma, Hongyang; Zheng, Chunhong; Chen, Libo

    2016-01-01

    The electromagnetically induced Talbot effect offers a nondestructive and lensless way to image ultracold atoms or molecules (Wen et al., 2011 [12]). In this paper, we propose another atomic imaging scheme based on the holographic imaging principle, in which three types of light source are employed as the imaging light to perform spatial interference. Compared to the previous self-imaging scheme, in the present one both the amplitude and phase information of the object can be imaged with the characteristic of arbitrarily controllable image variation in size, and the object to be imaged is no longer subject to the periodic structure.

  12. Light-induced maculopathy.

    PubMed

    Schoolmeesters, B; Rosselle, I; Leys, A; Missotten, L

    1995-01-01

    In this retrospective study of fluorescein angiograms performed between 1991 and 1995, we retrieved 17 eyes (15 patients) with light-induced maculopathy after a cataract extraction and lens implantation. Sixteen eyes underwent non-complicated procedures; 12 extracapsular cataract extractions and 4 phaco-emulsifications. One phaco-emulsification was complicated by a posterior capsular rupture and required an anterior vitrectomy. In 11 eyes the maculopathy was an incidential finding and the lesions were paracentral. In 6 eyes the phototoxic scar was central and the cause of a central scotoma with metamorphopsia. PMID:8936776

  13. Proteasome inhibition mediates p53 reactivation and anti-cancer activity of 6-gingerol in cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Namrata; Duggal, Shivali; Singh, Shailendra Kumar; Porwal, Konica; Srivastava, Vikas Kumar; Maurya, Rakesh; Bhatt, M L B; Mishra, Durga Prasad

    2015-12-22

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) expressing E6 and E7 oncoproteins, is known to inactivate the tumor suppressor p53 through proteasomal degradation in cervical cancers. Therefore, use of small molecules for inhibition of proteasome function and induction of p53 reactivation is a promising strategy for induction of apoptosis in cervical cancer cells. The polyphenolic alkanone, 6-Gingerol (6G), present in the pungent extracts of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) has shown potent anti-tumorigenic and pro-apoptotic activities against a variety of cancers. In this study we explored the molecular mechanism of action of 6G in human cervical cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. 6G potently inhibited proliferation of the HPV positive cervical cancer cells. 6G was found to: (i) inhibit the chymotrypsin activity of proteasomes, (ii) induce reactivation of p53, (iii) increase levels of p21, (iv) induce DNA damage and G2/M cell cycle arrest, (v) alter expression levels of p53-associated apoptotic markers like, cleaved caspase-3 and PARP, and (vi) potentiate the cytotoxicity of cisplatin. 6G treatment induced significant reduction of tumor volume, tumor weight, proteasome inhibition and p53 accumulation in HeLa xenograft tumor cells in vivo. The 6G treatment was devoid of toxic effects as it did not affect body weights, hematological and osteogenic parameters. Taken together, our data underscores the therapeutic and chemosensitizing effects of 6G in the management and treatment of cervical cancer. PMID:26621832

  14. Electromagnetically Induced Entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xihua; Xiao, Min

    2015-08-01

    Quantum entanglement provides an essential resource for quantum computation, quantum communication, and quantum network. How to conveniently and efficiently produce entanglement between bright light beams presents a challenging task to build realistic quantum information processing networks. Here, we present an efficient and convenient way to realize a novel quantum phenomenon, named electromagnetically induced entanglement, in the conventional ?-type three-level atomic system driven by a strong pump field and a relatively weak probe field. Nearly perfect entanglement between the two fields can be achieved with a low coherence decay rate between the two lower levels, high pump-field intensity, and large optical depth of the atomic ensemble. The physical origin is quantum coherence between the lower doublet produced by the pump and probe fields, similar to the well-known electromagnetically induced transparency. This method would greatly facilitate the generation of nondegenerate narrow-band continuous-variable entanglement between bright light beams by using only coherent laser fields, and may find potential and broad applications in realistic quantum information processing.

  15. Electromagnetically Induced Entanglement.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xihua; Xiao, Min

    2015-01-01

    Quantum entanglement provides an essential resource for quantum computation, quantum communication, and quantum network. How to conveniently and efficiently produce entanglement between bright light beams presents a challenging task to build realistic quantum information processing networks. Here, we present an efficient and convenient way to realize a novel quantum phenomenon, named electromagnetically induced entanglement, in the conventional ?-type three-level atomic system driven by a strong pump field and a relatively weak probe field. Nearly perfect entanglement between the two fields can be achieved with a low coherence decay rate between the two lower levels, high pump-field intensity, and large optical depth of the atomic ensemble. The physical origin is quantum coherence between the lower doublet produced by the pump and probe fields, similar to the well-known electromagnetically induced transparency. This method would greatly facilitate the generation of nondegenerate narrow-band continuous-variable entanglement between bright light beams by using only coherent laser fields, and may find potential and broad applications in realistic quantum information processing. PMID:26314514

  16. Electromagnetically Induced Entanglement

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xihua; Xiao, Min

    2015-01-01

    Quantum entanglement provides an essential resource for quantum computation, quantum communication, and quantum network. How to conveniently and efficiently produce entanglement between bright light beams presents a challenging task to build realistic quantum information processing networks. Here, we present an efficient and convenient way to realize a novel quantum phenomenon, named electromagnetically induced entanglement, in the conventional ?-type three-level atomic system driven by a strong pump field and a relatively weak probe field. Nearly perfect entanglement between the two fields can be achieved with a low coherence decay rate between the two lower levels, high pump-field intensity, and large optical depth of the atomic ensemble. The physical origin is quantum coherence between the lower doublet produced by the pump and probe fields, similar to the well-known electromagnetically induced transparency. This method would greatly facilitate the generation of nondegenerate narrow-band continuous-variable entanglement between bright light beams by using only coherent laser fields, and may find potential and broad applications in realistic quantum information processing. PMID:26314514

  17. Cholesterol depletion induces autophagy

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jinglei; Ohsaki, Yuki; Tauchi-Sato, Kumi; Fujita, Akikazu; Fujimoto, Toyoshi . E-mail: tfujimot@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2006-12-08

    Autophagy is a mechanism to digest cells' own components, and its importance in many physiological and pathological processes is being recognized. But the molecular mechanism that regulates autophagy is not understood in detail. In the present study, we found that cholesterol depletion induces macroautophagy. The cellular cholesterol in human fibroblasts was depleted either acutely using 5 mM methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin or 10-20 {mu}g/ml nystatin for 1 h, or metabolically by 20 {mu}M mevastatin and 200 {mu}M mevalonolactone along with 10% lipoprotein-deficient serum for 2-3 days. By any of these protocols, marked increase of LC3-II was detected by immunoblotting and by immunofluorescence microscopy, and the increase was more extensive than that caused by amino acid starvation, i.e., incubation in Hanks' solution for several hours. The induction of autophagic vacuoles by cholesterol depletion was also observed in other cell types, and the LC3-positive membranes were often seen as long tubules, >50 {mu}m in length. The increase of LC3-II by methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin was suppressed by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitors and was accompanied by dephosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin. By electron microscopy, autophagic vacuoles induced by cholesterol depletion were indistinguishable from those seen after amino acid starvation. These results demonstrate that a decrease in cholesterol activates autophagy by a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent mechanism.

  18. Methamphetamine Induces Chronic Corticostriatal Depression

    E-print Network

    Sulzer, David

    Methamphetamine Induces Chronic Corticostriatal Depression: Too Much of a Bad Thing Jeremy J. Day1-releasing psychostimu- lant methamphetamine alters neurotrans- mission at corticostriatal synapses. Imag- ing

  19. Induced Seismicity Monitoring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, S. R.; Jarpe, S.; Harben, P.

    2014-12-01

    There are many seismological aspects associated with monitoring of permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in geologic formations. Many of these include monitoring underground gas migration through detailed tomographic studies of rock properties, integrity of the cap rock and micro seismicity with time. These types of studies require expensive deployments of surface and borehole sensors in the vicinity of the CO2 injection wells. Another problem that may exist in CO2 sequestration fields is the potential for damaging induced seismicity associated with fluid injection into the geologic reservoir. Seismic hazard monitoring in CO2 sequestration fields requires a seismic network over a spatially larger region possibly having stations in remote settings. Expensive observatory-grade seismic systems are not necessary for seismic hazard deployments or small-scale tomographic studies. Hazard monitoring requires accurate location of induced seismicity to magnitude levels only slightly less than that which can be felt at the surface (e.g. magnitude 1), and the frequencies of interest for tomographic analysis are ~1 Hz and greater. We have developed a seismo/acoustic smart sensor system that can achieve the goals necessary for induced seismicity monitoring in CO2 sequestration fields. The unit is inexpensive, lightweight, easy to deploy, can operate remotely under harsh conditions and features 9 channels of recording (currently 3C 4.5 Hz geophone, MEMS accelerometer and microphone). An on-board processor allows for satellite transmission of parameter data to a processing center. Continuous or event-detected data is kept on two removable flash SD cards of up to 64+ Gbytes each. If available, data can be transmitted via cell phone modem or picked up via site visits. Low-power consumption allows for autonomous operation using only a 10 watt solar panel and a gel-cell battery. The system has been successfully tested for long-term (> 6 months) remote operations over a wide range of environments including summer in Arizona to winter above 9000' in the mountains of southern Colorado. Statistically based on-board processing is used for detection, arrival time picking, back azimuth estimation and magnitude estimates from coda waves and acoustic signals.

  20. Disorder induces explosive synchronization

    E-print Network

    Per Sebastian Skardal; Alex Arenas

    2014-06-02

    We study explosive synchronization, a phenomenon characterized by first-order phase transitions between incoherent and synchronized states in networks of coupled oscillators. While explosive synchronization has been the subject of many recent studies, in each case strong conditions on either the heterogeneity of the network, its link weights, or its initial construction are imposed to engineer a first-order phase transition. This raises the question of how robust explosive synchronization is in view of more realistic structural and dynamical properties. Here we show that explosive synchronization can be induced in mildly heterogeneous networks by the addition of quenched disorder to the oscillators' frequencies, demonstrating that it is not only robust to, but moreover promoted by, this natural mechanism. We support these findings with numerical and analytical results, presenting simulations of a real neural network as well as a self-consistency theory used to study synthetic networks.

  1. Laser induced nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ledingham, Ken; McCanny, Tom; Graham, Paul; Fang Xiao; Singhal, Ravi; Magill, Joe; Creswell, Alan; Sanderson, David; Allott, Ric; Neely, David; Norreys, Peter; Santala, Marko; Zepf, Matthew; Watts, Ian; Clark, Eugene; Krushelnick, Karl; Tatarakis, Michael; Dangor, Bucker; Machecek, Antonin; Wark, Justin

    1998-12-16

    Dramatic improvements in laser technology since 1984 have revolutionised high power laser technology. Application of chirped-pulse amplification techniques has resulted in laser intensities in excess of 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. In the mid to late eighties, C. K. Rhodes and K. Boyer discussed the possibility of shining laser light of this intensity onto solid surfaces and to cause nuclear transitions. In particular, irradiation of a uranium target could induce electro- and photofission in the focal region of the laser. In this paper it is shown that {mu}Ci of {sup 62}Cu can be generated via the ({gamma},n) reaction by a laser with an intensity of about 10{sup 19} Wcm{sup -2}.

  2. [Drug-induced dyspepsia].

    PubMed

    Gross, Manfred; Labenz, Joachim

    2015-05-01

    Gastrointestinal symptoms are among the most common side effects of drugs. There is a broad spectrum of symptoms. Patients often report upper abdominal pain, an early sense of satiety, epigastric discomfort or pain in the upper abdomen or behind the breastbone, flatulence, diarrhoea or constipation. Some of these symptoms are attributed to the stomach or upper abdomen by the patient and/or the physician. "Stomach pain", pain in the epigastric region, occurs in most cases in combination with other symptoms such as a feeling of pressure in the upper abdomen or bloating, early satiety, nausea or vomiting--a combination called dyspepsia. Given the high frequency of these symptoms in the general population and the large number of medications many patients are taking, it can be very difficult in a given patient to differentiate between drug-induced side effects and spontaneously occurring symptoms. PMID:25970411

  3. Pancytopenia induced by hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Lo, Louise; Singer, Sylvia Titi; Vichinsky, Elliott

    2002-11-01

    Hypothermia has been demonstrated to induce pancytopenia in animals, but whether this association exists in humans is unknown. The authors report the case of an 8-year-old girl in whom hypothermia (temperature 33 degrees C-35 degrees C) is the cause of pancytopenia. The patient developed thermoregulatory dysfunction subsequent to surgical resection of a craniopharyngioma. Her recurrent cytopenias could not be explained by any etiology except chronic hypothermia. The pancytopenia improved upon rewarming the patient to a temperature of 36 degrees C. This association between hypothermia and pancytopenia has rarely been reported in humans and may be underdiagnosed especially in cases of transient or milder presentations. The authors recommend careful hematologic monitoring of patients with thermoregulatory dysfunction. PMID:12439045

  4. Nebivolol-induced gynecomastia.

    PubMed

    Köklü, Erkan; Arslan, ?akir; Yüksel, ?sa Öner; Bayar, Nermin; Demirci, Deniz

    2015-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions play a substantial role in the etiology of gynecomastia. Gynecomastia as an adverse drug reaction, related to some cardiovascular drugs, has been reported in literature. Nebivolol is a third generation beta-blocker, and gynecomastia as an adverse effect on the consumption of this drug has not been reported in any article yet. We herein present the case of a 42-year-old male, who developed bilateral gynecomastia following nebivolol use and complete regression after discontinuation of nebivolol. Other reasons causing gynecomastia were excluded. Discontinuation of the responsible drug is quite sufficient with regard to the treatment of drug-induced gynecomastia, without any pharmacological or surgical treatment. PMID:26312003

  5. Laser-induced bioluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, G.D.; Lynch, R.V. III

    1981-01-01

    A project has been initiated to determine the feasibility of developing a complete airborne remote sensing system for rapidly mapping high concentration patches of bioluminescent organisms in the world's oceans. Conceptually, this system would be composed of a laser illuminator to induce bioluminescence and a low light level image intensifier for detection of light. Initial laboratory measurements consisted of using a 2-J flash lamp pulsed optical dye laser to excite bioluminescence in the marine dinoflagellate Pyrocustis lunula at ambient temperature using Rhodamine 6G as the lasing dye (585 nm) and a laser pulse width of 1 microsec. After a latency period of 15-20 msec, the bioluminescence maximum occurred in the blue (480 nm is the wavelength maximum for most dinoflagellate bioluminescence) with the peaking occurring approximately 65 msec after the laser pulse. Planned experiments will investigate the effect of different excitation wavelengths and energies at various temperatures and salinities of the cultures.

  6. [Drug--induced splenomegaly].

    PubMed

    Petroianu, Andy

    2011-12-01

    The diagnosis of splenomegaly due to drugs is based on a recent history of exposure to a drug before the spleen enlargement. The purpose of this paper is to review studies of the literature on drugs that may induce to splenomegaly. Drugs may provoke the enlargement of spleen by direct effect in splenic cells or as a side effect of disturbances in other organs, mainly liver and haematoimmunologic system. Some drugs provoke severe haemolysis associated with splenomegaly. Another cause of spleen increasing in size is the venous congestion due to liver disturbance with portal vein occlusion. All these drug side effects are usually transitory and splenomegaly disappears when the medication is discontinued. This is a complex problem that must be better studied to be understood in order to prevent its occurrence and to find the best treatment. PMID:22863507

  7. Tumor-induced osteomalacia

    PubMed Central

    Farrow, Emily G; White, Kenneth E

    2009-01-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is an acquired disorder of isolated renal phosphate wasting associated with tumors, typically of mesenchymal origin. Patients with TIO share similar biochemical and skeletal phenotypes with patients who have autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets (ADHR) and X-linked hypophosphatemia. The study of TIO introduced the idea of the existence of circulating factors, referred to as ‘phosphatonins’, produced by the tumor, which act upon the kidney to reduce phosphate reabsorption. Although several factors have been identified, the phosphatonin FGF-23, also identified as the causative factor in ADHR, is currently the best characterized of these factors relative to phosphate handling. This review describes the importance of TIO in understanding phosphate homeostasis in the context of new endocrine interactions between the skeleton and the kidney. PMID:20228870

  8. Induced seismicity. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Segall, P.

    1997-09-18

    The objective of this project has been to develop a fundamental understanding of seismicity associated with energy production. Earthquakes are known to be associated with oil, gas, and geothermal energy production. The intent is to develop physical models that predict when seismicity is likely to occur, and to determine to what extent these earthquakes can be used to infer conditions within energy reservoirs. Early work focused on earthquakes induced by oil and gas extraction. Just completed research has addressed earthquakes within geothermal fields, such as The Geysers in northern California, as well as the interactions of dilatancy, friction, and shear heating, on the generation of earthquakes. The former has involved modeling thermo- and poro-elastic effects of geothermal production and water injection. Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers are used to measure deformation associated with geothermal activity, and these measurements along with seismic data are used to test and constrain thermo-mechanical models.

  9. Electron-induced chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Nigel J.

    2008-11-01

    The ability to understand, manipulate and control physico-chemical processes at the molecular level is one of the great challenges of modern research and underpins the development of vibrant new technologies of the 21st century, for example the development of nanolithography. Such [`]single molecule engineering' requires selective bond cleavage in target molecules to allow subsequent management of the local site chemistry. Recent research has revealed that it is possible to influence the excitation and dissociation of molecules through the manipulation of electron interactions at the individual molecular level. Since electrons are ubiquitous in nature and electron-induced reactions initiate and drive the basic physical-chemical processes in many areas of science and technology from industrial plasmas to living tissues, our ability to control electron interactions provides exciting new opportunities that can be exploited in both the research and technological communities.

  10. Nebivolol-induced gynecomastia

    PubMed Central

    Köklü, Erkan; Arslan, ?akir; Yüksel, ?sa Öner; Bayar, Nermin; Demirci, Deniz

    2015-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions play a substantial role in the etiology of gynecomastia. Gynecomastia as an adverse drug reaction, related to some cardiovascular drugs, has been reported in literature. Nebivolol is a third generation beta-blocker, and gynecomastia as an adverse effect on the consumption of this drug has not been reported in any article yet. We herein present the case of a 42-year-old male, who developed bilateral gynecomastia following nebivolol use and complete regression after discontinuation of nebivolol. Other reasons causing gynecomastia were excluded. Discontinuation of the responsible drug is quite sufficient with regard to the treatment of drug-induced gynecomastia, without any pharmacological or surgical treatment. PMID:26312003

  11. Opioid-induced Cardioprotection

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Katsuya; Kersten, Judy R.; Riess, Matthias L.

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic heart disease and myocardial infarction continue to be leading causes of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Activation of opioid, adenosine, bradykinin, adrenergic and other G-protein coupled receptors have been found to be cardioprotective. ?- and/or ?-opioid receptor activation is involved in direct myocardial protection, while the role of ?-opioid receptors seems less clear. In addition, differential affinities to the three opioid-receptor subtypes by various agonists and cross-talk among different G-protein coupled receptors render conclusions regarding opioid-mediated cardioprotection challenging. The present review will focus on the protective effects of endogenously released opioid peptides as well as exogenously administered opioids such as morphine, fentanyl, remifentanil, butorphanol, and methadone against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. Receptor heterodimerization and cross-talk as well as interactions with other cardioprotective techniques will be discussed. Implications for opioid-induced cardioprotection in humans and for future drug development to improve myocardial salvage will be provided. PMID:24502571

  12. Discreteness induced extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Renato Vieira; da Silva, Linaena Méricy

    2015-11-01

    Two simple models based on ecological problems are discussed from the point of view of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. It is shown how discrepant may be the results of the models that include spatial distribution with discrete interactions when compared with the continuous analogous models. In the continuous case we have, under certain circumstances, the population explosion. When we take into account the finiteness of the population, we get the opposite result, extinction. We will analyze how these results depend on the dimension d of the space and describe the phenomenon of the "Discreteness Inducing Extinction" (DIE). The results are interpreted in the context of the "paradox of sex", an old problem of evolutionary biology.

  13. Chemotherapy-induced Cardiotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    FLORESCU, Maria; CINTEZA, Mircea; VINEREANU, Dragos

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Breast cancer represents the most frequent form of neoplasia in women worldwide, being responsible of 1.6% of annual deaths. Therefore, it is a major public health issue and research in this field should be a priority. Chemoterapics drugs are extremly potent tools, which alone or in association to radiotherapy, increase survival and lower the reccurrence rate of cancer, but their use can be limited by cardiotoxicity. Cardiotoxicity can appear early or late after therapy, and may vary from subclinical myocardial dysfunction to irreversible heart failure. Currently, cardiac dysfunction induced by chemotherapy is diagnosed through classical echocardiographic parameters. However, these cannot detect subtle, early changes of cardiac structure and function. Consequently, description of new methods, which could detect cardiac dysfunction in an early stage, becomes essential for detecting the group of patients at risk for irreversible heart failure and for monitoring the treatment. PMID:24023601

  14. Laser Induced Thermal Keratoplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Householder, John; Horwitz, Larry S.; Lowe, Kenneth W.; Murrillo, Adolfo

    1989-09-01

    A technique of corneal surgery that is thermally induced and relatively nonenvasive has been studied by the authors, and the preliminary results of the thermal keratoplasty performed on live rabbits are reported here. A carbon dioxide laser was used with simple optical and pointing systems to thermally induce several arbitrary patterns of corneal reformation. Endothelial photographs were taken before the procedure and then again ten days after. They indicated no damage in the Descemet's membrane nor was there damage observed to the endothelium. As much, as 14 "diopters" of change occurred in the corneal keratometry with both positive and negative directions signs. The magnitude and direction of the change were recorded as functions of the pattern of the therapy produced and the laser energy deposited in the stroma. Any corneal reformation was tracked as a function of time subsequent to the procedure. A-minor decay was observed within the first three days of the procedure and the majority of the reformations have maintained at the time of this writing. Since radiation at this wavelength is highly attenuated and absorbed in cornea, no change was observed beyond mid-stroma and the lens and retina appeared uneffective. The authors believe that this technology will be a significant contributor to corneal refractive procedures in the near future. Unlike any refractive surgery currently practiced, this technology may lead to a procedure that: 1) is reversible, 2) is re.eatable, 3) stren thens rather then weakens the cornea, 4) is a..arentl more stable, 5) is more flexible in the types of corneal curvature changes it can produce, 6) results in very clean mires, 7) is painless, and 8) results in total corneal clarity.

  15. Bellows flow-induced vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tygielski, P. J.; Smyly, H. M.; Gerlach, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    The bellows flow excitation mechanism and results of comprehensive test program are summarized. The analytical model for predicting bellows flow induced stress is refined. The model includes the effects of an upstream elbow, arbitrary geometry, and multiple piles. A refined computer code for predicting flow induced stress is described which allows life prediction if a material S-N diagram is available.

  16. Artemisinin Represses Telomerase Subunits and Induces Apoptosis in HPV-39 Infected Human Cervical Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Anushree; Chatterji, Urmi

    2015-09-01

    Artemisinin, a plant-derived antimalarial drug with relatively low toxicity on normal cells in humans, has selective anticancer activities in various types of cancers, both in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, we have investigated the anticancer effects of artemisinin in human cervical cancer cells, with special emphasis on its role in inducing apoptosis and repressing cell proliferation by inhibiting the telomerase subunits, ER? which is essential for maintenance of the cervix, and downstream components like VEGF, which is known to activate angiogenesis. Effects of artemisinin on apoptosis of ME-180 cells were measured by flow cytometry, DAPI, and annexin V staining. Expression of genes and proteins related to cell proliferation and apoptosis was quantified both at the transcriptional and translational levels by semi-quantitative RT-PCR and western blot analysis, respectively. Our findings demonstrated that artemisinin significantly downregulated the expression of ER? and its downstream component, VEGF. Antiproliferative activity was also supported by decreased telomerase activity and reduced expression of hTR and hTERT subunits. Additionally, artemisinin reduced the expression of the HPV-39 viral E6 and E7 components. Artemisinin-induced apoptosis was confirmed by FACS, nuclear chromatin condensation, annexin V staining. Increased expression of p53 with concomitant decrease in expression of the p53 inhibitor Mdm2 further supported that artemisinin-induced apoptosis was p53-dependent. The results clearly indicate that artemisinin induces antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects in HPV-39-infected ME-180 cells, and warrants further trial as an effective anticancer drug. PMID:25755006

  17. Characterization of the Meq oncoproteins of Marek's disease virus vaccine strain CVI988/Rispens 

    E-print Network

    Ajithdoss, Dharani K.

    2010-07-14

    Marek?s disease virus serotype-1 (MDV-1) causes T cell lymphomas in chickens. Vaccines prepared from attenuated CVI988/Rispens MDV-1 strain currently offer the best protection. Although attenuated CVI988 is non-oncogenic, it codes for two forms...

  18. Role of the Leucine Zipper of Marek's Disease Virus Oncoprotein Meq in Pathogenesis 

    E-print Network

    Suchodolski, Paulette F.

    2010-07-14

    Marek's disease virus (MDV), the etiologic agent of Marek's disease, is a potent oncogenic herpesvirus. MDV is highly contagious and elicits a rapid onset of malignant T-cell lymphomas in chickens within several weeks after infection. The MDV genome...

  19. Two decades of leukemia oncoprotein epistasis: the MLL1 paradigm for epigenetic deregulation in leukemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin E; Ernst, Patricia

    2014-12-01

    MLL1, located on human chromosome 11, is disrupted in distinct recurrent chromosomal translocations in several leukemia subsets. Studying the MLL1 gene and its oncogenic variants has provided a paradigm for understanding cancer initiation and maintenance through aberrant epigenetic gene regulation. Here we review the historical development of model systems to recapitulate oncogenic MLL1-rearrangement (MLL-r) alleles encoding mixed-lineage leukemia fusion proteins (MLL-FPs) or internal gene rearrangement products. These largely mouse and human cell/xenograft systems have been generated and used to understand how MLL-r alleles affect diverse pathways to result in a highly penetrant, drug-resistant leukemia. The particular features of the animal models influenced the conclusions of mechanisms of transformation. We discuss significant downstream enablers, inhibitors, effectors, and collaborators of MLL-r leukemia, including molecules that directly interact with MLL-FPs and endogenous mixed-lineage leukemia protein, direct target genes of MLL-FPs, and other pathways that have proven to be influential in supporting or suppressing the leukemogenic activity of MLL-FPs. The use of animal models has been complemented with patient sample, genome-wide analyses to delineate the important genomic and epigenomic changes that occur in distinct subsets of MLL-r leukemia. Collectively, these studies have resulted in rapid progress toward developing new strategies for targeting MLL-r leukemia and general cell-biological principles that may broadly inform targeting aberrant epigenetic regulators in other cancers. PMID:25264566

  20. Sonoporation of Cervical Carcinoma Cells Affected with E6-Oncoprotein for the Treatment of Uterine Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curiel, Laura; Lee, Kyle; Pichardo, Samuel; Zehbe, Ingeborg

    2010-03-01

    Cervical cancer has been identified as the third leading cause of average years of life lost per person dying of cancer. Since essentially all cervical cancers contain copies of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA, we propose a treatment that targets HPV-infected cells using strategies that re-introduce normal functions into the infected cells while sparing healthy cells. We propose the use of focused ultrasound in combination with microbubbles as means to deliver antibodies against the E6 protein present only in HPV positive cells. We conducted in vitro studies with cell cultures of SiHa cervical carcinoma cells seeded into Opticell™ chambers. An in-house ultrasound excitation apparatus was used to control and explore the optimal acoustic parameters in order to maximize delivery. We first validated the possibility of delivering the EX-EGFP-M02 vector (Genecopoeia) into the cells; 1.2 ?L of activated microbubbles (Definity®) and 50 ?g of the vector were mixed in media and then injected into the Opticell™ chamber. We used 32 ?s pulses at a central frequency of 930 KHz with a repetition frequency of 1.5 kHz and total exposure duration of 30 s; six pressure values were tested (0 to 1 MPa). Fluorescence imaging was used to determine the levels of intracellular proteins and assess delivery. The delivery of an anti-?-Tubulin antibody was next tested and confirmed that the delivery into HPV16 positive cells was successful.

  1. High resolution imaging &HPV oncoprotein detection for global prevention of cerv | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to main content Division of Cancer Prevention Search form Search Main menu Home Major Programs Research Networks Map Alliance of Glycobiologists for Detection of Cancer Barrett's Esophagus Translational Research Network (BETRNet) Cancer Prevention

  2. Proteolysis of EphA2 Converts It from a Tumor Suppressor to an Oncoprotein.

    PubMed

    Koshikawa, Naohiko; Hoshino, Daisuke; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Minegishi, Tomoko; Tomari, Taizo; Nam, Sung-Ouk; Aoki, Mikiko; Sueta, Takayuki; Nakagawa, Takashi; Miyamoto, Shingo; Nabeshima, Kazuki; Weaver, Alissa M; Seiki, Motoharu

    2015-08-15

    Eph receptor tyrosine kinases are considered candidate therapeutic targets in cancer, but they can exert opposing effects on cell growth. In the presence of its ligands, Eph receptor EphA2 suppresses signaling by other growth factor receptors, including ErbB, whereas ligand-independent activation of EphA2 augments ErbB signaling. To deploy EphA2-targeting drugs effectively in tumors, the anti-oncogenic ligand-dependent activation state of EphA2 must be discriminated from its oncogenic ligand-independent state. Because the molecular basis for the latter is little understood, we investigated how the activation state of EphA2 can be switched in tumor tissue. We found that ligand-binding domain of EphA2 is cleaved frequently by the membrane metalloproteinase MT1-MMP, a powerful modulator of the pericellular environment in tumor cells. EphA2 immunostaining revealed a significant loss of the N-terminal portion of EphA2 in areas of tumor tissue that expressed MT1-MMP. Moreover, EphA2 phosphorylation patterns that signify ligand-independent activation were observed specifically in these areas of tumor tissue. Mechanistic experiments revealed that processing of EphA2 by MT1-MMP promoted ErbB signaling, anchorage-independent growth, and cell migration. Conversely, expression of a proteolysis-resistant mutant of EphA2 prevented tumorigenesis and metastasis of human tumor xenografts in mice. Overall, our results showed how the proteolytic state of EphA2 in tumors determines its effector function and influences its status as a candidate biomarker for targeted therapy. PMID:26130649

  3. Mutations in MECOM, Encoding Oncoprotein EVI1, Cause Radioulnar Synostosis with Amegakaryocytic Thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Niihori, Tetsuya; Ouchi-Uchiyama, Meri; Sasahara, Yoji; Kaneko, Takashi; Hashii, Yoshiko; Irie, Masahiro; Sato, Atsushi; Saito-Nanjo, Yuka; Funayama, Ryo; Nagashima, Takeshi; Inoue, Shin-Ichi; Nakayama, Keiko; Ozono, Keiichi; Kure, Shigeo; Matsubara, Yoichi; Imaizumi, Masue; Aoki, Yoko

    2015-12-01

    Radioulnar synostosis with amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia (RUSAT) is an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome, characterized by thrombocytopenia and congenital fusion of the radius and ulna. A heterozygous HOXA11 mutation has been identified in two unrelated families as a cause of RUSAT. However, HOXA11 mutations are absent in a number of individuals with RUSAT, which suggests that other genetic loci contribute to RUSAT. In the current study, we performed whole exome sequencing in an individual with RUSAT and her healthy parents and identified a de novo missense mutation in MECOM, encoding EVI1, in the individual with RUSAT. Subsequent analysis of MECOM in two other individuals with RUSAT revealed two additional missense mutations. These three mutations were clustered within the 8(th) zinc finger motif of the C-terminal zinc finger domain of EVI1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and qPCR assays of the regions harboring the ETS-like motif that is known as an EVI1 binding site showed a reduction in immunoprecipitated DNA for two EVI1 mutants compared with wild-type EVI1. Furthermore, reporter assays showed that MECOM mutations led to alterations in both AP-1- and TGF-?-mediated transcriptional responses. These functional assays suggest that transcriptional dysregulation by mutant EVI1 could be associated with the development of RUSAT. We report missense mutations in MECOM resulting in a Mendelian disorder that provide compelling evidence for the critical role of EVI1 in normal hematopoiesis and in the development of forelimbs and fingers in humans. PMID:26581901

  4. GENETIC ANALYSYS OF THE IN VIVO FUNCTION AND REGULATION OF THE ONCOPROTEIN CDK8 IN DROSOPHILA 

    E-print Network

    Bridges, Lauren

    2012-05-09

    . Importantly, both CDK8 and CycC are highly conserved in all eukaryotes. Thus we use Drosophila as an experimental system to identify both the upstream regulators and downstream effectors of CDK8. We expect to elucidate the fundamental roles of CDK8- Cyc...

  5. Phylogenetic conservation of the regulatory and functional properties of the Vav oncoprotein family

    SciTech Connect

    Couceiro, Jose R.; Martin-Bermudo, Maria D.; Bustelo, Xose R. . E-mail: xbustelo@usal.es

    2005-08-15

    Vav proteins are phosphorylation-dependent GDP/GTP exchange factors for Rho/Rac GTPases. Despite intense characterization of mammalian Vav proteins both biochemically and genetically, there is little information regarding the conservation of their biological properties in lower organisms. To approach this issue, we have performed a characterization of the regulatory, catalytic, and functional properties of the single Vav family member of Drosophila melanogaster. These analyses have shown that the intramolecular mechanisms controlling the enzyme activity of mammalian Vav proteins are already present in Drosophila, suggesting that such properties have been set up before the divergence between protostomes and deuterostomes during evolution. We also show that Drosophila and mammalian Vav proteins have similar catalytic specificities. As a consequence, Drosophila Vav can trigger oncogenic transformation, morphological change, and enhanced cell motility in mammalian cells. Gain-of-function studies using transgenic flies support the implication of this protein in cytoskeletal-dependent processes such as embryonic dorsal closure, myoblast fusion, tracheal development, and the migration/guidance of different cell types. These results highlight the important roles of Vav proteins in the signal transduction pathways regulating cytoskeletal dynamics. Moreover, they indicate that the foundations for the regulatory and enzymatic activities of this protein family have been set up very early during evolution.

  6. A Small Molecule That Binds and Inhibits the ETV1 Transcription Factor Oncoprotein

    E-print Network

    Pop, Marius S.

    Members of the ETS transcription factor family have been implicated in several cancers, where they are often dysregulated by genomic derangement. ETS variant 1 (ETV1) is an ETS factor gene that undergoes chromosomal ...

  7. CIP2A oncoprotein controls cell growth and autophagy through mTORC1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Puustinen, Pietri; Rytter, Anna; Mortensen, Monika; Kohonen, Pekka; Moreira, José M.

    2014-01-01

    mTORC1 (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1) integrates information regarding availability of nutrients and energy to coordinate protein synthesis and autophagy. Using ribonucleic acid interference screens for autophagy-regulating phosphatases in human breast cancer cells, we identify CIP2A (cancerous inhibitor of PP2A [protein phosphatase 2A]) as a key modulator of mTORC1 and autophagy. CIP2A associates with mTORC1 and acts as an allosteric inhibitor of mTORC1-associated PP2A, thereby enhancing mTORC1-dependent growth signaling and inhibiting autophagy. This regulatory circuit is reversed by ubiquitination and p62/SQSTM1-dependent autophagic degradation of CIP2A and subsequent inhibition of mTORC1 activity. Consistent with CIP2A’s reported ability to protect c-Myc against proteasome-mediated degradation, autophagic degradation of CIP2A upon mTORC1 inhibition leads to destabilization of c-Myc. These data characterize CIP2A as a distinct regulator of mTORC1 and reveals mTORC1-dependent control of CIP2A degradation as a mechanism that links mTORC1 activity with c-Myc stability to coordinate cellular metabolism, growth, and proliferation. PMID:24590173

  8. Crystal structure of human multiple copies in T-cell lymphoma-1 oncoprotein.

    PubMed

    Tempel, Wolfram; Dimov, Slav; Tong, Yufeng; Park, Hee-Won; Hong, Bum Soo

    2013-03-01

    Overexpression of multiple copies in T-cell lymphoma-1 (MCT-1) oncogene accompanies malignant phenotypic changes in human lymphoma cells. Specific disruption of MCT-1 results in reduced tumorigenesis, suggesting a potential for MCT-1-targeted therapeutic strategy. MCT-1 is known as a cap-binding protein and has a putative RNA-binding motif, the PUA-domain, at its C-terminus. We determined the crystal structure of apo MCT-1 at 1.7 Å resolution using the surface entropy reduction method. Notwithstanding limited sequence identity to its homologs, the C-terminus of MCT-1 adopted a typical PUA-domain fold that includes secondary structural elements essential for RNA recognition. The surface of the N-terminal domain contained positively charged patches that are predicted to contribute to RNA-binding. PMID:23042581

  9. Glucocorticoid-Induced Osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Baruch; White, Wendy; Tuckermann, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is among the most devastating side effects of glucocorticoid (GC) therapy for the management of inflammatory and auto-immune diseases. Evidence from both humans and mice indicate deleterious skeletal effects within weeks of pharmacological GC administration, both related and unrelated to a decrease in bone mineral density (BMD). Osteoclast numbers and bone resorption are also rapidly increased, and together with osteoblast inactivation and decreased bone formation, these changes lead the fastest loss in BMD during the initial disease phase. Bone resorption then decreases to sub-physiological levels, but persistent and severe inhibition of bone formation leads to further bone loss and progressively increased fracture risk, up to an order of magnitude higher than that observed in untreated individuals. Bone forming osteoblasts are thus considered the main culprits in GC-induced osteoporosis (GIO). Accordingly, we focus this review primarily on deleterious effects on osteoblasts: inhibition of cell replication and function and acceleration of apoptosis. Mediating these adverse effects, GCs target pivotal regulatory mechanisms that govern osteoblast growth, differentiation and survival. Specifically, GCs inhibit growth factor pathways, including Insulin Growth Factors, Growth Hormone, Hepatocyte Growth/Scatter Factor and IL6-type cytokines. They also inhibit downstream kinases, including PI3-kinase and the MAP kinase ERK, the latter attributable in part to direct transcriptional stimulation of MAP kinase phosphatase 1. Most importantly, however, GCs inhibit the Wnt signaling pathway, which plays a pivotal role in osteoblast replication, function and survival. They transcriptionally stimulate expression of Wnt inhibitors of both the Dkk and Sfrp families, and they induce reactive oxygen species (ROS), which result in loss of ß-catenin to ROS-activated FoxO transcription factors. Identification of dissociated GCs, which would suppress the immune system without causing osteoporosis, is proving more challenging than initially thought, and GIO is currently managed by co-treatment with bisphosphonates or PTH. These drugs, however, are not ideally suited for GIO. Future therapeutic approaches may aim at GC targets such as those mentioned above, or newly identified targets including the Notch pathway, the AP-1/Il11 axis and the osteoblast master regulator RUNX2. PMID:26215995

  10. Chloroquine-induced Pruritus

    PubMed Central

    Aghahowa, S. E.; Obianwu, H. O.; Isah, A. O.; Arhewoh, I. M.

    2010-01-01

    Chloroquine-induced pruritus remains one of the most common side-effects in the use of chloroquine in the prophylaxis and treatment of uncomplicated malaria before the advent of artemisinin-based combination therapies. It has been reported to vary from a tolerable to intolerable intensity among susceptible individuals resulting in disruption of treatment and development of resistance to the drug thus leading to therapeutic failures as reported. This scourge is quite challenging due to the complex physiologic mechanism that has not been fully elucidated. Factors observed to be responsible in the induction of pruritus such as age, race, heredity, density of parasitaemia; impurities in formulations, plasmodial specie, dosage form and metabolites have been discussed in this review. Efforts to ameliorate this burden have necessitated the use of drugs of diverse pharmacological classes such as antihistamines, corticosteroids and multivitamins either alone or as a combination. This review is to look into the use of chloroquine retrospectively, and consider its re-introduction due to its safety. Efficacy can be attained if the pruritic effect is resolved. PMID:21188034

  11. Contrast-induced Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Nazar M. A.; Mahfouz, Ahmed; Achkar, Katafan; Rafie, Ihsan M.; Hajar, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) is a serious complication of angiographic procedures resulting from the administration of contrast media (CM). It is the third most common cause of hospital acquired acute renal injury and represents about 12% of the cases. CIN is defined as an elevation of serum creatinine (Scr) of more than 25% or ?0.5 mg/dl (44 ?mol/l) from baseline within 48 h. More sensitive markers of renal injury are desired, therefore, several biomarkers of tubular injury are under evaluation. Multiple risk factors may contribute to the development of CIN; these factors are divided into patient- and procedure-related factors. Treatment of CIN is mainly supportive, consisting mainly of careful fluid and electrolyte management, although dialysis may be required in some cases. The available treatment option makes prevention the corner stone of management. This article will review the recent evidence concerning CIN incidence, diagnosis, and prevention strategies as well as its treatment and prognostic implications. PMID:24696755

  12. Tumor-induced osteomalacia

    PubMed Central

    Chong, William H; Molinolo, Alfredo A; Chen, Clara C; Collins, Michael T

    2012-01-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a rare and fascinating paraneoplastic syndrome in which patients present with bone pain, fractures, and muscle weakness. The cause is high blood levels of the recently identified phosphate and vitamin D-regulating hormone, fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23). In TIO, FGF23 is secreted by mesenchymal tumors that are usually benign, but are typically very small and difficult to locate. FGF23 acts primarily at the renal tubule and impairs phosphate reabsorption and 1?-hydroxylation of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, leading to hypophosphatemia and low levels of 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D. A step-wise approach utilizing functional imaging (F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and octreotide scintigraphy) followed by anatomical imaging (computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging), and, if needed, selective venous sampling with measurement of FGF23 is usually successful in locating the tumors. For tumors that cannot be located, medical treatment with phosphate supplements and active vitamin D (calcitriol or alphacalcidiol) is usually successful; however, the medical regimen can be cumbersome and associated with complications. This review summarizes the current understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease and provides guidance in evaluating and treating these patients. Novel imaging modalities and medical treatments, which hold promise for the future, are also reviewed. PMID:21490240

  13. Hypoxia-Induced Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Krock, Bryan L.; Skuli, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    The vascular network delivers oxygen (O2) and nutrients to all cells within the body. It is therefore not surprising that O2 availability serves as a primary regulator of this complex organ. Most transcriptional responses to low O2 are mediated by hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs), highly conserved transcription factors that control the expression of numerous angiogenic, metabolic, and cell cycle genes. Accordingly, the HIF pathway is currently viewed as a master regulator of angiogenesis. HIF modulation could provide therapeutic benefit for a wide array of pathologies, including cancer, ischemic heart disease, peripheral artery disease, wound healing, and neovascular eye diseases. Hypoxia promotes vessel growth by upregulating multiple pro-angiogenic pathways that mediate key aspects of endothelial, stromal, and vascular support cell biology. Interestingly, recent studies show that hypoxia influences additional aspects of angiogenesis, including vessel patterning, maturation, and function. Through extensive research, the integral role of hypoxia and HIF signaling in human disease is becoming increasingly clear. Consequently, a thorough understanding of how hypoxia regulates angiogenesis through an ever-expanding number of pathways in multiple cell types will be essential for the identification of new therapeutic targets and modalities. PMID:22866203

  14. Discreteness inducing coexistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Renato Vieira

    2013-12-01

    Consider two species that diffuse through space. Consider further that they differ only in initial densities and, possibly, in diffusion constants. Otherwise they are identical. What happens if they compete with each other in the same environment? What is the influence of the discrete nature of the interactions on the final destination? And what are the influence of diffusion and additive fluctuations corresponding to random migration and immigration of individuals? This paper aims to answer these questions for a particular competition model that incorporates intra and interspecific competition between the species. Based on mean field theory, the model has a stationary state dependent on the initial density conditions. We investigate how this initial density dependence is affected by the presence of demographic multiplicative noise and additive noise in space and time. There are three main conclusions: (1) Additive noise favors denser populations at the expense of the less dense, ratifying the competitive exclusion principle. (2) Demographic noise, on the other hand, favors less dense populations at the expense of the denser ones, inducing equal densities at the quasi-stationary state, violating the aforementioned principle. (3) The slower species always suffers the more deleterious effects of statistical fluctuations in a homogeneous medium.

  15. [Glucocorticoid-induced osteopenia].

    PubMed

    Glerup, H; Eriksen, E F; Mosekilde, L

    1994-09-19

    This article reviews the pathogenesis of glucocorticoid-induced osteopenia (GIO). GIO is a result of direct and indirect mechanisms leading to: 1) decreased intestinal calcium absorption, 2) decreased renal calcium reabsorption, 3) increased osteoclast activity with increased bone resorption, 4) decreased osteoclast activity with decreased bone formation. The mainly osteoclast activity is raised on the basis of secondary hyperparathyroidism. The different possible treatments in order to prevent GIO are reviewed on the basis of the results of the most important studies about the subject. We conclude that before a secure recommendation about prophylactic treatment can be made more prospective studies with fracture incidence as a measure should be made. However, on the basis of the studies that have already been made, it seems rational to give patients in longterm glucocorticoid treatment a calcium supplement of 0.5-1 g/day either in tablet form or by changing the diet, combined with a vitamin-D supply: either ergocalciferol 600-800 IU/day (e.g. in the form of 2 multivitamin tabs/day) or calcitriol 0.5 microgram/day. PMID:7941080

  16. [Hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Daiji; Shirai, Kohji

    2013-09-01

    In Japan, the frequency of acute pancreatitis is 27.7 per 100,000, which includes 1.4 % of hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis(HTGP). Severity and complication rates with HTGP have been reported as higher in comparison to acute pancreatitis from other etiologies. Havel has suggested that hydrolysis of excessive triglyceride-rich lipoproteins releases high concentrations of free fatty acid(FFA). The FFA micelles injure the vascular endothelium and acinar cells of the pancreas, producing a self-perpetuating ischemic and acidic environment with resultant toxicity. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) abnormality has been reported to contribute to severe hypertriglyceridemia. However, patients without any LPL abnormality are often encountered clinically, suggesting that other factors may be involved in the development of severe hypertriglyceridemia. In 21 patients with HTGP, 9 patients(42.9 %) with apolipoprotein AV (ApoAV) Gly185-Cys polymorphism were observed, whereas 14.3 % with LPL gene variants. No patient had ApoCII deficiency. These results suggest that in addition to LPL gene variants, ApoAV variant may be numerously involved in HTGP. It is important for clinicians to routinely investigate pathogenesis of hypertriglyceridemia in case with pancreatitis because specific management may be needed. PMID:24205721

  17. [Cold-induced urticaria].

    PubMed

    Delorme, N; Drouet, M; Thibaudeau, A; Verret, J L

    2002-09-01

    Cold urticaria is characterized by the development of urticaria, usually superficial and/or angioedematous reaction after cold contact. It was found predominantly in young women. The diagnosis is based on the history and ice cube test. Patients with a negative ice cube test may have represented systemic cold urticaria (atypical acquired cold urticaria) induced by general body cooling. The pathogenesis is poorly understood. Cold urticaria can be classified into acquired and familial disorders, with an autosomal dominant inheritance. Idiopathic cold urticaria is most common type but the research of a cryopathy is necessary. Therapy is often difficult. It is essential that the patient be warned of the dangers of swimming in cold water because systemic hypotension can occur. H1 antihistamines can be used for treatment of cold urticaria but the clinical responses are highly variable. The combination with an H2 antagonists is more effective. Doxepin may be useful in the treatment. Leukotriene receptor antagonists may be a novel, promising drug entity. In patients who do not respond to previous treatments, induction of cold tolerance may be tried. PMID:12389450

  18. Laxative-induced rhabdomyolysis

    PubMed Central

    Merante, Alfonso; Gareri, Pietro; Marigliano, Norma Maria; De Fazio, Salvatore; Bonacci, Elvira; Torchia, Carlo; Russo, Gaetano; Lacroce, Pasquale; Lacava, Roberto; Castagna, Alberto; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Ruotolo, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    The present study describes a case of laxative-induced rhabdomyolysis in an elderly patient. An 87-year-old woman was hospitalized for the onset of confusion, tremors, an inability to walk, and a fever that she had been experiencing for 36 hours. She often took high dosages of lactulose and sorbitol syrup as a laxative (about 70 g/day). During her physical examination, the patient was confused, drowsy, and she presented hyposthenia in her upper and lower limbs, symmetric and diffuse moderate hyporeflexia, and her temperature was 37.8°C. Laboratory tests revealed severe hyponatremia with hypokalemia, hypocalcemia, hypochloremia, and metabolic alkalosis. Moreover, rhabdomyolysis markers were found. The correction of hydroelectrolytic imbalances with saline, potassium and sodium chlorure, calcium gluconate was the first treatment. During her hospitalization the patient presented acute delirium, treated with haloperidol and prometazine chloridrate intramuscularly. She was discharged 12 days later, after resolution of symptoms, and normalized laboratory tests. Over-the-counter drugs such as laxatives are usually not considered dangerous; on the other hand, they may cause serum electrolytic imbalance and rhabdomyolysis. A careful monitoring of all the drugs taken by the elderly is one of the most important duties of a physician since drug interactions and their secondary effects may be fatal. PMID:20396636

  19. Electromagnetically Induced Flows Michiel de Reus

    E-print Network

    Vuik, Kees

    Electromagnetically Induced Flows in Water Michiel de Reus 8 maart 2013 () Electromagnetically Conclusion and future research () Electromagnetically Induced Flows 2 / 56 #12;1 Introduction 2 Maxwell Navier Stokes equations 5 Simulations 6 Conclusion and future research () Electromagnetically Induced

  20. Plant Ecology VolumE 7, NumbEr 1,

    E-print Network

    Neher, Deborah A.

    .permissions@oup.com species-dependent responses of soil microbial properties to fresh leaf inputs in a subtropical forest soil Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510160, China 2 University of Chinese Academy of Science. Abstract Aims Forest disturbance from extreme weather events due to climate change could increase

  1. Identifying Your Skills & Qualifications Ready Reference E-7

    E-print Network

    1 ­ Divide a piece of paper into three columns. In the first column, make a comprehensive list, and personal qualities. Exercise 2: Meeting the Challenge Step 1 - Divide a piece of paper into two columns an inefficient or undesirable worker in the position for which you are applying. On a piece of paper divided

  2. Geothermal induced seismicity program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    A plan for a National Geothermal Induced Seismicity Program has been prepared in consultation with a panel of experts from industry, academia, and government. The program calls for baseline seismic monitoring in regions of known future geothermal development, continued seismic monitoring and characterization of earthquakes in zones of geothermal fluid production and injection, modeling of the earthquake-inducing mechanism, and in situ measurement of stresses in the geothermal development. The Geothermal Induced Seismicity Program (GISP) will have as its objectives the evaluation of the seismic hazard, if any, associated with geothermal resource exploitation and the devising of a technology which, when properly utilized, will control or mitigate such hazards.

  3. Cisplatin-Induced Eosinophilic Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Hirosako, Susumu; Kohrogi, Hirotsugu

    2014-01-01

    A 67-year-old man suffering from esophageal cancer was admitted to our hospital complaining of dyspnea and hypoxemia. He had been treated with cisplatin, docetaxel, and fluorouracil combined with radiotherapy. Chest computed tomography revealed bilateral ground-glass opacity, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid showed increased eosinophils. Two episodes of transient eosinophilia in peripheral blood were observed after serial administration of anticancer drugs before the admission, and drug-induced lymphocyte stimulation test to cisplatin was positive. Thus cisplatin-induced eosinophilic pneumonia was suspected, and corticosteroid was effectively administered. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of cisplatin-induced eosinophilic pneumonia. PMID:25478274

  4. Exercise-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Tan, R A; Spector, S L

    1998-01-01

    Exercise-induced asthma (EIA) is characterised by transient airway obstruction occurring after strenuous exertion. A fall of 10% or more in the FEV1 after exercise is diagnostic. Inhalation of large volumes of dry, cold air during exercise leads to loss of heat and water from the bronchial mucosa and airway cooling and drying. Proposed mechanisms for bronchoconstriction include: (i) mucosal drying and increased osmolarity stimulating mast cell degranulation; and (ii) rapid airway rewarming after exercise causing vascular congestion, increased permeability and oedema leading to obstruction. EIA symptoms start after exercise, peak 8 to 15 minutes after exercise and spontaneously resolve in about 60 minutes. A refractory period of up to 3 hours after recovery, during which repeat exercise causes less bronchospasm, has been observed. The amount of ventilation and the temperature of inspired air are important factors in determining the severity of EIA. Greater ventilation and cold, dry air increase the risk for EIA. Education regarding the nature and management of EIA is important not only for asthmatics but also for their families and coaches. With the proper precautions and workout techniques, there is no limit to what individuals with asthma can achieve in sports. Prevention is the main objective in managing EIA. Nonpharmacological measures include warming up before vigorous exertion, covering the mouth and nose in cold weather, exercising in warm, humidified environments if possible and warming down after exercise. Aerobic fitness and good control of baseline bronchial reactivity also help to diminish the effects of EIA. Inhaled beta-agonists are the medications of choice in EIA prophylaxis. Inhaled sodium cromoglycate (cromolyn sodium) or nedocromil may also be used. Agents that may be added if inhaled beta-agonists or sodium cromoglycate are not adequate include anticholinergic agents (such as ipratropium bromide), theophylline, calcium channel blockers, alpha-agonists, antihistamines and oral beta-agonists. Newer agents include antileukotriene agents, inhaled heparin and inhaled furosemide (frusemide). PMID:9458523

  5. Melt emplacement induced stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallner, Herbert; Schmeling, Harro

    2015-04-01

    Transport of melt into and through the lithosphere has an essential influence on it's state, evolution and properties. Rock deformation, physically seen as viscous flow, acts on a long time scale compared with the rapid ascent of melt originating in the asthenosphere. In our numerical models the short time scale transfer of melt is replaced by melt extraction and emplacement at a given depth zone above the source region. New findings reveal probably consequential stresses in the high viscous lithosphere. Thermo-mechanical physics of visco-plastic flow is approximated by Finite Difference Method with markers in an Eulerian formulation in two dimensions. The equations of conservation of mass, momentum and energy are solved for a multi component and two phase system: fluid and matrix. The full compaction formulation is used. The high Prandtl number approximation is applied, elasticity is neglected, and rheology is temperature-, stress- and depth-dependent. In consideration of depletion and enrichment melting and solidification are controlled by a simplified linear binary solid solution model. Extraction and emplacement of melt is accounted for. A continental rift scenario serves to define a model comprising asthenosphere and lithosphere under extensional conditions. A temperature anomaly generates deep melt intruding the lithosphere on its way up. We focus on the early phase of melting, forming a first plume and releasing some melt. Above a fraction limit melt extraction induces underpressure at its origin region attracting ambient melt and contracting the matrix. A melt fraction minimum develops in the inital batch. In the emplacement zone above sudden dilatation, immediate freezing, increase of enrichment and heating takes place. The dilatation of the rock matrix generates relative high stresses if it's viscosity is high. The behaviour is not intuitively comprehensible. Results are compared with numerical solutions of Compaction Boussinesq Approximation.

  6. Trauma-Induced Coagulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Pittet, Jean-Francois; Pierce, Bert

    2014-01-01

    Trauma is the leading cause of death among people under the age of 44. Hemorrhage is a major contributor to deaths related to trauma in the first 48 h. Accordingly, the management of these patients is a time-sensitive and critical affair that anesthesiologists responsible for surgical resuscitation will face. Coagulopathy associated with trauma exists in one-third of all severely injured patients upon presentation to the hospital. Trauma patients presenting with coagulopathy have significantly higher mortality. This trauma-induced coagulopathy (TIC) must be managed adroitly in the resuscitation of these patients. Recent advancements in our understanding of TIC have led to new protocols and therapy guidelines. Anesthesiologists must be aware of these to effectively manage this form of shock. TIC driven by a combination of endogenous biological processes, as well as iatrogenic causes, can ultimately lead to the lethal triad of hypothermia, acidemia, and coagulopathy. Providers should understand how to promptly diagnose TIC and be aware of the early indicators of massive transfusion. The use of common laboratory studies and patient vital signs serve as our current guide, but the importance of each is still under debate. Thromboelastography is a tool used often in the diagnosis of TIC and can be used to guide blood product transfusion. Certain pharmaceutical strategies and non-transfusion strategies also exist, which aid in the management of hemorrhagic shock. Damage control surgery, rewarming, tranexamic acid, and 1:1:1 transfusion protocols are promising methods used to treat the critically wounded. Though protocols have been developed, controversies still exist on the optimal resuscitation strategy. PMID:25587242

  7. 4-Hydroxydocosahexaenoic acid, a potent peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} agonist alleviates the symptoms of DSS-induced colitis

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Keiko; Ninomiya, Yuichi; Iseki, Mioko; Nakachi, Yutaka; Kanesaki-Yatsuka, Yukiko; Yamanoue, Yu; Itoh, Toshimasa; Nishii, Yasuho; Petrovsky, Nikolai; Okazaki, Yasushi

    2008-03-14

    (5E,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)-4-Hydroxy-5,7,10,13,16,19-docosahexaenoic acid (4-OHDHA) is a potential agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) and antidiabetic agent as has been previously reported. As PPAR{gamma} agonists may also have anti-inflammatory functions, in this study, we investigated whether 4-OHDHA has an inhibitory effect on expression of inflammatory genes in vitro and whether 4-OHDHA could relieve the symptoms of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis in a murine model of inflammatory bowel disease. 4-OHDHA inhibited production of nitric oxide and expression of a subset of inflammatory genes including inducible nitric oxide synthase (Nos2/iNOS) and interleukin 6 (Il6) by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated macrophages. In addition, 4-OHDHA-treated mice when compared to control mice not receiving treatment recovered better from the weight loss caused by DSS-induced colitis. Changes in disease activity index (DAI) of 4-OHDHA-treated mice were also more favorable than for control mice and were comparable with mice treated with a typical anti-inflammatory-drug, 5-aminosalichylic acid (5-ASA). These results suggest that 4-OHDHA has potentially clinically useful anti-inflammatory effects mediated by suppression of inflammatory gene expression.

  8. Induced-charge electrokinetic phenomena

    E-print Network

    Bazant, Martin Z.

    We give a general, physical description of “induced-charge electro-osmosis” (ICEO), the nonlinear electrokinetic slip at a polarizable surface, in the context of some new techniques for microfluidic pumping and mixing. ...

  9. Induced-charge Electrokinetic Phenomena

    E-print Network

    Bazant, M Z; Bazant, Martin Z.; Squires, Todd M.

    2003-01-01

    Motivated by the recent discovery of AC electro-osmosis near micro-electrodes, we predict a broad class of nonlinear electrokinetic phenomena involving induced interfacial charge. By considering various polarizable objects (metals or dielectrics) in DC and AC applied fields, we develop a simple physical picture of `induced-charge electro-osmosis' (ICEO), the fluid slip at a surface due to an electric field acting on the diffuse charge it induces. We also discuss `induced-charge electrophoresis' (ICEP), the analogous motion of a freely-suspended polarizable particle. Both differ significantly from their classical linear counterparts. We present a mathematical theory of ICEO flows in the weakly nonlinear limit of thin double layers. As an example, we calculate the time-dependent ICEO slip around a metallic sphere with a thin dielectric coating in a suddenly-applied DC field. We briefly discuss possible applications of ICEO to microfluidics and of ICEP to colloidal manipulation.

  10. Pathobiology of Helicobacter pylori-Induced Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Amieva, Manuel; Peek, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    Colonization of the human stomach by Helicobacter pylori and its role in causing gastric cancer is one of the richest examples of a complex relationship among human cells, microbes, and their environment. It is also a puzzle of enormous medical importance given the incidence and lethality of gastric cancer worldwide. We review recent findings that have changed how we view these relationships and affected the direction of gastric cancer research. For example, recent data have indicated that subtle mismatches between host and microbe genetic traits greatly affect the risk of gastric cancer. The ability of H pylori and its oncoprotein CagA to reprogram epithelial cells and activate properties of stemness show the sophisticated relationship between H pylori and progenitor cells in the gastric mucosa. The observation that cell-associated H pylori can colonize the gastric glands and directly affect precursor and stem cells supports these observations. The ability to mimic these interactions in human gastric organoid cultures as well as animal models will allow investigators to more fully unravel the extent of H pylori control on the renewing gastric epithelium. Finally, our realization that external environmental factors, such as dietary components and essential micronutrients, as well as the gastrointestinal microbiota, can change the balance between H pylori's activity as a commensal or a pathogen has provided direction to studies aimed at defining the full carcinogenic potential of this organism. PMID:26385073

  11. Advances in Vortex Induced Vibration! MOTIVATION

    E-print Network

    in Vortex Induced Vibration! MOTIVATION Vortex induced vibra7on (VIV) is a phenomenon. and Govardhan, R. Vortex induced vibra7ons. Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics, 36.M., 2008, Vortex-Induced Vibra7on of a Circular Cylinder with Combined In

  12. Induced airflow in flying insects II. Measurement of induced flow.

    PubMed

    Sane, Sanjay P; Jacobson, Nathaniel P

    2006-01-01

    The flapping wings of insects and birds induce a strong flow over their body during flight. Although this flow influences the sensory biology and physiology of a flying animal, there are very little data on the characteristics of this self-generated flow field or its biological consequences. A model proposed in the companion paper estimated the induced flow over flying insects. In this study, we used a pair of hot wire anemometers to measure this flow at two locations near the body of a tethered flapping hawk moth, Manduca sexta. The axial inflow anemometer measured the airflow prior to its entry into the stroke plane, whereas the radial outflow anemometer measured the airflow after it crossed the stroke plane. The high temporal resolution of the hot wire anemometers allowed us to measure not only the mean induced flow but also subtle higher frequency disturbances occurring at 1-4 times the wing beat frequency. These data provide evidence for the predictions of a mathematical model proposed in the companion paper. Specifically, the absolute value of the measured induced flow matches the estimate of the model. Also, as predicted by the model, the induced flow varies linearly with wing beat frequency. Our experiments also show that wing flexion contributes significantly to the observed higher frequency disturbances. Thus, the hot wire anemometry technique provides a useful means to quantify the aerodynamic signature of wing flexion. The phasic and tonic components of induced flow influence several physiological processes such as convective heat loss and gas exchange in endothermic insects, as well as alter the nature of mechanosensory and olfactory stimuli to the sensory organs of a flying insect. PMID:16354777

  13. Warfarin-induced skin necrosis following heparin-induced thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Candelario, Nicole M.; Rochet, Nicole; Tran, Connie; Brau, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Anticoagulants, such as heparin and warfarin, are commonly used in the treatment and prevention of thromboembolic events. The risk of developing warfarin-induced skin necrosis (WISN) with warfarin is reported to be <1%. However, the risk of WISN may be increased with the initiation of warfarin in the setting of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia and thrombosis syndrome (HITT). WISN can lead to catastrophic tissue necrosis requiring amputations and mass debridement. This report describes a case of WISN following HITT and discusses the appropriate medical management of patients with HITT to avoid secondary WISN. PMID:26722173

  14. Warfarin-induced skin necrosis following heparin-induced thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Fawaz, Bilal; Candelario, Nicole M; Rochet, Nicole; Tran, Connie; Brau, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Anticoagulants, such as heparin and warfarin, are commonly used in the treatment and prevention of thromboembolic events. The risk of developing warfarin-induced skin necrosis (WISN) with warfarin is reported to be <1%. However, the risk of WISN may be increased with the initiation of warfarin in the setting of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia and thrombosis syndrome (HITT). WISN can lead to catastrophic tissue necrosis requiring amputations and mass debridement. This report describes a case of WISN following HITT and discusses the appropriate medical management of patients with HITT to avoid secondary WISN. PMID:26722173

  15. Drug-induced hepatotoxicity: 2005.

    PubMed

    Maddrey, Willis C

    2005-04-01

    The removal from the marketplace of several widely prescribed drugs due to hepatotoxicity has attracted considerable attention. Now under extensive review are means by which we can better identify hepatic risk prior to federal approval. Assessment of risk-to-benefit ratios regarding a novel agent with hepatotoxicity issues (especially one for a life-threatening condition) requires considerable judgment and education on the part of prescribers and patients. The spectrum of drug-induced liver injury is broad with simulation of almost all unknown liver disorders. Drug-induced liver injuries often have a somewhat characteristic signature, as regards type of injury (hepatocellular vs cholestatic) and time of onset. The diagnosis of drug-induced liver injury is often one of exclusion with initial suspicion based on circumstantial evidence. Factors affecting susceptibility to drug-induced injury include age, sex, concomitant use of other drugs, and genetic polymorphism in metabolic pathways involved in activation or disposition of therapeutic drugs. Drug-drug interactions present particular problems in patients, often elderly, who are receiving several drugs simultaneously. Mechanisms of drug-induced liver injury are many and varied. With many drugs, intermediary products produced during metabolism are highly reactive and toxic. In these situations, the balance between the rate of production of the metabolite and the effectiveness of the drug may determine whether or not hepatic injury occurs. PMID:15758665

  16. Hyperthermia induces apoptosis in thymocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Sellins, K.S.; Cohen, J.J. )

    1991-04-01

    Mild hyperthermia (43{degree}C for 1 h) induces extensive double-stranded DNA fragmentation and, at a later time, cell death in murine thymocytes. The cleavage of DNA into oligonucleosome-sized fragments resembles that observed in examples of apoptosis including radiation-induced death of thymocytes. Following hyperthermia, incubation at 37{degree}C is necessary to detect DNA fragmentation, although protein and RNA synthesis do not seem to be required. Two protein synthesis inhibitors, cycloheximide and emetine, and two RNA synthesis inhibitors, actinomycin D and 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole, do not inhibit DNA fragmentation or cell death in heated thymocytes at concentrations which significantly block these effects in irradiated thymocytes. We have used this difference in sensitivity to show that the DNA fragmentation induced in thymocytes which are irradiated and then heated seems to be caused only by the heating and not by the irradiation.

  17. Persistent nicorandil induced oral ulceration

    PubMed Central

    Healy, C M; Smyth, Y; Flint, S R

    2004-01-01

    Four patients with nicorandil induced ulceration are described, and the literature on the subject is reviewed. Nicorandil induced ulcers are very painful and distressing for patients. Clinically they appear as large, deep, persistent ulcers that have punched out edges. They are poorly responsive to topical steroids and usually require alteration of nicorandil treatment. The ulceration tends to occur at high doses of nicorandil and all four cases reported here were on doses of 40 mg per day or greater. In these situations reduction of nicorandil dose may be sufficient to promote ulcer healing and prevent further recurrence. However, nicorandil induced ulcers have been reported at doses as low as 10 mg daily and complete cessation of nicorandil may be required. PMID:15201264

  18. Drug-induced renal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ghane Shahrbaf, Fatemeh; Assadi, Farahnak

    2015-01-01

    Drug-induced nephrotoxicity are more common among infants and young children and in certain clinical situations such as underlying renal dysfunction and cardiovascular disease. Drugs can cause acute renal injury, intrarenal obstruction, interstitial nephritis, nephrotic syndrome, and acid-base and fluid electrolytes disorders. Certain drugs can cause alteration in intraglomerular hemodynamics, inflammatory changes in renal tubular cells, leading to acute kidney injury (AKI), tubulointerstitial disease and renal scarring. Drug-induced nephrotoxicity tends to occur more frequently in patients with intravascular volume depletion, diabetes, congestive heart failure, chronic kidney disease, and sepsis. Therefore, early detection of drugs adverse effects is important to prevent progression to end-stage renal disease. Preventive measures requires knowledge of mechanisms of drug-induced nephrotoxicity, understanding patients and drug-related risk factors coupled with therapeutic intervention by correcting risk factors, assessing baseline renal function before initiation of therapy, adjusting the drug dosage and avoiding use of nephrotoxic drug combinations PMID:26468475

  19. Static behaviour of induced seismicity

    E-print Network

    Mignan, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    The standard paradigm to describe seismicity induced by fluid injection is to apply nonlinear diffusion dynamics in a poroelastic medium. I show that the spatiotemporal behaviour and rate evolution of induced seismicity can, instead, be expressed by geometric operations on a static stress field produced by volume change at depth. I obtain laws similar in form to the ones derived from poroelasticity while requiring a lower description length. Although fluid flow is known to occur in the ground, it is not pertinent to the behaviour of induced seismicity. The proposed model is equivalent to the static stress model for tectonic foreshocks generated by the Non- Critical Precursory Accelerating Seismicity Theory. This study hence verifies the explanatory power of this theory outside of its original scope.

  20. Interacting Induced Dark Energy Model

    E-print Network

    Bahrehbakhsh, Amir F

    2016-01-01

    Similar to the idea of the brane world scenarios, but based on the approach of the induced matter theory, for a non--vacuum five--dimensional version of general relativity, we propose a model in which the conventional matter sources considered as all kind of the matter (the baryonic and dark) and the induced terms emerging from the extra dimension supposed to be as dark energy. Then we investigate the FLRW type cosmological equations and illustrate that the model is capable to explain respectively the deceleration and then acceleration eras of the universe expansion with an interacting term between the matter and dark energy.

  1. Method for induced polarization logging

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Waxman, M.H.

    1987-04-14

    A method is described for generating a log of the formation phase shift, resistivity and spontaneous potential of an earth formation from data obtained from the earth formation with a multi-electrode induced polarization logging tool. The method comprises obtaining data samples from the formation at measurement points equally spaced in time of the magnitude and phase of the induced voltage and the magnitude and phase of the current supplied by a circuit through a reference resistance R/sub 0/ to a survey current electrode associated with the tool.

  2. Laser-induced dispersion control.

    PubMed

    Rasskazov, Gennady; Ryabtsev, Anton; Lozovoy, Vadim V; Dantus, Marcos

    2014-06-01

    An intense laser pulse is used to control the spectral phase of a weak probe pulse as they overlap in fused silica. The laser-induced linear chirp is controlled by the delay time between pulses. Dependence from intensity and spectral phase of the pump pulse is also studied. Experimental data is validated by numerical simulation based on optical Kerr effect. Results show that laser-induced pulse shaping is possible and may be useful for intracavity pulse compression and shaping in enhancement cavities. PMID:24876014

  3. Induced radioactivity in LDEF components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, B. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Parnell, T. A.; Laird, C. E.

    1992-01-01

    A systematic study of the induced radioactivity of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) is being carried out in order to gather information about the low earth orbit radiation environment and its effects on materials. The large mass of the LDEF spacecraft, its stabilized configuration, and long mission duration have presented an opportunity to determine space radiation-induced radioactivities with a precision not possible before. Data presented include preliminary activities for steel and aluminum structural samples, and activation subexperiment foils. Effects seen in the data show a clear indication of the trapped proton anisotropy in the South Atlantic Anomaly and suggest contributions from different sources of external radiation fluxes.

  4. Graphene with geometrically induced vorticity

    E-print Network

    Jiannis K. Pachos; Michael Stone; Kristan Temme

    2008-03-26

    At half filling, the electronic structure of graphene can be modelled by a pair of free two-dimensional Dirac fermions. We explicitly demonstrate that in the presence of a geometrically induced gauge field, an everywhere-real Kekule modulation of the hopping matrix elements can correspond to a non-real Higgs field with non-trivial vorticity. This provides a natural setting for fractionally charged vortices with localized zero modes. For fullerene-like molecules we employ the index theorem to demonstrate the existence of six low-lying states that do not depend strongly on the Kekule-induced mass gap.

  5. Plasma rotation induced by RF

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, V. S.; Chiu, S. C.; Lin-Liu, Y. R. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5698; Omelchenko, Y. A. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5698

    1999-09-20

    Plasma rotation has many beneficial effects on tokamak operation including stabilization of MHD and microturbulence to improve the beta limit and confinement. Contrary to present-day tokamaks, neutral beams may not be effective in driving rotation in fusion reactors; hence the investigation of radiofrequency (RF) induced plasma rotation is of great interest and potential importance. This paper reviews the experimental results of RF induced rotation and possible physical mechanisms, suggested by theories, to explain the observations. This subject is only in the infancy of its research and many challenging issues remained to be understood and resolved. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  6. Identification of immunotherapeutic epitope of E5 protein of human papillomavirus-16: An in silico approach.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anoop; Yadav, Inderjit Singh; Hussain, Showket; Das, Bhudev C; Bharadwaj, Mausumi

    2015-09-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common gynaecological cancer in India and contributes 1/3rd of global burden. High risk-human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) is the major etiological factor for development of cervical cancer. Two available HPV vaccines provide protection against HPV induced cervical malignancy. However, vaccines having therapeutic values are of utmost priority. Till date, most of HPV therapeutic vaccines are focused on two major HPV oncoproteins (E6/E7). HPV-E5 which acts by altering the activity of cellular proteins, mainly growth factor pathways emerges as a new therapeutic target. In present study, we predicted the candidate B-cell and T-cell epitopes of HPV16-E5, which can be used for HPV immunotherapy. We identified that epitope SAFRCFIVYIIFVY as most potent peptide for HLA-A*11:01 having percentile value of 0.5 and immunogenicity score of 0.69558. For MHC-II, epitopes IPLFLIHTHARFLIT for HLA-DRB1*14:01 alleles have the lowest IC50 value (18.13 nM). The identification of structural feature and immunogenic epitopes provides the best information for development of drugs or vaccine. In conclusion, the expression of E5 protein was detected in the early phase of the HPV infection, which gives an opportunity to target HPV-E5 that would help in the prevention and progression of the precancerous lesion to invasive carcinomas. PMID:26212000

  7. Conflict-Induced Perceptual Filtering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wendt, Mike; Luna-Rodriguez, Aquiles; Jacobsen, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    In a variety of conflict paradigms, target and distractor stimuli are defined in terms of perceptual features. Interference evoked by distractor stimuli tends to be reduced when the ratio of congruent to incongruent trials is decreased, suggesting conflict-induced perceptual filtering (i.e., adjusting the processing weights assigned to stimuli…

  8. MECHANISMS OF ARSENICAL INDUCED MALFORMATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our research uses the whole embryo culture system to expose mouse embryos to arsenic at the neurulation stage of development (This stage of development is most susceptible to arsenical-induced defects). This includes studies to assess the distribution of cells in the cell cycle a...

  9. Dexamethasone-induced withdrawal seizure.

    PubMed

    Mahar, Santwana; Malhotra, Mahima

    2015-01-01

    Dexamethasone-induced withdrawal seizure, which is a very rare and uncommon event, occurred after discontinuation of steroid therapy that was taken to increase weight by the patient. The pathogenesis is not well understood. In this submission, we have highlighted the fact that withdrawal of steroid has a propensity to cause seizure as a rare withdrawal phenomenon. PMID:25969660

  10. Rowell's syndrome induced by terbinafine.

    PubMed

    Murad, Aizuri; Shudell, Emma; Mulligan, Niall

    2015-01-01

    Terbinafine, a systemic antifungal commonly prescribed for onychomycosis (fungal infection involving the nails) has been reported to cause various cutaneous adverse effects. We describe an overlap syndrome between cutaneous lupus and erythaema multiforme induced by this medication with a review of other reported cases. PMID:26021384

  11. Flow-induced vibration 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.S. ); Fujita, K. ); Au-Yang, M.K. )

    1990-01-01

    This book contains articles presented at the 1990 Pressure Vessels and Piping Conference. Included are the following chapters: Multiple stability boundaries of tubes in a normal triangular cylinder array, Experiments on vibro-impact dynamics under fluid-elastic instability, swirling flow induced resonant pressure pulsations in a pipe.

  12. Microwave Induced Transparency in Ruby

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Y.; Wu, C.; Ham, B.; Kim, M.K.; Awad, E.

    1997-07-01

    We report experimental observations of field-induced transparency in a solid medium. Absorption reduction of 20{percent} was observed in ruby using a magnetic field for the creation of closely spaced lower levels and a microwave field for the coupling of these states. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. Microscopic Description of Induced Fission

    E-print Network

    N. Schunck

    2013-02-22

    Selected aspects of the description of neutron-induced fission in 240Pu in the framework of the nuclear energy density functional theory at finite temperature are presented. In particular, we discuss aspects pertaining to the choice of thermodynamic state variables, the evolution of fission barriers as function of the incident neutron energy, and the temperatures of the fission fragments.

  14. Adolescents and Exercise Induced Asthma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Pamela; Bickanse, Shanna; Bogenreif, Mike; VanSickle, Kyle

    2008-01-01

    This article defines asthma and exercise induced asthma, and provides information on the triggers, signs, and symptoms of an attack. It also gives treatments for these conditions, along with prevention guidelines on how to handle an attack in the classroom or on the practice field. (Contains 2 tables and 1 figure.)

  15. Contaminantsand injury induce inking on

    E-print Network

    Crisosto, Carlos H.

    Contaminantsand injury induce inking on peachesand nectarines Carlos H. Crisosto o R. Scott Johnson a Kevin R. Day Bob Beede a Harry Andris Brown and black spots on the fruit's skin are called "inking discoloration,called inking, on peaches and nectar- ines. Abrasion damage releases anthocyanin

  16. [Pseudotumor cerebri induced by danazol].

    PubMed

    Loukili, M; Cordonnier, M; Capelluto, E; Neve, P

    1990-01-01

    Case report of a 39-year-old woman treated by Danazol for a paroxystic nocturnal hemoglobinuria who developed benign intracranial hypertension and sclerosing cholangitis. Bilateral papilloedema cleared 4 weeks after Danazol was stopped. Twelve similar cases have already been reported in the literature. Danazol should be added to the list of drugs potentially inducing pseudo-tumor cerebri. PMID:2133530

  17. Context Inducing Nouns Charlotte Price

    E-print Network

    de Paiva, Valeria

    Context Inducing Nouns Charlotte Price Palo Alto Research Center 3333 Coyote Hill Rd. Palo Alto, CA 94304 USA lprice@parc.com Valeria de Paiva Palo Alto Research Center 3333 Coyote Hill Rd. Palo Alto, CA 94304 USA valeria.paiva@gmail.com Tracy Holloway King Palo Alto Research Center 3333 Coyote Hill Rd

  18. Divalent cations induce protofibril gelation.

    PubMed

    Marx, G

    1988-02-01

    Soluble fibrin oligomers (protofibrils) undergo phase change merely by adding 1-2 mM Ca2+ or 25-100 microM Zn2+. The cation-induced "protofibrin" clots appear similar to normally formed fibrin gels. Maximal clot turbidity of protofibrin gels increases with cations in a concentration-dependent manner. Magnesium (less than 0.5 mM) is ineffective in inducing protofibril gelation. Turbidity and degree of polymerization (DP) [indirectly expressed as AT (activation time)] appear to be positively correlated, regardless of whether the divalent cation is Ca2+ or Zn2+. Cross sections of Ca2+-induced protofibrin fibers are approximately 6-18-fibrin-monomers-thick. With both Ca2+ and 40 microM Zn2+, fiber cross section increases to 30-50 monomers thick. Negatively stained Zn2+-and Ca2+-induced protofibrin gels exhibit banding periodicity of approximately 240 A, similar to that of normally generated fibrin gels. Regions of lateral merging of individual segments of the protofibrin leads to increased cross section of the fiber and forms a branch required for gelation. These findings indicate that the rate of coagulation and the ultimate thickness of the fibers both relate to lateral associative processes of protofibrils, which are augmented by physiologic concentrations of 2+ and Zn2+. PMID:3341371

  19. Finite temperature induced fermion number

    E-print Network

    Gerald V. Dunne

    2001-12-04

    The induced fractional fermion number at zero temperature is topological (in the sense that it is only sensitive to global asymptotic properties of the background field), and is a sharp observable (in the sense that it has vanishing rms fluctuations). In contrast, at finite temperature, it is shown to be generically nontopological, and not a sharp observable.

  20. Induced geometry from disformal transformation

    E-print Network

    Fang-Fang Yuan; Peng Huang

    2015-02-08

    In this note, we use the disformal transformation to induce a geometry from the manifold which is originally Riemannian. The new geometry obtained here can be considered as a generalization of Weyl integrable geometry. Based on these results, we further propose a geometry which is naturally a generalization of Weyl geometry.

  1. Radiation-induced genomic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, A.

    1994-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of the heritable somatic effects of ionizing radiation exposures has relied upon the assumption that radiation-induced lesions were 'fixed' in the DNA prior to the first postirradiation mitosis. Lesion conversion was thought to occur during the initial round of DNA replication or as a consequence of error-prone enzymatic processing of lesions. The standard experimental protocols for the assessment of a variety of radiation-induced endpoints (cell death, specific locus mutations, neoplastic transformation and chromosome aberrations) evaluate these various endpoints at a single snapshot in time. In contrast with the aforementioned approaches, some studies have specifically assessed radiation effects as a function of time following exposure. Evidence has accumulated in support of the hypothesis that radiation exposure induces a persistent destabilization of the genome. This instability has been observed as a delayed expression of lethal mutations, as an enhanced rate of accumulation of non-lethal heritable alterations, and as a progressive intraclonal chromosomal heterogeneity. The genetic controls and biochemical mechanisms underlying radiation-induced genomic instability have not yet been delineated. The aim is to integrate the accumulated evidence that suggests that radiation exposure has a persistent effect on the stability of the mammalian genome.

  2. Photobiomodulation on alcohol induced dysfunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zheng-Ping; Liu, Timon C.; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Yan-Fang

    2007-05-01

    Alcohol, which is ubiquitous today, is a major health concern. Its use was already relatively high among the youngest respondents, peaked among young adults, and declined in older age groups. Alcohol is causally related to more than 60 different medical conditions. Overall, 4% of the global burden of disease is attributable to alcohol, which accounts for about as much death and disability globally as tobacco and hypertension. Alcohol also promotes the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and/or interferes with the body's normal defense mechanisms against these compounds through numerous processes, particularly in the liver. Photobiomodulation (PBM) is a cell-specific effect of low intensity monochromatic light or low intensity laser irradiation (LIL) on biological systems. The cellular effects of both alcohol and LIL are ligand-independent so that PBM might rehabilitate alcohol induced dysfunction. The PBM on alcohol induced human neutrophil dysfunction and rat chronic atrophic gastritis, the laser acupuncture on alcohol addiction, and intravascular PBM on alcoholic coma of patients and rats have been observed. The endonasal PBM (EPBM) mediated by Yangming channel, autonomic nervous systems and blood cells is suggested to treat alcohol induced dysfunction in terms of EPBM phenomena, the mechanism of alcohol induced dysfunction and our biological information model of PBM. In our opinion, the therapeutic effects of PBM might also be achieved on alcoholic myopathy.

  3. INDUCED DISEASE RESISTANCE IN PLANTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants employ multiple types of defenses against microbial invasion. One type of defense is dependent upon the activation of certain defense mechanisms by the invading microbes or abiotic treatment and is termed induced resistance. The objective of this chapter is to review our current understanding...

  4. INDUCED SECONDARY COMBUSTION IN WOODSTOVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper provides information useful for woodstove designers concerned with reducing emissions. A dual-chamber woodstove was modified to induce secondary combustion by utilizing an ignition source and forced flow of secondary air. The ignition source was an electric glow plug in...

  5. An inducible offense: carnivore morph tadpoles induced by tadpole carnivory

    PubMed Central

    Levis, Nicholas A; de la Serna Buzón, Sofia; Pfennig, David W

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity is commonplace, and plasticity theory predicts that organisms should often evolve mechanisms to detect and respond to environmental cues that accurately predict future environmental conditions. Here, we test this prediction in tadpoles of spadefoot toads, Spea multiplicata. These tadpoles develop into either an omnivore ecomorph, which is a dietary generalist, or a carnivore ecomorph, which specializes on anostracan shrimp and other tadpoles. We investigated a novel proximate cue – ingestion of Scaphiopus tadpoles – and its propensity to produce carnivores by rearing tadpoles on different diets. We found that diets containing tadpoles from the genus Scaphiopus produced more carnivores than diets without Scaphiopus tadpoles. We discuss why Scaphiopus tadpoles are an excellent food source and why it is therefore advantageous for S. multiplicata tadpoles to produce an inducible offense that allows them to better utilize this resource. In general, such inducible offenses provide an excellent setting for investigating the proximate and evolutionary basis of phenotypic plasticity. PMID:25897380

  6. Heparin-Induced Thrombocytopenia Antibody Test

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Visit Global Sites Search Help? Heparin-induced Thrombocytopenia Antibody Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Heparin-PF4 Antibody; HIT Antibody; HIT PF4 Antibody; Heparin Induced Antibody; ...

  7. Does a parthenogenesis-inducing Wolbachia induce vestigial cytoplasmic incompatibility?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraaijeveld, Ken; Reumer, Barbara M.; Mouton, Laurence; Kremer, Natacha; Vavre, Fabrice; van Alphen, Jacques J. M.

    2011-03-01

    Wolbachia is a maternally inherited bacterium that manipulates the reproduction of its host. Recent studies have shown that male-killing strains can induce cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) when introgressed into a resistant host. Phylogenetic studies suggest that transitions between CI and other Wolbachia phenotypes have also occurred frequently, raising the possibility that latent CI may be widespread among Wolbachia. Here, we investigate whether a parthenogenesis-inducing Wolbachia strain can also induce CI. Parthenogenetic females of the parasitoid wasp Asobara japonica regularly produce a small number of males that may be either infected or not. Uninfected males were further obtained through removal of the Wolbachia using antibiotics and from a naturally uninfected strain. Uninfected females that had mated with infected males produced a slightly, but significantly more male-biased sex ratio than uninfected females that had mated with uninfected males. This effect was strongest in females that mated with males that had a relatively high Wolbachia titer. Quantitative PCR indicated that infected males did not show higher ratios of nuclear versus mitochondrial DNA content. Wolbachia therefore does not cause diploidization of cells in infected males. While these results are consistent with CI, other alternatives such as production of abnormal sperm by infected males cannot be completely ruled out. Overall, the effect was very small (9%), suggesting that if CI is involved it may have degenerated through the accumulation of mutations.

  8. INDUCIBLE DNA PROMOTERS FOR USE IN APPLE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A chemically inducible and a light inducible DNA promoter is being developed and evaluated for their ability to regulate gene expression in transgenic apple. The estradiol-induced XVE gene expression system (Zou et al. 2000 Plant J. 24:265-273) is regulated by a chimeric transcription factor contai...

  9. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia: an update

    PubMed Central

    Franchini, Massimo

    2005-01-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is the most important and most frequent drug-induced, immune-mediated type of thrombocytopenia. It is associated with significant morbidity and mortality if unrecognized. In this review, we briefly discuss the main features of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, particularly analyzing the most recent advances in the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of this syndrome. PMID:16202170

  10. Irradiation-induced phenomena in carbon

    E-print Network

    Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.

    Chapter 1 Irradiation-induced phenomena in carbon nanotubes To appear in "Chemistry of Carbon@acclab.helsinki.fi 1 #12;2CHAPTER 1. IRRADIATION-INDUCED PHENOMENA IN CARBON NANOTUBES #12;Contents 1 Irradiation-induced phenomena in carbon nanotubes 1 1.1 Introduction

  11. Automatically Inducing Ontologies from Corpora Inderjeet Mani

    E-print Network

    Automatically Inducing Ontologies from Corpora Inderjeet Mani Department of Linguistics Georgetown describe a system that automatically induces an ontology from any large on-line text collection relationships among them. In this paper, we describe a system that automatically induces an ontology from any

  12. Toxin-induced hepatic injury.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Annette M; Hendrickson, Robert G

    2014-02-01

    Toxins such as pharmaceuticals, herbals, foods, and supplements may lead to hepatic damage. This damage may range from nonspecific symptoms in the setting of liver test abnormalities to acute hepatic failure. The majority of severe cases of toxin-induced hepatic injury are caused by acetaminophen and ethanol. The most important step in the patient evaluation is to gather an extensive history that includes toxin exposure and exclude common causes of liver dysfunction. Patients whose hepatic dysfunction progresses to acute liver failure may benefit from transfer to a transplant service for further management. Currently, the mainstay in management for most exposures is discontinuing the offending agent. This manuscript will review the incidence, pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of the different forms of toxin-induced hepatic injury and exam in-depth the most common hepatic toxins. PMID:24275171

  13. Synthetic Cannabis-Induced Mania

    PubMed Central

    Ustundag, Mehmet Fatih; Ozhan Ibis, Esra; Yucel, Atakan; Ozcan, Halil

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids (SC), cannabinoid 1 and cannabinoid 2 receptors agonists, are the psychoactive substances. SC was originally produced to treat medical conditions. Compared to other narcotics, SC is easier to obtain, cheap, and highly potent and has a long half-life. In addition, routine analysis does not detect SC, which has led to widespread use. A case is presented that manic episode was developed with the use of SC. Hospitalization and admission to psychiatric units depending on SC use have been observed mostly with psychosis. Although SC-induced affective symptoms were mentioned in the literature, mania has not been reported before. We aimed to discuss the psychiatric conditions induced by widespread use of SC via our case. PMID:25838957

  14. Gyromagnetically Induced Transparency of Metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, S. Hossein; Khanikaev, Alexander B.; Allen, Jeffery; Allen, Monica; Shvets, Gennady

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate that the presence of a (gyro) magnetic substrate can produce an analog of electromagnetically induced transparency in Fano-resonant metamolecules. The simplest implementation of such gyromagnetically induced transparency (GIT) in a metasurface, comprised of an array of resonant antenna pairs placed on a gyromagnetic substrate and illuminated by a normally incident electromagnetic wave, is analyzed. Time reversal and spatial inversion symmetry breaking introduced by the dc magnetization makes metamolecules bianisotropic. This causes Fano interference between the otherwise uncoupled symmetric and antisymmetric resonances of the metamolecules giving rise to a sharp transmission peak through the otherwise reflective metasurface. We show that, for an oblique wave incidence, one-way GIT can be achieved by the combination of spatial dispersion and gyromagnetic effect. These theoretically predicted phenomena pave the way to nonreciprocal switches and isolators that can be dynamically controlled by electric currents.

  15. The Surgically Induced Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Finnerty, Celeste C.; Mabvuure, Nigel Tapiwa; Ali, Arham; Kozar, Rosemary A.; Herndon, David N.

    2013-01-01

    The stress response to surgery, critical illness, trauma, and burns encompasses derangements of metabolic and physiological processes which induce perturbations in the inflammatory, acute phase, hormonal, and genomic responses. Hypermetabolism and hypercatabolism result, leading to muscle wasting, impaired immune function and wound healing, organ failure, and death. The surgery-induced stress response is largely similar to that triggered by traumatic injuries; the duration of the stress response, however, varies according to the severity of injury (surgical or traumatic). This spectrum of injuries and insults ranges from small lacerations to severe insults such as large poly-traumatic and burn injuries. Although the stress response to acute trauma evolved to improve chances of survival following injury, in modern surgical practice the stress response can be detrimental. PMID:24009246

  16. Some Remarks About Induced QCD

    E-print Network

    David J. Gross

    1992-08-02

    Migdal and Kazakov have suggested that lattice QCD with an adjoint representation scalar in the infinite coupling limit could induce QCD. I find an exact saddlepoint of this theory for infinite $N$ in the case of a quadratic scalar potential. I discuss some aspects of this solution and also show how the continuum D=1 matrix model with an arbitrary potential can be reproduced through this approach.

  17. Cadmium-induced testicular injury

    SciTech Connect

    Siu, Erica R.; Mruk, Dolores D.; Porto, Catarina S.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2009-08-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is an environmental toxicant and an endocrine disruptor in humans and rodents. Several organs (e.g., kidney, liver) are affected by Cd and recent studies have illustrated that the testis is exceedingly sensitive to Cd toxicity. More important, Cd and other toxicants, such as heavy metals (e.g., lead, mercury) and estrogenic-based compounds (e.g., bisphenols) may account for the recent declining fertility in men among developed countries by reducing sperm count and testis function. In this review, we critically discuss recent data in the field that have demonstrated the Cd-induced toxicity to the testis is probably the result of interactions of a complex network of causes. This is likely to involve the disruption of the blood-testis barrier (BTB) via specific signal transduction pathways and signaling molecules, such as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). We also summarize current studies on factors that confer and/or regulate the testis sensitivity to Cd, such as Cd transporters and metallothioneins, the impact of Cd on the testis as an endocrine disruptor and oxidative stress inducer, and how it may disrupt the Zn{sup 2+} and/or Ca{sup 2+} mediated cellular events. While much work is needed before a unified mechanistic pathway of Cd-induced testicular toxicity emerges, recent studies have helped to identify some of the likely mechanisms and/or events that take place during Cd-induced testis injury. Furthermore, some of the recent studies have shed lights on potential therapeutic or preventive approaches that can be developed in future studies by blocking or minimizing the destructive effects of Cd to testicular function in men.

  18. Acoustically-Induced Electrical Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    We have observed electrical signals excited by and moving along with an acoustic pulse propagating in a sandstone sample. Using resonance we are now studying the characteristics of this acousto-electric signal and determining its origin and the controlling physical parameters. Four rock samples with a range of porosities, permeabilities, and mineralogies were chosen: Berea, Boise, and Colton sandstones and Austin Chalk. Pore water salinity was varied from deionized water to sea water. Ag-AgCl electrodes were attached to the sample and were interfaced to a 4-wire electrical resistivity system. Under computer control, the acoustic signals were excited and the electrical response was recorded. We see strong acoustically-induced electrical signals in all samples, with the magnitude of the effect for each rock getting stronger as we move from the 1st to the 3rd harmonics in resonance. Given a particular fluid salinity, each rock has its own distinct sensitivity in the induced electrical effect. For example at the 2nd harmonic, Berea Sandstone produces the largest electrical signal per acoustic power input even though Austin Chalk and Boise Sandstone tend to resonate with much larger amplitudes at the same harmonic. Two effects are potentially responsible for this acoustically-induced electrical response: one the co-seismic seismo-electric effect and the other a strain-induced resistivity change known as the acousto-electric effect. We have designed experimental tests to separate these mechanisms. The tests show that the seismo-electric effect is dominant in our studies. We note that these experiments are in a fluid viscosity dominated seismo-electric regime, leading to a simple interpretation of the signals where the electric potential developed is proportional to the local acceleration of the rock. Toward a test of this theory we have measured the local time-varying acoustic strain in our samples using a laser vibrometer.

  19. Etanercept-induced cystic acne.

    PubMed

    Kashat, Maria; Caretti, Katherine; Kado, Jessica

    2014-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor ? antagonists are potent biologics used to treat a variety of autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, Crohn disease, psoriasis, and psoriatic arthritis. These medications are known to have many side effects (eg, infusion reactions, cytopenia, risk for infection, heart failure); however, only a few cases of acne vulgaris have been associated with the use of these biologics, particularly infliximab and adalimumab. We report a rare case of etanercept-induced cystic acne. PMID:25101341

  20. Immune responses in monkeys to lenses from patients with contact lens induced giant papillary conjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Ballow, M; Donshik, P C; Rapacz, P; Maenza, R; Yamase, H; Muncy, L

    1989-01-01

    The clinicopathologic findings in contact lens-induced giant papillary conjunctivitis (GPC) suggest that the syndrome is the result of a complex immunological process, an idea supported by the presence of elevated tear concentrations of IgG and IgE in GPC. Several groups of investigators have proposed that GPC may be due, in part, to the coating of the contact lens. To test this hypothesis we undertook development of an animal model of GPC in cynomolgus monkeys. Two soft contact lenses from patients with GPC, two from asymptomatic contact lens wearers, and two clean, unused lenses were each placed in one eye and held in place with a partial tarsorrhaphy. Tears from the two monkeys with GPC lenses showed increased levels of IgG (43 +/- 10 micrograms/mL), IgA (54.3 +/- 12.8 micrograms/mL) and IgE (7.7 +/- 3.3 IU/mL) 35-75 days post-lens placement. While the tears from the two monkeys with clean lenses, and the two monkeys with lenses from asymptomatic contact lens wearers had elevated levels of IgG compared to the contralateral control eye without a lens, the tear IgE levels remained normal. Histopathology studies of tarsal conjunctival biopsy material from the monkeys with GPC lenses showed an intense round cell infiltrate at the epithelial-stromal junction. Mast cells were seen in the epithelial layers. These studies suggest that some factor (or factors) in the lens coating from GPC patients was able to induce a local tear IgE response and histopathological changes in monkeys. These changes are similar to the histopathological and immunological findings in human patients with GPC. PMID:2917401

  1. Chalcones from Angelica keiskei: Evaluation of Their Heat Shock Protein Inducing Activities.

    PubMed

    Kil, Yun-Seo; Choi, Seul-Ki; Lee, Yun-Sil; Jafari, Mahtab; Seo, Eun-Kyoung

    2015-10-23

    Five new chalcones, 4,2',4'-trihydroxy-3'-[(2E,5E)-7-methoxy-3,7-dimethyl-2,5-octadienyl]chalcone (1), (±)-4,2',4'-trihydroxy-3'-[(2E)-6-hydroxy-7-methoxy-3,7-dimethyl-2-octenyl]chalcone (2), 4,2',4'-trihydroxy-3'-[(2E)-3-methyl-5-(1,3-dioxolan-2-yl)-2-pentenyl]chalcone (3), 2',3'-furano-4-hydroxy-4'-methoxychalcone (4), and (±)-4-hydroxy-2',3'-(2,3-dihydro-2-methoxyfurano)-4'-methoxychalcone (5), were isolated from the aerial parts of Angelica keiskei Koidzumi together with eight known chalcones, 6-13, which were identified as (±)-4,2',4'-trihydroxy-3'-[(6E)-2-hydroxy-7-methyl-3-methylene-6-octenyl]chalcone (6), xanthoangelol (7), xanthoangelol F (8), xanthoangelol G (9), 4-hydroxyderricin (10), xanthoangelol D (11), xanthoangelol E (12), and xanthoangelol H (13), respectively. Chalcones 1-13 were evaluated for their promoter activity on heat shock protein 25 (hsp25, murine form of human hsp27). Compounds 1 and 6 activated the hsp25 promoter by 21.9- and 29.2-fold of untreated control at 10 ?M, respectively. Further protein expression patterns of heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), HSP70, and HSP27 by 1 and 6 were examined. Compound 6 increased the expression of HSF1, HSP70, and HSP27 by 4.3-, 1.5-, and 4.6-fold of untreated control, respectively, without any significant cellular cytotoxicities, whereas 1 did not induce any expression of these proteins. As a result, 6 seems to be a prospective HSP inducer. PMID:26431394

  2. UV-induced cutaneous photobiology.

    PubMed

    Beissert, S; Granstein, R D

    1996-12-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) present in sunlight is a major environmental factor capable of affecting human health and well being. The organ primarily affected by UVR is the skin, which is composed of a variety of different cell types. Here, UVR is needed for production of active vitamin D as well as producing undesirable effects such as sunburn, premature cutaneous photoaging, and promoting skin cancer development. Depending on the radiation dose, UVR influences virtually every cutaneous cell type investigated differently. Since the end of the nineteenth century, sun exposure has been known to induce skin cancer, which is now the human malignancy with the most rapidly increasing incidence. In several experimental models, mid-range UVR has been demonstrated to be the major cause of UV-induced cutaneous tumors. The stratospheric ozone layer protecting the terrestrial surface from higher quantum energy solar radiation is being damaged by industrial activities resulting in the possibility of increased UVR exposure in the future. Investigations in the field of experimental dermatology have shown that within the skin an immunosurveillance system exists that may be able to detect incipient neoplasms and to elicit a host responses against it. This article reviews the literature on studies designed to investigate the effects of UVR on cutaneous cellular components, with special focus on the immune system within the skin and the development of UV-induced cancer. PMID:8994803

  3. Field induced gap infrared detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, C. Thomas (inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A tunable infrared detector which employs a vanishing band gap semimetal material provided with an induced band gap by a magnetic field to allow intrinsic semiconductor type infrared detection capabilities is disclosed. The semimetal material may thus operate as a semiconductor type detector with a wavelength sensitivity corresponding to the induced band gap in a preferred embodiment of a diode structure. Preferred semimetal materials include Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te, x is less than 0.15, HgCdSe, BiSb, alpha-Sn, HgMgTe, HgMnTe, HgZnTe, HgMnSe, HgMgSe, and HgZnSe. The magnetic field induces a band gap in the semimetal material proportional to the strength of the magnetic field allowing tunable detection cutoff wavelengths. For an applied magnetic field from 5 to 10 tesla, the wavelength detection cutoff will be in the range of 20 to 50 micrometers for Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te alloys with x about 0.15. A similar approach may also be employed to generate infrared energy in a desired band gap and then operating the structure in a light emitting diode or semiconductor laser type of configuration.

  4. Efficient treatment of induced dipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmonett, Andrew C.; Pickard, Frank C.; Shao, Yihan; Cheatham, Thomas E.; Brooks, Bernard R.

    2015-08-01

    Most existing treatments of induced dipoles in polarizable molecular mechanics force field calculations use either the self-consistent variational method, which is solved iteratively, or the "direct" approximation that is non-iterative as a result of neglecting coupling between induced dipoles. The variational method is usually implemented using assumptions that are only strictly valid under tight convergence of the induced dipoles, which can be computationally demanding to enforce. In this work, we discuss the nature of the errors that result from insufficient convergence and suggest a strategy that avoids such problems. Using perturbation theory to reintroduce the mutual coupling into the direct algorithm, we present a computationally efficient method that combines the precision of the direct approach with the accuracy of the variational approach. By analyzing the convergence of this perturbation series, we derive a simple extrapolation formula that delivers a very accurate approximation to the infinite order solution at the cost of only a few iterations. We refer to the new method as extrapolated perturbation theory. Finally, we draw connections to our previously published permanent multipole algorithm to develop an efficient implementation of the electric field and Thole terms and also derive some necessary, but not sufficient, criteria that force field parameters must obey.

  5. Induced radioactivity in LDEF components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, B. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Parnell, T. A.; Laird, C. E.

    1991-01-01

    The systematics of induced radioactivity on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) were studied in a wide range of materials using low level background facilities for detection of gamma rays. Approx. 400 samples of materials processed from structural parts of the spacecraft, as well as materials from onboard experiments, were analyzed at national facilities. These measurements show the variety of radioisotopes that are produced with half-lives greater than 2 wks, most of which are characteristic of proton induced reactions above 20 MeV. For the higher activity, long lived isotopes, it was possible to map the depth and directional dependences of the activity. Due to the stabilized configuration of the LDEF, the induced radioactivity data clearly show contributions from the anisotropic trapped proton flux in the South Atlantic Anomaly. This effect is discussed, along with evidence for activation by galactic protons and thermal neutrons. The discovery of Be-7 was made on leading side parts of the spacecraft, although this was though not to be related to the in situ production of radioisotopes from external particle fluxes.

  6. Chromium-induced kidney disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wedeen, R.P. ); Qian, Lifen )

    1991-05-01

    Kidney disease is often cited as one of the adverse effects of chromium, yet chronic renal disease due to occupational or environmental exposure to chromium has not been reported. Occasional cases of acute tubular necrosis (ATN) following massive absorption of chromate have been described. Chromate-induced ATN has been extensively studied in experimental animals following parenteral administration of large doses of potassium chromate (hexavalent). The chromate is selectively accumulated in the convoluted proximal tubule where necrosis occurs. An adverse long-term effect of low-dose chromium exposure on the kidneys is suggested by reports of low molecular weight (LMW) proteinuria in chromium workers. Excessive urinary excretion of {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin, a specific proximal tubule brush border protein, and retinol-binding protein has been reported among chrome palters and welders. However, LMW proteinuria occurs after a variety of physiologic stresses, is usually reversible, and cannot by itself be considered evidence of chromic renal disease. Chromate-induced ATN and LMW proteinuria in chromium workers, nevertheless, raise the possibility that low-level, long-term exposure may produce persistent renal injury. The absence of evidence of chromate-induced chromic renal disease cannot be interpreted as evidence of the absence of such injury.

  7. Apoptosis induced by parasitic diseases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Fatalities caused by parasitic infections often occur as a result of tissue injury that results from a form of host-cell death known as apoptosis. However, instead of being pathogenic, parasite-induced apoptosis may facilitate host survival. Consequently, it is of utmost importance to decipher and understand the process and the role of apoptosis induced or controlled by parasites in humans. Despite this, few studies provide definitive knowledge of parasite-induced host-cell apoptosis. Here, the focus is on a consideration of host-cell apoptosis as either a pathogenic feature or as a factor enabling parasite survival and development. Cell death by apoptotic-like mechanisms could be described as a ride to death with a return ticket, as initiation of the pathway may be reversed, with the potential that it could be manipulated for therapeutic purposes. The management of host-cell apoptosis could thus be an adjunctive factor for parasitic disease treatment. Evidence that the apoptotic process could be reversed by anti-apoptotic drugs has recently been obtained, leading to the possibility of host-cell rescue after injury. An important issue will be to predict the beneficial or deleterious effects of controlling human cell death by apoptotic-like mechanisms during parasitic diseases. PMID:21083888

  8. Mechanisms of AH receptor-mediated responses 

    E-print Network

    Dong, Lian

    1996-01-01

    The interaction of the nuclear aryl hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor complex with c-fos and c-jun oncoprotein was investigated in wild-type Ah responsive mouse Hepa lclc7 cells. Chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) activity was induced by 10 riM 2...

  9. Statistical Seismology and Induced Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiampo, K. F.; González, P. J.; Kazemian, J.

    2014-12-01

    While seismicity triggered or induced by natural resources production such as mining or water impoundment in large dams has long been recognized, the recent increase in the unconventional production of oil and gas has been linked to rapid rise in seismicity in many places, including central North America (Ellsworth et al., 2012; Ellsworth, 2013). Worldwide, induced events of M~5 have occurred and, although rare, have resulted in both damage and public concern (Horton, 2012; Keranen et al., 2013). In addition, over the past twenty years, the increase in both number and coverage of seismic stations has resulted in an unprecedented ability to precisely record the magnitude and location of large numbers of small magnitude events. The increase in the number and type of seismic sequences available for detailed study has revealed differences in their statistics that previously difficult to quantify. For example, seismic swarms that produce significant numbers of foreshocks as well as aftershocks have been observed in different tectonic settings, including California, Iceland, and the East Pacific Rise (McGuire et al., 2005; Shearer, 2012; Kazemian et al., 2014). Similarly, smaller events have been observed prior to larger induced events in several occurrences from energy production. The field of statistical seismology has long focused on the question of triggering and the mechanisms responsible (Stein et al., 1992; Hill et al., 1993; Steacy et al., 2005; Parsons, 2005; Main et al., 2006). For example, in most cases the associated stress perturbations are much smaller than the earthquake stress drop, suggesting an inherent sensitivity to relatively small stress changes (Nalbant et al., 2005). Induced seismicity provides the opportunity to investigate triggering and, in particular, the differences between long- and short-range triggering. Here we investigate the statistics of induced seismicity sequences from around the world, including central North America and Spain, and natural earthquake swarms and non-swarm tectonic events from California, Nevada and Iceland. We compare the foreshock and aftershock Omori decay parameters and the Gutenberg-Richter frequency-magnitude scaling relationships for these different sequences in order to better understand the relationship between triggering and cascade sequences.

  10. Enoxaparin-induced Skin Necrosis.

    PubMed

    Neloska, Lence; Damevska, Katerna; Pavleska, Lidija

    2015-09-01

    Anticoagulant-induced skin necrosis is a rare and serious complication of treatment with these commonly prescribed drugs. Few cases of heparin induced skin necrosis have been reported in literature and only a small number of them was attributed to enoxaparin (1). We report a case with a delayed diagnosis and fatal outcome. A 78-year-old obese woman with history of hypertension, poorly controlled diabetes mellitus, and cardiomyopathy was admitted to the Geriatric Hospital. Six days earlier she had fallen and sustained an intracapsular hip fracture which had been treated conservatively. For the prevention of deep vein thrombosis, low molecular weight heparin (Enoxaparin Sodium 30 mg, s.c. every 12 hours) was started on the day of injury. Her other routine medications included insulin glargine, metformin, enalapril, omeprazole, amlodipine, citalopram, atorvastatin, and pain medication. At admission she was afebrile, with stable vital signs. Clinical examination revealed redness at the sites of subcutaneous injection of enoxaparin, as well small purpuric lesions on the trunk and extremities. Over the following few days, new progressive, painful, and slightly indurated erythematous lesions were noted on the breasts, face, abdomen, and legs. Some of the purpuric lesions became bullous, with subsequent central necrosis (Figure 1). The diagnosis of enoxaparin-induced skin necrosis was proposed and the treatment was discontinued. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and sepsis were excluded in this case based on the clinical and laboratory findings. Chest radiography and clinical features of the lesions excluded fat embolism. Despite intensive supportive care our patient died from multiple organ dysfunction 16 days after the initiation of enoxaparin. Thromboprophylaxis has become established in clinical practice as a safe and effective means of decreasing venous thromboembolic events in surgical patients. Enoxaparin, a low-molecular-weight heparin, is the standard agents used for antithrombotic therapy and prophylaxis. Despite widespread use, reports about adverse effects from enoxaparin are very scarce (2). Heparin-induced skin necrosis typically affects middle-aged women with a history of thrombotic disease. The skin necrosis occurs between day 5 and 11 following initiation of therapy (3-5). The first symptoms are usually described as painful erythematous, subcutaneous lesions with edema, at the injection sites. Subsequently, bullous transformation is observed before full-skin necrosis occurs (5,6). Our experience with this case highlights the importance of early recognition of this adverse event and careful supervision of all patients who receive this medication. PMID:26476910

  11. RNA sequencing analysis identifies novel spliced transcripts but does not indicate quantitative or qualitative changes of viral transcripts during progression of cottontail rabbit papillomavirus-induced tumours.

    PubMed

    Probst-Hunczek, Sonja; Jäger, Günter; Schneider, Markus; Notz, Ekaterina; Stubenrauch, Frank; Iftner, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Persistent infections with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) can result in the development of cancer of the cervix uteri and other malignancies. The underlying molecular mechanisms leading to the progression of HPV-induced lesions are, however, not well understood. Cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV) induces papillomas in domestic rabbits which progress at a very high rate to cancer. Using this model, we compared the transcriptional patterns of CRPV in papillomas and carcinomas by RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). The most abundant transcripts can encode E7, short E6 and E1^E4, followed by full-length E6, E2, E1 and E9^E2C. In addition, we identified two rare, novel splice junctions 7810/3714 and 1751/3065 in both papillomas and carcinomas which have been described for other papillomaviruses. Neither RNA-seq nor quantitative real-time PCR-based assays identified qualitative or quantitative changes of viral transcription between papillomas and carcinomas. In summary, our analyses confirmed that papillomaviruses have highly similar transcriptional patterns, but they do not suggest that changes in these patterns contribute to the progression of CRPV-induced tumours. PMID:26297146

  12. Ion beam induced luminescence: Relevance to radiation induced bystander effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, S. B.; McNeill, F. E.; Byun, S. H.; Prestwich, W. V.; Seymour, C.; Mothersill, C. E.

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this work is quantify the light emitted as a result of charged particle interaction in materials which may be of relevance to radiation induced "bystander effects" studies. We have developed a system which employs single photon counting to measure the light emitted from samples irradiated under vacuum by a charged particle beam. The system uses a fast photomultiplier tube with a peak cathode response at 420 nm. It has been tested in a proof-of-principle experiment using polystyrene targets. Light output, as a result of irradiation, was measured. The luminescence yield appears to have a non-linear behavior with the incident ion fluence: it rises exponentially to an asymptotic value. The target was irradiated with beam energies varying from 1 to 2 MeV and showed saturation at or before an incident fluence rate of 3 × 1013 H+/cm2 s. The average saturation value for the photon output was found to be 40 × 106 cps. Some measurements were performed using filters to study the emission at specific wavelengths. In the case of filtered light measurements, the photon output was found to saturate at 28 × 103, 10 × 106, and 35 × 106 cps for wavelengths of 280 ± 5 nm, 320 ± 5 nm and 340 ± 5 nm respectively. The light output reaches a maximum value because of damage induced in the polymer. Our measurements indicate a "damage cross section" of the order of 10-14 cm2. The average radiant intensity was found to increase at wavelengths of 280 and 320 nm when the proton energy was increased. This was not found to occur at 340 nm. In conclusion, the light emission at specific wavelengths was found to depend upon the incident proton fluence and the proton energy. The wavelengths of the emitted light measured in this study have significance for the understanding of radiation induced bystander effects.

  13. Tanshinone IIA inhibits viral oncogene expression leading to apoptosis and inhibition of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Munagala, Radha; Aqil, Farrukh; Jeyabalan, Jeyaprakash; Gupta, Ramesh C

    2015-01-28

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) is the well-established etiological factor of cervical cancer. E6 and E7 oncoproteins expressed by HPV are known to inactivate tumor suppressor proteins p53 and pRb, respectively. Tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA) is a diterpenoid naphthoquinone found in the traditional Chinese medicine Danshen (Salvia sp.). Tan IIA has been shown to possess anti-tumor activity against several cancer types. In this study we show that Tan IIA potently inhibited proliferation of the human cervical cancer CaSki, SiHa, HeLa and C33a cells. Mechanistically in HPV positive CaSki cells, Tan IIA was found to (i) downregulate expression of HPV E6 and E7 genes and modulate associated proteins E6AP and E2F1, (ii) cause S phase cell cycle arrest, (iii) induce accumulation of p53 and alter expression of p53-dependent targets, (iv) modulate pRb and related proteins, and (v) cause p53-mediated apoptosis by moderating Bcl2, Bax, caspase-3, and PARP cleavage expressions. In vivo, Tan IIA resulted in over 66% reduction in tumor volume of cervical cancer xenograft in athymic nude mice. Tan IIA treated tumor tissues had lower expression of proliferation marker PCNA and changes in apoptosis targets were in agreement with in vitro studies, further confirming reduced proliferation and involvement of multiple targets behind anti-cancer effects. This is the first demonstration of Tan IIA to possess significant anti-viral activity by repressing HPV oncogenes leading to inhibition of cervical cancer. Together, our data suggest that Tan IIA can be exploited as a potent therapeutic agent for the prevention and treatment of cervical and other HPV-related cancers. PMID:25304375

  14. Replication-Competent Foamy Virus Vaccine Vectors as Novel Epitope Scaffolds for Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Janet; Osen, Wolfram; Gardyan, Adriane; Hotz-Wagenblatt, Agnes; Wei, Guochao; Gissmann, Lutz; Eichmüller, Stefan; Löchelt, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The use of whole viruses as antigen scaffolds is a recent development in vaccination that improves immunogenicity without the need for additional adjuvants. Previous studies highlighted the potential of foamy viruses (FVs) in prophylactic vaccination and gene therapy. Replication-competent FVs can trigger immune signaling and integrate into the host genome, resulting in persistent antigen expression and a robust immune response. Here, we explored feline foamy virus (FFV) proteins as scaffolds for therapeutic B and T cell epitope delivery in vitro. Infection- and cancer-related B and T cell epitopes were grafted into FFV Gag, Env, or Bet by residue replacement, either at sites of high local sequence homology between the epitope and the host protein or in regions known to tolerate sequence alterations. Modified proviruses were evaluated in vitro for protein steady state levels, particle release, and virus titer in permissive cells. Modification of Gag and Env was mostly detrimental to their function. As anticipated, modification of Bet had no impact on virion release and affected virus titers of only some recombinants. Further evaluation of Bet as an epitope carrier was performed using T cell epitopes from the model antigen chicken ovalbumin (OVA), human tyrosinase-related protein 2 (TRP-2), and oncoprotein E7 of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16E7). Transfection of murine cells with constructs encoding Bet-epitope chimeric proteins led to efficient MHC-I-restricted epitope presentation as confirmed by interferon-gamma enzyme-linked immunospot assays using epitope-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) lines. FFV infection-mediated transduction of cells with epitope-carrying Bet also induced T-cell responses, albeit with reduced efficacy, in a process independent from the presence of free peptides. We show that primate FV Bet is also a promising T cell epitope carrier for clinical translation. The data demonstrate the utility of replication-competent and -attenuated FVs as antigen carriers in immunotherapy. PMID:26397953

  15. The state of the p53 and retinoblastoma genes in human cervical carcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Scheffner, M.; Muenger, K.; Byrne, J.C.; Howley, P.M. )

    1991-07-01

    Human cervical carcinoma cell lines that were either positive or negative for human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA sequences were analyzed for evidence of mutation of the p53 and retinoblastoma genes. Each of five HPV-positive cervical cancer cell lines expressed normal pRB and low levels of wild-type p53 proteins, which are presumed to be altered in function as a consequence of association with HPV E7 and E6 oncoproteins, respectively. In contrast, mutations were identified in the p53 and RB genes expressed in the C-33A and HT-3 cervical cancer cell lines, which lack HPV DNA sequences. Mutations in the p53 genes mapped to codon 273 and codon 245 in the C33-A and HT-3 cell lines, respectively, located in the highly conserved regions of p53, where mutations appear in a variety of human cancers. Mutations in RB occurred at splice junctions, resulting in in-frame deletions, affecting exons 13 and 20 in the HT-3 and C-33A cell lines, respectively. These mutations resulted in aberrant proteins that were not phosphorylated and were unable to complex with the adenovirus E1A oncoprotein. These results support the hypothesis that the inactivation of the normal functions of the tumor-suppressor proteins pRB and p53 are important steps in human cervical carcinogenesis, either by mutation or from complex formation with the HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins.

  16. Amiodarone-induced thyroid dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Danzi, Sara; Klein, Irwin

    2015-05-01

    Amiodarone is an effective medication for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. Originally developed for the treatment of angina, it is now the most frequently prescribed antiarrhythmia drug despite the fact that its use is limited because of potential serious side effects including adverse effects on the thyroid gland and thyroid hormones. Although the mechanisms of action of amiodarone on the thyroid gland and thyroid hormone metabolism are poorly understood, the structural similarity of amiodarone to thyroid hormones, including the presence of iodine moieties on the inner benzene ring, may play a role in causing thyroid dysfunction. Amiodarone-induced thyroid dysfunction includes amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis (AIT) and amiodarone-induced hypothyroidism (AIH). The AIT develops more commonly in iodine-deficient areas and AIH in iodine-sufficient areas. The AIT type 1 usually occurs in patients with known or previously undiagnosed thyroid dysfunction or goiter. The AIT type 2 usually occurs in normal thyroid glands and results in destruction of thyroid tissue caused by thyroiditis. This is the result of an intrinsic drug effect from the amiodarone itself. Mixed types are not uncommon. Patients with cardiac disease receiving amiodarone treatment should be monitored for signs of thyroid dysfunction, which often manifest as a reappearance of the underlying cardiac disease state. When monitoring patients, initial tests should include the full battery of thyroid function tests, thyroid-stimulating hormone, thyroxine, triiodothyronine, and antithyroid antibodies. Mixed types of AIT can be challenging both to diagnose and treat and therapy differs depending on the type of AIT. Treatment can include thionamides and/or glucocorticoids. The AIH responds favorably to thyroid hormone replacement therapy. Amiodarone is lipophilic and has a long half-life in the body. Therefore, stopping the amiodarone therapy usually has little short-term benefit. PMID:24067547

  17. Snoring-Induced Vibratory Angioedema

    PubMed Central

    Kalathoor, Ipe

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 70 Final Diagnosis: Snoring induced vibratory angioedema Symptoms: Swelling of tongue • roof of mouth and throat • multiple episodes at night Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Continuous positive airway pressure therapy Specialty: Allergology Objective: Rare disease Background: Vibratory angioedema (VA) is a rare physical urticaria, with symptoms of itching and swelling of the skin or mucosa when it is exposed to vibration. Avoidance of vibration is the best way to manage this condition. This case report will assist physicians to diagnose this rare condition. Here, a previously unpublished potential successful treatment modality is being presented, with good symptom control, along with some photographs taken during an acute attack. A literature review points towards potential undiagnosed cases. Case Report: A 70-year-old woman had multiple emergency department visits for tongue and throat swelling over 3 years. The episodes always happened at night. Detailed history elicited some episodes of itching and swelling of hands when driving as well as significant snoring while sleeping. Physical examination was unremarkable except for morbid obesity. Complement factor 4 and C1esterase inhibitor level were within normal limits. A tentative diagnosis of angioedema induced by oropharyngeal vibration from snoring was made. A sleep study confirmed sleep apnea with severe snoring. After CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure) treatment, she had successful symptom control. Conclusions: Snoring-induced VA is very likely an under-diagnosed condition in the community. The typical history is the key to the diagnosis. This condition could be confirmed by vibration test or by the resolution of symptoms with elimination of vibration. Effective symptom control is possible by avoidance of oropharyngeal vibration from snoring with the administration of CPAP therapy, making it a potential novel indication for this condition. PMID:26437464

  18. Vibrational excitation induces double reaction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kai; Leung, Lydie; Lim, Tingbin; Ning, Zhanyu; Polanyi, John C

    2014-12-23

    Electron-induced reaction at metal surfaces is currently the subject of extensive study. Here, we broaden the range of experimentation to a comparison of vibrational excitation with electronic excitation, for reaction of the same molecule at the same clean metal surface. In a previous study of electron-induced reaction by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we examined the dynamics of the concurrent breaking of the two C-I bonds of ortho-diiodobenzene physisorbed on Cu(110). The energy of the incident electron was near the electronic excitation threshold of E0=1.0 eV required to induce this single-electron process. STM has been employed in the present work to study the reaction dynamics at the substantially lower incident electron energies of 0.3 eV, well below the electronic excitation threshold. The observed increase in reaction rate with current was found to be fourth-order, indicative of multistep reagent vibrational excitation, in contrast to the first-order rate dependence found earlier for electronic excitation. The change in mode of excitation was accompanied by altered reaction dynamics, evidenced by a different pattern of binding of the chemisorbed products to the copper surface. We have modeled these altered reaction dynamics by exciting normal modes of vibration that distort the C-I bonds of the physisorbed reagent. Using the same ab initio ground potential-energy surface as in the prior work on electronic excitation, but with only vibrational excitation of the physisorbed reagent in the asymmetric stretch mode of C-I bonds, we obtained the observed alteration in reaction dynamics. PMID:25489788

  19. High homocysteine induces betaine depletion

    PubMed Central

    Imbard, Apolline; Benoist, Jean-François; Esse, Ruben; Gupta, Sapna; Lebon, Sophie; de Vriese, An S; de Baulny, Helene Ogier; Kruger, Warren; Schiff, Manuel; Blom, Henk J.

    2015-01-01

    Betaine is the substrate of the liver- and kidney-specific betaine-homocysteine (Hcy) methyltransferase (BHMT), an alternate pathway for Hcy remethylation. We hypothesized that BHMT is a major pathway for homocysteine removal in cases of hyperhomocysteinaemia (HHcy). Therefore, we measured betaine in plasma and tissues from patients and animal models of HHcy of genetic and acquired cause. Plasma was collected from patients presenting HHcy without any Hcy interfering treatment. Plasma and tissues were collected from rat models of HHcy induced by diet and from a mouse model of cystathionine ?-synthase (CBS) deficiency. S-adenosyl-methionine (AdoMet), S-adenosyl-homocysteine (AdoHcy), methionine, betaine and dimethylglycine (DMG) were quantified by ESI—LC–MS/MS. mRNA expression was quantified using quantitative real-time (QRT)-PCR. For all patients with diverse causes of HHcy, plasma betaine concentrations were below the normal values of our laboratory. In the diet-induced HHcy rat model, betaine was decreased in all tissues analysed (liver, brain, heart). In the mouse CBS deficiency model, betaine was decreased in plasma, liver, heart and brain, but was conserved in kidney. Surprisingly, BHMT expression and activity was decreased in liver. However, in kidney, BHMT and SLC6A12 expression was increased in CBS-deficient mice. Chronic HHcy, irrespective of its cause, induces betaine depletion in plasma and tissues (liver, brain and heart), indicating a global decrease in the body betaine pool. In kidney, betaine concentrations were not affected, possibly due to overexpression of the betaine transporter SLC6A12 where betaine may be conserved because of its crucial role as an osmolyte. PMID:26182429

  20. HYPOGLYCEMIA INDUCED BY ANTIDIABETIC SULFONYLUREAS.

    PubMed

    Confederat, Lumini?a; Constantin, Sandra; Lupa?cu, Florentina; Pânzariu, Andreea; H?ncianu, Monica; Profire, Lenu?a

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major health problem due to its increasing prevalence and life-threatening complications. Antidiabetic sulfonylureas represent the first-line drugs in type 2 diabetes even though the most common associated risk is pharmacologically-induced hypoglycemia. In the development of this side effect are involved several factors including the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile of the drug, patient age and behavior, hepatic or renal dysfunctions, or other drugs associated with a high risk of interactions. If all these are controlled, the risk-benefit balance can be equal to other oral antidiabetic drugs. PMID:26204670

  1. Local conformity induced global oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dong; Li, Wei; Hu, Gang; Zheng, Zhigang

    2009-04-01

    The game ‘rock-paper-scissors’ model, with the consideration of the effect of the psychology of conformity, is investigated. The interaction between each two agents is global, but the strategy of the conformity is local for individuals. In the statistical opinion, the probability of the appearance of each strategy is uniform. The dynamical analysis of this model indicates that the equilibrium state may lose its stability at a threshold and is replaced by a globally oscillating state. The global oscillation is induced by the local conformity, which is originated from the synchronization of individual strategies.

  2. Magnetically induced pulser laser excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.S.; Leopold, K.E.

    1985-02-15

    A novel excitation scheme has been developed for excimer discharge lasers. The technique uses pulse transformer technology to induce a fast, high voltage pulse directly onto a ground potential laser electrode resulting in the breakdown of the laser gas mix. Saturation of the pulse transformer core inductance then permits efficient energy transfer from the main energy storage circuit into the discharge. When this excitation technique was used in a XeCl laser an output energy density of 2.5 J/l and an overall electrical to optical efficiency of 2% were obtained. The technique appears promising for the development of high energy, high average power excimer lasers.

  3. Torsion-induced spin precession

    E-print Network

    Morteza Mohseni

    2008-07-22

    We investigate the motion of a spinning test particle in a spatially-flat FRW-type space-time in the framework of the Einstein-Cartan theory. The space-time has a torsion arising from a spinning fluid filling the space-time. We show that for spinning particles with nonzero transverse spin components, the torsion induces a precession of particle spin around the direction of the fluid spin. We also show that a charged spinning particle moving in a torsion-less spatially-flat FRW space-time in the presence of a uniform magnetic field undergoes a precession of a different character.

  4. Break-Induced DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Ranjith P.; Lovett, Susan T.; Haber, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Recombination-dependent DNA replication, often called break-induced replication (BIR), was initially invoked to explain recombination events in bacteriophage but it has recently been recognized as a fundamentally important mechanism to repair double-strand chromosome breaks in eukaryotes. This mechanism appears to be critically important in the restarting of stalled and broken replication forks and in maintaining the integrity of eroded telomeres. Although BIR helps preserve genome integrity during replication, it also promotes genome instability by the production of loss of heterozygosity and the formation of nonreciprocal translocations, as well as in the generation of complex chromosomal rearrangements. PMID:23881940

  5. Plasmon-induced artificial photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Kosei; Oshikiri, Tomoya; Shi, Xu; Zhong, Yuqing; Misawa, Hiroaki

    2015-06-01

    We have successfully developed a plasmon-induced artificial photosynthesis system that uses a gold nanoparticle-loaded oxide semiconductor electrode to produce useful chemical energy as hydrogen and ammonia. The most important feature of this system is that both sides of a strontium titanate single-crystal substrate are used without an electrochemical apparatus. Plasmon-induced water splitting occurred even with a minimum chemical bias of 0.23 V owing to the plasmonic effects based on the efficient oxidation of water and the use of platinum as a co-catalyst for reduction. Photocurrent measurements were performed to determine the electron transfer between the gold nanoparticles and the oxide semiconductor. The efficiency of water oxidation was determined through spectroelectrochemical experiments aimed at elucidating the electron density in the gold nanoparticles. A set-up similar to the water-splitting system was used to synthesize ammonia via nitrogen fixation using ruthenium instead of platinum as a co-catalyst. PMID:26052419

  6. Simulations of Cavitating Cryogenic Inducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorney, Dan (Technical Monitor); Hosangadi, Ashvin; Ahuja, Vineet; Ungewitter, Ronald J.

    2004-01-01

    Simulations of cavitating turbopump inducers at their design flow rate are presented. Results over a broad range of Nss, numbers extending from single-phase flow conditions through the critical head break down point are discussed. The flow characteristics and performance of a subscale geometry designed for water testing are compared with the fullscale configuration that employs LOX. In particular, thermal depression effects arising from cavitation in cryogenic fluids are identified and their impact on the suction performance of the inducer quantified. The simulations have been performed using the CRUNCH CFD[R] code that has a generalized multi-element unstructured framework suitable for turbomachinery applications. An advanced multi-phase formulation for cryogenic fluids that models temperature depression and real fluid property variations is employed. The formulation has been extensively validated for both liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen by simulating the experiments of Hord on hydrofoils; excellent estimates of the leading edge temperature and pressure depression were obtained while the comparisons in the cavity closure region were reasonable.

  7. Psychosocial aspects of induced abortion.

    PubMed

    Stotland, N L

    1997-09-01

    US anti-abortion groups have used misinformation on the long-term psychological impact of induced abortion to advance their position. This article reviews the available research evidence on the definition, history, cultural context, and emotional and psychiatric sequelae of induced abortion. Notable has been a confusion of normative, transient reactions to unintended pregnancy and abortion (e.g., guilt, depression, anxiety) with serious mental disorders. Studies of the psychiatric aspects of abortion have been limited by methodological problems such as the impossibility of randomly assigning women to study and control groups, resistance to follow-up, and confounding variables. Among the factors that may impact on an unintended pregnancy and the decision to abort are ongoing or past psychiatric illness, poverty, social chaos, youth and immaturity, abandonment issues, ongoing domestic responsibilities, rape and incest, domestic violence, religion, and contraceptive failure. Among the risk factors for postabortion psychosocial difficulties are previous or concurrent psychiatric illness, coercion to abort, genetic or medical indications, lack of social supports, ambivalence, and increasing length of gestation. Overall, the literature indicates that serious psychiatric illness is at least 8 times more common among postpartum than among postabortion women. Abortion center staff should acknowledge that the termination of a pregnancy may be experienced as a loss even when it is a voluntary choice. Referrals should be offered to women who show great emotional distress, have had several previous abortions, or request psychiatric consultation. PMID:9328746

  8. Coffee induces autophagy in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pietrocola, Federico; Malik, Shoaib Ahmad; Mariño, Guillermo; Vacchelli, Erika; Senovilla, Laura; Chaba, Kariman; Niso-Santano, Mireia; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Madeo, Frank; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies and clinical trials revealed that chronic consumption coffee is associated with the inhibition of several metabolic diseases as well as reduction in overall and cause-specific mortality. We show that both natural and decaffeinated brands of coffee similarly rapidly trigger autophagy in mice. One to 4 h after coffee consumption, we observed an increase in autophagic flux in all investigated organs (liver, muscle, heart) in vivo, as indicated by the increased lipidation of LC3B and the reduction of the abundance of the autophagic substrate sequestosome 1 (p62/SQSTM1). These changes were accompanied by the inhibition of the enzymatic activity of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), leading to the reduced phosphorylation of p70(S6K), as well as by the global deacetylation of cellular proteins detectable by immunoblot. Immunohistochemical analyses of transgenic mice expressing a GFP-LC3B fusion protein confirmed the coffee-induced relocation of LC3B to autophagosomes, as well as general protein deacetylation. Altogether, these results indicate that coffee triggers 2 phenomena that are also induced by nutrient depletion, namely a reduction of protein acetylation coupled to an increase in autophagy. We speculate that polyphenols contained in coffee promote health by stimulating autophagy. PMID:24769862

  9. Ion-induced nuclear radiotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Horn, Kevin M. (Albuquerque, NM); Doyle, Barney L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1996-01-01

    Ion-induced Nuclear Radiotherapy (INRT) is a technique for conducting radiosurgery and radiotherapy with a very high degree of control over the spatial extent of the irradiated volume and the delivered dose. Based upon the concept that low energy, ion induced atomic and nuclear reactions can be used to produce highly energetic reaction products at the site of a tumor, the INRT technique is implemented through the use of a conduit-needle or tube which conducts a low energy ion beam to a position above or within the intended treatment area. At the end of the conduit-needle or tube is a specially fabricated target which, only when struck by the ion beam, acts as a source of energetic radiation products. The inherent limitations in the energy, and therefore range, of the resulting reaction products limits the spatial extent of irradiation to a pre-defined volume about the point of reaction. Furthermore, since no damage is done to tissue outside this irradiated volume, the delivered dose may be made arbitrarily large. INRT may be used both as a point-source of radiation at the site of a small tumor, or as a topical bath of radiation to broad areas of diseased tissue.

  10. Neutrino-induced meson productions

    E-print Network

    Satoshi X. Nakamura

    2015-11-04

    We develop a dynamical coupled-channels (DCC) model for neutrino-nucleon reactions in the resonance region, by extending the DCC model that we have previously developed through an analysis of $\\pi N, \\gamma N\\to \\pi N, \\eta N, K\\Lambda, K\\Sigma$ reaction data for $W\\le 2.1$ GeV. We analyze electron-induced reaction data for both proton and neutron targets to determine the vector current form factors up to $Q^2\\le$ 3.0 (GeV/$c$)$^2$. Axial-current matrix elements are derived in accordance with the Partially Conserved Axial Current (PCAC) relation to the $\\pi N$ interactions of the DCC model. As a result, we can uniquely determine the interference pattern between resonant and non-resonant amplitudes. Our calculated cross sections for neutrino-induced single-pion productions are compared with available data, and are found to be in reasonable agreement with the data. We also calculate the double-pion production cross sections in the resonance region, for the first time, with relevant resonance contributions and channel couplings. The result is compared with the double-pion production data. For a future development of a neutrino-nucleus reaction model and/or a neutrino event generator for analyses of neutrino experiments, the DCC model presented here can give a useful input.

  11. Coffee induces autophagy in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Pietrocola, Federico; Malik, Shoaib Ahmad; Mariño, Guillermo; Vacchelli, Erika; Senovilla, Laura; Chaba, Kariman; Niso-Santano, Mireia; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Madeo, Frank; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies and clinical trials revealed that chronic consumption coffee is associated with the inhibition of several metabolic diseases as well as reduction in overall and cause-specific mortality. We show that both natural and decaffeinated brands of coffee similarly rapidly trigger autophagy in mice. One to 4 h after coffee consumption, we observed an increase in autophagic flux in all investigated organs (liver, muscle, heart) in vivo, as indicated by the increased lipidation of LC3B and the reduction of the abundance of the autophagic substrate sequestosome 1 (p62/SQSTM1). These changes were accompanied by the inhibition of the enzymatic activity of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), leading to the reduced phosphorylation of p70S6K, as well as by the global deacetylation of cellular proteins detectable by immunoblot. Immunohistochemical analyses of transgenic mice expressing a GFP–LC3B fusion protein confirmed the coffee-induced relocation of LC3B to autophagosomes, as well as general protein deacetylation. Altogether, these results indicate that coffee triggers 2 phenomena that are also induced by nutrient depletion, namely a reduction of protein acetylation coupled to an increase in autophagy. We speculate that polyphenols contained in coffee promote health by stimulating autophagy. PMID:24769862

  12. Drug-induced esophageal strictures.

    PubMed Central

    Bonavina, L; DeMeester, T R; McChesney, L; Schwizer, W; Albertucci, M; Bailey, R T

    1987-01-01

    A retrospective study of 55 patients with a benign esophageal stricture showed that in 11 patients (20%) the cause was a drug-induced lesion due to potassium chloride (3), tetracyclines (3), aspirin (2), vitamin C (1), phenytoin (1), and quinidine (1). Five of the 11 patients would have been diagnosed as having a reflux etiology of their stricture if 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring was not performed. Six patients responded to dilatation and five patients required resection or bypass. A prospective study of 18 asymptomatic volunteers showed a high incidence of esophageal lodgment of a radiolabeled medicinal capsule, with subsequent dissolution and release of the isotope. This occurred most frequently in elderly subjects and was reduced by increasing the volume of water chaser. The sites of lodgment correspond to the location of the observed strictures in the patient population. An in vitro study showed that, when the causative drugs were mixed with saliva, dissolution occurred within 60 minutes and was associated with significant changes in pH. These investigations show that drug-induced esophageal strictures are more common than previously appreciated, and can be confused with a reflux etiology. Diagnosis is suggested by a history of drug ingestion, location of the stricture, and a normal esophageal acid exposure on 24-hour pH monitoring. The severity of the esophageal injury is variable and requires dilatation to resection for therapy. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:3606243

  13. Electron-induced wettability modification

    SciTech Connect

    Aronov, Daniel; Molotskii, Michel; Rosenman, Gil

    2007-07-15

    The pioneering works by Lippmann [Ann. Chim. Phys. 5, 494 (1875)] and Frumkin [Actual. Sci. Ind. 373, 5 (1936)] reported on electrowetting phenomenon. It was shown that electric potential, applied to an interface between a conducting liquid droplet and solid surface, strengthened the wetting effect. Here, we describe pronounced decrease of wettability induced by a low-energy electron irradiation. We observe this effect in many materials of different origins. The proposed theory of this phenomenon explains the found growth of the hydrophobicity under an electron irradiation by decreasing solid/liquid and solid/vapor interfacial free energies, when reduction of the latter is always higher. This theory considers the droplet shape dependence on the incident electron charge density and energy of the incident electrons, as well as on the liquid and solid origins. The results of calculations are in a good agreement with the experimental data obtained for water droplet on amorphous silicon dioxide. The effect of the decrease of the wettability, induced by an electron irradiation at low incident charge, is completely reversible after subjection of the electron-irradiated material to ultraviolet illumination, which restores its initial wettability state.

  14. Electron-induced wettability modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aronov, Daniel; Molotskii, Michel; Rosenman, Gil

    2007-07-01

    The pioneering works by Lippmann [Ann. Chim. Phys. 5, 494 (1875)] and Frumkin [Actual. Sci. Ind. 373, 5 (1936)] reported on electrowetting phenomenon. It was shown that electric potential, applied to an interface between a conducting liquid droplet and solid surface, strengthened the wetting effect. Here, we describe pronounced decrease of wettability induced by a low-energy electron irradiation. We observe this effect in many materials of different origins. The proposed theory of this phenomenon explains the found growth of the hydrophobicity under an electron irradiation by decreasing solid/liquid and solid/vapor interfacial free energies, when reduction of the latter is always higher. This theory considers the droplet shape dependence on the incident electron charge density and energy of the incident electrons, as well as on the liquid and solid origins. The results of calculations are in a good agreement with the experimental data obtained for water droplet on amorphous silicon dioxide. The effect of the decrease of the wettability, induced by an electron irradiation at low incident charge, is completely reversible after subjection of the electron-irradiated material to ultraviolet illumination, which restores its initial wettability state.

  15. Condensation induced water hammer safety

    SciTech Connect

    Gintner, M.A.

    1997-03-10

    Condensation induced water hammer events in piping systems can cause catastrophic steam system failures which can result in equipment damage, personal injury, and even death. As an industry, we have learned to become accustomed to the ''banging'' that we often hear in our steam piping systems, and complacent in our actions to prevent it. It is unfortunate that lives are lost needlessly, as this type of water hammer event is preventable if one only applies some basic principles when operating and maintaining their steam systems. At the U. S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site where I work, there was one such accident that occurred in 1993 which took the life of a former co-worker and friend of mine. Hanford was established as part of the Manhattan Project during World War II. it is a 560 square mile complex located along the banks of the Columbia River in Southeastern Washington State. For almost 45 years, hanford's mission was to produce weapons grade plutonium for our nations defense programs. Today, Hanford no longer produces plutonium, but is focused on site clean-up and economic diversification. Hanford still uses steam for heating and processing activities, utilizing over 20 miles of piping distribution systems similar to those found in industry. Although these aging systems are still sound, they cannot stand up to the extreme pressure pulses developed by a condensation induced water hammer.

  16. Ion-induced nuclear radiotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Horn, K.M.; Doyle, B.L.

    1996-08-20

    Ion-induced Nuclear Radiotherapy (INRT) is a technique for conducting radiosurgery and radiotherapy with a very high degree of control over the spatial extent of the irradiated volume and the delivered dose. Based upon the concept that low energy, ion induced atomic and nuclear reactions can be used to produce highly energetic reaction products at the site of a tumor, the INRT technique is implemented through the use of a conduit-needle or tube which conducts a low energy ion beam to a position above or within the intended treatment area. At the end of the conduit-needle or tube is a specially fabricated target which, only when struck by the ion beam, acts as a source of energetic radiation products. The inherent limitations in the energy, and therefore range, of the resulting reaction products limits the spatial extent of irradiation to a pre-defined volume about the point of reaction. Furthermore, since no damage is done to tissue outside this irradiated volume, the delivered dose may be made arbitrarily large. INRT may be used both as a point-source of radiation at the site of a small tumor, or as a topical bath of radiation to broad areas of diseased tissue. 25 figs.

  17. Hydroxycut-induced Liver Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Kaswala, Dh; Shah, S; Patel, N; Raisoni, S; Swaminathan, S

    2014-01-01

    In the recent era, use of various nutritional supplements is highly encouraged amongst the people of United States. Weight loss supplements are major part of the nutritional supplements and their usage is unregulated in the US. Obesity is a major health concern in the US and Americans spend around $30 billion a year for weight loss supplements. At times, these supplements can be responsible for documented or undocumented adverse drug effects. The health consequences related to these supplements are often overlooked by the general public, even though FDA issues advisories regarding them. One common supplement used for weight loss was Hydroxycut (Iovate Health Sciences Research, Oakville, Ontario, Canada). Hydroxycut was recalled from the market after a FDA warning in May 2009 because of 23 reports of serious health problems ranging from jaundice and elevated liver enzymes to liver damage. 1 This case report adds evidence for Hydroxycut - induced hepatotoxicity. A 27 year old man with right upper quadrant pain and jaundice was found to have elevated liver enzymes and was taking Hydroxycut along with other supplements. Liver biopsy showed drug induced hepatotoxicity. Discontinuation of Hydroxycut dramatically improved liver functions and related symptoms. PMID:24669349

  18. Shear-Induced Reactive Gelation.

    PubMed

    Brand, Bastian; Morbidelli, Massimo; Soos, Miroslav

    2015-11-24

    In this work, we describe a method for the production of porous polymer materials in the form of particles characterized by narrow pore size distribution using the principle of shear-induced reactive gelation. Poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) primary particles with diameter ranging from 80 to 200 nm are used as building blocks, which are assembled into fractal-like clusters when exposed to high shear rates generated in a microchannel. It was found that independent of the primary particle size, it is possible to modulate the internal structure of formed fractal-like aggregates having fractal dimension ranging from 2.4 to 2.7 by varying the residence time in the microchannel. Thermally induced postpolymerization was used to increase the mechanical resilience of such formed clusters. Primary particle interpenetration was observed by SEM and confirmed by light scattering resulting in an increase of fractal dimension. Nitrogen sorption measurements and mercury porosimetry confirmed formation of a porous material with surface area ranging from 20 to 40 m(2)/g characterized by porosity of 70% and narrow pore size distribution with an average diameter around 700 nm without the presence of any micropores. The strong perfusive character of the synthesized material was confirmed by the existence of a plateau of the height equivalent to a theoretical plate measured at high reduced velocities using a chromatographic column packed with the synthesized microclusters. PMID:26488233

  19. Radiation-induced cardiovascular effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapio, Soile

    Recent epidemiological studies indicate that exposure to ionising radiation enhances the risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in a moderate but significant manner. Our goal is to identify molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease using cellular and mouse models. Two radiation targets are studied in detail: the vascular endothelium that plays a pivotal role in the regulation of cardiac function, and the myocardium, in particular damage to the cardiac mitochondria. Ionising radiation causes immediate and persistent alterations in several biological pathways in the endothelium in a dose- and dose-rate dependent manner. High acute and cumulative doses result in rapid, non-transient remodelling of the endothelial cytoskeleton, as well as increased lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation of the heart tissue, independent of whether exposure is local or total body. Proteomic and functional changes are observed in lipid metabolism, glycolysis, mitochondrial function (respiration, ROS production etc.), oxidative stress, cellular adhesion, and cellular structure. The transcriptional regulators Akt and PPAR alpha seem to play a central role in the radiation-response of the endothelium and myocardium, respectively. We have recently started co-operation with GSI in Darmstadt to study the effect of heavy ions on the endothelium. Our research will facilitate the identification of biomarkers associated with adverse cardiac effects of ionising radiation and may lead to the development of countermeasures against radiation-induced cardiac damage.

  20. Sildenafil Induced Acute Interstitial Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Burkhart, Ryan; Shah, Nina; Lewin, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) is characterized by inflammation of the renal interstitium and usually occurs in a temporal relationship with the medication. We present a case of an Asian male who had nephrotic range proteinuria and presented with acute kidney injury. The patient reported an acute change in physical appearance and symptomatology after the ingestion of a single dose of sildenafil. Renal biopsy was notable for minimal change disease (MCD) with acute and chronic interstitial nephritis. Renal replacement and glucocorticoid therapy were initiated. Renal recovery within six weeks permitted discontinuation of dialysis. AIN superimposed on MCD is a known association of NSAID induced nephropathy. The temporal association and the absence of any new drugs suggest that the AIN was most likely due to the sildenafil. NSAIDs are less likely to have caused the AIN given their remote use. The ease of steroid responsiveness would also suggest another cause as NSAID induced AIN is often steroid resistant. The MCD was most likely idiopathic given the lack of temporal association with a secondary cause. As the number of sildenafil prescriptions increases, more cases of AIN may be identified and physician awareness for this potential drug disease association is necessary. PMID:26491581

  1. Antigen S1, encoded by the MIC1 gene, is characterized as an epitope of human CD59, enabling measurement of mutagen-induced intragenic deletions in the AL cell system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, A. B.; Seilly, D.; Willers, C.; Vannais, D. B.; McGraw, M.; Waldren, C. A.; Hei, T. K.; Davies, A.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    S1 cell membrane antigen is encoded by the MIC1 gene on human chromosome 11. This antigen has been widely used as a marker for studies in gene mapping or in analysis of mutagen-induced gene deletions/mutations, which utilized the human-hamster hybrid cell-line, AL-J1, carrying human chromosome 11. Evidence is presented here which identifies S1 as an epitope of CD59, a cell membrane complement inhibiting protein. E7.1 monoclonal antibody, specific for the S1 determinant, was found to react strongly with membrane CD59 in Western blotting, and to bind to purified, urinary form of CD59 in ELISAs. Cell membrane expression of S1 on various cell lines always correlated with that of CD59 when examined by immunofluorescent staining. In addition, E7.1 antibody inhibited the complement regulatory function of CD59. Identification of S1 protein as CD59 has increased the scope of the AL cell system by enabling analysis of intragenic mutations, and multiplex PCR analysis of mutated cells is described, showing variable loss of CD59 exons.

  2. Numerical calculation for cavitation flow of inducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, C.; Wang, Y.; Zhu, Z. T.; Xie, S. F.; Zhao, L. F.; Liu, Z. C.

    2015-01-01

    Inducer has significant effect on improving the cavitation characteristic of centrifugal pump. Several inducers were designed and modeled by Pro/E software. The mesh of flow field was done by ICEM and then was imported to ANSYS CFX to analyze the inducer's cavitation characteristic. Effects of the blade number on the performance of an inducer are investigated in the present paper. The inducers were designed on the basis of identical design flow rate and identical pressure elevation at nominal flow rate. The study focuses on the steady behavior of the inducers in cavitating conditions. Evolutions of performance, torque, mass flow rate, and amplitude of radial forces on the shaft according to the inlet pressure are considered. Furthermore, cavitation instabilities are analyzed in the study. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the pressure distribution and vapour volume fraction distribution through numerical simulations using the Navier-stokes solver with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code.

  3. The mechanism of PDT-induced apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xiongwei; Liu, Timon C.; Ding, Xin-Min; Gu, Ying; Liu, Fan-Guang; Liu, Song-Hao

    2003-12-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) can induce apoptosis in many cancer cells in vitro and in tumors in vivo. Cells become more oxidation with PDT, and maintain differentiation and proliferation, go apoptosis and necrosis with the increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentration. ROS can induce apoptosis through mitochondria by inhibiting respiration chain or oxidative phosphorylation or damaging mitochondrial membrane. ROS can initiate apoptosis through endoplamic reticulum(ER) by opening Ca2+ channel or starting unfold protein response (UPR). ROS can also induce apoptosis through Golgi by producing ganglioside GD3 by use of ceramide, which induces apoptosis by activating caspase-3, JNK and p38 MAPK. It can also induce apoptosis by activating Bip (mitochondria-dependant) or preocaspase-12 (mitochondria- independent) or inhibiting protein synthesizing. There are so complicated cross-talking among different signal pathways or organnells that we think PDT-induced apoptosis is mediated by multiplex pathways and excessive levels in a refined network.

  4. Local lesions and induced resistance.

    PubMed

    Loebenstein, G

    2009-01-01

    The local lesion phenomenon is one of the most notable resistance mechanisms where virus after multiplying in several hundred cells around the point of entry, does not continue to spread and remains in a local infection. Several types of local lesions are known, inter alia, necrotic, chlorotic, and starch lesions. Cells inside the lesion generally contain much less virus than cells in a systemic infection. Cytopathic changes accompany the local lesion development. Proteases that may have properties similar to caspases, which promote programmed cell death (PCD) in animals, seem to participate in PCD during the hypersensitive response. Salicylic acid seems to be associated with the HR and may play a role in localizing the virus. The functions and properties of the N gene of Nicotiana, which was the first plant virus resistance gene to be isolated by transposon tagging, are discussed and compared with other plant genes for disease resistance. The Inhibitor of Virus Replication (IVR) associated with the local lesion response is mainly a tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) protein. TPR motifs are also present in inducible interferons found in animal cells. Transformation of N. tabacum cv. Samsun nn, in which Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) spreads systemically, with the NC330 gene sequence, encoding an IVR-like protein, resulted in a number of transgenic plant lines, expressing variable resistance to TMV and the fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Transformation of tomato plants with the IVR gene became also partially resistant to B. cinerea (Loebenstein et al., in press). IVR-like compounds were found in the interspecific hybrid of N. glutinosa x N. debneyi that is highly resistant to TMV, and in the "green island" tissue of tobacco, cv. Xanthi-nc, infected with Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV). Infection in one part of the plant often induces resistance in other non-invaded tissues. Local (LAR) or systemic (SAR) acquired resistance can be activated by viruses, bacterial, and fungal pathogens or other natural and synthetic compounds. Accumulation of salicylic acid accompanies the induction of resistance. Possible mechanisms are outlined. Synthetic compounds, as for example, acibenzolar-S-methyl (ASM) were developed for use in a novel strategy for crop protection through abiotic induction of SAR. For example, ASM protected cantaloupes against a fungal pathogen and CMV. Additional attempts to protect crops by inducing SAR are outlined and it is hoped that future research and its application will find its use in plant protection. PMID:20109664

  5. An evaluation of a hubless inducer and a full flow hydraulic turbine driven inducer boost pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindley, B. K.; Martinson, A. R.

    1971-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the performance of several configurations of hubless inducers with a hydrodynamically similar conventional inducer and to demonstrate the performance of a full flow hydraulic turbine driven inducer boost pump using these inducers. A boost pump of this type consists of an inducer connected to a hydraulic turbine with a high speed rotor located in between. All the flow passes through the inducer, rotor, and hydraulic turbine, then into the main pump. The rotor, which is attached to the main pump shaft, provides the input power to drive the hydraulic turbine which, in turn, drives the inducer. The inducer, rotating at a lower speed, develops the necessary head to prevent rotor cavitation. The rotor speed is consistent with present main engine liquid hydrogen pump designs and the overall boost pump head rise is sufficient to provide adequate main pump suction head. This system would have the potential for operating at lower liquid hydrogen tank pressures.

  6. Nuclear dynamics induced by antiprotons

    E-print Network

    Zhao-Qing Feng

    2015-05-20

    Reaction dynamics in collisions of antiprotons on nuclei is investigated within the Lanzhou quantum molecular dynamics model. The reaction channels of elastic scattering, annihilation, charge exchange and inelastic collisions of antiprotons on nucleons have been included in the model. Dynamics on particle production, in particular pions, kaons, antikaons and hyperons, is investigated in collisions of $\\overline{p}$ on $^{12}$C, $^{20}$Ne, $^{40}$Ca and $^{181}$Ta from a low to high incident momenta. It is found that the annihilations of $\\overline{p}$ on nucleons are of importance on the dynamics of particle production in phase space. Hyperons are mainly produced via meson induced reactions on nucleons and strangeness exchange collisions, which lead to the delayed emission in antiproton-nucleus collisions.

  7. Magnetic field induced dynamical chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Somrita; Baura, Alendu; Bag, Bidhan Chandra

    2013-12-15

    In this article, we have studied the dynamics of a particle having charge in the presence of a magnetic field. The motion of the particle is confined in the x–y plane under a two dimensional nonlinear potential. We have shown that constant magnetic field induced dynamical chaos is possible even for a force which is derived from a simple potential. For a given strength of the magnetic field, initial position, and velocity of the particle, the dynamics may be regular, but it may become chaotic when the field is time dependent. Chaotic dynamics is very often if the field is time dependent. Origin of chaos has been explored using the Hamiltonian function of the dynamics in terms of action and angle variables. Applicability of the present study has been discussed with a few examples.

  8. Texture induced microwave background anisotropies

    SciTech Connect

    Borrill, Julian; Copeland, Edmund J.; Liddle, Andrew R.; Stebbins, Albert; Veeraraghavan, Shoba

    1994-03-01

    We use numerical simulations to calculate the cosmic microwave background anisotropy induced by the evolution of a global texture field, with special emphasis on individual textures. Both spherically symmetric and general configurations are analyzed, and in the latter case we consider field configurations which exhibit unwinding events and also ones which do not. We compare the results given by evolving the field numerically under both the expanded core (XCORE) and non-linear sigma model (NLSM) approximations with the analytic predictions of the NLSM exact solution for a spherically symmetric self-similar (SSSS) unwinding. We find that the random unwinding configuration spots' typical peak height is 60-75\\% and angular size typically only 10% of those of the SSSS unwinding, and that random configurations without an unwinding event nonetheless may generate indistinguishable hot and cold spots. A brief comparison is made with other work.

  9. Drug Induced Interstitial Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schwaiblmair, Martin; Behr, Werner; Haeckel, Thomas; Märkl, Bruno; Foerg, Wolfgang; Berghaus, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    With an increasing number of therapeutic drugs, the list of drugs that is responsible for severe pulmonary disease also grows. Many drugs have been associated with pulmonary complications of various types, including interstitial inflammation and fibrosis, bronchospasm, pulmonary edema, and pleural effusions. Drug-induced interstitial lung disease (DILD) can be caused by chemotherapeutic agents, antibiotics, antiarrhythmic drugs, and immunosuppressive agents. There are no distinct physiologic, radiographic or pathologic patterns of DILD, and the diagnosis is usually made when a patient with interstitial lung disease (ILD) is exposed to a medication known to result in lung disease. Other causes of ILD must be excluded. Treatment is avoidance of further exposure and systemic corticosteroids in patients with progressive or disabling disease. PMID:22896776

  10. Regeneration inducers in limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Akira; Mitogawa, Kazumasa; Makanae, Aki

    2015-08-01

    Limb regeneration ability, which can be observed in amphibians, has been investigated as a representative phenomenon of organ regeneration. Recently, an alternative experimental system called the accessory limb model was developed to investigate early regulation of amphibian limb regeneration. The accessory limb model contributed to identification of limb regeneration inducers in urodele amphibians. Furthermore, the accessory limb model may be applied to other species to explore universality of regeneration mechanisms. This review aims to connect the insights recently gained to emboss universality of regeneration mechanisms among species. The defined molecules (BMP7 (or2) + FGF2 + FGF8) can transform skin wound healing to organ (limb) regeneration responses. The same molecules can initiate regeneration responses in some species. PMID:26100345

  11. Electromagnetically induced angular Talbot effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Tianhui; Yang, Guojian

    2015-12-01

    The discrete angular spectrum (angular Talbot effect) of a periodic grating illuminated by a suitable spherical wave front has been observed recently (Azaña and Chatellus 2104 Phys. Rev. Lett. 112 213902). In this paper we study the possibility of such a phenomenon being realized with a medium that has no macroperiodic structure itself. Tunable electromagnetically induced grating (EIG) could be such a kind of medium. We obtain an EIG based on the periodically modulated strong susceptibility due to the third-order nonlinear effect generated in a double ?-type four-level atomic system, and show the angular Talbot effect of an amplitude EIG, as well as a hybrid EIG, as the condition of the discrete phase-modulation shift of the illumination light front is satisfied. EIG parameters are tunable and the EIG-based angular Talbot effect may have the same potential applications as its periodic grating counterpart has.

  12. Moduli-induced axion problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higaki, Tetsutaro; Nakayama, Kazunori; Takahashi, Fuminobu

    2013-07-01

    We point out that the cosmological moduli problem is not necessarily resolved even if the modulus mass is heavier than O(10) TeV, contrary to the common wisdom. The point is that, in many scenarios where the lightest moduli fields are stabilized by super symmetry breaking effects, those moduli fields tend to mainly decay into almost massless axions, whose abundance is tightly constrained by the recent Planck results. We study the moduli-induced axion problem in concrete examples, and discuss possible solutions. The problem and its solutions are widely applicable to decays of heavy scalar fields which dominate the energy density of the Universe, for instance, the reheating of the inflaton.

  13. Polymer translocation induced by adsorption

    E-print Network

    Pyeong Jun Park; Wokyung Sung

    1998-02-10

    We study the translocation of a flexible polymer through a pore in a membrane induced by its adsorption on \\trans side of the membrane. When temperature $T$ is higher than $T_c$, the adsorption-desorption transition temperature, attractive interaction between polymer and membrane plays little role in affecting polymer conformation, leading to translocation time that scales as $\\tau\\sim L^3$ where $L$ is the polymer contour length. When $T < T_c$, however, the translocation time undergoes a sharp crossover to $\\tau\\sim L^2$ for sufficiently long polymers, following the second order conformational (adsorption) transition. The translocation time is found to exhibit the crossover around $T=T_c'$, which is lower than $T_c$ for polymers shorter than a critical length($N

  14. [Management of pregnancy induced hypertension].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yoshikatsu; Matsuura, Ayano; Yamamoto, Tamao

    2015-11-01

    Pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH) is classified according to the severity of hypertension. The Japan Society of Hypertension made practice guidelines in 2014, and the Japan Society for the Study of Hypertension in Pregnancy made guidelines subsequently in 2015, too. Both guidelines state that the basic treatment for PIH is the interruption of pregnancy, and antihypertensive therapy should be given for protection in mother complicated by severe hypertension. The fetal heart rates should be monitored enough due to worsening fetal circulation. It recommends that methyldopa, hydralazine, labetalol, and long-acting nifedipine (only after 20 weeks of gestation) should be used as the first-choice antihypertensive oral drugs. Intravenous administration should be selected when a hypertensive emergency occurs. PMID:26619665

  15. Shock induced radiation from minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, D.; Svendsen, B.; Ahrens, T. J.

    1985-01-01

    Schmitt and Ahrens (1983) have concluded that the type of optical emission produced during shock compression was dependent upon phase changes taking place during shock compression. The present study is concerned with new observations of shock-induced optical radiation from Al2O3, MgO, NaCl, KCl, x-cut and fused SiO2, and LiF at various pressures up to 75 GPa. The experimental setup used in the study is similar to that employed by Schmitt and Ahrens. An Image Converter Camera with a three-frame plug-in unit was added to take two or three exposures of the radiation field during shock wave propagation through the sample, taking into account exposure times in the range from 50 to 500 nsec. The greybody emissions observed in LiF, which undergoes no phase transition, imply that localized heating and perhaps melting occurs in this material during shock deformation.

  16. Induced Pluripotency for Translational Research

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Menghua; Chen, Guilai; Hu, Baoyang

    2013-01-01

    The advent of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has revolutionized the concept of cellular reprogramming and potentially will solve the immunological compatibility issues that have so far hindered the application of human pluripotent stem cells in regenerative medicine. Recent findings showed that pluripotency is defined by a state of balanced lineage potency, which can be artificially instated through various procedures, including the conventional Yamanaka strategy. As a type of pluripotent stem cell, iPSCs are subject to the usual concerns over purity of differentiated derivatives and risks of tumor formation when used for cell-based therapy, though they provide certain advantages in translational research, especially in the areas of personalized medicine, disease modeling and drug screening. iPSC-based technology, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and direct lineage conversion each will play distinct roles in specific aspects of translational medicine, and continue yielding surprises for scientists and the public. PMID:24056061

  17. Radiocontrast-Induced Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Misson, Robert T.; Cutler, Ralph E.

    1985-01-01

    Review of the literature concerning contrast-induced renal dysfunction shows that the currently used agents are remarkably safe with careful patient selection. Clinically apparent kidney failure after their use is essentially nonexistent in those without preexistent renal insufficiency. The incidence rises rapidly in those with azotemia from any cause, however, and diabetic persons with nephropathy are perhaps at special risk. Vigorous volume expansion is possibly effective as a preventive measure and may attenuate adverse effects in those in whom postcontrast dysfunction occurs. New agents are becoming available. It is not yet known if these will prove safer or cost-effective. They have some experimentally demonstrated and theoretic advantages over the presently used agents. PMID:4013281

  18. Spatially dependent electromagnetically induced transparency.

    PubMed

    Radwell, N; Clark, T W; Piccirillo, B; Barnett, S M; Franke-Arnold, S

    2015-03-27

    Recent years have seen vast progress in the generation and detection of structured light, with potential applications in high capacity optical data storage and continuous variable quantum technologies. Here we measure the transmission of structured light through cold rubidium atoms and observe regions of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), using the phase profile as control parameter for the atomic opacity. With q plates we generate a probe beam with azimuthally varying phase and polarization structure, and its right and left circular polarization components provide the probe and control of an EIT transition. We observe an azimuthal modulation of the absorption profile that is dictated by the phase and polarization structure of the probe laser. Conventional EIT systems do not exhibit phase sensitivity. We show, however, that a weak transverse magnetic field closes the EIT transitions, thereby generating phase-dependent dark states which in turn lead to phase-dependent transparency, in agreement with our measurements. PMID:25860744

  19. Severe Hypothyroidism-Induced Volvulus.

    PubMed

    Khan, Rafay; Ahmed, Amar; Tulpule, Sunil; Regeti, Kalyani; Sen, Shuvendu; Mathew, Teena

    2015-12-01

    Thyroid disorders have been found to be associated with multiple organ systems and thus have a broad spectrum of presenting symptoms and clinical conditions. Certain aspects of the gastrointestinal (GI) system have yet to be fully understood and documented. Hypothyroidism and even hyperthyroidism have been identified in patients with motility symptoms involving the GI tract. These symptoms can vary and can be a complication of undertreated or undiagnosed condition involving the thyroid. Unfortunately, the mechanism in which these hormones can impact intestinal motility remains poorly understood and not well documented. In this case report, we discuss the presentation of a 71-year-old female with poorly managed hypothyroidism presenting with significant abdominal distention and pain secondary to underlying volvulus formation. By better understanding the complications induced by hypothyroidism, physicians may be able to prevent further life-threatening outcomes with early management and intervention. PMID:26566414

  20. Propylthiouracil-induced autoimmune disease

    PubMed Central

    Paiaulla, Santosh; Venkategowda, Pradeep Marur; Rao, S. Manimala; Balaraju, Banda

    2015-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism is a condition characterized by excessive production of thyroid hormones. Propylthiouracil (PTU) is commonly used as first line drug in the management of hyperthyroidism. This is a case report of 24-year-old female, a known case of hyperthyroidism since 4 years, who came with a history of fever and myalgia since 3 days and dyspnea with coughing out of blood since 1 day. Patient was taking PTU (100 mg per day) since 4 years for hyperthyroidism. Patient was immediately intubated for type-II respiratory failure. Diagnosed to be having PTU-induced autoimmune disease. PTU was stopped and treated with methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide. Clinical features improved over a period of 8 days and discharged home successfully. Having a high suspicion for the onset of autoimmune disease in hyperthyroidism patients who are on PTU therapy and timely treatment with immunosuppressants and supportive care along with the withdrawal of the drug can make a difference in morbidity and mortality. PMID:26321810