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Sample records for ear malformation cardiospondylocarpofacial

  1. Reconstruction of middle ear malformations

    PubMed Central

    Schwager, Konrad

    2008-01-01

    Malformations of the middle ear are classified as minor and major malformations. Minor malformations appear with regular external auditory canal, tympanic membrane and aerated middle ear space. The conducting hearing loss is due to fixation or interruption of the ossicular chain. The treatment is surgical, following the rules of ossiculoplasty and stapes surgery. In major malformations (congenital aural atresia) there is no external auditory canal and a deformed or missing pinna. The mastoid and the middle ear space may be underdevelopped, the ossicular chain is dysplastic. Surgical therapy is possible in patients with good aeration of the temporal bone, existing windows, a near normal positioned facial nerve and a mobile ossicular chain. Plastic and reconstructive surgery of the pinna should proceed the reconstruction of the external auditory canal and middle ear. In cases of good prognosis unilateral aural atresia can be approached already in childhood. In patients with high risk of surgical failure, bone anchored hearing aids are the treatment of choice. Recent reports of implantable hearing devices may be discussed as an alternative treatment for selected patients. PMID:22073077

  2. Classification and diagnosis of ear malformations

    PubMed Central

    Bartel-Friedrich, Sylva; Wulke, Cornelia

    2008-01-01

    In the ENT region 50% of the malformations affect the ear. Malformations of the outer and middle ear are predominantly unilateral (ca. 70-90%) and mostly involve the right ear. Inner ear malformations can be unilateral or bilateral. The incidence of ear malformations is approximately 1 in 3800 newborns. Ear malformations may be genetic (associated with syndromes or not, with family history, spontaneous mutations) or acquired in nature. Malformations can affect the outer ear (pinna and external auditory canal, EAC), middle ear and inner ear, not infrequently in combination. Formal classification is advisable in order to be able to predict the prognosis and compare treatment schedules. Various classifications have been proposed: pinna and EAC malformations according to Weerda [1], middle ear malformations according to Kösling [2], and inner ear malformations according to Jackler [3], [4], to Marangos [5] and to Sennaroglu [6]. Additionally, we describe Altmann’s classification of atresia auris congenita [7] and the Siegert-Mayer-Weerda score [8] for EAC and middle ear malformations, systems of great practicability that are in widespread clinical use. The diagnostic steps include clinical examination, audiological testing, genetic analysis and, especially, CT and MRI. These imaging methods are most usefully employed in combination. Precise description of the malformations by means of CT and MRI is indispensable for the planning and successful outcome of operative ear reconstruction and rehabilitation procedures, including cochlear implantation. PMID:22073081

  3. Surgical and Technical Modalities for Hearing Restoration in Ear Malformations.

    PubMed

    Dazert, Stefan; Thomas, Jan Peter; Volkenstein, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    Malformations of the external and middle ear often go along with an aesthetic and functional handicap. Independent of additional aesthetic procedures, a successful functional hearing restoration leads to a tremendous gain in quality of life for affected patients. The introduction of implantable hearing systems (bone conduction and middle ear devices) offers new therapeutic options in this field. We focus on functional rehabilitation of patients with malformations, either by surgical reconstruction or the use of different implantable hearing devices, depending on the disease itself and the severity of malformation as well as hearing impairment. Patients with an open ear canal and minor malformations are good candidates for surgical hearing restoration of middle ear structures with passive titanium or autologous implants. In cases with complete fibrous or bony atresia of the ear canal, the most promising functional outcome and gain in quality of life can be expected with an active middle ear implant or a bone conduction device combined with a surgical aesthetic rehabilitation in a single or multi-step procedure. Although the surgical procedure for bone conduction devices is straightforward and safe, more sophisticated operations for active middle ear implants (e.g., Vibrant Soundbridge, MED-EL, Innsbruck, Austria) provide an improved speech discrimination in noise and the ability of sound localization compared with bone conduction devices where the stimulation reaches both cochleae. PMID:26667632

  4. Middle ear malformations in identical twins.

    PubMed

    Kidowaki, Naoko; Kamitani, Toru; Nakamura, Takashi; Taki, Masakatsu; Sakaguchi, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Toshihiro; Hisa, Yasuo

    2014-06-01

    The majority of the congenital anomalies of middle ear are solitary and a non-hereditary. We report cases of identical twins with congenital incudo-stapedial disconnection. Case 1 was an 8-year-old girl. Hearing impairment was identified at the age of three. She was referred to our university hospital in April 2005. Pure-tone audiogram showed conductive hearing impairments. Computed tomography (CT) revealed the incudo-stapedial disconnections in both ears. The exploratory tympanotomies on the right and left ears were performed in May and July 2005, respectively. The surgical findings showed absence of the long process and presence of the lenticular process of the incus in both ears. After the reconstructions of ossicular chain, the hearing of both ears improved. Case 2 was an 11-year-old girl. The hearing impairment of the right ear was identified in May 2008. She was referred to our university hospital three months later. Pure-tone audiogram showed the conductive hearing impairment in the right ear. CT revealed the incudo-stapedial disconnection in the right ear. The surgery showed the same findings as those of case 1. Anomalies of both cases suggest that the lenticular process of the incus and the stapes originate from a common primordium. PMID:24355584

  5. Ear malformation and hearing loss in patients with Treacher Collins syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pron, G; Galloway, C; Armstrong, D; Posnick, J

    1993-01-01

    Although the hearing loss of patients with Treacher Collins syndrome is well documented, few studies have reported jointly on their hearing loss and ear pathology. This paper reports on the hearing loss and computerized tomography (CT) assessments of ear malformations in a large pediatric series of patients with Treacher Collins. Of the 29 subjects assessed by the Craniofacial Program between 1986 and 1990, paired audiologic and complete CT assessments were available for 23 subjects. The external ear canal abnormalities were largely symmetric, either bilaterally stenotic or atretic. In most cases, the middle ear cavity was bilaterally hypoplastic and dysmorphic, and ossicles were symmetrically dysmorphic or missing. Inner ear structures were normal in all patients. The majority of patients had a unilateral or bilateral moderate or greater degree of hearing loss and almost half had an asymmetric hearing loss. The hearing loss of all subjects was conductive, except for three whose loss was bilateral mixed. Two types of bilaterally symmetric hearing loss configurations, flat and reverse sloping, were noted. Conductive hearing loss in patients with Treacher Collins is mainly attributable to their middle ear malformations, which are similar for those of patients with malformed or missing ossicles. PMID:8418881

  6. Cochlear implantation in patients with inner ear bone malformations with posterior labyrinth involvement: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Palomeque Vera, Juan Miguel; Platero Sánchez-Escribano, María; Gómez Hervás, Javier; Fernández Prada, María; González Ramírez, Amanda Rocío; Sainz Quevedo, Manuel

    2016-04-01

    Inner ear bone malformations are one cause of profound sensorineural hearing loss. This investigation focused on those affecting the posterior labyrinth, especially enlarged vestibular aqueduct syndrome, which is associated with fluctuating and progressive hearing loss. The objectives of this study were to analyze the behavior of the electrical stimulation, auditory functionality and linguistic development in patients with inner ear malformations involving the posterior labyrinth. The study included ten patients undergoing cochlear implantation (cases: five with enlarged vestibular aqueduct, two with vestibular aqueduct stenosis/aplasia, and three with semicircular canal disorders). Post-implantation, data were gathered on the electrical stimulation threshold and maximum comfort levels and on the number of functioning electrodes. Evaluation of Auditory Responses to Speech (EARS) subtests were used to assess auditory functionality and language acquisition at 6, 12, and 24 months post-implantation. Results were compared with findings in a control group of 28 cochlear implantation patients without these malformations. No significant differences were found between case and control groups in electrical stimulation parameters; auditory functionality subtest scores were lower in cases than controls, although the difference was only statistically significant for some subtests. In conclusion, cochlear implantation patients with posterior labyrinth bone malformations and profound hearing loss, including those with enlarged vestibular aqueduct syndrome, showed no significant difference in electrical stimulation threshold with controls. Although some auditory functionality test results were lower in cases than in controls, cochlear implantation appears to be beneficial for all patients with these malformations. PMID:25971996

  7. Vibrant Soundbridge and Bone Conduction Hearing Aid in Patients with Bilateral Malformation of External Ear.

    PubMed

    Mondelli, Maria Fernanda Capoani Garcia; Mariano, Thais Cristina Barbosa; Honrio, Heitor Marques; Brito, Rubens Vuono de

    2016-01-01

    Introduction?Hearing loss is the most common clinical finding in patients with malformation of the external ear canal. Among the possibilities of treatment, there is the adaptation of hearing aids by bone conduction and the adaptation of implantable hearing aids. Objective?To assess speech perception with the use of Vibrant Soundbridge (VBS - MED-EL, Innsbruck, Austria) associated with additional amplification in patients with bilateral craniofacial malformation. Method?We evaluated 11 patients with bilateral malformation over 12 years with mixed hearing loss or bilateral conductive. They were using the Softband (Oticon Medical, Sweden) and bone conduction hearing aid in the ear opposite the one with the VSB. We performed the evaluation of speech perception using the Hearing in Noise Test. Results?Participants were eight men and three women with a mean of 19.5 years. The signal / noise ratio presented significant results in patients fitted with VSB and bone conduction hearing aid. Conclusion?The results of speech perception were significantly better with use of VBS combined with bone conduction hearing aids. PMID:26722343

  8. Vibrant Soundbridge and Bone Conduction Hearing Aid in Patients with Bilateral Malformation of External Ear

    PubMed Central

    Mondelli, Maria Fernanda Capoani Garcia; Mariano, Thais Cristina Barbosa; Honório, Heitor Marques; Brito, Rubens Vuono de

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hearing loss is the most common clinical finding in patients with malformation of the external ear canal. Among the possibilities of treatment, there is the adaptation of hearing aids by bone conduction and the adaptation of implantable hearing aids. Objective To assess speech perception with the use of Vibrant Soundbridge (VBS - MED-EL, Innsbruck, Austria) associated with additional amplification in patients with bilateral craniofacial malformation. Method We evaluated 11 patients with bilateral malformation over 12 years with mixed hearing loss or bilateral conductive. They were using the Softband (Oticon Medical, Sweden) and bone conduction hearing aid in the ear opposite the one with the VSB. We performed the evaluation of speech perception using the Hearing in Noise Test. Results Participants were eight men and three women with a mean of 19.5 years. The signal / noise ratio presented significant results in patients fitted with VSB and bone conduction hearing aid. Conclusion The results of speech perception were significantly better with use of VBS combined with bone conduction hearing aids. PMID:26722343

  9. FGF23 Deficiency Leads to Mixed Hearing Loss and Middle Ear Malformation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lysaght, Andrew C.; Yuan, Quan; Fan, Yi; Kalwani, Neil; Caruso, Paul; Cunnane, MaryBeth; Lanske, Beate; Stanković, Konstantina M.

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is a circulating hormone important in phosphate homeostasis. Abnormal serum levels of FGF23 result in systemic pathologies in humans and mice, including renal phosphate wasting diseases and hyperphosphatemia. We sought to uncover the role FGF23 plays in the auditory system due to shared molecular mechanisms and genetic pathways between ear and kidney development, the critical roles multiple FGFs play in auditory development and the known hearing phenotype in mice deficient in klotho (KL), a critical co-factor for FGF23 signaling. Using functional assessments of hearing, we demonstrate that Fgf mice are profoundly deaf. Fgf mice have moderate hearing loss above 20 kHz, consistent with mixed conductive and sensorineural pathology of both middle and inner ear origin. Histology and high-voltage X-ray computed tomography of Fgf mice demonstrate dysplastic bulla and ossicles; Fgf mice have near-normal morphology. The cochleae of mutant mice appear nearly normal on gross and microscopic inspection. In wild type mice, FGF23 is ubiquitously expressed throughout the cochlea. Measurements from Fgf mice do not match the auditory phenotype of Kl−/− mice, suggesting that loss of FGF23 activity impacts the auditory system via mechanisms at least partially independent of KL. Given the extensive middle ear malformations and the overlap of initiation of FGF23 activity and Eustachian tube development, this work suggests a possible role for FGF23 in otitis media. PMID:25243481

  10. Histopathology of inner ear malformations: Do we have enough evidence to explain pathophysiology?

    PubMed

    Sennaroglu, Levent

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the histopathology of inner ear malformations (IEMs) in order to explain their pathophysiology. Method Light microscopy was used to study 33 specimens exhibiting various IEMs in the collection of the Otopathology Laboratory at Harvard University's Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary. Results The investigation found 18 incidences of cochlear hypoplasia (CH) (3 CH-I, 10 CH-II, 5 CH-III), 11 incomplete partitions (IPs) (5 IP-I, 6 IP-II), 2 vestibular dilatations, and 2 cases of cochlear nerve aplasia. The IP-I cases had characteristic defective endosteums, while the IP-II cases showed hydropic changes in the scala vestibuli. The CH cases were small in size externally, with normal or defective internal architecture. Conclusion In combination with embryological data, these findings suggest that cases of CH-III and CH-IV are most probably genetically predetermined to be small in size, and that development of the membranous labyrinth stops at a point earlier than normal, so that it is shorter. At the time of complete ossification, this results in a cochlea with small external dimensions and normal internal architecture. In CH-I and CH-II cases, there is arrested development of the internal architecture, in addition to a small cochlea; it is most likely that in these cases, there is a severely defective vascular supply from the internal auditory canal (IAC). IP-I may be the result of a defective vascular supply from the blood vessels of the IAC. In IP-II, an enlarged endolymphatic sac (EES) appears to be the genetic abnormality that causes the other abnormalities, as it allows high pressure to be transmitted into the cochlea and vestibule. In IP-III, the pathophysiology appears to be an abnormal vascular supply from the middle ear mucosa, caused by a genetic abnormality and resulting in a thinner otic capsule and the absence of the modiolus. PMID:26158591

  11. [Novel possibilities for the rehabilitation of patients presenting with congenital external and middle ear malformations].

    PubMed

    Mileshina, N A; Osipenkov, S S; Bakhshinian, V V; Tavartkiladze, G A

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to estimate the advantages of cochlear Baha BIA 400 abutments in the intraoperative and early postoperative periods. A total of 10 implantations of the systems with the use of hydroxyapatite bone cement were performed in 9 patients of different age. Stability of the implants and intensity of skin reactions were evaluated. The data obtained indicate that the use of cochlear Baha BIA 400 abutments significantly simplifies and shortens the surgical stage of rehabilitation producing a good cosmetic result. The use of the Osstell instrument made it possible to estimate stability of the implants intraoperatively and evaluate the effectiveness of osteointegration during the follow-up period. Analysis of the results of the study provided a basis on which to improve the quality and shorten duration of the rehabilitative treatment of the patients presenting with congenital external and middle ear malformations. Moreover, the data obtained can be used to develop practical recommendations for the further work in this area. PMID:24781169

  12. Optical and tomographic imaging of a middle ear malformation in the bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, Seth S.; Simmons, Andrea Megela; Ketten, Darlene R.

    2005-08-01

    Using a combination of in vivo computerized tomography and histological staining, a middle ear anomaly in two wild-caught American bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana) is characterized. In these animals, the tympanic membrane, extrastapes, and pars media (shaft) of the stapes are absent on one side of the head, with the other side exhibiting normal morphology. The pars interna (footplate) of the stapes and the operculum are present in their normal positions at the entrance of the otic capsule on both the affected and unaffected sides. The pattern of deformity suggests a partial failure of development of tympanic pathway tissues, but with a preservation of the opercularis pathway. While a definitive proximate cause of the condition could not be determined, the anomalies show similarities to developmental defects in mammalian middle ear formation.

  13. Fusion of the ear bones

    MedlinePLUS

    Fusion of the ear bones is the joining of the bones of the inner ear. These are the incus, malleus, and stapes bones. Related topics include: Chronic ear infection Otosclerosis Middle ear malformations

  14. Deletion of a conserved regulatory element required for Hmx1 expression in craniofacial mesenchyme in the dumbo rat: a newly identified cause of congenital ear malformation

    PubMed Central

    Quina, Lely A.; Kuramoto, Takashi; Luquetti, Daniela V.; Cox, Timothy C.; Serikawa, Tadao; Turner, Eric E.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Hmx1 is a homeodomain transcription factor expressed in the developing eye, peripheral ganglia, and branchial arches of avian and mammalian embryos. Recent studies have identified a loss-of-function allele at the HMX1 locus as the causative mutation in the oculo-auricular syndrome (OAS) in humans, characterized by ear and eye malformations. The mouse dumbo (dmbo) mutation, with similar effects on ear and eye development, also results from a loss-of-function mutation in the Hmx1 gene. A recessive dmbo mutation causing ear malformation in rats has been mapped to the chromosomal region containing the Hmx1 gene, but the nature of the causative allele is unknown. Here we show that dumbo rats and mice exhibit similar neonatal ear and eye phenotypes. In midgestation embryos, dumbo rats show a specific loss of Hmx1 expression in neural-crest-derived craniofacial mesenchyme (CM), whereas Hmx1 is expressed normally in retinal progenitors, sensory ganglia and in CM, which is derived from mesoderm. High-throughput resequencing of 1 Mb of rat chromosome 14 from dmbo/dmbo rats, encompassing the Hmx1 locus, reveals numerous divergences from the rat genomic reference sequence, but no coding changes in Hmx1. Fine genetic mapping narrows the dmbo critical region to an interval of ?410 kb immediately downstream of the Hmx1 transcription unit. Further sequence analysis of this region reveals a 5777-bp deletion located ?80 kb downstream in dmbo/dmbo rats that is not apparent in 137 other rat strains. The dmbo deletion region contains a highly conserved domain of ?500 bp, which is a candidate distal enhancer and which exhibits a similar relationship to Hmx genes in all vertebrate species for which data are available. We conclude that the rat dumbo phenotype is likely to result from loss of function of an ultraconserved enhancer specifically regulating Hmx1 expression in neural-crest-derived CM. Dysregulation of Hmx1 expression is thus a candidate mechanism for congenital ear malformation, most cases of which remain unexplained. PMID:22736458

  15. Pinna abnormalities and low-set ears

    MedlinePLUS

    Low-set ears; Microtia; "Lop" ear ... conditions: Abnormal folds or location of the pinna Low-set ears No opening to the ear canal ... Common conditions that can cause low-set and unusually formed ears ... conditions that can cause low-set and malformed ears include: ...

  16. Pierced Ears

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Skiing, Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? Pierced Ears KidsHealth > For Kids > Pierced Ears Print A A ... cool, but infected ears do not! Getting Your Ears Pierced It's important to get your ears pierced ...

  17. Ear Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    MENU Return to Web version Ear Infections Overview How does the ear work? The ear works by receiving sound waves and sending messages to the brain. The outer ear includes the part of the ear you can ...

  18. Ear Tubes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Meeting Calendar Find an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Tubes Ear Tubes Patient Health Information News media ... and throat specialist) may be considered. What are ear tubes? Ear tubes are tiny cylinders placed through ...

  19. Ear emergencies

    MedlinePLUS

    Ear emergencies include objects in the ear canal and ruptured eardrums. ... Children often put objects into their ears. These objects can be hard to remove. The ear canal is a tube of solid bone that is lined with thin, sensitive ...

  20. Swimmer's Ear

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Skiing, Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? Swimmer's Ear KidsHealth > For Kids > Swimmer's Ear Print A A ... How Do I Know if I Have Swimmer's Ear? Swimmer's ear may start with some itching, but ...

  1. Pierced Ears

    MedlinePLUS

    ... System How the Body Works Main Page Pierced Ears KidsHealth > Kids > Puberty & Growing Up > Girl Stuff > Pierced ... cool, but infected ears do not! Getting Your Ears Pierced It's important to get your ears pierced ...

  2. Chiari Malformation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Conditions - Chiari Malformation Chiari Malformation (kee-AR-ee) Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here . You also ...

  3. Amphibian malformations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    National Wildlife Health Center

    1998-01-01

    Frog malformations have been reported from 42 states. The broad geographic distribution of these malformations warrants national attention. Scientists at the USGS National Wildlife Health Center in Madison, Wisconsin are studying this problem in an effort to document its scope and to determine the causes of the observed malformations.

  4. Ear examination

    MedlinePLUS

    An ear exam is performed when a health care provider looks inside your ear using an instrument called an otoscope. ... the head tilted toward the shoulder opposite the ear being examined. The provider will gently pull up, ...

  5. Cauliflower Ear

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? What's Cauliflower Ear? KidsHealth > For Kids > What's Cauliflower Ear? Print A A A Text Size Have you ever seen someone whose ear looks bumpy and lumpy? The person might have ...

  6. Ear Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... middle ear and is called otitis media. The tubes inside the ears become clogged with fluid and ... infections often may need surgery to place small tubes inside their ears. The tubes relieve pressure in ...

  7. Ear Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ear, where they make your eardrum vibrate. The vibrations are transmitted through three tiny bones, called ossicles, in your middle ear. The vibrations travel to your inner ear, a snail-shaped ...

  8. Ear Pieces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiJulio, Betsy

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes an art project wherein students make fanciful connections between art and medicine. This project challenges students to interpret "ear idioms" (e.g. "blow it out your ear," "in one ear and out the other") by relying almost entirely on realistic ear drawings, the placement of them, marks, and values. In that…

  9. Ear Pieces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiJulio, Betsy

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes an art project wherein students make fanciful connections between art and medicine. This project challenges students to interpret "ear idioms" (e.g. "blow it out your ear," "in one ear and out the other") by relying almost entirely on realistic ear drawings, the placement of them, marks, and values. In that

  10. Chiari Malformation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NINDS Funding Information Research Programs Training & Career Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Chiari Malformation ... Funding | News From NINDS | Find People | Training | Research | Enhancing Diversity Careers@NINDS | FOIA | Accessibility Policy | Contact Us | ...

  11. Arteriovenous Malformation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... malformations. Other NINDS-funded investigators hope to develop biomarkers (signs that may indicate risk of a disease) ... Worldwide NINDS Clinical Trials Organizations Column1 Column2 Brain Aneurysm Foundation 269 Hanover Street, Building 3 Hanover, MA ...

  12. Brain Malformations

    MedlinePLUS

    Most brain malformations begin long before a baby is born. Something damages the developing nervous system or causes it ... medicines, infections, or radiation during pregnancy interferes with brain development. Parts of the brain may be missing, ...

  13. Chiari Malformation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... these tests: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) , which uses magnets, radio waves, and computer technology to produce pictures ... ultrasound images before birth. Back Continue Treatment Most kids with Chiari malformations who don't have symptoms ...

  14. Your Ears

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Protect your hearing by wearing earplugs at loud music concerts and around noisy machinery, like in wood ... For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Can Loud Music Hurt My Ears? What Is an Ear Infection? ...

  15. Ear Injury

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Drugs Ear, Nose, and Throat Disorders Eye Disorders Fundamentals Heart and Blood Vessel Disorders Hormonal and Metabolic ... Drugs Ear, Nose, and Throat Disorders Eye Disorders Fundamentals Heart and Blood Vessel Disorders Hormonal and Metabolic ...

  16. Ear Injury

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Video) Rotator Cuff Injury Additional Content Medical News Ear Injury By Sam P. Most, MD NOTE: This ... Professional Version Facial Injuries Introduction to Facial Injuries Ear Injury Fractures of the Nose Fractures of the ...

  17. Elephant ear

    MedlinePLUS

    Elephant ear plants are indoor or outdoor plants with very large, arrow-shaped leaves. Poisoning may occur if you ... Elephant ear grows naturally in tropical and subtropical areas, but is easily found in northern climates as well.

  18. Ear barotrauma

    MedlinePLUS

    Barotitis media; Barotrauma; Ear popping; Pressure-related ear pain; Eustachian tube dysfunction ... The air pressure in the middle ear is most often the same as the air pressure outside of the body. The Eustachian tube is a connection between the middle ...

  19. The ear: Diagnostic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Vignaud, J.; Jardin, C.; Rosen, L.

    1986-01-01

    This is an English translation of volume 17-1 of Traite de radiodiagnostic and represents a reasonably complete documentation of the diseases of the temporal bone that have imaging manifestations. The book begins with chapters on embryology, anatomy and radiography anatomy; it continues with blood supply and an overview of temporal bone pathology. Subsequent chapters cover malformations, trauma, infections, tumors, postoperative changes, glomus tumors, vertebasilar insufficiency, and facial nerve canal lesions. A final chapter demonstrates and discusses magnetic resonance images of the ear and cerebellopontine angle.

  20. Chiari Malformation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of the back of the head or the neck and contains brain matter. The covering of the brain or spinal ... fusion of segments of the bones in the neck, and extra folds in the brain. How common are Chiari malformations? In the past, ...

  1. Congenital Auricular Malformations: Description of Anomalies and Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Bartel-Friedrich, Sylva

    2015-12-01

    Half of the malformations in the ear, nose, and throat region affect the ear. Malformations of the external ear (pinna or auricle with external auditory canal [EAC]) are collectively termed microtia. Microtia is a congenital anomaly that ranges in severity from mild structural abnormalities to complete absence of the external ear (anotia). Microtia occurs more frequently in males (?2 or 3:1), is predominantly unilateral (?70-90%), and more often involves the right ear (?60%). The reported prevalence varies geographically from 0.83 to 17.4 per 10,000 births. Microtia may be genetic (with family history, spontaneous mutations) or acquired. Malformations of the external ear can also involve the middle ear and/or inner ear. Microtia may be an isolated birth defect, but associated anomalies or syndromes are described in 20 to 60% of cases, depending on study design. These generally fit within the oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum; defects are located most frequently in the facial skeleton, facial soft tissues, heart, and vertebral column, or comprise a syndrome (e.g., Treacher Collins syndrome). Diagnostic investigation of microtia includes clinical examination, audiologic testing, genetic analysis and, especially in higher grade malformations with EAC deformities, computed tomography (CT) or cone-beam CT for the planning of surgery and rehabilitation procedures, including implantation of hearing aids. PMID:26667631

  2. Dysmorphism of the middle ear: case report

    PubMed Central

    Solero, P; Ferrara, M; Musto, R; Pira, A; Di Lisi, D

    2005-01-01

    Summary Although there are numerous publications in the literature describing the wide range of diagnosis, classifications and treatment of malformations of the hearing apparatus, even more variations can be found in clinical practice. Indeed, each individual case is unique as far as concerns pathogenesis, clinical course and treatment. The case reported herein describes a 12-year-old boy affected by cranio-facial dysmorphism and monolateral conductive hearing loss in the right ear: followed from radiological diagnosis carried out to study a malformation of the ear pinna to surgical treatment. PMID:16602328

  3. Ear Infections in Children

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Home » Health Info » Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness Ear Infections in Children On this page: What is ... additional information about ear infections? What is an ear infection? An ear infection is an inflammation of ...

  4. Swimmer's ear

    MedlinePLUS

    ... or a respiratory infection such as a cold. Swimming in unclean water can lead to swimmer's ear. ... very well after it has gotten wet. Avoid swimming in polluted water. Use earplugs when swimming. Try ...

  5. Ear wax

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is one of the most common causes of hearing loss. ... is plugged Noises in the ear (tinnitus) Partial hearing loss, may get worse ... become blocked with wax again in the future. Hearing loss is often temporary. In most cases, hearing returns ...

  6. Ear Plastic Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Meeting Calendar Find an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Plastic Surgery Ear Plastic Surgery Patient Health Information ... they may improve appearance and self-confidence. Can Ear Deformities Be Corrected? Formation of the ear during ...

  7. Better Ear Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Calendar Find an ENT Doctor Near You Better Ear Health Better Ear Health Patient Health Information News ... often helpful to those with this condition. Swimmer’s Ear An infection of the outer ear structures caused ...

  8. How the Ear Works

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Find an ENT Doctor Near You How the Ear Works How the Ear Works Patient Health Information News media interested in ... public relations staff at newsroom@entnet.org . The ear has three main parts: the outer ear (including ...

  9. Ear Infection and Vaccines

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Meeting Calendar Find an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Infection and Vaccines Ear Infection and Vaccines Patient Health Information News media ... who suffer from the most common type of ear infection, called middle ear infection or otitis media ( ...

  10. Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Find an ENT Doctor Near You Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease Patient Health Information ... with a hearing loss. How Does the Healthy Ear Work? The ear has three main parts: the ...

  11. Caring for Pierced Ears

    MedlinePLUS

    ... care Caring for pierced ears Caring for pierced ears Although ear piercings are more common and can be less ... handled safely. For anyone thinking about getting their ears pierced, dermatologists urge people to follow these steps ...

  12. Swimmer's Ear (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Emergency Cerebral Palsy: Caring for Your Child Swimmer's Ear (Otitis Externa) KidsHealth > For Parents > Swimmer's Ear (Otitis ... espaol Otitis del nadador (otitis externa) About Swimmer's Ear Otitis externa commonly known as swimmer's ear is ...

  13. Caring for Pierced Ears

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Video library Find a dermatologist Caring for pierced ears Although ear piercings are more common and can be less ... handled safely. For anyone thinking about getting their ears pierced, dermatologists urge people to follow these steps ...

  14. Ears and Altitude

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Meeting Calendar Find an ENT Doctor Near You Ears and Altitude Ears and Altitude Patient Health Information ... uncomfortable feeling of fullness or pressure. Why do ears pop? Normally, swallowing causes a little click or ...

  15. Ear infection - chronic

    MedlinePLUS

    Middle ear infection - chronic; Otitis media - chronic; Chronic otitis media; Chronic ear infection ... blocked, fluid can build up. When this happens, infection can occur. A chronic ear infection develops when ...

  16. "Swimmer's Ear" (Otitis Externa) Prevention

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Healthy Swimming Healthy Water Home Share Compartir "Swimmer’s Ear" (Otitis Externa) Prevention Swimmer's ear (also known as ... Health with CDC: Keep Your Ears Dry Swimmer’s Ear Prevention Tips DO keep your ears as dry ...

  17. Swimmer's Ear (External Otitis)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Swimmer's Ear (External Otitis) KidsHealth > For Teens > Swimmer's Ear (External Otitis) Print A A A Text Size ... Ryan woke with a sharp pain in his ear — it really hurt! He remembered having ear infections ...

  18. Swimmer's Ear (External Otitis)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Swimmer's Ear (External Otitis) KidsHealth > For Teens > Swimmer's Ear (External Otitis) Print A A A Text Size ... Ryan woke with a sharp pain in his ear it really hurt! He remembered having ear infections ...

  19. Prenatal Ultrasound Screening for External Ear Abnormality in the Fetuses

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jun; Ran, Suzhen; Yang, Zhengchun; Lin, Yun; Tang, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate the best time of examination and section chosen of routine prenatal ultrasound screening for external ear abnormalities and evaluate the feasibility of examining the fetal external ear with ultrasonography. Methods. From July 2010 until August 2011, 42118 pregnant women with single fetus during 16–40 weeks of pregnancy were enrolled in the study. Fetal auricles and external auditory canal in the second trimester of pregnancy were evaluated by routine color Doppler ultrasound screening and systematic screening. Ultrasound images of fetal external ears were obtained on transverse-incline view at cervical vertebra level and mandible level and on parasagittal view and coronal view at external ear level. Results. Five fetuses had anomalous ears including bilateral malformed auricles with malformed external auditory canal, unilateral deformed external ear, and unilateral microtia. The detection rate of both auricles was negatively correlated with gestational age. Of the 5843 fetuses undergoing a routine ultrasound screening, 5797 (99.21%) had bilateral auricles. Of the 4955 fetuses following systematic screening, all fetuses (100%) had bilateral auricles. The best time for fetal auricles observation with ultrasonography is 20–24 weeks of pregnancy. Conclusions. Detection of external ear abnormalities may assist in the diagnosis of chromosomal abnormalities. PMID:25050343

  20. Pediatric neuroanesthesia. Arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Newfield, P; Hamid, R K

    2001-06-01

    Intracranial arteriovenous malformations can occur singly, multiply, and in conjunction with aneurysms and denovo, family, or in conjunction with connective-tissue disorders. Intracranial hemorrhage is the most common presentation, occurring in 20% to 50% of cases. In children, seizures are the second most common presentation occurring in 15% to 20% of cases. The modalities available treatment of arteriovenous malformations are microsurgery, embolization, and stereotactic radiosurgery with heavy particles, alpha knife, or linear accelerator. Induction, maintenance, and emergence from anesthesia are designed to prevent rupture of arteriovenous malformation and aneurysm and to improve intracranial compliance in the presence of an intracranial hematoma, during both diagnostic (CT, MR scanning) and therapeutic procedures. PMID:11469062

  1. Ear drainage culture

    MedlinePLUS

    ... needed. Your health care provider will use a cotton swab to collect the sample from inside the ... Using a cotton swab to take a sample of drainage from the outer ear is not painful. However, ear pain may ...

  2. Middle ear infection (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    A middle ear infection is also known as otitis media. It is one of the most common of childhood infections. With this illness, the middle ear becomes red, swollen, and inflamed because of bacteria ...

  3. Middle Ear Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Middle Ear Infections Page Content Article Body What are the ... illness. What if a child with a middle ear infection is in great pain and discomfort? The ...

  4. Travel Inside the Ear

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Deafness Travel Inside the Ear Video When sound waves reach your ear, you know you've heard ... the sound through the hair cells to your brain. Last Updated Date: July 30, 2014 Languages Español ...

  5. Middle Ear Infections (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for Your Child All About Food Allergies Middle Ear Infections KidsHealth > For Parents > Middle Ear Infections Print ... 3 years old. A Close Look at the Ear To understand how ear infections develop, let's review ...

  6. Flying and Your Child's Ears

    MedlinePLUS

    ... All About Food Allergies Flying and Your Child's Ears KidsHealth > For Parents > Flying and Your Child's Ears ... a) cuando vuele en avión Flying's Effects on Ears Many of us have felt that weird ear- ...

  7. What Is an Ear Infection?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... System How the Body Works Main Page What Is an Ear Infection? KidsHealth > Kids > Illnesses & Injuries > I ... can cause ear pain and a fever . What Is a Middle Ear Infection? Middle ear infections are ...

  8. What Is an Ear Infection?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Skiing, Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? What Is an Ear Infection? KidsHealth > For Kids > What Is ... can cause ear pain and a fever . What Is a Middle Ear Infection? Middle ear infections are ...

  9. Flying and Your Child's Ears

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Caring for Your Child Flying and Your Child's Ears KidsHealth > For Parents > Flying and Your Child's Ears ... a) cuando vuele en avin Flying's Effects on Ears Many of us have felt that weird ear- ...

  10. Middle Ear Infections (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Emergency Cerebral Palsy: Caring for Your Child Middle Ear Infections KidsHealth > For Parents > Middle Ear Infections Print ... 3 years old. A Close Look at the Ear To understand how ear infections develop, let's review ...

  11. Pelvic Vascular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Christenson, Brian M.; Gipson, Matthew G.; Smith, Mitchell T.

    2013-01-01

    Vascular malformations (VMs) comprise a wide spectrum of lesions that are classified by content and flow characteristics. These lesions, occurring in both focal and diffuse forms, can involve any organ and tissue plane and can cause significant morbidity in both children and adults. Since treatment strategy depends on the type of malformation, correct diagnosis and classification of a vascular lesion are crucial. Slow-flow VMs (venous and lymphatic malformations) are often treated by sclerotherapy, whereas fast-flow lesions (arteriovenous malformations) are generally managed with embolization. In addition, some cases of VMs are best treated surgically. This review will present an overview of VMs in the female pelvis as well as a discussion of endovascular therapeutic techniques. PMID:24436563

  12. Congenital Vascular Malformation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... reason these artery- to-vein connections, or a cluster of them persist. Such connections are called arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs), or if there is a cluster of them they are called arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). ...

  13. Chiari Malformation: Treatment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... around the malformation and restore the flow of spinal fluid. There are many variations: Surgical Steps Craniectomy- ... in the head) may benefit from this procedure. Fusion/Stabilization - As part of a decompression, or at ...

  14. CT and MR imaging of the inner ear and brain in children with congenital sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Varsha M; Navlekar, Shantanu K; Kishore, G Ravi; Reddy, K Jitender; Kumar, E C Vinay

    2012-01-01

    Imaging plays an important role in the evaluation of congenital sensorineural hearing loss. In children who are candidates for cochlear implantation surgery, it provides vital preoperative information about the inner ear, the vestibulocochlear nerve, and the brain. High-resolution computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging provide excellent delineation of the intricate anatomy of the inner ear: CT depicts the minute details of osseous structures, and MR imaging allows visualization of the fluid-filled spaces and the vestibulocochlear nerve. Together, these complementary modalities can aid decision making about the best management strategy by facilitating the identification and characterization of inner ear malformations and any associated neurologic abnormalities. It is important that the radiologist be familiar with the key imaging features when interpreting CT and MR images obtained in this patient group. A broad spectrum of inner ear malformations have been described and linked to developmental insults at different stages of embryogenesis, and various systems have been proposed for classifying them. In this article, these malformations are described by using classification systems used by otolaryngologists for ease of interpretation. The relevant normal anatomy and development of the inner ear are briefly surveyed, standard imaging protocols for studying the inner ear are reviewed, and the imaging appearances of frequently observed inner ear malformations are described and illustrated. The impact of the identification of these malformations and commonly associated brain abnormalities on clinical management and prognosis also is discussed. PMID:22582354

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and families Gene Reviews Clinical summary Genetic Testing Registry Genetic testing ClinicalTrials.gov Research studies PubMed Recent ... providers. Gene Review: RASA1-Related Disorders Genetic Testing Registry: Capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation You might also find ...

  16. Ear, Nose & Throat Issues & Down Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Associated Conditions » Ear, Nose & Throat Issues & Down Syndrome Ear, Nose & Throat Issues & Down Syndrome Ear, nose, and ... Are Common in Children With Down Syndrome? External Ear Canal Stenosis Stenotic ear canals (narrow ear canals) ...

  17. [Multiple intracranial arteriovenous malformation].

    PubMed

    Gelabert-Gonzlez, Miguel; Santin-Amo, Jos Mara; Romn-Pena, Paula; Vzquez Herrero, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Multiple cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are thought to be exceedingly rare lesions and have usually been reported as single cases. The incidence of multiple cerebral AVMs in major series ranges from 0.3% to 9% and, in the majority of cases, these malformations are associated with other vascular anomalies of the brain or soft tissues. We report a 62-year-old woman that presented with a left temporal haemorrhage. Angiography showed 3 AVMs located in the left temporal lobe, left cerebellar hemisphere and right temporal lobe. The lesions were treated with radiosurgery. PMID:25596643

  18. Chiari malformation in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Parfitt, Sheryl E; Roth, Cheryl K

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of Chiari malformation is on the rise owing to the increased frequency of brain imaging for concussion and trauma. This abnormal brain physiology can have a significant impact on the care management of a pregnant woman during the gestational period. Here we present a case example of a pregnant woman presenting in labor with a history of Chiari malformation with surgical treatment during her pregnancy. Antepartum, intrapartum and postpartum considerations are reviewed. This brief article is meant to be used as an easy-reference tool in the clinical setting. PMID:25900588

  19. [Current strategy for the radiological exploration of the ear].

    PubMed

    Bourjat, P; Veillon, F

    1986-01-01

    CAT scan by thin slices offers the possibility of evaluation of the bone structures of the ear and their contents. The progressively increasing availability of the scanner should make access much more routine for study of the ear, with a concomitant reduction in tomographies, inadequate in a large number of circumstances. The 4 main indications are chronic otitis with cholesteatoma, trauma, acoustic neuromas and malformations. The respective performances of tomography and CAT scan in each of these situations are discussed and an investigation strategy is suggested. PMID:3010793

  20. Pathology of the Ear

    PubMed Central

    Orengo, Ida; Robbins, Kerri; Marsch, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    The external ear is exposed to weathering and trauma; it also has sparse vascularity, making it prone to infection and disease. The external location of the cutaneous ear makes it easily visible for diagnosis and accessible for treatment. In this article, the authors focus on diseases of the ear that are most commonly encountered and may be subject to surgical and medical evaluation and/or treatment. Epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical course, and treatment for each disease entity are discussed. PMID:23115534

  1. Ear - blocked at high altitudes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ears; Flying and blocked ears; Eustachian tube dysfunction - high altitude ... the middle ear and the back of the nose and upper throat. ... down from high altitudes. Chewing gum the entire time you are ...

  2. How to Use Ear Drops

    MedlinePLUS

    How to Use Ear Drops(Having someone else give you the ear drops may make this procedure easier.) Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and warm water. Gently clean your ear with a damp facecloth and then dry your ...

  3. Avoiding Infection After Ear Piercing

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Text Size Email Print Share Avoiding Infection After Ear Piercing Page Content Article Body What is the best way to avoid infection after ear piercing? Ears may be pierced for cosmetic reasons ...

  4. Taking Care of Your Ears

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Body Works Main Page Taking Care of Your Ears KidsHealth > Kids > Staying Healthy > Being Good to My ... you clean it out. Taking Care of Pierced Ears Pierced ears may look pretty, but you need ...

  5. Ear tube insertion - series (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    Ear tube insertion is recommended for: fluid in the middle ear (present for more than 12 weeks) recurrent ear ... the accumulated fluid is suctioned out. A small tube is inserted through the incised eardrum in order ...

  6. Congenital malformation of the oval window: experience of radiologic diagnosis and surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng; Liu, Yang; Sun, Jianjun; Li, Jinrang; Song, Rendong

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to introduce and discuss the method of preoperative radiological diagnosis to the congenital absence or atresia of the oval window (OW), and the method of surgical treatment. From July 2010 through August 2014, patients with normal external canal and tympanic membrane but conductive hearing loss underwent high resolution CT scan (HRCT). The multi-planar reformation (MPR), a post-processing protocol, was used. The patients with diagnosis of OW atresia and malformed stapes preoperatively underwent surgical treatment. The vestibular drilled-out and promontory drilled-out technique was used to reconstruct the ossicular chain. In the preoperative radiological diagnosis, six patients (ears) were noted to have congenital absence or atresia of the oval window with malformed facial nerve (class 4) and two patients (ears) were found to have footplate fixation (class 2). In the surgical treatment of eight ears, the malformed structure was identified and the ossicular chain reconstruction was made in six ears. The coronal HRCT CT imaging and the MPR post-processing technique can provide us practical and definite information for surgical treatment, especially in the discrimination of OW atresia and the fixed stapedal footplate. The promontory drill-out technique, fenestration in the bottom of the basal turn, provides us a new method in the hearing reconstruction when the area of OW was fully covered by malformed facial nerve. This technique was first reported in the literature. PMID:25763570

  7. Ear infection - acute

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Risk factors for acute ear infections include: Attending day care (especially centers with more than 6 children) Changes ... hands and toys often. If possible, choose a day care that has 6 or fewer children. This can ...

  8. Ear Injuries (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... head, sports injuries, and even listening to loud music can cause ear damage, which can affect hearing ... But for kids and teens, listening to loud music (at concerts, in the car, through headphones) is ...

  9. Ear Infections in Children

    MedlinePLUS

    ... have identified colonies of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, called biofilms, that are present in the middle ears of ... infections. Understanding how to attack and kill these biofilms would be one way to successfully treat chronic ...

  10. Capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation syndrome with spinal involvement.

    PubMed

    Yi?, Ulu; Kurul, Semra H; Gleryz, Handan; Men, Sleyman

    2014-01-01

    Capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation (CM-AVM) is a recently identified autosomal dominant disorder. Arteriovenous lesions have been reported in the brain, limbs, and face. We report a 7-year-old patient with CM-AVM with spinal AVM, which is a rarely reported association. PMID:25040073

  11. Chiari-like Malformation.

    PubMed

    Loughin, Catherine A

    2016-03-01

    Chiari-like malformation is a condition of the craniocervical junction in which there is a mismatch of the structures of the caudal cranial fossa causing the cerebellum to herniate into the foramen magnum. This herniation can lead to fluid buildup in the spinal cord, also known as syringomyelia. Pain is the most common clinical sign followed by scratching. Other neurologic signs noted are facial nerve deficits, seizures, vestibular syndrome, ataxia, menace deficit, proprioceptive deficits, head tremor, temporal muscle atrophy, and multifocal central nervous system signs. MRI is the diagnostic of choice, but computed tomography can also be used. PMID:26631589

  12. Arteriovenous Malformation Management

    SciTech Connect

    Yakes, Wayne F.; Rossi, Plinio; Odink, Henk

    1996-11-15

    Arteriovenous malformations (AVM) are rare vascular lesions that can present with a myriad of clinical presentations. In our institutions, initial workup consists of a clinical exam, color Doppler imaging, and magnetic resonance imaging. After the initial noninvasive workup, arteriography, at times closed system venography, and ethanol endovascular repair of the AVM is performed under general anesthesia. Depending on the size of the lesion, additional Swan-Ganz line and arterial line monitoring are performed. Patients are usually observed overnight and uneventfully discharged the following day if no complication occurs. Patients are followed at periodic intervals despite cure of their lesion. Long-term follow-up is essential in AVM management.

  13. Ear replantation without microsurgery.

    PubMed

    Pribaz, J J; Crespo, L D; Orgill, D P; Pousti, T J; Bartlett, R A

    1997-06-01

    Reconstitution of the amputated ear remains a challenge to the plastic surgeon. Reattachment as a composite graft of the total or subtotal amputated ear is unreliable. Microsurgical replantation can be performed in a minority of cases; however, difficulty with adequate venous drainage complicates the technical complexity of these cases. To enhance survival of a reattached ear segment, Mladick et al. advocated use of the retroauricular pocket principle. This technique involves deepithelialization of the amputated part, followed by anatomic reattachment to the amputation stump and then burial in a retroauricular pocket. This simple technique increases the surface area of the avulsed segment in contact with surrounding nutrients, maximizing the probability of "take." The relationship between the dermis and cartilage is preserved, thus minimizing the deformity from cartilage warping. The undisturbed dermis on the involved segment can reepithelialize spontaneously, negating the need for a skin graft. We have used this technique successfully in five of six patients. PMID:9180709

  14. Arteriovenous malformations and headache.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Jason A; Mejia Munne, Juan C; Lavine, Sean D; Meyers, Philip M; Connolly, E Sander; Solomon, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    Brain arteriovenous malformations (AVM) are complex vascular lesions commonly associated with chronic headache. An occipital location appears to increase the risk of concurrent migraine-like headaches in AVM patients. We have experienced great success in treating these headaches through a multidisciplinary approach to eradicate cerebral AVM. However, the specific clinical characteristics of AVM-associated headaches and the most effective treatment strategies for these patients remain unclear. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of the literature on AVM-associated headaches. We detail the history, classification, epidemiology, presentation, pathophysiology, treatment options, and outcomes for this poorly described condition. Additionally, we illustrate our approach to the management of patients with occipital AVM and associated intractable headaches. PMID:26461909

  15. Controversies in Chiari I malformations

    PubMed Central

    Baisden, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    Background: The diagnosis and management of Chiari I malformations (CMI) remains controversial, particularly since it is often an incidental finding on cervical MR scans performed for neck pain and/or headaches. Recently, some surgeons “over-operated” on asymptomatic patients with Chiari I malformations, or even on those without the requisite radiographic diagnostic features for Chiari I malformations: unfortunately, only a subset were admonished for indiscriminate surgery. Nevertheless, when this hindbrain malformation is truly symptomatic, contributing to impaired cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulation, various valid surgical management strategies may be adopted. Methods: This review focuses on the current literature regarding the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and surgical management of Chiari I malformation. Variations in the surgical technique are also presented and critiqued. Results: The recommended treatment for Chiari I malformations I consists of decompressive suboccipital craniectomy and duroplasty when abnormal cine-flow MRI is observed preoperatively and blockage of CSF flow persists intraoperatively despite bony decompression. Conclusions: Controversy continues regarding the optimal surgical technique to address Chiari malformations I. Proper diagnostic studies and patient selection are needed to optimize patient outcomes, while avoiding unnecessary surgical procedures. PMID:22905329

  16. Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Involved You are here Home » Health Info Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness Diseases and Conditions Age-Related Hearing Loss Auditory Neuropathy Auditory Processing Disorder Ear Infections in Children Enlarged Vestibular Aqueducts and Childhood ...

  17. From Ear to Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimura, Doreen

    2011-01-01

    In this paper Doreen Kimura gives a personal history of the "right-ear effect" in dichotic listening. The focus is on the early ground-breaking papers, describing how she did the first dichotic listening studies relating the effects to brain asymmetry. The paper also gives a description of the visual half-field technique for lateralized stimulus…

  18. Travel Inside the Ear

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... form Search A–Z Index Español Menu Home Health Info Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness Balance Taste ... Voice, Speech, and Language Información en español Statistics Health Resources Clinical Studies Research Extramural Research Intramural Research ...

  19. From Ear to Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimura, Doreen

    2011-01-01

    In this paper Doreen Kimura gives a personal history of the "right-ear effect" in dichotic listening. The focus is on the early ground-breaking papers, describing how she did the first dichotic listening studies relating the effects to brain asymmetry. The paper also gives a description of the visual half-field technique for lateralized stimulus

  20. Pancreatic Arteriovenous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Yamabuki, Takumi; Ohara, Masanori; Kimura, Noriko; Okamura, Kunishige; Kuroda, Aki; Takahashi, Ryo; Komuro, Kazuteru; Iwashiro, Nozomu

    2014-01-01

    An unusual case of pancreatic arteriovenous malformation (P-AVM) combined with esophageal cancer is reported. A 59-year-old man was admitted with upper abdominal pain. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed numerous strongly enhanced abnormal vessels and a hypovascular lesion in the area of the pancreatic tail. Angiographic study of the celiac artery confirmed racemose vascular networks in the tail of the pancreas. Endoscopic retrograde pancreatography revealed narrowing and displacement of the main pancreatic duct in the tail of the pancreas. Screening esophagoscopy showed a 0-IIa+IIc type tumor in the lower thoracic esophagus. Histological examination of esophagoscopic biopsies showed squamous cell carcinoma. Based on these findings, P-AVM or pancreatic cancer and esophageal cancer were diagnosed. Video-assisted thoracoscopic esophagectomy and distal pancreatectomy were performed. Histological examination of the resected pancreas revealed abundant abnormal vessels with intravascular thrombi. In addition, rupture of a dilated pancreatic duct with pancreatic stones and both severe atrophy and fibrosis of the pancreatic parenchyma were observed. The final diagnoses were P-AVM consequent to severe chronic pancreatitis and esophageal carcinoma. The patient's postoperative course was relatively good. PMID:24574946

  1. Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Shovlin, Claire L

    2014-12-01

    Within the past decade, pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) have evolved from rare curiosities to not uncommon clinical states, with the latest estimates suggesting a prevalence of ~1 in 2,600. PAVMs provide anatomic right-to-left shunts, allowing systemic venous blood to bypass gas exchange and pulmonary capillary bed processing. Hypoxemia and enhanced ventilatory demands result, although both are usually asymptomatic. Paradoxical emboli lead to strokes and cerebral abscesses, and these commonly occur in individuals with previously undiagnosed PAVMs. PAVM hemorrhage is rare but is the main cause of maternal death in pregnancy. PAVM occlusion by embolization is the standard of care to reduce these risks. However, recent data demonstrate that currently recommended management protocols can result in levels of radiation exposure that would be classified as harmful. Recent publications also provide a better appreciation of the hematologic and cardiovascular demands required to maintain arterial oxygen content and oxygen consumption in hypoxemic patients, identify patient subgroups at higher risk of complications, and emphasize the proportion of radiologically visible PAVMs too small to treat by embolization. This review, therefore, outlines medical states that exacerbate the consequences of PAVMs. Chief among these is iron deficiency, which is commonly present due to concurrent hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: iron deficiency impairs hypoxemia compensations by restricting erythropoiesis and increases the risk of ischemic strokes. Management of periodontal disease, dental interventions, pulmonary hypertension, and pregnancy also requires specific consideration in the setting of PAVMs. The review concludes by discussing to what extent previously recommended protocols may benefit from modification or revision. PMID:25420112

  2. Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Within the past decade, pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) have evolved from rare curiosities to not uncommon clinical states, with the latest estimates suggesting a prevalence of ∼1 in 2,600. PAVMs provide anatomic right-to-left shunts, allowing systemic venous blood to bypass gas exchange and pulmonary capillary bed processing. Hypoxemia and enhanced ventilatory demands result, although both are usually asymptomatic. Paradoxical emboli lead to strokes and cerebral abscesses, and these commonly occur in individuals with previously undiagnosed PAVMs. PAVM hemorrhage is rare but is the main cause of maternal death in pregnancy. PAVM occlusion by embolization is the standard of care to reduce these risks. However, recent data demonstrate that currently recommended management protocols can result in levels of radiation exposure that would be classified as harmful. Recent publications also provide a better appreciation of the hematologic and cardiovascular demands required to maintain arterial oxygen content and oxygen consumption in hypoxemic patients, identify patient subgroups at higher risk of complications, and emphasize the proportion of radiologically visible PAVMs too small to treat by embolization. This review, therefore, outlines medical states that exacerbate the consequences of PAVMs. Chief among these is iron deficiency, which is commonly present due to concurrent hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: iron deficiency impairs hypoxemia compensations by restricting erythropoiesis and increases the risk of ischemic strokes. Management of periodontal disease, dental interventions, pulmonary hypertension, and pregnancy also requires specific consideration in the setting of PAVMs. The review concludes by discussing to what extent previously recommended protocols may benefit from modification or revision. PMID:25420112

  3. Ear recognition: a complete system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abaza, Ayman; Harrison, Mary Ann F.

    2013-05-01

    Ear Recognition has recently received significant attention in the literature. Even though current ear recognition systems have reached a certain level of maturity, their success is still limited. This paper presents an efficient complete ear-based biometric system that can process five frames/sec; Hence it can be used for surveillance applications. The ear detection is achieved using Haar features arranged in a cascaded Adaboost classifier. The feature extraction is based on dividing the ear image into several blocks from which Local Binary Pattern feature distributions are extracted. These feature distributions are then fused at the feature level to represent the original ear texture in the classification stage. The contribution of this paper is three fold: (i) Applying a new technique for ear feature extraction, and studying various optimization parameters for that technique; (ii) Presenting a practical ear recognition system and a detailed analysis about error propagation in that system; (iii) Studying the occlusion effect of several ear parts. Detailed experiments show that the proposed ear recognition system achieved better performance (94:34%) compared to other shape-based systems as Scale-invariant feature transform (67:92%). The proposed approach can also handle efficiently hair occlusion. Experimental results show that the proposed system can achieve about (78%) rank-1 identification, even in presence of 60% occlusion.

  4. Tympanometry revealing middle ear pathology.

    PubMed

    Renvall, U; Holmquist, J

    1976-01-01

    In order to evaluate the usefulness of impedance audiometry as a screening method for school children, two different pilot studies were performed. The results indicated that impedance audiometry (tympanometry and stapedius reflex test) was more efficient than otoscopy and pure tone screening in the detection of ears with secretory otitis media (SOM). In order to gain some more experience, an extended study of 800 7-year-olds was performed. The results from this investigation showed 6.5% pathological values with pure tone screening, 13.5% pathological values with tympanometry and 32% elevated or nonelicitable stapedius reflexes. Analysis of our observations indicates that the stapedius reflex may be too sensitive a test to be used as a screening method. Tympanometry, however, is recommended as a complement to pure tone screening in screening of children. A 6-12 months follow-up was also performed on 357 ears in which an initial study had shown a middle ear pressure of less than or equal to -100 mm H2O. At the repeated test 20% had pathological pure tone screening, 40% had a middle ear pressure of less than or equal to -100 mm H2O, 57% had elevated or nonelicitable stapedius reflexes, and 14% had middle ear effusion. The high frequency of persisting abnormal middle ear pressure and effusion in these 357 ears suggests that a middle ear pressure of less than or equal to -100 mm H2O can be a predisposing factor for SOM. In an experimental study on human temporal bones it was demonstrated that the tympanogram preserves its original appearance when the water level is low in the middle ear, while a higher level gives rise to a pathological tympanogram. It is also demonstrated that there is a discrepancy between the tympanometrically, indirectly recorded middle ear pressure and the middle ear pressure as measured manometrically, directly from the middle ear. PMID:1267350

  5. Intracranial vascular malformations: MR and CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kucharczyk, W.; Lemme-Pleghos, L.; Uske, A.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.; Dooms, G.; Norman, D.

    1985-08-01

    Twenty-four patients with 29 cerebrovascular malformations were evaluated with a combination of computed tomography (CT), angiography, and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Characteristics of the malformations on MR images were reviewed retrospectively, and a comparative evaluation of MR and CT images was made. Of 14 angiographically evident malformations, 13 intra-axial lesions were detected on both CT and MR images, and one dural malformation gave false-negative results on both modalities. The appearance of parenchymal lesions on MR images closely mirrored characteristic CT findings. Angiographically evident malformations have a highly characteristic appearance on MR images. MR may be more sensitive than CT in the detection of small hemorrhagic foci associated with cryptic arteriovenous malformations and may add specificity in the diagnosis of occult malformations in some cases, but MR is less sensitive than CT for the detection of small calcified malformations.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: Cerebral cavernous malformation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and families Gene Reviews Clinical summary Genetic Testing Registry Genetic testing ClinicalTrials.gov Research studies PubMed Recent ... Gene Review: Familial Cerebral Cavernous Malformation Genetic Testing Registry: Cerebral cavernous malformation Genetic Testing Registry: Cerebral cavernous ...

  7. Red Ear Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Raieli, V; Compagno, A; D'Amelio, M

    2016-03-01

    The Red ear syndrome (RES) is an intriguing syndrome originally described for the first time nearly 20years ago. RES is characterized by unilateral/bilateral episodes of pain and burning sensation of the ear, associated with ipsilateral erythema. RES episodes are indeed isolated in some patients, but they can occur in association with primary headaches, including in particular migraine in the developmental age. Although the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms are still uncertain, in the recent years the described comorbidities have aroused increasing interest because of possible clinical implications. Moreover, RES seems to be more often associated with clinical features of migraine partially provoked by the involvement of the parasympathetic system. This clinical association has shed new light on the pathophysiology of RES, supporting the hypothesis of a shared pathophysiological background, for example, through the activation of the trigeminal autonomic reflex. Current therapies of RES will be also discussed. Finally, we will resume the more controversial aspects of this relatively new and probably underestimated neurological syndrome. PMID:26879877

  8. [MIDDLE EAR INFECTION].

    PubMed

    Mari?i?, Martina; Bonjak, Zrinka; Branica, Sre?ko

    2015-01-01

    Middle ear infection is one of the most common childhood infections and the leading reason for antibiotic prescriptions. Although the etiological diagnosis is rarely discovered, successful identification of pathogens depends on properly collected sample, chosen method and microbiological analysis made on time. The most common bacterial pathogen is Streptococcus pneumoniae. Others include Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, known as the most common bacterial pathogen of chronic inflamations. Viral or polimicrobial upper respiratory tract infections often precede this infection. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines given during infancy decrease rates of acute middle ear inflammation. It is a self-limited disease with rare complications. The best treatment is watchful waiting for two days followed by amoxicillin during 7 days, only if it is necessary. If there is resistance, then combination of amoxicillin and beta lactamase inhibitor is second line. The best choice for patients allergic to penicillin are macrolides. Antibiotic treatment has contributed to frequent relapses and increase of multi-drug resistant pathogens by permitting their colonization, which eliminates protective nasopharyngeal flora. PMID:26749955

  9. Pseudotumour cerebri associated with arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed Central

    Cockerell, O. C.; Lai, H. M.; Ross-Russell, R. W.

    1993-01-01

    The association of intracranial hypertension and arteriovenous malformations is described in two patients. Both patients had the typical clinical features of pseudotumour cerebri and were found to have intracranial arteriovenous malformations on arteriography. The mechanism of raised intracranial pressure in patients with arteriovenous malformations is discussed. Images Figure 1 PMID:8234111

  10. [SURGICAL TREATMENT OF THE FACE CAPILLARY MALFORMATION].

    PubMed

    Galich, S P; Gindich, O A; Dabizha, A Yu; Ogorodnik, Ya P

    2015-08-01

    Results of surgical treatment of 37 patients for the head and neck capillary malformations were analyzed. Optimal surgical tactics, depending on the malformation form and localization, was proposed. Restitution of the tissues defect after excision of malformation, using the flaps transposition, have permitted to achieve good esthetic results. PMID:26591862

  11. Genetic causes of vascular malformations.

    PubMed

    Brouillard, Pascal; Vikkula, Miikka

    2007-10-15

    Vascular malformations are localized defects of vascular development. They usually affect a limited number of vessels in a restricted area of the body. Although most malformations are sporadic, inheritance is observed, enabling genetic analysis. Usually, sporadic forms present with a single lesion whereas multiple lesions are observed in familial cases. The last decade has seen unraveling of several causative genes and beginning of elucidation of the pathophysiological pathways involved in the inherited forms. In parallel, definition of the clinical phenotypes has improved and disorders such as Parkes-Weber syndrome (PKWS), first thought to be sporadic, is now known to be part of a more common inheritable phenotype. In addition, the concept of double-hit mechanism that we proposed earlier to explain the incomplete penetrance, variable expressivity and multifocality of lesions in inherited venous anomalies is now becoming confirmed, as some somatic mutations have been identified in venous, glomuvenous and cerebral cavernous malformations. It is thus tempting to suggest that familial forms of vascular malformations follow paradominant inheritance and that sporadic forms, the etiopathogenic causes of which are still unelucidated, are caused by somatic mutations in the same genes. PMID:17670762

  12. [Uncommon malformative association (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Herrero, E; Ruza, F; Martnez-Almoyna, C; Figols, F J

    1975-01-01

    An uncommon malformative association is presented ((hydrocephalus, bilateral renal hypoplasia, aplasia cutis) associated with neonatal gastrointestinal perforation. The bibliography related with these problems is reviewed, discussing the possible relationship between them. The etiological hypothesis is infective, and pathogenic interpretation is pointed out in this context. PMID:1155862

  13. Otoscopic exam of the ear (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... intrument which is used to look into the ear canal. The ear speculum (a cone-shaped viewing piece of the otoscope) is slowly inserted into the ear canal while looking into the otoscope. The speculum ...

  14. Wax blockage in the ear (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    The ear canal is lined with hair follicles and glands that produce a waxy oil called cerumen. Sometimes the ... wax than can be easily excreted out the ear. This extra wax may harden within the ear ...

  15. Middle ear infection (otitis media) (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is an inflammation and/or infection of the middle ear. Acute otitis media (acute ear infection) occurs ... or viral infection of the fluid of the middle ear, which causes production of fluid or pus. ...

  16. Ear Reconstruction in Young Children.

    PubMed

    Reinisch, John

    2015-12-01

    The use of a porous high-density polyethylene ear implant, rather than a costal cartilage framework, allows ear reconstruction in young children before they enter school. The fact that the growth of the normal ear matures early allows for good symmetry. If the implant is covered completely with a large, well-vascularized superficial parietal fascia flap and appropriately color-matched skin, an ear with excellent projection and definition can be obtained with minimal complications and long-term viability. Ear reconstruction in young children is preferred by the author because the necessary fascial flap coverage is thinner, easier to harvest than in older patients, and can be done in a single outpatient procedure with minimal discomfort or psychological trauma. PMID:26667634

  17. Surgical correction of constricted ear combined with Stahl's ear.

    PubMed

    Bi, Ye; Lin, Lin; Yang, Qinhua; Pan, Bo; Zhao, Yanyong; He, Leren; Jiang, Haiyue

    2015-07-01

    Constricted ear combined with Stahl's ear is a rare ear deformity, which is a kind of complex congenital auricular deformity. From 1 January 2007 to 1 January 2014, 19 patients with constricted ear combined with Stahl's ear (Spock ear) were enrolled in this study, most of which were unilaterally deformed. To correct the deformity, a double Z-shaped skin incision was made on the posterior side of the auricle, with the entire layer of cartilage cut parallel to the helix traversing the third crus to form a fan-shaped cartilage flap. The superior crura of the antihelix were shaped by the folding cartilage rim. The cartilage of the abnormal third crus was made part of the new superior crura of antihelix, and the third crus was eliminated. The postoperative aesthetic assessment of the reshaped auricle was graded by both doctors and patients (or their parents). Out of the 19 patients, the number of satisfying cases of the symmetry, helix stretch, elimination of the third crus, the cranioauricular angle, and the substructure of the reshaped ears was 14 (nine excellent and five good), 16 (six excellent and 10 good), 17 (eight excellent and nine good), 15 (five excellent and 10 good), and 13 (two excellent and 11 good), respectively. With a maximum of a 90-month follow-up, no complication was observed. The results of the study suggested that this rare deformity could be corrected by appropriate surgical treatment, with a satisfied postoperative appearance. PMID:25921912

  18. Arteriovenous Malformation of the Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Manjunath, S. M.; Shetty, Sujan; Moon, Ninad J.; Metta, Kiran Kumar; Gupta, Nitin; Goyal, Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are a heterogeneous group of congenital blood vessel disorders more typically referred to as birthmarks. Subcategorized into vascular tumors and malformations, each anomaly is characterized by specific morphology, pathophysiology, clinical behavior, and management approach. Hemangiomas are the most common vascular tumors. Lymphatic, capillary, venous, and arteriovenous malformations make up the majority of vascular malformations. Arteriovenous malformation of the head and neck is a rare vascular anomaly but when present is persistent and progressive in nature and can represent a lethal benign disease. Here we present a case report of a 25-year-old male patient with arteriovenous malformation involving the base of tongue. PMID:24660070

  19. Middle Ear Infections and Ear Tube Surgery (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... them because of environmental and lifestyle factors (like attendance at a group childcare, secondhand tobacco smoke exposure, ... Disorder (ANSD) Preparing Your Child for Surgery Hearing Evaluation in Children Anesthesia Basics Ears Eardrum Injuries Middle ...

  20. Prenatal diagnosis of cloacal malformation.

    PubMed

    Peiro, Jose L; Scorletti, Federico; Sbragia, Lourenco

    2016-04-01

    Persistent cloaca malformation is the most severe type of anorectal and urogenital malformation. Decisions concerning the surgical treatment for this condition are taken during the first hours of life and may determine the quality of life of these patients. Thus, prenatal diagnosis becomes important for a prompt and efficient management of the fetus and newborn, and accurate counseling of the parents regarding its consequences and the future of the baby. Careful evaluation by ultrasonography, and further in-depth analysis with MRI, allow prenatal detection of characteristic findings, which can lead to diagnose or at least suspect this condition. We reviewed our experience and the literature in order to highlight the most important clues that can guide the physician in the differential diagnosis. PMID:26969229

  1. [Inner ear cochlear processes].

    PubMed

    Livshits, M S

    1995-01-01

    The processes accompanying the propagation across the basilar membrane (BM) of waves from a wide-band sound signal have been analyzed by physical methods. Particular emphasis in placed on the fact that BM is a low frequency filter. The characteristics of wave envelope from each of the sinusoidal components of the signal are given. The use of a simple mechanical model makes it possible to explain an initial increase in these envelopes. The steep slope of the envelope in its terminal part is explained in terms of the lighthill hydrodynamic model of cochlea. This provides a theoretical basis for adequate description of the periphery of the ear analyzer, with allowance for the active role of external auditory hair cells (EHC). Further research is needed to solve the problem completely. This is dictated by the complexity of the oscillatory system (BM in the region of the critical layer of cochlea plus EHC) and by its interaction with the autoregulation system in the air analyzer, which is described elsewhere. PMID:7662742

  2. Taking Care of Your Ears

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ll also want to prevent infections in your newly pierced ears. Wash your hands before touching your ... The Nemours Foundation, iStock, Getty Images, Corbis, Veer, Science Photo Library, Science Source Images, Shutterstock, and Clipart. ...

  3. Ototoxicity (Ear Poisoning) (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Speech or Language Development Speech-Language Therapy Physical Therapy Hearing Evaluation in Children The Danger of Antibiotic Overuse Eardrum Injuries Hearing Impairment: Advice From Kristin What's Hearing Loss? Can Loud Music Hurt My Ears? Going to the Audiologist Hearing ...

  4. Ototoxicity (Ear Poisoning) (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Signing Kids Up for Sports 15-Minute Meal: ... from auditory or listening therapy and speech (lip) reading. Those with serious damage to the inner ear ...

  5. Cochlear Implant Outcomes and Genetic Mutations in Children with Ear and Brain Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Busi, Micol; Rosignoli, Monica; Castiglione, Alessandro; Minazzi, Federica; Trevisi, Patrizia; Aimoni, Claudia; Calzolari, Ferdinando; Granieri, Enrico; Martini, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Background. Specific clinical conditions could compromise cochlear implantation outcomes and drastically reduce the chance of an acceptable development of perceptual and linguistic capabilities. These conditions should certainly include the presence of inner ear malformations or brain abnormalities. The aims of this work were to study the diagnostic value of high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in children with sensorineural hearing loss who were candidates for cochlear implants and to analyse the anatomic abnormalities of the ear and brain in patients who underwent cochlear implantation. We also analysed the effects of ear malformations and brain anomalies on the CI outcomes, speculating on their potential role in the management of language developmental disorders. Methods. The present study is a retrospective observational review of cochlear implant outcomes among hearing-impaired children who presented ear and/or brain anomalies at neuroimaging investigations with MRI and HRCT. Furthermore, genetic results from molecular genetic investigations (GJB2/GJB6 and, additionally, in selected cases, SLC26A4 or mitochondrial-DNA mutations) on this study group were herein described. Longitudinal and cross-sectional analysis was conducted using statistical tests. Results. Between January 1, 1996 and April 1, 2012, at the ENT-Audiology Department of the University Hospital of Ferrara, 620 cochlear implantations were performed. There were 426 implanted children at the time of the present study (who were <18 years). Among these, 143 patients (64 females and 79 males) presented ear and/or brain anomalies/lesions/malformations at neuroimaging investigations with MRI and HRCT. The age of the main study group (143 implanted children) ranged from 9 months and 16 years (average = 4.4; median = 3.0). Conclusions. Good outcomes with cochlear implants are possible in patients who present with inner ear or brain abnormalities, even if central nervous system anomalies represent a negative prognostic factor that is made worse by the concomitant presence of cochlear malformations. Common cavity and stenosis of the internal auditory canal (less than 2 mm) are negative prognostic factors even if brain lesions are absent. PMID:26236732

  6. 21 CFR 870.2710 - Ear oximeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ear oximeter. 870.2710 Section 870.2710 Food and... CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2710 Ear oximeter. (a) Identification. An ear... ear. The amount of reflected or scattered light as indicated by this device is used to measure...

  7. 21 CFR 870.2710 - Ear oximeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ear oximeter. 870.2710 Section 870.2710 Food and... CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2710 Ear oximeter. (a) Identification. An ear... ear. The amount of reflected or scattered light as indicated by this device is used to measure...

  8. 21 CFR 870.2710 - Ear oximeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ear oximeter. 870.2710 Section 870.2710 Food and... CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2710 Ear oximeter. (a) Identification. An ear... ear. The amount of reflected or scattered light as indicated by this device is used to measure...

  9. 21 CFR 870.2710 - Ear oximeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ear oximeter. 870.2710 Section 870.2710 Food and... CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2710 Ear oximeter. (a) Identification. An ear... ear. The amount of reflected or scattered light as indicated by this device is used to measure...

  10. 21 CFR 870.2710 - Ear oximeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ear oximeter. 870.2710 Section 870.2710 Food and... CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2710 Ear oximeter. (a) Identification. An ear... ear. The amount of reflected or scattered light as indicated by this device is used to measure...

  11. The visible ear surgery simulator.

    PubMed

    Trier, Peter; Noe, Karsten Østergaard; Sørensen, Mads Sølvsten; Mosegaard, Jesper

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a real-time computer simulation of surgical procedures in the ear, in which a surgeon drills into the temporal bone to gain access to the middle or inner ear. The purpose of this simulator is to support development of anatomical insight and training of drilling skills for both medical students and experienced otologists. The key contributions in this application are the visualization and interaction models in the context of ear surgical simulation. The visualization is based on an existing data set, "The Visible Ear", containing a unique volume depicting the inner ear in natural colours. The applied visualization is based on GPU ray casting, allowing high quality and flexible volume rendering using modern graphics card. In connection with the visualization model, different methods for optimizing the GPU ray casting procedure are presented, along with a method for combining polygon based graphics with volume rendering. In addition, different light models are presented that contribute to a realistic rendering of the different parts of the inner ear. To achieve a physically plausible drilling experience, a Phantom Omni force feedback device is utilized. The applied interaction model facilitates a realistic user experience of the response forces from the drilling tool. PMID:18391361

  12. Cryptic vascular malformations involving the brainstem

    SciTech Connect

    Yeates, A.; Enzmann, D.

    1983-01-01

    Six patients with angiographically cryptic vascular malformations involving the brainstem were examined with computed tomography (CT). The clinical and CT findings of cryptic vascular malformations of the brainstem are described and distinguished from those of brainstem glioma and multiple sclerosis. Calcification within a brainstem lesion that displays relatively little mass effect and shows little contrast enhancement, particularly when associated with a long history of waxing and waning brainstem symptoms, should suggest a vascular malformation.

  13. [Prenatal diagnosis of central nervous system malformations].

    PubMed

    Langmr, Zoltn; Nmeth, Mikls; Csaba, kos; Szigeti, Zsanett; Jo, Jzsef Gbor

    2013-07-30

    The prenatal diagnosis of fetal malformations have been the subject of numerous publications in the literature. This has dramatically increased in the last 15 years, mainly due to the advent of high-resolution ultrasound. In addition adequate guidelines issued by professional organizations have encouraged the universal approach to the imaging of fetal anatomy as well as malformations. One of the most significant groups of the fetal anomalies is the central nervous system malformation. Due to its prevalence and severity the praenatal diagnostics of central nervous system malformations got basic significance. In this review we attempted to summarize the recent informations concerning the prenatal diagnostics of the central nervous system anomalies. PMID:23971353

  14. Novel Vascular Malformation in an Affected Newborn with Deletion Del(4)(q31.3)

    PubMed Central

    de Len Ojeda, Norma Elena; Soriano-Torres, Michel; Cabrera, Mercedes J.; Bentez Ramos, Dunia Brbara

    2012-01-01

    We report on a newborn male patient with a terminal deletion in the long arm of the chromosome 4 with a congenital heart defect unreported before in association with this syndrome. The patient had multiple congenital anomalies including a pointed duplicated fingernail, low set posteriorly rotated ears, large anterior fontanel, micrognathia, glabellar capillary vascular malformation, and Interrupted Aortic Arch type C. The patient died due to multiple congenital malformations; a peripheral chromosome analysis showed 46, XY, del(4)(q31.3) de novo. The only reported case with the same deletion was a male newborn that exhibited the pattern of minor anomalies of deletion 4q31 syndrome. The parents were cytogenetically normal. We compare clinical signs to other cases with a deletion in long arm of chromosome 4. PMID:23320208

  15. 3D Printed Bionic Ears

    PubMed Central

    Mannoor, Manu S.; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A.; Soboyejo, Winston O.; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H.; McAlpine, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the precise anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing. PMID:23635097

  16. Ear disorders in scuba divers.

    PubMed

    Azizi, M H

    2011-01-01

    History of underwater diving dates back to antiquity. Breath-hold technique in diving was known to the ancient nations. However, deep diving progressed only in the early decades of the 19th century as the result of advancements in efficient underwater technologies which subsequently led to invention of sophisticated sets of scuba diving in the 20th century. Currently, diving is performed for various purposes including commercial, recreational, military, underwater construction, oil industry, underwater archeology and scientific assessment of marine life. By increasing popularity of underwater diving, dive-related medical conditions gradually became more evident and created a new challenge for the health care professionals, so that eventually, a specialty the so-called "diving medicine" was established. Most of the diving-associated disorders appear in the head and neck. The most common of all occupational disorders associated with diving are otologic diseases. External otitis has been reported as the most common otolaryngologic problem in underwater divers. Exostosis of the external ear canal may be formed in divers as the result of prolonged diving in cold waters. Other disorders of the ear and paranasal sinuses in underwater divers are caused by barometric pressure change (i.e., barotraumas), and to a lesser extent by decompression sickness. Barotrauma of the middle ear is the most prevalent barotrauma in divers. The inner ear barotraumas, though important, is less common. The present paper is a brief overview of diving-related ear disorders particularly in scuba divers. PMID:23022815

  17. 3D printed bionic ears.

    PubMed

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing. PMID:23635097

  18. Ear problems and injuries in athletes.

    PubMed

    Cassaday, Kacie; Vazquez, Gerardo; Wright, Justin M

    2014-01-01

    The ear is an unique organ--the principal structure involved in both hearing and balance. Although not common, problems with the ear may be encountered in specific sporting populations. Common conditions affecting the ear in the athlete include otitis externa, an infection of the external ear; external auditory canal exostoses, or abnormal bony growths in the canal; and otitis media, an infection of the middle ear. Given its position on the head, the ear is subject to trauma, often resulting in an auricular hematoma. Divers, due to pressure changes on descent and ascent, are subject to both ear barotrauma and ear decompression sickness. This article will discuss recognition, treatment, and prevention of these conditions affecting the ear in the athlete. PMID:24412886

  19. Developmental venous anomaly, capillary telangiectasia, cavernous malformation, and arteriovenous malformation: spectrum of a common pathological entity?

    PubMed

    Kalani, M Yashar S; Zabramski, Joseph M; Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Spetzler, Robert F

    2016-03-01

    Vascular malformations of the central nervous system are thought to originate from abnormal developmental processes during embryogenesis. Reports have cited the dynamic nature of these lesions and their "maturation" into other types of malformations. Herein we report on three patients with vascular malformations who exhibited dynamic alterations with stepwise progression of their lesions. These cases lend support to the hypothesis that these malformations may constitute the spectrum of a single disease caused by alterations in a common developmental program and that accumulating injury (e.g., by radiation) may allow one malformation type to mature into another. This concept warrants further investigation. PMID:26743915

  20. Tuning in the bullfrog ear.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, E R

    1988-01-01

    When electrical resonances were observed in acoustic sensory cells of lower vertebrates, the hearing research community was presented with the exciting possibility that tuning in the ears of those animals might be explained directly in terms of familiar molecular devices. It is reported here that in the frog sacculus, where electrical resonances have been observed in isolated hair cells, the effects of those resonances are completely obscured in the tuning properties of the sacculus in the intact ear. This observation has important implications not only for students of the ear, but for reductionist biologists in general. All of the dynamic properties of a system of connected, bidirectional processes are consequences of all of those processes at once; in such a system, the properties of an experimentally isolated subsystem may be totally obscured in the operation of the system as a whole. PMID:3258166

  1. Development of the inner ear.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, Tanya T

    2015-06-01

    The vertebrate inner ear is a sensory organ of exquisite design and sensitivity. It responds to sound, gravity and movement, serving both auditory (hearing) and vestibular (balance) functions. Almost all cell types of the inner ear, including sensory hair cells, sensory neurons, secretory cells and supporting cells, derive from the otic placode, one of the several ectodermal thickenings that arise around the edge of the anterior neural plate in the early embryo. The developmental patterning mechanisms that underlie formation of the inner ear from the otic placode are varied and complex, involving the reiterative use of familiar signalling pathways, together with roles for transcription factors, transmembrane proteins, and extracellular matrix components. In this review, I have selected highlights that illustrate just a few of the many recent discoveries relating to the development of this fascinating organ system. PMID:25796080

  2. Cerebral dysplastic vascular malformation: a developmental arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Wortzman, G.; Sima, A.A.F.; Morley, T.P.

    1983-08-01

    A cryptic malformation of the brain was found to represent an arrest in vascular development. Microscopy showed plump endothelium of blood vessels, which did not have a normal lumen and consisted of solid cords of cells. The microscopic, angiographic, and computed tomographic appearance of this anomaly are discussed and compared with cavernous angiomas, arteriovenous malformations, and venous angiomas.

  3. Chiari I malformation presenting as chronic cough.

    PubMed

    Amos, Louella B; Quintero, Diana R

    2008-10-01

    We present a 9-month-old infant with persistent cough refractory to conventional asthma therapy. An extensive evaluation eventually revealed a Chiari I malformation with syringohydromyelia. His cough resolved one month after surgical decompression, suggesting that brainstem compression from the Chiari malformation directly caused his symptoms. PMID:18785260

  4. The Notch Ligand JAG1 Is Required for Sensory Progenitor Development in the Mammalian Inner Ear

    PubMed Central

    Kiernan, Amy E; Xu, Jingxia; Gridley, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    In mammals, six separate sensory regions in the inner ear are essential for hearing and balance function. Each sensory region is made up of hair cells, which are the sensory cells, and their associated supporting cells, both arising from a common progenitor. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms that govern the development of these sensory organs. Notch signaling plays a pivotal role in the differentiation of hair cells and supporting cells by mediating lateral inhibition via the ligands Delta-like 1 and Jagged (JAG) 2. However, another Notch ligand, JAG1, is expressed early in the sensory patches prior to cell differentiation, indicating that there may be an earlier role for Notch signaling in sensory development in the ear. Here, using conditional gene targeting, we show that the Jag1 gene is required for the normal development of all six sensory organs within the inner ear. Cristae are completely lacking in Jag1-conditional knockout (cko) mutant inner ears, whereas the cochlea and utricle show partial sensory development. The saccular macula is present but malformed. Using SOX2 and p27kip1 as molecular markers of the prosensory domain, we show that JAG1 is initially expressed in all the prosensory regions of the ear, but becomes down-regulated in the nascent organ of Corti by embryonic day 14.5, when the cells exit the cell cycle and differentiate. We also show that both SOX2 and p27kip1 are down-regulated in Jag1-cko inner ears. Taken together, these data demonstrate that JAG1 is expressed early in the prosensory domains of both the cochlear and vestibular regions, and is required to maintain the normal expression levels of both SOX2 and p27kip1. These data demonstrate that JAG1-mediated Notch signaling is essential during early development for establishing the prosensory regions of the inner ear. PMID:16410827

  5. Mice Haploinsufficient for Ets1 and Fli1 Display Middle Ear Abnormalities and Model Aspects of Jacobsen Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Carpinelli, Marina R; Kruse, Elizabeth A; Arhatari, Benedicta D; Debrincat, Marlyse A; Ogier, Jacqueline M; Bories, Jean-Christophe; Kile, Benjamin T; Burt, Rachel A

    2015-07-01

    E26 transformation-specific 1 (ETS1) and friend leukemia integration 1 (FLI1) are members of the ETS family of transcription factors, of which there are 28 in humans. Both genes are hemizygous in Jacobsen syndrome, an 11q contiguous gene deletion disorder involving thrombocytopenia, facial dysmorphism, growth and mental retardation, malformation of the heart and other organs, and hearing impairment associated with recurrent ear infections. To determine whether any of these defects are because of hemizygosity for ETS1 and FLI1, we characterized the phenotype of mice heterozygous for mutant alleles of Ets1 and Fli1. Fli1(+/-) mice displayed mild thrombocytopenia, as did Ets1(+/-)Fli1(+/-) animals. Fli1(+/-) and Ets1(+/-)Fli1(+/-) mice also displayed craniofacial abnormalities, including a small middle ear cavity, short nasal bone, and malformed interface between the nasal bone process and cartilaginous nasal septum. They exhibited hearing impairment, otitis media, fusions of ossicles to the middle ear wall, and deformed stapes. Hearing impairment was more penetrant and stapes malformations were more severe in Ets1(+/-)Fli1(+/-) mice than in Fli1(+/-) mice, indicating partial functional redundancy of these transcription factors during auditory development. Our findings indicate that the short nose, otitis media, and hearing impairment in Jacobsen syndrome are likely because of hemizygosity for ETS1 and FLI1. PMID:26093983

  6. Physiological functioning of the ear and masking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The physiological functions of the ear and the role masking plays in speech communication are examined. Topics under investigation include sound analysis of the ear, the aural reflex, and various types of noise masking.

  7. Inner Ear Drug Delivery for Auditory Applications

    PubMed Central

    Swan, Erin E. Leary; Mescher, Mark J.; Sewell, William F.; Tao, Sarah L.; Borenstein, Jeffrey T.

    2008-01-01

    Many inner ear disorders cannot be adequately treated by systemic drug delivery. A blood-cochlear barrier exists, similar physiologically to the blood-brain barrier, which limits the concentration and size of molecules able to leave the circulation and gain access to the cells of the inner ear. However, research in novel therapeutics and delivery systems has led to significant progress in the development of local methods of drug delivery to the inner ear. Intratympanic approaches, which deliver therapeutics to the middle ear, rely on permeation through tissue for access to the structures of the inner ear, whereas intracochlear methods are able to directly insert drugs into the inner ear. Innovative drug delivery systems to treat various inner ear ailments such as ototoxicity, sudden sensorineural hearing loss, autoimmune inner ear disease, and for preserving neurons and regenerating sensory cells are being explored. PMID:18848590

  8. Mechanics of the frog ear

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Pim; Mason, Matthew J.; Schoffelen, Richard L. M.; Narins, Peter M.; Meenderink, Sebastiaan W. F.

    2010-01-01

    The frog inner ear contains three regions that are sensitive to airborne sound and which are functionally distinct. (1) The responses of nerve fibres innervating the low-frequency, rostral part of the amphibian papilla (AP) are complex. Electrical tuning of hair cells presumably contributes to the frequency selectivity of these responses. (2) The caudal part of the AP covers the mid-frequency portion of the frog's auditory range. It shares the ability to generate both evoked and spontaneous otoacoustic emissions with the mammalian cochlea and other vertebrate ears. (3) The basilar papilla functions mainly as a single auditory filter. Its simple anatomy and function provide a model system for testing hypotheses concerning emission generation. Group delays of stimulus frequency otoacoustic emissions (SFOAEs) from the basilar papilla are accounted for by assuming that they result from forward and reverse transmission through the middle ear, a mechanical delay due to tectorial membrane filtering and a rapid forward and reverse propagation through the inner ear fluids, with negligible delay. PMID:20149854

  9. The caecilian ear: further observations.

    PubMed

    Wever, E G; Gans, C

    1976-10-01

    The structure of the ear is examined in two species of caecilians, Ichthyophis glutinosus and I. orthoplicatus, and the sensitivity to aerial sounds is assessed in terms of the electrical potentials of the cochlea. The results are in general agreement with previous reports on other caecilian species. PMID:1068485

  10. New insights into craniofacial malformations.

    PubMed

    Twigg, Stephen R F; Wilkie, Andrew O M

    2015-10-15

    Development of the human skull and face is a highly orchestrated and complex three-dimensional morphogenetic process, involving hundreds of genes controlling the coordinated patterning, proliferation and differentiation of tissues having multiple embryological origins. Craniofacial malformations that occur because of abnormal development (including cleft lip and/or palate, craniosynostosis and facial dysostoses), comprise over one-third of all congenital birth defects. High-throughput sequencing has recently led to the identification of many new causative disease genes and functional studies have clarified their mechanisms of action. We present recent findings in craniofacial genetics and discuss how this information together with developmental studies in animal models is helping to increase understanding of normal craniofacial development. PMID:26085576

  11. Pediatric Obesity and Ear, Nose, and Throat Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... an ENT Doctor Near You Pediatric Obesity and Ear, Nose, and Throat Disorders Pediatric Obesity and Ear, ... all children be regularly screened for snoring. Middle ear infections Acute otitis media (AOM) and chronic ear ...

  12. Normative inner ear volumetric measurements.

    PubMed

    Teixido, Michael T; Kirkilas, Gary; Seymour, Peter; Sem, Kanik; Iaia, Alberto; Sabra, Omar; Isildak, Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    In the current study, we attempted to determine normative inner ear volumetric measurements generated from three-dimensional computed tomography (CT) images. In addition, we investigated a correlation between the axial length and the volume of the labyrinth and discussed clinical outcomes of this correlation. Amira 5.2.2 software was used to create three-dimensional isosurface images of the human labyrinth using two-dimensional CT images from 35 anatomically normal patients. With the three-dimensional labyrinths, complete dimensional analysis was performed to gain insight into both the volume and the greatest axial length of the inner ear. Paired t test and Pearson correlation were used. Our volume of the inner ear inquiry reported a mean volume of 221.5 with SD of 24.3 ?L (0.228 ?L for males and 0.218 ?L for females). The length showed a mean of 1.713 cm with SD of 0.064 cm (1.753 cm for males and 1.695 cm for females). The length was used to estimate the volume, and the estimates were within 10% of the measured volume 74.3% of the time. Normative volumetric measurements of the inner ear can be obtained by using three-dimensional CT Imaging by Amira 5.2.2 software. There was a statistically significant positive correlation between the axial length of the labyrinth and the volume of the labyrinth. The axial length of the labyrinth could be used to estimate the volume of the labyrinth, which may be clinically important to estimate the concentration of the drug distributed in the inner ear. PMID:25490572

  13. Malformations in Infants of Diabetic Mothers

    PubMed Central

    MILLS, JAMES L.

    2014-01-01

    Maternal insulin-dependent diabetes has long been associated with congenital malformations. As other causes of mortality and morbidity have been eliminated or reduced, malformations have become increasingly prominent. Although there is not universal agreement, the great majority of investigators find a two- to threefold increase in malformations in infants of insulin-dependent diabetic mothers. This increase is not seen in infants of gestational diabetics. It probably is not present in women whose diabetes can be controlled by diet or oral hypoglycemic agents. The risk does not appear to be primarily genetic since diabetic fathers do not have an increased number of malformed offspring. Most studies show a generalized increase in malformations involving multiple organ systems. Multiple malformations seem to be more common in diabetic than non-diabetic infants. Caudal regression has the strongest association with diabetes, occurring roughly 200 times more frequently in infants of diabetic mothers than in other infants. The teratogenic mechanism in diabetes is not known. Hyperglycemia may be important but human studies focusing on the period of organogenesis are lacking. Hypoglycemia has also been suggested based mainly on animal experiments. Insulin appears unlikely. Numerous other factors including vascular disease, hypoxia, ketone and amino acid abnormalities, glycosylation of proteins, or hormone imbalances could be teratogenic. None has been studied in sufficient detail to make a judgment. A large-scale prospective study is required to determine early fetal loss rates, correlate metabolic status during organogenesis with outcome, and assess the effect of diabetic control on malformation rates. PMID:20973049

  14. Immunologic Disorders of the Inner Ear.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinney, William C.; Hughes, Gordon B.

    1997-01-01

    Immune inner ear disease represents a series of immune system mediated problems that can present with hearing loss, dizziness, or both. The etiology, presentation, testing, and treatment of primary immune inner ear disease is discussed. A review of secondary immune inner ear disease is presented for comparison. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  15. Can Loud Music Hurt My Ears?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? Can Loud Music Hurt My Ears? KidsHealth > For Kids > Can Loud Music Hurt My Ears? Print A A A Text ... up? Oh! You want to know if loud music can hurt your ears . Are you asking because ...

  16. 21 CFR 878.3590 - Ear prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ear prosthesis. 878.3590 Section 878.3590 Food and... GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3590 Ear prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ear prosthesis is a silicone rubber solid device intended to be implanted to reconstruct the...

  17. 21 CFR 878.3590 - Ear prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ear prosthesis. 878.3590 Section 878.3590 Food and... GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3590 Ear prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ear prosthesis is a silicone rubber solid device intended to be implanted to reconstruct the...

  18. 21 CFR 878.3590 - Ear prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ear prosthesis. 878.3590 Section 878.3590 Food and... GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3590 Ear prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ear prosthesis is a silicone rubber solid device intended to be implanted to reconstruct the...

  19. 21 CFR 878.3590 - Ear prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ear prosthesis. 878.3590 Section 878.3590 Food and... GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3590 Ear prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ear prosthesis is a silicone rubber solid device intended to be implanted to reconstruct the...

  20. 21 CFR 878.3590 - Ear prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ear prosthesis. 878.3590 Section 878.3590 Food and... GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3590 Ear prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ear prosthesis is a silicone rubber solid device intended to be implanted to reconstruct the...

  1. Can Loud Music Hurt My Ears?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... What's a Booger? Can Loud Music Hurt My Ears? KidsHealth > For Kids > Can Loud Music Hurt My Ears? Print A A A Text Size en espaol ... to know if loud music can hurt your ears . Are you asking because you like to put ...

  2. [Acrania ultrasonography diagnosis: a rare embryologic malformation].

    PubMed

    Rezgui-Marhoul, Lamia; Sad, Wassim; Dridi, Lassaad; Ben Farhat, Leila; Ben M'Rad, Salmen; Hendaoui, Lotfi

    2004-06-01

    The authors report a case of acrania diagnosed on antenatal period in a routine morphologic ultrasonography at 19 weeks of intra uterine gestation on a 20-year-old patient, gravida 1, para 0. Acrania associated with exencephaly is a rare and lethal malformation characterized by a defect of development of the flat bones of the scalp whereas cerebral tissue is present often abnormal. Ultrasonography had allowed to find besides the cerebral malformation, spinal and visceral fetal malformations as well as cord abnormality that included only two vessels. PMID:15517958

  3. Computed tomography of congenital brain malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Sarwar, M.

    1984-01-01

    This book is illustrated showing each condition. This book is designed to correlate the pathology of CNS malformations with their CT scan appearance, mainly on the axial images. The author has drawn upon his personal experience and the information gleaned from the literature dealing with the description of the CT scan findings of these malformations. The emphasis is on simplicity of description. Since a large degree of morphological variation exists in each entity, numerous illustrations (wherever applicable) are shown to depict those variations. When appropriate, deficiency of the CT scan in the evaluation of these CNS malformations also is indicated. A description of CNS embryology is included as well.

  4. Antenatal diagnosis of aneurysmal malformation of the vein of Galen.

    PubMed

    Darji, Parth J; Gandhi, Viplav S; Banker, Hiral; Chaudhari, Hemang

    2015-01-01

    Vein of Galen malformation (VGAM) results from an aneurysmal aberration with an arteriovenous shunting of blood. Vein of Galen aneurysmal malformations are the most frequent arteriovenous malformations in infants and fetuses. The congenital malformation develops during weeks 6-11 of fetal development. Infants often die from high-output congestive heart failure. PMID:26643190

  5. The Effect of Ear Canal Pressure on Spontaneous Otoacoustic Emissions:. Comparison Between Human and Lizard Ears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dijk, P.; Manley, G. A.

    2009-02-01

    The center frequency, height and width of peaks in SOAE spectra depend on ear canal pressure. The width is interpreted as a measure of the inner ear source-signal-to-(e.g. thermal)-noise ratio. In humans, width increases with decreasing height. Apparently, ear canal pressure modifies the amplitude of the inner ear emission source signal. In lizards, the relation between peak width and height is not consistent. Here, middle ear transmission changes may account for many the observed amplitude effects.

  6. Postoperative ramifications of total ear replantation.

    PubMed

    Finical, S J; Keller, K M; Lovett, J E

    1998-12-01

    Complete avulsion of the external ear, much less common than other minor ear trauma, presents a complex and difficult problem. The authors present a 35-year-old male cigarette smoker who suffered traumatic avulsion of the right ear, and describe the replantation procedure and the patient's postoperative course. Aesthetic positioning of the replanted ear, treating the external auditory meatus, protecting the ear against exposure to the sun, and counseling the patient about issues related to sensation are important factors in the care of patients who have undergone such a procedure. PMID:9869143

  7. Gbx2 is required for the morphogenesis of the mouse inner ear: a downstream candidate of hindbrain signaling.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhengshi; Cantos, Raquel; Patente, Maria; Wu, Doris K

    2005-05-01

    Gbx2 is a homeobox-containing transcription factor that is related to unplugged in Drosophila. In mice, Gbx2 and Otx2 negatively regulate each other to establish the mid-hindbrain boundary in the neural tube. Here, we show that Gbx2 is required for the development of the mouse inner ear. Absence of the endolymphatic duct and swelling of the membranous labyrinth are common features in Gbx2-/- inner ears. More severe mutant phenotypes include absence of the anterior and posterior semicircular canals, and a malformed saccule and cochlear duct. However, formation of the lateral semicircular canal and its ampulla is usually unaffected. These inner ear phenotypes are remarkably similar to those reported in kreisler mice, which have inner ear defects attributed to defects in the hindbrain. Based on gene expression analyses, we propose that activation of Gbx2 expression within the inner ear is an important pathway whereby signals from the hindbrain regulate inner ear development. In addition, our results suggest that Gbx2 normally promotes dorsal fates such as the endolymphatic duct and semicircular canals by positively regulating genes such as Wnt2b and Dlx5. However, Gbx2 promotes ventral fates such as the saccule and cochlear duct, possibly by restricting Otx2 expression. PMID:15829521

  8. Contribution of congenital malformation to perinatal mortality in Lagos, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Abudu, O O; Uguru, V; Olude, O

    1988-08-01

    Over a 17-month period we prospectively recorded identifiable congenital malformations at delivery in singleton births in our hospital. Despite the prevailing religious and cultural belief we carried out autopsies in 41% of the perinatal deaths that occurred during the study period. Out of a total of 63 (21/1000 singleton births) congenital malformations discovered, 21 (33%) were identified at autopsy only. About 16% of total perinatal deaths were due to congenital malformation. Cardiovascular malformations accounted for about 40% of perinatal deaths from congenital malformations followed by central nervous system malformation (23.3%), gastrointestinal malformations (20%), musculo-skeletal malformations (6.7%); renal malformations (3.3%) and others (6.7%). No relationship between maternal age, parity and congenital malformation was found. The results from this study suggest that with the use of autopsy, teratology may contribute significantly to the prevailing high perinatal mortality in Lagos more than was previously thought. PMID:2905300

  9. Current concepts in lymphatic malformation.

    PubMed

    Lee, B B; Kim, Y W; Seo, J M; Hwang, J H; Do, Y S; Kim, D I; Byun, H S; Lee, S K; Huh, S H; Hyun, W S

    2005-01-01

    A lymphatic malformation (LM) is the most common form of congenital vascular malformation (CVM). The new Hamburg classification of CVM distinguishes the truncular (T) form from the extratruncular (ET) form of LMs. Both are consequences of a developmental arrest at the different stages of lymphangiogenesis as a result of defective genes. The purpose of this review was to evaluate the current management results of both forms of LMs. A retrospective review of the clinical data of 315 patients with a diagnosis of LMs treated between September 1994 and December 2001 was performed. Lymphoscintigraphy was the most frequent diagnostic test. The patients with the ET form were treated with sclerotherapy with OK-432 and/or ethanol. Combinations of CDP (complex decongestive physiotherapy) and/or compressotherapy were used to treat all the T-form patients. In addition, surgery, either reconstructive or ablative, was offered to patients with the T form who failed to respond to the proper CDP. A multidisciplinary team performed the management of LM, and the results were evaluated every 6 months. Among 797 patients with CVM, 315 were confirmed to have LMs, either as the T form (226) or the ET form (89). Another 66 LMs were diagnosed with hemolymphatic malformations (HLM). Most of the ET forms (89/315) were the cystic type (70/89), while the T forms included aplasia and/or an obstruction (204/226). The ET form was most frequent in the head, neck, and thorax (69/89). The T form was located most frequently to the extremities (202/226), mostly to the lower limb (180/202). Two hundred and twenty-six T forms belonged to the various clinical stages: stages I-32, II-104, III-48, IV-18, and an unclear stage-24. The ET form was treated with sclerotherapy using OK-432 (108/120) and absolute ethanol (12/120). Among the 11 patients with the multiple ET form, 7 patients underwent perioperative sclerotherapy with OK-432 and a subsequent surgical excision. The clinical response of the T form at the extremity to CDP was excellent to good in a majority of clinical stages I to II (121/136) but decreased to a good to fair degree in stages III to IV (31/66). The additional surgical therapy, either reconstructive (10/19) or ablative (9/19), provided limited success in improving CDP efficacy, owing mainly to poor compliance. The long-term outcome of the initial success through self-motivated home-maintenance care during the follow-up period of up to 48 months was totally dependent on patient compliance. OK-432 sclerotherapy to 51 ET forms has shown excellent results on 88.9% of the cystic type (40/45) and 50% (3/6) of the cavernous type (minimum follow-up for 24 months). Seventeen ET forms in 7 patients were treated with a preoperative OK-432 sclerotherapy and a subsequent surgical excision, which provided good to excellent results in 14 for a minimum of 24 months. Primary lymphedema, which is the T form of LMs, can be managed safely by a combination of CDP with compressotherapy. Patients with good compliance can benefit from additional surgical therapy, either reconstructive or ablative. The ET form, particularly the cystic type, can be treated with various scleroagents that are preferably less toxic as the primary therapy. A surgical excision with or without perioperative sclerotherapy provides good results for patients with the localized cavernous type of the ET form. A multidisciplinary team approach is essential for the proper care of LM. PMID:15696250

  10. [Gas ventilation through middle ear mucosa].

    PubMed

    Ohno, F; Imakiire, T; Nobori, T; Ohyama, M

    1993-11-01

    The possible effects of gas ventilation via the middle ear mucosa on middle ear pressure changes with N2O inhalation were studied. Sixty-seven ears without otologic problems were selected from among cases undergoing ENT surgery under general anesthesia. Anesthesia was induced by isoflurane or sevoflurane, and inhalation with a gas mixture of 21/min O2 and 31/min N2O was started under controlled respiration via endotracheal tube. Middle ear pressure was measured each minute with tympanometry just before and during N2O inhalation. Changes in pressure were plotted against time on an X-Y plotter, and the rate of middle ear pressure change and pressure change in 10 minutes were calculated. The following results were obtained; 1. In all cases, the middle ear pressure rose with N2O inhalation. However, the same concentration of N2O created different middle ear pressure changes in different individuals varying from 1.6 mmH2O to 107.8 mmH2O per minute. 2. The rate of middle ear pressure elevation tended to be greater in younger subjects, especially in children aged 4 to 7. 3. There was a negative correlation between the middle ear pressure change and pneumatization of the middle ear. 4. Sex, pulmonary function, and the N2O expiratory flow concentration did not contribute to the variability in the rate of the middle ear pressure elevation. PMID:8283337

  11. Genetics Home Reference: Dandy-Walker malformation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... right halves of the brain (agenesis of the corpus callosum), a sac-like protrusion of the brain through ... Walker malformation? agenesis ; atresia ; brainstem ; cell ; cerebellum ; chromosome ; corpus callosum ; diabetes ; disabilities ; disability ; fetus ; gait ; hydrocephalus ; hypoplasia ; imaging ; ...

  12. What Is an Arteriovenous Malformation (AVM)?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the rest of the body. Are there different types of brain AVMs? All blood vessel malformations involving the brain ... taken of all the blood vessels in the brain. For any type of treatment involving an AVM, an angiogram may ...

  13. Glomuvenous malformation: magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Flors, Lucia; Norton, Patrick T; Hagspiel, Klaus D

    2015-02-01

    We report a case of a glomuvenous malformation involving the dorsal aspect of the right hand and distal forearm in an 11-year-old boy. He had a history of multiple vascular anomalies since birth and presented with increasing right hand pain. MRI played an important role in characterizing and determining the extent of the lesion. In particular, dynamic time-resolved contrast-enhanced MR angiography precisely defined its vascularity. The diagnosis was made histopathologically after partial resection of the lesion. Glomuvenous malformation is a rare developmental hamartoma that originates from the glomus body. Clinically they usually resemble a venous malformation but they are a different entity. In the appropriate clinical setting this rare condition must be included in the differential diagnosis of a vascular malformation, especially when subtle arterial enhancement, early venous shunting and progressive filling of dilated venous spaces are depicted on MRA. PMID:24996811

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Cerebral cavernous malformation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and they lack other support tissues, such as elastic fibers, which normally make them stretchy. As a ... cell ; central nervous system ; cerebral hemorrhage ; CNS ; cutaneous ; elastic ; familial ; family history ; gene ; hemangioma ; hemorrhage ; inheritance ; malformation ; ...

  15. Genetic analysis of malformations causing perinatal mortality.

    PubMed

    Young, I D; Rickett, A B; Clarke, M

    1986-02-01

    An analysis of congenital malformations, other than neural tube defects, which have contributed to perinatal mortality in Leicestershire is presented for the years 1976 to 1982 inclusive. Chromosomal, single gene, or polygenic inheritance accounted for 67% of cases. PMID:3950936

  16. Genetic analysis of malformations causing perinatal mortality.

    PubMed Central

    Young, I D; Rickett, A B; Clarke, M

    1986-01-01

    An analysis of congenital malformations, other than neural tube defects, which have contributed to perinatal mortality in Leicestershire is presented for the years 1976 to 1982 inclusive. Chromosomal, single gene, or polygenic inheritance accounted for 67% of cases. PMID:3950936

  17. EEG Recorded from the Ear: Characterizing the Ear-EEG Method

    PubMed Central

    Mikkelsen, Kaare B.; Kappel, Simon L.; Mandic, Danilo P.; Kidmose, Preben

    2015-01-01

    Highlights Auditory middle and late latency responses can be recorded reliably from ear-EEG.For sources close to the ear, ear-EEG has the same signal-to-noise-ratio as scalp.Ear-EEG is an excellent match for power spectrum-based analysis. A method for measuring electroencephalograms (EEG) from the outer ear, so-called ear-EEG, has recently been proposed. The method could potentially enable robust recording of EEG in natural environments. The objective of this study was to substantiate the ear-EEG method by using a larger population of subjects and several paradigms. For rigor, we considered simultaneous scalp and ear-EEG recordings with common reference. More precisely, 32 conventional scalp electrodes and 12 ear electrodes allowed a thorough comparison between conventional and ear electrodes, testing several different placements of references. The paradigms probed auditory onset response, mismatch negativity, auditory steady-state response and alpha power attenuation. By comparing event related potential (ERP) waveforms from the mismatch response paradigm, the signal measured from the ear electrodes was found to reflect the same cortical activity as that from nearby scalp electrodes. It was also found that referencing the ear-EEG electrodes to another within-ear electrode affects the time-domain recorded waveform (relative to scalp recordings), but not the timing of individual components. It was furthermore found that auditory steady-state responses and alpha-band modulation were measured reliably with the ear-EEG modality. Finally, our findings showed that the auditory mismatch response was difficult to monitor with the ear-EEG. We conclude that ear-EEG yields similar performance as conventional EEG for spectrogram-based analysis, similar timing of ERP components, and equal signal strength for sources close to the ear. Ear-EEG can reliably measure activity from regions of the cortex which are located close to the ears, especially in paradigms employing frequency-domain analyses. PMID:26635514

  18. Malformation and plastic surgery in childhood

    PubMed Central

    Siegert, Ralf; Magritz, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Malformations of the head and neck show a huge variety of clinical symptoms with functional and esthetic consequences. Often times its rehabilitation requires multi-staged and multi-disciplinary procedures and concepts. These must consider eating, speech, mimic expression, hearing and “esthetics” or at least “normality”. A survey of the most common head and neck malformations and their treatment options are presented here. PMID:25587361

  19. Imaging diagnosis--split cord malformation.

    PubMed

    Zani, Davide D; De Zani, Donatella; Morandi, Nicola; Biggi, Marianna; Belloli, Angelo G; Riccaboni, Pietro; Rondena, Marco; Di Giancamillo, Mauro; Pravettoni, Davide

    2010-01-01

    The features of a calf with a split cord malformation are described. Clinically, there was severe cervicothoracic kyphoscoliosis and an interscapular dermal sinus associated with cerebrospinal fluid drainage. Using magnetic resonance imaging, complete duplication of the spinal cord at the cervical intumescence was detected. There was associated syringohydromyelia, multiple cervicothoracic vertebral malformations resulting in kyphoscoliosis and rachischisis, herniation of the cerebellar vermis, meningoencephalocele, and calvarial defects. PMID:20166395

  20. Capillary malformation--arteriovenous malformation syndrome: review of the literature, proposed diagnostic criteria, and recommendations for management.

    PubMed

    Orme, Charisse M; Boyden, Lynn M; Choate, Keith A; Antaya, Richard J; King, Brett A

    2013-01-01

    Capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations in the RASA1 gene and characterized by multiple small, round to oval capillary malformations with or without arteriovenous malformations. Ateriovenous malformations occur in up to one-third of patients and may involve the brain and spine. Although making the diagnosis is straightforward in some patients, there are other patients for whom diagnostic criteria may be helpful in their evaluation. Here we review the literature regarding capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation syndrome, propose diagnostic criteria, and discuss the care of patients with this condition. PMID:23662773

  1. Venous Malformation: update on etiopathogenesis, diagnosis & management

    PubMed Central

    Dompmartin, Anne; Vikkula, Miikka; Boon, Laurence M

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this review was to discuss the current knowledge on etiopathogenesis, diagnosis and therapeutic management of venous malformations. Venous malformations (VMs) are slow-flow vascular anomalies. They are simple, sporadic or familial (cutaneo-mucosal venous malformation or glomuvenous malformations), combined (e.g. capillaro-venous, capillaro-lymphaticovenous malformations) or syndromic (Klippel-Trenaunay, Blue Rubber Bleb Naevus and Maffucci). Genetic studies have identified causes of familial forms and of 40% of sporadic VMs. Another diagnostic advancement is the identification of elevated D-dimer level as the first biomarker of venous malformations within vascular anomalies. Those associated with pain are often responsive to Low Molecular Weight Heparin which should also be used to avoid disseminated intravascular coagulopathy secondary to intervention, especially if fibrinogen level is low. Finally, development of a modified sclerosing agent, ethylcelluloseethanol, has improved therapy. It is efficient and safe, and widens indications for sclerotherapy to sensitive and dangerous areas such as hands, feet and periocular area. PMID:20870869

  2. The War of Jenkins Ear

    PubMed Central

    Graboyes, Evan M.; Hullar, Timothy E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective In 1731, Spanish sailors boarded the British brig Rebecca off the coast of Cuba and sliced off the left ear of its captain, Robert Jenkins. This traumatic auriculectomy was used as a pretext by the British to declare war on Spain in 1739, a conflict that is now known as the War of Jenkins Ear. Here, we examine the techniques available for auricular repair at the time of Jenkins injury and relate them to the historical events surrounding the incident. Methods Review of relevant original published manuscripts and monographs. Results Surgeons in the mid-18th century did not have experience with repair of traumatic total auriculectomies. Some contemporary surgeons favored auricular prostheses over surgical treatment. Methods for the reconstruction of partial defects were available, and most authors advocated a local post-auricular flap instead of a free tissue transfer. Techniques for repair of defects of the auricle lagged behind those for repair of the nose. Conclusion Limitations in care of traumatic auricular defects may have intensified the significance of Jenkins injury and helped lead to the War of Jenkins Ear, but conflict between Britain and Spain was probably unavoidable due to their conflicting commercial interests in the Caribbean. PMID:23444484

  3. Some Remarks on Imaging of the Inner Ear: Options and Limitations.

    PubMed

    Giesemann, A; Hofmann, E

    2015-10-01

    The temporal bone has a highly complex anatomical structure, in which the sensory organs of the cochlea and the vestibular system are contained within a small space together with the sound-conducting system of the middle ear. Detailed imaging is thus required in this anatomical area. There are a great many clinical aims for which the highest-possible spatial resolution is required. These include the localization of cerebrospinal fluid fistulas, the detection of malformations of the middle and inner ear and the vestibulocochlear nerve, an aberrant course of the facial nerve and anomalies of the arterial and venous structures, the confirmation of dehiscence of the semicircular canals and finally, the verification of endolymphatic hydrops in cases of Mnire's disease. However, the term 'high resolution' is very time dependent. Two milestones in this respect have been (in 1991) the 3D visualization of the inner ear by means of maximum-intensity projection (MIP) of a T2-weighted constructive interference in steady state (CISS) sequence of a 1.5-tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner (Tanioka et al., Radiology 178:141-144, 1991) and (in 1997) imaging of the vestibulocochlear nerve for the diagnosis of hypoplasia inside the internal auditory canal using the same sequence (Casselman et al., Radiology 202:773-781, 1997).The objective of this article is to highlight the options for, and the challenges of, contemporary imaging with regard to some clinical issues relating to the inner ear. PMID:26153464

  4. Ear canal dynamic motion as a source of power for in-ear devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delnavaz, Aidin; Voix, Jrmie

    2013-02-01

    Ear canal deformation caused by temporomandibular joint (jaw joint) activity, also known as "ear canal dynamic motion," is introduced in this paper as a candidate source of power to possibly recharge hearing aid batteries. The geometrical deformation of the ear canal is quantified in 3D by laser scanning of different custom ear moulds. An experimental setup is proposed to measure the amount of power potentially available from this source. The results show that 9 mW of power is available from a 15 mm3 dynamic change in the ear canal volume. Finally, the dynamic motion and power capability of the ear canal are investigated in a group of 12 subjects.

  5. Abnormal facial appearance, body asymmetry, limb deformities, and internal malformations.

    PubMed

    Oudesluijs, Grtel; Simon, Marleen E H; Burggraaf, Rianne H J; Waterham, Hans R; Hennekam, Raoul C M

    2012-02-01

    We describe a newborn girl with multiple congenital anomalies and abnormal phenotype comprising underdeveloped corpus callosum with ventriculomegaly, chorioretinal atrophy, pulmonary arterial hypertension, annular pancreas, horseshoe kidney, asymmetric limb and chest anomalies, spinal segmentation defects, hypertrichosis, and unusual face with large anterior fontanel, high anterior hairline, broad forehead, mildly underdeveloped midface, hypertelorism, depressed nasal bridge, short and upturned nose, large mouth, retrognathia, and large and malformed ears. Work-up included cytogenetic studies of lymphocytes and skin fibroblasts, subtelomere Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA), whole-genome oligo-array, and molecular analysis of SETBP1 and NSDHL: no abnormalities were found. Mucopolysaccharide urinary excretion was elevated. Results of metabolic studies for sterol and peroxisomal abnormalities in fibroblasts were normal. Additional electronic microscopy studies in skin fibroblasts did not show evidence for storage in fibroblasts or lysosomal changes. Nosologic considerations allowed exclusion of Schinzel-Giedion and Urioste syndrome. This condition seems not to have been described before; a segregating Mendelian mutation is assumed. PMID:22140078

  6. Chiari 1.5 Malformation : An Advanced Form of Chiari I Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, In-Kyeong; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Kim, In-One

    2010-01-01

    The Chiari 1.5 malformation is defined as a tonsillar herniation within a Chiari I malformation with additional caudal descent of the brainstem through the foramen magnum. We describe a patient with Chiari I malformation who evolved to Chiari 1.5 malformation during longitudinal follow-up. A 15-year-old girl presented with neck pain during exercise for two years. She had been diagnosed with Chiari I malformation with mild hydrocephalus after minor cervical trauma at the age of six years. At that time, she was asymptomatic. After she complained of aggravated neck pain, neuroimaging (nine years after first imaging) revealed caudal descent of the brainstem and syringomyelia in addition to progression of tonsillar herniation. Posterior fossa decompressive surgery resulted in complete resolution of neck pain. Based on neuroimaging and operative findings, she was diagnosed as Chiari 1.5 malformation. Neuroimaging performed seven months after surgery showed an increased anterior-posterior diameter of the medulla oblongata and markedly decreased syringomyelia. This case demonstrates progressive developmental process of the Chiari 1.5 malformation as an advanced form of the Chiari I malformation. PMID:21113370

  7. Delayed presentation of anorectal malformations

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Shandip Kumar; Kanojia, Ravi P.; Wakhlu, Ashish; Rawat, J. D.; Kureel, S. N.; Tandon, R. K.

    2008-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Delayed management of anorectal malformation (ARM) increases the surgical and functional complications for the patient. We defined “delayed presentation of ARM” and reviewed our patients with ARM to find out the incidence and causes of delayed presentation. Materials and Methods: Patients satisfying the criteria of “delayed presentation of ARM” were involved. Detailed information of each patient including the mode of presentation, associated anomalies, plan of management and follow-up was obtained from the hospital records. Results: Between 2003 and 2006, 43 patients satisfied our criteria of “delayed presentation of ARM”. There were 21 males and 22 females. Seventeen of these males presented with low-type ARM. Eleven of them were managed by a single-stage procedure. These “delayed presenters” had to live with constipation, inadequate weight gain and parental anxiety for a greater time. Analysis of the outcomes showed more functional complications in patients who had undergone failed perineal surgery previously. In females with low ARM, the procedure of choice was anterior sagittal anorectoplasty (ASARP). Single stage surgery provides good outcomes for most of low type of ARMs. High-type ARMs in males and females were managed by a staged procedure. Conclusion: “Delayed presentation of ARM” is a major group of ARM in our setup. The management and results of their treatment are not different from those of the early presenters. The most common cause of delayed ARM is wrong advice given by the health care providers followed by inadequate treatment elsewhere. Corrective surgeries taking second attempt in perineum always produces poor outcomes. PMID:20011470

  8. Arteriovenous Malformations in the Brain.

    PubMed

    Graham, Glenn D.

    2002-11-01

    Arteriovenous malformations (AVM) are a leading cause of intracerebral hemorrhage, especially among the young. Because they pose a lifelong risk of serious bleeding, definitive treatment to obliterate the AVM should be pursued in the majority of patients. Microsurgical resection of a small AVM located in the superficial or non- eloquent brain achieves high cure rates with low morbidity, and is the recommended choice for such lesions. Radiosurgery with gamma knife, linear accelerator, or heavy ion beam irradiation is an alternative therapy for AVM treatments less than 3 centimeters in diameter located in brain regions where surgery is likely to produce major neurologic deficits, or for patients unable or unwilling to undergo craniotomy and resection. Cure rates are lower than with microsurgery, and obliteration of the lesion may take 2 to 3 years, during which time the patient remains at risk for hemorrhage. Because rates of recurrent hemorrhage are higher than rates of initial bleeding, radiosurgery may be a good option for patients who have not yet had an intracranial hemorrhage. Endovascular embolization as sole therapy is curative only in a small percentage of cases, but is recommended as part of a multimodal approach to reduce the size of a large AVM, and decrease bleeding risk of lesions with multiple or inaccessible feeding vessels or associated aneurysms prior to surgery or radiotherapy. Currently, treatment decisions must rely solely on Class III evidence from case series and expert opinion. Randomized clinical trials are needed to provide objective guidelines for the future management of patients with an AVM. PMID:12354370

  9. Numerical simulation of the human ear and the dynamic analysis of the middle ear sound transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, W.; Ma, J.; Huang, X.

    2013-06-01

    Based on the clinical CT of normal right ear, a 3-D ?nite element (FE) model of the human ear consisting of the external ear canal, middle ear(tympanic membrane, ossicular chain, ligaments, tendons), and inner ear (including semicircular canals, vestibular, spiral cochlear)was constructed in this paper. The complicated structures and inner boundary conditions of middle ear were described in this model. Model analysis and acoustic-structure-?uid coupled dynamic frequency response analysis were conducted on the model. The validity of this model was confirmed by comparing the results with published experimental data. The amplitudes and velocities of tympanic membrane and stapes footplate, sound pressure gain across the middle ear, and the cochlear input impedance were derived. Besides, it was concluded that the ear canal can amplify the sound signal in low frequencies.The modes of vibration of middle ear auditory ossicles, oval window and round window have been analysed. This model can well simulate the acoustic behavior with the interaction of external ear, middle ear and inner ear, which can supply more valuable theoretical support for development and improvement of hearing-aid and artificial inner ear.

  10. Prominent ears: Anthropometric study of the external ear of primary school children of Harare, Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Muteweye, Wilfred; Muguti, Godfrey I.

    2015-01-01

    Background Prominent ear is the most common congenital ear deformity affecting 5% of children in the Western world and has profound psychosocial effects on the bearer. It is important to know the prevalence in the local population to have a better appreciation of the local burden of the abnormality as well as to know the parameters of ear morphology locally. These parameters can be useful in the diagnosis and evaluation of ear anomalies and may help reconstructive surgeons in reproducing an anatomically correct ear of an African/Zimbabwean child. Objectives To evaluate the frequency of prominent ears in black school going children in Zimbabwe and to establish morphometric properties of the ear. Design Prospective observational, cross sectional study. Setting Three Primary schools in Harare. Two in a high density area and one in a low density area. Materials and methods Three Primary schools in Harare were selected at random. The following measurements were taken: ear lengths, ear projection and face height using a sliding caliper. Three hundred and five healthy pupils of the age range 9–13 years of both sexes were included in the study, whilst children with congenital anomalies, ear tumours and history of ear trauma were excluded. Results The mean ear height across the cohort was 56.95 ± 5.00 (right ear) and 56.86 ± 4.92 (left ear). Ear projection was 19.52 ± 2.14 (right ear) and 19.59 ± 2.09 (left ear). Gender related differences were noted. Mean ear height was significantly higher in males (p-value = 0.000). Ear projection was higher in males compared to females. A total of 6.89% had prominent ears. Among males, 7.69% had prominent ears whilst 6.17% of females had prominent ears. Conclusion The prevalence of prominent ear among black African children in the studied population is comparable to that of Caucasians. The study provides a set of biometric data of auricular dimensions for normal black African children aged 9–13 years. PMID:26468372

  11. Bacteriology of the chronically discharging middle ear.

    PubMed

    Karma, P; Jokippi, L; Ojala, K; Jokipii, A M

    1978-01-01

    Suitable bacteriological techniques revealed anaerobic bacteria in 38 (33%) of 114 chronically discharging middle ears. The genus Bacteroides was cultured from 25 ears. Aerobic bacteriology showed the predominance of staphylococci, facultative enteric gramnegative rods, diphtheroid bacilli and Pseudomonas species. Anaerobic bacterial cultures were always mixed with aerobic bacteria. 12 ears were culture-negative, and 9 of the 108 Gram-stained smers revealed no bacteria. No significant difference in bacteriology was noted between ears with or without local antimicrobial treatment, or between profusely draining or only moist ears. The ears with postoperative recurrent infection or with clinical suspicion of cholesteatoma grew anaerobes significantly more often, and were seldom sterile. Because anaerobic bacteria are frequently associated with chronic otitis media, their characteristics with regard to susceptibility to antimicrobials and to air must be remembered in the choice of therapy. PMID:358732

  12. Local Inner Ear Drug Delivery and Pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Salt, Alec N.; Plontke, Stefan K.R.

    2008-01-01

    Summary A number of drugs are in widespread clinical use for the treatment of inner ear disorders by applying them directly to the inner ear. Many new substances and drug delivery systems specific to the inner ear are under development, and in some cases are undergoing evaluations in animal experiments and in clinical studies. The pharmacokinetics of drugs in the inner ear, however, is not well defined and the field is plagued by technical problems in obtaining pure samples of the inner ear fluids for analysis. Nevertheless, a basic understanding of the mechanisms of drug dispersal in the inner ear has emerged that facilitates the design and interpretation of future pharmacokinetic studies. PMID:16214674

  13. Listening to Nature's orchestra with peculiar ears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yager, David D.

    2003-04-01

    Insects use hearing for the crucial tasks of communicating with conspecifics and avoiding predators. Although all are based on the same acoustic principles, the diversity of insect ears is staggering and instructive. For instance, a South African grasshopper demonstrates that hearing conspecific calls is possible over distances 1 km with ears that do not have tympana. Actually, these creatures have six pairs of ears that play different roles in behavior. In numerical contrast, praying mantises have just a single ear in the ventral midline. The ear is very effective at detecting ultrasonic bat cries. However, the bioacoustics of sound transduction by two tympana facing each other in a deep, narrow slit is a puzzle. Tachinid flies demonstrate that directional hearing at 5 kHz is possible with a pair of ears fused together to give a total size of 1 mm. The ears are under the fly's chin. Hawk moths have their ears built into their mouthparts and the tympanum is more like a hollow ball than the usual membrane. As an apt last example, cicada ears are actually part of the orchestra: their tympana function both in sound reception and sound production.

  14. Milestones in the History of Ear Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Berghaus, Alexander; Nicol, Marion San

    2015-12-01

    The reconstruction of ear deformities has been challenging plastic surgeons since centuries. However, it is only in the 19th century that reports on partial and total ear reconstruction start increasing. In the quest for an aesthetically pleasing and natural-looking result, surgeons worked on the perfect framework and skin coverage. Different materials and flap techniques have evolved. Some were abandoned out of frustration, while others kept evolving over the years. In this article, we discuss the milestones in ear reconstruction-from ancient times to early attempts in Western civilization to the key chapters of ear reconstruction in the 20th century leading to the current techniques. PMID:26667630

  15. An Effective 3D Ear Acquisition System

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yahui; Lu, Guangming; Zhang, David

    2015-01-01

    The human ear is a new feature in biometrics that has several merits over the more common face, fingerprint and iris biometrics. It can be easily captured from a distance without a fully cooperative subject. Also, the ear has a relatively stable structure that does not change much with the age and facial expressions. In this paper, we present a novel method of 3D ear acquisition system by using triangulation imaging principle, and the experiment results show that this design is efficient and can be used for ear recognition. PMID:26061553

  16. Management of Chronic Middle Ear Effusion

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Gary L.

    1969-01-01

    Management of chronic middle ear effusion must center around the reestablishment of normal eustachian tube function. If fluid does not clear with medical management, aspiration becomes necessary. A prosthetic eustachian tube is placed in the tympanic membrane in order to artificially ventilate the middle ear space while primary etiologic factors are being corrected. Unless recurrent or chronic ear disease of this nature is diligently treated, progressive damage may bring about irreversible hearing loss and the potentially dangerous disease, cholesteatoma of the ear. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:5798499

  17. Anorectal Malformation: Paediatric Problem Presenting in Adult

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, Rahulkumar N.; Chikkala, Bhargav; Das, Cinjini; Biswas, Somak; Sarkar, Diptendra Kumar; Pandey, Sushil Kumar

    2015-01-01

    This is a case report of 22-year-old girl admitted with abdominal distension, vomiting, and chronic constipation since birth. Abdomen was distended, and perineal examination revealed imperforate anus with vestibular fistula (ARM). So far worldwide very few cases have been reported about anorectal malformation presenting in adulthood, and thus extremely little data is available in the literature about an ideal management of anorectal malformation in adults. In our case in the treatment instead of conventional procedure of posterior sagittal anorectoplasty (PSARP) anal transposition was done and till two years after the definitive treatment during follow-up patient has been doing well with Kelly's score of six. Our experience suggests that anal transposition provides satisfactory outcome in adults presenting late with anorectal malformation. PMID:26539301

  18. Vascular malformations: localized defects in vascular morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Brouillard, P; Vikkula, M

    2003-05-01

    Vascular anomalies are localized defects of the vasculature, and usually affect a limited number of vessels in a restricted area of the body. They are subdivided into vascular malformations and vascular tumours. Most are sporadic, but Mendelian inheritance is observed in some families. By genetic analysis, several causative genes have been identified during the last 10 years. This has shed light into the pathophysiological pathways involved. Interestingly, in most cases, the primary defect seems to affect the characteristics of endothelial cells. Only mutations in the glomulin gene, responsible for hereditary glomuvenous malformations, are thought to directly affect vascular smooth-muscle cells. PMID:12752563

  19. Extrapyramidal dysfunction with cerebral arteriovenous malformations 1

    PubMed Central

    Lobo-Antunes, Joao; Yahr, Melvin D.; Hilal, Sadek K.

    1974-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformations have only rarely been implicated as a cause of basal ganglia dysfunction. In four instances where such a lesion was uncovered, abnormal involuntary movements were present. In two, tremor involving the contralateral limbs occurred, while in others the head and neck were involved in dystonic movements and posture. The clinical and angiographic characteristics of these four patients have been assessed and are presented in detail in this report. The possible mechanism by which arteriovenous malformations may disturb the internal circuitry of the basal ganglia and induce symptoms are discussed. Images PMID:4829531

  20. Percutaneous Cryotherapy of Vascular Malformation: Initial Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Cornelis, F.; Neuville, A.; Labreze, C.; Kind, M.; Bui, B.; Midy, D.; Palussiere, J.; Grenier, N.

    2013-06-15

    The present report describes a case of percutaneous cryotherapy in a 36-year-old woman with a large and painful pectoral venous malformation. Cryoablation was performed in a single session for this 9-cm mass with 24 h hospitalisation. At 2- and 6-month follow-up, the pain had completely disappeared, and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a significant decrease in size. Percutaneous cryoablation shows promise as a feasible and apparently safe method for local control in patients with symptomatic venous vascular malformations.

  1. Congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation type I

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Frederico Becker; Schultz, Regina

    2015-01-01

    Congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM) is an hamartomatous congenital pulmonary airway malformation with incidence ranging between 1:10,000 and 1:35,000 newborns. Currently CCAM is classified into five groups according to clinical and pathological features. The clinical outcome varies depending on the subtype and the extent of involvement. The authors report the case of a premature male newborn with the prenatal diagnosis of CCAM Type 1 associated with cardiac right axis deviation, who died 67 hours after birth due to respiratory failure. In addition to the autopsy report of this rare entity, the authors present its classification and prognosis. PMID:26558243

  2. Total knee arthroplasty in vascular malformation.

    PubMed

    Bhende, Harish; Laud, Nanadkishore; Deore, Sandeep; Shashidhar, V

    2015-01-01

    In Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, vascular malformations are not only in skin and superficial soft tissues but also in deep tissues like muscles bones and joints. It is well documemted that these recurrent intraarticular bleeds can cause early arthritis and joint pain. Performing arthroplasty in such patients is difficult and fraught with complications. We describe such a case where navigated total knee arthroplasty was performed with success to avoid the problems of intra medullary alignment used in the presence of intra medullary vascular malformations. We also suggest certain measures when knee arthroplasty is considered in such patients. PMID:26538765

  3. CT of congenital malformations of the lung.

    PubMed

    Mata, J M; Cceres, J; Lucaya, J; Garca-Conesa, J A

    1990-07-01

    We reviewed 40 cases of congenital malformations of the lung that were studied with both plain radiography and computed tomography (CT). We compared the CT findings with those of radiography. We found that CT was helpful in the management of these cases because it helped confirm the diagnosis, demonstrated unsuspected findings, and better depicted anatomic extent of anomalies, thus allowing better planning for surgery. We believe that CT is the method of choice for the study of congenital lung malformations and that it should be used before more invasive procedures such as bronchography or aortography. PMID:2377765

  4. Total knee arthroplasty in vascular malformation

    PubMed Central

    Bhende, Harish; Laud, Nanadkishore; Deore, Sandeep; Shashidhar, V

    2015-01-01

    In Klippel–Trenaunay syndrome, vascular malformations are not only in skin and superficial soft tissues but also in deep tissues like muscles bones and joints. It is well documemted that these recurrent intraarticular bleeds can cause early arthritis and joint pain. Performing arthroplasty in such patients is difficult and fraught with complications. We describe such a case where navigated total knee arthroplasty was performed with success to avoid the problems of intra medullary alignment used in the presence of intra medullary vascular malformations. We also suggest certain measures when knee arthroplasty is considered in such patients. PMID:26538765

  5. Neurodevelopmental malformations of the cerebellar vermis in genetically engineered rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    The cerebellar vermis is particularly vulnerable to neurodevelopmental malformations in humans and rodents. Sprague-Dawley, and Long-Evans rats exhibit spontaneous cerebellar malformations consisting of heterotopic neurons and glia in the molecular layer of the vermis. Malformati...

  6. [Lymphatic malformations in the head and neck area].

    PubMed

    Wiegand, S; Werner, J A

    2016-02-01

    Lymphatic malformations are congenital malformations of the lymphatic system. They are mainly located in the head and neck area, and grow proportional to the patients' body growth. Depending on the morphology, it can be distinguished between macrocystic, microcystic and mixed lymphatic malformations. Due to their infiltrative growth, microcystic lymphatic malformations are particularly difficult to treat. Therapeutic approaches include conventional surgical resection, laser therapy, sclerotherapy and systemic drug therapies. PMID:26820157

  7. Playing by Ear: Foundation or Frill?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woody, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    Many people divide musicians into two types: those who can read music and those who play by ear. Formal music education tends to place great emphasis on producing musically literate performers but devotes much less attention to teaching students to make music without notation. Some would suggest that playing by ear is a specialized skill that is…

  8. INNER EAR EMBRYOGENESIS: GENETIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL DETERMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The anatomy and developmental molecular genetics of the inner ear from establishment of the otic placode to formation of the definitive cochlea and vestibular apparatus will be reviewed and the complex 3-D structural changes that shape the developing inner ear will be illustrated...

  9. Playing by Ear: Foundation or Frill?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woody, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    Many people divide musicians into two types: those who can read music and those who play by ear. Formal music education tends to place great emphasis on producing musically literate performers but devotes much less attention to teaching students to make music without notation. Some would suggest that playing by ear is a specialized skill that is

  10. Differential Gene Expression in Human Cerebrovascular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Shenkar, Robert; Elliott, J. Paul; Diener, Katrina; Gault, Judith; Hu, Ling-Jia; Cohrs, Randall J.; Phang, Tzulip; Hunter, Lawrence; Breeze, Robert E.; Awad, Issam A.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We sought to identify genes with differential expression in cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs), arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), and control superficial temporal arteries (STAs) and to confirm differential expression of genes previously implicated in the pathobiology of these lesions. METHODS Total ribonucleic acid was isolated from four CCM, four AVM, and three STA surgical specimens and used to quantify lesion-specific messenger ribonucleic acid expression levels on human gene arrays. Data were analyzed with the use of two separate methodologies: gene discovery and confirmation analysis. RESULTS The gene discovery method identified 42 genes that were significantly up-regulated and 36 genes that were significantly down-regulated in CCMs as compared with AVMs and STAs (P = 0.006). Similarly, 48 genes were significantly up-regulated and 59 genes were significantly down-regulated in AVMs as compared with CCMs and STAs (P = 0.006). The confirmation analysis showed significant differential expression (P < 0.05) in 11 of 15 genes (angiogenesis factors, receptors, and structural proteins) that previously had been reported to be expressed differentially in CCMs and AVMs in immunohistochemical analysis. CONCLUSION We identify numerous genes that are differentially expressed in CCMs and AVMs and correlate expression with the immunohistochemistry of genes implicated in cerebrovascular malformations. In future efforts, we will aim to confirm candidate genes specifically related to the pathobiology of cerebrovascular malformations and determine their biological systems and mechanistic relevance. PMID:12535382

  11. Interventional treatment of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Poul Erik; Kjeldsen, Anette Drhse

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVM) are congenital vascular communications in the lungs. They act as right to left shunts so that the blood running through these malformations is not oxygenated or filtered. These patients are typically hypoxaemic with exercise intolerance and are at high risk of paradoxical emboli to the brain and other organs. These malformations are most commonly seen in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) (Mb. Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome). Nowadays, the generally accepted treatment strategy of first choice is embolization of the afferent arteries to the arteriovenous malformations. It is a minimally invasive procedure and at the same time a lung preserving treatment with a very high technical success, high effectiveness and low morbidity and mortality. Embolization prevents cerebral stroke and abscess as well as pulmonary haemorrhage and further raises the functional level. Embolization is a well-established method of treating PAVM, with a significant effect on oxygenation of the blood. Screening for PAVM in patients at risk is recommended, especially in patients with HHT. PMID:21160695

  12. Genetic basis of congenital cardiovascular malformations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardiovascular malformations are a singularly important class of birth defects and due to dramatic improvements in medical and surgical care, there are now large numbers of adult survivors. The etiologies are complex, but there is strong evidence that genetic factors play a crucial role. Over the la...

  13. Virus-induced congenital malformations in cattle.

    PubMed

    Agerholm, Jrgen S; Hewicker-Trautwein, Marion; Peperkamp, Klaas; Windsor, Peter A

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosing the cause of bovine congenital malformations (BCMs) is challenging for bovine veterinary practitioners and laboratory diagnosticians as many known as well as a large number of not-yet reported syndromes exist. Foetal infection with certain viruses, including bovine virus diarrhea virus (BVDV), Schmallenberg virus (SBV), blue tongue virus (BTV), Akabane virus (AKAV), or Aino virus (AV), is associated with a range of congenital malformations. It is tempting for veterinary practitioners to diagnose such infections based only on the morphology of the defective offspring. However, diagnosing a virus as a cause of BCMs usually requires laboratory examination and even in such cases, interpretation of findings may be challenging due to lack of experience regarding genetic defects causing similar lesions, even in cases where virus or congenital antibodies are present. Intrauterine infection of the foetus during the susceptible periods of development, i.e. around gestation days 60-180, by BVDV, SBV, BTV, AKAV and AV may cause malformations in the central nervous system, especially in the brain. Brain lesions typically consist of hydranencephaly, porencephaly, hydrocephalus and cerebellar hypoplasia, which in case of SBV, AKAV and AV infections may be associated by malformation of the axial and appendicular skeleton, e.g. arthrogryposis multiplex congenita. Doming of the calvarium is present in some, but not all, cases. None of these lesions are pathognomonic so diagnosing a viral cause based on gross lesions is uncertain. Several genetic defects share morphology with virus induced congenital malformations, so expert advice should be sought when BCMs are encountered. PMID:26399846

  14. Effects of middle-ear disorders on power reflectance measured in cadaveric ear canals

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Gabrielle R.; Horton, Nicholas J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Reflectance measured in the ear canal offers a noninvasive method to monitor the acoustic properties of the middle ear, and few systematic measurements exist on the effects of various middle-ear disorders on the reflectance. This work utilizes a human cadaver-ear preparation and a mathematical middle-ear model to both measure and predict how power reflectance ? is affected by the middle-ear disorders of static middle-ear pressures, middle-ear fluid, fixed stapes, disarticulated incudo-stapedial joint, and tympanic-membrane perforations. Design ? was calculated from ear-canal pressure measurements made on human-cadaver ears in the normal condition and five states: (1) positive and negative pressure in the middle-ear cavity, (2) fluid-filled middle ear, (3) stapes fixed with dental cement, (4) incudo-stapedial joint disarticulated, and (5) tympanic-membrane perforations. The middle-ear model of Kringlebotn (1988) was modified to represent the middle-ear disorders. Model predictions are compared to measurements. Results For a given disorder, the general trends of the measurements and model were similar. The changes from normal in ?, induced by the simulated disorder, generally depend on frequency and the extent of the disorder (except for the disarticulation). Systematic changes in middle-ear static pressure (up to 300 daPa) resulted in systematic increases in ?. These affects were most pronounced for frequencies up to 1000 to 2000 Hz. Above about 2000 Hz there were some asymmetries in behavior between negative and positive pressures. Results with fluid in the middle-ear air space were highly dependent on the percentage of the air space that was filled. Changes in ? were minimal when a smaller fraction of the air space was filled with fluid, and as the air space was filled with more saline, ? increased at most frequencies. Fixation of the stapes generally resulted in a relatively small low-frequency increase in ?. Disarticulation of the incus with the stapes led to a consistent low-frequency decreases in ? with a distinctive minimum below 1000 Hz. Perforations of the tympanic membrane resulted in a decrease in ? for frequencies up to about 2000 Hz; at these lower frequencies, smaller perforations led to larger changes from normal as compared to larger perforations. Conclusions These preliminary measurements help assess the utility of power reflectance as a diagnostic tool for middle-ear disorders. In particular, the measurements document (1) the frequency ranges for which the changes are largest and (2) the extent of the changes from normal for a spectrum of middle-ear disorders. PMID:22037477

  15. Genetic animal models of malformations of cortical development and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Wong, Michael; Roper, Steven N

    2016-02-15

    Malformations of cortical development constitute a variety of pathological brain abnormalities that commonly cause severe, medically-refractory epilepsy, including focal lesions, such as focal cortical dysplasia, heterotopias, and tubers of tuberous sclerosis complex, and diffuse malformations, such as lissencephaly. Although some cortical malformations result from environmental insults during cortical development in utero, genetic factors are increasingly recognized as primary pathogenic factors across the entire spectrum of malformations. Genes implicated in causing different cortical malformations are involved in a variety of physiological functions, but many are focused on regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, and neuronal migration. Advances in molecular genetic methods have allowed the engineering of increasingly sophisticated animal models of cortical malformations and associated epilepsy. These animal models have identified some common mechanistic themes shared by a number of different cortical malformations, but also revealed the diversity and complexity of cellular and molecular mechanisms that lead to the development of the pathological lesions and resulting epileptogenesis. PMID:25911067

  16. Surgical Management of Ear Diseases in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Csomos, Rebecca; Bosscher, Georgia; Mans, Christoph; Hardie, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Otitis externa and media are frequently diagnosed disorders in rabbits and are particularly common in lop-eared breeds because of the specific anatomy of the ear canal. Medical management for otitis externa and media often provides only a temporary improvement in clinical signs. Surgery by means of partial or total ear canal ablation (PECA or TECA) combined with lateral bulla osteotomy (LBO) represents a feasible approach that is well tolerated and provides a good clinical outcome. Short-term complications associated with PECA/TECA-LBO include facial nerve paralysis and vestibular disease. PMID:26611929

  17. [Cognitive and affective characteristics of children with malformation syndrome].

    PubMed

    Tosi, B; Maestro, S; Marcheschi, M

    1995-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the psychological and relational aspects in children suffering from specific malformative syndrome and precisely Down s., Sotos s., X-Fragile s. and Williams s. Indeed literature provides much data related to the phenotype, to the organic-biological characteristics, but little or nothing is known about the affective structure, the episodes and to the particular dynamics that emerge in he relation between the parents and the malformed child. A protocol was applied to our sample group (16 subjects). This protocol includes laboratory and instrumental tests (chromosome test, neurometabolic screening, EEG, CT or cranial MRI, cardiac and abdominal ultrasonography, ear and eye test) aspects. This evaluation is carried out through the proposal of standardized situations (psychometric tests) and a use of a freer observational setting. This permits us to understand how the child perceives himself the awareness and the image he has of himself and how able he is to integrate his illness experiences and his way of relating with the environment. The data of our observations are thus used to compile a grill for the structural diagnosis of the personality. Besides, this evaluation is flanked by the observation of the family in order to explore the psychological image that parents have of their child, his character, his good points, his bad points, his similarities, how he relates to them, any educational problems and the emotional reaction that the communication of the diagnosis has raised in them. The videotaped observations are subsequently evaluated through the application of a grill for the study of the mother-child relationship. The results obtained from the psychological research underline a reasonable heterogeneity both of the intellectual level and of the metapsychological profile. Twelve subjects were mentally retarded (5 with mild mental retardation, 7 with moderate mental retardation); the remaining 4 had a normal cognitive development (3 with Sotos s., 1 with Williams s.). Psychological disturbances are present and thus divided: light disturbances (affective immaturity, neurotic-depressive organisation) in 11 subjects. Average disturbances (dysharmonious structure, and borderline personality) in 4 subjects; severe disturbances (psychosis) in 1 subject. Besides, above all in the group of subjects with X-Fragile s. and Down s., the tendency to assume behaviour of a regressive type, also postural, emerges. Among the 4 groups it is frequent to resort to defence mechanisms of hypomaniac type, accompanied by the denial of the patient's "sick parts". Another common characteristic concerns the quality of imaginary life which is shown to be repetitive and stereotype in content. Indeed these children's play activity characterized by a limited capacity of symbolization. Instead, when the symbolic process is more developed, contents concerning a deteriorated and destructive image of the Self emerges. Through the evaluation of family dynamics what is more noticeable is that the parent-malformed child interaction appears to be quite nonstimulating and noninvolving or incoherent, lacking in harmony and empathy towards the child's inner world. Indeed we can notice a lack of both verbal and extraverbal exchange of communication and brief interactive sequences which do not usually take into account the child's proposals and an affective tonality of depressive and nonaffective type. Therefore it may be concluded a certain smoothness in the clinical expression of the syndromes considered, both as far as the cognitive deficit entity and the psychic problems are concerned. Referring to the interactive dynamics between parents and children with dismorphic syndrom it seems that the child's pathology becomes the organizational summit of the above-mentioned relational dynamics among most of the patients examined... PMID:8569638

  18. Mozart ear: diagnosis, treatment, and literature review.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Ken; Yotsuyanagi, Takatoshi; Saito, Tamotsu; Isogai, Noritaka; Mori, Hiromasa; Itani, Yoshihito

    2011-11-01

    Mozart ear is a congenital auricular deformity, which is mainly characterized by a bulging appearance of the anterosuperior portion of the auricle, a convexly protruded cavum conchae, and a slit-like narrowing of the orifice of the external auditory meatus. It is said to be uncommon, and because no one has yet fully described neither the disease nor the treatment, the concept of Mozart ear has not been unified. This report describes a case of a 13-year-old girl presented with an unusual congenital deformity which showed the features of Mozart ear. It is an extremely rare deformity that only about 4 clinical cases have been reported in medical literature thereby a treatment method has not been fully discussed. For surgical correction of our cases, we excised deformed conchal cartilage, turned it over, regrafted, and maintained a cosmetically positive result. We also reviewed and described the origin, current concept, and treatment method of Mozart ear. PMID:21587051

  19. Design Factors and Use of Ear Protection*

    PubMed Central

    Rice, C. G.; Coles, R. R. A.

    1966-01-01

    The problems of protecting the ear against hazardous noise are the subject of a general review, supported where relevant by data from the authors' own researches. Ear protectors are classified into two main types?plugs and muffsand the general principles of their function and limitations are stated. Examples of representative ear protectors are given in more detail, with particular respect to their relative merits and pure-tone attenuation characteristics. The effects of earplugs on speech communication are considered and the relationships between pure-tone attenuation and protection against continuous noise are discussed in some detail. The results of temporary threshold shift (T.T.S.) reduction studies of the efficiency of V.51R and Selectone-K earplugs in protecting against reverberant and non-reverberant impulsive noises are presented. The design requirements of ear protectors and some of the problems created by them are also outlined. Images PMID:5946129

  20. [Middle ear effusion and allergy in childhood].

    PubMed

    Bachert, C; Keilmann, A; Ganzer, U

    1989-04-01

    Besides mechanical or infectious factors in the genesis of secretory otitis media IgE-mediated hypersensitivity has often been discussed. In order to estimate the importance of an allergic reaction in the development of middle ear disease, we examined 27 children having adenoids and a secretory otitis media. We documented the patients' history of allergy and determined the IgE-levels in the serum, the middle ear effusions and the adenoid tissue. 5 out of 27 children suffered from an allergy of the upper respiratory tract, but only in one child we found an elevated level of IgE in middle ear effusion. On the basis of our investigations and recent literature, we suggest that an allergic rhinitis might cause an Eustachian tube dysfunction in a few patients. There is no evidence of a local allergic reaction of the middle ear mucosa. PMID:2742640

  1. Neuropathology of cerebral arteriovenous malformations in children.

    PubMed Central

    Takashima, S; Becker, L E

    1980-01-01

    Neuropathological findings in children who had died of cerebral arteriovenous malformation under 6 years of age were contrasted with those of children aged 6 to 15 years. In all subjects, the abnormalities were more marked in the shunting vessels and veins distal to the arteriovenous shunt than in the arteries. Fibrous thickening, calcification an adherent thrombus of vessel wall, and gliosis and haemosiderin in contiguous neural tissue were more common in the older than the younger children. Children less than 1 week old with vein of Galen malformations presented with congestive heart failure and "watershed" cerebral infarction; most of those over one week old had hydrocephalus and venous thrombosis with haemorrhagic infarction. Images PMID:7420086

  2. FTO variant associated with malformation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rohena, Luis; Lawson, Michelle; Guzman, Edwin; Ganapathi, Mythily; Cho, Megan T; Haverfield, Eden; Anyane-Yeboa, Kwame

    2016-04-01

    Common FTO variants are associated with obesity. However, it has recently been shown that homozygous FTO c.947G>A variant, which predicts p.R316Q, and c.956C>T, which predicts p.S319F, are associated with a malformation syndrome inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern. We present a similar homozygous FTO c.965G>A variant that predicts p.R322Q, associated with a lethal malformation syndrome in a consanguineous Yemeni family. Functional studies showed that the p.R316Q, p.S219F, and p.R322Q variants render the FTO protein inactive. We further expand on the phenotype of homozygous FTO loss-of-function mutations to include eye abnormalities, gingival overgrowth, craniosynostosis, and cutaneous photosensitivity. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26697951

  3. Arteriovenous malformation of the uterine cervix.

    PubMed

    Val-Bernal, José-Fernando; Hermana, Sandra

    2016-03-01

    A uterine arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is an uncommon cause of uterine bleeding. Location of this lesion in the uterine cervix is exceptional. We report a case of a 34-year-old woman who presented with chronic menorrhagias and hypochromic anemia. A sonographic study revealed a 10-cm, fundal, intramural, uterine well-circumscribed mass that distorted the endometrial cavity. The patient underwent hysterectomy for a large uterine leiomyoma. The pathological study revealed an incidental AVM of the posterior half of the cervix measuring 5.5cm in major diameter. We suggest that in our case cervical AVM might have occurred due to a large corporal leiomyoma distorting the uterine circulation. Differential diagnosis includes capillary hemangioma, venous malformation, or arteriovenous fistula. PMID:26810780

  4. Animal Models in Studying Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ming; Xu, Hongzhi; Qin, Zhiyong

    2015-01-01

    Brain arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is an important cause of hemorrhagic stroke. The etiology is largely unknown and the therapeutics are controversial. A review of AVM-associated animal models may be helpful in order to understand the up-to-date knowledge and promote further research about the disease. We searched PubMed till December 31, 2014, with the term “arteriovenous malformation,” limiting results to animals and English language. Publications that described creations of AVM animal models or investigated AVM-related mechanisms and treatments using these models were reviewed. More than 100 articles fulfilling our inclusion criteria were identified, and from them eight different types of the original models were summarized. The backgrounds and procedures of these models, their applications, and research findings were demonstrated. Animal models are useful in studying the pathogenesis of AVM formation, growth, and rupture, as well as in developing and testing new treatments. Creations of preferable models are expected. PMID:26649296

  5. 21 CFR 874.4140 - Ear, nose, and throat bur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat bur. 874.4140 Section 874...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4140 Ear, nose, and throat bur. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat bur is a device consisting of an interchangeable drill bit that...

  6. 38 CFR 4.87 - Schedule of ratings-ear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Schedule of ratings-ear...—ear. Diseases of the Ear Rating 6200Chronic suppurative otitis media, mastoiditis, or cholesteatoma... of the substance 10 6208Malignant neoplasm of the ear (other than skin only) 100 Note: A rating...

  7. 21 CFR 874.4140 - Ear, nose, and throat bur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat bur. 874.4140 Section 874...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4140 Ear, nose, and throat bur. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat bur is a device consisting of an interchangeable drill bit that...

  8. 21 CFR 874.3430 - Middle ear mold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Middle ear mold. 874.3430 Section 874.3430 Food... DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3430 Middle ear mold. (a) Identification. A middle ear mold is a preformed device that is intended to be implanted to reconstruct the middle...

  9. 38 CFR 4.87 - Schedule of ratings-ear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Schedule of ratings-ear...—ear. Diseases of the Ear Rating 6200Chronic suppurative otitis media, mastoiditis, or cholesteatoma... of the substance 10 6208Malignant neoplasm of the ear (other than skin only) 100 Note: A rating...

  10. 21 CFR 874.3430 - Middle ear mold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Middle ear mold. 874.3430 Section 874.3430 Food... DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3430 Middle ear mold. (a) Identification. A middle ear mold is a preformed device that is intended to be implanted to reconstruct the middle...

  11. 21 CFR 874.3430 - Middle ear mold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Middle ear mold. 874.3430 Section 874.3430 Food... DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3430 Middle ear mold. (a) Identification. A middle ear mold is a preformed device that is intended to be implanted to reconstruct the middle...

  12. 21 CFR 874.4140 - Ear, nose, and throat bur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat bur. 874.4140 Section 874...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4140 Ear, nose, and throat bur. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat bur is a device consisting of an interchangeable drill bit that...

  13. 38 CFR 4.87 - Schedule of ratings-ear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Schedule of ratings-ear...—ear. Diseases of the Ear Rating 6200Chronic suppurative otitis media, mastoiditis, or cholesteatoma... of the substance 10 6208Malignant neoplasm of the ear (other than skin only) 100 Note: A rating...

  14. 21 CFR 874.4140 - Ear, nose, and throat bur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat bur. 874.4140 Section 874...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4140 Ear, nose, and throat bur. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat bur is a device consisting of an interchangeable drill bit that...

  15. 38 CFR 4.87 - Schedule of ratings-ear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Schedule of ratings-ear...—ear. Diseases of the Ear Rating 6200Chronic suppurative otitis media, mastoiditis, or cholesteatoma... of the substance 10 6208Malignant neoplasm of the ear (other than skin only) 100 Note: A rating...

  16. 38 CFR 4.87 - Schedule of ratings-ear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Schedule of ratings-ear...—ear. Diseases of the Ear Rating 6200Chronic suppurative otitis media, mastoiditis, or cholesteatoma... of the substance 10 6208Malignant neoplasm of the ear (other than skin only) 100 Note: A rating...

  17. 21 CFR 874.3430 - Middle ear mold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Middle ear mold. 874.3430 Section 874.3430 Food... DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3430 Middle ear mold. (a) Identification. A middle ear mold is a preformed device that is intended to be implanted to reconstruct the middle...

  18. 21 CFR 874.4140 - Ear, nose, and throat bur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat bur. 874.4140 Section 874...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4140 Ear, nose, and throat bur. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat bur is a device consisting of an interchangeable drill bit that...

  19. 21 CFR 874.3430 - Middle ear mold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Middle ear mold. 874.3430 Section 874.3430 Food... DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3430 Middle ear mold. (a) Identification. A middle ear mold is a preformed device that is intended to be implanted to reconstruct the middle...

  20. Ear Infections in Autistic and Normal Children. Brief Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konstantareas, M. Mary; Homatidis, Soula

    1987-01-01

    Evaluation of the frequency of ear infections, ear tube drainage, and deafness for 51 autistic children (ages 2-18) indicated that autistic children had a greater incidence of ear infections than matched normal peers and lower functioning children had an earlier onset of ear infections than higher functioning autistic peers. (Author)

  1. An analysis of the acoustic input impedance of the ear.

    PubMed

    Withnell, Robert H; Gowdy, Lauren E

    2013-10-01

    Ear canal acoustics was examined using a one-dimensional lossy transmission line with a distributed load impedance to model the ear. The acoustic input impedance of the ear was derived from sound pressure measurements in the ear canal of healthy human ears. A nonlinear least squares fit of the model to data generated estimates for ear canal radius, ear canal length, and quantified the resistance that would produce transmission losses. Derivation of ear canal radius has application to quantifying the impedance mismatch at the eardrum between the ear canal and the middle ear. The length of the ear canal was found, in general, to be longer than the length derived from the one-quarter wavelength standing wave frequency, consistent with the middle ear being mass-controlled at the standing wave frequency. Viscothermal losses in the ear canal, in some cases, may exceed that attributable to a smooth rigid wall. Resistance in the middle ear was found to contribute significantly to the total resistance. In effect, this analysis "reverse engineers" physical parameters of the ear from sound pressure measurements in the ear canal. PMID:23917695

  2. Statins and congenital malformations: cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Diaz, Sonia; Fischer, Michael A; Seely, Ellen W; Ecker, Jeffrey L; Franklin, Jessica M; Desai, Rishi J; Allen-Coleman, Cora; Mogun, Helen; Avorn, Jerry; Huybrechts, Krista F

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the teratogenic potential of statins. Design Cohort study. Setting United States. Participants A cohort of 886?996 completed pregnancies linked to liveborn infants of women enrolled in Medicaid from 2000 to 2007. Methods We examined the risk of major congenital malformations and organ specific malformations in offspring associated with maternal use of a statin in the first trimester. Propensity score based methods were used to control for potential confounders, including maternal demographic characteristics, obstetric and medical conditions, and use of other drugs. Results 1152 (0.13%) women used a statin during the first trimester. In unadjusted analyses, the prevalence of malformations in the offspring of these women was 6.34% compared with 3.55% in those of women who did not use a statin in the first trimester (relative risk 1.79, 95% confidence interval 1.43 to 2.23). Controlling for confounders, particularly pre-existing diabetes, accounted for this increase in risk (1.07, 0.85 to 1.37). There were also no statistically significant increases in any of the organ specific malformations assessed after accounting for confounders. Results were similar across a range of sensitivity analyses. Conclusions Our analysis did not find a significant teratogenic effect from maternal use of statins in the first trimester. However, these findings need to be replicated in other large studies, and the long term effects of in utero exposure to statins needs to be assessed, before use of statins in pregnancy can be considered safe. PMID:25784688

  3. Embolization and radiosurgery for arteriovenous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Plasencia, Andres R.; Santillan, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) requires a multidisciplinary management including microsurgery, endovascular embolization, and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). This article reviews the recent advancements in the multimodality treatment of patients with AVMs using endovascular neurosurgery and SRS. We describe the natural history of AVMs and the role of endovascular and radiosurgical treatment as well as their interplay in the management of these complex vascular lesions. Also, we present some representative cases treated at our institution. PMID:22826821

  4. Ocular Malformations with Presumable Intraocular Calcification.

    PubMed

    Tengtrisorn, Supaporn; Vichitvejpaisal, Pornpattana; Nitirungjaras, Anupong; Kritsaneepaiboon, Supika; Kiddee, Weerawat; Singha, Penny

    2015-07-01

    This is a case of ocular malformations with presumable intraocular calcification based on computed tomography (CT) imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ocular ultrasound (US) findings. The authors presented the clinical, imaging and pathological findings of this case. Intraocular calcification is the most important finding in retinoblastoma, which requires aggressive management. It is important to distinguish it from other intraocular lesions, especially intraocular calcified hematoma. PMID:26267997

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Malformations of Midbrain-Hindbrain.

    PubMed

    Abdel Razek, Ahmed Abdel Khalek; Castillo, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    We aim to review the magnetic resonance imaging appearance of malformations of midbrain and hindbrain. These can be classified as predominantly cerebellar malformations, combined cerebellar and brain stem malformations, and predominantly brain stem malformations. The diagnostic criteria for the majority of these morphological malformations are based on neuroimaging findings. The predominantly cerebellar malformations include predominantly vermian hypoplasia seen in Dandy-Walker malformation and rhombencephalosynapsis, global cerebellar hypoplasia reported in lissencephaly and microlissencephaly, and unilateral cerebellar hypoplasia seen in PHACES, vanishing cerebellum, and cerebellar cleft. Cerebellar dysplasias are seen in Chudley-McCullough syndrome, associated with LAMA1 mutations and GPR56 mutations; Lhermitte-Duclos disease; and focal cerebellar dysplasias. Cerebellar hyperplasias are seen in megalencephaly-related syndromes and hemimegalencephaly with ipsilateral cerebellomegaly. Cerebellar and brain stem malformations include tubulinopathies, Joubert syndrome, cobblestone malformations, pontocerebellar hypoplasias, and congenital disorders of glycosylation type Ia. Predominantly brain stem malformations include congenital innervation dysgenesis syndrome, pontine tegmental cap dysplasia, diencephalic-mesencephalic junction dysplasia, disconnection syndrome, and pontine clefts. PMID:26599961

  6. Middle ear muscles of the frog.

    PubMed Central

    Wever, E G

    1979-01-01

    The anuran middle ear in its complete form includes two skeletal elements, the columella and operculum, each occupying a portion of the oval window of the otic capsule and each provided with a middle ear muscle. The two elements have an interlocking arrangement of a form that makes it possible for these muscles to exercise a high degree of control of sound transmission from tympanic membrane to inner ear receptors. From the anatomical relations it is inferred that the two muscles operate as antagonists so that contraction of the opercular muscle and relaxation of the columellar muscle leave the columella free to move in and out of the oval window in response to sound vibrations, whereas a contraction of the columellar muscle and relaxation of the opercular muscle tend to immobilize the columella and reduce the transmission inward. The frog thus achieves a degree of control of sound reception that probably is unmatched among vertebrate ears. The purpose of the middle ear mechanism is no doubt the protection of the inner ear receptors (the amphibian and basilar papillae) from overstimulation by sounds, including the animal's own cries and the intense clamor produced by a group of frogs calling in chorus. Images PMID:288086

  7. Giant Arteriovenous Malformation of the Neck

    PubMed Central

    Dieng, P. A.; Ba, P. S.; Gaye, M.; Diatta, S.; Diop, M. S.; Sene, E.; Ciss, A. G.; Ndiaye, A.; Ndiaye, M.

    2015-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformations (AVM) have a wide range of clinical presentations. Operative bleeding is one of the most hazardous complications in the surgical management of high-flow vascular malformations. In the cervical region, the presence of vital vascular structures, such as the carotid artery and jugular vein, may increase this risk. This is a case of massive arteriovenous malformation deforming the neck and the face aspect of this aged lady and growing for several years. A giant mass of the left neck occupied the carotid region and the subclavian region. The AVM was developed between the carotid arteries, jugular veins, and vertebral and subclavian vessels, with arterial and venous flux. The patient underwent surgery twice for the cure of that AVM. The first step was the ligation of the external carotid. Seven days later, the excision of the mass was done. In postoperative period the patient presented a peripheral facial paralysis which completely decreased within 10 days. The first ligation of the external carotid reduces significantly the blood flow into the AVM. It permitted secondarily the complete ablation of the AVM without major bleeding even though multiple ligations were done. PMID:26347847

  8. Simple risk predictions for arteriovenous malformation hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Kondziolka, D; McLaughlin, M R; Kestle, J R

    1995-11-01

    We present a simple risk prediction formula for arteriovenous malformation hemorrhage. Natural history studies have shown an annual risk of hemorrhage of 2 to 4% for patients with brain arteriovenous malformations. Although decision analysis programs and biostatistical models are available to predict long-term risks of hemorrhage, we hypothesized that there was varying knowledge regarding the use of such programs within the general neurosurgical community. To obtain information on the current use of risk data, we performed a survey of neurosurgeons at national meetings in 1988 and 1994. Neurosurgeons were asked to define the risk for arteriovenous malformation hemorrhage in the young adult patient over a 20- to 30-year period, given a 3 or 4% annual risk of hemorrhage. A wide range of answers was obtained (1-100% risk), and many different methods of calculation were used. The use of the multiplicative law of probability formula requires only knowledge of patient age and annual hemorrhage risk. Risk of hemorrhage = 1 - (risk of no hemorrhage) expected years of remaining life. The assumptions pertaining to this multiplicative formula include a constant yearly risk of hemorrhage and the independent behavior of all years of observation. We calculated the predictions of risk of hemorrhage across all age groups, as modified by published survival data. We think the use of this formula is justified by published natural history data across different ages and populations and that it is a simple and reasonable alternative to other methods of calculation. PMID:8559331

  9. The atrioventricular junctions in Ebstein malformation

    PubMed Central

    Ho, S; Goltz, D; McCarthy, K; Cook, A; Connell, M; Smith, A; Anderson, R

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVETo review the anatomical structure of the right atrioventricular junction, including the specialised atrioventricular conduction system, in hearts with Ebstein's malformation, to identify potential substrates for the abnormalities in conduction.?METHODSFive heart specimens representing the morphological spectrum of Ebstein malformation were examined grossly and histologically.?RESULTSOn the endocardial surface, the atrioventricular junction was marked by a faint line in two hearts, and by a small ridge in the other three. Analysis of the right parietal junction in four hearts revealed only two accessory muscular atrioventricular connections. A plane of fibrofatty tissue separated atrial from ventricular myocardium in the right parietal junction in all hearts. The compact atrioventricular node was closer to the coronary sinus than usual. Accessory nodoventricular connections were present in four hearts, while accessory fasciculo-ventricular connections were found in one. The right bundle branch was hypoplastic or absent in four hearts.?CONCLUSIONSIn this small series, the parietal atrioventricular junction was better developed than previously thought. Structural abnormalities of the atrioventricular conduction system, however, were present. These may account for some of the conduction abnormalities frequently observed with the Ebstein malformation.???Keywords: Ebstein's anomaly; atrioventricular node; bundle branch block; Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome PMID:10722549

  10. Combined Lymphedema and Capillary Malformation of the Lower Extremity

    PubMed Central

    Maclellan, Reid A.; Chaudry, Gulraiz

    2016-01-01

    Background: Primary lymphedema and capillary malformation are independent vascular malformations that can cause overgrowth of the lower extremity. We report a series of patients who had both types of malformations affecting the same leg. The condition is unique but may be confused with other types of vascular malformation overgrowth conditions (eg, Klippel–Trenaunay and Parkes Weber). Methods: Our Vascular Anomalies Center and Lymphedema Program databases were searched for patients with both capillary malformation and lymphedema. Diagnosis of lymphedema–capillary malformation was made by history, physical examination, and imaging studies. Because lymphedema–capillary malformation has phenotypical overlap with other conditions, only patients who had imaging confirming their diagnosis were included in the analysis. Clinical and radiological features, morbidity, and treatment were recorded. Results: Eight patients (4 females and 4 males) had confirmed lymphedema–capillary malformation. Referring diagnosis was Klippel–Trenaunay syndrome (n = 4), diffuse capillary malformation with overgrowth (n = 3), or lymphatic malformation (n = 1). The condition was unilateral (n = 6) or bilateral (n = 2). Morbidity included infection (n = 6), difficulty fitting clothes (n = 6), bleeding or leaking vesicles (n = 5), leg length discrepancy (n = 4), and difficulty ambulating (n = 3). All patients were managed with compression regimens. Operative management was liposuction (n = 3), treatment of phlebectatic veins (n = 3), staged skin/subcutaneous excision (n = 1), and/or epiphysiodesis (n = 1). Conclusions: Lymphedema and capillary malformation can occur together in the same extremity. Both conditions independently cause limb overgrowth primarily because of subcutaneous adipose deposition. Compression garments and suction-assisted lipectomy can improve the condition. Lymphedema–capillary malformation should not be confused with other vascular malformation overgrowth diseases that have different morbidities and treatments. PMID:27014547

  11. Evaluation and management of peripheral venous and lymphatic malformations.

    PubMed

    Nassiri, Naiem; Thomas, Jones; Cirillo-Penn, Nolan C

    2016-04-01

    The International Society for Study of Vascular Anomalies (ISSVA) broadly categorizes vascular anomalies as vascular tumors or vascular malformations. The latter are congenital lesions that are further categorized by their flow properties and include high-flow arteriovenous malformations, slow-flow venous and lymphatic malformations, and congenital mixed syndromes, which can include a combination of malformations. Unlike vascular tumors, vascular malformations never regress and can persist and grow for the duration of the patient's lifespan. As our understanding of the natural history, hemodynamics, and treatment outcomes of these lesions has expanded and evolved over the last few decades, certain fundamental diagnostic and therapeutic principles have been established and are considered standard of care. These overarching principles are crucial to adhere to in the overall management of these lesions and are highlighted and expanded on in this report, which focuses exclusively on peripheral slow-flow venous and lymphatic malformations. PMID:26993876

  12. [Maternal age as a risk factor for congenital malformations].

    PubMed

    Nazer, J; Cifuentes, L; Ruiz, G; Pizarro, M T

    1994-03-01

    We studied 131,899 consecutive births at the Maternity of the University of Chile Clinical Hospital, finding 4887 newborns with congenital malformations (representing a rate of 37.05 per 1000 alive newborns). Between January 1982 and December 1992 there were 41,344 births and 295 stillbirths (0.7%). Among the latter, 41 were malformed (13.9%). A graphic comparing the mean annual rates of malformations and maternal ages, shows a sustained increase in malformations form 1972 to 1988, that decreases thereafter and stabilizes since 1982. There is a marked parallelism between the curves of malformation rates and maternal age (t21 = 1.057, p < 0.1). It is concluded that the risk of congenital malformations increases along with maternal ages. PMID:7809519

  13. Extracranial vascular malformations (hemangiomas and vascular malformations) in children and adolescents – diagnosis, clinic, and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Eivazi, Behfar; Werner, Jochen A.

    2014-01-01

    The field of extracranial vascular anomalies is considered as special focus of pediatric otolaryngology and it has shown a rapid development during the last years. The reason for this interest is finally also due to the global acceptance of the classification introduced by the ISSVA (International Society for the Study of Vascular Anomalies). Hemangiomas are the most frequently observed vascular tumors. Today the systemic propranolol therapy is mostly used for therapy of hemangiomas requiring treatment. Increasingly, the topical application of beta blocker is discussed while the benefit in the head and neck seems to be limited. Vascular malformations are classified according to the morphology of the affected part of the vascular system in arterial, venous, arterio-venous, lymphatic, capillary, and combined vascular malformations. Conventional surgery, sclerosing therapy, and laser treatment are invasive options for the treatment of lymphatic malformations. The options for the treatment of venous malformations could be significantly improved during the last years. In this context, the use of Nd:YAG laser, the conservative treatment of the localized disseminated intravascular coagulation with low-molecular weight heparin, the re-discovery of bleomycin as effective sclerosing agent, and the improvement of alcohol-based embolization agents must be mentioned. Today the treatment with dye laser is the preferred therapy for capillary malformations and it is superior to other therapeutic options as for example photodynamic therapy. Arterio-venous malformations as representatives for high-flow lesions are the high-risk lesions. Frequently they are compared to malignant head and neck tumors, in particular when a curative treatment can no longer be assured because of diffuse or multifocal extent and when the disease shows a progressive course. The combined treatment of embolization and surgical resection and if necessary consecutive defect reconstruction have turned out to be appropriate for arterio-venous malformations. Incurable findings are still a major challenge. Despite the introduction of antiangiogenetic drugs in oncology, the medicamentous therapeutic approach could not be established for arterio-venous malformations up to now. PMID:25587362

  14. Structure and function of the mammalian middle ear. I: Large middle ears in small desert mammals.

    PubMed

    Mason, Matthew J

    2016-02-01

    Many species of small desert mammals are known to have expanded auditory bullae. The ears of gerbils and heteromyids have been well described, but much less is known about the middle ear anatomy of other desert mammals. In this study, the middle ears of three gerbils (Meriones, Desmodillus and Gerbillurus), two jerboas (Jaculus) and two sengis (elephant-shrews: Macroscelides and Elephantulus) were examined and compared, using micro-computed tomography and light microscopy. Middle ear cavity expansion has occurred in members of all three groups, apparently in association with an essentially 'freely mobile' ossicular morphology and the development of bony tubes for the middle ear arteries. Cavity expansion can occur in different ways, resulting in different subcavity patterns even between different species of gerbils. Having enlarged middle ear cavities aids low-frequency audition, and several adaptive advantages of low-frequency hearing to small desert mammals have been proposed. However, while Macroscelides was found here to have middle ear cavities so large that together they exceed brain volume, the bullae of Elephantulus are considerably smaller. Why middle ear cavities are enlarged in some desert species but not others remains unclear, but it may relate to microhabitat. PMID:26104342

  15. Delayed ear reconstruction: case report of reconstruction of an avulsed ear 2 days after injury.

    PubMed

    Brockhoff, Hans C; Zide, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Auricular reattachment and reconstruction following traumatic ear avulsion is a challenging surgical problem. Suggested reconstruction methods include direct reattachment, composite grafting, pocket methods, coverage with periauricular flaps, and microsurgical repair. A published alternative is reattachment and burial of the amputated part under a postauricular flap. If circumstances delay the surgical intervention, what is a safe window to still consider this form of treatment? In the current report, we present a case of a complete partial ear avulsion, which was reattached in the ER as a free graft. Two days later the cartilage was banked under a postauricular flap. A 22 year-old male had his ear was completely bitten off which was re-attached. Two days later the skin of the avulsed segment was dark and bloodless. The avulsed segment was removed from the ear. The overlying skin was dissected off of the attached ear leaving perichondrium on the medial aspect of the ear. The cartilage was then reattached. A postauricular pocket/flap was created and the ear tucked and secured to the postauricular fascia and skin closed overtop. Five weeks later, the patient had division and inset of the flap with a full thickness skin graft to the posterior aspect of the ear. Our results and experiences suggest that immediate reconstruction may not be crucial. PMID:24793138

  16. Do magnesium infusions protect the inner ear during middle ear surgery? A randomized double blind study.

    PubMed

    Pilgramm, M; Kchy, H P; Schfer, M; Weibel, H P

    1993-01-01

    Joachims et al. recently demonstrated that magnesium was able to protect the inner ear during exposure to noise and fire arms. During middle ear surgery, the inner ear is subjected to noise from fraising and drilling. We saw fit, therefore, to conduct a random double blind study to establish whether magnesium infusions would protect the inner ear during middle ear surgery. We examined 80 patients (38 verum, 42 placebo). The verum patients received 10 mg/kg body weight magnesium 12 hours and 1 hour prior to operation. Plasma and red cell magnesium levels were measured pre-operatively and intra-operatively; they rose as expected. Post-operative auditory tests showed that magnesium had no tendency to prevent inner ear damage. Advocates of magnesium criticize the limited number of patients in our study as well as the administration of the magnesium substitute. In our opinion, however, it should be borne in mind when evaluating these findings that noise from drilling and fraising is only one factor among many which can induce inner ear injury during middle ear surgery. PMID:8460391

  17. Hemangiomas and Vascular Malformations: Current Theory and Management

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Gresham T.; Friedman, Adva B.

    2012-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are a heterogeneous group of congenital blood vessel disorders more typically referred to as birthmarks. Subcategorized into vascular tumors and malformations, each anomaly is characterized by specific morphology, pathophysiology, clinical behavior, and management approach. Hemangiomas are the most common vascular tumor. Lymphatic, capillary, venous, and arteriovenous malformations make up the majority of vascular malformations. This paper reviews current theory and practice in the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of these more common vascular anomalies. PMID:22611412

  18. Occlusive vascular disease associated with cerebral arteriovenous malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Mawad, M.E.; Hilal, S.K.; Michelsen, W.J.; Stein, B.; Ganti, S.R.

    1984-11-01

    Selective carotid angiography and computed tomography were used in a study of the association of occlusive vascular disease with cerebral arteriovenous malformations in 13 patients. The majority of the arterial occlusions were proximal to the vascular malformation. Some, however, extended distal to the major branch supplying the arteriovenous malformation (AVM). Selective angiography with subtraction techniques defines the distinct angioarchitecture of these AVMs and the associated stenoses and collateral telangiectases.

  19. An evaluation of tympanometric estimates of ear canal volume.

    PubMed

    Shanks, J E; Lilly, D J

    1981-12-01

    The accuracy of tympanometric estimates of ear canal volume was evaluated by testing the following two assumptions on which the procedure is based: (a) ear canal volume does not change when ear canal pressure is varied, and (b) an ear canal pressure of 200 daPa drives the impedance of the middle ear transmission system to infinity so the immittance measured at 200 daPa can be attributed to the ear canal volume alone. The first assumption was tested by measuring the changes in ear canal volume in eight normal subjects for ear canal pressures between +/- 400 daPa using a manometric procedure based on Boyle's gas law. The data did not support the first assumption. Ear canal volume changed by a mean of .113 ml over the +/- 400 daPa pressure range with slightly larger volume changes occurring for negative ear canal pressures than for positive ear canal pressures. Most of the volume change was attributed to movement of the probe and to movement of the cartilaginous walls of the ear canal. The second assumption was tested by comparing estimates of ear canal volume from susceptance tympanograms with a direct measurement of ear canal volume adjusted for changes in volume due to changes in ear canal pressure between +/- 400 daPa. These data failed to support the second assumption. All tympanometric estimates of ear canal volume were larger than the measured volumes. The largest error (39%) occurred for an ear canal pressure of 200 daPa at 220 Hz, whereas the smallest error (10%) occurred for an ear canal pressure of -400 daPa at 660 Hz. This latter susceptance value (-400 daPa at 660 Hz) divided by three is suggested to correct the 220-Hz tympanogram to the plane of the tympanic membrane. Finally, the effects of errors in estimating ear canal volume on static immittance and on tympanometry are discussed. PMID:7329051

  20. Prolonged Radiant Exposure of the Middle Ear during Transcanal Endoscopic Ear Surgery.

    PubMed

    Shah, Parth V; Kozin, Elliott D; Remenschneider, Aaron K; Dedmon, Matthew M; Nakajima, Hideko Heidi; Cohen, Michael S; Lee, Daniel J

    2015-07-01

    Transcanal endoscopic ear surgery (EES) provides a high-resolution, wide-field view of the middle ear compared with the conventional operating microscope, reducing the need for a postauricular incision or mastoidectomy. Our group has shown in cadaveric human temporal bone studies that radiant energy from the endoscope tip can quickly elevate temperatures of the tympanic cavity. Elevated temperatures of the middle ear are associated with acute auditory brainstem response shifts in animal models. In EES, proposed methods to decrease middle ear temperature include frequent removal of the endoscope and the use of suction to rapidly dissipate heat; however, the routine application of such cooling techniques remains unknown. Herein, we aim to quantify the duration that the tympanic cavity is typically exposed to the endoscope during routine endoscopic middle ear surgery. We find that the tympanic cavity is exposed to the endoscope without a cooling mechanism for a prolonged period of time. PMID:25779471

  1. Retained Microcatheter after Onyx Embolization of Intracranial Arteriovenous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Il; Ko, Jun Kyeung; Lee, Tae Hong

    2012-01-01

    Endovascular embolization is being increasingly used to treat intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). However, we experienced two patients with retained microcatheters after AVM embolization using Onyx. PMID:22949969

  2. Histone deacetylase 1 is required for the development of the zebrafish inner ear

    PubMed Central

    He, Yingzi; Tang, Dongmei; Li, Wenyan; Chai, Renjie; Li, Huawei

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) has been reported to be important for multiple aspects of normal embryonic development, but little is known about its function in the development of mechanosensory organs. Here, we first confirmed that HDAC1 is expressed in the developing otic vesicles of zebrafish by whole-mount in situ hybridization. Knockdown of HDAC1 using antisense morpholino oligonucleotides in zebrafish embryos induced smaller otic vesicles, abnormal otoliths, malformed or absent semicircular canals, and fewer sensory hair cells. HDAC1 loss of function also caused attenuated expression of a subset of key genes required for otic vesicle formation during development. Morpholino-mediated knockdown of HDAC1 resulted in decreased expression of members of the Fgf family in the otic vesicles, suggesting that HDAC1 is involved in the development of the inner ear through regulation of Fgf signaling pathways. Taken together, our results indicate that HDAC1 plays an important role in otic vesicle formation. PMID:26832938

  3. Histone deacetylase 1 is required for the development of the zebrafish inner ear.

    PubMed

    He, Yingzi; Tang, Dongmei; Li, Wenyan; Chai, Renjie; Li, Huawei

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) has been reported to be important for multiple aspects of normal embryonic development, but little is known about its function in the development of mechanosensory organs. Here, we first confirmed that HDAC1 is expressed in the developing otic vesicles of zebrafish by whole-mount in situ hybridization. Knockdown of HDAC1 using antisense morpholino oligonucleotides in zebrafish embryos induced smaller otic vesicles, abnormal otoliths, malformed or absent semicircular canals, and fewer sensory hair cells. HDAC1 loss of function also caused attenuated expression of a subset of key genes required for otic vesicle formation during development. Morpholino-mediated knockdown of HDAC1 resulted in decreased expression of members of the Fgf family in the otic vesicles, suggesting that HDAC1 is involved in the development of the inner ear through regulation of Fgf signaling pathways. Taken together, our results indicate that HDAC1 plays an important role in otic vesicle formation. PMID:26832938

  4. Passive and active middle ear implants

    PubMed Central

    Beutner, Dirk; Httenbrink, Karl-Bernd

    2011-01-01

    Besides eradication of chronic middle ear disease, the reconstruction of the sound conduction apparatus is a major goal of modern ear microsurgery. The material of choice in cases of partial ossicular replacement prosthesis is the autogenous ossicle. In the event of more extensive destruction of the ossicular chain diverse alloplastic materials, e.g. metals, ceramics, plastics or composits are used for total reconstruction. Their specialised role in conducting sound energy within a half-open implant bed sets high demands on the biocompatibility as well as the acoustic-mechanic properties of the prosthesis. Recently, sophisticated titanium middle ear implants allowing individual adaptation to anatomical variations are widely used for this procedure. However, despite modern developments, hearing restoration with passive implants often faces its limitations due to tubal-middle-ear dysfunction. Here, implantable hearing aids, successfully used in cases of sensorineural hearing loss, offer a promising alternative. This article reviews the actual state of affairs of passive and active middle ear implants. PMID:22073102

  5. Extracellular Melanin in Inflammatory Middle Ear Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Mark; Roehm, Pamela C.; Bannan, Michael A.; Lalwani, Anil K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Melanin is a pigmented polymer with a known role in dermal solar protection. In vertebrates, melanogenesis has been reported in leukocyte population suggesting a potential role in innate immunity. In this study, we report the novel finding of melanin associated with chronic inflammation and speculate on its potential role in the middle ear and mastoid. Study Design Retrospective review of case series Methods Medical records of 6 patients who demonstrated melanin in the ear were reviewed. Results Six patients, ages from 1 to 63 were identified with extracellular melanin within middle ear and/or mastoid air cells at time of surgery. Intraoperative findings included cholesteatoma (n=3), chronic suppurative OM (n=2), and coalescent mastoiditis (n=1). Histologically, extracellular melanin was identified by Fontana-Masson stain; absence of melanocytes was confirmed by the absence of Melan-A and Prussian Blue stain. One patient had a positive stain for CD163 (a marker for macrophages). Conclusion This case series is the first demonstration of extracellular melanin within middle ear mucosa not associated with melanocytes or metastatic melanocytic lesions. The presence of melanin is either a variant of normal anatomy, a pathway of cholesteatoma formation, or a marker of the inflammatory immune response. Melanin's presence in the setting of inflammation suggests that there may be a heretofore unreported link between the pigmentary and immune systems in the ear. PMID:24999501

  6. Evolution and development of the vertebrate ear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritzsch, B.; Beisel, K. W.

    2001-01-01

    This review outlines major aspects of development and evolution of the ear, specifically addressing issues of cell fate commitment and the emerging molecular governance of these decisions. Available data support the notion of homology of subsets of mechanosensors across phyla (proprioreceptive mechanosensory neurons in insects, hair cells in vertebrates). It is argued that this conservation is primarily related to the specific transducing environment needed to achieve mechanosensation. Achieving this requires highly conserved transcription factors that regulate the expression of the relevant structural genes for mechanosensory transduction. While conserved at the level of some cell fate assignment genes (atonal and its mammalian homologue), the ear has also radically reorganized its development by implementing genes used for cell fate assignment in other parts of the developing nervous systems (e.g., neurogenin 1) and by evolving novel sets of genes specifically associated with the novel formation of sensory neurons that contact hair cells (neurotrophins and their receptors). Numerous genes have been identified that regulate morphogenesis, but there is only one common feature that emerges at the moment: the ear appears to have co-opted genes from a large variety of other parts of the developing body (forebrain, limbs, kidneys) and establishes, in combination with existing transcription factors, an environment in which those genes govern novel, ear-related morphogenetic aspects. The ear thus represents a unique mix of highly conserved developmental elements combined with co-opted and newly evolved developmental elements.

  7. Assessment of Ear Disorders Using Power Reflectance

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Hideko Heidi; Rosowski, John J.; Shahnaz, Navid; Voss, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the effect of various pathologies on power reflectance (PR) and absorbance measured in human adults. The pathologies studied include those affecting the tympanic membrane, the middle-ear ossicles, the middle-ear cavity, the inner ear, and intracranial pressure. Interesting pathology-induced changes in PR that are statistically significant have been reported. Nevertheless, because measurements of PR obtained from normal-hearing subjects have large variations and some pathology-induced changes are small, it can be difficult to use PR alone for differential diagnosis. There are, however, common clinical situations without reliable diagnostic methods that can benefit from PR measurements. These conditions include ears with a normal-appearing tympanic membrane, aerated middle-ear cavity and unknown etiology of conductive hearing loss. PR measurements in conjunction with audiometric measurements of air-bone gap have promise in differentiating among stapes fixation, ossicular discontinuity and superior semicircular canal dehiscence. Another possible application is to monitor an individual for possible changes in intracranial pressure. Descriptions of mechanisms affecting PR change and utilization of PR measurements in clinical scenarios are presented. PMID:23900180

  8. Sciaenid inner ears: a study in diversity.

    PubMed

    Ramcharitar, J; Higgs, D M; Popper, A N

    2001-01-01

    Sciaenid fishes (Family Sciaenidae) could potentially serve as models for understanding the relationship between structure and function in the teleost auditory system, as they show a broad range of variation in not only the structure of the ear but also in the relationship between the ear and swim bladder. In this study, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to investigate inner ear ultrastructure of the Atlantic croaker (Micropogonias undulatus), spotted seatrout (Cynoscion nebulosus), kingfish (Menticirrhus americanus) and spot (Leiostomus xanthurus). These species reflect the diversity of otolith and swim bladder morphology in sciaenids. The distribution of different hair cell bundle types, as well as hair cell orientation patterns on the saccular and lagenar maculae of these fishes were similar to one another. The rostral ends of the saccular sensory epithelia (maculae) were highly expanded in a dorsal-ventral direction in the Atlantic croaker and spotted seatrout as compared to the kingfish and spot. Also, ciliary bundles of the saccular maculae contained more stereocilia in the Atlantic croaker and spotted seatrout as compared with kingfish and spot. The shapes of the lagenar maculae were similar in all four species. In the Atlantic croaker and spotted seatrout lagenar maculae, the number of stereocilia per bundle was greater than those for the kingfish and spot. Given that saccular macula shape and numbers of stereocilia per bundle correlate with swim bladder proximity to the ear in the studied species, it is possible that inner ear ultrastructure could be indicative of auditory ability in fishes. PMID:11910172

  9. Ear Acupuncture in European Traditional Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Firenzuoli, Fabio

    2007-01-01

    Auricular acupuncture is a diagnostic and treatment system based on normalizing the body's dysfunction through stimulation of definite points on the ear. Rudimentary forms of acupuncture which probably arose during the Stone Age have survived in many parts of the world right down to present day. It was used in the ancient Egypt, Rome, Greece and all the Mediterranean area. It is a microacupuncture technique similar to reflexology, and was first described in France in 1950 by Paul Nogier who is considered the Father of modern ear acupuncture. It was speculated that the technique works because groups of pluripotent cells contain information from the whole organism and create regional organization centers representing different parts of the body. Nevertheless stimulation of a reflex point in the ear seems relieve symptoms of distant pathologies. Modern research is confirming the efficacy of ear acupuncture for analgesia and anxiety related disease, while tobacco dependence and other substance abuse still need confirmation. Actually main methodological problems with auricular acupuncture are that exist too many maps with little agreement regarding point location in the ear, and that the correspondence or reflex systems does not correlated with modern knowledge of anatomy and physiology. PMID:18227925

  10. Laser treatment of oral vascular malformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, U.; Gaimari, G.; Mohsen, M.; Tenore, G.; Palaia, G.

    2014-01-01

    Oral Vascular Malformations (OVM) are congenital anomalies characterized by morph-structural and/or functional changes of nature in severity and extension. OVM can affect any type of vessels arterial, venous or lymphatic and any capillary or anatomical. They are divided into two categories: low and high flow. In this study were treated 40 patients with OVM with a range size from 2 mm to 44 mm; they were subjected to clinical examination supported by Colour-Doppler Ultrasound instrumental examination and only for doubt cases the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) was prescribed. Only low flow venous and capillary malformations were treated by GaAlAs laser (Wiser®, Lambda, Brindole,Italy, 980nm) and KTP laser (SmartLite®, DEKA, Florence, Italy, 532nm) with two different techniques: the Transmucosal Thermophotocoagulation (TMT) and the Intralesional Photocoagulation (ILP). These techniques permitted a good control of haemostasis, avoiding bleeding both during surgery and in the postoperative. It is obtained an excellent and good healing respectively in 10% and 60% of cases, a moderate and poor resolution respectively in 22.5% and 7.5% of cases. A clear diagnosis allowed the management of Venous malformations (VM) by laser devices with wavelengths highly absorbed in haemoglobin in safety and efficacy and according to the principles of minimal invasive surgery. The aim of this study was to verify if the laser is effective in the treatment of OVM for the purpose of the clinical findings and the postoperative course. The Authors concluded that the laser can be considered the "gold standard" for treating OVM.

  11. Malformations of the tooth root in humans.

    PubMed

    Luder, Hans U

    2015-01-01

    The most common root malformations in humans arise from either developmental disorders of the root alone or disorders of radicular development as part of a general tooth dysplasia. The aim of this review is to relate the characteristics of these root malformations to potentially disrupted processes involved in radicular morphogenesis. Radicular morphogenesis proceeds under the control of Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS) which determines the number, length, and shape of the root, induces the formation of radicular dentin, and participates in the development of root cementum. Formation of HERS at the transition from crown to root development appears to be very insensitive to adverse effects, with the result that rootless teeth are extremely rare. In contrast, shortened roots as a consequence of impaired or prematurely halted apical growth of HERS constitute the most prevalent radicular dysplasia which occurs due to trauma and unknown reasons as well as in association with dentin disorders. While odontoblast differentiation inevitably stops when growth of HERS is arrested, it seems to be unaffected even in cases of severe dentin dysplasias such as regional odontodysplasia and dentin dysplasia type I. As a result radicular dentin formation is at least initiated and progresses for a limited time. The only condition affecting cementogenesis is hypophosphatasia which disrupts the formation of acellular cementum through an inhibition of mineralization. A process particularly susceptible to adverse effects appears to be the formation of the furcation in multirooted teeth. Impairment or disruption of this process entails taurodontism, single-rooted posterior teeth, and misshapen furcations. Thus, even though many characteristics of human root malformations can be related to disorders of specific processes involved in radicular morphogenesis, precise inferences as to the pathogenesis of these dysplasias are hampered by the still limited knowledge on root formation. PMID:26578979

  12. Somatic Mutations in Cerebral Cortical Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Jamuar, Saumya S.; Lam, Anh-Thu N.; Kircher, Martin; D'Gama, Alissa M.; Wang, Jian; Barry, Brenda J.; Zhang, Xiaochang; Hill, Robert Sean; Partlow, Jennifer N.; Rozzo, Aldo; Servattalab, Sarah; Mehta, Bhaven K.; Topcu, Meral; Amrom, Dina; Andermann, Eva; Dan, Bernard; Parrini, Elena; Guerrini, Renzo; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Leventer, Richard J.; Shen, Yiping; Wu, Bai Lin; Barkovich, A. James; Sahin, Mustafa; Chang, Bernard S.; Bamshad, Michael; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Shendure, Jay; Poduri, Annapurna; Yu, Timothy W.; Walsh, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although there is increasing recognition of the role of somatic mutations in genetic disorders, the prevalence of somatic mutations in neurodevelopmental disease and the optimal techniques to detect somatic mosaicism have not been systematically evaluated. METHODS Using a customized panel of known and candidate genes associated with brain malformations, we applied targeted high-coverage sequencing (depth, ?200) to leukocyte-derived DNA samples from 158 persons with brain malformations, including the double-cortex syndrome (subcortical band heterotopia, 30 persons), polymicrogyria with megalencephaly (20), periventricular nodular heterotopia (61), and pachygyria (47). We validated candidate mutations with the use of Sanger sequencing and, for variants present at unequal read depths, subcloning followed by colony sequencing. RESULTS Validated, causal mutations were found in 27 persons (17%; range, 10 to 30% for each phenotype). Mutations were somatic in 8 of the 27 (30%), predominantly in persons with the double-cortex syndrome (in whom we found mutations in DCX and LIS1), persons with periventricular nodular heterotopia (FLNA), and persons with pachygyria (TUBB2B). Of the somatic mutations we detected, 5 (63%) were undetectable with the use of traditional Sanger sequencing but were validated through subcloning and subsequent sequencing of the subcloned DNA. We found potentially causal mutations in the candidate genes DYNC1H1, KIF5C, and other kinesin genes in persons with pachygyria. CONCLUSIONS Targeted sequencing was found to be useful for detecting somatic mutations in patients with brain malformations. High-coverage sequencing panels provide an important complement to whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing in the evaluation of somatic mutations in neuropsychiatric disease. (Funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and others.) PMID:25140959

  13. Malformations of the tooth root in humans

    PubMed Central

    Luder, Hans U.

    2015-01-01

    The most common root malformations in humans arise from either developmental disorders of the root alone or disorders of radicular development as part of a general tooth dysplasia. The aim of this review is to relate the characteristics of these root malformations to potentially disrupted processes involved in radicular morphogenesis. Radicular morphogenesis proceeds under the control of Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS) which determines the number, length, and shape of the root, induces the formation of radicular dentin, and participates in the development of root cementum. Formation of HERS at the transition from crown to root development appears to be very insensitive to adverse effects, with the result that rootless teeth are extremely rare. In contrast, shortened roots as a consequence of impaired or prematurely halted apical growth of HERS constitute the most prevalent radicular dysplasia which occurs due to trauma and unknown reasons as well as in association with dentin disorders. While odontoblast differentiation inevitably stops when growth of HERS is arrested, it seems to be unaffected even in cases of severe dentin dysplasias such as regional odontodysplasia and dentin dysplasia type I. As a result radicular dentin formation is at least initiated and progresses for a limited time. The only condition affecting cementogenesis is hypophosphatasia which disrupts the formation of acellular cementum through an inhibition of mineralization. A process particularly susceptible to adverse effects appears to be the formation of the furcation in multirooted teeth. Impairment or disruption of this process entails taurodontism, single-rooted posterior teeth, and misshapen furcations. Thus, even though many characteristics of human root malformations can be related to disorders of specific processes involved in radicular morphogenesis, precise inferences as to the pathogenesis of these dysplasias are hampered by the still limited knowledge on root formation. PMID:26578979

  14. BIOLOGY OF VASCULAR MALFORMATIONS OF THE BRAIN

    PubMed Central

    Leblanc, Gabrielle G.; Golanov, Eugene; Awad, Issam A.; Young, William L.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose This review discusses recent research on the genetic, molecular, cellular, and developmental mechanisms underlying the etiology of vascular malformations of the brain (VMBs), including cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM), sporadic brain arteriovenous malformation (AVM), and the AVMs of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Summary of Review The identification of gene mutations and genetic risk factors associated with CCM, HHT, and sporadic AVM has enabled the development of animal models for these diseases and provided new insights into their etiology. All of the genes associated with VMBs to date have known or plausible roles in angiogenesis and vascular remodeling. Recent work suggests that the angiogenic process most severely disrupted by VMB gene mutation is that of vascular stabilization, the process whereby vascular endothelial cells form capillary tubes, strengthen their intercellular junctions, and recruit smooth muscle cells to the vessel wall. In addition, there is now good evidence that in some cases CCM lesion formation involves a genetic two-hit mechanism, in which a germline mutation in one copy of a CCM gene is followed by a somatic mutation in the other copy. There is also increasing evidence that environmental second hits can produce lesions when there is a mutation to a single allele of a VMB gene. Conclusions Recent findings begin to explain how mutations in VMB genes render vessels vulnerable to rupture when challenged with other inauspicious genetic or environmental factors, and have suggested candidate therapeutics. Understanding of the cellular mechanisms of VMB formation and progression in humans has lagged behind that in animal models. New knowledge of lesion biology will spur new translational work. Several well-established clinical and genetic database efforts are already in place, and further progress will be facilitated by collaborative expansion and standardization of these. PMID:19834013

  15. Capillary MalformationArteriovenous Malformation, a New Clinical and Genetic Disorder Caused by RASA1 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Eerola, Iiro; Boon, Laurence M.; Mulliken, John B.; Burrows, Patricia E.; Dompmartin, Anne; Watanabe, Shoji; Vanwijck, Romain; Vikkula, Miikka

    2003-01-01

    Capillary malformation (CM), or port-wine stain, is a common cutaneous vascular anomaly that initially appears as a red macular stain that darkens over years. CM also occurs in several combined vascular anomalies that exhibit hypertrophy, such as Sturge-Weber syndrome, Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, and Parkes Weber syndrome. Occasional familial segregation of CM suggests that there is genetic susceptibility, underscored by the identification of a large locus, CMC1, on chromosome 5q. We used genetic fine mapping with polymorphic markers to reduce the size of the CMC1 locus. A positional candidate gene, RASA1, encoding p120-RasGAP, was screened for mutations in 17 families. Heterozygous inactivating RASA1 mutations were detected in six families manifesting atypical CMs that were multiple, small, round to oval in shape, and pinkish red in color. In addition to CM, either arteriovenous malformation, arteriovenous fistula, or Parkes Weber syndrome was documented in all the families with a mutation. We named this newly identified association caused by RASA1 mutations CM-AVM, for capillary malformationarteriovenous malformation. The phenotypic variability can be explained by the involvement of p120-RasGAP in signaling for various growth factor receptors that control proliferation, migration, and survival of several cell types, including vascular endothelial cells. PMID:14639529

  16. The value of England and Wales congenital malformation notification scheme data for epidemiology: male genital tract malformations.

    PubMed Central

    Swerdlow, A J; Melzer, D

    1988-01-01

    Data from the England and Wales national congenital malformation notification scheme were examined for associations of male genital tract malformations. For some of the malformations comparison of notification rates with the literature suggested gross undernotification. There was also evidence suggesting bias: examination of the relationships of the malformations to birth weight, maternal parity, and maternal age at delivery showed some highly significant trends in risk, most of which were at variance with findings in the literature, and several potential mechanisms for bias could be adduced. Direct investigation is needed, for this and other similar data sets, of the extent and mechanisms of biased undernotification. PMID:2901455

  17. Intrapulmonary arteriovenous malformation causing recurrent strokes

    PubMed Central

    Abed, Kareem; Premachandra, Lalith; Vankawala, Viren; Sun, Qi

    2015-01-01

    This case reveals a left pulmonary arteriovenous malformation (PAVM) as a cause of recurrent cerebral and cerebellar emboli. Extensive workup excluded other etiologies of emboli formation, and the patient was transferred to a tertiary care center for percutaneous embolotherapy. In the absence of a clear etiology, PAVM should be considered as a potential cause of recurrent cerebral emboli, especially in the absence of carotid disease, intracardiac thrombus, atrial septal defect, and patent foramen ovale. Diagnostic work-up for the PAVM can be cost effective and expedited by utilization of agitated saline contrast echocardiography, as noted in our case. PMID:26486114

  18. Role of Embolization for Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Jason A.; Lavine, Sean D.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are complex high-flow lesions that can result in devastating neurological injury when they hemorrhage. Embolization is a critical component in the management of many patients with cerebral AVMs. Embolization may be used as an independent curative therapy or more commonly in an adjuvant fashion prior to either micro- or radiosurgery. Although the treatment-related morbidity and mortality for AVMsincluding that due to microsurgery, embolization, and radiosurgerycan be substantial, its natural history offers little solace. Fortunately, care by a multidisciplinary team experienced in the comprehensive management of AVMs can offer excellent results in most cases. PMID:25624978

  19. Smaller platelet volumes associated with vascular malformations.

    PubMed

    Klapman, Marvin H; Sosa, Valentina B; Mattson-Gates, Gail F; Baker, Cynthia N; Sydorak, Roman M; Ong, Victor L; Li, Bonnie H; Yao, Janis F

    2013-06-01

    Various parameters in 91 adult participants with vascular malformations and 91 controls were studied. The mean of the participants' platelet volumes was 8.5 fL and that of their controls was 9.1 (P < .001). The mean of the participants' platelet mass was 2145 L/L of blood and that of their controls was 2351 (P = .006). The other parameters studied were not significantly different than the controls. It is suggested that the lower platelet volume might be related to a compensatory mechanism to keep the total body platelet mass stable despite the increased vasculature. PMID:22297559

  20. Prevalence of Chiari I Malformation and Syringomyelia.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Elyne N; Muraszko, Karin M; Maher, Cormac O

    2015-10-01

    Chiari I malformation (CM) is a common neurosurgical diagnosis and spinal cord syrinx is frequently found in patients with CM. Asymptomatic CM is a common imaging finding. Symptomatic CM is less common. Variation in prevalence estimates may be attributed to differences in sensitivity of CM detection between studies as well as differences in the populations being analyzed. The prevalence of low tonsil position and CM on MRI is higher in children and young adults compared with older adults. Studies that include a large number of older adults find a lower prevalence compared with analyses of children. PMID:26408058

  1. Spinal arteriovenous malformation masquerating zoster sine herpete.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Young; Ok, Se Jin; Oh, Chang Keun; Park, Sun Kyung; Kim, Do Wan; Yang, Jong Yeun

    2013-01-01

    Zoster sine herpete (ZSH) is difficult to diagnosis during an acute period due to the absence of the characteristic zosteriform dermatomal rash; therefore, progression to postherpetic neuralgia is more common than typical zoster. In addition, misdiagnosis of other neuropathic pain as ZSH is common in clinical situations. Here, we report a case of spinal arteriovenous malformation that mimics ZSH. This is a rare condition; therefore, high clinical suspicion for a correct diagnosis and proper examination are not easy. However, early diagnosis and definitive treatment are essential to prevent neurologic deficit and mortality. PMID:23342212

  2. Spinal Arteriovenous Malformation Masquerating Zoster Sine Herpete

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Young; Ok, Se Jin; Oh, Chang Keun; Park, Sun Kyung; Kim, Do Wan

    2013-01-01

    Zoster sine herpete (ZSH) is difficult to diagnosis during an acute period due to the absence of the characteristic zosteriform dermatomal rash; therefore, progression to postherpetic neuralgia is more common than typical zoster. In addition, misdiagnosis of other neuropathic pain as ZSH is common in clinical situations. Here, we report a case of spinal arteriovenous malformation that mimics ZSH. This is a rare condition; therefore, high clinical suspicion for a correct diagnosis and proper examination are not easy. However, early diagnosis and definitive treatment are essential to prevent neurologic deficit and mortality. PMID:23342212

  3. Pretreatment imaging of peripheral vascular malformations

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Joshua B; Cogswell, Petrice M; McKusick, Michael A; Binkovitz, Larry A; Riederer, Stephen J; Young, Phillip M

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral vascular malformations (VMs) are complex and diverse vascular lesions which require individualized pretreatment planning. Pretreatment imaging using various modalities, especially magnetic resonance imaging and time-resolved magnetic resonance angiography, is a valuable tool for classifying peripheral VMs to allow proper diagnosis, demonstrate complete extent, identify the nidus, and distinguish between low-flow and high-flow dynamics that determines the treatment approach. We discuss pretreatment imaging findings in four patients with peripheral VMs and how diagnostic imaging helped guide management. PMID:25625123

  4. Pediatric aneurysms and vein of Galen malformations

    PubMed Central

    Rao, V. R. K.; Mathuriya, S. N.

    2011-01-01

    Pediatric aneurysms are different from adult aneurysms – they are more rare, are giant and in the posterior circulation more frequently than in adults and may be associated with congenital disorders. Infectious and traumatic aneursyms are also seen more frequently. Vein of Galen malformations are even rarer entities. They may be of choroidal or mural type. Based on the degree of AV shunting they may present with failure to thrive, with hydrocephalus or in severe cases with heart failure. The only possible treatment is by endovascular techniques – both transarterial and transvenous routes are employed. Rarely transtorcular approach is needed. These cases should be managed by an experienced neurointerventionist. PMID:22069420

  5. Genetic and Developmental Basis of Cardiovascular Malformations.

    PubMed

    Azhar, Mohamad; Ware, Stephanie M

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular malformations (CVMs) are the most common birth defect, occurring in 1% to 5% of all live births. Genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors all influence the development of CVMs, and an improved understanding of the causation of CVMs is a prerequisite for prevention. Cardiac development is a complex, multistep process of morphogenesis that is under genetic regulation. Although the genetic contribution to CVMs is well recognized, the genetic causes of human CVMs are still identified infrequently. This article discusses the key genetic concepts characterizing human CVMs, their developmental basis, and the critical developmental and genetic concepts underlying their pathogenesis. PMID:26876120

  6. Precise individualized armature for ear reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evenhouse, Raymond J.; Chen, Xiaoming

    1991-04-01

    The cosmetic result of an ear restored surgically or via prosthetics is dependent on the surgeon''s ability to carve a precise cartilage armature at the time of surgery or the prosthetist''s ability to sculpt in wax an exact duplicate of the patient''s " missing" ear. Introducing CAD/CAM technology into the process benefits the esthetic outcome of these procedures. By utilizing serial section information derived from CAT MRI or moulage techniques a mirrorimage of the patient''s " donor" ear is generated. The resulting earform data is then used for the design of a cartilage armature produced by multi-axis milling or to produce by stereolithography a model which serves as the basis for a prosthesis.

  7. Microsurgical reattachment of totally amputated ears.

    PubMed

    Mutimer, K L; Banis, J C; Upton, J

    1987-04-01

    At a time when microsurgical reattachment of amputated limbs is commonplace, successful reattachment of total ear amputations is rare. Avulsed vessels, small diameters (0.3 to 0.7 mm), and technical difficulties provide primary obstacles. Three clinical cases of ear reattachments are presented which encompass the clinical spectrum of an uncomplicated success, a salvage of an impending failure, and a late failure due to venous thrombosis. In all cases there was difficulty with identification of vessels, with differentiation of arteries from veins, and in the performance of venous anastomoses. Vein grafts were necessary in two of the three patients. Anticoagulation was essential in alleviating venous thrombosis. Medicinal leeches (Hirudo medicinalis) were used to salvage one case with venous thrombosis. Despite the technical difficulties and long operative times, successful microvascular reattachment of an amputated ear is superior to any other means of reattachment or reconstruction. PMID:3823244

  8. Middle ear gas exchange in isobaric counterdiffusion.

    PubMed

    Dueker, C W; Lambertsen, C J; Rosowski, J J; Saunders, J C

    1979-12-01

    Nitrous oxide entry into the middle ear gas space was studied in cats in relation to anesthesia and the vestibular dysfunction caused by isobaric inert gas counter-diffusion in diving. A catheter implanted in the auditory bulla was used for direct gas sampling and pressure measurements. Experiments were designed to evaluate the participation of the eustachian tube, mucosal blood vessels, and tympanic membrane in middle ear gas exchange. The eustachian tube did not contribute to N2O entry and the mucosal blood supply only contributed about one-third of the total N2O accumulation. Diffusion across the tympanic membrane accounted for most of the N2O entering the middle ear from ambient and respiratory environments containing N2O. PMID:536296

  9. [Complications Resulting from Taking Ear Impressions].

    PubMed

    Sugiuchi, Tomoko; Kodera, Kazuoki; Zusho, Hiroyuki; Asano, Yoshikazu; Kanesada, Keiko; Hayashida, Mitsuhiro; Kanaya, Koichiro; Tokumaru, Takeshi

    2015-08-01

    In 2012, we carried out a study in a large sample to understand the secondary injuries caused during the taking ear impressions for hearing aids. This study is a follow-up of previous research conducted in 1986 (285 medical institutions) and 1999 (98 medical institutions). We posted a questionnaire survey to the otolaryngology departments of 3,257 medical institutions. The response rate to the questionnaire was 62.9% (2,050 of the 3,257 institutions), and the results indicated that 301 of the 2050 institutions (14.7%) had experience with secondary injuries, with a total of 460 cases reported. In 342 of the 460 cases (74.3%), the secondary injuries occurred at hearing-aid dealerships, followed by 67 cases (14.6%) at affiliated medical institutions, and 51 cases (11.1%) in other locations, including other medical institutions, rehabilitation counseling centers, and educational institutions. The most common type of secondary injury (298 cases, 64.8%) was caused by the presence of foreign bodies in the ear, which in turn was a result of complications occurring during the removal of residual ear impression material. Of these 298 cases, 32 required excision of the foreign bodies and surgical intervention under general anesthesia. The remaining 10 cases exhibited isolated tympanic membrane perforation without foreign body-related complications. Furthermore, 146 cases (31.7%) developed bleeding and otitis externa following removal of the ear impression, and there were reports of cases with bleeding that required long-term outpatient care and treatment. Therefore, since retention of a foreign body in the ear and tympanic membrane perforation can occur even in patients without a history of surgery or prior otologic history, adjustment of hearing aids requires prior otorhinolaryngological examination. Furthermore, because of the risk of secondary injury when taking ear impressions, this procedure must be performed with caution under the guidance of an otolaryngologist. PMID:26548100

  10. High intensity anthropogenic sound damages fish ears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCauley, Robert D.; Fewtrell, Jane; Popper, Arthur N.

    2003-01-01

    Marine petroleum exploration involves the repetitive use of high-energy noise sources, air-guns, that produce a short, sharp, low-frequency sound. Despite reports of behavioral responses of fishes and marine mammals to such noise, it is not known whether exposure to air-guns has the potential to damage the ears of aquatic vertebrates. It is shown here that the ears of fish exposed to an operating air-gun sustained extensive damage to their sensory epithelia that was apparent as ablated hair cells. The damage was regionally severe, with no evidence of repair or replacement of damaged sensory cells up to 58 days after air-gun exposure.

  11. Middle ear cholesteatoma in 11 dogs

    PubMed Central

    Greci, Valentina; Travetti, Olga; Di Giancamillo, Mauro; Lombardo, Rocco; Giudice, Chiara; Banco, Barbara; Mortellaro, Carlo M.

    2011-01-01

    Middle ear cholesteatoma is a rare condition in dogs with chronic otitis. Otorrhea, otodinia, and pain on temporomandibular joint palpation are the most common clinical signs. Neurological abnormalities are often detectable. Computed tomography reveals the presence of an expansive and invasive unvascularized lesion involving the tympanic cavity and the bulla, with little or no contrast enhancement after administration of contrast mediu. Video-otoscopy may detect pearly growth or white/yellowish scales in the middle ear cavity. Surgery is the only therapy but is associated with a high risk of recurrence. PMID:22131579

  12. VEGF induces cardiovascular malformation and embryonic lethality.

    PubMed Central

    Feucht, M.; Christ, B.; Wilting, J.

    1997-01-01

    The essential function of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in embryonic angiogenesis has clearly been documented in murine embryos with targeted deletions of either VEGF or its receptors. The effects of VEGF in the organogenetic phase of development have not been studied to date. Therefore, we applied 0.7 to 0.9 microgram of VEGF via methylcellulose carriers into the midbrain or onto the right forelimb of 4.5-day-old quail embryos. Another group of embryos was treated with 1 microgram of platelet-derived growth factor and controls were carried out using carriers without any growth factor. VEGF-induced cardiovascular malformations resulted in embryonic lethality. The venous area of the vasculature was dilated in almost all organs. The heart was most seriously affected and showed typical characteristics of insufficiency. VEGF strongly increased endocardial cell proliferation and obviously induced impairment of the growth rates of myocardium and endocardium. The myocardium of the ventricles was extremely thin, and septation defects were observed. As a result of the disturbed outflow, the atria were extremely dilated and thin-walled. The morphology of the hearts was reminiscent of that observed in congenital malformations such as Uhl's and Osler's syndromes. Our results show that expression of VEGF has to be tightly controlled during development. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:9358767

  13. Management of posterior fossa arteriovenous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Joao Paulo; Medina, Roberto; Tamargo, Rafael J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Posterior fossa arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are rare vascular lesions, representing 715% of all intracranial AVMs. Although less frequent than supratentorial AVMs, they present higher rupture, morbidity, and mortality rates. Microsurgery, radiosurgery, and endovascular neurosurgery are treatment options for obliteration of those lesions. In this paper, we present a critical review of the literature about the management of posterior fossa AVM. Methods: A MEDLINE-based search of articles published between January 1960 and January 2014 was performed. The search terms: Posterior fossa arteriovenous malformation, microsurgery, radiosurgery, and endovascular were used to identify the articles. Results: Current data supports the role of microsurgery as the gold standard treatment for cerebellar AVMs. Brainstem AVMs are usually managed with radiotherapy and endovascular therapy; microsurgery is considered in cases of pial brainstem AVMs. Conclusions: Succsseful treatment of posterior fossa AVMs depend on an integrated work of neurosurgeons, radiosurgeons, and endovascular neurosurgery. Although the development of radiosurgery and endovascular techniques is remarkable, microsurgery remains as the gold standard treatment for most of those lesions. PMID:25745586

  14. Genetic Basis of Congenital Cardiovascular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Lalani, Seema R.; Belmont, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular malformations are a singularly important class of birth defects and, due to dramatic improvements in medical and surgical care, there are now large numbers of adult survivors. The etiologies are complex, but there is strong evidence that genetic factors play a crucial role. Over the last 15 years there has been enormous progress in the discovery of causative genes for syndromic heart malformations and in rare families with Mendelian forms. The rapid characterization of genomic disorders as major contributors to congenital heart defects is also notable. The genes identified encode many transcription factors, chromatin regulators, growth factors and signal transduction pathways– all unified by their required roles in normal cardiac development. Genome-wide sequencing of the coding regions promises to elucidate genetic causation in several disorders affecting cardiac development. Such comprehensive studies evaluating both common and rare variants would be essential in characterizing gene-gene interactions, as well as in understanding the gene-environment interactions that increase the susceptibility to congenital heart defects. PMID:24793338

  15. Unusual Presentation of Cerebral Cavernous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won-Hyung; Choi, Jong-Il; Ha, Sung-Kon; Kim, Sang-Dae; Kim, Se-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CMs) are vascular malformations of the central nervous system, which can be detected in the absence of any clinical symptoms. Nodules and cysts with mixed signal intensity and a peripheral hemosiderin rim are considered brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings typical of CMs. A 48-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of abnormal MRI findings without significant neurological symptoms. A cyst with an internal fluid-fluid level was found in the left basal ganglia on the initial brain MRI. We decided to observe the natural course of the asymptomatic lesion with serial MRI follow-up. On MRI at the 5-month follow-up, the cystic mass was enlarged and showed findings consistent with those of cystic CM. Surgical resection was performed and the pathological diagnosis was CM. Our experience suggests that the initial presentation of a CM can be a pure cyst and neurosurgeons should consider the likelihood of CMs in cases of cystic cerebral lesions with intracystic hemorrhage. PMID:26523262

  16. Variations of some elements in cadmium-induced malformed fish

    SciTech Connect

    Muramoto, S.

    1981-08-01

    Reports of malformation induced by cadmium such as the appearance of vertebral anomalies in carp have been described by the present author. In this paper, the appearance of such malformed fish by exposure to cadmium was confirmed in a repeat experiment. Decalcification of the fish was studied from spinal x-ray photographs and the results of some elements analysis.

  17. Successful percutaneous coil occlusion of a large pulmonary arteriovenous malformation.

    PubMed

    Jameel, Al-Ata; Arfi, Amin Muhammed; Ayman, M S; Nasser, Mahdi; Amjad, Kouatli; Iskandar, Al-Githmi

    2004-11-01

    Pulmonary arteriovenous malformation is one of the rarest congenital anomalies of cardiovascular system. We present a case of 30-year-old female with a large pulmonary arteriovenous malformation (PAVM) arising from the right lower pulmonary artery and draining to the left atrium. She underwent successful embolization using three detachable Cook coils. PMID:15530285

  18. Congenital malformations in Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) at Takasakiyama.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Yukimaru; Kurita, Hiroyuki; Matsui, Takeshi; Kimoto, Satoshi; Egawa, Junko

    2014-01-29

    From the late 1960s to the early 1970s, many congenitally malformed infants were born into provisioned Japanese macaque troops. Although the exact cause of this problem was not determined, the occurrence of malformations decreased thereafter. We examined possible factors such as total population size, number of adult females, birth rate, and volume of provisioned food. Agrichemicals attached to provisioned food are suspected as the main cause, as other factors were found to have no influence. Many more malformations were seen in males compared with females, in feet compared with hands, and in the fourth compared with other digits. We confirmed that the frequency of congenital malformation was high during the 1960s through to the mid-1970s when increased levels of provisioned food were given and that the incidence of congenital malformations was also elevated among wild macaques during this time. PMID:24474604

  19. Multiple Venous Malformations with Phleboliths: Radiological-Pathological Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Chava, Venkateswara Rao; Shankar, Ashwini Naveen; Vemanna, Naveen Shankar; Cholleti, Sudheer Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Vascular malformations are congenital lesions that are present at birth and do not regress. However, they often present later in life. They are subdivided into two categories: (1) slow- or low-flow and (2) fast- or high-flow malformations. Low-flow malformations contain combinations of capillary, venous, and lymphatic components. Venous malformations can occur anywhere in the body, but are most frequently seen in the head and neck (40%). These lesions present in a variety of ways, from a vague blue patch to a soft blue mass, which may be single isolated or may occur in multiple areas. Treatment depends on the type of lesion, the location, degree of involvement, and the clinical symptoms. Here we are report the imaging and histopathologic findings in a patient with multiple venous malformations affecting the left side of the face and trunk. PMID:24516776

  20. The study of malformations "by the company they keep".

    PubMed Central

    Miller, M T; Strmland, K

    1992-01-01

    Our study of individuals with thalidomide embryopathy reaffirms many of the principles of clinical teratology concerning sensitivity of developing structures and specificity of action. It also highlights important features of ocular teratology that differ from those of other organ systems. Because malformations of the eye and associated structures do not significantly threaten the survival of the embryo, fetus, or neonate, any variation in prevalence in older individuals is not due to the nature of the ocular malformation but may be significantly modified by "the company they keep," the systemic malformations occurring at the same time as the original insult, whether it be an environmental, a genetic, or a local disturbance. Additionally, the presence of clusters of malformations caused by a teratogen at a specific time supports the concept of a common pathogenic mechanism and provides suggested avenues for further research into the cause of these malformations. PMID:1494822

  1. Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work - Ear Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... on the Farm Get Smart About Antibiotics Week Ear Infection Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... Antibiotics are not recommended to help treat many ear infections. Your healthcare professional will be able to ...

  2. Middle Ear Infection (Chronic Otitis Media) and Hearing Loss

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Doctor Near You Middle Ear Infection (Chronic Otitis Media) and Hearing Loss Middle Ear Infection (Chronic Otitis ... staff at newsroom@entnet.org . What is otitis media? Otitis media refers to inflammation of the middle ...

  3. "Hot Tub Rash" and "Swimmer's Ear" (Pseudomonas)

    MedlinePLUS

    Facts About “Hot Tub Rash” and “Swimmer’s Ear” (Pseudomonas) What is Pseudomonas and how can it affect me? Pseudomonas (sue-doh- ... a major cause of infections commonly known as “hot tub rash” and “swimmer’s ear.” This germ is ...

  4. Mule Ear Drapery in Jewel Cave

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Jewel Cave is currently the 3rd most extensive cave network in the world. It is believed to have formed completely underwater, thus leading to the extensive coating of calcite crystals. In the center of this image, a cave formation known as mule-ear drapery can be seen....

  5. Getting Teens to Read with Their Ears

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fues, Marianne Cole

    2009-01-01

    Audiobooks have been around for years in various formats, like cassette tapes and CDs. This article describes a new type of audiobook on the market which is generating an interest in "reading." The device, called Playaway, is the size of a MP3 player and comes with a lanyard and ear buds. Buttons on the back of the player control the speed and…

  6. Ear biometric recognition using local texture descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzaoui, Amir; Hadid, Abdenour; Boukrouche, Abdelhani

    2014-09-01

    Automated personal identification using the shape of the human ear is emerging as an appealing modality in biometric and forensic domains. This is mainly due to the fact that the ear pattern can provide rich and stable information to differentiate and recognize people. In the literature, there are many approaches and descriptors that achieve relatively good results in constrained environments. The recognition performance tends, however, to significantly decrease under illumination variation, pose variation, and partial occlusion. In this work, we investigate the use of local texture descriptors, namely local binary patterns, local phase quantization, and binarized statistical image features for robust human identification from two-dimensional ear imaging. In contrast to global image descriptors which compute features directly from the entire image, local descriptors representing the features in small local image patches have proven to be more effective in real-world conditions. Our extensive experimental results on the benchmarks IIT Delhi-1, IIT Delhi-2, and USTB ear databases show that local texture features in general and BSIF in particular provide a significant performance improvement compared to the state-of-the-art.

  7. Ear Infections - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... List of All Topics All Ear Infections - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. French (français) Japanese (日本語) Korean (한국어) Russian (Русский) Somali ( ...

  8. Keep Your Ear-Lids Open.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrington, Gary

    1994-01-01

    This article suggests that the development of listening skills should extend to the "soundscape" of nonspeech acoustical information. It presents a model for effective aural processing, identifies categories of information obtained from nonverbal sound, and explores "ear-tuning" or listening exercises that use sound to glean information about

  9. Getting Teens to Read with Their Ears

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fues, Marianne Cole

    2009-01-01

    Audiobooks have been around for years in various formats, like cassette tapes and CDs. This article describes a new type of audiobook on the market which is generating an interest in "reading." The device, called Playaway, is the size of a MP3 player and comes with a lanyard and ear buds. Buttons on the back of the player control the speed and

  10. Diving injuries to the inner ear.

    PubMed

    Farmer, J C

    1977-01-01

    Most of the previous literature concerning otologic problems in compressed gas environments has emphasized middle ear barotrauma. With recent increases in commercial, military, and sport diving to deeper depths, inner ear disturbances during these exposures have been noted more frequently. Studies of inner ear physiology and pathology during diving indicate that the causes and treatment of these problems differ depending upon the phase and type of diving. Humans exposed to simulated depths of up to 305 meters without barotrauma or decompression sickness develop transient, conductive hearing losses with no audiometric evidence of cochlear dysfunction. Transient vertigo and nystagmus during diving have been noted with caloric stimulation, resulting from the unequal entry of cold water into the external auditory canals, and with asymmetric middle ear pressure equilibration during ascent and descent (alternobaric vertigo). Equilibrium disturbances noted with nitrogen narcosis, oxygen toxicity, hypercarbia, or hypoxia appear primarily related to the effects of these conditions upon the central nervous system and not to specific vestibular end-organ dysfunction. Compression of humans in helium-oxygen at depths greater than 152.4 meters results in transient symptoms of tremor, dizziness, and nausea plus decrements in postural equilibrium and psychomotor performance, the high pressure nervous syndrome. Vestibular function studies during these conditions indicate that these problems are due to central dysfunction and not to vestibular end-organ dysfunction. Persistent inner ear injuries have been noted during several phases of diving: 1) Such injuries during compression (inner ear barotrauma) have been related to round window ruptures occurring with straining, or a Valsalva's maneuver during inadequate middle ear pressure equilibration. Divers who develop cochlear and/or vestibular symptoms during shallow diving in which decompression sickness is unlikely or during compression in deeper diving, should be placed on bed rest with head elevation and avoidance of maneuvers which result in increased cerebrospinal fluid and intralabyrinthine pressure. With no improvement in symptoms after 48 hours, exploratory tympanotomy and repair of a possible labyrinthine window fistula should be considered. Recompression therapy is contraindicated in these cases... PMID:402882

  11. 40 CFR 211.206-1 - Real ear method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Real ear method. 211.206-1 Section 211... PRODUCT NOISE LABELING Hearing Protective Devices § 211.206-1 Real ear method. (a) The value of sound... “Method for the Measurement of Real-Ear Protection of Hearing Protectors and Physical Attenuation...

  12. 15 CFR 734.2 - Important EAR terms and principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Important EAR terms and principles... OF THE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS § 734.2 Important EAR terms and principles. (a) Subject to the EAR—Definition. (1) “Subject to the EAR” is a term used in the EAR to describe those items...

  13. 14 CFR 67.105 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.105... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION First-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.105 Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a first-class...

  14. 15 CFR 734.2 - Important EAR terms and principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Important EAR terms and principles... OF THE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS § 734.2 Important EAR terms and principles. (a) Subject to the EAR—Definition. (1) “Subject to the EAR” is a term used in the EAR to describe those items...

  15. 14 CFR 67.205 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.205... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Second-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.205 Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a second-class...

  16. 14 CFR 67.305 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.305... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Third-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.305 Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a third-class...

  17. 14 CFR 67.205 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.205... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Second-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.205 Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a second-class...

  18. 14 CFR 67.105 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.105... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION First-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.105 Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a first-class...

  19. 14 CFR 67.205 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.205... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Second-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.205 Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a second-class...

  20. 40 CFR 211.206-1 - Real ear method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Real ear method. 211.206-1 Section 211... PRODUCT NOISE LABELING Hearing Protective Devices § 211.206-1 Real ear method. (a) The value of sound... “Method for the Measurement of Real-Ear Protection of Hearing Protectors and Physical Attenuation...

  1. 14 CFR 67.305 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.305... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Third-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.305 Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a third-class...

  2. 40 CFR 211.206-1 - Real ear method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Real ear method. 211.206-1 Section 211... PRODUCT NOISE LABELING Hearing Protective Devices § 211.206-1 Real ear method. (a) The value of sound... “Method for the Measurement of Real-Ear Protection of Hearing Protectors and Physical Attenuation...

  3. 40 CFR 211.206-1 - Real ear method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Real ear method. 211.206-1 Section 211... PRODUCT NOISE LABELING Hearing Protective Devices § 211.206-1 Real ear method. (a) The value of sound... “Method for the Measurement of Real-Ear Protection of Hearing Protectors and Physical Attenuation...

  4. 14 CFR 67.205 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.205... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Second-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.205 Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a second-class...

  5. 40 CFR 211.206-1 - Real ear method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Real ear method. 211.206-1 Section 211... PRODUCT NOISE LABELING Hearing Protective Devices § 211.206-1 Real ear method. (a) The value of sound... “Method for the Measurement of Real-Ear Protection of Hearing Protectors and Physical Attenuation...

  6. 14 CFR 67.105 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.105... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION First-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.105 Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a first-class...

  7. 15 CFR 734.2 - Important EAR terms and principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Important EAR terms and principles... OF THE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS § 734.2 Important EAR terms and principles. (a) Subject to the EAR—Definition. (1) “Subject to the EAR” is a term used in the EAR to describe those items...

  8. 14 CFR 67.305 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.305... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Third-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.305 Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a third-class...

  9. 15 CFR 734.2 - Important EAR terms and principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Important EAR terms and principles... OF THE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS § 734.2 Important EAR terms and principles. (a) Subject to the EAR—Definition. (1) “Subject to the EAR” is a term used in the EAR to describe those items...

  10. 15 CFR 734.2 - Important EAR terms and principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Important EAR terms and principles... OF THE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS § 734.2 Important EAR terms and principles. (a) Subject to the EAR—Definition. (1) “Subject to the EAR” is a term used in the EAR to describe those items...

  11. 14 CFR 67.105 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.105... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION First-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.105 Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a first-class...

  12. 14 CFR 67.305 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.305... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Third-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.305 Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a third-class...

  13. 14 CFR 67.205 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.205... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Second-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.205 Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a second-class...

  14. 14 CFR 67.305 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.305... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Third-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.305 Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a third-class...

  15. 14 CFR 67.105 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.105... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION First-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.105 Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a first-class...

  16. The development of the mammalian outer and middleear.

    PubMed

    Anthwal, Neal; Thompson, Hannah

    2016-02-01

    The mammalian ear is a complex structure divided into three main parts: the outer; middle; and inner ear. These parts are formed from all three germ layers and neural crest cells, which have to integrate successfully in order to form a fully functioning organ of hearing. Any defect in development of the outer and middle ear leads to conductive hearing loss, while defects in the inner ear can lead to sensorineural hearing loss. This review focuses on the development of the parts of the ear involved with sound transduction into the inner ear, and the parts largely ignored in the world of hearing research: the outer and middle ear. The published data on the embryonic origin, signalling, genetic control, development and timing of the mammalian middle and outer ear are reviewed here along with new data showing the Eustachian tube cartilage is of dual embryonic origin. The embryonic origin of some of these structures has only recently been uncovered (Science, 339, 2013, 1453; Development, 140, 2013, 4386), while the molecular mechanisms controlling the growth, structure and integration of many outer and middle ear components are hardly known. The genetic analysis of outer and middle ear development is rather limited, with a small number of genes often affecting either more than one part of the ear or having only very small effects on development. This review therefore highlights the necessity for further research into the development of outer and middle ear structures, which will be important for the understanding and treatment of conductive hearing loss. PMID:26227955

  17. Transvenous Approach to Intracranial Arteriovenous Malformations: Challenging the Axioms of Arteriovenous Malformation Therapy?

    PubMed

    Choudhri, Omar; Ivan, Michael E; Lawton, Michael T

    2015-10-01

    : A compartmental conceptualization of intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) allows recognition of feeding arteries, an intervening plexiform nidus, and draining veins. AVM therapy involves eliminating the nidus, which is the source of hemorrhage, without compromising normal arterial and venous drainage of the brain. Traditional methods of AVM therapy through microsurgery and endovascular embolization involve arterial devascularization, with preservation of AVM venous drainage, until the nidus is excluded. The transvenous approach in treating vascular malformations was popularized by successful treatment models for dural arteriovenous fistulas. More recently, high-flow intracranial AVMs are being managed with transvenous endovascular approaches, although this novel technique has its challenges and perils. We review the current literature on transvenous AVM therapy and highlight its role for AVM therapy in the present day. PMID:26120797

  18. Ear deformity in children following high ear-piercing: current practice, consent issues and legislation.

    PubMed

    Jervis, P N; Clifton, N J; Woolford, T J

    2001-07-01

    In this presentation we examine the practice of high ear-piercing in children, the issue of informed consent and current legislation. We sampled current practice and consent policy by visiting nine establishments in Sheffield providing this service. There were two high street department stores, two fashion accessory outlets and five body-piercing studios. Enquiries were made as to the technique used, knowledge of complications, customer counselling and consent policy. A photograph of an ear with a cosmetic deformity following high ear-piercing was shown and awareness of this possible outcome was noted. Two ear-piercing techniques were identified, either a spring-loaded gun firing a blunt stud or the use of a body-piercing needle. The fashion accessory outlets were prepared to pierce any part of the ear using a spring-loaded gun in children under 16 years of age. There was a general lack of knowledge about possible serious complications. Two of the body piercers would not perform high ear-piercing on clients under the age of 16 years. The body piercers use a disposable needle and were of the opinion that using a spring-loaded gun shatters the cartilage and increases the risk of infection. The best technique is open to debate and it may be that the perceived unsavoury environment of the body-piercing studio represents a safer option than the more respectable or cheaper alternatives. The practice of body piercing in the UK remains uncontrolled. PMID:11485579

  19. Malformations and the Manx Syndrome in Cats

    PubMed Central

    DeForest, M. E.; Basrur, P. K.

    1979-01-01

    Breeding experiments were conducted on cats with congenital taillessness, to test the dissemination pattern of taillessness in their offspring. Clinical evaluation, radiographic analysis of the vertebral column and histological studies of the digestive tract and central nervous tissue were conducted to determine the association of malformations of these systems in cats born with different degrees of taillessness noted in the rumpy and stumpy cats. The mode of transmission of the tailless (Manx) condition assumed to be through an autosomal dominant factor (M) was confirmed by this investigation. It is hypothesized that the problems associated with the tailless condition such as spina bifida, urinary and faecal incontinence and locomotor disturbances of the pelvic limbs may all be related to a disturbance affecting the development of the central nervous system in the early embryonic life. ImagesFigure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10. PMID:393376

  20. Microsurgical resection of ambient cistern arteriovenous malformation.

    PubMed

    Choudhri, Omar; Lawton, Michael T

    2016-01-01

    The middle tentorial incisural space, located lateral to the midbrain and medial to the temporal lobe, contains the ambient cistern through which courses the third, fourth, and fifth cranial nerves, posterior cerebral artery (PCA), superior cerebellar artery, and the choroidal arteries. Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) in this compartment are supplied by the thalamogeniculate and posterior temporal branches of the PCA, and drain into tributaries of the basal vein of Rosenthal. We present a case of an AVM in this middle tentorial incisural space that persisted after embolization and radiosurgery, and was microsurgically resected through a subtemporal approach. This case demonstrates the anatomy of the middle incisural space and technical aspects in microsurgical resection of these rare AVMs. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/V-dIWh8ys3E . PMID:26722691

  1. CT of thrombosed arteriovenous malformations in children

    SciTech Connect

    Mitnick, J.S.; Pinto, R.S.; Lin, J.P.; Rose, H.; Lieberman, A.

    1984-02-01

    Thrombosed arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) in children are rare lesions that may present with headaches or a seizure disorder. Thirteen patients (4 months to 21 years of age) with this lesion were examined with computed tomography (CT). In 11 patients surgical confirmation was obtained, and the other two patients were examined with follow-up CT scans. Angiography either showed an avascular mass (7/13) or was negative (6/13). CT showed a lobulated lesion (8/13), peripheral location (11/13), and minimal surrounding edema (8/13). All of the lesions were hyperdense prior to the administration of contrast material and all enhanced either slightly or not at all following contrast material administration. It is concluded that these characteristic CT features aid in making the diagnosis of thrombosed AVM. The major differential diagnosis is small intracerebral neoplasm.

  2. Multimodal device for assessment of skin malformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekina, A.; Garancis, V.; Rubins, U.; Spigulis, J.; Valeine, L.; Berzina, A.

    2013-11-01

    A variety of multi-spectral imaging devices is commercially available and used for skin diagnostics and monitoring; however, an alternative cost-efficient device can provide an advanced spectral analysis of skin. A compact multimodal device for diagnosis of pigmented skin lesions was developed and tested. A polarized LED light source illuminates the skin surface at four different wavelengths - blue (450 nm), green (545 nm), red (660 nm) and infrared (940 nm). Spectra of reflected light from the 25 mm wide skin spot are imaged by a CMOS sensor. Four spectral images are obtained for mapping of the main skin chromophores. The specific chromophore distribution differences between different skin malformations were analyzed and information of subcutaneous structures was consecutively extracted.

  3. Diagnosis and management of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Papagiannis, J; Apostolopoulou, S; Sarris, GE; Rammos, S

    2002-01-01

    Pulmonary arteriovenous malformation is a rare anomaly that presents in several different ways. It can present as an isolated finding, or more often in the context of hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia. It can also complicate palliative surgery such as the Glenn operation for complex congenital heart disease with single ventricle physiology. Its management includes transcatheter embolization, which is the preferred mode of therapy, surgery (including resection of the affected lobe, segment, or the fistula itself), or rarely, medical therapy. Complications of the disease itself and of various modes of treatment are relatively common, and patients require close surveillance for possible recurrence, or development of new fistulas. In cases related to the Glenn operation, redirection of hepatic venous flow or heart transplantation may cure the problem. PMID:22368610

  4. Computational analyses of arteriovenous malformations in neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Di Ieva, Antonio; Boukadoum, Mounir; Lahmiri, Salim; Cusimano, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Computational models have been investigated for the analysis of the physiopathology and morphology of arteriovenous malformation (AVM) in recent years. Special emphasis has been given to image fusion in multimodal imaging and 3-dimensional rendering of the AVM, with the aim to improve the visualization of the lesion (for diagnostic purposes) and the selection of the nidus (for therapeutic aims, like the selection of the region of interest for the gamma knife radiosurgery plan). Searching for new diagnostic and prognostic neuroimaging biomarkers, fractal-based computational models have been proposed for describing and quantifying the angioarchitecture of the nidus. Computational modeling in the AVM field offers promising tools of analysis and requires a strict collaboration among neurosurgeons, neuroradiologists, clinicians, computer scientists, and engineers. We present here some updated state-of-the-art exemplary cases in the field, focusing on recent neuroimaging computational modeling with clinical relevance, which might offer useful clinical tools for the management of AVMs in the future. PMID:25521662

  5. Embolization of cerebral arteriovenous malformations with bucrylate.

    PubMed

    Debrun, G; Vinuela, F; Fox, A; Drake, C G

    1982-05-01

    Forty-six patients with cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVM's) were selected for embolization with bucrylate. These patients were assigned to three different groups. Group I consisted of 22 patients with nonresectable AVM's who were selected for embolization with a Silastic calibrated-leak ballon. In 16 or these patients, embolization was achieved, with partial obliteration of the AVM in 14 and complete obliteration in two. Five patients had subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by the balloon bursting and concomitant dissection of the feeding vessel. Four of these patients recovered completely and one died of a brain-stem hemorrhage. A permanent field defect was noted in five cases, and two patients had a transient mild neurological deficit. Group II consisted of 13 patients treated by intraoperative embolization. Complete obliteration by embolization was obtained in four cases, and complete surgical resection after embolization in five. Partial embolization with no surgical resection was achieved in five cases. Three of these patients had a permanent mild neurological deficit and two had transient deficits. There was no mortality in this group. Group III consisted of 11 patients treated by embolization with bucrylate using a new latex calibrated-leak balloon. This balloon has a higher malleability, and takes on the exact configuration of the feeder, with no risk of dissection. This balloon also permits delivery of the faster and larger injection of bucrylate to the arterial feeders of the AVM. Two AVM's were completely obliterated, and embolization was only partially successful in the other cases. Neurological complications consisted of incomplete field defects in two cases, slight memory loss in one case, and transient clumsiness of the arm and face in one case. Two patients have a catheter permanently glued in the malformation, with no neurological complication. There was no mortality in this group. PMID:7069472

  6. Amplatzer vascular plugs in congenital cardiovascular malformations

    PubMed Central

    Barwad, Parag; Ramakrishnan, Sivasubramanian; Kothari, Shyam S; Saxena, Anita; Gupta, Saurabh K; Juneja, Rajnish; Gulati, Gurpreet Singh; Jagia, Priya; Sharma, Sanjiv

    2013-01-01

    Background: Amplatzer vascular plugs (AVPs) are devices ideally suited to close medium-to-large vascular communications. There is limited published literature regarding the utility of AVPs in congenital cardiovascular malformations (CCVMs). Aims: To describe the use of AVPs in different CCVMs and to evaluate their safety and efficacy. Materials and Methods: All patients who required an AVP for the closure of CCVM were included in this retrospective review of our catheterization laboratory data. The efficacy and safety of AVPs are reported. Results: A total of 39 AVPs were implanted in 31 patients. Thirteen (33%) were AVP type I and 23 (59%) were AVP type II. AVP type III were implanted in two patients and type IV in one patient. The major indications for their use included closure of pulmonary arteriovenous malformation (AVM) (n = 7), aortopulmonary collaterals (n = 7), closure of a patent Blalock-Taussig shunt (n = 5), systemic AVM (n = 5), coronary AVM (n = 4), patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) (n = 3), pulmonary artery aneurysms (n = 3), and venovenous collaterals (n = 2). Deployment of the AVP was done predominantly via the 5 7F Judkin's right coronary guide catheter. Overall 92% of the AVPs could be successfully deployed and resulted in occlusion of the target vessel in all cases, within 10 minutes. No procedure-related or access site complication occurred. Conclusions: AVPs are versatile, easy to use, and effective devices to occlude the vascular communications in a variety of settings. AVP II is especially useful in the closure of tubular structures with a high flow. PMID:24688229

  7. A developmental and genetic classification for midbrain-hindbrain malformations

    PubMed Central

    Millen, Kathleen J.; Dobyns, William B.

    2009-01-01

    Advances in neuroimaging, developmental biology and molecular genetics have increased the understanding of developmental disorders affecting the midbrain and hindbrain, both as isolated anomalies and as part of larger malformation syndromes. However, the understanding of these malformations and their relationships with other malformations, within the central nervous system and in the rest of the body, remains limited. A new classification system is proposed, based wherever possible, upon embryology and genetics. Proposed categories include: (i) malformations secondary to early anteroposterior and dorsoventral patterning defects, or to misspecification of mid-hindbrain germinal zones; (ii) malformations associated with later generalized developmental disorders that significantly affect the brainstem and cerebellum (and have a pathogenesis that is at least partly understood); (iii) localized brain malformations that significantly affect the brain stem and cerebellum (pathogenesis partly or largely understood, includes local proliferation, cell specification, migration and axonal guidance); and (iv) combined hypoplasia and atrophy of putative prenatal onset degenerative disorders. Pertinent embryology is discussed and the classification is justified. This classification will prove useful for both physicians who diagnose and treat patients with these disorders and for clinical scientists who wish to understand better the perturbations of developmental processes that produce them. Importantly, both the classification and its framework remain flexible enough to be easily modified when new embryologic processes are described or new malformations discovered. PMID:19933510

  8. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Ear Care in Coastal Karnataka

    PubMed Central

    Ganapathi, Keerthan; Kanthila, Jayashree

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ear as an organ is necessary for the perception of sound and body balance. Ear infection, diabetes mellitus, hypertension and excessive use of mobile phone for listening to music at high volume all can reduce hearing. No earlier study was available in the costal Karnataka population, regarding the practice of ear care. The study objective was to ascertain the level of knowledge of the community regarding ear care, to find out whether some of the common conditions affecting hearing are known and to find out the common practices involved in maintaining ear hygiene. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted on 500 subjects in two tertiary care hospitals by convenient sampling, using self-administered questionnaire. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice across the age groups, religion & education background were studied. Results Across different education groups, 66.7%-90% did not know that cold can cause ear infection and 46.7%-75.0% did not know that diabetes and hypertension can reduce hearing. When there is ear pain or discharge, people put ear drops available at home in 48.3%-75.0% across 3 age groups; 58.5%-61.5% across 3 religions and 44.8%-67.9% across 5 education groups. No statistically significant difference was found in the practice of pouring oil into ears across religions. A total of 58.6%-100% daily clean inside the ear and 70-100% use cotton buds. Conclusion General perception of the people is that ear is necessary only for hearing. Majority did not know that nasal infection can affect the ear and that DM and hypertension can cause hearing loss. When there is ear pain and discharge, most of the adults put drops that are available at home. Pouring oil into the ears and cleaning inside the ear canals is routinely practiced in costal Karnataka. PMID:26816922

  9. CHD7 Deficiency in Looper, a New Mouse Model of CHARGE Syndrome, Results in Ossicle Malformation, Otosclerosis and Hearing Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Ogier, Jacqueline M.; Carpinelli, Marina R.; Arhatari, Benedicta D.; Symons, R. C. Andrew; Kile, Benjamin T.; Burt, Rachel A.

    2014-01-01

    CHARGE syndrome is a rare human disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 7 (CHD7). Characteristics of CHARGE are varied and include developmental ear and hearing anomalies. Here we report a novel mouse model of CHD7 dysfunction, termed Looper. The Looper strain harbours a nonsense mutation (c.5690C>A, p.S1897X) within the Chd7 gene. Looper mice exhibit many of the clinical features of the human syndrome, consistent with previously reported CHARGE models, including growth retardation, facial asymmetry, vestibular defects, eye anomalies, hyperactivity, ossicle malformation, hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction. Looper mice display an otosclerosis-like fusion of the stapes footplate to the cochlear oval window and blepharoconjunctivitis but not coloboma. Looper mice are hyperactive and have vestibular dysfunction but do not display motor impairment. PMID:24840056

  10. Estimation of outer-middle ear transmission using DPOAEs and fractional-order modeling of human middle ear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naghibolhosseini, Maryam

    Our ability to hear depends primarily on sound waves traveling through the outer and middle ear toward the inner ear. Hence, the characteristics of the outer and middle ear affect sound transmission to/from the inner ear. The role of the middle and outer ear in sound transmission is particularly important for otoacoustic emissions (OAEs), which are sound signals generated in a healthy cochlea, and recorded by a sensitive microphone placed in the ear canal. OAEs are used to evaluate the health and function of the cochlea; however, they are also affected by outer and middle ear characteristics. To better assess cochlear health using OAEs, it is critical to quantify the impact of the outer and middle ear on sound transmission. The reported research introduces a noninvasive approach to estimate outer-middle ear transmission using distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs). In addition, the role of the outer and middle ear on sound transmission was investigated by developing a physical/mathematical model, which employed fractional-order lumped elements to include the viscoelastic characteristics of biological tissues. Impedance estimations from wideband refectance measurements were used for parameter fitting of the model. The model was validated comparing its estimates of the outer-middle ear sound transmission with those given by DPOAEs. The outer-middle ear transmission by the model was defined as the sum of forward and reverse outer-middle ear transmissions. To estimate the reverse transmission by the model, the probe-microphone impedance was calculated through estimating the Thevenin-equivalent circuit of the probe-microphone. The Thevenin-equivalent circuit was calculated using measurements in a number of test cavities. Such modeling enhances our understanding of the roles of different parts of the outer and middle ear and how they work together to determine their function. In addition, the model would be potentially helpful in diagnosing pathologies of cochlear or middle ear origin.

  11. Structures that Contribute to Middle-Ear Admittance in Chinchilla

    PubMed Central

    Rosowski, John J.; Ravicz, Michael E.; Songer, Jocelyn E.

    2009-01-01

    We describe measurements of middle-ear input admittance in chinchillas (Chinchilla lanigera) before and after various manipulations that define the contributions of different middle-ear components to function. The chinchillas middle-ear air spaces have a large effect on the low-frequency compliance of the middle ear, and removing the influences of these spaces reveals a highly admittant tympanic membrane and ossicular chain. Measurements of the admittance of the air spaces reveal that the high-degree of segmentation of these spaces has only a small effect on the admittance. Draining the cochlea further increases the middle-ear admittance at low frequencies and removes a low-frequency (less than 300 Hz) level dependence in the admittance. Spontaneous or sound-driven contractions of the middle-ear muscles in deeply anesthetized animals were associated with significant changes in middle-ear admittance. PMID:16944166

  12. High intensity anthropogenic sound damages fish ears.

    PubMed

    McCauley, Robert D; Fewtrell, Jane; Popper, Arthur N

    2003-01-01

    Marine petroleum exploration involves the repetitive use of high-energy noise sources, air-guns, that produce a short, sharp, low-frequency sound. Despite reports of behavioral responses of fishes and marine mammals to such noise, it is not known whether exposure to air-guns has the potential to damage the ears of aquatic vertebrates. It is shown here that the ears of fish exposed to an operating air-gun sustained extensive damage to their sensory epithelia that was apparent as ablated hair cells. The damage was regionally severe, with no evidence of repair or replacement of damaged sensory cells up to 58 days after air-gun exposure. PMID:12558299

  13. Gene expression profiling of the inner ear.

    PubMed

    Schimmang, Thomas; Maconochie, Mark

    2016-02-01

    The identification of transcriptional differences has served as an important starting point in understanding the molecular mechanisms behind biological processes and systems. The developmental biology of the inner ear, the biology of hearing and of course the pathology of deafness are all processes that warrant a molecular description if we are to improve human health. To this end, technological innovation has meant that larger scale analysis of gene transcription has been possible for a number of years now, extending our molecular analysis of genes to beyond those that are currently in vogue for a given system. In this review, some of the contributions gene profiling has made to understanding developmental, pathological and physiological processes in the inner ear are highlighted. PMID:26403558

  14. Diseases of the middle ear in childhood

    PubMed Central

    Minovi, Amir; Dazert, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Middle ear diseases in childhood play an important role in daily ENT practice due to their high incidence. Some of these like acute otitis media or otitis media with effusion have been studied extensively within the last decades. In this article, we present a selection of important childhood middle ear diseases and discuss the actual literature concerning their treatment, management of complications and outcome. Another main topic of this paper deals with the possibilities of surgical hearing rehabilitation in childhood. The bone-anchored hearing aid BAHA and the active partially implantable device Vibrant Soundbridge could successfully be applied for children. In this manuscript, we discuss the actual literature concerning clinical outcomes of these implantable hearing aids. PMID:25587371

  15. An Ear-Worn Vital Signs Monitor.

    PubMed

    He, David Da; Winokur, Eric S; Sodini, Charles G

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a wearable vital signs monitor at the ear. The monitor measures the electrocardiogram (ECG), ballistocardiogram (BCG), and photoplethysmogram (PPG) to obtain pre-ejection period (PEP), stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO), and pulse transit time (PTT). The ear is demonstrated as a natural anchoring point for the integrated sensing of physiological signals. All three signals measured can be used to obtain heart rate (HR). Combining the ECG and BCG allows for the estimation of the PEP, while combining the BCG and PPG allows for the measurement of PTT. Additionally, the J-wave amplitude of the BCG is correlated with the SV and, when combined with HR, yields CO. Results from a clinical human study on 13 subjects demonstrate this proof-of-concept device. PMID:26208264

  16. The mast cells of the inner ear.

    PubMed

    Sleeckx, J P; Shea, J J; Peremans, J M

    1976-01-01

    The presence of mast cells in the subepithelial connective tissue of the human endolymphatic sac has, to the best of our knowledge for the first time, been described. A hypothesis has been put forward in which these cells, which are known to contain histamin, heparin and serotonin, play an important role in the physiologic functions of the endolymphatic sac as well as in some pathologic states of the inner ear. PMID:1023741

  17. Why Do Elephants Flap Their Ears?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koffi, Moise; Jiji, Latif; Andreopoulos, Yiannis

    2009-11-01

    It is estimated that a 4200 kg elephant generates as much as 5.12 kW of heat. How the elephant dissipates its metabolic heat and regulates its body temperature has been investigated during the past seven decades. Findings and conclusions differ sharply. The high rate of metabolic heat coupled with low surface area to volume ratio and the absence of sweat glands eliminate surface convection as the primary mechanism for heat removal. Noting that the elephant ears have high surface area to volume ratio and an extensive vascular network, ear flapping is thought to be the principal thermoregulatory mechanism. A computational and experimental program is carried out to examine flow and heat transfer characteristics. The ear is modeled as a uniformly heated oscillating rectangular plate. Our computational work involves a three-dimensional time dependent CFD code with heat transfer capabilities to obtain predictions of the flow field and surface temperature distributions. This information was used to design an experimental setup with a uniformly heated plate of size 0.2m x 0.3m oscillating at 1.6 cycles per second. Results show that surface temperature increases and reaches a steady periodic oscillation after a period of transient oscillation. The role of the vortices shed off the plate in heat transfer enhancement will be discussed.

  18. The glue ear 'epidemic': a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Alderson, David

    2011-12-01

    This paper explores the historical context of the dramatic rise in surgery for glue ear in the mid-20th century, and questions the published assertion that this represented a manufactured 'epidemic'. In examining historical sources, the reader's theoretical viewpoint greatly influences their conclusions: the sustained rise in treatment for glue ear may be seen as the advance of science in a golden age or the resistance of insular professionals to reason in the light of new scientific study methods. Current views on the practice of medicine, consumerism, science and standardisation, rationing and the nature of 'truth' all affect the way that we see this period. Technological advances clearly allowed better diagnosis and more effective treatment, but these did not appear to drive an 'epidemic', rather they were developed to meet the pre-existing challenges of otological practice. The proposition that an 'epidemic' was created does not appear to have any solid grounding. Society's perception of what constitutes disease and what needs treatment may have evolved, but the prevalence of other important diseases changed dramatically over this time period, and a real change in the epidemiology of glue ear cannot be dismissed. In defining the case for and against surgical treatment, a solely positivist, quantitative worldview cannot give us a complete picture of benefit and risk to individuals, families and society at large. PMID:21653931

  19. Ear Recognition from One Sample Per Person

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Long; Mu, Zhichun; Zhang, Baoqing; Zhang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Biometrics has the advantages of efficiency and convenience in identity authentication. As one of the most promising biometric-based methods, ear recognition has received broad attention and research. Previous studies have achieved remarkable performance with multiple samples per person (MSPP) in the gallery. However, most conventional methods are insufficient when there is only one sample per person (OSPP) available in the gallery. To solve the OSPP problem by maximizing the use of a single sample, this paper proposes a hybrid multi-keypoint descriptor sparse representation-based classification (MKD-SRC) ear recognition approach based on 2D and 3D information. Because most 3D sensors capture 3D data accessorizing the corresponding 2D data, it is sensible to use both types of information. First, the ear region is extracted from the profile. Second, keypoints are detected and described for both the 2D texture image and 3D range image. Then, the hybrid MKD-SRC algorithm is used to complete the recognition with only OSPP in the gallery. Experimental results on a benchmark dataset have demonstrated the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method in resolving the OSPP problem. A Rank-one recognition rate of 96.4% is achieved for a gallery of 415 subjects, and the time involved in the computation is satisfactory compared to conventional methods. PMID:26024226

  20. An investigation of ear necrosis in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeonghwa; Friendship, Robert M.; Poljak, Zvonimir; DeLay, Josepha; Slavic, Durda; Dewey, Catherine E.

    2013-01-01

    Porcine ear necrosis was investigated in 23 conveniently chosen farms, consisting of 14 case farms and 9 control farms. Biopsies of lesions and oral swabs from pigs on 11 case farms were examined by histology and bacterial culture. All farms were visited for observations and a survey on management, housing, and the presence of other clinical signs or behavioral vices. Histological examination revealed that the lesions began on the surface and progressed to deeper layers, and that vascular damage did not appear to be the initiating cause. Spirochetes were only rarely observed in histological examination and were not cultured from biopsies and oral swabs. Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus hyicus were cultured from 91% and 66% of samples, respectively. Ear biting and a humid environment were associated with ear necrosis. On some farms large numbers of pigs were affected and lesions were sometimes extensive. The condition appears to be an infectious disease beginning on the surface of the skin; contributing environmental and management factors are likely. PMID:24155434

  1. Predicting skin deficits through surface area measurements in ear reconstruction and adult ear surface area norms.

    PubMed

    Yazar, Memet; Sevim, Kamuran Zeynep; Irmak, Fatih; Yazar, Sevgi Kurt; Ye?ilada, Ay?in Karasoy; Kar?ida??, Semra Hacikerim; Tatlidede, Hamit Soner

    2013-07-01

    Ear reconstruction is one of the most challenging procedures in plastic surgery practice. Many studies and techniques have been described in the literature for carving a well-pronounced framework. However, just as important as the cartilage framework is the ample amount of delicate skin coverage of the framework. In this report, we introduce an innovative method of measuring the skin surface area of the auricle from a three-dimensional template created from the healthy ear.The study group consisted of 60 adult Turkish individuals who were randomly selected (30 men and 30 women). The participant ages ranged from 18 to 45 years (mean, 31.5 years), and they had no history of trauma or congenital anomalies. The template is created by dividing the ear into aesthetic subunits and using ImageJ software to estimate the necessary amount of total skin surface area required.Reconstruction of the auricle is a complicated process that requires experience and patience to provide the auricular details. We believe this estimate will shorten the learning curve for residents and surgeons interested in ear reconstruction and will help surgeons obtain adequate skin to drape over the well-sculpted cartilage frameworks by providing a reference list of total ear skin surface area measurements for Turkish men and women. PMID:23851770

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Megalencephaly-capillary malformation syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... these can include excess fluid within the brain (hydrocephalus) and abnormalities in the brain's structure, such as ... cell ; cell proliferation ; cM ; cutaneous ; disability ; enzyme ; gene ; hydrocephalus ; hypotonia ; inherited ; kidney ; kinase ; macrocephaly ; malformation ; megalencephaly ; mosaicism ; ...

  3. A case report: Pulmonary venous malformation complicated with pulmonary hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Supakul, Nucharin; Fan, Rong; Karmazyn, Boaz

    2012-12-01

    Pulmonary venous malformation is extremely rare. We present imaging and clinical findings of a 17-year-old male with multifocal subcutaneous venous malformations and multiple cystic lesions in the liver and spleen, suggestive of slow flow vascular malformation. In the right lung, chest radiography followed by chest CT demonstrated large tortuous pulmonary veins and cystic emphysematous changes. Tc99m-MAA (pertechnetate-labeled macroaggregated albumin) lung perfusion scan demonstrated only 3% of normal perfusion to the right lung, with no evidence of arteriovenous shunting. The child had diffuse intraparenchymal hemorrhage throughout the right lower and middle lobes and underwent resection. Pathology confirmed the diagnosis of venous malformation complicated with bleeding. PMID:23217914

  4. Management strategy after diagnosis of Abernethy malformation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The Abernethy malformation is a rare anomaly with a widely variable clinical presentation. Many diagnostic dilemmas have been reported. Nowadays, with the evolution of medical imaging, diagnosis can be made more easily, but management of patients with an Abernethy malformation is still open for discussion. Case presentation In this case study, we describe a 34-year-old Caucasian man who presented with a large hepatocellular carcinoma in the presence of an Abernethy malformation, which was complicated by the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Conclusion This case underlines the importance of regular examination of patients with an Abernethy malformation, even in older patients, to prevent complications and to detect liver lesions at an early stage. PMID:22742057

  5. Genetics Home Reference: Microcephaly-capillary malformation syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... proper balance of protein production and breakdown (protein homeostasis) that cells need to function and survive. Studies ... cell ; degrade ; developmental delay ; egg ; endocytosis ; epilepsy ; gene ; homeostasis ; inheritance ; inherited ; malformation ; microcephaly ; myoclonus ; pattern of inheritance ; ...

  6. Variants in CUL4B are Associated with Cerebral Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T.; Nakagawa, Tadashi; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Haas, Stefan A.; Hu, Hao; Bienek, Melanie; Vissers, Lisenka E.L.M.; Gilissen, Christian; Tzschach, Andreas; Busche, Andreas; Msebeck, Jrg; Rump, Patrick; Mathijssen, Inge B.; Avela, Kristiina; Somer, Mirja; Doagu, Fatma; Philips, Anju K.; Rauch, Anita; Baumer, Alessandra; Voesenek, Krysta; Poirier, Karine; Vigneron, Jacqueline; Amram, Daniel; Odent, Sylvie; Nawara, Magdalena; Obersztyn, Ewa; Lenart, Jacek; Charzewska, Agnieszka; Lebrun, Nicolas; Fischer, Ute; Nillesen, Willy M.; Yntema, Helger G.; Jrvel, Irma; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; de Vries, Bert B.A.; Brunner, Han G.; van Bokhoven, Hans; Raymond, F. Lucy; Willemsen, Michl A.A.P.; Chelly, Jamel; Xiong, Yue; Barkovich, A. James; Kalscheuer, Vera M.; Kleefstra, Tjitske; de Brouwer, Arjan P.M.

    2015-01-01

    Variants in cullin 4B (CUL4B) are a known cause of syndromic X-linked intellectual disability. Here, we describe an additional 25 patients from 11 families with variants in CUL4B. We identified nine different novel variants in these families and confirmed the pathogenicity of all nontruncating variants. Neuroimaging data, available for 15 patients, showed the presence of cerebral malformations in ten patients. The cerebral anomalies comprised malformations of cortical development (MCD), ventriculomegaly, and diminished white matter volume. The phenotypic heterogeneity of the cerebral malformations might result from the involvement of CUL-4B in various cellular pathways essential for normal brain development. Accordingly, we show that CUL-4B interacts with WDR62, a protein in which variants were previously identified in patients with microcephaly and a wide range of MCD. This interaction might contribute to the development of cerebral malformations in patients with variants in CUL4B. PMID:25385192

  7. MALLEABLE INSPECTION STATION WHERE WORKERS ELIMINATE MALFORMED CASTINGS AND SEPARATED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MALLEABLE INSPECTION STATION WHERE WORKERS ELIMINATE MALFORMED CASTINGS AND SEPARATED GOOD CASTINGS PRIOR TO ANNEALING. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Malleable Annealing Building, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  8. Macrocephaly-capillary malformation presenting with fetal arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Kuint, Jacob; Globus, Omer; Ben Simon, Guy J; Greenberger, Shoshana

    2012-01-01

    Macrocephaly-capillary malformation (OMIM 602501) is a rare overgrowth and asymmetry syndrome. Cardiac arrhythmias were reported to occur in few patients. We present a case in which fetal arrhythmia was the presenting symptom of the syndrome. PMID:22329570

  9. Oral encapsulated vascular malformation: An undescribed presentation in the mouth

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Márcio-Américo; Dias, Pedro-de Souza; Martínez-Martínez, Marisol; Sena-Filho, Marcondes; de Almeida, Oslei-Paes

    2016-01-01

    Vascular lesions have been classified in two broad categories, hemangiomas and malformations. Encapsulated vascular lesions have not been reported in the oral cavity, but they were described in other sites, mainly in the orbit. Herein, we present a case of an oral encapsulated vascular lesion located in the right buccal mucosa of a 69-year-old male, including histological and immunohistochemical description and a literature review. Key words:Buccal mucosa, hemangioma, vascular malformation, oral cavity. PMID:26855712

  10. Multiple medullary venous malformations decreasing cerebral blood flow: Case report

    SciTech Connect

    Tomura, N.; Inugami, A.; Uemura, K.; Hadeishi, H.; Yasui, N. )

    1991-02-01

    A rare case of multiple medullary venous malformations in the right cerebral hemisphere is reported. The literature review yielded only one case of multiple medullary venous malformations. Computed tomography scan showed multiple calcified lesions with linear contrast enhancement representing abnormal dilated vessels and mild atrophic change of the right cerebral hemisphere. Single-photon emission computed tomography using N-isopropyl-p-({sup 123}I) iodoamphetamine demonstrated decreased cerebral blood flow in the right cerebral hemisphere.

  11. Novel transcatheter closure of internal iliac arteriovenous malformation.

    PubMed

    Shankarappa, Ravindranath Khandenahally; Panneerselvam, Arunkumar; Dwarakaprasad, Ramesh; Chikkaswamy, Srinivas Budanur; Nayak, Mohan Honnayya; Nanjappa, Manjunath Cholenahally

    2011-05-01

    Arteriovenous malformations arising from iliac arteries are rare anomalies. Percutaneous embolization of such malformations is an established therapeutic option. In this paper, we will describe a case, wherein the internal iliac artery feeding a giant arteriovenous fistula was closed using a patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) duct occluder percutaneously. The PDA duct occluder is a versatile device that can be used as an alternative to vascular plugs. PMID:24122535

  12. Limb malformations and abnormal sex hormone concentrations in frogs.

    PubMed Central

    Sower, S A; Reed, K L; Babbitt, K J

    2000-01-01

    Declines in amphibian populations, and amphibians with gross malformations, have prompted concern regarding the biological status of many anuran species. A survey of bullfrogs, Rana catesbeiana, and green frogs, Rana clamitans, conducted in central and southern New Hampshire showed malformed frogs at 81% of the sites sampled (13 of 16 sites). Brain gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and the synthesis of androgens and estradiol, hormones essential to reproductive processes, were measured from limb-malformed and normal (no limb malformation) frogs. Normal frogs had significantly higher concentrations (nearly 3-fold) of in vitro produced androgens and of brain GnRH than malformed frogs. Because most malformations are thought to occur during development, we propose that environmental factors or endocrine-disrupting chemicals that may cause developmental abnormalities also act during early development to ultimately cause abnormally reduced GnRH and androgen production in adult frogs. The consequences of reduced GnRH and androgens on anuran reproductive behavior and population dynamics are unknown but certainly may be profound and warrant further research. PMID:11102301

  13. Eye malformations in Cameroonian children: a clinical survey

    PubMed Central

    Eball, Andr Omgbwa; Ellong, Augustin; Koki, Godefroy; Nanfack, Ngoune Chantal; Dohvoma, Viola Andin; Mvogo, Cme Ebana

    2012-01-01

    Summary The aim of this work was to describe the clinical aspects of eye malformations observed at the ophthalmology unit of the Yaound Gynaecology, Obstetrics and Pediatrics Hospital. Patients and methods We carried out a retrospective study of all malformations of the eye and its adnexae observed among children aged 05 years who were seen at the ophthalmology unit from January 2003 to December 2009. Results Out of the 2254 children who were examined, 150 (6.65%) presented eye malformations. The mean age was 14.40 4 months. Eye malformations were diagnosed in 71.66% of cases during the first year of life. The most frequent malformations were congenital lacrimal duct obstruction (66.66%), congenital cataract (10.9%), congenital glaucoma (10.9%), microphthalmos (5.03%), and congenital ptosis (3.77%). Conclusion Eye malformations among children can lead to visual impairment and are a cause for discomfort to children and parents. Therefore, systematic postnatal screening is recommended to enable early management. PMID:23055685

  14. Sleep Spindle Alterations in Patients with Malformations of Cortical Development

    PubMed Central

    Selvitelli, Megan F.; Krishnamurthy, Kaarkuzhali B.; Herzog, Andrew G.; Schomer, Donald L.; Chang, Bernard S.

    2009-01-01

    Malformations of cortical development are disorders of altered brain anatomy and architecture that arise from abnormalities in the usual processes of cerebral cortical development. Although they often lead to epilepsy, cognitive delay, and motor impairment, little is known about their effect on sleep. Since malformations may anatomically or functionally disrupt the cerebral circuits that mediate sleep spindles, we hypothesized that these disorders would be associated with abnormal spindle characteristics. We analyzed the density, maximum frequency, laterality and distribution of sleep spindles seen in routine and long-term electroencephalographic recordings performed in ten brain malformation subjects and ten matched controls. There were no significant differences in spindle density or maximum frequency between the two groups, but malformation subjects had a significantly lower proportion of bilateral spindles and a significantly higher proportion of anterior and diffuse spindles compared to controls. In addition, unilateral malformations appeared to be associated with a skewing of unilateral spindles toward the contralateral side. Our findings suggest that brain malformations disrupt the thalamocortical circuits responsible for sleep spindle generation, and support the need for further studies on the relationships between cortical maldevelopment and sleep. PMID:18667284

  15. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for large arteriovenous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huan-Chih; Chang, Rachel J.; Xiao, Furen

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are abnormal connections between the arteries and veins, with possible serious consequences of intracranial hemorrhage. The curative treatment for AVMs includes microsurgery and radiosurgery, sometimes with embolization as an adjunct. However, controversies exist with the treatment options available for large to giant AVMs. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (HSRT) is one treatment option for such difficult lesions. We aim to review recent literature, looking at the treatment outcome of HSRT in terms of AVM obliteration rate and complications. The rate of AVM obliteration utilizing HSRT as a primary treatment was comparable with that of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). For those not totally obliterated, HSRT makes them smaller and turns some lesions manageable by single-dose SRS or microsurgery. Higher doses per fraction seemed to exhibit better response. However, patients receiving higher total dose may be at risk for higher rates of complications. Fractionated regimens of 7 Gy 4 and 66.5 Gy 5 may be accepted compromises between obliteration and complication. Embolization may not be beneficial prior to HSRT in terms of obliteration rate or the volume reduction. Future work should aim on a prospectively designed study for larger patient groups and long-term follow-up results. PMID:22826813

  16. Vascular permeability in cerebral cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Mikati, Abdul G; Khanna, Omaditya; Zhang, Lingjiao; Girard, Romuald; Shenkar, Robert; Guo, Xiaodong; Shah, Akash; Larsson, Henrik B W; Tan, Huan; Li, Luying; Wishnoff, Matthew S; Shi, Changbin; Christoforidis, Gregory A; Awad, Issam A

    2015-10-01

    Patients with the familial form of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are haploinsufficient for the CCM1, CCM2, or CCM3 gene. Loss of corresponding CCM proteins increases RhoA kinase-mediated endothelial permeability in vitro, and in mouse brains in vivo. A prospective case-controlled observational study investigated whether the brains of human subjects with familial CCM show vascular hyperpermeability by dynamic contrast-enhanced quantitative perfusion magnetic resonance imaging, in comparison with CCM cases without familial disease, and whether lesional or brain vascular permeability correlates with CCM disease activity. Permeability in white matter far (WMF) from lesions was significantly greater in familial than in sporadic cases, but was similar in CCM lesions. Permeability in WMF increased with age in sporadic patients, but not in familial cases. Patients with more aggressive familial CCM disease had greater WMF permeability compared to those with milder disease phenotype, but similar lesion permeability. Subjects receiving statin medications for routine cardiovascular indications had a trend of lower WMF, but not lesion, permeability. This is the first demonstration of brain vascular hyperpermeability in humans with an autosomal dominant disease, as predicted mechanistically. Brain permeability, more than lesion permeability, may serve as a biomarker of CCM disease activity, and help calibrate potential drug therapy. PMID:25966944

  17. Stereotactic linac radiosurgery for arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, B G; Hitchcock, E R; Kitchen, G; Dalton, A E; Yates, D A; Chavda, S V

    1992-01-01

    Stereotactic linear accelerator (linac) radiosurgery has been in operation in the West Midlands since 1987, the first of its kind in the United Kingdom. Forty two patients with high-flow cerebral arteriovenous malformations have been treated, 26 of whom have been followed up. Angiography one year after treatment showed that five lesions were obliterated, 11 were reduced in size and/or flow rate and 10 were unchanged. Overall results show that nine out of 10 patients reviewed at 24 months had total obliteration. Three patients had complications; one has fully recovered, one died of an unrelated cause at 36 months and the other died from recurrent haemorrhage at nine months. Two patients had recurrent non-fatal haemorrhage within 24 months of treatment; both recovered without further deficit. All patients are fit to work but eight are unemployed. Although the follow up period is short, the early results indicate a success rate similar to those published by others using linac radiosurgery. Images PMID:1640237

  18. Gastroesophageal reflux and congenital gastrointestinal malformations

    PubMed Central

    Marseglia, Lucia; Manti, Sara; D’Angelo, Gabriella; Gitto, Eloisa; Salpietro, Carmelo; Centorrino, Antonio; Scalfari, Gianfranco; Santoro, Giuseppe; Impellizzeri, Pietro; Romeo, Carmelo

    2015-01-01

    Although the outcome of newborns with surgical congenital diseases (e.g., diaphragmatic hernia; esophageal atresia; omphalocele; gastroschisis) has improved rapidly with recent advances in perinatal intensive care and surgery, infant survivors often require intensive treatment after birth, have prolonged hospitalizations, and, after discharge, may have long-term sequelae including gastro-intestinal comorbidities, above all, gastroesophageal reflux (GER). This condition involves the involuntary retrograde passage of gastric contents into the esophagus, with or without regurgitation or vomiting. It is a well-recognized condition, typical of infants, with an incidence of 85%, which usually resolves after physiological maturation of the lower esophageal sphincter and lengthening of the intra-abdominal esophagus, in the first few months after birth. Although the exact cause of abnormal esophageal function in congenital defects is not clearly understood, it has been hypothesized that common (increased intra-abdominal pressure after closure of the abdominal defect) and/or specific (e.g., motility disturbance of the upper gastrointestinal tract, damage of esophageal peristaltic pump) pathological mechanisms may play a role in the etiology of GER in patients with birth defects. Improvement of knowledge could positively impact the long-term prognosis of patients with surgical congenital diseases. The present manuscript provides a literature review focused on pathological and clinical characteristics of GER in patients who have undergone surgical treatment for congenital abdominal malformations. PMID:26229394

  19. Gastroesophageal reflux and congenital gastrointestinal malformations.

    PubMed

    Marseglia, Lucia; Manti, Sara; D'Angelo, Gabriella; Gitto, Eloisa; Salpietro, Carmelo; Centorrino, Antonio; Scalfari, Gianfranco; Santoro, Giuseppe; Impellizzeri, Pietro; Romeo, Carmelo

    2015-07-28

    Although the outcome of newborns with surgical congenital diseases (e.g., diaphragmatic hernia; esophageal atresia; omphalocele; gastroschisis) has improved rapidly with recent advances in perinatal intensive care and surgery, infant survivors often require intensive treatment after birth, have prolonged hospitalizations, and, after discharge, may have long-term sequelae including gastro-intestinal comorbidities, above all, gastroesophageal reflux (GER). This condition involves the involuntary retrograde passage of gastric contents into the esophagus, with or without regurgitation or vomiting. It is a well-recognized condition, typical of infants, with an incidence of 85%, which usually resolves after physiological maturation of the lower esophageal sphincter and lengthening of the intra-abdominal esophagus, in the first few months after birth. Although the exact cause of abnormal esophageal function in congenital defects is not clearly understood, it has been hypothesized that common (increased intra-abdominal pressure after closure of the abdominal defect) and/or specific (e.g., motility disturbance of the upper gastrointestinal tract, damage of esophageal peristaltic pump) pathological mechanisms may play a role in the etiology of GER in patients with birth defects. Improvement of knowledge could positively impact the long-term prognosis of patients with surgical congenital diseases. The present manuscript provides a literature review focused on pathological and clinical characteristics of GER in patients who have undergone surgical treatment for congenital abdominal malformations. PMID:26229394

  20. [Stereotactically targeted radiotherapy of cerebral arteriovenous malformations].

    PubMed

    Kimmig, B; Engenhart, R; Wowra, B; Hver, K H; Marin-Grez, M; Sturm, V

    1989-09-01

    A report is given about radiotherapy in 41 patients suffering from cerebral vessel anomalies. A modified linear accelerator was used in a moving field technique with multiple pendulum planes to apply single doses between 8 and 28 Gy by means of stereotaxis into the angiographically determined target volume. The medium follow-up is 23 months. The latency of radiogenic effects is between one and two years. Radiological controls with an interval of more than 18 months after therapy are available in 17 out of 41 patients. Angiographic investigation showed complete obliterations of pathological vessels in six out of these patients and partial obliterations in six patients; five patients remained unchanged. There were no acute complications. Seven patients presented neurological deficiencies with a latency of 6 to 12 months, however, in all cases but one they regressed completely. Even taking into consideration the small number of patients and the short time of observation, a comparison with the results of other radiotherapeutical proceedings allows to draw the conclusion that the presented technique of stereotaxic convergent-beam irradiation represents a relatively simple, reliable and, in case of precise indication, efficient method for the therapy of cerebral arteriovenous malformations. PMID:2678547

  1. Implications of an Incidental Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Van K.; Shah, Nirav G.; Verceles, Avelino C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) have been associated with life-threatening complications, such as stroke and massive hemoptysis, thus posing significant morbidity if left untreated. We report a case of an incidental finding of a PAVM in a trauma patient newly recognized to have suspected hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Case Description. A 34-year-old man with a history of recurrent epistaxis presented with a sudden fall associated with seizure-like activity. Trauma imaging showed a large subdural hematoma and, incidentally, a serpiginous focus within the right upper lobe with a prominent feeding artery consistent with a PAVM. The patient was diagnosed with a simple PAVM related to possible or suspected HHT, an autosomal dominant trait with age-related penetrance. He underwent a pulmonary arteriography of the right upper and lower lobe with the use of a microcatheter system; however, the PAVM could not be visualized. Thus, he was managed medically. The patient was educated on the need for prophylactic antibiotics prior to dental procedures and surveillance imaging. Discussion. Our case highlights the importance of obtaining a complete past medical and family history in young patients with a history of recurrent epistaxis to elicit features of HHT. The diagnosis can be made clinically and directly affects family members, who would otherwise not receive appropriate screening.

  2. Arteriovenous malformation of the vestibulocochlear nerve

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Adam; Tsuji, Masao; Yamada, Yoshitaka; Hanabusa, Kenichiro; Ukita, Tohru; Miyake, Hiroji; Ohmura, Takehisa

    2015-01-01

    We describe a rare case of an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) embedded in the vestibulocochlear nerve presenting with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) treated by microsurgical elimination of the main feeding artery and partial nidus volume reduction with no permanent deficits. This 70-year-old woman was incidentally diagnosed 4 years previously with two small unruptured tandem aneurysms (ANs) on the right anterior inferior cerebral artery feeding a small right cerebellopontine angle AVM. The patient was followed conservatively until she developed sudden headache, nausea and vomiting and presented to our outpatient clinic after several days. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated findings suggestive of early subacute SAH in the quadrigeminal cistern. A microsurgical flow reduction technique via clipping between the two ANs and partial electrocoagulation of the nidus buried within the eighth cranial nerve provided radiographical devascularization of the ANs with residual AVM shunt flow and no major deficits during the 2.5 year follow-up. This is only the second report of an auditory nerve AVM. In the event of recurrence, reoperation or application of alternative therapies may be considered. PMID:26244159

  3. Diagnosis and evaluation of intracranial arteriovenous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Conger, Andrew; Kulwin, Charles; Lawton, Michael T.; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ideal management of intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) remains poorly defined. Decisions regarding management of AVMs are based on the expected natural history of the lesion and risk prediction for peritreatment morbidity. Microsurgical resection, stereotactic radiosurgery, and endovascular embolization alone or in combination are all viable treatment options, each with different risks. The authors attempt to clarify the existing literature's understanding of the natural history of intracranial AVMs, and risk-assessment grading scales for each of the three treatment modalities. Methods: The authors conducted a literature review of the existing AVM natural history studies and studies that clarify the utility of existing grading scales available for the assessment of peritreatment risk for all three treatment modalities. Results: The authors systematically outline the diagnosis and evaluation of patients with intracranial AVMs and clarify estimation of the expected natural history and predicted risk of treatment for intracranial AVMs. Conclusion: AVMs are a heterogenous pathology with three different options for treatment. Accurate assessment of risk of observation and risk of treatment is essential for achieving the best outcome for each patient. PMID:25984390

  4. The Eisenmenger malformation: a morphologic study.

    PubMed

    Restivo, Angelo; di Gioia, Cira R T; Anderson, Robert H; Carletti, Raffaella; Gallo, Pietro

    2016-02-01

    We studied 11 autopsied cases of the Eisenmenger malformation, comparing the findings with 11 hearts with intact ventricular septal structures, and nine hearts having perimembranous ventricular septal defects in the absence of aortic overriding. We found variable lengths for the subpulmonary infundibulum in the hearts with Eisenmenger defects. It was well developed in three hearts, of intermediate length in seven, and very short in one of the specimens. The muscular outlet septum was also of variable length compared with the free-standing subpulmonary infundibular sleeve. Except for one, all hearts had fibrous continuity between the aortic and tricuspid valvar leaflets, such that the ventricular septal defect was then perimembranous. In the remaining case, there was a completely subaortic muscular infundibulum, with the ventricular septal defect showing only muscular borders. The medial papillary muscle was absent in the majority of cases, but was well formed in three hearts, all with relatively short muscular outlet septums. We identified mild, intermediate, and severe degrees of rightward rotation of the aortic valve, and these findings correlated with the extent of aortic valvar overriding. In nine of the 11 hearts, the ventriculo-arterial connections were concordant, but there was double-outlet from the right ventricle in the other two specimens. Based on our anatomic and morphometric observations, we conclude that the hearts we have defined as having Eisenmenger defects show marked individual variation in their specific phenotypic anatomy. PMID:25687391

  5. Sham Control Methods Used in Ear-Acupuncture/Ear-Acupressure Randomized Controlled Trials: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Claire Shuiqing; Yang, Angela Weihong; Zhang, Anthony Lin; May, Brian H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Ear-acupuncture/ear-acupressure (EAP) has been used for a range of health conditions with numerous randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating its efficacy and safety. However, the design of sham interventions in these RCTs varied significantly. This study systematically reviewed RCTs on EAP for all clinical conditions involving a number of sham EAPs as a control intervention. The review is guided by the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions 5.1.0 and investigated the types and differences of sham EAP interventions. Four electronic English databases (The Cochrane Library, PubMed, Embase, CINAHL®) and two Chinese databases (CQVIP, CNKI) were searched in December 2012 and 55 published RCTs comparing real and sham EAP for any clinical condition were included. Characteristics of participants, real and sham interventions, and outcomes were extracted. Four types of sham methods were identified. Among the 55 RCTs, 25 studies involved treatment on nonspecific ear acupoints as the sham method; seven studies used nonacupoints on the ear; nine studies selected placebo needles or placebo ear-acupressure on the same ear acupoints for the real treatment; 10 studies employed pseudo-intervention; and five studies combined two of the above methods to be the sham control. Other factors of treatment such as number of points, treatment duration, and frequency also varied greatly. Risk of bias assessment suggests that 32 RCTs were “high risk” in terms of participants blinding, and 45 RCTs were “high risk” in terms of personnel blinding. Meta-analysis was not conducted due to the high clinical heterogeneity across included studies. No relationship was found between the sham designs and efficacy outcomes, or between the sham types and dropout rate. No solid conclusion of which design is the most appropriate sham control of EAP could be drawn in this review. PMID:24138333

  6. Effects of ear-canal pressurization on middle-ear bone- and air-conduction responses

    PubMed Central

    Homma, Kenji; Shimizu, Yoshitaka; Kim, Namkeun; Du, Yu; Puria, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    In extremely loud noise environments, it is important to not only protect ones hearing against noise transmitted through the air-conduction (AC) pathway, but also through the bone-conduction (BC) pathways. Much of the energy transmitted through the BC pathways is concentrated in the mid-frequency range around 1.52 kHz, which is likely due to the structural resonance of the middle ear. One potential approach for mitigating this mid-frequency BC noise transmission is to introduce a positive or negative static pressure in the ear canal, which is known to reduce BC as well as AC hearing sensitivity. In the present study, middle-ear ossicular velocities at the umbo and stapes were measured using human cadaver temporal bones in response to both BC and AC excitations, while static air pressures of 400 mm H2O were applied in the ear canal. For the maximum negative pressure of ?400 mm H2O, mean BC stapes-velocity reductions of about 58 dB were observed in the frequency range from 0.8 to 2.5 kHz, with a peak reduction of 8.6( 4.7) dB at 1.6 kHz. Finite-element analysis indicates that the peak BC-response reduction tends to be in the mid-frequency range because the middle-ear BC resonance, which is typically around 1.52 kHz, is suppressed by the pressure-induced stiffening of the middle-ear structure. The measured data also show that the BC responses are reduced more for negative static pressures than for positive static pressures. This may be attributable to a difference in the distribution of the stiffening among the middle-ear components depending on the polarity of the static pressure. The characteristics of the BC-response reductions are found to be largely consistent with the available psychoacoustic data, and are therefore indicative of the relative importance of the middle-ear mechanism in BC hearing. PMID:19944139

  7. Manual therapy and ear pain: a report of four cases

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Donald R.; Gay, Charles W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To report and discuss four cases of ear pain which were treated successfully with manual therapy. Methods: Report of four cases. Results: Four patients with ear pain were referred for chiropractic consult. They were all treated with a combination of manual therapy and exercise with resolution of their ear symptoms. Conclusions: The mechanism of idiopathic ear pain that may be amenable to manual therapy is not fully known. Further research is needed to investigate the etiology of this disorder and to determine whether manual therapy and exercise are viable options in some patients with idiopathic ear pain. In the meantime, it may be advantageous for otolaryngologists to seek input from physicians skilled in assessment and treatment of the musculoskeletal system in cases ear pain for which an otolarygologic etiology cannot be found. PMID:21403781

  8. A preliminary theoretical model of hydrodynamics in the inner ear.

    PubMed

    Yu, Vivian M; Strykowski, Paul J; Odland, Rick M

    2010-04-01

    Head movement should create a transient pressure imbalance across the membranous inner ear. We used basic concepts of fluid dynamics to develop a theoretical model of the inner ear. According to this model, two contiguous fluidic systems-the perilymphatic system and the endolymphatic system-are in hydrostatic equilibrium across a compliant membrane. Our model demonstrates that changes in resistance or compliance in one system results in a transient distortion of the membranous inner ear until equilibrium between the two systems is restored. The concept of hydrodynamic pressure changes in the inner ear has received little attention, but it may represent a new approach to understanding the inner ear and treating inner ear diseases. PMID:20397144

  9. Computed Tomography Staging of Middle Ear Cholesteatoma

    PubMed Central

    Razek, Ahmed Abdel Khalek Abdel; Ghonim, Mohamed Rashad; Ashraf, Bassem

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background To establish computed tomography (CT) staging of middle ear cholesteatoma and assess its impact on the selection of the surgical procedure. Material/Methods Prospective study was conducted on 61 consecutive patients (mean age 26.8 years) with middle ear cholesteatoma. CT scan of the temporal bone and surgery were performed in all patients. CT staging classified cholesteatoma according to its location in the tympanic cavity (T); extension into the mastoid (M); and associated complications (C). Cholesteatoma was staged as stage I (T1, T2), stage II (T3, M1, M2, C1), and stage III (C2). Results The overall sensitivity of CT staging of cholesteatoma compared to surgery was 88% with excellent agreement and correlation between CT findings and intra-operative findings (K=0.863, r=0.86, P=0.001). There was excellent agreement and correlation of CT staging with surgical findings for T location (K=0.811, r=0.89, P=0.001), good for M extension (K=0.734, r=0.88, P=0.001), and excellent for associated C complications (K=1.00, r=1.0, P=0.001). Atticotympanotomy was carried out in stage I (n=14), intact canal wall surgery was performed in stage II (n=38), and canal wall down surgery was done in stage III (n=5) and stage II (n=4). Conclusions We established CT staging of middle ear cholesteatoma that helps surgeons to select an appropriate surgery. PMID:26171086

  10. On hearing with more than one ear: lessons from evolution

    PubMed Central

    Schnupp, Jan W H; Carr, Catherine E

    2011-01-01

    Although ears capable of detecting airborne sound have arisen repeatedly and independently in different species, most animals that are capable of hearing have a pair of ears. We review the advantages that arise from having two ears and discuss recent research on the similarities and differences in the binaural processing strategies adopted by birds and mammals. We also ask how these different adaptations for binaural and spatial hearing might inform and inspire the development of techniques for future auditory prosthetic devices. PMID:19471267

  11. Epiphyseal, vertebral, and ear (EVE) dysplasia: a new syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Amiel, J.; Cormier-Daire, V.; Journeau, P.; Mussat, P.; Munnich, A.; Lyonnet, S.

    1999-01-01

    We report on the association of epiphyseal, vertebral, and ear dysplasia in two sisters with normal stature and psychomotor development born to distantly related, healthy parents. This distinctive association has not been reported previously and is likely to represent a new condition with an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. For this syndrome, we propose the acronym EVE standing for epiphyseal, vertebral, and ear dysplasia.???Keywords: epiphyseal; verterbal; and ear (EVE) dysplasia; new syndrome PMID:10424819

  12. Sebaceous Hyperplasia Mimicking Linear Wart over Ear

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Pragya A; Diwan, Nilofar G

    2015-01-01

    Sebaceous hyperplasia (SH), a common, benign condition of sebaceous gland, presents most commonly over face. Lesions are usually described as asymptomatic, soft, discrete, and yellow with a surface that ranges from smooth to slightly verrucous. The pathogenesis is not fully understood. It does not require treatment, but many time lesions can be cosmetically unfavorable than, need to be destroyed or excised. A case of 23-year-old male presenting with the skin colored to hyperpigmented linear hyperkeratotic plaque mimicking a wart, over the right ear is presented here, which was diagnosed as SH.

  13. [The obstetrical outlook in uterine malformations].

    PubMed

    Rudigoz, R C; Gaucherand, P; Dargent, D

    1989-01-01

    The authors start with an anatomical description which makes it possible to distinguish from one another septate, bicornuate unicornuate and pseudo-cornuate uteri. The diagnosis is often suggested by the clinical features and is made by using complementary examinations such as ultrasound, hysterography, hysteroscopy and laparoscopy. Although it is difficult to be sure of the incidence of the condition it is thought to be around 1%. In the 10 years from 1978 to 1987 the authors have studied 296 pregnancies occurring in 109 patients who were not operated on and 34 pregnancies occurring in 21 patients who had plastic operations on their uteri. They show that the condition has an effect at all stages of pregnancy and delivery and in the first category of patients (abortion in 38%, extra-uterine pregnancy in 8%, prematurity, pre-eclampsia and malpresentation in 28%, with a high rate for caesarean section in 37%). The prognosis was quite different in patients who had been operated on. The published literature confirms these findings. The authors discuss the different ways of carrying out surgical treatment (simple section or excision of the septum, or Bret-Palmer's plastic operation on the uterus with treatment of the associated vaginal abnormalities), plus the medical treatment (with rest and the use of vasodilatators and drugs for anti-platelet aggregation) to be used during the pregnancy. They conclude that it is necessary to make a diagnosis of what type of malformation is present, to decide which surgical procedures to carry out as this does improve the prognosis greatly. PMID:2723350

  14. Repeat radiosurgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Awad, Ahmed J; Walcott, Brian P; Stapleton, Christopher J; Ding, Dale; Lee, Cheng-Chia; Loeffler, Jay S

    2015-06-01

    We perform a systematic review of repeat radiosurgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVM) with an emphasis on lesion obliteration rates and complications. Radiosurgery is an accepted treatment modality for AVM located in eloquent cortex or deep brain structures. For residual or persistent lesions, repeat radiosurgery can be considered if sufficient time has passed to allow for a full appreciation of treatment effects, usually at least 3years. A systematic review was performed in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. References for this review were identified by searches of MEDLINE, Web of Science and Google Scholar databases. A total of 14 studies comprising 733 patients met the review criteria and were included. For series that reported target dose at both first and repeat treatments, the weighted means were 19.42Gy and 19.06Gy, respectively. The mean and median obliteration rate for the repeat radiosurgery treatments were 61% (95% confidence interval 51.9-71.7%) and 61.5%, respectively. The median follow up following radiosurgery ranged from 19.5 to 80months. Time to complete obliteration after the repeat treatment ranged from 21 to 40.8months. The most common complications of repeat radiosurgery for AVM included hemorrhage (7.6%) and radiation-induced changes (7.4%). Repeat radiosurgery can be used to treat incompletely obliterated AVM with an obliteration rate of 61%. Complications are related to treatment effect latency (hemorrhage risk) as well as radiation-induced changes. Repeat radiosurgery can be performed at 3 years following the initial treatment, allowing for full realization of effects from the initial treatment prior to commencing therapy. PMID:25913746

  15. Surgical Strategies for Acutely Ruptured Arteriovenous Malformations.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Jaime L; Macdonald, R Loch

    2015-11-01

    Brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are focal neurovascular lesions consisting of abnormal fistulous connections between the arterial and venous systems with no interposed capillaries. This arrangement creates a high-flow circulatory shunt with hemorrhagic risk and hemodynamic abnormalities. While most AVMs are asymptomatic, they may cause severe neurological complications and death. Each AVM carries an annual rupture risk of 2-4%. Intracranial hemorrhage due to AVM rupture is the most common initial manifestation (up to 70% of presentations), and it carries significant morbidity and mortality. This complication is particularly important in the young and otherwise healthy population, in whom AVMs cause up to one-third of all hemorrhagic strokes. A previous rupture is the single most important independent predictor of future hemorrhage. Current treatment modalities for AVM are microsurgery, endovascular embolization, and radiosurgery. In acutely ruptured AVMs, early microsurgical excision is usually avoided. The standard is to wait at least 4 weeks to allow for patient recovery, hematoma liquefaction, and inflammatory reactions to subside. Exceptions to this rule are small, superficial, low-grade AVMs with elucidated angioarchitecture, for which early simultaneous hematoma evacuation and AVM excision is feasible. Emergent hematoma evacuation with delayed AVM excision (unless, as mentioned, the AVM is low grade) is recommended in patients with a decreased level of consciousness due to intracranial hemorrhage, posterior fossa or temporal lobe hematoma of >30 ml, or hemispheric hematoma of >60 ml. The applicability of endovascular techniques for acutely ruptured AVMs is not clear, but feasible options, until a definitive treatment is determined, include occluding intranidal and distal flow-related aneurysms and 'sealing' any rupture site or focal angioarchitectural weakness when one can be clearly identified and safely accessed. Radiosurgery is not performed in acutely ruptured AVMs because its therapeutic effects occur in a delayed fashion. PMID:26587641

  16. Endovascular treatment of posterior fossa arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Robert, T; Blanc, R; Ciccio, G; Gilboa, B; Fahed, R; Boissonnet, H; Redjem, H; Pistocchi, S; Bartolini, B; Piotin, M

    2016-03-01

    Infratentorial arteriovenous malformations (AVM) are rare, representing only 7-15% of cerebral AVM. The concentration of eloquent neurological structures and the high rate of bleeding presentation of AVM in this location complicate the management of such lesions. New therapeutic options, especially in endovascular therapy, have fundamentally modified the treatment strategy and also the outcome of posterior fossa AVM. Between 1999 and 2013, baseline, clinical and angiographic data of cerebral AVM were prospectively collected. We analyzed data from patients treated for a posterior fossa AVM, focusing on risk factors for bleeding, and clinical and angiographic outcomes. Sixty-nine patients (mean age 34years, male to female ratio 2:1) were consecutively treated for an infratentorial AVM. Fifty-seven presented with hemorrhage, six with focal neurologic deficits, and the remaining six patients were diagnosed incidentally. The Spetzler-Martin grade was <3 in 39 (56.5%) patients. Associated aneurysms were noted in 43.5% of patients. All patients were treated using endovascular procedures, associated with microsurgical resection in nine patients and with stereotactic radiosurgery in six. Mean follow-up was 28.5months, with angiographic exclusion of the AVM in 72.5% of patients; 21.7% of patients presented a modified Rankin Score ?3 at follow-up. Endovascular embolization seems to be a secure approach for posterior fossa AVM although a large number of sessions are necessary to achieve complete obliteration. Multi-disciplinary discussion and management is crucial to obtain the best cure rate without increasing procedural risks. PMID:26549679

  17. Sex and congenital malformations: an international perspective.

    PubMed

    Lisi, Alessandra; Botto, Lorenzo D; Rittler, Monica; Castilla, Eduardo; Bianca, Sebastiano; Bianchi, Fabrizio; Botting, Beverley; De Walle, Hermien; Erickson, J David; Gatt, Miriam; De Vigan, Catherine; Irgens, Lorentz; Johnson, William; Lancaster, Paul; Merlob, Paul; Mutchinick, Osvaldo M; Ritvanen, Annukka; Robert, Elisabeth; Scarano, Gioacchino; Stoll, Claude; Mastroiacovo, Pierpaolo

    2005-04-01

    The study evaluated the sex distribution of major isolated malformations and common trisomies among a large and geographically varied sample. Eighteen registries from 24 countries contributed cases, which were centrally reviewed and classified in three clinical types as isolated, associated, or syndromic. We selected cases of 26 major defects (n = 108,534); trisomy 21, 18, and 13 (n = 30,114); other syndromes (n = 2,898); and multiple congenital anomalies (n = 24,197), for a total of 165,743 cases. We observed a significant deviation of sex distribution (compared to a sex ratio of 1.06 or male proportion of 51.4%) for 24 of the 29 groups (a male excess in 16, a female excess in 8), and in 8 of such groups these estimates varied significantly across registries. A male excess was noted for two left obstructive cardiac defects (hypoplastic left heart and coarctation of the aorta) and a female excess for all the main types of neural tube defects. A male excess was seen for omphalocele but not gastroschisis. For neural tube defects the female excess tended to be stronger in areas with historically high prevalence for these defects. For 15 of the 26 birth defects the sex distribution differed among isolated, associated, and syndromic cases. Some of these epidemiologic commonalities are consistent with known or putative developmental processes. Further, the geographic variation for some defects may reflect local prevalence rates and risk factors. Finally, the findings underscore the need for clinical classification (e.g., into isolated, multiple, syndromes) in studies of birth defects. PMID:15704121

  18. Incorporating anthropometry into design of ear-related products.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bor-Shong

    2008-01-01

    To achieve mass customization and collaborative product design, human factors and ergonomics should play a key development role. The purpose of this study was to provide product designers with the anthropometic dimensions of outer ears for different demographic data, including gender and age. The second purpose was to compare the dimensions of various ear-related products (i.e., earphone, bluetooth earphone and ear-cup earphone) with the anthropometic database and recommend appropriate solutions for design. Two hundred subjects aged 20-59 was selected for this study and divided into four age stratifications. Further, three different dimensions of the outer ear (i.e., the earhole length, the ear connection length and the length of the pinna) were measured by superimposed grid photographic technique. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to investigate the effects of gender, and age on ear dimensions. The results showed that all ear dimensions had significant gender effects. A comparison between the anthropometric dimensions and those of current products revealed that most current ear-related products need to be redesigned using anthropometric data. The shapes of earhole and pinna are not circular. Consequently, ear products need to be elongated so that users may feel more comfortably and not have the product slip off easily. PMID:17374520

  19. Customized tissue engineering for ear reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Staudenmaier, Rainer; Hoang, Nguyen The; Mandlik, Veronika; Schurr, Christian; Burghartz, Marc; Hauber, Katharina; Meier, Gerhard; Kadegge, Gnter; Blunk, Torsten

    2010-01-01

    Tissue engineering (TE) of cartilage for reconstructive surgery has proven to be a promising option for obtaining tissue for 3D structures that results in minimal donor site morbidity. Technological advances in this area are important since many defects can only be treated with customized implants. Most TE strategies rely on the use of resorbable 3D scaffolds to guide the growing tissue, with each tissue requiring a specific scaffold that has precisely defined properties depending on the physiological environment. Rapid prototyping (RP) technologies allow the fabrication of scaffolds of various geometric complexities from a variety of materials and as composites, while even allowing the inner architecture of the object to be varied in a defined manner at any given location. Scaffolds can be manufactured using RP techniques directly from computer aided design (CAD) data sources, e.g. via an STL file. The combination of TE and RP serves as the basis for the production of customized implants, for example the cartilage ear framework, and provides new perspectives for autologous ear reconstruction. PMID:20442566

  20. Enhanced visualization of inner ear structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemczyk, Kazimierz; Kucharski, Tomasz; Kujawinska, Malgorzata; Bruzgielewicz, Antoni

    2004-07-01

    Recently surgery requires extensive support from imaging technologies in order to increase effectiveness and safety of operations. One of important tasks is to enhance visualisation of quasi-phase (transparent) 3d structures. Those structures are characterized by very low contrast. It makes differentiation of tissues in field of view very difficult. For that reason the surgeon may be extremly uncertain during operation. This problem is connected with supporting operations of inner ear during which physician has to perform cuts at specific places of quasi-transparent velums. Conventionally during such operations medical doctor views the operating field through stereoscopic microscope. In the paper we propose a 3D visualisation system based on Helmet Mounted Display. Two CCD cameras placed at the output of microscope perform acquisition of stereo pairs of images. The images are processed in real-time with the goal of enhancement of quasi-phased structures. The main task is to create algorithm that is not sensitive to changes in intensity distribution. The disadvantages of existing algorithms is their lack of adaptation to occuring reflexes and shadows in field of view. The processed images from both left and right channels are overlaid on the actual images exported and displayed at LCD's of Helmet Mounted Display. A physician observes by HMD (Helmet Mounted Display) a stereoscopic operating scene with indication of the places of special interest. The authors present the hardware ,procedures applied and initial results of inner ear structure visualisation. Several problems connected with processing of stereo-pair images are discussed.

  1. Local Model of Arteriovenous Malformation of the Human Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadezhda Telegina, Ms; Aleksandr Chupakhin, Mr; Aleksandr Cherevko, Mr

    2013-02-01

    Vascular diseases of the human brain are one of the reasons of deaths and people's incapacitation not only in Russia, but also in the world. The danger of an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is in premature rupture of pathological vessels of an AVM which may cause haemorrhage. Long-term prognosis without surgical treatment is unfavorable. The reduced impact method of AVM treatment is embolization of a malformation which often results in complete obliteration of an AVM. Pre-surgical mathematical modeling of an arteriovenous malformation can help surgeons with an optimal sequence of the operation. During investigations, the simple mathematical model of arteriovenous malformation is developed and calculated, and stationary and non-stationary processes of its embolization are considered. Various sequences of embolization of a malformation are also considered. Calculations were done with approximate steady flow on the basis of balanced equations derived from conservation laws. Depending on pressure difference, a fistula-type AVM should be embolized at first, and then small racemose AVMs are embolized. Obtained results are in good correspondence with neurosurgical AVM practice.

  2. Anorectal Malformations Associated with Esophageal Atresia in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Shin Yun; Lim, Ryoung Kyoung; Park, Kyung Hee; Kim, Hae Young

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Anorectal malformations are often associated with other anomalies, reporting frequency with 40-70%. Gastrointestinal anomalies have been known to be relatively less common than associated anomalies of other organ system. This study was performed to assess a distinctive feature of cases associated with esophageal atresia. Methods Clinical data (from January 2000 through December 2011) on the 196 subjects with anorectal malformations, managed in our Hospital, were reviewed. Total 14 neonates were identified with accompanying esophageal atresia and retrospective analysis was conducted. Results The incidence was 7.1% and there were 8 male and 6 female subjects. Only 2 cases were associated with esophageal atresia without tracheoesophageal fistula. Although variable cases of anorectal malformation in female subjects, almost cases were anorectal malformations with rectourethral fistula in male. Other associated anomalies were identified in all cases, with more than 3 anomalies in 10 cases. There were 4 VACTERL (Vertebral abnormalities, Anal atresia, Cardiac anomalies, Tracheoesophageal fistula, Esophageal atresia, Renal and Limb anomalies) associations accounting for 28.6%, but could not identify chromosomal anomaly. Most cases were managed with staged procedure, usually primary repair of esophageal atresia and diverting colostomy. Overall mortality rate was 21.4%, mainly caused by heart problems. Conclusion This study shows that early diagnosis and rational surgical approach with multidisciplinary plan are mandatory in managing anorectal malformations with esophageal atresia, when considering a high frequency of associated anomaly and a relative high mortality. PMID:24010103

  3. Sporadic Multifocal Venous Malformations of the Head and Neck

    PubMed Central

    Amato, Michael V.; Patel, Neha A.; Hu, Shirley; Pantelides, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To report a case of unusually widespread sporadic venous malformations of the head and neck associated with normal D-dimer levels and, due to the protean clinical manifestations and increased risk of coagulopathy of these lesions, to review their diagnosis and clinical management. Case Report. A 25-year-old man presented with a one-year history of intermittent right-sided neck swelling and tongue swelling. Physical exam revealed additional lesions present throughout the head and neck. There was no family history suggestive of heritable vascular malformations. Radiographic imaging demonstrated 15 lesions located in various tissue layers consistent with venous malformations. A coagulation screen showed a normal prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, international normalized ratio, D-dimer level, and fibrinogen level. It was determined that the patient was not at increased risk for intraoperative coagulopathy and preoperative heparin administration would not be necessary. The patient's buccal and tongue lesions were subsequently excised with no complications. The patient also underwent sclerotherapy evaluation for his neck mass. Conclusion. This case describes a unique presentation of sporadic multifocal venous malformations. It also emphasizes the importance of prompt diagnosis and workup when multiple venous malformations are present to prevent morbidity during surgical excision secondary to intravascular coagulopathy. PMID:26483982

  4. A familial venous malformation locus is on chromosome 9p

    SciTech Connect

    Boon, L.M.; Mulliken, J.B.; Vikkula, M.

    1994-09-01

    Venous malformation is the most common vascular malformation affecting 0.2% of the population. Depending upon size and location, these slow-flow lesions may cause pain, anatomic distortion and threaten life. Most venous malformations occur sporadically and present as solitary lesions. For this reason, determining their pathogenic bases has proven elusive. However, venous malformations also occur in several rare syndromes, some of which demonstrate Mendelian inheritance. As a first step towards identifying the pathogenic bases for these lesions, we have mapped a locus for an autosomal dominant disorder in a three generation family that manifests as multiple cutaneous and mucosal venous malformations. This locus lies within a 24.5 cM interval on chromosome 9p, defined by the markers D9S157 and D9S163. A maximum LOD score of 4.11 at {theta} = 0.05 is obtained with several markers within the interval. The interferon gene cluster, which has previously been implicated in angiogenesis, and the multiple tumor suppressor gene, responsible for several types of malignant tumors, also lie within this interval and are potential candidates.

  5. Gross congenital malformation at birth in a government hospital.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Sandeep; Nanda, Smiti; Bhalla, Kapil; Sachdeva, Ruchi

    2014-01-01

    A hospital-based cross-sectional study was undertaken to determine proportion of gross congenital malformation (GCMF) occurring at intramural births. Rate of GCMF was found to be 16.4/1000 consecutive singleton births (>28 weeks) with three leading malformation as anencephaly (44.68%), talipes equinovarus (17.02%) and meningomyelocele (10.63%). Higher risk of malformed births were noticed amongst un-booked (2.07%) in-comparison to booked (1.01%) mothers; women with low level of education (up to 8 years [2.14%] vs. at least 9 years of schooling [0.82%]); gravida status of at least 3 (2.69%) followed by 1 (1.43%) and 2 (1.0%) respectively; pre-term (5.13%) vs. term (0.66%); cesarean section (4.36%) versus vaginal delivery (0.62%). Mortality was significantly higher among congenitally malformed (17.35%) than normal (0.34%) newborns. With-in study limitation, emergence of neural tube defect as the single largest category of congenital malformation indicates maternal malnutrition (especially folic acid) that needs appropriate attention and management. PMID:24748359

  6. Evaluation and management of congenital peripheral arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Nassiri, Naiem; Cirillo-Penn, Nolan C; Thomas, Jones

    2015-12-01

    The International Society for Study of Vascular Anomalies (ISSVA) broadly categorizes vascular anomalies into vascular tumors and vascular malformations. Vascular malformations are further divided based on their flow properties into slow-flow venous and lymphatic malformations, high-flow arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), and congenital mixed syndromes, which can include combinations thereof. Whether occurring in isolation or as part of a broader syndrome, congenital high-flow AVMs are arguably the most complicated, challenging, and gratifying of all vascular malformations to diagnose and manage. Various configurations exist depending on location and coexisting clinical features. Transcatheter embolization has evolved into the mainstay of treatment for most congenital peripheral AVMs with surgical excision playing a growingly limited role as an adjunctive modality. Successful treatment requires technical precision, creativity, patience, and persistence given the ever-evolving angioarchitecture and hemodynamic profile of these lesions. Despite these challenges, certain fundamental principles have been established as our understanding of the pathogenesis, natural history, hemodynamics, and treatment outcomes has expanded and evolved over the last few decades. These principles are crucial to adhere to in the overall management of these lesions and are highlighted and expanded upon herein. PMID:26598124

  7. Defining anural malformations in the context of a developmental problem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meteyer, C.U.; Cole, R.A.; Converse, K.A.; Docherty, D.E.; Wolcott, M.; Helgen, J.C.; Levey, R.; Eaton-Poole, L.; Burkhart, J.G.

    2000-01-01

    This paper summarizes terminology and general concepts involved in animal development for the purpose of providing background for the study and understanding of frog malformations. The results of our radiographic investigation of rear limb malformations in Rana pipiens provide evidence that frog malformations are the product of early developmental errors. Although bacteria, parasites and viruses were identified in these metamorphosed frogs, the relevant window to look for the teratogenic effect of these agents is in the early tadpole stage during limb development. As a result, our microbiological findings must be regarded as inconclusive relative to determining their contribution to malformations because we conducted our examinations on metamorphosed frogs not tadpoles. Future studies need to look at teratogenic agents (chemical, microbial, physical or mechanical) that are present in the embryo, tadpole, and their environments at the stages of development that are relevant for the malformation type. The impact of these teratogenic agents then needs to be assessed in appropriate animal models using studies that are designed to mimic field conditions. The results of these laboratory tests should then be analyzed in such a way that will allow comparison with the findings in the wild-caught tadpoles and frogs.

  8. Probing the Xenopus laevis inner ear transcriptome for biological function

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The senses of hearing and balance depend upon mechanoreception, a process that originates in the inner ear and shares features across species. Amphibians have been widely used for physiological studies of mechanotransduction by sensory hair cells. In contrast, much less is known of the genetic basis of auditory and vestibular function in this class of animals. Among amphibians, the genus Xenopus is a well-characterized genetic and developmental model that offers unique opportunities for inner ear research because of the amphibian capacity for tissue and organ regeneration. For these reasons, we implemented a functional genomics approach as a means to undertake a large-scale analysis of the Xenopus laevis inner ear transcriptome through microarray analysis. Results Microarray analysis uncovered genes within the X. laevis inner ear transcriptome associated with inner ear function and impairment in other organisms, thereby supporting the inclusion of Xenopus in cross-species genetic studies of the inner ear. The use of gene categories (inner ear tissue; deafness; ion channels; ion transporters; transcription factors) facilitated the assignment of functional significance to probe set identifiers. We enhanced the biological relevance of our microarray data by using a variety of curation approaches to increase the annotation of the Affymetrix GeneChip® Xenopus laevis Genome array. In addition, annotation analysis revealed the prevalence of inner ear transcripts represented by probe set identifiers that lack functional characterization. Conclusions We identified an abundance of targets for genetic analysis of auditory and vestibular function. The orthologues to human genes with known inner ear function and the highly expressed transcripts that lack annotation are particularly interesting candidates for future analyses. We used informatics approaches to impart biologically relevant information to the Xenopus inner ear transcriptome, thereby addressing the impediment imposed by insufficient gene annotation. These findings heighten the relevance of Xenopus as a model organism for genetic investigations of inner ear organogenesis, morphogenesis, and regeneration. PMID:22676585

  9. Cauliflower Ear and Skin Infections among Wrestlers in Tehran

    PubMed Central

    Kordi, Ramin; Mansournai, Mohammad Ali; Nourian, Roh Allah; Wallace, W. Angus

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe the magnitude of the selected sports medicine problems (i.e. cauliflower ear and skin infections) among wrestlers in Tehran. A number of 411 wrestlers were randomly selected from wrestling clubs in Tehran employing cluster sample setting method. The participants were interviewed using a specially designed and validated questionnaire. Nearly half of the participants (44%) had cauliflower ears. Only 23% of these participants had received any kind of treatment for their acute ear haematomas that are known to result in cauliflower ears. The prevalence of reported hearing loss among participants with cauliflower ears (11.5%, 95%CI: 6.9 to 16.2) was significantly more than this prevalence among those participants without cauliflower ears (1.8%, 95%CI: 0.1 to 3.5) (p < 0.05). More than half of the participants (52%) had skin infection diagnosed by a physician during the previous year. This study has identified evidence of an increase in hearing loss as a possible side effect of either cauliflower ear or ear injury in wrestling in Iran. There has been an outbreak of ringworm and there is a significant potential for an outbreak of impetigo among wrestlers in Tehran. Key points Skin infections are prevalent among wrestlers in Tehran. Commonly wrestlers in Tehran continue to carry out wrestling training while affected by skin infections. Cauliflower ear is common among wrestlers in Tehran. More research is needed to investigate hearing loss as a possible side effect of either cauliflower ear or ear injury in wrestling in Iran. PMID:24198702

  10. Genes and brain malformations associated with abnormal neuron positioning.

    PubMed

    Moffat, Jeffrey J; Ka, Minhan; Jung, Eui-Man; Kim, Woo-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal positioning is a fundamental process during brain development. Abnormalities in this process cause several types of brain malformations and are linked to neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism, intellectual disability, epilepsy, and schizophrenia. Little is known about the pathogenesis of developmental brain malformations associated with abnormal neuron positioning, which has hindered research into potential treatments. However, recent advances in neurogenetics provide clues to the pathogenesis of aberrant neuronal positioning by identifying causative genes. This may help us form a foundation upon which therapeutic tools can be developed. In this review, we first provide a brief overview of neural development and migration, as they relate to defects in neuronal positioning. We then discuss recent progress in identifying genes and brain malformations associated with aberrant neuronal positioning during human brain development. PMID:26541977

  11. Multiple vascular malformations in head and neck - Rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Lakkasetty, Yogesh T; Malik, Sangeeta; Shetty, Akshay; Nakhaei, Kourosh

    2014-01-01

    Multiple venous malformations (VMs) pose some of the most difficult challenges in the practice of medicine today. Clinical manifestations of these lesions are extremely protean. Because of the rarity of these lesions, experience in their diagnosis and management by most clinicians is limited. This augments the enormity of the problem and can lead to misdiagnoses, inadequate treatment, high complication rates and poor patient outcomes. Because these lesions can recur, removal of the nidus is the main priority. Vascular malformations are best treated in medical centers where patients with these maladies are seen regularly and the team approach is utilized. The presence of intralesional nerve in arteriovenous malformation (AVM) and sometimes in VMs, as reported in this study, provides an additional diagnostic criterion that is simple and reliable and can be readily used to differentiate VMs from hemangiomas. PMID:24959056

  12. Venous malformations: Sclerotherapy with a mixture of ethanol and lipiodol

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Jin-Suck; Shin, Kyoo-Ho; Na, Jae-Bum; Won, Jong-Yun; Hahn, Soo-Bong

    1997-07-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the usefulness of a mixture of absolute ethanol and lipiodol in the management of venous malformations. Methods. Percutaneous sclerotherapy was performed with a mixture of absolute ethanol and lipiodol (9:1) in 17 patients with venous malformations, once in 12 patients, twice in 5. The therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by pain reduction. Conventional radiographs (n=15) and posttreatment magnetic resonance imaging (n=5) were obtained for the follow-up evaluation. Results. Sclerotherapy was successful in all but two patients. The therapeutic effect was excellent in two patients, good in seven, fair in five, and poor in one. Radiopacity of lipiodol was beneficial for monitoring the procedure rather than for follow-up evaluations. Areas with low signal-intensity strands were increased on T2-weighted images obtained after the sclerotherapy. Conclusion. Sclerotherapy with a mixture of ethanol and lipiodol is effective in treating venous malformations.

  13. Echocardiographic screening in neonates undergoing surgery for selected gastrointestinal malformations.

    PubMed Central

    Tulloh, R M; Tansey, S P; Parashar, K; De Giovanni, J V; Wright, J G; Silove, E D

    1994-01-01

    To compare echocardiography with clinical examination, radiography, and electrocardiography for the detection of congenital heart defects (CHD) a four year prospective study was carried out in 166 neonates with selected congenital gastrointestinal malformations (anorectal anomaly, tracheo-oesophageal fistula, duodenal atresia, exomphalos, and gastroschisis). Routine examination and investigation detected CHD in 16 neonates. Using echocardiography CHD was diagnosed in 38 (23%) neonates of whom five had two gastrointestinal malformations: in 22/57 (39%) with a tracheo-oesophageal fistula, 10/67 (15%) with an anorectal anomaly, 4/20 (20%) with exomphalos, 6/20 (30%) with duodenal atresia, and 1/7 with gastroschisis. A significantly higher incidence of CHD in neonates with gastrointestinal malformations was diagnosed using echocardiography (23%) compared with routine examination and investigation (9%). Early diagnosis of CHD allowed a unified approach to be presented to the family. PMID:8198415

  14. Baller-Gerold syndrome associated with congenital portal venous malformation.

    PubMed Central

    Savarirayan, R; Tomlinson, P; Thompson, E

    1998-01-01

    We report a 4 year old boy in whom the clinical features of craniosynostosis and bilateral absent radii led to a diagnosis of Baller-Gerold syndrome. Additional congenital abnormalities included midface hypoplasia, atrial and ventricular septal defects, right hydronephrosis, partial sacral agenesis, and anterior ectopic anus. Evidence of portal venous hypertension was present from 8 months and a congenital portal venous malformation was discovered at 2 years. This is the first reported case of Baller-Gerold syndrome associated with a congenital portal venous malformation. We discuss the diagnostic confusion between this syndrome and other overlapping malformation syndromes and propose optimal evaluation strategies aimed at clarifying the nosology of these syndromes. Images PMID:9733037

  15. 21 CFR 344.12 - Ear drying aid active ingredient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ear drying aid active ingredient. 344.12 Section 344.12 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....12 Ear drying aid active ingredient. The active ingredient of the product consists of...

  16. CT of adenomas of the middle ear and mastoid cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Van Thong Ho; Rao, V.J.; Mikaelian, D.O.

    1996-03-01

    A case of mixed type adenoma of the middle ear and mastoid is presented in which CT showed complete opacification of the middle ear and mastoid air cells with bulging of the tympanic membrane but without ossicular or bony destruction. 7 refs., 1 figs.

  17. 21 CFR 344.12 - Ear drying aid active ingredient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ear drying aid active ingredient. 344.12 Section 344.12 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....12 Ear drying aid active ingredient. The active ingredient of the product consists of...

  18. 21 CFR 344.12 - Ear drying aid active ingredient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ear drying aid active ingredient. 344.12 Section 344.12 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....12 Ear drying aid active ingredient. The active ingredient of the product consists of...

  19. 21 CFR 344.12 - Ear drying aid active ingredient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ear drying aid active ingredient. 344.12 Section 344.12 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....12 Ear drying aid active ingredient. The active ingredient of the product consists of...

  20. 21 CFR 344.12 - Ear drying aid active ingredient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ear drying aid active ingredient. 344.12 Section 344.12 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....12 Ear drying aid active ingredient. The active ingredient of the product consists of...

  1. Replantation of an avulsed ear, using a single arterial anastamosis.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, G; Bhatti, K; Masood, S

    2008-01-01

    Avulsion of the ear is relatively uncommon and replantation a technical challenge. A case in which an avulsed ear was successfully replanted using a single arterial anastamosis is described. The surgical difficulties encountered, the pharmaceutical approach to postoperative care and the problems which resulted from the lack of venous drainage are discussed. PMID:18061545

  2. Middle Ear Resonance and Acoustic Immittance Measures in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanks, Wendy D.; Rose, Katie J.

    1993-01-01

    This study established a normal middle ear resonance estimated from sweep frequency tympanometry, established normal equivalent ear canal volume, static acoustic admittance, and tympanometric peak pressure at 226 hertz in 90 children with normal hearing and 68 children with deafness, ages 6-15. No significant intergroup or age differences were

  3. [Significance of the ear in the determination of age].

    PubMed

    Röhm, E; Adam, E

    1986-01-01

    The morphology of human ear conch is said to be rather individual, but a perfect person-identification by this mean is not possible. It is demonstrated by photographs-made in a 15 years' interval-that ear conch and auricular area can be typically marked by proceeding age and specific diseases. PMID:3741048

  4. Preventing Cauliflower Ear with a Modified Tie-Through Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimeff, Robert J.; Hough, David O.

    1989-01-01

    Describes a quick, simple tie-through suture technique (in which a collodion packing is secured to the auricle with two buttons) for preventing cauliflower ear following external ear trauma in wrestlers and boxers. The technique ensures constant compression; multiple treatments for fluid reaccumulation are rarely necessary. (SM)

  5. Inner ear contribution to bone conduction hearing in the human.

    PubMed

    Stenfelt, Stefan

    2015-11-01

    Bone conduction (BC) hearing relies on sound vibration transmission in the skull bone. Several clinical findings indicate that in the human, the skull vibration of the inner ear dominates the response for BC sound. Two phenomena transform the vibrations of the skull surrounding the inner ear to an excitation of the basilar membrane, (1) inertia of the inner ear fluid and (2) compression and expansion of the inner ear space. The relative importance of these two contributors were investigated using an impedance lumped element model. By dividing the motion of the inner ear boundary in common and differential motion it was found that the common motion dominated at frequencies below 7 kHz but above this frequency differential motion was greatest. When these motions were used to excite the model it was found that for the normal ear, the fluid inertia response was up to 20 dB greater than the compression response. This changed in the pathological ear where, for example, otosclerosis of the stapes depressed the fluid inertia response and improved the compression response so that inner ear compression dominated BC hearing at frequencies above 400 Hz. The model was also able to predict experimental and clinical findings of BC sensitivity in the literature, for example the so called Carhart notch in otosclerosis, increased BC sensitivity in superior semicircular canal dehiscence, and altered BC sensitivity following a vestibular fenestration and RW atresia. PMID:25528492

  6. The maize rachis affects Aspergillus flavus movement during ear development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) was used to follow infection in ears of maize hybrids resistant and susceptible to the fungus. Developing ears were needle-inoculated with GFP-transformed A. flavus 20 days after silk emergence, and GFP fluorescence in the pith was evalu...

  7. The interaction between ear and sex differences and stimulus rate.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Hasnaa; Thornton, A Roger D

    2003-05-01

    Evoked otoacoustic emissions (EOAEs) are produced by the cochlea in response to acoustic stimuli and provide an objective and non-invasive measure of cochlear function. A new technique, based on maximum length sequences (MLSs), enables stimulus rates of up to 5000 clicks/s to be used. Conventional EOAE amplitude differs between ears and sexes, female subjects having responses of greater amplitude than male subjects and right ears larger responses than left ears. As a prerequisite to clinical use it is necessary to establish if these differences occur with the MLS OAE technique and whether they change with stimulus rate. Eighty ears of normally hearing adults between the ages of 18 and 40 years were tested. MLS OAEs were recorded at eight stimulus rates ranging from 40/s to 5000/s. Two stimulus levels and two recordings were made at each stimulus rate. Female subjects were found to have statistically significantly larger MLS OAEs than male subjects and gave larger amplitude responses in the right ears. The difference was not significant between male right and left ears. A rate effect was also demonstrated with the amplitude of the MLS OAEs decreasing with an increase in rate. The study provides normative data for MLS OAE testing and shows that females have MLS OAEs of larger amplitude than males and that as the click stimulus rate increases the significance of this difference decreases. Female right ears also have MLS OAEs of greater amplitude than female left ears. PMID:12742242

  8. Models of cortical malformation-Chemical and physical.

    PubMed

    Luhmann, Heiko J

    2016-02-15

    Pharmaco-resistant epilepsies, and also some neuropsychiatric disorders, are often associated with malformations in hippocampal and neocortical structures. The mechanisms leading to these cortical malformations causing an imbalance between the excitatory and inhibitory system are largely unknown. Animal models using chemical or physical manipulations reproduce different human pathologies by interfering with cell generation and neuronal migration. The model of in utero injection of methylazoxymethanol (MAM) acetate mimics periventricular nodular heterotopia. The freeze lesion model reproduces (poly)microgyria, focal heterotopia and schizencephaly. The in utero irradiation model causes microgyria and heterotopia. Intraperitoneal injections of carmustine 1-3-bis-chloroethyl-nitrosurea (BCNU) to pregnant rats produces laminar disorganization, heterotopias and cytomegalic neurons. The ibotenic acid model induces focal cortical malformations, which resemble human microgyria and ulegyria. Cortical dysplasia can be also observed following prenatal exposure to ethanol, cocaine or antiepileptic drugs. All these models of cortical malformations are characterized by a pronounced hyperexcitability, few of them also produce spontaneous epileptic seizures. This dysfunction results from an impairment in GABAergic inhibition and/or an increase in glutamatergic synaptic transmission. The cortical region initiating or contributing to this hyperexcitability may not necessarily correspond to the site of the focal malformation. In some models wide-spread molecular and functional changes can be observed in remote regions of the brain, where they cause pathophysiological activities. This paper gives an overview on different animal models of cortical malformations, which are mostly used in rodents and which mimic the pathology and to some extent the pathophysiology of neuronal migration disorders associated with epilepsy in humans. PMID:25850077

  9. Anatomy of the Human Ear/Questions to Ask your Hearing Professional

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Section: Focus on Communication Anatomy of the Human Ear/ Questions to Ask your Hearing Professional Past Issues / ... A feeling of fullness or fluid in the ear Ringing in your ears (called tinnitus) Causes Aging ...

  10. Imaging features of lower limb malformations above the foot.

    PubMed

    Bergre, A; Amzallag-Bellenger, E; Lefebvre, G; Dieux-Coeslier, A; Mezel, A; Herbaux, B; Boutry, N

    2015-09-01

    Lower limb malformations are generally isolated or sporadic events. However, they are sometimes associated with other anomalies of the bones and/or viscera in patients with constitutional syndromes or disorders of the skeleton. This paper reviews the main imaging features of these abnormalities, which generally exhibit a broad spectrum. This paper focuses on several different bone malformations: proximal focal femoral deficiency, congenital short femur and femoral duplication for the femur, tibial hemimelia (aplasia/hypoplasia of the tibia) and congenital bowing for the tibia, fibular hemimelia (aplasia/hypoplasia) for the fibula, and aplasia, hypoplasia and congenital dislocation for the patella. PMID:25920687

  11. Regression of a Large Congenital Hepatic Arteriovenous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, Rania; Mostafa, Fatma Alzahraa; Hamza, Hala

    2015-01-01

    Congenital hepatic arteriovenous malformations are rarely seen in association with persistent neonatal pulmonary hypertension. We report the case of a full-term female newborn who presented with heart failure and respiratory distress soon after birth. Echocardiographic investigation revealed severe persistent pulmonary hypertension and patent ductus arteriosus. Here we report spontaneous regression in size of both the feeder vessel and the vascular bed of the congenital hepatic arteriovenous malformation. We postulate that our conservative use of oral heart failure therapy, in the form of diuretic agents and captopril, decreased the congestion and diameter of the affected vessels. PMID:25873838

  12. Multiple Complex Congenital Malformations in a Rabbit Kit (Oryctolagus cuniculi)

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Jennifer L; Peng, Xuwen; Baccon, Jennifer; Cooper, Timothy K

    2013-01-01

    Congenital malformations may occur during early embryogenesis in cases of genetic abnormalities or various environmental factors. Affected subjects most often have only one or 2 abnormalities; subjects rarely have several unrelated congenital defects. Here we describe a case of a stillborn New Zealand white rabbit with multiple complex congenital malformations, including synophthalmia, holoprosencephaly, gastroschisis, and a supernumerary hindlimb, among other anomalies. There was no historical exposure to teratogens or other known environmental causes. Although not confirmed, this case was most likely a rare spontaneous genetic event. PMID:24209970

  13. Arteriovenous malformation within an isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 mutated anaplastic oligodendroglioma

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Grace; Muller, Karra A.; Carter, Bob S.; Chen, Clark C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The co-occurrence of intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) and cerebral neoplasms is exceedingly rare but may harbor implications pertaining to the molecular medicine of brain cancer pathogenesis. Case Description: Here, we present a case of de novo AVM within an isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 mutated anaplastic oligodendroglioma (WHO Grade III) and review the potential contribution of this mutation to aberrant angiogenesis as an interesting case study in molecular medicine. Conclusion: The co-occurrence of an IDH1 mutated neoplasm and AVM supports the hypothesis that IDH1 mutations may contribute to aberrant angiogenesis and vascular malformation. PMID:26167373

  14. LKB1 Is Required for the Development and Maintenance of Stereocilia in Inner Ear Hair Cells in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Men, Yuqin; Zhang, Aizhen; Li, Haixiang; Zhang, Tingting; Jin, Yecheng; Li, Huashun

    2015-01-01

    The LKB1 gene, which encodes a serine/threonine kinase, was discovered to play crucial roles in cell differentiation, proliferation, and the establishment of cell polarity. In our study, LKB1 conditional knockout mice (Atoh1-LKB1-/- mice) were generated to investigate LKB1 function in the inner ear. Tests of auditory brainstem response and distortion product otoacoustic emissions revealed significant decreases in the hearing sensitivities of the Atoh1-LKB1-/- mice. In Atoh1-LKB1-/- mice, malformations of hair cell stereocilliary bundles were present as early as postnatal day 1 (P1), a time long before the maturation of the hair cell bundles. In addition, we also observed outer hair cell (OHC) loss starting at P14. The impaired stereocilliary bundles occurred long before the presence of hair cell loss. Stereociliary cytoskeletal structure depends on the core actin-based cytoskeleton and several actin-binding proteins. By Western blot, we examined actin-binding proteins, specifically ERM (ezrin/radixin/moesin) proteins involved in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton of hair cell stereocilia. Our results revealed that the phosphorylation of ERM proteins (pERM) was significantly decreased in mutant mice. Thus, we propose that the decreased pERM may be a key factor for the impaired stereocillia function, and the damaged stereocillia may induce hair cell loss and hearing impairments. Taken together, our data indicates that LKB1 is required for the development and maintenance of stereocilia in the inner ear. PMID:26274331

  15. Inner ear symptoms and disease: Pathophysiological understanding and therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Ciuman, Raphael R.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, huge advances have taken place in understanding of inner ear pathophysiology causing sensorineural hearing loss, tinnitus, and vertigo. Advances in understanding comprise biochemical and physiological research of stimulus perception and conduction, inner ear homeostasis, and hereditary diseases with underlying genetics. This review describes and tabulates the various causes of inner ear disease and defines inner ear and non-inner ear causes of hearing loss, tinnitus, and vertigo. The aim of this review was to comprehensively breakdown this field of otorhinolaryngology for specialists and non-specialists and to discuss current therapeutic options in distinct diseases and promising research for future therapies, especially pharmaceutic, genetic, or stem cell therapy. PMID:24362017

  16. Segmentation algorithms for ear image data towards biomechanical studies.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ana; Gentil, Fernanda; Tavares, Joo Manuel R S

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the segmentation, i.e. the identification, of ear structures in video-otoscopy, computerised tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) image data, has gained significant importance in the medical imaging area, particularly those in CT and MR imaging. Segmentation is the fundamental step of any automated technique for supporting the medical diagnosis and, in particular, in biomechanics studies, for building realistic geometric models of ear structures. In this paper, a review of the algorithms used in ear segmentation is presented. The review includes an introduction to the usually biomechanical modelling approaches and also to the common imaging modalities. Afterwards, several segmentation algorithms for ear image data are described, and their specificities and difficulties as well as their advantages and disadvantages are identified and analysed using experimental examples. Finally, the conclusions are presented as well as a discussion about possible trends for future research concerning the ear segmentation. PMID:22994296

  17. [Local drug therapy for inner ear hearing loss].

    PubMed

    Liebau, A; Plontke, S K

    2015-06-01

    The indications for local drug therapy of inner ear hearing loss include sudden sensorineural hearing loss, Menière's disease, autoimmune-associated hearing loss, ototoxicity as a side effect of other therapies, acute acoustic trauma and improvement of the safety and performance of cochlear implants. Various drugs are currently being used and tested for local treatment of inner ear hearing loss, including glucocorticoids, growth factors, apoptosis inhibitors, antioxidants, TNF-α inhibitors and antibodies. To further a better understanding of pharmacokinetics and the development of rational pharmacotherapy of the inner ear, the"liberation, absorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination" (LADME) principle can be applied to local therapy of the inner ear. Local application strategies can be differentiated into intratympanic applications to the middle ear cavity and direct intralabyrinthine or intracochlear applications. PMID:25008276

  18. Day care ear surgery: our experience of 4years.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mubarak M; Parab, Sapna R

    2012-09-01

    Day care surgery is gaining wide popularity not only in the West, but also in our country. We present our experience of 4years of day care surgery in otological practice. To identify the scope of day care ear surgery in our rural setup and to determine the rate of complications, if any, of day care ear surgery. A prospective study of major ear cases operated in M.I.M.E.R. Medical College and Sushrut ENT Hospital was carried out from January 2005 to December 2008 with a minimum follow up of 2years. In the period from 2005 to 2008, a total of 527 major ear cases were operated. There was re-admission of 5 operated patients (0.94%). The acceptance of day care ear surgery is enormous in our rural setup due to its obvious advantages. PMID:23998036

  19. Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Embolization of a Pelvic Arteriovenous Malformation

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsuzaki, Katsuhiko; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Sumi, Seiya; Ogata, Ichiro; Takahashi, Mutsumasa; Kawakami, Shigeo; Ueda, Shohichi

    1999-11-15

    We successfully performed embolization therapy for a pelvic arteriovenous malformation by the retrograde transvenous approach using a liquid embolic material. This malformation was unique in that it had a single draining vein, which allowed this technique employing an occlusion balloon.

  20. A rare newly described overgrowth syndrome with vascular malformations-Cloves syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Balaji; Keshava, Shyamkumar N; Selvaraj, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    There are many overgrowth syndromes described in the literature. Few are associated with vascular malformations. We describe a rare, newly described syndrome with features of overgrowth and vascular malformations. PMID:25709171

  1. ASSESSMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL STRESSORS POTENTIALLY RESPONSIBLE FOR MALFORMATIONS IN NORTH AMERICAN ANURAN AMPHIBIANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of species of anuran amphibians from different regions across North America have recently exhibited an increased occurrence of, predominantly, hind limb malformations. Research concerning factors potentially responsible for these malformations has focused extensively on ...

  2. Diagnosis and management of extensive vascular malformations of the lower limb: part I. Clinical diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Redondo, Pedro; Aguado, Leyre; Martnez-Cuesta, Antonio

    2011-11-01

    There is significant confusion in the literature when describing vascular anomalies, and vascular malformations are often misnamed or incorrectly classified. Part I of this two-part series on the diagnosis and management of extensive vascular malformations of the lower limbs will discuss the dermatologist's role in the diagnosis of these lesions. At least nine types of vascular malformations with specific clinical and radiologic characteristics must be distinguished in the lower limbs: Klippel-Trnaunay syndrome, port-wine stain with or without hypertrophy, cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita, macrocephaly-capillary malformation, Parkes Weber syndrome, Stewart-Bluefarb syndrome, venous malformation, glomuvenous malformation, and lymphatic malformation. This article highlights the differences in clinical appearance and discusses the differential diagnosis of extensive vascular malformations in an attempt to ensure earlier diagnosis and better outcomes for these patients. PMID:22000870

  3. Analysis of Earing in Deep Drawn Cups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aretz, Holger; Aegerter, Johannes; Engler, Olaf

    2010-06-01

    The cup-drawing of a strongly anisotropic sheet metal is simulated using a commercial finite element software along with a user material subroutine. In order to accurately describe the plastic anisotropy of the material the well-known recent yield function `Yld2004-18p' is extended. Regarding the experimental characterization of the considered material the occurrence of dynamic strain aging lead to an oscillating signal of the width change of the tensile samples, which prevented a reliable determination of plastic strain ratios (r-values). Thus, an improved measurement concept was developed that leads to a very robust and reproducible determination of r-values. Furthermore, a novel plane-strain tensile test sample is presented which is used for the characterization of the plastic anisotropy in biaxial loading states. A quantitative comparison with measured earing profiles of deep drawn cups illustrates the predictive capabilities of the numerical simulation.

  4. Mechanics of the exceptional anuran ear

    PubMed Central

    Segenhout, Johannes M.; van Dijk, Pim

    2008-01-01

    The anuran ear is frequently used for studying fundamental properties of vertebrate auditory systems. This is due to its unique anatomical features, most prominently the lack of a basilar membrane and the presence of two dedicated acoustic end organs, the basilar papilla and the amphibian papilla. Our current anatomical and functional knowledge implies that three distinct regions can be identified within these two organs. The basilar papilla functions as a single auditory filter. The low-frequency portion of the amphibian papilla is an electrically tuned, tonotopically organized auditory end organ. The high-frequency portion of the amphibian papilla is mechanically tuned and tonotopically organized, and it emits spontaneous otoacoustic emissions. This high-frequency portion of the amphibian papilla shows a remarkable, functional resemblance to the mammalian cochlea. PMID:18386018

  5. Problems in alloplastic middle ear reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Blayney, A W; Williams, K R; Erre, J P; Lesser, T H; Portmann, M

    1992-01-01

    Alloplastic materials have been used in middle ear reconstruction since 1952. Biologically, biomaterials and specifically ceramics can be defined as being bioinert, bioactive or biodegradable; these terms being descriptive of the biochemical response provoked by the material in the host tissue. Various ceramics, carbons and polymers and their reactions have been studied by the author and his colleagues over the past 5 years utilising animal implantation and fibroblast culture studies aligned with experience from clinical usage. The qualities of the ideal alloplastic implant namely: biocompatibility, stabilisation and incorporation, the consistency of the implant and bioactive bonding and the biofunctionality or mechanics, are applied to the materials currently available. No single alloplastic material fulfills all criteria, the problems encountered in relation to the biomaterials are reported. A better understanding of the microstresses, fatigue and microfractures is necessary, before the ideal alloplastic biomaterial becomes available. PMID:1605000

  6. The prevalence of middle ear pathogens in the outer ear canal and the nasopharyngeal cavity of healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    De Baere, T; Vaneechoutte, M; Deschaght, P; Huyghe, J; Dhooge, I

    2010-07-01

    Culturing middle ear fluid samples from children with chronic otitis media with effusion (OME) using standard techniques results in the isolation of bacterial species in approximately 30-50% of the cases. Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Moraxella catarrhalis, the classic middle ear pathogens of acute otitis media, are involved but, recently, several studies suggested Alloiococcus otitidis as an additional pathogen. In the present study, we used species-specific PCRs to establish the prevalence, in both the nasopharyngeal cavity and the outer ear, of H. influenzae, M. catarrhalis, S. pneumoniae and A. otitidis. The study group consisted of 70 healthy volunteers (aged 19-22 years). The results indicate a high prevalence (>80%) of A. otitidis in the outer ear in contrast to its absence in the nasopharynx. H. influenzae was found in both the outer ear and the nasopharynx (6% and 14%, respectively), whereas S. pneumoniae and M. catarrhalis were found only in the nasopharynx (9% and 34%, respectively).A. otitidis, described as a fastidious organism, were able to be cultured using an optimized culture protocol, with prolonged incubation, which allowed the isolation of A. otitidis in five of the nine PCR-positive samples out of the total of ten samples tested. Given the absence of the outer ear inhabitant A. otitidis from the nasopharynx, its role in the aetiology of OME remains ambiguous because middle ear infecting organisms are considered to invade the middle ear from the nasopharynx through the Eustachian tube. PMID:19895585

  7. "Play It by Ear"--Teachers' Responses to Ear-Playing Tasks during One-to-One Instrumental Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varvarigou, Maria

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports findings from the Ear-Playing Project in relation to the teaching strategies that 15 instrumental teachers adopted during one-to-one instrumental lessons whilst helping their students to copy music by ear from a recording. Overall, the teachers used a variety of strategies including singing and humming along with or without the…

  8. "Play It by Ear"--Teachers' Responses to Ear-Playing Tasks during One-to-One Instrumental Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varvarigou, Maria

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports findings from the Ear-Playing Project in relation to the teaching strategies that 15 instrumental teachers adopted during one-to-one instrumental lessons whilst helping their students to copy music by ear from a recording. Overall, the teachers used a variety of strategies including singing and humming along with or without the

  9. Sclerotherapy using 1% sodium tetradecyl sulfate to treat a vascular malformation: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Min, Hong-Gi; Kim, Su-Gwan; Oh, Ji-Su; You, Jae-Seek

    2015-12-01

    Vascular malformations are the most common congenital and neonatal vascular anomalies in the head and neck region. The demand for simple and esthetic vascular malformation treatments have increased more recently. In this study, two patients that were diagnosed with venous malformations were treated with sodium tetradecyl sulfate as a sclerosing agent. Recurrence was not found one year after the surgery. This article gives a brief case report of sclerotherapy as an effective approach to treat vascular malformations in the oral cavity. PMID:26734559

  10. Sclerotherapy using 1% sodium tetradecyl sulfate to treat a vascular malformation: a report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Vascular malformations are the most common congenital and neonatal vascular anomalies in the head and neck region. The demand for simple and esthetic vascular malformation treatments have increased more recently. In this study, two patients that were diagnosed with venous malformations were treated with sodium tetradecyl sulfate as a sclerosing agent. Recurrence was not found one year after the surgery. This article gives a brief case report of sclerotherapy as an effective approach to treat vascular malformations in the oral cavity. PMID:26734559

  11. Passage of albumin from the middle ear to the inner ear in otitis media in the chinchilla

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, B.; Goycoolea, M.V.; Schleivert, P.M.; Shea, D.; Schachern, P.; Paparella, M.M.; Carpenter, A.M.

    1981-08-01

    A study of the permeability of the middle ear-inner ear interface for macromolecules was carried out in chinchillas with open and obstructed eustachian tubes utilizing tritiated human serum albumin and immunoelectrophoresis. Tritiated albumin was placed in the round window niche area or normal animals and animals in which the eustachian tubes had been obstructed for 24 hours or 14 days. The tritiated albumin was allowed to remain in the middle ear cavity for 24 hours, Samples of middle ear effusion, perilymph, blood and cerebrospinal fluid were collected and measured for radioactivity. Radioactivity was demonstrated in the perilymph. Samples of middle ear effusions and perilymph were also studied by immunoelectrophoresis with goat antihuman albumin. Albumin placed in the round window niche of an experimental animal could be recovered unchanged in the perilymph. The results suggest a pathophysiologic explanation for the association of otitis media and sensorineural hearing loss or endolymphatic hydrops.

  12. Notch-1 Signalling Is Activated in Brain Arteriovenous Malformations in Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ZhuGe, Qichuan; Zhong, Ming; Zheng, WeiMing; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Mao, XiaoOu; Xie, Lin; Chen, Gourong; Chen, Yongmei; Lawton, Michael T.; Young, William L.; Greenberg, David A.; Jin, Kunlin

    2009-01-01

    A role for the Notch signalling pathway in the formation of arteriovenous malformations during development has been suggested. However, whether Notch signalling is involved in brain arteriovenous malformations in humans remains unclear. Here, we performed immunohistochemistry on surgically resected brain arteriovenous malformations and found that,

  13. Mimosa tenuiflora as a Cause of Malformations in Ruminants in the Northeastern Brazilian Semiarid Rangelands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Craniofacial anomalies, eye malformations, and permanent flexures of the forelimbs are common malformations seen in ruminants grazing semiarid rangelands of Northeastern Brazil. To investigate the cause of these malformations, we fed 2 suspected plants, Mimosa tenuiflora or Prosopis juliflora, to gr...

  14. Hydrostatic pressure in the inner ear fluid compartments and its effects on inner ear function.

    PubMed

    Bhmer, A

    1993-01-01

    The present study summarizes the experimental findings obtained on the pressure in the inner ear fluids and on the effects of pressure changes on cochlear function in the guinea pig. Two types of pressures have to be distinguished in the inner ear fluid compartments: (i) hydrostatic fluid pressure and (ii) superimposed hydrodynamic high frequency (> 100 Hz) sound pressure oscillations. Hydrostatic pressure in the inner ear fluids in guinea pigs is in the order of 200 Pa (2 cm H2O) and shows slow (< 5 Hz) respiratory and pulsatory oscillations as well as considerable physiological variations in the range of -100 to +700 Pa. In normal ears, hydrostatic pressure in the perilymph equals pressure in the endolymph, and pressure changes applied to one compartment are immediately transmitted to the other one. A high compliance of Reissner's membrane seems to be the cause of this endolymphatic-perilymphatic pressure equalization. In experimental endolymphatic hydrops, a unique animal model for Meniere's disease, endolymphatic pressure is higher (100 Pa and above) than perilymphatic pressure. These pressure gradients occur only in late stages of hydrops, probably when Reissner's membrane has lost its high compliance after long standing distension. Positive endolymphatic-perilymphatic pressure gradients are secondary to and not the primary cause of hydrops formation. Changes of hydrostatic pressure do not affect auditory function as long as they stay in the physiological range. This includes the sudden loss of positive inner ear pressure that occurs in perilymph fistulas. The rationale for surgical repair of perilymph fistulas in patients in order to restore the hearing function thus becomes questionable. Other aspects of surgical repair, however, as e.g. prevention of labyrinthitis due to permanently open fistula, could not be investigated in this model, because in guinea pigs even large fistulas heal spontaneously within a few days. In experimental endolymphatic hydrops, deterioration of auditory thresholds was partially correlated to the presence of positive endolymphatic-perilymphatic pressure gradients. A change in pressure, however, occurred later than the first deterioration in auditory function. Therefore positive endo-perilymphatic pressure gradients may contribute to, but are not the only cause of hearing impairment. PMID:8273452

  15. Appendicitis Presenting Concurrently with Cecal Arteriovenous Malformation in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Eric; Portalatin, Manuel E; Fakhoury, Elias; Madlinger, Robert V

    2015-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is a commonly diagnosed surgical problem in the pediatric population. Arterio-venous malformations (AVM) of the colonic tract are rarely reported in the pediatric literature. A 13-year old boy who presented with acute appendicitis with concurrent cecal AVM is reported in whom appendectomy was done. Later on radiological investigations AVM was confirmed. PMID:26623251

  16. Paraspinal arteriovenous malformation Onyx embolization via an Ascent balloon.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Galdámez, Mario; Rodriguez-Arias, Carlos A; Utiel, Elena; Arreba, Emilio; Gonzalo, Miguel; Arenillas, Juan F

    2014-04-01

    Purely extradural lumbar spinal arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are rare lesions that have diverse presentations and imaging features. The treatment of a symptomatic high flow paraspinal AVM with multiple feeders remains a challenge. We report the first use of an Ascent balloon (dual lumen balloon catheter) to deliver Onyx with excellent penetration to a paraspinal AVM. PMID:23543731

  17. Paraspinal arteriovenous malformation Onyx embolization via an Ascent balloon.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Galdámez, Mario; Rodriguez-Arias, Carlos A; Utiel, Elena; Arreba, Emilio; Gonzalo, Miguel; Arenillas, Juan F

    2013-01-01

    Purely extradural lumbar spinal arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are rare lesions that have diverse presentations and imaging features. The treatment of a symptomatic high flow paraspinal AVM with multiple feeders remains a challenge. We report the first use of an Ascent balloon (dual lumen balloon catheter) to deliver Onyx with excellent penetration to a paraspinal AVM. PMID:23524491

  18. Diencephalic-Mesencephalic Junction Dysplasia: A Novel Recessive Brain Malformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaki, Maha S.; Saleem, Sahar N.; Dobyns, William B.; Barkovich, A. James; Bartsch, Hauke; Dale, Anders M.; Ashtari, Manzar; Akizu, Naiara; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Grijalvo-Perez, Ana Maria

    2012-01-01

    We describe six cases from three unrelated consanguineous Egyptian families with a novel characteristic brain malformation at the level of the diencephalic-mesencephalic junction. Brain magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a dysplasia of the diencephalic-mesencephalic junction with a characteristic "butterfly"-like contour of the midbrain on

  19. LIMITED PCB ANTAGONISM OF TCDD-INDUCED MALFORMATIONS IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    C57BL/6N mice, used to model induction of cleft palate and kidney malformations in offspring following maternal treatment with TCDD, were dosed on gestation day (gd) 9 with ,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachloro-biphenyl (HCB) (62.5, 125, 250, 500. 1000 mg/kg) and/or gd 10 with 2,3,7,8-tetrach...

  20. Neurodevelopmental Outcomes in Children with Cerebellar Malformations: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolduc, Marie-Eve; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Cerebellar malformations are increasingly diagnosed in the fetal period. Consequently, their consideration requires stressful and often critical decisions from both clinicians and families. This has resulted in an emergent need to understand better the impact of these early life lesions on child development. We performed a comprehensive literature

  1. Diencephalic-Mesencephalic Junction Dysplasia: A Novel Recessive Brain Malformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaki, Maha S.; Saleem, Sahar N.; Dobyns, William B.; Barkovich, A. James; Bartsch, Hauke; Dale, Anders M.; Ashtari, Manzar; Akizu, Naiara; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Grijalvo-Perez, Ana Maria

    2012-01-01

    We describe six cases from three unrelated consanguineous Egyptian families with a novel characteristic brain malformation at the level of the diencephalic-mesencephalic junction. Brain magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a dysplasia of the diencephalic-mesencephalic junction with a characteristic "butterfly"-like contour of the midbrain on…

  2. Diagnosis and Nonsurgical Management of Uterine Arteriovenous Malformation

    SciTech Connect

    Rangarajan, R. D.; Moloney, J. C.; Anderson, H. J.

    2007-11-15

    Uterine arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is an uncommon problem and traditional treatment by hysterectomy excludes the possibility of future pregnancy. Developments in interventional techniques make transcatheter embolization of the feeding vessel(s) a therapeutic alternative, potentially preserving the patient's fertility. We present a case of successful endovascular treatment of uterine AVM.

  3. Zwislocki's model of the middle ear re-visited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withnell, Robert H.; Fields, Taylor N.

    2015-12-01

    Zwislocki's circuit model of the middle ear [11] has been used, in original or modified form, in subsequent studies modeling the ear [4, 6]. The model includes two eardrum modes of vibration, a shunt for flexible coupling between the incus and stapes, and a single tuned oscillator for ossicular vibration. The contribution of each of these mechanisms was examined by fitting a model of the ear to acoustic input impedance data from healthy human ears. The circuit elements for a non-ossicular eardrum vibration and a flexible coupling between the incus and stapes were found to be detrimental or non-essential for the model-fit-to-data. A single mode of eardrum vibration for sound transmission to the middle ear is consistent with the eardrum acting as an impedance-matching device, with pars-tensa eardrum vibration coupled to the ossicles [1]. A single-tuned oscillator was insufficient to account for the bandwidth of the ear. The frequency response of the ear suggests multiple resonant modes of ossicular vibration.

  4. Inverse solution of ear-canal area function from reflectance

    PubMed Central

    Rasetshwane, Daniel M.; Neely, Stephen T.

    2011-01-01

    A number of acoustical applications require the transformation of acoustical quantities, such as impedance and pressure that are measured at the entrance of the ear canal, to quantities at the eardrum. This transformation often requires knowledge of the shape of the ear canal. Previous attempts to measure ear-canal area functions were either invasive, non-reproducible, or could only measure the area function up to a point mid-way along the canal. A method to determine the area function of the ear canal from measurements of acoustic impedance at the entrance of the ear canal is described. The method is based on a solution to the inverse problem in which measurements of impedance are used to calculate reflectance, which is then used to determine the area function of the canal. The mean ear-canal area function determined using this method is similar to mean ear-canal area functions measured by other researchers using different techniques. The advantage of the proposed method over previous methods is that it is non- invasive, fast, and reproducible. PMID:22225043

  5. Fetal ear measurements in the prenatal detection of trisomy 21.

    PubMed

    Gill, P; Vanhook, J; Fitzsimmons, J; Pascoe-Mason, J; Fantel, A

    1994-08-01

    Although prominent fetal nuchal folds, short long bones, echogenic bowel, and renal pelviectasis have been shown to be associated with trisomy 21, none has acceptable diagnostic efficacy. Diminished fetal ear lengths measured by ultrasound have recently been reported as yet another potential morphological marker for the prenatal detection of trisomy 21. To investigate this further, we measured ear lengths and widths of normal (n = 107) and trisomy 21 (n = 25) second-trimester formalin-preserved fetuses. The normal ear growth characteristics are described and compared with those of trisomy 21 fetuses. The normal fetal ear shape, not unlike that of the neonates, manifested a marked variation. When the ear lengths and widths were regressed against gestational age, the slopes of the regression lines for the two groups were found to be different (P < 0.001). However, despite the statistically significant difference between the ear sizes of normal and trisomy 21 fetuses, the wide range of normal variation seen at each gestational age means that the fetal ear measurements are not diagnostically helpful. PMID:7991515

  6. 3D visualization of middle ear structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Uwe; Schmitt, Thomas

    1998-06-01

    The achievement of volume geometry data from middle ear structures and surrounding components performs a necessary supposition for the finite element simulation of the vibrational and transfer characteristics of the ossicular chain. So far those models base on generalized figures and size data from anatomy textbooks or particular manual and one- or two-dimensional distance measurements of single ossicles, mostly obtained by light microscopy, respectively. Therefore the goal of this study is to create a procedure for complete three-dimensional imaging of real middle ear structures (tympanic membrane, ossicles, ligaments) in vitro or even in vivo. The main problems are their microscopic size with relevant structures from 10 micrometer to 5 mm, representing various tissue properties (bone, soft tissue). Additionally, these structures are surrounded by the temporal bone, the most solid bone of the human body. Generally there exist several established diagnostic tools for medical imaging that could be used for geometry data acquisition, e.g., X-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Basically they image different tissue parameters, either bony structures (ossicles), or soft tissue (tympanic membrane, ligaments). But considering this application those standard techniques allow low spatial resolution only, usually in the 0.5 - 1mm range, at least in one spatial direction. Thus particular structures of the middle ear region could even be missed completely because of their spatial location. In vitro there is a way out by collecting three complete data sets, each distinguished by 90 degree rotation of a cube-shaped temporal bone specimen. That allows high-resolution imaging in three orthogonal planes, which essentially supports the three-dimensional interpolation of the unknown elements, starting from the regularly set elements of the cubic grid with an edge extension given by the original two-dimensional matrix. A different approach represents the application of a micro- tomographic imaging device. Therefore an X-ray beam focused down to few microns passes the object in a tomographic arrangement. Subsequently the slices become reconstructed. Generally spatial resolution down to 10 micrometer may be obtained by using this procedure. But there exist few devices only, it is not available as standard equipment. The best results concerning spatial resolution should be achieved by applying conventional histologic sectioning techniques. Of course the target will become destroyed during the procedure. It is cut into sections (e.g., 10 micrometer thick), every layer is stained, and the image acquired and stored by a digital still-camera with appropriate resolution (e.g., 2024 X 3036). Three-dimensional reconstruction is done with the computer. The staining allows visual selection of bones and soft tissues, resolutions down to 10 micrometer are possible without target segmentation. But there arise some practical problems. Mainly the geometric context of the layers is affected by the cutting procedure, especially if cutting bone. Another problem performs the adjustment of the -- possibly distorted -- slices to each other. Artificial markers are necessary, which could allow automatic adjustment too. But the introduction and imaging of the markers is difficult inside the temporal bone specimen, that is interspersed by several cavities. Of course the internal target structures must not be destroyed by the marker introduction. Furthermore the embedding compound could disturb the image acquisition, e.g., by optical scattering of paraffin. A related alternative is given by layered ablation/grinding and imaging of the top layer. This saves the geometric consistency, but requires very tricky and time-consuming embedding procedures. Both approaches require considerable expenditures. The possible approaches are evaluated in detail and first results are compared. So far none of the above-mentioned procedures has been established as a standard tool for three-dimensional geometry data acquisition of the middle ear. Otherwise the establishment of a high-resolution imaging technique for those structures, even in vivo, would be of high interest in diagnostics, anatomy and middle ear modeling and research at all.

  7. Human fetal inner ear involvement in congenital cytomegalovirus infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is a leading cause of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). The mechanisms of pathogenesis of CMV-related SNHL are still unclear. The aim is to study congenital CMV-related damage in the fetal inner ear, in order to better understand the underlying pathophysiology behind CMV-SNHL. Results We studied inner ears and brains of 20 human fetuses, all at 21week gestational age, with a high viral load in the amniotic fluid, with and without ultrasound (US) brain abnormalities. We evaluated histological brain damage, inner ear infection, local inflammatory response and tissue viral load. Immunohistochemistry revealed that CMV was positive in 14/20 brains (70%) and in the inner ears of 9/20 fetuses (45%). In the cases with inner ear infection, the marginal cell layer of the stria vascularis was always infected, followed by infection in the Reissners membrane. The highest tissue viral load was observed in the inner ear with infected Organ of Corti. Vestibular labyrinth showed CMV infection of sensory cells in the utricle and in the crista ampullaris. US cerebral anomalies were detected in 6 cases, and in all those cases, the inner ear was always involved. In the other 14 cases with normal brain scan, histological brain damage was present in 8 fetuses and 3 of them presented inner ear infection. Conclusions CMV-infection of the marginal cell layer of the stria vascularis may alter potassium and ion circulation, dissipating the endocochlear potential with consequent SNHL. Although abnormal cerebral US is highly predictive of brain and inner ear damage, normal US findings cannot exclude them either. PMID:24252374

  8. Cells, molecules and morphogenesis: The making of the vertebrate ear

    PubMed Central

    Fritzsch, Bernd; Pauley, Sarah; Beisel, Kirk W.

    2014-01-01

    The development and evolution of mechanosensory cells and the vertebrate ear is reviewed with an emphasis on delineating the cellular, molecular and developmental basis of these changes. Outgroup comparisons suggests that mechanosensory cells are ancient features of multicellular organisms. Molecular evidence suggests that key genes involved in mechanosensory cell function and development are also conserved among metazoans. The divergent morphology of mechanosensory cells across phyla is interpreted here as deep molecular homology that was in parallel shaped into different forms in each lineage. The vertebrate mechanosensory hair cell and its associated neuron are interpreted as uniquely derived features of vertebrates. It is proposed that the vertebrate otic placode presents a unique embryonic adaptation in which the diffusely distributed ancestral mechanosensory cells became concentrated to generate a large neurosensory precursor population. Morphogenesis of the inner ear is reviewed and shown to depend on genes expressed in and around the hindbrain that interact with the otic placode to define boundaries and polarities. These patterning genes affect downstream genes needed to maintain proliferation and to execute ear morphogenesis. We propose that fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) and their receptors (FGFRs) are a crucial central node to translate patterning into the complex morphology of the vertebrate ear. Unfortunately, the FGF and FGFR genes have not been fully analyzed in the many mutants with morphogenetic ear defects described thus far. Likewise, little information exists on the ear histogenesis and neurogenesis in many mutants. Nevertheless, a molecular mechanism is now emerging for the formation of the horizontal canal, an evolutionary novelty of the gnathostome ear. The existing general module mediating vertical canal growth and morphogenesis was modified by two sets of new genes: one set responsible for horizontal canal morphogenesis and another set for neurosensory formation of the horizontal crista and associated sensory neurons. The dramatic progress in deciphering the molecular basis of ear morphogenesis offers grounds for optimism for translational research toward intervention in human morphogenetic defects of the ear. PMID:16643865

  9. 3D ear identification based on sparse representation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Ding, Zhixuan; Li, Hongyu; Shen, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Biometrics based personal authentication is an effective way for automatically recognizing, with a high confidence, a person's identity. Recently, 3D ear shape has attracted tremendous interests in research field due to its richness of feature and ease of acquisition. However, the existing ICP (Iterative Closet Point)-based 3D ear matching methods prevalent in the literature are not quite efficient to cope with the one-to-many identification case. In this paper, we aim to fill this gap by proposing a novel effective fully automatic 3D ear identification system. We at first propose an accurate and efficient template-based ear detection method. By utilizing such a method, the extracted ear regions are represented in a common canonical coordinate system determined by the ear contour template, which facilitates much the following stages of feature extraction and classification. For each extracted 3D ear, a feature vector is generated as its representation by making use of a PCA-based local feature descriptor. At the stage of classification, we resort to the sparse representation based classification approach, which actually solves an l1-minimization problem. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work introducing the sparse representation framework into the field of 3D ear identification. Extensive experiments conducted on a benchmark dataset corroborate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed approach. The associated Matlab source code and the evaluation results have been made publicly online available at http://sse.tongji.edu.cn/linzhang/ear/srcear/srcear.htm. PMID:24740247

  10. Brain Vascular Malformation Consortium: Overview, Progress and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Akers, Amy L.; Ball, Karen L.; Clancy, Marianne; Comi, Anne M.; Faughnan, Marie E.; Gopal-Srivastava, Rashmi; Jacobs, Thomas P.; Kim, Helen; Krischer, Jeffrey; Marchuk, Douglas A.; McCulloch, Charles E.; Morrison, Leslie; Moses, Marsha; Moy, Claudia S.; Pawlikowska, Ludmilla; Young, William L.

    2013-01-01

    Brain vascular malformations are resource-intensive to manage effectively, are associated with serious neurological morbidity, lack specific medical therapies, and have no validated biomarkers for disease severity and progression. Investigators have tended to work in research silos with suboptimal cross-communication. We present here a paradigm for interdisciplinary collaboration to facilitate rare disease research. The Brain Vascular Malformation Consortium (BVMC) is a multidisciplinary, inter-institutional group of investigators, one of 17 consortia in the Office of Rare Disease Research Rare Disease Clinical Research Network (RDCRN). The diseases under study are: familial Cerebral Cavernous Malformations type 1, common Hispanic mutation (CCM1-CHM); Sturge-Weber Syndrome (SWS); and brain arteriovenous malformation in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Each project is developing biomarkers for disease progression and severity, and has established scalable, relational databases for observational and longitudinal studies that are stored centrally by the RDCRN Data Management and Coordinating Center. Patient Support Organizations (PSOs) are a key RDCRN component in the recruitment and support of participants. The BVMC PSOs include Angioma Alliance, Sturge Weber Foundation, and HHT Foundation International. Our networks of clinical centers of excellence in SWS and HHT, as well as our PSOs, have enhanced BVMC patient recruitment. The BVMC provides unique and valuable resources to the clinical neurovascular community, and recently reported findings are reviewed. Future planned studies will apply successful approaches and insights across the three projects to leverage the combined resources of the BVMC and RDCRN in advancing new biomarkers and treatment strategies for patients with vascular malformations. PMID:25221778

  11. Unilateral cerebellar hypoplasia and mesencephalic malformation in a Hanoverian foal.

    PubMed

    Schröder, S; Schmidt, M J; Preis, S; Klumpp, S; Köhler, K; Kuchelmeister, K; Herden, C

    2013-01-01

    Neurological cases, especially in foals, are rare in the daily practical work. The most common causes are traumata and infectious diseases of the central nervous system (CNS). This case report provides further insights into the wide spectrum of possible neuropathological lesions by detailing a complex malformation with unilateral neurological signs that occurred later post natum. Thus, clinicians should also be aware of malformations in case of respective neurological patients. A Hanoverian foal was presented with progressive ataxia. General and blood examination revealed no further alterations. By neurologic examination, a unilateral hypermetria was diagnosed and a cysternography of the head was performed. A cerebellar malformation was assumed and the foal was euthanized due to poor prognosis. At necropsy, a unilateral absence of a cerebellar hemisphere and vermis accompanied by contralateral malformation of the mesencephalon was diagnosed. The missing areas of the right cerebellar hemisphere were replaced by a cystic formation. The left part of the mesencephalic lamina quadrigemina was reduced in size and the corpus callosum was hypoplastic. Additional microscopical findings were most obvious near the cyst formation and included angiofibrosis in remaining cerebellar and mesencephalic parenchyma and leptomeninges, heterotopia of cerebellar neurons, sclerosis in cerebellar cortex, focal proliferation of meningeal cells and mild mononuclear perivascular infiltrates. Occassional irregular neuronal arrangement in the mesencephalon was also present. Infectious agents such as Borna disease virus, rabies virus, and equine herpesvirus were not detected. Therefore, the complex malformation in this foal might have been caused by a destructive, possibly ischemic event, or could represent a sequel of a primary retrocerebellar cyst with accompanying compression of adjacent parenchyma. PMID:23608891

  12. Subgridding method for FDTD modeling in the inner ear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopecky, Rudolf; Persson, Mikael

    2004-04-01

    A detailed dosimetry in the inner ear is performed using the FDTD algorithm with a subgridding method. A head model is exposed to a mobile phone radiation and the electromagnetic field in the region of the inner ear is computed with increased numerical resolution by factor of 3, 5 and 7. Results show that increase of the numerical resolution without increase of the geometrical resolution does not give more detailed SAR distribution in the inner ear. Therefore a new model of the cochlea with increasing the geometrical resolution from 1 mm to 1/7 mm and dosimetry in this model is presented.

  13. [Introduction to the surgery of the middle ear: general principles].

    PubMed

    Babighian, G; Domnguez, M J

    1993-01-01

    We study the basic guidelines of the middle ear surgery, having as target the recuperation of the anatomic functional integrity of ear. There are different important elements in the quality/quantity of the functional results as follows: The surgery technical method used. The actual pathology in the middle ear. The quality of eustachian tube function. The surgeon's experience and ability and several factors. We review the concept introduced by Wullstein called it tympanoplasty from 1952 till nowadays. Finally, we described the most frequent surgery procedures used in the daily practice. PMID:8129965

  14. Shaping sound in space: the regulation of inner ear patterning

    PubMed Central

    Groves, Andrew K.; Fekete, Donna M.

    2012-01-01

    The inner ear is one of the most morphologically elaborate tissues in vertebrates, containing a group of mechanosensitive sensory organs that mediate hearing and balance. These organs are arranged precisely in space and contain intricately patterned sensory epithelia. Here, we review recent studies of inner ear development and patterning which reveal that multiple stages of ear development – ranging from its early induction from the embryonic ectoderm to the establishment of the three cardinal axes and the fine-grained arrangement of sensory cells – are orchestrated by gradients of signaling molecules. PMID:22186725

  15. Neonatal Hairy Ear Pinnae and Gestational Diabetes: Just a Coincidence?

    PubMed

    Valerio, Enrico; Riello, Laura; Chirico, Michela; Semenzato, Rossella; Cutrone, Mario

    2015-01-01

    A newborn girl of 36 weeks gestation was noted to have several anomalies, including bilateral low ear attachment with ear pinnae hypertrichosis, left preauricular pit, micrognathia, short lingual frenulum, and short neck. Pregnancy history revealed poorly controlled maternal gestational diabetes (GD). Localized hypertrichosis of the ear pinnae may represent a potential marker of GD and thereby alert physicians to suspect other potentially GD-associated conditions such as macrosomia, asphyxia, respiratory distress, hypoglycemia, hypocalcemia, hyperbilirubinemia, polycythemia, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and congenital anomalies, particularly those involving the central nervous system. PMID:26391439

  16. A Case of Atypical Granuloma Annulare Involving Both Ears

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Gu; Lee, Seung Hun

    2009-01-01

    We report a rare case of granuloma annulare (GA), affecting both ear antihelixes, in a 28-year old male patient that presented with a 1-year history of non-tender, firm, skin-colored, 1~5 mm papules on both ear antihelixes. There was no history of trauma. An excisional biopsy specimen taken from one of the lesions of the right ear revealed infiltration of histiocytes and lymphocytes around a zone of collagen alteration in the dermis. Based on the clinical and pathological findings, the patient was diagnosed with a rare case of bilateral GA of both antihelixes; this is the first report in the Korean dermatology literature. PMID:20523836

  17. Acute effects of irradiation on middle ear mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Ohashi, Y.; Nakai, Y.; Esaki, Y.; Ikeoka, H.; Koshimo, H.; Onoyama, Y.

    1988-03-01

    Single field, fixed irradiation of bilateral tympanic cavities using 200-kV x-rays was administered to five guinea pigs. The irradiation dose was 30 Gy. They were killed immediately after irradiation, and bilateral middle ear mucosa was examined for ciliary activity and epithelial structure. Significant deterioration of the ciliary activity in the middle ear mucosa was observed, proximal as well as distal to the eustachian tube. Electron microscopy showed various changes in the irradiated middle ear mucosa. The most conspicuous findings were hyperreactivity in secretion, vacuolation of ciliated cells, and stomal edema.

  18. Stereotactic radiosurgery for deep intracranial arteriovenous malformations, part 2: Basal ganglia and thalamus arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Inbar, Or; Ding, Dale; Sheehan, Jason P

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this review is to critically analyze the outcomes following stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for arteriovenous malformations (AVM) of the basal ganglia and thalamus. The management of these deep-seated lesions continues to challenge neurosurgeons. Basal ganglia and thalamic AVM show a higher risk of hemorrhage, and an associated devastating morbidity and mortality, as compared to AVM in more superficial locations. Any of the currently available treatment modalities may fail or result in iatrogenic neurologic deterioration. Recent evidence from A Randomized Trial of Unruptured Brain AVM (ARUBA) further deters aggressive approaches that carry a significant risk of treatment-related adverse events. Microsurgical resection, endovascular embolization and SRS all play a role in the treatment of AVM. SRS is an effective therapeutic option for AVM of the thalamus and basal ganglia that are deemed high risk for resection. SRS offers acceptable obliteration rates, with generally lower risks of hemorrhage occurring during the latency period compared to the AVM natural history. Considering that incompletely obliterated lesions still harbor the potential for rupture, additional treatments such as repeat SRS and microsurgical resection should be considered when complete obliteration is not achieved by an initial SRS procedure. Patients with AVM of the basal ganglia and thalamus require continued clinical and radiologic observation and follow-up after SRS, even after angiographic obliteration has been confirmed. PMID:26732284

  19. Stereotactic radiosurgery for deep intracranial arteriovenous malformations, part 1: Brainstem arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Inbar, Or; Ding, Dale; Chen, Ching-Jen; Sheehan, Jason P

    2016-02-01

    The management of brainstem arteriovenous malformations (AVM) are one of the greatest challenges encountered by neurosurgeons. Brainstem AVM have a higher risk of hemorrhage compared to AVM in other locations, and rupture of these lesions commonly results in devastating neurological morbidity and mortality. The potential morbidity associated with currently available treatment modalities further compounds the complexity of decision making for affected patients. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has an important role in the management of brainstem AVM. SRS offers acceptable obliteration rates with lower risks of hemorrhage occurring during the latency period. Complex nidal architecture requires a multi-disciplinary treatment approach. Nidi partly involving subpial/epipial regions of the dorsal midbrain or cerebellopontine angle should be considered for a combination of endovascular embolization, micro-surgical resection and SRS. Considering the fact that incompletely obliterated lesions (even when reduced in size) could still cause lethal hemorrhages, additional treatment, including repeat SRS and surgical resection should be considered when complete obliteration is not achieved by first SRS. Patients with brainstem AVM require continued clinical and radiological observation and follow-up after SRS, well after angiographic obliteration has been confirmed. PMID:26740034

  20. Is a Swine Model of Arteriovenous Malformation Suitable for Human Extracranial Arteriovenous Malformation? A Preliminary Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, Ming-ming; Fan, Xin-dong; Su, Li-xin

    2013-10-15

    Objective: A chronic arteriovenous malformation (AVM) model using the swine retia mirabilia (RMB) was developed and compared with the human extracranial AVM (EAVM) both in hemodynamics and pathology, to see if this brain AVM model can be used as an EAVM model. Methods: We created an arteriovenous fistula between the common carotid artery and the external jugular vein in eight animals by using end-to-end anastomosis. All animals were sacrificed 1 month after surgery, and the bilateral retia were obtained at autopsy and performed hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry. Pre- and postsurgical hemodynamic evaluations also were conducted. Then, the blood flow and histological changes of the animal model were compared with human EAVM. Results: The angiography after operation showed that the blood flow, like human EAVM, flowed from the feeding artery, via the nidus, drained to the draining vein. Microscopic examination showed dilated lumina and disrupted internal elastic lamina in both RMB of model and nidus of human EAVM, but the thickness of vessel wall had significant difference. Immunohistochemical reactivity for smooth muscle actin, angiopoietin 1, and angiopoietin 2 were similar in chronic model nidus microvessels and human EAVM, whereas vascular endothelial growth factor was significant difference between human EAVM and RMB of model. Conclusions: The AVM model described here is similar to human EAVM in hemodynamics and immunohistochemical features, but there are still some differences in anatomy and pathogenetic mechanism. Further study is needed to evaluate the applicability and efficacy of this model.

  1. Congenital pulmonary malformations in pediatric patients: review and update on etiology, classification, and imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Lee, Edward Y; Dorkin, Henry; Vargas, Sara O

    2011-09-01

    Congenital pulmonary malformations represent a heterogeneous group of developmental disorders affecting the lung parenchyma, the arterial supply to the lung, and the lung's venous drainage. In both asymptomatic and symptomatic pediatric patients with congenital pulmonary malformations, the diagnosis of such malformations usually requires imaging evaluation, particularly in cases of surgical lesions for preoperative assessment. The goal of this article is to review the current imaging techniques for evaluating congenital pulmonary malformations and their characteristic imaging findings, which can allow differentiation among various congenital pulmonary malformations in pediatric patients. PMID:21889015

  2. cis-Regulatory Mutations Are a Genetic Cause of Human Limb Malformations

    PubMed Central

    VanderMeer, Julia E.; Ahituv, Nadav

    2011-01-01

    The underlying mutations that cause human limb malformations are often difficult to determine, particularly for limb malformations that occur as isolated traits. Evidence from a variety of studies shows that cis-regulatory mutations, specifically in enhancers, can lead to some of these isolated limb malformations. Here, we provide a review of human limb malformations that have been shown to be caused by enhancer mutations and propose that cis-regulatory mutations will continue to be identified as the cause of additional human malformations as our understanding of regulatory sequences improves. PMID:21509892

  3. Evolution of Gravity Receptors in the Ear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popper, Arthur N. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The general status of a grant to investigate the origins and evolution of two hair cell types in the ears of a teleost fish, Astronotus ocellatus (the oscar), is presented. First, it was demonstrated that the cells in the rostral end of the saccule of the , Carassius auratus, are type 1-like, while those at the caudal end are type 2 cells. It was demonstrated that the dichotomy of hair cell types found in the utricle of the oscar is also found in the goldfish. Second, the lateral line system of the oscar was examined using gentamicin sulphate, an ototocix drug that destroys type 1- like hair cells but does not appear to damage type 2 hair cells. It was demonstrated that the hair cells found in neuromasts of lateral line canal organs were totally destroyed within 1 day of treatment, while the hair cells in free neuromasts were undamaged after 12 days of treatment. Third, it was demonstrated that the calyx, the specialized nerve ending, is not unique to amniotes and that it is present at least in the cristae of semicirular canals in goldfish. These results have demonstrated that: (1) there are multiple hair cell types in the vestibular endorgans of the ear of fishes, (2) these hair cell types are very similar to those found in the mammalian vestibular endorgans, (3) the nerve calyx is also present in fishes, and (4) multiple hair cell types and the calyx have evolved far earlier in the course of vertebrate evolution than heretofore thought. Understanding the structure of the vestibular endorgans has important implications for being able to understand how these organs respond to gravistatic, acceleration and acoustic input. The vestibular endorgans of fishes may provide an ideal system in which to analyze functional differences in hair cells. Not only are the two hair cell types similar to those found in mammals, they are located in very discrete regions in each endorgan. Thus, it is relatively easy to gain access to cells of one or the other type. The presence of two cell types in the lateral line have equally significant implications for studies of the vestibular system.

  4. Laser vibrometer measurements and middle ear prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flock, Stephen T.; Dornhoffer, John; Ferguson, Scott

    1997-05-01

    One of us has developed an improved partial ossicular replacement prosthesis that is easier to implant and, based on pilot clinical measurements, results in better high-frequency hearing as compared to patients receiving one of the alternative prostheses. It is hypothesized that the primary reason for this is because of the relatively light weight (about 25 mg) and low compliance of the prosthesis, which could conceivably result in better high frequency vibrational characteristics. The purpose of our initial work was to develop an instrument suitable for objectively testing the vibrational characteristics of prostheses. We have developed a laser based device suitable for measuring the vibrational characteristics of the oval window or other structures of the middle ear. We have tested this device using a piezoelectric transducer excited at audio frequencies, as well as on the oval window in human temporal bones harvested from cadavers. The results illustrate that it is possible to non-invasively monitor the vibrational characteristics of anatomic structures with a very inexpensive photonic device.

  5. Image analysis of the human inner ear.

    PubMed

    Kubo, T; Anniko, M; Hsu, W J

    1998-01-01

    The KS 300 is a multifunctional software image analysis system using an object-oriented programming environment. The possibility of its application for the inner ear was studied by using specimens from humans and squirrel monkeys, immunostained for the brain-derived calcium-binding protein, S-100 protein. Grey images were used for measurements. The cell borders were outlined by hand, using a digitizer. The absolute grey values of the pixels changed when the brightness of the images or other conditions changed. By contrast, the relative grey values, i.e. the absolute grey values correlated to the mean grey values of the histoimage, remained constant. By utilizing these relative grey values, it was possible to compare cells both between different specimens and between different areas within the same specimen. The different grey values of spiral ganglion cells stained for S-100 protein are objective quantitative measurements and are believed to reflect differences in their function. In some regions of both human and squirrel monkey specimens, relatively intensely stained cells predominated, whereas in other regions, relatively weakly stained cells were mainly observed. Thus, our image analysis system using the relative grey values has proved suitable for quantitative analysis of immunostained specimens in order to compare them and to assess cell function. PMID:9504164

  6. Changes in bacteriology of discharging ears.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Juen-Haur; Chu, Chih-Kai; Liu, Tien-Chen

    2002-09-01

    A bacteriological study on 161 consecutive out-patients presenting with otorrhoea was performed prospectively at a local teaching hospital in Taiwan between August 2000 and June 2001. A total of 177 isolates were recovered. Staphylococcus aureus was found in 77 (43.5 per cent) isolates, and non-Staphylococcus aureus in 100 (56.5 per cent) isolates. Pseudomas sp was found to be the most common pathogen (28.8 per cent) in the non-Staphylococcus aureus group. Staphylococcus aureus had become more common than Pseudomonas aeruginosa in acute otitis externa, granular myringitis, and chronic otitis media in Taiwan. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was also an increasing problem in all three disease entities. The prevalence of community-acquired MRSA infections in discharging ears was found to be 13.7 per cent (22/161). MRSAs were highly susceptible to vancomycin, teicoplanin, fusidic acid, and minocycline. More studies should be done to determine the susceptibility of MRSA to ofloxacin in the future. PMID:12437801

  7. Why Internally Coupled Ears (ICE) Work Well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hemmen, J. Leo

    2014-03-01

    Many vertebrates, such as frogs and lizards, have an air-filled cavity between left and right eardrum, i.e., internally coupled ears (ICE). Depending on source direction, internal time (iTD) and level (iLD) difference as experienced by the animal's auditory system may greatly exceed [C. Vossen et al., JASA 128 (2010) 909-918] the external, or interaural, time and level difference (ITD and ILD). Sensory processing only encodes iTD and iLD. We present an extension of ICE theory so as to elucidate the underlying physics. First, the membrane properties of the eardrum explain why for low frequencies iTD dominates whereas iLD does so for higher frequencies. Second, the plateau of iTD = ? ITD for constant 1 < ? < 5 and variable input frequency

  8. Green laser light activates the inner ear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Gentiana I.; Balster, Sven; Zhang, Kaiyin; Lim, Hubert H.; Reich, Uta; Massow, Ole; Lubatschowski, Holger; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Lenarz, Thomas; Reuter, Guenter

    2009-07-01

    The hearing performance with conventional hearing aids and cochlear implants is dramatically reduced in noisy environments and for sounds more complex than speech (e. g. music), partially due to the lack of localized sensorineural activation across different frequency regions with these devices. Laser light can be focused in a controlled manner and may provide more localized activation of the inner ear, the cochlea. We sought to assess whether visible light with parameters that could induce an optoacoustic effect (532 nm, 10-ns pulses) would activate the cochlea. Auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) were recorded preoperatively in anesthetized guinea pigs to confirm normal hearing. After opening the bulla, a 50-μm core-diameter optical fiber was positioned in the round window niche and directed toward the basilar membrane. Optically induced ABRs (OABRs), similar in shape to those of acoustic stimulation, were elicited with single pulses. The OABR peaks increased with energy level (0.6 to 23 μJ/pulse) and remained consistent even after 30 minutes of continuous stimulation at 13 μJ, indicating minimal or no stimulation-induced damage within the cochlea. Our findings demonstrate that visible light can effectively and reliably activate the cochlea without any apparent damage. Further studies are in progress to investigate the frequency-specific nature and mechanism of green light cochlear activation.

  9. Groovy flow patterns in the fish ear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotas, Charlotte W.; Rogers, Peter H.; Yoda, Minami

    2007-11-01

    The dense, bony otoliths contained in the fish ear oscillate with respect to their surrounding tissue and endolymph in the presence of sound waves. How an otolith actually transduces this acoustically induced fluid motion into the hair cell displacements that the fish ``hears'' is not fully understood, however. The fluid flow created by the oscillation of the irregularly shaped otolith has both steady and unsteady components. Since most of the hair cells are next to a grooved area on the otolith, the sulcus, the otolith was modeled as a grooved spheroid oscillating in a quiescent Newtonian fluid. Particle-image velocimetry and pathline visualizations for the steady streaming flows within the groove are presented for oscillation at 0 --90 with respect to the body axis of symmetry Re=2?f,^2/?=O(10-10^2), and ?=s/L 0.025-0.05. Here, ? is the fluid kinematic viscosity, L is a typical length based on the spheroid, and f and s are the oscillation frequency and amplitude, respectively. Results for bodies oscillated by multiple frequencies f1 and f2 along the same direction imply that the velocity fields are the superposition of those due to the component frequencies for small values of ?.

  10. Blackbody for metrological control of ear thermometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crdenas-Garca, D.; Mndez-Lango, E.

    2013-09-01

    Body temperature is an important parameter in medical practice, and most of health diagnoses are made based upon measured temperature values. Non-contact measurements are attractive to both patients and physicians, and ear thermometers (ET) are part of the set of infrared thermometers for medical applications. ETs sense the tympanic membrane temperature which best represents body temperature. They take advantage of the natural high effective emissivity cavity that is formed as radiation source. To calibrate or to check the performance of ETs, we designed a high-emissivity spherical cavity as a blackbody source which can be placed in a dry block oven. Although the blackbody cavity can have any shape, we decided to build it spherical because its effective emissivity can be easily calculated in a closed form. The cavity is made of Aluminum to take advantage of its high thermal conductivity while its inner side is covered with a black paint to increase the cavity effective emissivity. Based on paint emissivity measurements and the geometrical shape, we calculated that the cavity has an effective emissivity higher than 0.999. Blackbody temperature is measured with a calibrated contact thermometer placed inside the bottom wall of the cavity. We present the design of the cavity, the experimental setup, and results of three commercial ETs compared with this cavity.

  11. Making an Effort to Listen: Mechanical Amplification in the Ear

    PubMed Central

    Hudspeth, A. J.

    2009-01-01

    The inner ears performance is greatly enhanced by an active process defined by four features: amplification, frequency selectivity, compressive nonlinearity, and spontaneous otoacoustic emission. These characteristics emerge naturally if the mechanoelectrical transduction process operates near a dynamical instability, the Hopf bifurcation, whose mathematical properties account for specific aspects of our hearing. The active process of non-mammalian tetrapods depends upon active hair-bundle motility, which emerges from the interaction of negative hair-bundle stiffness and myosin-based adaptation motors. Taken together, these phenomena explain the four characteristics of the ears active process. In the high-frequency region of the mammalian cochlea, the active process is dominated instead by the phenomenon of electromotility, in which the cell bodies of outer hair cells extend and contract as the protein prestin alters its membrane surface area in response to changes in membrane potential. PMID:18760690

  12. How minute sooglossid frogs hear without a middle ear.

    PubMed

    Boistel, Renaud; Aubin, Thierry; Cloetens, Peter; Peyrin, Franoise; Scotti, Thierry; Herzog, Philippe; Gerlach, Justin; Pollet, Nicolas; Aubry, Jean-Franois

    2013-09-17

    Acoustic communication is widespread in animals. According to the sensory drive hypothesis [Endler JA (1993) Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 340(1292):215-225], communication signals and perceptual systems have coevolved. A clear illustration of this is the evolution of the tetrapod middle ear, adapted to life on land. Here we report the discovery of a bone conduction-mediated stimulation of the ear by wave propagation in Sechellophryne gardineri, one of the world's smallest terrestrial tetrapods, which lacks a middle ear yet produces acoustic signals. Based on X-ray synchrotron holotomography, we measured the biomechanical properties of the otic tissues and modeled the acoustic propagation. Our models show how bone conduction enhanced by the resonating role of the mouth allows these seemingly deaf frogs to communicate effectively without a middle ear. PMID:24003145

  13. How minute sooglossid frogs hear without a middle ear

    PubMed Central

    Boistel, Renaud; Aubin, Thierry; Cloetens, Peter; Peyrin, Françoise; Scotti, Thierry; Herzog, Philippe; Gerlach, Justin; Pollet, Nicolas; Aubry, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic communication is widespread in animals. According to the sensory drive hypothesis [Endler JA (1993) Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 340(1292):215–225], communication signals and perceptual systems have coevolved. A clear illustration of this is the evolution of the tetrapod middle ear, adapted to life on land. Here we report the discovery of a bone conduction–mediated stimulation of the ear by wave propagation in Sechellophryne gardineri, one of the world’s smallest terrestrial tetrapods, which lacks a middle ear yet produces acoustic signals. Based on X-ray synchrotron holotomography, we measured the biomechanical properties of the otic tissues and modeled the acoustic propagation. Our models show how bone conduction enhanced by the resonating role of the mouth allows these seemingly deaf frogs to communicate effectively without a middle ear. PMID:24003145

  14. Ensemble training to improve recognition using 2D ear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middendorff, Christopher; Bowyer, Kevin W.

    2009-05-01

    The ear has gained popularity as a biometric feature due to the robustness of the shape over time and across emotional expression. Popular methods of ear biometrics analyze the ear as a whole, leaving these methods vulnerable to error due to occlusion. Many researchers explore ear recognition using an ensemble, but none present a method for designing the individual parts that comprise the ensemble. In this work, we introduce a method of modifying the ensemble shapes to improve performance. We determine how different properties of an ensemble training system can affect overall performance. We show that ensembles built from small parts will outperform ensembles built with larger parts, and that incorporating a large number of parts improves the performance of the ensemble.

  15. Tympanostomy Tubes: A Rational Clinical Treatment for Middle Ear Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roland, Peter S.; Brown, Orval

    1990-01-01

    The use of tympanostomy tubes to treat middle ear disease including otitis media is discussed with sections on the eustachian tube; acute otitis media; persistent effusion; changes in the tympanic membrane; special populations; and complications. (DB)

  16. 21 CFR 874.5300 - Ear, nose, and throat examination and treatment unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat examination and treatment... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5300 Ear, nose, and throat examination and treatment unit. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and...

  17. 21 CFR 874.4420 - Ear, nose, and throat manual surgical instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat manual surgical instrument... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4420 Ear, nose, and throat manual surgical instrument. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat manual...

  18. 21 CFR 874.5220 - Ear, nose, and throat drug administration device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat drug administration device... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5220 Ear, nose, and throat drug administration device. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat...

  19. 21 CFR 874.3620 - Ear, nose, and throat synthetic polymer material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat synthetic polymer material... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3620 Ear, nose, and throat synthetic polymer material. (a) Identification. Ear, nose, and throat synthetic...

  20. 21 CFR 874.5220 - Ear, nose, and throat drug administration device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat drug administration device... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5220 Ear, nose, and throat drug administration device. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat...