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Sample records for early acute kidney

  1. Early detection of acute kidney injury after pediatric cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jefferies, John Lynn; Devarajan, Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is increasingly recognized as a common problem in children undergoing cardiac surgery, with well documented increases in morbidity and mortality in both the short and the long term. Traditional approaches to the identification of AKI such as changes in serum creatinine have revealed a large incidence in this population with significant negative impact on clinical outcomes. However, the traditional diagnostic approaches to AKI diagnosis have inherent limitations that may lead to under-diagnosis of this pathologic process. There is a dearth of randomized controlled trials for the prevention and treatment of AKI associated with cardiac surgery, at least in part due to the paucity of early predictive biomarkers. Novel non-invasive biomarkers have ushered in a new era that allows for earlier detection of AKI. With these new diagnostic tools, a more consistent approach can be employed across centers that may facilitate a more accurate representation of the actual prevalence of AKI and more importantly, clinical investigation that may minimize the occurrence of AKI following pediatric cardiac surgery. A thoughtful management approach is necessary to mitigate the effects of AKI after cardiac surgery, which is best accomplished in close collaboration with pediatric nephrologists. Long-term surveillance for improvement in kidney function and potential development of chronic kidney disease should also be a part of the comprehensive management strategy. PMID:27429538

  2. Incidence, etiology, and significance of acute kidney injury in the early post-kidney transplant period.

    PubMed

    Panek, Romuald; Tennankore, Karthik K; Kiberd, Bryce A

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the incidence, causes, and significance of acute kidney injury (AKI) in the early transplant period. This study used a definition as >26 μmol/L increase in creatinine within 48 h or >50% increase over a period >48 h. In 326 adult consecutive recipients of a solitary kidney transplant from 2006 to 2014 followed at this center, 21% developed AKI within the first six months. Most etiologies were CNI toxicity (33%) or unknown (26%), whereas acute rejection accounted for 17% and urinary tract obstruction for 10%. Those with AKI had a significantly lower glomerular filtration rate (GFR) at one-yr post-transplant (adjusted beta coefficient -5.5 mL/min/1.73 m(2) , 95% CI: -10.4, -0.7, p = 0.025) in a multivariable linear regression model. However, the AKI definition missed 6 of 19 episodes of acute rejection and 4 of 10 episodes of urinary tract obstruction. When acute rejection (including those that did not satisfy AKI criteria) was included in the model, other causes of AKI were not significantly associated with GFR at year 1. Although AKI, using current criteria, is likely to be a significant predictor of later outcomes, important causes are missed and the criteria are not sensitive for clinical decision-making. PMID:26497636

  3. Acute kidney failure

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure; Renal failure; Renal failure - acute; ARF; Kidney injury - acute ... There are many possible causes of kidney damage. They include: ... cholesterol (cholesterol emboli) Decreased blood flow due to very ...

  4. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    Acute renal arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... kidneys need a good blood supply. The main artery to the kidney is called the renal artery. ...

  5. Pyruvate Kinase M2: A Novel Biomarker for the Early Detection of Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Ji Hyun; Kim, Sun Young; Son, Ji Yeon; Kang, Ye Rim; An, Ji Hye; Kwon, Ji Hoon; Song, Ho Sub; Moon, Aree; Lee, Byung Mu; Kim, Hyung Sik

    2016-01-01

    The identification of biomarkers for the early detection of acute kidney injury (AKI) is clinically important. Acute kidney injury (AKI) in critically ill patients is closely associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Conventional biomarkers, such as serum creatinine (SCr) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN), are frequently used to diagnose AKI. However, these biomarkers increase only after significant structural damage has occurred. Recent efforts have focused on identification and validation of new noninvasive biomarkers for the early detection of AKI, prior to extensive structural damage. Furthermore, AKI biomarkers can provide valuable insight into the molecular mechanisms of this complex and heterogeneous disease. Our previous study suggested that pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2), which is excreted in the urine, is a sensitive biomarker for nephrotoxicity. To appropriately and optimally utilize PKM2 as a biomarker for AKI requires its complete characterization. This review highlights the major studies that have addressed the diagnostic and prognostic predictive power of biomarkers for AKI and assesses the potential usage of PKM2 as an early biomarker for AKI. We summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the role of biomarkers and the molecular and cellular mechanisms of AKI. This review will elucidate the biological basis of specific biomarkers that will contribute to improving the early detection and diagnosis of AKI. PMID:26977258

  6. Pyruvate Kinase M2: A Novel Biomarker for the Early Detection of Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Ji Hyun; Kim, Sun Young; Son, Ji Yeon; Kang, Ye Rim; An, Ji Hye; Kwon, Ji Hoon; Song, Ho Sub; Moon, Aree; Lee, Byung Mu; Kim, Hyung Sik

    2016-01-01

    The identification of biomarkers for the early detection of acute kidney injury (AKI) is clinically important. Acute kidney injury (AKI) in critically ill patients is closely associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Conventional biomarkers, such as serum creatinine (SCr) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN), are frequently used to diagnose AKI. However, these biomarkers increase only after significant structural damage has occurred. Recent efforts have focused on identification and validation of new noninvasive biomarkers for the early detection of AKI, prior to extensive structural damage. Furthermore, AKI biomarkers can provide valuable insight into the molecular mechanisms of this complex and heterogeneous disease. Our previous study suggested that pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2), which is excreted in the urine, is a sensitive biomarker for nephrotoxicity. To appropriately and optimally utilize PKM2 as a biomarker for AKI requires its complete characterization. This review highlights the major studies that have addressed the diagnostic and prognostic predictive power of biomarkers for AKI and assesses the potential usage of PKM2 as an early biomarker for AKI. We summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the role of biomarkers and the molecular and cellular mechanisms of AKI. This review will elucidate the biological basis of specific biomarkers that will contribute to improving the early detection and diagnosis of AKI. PMID:26977258

  7. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    ... arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... often result in permanent kidney failure. Acute arterial occlusion of the renal artery can occur after injury ...

  8. Acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Lang, Joanna; Zuber, Kim; Davis, Jane

    2016-04-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) complicates up to 20% of all hospital admissions. Responding to the increase in admissions, complications, mortality, morbidity, and cost of AKI, Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes convened an expert panel to study the issue, review the literature, and publish guidelines to evaluate and treat patients with AKI in the acute setting. This article reviews those guidelines. PMID:27023656

  9. [Ascites and acute kidney injury].

    PubMed

    Piano, Salvatore; Tonon, Marta; Angeli, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    Ascites is the most common complication of cirrhosis. Ascites develops as a consequence of an abnormal splanchnic vasodilation with reduction of effecting circulating volume and activation of endogenous vasoconstrictors system causing salt and water retention. Patients with ascites have a high risk to develop further complications of cirrhosis such as hyponatremia, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and acute kidney injury resulting in a poor survival. In recent years, new studies helped a better understanding of the pathophysiology of ascites and acute kidney injury in cirrhosis. Furthermore, new diagnostic criteria have been proposed for acute kidney injury and hepatorenal syndrome and a new algorithm for their management has been recommended with the aim of an early diagnosis and treatment. Herein we will review the current knowledge on the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of ascites and acute kidney injury in patients with cirrhosis and we will identify the unmet needs that should be clarified in the next years. PMID:27571467

  10. Acute kidney injury in children.

    PubMed

    Merouani, A; Flechelles, O; Jouvet, P

    2012-04-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) affects 5% of critically ill hospitalized children and is a risk factor for increased morbidity and mortality. The current review focuses on new definitions of acute kidney injury, standardized to reflect the entire spectrum of the disease, as well as on ongoing research to identify early biomarkers of kidney injury. Its also provides an overview of current practice and available therapies, with emphasis on new strategies for the prevention and pharmacological treatment of diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome. Furthermore, a decision-making algorithm is presented for the use of renal replacement therapies in critically ill children with AKI. PMID:22495187

  11. Novel biomarkers for early diagnosis of acute kidney injury after cardiac surgery in adults

    PubMed Central

    Kališnik, Jurij Matija

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass is a common and serious complication and it is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Diagnosis of acute kidney injury is based on the serum creatinine levels which rise several hours to days after the initial injury. Thus, novel biomarkers that will enable faster diagnosis are needed in clinical practice. There are numerous urine and serum proteins that indicate kidney injury and are under extensive research. Despite promising basic research results and assembled data, which indicate superiority of some biomarkers to creatinine, we are still awaiting clinical application. PMID:27212976

  12. Discovery of urinary metabolomic biomarkers for early detection of acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Won, A Jin; Kim, Siwon; Kim, Yoon Gyoon; Kim, Kyu-Bong; Choi, Wahn Soo; Kacew, Sam; Kim, Kyeong Seok; Jung, Jee H; Lee, Byung Mu; Kim, Suhkmann; Kim, Hyung Sik

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of new biomarkers for early detection of drug-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) is clinically important. In this study, sensitive metabolomic biomarkers identified in the urine of rats were used to detect cisplatin-induced AKI. Cisplatin (10 mg kg(-1), i.p.) was administered to Sprague-Dawley rats, which were subsequently euthanized after 1, 3 or 5 days. In cisplatin-treated rats, mild histopathological alterations were noted at day 1, and these changes were severe at days 3 and 5. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine (SCr) levels were significantly increased at days 3 and 5. The levels of new urinary protein-based biomarkers, including kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), glutathione S-transferase-α (GST-α), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), calbindin, clusterin, neutrophil, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), and osteopontin, were significantly elevated at days 3 and 5. Among urinary metabolites, trigonelline and 3-indoxylsulfate (3-IS) levels were significantly decreased in urine collected from cisplatin-treated rats prior to histological kidney damage. However, carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), a hepatotoxicant, did not affect these urinary biomarkers. Trigonelline is closely associated with GSH depletion and results in insufficient antioxidant capacity against cisplatin-induced AKI. The predominant cisplatin-induced AKI marker appeared to be reduced in urinary 3-IS levels. Because 3-IS is predominantly excreted via active secretion in proximal tubules, a decrease is indicative of tubular damage. Further, urinary excretion of 3-IS levels was markedly reduced in patients with AKI compared to normal subjects. The area under the curve receiver operating characteristics (AUC-ROC) for 3-IS was higher than for SCr, BUN, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), total protein, and glucose. Therefore, low urinary or high serum 3-IS levels may be more useful for early detection of AKI than

  13. Urinary Biomarkers TIMP-2 and IGFBP7 Early Predict Acute Kidney Injury after Major Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gocze, Ivan; Koch, Matthias; Renner, Philipp; Zeman, Florian; Graf, Bernhard M.; Dahlke, Marc H.; Nerlich, Michael; Schlitt, Hans J.; Kellum, John A.; Bein, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the ability of the urinary biomarkers IGFBP7 (insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 7) and TIMP-2 (tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 2) to early predict acute kidney injury (AKI) in high-risk surgical patients. Introduction Postoperative AKI is associated with an increase in short and long-term mortality. Using IGFBP7 and TIMP-2 for early detection of cellular kidney injury, thus allowing the early initiation of renal protection measures, may represent a new concept of evaluating renal function. Methods In this prospective study, urinary [TIMP-2]×[IGFBP7] was measured in surgical patients at high risk for AKI. A predefined cut-off value of [TIMP-2]×[IGFBP7] >0.3 was used for assessing diagnostic accuracy. Perioperative characteristics were evaluated, and ROC analyses as well as logistic regression models of risk assessment were calculated with and without a [TIMP-2]×[IGFBP7] test. Results 107 patients were included in the study, of whom 45 (42%) developed AKI. The highest median values of biomarker were detected in septic, transplant and patients after hepatic surgery (1.24 vs 0.45 vs 0.47 ng/l2/1000). The area under receiving operating characteristic curve (AUC) for the risk of any AKI was 0.85, for early use of RRT 0.83 and for 28-day mortality 0.77. In a multivariable model with established perioperative risk factors, the [TIMP-2]×[IGFBP7] test was the strongest predictor of AKI and significantly improved the risk assessment (p<0.001). Conclusions Urinary [TIMP-2]×[IGFBP7] test sufficiently detect patients with risk of AKI after major non-cardiac surgery. Due to its rapid responsiveness it extends the time frame for intervention to prevent development of AKI. PMID:25798585

  14. Kidney Disease and the Nexus of Chronic Kidney Disease and Acute Kidney Injury: The Role of Novel Biomarkers as Early and Accurate Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Yerramilli, Murthy; Farace, Giosi; Quinn, John; Yerramilli, Maha

    2016-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and acute kidney injury (AKI) are interconnected and the presence of one is a risk for the other. CKD is an important predictor of AKI after exposure to nephrotoxic drugs or major surgery, whereas persistent or repetitive injury could result in the progression of CKD. This brings new perspectives to the diagnosis and monitoring of kidney diseases highlighting the need for a panel of kidney-specific biomarkers that reflect functional as well as structural damage and recovery, predict potential risk and provide prognosis. This article discusses the kidney-specific biomarkers, symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA), clusterin, cystatin B, and inosine. PMID:27485279

  15. Urinary L-FABP predicts poor outcomes in critically ill patients with early acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Parr, Sharidan K; Clark, Amanda J; Bian, Aihua; Shintani, Ayumi K; Wickersham, Nancy E; Ware, Lorraine B; Ikizler, T Alp; Siew, Edward D

    2015-03-01

    Biomarker studies for early detection of acute kidney injury (AKI) have been limited by nonselective testing and uncertainties in using small changes in serum creatinine as a reference standard. Here we examine the ability of urine L-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP), neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), interleukin-18 (IL-18), and kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) to predict injury progression, dialysis, or death within 7 days in critically ill adults with early AKI. Of 152 patients with known baseline creatinine examined, 36 experienced the composite outcome. Urine L-FABP demonstrated an area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC-ROC) of 0.79 (95% confidence interval 0.70-0.86), which improved to 0.82 (95% confidence interval 0.75-0.90) when added to the clinical model (AUC-ROC of 0.74). Urine NGAL, IL-18, and KIM-1 had AUC-ROCs of 0.65, 0.64, and 0.62, respectively, but did not significantly improve discrimination of the clinical model. The category-free net reclassification index improved with urine L-FABP (total net reclassification index for nonevents 31.0%) and urine NGAL (total net reclassification index for events 33.3%). However, only urine L-FABP significantly improved the integrated discrimination index. Thus, modest early changes in serum creatinine can help target biomarker measurement for determining prognosis with urine L-FABP, providing independent and additive prognostic information when combined with clinical predictors. PMID:25229339

  16. Early lipid changes in acute kidney injury using SWATH lipidomics coupled with MALDI tissue imaging.

    PubMed

    Rao, Sangeetha; Walters, Kelly B; Wilson, Landon; Chen, Bo; Bolisetty, Subhashini; Graves, David; Barnes, Stephen; Agarwal, Anupam; Kabarowski, Janusz H

    2016-05-15

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is one of the leading causes of in-hospital morbidity and mortality, particularly in critically ill patients. Although our understanding of AKI at the molecular level remains limited due to its complex pathophysiology, recent advances in both quantitative and spatial mass spectrometric approaches offer new opportunities to assess the significance of renal metabolomic changes in AKI models. In this study, we evaluated lipid changes in early ischemia-reperfusion (IR)-related AKI in mice by using sequential window acquisition of all theoretical spectra (SWATH)-mass spectrometry (MS) lipidomics. We found a significant increase in two abundant ether-linked phospholipids following IR at 6 h postinjury, a plasmanyl choline, phosphatidylcholine (PC) O-38:1 (O-18:0, 20:1), and a plasmalogen, phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) O-42:3 (O-20:1, 22:2). Both of these lipids correlated with the severity of AKI as measured by plasma creatinine. In addition to many more renal lipid changes associated with more severe AKI, PC O-38:1 elevations were maintained at 24 h post-IR, while renal PE O-42:3 levels decreased, as were all ether PEs detected by SWATH-MS at this later time point. To further assess the significance of this early increase in PC O-38:1, we used matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) to determine that it occurred in proximal tubules, a region of the kidney that is most prone to IR injury and also rich in the rate-limiting enzymes involved in ether-linked phospholipid biosynthesis. Use of SWATH-MS lipidomics in conjunction with MALDI-IMS for lipid localization will help in elucidating the role of lipids in the pathobiology of AKI. PMID:26911846

  17. Development of a MALDI MS‐based platform for early detection of acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Vanmassenhove, Jill; Glorieux, Griet; Metzger, Jochen; Dakna, Mohammed; Pejchinovski, Martin; Jankowski, Vera; Mansoorian, Bahareh; Husi, Holger; Mullen, William; Mischak, Harald; Vanholder, Raymond; Van Biesen, Wim

    2016-01-01

    1 Purpose Septic acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with poor outcome. This can partly be attributed to delayed diagnosis and incomplete understanding of the underlying pathophysiology. Our aim was to develop an early predictive test for AKI based on the analysis of urinary peptide biomarkers by MALDI‐MS. 2 Experimental design Urine samples from 95 patients with sepsis were analyzed by MALDI‐MS. Marker search and multimarker model establishment were performed using the peptide profiles from 17 patients with existing or within the next 5 days developing AKI and 17 with no change in renal function. Replicates of urine sample pools from the AKI and non‐AKI patient groups and normal controls were also included to select the analytically most robust AKI markers. 3 Results Thirty‐nine urinary peptides were selected by cross‐validated variable selection to generate a support vector machine multidimensional AKI classifier. Prognostic performance of the AKI classifier on an independent validation set including the remaining 61 patients of the study population (17 controls and 44 cases) was good with an area under the receiver operating characteristics curve of 0.82 and a sensitivity and specificity of 86% and 76%, respectively. 4 Conclusion and clinical relevance A urinary peptide marker model detects onset of AKI with acceptable accuracy in septic patients. Such a platform can eventually be transferred to the clinic as fast MALDI‐MS test format. PMID:27119821

  18. Assessment of Plasma and NGAL for the Early Prediction of Acute Kidney Injury After Cardiac Surgery in Adults Study

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-11

    Acute Kidney Injury (AKI); Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD); End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD); Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate (eGFR); Neutrophil Gelatinase-associated Lipocalin (NGAL); Serum Creatinine (SCr); Urine Creatinine (UCr); Urine Albumin (UAlb)

  19. Fiber optic probe enabled by surface-enhanced Raman scattering for early diagnosis of potential acute rejection of kidney transplant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Jingmao; Chen, Hui; Tolias, Peter; Du, Henry

    2014-06-01

    We have explored the use of a fiber-optic probe with surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensing modality for early, noninvasive and, rapid diagnosis of potential renal acute rejection (AR) and other renal graft dysfunction of kidney transplant patients. Multimode silica optical fiber immobilized with colloidal Ag nanoparticles at the distal end was used for SERS measurements of as-collected urine samples at 632.8 nm excitation wavelength. All patients with abnormal renal graft function (3 AR episodes and 2 graft failure episodes) who were clinically diagnosed independently show common unique SERS spectral features in the urines collected just one day after transplant. SERS-based fiber-optic probe has excellent potential to be a bedside tool for early diagnosis of kidney transplant patients for timely medical intervention of patients at high risk of transplant dysfunction.

  20. Is Progressive Chronic Kidney Disease a Slow Acute Kidney Injury?

    PubMed

    Cowgill, Larry D; Polzin, David J; Elliott, Jonathan; Nabity, Mary B; Segev, Gilad; Grauer, Gregory F; Brown, Scott; Langston, Cathy; van Dongen, Astrid M

    2016-11-01

    International Renal Interest Society chronic kidney disease Stage 1 and acute kidney injury Grade I categorizations of kidney disease are often confused or ignored because patients are nonazotemic and generally asymptomatic. Recent evidence suggests these seemingly disparate conditions may be mechanistically linked and interrelated. Active kidney injury biomarkers have the potential to establish a new understanding for traditional views of chronic kidney disease, including its early identification and possible mediators of its progression, which, if validated, would establish a new and sophisticated paradigm for the understanding and approach to the diagnostic evaluation, and treatment of urinary disease in dogs and cats. PMID:27593574

  1. Over-diuresis or cardiac tamponade? An unusual case of acute kidney injury and early closure

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gurkeerat; Sabath, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    An 84-year-old man with hypertension and a history of deep venous thrombosis (on warfarin) was admitted with shortness of breath presumed to be due to congestive heart failure. Echocardiogram performed the following day showed a low-normal ejection fraction with signs of elevated right-sided pressures but was otherwise normal. He improved with diuretic therapy but after a few days was found to be hypotensive with a concomitant rise in creatinine with decreased urine output. This was felt to be secondary to over-diuresis but he did not respond to small boluses of intravenous fluids as his kidney function continued to worsen and hypotension persisted. He was transferred to the intermediate care unit where a rapid, bedside ultrasound revealed a new, moderate-sized pericardial effusion with tamponade physiology. Pericardiocentesis, with removal of 750 cc of frank blood, led to dramatic improvement in blood pressure, kidney function, and urine output. Here, we demonstrate the utility of point-of-care ultrasound in a community hospital setting where urgent echocardiogram is not routinely available. We also report acute kidney injury due to pericardial tamponade reversed with therapeutic pericardiocentesis. PMID:27124173

  2. Early start renal replacement therapy for acute kidney injury-Universal panacea or another case of over medicalization?

    PubMed

    Davenport, Andrew

    2015-10-01

    Despite advances in medical practice and renal replacement therapy, the mortality of patients who develop acute kidney injury remains high. In the field of cardiology, the management of myocardial infarction has evolved from one of conservative bed rest to primary coronary intervention. As renal replacement therapy is now generally available, the question arises whether earlier intervention could lead to improved patient outcomes. The evidence to date is primarily centered on retrospective observational reports, with the majority reporting increased patient survival for earlier intervention. However, these reports are typically based on small numbers of patients and differ in the etiology of acute kidney injury, patient comorbidity, and definitions of what constitutes "early" start. To date, there is less than a handful of prospective randomized studies published in the modern era. Again these are small studies, with differing patient populations, and definitions of "early" start, but generally do not show any significant advantage for an "early" start approach. As such until adequately powered prospective trial data become available, the decision to initiate renal replacement therapy should be made by the traditional review of patient history, repeated clinical assessments, and trends in biochemical data. PMID:26448386

  3. Assessment of Cell-Cycle Arrest Biomarkers to Predict Early and Delayed Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Max; Larsson, Anders; Venge, Per; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Mårtensson, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To assess urinary tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7 ([TIMP-2]·[IGFBP7]), urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), and urinary cystatin-C as acute kidney injury predictors (AKI) exploring the association of nonrenal factors with elevated biomarker levels. Methods. We studied 94 patients with urine collected within 48 hours of ICU admission and no AKI at sampling. AKI was defined by the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes criteria. Predictive performance was assessed by the area under the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve. Associations between biomarkers and clinical factors were assessed by multivariate linear regression. Results. Overall, 19 patients (20%) developed AKI within 48 hours. [TIMP-2]·[IGFBP7], NGAL, or cystatin-C admission levels did not differ between patients without AKI and patients developing AKI. [TIMP-2]·[IGFBP7], NGAL, and cystatin-C were poor AKI predictors (ROC areas 0.34–0.51). Diabetes was independently associated with higher [TIMP-2]·[IGFBP7] levels (P = 0.02) but AKI was not (P = 0.24). Sepsis was independently associated with higher NGAL (P < 0.001) and cystatin-C (P = 0.003) levels. Conclusions. Urinary [TIMP-2]·[IGFBP7], NGAL, and cystatin-C should be used cautiously as AKI predictors in general ICU patients since urine levels of these biomarkers are affected by factors other than AKI and their performance can be poor. PMID:25866432

  4. Loss of CD28 on Peripheral T Cells Decreases the Risk for Early Acute Rejection after Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Dedeoglu, Burç; Meijers, Ruud W. J.; Klepper, Mariska; Hesselink, Dennis A.; Baan, Carla C.; Litjens, Nicolle H. R.; Betjes, Michiel G. H.

    2016-01-01

    Background End-stage renal disease patients have a dysfunctional, prematurely aged peripheral T-cell system. Here we hypothesized that the degree of premature T-cell ageing before kidney transplantation predicts the risk for early acute allograft rejection (EAR). Methods 222 living donor kidney transplant recipients were prospectively analyzed. EAR was defined as biopsy proven acute allograft rejection within 3 months after kidney transplantation. The differentiation status of circulating T cells, the relative telomere length and the number of CD31+ naive T cells were determined as T-cell ageing parameters. Results Of the 222 patients analyzed, 30 (14%) developed an EAR. The donor age and the historical panel reactive antibody score were significantly higher (p = 0.024 and p = 0.039 respectively) and the number of related donor kidney transplantation was significantly lower (p = 0.018) in the EAR group. EAR-patients showed lower CD4+CD28null T-cell numbers (p<0.01) and the same trend was observed for CD8+CD28null T-cell numbers (p = 0.08). No differences regarding the other ageing parameters were found. A multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that higher CD4+CD28null T-cell numbers was associated with a lower risk for EAR (HR: 0.65, p = 0.028). In vitro, a significant lower percentage of alloreactive T cells was observed within CD28null T cells (p<0.001). Conclusion Immunological ageing-related expansion of highly differentiated CD28null T cells is associated with a lower risk for EAR. PMID:26950734

  5. [Acute kidney injury in children].

    PubMed

    Amira-Peco-Antić; Paripović, Dusan

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a clinical condition considered to be the consequence of a sudden decrease (> 25%) or discontinuation of renal function. The term AKI is used instead of the previous term acute renal failure, because it has been demonstrated that even minor renal lesions may cause far-reaching consequences on human health. Contemporary classifications of AKI (RIFLE and AKIN) are based on the change of serum creatinine and urinary output. In the developed countries, AKI is most often caused by renal ischemia, nephrotoxins and sepsis, rather than a (primary) diffuse renal disease, such as glomerulonephritis, interstitial nephritis, renovascular disorder and thrombotic microangiopathy. The main risk factors for hospital AKI are mechanical ventilation, use of vasoactive drugs, stem cell transplantation and diuretic-resistant hypervolemia. Prerenal and parenchymal AKI (previously known as acute tubular necrosis) jointly account for 2/3 of all AKI causes. Diuresis and serum creatinine concentration are not early diagnostic markers of AKI. Potential early biomarkers of AKI are neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), cystatin C, kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), interleukins 6, 8 and 18, and liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP). Early detection of kidney impairment, before the increase of serum creatinine, is important for timely initiated therapy and recovery. The goal of AKI treatment is to normalize the fluid and electrolyte status, as well as the correction of acidosis and blood pressure. Since a severe fluid overload resistant to diuretics and inotropic agents is associated with a poor outcome, the initiation of dialysis should not be delayed. The mortality rate of AKI is highest in critically ill children with multiple organ failure and hemodynamically unstable patients. PMID:25033598

  6. Acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Gerhard Anton

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Acute kidney injury is a frequent and serious complication in hospitalized patients. Mortality rates have not substantially been decreased during the last 20 years. In most patients AKI results from transient renal hypoperfusion or ischemia. The consequences include tubular cell dysfunction/damage, inflammation of the organ, and post-ischemic microvasculopathy. The two latter events perpetuate kidney damage in AKI. Clinical manifestations result from diminished excretion of water, electrolytes, and endogenous / exogenous waste products. Patients are endangered by cardiovascular complications such as hypertension, heart failure, and arrhythmia. In addition, the whole organism may be affected by systemic toxification (uremia). The diagnostic approach in AKI involves several steps with renal biopsy inevitable in some patients. The current therapy focuses on preventing further kidney damage and on treatment of complications. Different pharmacological strategies have failed to significantly improve prognosis in AKI. If dialysis treatment becomes mandatory, intermittent and continuous renal replacement therapies are equally effective. Thus, new therapies are urgently needed in order to reduce short- and long-term outcome in AKI. In this respect, stem cell-based regimens may offer promising perspectives. PMID:25618438

  7. Acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Patschan, Daniel; Müller, Gerhard Anton

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is a frequent and serious complication in hospitalized patients. Mortality rates have not substantially been decreased during the last 20 years. In most patients AKI results from transient renal hypoperfusion or ischemia. The consequences include tubular cell dysfunction/damage, inflammation of the organ, and post-ischemic microvasculopathy. The two latter events perpetuate kidney damage in AKI. Clinical manifestations result from diminished excretion of water, electrolytes, and endogenous / exogenous waste products. Patients are endangered by cardiovascular complications such as hypertension, heart failure, and arrhythmia. In addition, the whole organism may be affected by systemic toxification (uremia). The diagnostic approach in AKI involves several steps with renal biopsy inevitable in some patients. The current therapy focuses on preventing further kidney damage and on treatment of complications. Different pharmacological strategies have failed to significantly improve prognosis in AKI. If dialysis treatment becomes mandatory, intermittent and continuous renal replacement therapies are equally effective. Thus, new therapies are urgently needed in order to reduce short- and long-term outcome in AKI. In this respect, stem cell-based regimens may offer promising perspectives. PMID:25618438

  8. Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Zuk, Anna; Bonventre, Joseph V

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a global public health concern associated with high morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs. Other than dialysis, no therapeutic interventions reliably improve survival, limit injury, or speed recovery. Despite recognized shortcomings of in vivo animal models, the underlying pathophysiology of AKI and its consequence, chronic kidney disease (CKD), is rich with biological targets. We review recent findings relating to the renal vasculature and cellular stress responses, primarily the intersection of the unfolded protein response, mitochondrial dysfunction, autophagy, and the innate immune response. Maladaptive repair mechanisms that persist following the acute phase promote inflammation and fibrosis in the chronic phase. Here macrophages, growth-arrested tubular epithelial cells, the endothelium, and surrounding pericytes are key players in the progression to chronic disease. Better understanding of these complex interacting pathophysiological mechanisms, their relative importance in humans, and the utility of biomarkers will lead to therapeutic strategies to prevent and treat AKI or impede progression to CKD or end-stage renal disease (ESRD). PMID:26768243

  9. Biomarkers of Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Vishal S.; Ferguson, Michael A.; Bonventre, Joseph V.

    2009-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common condition with a high risk of death. The standard metrics used to define and monitor the progression of AKI, such as serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen levels, are insensitive, nonspecific, and change significantly only after significant kidney injury and then with a substantial time delay. This delay in diagnosis not only prevents timely patient management decisions, including administration of putative therapeutic agents, but also significantly affects the preclinical evaluation of toxicity thereby allowing potentially nephrotoxic drug candidates to pass the preclinical safety criteria only to be found to be clinically nephrotoxic with great human costs. Studies to establish effective therapies for AKI will be greatly facilitated by two factors: (a) development of sensitive, specific, and reliable biomarkers for early diagnosis/prognosis of AKI in preclinical and clinical studies, and (b) development and validation of high-throughput innovative technologies that allow rapid multiplexed detection of multiple markers at the bedside. PMID:17937594

  10. Early prediction of acute kidney injury biomarkers after endovascular stent graft repair of aortic aneurysm: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common and serious condition usually detected some time after onset by changes in serum creatinine (sCr). Although stent grafting to repair aortic aneurysms is associated with AKI caused by surgical procedures or the use of contrast agents, early biomarkers for AKI have not been adequately examined in stent graft recipients. We studied biomarkers including urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), blood NGAL, N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase (NAG), microalbumin (Alb), and liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) as prospective early biomarkers for AKI in patients who had received stent graft repairs of aortic aneurysms. Methods In addition to pre-surgical sampling, at 2 to 6 h and at 1, 3 to 4, and 5 days or later (until stable) after surgery, urine and serum biomarkers were sampled from 47 patients who underwent stent graft repair of aortic aneurysms. Results Using Acute Kidney Injury Network criteria, 6 (14%) of 42 retained patients developed AKI. NGAL corrected with urine Cr (NGAL/Cr) values demonstrated the best predictive value for AKI (97% specificity, 83% sensitivity at a 65.1 μg/gCr cutoff). The area under the receiver-operator characteristic curve of NGAL/Cr value 2 h after surgery was 0.9. Although NGAL/Cr, L-FABP corrected with urine Cr (L-FABP/Cr), L-FABP, NAG, and Alb corrected by urine Cr (Alb/Cr) all reached peak values before AKI detection by sCr in AKI patients, all biomarkers reached the cutoff value before AKI detection after adaption of cutoff value. Conclusions After stent graft repair of aortic aneurysm, NGAL/Cr is a potentially useful early biomarker for AKI. PMID:25960881

  11. Acute kidney injury due to decompression illness.

    PubMed

    Viecelli, Andrea; Jamboti, Jagadish; Waring, Andrew; Banham, Neil; Ferrari, Paolo

    2014-08-01

    Decompression illness is a rare but serious complication of diving caused by intravascular or extravascular gas bubble formation. We report the first case of acute kidney injury in a 27-year-old diver following three rapid ascents. He presented with transient neurological symptoms and abdominal pain followed by rapidly progressive acute kidney injury (creatinine peak 1210 µmol/L) due to arterial air emboli. He received supportive care and 100% oxygen followed by hyperbaric therapy and recovered fully. Arterial air emboli caused by rapid decompression can affect multiple organs including the kidneys. Early transfer to a hyperbaric unit is important as complications may present delayed. PMID:25852912

  12. Acute kidney injury due to decompression illness

    PubMed Central

    Viecelli, Andrea; Jamboti, Jagadish; Waring, Andrew; Banham, Neil; Ferrari, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Decompression illness is a rare but serious complication of diving caused by intravascular or extravascular gas bubble formation. We report the first case of acute kidney injury in a 27-year-old diver following three rapid ascents. He presented with transient neurological symptoms and abdominal pain followed by rapidly progressive acute kidney injury (creatinine peak 1210 µmol/L) due to arterial air emboli. He received supportive care and 100% oxygen followed by hyperbaric therapy and recovered fully. Arterial air emboli caused by rapid decompression can affect multiple organs including the kidneys. Early transfer to a hyperbaric unit is important as complications may present delayed. PMID:25852912

  13. Early postoperative albumin level following total knee arthroplasty is associated with acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ha-Jung; Koh, Won-Uk; Kim, Sae-Gyeol; Park, Hyeok-Seong; Song, Jun-Gol; Ro, Young-Jin; Yang, Hong-Seuk

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hypoalbuminemia has been reported to be an independent risk factor for acute kidney injury (AKI). However, little is known about the relationship between the albumin level and the incidence of AKI in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The aim of our study was to assess incidence and risk factors for AKI and to evaluate the relationship between albumin level and AKI following TKA. The study included a retrospective review of medical records of 1309 consecutive patients who underwent TKA between January 2008 and December 2014. The patients were divided into 2 groups according to the lowest serum albumin level within 2 postoperative days (POD2_alb level < 3.0 g/dL vs ≥3.0 g/dL). Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to assess risk factors for AKI. A comparison of incidence of AKI, hospital stay, and overall mortality in the 2 groups was performed using propensity score analysis. Of 1309 patients, 57 (4.4%) developed AKI based on Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes criteria. Factors associated with AKI included age (odds ratio [OR] 1.05; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01–1.09; P = 0.030), diabetes (OR 3.12; 95% CI 1.65–5.89; P < 0.001), uric acid (OR 1.51; 95% CI 1.26–1.82; P < 0.001), beta blocker use (OR 2.65; 95% CI 1.48–4.73; P = 0.001), diuretics (OR 16.42; 95% CI 3.08–87.68; P = 0.001), and POD2_alb level < 3.0 g/dL (OR 1.92; 95% CI 1.09–3.37; P = 0.023). After propensity score analysis, POD2_alb level<3.0 g/dL was associated with AKI occurrence (OR 1.82; 95% CI 1.03–3.24, P = 0.041) and longer hospital stay (P = 0.001). In this study, we demonstrated that POD2_alb level<3.0 g/dL was an independent risk factor for AKI and lengthened hospital stay in patients undergoing TKA. PMID:27495094

  14. Cystatin C for early detection of acute kidney injury after laparoscopic partial nephrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Alesawi, Anwar; Nadeau, Geneviève; Bergeron, Alain; Dujardin, Thierry; Lacombe, Louis; Caumartin, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Introduction and Objectives: Mortality due to AKI has not changed significantly over the past 50 years. This is due in part to failure to detect early AKI and to initiate appropriate therapeutic measures. There is therefore a need to identify biomarkers that would improve the early detection of AKI. The objective of this study was to assess whether cystatin C levels obtained at specific timepoints during laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (PN) could be early predictors of AKI. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five patients underwent laparoscopic PN for organ-confined tumors. All procedures were performed by two surgeons in a single institution. Plasma samples were collected preoperatively, and post-unclamping at 5, 20, 120 min and on the day following surgery. Plasma cystatin C was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Correlation between levels of cystatin C and other parameters of interest were assessed in order to define cystatin C ability to predict AKI and loss of renal function following laparoscopic PN. Results: The mean baseline eGFR was 93 ml/min/1.73 m2. Warm ischemia time varied between 16 and 44 min. Post-operative day 1 (POD1) cystatin C levels compared to baseline were increased in 13 (52%) of the patients. There was a high correlation between the difference of POD 1 and baseline value, and eGFR in the immediate postoperative period (r = −0.681; P = 0.0002) and at 12-month follow-up (r = −0.460, P = 0.048). However, the variation in cystatin C levels at earlier timepoints were not associated to AKI nor renal function. Conclusions: High increase in POD 1 cystatin C levels from baseline may help identify patients with AKI and those at higher risk of chronic kidney disease, following laparoscopic PN. PMID:25371605

  15. Comparison of Cystatin C and NGAL in Early Diagnosis of Acute Kidney Injury After Heart Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hošková, Lenka; Franekova, Janka; Málek, Ivan; Kautzner, Josef; Szárszoi, Ondřej; Jabor, Antonín; Pinďák, Marian; Viklický, Ondřej; Melenovský, Vojtěch

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a risk factor for adverse hospital outcomes in recipients of a heart transplantation (HTx). Timely recognition of AKI is crucial for the initiation of proper treatment. We hypothesized that serum or urine biomarkers can predict AKI. MATERIAL AND METHODS In this prospective study we evaluated 117 consecutive patients after HTx. AKI was defined as an increase of the serum creatinine level by ≥50% or a worsening of the renal function requiring renal replacement therapy during the first post-HTx week. We serially sampled serum cystatin C (S-cystatin C) as a marker of glomerular filtration and urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (U-NGAL) as a marker of tubular damage. RESULTS A cohort of 30 patients (25.6%) fulfilled the criteria of AKI. S-cystatin C allowed the earliest separation between the AKI and non-AKI groups, with a significant difference present as soon as 3 h after surgery and it persisted on days 7, 10, and 30. The increase in S-cystatin C preceded the serum creatinine elevation by 4 days. In a multivariate analysis, S-cystatin C >1.6 mg/L at 3 h after HTx predicted AKI with OR 4.3 (95% CI: 1.6-11.5). U-NGAL was significantly higher at day 3 in the AKI group (p=0.003) and elevated S-cystatin C (≥2.54 mg/L on day 7) could predict 1-year mortality in these HTx recipients. CONCLUSIONS Our study showed that the measurement of S-cystatin C at 3 h after surgery may help to identify patients with high risk for renal complications. A persistent elevation of S-cystatin C also predicts 1-year mortality. PMID:27226081

  16. Ultrasound in Acute Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Nalesso, Federico; Petrucci, Ilaria; Samoni, Sara; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Kidneys' imaging provides useful information in acute kidney injury (AKI) diagnosis and management. Today, several imaging techniques give information on kidneys anatomy, urinary obstruction, differential diagnosis between AKI and chronic kidney disease (CKD), renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate. Ultrasound is a safe, non-invasive and repeatable imaging technique so it is widely used in the first level work-up of AKI. The utility of contrast-enhanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in AKI or in AKI during CKD is limited because of renal toxicity associated with contrast agents used. PMID:27169556

  17. Early Acute Kidney Injury based on Serum Creatinine or Cystatin C in Intensive Care Unit after Major Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Zand, Farid; Sabetian, Golnar; Abbasi, Ghasem; Rezaianzadeh, Abbas; Salehi, Alireza; Khosravi, Abbas; Geramizadeh, Bita; Taregh, Shuja Ulhaq; Javadpour, Shohreh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common problem in critically ill patients and is independently associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Recently, serum cystatin C has been shown to be superior to creatinine in early detection of renal function impairment. We compared estimated GFR based on serum cystatin C with estimated GFR based on serum creatinine for early detection of renal dysfunction according to the RIFLE criteria. Methods: During 9 months, three hundred post trauma patients that were referred to the intensive care unit of a referral trauma hospital were recruited. Serum creatinine and serum cystatin C were measured and the estimated GFR within 24 hours of ICU admission was calculated. The primary outcome was the incidence of AKI according to the RIFLE criteria within 2nd to 7th day of admission. Results: During the first week of ICU admission, 21% of patients experienced AKI. After adjusting for major confounders, only the patients with first day’s serum cystatin level higher than 0.78 mg/l were at higher risk of first week AKI (OR=6.14, 95% CI: 2.5-14.7, P<0.001). First day’s serum cystatin C and injury severity score were the major risk factors for ICU mortality (OR=3.54, 95% CI: 1.7-7.4, P=0.001) and (OR=4.6, 95% CI: 1.5-14, P=0.007), respectively. Conclusion: Within 24 hours after admission in ICU due to multiple trauma, high serum cystatin C level may have prognostic value in predicting early AKI and mortality during ICU admission. However, such correlation was not seen neither with creatinine nor cystatin C based GFR. PMID:26538776

  18. Acute kidney failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... level. You may need dialysis. This is a treatment that does what healthy kidneys normally do -- rid the body of harmful wastes, extra salt, and water. Dialysis can save your life if your potassium ...

  19. Potential biomarkers for the early detection of acute kidney injury after percutaneous nephrolithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Daggülli, Mansur; Utangaç, Mehmet M; Dede, Onur; Bodakci, Mehmet N; Hatipoglu, Namık K; Penbegül, Necmettin; Sancaktutar, Ahmet A; Bozkurt, Yaşar; Söylemez, Haluk

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the role of urinary biomarkers in the determination of the potential risks of renal parenchymal tubular damage in adult patients who underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) with the indication of renal stone. A randomized and prospective controlled study was performed between June and December 2013. We enrolled 29 consecutive patients with renal calculi > 2 cm and who underwent PNL, as well as 47 healthy control subjects. Urine samples, including 2 h before surgery, 2 and 24 h after surgery were collected from the patient group. Freshly voided urine samples were collected from the control group. Kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), N-acetyl-glucosaminidase (NAG), and liver-type fatty acid binding protein (LFABP) levels were measured from these urine samples. The mean KIM-1/Cr value that measured 24 h after the operation was statistically significant, higher than its preoperative (preop) level (p = 0.045). A significant difference was detected between the mean preop and postoperative (postop) 24 h NAG/Cr values (p < 0.001). Also, postop 24 h NGAL/Cr levels were statistically significant, higher than its preop levels (p = 0.013). According to the comparison of preop and postop levels, an increase in LFABP/Cr values secondary to surgical intervention was observed without any statistically significant difference. Besides the LFABP/Cr levels do not change after percutaneous kidney surgery, KIM-1/Cr, NAG/Cr, and NGAL/Cr levels increase postop period, especially at 24 h. Further studies with a larger series and repeated measurements should be performed to clarify if they can be used to demonstrate renal damage after percutaneous surgery or not. PMID:26481764

  20. Acute kidney injury after pediatric cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sarvesh Pal

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is a common complication after pediatric cardiac surgery. The definition, staging, risk factors, biomarkers and management of acute kidney injury in children is detailed in the following review article. PMID:27052074

  1. Acute Kidney Injury in Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Karvellas, Constantine J; Durand, Francois; Nadim, Mitra K

    2015-10-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent complication of end-stage liver disease, especially in those with acute-on-chronic liver failure, occurring in up to 50% of hospitalized patients with cirrhosis. There is no specific blood or urine biomarker that can reliably identify the cause of AKI in cirrhotic patients. This review examines studies used to assess renal dysfunction in cirrhotic patients including new diagnostic criteria and potential novel biomarkers. Although biomarker development to differentiate the cause of AKI in cirrhosis has promise, the utility of biomarkers to determine irreversible renal dysfunction with liver transplant remains lacking, warranting further investigation. PMID:26410141

  2. Cardiac Surgery-Associated Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Huijuan; Katz, Nevin; Ariyanon, Wassawon; Blanca-Martos, Lourdes; Adýbelli, Zelal; Giuliani, Anna; Danesi, Tommaso Hinna; Kim, Jeong Chul; Nayak, Akash; Neri, Mauro; Virzi, Grazia Maria; Brocca, Alessandra; Scalzotto, Elisa; Salvador, Loris; Ronco, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury (CSA-AKI) is a common and serious postoperative complication of cardiac surgery requiring cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), and it is the second most common cause of AKI in the intensive care unit. Although the complication has been associated with the use of CPB, the etiology is likely multifactorial and related to intraoperative and early postoperative management including pharmacologic therapy. To date, very little evidence from randomized trials supporting specific interventions to protect from or prevent AKI in broad cardiac surgery populations has been found. The definition of AKI employed by investigators influences not only the incidence of CSA-AKI, but also the identification of risk variables. The advent of novel biomarkers of kidney injury has the potential to facilitate the subclinical diagnosis of CSA-AKI, the assessment of its severity and prognosis, and the early institution of interventions to prevent or reduce kidney damage. Further studies are needed to determine how to optimize cardiac surgical procedures, CPB parameters, and intraoperative and early postoperative blood pressure and renal blood flow to reduce the risk of CSA-AKI. No pharmacologic strategy has demonstrated clear efficacy in the prevention of CSA-AKI; however, some agents, such as the natriuretic peptide nesiritide and the dopamine agonist fenoldopam, have shown promising results in renoprotection. It remains unclear whether CSA-AKI patients can benefit from the early institution of such pharmacologic agents or the early initiation of renal replacement therapy. PMID:24454314

  3. Cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Mao, Huijuan; Katz, Nevin; Ariyanon, Wassawon; Blanca-Martos, Lourdes; Adýbelli, Zelal; Giuliani, Anna; Danesi, Tommaso Hinna; Kim, Jeong Chul; Nayak, Akash; Neri, Mauro; Virzi, Grazia Maria; Brocca, Alessandra; Scalzotto, Elisa; Salvador, Loris; Ronco, Claudio

    2013-10-01

    Cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury (CSA-AKI) is a common and serious postoperative complication of cardiac surgery requiring cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), and it is the second most common cause of AKI in the intensive care unit. Although the complication has been associated with the use of CPB, the etiology is likely multifactorial and related to intraoperative and early postoperative management including pharmacologic therapy. To date, very little evidence from randomized trials supporting specific interventions to protect from or prevent AKI in broad cardiac surgery populations has been found. The definition of AKI employed by investigators influences not only the incidence of CSA-AKI, but also the identification of risk variables. The advent of novel biomarkers of kidney injury has the potential to facilitate the subclinical diagnosis of CSA-AKI, the assessment of its severity and prognosis, and the early institution of interventions to prevent or reduce kidney damage. Further studies are needed to determine how to optimize cardiac surgical procedures, CPB parameters, and intraoperative and early postoperative blood pressure and renal blood flow to reduce the risk of CSA-AKI. No pharmacologic strategy has demonstrated clear efficacy in the prevention of CSA-AKI; however, some agents, such as the natriuretic peptide nesiritide and the dopamine agonist fenoldopam, have shown promising results in renoprotection. It remains unclear whether CSA-AKI patients can benefit from the early institution of such pharmacologic agents or the early initiation of renal replacement therapy. PMID:24454314

  4. Targeting Iron Homeostasis in Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Walker, Vyvyca J; Agarwal, Anupam

    2016-01-01

    Iron is an essential metal involved in several major cellular processes required to maintain life. Because of iron's ability to cause oxidative damage, its transport, metabolism, and storage is strictly controlled in the body, especially in the small intestine, liver, and kidney. Iron plays a major role in acute kidney injury and has been a target for therapeutic intervention. However, the therapies that have been effective in animal models of acute kidney injury have not been successful in human beings. Targeting iron trafficking via ferritin, ferroportin, or hepcidin may offer new insights. This review focuses on the biology of iron, particularly in the kidney, and its implications in acute kidney injury. PMID:27085736

  5. Epigenetics in acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jinhua; Zhuang, Shougang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Recent advances in epigenetics indicate the involvement of several epigenetic modifications in the pathogenesis of acute kidney injury (AKI). The purpose of this review is to summarize our understanding of recent advances in epigenetic regulation of AKI and provide mechanistic insight into the role of acetylation, methylation, and microRNA expression in the pathological processes of AKI. Recent findings Enhancement of protein acetylation by pharmacological inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACs) leads to more severe tubular injury and impairment of renal structural and functional recovery. The changes in promoter DNA methylation occur in the kidney with ischemia/reperfusion. microRNA expression is associated with regulation of both renal injury and regeneration after AKI. Summary Recent studies on epigenetic regulation indicate that acetylation, methylation, and microRNA expression are critically implicated in the pathogenesis of AKI. Strategies targeting epigenetic processes may hold a therapeutic potential for patients with AKI. PMID:26050122

  6. Exenatide induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Aijazi, Ishma; Abdulla, Fadhil M; Zuberi, Beyla J; Elhassan, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Exenatide is an incretin mimetic. It was approved by the federal drug authority in 2005 for the treatment of type-2 diabetes. Since it is a relatively new medicine clinicians have limited experience with regards to its side effects and safety profile. We report a 47 year old lady who presented with exenatide associated acute kidney injury. She had type-2 diabetes for 10 years with mild micro albuminuria and normal renal functions. She was also taking a stable dose of metformin, gliclazide, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor and diuretic for over a year and there was no history of any recent use of non-steroid anti-inflammatory medications. One week after starting exenatide, she developed severe vomiting, followed by hypotension. She presented with acute renal insufficiency and severe lactic acidosis and had to be dialyzed on emergency basis. To our knowledge this is probably the first case reported in the local United Arab Emirate (U.A.E) population. PMID:25672206

  7. Nephrology Update: Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Sarabu, Nagaraju; Rahman, Mahboob

    2016-05-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) refers to any acute decrease in glomerular filtration rate, regardless of etiology. Staging of AKI has been recommended to stratify AKI patients according to severity of the condition, based on serum creatinine level and urine output. Classification of AKI into prerenal, intrinsic renal, and postrenal etiologies is helpful in differential diagnosis and management. AKI in hospitalized patients typically occurs due to decreased renal perfusion. Drug-induced, contrast-associated, postoperative, and sepsis-associated AKI also can occur. Clinical assessment of a patient with AKI involves a medical record review, thorough history and physical examination, urinary and blood tests, renal imaging, and, in some instances, renal biopsy. Contrast-induced nephropathy is a common iatrogenic etiology of AKI associated with administration of intravenous iodinated contrast media. Measures to prevent AKI should be taken before administration of intravenous iodinated contrast. AKI can result in many short- and long-term complications, including chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. Appropriate treatment of AKI patients involves management of the underlying etiology, when possible, and use of nondialytic and dialytic therapies. PMID:27163760

  8. The cell cycle and acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Price, Peter M.; Safirstein, Robert L.; Megyesi, Judit

    2009-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) activates pathways of cell death and cell proliferation. Although seemingly discrete and unrelated mechanisms, these pathways can now be shown to be connected and even to be controlled by similar pathways. The dependence of the severity of renal-cell injury on cell cycle pathways can be used to control and perhaps to prevent acute kidney injury. This review is written to address the correlation between cellular life and death in kidney tubules, especially in acute kidney injury. PMID:19536080

  9. Kidney Disease: Early Detection and Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Kidney Disease: Early Detection and Treatment Past Issues / Winter ... called a "urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio." Treating Kidney Disease Kidney disease is usually a progressive disease, ...

  10. Kidney Disease: Early Detection and Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Kidney Disease: Early Detection and Treatment Past Issues / Winter 2008 ... called a "urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio." Treating Kidney Disease Kidney disease is usually a progressive disease, which ...

  11. Pathophysiology of Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Basile, David P.; Anderson, Melissa D.; Sutton, Timothy A.

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is the leading cause of nephrology consultation and is associated with high mortality rates. The primary causes of AKI include ischemia, hypoxia or nephrotoxicity. An underlying feature is a rapid decline in GFR usually associated with decreases in renal blood flow. Inflammation represents an important additional component of AKI leading to the extension phase of injury, which may be associated with insensitivity to vasodilator therapy. It is suggested that targeting the extension phase represents an area potential of treatment with the greatest possible impact. The underlying basis of renal injury appears to be impaired energetics of the highly metabolically active nephron segments (i.e., proximal tubules and thick ascending limb) in the renal outer medulla, which can trigger conversion from transient hypoxia to intrinsic renal failure. Injury to kidney cells can be lethal or sublethal. Sublethal injury represents an important component in AKI, as it may profoundly influence GFR and renal blood flow. The nature of the recovery response is mediated by the degree to which sublethal cells can restore normal function and promote regeneration. The successful recovery from AKI depends on the degree to which these repair processes ensue and these may be compromised in elderly or CKD patients. Recent data suggest that AKI represents a potential link to CKD in surviving patients. Finally, earlier diagnosis of AKI represents an important area in treating patients with AKI that has spawned increased awareness of the potential that biomarkers of AKI may play in the future. PMID:23798302

  12. Role of Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin in the Diagnosis and Early Treatment of Acute Kidney Injury in a Case Series of Patients with Acute Decompensated Heart Failure: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Fogolari, Marta; Morolla, Davide; Capone, Federico; Costantino, Sebastiano; Spoto, Silvia; De Cesaris, Marina; Lo Presti, Alessandra; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Dicuonzo, Giordano

    2016-01-01

    Patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) frequently develop worsening in renal function until Acute Kidney Injury (AKI). The use of kidney injury biomarkers could be useful in the early diagnosis of AKI. In the present study, the role of the neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), compared to the standard creatinine, in ADHF patients, was analyzed to evaluate if an early treatment could affect the outcome. A case series of 24 ADHF patients was enrolled and patients randomly divided in two groups (Group A and Group B). In Group A, NGAL, creatinine, and eGFR were measured, while in Group B, creatinine and eGFR alone were measured. NGAL was measured by turbidimetric immunoassay and creatinine using an enzymatic spectrophotometric method. In presence of AKI, creatinine increase and eGFR decrease were significantly lower in Group A than in Group B, whereas in absence of AKI the difference between the two groups was not significant. Hospitalization stay was significantly lower in Group A (receiving early treatment based on NGAL) than in Group B. In ADHF patients, plasma NGAL in combination with creatinine was superior to the standard creatinine in the diagnosis and early treatment of AKI with a better outcome and a decreased hospital stay. PMID:27022499

  13. Ischemic Acute Kidney Injury Perturbs Homeostasis of Serine Enantiomers in the Body Fluid in Mice: Early Detection of Renal Dysfunction Using the Ratio of Serine Enantiomers

    PubMed Central

    Sasabe, Jumpei; Suzuki, Masataka; Miyoshi, Yurika; Tojo, Yosuke; Okamura, Chieko; Ito, Sonomi; Konno, Ryuichi; Mita, Masashi; Hamase, Kenji; Aiso, Sadakazu

    2014-01-01

    The imbalance of blood and urine amino acids in renal failure has been studied mostly without chiral separation. Although a few reports have shown the presence of D-serine, an enantiomer of L-serine, in the serum of patients with severe renal failure, it has remained uncertain how serine enantiomers are deranged in the development of renal failure. In the present study, we have monitored serine enantiomers using a two-dimensional HPLC system in the serum and urine of mice after renal ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI), known as a mouse model of acute kidney injury. In the serum, the level of D-serine gradually increased after renal IRI in parallel with that of creatinine, whereas the L-serine level decreased sharply in the early phase after IRI. The increase of D-serine was suppressed in part by genetic inactivation of a D-serine-degrading enzyme, D-amino acid oxidase (DAO), but not by disruption of its synthetic enzyme, serine racemase, in mice. Renal DAO activity was detected exclusively in proximal tubules, and IRI reduced the number of DAO-positive tubules. On the other hand, in the urine, D-serine was excreted at a rate nearly triple that of L-serine in mice with sham operations, indicating that little D-serine was reabsorbed while most L-serine was reabsorbed in physiological conditions. IRI significantly reduced the ratio of urinary D−/L-serine from 2.82±0.18 to 1.10±0.26 in the early phase and kept the ratio lower than 0.5 thereafter. The urinary D−/L-serine ratio can detect renal ischemia earlier than kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) or neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) in the urine, and more sensitively than creatinine, cystatin C, or the ratio of D−/L-serine in the serum. Our findings provide a novel understanding of the imbalance of amino acids in renal failure and offer a potential new biomarker for an early detection of acute kidney injury. PMID:24489731

  14. Use of surface-enhanced Raman scattering as a prognostic indicator of acute kidney transplant rejection

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Jingmao; Zaw, Thet; Cardona, Iliana; Hosnain, Mujtaba; Garg, Neha; Lefkowitz, Heather R.; Tolias, Peter; Du, Henry

    2015-01-01

    We report an early, noninvasive and rapid prognostic method of predicting potential acute kidney dysfunction using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Our analysis was performed on urine samples collected prospectively from 58 kidney transplant patients using a He-Ne laser (632.8 nm) as the excitation source. All abnormal kidney function episodes (three acute rejections and two acute kidney failures that were eventually diagnosed independently by clinical biopsy) consistently exhibited unique SERS spectral features in just one day following the transplant surgery. These results suggested that SERS analysis provides an early and more specific indication to kidney function than the clinically used biomarker, serum creatinine (sCr). PMID:25798301

  15. Sepsis-Associated Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Alobaidi, Rashid; Basu, Rajit K.; Goldstein, Stuart L.; Bagshaw, Sean M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an epidemic problem. Sepsis has long been recognized as a foremost precipitant of AKI. Sepsis-associated AKI (SA-AKI) portends a high burden of morbidity and mortality in both children and adults with critical illness. Although our understanding of its pathophysiology is incomplete, SA-AKI likely represents a distinct subset of AKI contributed to by a unique constellation of hemodynamic, inflammatory, and immune mechanisms. SA-AKI poses significant clinical challenges for clinicians. To date, no singular effective therapy has been developed to alter the natural history of SA-AKI. Rather, current strategies to alleviate poor outcomes focus on clinical risk identification, early detection of injury, modifying clinician behavior to avoid harm, early appropriate antimicrobial therapy, and surveillance among survivors for the longer-term sequelae of kidney damage. Recent evidence has confirmed that patients no longer die with AKI, but from AKI. To improve the care and outcomes for sufferers of SA-AKI, clinicians need a robust appreciation for its epidemiology and current best-evidence strategies for prevention and treatment. PMID:25795495

  16. Acute Kidney Injury is More Common in Acute Haemorrhagic Stroke in Mymensingh Medical College Hospital.

    PubMed

    Ray, N C; Chowdhury, M A; Sarkar, S R

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication after acute stroke and is an independent predictor of both early and long-term mortality after acute stroke. Acute kidney injury is associated with increased mortality in haemorrhagic stroke patients. This cross sectional observational study was conducted in Nephrology, Neuromedicine and Medicine department of Mymensingh Medical College & Hospital, Mymensingh from July 2012 to June 2014. A total of 240 patients with newly detected acute stroke confirmed by CT scan of brain were included in this study. According to this study, 15.42% of acute stroke patients developed AKI. Among the patients with haemorrhagic stroke 21.87% developed AKI while only 13.07% patients with ischaemic stroke developed AKI. So, early diagnosis and management of AKI in patients with acute stroke especially in haemorrhagic stroke is very important to reduce the morbidity and mortality of these patients. PMID:26931240

  17. Blocking TGF-β Signaling Pathway Preserves Mitochondrial Proteostasis and Reduces Early Activation of PDGFRβ+ Pericytes in Aristolochic Acid Induced Acute Kidney Injury in Wistar Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pozdzik, Agnieszka A.; Giordano, Laetitia; Li, Gang; Antoine, Marie-Hélène; Quellard, Nathalie; Godet, Julie; De Prez, Eric; Husson, Cécile; Declèves, Anne-Emilie; Arlt, Volker M.; Goujon, Jean-Michel; Brochériou-Spelle, Isabelle; Ledbetter, Steven R.; Caron, Nathalie; Nortier, Joëlle L.

    2016-01-01

    Background The platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ)+ perivascular cell activation becomes increasingly recognized as a main source of scar-associated kidney myofibroblasts and recently emerged as a new cellular therapeutic target. Aims In this regard, we first confirmed the presence of PDGFRβ+ perivascular cells in a human case of end-stage aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN) and thereafter we focused on the early fibrosis events of transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) inhibition in a rat model of AAN. Materials and Methods Neutralizing anti-TGFβ antibody (1D11) and its control isotype (13C4) were administered (5 mg/kg, i.p.) at Days -1, 0, 2 and 4; AA (15 mg/kg, sc) was injected daily. Results At Day 5, 1D11 significantly suppressed p-Smad2/3 signaling pathway improving renal function impairment, reduced the score of acute tubular necrosis, peritubular capillaritis, interstitial inflammation and neoangiogenesis. 1D11 markedly decreased interstitial edema, disruption of tubular basement membrane loss of brush border, cytoplasmic edema and organelle ultrastructure alterations (mitochondrial disruption and endoplasmic reticulum edema) in proximal tubular epithelial cells. Moreover, 1D11 significantly inhibited p-PERK activation and attenuated dysregulation of unfolded protein response (UPR) pathways, endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial proteostasis in vivo and in vitro. Conclusions The early inhibition of p-Smad2/3 signaling pathway improved acute renal function impairment, partially prevented epithelial-endothelial axis activation by maintaining PTEC proteostasis and reduced early PDGFRβ+ pericytes-derived myofibroblasts accumulation. PMID:27379382

  18. Wasp sting-induced acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Dhanapriya, Jeyachandran; Dineshkumar, Thanigachalam; Sakthirajan, Ramanathan; Shankar, Palaniselvam; Gopalakrishnan, Natarajan; Balasubramaniyan, Thoppalan

    2016-01-01

    Background Wasp stings are a common form of envenomation in tropical countries, especially in farmers. The aim of this study was to document the clinical presentation, treatment and outcomes of patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) due to multiple wasp stings in a tertiary care hospital. Methods We conducted a retrospective observational study of patients with multiple wasp stings and AKI at the Department of Nephrology between July 2011 and August 2015. The clinical features, laboratory data, treatment details and outcomes were noted. Results A total of 11 patients were included. All were from rural areas. All of them were males with age ranging from 21 to 70 years, mean age 45 ± 23 years. Six had oliguria and two had hypotension. All 11 patients had evidence of rhabdomyolysis and three also had hemolysis. Ten patients required hemodialysis with a mean number of hemodialysis sessions of 8.7 ± 2.8. Renal biopsy carried out on four patients, showed acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) in one patient, acute tubular necrosis (ATN) in two patients, and one patient had both AIN and ATN. The two patients with AIN were given steroids, while all other patients were managed with supportive measures. One patient died within 48 h of presentation due to shock. At a mean follow-up of 24 months, one had progressed to chronic kidney disease and the remaining nine had normal renal function. Conclusions Wasp sting is an occupational hazard. AKI was most commonly due to rhabdomyolysis. Early renal biopsy is indicated in those patients who do not respond to supportive measures. Timely dialysis and steroid in the case of AIN improves renal survival. PMID:26985369

  19. Acute kidney injury due to rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Lima, Rafael Siqueira Athayde; da Silva Junior, Geraldo Bezerra; Liborio, Alexandre Braga; Daher, Elizabeth De Francesco

    2008-09-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a clinical and biochemical syndrome that occurs when skeletal muscle cells disrupt and release creatine phosphokinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and myoglobin into the interstitial space and plasma. The main causes of rhabdomyolysis include direct muscular injury, strenuous exercise, drugs, toxins, infections, hyperthermia, seizures, meta-bolic and/or electrolyte abnormalities, and endocrinopathies. Acute kidney injury (AKI) occurs in 33-50% of patients with rhabdomyolysis. The main pathophysiological mechanisms of renal injury are renal vasoconstriction, intraluminal cast formation, and direct myoglobin toxicity. Rhabdo-myolysis can be asymptomatic, present with mild symptoms such as elevation of muscular en-zymes, or manifest as a severe syndrome with AKI and high mortality. Serum CK five times higher than the normal value usually confirms rhabdomyolysis. Early diagnosis and saline volume expansion may reduce the risk of AKI. Further studies are necessary to establish the importance of bicarbonate and mannitol in the prevention of AKI due to rhabdomyolysis. PMID:18711286

  20. [Perioperative acute kidney injury and failure].

    PubMed

    Chhor, Vibol; Journois, Didier

    2014-04-01

    Perioperative period is very likely to lead to acute renal failure because of anesthesia (general or perimedullary) and/or surgery which can cause acute kidney injury. Characterization of acute renal failure is based on serum creatinine level which is imprecise during and following surgery. Studies are based on various definitions of acute renal failure with different thresholds which skewed their comparisons. The RIFLE classification (risk, injury, failure, loss, end stage kidney disease) allows clinicians to distinguish in a similar manner between different stages of acute kidney injury rather than using a unique definition of acute renal failure. Acute renal failure during the perioperative period can mainly be explained by iatrogenic, hemodynamic or surgical causes and can result in an increased morbi-mortality. Prevention of this complication requires hemodynamic optimization (venous return, cardiac output, vascular resistance), discontinuation of nephrotoxic drugs but also knowledge of the different steps of the surgery to avoid further degradation of renal perfusion. Diuretics do not prevent acute renal failure and may even push it forward especially during the perioperative period when venous retourn is already reduced. Edema or weight gain following surgery are not correlated with the vascular compartment volume, much less with renal perfusion. Treatment of perioperative acute renal failure is similar to other acute renal failure. Renal replacement therapy must be mastered to prevent any additional risk of hemodynamic instability or hydro-electrolytic imbalance. PMID:24656890

  1. A comparison of early versus late initiation of renal replacement therapy in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Our aim was to investigate the impact of early versus late initiation of renal replacement therapy (RRT) on clinical outcomes in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury (AKI). Methods Systematic review and meta-analysis were used in this study. PUBMED, EMBASE, SCOPUS, Web of Science and Cochrane Central Registry of Controlled Clinical Trials, and other sources were searched in July 2010. Eligible studies selected were cohort and randomised trials that assessed timing of initiation of RRT in critically ill adults with AKI. Results We identified 15 unique studies (2 randomised, 4 prospective cohort, 9 retrospective cohort) out of 1,494 citations. The overall methodological quality was low. Early, compared with late therapy, was associated with a significant improvement in 28-day mortality (odds ratio (OR) 0.45; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.28 to 0.72). There was significant heterogeneity among the 15 pooled studies (I2 = 78%). In subgroup analyses, stratifying by patient population (surgical, n = 8 vs. mixed, n = 7) or study design (prospective, n = 10 vs. retrospective, n = 5), there was no impact on the overall summary estimate for mortality. Meta-regression controlling for illness severity (Acute Physiology And Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II)), baseline creatinine and urea did not impact the overall summary estimate for mortality. Of studies reporting secondary outcomes, five studies (out of seven) reported greater renal recovery, seven (out of eight) studies showed decreased duration of RRT and five (out of six) studies showed decreased ICU length of stay in the early, compared with late, RRT group. Early RRT did not; however, significantly affect the odds of dialysis dependence beyond hospitalization (OR 0.62 0.34 to 1.13, I2 = 69.6%). Conclusions Earlier institution of RRT in critically ill patients with AKI may have a beneficial impact on survival. However, this conclusion is based on heterogeneous studies of variable quality

  2. Computerized clinical decision support for the early recognition and management of acute kidney injury: a qualitative evaluation of end-user experience

    PubMed Central

    Kanagasundaram, Nigel S.; Bevan, Mark T.; Sims, Andrew J.; Heed, Andrew; Price, David A.; Sheerin, Neil S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although the efficacy of computerized clinical decision support (CCDS) for acute kidney injury (AKI) remains unclear, the wider literature includes examples of limited acceptability and equivocal benefit. Our single-centre study aimed to identify factors promoting or inhibiting use of in-patient AKI CCDS. Methods Targeting medical users, CCDS triggered with a serum creatinine rise of ≥25 μmol/L/day and linked to guidance and test ordering. User experience was evaluated through retrospective interviews, conducted and analysed according to Normalization Process Theory. Initial pilot ward experience allowed tool refinement. Assessments continued following CCDS activation across all adult, non-critical care wards. Results Thematic saturation was achieved with 24 interviews. The alert was accepted as a potentially useful prompt to early clinical re-assessment by many trainees. Senior staff were more sceptical, tending to view it as a hindrance. ‘Pop-ups’ and mandated engagement before alert dismissal were universally unpopular due to workflow disruption. Users were driven to close out of the alert as soon as possible to review historical creatinines and to continue with the intended workflow. Conclusions Our study revealed themes similar to those previously described in non-AKI settings. Systems intruding on workflow, particularly involving complex interactions, may be unsustainable even if there has been a positive impact on care. The optimal balance between intrusion and clinical benefit of AKI CCDS requires further evaluation. PMID:26798462

  3. Umbilical Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin Level as an Early Predictor of Acute Kidney Injury in Neonates with Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Walencka, Zofia; Więcek, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a primarily described complication after unbalanced systemic perfusion in neonates with congenital heart defects, including hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS). The aim of the study was to compare the umbilical NGAL concentrations between neonates born with HLHS and healthy infants, as well as to analyze whether the determination of NGAL level could predict AKI in neonates with prenatally diagnosed HLHS. Twenty-one neonates with prenatally diagnosed HLHS were enrolled as study group and 30 healthy neonates served as controls. Perinatal characteristics and postnatal parameters were extracted from the hospital neonatal database. In umbilical cord blood, we determined plasma NGAL concentrations, acid base balance, and lactate and creatinine levels. In neonates with HLHS, complications (respiratory insufficiency, circulatory failure, NEC, IVH, and AKI) were recorded until the day of cardiosurgery. We observed in neonates with HLHS higher umbilical NGAL levels compared to controls. Among 8 neonates with HLHS and diagnosed AKI stage 1, we observed elevated NGAL levels in comparison to those newborns without AKI. Umbilical NGAL could predict, with high sensitivity and specificity, AKI development in study neonates. We suggest that the umbilical blood NGAL concentration may be an early marker to predict AKI in neonates with HLHS. PMID:25699275

  4. Umbilical neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin level as an early predictor of acute kidney injury in neonates with hypoplastic left heart syndrome.

    PubMed

    Surmiak, Piotr; Baumert, Małgorzata; Fiala, Małgorzata; Walencka, Zofia; Więcek, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a primarily described complication after unbalanced systemic perfusion in neonates with congenital heart defects, including hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS). The aim of the study was to compare the umbilical NGAL concentrations between neonates born with HLHS and healthy infants, as well as to analyze whether the determination of NGAL level could predict AKI in neonates with prenatally diagnosed HLHS. Twenty-one neonates with prenatally diagnosed HLHS were enrolled as study group and 30 healthy neonates served as controls. Perinatal characteristics and postnatal parameters were extracted from the hospital neonatal database. In umbilical cord blood, we determined plasma NGAL concentrations, acid base balance, and lactate and creatinine levels. In neonates with HLHS, complications (respiratory insufficiency, circulatory failure, NEC, IVH, and AKI) were recorded until the day of cardiosurgery. We observed in neonates with HLHS higher umbilical NGAL levels compared to controls. Among 8 neonates with HLHS and diagnosed AKI stage 1, we observed elevated NGAL levels in comparison to those newborns without AKI. Umbilical NGAL could predict, with high sensitivity and specificity, AKI development in study neonates. We suggest that the umbilical blood NGAL concentration may be an early marker to predict AKI in neonates with HLHS. PMID:25699275

  5. Acute Kidney Injury Associated with Linagliptin.

    PubMed

    Nandikanti, Deepak K; Gosmanova, Elvira O; Gosmanov, Aidar R

    2016-01-01

    Linagliptin is a dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) inhibitor that is approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. About 5% of linagliptin is eliminated by the kidneys and no dose adjustment is recommended in kidney impairment. We report a first case of linagliptin-associated acute kidney injury (AKI) in a patient with preexisting chronic kidney disease (CKD). We hypothesize that AKI was due to renal hypoperfusion from linagliptin-induced natriuresis and intravascular volume contraction in the setting of concomitant lisinopril use, which is known to impair autoregulation and potentiate hypotension-induced AKI. It may be prudent to exert caution and closely monitor kidney function when initiating linagliptin in combination with ACE-inhibitors in CKD patients. PMID:26981294

  6. Acute Kidney Injury Associated with Linagliptin

    PubMed Central

    Nandikanti, Deepak K.; Gosmanova, Elvira O.; Gosmanov, Aidar R.

    2016-01-01

    Linagliptin is a dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) inhibitor that is approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. About 5% of linagliptin is eliminated by the kidneys and no dose adjustment is recommended in kidney impairment. We report a first case of linagliptin-associated acute kidney injury (AKI) in a patient with preexisting chronic kidney disease (CKD). We hypothesize that AKI was due to renal hypoperfusion from linagliptin-induced natriuresis and intravascular volume contraction in the setting of concomitant lisinopril use, which is known to impair autoregulation and potentiate hypotension-induced AKI. It may be prudent to exert caution and closely monitor kidney function when initiating linagliptin in combination with ACE-inhibitors in CKD patients. PMID:26981294

  7. CAPing inflammation and acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Rosin, Diane L; Okusa, Mark D

    2016-09-01

    The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway has been shown to modulate inflammation in disease models such as rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. A recent study demonstrated a protective effect of vagus nerve stimulation with activation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway in the ischemia reperfusion model of acute kidney injury. PMID:27521104

  8. Microcirculation in Acute and Chronic Kidney Diseases.

    PubMed

    Zafrani, Lara; Ince, Can

    2015-12-01

    The renal microvasculature is emerging as a key player in acute and chronic kidney diseases. Renal microvascular disease involves alterations in endothelial barrier permeability, exaggerated inflammation, impairment of endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation involving the nitric oxide system, increased oxidative stress, and loss of angiogenic factors. Moreover, evidence suggests that there is a microvascular component to the pathogenesis of renal scarring. New technology is being developed to explore renal microcirculation in vivo in experimental models and humans. This technology will provide a better understanding of the pathogenesis of kidney diseases and will help guide specific therapeutic strategies aimed at restoring the renal microcirculation. This article reviews the cellular and molecular mechanisms of renal microvascular dysfunction in acute and chronic kidney diseases and the potential diagnostic and therapeutic implications of these findings. Recent developments in the monitoring of renal microcirculation are described with respect to their advantages and limitations, and future directions are outlined. PMID:26231789

  9. Pre-Transplant Donor-Specific T-Cell Alloreactivity Is Strongly Associated with Early Acute Cellular Rejection in Kidney Transplant Recipients Not Receiving T-Cell Depleting Induction Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Crespo, Elena; Lucia, Marc; Cruzado, Josep M.; Luque, Sergio; Melilli, Edoardo; Manonelles, Anna; Lloberas, Nuria; Torras, Joan; Grinyó, Josep M.; Bestard, Oriol

    2015-01-01

    Preformed T-cell immune-sensitization should most likely impact allograft outcome during the initial period after kidney transplantation, since donor-specific memory T-cells may rapidly recognize alloantigens and activate the effector immune response, which leads to allograft rejection. However, the precise time-frame in which acute rejection is fundamentally triggered by preformed donor-specific memory T cells rather than by de novo activated naïve T cells is still to be established. Here, preformed donor-specific alloreactive T-cell responses were evaluated using the IFN-γ ELISPOT assay in a large consecutive cohort of kidney transplant patients (n = 90), to assess the main clinical variables associated with cellular sensitization and its predominant time-frame impact on allograft outcome, and was further validated in an independent new set of kidney transplant recipients (n = 67). We found that most highly T-cell sensitized patients were elderly patients with particularly poor HLA class-I matching, without any clinically recognizable sensitizing events. While one-year incidence of all types of biopsy-proven acute rejection did not differ between T-cell alloreactive and non-alloreactive patients, Receiver Operating Characteristic curve analysis indicated the first two months after transplantation as the highest risk time period for acute cellular rejection associated with baseline T-cell sensitization. This effect was particularly evident in young and highly alloreactive individuals that did not receive T-cell depletion immunosuppression. Multivariate analysis confirmed preformed T-cell sensitization as an independent predictor of early acute cellular rejection. In summary, monitoring anti-donor T-cell sensitization before transplantation may help to identify patients at increased risk of acute cellular rejection, particularly in the early phases after kidney transplantation, and thus guide decision-making regarding the use of induction therapy. PMID:25689405

  10. Pathophysiology and Clinical Work-Up of Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Nalesso, Federico; Petrucci, Ilaria; Samoni, Sara; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI), also known in the past as acute renal failure, is a syndrome characterized by the rapid loss of kidney excretory function. It is usually diagnosed by the accumulation of end products of nitrogen metabolism (urea and creatinine) or decreased urine output or both. AKI is the clinical consequence of several disorders that acutely affect the kidney, causing electrolytes and acid-base imbalance, hyperhydration and loss of depurative function. AKI is common in critical care patients in whom it is often secondary to extrarenal events. No specific therapies can attenuate AKI or accelerate renal function recovery; thus, the only treatment is supportive. New diagnostic techniques such as renal biomarkers might improve early diagnosis. Also ultrasonography helps nephrologists in AKI diagnosis, in order to describe and follow kidney alterations and find possible causes of AKI. Renal replacement therapy is a life-saving treatment if AKI is severe. If patients survive to AKI, and did not have previous chronic kidney disease (CKD), they typically recover to dialysis independence. However, evidence suggests that patients who have had AKI are at increased risk of subsequent CKD. PMID:27169469

  11. A SCUBA diver with acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Patrick James; Kelly, Yvelynne; Ni Sheaghdha, Eadaoin; Lappin, David

    2015-01-01

    An otherwise healthy young man was transferred to our hospital after a diving incident. He had made an uncontrolled ascent from 10 m. On arrival he appeared well. No hypotensive episodes occurred during the transfer. He denied having arthralgias, back pain, dyspnoea or neurological symptoms. Laboratory investigations revealed acutely elevated creatinine (170 µmol/L) and creatine kinase (909 U/L). Radiology was consistent with a focus of pulmonary barotrauma and intrinsic renal disease. Creatine kinase is a marker of arterial gas embolism (AGE). We determined that our patient suffered acute kidney injury as a result of gas embolisation to his renal vasculature from an area of pulmonary barotrauma. Creatinine fell the following day in response to aggressive intravenous fluids. This is the first reported case of acute kidney injury secondary to AGE. Biochemical studies should be part of the routine assessment of patients involved in diving incidents. PMID:25948841

  12. Biomarkers of delayed graft function as a form of acute kidney injury in kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Malyszko, Jolanta; Lukaszyk, Ewelina; Glowinska, Irena; Durlik, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Renal transplantation ensures distinct advantages for patients with end-stage kidney disease. However, in some cases early complications can lead to allograft dysfunction and consequently graft loss. One of the most common early complications after kidney transplantation is delayed graft function (DGF). Unfortunately there is no effective treatment for DGF, however early diagnosis of DGF and therapeutic intervention (eg modification of immunosuppression) may improve outcome. Therefore, markers of acute kidney injury are required. Creatinine is a poor biomarker for kidney injury due principally to its inability to help diagnose early acute renal failure and complete inability to help differentiate among its various causes. Different urinary and serum proteins have been intensively investigated as possible biomarkers in this setting. There are promising candidate biomarkers with the ability to detect DGF. We focused on emerging biomarkers of DGF with NGAL is being the most studied followed by KIM-1, L-FABP, IL-18, and others. However, large randomized studies are needed to establish the value of new, promising biomarkers, in DGF diagnosis, prognosis and its cost-effectiveness. PMID:26175216

  13. Biomarkers of delayed graft function as a form of acute kidney injury in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Malyszko, Jolanta; Lukaszyk, Ewelina; Glowinska, Irena; Durlik, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Renal transplantation ensures distinct advantages for patients with end-stage kidney disease. However, in some cases early complications can lead to allograft dysfunction and consequently graft loss. One of the most common early complications after kidney transplantation is delayed graft function (DGF). Unfortunately there is no effective treatment for DGF, however early diagnosis of DGF and therapeutic intervention (eg modification of immunosuppression) may improve outcome. Therefore, markers of acute kidney injury are required. Creatinine is a poor biomarker for kidney injury due principally to its inability to help diagnose early acute renal failure and complete inability to help differentiate among its various causes. Different urinary and serum proteins have been intensively investigated as possible biomarkers in this setting. There are promising candidate biomarkers with the ability to detect DGF. We focused on emerging biomarkers of DGF with NGAL is being the most studied followed by KIM-1, L-FABP, IL-18, and others. However, large randomized studies are needed to establish the value of new, promising biomarkers, in DGF diagnosis, prognosis and its cost-effectiveness. PMID:26175216

  14. Acute Kidney Injury in the Surgical Patient.

    PubMed

    Hobson, Charles; Singhania, Girish; Bihorac, Azra

    2015-10-01

    Perioperative acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common, morbid, and costly surgical complication. Current efforts to understand and manage AKI in surgical patients focus on prevention, mitigation of further injury when AKI has occurred, treatment of associated conditions, and facilitation of renal recovery. Lesser severity AKI is now understood to be much more common, and more morbid, than was previously thought. The ability to detect AKI within hours of onset would be helpful in protecting the kidney and in preserving renal function, and several imaging and biomarker modalities are currently being evaluated. PMID:26410139

  15. Acute kidney injury: current concepts and new insights

    PubMed Central

    Koza, Yavuzer

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Acute kidney injury, which was previously named as acute renal failure, is a complex clinical disorder and continues to be associated with poor outcomes. It is frequently seen in hospitalized patients, especially in critically ill patients. The primary causes of acute kidney injury are divided into three categories: prerenal, intrinsic renal and postrenal. The definition and staging of acute kidney injury are mainly based on the risk, injury, failure, loss, end-stage kidney disease (RIFLE) criteria and the acute kidney injury network (AKIN) criteria, which have previously been defined. However the clinical utility of these criteria is still uncertain. Several biomarkers such as Cystatin C and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin have been suggested for the diagnosis, severity classification and most importantly, the modification of outcome in acute kidney injury. Methods: Current literature on the definition, biomarkers, management and epidemiology of acute kidney injury was reviewed by searching keywords in Medline and PubMed databases. Results: The epidemiology, pathophysiology and diagnosis of acute kidney injury were discussed. The clinical implications of novel biomarkers and management of acute kidney injury were also discussed. Conclusions: The current definitions of acute kidney injury are based on the RIFLE, AKIN and KDIGO criteria. Although these criteria have been widely validated, some of limitations are still remain. Since acute kidney injury is common and harmful, all preventive measures should be taken to avoid its occurrence. Currently, there is no a definitive role for novel biomarkers. PMID:26804946

  16. Immune Mechanisms and Novel Pharmacological Therapies of Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, Amandeep; Kinsey, Gilbert R.; Okusa, Mark D.

    2010-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is a major cause of acute kidney injury (AKI) and both innate and adaptive immunity contribute to the pathogenesis. Kidney resident cells promote inflammation after IRI by increasing endothelial cell adhesion molecule expression and vascular permeability. Kidney epithelial cells bind complement and express tolllike receptors and resident and infiltrating cells produce cytokines/chemokines. Early activation of kidney dendritic cells (DCs) initiates a cascade of events leading to accumulation of interferon-γ-producing neutrophils, infiltrating macrophages, CD4+ T cells, B cells and invariant natural killer T (NKT) cells. Recent studies from our laboratory now implicate the IL23/IL17 pathway in kidney IRI. Following the initial early phase of inflammation, the late phase involves infiltration of anti-inflammatory cells including regulatory T cells, alternatively activated macrophages and stem cells leading to attenuation of inflammation and initiation of repair. Based upon these immune mechanisms of injury, recent studies hold promise for novel drug therapies. These pharmacological agents have been shown to reduce inflammation or cytotoxicity in rodent models of AKI and some show early promise in clinical trials. This review summarizes recent advances to further our understanding of the immune mechanisms of AKI and potential pharmacological therapies. PMID:19715538

  17. Acute kidney injury: A rare cause.

    PubMed

    Mendonca, Satish; Barki, Satish; Mishra, Mayank; Kumar, R S V; Gupta, Devika; Gupta, Pooja

    2015-09-01

    We present a young lady who consumed hair dye, which contained paraphenylene diamine (PPD), as a means of deliberate self-harm. This resulted in severe angio-neurotic edema for which she had to be ventilated, and thereafter developed rhabdomyolysis leading to acute kidney injury (AKI). The unusual aspect was that the patient continued to have flaccid quadriparesis and inability to regain kidney function. Renal biopsy performed 10 weeks after the dye consumption revealed severe acute tubular necrosis with myoglobin pigment casts. This suggests that PPD has a long-term effect leading to ongoing myoglobinuria, causing flaccid paralysis to persist and preventing the recovery of AKI. In such instances, timely treatment to prevent AKI in the form alkalinization of urine should be initiated promptly. Secondly, because PPD is a nondialyzable toxin, and its long-term effect necessitates its speedy removal, hemoperfusion might be helpful and is worth considering. PMID:26354573

  18. Renal and urological diseases of the newborn neonatal acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Kirtida

    2014-01-01

    Survival of critically ill neonates in the intensive care unit has improved over the past decades reflecting improvements in obstetric, delivery room and neonatal intensive care, however, morbidity remains significant. Acute kidney injury is a common occurrence in these neonates and despite improved understanding of the pathophysiology and management of acute kidney injury in full term and preterm infants, the mortality remains as high as 61%. Furthermore, there is growing evidence that despite recovery from the acute injury, these infants are at risk for developing hypertension and chronic kidney disease later in life. Emphasis on improving our capability to detect renal insult and injury early, before renal failure occurs, and identification of novel therapeutic agents to prevent and treat acute kidney injury may impact mortality and morbidity. This review focuses on our current knowledge of acute kidney injury in the newborn, approaches to investigating and managing this complication and what future trends in this field may bring. PMID:25088261

  19. Dengue-associated acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, João Fernando Picollo; Burdmann, Emmanuel A.

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is presently the most relevant viral infection transmitted by a mosquito bite that represents a major threat to public health worldwide. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a serious and potentially lethal complication of this disease, and the actual incidence is unknown. In this review, we will assess the most relevant epidemiological and clinical data regarding dengue and the available evidence on the frequency, etiopathogenesis, outcomes and treatment of dengue-associated AKI. PMID:26613023

  20. Acute kidney injury caused by bothrops snake venom.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues Sgrignolli, Lívia; Florido Mendes, Glória Elisa; Carlos, Carla Patricia; Burdmann, Emmanuel A

    2011-01-01

    Medically important venomous snakes in Latin America belong to the genus Bothrops, Crotalus, Lachesis and Micrurus. The Bothrops genus is responsible for the majority of accidents. The WHO globally estimates 2,500,000 poisonous snakebites and 125,000 deaths annually. In its last report in 2001, the Brazilian Ministry of Health accounted 359 deaths due to snakebites, of which the Bothrops genus was responsible for 185. Snake venoms cause local and systemic damage, including acute kidney injury, which is the most important cause of death among patients surviving the early effects of envenoming by the Crotalus and Bothrops genuses. Venom-induced acute kidney injury is a frequent complication of Bothrops snakebite, carrying relevant morbidity and mortality. PMID:21757950

  1. Intestinal Microbiota-Kidney Cross Talk in Acute Kidney Injury and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Sanjeev; Martina-Lingua, Maria N.; Bandapalle, Samatha; Pluznick, Jennifer; Hamad, Abdel Rahim A.; Peterson, Daniel A.; Rabb, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    The pathophysiology of acute kidney injury (AKI) involves multiple and overlapping immunological, biochemical, and hemodynamic mechanisms that modulate the effects of both the initial insult and the subsequent repair. Limited but recent experimental data have revealed that the intestinal microbiota significantly affects outcomes in AKI. Additional evidence shows significant changes in the intestinal microbiota in chronic kidney disease patients and in experimental AKI. In this minireview, we discuss the current status of the effect of intestinal microbiota on kidney diseases, the immunomodulatory effects of intestinal microbiota, and the potential mechanisms by which microbiota can modify kidney diseases and vice versa. We also propose future studies to clarify the role of intestinal microbiota in kidney diseases and to explore how the modification of gut microbiota may be a potential therapeutic tool. PMID:25343838

  2. Acute and Chronic Allograft Dysfunction in Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Ryan J; Weng, Francis L; Kandula, Praveen

    2016-05-01

    Allograft dysfunction after a kidney transplant is often clinically asymptomatic and is usually detected as an increase in serum creatinine level with corresponding decrease in glomerular filtration rate. The diagnostic evaluation may include blood tests, urinalysis, transplant ultrasonography, radionuclide imaging, and allograft biopsy. Whether it occurs early or later after transplant, allograft dysfunction requires prompt evaluation to determine its cause and subsequent management. Acute rejection, medication toxicity from calcineurin inhibitors, and BK virus nephropathy can occur early or later. Other later causes include transplant glomerulopathy, recurrent glomerulonephritis, and renal artery stenosis. PMID:27095641

  3. Early Acute Antibody-Mediated Rejection of a Negative Flow Crossmatch 3rd Kidney Transplant with Exclusive Disparity at HLA-DP

    PubMed Central

    Mierzejewska, Beata; Schroder, Paul M.; Baum, Caitlin E.; Blair, Annette; Smith, Connie; Duquesnoy, Rene J.; Marrari, Marilyn; Gohara, Amira; Malhotra, Deepak; Kaw, Dinkar; Liwski, Robert; Rees, Michael A.; Stepkowski, Stanislaw

    2014-01-01

    Donor-specific alloantibodies (DSA) to HLA-DP may cause antibody-mediated rejection (AMR), especially in re-transplants. We describe the immunization history of a patient who received 3 kidney transplants; the 3rd kidney was completely matched except at DPA1 and DPB1. Prior to the 3rd transplant, single antigen bead analysis (SAB) showed DSA reactivity against DPA1 shared by the 1st and 3rd donors, but B and T flow crossmatch (FXM) results were negative. Within 11 days the 3rd transplant underwent acute C4d+ AMR which coincided with the presence of complement (C1q)-binding IgG1 DSA against donor DPA1 and DPB1. Using HLAMatchmaker and SAB, we provide evidence that eplet (epitope) spreading on DPA1 and eplet sharing on differing DPB1 alleles of the 1st and 3rd transplants was associated with AMR. Since weak DSA to DPA1/DPB1 may induce acute AMR with negative FXM, donor DPA1/DPB1 high resolution typing should be considered in sensitized patients with DP-directed DSA. PMID:24755353

  4. [Drug-induced acute kidney injury].

    PubMed

    Derungs, Adrian

    2015-12-01

    Due to their physiological function, the kidneys are exposed to high concentrations of numerous drugs and their metabolites, making them vulnerable to drug-related injuries. This article provides an overview of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in nephrotoxicity, the most common nephrotoxic drugs, and the risk factors for the occurrence of drug-induced acute kidney injuries. NSAIDs, diuretics, ACE inhibitors, and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs} are the most frequent prerenal causes of an acute elevation in creatinine levels. Primary vascular damage arises from thrombotic microangiopathy (e. g. due to cic/osporin, tacrolimus, muromonab-CD3, mitomycin C, quinine, ticlopidine, clopidogrel}. Anticoagulants and thrombolytic medications lead to secondary blood vessel damage by cholesterol emboli, embolism of thrombus material into the periphery or bleeding. Tubulopathies can be observed on treatment with ifosfamide and cisplatin (rarely with cyclophosphamide or carboplatin), aminoglycosides, vancomycin, and radiocontrast agents. Immunological mechanisms underlie interstitial nephritides, which are induced by drugs in about 85% of cases. In drug-induced glomerulopathies;- renal biopsy allows closer identification of the triggering medication. Drug-induced systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE} represents a special form of immune complex glomerulonephritis and can be triggered by procainamide, hydralazine, isoniazid, methyldopa, quinidine, chlorpromazine, and propylthiouracil. Crystal-induced kidney injury is caused by precipitation of drugs (e. g. aciclovir, sulfonamide antibiotics, methotrexate, indinavir) in the renal tubules and the urine-conducting organs with consecutive obstruction thereof. PMID:26654816

  5. Acute Kidney Injury in Patients with Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Russ, Kirk B.; Stevens, Todd M; Singal, Ashwani K.

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) occurs commonly in patients with advanced cirrhosis and negatively impacts pre- and post-transplant outcomes. Physiologic changes that occur in patients with decompensated cirrhosis with ascites, place these patients at high risk of AKI. The most common causes of AKI in cirrhosis include prerenal injury, acute tubular necrosis (ATN), and the hepatorenal syndrome (HRS), accounting for more than 80% of AKI in this population. Distinguishing between these causes is particularly important for prognostication and treatment. Treatment of Type 1 HRS with vasoconstrictors and albumin improves short term survival and renal function in some patients while awaiting liver transplantation. Patients with HRS who fail to respond to medical therapy or those with severe renal failure of other etiology may require renal replacement therapy. Simultaneous liver kidney transplant (SLK) is needed in many of these patients to improve their post-transplant outcomes. However, the criteria to select patients who would benefit from SLK transplantation are based on consensus and lack strong evidence to support them. In this regard, novel serum and/or urinary biomarkers such as neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, interleukins-6 and 18, kidney injury molecule-1, fatty acid binding protein, and endothelin-1 are emerging with a potential for accurately differentiating common causes of AKI. Prospective studies are needed on the use of these biomarkers to predict accurately renal function recovery after liver transplantation alone in order to optimize personalized use of SLK. PMID:26623266

  6. Clinical Scenarios in Acute Kidney Injury: Parenchymal Acute Kidney Injury-Tubulo-Interstitial Diseases.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Acute tubular necrosis (ATN) is the most common type of acute kidney injury (AKI) related to parenchymal damage (90% of cases). It may be due to a direct kidney injury, such as sepsis, drugs, toxins, contrast media, hemoglobinuria and myoglobinuria, or it may be the consequence of a prolonged systemic ischemic injury. Conventional ultrasound (US) shows enlarged kidneys with hypoechoic pyramids. Increased volume is largely sustained by the increase of anteroposterior diameter, while longitudinal axis usually maintains its normal length. Despite the role of color Doppler in AKI still being debated, many studies demonstrate that renal resistive indexes (RIs) vary on the basis of primary disease. Moreover, several studies assessed that higher RI values are predictive of persistent AKI. Nevertheless, due to the marked heterogeneity among the studies, further investigations focused on timing of RI measurement and test performances are needed. Acute interstitial nephritis is also a frequent cause of AKI, mainly due to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and antibiotics administration. The development of acute interstitial nephritis is due to an immunological reaction against nephritogenic exogenous antigens, processed by tubular cells. In acute interstitial nephritis, as well as in ATN, conventional US does not allow a definitive diagnosis. Kidneys appear enlarged and widely hyperechoic due to interstitial edema and inflammatory infiltration. Also, in this condition, hemodynamic changes are closely correlated to the severity and the progression of the anatomical damage. PMID:27169885

  7. Acute kidney injury in patients with acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Marenzi, Giancarlo; Cosentino, Nicola; Bartorelli, Antonio L

    2015-11-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is increasingly being seen in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACSs). This condition has a complex pathogenesis, an incidence that can reach 30% and it is associated with higher short-term and long-term morbidity and mortality. Nevertheless, AKI is still characterised by lack of a single accepted definition, unclear pathophysiology understanding and insensitive diagnostic tools that make its detection difficult, particularly in the setting of ACS. Recent data suggested that patients with AKI during ACS, even those in whom renal function seems to fully recover, face an increased, persisting risk of future AKI and may develop chronic kidney disease. Thus, in these patients, nephrology follow-up, after hospital discharge, and secondary preventive measures should possibly be implemented. In this review, we aim at providing a framework of knowledge to increase cardiologists' awareness of AKI, with the goal of improving the outcome of patients with ACS. PMID:26243789

  8. [Hyperhydration and dialysis in acute kidney failure].

    PubMed

    Saner, Fuat H; Bienholz, Anja; Tyczynski, Bartosz; Kribben, Andreas; Feldkamp, Thorsten

    2015-05-01

    Despite the advances in critical care medicine, the hospital mortality in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) requiring dialysis remains high. Depending on the underlying disease the in-house mortality is reported to be up to 80%. Several observational studies demonstrated an association between mortality and fluid overload. A primary mechanism of interest is that fluid overload causes tissue edema and subsequent reduction of perfusion, oxygenation and nutrient delivery. This results in further renal damage. In addition, fluid overload-related dilution within the extracellular space causes artificially low serum creatinine, which masks AKI diagnosis. As a consequence, renal protective management strategies are deferred, which further aggravates kidney injury. This aggravation of renal damage subsequently increases the mortality. This review discusses the role of fluid overload for outcomes in critically ill patients as described in the current literature and assesses criteria for the initiation of renal replacement therapy in this critically ill population. PMID:25970415

  9. Acute kidney injury in HCT: an update.

    PubMed

    Lopes, J A; Jorge, S; Neves, M

    2016-06-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is highly prevalent whether the patients undergo myeloablative or non-myeloablative hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT); however, the pathogenesis and risk factors leading to AKI can differ between the two. The prognosis of AKI in patients receiving HCT is poor. In fact, AKI following HCT is associated not only with increased short- and long-term mortality, but also with progression to chronic kidney disease. Herein, the authors provide a comprehensive and up-to-date review of the definition and diagnosis, as well as of the incidence, pathogenesis and outcome of AKI in patients undergoing HCT, centering on the differences between myeloablative and non-myeloablative regimens. PMID:26855155

  10. Acute Kidney Injury: Quoi de Neuf?

    PubMed Central

    Reichel, Ronald R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute kidney injury (AKI) is frequently encountered in the nephrology practice. Serum creatinine, with its many shortcomings, is still the main biomarker used to detect AKI. Methods This review focuses on recent advances in definition, diagnosis, risk factors, and molecular mechanisms of AKI. In addition, specific AKI syndromes such as contrast-induced AKI, hepatorenal syndrome, and acute decompensated heart failure are discussed. The connection between AKI and subsequent chronic kidney disease and recent developments in renal replacement therapy are also covered. Results Novel biomarkers such as cystatin C and neutrophil gelatinase–associated lipocalin (NGAL) are being investigated to replace serum creatinine in the detection of AKI. Recent studies suggest that intravenous (IV) fluid use is beneficial for the prevention of contrast-induced AKI, while N-acetylcysteine use is not as well established. Diuretics are clearly beneficial in the treatment of acute decompensated heart failure. Ultrafiltration is less promising and can lead to adverse side effects. Although terlipressin use in hepatorenal syndrome is associated with reduced mortality, it is not available in the United States; combination therapy with midodrine, octreotide, and albumin provides an alternative. Fluid resuscitation is frequently used in critically ill patients with AKI; however, overly aggressive fluid resuscitation is frequently associated with an increased risk of mortality. A 3-step approach that combines guided fluid resuscitation, establishment of an even fluid balance, and an appropriate rate of fluid removal may be beneficial. If fluid resuscitation is needed, crystalloid solutions are preferred over hetastarch solutions. Renal replacement therapy is the last resort in AKI treatment, and timing, modality, and dosing are discussed. Research suggests that AKI leads to an increased incidence of subsequent chronic kidney disease. However, this relationship has not been fully

  11. Comparison of serum creatinine, cystatin C, and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin for acute kidney injury occurrence according to risk, injury, failure, loss, and end-stage criteria classification system in early after living kidney donation.

    PubMed

    Hekmat, Reza; Mohebi, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the kidney function after living kidney donation, we measured serum creatinine (SCr), cystatin C, and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) of 42 living donors before uninephrectomy and in three immediate days after it. We also evaluated the prevalence of the occurrence of the different stages of acute kidney injury (AKI) classified according to risk, injury, failure, loss, and end-stage (RIFLE) criteria, and accuracy of each of these three biomarkers for predicting them were evaluated. Significant serum NGAL (s-NGAL) changes were limited to the 1 st day after donation, whereas SCr and cystatin C changes continued to the third day after donation. s-NGAL level in the 1 st day and serum cystatin C in the 3 rd day after donation, respectively, had the largest area under curve and best sensitivity and specificity for Stage 1 (risk) AKI prediction. During the immediate three days after donation, about half of patients suffered from AKI; mostly Stage 1 (injury). The sequence of the emergence of s-NGAL and s-cystatin C in the 1 st and 3 rd days as biomarkers with highest accuracy and power for RIFLE criteria defined AKI stage discrimination in our study was comparable to previous studies. We conclude that our study suggests that AKI was best detected in the 1 st day after uninephrectomy by the s-NGAL levels, whereas cystatin C was the best in the 3 rd day after donation for detection of AKI. PMID:27424680

  12. Sodium hypochlorite-induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Peck, Brandon W; Workeneh, Biruh; Kadikoy, Huseyin; Abdellatif, Abdul

    2014-03-01

    Sodium hypochlorite (bleach) is commonly used as an irrigant during dental procedures as well as a topical antiseptic agent. Although it is generally safe when applied topically, reports of accidental injection of sodium hypochlorite into tissue have been reported. Local necrosis, pain and nerve damage have been described as a result of exposure, but sodium hypo-chlorite has never been implicated as a cause of an acute kidney injury (AKI). In this report, we describe the first case of accidental sodium hypochlorite injection into the infraorbital tissue during a dental procedure that precipitated the AKI. We speculate that oxidative species induced by sodium hypochlorite caused AKI secondary to the renal tubular injury, causing mild acute tubular necrosis. PMID:24626008

  13. Acute kidney injury: Renal disease in the ICU.

    PubMed

    Seller-Pérez, G; Más-Font, S; Pérez-Calvo, C; Villa-Díaz, P; Celaya-López, M; Herrera-Gutiérrez, M E

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) in the ICU frequently requires costly supportive therapies, has high morbidity, and its long-term prognosis is not as good as it has been presumed so far. Consequently, AKI generates a significant burden for the healthcare system. The problem is that AKI lacks an effective treatment and the best approach relies on early secondary prevention. Therefore, to facilitate early diagnosis, a broader definition of AKI should be established, and a marker with more sensitivity and early-detection capacity than serum creatinine - the most common marker of AKI - should be identified. Fortunately, new classification systems (RIFLE, AKIN or KDIGO) have been developed to solve these problems, and the discovery of new biomarkers for kidney injury will hopefully change the way we approach renal patients. As a first step, the concept of renal failure has changed from being a "static" disease to being a "dynamic process" that requires continuous evaluation of kidney function adapted to the reality of the ICU patient. PMID:27388683

  14. KIM-1-mediated phagocytosis reduces acute injury to the kidney.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Brooks, Craig R; Xiao, Sheng; Sabbisetti, Venkata; Yeung, Melissa Y; Hsiao, Li-Li; Ichimura, Takaharu; Kuchroo, Vijay; Bonventre, Joseph V

    2015-04-01

    Kidney injury molecule 1 (KIM-1, also known as TIM-1) is markedly upregulated in the proximal tubule after injury and is maladaptive when chronically expressed. Here, we determined that early in the injury process, however, KIM-1 expression is antiinflammatory due to its mediation of phagocytic processes in tubule cells. Using various models of acute kidney injury (AKI) and mice expressing mutant forms of KIM-1, we demonstrated a mucin domain-dependent protective effect of epithelial KIM-1 expression that involves downregulation of innate immunity. Deletion of the mucin domain markedly impaired KIM-1-mediated phagocytic function, resulting in increased proinflammatory cytokine production, decreased antiinflammatory growth factor secretion by proximal epithelial cells, and a subsequent increase in tissue macrophages. Mice expressing KIM-1Δmucin had greater functional impairment, inflammatory responses, and mortality in response to ischemia- and cisplatin-induced AKI. Compared with primary renal proximal tubule cells isolated from KIM-1Δmucin mice, those from WT mice had reduced proinflammatory cytokine secretion and impaired macrophage activation. The antiinflammatory effect of KIM-1 expression was due to the interaction of KIM-1 with p85 and subsequent PI3K-dependent downmodulation of NF-κB. Hence, KIM-1-mediated epithelial cell phagocytosis of apoptotic cells protects the kidney after acute injury by downregulating innate immunity and inflammation. PMID:25751064

  15. Contrast Medium-Induced Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sadat, Umar; Usman, Ammara; Boyle, Jonathan R.; Hayes, Paul D.; Solomon, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Contrast medium-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) is a predominant cause of hospital-acquired renal insufficiency. With an increasing number of contrast medium-enhanced radiological procedures being performed in a rapidly increasing ageing population in the Western world, it is imperative that more attention is given to understand the aetiology of CI-AKI to devise novel diagnostic methods and to formulate effective prophylactic and therapeutic regimens to reduce its incidence and its associated morbidity and mortality. This article presents high-yield information on the above-mentioned aspects of CI-AKI, primarily based on results of randomised controlled trials, meta-analyses, systematic reviews and international consensus guidelines. PMID:26195974

  16. Molecular determinants of acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Husi, Holger; Human, Christin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a condition that leads to a rapid deterioration of renal function associated with impairment to maintain electrolyte and acid balance, and, if left untreated, ultimately irreversible kidney damage and renal necrosis. There are a number of causes that can trigger AKI, ranging from underlying conditions as well as trauma and surgery. Specifically, the global rise in surgical procedures led to a substantial increase of AKI incidence rates, which in turn impacts on mortality rates, quality of life and economic costs to the healthcare system. However, no effective therapy for AKI exists. Current approaches, such as pharmacological intervention, help in alleviating symptoms in slowing down the progression, but do not prevent or reverse AKI-induced organ damage. Methods: An in-depth understanding of the molecular machinery involved in and modulated by AKI induction and progression is necessary to specifically pharmacologically target key molecules. A major hurdle to devise a successful strategy is the multifactorial and complex nature of the disorder itself, whereby the activation of a number of seemingly independent molecular pathways in the kidney leads to apoptotic and necrotic events. Results: The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system (RAAS) axis appears to be a common element, leading to downstream events such as triggers of immune responses via the NFB pathway. Other pathways intricately linked with AKI-induction and progression are the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF α) and transforming growth factor beta (TGF β) signaling cascades, as well as a number of other modulators. Surprisingly, it has been shown that the involvement of the glutamatergic axis, believed to be mainly a component of the neurological system, is also a major contributor. Conclusions: Here we address the current understanding of the molecular pathways evoked in AKI, their interplay, and the potential to pharmacologically intervene in the

  17. Acute Kidney Injury Subsequent to Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Robert S; Herron, Crystal R; Groom, Robert C; Brown, Jeremiah R

    2015-03-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) after cardiac surgery is a common and underappreciated syndrome that is associated with poor shortand long-term outcomes. AKI after cardiac surgery may be epiphenomenon, a signal for adverse outcomes by virtue of other affected organ systems, and a consequence of multiple factors. Subtle increases in serum creatinine (SCr) postoperatively, once considered inconsequential, have been shown to reflect a kidney injury that likely occurred in the operating room during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and more often in susceptible individuals. The postoperative elevation in SCr is a delayed signal reflecting the intraoperative injury. Preoperative checklists and the conduct of CPB represent opportunities for prevention of AKI. Newer definitions of AKI provide us with an opportunity to scrutinize perioperative processes of care and determine strategies to decrease the incidence of AKI subsequent to cardiac surgery. Recognizing and mitigating risk factors preoperatively and optimizing intraoperative practices may, in the aggregate, decrease the incidence of AKI. This review explores the pathophysiology of AKI and addresses the features of patients who are the most vulnerable to AKI. Preoperative strategies are discussed with particular attention to a readiness for surgery checklist. Intraoperative strategies include minimizing hemodilution and maximizing oxygen delivery with specific suggestions regarding fluid management and plasma preservation. PMID:26390675

  18. Acute Kidney Injury Subsequent to Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Robert S.; Herron, Crystal R.; Groom, Robert C.; Brown, Jeremiah R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Acute kidney injury (AKI) after cardiac surgery is a common and underappreciated syndrome that is associated with poor short- and long-term outcomes. AKI after cardiac surgery may be epiphenomenon, a signal for adverse outcomes by virtue of other affected organ systems, and a consequence of multiple factors. Subtle increases in serum creatinine (SCr) postoperatively, once considered inconsequential, have been shown to reflect a kidney injury that likely occurred in the operating room during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and more often in susceptible individuals. The postoperative elevation in SCr is a delayed signal reflecting the intraoperative injury. Preoperative checklists and the conduct of CPB represent opportunities for prevention of AKI. Newer definitions of AKI provide us with an opportunity to scrutinize perioperative processes of care and determine strategies to decrease the incidence of AKI subsequent to cardiac surgery. Recognizing and mitigating risk factors preoperatively and optimizing intraoperative practices may, in the aggregate, decrease the incidence of AKI. This review explores the pathophysiology of AKI and addresses the features of patients who are the most vulnerable to AKI. Preoperative strategies are discussed with particular attention to a readiness for surgery checklist. Intraoperative strategies include minimizing hemodilution and maximizing oxygen delivery with specific suggestions regarding fluid management and plasma preservation. PMID:26390675

  19. Biomarkers in Acute Kidney Injury: Are We Ready for Prime Time?

    PubMed Central

    Devarajan, Prasad; Murray, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Novel biomarkers are required to improve the timely detection of early acute kidney injury (AKI) and to improve the differential diagnosis, prognostic assessment, and management of AKI cases. It is anticipated that novel biomarkers of early structural AKI (‘acute kidney damage’) will provide critical diagnostic and prognostic stratification and complement functional markers such as serum creatinine. Further studies are required to conclusively demonstrate the association between early kidney damage biomarkers and clinical outcomes, both with and independently of functional markers, and to discern whether or not randomization to a treatment for AKI based on high structural/damage biomarker levels results in an improvement in kidney function and clinical outcomes. PMID:25343845

  20. Unilateral Renal Ischemia as a Model of Acute Kidney Injury and Renal Fibrosis in Cats.

    PubMed

    Schmiedt, C W; Brainard, B M; Hinson, W; Brown, S A; Brown, C A

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to define the acute and chronic effects of 1-hour unilateral in vivo renal ischemia on renal function and histology in cats. Twenty-one adult purpose-bred research cats were anesthetized, and 1 kidney underwent renal artery and vein occlusion for 1 hour. Serum creatinine and urea concentrations, urine protein:creatinine ratio, urine-specific gravity, glomerular filtration rate, hematocrit, platelet concentration and function, and white blood cell count were measured at baseline and variable time points after ischemia. Renal histopathology was evaluated on days 3, 6, 12, 21, 42, and 70 postischemia; changes in smooth muscle actin and interstitial collagen were examined. Following ischemia, whole animal glomerular filtration rate was significantly reduced (57% of baseline on day 6; P < .05). At the early time points, the ischemic kidneys exhibited severe acute epithelial necrosis accompanied by evidence of regeneration of tubules predominantly within the corticomedullary junction. At later periods, postischemic kidneys had evidence of tubular atrophy and interstitial inflammation with significantly more smooth muscle actin and interstitial collagen staining and interstitial fibrosis when compared with the contralateral control kidneys. This study characterizes the course of ischemic acute kidney injury in cats and demonstrates that ischemic acute kidney injury triggers chronic fibrosis, interstitial inflammation, and tubular atrophy in feline kidneys. These late changes are typical of those observed in cats with naturally occurring chronic kidney disease. PMID:26319781

  1. Acute Renal Failure - A Serious Complication in Patients After Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Basta-Jovanovic, G; Bogdanovic, Lj; Radunovic, M; Prostran, M; Naumovic, R; Simic-Ogrizovic, S; Radojevic-Skodric, S

    2016-01-01

    Free radical-mediated injury releases proinflammatory cytokines and activates innate immunity. It has been suggested that the early innate response and the ischemic tissue damage play roles in the development of adaptive responses, which may lead to acute kidney rejection. Various durations of hypothermic kidney storage before transplantation add to ischemic tissue damage. The final stage of ischemic injury occurs during reperfusion that develops hours or days after the initial insult. Repair and regeneration processes occur together with cellular apoptosis, autophagy and necrosis and a favorable outcome is expected if regeneration prevails. Along the entire transplantation time course, there is a great demand for novel immune and nonimmune injury biomarkers. The use of these markers can be of great help in the monitoring of kidney injury in potential kidney donors, where acute kidney damage can be overlooked, in predicting acute transplant dysfunction during the early post-transplant periods, or in predicting chronic changes in long term followup. Numerous investigations have demonstrated that biomarkers that have the highest predictive value in acute kidney injury include NGAL, Cystatin C, KIM-1, IL-18, and L-FABP. Most investigations show that the ideal biomarker to fulfill all the needs in renal transplant has not been identified yet. Although, in many animal models, new biomarkers are emerging for predicting acute and chronic allograft damage, in human allograft analysis they are still not routinely accepted and renal biopsy still remains the gold standard. PMID:27498898

  2. Urinary output and fractional excretion of sodium and urea as indicators of transient versus intrinsic acute kidney injury during early sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The pathophysiology of acute kidney injury (AKI) in sepsis is ill defined. We investigated parameters associated with low glomerular filtration, and their predictive value to discriminate transient from intrinsic septic AKI. Methods In 107 sepsis patients, AKI was defined by the Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss of Kidney Function, End-stage renal disease (RIFLE) urinary output or serum creatinine criterion, or both. Transient AKI (TAKI) versus intrinsic AKI was defined as RIFLE R, I, or F on the first day evolving to no AKI or not, respectively, over the following 5 days. Fractional excretion of sodium (FENa), urea (FEUrea), and NGAL (FENGAL) at admission (d0t0), 4 (d0t4), and 24 hours (d1) was determined. Results Including versus not including the urinary-output criterion of RIFLE increased AKI from 43% to 64.5%. Median uNGAL levels and FENGAL were lower in no AKI versus transient AKI when AKI was defined based on creatinine (P = 0.002 and P = 0.04, respectively), but not when based on urinary output (P = 0.9 and P = 0.49, respectively). FENa < 1% and FEUrea <35% was present in 77.3% and 63.2% of patients. Urinary NGAL was higher (P < 0.001) in those with high versus low fractional sodium excretion, but this was only in patients with transient or intrinsic AKI (P < 0.001 in subgroups), and not in patients without AKI. The negative predictive value for either intrinsic AKI or not restoring diuresis in patients with FENa > 0.36% and FEUrea > 31.5% was 92% and 94.5% respectively. Conclusions A low FENa and FEUrea is highly prevalent in the first hours of sepsis. In sepsis, oliguria is an earlier sign of impending AKI than increase in serum creatinine. A combination of a high FENa and a low FEUrea is associated with intrinsic AKI, whereas a combined high FENa and FEUrea is strongly predictive of transient AKI. PMID:24119730

  3. Novel Biomarkers of Acute Kidney Injury After Contrast Coronary Angiography.

    PubMed

    Connolly, M; McEneaney, D; Menown, Ian; Morgan, N; Harbinson, M

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI), defined as a rise in serum creatinine of greater than 25% from baseline measured at 48 hours after renal insult, may follow iodinated contrast coronary angiography. Termed contrast-induced nephropathy, it can result in considerable morbidity and mortality. Measurement of serum creatinine as a functional biomarker of glomerular filtration rate is widely used for detection of AKI, but it lacks sensitivity for the early diagnosis of AKI (typically rising 24 hours after functional loss) and, as a solely functional marker of glomerular filtration rate, is unable to differentiate among the various causes of AKI. These intrinsic limitations to creatinine measurement and the recognition that improved clinical outcomes are linked to a more timely diagnosis of AKI, has led investigators to search for novel biomarkers of "early" kidney injury. Several studies have investigated the utility of renal injury biomarkers in a variety of clinical settings including angiography/percutaneous coronary intervention, coronary artery bypass graft surgery, sepsis in intensive care patients, and pediatric cardiac surgery. In this article, we discuss the use of iodinated contrast for coronary procedures and the risk factors for contrast-induced nephropathy, followed by a review the potential diagnostic utility of several novel biomarkers of early AKI in the clinical settings of coronary angiography/percutaneous coronary intervention. In particular, we discuss neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin in depth. If validated, such biomarkers would facilitate earlier AKI diagnosis and improve clinical outcomes. PMID:25699983

  4. Cell-specific translational profiling in acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Krautzberger, A. Michaela; Sui, Shannan H.; Hofmann, Oliver M.; Chen, Ying; Baetscher, Manfred; Grgic, Ivica; Kumar, Sanjeev; Humphreys, Benjamin; Hide, Winston A.; McMahon, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) promotes an abrupt loss of kidney function that results in substantial morbidity and mortality. Considerable effort has gone toward identification of diagnostic biomarkers and analysis of AKI-associated molecular events; however, most studies have adopted organ-wide approaches and have not elucidated the interplay among different cell types involved in AKI pathophysiology. To better characterize AKI-associated molecular and cellular events, we developed a mouse line that enables the identification of translational profiles in specific cell types. This strategy relies on CRE recombinase–dependent activation of an EGFP-tagged L10a ribosomal protein subunit, which allows translating ribosome affinity purification (TRAP) of mRNA populations in CRE-expressing cells. Combining this mouse line with cell type–specific CRE-driver lines, we identified distinct cellular responses in an ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) model of AKI. Twenty-four hours following IRI, distinct translational signatures were identified in the nephron, kidney interstitial cell populations, vascular endothelium, and macrophages/monocytes. Furthermore, TRAP captured known IRI-associated markers, validating this approach. Biological function annotation, canonical pathway analysis, and in situ analysis of identified response genes provided insight into cell-specific injury signatures. Our study provides a deep, cell-based view of early injury-associated molecular events in AKI and documents a versatile, genetic tool to monitor cell-specific and temporal-specific biological processes in disease modeling. PMID:24569379

  5. Babesiosis-induced acute kidney injury with prominent urinary macrophages.

    PubMed

    Luciano, Randy L; Moeckel, Gilbert; Palmer, Matthew; Perazella, Mark A

    2013-10-01

    Babesia is an obligate intracellular erythrocyte parasite that can infect humans. Severe symptomatic disease from massive hemolysis and multiorgan system failure, including acute kidney injury (AKI), occurs. Acute tubular injury from a combination of volume depletion and heme pigment toxicity from profound hemolysis is the most common cause of AKI. We present a case of severe babesiosis complicated by dialysis-requiring AKI with the unique finding of large macrophages containing engulfed erythrocyte fragments in urine sediment. This urinary finding raised the possibility of another diagnosis distinct from acute tubular injury. Subsequent kidney biopsy demonstrated infection-associated acute interstitial nephritis. PMID:23643302

  6. Septic acute kidney injury: the glomerular arterioles.

    PubMed

    Bellomo, Rinaldo; Wan, Li; Langenberg, Christoph; Ishikawa, Ken; May, Clive N

    2011-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a serious condition that affects many intensive care unit (ICU) patients. The most common causes of AKI in the ICU are severe sepsis and septic shock. The mortality of AKI in septic critically ill patients remains high despite our increasing ability to support vital organs. This is partly due to our poor understanding of the pathogenesis of sepsis-induced renal dysfunction. However, new concepts are emerging to explain the pathogenesis of septic AKI, which challenge previously held dogma. Throughout the past half century, septic AKI has essentially been considered secondary to tubular injury, which, in turn, has been considered secondary to renal ischemia. This belief is curious because the hallmark of septic AKI and AKI in general is the loss of glomerular filtration rate (GFR). It would seem logical, therefore, to focus on the glomerulus in trying to understand why such loss of GFR occurs. Recent experimental observations suggest that, at least in the initial phases of septic AKI, profound changes occur which involve glomerular hemodynamics and lead to loss of GFR. These observations imply that changes in the vasoconstrictor tone of both the afferent and efferent arterioles are an important component of the pathogenesis of septic AKI. PMID:21921614

  7. MicroRNAs in acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Fan, Pei-Chun; Chen, Chia-Chun; Chen, Yung-Chang; Chang, Yu-Sun; Chu, Pao-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an important clinical issue that is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Despite research advances over the past decades, the complex pathophysiology of AKI is not fully understood. The regulatory mechanisms underlying post-AKI repair and fibrosis have not been clarified either. Furthermore, there is no definitively effective treatment for AKI. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous single-stranded noncoding RNAs of 19~23 nucleotides that have been shown to be crucial to the post-transcriptional regulation of various cellular biological functions, including proliferation, differentiation, metabolism, and apoptosis. In addition to being fundamental to normal development and physiology, miRNAs also play important roles in various human diseases. In AKI, some miRNAs appear to act pathogenically by promoting inflammation, apoptosis, and fibrosis, while others may act protectively by exerting anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, anti-fibrotic, and pro-angiogenic effects. Thus, miRNAs have not only emerged as novel biomarkers for AKI; they also hold promise to be potential therapeutic targets. PMID:27608623

  8. Early postoperative albumin level following total knee arthroplasty is associated with acute kidney injury: A retrospective analysis of 1309 consecutive patients based on kidney disease improving global outcomes criteria.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ha-Jung; Koh, Won-Uk; Kim, Sae-Gyeol; Park, Hyeok-Seong; Song, Jun-Gol; Ro, Young-Jin; Yang, Hong-Seuk

    2016-08-01

    Hypoalbuminemia has been reported to be an independent risk factor for acute kidney injury (AKI). However, little is known about the relationship between the albumin level and the incidence of AKI in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The aim of our study was to assess incidence and risk factors for AKI and to evaluate the relationship between albumin level and AKI following TKA.The study included a retrospective review of medical records of 1309 consecutive patients who underwent TKA between January 2008 and December 2014. The patients were divided into 2 groups according to the lowest serum albumin level within 2 postoperative days (POD2_alb level < 3.0 g/dL vs ≥3.0 g/dL). Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to assess risk factors for AKI. A comparison of incidence of AKI, hospital stay, and overall mortality in the 2 groups was performed using propensity score analysis.Of 1309 patients, 57 (4.4%) developed AKI based on Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes criteria. Factors associated with AKI included age (odds ratio [OR] 1.05; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-1.09; P = 0.030), diabetes (OR 3.12; 95% CI 1.65-5.89; P < 0.001), uric acid (OR 1.51; 95% CI 1.26-1.82; P < 0.001), beta blocker use (OR 2.65; 95% CI 1.48-4.73; P = 0.001), diuretics (OR 16.42; 95% CI 3.08-87.68; P = 0.001), and POD2_alb level < 3.0 g/dL (OR 1.92; 95% CI 1.09-3.37; P = 0.023). After propensity score analysis, POD2_alb level<3.0 g/dL was associated with AKI occurrence (OR 1.82; 95% CI 1.03-3.24, P = 0.041) and longer hospital stay (P = 0.001).In this study, we demonstrated that POD2_alb level<3.0 g/dL was an independent risk factor for AKI and lengthened hospital stay in patients undergoing TKA. PMID:27495094

  9. Recent advances in the understanding of acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Tögel, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common clinical entity associated with high morbidity and mortality and clinical costs. The pathophysiology is multifaceted and involves inflammation, tubular injury, and vascular damage. Recently identified components include necroptosis, a special form of cell death, and autophagy. Most of the pathophysiological knowledge is obtained from animal models but these do not directly reflect the reality of the clinical situation. Tubular cells have a remarkable capacity to regenerate, and the role of stem/progenitor cells is discussed. Acute kidney injury is frequently associated with chronic kidney disease, and the implications are widespread. PMID:25343040

  10. Rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury in dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Arvind; Singh, Varun Kumar; Nanda, Satyan

    2015-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a rare but potentially lethal complication of severe dengue fever. We present a case of 21-year-old man with fever, bodyache and black coloured and decreasing amount of urine. He was positive for NS1 (non-structural protein-1) antigen and IgM antibody for dengue. Platelet count was below 20 × 10(9)/L and kidney function test was deranged. Urine was positive for myoglobin. The patient was managed emergently on conservative lines and improved in 10 days. Rhabdomyolysis should always be kept in mind in a patient with severe dengue, as its early detection and prompt management can prevent further progression to acute renal failure. PMID:26174727

  11. Keep Your Kidneys Healthy: Catch Kidney Disease Early

    MedlinePlus

    ... point, you may need a kidney transplant or dialysis. It’s a good idea to talk with your ... healthy kidneys and finding a well-matched donor. Dialysis is a treatment that filters wastes and water ...

  12. Acute Kidney Injury Predicts Mortality after Charcoal Burning Suicide

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Chin; Tseng, Yi-Chia; Huang, Wen-Hung; Hsu, Ching-Wei; Weng, Cheng-Hao; Liu, Shou-Hsuan; Yang, Huang-Yu; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Chen, Hui-Ling; Fu, Jen-Fen; Lin, Wey-Ran; Wang, I-Kuan; Yen, Tzung-Hai

    2016-01-01

    A paucity of literature exists on risk factors for mortality in charcoal burning suicide. In this observational study, we analyzed the data of 126 patients with charcoal burning suicide that seen between 2002 and 2013. Patients were grouped according to status of renal damage as acute kidney injury (N = 49) or non-acute kidney injury (N = 77). It was found that patients with acute kidney injury suffered severer complications such as respiratory failure (P = 0.002), myocardial injury (P = 0.049), hepatic injury (P < 0.001), rhabdomyolysis (P = 0.045) and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (P = 0.028) than patients without acute kidney injury. Moreover, patients with acute kidney injury suffered longer hospitalization duration (16.9 ± 18.3 versus 10.7 ± 10.9, P = 0.002) and had higher mortality rate (8.2% versus 0%, P = 0.011) than patients without injury. In a multivariate Cox regression model, it was demonstrated that serum creatinine level (P = 0.019) and heart rate (P = 0.022) were significant risk factors for mortality. Finally, Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that patients with acute kidney injury suffered lower cumulative survival than without injury (P = 0.016). In summary, the overall mortality rate of charcoal burning suicide population was 3.2%, and acute kidney injury was a powerful predictor of mortality. Further studies are warranted. PMID:27430168

  13. Acute Kidney Injury Predicts Mortality after Charcoal Burning Suicide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Chin; Tseng, Yi-Chia; Huang, Wen-Hung; Hsu, Ching-Wei; Weng, Cheng-Hao; Liu, Shou-Hsuan; Yang, Huang-Yu; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Chen, Hui-Ling; Fu, Jen-Fen; Lin, Wey-Ran; Wang, I-Kuan; Yen, Tzung-Hai

    2016-01-01

    A paucity of literature exists on risk factors for mortality in charcoal burning suicide. In this observational study, we analyzed the data of 126 patients with charcoal burning suicide that seen between 2002 and 2013. Patients were grouped according to status of renal damage as acute kidney injury (N = 49) or non-acute kidney injury (N = 77). It was found that patients with acute kidney injury suffered severer complications such as respiratory failure (P = 0.002), myocardial injury (P = 0.049), hepatic injury (P < 0.001), rhabdomyolysis (P = 0.045) and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (P = 0.028) than patients without acute kidney injury. Moreover, patients with acute kidney injury suffered longer hospitalization duration (16.9 ± 18.3 versus 10.7 ± 10.9, P = 0.002) and had higher mortality rate (8.2% versus 0%, P = 0.011) than patients without injury. In a multivariate Cox regression model, it was demonstrated that serum creatinine level (P = 0.019) and heart rate (P = 0.022) were significant risk factors for mortality. Finally, Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that patients with acute kidney injury suffered lower cumulative survival than without injury (P = 0.016). In summary, the overall mortality rate of charcoal burning suicide population was 3.2%, and acute kidney injury was a powerful predictor of mortality. Further studies are warranted. PMID:27430168

  14. Molecular mediators of favism-induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    García-Camín, Rosa María; Goma, Montserrat; Osuna, Rosa García; Rubio-Navarro, Alfonso; Buendía, Irene; Ortiz, Alberto; Egido, Jesús; Manzarbeitia, Félix; Chevarria, Julio Leonel; Gluksmann, María Constanza; Moreno, Juan Antonio

    2014-03-01

    Intolerance to fava beans in subjects with glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase deficiency (favism) may lead to severe hemolytic crises and decreased renal function. Renal biopsy findings exploring the molecular mechanisms of renal damage in favism have not been previously reported. We report a case of favism-associated acute kidney injury in which renal biopsy showed acute tubular necrosis and massive iron deposits in tubular cells. Interestingly, iron deposit areas were characterized by the presence of oxidative stress markers (NADPH-p22 phox and heme-oxigenase-1) and macrophages expressing the hemoglobin scavenger receptor CD163. In addition, iron deposits, NADPH-p22 phox, hemeoxigenase- 1 and CD163 positive cells were observed in some glomeruli. These results identify both glomerular and tubular involvement in favism-associated acute kidney injury and suggest novel therapeutic targets to prevent or accelerate recovery from acute kidney injury. PMID:23006341

  15. Electronic Medical Record-Based Predictive Model for Acute Kidney Injury in an Acute Care Hospital.

    PubMed

    Laszczyńska, Olga; Severo, Milton; Azevedo, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) are at risk for increased morbidity and mortality. Lack of specific treatment has meant that efforts have focused on early diagnosis and timely treatment. Advanced algorithms for clinical assistance including AKI prediction models have potential to provide accurate risk estimates. In this project, we aim to provide a clinical decision supporting system (CDSS) based on a self-learning predictive model for AKI in patients of an acute care hospital. Data of all in-patient episodes in adults admitted will be analysed using "data mining" techniques to build a prediction model. The subsequent machine-learning process including two algorithms for data stream and concept drift will refine the predictive ability of the model. Simulation studies on the model will be used to quantify the expected impact of several scenarios of change in factors that influence AKI incidence. The proposed dynamic CDSS will apply to future in-hospital AKI surveillance in clinical practice. PMID:27577501

  16. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Acute Kidney Injury: Present Status.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hai Ying; Chen, Tian Wu; Zhang, Xiao Ming

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication of hospitalization that is characterized by a sudden loss of renal excretory function and associated with the subsequent development of chronic kidney disease, poor prognosis, and increased mortality. Although the pathophysiology of renal functional impairment in the setting of AKI remains poorly understood, previous studies have identified changes in renal hemodynamics, perfusion, and oxygenation as key factors in the development and progression of AKI. The early assessment of these changes remains a challenge. Many established approaches are not applicable to humans because of their invasiveness. Functional renal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging offers an alternative assessment tool that could be used to evaluate renal morphology and function noninvasively and simultaneously. Thus, the purpose of this review is to illustrate the principle, application, and role of the techniques of functional renal MR imaging, including blood oxygen level-dependent imaging, arterial spin labeling, and diffusion-weighted MR imaging, in the management of AKI. The use of gadolinium in MR imaging may exacerbate renal impairment and cause nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. Therefore, dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging will not be discussed in this paper. PMID:26925411

  17. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Acute Kidney Injury: Present Status

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hai Ying; Chen, Tian Wu; Zhang, Xiao Ming

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication of hospitalization that is characterized by a sudden loss of renal excretory function and associated with the subsequent development of chronic kidney disease, poor prognosis, and increased mortality. Although the pathophysiology of renal functional impairment in the setting of AKI remains poorly understood, previous studies have identified changes in renal hemodynamics, perfusion, and oxygenation as key factors in the development and progression of AKI. The early assessment of these changes remains a challenge. Many established approaches are not applicable to humans because of their invasiveness. Functional renal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging offers an alternative assessment tool that could be used to evaluate renal morphology and function noninvasively and simultaneously. Thus, the purpose of this review is to illustrate the principle, application, and role of the techniques of functional renal MR imaging, including blood oxygen level-dependent imaging, arterial spin labeling, and diffusion-weighted MR imaging, in the management of AKI. The use of gadolinium in MR imaging may exacerbate renal impairment and cause nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. Therefore, dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging will not be discussed in this paper. PMID:26925411

  18. Acute kidney injury: from clinical to molecular diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The RIFLE classification was introduced in 2004 to describe the presence of acute kidney injury (AKI) and to define its clinical stage, based upon the serum creatinine level and urine output. The same criteria, although slightly modified, are used in the other scoring systems AKIN and KDIGO. Mortality and morbidity remain high in AKI, suggesting that current diagnostic methods are suboptimal, poorly accurate, and often timely inadequate in detecting the presence of early kidney injury. Conversely, a growing body of evidence indicates that new AKI biomarkers can be used to both rule out AKI and to assess high-risk conditions or the presence of subclinical forms. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin or cell cycle arrest biomarkers seem to be sensitive and specific enough to be used in conjunction with existing markers of AKI for better classifying renal injury as well as dysfunction. Improvements in diagnosis, risk identification, stratification, prognosis, and therapeutic monitoring may improve prevention and protection from organ damage and help to identify patients at risk, allowing individualized therapy. In this view, we may say that AKI diagnosis has finally moved from clinical to molecular level with potential benefits for the patients because similar progress has been shown in other disciplines. PMID:27384344

  19. Acute oxalate nephropathy following kidney transplantation: Report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Taheri, Diana; Gheissari, Alaleh; Shaabani, Pooria; Tabibian, Seyed Reza; Mortazavi, Mojgan; Seirafian, Shiva; Merrikhi, Alireza; Fesharakizadeh, Mehdi; Dolatkhah, Shahaboddin

    2015-01-01

    Calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystal deposition is a common finding immediately after kidney transplantation. However, small depositions of CaOx could be benign while extensive depositions lead to poor graft outcome. Here we report three cases with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), bilateral nephrolithiasis, and unknown diagnosis of primary hyperoxaluria (PH) who underwent a renal transplant and experienced an early-onset graft failure. Although an acute rejection was suspected, renal allograft biopsies and subsequent allograft nephrectomies showed extensive CaOx deposition, which raised a suspicion of PH. Even though increased urinary excretion of CaOx was found in all patients, this diagnosis could be confirmed with further tests including genetic study and metabolic assay. In conclusion, massive CaOx deposition in kidney allograft is an important cause of poor allograft survival and needs special management. Furthermore, our cases suggest patients with ESRD and a history of nephrolithiasis should be screened for elevated urinary oxalate excretion and rule out of PH. PMID:26664431

  20. Severe but reversible acute kidney injury resulting from Amanita punctata poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Eunjung; Cheong, Ka-Young; Lee, Min-Jeong; Kim, Seirhan; Shin, Gyu-Tae; Kim, Heungsoo; Park, In-Whee

    2015-01-01

    Mushroom-related poisoning can cause acute kidney injury. Here we report a case of acute kidney injury after ingestion of Amanita punctata, which is considered an edible mushroom. Gastrointestinal symptoms occurred within 24 hours from the mushroom intake and were followed by an asymptomatic period, acute kidney injury, and elevation of liver and pancreatic enzymes. Kidney function recovered with supportive care. Nephrotoxic mushroom poisoning should be considered as a cause of acute kidney injury. PMID:26779427

  1. What is the real impact of acute kidney injury?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common clinical problem. Studies have documented the incidence of AKI in a variety of populations but to date we do not believe the real incidence of AKI has been accurately documented in a district general hospital setting. The aim here was to describe the detected incidence of AKI in a typical general hospital setting in an unselected population, and describe associated short and long-term outcomes. Methods A retrospective observational database study from secondary care in East Kent (adult catchment population of 582,300). All adult patients (18 years or over) admitted between 1st February 2009 and 31st July 2009, were included. Patients receiving chronic renal replacement therapy (RRT), maternity and day case admissions were excluded. AKI was defined by the acute kidney injury network (AKIN) criteria. A time dependent risk analysis with logistic regression and Cox regression was used for the analysis of in-hospital mortality and survival. Results The incidence of AKI in the 6 month period was 15,325 pmp/yr (adults) (69% AKIN1, 18% AKIN2 and 13% AKIN3). In-hospital mortality, length of stay and ITU utilisation all increased with severity of AKI. Patients with AKI had an increase in care on discharge and an increase in hospital readmission within 30 days. Conclusions This data comes closer to the real incidence and outcomes of AKI managed in-hospital than any study published in the literature to date. Fifteen percent of all admissions sustained an episode of AKI with increased subsequent short and long term morbidity and mortality, even in those with AKIN1. This confers an increased burden and cost to the healthcare economy, which can now be quantified. These results will furnish a baseline for quality improvement projects aimed at early identification, improved management, and where possible prevention, of AKI. PMID:24952580

  2. Acute kidney injury in critically ill patients with lung disease: kidney-lung crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    de Abreu, Krasnalhia Lívia Soares; da Silva Junior, Geraldo Bezerra; Muniz, Thalita Diógenes; Barreto, Adller Gonçalves Costa; Lima, Rafael Siqueira Athayde; Holanda, Marcelo Alcântara; Pereira, Eanes Delgado Barros; Libório, Alexandre Braga; Daher, Elizabeth de Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the factors associated with acute kidney injury and outcome in patients with lung disease. Methods A prospective study was conducted with 100 consecutive patients admitted to a respiratory intensive care unit in Fortaleza (CE), Brazil. The risk factors for acute kidney injury and mortality were investigated in a group of patients with lung diseases. Results The mean age of the study population was 57 years, and 50% were male. The incidence of acute kidney injury was higher in patients with PaO2/FiO2<200 mmHg (54% versus 23.7%; p=0.02). Death was observed in 40 cases and the rate of mortality of the acute kidney injury group was higher (62.8% versus 27.6%; p=0.01). The independent factor that was found to be associated with acute kidney injury was PaO2/FiO2<200 mmHg (p=0.01), and the independent risk factors for death were PEEP at admission (OR: 3.6; 95%CI: 1.3-9.6; p=0.009) and need for hemodialysis (OR: 7.9; 95%CI: 2.2-28.3; p=0.001). Conclusion There was a higher mortality rate in the acute kidney injury group. Increased mortality was associated with mechanical ventilation, high PEEP, urea and need for dialysis. Further studies must be performed to better establish the relationship between kidney and lung injury and its impact on patient outcome. PMID:23917978

  3. Suramin protects from cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Dupre, Tess V; Doll, Mark A; Shah, Parag P; Sharp, Cierra N; Kiefer, Alex; Scherzer, Michael T; Saurabh, Kumar; Saforo, Doug; Siow, Deanna; Casson, Lavona; Arteel, Gavin E; Jenson, Alfred Bennett; Megyesi, Judit; Schnellmann, Rick G; Beverly, Levi J; Siskind, Leah J

    2016-02-01

    Cisplatin, a commonly used cancer chemotherapeutic, has a dose-limiting side effect of nephrotoxicity. Approximately 30% of patients administered cisplatin suffer from kidney injury, and there are limited treatment options for the treatment of cisplatin-induced kidney injury. Suramin, which is Federal Drug Administration-approved for the treatment of trypanosomiasis, improves kidney function after various forms of kidney injury in rodent models. We hypothesized that suramin would attenuate cisplatin-induced kidney injury. Suramin treatment before cisplatin administration reduced cisplatin-induced decreases in kidney function and injury. Furthermore, suramin attenuated cisplatin-induced expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and apoptosis in the kidney cortex. Treatment of mice with suramin 24 h after cisplatin also improved kidney function, suggesting that the mechanism of protection is not by inhibition of tubular cisplatin uptake or its metabolism to nephrotoxic species. If suramin is to be used in the context of cancer, then it cannot prevent cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity of cancer cells. Suramin did not alter the dose-response curve of cisplatin in lung adenocarcinoma cells in vitro. In addition, suramin pretreatment of mice harboring lung adenocarcinomas did not alter the initial cytotoxic effects of cisplatin (DNA damage and apoptosis) on tumor cells. These results provide evidence that suramin has potential as a renoprotective agent for the treatment/prevention of cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury and justify future long-term preclinical studies using cotreatment of suramin and cisplatin in mouse models of cancer. PMID:26661653

  4. Autophagy is activated to protect against endotoxic acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Mei, Shuqin; Livingston, Man; Hao, Jielu; Li, Lin; Mei, Changlin; Dong, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Endotoxemia in sepsis, characterized by systemic inflammation, is a major cause of acute kidney injury (AKI) in hospitalized patients, especially in intensive care unit; however the underlying pathogenesis is poorly understood. Autophagy is a conserved, cellular catabolic pathway that plays crucial roles in cellular homeostasis including the maintenance of cellular function and viability. The regulation and role of autophagy in septic or endotoxic AKI remains unclear. Here we show that autophagy was induced in kidney tubular cells in mice by the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Pharmacological inhibition of autophagy with chloroquine enhanced LPS-induced AKI. Moreover, specific ablation of autophagy gene 7 (Atg7) from kidney proximal tubules worsened LPS-induced AKI. Together, the results demonstrate convincing evidence of autophagy activation in endotoxic kidney injury and support a renoprotective role of autophagy in kidney tubules. PMID:26916346

  5. The perfect storm: older adults and acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Hain, Debra; Paixao, Rute

    2015-01-01

    Older adults have a high risk for acute kidney injury (AKI), often necessitating critical care admission. The majority of older adults live with 1 or more chronic conditions requiring multiple medications, and when faced with acute illness increased vulnerability can lead to poor health outcomes. When combined with circumstances that exacerbate chronic conditions, clinicians may witness the perfect storm. Some factors that contribute to AKI risk include the aging kidney, sepsis, polypharmacy, and nephrotoxic medications and contrast media. This paper discusses specific risks and approaches to care for older adults with AKI who are in critical care. PMID:26039649

  6. Early demographic and clinical predictors of developing acute kidney injury in snake bite patients: A retrospective controlled study from an Indian tertiary care hospital in North Eastern Uttar Pradesh India

    PubMed Central

    Singh, R. R.; Uraiya, Dharmendra; Kumar, Anoop; Tripathi, Neeraj

    2016-01-01

    Aims: This study was conducted retrospectively to define early demographic and clinical predictors for acute kidney injury (AKI) among snake bite patients at the time of hospital admission. Materials and Methods: We analyzed 138 cases with a poisonous snake bite. Patients were classified into two groups according to the presence and absence of AKI. The data regarding clinical features and demographic profile of these patients were collected from the hospital records in a prestructured pro forma and statistically compared. Results: Of the 138 patients of venomous snake bite, 62 developed AKI (44.92%). Patients who developed AKI were older in age. Moreover, prolonged bite to anti-snake venom (ASV) time had a significant relationship in developing AKI (P < 0.05). Among the clinical features, there was an independent positive association of AKI with abdomen pain, tenderness and vomiting, cellulitis, bleeding tendencies, myalgia, and black or brown urine (P < 0.05). Neurological features were inversely associated with renal involvement. Conclusion: We found that marked abdominal pain, tenderness and vomiting, myalgia, black or brown urine, bite site cellulitis, bleeding tendencies, and prolonged (>2 h) bite to ASV time were significantly associated with the development of AKI in snake bite patients. PMID:27555694

  7. Obstetric Acute Kidney Injury; A Three Year Experience at a Medical College Hospital in North Karnataka, India

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmi, K.S.; Gorikhan, Gousia; M.M., Umadi; S.T., Kalsad; M.P., Madhavaranga; Dambal, Amrut; Padaki, Samata

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Acute kidney injury is a rare and sometimes fatal complication of pregnancy, the incidence of which has been declining worldwide, though still high in developing countries. There are recent observations of increasing incidence in some developed countries attributed to hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. Materials and Methods: In this study, we have analysed the records of all patients referred to the dialysis unit of a medical college hospital in Karnataka for acute kidney injury related to pregnancy. AKIN (Acute Kidney Injury Network) criteria for the diagnosis of acute kidney injury were adapted. Age, parity, gestational age, causative factors for acute kidney injury, mode of delivery, access to antenatal care, operative procedures, blood component transfusions, number of haemodialysis, time for initiation of haemodialysis, duration of hospital stay and mortality were analysed by finding mean, standard deviation and standard error. Results: Fifteen patients out of 21563 who delivered in our hospital developed acute kidney injury. These (n=15) were out of 149 patients of acute kidney injury of various aetiologies who underwent haemodialysis between 2012 and 2014. Of these two were unregistered for antenatal care. Ten were multiparous, Eleven were from rural background, one had home delivery, six had vaginal delivery, seven had caesarean section and two had second trimester abortion. Placental abruption with intrauterine death was the commonest Cause in 9 out of 15 cases. All had severe anaemia. Patients received a mean of 3.9 (SD+/- 2.4) sessions of haemodialysis. Eleven patients recovered completely, two died and two left against medical advice. Conclusion: Obstetric acute kidney injury is associated with poor access to antenatal care, multiparity and rural background. Placental abruption is the commonest cause of obstetric acute kidney injury. Blood component transfusions, avoidance of nephrotoxic drugs and early initiation of haemodialysis are

  8. Acute Kidney Injury Associated With Vancomycin When Laxity Leads to Injury and Findings on Kidney Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Katikaneni, Madhavi; Lwin, Lin; Villanueva, Hugo; Yoo, Jinil

    2016-01-01

    The issue of vancomycin-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) has resurged with the use of intravenous vancomycin as a first-line antibiotic, often for prolonged periods of time for the management of serious methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections, and with a higher recommended trough level (15-20 μg/mL). We have observed 3 patients on intravenous vancomycin who developed very high trough levels (>40 μg/mL) and severe (stage 3) AKI. Those 3 patients underwent kidney biopsy for unresolving AKI, which revealed findings compatible with acute tubular necrosis. The first patient initially developed asymptomatic acute interstitial nephritis because of a concomitant antibiotic that caused worsening of kidney function, and the dose of vancomycin was not properly adjusted while staying at the nursing home. The second was an emaciated patient (BMI, 14) whose serum creatinine level was a deceptive marker of kidney function for the proper dosing of vancomycin, resulting in a toxic level. The third patient developed vancomycin-related AKI on an initially high therapeutic level, which then contributed to further rising in vancomycin level and subsequently causing severe AKI. One patient required hemodialysis, but all 3 patients ultimately recovered their kidney function significantly. A regular monitoring (preferably twice weekly) of serum creatinine and vancomycin trough level is advisable to minimize vancomycin-associated AKI, primarily acute tubular necrosis, for patients requiring prolonged administration of vancomycin (>2 weeks) on the currently recommended higher therapeutic trough levels (>15 μg/mL). PMID:26035034

  9. Histone lysine crotonylation during acute kidney injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Andres, Olga; Sanchez-Niño, Maria Dolores; Cannata-Ortiz, Pablo; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Egido, Jesus; Ortiz, Alberto; Sanz, Ana Belen

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a potentially lethal condition for which no therapy is available beyond replacement of renal function. Post-translational histone modifications modulate gene expression and kidney injury. Histone crotonylation is a recently described post-translational modification. We hypothesized that histone crotonylation might modulate kidney injury. Histone crotonylation was studied in cultured murine proximal tubular cells and in kidneys from mice with AKI induced by folic acid or cisplatin. Histone lysine crotonylation was observed in tubular cells from healthy murine and human kidney tissue. Kidney tissue histone crotonylation increased during AKI. This was reproduced by exposure to the protein TWEAK in cultured tubular cells. Specifically, ChIP-seq revealed enrichment of histone crotonylation at the genes encoding the mitochondrial biogenesis regulator PGC-1α and the sirtuin-3 decrotonylase in both TWEAK-stimulated tubular cells and in AKI kidney tissue. To assess the role of crotonylation in kidney injury, crotonate was used to increase histone crotonylation in cultured tubular cells or in the kidneys in vivo. Crotonate increased the expression of PGC-1α and sirtuin-3, and decreased CCL2 expression in cultured tubular cells and healthy kidneys. Systemic crotonate administration protected from experimental AKI, preventing the decrease in renal function and in kidney PGC-1α and sirtuin-3 levels as well as the increase in CCL2 expression. For the first time, we have identified factors such as cell stress and crotonate availability that increase histone crotonylation in vivo. Overall, increasing histone crotonylation might have a beneficial effect on AKI. This is the first observation of the in vivo potential of the therapeutic manipulation of histone crotonylation in a disease state. PMID:27125278

  10. Contrast-Induced Acute Kidney Injury: An Update.

    PubMed

    Chalikias, George; Drosos, Ioannis; Tziakas, Dimitrios N

    2016-04-01

    Contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) is defined as an abrupt deterioration in renal function associated with the administration of iodinated contrast media. This type of acute kidney injury is frequently encountered as a complication of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and is associated with adverse short- and long-term outcomes including mainly mortality, cardiovascular morbidity and prolongation of hospitalization. The incidence of CI-AKI after PCI ranges from 2 to 20 % according to baseline kidney function. It may also range according to the clinical setting, being higher after emergency PCI. The primary manifestation is a small decline in kidney function, occurring 1 to 3 days after the procedure. Kidney function usually returns to preexisting levels within 7 days. Incidence of acute renal failure requiring dialysis following PCI is rare (<1 %). The present article aims to review up-to-date published data concerning diagnosis, definition, epidemiology and prognosis of this novel in-hospital epidemic. PMID:26780748

  11. Acute kidney injury and dermonecrosis after Loxosceles reclusa envenomation

    PubMed Central

    Nag, A.; Datta, J.; Das, A.; Agarwal, A. K.; Sinha, D.; Mondal, S.; Ete, T.; Chakraborty, A.; Ghosh, S.

    2014-01-01

    Spiders of the Loxosceles species can cause dermonecrosis and acute kidney injury (AKI). Hemolysis, rhabdomyolysis and direct toxin-mediated renal damage have been postulated. There are very few reports of Loxoscelism from India. We report a case of AKI, hemolysis and a “gravitational” pattern of ulceration following the bite of the brown recluse spider (Loxosceles spp). PMID:25097339

  12. Acute kidney injury and dermonecrosis after Loxosceles reclusa envenomation.

    PubMed

    Nag, A; Datta, J; Das, A; Agarwal, A K; Sinha, D; Mondal, S; Ete, T; Chakraborty, A; Ghosh, S

    2014-07-01

    Spiders of the Loxosceles species can cause dermonecrosis and acute kidney injury (AKI). Hemolysis, rhabdomyolysis and direct toxin-mediated renal damage have been postulated. There are very few reports of Loxoscelism from India. We report a case of AKI, hemolysis and a "gravitational" pattern of ulceration following the bite of the brown recluse spider (Loxosceles spp). PMID:25097339

  13. Dyselectrolytemia in acute kidney injury causing tetany and quadriparesis.

    PubMed

    Palkar, Atul Vijay; Mewada, Mayur; Thakur, Sonal; Shrivastava, Makardhwaj Sarvadaman

    2011-01-01

    A 40-year-old female, presented with prerenal acute kidney injury secondary to diarrhoea. With appropriate hydration, she went into diuretic phase and subsequently developed hypokalemic quadriparesis with hypocalcaemic tetany due to hypomagnesemia and subclinical vitamin D deficiency. The patient improved with oral potassium, magnesium, calcium and vitamin D supplementation. PMID:22674589

  14. Critical care in the emergency department: acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Nee, Patrick A; Bailey, David J; Todd, Victoria; Lewington, Andrew J; Wootten, Andrea E; Sim, Kevin J

    2016-05-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common among emergency department patients admitted to hospital. There is evidence of inadequate management of the condition leading to adverse outcomes. We present an illustrative case of AKI complicating a gastrointestinal disorder in an older adult. We discuss the clinical presentation, assessment and management of AKI with reference to recent consensus guidelines on classification and treatment. PMID:25969433

  15. Impact on mortality of the timing of renal replacement therapy in patients with severe acute kidney injury in septic shock: the IDEAL-ICU study (initiation of dialysis early versus delayed in the intensive care unit): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background One of the most dreaded complications of septic shock is acute kidney injury. It occurs in around 50% of patients, with a mortality rate of about 60% at 3 months. There is no consensus on the optimal time to initiate renal replacement therapy. Retrospective and observational studies suggest that early implementation of renal replacement therapy could improve the prognosis for these patients. Methods/design This protocol summarizes the rationale and design of a randomized, controlled, multicenter trial investigating the effect of early versus delayed renal replacement therapy in patients with severe acute kidney injury in early septic shock. In total, 864 critically ill adults with septic shock and evidence of acute kidney injury, defined as the failure stage of the RIFLE classification, will be enrolled. The primary outcome is mortality at 90 days. Secondary outcomes include safety, number of days free of mechanical ventilation, number of days free of renal replacement therapy, intensive care length of stay, in-hospital length of stay, quality of life as evaluated by the EQ-5D and renal replacement therapy dependence at hospital discharge. The primary analysis will be intention to treat. Recruitment started in March 2012 and will be completed by March 2015. Discussion This protocol for a randomized controlled study investigating the impact of the timing of renal replacement therapy initiation should provide an answer to a key question for the management of patients with acute kidney injury in the context of septic shock, for whom the mortality rate remains close to 60% despite improved understanding of physiopathology and recent therapeutic advances. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01682590, registered on 10 September 2012. PMID:24998258

  16. [The early history of the artificial kidney].

    PubMed

    Benedum, J

    2003-11-01

    turning point was the availability of purified heparin from 1925 on. Haas, who in 1924 conducted the first dialysis using hirudin, in 1927 conducted the first hemodialysis using heparin. Further hemodialysis treatments followed. Haas concluded: "The problem of hemodialysis is still in the first steps of practical application. Nevertheless it could be shown that hemodialysis has developed sufficiently to find applicability even in patients with serious kidney ailments and irritable heart...Hemodialysis was not only well tolerated but also brought a temporary subjective improvement. Of course, the technical aspects of hemodialysis still need improvement and further development to qualify as detoxicant therapy." A look at the early history of the artificial kidney and its applicability to humans reveals that J. Abel conducted the first hemodialysis on experimental animals. It also becomes evident that Haas conducted the first hemodialysis in humans. The American experiments pursued the quantitative optimization of the method in animal trials, while Haas' experiments focused on the development of a therapeutic method following the principle "primum nil nocere." PMID:14600857

  17. Acute renal failure: outcomes and risk of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Block, C A; Schoolwerth, A C

    2007-09-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is a common condition, especially among the critically ill, and confers a high mortality. The incidence of ARF is increasing. Efforts such as the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI) are being undertaken to establish a consensus definition of ARF, and to distinguish between varying degrees of acute kidney injury that might confer a different prognosis. Data are emerging to allow comparison of the epidemiology of ARF across institutions internationally. There is ongoing recognition of the important interaction between ARF and chronic kidney disease and more information regarding recovery from ARF is available. Controversy exists regarding the optimal management of ARF. Recent publications emphasize the importance of timing and dose of renal replacement therapy rather than the modality of treatment (intermittent hemodialysis vs continuous therapies). These issues are explored in this review. PMID:17912228

  18. Crohnic Kidney Disease: Recurrent Acute Kidney Failure in a Patient With Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Mehmet Emin; Ercan, Zafer; Karakas, Emel Yigit; Ulas, Turgay; Buyukhatipoglu, Hakan

    2014-01-01

    Context: Short bowel syndrome is a rare and devastating complication in chronic inflammatory bowel disease following functional or anatomic loss of extensive segments of the intestine. Case Report: A 60-year-old male patient with Crohn's disease had undergone multiple resections of the intestine and developed short bowel syndrome. Despite up to 4-5 liters of orally fluid, sufficient calcium and magnesium intake, he suffered from recurrent acute kidney injury due to profound volume depletion and those electrolyte deficiencies. Administration of intravenous fluid and electrolyte repleacement treatment at regular intervals prevented further kidney injuries. Conclusion: We present a case of recurrent acute kidney failure in a patient with Crohn's disease, and aimed to remark importance of receiving sufficient parenteral fluid and electrolyte support in those with short bowel syndrome. PMID:25599054

  19. Plasma FGF23 levels increase rapidly after acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Christov, Marta; Waikar, Sushrut; Pereira, Renata; Havasi, Andrea; Leaf, David E.; Goltzman, David; Pajevic, Paola Divieti; Wolf, Myles; Jüppner, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) levels are elevated in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI). In order to determine how early this increase occurs we used a murine folic acid nephropathy model and found that plasma FGF23 levels increased significantly from baseline already after 1 hour of AKI, with an 18-fold increase at 24 hours. Similar elevations of FGF23 levels were found when AKI was induced in mice with osteocyte-specific parathyroid hormone receptor ablation or the global deletion of parathyroid hormone or vitamin D receptor, indicating that the increase in FGF23 was independent of parathyroid hormone and vitamin D signaling. Furthermore, FGF23 levels increased to a similar extent in wild-type mice maintained on normal or phosphate-depleted diets prior to induction of AKI, indicating that the marked FGF23 elevation is at least partially independent of dietary phosphate. Bone production of FGF23 was significantly increased in AKI. The half-life of intravenously administered recombinant FGF23 was only modestly increased. Consistent with the mouse data, plasma FGF23 levels rose 15.9-fold by 24 hours following cardiac surgery in patients who developed AKI. The levels were significantly higher than in those without postoperative AKI. Thus, circulating FGF23 levels rise rapidly during AKI in rodents and humans. In mice this increase is independent of established modulators of FGF23 secretion. PMID:23657144

  20. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin: a promising biomarker for human acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Devarajan, Prasad

    2010-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common and serious condition, the diagnosis of which depends on serum creatinine measurements. Unfortunately, creatinine is a delayed and unreliable indicator of AKI. The lack of early biomarkers has crippled our ability to translate promising experimental therapies to human AKI. Fortunately, understanding the early stress response of the kidney to acute injuries has revealed a number of potential biomarkers. The discovery, translation and validation of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, arguably the most promising novel AKI biomarker, are reviewed in this article. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin is emerging as an excellent standalone troponin-like biomarker in the plasma and urine for the prediction of AKI, monitoring clinical trials in AKI and for the prognosis of AKI in several common clinical scenarios. PMID:20406069

  1. Kidney diseases in children - early diagnosis and prevention.

    PubMed

    Polenakovic, Momir; Gucev, Zoran; Tasic, Velibor

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric kidney diseases were in the focus of the World Kidney Day 2016. Macedonian pediatric nephrologists gave their contribution with public appearance in kindergartens, primary and secondary schools, with interactive lectures and discussion with the youngest about the kidney function, healthy life style and simple measures to prevent kidney and urinary tract diseases. Besides promotive appearance in the media, series of lectures were presented in front of the health professionals. The aim was to attract the attention of the professionals for early diagnosis and prevention of kidney disease. The action starts in utero, followed by early postnatal imaging and assessment, conservative treatment and in selected cases surgical treatment. The emphasis is on the multidisciplinary and comprehensive approach to children and adolescents with kidney diseases. PMID:27442411

  2. Dynamic Multiphoton Microscopy: Focusing Light on Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Molitoris, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a major global health problem; much research has been conducted on AKI, and numerous agents have shown benefit in animal studies, but none have translated into treatments. There is, therefore, a pressing unmet need to increase knowledge of the pathophysiology of AKI. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) provides a tool to non-invasively visualize dynamic events in real time and at high resolution in rodent kidneys, and in this article we review its application to study novel mechanisms and treatments in different forms of AKI. PMID:25180263

  3. Nutrition for Early Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Center Medical Education Institute, Inc. (MEI) MedlinePlus Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Nutrition for Early Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults Page Content On this page: ...

  4. Nephrotoxin Microinjection in Zebrafish to Model Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    McKee, Robert A; Wingert, Rebecca A

    2016-01-01

    The kidneys are susceptible to harm from exposure to chemicals they filter from the bloodstream. This can lead to organ injury associated with a rapid decline in renal function and development of the clinical syndrome known as acute kidney injury (AKI). Pharmacological agents used to treat medical circumstances ranging from bacterial infection to cancer, when administered individually or in combination with other drugs, can initiate AKI. Zebrafish are a useful animal model to study the chemical effects on renal function in vivo, as they form an embryonic kidney comprised of nephron functional units that are conserved with higher vertebrates, including humans. Further, zebrafish can be utilized to perform genetic and chemical screens, which provide opportunities to elucidate the cellular and molecular facets of AKI and develop therapeutic strategies such as the identification of nephroprotective molecules. Here, we demonstrate how microinjection into the zebrafish embryo can be utilized as a paradigm for nephrotoxin studies. PMID:27500823

  5. Renoprotective approaches and strategies in acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuan; Song, Meifang; Liu, Yu; Liu, Hong; Sun, Lin; Peng, Youming; Liu, Fuyou; Venkatachalam, Manjeri A; Dong, Zheng

    2016-07-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a major renal disease associated with high mortality rate and increasing prevalence. Decades of research have suggested numerous chemical and biological agents with beneficial effects in AKI. In addition, cell therapy and molecular targeting have been explored for reducing kidney tissue damage and promoting kidney repair or recovery from AKI. Mechanistically, these approaches may mitigate oxidative stress, inflammation, cell death, and mitochondrial and other organellar damage, or activate cytoprotective mechanisms such as autophagy and pro-survival factors. However, none of these findings has been successfully translated into clinical treatment of AKI. In this review, we analyze these findings and propose experimental strategies for the identification of renoprotective agents or methods with clinical potential. Moreover, we propose the consideration of combination therapy by targeting multiple targets in AKI. PMID:27108948

  6. Molecular Ultrasound Imaging of Tissue Inflammation Using an Animal Model of Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hoyt, Kenneth; Warram, Jason M.; Wang, Dezhi; Ratnayaka, Sithira; Traylor, Amie; Agarwal, Anupam

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of molecular ultrasound (US) imaging for monitoring the early inflammatory effects following acute kidney injury. Procedures A population of rats underwent 30 min of renal ischemia (acute kidney injury, N=6) or sham injury (N=4) using established surgical methods. Animals were divided and molecular US imaging was performed during the bolus injection of a targeted microbubble (MB) contrast agent to either P-selectin or vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1). Imaging was performed before surgery and 4 and 24 h thereafter. After manual segmentation of renal tissue space, the molecular US signal was calculated as the difference between time-intensity curve data before MB injection and after reaching steady-state US image enhancement. All animals were terminated after the 24 h imaging time point and kidneys excised for immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis. Results Renal inflammation was analyzed using molecular US imaging. While results using the P-selectin and VCAM-1 targeted MBs were comparable, it appears that the former was more sensitive to biomarker expression. All molecular US imaging measures had a positive correlation with IHC findings. Conclusions Acute kidney injury is a serious disease in need of improved noninvasive methods to help diagnose the extent of injury and monitor the tissue throughout disease progression. Molecular US imaging appears well suited to address this challenge and more research is warranted. PMID:25905474

  7. Acute kidney injury and ESRD management in austere environments.

    PubMed

    Raman, Gaurav; Perkins, Robert M; Jaar, Bernard G

    2012-05-01

    Current knowledge about managing acute kidney injury in disaster situations stems mostly from lessons learned while taking care of crush syndrome patients during major earthquakes. More recently, there has been a greater focus on emergency preparedness for ESRD management. Natural or man-made disasters create an "austere environment," wherein resources to administer standard of care are limited. Advance planning and timely coordinated intervention during disasters are paramount to administer effective therapies and save lives. This article reviews the presentation and management of disaster victims with acute kidney injury and those requiring renal replacement therapies. Major contributions of some key national and international organizations in the field of disaster nephrology are highlighted. The article intends to increase awareness about nephrology care of disaster victims, among nephrology and non-nephrology providers alike. PMID:22578674

  8. New Biomarkers of Acute Kidney Injury and the Cardio-renal Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Changes in renal function are one of the most common manifestations of severe illness. There is a clinical need to intervene early with proven treatments in patients with potentially deleterious changes in renal function. Unfortunately progress has been hindered by poor definitions of renal dysfunction and a lack of early biomarkers of renal injury. In recent years, the definitional problem has been addressed with the establishment of a new well-defined diagnostic entity, acute kidney injury (AKI), which encompasses the wide spectrum of kidney dysfunction, together with clearer definition and sub-classification of the cardio-renal syndromes. From the laboratory have emerged new biomarkers which allow early detection of AKI, including neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) and cystatin C. This review describes the new concepts of AKI and the cardio-renal syndromes as well as novel biomarkers which allow early detection of AKI. Panels of AKI biomarker tests are likely to revolutionise the diagnosis and management of critically ill patients in the coming years. Earlier diagnosis and intervention should significantly reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with acute kidney damage. PMID:21474979

  9. Pathophysiology of cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Ozkok, Abdullah; Edelstein, Charles L

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin and other platinum derivatives are the most widely used chemotherapeutic agents to treat solid tumors including ovarian, head and neck, and testicular germ cell tumors. A known complication of cisplatin administration is acute kidney injury (AKI). The nephrotoxic effect of cisplatin is cumulative and dose-dependent and often necessitates dose reduction or withdrawal. Recurrent episodes of AKI may result in chronic kidney disease. The pathophysiology of cisplatin-induced AKI involves proximal tubular injury, oxidative stress, inflammation, and vascular injury in the kidney. There is predominantly acute tubular necrosis and also apoptosis in the proximal tubules. There is activation of multiple proinflammatory cytokines and infiltration of inflammatory cells in the kidney. Inhibition of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α or IL-33 or depletion of CD4+ T cells or mast cells protects against cisplatin-induced AKI. Cisplatin also causes endothelial cell injury. An understanding of the pathogenesis of cisplatin-induced AKI is important for the development of adjunctive therapies to prevent AKI, to lessen the need for dose decrease or drug withdrawal, and to lessen patient morbidity and mortality. PMID:25165721

  10. Recent developments in epigenetics of acute and chronic kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Marpadga A; Natarajan, Rama

    2015-08-01

    The growing epidemic of obesity and diabetes, the aging population as well as prevalence of drug abuse has led to significant increases in the rates of the closely associated acute and chronic kidney diseases, including diabetic nephropathy. Furthermore, evidence shows that parental behavior and diet can affect the phenotype of subsequent generations via epigenetic transmission mechanisms. These data suggest a strong influence of the environment on disease susceptibility and that, apart from genetic susceptibility, epigenetic mechanisms need to be evaluated to gain critical new information about kidney diseases. Epigenetics is the study of processes that control gene expression and phenotype without alterations in the underlying DNA sequence. Epigenetic modifications, including cytosine DNA methylation and covalent post-translational modifications of histones in chromatin, are part of the epigenome, the interface between the stable genome and the variable environment. This dynamic epigenetic layer responds to external environmental cues to influence the expression of genes associated with disease states. The field of epigenetics has seen remarkable growth in the past few years with significant advances in basic biology, contributions to human disease, as well as epigenomics technologies. Further understanding of how the renal cell epigenome is altered by metabolic and other stimuli can yield novel new insights into the pathogenesis of kidney diseases. In this review, we have discussed the current knowledge on the role of epigenetic mechanisms (primarily DNAme and histone modifications) in acute and chronic kidney diseases, and their translational potential to identify much needed new therapies. PMID:25993323

  11. Recent Developments in Epigenetics of Acute and Chronic Kidney Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Marpadga A.; Natarajan, Rama

    2015-01-01

    The growing epidemic of obesity and diabetes, the aging population as well as prevalence of drug abuse has led to significant increases in the rates of the closely associated acute and chronic kidney diseases, including diabetic nephropathy. Furthermore, evidence shows that parental behavior and diet can affect the phenotype of subsequent generations via epigenetic transmission mechanisms. These data suggest a strong influence of the environment on disease susceptibility and that, apart from genetic susceptibility, epigenetic mechanisms need to be evaluated to gain critical new information about kidney diseases. Epigenetics is the study of processes that control gene expression and phenotype without alterations in the underlying DNA sequence. Epigenetic modifications, including cytosine DNA methylation and covalent post translational modifications of histones in chromatin are part of the epigenome, the interface between the stable genome and the variable environment. This dynamic epigenetic layer responds to external environmental cues to influence the expression of genes associated with disease states. The field of epigenetics has seen remarkable growth in the past few years with significant advances in basic biology, contributions to human disease, as well as epigenomics technologies. Further understanding of how the renal cell epigenome is altered by metabolic and other stimuli can yield novel new insights into the pathogenesis of kidney diseases. In this review, we have discussed the current knowledge on the role of epigenetic mechanisms (primarily DNA me and histone modifications) in acute and chronic kidney diseases, and their translational potential to identify much needed new therapies. PMID:25993323

  12. [Uncaria tomentosa and acute ischemic kidney injury in rats].

    PubMed

    de Fátima Fernandes Vattimo, Maria; da Silva, Natalia Oliveira

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the renoprotective effects of Uncaria Tomentosa (cat's claw) on ischemic acute kidney injury induced by renal clamping in rats. The hypoxia and hypoperfusion increase the production of reactive species already present in the inflammatory process. Results showed that the renal function evaluated by creatinine clearance, the urinary excretion of peroxides and malondealdehyde indexes demonstrated that UT induced renoprotection, probably related to its antioxidant activities. PMID:21445508

  13. Ammonium dichromate poisoning: A rare cause of acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, H.; Gopi, M.; Arumugam, A.

    2014-01-01

    Ammonium dichromate is an inorganic compound frequently used in screen and color printing. Being a strong oxidizing agent, it causes oxygen free radical injury resulting in organ failure. We report a 25-year-old female who presented with acute kidney injury after consumption of ammonium dichromate. She was managed successfully with hemodialysis and supportive measures. This case is reported to highlight the toxicity of ammonium dichromate. PMID:25484533

  14. Iron, hormesis, and protection in acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Sundararaman

    2016-07-01

    Iron is critical for cellular, organismal, and possibly universal existence. Use of iron complexes to treat human diseases is ancient and is described in detail in Ayurveda/Siddha systems of medicine. Old aphorisms from Siddha medicine ("Alavukku Minjinal Amirdhamum Nanjagum," an elixir turns poisonous when taken in excess) and Paracelsus ("Die Dosis macht das Gift," the dose makes the poison) are of practical relevance in understanding the role of this ancient metal in acute kidney injury. PMID:27312440

  15. AT1 receptor antagonism before ischemia prevents the transition of acute kidney injury to chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Romo, Roxana; Benítez, Kenia; Barrera-Chimal, Jonatan; Pérez-Villalva, Rosalba; Gómez, Arturo; Aguilar-León, Diana; Rangel-Santiago, Jesús F; Huerta, Sara; Gamba, Gerardo; Uribe, Norma; Bobadilla, Norma A

    2016-02-01

    Despite clinical recovery of patients from an episode of acute kidney injury (AKI), progression to chronic kidney disease (CKD) is possible on long-term follow-up. However, mechanisms of this are poorly understood. Here, we determine whether activation of angiotensin-II type 1 receptors during AKI triggers maladaptive mechanisms that lead to CKD. Nine months after AKI, male Wistar rats develop CKD characterized by renal dysfunction, proteinuria, renal hypertrophy, glomerulosclerosis, tubular atrophy, and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Renal injury was associated with increased oxidative stress, inflammation, α-smooth muscle actin expression, and activation of transforming growth factor β; the latter mainly found in epithelial cells. Although administration of losartan prior to the initial ischemic insult did not prevent or reduce AKI severity, it effectively prevented eventual CKD. Three days after AKI, renal dysfunction, tubular structural injury, and elevation of urinary biomarkers were present. While the losartan group had similar early renal injury, renal perfusion was completely restored as early as day 3 postischemia. Further, there was increased vascular endothelial growth factor expression and an early activation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 α, a transcription factor that regulates expression of many genes that help reduce renal injury. Thus, AT1 receptor antagonism prior to ischemia prevented AKI to CKD transition by improving early renal blood flow recovery, lesser inflammation, and increased hypoxia-inducible factor 1 α activity. PMID:26509589

  16. Urinary Biomarkers of Acute Kidney Injury in Patients With Liver Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Qasem Anass; El Sayed, Farag Salama; Emad, Hamed; Mohamed, Emara; Ahmed, Bihery; Heba, Pasha

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background and aim: Acute kidney injury is a common complication in cirrhotic patients. Serum creatinine is a poor biomarker for detection of renal impairment in cirrhotic patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate Urinary Neutrophils Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin (NGAL) and Urinary interleukin-18 (IL-18) as early biomarkers of acute kidney injury in cirrhotic patients. Patients and methods: 160 cirrhotic patients was enrolled in this study divided into 3 main groups according to presence or absence of ascites and renal impairment. Results: Significant elevation of both Urinary NGAL and Urinary IL-18 in cirrhotic patients with renal impairment especially in patients with Acute tubular necrosis (ATN) was observed. AUROC was (0.909) with (sensitivity 95.5 %, specificity 76.1) for Urinary NGAL and AUROC was (0.975), with (sensitivity 95.5 %, specificity 91.3 %) for Urinary IL-18. Conclusion: both Urinary NGAL and Urinary IL-18 can act as urinary biomarkers of acute kidney injury in cirrhotic patient PMID:24937940

  17. Acute kidney injury in critically ill cancer patients: an update.

    PubMed

    Lameire, Norbert; Vanholder, Raymond; Van Biesen, Wim; Benoit, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Patients with cancer represent a growing group among actual ICU admissions (up to 20 %). Due to their increased susceptibility to infectious and noninfectious complications related to the underlying cancer itself or its treatment, these patients frequently develop acute kidney injury (AKI). A wide variety of definitions for AKI are still used in the cancer literature, despite existing guidelines on definitions and staging of AKI. Alternative diagnostic investigations such as Cystatin C and urinary biomarkers are discussed briefly. This review summarizes the literature between 2010 and 2015 on epidemiology and prognosis of AKI in this population. Overall, the causes of AKI in the setting of malignancy are similar to those in other clinical settings, including preexisting chronic kidney disease. In addition, nephrotoxicity induced by the anticancer treatments including the more recently introduced targeted therapies is increasingly observed. However, data are sometimes difficult to interpret because they are often presented from the oncological rather than from the nephrological point of view. Because the development of the acute tumor lysis syndrome is one of the major causes of AKI in patients with a high tumor burden or a high cell turnover, the diagnosis, risk factors, and preventive measures of the syndrome will be discussed. Finally, we will briefly discuss renal replacement therapy modalities and the emergence of chronic kidney disease in the growing subgroup of critically ill post-AKI survivors. PMID:27480256

  18. Renal functional reserve and renal recovery after acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aashish; Mucino, Marìa Jimena; Ronco, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Renal functional reserve (RFR) represents the capacity of the kidney to increase glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in response to certain physiological or pathological stimuli or conditions. Once baseline GFR is determined, RFR can be assessed clinically after an oral protein load or intravenous amino acid infusion. In clinical practice, baseline GFR displays variable levels due to diet or other factors. RFR is the difference between peak 'stress' GFR induced by the test (p.o. or i.v.) and the baseline GFR. In clinical scenarios where hyperfiltration is present (high baseline GFR due to pregnancy, hypertension or diabetic nephropathy, in solitary kidney or kidney donors), RFR may be fully or partially used to achieve normal or supranormal renal function. Since commonly used renal function markers, such as GFR, may remain within normal ranges until 50% of nephrons are lost or in patients with a single remnant kidney, the RFR test may represent a sensitive and early way to assess the functional decline in the kidney. RFR assessment may become an important tool to evaluate the ability of the kidney to recover completely or partially after a kidney attack. In case of healing with a defect and progressive fibrosis, recovery may appear complete clinically, but a reduced RFR may be a sign of a maladaptive repair or subclinical loss of renal mass. Thus, a reduction in RFR may represent the equivalent of renal frailty or susceptibility to insults. The main aim of this article is to review the concept of RFR, its utility in different clinical scenarios, and future perspective for its use. PMID:25343829

  19. Protein biomarkers associated with acute renal failure and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Perco, P; Pleban, C; Kainz, A; Lukas, A; Mayer, G; Mayer, B; Oberbauer, R

    2006-11-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) as well as chronic kidney disease (CKD) are currently categorized according to serum creatinine concentrations. Serum creatinine, however, has shortcomings because of its low predictive values. The need for novel markers for the early diagnosis and prognosis of renal diseases is imminent, particularly for markers reflecting intrinsic organ injury in stages when glomerular filtration is not impaired. This review summarizes protein markers discussed in the context of ARF as well as CKD, and provides an overview on currently available discovery results following 'omics' techniques. The identified set of candidate marker proteins is discussed in their cellular and functional context. The systematic review of proteomics and genomics studies revealed 56 genes to be associated with acute or chronic kidney disease. Context analysis, i.e. correlation of biological processes and molecular functions of reported kidney markers, revealed that 15 genes on the candidate list were assigned to the most significant ontology groups: immunity and defence. Other significantly enriched groups were cell communication (14 genes), signal transduction (22 genes) and apoptosis (seven genes). Among 24 candidate protein markers, nine proteins were also identified by gene expression studies. Next generation candidate marker proteins with improved diagnostic and prognostic values for kidney diseases will be derived from whole genome scans and protemics approaches. Prospective validation still remains elusive for all proposed candidates. PMID:17032342

  20. Impact of an Early Invasive Strategy versus Conservative Strategy for Unstable Angina and Non-ST Elevation Acute Coronary Syndrome in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Catriona; Nitsch, Dorothea; Lee, Jasmine; Fogarty, Damian; Sharpe, Claire C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical practice guidelines support an early invasive approach after NSTE-ACS in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). There is no direct randomised controlled trial evidence in the CKD population, and whether the benefit of an early invasive approach is maintained across the spectrum of severity of CKD remains controversial. Methods We conducted a systematic review to evaluate the association between an early invasive approach and all-cause mortality in patients with CKD. We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE (1990-May 2015) and article reference lists. Data describing study design, participants, invasive management strategies, renal function, all-cause mortality and risk of bias were extracted. Results 3,861 potentially relevant studies were identified. Ten studies, representing data on 147,908 individuals with NSTE-ACS met the inclusion criteria. Qualitative heterogeneity in the definitions of early invasive approach, comparison groups and renal dysfunction existed. Meta-analysis of the RCT derived and observational data were generally supportive of an early invasive approach in CKD (RR0.76 (95% CI 0.49–1.17) and RR0.50 (95%CI 0.42–0.59) respectively). Meta-analysis of the observational studies demonstrated a large degree of heterogeneity (I2 79%) driven in part by study size and heterogeneity across various kidney function levels. Conclusions The observational data support that an early invasive approach after NSTE-ACS confers a survival benefit in those with early-moderate CKD. Local opportunities for quality improvement should be sought. Those with severe CKD and the dialysis population are high risk and under-studied. Novel and inclusive approaches for CKD and dialysis patients in cardiovascular clinical trials are needed. PMID:27195786

  1. Biomarkers of acute kidney injury and associations with short- and long-term outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Schaub, Jennifer A.; Parikh, Chirag R.

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is strongly associated with increased mortality and other adverse outcomes. Medical researchers have intensively investigated novel biomarkers to predict short- and long-term outcomes of acute kidney injury in many patient care settings, such as cardiac surgery, intensive care units, heart failure, and transplant. Future research should focus on leveraging this relationship to improve enrollment for clinical trials of acute kidney injury. PMID:27239295

  2. Pathogenesis of Acute Kidney Injury: Foundation for Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Kinsey, Gilbert R.; Okusa, Mark D.

    2011-01-01

    The pathogenesis of acute kidney injury (AKI) is complex, involving factors such as vasoconstriction, leukostasis, vascular congestion, cell death, and abnormal immune modulators and growth factors. Many targeted clinical therapies have failed, are inconclusive, or have yet to be tested. Given the complexity of the pathogenesis of AKI, it may be naïve to expect one therapeutic intervention would have success. Some examples of detrimental processes that can be blocked in pre-clinical models to improve kidney function and survival are apoptotic cell death in tubular epithelial cells, complement-mediated immune system activation, and impairment of cellular homeostasis and metabolism. Modalities with potential to reduce morbidity and mortality in AKI include vasodilators, growth factors, anti-inflammatory agents, and cell-based therapies. Pharmacological agents that target these diverse pathways are being used clinically for other indications. Using combinatorial approaches in future clinical trials may improve our ability to prevent and treat AKI. PMID:21530035

  3. Mitochondria: a therapeutic target in acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Ishimoto, Yu; Inagi, Reiko

    2016-07-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common clinical entity that is associated with high mortality and morbidity. It is a risk factor for the development and progression of chronic kidney disease. Presently, no effective treatment for AKI is available, and novel therapeutic approaches are desperately needed. Accumulating evidence highlights mitochondrial dysfunction as an important factor in the pathogenesis of AKI. Recent advances in our understanding of the molecules involved in mitochondrial biogenesis, fusion/fission, mitophagy and their pathophysiological roles will lead to the development of drugs that target mitochondria for the treatment of various diseases, including AKI. In this review, we summarize current knowledge of the contribution of mitochondria-related pathophysiology in AKI and the prospective benefits of mitochondria-targeting therapeutic approaches against AKI. PMID:26333547

  4. Difficulties in diagnosing acute kidney injury post liver transplantation using serum creatinine based diagnostic criteria

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Banwari; Davenport, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Renal function in patients with advanced cirrhosis is an important prognostic factor for survival both prior to and following liver transplantation. The importance of renal function is reflected by the introduction of the model for end stage liver disease (MELD) score, which includes serum creatinine. The MELD score has been shown to predict the short term risk of death for transplant wait listed patients and is currently used by many countries to allocate liver transplants on the basis of severity of underlying illness. Changes in serum creatinine are also used to stage acute kidney injury. However prior to liver transplantation the serum creatinine typically over estimates underlying renal function, particularly when a colorimetric Jaffe based assay is used, and paradoxically then under estimates renal function post liver transplantation, particularly when immunophyllins are started early as part of transplant immunosuppression. As acute kidney injury is defined by changes in serum creatinine, this potentially leads to over estimation of the incidence and severity of acute kidney injury in the immediate post-operative period. PMID:25349641

  5. A case of life-threatening acute kidney injury with toxic encephalopathy caused by Dioscorea quinqueloba.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyung-Sik; Heo, Sang Taek

    2015-01-01

    Some herbal medications induce acute kidney injury. The acute kidney injuries caused by herbal medications are mild and commonly treated by palliative care. A 51-years-old man who drank the juice squeezed from the raw tubers of Dioscorea quinqueloba (D. quinqueloba) was admitted with nausea, vomiting and chilling. He developed a seizure with decreased level of consciousness. He was diagnosed with acute kidney injury, which was cured by continuous venovenous hemodialfiltration. Non-detoxified D. quinqueloba can cause severe acute kidney injury with toxic encephalopathy. It is critical to inform possible adverse effects of the medicinal herbs and to implement more strict regulation of these products. PMID:25510780

  6. Bilateral ureteric stones: an unusual cause of acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Sumner, Daniel; Rehnberg, Lucas; Kler, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    A 49-year-old man presented to the accident and emergency department, with a short history of vague abdominal pain, abdominal distension and two episodes of frank haematuria. A plain chest film showed dilated loops of large bowel and blood results on admission showed an acute kidney injury (stage 3). A diagnosis of bowel obstruction was made initially but a CT scan of the abdomen showed bilateral obstructing calculi. After initial resuscitation, the patient had bilateral ultrasound-guided nephrostomies and haemofiltration. He later underwent bilateral antegrade ureteric stenting. A decision will later be made on whether or not he is fit enough to undergo ureteroscopy and laser stone fragmentation. PMID:27030462

  7. Pentoxifylline in ischemia-induced acute kidney injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Alice S; Rodrigues, Luiz Erlon; Martinelli, Reinaldo

    2009-01-01

    Ischemia is an important cause of acute kidney injury (AKI). Pentoxifylline has been shown to improve tissue oxygenation and endothelial function and inhibit proinflammatory cytokine production. The aim of this study was to evaluate a possible renal protective effect of pentoxifylline against ischemia by measuring mitochondrial respiratory metabolism as an index of cell damage. Rats were submitted to right nephrectomy. The left kidney was submitted to ischemia by clamping the renal artery for 45 minutes. Immediately after release of the clamp, 1 mL of a solution containing 20 mg of pentoxifylline/mL was injected intravenously, while a control group received 1 mL of normal saline intravenously. Five minutes after the injection, the left kidney was removed, homogenized, and subjected to refrigerated differential centrifugation. Mitochondrial respiratory metabolism was measured polarographically. The mitochondria isolated from the kidneys of saline-treated rats had an endogenous respiration of 9.20 +/- 1.0 etamol O(2)/mg protein/min compared to 8.9 +/- 1.4 etamol O(2)/mg protein/min in the pentoxifylline-treated rats (p > 0.05). When stimulated by sodium succinate, the respiratory metabolism increased in a similar fashion in both groups of animals: 17.9 +/- 2.3 and 18.1 +/- 2.1 etamol O(2)/mg protein/min in the untreated and pentoxifylline-treated groups, respectively (p > 0.05). In the present study, pentoxifylline was not found to exert any protective effect on the kidney. It is possible that at the time of pentoxifylline administration, the mitochondria had already been damaged by the process of ischemia, and its effect may have been insufficient to reverse cell damage. PMID:19925292

  8. TNFR1-dependent pulmonary apoptosis during ischemic acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    White, Laura E.; Santora, Rachel J.; Cui, Yan; Moore, Frederick A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite advancements in renal replacement therapy, the mortality rate for acute kidney injury (AKI) remains unacceptably high, likely due to remote organ injury. Kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) activates cellular and soluble mediators that incite a distinct pulmonary proinflammatory and proapoptotic response. Tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1) has been identified as a prominent death receptor activated in the lungs during ischemic AKI. We hypothesized that circulating TNF-α released from the postischemic kidney induces TNFR1-mediated pulmonary apoptosis, and we aimed to elucidate molecular pathways to programmed cell death. Using an established murine model of kidney IRI, we characterized the time course for increased circulatory and pulmonary TNF-α levels and measured concurrent upregulation of pulmonary TNFR1 expression. We then identified TNFR1-dependent pulmonary apoptosis after ischemic AKI using TNFR1−/− mice. Subsequent TNF-α signaling disruption with Etanercept implicated circulatory TNF-α as a key soluble mediator of pulmonary apoptosis and lung microvascular barrier dysfunction during ischemic AKI. We further elucidated pathways of TNFR1-mediated apoptosis with NF-κB (Complex I) and caspase-8 (Complex II) expression and discovered that TNFR1 proapoptotic signaling induces NF-κB activation. Additionally, inhibition of NF-κB (Complex I) resulted in a proapoptotic phenotype, lung barrier leak, and altered cellular flice inhibitory protein signaling independent of caspase-8 (Complex II) activation. Ischemic AKI activates soluble TNF-α and induces TNFR1-dependent pulmonary apoptosis through augmentation of the prosurvival and proapoptotic TNFR1 signaling pathway. Kidney-lung crosstalk after ischemic AKI represents a complex pathological process, yet focusing on specific biological pathways may yield potential future therapeutic targets. PMID:22728466

  9. Research Progress on Regulatory T Cells in Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yamei; Tao, Yuhong

    2015-01-01

    Immune inflammation is crucial in mediating acute kidney injury (AKI). Immune cells of both the innate and adaptive immune systems substantially contribute to overall renal damage in AKI. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are key regulator of immunological function and have been demonstrated to ameliorate injury in several murine experimental models of renal inflammation. Recent studies have illuminated the renal-protective function of Tregs in AKI. Tregs appear to exert beneficial effects in both the acute injury phase and the recovery phase of AKI. Additionally, Tregs-based immunotherapy may represent a promising approach to ameliorate AKI and promote recovery from AKI. This review will highlight the recent insights into the role of Tregs and their therapeutic potential in AKI. PMID:26273681

  10. [Urinalysis in patients at the early stage of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Rybak, Katarzyna; Sporek, Mateusz; Gala-Błądzińska, Agnieszka; Mazur-Laskowska, Małgorzata; Dumnicka, Paulina; Walocha, Jerzy; Drożdż, Ryszard; Kuźniewski, Marek; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Urinalysis is a routine and cheap laboratory test that provides clinically useful information in patients with acute abdominal conditions, including acute pancreatitis. The aim of the study was to assess the relationships between the results of urinalysis and the course of the disease among 65 patients with acute pancreatitis (34 men and 31 women, mean age 61 ± 19 years) at the early phase of the disease, i.e. during the first 72 hours from the onset of symptoms. Mild acute pancreatitis was diagnosed in 47 patients, moderately severe in 13 and severe in 5. The most prevalent abnormalities were proteinuria (43% of patients), high urinary bilirubin (20%), erythrocytes (18%), glucose (18%) and leukocytes (17%). High urinary protein and low specific gravity were associated with more severe acute disease and with acute kidney injury. The severity of bilirubinuria and proteinuria were positively correlated with urine concentrations of neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin (NGAL). Urinalysis should be routinely performed in patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:27197429

  11. Risk Factors and Outcomes of Acute Kidney Injury in Patients With Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Tujios, Shannan R.; Hynan, Linda S.; Vazquez, Miguel A.; Larson, Anne M.; Seremba, Emmanuel; Sanders, Corron M.; Lee, William M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Patients with acute liver failure (ALF) frequently develop renal dysfunction, yet its overall incidence and outcomes have not been fully assessed. We investigated the incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) among patients with ALF, using defined criteria to identify risk factors and to evaluate its effect on overall outcomes. METHODS We performed a retrospective review of data from 1604 patients enrolled in the Acute Liver Failure Study Group, from 1998 through 2010. Patients were classified by the Acute Kidney Injury Network criteria, as well as for etiology of liver failure (acetaminophen-based, ischemic, and all others). RESULTS Seventy percent of patients with ALF developed AKI, and 30% received renal replacement therapy (RRT). Patients with severe AKI had higher international normalized ratio values than those without renal dysfunction (P < .001), and a higher proportion had advanced-grade coma (coma grades 3 or 4; P < .001) or presented with hypotension requiring vasopressor therapy (P < .001). A greater proportion of patients with acetaminophen-induced ALF had severe kidney injury than of patients with other etiologies of ALF; 34% required RRT, compared with 25% of patients with ALF not associated with acetaminophen or ischemia (P < .002). Of the patients with ALF who were alive at 3 weeks after study entry, significantly fewer with AKI survived for 1 year. Although AKI reduced the overall survival time, more than 50% of patients with acetaminophen-associated or ischemic ALF survived without liver transplantation (even with RRT), compared with 19% of patients with ALF attribute to other causes (P < .001). Only 4% of patients requiring RRT became dependent on dialysis. CONCLUSIONS Based on a retrospective analysis of data from more than 1600 patients, AKI is common in patients with ALF and affects short- and long-term outcomes, but rarely results in chronic kidney disease. Acetaminophen-induced kidney injury is frequent, but patients have

  12. Comparison of stem cell therapies for acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Carol J; Distaso, Casey T; Spitz, Kristin M; Verdun, Valerie A; Haramati, Aviad

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is the rapid onset of decreased kidney function that ultimately increases mortality and morbidity. Stem cell research is a promising avenue for curative and preventative therapies of kidney injury, however, there are many types of stem cells under investigation. Currently there is no research to compare the value of one stem cell method over another. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) have been shown to differentiate into renal cells, though further clinical research is needed to fully explore potential therapeutic strategies. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have long been investigated in the preclinical setting and have recently been successful in Phase I clinical trials. MSCs may represent a promising new therapeutic approach to treat AKI as they demonstrate renoprotective effects post-injury via the secretion of promitotic, anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory, and immunomodulatory factors. Given the most current research, MSCs appear to offer a promising course of treatment for AKI. PMID:27335697

  13. Vitamin D deficiency aggravates ischemic acute kidney injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    de Bragança, Ana Carolina; Volpini, Rildo A; Canale, Daniele; Gonçalves, Janaína G; Shimizu, Maria Heloisa M; Sanches, Talita R; Seguro, Antonio C; Andrade, Lúcia

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency (VDD) increases the risk of death in hospitalized patients. Renal ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) induces acute kidney injury (AKI), which activates cell cycle inhibitors, including p21, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor and genomic target of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, which is in turn a potent immunomodulator with antiproliferative effects. In this study, we assess the impact of VDD in renal IRI. Wistar rats were divided into groups, each evaluated for 30 days: control (receiving a standard diet); VDD (receiving a vitamin D-free diet); IRI (receiving a standard diet and subjected to 45-min bilateral renal ischemia on day 28); and VDD + IRI (receiving a vitamin D-free diet and subjected to 45-min bilateral renal ischemia on day 28). At 48 h after IRI, animals were euthanized; blood, urine, and kidney tissue samples were collected. Compared with IRI rats, VDD + IRI rats showed a more severe decrease in glomerular filtration rate, greater urinary protein excretion, a higher kidney/body weight ratio and lower renal aquaporin 2 expression, as well as greater morphological damage, characterized by increased interstitial area and tubular necrosis. Our results suggest that the severity of tubular damage in IRI may be associated with downregulation of vitamin D receptors and p21. VDD increases renal inflammation, cell proliferation and cell injury in ischemic AKI. PMID:25780095

  14. Renalase and Biomarkers of Contrast-Induced Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wybraniec, Maciej T.; Mizia-Stec, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Background Contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) remains one of the crucial issues related to the development of invasive cardiology. The massive use of contrast media exposes patients to a great risk of contrast-induced nephropathy and chronic kidney disease development, and increases morbidity and mortality rates. The serum creatinine concentration does not allow for a timely and accurate CI-AKI diagnosis; hence numerous other biomarkers of renal injury have been proposed. Renalase, a novel catecholamine-metabolizing amine oxidase, is synthesized mainly in proximal tubular cells and secreted into urine and blood. It is primarily engaged in the degradation of circulating catecholamines. Notwithstanding its key role in blood pressure regulation, renalase remains a potential CI-AKI biomarker, which was shown to be markedly downregulated in the aftermath of renal injury. In this sense, renalase appears to be the first CI-AKI marker revealing an actual loss of renal function and indicating disease severity. Summary The purpose of this review is to summarize the contemporary knowledge about the application of novel biomarkers of CI-AKI and to highlight the potential role of renalase as a functional marker of contrast-induced renal injury. Key Messages Renalase may constitute a missing biochemical link in the mutual interplay between kidney and cardiac pathology known as the cardiorenal syndrome. PMID:27194994

  15. Autophagy, Innate Immunity and Tissue Repair in Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Duann, Pu; Lianos, Elias A; Ma, Jianjie; Lin, Pei-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Kidney is a vital organ with high energy demands to actively maintain plasma hemodynamics, electrolytes and water homeostasis. Among the nephron segments, the renal tubular epithelium is endowed with high mitochondria density for their function in active transport. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an important clinical syndrome and a global public health issue with high mortality rate and socioeconomic burden due to lack of effective therapy. AKI results in acute cell death and necrosis of renal tubule epithelial cells accompanied with leakage of tubular fluid and inflammation. The inflammatory immune response triggered by the tubular cell death, mitochondrial damage, associative oxidative stress, and the release of many tissue damage factors have been identified as key elements driving the pathophysiology of AKI. Autophagy, the cellular mechanism that removes damaged organelles via lysosome-mediated degradation, had been proposed to be renoprotective. An in-depth understanding of the intricate interplay between autophagy and innate immune response, and their roles in AKI pathology could lead to novel therapies in AKI. This review addresses the current pathophysiology of AKI in aspects of mitochondrial dysfunction, innate immunity, and molecular mechanisms of autophagy. Recent advances in renal tissue regeneration and potential therapeutic interventions are also discussed. PMID:27153058

  16. Autophagy, Innate Immunity and Tissue Repair in Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Duann, Pu; Lianos, Elias A.; Ma, Jianjie; Lin, Pei-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Kidney is a vital organ with high energy demands to actively maintain plasma hemodynamics, electrolytes and water homeostasis. Among the nephron segments, the renal tubular epithelium is endowed with high mitochondria density for their function in active transport. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an important clinical syndrome and a global public health issue with high mortality rate and socioeconomic burden due to lack of effective therapy. AKI results in acute cell death and necrosis of renal tubule epithelial cells accompanied with leakage of tubular fluid and inflammation. The inflammatory immune response triggered by the tubular cell death, mitochondrial damage, associative oxidative stress, and the release of many tissue damage factors have been identified as key elements driving the pathophysiology of AKI. Autophagy, the cellular mechanism that removes damaged organelles via lysosome-mediated degradation, had been proposed to be renoprotective. An in-depth understanding of the intricate interplay between autophagy and innate immune response, and their roles in AKI pathology could lead to novel therapies in AKI. This review addresses the current pathophysiology of AKI in aspects of mitochondrial dysfunction, innate immunity, and molecular mechanisms of autophagy. Recent advances in renal tissue regeneration and potential therapeutic interventions are also discussed. PMID:27153058

  17. Adrenal insufficiency presenting as hypercalcemia and acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Seung Won; Kim, Tong Yoon; Lee, Sangmin; Jeong, Jeong Yeon; Shim, Hojoon; Han, Yu min; Choi, Kyu Eun; Shin, Seok Joon; Yoon, Hye Eun

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal insufficiency is an uncommon cause of hypercalcemia and not easily considered as an etiology of adrenal insufficiency in clinical practice, as not all cases of adrenal insufficiency manifest as hypercalcemia. We report a case of secondary adrenal insufficiency presenting as hypercalcemia and acute kidney injury in a 66-year-old female. The patient was admitted to the emergency department with general weakness and poor oral intake. Hypercalcemia (11.5 mg/dL) and moderate renal dysfunction (serum creatinine 4.9 mg/dL) were shown in her initial laboratory findings. Studies for malignancy and hyperparathyroidism showed negative results. Basal cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone levels and adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation test confirmed the diagnosis of adrenal insufficiency. With the administration of oral hydrocortisone, hypercalcemia was dramatically resolved within 3 days. This case shows that adrenal insufficiency may manifest as hypercalcemia and acute kidney injury, which implicates that adrenal insufficiency should be considered a cause of hypercalcemia in clinical practice. PMID:27536162

  18. Lithium-Induced Minimal Change Disease and Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Parul; Wong, Natalie; Zaltzman, Jeffrey S

    2015-01-01

    Context: Lithium carbonate is a psychiatric medication commonly used in the treatment of bipolar disorder. It has been implicated in inducing nephrogenic diabetes inspidus, chronic tubulointerstitial nephropathy, and acute tubular necrosis. We describe a case of lithium-induced minimal change disease (MCD) and acute kidney injury (AKI). Case Report: A 32-year-old female with a medical history of bipolar disorder treated with chronic lithium therapy presented with anasarca, fatigue, and tremors. Work-up revealed supra-therapeutic lithium levels, hypoalbuminemia, and significant proteinuria. The patient was treated conservatively with fluids and discontinuation of lithium therapy. Subsequently, she developed significant AKI and persistent proteinuria. She underwent a renal biopsy that demonstrated effacement of podocyte foot processes consistent with lithium-induced MCD. This was treated with corticosteroids, which decreased the proteinuria and resolved all the patient's symptoms. Conclusion: Lithium-induced MCD is a rare disease that affects patients of all ages. It is often associated with therapeutic lithium and is typically resolved with discontinuation of lithium. In some cases, concurrent AKI may result due to vascular obstruction from hyperalbuminuria and associated renal interstitial edema. Corticosteroids may be needed to reduce the proteinuria and prevent progression to chronic kidney disease. As such, patients on lithium therapy may benefit from monitoring of glomerular function via urinalysis to prevent the onset of nephrotic syndrome. PMID:26258081

  19. Acute kidney injury by radiographic contrast media: pathogenesis and prevention.

    PubMed

    Andreucci, Michele; Faga, Teresa; Pisani, Antonio; Sabbatini, Massimo; Michael, Ashour

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that iodinated radiographic contrast media may cause kidney dysfunction, particularly in patients with preexisting renal impairment associated with diabetes. This dysfunction, when severe, will cause acute renal failure (ARF). We may define contrast-induced Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) as ARF occurring within 24-72 hrs after the intravascular injection of iodinated radiographic contrast media that cannot be attributed to other causes. The mechanisms underlying contrast media nephrotoxicity have not been fully elucidated and may be due to several factors, including renal ischaemia, particularly in the renal medulla, the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), reduction of nitric oxide (NO) production, and tubular epithelial and vascular endothelial injury. However, contrast-induced AKI can be prevented, but in order to do so, we need to know the risk factors. We have reviewed the risk factors for contrast-induced AKI and measures for its prevention, providing a long list of references enabling readers to deeply evaluate them both. PMID:25197639

  20. Acute Kidney Injury by Radiographic Contrast Media: Pathogenesis and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Faga, Teresa; Pisani, Antonio; Michael, Ashour

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that iodinated radiographic contrast media may cause kidney dysfunction, particularly in patients with preexisting renal impairment associated with diabetes. This dysfunction, when severe, will cause acute renal failure (ARF). We may define contrast-induced Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) as ARF occurring within 24–72 hrs after the intravascular injection of iodinated radiographic contrast media that cannot be attributed to other causes. The mechanisms underlying contrast media nephrotoxicity have not been fully elucidated and may be due to several factors, including renal ischaemia, particularly in the renal medulla, the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), reduction of nitric oxide (NO) production, and tubular epithelial and vascular endothelial injury. However, contrast-induced AKI can be prevented, but in order to do so, we need to know the risk factors. We have reviewed the risk factors for contrast-induced AKI and measures for its prevention, providing a long list of references enabling readers to deeply evaluate them both. PMID:25197639

  1. Hyperglycemia and acute kidney injury in critically ill children

    PubMed Central

    Gordillo, Roberto; Ahluwalia, Tania; Woroniecki, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Background Hyperglycemia and acute kidney injury (AKI) are common in critically ill children and have been associated with higher morbidity and mortality. The incidence of AKI in children is difficult to estimate because of the lack of a standard definition for AKI. The pediatric RIFLE (Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss of kidney function, and End-stage kidney disease) criteria can be used to define AKI in children. Various biomarkers in urine and blood have been studied to detect AKI in critically ill children. However, it is not clear whether hyperglycemia is associated with AKI. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of hyperglycemia on kidney function and its effect on neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) in children. Methods We studied retrospective and prospective cohorts of pediatric critically ill subjects admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). We analyzed data from admission that included estimated glomerular filtration rate, plasma and urine NGAL, serum glucose and peak glycemia (highest glycemia during PICU admission), and length of hospital and PICU stay from two different institutions. Results We found that the prevalence of hyperglycemia was 89% in the retrospective cohort and 86% in the prospective cohort, P=0.99. AKI was associated with peak glycemia, P=0.03. There was a statistically significant correlation between peak glycemia and hospital and PICU stays, P=<0.001 and P<0.001, respectively. Urine NGAL and plasma NGAL were not statistically different in subjects with and without hyperglycemia, P=0.99 and P=0.85, respectively. Subjects on vasopressors had lower estimated glomerular filtration rate and higher glycemia, P=0.01 and P=0.04, respectively. Conclusion We conclude that in critically ill children, hyperglycemia is associated with AKI and longer PICU stays. PMID:27601931

  2. Acute Kidney Injury: the beginning of the end of the dark ages

    PubMed Central

    Winterberg, Pamela D.; Lu, Christopher Y.

    2011-01-01

    There has been enormous progress in the understanding of acute kidney injury (AKI) over the last five years. This article reviews some of the salient new findings, the challenges revealed by these findings, and new insights into the pathogenesis of ischemic AKI. Clinical studies have demonstrated that even a small, transient rise in serum creatinine increases the risk of mortality in hospitalized patients and that a single event of AKI increases the risk for developing chronic kidney disease. Although the overall mortality rate from AKI has improved over the last two decades, it continues to be significant. Current treatment is focused on maintaining renal perfusion and avoiding volume overload. However, new therapeutic targets are emerging for the treatment of AKI as our understanding of the pathogenesis of ischemic injury and inflammation increases. Early diagnosis, however, continues to be challenging as the search continues for sensitive and specific biomarkers. PMID:21817881

  3. Application of new acute kidney injury biomarkers in human randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Chirag R; Moledina, Dennis G; Coca, Steven G; Thiessen-Philbrook, Heather R; Garg, Amit X

    2016-06-01

    The use of novel biomarkers of acute kidney injury (AKI) in clinical trials may help evaluate treatments for AKI. Here we explore potential applications of biomarkers in simulated clinical trials of AKI using data from the TRIBE-AKI multicenter, prospective cohort study of patients undergoing cardiac surgery. First, in a hypothetical trial of an effective therapy at the time of acute tubular necrosis to prevent kidney injury progression, use of an indirect kidney injury marker such as creatinine compared to a new direct biomarker of kidney injury reduces the proportion of true acute tubular necrosis cases enrolled. The result is a lower observed relative risk reduction with the therapy, and lower statistical power to detect a therapy effect at a given sample size. Second, the addition of AKI biomarkers (interleukin-18 and NGAL) to clinical risk factors as eligibility criteria for trial enrollment in early AKI has the potential to increase the proportion of patients who will experience AKI progression and reduce trial cost. Third, we examine AKI biomarkers as outcome measures for the purposes of identifying therapies that warrant further testing in larger, multicenter, multi-country trials. In the hypothetical trial of lower cardiopulmonary bypass time to reduce the risk of postoperative AKI, the sample size required to detect a reduction in AKI is lower if new biomarkers are used to define AKI rather than serum creatinine. Thus, incorporation of new biomarkers of AKI has the potential to increase statistical power, decrease the sample size, and lower the cost of AKI trials. PMID:27165835

  4. Rare allergic reaction of the kidney: sitagliptin-induced acute tubulointerstitial nephritis.

    PubMed

    Alsaad, Ali A; Dhannoon, Sarah M; Pantin, Sally-Ann L; Porter, Ivan E

    2016-01-01

    A 56-year-old man with a history of diabetes mellitus type-2 and stage-2 chronic kidney disease secondary to diabetic nephropathy presented with an acute deterioration of kidney function. Non-invasive work-up failed to reveal the underlying aetiology for the acute kidney failure. Kidney biopsy revealed acute tubulointerstitial nephritis (ATIN) which was attributed to sitagliptin use. Only few case reports have shown this correlation. Our aim is to alert physicians and other providers of the potential effect of sitagliptin to cause ATIN with this biopsy-proven case. PMID:27436034

  5. Hemojuvelin Modulates Iron Stress During Acute Kidney Injury: Improved by Furin Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Young, Guang-Huar; Huang, Tao-Min; Wu, Che-Hsiung; Lai, Chun-Fu; Hou, Chun-Cheng; Peng, Kang-Yung; Liang, Chan-Jung; Lin, Shuei-Liong; Chang, Shih-Chung; Tsai, Pi-Ru; Wu, Kwan-Dun

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Free iron plays an important role in the pathogenesis of acute kidney injury (AKI) via the formation of hydroxyl radicals. Systemic iron homeostasis is controlled by the hemojuvelin-hepcidin-ferroportin axis in the liver, but less is known about this role in AKI. Results: By proteomics, we identified a 42 kDa soluble hemojuvelin (sHJV), processed by furin protease from membrane-bound hemojuvelin (mHJV), in the urine during AKI after cardiac surgery. Biopsies from human and mouse specimens with AKI confirm that HJV is extensively increased in renal tubules. Iron overload enhanced the expression of hemojuvelin-hepcidin signaling pathway. The furin inhibitor (FI) decreases furin-mediated proteolytic cleavage of mHJV into sHJV and augments the mHJV/sHJV ratio after iron overload with hypoxia condition. The FI could reduce renal tubule apoptosis, stabilize hypoxic induced factor-1, prevent the accumulation of iron in the kidney, and further ameliorate ischemic-reperfusion injury. mHJV is associated with decreasing total kidney iron, secreting hepcidin, and promoting the degradation of ferroportin at AKI, whereas sHJV does the opposite. Innovation: This study suggests the ratio of mHJV/sHJV affects the iron deposition during acute kidney injury and sHJV could be an early biomarker of AKI. Conclusion: Our findings link endogenous HJV inextricably with renal iron homeostasis for the first time, add new significance to early predict AKI, and identify novel therapeutic targets to reduce the severity of AKI using the FI. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1181–1194. PMID:23901875

  6. Kidney-specific Overexpression of Sirt1 Protects against Acute Kidney Injury by Retaining Peroxisome Function

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Wakino, Shu; Yoshioka, Kyoko; Tatematsu, Satoru; Hara, Yoshikazu; Minakuchi, Hitoshi; Sueyasu, Keiko; Washida, Naoki; Tokuyama, Hirobumi; Tzukerman, Maty; Skorecki, Karl; Hayashi, Koichi; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Sirt1, a NAD-dependent protein deacetylase, is reported to regulate intracellular metabolism and attenuate reactive oxidative species (ROS)-induced apoptosis leading to longevity and acute stress resistance. We created transgenic (TG) mice with kidney-specific overexpression of Sirt1 using the promoter sodium-phosphate cotransporter IIa (Npt2) driven specifically in proximal tubules and investigated the kidney-specific role of Sirt1 in the protection against acute kidney injury (AKI). We also elucidated the role of number or function of peroxisome and mitochondria in mediating the mechanisms for renal protective effects of Sirt1 in AKI. Cisplatin-induced AKI decreased the number and function of peroxisomes as well as mitochondria and led to increased local levels of ROS production and renal tubular apoptotic cells. TG mice treated with cisplatin mitigated AKI, local ROS, and renal tubular apoptotic tubular cells. Consistent with these results, TG mice treated with cisplatin also exhibited recovery of peroxisome number and function, as well as rescued mitochondrial function; however, mitochondrial number was not recovered. Immunoelectron microscopic findings consistently demonstrated that the decrease in peroxisome number by cisplatin in wild type mice was restored in transgenic mice. In HK-2 cells, a cultured proximal tubule cell line, overexpression of Sirt1 rescued the cisplatin-induced cell apoptosis through the restoration of peroxisome number, although the mitochondria number was not restored. These results indicate that Sirt1 overexpression in proximal tubules rescues cisplatin-induced AKI by maintaining peroxisomes number and function, concomitant up-regulation of catalase, and elimination of renal ROS levels. Renal Sirt1 can be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of AKI. PMID:20139070

  7. Development of an Immunoassay for the Kidney Specific Protein myo-Inositol Oxygenase, a Potential Biomarker of Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gaut, Joseph P.; Crimmins, Dan L.; Ohlendorf, Matt F.; Lockwood, Christina M.; Griest, Terry A.; Brada, Nancy A.; Hoshi, Masato; Sato, Bryan; Hotchkiss, Richard S.; Jain, Sanjay; Ladenson, Jack H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute kidney injury (AKI) affects 45% of critically ill patients resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. The diagnostic standard, serum creatinine (SCr), is non-specific and may not increase until days after injury. There is significant need for a renal specific AKI biomarker detectable early enough that there would be a potential window for therapeutic intervention. In this study, we sought to identify a renal specific biomarker of AKI. Methods Gene expression data was analyzed from normal mouse tissues to identify kidney specific genes, one of which was Miox. Monoclonal antibodies were generated to recombinant myo-inositol oxygenase (MIOX), and an immunoassay was developed to quantify MIOX in plasma. The immunoassay was tested in animals and retrospectively in patients with and without AKI. Results Kidney tissue specificity of MIOX was supported by Western blot. Immunohistochemistry localized MIOX to the proximal renal tubule. Plasma MIOX, undetectable at baseline, increased 24 hours following AKI in mice. Plasma MIOX was increased in critically ill patients with AKI (12.4 ± 4.3 ng/mL, n=42) compared with patients without AKI (0.5 ± 0.3 ng/mL, n=17) and was highest in patients with oliguric AKI (20.2 ± 7.5 ng/mL, n=23). Plasma MIOX increased 54.3 ± 3.8 hours before the increase in SCr. Conclusions MIOX is a renal specific, proximal tubule protein that is increased in plasma of animals and critically ill patients with AKI. MIOX preceded the elevation in SCr by approximately two days in human patients. Large-scale studies are warranted to further investigate MIOX as an AKI biomarker. PMID:24486646

  8. Recurrent acute kidney injury associated with metastatic bronchial carcinoid.

    PubMed

    Barton, James C; Barton, J Clayborn; Bertoli, Luigi F

    2012-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a rare complication of carcinoid syndrome. A 61-year-old man developed carcinoid syndrome 51 months after pneumonectomy for bronchial carcinoid, and 8 episodes of AKI 101 to 118 months after pneumonectomy. Serum chromogranin A and urine 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid levels were elevated for more than 1 year before AKI occurred. Each episode was characterized by flushing, facial edema, mild diarrhea, necrosis of hepatic metastatic nodules, mild oliguria, hyponatremia, acidosis, hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia and hyperphosphatemia. He did not have elevated urine sodium levels or osmolality, hypotension or hypertension. Plasma levels of dopamine, epinephrine and norepinephrine, measured during a single episode, were markedly elevated. Serum creatinine levels returned to normal after most episodes. Hyponatremia persisted but was more severe during AKI. Elevated plasma levels of vasoactive substances other than 5-hydroxytryptamine, perhaps dopamine or other catecholamines, could explain recurrent AKI. The natriuretic effect of elevated plasma dopamine levels could explain chronic hyponatremia. PMID:22008780

  9. Acute kidney injury after massive attack of Africanised bees.

    PubMed

    Bridi, Ramaiane A; Balbi, Andre Luis; Neves, Precil M; Ponce, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a well-documented complication of massive attack by Africanised bees and can be observed 48-72 h after the accident. We report a case of Africanised bees attack followed by severe and lethal AKI. A 56-year-old man was admitted to emergency department after a massive attack of Africanised bees (>1000 bee stings). He was unconscious, presenting with hypotension and tachycardia. Mechanical ventilation, volume expansion and care for anaphylaxis were instituted. The patient was transferred to the intensive care unit (ICU) and after 48 h he developed rhabdomyolysis, oliguria, increased creatinine levels, hyperkalaemia and refractory acidosis. A diagnosis of AKI secondary to rhabdomyolysis and shock was made. The patient was treated with a prolonged course of haemodialysis. However, he progressed to refractory shock and died 5 days after admission. PMID:24618864

  10. Necroptosis in acute kidney injury: a shedding light

    PubMed Central

    Wang, S; Zhang, C; Hu, L; Yang, C

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common and severe clinical condition with a heavy healthy burden around the world. In spite of supportive therapies, the mortality associated with AKI remains high. Our limited understanding of the complex cell death mechanism in the process of AKI impedes the development of desirable therapeutics. Necroptosis is a recently identified novel form of cell death contributing to numerable diseases and tissue damages. Increasing evidence has suggested that necroptosis has an important role in the pathogenesis of various types of AKI. Therefore, we present here the signaling pathways and main regulators of necroptosis that are potential candidate for therapeutic strategies. Moreover, we emphasize on the potential role and corresponding mechanisms of necroptosis in AKI based on recent advances, and also discuss the possible therapeutic regimens based on manipulating necroptosis. Taken together, the progress in this field sheds new light into the prevention and management of AKI in clinical practice. PMID:26938298

  11. Pyelonephritis and obstructive uropathy: a case of acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Ashmore, Adam Edward; Thompson, Christopher James

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a man in his late 50s with a history of metastatic prostate carcinoma requiring bilateral ureteric stenting. He was admitted with increasing confusion and lethargy. He was diagnosed with sepsis and an acute kidney injury (AKI). Clinical suspicions of an obstructive component to his AKI were not confirmed by an ultrasound scan, which showed a unilateral hydronephrosis unchanged from a scan 1 month previously. A nephrostomy was performed, and frank pus aspirated. The patient's clinical state improved steadily thereafter. Patients who are dehydrated, or who have suffered from malignant or fibrotic processes affecting the retroperitoneum, may present with urinary obstruction without a corresponding increase in urinary tract dilation. Additionally, there must be a suspicion of pyonephrosis in a symptomatic patient with known hydronephrosis. Clinicians should be aware that clinical suspicions of urinary obstruction not demonstrated on ultrasound scanning require further investigation. PMID:26733429

  12. Snakebite-induced acute kidney injury in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Pinho, Fábia M Oliveira; Yu, Luis; Burdmann, Emmanuel A

    2008-07-01

    There are 4 genera of venomous snakes in Latin America: Bothrops, Crotalus, Lachesis, and Micrurus. Acute kidney injury (AKI) has been reported consistently after Bothrops and Crotalus envenomations. In fact, these 2 genera of snakes are responsible, along with the Russell's viper, for the majority of cases of snakebite-induced AKI reported worldwide. Although the Bothrops snakes are the leading cause of venomous snakebites in Latin America, the absolute number of AKI cases seen after Bothrops and Crotalus snakebites is similar. In this article the main characteristics of Bothrops and Crotalus snakes and their venoms, the clinical picture, and the pattern of accidents, risk factors, and mechanisms of renal injury are reviewed. PMID:18620958

  13. Acute Kidney Injury Increases Risk of ESRD among Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Ishani, Areef; Xue, Jay L.; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Eggers, Paul W.; Kimmel, Paul L.; Molitoris, Bruce A.; Collins, Allan J.

    2009-01-01

    Risk for ESRD among elderly patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) has not been studied in a large, representative sample. This study aimed to determine incidence rates and hazard ratios for developing ESRD in elderly individuals, with and without chronic kidney disease (CKD), who had AKI. In the 2000 5% random sample of Medicare beneficiaries, clinical conditions were identified using Medicare claims; ESRD treatment information was obtained from ESRD registration during 2 yr of follow-up. Our cohort of 233,803 patients were hospitalized in 2000, were aged ≥67 yr on discharge, did not have previous ESRD or AKI, and were Medicare-entitled for ≥2 yr before discharge. In this cohort, 3.1% survived to discharge with a diagnosis of AKI, and 5.3 per 1000 developed ESRD. Among patients who received treatment for ESRD, 25.2% had a previous history of AKI. After adjustment for age, gender, race, diabetes, and hypertension, the hazard ratio for developing ESRD was 41.2 (95% confidence interval [CI] 34.6 to 49.1) for patients with AKI and CKD relative to those without kidney disease, 13.0 (95% CI 10.6 to 16.0) for patients with AKI and without previous CKD, and 8.4 (95% CI 7.4 to 9.6) for patients with CKD and without AKI. In summary, elderly individuals with AKI, particularly those with previously diagnosed CKD, are at significantly increased risk for ESRD, suggesting that episodes of AKI may accelerate progression of renal disease. PMID:19020007

  14. Expanding the pool of kidney donors: use of kidneys with acute renal dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    de Matos, Ana Cristina Carvalho; Requião-Moura, Lúcio Roberto; Clarizia, Gabriela; Durão, Marcelino de Souza; Tonato, Eduardo José; Chinen, Rogério; de Arruda, Érika Ferraz; Filiponi, Thiago Corsi; Pires, Luciana Mello de Mello Barros; Bertocchi, Ana Paula Fernandes; Pacheco-Silva, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Given the shortage of organs transplantation, some strategies have been adopted by the transplant community to increase the supply of organs. One strategy is the use of expanded criteria for donors, that is, donors aged >60 years or 50 and 59 years, and meeting two or more of the following criteria: history of hypertension, terminal serum creatinine >1.5mg/dL, and stroke as the donor´s cause of death. In this review, emphasis was placed on the use of donors with acute renal failure, a condition considered by many as a contraindication for organ acceptance and therefore one of the main causes for kidney discard. Since these are well-selected donors and with no chronic diseases, such as hypertension, renal disease, or diabetes, many studies showed that the use of donors with acute renal failure should be encouraged, because, in general, acute renal dysfunction is reversible. Although most studies demonstrated these grafts have more delayed function, the results of graft and patient survival after transplant are very similar to those with the use of standard donors. Clinical and morphological findings of donors, the use of machine perfusion, and analysis of its parameters, especially intrarenal resistance, are important tools to support decision-making when considering the supply of organs with renal dysfunction. PMID:26154553

  15. Expanding the pool of kidney donors: use of kidneys with acute renal dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Matos, Ana Cristina Carvalho de; Requião-Moura, Lúcio Roberto; Clarizia, Gabriela; Durão Junior, Marcelino de Souza; Tonato, Eduardo José; Chinen, Rogério; Arruda, Érika Ferraz de; Filiponi, Thiago Corsi; Pires, Luciana Mello de Mello Barros; Bertocchi, Ana Paula Fernandes; Pacheco-Silva, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Given the shortage of organs transplantation, some strategies have been adopted by the transplant community to increase the supply of organs. One strategy is the use of expanded criteria for donors, that is, donors aged >60 years or 50 and 59 years, and meeting two or more of the following criteria: history of hypertension, terminal serum creatinine >1.5mg/dL, and stroke as the donor´s cause of death. In this review, emphasis was placed on the use of donors with acute renal failure, a condition considered by many as a contraindication for organ acceptance and therefore one of the main causes for kidney discard. Since these are well-selected donors and with no chronic diseases, such as hypertension, renal disease, or diabetes, many studies showed that the use of donors with acute renal failure should be encouraged, because, in general, acute renal dysfunction is reversible. Although most studies demonstrated these grafts have more delayed function, the results of graft and patient survival after transplant are very similar to those with the use of standard donors. Clinical and morphological findings of donors, the use of machine perfusion, and analysis of its parameters, especially intrarenal resistance, are important tools to support decision-making when considering the supply of organs with renal dysfunction. PMID:26154553

  16. Endothelial Glycocalyx Damage Is Associated with Leptospirosis Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Libório, Alexandre Braga; Braz, Marcelo Boecker Munoz; Seguro, Antonio Carlos; Meneses, Gdayllon C.; Neves, Fernanda Macedo de Oliveira; Pedrosa, Danielle Carvalho; Cavalcanti, Luciano Pamplona de Góes; Martins, Alice Maria Costa; Daher, Elizabeth de Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a common disease in tropical countries, and the kidney is one of the main target organs. Membrane proteins of Leptospira are capable of causing endothelial damage in vitro, but there have been no studies in humans evaluating endothelial glycocalyx damage and its correlation with acute kidney injury (AKI). We performed a cohort study in an outbreak of leptospirosis among military personnel. AKI was diagnosed in 14 of 46 (30.4%) patients. Leptospirosis was associated with higher levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1; 483.1 ± 31.7 versus 234.9 ± 24.4 mg/L, P < 0.001) and syndecan-1 (73.7 ± 15.9 versus 21.2 ± 7.9 ng/mL, P < 0.001) compared with exposed controls. Patients with leptospirosis-associated AKI had increased level of syndecan-1 (112.1 ± 45.4 versus 41.5 ± 11.7 ng/mL, P = 0.021) and ICAM-1 (576.9 ± 70.4 versus 434.9 ± 35.3, P = 0.034) compared with leptospirosis patients with no AKI. Association was verified between syndecan-1 and ICAM-1 with serum creatinine elevation and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) levels. This association remained even after multivariate analysis including other AKI-associated characteristics. Endothelial injury biomarkers are associated with leptospirosis-associated renal damage. PMID:25624405

  17. Contrast-Induced Acute Kidney Injury: Definition, Epidemiology, and Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Meinel, Felix G.; De Cecco, Carlo N.; Schoepf, U. Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) is commonly defined as a decline in kidney function occurring in a narrow time window after administration of iodinated contrast material. The incidence of AKI after contrast material administration greatly depends on the specific definition and cutoff values used. Although self-limiting in most cases, postcontrast AKI carries a risk of more permanent renal insufficiency, dialysis, and death. The risk of AKI from contrast material, in particular when administered intravenously for contrast-enhanced CT, has been exaggerated by older, noncontrolled studies due to background fluctuations in renal function. More recent evidence from controlled studies suggests that the risk is likely nonexistent in patients with normal renal function, but there may be a risk in patients with renal insufficiency. However, even in this patient population, the risk of CI-AKI is probably much smaller than traditionally assumed. Since volume expansion is the only preventive strategy with a convincing evidence base, liberal hydration should be encouraged to further minimize the risk. The benefits of the diagnostic information gained from contrast-enhanced examinations will still need to be balanced with the potential risk of CI-AKI for the individual patient and clinical scenario. PMID:24734250

  18. [Disglycemia in patients with acute kidney injury in the ICU].

    PubMed

    Fiaccadori, E; Sabatino, A; Morabito, S; Bozzoli, L; Donadio, C; Maggiore, U; Regolisti, G

    2015-01-01

    Derangements of glucose metabolism are common among critically ill patients. Critical illness- associated hyperglycemia (CIAH) is characterized by raised blood glucose levels in association with an acute event that is reversible after resolution of the underlying disease. CIAH has many causes, such as changes in counter-regulatory hormone status, release of sepsis mediators, insulin resistance, drugs and nutritional factors. It is associated with increased mortality risk. This association appears to be strongly influenced by diabetes mellitus as a comorbidity, suggesting the need for an accurate individualization of glycemic targets according to baseline glycemic status. Hypoglycemia is also very common in this clinical context and it has a negative prognostic impact. Many studies based on intensive insulin treatment protocols targeting normal blood glucose values have in fact documented both an increased incidence of hypoglycemia and an increased mortality risk. Finally, glycemic control in the ICU is made even more complex in the presence of acute kidney injury. On one hand, there is in fact a reduction of both the renal clearance of insulin and of gluconeogenesis by the kidney. On the other hand, the frequent need for renal replacement therapy (dialysis / hemofiltration) may result in an energy intake excess, under the form of citrate, lactate and glucose in the dialysate/reinfusion fluids. With regard to the possible renal protective effects afforded by intensive glycemic control protocols, the presently available evidence does not support a reduction in the incidence of AKI and/or the need for RRT with this approach, when compared with standard glucose control. Thus, the most recent guidelines now suggest higher blood glucose targets (<180 mg/dl or 140-180 mg/dl) than in the past (80-110 mg/dl). Albeit with limited evidence, it seems reasonable to extend these indications also to patients with AKI in the intensive care unit. Further studies are needed in order

  19. An unusual case of reversible acute kidney injury due to chlorine dioxide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Bathina, Gangadhar; Yadla, Manjusha; Burri, Srikanth; Enganti, Rama; Prasad Ch, Rajendra; Deshpande, Pradeep; Ch, Ramesh; Prayaga, Aruna; Uppin, Megha

    2013-09-01

    Chlorine dioxide is a commonly used water disinfectant. Toxicity of chlorine dioxide and its metabolites is rare. In experimental studies, it was shown that acute and chronic toxicity were associated with insignificant hematological changes. Acute kidney injury due to chlorine dioxide was not reported. Two cases of renal toxicity due to its metabolites, chlorate and chlorite were reported. Herein, we report a case of chlorine dioxide poisoning presenting with acute kidney injury. PMID:23902291

  20. Comparison of Plasma and Urine Biomarker Performance in Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Schley, Gunnar; Köberle, Carmen; Manuilova, Ekaterina; Rutz, Sandra; Forster, Christian; Weyand, Michael; Formentini, Ivan; Kientsch-Engel, Rosemarie; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Willam, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Background New renal biomarkers measured in urine promise to increase specificity for risk stratification and early diagnosis of acute kidney injury (AKI) but concomitantly may be altered by urine concentration effects and chronic renal insufficiency. This study therefore directly compared the performance of AKI biomarkers in urine and plasma. Methods This single-center, prospective cohort study included 110 unselected adults undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass between 2009 and 2010. Plasma and/or urine concentrations of creatinine, cystatin C, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP), kidney injury molecule 1 (KIM1), and albumin as well as 15 additional biomarkers in plasma and urine were measured during the perioperative period. The primary outcome was AKI defined by AKIN serum creatinine criteria within 72 hours after surgery. Results Biomarkers in plasma showed markedly better discriminative performance for preoperative risk stratification and early postoperative (within 24h after surgery) detection of AKI than urine biomarkers. Discriminative power of urine biomarkers improved when concentrations were normalized to urinary creatinine, but urine biomarkers had still lower AUC values than plasma biomarkers. Best diagnostic performance 4h after surgery had plasma NGAL (AUC 0.83), cystatin C (0.76), MIG (0.74), and L-FAPB (0.73). Combinations of multiple biomarkers did not improve their diagnostic power. Preoperative clinical scoring systems (EuroSCORE and Cleveland Clinic Foundation Score) predicted the risk for AKI (AUC 0.76 and 0.71) and were not inferior to biomarkers. Preexisting chronic kidney disease limited the diagnostic performance of both plasma and urine biomarkers. Conclusions In our cohort plasma biomarkers had higher discriminative power for risk stratification and early diagnosis of AKI than urine biomarkers. For preoperative risk stratification of AKI clinical models showed

  1. Fluid Balance, Diuretic Use, and Mortality in Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Estrella, Michelle M.; Coresh, Josef; Brower, Roy G.; Liu, Kathleen D.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Management of volume status in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) is complex, and the role of diuretics is controversial. The primary objective was to elucidate the association between fluid balance, diuretic use, and short-term mortality after AKI in critically ill patients. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Using data from the Fluid and Catheter Treatment Trial (FACTT), a multicenter, randomized controlled trial evaluating a conservative versus liberal fluid-management strategy in 1000 patients with acute lung injury (ALI), we evaluated the association of post-renal injury fluid balance and diuretic use with 60-day mortality in patients who developed AKI, as defined by the AKI Network criteria. Results 306 patients developed AKI in the first 2 study days and were included in our analysis. There were 137 in the fluid-liberal arm and 169 in the fluid-conservative arm (P = 0.04). Baseline characteristics were similar between groups. Post-AKI fluid balance was significantly associated with mortality in both crude and adjusted analysis. Higher post-AKI furosemide doses had a protective effect on mortality but no significant effect after adjustment for post-AKI fluid balance. There was no threshold dose of furosemide above which mortality increased. Conclusions A positive fluid balance after AKI was strongly associated with mortality. Post-AKI diuretic therapy was associated with 60-day patient survival in FACTT patients with ALI; this effect may be mediated by fluid balance. PMID:21393482

  2. Nonapoptotic cell death in acute kidney injury and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Linkermann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Acute tubular necrosis causes a loss of renal function, which clinically presents as acute kidney failure (AKI). The biochemical signaling pathways that trigger necrosis have been investigated in detail over the past 5 years. It is now clear that necrosis (regulated necrosis, RN) represents a genetically driven process that contributes to the pathophysiology of AKI. RN pathways such as necroptosis, ferroptosis, parthanatos, and mitochondrial permeability transition-induced regulated necrosis (MPT-RN) may be mechanistically distinct, and the relative contributions to overall organ damage during AKI in living organisms largely remain elusive. In a synchronized manner, some necrotic programs induce the breakdown of tubular segments and multicellular functional units, whereas others are limited to killing single cells in the tubular compartment. Importantly, the means by which a renal cell dies may have implications for the subsequent inflammatory response. In this review, the recent advances in the field of renal cell death in AKI and key enzymes that might serve as novel therapeutic targets will be discussed. As a consequence of the interference with RN, the immunogenicity of dying cells in AKI in renal transplants will be diminished, rendering inhibitors of RN indirect immunosuppressive agents. PMID:26759047

  3. An unusual cause of acute kidney injury due to oxalate nephropathy in systemic scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Mascio, Heather M; Joya, Christie A; Plasse, Richard A; Baker, Thomas P; Flessner, Michael F; Nee, Robert

    2015-08-01

    Oxalate nephropathy is an uncommon cause of acute kidney injury. Far rarer is its association with scleroderma, with only one other published case report in the literature. We report a case of a 75-year-old African-American female with a history of systemic scleroderma manifested by chronic pseudo-obstruction and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) treated with rifaximin, who presented with acute kidney injury with normal blood pressure. A renal biopsy demonstrated extensive acute tubular injury with numerous intratubular birefringent crystals, consistent with oxalate nephropathy. We hypothesize that her recent treatment with rifaximin for SIBO and decreased intestinal transit time in pseudo-obstruction may have significantly increased intestinal oxalate absorption, leading to acute kidney injury. Oxalate nephropathy should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute kidney injury in scleroderma with normotension, and subsequent evaluation should be focused on bowel function to include alterations in gut flora due to antibiotic administration. PMID:25500295

  4. Immediate Consequences of Acute Kidney Injury: The Impact of Traditional and Nontraditional Complications on Mortality in Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Faubel, Sarah; Shah, Pratik B

    2016-05-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) that requires renal replacement therapy is associated with a mortality rate that exceeds 50% in the intensive care unit, which is greater than other serious illnesses such as acute lung injury and myocardial infarction. Much information is now available regarding the complications of AKI that contribute to mortality and may be usefully categorized as "traditional" and "nontraditional". Traditional complications are the long-recognized complications of AKI such as hyperkalemia, acidosis, and volume overload, which may be typically corrected with renal replacement therapy. "Nontraditional" complications include complications such as sepsis, lung injury, and heart failure that may arise due to the effects of AKI on inflammatory cytokines, immune function, and cell death pathways such as apoptosis. In this review, we discuss both traditional and nontraditional complications of AKI with a focus on factors that contribute to mortality, considering both pathophysiology and potential remedies. Because AKI is the most common inpatient consult to nephrologists, it is essential to be aware of the complications of AKI that contribute to mortality to devise appropriate treatment strategies to prevent and manage AKI complications with the ultimate goal of reducing the unacceptably high mortality rate of AKI. PMID:27113694

  5. Dyschloremia Is a Risk Factor for the Development of Acute Kidney Injury in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Min; Li, Guangxi; Sarvottam, Kumar; Wang, Shengyu; Thongprayoon, Charat; Dong, Yue; Gajic, Ognjen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dyschloremia is common in critically ill patients, although its impact has not been well studied. We investigated the epidemiology of dyschloremia and its associations with the incidence of acute kidney injury and other intensive care unit outcomes. Material and Methods This is a single-center, retrospective cohort study at Mayo Clinic Hospital—Rochester. All adult patients admitted to intensive care units from January 1st, 2006, through December 30th, 2012 were included. Patients with known acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease stage 5 before intensive care unit admission were excluded. We evaluated the association of dyschloremia with ICU outcomes, after adjustments for the effect of age, gender, Charlson comorbidity index and severity of illness score. Results A total of 6,025 patients were enrolled in the final analysis following the implementation of eligibility criteria. From the cohort, 1,970 patients (33%) developed acute kidney injury. Of the total patients enrolled, 4,174 had a baseline serum chloride. In this group, 1,530 (37%) had hypochloremia, and 257 (6%) were hyperchloremic. The incidence of acute kidney injury was higher in hypochloremic and hyperchloremic patients compared to those with a normal serum chloride level (43% vs.30% and 34% vs. 30%, respectively; P < .001). Baseline serum chloride was lower in the acute kidney injury group vs. the non-acute kidney injury group [100 mmol/L (96–104) vs. 102 mmol/L (98–105), P < .0001]. In a multivariable logistic regression model, baseline serum chloride of ≤94 mmol/L found to be independently associated with the risk of acute kidney injury (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.1–2.6; P = .01). Discussion Dyschloremia is common in critically ill patients, and severe hypochloremia is independently associated with an increased risk of development of acute kidney injury. PMID:27490461

  6. Nonapnea Sleep Disorders and the Risk of Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hugo You-Hsien; Chang, Kai-Ting; Chang, Yu-Han; Lu, Tzongshi; Liang, Chan-Jung; Wang, Dean-Chuan; Tsai, Jui-Hsiu; Hsu, Chung-Yao; Hung, Chi-Chih; Kuo, Mei-Chuan; Lin, Chang-Shen; Hwang, Shang-Jyh

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Nonapnea sleep disorders (NASDs) and associated problems, which are highly prevalent in patients with kidney diseases, are associated with unfavorable medical sequelae. Nonetheless, whether NASDs are associated with acute kidney injury (AKI) development has not been thoroughly analyzed. We examined the association between NASD and AKI. We conducted a population-based study by using 1,000,000 representative data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database for the period from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2010. We studied the incidence and risk of AKI in 9178 newly diagnosed NASD patients compared with 27,534 people without NASD matched according to age, sex, index year, urbanization level, region of residence, and monthly income at a 1:3 ratio. The NASD cohort had an adjusted hazard ratio (hazard ratio [HR]; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.15–2.63) of subsequent AKI 1.74-fold higher than that of the control cohort. Older age and type 2 diabetes mellitus were significantly associated with an increased risk of AKI (P < 0.05). Among different types of NASDs, patients with insomnia had a 120% increased risk of developing AKI (95% CI = 1.38–3.51; P = 0.001), whereas patients with other sleep disorders had a 127% increased risk of subsequent AKI (95% CI = 1.07–4.80; P = 0.033). Men with NASDs were at a high risk of AKI (P < 0.05). This nationwide population-based cohort study provides evidence that patients with NASDs are at higher risk of developing AKI than people without NASDs. PMID:26986132

  7. Targeted fibrillar nanocarbon RNAi treatment of acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Alidori, Simone; Akhavein, Nima; Thorek, Daniel L J; Behling, Katja; Romin, Yevgeniy; Queen, Dawn; Beattie, Bradley J; Manova-Todorova, Katia; Bergkvist, Magnus; Scheinberg, David A; McDevitt, Michael R

    2016-03-23

    RNA interference has tremendous yet unrealized potential to treat a wide range of illnesses. Innovative solutions are needed to protect and selectively deliver small interfering RNA (siRNA) cargo to and within a target cell to fully exploit siRNA as a therapeutic tool in vivo. Herein, we describe ammonium-functionalized carbon nanotube (fCNT)-mediated transport of siRNA selectively and with high efficiency to renal proximal tubule cells in animal models of acute kidney injury (AKI). fCNT enhanced siRNA delivery to tubule cells compared to siRNA alone and effectively knocked down the expression of several target genes, includingTrp53,Mep1b,Ctr1, andEGFP A clinically relevant cisplatin-induced murine model of AKI was used to evaluate the therapeutic potential of fCNT-targeted siRNA to effectively halt the pathogenesis of renal injury. Prophylactic treatment with a combination of fCNT/siMep1band fCNT/siTrp53significantly improved progression-free survival compared to controls via a mechanism that required concurrent reduction of meprin-1β and p53 expression. The fCNT/siRNA was well tolerated, and no toxicological consequences were observed in murine models. Toward clinical application of this platform, fCNTs were evaluated for the first time in nonhuman primates. The rapid and kidney-specific pharmacokinetic profile of fCNT in primates was comparable to what was observed in mice and suggests that this approach is amenable for use in humans. The nanocarbon-mediated delivery of siRNA provides a therapeutic means for the prevention of AKI to safely overcome the persistent barrier of nephrotoxicity during medical intervention. PMID:27009268

  8. Targeted fibrillar nanocarbon RNAi treatment of acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Alidori, Simone; Akhavein, Nima; Thorek, Daniel L. J.; Behling, Katja; Romin, Yevgeniy; Queen, Dawn; Beattie, Bradley J.; Manova-Todorova, Katia; Bergkvist, Magnus; Scheinberg, David A.; McDevitt, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference has tremendous yet unrealized potential to treat a wide range of illnesses. Innovative solutions are needed to protect and selectively deliver small interfering RNA (siRNA) cargo to and within a target cell to fully exploit siRNA as a therapeutic tool in vivo. Herein, we describe ammonium-functionalized carbon nanotube (fCNT)–mediated transport of siRNA selectively and with high efficiency to renal proximal tubule cells in animal models of acute kidney injury (AKI). fCNT enhanced siRNA delivery to tubule cells compared to siRNA alone and effectively knocked down the expression of several target genes, including Trp53, Mep1b, Ctr1, and EGFP. A clinically relevant cisplatin-induced murine model of AKI was used to evaluate the therapeutic potential of fCNT-targeted siRNA to effectively halt the pathogenesis of renal injury. Prophylactic treatment with a combination of fCNT/siMep1b and fCNT/siTrp53 significantly improved progression-free survival compared to controls via a mechanism that required concurrent reduction of meprin-1β and p53 expression. The fCNT/siRNA was well tolerated, and no toxicological consequences were observed in murine models. Toward clinical application of this platform, fCNTs were evaluated for the first time in nonhuman primates. The rapid and kidney-specific pharmacokinetic profile of fCNT in primates was comparable to what was observed in mice and suggests that this approach is amenable for use in humans. The nanocarbon-mediated delivery of siRNA provides a therapeutic means for the prevention of AKI to safely overcome the persistent barrier of nephrotoxicity during medical intervention. PMID:27009268

  9. The yin and yang of autophagy in acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Melk, Anette; Baisantry, Arpita; Schmitt, Roland

    2016-03-01

    Antagonizing the strongly activated pathway of autophagy in renal ischemic injury has been associated with poor outcome. In our recent study we used mice with a selective deletion of Atg5 in the S3 proximal tubule segment, which is most susceptible to ischemic damage. In line with the notion that autophagy is a prosurvival mechanism our studies revealed an early accelerated cell death of heavily damaged tubular cells in the S3 segment of these mice. Interestingly, this expedited loss of cells was associated with better long-term outcome as reflected by less inflammation, improved tubular repair, and function and reduced accumulation of senescent cells. While these data confirm the role of tubular autophagy as a prosurvival mechanism in ischemic kidney injury, they also show that autophagy may enable severely damaged cells to persist and exert deleterious effects. Such ambivalent effects might be of relevance if modulating autophagy is considered as a therapeutic option. PMID:26761120

  10. Loxosceles gaucho Venom-Induced Acute Kidney Injury – In Vivo and In Vitro Studies

    PubMed Central

    Lucato, Rui V.; Abdulkader, Regina C. R. M.; Barbaro, Katia C.; Mendes, Glória E.; Castro, Isac; Baptista, Maria A. S. F.; Cury, Patrícia M.; Malheiros, Denise M. C.; Schor, Nestor; Yu, Luis; Burdmann, Emmanuel A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Accidents caused by Loxosceles spider may cause severe systemic reactions, including acute kidney injury (AKI). There are few experimental studies assessing Loxosceles venom effects on kidney function in vivo. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to test Loxosceles gaucho venom (LV) nephrotoxicity and to assess some of the possible mechanisms of renal injury, rats were studied up to 60 minutes after LV 0.24 mg/kg or saline IV injection (control). LV caused a sharp and significant drop in glomerular filtration rate, renal blood flow and urinary output and increased renal vascular resistance, without changing blood pressure. Venom infusion increased significantly serum creatine kinase and aspartate aminotransferase. In the LV group renal histology analysis found acute epithelial tubular cells degenerative changes, presence of cell debris and detached epithelial cells in tubular lumen without glomerular or vascular changes. Immunohistochemistry disclosed renal deposition of myoglobin and hemoglobin. LV did not cause injury to a suspension of fresh proximal tubules isolated from rats. Conclusions/Significance Loxosceles gaucho venom injection caused early AKI, which occurred without blood pressure variation. Changes in glomerular function occurred likely due to renal vasoconstriction and rhabdomyolysis. Direct nephrotoxicity could not be demonstrated in vitro. The development of a consistent model of Loxosceles venom-induced AKI and a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the renal injury may allow more efficient ways to prevent or attenuate the systemic injury after Loxosceles bite. PMID:21655312

  11. Effects of acute and chronic hypohydration on kidney health and function.

    PubMed

    Feehally, John; Khosravi, Maryam

    2015-09-01

    The kidneys play a critical role in the homeostasis of body fluid tonicity and effective circulating volume. Renal homeostatic mechanisms are frequently challenged in acutely ill people. Fluid depletion causing hypovolemia may result in renal hypoperfusion that, if left untreated, may lead to acute kidney failure. Some populations, notably older people and neonates, are less tolerant of extremes in fluid loading and deprivation, similar to those with established chronic kidney disease. Risk of kidney injury during fluid depletion is increased by medications including diuretics, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, and renin-angiotensin system blockers. There is no consistent evidence indicating that lower-than-average fluid intake can cause chronic kidney disease, nor accelerate progression of established kidney disease. Increasing consumption of sugar-containing beverages is, however, a major concern for kidney health as a precursor of obesity and diabetes. There is no evidence that high dietary protein intake can cause chronic kidney disease, nor accelerate progression of established kidney disease. Idiosyncratic, adverse renal responses have been described with creatine supplements. There are only a few clinical conditions for which high fluid intake should be considered. These include recurrent kidney stones or urinary tract infections and, possibly, polycystic kidney disease. PMID:26290296

  12. Tanshinone IIA Attenuates Renal Fibrosis after Acute Kidney Injury in a Mouse Model through Inhibition of Fibrocytes Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chunming; Shao, Qiuyuan; Jin, Bo; Zhang, Miao

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with an increased risk of developing advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD). Yet, effective interventions to prevent this conversion are unavailable for clinical practice. In this study, we examined the beneficial effects of Tanshinone IIA on renal fibrosis in a mouse model of folic acid induced AKI. We found that Tanshinone IIA treatment significantly attenuated the folic acid elicited kidney dysfunction on days 3, 14, and 28. This effect was concomitant with a much lessened accumulation of fibronectin and collagen in tubulointerstitium 28 days after folic acid injury, denoting an ameliorated renal fibrosis. The kidney protective and antifibrotic effect of Tanshinone IIA was likely attributable to an early inhibition of renal recruitment of fibrocytes positive for both CD45 and collagen I. Mechanistically, Tanshinone IIA treatment not only markedly diminished renal expression of chemoattractants for fibrocytes such as TGFβ1 and MCP-1, but also significantly reduced circulating fibrocytes at the acute phase of kidney injury. These data suggested that Tanshinone IIA might be a novel therapy for preventing progression of CKD after AKI. PMID:26885500

  13. Single cell dissection of early kidney development: multilineage priming.

    PubMed

    Brunskill, Eric W; Park, Joo-Seop; Chung, Eunah; Chen, Feng; Magella, Bliss; Potter, S Steven

    2014-08-01

    We used a single cell RNA-seq strategy to create an atlas of gene expression patterns in the developing kidney. At several stages of kidney development, histologically uniform populations of cells give rise to multiple distinct lineages. We performed single cell RNA-seq analysis of total mouse kidneys at E11.5 and E12.5, as well as the renal vesicles at P4. We define an early stage of progenitor cell induction driven primarily by gene repression. Surprising stochastic expression of marker genes associated with differentiated cell types was observed in E11.5 progenitors. We provide a global view of the polarized gene expression already present in the renal vesicle, the first epithelial precursor of the nephron. We show that Hox gene read-through transcripts can be spliced to produce intergenic homeobox swaps. We also identify a surprising number of genes with partially degraded noncoding RNA. Perhaps most interesting, at early developmental times single cells often expressed genes related to several developmental pathways. This provides powerful evidence that initial organogenesis involves a process of multilineage priming. This is followed by a combination of gene repression, which turns off the genes associated with most possible lineages, and the activation of increasing numbers of genes driving the chosen developmental direction. PMID:25053437

  14. Single cell dissection of early kidney development: multilineage priming

    PubMed Central

    Brunskill, Eric W.; Park, Joo-Seop; Chung, Eunah; Chen, Feng; Magella, Bliss; Potter, S. Steven

    2014-01-01

    We used a single cell RNA-seq strategy to create an atlas of gene expression patterns in the developing kidney. At several stages of kidney development, histologically uniform populations of cells give rise to multiple distinct lineages. We performed single cell RNA-seq analysis of total mouse kidneys at E11.5 and E12.5, as well as the renal vesicles at P4. We define an early stage of progenitor cell induction driven primarily by gene repression. Surprising stochastic expression of marker genes associated with differentiated cell types was observed in E11.5 progenitors. We provide a global view of the polarized gene expression already present in the renal vesicle, the first epithelial precursor of the nephron. We show that Hox gene read-through transcripts can be spliced to produce intergenic homeobox swaps. We also identify a surprising number of genes with partially degraded noncoding RNA. Perhaps most interesting, at early developmental times single cells often expressed genes related to several developmental pathways. This provides powerful evidence that initial organogenesis involves a process of multilineage priming. This is followed by a combination of gene repression, which turns off the genes associated with most possible lineages, and the activation of increasing numbers of genes driving the chosen developmental direction. PMID:25053437

  15. Bath salt intoxication causing acute kidney injury requiring hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Regunath, Hariharan; Ariyamuthu, Venkatesh Kumar; Dalal, Pranavkumar; Misra, Madhukar

    2012-10-01

    Traditional bath salts contain a combination of inorganic salts like Epsom salts, table salt, baking soda, sodium metaphosphate, and borax that have cleansing properties. Since 2010, there have been rising concerns about a new type of substance abuse in the name of "bath salts." They are beta-ketone amphetamine analogs and are derivates of cathinone, a naturally occurring amphetamine analog found in the "khat" plant (Catha edulis). Effects reported with intake included increased energy, empathy, openness, and increased libido. Serious adverse effects reported with intoxication included cardiac, psychiatric, and neurological signs and symptoms. Not much is known about the toxicology and metabolism of these compounds. They inhibit monoamine reuptake (dopamine, nor epinephrine, etc.) and act as central nervous system stimulants with high additive and abuse potential because of their clinical and biochemical similarities to effects from use of cocaine, amphetamine, and 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine. Deaths associated with use of these compounds have also been reported. We report a case of acute kidney injury associated with the use of "bath salt" pills that improved with hemodialysis. PMID:23036036

  16. Mitochondrial dysfunction in inherited renal disease and acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Emma, Francesco; Montini, Giovanni; Parikh, Samir M; Salviati, Leonardo

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondria are increasingly recognized as key players in genetic and acquired renal diseases. Most mitochondrial cytopathies that cause renal symptoms are characterized by tubular defects, but glomerular, tubulointerstitial and cystic diseases have also been described. For example, defects in coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) biosynthesis and the mitochondrial DNA 3243 A>G mutation are important causes of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis in children and in adults, respectively. Although they sometimes present with isolated renal findings, mitochondrial diseases are frequently associated with symptoms related to central nervous system and neuromuscular involvement. They can result from mutations in nuclear genes that are inherited according to classic Mendelian rules or from mutations in mitochondrial DNA, which are transmitted according to more complex rules of mitochondrial genetics. Diagnosis of mitochondrial disorders involves clinical characterization of patients in combination with biochemical and genetic analyses. In particular, prompt diagnosis of CoQ10 biosynthesis defects is imperative because of their potentially reversible nature. In acute kidney injury (AKI), mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to the physiopathology of tissue injury, whereas mitochondrial biogenesis has an important role in the recovery of renal function. Potential therapies that target mitochondrial dysfunction or promote mitochondrial regeneration are being developed to limit renal damage during AKI and promote repair of injured tissue. PMID:26804019

  17. Paneth cell-mediated multiorgan dysfunction after acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Won; Kim, Mihwa; Kim, Joo Yun; Ham, Ahrom; Brown, Kevin M.; Mori-Akiyama, Yuko; Ouellette, André J.; D’Agati, Vivette D.; Lee, H. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is frequently complicated by extra-renal multi-organ injury including intestinal and hepatic dysfunction. In this study, we hypothesized that a discrete intestinal source of pro-inflammatory mediators drives multi-organ injury in response to AKI. After induction of AKI in mice by renal ischemia-reperfusion or bilateral nephrectomy, small intestinal Paneth cells increased the synthesis and release of IL-17A in conjunction with severe intestinal apoptosis and inflammation. We also detected significantly increased IL-17A in portal and systemic circulation after AKI. Intestinal macrophages appear to transport released Paneth cell granule constituents induced by AKI, away from the base of the crypts into the liver. Genetic or pharmacologic depletion of Paneth cells decreased small intestinal IL-17A secretion and plasma IL-17A levels significantly and attenuated intestinal, hepatic, and renal injury after AKI. Similarly, portal delivery of IL-17A in macrophage depleted mice decreased markedly, and intestinal, hepatic, and renal injury following AKI was attenuated without affecting intestinal IL-17A generation. In conclusion, AKI induces IL-17A synthesis and secretion by Paneth cells to initiate intestinal and hepatic injury by hepatic and systemic delivery of IL-17A by macrophages. Modulation of Paneth cell dysregulation may have therapeutic implications by reducing systemic complications arising from AKI. PMID:23109723

  18. Hospital Mortality in the United States following Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rezaee, Michael E.; Marshall, Emily J.; Matheny, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common reason for hospital admission and complication of many inpatient procedures. The temporal incidence of AKI and the association of AKI admissions with in-hospital mortality are a growing problem in the world today. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology of AKI and its association with in-hospital mortality in the United States. AKI has been growing at a rate of 14% per year since 2001. However, the in-hospital mortality associated with AKI has been on the decline starting with 21.9% in 2001 to 9.1 in 2011, even though the number of AKI-related in-hospital deaths increased almost twofold from 147,943 to 285,768 deaths. We discuss the importance of the 71% reduction in AKI-related mortality among hospitalized patients in the United States and draw on the discussion of whether or not this is a phenomenon of hospital billing (coding) or improvements to the management of AKI. PMID:27376083

  19. Prediction and Prevention of Acute Kidney Injury after Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Su Rin; Kim, Won Ho; Kim, Dong Joon; Shin, Il-Woo; Sohn, Ju-Tae

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of acute kidney injury after cardiac surgery (CS-AKI) ranges from 33% to 94% and is associated with a high incidence of morbidity and mortality. The etiology is suggested to be multifactorial and related to almost all aspects of perioperative management. Numerous studies have reported the risk factors and risk scores and novel biomarkers of AKI have been investigated to facilitate the subclinical diagnosis of AKI. Based on the known independent risk factors, many preventive interventions to reduce the risk of CS-AKI have been tested. However, any single preventive intervention did not show a definite and persistent benefit to reduce the incidence of CS-AKI. Goal-directed therapy has been considered to be a preventive strategy with a substantial level of efficacy. Many pharmacologic agents were tested for any benefit to treat or prevent CS-AKI but the results were conflicting and evidences are still lacking. The present review will summarize the current updated evidences about the risk factors and preventive strategies for CS-AKI. PMID:27419130

  20. Clinical Predictors of Acute Kidney Injury Following Snake Bite Envenomation

    PubMed Central

    Dharod, Mrudul V; Patil, Tushar B; Deshpande, Archana S; Gulhane, Ragini V; Patil, Mangesh B; Bansod, Yogendra V

    2013-01-01

    Background: Snake bite envenomation is a major public health concern in developing countries. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is as important cause of mortality in patients with vasculotoxic snake bite. Aims: This study was to evaluate the clinical profile of snake bite patients and to determine the predictors of developing AKI following snake bite. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and eighty-one patients with snake envenomation were included. Eighty-seven patients developed AKI (Group A) and 194 (Group B) did not. History, examination findings and investigations results were recorded and compared between the two groups. Results: In group A, 61 (70.11%) patients were male and in group B, 117 (60.30%) patients were male. Out of 281 patients, 232 had cellulitis, 113 had bleeding tendencies, 87 had oliguria, 76 had neuroparalysis, and 23 had hypotension at presentation. After multivariate analysis, bite to hospital time (P = 0.016), hypotension (P = 0.000), albuminuria (P = 0.000), bleeding time (P = 0.000), prothrombin time (P = 0.000), hemoglobin (P = 0.000) and total bilirubin (P = 0.010) were significant independent predictors of AKI. Conclusions: AKI developed in 30.96% of patients with snake bite, leading to mortality in 39.08% patients. Factors associated with AKI are bite to hospital time, hypotension, albuminuria, prolonged bleeding time, prolonged prothrombin time, low hemoglobin and a high total bilirubin. PMID:24350071

  1. Failure to visualize acutely injured kidneys with technetium-99m DMSA does not preclude recoverable function

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, A. Jr.; Akiya, F.; Gregory, M.C.

    1986-03-01

    A 35-yr-old patient developed severe acute tubular necrosis requiring hemodialysis. A (99mTc)dimercaptosuccinic acid scan of the kidneys showed no renal uptake at 4 or 24 hr, but the patient subsequently recovered normal renal function as judged by a normal serum creatinine. Based on this case report and a review of the literature, one cannot assume irreversible loss of function in patients with acute renal failure, based on the absence of radiopharmaceutical uptake by the kidneys.

  2. Wnt4 is a novel biomarker for the early detection of kidney tubular injury after ischemia/reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shi-Lei; Wei, Shi-Yao; Wang, Yu-Xiao; Diao, Tian-Tian; Li, Jian-Si; He, Yi-Xin; Yu, Jing; Jiang, Xi-Yue; Cao, Yang; Mao, Xin-Yue; Wei, Qiu-Ju; Wang, Yu; Li, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Earlier intervention after acute kidney injury would promote better outcomes. Our previous study found that Wnt proteins are promptly upregulated after ischemic kidney injury. Thus, we assessed whether Wnt4 could be an early and sensitive biomarker of tubular injury. We subjected mice to bilateral ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI). Kidney and urinary Wnt4 expression showed an early increase at 3 hours and increased further at 24 hours post-IRI and was closely correlated with histopathological alterations. Serum creatinine slightly increased at 6 hours, indicating that it was less sensitive than Wnt4 expression. These data were further confirmed by clinical study. Both kidney and urinary Wnt4 expression were significantly increased in patients diagnosed with biopsy-proven minimal change disease (MCD) with tubular injury, all of whom nevertheless had normal estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and serum creatinine. The increased Wnt4 expression also strongly correlated with histopathological alterations in these MCD patients. In conclusion, this is the first demonstration that increases in both kidney and urinary Wnt4 expression can be detected more sensitively and earlier than serum creatinine after kidney injury. In particular, urinary Wnt4 could be a potential noninvasive biomarker for the early detection of tubular injury. PMID:27600466

  3. Wnt4 is a novel biomarker for the early detection of kidney tubular injury after ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shi-Lei; Wei, Shi-Yao; Wang, Yu-Xiao; Diao, Tian-Tian; Li, Jian-Si; He, Yi-Xin; Yu, Jing; Jiang, Xi-Yue; Cao, Yang; Mao, Xin-Yue; Wei, Qiu-Ju; Wang, Yu; Li, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Earlier intervention after acute kidney injury would promote better outcomes. Our previous study found that Wnt proteins are promptly upregulated after ischemic kidney injury. Thus, we assessed whether Wnt4 could be an early and sensitive biomarker of tubular injury. We subjected mice to bilateral ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI). Kidney and urinary Wnt4 expression showed an early increase at 3 hours and increased further at 24 hours post-IRI and was closely correlated with histopathological alterations. Serum creatinine slightly increased at 6 hours, indicating that it was less sensitive than Wnt4 expression. These data were further confirmed by clinical study. Both kidney and urinary Wnt4 expression were significantly increased in patients diagnosed with biopsy-proven minimal change disease (MCD) with tubular injury, all of whom nevertheless had normal estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and serum creatinine. The increased Wnt4 expression also strongly correlated with histopathological alterations in these MCD patients. In conclusion, this is the first demonstration that increases in both kidney and urinary Wnt4 expression can be detected more sensitively and earlier than serum creatinine after kidney injury. In particular, urinary Wnt4 could be a potential noninvasive biomarker for the early detection of tubular injury. PMID:27600466

  4. Modified Citrus Pectin Reduces Galectin-3 Expression and Disease Severity in Experimental Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kolatsi-Joannou, Maria; Price, Karen L.; Winyard, Paul J.; Long, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Galectin-3 is a β-galactoside binding lectin with roles in diverse processes including proliferation, apoptosis, inflammation and fibrosis which are dependent on different domains of the molecule and subcellular distribution. Although galectin-3 is known to be upregulated in acute kidney injury, the relative importance of its different domains and functions are poorly understood in the underlying pathogenesis. Therefore we experimentally modulated galectin-3 in folic acid (FA)-induced acute kidney injury utilising modified citrus pectin (MCP), a derivative of pectin which can bind to the galectin-3 carbohydrate recognition domain thereby predominantly antagonising functions linked to this role. Mice were pre-treated with normal or 1% MCP-supplemented drinking water one week before FA injection. During the initial injury phase, all FA-treated mice lost weight whilst their kidneys enlarged secondary to the renal insult; these gross changes were significantly lessened in the MCP group but this was not associated with significant changes in galectin-3 expression. At a histological level, MCP clearly reduced renal cell proliferation but did not affect apoptosis. Later, during the recovery phase at two weeks, MCP-treated mice demonstrated reduced galectin-3 in association with decreased renal fibrosis, macrophages, pro-inflammatory cytokine expression and apoptosis. Other renal galectins, galectin-1 and -9, were unchanged. Our data indicates that MCP is protective in experimental nephropathy with modulation of early proliferation and later galectin-3 expression, apoptosis and fibrosis. This raises the possibility that MCP may be a novel strategy to reduce renal injury in the long term, perhaps via carbohydrate binding-related functions of galectin-3. PMID:21494626

  5. Cardiorenal syndrome: acute kidney injury secondary to cardiovascular disease and role of protein-bound uraemic toxins

    PubMed Central

    Lekawanvijit, Suree; Krum, Henry

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and kidney disease are closely interrelated. Disease of one organ can induce dysfunction of the other, ultimately leading to failure of both. Clinical awareness of synergistic adverse clinical outcomes in patients with coexisting CVD and kidney disease or ‘cardiorenal syndrome (CRS)’ has existed. Renal dysfunction, even mild, is a strong independent predictor for poor prognosis in CVD patients. Developing therapeutic interventions targeting acute kidney injury (AKI) has been limited due mainly to lack of effective tools to accurately detect AKI in a timely manner. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and kidney injury molecule-1 have been recently demonstrated to be potential candidate biomarkers in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. However, further validation of AKI biomarkers is needed in other CVD settings, especially acute decompensated heart failure and acute myocardial infarction where AKI commonly occurs. The other concern with regard to understanding the pathogenesis of renal complications in CVD is that mechanistically oriented studies have been relatively rare. Pre-clininal studies have shown that activation of renal inflammation–fibrosis processes, probably triggered by haemodynamic derangement, underlies CVD-associated renal dysfunction. On the other hand, it is postulated that there still are missing links in the heart–kidney connection in CRS patients who have significant renal dysfunction. At present, non-dialysable protein-bound uraemic toxins (PBUTs) appear to be the main focus in this regard. Evidence of the causal role of PBUTs in CRS has been increasingly demonstrated, mainly focusing on indoxyl sulfate (IS) and p-cresyl sulfate (pCS). Both IS and pCS are derived from colonic microbiotic metabolism of dietary amino acids, and hence the colon has become a target of treatment in addition to efforts to improve dialysis techniques for better removal of PBUTs. Novel therapy targeting the site of toxin

  6. Blood Pressure in Early Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schrier, Robert W.; Abebe, Kaleab Z.; Perrone, Ronald D.; Torres, Vicente E.; Braun, William E.; Steinman, Theodore I.; Winklhofer, Franz T.; Brosnahan, Godela; Czarnecki, Peter G.; Hogan, Marie C.; Miskulin, Dana C.; Rahbari-Oskoui, Frederic F.; Grantham, Jared J.; Harris, Peter C.; Flessner, Michael F.; Bae, Kyongtae T.; Moore, Charity G.; Chapman, Arlene B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hypertension is common in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and is associated with increased total kidney volume, activation of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system, and progression of kidney disease. METHODS In this double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we randomly assigned 558 hypertensive participants with ADPKD (15 to 49 years of age, with an estimated glomerular filtration rate [GFR] >60 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 of body-surface area) to either a standard blood-pressure target (120/70 to 130/80 mm Hg) or a low blood-pressure target (95/60 to 110/75 mm Hg) and to either an angiotensin-converting–enzyme inhibitor (lisinopril) plus an angiotensin-receptor blocker (telmisartan) or lisinopril plus placebo. The primary outcome was the annual percentage change in the total kidney volume. RESULTS The annual percentage increase in total kidney volume was significantly lower in the low-blood-pressure group than in the standard-blood-pressure group (5.6% vs. 6.6%, P = 0.006), without significant differences between the lisinopril–telmisartan group and the lisinopril–placebo group. The rate of change in estimated GFR was similar in the two medication groups, with a negative slope difference in the short term in the low-blood-pressure group as compared with the standard-blood-pressure group (P<0.001) and a marginally positive slope difference in the long term (P = 0.05). The left-ventricular-mass index decreased more in the low-blood-pressure group than in the standard-blood-pressure group (−1.17 vs. −0.57 g per square meter per year, P<0.001); urinary albumin excretion was reduced by 3.77% with the low-pressure target and increased by 2.43% with the standard target (P<0.001). Dizziness and light-headedness were more common in the low-blood-pressure group than in the standard-blood-pressure group (80.7% vs. 69.4%, P = 0.002). CONCLUSIONS In early ADPKD, the combination of lisinopril and telmisartan did not significantly

  7. Urinary Biomarkers Improve the Diagnosis of Intrinsic Acute Kidney Injury in Coronary Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chih-Hsiang; Yang, Chia-Hung; Yang, Huang-Yu; Chen, Tien-Hsing; Lin, Chan-Yu; Chang, Su-Wei; Chen, Yi-Ting; Hung, Cheng-Chieh; Fang, Ji-Tseng; Yang, Chih-Wei; Chen, Yung-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality and is frequently encountered in coronary care units (CCUs). Its clinical presentation differs considerably from that of prerenal or intrinsic AKI. We used the biomarkers calprotectin and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) and compared their utility in predicting and differentiating intrinsic AKI. This was a prospective observational study conducted in a CCU of a tertiary care university hospital. Patients who exhibited any comorbidity and a kidney stressor were enrolled. Urinary samples of the enrolled patients collected between September 2012 and August 2013 were tested for calprotectin and NGAL. The definition of AKI was based on Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes classification. All prospective demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were evaluated as predictors of AKI. A total of 147 adult patients with a mean age of 67 years were investigated. AKI was diagnosed in 71 (50.3%) patients, whereas intrinsic AKI was diagnosed in 43 (60.5%) of them. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed urinary calprotectin and serum albumin as independent risk factors for intrinsic AKI. For predicting intrinsic AKI, both urinary NGAL and calprotectin displayed excellent areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) (0.918 and 0.946, respectively). A combination of these markers revealed an AUROC of 0.946. Our result revealed that calprotectin and NGAL had considerable discriminative powers for predicting intrinsic AKI in CCU patients. Accordingly, careful inspection for medication, choice of therapy, and early intervention in patients exhibiting increased biomarker levels might improve the outcomes of kidney injury. PMID:26448023

  8. Exacerbation of acute kidney injury by bone marrow stromal cells from rats with persistent renin-angiotensin system activation.

    PubMed

    Kankuri, Esko; Mervaala, Elina E; Storvik, Markus; Ahola, Aija M J; Levijoki, Jouko; Müller, Dominik N; Finckenberg, Piet; Mervaala, Eero M

    2015-06-01

    Hypertension and persistent activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) are predisposing factors for the development of acute kidney injury (AKI). Although bone-marrow-derived stromal cells (BMSCs) have shown therapeutic promise in treatment of AKI, the impact of pathological RAS on BMSC functionality has remained unresolved. RAS and its local components in the bone marrow are involved in several key steps of cell maturation processes. This may also render the BMSC population vulnerable to alterations even in the early phases of RAS pathology. We isolated transgenic BMSCs (TG-BMSCs) from young end-organ-disease-free rats with increased RAS activation [human angiotensinogen/renin double transgenic rats (dTGRs)] that eventually develop hypertension and die of end-organ damage and kidney failure at 8 weeks of age. Control cells (SD-BMSCs) were isolated from wild-type Sprague-Dawley rats. Cell phenotype, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and respiration were assessed, and gene expression profiling was carried out using microarrays. Cells' therapeutic efficacy was evaluated in a rat model of acute ischaemia/reperfusion-induced AKI. Serum urea and creatinine were measured at 24 h and 48 h. Acute tubular damage was scored and immunohistochemistry was used for evaluation for markers of inflammation [monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1), ED-1], and kidney injury [kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL)]. TG-BMSCs showed distinct mitochondrial morphology, decreased cell respiration and increased production of ROS. Gene expression profiling revealed a pronounced pro-inflammatory phenotype. In contrast with the therapeutic effect of SD-BMSCs, administration of TG-BMSCs in the AKI model resulted in exacerbation of kidney injury and high mortality. Our results demonstrate that early persistent RAS activation can dramatically compromise therapeutic potential of BMSCs by causing a shift into a pro

  9. [Acute Kidney Injury, Type - 3 cardiorenal syndrome, Biomarkers, Renal Replacement Therapy].

    PubMed

    Di Lullo, Luca; Bellasi, Antonio; Barbera, Vincenzo; Cozzolino, Mario; Russo, Domenico; De Pascalis, Antonio; Santoboni, Francesca; Villani, Annalisa; De Rosa, Silvia; Colafelice, Marco; Russo, Luigi; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease and major cardiovascular events represent main cause of death in both acute and chronic kidney disease patients. Kidney and heart failure are common and frequently co-exist This organ-organ interaction, also called organ cross-talk, leads to well-known definition of cardiorenal syndrome (CRS). Here we will describe cardiovascular involvement in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI). Also known as Type-3 CRS or acute reno-cardiac CRS, it occurs when AKI contributes and/or precipitates development of acute cardiac injury. AKI may directly or indirectly produces an acute cardiac event and it can be associated with volume overload, metabolic acidosis and electrolytes disorders such as hyperkalemia and hypocalcemia, coronary artery disease, left ventricular dysfunction and fibrosis which has been also described in patients with AKI with the consequence of direct negative effects on cardiac performance. PMID:27374388

  10. Community-acquired acute kidney injury: A challenge and opportunity for primary care in kidney health.

    PubMed

    Mesropian, Paul Der; Othersen, Jennifer; Mason, Darius; Wang, Jeffrey; Asif, Arif; Mathew, Roy O

    2016-09-01

    Community-acquired acute kidney injury (CA-AKI) has been found to be a common event in the population. Current incidence estimates are not available, but evaluations of severe elevations in serum creatinine indicate that incidence can be as high as 989 cases per million population in those older than 80 years. Data on risk factors are limited, but older age and higher comorbid illness burden, especially diabetes and cardiovascular disease, seem to be more common in patients who suffer CA-AKI. In addition to being more common than hospital-acquired AKI, the long-term sequelae of CA-AKI seem to be just as severe, including renal disease progression and mortality. Efforts to better understand the aetiology of CA-AKI and how ultimately to prevent the development of this condition will need to be taken. In the meantime, a concerted effort by general internists and nephrologists will be needed to prevent CA-AKI in the highest risk patients and thus limit the poor outcomes associated with this entity. PMID:26890822

  11. Routine prophylaxis with proton pump inhibitors and post-transplant complications in kidney transplant recipients undergoing early corticosteroid withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Courson, Alesa Y; Lee, John R; Aull, Meredith J; Lee, Jennifer H; Kapur, Sandip; McDermott, Jennifer K

    2016-06-01

    Surgical stress, corticosteroids, and mycophenolate may contribute to gastrointestinal ulcers/bleeding after kidney transplantation. Prophylactic acid suppression with H2RAs or PPIs is often utilized after transplantation, although unclear if truly indicated after early corticosteroid withdrawal (CSWD). PPIs have been associated with increased risks of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), pneumonia, and acute rejection. This retrospective cohort study investigated benefits and risks of prolonged PPI use following kidney transplantation and included 286 kidney recipients undergoing CSWD within five d of transplant who were maintained on tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil/sodium. Patients on PPI before transplant, H2RA before/after transplant, and/or those with pre-transplant GI complications were excluded. A total of 171 patients received PPI>30 d, mean duration 287 ± 120 d (PPI group); 115 patients were not maintained on acid suppression (No-PPI group). GI ulceration and bleeding events were rare in PPI group (1.2% and 2.3%, respectively) and not observed in No-PPI group (p = NS). The incidence of infectious or hematological complications was not significantly different between groups. The PPI group experienced more biopsy-proven acute rejection (9.4% vs. 2.6%, p = 0.03). No direct benefit was observed with PPI in reducing the incidence of GI ulcers and bleeding events in kidney transplant recipients undergoing early CSWD. Further studies are needed to investigate the association of PPI and acute rejection. PMID:27004722

  12. Clinical Impact of Speed Variability to Identify Ultramarathon Runners at Risk for Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Sen-Kuang; Chiu, Yu-Hui; Tsai, Yi-Fang; Tai, Ling-Chen; Hou, Peter C.; How, Chorng-Kuang; Yang, Chen-Chang; Kao, Wei-Fong

    2015-01-01

    Background Ultramarathon is a high endurance exercise associated with a wide range of exercise-related problems, such as acute kidney injury (AKI). Early recognition of individuals at risk of AKI during ultramarathon event is critical for implementing preventative strategies. Objectives To investigate the impact of speed variability to identify the exercise-related acute kidney injury anticipatively in ultramarathon event. Methods This is a prospective, observational study using data from a 100 km ultramarathon in Taipei, Taiwan. The distance of entire ultramarathon race was divided into 10 splits. The mean and variability of speed, which was determined by the coefficient of variation (CV) in each 10 km-split (25 laps of 400 m oval track) were calculated for enrolled runners. Baseline characteristics and biochemical data were collected completely 1 week before, immediately post-race, and one day after race. The main outcome was the development of AKI, defined as Stage II or III according to the Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) criteria. Multivariate analysis was performed to determine the independent association between variables and AKI development. Results 26 ultramarathon runners were analyzed in the study. The overall incidence of AKI (in all Stages) was 84.6% (22 in 26 runners). Among these 22 runners, 18 runners were determined as Stage I, 4 runners (15.4%) were determined as Stage II, and none was in Stage III. The covariates of BMI (25.22 ± 2.02 vs. 22.55 ± 1.96, p = 0.02), uric acid (6.88 ± 1.47 vs. 5.62 ± 0.86, p = 0.024), and CV of speed in specific 10-km splits (from secondary 10 km-split (10th – 20th km-split) to 60th – 70th km-split) were significantly different between runners with or without AKI (Stage II) in univariate analysis and showed discrimination ability in ROC curve. In the following multivariate analysis, only CV of speed in 40th – 50th km-split continued to show a significant association to the development of AKI (Stage II) (p

  13. A Novel Therapy to Attenuate Acute Kidney Injury and Ischemic Allograft Damage after Allogenic Kidney Transplantation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gueler, Faikah; Shushakova, Nelli; Mengel, Michael; Hueper, Katja; Chen, Rongjun; Liu, Xiaokun; Park, Joon-Keun; Haller, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Ischemia followed by reperfusion contributes to the initial damage to allografts after kidney transplantation (ktx). In this study we tested the hypothesis that a tetrapeptide EA-230 (AQGV), might improve survival and attenuate loss of kidney function in a mouse model of renal ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) and ischemia-induced delayed graft function after allogenic kidney transplantation. IRI was induced in male C57Bl/6N mice by transient bilateral renal pedicle clamping for 35 min. Treatment with EA-230 (20–50mg/kg twice daily i.p. for four consecutive days) was initiated 24 hours after IRI when acute kidney injury (AKI) was already established. The treatment resulted in markedly improved survival in a dose dependent manner. Acute tubular injury two days after IRI was diminished and tubular epithelial cell proliferation was significantly enhanced by EA-230 treatment. Furthermore, CTGF up-regulation, a marker of post-ischemic fibrosis, at four weeks after IRI was significantly less in EA-230 treated renal tissue. To learn more about these effects, we measured renal blood flow (RBF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) at 28 hours after IRI. EA-230 improved both GFR and RBF significantly. Next, EA-230 treatment was tested in a model of ischemia-induced delayed graft function after allogenic kidney transplantation. The recipients were treated with EA-230 (50 mg/kg) twice daily i.p. which improved renal function and allograft survival by attenuating ischemic allograft damage. In conclusion, EA-230 is a novel and promising therapeutic agent for treating acute kidney injury and preventing IRI-induced post-transplant ischemic allograft injury. Its beneficial effect is associated with improved renal perfusion after IRI and enhanced regeneration of tubular epithelial cells. PMID:25617900

  14. Delayed Diagnosis of Falciparum Malaria with Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Choi, Iee Ho; Hwang, Pyoung Han; Choi, Sam Im; Lee, Dae Yeol; Kim, Min Sun

    2016-09-01

    Prompt malaria diagnosis is crucial so antimalarial drugs and supportive care can then be rapidly initiated. A 15-year-old boy who had traveled to Africa (South Africa, Kenya, and Nigeria between January 3 and 25, 2011) presented with fever persisting over 5 days, headache, diarrhea, and dysuria, approximately 17 days after his return from the journey. Urinalysis showed pyuria and hematuria. Blood examination showed hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and hyperbilirubinemia. Plasmapheresis and hemodialysis were performed for 19 hospital days. Falciparum malaria was then confirmed by peripheral blood smear, and antimalarial medications were initiated. The patient's condition and laboratory results were quickly normalized. We report a case of severe acute renal failure associated with delayed diagnosis of falciparum malaria, and primary use of supportive treatment rather than antimalarial medicine. The present case suggests that early diagnosis and treatment is important because untreated tropical malaria can be associated with severe acute renal failure and fatality. Physicians must be alert for correct diagnosis and proper management of imported tropical malaria when patients have travel history of endemic areas. PMID:27510397

  15. Postpartum acute kidney injury: a review of 99 cases.

    PubMed

    Eswarappa, Mahesh; Madhyastha, P Rakesh; Puri, Sonika; Varma, Vijay; Bhandari, Aneesh; Chennabassappa, Gurudev

    2016-07-01

    Postpartum acute kidney injury (PPAKI) constitutes an important cause of obstetric AKI. It is associated with high maternal and fetal mortality in developing nations. The aim of this study is to survey the etiology and outcomes of PPAKI in a tertiary care Indian hospital. Ninety-nine patients, without prior comorbidities, treated for PPAKI, between 2005-2014 at M.S. Ramaiah Medical College, were included for analysis in this retrospective, observational study. AKI was analyzed in terms of maximal stage of renal injury attained as per RIFLE criteria. Outcomes included requirement for renal replacement therapy (RRT), maternal and fetal outcomes. PPAKI constituted 60% of all obstetric AKI cases. Median maternal age was 23 years and 52% of patients were primigravidas. Mean serum creatinine was 4.1 mg/dL. Failure (33%) and injury (31%) were the major categories as per RIFLE criteria. Thirty-nine percent of cases required RRT. Sepsis, particularly puerperal sepsis, was the leading causes of PPAKI (75% of cases) and maternal mortality (94% of deaths). Maternal and fetal mortality were 19% and 22% respectively. The incidence of cortical necrosis was 10.3%. Three patients required long-term RRT. In conclusion, consistent with other Indian literature, we report a high incidence of PPAKI. We found incremental mortality on moving from "Risk" to "Failure" category of RIFLE. PPAKI was associated with high maternal and fetal mortality with sepsis being the leading cause. Our study highlights the need for provision of better quality of maternal care and fetal monitoring to decrease mortality associated with PPAKI in developing countries. PMID:27319810

  16. Pediatric reference ranges for acute kidney injury biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Nehus, Edward; Haffner, Christopher; Ma, Qing; Devarajan, Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Background Novel urinary biomarkers are useful for the prediction of acute kidney injury (AKI). Most promising are the urine markers NGAL, IL-18, KIM-1, and LFABP. Each of these has shown considerable promise diagnosing AKI earlier than serum creatinine (Scr) using disease controls. We set out to determine reference levels of these markers in a healthy pediatric population. Methods Urine was collected from 368 healthy children and assayed for NGAL, IL-18, KIM-1, and LFABP using commercially available kits or assay materials. Analysis of biomarkers by linear regression and according to age groups (3–<5 years; 5–<10; 10–<15; 15–<18) was performed to determine if biomarker levels differed with age and gender. Results Median values were: NGAL (6.6 ng/ml; IQR 2.8–17), IL-18 (21.6 pg/ml; IQR 13.6–32.9), KIM-1 (410 pg/ml; IQR 226–703), LFABP (3.4 ng/ml; IQR 1.6–6.0). Significant gender differences were found with NGAL and IL-18 and significant age differences were found with all markers. 95th percentile values for each marker varied with age and gender greater than median values. Conclusions This is the largest pediatric reference range study for the urinary measurement of NGAL, IL-18, KIM-1, and LFABP and highlights age and gender differences in these markers. This information is essential for rational interpretation of studies and clinical trials utilizing these emerging AKI biomarkers. PMID:25348707

  17. Role of fibrinogen in acute ischemic kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Sörensen-Zender, I; Rong, S; Susnik, N; Lange, J; Gueler, F; Degen, J L; Melk, A; Haller, H; Schmitt, R

    2013-09-01

    Renal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) is associated with activation of the coagulation system and accumulation of blood clotting factors in the kidney. The aim of the present study was to examine the functional impact of fibrinogen on renal inflammation, damage, and repair in the context of I/R injury. In this study, we found that I/R was associated with a significant increase in the renal deposition of circulating fibrinogen. In parallel, I/R stress induced the de novo expression of fibrinogen in tubular epithelial cells, as reflected by RT-PCR, immunofluorescence, and in situ hybridization. In vitro, fibrinogen expression was induced by oncostatin M and hyper-IL-6 in primary tubular epithelial cells, and fibrinogen-containing medium had an inhibitory effect on tubular epithelial cell adhesion and migration. Fibrinogen(+/-) mice showed similar survival as wild-type mice but better preservation in early postischemic renal function. In fibrinogen(-/-) mice, renal function and survival were significantly worse than in fibrinogen(+/-) mice. Renal transplant experiments revealed reduced expression of tubular damage markers and attenuated proinflammatory cytokine expression but increased inflammatory cell infiltrates and transforming growth factor-β expression in fibrinogen(-/-) isografts. These data point to heterogeneous effects of fibrinogen in renal I/R injury. While a complete lack of fibrinogen may be detrimental, partial reduction of fibrinogen in heterozygous mice can improve renal function and overall outcome. PMID:23804451

  18. Rapidly Progressing Severe Cutaneous Adverse Reaction With Acute Kidney Injury After Drug Exposure: An Uncommon Presentation.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Bradley K; Kumar, Avinash B

    2016-01-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis syndrome (TEN) is a rare severe cutaneous adverse drug reaction that involves skin and mucous membranes. We describe a case of TEN presenting with stage III acute kidney injury, rhabdomyolysis, and acute respiratory failure likely triggered by allopurinol for recently diagnosed gout. Prompt diagnosis, multidisciplinary management, including aggressive resuscitation, cardiorespiratory support, intravenous immunoglobulin therapy, and daily wound care resulted in a positive outcome despite a predicted mortality greater than 60%. Although allopurinol is a known triggering agent, TEN presenting with rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury is rare. PMID:24832386

  19. Plasma Uromodulin Correlates With Kidney Function and Identifies Early Stages in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Steubl, Dominik; Block, Matthias; Herbst, Victor; Nockher, Wolfgang Andreas; Schlumberger, Wolfgang; Satanovskij, Robin; Angermann, Susanne; Hasenau, Anna-Lena; Stecher, Lynne; Heemann, Uwe; Renders, Lutz; Scherberich, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Uromodulin, released from tubular cells of the ascending limb into the blood, may be associated with kidney function. This work studies the relevance of plasma uromodulin as a biomarker for kidney function in an observational cohort of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients and subjects without CKD (CKD stage 0). It should be further evaluated if uromodulin allows the identification of early CKD stages. Plasma uromodulin, serum creatinine, cystatin C, blood-urea-nitrogen (BUN) concentrations, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR CKD-EPIcrea-cystatin) were assessed in 426 individuals of whom 71 were CKD stage 0 and 355 had CKD. Besides descriptive statistics, univariate correlations between uromodulin and biomarkers/eGFR were calculated using Pearson-correlation coefficient. Multiple linear regression modeling was applied to establish the association between uromodulin and eGFR adjusted for demographic parameters and pharmacologic treatment. Receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) analysis adjusted for demographic parameters was performed to test if uromodulin allows differentiation of subjects with CKD stage 0 and CKD stage I. Mean uromodulin plasma levels were 85.7 ± 60.5 ng/mL for all CKD stages combined. Uromodulin was correlated with all biomarkers/eGFR in univariate analysis (eGFR: r = 0.80, creatinine: r = −0.76, BUN: r = −0.72, and cystatin C: r = −0.79). Multiple linear regression modeling showed significant association between uromodulin and eGFR (coefficient estimate β = 0.696, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.603–0.719, P < 0.001). In ROC analysis uromodulin was the only parameter that significantly improved a model containing demographic parameters to differentiate between CKD 0° and I° (area under the curve [AUC] 0.831, 95% CI 0.746–0.915, P = 0.008) compared to creatinine, cystatin C, BUN, and eGFR (AUC for creatinine: 0.722, P = 0.056, cystatin C: 0.668, P = 0.418, BUN: 0.653, P

  20. Plasma Uromodulin Correlates With Kidney Function and Identifies Early Stages in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Steubl, Dominik; Block, Matthias; Herbst, Victor; Nockher, Wolfgang Andreas; Schlumberger, Wolfgang; Satanovskij, Robin; Angermann, Susanne; Hasenau, Anna-Lena; Stecher, Lynne; Heemann, Uwe; Renders, Lutz; Scherberich, Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    Uromodulin, released from tubular cells of the ascending limb into the blood, may be associated with kidney function. This work studies the relevance of plasma uromodulin as a biomarker for kidney function in an observational cohort of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients and subjects without CKD (CKD stage 0). It should be further evaluated if uromodulin allows the identification of early CKD stages.Plasma uromodulin, serum creatinine, cystatin C, blood-urea-nitrogen (BUN) concentrations, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR CKD-EPIcrea-cystatin) were assessed in 426 individuals of whom 71 were CKD stage 0 and 355 had CKD. Besides descriptive statistics, univariate correlations between uromodulin and biomarkers/eGFR were calculated using Pearson-correlation coefficient. Multiple linear regression modeling was applied to establish the association between uromodulin and eGFR adjusted for demographic parameters and pharmacologic treatment. Receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) analysis adjusted for demographic parameters was performed to test if uromodulin allows differentiation of subjects with CKD stage 0 and CKD stage I.Mean uromodulin plasma levels were 85.7 ± 60.5 ng/mL for all CKD stages combined. Uromodulin was correlated with all biomarkers/eGFR in univariate analysis (eGFR: r = 0.80, creatinine: r = -0.76, BUN: r = -0.72, and cystatin C: r = -0.79). Multiple linear regression modeling showed significant association between uromodulin and eGFR (coefficient estimate β = 0.696, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.603-0.719, P < 0.001). In ROC analysis uromodulin was the only parameter that significantly improved a model containing demographic parameters to differentiate between CKD 0° and I° (area under the curve [AUC] 0.831, 95% CI 0.746-0.915, P = 0.008) compared to creatinine, cystatin C, BUN, and eGFR (AUC for creatinine: 0.722, P = 0.056, cystatin C: 0.668, P = 0.418, BUN: 0.653, P = 0.811, and e

  1. Early Stent Removal After Kidney Transplantation: Is it Possible?

    PubMed Central

    Ali Asgari, Majid; Dadkhah, Farid; Tara, Seyed Ahmad; Argani, Hassan; Tavoosian, Ali; Ghadian, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background The most important surgical complications of renal transplantation are stenosis and obstruction of the ureterovesical anastomosis. Routine use of ureteral stents can prevent this complication, but the optimal time for ureteral stent use is still controversial. Objectives The purpose of this study is to compare the benefits and complications of early and delayed stent removal after surgery. Early ureteral stent removal can decrease some complications, such as urinary tract infections (UTIs), bladder irritation symptoms, persistent hematuria, and the risk of stent crusting; its benefits include easier stent removal and shorter hospitalization time. Patients and Methods All patients who underwent kidney transplantation from May 2011 until March 2012 in Modarres Hospital were included in this study. We classified the patients into three groups, based on time of stent removal (10, 20, and 30 days after transplantation). Results Ninety-one patients were studied; urologic complications (hydroureteronephrosis and urinoma) in these three groups were analyzed and showed no statistical significant difference. Conclusions We can remove the ureteral stent earlier after kidney transplantation with no increase in the prevalence of surgical complications. PMID:27231684

  2. Oxidative Stress in Diabetic Nephropathy with Early Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Andrade-Sierra, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    The increase in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) and the secondary kidney damage produces diabetic nephropathy (DN). Early nephropathy is defined as the presence of microalbuminuria (30–300 mg/day), including normal glomerular filtration rate (GFR) or a mildly decreased GFR (60–89 mL/min/1.73 m2), with or without overt nephropathy. The earliest change caused by DN is hyperfiltration with proteinuria. The acceptable excretion rate of albumin in urine is <30 mg/day. Albuminuria represents the excretion of >300 mg/day. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by abnormalities in renal function that persist for >3 months with health implications. Alterations in the redox state in DN are caused by the persistent state of hyperglycemia and the increase in advanced glycation end products (AGEs) with ability to affect the renin-angiotensin system and the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), producing chronic inflammation and glomerular and tubular hypertrophy and favoring the appearance of oxidative stress. In DN imbalance between prooxidant/antioxidant processes exists with an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). The overproduction of ROS diminishes expression of the antioxidant enzymes (manganese superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase). The early detection of CKD secondary to DN and the timely identification of patients would permit decreasing its impact on health. PMID:27525285

  3. Oxidative Stress in Diabetic Nephropathy with Early Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Díaz, Alejandra Guillermina; Pazarín-Villaseñor, Leonardo; Yanowsky-Escatell, Francisco Gerardo; Andrade-Sierra, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    The increase in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) and the secondary kidney damage produces diabetic nephropathy (DN). Early nephropathy is defined as the presence of microalbuminuria (30-300 mg/day), including normal glomerular filtration rate (GFR) or a mildly decreased GFR (60-89 mL/min/1.73 m(2)), with or without overt nephropathy. The earliest change caused by DN is hyperfiltration with proteinuria. The acceptable excretion rate of albumin in urine is <30 mg/day. Albuminuria represents the excretion of >300 mg/day. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by abnormalities in renal function that persist for >3 months with health implications. Alterations in the redox state in DN are caused by the persistent state of hyperglycemia and the increase in advanced glycation end products (AGEs) with ability to affect the renin-angiotensin system and the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), producing chronic inflammation and glomerular and tubular hypertrophy and favoring the appearance of oxidative stress. In DN imbalance between prooxidant/antioxidant processes exists with an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). The overproduction of ROS diminishes expression of the antioxidant enzymes (manganese superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase). The early detection of CKD secondary to DN and the timely identification of patients would permit decreasing its impact on health. PMID:27525285

  4. The Role of Eugenol in the Prevention of Acute Pancreatitis-Induced Acute Kidney Injury: Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Markakis, Charalampos; Tsaroucha, Alexandra; Papalois, Apostolos E.; Lambropoulou, Maria; Spartalis, Eleftherios; Tsigalou, Christina; Romanidis, Konstantinos; Simopoulos, Constantinos

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory intra-abdominal disease, which takes a severe form in 15–20% of patients and can result in high mortality especially when complicated by acute renal failure. The aim of this study is to assess the possible reduction in the extent of acute kidney injury after administration of eugenol in an experimental model of acute pancreatitis. Materials and Methods. 106 male Wistar rats weighing 220–350 g were divided into 3 groups: (1) Sham, with sham surgery; (2) Control, with induction of acute pancreatitis, through ligation of the biliopancreatic duct; and (3) Eugenol, with induction of acute pancreatitis and eugenol administration at a dose of 15 mg/kg. Serum urea and creatinine, histopathological changes, TNF-α, IL-6, and MPO activity in the kidneys were evaluated at predetermined time intervals. Results. The group that was administered eugenol showed milder histopathological changes than the Control group, TNF-α activity was milder in the Eugenol group, and there was no difference in activity for MPO and IL-6. Serum urea and creatinine levels were lower in the Eugenol group than in the Control group. Conclusions. Eugenol administration was protective for the kidneys in an experimental model of acute pancreatitis in rats. PMID:26884642

  5. Segmentation of acute pyelonephritis area on kidney SPECT images using binary shape analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chia-Hsiang; Sun, Yung-Nien; Chiu, Nan-Tsing

    1999-05-01

    Acute pyelonephritis is a serious disease in children that may result in irreversible renal scarring. The ability to localize the site of urinary tract infection and the extent of acute pyelonephritis has considerable clinical importance. In this paper, we are devoted to segment the acute pyelonephritis area from kidney SPECT images. A two-step algorithm is proposed. First, the original images are translated into binary versions by automatic thresholding. Then the acute pyelonephritis areas are located by finding convex deficiencies in the obtained binary images. This work gives important diagnosis information for physicians and improves the quality of medical care for children acute pyelonephritis disease.

  6. Preischemic targeting of HIF prolyl hydroxylation inhibits fibrosis associated with acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Kapitsinou, Pinelopi P; Jaffe, Jonathan; Michael, Mark; Swan, Christina E; Duffy, Kevin J; Erickson-Miller, Connie L; Haase, Volker H

    2012-05-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) due to ischemia is an important contributor to the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Key mediators of cellular adaptation to hypoxia are oxygen-sensitive hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF), which are regulated by prolyl-4-hydroxylase domain (PHD)-containing dioxygenases. While activation of HIF protects from ischemic cell death, HIF has been shown to promote fibrosis in experimental models of CKD. The impact of HIF activation on AKI-induced fibrosis has not been defined. Here, we investigated the role of pharmacologic HIF activation in AKI-associated fibrosis and inflammation. We found that pharmacologic inhibition of HIF prolyl hydroxylation before AKI ameliorated fibrosis and prevented anemia, while inhibition of HIF prolyl hydroxylation in the early recovery phase of AKI did not affect short- or long-term clinical outcome. Therefore, preischemic targeting of the PHD/HIF pathway represents an effective therapeutic strategy for the prevention of CKD resulting from AKI, and it warrants further investigation in clinical trials. PMID:22262480

  7. Raising Awareness of Acute Kidney Injury: A Global Perspective of a Silent Killer

    PubMed Central

    Lewington, Andrew JP; Cerdá, Jorge; Mehta, Ravindra L

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide, acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with poor patient outcomes. Over the last few years, collaborative efforts, enabled by a common definition of AKI, have provided a description of the epidemiology, natural history and outcomes of this disease and improved our understanding of the pathophysiology. There is increased recognition that AKI is encountered in multiple settings and in all age groups, and that its course and outcomes are influenced by the severity and duration of the event. The effect of AKI on an individual patient and the resulting societal burden that ensues from the long term effects of the disease, including development of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end stage renal disease (ESRD), is attracting increasing scrutiny. There is evidence of marked variation in the management of AKI which is, to a large extent, due to a lack of awareness and an absence of standards for prevention, early recognition and intervention. These emerging data point to an urgent need for a global effort to highlight that AKI is preventable, its course modifiable, and its treatment can improve outcomes. In this article, we provide a framework of reference and propose specific strategies to raise awareness of AKI globally, with the goal to ultimately improve outcomes from this devastating disease. PMID:23636171

  8. Acute kidney injury: what part do toll-like receptors play?

    PubMed Central

    Vallés, Patricia G; Lorenzo, Andrea Gil; Bocanegra, Victoria; Vallés, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    The innate immune system plays an important role as a first response to tissue injury. This first response is carried out via germline-encoded receptors. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are the first identified and best studied family of pattern recognition receptors. TLRs are expressed on a variety of cell types, including epithelial cells, endothelia, dendritic cells, monocytes/macrophages, and B- and T-cells. TLRs initiate innate immune responses and concurrently shape the subsequent adaptive immune response. They are sensors of both pathogens, through the exogenous pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), and tissue injury, through the endogenous danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). TLR signaling is critical in defending against invading microorganisms; however, sustained receptor activation is also implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. Ischemic kidney injury involves early TLR-driven immunopathology, and the resolution of inflammation is needed for rapid regeneration of injured tubule cells. Notably, the activation of TLRs also has been implicated in epithelial repair. This review focuses on the role of TLRs and their endogenous ligands within the inflammatory response of acute kidney injury. PMID:24971030

  9. Development of Inpatient Risk Stratification Models of Acute Kidney Injury for Use in Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Matheny, Michael E.; Miller, Randolph A.; Ikizler, T. Alp; Waitman, Lemuel R.; Denny, Joshua C.; Schildcrout, Jonathan S.; Dittus, Robert S.; Peterson, Josh F.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Patients with hospital-acquired acute kidney injury (AKI) are at risk for increased mortality and further medical complications. Evaluating these patients with a prediction tool easily implemented within an electronic health record (EHR) would identify high risk patients prior to the development of AKI, and could prevent iatrogenically induced episodes of AKI and improve clinical management. Methods We used structured clinical data acquired from an EHR to identify patients with normal kidney function for admissions from August 1st, 1999 to July 31st, 2003. Using administrative, computerized provider order entry, and laboratory test data, we developed a 3-level risk stratification model to predict each of two severity levels of in-hospital AKI as defined by RIFLE criteria. The severity levels were defined as 150% or 200% of baseline serum creatinine. Model discrimination and calibration was evaluated using 10-fold cross-validation. Results Cross-validation of the models resulted in area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUC) curves of 0.75 (150% elevation) and 0.78 (200% elevation). Both models were adequately calibrated as measured by the Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test chi-squared values of 9.7 (p = 0.29) and 12.7 (p = 0.12), respectively. Conclusions We generated risk prediction models for hospital-acquired AKI using only commonly available electronic data. The models identify patients at high risk for AKI who might benefit from early intervention or increased monitoring. PMID:20354229

  10. Cell-cycle arrest and acute kidney injury: the light and the dark sides

    PubMed Central

    Kellum, John A.; Chawla, Lakhmir S.

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common consequence of systemic illness or injury and it complicates several forms of major surgery. Two major difficulties have hampered progress in AKI research and clinical management. AKI is difficult to detect early and its pathogenesis is still poorly understood. We recently reported results from multi-center studies where two urinary markers of cell-cycle arrest, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2 (TIMP-2) and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 7 (IGFBP7) were validated for development of AKI well ahead of clinical manifestations—azotemia and oliguria. Cell-cycle arrest is known to be involved in the pathogenesis of AKI and this ‘dark side’ may also involve progression to chronic kidney disease. However, cell-cycle arrest has a ‘light side’ as well, since this mechanism can protect cells from the disastrous consequences of entering cell division with damaged DNA or insufficient bioenergetic resources during injury or stress. Whether we can use the light side to help prevent AKI remains to be seen, but there is already evidence that cell-cycle arrest biomarkers are indicators of both sides of this complex physiology. PMID:26044835