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Sample records for early decomposition observation

  1. Evidence for Early Morphological Decomposition: Combining Masked Priming with Magnetoencephalography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehtonen, Minna; Monahan, Philip J.; Poeppel, David

    2011-01-01

    Are words stored as morphologically structured representations? If so, when during word recognition are morphological pieces accessed? Recent masked priming studies support models that assume early decomposition of (potentially) morphologically complex words. The electrophysiological evidence, however, is inconsistent. We combined masked…

  2. Evidence for Early Morphological Decomposition: Combining Masked Priming with Magnetoencephalography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehtonen, Minna; Monahan, Philip J.; Poeppel, David

    2011-01-01

    Are words stored as morphologically structured representations? If so, when during word recognition are morphological pieces accessed? Recent masked priming studies support models that assume early decomposition of (potentially) morphologically complex words. The electrophysiological evidence, however, is inconsistent. We combined masked

  3. Young Children's Thinking about Decomposition: Early Modeling Entrees to Complex Ideas in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ero-Tolliver, Isi; Lucas, Deborah; Schauble, Leona

    2013-01-01

    This study was part of a multi-year project on the development of elementary students' modeling approaches to understanding the life sciences. Twenty-three first grade students conducted a series of coordinated observations and investigations on decomposition, a topic that is rarely addressed in the early grades. The instruction included

  4. Young Children's Thinking about Decomposition: Early Modeling Entrees to Complex Ideas in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ero-Tolliver, Isi; Lucas, Deborah; Schauble, Leona

    2013-01-01

    This study was part of a multi-year project on the development of elementary students' modeling approaches to understanding the life sciences. Twenty-three first grade students conducted a series of coordinated observations and investigations on decomposition, a topic that is rarely addressed in the early grades. The instruction included…

  5. Decomposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Middleton, Beth A.

    2014-01-01

    A cornerstone of ecosystem ecology, decomposition was recognized as a fundamental process driving the exchange of energy in ecosystems by early ecologists such as Lindeman 1942 and Odum 1960). In the history of ecology, studies of decomposition were incorporated into the International Biological Program in the 1960s to compare the nature of organic matter breakdown in various ecosystem types. Such studies still have an important role in ecological studies of today. More recent refinements have brought debates on the relative role microbes, invertebrates and environment in the breakdown and release of carbon into the atmosphere, as well as how nutrient cycling, production and other ecosystem processes regulated by decomposition may shift with climate change. Therefore, this bibliography examines the primary literature related to organic matter breakdown, but it also explores topics in which decomposition plays a key supporting role including vegetation composition, latitudinal gradients, altered ecosystems, anthropogenic impacts, carbon storage, and climate change models. Knowledge of these topics is relevant to both the study of ecosystem ecology as well projections of future conditions for human societies.

  6. Young Children's Thinking About Decomposition: Early Modeling Entrees to Complex Ideas in Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ero-Tolliver, Isi; Lucas, Deborah; Schauble, Leona

    2013-01-01

    This study was part of a multi-year project on the development of elementary students' modeling approaches to understanding the life sciences. Twenty-three first grade students conducted a series of coordinated observations and investigations on decomposition, a topic that is rarely addressed in the early grades. The instruction included in-class observations of different types of soil and soil profiling, visits to the school's compost bin, structured observations of decaying organic matter of various kinds, study of organisms that live in the soil, and models of environmental conditions that affect rates of decomposition. Both before and after instruction, students completed a written performance assessment that asked them to reason about the process of decomposition. Additional information was gathered through one-on-one interviews with six focus students who represented variability of performance across the class. During instruction, researchers collected video of classroom activity, student science journal entries, and charts and illustrations produced by the teacher. After instruction, the first-grade students showed a more nuanced understanding of the composition and variability of soils, the role of visible organisms in decomposition, and environmental factors that influence rates of decomposition. Through a variety of representational devices, including drawings, narrative records, and physical models, students came to regard decomposition as a process, rather than simply as an end state that does not require explanation.

  7. Decomposition of the sensitivity of the symmetry energy observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, He-lei; Yong, Gao-Chan; Wen, De-Hua

    2015-04-01

    To exactly answer which density region that some frequently used symmetry-energy-sensitive observables probe, for the first time, we make a study of the decomposition of the sensitivity of some symmetry-energy-sensitive observables. It is found that for the Au+Au reaction at incident beam energies of 200 and 400 MeV/nucleon, frequently used symmetry-energy-sensitive observables mainly probe the density-dependent symmetry energy around 1.25 ρ0 (for pionic observables) or 1.5 ρ0 (for nucleonic observables). Effects of the symmetry energy in the low-density region is in general small but observable. The fact that the symmetry-energy-sensitive observables are not sensitive to the symmetry energy in the maximal baryon-density region increases the difficulty of studying nuclear symmetry energy at superdensity.

  8. Adhesive hard sphere dispersions V. Observation of spinodal decomposition in a colloidal dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouw, P. W.; Woutersen, A. T. J. M.; Ackerson, B. J.; De Kruif, C. G.

    1989-04-01

    Sterically stabilized silica particles dispersed in a marginal solvent undergo a spinodal decomposition upon cooling below the critical temperature. Because of the low diffusivity of the particles the early time regime of the decomposition can be studied. The decomposition was studied by light scattering. The results show that linear theory cannot be applied. Results can however be scaled to a universal function which is also applicable to phase separation dynamics in metals, binary fluid mixtures, glasses, and polymeric blends.

  9. Evidence for Early Morphological Decomposition in Visual Word Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomyak, Olla; Marantz, Alec

    2010-01-01

    We employ a single-trial correlational MEG analysis technique to investigate early processing in the visual recognition of morphologically complex words. Three classes of affixed words were presented in a lexical decision task: free stems (e.g., taxable), bound roots (e.g., tolerable), and unique root words (e.g., vulnerable, the root of which…

  10. Evidence for Early Morphological Decomposition in Visual Word Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomyak, Olla; Marantz, Alec

    2010-01-01

    We employ a single-trial correlational MEG analysis technique to investigate early processing in the visual recognition of morphologically complex words. Three classes of affixed words were presented in a lexical decision task: free stems (e.g., taxable), bound roots (e.g., tolerable), and unique root words (e.g., vulnerable, the root of which

  11. Polar decomposition for attitude determination from vector observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.

    1993-01-01

    This work treats the problem of weighted least squares fitting of a 3D Euclidean-coordinate transformation matrix to a set of unit vectors measured in the reference and transformed coordinates. A closed-form analytic solution to the problem is re-derived. The fact that the solution is the closest orthogonal matrix to some matrix defined on the measured vectors and their weights is clearly demonstrated. Several known algorithms for computing the analytic closed form solution are considered. An algorithm is discussed which is based on the polar decomposition of matrices into the closest unitary matrix to the decomposed matrix and a Hermitian matrix. A somewhat longer improved algorithm is suggested too. A comparison of several algorithms is carried out using simulated data as well as real data from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite. The comparison is based on accuracy and time consumption. It is concluded that the algorithms based on polar decomposition yield a simple although somewhat less accurate solution. The precision of the latter algorithms increase with the number of the measured vectors and with the accuracy of their measurement.

  12. Near-infrared surface photometry of early-type spiral galaxies. I. Bulge and disk decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriondo, G.; Giovanardi, C.; Hunt, L. K.

    1998-05-01

    We present near-infrared (NIR) surface photometry of a sample of 14 early-type spirals with observed rotation curves. In this first paper, we report the results of two-dimensional parametric and non-parametric decompositions to separate the bulge and disk components; the parametric bulge is modeled with a generalized exponential law of integer index n, and the disk with a simple exponential. We find that the derived bulge parameters, for a given galaxy, vary systematically with the bulge shape index n. The mean early-type bulge has a best-fit n = 2.6, and 80% of the sample has best n of 2 or 3. Bulges are rarely spherical; the median bulge intrinsic ellipticity is 0.33. The median early-type disk has (J-K)_d more than 0.1 mag bluer than the bulge, and a NIR disk surface brightness more than 1 mag arcsec(-2) brighter than later-type disks. Our data are consistent with the well-established correlation of both bulge and disk surface brightness with physical scale length, and we note that the location of bulges within this projection of the fundamental plane depends on their shape index n. In agreement with previous work, the ratios of bulge and disk scale lengths are consistent with a constant value r_e/r_d = 0.3; however, such value again depends on the bulge index n, implying that claims for a scale-free Hubble sequence may be premature. Based on observations taken at TIRGO (Gornergrat, Switzerland). TIRGO is operated by CAISMI--CNR, Arcetri, Firenze, Italy.

  13. Changes in the quality of chromophoric dissolved organic matter leached from senescent leaf litter during the early decomposition.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Satoshi; Maie, Nagamitsu; Baba, Mitsuhisa; Sudo, Takahiro; Sugiura, Toshihiro; Shima, Eikichi

    2012-01-01

    Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) leached from leaf litter is a major source of humus in mineral soil of forest ecosystems. While their functions and refractoriness depend on the physicochemical structure, there is little information on the quality of CDOM, especially for that leached in the very early stages of litter decomposition when a large amount of dissolved organic matter (DOM) is leached. This study aimed to better understand the variations/changes in the composition of CDOM leached from senescent leaf litter from two tree species during the early stage of decomposition. Leaf litter from a conifer tree (Japanese cedar, D. Don) and a deciduous broad-leaved tree (Konara oak, Thunb.) were incubated in columns using simulated rainfall events periodically for a total of 300 d at 20C. The quality of CDOM was investigated based on the fluorescence properties by using a combination of excitation-emission matrix fluorescence (EEM) and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). In addition, the phenolic composition of DOM was investigated at a molecular level by thermally assisted hydrolysis and methylation-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (THM-GC-MS) in the presence of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH). The EEM was statistically decomposed into eight fluorescence components (two tannin/peptide-like peaks, one protein-like peak, and five humic-like peaks). A significant contribution of tannin/peptide-like peaks was observed at the beginning of incubation, but these peaks decreased quickly and humic-like peaks increased within 1 mo of incubation. The composition of humic-like peaks was different between tree species and changed over the incubation period. Since tannin-derived phenolic compounds were detected in the DOM collected after 254 d of incubation on THM-GC-MS, it was suggested that tannins partially changed its structure, forming various humic-like peaks during the early decomposition. PMID:22565264

  14. Evidence from neglect dyslexia for morphological decomposition at the early stages of orthographic-visual analysis

    PubMed Central

    Reznick, Julia; Friedmann, Naama

    2015-01-01

    This study examined whether and how the morphological structure of written words affects reading in word-based neglect dyslexia (neglexia), and what can be learned about morphological decomposition in reading from the effect of morphology on neglexia. The oral reading of 7 Hebrew-speaking participants with acquired neglexia at the word level—6 with left neglexia and 1 with right neglexia—was evaluated. The main finding was that the morphological role of the letters on the neglected side of the word affected neglect errors: When an affix appeared on the neglected side, it was neglected significantly more often than when the neglected side was part of the root; root letters on the neglected side were never omitted, whereas affixes were. Perceptual effects of length and final letter form were found for words with an affix on the neglected side, but not for words in which a root letter appeared in the neglected side. Semantic and lexical factors did not affect the participants' reading and error pattern, and neglect errors did not preserve the morpho-lexical characteristics of the target words. These findings indicate that an early morphological decomposition of words to their root and affixes occurs before access to the lexicon and to semantics, at the orthographic-visual analysis stage, and that the effects did not result from lexical feedback. The same effects of morphological structure on reading were manifested by the participants with left- and right-sided neglexia. Since neglexia is a deficit at the orthographic-visual analysis level, the effect of morphology on reading patterns in neglexia further supports that morphological decomposition occurs in the orthographic-visual analysis stage, prelexically, and that the search for the three letters of the root in Hebrew is a trigger for attention shift in neglexia. PMID:26528159

  15. Early stages of spinodal decomposition in Fe-Cr resolved by in-situ small-angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hörnqvist, M.; Thuvander, M.; Steuwer, A.; King, S.; Odqvist, J.; Hedström, P.

    2015-02-01

    In-situ, time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) investigations of the early stages of the spinodal decomposition process in Fe-35Cr were performed at 773 and 798 K. The kinetics of the decomposition, both in terms of characteristic distance and peak intensity, followed a power-law behaviour from the start of the heat treatment (a'= 0.10-0.11 and a″ = 0.67-0.86). Furthermore, the method allows tracking of the high-Q slope, which is a sensitive measure of the early stages of decomposition. Ex-situ SANS and atom probe tomography were used to verify the results from the in-situ investigations. Finally, the in-situ measurement of the evolution of the characteristic distance at 773 K was compared with the predictions from the Cahn-Hilliard-Cook model, which showed good agreement with the experimental data (a'= 0.12-0.20 depending on the assumed mobility).

  16. Unimolecular thermal decomposition of phenol and d5-phenol: Direct observation of cyclopentadiene formation via cyclohexadienone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheer, Adam M.; Mukarakate, Calvin; Robichaud, David J.; Nimlos, Mark R.; Carstensen, Hans-Heinrich; Barney Ellison, G.

    2012-01-01

    The pyrolyses of phenol and d5-phenol (C6H5OH and C6D5OH) have been studied using a high temperature, microtubular (μtubular) SiC reactor. Product detection is via both photon ionization (10.487 eV) time-of-flight mass spectrometry and matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy. Gas exiting the heated reactor (375 K-1575 K) is subject to a free expansion after a residence time in the μtubular reactor of approximately 50-100 μs. The expansion from the reactor into vacuum rapidly cools the gas mixture and allows the detection of radicals and other highly reactive intermediates. We find that the initial decomposition steps at the onset of phenol pyrolysis are enol/keto tautomerization to form cyclohexadienone followed by decarbonylation to produce cyclopentadiene; C6H5OH → c-C6H6 = O → c-C5H6 + CO. The cyclopentadiene loses a H atom to generate the cyclopentadienyl radical which further decomposes to acetylene and propargyl radical; c-C5H6 → c-C5H5 + H → HC≡CH + HCCCH2. At higher temperatures, hydrogen loss from the PhO-H group to form phenoxy radical followed by CO ejection to generate the cyclopentadienyl radical likely contributes to the product distribution; C6H5O-H → C6H5O + H → c-C5H5 + CO. The direct decarbonylation reaction remains an important channel in the thermal decomposition mechanisms of the dihydroxybenzenes. Both catechol (o-HO-C6H4-OH) and hydroquinone (p-HO-C6H4-OH) are shown to undergo decarbonylation at the onset of pyrolysis to form hydroxycyclopentadiene. In the case of catechol, we observe that water loss is also an important decomposition channel at the onset of pyrolysis.

  17. Indium hydroxide to oxide decomposition observed in one nanocrystal during in situ transmission electron microscopy studies

    SciTech Connect

    Miehe, Gerhard; Lauterbach, Stefan; Kleebe, Hans-Joachim; Gurlo, Aleksander

    2013-02-15

    The high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) is used to study, in situ, spatially resolved decomposition in individual nanocrystals of metal hydroxides and oxyhydroxides. This case study reports on the decomposition of indium hydroxide (c-In(OH){sub 3}) to bixbyite-type indium oxide (c-In{sub 2}O{sub 3}). The electron beam is focused onto a single cube-shaped In(OH){sub 3} crystal of {l_brace}100{r_brace} morphology with ca. 35 nm edge length and a sequence of HR-TEM images was recorded during electron beam irradiation. The frame-by-frame analysis of video sequences allows for the in situ, time-resolved observation of the shape and orientation of the transformed crystals, which in turn enables the evaluation of the kinetics of c-In{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystallization. Supplementary material (video of the transformation) related to this article can be found online at (10.1016/j.jssc.2012.09.022). After irradiation the shape of the parent cube-shaped crystal is preserved, however, its linear dimension (edge) is reduced by the factor 1.20. The corresponding spotted selected area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern representing zone [001] of c-In(OH){sub 3} is transformed to a diffuse strongly textured ring-like pattern of c-In{sub 2}O{sub 3} that indicates the transformed cube is no longer a single crystal but is disintegrated into individual c-In{sub 2}O{sub 3} domains with the size of about 5-10 nm. The induction time of approximately 15 s is estimated from the time-resolved Fourier transforms. The volume fraction of the transformed phase (c-In{sub 2}O{sub 3}), calculated from the shrinkage of the parent c-In(OH){sub 3} crystal in the recorded HR-TEM images, is used as a measure of the kinetics of c-In{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystallization within the framework of Avrami-Erofeev formalism. The Avrami exponent of {approx}3 is characteristic for a reaction mechanism with fast nucleation at the beginning of the reaction and subsequent three-dimensional growth of nuclei with a constant growth rate. The structural transformation path in reconstructive decomposition of c-In(OH){sub 3} to c-In{sub 2}O{sub 3} is discussed in terms of (i) the displacement of hydrogen atoms that lead to breaking the hydrogen bond between OH groups of [In(OH){sub 6}] octahedra and finally to their destabilization and (ii) transformation of the vertices-shared indium-oxygen octahedra in c-In(OH){sub 3} to vertices- and edge-shared octahedra in c-In{sub 2}O{sub 3}. - Graphical abstract: Frame-by-frame analysis of video sequences recorded of HR-TEM images reveals that a single cube-shaped In(OH){sub 3} nanocrystal with {l_brace}100{r_brace} morphology decomposes into bixbyite-type In{sub 2}O{sub 3} domains while being imaged. The mechanism of this decomposition is evaluated through the analysis of the structural relationship between initial (c-In(OH){sub 3}) and transformed (c-In{sub 2}O{sub 3}) phases and though the kinetics of the decomposition followed via the time-resolved shrinkage of the initial crystal of indium hydroxide. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In-situ time-resolved High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Crystallographic transformation path. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kinetics of the decomposition in one nanocrystal.

  18. Chandra Observations of Early-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athey, Alex E.

    2007-11-01

    We have performed uniform analysis of a sample of 54 nearby, early-type galaxies observed with emph{Chandra}. In this work we present the spectral results for both the diffuse Interstellar Medium, ISM, and low-mass X-ray binaries, LMXBs. We determine the metallicity of the hot ISM in the 22 brightest galaxies and find a narrow range of abundance ratios relative to iron. The average iron metallicity of these bright galaxies is 0.96±0.33 relative to solar. By assuming these enrichment patterns continue to fainter galaxies, we are able to extend accurate ISM modeling down to the faintest galaxies in the sample. The sample of galaxies span 4.5 orders of magnitude in X-ray luminosity starting at L_X=10(38) erg * s(-1) and the average gas temperature in the sample is 0.58±0.24 keV. We present the X-ray properties of these galaxies scaled to one effective radius as well as radial variations of gas and stellar binary luminosities, and radial variations of gas temperature, metallicity, mass, entropy and density.

  19. Unimolecular Thermal Decomposition of Phenol and d5-Phenol: Direct Observation of Cyclopentadiene Formation via Cyclohexadienone

    SciTech Connect

    Scheer, A. M.; Mukarakate, C.; Robichaud, D. J.; Nimlos, M. R.; Carstensen, H. H.; Barney, E. G.

    2012-01-28

    The pyrolyses of phenol and d{sub 5}-phenol (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}OH and C{sub 6}D{sub 5}OH) have been studied using a high temperature, microtubular ({mu}tubular) SiC reactor. Product detection is via both photon ionization (10.487 eV) time-of-flight mass spectrometry and matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy. Gas exiting the heated reactor (375 K-1575 K) is subject to a free expansion after a residence time in the {mu}tubular reactor of approximately 50-100 {micro}s. The expansion from the reactor into vacuum rapidly cools the gas mixture and allows the detection of radicals and other highly reactive intermediates. We find that the initial decomposition steps at the onset of phenol pyrolysis are enol/keto tautomerization to form cyclohexadienone followed by decarbonylation to produce cyclopentadiene; C{sub 6}H{sub 5}OH {yields} c-C{sub 6}H{sub 6} = O {yields} c-C{sub 5}H{sub 6} + CO. The cyclopentadiene loses a H atom to generate the cyclopentadienyl radical which further decomposes to acetylene and propargyl radical; c-C{sub 5}H{sub 6} {yields} c-C{sub 5}H{sub 5} + H {yields} HC {triple_bond} CH + HCCCH{sub 2}. At higher temperatures, hydrogen loss from the PhO-H group to form phenoxy radical followed by CO ejection to generate the cyclopentadienyl radical likely contributes to the product distribution; C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O-H {yields} C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O + H {yields} c-C{sub 5}H{sub 5} + CO. The direct decarbonylation reaction remains an important channel in the thermal decomposition mechanisms of the dihydroxybenzenes. Both catechol (o-HO-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-OH) and hydroquinone (p-HO-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-OH) are shown to undergo decarbonylation at the onset of pyrolysis to form hydroxycyclopentadiene. In the case of catechol, we observe that water loss is also an important decomposition channel at the onset of pyrolysis.

  20. Active Control of Jet Noise Using Observable Inferred Decomposition and Large Window PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Zachary; Berry, Matthew; Low, Kerwin; Cordier, Laurent; Noack, Bernd; Gogineni, Sivaram; Glauser, Mark

    2012-11-01

    In this investigation, we seek to find sources of noise created in the near-region of a highly subsonic jet, with a nozzle diameter of 2''. Using large window PIV alongside simultaneous hydrodynamic and acoustic pressure, we focus on observing flow structures created in the collapse of the potential core. Correlations can be made between the low-dimensional velocity field (using POD) and the far-field acoustics in an effort to identify loud modes in the flow. An advanced reduced order model known as Observable Inferred Decomposition (OID) is used to form closed-loop controllers for noise reduction in the far-field. With this technique, we find low-dimensional representations of near-field velocity and far-field pressure - finding a linear mapping between the two fields. Then, we obtain acoustically optimized modes in the flow field and seek to drive these modes to zero using active control strategies. For flow control, synthetic jet actuators are used as shear layer excitation. A large range of tests are explored, varying Mach number and flow control configurations. Finally, large PIV windows will allow us to investigate several diameters of the flow field in the streamwise plane.

  1. Early stages of spinodal decomposition in Fe–Cr resolved by in-situ small-angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hörnqvist, M. Thuvander, M.; Steuwer, A.; King, S.; Odqvist, J.; Hedström, P.

    2015-02-09

    In-situ, time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) investigations of the early stages of the spinodal decomposition process in Fe–35Cr were performed at 773 and 798 K. The kinetics of the decomposition, both in terms of characteristic distance and peak intensity, followed a power-law behaviour from the start of the heat treatment (a′{sup  }= 0.10–0.11 and a″ = 0.67–0.86). Furthermore, the method allows tracking of the high–Q slope, which is a sensitive measure of the early stages of decomposition. Ex-situ SANS and atom probe tomography were used to verify the results from the in-situ investigations. Finally, the in-situ measurement of the evolution of the characteristic distance at 773 K was compared with the predictions from the Cahn-Hilliard-Cook model, which showed good agreement with the experimental data (a′{sup  }= 0.12–0.20 depending on the assumed mobility)

  2. An Early Astronomical Observation by John Goodricke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Linda M.

    2009-12-01

    John Goodricke (1764-1786) is one of the most intriguing and enigmatic figures in the history of astronomy. Deaf from the age of five, his observations of the light variation of Algol brought him acclaim and the Copley Medal of the Royal Society by the age of nineteen. Together with his neighbor, mentor, and distant relative Edward Pigott, he went on to discover and quantify the light variations of other stars, including Delta Cephei. Goodricke's careful accounts of his observations, and their accuracy, remain a model of clear scientific thinking and reporting. His final derived value for the time between eclipse minima for Algol, for example, is within eight seconds of the modern value. Goodricke's astronomical observing career is generally thought to have begun with his return to his family home in York in 1781 at the age of seventeen. His school mathematics notebook and workbook from the Warrington Academy, however, contains a detailed drawing of the sky which suggest that he was already a knowledgable observer by the age of fifteen. This drawing is presented and interpreted.

  3. Some observations on early military anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Houghton, I T

    2006-06-01

    Although anaesthesia was discovered in 1846, pain relief had been used for many years previously. Opium, mandragora, and Indian hemp amongst others have been used since the earliest times as alluded to by many of the classical writers. The use of refrigeration anaesthesia is known to have been recommended a millennium ago although it never had much usage. Very soon after the introduction of ether anaesthesia, it was recommended for military use and the first use by the American forces was in Buena Vista early in 1847 and then again at Vera Cruz. Pirogoff taught and used ether anaesthesia on active service with the Russian forces in the Caucasus in the summer of 1847. Meanwhile Spencer Wells, who was serving with the Royal Navy in Malta, was the first British service medical officer recorded to have used anaesthesia. He went on to write up a series of 106 anaesthetics. The Danes were probably next to use anaesthesia in battle using chloroform in 1848. However, it was not until the Crimean War that anaesthesia began to play an important part in battle surgery with many anaesthetics being given with varying results. The War of the Rebellion was the next war in which anaesthesia was important and the first one in which proper statistics were kept allowing useful analysis. Anaesthesia had irrevocably found its place in battlefield surgery. PMID:16800222

  4. SOAR remote observing: tactics and early results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecil, Gerald N.; Crain, J. Adam

    2004-09-01

    Travel from North America to the 4.1m SOAR telescope atop Cerro Pachon exceeds $1000, and takes >16 hours door to door (20+ hours typically). SOAR aims to exploit best seeing, requiring dynamic scheduling that is impossible to accomplish when catering to peripatetic astronomers. According to technical arguments at www.peakoil.org, we are near the peak rate of depleting world petroleum, so can expect travel costs to climb sharply. With the telecom bubble's glut of optical fiber, we can transmit data more efficiently than astronomers and "observe remotely". With data compression, less than half of the 6 Mbps bandwidth shared currently by SOAR and CTIO is enough to enable a high-fidelity observing presence for SOAR partners in North America, Brazil, and Chile. We discuss access from home by cable modem/DSL link.

  5. Direct observation of roaming radicals in the thermal decomposition of acetaldehyde.

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaramakrishnan, R.; Michael, J. V.; Klippenstein, S. J.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2010-01-21

    The thermal dissociation of acetaldehyde has been studied with the reflected shock tube technique using H(D)-atom atomic resonance absorption spectrometry detection. The use of an unreversed light source yields extraordinarily sensitive H atom detection. As a result, we are able to measure both the total decomposition rate and the branching to radical versus molecular channels. This branching provides a direct measure of the contribution from the roaming radical mechanism since the contributions from the usual tight transition states are predicted by theory to be negligible. The experimental observations also provide a measure of the rate coefficient for H + CH{sub 3}CHO. Another set of experiments employing C{sub 2}H{sub 5}I as an H-atom source provides additional data for this rate coefficient that extends to lower temperature. An evaluation of the available experimental results for H + CH{sub 3}CHO can be expressed by a three-parameter Arrhenius expression as k = 7.66 x 10{sup -20}T{sup 2.75} exp((-486 K)/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} (298-1415 K). Analogous experiments employing C{sub 2}D{sub 5}I as a D-atom source allow for the study of the isotopically substituted reaction. The present experiments are the only direct measure for this reaction rate constant, and the results can be expressed by an Arrhenius expression as k = 5.20 x 10{sup -10} exp((-4430 K)/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} (1151-1354 K). The H/D + CH{sub 3}CHO reactions are also studied with ab initio transition-state theory, and the results are in remarkably good agreement with the current experimental data.

  6. Microscopic observations of X-ray and gamma-ray induced decomposition of ammonium perchlorate crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herley, P. J.; Levy, P. W.

    1972-01-01

    The X-ray and gamma-ray induced decomposition of ammonium perchlorate was studied by optical, transmission, and scanning electron microscopy. This material is a commonly used oxidizer in solid propellents which could be employed in deep-space probes, and where they will be subjected to a variety of radiations for as long as ten years. In some respects the radiation-induced damage closely resembles the effects produced by thermal decomposition, but in other respects the results differ markedly. Similar radiation and thermal effects include the following: (1) irregular or ill-defined circular etch pits are formed in both cases; (2) approximately the same size pits are produced; (3) the pit density is similar; (4) the c face is considerably more reactive than the m face; and (5) most importantly, many of the etch pits are aligned in crystallographic directions which are the same for thermal or radiolytic decomposition. Thus, dislocations play an important role in the radiolytic decomposition process.

  7. Decomposition Rate and Pattern in Hanging Pigs.

    PubMed

    Lynch-Aird, Jeanne; Moffatt, Colin; Simmons, Tal

    2015-09-01

    Accurate prediction of the postmortem interval requires an understanding of the decomposition process and the factors acting upon it. A controlled experiment, over 60 days at an outdoor site in the northwest of England, used 20 freshly killed pigs (Sus scrofa) as human analogues to study decomposition rate and pattern. Ten pigs were hung off the ground and ten placed on the surface. Observed differences in the decomposition pattern required a new decomposition scoring scale to be produced for the hanging pigs to enable comparisons with the surface pigs. The difference in the rate of decomposition between hanging and surface pigs was statistically significant (p=0.001). Hanging pigs reached advanced decomposition stages sooner, but lagged behind during the early stages. This delay is believed to result from lower variety and quantity of insects, due to restricted beetle access to the aerial carcass, and/or writhing maggots falling from the carcass. PMID:26249126

  8. Direct observation and quantification of nanoscale spinodal decomposition in super duplex stainless steel weld metals.

    PubMed

    Shariq, Ahmed; Hättestrand, Mats; Nilsson, Jan-Olof; Gregori, Andrea

    2009-06-01

    Three variants of super duplex stainless steel weld metals with the basic composition 29Cr-8Ni-2Mo (wt%) were investigated. The nitrogen content of the three materials was 0.22%, 0.33% and 0.37%, respectively. Isothermal heat treatments were performed at 450 degrees C for times up to 243 h. The hardness evolution of the three materials was found to vary with the overall concentration of the nitrogen. Atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM) was used to directly detect and quantify the degree of spinodal decomposition in different material conditions. 3-DAP atomic reconstruction clearly illustrate nanoscale variation of iron rich (alpha) and chromium rich (alpha') phases. A longer ageing time produces a coarser microstructure with larger alpha and alpha' domains. Statistical evaluation of APFIM data showed that phase separation was significant already after 1 h of ageing that gradually became more pronounced. Although nanoscale concentration variation was evident, no significant influence of overall nitrogen content on the degree of spinodal decomposition was found. PMID:19504899

  9. Early Decomposition in Visual Word Recognition: Dissociating Morphology, Form, and Meaning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marslen-Wilson, William D.; Bozic, Mirjana; Randall, Billi

    2008-01-01

    The role of morphological, semantic, and form-based factors in the early stages of visual word recognition was investigated across different SOAs in a masked priming paradigm, focusing on English derivational morphology. In a first set of experiments, stimulus pairs co-varying in morphological decomposability and in semantic and orthographic…

  10. Using soil enzymes to explain observed differences in the response of soil decomposition to nitrogen fertilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, M.; Weiss, M.; Goodale, C. L.

    2010-12-01

    Soil microbes produce extracellular enzymes that degrade a variety of carbon-rich polymers contained within soil organic matter (SOM). These enzymes are key regulators of the terrestrial carbon cycle. However, basic information about the kinetics of extracellular enzymes and key environmental variables that regulate their catalytic ability is lacking. This study aims to clarify the mechanisms by which microbial carbon-degrading enzymes drive different responses to nitrogen (N) fertilization in soil decomposition at two sites with long-term N fertilization experiments, the Bear Brook (BB) forest in Maine and Fernow Forest (FF) in West Virginia. We examined a suite of cellulolytic and lignolytic enzymes that break down common SOM constituents. We hypothesized that enzymes derived from the site with a higher mean annual temperature (FF) would be more heat-tolerant, and retain their catalytic efficiency (Km) as temperature rises, relative to enzymes from the colder environment (BB). We further hypothesized that cellulolytic enzyme activity would be unaffected by N, while oxidative enzyme activity would be suppressed in N-fertilized soils. To test these hypotheses and examine the interactive effects of temperature and N, we measured enzyme activity in unfertilized and N-fertilized soils under a range of laboratory temperature manipulations. Preliminary results show a significant decrease in cellulolytic enzyme efficiency with temperature at the colder site (BB), as well as a significant increase in efficiency due to N-fertilization for two cellulolytic enzymes. Oxidative enzyme activity shows a marginally significant reduction due to N-fertilization at BB. These results suggest that soil warming may produce a negative feedback on carbon turnover in certain climates, while N-fertilization may alter the relative decomposition rates of different soil organic matter constituents. FF activity will be analyzed in a similar manner and the two sites will be compared in order to fully assess our hypotheses.

  11. Early morphological decomposition during visual word recognition: evidence from masked transposed-letter priming.

    PubMed

    Beyersmann, Elisabeth; Castles, Anne; Coltheart, Max

    2011-10-01

    The present experiments were designed to explore the theory of early morpho-orthographic segmentation (Rastle, Davis, & New, Psychonomic Bulletin & Review 11,1090-1098, 2004), which postulates that written words with a true morphologically complex structure (cleaner) and those with a morphological pseudostructure (corner) are both decomposed into affix and stem morphemes. We used masked complex transposed-letter (TL) nonword primes in a lexical decision task. Experiment 1 replicated the well-known masked TL-priming effect using monomorphemic nonword primes (e.g., wran-WARN). Experiment 2 used the same nonword TL stems as in Experiment 1, but combined them with real suffixes (e.g., ish as in wranish-WARN). Priming was compared with that from nonsuffixed primes in which the real suffixes were replaced with nonmorphemic endings (e.g., el as in wranel-WARN). Significant priming was found in the suffixed but not in the nonsuffixed condition, suggesting that affix-stripping occurs at prelexical stages in visual word recognition and operates over early letter-position encoding mechanisms. PMID:21713371

  12. TEMPORAL SIGNATURES OF AIR QUALITY OBSERVATIONS AND MODEL OUTPUTS: DO TIME SERIES DECOMPOSITION METHODS CAPTURE RELEVANT TIME SCALES?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Time series decomposition methods were applied to meteorological and air quality data and their numerical model estimates. Decomposition techniques express a time series as the sum of a small number of independent modes which hypothetically represent identifiable forcings, thereb...

  13. Spectral types for early-type stars observed by Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, N. G.

    1978-01-01

    MK spectral types are presented for 246 early-type stars observed with the S-019 ultraviolet stellar astronomy experiment on Skylab. K-line types are also given where applicable, and various peculiar stars are identified. The peculiar stars include five silicon stars, a shell star, a helium-rich star, a silicon-strontium star, a chromium-europium star, and two marginal metallic-line stars.

  14. Self-healing slip pulses driven by thermal decomposition: Towards identifying dynamic weakening mechanisms in seismic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, J. D.; Viesca, R. C.; Garagash, D.

    2012-12-01

    Seismological observations indicate that earthquake ruptures commonly propagate as self-healing slip pulses, with slip duration at any location on the fault being much shorter than the total event duration [Heaton 1990]. Theoretical work has linked these slip pulses to low values of the background driving stress on the fault [Zheng and Rice 1998]. Recent experiments [Han et al. 2007;Brantut et al. 2008] have shown that fault materials may thermally decompose during shear. These endothermic reactions release pore fluid, leading to an increase in pore pressure and a decrease in temperature [Sulem and Famin 2009]. An Arrhenius kinetic controls the reaction rate, and dynamic weakening only occurs when the temperature reaches a critical temperature triggering the reaction. This abrupt change is in sharp contrast with thermal pressurization where the pore pressure increases smoothly with slip. Previous theoretical studies of thermal decomposition have focused on simple mechanical systems with imposed slip rates [Sulem and Famin 2009], or coupling to a spring-slider model [Brantut et al. 2011]. We present the first solutions to couple thermal decomposition with dynamic rupture, extending the model in Garagash [2012] to solve for self-healing slip pulses. For a range of driving stresses there are two possible slip pulses, compared with a single solution for thermal pressurization alone. One solution corresponds to small slip and a low temperature rise that precludes the reaction; the other is a larger slip solution with weakening due to thermal pressurization at the rupture tip, and weakening due to thermal decomposition in the middle of the pulse. A dramatic drop in fault strength accompanies the onset of the reaction, leading to peak slip rates coinciding with the onset of the reaction. For thermal pressurization alone the maximum strain rate always occurs at the rupture tip, and depends sensitively on the driving stress. Thermal decomposition is identified by slower rupture speeds, longer slip duration and more dramatic strength drops. The peak slip rates occur away from the rupture tip, and are insensitive to changes in the driving stress. For deeper events the ambient temperature is higher, causing the reaction to initiate earlier, and the peak slip rate to move towards the rupture tip. Often the total slip in a pulse is linked to a critical slip required to activate the reaction, suggesting a decrease in slip with depth. Our results could also be linked to observed variations in fault zone mineralogy, with different reactions activated on different faults. Since the peak slip rate is achieved at the onset of reaction, maximum pore pressure generation by thermal pressurization coincides with the maximum generation by thermal decomposition, leading to pore pressures exceeding the normal compressive stress on the fault. One possible mechanism to cap the pore pressure is to allow the permeability to increase with the pore pressure [Wibberley and Shimamoto 2003], enhancing healing by hydraulic diffusion at the trailing edge of the pulse. This leads to slip pulses with shorter slip durations and higher rupture velocities.

  15. No Differences in Decomposition Rates observed between Bacillus thuringiensis and Non-Bacillus thuringiensis Corn Residue Incubated in the Field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent speculation of slower residue decomposition for Bt corn hybrids compared to non-Bt corn hybrids has prompted investigative study. We evaluated the residue decomposition rates of Bt and non-Bt corn hybrids over a period of 22 months under field conditions using the litter bag technique. The ...

  16. Acquiring Comprehensive Observations using an integrated Sensorweb for Early Warning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habib, Shahid; Ambrose, Steve

    2006-01-01

    As an integrated observing strategy, the concept of sensorweb for Earth observations is appealing in many aspects. For instance, by increasing the spatial and temporal coverage of observations from space and other vantage points, one can eventually aid in increasing the accuracy of the atmospheric models which are precursor to hurricane track prediction, volcanic eruption forecast, and trajectory path of transcontinental transport of dust, harmful nuclear and chemical plumes. In reality, there is little analysis'available in terms of benefits, costs and optimized set of sensors needed to make these necessary observations. This is a complex problem that must be carefully studied and balanced over many boundaries such as science, defense, early warning, security, and surveillance. Simplistically, the sensorweb concept from the technological point of view alone has a great appeal in the defense, early warning and security applications. In fact, it can be relatively less expensive in per unit cost as opposed to building and deploying it for the scientific use. However, overall observing approach should not be singled out and aligned somewhat orthogonally to serve a particular need. On the other hand, the sensorweb should be designed and deployed to serve multiple subject areas and customers simultaneously; and can behave as directed measuring systems for both science and operational entities. Sensorweb can be designed to act as expert systems, and/or also provide a dedicated integrated surveillance network. Today, there is no system in the world that is fully integrated in terms of reporting timely multiple hazards warnings, computing the loss of life and property damage estimates, and is also designed to cater to everyone's needs. It is not an easier problem to undertake and more so is not practically solvable. At this time due to some recent events in the world, the scientific community, social scientists, and operational agencies are more cognizant and getting together to address such colossal problems. Increasing our knowledge of the home planet, via amplified set of observations, is certainly a right step in a right direction. Furthermore, this is a pre-requisite in understanding multiple hazard phenomena's. This paper examines various sensorweb options and observing architectures that can be useful specifically in addressing some of these complex issues. The ultimate goal is to serve the society by providing potential natural hazards information to the decision makers in the most expeditious manner so they can prepare themselves to mitigate potential risks to human life, livestock and property.

  17. Acquiring Comprehensive Observations using an Integrated Sensorweb for Early Warning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habib, Shahid; Ambrose, Steve

    2006-01-01

    As an integrated observing strategy, the concept of sensorweb for Earth observations is appealing in many aspects. For instance, by increasing the spatial and temporal coverage of observations from space and other vantage points, one can eventually aid in increasing the accuracy of the atmospheric models which are precursor to hurricane track prediction, volcanic eruption forecast, and trajectory path of transcontinental transport of dust, harmful nuclear and chemical plumes. In reality, there is little analysis'available in terms of benefits, costs and optimized set of sensors needed to make these necessary observations. This is a complex problem that must be carefully studied and balanced over many boundaries such as science, defense, early warning security, and surveillance. Simplistically, the sensorweb concept from the technological point of view alone has a great appeal in the defense, early warning and security applications. In fact, it can be relatively less expensive in per unit cost as opposed to building and deploying it for the scientific use. However, overall observing approach should not be singled out and aligned somewhat . orthogonally to serve a particular need. On the other hand, the sensorweb should be designed and deployed to serve multiple subject areas and customers simultaneously; and can behave as directed measuring systems for both science and operational entities. Sensorweb can be designed to act as expert systems, and/or also provide a dedicated integrated surveillance network. Today, there is no system in the world that is fully integrated in terms of reporting timely multiple hazards warnings, computing the lass of life and property damage estimates, and is also designed to cater to everyone's needs. It is not an easier problem to undertake and more so is not practically solvable. At this time due to some recent events in the world, the scientific community, social scientists, and operational agencies are more cognizant and getting together to address such colossal problems. Increasing our knowledge of the home planet, via amplified set of observations, is certainly a right step in a right direction. Furthermore, this is a pre-requisite in understanding multiple hazard phenomena's. This paper examines various sensorweb options and observing architectures that can be useful specifically in addressing some of these complex issues. The ultimate goal is to serve the society by providing potential natural hazards information to the decision makers in the most expeditious manner so they can prepare themselves to mitigate potential risks to human life, livestock and property.

  18. Observational evidence for AGN feedback in early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schawinski, Kevin; Thomas, Daniel; Sarzi, Marc; Maraston, Claudia; Kaviraj, Sugata; Joo, Seok-Joo; Yi, Sukyoung K.; Silk, Joseph

    2007-12-01

    A major amendment in recent models of hierarchical galaxy formation is the inclusion of so-called active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback. The energy input from an active central massive black hole is invoked to suppress star formation in early-type galaxies at later epochs. A major problem is that this process is poorly understood, and compelling observational evidence for its mere existence is still missing. In search for signatures of AGN feedback, we have compiled a sample of 16000 early-type galaxies in the redshift range 0.05 < z < 0.1 from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data base (MOSES: Morphologically Selected Ellipticals in SDSS). Key in our approach is the use of a purely morphological selection criterion through visual inspection which produces a sample that is not biased against recent star formation and nuclear activity. Based on the nebular emission-line characteristics we separate between star formation activity, black hole activity, the composite of the two and quiescence. We find that emission is mostly LINER (low ionization nuclear emission line region) like in high-mass galaxies (σ > 200kms-1) and roughly evenly distributed between star formation and AGN at intermediate and low (σ < 100kms-1) masses. The objects with emission (~20 per cent) are offset from the red sequence and form a well-defined pattern in the colour-mass diagram. Star-forming early-types inhabit the blue cloud, while early-types with AGN are located considerably closer to and almost on the red sequence. Star formation-AGN composites are found right between these two extremes. We further derive galaxy star formation histories using a novel method that combines multiwavelength photometry from near-ultraviolet (UV) to near-infrared (IR) and stellar absorption indices. We find that in those objects deviating from the red sequence star formation occurred several 100Myr in the past involving 1-10per cent of the total stellar mass. We identify an evolutionary sequence from star formation via nuclear activity to quiescence. This transition process lasts about 1Gyr, and the peak AGN phase occurs roughly half a Gyr after the starburst. The most likely interpretation is that star formation is suppressed by nuclear activity in these objects before they settle on the red sequence. This is empirical evidence for the occurrence of AGN feedback in early-type galaxies at recent epochs.

  19. Early Observations with the Expanded Owens Valley Solar Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gary, Dale E.

    2016-05-01

    The Expanded Owens Valley Solar Array (EOVSA) is a newly expanded and upgraded, solar-dedicated radio array consisting of 13 antennas of 2.1 m diameter equipped with receivers designed to cover the 1-18 GHz frequency range. Two large (27-m diameter) dishes are being outfitted with He-cooled receivers for use in calibration of the small dishes. During 2015, the array obtained observations from dozens of flares in total power mode on 8 antennas. Since February 2016, it has begun taking solar data on all 13 small antennas with full interferometric correlations, as well as calibration observations with the first of the two large antennas equipped with its He-cooled receiver. The second He-cooled receiver is nearly complete, and will be available around the time of the meeting. We briefly review the commissioning activities leading up to full operations, including polarization and gain measurements and calibration methods, and resulting measures of array performance. We then present some early imaging observations with the array, emphasizing the remarkable temporal and spectral resolution of the instrument, together with joint RHESSI hard X-ray and SDO EUV observations.

  20. Simulation Study Of Early Afterglows Observed With Swift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Hededal, C.; Hardee, P.; Mizuno, Y.; Fishman, G. J.

    2006-09-01

    A 3-D relativistic particle-in-cell code has been used to simulate the dynamics of forward and reverse shocks with thin and thick shells within the parameter constraints provided by present Swift observations and the present models of GRB emission. Our 3-D RPIC simulations have provided the dynamics of collisionless shocks in electron-ion and electron-positron plasmas with and without initial ambient magnetic fields and revealed the importance of ``jitter radiation'' with prompt and afterglow spectra due to the inhomogeneous magnetic fields generated by the Weibel instability. It is different from synchrotron radiation, which is usually assumed to be the dominant radiation process. We have investigated gamma-ray burst emissions from prompt, early, and late afterglows considering microscopic processes. Based on our previous investigation of the Weibel instability for each stage of evolution of ejecta propagating in the ISM, we have incorporated the plasma conditions (relativistic jets) with the density and composition of the plasmas, the magnetic field strength ($\\sigma$-values (the ratio of the electromagnetic energy flux to the particle energy flux)) and its direction, and the Lorentz factor for the different stages in prompt and afterglows. Systematic simulation studies of the relativistic collisionless shocks, associated particle acceleration, magnetic field generation and self-consistent radiation provide insight into undetermined issues in prompt and afterglows observed by Swift. Self-consistently calculated lightcurves, spectra, spectral evolutions, and polarization as function of viewing angle will be done to light a shed on recent new observations by Swift, in particular, X-ray flares, early steep decay, and shallow decay.

  1. Early Australian Optical and Radio Observations of Centaurus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Peter; Cozens, Glen; Orchiston, Wayne; Slee, Bruce; Wendt, Harry

    2010-10-01

    The discovery of the radio source Centaurus A and its optical counterpart NGC 5128 were important landmarks in the history of Australian astronomy. NGC 5128 was first observed in August 1826 by James Dunlop during a survey of southern objects at the Parramatta Observatory, west of the settlement at Sydney Cove. The observatory had been founded a few years earlier by Thomas Brisbane, the new governor of the British colony of New South Wales. Just over 120 years later, John Bolton, Gordon Stanley and Bruce Slee discovered the radio source Centaurus A at the Dover Heights field station in Sydney, operated by CSIRO's Radiophysics Laboratory (the forerunner to CSIRO Astronomy and Space Sciences). This paper will describe this early historical work and summarize further studies of Centaurus A by other Radiophysics groups up to 1960.

  2. Early-stage changes in natural (13)C and (15)N abundance and nutrient dynamics during different litter decomposition.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Mukesh Kumar; Lee, Kwang-Sik; Song, Byeong-Yeol; Lee, Dongho; Bong, Yeon-Sik

    2016-05-01

    Decomposition, nutrient, and isotopic (δ(13)C and δ(15)N) dynamics during 1 year were studied for leaf and twig litters of Pinus densiflora, Castanea crenata, Erigeron annuus, and Miscanthus sinensis growing on a highly weathered soil with constrained nutrient supply using litterbags in a cool temperate region of South Korea. Decay constant (k/year) ranged from 0.58 to 1.29/year, and mass loss ranged from 22.36 to 58.43 % among litter types. The results demonstrate that mass loss and nutrient dynamics of decomposing litter were influenced by the seasonality of mineralization and immobilization processes. In general, most nutrients exhibited alternate phases of rapid mineralization followed by gradual immobilization, except K, which was released throughout the field incubation. At the end of study, among all the nutrients only N and P showed net immobilization. Mobility of different nutrients from decomposing litter as the percentage of initial litter nutrient concentration was in the order of K > Mg > Ca > N ≈ P. The δ(13)C (0.32-6.70 ‰) and δ(15)N (0.74-3.90 ‰) values of residual litters showed nonlinear increase and decrease, respectively compared to initial isotopic values during decomposition. Litter of different functional types and chemical quality converged toward a conservative nutrient use strategy through mechanisms of slow decomposition and slow nutrient mobilization. Our results indicate that litter quality and season, are the most important regulators of litter decomposition in these forests. The results revealed significant relationships between litter decomposition rates and N, C:N ratio and P, and seasonality (temperature). These results and the convergence of different litters towards conservative nutrient use in these nutrient constrained ecosystems imply optimization of litter management because litter removal can have cascading effects on litter decomposition and nutrient availability in these systems. PMID:26915037

  3. Early Hinode Observations of a Solar Filament Eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2007-01-01

    We use Hinode X-Ray Telescope (XRT) and Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) filtergraph (FG) Stokes-V magnetogram observations to study the early onset of a solar eruption that includes an erupting filament that we observe in TRACE EUV images; this is one of the first filament eruptions seen with Hinode. The filament undergoes a slow rise for at least 30 min prior to its fast eruption and strong soft X-ray flaring, and the new Hinode data elucidate the physical processes occurring during the slow-rise period: During the slow-rise phase, a soft X-ray (SXR) sigmoid forms from apparent reconnection low in the sheared core field traced by the filament, and there is a low-level intensity peak in both EUV and SXRs during the slow rise. The SOT data show that magnetic flux cancellation occurs along the neutral line of the filament in the hours before eruption, and this likely caused the low-lying reconnection that produced the microflaring and the slow rise leading up to the eruption.

  4. "Learning Stories"--Crossing Borders: Introducing Qualitative Early Childhood Observation Techniques to Early Childhood Practitioners in Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyland, Berenice; Alfayez, Shatha

    2012-01-01

    Early childhood education has become a focus of government policy across the world. Part of the present increased interest in early childhood education has been a focus on curriculum frameworks and socio/cultural methods of assessment. Currently, New Zealand has emerged as a world leader in early childhood education, and observation and assessment…

  5. Spectral models for early time SN 2011fe observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, E.; Hoeflich, P.; Friesen, Brian; Sullivan, M.; Hsiao, E.; Ellis, R. S.; Gal-Yam, A.; Howell, D. A.; Nugent, P. E.; Dominguez, I.; Krisciunas, K.; Phillips, M. M.; Suntzeff, N.; Wang, L.; Thomas, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    We use observed UV through near-IR spectra to examine whether SN 2011fe can be understood in the framework of Branch-normal Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) and to examine its individual peculiarities. As a benchmark, we use a delayed-detonation model with a progenitor metallicity of Z⊙/20. We study the sensitivity of features to variations in progenitor metallicity, the outer density profile, and the distribution of radioactive nickel. The effect of metallicity variations in the progenitor have a relatively small effect on the synthetic spectra. We also find that the abundance stratification of SN 2011fe resembles closely that of a delayed-detonation model with a transition density that has been fit to other Branch-normal SNe Ia. At early times, the model photosphere is formed in material with velocities that are too high, indicating that the photosphere recedes too slowly or that SN 2011fe has a lower specific energy in the outer ≈0.1 M⊙ than does the model. We discuss several explanations for the discrepancies. Finally, we examine variations in both the spectral energy distribution and in the colours due to variations in the progenitor metallicity, which suggests that colours are only weak indicators for the progenitor metallicity, in the particular explosion model that we have studied. We do find that the flux in the U band is significantly higher at maximum light in the solar metallicity model than in the lower metallicity model and the lower metallicity model much better matches the observed spectrum.

  6. [Effects of Eucalyptus grandis leaf litter at its early stage of decomposition on the growth and photosynthetic characteristics of Cichorium intybus].

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiu-Hua; Li, Yi-Qiao; Hu, Ting-Xing; Chen, Bao-Jun; Yang, Yong-Gui; Chen, Hong; Hu, Hong-Ling

    2013-07-01

    From March to May, 2010, a pot experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of Eucalyptus grandis leaf litter at its early stage of decomposition on the growth and photosynthetic characteristics of Cichorium intybus. Four treatments with different application rate of the leaf litter, i.e., 0 g x pot(-1) (CK), 30 g x pot(-1) (A1), 60 g x pot(-1) (A2), and 90 g x pot(-1) (A3), were installed. Each pot contained 12 kg soil mixed with the leaf litter, and then, C. intybus was sown. The growth indicators of the C. intybus were measured at the 30, 45, 60, and 75 d after sowing, and the photosynthetic characteristics of the C. intybus in treatment A3 were studied after the seedlings third leaf fully expanded. At each measured time, the biomass accumulation and leaf area growth of C. intybus in treatments A1, A2, and A3 were inhibited significantly. At the early stage of the leaf litter decomposition, the synthesis of photosynthetic pigments of the C. intybus seedlings was inhibited significantly, and the inhibition effect was getting stronger with the increasing amount of the leaf litter addition. The diurnal change of the seedlings photosynthetic rate in all treatments showed a bimodal curve with midday depression, the stomatal conductance and water use efficiency had the same variation trend with the net photosynthetic rate, and the total diurnal photosynthesis decreased in the order of CK > A1 > A2 > A3. The GC-MS analysis showed there were 33 kinds of small molecule compounds released gradually with the decomposition of the leaf litter, among which, allelopathic substance terpenoid dominated. PMID:24175509

  7. Imaging chemical concentration pattern and early stages of spinodal decomposition in the Ag x Na1-x Br system by scanning force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güthoff, F.; Zhang, B.; Eckold, G.

    2015-10-01

    In quasi binary systems like AgBr-NaBr the demixing from the homogeneous high temperature phase into separated phases is a complex process that depends on the ageing temperature as well as on the quench rate. Spinodal decomposition and nucleation processes can be distinguished which lead, however, to the same final equilibrium state. Using frequency modulated scanning force microscopy we aimed to distinguish the demixed phases and their morphologies on a nm-scale at room temperature for samples with different concentration. While no contrast between the different phases are observed in the usual topographic mode, a modified evaluation of Kelvin experiments allows the distinction of silver- and sodium enriched phases. Moreover, direct evidence is found for concentration fluctuations which are characteristic for spinodal decomposition.

  8. Supernova 2008J: early time observations of a heavily reddened SN 2002ic-like transient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddia, F.; Stritzinger, M. D.; Phillips, M. M.; Burns, C. R.; Heinrich-Josties, E.; Morrell, N.; Sollerman, J.; Valenti, S.; Anderson, J. P.; Boldt, L.; Campillay, A.; Castellon, S.; Contreras, C.; Folatelli, G.; Freedman, W. L.; Hamuy, M.; Krzeminski, W.; Leloudas, G.; Maeda, K.; Persson, S. E.; Roth, M.; Suntzeff, N. B.

    2012-09-01

    Aims: We provide additional observational evidence that some Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) show signatures of circumstellar interaction (CSI) with hydrogen-rich material. Methods: Early phase optical and near-infrared (NIR) light curves and spectroscopy of SN 2008J obtained by the Carnegie Supernova Project are studied and compared to those of SNe 2002ic and 2005gj. Our NIR spectrum is the first obtained for a 2002ic-like object extending up to 2.2 ?m. A published high-resolution spectrum is used to provide insight on the circumstellar material (CSM). Results: SN 2008J is found to be affected by AV ~ 1.9 mag of extinction and to closely resemble SN 2002ic. Spectral and color comparison to SNe 2002ic and 2005gj suggests RV < 3.1. Spectral decomposition reveals the underlying SN emission matches a 1991T-like event and, since SN 2008J is as luminous as SN 2005gj (Vmax = -20.3 mag), we conclude that their CSI emissions are similarly robust. The high-resolution spectrum reveals narrow emission lines produced from un-shocked gas characterized by a wind velocity of ~50 km s-1. We conclude that SN 2008J best matches an explosion of a SN Ia that interacts with its CSM. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile (ESO Programme 080.A-0516).Figure 4 and Tables 1-6 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  9. Implementing Observation Protocols: Lessons for K-12 Education from the Field of Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pianta, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    This report draws from decades of experience using observation in early childhood education, which has implications for administrative decisions, evaluation practices, and policymaking in K-12. Early childhood education has long embraced the value of observing classrooms and teacher-child interactions. In early childhood education the features of…

  10. Cumulus clouds - Early aircraft observations and entrainment hypotheses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, J.

    1983-01-01

    The history of cumulus research in the decade following World War II is reviewed in the perspective of the new ideas and advances made during the subsequent generation. Emphasis is placed upon pioneering aircraft measurements, evidence for entrainment, the early model attempts and their attendant controversies.

  11. Prescriptive Early Intervention With Culturally Diverse Populations: Some Initial Observations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handy, Walter S.; Pedro-Carroll, JoAnne

    The Social Skills Development Program (SSDP) is a prevention program for inner-city primary-age school children. The services provided by SSDP are for children experiencing moderate school maladjustment. Included are descriptions of program rationale and operations, staffing, prescriptive early intervention, preventive health interventions and…

  12. The Swift XRT: Observations of Early X-ray Afterglows

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, David N.; Kennea, J. A.; Nousek, J. A.; Osborne, J. P.; O'Brien, P. T.; Chincarini, G.; Tagliaferri, G.; Giommi, P.; Zhang, B.

    2006-05-19

    During the first year of operations of the Swift observatory, the X-ray Telescope has made a number of discoveries concerning the nature of X-ray afterglows of both long and short GRBs. We highlight the key findings, which include rapid declines at early times, a standard template of afterglow light curve shapes, common flaring, and the discovery of the first short GRB afterglow.

  13. Innovation in observation: a vision for early outbreak detection.

    PubMed

    Fefferman, Nh; Naumova, En

    2010-01-01

    The emergence of new infections and resurgence of old onesFhealth threats stemming from environmental contamination or purposeful acts of bioterrorismFcall for a worldwide effort in improving early outbreak detection, with the goal of ameliorating current and future risks. In some cases, the problem of outbreak detection is logistically straightforward and mathematically easy: a single case of a disease of great concern can constitute an outbreak. However, for the vast majority of maladies, a simple analytical solution does not exist. Furthermore, each step in developing reliable, sensitive, effective surveillance systems demonstrates enormous complexities in the transmission, manifestation, detection, and control of emerging health threats. In this communication, we explore potential future innovations in early outbreak detection systems that can overcome the pitfalls of current surveillance. We believe that modern advances in assembling data, techniques for collating and processing information, and technology that enables integrated analysis will facilitate a new paradigm in outbreak definition and detection. We anticipate that moving forward in this direction will provide the highly desired sensitivity and specificity in early detection required to meet the emerging challenges of global disease surveillance. PMID:22460396

  14. Innovation in observation: a vision for early outbreak detection

    PubMed Central

    Fefferman, NH; Naumova, EN

    2010-01-01

    The emergence of new infections and resurgence of old ones—health threats stemming from environmental contamination or purposeful acts of bioterrorism—call for a worldwide effort in improving early outbreak detection, with the goal of ameliorating current and future risks. In some cases, the problem of outbreak detection is logistically straightforward and mathematically easy: a single case of a disease of great concern can constitute an outbreak. However, for the vast majority of maladies, a simple analytical solution does not exist. Furthermore, each step in developing reliable, sensitive, effective surveillance systems demonstrates enormous complexities in the transmission, manifestation, detection, and control of emerging health threats. In this communication, we explore potential future innovations in early outbreak detection systems that can overcome the pitfalls of current surveillance. We believe that modern advances in assembling data, techniques for collating and processing information, and technology that enables integrated analysis will facilitate a new paradigm in outbreak definition and detection. We anticipate that moving forward in this direction will provide the highly desired sensitivity and specificity in early detection required to meet the emerging challenges of global disease surveillance. PMID:22460396

  15. Peer Observation of Teaching: Reflections of an Early Career Academic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eri, Rajaraman

    2014-01-01

    Peer observation of teaching (POT) is a reciprocal process where a peer observes another's teaching (classroom, virtual, on-line or even teaching resource such as unit outlines, assignments). Peers then provide constructive feedbacks that would enable teaching professional development through the mirror of critical reflection by both the observer…

  16. Chemical Properties, Decomposition, and Methane Production of Tertiary Relict Plant Litters: Implications for Atmospheric Trace Gas Production in the Early Tertiary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavitt, J. B.; Bartella, T. M.; Williams, C. J.

    2006-12-01

    Throughout the early Tertiary (ca. 65-38 Ma) Taxodiaceae-dominated (redwood) wetland forests occupied the high latitudes and were circumpolar in their distribution. Many of these forests had high standing biomass with moderate primary productivity. The geographic extent and amount of Tertiary coals and fossil forests throughout Arctic Canada suggests large areas of wetland forests that may have cycled substantial quantities of carbon, particularly methane until they were replaced by cold tolerant Pinus, Picea, and Larix following climatic cooling associated with the Terminal Eocene Event. To test this hypothesis we compared physiochemical properties, decomposition, and trace gas production of litter from extant Metasequoia, Pinus, Picea, and Larix. Initial results from plantation-grown trees indicate Metasequoia litter is a better source of labile organic substrate than pinaceous litter. Metasequoia litter contained the least lignin and highest amounts of water-soluble compounds of the four litter types studied. Analysis of the lignin structure using cupric oxide oxidation indicates that Metasequoia lignin is enriched in 4'-hydroxyacetophenone and 4'- Hydroxy-3'-methoxyacetophenone relative to the pinaceous litter. In a 12-month decomposition study using litterbags, average litter mass loss was greater for Metasequoia litter (62%) compared to the pinaceous species (50%). Moreover, Metasequoia litter incubated under anoxic conditions produced nearly twice as much CO2 (ca. 4.2 umol/g.day) and CH4 (2.1 umol/g.day) as the pinaceous litter (2.4 umol/g.day for CO2; 1.2 umol/g.day for CH4). Our results support the idea of greater decomposability and palatability of Metasequoia litter as compared to Larix, Picea, or Pinus. Provided that the biochemical properties of Metasequoia have remained relatively stable through geologic time, it appears that early Tertiary Metasequoia-dominated wetland forests may have had higher microbial driven trace gas production than the Pinaceae-dominated forests that replaced them in the late Tertiary.

  17. LRO LAMP: Experiment Description, Observation Status, And Early Results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, S. Alan; Gladstone, R. R.; Retherford, K. R.; Parker, J. W.; Slater, D. C.; Davis, M. W.; Black, R. K.; Greathouse, T. K.; Versteeg, M.; Persson, K. B.; Kaufman, D. E.; Egan, A. F.; Hurley, D.; Feldman, P. D.; Pryor, W. R.

    2009-09-01

    LAMP is an Extreme/Far ultraviolet (UV) imaging spectrograph operating in lunar orbit aboard the NASA Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). LRO arrived in lunar orbit in July, 2009. LAMP's primary objective is to search for evidence of exposed polar frosts in permanently shadowed regions; its secondary objectives are to explore the UV reflectivity characteristics of the lunar surface and to study the lunar atmosphere. At the time of this abstract submission, LAMP has been turned on in lunar orbit but has not yet begun its data collections; those collections will begin in August. We will describe the LAMP instrument and investigation, show first light and other early datasets, and describe some initial results.

  18. Determining the progenitors of supernovae with early robotic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Andrew

    2015-08-01

    We present results from the LCOGT Supernova Key Project, a three year program to obtain lightcurves and spectra of 600 supernovae. The Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network is a network of eleven robotic 1m and 2m telescopes located at 5 sites around the world. With this facility long term monitoring of transient phenomena is possible, as are nearly instantaneous observations. We report on both core-collapse and thermonuclear supernovae observed within days of explosion, allowing insight into their progenitor stars.

  19. An Observational Study of the Interactions of Socially Withdrawn/Anxious Early Adolescents and Their Friends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Barry H.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The friendships of socially withdrawn/anxious children and early adolescents have been found to lack critical rewarding qualities. Observational research may help elucidate the obstacles they face in forming and maintaining high-quality friendships with sociable peers. Method: We observed the interactions of 38 socially withdrawn early

  20. Observations of Glide and Decomposition of a<101> Dislocations at High Temperatures in Ni-Al Single Crystals Deformed along the Hard Orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R.; Daw, M. S.; Noebe, R. D.; Mills, M. J.

    2003-01-01

    Ni-44at.% Al and Ni-50at.% single crystals were tested in compression in the hard (001) orientations. The dislocation processes and deformation behavior were studied as a function of temperature, strain and strain rate. A slip transition in NiAl occurs from alpha(111) slip to non-alphaaaaaaaaaaa9111) slip at intermediate temperatures. In Ni-50at.% Al single crystal, only alpha(010) dislocations are observed above the slip transition temperature. In contrast, alpha(101)(101) glide has been observed to control deformation beyond the slip transition temperature in Ni-44at.%Al. alpha(101) dislocations are observed primarily along both (111) directions in the glide plane. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy observations show that the core of the alpha(101) dislocations along these directions is decomposed into two alpha(010) dislocations, separated by a distance of approximately 2nm. The temperature window of stability for these alpha(101) dislocations depends upon the strain rate. At a strain rate of 1.4 x 10(exp -4)/s, lpha(101) dislocations are observed between 800 and 1000K. Complete decomposition of a alpha(101) dislocations into alpha(010) dislocations occurs beyond 1000K, leading to alpha(010) climb as the deformation mode at higher temperature. At lower strain rates, decomposition of a alpha(101) dislocations has been observed to occur along the edge orientation at temperatures below 1000K. Embedded-atom method calculations and experimental results indicate that alpha(101) dislocation have a large Peieris stress at low temperature. Based on the present microstructural observations and a survey of the literature with respect to vacancy content and diffusion in NiAl, a model is proposed for alpha(101)(101) glide in Ni-44at.%Al, and for the observed yield strength versus temperature behavior of Ni-Al alloys at intermediate and high temperatures.

  1. Ozone decomposition.

    PubMed

    Batakliev, Todor; Georgiev, Vladimir; Anachkov, Metody; Rakovsky, Slavcho; Zaikov, Gennadi E

    2014-06-01

    Catalytic ozone decomposition is of great significance because ozone is a toxic substance commonly found or generated in human environments (aircraft cabins, offices with photocopiers, laser printers, sterilizers). Considerable work has been done on ozone decomposition reported in the literature. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the literature, concentrating on analysis of the physico-chemical properties, synthesis and catalytic decomposition of ozone. This is supplemented by a review on kinetics and catalyst characterization which ties together the previously reported results. Noble metals and oxides of transition metals have been found to be the most active substances for ozone decomposition. The high price of precious metals stimulated the use of metal oxide catalysts and particularly the catalysts based on manganese oxide. It has been determined that the kinetics of ozone decomposition is of first order importance. A mechanism of the reaction of catalytic ozone decomposition is discussed, based on detailed spectroscopic investigations of the catalytic surface, showing the existence of peroxide and superoxide surface intermediates. PMID:26109880

  2. Ozone decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Batakliev, Todor; Georgiev, Vladimir; Anachkov, Metody; Rakovsky, Slavcho

    2014-01-01

    Catalytic ozone decomposition is of great significance because ozone is a toxic substance commonly found or generated in human environments (aircraft cabins, offices with photocopiers, laser printers, sterilizers). Considerable work has been done on ozone decomposition reported in the literature. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the literature, concentrating on analysis of the physico-chemical properties, synthesis and catalytic decomposition of ozone. This is supplemented by a review on kinetics and catalyst characterization which ties together the previously reported results. Noble metals and oxides of transition metals have been found to be the most active substances for ozone decomposition. The high price of precious metals stimulated the use of metal oxide catalysts and particularly the catalysts based on manganese oxide. It has been determined that the kinetics of ozone decomposition is of first order importance. A mechanism of the reaction of catalytic ozone decomposition is discussed, based on detailed spectroscopic investigations of the catalytic surface, showing the existence of peroxide and superoxide surface intermediates. PMID:26109880

  3. Measurements of physical properties of gas hydrates and in situ observations of formation and decomposition processes via Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, T.; Takeya, S.; Wilson, L. D.; Tulk, C. A.; Ripmeester, J. A.; Nagao, J.; Ebinuma, T.; Narita, H.

    2003-01-01

    Gas hydrate properties and phase transition kinetics were studied using Raman spectroscopic and X-ray diffraction methods. These techniques have the advantage of measuring physical properties such as crystal structure, gas composition, and cage occupancy of gas molecules without decomposing the sample. In situ observations using these techniques are indicative of formation and decomposition processes in gas hydrates. Raman spectroscopy is used for the analysis of gas concentrations and gas compositions of gas hydrates. The nu(1) symmetrical C-H stretching vibration mode of methane molecules in the hydrate phase shows a doublet, and the relative intensity of the peaks determines the cage-occupancy ratio. However, as the Raman method is not standard for this application, we evaluated the method by analyzing the same methane hydrate sample using NMR and Raman scattering in a laboratory in Canada and also comparing the data with the Raman measurements made on the same sample in a laboratory in Japan. The data were consistent with all three measurements. In addition, in situ measurements of hydrate formation and decomposition were done by X-ray diffraction. The transformation of ice into CO2 hydrates occurred in two steps: at first a CO2 hydrate layer rapidly formed a coating on the ice surface and then the CO2 hydrate slowly grew according to the diffusion rates of CO2 and H2O molecules through the hydrate layer to the reaction sites. The same methods were used to observe the self-preservation effect of methane hydrates.

  4. Geotechnical Trainspotting: Early Observations From the New Seattle Liquefaction Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodin, P.; Yelin, T.; Weaver, C. S.; Steidl, J. H.; Steller, R. A.; Gomberg, J. S.

    2012-12-01

    The Seattle Liquefaction Array (SLA) is a geotechnical monitoring array established by the US Geological Survey earlier this year in industrialized Seattle, Washington. Funding for the array was provided by the Advanced National Seismic System, at the behest of the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network's regional advisory committee. The SLA aims to further the understanding of earthquake-induced liquefaction, particularly the processes associated with repeatedly liquefied soils and the liquefaction of deeply buried deposits. The SLA occupies a site at which shaking-induced liquefaction was observed during earthquakes in 1949, 1965, and 2001. The SLA site is seismically noisy but important as it is similar to sites that host many structures in Seattle. The site is comprised chiefly by loose-to-dense interbedded coastal and river outwash sands. Instrumentation at the site includes four 3-component accelerometers at the surface and at depths of 5.4, 44.9, and 56.4 meters, a surface barometer, and six piezometers at depths of 6.9, 22.9, 28.9, 43.1, 46.9, and 51.9 meters. Emplacement depths were selected to sample a variety of liquefaction susceptibilities. Continuous data from all sensors are sampled at 200 samples per second, and are available from the IRIS DMC archive, with a buffer of data stored on site in the event of telemetry failure. To date, only a handful of earthquakes have produced shaking strong enough at the SLA to be observed within the high levels of background noise. However, the noise itself provides data useful to constrain the low-strain seismic and pressure response of the site. Notably, the array is within a few meters of a set of busy railroad tracks. Passing and parked trains expose the site to a broad bandwidth of deformations, including seismic frequencies, albeit with a source at the surface. Many times each day the site experiences both high levels of shaking, and step changes in the pressure field of a variety of amplitudes that may last from seconds to hours. The pore pressure response varies between sensors and can be used to elucidate the drained and undrained pressure response within the different strata. Spectral ratios of the ground motions from trains amongst the accelerometers confirm that the site is still responding linearly to these ground motions.

  5. Decomposition techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chao, T.T.; Sanzolone, R.F.

    1992-01-01

    Sample decomposition is a fundamental and integral step in the procedure of geochemical analysis. It is often the limiting factor to sample throughput, especially with the recent application of the fast and modern multi-element measurement instrumentation. The complexity of geological materials makes it necessary to choose the sample decomposition technique that is compatible with the specific objective of the analysis. When selecting a decomposition technique, consideration should be given to the chemical and mineralogical characteristics of the sample, elements to be determined, precision and accuracy requirements, sample throughput, technical capability of personnel, and time constraints. This paper addresses these concerns and discusses the attributes and limitations of many techniques of sample decomposition along with examples of their application to geochemical analysis. The chemical properties of reagents as to their function as decomposition agents are also reviewed. The section on acid dissolution techniques addresses the various inorganic acids that are used individually or in combination in both open and closed systems. Fluxes used in sample fusion are discussed. The promising microwave-oven technology and the emerging field of automation are also examined. A section on applications highlights the use of decomposition techniques for the determination of Au, platinum group elements (PGEs), Hg, U, hydride-forming elements, rare earth elements (REEs), and multi-elements in geological materials. Partial dissolution techniques used for geochemical exploration which have been treated in detail elsewhere are not discussed here; nor are fire-assaying for noble metals and decomposition techniques for X-ray fluorescence or nuclear methods be discussed. ?? 1992.

  6. The observational influence of the North Atlantic SST tripole on the early spring atmospheric circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zhe; Luo, Feifei; Wan, Jianghua

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated the forcing of the North Atlantic sea surface temperature (SST) tripole on the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO)-like circulation in early spring (February-April) in observations. Corresponding to an SST tripole forcing in early spring, the atmospheric circulation is very weak and insignificant. However, further analyses indicate that the observational effect of the SST anomalies on the NAO-like circulation is disturbed by the concomitant sea ice anomalies. With the linear effects of sea ice anomalies removed, there is an equivalent barotropic NAO-like circulation in early spring related to a North Atlantic SST tripole.

  7. A New Observation Technique Applied to Early/Fast VLF Scattering Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotovsky, D. A.; Moore, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    Early/fast very low frequency (VLF, 3-30 kHz) events are understood to result from ionospheric conductivity changes associated with lightning. Early/fast amplitude and phase perturbations have been observed coincidentally with various optical observations of transient luminous events (TLEs), including elves, sprites, and sprite halos, each of which can have temporal characteristics consistent with those of early/fast VLF events. It is yet unresolved, however, whether a specific type of TLE is directly related to the ionospheric conductivity changes responsible for the typical early/fast event. In this paper, we present spread spectrum VLF scattering observations of early/fast events. The spread spectrum analysis technique determines the amplitude and phase of a subionospherically propagating VLF signal as a function of time during the early/fast event and as a function of frequency across the 200 Hz bandwidth of the VLF transmission. VLF scattering observations, each identified with causative lightning logged by the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN), are compared with the predictions of the Long-Wave Propagation Capability (LWPC) code, a three-dimensional earth-ionosphere waveguide propagation and scattering model. Theoretical predictions for VLF scattering from ionization changes associated with elves are compared with those associated with sprite halos, and each are compared with experimental observations. Results indicate that the observed frequency dependence of VLF scattering during early/fast events results from the combination of scattering source properties and Earth-ionosphere waveguide propagation effects. Observations are more consistent with the modeled amplitude perturbations associated with sprite halos than those with elves.

  8. A Validation of the Early Childhood Classroom Observation Measure in Finnish and Estonian Kindergartens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerkkanen, Marja-Kristiina; Kikas, Eve; Pakarinen, Eija; Trossmann, Kaili; Poikkeus, Anna-Maija; Rasku-Puttonen, Helena; Siekkinen, Martti; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2012-01-01

    Research Findings: The aim of the study was to examine the applicability and psychometric properties of the Early Childhood Classroom Observation Measure (ECCOM; D. J. Stipek & P. Byler, 2005) outside the United States. The ECCOM was used to observe 83 kindergarten teachers (49 in Finland and 34 in Estonia) in classroom situations. Self-ratings…

  9. Decomposing observations of high-frequency radar-derived surface currents by their forcing mechanisms: Decomposition techniques and spatial structures of decomposed surface currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Yong; Cornuelle, Bruce D.; Terrill, Eric J.

    2010-12-01

    Surface current observations from a high-frequency radar network deployed in southern San Diego are decomposed according to their driving forces: pure tides and their neighboring off-band energy, local winds, and low frequency. Several superposed ocean responses are present as a result of the complicated bottom topography and relatively weak winds off southern San Diego, as opposed to coastal regions where circulation can be explained by a dominant forcing mechanism. This necessitates an application of a statistical decomposition approach. Surface currents coherent with pure tides are calculated using harmonic analysis. Locally wind-driven surface currents are estimated by regression of observed winds on observed surface currents. The dewinded and detided surface currents are filtered by weighted least-squares fitting assuming white noise and three colored signal bands: low-frequency band (less than 0.4 cycles per day) and near-tidal peaks at the diurnal (K1) and semidiurnal (M2) frequencies. The spatial and temporal variability of each part of the decomposed surface currents is investigated in terms of ocean response to the driving forces. In addition, the spatial correlations of individual components exhibit Gaussian and exponential shapes with varying decorrelation length scales.

  10. Thermal Decomposition of IMX-104: Ingredient Interactions Govern Thermal Insensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Maharrey, Sean; Wiese-Smith, Deneille; Highley, Aaron M.; Steill, Jeffrey D.; Behrens, Richard; Kay, Jeffrey J.

    2015-04-01

    This report summarizes initial studies into the chemical basis of the thermal insensitivity of INMX-104. The work follows upon similar efforts investigating this behavior for another DNAN-based insensitive explosive, IMX-101. The experiments described demonstrate a clear similarity between the ingredient interactions that were shown to lead to the thermal insensitivity observed in IMX-101 and those that are active in IMX-104 at elevated temperatures. Specifically, the onset of decomposition of RDX is shifted to a lower temperature based on the interaction of the RDX with liquid DNAN. This early onset of decomposition dissipates some stored energy that is then unavailable for a delayed, more violent release.

  11. Validity, Reliability, and Utility of the Observation Survey of Early Literacy Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denton, Carolyn A.; Ciancio, Dennis J.; Fletcher, Jack M.

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the validity, reliability, and utility of five of the six subtests of Clay's (2002) Observation Survey of Early Literacy Achievement (OS), including Letter Identification, Word Reading, Writing Vocabulary, Hearing and Recording Sounds in Words, and Text Reading. In addition to a review of studies providing assessment of the…

  12. Probing the interstellar medium in early-type galaxies with Infrared Space Oberservatory observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malhotra, S.; Hollenbach, D.; Helou, D.; Silbermann, N.; Valjavec, E.; Rubin, R.; Dale, D.; Hunter, D.; Lu, N.; Lord, S.; Dinerstein, H.; Thronson, H.

    2000-01-01

    Four IRAS-detected early-type galaxies were observed with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). With the exception of the 15 mu m image of NGC 1052, the mid-IR images of NGC 1052, NGC 1155, NGC 5866, and NGC 6958 at 4.5, 7, and 15 mu m show extended emission.

  13. Factors Associated with South Korean Early Childhood Educators' Observed Behavior Support Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Yeon Ha; Stormont, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    This study was an exploratory study of 34 South Korean early childhood educators' strategies for addressing behavior problems in natural settings. Factors related to teachers' strategy implementation were also explored. Four specific teacher behaviors were observed: precorrection, behavioral-specific praise, redirection, and reprimand/punishment.

  14. Naturalistic Observations of Schoolyard Social Participation: Marker Variables for Socio-Emotional Functioning in Early Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coplan, Robert J.; Ooi, Laura L.; Rose-Krasnor, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine links between observed social participation in the schoolyard and indices of socio-emotional functioning in early adolescence. Participants were children (N = 290) aged 9 to 12 years. Social participation (e.g., solitary play, dyadic interaction, group interaction) was assessed in the schoolyard during recess…

  15. Early Childhood Teachers' Curriculum Beliefs: Are They Consistent with Observed Classroom Practices?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wen, Xiaoli; Elicker, James G.; McMullen, Mary B.

    2011-01-01

    Research Findings: This study examined the consistency between early childhood teachers' self-reported curriculum beliefs and observations of their actual interactive behaviors with children in classrooms. Also tested was the hypothesized moderation by teacher and classroom characteristics of the association between beliefs and practices. A total…

  16. Chao Yuanfang: Imperial Physician of the Sui Dynasty and an Early Pertussis Observer?

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yan; Salim, Abdulbaset M.; Wu, Wendy; Kilgore, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    Early Chinese texts contain extensive disease descriptions, including various texts that contain descriptions of modern-day conditions. During the Sui Dynasty, a leading scholar, Chao Yuanfang, may have authored a leading treatise 1400 years ago. Although these texts are the subject of ongoing research, evidence suggests that a clinical syndrome consistent with pertussis was observed in ancient China. PMID:26977422

  17. Factors Associated with South Korean Early Childhood Educators' Observed Behavior Support Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Yeon Ha; Stormont, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    This study was an exploratory study of 34 South Korean early childhood educators' strategies for addressing behavior problems in natural settings. Factors related to teachers' strategy implementation were also explored. Four specific teacher behaviors were observed: precorrection, behavioral-specific praise, redirection, and reprimand/punishment.…

  18. Clinical observations of early and late normal tissue injury in patients receiving fast neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ornitz, R.D.; Bradley, E.W.; Mossman, K.L.; Fender, F.M.; Schell, M.C.; Rogers, C.C.

    1980-03-01

    This communication describes early and late normal tissue effects in 177 patients treated totally or in part by 15 MeV neutrons from the Naval Research Laboratory Cyclotron in Washington, D.C. between October 1973 and December 1976. Late normal tissue reactions were found to be greater than would be expected from careful observation of the early clinical responses to neutron treatment. Neutron prescriptions must be written based on the late effect tolerance level experience which is being accumulated at several neutron therapy facilities.

  19. Chandra Observations of Coronal Emission from the Early G Supergiants α and β Aquarii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, Thomas R.; Brown, Alexander; Harper, Graham M.

    2005-07-01

    We report Chandra detections of coronal X-rays from the early G supergiants α Aquarii (HD 209750: G2 Ib) and β Aquarii (HD 204867: G0 Ib). Previous ROSAT observations of these archetypical ``hybrid chromosphere'' stars were inconclusive, in the case of α Aqr owing to a 38' mispointing, and for β Aqr because of a small positional discrepancy of the apparent source. The Chandra High Resolution Camera (HRC-I), with its superior spatial resolution and sensitivity, has obtained a positive detection of α Aqr and recovered faint emission at the location of β Aqr, now well separated from the stronger source to the southeast that dominated the earlier ROSAT image. The coronal LX/LC IV luminosity ratios of both supergiants are extremely depressed relative to early G main-sequence stars, continuing the ``X-ray deficiency syndrome'' originally identified in late F/early G luminosity class III giants of the Hertzsprung gap.

  20. Observed multivariable signals of late 20th and early 21st century volcanic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santer, Benjamin D.; Solomon, Susan; Bonfils, Céline; Zelinka, Mark D.; Painter, Jeffrey F.; Beltran, Francisco; Fyfe, John C.; Johannesson, Gardar; Mears, Carl; Ridley, David A.; Vernier, Jean-Paul; Wentz, Frank J.

    2015-01-01

    The relatively muted warming of the surface and lower troposphere since 1998 has attracted considerable attention. One contributory factor to this "warming hiatus" is an increase in volcanically induced cooling over the early 21st century. Here we identify the signals of late 20th and early 21st century volcanic activity in multiple observed climate variables. Volcanic signals are statistically discernible in spatial averages of tropical and near-global SST, tropospheric temperature, net clear-sky short-wave radiation, and atmospheric water vapor. Signals of late 20th and early 21st century volcanic eruptions are also detectable in near-global averages of rainfall. In tropical average rainfall, however, only a Pinatubo-caused drying signal is identifiable. Successful volcanic signal detection is critically dependent on removal of variability induced by the El Niño-Southern Oscillation.

  1. Observing the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation: A Unique Window on the Early Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinshaw, Gary; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background radiation is the remnant heat from the Big Bang. It provides us with a unique probe of conditions in the early universe, long before any organized structures had yet formed. The anisotropy in the radiation's brightness yields important clues about primordial structure and additionally provides a wealth of information about the physics,of the early universe. Within the framework of inflationary dark matter models observations of the anisotropy on sub-degree angular scales will reveal the signatures of acoustic oscillations of the photon-baryon fluid at a redshift of approx. 1100. The validity of inflationary models will be tested and, if agreement is found, accurate values for most of the key cosmological parameters will result. If disagreement is found, we will need to rethink our basic ideas about the physics of the early universe. I will present an overview of the physical processes at work in forming the anisotropy and discuss what we have already learned from current observations. I will conclude with a brief overview of the recently launched Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) mission which will observe the anisotropy over the full sky with 0.21 degree angular resolution. At the time of this meeting, MAP will have just arrived at the L2 Lagrange point, marking the start of its observing campaign. The MAP hardware is being produced by Goddard in partnership with Princeton University.

  2. Observing the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation: A Unique Window on the Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinshaw, Gary

    2001-11-01

    The cosmic microwave background radiation is the remnant heat from the Big Bang. It provides us with a unique probe of conditions in the early universe, long before any organized structures had yet formed. The anisotropy in the radiation's brightness yields important clues about primordial structure and additionally provides a wealth of information about the physics of the early universe. Within the framework of inflationary dark matter models, observations of the anisotropy on sub-degree angular scales will reveal the signatures of acoustic oscillations of the photon-baryon fluid at a redshift of 1100. The validity of inflationary models will be tested and, if agreement is found, accurate values for most of the key cosmological parameters will result. If disagreement is found, we will need to rethink our basic ideas about the physics of the early universe. I will present an overview of the physical processes at work in forming the anisotropy and discuss what we have already learned from current observations. I will conclude with a brief overview of the recently launched Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) mission which will observe the anisotropy over the full sky with 0.21 degree angular resolution. At the time of this meeting, MAP will have just arrived at the L2 Lagrange point, marking the start of its observing campaign. The MAP hardware is being produced by Goddard in partnership with Princeton University.

  3. Observational Constraints on the Nature of the First Supermassive Black Holes Seeds in the Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treister, Ezequiel; Schawinski, Kevin; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Weigel, Anna

    2015-08-01

    We constrain the total accreted mass density in supermassive black holes at z>6, as inferred from the integrated X-ray emission in a sample of galaxy candidates selected using observed-frame optical and near-IR dropout techniques. Combining galaxy samples acquired in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field with recent deep Hubble observations of the CANDELS fields and Chandra 4 Msec observations we obtain the most restrictive current constraints on total black hole growth in the early Universe, estimating a mass density <1000M⊙Mpc-3. We further carry out a detailed study of all the individually-detected X-ray sources in the Chandra Deep Field South, finding that none of them is a good candidate to be at z>5.These results place interesting constraints on growth by accretion and imply one or more of the following: only ~20% luminous galaxies at this epoch are seeded with BHs - so seeding is inefficient; most black hole growth at early epochs happens in dusty - as yet undetected - host galaxies and/or in less-massive - also as yet undetected - galaxies; therefore a large fraction of the early black hole buildup is heavily obscured or that either most of the growth is due to radiatively inefficient accretion or due to black hole mergers at these early times. Not seeing a signal from growing black holes in high-redshift galaxies suggests that if their black holes are growing they are doing so in a veiled fashion, or they are simply not growing or perhaps most galaxies do not harbor black holes at their centers at all. These possibilities offer novel insights for high redshift seed formation models.Finally, we present the prospects to constrain the nature of the first black hole seeds in the early Universe using existing and planned space-based facilities.

  4. In situ observations of early oxide formation in steel under hot-rolling conditions.

    PubMed

    Melfo, W M; Dippenaar, R J

    2007-02-01

    A technique was developed to study in situ the early stages of the reaction between iron and air. Using a high-temperature microscope, we observed at temperatures between 1000 degrees C and 1050 degrees C and within the first 30 s of reaction, the formation of iron-oxide layers on the surface of low-carbon steel. We observed the nucleation and growth of a first layer of iron oxide and the consecutive formation in sequence, of higher iron oxides sweeping over the surface of the former oxide. The grain boundaries of the steel substrate remain visible for quite some time following exposure to an oxidizing atmosphere indicating that diffusion through steel grain boundaries may have a determining influence on the formation of oxides. These findings emphasize the importance of conducting further studies to better understand the kinetics and mechanisms by which iron-oxide layers form in the early stages of oxidation. PMID:17359249

  5. Envisaged in-situ dust observations in the early comet orbit phase of ROSETTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilchenbach, M.; Engrand, C.; Krueger, H.; Cottin, H.; Silen, J. V.; Briois, C.

    2012-12-01

    The detection and analysis of icy grains ejected off comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko is one of the observational science themes of the COSIMA instrument onboard ROSETTA. Due to their short lifetime, icy grains have be collected in the very vicinity of the nucleus and in the early Rosetta mission phase before the snow line crossing. COSIMA is a secondary ion mass spectrometer, collecting dust grains on metal targets, imaging the grains with a microscope and analyzing the composition of the dust grains with a high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer. We will discuss the potential observations in view of the recent Enceladus icy grain detections onboard CASSINI.

  6. Overlooked sunspot observations by Hevelius in the early Maunder Minimum, 1653 1684

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyt, Douglas V.; Schatten, Kenneth H.

    1995-09-01

    In the bookMachina Coelestis (1679), Johannes Hevelius lists his daily solar observations from 1653 to 1679. He mentions 19 sunspot groups during this interval, of which 14 are unique to Hevelius and five are confirmed by other observers. There are an additional 9 sunspot groups during this interval that were not observed by Hevelius. In five cases he was not observing, but in the other four cases he did observe but failed to comment upon sunspots. The spots he missed or failed to observe tend to occur near the end of his career. This suggests Hevelius occasionally missed sunspots but usually was a reliable observer. These observations are important because they provide us the only known daily listing of solar observations during the early years of the Maunder Minimum. They are also important because they were overlooked by Wolf, Spoerer, Maunder, Eddy, and others in their study of solar activity in the seventeenth century. They provide us the best record of the sunspot maximum of 1660 when one sunspot lasted at least 86 days as it traversed the solar disk four times. The same region was active for seven solar rotations.

  7. Towards Characterizing Early-stage SEP Fluxes with High-Cadence EUV Coronal Shock Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozarev, Kamen A.; Raymond, John C.; Hammer, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Recent advances in space-based solar observing have enabled unprecedented access to high-cadence, high-resolution observations of the coronal dynamics. This is extremely important, since transient phenomena in the corona usually cover multiple scales - from the current spatial resolution limit in the case of reconnection, to several solar radii in the case of coronal waves and mass ejections. The latter are also thought to drive shocks in the corona, which in turn have been shown capable of accelerating protons, electrons, and other species up to GeV energies in a matter of tens of minutes. These solar energetic particles (SEPs) are a prime source of space weather. Historically, it has been notoriously difficult to extract information about energetic particle spectra in the corona, due to the lack of in situ measurements. It is possible, however, to use remote observations in order to deduce coronal shock dynamics and related particle spectra, with some reasonable assumptions. We present an effort towards building a framework for estimating coronal SEP spectra in the early stages of real CME events, based on a combination of fast-cadence extreme ultraviolet imaging (from the SDO/AIA instrument), potential coronal magnetic field models, and differential emission measure models. The ultimate goal for this framework is to give predictions for early-stage SEP spectra for various source populations and coronal turbulence levels. It is designed in a modular fashion, and may be adapted for near real time use. This system can be applied for early warning and predicting the severity of the impulsive early stages of SEP events.

  8. Interactions of tissue and fertilizer nitrogen on decomposition dynamics of lignin-rich conifer litter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perakis, Steven S.; Matkins, Joselin J.; Hibbs, David E.

    2012-01-01

    High tissue nitrogen (N) accelerates decomposition of high-quality leaf litter in the early phases of mass loss, but the influence of initial tissue N variation on the decomposition of lignin-rich litter is less resolved. Because environmental changes such as atmospheric N deposition and elevated CO2 can alter tissue N levels within species more rapidly than they alter the species composition of ecosystems, it is important to consider how within-species variation in tissue N may shape litter decomposition and associated N dynamics. Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii ) is a widespread lignin-rich conifer that dominates forests of high carbon (C) storage across western North America, and displays wide variation in tissue and litter N that reflects landscape variation in soil N. We collected eight unique Douglas-fir litter sources that spanned a two-fold range in initial N concentrations (0.67–1.31%) with a narrow range of lignin (29–35%), and examined relationships between initial litter chemistry, decomposition, and N dynamics in both ambient and N fertilized plots at four sites over 3 yr. High initial litter N slowed decomposition rates in both early (0.67 yr) and late (3 yr) stages in unfertilized plots. Applications of N fertilizer to litters accelerated early-stage decomposition, but slowed late-stage decomposition, and most strongly affected low-N litters, which equalized decomposition rates across litters regardless of initial N concentrations. Decomposition of N-fertilized litters correlated positively with initial litter manganese (Mn) concentrations, with litter Mn variation reflecting faster turnover of canopy foliage in high N sites, producing younger litterfall with high N and low Mn. Although both internal and external N inhibited decomposition at 3 yr, most litters exhibited net N immobilization, with strongest immobilization in low-N litter and in N-fertilized plots. Our observation for lignin-rich litter that high initial N can slow decomposition yet accelerate N release differs from findings where litter quality variation across species promotes coupled C and N release during decomposition. We suggest reevaluation of ecosystem models and projected global change effects to account for a potential decoupling of ecosystem C and N feedbacks through litter decomposition in lignin-rich conifer forests.

  9. [Observations of play and verbal behavior of boys with fragile X syndrome in early childhood].

    PubMed

    Sarimski, K

    1999-08-01

    Reports on development and behaviour in boys with fragile-X syndrome support the idea of a characteristic behavioural phenotype in this special population. Preliminary results are presented for 10 boys with fragile-X syndrome in early childhood. Severe mental handicaps and communicative abnormalities are observed less frequently than was expected on the basis of results reported for school-age children or adults. Boys with fragile-X syndrome show goal-directed and cooperative play behaviours in a Montessori play session, but less persistence and organisation than children with normal development or a mental handicap of heterogeneous origin. Results confirmed these behavioural differences as characteristic aspects of a "behavioural phenotype" in children who already in early childhood have fragile-X syndrome. PMID:10478436

  10. Constraining the temperature history of the past millennium using early instrumental observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brohan, P.

    2012-12-01

    The current assessment that twentieth-century global temperature change is unusual in the context of the last thousand years relies on estimates of temperature changes from natural proxies (tree-rings, ice-cores etc.) and climate model simulations. Confidence in such estimates is limited by difficulties in calibrating the proxies and systematic differences between proxy reconstructions and model simulations - notable differences include large differences in multi-decadal variability between proxy reconstructions, and big uncertainties in the effect of volcanic eruptions. Because the difference between the estimates extends into the relatively recent period of the early nineteenth century it is possible to compare them with a reliable instrumental estimate of the temperature change over that period, provided that enough early thermometer observations, covering a wide enough expanse of the world, can be collected. By constraining key aspects of the reconstructions and simulations, instrumental observations, inevitably from a limited period, can reduce reconstruction uncertainty throughout the millennium. A considerable quantity of early instrumental observations are preserved in the world's archives. One organisation which systematically made observations and collected the results was the English East-India Company (EEIC), and 900 log-books of EEIC ships containing daily instrumental measurements of temperature and pressure have been preserved in the British Library. Similar records from voyages of exploration and scientific investigation are preserved in published literature and the records in National Archives. Some of these records have been extracted and digitised, providing hundreds of thousands of new weather records offering an unprecedentedly detailed view of the weather and climate of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. The new thermometer observations demonstrate that the large-scale temperature response to the Tambora eruption and the 1809 eruption was modest (perhaps 0.5C). This provides a powerful out-of-sample validation for the proxy reconstructions --- supporting their use for longer-term climate reconstructions. However, some of the climate model simulations in the CMIP5 ensemble show much larger volcanic effects than this --- such simulations are unlikely to be accurate in this respect.

  11. Linear decomposition-based methodology for determining the relative importance of wind and non-wind phenomena on observed air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Kit Man

    Air pollution in Hong Kong (HK) is becoming more significant. Many people have expressed their concern about changes in air quality. The problems and concerns have been manifest, in recent years, in HK and the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region. Typically, it is believed that increased emissions should be blamed for causing air pollution in this region. However, the authorities explain that increased occurrence in calm/light wind conditions is also important in hindering dispersion of air pollutants. Understanding the real causes can benefit in setting the best control policies. The conflict between the "emission" and "wind pattern" viewpoints can be resolved if we can distinguish the respective contributions of wind changes (wind influence) and emission strengths (non-wind influence) on air quality. However, up to now, there has been no systematic way to determine the relative importance of these two main phenomena on air quality. Most current related research can only show they have an impact on air quality. Little has compared them quantitatively. This research first investigated whether the frequency of calm/light wind conditions is closely related to the concentration of pollutants. The plotted charts show high wind speed with low pollutant concentration and vice versa. Although the frequency distributions of wind speed in 2000 -- 2003 versus 2004 -- 2007 do show that there was a higher frequency of low wind speeds in the latter period, when pollution levels are compared during periods of similar wind speed, they are higher in the latter period than in the former. A linear decomposition-based methodology is proposed to distinguish the relative importance of these two main phenomena on air quality. Based on the hourly wind data (speed and direction) and pollutant concentration, the wind frequency and pollutant emission "roses" (circular frequency diagrams) are established. Hypothetical pollutant concentration can be calculated from these two roses. By comparing the hypothetical pollutant concentration with the actual measurement, the relative importance of these two main phenomena on average pollutant concentration in two periods can be determined respectively quantitatively. Last, the respirable suspended particulates (RSP), ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulphur dioxide (SO2) in 2000 -- 2007 in HK were analyzed and two past air quality related controversial cases were also studied. It is shown that the non-wind influence on observed air quality in HK was more significant than the wind influence in annual-based comparison.

  12. Constraining the temperature history of the past millennium using early instrumental observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brohan, P.; Allan, R.; Freeman, E.; Wheeler, D.; Wilkinson, C.; Williamson, F.

    2012-10-01

    The current assessment that twentieth-century global temperature change is unusual in the context of the last thousand years relies on estimates of temperature changes from natural proxies (tree-rings, ice-cores, etc.) and climate model simulations. Confidence in such estimates is limited by difficulties in calibrating the proxies and systematic differences between proxy reconstructions and model simulations. As the difference between the estimates extends into the relatively recent period of the early nineteenth century it is possible to compare them with a reliable instrumental estimate of the temperature change over that period, provided that enough early thermometer observations, covering a wide enough expanse of the world, can be collected. One organisation which systematically made observations and collected the results was the English East India Company (EEIC), and their archives have been preserved in the British Library. Inspection of those archives revealed 900 log-books of EEIC ships containing daily instrumental measurements of temperature and pressure, and subjective estimates of wind speed and direction, from voyages across the Atlantic and Indian Oceans between 1789 and 1834. Those records have been extracted and digitised, providing 273 000 new weather records offering an unprecedentedly detailed view of the weather and climate of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. The new thermometer observations demonstrate that the large-scale temperature response to the Tambora eruption and the 1809 eruption was modest (perhaps 0.5 °C). This provides an out-of-sample validation for the proxy reconstructions - supporting their use for longer-term climate reconstructions. However, some of the climate model simulations in the CMIP5 ensemble show much larger volcanic effects than this - such simulations are unlikely to be accurate in this respect.

  13. Constraining the temperature history of the past millennium using early instrumental observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brohan, P.; Allan, R.; Freeman, E.; Wheeler, D.; Wilkinson, C.; Williamson, F.

    2012-05-01

    The current assessment that twentieth-century global temperature change is unusual in the context of the last thousand years relies on estimates of temperature changes from natural proxies (tree-rings, ice-cores etc.) and climate model simulations. Confidence in such estimates is limited by difficulties in calibrating the proxies and systematic differences between proxy reconstructions and model simulations. As the difference between the estimates extends into the relatively recent period of the early nineteenth century it is possible to compare them with a reliable instrumental estimate of the temperature change over that period, provided that enough early thermometer observations, covering a wide enough expanse of the world, can be collected. One organisation which systematically made observations and collected the results was the English East-India Company (EEIC), and their archives have been preserved in the British Library. Inspection of those archives revealed 900 log-books of EEIC ships containing daily instrumental measurements of temperature and pressure, and subjective estimates of wind speed and direction, from voyages across the Atlantic and Indian Oceans between 1789 and 1834. Those records have been extracted and digitised, providing 273 000 new weather records offering an unprecedentedly detailed view of the weather and climate of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. The new thermometer observations demonstrate that the large-scale temperature response to the Tambora eruption and the 1809 eruption was modest (perhaps 0.5 °C). This provides a powerful out-of-sample validation for the proxy reconstructions - supporting their use for longer-term climate reconstructions. However, some of the climate model simulations in the CMIP5 ensemble show much larger volcanic effects than this - such simulations are unlikely to be accurate in this respect.

  14. Current constraints on early dark energy and growth index using latest observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, F. Y.

    2012-07-01

    Aims: In this paper we study observational constraints on early dark energy model proposed by Doran & Robbers and growth index using the latest Union2 type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) in the large-scale correlation function of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and Two-degree Field Galaxy Redshift Survey, cosmic microwave background (CMB) from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe seven-year data, the linear growth factors data and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Methods: By using the χ2 statics method, we constrain the early dark energy model and growth factor from the above datasets. When including the GRB data, we use the cosmographic parameters to calibrate the GRB luminosity relations using SNe Ia. Results: At 2σ confidence level, we find that the fractional dark energy density at early times is Ωde<0.05 using SNe Ia, CMB and BAO. When we include high-redshift probes, such as measurements of the linear growth factors and GRBs, the constraint is tightened considerably and becomes Ωde<0.03 at 2σ confidence level. We also discuss the growth rate index γ. We find γ = 0.661-0.203+0.302(1σ) using the SNe Ia, CMB, BAO and linear growth factor data. After including high-redshift GRB data, the growth index is γ = 0.653-0.363+0.372.

  15. Observation of x-ray resonant Raman scattering: The early days

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, C.J.

    1995-12-31

    My early observation of Raman scattering came as a serendipitous by-product of our efforts to achieve the best possible signal for x-ray fluorescent analysis. We were also investigating the x-ray spectrum produced by a monochromatic x-ray beam striking metal targets which might contribute to the inelastic background. This background could contaminate the very weak diffusively distributed elastically scattered radiation associated with defects in the perfect periodicity of crystals. Energy analysis of the x-ray spectra created by monochromatic Cu K{sub {alpha}} and Mo K{sub {alpha}} radiation impinging on highly pure metal targets showed an inelastically scattered intensity related to the energy difference between the exciting radiation and the nearest bound state. Confirmation of these observations and availability of synchrotron radiation has led to wide application of this new x-ray spectroscopy in atomic physics including its use as a probe of the unoccupied density of states.

  16. Observing System Simulation Experiments for Hurricanes: Early results and plans for the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atlas, R. M.; Pu, Z.

    2010-12-01

    Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) are an important tool for evaluating the potential impact of proposed new observing systems, as well as for evaluating trade-offs in observing system design, and in developing and assessing improved methodology for assimilating new observations. Extensive OSSEs have been conducted at NASA/GSFC and NOAA/AOML in collaboration with Simpson Weather Associates, operational data assimilation centers, and academic partners over the last 25 years. These OSSEs determined correctly the quantitative potential for several proposed satellite observing systems to improve weather analysis and prediction prior to their launch, evaluated trade-offs in orbits, coverage and accuracy for space-based wind lidars, and were used in the development of the methodology that led to the first beneficial impacts of satellite surface winds on numerical weather prediction. In this paper, we will summarize early applications of global OSSEs to hurricane track forecasting, current experiments using both global and regional models aimed at both track and intensity forecasting, and plans for future experiments.

  17. Experimental observation of critical slowing down as an early warning of population collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorselen, Daan; Dai, Lei; Korolev, Kirill; Gore, Jeff

    2012-02-01

    Near tipping points marking population collapse or other critical transitions in complex systems small changes in conditions can result in drastic shifts in the system state. In theoretical models it is known that early warning signals can be used to predict the approach of these tipping points (bifurcations), but little is known about how these signals can be detected in practice. Here we use the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to study these early warning signals in controlled experimental populations. We grow yeast in the sugar sucrose, where cooperative feeding dynamics causes a fold bifurcation; falling below a critical population size results in sudden collapse. We demonstrate the experimental observation of an increase in both the size and timescale of the fluctuations of population density near this fold bifurcation. Furthermore, we test the utility of theoretically predicted warning signals by observing them in two different slowly deteriorating environments. These findings suggest that these generic indicators of critical slowing down can be useful in predicting catastrophic changes in population biology.

  18. Ultrastructural observations of the early and late stages of gorgonian coral (Junceella juncea) oocytes.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Sujune; Jhuang, Yating; Spikings, Emma; Sung, Ping-Jyun; Lin, Chiahsin

    2014-08-01

    The developmental oogenesis of gorgonian coral was investigated at the histological level. The objective of this study was to examine and improve the understanding of Junceella juncea oogenesis using ultrastructural methods, such as histological sectioning and transmission electron microscopy. At least three types of yolk materials were observed in this study: yolk body, lipid granules and cortical alveoli. Some of the complex yolk materials were encompassed by concentric or arched layers of smooth and rough endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi complex in early stage oocytes. Different types of vesicles were found in both early and late stage oocytes and some granules could be seen inside the empty vesicles. This may be a possible method for elaborating complex yolk materials. Homogeneous yolks from different types of inclusions were abundant and the autosynthesis of yolk may be a major mechanism in J. juncea oocytes. This is the first report of the ultrastructural observation of oogenesis in gorgonian coral species using transmission electron microscopy. Our study obtained relatively detailed information at the ultrastructural level, and it provides an overview of the oocyte ultrastucture of the gorgonian coral J. juncea. PMID:24973261

  19. Observational Manifestations of Early Mixing in b- and O-Type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubimkov, L. S.

    The helium and nitrogen en-rich-ment of the atmospheres of early B-type stars during the main sequence (MS) evolutionary phase is re-analysed. It is con-fir-med that the effect depends on both the age t and the stellar mass M. For example, the helium abundance He/H increases by 0.04 (60-70% of initial value) for stars with M=8-13 M_odot and by 0.025 (about 30%) for stars with M=6M_odot. The nitrogen abundance rises by three times for M=14 M_odot and by two times for M=10 M_odot. According to the latest theoretical computations, the observed appearance of CNO-cycled material in surface layers of the stars can be a result of the rotationally induced mixing, in particular, of the turbulent diffusion. Carbon is in deficiency in B stars, but unexpectedly does not show any correlation with the stellar age. However it is shown that the total C+N abundance derived for early B stars conflicts with the theory. Basing on modern data the helium en-rich-ment is first examined in O-type MS stars, as well as in components of binaries. As compared with early B stars, the He abundance for more massive O stars and for components of binaries show a different relation with the relative age t/t_{MS. Namely during the first half of the MS stage the normal value He/H=0.08-0.10 is conserved, whereas in the short time between t/t_{MS approx 0.5 and 0.7 a sharp jump is observed up to He/H=0.2 and more. In particular, such a jump is typical for fast rotating O stars (v,sin,i ge 200 km s^{-1). Therefore the effect of mixing depends on mass M, relative age t/t_{MS, rotational velocity v and duplicity. The mass problem (the discrepancy between M_{ev and M_{sp) is also analysed, because some authors consider it as a possible evidence of early mixing, too. It is shown that the ac-cu-ra-te data for components of binaries lead to the conclusion that the discrepancy is less than 30%. Such a difference can be removed at the expense of the M_{ev lowering, if the displacement of evolutionary tracks owing to the rotationally induced mixing is taken into consideration. Full version of this paper will be published in {it Astrophysics and Space Science.

  20. Observational manifestations of early mixing in B- and O-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubimkov, L. S.

    1996-09-01

    The helium and nitrogen enrichment of the atmospheres of early B-type stars during the main sequence (MS) evolutionary phase is re-analysed. It is confirmed that the effect depends on both the aget and the stellar massM. For example, the helium abundanceHe/H increases by 0.04 (60 70% of initial value) for stars withM=8 13M ? and by 0.025 (about 30%) for stars withM=6M ?. The nitrogen abundance rises by three times forM=14M ? and by, two times forM=10M ?. According to the latest theoretical computations, the observed appearance of CNO-cycled material in surface layers of the stars can be a result of the rotationally induced mixing, in particular, of the turbulent diffusion. Carbon is in deficiency in B stars, but unexpectedly does not show any correlation with the stellar age. However it is shown that the total C+N abundance derived for early B stars conflicts with the theory. Basing on modern data the helium enrichment is first examined in O-type MS stars, as well as in components of binaries. As compared with early B stars, the He abundance for more massive O stars and for components of binaries show a different relation with the relative aget/t MS . Namely during short time betweent/t MS ?0.5 and 0.7 a sharp jump is observed up toHe/H=0.2 and more. In particular, such a jump is typical for fast rotating O stars (v sini?200 km s-1),. Therefore the effect of mixing depends on massM, relative aget/t MS , rotational velocityv and duplicity. The mass problem (the discrepancy betweenM ev andM sp ) is also analysed, because some authors consider it as a possible evidence of early mixing, too. It is shown that the accurate data for components of binaries lead to the conclusion that the discrepancy is less than 30%. Such a difference can be removed at the expense of theM ev lowering, if the displacement of evolutionary tracks, owing to the rotationally induced mixing is taken into consideration.

  1. Sensitization of O 21Σ g+ → 1Δ g emission in solution, and observation of O 21Δ g → 3Σ g- chemiluminescence upon decomposition of 1,4-dimethylnaphthalene endoperoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Pi-Tai; Frei, Heinz

    1985-11-01

    O 2( 1Σ g+) has been detected in solution for the first time through observation of 1Σ g+ → 1Δ g emission at 1.93 μm. In a search for direct evidence of singlet molecular oxygen expelled upon decomposition of 1,4-dimethylnaphthalene endoperoxide, we found O 21Δ g → 3Σ g- chemiluminescence at 1.27 μm during thermolysis at room temperature and upon excitation of the S 2 excited state at 266 nm. No chemiluminescence was observed upon excitation of the S 1 state at 355 nm.

  2. ASCA observation of three bright early-type galaxies: NGC 4472, NGC 4406, and NGC 4636

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Awaki, Hisamitsu; Mushotzky, Richard; Tsuru, Takeshi; Fabian, Andrew C.; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Loewenstein, Michael; Makishima, Kazuo; Matsumoto, Hironori; Matsushita, Kyoko; Mihara, Tatehiro

    1994-01-01

    We report Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) 0.3-10 keV and X-ray observations of three early type galaxies, NGC 4472, NGC 4406, and NGC 4636. The extended mission in these galaxies is well described by thin thermal eimssion from hot gas. The gas temperature is 0.92 +/- 0.02 keV for NGC 4472, 0.79 +/- 0.01 keV for NGC 4406, and 0.73 +/- 0.02 keV for NGC 4636. The metal abundance for NGC 4472, NGC 4406, and NGC 4636 are, under the assumption of solar ratios, 0.63 +/- 0.15, 0.45 +/- 0.10, and 0.38 +/- 0.07, respectively. Detailed analysis has allowed determination of the abundances of oxygen, silicon, sulfur, and iron. The observed abundances are consistent with the solar ratios. For NGC 4472 and NGC 4406 we also determined the mean temperature of the gas producing the Si lines from the ratio of the Si H to He-like lines and find it to be consistent with the continuum temperature. The X-ray temperature is in good agreement with the observed optical velocity dispersion, stellar density profile, and gas density profile. Our data indicates that the supernova rate should be less than one fifth of the nominal rate in early type galaxies. We derive the mass of these systems within fixed angular scales and find that M/L greater than 40, confirming that elliptical galaxies are dark matter dominated at large radii.

  3. EARLY PHASE OBSERVATIONS OF EXTREMELY LUMINOUS TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA 2009dc

    SciTech Connect

    Yamanaka, M.; Arai, A.; Chiyonobu, S.; Fukazawa, Y.; Ikejiri, Y.; Itoh, R.; Komatsu, T.; Miyamoto, H.; Kawabata, K. S.; Kinugasa, K.; Hashimoto, O.; Honda, S.; Tanaka, M.; Imada, A.; Kuroda, D.; Maeda, K.; Nomoto, K.; Kamata, Y.; Kawai, N.; Konishi, K.

    2009-12-20

    We present early phase observations in optical and near-infrared wavelengths for the extremely luminous Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) 2009dc. The decline rate of the light curve is DELTAm{sub 15}(B) = 0.65 +- 0.03, which is one of the slowest among SNe Ia. The peak V-band absolute magnitude is estimated to be M{sub V} = -19.90 +- 0.15 mag if no host extinction is assumed. It reaches M{sub V} = -20.19 +- 0.19 mag if we assume the host extinction of A{sub V} = 0.29 mag. SN 2009dc belongs to the most luminous class of SNe Ia, like SNe 2003fg and 2006gz. Our JHK{sub s} -band photometry shows that this SN is also one of the most luminous SNe Ia in near-infrared wavelengths. We estimate the ejected {sup 56}Ni mass of 1.2 +- 0.3 M{sub sun} for the no host extinction case (and of 1.6 +- 0.4 M{sub sun} for the host extinction of A{sub V} = 0.29 mag). The C II lambda6580 absorption line remains visible until a week after the maximum brightness, in contrast to its early disappearance in SN 2006gz. The line velocity of Si II lambda6355 is about 8000 km s{sup -1} around the maximum, being considerably slower than that of SN 2006gz. The velocity of the C II line is similar to or slightly less than that of the Si II line around the maximum. The presence of the carbon line suggests that the thick unburned C+O layer remains after the explosion. Spectropolarimetric observations by Tanaka et al. indicate that the explosion is nearly spherical. These observational facts suggest that SN 2009dc is a super-Chandrasekhar mass SN Ia.

  4. VERY EARLY ULTRAVIOLET AND OPTICAL OBSERVATIONS OF THE TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA 2009ig

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, Ryan J.; Challis, P. J.; Marion, G. H.; Kirshner, R. P.; Filippenko, A. V.; Ganeshalingam, M.; Li, W.; Silverman, J. M.; Cenko, S. B.; Landsman, W.; Beaton, R. L.; Bennert, V. N.; Childress, M.; Guhathakurta, P.; Kalirai, J. S.; Stockton, A.; Tollerud, E. J.; Vinko, J.; Wheeler, J. C.; and others

    2012-01-01

    Supernova (SN) 2009ig was discovered 17 hr after explosion by the Lick Observatory Supernova Search, promptly classified as a normal Type Ia SN (SN Ia), peaked at V = 13.5 mag, and was equatorial, making it one of the foremost SNe for intensive study in the last decade. Here, we present ultraviolet (UV) and optical observations of SN 2009ig, starting about 1 day after explosion until around maximum brightness. Our data include excellent UV and optical light curves, 25 premaximum optical spectra, and 8 UV spectra, including the earliest UV spectrum ever obtained of an SN Ia. SN 2009ig is a relatively normal SN Ia, but does display high-velocity ejecta-the ejecta velocity measured in our earliest spectra (v Almost-Equal-To -23, 000 km s{sup -1} for Si II {lambda}6355) is the highest yet measured in an SN Ia. The spectral evolution is very dramatic at times earlier than 12 days before maximum brightness, but slows after that time. The early-time data provide a precise measurement of 17.13 {+-} 0.07 days for the SN rise time. The optical color curves and early-time spectra are significantly different from template light curves and spectra used for light-curve fitting and K-corrections, indicating that the template light curves and spectra do not properly represent all SNe Ia at very early times. In the age of wide-angle sky surveys, SNe like SN 2009ig that are nearby, bright, well positioned, and promptly discovered will still be rare. As shown with SN 2009ig, detailed studies of single events can provide significantly more information for testing systematic uncertainties related to SN Ia distance estimates and constraining progenitor and explosion models than large samples of more distant SNe.

  5. Early Observations with the Rosetta/MIRO Instrument at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulkis, Samuel

    2015-04-01

    The MIRO (Microwave Instrument on the Rosetta Orbiter) is a dual frequency (560 GHz and 190 GHz) heterodyne instrument consisting of two broadband channels (one in each frequency band) for continuum measurements, and a very high spectral resolution (44 kHz, 4096 channels) spectrometer interfaced with the submillimeter radiometer. Broad scientific objectives are to understand heat transport and ice sublimation in comets as interrelated processes reflecting properties acquired at time of formation and subsequent evolution and to understand important processes in the coma. The spectroscopic receiver is fixed tuned to measure simultaneously 8 molecular transitions of water, carbon monoxide, ammonia, and methanol. The continuum channels probe the nucleus sub-surface temperatures; the spectrometer channels are sensitive to gas abundance, velocity, and temperature. This paper will present an overview of the MIRO instrument, status of observations, and early results. Early results include detection and monitoring of water vapor in the coma, measurements of water gas production rates and their temporal and spatial variability, and measurements of subsurface temperatures and temperature gradients in the nucleus at depths of a few centimeters. The authors acknowledge funding support from NASA, CNES and CNRS/INSU, National Central University, and SNSB (Sweden). A part of this work was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. We thank the operational support teams from the ESA Rosetta Mission.

  6. Watching Teachers Work: Using Observation Tools to Promote Effective Teaching in the Early Years and Early Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guernsey, Lisa; Ochshorn, Susan

    2011-01-01

    This paper paints a picture of the dismal state of early education for many children--especially the disadvantaged--who are rarely given access to the kinds of stimulating, content-rich conversations that provide them with the cognitive and social-emotional skills they need to succeed throughout their years in school. With many states currently…

  7. Modelling multiwavelength observational characteristics of bow shocks from runaway early-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acreman, David M.; Stevens, Ian R.; Harries, Tim J.

    2016-02-01

    We assess the multiwavelength observable properties of the bow shock around a runaway early-type star using a combination of hydrodynamical modelling, radiative transfer calculations and synthetic imaging. Instabilities associated with the forward shock produce dense knots of material which are warm, ionized and contain dust. These knots of material are responsible for the majority of emission at far infrared, H ? and radio wavelengths. The large-scale bow shock morphology is very similar and differences are primarily due to variations in the assumed spatial resolution. However infrared intensity slices (at 22 microns and 12 microns) show that the effects of a temperature gradient can be resolved at a realistic spatial resolution for an object at a distance of 1 kpc.

  8. Lightning Sensing from Space: Early Observations to the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, H.

    2010-12-01

    Lightning was serendipitously detected by some of the earliest space-based sensors. Small instruments of opportunity such as the Piggy Back Experiment followed these early observations. In 1980, NASA began a serious study on the possibility for observing lightning from geostationary orbit. An U-2 aircraft was instrumented with optical and electric field sensors and flown over the tops of thunderstorms. This early work quantified the characteristics of the lightning optical emissions radiating from cloud tops and lead to the selection of the 774 nm oxygen emission line (originally identified by Leon Salanave) as the line of choice for space-based lightning observations. The U-2 results provided the basis for the Optical Transient Detector (OTD) and the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) designs. The OTD and LIS were the first pixilated lightning sensors to be flown in space, an approach that enabled high detection efficiency for both cloud and ground flashes and good spatial resolution. OTD and LIS data provided the first detailed view of the global distribution of lightning activity, an accurate estimate of the global flash rate, helped quantify the global relationship between ice flux and flash rates, provided a lightning climatology over a continuous 15 year interval and made numerous other contributions. In addition, OTD and LIS data provided the detailed characterization of optical lightning emissions that been necessary for the effective design of geostationary-based lightning sensors. The low earth orbiting lightning data played an essential role in refining the conceptional design of the Lightning Mapper Sensor (LMS) and provided the basis for the detailed design of the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) which is scheduled to be launch on the GOES-R satellite. The GLM is being designed to detect 90% of all lightning flashes within its field of view with less than a 5% false alarm rate and a spatial resolution of 8 km. An analysis of how these performance goals can be achieved will be presented along with details of how lightning characteristics drove the instrument design.

  9. At the sources of the symbolization process. The psychoanalyst as an observer of early trauma.

    PubMed

    Torsti, M

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a psychoanalytic study of mothers and infants, concentrating on very early traumatization and its impact on the symbolization process. This can be traced in the analysis in the destruction of freedom of association and the symbolization process, leading to petrifications, somatizations, or acting out. A theory of the origin of the symbolization process is developed by observing the kinesthesia of traumatized infants. This approach, based on years of observation, offers a perspective on the landscape before representation, before the object has become represented. The theory takes account of forces from the area of the unconscious as described in "Beyond the Pleasure Principle" (Freud, 1920). A new view of the complexity and multi-dimensionality of the mind emerges from this study. The author tries to demonstrate that the mind is multi-dimensional and that our theory of the mind therefore needs the complexity of UCS/PRC/CS. If psychoanalytic theorizing is to remain faithful to the forms and movements of the associative mind, it should not be simplified into linear causalities, as it would be if we were concerned only with object representations. PMID:11338993

  10. In situ observations of soil minerals and organic matter in the early phases of prescribed fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavouras, Ilias G.; Nikolich, George; Etyemezian, Vic; Dubois, David W.; King, James; Shafer, David

    2012-06-01

    We examined the chemical composition of aerosol samples collected during a prescribed fire at a Great Basin Desert site in the context of samples collected from controlled combustion of vegetation clippings from the same site and resuspension of soil samples obtained prior to and after the burn event. We observed a distinct difference in the composition of organic carbon resuspended soil dust after the burn, reflecting changes caused by the heating of the soil. The relative abundances of minerals and organic carbon fractions in aerosols collected during the first period of the burn were identical to those measured in soil dust. For aerosol samples collected for the remaining two periods of the burn event, the profiles of both minerals and organic carbon matched quite well those observed for vegetation combustion. Reconstruction of aerosol samples collected during the burn event showed that vegetation combustion dominated emissions but mineral soil dust may account for about 10% of PM10emissions (reconstructed) during the early stages of the fire. A large fraction of emissions during the first two hours was also unaccounted mainly because of the insufficient conversion of organic carbon to organic mass. The abundance of heavier non-volatile organics in soil dust suggested the presence of humic/fulvic acids that exhibit higher OM-to-OC ratios and thus, account for a proportion of the unaccounted emissions. These findings indicated that soil dust may be released into the air during a fire event, probably due to the enhanced turbulent mixing near the burn front.

  11. Earth Observing System (EOS) Aqua Launch and Early Mission Attitude Support Experiences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tracewell, D.; Glickman, J.; Hashmall, J.; Natanson, G.; Sedlak, J.

    2003-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) Aqua satellite was successfully launched on May 4,2002. Aqua is the second in the series of EOS satellites. EOS is part of NASA s Earth Science Enterprise Program, whose goals are to advance the scientific understanding of the Earth system. Aqua is a three-axis stabilized, Earth-pointing spacecraft in a nearly circular, sun-synchronous orbit at an altitude of 705 km. The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Flight Dynamics attitude team supported all phases of the launch and early mission. This paper presents the main results and lessons learned during this period, including: real-time attitude mode transition support, sensor calibration, onboard computer attitude validation, response to spacecraft emergencies, postlaunch attitude analyses, and anomaly resolution. In particular, Flight Dynamics support proved to be invaluable for successful Earth acquisition, fine-point mode transition, and recognition and correction of several anomalies, including support for the resolution of problems observed with the MODIS instrument.

  12. Early and Efficient Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Sputum by Microscopic Observation of Broth Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Kidenya, Benson R.; Kabangila, Rodrick; Peck, Robert N.; Mshana, Stephen E.; Webster, Lauren E.; Koenig, Serena P.; Johnson, Warren D.; Fitzgerald, Daniel W.

    2013-01-01

    Early, efficient and inexpensive methods for the detection of pulmonary tuberculosis are urgently needed for effective patient management as well as to interrupt transmission. These methods to detect M. tuberculosis in a timely and affordable way are not yet widely available in resource-limited settings. In a developing-country setting, we prospectively evaluated two methods for culturing and detecting M. tuberculosis in sputum. Sputum samples were cultured in liquid assay (micro broth culture) in microplate wells and growth was detected by microscopic observation, or in Löwenstein–Jensen (LJ) solid media where growth was detected by visual inspection for colonies. Sputum samples were collected from 321 tuberculosis (TB) suspects attending Bugando Medical Centre, in Mwanza, Tanzania, and were cultured in parallel. Pulmonary tuberculosis cases were diagnosed using the American Thoracic Society diagnostic standards. There were a total of 200 (62.3%) pulmonary tuberculosis cases. Liquid assay with microscopic detection detected a significantly higher proportion of cases than LJ solid culture: 89.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 84.7% to 93.3%) versus 77.0% (95% CI, 71.2% to 82.8%) (p = 0.0007). The median turn around time to diagnose tuberculosis was significantly shorter for micro broth culture than for the LJ solid culture, 9 days (interquartile range [IQR] 7–13), versus 21 days (IQR 14–28) (p<0.0001). The cost for micro broth culture (labor inclusive) in our study was US $4.56 per sample, versus US $11.35 per sample for the LJ solid culture. The liquid assay (micro broth culture) is an early, feasible, and inexpensive method for detection of pulmonary tuberculosis in resource limited settings. PMID:23469014

  13. Shock Breakout and Early Light Curves of Type II-P Supernovae Observed with Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnavich, Peter M.; Tucker, Bradley E.; Rest, Armin; Shaya, Edward J.; Olling, Robert; Kasen, Daniel; Villar, Victoria; KEGS

    2016-01-01

    We discovered two transient events in the Kepler field with light curves that strongly suggest they are type II-P supernovae. Using the fast cadence of the Kepler observations we precisely estimate the rise time to maximum for KSN2011a and KSN2011d as 10.5±0.4 and 13.3±0.4 rest-frame days respectively. We find the progenitor radius of KSN2011a (280±20 R⊙) to be significantly smaller than that for KSN2011d (490±20 R⊙) but both have similar explosion energies of 2.0±0.3 ×1051 erg.The rising light curve of KSN2011d is an excellent match to that predicted by simple models of exploding red supergiants (RSG). However, the early rise of KSN2011a is faster than the models predict possibly due to the supernova shockwave moving into pre-existing wind or mass-loss from the RSG. A mass loss rate of 10-4 M⊙ yr-1 from the RSG can explain the fast rise without impacting the optical flux at maximum light or the shape of the post-maximum light curve.No shock breakout emission is seen in KSN2011a, but this is likely due to the circumstellar interaction suspected in the fast rising light curve. The early light curve of KSN2011d does show excess emission consistent with model predictions of a shock breakout. This is the first optical detection of a shock breakout from a type II-P supernova.

  14. Shock Breakout and Early Light Curves of Type II-P Supernovae Observed with Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnavich, P. M.; Tucker, B. E.; Rest, A.; Shaya, E. J.; Olling, R. P.; Kasen, D.; Villar, A.

    2016-03-01

    We discovered two transient events in the Kepler field with light curves that strongly suggest they are type II-P supernovae (SNe II-P). Using the fast cadence of the Kepler observations we precisely estimate the rise time to maximum for KSN2011a and KSN2011d as 10.5 ± 0.4 and 13.3 ± 0.4 rest-frame days, respectively. Based on fits to idealized analytic models, we find the progenitor radius of KSN2011a (280 ± 20 R⊙) to be significantly smaller than that for KSN2011d (490 ± 20 R⊙), but both have similar explosion energies of 2.0 ± 0.3 × 1051 erg. The rising light curve of KSN2011d is an excellent match to that predicted by simple models of exploding red supergiants (RSG). However, the early rise of KSN2011a is faster than the models predict, possibly due to the supernova shock wave moving into pre-existing wind or mass-loss from the RSG. A mass-loss rate of 10-4M⊙ yr-1 from the RSG can explain the fast rise without impacting the optical flux at maximum light or the shape of the post-maximum light curve. No shock breakout emission is seen in KSN2011a, but this is likely due to the circumstellar interaction suspected in the fast rising light curve. The early light curve of KSN2011d does show excess emission consistent with model predictions of a shock breakout. This is the first optical detection of a shock breakout from a SNe II-P.

  15. NIRS0S: Observations of early-type galaxy secular evolution spanning the Sa/S0/disky-E boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki; Buta, Ronald; Knapen, Johan

    2015-03-01

    NIRS0S (Near-IR S0 galaxy Survey), is a K-band survey of ~ 200 early-type disk galaxies, mainly S0s, 2-3 mag deeper than the 2Micron All Sky Survey. In depth morphological analysis was done, in which multi-component structural decompositions played an important role. Possible implications to internal dynamical galaxy evolution were discussed. S0s were suggested to be former spirals in which star formation has ceased, forming a parallel sequence with spirals (see Fig. 1). If that evolution is faster among the brighter galaxies, the observed magnitude difference between the barred and non-barred S0s could be understood. Bars are suggested to play a critical role in such evolution. For example, the inner lenses in the bright non-barred S0s can be explained as former barlenses (inner parts of bars), in which the elongated bar component has dissolved. We suggest that the last destructive merger event happened at a fairly large redshift.

  16. Hubble's Early Release Observations Student Pilot Project: Implementing Formal and Informal Collaborations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenhamer, B.; Ryer, H.; McCallister, D.

    2012-08-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope's Early Release Observations (EROs) were revealed to the public on September 9, 2009, and K-12 students and educators in five states across the country were able to join the celebration. To date, students and educators in Maryland, Ohio, New York, California, and Florida have participated in the Hubble Space Telescope's ERO Pilot Project. This is an interdisciplinary project created by the Space Telecope Science Institute's (STScI) Office of Public Outreach in which students use skills from subject areas such as language arts, science, art, and technology to research the four ERO objects and create compositions. In recognition of their participation, the students' compositions are displayed at host institutions in each state (a museum, science center, school, planetarium or library) during a special public event for participating students, their families, and teachers. As part of its evaluation program, STScI's Office of Public Outreach has been conducting an evaluation of the project to determine the viability and potential of conducting large-scale, formal/informal collaborative projects in the future and to share lessons learned. Lessons learned will be applied to a new interdisciplinary project, the James Webb Space Telescope Student Innovation Project.

  17. Constraint on the early Universe by relic gravitational waves: From pulsar timing observations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Wen

    2011-05-15

    Recent pulsar timing observations by the Parkers Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) and European Pulsar Timing Array (EPTA) teams obtained the constraint on the relic gravitational waves at the frequency f{sub *}=1/yr, which provides the opportunity to constrain H{sub *}, the Hubble parameter, when these waves crossed the horizon during inflation. In this paper, we investigate this constraint by considering the general scenario for the early Universe: we assume that the effective (average) equation-of-state w before the big bang nucleosynthesis stage is a free parameter. In the standard hot big-bang scenario with w=1/3, we find that the current PPTA result follows a bound H{sub *{<=}}1.15x10{sup -1}m{sub Pl}, and the EPTA result follows H{sub *{<=}}6.92x10{sup -2}m{sub Pl}. We also find that these bounds become much tighter in the nonstandard scenarios with w>1/3. When w=1, the bounds become H{sub *{<=}}5.89x10{sup -3}m{sub Pl} for the current PPTA and H{sub *{<=}}3.39x10{sup -3}m{sub Pl} for the current EPTA. In contrast, in the nonstandard scenario with w=0, the bound becomes H{sub *{<=}}7.76m{sub Pl} for the current PPTA.

  18. Assessment of skeletal changes after post-mortem exposure to fire as an indicator of decomposition stage.

    PubMed

    Keough, N; L'Abbé, E N; Steyn, M; Pretorius, S

    2015-01-01

    Forensic anthropologists are tasked with interpreting the sequence of events from death to the discovery of a body. Burned bone often evokes questions as to the timing of burning events. The purpose of this study was to assess the progression of thermal damage on bones with advancement in decomposition. Twenty-five pigs in various stages of decomposition (fresh, early, advanced, early and late skeletonisation) were exposed to fire for 30 min. The scored heat-related features on bone included colour change (unaltered, charred, calcined), brown and heat borders, heat lines, delineation, greasy bone, joint shielding, predictable and minimal cracking, delamination and heat-induced fractures. Colour changes were scored according to a ranked percentage scale (0-3) and the remaining traits as absent or present (0/1). Kappa statistics was used to evaluate intra- and inter-observer error. Transition analysis was used to formulate probability mass functions [P(X=j|i)] to predict decomposition stage from the scored features of thermal destruction. Nine traits displayed potential to predict decomposition stage from burned remains. An increase in calcined and charred bone occurred synchronously with advancement of decomposition with subsequent decrease in unaltered surfaces. Greasy bone appeared more often in the early/fresh stages (fleshed bone). Heat borders, heat lines, delineation, joint shielding, predictable and minimal cracking are associated with advanced decomposition, when bone remains wet but lacks extensive soft tissue protection. Brown burn/borders, delamination and other heat-induced fractures are associated with early and late skeletonisation, showing that organic composition of bone and percentage of flesh present affect the manner in which it burns. No statistically significant difference was noted among observers for the majority of the traits, indicating that they can be scored reliably. Based on the data analysis, the pattern of heat-induced changes may assist in estimating decomposition stage from unknown, burned remains. PMID:25460103

  19. Erbium hydride decomposition kinetics.

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2006-11-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report are analyzed quantitatively using Redhead's method to yield kinetic parameters (E{sub A} {approx} 54.2 kcal/mol), which are then utilized to predict hydrogen outgassing in vacuum for a variety of thermal treatments. Interestingly, it was found that the activation energy for desorption can vary by more than 7 kcal/mol (0.30 eV) for seemingly similar samples. In addition, small amounts of less-stable hydrogen were observed for all erbium dihydride films. A detailed explanation of several approaches for analyzing thermal desorption spectra to obtain kinetic information is included as an appendix.

  20. An overview of the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) and its observations - New sky maps of the early universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smoot, George F.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the three instruments aboard NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite and presents early results obtained from the first six months of observations. The three instruments (FIRAS, DMR, and DIRBE) have operated well and produced significant new results. The FIRAS measurement of the CMB spectrum supports the standard Big Bang model. The maps made from the DMR instrument measurements show a spatially smooth early universe. The maps of galactic and zodiacal emission produced by the DIRBE instrument are needed to identify the foreground emissions from extragalactic and thus to interpret its and the other COBE results in terms of events in the early universe.

  1. Thermal decomposition products of butyraldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatten, Courtney D.; Kaskey, Kevin R.; Warner, Brian J.; Wright, Emily M.; McCunn, Laura R.

    2013-12-01

    The thermal decomposition of gas-phase butyraldehyde, CH3CH2CH2CHO, was studied in the 1300-1600 K range with a hyperthermal nozzle. Products were identified via matrix-isolation Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and photoionization mass spectrometry in separate experiments. There are at least six major initial reactions contributing to the decomposition of butyraldehyde: a radical decomposition channel leading to propyl radical + CO + H; molecular elimination to form H2 + ethylketene; a keto-enol tautomerism followed by elimination of H2O producing 1-butyne; an intramolecular hydrogen shift and elimination producing vinyl alcohol and ethylene, a β-C-C bond scission yielding ethyl and vinoxy radicals; and a γ-C-C bond scission yielding methyl and CH2CH2CHO radicals. The first three reactions are analogous to those observed in the thermal decomposition of acetaldehyde, but the latter three reactions are made possible by the longer alkyl chain structure of butyraldehyde. The products identified following thermal decomposition of butyraldehyde are CO, HCO, CH3CH2CH2, CH3CH2CH=C=O, H2O, CH3CH2C≡CH, CH2CH2, CH2=CHOH, CH2CHO, CH3, HC≡CH, CH2CCH, CH3C≡CH, CH3CH=CH2, H2C=C=O, CH3CH2CH3, CH2=CHCHO, C4H2, C4H4, and C4H8. The first ten products listed are direct products of the six reactions listed above. The remaining products can be attributed to further decomposition reactions or bimolecular reactions in the nozzle.

  2. Thermal decomposition products of butyraldehyde.

    PubMed

    Hatten, Courtney D; Kaskey, Kevin R; Warner, Brian J; Wright, Emily M; McCunn, Laura R

    2013-12-01

    The thermal decomposition of gas-phase butyraldehyde, CH3CH2CH2CHO, was studied in the 1300-1600 K range with a hyperthermal nozzle. Products were identified via matrix-isolation Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and photoionization mass spectrometry in separate experiments. There are at least six major initial reactions contributing to the decomposition of butyraldehyde: a radical decomposition channel leading to propyl radical + CO + H; molecular elimination to form H2 + ethylketene; a keto-enol tautomerism followed by elimination of H2O producing 1-butyne; an intramolecular hydrogen shift and elimination producing vinyl alcohol and ethylene, a ?-C-C bond scission yielding ethyl and vinoxy radicals; and a ?-C-C bond scission yielding methyl and CH2CH2CHO radicals. The first three reactions are analogous to those observed in the thermal decomposition of acetaldehyde, but the latter three reactions are made possible by the longer alkyl chain structure of butyraldehyde. The products identified following thermal decomposition of butyraldehyde are CO, HCO, CH3CH2CH2, CH3CH2CH=C=O, H2O, CH3CH2C?CH, CH2CH2, CH2=CHOH, CH2CHO, CH3, HC?CH, CH2CCH, CH3C?CH, CH3CH=CH2, H2C=C=O, CH3CH2CH3, CH2=CHCHO, C4H2, C4H4, and C4H8. The first ten products listed are direct products of the six reactions listed above. The remaining products can be attributed to further decomposition reactions or bimolecular reactions in the nozzle. PMID:24320376

  3. Variable Deformation Rates at Sierra Negra Volcano: Geodetic Observations from 2008 to Early 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, N. J.; La Femina, P. C.; Geirsson, H.; Ruiz, G.

    2014-12-01

    Sierra Negra is a basaltic shield volcano located at the southern end of Isabela Island, Galápagos Islands, Ecuador. The volcano, along with the rest of the Galápagos Islands, has formed by hotspot volcanism. The volcano has erupted twice over the last 35 years, producing VEI-3 eruptions in November 1979 and October 2005. Previous studies suggest that deformation is due to a flat-topped chamber or sill centered 1.9-2.2 km beneath the caldera (Amelung et al. 2000; Yun et al. 2006; Geist et al. 2007). Ten continuous Global Positioning System (cGPS) stations were installed within and on the rim of the caldera of Sierra Negra (i.e., sites GV01 - GV10) in 2002, 2006, and 2009 to track ongoing deformation. In addition, there is one cGPS site on the nearby (90 km) island of Santa Cruz (GLPS), where no recent volcanism has been observed. We analyzed the cGPS data for the period 2008 to 2014 using GIPSY-OASIS II and produced daily position time series for each site. We then estimated yearly velocities for each site assuming linear deformation. We subtract the velocity vector for site GLPS from all Sierra Negra cGPS sites to remove the motion of the Nazca plate. The resulting horizontal and vertical velocity fields indicate significant upward and outward displacement of the volcanic edifice, which we interpret as caused by the influx of new magma or magma chamber pressurization. There are significant yearly variations in both the direction and magnitude of station velocities. For the period covering 2008 to 2011 there is accelerating inflation. Maximum rates of deformation (mm/yr) are seen at GV07 in 2008 (87.02), GV09 in 2009 (161.18), and GV03 in 2010 (191.03). Inflation continues for the period 2011-2013, but at a slower rate. Maximum rates are seen at GV03 in 2011 (78.53) and GV06 in 2012 (22.44). The rate then increases again for the period covering mid-2013 through early 2014. Maximum rates are seen at GV06 in both 2013 (318.27) and early 2014 (308.53). The maximum vertical uplift rates (564.92) are seen at the sites closest to the center of the caldera, GV02 and GV04. A preliminary model for the influx of magma into the system during 2013 suggests 0.015 km3 and a source depth of 2.2 km.

  4. Increasing Accountability Measures for Early Childhood Teachers Using Evaluation Models: Observation, Feedback, and Self-Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinking, Anna Krummel

    2015-01-01

    President Barack Obama and U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan are promoting an early learning initiative focusing on the agenda of every four year old having equal access to high-quality early learning environments (Administration for Children and Families, 2013). One way the Federal government is supporting this proposal is through a grant;…

  5. On the utility of in situ soil moisture observations for flash drought early warning in Oklahoma, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Trent W.; McRoberts, D. Brent; Quiring, Steven M.; Hall, Ryann E.

    2015-11-01

    Drought early warning systems are a vital component of drought monitoring and require information at submonthly time scales because of the rapidly evolving nature of drought. This study evaluates the utility of in situ soil moisture observations for drought early warning in Oklahoma. Soil moisture was used to identify drought events, and the results were compared with the U.S. Drought Monitor with respect to the identification of drought onset. Soil moisture observations consistently identify rapid-onset (flash) drought events earlier than the U.S. Drought Monitor. Our results show that soil moisture percentiles provide a 2-3 week lead time over the U.S. Drought Monitor based on five flash drought events that occurred in Oklahoma between 2000 and 2013. We conclude that in situ soil moisture observations are an important source of information for early warning of flash drought events in the Oklahoma.

  6. Early results on 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko observed by Rosetta/OSIRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierks, H.; Tubiana, C.; Snodgrass, C.; Agarwal, J.; Güttler, C.; Oklay, N.; Vincent, J.; Küppers, M.; Barbieri, C.; Lamy, P.; Rickman, H.; Rodrigo, R.; Koschny, D.; Hviid, S.; Mottola, S.; Osiris Team

    2014-07-01

    67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67P) is the target comet of the ESA Rosetta mission. Launched in 2004, the Rosetta spacecraft woke up on the 20th of January 2014. After 36 months of deep space hibernation, Rosetta is now traveling to rendezvous with the comet at 4.1 au from the Sun, and it will follow 67P along its orbit, investigating how the comet changes and evolves while approaching the Sun. The Optical, Spectroscopic, and Infrared Remote Imaging System OSIRIS (Keller et al., 2007) is the scientific imaging system onboard Rosetta. It comprises the Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) with wavelength range 250--1000 nm and the Wide Angle Camera (WAC) with wavelength range 240--720 nm. The NAC (FOV = 2.20×2.22 deg) is a system with high spatial resolution that allows an initial detection of the nucleus, studies its structure and rotation from relatively great distances, investigates the mineralogy of the surface, and studies the dust ejection processes. The WAC has much lower spatial resolution but, accordingly, a much wider field of view (about 11.35×12.11 deg). This allows observations of the 3-dimensional flow field of dust and gas near the nucleus and, in addition, provides a synoptic view of the whole nucleus. In summary, the WAC would provide long-term monitoring of the entire nucleus from close distances, while the NAC studies the details. The two camera units have been designed as a complementary pair, which, on one hand, addresses the study of the nucleus surface, and on the other hand, investigates the dynamics of the sublimation process. After commissioning in March 2014, OSIRIS took first images of comet 67P and its dust environment. Ground-based observations performed in 2007/08 when 67P was in the same orbital arc as it will be in March/April 2014, show that the comet was already active at 4.3 au inbound and that its behavior was repetitive during the last three apparitions (Snodgrass et al. 2013). We therefore expect to detect early comet activity by OSIRIS in March/April 2014. At this time, Rosetta will be at about 4 million kilometers from the comet and 67P will still be unresolved. We present results about the early cometary activity based on OSIRIS images. Orange-filter images (central wavelength 649.2 nm) will be used to determine the dust environment of 67P, since this wavelength range is quite free from gas emission lines. Moreover, a series of lightcurves will be taken to compare with the existing ones and look for possible changes in the rotational period due to its last perihelion passage.

  7. Titan: Preliminary results on surface properties and photometry from VIMS observations of the early flybys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buratti, B.J.; Sotin, C.; Brown, R.H.; Hicks, M.D.; Clark, R.N.; Mosher, J.A.; McCord, T.B.; Jaumann, R.; Baines, K.H.; Nicholson, P.D.; Momary, T.; Simonelli, D.P.; Sicardy, B.

    2006-01-01

    Cassini observations of the surface of Titan offer unprecedented views of its surface through atmospheric windows in the 1-5 ??m region. Images obtained in windows for which the haze opacity is low can be used to derive quantitative photometric parameters such as albedo and albedo distribution, and physical properties such as roughness and particle characteristics. Images from the early Titan flybys, particularly T0, Ta, and T5 have been analyzed to create albedo maps in the 2.01 and 2.73 ??m windows. We find the average normal reflectance at these two wavelengths to be 0.15??0.02 and 0.035??0.003, respectively. Titan's surface is bifurcated into two albedo regimes, particularly at 2.01 ??m. Analysis of these two regimes to understand the physical character of the surface was accomplished with a macroscopic roughness model. We find that the two types of surface have substantially different roughness, with the low-albedo surface exhibiting mean slope angles of ???18??, and the high-albedo terrain having a much more substantial roughness with a mean slope angle of ???34??. A single-scattering phase function approximated by a one-term Henyey-Greenstein equation was also fit to each unit. Titan's surface is back-scattering (g???0.3-0.4), and does not exhibit substantially different backscattering behavior between the two terrains. Our results suggest that two distinct geophysical domains exist on Titan: a bright region cut by deep drainage channels and a relatively smooth surface. The two terrains are covered by a film or a coating of particles perhaps precipitated from the satellite's haze layer and transported by eolian processes. Our results are preliminary: more accurate values for the surface albedo and physical parameters will be derived as more data is gathered by the Cassini spacecraft and as a more complete radiative transfer model is developed from both Cassini orbiter and Huygens Lander measurements. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Use of 13C NMR and ftir for elucidation of degradation pathways during natural litter decomposition and composting I. early stage leaf degradation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wershaw, R. L.; Leenheer, J.A.; Kennedy, K.R.; Noyes, T.I.

    1996-01-01

    Oxidative degradation of plant tissue leads to the formation of natural dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and humus. Infrared (IR) and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry have been used to elucidate the chemical reactions of the early stages of degradation that give rise to DOC derived from litter and compost. The results of this study indicate that oxidation of the lignin components of plant tissue follows the sequence of O-demethylation, and hydroxylation followed by ring-fission, chain-shortening, and oxidative removal of substituents. Oxidative ring-fission leads to the formation of carboxylic acid groups on the cleaved ends of the rings and, in the process, transforms phenolic groups into aliphatic alcoholic groups. The carbohydrate components are broken down into aliphatic hydroxy acids and aliphatic alcohols.

  9. Newly observed several peroxides from the gas phase ozonolysis of isoprene using a flow tube reactor and the water vapor effect on their formation and decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, D.; Chen, Z.; Zhao, Y.

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, one has been paying more and more attention to the formation of hydrogen peroxide and organic peroxides in the oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) because peroxides play important roles, such as reservoir of OH, HO2 and RO2 radicals, intermediate of Criegee radical chemistry and contributor to secondary organic aerosol. However, to the best of our knowledge, in the reaction of ozone with VOCs, only several small peroxides such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide (HMHP), and methyl hydroperoxide (MHP) were separately identified, and their yields varied widely between different studies. Moreover, the information on the formation mechanism of peroxides in the ozonolysis of VOCs was mostly from a speculation rather than experimental evidence. Notably, a static chamber was employed in most of the previous studies, potentially resulting in the decomposition and heterogeneous reaction of peroxides on the chamber walls within an experiment time of tens of minutes to several hours, and possibly missing the details about the generation of peroxides. In the present study, we have used a flow quartz tube reactor to investigate the formation of peroxides in the ozonolysis of isoprene at various relative humidities (RH). A variety of peroxides have been detected on the tens of seconds of time scale using an online high performance liquid chromatography coupled with post-column derivatization using p-hydroxyphenylacetic acid and fluorescence detection. Our experimental results show that in addition to the three peroxides mentioned previously, more four ones, those are peroxyacetic acid (PAA) and three unknown peroxides, have been found. Furthermore, the total yield of the three small peroxides (H2O2, HMHP and MHP) is found to be similar to the result of literature; while for PAA and three unknown peroxides, they highlight a combined molar yield, for example, ~ 40% at 5% RH, much higher than that of the three small peroxides. Opposite to the previous conclusion that the peroxide yield would be positively correlated with RH, the yields of PAA and three unknown peroxides detected in the present study decreased with the RH increase. We tentatively assign these unknown peroxides to be hydroxyl hydroperoxides, which are produced by the reaction of different Criegee radicals with water. We used a box model coupled with the MCM v3.2 mechanism to simulate the reaction processes of the ozone-initiated oxidation of isoprene, adding the reaction between the gaseous water (and water dimer) and Criegee radicals and the decomposition of water-assisted hydroxyl hydroperoxides. We find that this modified mechanism would better explain the variation of peroxides with the RH increase, implying that molecular water and water cluster should be involved in the production and removal of peroxides in the future model.

  10. Training in early gastric cancer diagnosis improves the detection rate of early gastric cancer: an observational study in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Chen, Zhen-yu; Chen, Chu-di; Liu, Tao; Tang, Xiao-wei; Ren, Yu-tang; Huang, Si-lin; Cui, Xiao-bing; An, Sheng-li; Xiao, Bing; Bai, Yang; Liu, Si-de; Jiang, Bo; Zhi, Fa-chao; Gong, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have analyzed the training of endoscopists in the diagnosis of early gastric cancer (EGC). This study assessed whether specific training of endoscopists improves the detection rate of EGC. The rates of detection of EGC by endoscopists at the Digestive Endoscopy Center of the Affiliated Nanfang Hospital of China Southern Medical University between January 2013 and May 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. Because some endoscopists received training in the diagnosis of EGC, beginning in September 2013, the study was divided into 3 time periods: January to September 2013 (period 1), September 2013 to January 2014 (period 2), and January to May 2014 (period 3). The rates of EGC detection during these 3 periods were analyzed. From January 2013 to May 2014, a total of 25,314 gastroscopy examinations were performed at our center, with 48 of these examinations (0.2%) detecting EGCs, accounting for 12.1% (48/396) of the total number of gastric cancers detected. The EGC detection rates by trained endoscopists during periods 1, 2, and 3 were 0.3%, 0.6%, and 1.5%, respectively, accounting for 22.0%, 39.0%, and 60.0%, respectively, of the gastric cancers detected during these time periods. In comparison, the EGC detection rates by untrained endoscopists during periods 1, 2, and 3 were 0.05%, 0.08%, and 0.10%, respectively, accounting for 3.1%, 6.0%, and 5.7%, respectively, of the gastric cancers detected during these times. After training, the detection rate by some trained endoscopists markedly increased from 0.2% during period 1 to 2.3% during period 3. Further, the use of magnifying endoscopy with narrow-band imaging (M-NBI) (odds ratio = 3.1, 95% confidence interval 2.4-4.1, P < 0.001) contributed to the diagnosis of EGC. In conclusion, specific training could improve the endoscopic detection rate of EGC. M-NBI contributed to the diagnosis of EGC. PMID:25590840

  11. Highlights of early VIRTIS/ROSETTA observations: 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko seen from orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erard, Stéphane; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Filacchione, Gianricco; Arnold, Gabriele; Bockelee-Morvan, Dominique; Capria, Teresa; DeSanctis, Maria Cristina; Leyrat, Cédric; Tosi, Federico; Drossart, Pierre; Ciarniello, Mauro; Raponi, Andrea; Quirico, Eric; Schmitt, Bernard

    2015-08-01

    VIRTIS is the imaging spectrometer of the Rosetta mission, devoted to remote sensing studies of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (1). The instrument is made of a mapping channel covering the 0.3-5 μm range at moderate spectral resolution (VIRTIS-M), and of a cross-dispersion spectrometer covering the 2-5um range with resolution ~3000 (VIRTIS-H). The most recent results will be presented at the meeting; early ones are discussed here.The nucleus is observed from a wide range of illumination conditions and spatial resolution (down to 2.5 m). Albedo, spectral parameters, and compositional maps have been derived for areas out of the polar night. The nucleus surface appears to be extremely homogeneous and dark. The inferred normal albedo is 0.060 ± 0.003 at 0.55 μm (2), with distinct spectral slopes in the VIS and IR regions (5-25 and 1.5-5 % kÅ-1 respectively). The main spectral feature is a ubiquitous absorption in the 2.9-3.6 μm range, consistent with non-volatile organic macromolecular materials (2,3). The most likely absorbents include carboxylic groups, alcoholic OH, and possibly NH4+ ions. However, the low albedo and marked slope suggest a mixture with opaque minerals (e.g. sulfides) or Fe-Ni alloys in the refractory crust. Ice is so far marginally detected in areas just emerging from shadow (4).The surface temperature is measured on the dayside as a function of local time and heliocentric distance. A maximum of 220K has been derived, with fast variations controlled by low thermal inertia. This is consistent with a surface covered by a porous crust, mainly devoid of water ice (5,6).Water vapor and carbon dioxide have been observed in the coma and their variability with altitude, geographic location and heliocentric distance has been studied. CO2/H2O ratio averages to 3-7%, but both species display different distributions. This suggests either different source regions, or seasonal variability (7).1- Coradini et al, SSR, 20072- Capaccioni et al., Science, 20153- Quirico et al, LPSC 20154- De Sanctis et al, LPSC 20155- Tosi et al, LPSC 20156- Leyrat et al, EGU 20157- Bockelée-Morvan et al, this meeting

  12. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE WFC3 EARLY RELEASE SCIENCE: EMISSION-LINE GALAXIES FROM INFRARED GRISM OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Straughn, Amber N.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Kuntschner, Harald; Kuemmel, Martin; Walsh, Jeremy R.; Cohen, Seth H.; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James; O'Connell, Robert W.; Pirzkal, Norbert; Bond, Howard E.; Meurer, Gerhardt; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Hathi, Nimish P.; Balick, Bruce; Calzetti, Daniela; Disney, Michael J.; Dopita, Michael A.; Frogel, Jay A.

    2011-01-15

    We present grism spectra of emission-line galaxies (ELGs) from 0.6 to 1.6 {mu}m from the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope. These new infrared grism data augment previous optical Advanced Camera for Surveys G800L 0.6-0.95 {mu}m grism data in GOODS-South from the PEARS program, extending the wavelength coverage well past the G800L red cutoff. The Early Release Science (ERS) grism field was observed at a depth of two orbits per grism, yielding spectra of hundreds of faint objects, a subset of which is presented here. ELGs are studied via the H{alpha}, [O III], and [O II] emission lines detected in the redshift ranges 0.2 {approx}< z {approx}< 1.4, 1.2 {approx}< z {approx}< 2.2, and 2.0 {approx}< z {approx}< 3.3, respectively, in the G102 (0.8-1.1 {mu}m; R {approx_equal} 210) and G141 (1.1-1.6 {mu}m; R {approx_equal} 130) grisms. The higher spectral resolution afforded by the WFC3 grisms also reveals emission lines not detectable with the G800L grism (e.g., [S II] and [S III] lines). From these relatively shallow observations, line luminosities, star formation rates, and grism spectroscopic redshifts are determined for a total of 48 ELGs to m A{sub B(F098M)} {approx_equal} 25 mag. Seventeen GOODS-South galaxies that previously only had photometric redshifts now have new grism-spectroscopic redshifts, in some cases with large corrections to the photometric redshifts ({Delta}z {approx_equal} 0.3-0.5). Additionally, one galaxy had no previously measured redshift but now has a secure grism-spectroscopic redshift, for a total of 18 new GOODS-South spectroscopic redshifts. The faintest source in our sample has a magnitude m{sub AB(F098M)}= 26.9 mag. The ERS grism data also reflect the expected trend of lower specific star formation rates for the highest mass galaxies in the sample as a function of redshift, consistent with downsizing and discovered previously from large surveys. These results demonstrate the remarkable efficiency and capability of the WFC3 NIR grisms for measuring galaxy properties to faint magnitudes and redshifts to z {approx}> 2.

  13. Kinetics of spinodal decomposition in a critical polymer solution

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, K.; Kuwahara, N. )

    1992-08-10

    This paper reports that spinodal decomposition in a critical mixture of polydimethylsiloxane and diethyl carbonate was investigated by a time-resolved light-scattering technique in the time region of the early to the intermediate stage of phase separation. The exponential growth of the scattered light intensity without changing the wave number of its peak was observed, in good agreement with the linearized theory of Cahn-Hillard. The quench depth dependences of the interdiffusion coefficient and of the wave number corresponding to the most dominant fluctuation show the three-dimensional Ising-model behavior indicating the validity of the symmetric law of critical-point universality.

  14. Decomposition of Sodium Tetraphenylborate

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.J.

    1998-11-20

    The chemical decomposition of aqueous alkaline solutions of sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) has been investigated. The focus of the investigation is on the determination of additives and/or variables which influence NaTBP decomposition. This document describes work aimed at providing better understanding into the relationship of copper (II), solution temperature, and solution pH to NaTPB stability.

  15. Conflict Resolution and Children's Behaviour: Observing and Understanding Social and Cooperative Play in Early Years Educational Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadhead, Pat

    2009-01-01

    This paper draws from continuing research into the growth of sociability and cooperation in young children. It began in the mid-1980s and has continued periodically in a range of early years educational settings across the 3-6 age range. The research has underpinned the development of an observational tool. This tool--the Social Play Continuum or…

  16. Simulated NASA Satellite Data Products for the NOAA Integrated Coral Reef Observation Network/Coral Reef Early Warning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estep, Leland; Spruce, Joseph P.

    2007-01-01

    This RPC (Rapid Prototyping Capability) experiment will demonstrate the use of VIIRS (Visible/Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite) and LDCM (Landsat Data Continuity Mission) sensor data as significant input to the NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) ICON/ CREWS (Integrated Coral Reef Observation System/Coral Reef Early Warning System). The project affects the Coastal Management Program Element of the Applied Sciences Program.

  17. Parenting and the Family Check-Up: Changes in Observed Parent-Child Interaction Following Early Childhood Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Sitnick, Stephanie L.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Gill, Anne; Dishion, Thomas; Winter, Charlotte; Waller, Rebecca; Gardner, Frances; Wilson, Melvin

    2016-01-01

    Coercion theory posits a cyclical relationship between harsh and coercive parent–child interactions and problem behavior beginning in early childhood. As coercive interactions have been theorized and found to facilitate the development and growth of early conduct problems, early interventions often target parenting to prevent or reduce early disruptive problem behavior. This study utilizes direct observations of parent–child interactions from the Early Steps Multisite study (N = 731; 369 boys) to examine the effect of the Family Check-Up, a family-centered intervention program, on measures of parent–child positive engagement and coercion from age 2 through 5, as well as on childhood problem behavior at age 5. Results indicate that high levels of parent–child positive engagement were associated with less parent–child coercion the following year, but dyadic coercion was unrelated to future levels of positive engagement. In addition, families assigned to the Family Check-Up showed increased levels of positive engagement at ages 3 and 5, and the association between positive engagement at age 3 and child problem behavior at age 5 was mediated by reductions in parent–child coercion at age 4. These findings provide longitudinal confirmation that increasing positive engagement in parent–child interaction can reduce the likelihood of coercive family dynamics in early childhood and growth in problem behavior. PMID:25133754

  18. Small-scale early aggregation of green tide macroalgae observed on the Subei Bank, Yellow Sea.

    PubMed

    Hu, Song; Yang, Hong; Zhang, Jianheng; Chen, Changsheng; He, Peimin

    2014-04-15

    Massive green algae blooms became an environmental disaster in the Yellow Sea from 2008 to 2013. Recent studies suggested that recurrences of early aggregates of macroalgae were found over the Subei Bank, a unique shallow radial sand ridge system off the Jiangsu coast, China. Yearly field surveys have been carried out over this bank during the past five years (2009-2013), with an aim at identifying and qualifying the physical-biological mechanism for the early aggregation of algae. Data synthesis showed that early aggregation of macroalgae usually occurred from April-May as small-scale patches either over the intertidal mudflat of the Subei Bank or along local isobaths in the northern coastal area north of the bank. Both hydrographic and current measurements were performed by tracking a narrow patchy area of floating macroalgae (nearly 4 km in length and 5-10 m in width) on April 26, 2013, and the results showed that the algae aggregation was mainly caused by tide-induced convergence. This convergence was produced by the local geometrically controlled interaction of tidal currents with mudflats, which is believed to be a key physical mechanism for the early development of algal blooms in addition to marine ecosystem responses and human aquaculture activities. PMID:24569106

  19. Nucleon spin decomposition and orbital angular momentum in the nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakamatsu, Masashi

    2014-09-01

    To get a complete decomposition of nucleon spin is a fundamentally important homework of QCD. In fact, if our researches end up without accomplishing this task, a tremendous efforts since the 1st discovery of the nucleon spin crisis would end in the air. We now have a general agreement that there are at least two physically inequivalent gauge-invariant decompositions of the nucleon. In these two decompositions, the intrinsic spin parts of quarks and gluons are just common. What discriminate these two decompositions are the orbital angular momentum (OAM) parts. The OAMs of quarks and gluons appearing in the first decomposition are the so-called ``mechanical'' OAMs, while those appearing in the second decomposition are the generalized (gauge-invariant) ``canonical'' ones. By this reason, these decompositions are broadly called the ``mechanical'' and ``canonical'' decompositions of the nucleon spin. Still, there remains several issues, which have not reached a complete consensus among the experts. (See the latest recent). In the present talk, I will mainly concentrate on the practically most important issue, i.e. which decomposition is more favorable from the observational viewpoint. There are two often-claimed advantages of canonical decomposition. First, each piece of this decomposition satisfies the SU(2) commutation relation or angular momentum algebra. Second, the canonical OAM rather than the mechanical OAM is compatible with free partonic picture of constituent orbital motion. In the present talk, I will show that both these claims are not necessarily true, and push forward a viewpoint that the ``mechanical'' decomposition is more physical in that it has more direct connection with observables. I also emphasize that the nucleon spin decomposition accessed by the lattice QCD analyses is the ``mechanical'' decomposition not the ``canonical'' one. The recent lattice QCD studies of the nucleon spin decomposition are also briefly overviewed.

  20. Thermal Decomposition Mechanism of Butyraldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatten, Courtney D.; Warner, Brian; Wright, Emily; Kaskey, Kevin; McCunn, Laura R.

    2013-06-01

    The thermal decomposition of butyraldehyde, CH_3CH_2CH_2C(O)H, has been studied in a resistively heated SiC tubular reactor. Products of pyrolysis were identified via matrix-isolation FTIR spectroscopy and photoionization mass spectrometry in separate experiments. Carbon monoxide, ethene, acetylene, water and ethylketene were among the products detected. To unravel the mechanism of decomposition, pyrolysis of a partially deuterated sample of butyraldehyde was studied. Also, the concentration of butyraldehyde in the carrier gas was varied in experiments to determine the presence of bimolecular reactions. The results of these experiments can be compared to the dissociation pathways observed in similar aldehydes and are relevant to the processing of biomass, foods, and tobacco.

  1. On the Helmert-blocking technique: its acceleration by block Choleski decomposition and formulae to insert observations into an adjusted network

    PubMed Central

    Del Rio, Eduardo; Oliveira, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    The Helmert-blocking technique is a common approach to adjust large geodetic networks like Europeans and Brazilians. The technique is based upon a division of the network into partial networks called blocks. This way, the global network adjustment can be done by manipulating these blocks. Here we show alternatives to solve the block system that arises from the application of the technique. We show an alternative that optimizes its implementation as the elapsed processing time is decreased by about 33%. We also show that to insert observations into an adjusted network it is not necessary to readjust the whole network. We show the formulae to insert new observations into an adjusted network that are more efficient than simply readjusting the whole new network. PMID:26064634

  2. On the Helmert-blocking technique: its acceleration by block Choleski decomposition and formulae to insert observations into an adjusted network.

    PubMed

    Del Rio, Eduardo; Oliveira, Leonardo

    2015-04-01

    The Helmert-blocking technique is a common approach to adjust large geodetic networks like Europeans and Brazilians. The technique is based upon a division of the network into partial networks called blocks. This way, the global network adjustment can be done by manipulating these blocks. Here we show alternatives to solve the block system that arises from the application of the technique. We show an alternative that optimizes its implementation as the elapsed processing time is decreased by about 33%. We also show that to insert observations into an adjusted network it is not necessary to readjust the whole network. We show the formulae to insert new observations into an adjusted network that are more efficient than simply readjusting the whole new network. PMID:26064634

  3. An Observational Study on Early Empiric versus Culture-Directed Antifungal Therapy in Critically Ill with Intra-Abdominal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Winnie; Liew, Yixin; Chlebicki, Maciej Piotr; Ong, Sharon; Lee, Pang; Kwa, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To compare early empiric antifungal treatment with culture-directed treatment in critically ill patients with intra-abdominal sepsis. Methods. A prospective observational cohort study was conducted between August 2010 and July 2011, on SICU patients admitted after surgery for gastrointestinal perforation, bowel obstruction or ischemia, malignancy and anastomotic leakages. Patients who received antifungal treatment within two days of sepsis onset were compared to patients who received culture-directed antifungal treatment in terms of mortality rate and clinical improvement. Patients' demographics, comorbidities, severity-of-illness scores, and laboratory results were systematically collected and analysed. Results. Thirty-three patients received early empiric and 19 received culture-directed therapy. Of these, 30 from the early empiric group and 18 from culture-directed group were evaluable and analysed. Both groups had similar baseline characteristics and illness severity. Patients on empiric antifungal use had significantly lower 30-day mortality (P = 0.03) as well as shorter median time to clinical improvement (P = 0.025). Early empiric antifungal therapy was independently associated with survival beyond 30 days (OR 0.131, 95% CI: 0.018 to 0.966; P = 0.046). Conclusion. Early empiric antifungal therapy in surgical patients with intra-abdominal sepsis was associated with reduced mortality and warrants further evaluation in randomised controlled trials. PMID:24959349

  4. Nanoparticles in the brain: a potential therapeutic system targeted to an early defect observed in many neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Gunawardena, Shermali

    2013-10-01

    Currently, there are no effective treatments or cures for many neurodegenerative diseases affecting an aging baby-boomer generation. The ongoing problem with many of the current therapeutic treatments is that most are aimed at dissolving or dissociating aggregates and preventing cell death, common neuropathology often seen towards the end stage of disease. Often such treatments have secondary effects that are more devastating than the disease itself. Thus, effective therapeutics must be focused on directly targeting early events such that global deleterious effects of drugs are minimized while beneficial therapeutic effects are maximized. Recent work indicates that in many neurodegenerative diseases long distance axonal transport is perturbed, leading to axonal blockages. Axonal blockages are observed before pathological or behavioral phenotypes are seen indicating that this pathway is perturbed early in disease. Thus, developing novel therapeutic treatments to an early defect is critical in curing disease. Here I review neurodegenerative disease and current treatment strategies, and discuss a novel nanotechnology based approach that is aimed at targeting an early pathway, with the rationale that restoring an early problem will prevent deleterious downstream effects. To accomplish this, knowledge exchange between biologists, chemists, and engineers will be required to manufacture effective novel biomaterials for medical use. PMID:23625095

  5. Observations of two ``millimetre-only'' cores as candidates for early high-mass star-forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balnozan, Egon; Lo, Nadia; Jones, Paul; Cunningham, Maria; Hill, Tracey; Bronfman, Leonardo

    2013-04-01

    We wish to image at high spectral resolution two “millimetre-only” sources from a subset of 10 identified by Hill et al. (2005) in a 1.2-mm continuum survey. These very bright mm-only sources (also featuring strong NH3 emission) are believed to be excellent candidates for early-stage protostars (C2102-2009JULS) through their characteristic similarity to known massive star-forming sources, despite lacking typical features of massive star formation such as methanol masers and radio continuum. We present evidence of methanol emission in these sources from a recent spectral analysis, along with other molecular species indicative of very early-stage star-formation in cores featuring outflows but devoid of HII regions. High-resolution observations are critical in discriminating between maser and thermal methanol line emission mechanisms that can distinguish between early-stage massive star formation and lower-mass objects. These observations will allow us to quantify the frequency, spatial position and scale of molecular emission to further understanding of the chemistry that distinguishes between low and high-mass star formation, investigate the possible relation between mm-only radio sources and massive protostars, while also gathering data relevant to creating chemical timelines of their early evolution.

  6. Temporal dynamics of biotic and abiotic drivers of litter decomposition.

    PubMed

    García-Palacios, Pablo; Shaw, E Ashley; Wall, Diana H; Hättenschwiler, Stephan

    2016-05-01

    Climate, litter quality and decomposers drive litter decomposition. However, little is known about whether their relative contribution changes at different decomposition stages. To fill this gap, we evaluated the relative importance of leaf litter polyphenols, decomposer communities and soil moisture for litter C and N loss at different stages throughout the decomposition process. Although both microbial and nematode communities regulated litter C and N loss in the early decomposition stages, soil moisture and legacy effects of initial differences in litter quality played a major role in the late stages of the process. Our results provide strong evidence for substantial shifts in how biotic and abiotic factors control litter C and N dynamics during decomposition. Taking into account such temporal dynamics will increase the predictive power of decomposition models that are currently limited by a single-pool approach applying control variables uniformly to the entire decay process. PMID:26947573

  7. Early-time VLA Observations and Broadband Afterglow Analysis of the Fermi/LAT Detected GRB 130907A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veres, Péter; Corsi, Alessandra; Frail, Dale A.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Perley, Daniel A.

    2015-09-01

    We present multi-wavelength observations of the hyper-energetic gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130907A, a Swift-discovered burst with early radio observations starting at ≈4 hr after the γ-ray trigger. GRB 130907A was also detected by the Fermi/LAT instrument and at late times showed a strong spectral evolution in X-rays. We focus on the early-time radio observations, especially at >10 GHz, to attempt to identify reverse shock signatures. While our radio follow-up of GRB 130907A ranks among the earliest observations of a GRB with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array, we did not see an unambiguous signature of a reverse shock. While a model with both reverse and forward shock can correctly describe the observations, the data is not constraining enough to decide upon the presence of the reverse-shock component. We model the broadband data using a simple forward-shock synchrotron scenario with a transition from a wind environment to a constant density interstellar medium (ISM) in order to account for the observed features. Within the confines of this model, we also derive the underlying physical parameters of the fireball, which are within typical ranges except for the wind density parameter (A*), which is higher than those for bursts with wind-ISM transition, but typical for the general population of bursts. We note the importance of early-time radio observations of the afterglow (and of well-sampled light curves) for unambiguously identifying the potential contribution of the reverse shock.

  8. Thermal Decomposition of Nitropyrazoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragin, A.; Pivkina, Alla; Muravyev, N.; Monogarov, K.; Gryzlova, Olga; Shkineva, Tatyana; Dalinger, I.

    Fully nitrated five-membered heterocycles (pyrazoles), polynitropyrazoles in particular, have been actively studied as promising high-energy materials. Polynitropyrazoles have high density and high enthalpy of formation combined with reduced sensitivity to external stimuli. We have studied non-equilibrium processes of thermal decomposition of the first members of high-energy polynitropyrazoles row, i.e., 3,4-dinitropyrazole, 3,5-dinitropyrazole, and 3,4,5-trinitropyrazole, under atmospheric and increased pressures. The use of increased pressure allowed to reduce the influence of evaporation process of 3,5-dinitropyrazole and to determine the temperature and heat effect of its decomposition, which was found to exceed this value for HMX. For the first time evolved gas products were identified for each stage of decomposition. As a result the probable thermal decomposition pathway for the investigated materials was suggested.

  9. Orthogonal tensor decompositions

    SciTech Connect

    Tamara G. Kolda

    2000-03-01

    The authors explore the orthogonal decomposition of tensors (also known as multi-dimensional arrays or n-way arrays) using two different definitions of orthogonality. They present numerous examples to illustrate the difficulties in understanding such decompositions. They conclude with a counterexample to a tensor extension of the Eckart-Young SVD approximation theorem by Leibovici and Sabatier [Linear Algebra Appl. 269(1998):307--329].

  10. Using Videoconferencing Technology to Enhance Classroom Observation Methodology for the Instruction of Preservice Early Childhood Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickering, Lloyd E.; Walsh, Eamonn Joseph

    2011-01-01

    To learn about and become acclimated to the environment in which they someday plan to work, preservice teachers and pre-professional daycare providers are typically required to conduct onsite observations. Traditionally, these observations require that the pre-professional spend a required number of hours studying the dynamics of the real-world

  11. Systematic Observation of Early Adolescents in Educational Settings: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Anne; Mikami, Amori Yee

    2015-01-01

    The growing use of systematic, empirically tested observational frameworks in school-based research is crucial for increasing the replicability and generalizability of findings across settings. That said, observations are often mistakenly assumed to be the "gold standard" assessment, without more nuanced discussions about the best uses…

  12. Early-infantile galactosialidosis: Clinical, biochemical, and molecular observations in a new patient

    SciTech Connect

    Zammarchi, E.; Donati, M.A.; Morrone, A.

    1996-08-23

    Few patients with the early-infantile form of galactosialidosis have been described to date. Presented here is the first Italian case. Fetal hydrops was detected by ultrasound at week 24 of gestation. At birth, the infant presented with hypotonial, massive edema, a flattened coarse facies. telangiectasias, and hepatosplenomegaly, but no dysostosis multiplex. The patient died 72 days postpartum. Excessive sialyloligosaccharides in urine, as well as vacuolation of lymphocytes and eosinophilic granulocytes in peripheral blood, were indicative of a lysosomal storage disease. In the patient`s fibroblasts, both {alpha}-neuraminidase and {beta}-galactosidase activities were severely reduced, and cathepsin A activity was <1% of control levels, confirming the biochemical diagnosis of galactosialidosis. However, in contrast to previously reported early-infantile cases, a normal amount of protective protein/cathepsin A mRNA was detected on Northern blots. This mutant transcript was translated into a precursor protein that was not processed into the mature enzyme and lacked both protective and catalytic activities. 28 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Morphological Decomposition in Early Visual Word Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longtin, C.M.; Meunier, F.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we looked at priming effects produced by a short presentation (47ms) of morphologically complex pseudowords in French. In Experiment 1, we used as primes semantically interpretable pseudowords made of the grammatical combination of a root and a suffix, such as rapidifier ''to quickify.'' In Experiment 2, we used non-morphological

  14. Thermal decomposition mechanism of disilane.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kazumasa; Matsumoto, Keiji; Oguchi, Tatsuo; Tonokura, Kenichi; Koshi, Mitsuo

    2006-04-13

    Thermal decomposition of disilane was investigated using time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry coupled with vacuum ultraviolet single-photon ionization (VUV-SPI) at a temperature range of 675-740 K and total pressure of 20-40 Torr. Si(n)H(m) species were photoionized by VUV radiation at 10.5 eV (118 nm). Concentrations of disilane and trisilane during thermal decomposition of disilane were quantitatively measured using the VUV-SPI method. Formation of Si(2)H(4) species was also examined. On the basis of pressure-dependent rate constants of disilane dissociation reported by Matsumoto et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A 2005, 109, 4911], kinetic simulation including gas-phase and surface reactions was performed to analyze thermal decomposition mechanisms of disilane. The branching ratio for (R1) Si(2)H(6) --> SiH(4) + SiH(2)/(R2) Si(2)H(6) --> H(2) + H(3)SiSiH was derived by the pressure-dependent rate constants. Temperature and reaction time dependences of disilane loss and formation of trisilane were well represented by the kinetic simulation. Comparison between the experimental results and the kinetic simulation results suggested that about 70% of consumed disilane was converted to trisilane, which was observed as one of the main reaction products under the present experimental conditions. PMID:16599440

  15. Early Sixty-Day Observations of Nova Sagittarii 2015 No.2 Using a DSLR Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, S.

    2015-12-01

    Photometric observations of Nova Sagittarii 2015 No.2 were carried using a consumer grade DSLR camera. Observations have been made from the urban sky conditions for 60 days after the discovery. The brightness of the nova was monitored with reference to several nearby reference stars using Canon EOS 600D with CMOS sensor. Estimates were then transformed using a "median" B-V value of 0.28 into standard magnitude. Preliminary plot shows large variations, especially gradual rise and rapid falls.

  16. EXCESS OPTICAL ENHANCEMENT OBSERVED WITH ARCONS FOR EARLY CRAB GIANT PULSES

    SciTech Connect

    Strader, M. J.; Mazin, B. A.; Spiro Jaeger, G. V.; Gwinn, C. R.; Meeker, S. R.; Szypryt, P.; Van Eyken, J. C.; Marsden, D.; Walter, A. B.; Ulbricht, G.; Johnson, M. D.; O'Brien, K.; Stoughton, C.; Bumble, B.

    2013-12-10

    We observe an extraordinary link in the Crab pulsar between the enhancement of an optical pulse and the timing of the corresponding giant radio pulse. At optical through infrared wavelengths, our observations use the high time resolution of ARray Camera for Optical to Near-IR Spectrophotometry, a unique superconducting energy-resolving photon-counting array at the Palomar 200 inch telescope. At radio wavelengths, we observe with the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope and the Green Bank Ultimate Pulsar Processing Instrument backend. We see an 11.3% ± 2.5% increase in peak optical flux for pulses that have an accompanying giant radio pulse arriving near the peak of the optical main pulse, in contrast to a 3.2% ± 0.5% increase when an accompanying giant radio pulse arrives soon after the optical peak. We also observe that the peak of the optical main pulse is 2.8% ± 0.8% enhanced when there is a giant radio pulse accompanying the optical interpulse. We observe no statistically significant spectral differences between optical pulses accompanied by and not accompanied by giant radio pulses. Our results extend previous observations of optical-radio correlation to the time and spectral domains. Our refined temporal correlation suggests that optical and radio emission are indeed causally linked, and the lack of spectral differences suggests that the same mechanism is responsible for all optical emission.

  17. UIT Observations of Early-Type Galaxies and Analysis of the FUSE Spectrum of a Subdwarf B Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohl, Raymond G.; Krebs, Carolyn (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This work covers Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT) observations of early-type galaxies (155 nm) and Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) spectra of a Galactic subdwarf B star (sdB). Early UV space astronomy missions revealed that early-type galaxies harbor a population of stars with effective temperatures greater than that of the main sequence turn-off (about 6,000 K) and UV emission that is very sensitive to characteristics of the stellar population. We present UV (155 nm) surface photometry and UV-B color profiles for 8 E and SO galaxies observed by UIT. Some objects have de Vaucouleurs surface brightness profiles, while others have disk-like profiles, but we find no other evidence for the presence of a disk or young, massive stars. There is a wide range of UV-B color gradients, but there is no correlation with metallicity gradients. SdB stars are the leading candidate UV emitters in old, high metallicity stellar populations (e.g., early-type galaxies). We observed the Galactic sdB star PG0749+658 with FUSE and derived abundances with the aim of constraining models of the heavy element distribution in sdB atmospheres. All of the elements measured are depleted with respect to solar, except for Cr and Mn, which are about solar, and Ni, which is enhanced. This work was supported in part by NASA grants NAG5-700 and NAG5-6403 to the University of Virginia and NAS5-32985 to Johns Hopkins University.

  18. Early-time observations of gamma-ray burst error boxes with the Livermore optical transient imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, George Grant

    Approximately three times per day a bright flash of high energy radiation from the depths of the universe encounters the Earth. These gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) were discovered circa 1970 yet their origin remains a mystery. Traditional astronomical observations of GRBs are hindered by their transient nature. They have durations of only a few seconds and occur at random times from unpredictable directions. In recent years, precise GRB localizations and rapid coordinate dissemination have permitted sensitive follow-up observations. These observations resulted in the identification of long wavelength counterparts within distant galaxies. Despite the wealth of data now available the physical mechanism which produces these extremely energetic phenomena is still unknown. In the near future, simultaneous and early-time optical observations of GRBs will aid in constraining the theoretical models. The Livermore Optical Transient Imaging System (LOTIS) is an automated robotic wide field-of-view telescope dedicated to the search for prompt and early-time optical emission from GRBs. Since routine operations began in October 1996 LOTIS has responded to over 145 GRB triggers. LOTIS has not yet detected optical emission from a GRB but upper limits provided by the telescope constrain the theoretical emission mechanisms. Super-LOTIS, also a robotic wide field-of-view telescope, is 100 times more sensitive than LOTIS. Routine observations from Steward Observatory's Kitt Peak Station will begin in the immediate future. During engineering test runs Super-LOTIS obtained its first upper limit on the early-time optical afterglow of GRBs. An overview of the history and current state of GRBs is presented. Theoretical models are reviewed briefly. The LOTIS and Super-LOTIS hardware and operating procedures are discussed. A summary of the results from both LOTIS and Super-LOTIS and an interpretation of those results is presented. Plans for future studies with both systems are briefly stated.

  19. Anemia after gastrectomy for early gastric cancer: Long-term follow-up observational study

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chul-Hyun; Kim, Sang Woo; Kim, Won Chul; Kim, Jin Soo; Cho, Yu Kyung; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, In Seok; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Song, Kyo-Young; Jeon, Hae Myung; Park, Cho-Hyun

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To identify the incidence and etiology of anemia after gastrectomy in patients with long-term follow-up after gastrectomy for early gastric cancer. METHODS: The medical records of those patients with early gastric adenocarcinoma who underwent curative gastrectomy between January 2006 and October 2007 were reviewed. Patients with anemia in the preoperative workup, cancer recurrence, undergoing systemic chemotherapy, with other medical conditions that can cause anemia, or treated during follow up with red cell transfusions or supplements for anemia were excluded. Anemia was defined by World Health Organization criteria (Hb < 12 g/dL in women and < 13 g/dL in men). Iron deficiency was defined as serum ferritin < 20 μg/dL. Vitamin B12 deficiency was defined as serum vitamin B12 < 200 pg/mL. Iron deficiency anemia was defined as anemia with concomitant iron deficiency. Anemia from vitamin B12 deficiency was defined as megaloblastic anemia (mean cell volume > 100 fL) with vitamin B12 deficiency. The profile of anemia over 48 mo of follow-up was analyzed. RESULTS: One hundred sixty-one patients with gastrectomy for early gastric cancer were analyzed. The incidence of anemia was 24.5% at 3 mo after surgery and increased up to 37.1% at 48 mo after surgery. The incidence of iron deficiency anemia increased during the follow up and became the major cause of anemia at 48 mo after surgery. Anemia of chronic disease and megaloblastic anemia were uncommon. The incidence of anemia in female patients was significantly higher than in male patients at 12 (40.0% vs 22.0%, P = 0.033), 24 (45.0% vs 25.0%, P = 0.023), 36 (55.0% vs 28.0%, P = 0.004), and 48 mo (52.0% vs 31.0%, P = 0.022) after surgery. Patients with total gastrectomy showed significantly higher incidence of anemia than patients with subtotal gastrectomy at 48 mo after surgery (60.7% vs 31.3%, P = 0.008). The incidence of iron deficiency was significantly higher in female patients than in male patients at 6 (35.4% vs 13.3%, P = 0.002), 12 (45.8% vs 16.8%, P < 0.001), 18 (52.1% vs 22.3%, P < 0.001), 24 (60.4% vs 20.9%, P < 0.001), 36 (62.5% vs 29.2%, P < 0.001), and 48 mo (66.7% vs 34.7%, P = 0.001) after surgery. CONCLUSION: Anemia was frequent after gastrectomy for early gastric cancer, with iron deficiency being the major cause. Evaluation for anemia including iron status should be performed after gastrectomy and appropriate iron replacement should be considered. PMID:23155340

  20. TEST FUSION IN ADULT FORAMINIFERA: A REVIEW WITH NEW OBSERVATIONS OF AN EARLY EOCENE NUMMULITES SPECIMEN

    PubMed Central

    Ferràndez-Cañadell, Carles; Briguglio, Antonino; Hohenegger, Johann; Wöger, Julia

    2015-01-01

    In foraminifera, so-called “double tests” usually arise due to abnormal growth originating mainly from twinning, but may also be caused by irregularities in the early chambers and by regeneration after test injury that modifies the direction of growth. A fourth cause of double tests has only rarely been reported: the fusion of the tests of two adult individuals. We studied an early Eocene Nummulites double test consisting of two adult individuals that fused after an extended period of independent growth. The specimen was studied using computed tomography with micrometric resolution (micro-CT) that allowed bi- and three-dimensional visualization of the internal structure. Before fusion each individual test had 30–36 chambers, which, by comparison with growth rates in recent nummulitids, implies at least three months of independent growth. After fusion, the compound test grew in two spirals that fused after about one whorl and then continued in a single spiral. To fuse their tests, either adult individuals have to be forced to do so or the allorecognition (ability to distinguish between self and another individual) mechanisms must fail. A possible explanation for the merged Nummulites tests in this study is forced fusion in attached individuals after surviving ingestion and digestion by a metazoan. Alternatively, environmental stress could lead to a failure of allorecognition mechanisms and/or foraminiferal motility. Once fused, subsequent growth seems to be determined mainly by the relative orientation of individual tests. In any case, the frequency in which adult fusion occurs remains unknown. PMID:26166916

  1. Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory (uffo) for Observation of Early Photons from Gamma Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, I. H.; Ahmad, S.; Barrillon, P.; Brandt, S.; Budtz-Jorgensen, C.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Chen, P.; Choi, Y. J.; Connell, P.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Eyles, C.; Grossan, B.; Huang, M.-H. A.; Jung, A.; Jeong, S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. B.; Kim, S.-W.; Kim, Y. W.; Krasnov, A. S.; Lee1, J.; Lim, H.; Linder, E. V.; Liu, T.-C.; Lund, N.; Min, K. W.; Na, G. W.; Nam, J. W.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Ripa, J.; Reglero, V.; Rodrigo, J. M.; Smoot, G. F.; Suh, J. E.; Svertilov, S.; Vedenkin, N.; Wang, M.-Z.; Yashin, I.

    2013-12-01

    One of the least documented and understood aspects of gamma-ray bursts (GRB) is the rise phase of the optical light curve. The Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory (UFFO) is an effort to address this question through extraordinary opportunities presented by a series of space missions including a small spacecraft observatory. The UFFO is equipped with a fast-response Slewing Mirror Telescope (SMT) which uses rapidly moving mirror or mirror arrays to redirect the optical beam rather than slewing the entire spacecraft to aim the optical instrument at the GRB position. The UFFO will probe the early optical rise of GRBs with a sub-second response, for the first time, opening a completely new frontier in GRB and transient studies, the only GRB system which can point and measure on these time scales. Its fast response measurements of the optical emission of dozens of GRB each year will provide unique probes of the burst mechanism, shock breakouts in core-collapse supernovae, tidal disruptions around black holes, test Lorentz violation, be the electromagnetic counterpart to neutrino and gravitational wave signatures of the violent universe, and verify the prospect of GRB as a new standard candle potentially opening up the z>10 universe. As a first step, we employ a motorized slewing stage in SMT which can point to the event within 1s after X-ray trigger, in the UFFO-pathfinder payload onboard the Lomonosov satellite to be launched in 2012. The pathfinder was a small and limited, yet remarkably powerful micro-observatory for rapid optical response to bright gamma-ray bursts, the first part of our GRB and rapid-response long-term program. We describe the early photon science, the space mission of UFFO-pathfinder, and our plan for the next step.

  2. Timing and specificity of early changes in motor excitability during movement observation.

    PubMed

    Naish, Katherine R; Obhi, Sukhvinder S

    2015-06-01

    Motor resonance is typically considered a modulation of motor activity during action observation, which mirrors the pattern of muscle activation occurring during execution of the observed action. There is preliminary evidence that motor activity accompanying action observation comprises two stages: an initial non-specific modulation, followed by a later change in excitability that is specific to the muscles involved in the action. We built on this previous work, with the aims of (1) clarifying the time-course of muscle specificity during action observation and (2) establishing whether modulation at each time point reflects significant changes (facilitation or suppression) from baseline. Motor-evoked potentials were elicited in two muscles-the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM)-while participants watched stimuli showing index or little finger abduction. Our results provide partial support for previous findings of muscle-specific modulation after, but not before, 200 ms. Interestingly, however, this was shown only by facilitation of the FDI during index finger observation; there was no significant facilitation of the ADM when little finger movement was observed. Furthermore, we found no facilitation of corticospinal excitability (specific or non-specific) at time points earlier than 200 ms (100-150 ms). We discuss these results in the context of previous work showing a non-specific increase in excitability at 90 ms during action observation. Together, these findings suggest a fast and short-lived facilitation of corticospinal excitability that occurs at around 60-90 ms and ends by 100-150 ms. PMID:25788012

  3. Mid-Infrared Observational and Theoretical Studies of Star Formation and Early Solar Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Barbara

    1997-01-01

    The first 2 years of this program were used to make mid-IR observations of regions of star formation in the Orion nebula with the UCSD mid-IR camera at the UCSD/University of Minnesota telescope at Mt. Lemmon. These observations attempted to make the first systematic study of an extended region, known to have newly forming stars, and expected to have complex mid-IR emission. We discovered, to our surprise, that most of the thermal emission originated from extended sources rather than from point sources. This interesting observation made the analysis of the data much more complex, since the chop/nod procedures used at these wavelengths produce a differential measurement of the emission in one region compared to that in the adjacent region. Disentangling complex extended emission in such a situation is very difficult. In parallel with this work we were also observing comets in the thermal infrared, the other component of the original proposal. Some spectacular data on the comet Swift-Tuttle was acquired and published. A changing jet structure observed over a 2 week period is described. The rotation period of the comet can be measured at 66 hours. The size of the nucleus can also be estimated (at 30 km) from the observed excess flux from the nucleus. These data have lead to the development of models describing the action of dust particles of differing sizes and composition leaving the nucleus. The spatial distribution of the predicted IR emission has been compared to the observed jet structures, leading to estimates of both particles sizes, relative amounts of silicate vs organic grains, and the amounts of dust emitted in the jets vs isotopic emission.

  4. 2 to 20 micron observations of mass loss from early-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telesco, C. M.; Abbott, D. C.; Wolff, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    Values are derived for the infrared wind emission for 16 O, B, and A stars by comparing observed fluxes at K, L, M, N, and Q with photospheric model atmospheres. The infrared emission is strongly correlated with the emisison of the H-alpha recombination line, in agreement with models of thermal wind emission. The bulk of the wind material must be at a temperature which is near the stellar effective temperature. A combined analysis of the infrared data and previous radio observations shows that the velocity law varies dramatically from star to star. Any mass-loss rates derived from infrared data alone are therefore highly uncertain. For two stars, 9 Sgr and Cyg OB2 No. 9, the observed radio flux cannot be thermal emission from a stellar wind.

  5. The Observed State of the Water Cycle in the Early Twenty-First Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodell, M.; Beaudoing, H. K.; L'Ecuyer, T. S.; Olson, W. S.; Famiglietti, J. S.; Houser, P. R.; Adler, R.; Bosilovich, M. G.; Clayson, C. A.; Chambers, D.; Clark, E.; Fetzer, Eric J.; Gao, X.; Gu, G.; Hilburn, K.; Huffman, G. J.; Lettenmier, D. P.; Liu, W. T.; Robertson, F. R.; Schlosser, C. A.; Sheffield, J.; Wood, E. F.

    2015-01-01

    This study quantifies mean annual and monthly fluxes of Earth's water cycle over continents and ocean basins during the first decade of the millennium. To the extent possible, the flux estimates are based on satellite measurements first and data-integrating models second. A careful accounting of uncertainty in the estimates is included. It is applied within a routine that enforces multiple water and energy budget constraints simultaneously in a variational framework in order to produce objectively determined optimized flux estimates. In the majority of cases, the observed annual surface and atmospheric water budgets over the continents and oceans close with much less than 10% residual. Observed residuals and optimized uncertainty estimates are considerably larger for monthly surface and atmospheric water budget closure, often nearing or exceeding 20% in North America, Eurasia, Australia and neighboring islands, and the Arctic and South Atlantic Oceans. The residuals in South America and Africa tend to be smaller, possibly because cold land processes are negligible. Fluxes were poorly observed over the Arctic Ocean, certain seas, Antarctica, and the Australasian and Indonesian islands, leading to reliance on atmospheric analysis estimates. Many of the satellite systems that contributed data have been or will soon be lost or replaced. Models that integrate ground-based and remote observations will be critical for ameliorating gaps and discontinuities in the data records caused by these transitions. Continued development of such models is essential for maximizing the value of the observations. Next-generation observing systems are the best hope for significantly improving global water budget accounting.

  6. Early ALMA Science Verification Observations of Obscured Galaxy Formation at Redshift 4.7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagg, J.; Wiklind, T.; Carilli, C.; Espada, D.; Peck, A.; Riechers, D.; Walter, F.; Wootten, A.; Aravena, M.; Barkats, D.; Cortes, J.; Hills, R.; Hodge, J.; Impellizeri, V.; Iono, D.; Leroy, A.; Martin, S.; Rawlings, M.; Maiolino, R.; McMahon, R. G.; Scott, K. S.; Villard, E.; Vlahakis, C.

    2012-12-01

    Roughly half the star formation in the young Universe is thought to have been heavily obscured by dust and molecular gas. A new suite of facilities and experiments operating at submillimetre through to centimetre wavelengths is providing astronomers with the ability to study galaxies whose star formation and AGN activity would be partially invisible to optical telescopes. The most sensitive of these new instruments is ALMA. Even with only a subset of the final number of 12-metre antennas operational, the first ALMA observations are providing sensitive, unobscured images of the formation of massive galaxies. Observations of BR1202-0725 at z = 4.7 are described as an example.

  7. Observation of the prompt and early afterglow of GRB 050904 by TAROT

    SciTech Connect

    Boeer, M.; Damerdji, Y.; Atteia, J. L.; Stratta, G.; Gendre, B.

    2006-05-19

    We present the recent observation of the very high redshift burst source GRB 050904 made by the TAROT robotized telescope. We have compared our data with the SWIFT XRT light curve to analyze the broad ban spectrum. We show that the luminosity and the behavior of this event is comparable with that of GRB 990123, suggesting the existence of very bright events. They can be detected at very high redshifts, even with small or moderate aperture telescopes, and they may constitute a powerful means for the exploration of the young universe. An update of the last TAROT observations performed as a response from SWIFT alerts is made.

  8. Early Results on Energetic Particle Precipitation Observed by the ABOVE Instrument Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cully, C. M.; Chaddock, D.; Daniel, C.; Davis, E.; Galts, D.; McGuffin, N.; Quinn, C.; Sheldon, A.; Wilson, C.

    2014-12-01

    ABOVE, the Array for Broadband Observations of VLF/ELF Emissions, is a network of radio instruments located across western Canada. The instruments monitor natural and artificial electromagnetic radiation in the frequency range from 200 Hz to 75 kHz. The primary scientific focus is on energetic particle precipitation: we infer precipitation into the atmosphere based on the observed amplitude and phase of remotely transmitted artificial signals, and simultanesouly monitor natural whistler-mode waves (chorus and hiss) that drive the precipitation. Instrument deployment began during the summer of 2014. We report here on the instrument design and the first results.

  9. Adoption of an electronic observation chart with an integrated early warning scoring system on pilot wards: a descriptive report.

    PubMed

    Nwulu, Ugochi; Westwood, David; Edwards, Debby; Kelliher, Fiona; Coleman, Jamie J

    2012-07-01

    The charting of physiological variables in hospital inpatients allows for recognition and treatment of deteriorating patients. The use of electronic records to capture patients' vital signs is still in its infancy in the United Kingdom. The main objective of this article was to describe the adoption of an electronic observation charting function integrated into an established bedside e-prescribing record system on acute wards in a large English university hospital. This new function also has the capability of contacting Critical Care Outreach and clinical staff when patients deteriorate. Data captured over a 4-month period from the pilot wards showed that 80% of observation sets were completed sufficiently to produce early warning scores over the time period. A daily average of 419 Standardized Early Warning Score produced 74 alerts to clinical staff, and two critical alarms per day were e-mailed to the Outreach team. The wards showed different levels of completeness of observations (from 69% to 92%). Although a good overall rate of completeness of physiological data was found, traditional gaps in observation recording documented in the literature (eg, recording of respiratory rate) were still apparent. This system can be used for audit for targeted staff education and to evaluate the Critical Care Outreach service. PMID:22525045

  10. Moment tensor decompositions revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavryčuk, Václav

    2015-01-01

    The decomposition of moment tensors into isotropic (ISO), double-couple (DC) and compensated linear vector dipole (CLVD) components is a tool for classifying and physically interpreting seismic sources. Since an increasing quantity and quality of seismic data allow inverting for accurate moment tensors and interpreting details of the source process, an efficient and physically reasonable decomposition of moment and source tensors is necessary. In this paper, the most common moment tensor decompositions are revisited, new equivalent formulas of the decompositions are derived, suitable norms of the moment tensors are discussed and the properties of commonly used source-type plots are analysed. The Hudson skewed diamond plot is introduced in a much simpler way than originally proposed. It is shown that not only the Hudson plot but also the diamond CLVD-ISO plot and the Riedesel-Jordan plot conserve the uniform distribution probability of moment eigenvalues if the appropriate norm of moment tensors is applied. When analysing moment tensor uncertainties, no source-type plot is clearly preferable. Since the errors in the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the moment tensors cannot be easily separated, the moment tensor uncertainties project into the source-type plots in a complicated way. As a consequence, the moment tensors with the same uncertainties project into clusters of a different size. In case of an anisotropic focal area, the complexity of moment tensors of earthquakes prevents their direct interpretation, and the decomposition of moment tensors must be substituted by that of the source tensors.

  11. Observations of Nucleation and Early Stage Growth of Amorphous Silica on Carboxyl-Terminated Model Biosubstrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, A. F.; Dove, P. M.

    2005-12-01

    Over Earth history, organisms have developed the ability to control the nucleation and growth of a broad range of nanocrystalline and amorphous materials. The formation of amorphous biosilica is of particular interest because silicifiers sequester gigatons of silica annually, and suppress dissolved silica levels in the ocean to current low levels. The ecological success of marine diatoms, which are arguably the most important silicifiers, places them alongside marine calcifiers as major players in the sequestration of organic carbon. Thus, the biologically mediated formation of amorphous silica plays a key role in the global cycling of silicon and carbon. During controlled biomineralization, nucleation typically occurs in designated locations. There is a substantial body of evidence suggesting that macromolecules in the cellular environment determine these locations by acting as templates to provide energetically favorable sites for the onset of mineral and amorphous material nucleation. In diatoms, silica formation is likely initiated through heterogeneous nucleation on functional portions of macromolecules inside the Silica Deposition Vesicle (SDV). Previous studies of silica nucleation have implicated multiple chemical moieties associated with the constituent amino acids and sugars of polysaccharides, proteins, and glycoproteins as probable sites for in vivo surface nucleation and patterning. These investigations have usually employed complex macromolecules that exhibit multiple functionalities, and un-characterized solution compositions, thus rendering a quantitative analysis of kinetic and thermodynamic processes impossible. The objective of this research is to experimentally test kinetic and thermodynamic controls exercised by surface moieties on silica nucleation. Our experimental model system uses synthetic organic substrates designed to mimic key features of the interfacial regions between the surrounding cellular environment and the amorphous silica surface. While controlling solution chemistry, we can make in situ measurements of nucleation and early stage growth at these interfaces with Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Preliminary experiments show that at pH 4 to 7, and supersaturations of 0.76 to 1.45 (σ = ln([H4SiO4]/Ksp)), silica nucleates on carboxyl-terminated areas of the surface, that are less than 30 nm in diameter. The nuclei evolve during early stages of growth to spread over the surface into a sheet like form.

  12. The Early Development of Object Knowledge: A Study of Infants' Visual Anticipations during Action Observation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunnius, Sabine; Bekkering, Harold

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the developing object knowledge of infants through their visual anticipation of action targets during action observation. Infants (6, 8, 12, 14, and 16 months) and adults watched short movies of a person using 3 different everyday objects. Participants were presented with objects being brought either to a correct or to an…

  13. An Observational Study of Early Heterosexual Interaction at Middle School Dances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellegrini, Anthony D.; Long, Jeffery D.

    2007-01-01

    In this longitudinal, observational study of heterosexual interaction at middle school dances we examined the degree to which boys' and girls' groups became more gender integrated over time. The results show groups became more integrated over time with the pattern differing by gender. Boys had a relatively low level of contact with girls over the…

  14. Educative Experiences and Early Childhood Science Education: A Deweyan Perspective on Learning to Observe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howes, Elaine V.

    2008-01-01

    This paper is a report of work conducted at an urban elementary professional development school in the eastern US. John Dewey's explication of "educative experiences" is applied to describe curriculum involving small animals as a basis for teaching science inquiry processes, particularly the process of observation. The analysis is qualitative and…

  15. Observing Preschoolers' Social-Emotional Behavior: Structure, Foundations, and Prediction of Early School Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denham, Susanne A.; Bassett, Hideko Hamada; Thayer, Sara K.; Mincic, Melissa S.; Sirotkin, Yana S.; Zinsser, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    Social-emotional behavior of 352 3- and 4-year-olds attending private childcare and Head Start programs was observed using the Minnesota Preschool Affect Checklist, Revised (MPAC-R). Goals of the investigation included (a) using MPAC-R data to extract a shortened version, MPAC-R/S, comparing structure, internal consistency, test-retest…

  16. Copernicus observations of neutral helium lines in early-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufton, P. L.; McKeith, C. D.

    1980-01-01

    Observations of stellar ultraviolet He I lines at 2829, 2945, and 3187 A obtained with the Copernicus Satellite, are compared with LTE and non-LTE calculations. The stars observed cover the range of spectral types O8-B7 and luminosity Classes I-V and were chosen to have relatively low projected rotational velocities. The equivalent widths measured with the two near ultraviolet Copernicus spectrometers (VI and V2) are in satisfactory accord both with each other and with results obtained from balloon flights and the IUE satellite. The model atmosphere calculations use the 'complete linearization procedure' and are similar to those of Auer and Mihalas (1973) but with a different choice of atomic data. For stars of Class II-V the observations and non-LTE calculations for the 2829 and 2945 A lines are in satisfactory agreement but there is an unresolved discrepancy for the 3187 A line. For the Class I supergiants neither LTE nor non-LTE theory reproduces the observations, in common with that found previously for visible triplet lines. In an appendix LTE and non-LTE equivalent widths are tabulated for T-sub-eff = 15,000 to 27,500 K and log 0 = 3 and 4.

  17. Observation and Early Intervention in Mild Idiopathic Scoliosis via Corrective Exercises in Growing Children.

    PubMed

    Sy, Ng

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic scoliosis afflicts 2-3% of the population. For mild curvatures, observation is the treatment of choice. Though this passive "wait and see" approach has been used for many years, the practice is inconsistent among different countries. In Anglo-Saxon countries where scoliosis specific exercises are not practised, observation is indicated for curvatures below 25 in growing children and adolescents. In countries, such as France, Germany, Italy and Poland where scoliosis specific corrective exercises are employed, only patients with no signs of maturity and with curvatures below 15 are treated by observation. Patients with curvatures between 15 - 25 are treated by scoliosis specific exercises. In view of the unpredictability of the progression of scoliosis curvatures in immature patients and the lack of knowledge of long term biomechanical repercussions of mild idiopathic scoliosis on lumbar spine and lower extremities, it is proposed that active intervention through scoliosis specific exercises rather than passive observation be employed in the treatment of mild adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. PMID:26573164

  18. Observing Preschoolers' Social-Emotional Behavior: Structure, Foundations, and Prediction of Early School Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denham, Susanne A.; Bassett, Hideko Hamada; Thayer, Sara K.; Mincic, Melissa S.; Sirotkin, Yana S.; Zinsser, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    Social-emotional behavior of 352 3- and 4-year-olds attending private childcare and Head Start programs was observed using the Minnesota Preschool Affect Checklist, Revised (MPAC-R). Goals of the investigation included (a) using MPAC-R data to extract a shortened version, MPAC-R/S, comparing structure, internal consistency, test-retest

  19. Explicit Instructional Interactions: Observed Stability and Predictive Validity during Early Literacy and Beginning Mathematics Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doabler, Christian T.; Nelson-Walker, Nancy; Kosty, Derek; Baker, Scott K.; Smolkowski, Keith; Fien, Hank

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the authors conceptualize teaching episodes such as an integrated set of observable student-teacher interactions. Instructional interactions that take place between teachers and students around critical academic content are a defining characteristic of classroom instruction and a component carefully defined in many education…

  20. A Simplified Diagnostic Observational Assessment of Autism Spectrum Disorder in Early Childhood.

    PubMed

    Grodberg, David; Siper, Paige; Jamison, Jesslyn; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Kolevzon, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Subspecialty physicians who have expertise in the diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder typically do not have the resources to administer comprehensive diagnostic observational assessments for patients suspected of ASD. The autism mental status exam (AMSE) is a free and brief eight-item observation tool that addresses this practice gap. The AMSE, designed by Child and Adolescent Psychiatrists, Developmental Behavioral Pediatricians and Pediatric Neurologists structures the observation and documentation of signs and symptoms of ASD and yields a score. Excellent sensitivity and specificity was demonstrated in a population of high-risk adults. This protocol now investigates the AMSE's test performance in a population of 45 young children age 18 months to 5 years with suspected ASD or social and communication concerns who are evaluated at an autism research center. Each subject received a developmental evaluation, including the AMSE, performed by a Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist, that was followed by independent standardized assessment using the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule and the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised. A Best Estimate Diagnosis protocol used DSM-5 criteria to ascertain a diagnosis of ASD or non-ASD. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to determine the AMSE cut point with the highest sensitivity and specificity. Findings indicate an optimized sensitivity of 94% and a specificity of 100% for this high prevalence group. Because of its high classification accuracy in this sample of children the AMSE holds promise as a tool that can support both diagnostic decision making and standardize point of care observational assessment of ASD in high risk children. Autism Res 2016, 9: 443-449. © 2015 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26305145

  1. Integrating observation and statistical forecasts over sub-Saharan Africa to support Famine Early Warning

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Funk, C.; Verdin, J.P.; Husak, G.

    2007-01-01

    Famine early warning in Africa presents unique challenges and rewards. Hydrologic extremes must be tracked and anticipated over complex and changing climate regimes. The successful anticipation and interpretation of hydrologic shocks can initiate effective government response, saving lives and softening the impacts of droughts and floods. While both monitoring and forecast technologies continue to advance, discontinuities between monitoring and forecast systems inhibit effective decision making. Monitoring systems typically rely on high resolution satellite remote-sensed normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and rainfall imagery. Forecast systems provide information on a variety of scales and formats. Non-meteorologists are often unable or unwilling to connect the dots between these disparate sources of information. To mitigate these problem researchers at UCSB's Climate Hazard Group, NASA GIMMS and USGS/EROS are implementing a NASA-funded integrated decision support system that combines the monitoring of precipitation and NDVI with statistical one-to-three month forecasts. We present the monitoring/forecast system, assess its accuracy, and demonstrate its application in food insecure sub-Saharan Africa.

  2. Observations of the Early Evening Boundary-Layer Transition Using a Small Unmanned Aerial System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonin, Timothy; Chilson, Phillip; Zielke, Brett; Fedorovich, Evgeni

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of the lower portion of the planetary boundary layer is investigated using the Small Multifunction Research and Teaching Sonde (SMARTSonde), an unmanned aerial vehicle developed at the University of Oklahoma. The study focuses on the lowest 200 m of the atmosphere, where the most noticeable thermodynamic changes occur during the day. Between October 2010 and February 2011, a series of flights was conducted during the evening hours on several days to examine the vertical structure of the lower boundary layer. Data from a nearby Oklahoma Mesonet tower was used to supplement the vertical profiles of temperature, humidity, and pressure, which were collected approximately every 30 min, starting 2 h before sunset and continuing until dusk. From the profiles, sensible and latent heat fluxes were estimated. These fluxes were used to diagnose the portion of the boundary layer that was most affected by the early evening transition. During the transition period, a shallow cool and moist layer near the ground was formed, and as the evening progressed the cooling affected an increasingly shallower layer just above the surface.

  3. Copernicus observations of the N v resonance doublet in 53 early-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, D. C.; Bohlin, R. C.; Savage, B. D.

    1982-01-01

    UV spectra in the wavelength interval 1170-1270 A are presented for 53 early-type stars ranging in spectral type from O6.5 V to B2.5 IV. The sample includes four Wolf-Rayet stars, seven known Oe-Be stars, and six galactic halo OB stars. A qualitative analysis of the stellar N v doublet reveals that: (1) N v is present in all stars hotter and more luminous than type B0 for the main sequence, B1 for giants, and B2 for supergiants; (2) shell components of N v and an unidentified absorption feature at 1230 A are present in about half of the stars; (3) the column density of N v is well correlated with bolometric luminosity over the spectral range O6 to B2; and (4) the ratio of emission to absorption equivalent width is a factor of 2 smaller in the main sequence stars than in supergiants, which suggests that the wind structure changes as a star evolves. For several stars, this ratio is too small to be explained by traditional wind models.

  4. Early atherogenesis in White Carneau pigeons. II. Ultrastructural and cytochemical observations.

    PubMed Central

    Jerome, W. G.; Lewis, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    The addition of cholesterol (0.5%) to the diet of White Carneau pigeons induces site specific, temporally predictable, atherosclerotic lesions. The earliest lesions, which occurred after 3 weeks, were small (less than 2500 sq mu in surface area) and were composed primarily of macrophage foam cells (94% of lesion volume). With a prolonged time on the diet the lesions expanded due to increases in the number and size of foam cells, increases in the amount of extracellular space, and influx of smooth muscle cells. Macrophage foam cells in advanced lesions composed 61% of the lesion volume, smooth muscle cells 25%, and extracellular space 14%. Concurrent with the alteration in the constituency of the lesion, redistribution of lipid within foam cells was noted. Lipid in small lesions was primarily cytoplasmic (88%), with the remaining 12% in acid-phosphatase-positive secondary lysosomes. In more advanced lesions, 34% of the lipid was cytoplastic and 66% was lysosomal. The changes in large lesions appeared to be a function of lesion age, because at the growing edge of large lesions both composition and lipid distribution resembled those of small early lesions. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:3993740

  5. Patient demographics and treatment for early breast cancer: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Osborn, G D; Hodin, M; Drew, P J; Fielder, H; Vaughan-Williams, E; Sweetland, H M

    2006-06-01

    This study aims to examine relationships between demographic factors and treatment choice for early breast cancer (T2/N<1). Two hundred and two patients were offered modified radical mastectomy (MRM), breast conserving therapy (BCT) or MRM and reconstruction and interviewed at a University Hospital and oncology centre in South Wales. Median age at treatment was 57 (32-90) years. Seventy-one patients (35%) choose MRM, 10 (5%) MRM and reconstruction and 121 (60%) BCT. Median age of women choosing MRM was 61 and 55 for BC (P<0.0001). Single women (P=0.009) and those with no family history of breast cancer (P=0.02) were more likely to choose MRM. There was no difference between treatment choice and method of cancer detection and the age at which the patient left education (P=0.065). Mean histological tumour diameter was smaller for women choosing BC (15 mm) than for women choosing mastectomy (17 mm; P=0.014). There was no association between tumour grade and treatment choice. PMID:16169221

  6. In situ observations of nanoparticle early development kinetics at mineral-water interfaces.

    SciTech Connect

    Jun, Y. S.; Lee, B.; Waychunas, G. A.

    2010-10-08

    The early development of nanoparticles at mineral?water interfaces exerts crucial influences on the sequestration and transport of aqueous toxic species originating from both natural and anthropogenic sources. Homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation often occur simultaneously, making it difficult to sort out whether toxic species are transported as free species, sorbed on nanoparticle surfaces, or trapped between aggregated nanoparticles. Here, using a newly developed X-ray scattering setup, we show how homogeneous nucleation and growth can be quantitatively separated from heterogeneous processes under aqueous conditions in real-time. Under conditions found in acid-mine-drainage (at pH 3.6 and [Fe{sup 3+}] = 10{sup -4} M), heterogeneous nucleation of iron oxide nanoparticles on quartz dominated homogeneous nucleation by a factor of 192 (by particle volume). The smallest heterogeneously formed nanoparticles had radii of 1.7 {+-} 0.5 nm, significantly smaller than the size estimated using classical nucleation theory (CNT). Based on the data, the dominant nucleation and growth mechanisms of iron oxide nanoparticles depending on ionic strength were presented. Our findings have implications for the formation and transport of nanoparticles, and thus toxins, in both environmental and biological systems.

  7. Development of Ego-Resiliency: Relations to Observed Parenting and Polymorphisms in the Serotonin Transporter Gene During Early Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Zoe E.; Sulik, Michael J.; Eisenberg, Nancy; Spinrad, Tracy L.; Silva, Kassondra M.; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Stover, Daryn A.; Verrelli, Brian C.

    2013-01-01

    We used observed parenting behaviors, along with genetic variants and haplotypes of the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4), as predictors of children’s ego-resiliency during early childhood (N =153). Quality of mothers’ parenting was observed at 18 months of age and mothers’ reports of ego-resiliency were collected at six time points from 18 to 84 months. Genetic data were collected at 72 months. Observed parenting was positively associated with initial levels of children’s ego-resiliency. Furthermore, although individual genetic variants of the serotonin transporter gene (LPR, STin2) were not associated with ego-resiliency, the S10 haplotype (that combines information from these two variants) was negatively associated with initial levels of ego-resiliency. Both parenting and serotonin genetic variation uniquely predicted children’s ego-resiliency, suggesting an additive effect of genetic and parental factors. PMID:25346579

  8. Microscopic observations of the early development of Pleurotus pulmonarius fruit bodies.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Carmen; Moore, David; Díaz-Godínez, Gerardo

    2006-01-01

    From observations made by light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, environmental-scanning and cryoscanning electron microscopy we conclude that the expansion of the young fruit body of Pleurotus pulmonarius involves considerable vacuolation of hyphae but no marked inflation of cell dimensions. There is evidence for an extensive extracellular matrix (ECM), the components of which must be under the control of the hyphae which the ECM surrounds. However the ECM in these fruit bodies is a dilute material. It is easily lost during specimen preparation and is evident only when certain techniques are used to preserve the fluid surface of the hyphae. Observations of the hyphal and fruit body structures with a range of conventional microscopic techniques are crucial to complement the information obtained through physiological and molecular studies for understanding the cellular changes that occur during mushroom development. PMID:17256572

  9. High-resolution Observations of Molecular Gas in the Early-type Dwarf Galaxy NGC 404

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Christopher L.; Petitpas, Glen R.; del Rio, M. S.

    2015-06-01

    We present Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland Association CO (1-0) observations of the nearby dwarf elliptical galaxy NGC 404. The detected CO emission is concentrated in a small feature, slightly larger than the beam size, at the center of the optical galaxy. For an assumed CO-to-H2 conversion factor of 2.3 {{10}20} (K km s-1)-1, the molecular gas mass is 9.0 {{10}6} M?. The velocity field suggests rotation, with a position angle 90 different from previous single-dish observations. Both position angles are different from that of the extended H i distribution detected by del Ri et al. The lack of agreement between the postion angle of the CO velocity field and other position angles suggests an external origin for the central molecular gas clump in NGC 404.

  10. Decomposing Nekrasov decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, A.; Zenkevich, Y.

    2016-02-01

    AGT relations imply that the four-point conformal block admits a decomposition into a sum over pairs of Young diagrams of essentially rational Nekrasov functions — this is immediately seen when conformal block is represented in the form of a matrix model. However, the q-deformation of the same block has a deeper decomposition — into a sum over a quadruple of Young diagrams of a product of four topological vertices. We analyze the interplay between these two decompositions, their properties and their generalization to multi-point conformal blocks. In the latter case we explain how Dotsenko-Fateev all-with-all (star) pair "interaction" is reduced to the quiver model nearest-neighbor (chain) one. We give new identities for q-Selberg averages of pairs of generalized Macdonald polynomials. We also translate the slicing invariance of refined topological strings into the language of conformal blocks and interpret it as abelianization of generalized Macdonald polynomials.

  11. Early Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Observations of the Quasar 3C454.3

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A

    2009-05-07

    This is the first report of Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope observations of the quasar 3C 454.3, which has been undergoing pronounced long-term outbursts since 2000. The data from the Large Area Telescope (LAT), covering 2008 July 7-October 6, indicate strong, highly variable {gamma}-ray emission with an average flux of {approx} 3 x 10{sup -6} photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, for energies > 100 MeV. The {gamma}-ray flux is variable, with strong, distinct, symmetrically-shaped flares for which the flux increases by a factor of several on a time scale of about three days. This variability indicates a compact emission region, and the requirement that the source is optically thin to pair-production implies relativistic beaming with Doppler factor {delta} > 8, consistent with the values inferred from VLBI observations of superluminal expansion ({delta} {approx} 25). The observed {gamma}-ray spectrum is not consistent with a simple power-law, but instead steepens strongly above {approx} 2 GeV, and is well described by a broken power-law with photon indices of {approx} 2.3 and {approx} 3.5 below and above the break, respectively. This is the first direct observation of a break in the spectrum of a high luminosity blazar above 100 MeV, and it is likely direct evidence for an intrinsic break in the energy distribution of the radiating particles. Alternatively, the spectral softening above 2GeV could be due to -ray absorption via photonphoton pair production on the soft X-ray photon field of the host AGN, but such an interpretation would require the dissipation region to be located very close ({approx}< 100 gravitational radii) to the black hole, which would be inconsistent with the X-ray spectrum of the source.

  12. Recent increases in trifluoromethane (HFC-23) global emissions and early atmospheric changes observed for other hydrofluorocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montzka, S. A.; Miller, B. R.; Battle, M. O.; Aydin, K. M.; Fahey, D. W.; Hall, B. D.; Miller, L.; Verhulst, K. R.; Saltzman, E.; McFarland, M.

    2009-12-01

    Trifluoromethane (HFC-23) is an unintended by-product of chlorodifluoromethane (HCFC-22) production and has a 100-yr global warming potential of 14,800. Firn-air and ambient air measurements of HFC-23 from three firn sampling excursions to Antarctica between 2001 and 2009 are used to construct a consistent atmospheric history for this chemical in the Southern Hemisphere. The results show continued increases in the atmospheric abundance of HFC-23 and imply substantial increases in HFC-23 global emissions since 2003. These emission increases are coincident with rapidly increasing HCFC-22 production in developing countries and are observed despite efforts in recent years to limit emissions of HFC-23 through the Kyoto Protocol’s Clean Development Mechanism. These results will be considered along with new observations of additional HFCs from archived air, firn air, and ongoing flask-air measurements. Considered together, atmospheric increases observed for hydrochlorofluorocarbons and hydrofluorocarbons accounted for ~9% of the increase in total direct radiative forcing from anthropogenic gases during 2003-2008, an addition that was slightly larger than attributable to N2O over this same period.

  13. Optimal domain decomposition strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoon, Yonghyun; Soni, Bharat K.

    1995-01-01

    The primary interest of the authors is in the area of grid generation, in particular, optimal domain decomposition about realistic configurations. A grid generation procedure with optimal blocking strategies has been developed to generate multi-block grids for a circular-to-rectangular transition duct. The focus of this study is the domain decomposition which optimizes solution algorithm/block compatibility based on geometrical complexities as well as the physical characteristics of flow field. The progress realized in this study is summarized in this paper.

  14. Assimilating Doppler radar radial velocity and reflectivity observations in the weather research and forecasting model by a proper orthogonal-decomposition-based ensemble, three-dimensional variational assimilation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xiaoduo; Tian, Xiangjun; Li, Xin; Xie, Zhenghui; Shao, Aimei; Lu, Chunyan

    2012-09-01

    Doppler radar observations with high spatial and temporal resolution can effectively improve the description of small-scale structures in the initial condition and enhance the mesoscale and microscale model skills of numerical weather prediction (NWP). In this paper, Doppler radar radial velocity and reflectivity are simultaneously assimilated into a weather research and forecasting (WRF) model by a proper orthogonal-decomposition-based ensemble, three-dimensional variational assimilation method (referred to as PODEn3DVar), which therefore forms the PODEn3DVar-based radar assimilation system (referred to as WRF-PODEn3DVar). The main advantages of WRF-PODEn3DVar over the standard WRF-3DVar are that (1) the PODEn3DVar provides flow-dependent covariances through the evolving ensemble of short-range forecasts, and (2) the PODEn3DVar analysis can be obtained directly without an iterative process, which significantly simplifies the assimilation. Results from real data assimilation experiments with the WRF model show that WRF-PODEn3DVar simulation yields better rainfall forecasting than radar retrieval, and radar retrieval is better than the standard WRF-3DVar assimilation, probably because of the flow-dependence character embedded in the WRF-PODEn3DVar.

  15. Early Chromospheric Response During a Solar Microflare Observed with SOHO's CDS and RHESSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brosius, Jeffrey W.; Holman, Gordon D.

    2010-01-01

    We observed a solar microflare with RHESSI and SOHO's Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) on 2009 July 5. With CDS we obtained rapid cadence (7 s) stare spectra within a narrow field of view toward the center of AR 11024. The spectra contain emission lines from ions that cover a wide range of temperature, including He I (< 0.025 MK), O V (0.25 MK), Si XII (2 MK), and Fe XIX (8 MK). The start of a precursor burst of He I and O V line emission preceded the steady increase of Fe XIX line emission by about 1 minute, and the emergence of 3-12 keV X-ray emission by about 4 minutes. Thus the onset of the microflare was observed in upper chromospheric (He I) and transition region (O V) line emission before it was detected in high temperature flare plasma emission. Redshifted O V emission during the precursor suggests explosive chromospheric evaporation, but no corresponding blueshifts were found with either Fe XIX (which was very weak) or Si XII. Similarly, in subsequent microflare brightenings the O V and He I intensities increased (between 49 s and almost 2 minutes) before emissions from the hot flare plasma. Although these time differences likely indicate heating by a nonthermal particle beam, the RHESSI spectra provide no additional evidence for such a beam. In intervals lasting up to about 3 minutes during several bursts, the He I and O V emission line profiles showed secondary, highly blueshifted ( approximately 200 km/s) components; during intervals lasting nearly 1 minute the velocities of the primary and secondary components were oppositely directed. Combined with no corresponding blueshifts in either Fe XIX or Si XII, this indicates that explosive chromospheric evaporation occurred predominantly at either comparatively cool temperatures (< 2 MK) or within a hot temperature range to which our observations were not sensitive (e.g., between 2 and 8 MK).

  16. The accelerations of the earth and moon from early astronomical observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, P. M.; Stephenson, F. R.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation has compiled a very large amount of data on central or near central solar eclipses as recorded in four principal ancient sources (Greek and Roman classics, medieval European chronicles, Chinese annals and astronomical treatises, and Late Babylonian astronomical texts) and applied careful data selectivity criteria and statistical methods to obtain reliable dates, magnitudes, and places of observation of the events, and thereby made estimates of the earth acceleration and lunar acceleration. The basic conclusion is that the lunar acceleration and both tidal and nontidal earth accelerations have been essentially constant during the period from 1375 B.C. to the present.

  17. The early Earth Observing System reference handbook: Earth Science and Applications Division missions, 1990-1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Prior to the launch of the Earth Observing System (EOS) series, NASA will launch and operate a wide variety of new earth science satellites and instruments, as well as undertake several efforts collecting and using the data from existing and planned satellites from other agencies and nations. These initiatives will augment the knowledge base gained from ongoing Earth Science and Applications Division (ESAD) programs. This volume describes three sets of ESAD activities -- ongoing exploitation of operational satellite data, research missions with upcoming launches between now and the first launch of EOS, and candidate earth probes.

  18. Using Satellite Observation for Early Warning of Convective Storm in Tehran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owlad, E.

    2015-12-01

    Severe convective storms are responsible for large amount of damage each year around the world. They form an important part of the climate system by redistributing heat, moisture, and trace gases, as well as producing large quantities of precipitation. As these extreme and rare events are in mesoscale there is many uncertainty in predicting them and we can't rely on just models. On the other hand, remote sensing has a large application in Meteorology and near real time weather forecasting, especially in rare and extreme events like convective storms that might be difficult to predict with atmospheric models. On second of June 2014, near 12UTC a sudden and strong convective storm occurred in Tehran province that was not predicted, and caused economic and human losses. In This research we used satellite observations along with synoptic station measurements to predict and monitor this storm. Results from MODIS data show an increase in the amount of cloudiness and also aerosol optical depth and sudden decrease in cloud top temperature few hours before the storm occurs. EUMETSAT images show the governing of convection before the storm occurs. With combining the observation data that shows Lake of humidity and high temperature in low levels with satellite data that reveals instability in high levels that together caused this convective, we could track the storm and decrease the large amount of damage.

  19. Early stage intercalation of doxorubicin to DNA fragments observed in molecular dynamics binding simulations.

    PubMed

    Lei, Hongxing; Wang, Xiaofeng; Wu, Chun

    2012-09-01

    The intercalation mode between doxorubicin (an anticancer drug) and two 6-base-pair DNA model fragments (d(CGATCG)₂ and d(CGTACG)₂) has been well studied by X-ray crystallography and NMR experimental methods. Yet, the detailed intercalation pathway at molecular level remains elusive. In this study, we conducted molecular dynamics binding simulations of these two systems using AMBER DNA (parmbsc0) and drug (GAFF) force fields starting from the unbound state. We observed outside binding (minor groove binding or end-binding) in all six independent binding simulations (three for each DNA fragment), followed by the complete intercalation of a drug molecule in two simulations (one for each DNA fragment). First, our data directly supported that the minor groove binding is the dominant pre-intercalation step. Second, we observed that the opening and flipping of a local base pair (A3-T10 for d(CGATCG)₂ and C1-G12 for d(CGTACG)₂) in the two intercalation trajectories. This locally cooperative flipping-intercalation mechanism was different from the previously proposed rise-insertion mechanism by which the distance between two neighboring intact base pairs increases to create a space for the drug insertion. Third, our simulations provided the first set of data to support the applicability of the AMBER DNA and drug force fields in drug-DNA atomistic binding simulations. Implications on the kinetics pathway and drug action are also discussed. PMID:23079648

  20. A SOLAR CYCLE LOST IN 1793-1800: EARLY SUNSPOT OBSERVATIONS RESOLVE THE OLD MYSTERY

    SciTech Connect

    Usoskin, Ilya G.; Mursula, Kalevi; Arlt, Rainer; Kovaltsov, Gennady A.

    2009-08-01

    Because of the lack of reliable sunspot observations, the quality of the sunspot number series is poor in the late 18th century, leading to the abnormally long solar cycle (1784-1799) before the Dalton minimum. Using the newly recovered solar drawings by the 18-19th century observers Staudacher and Hamilton, we construct the solar butterfly diagram, i.e., the latitudinal distribution of sunspots in the 1790s. The sudden, systematic occurrence of sunspots at high solar latitudes in 1793-1796 unambiguously shows that a new cycle started in 1793, which was lost in the traditional Wolf sunspot series. This finally confirms the existence of the lost cycle that has been proposed earlier, thus resolving an old mystery. This Letter brings the attention of the scientific community to the need of revising the sunspot series in the 18th century. The presence of a new short, asymmetric cycle implies changes and constraints to sunspot cycle statistics, solar activity predictions, and solar dynamo theories, as well as for solar-terrestrial relations.

  1. BIMA Observations of Early Stages of High-Mass Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyrowski, Friedrich; Sridharan, T. K.; Menten, Karl M.; Schilke, Peter

    1999-10-01

    To systematically search for high mass protostars without any free-free emission, meaning that no UC HII has formed yet, we studied 70 candidate sources, selected according to their FIR radiation characteristics and their non-detection in Galaxy wide cm continuum surveys (Ramesh & Sridharan 1997), in the water vapor and ammonia lines with the 100 m and, in case of detections, with the 30 m telescope (Menten et al. 1999; Sridharan et al. 1999). This lead to the detection of several new water masers, ubiquitous outflow activity, and several new hot core sources as evident from bright CH3CN emission. As a follow up we started interferometric observations of selected sources using the BIMA array. Here we present observations of IRAS 18089-1732, a source at a distance of 3.6 kpc with about 4 x 104 solar luminosities derived from the IRAS fluxes. The massive core is seen in 3 mm dust continuum emission and is associated with compact (~ 0.03 pc) and hot (T ~ 100 K) strong line emission of CH3CN suggesting an enhancement and heating of this molecule through very recent evaporation of dust grains by a newly born high mass (proto) star.

  2. Observations of the Gas Reservoir around a Star-Forming Galaxy in the Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frye, Brenda L.; Bowen, David V.; Hurley, Mairead; Tripp, Todd M.; Fan, Xiaohui; Holden, Bradford; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Coe, Dan; Broadhurst, Tom; Egami, Eiichi; Meylan, G.

    2008-09-01

    We present a high signal-to-noise spectrum of a bright galaxy at z = 4.9 in 14 hr of integration on VLT FORS2. This galaxy is extremely bright, i850 = 23.10 +/- 0.01, and is strongly lensed by the foreground massive galaxy cluster A1689 (z = 0.18). Stellar continuum is seen longward of the Lyα emission line at ~7100 Å, while intergalactic H I produces strong absorption shortward of Lyα. Two transmission spikes at ~6800 and ~7040 Å are also visible, along with other structures at shorter wavelengths. Although this star-forming is galaxy fainter than a QSO, the absence of a strong central ultraviolet flux source in it enables a measurement of the H I flux transmission in the intergalactic medium (IGM) in the vicinity of a high-redshift object. We find that the effective H I optical depth of the IGM is remarkably high within a large 14 Mpc (physical) region surrounding the galaxy compared to that seen toward QSOs at similar redshifts. Evidently, this high-redshift galaxy is located in a region of space where the amount of H I is much larger than that seen at similar epochs in the diffuse IGM. We argue that observations of high-redshift galaxies like this one provide unique insights into the nascent stages of baryonic large-scale structures that evolve into the filamentary cosmic web of galaxies and clusters of galaxies observed in the current universe.

  3. High-resolution observations of tungsten liner collapse and early jet formation

    SciTech Connect

    Winer, K.A.; Breithaupt, R.D.; Muelder, S.A.; Baum, D.W.

    1996-07-01

    High-resolution photography of collapsing tungsten-lined shaped charges has revealed surface texturing both similar to and strikingly different from that previously observed during copper liner collapse. The behavior of three types of tungsten-lined shaped charges, with different liner designs and high explosives but with similar tungsten processing, were characterized by image-converter camera and fast- framing camera photography, and flash x-ray radiography. 120-mm- diameter, trumpet-shaped Octol charges produced surface blistering near the base of the tungsten liner, probably due to inhomogeneities near the liner-explosive interface resulting from cast loading. 148- mm-diameter, quasi-conical LX-14 charges produced smooth shocked- surface texture similar to that observed in conical, copper-lined LX- 14 (Viper) charges. 81-mm-diameter, conical LX-20 charges produced severe radial texturing throughout the collapsing tungsten liner, which transitioned to azimuthal banding on the jet surface. For each type of charge, obscuring debris from the tungsten jet tip prevented clear imaging of the jet surface at late time. 8 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Early observations on an emerging Great Lakes invader Hemimysis anomala in Lake Ontario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walsh, Maureen G.; Lantry, Brian F.; Boscarino, Brent; Bowen, Kelly; Gerlofsma, Jocelyn; Schaner, Ted; Back, Richard; Questel, Jennifer; Smythe, A. Garry; Cap, Roberta; Goehle, Michael; Young, Bryan; Chalupnicki, Marc; Johnson, James H.; McKenna, James E.

    2010-01-01

    Hemimysis anomala, a Ponto-Caspian littoral mysid, is an emerging Great Lakes invader that was discovered in Lakes Michigan and Ontario in 2006. Similar to the native mysid Mysis diluviana, Hemimysis exhibits a diel vertical migration pattern but generally inhabits shallower and warmer waters than M. diluviana. Because basic information on the distribution, habitat use, and biology of Hemimysis in the Great Lakes is scarce, the potential for food web disruption by Hemimysis cannot easily be predicted. Preliminary observations indicate widespread invasion of Hemimysis in Lake Ontario. In this study, we confirm the presence of Hemimysis at sites spanning the northern and southern shores of Lake Ontario and the presence of the individuals during winter months. In one horizontal tow in November 2007, over 26,000 individuals were collected with a length range of 4.4 to 9.0. mm and an average caloric density of 611. cal/g wet weight. The most effective methods for sampling Hemimysis were horizontal tows with either a zooplankton net in the water column or a benthic sled near the lake bottom. Although more quantitative data on the life history and distribution of this species is necessary, our preliminary observations support the prediction that the potential for Hemimysis to impact the nearshore food web in Lake Ontario appears high.

  5. Looking Into the Fireball: ROTSE-III and Swift Observations of Early Gamma-ray Burst Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rykoff, E. S.; Aharonian, F.; Akerlof, C. W.; Ashley, M. C. B.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Flewelling, H. A.; Gehrels, N.; G??, E.; Gver, T.; Kizilo?lu, .; Krimm, H. A.; McKay, T. A.; zel, M.; Phillips, A.; Quimby, R. M.; Rowell, G.; Rujopakarn, W.; Schaefer, B. E.; Smith, D. A.; Vestrand, W. T.; Wheeler, J. C.; Wren, J.; Yuan, F.; Yost, S. A.

    2009-09-01

    We report on a complete set of early optical afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) obtained with the Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment (ROTSE-III) telescope network from 2005 March through 2007 June. This set is comprised of 12 afterglows with early optical and Swift/X-Ray Telescope observations, with a median ROTSE-III response time of 45 s after the start of ?-ray emission (8 s after the GCN notice time). These afterglows span 4 orders of magnitude in optical luminosity, and the contemporaneous X-ray detections allow multi-wavelength spectral analysis. Excluding X-ray flares, the broadband synchrotron spectra show that the optical and X-ray emission originate in a common region, consistent with predictions of the external forward shock in the fireball model. However, the fireball model is inadequate to predict the temporal decay indices of the early afterglows, even after accounting for possible long-duration continuous energy injection. We find that the optical afterglow is a clean tracer of the forward shock, and we use the peak time of the forward shock to estimate the initial bulk Lorentz factor of the GRB outflow, and find 100 lsim ?0 lsim 1000, consistent with expectations.

  6. Predicted and observed early effects of combined alpha and beta lung irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, B.R.; Hahn, F.F.; Snipes, M.B.; Newton, G.J.; Eidson, A.F.; Mauderly, J.L.; Boecker, B.B. )

    1990-12-01

    The nonstochastic radiobiological effects of combined alpha and beta irradiation of the lungs of rats from inhaled radionuclides were studied. Both respiratory functional morbidity at 18 mo and mortality from radiation pneumonitis within 18 mo after exposure were examined for rats exposed to the beta-emitter 147Pm, the alpha-emitter 238Pu, or both combined. The results were used to validate hazard-function models that were developed (1) for respiratory functional morbidity at 18 mo and (2) for lethality from radiation pneumonitis within 18 mo. Both models were found to adequately predict the experimental observations for chronic alpha plus beta irradiation of the lung. Based on this 18-mo study, a relative biological effectiveness of approximately seven was obtained for 238Pu alpha radiation compared to 147Pm beta radiation for both respiratory functional morbidity and lethality from radiation pneumonitis. However, the relative biological effectiveness for the alpha radiation is likely to increase with longer follow-up.

  7. EARLY OBSERVATIONS AND ANALYSIS OF THE TYPE Ia SN 2014J IN M82

    SciTech Connect

    Marion, G. H.; Vinkó, J.; Sand, D. J.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Banerjee, D. P. K.; Joshi, V.; Venkataraman, V.; Ashok, N. M.; Valenti, S.; Howell, D. A.; Stritzinger, M. D.; Amanullah, R.; Johansson, J.; Binzel, R. P.; Bochanski, J. J.; Bryngelson, G. L.; Burns, C. R.; Drozdov, D.; Fieber-Beyer, S. K.; Graham, M. L.; and others

    2015-01-01

    We present optical and near infrared (NIR) observations of the nearby Type Ia SN 2014J. Seventeen optical and 23 NIR spectra were obtained from 10 days before (–10d) to 10 days after (+10d) the time of maximum B-band brightness. The relative strengths of absorption features and their patterns of development can be compared at one day intervals throughout most of this period. Carbon is not detected in the optical spectra, but we identify C I λ1.0693 in the NIR spectra. Mg II lines with high oscillator strengths have higher initial velocities than other Mg II lines. We show that the velocity differences can be explained by differences in optical depths due to oscillator strengths. The spectra of SN 2014J show that it is a normal SN Ia, but many parameters are near the boundaries between normal and high-velocity subclasses. The velocities for O I, Mg II, Si II, S II, Ca II, and Fe II suggest that SN 2014J has a layered structure with little or no mixing. That result is consistent with the delayed detonation explosion models. We also report photometric observations, obtained from –10d to +29d, in the UBVRIJH and K{sub s} bands. The template fitting package SNooPy is used to interpret the light curves and to derive photometric parameters. Using R{sub V} = 1.46, which is consistent with previous studies, SNooPy finds that A{sub V} = 1.80 for E(B – V){sub host} = 1.23 ± 0.06 mag. The maximum B-band brightness of –19.19 ± 0.10 mag was reached on February 1.74 UT ± 0.13 days and the supernova has a decline parameter, Δm {sub 15}, of 1.12 ± 0.02 mag.

  8. HST WFC3 Early Release Science: Emission-Line Galaxies from IR Grism Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straughn, A. N.; Kuntschner, H.; Kuemmel, M.; Walsh, J. R.; Cohen, S. H.; Gardner, J. P.; Windhorst, R. A.; O'Connell, R. W.; Pirzkal, N.; Meurer, G.; McCarthy, P. J.; Hathi, N. P.; Malhotra, S.; Rhoads, J.; Balick, B.; Bond, H. E.; Calzetti, D.; Disney, M. J.; Dopita, M. A.; Frogel, J. A.; Hall, D. N. B.; Holtzman, J. A.; Kimlbe, R. A.; Trauger, J. T.; Young, E. T.

    2010-01-01

    We present grism spectra of emission line galaxies (ELGs) from 0.6-1.6 microns from the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). These new infrared grism data augment previous optical Advanced Camera for Surveys G800L (0.6-0.95 micron) grism data in GOODS South, extending the wavelength coverage well past the G800L red cutoff. The ERS grism field was observed at a depth of 2 orbits per grism, yielding spectra of hundreds of faint objects, a subset of which are presented here. ELGs are studied via the Ha, [O III ], and [OII] emission lines detected in the redshift ranges 0.2 less than or equal to z less than or equal to 1.6, 1.2 less than or equal to z less than or equal to 2.4 and 2.0 less than or equal to z less than or equal to 3.6 respectively in the G102 (0.8-1.1 microns; R approximately 210) and C141 (1.1-1.6 microns; R approximately 130) grisms. The higher spectral resolution afforded by the WFC3 grisms also reveals emission lines not detectable with the G800L grism (e.g., [S II] and [S III] lines). From these relatively shallow observations, line luminosities, star formation rates, and grism spectroscopic redshifts are determined for a total of 25 ELGs to M(sub AB)(F098M) approximately 25 mag. The faintest source in our sample with a strong but unidentified emission line--is MAB(F098M)=26.9 mag. We also detect the expected trend of lower specific star formation rates for the highest mass galaxies in the sample, indicative of downsizing and discovered previously from large surveys. These results demonstrate the remarkable efficiency and capability of the WFC3 NIR grisms for measuring galaxy properties to faint magnitudes.

  9. Early Observations and Analysis of the Type Ia SN 2014J in M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marion, G. H.; Sand, D. J.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Banerjee, D. P. K.; Valenti, S.; Stritzinger, M. D.; Vinkó, J.; Joshi, V.; Venkataraman, V.; Ashok, N. M.; Amanullah, R.; Binzel, R. P.; Bochanski, J. J.; Bryngelson, G. L.; Burns, C. R.; Drozdov, D.; Fieber-Beyer, S. K.; Graham, M. L.; Howell, D. A.; Johansson, J.; Kirshner, R. P.; Milne, P. A.; Parrent, J.; Silverman, J. M.; Vervack, R. J., Jr.; Wheeler, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    We present optical and near infrared (NIR) observations of the nearby Type Ia SN 2014J. Seventeen optical and 23 NIR spectra were obtained from 10 days before (-10d) to 10 days after (+10d) the time of maximum B-band brightness. The relative strengths of absorption features and their patterns of development can be compared at one day intervals throughout most of this period. Carbon is not detected in the optical spectra, but we identify C I λ1.0693 in the NIR spectra. Mg II lines with high oscillator strengths have higher initial velocities than other Mg II lines. We show that the velocity differences can be explained by differences in optical depths due to oscillator strengths. The spectra of SN 2014J show that it is a normal SN Ia, but many parameters are near the boundaries between normal and high-velocity subclasses. The velocities for O I, Mg II, Si II, S II, Ca II, and Fe II suggest that SN 2014J has a layered structure with little or no mixing. That result is consistent with the delayed detonation explosion models. We also report photometric observations, obtained from -10d to +29d, in the UBVRIJH and Ks bands. The template fitting package SNooPy is used to interpret the light curves and to derive photometric parameters. Using RV = 1.46, which is consistent with previous studies, SNooPy finds that AV = 1.80 for E(B - V)host = 1.23 ± 0.06 mag. The maximum B-band brightness of -19.19 ± 0.10 mag was reached on February 1.74 UT ± 0.13 days and the supernova has a decline parameter, Δm 15, of 1.12 ± 0.02 mag.

  10. Passive microwave observations of the Wedell Sea during austral winter and early spring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grenfell, T. C.; Comiso, J. C.; Lange, M. A.; Eicken, H.; Wensnahan, M. R.

    1994-01-01

    The results of multispectral passive microwave observations (6.7 to 90-GHz) are presented from the cruises of the FS Polarstern in the Weddell Sea from July to December 1986. This paper includes primarily the analysis of radiometric observations taken at ice station sites. Averaged emissivity spectra for first-year (FY) ice were relatively constant throughout the experiment and were not statistically different from FY ice signatures in the Arctic. Detailed ice characterization was carried out at each site to compare the microwave signatures of the ice with the physical properties. Absorption optical depths of FY ice were found to be sufficiently high that only the structure in the upper portions of the ice contributed significantly to interstation emissivity variations. The emissivities at 90-GHz, e(90), had the greatest variance. Both e(90) at vertical polarization and GR(sub e)(90, 18.7)(defined as (e(sub V)(90)-e(sub V)(18.7))/e(sub V)(90 + e(sub V)(18.7)) depended on the scattering optical depth which is a function of the snow grain diameter and layer thickness. The variance showed a latitude dependence and is probably due to an increase in the strength of snow metamorphism nearer the northern edge of the ice pack. The contribution of variations of near-surface brine volume to the emissivity was not significant over the range of values encountered at the station sites. Emissivity spectra are presented for a range of thin ice types. Unsupervised principal component analysis produced three significant eigenvectors and showed a separation among four different surface types: open water, thin ice, FY ice, and FY ice with a thick snow cover. A comparison with SMMR satellite data showed that average ice concentrations derived from the ship's ice watch log were consistent with the satellite concentrations. The surface based emissivities for FY ice were also compared with emissivities calculated from scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR) satellite radiances. Best agreement was found at 6.7 and 10-GHz, while at 18 and 37-GHz, SMMR emissivities were slightly lower than surface based results. For the three lower frequencies agreement was found within a confidence limit of 95% and for 37-GHz within about 90%.

  11. [CII] At 1 < z < 2: Observing Star Formation in the Early Universe with Zeus (1 and 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferkinhoff, Carl; Hailey-Dunsheath, S.; Nikola, T.; Oberst, T.; Parshley, S.; Stacey, G.; Benford, D.; staguhn, J.

    2010-01-01

    We report the detection of the [CII] 158 micron fine structure line from six submillimeter galaxies with redshifts between 1.12 and 1.73. This more than doubles the total number of [CII] 158 micron detections reported from high redshift sources. These observations were made with the Redshift(z) and Early Universe Spectrometer(ZEUS) at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory on Mauna Kea, Hawaii between December 2006 and March 2009. ZEUS is a background limited submm echelle grating spectrometer (Hailey-Dunsheath 2009). Currently we are constructing ZEUS-2. This new instrument will utilize the same grating but will feature a two dimensional transition-edge sensed bolometer array with SQUID multiplexing readout system enabling simultaneous background limited observations in the 200, 340,450 and 650 micron telluric windows. ZEUS-2 will allow for long slit imaging spectroscopy in nearby galaxies and a [CII] survey from z 0.25 to 2.5.

  12. Predicted and observed early effects of combined alpha and beta lung irradiation.

    PubMed

    Scott, B R; Hahn, F F; Snipes, M B; Newton, G J; Eidson, A F; Mauderly, J L; Boecker, B B

    1990-12-01

    The nonstochastic radiobiological effects of combined alpha and beta irradiation of the lungs of rats from inhaled radionuclides were studied. Both respiratory functional morbidity at 18 mo and mortality from radiation pneumonitis within 18 mo after exposure were examined for rats exposed to the beta-emitter 147Pm, the alpha-emitter 238Pu, or both combined. The results were used to validate hazard-function models that were developed (1) for respiratory functional morbidity at 18 mo and (2) for lethality from radiation pneumonitis within 18 mo. Both models were found to adequately predict the experimental observations for chronic alpha plus beta irradiation of the lung. Based on this 18-mo study, a relative biological effectiveness of approximately seven was obtained for 238Pu alpha radiation compared to 147Pm beta radiation for both respiratory functional morbidity and lethality from radiation pneumonitis. However, the relative biological effectiveness for the alpha radiation is likely to increase with longer follow-up. PMID:2228607

  13. The performance of field scientists undertaking observations of early life fossils while in simulated space suit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willson, D.; Rask, J. C.; George, S. C.; de Leon, P.; Bonaccorsi, R.; Blank, J.; Slocombe, J.; Silburn, K.; Steele, H.; Gargarno, M.; McKay, C. P.

    2014-01-01

    We conducted simulated Apollo Extravehicular Activity's (EVA) at the 3.45 Ga Australian 'Pilbara Dawn of life' (Western Australia) trail with field and non-field scientists using the University of North Dakota's NDX-1 pressurizable space suit to overview the effectiveness of scientist astronauts employing their field observation skills while looking for stromatolite fossil evidence. Off-world scientist astronauts will be faced with space suit limitations in vision, human sense perception, mobility, dexterity, the space suit fit, time limitations, and the psychological fear of death from accidents, causing physical fatigue reducing field science performance. Finding evidence of visible biosignatures for past life such as stromatolite fossils, on Mars, is a very significant discovery. Our preliminary overview trials showed that when in simulated EVAs, 25% stromatolite fossil evidence is missed with more incorrect identifications compared to ground truth surveys but providing quality characterization descriptions becomes less affected by simulated EVA limitations as the science importance of the features increases. Field scientists focused more on capturing high value characterization detail from the rock features whereas non-field scientists focused more on finding many features. We identified technologies and training to improve off-world field science performance. The data collected is also useful for NASA's "EVA performance and crew health" research program requirements but further work will be required to confirm the conclusions.

  14. Estimates for Lorentz factors of gamma-ray bursts from early optical afterglow observations

    SciTech Connect

    Hascot, Romain; Beloborodov, Andrei M.; Daigne, Frdric; Mochkovitch, Robert

    2014-02-10

    The peak time of optical afterglow may be used as a proxy to constrain the Lorentz factor ? of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) ejecta. We revisit this method by including bursts with optical observations that started when the afterglow flux was already decaying; these bursts can provide useful lower limits on ?. Combining all analyzed bursts in our sample, we find that the previously reported correlation between ? and the burst luminosity L {sub ?} does not hold. However, the data clearly show a lower bound ?{sub min} that increases with L {sub ?}. We suggest an explanation for this feature: explosions with large jet luminosities and ? < ?{sub min} suffer strong adiabatic cooling before their radiation is released at the photosphere; they produce weak bursts, barely detectable with present instruments. To test this explanation, we examine the effect of adiabatic cooling on the GRB location in the L {sub ?} ? plane using a Monte Carlo simulation of the GRB population. Our results predict detectable on-axis 'orphan' afterglows. We also derive upper limits on the density of the ambient medium that decelerates the explosion ejecta. We find that the density in many cases is smaller than expected for stellar winds from normal Wolf-Rayet progenitors. The burst progenitors may be peculiar massive stars with weaker winds, or there might exist a mechanism that reduces the stellar wind a few years before the explosion.

  15. Earth Observations for Early Detection of Agricultural Drought in Countries at Risk: Contributions of the Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdin, J. P.; Rowland, J.; Senay, G. B.; Funk, C. C.; Budde, M. E.; Husak, G. J.; Jayanthi, H.

    2013-12-01

    The Group on Earth Observations' Global Agricultural Monitoring (GEOGLAM) implementation plan emphasizes the information needs of countries at risk of food insecurity emergencies. Countries in this category are often vulnerable to disruption of agricultural production due to drought, while at the same time they lack well developed networks of in-situ observations to support early drought detection. Consequently, it is vital that Earth observations by satellites supplement those available from surface stations. The USGS, in its role as a FEWS NET implementing partner, has recently developed a number of new applications of satellite observations for this purpose. (1) In partnership with the University of California, Santa Barbara, a 30+ year time series of gridded precipitation estimates (CHIRPS) has been developed by blending NOAA GridSat B1 geostationary thermal infrared imagery with station observations using robust geostatistical methods. The core data set consists of pentadal (5-daily) accumulations from 1981-2013 at 0.05 degree spatial resolution between +/- 50 degrees latitude. Validation has been recently completed, and applications for gridded crop water balance calculations and mapping the Standardized Precipitation Index are in development. (2) Actual evapotranspiration (ETa) estimates using MODIS Land Surface Temperature (LST) data at 1-km have been successfully demonstrated using the operational Simplified Surface Energy Balance model with 8-day composites from the LPDAAC. A new, next-day latency implementation using daily LST swath data from the NASA LANCE server is in development for all the crop growing regions of the world. This ETa processing chain follows in the footsteps of (3) the expedited production of MODIS 250-meter NDVI images every five days at USGS EROS, likewise using LANCE daily swath data as input since 2010. Coverage includes Africa, Central Asia, the Middle East, Central America, and the Caribbean. (4) A surface water point monitoring method for pastoralist areas has been successfully demonstrated. It involves mapping small surface water bodies with ASTER and Landsat imagery, delineating their catchment areas with SRTM elevation data, and maintaining a continuous water balance calculation with satellite rainfall and weather model evaporation estimates to track relative fullness of these ephemeral water bodies. Piloted with NASA funds in partnership with Texas A&M University, the technique is now being implemented across the Sahel. (5) To move beyond monitoring and early warning to disaster risk management, loss exceedence probability functions are being derived for crop production shortfalls in FEWS NET countries. Drought hazard indicators, based on both ETa and crop water balance modeling forced by CHIRPS, have been used to develop regional crop drought risk models. In the case of ETa, the drought risk model provides the basis for index insurance in experiments being conducted in Senegal. A program of training events with GEO partners ensures that the data sets and applications are made available to scientists in FEWS NET countries.

  16. Early evolution of a stratospheric volcanic eruption cloud as observed with TOMS and AVHRR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schneider, D.J.; Rose, William I., Jr.; Coke, L.R.; Bluth, G.J.S.; Sprod, I.E.; Krueger, A.J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper is a detailed study of remote sensing data from the total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) and the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) satellite detectors, of the 1982 eruption of El Chicho??n, Mexico. The volcanic cloud/atmosphere interactions in the first four days of this eruption were investigated by combining ultraviolet retrievals to estimate the mass of sulfur dioxide in the volcanic cloud [Krueger et al., 1995] with thermal infrared retrievals of the size, optical depth, and mass of fine-grained (1-10 ??m radius) volcanic ash [Wen and Rose, 1994]. Our study provides the first direct evidence of gravitational separation of ash from a stratospheric, gas-rich, plinian eruption column and documents the marked differences in residence times of volcanic ash and sulfur dioxide in volcanic clouds. The eruption column reached as high as 32 km [Carey and Sigurdsson, 1986] and was injected into an atmosphere with a strong wind shear, which allowed for an observation of the separation of sulfur dioxide and volcanic ash. The upper, more sulfur dioxide-rich part of the cloud was transported to the west in the stratosphere, while the fine-grained ash traveled to the south in the troposphere. The mass of sulfur dioxide released was estimated at 7.1 ?? 109 kg with the mass decreasing by approximately 4% 1 day after the peak. The mass of fine-grained volcanic ash detected was estimated at 6.5 ?? 109 kg, amounting to about 0.7% of the estimated mass of the ash which fell out in the mapped ash blanket close to the volcano. Over the following days, 98% of this remaining fine ash was removed from the volcanic cloud, and the effective radius of ash in the volcanic cloud decreased from about 8 ??m to about 4 ??m. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Hydrazine decomposition and other reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Warren E. (Inventor); La France, Donald S. (Inventor); Voge, Hervey H. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to the catalytic decomposition of hydrazine, catalysts useful for this decomposition and other reactions, and to reactions in hydrogen atmospheres generally using carbon-containing catalysts.

  18. Research capacity and culture in podiatry: early observations within Queensland Health

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Research is a major driver of health care improvement and evidence-based practice is becoming the foundation of health care delivery. For health professions to develop within emerging models of health care delivery, it would seem imperative to develop and monitor the research capacity and evidence-based literacy of the health care workforce. This observational paper aims to report the research capacity levels of statewide populations of public-sector podiatrists at two different time points twelve-months apart. Methods The Research Capacity & Culture (RCC) survey was electronically distributed to all Queensland Health (Australia) employed podiatrists in January 2011 (n = 58) and January 2012 (n = 60). The RCC is a validated tool designed to measure indicators of research skill in health professionals. Participants rate skill levels against each individual, team and organisation statement on a 10-point scale (one = lowest, ten = highest). Chi-squared and Mann Whitney U tests were used to determine any differences between the results of the two survey samples. A minimum significance of p < 0.05 was used throughout. Results Thirty-seven (64%) podiatrists responded to the 2011 survey and 33 (55%) the 2012 survey. The 2011 survey respondents reported low skill levels (Median < 4) on most aspects of individual research aspects, except for their ability to locate and critically review research literature (Median > 6). Whereas, most reported their organisation’s skills to perform and support research at much higher levels (Median > 6). The 2012 survey respondents reported significantly higher skill ratings compared to the 2011 survey in individuals’ ability to secure research funding, submit ethics applications, and provide research advice, plus, in their organisation’s skills to support, fund, monitor, mentor and engage universities to partner their research (p < 0.05). Conclusions This study appears to report the research capacity levels of the largest populations of podiatrists published. The 2011 survey findings indicate podiatrists have similarly low research capacity skill levels to those reported in the allied health literature. The 2012 survey, compared to the 2011 survey, suggests podiatrists perceived higher skills and support to initiate research in 2012. This improvement coincided with the implementation of research capacity building strategies. PMID:23302627

  19. Real time observations of coastal algal blooms by an early warning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. H. W.; Hodgkiss, I. J.; Wong, K. T. M.; Lam, I. H. Y.

    2005-10-01

    In eutrophic sub-tropical coastal waters around Hong Kong, phytoplankton or unicellular microalgae can grow rapidly to very high concentrations under favourable environmental conditions. These harmful algal blooms (HABs) have led to massive fish kills, hypoxia, and beach closures. However, to date the causality and mechanism of coastal algal blooms are still poorly understood. A remotely controlled autonomous real time field monitoring system has been developed to continuously track the changes in chlorophyll fluorescence, dissolved oxygen and other hydro-meteorological variables at two representative mariculture zones. The system can give an alarm when a bloom is detected, so that timely manual water quality sampling can be carried out to supplement the telemetric data. During 2000-2003, the system has successfully tracked 19 algal blooms. In the shallow weakly flushed coastal water (depth 7-10 m, tidal current 5-19 cm s -1), the bloom is short-lived, typically lasting a few days to over a week, with chlorophyll and DO concentrations in the range of 20-40 mg m -3 and 2-15 g m -3, respectively. It is found that: (1) the chlorophyll concentration is strongly correlated with its past values in the previous week, suggesting an auto-regressive type of algal dynamics; (2) the dissolved oxygen can reach highly super-saturated levels (12 g m -3) during a diatom bloom, and decreases to below 4 g m -3 at the tail of the growth phase; (3) in contrast, a dinoflagellate bloom is characterized by a much more pronounced vertical structure. Diel vertical migration and aggregation to dense layers are clearly observed. Significant dissolved oxygen consumption is associated with the migration, resulting in DO drops by as much as 6 g m -3 during the bloom; (4) the predominance of diatoms and dinoflagellates at the two sites can be explained in terms of the different hydrographic and nutrient conditions (the N:P ratio). Net algal growth rate, sinking and swimming velocities are derived from the in situ bloom data. The 4-year high frequency data set provides a basis for development of models for forecast of harmful algal blooms.

  20. Battery Electric Vehicle Driving and Charging Behavior Observed Early in The EV Project

    SciTech Connect

    John Smart; Stephen Schey

    2012-04-01

    As concern about society's dependence on petroleum-based transportation fuels increases, many see plug-in electric vehicles (PEV) as enablers to diversifying transportation energy sources. These vehicles, which include plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV), range-extended electric vehicles (EREV), and battery electric vehicles (BEV), draw some or all of their power from electricity stored in batteries, which are charged by the electric grid. In order for PEVs to be accepted by the mass market, electric charging infrastructure must also be deployed. Charging infrastructure must be safe, convenient, and financially sustainable. Additionally, electric utilities must be able to manage PEV charging demand on the electric grid. In the Fall of 2009, a large scale PEV infrastructure demonstration was launched to deploy an unprecedented number of PEVs and charging infrastructure. This demonstration, called The EV Project, is led by Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation (eTec) and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. eTec is partnering with Nissan North America to deploy up to 4,700 Nissan Leaf BEVs and 11,210 charging units in five market areas in Arizona, California, Oregon, Tennessee, and Washington. With the assistance of the Idaho National Laboratory, eTec will collect and analyze data to characterize vehicle consumer driving and charging behavior, evaluate the effectiveness of charging infrastructure, and understand the impact of PEV charging on the electric grid. Trials of various revenue systems for commercial and public charging infrastructure will also be conducted. The ultimate goal of The EV Project is to capture lessons learned to enable the mass deployment of PEVs. This paper is the first in a series of papers documenting the progress and findings of The EV Project. This paper describes key research objectives of The EV Project and establishes the project background, including lessons learned from previous infrastructure deployment and PEV demonstrations. One such previous study was a PHEV demonstration conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA), led by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). AVTA's PHEV demonstration involved over 250 vehicles in the United States, Canada, and Finland. This paper summarizes driving and charging behavior observed in that demonstration, including the distribution of distance driven between charging events, charging frequency, and resulting proportion of operation charge depleting mode. Charging demand relative to time of day and day of the week will also be shown. Conclusions from the PHEV demonstration will be given which highlight the need for expanded analysis in The EV Project. For example, the AVTA PHEV demonstration showed that in the absence of controlled charging by the vehicle owner or electric utility, the majority of vehicles were charged in the evening hours, coincident with typical utility peak demand. Given this baseline, The EV Project will demonstrate the effects of consumer charge control and grid-side charge management on electricity demand. This paper will outline further analyses which will be performed by eTec and INL to documenting driving and charging behavior of vehicles operated in a infrastructure-rich environment.

  1. Sleep Symptoms During the Menopausal Transition and Early Postmenopause: Observations from the Seattle Midlife Women's Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Nancy Fugate; Mitchell, Ellen Sullivan

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: Describe the severity of getting to sleep, nighttime awakening, and early morning awakening across the menopausal transition (MT) and early postmenopause (PM) and their relationship to age, menopausal transition factors, symptoms, stress-related factors, and health related factors. Design: Cohort Setting: community Participants: 286 women from the Seattle Midlife Women's Health Study cohort Measurements: Participants completed annual menstrual calendars for MT staging, diaries in which they rated their symptoms, stress levels, and perceived health multiple times per year from 1990-2007 and provided first morning urine samples assayed for E1G, FSH, cortisol, and catecholamines. Multilevel modeling (R program) was used for data analysis. Results: Severity of self-reported problems going to sleep was associated with all symptoms, perceived stress, history of sexual abuse, perceived health (-), alcohol use (-) (all P < 0.001), and lower cortisol (P = 0.009), but not E1G or FSH. Severity of nighttime awakening was significantly associated with age, late MT stage. and early PM, FSH, E1G (-), hot flashes, depressed mood, anxiety, joint pain, backache, perceived stress, history of sexual abuse, perceived health (-), and alcohol use (-) (all P < 0.001, except E1G for which P = 0.030). Severity of early morning awakening was significantly associated with age, hot flashes, depressed mood anxiety, joint pain, backache, perceived stress, history of sexual abuse, perceived health (-) (all P ≤ 0.001, except E1G for which P = 0.02 and epinephrine (P = 0.038), but not MT stages or FSH. Multivariate models for each symptom included hot flashes, depressed mood, and perceived health. Conclusion: Sleep symptoms during the MT may be amenable to symptom management strategies that take into account the symptom clusters and promote women's general health rather than focusing only on the MT. Citation: Woods NF; Mitchell ES. Sleep symptoms during the menopausal transition and early postmenopause: observations from the seattle midlife women's health study. SLEEP 2010;33(4):539-549. PMID:20394324

  2. Group on Earth Observations (GEO) Global Drought Monitor Portal: Adding Capabilities for Forecasting Hydrological Extremes and Early Warning Networking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzi, W.; de Roo, A.; Vogt, J.; Lawford, R. G.; Pappenberger, F.; Heim, R. R.; Stefanski, R.

    2011-12-01

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC 2007) has suggested the hydrometeorological extremes of both drought and flooding may increase under climate change. Drought zones can grow over large tracts of continental area and are a global-scale phenomenon (Sheffield and Wood 2011). The Group on Earth Observations Global Drought Monitor Portal (GDMP) was established as a demonstration for the 5th Earth Observation Ministerial Summit in Beijing in 2010. The European Drought Observatory, the North American Drought Monitor, the Princeton University experimental African Drought Monitor, and the University College London experimental global drought monitor were made "interoperable" through installation of Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Mapping Services (WMS) on their respective servers, allowing maps of current drought conditions to be exchanged and assembled into maps of global drought coverage on the NIDIS portal. Partners from the Republic of Argentina, the Commonwealth of Australia, China, Jordan, Brazil, and Uruguay have also joined. The GEO Global Drought Monitoring, Forecasting, and Early Warning effort involves multiple parties and institutions, including the World Meteorological Organization, the World Climate Research Program Drought Interest Group, NASA, and others. The GEO Secretariat held a launch workshop in Geneva on 4-6 May 2010 to initiate drafting the final GEO Work Plan, and, during this meeting, additional capabilities were added to the existing GDMP: 1) drought forecasting was added to drought "current conditions" monitoring, in a partnership with Joint Research Centre (and other partners) aiming at a combined platform for Hydrological Extremes (drought and flooding); 2) extending drought forecasts from the medium-range 15-day window to a 30-day window; this will be tested through pilot projects over Europe and Africa, as part of the Global Water Scarcity Information Service (GLOWASIS)and the Improved Drought Early Warning Forecasting for Africa (DEWFORA) to strengthen preparedness and adaptation; 3) setting up an Early Warning System network for drought ( to be developed through World Meteorological Organization WMO); and 4) adding global remote sensing drought monitoring capabilities (soil moisture anomalies). Flooding represents positive precipitation anomalies, whereas drought represents negative precipitation anomalies. The JRC combined Hydrologic Extremes platform will include multiple models and tools, such as; 1) JRC Global Flood Detection System and Global Flood Early Warning System; 2) the WMO Flash Flood Guidance system; 3) the Dartmouth Flood Observatory; 4) a suite of monitored and forecasted drought and water scarcity indicators through the various drought observatories accessible through the GEO Global Drought Monitor Portal. The GEO Global Drought and Flooding systems represent the "applications-side" of water activities within the GEO Work Plan and are supported by the "Research and Development (R&D) side" of water activities within the new 2012-2015 GEO Work Plan.

  3. ROSAT PSPC observations of two X-ray-faint early-type galaxies: NGC 4365 and NGC 4382

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabbiano, G.; Kim, D.-W.; Trinchieri, G.

    1994-01-01

    We present the results of ROSAT Positive Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) observations of the two early-type galaxies NGC 4365 and NGC 4382. These galaxies are among those observed with Einstein to have the lowest X-ray to optical flux ratios of early-type galaxies. The PSCP data show that for radii r greater than 50 arcsec the radial distributions of the X-ray surface brightness are consistent with the optical distributions of King (1978). We also find that these galaxies have X-ray spectra significantly different from those observed in X-ray-bright ellipticals, with a relative excess of counts detected in the softest spectral channels. This confirms earlier Einstein results. The characteristics of the ROSAT PSPC do not allow us to discriminate between possible spectral models. If we adopt a two-component thermal model on the grounds of physical plausibility, we find that the spectral data can be fitted with a very soft optically thin component, with kT approximately 0.2 keV, and a hard component with kT greater than (1.0-1.5) keV. The hard component has a luminosity consistent with that expected from the integrated emission of a population of low mass-X-ray binaries in these galaxies; the nature of the very soft component is more speculative. Candidates include the coronal emission of late-type stars, supersoft X-ray sources, RS CVn, and perhaps a hot Interstellar Medium (ISM). Alternatively, the spectal data may be fitted with a 0.6-1 keV bremsstrahlung spectrum (expontential plus Gaunt), and may suggest the presence of a totally new population of X-ray sources.

  4. The decomposition of methyltrichlorosilane: Studies in a high-temperature flow reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Allendorf, M.D.; Osterheld, T.H.; Melius, C.F.

    1994-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the decomposition of methyltrichlorosilane (MTS), a common silicon carbide precursor, in a high-temperature flow reactor are presented. The results indicate that methane and hydrogen chloride are major products of the decomposition. No chlorinated silane products were observed. Hydrogen carrier gas was found to increase the rate of MTS decomposition. The observations suggest a radical-chain mechanism for the decomposition. The implications for silicon carbide chemical vapor deposition are discussed.

  5. Coupling experimental data and a prototype model to probe the physical and chemical processes of 2,4-dinitroimidazole solid-phase thermal decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Behrens, R.; Minier, L.; Bulusu, S.

    1998-12-31

    The time-dependent, solid-phase thermal decomposition behavior of 2,4-dinitroimidazole (2,4-DNI) has been measured utilizing simultaneous thermogravimetric modulated beam mass spectrometry (STMBMS) methods. The decomposition products consist of gaseous and non-volatile polymeric products. The temporal behavior of the gas formation rates of the identified products indicate that the overall thermal decomposition process is complex. In isothermal experiments with 2,4-DNI in the solid phase, four distinguishing features are observed: (1) elevated rates of gas formation are observed during the early stages of the decomposition, which appear to be correlated to the presence of exogenous water in the sample; (2) this is followed by a period of relatively constant rates of gas formation; (3) next, the rates of gas formation accelerate, characteristic of an autocatalytic reaction; (4) finally, the 2,4-DNI is depleted and gaseous decomposition products continue to evolve at a decreasing rate. A physicochemical and mathematical model of the decomposition of 2,4-DNI has been developed and applied to the experimental results. The first generation of this model is described in this paper. Differences between the first generation of the model and the experimental data collected under different conditions suggest refinements for the next generation of the model.

  6. Spitzer Observations of Passive and Star-Forming Early-Type Galaxies: An Infrared Color-Color Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temi, Pasquale; Brighenti, Fabrizio; Mathews, William G.

    2009-12-01

    We describe the infrared properties of a large sample of early-type galaxies, comparing data from the Spitzer archive with Ks-band emission from the Two Micron All Sky Survey. While most representations of this data result in correlations with large scatter, we find a remarkably tight relation among colors formed by ratios of luminosities in Spitzer-Multiband Imaging Photometer bands (24, 70, and 160 μm) and the Ks band. Remarkably, this correlation among E and S0 galaxies follows that of nearby normal galaxies of all morphological types. In particular, the tight infrared color-color correlation for S0 galaxies alone follows that of the entire Hubble sequence of normal galaxies, roughly in order of galaxy type from ellipticals to spirals to irregulars. The specific star formation rate (SFR) of S0 galaxies estimated from the 24 μm luminosity increases with decreasing K-band luminosity (or stellar mass) from essentially zero, as with most massive ellipticals, to rates typical of irregular galaxies. Moreover, the luminosities of the many infrared-luminous S0 galaxies can significantly exceed those of the most luminous (presumably post-merger) E galaxies. SFRs in the most infrared-luminous S0 galaxies approach 1-10 solar masses per year. Consistently, with this picture we find that while most early-type galaxies populate an infrared red sequence, about 24% of the objects (mostly S0s) are in an infrared blue cloud together with late-type galaxies. For those early-type galaxies also observed at radio frequencies, we find that the far-infrared luminosities correlate with the mass of neutral and molecular hydrogen, but the scatter is large. This scatter suggests that the star formation may be intermittent or that similar S0 galaxies with cold gaseous disks of nearly equal mass can have varying radial column density distributions that alter the local and global SFRs.

  7. Alcohol decomposition by reverse spillover

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, B.; Falconer, J.L. )

    1993-11-01

    Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) was used to study methanol, ethanol, and 1-propanol decomposition on Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] and Ni/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] catalysts. These alcohols adsorb on the Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] support of Ni/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] and dehydrogenate by reverse spillover to the Ni surface. Thus, the presence of Ni dramatically increases their decomposition rates. Methanol adsorbed on Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] alone decomposes to form (CH[sub 3])[sub 2]O at lower temperature and CO, H[sub 2], and CO[sub 2] above 600 K. On Ni/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], most CH[sub 3]OH dehydrogenates to form CO and H[sub 2]. Ethanol adsorbed on Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] mostly dehydrates to form C[sub 2]H[sub 4] and (C[sub 2]H[sub 5])[sub 2]O, but C[sub 2]H[sub 4]O and H[sub 2] are also observed. On Ni/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], C[sub 2]H[sub 5]OH dehydrogenation to CO, H[sub 2], and surface carbon is the main reaction. 1-Propanol decomposes on Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] to form C[sub 3]H[sub 6], H[sub 2], (C[sub 3]H[sub 7])[sub 2]O, and C[sub 3]H[sub 6]O. When Ni is present, propanol decomposition to H[sub 2], CO, and surface carbon is the dominant process, but some C[sub 3]H[sub 6], C[sub 3]H[sub 6]O, and CO[sub 2] also form. On Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], the alcohols decomposition rates are in the order 1-C[sub 3]H[sub 7]OH > C[sub 2]H[sub 5]OH > CH[sub 3]OH, but on Ni/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] the rates are almost identical. The increase in the decomposition rate of alcohols, when Ni is present, is attributed to alcohol diffusion along the Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] surface and decomposition on the Ni surface or at the Ni-Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] interface. The diffusivity of CH[sub 3]O on the Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] surface at 534 K is estimated to be larger than 6.6 x 10[sup [minus]11] cm[sup 2]/s. 38 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. The 2014 Mw 6.0 Napa Earthquake, California: Observations from Real-time GPS-enhanced Earthquake Early Warning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johanson, I. A.; Grapenthin, R.; Allen, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    Recently, progress has been made to demonstrate feasibility and benefits of including real-time GPS (rtGPS) in earthquake early warning and rapid response systems. While most concepts have yet to be integrated into operational environments, the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory is currently running an rtGPS based finite fault inversion scheme in true real-time, which is triggered by the seismic-based ShakeAlert system and then sends updated earthquake alerts to a test receiver. The Geodetic Alarm System (G-larmS) was online and responded to the 2014 Mw6.0 South Napa earthquake in California. We review G-larmS' performance during this event and for 13 aftershocks, and we present rtGPS observations and real-time modeling results for the main shock. The first distributed slip model and a magnitude estimate of Mw5.5 were available 24 s after the event origin time, which could be reduced to 14 s after a bug fix (~8 s S-wave travel time, ~6 s data latency). The system continued to re-estimate the magnitude once every second: it increased to Mw5.9 3 s after the first alert and stabilized at Mw5.8 after 15 s. G-larmS' solutions for the subsequent small magnitude aftershocks demonstrate that Mw~6.0 is the current limit for alert updates to contribute back to the seismic-based early warning system.

  9. Decomposition in diverse dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpe, Eric

    2014-07-01

    This paper discusses the relationships between gauge theories defined by gauge groups with finite trivially acting centers and theories with restrictions on nonperturbative sectors, in two and four dimensions. In two dimensions, these notions seem to coincide. Generalizing old results on orbifolds and Abelian gauge theories, we propose a decomposition of two-dimensional non-Abelian gauge theories with center-invariant matter into disjoint sums of theories with rotating discrete theta angles; for example, schematically, SU(2)=SO(3)++SO(3)-. We verify that decomposition directly in pure nonsupersymmetric two-dimensional Yang-Mills as well as in supersymmetric theories. In four dimensions, by contrast, these notions do not coincide. To clarify the relationship, we discuss theories obtained by restricting nonperturbative sectors. These theories violate cluster decomposition, but we illustrate how they may at least in special cases be understood as disjoint sums of well-behaved quantum field theories, and how dyon spectra can be used to distinguish, for example, an SO(3) theory with a restriction on instantons from an SU(2) theory. We also briefly discuss how coupling various analogues of Dijkgraaf-Witten theory, as part of a description of instanton restriction via coupling topological field theories to quantum field theories, may modify these results.

  10. Multicriteria approximation through decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, C.; Krumke, S.; Marathe, M.; Phillips, C.; Sundberg, E.

    1998-06-01

    The authors propose a general technique called solution decomposition to devise approximation algorithms with provable performance guarantees. The technique is applicable to a large class of combinatorial optimization problems that can be formulated as integer linear programs. Two key ingredients of their technique involve finding a decomposition of a fractional solution into a convex combination of feasible integral solutions and devising generic approximation algorithms based on calls to such decompositions as oracles. The technique is closely related to randomized rounding. Their method yields as corollaries unified solutions to a number of well studied problems and it provides the first approximation algorithms with provable guarantees for a number of new problems. The particular results obtained in this paper include the following: (1) the authors demonstrate how the technique can be used to provide more understanding of previous results and new algorithms for classical problems such as Multicriteria Spanning Trees, and Suitcase Packing; (2) they also show how the ideas can be extended to apply to multicriteria optimization problems, in which they wish to minimize a certain objective function subject to one or more budget constraints. As corollaries they obtain first non-trivial multicriteria approximation algorithms for problems including the k-Hurdle and the Network Inhibition problems.

  11. Multicriteria approximation through decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, C. |; Krumke, S.; Marathe, M.; Phillips, C.; Sundberg, E. |

    1997-12-01

    The authors propose a general technique called solution decomposition to devise approximation algorithms with provable performance guarantees. The technique is applicable to a large class of combinatorial optimization problems that can be formulated as integer linear programs. Two key ingredients of the technique involve finding a decomposition of a fractional solution into a convex combination of feasible integral solutions and devising generic approximation algorithms based on calls to such decompositions as oracles. The technique is closely related to randomized rounding. The method yields as corollaries unified solutions to a number of well studied problems and it provides the first approximation algorithms with provable guarantees for a number of new problems. The particular results obtained in this paper include the following: (1) The authors demonstrate how the technique can be used to provide more understanding of previous results and new algorithms for classical problems such as Multicriteria Spanning Trees, and Suitcase Packing. (2) They show how the ideas can be extended to apply to multicriteria optimization problems, in which they wish to minimize a certain objective function subject to one or more budget constraints. As corollaries they obtain first non-trivial multicriteria approximation algorithms for problems including the k-Hurdle and the Network Inhibition problems.

  12. Decomposition mechanisms of tertiarybutylarsine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, C. A.; Buchan, N. I.; Li, S. H.; Stringfellow, G. B.

    1989-03-01

    As a new source compound to replace AsH 3 for organometallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE) of III/V semiconductors, tertiarybutylarsine (TBAs) has the advantages of low decomposition temperatures, lower safety hazards, and low carbon contamination in OMVPE grown GaAs layers. The vapor pressure of TBAs was measured, and is given by log 10P( Torr) = 7.500 - 1562.3/ T( K). The decomposition mechanisms of TBAs were studied in a D 2 ambient using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer to analyze the gaseous products. Although a free radical mechanisms would seem the most likely, it is not the dominant route for decomposition. Instead, unimolecular processes are the preferred pathway. Two such reactions are proposed. The major step is intramolecular coupling yielding AsH and isobutane. At higher temperatures β-elimination becomes important, producing AsH 3 and isobutene. The reactions are catalyzed by GaAs surfaces, but not by silica. The temperature dependence of the reaction rates was studied, and Arrhenius parameters for the rate constants are given.

  13. Observation of early shell-dopant mix in OMEGA direct-drive implosions and comparisons with radiation-hydrodynamic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgaertel, J. A.; Bradley, P. A.; Hsu, S. C.; Cobble, J. A.; Hakel, P.; Tregillis, I. L.; Krasheninnikova, N. S.; Murphy, T. J.; Schmitt, M. J.; Shah, R. C.; Obrey, K. D.; Batha, S.; Johns, H.; Joshi, T.; Mayes, D.; Mancini, R. C.; Nagayama, T.

    2014-05-15

    Temporally, spatially, and spectrally resolved x-ray image data from direct-drive implosions on OMEGA were interpreted with the aid of radiation-hydrodynamic simulations. Neither clean calculations nor those using a turbulent mix model can explain fully the observed migration of shell-dopant material (titanium) into the core. Shell-dopant migration was observed via time-dependent, spatially integrated spectra, and spatially and spectrally resolved x-ray images of capsule implosions and resultant dopant emissions. The titanium emission was centrally peaked in narrowband x-ray images. In post-processed clean simulations, the peak titanium emission forms in a ring in self-emission images as the capsule implodes. Post-processed simulations with mix reproduce trends in time-dependent, spatially integrated spectra, as well having centrally peaked Ti emission in synthetic multiple monochromatic imager. However, mix simulations still do not transport Ti to the core as is observed in the experiment. This suggests that phenomena in addition to the turbulent mix must be responsible for the transport of Ti. Simple diffusion estimates are unable to explain the early Ti mix into the core. Mechanisms suggested for further study are capsule surface roughness, illumination non-uniformity, and shock entrainment.

  14. Climate forcing due to the 8200 cal yr BP event observed at Early Neolithic sites in the eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weninger, Bernhard; Alram-Stern, Eva; Bauer, Eva; Clare, Lee; Danzeglocke, Uwe; Jöris, Olaf; Kubatzki, Claudia; Rollefson, Gary; Todorova, Henrieta; van Andel, Tjeerd

    2006-11-01

    We explore the hypothesis that the abrupt drainage of Laurentide lakes and associated rapid switch of the North Atlantic thermohaline circulation 8200 yr ago had a catastrophic influence on Neolithic civilisation in large parts of southeastern Europe, Anatolia, Cyprus, and the Near East. The event at 8200 cal yr BP is observed in a large number of high-resolution climate proxies in the Northern Hemisphere, and in many cases corresponds to markedly cold and arid conditions. We identify the relevant archaeological levels of major Neolithic settlements in Central Anatolia, Cyprus, Greece and Bulgaria, and examine published stratigraphic, architectural, cultural and geoarchaeological studies for these sites. The specific archaeological events and processes we observe at a number of these sites during the study interval 8400-8000 cal yr BP lead us to refine some previously established Neolithisation models. The introduction of farming to South-East Europe occurs in all study regions (Thrace, Macedonia, Thessaly, Bulgaria) near 8200 cal yr BP. We observe major disruptions of Neolithic cultures in the Levant, North Syria, South-East Anatolia, Central Anatolia and Cyprus, at the same time. We conclude that the 8200 cal yr BP aridity event triggered the spread of early farmers, by different routes, out of West Asia and the Near East into Greece and Bulgaria.

  15. Early polarization observations of the optical emission of gamma-ray bursts: GRB 150301B and GRB 150413A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbovskoy, E. S.; Lipunov, V. M.; Buckley, D. A. H.; Kornilov, V. G.; Balanutsa, P. V.; Tyurina, N. V.; Kuznetsov, A. S.; Kuvshinov, D. A.; Gorbunov, I. A.; Vlasenko, D.; Popova, E.; Chazov, V. V.; Potter, S.; Kotze, M.; Kniazev, A. Y.; Gress, O. A.; Budnev, N. M.; Ivanov, K. I.; Yazev, S. A.; Tlatov, A. G.; Senik, V. A.; Dormidontov, D. V.; Parhomenko, A. V.; Krushinski, V. V.; Zalozhnich, I. S.; Castro-Tirado, R. Alberto; Sánchez-Ramírez, R.; Sergienko, Yu. P.; Gabovich, A.; Yurkov, V. V.; Levato, H.; Saffe, C.; Mallamaci, C.; Lopez, C.; Podest, F.; Vladimirov, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    We report early optical linear polarization observations of two gamma-ray bursts made with the MASTER robotic telescope network. We found the minimum polarization for GRB 150301B to be 8 per cent at the beginning of the initial stage, whereas we detected no polarization for GRB 150413A either at the rising branch or after the burst reached the power-law afterglow stage. This is the earliest measurement of the polarization (in cosmological rest frame) of gamma-ray bursts. The primary intent of the paper is to discover optical emission and publish extremely rare (unique) high-quality light curves of the prompt optical emission of gamma-ray bursts during the non-monotonic stage of their evolution. We report that our team has discovered the optical counterpart of one of the bursts, GRB 150413A.

  16. Quality versus Quantity: The Use of Observation by Early Childhood Educators in Improving the Performance of Children Enrolled in Preschool Programs in Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tackie-Ofosu, Vivian; Bentum, Kwesi

    2013-01-01

    In the current study, the authors explored how early childhood educators used observation to support children in the learning environment. The objectives set were to find out the observation methods teachers used, ascertain their understanding of child observation, find out activities children undertook, and how teachers documented what children…

  17. High temperature phase decomposition in TixZryAlzN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Hans; Pilemalm, Robert; Rogström, Lina; Tasnadi, Ferenc; Ghafoor, Naureen; Forsén, Rikard; Johnson, Lars J. S.; Johansson-Jöesaar, Mats P.; Odén, Magnus; Abrikosov, Igor A.

    2014-12-01

    Through a combination of theoretical and experimental observations we study the high temperature decomposition behavior of c-(TixZryAlzN) alloys. We show that for most concentrations the high formation energy of (ZrAl)N causes a strong tendency for spinodal decomposition between ZrN and AlN while other decompositions tendencies are suppressed. In addition we observe that entropic effects due to configurational disorder favor a formation of a stable Zr-rich (TiZr)N phase with increasing temperature. Our calculations also predict that at high temperatures a Zr rich (TiZrAl)N disordered phase should become more resistant against the spinodal decomposition despite its high and positive formation energy due to the specific topology of the free energy surface at the relevant concentrations. Our experimental observations confirm this prediction by showing strong tendency towards decomposition in a Zr-poor sample while a Zr-rich alloy shows a greatly reduced decomposition rate, which is mostly attributable to binodal decomposition processes. This result highlights the importance of considering the second derivative of the free energy, in addition to its absolute value in predicting decomposition trends of thermodynamically unstable alloys.

  18. Observations of Middle Atmosphere CO from the UARS ISAMS during the Early Northern Winter 1991/92

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, D. R.; Stanford, J. L.; Lopez-Valverde, M. A.; Nakamura, N.; Lary, D. J.; Douglass, A. R.; Cerniglia, M. C.; Remedios, J. J.; Taylor, F. W.

    1999-01-01

    Structure and kinematics of carbon monoxide in the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere (10-0.03 hPa) are studied for the early northern winter 1991/92 using the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite Improved Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder (ISAMS) measurements. The study is aided by data from a 6-week parameterized-chemistry run of the Goddard Space Flight Center 3D Chemistry and Transport Model (CTM), initialized on 8 December 1991. Generally, CO mixing ratios increase with height due to the increasing source contribution from CO, photolysis. In the tropical upper stratosphere. however, a local maximum in CO mixing ratio occurs. A simple photochemical model is used to show that this feature results largely from methane oxidation. In the extratropics the photochemical lifetime of CO is long, and therefore its evolution is dictated by large-scale motion of air. evidenced by strong correlation with Ertel potential vorticity. This makes CO one of the few useful observable tracers at the stratopause level and above. Thus CO maps are used to study the synoptic evolution of the polar vortex in early January 1992. Modified Lagrangian mean mixing diagnostics are applied to ISAMS and CTM data to examine the strength of the mixing barrier at the polar vortex edge. It is demonstrated that planetary wave activity weakens the barrier. promoting vortex erosion. The vortex erosion first appears in the lower mesosphere and subsequently descends through the upper stratosphere. and is attributed to effects of planetary wave dissipation. Agreement between ISAMS and CTM is good in the horizontal distribution of CO throughout the examined period, but vertical CO gradients in the CTM weaken with time relative to the ISAMS observations.

  19. Significance of preoperatively observed detrusor overactivity as a predictor of continence status early after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Yanagiuchi, Akihiro; Miyake, Hideaki; Tanaka, Kazushi; Fujisawa, Masato

    2014-01-01

    Several recent studies have reported the involvement of bladder dysfunction in the delayed recovery of urinary continence following radical prostatectomy (RP). The objective of this study was to investigate the significance of detrusor overactivity (DO) as a predictor of the early continence status following robot-assisted RP (RARP). This study included 84 consecutive patients with prostate cancer undergoing RARP. Urodynamic studies, including filling cystometry, pressure flow study, electromyogram of the external urethral sphincter and urethral pressure profile, were performed in these patients before surgery. Urinary continence was defined as the use of either no or one pad per day as a precaution only. DO was preoperatively observed in 30 patients (35.7%), and 55 (65.5%) and 34 (40.5%) were judged to be incontinent 1 and 3 months after RARP, respectively. At both 1 and 3 months after RARP, the incidences of incontinence in patients with DO were significantly higher than in those without DO. Of several demographic and urodynamic parameters, univariate analyses identified DO and maximal urethral closure pressure (MUCP) as significant predictors of the continence status at both 1 and 3 months after RARP. Furthermore, DO and MUCP appeared to be independently associated with the continence at both 1 and 3 months after RARP on multivariate analysis. These findings suggest that preoperatively observed DO could be a significant predictor of urinary incontinence early after RARP; therefore, it is recommended to perform urodynamic studies for patients who are scheduled to undergo RARP in order to comprehensively evaluate their preoperative vesicourethral functions. PMID:25038181

  20. The VLA Low Band Project: Early Commissioning Results and Vision for a Primary Focus-based Commensal Observing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassim, Namir E.; Clarke, T. E.; Hicks, B.; Peters, W. M.; Wilson, T. L.; Cutchin, S.; Owen, F. N.; Perley, R. A.; Durand, S.; Kutz, C.; Harden, P.; Intema, H.; Brisken, W.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Taylor, G. B.; Lazio, T. J.

    2013-01-01

    We present an update on the Jansky Very Large Array Low Band (VLA-LB) project, currently undergoing scientific commissioning and expected to be fully available in 2013. VLA-LB is a joint NRL and NRAO initiative to equip the VLA with broadband low frequency receivers that cover the spectrum between 66 and 470 MHz. The current system can already access the 66 to 86 MHz and 230 to 436 MHz sub-bands by working with existing 74 and 330 MHz feeds, respectively. The bandwidth at 74 MHz will increase by more than an order of magnitude while the 330 MHz bandwidth increases by approximately a factor of 6. The improved bandwidth and system temperature, coupled with the power of the WIDAR correlator, promise significantly enhanced performance compared to past VLA capabilities. Early commissioning results at “P band” (330 MHz) with a handful of antennas accessing the larger bandwidth indicate sensitivity rivaling that of the legacy 27-antenna, narrow-band old VLA capability. New feeds that can exploit a larger fraction of the available receiver bandwidth are being explored. While VLA-LB is useful as a conventional system, we are looking to enhance its power by leveraging the VLA’s capability to detect radiation at its prime and Cassegrain foci simultaneously. The ability to observe with more than one band in parallel is a powerful multiplier of a telescope’s function, and many instruments (e.g. the GMRT, WSRT and VLA) offer this. A variant is being explored for VLA-LB: observing from the prime focus during all normal Cassegrain observations. This proposed VLA-LB commensal system would piggyback normal VLA observing time to survey at low frequencies with relatively large field of views. Shared fields with other multi-beaming, dipole-based arrays that view the same sky with the VLA, e.g. the first station of the Long Wavelength Array (LWA1), would be possible. The collected data will be assembled into a database of spectra and wide-field images, suitable for studies of individual objects as well as searches for transients and high redshift spectral features (eg. HI absorption or OH mega-masers). We describe how the VLA-LB commensal system might be implemented, and explore early ideas for its scientific promise.

  1. The 3-D effects in the long-term solar wind speed rise observed by Voyager 2 in early 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzo, V. J.; Paularena, K. I.; Richardson, J. D.; Lazarus, A. J.; Belcher, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    In early 1994, Voyager 2 at 42-43 AU near heliolatitude 10 deg S observed over a period of approximately 100 days a remarkable sequence of quasi-recurrent stream fronts, wherein the background (ambient) speed rose steadily from approximately 450 to approximately 550 km/s while the mean period of the streams decreased from the usual 25 days down to approximately 20 days. A qualitative explanation for this effect can be derived from IMP observations, which show that the amplitude of the stream structure at 1 AU increased monotonically in late 1993, concurrent with major secular evolution in the corona. The reduction in period, then, amounts to a doppler shift due to the progressive overtaking of successively faster streams in the sequence. Attempts to model this process quantitatively with 1-D dynamic simulations falter on three accounts: (1) the reduction in period is overestimated, (2) the simulation predicts many more fronts surviving to 43 AU than are observed by Voyager; (3) the density variations are much too large. It is argued that inclusion of the 3-D geometry in the simulation would resolve most all these shortcomings. Using a series of calculations executed with 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D MHD models of hypothetical tilted-dipole flows, we show that: (1) the radial propagation velocities of 3-D fronts are less than those of 1-D or 2-D fronts, owing to the tilt of (and increased shearing across) the interaction surfaces hence the overtaking rate of successive streams is reduced; (2) in a tilted-dipole geometry, the reverse fronts should largely disappear from the equatorial plane by 43 AU, effectively halving the number of fronts to be observed (see companion paper on predominance of forward fronts at Voyager); and (3) the density enhancements would be much smaller than predicted by a 1-D model.

  2. CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF NGC 4342, AN OPTICALLY FAINT, X-RAY GAS-RICH EARLY-TYPE GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdan, Akos; Forman, William R.; Kraft, Ralph P.; Jones, Christine; Randall, Scott W.; Li Zhiyuan; Nulsen, Paul E. J.; Vikhlinin, Alexey; Blom, Christina; Zhang Zhongli; Zhuravleva, Irina; Churazov, Eugene; Schindler, Sabine

    2012-08-10

    Chandra x-ray observations of NGC 4342, a low-stellar mass (M{sub K} = -22.79 mag) early-type galaxy, show luminous, diffuse x-ray emission originating from hot gas with temperature of kT {approx} 0.6 keV. The observed 0.5-2 keV band luminosity of the diffuse x-ray emission within the D{sub 25} ellipse is L{sub 0.5-2keV} = 2.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1}. The hot gas has a significantly broader distribution than the stellar light, and shows strong hydrodynamic disturbances with a sharp surface brightness edge to the northeast and a trailing tail. We identify the edge as a cold front and conclude that the distorted morphology of the hot gas is produced by ram pressure as NGC 4342 moves through external gas. From the thermal pressure ratios inside and outside the cold front, we estimate the velocity of NGC 4342 and find that it moves supersonically (M {approx} 2.6) toward the northeast. Outside the optical extent of the galaxy, we detect {approx}17 bright (L{sub 0.5-8keV} > or approx. 3 x 10{sup 37} erg s{sup -1}) excess x-ray point sources. The excess sources are presumably LMXBs located in metal-poor globular clusters (GCs) in the extended dark matter halo of NGC 4342. Based on the number of excess sources and the average frequency of bright LMXBs in GCs, we estimate that NGC 4342 may host roughly 850-1700 GCs. In good agreement with this, optical observations hint that NGC 4342 may harbor 1200 {+-} 500 GCs. This number corresponds to a GC specific frequency of S{sub N} = 19.9 {+-} 8.3, which is among the largest values observed in full-size galaxies.

  3. Variation of Soil Mycoflora in Decomposition of Rice Stubble from Rice-wheat Cropping System

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Asha

    2007-01-01

    The colonization pattern and extent of decay produced in paddy stubble by soil inhabiting mycoflora were done by using nylon net bag technique. Among the three methods used for isolation of fungi, dilution plate technique recorded the highest number of fungi followed by damp chamber and direct observation method. Nutrient availability and climatic conditions (temperature, humidity and rainfall) influenced the occurrence and colonization pattern of fungi. Maximum fungal population was recorded in October (48.99 × 104/g dry litter) and minimum in May (11.41 × 104/g dry litter). Distribution of Deuteromycetous fungi was more in comparison to Zygomycetes, oomycetes and ascomycetes. In the early stage of decomposition Mucor racemosus, Rhizopus nigricans, Chaetomium globosum and Gliocladium species were found primarly whereas at later stages of decomposition preponderance of Aspergillus candidus, Torula graminis, Cladosporiun cladosporioides and Aspergillus luchuensis was recorded. PMID:24015096

  4. Variation of Soil Mycoflora in Decomposition of Rice Stubble from Rice-wheat Cropping System.

    PubMed

    Vibha; Sinha, Asha

    2007-12-01

    The colonization pattern and extent of decay produced in paddy stubble by soil inhabiting mycoflora were done by using nylon net bag technique. Among the three methods used for isolation of fungi, dilution plate technique recorded the highest number of fungi followed by damp chamber and direct observation method. Nutrient availability and climatic conditions (temperature, humidity and rainfall) influenced the occurrence and colonization pattern of fungi. Maximum fungal population was recorded in October (48.99 × 10(4)/g dry litter) and minimum in May (11.41 × 10(4)/g dry litter). Distribution of Deuteromycetous fungi was more in comparison to Zygomycetes, oomycetes and ascomycetes. In the early stage of decomposition Mucor racemosus, Rhizopus nigricans, Chaetomium globosum and Gliocladium species were found primarly whereas at later stages of decomposition preponderance of Aspergillus candidus, Torula graminis, Cladosporiun cladosporioides and Aspergillus luchuensis was recorded. PMID:24015096

  5. Unusually strong nitric oxide descent in the Arctic middle atmosphere in early 2013 as observed by Odin/SMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérot, K.; Urban, J.; Murtagh, D. P.

    2014-08-01

    The middle atmosphere was affected by an exceptionally strong midwinter stratospheric sudden warming (SSW) during the Arctic winter 2012/2013. These unusual meteorological conditions led to a breakdown of the polar vortex, followed by the reformation of a strong upper stratospheric vortex associated with particularly efficient descent of air. Measurements by the submillimetre radiometer (SMR), on board the Odin satellite, show that very large amounts of nitric oxide (NO), produced by energetic particle precipitation (EPP) in the mesosphere/lower thermosphere (MLT), could thus enter the polar stratosphere in early 2013. The mechanism referring to the downward transport of EPP-generated NOx during winter is generally called the EPP indirect effect. SMR observed up to 20 times more NO in the upper stratosphere than the average NO measured at the same latitude, pressure and time during three previous winters where no mixing between mesospheric and stratospheric air was noticeable. This event turned out to be the strongest in the aeronomy-only period of SMR (2007-present). Our study is based on a comparison with the Arctic winter 2008/2009, when a similar situation was observed. This outstanding situation is the result of the combination of a relatively high geomagnetic activity and an unusually high dynamical activity, which makes this case a prime example to study the EPP impacts on the atmospheric composition.

  6. HF radar observations of Pc 5 field line resonances in the midnight/early morning MLT sector

    SciTech Connect

    Ruohoniemi, J.M.; Greenwald, R.A.; Baker, K.B. ); Samson, J.C. )

    1991-09-01

    On a number of occasions The Johns Hopkins University/Applied Physics Laboratory HF radar at Goose Bay, Labrador, has observed the effects of field line resonances on the drift velocities of irregularities in the F region of the high-latitude ionosphere. One of the most interesting sets of resonances occurs near midnight MLT and may be associated with shear in the convective flow in the magnetotail. This paper discusses in detail a particularly clear example which shows field line resonance equatorward of a region of shear flow in the early morning sector. The motions were predominantly in the geomagnetic east-west direction, indicating north-south electric fields. As expected of field line resonance pulsations, these oscillations had pronounced peaks in their latitudinal power distribution. The pulsations could occur simultaneously but remained distinct as the latitude of peak response was observed to vary inversely with the frequency of the pulsation. The authors interpret these features in terms of field line resonance theory and discuss the possible sources of the pulsation energy.

  7. Wood decomposition as influenced by invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Ulyshen, Michael D

    2016-02-01

    The diversity and habitat requirements of invertebrates associated with dead wood have been the subjects of hundreds of studies in recent years but we still know very little about the ecological or economic importance of these organisms. The purpose of this review is to examine whether, how and to what extent invertebrates affect wood decomposition in terrestrial ecosystems. Three broad conclusions can be reached from the available literature. First, wood decomposition is largely driven by microbial activity but invertebrates also play a significant role in both temperate and tropical environments. Primary mechanisms include enzymatic digestion (involving both endogenous enzymes and those produced by endo- and ectosymbionts), substrate alteration (tunnelling and fragmentation), biotic interactions and nitrogen fertilization (i.e. promoting nitrogen fixation by endosymbiotic and free-living bacteria). Second, the effects of individual invertebrate taxa or functional groups can be accelerative or inhibitory but the cumulative effect of the entire community is generally to accelerate wood decomposition, at least during the early stages of the process (most studies are limited to the first 2-3 years). Although methodological differences and design limitations preclude meta-analysis, studies aimed at quantifying the contributions of invertebrates to wood decomposition commonly attribute 10-20% of wood loss to these organisms. Finally, some taxa appear to be particularly influential with respect to promoting wood decomposition. These include large wood-boring beetles (Coleoptera) and termites (Termitoidae), especially fungus-farming macrotermitines. The presence or absence of these species may be more consequential than species richness and the influence of invertebrates is likely to vary biogeographically. PMID:25424353

  8. Environmental effects of solar-thermal power systems: ecological observations during early testing of the Barstow 10-MWe pilot STPS

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, F.B.

    1982-11-01

    Environmental measurements were continued at Solar One during 1982, while final steps in construction and early testing were carried out. Measurements of sand depths downwind (east) of the heliostat field indicated that some of the sand blown off the field (most of it between September 1979 and March 1980) has been carried farther east, reducing sand depths somewhat in areas just east of the field. Observations of birds between March and June 1982 revealed that (1) the natural avifauna of the field has been altered, although the area is still used for feeding by some icterids (larks, blackbirds) and aerial insectivores (swallows, swifts); (2) of 15 bird casualties ascribable to the presence and/or operation of Solar One, 12 followed collisions with heliostats, three resulted from incineration in heliostat beams; (3) the central receiver tower does not appear to be a source of mortality. Numbers of rodents (particularly kangaroo rats) trapped in areas downwind of the site declined steadily between 1978 and 1982 in areas both clost to the field and as far east as 600 m from the fence. The most likely interpretation of these changes is a reduction in reproductivity and/or early survival caused by four consecutive years (1978, 1979, 1980, 1981) of suboptimal autumn rainfall. Micrometeorological measurements in areas downwind of Solar One showed small effects on air temperatures (<0.5/sup 0/C), wind speeds (<0.4 m/sec), and evaporation rates (<1.5 ml/hr).Effects were detected only in areas 100 to 190 m from the east perimeter fence. Because these differences are so small, relative to natural heterogeneities, the effects of Solar One on rates of evaporation, air temperatures and wind speed will not affect the downwind biological community. The relavance of these findings to construction of a larger solar thermal power plant (e.g., Solar 100) are considered.

  9. Early-type galaxies at intermediate redshift observed with Hubble space telescope WFC3: perspectives on recent star formation

    SciTech Connect

    Rutkowski, Michael J.; Jeong, Hyunjin; Yi, Sukyoung K.; Cohen, Seth H.; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Ryan, Russell E. Jr.; Koekemoer, Anton; Hathi, Nimish P.; Dopita, Michael A.

    2014-12-01

    We present an analysis of the stellar populations of 102 visually selected early-type galaxies (ETGs) with spectroscopic redshifts (0.35 ≲ z ≲ 1.5) from observations in the Early Release Science program with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We fit one- and two-component synthetic stellar models to the ETGs UV-optical-near-IR spectral energy distributions and find that a large fraction (∼40%) are likely to have experienced a minor (f{sub YC} ≲ 10% of stellar mass) burst of recent (t{sub YC} ≲ 1 Gyr) star formation. The measured age and mass fraction of the young stellar populations do not strongly trend with measurements of galaxy morphology. We note that massive (M > 10{sup 10.5} M {sub ☉}) recent star-forming ETGs appear to have larger sizes. Furthermore, high-mass, quiescent ETGs identified with likely companions populate a distinct region in the size-mass parameter space, in comparison with the distribution of massive ETGs with evidence of recent star formation (RSF). We conclude that both mechanisms of quenching star formation in disk-like ETGs and (gas-rich, minor) merger activity contribute to the formation of young stars and the size-mass evolution of intermediate redshift ETGs. The number of ETGs for which we have both HST WFC3 panchromatic (especially UV) imaging and spectroscopically confirmed redshifts is relatively small, therefore, a conclusion about the relative roles of both of these mechanisms remains an open question.

  10. Soil-litter mixing accelerates decomposition in a Chihuahuan Desert grassland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Decomposition models typically under-predict decomposition relative to observed rates in drylands. This discrepancy indicates a significant gap in our mechanistic understanding of carbon and nutrient cycling in these systems. Recent research suggests that certain drivers of decomposition that are of...

  11. Biological characterization and selection criteria of adjuvant chemotherapy for early breast cancer: experience from the Italian observational NEMESI study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background International treatment guidelines recommend administration of adjuvant chemotherapy in early breast cancer based on clinical, prognostic and predictive parameters. Methods An observational study (NEMESI) was conducted in 63 Italian oncology centres in patients with early breast cancer. Age, performance status, concomitant disease, menopausal status, histology, tumor dimension (pT), axillary lymph node status (pN), grading (G), estrogen and progesterone receptor (ER and PgR), proliferative index (ki67 or MIB-1), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and type of adjuvant treatment were recorded. The primary objective of the study was to define parameters influencing the decision to prescribe adjuvant chemotherapy and the type of chemotherapy. Results Data for 1894 patients were available. 69.0% postmenopausal, 67.0% pT1, 22.3% pTmic/pT1a/pT1b, 61.0% pN0, 48.7% luminal A, 18.1% luminal B, 16.1% HER2 positive, 8.7% triple negative, 8.4% unknown. 57.8% received adjuvant chemotherapy: 38.1% of luminal A, 67.3% luminal B, 88.2% HER2-positive, 97.6% triple negative. Regimens administered: 9.1% CMF-like, 48.8% anthracyclines, 38.4% anthracyclines plus taxanes, 3.7% taxanes alone. Increasing pT/pN and, marginally, HER2-positive were associated with the prescription of anthracyclines plus taxanes. Suboptimal schedules (CMF-like or AC/EC or FEC-75) were prescribed in 37.3% receiving chemotherapy, even in HER2-positive and triple negative disease (36.5% and 34.0%, respectively). Conclusions This study showed an overprescription of adjuvant chemotherapy for early breast cancer, particularly referred to luminal A. pT, pN and, marginally, HER2 were the principal determinants for the choice of chemotherapy type. Suboptimal chemotherapy regimens were adopted in at least one third of HER2-positve and triple negative. PMID:22672524

  12. Fulvenallene decomposition kinetics.

    PubMed

    Polino, Daniela; Cavallotti, Carlo

    2011-09-22

    While the decomposition kinetics of the benzyl radical has been studied in depth both from the experimental and the theoretical standpoint, much less is known about the reactivity of what is likely to be its main decomposition product, fulvenallene. In this work the high temperature reactivity of fulvenallene was investigated on a Potential Energy Surface (PES) consisting of 10 wells interconnected through 11 transition states using a 1 D Master Equation (ME). Rate constants were calculated using RRKM theory and the ME was integrated using a stochastic kinetic Monte Carlo code. It was found that two main decomposition channels are possible, the first is active on the singlet PES and leads to the formation of the fulvenallenyl radical and atomic hydrogen. The second requires intersystem crossing to the triplet PES and leads to acetylene and cyclopentadienylidene. ME simulations were performed calculating the microcanonical intersystem crossing frequency using Landau-Zener theory convoluting the crossing probability with RRKM rates evaluated at the conical intersection. It was found that the reaction channel leading to the cyclopentadienylidene diradical is only slightly faster than that leading to the fulvenallenyl radical, so that it can be concluded that both reactions are likely to be active in the investigated temperature (1500-2000 K) and pressure (0.05-50 bar) ranges. However, the simulations show that intersystem crossing is rate limiting for the first reaction channel, as the removal of this barrier leads to an increase of the rate constant by a factor of 2-3. Channel specific rate constants are reported as a function of temperature and pressure. PMID:21819060

  13. Photolytic decomposition of hydrochlorothiazide.

    PubMed

    Tamat, S R; Moore, D E

    1983-02-01

    Hydrochlorothiazide decomposes upon irradiation with near-UV light (lambda greater than 310 nm) both in methanol and aqueous solutions. In the photolysis the chlorine substituent is removed to be replaced by either--H or--OR from the solvent ROH. Hydrolysis of the thiadiazine ring is superimposed upon the dechlorination. The presence of oxygen inhibits the decomposition. The mechanism of the photolysis is suggested to involve cation radical formation which facilitates the hydrolysis step. 5-Chloro-2,4-disulphonamido-aniline, the normal hydrolysis product from hydrochlorothiazide, is also susceptible to photolytic dechlorination by a similar mechanism. PMID:6834257

  14. Hydrogen peroxide catalytic decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide in a gaseous stream is converted to nitrogen dioxide using oxidizing species generated through the use of concentrated hydrogen peroxide fed as a monopropellant into a catalyzed thruster assembly. The hydrogen peroxide is preferably stored at stable concentration levels, i.e., approximately 50%-70% by volume, and may be increased in concentration in a continuous process preceding decomposition in the thruster assembly. The exhaust of the thruster assembly, rich in hydroxyl and/or hydroperoxy radicals, may be fed into a stream containing oxidizable components, such as nitric oxide, to facilitate their oxidation.

  15. Mode decomposition evolution equations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Wei, Guo-Wei; Yang, Siyang

    2011-01-01

    Partial differential equation (PDE) based methods have become some of the most powerful tools for exploring the fundamental problems in signal processing, image processing, computer vision, machine vision and artificial intelligence in the past two decades. The advantages of PDE based approaches are that they can be made fully automatic, robust for the analysis of images, videos and high dimensional data. A fundamental question is whether one can use PDEs to perform all the basic tasks in the image processing. If one can devise PDEs to perform full-scale mode decomposition for signals and images, the modes thus generated would be very useful for secondary processing to meet the needs in various types of signal and image processing. Despite of great progress in PDE based image analysis in the past two decades, the basic roles of PDEs in image/signal analysis are only limited to PDE based low-pass filters, and their applications to noise removal, edge detection, segmentation, etc. At present, it is not clear how to construct PDE based methods for full-scale mode decomposition. The above-mentioned limitation of most current PDE based image/signal processing methods is addressed in the proposed work, in which we introduce a family of mode decomposition evolution equations (MoDEEs) for a vast variety of applications. The MoDEEs are constructed as an extension of a PDE based high-pass filter (Europhys. Lett., 59(6): 814, 2002) by using arbitrarily high order PDE based low-pass filters introduced by Wei (IEEE Signal Process. Lett., 6(7): 165, 1999). The use of arbitrarily high order PDEs is essential to the frequency localization in the mode decomposition. Similar to the wavelet transform, the present MoDEEs have a controllable time-frequency localization and allow a perfect reconstruction of the original function. Therefore, the MoDEE operation is also called a PDE transform. However, modes generated from the present approach are in the spatial or time domain and can be easily used for secondary processing. Various simplifications of the proposed MoDEEs, including a linearized version, and an algebraic version, are discussed for computational convenience. The Fourier pseudospectral method, which is unconditionally stable for linearized the high order MoDEEs, is utilized in our computation. Validation is carried out to mode separation of high frequency adjacent modes. Applications are considered to signal and image denoising, image edge detection, feature extraction, enhancement etc. It is hoped that this work enhances the understanding of high order PDEs and yields robust and useful tools for image and signal analysis. PMID:22408289

  16. Mode decomposition evolution equations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Wei, Guo-Wei; Yang, Siyang

    2012-03-01

    Partial differential equation (PDE) based methods have become some of the most powerful tools for exploring the fundamental problems in signal processing, image processing, computer vision, machine vision and artificial intelligence in the past two decades. The advantages of PDE based approaches are that they can be made fully automatic, robust for the analysis of images, videos and high dimensional data. A fundamental question is whether one can use PDEs to perform all the basic tasks in the image processing. If one can devise PDEs to perform full-scale mode decomposition for signals and images, the modes thus generated would be very useful for secondary processing to meet the needs in various types of signal and image processing. Despite of great progress in PDE based image analysis in the past two decades, the basic roles of PDEs in image/signal analysis are only limited to PDE based low-pass filters, and their applications to noise removal, edge detection, segmentation, etc. At present, it is not clear how to construct PDE based methods for full-scale mode decomposition. The above-mentioned limitation of most current PDE based image/signal processing methods is addressed in the proposed work, in which we introduce a family of mode decomposition evolution equations (MoDEEs) for a vast variety of applications. The MoDEEs are constructed as an extension of a PDE based high-pass filter (Europhys. Lett., 59(6): 814, 2002) by using arbitrarily high order PDE based low-pass filters introduced by Wei (IEEE Signal Process. Lett., 6(7): 165, 1999). The use of arbitrarily high order PDEs is essential to the frequency localization in the mode decomposition. Similar to the wavelet transform, the present MoDEEs have a controllable time-frequency localization and allow a perfect reconstruction of the original function. Therefore, the MoDEE operation is also called a PDE transform. However, modes generated from the present approach are in the spatial or time domain and can be easily used for secondary processing. Various simplifications of the proposed MoDEEs, including a linearized version, and an algebraic version, are discussed for computational convenience. The Fourier pseudospectral method, which is unconditionally stable for linearized the high order MoDEEs, is utilized in our computation. Validation is carried out to mode separation of high frequency adjacent modes. Applications are considered to signal and image denoising, image edge detection, feature extraction, enhancement etc. It is hoped that this work enhances the understanding of high order PDEs and yields robust and useful tools for image and signal analysis. PMID:22408289

  17. Identification of old tidal dwarfs near early-type galaxies from deep imaging and H I observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc, Pierre-Alain; Paudel, Sanjaya; McDermid, Richard M.; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Serra, Paolo; Bournaud, Frédéric; Cappellari, Michele; Emsellem, Eric

    2014-05-01

    It has recently been proposed that the dwarf spheroidal galaxies located in the Local Group discs of satellites (DoSs) may be tidal dwarf galaxies (TDGs) born in a major merger at least 5 Gyr ago. Whether TDGs can live that long is still poorly constrained by observations. As part of deep optical and H I surveys with the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) MegaCam camera and Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope made within the ATLAS3D project, and follow-up spectroscopic observations with the Gemini-North telescope, we have discovered old TDG candidates around several early-type galaxies. At least one of them has an oxygen abundance close to solar, as expected for a tidal origin. This confirmed pre-enriched object is located within the gigantic, but very low surface brightness, tidal tail that emanates from the elliptical galaxy, NGC 5557. An age of 4 Gyr estimated from its SED fitting makes it the oldest securely identified TDG ever found so far. We investigated the structural and gaseous properties of the TDG and of a companion located in the same collisional debris, and thus most likely of tidal origin as well. Despite several Gyr of evolution close to their parent galaxies, they kept a large gas reservoir. Their central surface brightness is low and their effective radius much larger than that of typical dwarf galaxies of the same mass. This possibly provides us with criteria to identify tidal objects which can be more easily checked than the traditional ones requiring deep spectroscopic observations. In view of the above, we discuss the survival time of TDGs and question the tidal origin of the DoSs.

  18. Purely Dry Mergers do not Explain the Observed Evolution of Massive Early-type Galaxies since z ~ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnenfeld, Alessandro; Nipoti, Carlo; Treu, Tommaso

    2014-05-01

    Several studies have suggested that the observed size evolution of massive early-type galaxies (ETGs) can be explained as a combination of dry mergers and progenitor bias, at least since z ~ 1. In this paper we carry out a new test of the dry-merger scenario based on recent lensing measurements of the evolution of the mass density profile of ETGs. We construct a theoretical model for the joint evolution of the size and mass density profile slope γ' driven by dry mergers occurring at rates given by cosmological simulations. Such dry-merger model predicts a strong decrease of γ' with cosmic time, inconsistent with the almost constant γ' inferred from observations in the redshift range 0 < z < 1. We then show with a simple toy model that a modest amount of cold gas in the mergers—consistent with the upper limits on recent star formation in ETGs—is sufficient to reconcile the model with measurements of γ'. By fitting for the amount of gas accreted during mergers, we find that models with dissipation are consistent with observations of the evolution in both size and density slope, if ~4% of the total final stellar mass arises from the gas accreted since z ~ 1. Purely dry merger models are ruled out at >99% CL. We thus suggest a scenario where the outer regions of massive ETGs grow by accretion of stars and dark matter, while small amounts of dissipation and nuclear star formation conspire to keep the mass density profile constant and approximately isothermal.

  19. Purely dry mergers do not explain the observed evolution of massive early-type galaxies since z ∼ 1

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnenfeld, Alessandro; Treu, Tommaso; Nipoti, Carlo

    2014-05-10

    Several studies have suggested that the observed size evolution of massive early-type galaxies (ETGs) can be explained as a combination of dry mergers and progenitor bias, at least since z ∼ 1. In this paper we carry out a new test of the dry-merger scenario based on recent lensing measurements of the evolution of the mass density profile of ETGs. We construct a theoretical model for the joint evolution of the size and mass density profile slope γ' driven by dry mergers occurring at rates given by cosmological simulations. Such dry-merger model predicts a strong decrease of γ' with cosmic time, inconsistent with the almost constant γ' inferred from observations in the redshift range 0 < z < 1. We then show with a simple toy model that a modest amount of cold gas in the mergers—consistent with the upper limits on recent star formation in ETGs—is sufficient to reconcile the model with measurements of γ'. By fitting for the amount of gas accreted during mergers, we find that models with dissipation are consistent with observations of the evolution in both size and density slope, if ∼4% of the total final stellar mass arises from the gas accreted since z ∼ 1. Purely dry merger models are ruled out at >99% CL. We thus suggest a scenario where the outer regions of massive ETGs grow by accretion of stars and dark matter, while small amounts of dissipation and nuclear star formation conspire to keep the mass density profile constant and approximately isothermal.

  20. Empirical resolvent mode decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Towne, Aaron; Colonius, Tim; Schmidt, Oliver

    2015-11-01

    The computation of resolvent modes is a popular method for studying the input/output behavior of fluid dynamical systems. These modes maximize the linear gain between the inputs and outputs of the system as a function of frequency and are computed via a singular decomposition of the linearized operator relating these quantities. Typically, the inputs are meant to represent the nonlinear interactions that are otherwise omitted in linear models. Here, we develop a data-based input/output methodology. The method constructs orthogonal input and output modes from ensembles of flow data that maximize the gains. The essential difference compared to traditional resolvent modes is that the empirical modes are constrained to lie within the subspace spanned by the data. The empirical modes can be shown to be equivalent to either traditional resolvent modes or proper-orthogonal-decomposition modes in appropriate limits. We demonstrate the properties and utility of the method using the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation and LES data from a Mach 0.9 turbulent jet, and compare the empirical modes to traditional resolvent modes in both cases.

  1. Hydrogen iodide decomposition

    DOEpatents

    O'Keefe, Dennis R.; Norman, John H.

    1983-01-01

    Liquid hydrogen iodide is decomposed to form hydrogen and iodine in the presence of water using a soluble catalyst. Decomposition is carried out at a temperature between about 350.degree. K. and about 525.degree. K. and at a corresponding pressure between about 25 and about 300 atmospheres in the presence of an aqueous solution which acts as a carrier for the homogeneous catalyst. Various halides of the platinum group metals, particularly Pd, Rh and Pt, are used, particularly the chlorides and iodides which exhibit good solubility. After separation of the H.sub.2, the stream from the decomposer is countercurrently extracted with nearly dry HI to remove I.sub.2. The wet phase contains most of the catalyst and is recycled directly to the decomposition step. The catalyst in the remaining almost dry HI-I.sub.2 phase is then extracted into a wet phase which is also recycled. The catalyst-free HI-I.sub.2 phase is finally distilled to separate the HI and I.sub.2. The HI is recycled to the reactor; the I.sub.2 is returned to a reactor operating in accordance with the Bunsen equation to create more HI.

  2. Nitrosonium-Catalyzed Decomposition of S-Nitrosothiols in Solution

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yi-Lei; McCarren, Patrick R.; Houk, K. N.; Choi, Bo Yoon; Toone, Eric J.

    2008-01-01

    The decomposition of S-nitrosothiols (RSNO) in solution under oxidative conditions is significantly faster than can be accounted for by homolysis of the S-N bond. Here we propose a cationic chain mechanism in which nitrosylation of nitrosothiol produces a nitrosylated cation that, in turn, reacts with a second nitrosothiol to produce disulfide and the NO dimer. Nitrosylated dimer acts as a source of nitrosonium for nitrosothiol nitrosylation, completing the catalytic cycle. The mechanism accounts for several unexplained facets of nitrosothiol chemistry in solution, including the observation that the decomposition of an RSNO is accelerated by O2, mixtures of O2 and NO, and other oxidants, that decomposition is inhibited by thiols and other antioxidants, that decomposition is dependent on sulfur substitution, and that decomposition often shows non-integral kinetic orders. PMID:16076198

  3. The decomposition of C60 on nickel clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, E. K.; Kerns, K. P.; Koretsky, G. M.; Nieman, G. C.; Riley, S. J.

    2000-02-01

    The adsorption of C60 on nickel clusters Nin in the n=8-31 size range is studied at elevated temperatures. Above 800 °C, decomposition of C60 is seen on clusters containing oxide impurities by the loss of CO and/or CO2 molecules. The extent of decomposition depends on cluster size and C60 coverage, which affect the charging of the metal core by electron transfer from the metal to the C60. Both decreased cluster size and increased C60 coverage reduce the electron transfer per C60 molecule, weakening the C60-Nin bond and decreasing the rate of decomposition. In spite of this effect, C60 appears to decompose more readily on small nickel clusters than on bulk nickel surfaces. While decomposition is only observed for clusters having adsorbed O atoms, the oxygen may actually inhibit decomposition by withdrawing electronic charge from the metal, likewise weakening the C60-Nin bond.

  4. UV-DROPOUT GALAXIES IN THE GOODS-SOUTH FIELD FROM WFC3 EARLY RELEASE SCIENCE OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Hathi, N. P.; Ryan, R. E.; Cohen, S. H.; Windhorst, R. A.; Rutkowski, M. J.; Yan, H.; McCarthy, P. J.; O'Connell, R. W.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Bond, H. E.; Balick, B.; Calzetti, D.; Disney, M. J.; Dopita, M. A.; Frogel, Jay A.; Hall, D. N. B.; Holtzman, J. A.; Kimble, R. A.; Paresce, F.; Saha, A.

    2010-09-10

    We combine new high sensitivity ultraviolet (UV) imaging from the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) with existing deep HST/Advanced Camera for Surveys optical images from the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) program to identify UV-dropouts, which are Lyman break galaxy (LBG) candidates at z {approx_equal} 1-3. These new HST/WFC3 observations were taken over 50 arcmin{sup 2} in the GOODS-South field as a part of the Early Release Science program. The uniqueness of these new UV data is that they are observed in three UV/optical (WFC3 UVIS) channel filters (F225W, F275W, and F336W), which allows us to identify three different sets of UV-dropout samples. We apply Lyman break dropout selection criteria to identify F225W-, F275W-, and F336W-dropouts, which are z {approx_equal} 1.7, 2.1, and 2.7 LBG candidates, respectively. We use multi-wavelength imaging combined with available spectroscopic and photometric redshifts to carefully access the validity of our UV-dropout candidates. Our results are as follows: (1) these WFC3 UVIS filters are very reliable in selecting LBGs with z {approx_equal} 2.0, which helps to reduce the gap between the well-studied z {approx}> 3 and z {approx} 0 regimes; (2) the combined number counts with average redshift z {approx_equal} 2.2 agree very well with the observed change in the surface densities as a function of redshift when compared with the higher redshift LBG samples; and (3) the best-fit Schechter function parameters from the rest-frame UV luminosity functions at three different redshifts fit very well with the evolutionary trend of the characteristic absolute magnitude, M*, and the faint-end slope, {alpha}, as a function of redshift. This is the first study to illustrate the usefulness of the WFC3 UVIS channel observations to select z {approx}< 3 LBGs. The addition of the new WFC3 on the HST has made it possible to uniformly select LBGs from z {approx_equal} 1 to z {approx_equal} 9 and significantly enhance our understanding of these galaxies using HST sensitivity and resolution.

  5. New observations of the early land plant Eocooksonia Doweld from the Pridoli (Upper Silurian) of Xinjiang, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Jinzhuang; Wang, Qi; Wang, Deming; Wang, Yi; Hao, Shougang

    2015-04-01

    As an early land plant previously reported from the Upper Silurian (Pridoli) of Xinjiang, Northwest China and Central Kazakhstan, the circumscription of Eocooksonia sphaerica (Senkevitsch) Doweld remains ill-defined because of the paucity of specimens and poor preservation in marine deposits. New specimens of this plant are described from the Pridoli-aged Wutubulake Formation of the Junggar Basin, Xinjiang. New observations and comparisons with the type material from Kazakhstan confirm the pseudomonopodial branching pattern, which forms an apparent main axis with lateral dichotomously branching systems. Our specimens demonstrate that the terminal sporangia of Eocooksonia Doweld consist of a central body and a border with four to eight elongate-triangular emergences, a character shown in the published illustrations of the type material but not mentioned in the original diagnosis. Eocooksonia may be close to Cooksonia Lang and Pertonella Fanning, Edwards et Richardson in affinities, particularly to the latter that has terminal discoidal sporangia with spiny emergences. It is deduced that the sporangial central body of Eocooksonia contains sporogenous tissues, which are covered by a distal surface wall with radiated emergences. One sporangium specimen of an unnamed plant is also described from the Wutubulake Formation of Xinjiang; it shows a central body with a wide border lacking emergences, and represents a taxon superficially similar to Eocooksonia.

  6. Electron microscopic observation of the early stages of Cryptosporidium parvum asexual multiplication and development in in vitro axenic culture.

    PubMed

    Aldeyarbi, Hebatalla M; Karanis, Panagiotis

    2016-02-01

    The stages of Cryptosporidium parvum asexual exogenous development were investigated at high ultra-structural resolution in cell-free culture using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Early C. parvum trophozoites were ovoid in shape, 1.07 × 1.47 μm(2) in size, and contained a large nucleus and adjacent Golgi complex. Dividing and mature meronts containing four to eight developing merozoites, 2.34 × 2.7 μm(2) in size, were observed within the first 24h of cultivation. An obvious peculiarity was found within the merozoite pellicle, as it was composed of the outer plasma membrane with underlying middle and inner membrane complexes. Further novel findings were vacuolization of the meront's residuum and extension of its outer pellicle, as parasitophorous vacuole-like membranes were also evident. The asexual reproduction of C. parvum was consistent with the developmental pattern of both eimerian coccidia and Arthrogregarinida (formerly Neogregarinida). The unique cell-free development of C. parvum described here, along with the establishment of meronts and merozoite formation, is the first such evidence obtained from in vitro cell-free culture at the ultrastructural level. PMID:26587578

  7. ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCES IN THE X-RAY GAS OF EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES WITH XMM-NEWTON AND CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Ji Jun; Irwin, Jimmy A.; Athey, Alex; Bregman, Joel N.; Lloyd-Davies, Edward J. E-mail: jairwin@umich.edu E-mail: jbregman@umich.edu

    2009-05-10

    The source of hot gas in elliptical galaxies is thought to be due to stellar mass loss, with contributions from supernova (SN) events and possibly from infall from a surrounding environment. This picture predicts supersolar values for the metallicity of the gas toward the inner part of the galaxy, which can be tested by measuring the gas phase abundances. We use high-quality data for 10 nearby early-type galaxy from XMM-Newton, featuring both the European Photon Imaging Camera and the Reflection Grating Spectrometer, where the strongest emission lines are detected with little blending; some Chandra data are also used. We find excellent consistency in the elemental abundances between the different XMM-Newton instruments and good consistency with Chandra. Differences in abundances with aperture size and model complexity are examined, but large differences rarely occur. For a two-temperature thermal model plus a point source contribution, the median Fe and O abundances are 0.86 and 0.44 of the solar value, while Si and Mg abundances are similar to that for Fe. This is similar to stellar abundances for these galaxies but SNe were expected to enhance the gas phase abundances considerably, which is not observed.

  8. Usual Clinical Practice for Early Supported Discharge after Stroke with Continued Rehabilitation at Home: An Observational Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Tistad, Malin; von Koch, Lena

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Based on randomised controlled trials, evidence exists that early supported discharge (ESD) from the hospital with continued rehabilitation at home has beneficial effects after stroke; however, the effects of ESD service in regular clinical practice have not been investigated. The purpose of the current study was to compare ESD service with conventional rehabilitation in terms of patient outcomes, caregiver burden at 3 and 12 months and the use and costs of healthcare during the first year after stroke. Material and Methods This study was a subgroup analysis of a longitudinal observational study of patients who received care in the stroke unit at Karolinska University Hospital in Sweden. Patients who met the inclusion criteria for ESD in previous experimental studies were included. The patients were referred to available rehabilitation services at discharge, and comparisons between those who received ESD service (the ESD group, n = 40) and those who received conventional rehabilitation (the NoESD group, n = 110) were performed with regard to independence in activities of daily living (ADL), the frequency of social activities, life satisfaction, and caregiver burden and the use and costs of healthcare during the first year after stroke. Results At 3 and 12 months, no differences were observed with regard to patient outcomes; however, ESD was associated with a lower caregiver burden (p = 0.01) at 12 months. The initial length of stay (LOS) at the hospital was 8 days for the ESD group and 15 days for the NoESD group (p = 0.02). The median number of outpatient rehabilitation contacts was 20.5 for the ESD group (81% constituting ESD service) and 3 for the NoESD group (p<0.001). There was no difference between the groups with regard to overall healthcare costs. Conclusions ESD service in usual clinical practice renders similar health benefits as conventional rehabilitation but a different pattern of resource use and with released capacity in acute stroke care. PMID:26186211

  9. Observations of Near-Surface Heat-Flux and Temperature Profiles Through the Early Evening Transition over Contrasting Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Derek D.; Nadeau, Daniel F.; Hoch, Sebastian W.; Pardyjak, Eric R.

    2015-07-01

    Near-surface turbulence data from the Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observations (MATERHORN) program are used to study countergradient heat fluxes through the early evening transition. Two sites, subjected to similar large-scale forcing, but with vastly different surface and sub-surface characteristics, are considered. The Playa site is situated at the interior of a large dry lakebed desert with high sub-surface soil moisture, shallow water table, and devoid of vegetation. The Sagebrush site is located in a desert steppe region with sparse vegetation and little soil moisture. Countergradient sensible heat fluxes are observed during the transition at both sites. The transition process is both site and height dependent. At the Sagebrush site, the countergradient flux at 5 m and below occurs when the sign change of the sensible heat flux precedes the local temperature gradient sign change. For 10 m and above, the countergradient flux occurs when the sign change of the sensible heat flux follows the local temperature gradient sign change. At the Playa site, the countergradient flux at all tower levels occurs when the sign change of the sensible heat flux follows the local temperature gradient sign change. The phenomenon is explained in terms of the mean temperature and heat-flux evolution. The temperature gradient sign reversal is a top-down process while the flux reversal occurs nearly simultaneously at all heights. The differing countergradient behaviour is primarily due to the different subsurface thermal characteristics at the two sites. The combined high volumetric heat capacity and high thermal conductivity at the Playa site lead to small vertical temperature gradients that affect the relative magnitude of terms in the heat-flux tendency equation. A critical ratio of the gradient production to buoyant production of sensible heat flux is suggested so as to predict the countergradient behaviour.

  10. Evaluation of Cloud and Aerosol Screening of Early Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 Observations with Collocated MODIS Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, T.; O'Dell, C.; Cronk, H. Q.; Partain, P.; Frankenberg, C.; Eldering, A.; Pollock, H. R.; Crisp, D.

    2014-12-01

    Effective cloud and aerosol screening is critically important to the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) mission, which can accurately determine column averaged dry air mole fraction of carbon dioxide (XCO2) only when the scenes are sufficiently clear of scattering material. Two primary algorithms are used to calculate the degree of contamination within OCO-2 soundings, both of which evaluate the light path modification induced by clouds and aerosols. The first algorithm compares the measured spectra of the Oxygen-A band near 0.76 microns (mm), to synthetic spectra generated for clear scenes with only Rayleigh scattering. Large, spectrally dependent residuals indicate the presence of large path length modifications. The second cloud screening algorithm compares ratios of retrieved CO2 (and H2O) in the 1.6mm (weak CO2) and 2.0mm (strong CO2) spectral bands estimated with a radiative transfer code that neglects scattering. Soundings with significant cloud or aerosol scattering produce ratios that differ from unity because scattering modifies the optical path lengths differently in these two spectral regions. These two cloud screening algorithms have been used successfully for the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) mission. Here they are evaluated for the first time as applied to early OCO-2 data by comparing their results to cloud and aerosol parameters retrieved from collocated observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument. In addition, we also evaluate the hypothesis that an individual OCO-2 sounding is twice as likely to be cloud-free as compared to a GOSAT TANSO-FTS sounding, due to a surface footprint that is more than 30 times smaller.

  11. Multiband photometric decomposition of nuclear stellar disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morelli, L.; Cesetti, M.; Corsini, E. M.; Pizzella, A.; Dalla Bont, E.; Sarzi, M.; Bertola, F.

    2010-07-01

    Context. Small, bright stellar disks with scale lengths of a few tens of parsec are known to reside in the center of galaxies. They are believed to have formed in a dissipational process as the end result of star formation in gas either accreted during a merging (or acquisition) event or piled up by the secular evolution of a nuclear bar. Only a few of them have been studied in detail to date. Aims: Using archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging, we investigate the photometric parameters of the nuclear stellar disks hosted by three early-type galaxies in the Virgo cluster, NGC 4458, NGC 4478, and NGC 4570, to constrain the process that forms their stars. Methods: The central surface brightness, scale length, inclination, and position angle of the nuclear disks were derived by adopting the photometric decomposition method introduced by Scorza & Bender and assuming the disks to be infinitesimally thin and exponential. Results: The location, orientation, and size of the nuclear disks is the same in all the images obtained with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 and Advanced Camera for Surveys and available in the HST Science Archive. The scale length, inclination, and position angle of each disk are constant within the errors in the observed U, B, V, and I passbands, independently of their values and the properties of the host spheroid. Conclusions: We interpret the absence of color gradients in the stellar population of the nuclear disks as the signature that star formation homogeneously occurred along their length. An inside-out formation scenario is, instead, expected to produce color gradients and is therefore ruled out.

  12. Autocatalytic Decomposition Mechanisms in Energetic Molecular Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuklja, Maija; Rashkeev, Sergey

    2009-06-01

    Atomic scale mechanisms of the initiation of chemical processes in energetic molecular crystals, which lead to the decomposition and ultimately to an explosive chain reaction, are still far from being understood. In this work, we investigate the onset of the initiation processes in two high explosive crystals - diamino-dinitroethylene (DADNE) and triamino- trinitrobenzene (TATB). We found that an autocatalytic decomposition mechanism is likely to take place in DADNE crystal that consists of corrugated, dashboard-shaped molecular layers. The presence of a dissociated NO2 group in the interstitial space between two layers induces a significant shear-strain between these layers, which, in turn, facilitates the further dissociation of NO2 groups from surrounding molecules through lowering the C-NO2 decomposition barrier. Unlike this, in TATB (that consists of flat, graphite-like molecular layers), an interstitial NO2 group positioned between two layers tends to produce a tensile stress (rather than a shear-strain), which leads to local molecular disorder in these layers without any significant modification of the C-NO2 decomposition barrier. The observed differences between the two materials are discussed in terms of their structural, electronic, and chemical properties.

  13. Low Temperature Decomposition Rates for Tetraphenylborate Ion

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.D.

    1998-11-18

    Previous studies indicated that palladium is catalyzes rapid decomposition of alkaline tetraphenylborate slurries. Additional evidence suggest that Pd(II) reduces to Pd(0) during catalyst activation. Further use of tetraphenylborate ion in the decontamination of radioactive waste may require removal of the catalyst or cooling to temperatures at which the decomposition reaction proceeds slowly and does not adversely affect processing. Recent tests showed that tetraphenylborate did not react appreciably at 25 degrees Celsius over six months suggesting the potential to avoid the decomposition at low temperatures. The lack of reaction at low temperature could reflect very slow kinetics at the lower temperature, or may indicate a catalyst ''deactivation'' process. Previous tests in the temperature range 35 to 70 degrees Celsius provided a low precision estimate of the activation energy of the reaction with which to predict the rate of reaction at 25 percent Celsius. To understand the observations at 25 degrees Celsius, experiments must separate the catalyst activation step and the subsequent reaction with TPB. Tests described in this report represent an initial attempt to separate the two steps and determine the rate and activation energy of the reaction between active catalyst and TPB. The results of these tests indicate that the absence of reaction at 25 degrees Celsius was caused by failure to activate the catalyst or the presence of a deactivating mechanism. In the presence of activated catalyst, the decomposition reaction rate is significant.

  14. Cortisol Levels during the Menopausal Transition and Early Postmenopause: Observations from the Seattle Midlife Women’s Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Nancy Fugate; Mitchell, Ellen Sullivan; Smith-DiJulio, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    Aims Cortisol levels rise among some women during the late stage of the menopausal transition, but we know little about changes in cortisol levels in relation to menopause-related factors (menopausal transition (MT) stage, urinary estrone glucuronide, testosterone, FSH), stress-related factors (epinephrine, norepinephrine, perceived stress), symptoms (hot flashes, mood, memory and sleep), social factors (income adequacy, role burden, social support, employment, parenting, and history of sexual abuse) and health-related factors (depressed mood, perceived health, physical appraisal, BMI, and smoking). Aims were to examine the influence of menopause-related factors, stress-related factors, symptoms, social, and health-related factors on cortisol levels during the menopausal transition. Methods A subset of Seattle Midlife Women’s Health Study participants who provided data during the late reproductive, early and late MT stages or early postmenopause (PM) and who were not using hormone therapy or corticosteroids (N=132 women, up to 5218 observations) including menstrual calendars for staging the MT, annual health reports, health diaries, and overnight urine specimens (assayed for cortisol, catecholamines, estrone glucuronide and FSH) between 1990 and 2005 were included. Perceived stress, symptoms, and health behaviors were assessed in a health diary. Health-related and social factors were assessed in an annual health update. Multilevel modeling was used to test effects of menopause- related and other factors on overnight cortisol levels. Results When tested with age as a measure of time, menopause-related covariates, including estrone glucuronide (E1G), FSH, and testosterone were associated with significant increases in overnight cortisol levels (p<.0001). Likewise, epinephrine and norepinephrine were each associated significantly with overnight cortisol levels (p<.0001). In multivariate analyses, E1G, FSH, and testosterone constituted the best set of predictors. Conclusions Overnight cortisol levels during the MT were associated with E1G, testosterone, and FSH levels. In addition, they were significantly and positively associated with epinephrine and norepinephrine. MT stage, symptoms, and social, stress-related, and health-related factors had little relationship to overnight cortisol levels when other biological indicators were considered. PMID:19322116

  15. A-train CALIOP and MLS observations of early winter Antarctic polar stratospheric clouds and nitric acid in 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, A.; Santee, M. L.; Wu, D. L.; Chae, J. H.

    2012-03-01

    A-train Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) observations are used to investigate the development of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) and the gas-phase nitric acid distribution in the early 2008 Antarctic winter. Observational evidence of gravity-wave activity is provided by Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) radiances and infrared spectroscopic detection of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) in PSCs is obtained from the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS). Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System (GEOS-5 DAS) analyses are used to derive Lagrangian trajectories and to determine temperature-time histories of air parcels. We use CALIOP backscatter and depolarization measurements to classify PSCs and the MLS measurements to determine the corresponding gas-phase HNO3 as a function of temperature. For liquid PSCs the uptake of HNO3 follows the theoretical equilibrium curve for supercooled ternary solutions (STS), but at temperatures about 1 K lower as determined from GEOS-5. In the presence of solid phase PSCs, above the ice frost-point, the HNO3 depletion occurs over a wider range of temperatures (+2 to -7 K) distributed about the NAT equilibrium curve. Rapid gas-phase HNO3 depletion is first seen by MLS from from 23-25 May 2008, consisting of a decrease in the volume mixing ratio from 14 ppbv (parts per billion by volume) to 7 ppbv on the 46-32 hPa (hectopascal) pressure levels and accompanied by a 2-3 ppbv increase by renitrification at the 68 hPa pressure level. The observed region of depleted HNO3 is substantially smaller than the region bounded by the NAT existence temperature threshold. Temperature-time histories of air parcels demonstrate that the depletion is more clearly correlated with prior exposure to temperatures a few kelvin above the frost-point. From the combined data we infer the presence of large-size NAT particles with effective radii >5-7 μm and low NAT number densities <1 × 10-3 cm-3. This denitrification event is observed close to the pole in the Antarctic vortex before synoptic temperatures first fall below the ice frost point and before the widespread occurrence of large-scale NAT PSCs. An episode of mountain wave activity detected by AIRS on 28 May 2008 led to wave-ice formation in the rapid cooling phases over the Antarctic Peninsula and Ellsworth Mountains, seeding an outbreak of NAT PSCs that were detected by CALIOP and MIPAS. The NAT clouds formed at altitudes of 18-26 km in a polar freezing belt and appear to be composed of relatively small particles with estimated effective radii of around 1 μm and high NAT number densities >0.2 cm-3. This NAT outbreak is similar to an event previously reported from MIPAS observations in mid-June 2003.

  16. Direct Sum Decomposition of Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thaheem, A. B.

    2005-01-01

    Direct sum decomposition of Abelian groups appears in almost all textbooks on algebra for undergraduate students. This concept plays an important role in group theory. One simple example of this decomposition is obtained by using the kernel and range of a projection map on an Abelian group. The aim in this pedagogical note is to establish a direct…

  17. A-train CALIOP and MLS observations of early winter antarctic polar stratospheric clouds and nitric acid in 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, A.; Santee, M. L.; Wu, D. L.; Chae, J. H.

    2011-10-01

    A-train Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) observations are used to investigate the development of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) and the gas phase nitric acid distribution in the early 2008 Antarctic winter. Observational evidence of gravity-wave activity is provided by Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) radiances and infrared spectroscopic detection of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) in PSCs is obtained from the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS). Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System (GEOS-5 DAS) analyses are used to derive Lagrangian trajectories and to determine temperature-time histories of air parcels. We use CALIOP backscatter and depolarization measurements to classify PSCs and the MLS measurements to determine the corresponding gas phase HNO3 as a function of temperature. For liquid PSCs the uptake of HNO3 follows the theoretical equilibrium curve for supercooled ternary solutions (STS), but at temperatures about 1 K lower as determined from GEOS-5. In the presence of solid phase PSCs, above the ice frost-point, the HNO3 depletion occurs over a wider range of temperatures (+2 to -7 K) distributed about the NAT equilibrium curve. Rapid gas phase HNO3 depletion is first seen by MLS from from 23-25 May 2008, consisting of a decrease in the volume mixing ratio (parts per billion by volume) from 14 ppbv to 7 ppbv on the 46-32 hPa (hectopascal) pressure levels and accompanied by a 2-3 ppbv increase by renitrification at the 68 hPa pressure level. Temperature-time histories of air parcels demonstrate that the depleted HNO3 region is more clearly correlated with prior low temperature exposure of a few kelvin above the frost-point than with either the region bounded by the NAT existence temperature threshold or the region of minimum temperatures. From the combined data we infer the presence of large-size NAT particles with effective radii >5-7 μm and low NAT number densities <1×10-3 cm-3. This denitrification event is observed close to the pole in the Antarctic vortex before synoptic temperatures first fall below the ice frost point and before the widespread occurrence of large-scale NAT PSCs at altitudes 18-26 km in a polar freezing belt. The NAT outbreak is similar to an event previously reported from MIPAS observations in mid-June 2003 and is again linked to NAT formation via ice-seeding following an episode of mountain wave activity detected by AIRS. Subsequent wave-ice formation in the rapid cooling phases over the Antarctic Peninsula and Ellsworth Mountains is detected here by CALIOP and MIPAS. The NAT clouds appear to be composed of relatively small particles with estimated effective radii of around 1 μm and high NAT number densities >0.2 cm-3.

  18. Cognitive Function After the Initiation of Adjuvant Endocrine Therapy in Early-Stage Breast Cancer: An Observational Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Ganz, Patricia A.; Petersen, Laura; Castellon, Steven A.; Bower, Julienne E.; Silverman, Daniel H.S.; Cole, Steven W.; Irwin, Michael R.; Belin, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This report examines cognitive complaints and neuropsychological (NP) testing outcomes in patients with early-stage breast cancer after the initiation of endocrine therapy (ET) to determine whether this therapy plays any role in post-treatment cognitive complaints. Patients and Methods One hundred seventy-three participants from the Mind Body Study (MBS) observational cohort provided data from self-report questionnaires and NP testing obtained at enrollment (T1, before initiation of ET), and 6 months later (T2). Bivariate analyses compared demographic and treatment variables, cognitive complaints, depressive symptoms, quality of life, and NP functioning between those who received ET versus not. Multivariable linear regression models examined predictors of cognitive complaints at T2, including selected demographic variables, depressive symptoms, ET use, and other medical variables, along with NP domains that were identified in bivariate analyses. Results Seventy percent of the 173 MBS participants initiated ET, evenly distributed between tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors. ET-treated participants reported significantly increased language and communication (LC) cognitive complaints at T2 (P = .003), but no significant differences in NP test performance. Multivariable regression on LC at T2 found higher LC complaints significantly associated with T1 LC score (P < .001), ET at T2 (P = .004), interaction between ET and past hormone therapy (HT) (P < .001), and diminished improvement in NP psychomotor function (P = .05). Depressive symptoms were not significant (P = .10). Conclusion Higher LC complaints are significantly associated with ET 6 months after starting treatment and reflect diminished improvements in some NP tests. Past HT is a significant predictor of higher LC complaints after initiation of ET. PMID:25267747

  19. Use of the Earth Observing One (EO-1) Satellite for the Namibia SensorWeb Flood Early Warning Pilot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandl, Daniel; Frye, Stuart; Cappelaere, Pat; Handy, Matthew; Policelli, Fritz; Katjizeu, McCloud; Van Langenhove, Guido; Aube, Guy; Saulnier, Jean-Francois; Sohlberg, Rob; Silva, Julie; Kussul, Nataliia; Skakun, Sergii; Ungar, Stephen; Grossman, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The Earth Observing One (EO-1) satellite was launched in November 2000 as a one year technology demonstration mission for a variety of space technologies. After the first year, it was used as a pathfinder for the creation of SensorWebs. A SensorWeb is the integration of variety of space, airborne and ground sensors into a loosely coupled collaborative sensor system that automatically provides useful data products. Typically, a SensorWeb is comprised of heterogeneous sensors tied together with a messaging architecture and web services. Disasters are the perfect arena to use SensorWebs. One SensorWeb pilot project that has been active since 2009 is the Namibia Early Flood Warning SensorWeb pilot project. The Pilot Project was established under the auspices of the Namibian Ministry of Agriculture Water and Forestry (MAWF)/Department of Water Affairs, the Committee on Earth Observing Satellites (CEOS)/Working Group on Information Systems and Services (WGISS) and moderated by the United Nations Platform for Space-based Information for Disaster Management and Emergency Response (UN-SPIDER). The effort began by identifying and prototyping technologies which enabled the rapid gathering and dissemination of both space-based and ground sensor data and data products for the purpose of flood disaster management and water-borne disease management. This was followed by an international collaboration to build small portions of the identified system which was prototyped during that past few years during the flood seasons which occurred in the February through May timeframe of 2010 and 2011 with further prototyping to occur in 2012. The SensorWeb system features EO-1 data along with other data sets from such satellites as Radarsat, Terra and Aqua. Finally, the SensorWeb team also began to examine the socioeconomic component to determine the impact of the SensorWeb technology and how best to assist in the infusion of this technology in lesser affluent areas with low levels of basic infrastructure. This paper provides an overview of these efforts, highlighting the EO-1 usage in this SensorWeb.

  20. Solid-state decomposition kinetics of pentaerythritol tetranitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Pickard, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    Decomposition of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) was monitored at constant volume under variable pressures of NO{sub 2} using differential scanning calorimetry(DSC). Decomposition involved a slow initial reaction followed by an autocatalytic transition at longer times. The apparent induction time(time-to-maximum rate) for autocatalysis was found to be dependent upon sample mass and the initial pressure of NO{sub 2}. A global kinetic model consistent with observed product distributions and the free radical chain decomposition mechanisms proposed for simpler alkyl nitrates was found to yield calculated induction times in accord with experiment. 13 refs., 3 figs.

  1. A Fantastic Decomposition: Unsettling the Fury of Having to Wait

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    This article draws on data from a single element of a larger project, which focused on the issue of "how children develop a reputation as "naughty" in the early years classroom." The author draws attention to the (in)corporeal (re)formation of the line in school, undertaking a decomposition of the topological spaces of research/art/education. She…

  2. A Fantastic Decomposition: Unsettling the Fury of Having to Wait

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    This article draws on data from a single element of a larger project, which focused on the issue of "how children develop a reputation as "naughty" in the early years classroom." The author draws attention to the (in)corporeal (re)formation of the line in school, undertaking a decomposition of the topological spaces of research/art/education. She

  3. Decomposition in northern Minnesota peatlands

    SciTech Connect

    Farrish, K.W.

    1985-01-01

    Decomposition in peatlands was investigated in northern Minnesota. Four sites, an ombrotrophic raised bog, an ombrotrophic perched bog and two groundwater minerotrophic fens, were studied. Decomposition rates of peat and paper were estimated using mass-loss techniques. Environmental and substrate factors that were most likely to be responsible for limiting decomposition were monitored. Laboratory incubation experiments complemented the field work. Mass-loss over one year in one of the bogs, ranged from 11 percent in the upper 10 cm of hummocks to 1 percent at 60 to 100 cm depth in hollows. Regression analysis of the data for that bog predicted no mass-loss below 87 cm. Decomposition estimates on an area basis were 2720 and 6460 km/ha yr for the two bogs; 17,000 and 5900 kg/ha yr for the two fens. Environmental factors found to limit decomposition in these peatlands were reducing/anaerobic conditions below the water table and cool peat temperatures. Substrate factors found to limit decomposition were low pH, high content of resistant organics such as lignin, and shortages of available N and K. Greater groundwater influence was found to favor decomposition through raising the pH and perhaps by introducing limited amounts of dissolved oxygen.

  4. Selected Optical-to-Radio Observations of the Evolution of Massive Galaxies and Structure Formation in the Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagg, Jeffrey Franklin William

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents a study of the formation and evolution of massive galaxies and large-scale structure in the early Universe, through complementary observations of distinct, but related phenomena over the wavelength range ~4200 Angstrom to ~2 cm. I introduce this study by briefly presenting the results of a collaborative analysis of cosmic microwave background fluctuations measured by WMAP, where we find that the power on large scales (>=60 deg), although low, is consistent with the lambda-CDM model predictions. Meanwhile the quantum fluctuations which initially "seeded" the overdensities in the matter distribution are confirmed to be Gaussian random as predicted by inflationary models. The evolution of large-scale structure following recombination, can be traced by the formation of massive high-redshift galaxies revealed in blank-field sub(mm) wavelength surveys. I present an independent analysis of the 450/850 micron SCUBA Half-Degree Extragalactic Survey (SHADES) survey data, wherein I conclude that a high-redshift tail (z ≫ 3) of luminous infrared galaxies is missed by current optical redshift surveys of radio-detected (sub)mm galaxy optical/infrared counterparts. In an attempt to address the need for a method of redshift determination for this higher redshift (sub)mm galaxy population, I present a cm-wavelength GBT search for low-J CO line emission in HDF850.1, predicted to have a redshift of z~4.1. Though this search was unsuccessful due to instrumental limitations, I conclude that future mm wavelength searches for high-J line emission will be more successful due to the gaseous medium in these objects being warm and dense. Once redshifts for these objects are obtained, subsequent studies of the physical conditions responsible for their extreme nature may be carried out through observations of additional diagnostic molecules. I present the first detections of HCN J=5-4 and [CI] J=1-0 in one of the most extreme high-redshift objects currently know, the ultraluminous lensed quasar APM 08279+5255 at z= 3.91. Indeed the HCN J=5-4 detection is the first in any extragalactic object. I find that the [CI] line luminosity predicts total molecular gas densities which are consistent with those measured by the CO J=1-0 line luminosity. The HCN J=5-4 line luminosity is a factor of 10 larger than expected, which may be due to radiative excitation by infrared photons from the central AGN. The final study of large-scale structure presented in this thesis uses the Ly-alpha forest of HI absorption lines, in simulated and observed QSO spectra, to explore the impact that extreme high-redshift starburst galaxies and AGN have on the gas in their local environments. I find that 20-40% of the contribution to the HI ionizing radiation field at z~2.5-3.5, is likely due to UV photons from star-forming galaxies, in addition to that believed to come from QSOs. These studies of high-redshift galaxies and large-scale structure have made use of current instruments on world-class facilities. I am now preparing to conduct similar studies with the next generation of interferometers and single-dish telescopes that will provide order of magnitude increases in the sensitivities to the continuum and molecular line emission from these tracers of structure formation and evolution.

  5. Effect of dislocations on spinodal decomposition in Fe-Cr alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong-Sheng; Li, Shu-Xiao; Zhang, Tong-Yi

    2009-12-01

    Phase-field simulations of spinodal decomposition in Fe-Cr alloys with dislocations were performed by using the Cahn-Hilliard diffusion equation. The stress field of dislocations was calculated in real space via Stroh's formalism, while the composition inhomogeneity-induced stress field and the diffusion equation were numerically calculated in Fourier space. The simulation results indicate that dislocation stress field facilitates, energetically and kinetically, spinodal decomposition, making the phase separation faster and the separated phase particles bigger at and near the dislocation core regions. A tilt grain boundary is thus a favorable place for spinodal decomposition, resulting in a special microstructure morphology, especially at the early stage of decomposition.

  6. Perfluoropolyalkylether decomposition on catalytic aluminas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morales, Wilfredo

    1994-01-01

    The decomposition of Fomblin Z25, a commercial perfluoropolyalkylether liquid lubricant, was studied using the Penn State Micro-oxidation Test, and a thermal gravimetric/differential scanning calorimetry unit. The micro-oxidation test was conducted using 440C stainless steel and pure iron metal catalyst specimens, whereas the thermal gravimetric/differential scanning calorimetry tests were conducted using catalytic alumina pellets. Analysis of the thermal data, high pressure liquid chromatography data, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data support evidence that there are two different decomposition mechanisms for Fomblin Z25, and that reductive sites on the catalytic surfaces are responsible for the decomposition of Fomblin Z25.

  7. The Association between Parent Early Adult Drug Use Disorder and Later Observed Parenting Practices and Child Behavior Problems: Testing Alternate Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Jennifer A.; Hill, Karl G.; Guttmannova, Katarina; Oesterle, Sabrina; Hawkins, J. David; Catalano, Richard F.; McMahon, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    This study tested the association between parent illicit drug use disorder (DUD) in early adulthood and observed parenting practices at ages 27-28 and examined the following 3 theoretically derived models explaining this link: (a) a disrupted parent adult functioning model,(b) a preexisting parent personality factor model, and (c) a disrupted…

  8. The View from the Little Chair in the Corner: Improving Teacher Practice and Early Childhood Learning (Wisdom from an Experienced Classroom Observer)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bess, Cindy Rzasa

    2009-01-01

    This is a down-to-earth, heart-to-heart book about what it takes to be an exceptional early childhood teacher. The author uses her experience as a classroom observer and a developmental psychologist to create a rationale for best practice--the reasoning behind the best (worst and average) classroom practice. Cindy Rzasa Bess examines a variety of

  9. Observed Differences between Early Childhood Programs in the U.S. and Korea: Reflections of "Developmentally Appropriate Practices" in Two Cultural Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke-Stewart, K. Alison; Lee, Young; Allhusen, Virginia D.; Kim, Myoung Soon; McDowell, David J.

    2006-01-01

    Ninety children from South Korea and 119 children from the United States were observed in early childhood programs, and differences in classroom environments and teachers' and children's behavior in the two countries were identified. In both countries, there was evidence that preschool education is guided by ideas about "developmentally…

  10. The Association between Parent Early Adult Drug Use Disorder and Later Observed Parenting Practices and Child Behavior Problems: Testing Alternate Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Jennifer A.; Hill, Karl G.; Guttmannova, Katarina; Oesterle, Sabrina; Hawkins, J. David; Catalano, Richard F.; McMahon, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    This study tested the association between parent illicit drug use disorder (DUD) in early adulthood and observed parenting practices at ages 27-28 and examined the following 3 theoretically derived models explaining this link: (a) a disrupted parent adult functioning model,(b) a preexisting parent personality factor model, and (c) a disrupted

  11. Steadily propagating slip pulses driven by thermal decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, John D.; Viesca, Robert C.; Garagash, Dmitry I.

    2015-09-01

    Geophysical observations suggest that mature faults weaken significantly at seismic slip rates. Thermal pressurization and thermal decomposition are two mechanisms commonly used to explain this dynamic weakening. Both rely on pore fluid pressurization with thermal pressurization achieving this through thermal expansion of native solids and pore fluid and thermal decomposition by releasing additional pore fluid during a reaction. Several recent papers have looked at the role thermal pressurization plays during a dynamically propagating earthquake, but no previous models have studied the role of thermal decomposition. In this paper we present the first solutions accounting for thermal decomposition during dynamic rupture, solving for steady state self-healing slip pulses propagating at a constant rupture velocity. First, we show that thermal decomposition leads to longer slip durations, larger total slips, and a distinctive along-fault slip rate profile. Next, we show that accounting for more than one weakening mechanism allows multiple steady slip pulses to exist at a given background stress, with some solutions corresponding to different balances between thermal pressurization and thermal decomposition, and others corresponding to activating a single reaction multiple times. Finally, we study how the rupture properties depend on the fault properties and show that the impact of thermal decomposition is largely controlled by the ratio of the hydraulic and thermal diffusivities χ = αhy/αth and the ratio of pore pressure generated to temperature rise buffered by the reaction Pr/Er.

  12. Hydroxyl radical formation during peroxynitrous acid decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Coddington, J.W.; Hurst, J.K.; Lymar, S.V.

    1999-03-24

    Yields of O{sub 2} formed during decomposition of peroxynitrous acid (ONOOH) under widely varying medium conditions are compared to predictions based upon the assumption that the reaction involves formation of discrete {sm{underscore}bullet}OH and {sm{underscore}bullet}NO{sub 2} radicals as oxidizing intermediates. The kinetic model used includes all reactions of {sm{underscore}bullet}OH, {sm{underscore}bullet}O{sub 2}{sup {minus}}, and reactive nitrogen species known to be important under the prevailing conditions; because the rate constants for all of these reactions have been independently measured, the calculations contain no adjustable fitting parameters. The model quantitatively accounts for (1) the complex pH dependence of the O{sub 2} yields and (2) the unusual effects of NO{sub 2} {sup {minus}}, which inhibits O{sub 2} formation in neutral, but not alkaline, solutions and also reverses inhibition by organic {sm{underscore}bullet}OH scavengers in alkaline media. Other observations, including quenching of O{sub 2} yields by ferrocyanide and bicarbonate, the pressure dependence of the decomposition rate, and the reported dynamic behavior for O{sub 2} generation in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, also appear to be in accord with the suggested mechanism. Overall, the close correspondence between observed and calculated O{sub 2} yields provides strong support for decomposition via homolysis of the ONOOH peroxo bond.

  13. Symptom Clusters during the Late Reproductive Stage through the Early Postmenopause: Observations from the Seattle Midlife Women’s Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Cray, Lori A.; Woods, Nancy Fugate; Herting, Jerald R.; Mitchell, Ellen Sullivan

    2012-01-01

    Objective Identify symptom clusters that characterize women’s experiences through the late reproductive stage, the menopausal transition and early postmenopause; and explore the influence of the menopausal transition stages and early postmenopause, compared to the late reproductive stage, on the clusters of symptoms women experience. Methods Participants from the Seattle Midlife Women’s Health Study whose symptom calendars were staged for menopausal transition provided data for a total of 6857 occasions. Multilevel latent class analysis was used to identify classes using scores for hot flashes and symptom factors (sleep, cognitive, mood, pain, tension). Results Class 1 included observations of low severity levels for all symptoms, whereas class 2 included low severity hot flashes and moderate severity levels for all other symptom factors. Class 3 included high severity hot flashes with lower severity levels of all other symptom factors. During the early and late menopausal transitions stages and early postmenopause, the likelihood of being in class 3 was significantly greater than being in class 1 relative to the late reproductive stage. There were no significant effects of menopausal transition stages on the likelihood of being in class 2. Conclusions This effort is the first to examine latent classes or clusters of symptoms over the prolonged period from late reproductive stage through early postmenopause. As such, the data contribute to understanding of symptom experiences beyond our early efforts to characterize the late menopausal transition stage. PMID:22643229

  14. Catalyst for sodium chlorate decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wydeven, T.

    1972-01-01

    Production of oxygen by rapid decomposition of cobalt oxide and sodium chlorate mixture is discussed. Cobalt oxide serves as catalyst to accelerate reaction. Temperature conditions and chemical processes involved are described.

  15. Camera calibration by linear decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarbek, Wladyslaw; Tomaszewski, Michal; Nowakowski, Artur

    2006-03-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for camera calibration, applying digital images to calculate camera parameters, position and orientation. A linear decomposition technique is proposed to solve nonlinear pixel equations in which camera parameters are involved.

  16. Lignocellulose decomposition by microbial secretions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carbon storage in terrestrial ecosystems is contingent upon the natural resistance of plant cell wall polymers to rapid biological degradation. Nevertheless, certain microorganisms have evolved remarkable means to overcome this natural resistance. Lignocellulose decomposition by microorganisms com...

  17. Optimization by nonhierarchical asynchronous decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shankar, Jayashree; Ribbens, Calvin J.; Haftka, Raphael T.; Watson, Layne T.

    1992-01-01

    Large scale optimization problems are tractable only if they are somehow decomposed. Hierarchical decompositions are inappropriate for some types of problems and do not parallelize well. Sobieszczanski-Sobieski has proposed a nonhierarchical decomposition strategy for nonlinear constrained optimization that is naturally parallel. Despite some successes on engineering problems, the algorithm as originally proposed fails on simple two dimensional quadratic programs. The algorithm is carefully analyzed for quadratic programs, and a number of modifications are suggested to improve its robustness.

  18. Managing Student Behavior with Class-Wide Function-Related Intervention Teams: An Observational Study in Early Elementary Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldarella, Paul; Williams, Leslie; Hansen, Blake D.; Wills, Howard

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive evidence-based interventions are needed to help early childhood educators manage challenging student behaviors. One such intervention, class-wide function-related intervention teams (CW-FIT), is a multi-tiered behavioral intervention program based on positive behavior support principles, including four main elements: (a) teaching

  19. Early-Career EBD Teacher Knowledge, Ratings of Competency Importance, and Observed Use of Instruction and Management Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Lori F.; Hendrickson, Jo M.

    2007-01-01

    The empirical, conceptual, and theoretical knowledge of early-career EBD teachers was assessed two years after student teaching and compared to their ratings of the importance of specific instruction and classroom management competencies as well as to their application of those competencies. Twelve teachers, six elementary and six secondary, with…

  20. Observation of Early Cleavage in Animal Development: A Simple Technique for Obtaining the Eggs of Rhabditis (Nematoda)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinchliffe, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Outlines the advantages of using the readily available eggs of the nematode Rhabditis in studying the early cleavage stages of animal development. Discusses the identification and life history of Rhabditis, how to culture and examine the organism, the cleavage stages and cell lineage, and sources of visual aids. (JR)

  1. Managing Student Behavior with Class-Wide Function-Related Intervention Teams: An Observational Study in Early Elementary Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldarella, Paul; Williams, Leslie; Hansen, Blake D.; Wills, Howard

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive evidence-based interventions are needed to help early childhood educators manage challenging student behaviors. One such intervention, class-wide function-related intervention teams (CW-FIT), is a multi-tiered behavioral intervention program based on positive behavior support principles, including four main elements: (a) teaching…

  2. Estimating the Effectiveness of Early Control Measures through School Absenteeism Surveillance in Observed Outbreaks at Rural Schools in Hubei, China

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yunzhou; Yang, Mei; Jiang, Hongbo; Wang, Ying; Yang, Wenwen; Zhang, Zhixia; Yan, Weirong; Diwan, Vinod K.; Xu, Biao; Dong, Hengjin; Palm, Lars; Liu, Li; Nie, Shaofa

    2014-01-01

    Background School absenteeism is a common data source in syndromic surveillance, which allows for the detection of outbreaks at an early stage. Previous studies focused on its correlation with other data sources. In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of control measures based on early warning signals from school absenteeism surveillance in rural Chinese schools. Methods A school absenteeism surveillance system was established in all 17 primary schools in 3 adjacent towns in the Chinese region of Hubei. Three outbreaks (varicella, mumps, and influenza-like illness) were detected and controlled successfully from April 1, 2012, to January 15, 2014. An impulse susceptible-exposed-infectious-recovered model was used to fit the epidemics of these three outbreaks. Moreover, it simulated the potential epidemics under interventions resulting from traditional surveillance signals. The effectiveness of the absenteeism-based control measures was evaluated by comparing the simulated datasets. Results The school absenteeism system generated 52 signals. Three outbreaks were verified through epidemiological investigation. Compared to traditional surveillance, the school absenteeism system generated simultaneous signals for the varicella outbreak, but 3 days in advance for the mumps outbreak and 2–4 days in advance for the influenza-like illness outbreak. The estimated excess protection rates of control measures based on early signals were 0.0%, 19.0–44.1%, and 29.0–37.0% for the three outbreaks, respectively. Conclusions Although not all outbreak control measures can benefit from early signals through school absenteeism surveillance, the effectiveness of early signal-based interventions is obvious. School absenteeism surveillance plays an important role in reducing outbreak spread. PMID:25250786

  3. Nonequilibrium adiabatic molecular dynamics simulations of methane clathrate hydrate decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, J. A.

    2010-04-01

    Nonequilibrium, constant energy, constant volume (NVE) molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the decomposition of methane clathrate hydrate in contact with water. Under adiabatic conditions, the rate of methane clathrate decomposition is affected by heat and mass transfer arising from the breakup of the clathrate hydrate framework and release of the methane gas at the solid-liquid interface and diffusion of methane through water. We observe that temperature gradients are established between the clathrate and solution phases as a result of the endothermic clathrate decomposition process and this factor must be considered when modeling the decomposition process. Additionally we observe that clathrate decomposition does not occur gradually with breakup of individual cages, but rather in a concerted fashion with rows of structure I cages parallel to the interface decomposing simultaneously. Due to the concerted breakup of layers of the hydrate, large amounts of methane gas are released near the surface which can form bubbles that will greatly affect the rate of mass transfer near the surface of the clathrate phase. The effects of these phenomena on the rate of methane hydrate decomposition are determined and implications on hydrate dissociation in natural methane hydrate reservoirs are discussed.

  4. Long-term litter decomposition controlled by manganese redox cycling.

    PubMed

    Keiluweit, Marco; Nico, Peter; Harmon, Mark E; Mao, Jingdong; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Kleber, Markus

    2015-09-22

    Litter decomposition is a keystone ecosystem process impacting nutrient cycling and productivity, soil properties, and the terrestrial carbon (C) balance, but the factors regulating decomposition rate are still poorly understood. Traditional models assume that the rate is controlled by litter quality, relying on parameters such as lignin content as predictors. However, a strong correlation has been observed between the manganese (Mn) content of litter and decomposition rates across a variety of forest ecosystems. Here, we show that long-term litter decomposition in forest ecosystems is tightly coupled to Mn redox cycling. Over 7 years of litter decomposition, microbial transformation of litter was paralleled by variations in Mn oxidation state and concentration. A detailed chemical imaging analysis of the litter revealed that fungi recruit and redistribute unreactive Mn(2+) provided by fresh plant litter to produce oxidative Mn(3+) species at sites of active decay, with Mn eventually accumulating as insoluble Mn(3+/4+) oxides. Formation of reactive Mn(3+) species coincided with the generation of aromatic oxidation products, providing direct proof of the previously posited role of Mn(3+)-based oxidizers in the breakdown of litter. Our results suggest that the litter-decomposing machinery at our coniferous forest site depends on the ability of plants and microbes to supply, accumulate, and regenerate short-lived Mn(3+) species in the litter layer. This observation indicates that biogeochemical constraints on bioavailability, mobility, and reactivity of Mn in the plant-soil system may have a profound impact on litter decomposition rates. PMID:26372954

  5. Long-term litter decomposition controlled by manganese redox cycling

    PubMed Central

    Keiluweit, Marco; Nico, Peter; Harmon, Mark E.; Mao, Jingdong; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Kleber, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Litter decomposition is a keystone ecosystem process impacting nutrient cycling and productivity, soil properties, and the terrestrial carbon (C) balance, but the factors regulating decomposition rate are still poorly understood. Traditional models assume that the rate is controlled by litter quality, relying on parameters such as lignin content as predictors. However, a strong correlation has been observed between the manganese (Mn) content of litter and decomposition rates across a variety of forest ecosystems. Here, we show that long-term litter decomposition in forest ecosystems is tightly coupled to Mn redox cycling. Over 7 years of litter decomposition, microbial transformation of litter was paralleled by variations in Mn oxidation state and concentration. A detailed chemical imaging analysis of the litter revealed that fungi recruit and redistribute unreactive Mn2+ provided by fresh plant litter to produce oxidative Mn3+ species at sites of active decay, with Mn eventually accumulating as insoluble Mn3+/4+ oxides. Formation of reactive Mn3+ species coincided with the generation of aromatic oxidation products, providing direct proof of the previously posited role of Mn3+-based oxidizers in the breakdown of litter. Our results suggest that the litter-decomposing machinery at our coniferous forest site depends on the ability of plants and microbes to supply, accumulate, and regenerate short-lived Mn3+ species in the litter layer. This observation indicates that biogeochemical constraints on bioavailability, mobility, and reactivity of Mn in the plant–soil system may have a profound impact on litter decomposition rates. PMID:26372954

  6. Thermal decomposition of surrogate wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Missoum, A.; Gupta, A.K.; Chen, J.; Keating, E.L.

    1996-12-31

    Results on the thermal behavior characteristics during the decomposition of cellulose and cellulose-polystyrene mixtures in a controlled environment are presented. Thermogravimetry analysis (TGA) tests were conducted on the decomposition of cellulose and mixtures of cellulose-polystyrene (100% cellulose, 90% cellulose-10% polystyrene and 50% cellulose-50% polystyrene) in nitrogen and air environments. These tests were performed at a heating rate of 50 C/min. The TGA tests were followed by addition of air at the end of the thermal decomposition process to further destruct the residual char remained from the material. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was also used to measure the heat flow into the sample during pyrolysis (endothermicity) and during combustion of the solid residue (exothermicity). The TGA results provided mass evolution of the samples versus temperature while the DSC data provided heat flow into and out of the sample during the process of pyrolysis and combustion. TGA results also showed that all samples contained moisture in addition to the fixed carbon. The temperature dependency and mass loss characteristics of the materials were obtained. This information was used to obtain Arrhenius kinetic parameters and therefore the overall decomposition rates under defined conditions of pressure, temperature, surrounding chemical environment, heating rate of the material, and material`s chemical composition. This information is helpful in characterizing and understanding the thermal decomposition properties of these materials during their thermal destruction. The thermal decomposition of these materials can be related to their chemical composition. It was found that cellulose has the lowest decomposition rate while polystyrene has the highest.

  7. Sexual Desire During the Menopausal Transition and Early Postmenopause: Observations from the Seattle Midlife Women's Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Ellen Sullivan; Smith-Di Julio, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Aims To describe levels of sexual desire across the menopausal transition (MT) and early postmenopause (PM), including effects of age, MT-related factors, health, stress, symptoms (hot flash, sleep, mood), and social opportunity factors. Methods A subset of Seattle Midlife Women's Health Study (SMWHS) participants who provided data during the early reproductive, early and late menopausal transition stages, or postmenopause (n = 286), including menstrual calendars for staging the MT, annual health reports between 1990 and 2005, and morning urine samples assayed for estrone glucuronide (E1G), testosterone (T), and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) was included. Multilevel modeling using the R program was used to test factors related to sexual desire. Results Women experienced a significant decrease in sexual desire during the late MT stage (p < 0.01) and early PM (p < 0.0001). Those with higher urinary E1G and T reported significantly higher levels of sexual desire, whereas those with higher FSH levels reported significantly lower sexual desire (p < 0.0001, 0.06, and 0.0002, respectively). Women using hormone therapy also reported higher sexual desire (p = 0.02). Those reporting higher perceived stress reported lower sexual desire (p < 0.0001), but history of sexual abuse did not have a significant effect. Those most troubled by symptoms of hot flashes, fatigue, depressed mood, anxiety, difficulty getting to sleep, early morning awakening, and awakening during the night also reported significantly lower sexual desire (p range from <0.03 to 0.0001), but there was no effect of vaginal dryness. Women with better perceived health reported higher sexual desire (p < 0.0001), and those reporting more exercise and more alcohol intake also reported greater sexual desire (p < 0.0001). Having a partner was associated with lower sexual desire. Conclusions Clinicians working with women traversing the MT should be aware that promoting healthy sexual functioning among midlife women requires consideration of their changing biology as well as ongoing life challenges. PMID:20109116

  8. Decomposition rates and termite assemblage composition in semiarid Africa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schuurman, G.

    2005-01-01

    Outside of the humid tropics, abiotic factors are generally considered the dominant regulators of decomposition, and biotic influences are frequently not considered in predicting decomposition rates. In this study, I examined the effect of termite assemblage composition and abundance on decomposition of wood litter of an indigenous species (Croton megalobotrys) in five terrestrial habitats of the highly seasonal semiarid Okavango Delta region of northern Botswana, to determine whether natural variation in decomposer community composition and abundance influences decomposition rates. 1 conducted the study in two areas, Xudum and Santawani, with the Xudum study preceding the Santawani study. I assessed termite assemblage composition and abundance using a grid of survey baits (rolls of toilet paper) placed on the soil surface and checked 2-4 times/month. I placed a billet (a section of wood litter) next to each survey bait and measured decomposition in a plot by averaging the mass loss of its billets. Decomposition rates varied up to sixfold among plots within the same habitat and locality, despite the fact that these plots experienced the same climate. In addition, billets decomposed significantly faster during the cooler and drier Santawani study, contradicting climate-based predictions. Because termite incidence was generally higher in Santawani plots, termite abundance initially seemed a likely determinant of decomposition in this system. However, no significant effect of termite incidence on billet mass loss rates was observed among the Xudum plots, where decomposition rates remained low even though termite incidence varied considerably. Considering the incidences of fungus-growing termites and non-fungus-growing termites separately resolves this apparent contradiction: in both Santawani and Xudum, only fungus-growing termites play a significant role in decomposition. This result is mirrored in an analysis of the full data set of combined Xudum and Santawani data. The determination that natural variation in the abundance of a single taxonomic group of soil fauna, a termite subfamily, determines almost all observed variation in decomposition rates supports the emerging view that biotic influences may be important in many biomes and that consideration of decomposer community composition and abundance may be critical for accurate prediction of decomposition rates. ?? 2005 by the Ecological Society of America.

  9. Seasonal necrophagous insect community assembly during vertebrate carrion decomposition.

    PubMed

    Benbow, M E; Lewis, A J; Tomberlin, J K; Pechal, J L

    2013-03-01

    Necrophagous invertebrates have been documented to be a predominant driver of vertebrate carrion decomposition; however, very little is understood about the assembly of these communities both within and among seasons. The objective of this study was to evaluate the seasonal differences in insect taxa composition, richness, and diversity on carrion over decomposition with the intention that such data will be useful for refining error estimates in forensic entomology. Sus scrofa (L.) carcasses (n = 3-6, depending on season) were placed in a forested habitat near Xenia, OH, during spring, summer, autumn, and winter. Taxon richness varied substantially among seasons but was generally lower (1-2 taxa) during early decomposition and increased (3-8 taxa) through intermediate stages of decomposition. Autumn and winter showed the highest richness during late decomposition. Overall, taxon richness was higher during active decay for all seasons. While invertebrate community composition was generally consistent among seasons, the relative abundance of five taxa significantly differed across seasons, demonstrating different source communities for colonization depending on the time of year. There were significantly distinct necrophagous insect communities for each stage of decomposition, and between summer and autumn and summer and winter, but the communities were similar between autumn and winter. Calliphoridae represented significant indicator taxa for summer and autumn but replaced by Coleoptera during winter. Here we demonstrated substantial variability in necrophagous communities and assembly on carrion over decomposition and among seasons. Recognizing this variation has important consequences for forensic entomology and future efforts to provide error rates for estimates of the postmortem interval using arthropod succession data as evidence during criminal investigations. PMID:23540134

  10. Early prediction of acute kidney injury biomarkers after endovascular stent graft repair of aortic aneurysm: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common and serious condition usually detected some time after onset by changes in serum creatinine (sCr). Although stent grafting to repair aortic aneurysms is associated with AKI caused by surgical procedures or the use of contrast agents, early biomarkers for AKI have not been adequately examined in stent graft recipients. We studied biomarkers including urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), blood NGAL, N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase (NAG), microalbumin (Alb), and liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) as prospective early biomarkers for AKI in patients who had received stent graft repairs of aortic aneurysms. Methods In addition to pre-surgical sampling, at 2 to 6 h and at 1, 3 to 4, and 5 days or later (until stable) after surgery, urine and serum biomarkers were sampled from 47 patients who underwent stent graft repair of aortic aneurysms. Results Using Acute Kidney Injury Network criteria, 6 (14%) of 42 retained patients developed AKI. NGAL corrected with urine Cr (NGAL/Cr) values demonstrated the best predictive value for AKI (97% specificity, 83% sensitivity at a 65.1 μg/gCr cutoff). The area under the receiver-operator characteristic curve of NGAL/Cr value 2 h after surgery was 0.9. Although NGAL/Cr, L-FABP corrected with urine Cr (L-FABP/Cr), L-FABP, NAG, and Alb corrected by urine Cr (Alb/Cr) all reached peak values before AKI detection by sCr in AKI patients, all biomarkers reached the cutoff value before AKI detection after adaption of cutoff value. Conclusions After stent graft repair of aortic aneurysm, NGAL/Cr is a potentially useful early biomarker for AKI. PMID:25960881

  11. Early structural anomalies observed by high-resolution imaging in two related cases of autosomal-dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Pyo; Lee, Winston; Bae, Eun Jin; Greenstein, Vivianne; Sin, Bum Ho; Chang, Stanley; Tsang, Stephen H

    2014-01-01

    The authors report the use of adaptive-optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AO-SLO) to investigate RHO, D190N autosomal-dominant retinitis pigmentosa in two siblings (11 and 16 years old, respectively). Each patient exhibited distinct hyperautofluorescence patterns in which the outer borders corresponded to inner segment ellipsoid band disruption. Areas within the hyperautofluorescence patterns exhibited normal photoreceptor outer segments and retinal pigment epithelium. However, AO-SLO imaging revealed noticeable spacing irregularities in the cone mosaic. AO-SLO allows researchers to characterize retinal structural abnormalities with precision so that early structural changes in retinitis pigmentosa can be identified and reconciled with genetic findings. PMID:25215869

  12. Loss of diversity in wood-inhabiting fungal communities affects decomposition activity in Norway spruce wood

    PubMed Central

    Valentín, Lara; Rajala, Tiina; Peltoniemi, Mikko; Heinonsalo, Jussi; Pennanen, Taina; Mäkipää, Raisa

    2014-01-01

    Hundreds of wood-inhabiting fungal species are now threatened, principally due to a lack of dead wood in intensively managed forests, but the consequences of reduced fungal diversity on ecosystem functioning are not known. Several experiments have shown that primary productivity is negatively affected by a loss of species, but the effects of microbial diversity on decomposition are less studied. We studied the relationship between fungal diversity and the in vitro decomposition rate of slightly, moderately and heavily decayed Picea abies wood with indigenous fungal communities that were diluted to examine the influence of diversity. Respiration rate, wood-degrading hydrolytic enzymes and fungal community structure were assessed during a 16-week incubation. The number of observed OTUs in DGGE was used as a measure of fungal diversity. Respiration rate increased between early- and late-decay stages. Reduced fungal diversity was associated with lower respiration rates during intermediate stages of decay, but no effects were detected at later stages. The activity of hydrolytic enzymes varied among decay stages and fungal dilutions. Our results suggest that functioning of highly diverse communities of the late-decay stage were more resistant to the loss of diversity than less diverse communities of early decomposers. This indicates the accumulation of functional redundancy during the succession of the fungal community in decomposing substrates. PMID:24904544

  13. Loss of diversity in wood-inhabiting fungal communities affects decomposition activity in Norway spruce wood.

    PubMed

    Valentín, Lara; Rajala, Tiina; Peltoniemi, Mikko; Heinonsalo, Jussi; Pennanen, Taina; Mäkipää, Raisa

    2014-01-01

    Hundreds of wood-inhabiting fungal species are now threatened, principally due to a lack of dead wood in intensively managed forests, but the consequences of reduced fungal diversity on ecosystem functioning are not known. Several experiments have shown that primary productivity is negatively affected by a loss of species, but the effects of microbial diversity on decomposition are less studied. We studied the relationship between fungal diversity and the in vitro decomposition rate of slightly, moderately and heavily decayed Picea abies wood with indigenous fungal communities that were diluted to examine the influence of diversity. Respiration rate, wood-degrading hydrolytic enzymes and fungal community structure were assessed during a 16-week incubation. The number of observed OTUs in DGGE was used as a measure of fungal diversity. Respiration rate increased between early- and late-decay stages. Reduced fungal diversity was associated with lower respiration rates during intermediate stages of decay, but no effects were detected at later stages. The activity of hydrolytic enzymes varied among decay stages and fungal dilutions. Our results suggest that functioning of highly diverse communities of the late-decay stage were more resistant to the loss of diversity than less diverse communities of early decomposers. This indicates the accumulation of functional redundancy during the succession of the fungal community in decomposing substrates. PMID:24904544

  14. Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition Analysis of EEG Data Collected during a Contour Integration Task.

    PubMed

    Al-Subari, Karema; Al-Baddai, Saad; Tom, Ana Maria; Volberg, Gregor; Hammwhner, Rainer; Lang, Elmar W

    2015-01-01

    We discuss a data-driven analysis of EEG data recorded during a combined EEG/fMRI study of visual processing during a contour integration task. The analysis is based on an ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) and discusses characteristic features of event related modes (ERMs) resulting from the decomposition. We identify clear differences in certain ERMs in response to contour vs noncontour Gabor stimuli mainly for response amplitudes peaking around 100 [ms] (called P100) and 200 [ms] (called N200) after stimulus onset, respectively. We observe early P100 and N200 responses at electrodes located in the occipital area of the brain, while late P100 and N200 responses appear at electrodes located in frontal brain areas. Signals at electrodes in central brain areas show bimodal early/late response signatures in certain ERMs. Head topographies clearly localize statistically significant response differences to both stimulus conditions. Our findings provide an independent proof of recent models which suggest that contour integration depends on distributed network activity within the brain. PMID:25910061

  15. Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition Analysis of EEG Data Collected during a Contour Integration Task

    PubMed Central

    Al-Subari, Karema; Al-Baddai, Saad; Tomé, Ana Maria; Volberg, Gregor; Hammwöhner, Rainer; Lang, Elmar W.

    2015-01-01

    We discuss a data-driven analysis of EEG data recorded during a combined EEG/fMRI study of visual processing during a contour integration task. The analysis is based on an ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) and discusses characteristic features of event related modes (ERMs) resulting from the decomposition. We identify clear differences in certain ERMs in response to contour vs noncontour Gabor stimuli mainly for response amplitudes peaking around 100 [ms] (called P100) and 200 [ms] (called N200) after stimulus onset, respectively. We observe early P100 and N200 responses at electrodes located in the occipital area of the brain, while late P100 and N200 responses appear at electrodes located in frontal brain areas. Signals at electrodes in central brain areas show bimodal early/late response signatures in certain ERMs. Head topographies clearly localize statistically significant response differences to both stimulus conditions. Our findings provide an independent proof of recent models which suggest that contour integration depends on distributed network activity within the brain. PMID:25910061

  16. [Decomposition of eucalyptus-alder mixed litters and dynamics of soil faunal community].

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-hong; Luo, Cheng-de; Yang, Wan-qin; Hu, Jie; Wu, Fu-zhong

    2011-04-01

    In order to understand the decomposition characteristics of eucalyptus (Eucalyptus grandis) -alder (Alnus formosana) mixed litters and the roles of soil fauna in the decomposition process, litter samples of the two tree species were collected from the Suji Town of Leshan, Sichuan Province, and mixed with different proportions. The mixtures were put in 6-, 30-, and 260-mesh litterbags to investigate their mass loss and the dynamics of soil faunal community during the process of decomposition. Different proportion mixtures all presented the same decomposition pattern, i. e., decomposed rapidly in early period and slower in later period. The mixtures had the highest decomposition rate in 6-mesh litterbag, followed by in 30-mesh, and in 260-mesh litterbag. In the litterbags with same meshes, the decomposition rate of different proportion mixed litters also varied. In 6-mesh litterbag, the durations for the decomposition of the litters had slight difference; while in 30- and 260-mesh litterbags, the durations for pure E. grandis and A. formosana litters getting 95% mass loss had a difference of 1175 and 908 days, respectively. During the decomposition of the litters, soil macrofauna had an obvious change in community structure. In early period, Psocoptera dominated; in mid period, Opisthopora dominated; in later period, Coleoptera dominated; and by the end, Diptera dominated. This study provided important information to understand the material cycling in eucalyptus-alder mixed plantation. PMID:21774303

  17. Evaluating litter decomposition and soil organic matter dynamics in earth system models: contrasting analysis of long-term litter decomposition and steady-state soil carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonan, G. B.; Wieder, W. R.

    2012-12-01

    Decomposition is a large term in the global carbon budget, but models of the earth system that simulate carbon cycle-climate feedbacks are largely untested with respect to litter decomposition. Here, we demonstrate a protocol to document model performance with respect to both long-term (10 year) litter decomposition and steady-state soil carbon stocks. First, we test the soil organic matter parameterization of the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4), the terrestrial component of the Community Earth System Model, with data from the Long-term Intersite Decomposition Experiment Team (LIDET). The LIDET dataset is a 10-year study of litter decomposition at multiple sites across North America and Central America. We show results for 10-year litter decomposition simulations compared with LIDET for 9 litter types and 20 sites in tundra, grassland, and boreal, conifer, deciduous, and tropical forest biomes. We show additional simulations with DAYCENT, a version of the CENTURY model, to ask how well an established ecosystem model matches the observations. The results reveal large discrepancy between the laboratory microcosm studies used to parameterize the CLM4 litter decomposition and the LIDET field study. Simulated carbon loss is more rapid than the observations across all sites, despite using the LIDET-provided climatic decomposition index to constrain temperature and moisture effects on decomposition. Nitrogen immobilization is similarly biased high. Closer agreement with the observations requires much lower decomposition rates, obtained with the assumption that nitrogen severely limits decomposition. DAYCENT better replicates the observations, for both carbon mass remaining and nitrogen, without requirement for nitrogen limitation of decomposition. Second, we compare global observationally-based datasets of soil carbon with simulated steady-state soil carbon stocks for both models. The models simulations were forced with observationally-based estimates of annual litterfall and model-derived climatic decomposition index. While comparison with the LIDET 10-year litterbag study reveals sharp contrasts between CLM4 and DAYCENT, simulations of steady-state soil carbon show less difference between models. Both CLM4 and DAYCENT significantly underestimate soil carbon. Sensitivity analyses highlight causes of the low soil carbon bias. The terrestrial biogeochemistry of earth system models must be critically tested with observations, and the consequences of particular model choices must be documented. Long-term litter decomposition experiments such as LIDET provide a real-world process-oriented benchmark to evaluate models and can critically inform model development. Analysis of steady-state soil carbon estimates reveal additional, but here different, inferences about model performance.

  18. The early stage of formation of self-organized nanocolumns in thin films: Monte Carlo simulations versus atomic-scale observations in Ge-Mn

    SciTech Connect

    Mouton, I.; Talbot, E. Pareige, C.; Lardé, R.; Blavette, D.

    2014-02-07

    Formation kinetics of self-organized nanocolumns during epitaxial growth of a thin film composed of immiscible elements (A,B) has been investigated using Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. Simulated nanostructures show a good agreement with those observed in Ge-Mn using Atom Probe Tomography and Transmission Electron Microscopy. Self organisation is observed although the rigid lattice simulations used do not account for misfit elastic strain. Simulations reveal that the final nanostructure, in term of number density and diameter of nanocolumns, is controlled by the early stages of growth of the film. The influence of both growth temperature and solute concentration on the nanostructure features is discussed in details.

  19. Observations on the early course of untreated falciparum malaria in semi-immune African children following a short period of protection

    PubMed Central

    Pringle, G.; Avery-Jones, S.

    1966-01-01

    The early course of new malarial infections was observed, in a highly malarious area of East Africa, in a group of schoolchildren who had been protected from infection for between one and two months by the administration of antimalarial drugs. Many of the new infections caused clinical symptoms of malaria and a parasitaemia that was significantly greater than had prevailed generally before treatment. It was concluded that even the short period of a few weeks of drug protection against malarial infection had lowered the immunity of the children to an appreciable degree. This observation tends to support other evidence of the lability of the anti-parasite defence mechanism. PMID:5328493

  20. Decomposition in Arctic terrestrial environments

    SciTech Connect

    Laursen, G.A.

    1989-01-01

    The principal goal of this research unit is to further elucidate the rate and quality of microbial decomposition within cold, wet, Arctic tundra peat soils found in water tract systems of Foothills Province terrain (8-10{degree}) on the north slope of Alaska. Research objectives include demonstration of of four hypotheses. A positive correlation exists between the rate of decomposing litter and the viable microbial (fungal) biomass, as measured by ARP activities and direct counts, associated with that litter. In Arctic tundra peat soil systems, there exists a positive correlation between the presence and abundance of viable mycelial biomass and the enzymatic potential for degradative activity as measured by the presence of cellulase, peroxidase, chitinase and protease enzymes produced by the miocrobial community. Substrate quality, as defined by lignin to cellulose ratios, influences the rate of natural litter decomposition. The lignin to total nitrogen ratio describes an inverse correlation to decomposition rates of litter.

  1. Meshless helmholtz-hodge decomposition.

    PubMed

    Petronetto, Fabiano; Paiva, Afonso; Lage, Marcos; Tavares, Geovan; Lopes, Hélio; Lewiner, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Vector fields analysis traditionally distinguishes conservative (curl-free) from mass preserving (divergence-free) components. The Helmholtz-Hodge decomposition allows separating any vector field into the sum of three uniquely defined components: curl free, divergence free and harmonic. This decomposition is usually achieved by using mesh-based methods such as finite differences or finite elements. This work presents a new meshless approach to the Helmholtz-Hodge decomposition for the analysis of 2D discrete vector fields. It embeds into the SPH particle-based framework. The proposed method is efficient and can be applied to extract features from a 2D discrete vector field and to multiphase fluid flow simulation to ensure incompressibility. PMID:20075492

  2. Does Early Post-operative Administration of Aspirin Influence the Risk of Bleeding After Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery? A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Nouraei, Seyed Mahmood; Gholipour Baradari, Afshin; Emami Zeydi, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Background: Aspirin has a proven role in preventing thrombotic diseases. However, given its anti-platelet activity, it is often assumed that its early post-operative administration significantly increase the amount of post-operative bleeding. Aim: The aim of this study was to determine whether early post-operative administration of aspirin influence the risk of bleeding in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Methods: In a prospective observational study, 100 consecutive patients undergoing first time elective CABG surgery were include in the study. Patients received a low dose of aspirin (75-150 mg per day) either 1 hours (the early aspirin group; n=43) or 6 hours after surgery (the late aspirin group; n=57). Total mediastinal blood drainage, blood drainage after 6 hours, incidences of re-operation for the control of bleeding and transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs) and blood products were recorded and followed until chest tube removal. Results: The groups were found to be matched for the confounding variables and no significant differences were found between post-aspirin bleeding (p=0.37), RBCs and blood product usage (p=0.90) or incidences of re-operation for control of bleeding (p=1.00) between the two groups. Conclusions: Early administration (1 hour after surgery) of aspirin did not appear to increase the risk of post-operative bleeding in patients undergoing CABG. Thereby, its early administration in such cases may be considered. Although further well-designed randomized controlled trials to confirm the safety and efficacy of early administration of aspirin after CABG surgery are warranted. PMID:26843729

  3. Early Anti-Pseudomonal Acquisition in Young Patients with Cystic Fibrosis: Rationale and Design of the EPIC Clinical Trial and Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Treggiari, Miriam M; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole; Retsch-Bogart, George; Gibson, Ronald L.; Williams, Judy; Emerson, Julia; Kronmal, Richard A; Ramsey, Bonnie W

    2009-01-01

    Background The primary cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) is progressive obstructive pulmonary disease due to chronic endobronchial infection, particularly with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa). Risk factors for and clinical impact of early Pa infection in young CF patients are less well understood. Purpose The present studies are designed to evaluate risk factors and outcomes associated with early Pa acquisition, and the benefits and harms of four anti-pseudomonal treatment regimens in young CF patients initiated after the first Pa positive respiratory culture. Methods The Early Pseudomonas Infection Control (EPIC) program consists of two studies, a randomized multicenter trial in CF patients ages 1–12 years at first isolation of Pa from a respiratory culture, and a longitudinal cohort study enrolling Pa-negative patients. Using a factorial design, trial participants are assigned for 18 months to either anti-pseudomonal treatment on a scheduled quarterly basis (cycled therapy) or based on recovery of Pa from quarterly respiratory cultures (culture-based therapy). The study drugs include inhaled tobramycin (300 mg BID) for 28 days, combined with either oral ciprofloxacin (15–20 mg/kg BID) or oral placebo for 14 days. The primary endpoints of the trial are the time to pulmonary exacerbation requiring IV antibiotics or hospitalization for respiratory symptoms, and the proportion of patients with new Pa-positive respiratory cultures during the study. The broad goals of the observational study are to describe the risk factors and outcomes associated with early acquisition of Pa. 306 patients were randomized in the clinical trial and 1,787 were enrolled in the cohort study. Conclusions These companion studies will provide valuable epidemiological and microbiological information on early CF lung disease and Pa acquisition, and safety and clinical efficacy data on anti-pseudomonal treatment strategies for early Pa infections in the airways of young children with CF. PMID:19470318

  4. Rigid Part Decomposition in a Graph Pyramid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artner, Nicole M.; Ion, Adrian; Kropatsch, Walter G.

    This paper presents an approach to extract the rigid parts of an observed articulated object. First, a spatio-temporal filtering in a video selects interest points that correspond to rigid parts. This selection is driven by the spatial relationships and the movement of the interest points. Then, a graph pyramid is built, guided by the orientation changes of the object parts in the scene. This leads to a decomposition of the scene into its rigid parts. Each vertex in the top level of the pyramid represents one rigid part in the scene.

  5. Mechanism of the Thermal Decomposition of Furan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliou, Angayle; Ellison, G. Barney; Nimlos, Mark R.; Daily, John W.

    2009-06-01

    Both furan (C_4H_4O) and furfural (C_4H_3O-CHO) areimportant products in biomass pyrolysis. We have used a resistively-heated SiC tubular reactor with a 30 microseconds residence time to study the thermal cracking of furan. The decomposition products are identified by two independent techniques: 118.2 nm VUV photoionization mass spectroscopy and infrared spectroscopy. We observe three different thermal dissociation channels leading to: a) CH_3CCH + CO b) HCCH + CH_2CO c) HCCCH_2.

  6. Updating the singular value decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Philip I.; Smith, M. I. Matthew I.

    2004-09-01

    The spectral decomposition of a symmetric matrix A with small off-diagonal and distinct diagonal elements can be approximated using a direct scheme of R. Davies and Modi (Linear Algebra Appl. 77 (1986) 61). In this paper a generalization of this method for computing the singular value decomposition of close-to-diagonal is presented. When A has repeated or "close" singular values it is possible to apply the direct method to split the problem in two with one part containing the well-separated singular values and one requiring the computation of the "close" singular values.

  7. Reliable algorithm for modal decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Robert A.; Bryson, Arthur E., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a reliable, general algorithm for modal decomposition in real arithmetic and its use in analyzing and synthesizing control logic for linear dynamic systems. The numerical difficulties are described associated with computing the Jordan canonical form when the system has repeated, or nearly repeated, eigenvalues. A new algorithm is described that satisfactorily solves these numerical difficulties. The relation and extension to related numerical analysis research are discussed to clarify the reliability of the techniques. Finally, its implementation as a practical modal decomposition method for efficiently computing the matrix exponential, transfer functions, and frequency response is also described.

  8. Secondary decomposition reactions in nitramines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweigert, Igor

    Thermal decomposition of nitramines is known to proceed via multiple, competing reaction branches, some of which are triggered by secondary reactions between initial decomposition products and unreacted nitramine molecules. Better mechanistic understanding of these secondary reactions is needed to enable extrapolations of measured rates to higher temperatures and pressures relevant to shock ignition. I will present density functional theory (DFT) based simulations of nitramines that aim to re-evaluate known elementary mechanisms and seek alternative pathways in the gas and condensed phases. This work was supported by the Office of Naval Research, both directly and through the Naval Research Laboratory.

  9. The ACS LCID Project. XI. On the Early Time Resolution of SFHs of Local Group Dwarf Galaxies: Comparing the Effects of Reionization in Models with Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparicio, Antonio; Hidalgo, Sebastian L.; Skillman, Evan; Cassisi, Santi; Mayer, Lucio; Navarro, Julio; Cole, Andrew; Gallart, Carme; Monelli, Matteo; Weisz, Daniel; Bernard, Edouard; Dolphin, Andrew; Stetson, Peter

    2016-05-01

    The analysis of the early star formation history (SFH) of nearby galaxies, obtained from their resolved stellar populations, is relevant as a test for cosmological models. However, the early time resolution of observationally derived SFHs is limited by several factors. Thus, direct comparison of observationally derived SFHs with those derived from theoretical models of galaxy formation is potentially biased. Here we investigate and quantify this effect. For this purpose, we analyze the duration of the early star formation activity in a sample of four Local Group dwarf galaxies and test whether they are consistent with being true fossils of the pre-reionization era; i.e., if the quenching of their star formation occurred before cosmic reionization by UV photons was completed. Two classical dSph (Cetus and Tucana) and two dTrans (LGS-3 and Phoenix) isolated galaxies with total stellar masses between 1.3× {10}6 and 7.2× {10}6 {M}ȯ have been studied. Accounting for time resolution effects, the SFHs peak as much as 1.25 Gyr earlier than the optimal solutions. Thus, this effect is important for a proper comparison of model and observed SFHs. It is also shown that none of the analyzed galaxies can be considered a true fossil of the pre-reionization era, although it is possible that the outer regions of Cetus and Tucana are consistent with quenching by reionization. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program #10505.

  10. Slewing Mirror Telescope optics for the early observation of UV/optical photons from Gamma-Ray Bursts.

    PubMed

    Jeong, S; Nam, J W; Ahn, K B; Park, I H; Kim, S W; Lee, J; Lim, H; Brandt, S; Budtz-Jørgensen, C; Castro-Tirado, A J; Chen, P; Cho, M H; Choi, J N; Grossan, B; Huang, M A; Jung, A; Kim, J E; Kim, M B; Kim, Y W; Linder, E V; Min, K W; Na, G W; Panasyuk, M I; Ripa, J; Reglero, V; Smoot, G F; Suh, J E; Svertilov, S; Vedenkin, N; Yashin, I

    2013-01-28

    We report on design, manufacture, and testing of a Slewing Mirror Telescope (SMT), the first of its kind and a part of Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory-pathfinder (UFFO-p) for space-based prompt measurement of early UV/optical light curves from Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). Using a fast slewing mirror of 150 mm diameter mounted on a 2 axis gimbal stage, SMT can deliver the images of GRB optical counterparts to the intensified CCD detector within 1.5~1.8 s over ± 35 degrees in the slewing field of view. Its Ritchey-Chrétien telescope of 100 mm diameter provides a 17 × 17 arcmin² instantaneous field of view. Technical details of design, construction, the laboratory performance tests in space environments for this unique SMT are described in conjunction with the plan for in-orbit operation onboard the Lomonosov satellite in 2013. PMID:23389206

  11. Recent applications of PIXE spectrometry in archaeology part II Observations on early glassmaking in the Near East

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swann, C. P.; McGovern, P. E.; Fleming, S. J.

    1993-04-01

    The study of glass offers some special challenges for PIXE spectrometry, because of the complex trace element patterns which will result from the mixing of several ingredients to produce certain colors. This paper addresses such issues, to the extent that they influence characterization of ancient glass and related frits. Emphasis is placed upon the role of selective filtering in the sensitive measurement of Co, Mn, Ag, Sn, Sb and Pb, all of which seem to be important in the processes of glass coloration in antiquity. Application of these ideas focuses upon innovations of glassmaking that emerged in the Near East early in the 2nd millennium B.C., at settlements such as Dinkha Tepe and Geoy Tepe (Azerbaijan) and Nuzi (northeast Iraq).

  12. Rank-based decompositions of morphological templates.

    PubMed

    Sussner, P; Ritter, G X

    2000-01-01

    Methods for matrix decomposition have found numerous applications in image processing, in particular for the problem of template decomposition. Since existing matrix decomposition techniques are mainly concerned with the linear domain, we consider it timely to investigate matrix decomposition techniques in the nonlinear domain with applications in image processing. The mathematical basis for these investigations is the new theory of rank within minimax algebra. Thus far, only minimax decompositions of rank 1 and rank 2 matrices into outer product expansions are known to the image processing community. We derive a heuristic algorithm for the decomposition of matrices having arbitrary rank. PMID:18262978

  13. Stratospheric aerosol change in the early stage of volcanic disturbance by the Pinatubo eruption observed over Tsukuba, Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashida, Sachiko; Sasano, Yasuhiro

    1993-04-09

    An increase in the amount of stratospheric aerosol due to the Pinatubo eruption (June 12-15, 1991, 15.14[degree]N, 120.35[degree]E) was observed from the end of June by a lidar in NIES, Tsukuba (36[degree]N, 140[degree]E). The first arrival of volcanic aerosol layers was observed just above the tropopause on June 28, 1991, only two weeks after the eruption. Aerosol layers higher than 20 km appeared sporadically in July and August, reflecting the inhomogeneity of aerosol distribution. After the change in the wind system from summer easterlies to winter westerlies, the main body of the volcanic aerosol layer made its appearance over Tsukuba. The integrated backscattering coefficient (IBC) increased in winter as a result of transportation of aerosols from the tropical region. The IBC, which can be converted to optical thickness, exceeded the level of the value observed after the El Chichon eruption. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Effects observed in the ionospheric F region in the east Asian sector during the intense geomagnetic disturbances in the early part of November 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Y.; Becker-Guedes, F.; Fagundes, P. R.; de Jesus, R.; de Abreu, A. J.; Otsuka, Y.; Shiokawa, K.; Igarashi, K.; Yumoto, K.; Huang, C.-S.; Lan, H. T.; Saito, A.; Guarnieri, F. L.; Pillat, V. G.; Bittencourt, J. A.

    2009-03-01

    The Sun was very active in the early part of November 2004. During the period of 8-10 November 2004, intense geomagnetic disturbances with two superstorms were observed. In a companion paper (hereinafter referred to as paper 1), the effects observed in the F region during the intense geomagnetic disturbances in the early part of November 2004 in the Latin American sector were presented. In the present paper, we investigate the effects observed in the F region during the intense geomagnetic disturbances in the early part of November 2004 in the east Asian sector. We have used the ionospheric sounding observations at Ho Chi Minh City (Vietnam) and Okinawa, Yamagawa, Kokubunji, and Wakkanai (Japan) in the present investigations. Also, GPS observations in the east Asian sector (several longitude zones) have been used to study the effect in the F region during the intense geomagnetic disturbances. The ion density versus latitudinal variations obtained by the DMSP F15 satellite orbiting at about 800 km altitude in the east Asian sector and the magnetic field data obtained at several stations in the Japanese meridian are also presented. Several important features from these observations in both the sectors during this extended period of intense geomagnetic disturbances are presented. The east Asian sector showed very pronounced effects during the second superstorm, which was preceded by two storm enhancements. It should be mentioned that around the beginning of the night on 10 November, ionospheric irregularities propagating from higher midlatitude region to low-latitude region were observed in the Japanese sector. The most intense geomagnetic field H component in that sector was observed on 10 November at L = 2.8, indicating that the auroral oval and the heating got further to low latitudes and the ionospheric irregularities observed in the Japanese sector on this night are midlatitude ionospheric disturbances associated with the second superstorm. The absence of ionospheric irregularities in the Japanese sector during the 8 November superstorm suggests that the magnetosphere-ionosphere system was possibly preconditioned (primed) when the second interplanetary structure impacted the magnetosphere.

  15. From Dogmatic Discussions to Observations and Planned Experiments: Some Examples from Early Aurora Borealis Research in Finland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmberg, Peter

    1996-01-01

    Traces the evolution of physics research methods in Finland from passive observations to planned experiments. Presents examples of planned experiments designed to solve particular problems with the goal of establishing a theory of the phenomenon under study. Contains 16 references. (JRH)

  16. Initiation and early evolution of a Coronal Mass Ejection on May 13, 2009 from EUV and white-light observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reva, Anton; Kuzin, Sergey; Bogachev, Sergey; Ulyanov, Artyom

    In this talk we present results of the observations of a CME, which occurred on May 13, 2009. The most important feature of these observations is that the CME was observed from the very beginning stage (the solar surface) up to the distance of 15 solar radii (R_⊙). Below 2 R_⊙ we used the data from the TESIS EUV telescopes obtained in the Fe 171 Å and He 304 Å lines, and above 2 R_⊙ we used the observations of the LASCO C2 and C3 coronagraphs. Using data of these three instruments, we have studied the evolution of the CME in details. The CME had a curved trajectory -- its helio-latitude decreased with time. The mass ejection originated at a latitudes of about 50(°) and reached the ecliptic plane at a distance of 2.5 R_⊙ from the Sun’s center. The CME velocity and acceleration increased as the CME went away from the Sun. At the distance of 15 R_⊙ from the Sun’s center the CME had a velocity of 250 km/s and an acceleration of 5 m/s(2) . The CME was not associated with a flare, and didn’t have an impulsive acceleration phase. The mass ejection had U-shaped structure which was observed both in the 171 Å images and in white-light. The CME was formed at a distance of about 0.2 -- 0.5 R_⊙ from the Sun’s surface. Observations in the line 304 Å showed that the CME was associated with the erupting prominence, which was located in the lowest part of the U-shaped structure close to the X-point of the magnetic reconnection. The prominence disappeared at the height of 0.4 R_⊙ above the solar limb. Some aspects of these observations can’t be explained in the standard CME model, which predicts that the prominence should be located inside the U-shaped structure, and the CME should be associated with a flare and have an impulsive acceleration phase.

  17. Microbial interactions during carrion decomposition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This addresses the microbial ecology of carrion decomposition in the age of metagenomics. It describes what is known about the microbial communities on carrion, including a brief synopsis about the communities on other organic matter sources. It provides a description of studies using state-of-the...

  18. The ecology of carrion decomposition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carrion, or the remains of dead animals, is something that most people would like to avoid. It is visually unpleasant, emits foul odors, and may be the source of numerous pathogens. Decomposition of carrion, however, provides a unique opportunity for scientists to investigate how nutrients cycle t...

  19. Cadaver decomposition in terrestrial ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, David O.; Yellowlees, David; Tibbett, Mark

    2007-01-01

    A dead mammal (i.e. cadaver) is a high quality resource (narrow carbon:nitrogen ratio, high water content) that releases an intense, localised pulse of carbon and nutrients into the soil upon decomposition. Despite the fact that as much as 5,000 kg of cadaver can be introduced to a square kilometre of terrestrial ecosystem each year, cadaver decomposition remains a neglected microsere. Here we review the processes associated with the introduction of cadaver-derived carbon and nutrients into soil from forensic and ecological settings to show that cadaver decomposition can have a greater, albeit localised, effect on belowground ecology than plant and faecal resources. Cadaveric materials are rapidly introduced to belowground floral and faunal communities, which results in the formation of a highly concentrated island of fertility, or cadaver decomposition island (CDI). CDIs are associated with increased soil microbial biomass, microbial activity (C mineralisation) and nematode abundance. Each CDI is an ephemeral natural disturbance that, in addition to releasing energy and nutrients to the wider ecosystem, acts as a hub by receiving these materials in the form of dead insects, exuvia and puparia, faecal matter (from scavengers, grazers and predators) and feathers (from avian scavengers and predators). As such, CDIs contribute to landscape heterogeneity. Furthermore, CDIs are a specialised habitat for a number of flies, beetles and pioneer vegetation, which enhances biodiversity in terrestrial ecosystems.

  20. The value of telehealth in the early detection of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations: A prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Hamad, Ghassan A; Crooks, Michael; Morice, Alyn H

    2016-06-01

    We aim to establish the value of telemonitoring in the early detection of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations. We followed up patients undergoing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease telemonitoring for 4 months. We studied changes in the telemonitored data in the week prior to admission or to community chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation. A total of 183 patients were studied. In all, 30 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease-related hospital admissions and 68 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease community exacerbations were recorded. Changes in telehealth parameters occurred in 80 per cent (24/30) of admissions and 82 per cent (56/68) of community exacerbations. Although changes in telehealth data occurred in the majority of exacerbations, most individual symptoms was present in less than half the exacerbations and almost 20 per cent of exacerbations were not preceded by any change in telemonitoring data. Cough created significantly more alerts by those treated in the community (p = 0.008), whereas a drop in oxygen saturation created significantly more alerts pre-hospitalisation (p = 0.049). We conclude that further work is required to develop methods of identifying impending chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations with greater sensitivity and specificity. PMID:25564494

  1. A collection of sub-daily pressure and temperature observations for the early instrumental period with a focus on the "year without a summer" 1816

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugnara, Y.; Auchmann, R.; Brönnimann, S.; Allan, R. J.; Auer, I.; Barriendos, M.; Bergström, H.; Bhend, J.; Brázdil, R.; Compo, G. P.; Cornes, R. C.; Dominguez-Castro, F.; van Engelen, A. F. V.; Filipiak, J.; Holopainen, J.; Jourdain, S.; Kunz, M.; Luterbacher, J.; Maugeri, M.; Mercalli, L.; Moberg, A.; Mock, C. J.; Pichard, G.; Řezníčková, L.; van der Schrier, G.; Slonosky, V.; Ustrnul, Z.; Valente, M. A.; Wypych, A.; Yin, X.

    2015-08-01

    The eruption of Mount Tambora (Indonesia) in April 1815 is the largest documented volcanic eruption in history. It is associated with a large global cooling during the following year, felt particularly in parts of Europe and North America, where the year 1816 became known as the "year without a summer". This paper describes an effort made to collect surface meteorological observations from the early instrumental period, with a focus on the years of and immediately following the eruption (1815-1817). Although the collection aimed in particular at pressure observations, correspondent temperature observations were also recovered. Some of the series had already been described in the literature, but a large part of the data, recently digitised from original weather diaries and contemporary magazines and newspapers, is presented here for the first time. The collection puts together more than 50 sub-daily series from land observatories in Europe and North America and from ships in the tropics. The pressure observations have been corrected for temperature and gravity and reduced to mean sea level. Moreover, an additional statistical correction was applied to take into account common error sources in mercury barometers. To assess the reliability of the corrected data set, the variance in the pressure observations is compared with modern climatologies, and single observations are used for synoptic analyses of three case studies in Europe. All raw observations will be made available to the scientific community in the International Surface Pressure Databank.

  2. A characterization of the two-step reaction mechanism of phenol decomposition by a Fenton reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdés, Cristian; Alzate-Morales, Jans; Osorio, Edison; Villaseñor, Jorge; Navarro-Retamal, Carlos

    2015-11-01

    Phenol is one of the worst contaminants at date, and its degradation has been a crucial task over years. Here, the decomposition process of phenol, in a Fenton reaction, is described. Using scavengers, it was observed that decomposition of phenol was mainly influenced by production of hydroxyl radicals. Experimental and theoretical activation energies (Ea) for phenol oxidation intermediates were calculated. According to these Ea, phenol decomposition is a two-step reaction mechanism mediated predominantly by hydroxyl radicals, producing a decomposition yield order given as hydroquinone > catechol > resorcinol. Furthermore, traces of reaction derived acids were detected by HPLC and GS-MS.

  3. Aqueous ozone decomposition onto a Co2O3-alumina supported catalyst.

    PubMed

    Rivas, F Javier; Beltrn, Fernando J; Vera, Esther; Gimeno, Olga

    2004-01-01

    The aqueous ozone decomposition in the presence of a Co2O3-Alumina catalyst was investigated. Activity and estability assays were conducted by reusing the same catalyst in consecutive runs. The catalyst was shown to significantly increase the ozone abatement rate without loss in activity after five consecutive experiments. The process can be acceptably simulated by a double homogeneous-heterogeneous decomposition mechanism. An increase in the working temperature resulted in an opposite effect by increasing the extension of the homogeneous decomposition and lowering the extension of the heterogeneous decomposition. Similarly, different trends were observed by adding two distinct free radical scavengers (terc-butyl alcohol and carbonates). PMID:15533013

  4. Early Radio and X-Ray Observations of the Youngest Nearby Type Ia Supernova PTF 11kly (SN 2011fe)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horesh, Assaf; Kulkarni, S. R.; Fox, Derek B.; Carpenter, John; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Ofek, Eran O.; Quimby, Robert; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Cenko, S. Bradley; deBruyn, A. G.; Kamble, Atish; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; vanderHorst, Alexander J.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Podsiadlowski, Philipp; Sullivan, Mark; Maguire, Kate; Howell, D. Andrew; Nugent, Peter E.; Gehrels, Neil; Law, Nicolas M.; Poznanski, Dovi; Shara, Michael

    2012-01-01

    On August 24 (UT) the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) discovered PTF11kly (SN 2011fe), the youngest and most nearby type Ia supernova (SN Ia) in decades. We followed this event up in the radio (centimeter and millimeter bands) and X-ray bands, starting about a day after the estimated explosion time. We present our analysis of the radio and X-ray observations, yielding the tightest constraints yet placed on the pre-explosion mass-loss rate from the progenitor system of this supernova. We find a robust limit of M(raised dot) less than or equal to 10(exp -8) (w /100 kilometers per second ) solar mass yr(exp -1) from sensitive X-ray non-detections, as well as a similar limit from radio data, which depends, however, on assumptions about microphysical parameters. We discuss our results in the context of single-degenerate models for SNe Ia and find that our observations modestly disfavor symbiotic progenitor models involving a red giant donor, but cannot constrain systems accreting from main sequence or sub-giant stars, including the popular supersoft channel. In view of the proximity of PTF11kly and the sensitivity of our prompt observations we would have to wait for a long time (decade or longer) in order to more meaningfully probe the circumstellar matter of Ia supernovae.

  5. EARLY RADIO AND X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF THE YOUNGEST NEARBY TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA PTF 11kly (SN 2011fe)

    SciTech Connect

    Horesh, Assaf; Kulkarni, S. R.; Carpenter, John; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Ofek, Eran O.; Fox, Derek B.; Quimby, Robert; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Cenko, S. Bradley; De Bruyn, A. G.; Kamble, Atish; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Van der Horst, Alexander J.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Podsiadlowski, Philipp; Sullivan, Mark; Maguire, Kate; Howell, D. Andrew; Nugent, Peter E.; Gehrels, Neil; and others

    2012-02-10

    On 2011 August 24 (UT) the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) discovered PTF11kly (SN 2011fe), the youngest and most nearby Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) in decades. We followed this event up in the radio (centimeter and millimeter bands) and X-ray bands, starting about a day after the estimated explosion time. We present our analysis of the radio and X-ray observations, yielding the tightest constraints yet placed on the pre-explosion mass-loss rate from the progenitor system of this supernova. We find a robust limit of M-dot {approx}<10{sup -8}(w/100 km s{sup -1}) M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} from sensitive X-ray non-detections, as well as a similar limit from radio data, which depends, however, on assumptions about microphysical parameters. We discuss our results in the context of single-degenerate models for SNe Ia and find that our observations modestly disfavor symbiotic progenitor models involving a red giant donor, but cannot constrain systems accreting from main-sequence or sub-giant stars, including the popular supersoft channel. In view of the proximity of PTF11kly and the sensitivity of our prompt observations, we would have to wait for a long time (a decade or longer) in order to more meaningfully probe the circumstellar matter of SNe Ia.

  6. Endocrine Biomarkers and Symptom Clusters during the Menopausal Transition and Early Postmenopause: Observations from the Seattle Midlife Women's Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Nancy F.; Cray, Lori A.; Mitchell, Ellen S.; Herting, Jerald R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective During the menopausal transition and early postmenopause participants in the Seattle Midlife Women's Health Study (SMWHS) were likely to belong to one of three symptom severity classes: severe hot flashes with moderate sleep, mood, cognitive, and pain symptoms (High-severity Hot Flash); moderate levels of all but hot flashes (Moderate Severity); and low levels of all (Low Severity). We tested models of differential effects of hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian (HPO), hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA), and autonomic nervous system (ANS) biomarkers on the three symptom severity classes. Methods SMWHS participants recorded symptoms monthly in diaries and provided overnight urine samples several times per year that were analyzed for estrone, follicle stimulating hormone, cortisol, testosterone, epinephrine and norepinephrine. Multilevel latent class analysis with multinomial regression was used to determine the effects of HPO, HPA, and ANS biomarkers on symptom severity class membership. Results Having lower estrogen levels and higher FSH levels were associated significantly with belonging to the High-severity Hot Flash vs the Low Severity class. Having lower epinephrine and higher norepinephrine levels increased the likelihood of belonging to the High-severity Hot Flash vs the Low Severity class. Having lower epinephrine levels was associated significantly with belonging to the Moderate Severity vs the Low severity class. Cortisol and testosterone were unrelated to symptom severity class membership. Conclusion Association of HPO biomarkers (estrogen, FSH) with the High-severity Hot Flash class was anticipated based on prior hot flash research and associations of HPA biomarkers were as expected based on earlier laboratory studies. Association of lower epinephrine levels with the Moderate Severity class suggests these symptoms may be mediated by the ANS. PMID:24781854

  7. THE SIZE EVOLUTION OF PASSIVE GALAXIES: OBSERVATIONS FROM THE WIDE-FIELD CAMERA 3 EARLY RELEASE SCIENCE PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, R. E. Jr.; McCarthy, P. J.; Cohen, S. H.; Rutkowski, M. J.; Mechtley, M. R.; Windhorst, R. A.; Yan, H.; Hathi, N. P.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Bond, H. E.; Bushouse, H.; O'Connell, R. W.; Balick, B.; Calzetti, D.; Crockett, R. M.; Disney, M.; Dopita, M. A.; Frogel, J. A.; Hall, D. N. B.; Holtzman, J. A.; and others

    2012-04-10

    We present the size evolution of passively evolving galaxies at z {approx} 2 identified in Wide-Field Camera 3 imaging from the Early Release Science program. Our sample was constructed using an analog to the passive BzK galaxy selection criterion, which isolates galaxies with little or no ongoing star formation at z {approx}> 1.5. We identify 30 galaxies in {approx}40 arcmin{sup 2} to H < 25 mag. By fitting the 10-band Hubble Space Telescope photometry from 0.22 {mu}m {approx}< {lambda}{sub obs} {approx}< 1.6 {mu}m with stellar population synthesis models, we simultaneously determine photometric redshift, stellar mass, and a bevy of other population parameters. Based on the six galaxies with published spectroscopic redshifts, we estimate a typical redshift uncertainty of {approx}0.033(1 + z). We determine effective radii from Sersic profile fits to the H-band image using an empirical point-spread function. By supplementing our data with published samples, we propose a mass-dependent size evolution model for passively evolving galaxies, where the most massive galaxies (M{sub *} {approx} 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }) undergo the strongest evolution from z {approx} 2 to the present. Parameterizing the size evolution as (1 + z){sup -{alpha}}, we find a tentative scaling of {alpha} Almost-Equal-To (- 0.6 {+-} 0.7) + (0.9 {+-} 0.4)log (M{sub *}/10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }), where the relatively large uncertainties reflect the poor sampling in stellar mass due to the low numbers of high-redshift systems. We discuss the implications of this result for the redshift evolution of the M{sub *}-R{sub e} relation for red galaxies.

  8. A review of myrmecophily in ant nest beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae: Paussinae): linking early observations with recent findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiselhardt, Stefanie F.; Peschke, Klaus; Nagel, Peter

    2007-11-01

    Myrmecophily provides various examples of how social structures can be overcome to exploit vast and well-protected resources. Ant nest beetles (Paussinae) are particularly well suited for ecological and evolutionary considerations in the context of association with ants because life habits within the subfamily range from free-living and predatory in basal taxa to obligatory myrmecophily in derived Paussini. Adult Paussini are accepted in the ant society, although parasitising the colony by preying on ant brood. Host species mainly belong to the ant families Myrmicinae and Formicinae, but at least several paussine genera are not host-specific. Morphological adaptations, such as special glands and associated tufts of hair (trichomes), characterise Paussini as typical myrmecophiles and lead to two different strategical types of body shape: while certain Paussini rely on the protective type with less exposed extremities, other genera access ant colonies using glandular secretions and trichomes (symphile type). We compare these adaptations with other taxonomic groups of insects by joining contemporary research and early sources and discuss the possibility of an attracting or appeasing effect of the secretion. Species that are ignored by their host ants might use chemical mimicry instead. Furthermore, vibrational signals may contribute to ant-beetle communication, and chemical signals have proven to play a role in host finding. The powerful defense chemistry of paussines as “bombardier beetles” is not used in contact with host ants. We attempt to trace the evolution of myrmecophily in paussines by reviewing important aspects of the association between paussine beetles and ants, i.e. morphological and potential chemical adaptations, life cycle, host specificity, alimentation, parasitism and sound production.

  9. The Size Evolution of Passive Galaxies: Observations From the Wide-Field Camera 3 Early Release Science Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, R. E., Jr.; Mccarthy, P.J.; Cohen, S. H.; Yan, H.; Hathi, N. P.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Rutkowski, M. J.; Mechtley, M. R.; Windhorst, R. A.; O’Connell, R. W.; Balick, B.; Bond, H. E.; Bushouse, H.; Calzetti, D.; Crockett, R. M.; Disney, M.; Dopita, M. A.; Frogel, J. A.; Hall, D., N., B.; Holtzman, J. A.; Kaviraj, S.; Kimble, R. A.; MacKenty, J.; Trauger, J.; Young, E.

    2012-01-01

    We present the size evolution of passively evolving galaxies at z approximately 2 identified in Wide-Field Camera 3 imaging from the Early Release Science program. Our sample was constructed using an analog to the passive BzK galaxy selection criterion, which isolates galaxies with little or no ongoing star formation at z greater than approximately 1.5. We identify 30 galaxies in approximately 40 arcmin(sup 2) to H less than 25 mag. By fitting the 10-band Hubble Space Telescope photometry from 0.22 micrometers less than approximately lambda (sub obs) 1.6 micrometers with stellar population synthesis models, we simultaneously determine photometric redshift, stellar mass, and a bevy of other population parameters. Based on the six galaxies with published spectroscopic redshifts, we estimate a typical redshift uncertainty of approximately 0.033(1+z).We determine effective radii from Sersic profile fits to the H-band image using an empirical point-spread function. By supplementing our data with published samples, we propose a mass-dependent size evolution model for passively evolving galaxies, where the most massive galaxies (M(sub *) approximately 10(sup 11) solar mass) undergo the strongest evolution from z approximately 2 to the present. Parameterizing the size evolution as (1 + z)(sup - alpha), we find a tentative scaling of alpha approximately equals (-0.6 plus or minus 0.7) + (0.9 plus or minus 0.4) log(M(sub *)/10(sup 9 solar mass), where the relatively large uncertainties reflect the poor sampling in stellar mass due to the low numbers of highredshift systems. We discuss the implications of this result for the redshift evolution of the M(sub *)-R(sub e) relation for red galaxies.

  10. Actual-Waste Tests of Enhanced Chemical Cleaning for Retrieval of SRS HLW Sludge Tank Heels and Decomposition of Oxalic Acid - 12256

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, Christopher J.; King, William D.; Ketusky, Edward T.

    2012-07-01

    Savannah River National Laboratory conducted a series of tests on the Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process using actual Savannah River Site waste material from Tanks 5F and 12H. Testing involved sludge dissolution with 2 wt% oxalic acid, the decomposition of the oxalates by ozonolysis (with and without the aid of ultraviolet light), the evaporation of water from the product, and tracking the concentrations of key components throughout the process. During ECC actual waste testing, the process was successful in decomposing oxalate to below the target levels without causing substantial physical or chemical changes in the product sludge. During ECC actual waste testing, the introduction of ozone was successful in decomposing oxalate to below the target levels. This testing did not identify physical or chemical changes in the ECC product sludge that would impact downstream processing. The results from these tests confirm observations made by AREVA NP during larger scale testing with waste simulants. This testing, however, had a decreased utilization of ozone, requiring approximately 5 moles of ozone per mole of oxalate decomposed. Decomposition of oxalates in sludge dissolved in 2 wt% OA to levels near 100 ppm oxalate using ECC process conditions required 8 to 12.5 hours without the aid of UV light and 4.5 to 8 hours with the aid of UV light. The pH and ORP were tracked during decomposition testing. Sludge components were tracked during OA decomposition, showing that most components have the highest soluble levels in the initial dissolved sludge and early decomposition samples and exhibit lower soluble levels as OA decomposition progresses. The Deposition Tank storage conditions that included pH adjustment to approximately 1 M free hydroxide tended to bring the soluble concentrations in the ECC product to nearly the same level for each test regardless of storage time, storage temperature, and contact with other tank sludge material. (authors)

  11. Early-type stars observed in the ESO UVES Paranal Observatory Project - V. Time-variable interstellar absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEvoy, Catherine M.; Smoker, Jonathan V.; Dufton, Philip L.; Smith, Keith T.; Kennedy, Michael B.; Keenan, Francis P.; Lambert, David L.; Welty, Daniel E.; Lauroesch, James T.

    2015-08-01

    The structure and properties of the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) on small scales, sub-au to 1 pc, are poorly understood. We compare interstellar absorption lines, observed towards a selection of O- and B-type stars at two or more epochs, to search for variations over time caused by the transverse motion of each star combined with changes in the structure in the foreground ISM. Two sets of data were used: 83 VLT/UVES spectra with approximately 6 yr between epochs and 21 McDonald observatory 2.7-m telescope echelle spectra with 6-20 yr between epochs, over a range of scales from ˜0-360 au. The interstellar absorption lines observed at the two epochs were subtracted and searched for any residuals due to changes in the foreground ISM. Of the 104 sightlines investigated with typically five or more components in Na I D, possible temporal variation was identified in five UVES spectra (six components), in Ca II, Ca I and/or Na I absorption lines. The variations detected range from 7 per cent to a factor of 3.6 in column density. No variation was found in any other interstellar species. Most sightlines show no variation, with 3σ upper limits to changes of the order 0.1-0.3 dex in Ca II and Na I. These variations observed imply that fine-scale structure is present in the ISM, but at the resolution available in this study, is not very common at visible wavelengths. A determination of the electron densities and lower limits to the total number density of a sample of the sightlines implies that there is no striking difference between these parameters in sightlines with, and sightlines without, varying components.

  12. Thermal decomposition and non-isothermal decomposition kinetics of carbamazepine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhen-li; Zhang, Duan-feng; Chen, Fei-xiong; Miao, Jun-yan; Ren, Bao-zeng

    2014-12-01

    The thermal stability and kinetics of isothermal decomposition of carbamazepine were studied under isothermal conditions by thermogravimetry (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) at three heating rates. Particularly, transformation of crystal forms occurs at 153.75°C. The activation energy of this thermal decomposition process was calculated from the analysis of TG curves by Flynn-Wall-Ozawa, Doyle, distributed activation energy model, Šatava-Šesták and Kissinger methods. There were two different stages of thermal decomposition process. For the first stage, E and log A [s-1] were determined to be 42.51 kJ mol-1 and 3.45, respectively. In the second stage, E and log A [s-1] were 47.75 kJ mol-1 and 3.80. The mechanism of thermal decomposition was Avrami-Erofeev (the reaction order, n = 1/3), with integral form G(α) = [-ln(1 - α)]1/3 (α = ˜0.1-0.8) in the first stage and Avrami-Erofeev (the reaction order, n = 1) with integral form G(α) = -ln(1 - α) (α = ˜0.9-0.99) in the second stage. Moreover, Δ H ≠, Δ S ≠, Δ G ≠ values were 37.84 kJ mol-1, -192.41 J mol-1 K-1, 146.32 kJ mol-1 and 42.68 kJ mol-1, -186.41 J mol-1 K-1, 156.26 kJ mol-1 for the first and second stage, respectively.

  13. Investigating hydrogel dosimeter decomposition by chemical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The chemical oxidative decomposition of leucocrystal violet micelle hydrogel dosimeters was investigated using the reaction of ferrous ions with hydrogen peroxide or sodium bicarbonate with hydrogen peroxide. The second reaction is more effective at dye decomposition in gelatin hydrogels. Additional chemical analysis is required to determine the decomposition products.

  14. Nonlinear mode decomposition: A noise-robust, adaptive decomposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iatsenko, Dmytro; McClintock, Peter V. E.; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2015-09-01

    The signals emanating from complex systems are usually composed of a mixture of different oscillations which, for a reliable analysis, should be separated from each other and from the inevitable background of noise. Here we introduce an adaptive decomposition tool—nonlinear mode decomposition (NMD)—which decomposes a given signal into a set of physically meaningful oscillations for any wave form, simultaneously removing the noise. NMD is based on the powerful combination of time-frequency analysis techniques—which, together with the adaptive choice of their parameters, make it extremely noise robust—and surrogate data tests used to identify interdependent oscillations and to distinguish deterministic from random activity. We illustrate the application of NMD to both simulated and real signals and demonstrate its qualitative and quantitative superiority over other approaches, such as (ensemble) empirical mode decomposition, Karhunen-Loève expansion, and independent component analysis. We point out that NMD is likely to be applicable and useful in many different areas of research, such as geophysics, finance, and the life sciences. The necessary matlab codes for running NMD are freely available for download.

  15. Atmosphere-Ice-Ocean Interactions During Early Autumn Freeze-up: Boundary-Layer and Surface Observations from the ACSE Field Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, Ola; Brooks, Barbara; Tjernström, Michael; Sedlar, Joseph; Brooks, Ian; Shupe, Matthew; Björck, Göran; Prytherch, John; Salisbury, Dominic; Achtert, Peggy; Sotiropoulou, Georgia; Johnston, Paul; Wolfe, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Surface energy fluxes are key to the annual summer melt and autumn freeze-up of Arctic sea ice, but are strongly modulated by atmospheric, ocean, and sea-ice processes. This paper will examine direct observations of energy fluxes during the onset of autumn freeze-up from the Arctic Clouds in Summer Experiment (ACSE), and place them in context of those from other observational campaigns. The ACSE field program obtained measurements of surface energy fluxes, boundary-layer structure, cloud macro- and microphysical structure, and upper-ocean thermal and salinity structure from pack-ice and open-water regions in the eastern Arctic from early July to early October 2014. Late August and September measurements showed periods of energy flux deficits, leading to freeze-up of sea ice and the ocean surface. The surface albedo and processes impacting the energy content of the upper ocean appear key to producing a temporal difference between the freeze-up of the sea ice and adjacent open water. While synoptic conditions, atmospheric advection, and the annual solar cycle have primary influence determining when energy fluxes are conducive for melt or freeze, mesoscale atmospheric phenomena unique to the ice edge region appear to also play a role. For instance, low-level jets were often observed near the ice edge during the latter part of ACSE, and may have enhanced the turbulent energy loss. In conjunction with observations of summer melt, these observations of the onset of freeze-up suggest scenarios of key atmospheric processes, including thermal advection on various scales, that are important for the annual evolution of melt and freeze-up.

  16. X-Ray, UV, and Optical Observations of Supernova 2006bp with Swift: Detection of Early X-Ray Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Immler, S.; Brown, P. J.; Milne, P.; Dessart, L.; Mazzali, P. A.; Landsman, W.; Gehrels, N.; Petre, R.; Burrows, D. N.; Nousek, J. A.; Chevalier, R. A.; Williams, C. L.; Koss, M.; Stockdale, C. J.; Kelley, M. T.; Weiler, K. W.; Holland, S. T.; Pian, E.; Roming, P. W. A.; Pooley, D.; Nomoto, K.; Greiner, J.; Campana, S.; Soderberg, A. M.

    2007-01-01

    We present results on the X-ray and optical/UV emission from the Type IIP supernova (SN) 2006bp and the interaction of the SW shock with its environment, obtained with the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) and UV/Optical Telescope (UVOT) on-board the Swift observatory. SN 2006bp is detected in X-rays at a 4.5 sigmalevel of significance in the merged XRT data from days 1 to 12 after the explosion. If the (0.2-10 keV band) X-ray luminosity of L(sub 0.2-10) = (1.8 plus or minus 0.4) x l0(exp 39 ergs s(exp -1) is caused by interaction of the SN shock with circumstellar material (CSM), deposited by a stellar wind from the progenitor's companion star, a mass-loss rate of M is approximately 2x10(exp -6) solar mass yr(exp -1) (v(sub w)/10 km s(exp -l) is inferred. The mass-loss rate is one of the lowest ever recorded for a core-collapse SN and consistent with the non-detection in the radio with the VLA on days 2, 9, and 11 after the explosion. The Swift data further show a fading of the X-ray emission starting around day 12 after the explosion. In combination with a follow-up XMM-Newton observation obtained on day 21 after the explosion, an X-ray rate of decline Lx, varies as t(exp -n) with index n = 1.2 plus or minus 0.6 is inferred. Since no other SN has been detected in X-rays prior to the optical peak and since Type IIP SNe have an extended 'plateau' phase in the optical, we discuss the scenario that the X-rays might be due to inverse Compton scattering of photospheric optical photons off relativistic electrons produced in circumstellar shocks. However, due to the high required value of the Lorentz factor (approximately 10-100), inconsistent with the ejecta velocity inferred from optical line widths, we conclude that Inverse Compton scattering is an unlikely explanation for the observed X-ray emission. The fast evolution of the optical/ultraviolet (1900-5500A) spectral energy distribution and the spectral changes observed with Swift reveal the onset of metal line-blanketing and cooling of the expanding photosphere during the first few weeks after the outburst.

  17. Geological Observation of the Young Petit-Spot Volcanoes on the Early Cretaceous Pacific Plate using SHINKAI 6500

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, S.; Hirano, N.; Ingle, S.; Ishii, T.; Abe, N.

    2005-12-01

    Young volcanoes are newly discovered on the cool, thick, and old Pacific Plate approximately 600 km ESE off the northern Japan Trench, during KR04-08 cruise using R/V Kairei (JAMSTEC) in 2004. The site was predicted lava eruption based on previous study for young alkali-basalt lavas (5.95 Ma) on the Japan Trench oceanward slope (the Kaiko knolls lava field). We named the Petit-Spot for such small and young volcanoes. Four SHINKAI 6500 submersible dives (dive #877 to #880) were performed in the Petit-Spot knolls and the Kaiko Knolls lava field during May 2005. Dives were initially targeted in the hopes of finding outcrops of lava flow, sampling rocks, observation of eruptive styles, and discussion of the stratigraphy of the monogenic Petit-Spot volcanoes. Three dives were conducted at the Petit-Spot lava field. One young knoll, named the Yukawa Knoll, discovered by the dredges (D-07, 08) during KR04-08 cruise was selected for dive #877. Two other knolls for dives #878 and #879 show the similar features of bathymetry and acoustic reflectivity to the Yukawa Knoll. In contrast, one site of knoll and fault wall for dive #880 situate in the Kaiko Knolls lava field, the Japan Trench oceanward slope. Dives were planned to ascending the slope from the foot of knoll with continuously observation of lavas and volcaniclastic sequences, and sampling along the slope. The basin or flat floor at the beginning of the dive was fully covered in soft pelagic sediment. We found oblong shaped pillow lavas and the pillow robes outcrops along the slope. However, outcrops are exhibited in limited area around the summit of knoll. Lavas commonly include peperites. Rock fragments sampled appear to be volcanic breccias containing clasts of lava enclosed in sedimentary rock; manganese coating on these breccias is thin, suggesting they were deposited recently. Based on above observation, we assumed that knolls in the Petit-Spot lava field show feeder dike or cryptdome like stratigraphy with some lava flows, in-situ and redeposited hyaloclastites, and water-chilled bumps. That is, basaltic lavas mainly inject into pelagic sediment layer. Furthermore, lavas show very high vesicularity in spite of high water pressure about 6000m deep, suggesting high volatile composition. Brecciated lava clasts containing peridotitic xenolith. These features may indicate that the Petit-Spot volcanoes also have aspect as a kind of abyssal diatreme induced in the oceanic lithosphere.

  18. Trade-Offs in Resource Allocation Among Moss Species Control Decomposition in Boreal Peatlands

    SciTech Connect

    Turetsky, M. R.; Crow, S. E.; Evans, R. J.; Vitt, D. H.; Wieder, R. K.

    2008-01-01

    We separated the effects of plant species controls on decomposition rates from environmental controls in northern peatlands using a full factorial, reciprocal transplant experiment of eight dominant bryophytes in four distinct peatland types in boreal Alberta, Canada. Standard fractionation techniques as well as compound-specific pyrolysis molecular beam mass spectrometry were used to identify a biochemical mechanism underlying any interspecific differences in decomposition rates. We found that over a 3-year field incubation, individual moss species and not micro-environmental conditions controlled early stages of decomposition. Across species, Sphagnum mosses exhibited a trade-off in resource partitioning into metabolic and structural carbohydrates, a pattern that served as a strong predictor of litter decomposition. Decomposition rates showed a negative co-variation between species and their microtopographic position, as species that live in hummocks decomposed slowly but hummock microhabitats themselves corresponded to rapid decomposition rates. By forming litter that degrades slowly, hummock mosses appear to promote the maintenance of macropore structure in surface peat hummocks that aid in water retention. Many northern regions are experiencing rapid climate warming that is expected to accelerate the decomposition of large soil carbon pools stored within peatlands. However, our results suggest that some common peatland moss species form tissue that resists decomposition across a range of peatland environments, suggesting that moss resource allocation could stabilize peatland carbon losses under a changing climate.

  19. Crop residue decomposition in Minnesota biochar amended plots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weyers, S. L.; Spokas, K. A.

    2014-02-01

    Impacts of biochar application at laboratory scales are routinely studied, but impacts of biochar application on decomposition of crop residues at field scales have not been widely addressed. The priming or hindrance of crop residue decomposition could have a cascading impact on soil processes, particularly those influencing nutrient availability. Our objectives were to evaluate biochar effects on field decomposition of crop residue, using plots that were amended with biochars made from different feedstocks and pyrolysis platforms prior to the start of this study. Litterbags containing wheat straw material were buried below the soil surface in a continuous-corn cropped field in plots that had received one of seven different biochar amendments or a non-charred wood pellet amendment 2.5 yr prior to start of this study. Litterbags were collected over the course of 14 weeks. Microbial biomass was assessed in treatment plots the previous fall. Though first-order decomposition rate constants were positively correlated to microbial biomass, neither parameter was statistically affected by biochar or wood-pellet treatments. The findings indicated only a residual of potentially positive and negative initial impacts of biochars on residue decomposition, which fit in line with established feedstock and pyrolysis influences. Though no significant impacts were observed with field-weathered biochars, effective soil management may yet have to account for repeat applications of biochar.

  20. Effect of polar surfaces on decomposition of molecular materials.

    PubMed

    Kuklja, Maija M; Tsyshevsky, Roman V; Sharia, Onise

    2014-09-24

    We report polar instability in molecular materials. Polarization-induced explosive decomposition in molecular crystals is explored with an illustrative example of two crystalline polymorphs of HMX, an important energetic material. We establish that the presence of a polar surface in δ-HMX has fundamental implications for material stability and overall chemical behavior. A comparative quantum-chemical analysis of major decomposition mechanisms in polar δ-HMX and nonpolar β-HMX discovered a dramatic difference in dominating dissociation reactions, activation barriers, and reaction rates. The presence of charge on the polar δ-HMX surface alters chemical mechanisms and effectively triggers decomposition simultaneously through several channels with significantly reduced activation barriers. This results in much faster decomposition chemistry and in higher chemical reactivity of δ-HMX phase relatively to β-HMX phase. We predict decomposition mechanisms and their activation barriers in condensed δ-HMX phase, sensitivity of which happens to be comparable to primary explosives. We suggest that the observed trend among polymorphs is a manifestation of polar instability phenomena, and hence similar processes are likely to take place in all polar molecular crystals. PMID:25170566

  1. Variance decomposition in stochastic simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Maître, O. P.; Knio, O. M.; Moraes, A.

    2015-06-01

    This work aims at the development of a mathematical and computational approach that enables quantification of the inherent sources of stochasticity and of the corresponding sensitivities in stochastic simulations of chemical reaction networks. The approach is based on reformulating the system dynamics as being generated by independent standardized Poisson processes. This reformulation affords a straightforward identification of individual realizations for the stochastic dynamics of each reaction channel, and consequently a quantitative characterization of the inherent sources of stochasticity in the system. By relying on the Sobol-Hoeffding decomposition, the reformulation enables us to perform an orthogonal decomposition of the solution variance. Thus, by judiciously exploiting the inherent stochasticity of the system, one is able to quantify the variance-based sensitivities associated with individual reaction channels, as well as the importance of channel interactions. Implementation of the algorithms is illustrated in light of simulations of simplified systems, including the birth-death, Schlögl, and Michaelis-Menten models.

  2. A near-infrared interferometric survey of debris disc stars. II. CHARA/FLUOR observations of six early-type dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Absil, O.; di Folco, E.; Mérand, A.; Augereau, J.-C.; Coudé du Foresto, V.; Defrère, D.; Kervella, P.; Aufdenberg, J. P.; Desort, M.; Ehrenreich, D.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Montagnier, G.; Olofsson, J.; ten Brummelaar, T. A.; McAlister, H. A.; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L.; Turner, N. H.

    2008-09-01

    Aims: We aim at directly detecting the presence of optically thin circumstellar dust emission within the terrestrial planetary zone around main sequence stars known to harbour cold debris discs. The present study focuses on a sample of six bright A- and early F-type stars. Methods: High-precision interferometric observations have been obtained in the near-infrared K band with the FLUOR instrument installed on the CHARA Array. The measured squared visibilities are compared to the expected visibility of the stellar photospheres based on theoretical photospheric models taking into account rotational distortion. We search for potential visibility reduction at short baselines, a direct piece of evidence for resolved circumstellar emission. Results: Our observations bring to light the presence of resolved circumstellar emission around one of the six target stars (ζ Aql) at the 5σ level. The morphology of the emission source cannot be directly constrained because of the sparse spatial frequency sampling of our interferometric data. Using complementary adaptive optics observations and radial velocity measurements, we find that the presence of a low-mass companion is a likely origin for the excess emission. The potential companion is characterised by a K-band contrast of four magnitudes. It has a most probable mass of about 0.6~M⊙ and is expected to orbit between about 5.5 AU and 8 AU from its host star assuming a purely circular orbit. Nevertheless, by adjusting a physical debris disc model to the observed Spectral Energy Distribution of the ζ Aql system, we also show that the presence of hot dust within 10 AU from ζ Aql, producing a total thermal emission equal to 1.69 ± 0.31% of the photospheric flux in the K band, is another viable explanation for the observed near-infrared excess. Our re-interpretation of archival near- to far-infrared photometric measurements shows however that cold dust is not present around ζ Aql at the sensitivity limit of the IRS and MIPS instruments onboard Spitzer, and urges us to remove ζ Aql from the category of bona fide debris disc stars. Conclusions: The hot debris disc around Vega (Absil et al. 2006) currently remains our only secure resolved detection within the context of this survey, with six genuine early-type debris disc stars observed so far. Further observations will be needed to assess whether ζ Aql also belongs to this hot debris disc category. Partly based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile, under program IDs 073.C-0733, 077.C-0295 and 080.C-0712.

  3. Observational Evidence Against Mountain-Wave Generation of Ice Nuclei as a Prerequisite for the Formation of Three Solid Nitric Acid Polar Stratospheric Clouds Observed in the Arctic in Early December 1999

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagan, Kathy L.; Tabazadeh, Azadeh; Drdla, Katja; Hervig, Mark E.; Eckermann, Stephen D.; Browell, Edward V.; Legg, Marion J.; Foschi, Patricia G.

    2004-01-01

    A number of recently published papers suggest that mountain-wave activity in the stratosphere, producing ice particles when temperatures drop below the ice frost point, may be the primary source of large NAT particles. In this paper we use measurements from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) instruments on board the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) polar-orbiting satellites to map out regions of ice clouds produced by stratospheric mountain-wave activity inside the Arctic vortex. Lidar observations from three DC-8 flights in early December 1999 show the presence of solid nitric acid (Type Ia or NAT) polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). By using back trajectories and superimposing the position maps on the AVHRR cloud imagery products, we show that these observed NAT clouds could not have originated at locations of high-amplitude mountain-wave activity. We also show that mountain-wave PSC climatology data and Mountain Wave Forecast Model 2.0 (MWFM-2) raw hemispheric ray and grid box averaged hemispheric wave temperature amplitude hindcast data from the same time period are in agreement with the AVHRR data. Our results show that ice cloud formation in mountain waves cannot explain how at least three large scale NAT clouds were formed in the stratosphere in early December 1999.

  4. Exsolution by spinodal decomposition in multicomponent mineral solutions

    PubMed Central

    Petrishcheva, E.; Abart, R.

    2012-01-01

    Phase separation in a three-component system that results from the uphill diffusion of chemical components is considered. The binary decomposition model of Cahn and Hilliard is generalized to account for the interdiffusion of several chemical components with considerably different diffusion constants. Thereafter the decomposition dynamics and the phase relations of the final system state are investigated by means of finite-element modeling. Examples from a hypothetical regular solution and from ternary feldspar are addressed. Special attention is given to situations in which different diffusivities affect decomposition dynamics and the final system states. Good qualitative agreement between our modeling and petrographic observations on exsolved feldspar is achieved. Our model explains systematic deviations from equilibrium element partitioning between the two phases exsolving from an initially homogeneous ternary feldspar during slow cooling. PMID:23888123

  5. Exsolution by spinodal decomposition in multicomponent mineral solutions.

    PubMed

    Petrishcheva, E; Abart, R

    2012-09-01

    Phase separation in a three-component system that results from the uphill diffusion of chemical components is considered. The binary decomposition model of Cahn and Hilliard is generalized to account for the interdiffusion of several chemical components with considerably different diffusion constants. Thereafter the decomposition dynamics and the phase relations of the final system state are investigated by means of finite-element modeling. Examples from a hypothetical regular solution and from ternary feldspar are addressed. Special attention is given to situations in which different diffusivities affect decomposition dynamics and the final system states. Good qualitative agreement between our modeling and petrographic observations on exsolved feldspar is achieved. Our model explains systematic deviations from equilibrium element partitioning between the two phases exsolving from an initially homogeneous ternary feldspar during slow cooling. PMID:23888123

  6. Decomposition Studies of Tetraphenylborate Slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.L.

    1997-05-06

    This report details the decomposition of aqueous (K,Na) slurries in concentrated salt solutions using a more complete candidate catalyst recipe, extended testing temperatures (40-70 degrees C) and test durations of approximately 1500 hours (9 weeks). This study uses recently developed High-Pressure Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) methods for analysis of tetraphenylborate (TPB-), triphenylborane (3PB) and diphenylborinic acid (2PB). All of the present tests involve non-radioactive simulants and do not include investigations of radiolysis effects.

  7. Decomposition Properties of Quantum Discord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunho, Kim; Wu, Jun-De; Minhyung, Cho

    2016-04-01

    The quantum discord was introduced by Ollivier, Zurek, Henderson, and Vedral as an indicator of the degree of quantumness of mixed states. In this paper, we provide a decomposition condition for quantum discord. Moreover, we show that under the condition, the quantum correlations between the quantum systems can be captured completely by the entanglement measure. Finally, we present examples of our conclusions. Supported by Research Fund, Kumoh National Institute of Technology

  8. Reactive Goal Decomposition Hierarchies for On-Board Autonomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, L.

    2002-01-01

    As our experience grows, space missions and systems are expected to address ever more complex and demanding requirements with fewer resources (e.g., mass, power, budget). One approach to accommodating these higher expectations is to increase the level of autonomy to improve the capabilities and robustness of on- board systems and to simplify operations. The goal decomposition hierarchies described here provide a simple but powerful form of goal-directed behavior that is relatively easy to implement for space systems. A goal corresponds to a state or condition that an operator of the space system would like to bring about. In the system described here goals are decomposed into simpler subgoals until the subgoals are simple enough to execute directly. For each goal there is an activation condition and a set of decompositions. The decompositions correspond to different ways of achieving the higher level goal. Each decomposition contains a gating condition and a set of subgoals to be "executed" sequentially or in parallel. The gating conditions are evaluated in order and for the first one that is true, the corresponding decomposition is executed in order to achieve the higher level goal. The activation condition specifies global conditions (i.e., for all decompositions of the goal) that need to hold in order for the goal to be achieved. In real-time, parameters and state information are passed between goals and subgoals in the decomposition; a termination indication (success, failure, degree) is passed up when a decomposition finishes executing. The lowest level decompositions include servo control loops and finite state machines for generating control signals and sequencing i/o. Semaphores and shared memory are used to synchronize and coordinate decompositions that execute in parallel. The goal decomposition hierarchy is reactive in that the generated behavior is sensitive to the real-time state of the system and the environment. That is, the system is able to react to state and environment and in general can terminate the execution of a decomposition and attempt a new decomposition at any level in the hierarchy. This goal decomposition system is suitable for workstation, microprocessor and fpga implementation and thus is able to support the full range of prototyping activities, from mission design in the laboratory to development of the fpga firmware for the flight system. This approach is based on previous artificial intelligence work including (1) Brooks' subsumption architecture for robot control, (2) Firby's Reactive Action Package System (RAPS) for mediating between high level automated planning and low level execution and (3) hierarchical task networks for automated planning. Reactive goal decomposition hierarchies can be used for a wide variety of on-board autonomy applications including automating low level operation sequences (such as scheduling prerequisite operations, e.g., heaters, warm-up periods, monitoring power constraints), coordinating multiple spacecraft as in formation flying and constellations, robot manipulator operations, rendez-vous, docking, servicing, assembly, on-orbit maintenance, planetary rover operations, solar system and interstellar probes, intelligent science data gathering and disaster early warning. Goal decomposition hierarchies can support high level fault tolerance. Given models of on-board resources and goals to accomplish, the decomposition hierarchy could allocate resources to goals taking into account existing faults and in real-time reallocating resources as new faults arise. Resources to be modeled include memory (e.g., ROM, FPGA configuration memory, processor memory, payload instrument memory), processors, on-board and interspacecraft network nodes and links, sensors, actuators (e.g., attitude determination and control, guidance and navigation) and payload instruments. A goal decomposition hierarchy could be defined to map mission goals and tasks to available on-board resources. As faults occur and are detected the resource allocation is modified to avoid using the faulty resource. Goal decomposition hierarchies can implement variable autonomy (in which the operator chooses to command the system at a high or low level, mixed initiative planning (in which the system is able to interact with the operator, e.g, to request operator intervention when a working envelope is exceeded) and distributed control (in which, for example, multiple spacecraft cooperate to accomplish a task without a fixed master). The full paper will describe in greater detail how goal decompositions work, how they can be implemented, techniques for implementing a candidate application and the current state of the fpga implementation.

  9. Investigating early-type galaxy evolution with a multiwavelength approach - I. X-ray properties of 12 galaxies observed with Swift and XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinchieri, G.; Rampazzo, R.; Mazzei, P.; Marino, A.; Wolter, A.

    2015-05-01

    We report here the results from the X-ray observations of 12 early-type galaxies (ETGs) observed with Swift and XMM-Newton, originally selected from a sample of galaxies with Spitzer and/or GALEX data. With the combined analysis of new X-ray and optical-UV observations and of previously available data from archives, we aim at investigating the relation between X-ray luminosity and evolutionary phases of ETGs. We will interpret the results with the additional aid of smoothed particle hydrodynamics chemo-photometric simulations. All galaxies have been detected in the X-ray band, with luminosities Lx > 1039 erg s-1. X-ray emitting gas has been detected in about half of the sample, with luminosities from ≥1039 to 1040 erg s-1. UVOT images show a variety of morphologies, from absence of peculiar features relative to optical wavelengths typical of red and dead early-types, to well defined almost circular rings clearly emerging in the U band, to more spectacular and complex features connected to recent or even ongoing star formation (SF). We find little evidence of any influence of the SF activity on their global X-ray properties, and in particular, on the luminosity-weighted age of the system, usually estimated in the nuclear region. However, with the present data we cannot exclude that such a relation exists on smaller scales, related to the specific sites where we see evidence of newly formed stars, such as outer rings and arcs and peculiar features observed in UV images.

  10. Early spring evolution of the Giza and Inca City regions as observed by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment over two Martian years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portyankina, G.; Thomas, N.; Hansen, C. J.; Schmidt, F.; Aye, K.-M.

    2009-04-01

    The Martian South Polar Regions which are covered by a CO2 layer during winter, become in spring a place for exotic activity and a place of CO2, water ice and dust interplay. Dark and bright fans have been observed. They are associated with araneiform (spider-like) structures and are believed to be deposits from jets which arise from pressure produced below translucent CO2 slab ice. The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) has imaged the southern polar terrain in unprecedented detail throughout local spring of Martian year 28. At the moment (beginning of 2009) a similar observational campaign for the southern spring of Martian year 29 is being conducted. We will present HiRISE observations for two chosen locations that exhibit jet activity - the Giza region (-84.8, 65.7E) and Inca City (-81.3, 295.8E) - and compare their early spring evolution. Although these two areas are situated at similar latitudes, they lie on opposite sides of the South Pole and are topographically quite different: Giza occupies a relatively flat area, while Inca City possesses a distinctive set of orthogonal ridges. The most important difference is the relation of these regions to the cryptic terrain. OMEGA observations suggest Inca City lies completely outside the cryptic terrain, while Giza is inside the early cryptic region (at Ls=220 deg-230 deg). Similarities and differences in the evolution of these areas will be discussed on the basis of models of processes involving translucent CO2 ice.

  11. Phlogopite Decomposition, Water, and Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, N. M.; Fegley, B., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Venus is a hot and dry planet with a surface temperature of 660 to 740 K and 30 parts per million by volume (ppmv) water vapor in its lower atmosphere. In contrast Earth has an average surface temperature of 288 K and 1-4% water vapor in its troposphere. The hot and dry conditions on Venus led many to speculate that hydrous minerals on the surface of Venus would not be there today even though they might have formed in a potentially wetter past. Thermodynamic calculations predict that many hydrous minerals are unstable under current Venusian conditions. Thermodynamics predicts whether a particular mineral is stable or not, but we need experimental data on the decomposition rate of hydrous minerals to determine if they survive on Venus today. Previously, we determined the decomposition rate of the amphibole tremolite, and found that it could exist for billions of years at current surface conditions. Here, we present our initial results on the decomposition of phlogopite mica, another common hydrous mineral on Earth.

  12. Radio-cesium accumulation during decomposition of leaf litter in a deciduous forest after the Fukushima NPP accident.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Nobuhiro; Huang, Yao; Nakamori, Taizo; Tanaka, Yoichiro; Nonaka, Masanori

    2013-04-01

    Fukusima NPP accident contaminated vast area in eastern Japan with radio isotopes. Most of the area is covered by natural and plantation forest. The forest floor in deciduous forests, and canopy of evergreen forest were most contaminated by fall out. Radio-cesium is known to stay bioavailable in forest ecosystems for long time, and it is necessary to cut the cycling process to decontaminate the forest ecosystem. Ecological process to recycle radio-Cs in forest ecosystem should be studied to enhance decontamination of radio-Cs. Mushrooms show high concentration of Cs. Although mushroom biomass in a forest ecosystem is small, fungal mycelium in detritus and soil is large, thus fungi contain substantial amount of radio-Cs. It is well known that concentration of some nutrients, such as nitrogen and phosphorus, increase, whereas potassium decreases during the leaf litter decomposition. We observed radio-Cs concentration of leaf litter during decomposition on a forest floor where 134-Cs and 137-Cs of surface soil were 5,700, and 6,800 Bq/kg, respectively. We put 16 g (dry weight) of newly fallen mixed deciduous leaf litter (half of which was oak, Quercus serrata) into 25 cm x 25 cm litter bag (2 mm mesh size) in a deciduous forest about 50 km from Fukushima NPP. Fresh litter 137-Cs concentration was ca. 1,000 Bq/kg in December 2011. During the decomposition process on the forest floor, litter Cs increased exponentially and exceeded 10,000 Bq/kg after 6 months, indicating that Cs and K show contrasting dynamics during early decomposition phase. Increase in fungal biomass in the early stage of litter decomposition was observed. Therefore, this upward movement of Cs from humus and soil layer suggests fungal translocation of nutrients from outside of litter substrate. Retrieving the litter after 6 months can remove 18.0% of 134-Cs. Interaction between fungal species, grazing effect on fungi by fungivorous invertebrates will change the amount of translocation of radio-Cs from soil to decomposing litter.

  13. Early Science with the Large Millimeter Telescope: Observations of Extremely Luminous High-z Sources Identified by Planck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, K. C.; Yun, Min S.; Cybulski, R.; Wilson, G. W.; Aretxaga, I.; Chavez, M.; Luz, V. De la; Erickson, N.; Ferrusca, D.; Gallup, A. D.; Hughes, D. H.; Monta na, A.; Narayanan, G.; Sánchez-Argüelles, D.; Schloerb, F. P.; Souccar, K.; Terlevich, E.; Terlevich, R.; Zeballos, M.; Zavala, J. A.

    2016-03-01

    We present 8.5″ resolution 1.1mm continuum imaging and CO spectroscopic redshift measurements of eight extremely bright submillimetre galaxies identified from the Planck and Herschel surveys, taken with the Large Millimeter Telescope's AzTEC and Redshift Search Receiver instruments. We compiled a candidate list of high redshift galaxies by cross-correlating the Planck Surveyor mission's highest frequency channel (857 GHz, FWHM = 4.5') with the archival Herschel Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) imaging data, and requiring the presence of a unique, single Herschel counterpart within the 150″ search radius of the Planck source positions with 350 μm flux density larger than 100 mJy, excluding known blazars and foreground galaxies. All eight candidate objects observed are detected in 1.1mm continuum by AzTEC bolometer camera, and at least one CO line is detected in all cases with a spectroscopic redshift between 1.3 < zCO < 3.3. Their infrared spectral energy distributions mapped using the Herschel and AzTEC photometry are consistent with cold dust emission with characteristic temperature between Td = 43 K and 84 K. With apparent infrared luminosity of up to LIR = 3 × 1014μ-1L⊙, they are some of the most luminous galaxies ever found (with yet unknown gravitational magnification factor μ). The analysis of their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) suggests that star formation is powering the bulk of their extremely large IR luminosities. Derived molecular gas masses of MH2 = (0.6 - 7.8) × 1011M⊙ (for μ ≈ 10) also make them some of the most gas-rich high redshift galaxies ever detected.

  14. ALMA Early Science Observations of Outbursting Stellar Systems:Disk Masses for FU Ori and EXor Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieza, Lucas A.; Prieto, Jose Luis; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Tobin, John J.; Williams, Jonathan P.; Hales, Antonio; Casassus, Simon; Principe, David; Schreiber, Matthias R.

    2016-01-01

    It is believed that low-mass stars build a significant fraction of their total mass during short outbursts of enhanced accretion (up to 10E-4 MSOLAR /yr). The most dramatic episodic accretion events known in Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) are FU Ori and EXor outbursts. FU Ori objects are characterized by a sudden brightening of 5 magnitudes or more within one year and remain bright for decades. EXor objects have lower amplitude outbursts on shorter timescales (months to years). Here we present an ALMA 230 GHz (1.3 mm / band-6) mini-survey of 8 outbursting sources (three FU Ori and ve EXor objects) in Orion with 1" (450 AU) resolution. We present continuum, 12CO, 13CO, and C18O line images and derive dust and (when possible) gas disk masses. The disk masses derived from the line observations are systematically lower (by factors of 3-5) than those calculated from the continuum and adopting the standard gas-to-dust ratio of 100, which agrees with results on T Tauri disks in Taurus. After beam deconvolution, we nd that the disks are remarkably compact (r = 70-150 AU). The 1.3 mm fuxes of the outbursting sources span over three orders of magnitude, but the FU Ori objects are signi cantly brighter than the EXor objects. The inferred disk masses for the brightest objects are > 0.1 Msolar , rendering gravitational instability a likely outburst mechanism. On the other hand, the inferred disk masses for the faintest targets are ~ 1-5 MJUP , and thus an alternative mechanism must be responsible for their outbursts.

  15. The Resolved Stellar Population in 50 Regions of M83 from HST/WFC3 Early Release Science Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hwihyun; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Chandar, Rupali; Saha, Abhijit; Kaleida, Catherine C.; Mutchler, Max; Cohen, Seth H.; Calzetti, Daniela; O’Connell, Robert W.; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Balick, Bruce; Bond, Howard E.; Carollo, Marcella; Disney, Michael J.; Dopita, Michael A.; Frogel, Jay A.; Hall, Donald N. B.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Kimble, Randy A.; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Paresce, Francesco; Silk, Joe I; Trauger, John T.; Walker, Alistair R.; Young, Erick T.

    2012-01-01

    We present a multi-wavelength photometric study of approximately 15,000 resolved stars in the nearby spiral galaxy M83 (NGC 5236, D = 4.61 Mpc) based on Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 observations using four filters: F336W, F438W, F555W, and F814W. We select 50 regions (an average size of 260 pc by 280 pc) in the spiral arm and inter-arm areas of M83 and determine the age distribution of the luminous stellar populations in each region. This is accomplished by correcting for extinction toward each individual star by comparing its colors with predictions from stellar isochrones.We compare the resulting luminosity-weighted mean ages of the luminous stars in the 50 regions with those determined from several independent methods, including the number ratio of red-to-blue supergiants, morphological appearance of the regions, surface brightness fluctuations, and the ages of clusters in the regions. We find reasonably good agreement between these methods. We also find that young stars are much more likely to be found in concentrated aggregates along spiral arms, while older stars are more dispersed. These results are consistent with the scenario that star formation is associated with the spiral arms, and stars form primarily in star clusters and then disperse on short timescales to form the field population. The locations ofWolf-Rayet stars are found to correlate with the positions of many of the youngest regions, providing additional support for our ability to accurately estimate ages. We address the effects of spatial resolution on the measured colors, magnitudes, and age estimates. While individual stars can occasionally show measurable differences in the colors and magnitudes, the age estimates for entire regions are only slightly affected.

  16. THE RESOLVED STELLAR POPULATION IN 50 REGIONS OF M83 FROM HST/WFC3 EARLY RELEASE SCIENCE OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hwihyun; Cohen, Seth H.; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Mutchler, Max; Bond, Howard E.; Chandar, Rupali; Saha, Abhijit; Kaleida, Catherine C.; Calzetti, Daniela; O'Connell, Robert W.; Balick, Bruce; Carollo, Marcella; Disney, Michael J.; Dopita, Michael A.; Frogel, Jay A.; Hall, Donald N. B.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Kimble, Randy A.; McCarthy, Patrick J.; and others

    2012-07-01

    We present a multi-wavelength photometric study of {approx}15,000 resolved stars in the nearby spiral galaxy M83 (NGC 5236, D = 4.61 Mpc) based on Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 observations using four filters: F336W, F438W, F555W, and F814W. We select 50 regions (an average size of 260 pc by 280 pc) in the spiral arm and inter-arm areas of M83 and determine the age distribution of the luminous stellar populations in each region. This is accomplished by correcting for extinction toward each individual star by comparing its colors with predictions from stellar isochrones. We compare the resulting luminosity-weighted mean ages of the luminous stars in the 50 regions with those determined from several independent methods, including the number ratio of red-to-blue supergiants, morphological appearance of the regions, surface brightness fluctuations, and the ages of clusters in the regions. We find reasonably good agreement between these methods. We also find that young stars are much more likely to be found in concentrated aggregates along spiral arms, while older stars are more dispersed. These results are consistent with the scenario that star formation is associated with the spiral arms, and stars form primarily in star clusters and then disperse on short timescales to form the field population. The locations of Wolf-Rayet stars are found to correlate with the positions of many of the youngest regions, providing additional support for our ability to accurately estimate ages. We address the effects of spatial resolution on the measured colors, magnitudes, and age estimates. While individual stars can occasionally show measurable differences in the colors and magnitudes, the age estimates for entire regions are only slightly affected.

  17. Evidence of Multiple r-Process Sites in the Early Galaxy: New Observations of CS 22892-052.

    PubMed

    Sneden; Cowan; Ivans; Fuller; Burles; Beers; Lawler

    2000-04-20

    First results are reported of a new abundance study of neutron-capture elements in the ultra-metal-poor (&sqbl0;Fe&solm0;H&sqbr0;=-3.1) halo field giant star CS 22892-052. Using new high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio spectra, abundances of more than 30 neutron-capture elements (Z>30) have been determined. Six elements in the 40/=56) stable neutron-capture elements in CS 22892-052 match well the scaled solar system r-process abundance distribution. From the observed Th abundance, an average age of approximately 16+/-4 Gyr is derived for CS 22892-052, consistent with the lower age limit of approximately 11 Gyr derived from the upper limit on the U abundance. The concordance of scaled solar r-process and CS 22892-052 abundances breaks down for the lighter neutron-capture elements, supporting previous suggestions that different r-process production sites are responsible for lighter and heavier neutron-capture elements. PMID:10770709

  18. ROSAT PSPC observations of the early-type galaxies NGC 507 and NGC 499: Central cooling and mass determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Dong-Woo; Fabbiano, G.

    1995-01-01

    We present the results of a deep observation of NGC 507 and NGC 499 with the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC). The X-ray emission of NGC 507 is extended at least out to 1000 sec (458 kpc at a distance of 94.5 Mpc). The radial profile of X-ray surface brightness goes as Sigma(sub x) is approximately r(exp -1.8) outside the core region. The radial profile is a function of energy such that the softer X-rays have a smaller core radius and a flatter slope. Spectral analysis reveals that the emission temperature, with an average of 1 keV, peaks at an intermediate radius of 2-3 min and falls toward the center (possibly decreases outward as well). The absorption column density is consistent with the Galactic line-of-sight value. The X-ray emission of NGC 499 is extended to 300 sec and suggests a similarly cooler core. The cooler cores of NGC 507 and NGC 499 are strong evidence of the presence of cooling flows in these galaxies. Assuming hydrostatic equilibrium outside the cooling radius, the estimated mass-to-light ratio of NGC 507 is 97 +/- 16 within 458 kpc, indicative of the presence of a heavy halo. Similarly, the mass-to-light ratio of NGC 499 is 89 +/- 14 within 137 kpc. Near the edge of the X-ray-emitting region of NGC 507 we detect 19 soft, unresolved sources. These sources do not have optical counterparts and are significantly in excess of the expected number of background serendipitous sources. We speculate that they may represent cooling clumps in the halo of NGC 507. If there are many undetected cooling clumps distributed at large radii, then the radial profile of the X-ray surface brightness does not directly reflect the potential, adding uncertainty to the measurement of the binding mass; the gas mass could also be overestimated.

  19. Early science with the Large Millimeter Telescope: observations of extremely luminous high-z sources identified by Planck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, K. C.; Yun, Min S.; Cybulski, R.; Wilson, G. W.; Aretxaga, I.; Chavez, M.; De la Luz, V.; Erickson, N.; Ferrusca, D.; Gallup, A. D.; Hughes, D. H.; Montaña, A.; Narayanan, G.; Sánchez-Argüelles, D.; Schloerb, F. P.; Souccar, K.; Terlevich, E.; Terlevich, R.; Zeballos, M.; Zavala, J. A.

    2016-06-01

    We present 8.5 arcsec resolution 1.1-mm continuum imaging and CO spectroscopic redshift measurements of eight extremely bright submillimetre galaxies identified from the Planck and Herschel surveys, taken with the Large Millimeter Telescope's AzTEC and Redshift Search Receiver instruments. We compiled a candidate list of high-redshift galaxies by cross-correlating the Planck Surveyor mission's highest frequency channel (857 GHz, full width at half-maximum = 4.5 arcmin) with the archival Herschel Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver imaging data, and requiring the presence of a unique, single Herschel counterpart within the 150-arcsec search radius of the Planck source positions with 350-μm flux density larger than 100 mJy, excluding known blazars and foreground galaxies. All eight candidate objects observed are detected in 1.1 mm continuum by AzTEC bolometer camera, and at least one CO line is detected in all cases with a spectroscopic redshift between 1.3 < zCO < 3.3. Their infrared (IR) spectral energy distributions (SEDs) mapped using the Herschel and AzTEC photometry are consistent with cold dust emission with characteristic temperature between Td = 43 and 84 K. With apparent IR luminosity of up to LIR = 3 × 1014μ-1 L⊙, they are some of the most luminous galaxies ever found (with yet unknown gravitational magnification factor μ). The analysis of their SEDs suggests that star formation is powering the bulk of their extremely large IR luminosities. Derived molecular gas masses of M_{H_2}=(0.6-7.8)× 10^{11} M_{odot } (for μ ≈ 10) also make them some of the most gas-rich high-redshift galaxies ever detected.

  20. Spectral decomposition of nonlinear systems with memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svenkeson, Adam; Glaz, Bryan; Stanton, Samuel; West, Bruce J.

    2016-02-01

    We present an alternative approach to the analysis of nonlinear systems with long-term memory that is based on the Koopman operator and a Lévy transformation in time. Memory effects are considered to be the result of interactions between a system and its surrounding environment. The analysis leads to the decomposition of a nonlinear system with memory into modes whose temporal behavior is anomalous and lacks a characteristic scale. On average, the time evolution of a mode follows a Mittag-Leffler function, and the system can be described using the fractional calculus. The general theory is demonstrated on the fractional linear harmonic oscillator and the fractional nonlinear logistic equation. When analyzing data from an ill-defined (black-box) system, the spectral decomposition in terms of Mittag-Leffler functions that we propose may uncover inherent memory effects through identification of a small set of dynamically relevant structures that would otherwise be obscured by conventional spectral methods. Consequently, the theoretical concepts we present may be useful for developing more general methods for numerical modeling that are able to determine whether observables of a dynamical system are better represented by memoryless operators, or operators with long-term memory in time, when model details are unknown.

  1. The decomposition of fine and coarse roots: their global patterns and controlling factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinyue; Wang, Wei

    2015-05-01

    Fine root decomposition represents a large carbon (C) cost to plants, and serves as a potential soil C source, as well as a substantial proportion of net primary productivity. Coarse roots differ markedly from fine roots in morphology, nutrient concentrations, functions, and decomposition mechanisms. Still poorly understood is whether a consistent global pattern exists between the decomposition of fine (<2 mm root diameter) and coarse (≥2 mm) roots. A comprehensive terrestrial root decomposition dataset, including 530 observations from 71 sampling sites, was thus used to compare global patterns of decomposition of fine and coarse roots. Fine roots decomposed significantly faster than coarse roots in middle latitude areas, but their decomposition in low latitude regions was not significantly different from that of coarse roots. Coarse root decomposition showed more dependence on climate, especially mean annual temperature (MAT), than did fine roots. Initial litter lignin content was the most important predictor of fine root decomposition, while lignin to nitrogen ratios, MAT, and mean annual precipitation were the most important predictors of coarse root decomposition. Our study emphasizes the necessity of separating fine roots and coarse roots when predicting the response of belowground C release to future climate changes.

  2. The decomposition of fine and coarse roots: their global patterns and controlling factors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinyue; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Fine root decomposition represents a large carbon (C) cost to plants, and serves as a potential soil C source, as well as a substantial proportion of net primary productivity. Coarse roots differ markedly from fine roots in morphology, nutrient concentrations, functions, and decomposition mechanisms. Still poorly understood is whether a consistent global pattern exists between the decomposition of fine (<2 mm root diameter) and coarse (≥2 mm) roots. A comprehensive terrestrial root decomposition dataset, including 530 observations from 71 sampling sites, was thus used to compare global patterns of decomposition of fine and coarse roots. Fine roots decomposed significantly faster than coarse roots in middle latitude areas, but their decomposition in low latitude regions was not significantly different from that of coarse roots. Coarse root decomposition showed more dependence on climate, especially mean annual temperature (MAT), than did fine roots. Initial litter lignin content was the most important predictor of fine root decomposition, while lignin to nitrogen ratios, MAT, and mean annual precipitation were the most important predictors of coarse root decomposition. Our study emphasizes the necessity of separating fine roots and coarse roots when predicting the response of belowground C release to future climate changes. PMID:25942391

  3. The decomposition of fine and coarse roots: their global patterns and controlling factors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinyue; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Fine root decomposition represents a large carbon (C) cost to plants, and serves as a potential soil C source, as well as a substantial proportion of net primary productivity. Coarse roots differ markedly from fine roots in morphology, nutrient concentrations, functions, and decomposition mechanisms. Still poorly understood is whether a consistent global pattern exists between the decomposition of fine (<2 mm root diameter) and coarse (≥2 mm) roots. A comprehensive terrestrial root decomposition dataset, including 530 observations from 71 sampling sites, was thus used to compare global patterns of decomposition of fine and coarse roots. Fine roots decomposed significantly faster than coarse roots in middle latitude areas, but their decomposition in low latitude regions was not significantly different from that of coarse roots. Coarse root decomposition showed more dependence on climate, especially mean annual temperature (MAT), than did fine roots. Initial litter lignin content was the most important predictor of fine root decomposition, while lignin to nitrogen ratios, MAT, and mean annual precipitation were the most important predictors of coarse root decomposition. Our study emphasizes the necessity of separating fine roots and coarse roots when predicting the response of belowground C release to future climate changes. PMID:25942391

  4. One Dose versus Three Weekly Doses of Benzathine Penicillin G for Patients Co-Infected with HIV and Early Syphilis: A Multicenter, Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chia-Jui; Lee, Nan-Yao; Chen, Tun-Chieh; Lin, Yu-Hui; Liang, Shiou-Haur; Lu, Po-Liang; Huang, Wen-Chi; Tang, Hung-Jen; Lee, Chen-Hsiang; Lin, Hsi-Hsun; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Ko, Wen-Chien; Hung, Chien-Ching

    2014-01-01

    Background One dose of benzathine penicillin G (BPG) has been recommended for HIV-infected patients with early syphilis (primary, secondary, and early latent syphilis) in the sexually transmitted diseases treatment guidelines, but clinical data to support such a recommendation are limited. Methods We prospectively observed the serological response to 1 or 3 weekly doses of BPG in HIV-infected adults who sought treatment of early syphilis at 8 hospitals around Taiwan. Rapid plasma reagin (RPR) titers were followed every 3–6 months after treatment. The serological response was defined as a 4-fold or greater decline in RPR titers at 12 months of treatment. The missing values were treated by following the last-observed-carried-forward principle. We hypothesized that 1 dose was non-inferior to 3 weekly doses of BPG with the non-inferiority margin for the difference of serological response set to 10%. Results Between 2007 and 2012, 573 patients completed at least 12 months of follow-up: 295 (51.5%) receiving 1 dose of BPG (1-dose group) and 278 (48.5%) 3 doses (3-dose group). Overall, 198 patients (67.1%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 61.4–72.5%) in the 1-dose group achieved serological response at 12 months, as did 208 patients (74.8%; 95% CI, 69.3–79.8%) in the 3-dose group (one-sided 95% CI of the difference, 15.1%). In the multivariate analysis, secondary syphilis (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 1.90; 95% CI 1.17–3.09), RPR titer ≥32 (AOR, 1.93; 95% CI, 1.38–2.69), and 3 doses of BPG (AOR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.20–2.36) were independently associated with a serological response. The time to the first episode of treatment failure was 1184 (standard deviation [SD], 70.5) and 1436 (SD, 80.0) days for 1- and 3-dose group, respectively. Conclusions Single-dose BPG resulted in a higher serological failure rate and shorter time to treatment failure than 3 weekly doses of BPG in the treatment of early syphilis in HIV-infected patients. PMID:25286091

  5. Outline of the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake ( M w 9.0) —Earthquake Early Warning and observed seismic intensity—

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshiba, Mitsuyuki; Iwakiri, Kazuhiro; Hayashimoto, Naoki; Shimoyama, Toshihiro; Hirano, Kazuyuki; Yamada, Yasuyuki; Ishigaki, Yuzo; Kikuta, Haruyuki

    2011-07-01

    The 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake ( M w 9.0) that occurred on March 11, 2011, caused strong ground motion around northeastern Japan. Before the strong ground motion hit cities, the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) issued Earthquake Early Warning (EEW) announcements to the general public of the Tohoku district and then the warning was automatically broadcast through TV, radios and cellular phone mails. The EEW was earlier than the S wave arrival and more than 15 s earlier than the strong ground motion (intensity 5-lower or greater on the JMA scale) everywhere in the district. Seismic intensity 7 was observed for only the second time since JMA introduced instrument-based observation for intensity measurements in 1996. Intensities of 6-upper and 6-lower were widely observed at many stations in the Tohoku and Kanto districts, over an area of approximately 400 km × 100 km. The duration of strong ground motions was quite long. For the Tokyo region, JMA EEW expected intensities of 4, which was an underestimation of the observed intensity (5-upper). This underestimation can probably be attributed to the large extent of the fault rupture.

  6. Spectral decomposition of broad-line agns and host galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Vanden Berk, Daniel E.; Shen, Jiajian; Yip, Ching-Wa; Schneider, Donald P.; Connolly, Andrew J.; Burton, Ross E.; Jester, Sebastian; Hall, Patrick B.; Szalay, Alex S.; Brinkmann, John; /Apache Point Observ.

    2005-09-01

    Using an eigenspectrum decomposition technique, we separate the host galaxy from the broad line active galactic nucleus (AGN) in a set of 4666 spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), from redshifts near zero up to about 0.75. The decomposition technique uses separate sets of galaxy and quasar eigenspectra to efficiently and reliably separate the AGN and host spectroscopic components. The technique accurately reproduces the host galaxy spectrum, its contributing fraction, and its classification. We show how the accuracy of the decomposition depends upon S/N, host galaxy fraction, and the galaxy class. Based on the eigencoefficients, the sample of SDSS broad-line AGN host galaxies spans a wide range of spectral types, but the distribution differs significantly from inactive galaxies. In particular, post-starburst activity appears to be much more common among AGN host galaxies. The luminosities of the hosts are much higher than expected for normal early-type galaxies, and their colors become increasingly bluer than early-type galaxies with increasing host luminosity. Most of the AGNs with detected hosts are emitting at between 1% and 10% of their estimated Eddington luminosities, but the sensitivity of the technique usually does not extend to the Eddington limit. There are mild correlations among the AGN and host galaxy eigencoefficients, possibly indicating a link between recent star formation and the onset of AGN activity. The catalog of spectral reconstruction parameters is available as an electronic table.

  7. Initiation and early evolution of the coronal mass ejection on 2009 May 13 from extreme-ultraviolet and white-light observations

    SciTech Connect

    Reva, A. A.; Ulyanov, A. S.; Bogachev, S. A.; Kuzin, S. V.

    2014-10-01

    We present the results of the observations of a coronal mass ejection (CME) that occurred on 2009 May 13. The most important feature of these observations is that the CME was observed from the very early stage (the solar surface) up to a distance of 15 solar radii (R {sub ☉}). Below 2 R {sub ☉}, we used the data from the TESIS extreme-ultraviolet telescopes obtained in the Fe 171 Å and He 304 Å lines, and above 2 R {sub ☉}, we used the observations of the LASCO C2 and C3 coronagraphs. The CME was formed at a distance of 0.2-0.5R {sub ☉} from the Sun's surface as a U-shaped structure, which was observed both in the 171 Å images and in the white light. Observations in the He 304 Å line showed that the CME was associated with an erupting prominence, which was not located above—as the standard model predicts—but rather in the lowest part of the U-shaped structure close to the magnetic X point. The prominence location can be explained with the CME breakout model. Estimates showed that CME mass increased with time. The CME trajectory was curved—its heliolatitude decreased with time. The CME started at a latitude of 50° and reached the ecliptic plane at distances of 2.5 R {sub ☉}. The CME kinematics can be divided into three phases: initial acceleration, main acceleration, and propagation with constant velocity. After the CME, onset GOES registered a sub-A-class flare.

  8. Initiation and Early Evolution of the Coronal Mass Ejection on 2009 May 13 from Extreme-ultraviolet and White-light Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reva, A. A.; Ulyanov, A. S.; Bogachev, S. A.; Kuzin, S. V.

    2014-10-01

    We present the results of the observations of a coronal mass ejection (CME) that occurred on 2009 May 13. The most important feature of these observations is that the CME was observed from the very early stage (the solar surface) up to a distance of 15 solar radii (R ⊙). Below 2 R ⊙, we used the data from the TESIS extreme-ultraviolet telescopes obtained in the Fe 171 Å and He 304 Å lines, and above 2 R ⊙, we used the observations of the LASCO C2 and C3 coronagraphs. The CME was formed at a distance of 0.2-0.5R ⊙ from the Sun's surface as a U-shaped structure, which was observed both in the 171 Å images and in the white light. Observations in the He 304 Å line showed that the CME was associated with an erupting prominence, which was not located above—as the standard model predicts—but rather in the lowest part of the U-shaped structure close to the magnetic X point. The prominence location can be explained with the CME breakout model. Estimates showed that CME mass increased with time. The CME trajectory was curved—its heliolatitude decreased with time. The CME started at a latitude of 50° and reached the ecliptic plane at distances of 2.5 R ⊙. The CME kinematics can be divided into three phases: initial acceleration, main acceleration, and propagation with constant velocity. After the CME, onset GOES registered a sub-A-class flare.

  9. Climate sensitivity and macronutrient regulation of peat decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Rachel; Ostle, Nick; McNamara, Niall; Baggs, Elizabeth

    2013-04-01

    Organic soils act as vital global carbon stores maintained in northern latitudes by climate and nutrient limited rates of organic matter decomposition. Peatland decomposition rates are sensitive to climate change, however predicting the magnitude of the microbial respiratory response is complex due to unknown interactions between climate and substrate quality. The nutrient status of peatlands varies widely from mineral rich fens to nutrient poor ombrotrophic bogs, which have the potential to respond differently to climate driven changes in temperature and carbon (C) inputs. In this work we examine the links between peatland macronutrient C, phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) stoichiometry, microbial community structure and the microbial response to direct and indirect effects of climate change. Using total soil C:N and C:P ratios to define nutrient gradients in organic soils from Svalbard and Finland we investigated the interaction between the microbial response to temperature and nutrient limitation of decomposition. In organic rich soils from Svalbard we found there was a significant relationship between increasing temperature sensitivity of respiration and decreasing total soil P concentrations. Further investigation of the potential direct link between P limitation of decomposition and increased temperature sensitivity along a minerotrophic-ombroptrophic gradient in Finland was performed using multi-factorial P limitation assays. These showed that despite varying degrees of P limitation across four peatland soils there was no relationship between P limitation and increased temperature sensitivity of soil respiration. Throughout this study we found consistently high temperature sensitivity of decomposition in organic rich soils with Q10 values ranging between 2 to 4.5, indicating potentially higher vulnerability of these C stores to warming than is currently predicted using a globally invariant Q10. Following on from this we examined the interaction between peatland nutrient status and the potential for labile C substrates to stimulate (prime) decomposition of the peat organic matter. Using 13C labelled glucose and hemicellulose compounds we observed significant differences in the amount and rate of microbial substrate use between peats with differing nutrient status. Nutrient addition experiments were used with labelled C substrates to investigate the role of N and P limitation in enhancing or restricting priming effects. This is one of the first studies to use 13C substrates to examine potential priming effects in peat soil and it provides an insight into the importance of priming mechanisms in peat decomposition. This work explicitly links soil microbial responses to temperature and nutrient manipulations with microbial community structure allowing us to observe how microbial communities mediate soil C losses in peat soils. Disentangling the complex interactions between soil microbial community, C and nutrient limitation of decomposition is essential for predicting the vulnerability of different peatland ecosystems to climate driven changes.

  10. Radiocesium immobilization to leaf litter by fungi during first-year decomposition in a deciduous forest in Fukushima.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yao; Kaneko, Nobuhiro; Nakamori, Taizo; Miura, Toshiko; Tanaka, Yoichiro; Nonaka, Masanori; Takenaka, Chisato

    2016-02-01

    Vast forest areas in eastern Japan have been contaminated with radio-isotopes by the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident. Radiocesium (radioCs) is known to remain bioavailable in forest ecosystems for a long time, and it is necessary to terminate the cycling process to decontaminate the forest ecosystem. We observed radiocesium concentrations of leaf litter during decomposition on a forest floor where radiocesium ((137)Cs) contamination was ∼155 kBq/m(2). Litter bag experiments were conducted with newly fallen mixed deciduous leaf litter in a deciduous forest (alt. 610 m) about 50 km from the FDNPP. Litter bags were retrieved in April, June, August, October, and December 2012. Fresh litter (137)Cs concentration was ∼3000 Bq/kg in December 2011. During the decomposition process on the forest floor, litter (137)Cs concentration increased rapidly and exceeded 25,000 Bq/kg after 6 months, whereas potassium (K) concentration in the litter was rather stable, indicating that radiocesium and K showed contrasting dynamics during the early decomposition phase. Nitrogen, phosphorus, and (137)Cs contents were positively correlated to fungal biomass, evaluated by phospholipid fatty acids in the litter during decomposition. The increase of radiocesium concentration mainly occurred during from April to October, when fungal growth peaked. Therefore, this suggests fungal translocation of nutrients from outside the litter substrate (immobilization) is the mechanism to increase radiocesium in the decomposing litter. The amount of (137)Cs contained in the 1-year-old decomposed leaf litter was estimated to be 4% per area of the soil-contaminated (137)Cs. PMID:26630038

  11. Symmetry-related decompositions of uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viana, Marlos

    2012-10-01

    In statistics, the sample mean and variance are intimately related to the symmetries of the full symmetric group describing all possible permutations of assignments of observations to sampling units. While those symmetries yield exactly two invariant subspaces (in a sense to be defined in the text) in correspondence to those summary statistics, the invariant subspaces associated with specific subgroups of the full symmetric group may then lead to much detailed decompositions of the experimental uncertainty. In the present chapter we discuss the symmetry-related summaries of data arising from dihedral experiments, specifically in the context of multinomial models for frequency counts in symbolic sequences. Special examples are given to dihedral summaries that can be potentially interpreted as measures of (molecular) chirality or handedness.

  12. Development of rate expressions for the thermal decomposition of RDX

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, K.L. ); Behrens, R. Jr. ); Bulusu, S. )

    1992-01-01

    Decomposition and combustion of energetic materials involve processes in both condensed and gas phases. Development of reliable models for design, performance, stability, and hazard analyses requires detailed understanding of the mechanisms for both the initial condensed phase decomposition of the energetic material and the subsequent reaction of the decomposition species to form the ultimate reaction products. Those mechanisms must be described in terms of constitutive rate expressions that can be incorporated into mathematical models. The thermal decomposition of RDX has been studied by Behrens and Bulusu using Simultaneous Thermogravimetric Modulated Beam Mass Spectrometry (STMBMS). Their work provides a basis for developing some of the constitutive rate expressions that are needed in models for design, performance, stability and hazard analyses involving RDX. Behrens and Bulusu have identified four primary reaction pathways that control the liquid-phase decomposition of RDX at temperatures between 200 and 215[degrees]C, and one that controls solid-phase decomposition at temperatures below 200[degrees]C. Two of the liquid-phase pathways appear to be first order in RDX. Arrhenius parameters for the first-order rate constants were evaluated from data reported by Behrens and Bulusu. Reaction rates extrapolated to temperatures between 370 and 450[degrees]C are in good agreement with global reaction rates observed by Trott et al. using high-speed photography and laser-heated thin-film samples. Furthermore, the STMBMS results of Behrens and Bulusu appear to be consistent with condensed-phase infrared results reported by Trott et al. and Erickson et al.

  13. Development of rate expressions for the thermal decomposition of RDX

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, K.L.; Behrens, R. Jr.; Bulusu, S.

    1992-12-31

    Decomposition and combustion of energetic materials involve processes in both condensed and gas phases. Development of reliable models for design, performance, stability, and hazard analyses requires detailed understanding of the mechanisms for both the initial condensed phase decomposition of the energetic material and the subsequent reaction of the decomposition species to form the ultimate reaction products. Those mechanisms must be described in terms of constitutive rate expressions that can be incorporated into mathematical models. The thermal decomposition of RDX has been studied by Behrens and Bulusu using Simultaneous Thermogravimetric Modulated Beam Mass Spectrometry (STMBMS). Their work provides a basis for developing some of the constitutive rate expressions that are needed in models for design, performance, stability and hazard analyses involving RDX. Behrens and Bulusu have identified four primary reaction pathways that control the liquid-phase decomposition of RDX at temperatures between 200 and 215{degrees}C, and one that controls solid-phase decomposition at temperatures below 200{degrees}C. Two of the liquid-phase pathways appear to be first order in RDX. Arrhenius parameters for the first-order rate constants were evaluated from data reported by Behrens and Bulusu. Reaction rates extrapolated to temperatures between 370 and 450{degrees}C are in good agreement with global reaction rates observed by Trott et al. using high-speed photography and laser-heated thin-film samples. Furthermore, the STMBMS results of Behrens and Bulusu appear to be consistent with condensed-phase infrared results reported by Trott et al. and Erickson et al.

  14. Early Observations on Facial Palsy.

    PubMed

    Pearce, J M S

    2015-01-01

    Before Charles Bell's eponymous account of facial palsy, physicians of the Graeco-Roman era had chronicled the condition. The later neglected accounts of the Persian physicians Abu al-Hasan Ali ibn Sahl Rabban al-Tabari and Abu Bakr Muhammad ibn Zakarīya Rāzi ("Rhazes") and Avicenna in the first millennium are presented here as major descriptive works preceding the later description by Stalpart van der Wiel in the seventeenth century and those of Friedreich and Bell at the end of the eighteenth and the beginning of the nineteenth centuries. PMID:25513852

  15. Linear-scaling Cholesky decomposition.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, Sabine; Kussmann, Jörg; Doser, Bernd; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2008-04-30

    We present linear-scaling routines for the calculation of the Cholesky decomposition of a symmetric positive-definite matrix and its inverse. As an example, we consider the inversion of the overlap matrix of DNA and amylose fragments as well as of linear alkanes, where the largest system corresponds to a 21,442 x 21,442 matrix. The efficiency and the scaling behavior are discussed and compared to standard LAPACK routines. Our Cholesky routines are publicly available on the web. PMID:17999386

  16. Fischer decomposition for polynomials on superspace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lávička, Roman; Šmíd, Dalibor

    2015-11-01

    Recently, the Fischer decomposition for polynomials on superspace ℝm|2n (that is, polynomials in m commuting and 2n anti-commuting variables) has been obtained unless the superdimension M = m - 2n is even and non-positive. In this case, it turns out that the Fischer decomposition of polynomials into spherical harmonics is quite analogous as in ℝm and it is an irreducible decomposition under the natural action of Lie superalgebra 𝔬𝔰𝔭(m|2n). In this paper, we describe explicitly the Fischer decomposition in the exceptional case when M ∈ - 2ℕ0. In particular, we show that, under the action of 𝔬𝔰𝔭(m|2n), the Fischer decomposition is not, in general, a decomposition into irreducible but just indecomposable pieces.

  17. Potential role of gas hydrate decomposition in generating submarine slope failures: Chapter 12

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pauli, Charles K.; mUssler, William III; Dillon, William P.

    2003-01-01

    Gas hydrate decomposition is hypothesized to be a factor in generating weakness in continental margin sediments that may help explain some of the observed patterns of continental margin sediment instability. The processes associated with formation and decomposition of gas hydrate can cause the strengthening of sediments in which gas hydrate grow and the weakening of sediments in which gas hydrate decomposes. The weakened sediments may form horizons along which the potential for sediment failure is increased. While a causal relationship between slope failures and gas hydrate decomposition has not been proven, a number of empirical observations support their potential connection.

  18. Leaf Litter Mixtures Alter Microbial Community Development: Mechanisms for Non-Additive Effects in Litter Decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Samantha K.; Newman, Gregory S.; Hart, Stephen C.; Schweitzer, Jennifer A.; Koch, George W.

    2013-01-01

    To what extent microbial community composition can explain variability in ecosystem processes remains an open question in ecology. Microbial decomposer communities can change during litter decomposition due to biotic interactions and shifting substrate availability. Though relative abundance of decomposers may change due to mixing leaf litter, linking these shifts to the non-additive patterns often recorded in mixed species litter decomposition rates has been elusive, and links community composition to ecosystem function. We extracted phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) from single species and mixed species leaf litterbags after 10 and 27 months of decomposition in a mixed conifer forest. Total PLFA concentrations were 70% higher on litter mixtures than single litter types after 10 months, but were only 20% higher after 27 months. Similarly, fungal-to-bacterial ratios differed between mixed and single litter types after 10 months of decomposition, but equalized over time. Microbial community composition, as indicated by principal components analyses, differed due to both litter mixing and stage of litter decomposition. PLFA biomarkers a15∶0 and cy17∶0, which indicate gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria respectively, in particular drove these shifts. Total PLFA correlated significantly with single litter mass loss early in decomposition but not at later stages. We conclude that litter mixing alters microbial community development, which can contribute to synergisms in litter decomposition. These findings advance our understanding of how changing forest biodiversity can alter microbial communities and the ecosystem processes they mediate. PMID:23658639

  19. Mixing effects on litter decomposition rates in a young tree diversity experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiawan, Nuri Nurlaila; Vanhellemont, Margot; De Schrijver, An; Schelfhout, Stephanie; Baeten, Lander; Verheyen, Kris

    2016-01-01

    Litter decomposition is an essential process for biogeochemical cycling and for the formation of new soil organic matter. Mixing litter from different tree species has been reported to increase litter decomposition rates through synergistic effects. We assessed the decomposition rates of leaf litter from five tree species in a recently established tree diversity experiment on a post-agriculture site in Belgium. We used 20 different leaf litter compositions with diversity levels ranging from 1 up to 4 species. Litter mass loss in litterbags was assessed 10, 20, 25, 35, and 60 weeks after installation in the field. We found that litter decomposition rates were higher for high-quality litters, i.e., with high nitrogen content and low lignin content. The decomposition rates of mixed litter were more affected by the identity of the litter species within the mixture than by the diversity of the litter per se, but the variability in litter decomposition rates decreased as the litter diversity increased. Among the 15 different mixed litter compositions in our study, only three litter combinations showed synergistic effects. Our study suggests that admixing tree species with high-quality litter in post-agricultural plantations helps in increasing the mixture's early-stage litter decomposition rate.

  20. Conductimetric determination of decomposition of silicate melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroeger, C.; Lieck, K.

    1986-01-01

    A description of a procedure is given to detect decomposition of silicate systems in the liquid state by conductivity measurements. Onset of decomposition can be determined from the temperature curves of resistances measured on two pairs of electrodes, one above the other. Degree of decomposition can be estimated from temperature and concentration dependency of conductivity of phase boundaries. This procedure was tested with systems PbO-B2O3 and PbO-B2O3-SiO2.

  1. Decomposition methods in turbulence research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uruba, Václav

    2012-04-01

    Nowadays we have the dynamical velocity vector field of turbulent flow at our disposal coming thanks advances of either mathematical simulation (DNS) or of experiment (time-resolved PIV). Unfortunately there is no standard method for analysis of such data describing complicated extended dynamical systems, which is characterized by excessive number of degrees of freedom. An overview of candidate methods convenient to spatiotemporal analysis for such systems is to be presented. Special attention will be paid to energetic methods including Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) in regular and snapshot variants as well as the Bi-Orthogonal Decomposition (BOD) for joint space-time analysis. Then, stability analysis using Principal Oscillation Patterns (POPs) will be introduced. Finally, the Independent Component Analysis (ICA) method will be proposed for detection of coherent structures in turbulent flow-field defined by time-dependent velocity vector field. Principle and some practical aspects of the methods are to be shown. Special attention is to be paid to physical interpretation of outputs of the methods listed above.

  2. Variance decomposition in stochastic simulators.

    PubMed

    Le Maître, O P; Knio, O M; Moraes, A

    2015-06-28

    This work aims at the development of a mathematical and computational approach that enables quantification of the inherent sources of stochasticity and of the corresponding sensitivities in stochastic simulations of chemical reaction networks. The approach is based on reformulating the system dynamics as being generated by independent standardized Poisson processes. This reformulation affords a straightforward identification of individual realizations for the stochastic dynamics of each reaction channel, and consequently a quantitative characterization of the inherent sources of stochasticity in the system. By relying on the Sobol-Hoeffding decomposition, the reformulation enables us to perform an orthogonal decomposition of the solution variance. Thus, by judiciously exploiting the inherent stochasticity of the system, one is able to quantify the variance-based sensitivities associated with individual reaction channels, as well as the importance of channel interactions. Implementation of the algorithms is illustrated in light of simulations of simplified systems, including the birth-death, Schlögl, and Michaelis-Menten models. PMID:26133418

  3. Resolving Some Paradoxes in the Thermal Decomposition Mechanism of Acetaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Sivaramakrishnan, Raghu; Michael, Joe V; Harding, Lawrence B; Klippenstein, Stephen J

    2015-07-16

    The mechanism for the thermal decomposition of acetaldehyde has been revisited with an analysis of literature kinetics experiments using theoretical kinetics. The present modeling study was motivated by recent observations, with very sensitive diagnostics, of some unexpected products in high temperature microtubular reactor experiments on the thermal decomposition of CH3CHO and its deuterated analogs, CH3CDO, CD3CHO, and CD3CDO. The observations of these products prompted the authors of these studies to suggest that the enol tautomer, CH2CHOH (vinyl alcohol), is a primary intermediate in the thermal decomposition of acetaldehyde. The present modeling efforts on acetaldehyde decomposition incorporate a master equation reanalysis of the CH3CHO potential energy surface (PES). The lowest-energy process on this PES is an isomerization of CH3CHO to CH2CHOH. However, the subsequent product channels for CH2CHOH are substantially higher in energy, and the only unimolecular process that can be thermally accessed is a reisomerization to CH3CHO. The incorporation of these new theoretical kinetics predictions into models for selected literature experiments on CH3CHO thermal decomposition confirms our earlier experiment and theory-based conclusions that the dominant decomposition process in CH3CHO at high temperatures is C-C bond fission with a minor contribution (∼10-20%) from the roaming mechanism to form CH4 and CO. The present modeling efforts also incorporate a master-equation analysis of the H + CH2CHOH potential energy surface. This bimolecular reaction is the primary mechanism for removal of CH2CHOH, which can accumulate to minor amounts at high temperatures, T > 1000 K, in most lab-scale experiments that use large initial concentrations of CH3CHO. Our modeling efforts indicate that the observation of ketene, water, and acetylene in the recent microtubular experiments are primarily due to bimolecular reactions of CH3CHO and CH2CHOH with H-atoms and have no bearing on the unimolecular decomposition mechanism of CH3CHO. The present simulations also indicate that experiments using these microtubular reactors when interpreted with the aid of high-level theoretical calculations and kinetics modeling can offer insights into the chemistry of elusive intermediates in the high-temperature pyrolysis of organic molecules. PMID:25793559

  4. 9 CFR 354.131 - Decomposition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... CERTIFICATION VOLUNTARY INSPECTION OF RABBITS AND EDIBLE PRODUCTS THEREOF Disposition of Diseased Rabbit Carcasses and Parts § 354.131 Decomposition. Carcasses of rabbits deleteriously affected by...

  5. 9 CFR 354.131 - Decomposition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... CERTIFICATION VOLUNTARY INSPECTION OF RABBITS AND EDIBLE PRODUCTS THEREOF Disposition of Diseased Rabbit Carcasses and Parts § 354.131 Decomposition. Carcasses of rabbits deleteriously affected by...

  6. 9 CFR 354.131 - Decomposition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... CERTIFICATION VOLUNTARY INSPECTION OF RABBITS AND EDIBLE PRODUCTS THEREOF Disposition of Diseased Rabbit Carcasses and Parts § 354.131 Decomposition. Carcasses of rabbits deleteriously affected by...

  7. 9 CFR 354.131 - Decomposition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... CERTIFICATION VOLUNTARY INSPECTION OF RABBITS AND EDIBLE PRODUCTS THEREOF Disposition of Diseased Rabbit Carcasses and Parts § 354.131 Decomposition. Carcasses of rabbits deleteriously affected by...

  8. 9 CFR 354.131 - Decomposition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... CERTIFICATION VOLUNTARY INSPECTION OF RABBITS AND EDIBLE PRODUCTS THEREOF Disposition of Diseased Rabbit Carcasses and Parts § 354.131 Decomposition. Carcasses of rabbits deleteriously affected by...

  9. Thermal-decomposition studies of HMX

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, J.R.; Garza, R.G.

    1981-10-20

    We have investigated the rates of decomposition as functions of time and temperature on a combined thermogravimetric analyzer-residual gas analyzer (TGA-RGA). This technique also allows us to identify decomposition products generated as the original HMX begins to decompose. The temperature range studied was 50 to 200/sup 0/C. The decomposition process and the nature of decomposition products as functions of HMX polymorphs and conformations of the organic ring systems and possible reactive intermediates are discussed. 7 figures, 3 tables.

  10. Direct and Indirect Effects of UV-B Exposure on Litter Decomposition: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xinzhang; Peng, Changhui; Jiang, Hong; Zhu, Qiuan; Wang, Weifeng

    2013-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B (UV-B) exposure in the course of litter decomposition may have a direct effect on decomposition rates via changing states of photodegradation or decomposer constitution in litter while UV-B exposure during growth periods may alter chemical compositions and physical properties of plants. Consequently, these changes will indirectly affect subsequent litter decomposition processes in soil. Although studies are available on both the positive and negative effects (including no observable effects) of UV-B exposure on litter decomposition, a comprehensive analysis leading to an adequate understanding remains unresolved. Using data from 93 studies across six biomes, this introductory meta-analysis found that elevated UV-B directly increased litter decomposition rates by 7% and indirectly by 12% while attenuated UV-B directly decreased litter decomposition rates by 23% and indirectly increased litter decomposition rates by 7%. However, neither positive nor negative effects were statistically significant. Woody plant litter decomposition seemed more sensitive to UV-B than herbaceous plant litter except under conditions of indirect effects of elevated UV-B. Furthermore, levels of UV-B intensity significantly affected litter decomposition response to UV-B (P<0.05). UV-B effects on litter decomposition were to a large degree compounded by climatic factors (e.g., MAP and MAT) (P<0.05) and litter chemistry (e.g., lignin content) (P<0.01). Results suggest these factors likely have a bearing on masking the important role of UV-B on litter decomposition. No significant differences in UV-B effects on litter decomposition were found between study types (field experiment vs. laboratory incubation), litter forms (leaf vs. needle), and decay duration. Indirect effects of elevated UV-B on litter decomposition significantly increased with decay duration (P<0.001). Additionally, relatively small changes in UV-B exposure intensity (30%) had significant direct effects on litter decomposition (P<0.05). The intent of this meta-analysis was to improve our understanding of the overall effects of UV-B on litter decomposition. PMID:23818993

  11. Impacts of Photodegradation on Surface Litter Decomposition and Organic Matter Cycling in Semi-Arid Grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, J. Y.; Brandt, L. A.; Milchunas, D. G.

    2006-12-01

    Litter decomposition is typically modeled as a biological process controlled primarily by moisture and temperature effects on faunal decomposers. The role of ultraviolet (UV) radiation in surface plant litter decomposition via the abiotic process of photodegradation is not well understood or quantified. We hypothesized that photodegradation by UV radiation may significantly influence decomposition rates and organic matter cycling in the semi-arid environment of the Colorado shortgrass steppe. We conducted a 3-year field litterbag experiment to investigate the effects of UV radiation on litter decomposition under high and low precipitation conditions for litter of differing tissue chemistry. The experimental treatments included UV (10% and 90% of ambient), precipitation (wet and dry), and litter chemistry (high and low carbon to nitrogen ratio (C:N)) in a factorial design. UV radiation can suppress biotic decomposition by inhibiting faunal activity; UV radiation can also enhance abiotic decomposition via photodegradation. We therefore imposed the precipitation and litter chemistry treatments in order to examine responses to UV radiation with different levels of biotic decomposition. Our results demonstrate that UV radiation plays an important role in litter decomposition. Under dry conditions, decomposition rates were significantly higher (18-30%) for litter exposed to higher UV compared to lower UV radiation. Under wet conditions, decomposition rates were not significantly affected by level of UV radiation. Under dry conditions, high C:N litter showed a greater increase in decomposition rates with UV radiation than low C:N litter. Nitrogen immobilization did not increase with higher decomposition rates under higher UV radiation. These observations are consistent with our hypothesis that UV radiation is an important abiotic mechanism of decomposition. Our results indicate that photodegradation is responsible for as much as 23% of mass loss under dry conditions. Photodegradation effects on decomposition should therefore be included as a driver in models of decomposition in arid and semi-arid regions where minimal live-canopy interception results in high UV radiation exposure at the soil surface. Our results also suggest that photodegradation has important impacts on nitrogen cycling in shortgrass steppe.

  12. Thermodynamic anomaly in magnesium hydroxide decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Reis, T.A.

    1983-08-01

    The Origin of the discrepancy in the equilibrium water vapor pressure measurements for the reaction Mg(OH)/sub 2/(s) = MgO(s) + H/sub 2/O(g) when determined by Knudsen effusion and static manometry at the same temperature was investigated. For this reaction undergoing continuous thermal decomposition in Knudsen cells, Kay and Gregory observed that by extrapolating the steady-state apparent equilibrium vapor pressure measurements to zero-orifice, the vapor pressure was approx. 10/sup -4/ of that previously established by Giauque and Archibald as the true thermodynamic equilibrium vapor pressure using statistical mechanical entropy calculations for the entropy of water vapor. This large difference in vapor pressures suggests the possibility of the formation in a Knudsen cell of a higher energy MgO that is thermodynamically metastable by about 48 kJ / mole. It has been shown here that experimental results are qualitatively independent of the type of Mg(OH)/sub 2/ used as a starting material, which confirms the inferences of Kay and Gregory. Thus, most forms of Mg(OH)/sub 2/ are considered to be the stable thermodynamic equilibrium form. X-ray diffraction results show that during the course of the reaction only the equilibrium NaCl-type MgO is formed, and no different phases result from samples prepared in Knudsen cells. Surface area data indicate that the MgO molar surface area remains constant throughout the course of the reaction at low decomposition temperatures, and no significant annealing occurs at less than 400/sup 0/C. Scanning electron microscope photographs show no change in particle size or particle surface morphology. Solution calorimetric measurements indicate no inherent hgher energy content in the MgO from the solid produced in Knudsen cells. The Knudsen cell vapor pressure discrepancy may reflect the formation of a transient metastable MgO or Mg(OH)/sub 2/-MgO solid solution during continuous thermal decomposition in Knudsen cells.

  13. Analysis of UBV-Photometric Observations of the Massive, Early-Type Binary System V729 Cyg (Cyg OB2 No. 5)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antokhina, E. A.; Kumsiashvili, M. I.; Chargeishvili, K. B.

    2016-03-01

    We have analyzed photometric UBV light curves of the massive eclipsing binary system V729 Cyg which lies in the Cyg OB2 stellar association. The observations were made at the Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory in 1983-2003 as part of a program for studying binary systems of early types. The system V729 Cyg is a spectroscopic binary and consists of Of-stars. Effects associated with the collision of stellar winds are observed in it. Various researchers have assumed previously that the binary system is at an evolutionary stage of conversion into a WR+O system. The light curves have been analyzed by a synthesis method in terms of a Roche model using our own computer code analogous to the standard Wilson-Devinney code. This analysis shows that the binary system has a contact configuration and an orbital inclination of about 66 degrees. The absolute parameters of the components are estimated to be M 1 = 30 .4 M ⊙ , M 2 = 9 .2 M ⊙, R 1 = 24 .6 R ⊙ , and R 2 = 13 .8 R ⊙.

  14. Decreases in Soil Moisture and Organic Matter Quality Suppress Microbial Decomposition Following a Boreal Forest Fire

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, Sandra R.; Berhe, Asmeret A.; Treseder, Kathleen K.

    2015-08-01

    Climate warming is projected to increase the frequency and severity of wildfires in boreal forests, and increased wildfire activity may alter the large soil carbon (C) stocks in boreal forests. Changes in boreal soil C stocks that result from increased wildfire activity will be regulated in part by the response of microbial decomposition to fire, but post-fire changes in microbial decomposition are poorly understood. Here, we investigate the response of microbial decomposition to a boreal forest fire in interior Alaska and test the mechanisms that control post-fire changes in microbial decomposition. We used a reciprocal transplant between a recently burned boreal forest stand and a late successional boreal forest stand to test how post-fire changes in abiotic conditions, soil organic matter (SOM) composition, and soil microbial communities influence microbial decomposition. We found that SOM decomposing at the burned site lost 30.9% less mass over two years than SOM decomposing at the unburned site, indicating that post-fire changes in abiotic conditions suppress microbial decomposition. Our results suggest that moisture availability is one abiotic factor that constrains microbial decomposition in recently burned forests. In addition, we observed that burned SOM decomposed more slowly than unburned SOM, but the exact nature of SOM changes in the recently burned stand are unclear. Finally, we found no evidence that post-fire changes in soil microbial community composition significantly affect decomposition. Taken together, our study has demonstrated that boreal forest fires can suppress microbial decomposition due to post-fire changes in abiotic factors and the composition of SOM. Models that predict the consequences of increased wildfires for C storage in boreal forests may increase their predictive power by incorporating the observed negative response of microbial decomposition to boreal wildfires.

  15. Decomposition-Based Decision Making for Aerospace Vehicle Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borer, Nicholas K.; Mavris, DImitri N.

    2005-01-01

    Most practical engineering systems design problems have multiple and conflicting objectives. Furthermore, the satisfactory attainment level for each objective ( requirement ) is likely uncertain early in the design process. Systems with long design cycle times will exhibit more of this uncertainty throughout the design process. This is further complicated if the system is expected to perform for a relatively long period of time, as now it will need to grow as new requirements are identified and new technologies are introduced. These points identify a need for a systems design technique that enables decision making amongst multiple objectives in the presence of uncertainty. Traditional design techniques deal with a single objective or a small number of objectives that are often aggregates of the overarching goals sought through the generation of a new system. Other requirements, although uncertain, are viewed as static constraints to this single or multiple objective optimization problem. With either of these formulations, enabling tradeoffs between the requirements, objectives, or combinations thereof is a slow, serial process that becomes increasingly complex as more criteria are added. This research proposal outlines a technique that attempts to address these and other idiosyncrasies associated with modern aerospace systems design. The proposed formulation first recasts systems design into a multiple criteria decision making problem. The now multiple objectives are decomposed to discover the critical characteristics of the objective space. Tradeoffs between the objectives are considered amongst these critical characteristics by comparison to a probabilistic ideal tradeoff solution. The proposed formulation represents a radical departure from traditional methods. A pitfall of this technique is in the validation of the solution: in a multi-objective sense, how can a decision maker justify a choice between non-dominated alternatives? A series of examples help the reader to observe how this technique can be applied to aerospace systems design and compare the results of this so-called Decomposition-Based Decision Making to more traditional design approaches.

  16. The helical decomposition and the instability assumption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waleffe, Fabian A.

    1993-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations show that the triadic transfer function T(k,p,q) peaks sharply when q (or p) is much smaller than k. The triadic transfer function T(k,p,q) gives the rate of energy input into wave number k from all interactions with modes of wave number p and q, where k, p, q form a triangle. This observation was thought to suggest that energy is cascaded downscale through non-local interactions with local transfer and that there was a strong connection between large and small scales. Both suggestions were in contradiction with the classical Kolmogorov picture of the energy cascade. The helical decomposition was found useful in distinguishing between kinematically independent interactions. That analysis has gone beyond the question of non-local interaction with local transfer. In particular, an assumption about the statistical direction of triadic energy transfer in any kinematically independent interaction was introduced (the instability assumption). That assumption is not necessary for the conclusions about non-local interactions with local transfer recalled above. In the case of turbulence under rapid rotation, the instability assumption leads to the prediction that energy is transferred in spectral space from the poles of the rotation axis toward the equator. The instability assumption is thought to be of general validity for any type of triad interactions (e.g. internal waves). The helical decomposition and the instability assumption offer detailed information about the homogeneous statistical dynamics of the Navier-Stokes equations. The objective was to explore the validity of the instability assumption and to study the contributions of the various types of helical interactions to the energy cascade and the subgrid-scale eddy-viscosity. This was done in the context of spectral closures of the Direct Interaction or Quasi-Normal type.

  17. Thermal Decomposition of Radiation-Damaged Polystyrene

    SciTech Connect

    J Abrefah GS Klinger

    2000-09-26

    The radiation-damaged polystyrene material (''polycube'') used in this study was synthesized by mixing a high-density polystyrene (''Dylene Fines No. 100'') with plutonium and uranium oxides. The polycubes were used on the Hanford Site in the 1960s for criticality studies to determine the hydrogen-to-fissile atom ratios for neutron moderation during processing of spent nuclear fuel. Upon completion of the studies, two methods were developed to reclaim the transuranic (TRU) oxides from the polymer matrix: (1) burning the polycubes in air at 873 K; and (2) heating the polycubes in the absence of oxygen and scrubbing the released monomer and other volatile organics using carbon tetrachloride. Neither of these methods was satisfactory in separating the TRU oxides from the polystyrene. Consequently, the remaining polycubes were sent to the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) for storage. Over time, the high dose of alpha and gamma radiation has resulted in a polystyrene matrix that is highly cross-linked and hydrogen deficient and a stabilization process is being developed in support of Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board Recommendation 94-1. Baseline processes involve thermal treatment to pyrolyze the polycubes in a furnace to decompose the polystyrene and separate out the TRU oxides. Thermal decomposition products from this degraded polystyrene matrix were characterized by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to provide information for determining the environmental impact of the process and for optimizing the process parameters. A gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) system coupled to a horizontal tube furnace was used for the characterization studies. The decomposition studies were performed both in air and helium atmospheres at 773 K, the planned processing temperature. The volatile and semi-volatile organic products identified for the radiation-damaged polystyrene were different from those observed for virgin polystyrene. The differences were in the n umber of organic species generated and their concentrations.

  18. A two-stage clinical decision support system for early recognition and stratification of patients with sepsis: an observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Jason J; Greene, Tracy L; Haley, James M

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the diagnostic accuracy of a two-stage clinical decision support system for early recognition and stratification of patients with sepsis. Design Observational cohort study employing a two-stage sepsis clinical decision support to recognise and stratify patients with sepsis. The stage one component was comprised of a cloud-based clinical decision support with 24/7 surveillance to detect patients at risk of sepsis. The cloud-based clinical decision support delivered notifications to the patients’ designated nurse, who then electronically contacted a provider. The second stage component comprised a sepsis screening and stratification form integrated into the patient electronic health record, essentially an evidence-based decision aid, used by providers to assess patients at bedside. Setting Urban, 284 acute bed community hospital in the USA; 16,000 hospitalisations annually. Participants Data on 2620 adult patients were collected retrospectively in 2014 after the clinical decision support was implemented. Main outcome measure ‘Suspected infection’ was the established gold standard to assess clinical decision support clinimetric performance. Results A sepsis alert activated on 417 (16%) of 2620 adult patients hospitalised. Applying ‘suspected infection’ as standard, the patient population characteristics showed 72% sensitivity and 73% positive predictive value. A postalert screening conducted by providers at bedside of 417 patients achieved 81% sensitivity and 94% positive predictive value. Providers documented against 89% patients with an alert activated by clinical decision support and completed 75% of bedside screening and stratification of patients with sepsis within one hour from notification. Conclusion A clinical decision support binary alarm system with cross-checking functionality improves early recognition and facilitates stratification of patients with sepsis. PMID:26688744

  19. GC??GC-TOFMS and supervised multivariate approaches to study human cadaveric decomposition olfactive signatures.

    PubMed

    Stefanuto, Pierre-Hugues; Perrault, Katelynn A; Stadler, Sonja; Pesesse, Romain; LeBlanc, Helene N; Forbes, Shari L; Focant, Jean-Franois

    2015-06-01

    In forensic thanato-chemistry, the understanding of the process of soft tissue decomposition is still limited. A better understanding of the decomposition process and the characterization of the associated volatile organic compounds (VOC) can help to improve the training of victim recovery (VR) canines, which are used to search for trapped victims in natural disasters or to locate corpses during criminal investigations. The complexity of matrices and the dynamic nature of this process require the use of comprehensive analytical methods for investigation. Moreover, the variability of the environment and between individuals creates additional difficulties in terms of normalization. The resolution of the complex mixture of VOCs emitted by a decaying corpse can be improved using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC??GC), compared to classical single-dimensional gas chromatography (1DGC). This study combines the analytical advantages of GC??GC coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) with the data handling robustness of supervised multivariate statistics to investigate the VOC profile of human remains during early stages of decomposition. Various supervised multivariate approaches are compared to interpret the large data set. Moreover, early decomposition stages of pig carcasses (typically used as human surrogates in field studies) are also monitored to obtain a direct comparison of the two VOC profiles and estimate the robustness of this human decomposition analog model. In this research, we demonstrate that pig and human decomposition processes can be described by the same trends for the major compounds produced during the early stages of soft tissue decomposition. PMID:25910882

  20. Catalytic Decomposition of Organophosphorus Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalkova, A.; Leszczynski, J.

    Organophosphorus compounds have several applications (agricultural, industrial, and military). Nevertheless, assessments of the hazards from these applications quite often do not take into account chemical processes during their interactions with environment. The management of contaminants requires considerable knowledge and understanding of contaminant behavior. Unique properties of clay minerals and metal oxides, such as high adsorption and catalytic ability, have resulted in their applications as natural adsorbents and catalysts in the development of cleanup technologies. Knowledge of molecular structure, transformation mechanisms, and the spectrum of potential intermediates/products of the contaminant decomposition is helpful for developing remediation processes. An understanding of the physical characteristics of the adsorption sites of selected soil ingredients, the physical and chemical characteristics of the contaminant, details of sorption of contaminants on soil and in water solution, and also their distribution within the environment is of particular interest. Application of computational chemistry (CC) can provide deeper insight into the aforementioned characteristics of organophosphorus compounds.

  1. An analysis of scatter decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.; Saltz, Joel H.

    1990-01-01

    A formal analysis of a mapping method known as scatter decomposition (SD) is presented. SD divides an irregular domain into many equal-size pieces and distributes them modularly among processors. It is shown that, if a correlation in workload is a convex function of distance, then scattering a more finely decomposed domain yields a lower average processor workload variance; if the workload process is stationary Gaussian and the correlation function decreases linearly in distance to zero and then remains zero, scattering a more finely decomposed domain yields a lower expected maximum processor workload. Finally, if the correlation function decreases linearly across the entire domain, then (among all mappings that assign an equal number of domain pieces to each processor) SD minimizes the average processor workload variance. The dependence of these results on the assumption of decreasing correlation is illustrated with cases where a coarser granularity actually achieves better load balance.

  2. A global HMX decomposition model

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, M.L.

    1996-12-01

    HMX (octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine) decomposes by competing reaction pathways to form various condensed and gas-phase intermediate and final products. Gas formation is related to the development of nonuniform porosity and high specific surface areas prior to ignition in cookoff events. Such thermal damage enhances shock sensitivity and favors self-supported accelerated burning. The extent of HMX decomposition in highly confined cookoff experiments remains a major unsolved experimental and modeling problem. The present work is directed at determination of global HMX kinetics useful for predicting the elapsed time to thermal runaway (ignition) and the extent of decomposition at ignition. Kinetic rate constants for a six step engineering based global mechanism were obtained using gas formation rates measured by Behrens at Sandia National Laboratories with his Simultaneous Modulated Beam Mass Spectrometer (STMBMS) experimental apparatus. The six step global mechanism includes competition between light gas (H[sub 2]Awe, HCN, CO, H[sub 2]CO, NO, N[sub 2]Awe) and heavy gas (C[sub 2]H[sub 6]N[sub 2]Awe and C[sub 4]H[sub 10]N0[sub 2]) formation with zero order sublimation of HMX and the mononitroso analog of HMX (mn-HMX), C[sub 4]H[sub 8]N[sub 8]Awe[sub 7]. The global mechanism was applied to the highly confined, One Dimensional Time to eXplosion (ODTX) experiment and hot cell experiments by suppressing the sublimation of HMX and mn-HMX. An additional gas-phase reaction was also included to account for the gas-phase reaction of N[sub 2]Awe with H[sub 2]CO. Predictions compare adequately to the STMBMS data, ODTX data, and hot cell data. Deficiencies in the model and future directions are discussed.

  3. Observation of a nearby early merging cluster of galaxies, CIZA J1358.9-4750: new born shocks in the ICM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Yuichi; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Akahori, Takuya; Gu, Liyi; Takizawa, Motokazu; Fujita, Yutaka; Makishima, Kazuo; Simionescu, Aurora

    2016-04-01

    Cluster merger events drive shocks in the intra-cluster plasma and activate non-thermal phenomena such as particle acceleration, magnetic field amplification, and turbulence. However, details of these processes are not well known because of a lack of observations. The known examples of merging clusters are mostly in late merger phases, wherein the shocks have already reached the low-density outer regions. Therefore, finding nearby merging clusters in early phases, in which the shock is still located in dense regions, is of great importance.In order to find suitable objects, we searched the CIZA catalog, which collects X-ray detected cluster candidates located behind the Zone of Avoidance, near the Galactic ridge. We found a very promising merging-cluster candidate CIZA J1358.9-4750, with a redshift of 0.07. It consists of a close pair of X-ray clusters of galaxies in North-west(NW) and South-east(SE), which are connected by an X-ray bright ``bridge’’ region in between. We observed this object with Suzaku and Chandra, and analyzed its archival short exposure XMM-Newton data. The Suzaku data revealed that the NW and SE clusters have temperatures of 5.2±0.2 keV and 4.6±0.2 keV, respectively. The bridge region was found to have a 1.6 times higher temperature, 9.2±1.5 keV. In the existing XMM-Newton data, we found an abrupt brightness jump coinciding in position with the Suzaku high-temperature region. With additional Chandra data, we found a bright plateau with a width of 2’, i.e. 170 kpc. The front and back jumps are presumably the forward and reverse shocks between the two clusters. Therefore, the object is likely to be a rather symmetric shock system, in which two clusters of similar masses are colliding. The Mach number of the collision was derived as 1.3±0.2 and 1.17±0.04 from the Suzaku temperature jump and the Chandra brightness jump, respectively. This Mach number and the X-ray temperature give the shock velocity as 1200 km/s. It can be combined with the separation of the two shocks(120 kpc), to yield an age estimate of 70 Myr after the shocks started to develop. Therefore, the system is indeed in a very early phase of its collision process.

  4. Surgical Data and Early Postoperative Outcomes after Minimally Invasive Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Results of a Prospective, Multicenter, Observational Data-Monitored Study

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Paulo; Buzek, David; Franke, Jörg; Senker, Wolfgang; Kosmala, Arkadiusz; Hubbe, Ulrich; Manson, Neil; Rosenberg, Wout; Assietti, Roberto; Martens, Frederic; Barbanti Brodano, Giovanni; Scheufler, Kai-Michael

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive lumbar interbody fusion (MILIF) offers potential for reduced operative morbidity and earlier recovery compared with open procedures for patients with degenerative lumbar disorders (DLD). Firm conclusions about advantages of MILIF over open procedures cannot be made because of limited number of large studies of MILIF in a real-world setting. Clinical effectiveness of MILIF in a large, unselected real-world patient population was assessed in this Prospective, monitored, international, multicenter, observational study. Objective: To observe and document short-term recovery after minimally invasive interbody fusion for DLD. Materials and Methods: In a predefined 4-week analysis from this study, experienced surgeons (≥30 MILIF surgeries pre-study) treated patients with DLD by one- or two-level MILIF. The primary study objective was to document patients’ short-term post-interventional recovery (primary objective) including back/leg pain (visual analog scale [VAS]), disability (Oswestry Disability Index [ODI]), health status (EQ-5D) and Patient satisfaction. Results: At 4 weeks, 249 of 252 patients were remaining in the study; the majority received one-level MILIF (83%) and TLIF was the preferred approach (94.8%). For one-level (and two-level) procedures, surgery duration was 128 (182) min, fluoroscopy time 115 (154) sec, and blood-loss 164 (233) mL. Time to first ambulation was 1.3 days and time to study-defined surgery recovery was 3.2 days. Patients reported significantly (P < 0.0001) reduced back pain (VAS: 2.9 vs 6.2), leg pain (VAS: 2.5 vs 5.9), and disability (ODI: 34.5% vs 45.5%), and a significantly (P < 0.0001) improved health status (EQ-5D index: 0.61 vs 0.34; EQ VAS: 65.4 vs 52.9) 4 weeks postoperatively. One adverse event was classified as related to the minimally invasive surgical approach. No deep site infections or deaths were reported. Conclusions: For experienced surgeons, MILIF for DLD demonstrated early benefits (short time to first ambulation, early recovery, high patient satisfaction and improved patient-reported outcomes) and low major perioperative morbidity at 4 weeks postoperatively. PMID:25811615

  5. Sampling Stoichiometry: The Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clift, Philip A.

    1992-01-01

    Describes a demonstration of the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to provide an interesting, quantitative illustration of the stoichiometric relationship between the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide and the formation of oxygen gas. This 10-minute demonstration uses ordinary hydrogen peroxide and yeast that can be purchased in a supermarket.…

  6. Modular polynomial arithmetic in partial fraction decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdali, S. K.; Caviness, B. F.; Pridor, A.

    1977-01-01

    Algorithms for general partial fraction decomposition are obtained by using modular polynomial arithmetic. An algorithm is presented to compute inverses modulo a power of a polynomial in terms of inverses modulo that polynomial. This algorithm is used to make an improvement in the Kung-Tong partial fraction decomposition algorithm.

  7. 9 CFR 381.93 - Decomposition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Decomposition. 381.93 Section 381.93 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY... § 381.93 Decomposition. Carcasses of poultry deleteriously affected by post mortem changes shall...

  8. 9 CFR 381.93 - Decomposition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Decomposition. 381.93 Section 381.93 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY... § 381.93 Decomposition. Carcasses of poultry deleteriously affected by post mortem changes shall...

  9. 9 CFR 381.93 - Decomposition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Decomposition. 381.93 Section 381.93 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY... § 381.93 Decomposition. Carcasses of poultry deleteriously affected by post mortem changes shall...

  10. English and Turkish Pupils' Understanding of Decomposition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cetin, Gulcan

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to describe seventh grade English and Turkish students' levels of understanding of decomposition. Data were analyzed descriptively from the students' written responses to four diagnostic questions about decomposition. Results revealed that the English students had considerably higher sound understanding and lower no understanding…

  11. 9 CFR 381.93 - Decomposition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Decomposition. 381.93 Section 381.93 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY... § 381.93 Decomposition. Carcasses of poultry deleteriously affected by post mortem changes shall...

  12. 9 CFR 381.93 - Decomposition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Decomposition. 381.93 Section 381.93 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY... § 381.93 Decomposition. Carcasses of poultry deleteriously affected by post mortem changes shall...

  13. Sampling Stoichiometry: The Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clift, Philip A.

    1992-01-01

    Describes a demonstration of the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to provide an interesting, quantitative illustration of the stoichiometric relationship between the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide and the formation of oxygen gas. This 10-minute demonstration uses ordinary hydrogen peroxide and yeast that can be purchased in a supermarket.

  14. Chinese Orthographic Decomposition and Logographic Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Chao-Ming; Lin, Shan-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    "Chinese orthographic decomposition" refers to a sense of uncertainty about the writing of a well-learned Chinese character following a prolonged inspection of the character. This study investigated the decomposition phenomenon in a test situation in which Chinese characters were repeatedly presented in a word context and assessed…

  15. Chinese Orthographic Decomposition and Logographic Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Chao-Ming; Lin, Shan-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    "Chinese orthographic decomposition" refers to a sense of uncertainty about the writing of a well-learned Chinese character following a prolonged inspection of the character. This study investigated the decomposition phenomenon in a test situation in which Chinese characters were repeatedly presented in a word context and assessed

  16. Multilinear operators for higher-order decompositions.

    SciTech Connect

    Kolda, Tamara Gibson

    2006-04-01

    We propose two new multilinear operators for expressing the matrix compositions that are needed in the Tucker and PARAFAC (CANDECOMP) decompositions. The first operator, which we call the Tucker operator, is shorthand for performing an n-mode matrix multiplication for every mode of a given tensor and can be employed to concisely express the Tucker decomposition. The second operator, which we call the Kruskal operator, is shorthand for the sum of the outer-products of the columns of N matrices and allows a divorce from a matricized representation and a very concise expression of the PARAFAC decomposition. We explore the properties of the Tucker and Kruskal operators independently of the related decompositions. Additionally, we provide a review of the matrix and tensor operations that are frequently used in the context of tensor decompositions.

  17. Canonical Huynen decomposition of radar targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dong; Zhang, Yunhua

    2015-10-01

    Huynen decomposition prefers the world of basic symmetry and regularity (SR) in which we live. However, this preference restricts its applicability to ideal SR scatterer only. As for the complex non-symmetric (NS) and irregular (IR) scatterers such as forest and building, Huynen decomposition fails to analyze their scattering. The canonical Huynen dichotomy is devised to extend Huynen decomposition to the preferences for IR and NS. From the physical realizability conditions of polarimetric scattering description, two other dichotomies of polarimetric radar target are developed, which prefer scattering IR, and NS, respectively, and provide two competent supplements to Huynen decomposition. The canonical Huynen dichotomy is the combination of the two dichotomies and Huynen decomposition. In virtue of an Adaptive selection, the canonical Huynen dichotomy is used in target extraction, and the experiments on AIRSAR San Francisco data demonstrate its high efficiency and excellent discrimination of radar targets.

  18. TE/TM decomposition of electromagnetic sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindell, Ismo V.

    1988-01-01

    Three methods are given by which bounded EM sources can be decomposed into two parts radiating transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) fields with respect to a given constant direction in space. The theory applies source equivalence and nonradiating source concepts, which lead to decomposition methods based on a recursive formula or two differential equations for the determination of the TE and TM components of the original source. Decompositions for a dipole in terms of point, line, and plane sources are studied in detail. The planar decomposition is seen to match to an earlier result given by Clemmow (1963). As an application of the point decomposition method, it is demonstrated that the general exact image expression for the Sommerfeld half-space problem, previously derived through heuristic reasoning, can be more straightforwardly obtained through the present decomposition method.

  19. Minimum near-convex shape decomposition.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhou; Yuan, Junsong; Liu, Wenyu

    2013-10-01

    Shape decomposition is a fundamental problem for part-based shape representation. We propose the minimum near-convex decomposition (MNCD) to decompose arbitrary shapes into minimum number of "near-convex" parts. The near-convex shape decomposition is formulated as a discrete optimization problem by minimizing the number of nonintersecting cuts. Two perception rules are imposed as constraints into our objective function to improve the visual naturalness of the decomposition. With the degree of near-convexity a user-specified parameter, our decomposition is robust to local distortions and shape deformation. The optimization can be efficiently solved via binary integer linear programming. Both theoretical analysis and experiment results show that our approach outperforms the state-of-the-art results without introducing redundant parts and thus leads to robust shape representation. PMID:23969396

  20. Minimum Near-Convex Shape Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhou; Yuan, Junsong; Liu, Wenyu

    2013-03-27

    Shape decomposition is a fundamental problem for part-based shape representation. We propose the Minimum Near-Convex Decomposition (MNCD) to decompose arbitrary shapes into minimum number of "near-convex" parts. The near-convex shape decomposition is formulated as a discrete optimization problem by minimizing the number of non-intersecting cuts. Two perception rules are imposed as constraints into our objective function to improve the visual naturalness of the decomposition. With the degree of near-convexity a user specified parameter, our decomposition is robust to local distortions and shape deformation. The optimization can be efficiently solved via Binary Integer Linear Programming. Both theoretical analysis and experiment results show that our approach outperforms the state-of-the-art results without introducing redundant parts, and thus leads to robust shape representation. PMID:23546996

  1. Measurement of the energy dependence of X-ray-induced decomposition of potassium chlorate.

    PubMed

    Pravica, Michael; Bai, Ligang; Sneed, Daniel; Park, Changyong

    2013-03-21

    We report the first measurements of the X-ray induced decomposition of KClO3 as a function of energy in two experiments. KClO3 was pressurized to 3.5 GPa and irradiated with monochromatic synchrotron X-rays ranging in energy from 15 to 35 keV in 5 keV increments. A systematic increase in the decomposition rate as the energy was decreased was observed, which agrees with the 1/E(3) trend for the photoelectric process, except at the lowest energy studied. A second experiment was performed to access lower energies (10 and 12 keV) using a beryllium gasket; suggesting an apparent resonance near 15 keV or 0.83 Ǻ maximizing the chemical decomposition rate. A third experiment was performed using KIO3 to ascertain the anionic dependence of the decomposition rate, which was observed to be far slower than in KClO3, suggesting that the O-O distance is the critical factor in chemical reactions. These results will be important for more efficiently initiating chemical decomposition in materials using selected X-ray wavelengths that maximize decomposition to aid useful hard X-ray-induced chemistry and contribute understanding of the mechanism of X-ray-induced decomposition of the chlorates. PMID:23444908

  2. Nitrogen Addition Significantly Affects Forest Litter Decomposition under High Levels of Ambient Nitrogen Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gang; Peng, Yong; Xiao, Yin-long; Hu, Ting-xing; Zhang, Jian; Li, Xian-wei; Liu, Li; Tang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Background Forest litter decomposition is a major component of the global carbon (C) budget, and is greatly affected by the atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition observed globally. However, the effects of N addition on forest litter decomposition, in ecosystems receiving increasingly higher levels of ambient N deposition, are poorly understood. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a two-year field experiment in five forests along the western edge of the Sichuan Basin in China, where atmospheric N deposition was up to 82114 kg N ha1 in the study sites. Four levels of N treatments were applied: (1) control (no N added), (2) low-N (50 kg N ha1 year1), (3) medium-N (150 kg N ha1 year1), and (4) high-N (300 kg N ha1 year1), N additions ranging from 40% to 370% of ambient N deposition. The decomposition processes of ten types of forest litters were then studied. Nitrogen additions significantly decreased the decomposition rates of six types of forest litters. N additions decreased forest litter decomposition, and the mass of residual litter was closely correlated to residual lignin during the decomposition process over the study period. The inhibitory effect of N addition on litter decomposition can be primarily explained by the inhibition of lignin decomposition by exogenous inorganic N. The overall decomposition rate of ten investigated substrates exhibited a significant negative linear relationship with initial tissue C/N and lignin/N, and significant positive relationships with initial tissue K and N concentrations; these relationships exhibited linear and logarithmic curves, respectively. Conclusions/Significance This study suggests that the expected progressive increases in N deposition may have a potential important impact on forest litter decomposition in the study area in the presence of high levels of ambient N deposition. PMID:24551152

  3. Management intensity alters decomposition via biological pathways

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wickings, Kyle; Grandy, A. Stuart; Reed, Sasha; Cleveland, Cory

    2011-01-01

    Current conceptual models predict that changes in plant litter chemistry during decomposition are primarily regulated by both initial litter chemistry and the stage-or extent-of mass loss. Far less is known about how variations in decomposer community structure (e.g., resulting from different ecosystem management types) could influence litter chemistry during decomposition. Given the recent agricultural intensification occurring globally and the importance of litter chemistry in regulating soil organic matter storage, our objectives were to determine the potential effects of agricultural management on plant litter chemistry and decomposition rates, and to investigate possible links between ecosystem management, litter chemistry and decomposition, and decomposer community composition and activity. We measured decomposition rates, changes in litter chemistry, extracellular enzyme activity, microarthropod communities, and bacterial versus fungal relative abundance in replicated conventional-till, no-till, and old field agricultural sites for both corn and grass litter. After one growing season, litter decomposition under conventional-till was 20% greater than in old field communities. However, decomposition rates in no-till were not significantly different from those in old field or conventional-till sites. After decomposition, grass residue in both conventional- and no-till systems was enriched in total polysaccharides relative to initial litter, while grass litter decomposed in old fields was enriched in nitrogen-bearing compounds and lipids. These differences corresponded with differences in decomposer communities, which also exhibited strong responses to both litter and management type. Overall, our results indicate that agricultural intensification can increase litter decomposition rates, alter decomposer communities, and influence litter chemistry in ways that could have important and long-term effects on soil organic matter dynamics. We suggest that future efforts to more accurately predict soil carbon dynamics under different management regimes may need to explicitly consider how changes in litter chemistry during decomposition are influenced by the specific metabolic capabilities of the extant decomposer communities.

  4. Ultraviolet photodegradation facilitates microbial litter decomposition in a Mediterranean climate.

    PubMed

    Baker, Nameer R; Allison, Steven D

    2015-07-01

    Rates of litter decomposition in dryland ecosystems are consistently underestimated by decomposition models driven by temperature, moisture, and litter chemistry. The most common explanation for this pattern is that ultraviolet radiation (UV) increases decomposition through photodegradation of the litter lignin fraction. Alternatively, UV could increase decomposition through effects on microbial activity. To assess the mechanisms underlying UV photodegradation in a semiarid climate, we exposed high- and low-lignin litter to ambient and blocked UV over 15 months in a Mediterranean ecosystem. We hypothesized that UV would increase litter mass loss, that UV would preferentially increase mass loss of the lignin fraction, and that UV would have a negative effect on microbial activity. Consistent with our first hypothesis, we found that UV-blocking reduced litter mass loss from 16% to 1% in high-lignin litter and from 29% to 17% in low-lignin litter. Contrary to our second hypothesis, UV treatment did not have a significant effect on lignin content in either litter type. Instead, UV-blocking significantly reduced cellulose and hemicellulose mass loss in both litter types. Contrary to our third hypothesis, we observed a positive effect of UV on both fungal abundance and the potential activities of several assayed extracellular enzymes. Additionally, under ambient UV only, we found significant correlations between potential activities of cellulase and oxidase enzymes and both the concentrations and degradation rates of their target compounds. Our results indicate that UV is a significant driver of litter mass loss in Mediterranean ecosystems, but not solely because UV directly degrades carbon compounds such as lignin. Rather, UV facilitates microbial degradation of litter compounds, such as cellulose and hemicellulose. Thus, unexpectedly high rates of litter decomposition previously attributed directly to UV in dryland ecosystems may actually derive from a synergistic interaction between UV and microbes. PMID:26378321

  5. Researches on the Nankai trough mega thrust earthquake seismogenic zones using real time observing systems for advanced early warning systems and predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneda, Yoshiyuki

    2015-04-01

    We recognized the importance of real time monitoring on Earthquakes and Tsunamis Based on lessons learned from 2004 Sumatra Earthquake/Tsunamis and 2011 East Japan Earthquake. We deployed DONET1 and are developing DONET2 as real time monitoring systems which are dense ocean floor networks around the Nankai trough seismogenic zone Southwestern Japan. Total observatories of DONE1 and DONET2 are 51 observatories equipped with multi kinds of sensors such as the accelerometer, broadband seismometer, pressure gauge, difference pressure gauge, hydrophone and thermometer in each observatory. These systems are indispensable for not only early warning of Earthquakes/ Tsunamis, but also researches on broadband crustal activities around the Nankai trough seismogenic zone for predictions. DONET1 detected offshore tsunamis 15 minutes earlier than onshore stations at the 2011 East Japan earthquake/tsunami. Furthermore, DONET1/DONET2 will be expected to monitor slow events such as low frequency tremors and slow earthquakes for the prediction researches. Finally, the integration of observations and simulation researches will contribute to estimate of seismic stage changes from the inter-seismic to pre seismic stage. I will introduce applications of DONET1/DONET2 data and advanced simulation researches.

  6. Early Science with the Large Millimeter Telescope: observations of dust continuum and CO emission lines of cluster-lensed submillimetre galaxies at z=2.0-4.7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala, J. A.; Yun, M. S.; Aretxaga, I.; Hughes, D. H.; Wilson, G. W.; Geach, J. E.; Egami, E.; Gurwell, M. A.; Wilner, D. J.; Smail, Ian; Blain, A. W.; Chapman, S. C.; Coppin, K. E. K.; Dessauges-Zavadsky, M.; Edge, A. C.; Montaña, A.; Nakajima, K.; Rawle, T. D.; Sánchez-Argüelles, D.; Swinbank, A. M.; Webb, T. M. A.; Zeballos, M.

    2015-09-01

    We present Early Science observations with the Large Millimeter Telescope, AzTEC 1.1 mm continuum images and wide bandwidth spectra (73-111 GHz) acquired with the Redshift Search Receiver, towards four bright lensed submillimetre galaxies identified through the Herschel Lensing Survey-snapshot and the Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array-2 Cluster Snapshot Survey. This pilot project studies the star formation history and the physical properties of the molecular gas and dust content of the highest redshift galaxies identified through the benefits of gravitational magnification. We robustly detect dust continuum emission for the full sample and CO emission lines for three of the targets. We find that one source shows spectroscopic multiplicity and is a blend of three galaxies at different redshifts (z = 2.040, 3.252, and 4.680), reminiscent of previous high-resolution imaging follow-up of unlensed submillimetre galaxies, but with a completely different search method, that confirm recent theoretical predictions of physically unassociated blended galaxies. Identifying the detected lines as 12CO (Jup = 2-5) we derive spectroscopic redshifts, molecular gas masses, and dust masses from the continuum emission. The mean H2 gas mass of the full sample is (2.0 ± 0.2) × 1011 M⊙/μ, and the mean dust mass is (2.0 ± 0.2) × 109 M⊙/μ, where μ ≈ 2-5 is the expected lens amplification. Using these independent estimations we infer a gas-to-dust ratio of δGDR ≈ 55-75, in agreement with other measurements of submillimetre galaxies. Our magnified high-luminosity galaxies fall on the same locus as other high-redshift submillimetre galaxies, extending the L^' }_CO-LFIR correlation observed for local luminous and ultraluminous infrared galaxies to higher far-infrared and CO luminosities.

  7. SeismoGeodesy: Combination of High Rate, Real-time GNSS and Accelerometer Observations and Rapid Seismic Event Notification for Earth Quake Early Warning and Volcano Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Michael; Zimakov, Leonid; Moessmer, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    Scientific GNSS networks are moving towards a model of real-time data acquisition, epoch-by-epoch storage integrity, and on-board real-time position and displacement calculations. This new paradigm allows the integration of real-time, high-rate GNSS displacement information with acceleration and velocity data to create very high-rate displacement records. The mating of these two instruments allows the creation of a new, very high-rate (200 Hz) displacement observable that has the full-scale displacement characteristics of GNSS and high-precision dynamic motions of seismic technologies. It is envisioned that these new observables can be used for earthquake early warning studies, volcano monitoring, and critical infrastructure monitoring applications. Our presentation will focus on the characteristics of GNSS, seismic, and strong motion sensors in high dynamic environments, including historic earthquakes replicated on a shake table over a range of displacements and frequencies. We will explore the optimum integration of these sensors from a filtering perspective including simple harmonic impulses over varying frequencies and amplitudes and under the dynamic conditions of various earthquake scenarios. We will also explore the tradeoffs between various GNSS processing schemes including real-time precise point positioning (PPP) and real-time kinematic (RTK) as applied to seismogeodesy. In addition we will discuss implementation of a Rapid Seismic Event Notification System that provides quick delivery of digital data from seismic stations to the acquisition and processing center and a full data integrity model for real-time earthquake notification that provides warning prior to significant ground shaking.

  8. FUEL DECOMPOSITION AND FLAME REACTIONS IN CONVERSION OF FUEL NITROGEN TO NOX

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes an experimental and analytical research program conducted to provide information on the chemical phenomena involved in the conversion of air and fuel nitrogen to NOx. Under Task 1, Fuel Decomposition, early (preflame) reactions of fuel nitrogen species were i...

  9. Modified Early Warning Score (MEWS) Identifies Critical Illness among Ward Patients in a Resource Restricted Setting in Kampala, Uganda: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Kruisselbrink, Rebecca; Kwizera, Arthur; Crowther, Mark; Fox-Robichaud, Alison; O'Shea, Timothy; Nakibuuka, Jane; Ssinabulya, Isaac; Nalyazi, Joan; Bonner, Ashley; Devji, Tahira; Wong, Jeffrey; Cook, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Providing optimal critical care in developing countries is limited by lack of recognition of critical illness and lack of essential resources. The Modified Early Warning Score (MEWS), based on physiological parameters, is validated in adult medical and surgical patients as a predictor of mortality. The objective of this study performed in Uganda was to determine the prevalence of critical illness on the wards as defined by the MEWS, to evaluate the MEWS as a predictor of death, and to describe additional risk factors for mortality. Methods We conducted a prospective observational study at Mulago National Referral Teaching Hospital in Uganda. We included medical and surgical ward patients over 18 years old, excluding patients discharged the day of enrolment, obstetrical patients, and patients who self-discharged prior to study completion. Over a 72-hour study period, we collected demographic and vital signs, and calculated MEWS; at 7-days we measured outcomes. Patients discharged prior to 7 days were assumed to be alive at study completion. Descriptive and inferential statistical analyses were performed. Results Of 452 patients, the median age was 40.5 (IQR 29–54) years, 53.3% were male, 24.3% were HIV positive, and 45.1% had medical diagnoses. MEWS ranged from 0 to 9, with higher scores representing hemodynamic instability. The median MEWS was 2 [IQR 1–3] and the median length of hospital stay was 9 days [IQR 4–24]. In-hospital mortality at 7-days was 5.5%; 41.4% of patients were discharged and 53.1% remained on the ward. Mortality was independently associated with medical admission (OR: 7.17; 95% CI: 2.064–24.930; p = 0.002) and the MEWS ≥ 5 (OR: 5.82; 95% CI: 2.420–13.987; p<0.0001) in the multivariable analysis. Conclusion There is a significant burden of critical illness at Mulago Hospital, Uganda. Implementation of the MEWS could provide a useful triage tool to identify patients at greatest risk of death. Future research should include refinement of MEWS for low-resource settings, and development of appropriate interventions for patients identified to be at high risk of death based on early warning scores. PMID:26986466

  10. Climatic influence on residue decomposition prediction in the Wind Erosion Prediction System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schomberg, H. H.; Steiner, J. L.; Evett, S. R.; Moulin, A. P.

    1996-03-01

    The effectiveness of crop residues to protect the soil surface and reduce soil erosion decreases as residues decompose. The rate of residue decomposition is directly related to the temperature and moisture regimes of the residues. Predicting changes in residue mass, orientation, and soil cover requires the use of functions that relate changes in decomposition rates to changes in the temperature and water regimes. Temperature and water functions used in the residue decomposition submodel of the Wind Erosion Prediction System (WEPS) were evaluated for their effects on predictions of residue decomposition. A precipitation function (PC) was found to produce relatively more accurate estimates of decomposition than a near surface soil water content function (SWC) for describing water regime effects. The estimated accuracies of the two functions were similar when bias in the estimation was considered. Predictions made with PC had estimated accuracies of ± 11.4, 14.5, 13.5% for alfalfa, sorghum and wheat, respectively, while those made with SWC had estimated accuracies of ± 13.8, 16.2, and 16.9%, respectively. Three temperature functions were compared for use in predicting residue decomposition over a range of locations and crops. There was little difference between the temperature functions over all the locations but, for several locations, one function overpredicted decomposition more often than the other two functions. Accuracies ranged from ±4 to ±51% of the observed values. The highest values were obtained at one location, and all three temperature functions produced similar high values. Over most of the data, estimated accuracies were generally between ± 15 and ± 25%. The prediction intervals were similar to those observed for decomposition of surface-placed residues. This evaluation indicates that the temperature and water functions used in the WEPS decomposition submodel will give reasonable estimates of mass loss from surface residues using easy-to-obtain weather data.

  11. Determination of value of bovine respiratory disease control using a remote early disease identification system compared with conventional methods of metaphylaxis and visual observations.

    PubMed

    White, B J; Amrine, D E; Goehl, D R

    2015-08-01

    Mitigation of the deleterious effects of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is an important issue in the cattle industry. Conventional management of calves at high risk for BRD often includes mass treatment with antimicrobials at arrival followed by visual observation for individual clinical cases. These methods have proven effective; however, control program efficacy is influenced by the accuracy of visual observation. A remote early disease identification (REDI) system has been described that monitors cattle behavior to identify potential BRD cases. The objective of this research was to compare health and performance outcomes using either traditional BRD control (visual observation and metaphylaxis) or REDI during a 60-d postarrival phase in high-risk beef calves. The randomized controlled clinical trial was performed in 8 replicates at 3 different facilities over a 19-mo period. In each replicate, a single load of calves was randomly allocated to receive either conventional management (CONV; total = 8) or REDI (total = 8) as the method for BRD control. Cattle were monitored with each diagnostic method for the first 30 d on feed and performance variables were collected until approximately 60 d after arrival. Statistical differences ( < 0.10) were not identified in common performance (ADG) or health (morbidity, first treatment success, and mortality risk) among the treatment groups. Calves in the REDI pens had a lower ( < 0.01) average number of days on feed at first treatment (9.1 1.2 d) compared with CONV pens (15.8 1.2 d). There were no statistical differences ( > 0.10) in risk of BRD treatment and REDI calves were not administered antimicrobials at arrival; therefore, REDI calves had a lower ( < 0.01) average number of doses of antimicrobials/calf (0.75 0.1 doses) compared with CONV calves (1.67 0.1 doses). In this trial, the REDI system was comparable to conventional management with the potential advantages of earlier BRD diagnosis and decreased use of antimicrobials. Further research should be performed to evaluate the longer-term impacts of the 2 systems. PMID:26440191

  12. The Role of Endophytic Fungal Individuals and Communities in the Decomposition of Pinus massoniana Needle Litter

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhilin; Chen, Lianqing

    2014-01-01

    The role of fungal endophytes (FEs) as “pioneer” decomposers has recently been recognized; however, the extent to which FEs contribute to litter loss is less well understood. The genetic and enzymatic bases of FE-mediated decomposition have also rarely been addressed. The effects of populations and individuals (with an emphasis on two dominant Lophodermium taxa) of FEs on needle-litter decomposition were assessed for Pinus massoniana, a ubiquitous pine in southern China. Data from in vivo (microcosm) experiments indicated that the percentage of litter-mass loss triggered by FEs was linearly correlated with incubation time and approached 60% after seven months. In vitro decomposition tests also confirmed that endophytic Lophodermium isolates caused 14–22% mass loss within two months. Qualitative analysis of exoenzymes (cellulase and laccase, important for lignocellulose degradation) revealed that almost all of the Lophodermium isolates showed moderate or strong positive reactions. Furthermore, partial sequences of β-glucosidase (glycoside hydrolase family 3, GH3), laccase, and cellobiohydrolase (GH7) genes were amplified from Lophodermium isolates as “functional markers” to evaluate their potential for lignocellulolytic activity. Three different genes were detected, suggesting a flexible and delicate decomposition system rich in FEs. Our work highlights the possibility that the saprophytism and endophytism of FEs may be prerequisites to initiating rapid decomposition and thus may be key in Fes’ contribution to litter decomposition, at least in the early stage. Potential indicators of the presence of core fungal decomposers are also briefly discussed. PMID:25157631

  13. The role of endophytic fungal individuals and communities in the decomposition of Pinus massoniana needle litter.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhilin; Chen, Lianqing

    2014-01-01

    The role of fungal endophytes (FEs) as "pioneer" decomposers has recently been recognized; however, the extent to which FEs contribute to litter loss is less well understood. The genetic and enzymatic bases of FE-mediated decomposition have also rarely been addressed. The effects of populations and individuals (with an emphasis on two dominant Lophodermium taxa) of FEs on needle-litter decomposition were assessed for Pinus massoniana, a ubiquitous pine in southern China. Data from in vivo (microcosm) experiments indicated that the percentage of litter-mass loss triggered by FEs was linearly correlated with incubation time and approached 60% after seven months. In vitro decomposition tests also confirmed that endophytic Lophodermium isolates caused 14-22% mass loss within two months. Qualitative analysis of exoenzymes (cellulase and laccase, important for lignocellulose degradation) revealed that almost all of the Lophodermium isolates showed moderate or strong positive reactions. Furthermore, partial sequences of β-glucosidase (glycoside hydrolase family 3, GH3), laccase, and cellobiohydrolase (GH7) genes were amplified from Lophodermium isolates as "functional markers" to evaluate their potential for lignocellulolytic activity. Three different genes were detected, suggesting a flexible and delicate decomposition system rich in FEs. Our work highlights the possibility that the saprophytism and endophytism of FEs may be prerequisites to initiating rapid decomposition and thus may be key in Fes' contribution to litter decomposition, at least in the early stage. Potential indicators of the presence of core fungal decomposers are also briefly discussed. PMID:25157631

  14. Addition of External Organic Carbon and Native Soil Organic Carbon Decomposition: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weidong; Wang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Silong

    2013-01-01

    Background Extensive studies have been conducted to evaluate the effect of external organic Carbon on native soil organic carbon (SOC) decomposition. However, the direction and extent of this effect reported by different authors is inconsistent. Objective The objective was to provide a synthesis of existing data that comprehensively and quantitatively evaluates how the soil chemical properties and incubation conditions interact with additional external organic C to affect the native SOC decomposition. Data Source A meta-analysis was conducted on previously published empirical studies that examined the effect of the addition of external organic carbon on the native SOC decomposition through isotopic techniques. Results and Conclusions The addition of external organic C, when averaged across all studies, enhanced the native SOC decomposition by 26.5%. The soil with higher SOC content and fine texture showed significantly higher priming effects, whereas the soil with higher total nitrogen content showed an opposite trend. The soils with higher C:N ratios had significantly stronger priming effects than those with low C:N ratios. The decomposition of native SOC was significantly enhanced more at early stage of incubation (<15d) than at the later stages (>15d). In addition, the incubation temperature and the addition rate of organic matter significantly influenced the native SOC decomposition in response to the addition of external organic C. PMID:23405095

  15. Social and Emotional Characteristics and Early Childhood Mathematical and Literacy Giftedness: Observations From Parents and Childcare Providers Using the ECLS-B

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Hope E.

    2015-01-01

    Research has demonstrated mixed results regarding differences in social and emotional characteristics between gifted and typical populations. The purpose of this secondary analysis of data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study: Birth Cohort (ECLS-B) is to investigate the affective characteristics of early mathematics and literacy ability…

  16. Downregulation of Early Ionotrophic Glutamate Receptor Subunit Developmental Expression as a Mechanism for Observed Plasticity Deficits Following Gestational Exposure to Benzo(a)pyrene

    PubMed Central

    Brown, La’Nissa A.; Khoshbouei, Habibeh; Goodwin, J. Shawn; Irvin-Wilson, Charletha V.; Ramesh, Aramandla; Sheng, Liu; McCallister, Monique M.; Jiang, George C. T.; Aschner, Michael; Hood, Darryl B.

    2007-01-01

    The focus of this study was to characterize the impact of gestational exposure to benzo(a)pyrene, [B(a)P] on modulation of glutamate receptor subunit expression that is critical for the maintenance of synaptic plasticity mechanisms during hippocampal or cortical development in offspring. Previous studies have demonstrated that hippocampal and/or cortical synaptic plasticity (as measured by long-term potentiation and S1-cortex spontaneous/evoked neuronal activity) and learning behavior (as measured by fixed-ratio performance operant testing) is significantly impaired in polycyclic aromatic or halogenated aromatic hydrocarbon-exposed offspring as compared to controls. These previous studies have also revealed that brain to body weight ratios are greater in exposed offspring relative to controls indicative of intrauterine growth retardation which has been shown to manifest as low birth weight in offspring. Recent epidemiological studies have identified an effect of prenatal exposure to airborne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on neurodevelopment in the first 3 Years of life among inner-city children (Perera et al., 2006). The present study utilizes a well-characterized animal model to test the hypothesis that gestational exposure to B(a)P causes dysregulation of developmental ionotropic glutamate receptor subunit expression, namely the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate receptor (AMPAR) both critical to the expression of synaptic plasticity mechanisms. To mechanistically ascertain the basis of B(a)P-induced plasticity perturbations, timed pregnant Long-Evans rats were exposed in an oral subacute exposure regimen to 0, 25 and 150µg/kg BW B(a)P on gestation days 14–17. The first sub-hypothesis tested whether gestational exposure to B(a)P would result in significant disposition in offspring. The second sub-hypothesis tested whether gestational exposure to B(a)P would result in downregulation of early developmental expression of NMDA and AMPA receptor subunits in the hippocampus of offspring as well as in primary neuronal cultures. The results of these studies revealed significant: 1) disposition to the hippocampus and cortex, 2) down-regulation of developmental glutamate receptor mRNA and protein subunit expression and 3) voltage-dependent decreases in the amplitude of inward currents at negative potentials in B(a)P-treated cortical neuronal membranes. These results suggest that plasticity and behavioral deficits produced as a result of gestational B(a)P exposure are at least, in part, a result of down-regulation of early developmental glutamate receptor subunit expression and function at a time when excitatory synapses are being formed for the first time in the developing central nervous system. The results also predict that in B(a)P-exposed offspring with reduced early glutamate receptor subunit expression, a parallel deficit in behaviors that depend on normal hippocampal or cortical functioning will be observed and that these deficits will be present throughout life. PMID:17606297

  17. Ultrasonographic Observation of the Breast in Early Postmenopausal Women during Therapy with Cimicifuga Foetida Extract and Sequential Therapy with Estrogen and Progestin

    PubMed Central

    Gaowa, Sharen; Sun, Ai-Jun; Jiang, Ying; He, Fa-Wei; Zheng, Ting-Ping; Wang, Ya-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is now recognized that Cimicifuga foetida (C. foetida) extract is effective in alleviating menopausal symptoms. But the durations reported were usually short. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of C. foetida extract therapy and different estrogen and progesterone sequential therapies, on the breasts of early postmenopausal women. Methods: This was a prospective randomized trial. Ninety-six early menopausal women were recruited and randomly assigned into three groups treated with different therapies for 2 years. Patients were given C. foetida extract in Group A, estradiol valerate and medroxyprogesterone acetate in Group B, and estradiol valerate and progesterone in Group C. Ultrasonography was used to monitor changes in breast during treatment. Results: In comparing breast glandular section thickness before and after 1 and 2 years of treatment, no significant difference was observed in Group A (11.97 ± 2.84 mm vs. 12.09 ± 2.58 mm and 12.61 ± 3.73 mm, P > 0.05); in Group B glandular section thickness had increased significantly (10.98 ± 2.34 mm vs. 11.84 ± 2.72 mm and 11.90 ± 3.33 mm, P < 0.05) after treatment, the same as Group C (11.56 ± 3.03 mm vs. 12.5 ± 3.57 mm and 12.22 ± 4.39 mm P < 0.05). In comparing breast duct width before and after 1 and 2 years of treatment, no significant difference was seen in Group A (1.07 ± 0.19 mm vs. 1.02 ± 0.18 mm and 0.98 ± 0.21 mm, P > 0.05); in Group B the duct width had a downward trend after treatment (0.99 ± 0.14 mm vs. 0.96 ± 0.22 mm and 0.90 ± 0.18 mm, P < 0.05), the same as Group C (1.07 ± 0.20 mm vs. 1.02 ± 0.17 mm and 0.91 ± 0.19 mm, P < 0.05). The nodules detected before treatment had disappeared after 1-year of treatment or exhibited no distinct changes in the three groups. However, new breast nodules had appeared after 2 years of treatment: There was one case in Group A, two cases in Group B and four cases in Group C, with breast hyperplasia after the molybdenum target check. Conclusions: In early postmenopausal patients, C. foetida extract therapy and estrogen and progesterone therapy at low doses did not increase the incidence of malignant breast tumors PMID:25881590

  18. Thermal Decomposition Kinetics of HMX

    SciTech Connect

    Burnham, A K; Weese, R K

    2005-03-17

    Nucleation-growth kinetic expressions are derived for thermal decomposition of HMX from a variety of types of data, including mass loss for isothermal and constant rate heating in an open pan, and heat flow for isothermal and constant rate heating in open and closed pans. Conditions are identified in which thermal runaway is small to nonexistent, which typically means temperatures less than 255 C and heating rates less than 1 C/min. Activation energies are typically in the 140 to 165 kJ/mol regime for open pan experiments and about 150-165 kJ/mol for sealed-pan experiments. The reaction clearly displays more than one process, and most likely three processes, which are most clearly evident in open pan experiments. The reaction is accelerated for closed pan experiments, and one global reaction fits the data fairly well. Our A-E values lie in the middle of the values given in a compensation-law plot by Brill et al. (1994). Comparison with additional open and closed low temperature pyrolysis experiments support an activation energy of 165 kJ/mol at 10% conversion.

  19. Unimolecular thermal decomposition of dimethoxybenzenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robichaud, David J.; Scheer, Adam M.; Mukarakate, Calvin; Ormond, Thomas K.; Buckingham, Grant T.; Ellison, G. Barney; Nimlos, Mark R.

    2014-06-01

    The unimolecular thermal decomposition mechanisms of o-, m-, and p-dimethoxybenzene (CH3O-C6H4-OCH3) have been studied using a high temperature, microtubular (μtubular) SiC reactor with a residence time of 100 μs. Product detection was carried out using single photon ionization (SPI, 10.487 eV) and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry and matrix infrared absorption spectroscopy from 400 K to 1600 K. The initial pyrolytic step for each isomer is methoxy bond homolysis to eliminate methyl radical. Subsequent thermolysis is unique for each isomer. In the case of o-CH3O-C6H4-OCH3, intramolecular H-transfer dominates leading to the formation of o-hydroxybenzaldehyde (o-HO-C6H4-CHO) and phenol (C6H5OH). Para-CH3O-C6H4-OCH3 immediately breaks the second methoxy bond to form p-benzoquinone, which decomposes further to cyclopentadienone (C5H4=O). Finally, the m-CH3O-C6H4-OCH3 isomer will predominantly follow a ring-reduction/CO-elimination mechanism to form C5H4=O. Electronic structure calculations and transition state theory are used to confirm mechanisms and comment on kinetics. Implications for lignin pyrolysis are discussed.

  20. Stability of the Trotter-Suzuki decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhand, Ish; Sanders, Barry C.

    2014-07-01

    The Trotter-Suzuki decomposition (TSD) is an important tool for the simulation and control of physical systems. We provide evidence for the stability of the TSD. We model the error in the decomposition and determine sufficiency conditions that guarantee the stability of this decomposition under this model. We relate these sufficiency conditions to precision limitations of computing and control in both classical and quantum cases. Furthermore we show that bounded-error TSD can be achieved by a suitable choice of machine precision.

  1. Hamiltonian decomposition for bulk and surface states.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Ken-Ichi; Shimomura, Yuji; Takane, Yositake; Wakabayashi, Katsunori

    2009-04-10

    We demonstrate that a tight-binding Hamiltonian with nearest- and next-nearest-neighbor hopping integrals can be decomposed into bulk and boundary parts for honeycomb lattice systems. The Hamiltonian decomposition reveals that next-nearest-neighbor hopping causes sizable changes in the energy spectrum of surface states even if the correction to the energy spectrum of bulk states is negligible. By applying the Hamiltonian decomposition to edge states in graphene systems, we show that the next-nearest-neighbor hopping stabilizes the edge states. The application of Hamiltonian decomposition to a general lattice system is discussed. PMID:19392470

  2. Linking early Earth magma ocean crystallization and overturn with observed large low-shear-velocity provinces (LLSVPs) and short-lived radioisotopic measurements in Archean rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, S. M.; Elkins-Tanton, L. T.; Walker, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    Motivated by the well-characterized discrepancy between measurements of 142Nd in chondrites and those in Earth rocks (e.g.,[1][2]) in addition to recent measurements of Archean rocks with anomalous 142Nd and 182W (e.g.,[3][4][5]), we model the crystallization and overturn of a terrestrial chondritic magma ocean, and track the isotopic reservoirs that may result. Following magma ocean solidification, solid-state overturn occurs because solidification produces a gravitationally unstable configuration where the last cumulates to solidify are densest and also enriched in incompatible elements. As suggested by [1][2], these originally shallow cumulates that, following overturn, would now reside near the core-mantle boundary are tantalizing targets for the hypothesized hidden reservoir(s) of incompatible elements. These last, dense, enriched cumulates may have evolved negative 142Nd and 182W isotopic anomalies, while cumulates that form earlier and deeper in the magma ocean would likely be poor in incompatible elements and have evolved complementary positive isotopic anomalies. Because crystal - liquid partition coefficients of Sm, Nd, Hf, and W in nucleating mantle phases are poorly constrained and vary over orders of magnitude, we use a Monte Carlo approach to cover the parameter space of reported partition coefficients. Although data are limited, Archean rocks appear to show a non-linear trend between age and 142Nd and 182W, suggesting inefficient heterogeneous mixing of some of the early enriched reservoir (EER or late stage cumulates) back into the early depleted reservoir (EDR or deeper cumulates) during or after overturn, also first suggested by [1][2]. To account for this, we model various mixing scenarios using post-overturn mantle stratigraphy. Additionally, because 142Nd and 182W are decay products of short-lived radioisotopes, the timing of magma ocean crystallization is critical to producing a modern day mantle consistent with measured compositions. We therefore iterate through time to determine the statistically most likely time of the last major mantle-melting event. Consistent with [2], we argue that the EER is not hidden but is instead the seismologically observed large low-shear-velocity provinces (LLSVPs), or the D'' region, and the ultra low velocity zones (ULVZs) are dense, iron-rich silicon-poor melts of the LLSVPs. Given this, the isotopic reservoirs produced by our models must mix such that the EER remaining after mixing is the same volume as the LLSVPs, or 2% of the mantle (e.g., [6][7]). Approximately two-thirds our run results are "successful" given known partition coefficients, and so our results suggest that this model is viable: magma ocean fractional solidification can produce mantle reservoirs consistent with isotopic compositions observed in some rocks, and can produce a dense lower mantle layer consistent in longevity and volume to the LLSVPs. [1]Boyet and Carlson,2005,Science,309(5743),576-81.[2]Carlson and Boyet,2008,Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A,366(1883),4077-103. [3]Willbold et al.,2011,Nature,477(7363), 195-8. [4]Touboul et al.,2012,Science,335(6072),1065-9. [5]Rizo et al.,Nature,491(7422),96-100. [6]Burke et al.,2008,EPSL,265(1-2),49-60. [7]Hernlund and Houser,2008,EPSL,265(3-4),423-37.

  3. Stellar Populations of Lyman Break Galaxies at z approx. to 1-3 in the HST/WFC3 Early Release Science Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathi, N. P.; Cohen, S. H.; Ryan, R. E., Jr.; Finkelstein, S. L.; McCarthy, P. J.; Windhorst, R. A.; Yan, H.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Rutkowski, M. J.; OConnell, R. W.; Straughn, A. N.; Balick, B.; Bond, H. E.; Calzetti, D.; Disney, M. J.; Dopita, M. A.; Frogel, Jay A.; Hall, D. N. B.; Holtzman, J. A.; Kimble, R. A.; Paresce, F.; Saha, A.; Silk, J. I.; Tauger, J. T.; Young, E. T.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of Lyman break galaxies . (LBGs) at z approx = 1-3 selected using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) UVIS channel filters. These HST /WFC3 obse,rvations cover about 50 arcmin2 in the GOODS-South field as a part of the WFC3 Early Release Science program. These LBGs at z approx = 1-3 are selected using dropout selection criteria similar to high redshift LBGs. The deep multi-band photometry in this field is used to identify best-fit SED models, from which we infer the following results: (1) the photometric redshift estimate of these dropout selected LBGs is accurate to within few percent; (2) the UV spectral slope f3 is redder than at high redshift (z > 3), where LBGs are less dusty; (3) on average, LBGs at .z approx = 1-3 are massive, dustier and more highly star-forming, compared to LBGs at higher redshifts with similar luminosities, though their median values are similar within 1a uncertainties. This could imply that identical dropout selection technique, at all. redshifts, find physically similar galaxies; and (4) the stellar masses of these LBGs are directly proportional to their UV luminosities with a logarithmic slope of approx 0.46, and star-formation rates are proportional to their stellar masses with a logarithmic slope of approx 0.90. These relations hold true - within luminosities probed in this study - for LBGs from z approx = 1.5 to 5. The star-forming galaxies selected using other color-based techniques show similar correlations at z approx = 2, but to avoid any selection biases, and for direct comparison with LBGs at z > 3, a true Lyman break selection at z approx = 2 is essential. The future HST UV surveys,. both wider and deeper, covering a large luminosity range are important to better understand LBG properties, and their evolution.

  4. Early fluid loading in acute respiratory distress syndrome with septic shock deteriorates lung aeration without impairing arterial oxygenation: a lung ultrasound observational study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The study was designed to assess the impact of fluid loading on lung aeration, oxygenation and hemodynamics in patients with septic shock and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Methods During a 1-year period, a prospective observational study was performed in 32 patients with septic shock and ARDS. Cardiorespiratory parameters were measured using Swan Ganz (n = 29) or PiCCO catheters (n = 3). Lung aeration and regional pulmonary blood flows were measured using bedside transthoracic ultrasound. Measurements were performed before (T0), at the end of volume expansion (T1) and 40 minutes later (T2), consisting of 1-L of saline over 30 minutes during the first 48 h following onset of septic shock and ARDS. Results Lung ultrasound score increased by 23% at T2, from 13 at baseline to 16 (P < 0.001). Cardiac index and cardiac filling pressures increased significantly at T1 (P < 0.001) and returned to control values at T2. The increase in lung ultrasound score was statistically correlated with fluid loading-induced increase in cardiac index and was not associated with increase in pulmonary shunt or regional pulmonary blood flow. At T1, PaO2/FiO2 significantly increased (P < 0.005) from 144 (123 to 198) to 165 (128 to 226) and returned to control values at T2, whereas lung ultrasound score continued to increase. Conclusions Early fluid loading transitorily improves hemodynamics and oxygenation and worsens lung aeration. Aeration changes can be detected at the bedside by transthoracic lung ultrasound, which may serve as a safeguard against excessive fluid loading. PMID:24887155

  5. Impact of radiotherapy technique on the outcome of early breast cancer treated with conservative surgery: A multicenter observational study on 1,176 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Palazzi, Mauro . E-mail: mauro.palazzi@istitutotumori.mi.it; Tomatis, Stefano; Valli, Maria Carla; Guzzetti, Renata; Tonoli, Sandro; Bertoni, Filippo; Magrini, Stefano Maria; Meregalli, Sofia; Asnaghi, Diego; Arienti, Virginia; Pradella, Renato; Cafaro, Ines

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: To quantify the impact of radiotherapy technique on cosmetic outcome and on 5-year local control rate of early breast cancer treated with conservative surgery and adjuvant radiation. Methods and MaterialsPurpose: A total of 1,176 patients irradiated to the breast in 1997 were entered by eight centers into a prospective, observational study. Surgical procedure was quadrantectomy in 97% of patients, with axillary dissection performed in 96%; pT-stage was T1 in 81% and T2 in 19% of cases; pN-stage was N0 in 71%, N + (1-3) in 21%, and N + (>3) in 8% of cases. An immobilization device was used in 17% of patients; external contour-based and computed tomography-based treatment planning were performed in 20% and 72% of cases, respectively; 37% of patients were treated with a telecobalt unit and 63% with a linear accelerator; portal verification was used in 55% of patients; a boost dose to the tumor bed was delivered in 60% of cases. Results: With a median follow-up of 6.2 years, local, regional, and distant control rates at 5 years are 98%, 99%, and 92%, respectively. Use of less sophisticated treatment technique was associated with a less favorable cosmetic outcome. Local control was comparable between centers despite substantial technical differences. In a multivariate analysis including clinical and technical factors, only older age and prescription of medical adjuvant treatment significantly predicted for better local control, whereas use of portal verification was of borderline significance. Conclusions: Radiation technical factors impacted negatively on cosmetic outcome, but had relatively small effects on local control compared with other clinical factors.

  6. El Mayor-Cucapah (Mw 7.2) earthquake: Early near-field postseismic deformation from InSAR and GPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Ortega, Alejandro; Fialko, Yuri; Sandwell, David; Alejandro Nava-Pichardo, F.; Fletcher, John; Gonzalez-Garcia, Javier; Lipovsky, Brad; Floyd, Michael; Funning, Gareth

    2014-02-01

    El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake occurred on 4 April 2010 in northeastern Baja California just south of the U.S.-Mexico border. The earthquake ruptured several previously mapped faults, as well as some unidentified ones, including the Pescadores, Borrego, Paso Inferior and Paso Superior faults in the Sierra Cucapah, and the Indiviso fault in the Mexicali Valley and Colorado River Delta. We conducted several Global Positioning System (GPS) campaign surveys of preexisting and newly established benchmarks within 30 km of the earthquake rupture. Most of the benchmarks were occupied within days after the earthquake, allowing us to capture the very early postseismic transient motions. The GPS data show postseismic displacements in the same direction as the coseismic displacements; time series indicate a gradual decay in postseismic velocities with characteristic time scales of 66 ± 9 days and 20 ± 3 days, assuming exponential and logarithmic decay, respectively. We also analyzed interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data from the Envisat and ALOS satellites. The main deformation features seen in the line-of-sight displacement maps indicate subsidence concentrated in the southern and northern parts of the main rupture, in particular at the Indiviso fault, at the Laguna Salada basin, and at the Paso Superior fault. We show that the near-field GPS and InSAR observations over a time period of 5 months after the earthquake can be explained by a combination of afterslip, fault zone contraction, and a possible minor contribution of poroelastic rebound. Far-field data require an additional mechanism, most likely viscoelastic relaxation in the ductile substrate.

  7. SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF SN 2012fr: A LUMINOUS, NORMAL TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA WITH EARLY HIGH-VELOCITY FEATURES AND A LATE VELOCITY PLATEAU

    SciTech Connect

    Childress, M. J.; Scalzo, R. A.; Sim, S. A.; Tucker, B. E.; Yuan, F.; Schmidt, B. P.; Cenko, S. B.; Filippenko, A. V.; Silverman, J. M.; Contreras, C.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Phillips, M.; Morrell, N.; Jha, S. W.; McCully, C.; Anderson, J. P.; De Jaeger, T.; Forster, F.; Benetti, S.; Bufano, F.; and others

    2013-06-10

    We present 65 optical spectra of the Type Ia SN 2012fr, 33 of which were obtained before maximum light. At early times, SN 2012fr shows clear evidence of a high-velocity feature (HVF) in the Si II {lambda}6355 line that can be cleanly decoupled from the lower velocity ''photospheric'' component. This Si II {lambda}6355 HVF fades by phase -5; subsequently, the photospheric component exhibits a very narrow velocity width and remains at a nearly constant velocity of {approx}12,000 km s{sup -1} until at least five weeks after maximum brightness. The Ca II infrared triplet exhibits similar evidence for both a photospheric component at v Almost-Equal-To 12,000 km s{sup -1} with narrow line width and long velocity plateau, as well as an HVF beginning at v Almost-Equal-To 31,000 km s{sup -1} two weeks before maximum. SN 2012fr resides on the border between the ''shallow silicon'' and ''core-normal'' subclasses in the Branch et al. classification scheme, and on the border between normal and high-velocity Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in the Wang et al. system. Though it is a clear member of the ''low velocity gradient'' group of SNe Ia and exhibits a very slow light-curve decline, it shows key dissimilarities with the overluminous SN 1991T or SN 1999aa subclasses of SNe Ia. SN 2012fr represents a well-observed SN Ia at the luminous end of the normal SN Ia distribution and a key transitional event between nominal spectroscopic subclasses of SNe Ia.

  8. Nuclei fluorescence microscopic observation on early embryonic development of mitogynogenetic diploid induced by hydrostatic pressure treatment in olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus).

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhengmei; Zhu, Xiangping; You, Feng; Wu, Zhihao; Cao, Yuanshui

    2015-05-01

    Sperm genetic material of olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) was inactivated by ultraviolet irradiation. The nuclear phase changes during early embryonic development of diploid, haploid, and mitogynogenetic diploid induced by hydrostatic pressure treatment were observed under fluorescent microscope with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining. The parameters of hydrostatic pressure treatment were 600 kg/cm(2) for 6 minutes at prometaphase stage. The data showed that developmental timing sequence of diploid and haploid fertilized eggs was similar. The cell cycle was about 48 minutes, including interphase (about 21 minutes), prophase (about 3 minutes), prometaphase (about 6 minutes), metaphase (about 6 minutes), anaphase (around 9 minutes), and telophase (about 3 minutes). After entering the fertilized egg, ultraviolet-inactivated sperm formed a male pronucleus and became a dense chromatin body in the cytoplasm. Dense chromatin body did not participate in nuclear division and unchanged all the time. For hydrostatic pressure-treated embryos, the first nuclear division and cytokinesis after treatment proceeded normally after about 15 minutes recovery. During the second mitosis, having undergone interphase, prophase, and prometaphase stage, chromosomes began to slowly spread around and scattered in the cell but not entered into metaphase and anaphase. The second nuclear division and cytokinesis was inhibited. The occurrence frequency of developmentally delayed embryos also showed that the second cleavage of about 80% treated eggs was inhibited. The inhibition of the second cleavage resulted to chromosome set doubling. So chromosome set doubling for mitogynogenetic flounder diploid induced by hydrostatic pressure treatment, performed at prometaphase stage, was mainly due to inhibition of the second mitosis rather than the first one. PMID:25726149

  9. Early-type stars observed in the ESO UVES Paranal Observatory Project - IV. Studies of CN, CH+ and CH in the interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smoker, J.; Ledoux, C.; Jehin, E.; Keenan, F. P.; Kennedy, M.; Cabanac, R.; Melo, C.

    2014-02-01

    High spectral resolution (˜80 000) and signal-to-noise observations from the Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph Paranal Observatory Project (UVES-POP) are used to study the interstellar molecular lines CN (3874 Å), CH+ (3957, 4232 Å) and CH (3886, 4300 Å) towards 74 O- and B-type stellar sightlines. Additionally, archive data are presented for 140 ELODIE early-type stellar sightlines at R = 42 000, plus 25 FEROS at R = 48 000 and 3 UVES at R > 50 000, mainly in the CH+ (4232 Å) and CH (3886, 4300 Å) transitions. Detection rates are ˜45 per cent for CN and ˜67 per cent for the other lines in the POP sample, and ˜10-15 per cent for CH+ and CH lines in the additional sample. CH and CH+ are well correlated between log[N(CH) cm-2]˜12-14, implying that these clouds are CH+-like CH and not CN-like CH. CH is also very well correlated with Na I D in the range log[N(Na I cm-2]) ˜12.2-14.2. A few sightlines show tentative velocity shifts of ˜2 km s-1 between CH and CH+, which appear to be caused by differences in component strength in blends, and hence do not provide firm evidence for shocks. Finally, we describe a search for 13CH+ in a sightline towards HD 76341. No 13CH+ is detected, placing a limit on the 13CH+ to 12CH+ ratio of ˜0.01. If a formal fit is attempted, the equivalent width ratio in the two isotopes is a factor ˜90 but with large errors.

  10. Decomposition reactions in RDX at elevated temperatures and pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweigert, Igor

    2015-03-01

    Mechanisms and rates of elementary reactions controlling condensed-phase decomposition of RDX under elevated temperatures (up to 2000 K) and pressures (up to a few GPa) are not known. Global decomposition kinetics in RDX below 700 K has been measured; however, the observed global pathways result from complex manifolds of elementary reactions and are likely to be altered by elevated temperatures. Elevated pressures can further affect the condensed-phase kinetics and compete with elevated temperatures in promoting some elementary reactions and suppressing others. This presentation will describe density functional theory (DFT) based molecular dynamics simulations of crystalline and molten RDX aimed to delineate the effects of elevated temperatures and pressures on the mechanism of initial dissociation and the resulting secondary reactions. This work was supported by the Naval Research Laboratory, by the Office of Naval Research, and by the DOD High Performance Computing Modernization Program Software Application Institute for Multiscale Reactive Modeling of Insensitive Munitions.

  11. High temperature phase decomposition in Ti{sub x}Zr{sub y}Al{sub z}N

    SciTech Connect

    Lind, Hans; Pilemalm, Robert; Rogström, Lina; Tasnadi, Ferenc; Ghafoor, Naureen; Forsén, Rikard; Odén, Magnus; Johnson, Lars J. S.; Johansson-Jöesaar, Mats P.; Abrikosov, Igor A.

    2014-12-15

    Through a combination of theoretical and experimental observations we study the high temperature decomposition behavior of c-(Ti{sub x}Zr{sub y}Al{sub z}N) alloys. We show that for most concentrations the high formation energy of (ZrAl)N causes a strong tendency for spinodal decomposition between ZrN and AlN while other decompositions tendencies are suppressed. In addition we observe that entropic effects due to configurational disorder favor a formation of a stable Zr-rich (TiZr)N phase with increasing temperature. Our calculations also predict that at high temperatures a Zr rich (TiZrAl)N disordered phase should become more resistant against the spinodal decomposition despite its high and positive formation energy due to the specific topology of the free energy surface at the relevant concentrations. Our experimental observations confirm this prediction by showing strong tendency towards decomposition in a Zr-poor sample while a Zr-rich alloy shows a greatly reduced decomposition rate, which is mostly attributable to binodal decomposition processes. This result highlights the importance of considering the second derivative of the free energy, in addition to its absolute value in predicting decomposition trends of thermodynamically unstable alloys.

  12. Unimolecular decomposition of methyltrichlorosilane: RRKM calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Osterheld, T.H.; Allendorf, M.D.; Melius, C.F.

    1993-06-01

    Based on reaction thermochemistry and estimates of Arrhenius A-factors, it is expected that Si-C bond cleavage, C-H bond cleavage, and HCl elimination will be the primary channels for the unimolecular decomposition of methyltrichlorosilane. Using RRKM theory, we calculated rate constants for these three reactions. The calculations support the conclusion that these three reactions are the major decomposition pathways. Rate constants for each reaction were calculated in the high-pressure limit (800--1500 K) and in the falloff regime (1300--1500 K) for bath gases of both helium and hydrogen. These calculations thus provide branching fractions as well as decomposition rates. We also calculated bimolecular rate constants for the overall decomposition in the low-pressure limit. Interesting and surprising kinetic behavior of this system and the individual reactions is discussed. The reactivity of this chlorinated organosilane is compared to that of other organosilanes.

  13. Non-isothermal decomposition kinetics of diosgenin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fei-xiong; Fu, Li; Feng, Lu; Liu, Chuo-chuo; Ren, Bao-zeng

    2013-10-01

    The thermal stability and kinetics of isothermal decomposition of diosgenin were studied by thermogravimetry (TG) and Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC). The activation energy of the thermal decomposition process was determined from the analysis of TG curves by the methods of Flynn-Wall-Ozawa, Doyle, atava-estk and Kissinger, respectively. The mechanism of thermal decomposition was determined to be Avrami-Erofeev equation ( n = 1/3, n is the reaction order) with integral form G(?) = [-ln(1 - ?)]1/3 (? = 0.10-0.80). E a and log A [s-1] were determined to be 44.10 kJ mol-1 and 3.12, respectively. Moreover, the thermodynamics properties of ? H ?, ? S ?, and ? G ? of this reaction were 38.18 kJ mol-1, -199.76 J mol-1 K-1, and 164.36 kJ mol-1 in the stage of thermal decomposition.

  14. New Integrable Decomposition of Super AKNS Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Jie; Dong, Ya-Juan

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, a new 7 × 7 matrix spectral problem, which is associated with the super AKNS equation is constructed. With the use of the binary nonlinearization method, a new integrable decomposition of the super AKNS equation is presented.

  15. Experimental Shock Decomposition of Siderite to Magnetite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, M. S.; Golden, D. C.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2005-01-01

    The debate about fossil life on Mars includes the origin of magnetites of specific sizes and habits in the siderite-rich portions of the carbonate spheres in ALH 84001 [1,2]. Specifically [2] were able to demonstrate that inorganic synthesis of these compositionally zoned spheres from aqueous solutions of variable ion-concentrations is possible. They further demonstrated the formation of magnetite from siderite upon heating at 550 C under a Mars-like CO2-rich atmosphere according to 3FeCO3 = Fe3O4 + 2CO2 + CO [3] and they postulated that the carbonates in ALH 84001 were heated to these temperatures by some shock event. The average shock pressure for ALH 84001, substantially based on the refractive index of diaplectic feldspar glasses [3,4,5] is some 35-40 GPa and associated temperatures are some 300-400 C [4]. However, some of the feldspar is melted [5], requiring local deviations from this average as high as 45-50 GPa. Indeed, [5] observes the carbonates in ALH 84001 to be melted locally, requiring pressures in excess of 60 GPa and temperatures > 600 C. Combining these shock studies with the above inorganic synthesis of zoned carbonates it seems possible to produce the ALH 84001 magnetites by the shock-induced decomposition of siderite.

  16. Moisture can be the dominant environmental parameter governing cadaver decomposition in soil.

    PubMed

    Carter, David O; Yellowlees, David; Tibbett, Mark

    2010-07-15

    Forensic taphonomy involves the use of decomposition to estimate postmortem interval (PMI) or locate clandestine graves. Yet, cadaver decomposition remains poorly understood, particularly following burial in soil. Presently, we do not know how most edaphic and environmental parameters, including soil moisture, influence the breakdown of cadavers following burial and alter the processes that are used to estimate PMI and locate clandestine graves. To address this, we buried juvenile rat (Rattus rattus) cadavers (approximately 18 g wet weight) in three contrasting soils from tropical savanna ecosystems located in Pallarenda (sand), Wambiana (medium clay), or Yabulu (loamy sand), Queensland, Australia. These soils were sieved (2mm), weighed (500 g dry weight), calibrated to a matric potential of -0.01 megapascals (MPa), -0.05 MPa, or -0.3 MPa (wettest to driest) and incubated at 22 degrees C. Measurements of cadaver decomposition included cadaver mass loss, carbon dioxide-carbon (CO(2)-C) evolution, microbial biomass carbon (MBC), protease activity, phosphodiesterase activity, ninhydrin-reactive nitrogen (NRN) and soil pH. Cadaver burial resulted in a significant increase in CO(2)-C evolution, MBC, enzyme activities, NRN and soil pH. Cadaver decomposition in loamy sand and sandy soil was greater at lower matric potentials (wetter soil). However, optimal matric potential for cadaver decomposition in medium clay was exceeded, which resulted in a slower rate of cadaver decomposition in the wettest soil. Slower cadaver decomposition was also observed at high matric potential (-0.3 MPa). Furthermore, wet sandy soil was associated with greater cadaver decomposition than wet fine-textured soil. We conclude that gravesoil moisture content can modify the relationship between temperature and cadaver decomposition and that soil microorganisms can play a significant role in cadaver breakdown. We also conclude that soil NRN is a more reliable indicator of gravesoil than soil pH. PMID:20400249

  17. Warming and Nitrogen Addition Increase Litter Decomposition in a Temperate Meadow Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Shiwei; Guo, Rui; Zhang, Tao; Guo, Jixun

    2015-01-01

    Background Litter decomposition greatly influences soil structure, nutrient content and carbon sequestration, but how litter decomposition is affected by climate change is still not well understood. Methodology/Principal Findings A field experiment with increased temperature and nitrogen (N) addition was established in April 2007 to examine the effects of experimental warming, N addition and their interaction on litter decomposition in a temperate meadow steppe in northeastern China. Warming, N addition and warming plus N addition reduced the residual mass of L. chinensis litter by 3.78%, 7.51% and 4.53%, respectively, in 2008 and 2009, and by 4.73%, 24.08% and 16.1%, respectively, in 2010. Warming, N addition and warming plus N addition had no effect on the decomposition of P. communis litter in 2008 or 2009, but reduced the residual litter mass by 5.58%, 15.53% and 5.17%, respectively, in 2010. Warming and N addition reduced the cellulose percentage of L. chinensis and P. communis, specifically in 2010. The lignin percentage of L. chinensis and P. communis was reduced by warming but increased by N addition. The C, N and P contents of L. chinensis and P. communis litter increased with time. Warming and N addition reduced the C content and C:N ratios of L. chinensisand P. communis litter, but increased the N and P contents. Significant interactive effects of warming and N addition on litter decomposition were observed (P<0.01). Conclusion/Significance The litter decomposition rate was highly correlated with soil temperature, soil water content and litter quality. Warming and N addition significantly impacted the litter decomposition rate in the Songnen meadow ecosystem, and the effects of warming and N addition on litter decomposition were also influenced by the quality of litter. These results highlight how climate change could alter grassland ecosystem carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus contents in soil by influencing litter decomposition. PMID:25774776

  18. Evaluating litter decomposition in earth system models with long-term litterbag experiments: an example using the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4).

    PubMed

    Bonan, Gordon B; Hartman, Melannie D; Parton, William J; Wieder, William R

    2013-03-01

    Decomposition is a large term in the global carbon budget, but models of the earth system that simulate carbon cycle-climate feedbacks are largely untested with respect to litter decomposition. We tested the litter decomposition parameterization of the community land model version 4 (CLM4), the terrestrial component of the community earth system model, with data from the long-term intersite decomposition experiment team (LIDET). The LIDET dataset is a 10-year study of litter decomposition at multiple sites across North America and Central America. We performed 10-year litter decomposition simulations comparable with LIDET for 9 litter types and 20 sites in tundra, grassland, and boreal, conifer, deciduous, and tropical forest biomes using the LIDET-provided climatic decomposition index to constrain temperature and moisture effects on decomposition. We performed additional simulations with DAYCENT, a version of the CENTURY model, to ask how well an established ecosystem model matches the observations. The results show large discrepancy between the laboratory microcosm studies used to parameterize the CLM4 litter decomposition and the LIDET field study. Simulated carbon loss is more rapid than the observations across all sites, and nitrogen immobilization is biased high. Closer agreement with the observations requires much lower decomposition rates, obtained with the assumption that soil mineral nitrogen severely limits decomposition. DAYCENT better replicates the observations, for both carbon mass remaining and nitrogen, independent of nitrogen limitation. CLM4 has low soil carbon in global earth system simulations. These results suggest that this bias arises, in part, from too rapid litter decomposition. More broadly, the terrestrial biogeochemistry of earth system models must be critically tested with observations, and the consequences of particular model choices must be documented. Long-term litter decomposition experiments such as LIDET provide a real-world process-oriented benchmark to evaluate models. PMID:23504851

  19. Unimolecular thermal decomposition of dimethoxybenzenes

    SciTech Connect

    Robichaud, David J. Mukarakate, Calvin; Nimlos, Mark R.; Scheer, Adam M.; Ormond, Thomas K.; Buckingham, Grant T.; Ellison, G. Barney

    2014-06-21

    The unimolecular thermal decomposition mechanisms of o-, m-, and p-dimethoxybenzene (CH{sub 3}O-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-OCH{sub 3}) have been studied using a high temperature, microtubular (μtubular) SiC reactor with a residence time of 100 μs. Product detection was carried out using single photon ionization (SPI, 10.487 eV) and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry and matrix infrared absorption spectroscopy from 400 K to 1600 K. The initial pyrolytic step for each isomer is methoxy bond homolysis to eliminate methyl radical. Subsequent thermolysis is unique for each isomer. In the case of o-CH{sub 3}O-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-OCH{sub 3}, intramolecular H-transfer dominates leading to the formation of o-hydroxybenzaldehyde (o-HO-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-CHO) and phenol (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}OH). Para-CH{sub 3}O-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-OCH{sub 3} immediately breaks the second methoxy bond to form p-benzoquinone, which decomposes further to cyclopentadienone (C{sub 5}H{sub 4}=O). Finally, the m-CH{sub 3}O-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-OCH{sub 3} isomer will predominantly follow a ring-reduction/CO-elimination mechanism to form C{sub 5}H{sub 4}=O. Electronic structure calculations and transition state theory are used to confirm mechanisms and comment on kinetics. Implications for lignin pyrolysis are discussed.

  20. High Temperature Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is oxidized into nitrogen dioxide (NO2) by the high temperature decomposition of a hydrogen peroxide solution to produce the oxidative free radicals, hydroxyl and hydropemxyl. The hydrogen peroxide solution is impinged upon a heated surface in a stream of nitric oxide where it decomposes to produce the oxidative free radicals. Because the decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide solution occurs within the stream of the nitric oxide, rapid gas-phase oxidation of nitric oxide into nitrogen dioxide occurs.

  1. Moisture drives surface decomposition in thawing tundra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks Pries, Caitlin E.; Schuur, E. A. G.; Vogel, Jason G.; Natali, Susan M.

    2013-07-01

    Permafrost thaw can affect decomposition rates by changing environmental conditions and litter quality. As permafrost thaws, soils warm and thermokarst (ground subsidence) features form, causing some areas to become wetter while other areas become drier. We used a common substrate to measure how permafrost thaw affects decomposition rates in the surface soil in a natural permafrost thaw gradient and a warming experiment in Healy, Alaska. Permafrost thaw also changes plant community composition. We decomposed 12 plant litters in a common garden to test how changing plant litter inputs would affect decomposition. We combined species' tissue-specific decomposition rates with species and tissue-level estimates of aboveground net primary productivity to calculate community-weighted decomposition constants at both the thaw gradient and warming experiment. Moisture, specifically growing season precipitation and water table depth, was the most significant driver of decomposition. At the gradient, an increase in growing season precipitation from 200 to 300 mm increased mass loss of the common substrate by 100%. At the warming experiment, a decrease in the depth to the water table from 30 to 15 cm increased mass loss by 100%. At the gradient, community-weighted decomposition was 21% faster in extensive than in minimal thaw, but was similar when moss production was included. Overall, the effect of climate change and permafrost thaw on surface soil decomposition are driven more by precipitation and soil environment than by changes to plant communities. Increasing soil moisture is thereby another mechanism by which permafrost thaw can become a positive feedback to climate change.

  2. Mueller matrix decomposition for biological tissue analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, L.; Le Brun, G.; Le Jeune, B.

    2013-04-01

    This study deals with the polarimetric characterization of biological tissues based on the Stokes-Mueller formalism. The optimal experimental conditions to study irradiated pig skin samples are analyzed. Two Mueller matrix decomposition techniques, the one developed by Lu and Chipman and the other by Ossikovski, are used. These decompositions allow identification of useful factors such as retardance, diattenuation and depolarization for differentiating between various levels of irradiation and for better interpreting the behavior of the skin with respect to irradiation.

  3. Domain decomposition for the SPN solver MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Jamelot, Erell; Baudron, Anne-Marie; Lautard, Jean-Jacques

    2012-07-01

    In this article we present a domain decomposition method for the mixed SPN equations, discretized with Raviart-Thomas-Nedelec finite elements. This domain decomposition is based on the iterative Schwarz algorithm with Robin interface conditions to handle communications. After having described this method, we give details on how to optimize the convergence. Finally, we give some numerical results computed in a realistic 3D domain. The computations are done with the MINOS solver of the APOLLO3 (R) code. (authors)

  4. High temperature decomposition of hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is oxidized into nitrogen dioxide (NO2) by the high temperature decomposition of a hydrogen peroxide solution to produce the oxidative free radicals, hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl. The hydrogen peroxide solution is impinged upon a heated surface in a stream of nitric oxide where it decomposes to produce the oxidative free radicals. Because the decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide solution occurs within the stream of the nitric oxide, rapid gas-phase oxidation of nitric oxide into nitrogen dioxide occurs.

  5. Critical analysis of nitramine decomposition data: Activation energies and frequency factors for HMX and RDX decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, M. A.

    1980-01-01

    A summary of a literature review on thermal decomposition of HMX and RDX is presented. The decomposition apparently fits first order kinetics. Recommended values for Arrhenius parameters for HMX and RDX decomposition in the gaseous and liquid phases and for decomposition of RDX in solution in TNT are given. The apparent importance of autocatalysis is pointed out, as are some possible complications that may be encountered in interpreting extending or extrapolating kinetic data for these compounds from measurements carried out below their melting points to the higher temperatures and pressure characteristic of combustion.

  6. Sustaining effect of soil warming on organic matter decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Ruixing; Ouyang, Zhu; Dorodnikov, Maxim; Wilson, Glenn; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    Global warming affects various parts of carbon (C) cycle including acceleration of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition with strong feedback to atmospheric CO2 concentration. Despite many soil warming studies showed changes of microbial community structure, only very few were focused on sustainability of soil warming on microbial activity associated with SOM decomposition. Two alternative hypotheses: 1) acclimation because of substrate exhaustion and 2) sustaining increase of microbial activity with accelerated decomposition of recalcitrant SOM pools were never proven under long term field conditions. This is especially important in the nowadays introduced no-till crop systems leading to redistribution of organic C at the soil surface, which is much susceptible to warming effects than the rest of the profile. We incubated soil samples from a four-year warming experiment with tillage (T) and no-tillage (NT) practices under three temperatures: 15, 21, and 27 °C, and related the evolved total CO2 efflux to changes of organic C pools. Warmed soils released significantly more CO2 than the control treatment (no warming) at each incubation temperature, and the largest differences were observed under 15 °C (26% increase). The difference in CO2 efflux from NT to T increase with temperature showing high vulnerability of C stored in NT to soil warming. The Q10 value reflecting the sensitivity of SOM decomposition to warming was lower for warmed than non-warmed soil indicating better acclimation of microbes or lower C availability during long term warming. The activity of three extracellular enzymes: β-glucosidase, chitinase, sulphatase, reflecting the response of C, N and S cycles to warming, were significantly higher under warming and especially under NT compared to two other respective treatments. The CO2 released during 2 months of incubation consisted of 85% from recalcitrant SOM and the remaining 15% from microbial biomass and extractable organic C based on the decrease of respective OM pools during incubation. The dominance of CO2 from recalcitrant SOM was especially pronounced in NT. We conclude that the accelerated decomposition of recalcitrant SOM due to stimulation of microorganisms by warming is sustainable. Consequently, predictions of redistribution or even accumulation of C in the topsoil of no-till should be taken with high caution, as global warming could potentially sustain high rates of decomposition.

  7. A novel methodology for triple/multiple-patterning layout decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaida, Rani S.; Agarwal, Kanak B.; Liebmann, Lars W.; Nassif, Sani R.; Gupta, Puneet

    2012-03-01

    Double patterning (DP) in a litho-etch-litho-etch (LELE) process is an attractive technique to scale the K1 factor below 0.25. For dense bidirectional layers such as the first metal layer (M1), however, density scaling with LELE suffers from poor tip-to-tip (T2T) and tip-to-side (T2S) spacing. As a result, triple-patterning (TP) in a LELELE process has emerged as a strong alternative. Because of the use of a third exposure/etch, LELELE can achieve good T2T and T2S scaling as well as improved pitch scaling over LELE in case further scaling is needed. TP layout decomposition, a.k.a. TP coloring, is much more challenging than DP layout decomposition. One of the biggest complexities of TP decomposition is that a stitch can be between different two-mask combinations (i.e. first/second, first/third, second/third) and, consequently, stitches are color-dependent and candidate stitch locations can be determined only during/after coloring. In this paper, we offer a novel methodology for TP layout decomposition. Rather than simplifying the TP stitching problem by using DP candidate stitches only (as in previous works), the methodology leverages TP stitching capability by considering additional candidate stitch locations to give coloring higher flexibility to resolve decomposition conflicts. To deal with TP coloring complexity, the methodology employs multiple DP coloring steps, which leverages existing infrastructure developed for DP layout decomposition. The method was used to decompose bidirectional M1 and M2 layouts at 45nm, 32nm, 22nm, and 14nm nodes. For reasonably dense layouts, the method achieves coloring solutions with no conflicts (or a reasonable number of conflicts solvable with manual legalization). For very dense and irregular M1 layouts, however, the method was unable to reach a conflict-free solution and a large number of conflicts was observed. Hence, layout simplifications for the M1 layer may be unavoidable to enable TP for the M1 layer. Although we apply the method for TP, the method is more general and can be applied for multiple patterning with any number of masks.

  8. Performance impact of stop lists and morphological decomposition on word-word corpus-based semantic space models.

    PubMed

    Keith, Jeff; Westbury, Chris; Goldman, James

    2015-09-01

    Corpus-based semantic space models, which primarily rely on lexical co-occurrence statistics, have proven effective in modeling and predicting human behavior in a number of experimental paradigms that explore semantic memory representation. The most widely studied extant models, however, are strongly influenced by orthographic word frequency (e.g., Shaoul & Westbury, Behavior Research Methods, 38, 190-195, 2006). This has the implication that high-frequency closed-class words can potentially bias co-occurrence statistics. Because these closed-class words are purported to carry primarily syntactic, rather than semantic, information, the performance of corpus-based semantic space models may be improved by excluding closed-class words (using stop lists) from co-occurrence statistics, while retaining their syntactic information through other means (e.g., part-of-speech tagging and/or affixes from inflected word forms). Additionally, very little work has been done to explore the effect of employing morphological decomposition on the inflected forms of words in corpora prior to compiling co-occurrence statistics, despite (controversial) evidence that humans perform early morphological decomposition in semantic processing. In this study, we explored the impact of these factors on corpus-based semantic space models. From this study, morphological decomposition appears to significantly improve performance in word-word co-occurrence semantic space models, providing some support for the claim that sublexical information-specifically, word morphology-plays a role in lexical semantic processing. An overall decrease in performance was observed in models employing stop lists (e.g., excluding closed-class words). Furthermore, we found some evidence that weakens the claim that closed-class words supply primarily syntactic information in word-word co-occurrence semantic space models. PMID:26100766

  9. Insights from letter position dyslexia on morphological decomposition in reading.

    PubMed

    Friedmann, Naama; Gvion, Aviah; Nisim, Roni

    2015-01-01

    We explored morphological decomposition in reading, the locus in the reading process in which it takes place and its nature, comparing different types of morphemes. We assessed these questions through the analysis of letter position errors in readers with letter position dyslexia (LPD). LPD is a selective impairment to letter position encoding in the early stage of word reading, which results in letter migrations (such as reading "cloud" for "could"). We used the fact that migrations in LPD occur mainly in word-interior letters, whereas exterior letters rarely migrate. The rationale was that if morphological decomposition occurs prior to letter position encoding and strips off affixes, word-interior letters adjacent to an affix (e.g., signs-signs) would become exterior following affix-stripping and hence exhibit fewer migrations. We tested 11 Hebrew readers with developmental LPD and 1 with acquired LPD in 6 experiments of reading aloud, lexical decision, and comprehension, at the single word and sentence levels (compared with 25 age-matched control participants). The LPD participants read a total of 12,496 migratable words. We examined migrations next to inflectional, derivational, or bound function morphemes compared with migrations of exterior letters. The results were that root letters adjacent to inflectional and derivational morphemes were treated like middle letters, and migrated frequently, whereas root letters adjacent to bound function morphemes patterned with exterior letters, and almost never migrated. Given that LPD is a pre-lexical deficit, these results indicate that morphological decomposition takes place in an early, pre-lexical stage. The finding that morphologically complex nonwords showed the same patterns indicates that this decomposition is structurally, rather than lexically, driven. We suggest that letter position encoding takes place before morphological analysis, but in some cases, as with bound function morphemes, the complex word is re-analyzed as two separate words. In this reanalysis, letter positions in each constituent word are encoded separately, and hence the exterior letters of the root are treated as exterior and do not migrate. PMID:26190985

  10. Insights from letter position dyslexia on morphological decomposition in reading

    PubMed Central

    Friedmann, Naama; Gvion, Aviah; Nisim, Roni

    2015-01-01

    We explored morphological decomposition in reading, the locus in the reading process in which it takes place and its nature, comparing different types of morphemes. We assessed these questions through the analysis of letter position errors in readers with letter position dyslexia (LPD). LPD is a selective impairment to letter position encoding in the early stage of word reading, which results in l