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Sample records for early enteral nutrition

  1. Early aggressive nutrition: parenteral amino acids and minimal enteral nutrition for extremely low birth weight (<1 000 g) infants.

    PubMed

    Adamkin, D H

    2007-08-01

    Postnatal growth failure in the extremely low birthweight infant is a morbidity that needs vigorous attention. The transition from intrauterine to the extrauterine environment should occur with minimal disruption in nutritional support. Early aggressive parenteral and enteral nutrition strategies may lead to reducing cumulative deficits of energy and protein that occur during the first weeks of life. These strategies decrease the degree of postnatal weight loss, reduce the age that birthweight is regained and the age that full enteral nutrition is achieved. Overall growth outcomes are also improved through discharge and beyond. This article provides clinical practicum to guide the use of early parenteral nutrition and both miminal enteral nutrition and advancing enteral nutrition. PMID:17947842

  2. Early enteral nutrition vs parenteral nutrition following pancreaticoduodenectomy: Experience from a single center

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jian-Wen; Liu, Chang; Du, Zhao-Qing; Liu, Xue-Min; Lv, Yi; Zhang, Xu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To analyze and compare postoperative morbidity between patients receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and early enteral nutrition supplemented with parenteral nutrition (EEN + PN). METHODS: Three hundred and forty patients receiving pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) from 2009 to 2013 at our center were enrolled retrospectively. Patients were divided into two groups depending on postoperative nutrition support scheme: an EEN + PN group (n = 87) and a TPN group (n = 253). Demographic characteristics, comorbidities, preoperative biochemical parameters, pathological diagnosis, intraoperative information, and postoperative complications of the two groups were analyzed. RESULTS: The two groups did not differ in demographic characteristics, preoperative comorbidities, preoperative biochemical parameters or pathological findings (P > 0.05 for all). However, patients with EEN + PN following PD had a higher incidence of delayed gastric emptying (16.1% vs 6.7%, P = 0.016), pulmonary infection (10.3% vs 3.6%, P = 0.024), and probably intraperitoneal infection (18.4% vs 10.3%, P = 0.059), which might account for their longer nasogastric tube retention time (9 d vs 5 d, P = 0.006), postoperative hospital stay (25 d vs 20 d, P = 0.055) and higher hospitalization expenses (USD10397 vs USD8663.9, P = 0.008), compared to those with TPN. CONCLUSION: Our study suggests that TPN might be safe and sufficient for patient recovery after PD. Postoperative EEN should only be performed scrupulously and selectively. PMID:27076767

  3. [Early enteral nutrition in patients treated with major surgery of the abdomen and the pelvis].

    PubMed

    Soliani, P; Dell'Abate, P; Del Rio, P; Arcuri, M F; Salsi, P; Cortellini, P; Sianesi, M

    2001-01-01

    Hypercatabolism after operations has a negative influence on nutritional status, the healing process, infective complications and hospital stay. Moreover, the immune status of the patient has been shown to be equally important for septic morbidity and mortality. It is extensively accepted that in critical situations, an adequate nutritional support (enteral or parenteral) is absolutely necessary, but subjects such as the best way of feeding, the kind of nutrients to be used and the administration time are still debatable issues. Our aim was to evaluate the effectiveness (nutritional and immunological features) and clinical outcomes (septic morbidity and mortality) of total parenteral nutrition (TPN), early enteral nutrition and early enteral immunonutrition (EEN, EEIN) in 171 patients undergoing major abdominal and urological surgery for neoplastic pathology. Our prospective, randomised study showed no significant differences among the 3 nutritional supports (TPN, EEN, EEIN) with regard to restoration of normal nitrogen balance during the acute phase of surgical stress. No correlations were found in the 3 groups with immunoglobulin percentage, lymphocyte subpopulations and their functional patterns as studied by specific immunological tests. The skin test, on the other hand, seems to be more representative of the immune condition of the patients, demonstrating a faster improvement in immunological status in the EEIN group as compared to the control group. A smaller percentage of septic morbidity and mortality was found in both enteral nutritional groups (EEN and EEIN), although there was a statistically significant difference only between the TPN and EEIN groups. The hospital stay was 3.5 days shorter in enteral feeding patients (EEN, EEIN). Finally, EEN was less expensive than the other nutritional conditions, this result depending on the cost of the different materials used (infusion sets, linear filters, prepacked diets, etc.). PMID:11723892

  4. Early combined parenteral and enteral nutrition for pancreaticoduodenectomy – Retrospective cohort analysis

    PubMed Central

    Probst, Pascal; Keller, Daniel; Steimer, Johannes; Gmür, Emanuel; Haller, Alois; Imoberdorf, Reinhard; Rühlin, Maya; Gelpke, Hans; Breitenstein, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Background Suggested guidelines for nutritional support after pancreaticoduodenectomy are still controversial. Recent evidence suggests that combining enteral nutrition (EN) with parenteral nutrition (PN) improves outcome. For ten years, patients have been treated with Early Combined Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ECPEN) after PD. The aim of this study was to report on rationale, safety, effectiveness and outcome associated with this method. Methods Consecutive PD performed between 2003 and 2012 were analyzed retrospectively. Early EN and PN was standardized and started immediately after surgery. EN was increased to 40 ml/h (1 kcal/ml) over 24 h, while PN was supplemented based on a daily energy target of 25 kcal/kg. Standard enteral and parenteral products were used. Results Sixty-nine patients were nutritionally supplemented according to ECPEN. The median coverage of kcal per patients related to the total caloric requirements during the entire hospitalization (nutrition balance) was 93.4% (range: 100%–69.3%). The nutritional balance in patients with needle catheter jejunostomy (NCJ) was significantly higher than in the group with nasojejunal tube (97.1% vs. 91.6%; p < 0.0001). Mortality rate was 5.8%, while major complications (Clavien-Dindo 3–5) occurred in 21.7% of patients. Neither the presence of preoperative malnutrition nor the application of preoperative immunonutrition was associated with postoperative clinical outcome. Conclusion This is the first European study of ECPEN after PD. ECPEN is safe and, especially in combination with NCJ, provides comprehensive coverage of caloric requirements during the postoperative phase. Clinical controlled trials are needed to investigate potential benefits of complete energy supplementation during the early postoperative phase after PD. PMID:26955477

  5. Is Early Enteral Nutrition Better for Postoperative Course in Esophageal Cancer Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Kazuaki; Koyama, Yu; Kosugi, Shin-ichi; Ishikawa, Takashi; Sakamoto, Kaoru; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Wakai, Toshifumi

    2013-01-01

    We retrospectively examined esophageal cancer patients who received enteral nutrition (EN) to clarify the validity of early EN compared with delayed EN. A total of 103 patients who underwent transthoracic esophagectomy with three-field lymphadenectomy for esophageal cancer were entered. Patients were divided into two groups; Group E received EN within postoperative day 3, and Group L received EN after postoperative day 3. The clinical factors such as days for first fecal passage, the dose of postoperative albumin infusion, differences of serum albumin value between pre- and postoperation, duration of systematic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), incidence of postoperative infectious complication, and use of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) were compared between the groups. The statistical analyses were performed using Mann-Whitney U test and Chi square test. The statistical significance was defined as p < 0.05. Group E showed fewer days for the first fecal passage (p < 0.01), lesser dose of postoperative albumin infusion (p < 0.01), less use of TPN (p < 0.01), and shorter duration of SIRS (p < 0.01). However, there was no significant difference in postoperative complications between the two groups. Early EN started within 3 days after esophagectomy. It is safe and valid for reduction of albumin infusion and TPN, for promoting early recovery of intestinal movement, and for early recovery from systemic inflammation. PMID:24067386

  6. [Cyclic enteral nutrition].

    PubMed

    Hébuterne, X; Rampal, P

    1996-02-10

    Cyclic enteral nutrition consists in continuous infusion of nutrients with a pump over a 12 to 14 hour period at night. Different reports have demonstrated that cyclic enteral nutrition is well tolerated in malnourished ambulatory patients. The incidence of pneumonia by inhalation in this type of patients is less than 2%. Excepting patients with major amputation of the small intestine and important functional consequences, the increased infusion rate required by cyclic enteral nutrition does not diminish digestive tract absorption making the technique as effective as continuous 24-hour infusion. The main advantages of the cyclic infusion are the preservation of physiological balance between fasting and feeding, improved physical activity during the day with its beneficial effect on protein-energy metabolism, compatibility with oral nutrition during the day in nutrition reeducation programs, and the psychological impact in patients who are free to move about, further improving tolerance. Finally, cyclic enteral nutrition is adapted to enteral nutrition programs conducted in the patient's homes. PMID:8729381

  7. Effects of early enteral nutrition on immune function of severe acute pancreatitis patients

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jia-Kui; Mu, Xin-Wei; Li, Wei-Qin; Tong, Zhi-Hui; Li, Jing; Zheng, Shu-Yun

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of early enteral nutrition (EEN) on the immune function and clinical outcome of patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). METHODS: Patients were randomly allocated to receive EEN or delayed enteral nutrition (DEN). Enteral nutrition was started within 48 h after admission in EEN group, whereas from the 8th day in DEN group. All the immunologic parameters and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were collected on days 1, 3, 7 and 14 after admission. The clinical outcome variables were also recorded. RESULTS: Sixty SAP patients were enrolled to this study. The CD4+ T-lymphocyte percentage, CD4+/CD8+ ratio, and the CRP levels in EEN group became significantly lower than in DEN group from the 7th day after admission. In contrast, the immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels and human leukocyte antigen-DR expression in EEN group became significantly higher than in DEN group from the 7th day after admission. No difference of CD8+ T-lymphocyte percentage, IgM and IgA levels was found between the two groups. The incidences of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, systemic inflammatory response syndrome, and pancreatic infection as well as the duration of intensive care unit stay were significantly lower in EEN group than in DEN group. However, there was no difference of hospital mortality between the two groups. CONCLUSION: EEN moderates the excessive immune response during the early stage of SAP without leading to subsequent immunosuppression. EEN can improve the clinical outcome, but not decrease the hospital mortality of SAP patients. PMID:23431120

  8. [Enteral nutrition: past and future].

    PubMed

    Bengmark, S; Ortiz de Urbina, J J

    2004-01-01

    Perioperative nutrition has during the last century been transformed from a tool to provide calorie and nitrogen support to a tool to boost the immune system and increase resistance to complications. Despite all progress in medicine and surgery has perioperative morbidity, rate of infections, thrombosis and development of serosal adhesions remained the same as long as can be judged or at least during the last eighty years. Most prone to develop complications are persons above the age of 65 and persons with depressed immunity. About eighty percent of the immune system is localised in the gastrointestinal tract, which offers great opportunities for modulation through enterar nutrition. As the stomach has a tendency to develop postoperative paralysis, tube feeding is often necessary. Andresen demonstrated already in 1918 the advantages of enteral nutrition, which starts already on the table. Mulholland et al and Rhoads and co-workers demonstrated during the 1940s certain advantages of enteral tube feeding. Also works by Alexander, Fischer, Ryan and their co-workers supported the value of early enteral feeding, and suggested enteral feeding as an effective tool to boost the immune system. It was, however, works published in the early nineties by Moore et al and by Kudsk et al, which made surgeons more aware of the advantages of early enteral nutrition. Major surgery is known to have a high rate of complications. Uninterrupted perioperative nutrition, eg nutrition during the night before, during surgery and immediately after offers a strong tool to prevent complications. It is essential that the nutrition provides food also for the colon, e.g. fibres and healthy bacteria (probiotics) to ferment the fibre and boost the immune system. PMID:15049413

  9. Early enteral nutrition compared with parenteral nutrition for esophageal cancer patients after esophagectomy: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Peng, J; Cai, J; Niu, Z-X; Chen, L-Q

    2016-05-01

    Early postoperative enteral nutrition (EN) after esophagectomy in esophageal cancer patient has been reported to be correlated with a better rehabilitation than parenteral nutrition (PN). However, a robust conclusion has not been achieved. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to compare the postoperative EN and PN in patients with esophageal cancer undergoing esophagectomy. Three electronic databases were searched for eligible studies to be included in the meta-analysis. The summary relative risk/weighted mean difference (RR/WMD) estimates and corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated using fixed- and random-effects models. Ten studies met the inclusion criteria. The analysis demonstrated that the early postoperative EN could significantly decrease the pulmonary complications (RR = 0.37, 95% CI = 0.22-0.62, P = 0.00, test for heterogeneity: I(2) = 0.0%, P = 0.89) and anastomotic leakage (RR = 0.46, 95% CI = 0.22-0.96, P = 0.04, test for heterogeneity: I(2) = 0.0%, P = 0.66) compared with PN. On the eighth postoperative day, the EN group had a higher levels of albumin (WMD = 1.84, 95% CI = 0.47-3.21, P = 0.01, test for heterogeneity: I(2) = 84.5%, P = 0.00) and prealbumin (WMD = 12.96, 95% CI = 3.63-22.29, P = 0.01, test for heterogeneity: I(2) = 0.0%, P = 0.63) compared with the PN group. However, there was no difference in digestive complications between these two approaches (RR = 1.30, 95% CI = 0.79-2.13, P = 0.30, test for heterogeneity: I(2) = 0.0%, P = 0.97). For patients with esophageal cancer following esophagectomy, the early postoperative EN support could decrease the morbidity of severe complications, such as pulmonary complications and anastomotic leakage, and maintain patients at a better nutritional status than parenteral nutrion support. PMID:25721689

  10. Enteral nutrition - child - managing problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000164.htm Enteral nutrition - child - managing problems To use the sharing features ... trouble breathing, call 911. References Mcclave SA. Enteral nutrition. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ...

  11. What Is Enteral Nutrition?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Education Certification Claim CE Credits Clinical Nutrition Week eLearning Center Professional Development Webinars Calendar of Events Guidelines & ... Store Certification Claim CE Credits Clinical Nutrition Week eLearning Center Professional Development Webinars Calendar of Events What ...

  12. Early enteral nutrition for mass burn injury: the revised egg-rich diet.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, T; Hirshowitz, B; Moscona, R; Brook, G J

    1986-04-01

    An aggressive enteral nutritional approach has been employed to support our severely burned patients. The diet is based on a daily intake of 5 eggs/10 kg of body weight, incorporated into milkshakes. Twelve patients with severe burns (age, 24 +/- 4 years; burns, 54 +/- 12 per cent of total body surface area (TBSA] were studied. Enteral feeding was initiated on the day of injury and gradually reached the full formula within 3-7 days. Feeding was carried out either orally or through a nasogastric drip or a combination of both, depending on the patient's condition. Each bottle of milkshake contained 2318 kJ, 29 g protein, 51 g carbohydrate and 28.6 g fat in 250 ml. Each millilitre of the diet contained 9.32 kJ. The protein provided 21 per cent of the total calorie intake, while the fat and carbohydrate provided 42 per cent and 37 per cent respectively. The mean daily intake consisted of protein (5 +/- 1.5 g/kg), carbohydrate (8 +/- 0.75 g/kg) and fat (5 +/- 1 g/kg), providing a daily administration of 378-420 kJ/kg. Plasma lipids remained within normal limits during the 40 days of the diet, while serum protein levels rose to normal levels within the first 3 weeks. PMID:3087586

  13. Early parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients with short-term relative contraindications to early enteral nutrition: a full economic analysis of a multicenter randomized controlled trial based on US costs

    PubMed Central

    Doig, Gordon S; Simpson, Fiona

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The provision of early enteral (gut) nutrition to critically ill patients, started within 24 hours of injury or intensive care unit admission, is accepted to improve health outcomes. However, not all patients are able to receive early enteral nutrition. The purpose of the economic analysis presented here was to estimate the cost implications of providing early parenteral (intravenous) nutrition to critically ill patients with short-term relative contraindications to early enteral nutrition. Materials and methods From the perspective of the US acute care hospital system, a cost-minimization analysis was undertaken based on large-scale Monte Carlo simulation (N = 1,000,000 trials) of a stochastic model developed using clinical outcomes and measures of resource consumption reported in a 1,363-patient multicenter clinical trial combined with cost distributions obtained from the published literature. The mean costs of acute care attributable to each study group (early parenteral nutrition versus pragmatic standard care) and the mean cost difference between groups, along with respective 95% confidence intervals, were obtained using the percentile method. Results and conclusion The use of early parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients with short-term relative contraindications to early enteral nutrition may significantly and meaningfully reduce total costs of acute hospital care by US$3,150 per patient (95% confidence interval US$1,314 to US$4,990). These findings were robust, with all sensitivity analyses demonstrating significant savings attributable to the use of early parenteral nutrition, including sensitivity analysis conducted using European cost data. PMID:23901287

  14. Enteral Nutrition in Critical Care

    PubMed Central

    Seron-Arbeloa, Carlos; Zamora-Elson, Monica; Labarta-Monzon, Lorenzo; Mallor-Bonet, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    There is a consensus that nutritional support, which must be provided to patients in intensive care, influences their clinical outcome. Malnutrition is associated in critically ill patients with impaired immune function and impaired ventilator drive, leading to prolonged ventilator dependence and increased infectious morbidity and mortality. Enteral nutrition is an active therapy that attenuates the metabolic response of the organism to stress and favorably modulates the immune system. It is less expensive than parenteral nutrition and is preferred in most cases because of less severe complications and better patient outcomes, including infections, and hospital cost and length of stay. The aim of this work was to perform a review of the use of enteral nutrition in critically ill patients. PMID:23390469

  15. Impact of early enteral and parenteral nutrition on prealbumin and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein after gastric surgery.

    PubMed

    Li, B; Liu, H-Y; Guo, S-H; Sun, P; Gong, F-M; Jia, B-Q

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the impact of early enteral nutrition (EEN) and parenteral nutrition (PN) on prealbumin (PA) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in patients after gastric cancer surgery. Sixty-eight selected patients undergoing gastric cancer surgery were randomly divided into the EEN (N = 34) and PN (N = 34) groups. Body weight (BW), serum albumin (ALB), transferrin (TF), PA, hs-CRP, length of hospital stay, cost of postoperative nutritional support, and incidence of complications were compared between groups. On postoperative day 7, the BW, TF, ALB, and PA for both groups were significantly decreased compared with the values obtained on preoperative day 1 (P < 0.01). A significant decrease was observed in TF and PA in the PN group compared with the EEN group (P < 0.01). There was no significant difference in BW and ALB between the two groups (P > 0.05). The hs-CRP level of both groups was significantly higher than on preoperative day 1. There was a significant increase in hs-CRP in the PN group compared with the EEN group (P < 0.01). The anal exhaust time, length of hospital stay, and nutritional support cost were significantly shorter or lower in the EEN group than in the PN group (P < 0.01). There was no significant difference in the incidence of complications between the two groups (P > 0.05). EEN helps regulate the postoperative response of patients after gastric cancer surgery, promotes rehabilitation, and accelerates the recovery of gastrointestinal function. Furthermore, EEN has the advantage of being inexpensive. PMID:26125923

  16. Comparison of early enteral nutrition in severe acute pancreatitis with prebiotic fiber supplementation versus standard enteral solution: A prospective randomized double-blind study

    PubMed Central

    Karakan, Tarkan; Ergun, Meltem; Dogan, Ibrahim; Cindoruk, Mehmet; Unal, Selahattin

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To compare the beneficial effects of early enteral nutrition (EN) with prebiotic fiber supplementation in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (AP). METHODS: Thirty consecutive patients with severe AP, who required stoppage of oral feeding for 48 h, were randomly assigned to nasojejunal EN with or without prebiotics. APACHE II score, Balthazar’s CT score and CRP were assessed daily during the study period. RESULTS: The median duration of hospital stay was shorter in the study group [10 ± 4 (8-14) d vs 15 ± 6 (7-26) d] (P < 0.05). The median value of days in intensive care unit was also similar in both groups [6 ± 2 (5-8) d vs 6 ± 2 (5-7) d]. The median duration of EN was 8 ± 4 (6-12) d vs 10 ± 4 (6-13) d in the study and control groups, respectively (P > 0.05). Deaths occurred in 6 patients (20%), 2 in the study group and 4 in the control group. The mean duration of APACHE II normalization (APACHE II score < 8) was shorter in the study group than in the control group (4 ± 2 d vs 6.5 ± 3 d, P < 0.05). The mean duration of CRP normalization was also shorter in the study group than in the control group (7 ± 2 d vs 10 ± 3 d, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Nasojejunal EN with prebiotic fiber supplementation in severe AP improves hospital stay, duration nutrition therapy, acute phase response and overall complications compared to standard EN therapy. PMID:17569144

  17. Effects of early enteral nutrition on the gastrointestinal motility and intestinal mucosal barrier of patients with burn-induced invasive fungal infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Gu, Fang; Wang, Fengxian; Zhang, Yuanda

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of early enteral nutrition on the gastrointestinal motility and intestinal mucosal barrier of patients with burn-induced invasive fungal infection. Methods: A total of 120 patients with burn-induced invasive fungal infection were randomly divided into an early enteral nutrition (EN) group and a parenteral nutrition (PN) group (n=60). The patients were given nutritional support intervention for 14 days, and the expression levels of serum transferrin, albumin, total protein, endotoxin, D-lactic acid and inflammatory cytokines were detected on the 1st, 7th and 14th days respectively. Results: As the treatment progressed, the levels of serum transferrin, albumin and total protein of the EN group were significantly higher than those of the PN group (P<0.05), while the levels of serum endotoxin and D-lactic acid of the form group were significantly lower (P<0.05). After treatment, the expression levels of IL-6 and TNF-α were decreased in the EN group, which were significantly different from those of the PN group (P<0.05). During treatment, the incidence rates of complications such as abdominal distension, diarrhea, sepsis, nausea, vomiting and gastric retention were similar. The mean healing time of wound surface was 9.34±0.78 days in the EN group and 12.46±2.19 days in the PN group, i.e. such time of the former was significantly shorter than that of the latter (P<0.05). Conclusion: Treating patients having burn-induced invasive fungal infection by early enteral nutrition support with arginine can safely alleviate malnutrition and stress reaction, strengthen cellular immune function and promote wound healing, thereby facilitating the recovery of gastrointestinal motility and the function of intestinal mucosal barrier. PMID:27375697

  18. Enteral nutrition and immune modulation of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hegazi, Refaat A; DeWitt, Tiffany

    2014-11-21

    Enteral nutrition has been strongly recommended by major scientific societies for the nutritional management of patients with acute pancreatitis. Providing severe acute pancreatitis patients with enteral nutrition within the first 24-48 h of hospital admission can help improve outcomes compared to parenteral nutrition and no feeding. New research is focusing in on when and what to feed to best improve outcomes for acute pancreatitis patients. Early enteral nutrition have the potential to modulate the immune responses. Despite this consistent evidence of early enteral nutrition in patients with acute pancreatitis, clinical practice continues to vary due to individual clinician preference. Achieving the immune modulating effects of enteral nutrition heavily depend on proper placement of the feeding tube and managing any tube feeding associated complications. The current article reviews the immune modulating effects of enteral nutrition and pro- and prebiotics and suggests some practical tools that help improve the patient adherence and tolerance to the tube feeding. Proper selection of the type of the tube, close monitoring of the tube for its placement, patency and securing its proper placement and routine checking the gastric residual volume could all help improve the outcome. Using peptide-based and high medium chain triglycerides feeding formulas help improving feeding tolerance. PMID:25473161

  19. Enteral nutrition in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed Central

    Gassull, M A; Abad, A; Cabré, E; González-Huix, F; Giné, J J; Dolz, C

    1986-01-01

    To assess the effect of the addition of enteral tube feeding with polymeric diets to the standard treatment of acute attacks of inflammatory bowel disease a total of 43 patients admitted to hospital (23 with Crohn's disease and 20 with ulcerative colitis) were studied retrospectively. Total enteral nutrition was given to 26 as the sole nutritional supply and to 17 in conjunction with a normal ward diet, when appropriate, according to the severity of attack (control group). Nutritional state was assessed and classified in all patients at admission and at the end of the study, by measuring the triceps skinfold thickness, mid arm muscle circumference, and serum albumin concentration as representative of body fat, muscle protein, and visceral protein, respectively. At admission the three nutritional variables were not statistically different between the groups. There was a significantly positive effect on mid arm muscle circumference in patients on total enteral nutrition compared with the control group, but there was no effect on either triceps skinfold thickness or serum albumin concentration. The percentage of subjects requiring intravenous albumin infusion, however, was significantly less in the group fed enterally than in the control group. In addition, fewer patients in the group fed enterally required surgical treatment compared with the control group, despite the fact that one of the criteria for starting enteral nutritional support was the expectancy that surgery would be needed. Total enteral nutrition was well tolerated and no major side effects arose during its use in patients with acute exacerbations of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:3098646

  20. Enteral nutrition in dementia: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Brooke, Joanne; Ojo, Omorogieva

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate the role of enteral nutrition in dementia. The prevalence of dementia is predicted to rise worldwide partly due to an aging population. People with dementia may experience both cognitive and physical complications that impact on their nutritional intake. Malnutrition and weight loss in dementia correlates with cognitive decline and the progress of the disease. An intervention for long term eating difficulties is the provision of enteral nutrition through a Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy tube to improve both nutritional parameters and quality of life. Enteral nutrition in dementia has traditionally been discouraged, although further understanding of physical, nutritional and quality of life outcomes are required. The following electronic databases were searched: EBSCO Host, MEDLINE, PubMed, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and Google Scholar for publications from 1st January 2008 and up to and including 1st January 2014. Inclusion criteria included the following outcomes: mortality, aspiration pneumonia, pressure sores, nutritional parameters and quality of life. Each study included separate analysis for patients with a diagnosis of dementia and/or neurological disease. Retrospective and prospective observational studies were included. No differences in mortality were found for patients with dementia, without dementia or other neurological disorders. Risk factors for poor survival included decreased or decreasing serum albumin levels, increasing age or over 80 years and male gender. Evidence regarding pneumonia was limited, although did not impact on mortality. No studies explored pressure sores or quality of life. PMID:25854831

  1. Enteral Nutrition in Dementia: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Brooke, Joanne; Ojo, Omorogieva

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate the role of enteral nutrition in dementia. The prevalence of dementia is predicted to rise worldwide partly due to an aging population. People with dementia may experience both cognitive and physical complications that impact on their nutritional intake. Malnutrition and weight loss in dementia correlates with cognitive decline and the progress of the disease. An intervention for long term eating difficulties is the provision of enteral nutrition through a Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy tube to improve both nutritional parameters and quality of life. Enteral nutrition in dementia has traditionally been discouraged, although further understanding of physical, nutritional and quality of life outcomes are required. The following electronic databases were searched: EBSCO Host, MEDLINE, PubMed, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and Google Scholar for publications from 1st January 2008 and up to and including 1st January 2014. Inclusion criteria included the following outcomes: mortality, aspiration pneumonia, pressure sores, nutritional parameters and quality of life. Each study included separate analysis for patients with a diagnosis of dementia and/or neurological disease. Retrospective and prospective observational studies were included. No differences in mortality were found for patients with dementia, without dementia or other neurological disorders. Risk factors for poor survival included decreased or decreasing serum albumin levels, increasing age or over 80 years and male gender. Evidence regarding pneumonia was limited, although did not impact on mortality. No studies explored pressure sores or quality of life. PMID:25854831

  2. Influence of postoperative enteral nutrition on postsurgical infections.

    PubMed Central

    Beier-Holgersen, R; Boesby, S

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that early enteral nutrition might reduce the incidence of serious complications after major abdominal surgery. METHODS: In a randomised double blind prospective trial 30 patients received Nutri-drink and 30 patients received placebo through a nasoduodenal feeding tube. On the day of operation the patients were given median 600 ml of either nutrition or placebo, 60 ml per hour. On the first postoperative day the patients received either 1000 ml (median) of nutrition or placebo, on day 2 1200 ml (median) nutrition, 1400 ml placebo, on day 3 1000 ml (median) nutrition, 1150 ml placebo, and on day 4 1000 ml (median) nutrition, 800 ml placebo. All patients were followed up for 30 days by the same investigator. RESULTS: The two groups were similar with regard to nutritional status and type of operation. The rate of postoperative infectious complications was significantly lower in the nutrition group, two of 30 compared with 14 of 30 in the placebo group (p = 0.0009). CONCLUSION: Early enteral nutrition given to patients after major abdominal surgery results in an important reduction in infectious complications. PMID:9038665

  3. [Endoscopic and surgical procedures for enteral nutrition].

    PubMed

    Wallstabe, I; Tiedemann, A; Schiefke, I; Weimann, A

    2013-07-01

    Standardized management of oncology patients necessarily includes screening for nutritional risk. Weight loss of > 5 kg within 3 months and diminished food intake are warning signals even in overweight patients. In case oral nutrition is neither adequate nor feasible even by fortification or oral nutritional supplements, the implantation of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) or fine needle catheter jejunostomy (FNCJ) offers enteral access for long-term nutritional support. Although the indications derive from fulfilling caloric needs, endoscopic or operative measures are not considered to be an urgent or even emergency measure. The endoscopist or surgeon should be fully aware and informed of the indications and make a personal assessment of the situation. The implantation of a feeding tube requires informed consent of the patient or legal surrogates. The review summarizes recent indications, technical problems and complications. PMID:23719727

  4. Clinical and nutritional implications of radiation enteritis

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, W.H.; Fan, A.; Halsted, C.H.

    1985-01-01

    The clinical and nutritional significance of radiation enteritis was assessed in eight patients with chronic diarrhea which followed curative doses of radiotherapy for pelvic malignancies. Steatorrhea, found in seven malnourished patients, was ascribed to ileal disease or previous surgery, or to bacterial contamination of the small intestine. Lactose intolerance, assessed by breath hydrogen excretion after oral lactose and by jejunal lactase levels, was found in six patients. In a subgroup of five patients, the administration of two different defined formula liquid diets by nasoduodenal infusion decreased fecal fluid and energy losses by about one-half. Compared to Vivonex-HN, the infusion of Criticare-HN was associated with greater likelihood of intestinal gas production but a three-fold greater utilization of protein. Intestinal malabsorption and malnutrition in radiation enteritis has diverse etiologies. Whereas nutritional support by liquid diet limits fecal fluid and energy losses, these diets differ significantly in clinical tolerance and biologic value.

  5. Clinical and nutritional implications of radiation enteritis.

    PubMed

    Beer, W H; Fan, A; Halsted, C H

    1985-01-01

    The clinical and nutritional significance of radiation enteritis was assessed in eight patients with chronic diarrhea which followed curative doses of radiotherapy for pelvic malignancies. Steatorrhea, found in seven malnourished patients, was ascribed to ileal disease or previous surgery, or to bacterial contamination of the small intestine. Lactose intolerance, assessed by breath hydrogen excretion after oral lactose and by jejunal lactase levels, was found in six patients. In a subgroup of five patients, the administration of two different defined formula liquid diets by nasoduodenal infusion decreased fecal fluid and energy losses by about one-half. Compared to Vivonex-HN, the infusion of Criticare-HN was associated with greater likelihood of intestinal gas production but a three-fold greater utilization of protein. Intestinal malabsorption and malnutrition in radiation enteritis has diverse etiologies. Whereas nutritional support by liquid diet limits fecal fluid and energy losses, these diets differ significantly in clinical tolerance and biologic value. PMID:3917601

  6. Maintaining adequate hydration and nutrition in adult enteral tube feeding.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Sasha

    2015-01-01

    Predicting the nutritional and fluid requirements of enterally-fed patients can be challenging and the practicalities of ensuring adequate delivery must be taken into consideration. Patients who are enterally fed can be more reliant on clinicians, family members and carers to meet their nutrition and hydration needs and identify any deficiencies, excesses or problems with delivery. Estimating a patient's requirements can be challenging due to the limitations of using predictive equations in the clinical setting. Close monitoring by all those involved in the patient's care, as well as regular review by a dietitian, is therefore required to balance the delivery of adequate feed and fluids to meet each patient's individual needs and prevent the complications of malnutrition and dehydration. Increasing the awareness of the signs of malnutrition and dehydration in patients receiving enteral tube feeding among those involved in a patient's care will help any deficiencies to be detected early on and rectified before complications occur. PMID:26087203

  7. A multicentre, randomised controlled trial comparing the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of early nutritional support via the parenteral versus the enteral route in critically ill patients (CALORIES).

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Sheila E; Parrott, Francesca; Harrison, David A; Sadique, M Zia; Grieve, Richard D; Canter, Ruth R; McLennan, Blair Kp; Tan, Jermaine Ck; Bear, Danielle E; Segaran, Ella; Beale, Richard; Bellingan, Geoff; Leonard, Richard; Mythen, Michael G; Rowan, Kathryn M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Malnutrition is a common problem in critically ill patients in UK NHS critical care units. Early nutritional support is therefore recommended to address deficiencies in nutritional state and related disorders in metabolism. However, evidence is conflicting regarding the optimum route (parenteral or enteral) of delivery. OBJECTIVES To estimate the effect of early nutritional support via the parenteral route compared with the enteral route on mortality at 30 days and on incremental cost-effectiveness at 1 year. Secondary objectives were to compare the route of early nutritional support on duration of organ support; infectious and non-infectious complications; critical care unit and acute hospital length of stay; all-cause mortality at critical care unit and acute hospital discharge, at 90 days and 1 year; survival to 90 days and 1 year; nutritional and health-related quality of life, resource use and costs at 90 days and 1 year; and estimated lifetime incremental cost-effectiveness. DESIGN A pragmatic, open, multicentre, parallel-group randomised controlled trial with an integrated economic evaluation. SETTING Adult general critical care units in 33 NHS hospitals in England. PARTICIPANTS 2400 eligible patients. INTERVENTIONS Five days of early nutritional support delivered via the parenteral (n = 1200) and enteral (n = 1200) route. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES All-cause mortality at 30 days after randomisation and incremental net benefit (INB) (at £20,000 per quality-adjusted life-year) at 1 year. RESULTS By 30 days, 393 of 1188 (33.1%) patients assigned to receive early nutritional support via the parenteral route and 409 of 1195 (34.2%) assigned to the enteral route had died [p = 0.57; absolute risk reduction 1.15%, 95% confidence interval (CI) -2.65 to 4.94; relative risk 0.97 (0.86 to 1.08)]. At 1 year, INB for the parenteral route compared with the enteral route was negative at -£1320 (95% CI -£3709 to £1069). The probability that early

  8. Enteral Nutrition in Crohn's Disease: An Underused Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kansal, S.; Wagner, J.; Kirkwood, C. D.; Catto-Smith, A. G.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on the history, efficacy, and putative mechanism of action of enteral nutrition for inflammatory bowel disease in both paediatric and adult patients. It also analyses the reasoning behind the low popularity of exclusive enteral nutrition in clinical practice despite the benefits and safety profile. PMID:24382954

  9. Jordanian Critical Care Nurses' Practices Regarding Enteral Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Hammad, Sawsam Mohammad; Al-Hussami, Mahmoud; Darawad, Muhammad Waleed

    2015-01-01

    In Jordan, there is a gap in literature regarding nurses' practices of enteral nutrition. Thus, the purpose of this study was to assess nurses' practices regarding enteral nutrition of critically ill adult patients. A descriptive, cross-sectional design was used to collect data through self-reported questionnaires and descriptive analyses were used to display the results of the study. The results revealed that some aspects of enteral nutrition practices were consistent with the current best evidences such as initiation time of enteral nutrition and backrest elevation. On the contrary, some aspects showed variations and inconsistency with current best evidences such as the amount of high gastric residual volume and its management. Nurses' practices regarding enteral nutrition were not consistent with international guidelines. This inconsistency can predispose patients to underfeeding. Enhancement of research utilization is highly recommended as well as establishing evidence-based guidelines. PMID:26226022

  10. Innovative Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition Therapy for Intestinal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Le, Hau D.; Fallon, Erica M.; de Meijer, Vincent E.; Malkan, Alpin D.; Puder, Mark; Gura, Kathleen M.

    2010-01-01

    Children with intestinal failure suffer from insufficient intestinal length or function, making them dependent on parenteral nutrition (PN) for growth and survival. PN and its components are associated with many complications ranging from simple electrolyte abnormalities to life-threatening PN-associated liver disease, which is also called intestinal failure-associated liver disease (ILALD). From a nutrition perspective, the ultimate goal is to provide adequate caloric requirements and make the transition from PN to full enteral Nutrition (EN) successful. Upon review of the literature, we have summarized the most effective and innovative PN and EN therapies for this patient population. Antibiotic-coated catheters and antibiotic or ethanol locks can be implemented, as they appear effective in reducing catheter-related infection and thus further reduce the risk of IFALD. Lipid emulsions should be given judiciously. The use of an omega-3 fatty acid-based formulation should be considered in patients who develop IFALD. Trophic feeding is important for intestinal adaptation, and EN should be initiated early to help wean patients from PN. Long term management of children with IF continues to be an emerging field. We have entered uncharted territory as more children survive complications of IF, including IFALD. Careful monitoring and individualized management to ensure maintenance of growth with avoidance of complications are the keys to successful patient outcomes. PMID:20123271

  11. [Enteral Nutritional Support in Gastrointestinal and Liver Diseases].

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Ran

    2015-06-01

    Nutritional support is important because malnutrition is a major contributor to increased morbidity and mortality, decreased quality of life, increased length of hospital stay, and higher healthcare costs. Patients with gastrointestinal disease are at an increased risk of nutritional deterioration due to therapeutic dietary restriction, fasting for the diagnostic tests, loss of appetite due to anorexia or altered nutritional requirement caused by the disease itself. Therefore, it is important that gastroenterologists are aware of the nutritional status of patients and plan a treatment strategy considering patient's nutritional status. Enteral nutrition is preferred to parenteral nutrition as it is more physiologic, has fewer complications, help to prevent mucosal atrophy and maintain gut barrier function, which decrease intestinal bacterial translocation. Hence, enteral nutrition has been considered to be the most effective route for nutritional support. In this article, we will review enteral nutrition (oral nutritional supplements, enteral tube feeding) as a treatment for the patients with gastrointestinal, liver and pancreatic disease at risk of malnutrition. PMID:26087690

  12. Early Childhood Educator's Nutrition Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Christine; And Others

    This nutrition handbook is designed to provide enough information on nutrition and food habits to enable early childhood educators to add a nutrition dimension to children's learning activities. Topics covered are the role of nutrition in growth during the preschool years; nutrients and their functions; selecting a healthy diet; common nutritional…

  13. American Society for Parenteral & Enteral Nutrition

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Continuing Education Certification Claim CE Credits Clinical Nutrition Week eLearning Center Professional Development Webinars Calendar of ... Guidelines Clinical Practice Library Standards Malnutrition Awareness Parenteral ... Resources Practice and Research Toolkits Online Store Research ...

  14. Enteral nutrition in acute pancreatitis: a review of the current evidence.

    PubMed

    Oláh, Attila; Romics, Laszlo

    2014-11-21

    The use of enteral feeding as part of the management of acute pancreatitis dates back almost two decades. This review describes the indications for and limitations of enteral feeding for the treatment of acute pancreatitis using up-to-date evidence-based data. A systematic review was carried out to analyse current data on the use of enteral nutrition in the management of acute pancreatitis. Relevant literature was analysed from the viewpoints of enteral vs parenteral feeding, early vs delayed enteral nutrition, nasogastric vs nasojejunal feeding, and early oral diet and immunonutrition, particularly glutamine and probiotic supplementation. Finally, current applicable guidelines and the effects of these guidelines on clinical practice are discussed. The latest meta-analyses suggest that enteral nutrition significantly reduces the mortality rate of severe acute pancreatitis compared to parenteral feeding. To maintain gut barrier function and prevent early bacterial translocation, enteral feeding should be commenced within the first 24 h of hospital admission. Also, the safety of nasogastric feeding, which eases the administration of enteral nutrients in the clinical setting, is likely equal to nasojejunal feeding. Furthermore, an early low-fat oral diet is potentially beneficial in patients with mild pancreatitis. Despite the initial encouraging results, the current evidence does not support the use of immunoenhanced nutrients or probiotics in patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:25473164

  15. [The participation of hospital pharmacy services in enteral nutrition].

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, F J; Bermejo, T; de Juana, P; Delgado, E; García, D

    1995-01-01

    We present the results of a study done in the departments of hospital pharmacy of our country with the aim of knowing their participation in the use and clinical follow up of patients with enteral nutrition. 293 questionnaires were sent out, and 121 were filled out and returned (41.3%). The responses were classified into three groups, according to the number of hospital beds, considering > or = 1000 (large), 500-1000 (medium), and < or = 500 (small). The data were analyzed by means of a statistical program (R-Sigma Horus). 79% (68) of the small hospitals have a unitary dose drug dispensation system, and the Enteral Nutrition was distributed through this system in 53% (50) of them; only 29% (27) of them have a stock of these preparations on the wards. 93% (14) and 65% (54) of the large and small hospitals respectively, prefer the use of enteral nutrition as opposed to parenteral nutrition. 85% (11) of the large hospitals have protocols for the use of enteral nutrition, this being 62% (10) and 59% (47) in medium and small hospitals. The committees for artificial nutrition are present in 75% of the large hospitals, in addition to which, in 66% of these there is a nutritional support team. A pharmacist from the department of pharmacy participates in both multidisciplinary groups. If it is necessary to manipulate the enteral nutrition preparations, in 30% of the departments of pharmacy of the smaller hospitals, this is centralized, being done by personnel of the department itself; in 59% of them (19) there is a specific area for the elaboration, which is not the case in large hospitals. Drugs are mixed with the enteral nutrition in 25% (1), 12% (1), and 9% (4) of the large, medium and small hospitals respectively. There is great, active participation of the hospital pharmacists in the activities of the multidisciplinary nutritional support systems, although at the present time, the involvement of the departments of pharmacy in the centralization of the manipulation of

  16. Enteral nutrition in the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers in adult critical care patients.

    PubMed

    Cox, Jill; Rasmussen, Louisa

    2014-12-01

    Prevention and healing of pressure ulcers in critically ill patients can be especially challenging because of the patients' burden of illness and degree of physiological compromise. Providing adequate nutrition may help halt the development or worsening of pressure ulcers. Optimization of nutrition can be considered an essential ingredient in prevention and healing of pressure ulcers. Understanding malnutrition in critical care patients, the effect of nutrition on wound healing, and the application of evidence-based nutritional guidelines are important aspects for patients at high risk for pressure ulcers. Appropriate screenings for nutritional status and risk for pressure ulcers, early collaboration with a registered dietician, and administration of appropriate feeding formulations and micronutrient and macronutrient supplementation to promote wound healing are practical solutions to improve the nutritional status of critical care patients. Use of nutritional management and enteral feeding protocols may provide vital elements to augment nutrition and ultimately result in improved clinical outcomes. PMID:25452406

  17. Enteral nutrition intolerance in critically ill septic burn patients.

    PubMed

    Lavrentieva, Athina; Kontakiotis, Theodore; Bitzani, Militsa

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the frequency of enteral feeding intolerance in critically ill septic burn patients, the effect of enteral feeding intolerance on the efficacy of feeding, the correlation between the infection marker (procalcitonin [PCT]) and the nutrition status marker (prealbumin) and the impact of feeding intolerance on the outcome of septic burn patients. From January 2009 to December 2012 the data of all burn patients with the diagnosis of sepsis who were placed on enteral nutrition were analyzed. Septic patients were divided into two groups: group A, septic patients who developed feeding intolerance; group B, septic patients who did not develop feeding intolerance. Demographic and clinical characteristics of patients were analyzed and compared. The diagnosis of sepsis was applied to 29% of all patients. Of these patients 35% developed intolerance to enteral feeding throughout the septic period. A statistically significant increase in mean PCT level and a decrease in prealbumin level was observed during the sepsis period. Group A patients had statistically significant lower mean caloric intake, higher PCT:prealbumin ratio, higher pneumonia incidence, higher Sequential Organ Failure Assessment Maximum Score, a longer duration of mechanical ventilation, and a higher mortality rate in comparison with the septic patients without gastric feeding intolerance. The authors concluded that a high percentage of septic burn patients developed enteral feeding intolerance. Enteral feeding intolerance seems to have a negative impact on the patients' nutritional status, morbidity, and mortality. PMID:24879397

  18. Supplementary enteral nutrition maintains remission in paediatric Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Wilschanski, M; Sherman, P; Pencharz, P; Davis, L; Corey, M; Griffiths, A

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Liquid diets given enterally combined with "bowel rest' are efficacious in the treatment of active Crohn's disease, but rapid recrudescence of gastrointestinal symptoms after resumption of a normal diet is common. AIMS--This study examined whether continuation of enteral nutrition as a nocturnal supplement to an ad libitum daytime intake of a normal diet increased the length of remission of Crohn's disease in children. PATIENTS AND METHODS--Children and adolescents with active Crohn's disease treated successfully with exclusive enteral nutrition were classified retrospectively according to whether they continued supplementary enteral nutrition or not. Time to relapse and linear growth were compared between the two cohorts. RESULTS--Between January 1986 and December 1992, 65 patients aged 7-17 years (mean (SD) 13.6 (2.1) years) (36 males, 29 females) with Crohn's disease in exacerbation were treated for > or = four weeks by bowel rest and nasogastric tube feeding of an oligopeptide or amino acid based formula. At first follow up visit, remission (fall in Paediatric Crohn's Disease Activity Index, PCDAI to < or = 20) was achieved in 47 of 65 (72%) patients. Subsequently, 20 of these 47 (43%) relapsed by six months and 28 of 47 (60%) by 12 months. Patients who continued nasogastric supplementary feeding (n = 28) after resumption of an otherwise normal diet remained well longer than those who discontinued nocturnal supplements completely (n = 19) (p < 0.02). Furthermore, continued use of nasogastric supplements before completion of puberty was associated with improved linear growth. CONCLUSION--After successful treatment of active Crohn's disease by exclusive enteral nutrition, supplementary enteral nutrition without restriction of normal diet is associated with prolongation of remission and improved linear growth in children and adolescents. PMID:8707085

  19. Effect of enteral nutrition on human pancreatic secretions.

    PubMed

    Grant, J P; Davey-McCrae, J; Snyder, P J

    1987-01-01

    The influence on pancreatic secretion of four enteral feeding products was evaluated in a unique patient with an isolated duodenal fistula for whom enteral feeding access was obtained via a gastrostomy with a small Silastic catheter passed through the gastrostomy and through a surgically created gastrojejunostomy. The patient was totally supported by intravenous nutrition during the study. Each enteral feeding solution was administered at full strength at 50 ml/hr for 2 days with a 24-hr collection of pancreatic secretions by the duodenal cutaneous fistula taken on the second day. Infusion of the enteral feeding solutions did not alter volume of fistula drainage. All solutions decreased bicarbonate and amylase secretion but increased lipase and total nitrogen excretion. From this study, it would appear reasonable to administer Vivonex HN and Criticare HN via the jejunum in patients with pancreatic disease, whereas Osmolite would appear less satisfactory, due to its much stronger stimulation of lipase secretion. PMID:3110448

  20. Adequacy of energy and protein balance of enteral nutrition in intensive care: what are the limiting factors?

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Lia Mara Kauchi; Oliveira, Ronaldo Sousa; Caruso, Lucia; Lima, Patricia Azevedo; Damasceno, Nágila Raquel Teixeira; Soriano, Francisco Garcia

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the factors that influence the adequacy of enteral nutritional therapy in an intensive care unit. Methods This prospective observational study was conducted in an intensive care unit between 2010 and 2012. Patients >18 years of age underwent exclusive enteral nutritional therapy for ≥72 hours. The energy and protein requirements were calculated according to the ICU protocols. The data regarding enteral nutrition, the causes of non-compliance, and the biochemical test results were collected daily. Results Ninety-three patients admitted to the intensive care unit were evaluated. Among these patients, 82% underwent early enteral nutritional therapy, and 80% reached the nutritional goal in <36 hours. In addition, 81.6%±15.4% of the enteral nutrition volume was infused, with an adequacy of 82.2%±16.0% for calories, 82.2%±15.9% for proteins, and a mean energy balance of -289.9±277.1kcal/day. A negative correlation of C-reactive protein with the volume infused and the energy and protein balance was observed. In contrast, a positive correlation was found between C-reactive protein and the time required to reach nutritional goals. Extubation was the main cause for interrupting the enteral nutritional therapy (29.9% of the interruption hours), and the patients >60 years of age exhibited a lower percentage of recovery of the oral route compared with the younger patients (p=0.014). Conclusion Early enteral nutritional therapy and the adequacy for both energy and protein of the nutritional volume infused were in accordance with the established guidelines. Possible inadequacies of energy and protein balance appeared to be associated with an acute inflammatory response, which was characterized by elevated C-reactive protein levels. The main cause of interruption of the enteral nutritional therapy was the time spent in extubation. PMID:25028950

  1. [ADMINISTRATION OF ENTERAL NUTRITION. USE OF INFUSION PUMPS].

    PubMed

    Vaz Rodríguez, José Antonio; Díaz Estrella, Ana; González Pérez, María Andalucía; Romero Moreno, Francisco Javier

    2015-09-01

    Enteral nutrition (NE) is a technique of artificial nutrition that enables management by digestive tract of a defined mixture of nutrients and water, by means of probes implanted nasally or by enterostomies (eg: gastrostomy). Whenever the patient present limitations for voluntary oral ingestion or swallowing of the nutrients, and digestive capacity permitted to absorb nutrients, will draw the administration through a tube. Concern for the nutritional status of the patients is a more present reality among health professionals have demonstrated the direct relationship between malnutrition and morbidity and mortality of hospitalized patients. Enteral nutrition has become a useful procedure for the treatment of these patients, reducing their morbidity and mortality. The NE can be administered by infusion by gravity drip (less clinical use) pump and syringe (bolus), taking into account the speed of it, thus avoiding a large number of complications (usually due to too rapid administrations), so the method employed will be adjusted to the needs of each patient, whereas, the tolerance and its risk of aspiration. In this paper we will focus on the NE by infusion pump administration emphasizing the reduction of complications with this methodology against the administration by bolus (syringe). PMID:26738229

  2. [Enteral nutrition in premature newborn infants with sepsis].

    PubMed

    Pawlik, Dorota; Lauterbach, Ryszard

    2008-01-01

    The authors present beneficial effects and possible disadvantages of early enteral feeding of prematurely born infants. Also, the indications for maintaining enteral feeding in patients with sepsis are discussed. Breast milk is known to accelerate the process of maturation of alimentary tract as well as to improve the digestion of food compounds. Additionally, it protects the infant against bacterial translocations from gut to the blood stream and reduces the risk of sepsis in newborns, especially in very low birth weight infants. Finally, the authors formulate preliminary recommendations for enteral feeding of septic newborn infants. PMID:19471066

  3. Early enteral feeding with human milk for VLBW infants.

    PubMed

    De Nisi, G; Berti, M; De Nisi, M; Bertino, E

    2012-01-01

    In a NICU early enteral feeding is usually possible only when the newborn clinical conditions permit it. Because of the frequent need of umbilical/central catheters, they usually start with parenteral feeding and/or with minimal enteral feeding (trophic feeding). This kind of management is even more frequent in VLBWIs, in which the risk of NEC is very high. In this work we describe a model of early enteral exclusive feeding (EEEF) based on the use of banking human milk followed by mother milk. In the Centre of Neonatology of Trento, as in other Centers, the newborns weighing less than 750g or with a GE< 27 weeks, are treated with parenteral nutrition and minimal enteral feeding. The newborn weighing 750-1249g and with GE > 26 weeks define a group in which we find critical neonates, who can not be treated with enteral feeding, and neonates whose clinical conditions permit EEEF. In particular, in a period of 16 years (1994-2009) in Trento, 308 newborns weighing 750-1249 g and GE > than 26 weeks were admitted. The 90,9 % has been treated with prenatal steroids, the 91,9 % was inborn, the 96,1% survived. In the 59,1 % of the cases (175) we gave EEEF. We could continue with a complete EEEF in the 40,2 % of the total (119 cases). The characteristics of these neonates and our centre management, based mainly on early use of banking human milk and mother milk, are detailed described. PMID:23158518

  4. Demographic, epidemiological and nutritional profile of elders using home enteral nutritional therapy in Distrito Federal, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Salomon Zaban, Ana Lúcia Ribeiro; Garbi Novaes, Maria Rita Carvalho

    2009-09-01

    According to statistical projections of the World Health Organization, during the period between 1950 and 2025, the group of elderly in Brazil will have increased 15 times. Chronic-degenerative diseases are the illnesses that most affect the elderly population, directly related to the growing demand for Enteral Nutrition Therapy. The objective of this study was to analyze the demographic, epidemiological and nutritional profile of elderly patients assisted at the public hospitals in the Home Enteral Nutrition Therapy Program, of the State Health Department of Distrito Federal. This is a retroprospective, cross-sectional and analytical study, based on primary data, which enrolled 141 elderly patients who were prescribed home enteral nutrition. The collected variables corresponded to age, gender, clinical diagnosis, enteral route and nutritional status at the beginning of Home Enteral Nutrition Therapy. The association between variables was analyzed through the t-Student and chi-square tests, with a significance level of 0.05 and a Confidence Interval (CI) of 95%. There was a higher number of female patients (53.9%) when compared to male (46.1%), average age 75.82 years old for both groups. The most prevalent diseases were cerebro-vascular accident sequels and cancer (42.6% and 22.7% respectively). It was observed a prevalence of malnutrition equal to 69.7%, independent of age and gender. The most used enteral route was the nasal. Though Brazilian policies concerning assistance to the elderly have advanced during the last few years, the need for public policies for nutritional recovery of such patients persists, to promote a better quality of life for them. PMID:19961057

  5. [Crohn's disease and enteral feeding: comparative nutritional efficacy of elemental and polymeric nutritive mixtures].

    PubMed

    Cosnes, J; Bellanger, J; Gendre, J P; Le Quintrec, Y

    1988-10-01

    The nutritional development with three types of enteral diets during 28 days, was compared in 45 patients with malnutrition presenting an active Crohn's disease. Enteral feeding consisted of a polymeric mixture (Realmentyl) administered in addition to a normal oral diet in 11 patients; the same mixture was administered alone exclusively to 9 patients, and an elemental diet (Vivonex HN) administered exclusively to 25 patients. The total caloric intake reached, in the three groups, the mean values of 60.2, 36.9 and 33.8 kcal/kg of ideal weight/day, respectively. 33 patients also received steroids. At the end of 28 days of enteral diet, the improvement in the weight and the anthropometric measurements (muscle circumference, triceps skinfold) was significantly more marked (gain of 6.5 kg) with the supplemental polymeric mixture than with exclusive enteral diet, polymeric diet (+/- 2.0 kg) or basic (+1.2 kg). Transferrin and albumin plasma levels increased in all 3 groups, but much faster with the exclusive elemental feeding, in spite of a higher urinary urea excretion in these patients. The overall nutritional development was significantly better with supplemental polymeric feeding, and was identical in the two other groups. These results confirm that the supplemental polymeric enteral feeding is more effective, from the nutrition standpoint. With an exclusive enteral feeding, the nutritional result is appreciably the same, whether the mixture consists of polymers or basic elements. PMID:3144938

  6. Enteral nutrition during multimodality therapy in upper gastrointestinal cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Daly, J M; Weintraub, F N; Shou, J; Rosato, E F; Lucia, M

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate long-term enteral nutrition support in postoperative cancer patients. BACKGROUND: Multimodality therapy for surgical patients with upper gastrointestinal malignancies may improve survival, but often results in substantial malnutrition, immunosuppression, and morbidity. The benefits of combined inpatient and outpatient enteral feeding with standard diets or diets supplemented with arginine, RNA + omega-3 fatty acids are unclear. METHODS: Sixty adult patients with esophageal (22), gastric (16), and pancreatic (22) lesions were stratified by disease site and percent usual weight and randomized to receive supplemental or standard diet via jejunostomy beginning on the first postoperative day (goal = 25 kcal/kg/day) until hospital discharge. Patients also were randomized to receive (n = 37) or not receive (n = 23) enteral jejunostomy feedings (1000 kcal/day overnight) for the 12- to 16-week recovery and radiation/chemotherapy periods. Plasma and peripheral white blood cells were obtained for fatty acid levels and PGE2 production measurements. RESULTS: Mean plasma and cellular omega 3/omega 6 fatty acid levels (percent composition) increased significantly (p < 0.05) in the arginine + omega-3 fatty acid group by postoperative day 7 (0.30 vs. 0.13) and (0.29 vs. 0.14) and continued to increase over time. Mean PGE2 production decreased significantly (p < 0.05) from 2760 to 1600 ng/10(6) cells/mL at day 7 in the arginine + omega-3 fatty acid group, whereas no significant change over time was noted in the standard group. Infectious/wound complications occurred in 10% of the supplemented group compared with 43% of the standard group (p < 0.05); mean length of hospital stay was 16 vs. 22 (p < 0.05) days, respectively. Of the patients who received postoperative chemoradiation therapy, only 1 (6%) of the 18 patients randomized to receive tube feeding did not continue, whereas 8 (61%) of the 13 patients not randomized to tube

  7. Development and Evaluation of a Home Enteral Nutrition Team

    PubMed Central

    Dinenage, Sarah; Gower, Morwenna; Van Wyk, Joanna; Blamey, Anne; Ashbolt, Karen; Sutcliffe, Michelle; Green, Sue M.

    2015-01-01

    The organisation of services to support the increasing number of people receiving enteral tube feeding (ETF) at home varies across regions. There is evidence that multi-disciplinary primary care teams focussed on home enteral nutrition (HEN) can provide cost-effective care. This paper describes the development and evaluation of a HEN Team in one UK city. A HEN Team comprising dietetians, nurses and a speech and language therapist was developed with the aim of delivering a quality service for people with gastrostomy tubes living at home. Team objectives were set and an underpinning framework of organisation developed including a care pathway and a schedule of training. Impact on patient outcomes was assessed in a pre-post test evaluation design. Patients and carers reported improved support in managing their ETF. Cost savings were realised through: (1) prevention of hospital admission and related transport for ETF related issues; (2) effective management and reduction of waste of feed and thickener; (3) balloon gastrostomy tube replacement by the HEN Team in the patient’s home, and optimisation of nutritional status. This service evaluation demonstrated that the establishment of a dedicated multi-professional HEN Team focussed on achievement of key objectives improved patient experience and, although calculation of cost savings were estimates, provided evidence of cost-effectiveness. PMID:25751819

  8. Development and evaluation of a home enteral nutrition team.

    PubMed

    Dinenage, Sarah; Gower, Morwenna; Van Wyk, Joanna; Blamey, Anne; Ashbolt, Karen; Sutcliffe, Michelle; Green, Sue M

    2015-03-01

    The organisation of services to support the increasing number of people receiving enteral tube feeding (ETF) at home varies across regions. There is evidence that multi-disciplinary primary care teams focussed on home enteral nutrition (HEN) can provide cost-effective care. This paper describes the development and evaluation of a HEN Team in one UK city. A HEN Team comprising dietetians, nurses and a speech and language therapist was developed with the aim of delivering a quality service for people with gastrostomy tubes living at home. Team objectives were set and an underpinning framework of organisation developed including a care pathway and a schedule of training. Impact on patient outcomes was assessed in a pre-post test evaluation design. Patients and carers reported improved support in managing their ETF. Cost savings were realised through: (1) prevention of hospital admission and related transport for ETF related issues; (2) effective management and reduction of waste of feed and thickener; (3) balloon gastrostomy tube replacement by the HEN Team in the patient's home, and optimisation of nutritional status. This service evaluation demonstrated that the establishment of a dedicated multi-professional HEN Team focussed on achievement of key objectives improved patient experience and, although calculation of cost savings were estimates, provided evidence of cost-effectiveness. PMID:25751819

  9. American Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition Presidential Address: food for thought: it's more than nutrition.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Marion F

    2007-01-01

    Three issues were highlighted in the 30(th) Presidential Address to the society: (1) A.S.P.E.N.'s unique interdisciplinary structure; (2) support of the A.S.P.E.N. Rhoads Research Foundation; and (3) the meaning of food from the perspective of the patient who is receiving life-sustaining home enteral or parenteral nutrition. A.S.P.E.N., founded as a multidisciplinary society in the 1970s has evolved into an interdisciplinary society with an expanded and diverse membership of health care professionals and scientists with overlapping interests in clinical nutrition and metabolism. A.S.P.E.N. envisions an environment in which every patient receives safe, efficacious, and high quality patient care. The society is committed to advancing the science and practice of nutrition support therapy. In support of this direction, the A.S.P.E.N. Rhoads Research Foundation exists to fund research grants, promote evidence-based practice, and foster training and mentorship in nutrition and metabolic research. The scientific advances and technologic innovations that have enabled our profession to provide enteral and parenteral nutrition to patients has caused practitioners to forget that the meaning of food extends beyond nutrient value. Some individuals receiving long term enteral nutrition or home parenteral nutrition have expressed feelings of anger, anxiety, and depression resulting from the inability to eat normally, from losses of independence, and control of body functions. The ritual of eating may be altered when the enteral or intravenous feedings provide nourishment and, for some, the loss of the eating function is a distressing experience, especially given the cultural focus on social gatherings and meals. The emotional meaning attributed to food, and changes in food preferences and eating behaviors, may become a source of conflict for individuals who have substantial dietary restrictions, or for those individuals dependent on enteral or parenteral nutrition therapy. The

  10. The impact of microbial immune enteral nutrition on the patients with acute radiation enteritis in bowel function and immune status.

    PubMed

    Shao, Feng; Xin, Fu-Ze; Yang, Cheng-Gang; Yang, Dao-Gui; Mi, Yue-Tang; Yu, Jun-Xiu; Li, Guo-Yong

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of microbial immune enteral nutrition by microecopharmaceutics and deep sea fish oil and glutamine and Peptisorb on the patients with acute radiation enteritis in bowel function and immune status. From June 2010 to January 2013, 46 acute radiation enteritis patients in Liaocheng People's Hospital were randomized into the microbial immune enteral nutrition group and the control group: 24 patients in treatment group and 22 patients in control group. The immune microbial nutrition was given to the study group, but not to the control group. The concentration of serum albumin and prealbumin and the number of CD3 (+) T cell, CD4 (+) T cell, CD8 (+) T cell, CD4 (+)/CD8 (+) and natural killer cell of the two groups were detected on the 1, 7 and 14 days after treatment. The arm muscle circumference and triceps skinfold thickness (TSF) were recorded, and the tolerance of the two groups for enteral nutrition and intestinal symptoms was collected and then comparing the two indicators and get results. The tolerance of microbial immune enteral nutrition group about abdominal pain, bloating and diarrhea was better than the control group (P values were 0.018, 0.04 and 0.008 after 7 days; P values were 0.018, 0.015 and 0.002 after 14 days); and the cellular immune parameters were better than the control group((△) P = 0.008,([Symbol: see text]) P = 0.039, (☆) P = 0.032); No difference was found in nutrition indicators. To the patients with acute radiation enteritis, microbial immune enteral nutrition could improve the patient's immune status, and the tolerance of enteral nutrition could be better for the bowel function and the patients' rehabilitation. PMID:24366547

  11. Enteral Nutrition for Older Adults in Healthcare Communities.

    PubMed

    Posthauer, Mary Ellen; Dorner, Becky; Friedrich, Elizabeth K

    2014-06-25

    Older adults living in healthcare communities (HCCs) have multiple comorbidities and are at increased risk of malnutrition and unintended weight loss. Aging affects nearly every system as well as body composition and structure, causing physiological changes that can affect nutrition status. A significant percentage (56%) of residents who live in nursing facilities require extensive help to eat and have dental problems such as ill-fitting dentures, missing teeth, and swallowing problems, which can lead to inadequate caloric intake and unintended weight loss. Alzheimer disease or dementia is prevalent in both nursing facilities and in assisted living/residential care communities, where it affects 45% of older adults. In cognitively impaired residents, most tube feeding placements occur in the acute care setting and result in significant use of additional healthcare resources, along with high postinsertion mortality rates within 60 days of insertion. Nursing facilities receiving Medicare or Medicaid funding must abide by state and federal regulations and undergo rigorous surveys while balancing complex decisions related to initial placement of feeding tubes. Healthcare professionals must recognize the importance of establishing nutrition treatment goals that are resident centered and that respect the unique values and personal decisions of the older adult. Informed choice, resident-centered care decisions, and the review of living wills and/or advance directives are essential in the decision-making process. After enteral nutrition is started, healthcare practitioners must carefully review the physician's orders and administer and monitor the resident's tolerance, checking for potential complications. PMID:24964789

  12. Early enteral feeding for burned patients--an effective method which should be encouraged in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Lam, Nguyen Nhu; Tien, Nguyen Gia; Khoa, Chu Manh

    2008-03-01

    A randomized control trial was conducted to investigate impact of early enteral feeding on immune, metabolic aspects and outcomes of 82 severe burned patients admitting to National Institute of Burns, Hanoi, Vietnam from November 2003 to November 2004. Fourty-one patients were in early enteral group and 41 patients were in total parenteral nutrition group. Blood samples were collected at admission and 7th day postburn to determine plasma level of IgG, IgM, insulin, corrtisol and blood absolute number of TCD4, TCD8. Intestinal chyme was drawn through a weighted feeding tube to determine intestinal secreted IgA. Results showed that, at the 7th day after burn, both humoral and cellular immunology recovered faster in enteral nutrition group as compared to total parenteral group (p<0.05). In the early enteral nutrition group, after 1 week, plasma concentration of cortisol decreased from 599.70 to 437nmol/l and that of insulin increased from 12.07 to 30.34micromol/ml. Vice versa, in the control group the change was in the reverse direction (p<0.01). Overall complication decreased in the enteral nutrition group in comparison with parenteral group. Finally, mortality was significantly lower in early enteral nutrition group as compared to the parenteral group (14.65% and 36.58%, respectively). In conclusion, early enteral nutrition after burn has positive effects on immune and metabolic function, and reduces complication as well as death rate. PMID:17804169

  13. Oesophageal bezoar as a complication of enteral nutrition in critically ill patients. Two case studies.

    PubMed

    Gil-Almagro, Fernanda; Carmona-Monge, Francisco Javier

    2016-02-01

    Enteral nutrition has a relatively low incidence of major complications. The most common complications are mechanical problems, bronchoaspiration and diarrhoea. A rare complication associated with the use of enteral nutrition is oesophageal bezoar. A bezoar is a body of undigested and partially digested matter in the gastrointestinal tract. The main risks factors are gastric motility dysfunction and the use of opiates or sucralfate. The aim of this paper was to present two cases of oesophageal obstruction resulting from the formation of bezoars due to enteral nutrition. Both patients experienced prolonged stays in the intensive care unit and were receiving enteral nutrition, and both cases involved an obstruction of the nasogastric tube and the regurgitation of solid chunks of enteral nutrition through the mouth and the nose. Impactions of solidified enteral nutrition in the distal parts of the oesophagus were confirmed with gastroscopies. Enzymatic complexes containing papain, cellulose, pancreatin, pepsin and diastase were used to successfully dissolve the bezoars in both cases. PMID:26531231

  14. Management of Hyperglycemia and Enteral Nutrition in the Hospitalized Patient.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Patricia; Kwiatkowski, Cynthia Ann; Wien, Michelle

    2015-10-01

    There has been increased attention on the importance of identifying and distinguishing the differences between stress-induced hyperglycemia (SH), newly diagnosed hyperglycemia (NDH), and hyperglycemia in persons with established diabetes mellitus (DM). Inpatient blood glucose control is now being recognized as not only a cost issue for hospitals but also a concern for patient safety and care. The reasons for the increased incidence of hyperglycemia in hospitalized patients include preexisting DM, undiagnosed DM or prediabetes, SH, and medication-induced hyperglycemia with resulting transient blood glucose variability. It is clear that identifying and documenting hyperglycemia in hospitalized patients with and without a previous diagnosis of DM and initiating prompt insulin treatment are important. Agreement on the optimum treatment goals for hyperglycemia remains quite controversial, and the benefits of intensive glucose management may be lost at the cost of hypoglycemia in intensive care unit patients. Nutrition support in the form of enteral nutrition (EN) increases the risk of hyperglycemia in both critical and non-critically ill hospitalized patients. Reasons for beginning a tube feeding are the same whether a person has NDH or DM. What differs is how to incorporate EN into the established insulin management protocols. The risk for hyperglycemia with the addition of EN is even higher in those without a previous diagnosis of DM. This review discusses the incidence of hyperglycemia, the pathogenesis of hyperglycemia, factors contributing to hyperglycemia in the hospitalized patient, glycemic management goals, current glycemic management recommendations, and considerations for EN formula selection, administration, and treatment. PMID:26084507

  15. Enteral nutrition formula selection: current evidence and implications for practice.

    PubMed

    Brown, Britta; Roehl, Kelly; Betz, Melanie

    2015-02-01

    Many new enteral nutrition (EN) formulas have been created over the past several decades with a variety of intended uses. Although each is intended to promote improved outcomes, research is often unclear and, in many cases, conflicting. It is important to note that EN products are considered medical foods by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and therefore do not have to complete premarket review or approval and are not regulated to the same extent as pharmaceuticals. While standard EN formulas are designed to meet the basic macro- and micronutrient requirements of individuals who cannot meet nutrition needs orally, specialty EN products have been developed to exhibit pharmacologic properties, such as immune-enhancing formulas containing arginine, glutamine, nucleotides, and ω-3 fatty acids. With the vast number of products available, rising costs of healthcare, and the drive toward evidence-based practice, it is imperative that clinicians carefully consider research regarding use of specialty formulas, paying close attention to the quality, patient population, clinical end points, and cost to patient and/or facility. PMID:25516537

  16. Contamination of enteral nutrition systems during prolonged intermittent use.

    PubMed

    Grunow, J E; Christenson, J C; Moutos, D

    1989-01-01

    Two related studies were done to determine the incidence of bacterial contamination in enteral delivery systems that were used for 15 and 7.5 hr, rinsed after each use, and reused daily in vitro for 7 and 5 days, respectively. In the first study, systems infusing either a premixed formula (Ensure) or a hand-mixed formula (Vivonex) did not show bacterial growth until the 4th day, 1.0-2.0 X 10 colony-forming units per milliliter (CFU/ml) of Staphylococcus epidermidis. Thereafter there was sporadic growth of different organisms but never increasing growth during the 7 days of infusion. In the second study, systems with Ensure were initially contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli and reused for 5 days. S. aureus was eliminated by rinsing, but E. coli persisted in the delivery system at concentrations of 10(3)-10(6) CFU/ml. We conclude that clean enteral nutrition systems can be rinsed after short-infusion periods and reused up to 7 days in vitro without significant contamination; however, once a bag has become heavily contaminated some bacteria cannot be eradicated from the system by rinsing. PMID:2494364

  17. Malnutrition in the Critically Ill Child: The Importance of Enteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Marta Botrán; Cid, Jesús López-Herce

    2011-01-01

    Malnutrition affects 50% of hospitalized children and 25–70% of the critically ill children. It increases the incidence of complications and mortality. Malnutrition is associated with an altered metabolism of certain substrates, increased metabolism and catabolism depending on the severity of the lesion, and reduced nutrient delivery. The objective should be to administer individualized nutrition to the critically ill child and to be able to adjust the nutrition continuously according to the metabolic changes and evolving nutritional status. It would appear reasonable to start enteral nutrition within the first 24 to 48 hours after admission, when oral feeding is not possible. Parenteral nutrition should only be used when enteral nutrition is contraindicated or is not tolerated. Energy delivery must be individually adjusted to energy expenditure (40–65 kcal/100 calories metabolized/day) with a protein delivery of 2.5–3 g/kg/day. Frequent monitoring of nutritional and metabolic parameters should be performed. PMID:22163211

  18. Prescribing practice and evaluation of appropriateness of enteral nutrition in a university teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiu-Ping; Zhu, Ling-Ling; Zhou, Quan

    2013-01-01

    Background A retrospective utilization study was performed to evaluate utilization patterns for enteral nutrition in a university teaching hospital. Methods Enteral nutrition was divided into three types according to the nitrogen source, ie, total protein type [Nutrison Fibre®, Fresubin Energy Fibre®, Fresubin®, Supportan® (a special immunonutrition for cancer patients or patients with increased demands for omega-3 fatty acids), Fresubin Diabetes® (a diabetes-specific formula), Ensure®]; short peptide type (Peptison®); and amino acid type (Vivonex®). A pharmacoeconomic analysis was done based on defined daily dose methodology. Results Among hospitalized patients taking enteral nutrition, 34.8% received enteral nutrition alone, 30% concomitantly received parenteral nutrition, and 35.2% received enteral nutrition after parenteral nutrition. Combined use of the different formulas was observed in almost all hospitalized patients receiving enteral nutrition. In total, 61.5% of patients received triple therapy with Nutrison Fibre, Fresubin Diabetes, and Supportan. Number of defined daily doses (total dose consumed/defined daily dose, also called DDDs) of formulas in descending order were as follows: Nutrison Fibre, Fresubin Energy Fibre, Fresubin Diabetes > Supportan > Peptison, Ensure > Vivonex, Fresubin. The ratio of the cumulative DDDs for the three types of enteral nutrition was 35:2.8:1 (total protein type to short peptide type to amino acid type). Off-label use of Fresubin Diabetes was also observed, with most of this formula being prescribed for patients with stress hyperglycemia. Only 2.1% of cancer patients received Supportan. There were 35 cases of near misses in dispensing look-alike or sound-alike enteral nutrition formulas, and one adverse drug reaction in an elderly malnourished patient who did not receive vitamin K1-enriched enteral nutrition during treatment with cefoperazone. After 4 months of the trial intervention, off-label use of Fresubin

  19. Review of American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN) Clinical Guidelines for Nutrition Support in Cancer Patients: nutrition screening and assessment.

    PubMed

    Huhmann, Maureen B; August, David A

    2008-01-01

    It is clear that cancer patients develop complex nutrition issues. Nutrition support may or may not be indicated in these patients depending on individual patient characteristics. This review article, the first in a series of articles to examine the A.S.P.E.N. Guidelines for the Use of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition in Adult and Pediatric Patients Cancer Guidelines, evaluates the evidence related to the use of nutrition screening and nutrition assessment in cancer patients. This first article will provide background concerning nutrition issues in cancer patients as well as discuss the role of nutrition screening and nutrition assessment in the care of cancer patients. The goal of this review is to enrich the discussion contained in the Clinical Guidelines, cite the primary literature more completely, and suggest updates to the guideline statements in light of subsequent published studies. Future articles will explore the guidelines related to nutrition support in oncology patients receiving anticancer therapies. PMID:18390787

  20. Enteral nutrition associated non-occlusive bowel ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Gwon, Jun-Gyo; Lee, Young-Ju; Kyoung, Kyu-Hyouck; Kim, Young-Hwan

    2012-01-01

    We describe two patients, with no previous history of vascular problems but poor lung function, who experienced septic shock due to bowel ischemia. Both were fed an enteral formula rich in fiber using a feeding tube and experienced septic shock with regular enteral feeding. Surgical finding showed hemorrhagic ischemia in the bowel. The pathologic finding suggests these changes may have been due to inspissations of bowel contents, which may put direct pressure on the mucosa of the bowel wall, leading to local impairment of mucosal and submucosal blood flow with subsequent bowel necrosis. Bowel ischemia may have been precipitated by an increased mesenteric blood flow requirement in combination with a metabolically stressed bowel. Patients in the intensive care unit fed a fiber-rich enteral formula may have inspissated bowel contents, leading to bowel ischemia, suggesting that the use of fiber-rich formula should be limited in patients at high-risk of bowel ischemia. PMID:22977764

  1. Enteral nutrition associated non-occlusive bowel ischemia.

    PubMed

    Gwon, Jun-Gyo; Lee, Young-Ju; Kyoung, Kyu-Hyouck; Kim, Young-Hwan; Hong, Suk-Kyung

    2012-09-01

    We describe two patients, with no previous history of vascular problems but poor lung function, who experienced septic shock due to bowel ischemia. Both were fed an enteral formula rich in fiber using a feeding tube and experienced septic shock with regular enteral feeding. Surgical finding showed hemorrhagic ischemia in the bowel. The pathologic finding suggests these changes may have been due to inspissations of bowel contents, which may put direct pressure on the mucosa of the bowel wall, leading to local impairment of mucosal and submucosal blood flow with subsequent bowel necrosis. Bowel ischemia may have been precipitated by an increased mesenteric blood flow requirement in combination with a metabolically stressed bowel. Patients in the intensive care unit fed a fiber-rich enteral formula may have inspissated bowel contents, leading to bowel ischemia, suggesting that the use of fiber-rich formula should be limited in patients at high-risk of bowel ischemia. PMID:22977764

  2. Gastrointestinal Manifestations, Malnutrition, and Role of Enteral and Parenteral Nutrition in Patients With Scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Bharadwaj, Shishira; Tandon, Parul; Gohel, Tushar; Corrigan, Mandy L; Coughlin, Kathleen L; Shatnawei, Abdullah; Chatterjee, Soumya; Kirby, Donald F

    2015-08-01

    Scleroderma (systemic sclerosis) is an autoimmune disease that can affect multiple organ systems. Gastrointestinal (GI) involvement is the most common organ system involved in scleroderma. Complications of GI involvement including gastroesophageal reflux disease, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, and chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction secondary to extensive fibrosis may lead to nutritional deficiencies in these patients. Here, we discuss pathophysiology, progression of GI manifestations, and malnutrition secondary to scleroderma, and the use of enteral and parenteral nutrition to reverse severe nutritional deficiencies. Increased mortality in patients with concurrent malnutrition in systemic sclerosis, as well as the refractory nature of this malnutrition to pharmacologic therapies compels clinicians to provide novel and more invasive interventions in reversing these nutritional deficiencies. Enteral and parenteral nutrition have important implications for patients who are severely malnourished or have compromised GI function as they are relatively safe and have substantial retrospective evidence of success. Increased awareness of these therapeutic options is important when treating scleroderma-associated malnutrition. PMID:25992813

  3. Effects of early enteral micro-feeding on neonatal serum Vitamin D levels

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Liang; Yin, Xiangdang; Chu, Haifeng; Zheng, Guangli

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of early enteral micro-feeding on neonatal serum vitamin D levels, and to analyze the application value of glutamine. Methods: One hundred ninty neonates enrolled in intensive care unit were randomly divided into a treatment group and a control group (n=95) that were both given enteral and parenteral nutrition support. Meanwhile, the treatment group was fed formula milk containing 0.3 g/(kg·d) glutamine as enteral nutrition support for 14 days. Results: The weight of the treatment group increased significantly faster than that of the control group did (P<0.05). The treatment group had significantly higher milk amount and calorie intake than those of the control group (P<0.05), and neonates in the treatment group who reached calorie intake of 50/80/100 kcal/kg/d were significantly younger (P<0.05). Meanwhile, the treatment group was significantly less prone to feeding intolerance than the control group (P<0.05). After 14 days of feeding, the serum motilin, gastrin and vitamin D levels of both groups all increased, with significant intra-group and inter-group differences. Such levels of the treatment group significantly exceeded those of the control group (P<0.05). Conclusion: Supplementing early enteral micro-feeding with glutamine promoted the absorption of neonatal routine nutrients and vitamin D, obviously regulated gastrointestinal hormones, and elevated weight as a result. PMID:26870119

  4. Early Enteral Feeding After Living Donor Liver Transplantation Prevents Infectious Complications

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Man; Joh, Jae-Won; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Sung-Hye; Rha, Miyong; Sinn, Dong Hyun; Choi, Gyu-Seong; Kwon, Choon Hyuck David; Cho, Young Yun; Suh, Jeong-Meen; Lee, Suk-Koo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Infectious complications, including bacteria, virus, and fungus, often occur after liver transplantation and are the most frequent causes of in-hospital mortality. The current study prospectively analyze the effect of early enteral feeding in patients after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) Between January 2013 and August 2013, 36 patients underwent LDLT. These patients were randomly assigned to receive enteral formula via nasointestinal feeding tubes [enteral feeding (EN) group, n = 17] or maintenance on intravenous fluid until oral diets were initiated (control group, n = 19). All patients completed the study. The pretransplant and perioperative characteristics of patients did not differ between the 2 groups. The incidence of bacterial infection was significantly lower in the EN group (29.4%) than in the control group (63.2%) (P = 0.043). In addition, the incidence of bile duct complications in the EN group was lower than in the control group (5.9% versus 31.6%, P = 0.041). Multivariate analysis showed that early enteral feeding was closely associated with bacterial infections (odds ratio, 0.178; P = 0.041). There was no statistically significant difference in nutritional status between the 2 groups. There were no cases of in-hospital mortality. Early enteral feeding after LDLT prevents posttransplant bacterial infection, suggesting the possibility of a reduction of in-hospital mortality as a result of decreased infectious complications. PMID:26554774

  5. Nutritional support of bone marrow transplant recipients: a prospective, randomized clinical trial comparing total parenteral nutrition to an enteral feeding program.

    PubMed

    Szeluga, D J; Stuart, R K; Brookmeyer, R; Utermohlen, V; Santos, G W

    1987-06-15

    Although standard supportive care for bone marrow transplant (BMT) recipients includes total parenteral nutrition (TPN), it has not been shown that this is the most appropriate method of nutritional support. To determine whether current BMT recipients require TPN during the early recovery period, we conducted a prospective, randomized clinical trial comparing TPN and an individualized enteral feeding program (counseling, high protein snacks and/or tube feeding). Nutritional assessment included measurement of serum proteins, anthropometry, and body composition analysis. For the latter, total body water and extracellular fluid were measured by standard radioisotope dilution techniques and used to quantitate body cell mass and body fat plus extracellular solids (FAT + ECS). In 27 TPN patients, body composition 28 days after BMT, expressed as a percentage of baseline, was body cell mass, 100%, extracellular fluid, 108%, FAT + ECS, 108%, and in 30 enteral feeding program patients, was body cell mass, 93%, extracellular fluid, 104%, and FAT + ECS, 94%. Only the difference in FAT + ECS was statistically significant (p less than 0.01). Compared to the enteral feeding program, TPN was associated with more days of diuretic use, more frequent hyperglycemia, and more frequent catheter removal (prompted by catheter-related complications), but less frequent hypomagnesemia. There were no significant differences in the rate of hematopoietic recovery, length of hospitalization, or survival, but nutrition-related costs were 2.3 times greater in the TPN group. We conclude that TPN is not clearly superior to individualized enteral feeding and recommend that TPN be reserved for BMT patients who demonstrate intolerance to enteral feeding. PMID:3107808

  6. Evaluation of the Role of Enteral Nutrition in Managing Patients with Diabetes: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ojo, Omorogieva; Brooke, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate the role of enteral nutrition in managing patients with diabetes on enteral feed. The prevalence of diabetes is on the increase in the UK and globally partly due to lack of physical activities, poor dietary regimes and genetic susceptibility. The development of diabetes often leads to complications such as stroke, which may require enteral nutritional support. The provision of enteral feeds comes with its complications including hyperglycaemia which if not managed can have profound consequences for the patients in terms of clinical outcomes. Therefore, it is essential to develop strategies for managing patients with diabetes on enteral feed with respect to the type and composition of the feed. This is a systematic review of published peer reviewed articles. EBSCOhost Research, PubMed and SwetsWise databases were searched. Reference lists of identified articles were reviewed. Randomised controlled trials comparing enteral nutrition diabetes specific formulas with standard formulas were included. The studies which compared diabetes specific formulas (DSF) with standard formulas showed that DSF was more effective in controlling glucose profiles including postprandial glucose, HbA1c and insulinemic response. The use of DSF appears to be effective in managing patients with diabetes on enteral feed compared with standard feed. PMID:25412151

  7. Continuous parenteral and enteral nutrition induces metabolic dysfunction in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We previously showed that parenteral nutrition (PN) compared with formula feeding results in hepatic insulin resistance and steatosis in neonatal pigs. The current aim was to test whether the route of feeding (intravenous [IV] vs enteral) rather than other feeding modalities (diet, pattern) had cont...

  8. Supplementing monosodium glutamate to partial enteral nutrition slows gastric emptying in preterm pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emerging evidence suggests that free glutamate may play a functional role in modulating gastroduodenal motor function. We hypothesized that supplementing monosodium glutamate (MSG) to partial enteral nutrition stimulates gastric emptying in preterm pigs. Ten-day-old preterm, parenterally fed pigs re...

  9. Enteral obeticholic acid promotes intestinal growth in total parenteral nutrition fed neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Intestinal atrophy is an adverse outcome associated with prolonged total parenteral nutrition (PN) partly due to disruption of normal enterohepatic circulation of bile acids. Previously we showed that enteral treatment with chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), a dual agonist for the nuclear receptor, farne...

  10. Transition from parenteral to enteral nutrition induces immediate diet-dependent gut histological and immunological responses in preterm neonates.

    PubMed

    Siggers, Jayda; Sangild, Per T; Jensen, Tim K; Siggers, Richard H; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Støy, Ann Cathrine F; Jensen, Bent B; Thymann, Thomas; Bering, Stine B; Boye, Mette

    2011-09-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in preterm infants develops very rapidly from a mild intolerance to enteral feeding into intestinal mucosal hemorrhage, inflammation, and necrosis. We hypothesized that immediate feeding-induced gut responses precede later clinical NEC symptoms in preterm pigs. Fifty-six preterm pigs were fed total parenteral nutrition (TPN) for 48 h followed by enteral feeding for 0, 8, 17, or 34 h with either colostrum (Colos, n = 20) or formula (Form, n = 31). Macroscopic NEC lesions were detected in Form pigs throughout the enteral feeding period (20/31, 65%), whereas most Colos pigs remained protected (1/20, 5%). Just 8 h of formula feeding induced histopathological lesions, as evidenced by capillary stasis and necrosis, epithelial degeneration, edema, and mucosal hemorrhage. These immediate formula-induced changes were paralleled by decreased digestive enzyme activities (lactase and dipeptidylpeptidase IV), increased nutrient fermentation, and altered expression of innate immune defense genes such as interleukins (IL-1α, IL-6, IL-18), nitric oxide synthetase, tight junction proteins (claudins), Toll-like receptors (TLR-4), and TNF-α. In contrast, the first hours of colostrum feeding induced no histopathological lesions, increased maltase activity, and induced changes in gene expressions related to tissue development. Total bacterial density was high after 2 days of parenteral feeding and was not significantly affected by diet (colostrum, formula) or length of enteral feeding (8-34 h), except that a few bacterial groups (Clostridium, Enterococcus, Streptococcus species) increased with time. We conclude that a switch from parenteral to enteral nutrition rapidly induces diet-dependent histopathological, functional, and proinflammatory insults to the immature intestine. Great care is required when introducing enteral feeds to TPN-fed preterm infants, particularly when using formula, because early feeding-induced insults may predispose to NEC

  11. [INFLUENCE TIMING OF THE START OF ENTERAL NUTRITION ON THE IMMEDIATE RESULTS OF SURGICAL TREATMENT OF COLON CANCER].

    PubMed

    Mahmudov, D E

    2015-12-01

    Results of treatment of 215 patients with colon cancer (CC), whom performed at the clinic radical or palliative intervention were analyzed. In 100 patients (control group) enteral nutrition (EN) began after the restoration of the alimentary canal functions; in 115 (main group)--no later than 12 hours after surgery. For the EN in all patients used a balanced liquid mixture "Frezubin" manufactured by Fresenius Kabi GmbH (Germany). It is proved that early EN is a safe and effective method in the program of the accelerated rehabilitation of patients after surgery for CC. PMID:27025022

  12. Postpyloric enteral nutrition in the critically ill child with shock: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    López-Herce, Jesús; Mencía, Santiago; Sánchez, César; Santiago, Maria J; Bustinza, Amaya; Vigil, Dolores

    2008-01-01

    Background Tolerance to enteral nutrition in the critically ill child with shock has not been studied. The purpose of the study was to analyze the characteristics of enteral nutrition and its tolerance in the critically ill child with shock and to compare this with non-shocked patients. Methods A prospective, observational study was performed including critically ill children with shock who received postpyloric enteral nutrition (PEN). The type of nutrition used, its duration, tolerance, and gastrointestinal complications were assessed. The 65 children with shock who received PEN were compared with 461 non-shocked critically ill children who received PEN. Results Sixty-five critically ill children with shock, aged between 21 days and 22 years, received PEN. 75.4% of patients with shock received PEN exclusively. The mean duration of the PEN was 25.2 days and the maximum calorie intake was 79.4 kcal/kg/day. Twenty patients with shock (30.7%) presented gastrointestinal complications, 10 (15.4%) abdominal distension and/or excessive gastric residue, 13 (20%) diarrhoea, 1 necrotising enterocolitis, and 1 duodenal perforation due to the postpyloric tube. The frequency of gastrointestinal complications was significantly higher than in the other 461 critically ill children (9.1%). PEN was suspended due to gastrointestinal complications in 6 patients with shock (9.2%). There were 18 deaths among the patients with shock and PEN (27.7%). In only one patient was the death related to complications of the nutrition. Conclusion Although most critically ill children with shock can tolerate postpyloric enteral nutrition, the incidence of gastrointestinal complications is higher in this group of patients than in other critically ill children. PMID:18237381

  13. Enteritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... with suspected enteric infection. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ... with diarrhea and malabsorption. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  14. [Cholestatic icterus during parenteral nutrition and the therapeutic effect of enteral feeding--case report].

    PubMed

    Havel, E; Sobotka, L; Bedrna, J; Hladík, P; Manák, J; Bláha, V; Adámek, P; Vyroubal, P; Zadák, Z

    2003-08-01

    An acute operation was made on a 56-year woman for inflammatory perforation of colon. A series of repeated operations followed due to relapsing iatrogenic intestinal fistula and peritonitis. From the day 70 the patient was treated at the Intensive Metabolic Care Unit of the Gerontological and Metabolic Clinic of Faculty Hospital in Hradec Králové. Having cured the septic shock the authors prepared the patient to a reconstruction operation on alimentary tract by administering parenteral nutrition, treating the wounds and by motion rehabilitation. From day 150 on the patient was treated with low doses of enteral nutrition into the segment of intestine between the fistulas, in connection with the subsequent decrease of two-month lasting hyperbilirubinemia of 200-260 mumol/l. A successful reconstruction of the alimentary tract was performed on the day 205 of the treatment with the time lapse of 146 days after the last surgical intervention. A three-fold anastomosis on small intestine and a resection of the fistula on the transversal colon was made. The post-operation fistula was healed-up conservatively, while the parenteral nutrition continued, as verified on day 246 by enteroclysis. The paper draws attention to the importance of conservative metabolic care in the therapy of dishiscences of intestinal anastomoses not treated by acute surgery in time. A favourable additive effect of enteral nutrition on the persisting cholestasis during parenteral nutrition is discussed. PMID:14518096

  15. Enteral nutrient supply for preterm infants: commentary from the European Society of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition Committee on Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Agostoni, C; Buonocore, G; Carnielli, V P; De Curtis, M; Darmaun, D; Decsi, T; Domellöf, M; Embleton, N D; Fusch, C; Genzel-Boroviczeny, O; Goulet, O; Kalhan, S C; Kolacek, S; Koletzko, B; Lapillonne, A; Mihatsch, W; Moreno, L; Neu, J; Poindexter, B; Puntis, J; Putet, G; Rigo, J; Riskin, A; Salle, B; Sauer, P; Shamir, R; Szajewska, H; Thureen, P; Turck, D; van Goudoever, J B; Ziegler, E E

    2010-01-01

    The number of surviving children born prematurely has increased substantially during the last 2 decades. The major goal of enteral nutrient supply to these infants is to achieve growth similar to foetal growth coupled with satisfactory functional development. The accumulation of knowledge since the previous guideline on nutrition of preterm infants from the Committee on Nutrition of the European Society of Paediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition in 1987 has made a new guideline necessary. Thus, an ad hoc expert panel was convened by the Committee on Nutrition of the European Society of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition in 2007 to make appropriate recommendations. The present guideline, of which the major recommendations are summarised here (for the full report, see http://links.lww.com/A1480), is consistent with, but not identical to, recent guidelines from the Life Sciences Research Office of the American Society for Nutritional Sciences published in 2002 and recommendations from the handbook Nutrition of the Preterm Infant. Scientific Basis and Practical Guidelines, 2nd ed, edited by Tsang et al, and published in 2005. The preferred food for premature infants is fortified human milk from the infant's own mother, or, alternatively, formula designed for premature infants. This guideline aims to provide proposed advisable ranges for nutrient intakes for stable-growing preterm infants up to a weight of approximately 1800 g, because most data are available for these infants. These recommendations are based on a considered review of available scientific reports on the subject, and on expert consensus for which the available scientific data are considered inadequate. PMID:19881390

  16. Immunonutrition – the influence of early postoperative glutamine supplementation in enteral/parenteral nutrition on immune response, wound healing and length of hospital stay in multiple trauma patients and patients after extensive surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Kai J.; Schallert, Reiner; Daniel, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In the postoperative phase, the prognosis of multiple trauma patients with severe brain injuries as well as of patients with extensive head and neck surgery mainly depends on protein metabolism and the prevention of septic complications. Wound healing problems can also result in markedly longer stays in the intensive care unit and general wards. As a result, the immunostimulation of patients in the postoperative phase is expected to improve their immunological and overall health. Patients and methods: A study involving 15 patients with extensive ENT tumour surgery and 7 multiple-trauma patients investigated the effect of enteral glutamine supplementation on immune induction, wound healing and length of hospital stay. Half of the patients received a glutamine-supplemented diet. The control group received an isocaloric, isonitrogenous diet. Results: In summary, we found that total lymphocyte counts, the percentage of activated CD4+DR+ T helper lymphocytes, the in-vitro response of lymphocytes to mitogens, as well as IL-2 plasma levels normalised faster in patients who received glutamine-supplemented diets than in patients who received isocaloric, isonitrogenous diets and that these parameters were even above normal by the end of the second postoperative week. Summary: We believe that providing critically ill patients with a demand-oriented immunostimulating diet is fully justified as it reduces septic complications, accelerates wound healing, and shortens the length of ICU (intensive care unit) and general ward stays. PMID:26734536

  17. Nutritional status of refugee children entering DeKalb County, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ankoor Y; Suchdev, Parminder S; Mitchell, Tarissa; Shetty, Sharmila; Warner, Catherine; Oladele, Alawode; Reines, Susan

    2014-10-01

    This study determines the nutritional status among refugee children entering one of the largest resettlement counties in the United States and identifies differences between incoming populations. Medical records of all newly arriving pediatric refugees (0-18 years) entering DeKalb County, Georgia between October 2010 and July 2011 were reviewed. Refugee children were grouped as African, Bhutanese, or Burmese (resettling from either Thailand or Malaysia) for comparative analysis. Approximately one in five refugees were anemic or malnourished, while a quarter had stool parasites, and nearly half had dental caries. African refugees had the highest anemia but the lowest underweight prevalence (p < 0.05). Compared to Burmese resettling from Malaysia, Burmese children from Thailand had a higher prevalence of anemia, underweight, and stool parasites (p < 0.05). Clinicians should use CDC medical screening guidelines for newly arriving pediatric refugees, as well as ensure proper nutritional support and follow-up care. PMID:23828627

  18. Early Post Operative Enteral Versus Parenteral Feeding after Esophageal Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rajabi Mashhadi, Mohammad Taghi; Bagheri, Reza; Ghayour-Mobarhan, Majid; Zilaee, Marzie; Rezaei, Reza; Maddah, Ghodratollah; Majidi, Mohamad Reza; Bahadornia, Mojgan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The incidence of malnutrition in hospitalized patients is reported to be high. In particular, patients with esophageal cancer are prone to malnutrition, due to preoperative digestive system dysfunctions and short-term non-oral feeding postoperatively. Selection of an appropriate method for feeding in the postoperative period is important in these patients. Materials and Methods: In this randomized clinical trial, 40 patients with esophageal cancer who had undergone esophagectomy between September 2008 and October 2009 were randomly assigned into either enteral feeding or parenteral feeding groups, with the same calorie intake in each group. The level of serum total protein, albumin, prealbumin, transferrin, C3, C4 and hs-C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), as well as the rate of surgical complications, restoration of bowel movements and cost was assessed in each group. Results: Our results showed that there was no significant difference between the groups in terms of serum albumin, prealbumin or transferrin. However, C3 and C4 levels were significantly higher in the enteral feeding group compared with the parenteral group, while hs-CRP level was significantly lower in the enteral feeding group. Bowel movements were restored sooner and costs of treatment were lower in the enteral group. Postoperative complications did not differ significantly between the groups. There was one death in the parenteral group 10 days after surgery due to myocardial infarction. Conclusion: The results of our study showed that enteral feeding can be used effectively in the first days after surgery, with few early complications and similar nutritional outcomes compared with the parenteral method. Enteral feeding was associated with reduced inflammation and was associated with an improvement in immunological responses, quicker return of bowel movements, and reduced costs in comparison with parenteral feeding. PMID:26568935

  19. Established enteral nutrition pathway in a severe acute pancreatitis patient with duodenum fistula: a case report.

    PubMed

    Li, G; Shen, X; Ke, L; Tong, Z; Li, W

    2015-10-01

    Enteral feeding is the preferred way to provide nutritional support in patients with high nutritional risk but relatively normal gastrointestinal function; thus, establishing a safe and a reliable pathway of enteral nutrition (EN) is of great importance. There are many techniques for placing the feeding tube, such as blind placement at bedside, assisting by fluoroscopy and endoscopy, surgical and so on. Despite these variable techniques, it is still difficult to obtain the pathway for EN in some specific patients. Here, we present a recent case of infected pancreatic/peripancreatic necrosis complicated by a duodenal enteric fistula in whom we establish the feeding pathway extraordinarily. Briefly, after several failed attempts of placing the nasojejunal feeding tube, a jejunal feeding tube was placed percutaneously guided by computed tomography, and EN was successfully applied thereafter. With the implementation of EN, duodenal fistula healed without surgical intervention. As EN is pivotal for the recovery of duodenal fistula, this novel approach could be beneficial in selected patients. PMID:26306567

  20. Effects of formula composition on hepatic and intestinal drug metabolism during enteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Knodell, R G

    1990-01-01

    Significant compositional differences in protein and lipid content are present in currently available enteral nutrition preparations. Since variations in dietary protein and/or lipid have previously been shown to produce alterations in liver and gut drug metabolism, effects of five commonly used enteral nutrition regimens on several drug metabolic parameters were assessed in rats. Study formulations included: 1) Vivonex: low protein -no lipid; 2) High Protein Vivonex: normal protein -no lipid; 3) Vital: normal protein -normal lipid; 4) Sustacal: high protein -high lipid; 5) Isocal: normal protein -high lipid. Hepatic and intestinal microsomes were prepared after a continuous 7-day intragastric infusion of one of the formulations, and measurements of cytochrome P-450 content and assays of drug metabolizing activity were performed. No differences in intestinal microsomal cytochrome P-450 content or meperidine demethylase activity were seen among the various alimentation groups. However, significantly decreased amounts of cytochrome P-450 and reduced meperidine demethylase and pentobarbital hydroxylase activity were present in hepatic microsomes of animals receiving the lipid-poor Vivonex and High Nitrogen Vivonex preparations compared to the other alimentation groups. These data suggest that the composition of enteral nutrition formulations may significantly impact on hepatic function and specifically that the presence of lipid in such preparations may be important for maintaining normal levels of hepatic drug metabolism. PMID:2109111

  1. Effects of various enteral nutrition solutions on bacterial translocation and intestinal morphology during the postoperative period.

    PubMed

    Aydogan, Akin; Kismet, Kemal; Kilicoglu, Bulent; Erel, Serap; Ozcan, Ali Haldun; Gollu, Avni; Yildiz, Eda; Akkus, Mehmet Ali

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial translocation is the passage of bacteria or endotoxins from the gastrointestinal tract to extraintestinal sites, such as mesenteric lymph nodes, liver, spleen, and bloodstream. In this study, the investigators examined the effects of various enteral nutrients on bacterial translocation and intestinal morphology during the postoperative period. Sixty rats were randomly divided into 5 groups, each of which included 12 animals; cecal mobilization was performed in all groups. Group I rats were fed rat chow and water; group II was given standard enteral nutrients; group III, high-energy enteral nutrients; group IV, enteral nutrients supplemented with fiber; and group V, immunonutrients. Bacterial translocation was detected in mesenteric lymph nodes, spleen, liver, and blood cultures. Changes in the terminal ileum were scored from 0 to 4 with the morphologic scoring system. Bacterial translocation was predominantly detected in mesenteric lymph nodes. Rats fed immunonutrients (group V) showed a significant reduction in bacterial translocation compared with other groups. Although minor morphologic alterations in the villi were observed in groups IV and V, the histologic scores of these groups were not statistically different from the scores of control group members. In the present study, investigators evaluated the effects of various enteral nutritional solutions on bacterial translocation and intestinal morphology during the postoperative period. Enteral diets supplemented with arginine, nucleotides, and omega-3 fatty acids were found to reduce bacterial translocation. The investigators concluded that this effect might be related to improvement in immune function resulting from the use of immunonutrients. PMID:17526460

  2. [Case report--cooperation among medical staff to improve home enteral nutrition and increase hope in a patient with dementia].

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Mio; Hidaka, Kumi; Doi, Seiko; Hata, Akiko; Ibata, Takeshi; lijima, Shohei

    2013-12-01

    Herein, we describe the case of a man in his 70s who had slight dementia. Because of dysphagia, the patient received enteral nutrition by gastrostomy. The patient wished to care for his wife, who had severe dementia and was also receiving enteral nutrition. He was later re-hospitalized for aspiration-related pneumonia. At this point, it was discovered that the management of enteral nutrition via gastrostomy was different from that at the time of discharge from our hospital. Nutritional management during home care may change for various reasons after discharge from hospital. If a change is identified at the time of re-hospitalization, this process should be confirmed. In addition, it is necessary that any changes in nutritional management should benefit the patient. In order to improve the home care of the present patient, we changed his diet to semisolid enteral nutrition that was easier for him to manage. This diet would also be beneficial for the aspiration-related pneumonia. Importantly, we shared these changes in enteral nutrition with all medical staff involved in his care. This included explaining changes in nutritional content, dose, and method of delivery. PMID:24712154

  3. A Retrospective, Observational Study of Enteral Nutrition in Patients with Enteroatmospheric Fistulas.

    PubMed

    Reinisch, Alexander; Liese, Juliane; Woeste, Guido; Bechstein, Wolf; Habbe, Nils

    2016-07-01

    Enteroatmospheric fistulas (EAFs) represent a challenging problem in patients with an open abdomen (OA). A retrospective, descriptive study was conducted to evaluate the effects of enteral alimentation on wound status and management and nutrition. All patients with an EAF in an OA treated between October 2012 and December 2014 at a university hospital in Germany were included without criteria for exclusions. Demographic and morbidity-related data collected included age, gender, surgeries, OA grading, body mass index (BMI), serum albumin, and serum creatinin. Underlying diseases and time between the index operation and the formation of the OA and EAFs were analyzed in relation to the initiation of enteral nutrition (EN), which can aggravate and contaminate the OA due to intestinal secretions necessary for digestion. The OA was described in size and area of the fascia defect and classified according to the Björck Scale. The number and location of the fistulas and the duration of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) were documented. Outcome parameters included fistula volume, wound management (eg, dressing change frequency, need for wound revision), feeding tolerance, systemic impact of nutrition, nutrition status at discharge, and mortality. Data were analyzed using primary descriptive statistics. The Mann-Whitney test was used to evaluate changes in fistula volume and BMI; categorical data were compared using Fisher's exact test. A P value less than 0.05 was considered significant. Ten (10) patients (8 women, median age of participants 55.4 [range 44-71] years) were treated during the study time period. Seven (7) patients had the first fistula orifice in the upper jejunum (UJF); 8 had more than 1 fistula. EN was initiated with high caloric liquid nutrition and gradually increased to a 25 kcal/kg/day liquid or solid nutrition. All patients were provided NPWT at 75 mm Hg to 100 mm Hg. EN was not followed by a significant increase of median daily fistula volume

  4. Fistuloclysis Improves Liver Function and Nutritional Status in Patients with High-Output Upper Enteric Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yin; Ren, Jianan; Wang, Gefei; Zhou, Bo; Ding, Chao; Gu, Guosheng; Chen, Jun; Liu, Song; Li, Jieshou

    2014-01-01

    Background. We aimed to determine the efficacy of fistuloclysis in patients with high-output upper enteric fistula (EF). Methods. Patients were assigned into the fistuloclysis group (n = 35, receiving fistuloclysis plus total enteral nutrition (TEN)) and the control group (n = 60, receiving TEN). Laboratory variables were measured during the four-week treatment. Results. At baseline, variables were similar between the two groups. Delta value was defined as the changes from baseline to day 28. Compared with the control group, the fistuloclysis group showed greater improvements in liver function (Delta total bilirubin (TB): 20.3 ± 9.7 in the fistuloclysis group versus 15.6 ± 6.3 in the control group, P = 0.040; Delta direct bilirubin (DB): 12.5 ± 3.4 versus 10.0 ± 3.6, P = 0.011; Delta alkaline phosphatase (ALP): 98.4 ± 33.5 versus 57.6 ± 20.9, P < 0.001); nutritional status (Delta total protein: 21.8 ± 8.7 versus 10.7 ± 2.1, P < 0.001; Delta albumin: 11.3 ± 2.5 versus 4.2 ± 1.3, P < 0.001). In the fistuloclysis subgroups, biliary fistula patients had the maximum number of variables with the greatest improvements. Conclusions. Fistuloclysis improved hepatic and nutritional parameters in patients with high-output upper EF, particularly in biliary fistula patients. PMID:24719613

  5. Consensus statement of the academy of nutrition and dietetics/american society for parenteral and enteral nutrition: Characteristics recommended for the identification and documentation of adult malnutrition (undernutrition)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (Academy) and the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.) recommend that a standardized set of diagnostic characteristics be used to identify and document adult malnutrition in routine clinical practice. An etiologically based diagno...

  6. Prepregnancy Nutrition and Early Pregnancy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Gaskins, Audrey J.; Toth, Thomas L.; Chavarro, Jorge E.

    2015-01-01

    Implantation failure and pregnancy loss are estimated to affect up to 75% of fertilized ova; however as of yet there is limited empirical evidence, particularly at the population level, for understanding the environmental determinants of these losses. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current knowledge on prepregnancy nutrition and early pregnancy outcomes with particular focus on the outcome of spontaneous abortion among pregnancies conceived naturally and early pregnancy end points among pregnancies conceived through in vitro fertilization. To date, there is limited evidence to support associations of prepregnancy vitamin D and caffeine intake with pregnancy loss. There is suggestive data supporting a link between a healthy diet and lower risk of pregnancy loss. High folate and minimal to no alcohol intake prior to conception have the most consistent evidence supporting an association with lower risk of pregnancy loss. PMID:26457232

  7. Parenteral nutrition in the management of a dog with lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteritis and severe protein-losing enteropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Lane, I F; Miller, E; Twedt, D C

    1999-01-01

    Management of lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteritis in a dog with whipworm infestation, hypoproteinemia, and ascites is described. Short-term parenteral nutrition hastened normalization of serum proteins, resolution of diarrhea, and weight gain. A description of the potential benefits, limitations, and possible complications of parenteral nutrition in refractory inflammatory bowel disease is given. PMID:10572669

  8. Bedside placement of small-bowel feeding tube in Intensive Care Unit for enteral nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Gokhale, Antara; Kantoor, Sandeep; Prakash, Sadanandan; Manhas, Yogesh; Chandwani, Juhi; Mahmoud, Ashraf Ezzat

    2016-01-01

    Enteral nutrition is the preferred mode of nutrition in critically ill patients whenever feasible as it has a number of advantages over parenteral feeding. Both gastric and small-bowel feeding can effectively deliver calories. In patients with gastroparesis, small-bowel feeding can help avoid parenteral feeding. We carried out a retrospective observational study to assess the ability to insert the Tiger 2 tube into the small bowel at the bedside in 25 patients who failed to tolerate gastric feeds. The time taken, rate of successful insertion, and ability to feed these patients using a standardized feeding protocol were noted. Success rate of insertion was 78% and feeding could be established. This method reduced the delays and risks associated with transportation and dependence on other specialties. PMID:27390461

  9. Bedside placement of small-bowel feeding tube in Intensive Care Unit for enteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Gokhale, Antara; Kantoor, Sandeep; Prakash, Sadanandan; Manhas, Yogesh; Chandwani, Juhi; Mahmoud, Ashraf Ezzat

    2016-06-01

    Enteral nutrition is the preferred mode of nutrition in critically ill patients whenever feasible as it has a number of advantages over parenteral feeding. Both gastric and small-bowel feeding can effectively deliver calories. In patients with gastroparesis, small-bowel feeding can help avoid parenteral feeding. We carried out a retrospective observational study to assess the ability to insert the Tiger 2 tube into the small bowel at the bedside in 25 patients who failed to tolerate gastric feeds. The time taken, rate of successful insertion, and ability to feed these patients using a standardized feeding protocol were noted. Success rate of insertion was 78% and feeding could be established. This method reduced the delays and risks associated with transportation and dependence on other specialties. PMID:27390461

  10. The Role of Enteral Nutrition in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Current Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Triantafillidis, John K.; Vagianos, Costas; Papalois, Apostolos E.

    2015-01-01

    Enteral nutrition (EN) is considered to be of great importance in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and nutritional problems. This comprehensive review is aiming to provide the reader with an update on the role of EN in IBD patients. EN can reduce Crohn's disease (CD) activity and maintain remission in both adults and children. Nutritional support using liquid formulas should be considered for CD patients and in serious cases of ulcerative colitis (UC), especially for those who may require prolonged cycles of corticosteroids. Given that the ultimate goal in the treatment of CD is mucosal healing, this advantage of EN over corticosteroid treatment is valuable in therapeutic decision-making. EN is indicated in active CD, in cases of steroid intolerance, in patient's refusal of steroids, in combination with steroids in undernourished individuals, and in patients with an inflammatory stenosis of the small intestine. No differences between the efficiency of elemental diets and nonelemental formulas have been noticed. EN must be the first choice compared to TPN. EN has a restricted value in the treatment of patients with large bowel CD. In conclusion, it seems important not to underestimate the role of nutrition as supportive care in patients with IBD. PMID:25793189

  11. Current status of parenteral nutrition and enteral nutrition application: an assessment of nutritional prescriptions from 59 hospitals in the People’s Republic of China

    PubMed Central

    Han, Gang; Yu, Zhenwei; Ma, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the study reported here was to assess the use of parenteral nutrition (PN) and enteral nutrition (EN), and the prevalence of PN and EN formulas, in the People’s Republic of China. Methods Fifty-nine hospitals in the People’s Republic of China participated in a nutrition survey. The resulting information on nutritional support was analyzed. Results We received 379,584 nutritional-support prescriptions over 40 days in 2013. PN provided approximately 63.2% and EN provided approximately 36.8% of nitrogen intake. PN provided 63.5% and EN provided 36.5% of lipid intake. There were obvious differences in nitrogen and lipid intake between PN and EN in different regions, departments, and diseases. The percentage of nourishment provided by PN in different regions was highest in Chengdu, followed by the Beijing, Guangzhou, and Hangzhou areas. The percentage of nourishment provided by PN in different departments was highest in general surgery, followed by gastroenterology and the intensive care unit. The percentage of nourishment provided by PN in different diseases/conditions was highest in acute pancreatitis, followed by cancer, and burns. The main source of nitrogen in PN was balanced amino-acid preparations, and in EN, it was protein. The main source of lipids in PN was long- and medium-chain triglyceride lipid emulsion injection. Conclusion Despite recent improvements in the application of nutritional support in the People’s Republic of China, a much higher percentage of nitrogen and lipids is delivered through PN than through EN. Furthermore, there are marked regional, departmental, and disease-based differences in the selection of PN versus EN. The rationale for use of nutritional support needs to be improved. PMID:25709462

  12. Early life nutrition and neural plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Georgieff, Michael K.; Brunette, Katya E; Tran, Phu V

    2015-01-01

    The human brain undergoes a remarkable transformation during fetal life and the first postnatal years from a relatively undifferentiated but pluripotent organ to a highly specified and organized one. The outcome of this developmental maturation is highly dependent on a sequence of environmental exposures that can have either positive or negative influences on the ultimate plasticity of the adult brain. Many environmental exposures are beyond the control of the individual, but nutrition is not. An ever-increasing amount of research demonstrates that nutrition not only shapes the brain and affects its function during development, but that several nutrients early in life have profound and long-lasting effects on the brain. Nutrients have been shown to alter opening and closing of critical and sensitive periods of particular brain regions. This paper discusses the roles that various nutrients play in shaping the developing brain, concentrating specifically on recently explicated biological mechanisms by which particularly salient nutrients influence childhood and adult neural plasticity. PMID:25997762

  13. Partial Enteral Nutrition Mitigated Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Damage of Rat Small Intestinal Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chao; Wang, Xinying; Jiang, Tingting; Li, Chaojun; Zhang, Li; Gao, Xuejin; Tian, Feng; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: This study was designed to investigate a relatively optimum dose of partial enteral nutrition (PEN) which effectively attenuates intestinal barrier dysfunction initiated by ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI). Methods: In experiment 1, 60 male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were subjected to intestinal IRI and assigned to six groups according to the different proportion of EN administrations: namely total parenteral nutrition (TPN or 0%EN), 10%EN, 20%EN, 40%EN, 60%EN, and total enteral nutrition (TEN or 100%) groups, the deficits of intraluminal calorie were supplemented by PN. In experiment 2, 50 male SD rats were subjected to intestinal IRI and divided into five groups based on the results of experiment 1: TPN, TEN, 20%EN, TPN plus pretreatment with NF-κB antagonist 30 min before IRI (TPN+PDTC), and TPN plus pretreatment with HIF-1α antagonist 30 min before IRI (TPN+YC-1) groups. Results: In experiment 1, previous IRI combined with subsequent EN shortage disrupted the structure of intestinal epithelial cell and tight junctions (TJs). While 20% dose of EN had an obviously protective effect on these detrimental consequences. In experiment 2, compared with TPN only, 20%EN exerted a significant protection of barrier function of intestinal epithelium. Analogous results were observed when TPN combined with specific NF-κB/HIF-1α inhibitors (PDTC and YC-1). Meanwhile, the expression of NF-κB/HIF-1α had a similar trend among the groups. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that 20%EN is the minimally effective dosage of EN which promotes the recovery of intestinal barrier function after IRI in a rat model. Furthermore, we discreetly speculate that this benefit is, at least partly, related to NF-κB/HIF-1α pathway expression. PMID:27548209

  14. The evolving role of post-ligament of Trietz nasojejunal feeding in enteral nutrition and the need for improved feeding tube design and placement methods.

    PubMed

    Silk, D B A

    2011-05-01

    Nutrition support is an important link in the chain of therapy for intensive care unit patients. The early institution of nutrition support significantly reduces the incidence of septic complications, reduces mortality, and shortens hospital stay. Unfortunately, impaired gastrointestinal function, particularly gastric atony, restricts the use of nasogastric enteral tube feeding, and the use of this route of administration in these patients can lead to regurgitation, aspiration, and the development of pneumonia. Postpyloric enteral feeding was heralded as a means of overcoming many of these problems. Overall, the results of controlled studies do not support a role of postpyloric duodenal feeding in reducing the incidence of aspiration pneumonia. As a consequence, post-ligament of Treitz nasojejunal enteral feeding is proposed as the technique of choice in these patients. Feeding tube design must incorporate a gastric aspiration port to overcome problems of gastroesophageal acid reflux, duodenogastric bile reflux, and increased gastric acid secretion, problems that occur during "downstream" jejunal feeding. Tube placement technique will need to be refined and patients will need to receive a predigested enteral diet. In postoperative surgical patients in the intensive care unit, there is also a need for a newly designed dual-purpose nasogastric tube capable initially of providing a means of undertaking gastric aspiration and decompression and subsequently a means of initiating nasogastric enteral feeding. PMID:21393640

  15. Early influences of nutrition on postnatal growth.

    PubMed

    Koletzko, Berthold; Beyer, Jeanette; Brands, Brigitte; Demmelmair, Hans; Grote, Veit; Haile, Gudrun; Gruszfeld, Dariusz; Rzehak, Peter; Socha, Piotr; Weber, Martina

    2013-01-01

    Health and nutrition modulate postnatal growth. The availability of amino acids and energy, and insulin and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) regulates early growth through the mTOR pathway. Amino acids and glucose also stimulate the secretion of IGF-I and insulin. Postnatal growth induces lasting, programming effects on later body size and adiposity in animals and in human observational studies. Rapid weight gain in infancy and the first 2 years was shown to predict increased obesity risk in childhood and adulthood. Breastfeeding leads to lesser high weight gain in infancy and reduces obesity risk in later life by about 20%, presumably partly due to the lower protein supply with human milk than conventional infant formula. In a large randomized clinical trial, we tested the hypothesis that reduced infant formula protein contents lower insulin-releasing amino acid concentrations and thereby decrease circulating insulin and IGF-I levels, resulting in lesser early weight gain and reduced later obesity risk (the 'Early Protein Hypothesis'). The results demonstrate that lowered protein in infant formula induces similar - but not equal - metabolic and endocrine responses and normalizes weight and BMI relative to breastfed controls at the age of 2 years. The results available should lead to enhanced efforts to actively promote, protect and support breastfeeding. For infants that are not breastfed or not fully breastfed, the use of infant formulas with lower protein contents but high protein quality appears preferable. Cows' milk as a drink provides high protein intake and should be avoided in infancy. PMID:23502135

  16. Early enteral feeding of patients with multiple trauma.

    PubMed

    Cheever, K H

    1999-12-01

    The case study illustrates the recovery of a patient with multiple trauma who was fed a peptide-based formula via the enteral route soon after the trauma. Although the clinical course might have been worse if D.H. had not received this treatment, his generally excellent recovery might be partly attributable to this therapy. Although stress hypermetabolism occurs in most patients with multiple trauma within 48 hours after injury, no known treatment can arrest or reverse this problem. However, the lethal catabolic and septic effects of stress hypermetabolism can be at least partly thwarted through delivery of enteral nutrients within 72 hours after trauma. PMID:10889604

  17. Dietary fiber and total enteral nutrition: fermentative assessment of five fiber supplements.

    PubMed

    McBurney, M I; Thompson, L U

    1991-01-01

    Total enteral nutrition (TEN) formulas supplemented with dietary fiber, typically soy polysaccharide, are in widespread clinical use. Five commercially available dietary fiber supplements obtained from fruits (apple, grapefruit, orange, prune, tomato) were examined for potential use in TEN formulas. In vitro fermentations of 0, 4, 8, 12, and 24 hours' duration with human fecal microbiota from three different donors were conducted to assess colonic fermentative effects. Short-chain fatty acid and hydrogen productions differed significantly with fiber source. The most rapid fermentation rate was with tomato followed by orange, grapefruit, apple, and finally prune fiber. Such differences in fermentability should be considered when fiber sources are selected to supplement TEN formulas. PMID:1650853

  18. The effect of fibers on coagulation of casein-based enteral nutrition in an artificial gastric digestion model.

    PubMed

    Luttikhold, Joanna; van Norren, Klaske; Minor, Marcel; Buijs, Nikki; van den Braak, Claudia C M; Ludwig, Thomas; Abrahamse, Evan; Rijna, Herman; van Leeuwen, Paul A M

    2014-08-01

    A serious complication seen in critically ill patients is the solidification of enteral nutrition causing gastrointestinal obstruction. It has been suggested that enteral nutrition enriched with insoluble fibers may increase the risk of this complication. Therefore, we investigate the effect of soluble and insoluble dietary fibers on the coagulation of a casein-based enteral nutrition in an artificial gastric digestion model. A 100% casein-based enteral nutrition was enriched with increasing concentrations of soluble fibers (acacia fiber, oligofructose and inulin) and insoluble fibers (soy polysaccharide, resistant starch and alpha cellulose). After digestion in an artificial gastric model, the chyme was poured over sequentially placed sieves, separating the coagulate into size fractions of larger than 2 mm, between 1 and 2 mm, and between 0.25 and 1 mm. Of these fractions we measured wet weight, dry weight and protein content. A significant effect on the fraction larger than 2 mm was considered to be clinically relevant. Addition of high concentrations soy polysaccharide and resistant starch to a casein-based enteral nutrition, did not alter the wet weight, whereas dry weight and protein content of the coagulate was significantly reduced. When high concentrations of soy polysaccharide and resistant starch are added to a 100% casein-based enteral nutrition, the coagulate consist of more water and less proteins, which may lead to an increased protein digestion and absorption in a clinical setting. The suggestion that insoluble fibers increase the risk of gastrointestinal obstruction in critically ill patients is not supported by these data. PMID:24943994

  19. ICU and process related barriers to optimizing enteral nutrition in a tertiary medical intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Kozeniecki, Michelle; McAndrew, Natalie; Patel, Jayshil

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Enteral nutrition (EN) is the preferred route of nutrient delivery in critically ill patients. Research has consistently described an incomplete delivery of EN in critically ill patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate barriers to reach and maintain >90% prescribed EN amongst critically ill MICU patients. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort quality improvement study of adult patients ≥18 years of age admitted to a tertiary MICU and referred for EN from October 1–December 31, 2013. We excluded patients who received intermittent or bolus feeding. Demographic, clinical, and nutrition data were collected. Potential barriers to EN were categorized a priori. Results Seventy-eight patients receiving a total of 344 days of EN were included in the study. EN was initiated at a median of 32 hours (IQR 18.5–75 hours) after ICU admission. Initiation and advancement of EN was identified as the most common reason for <90% prescribed intake. Top 5 interruption reasons were (1) extubation (2) fasting for bedside procedure (3) loss of enteral access and (4) gastric residual volume 0–499 mL and (5) radiology suite procedure Conclusions Sub-optimal EN volume delivery continues to be an issue in critically ill patients. Our study identified initiation and advancement of EN as the most common reason for sub-optimal EN volume delivery. Variation in practice was also noted within several categories and multiple reversible barriers to optimal EN delivery were identified. These data can serve as the impetus to modify practice models and workflow to optimize EN delivery amongst critically ill patients. PMID:26471285

  20. Comparison of the effects of enteral feeding with continuous and intermittent parenteral nutrition on hepatic triglyceride secretion in human beings

    SciTech Connect

    Isabel-Martinez, L.; Skinner, C.; Parkin, A.; Hall, R.I.

    1989-03-01

    Plasma triglyceride turnover was measured during steady-state conditions in 22 postoperative patients. Nine had received nutritional support with an enteral regimen, seven had received an equivalent regimen as continuous parenteral nutrition, and six received the same parenteral regimen as a cyclical infusion. After 5 days of nutritional support, each patient received an intravenous bolus of tritiated glycerol. Plasma radiolabeled triglyceride content was measured during the subsequent 24 hours. The data were analyzed by means of a simple deterministic model of plasma triglyceride kinetics and compared with the results obtained by stochastic analysis. The rates of hepatic triglyceride secretion obtained by deterministic analysis were higher than those obtained by the stochastic approach. However, the mode of delivery of the nutritional regimen did not affect the rate of hepatic triglyceride secretion regardless of the method of analysis. The results suggest that neither complete nutritional bypass of the gastrointestinal tract nor interruption of parenteral nutrition in an attempt to mimic normal eating has any effect on hepatic triglyceride secretion. Any beneficial effect that enteral feeding or cyclical parenteral nutrition may have on liver dysfunction associated with standard parenteral nutrition appears to be unrelated to changes in hepatic triglyceride secretion.

  1. Early nutrition and immunity - progress and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Calder, Philip C; Krauss-Etschmann, Susanne; de Jong, Esther C; Dupont, Christophe; Frick, Julia-Stefanie; Frokiaer, Hanne; Heinrich, Joachim; Garn, Holger; Koletzko, Sibylle; Lack, Gideon; Mattelio, Gianluca; Renz, Harald; Sangild, Per T; Schrezenmeir, Jürgen; Stulnig, Thomas M; Thymann, Thomas; Wold, Agnes E; Koletzko, Berthold

    2006-10-01

    The immune system exists to protect the host against pathogenic organisms and highly complex pathways of recognition, response, elimination and memory have evolved in order to fulfil this role. The immune system also acts to ensure tolerance to 'self', to food and other environmental components, and to commensal bacteria. A breakdown in the tolerogenic pathways can also lead to inflammatory diseases. The prevalence of inflammatory diseases, including atopic disorders, has increased over the last 60 years. The development of tolerance is the result of active immune mechanisms and both development and maintenance of tolerance are lifelong processes which start very early in life, even prenatally. Profound immunologic changes occur during pregnancy, involving a polarization of T helper (Th) cells towards a dominance of Th2 and regulatory T cell effector responses in both mother and fetus. This situation is important to maintain pregnancy through avoidance of the rejection of the immunologically incompatible fetus. During the third trimester of human pregnancy, fetal T cells are able to mount antigen-specific responses to environmental and food-derived antigens and antigen-specific T cells are detectable in cord blood in virtually all newborns indicating in utero sensitization. If the neonatal immune system is not able to down-regulate the pre-existing Th2 dominance effectively then an allergic phenotype may develop. Changes occur at, and soon after, birth in order that the immune system of the neonate becomes competent and functional and that the gut becomes colonized with bacteria. Exposure to bacteria during birth and from the mother's skin and the provision of immunologic factors in breast milk are amongst the key events that promote maturation of the infant's gut and gut-associated and systemic immune systems. The introduction of formula and of solid foods exposes the infant to novel food antigens and also affects the gut flora. Nutrition may be the source of

  2. A multidisciplinary QA program for enteral nutrition in high-risk patients.

    PubMed

    D'Addario, V; Danek, M

    1991-01-01

    An increase in elderly patients and severity of illness rates means greater use of nasogastric feeding tubes for both high-risk acutely ill and chronically ill patients. When the QA screening process at Booth Memorial Medical Center revealed a certain percentage of complications with small bore, weight-tipped feeding tubes inserted through the nares, a multidisciplinary peer review committee (MPRC) was formed to review the enteral nutrition program. After a literature review to determine possible complications, the MPRC identified lung perforations due to tube misplacement, tube feeding aspiration into the lungs leading to possible aspiration pneumonia, and an internal tip separation from the tube product failure. Unconscious incubated patients on ventilators were shown as at high risk for feeding tube misplacement in an initial MPRC patient study. A second study evaluated several different feeding tube products in the medical, respiratory and surgical ICU. The MPRC established a credentialing process for physician assistants, interns and residents in feeding tube placement. The MPRC proceedings were presented to the hospital-wide QA committee for review, endorsement and recommendations on all policy and procedure changes. The conclusions were that a more concerted effort must be made to improve medical management and encourage ongoing education in the administration of enteral feedings to high-risk patients. PMID:10113670

  3. Application of dietary fiber in clinical enteral nutrition: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Gang; Wu, Xiao-Ting; Zhou, Yong; Wang, Ying-Li

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effects of dietary fiber (DF) as a part of enteral nutrition (EN) formula on diarrhea, infection, and length of hospital stay. METHODS: Following electronic databases were searched for randomized controlled trials about DF: Chinese Biomedicine Database (CBM), MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Controlled Trials Register. RevMan 4.1 was used for statistical analysis. RESULTS: Seven randomized controlled trials with 400 pat-ients were included. The supplement of DF in EN was compared with standard enteral formula in five trials. Combined analysis did not show a significant reduction in occurrence of diarrhea, but there were valuable results for non-critically ill patients. Combined analysis of two trials observing the infection also did not show any valid evidence that DF could decrease the infection rate, though the length of hospital stay was reduced significantly. CONCLUSION: Based on the current eligible randomized controlled trials, there is no evidence that the value of DF in the diarrhea can be proved. Though length of hospital stay was shortened by the use of DF, there is no available evidence in preventing infection by DF. Further studies are needed for evaluating the value of DF in EN. PMID:15991297

  4. Nutritional support of bone marrow transplant recipients: a prospective, randomized clinical trial comparing total parental nutrition to an enteral feeding program

    SciTech Connect

    Szeluga, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    Allogeneic and autologous bone marrow transplantation (BMT) have been associated with nutritionally-depleting side effects. Total parental nutrition (TPN) has become the standard, but it has not been demonstrated that TPN is the appropriate method of nutritional support. Therefore, in a prospective, randomized clinical trial TPN and enteral feeding were compared for their effectiveness in maintaining the nutritional status of patients through the first 29 post-transplant days. Nutritional assessment included measurement of serum proteins, body weight, anthropometry and isotope dilution analysis of body composition. Total body water (TBW) and extracellular fluid (ECF) were quantified by standard radioisotope dilution techniques using tritiated water and /sup 169/ytterbium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate, respectively as the tracers. Consenting patients 10-58 years of age were stratified by type of BMT (autologous or allogeneic) and randomized to either TPN plus ad libitum oral feeding or the individualized enteral feeding program (EFP), which included one-on-one counseling, meal-by-meal menu selection, special snacks and tube feeding. There were no differences in the rate of hematologic recovery, incidence of graft-versus-host disease, organ toxicity, length of hospitalization or survival. Therefore, the observed changes in body composition were not clinically significant. Even allowing for increased dietary service, the EFP was only half as expensive as TPN. It was concluded that TPN is not superior to the EFP and therefore, TPN should be reserved for patients who demonstrate intolerance to enteral feeding.

  5. Effects of long term ethanol administration in a rat total enteral nutrition model of alcoholic liver disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats were chronically fed a high unsaturated fat diet for 130 d using total enteral nutrition (TEN), or the same diet in which ethanol (EtOH) isocalorically replaced carbohydrate calories. Additional control and EtOH-treated groups were supplemented with the antioxidant N-acetylc...

  6. Cytokine and Chemokine Expression Associated with Steatohepatitis and Hepatocyte Proliferation in Rats Fed Ethanol Via Total Enteral Nutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sprague-Dawley rats were intragastrically fed low carbohydrate-containing ethanol (EtOH) diets via total enteral nutrition for up to 49 d. Induction of EtOH metabolism and appearance of steatosis preceded development of oxidative stress, inflammation, and cell death. A transitory peak of tumor necro...

  7. Enteral nutrition feeding alters antioxidant activity in unstimulated whole saliva composition of patients with neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Cunha-Correia, Adriana Sales; Neto, Antonio Hernandes; Pereira, Ariana Ferreira; Aguiar, Sandra Maria Herondina Coelho Ávila; Nakamune, Ana Cláudia de Melo Stevanato

    2014-06-01

    Patients with neurological disorders have an increased risk of oral and systemic diseases due to compromised oral hygiene. If patients lose the ability to swallow and chew food as a result of their disorder, enteral nutrition is often utilized. However, this type of feeding may modify salivary antioxidant defenses, resulting in increased oxidative damage and the emergence of various diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of enteral nutrition on biochemical parameters in the unstimulated whole saliva composition of patients with neurological disorders. For this, enzymatic (superoxide dismutase - SOD; glutathione peroxidase - GPx) and non-enzymatic (uric acid; ferric ion reducing antioxidant power - FRAP) antioxidant activity, as well as a marker for oxidative damage (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances - TBARS) were analyzed. Unstimulated whole saliva was collected from 12 patients with neurological disorders and tube-feeding (tube-fed group - TFG), 15 patients with neurological disorders and normal feeding via the mouth (non-tube-fed group - NTFG), and 12 volunteers without neurological disorders (control group - CG). The daily oral hygiene procedures of TFG and NTFG patients were similar and dental care was provided monthly by the same institution's dentist. All patients exhibited adequate oral health conditions. The salivary levels of FRAP, uric acid, SOD, GPx, TBARS, and total protein were compared between studied groups. FRAP was increased (p<0.05) in the NTFG (4,651 ± 192.5 mmol/mL) and the TFG (4,743 ± 116.7 mmol/mL) when compared with the CG (1,844 ± 343.8 mmol/mL). GPx values were lower (p<0.05) in the NTGF (8.24 ± 1.09 mmol/min/mg) and the TFG (8.37 ± 1.60 mmol/min/mg) than in the CG (15.30 ± 2.61 mmol/min/mg). Uric acid in the TFG (1.57 ± 0.23 mg/dL) was significantly lower than in the NTFG (2.34 ± 0.20mg/dL) and the CG (3.49 ± 0.21 mg/dL). Protein was significantly lower in the TFG (5.35 ± 0.27 g/dL) than in the NTFG (7

  8. Successful Treatment of Septic Shock due to Spontaneous Esophageal Perforation 96 Hours after Onset by Drainage and Enteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Risako; Takeno, Shinsuke; Yamana, Ippei; Maki, Kenji; Miyake, Toru; Shiwaku, Hironari; Shiroshita, Toyoo; Shiraishi, Takeshi; Iwasaki, Akinori; Yamashita, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous esophageal perforation is relatively uncommon, but carries a high mortality rate if diagnosis or treatment is delayed. We report the case of a 68-year-old man with spontaneous esophageal perforation who was successfully treated over 96 h after onset by thoracic drainage and jejunostomy for enteral nutrition. He vomited after drinking alcohol, soon followed by epigastralgia. Heart failure was suspected on admission to another hospital. Spontaneous esophageal perforation was diagnosed 48 h after admission. Chest tube drainage was performed, but his general condition deteriorated and he was transferred to our hospital. Emergent surgery was performed and esophageal perforation combined with pyothorax and mediastinitis was identified on the left side of the lower esophagus. The left thoracic cavity was rinsed and thoracic drainage was performed. Feeding jejunostomy was performed for postoperative enteral nutrition. Effective drainage and sufficient nutrition management appear extremely valuable in treating spontaneous esophageal perforation. PMID:25565934

  9. Successful Treatment of Septic Shock due to Spontaneous Esophageal Perforation 96 Hours after Onset by Drainage and Enteral Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Risako; Takeno, Shinsuke; Yamana, Ippei; Maki, Kenji; Miyake, Toru; Shiwaku, Hironari; Shiroshita, Toyoo; Shiraishi, Takeshi; Iwasaki, Akinori; Yamashita, Yuichi

    2014-09-01

    Spontaneous esophageal perforation is relatively uncommon, but carries a high mortality rate if diagnosis or treatment is delayed. We report the case of a 68-year-old man with spontaneous esophageal perforation who was successfully treated over 96 h after onset by thoracic drainage and jejunostomy for enteral nutrition. He vomited after drinking alcohol, soon followed by epigastralgia. Heart failure was suspected on admission to another hospital. Spontaneous esophageal perforation was diagnosed 48 h after admission. Chest tube drainage was performed, but his general condition deteriorated and he was transferred to our hospital. Emergent surgery was performed and esophageal perforation combined with pyothorax and mediastinitis was identified on the left side of the lower esophagus. The left thoracic cavity was rinsed and thoracic drainage was performed. Feeding jejunostomy was performed for postoperative enteral nutrition. Effective drainage and sufficient nutrition management appear extremely valuable in treating spontaneous esophageal perforation. PMID:25565934

  10. Controlled trial comparing two types of enteral nutrition in treatment of active Crohn's disease: elemental versus polymeric diet.

    PubMed Central

    Rigaud, D; Cosnes, J; Le Quintrec, Y; René, E; Gendre, J P; Mignon, M

    1991-01-01

    To determine whether an elemental diet or a polymeric defined formula diet would be more effective for treating active Crohn's disease, we conducted a prospective randomised clinical trial in 30 patients with active Crohn's disease unresponsive to steroids and/or complicated by malnutrition. They received a four to six week enteral nutrition course with either an elemental diet or a polymeric diet. Clinical remission occurred in 10 of the 15 patients on elemental diet compared with 11 of the 15 patients assigned to polymeric diet. Both groups showed similar improvements in nutritional status, biological inflammation, alpha 1 antitrypsin clearance, and colonoscopic lesions (diminished in 17 out of 24 patients). Most patients relapsed during the year after discharge. We conclude that enteral nutrition, whatever the diet, is an efficient primary therapy for active Crohn's disease but does not influence the long term outcome. PMID:1773955

  11. Screening and risk factors of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in critically ill adult patients receiving enteral nutrition

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Malnutrition is a frequent problem associated with detrimental clinical outcomes in critically ill patients. To avoid malnutrition, most studies focus on the prevention of inadequate nutrition delivery, whereas little attention is paid to the potential role of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI). In this trial, we aim to evaluate the prevalence of EPI and identify its potential risk factors in critically ill adult patients without preexisting pancreatic diseases. Methods In this prospective cross-sectional study, we recruited 563 adult patients with critical illnesses. All details of the patients were documented, stool samples were collected three to five days following the initiation of enteral nutrition, and faecal elastase 1 (FE-1) concentrations were assayed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Blood samples were also taken to determine serum amylase and lipase activity. Results The percentages of recruited patients with EPI (FE-1 concentration <200 μg/g) and severe EPI (FE-1 concentration <100 μg/g) were 52.2% and 18.3%, respectively. The incidences of steatorrhea were significantly different (P < 0.05) among the patients without EPI, with moderate EPI (FE-1 concentration = 100 to 200 μg/g) and severe EPI (FE-1 concentration < 100 μg/g). Both multivariate logistic regression analysis and z-tests indicated that the occurrence of EPI was closely associated with shock, sepsis, diabetes, cardiac arrest, hyperlactacidemia, invasive mechanical ventilation and haemodialysis. Conclusions More than 50% of critically ill adult patients without primary pancreatic diseases had EPI, and nearly one-fifth of them had severe EPI. The risk factors for EPI included shock, sepsis, diabetes, cardiac arrest, hyperlactacidemia, invasive mechanical ventilation and haemodialysis. Trial registration NCT01753024 PMID:23924602

  12. Early enteral feeding, compared with parenteral, reduces postoperative septic complications. The results of a meta-analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, F A; Feliciano, D V; Andrassy, R J; McArdle, A H; Booth, F V; Morgenstein-Wagner, T B; Kellum, J M; Welling, R E; Moore, E E

    1992-01-01

    This two-part meta-analysis combined data from eight prospective randomized trials designed to compare the nutritional efficacy of early enteral (TEN) and parenteral (TPN) nutrition in high-risk surgical patients. The combined data gave sufficient patient numbers (TEN, n = 118; TPN, n = 112) to adequately address whether route of substrate delivery affected septic complication incidence. Phase I (dropouts excluded) meta-analysis confirmed data homogeneity across study sites, that TEN and TPN groups were comparable, and that significantly fewer TEN patients experienced septic complications (TEN, 18%; TPN, 35%; p = 0.01). Phase II meta-analysis, an intent-to-treat analysis (dropouts included), confirmed that fewer TEN patients developed septic complications. Further breakdown by patient type showed that all trauma and blunt trauma subgroups had the most significant reduction in septic complications when fed enterally. In conclusion, this meta-analysis attests to the feasibility of early postoperative TEN in high-risk surgical patients and that these patients have reduced septic morbidity rates compared with those administered TPN. PMID:1386982

  13. [The nutritional status of the child entering the Nuevo Hospital Civil de Guadalajara].

    PubMed

    Vásquez-Garibay, E M; Sandoval-Galindo, D M; Kumazawa-Ichikawa, M R; Romero-Velarde, E; Nápoles-Rodríguez, F

    1993-06-01

    With the purpose to evaluate the nutritional status of children hospitalized in the Nuevo Hospital Civil de Guadalajara, they were included 278 subjects that entered in the infant, preschool, schoolchildren and infectious disease clinical ward of the Division of Pediatrics. There were chosen two subjects every day during one year. It was obtained information about family and sociodemographic background. In addition, there were undertaken anthropometric measurements; weight/age, weight/height and height/age indices were also calculated. It was obtained the parameters of median, percentiles and Z-score. Undernutrition was determined by the Gómez and Waterlow classifications. Is was also compared the reference pattern of Ramos-Galván and National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). Blood was drawn for total protein and hemoglobin. Mean of height/age was 95.74% (NCHS), weight/age 84.04% and weight/height 89.7%. It was not difference on weight/age between Ramos-Galván and NCHS. Weight/height and height/age had little difference. The median system identified more cases with deficit than Z-score, which seems to be more specific and conservative. There is a high prevalence of acute and chronic malnutrition identified with the median system, and maybe reflects the poor quality of life and major morbidity in this population. PMID:8517933

  14. Influences of enteral nutrition upon CEACAM6 expression by intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Jacqueline I; Hooper, Elizabeth M; Tyrer, Peter C; Day, Andrew S

    2014-11-01

    Exclusive enteral nutrition is established as an initial therapy to induce remission in active Crohn's disease (CD), especially in children, but the mechanisms of action of this therapy are yet to be fully defined. CEACAM6 protein is an adhesion molecule that is up-regulated in active CD and implicated in the attachment of adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) to the gut epithelium. Using the Caco-2 human adenocarcinoma cell line, this study showed that the incubation of human cells with a polymeric formula (PF) resulted in a dose-dependent increase in the expression of CEACAM6, and that this effect was most noticeable on the cell surface. Further investigation revealed that PF doubled the release of CEACAM6 protein by Caco-2 cells exposed to PF, and that an increase in release of soluble CEACAM6 inversely correlated with the ability of AIEC to associate with the intestinal epithelial cells. Our findings suggest that the secretion of cell surface-associated proteins acting as releasable decoys may be an aspect of the gut's innate immune response to pathogenic bacteria that is strengthened by PF in the setting of CD. PMID:24326999

  15. Laparoscopy-assisted percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy enables enteral nutrition even in patients with distorted anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Hermanowicz, Adam; Matuszczak, Ewa; Komarowska, Marta; Jarocka-Cyrta, Elzbieta; Wojnar, Jerzy; Debek, Wojciech; Matysiak, Konrad; Klek, Stanislaw

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To analyzed whether laparoscopy-assisted percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) could be a valuable option for patients with complicated anatomy. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of twelve patients (seven females, five males; six children, six young adults; mean age 19.2 years) with cerebral palsy, spastic quadriparesis, severe kyphoscoliosis and interposed organs and who required enteral nutrition (EN) due to starvation was performed. For all patients, standard PEG placement was impossible due to distorted anatomy. All the patients qualified for the laparoscopy-assisted PEG procedure. RESULTS: In all twelve patients, the laparoscopy-assisted PEG was successful, and EN was introduced four to six hours after the PEG placement. There were no complications in the perioperative period, either technical or metabolic. All the patients were discharged from the hospital and were then effectively fed using bolus methods. CONCLUSION: Laparoscopy-assisted PEG should become the method of choice for gastrostomy tube placement and subsequent EN if PEG placement cannot be performed safely. PMID:24282357

  16. Use of exclusive enteral nutrition in adults with Crohn’s disease: A review

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Catherine L; Day, Andrew S; Gearry, Richard B

    2013-01-01

    Exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN) is well-established as a first line therapy instead of corticosteroid (CS) therapy to treat active Crohn’s disease (CD) in children. It also has been shown to have benefits over and above induction of disease remission in paediatric populations. However, other than in Japanese populations, this intervention is not routinely utilised in adults. To investigate potential reasons for variation in response between adult studies of EEN and CS therapy. The Ovid database was searched over a 6-mo period. Articles directly comparing EEN and CS therapy in adults were included. Eleven articles were identified. EEN therapy remission rates varied considerably. Poor compliance with EEN therapy due to unpalatable formula was an issue in half of the studies. Remission rates of studies that only included patients with previously untreated/new CD were higher than studies including patients with both existing and new disease. There was limited evidence to determine if disease location, duration of disease or age of diagnosis affected EEN therapy outcomes. There is some evidence to support the use of EEN as a treatment option for a select group of adults, namely those motivated to adhere to an EEN regimen and possibly those newly diagnosed with CD. In addition, the use of more palatable formulas could improve treatment compliance. PMID:24282355

  17. Simulated neonatal exposure to DEHP and MEHP from PVC enteral nutrition products.

    PubMed

    Takatori, Satoshi; Okamoto, You; Kitagawa, Yoko; Hori, Shinjiro; Izumi, Shun-Ichiro; Makino, Tsunehisa; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki

    2008-03-20

    The leaching of di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) and mono(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (MEHP) from medical products made of polyvinyl-chloride (PVC) to enteral nutrition (EN) for neonatal patients was determined in a simulated study. The study simulated a typical case of EN administration to a neonatal patient (body weight, 3 kg) in a neonatal care unit (temperature, 25 degrees C); the medical products used were an irrigator and catheter containing DEHP (9.1-31.8%, w/w) as a plasticizer. The worst-case daily exposures of the neonatal patient to DEHP and MEHP by the administration of EN were estimated to be 148 and 3.72 microg/(kg day), respectively, as assessed from the levels of these compounds leaching from the medical products to the EN. The use of DEHP-free medical products reduced the exposure of DEHP and MEHP to the minimum levels contained in the EN at preparation. A transition to DEHP-free medical products for neonatal patients would be effective in reducing the exposure of neonatal patients to DEHP via EN administration. PMID:18063492

  18. Toward enteral nutrition for the treatment of pediatric Crohn disease in Canada: a workshop to identify barriers and enablers.

    PubMed

    Van Limbergen, Johan; Haskett, Jennifer; Griffiths, Anne M; Critch, Jeff; Huynh, Hien; Ahmed, Najma; deBruyn, Jennifer C; Issenman, Robert; El-Matary, Wael; Walters, Thomas D; Kluthe, Cheryl; Roy, Marie-Eve; Sheppard, Elizabeth; Crandall, Wallace V; Cohen, Stan; Ruemmele, Frank M; Levine, Arie; Otley, Anthony R

    2015-10-01

    The treatment armamentarium in pediatric Crohn disease (CD) is very similar to adult-onset CD with the notable exception of the use of exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN [the administration of a liquid formula diet while excluding normal diet]), which is used more frequently by pediatric gastroenterologists to induce remission. In pediatric CD, EEN is now recommended by the pediatric committee of the European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation and the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition as a first-choice agent to induce remission, with remission rates in pediatric studies consistently >75%. To chart and address enablers and barriers of use of EEN in Canada, a workshop was held in September 2014 in Toronto (Ontario), inviting pediatric gastroenterologists, nurses and dietitians from most Canadian pediatric IBD centres as well as international faculty from the United States and Europe with particular research and clinical expertise in the dietary management of pediatric CD. Workshop participants ranked the exclusivity of enteral nutrition; the health care resources; and cost implications as the top three barriers to its use. Conversely, key enablers mentioned included: standardization and sharing of protocols for use of enteral nutrition; ensuring sufficient dietetic resources; and reducing the cost of EEN to the family (including advocacy for reimbursement by provincial ministries of health and private insurance companies). Herein, the authors report on the discussions during this workshop and list strategies to enhance the use of EEN as a treatment option in the treatment of pediatric CD in Canada. PMID:26076398

  19. The economic value of enteral medical nutrition in the management of disease-related malnutrition: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Freijer, Karen; Bours, Martijn J L; Nuijten, Mark J C; Poley, Marten J; Meijers, Judith M M; Halfens, Ruud J G; Schols, Jos M G A

    2014-01-01

    Economic evaluations for medical nutrition, such as oral nutritional supplements (ONS), are relatively uncommon compared with other health technologies, and represent an area that has not been reviewed so far. In this systematic review, economic evaluations of enteral medical nutrition in the management of disease-related malnutrition (DRM) were reviewed and qualified to estimate the economic value. Initially, 481 studies were found, of which 37 full-text articles were assessed for eligibility and were rated on their quality using the Quality of Health Economic Studies (QHES) instrument. The final review focused on the high QHES quality economic evaluation studies. As both the studied medical nutrition intervention and the form of the economic evaluation varied, a quantitative synthesis (meta-analysis) was not attempted but a critical analysis and comparison of the individual study results were performed. ONS was the most studied intervention, covering several patient populations and different health care settings. Outcomes included cost savings (n = 3), no significant extra costs per unit of clinical and/or functional improvement (n = 1), or significantly higher costs per unit of clinical and/or functional improvement but still cost-effective for the used threshold (n = 4). This review shows that the use of enteral medical nutrition in the management of DRM can be efficient from a health economic perspective. PMID:24239013

  20. Hepatic transcriptomic profiles of preterm piglets nourished by enteral and parenteral nutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parenteral nutrition is a life-saving nutritional support for more than half a million premature and hospitalized infants in the U.S. annually. Lipids in parenteral nutrition provide essential fatty acids and are a major source of energy. Intralipid (IL) is the only approved lipid emulsion in the U....

  1. Effect of Exclusive Enteral Nutrition on the Microbiota of Children With Newly Diagnosed Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaakoush, Nadeem O; Day, Andrew S; Leach, Steven T; Lemberg, Daniel A; Nielsen, Shaun; Mitchell, Hazel M

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN) is commonly used to treat pediatric Crohn's disease (CD). Meta-analysis of pediatric studies that have compared the effect of EEN with other treatments have shown that EEN induces remission in up to 80–85% of patients. We aimed to gain a comprehensive understanding of the effect of EEN on the microbiota of CD patients. Methods: We used 16S rRNA gene and whole-genome high throughout sequencing to determine changes in the fecal microbiota of five CD children, before, during, and after EEN therapy and compared this with five healthy controls. Results: The microbial diversity observed in CD patients tended to be lower than that in controls (CD: 2.25±0.24, controls: 2.75±0.14, P=0.11). In all CD patients, dysbiosis was observed prior to therapy. EEN therapy had a positive effect in all patients, with 80% going into remission. In some patients, the positive effect diminished following the conclusion of EEN therapy. Significantly, the number of operational taxonomic units (OTU) decreased dramatically upon starting EEN and this corresponded with CD remission. Recurrence of CD corresponded with an increase in OTUs. Six families within the Firmicutes were found to correlate with disease activity during and following EEN therapy, a finding that was confirmed by whole-genome high throughput sequencing. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that EEN leads to common and patient-specific alterations in the microbiota of CD patients, a number of which correlate with disease activity. PMID:25588524

  2. Extensive Modulation of the Fecal Metagenome in Children With Crohn's Disease During Exclusive Enteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Quince, Christopher; Ijaz, Umer Zeeshan; Loman, Nick; Eren, A Murat; Saulnier, Delphine; Russell, Julie; Haig, Sarah J; Calus, Szymon T; Quick, Joshua; Barclay, Andrew; Bertz, Martin; Blaut, Michael; Hansen, Richard; McGrogan, Paraic; Russell, Richard K; Edwards, Christine A; Gerasimidis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Exploring associations between the gut microbiota and colonic inflammation and assessing sequential changes during exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN) may offer clues into the microbial origins of Crohn's disease (CD). METHODS: Fecal samples (n=117) were collected from 23 CD and 21 healthy children. From CD children fecal samples were collected before, during EEN, and when patients returned to their habitual diets. Microbiota composition and functional capacity were characterized using sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and shotgun metagenomics. RESULTS: Microbial diversity was lower in CD than controls before EEN (P=0.006); differences were observed in 36 genera, 141 operational taxonomic units (OTUs), and 44 oligotypes. During EEN, the microbial diversity of CD children further decreased, and the community structure became even more dissimilar than that of controls. Every 10 days on EEN, 0.6 genus diversity equivalents were lost; 34 genera decreased and one increased during EEN. Fecal calprotectin correlated with 35 OTUs, 14 of which accounted for 78% of its variation. OTUs that correlated positively or negatively with calprotectin decreased during EEN. The microbiota of CD patients had a broader functional capacity than healthy controls, but diversity decreased with EEN. Genes involved in membrane transport, sulfur reduction, and nutrient biosynthesis differed between patients and controls. The abundance of genes involved in biotin (P=0.005) and thiamine biosynthesis decreased (P=0.017), whereas those involved in spermidine/putrescine biosynthesis (P=0.031), or the shikimate pathway (P=0.058), increased during EEN. CONCLUSIONS: Disease improvement following treatment with EEN is associated with extensive modulation of the gut microbiome. PMID:26526081

  3. Immune functional impacts of oyster peptide-based enteral nutrition formula (OPENF) on mice: a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Bingna; Pan, Jianyu; Wu, Yuantao; Wan, Peng; Sun, Huili

    2013-07-01

    Oyster peptides were produced from Crassostrea hongkongensis and used as a new protein source for the preparation of an oyster peptide-based enteral nutrition formula (OPENF). Reserpineinduced malabsorption mice and cyclophosphamide-induced immunosuppression mice were used in this study. OPENF powder is light yellow green and has a protein-fat-carbohydrate ratio of 16:9:75 with good solubility in water. A pilot study investigating immune functional impacts of the OPENF on mice show that the OPENF enhanced spleen lymphocyte proliferation and the activity of natural killer (NK) cells in BALB/c mice. Furthermore, OPENF can improve intestinal absorption, increase food utilization ratio, and maintain the normal physiological function of mice. These results suggest that oyster peptides could serve as a new protein source for use in enteral nutrition formula, but more importantly, also indicate that OPENF has an immunostimulating effect in mice.

  4. Health-Care Costs, Glycemic Control and Nutritional Status in Malnourished Older Diabetics Treated with a Hypercaloric Diabetes-Specific Enteral Nutritional Formula

    PubMed Central

    Sanz-Paris, Alejandro; Boj-Carceller, Diana; Lardies-Sanchez, Beatriz; Perez-Fernandez, Leticia; Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso J.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes-specific formulas are an effective alternative for providing nutrients and maintaining glycemic control. This study assesses the effect of treatment with an oral enteral nutrition with a hypercaloric diabetes-specific formula (HDSF) for one year, on health-care resources use, health-care costs, glucose control and nutritional status, in 93 type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) malnourished patients. Changes in health-care resources use and health-care costs were collected the year before and during the year of intervention. Glucose status and nutritional laboratory parameters were analyzed at baseline and one-year after the administration of HDSF. The administration of HDSF was significantly associated with a reduced use of health-care resources, fewer hospital admissions (54.7%; p < 0.001), days spent at hospital (64.1%; p < 0.001) and emergency visits (57.7%; p < 0.001). Health-care costs were reduced by 65.6% (p < 0.001) during the intervention. Glycemic control (short- and long-term) and the need of pharmacological treatment did not change, while some nutritional parameters were improved at one year (albumin: +10.6%, p < 0.001; hemoglobin: +6.4%, p = 0.026). In conclusion, using HDSF in malnourished older type-2 diabetic patients may allow increasing energy intake while maintaining glucose control and improving nutritional parameters. The use of health-care resources and costs were significantly reduced during the nutritional intervention. PMID:27005661

  5. Health-Care Costs, Glycemic Control and Nutritional Status in Malnourished Older Diabetics Treated with a Hypercaloric Diabetes-Specific Enteral Nutritional Formula.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Paris, Alejandro; Boj-Carceller, Diana; Lardies-Sanchez, Beatriz; Perez-Fernandez, Leticia; Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso J

    2016-03-01

    Diabetes-specific formulas are an effective alternative for providing nutrients and maintaining glycemic control. This study assesses the effect of treatment with an oral enteral nutrition with a hypercaloric diabetes-specific formula (HDSF) for one year, on health-care resources use, health-care costs, glucose control and nutritional status, in 93 type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) malnourished patients. Changes in health-care resources use and health-care costs were collected the year before and during the year of intervention. Glucose status and nutritional laboratory parameters were analyzed at baseline and one-year after the administration of HDSF. The administration of HDSF was significantly associated with a reduced use of health-care resources, fewer hospital admissions (54.7%; p < 0.001), days spent at hospital (64.1%; p < 0.001) and emergency visits (57.7%; p < 0.001). Health-care costs were reduced by 65.6% (p < 0.001) during the intervention. Glycemic control (short- and long-term) and the need of pharmacological treatment did not change, while some nutritional parameters were improved at one year (albumin: +10.6%, p < 0.001; hemoglobin: +6.4%, p = 0.026). In conclusion, using HDSF in malnourished older type-2 diabetic patients may allow increasing energy intake while maintaining glucose control and improving nutritional parameters. The use of health-care resources and costs were significantly reduced during the nutritional intervention. PMID:27005661

  6. American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition and Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Revised 2014 Standards of Practice and Standards of Professional Performance for Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (Competent, Proficient, and Expert) in Nutrition Support.

    PubMed

    Brantley, Susan L; Russell, Mary K; Mogensen, Kris M; Wooley, Jennifer A; Bobo, Elizabeth; Chen, Yimin; Malone, Ainsley; Roberts, Susan; Romano, Michelle M; Taylor, Beth

    2014-12-01

    This 2014 revision of the Standards of Practice (SOP) and Standards of Professional Performance (SOPP) for Registered Dietitians Nutritionists (RDNs) in Nutrition Support represents an update of the 2007 Standards composed by content experts of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The revision is based upon the Revised 2012 SOP in Nutrition Care and SOPP for RDs, which incorporates the Nutrition Care Process and the six domains of professionalism: Quality in Practice, Competence and Accountability, Provision of Services, Application of Research, Communication and Application of Knowledge, and Utilization and Management of Resources. These SOP and SOPP are designed to promote the provision of safe, effective, and efficient nutrition support services, facilitate evidence-based practice, and serve as a professional evaluation resource for RDNs who specialize or wish to specialize in nutrition support therapy. These standards should be applied in all patient/client care settings in which RDNs in nutrition support provide care. These settings include, but are not limited to, acute care, ambulatory/outpatient care, and home and alternate site care. The standards highlight the value of the nutrition support RDN's roles in quality management, regulatory compliance, research, teaching, consulting, and writing for peer-reviewed professional publications. The standards assist the RDN in nutrition support to distinguish his or her level of practice (competent, proficient, or expert) and would guide the RDN in creating a personal development plan to achieve increasing levels of knowledge, skill, and ability in nutrition support practice. PMID:25362700

  7. Assessment of vitamin and trace element supplementation in severely burned patients undergoing long-term parenteral and enteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Perro, G; Bourdarias, B; Cutillas, M; Higueret, D; Sanchez, R; Iron, A

    1995-10-01

    The efficacy of an oral supplement of vitamins and trace elements during a longterm artificial parenteral and enteral nutrition was investigated for 3 months in patients with extensive burns. Thirty severely burned patients (22 male, 8 female, age 41 +/- 18 years, range 23-59 years, 33 +/- 12% total body surface area burn, 22% +/- 8 full thickness burn surface area) were included. Every 10 days, from day 10 until day 90, we determined serum levels of: *vitamins B1, B12, A, E, *folic acid, *copper, zinc, iron, *transferrin, albumin, prealbumin, total proteins, *fibronectin, retinol binding protein (RBP), *calcium, *phosphorus, *triglycerides, *total cholesterol, *C reactive protein (CRP), *erythrocyte folic acid. The mean daily nutritional support was 60 Kcals and 0.4 g N per kg of body weight, 70% enterally and 30% parenterally administered, with enteral vitamin and trace element supplementation. On day 10, there was a decrease of the serum level of 19/20 parameters. For 8 parameters (vitamin A, total cholesterol, iron, transferrin, fibronectin, phosphorus, RBP, total proteins), the level was lower than usual. Between day 10 and day 20, a significant normalization of 6 of them was noted, the average levels of transferrin and iron remaining below normal values until day 50. There was a significant decrease in C-reactive protein levels, however above normal limits. No deficiency in vitamins or trace elements was found. Cyclic variations of serum levels occurred which may be more related to volemic, hydroelectrolytic, endocrine and inflammatory disorders than to nutritional problems. PMID:16843945

  8. [Determination of the content of eight metal elements in enteral nutritional powder (VIVONEX) by microwave digestion-AAS].

    PubMed

    Ding, Rui; Zhou, Chang-Ming; Ji, Hong; Yu, Li; Li, Zhi-Gang; Peng, Tao; Wang, Lin

    2011-11-01

    Enteral nutritional powder (VIVONEX) is mainly used to provide nourishment for critical patients and those patients who have just undergone surgical operation. Microelements included in it exert significant influence on the patients' physical functioning. In the present paper, Enteral nutritional powder was digested with HNO3 by microwave digestion. After that, the content of eight metal elements in it, K, Na, Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn, Cu and Zn, was determined by FAAS. With the good linear correlations of standard curves (r = 0.999 2-0.999 8), the recovery (n = 6) ranging from 97% to 103%, and the RSD (n = 6) from 0.46% to 1.12%, the method can be applied to simultaneous determination of several metal elements in enteral nutritional powder, and offers advantages of low detection limit, high sensitivity, speediness and accuracy. The determination of metal elements in samples by this method gives satisfactory results. Hence, the method helps to guarantee quality control of this kind of medicine, and supplies statistical evidence for the safety of clinical drug use. PMID:22242533

  9. Enteral feeding induces diet-dependent mucosal dysfunction, bacterial proliferation, and necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm pigs on parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Bjornvad, Charlotte R; Thymann, Thomas; Deutz, Nicolaas E; Burrin, Douglas G; Jensen, Søren K; Jensen, Bent B; Mølbak, Lars; Boye, Mette; Larsson, Lars-Inge; Schmidt, Mette; Michaelsen, Kim F; Sangild, Per T

    2008-11-01

    Preterm neonates have an immature gut and metabolism and may benefit from total parenteral nutrition (TPN) before enteral food is introduced. Conversely, delayed enteral feeding may inhibit gut maturation and sensitize to necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Intestinal mass and NEC lesions were first recorded in preterm pigs fed enterally (porcine colostrum, bovine colostrum, or formula for 20-40 h), with or without a preceding 2- to 3-day TPN period (n = 435). Mucosal mass increased during TPN and further after enteral feeding to reach an intestinal mass similar to that in enterally fed pigs without TPN (+60-80% relative to birth). NEC developed only after enteral feeding but more often after a preceding TPN period for both sow's colostrum (26 vs. 5%) and formula (62 vs. 39%, both P < 0.001, n = 43-170). Further studies in 3-day-old TPN pigs fed enterally showed that formula feeding decreased villus height and nutrient digestive capacity and increased luminal lactic acid and NEC lesions, compared with colostrum (bovine or porcine, P < 0.05). Mucosal microbial diversity increased with enteral feeding, and Clostridium perfringens density was related to NEC severity. Formula feeding decreased plasma arginine, citrulline, ornithine, and tissue antioxidants, whereas tissue nitric oxide synthetase and gut permeability increased, relative to colostrum (all P < 0.05). In conclusion, enteral feeding is associated with gut dysfunction, microbial imbalance, and NEC in preterm pigs, especially in pigs fed formula after TPN. Conversely, colostrum milk diets improve gut maturation and NEC resistance in preterm pigs subjected to a few days of TPN after birth. PMID:18818317

  10. Early-life enteric infections: relation between chronic systemic inflammation and poor cognition in children.

    PubMed

    Oriá, Reinaldo B; Murray-Kolb, Laura E; Scharf, Rebecca J; Pendergast, Laura L; Lang, Dennis R; Kolling, Glynis L; Guerrant, Richard L

    2016-06-01

    The intestinal microbiota undergoes active remodeling in the first 6 to 18 months of life, during which time the characteristics of the adult microbiota are developed. This process is strongly influenced by the early diet and enteric pathogens. Enteric infections and malnutrition early in life may favor microbiota dysbiosis and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, resulting in intestinal barrier dysfunction and translocation of intestinal bacterial products, ultimately leading to low-grade, chronic, subclinical systemic inflammation. The leaky gut-derived low-grade systemic inflammation may have profound consequences on the gut-liver-brain axis, compromising normal growth, metabolism, and cognitive development. This review examines recent data suggesting that early-life enteric infections that lead to intestinal barrier disruption may shift the intestinal microbiota toward chronic systemic inflammation and subsequent impaired cognitive development. PMID:27142301

  11. Limited effects of preterm birth and the first enteral nutrition on cerebellum morphology and gene expression in piglets.

    PubMed

    Bergström, Anders; Kaalund, Sanne S; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Andersen, Anders D; Pakkenberg, Bente; Rosenørn, Ann; van Elburg, Ruurd M; Thymann, Thomas; Greisen, Gorm O; Sanglid, Per T

    2016-07-01

    Preterm pigs show many signs of immaturity that are characteristic of preterm infants. In preterm infants, the cerebellum grows particularly rapid and hypoplasia and cellular lesions are associated with motor dysfunction and cognitive deficits. We hypothesized that functional brain delays observed in preterm pigs would be paralleled by both structural and molecular differences in the cerebellum relative to term born piglets. Cerebella were collected from term (n = 56) and preterm (90% gestation, n = 112) pigs at 0, 5, and 26 days after birth for stereological volume estimations, large-scale qPCR gene expression analyses (selected neurodevelopmental genes) and western blot protein expression analysis (Sonic Hedgehog pathway). Memory and learning was tested using a T-maze, documenting that preterm pigs showed delayed learning. Preterm pigs also showed reduced volume of both white and gray matter at all three ages but the proportion of white matter increased postnatally, relative to term pigs. Early initiation of enteral nutrition had limited structural or molecular effects. The Sonic Hedgehog pathway was unaffected by preterm birth. Few differences in expression of the selected genes were found, except consistently higher mRNA levels of Midkine, p75, and Neurotrophic factor 3 in the preterm cerebellum postnatally, probably reflecting an adaptive response to preterm birth. Pig cerebellar development appears more affected by postconceptional age than by environmental factors at birth or postnatally. Compensatory mechanisms following preterm birth may include faster white matter growth and increased expression of selected genes for neurotrophic factors and regulation of angiogenesis. While the pig cerebellum is immature in 90% gestation preterm pigs, it appears relatively mature and resilient toward environmental factors. PMID:27462071

  12. Fast-track surgery and exclusive enteral nutrition applied to a rat model of heterotopic intestinal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    XU, XINGWEI; FENG, TAO; GAO, XIN; ZHAO, XIN; LIAO, YANNIAN; JI, WU

    2016-01-01

    The present study applied fast-track surgery (FTS) concepts and exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN) to a rat model of heterotopic intestinal transplantation (HIT). A total of 96 pairs of Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly distributed into three groups, as follows: i) The conventional group (group 1); ii) the FTS group (group 2); and iii) the FTS with EEN group (EEN group). FTS alterations to the HIT protocol were as follows: i) The use of sevoflurane as an anesthetic; ii) alterations to the order of the procedure and iii) a modified suturing technique. In addition, the EEN group rats underwent an early EEN gavage. The operation time, success rate, recovery state and morphological characteristics of the grafts were compared among the groups. The average operative time was significantly decreased in the group 2 and EEN group rats (137.44±16.03 and 139.67±15.25 min, respectively), as compared with the group 1 rats (169.36±13.72 min; P<0.05). In addition, the percentage of rats surviving >14 days was significantly increased in the group 2 (87.5%) and EEN group (90.6%) rats, as compared with the group 1 rats (68.7%; P<0.05). Furthermore, the villi of graft in EEN group appeared longer, and exhibited narrower interspaces. The ischemia-reperfusion injury and mononuclear cell infiltration were attenuated at postoperative day 7. The results of the present study suggested that the application of FTS concepts and EEN gavage to HIT may accelerate recovery and ameliorate graft damage following surgery. PMID:26998015

  13. Enteral obeticholic acid prevents hepatic cholestasis in total parenteral nutrition-fed neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is a vital support for neonatal infants with congenital or acquired gastrointestinal (GI) disorders and requiring small bowel resection. An adverse outcome associated with prolonged TPN use is parenteral nutrition associated cholestasis (PNAC). We previously showed t...

  14. Nutrition for Early Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Center Medical Education Institute, Inc. (MEI) MedlinePlus Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Nutrition for Early Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults Page Content On this page: ...

  15. Home parenteral nutrition in management of patients with severe radiation enteritis

    SciTech Connect

    Lavery, I.C.; Steiger, E.; Fazio, V.W.

    1980-03-01

    Five patients who would have been unable to survive because of intestinal complications of radiation therapy were able to lead an otherwise normal life with the use of parenteral nutrition administered at home. One patient died of recurrent carcinoma of the cervix after 14 months. Another patient died as the result of a totally avoidable pharmaceutical error after 2 1/2 years. The remaining three are still disease free without morbidity relating to the parenteral nutrition.

  16. Update on Early Nutrition and Food Allergy in Children

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun Eun

    2016-01-01

    With growing evidence of an increase in the prevalence, food allergy has been emerged as a new public health problem. As treatment and management of food allergy remain challenging, more attention has been paid to the importance of prevention of food allergy. Although the exact mechanism of recent epidemic is not fully understood, it is suggested that nutritional exposure in early life may play an important role in food allergy development. The underlying hypothesis is that nutritional status or food exposure in the critical period of fetal development can affect the programming of immune system and modify the risk of immunologic reactions to foods in postnatal life. We review accumulating epidemiological studies to examine an association between nutritional exposure during pregnancy or early infancy and food allergy development in children. We also discuss recent advances in the studies of the genetic and epigenetic regulation of food allergy and evaluate the role of early nutrition in food allergy development to provide a new perspective on the prevention of food allergy. PMID:26996550

  17. Update on Early Nutrition and Food Allergy in Children.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun Eun; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2016-05-01

    With growing evidence of an increase in the prevalence, food allergy has been emerged as a new public health problem. As treatment and management of food allergy remain challenging, more attention has been paid to the importance of prevention of food allergy. Although the exact mechanism of recent epidemic is not fully understood, it is suggested that nutritional exposure in early life may play an important role in food allergy development. The underlying hypothesis is that nutritional status or food exposure in the critical period of fetal development can affect the programming of immune system and modify the risk of immunologic reactions to foods in postnatal life. We review accumulating epidemiological studies to examine an association between nutritional exposure during pregnancy or early infancy and food allergy development in children. We also discuss recent advances in the studies of the genetic and epigenetic regulation of food allergy and evaluate the role of early nutrition in food allergy development to provide a new perspective on the prevention of food allergy. PMID:26996550

  18. American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition and Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: revised 2014 standards of practice and standards of professional performance for registered dietitian nutritionists (competent, proficient, and expert) in nutrition support.

    PubMed

    Brantley, Susan L; Russell, Mary K; Mogensen, Kris M; Wooley, Jennifer A; Bobo, Elizabeth; Chen, Yimin; Malone, Ainsley; Roberts, Susan; Romano, Michelle M; Taylor, Beth

    2014-12-01

    This 2014 revision of the Standards of Practice (SOP) and Standards of Professional Performance (SOPP) for Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (RDNs) in Nutrition Support represents an update of the 2007 Standards composed by content experts of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The revision is based on the Revised 2012 SOP in Nutrition Care and SOPP for RDs, which incorporates the Nutrition Care Process and the following six domains of professionalism: Quality in Practice, Competence and Accountability, Provision of Services, Application of Research, Communication and Application of Knowledge, and Utilization and Management of Resources. These SOP and SOPP are designed to promote the provision of safe, effective, and efficient nutrition support services; facilitate evidence-based practice; and serve as a professional evaluation resource for RDNs who specialize in or wish to specialize in nutrition support therapy. These standards should be applied in all patient/client care settings in which RDNs in nutrition support provide care. These settings include, but are not limited to, acute care, ambulatory/outpatient care, and home and alternate site care. The standards highlight the value of the nutrition support RDN's roles in quality management, regulatory compliance, research, teaching, consulting, and writing for peer-reviewed professional publications. The standards assist the RDN in nutrition support to distinguish his or her level of practice (competent, proficient, or expert) and would guide the RDN in creating a personal development plan to achieve increasing levels of knowledge, skill, and ability in nutrition support practice. PMID:25443567

  19. Economic perspectives on integrating early child stimulation with nutritional interventions.

    PubMed

    Alderman, Harold; Behrman, Jere R; Grantham-McGregor, Sally; Lopez-Boo, Florencia; Urzua, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    There is a strongly held view that a narrow window exists for effective nutritional interventions and a widely known stylized depiction of age-dependent economic rates of returns to investments in cognitive and socioemotional development. Both indicate critical periods in early life. Moreover, the fact that both the physical and cognitive development of a child in these early years are highly dependent on childcare practices and on the characteristics of the caregivers motivates an interest in finding effective means to enhance stimulation in the context of nutritional programs, or vice versa. Nevertheless, there is relatively little evidence to date on how to align integrated interventions to these age-specific patterns and how to undertake benefit-cost analyses for integrated interventions. Thus, many core questions need further consideration in order to design integrated nutritional and stimulation programs. This paper looks at some of these questions and provides some guidelines as to how the economic returns from joint nutrition and stimulation programs might be estimated. PMID:24405371

  20. Effect of Immune-Enhancing Enteral Nutrition Enriched with or without Beta-Glucan on Immunomodulation in Critically Ill Patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Gil; Kim, Young Sam; Lee, Young Ju; Ahn, Hyeon Yeong; Kim, Minjoo; Kim, Minkyung; Cho, Min Jung; Cho, Younsoo; Lee, Jong Ho

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether high-protein enteral nutrition with immune-modulating nutrients (IMHP) enriched with β-glucan stimulates immune function in critically ill patients. In a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study, 30 patients consumed one of three types of enteral nutrition: a control or IMHP with and without β-glucan. The IMHP with β-glucan group showed increases in natural killer (NK) cell activities relative to the baseline, and greater increases were observed in NK cell activities relative to the control group after adjusting for age and gender. The IMHP groups with and without β-glucan had greater increases in serum prealbumin and decreases in high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) than the control group. The control group had a greater decrease in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) interleukin (IL)-12 production than the IMHP with and without β-glucan groups. In all patients, the change (Δ) in hs-CRP was correlated with Δ prealbumin and Δ PBMC IL-12, which were correlated with ΔNK cell activity and Δ prealbumin. This study showed beneficial effects of a combination treatment of β-glucan and IMHP on NK cell activity. Additionally, strong correlations among changes in NK cell activity, PBMC IL-12, and hs-CRP suggested that β-glucan could be an attractive candidate for stimulating protective immunity without enhanced inflammation (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02569203). PMID:27271657

  1. Effect of Immune-Enhancing Enteral Nutrition Enriched with or without Beta-Glucan on Immunomodulation in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Gil; Kim, Young Sam; Lee, Young Ju; Ahn, Hyeon Yeong; Kim, Minjoo; Kim, Minkyung; Cho, Min Jung; Cho, Younsoo; Lee, Jong Ho

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether high-protein enteral nutrition with immune-modulating nutrients (IMHP) enriched with β-glucan stimulates immune function in critically ill patients. In a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study, 30 patients consumed one of three types of enteral nutrition: a control or IMHP with and without β-glucan. The IMHP with β-glucan group showed increases in natural killer (NK) cell activities relative to the baseline, and greater increases were observed in NK cell activities relative to the control group after adjusting for age and gender. The IMHP groups with and without β-glucan had greater increases in serum prealbumin and decreases in high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) than the control group. The control group had a greater decrease in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) interleukin (IL)-12 production than the IMHP with and without β-glucan groups. In all patients, the change (Δ) in hs-CRP was correlated with Δ prealbumin and Δ PBMC IL-12, which were correlated with ΔNK cell activity and Δ prealbumin. This study showed beneficial effects of a combination treatment of β-glucan and IMHP on NK cell activity. Additionally, strong correlations among changes in NK cell activity, PBMC IL-12, and hs-CRP suggested that β-glucan could be an attractive candidate for stimulating protective immunity without enhanced inflammation (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02569203). PMID:27271657

  2. Therapeutic Efficacy of Oral Enteral Nutrition in Pediatric Crohn's Disease: A Single Center Non-Comparative Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Jin; Kim, Young; Cho, Jin Min; Oh, Seak Hee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN) therapy effectively induces clinical remission in Crohn's disease (CD). It remains unclear, however, whether partial enteral nutrition (PEN) can maintain remission. This study was performed to determine the abilities of oral EEN and oral PEN to induce and maintain clinical remission in pediatric patients with CD, respectively. Materials and Methods Pediatric patients with CD who received oral EEN at a single center in 2000–2014 were identified retrospectively. Remission rates of the EEN and PEN during the 2 years study period were determined. Risk factors for EEN and PEN failure were identified. Results Of the 66 patients who started EEN, 61 (92%) completed the course. Clinical remission was achieved in 88% (58/66) of the patients. All 58 patients with remission continued with PEN: 43 (74%) were treatment adherent. The cumulative remission rates at 1 and 2 years were 67% and 52%, respectively. Differing from EEN, limited therapeutic efficacy of PEN was shown in severe CD patients. Female gender associated significantly with non-adherence. Conclusion Oral EEN and PEN effectively induced and maintained remission in a pediatric population. Non-adherence was a limiting factor in the success of therapy. PMID:27401650

  3. Ketogenic enteral nutrition as a treatment for obesity: short term and long term results from 19,000 patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Only protein diet has been used successfully to prevent loss of lean body mass first in post-surgical and then in obese patients. We studied overweight and obese patients receiving short treatments of an exclusively protein-based nutritional solution as 24-hour enteral infusion. Methods 19,036 patients (age 44.3 ± 13, M:F = 2:5) with an initial body mass index of 36.5 ± 7.1 underwent 10-day cycles of enteral nutrition through a fine nasogastric tube. The nutritional solution consisted solely of 50–65 g of proteins, plus vitamins and electrolytes. The 24-hour infusion was controlled with a small portable pump. Before and after each 10-day cycle body composition was checked with a Handy 3000 impedance analyzer. At the onset of treatment, average fat mass was 40.9 ± 12.8 kg while body cell mass was 42.7 ± 7.2 kg in males and 27.4 ± 4.6 kg in females. Results After an average of 2.5 cycles the patients lost 10.2 ± 7.0 kg of body weight, 5.8 ± 5.5 kg of fat mass and 2.2 ± 3.3 kg of body cell mass. No significant adverse effects were recorded except asthenia and constipation which were easily controlled with therapy. Long-term results were obtained from 15,444 patients and after an average of 362 ± 296 days we found a mean weight regain of 15.4%. Conclusion Ketogenic Enteral Nutrition treatment of over 19,000 patients induced a rapid 10% weight loss, 57% of which was Fat Mass. No significant adverse effects were found. The treatment is safe, fast, inexpensive and has good one-year results for weight maintenance. PMID:23110922

  4. Enteral nutrition versus parenteral nutrition after major abdominal surgery in patients with gastrointestinal cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xu-Fei; Wu, Ning; Zhao, Guo-Qiang; Liu, Jian-Fang; Dai, Ye-Feng

    2016-06-01

    To clarify the benefits of enteral nutrition (EN) versus total parenteral nutrition (TPN) in patients with gastrointestinal cancer who underwent major abdominal surgery. Medline, Cochrane, EMBASE, and Google Scholar were searched for studies published until July 10, 2015, reporting outcomes between the two types of postoperative nutritional support. Only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included. A χ(2)-based test of homogeneity was performed using Cochran's Q statistic and I(2) A total of 2540 patients (1268 who received EN and 1272 who received TPN; average age range: 58.3-67.7 years) from 18 RCTs were included for assessment. Patients who received EN had shorter lengths of hospital stay (pooled difference in mean=-1.74, 95% CI -2.41 to -1.07, p<0.001, shorter time to flatus (pooled difference in mean=-1.27, 95% CI -1.69 to -0.85, p<0.001), and significantly greater increases in albumin levels (pooled difference in mean=-1.33, 95% CI -2.18 to -0.47, p=0.002) compared with those who received TPN after major abdominal surgery, based on a random-effects model of analysis. EN after major abdominal surgery provided better outcomes compared with TPN in patients with gastrointestinal cancer. PMID:27112357

  5. Comparison of amino acid v peptide based enteral diets in active Crohn's disease: clinical and nutritional outcome.

    PubMed Central

    Royall, D; Jeejeebhoy, K N; Baker, J P; Allard, J P; Habal, F M; Cunnane, S C; Greenberg, G R

    1994-01-01

    Elemental diets are considered an effective primary treatment for active Crohn's disease. This study examined the hypothesis that improvement occurs because of the presence of amino acids or the low fat content, or both. A randomised, controlled trial was undertaken in 40 patients with active Crohn's disease to evaluate clinical and nutritional outcomes after an amino acid based diet containing 3% fat was given by a feeding tube compared with a peptide based diet containing 33% fat. After three weeks' treatment, clinical remission occurred in 84% of patients who were given the amino acid diet and 75% of patients who received the peptide diet (p = 0.38). Plasma linoleic acid concentration was reduced after the amino acid but not the peptide diet. An increase in total body nitrogen was associated with the magnitude of nutritional depletion before treatment and at six months' follow up, only patients who showed gains in total body nitrogen after enteral nutrition had a sustained clinical remission. This study shows that peptide based high fat diets are as effective as amino acid low fat diets for achieving clinical remission in active Crohn's disease. Improved total body protein stores but not essential fatty acid depletion may be an important indicator of a sustained remission. PMID:8020806

  6. ILSI Task Force on enteral nutrition; estimated composition and costs of blenderized diets.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Roseli; Dutra Araujo, Thalita; Airoldi Vieira, Roberta Ianni; Theodoro de Souza, Telma; Waitzberg, Dan Linetzky

    2013-01-01

    Blenderized tube diets (BTD) are used in some parts of Brazil and few studies have analyzed their features in comparison with industrialized preparations. Among 14 randomly collected BTD recipes 9 were poorly described or failed to standardize foodstuffs and portions and, consequently, nutrient and energy composition was difficult to define. Only five BTD allowed theoretical estimation of their nutritional properties. Macronutrient content was highly variable, often conflicting with accepted daily recommendations. According to the literature there are further disadvantages with BTD use including diet high risk of contamination, physical and chemical instability, and high osmolarity and viscosity. Nominal cost of BTD was comparatively low in relation to industrialized formulas; however we did not compute labor and indirect expenses, probably rendering final value more expensive than with the industrialized alternative. It is likely that within such circumstances, hospital and home care malnutrition will not be adequately dealt with and related complications may occur. It is concluded that the continued use of blenderized tube feeding diets requires careful assessment, prioritizing correction of potencial nutritional deficits by means of safe, balanced, chemically complete and effective nutritional prescriptions. PMID:24506385

  7. Percutaneous endoscopic transgastric jejunostomy (PEG-J): a retrospective analysis on its utility in maintaining enteral nutrition after unsuccessful gastric feeding

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Ezekiel Wong Toh; Yoneda, Kaori; Nakamura, Shinya; Nishihara, Kazuki

    2016-01-01

    Background/aims Although percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is the method of choice for long-term enteral nutrition, feeding-related adverse events such as aspiration pneumonia and peristomal leakage can impede the use of PEG. Percutaneous endoscopic transgastric jejunostomy (PEG-J) using large-bore jejunal tubes may help by circumventing gastric passage during enteral nutrition and improving drainage of gastric secretions. Methods 20 patients (12 males and 8 females) who received PEG-J after unsuccessful PEG feeding during a 6-year period in our institution were analysed retrospectively to evaluate the efficacy of large-bore jejunal feeding tubes in maintaining enteral nutrition. Results The median age was 83.5 (71–96) years. The median period between PEG and PEG-J was 33 (14–280) days. Indications were aspiration due to gastro-oesophageal reflux in 18 patients and severe peristomal leakage in 2 patients. Tube placements were successful in all patients. There were 6 (30%) in-hospital mortalities, with 3 (15%) occurring within 30 days after procedure. Conclusions PEG-J can be performed safely in patients with PEG and may facilitate the maintenance of enteral nutrition in most of the patients. Patients with unsuccessful PEG feeding can be offered the option of jejunal feeding before considering termination of enteral nutrition. PMID:27486522

  8. Early nutrition and health: short- and long-term outcomes.

    PubMed

    Gruszfeld, Dariusz; Socha, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Maternal diet, nutritional status during pregnancy, and the early diet of the offspring play an important role in later health. The short- and long-term outcomes of early nutrition have been extensively studied in recent decades. One of the most commonly investigated nutritional interventions is breastfeeding, which is associated with a number of positive short- and long-term outcomes. A short-term effect of breastfeeding is reduced morbidity and mortality in children from poor living conditions and in preterm infants. Breastfeeding is associated with better cognitive development and also has a long-term protective effect on obesity risk, prevalence of type 2 diabetes, and a lowering effect on blood pressure. Selected nutrients have undergone extensive investigation to show their role in disease prevention or improved development, e.g. protein intake in infancy seems to be associated with a later risk of obesity or docosahexaenoic acid supplementation has a positive impact on cognitive function. Another consideration is the fast catch-up growth in small for gestational age infants as an important factor associated with adult risk of cardiovascular problems. On the other hand, high protein and energy intake seems to be positively associated with some indicators of cognitive development. Most of the evidence comes from observational studies that cannot exclude potential confounders. Animal studies demonstrate causality but should not be directly extrapolated to humans. The number of randomized controlled studies is increasing but long-term follow-ups are necessary to obtain convincing results. The majority of these trials compare different infant formula compositions and macro- or micronutrient supplementation. One of the major questions is to define a critical (or opportunity) window and a mechanism of nutritional influence on several health outcomes. PMID:24029784

  9. Treatment of Hypothyroidism due to Iodine Deficiency Using Daily Powdered Kelp in Patients Receiving Long-term Total Enteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Takako; Kamasaki, Hotaka; Hotsubo, Tomoyuki; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    We investigated thyroid function and urinary iodine concentration (UIC) in seven patients with severe motor intellectual disabilities. All seven received total enteral nutrition (TEN) for more than three years with a daily iodine intake of less than 20 µg. They were diagnosed as hypothyroidism due to iodine deficiency (HID) because of high TSH levels (7.6–82.3 µIU/ml), lower free T4 (FT4 0.4–1.5 ng/dl), negative anti-thyroid antibodies (anti-thyroglobulin antibody, anti-thyroidal peroxidase antibody) and extremely low UIC (<25–58 µg/l) levels. We gave them 1–2 g powdered kelp (200–400 µg as iodine) once a day, which restored their thyroid function and normalized their UICs. We proposed that daily powdered kelp would be effective and safe to treat HID in patient receiving long term TEN. PMID:23926395

  10. The Enteric Two-Step: nutritional strategies of bacterial pathogens within the gut

    PubMed Central

    Ferreyra, Jessica A.; Ng, Katharine M.; Sonnenburg, Justin L.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The gut microbiota is a dense and diverse microbial community governed by dynamic microbe–microbe and microbe–host interactions, the status of which influences whether enteric pathogens can cause disease. Here we review recent insights into the key roles that nutrients play in bacterial pathogen exploitation of the gut microbial ecosystem. We synthesize recent findings to support a five-stage model describing the transition between a healthy microbiota and one dominated by a pathogen and disease. Within this five-stage model, two stages are critical to the pathogen: (i) an initial expansion phase that must occur in the absence of pathogen-induced inflammation, followed by (ii) pathogen-promoting physiological changes such as inflammation and diarrhoea. We discuss how this emerging paradigm of pathogen life within the lumen of the gut is giving rise to novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:24720567

  11. The impact of early nutrition on the ageing trajectory.

    PubMed

    Tarry-Adkins, Jane L; Ozanne, Susan E

    2014-05-01

    Epidemiological studies, including those in identical twins, and in individuals in utero during periods of famine have provided robust evidence of strong correlations between low birth-weight and subsequent risk of disease in later life, including type 2 diabetes (T2D), CVD, and metabolic syndrome. These and studies in animal models have suggested that the early environment, especially early nutrition, plays an important role in mediating these associations. The concept of early life programming is therefore widely accepted; however the molecular mechanisms by which early environmental insults can have long-term effects on a cell and consequently the metabolism of an organism in later life, are relatively unclear. So far, these mechanisms include permanent structural changes to the organ caused by suboptimal levels of an important factor during a critical developmental period, changes in gene expression caused by epigenetic modifications (including DNA methylation, histone modification and microRNA) and permanent changes in cellular ageing. Many of the conditions associated with early-life nutrition are also those which have an age-associated aetiology. Recently, a common molecular mechanism in animal models of developmental programming and epidemiological studies has been development of oxidative stress and macromolecule damage, specifically DNA damage and telomere shortening. These are phenotypes common to accelerated cellular ageing. Thus, this review will encompass epidemiological and animal models of developmental programming with specific emphasis on cellular ageing and how these could lead to potential therapeutic interventions and strategies which could combat the burden of common age-associated disease, such as T2D and CVD. PMID:24411102

  12. The Effect of Early Marriages and Early Childbearing on Women's Nutritional Status in India.

    PubMed

    Goli, Srinivas; Rammohan, Anu; Singh, Deepti

    2015-08-01

    The consequences of early childbearing on the growth and nutritional status of women in India has not been quantified in previous studies. Our study aimed to fill this gap by analysing the association between early marriage and early childbearing on nutritional status of Indian women, with a focus on Bihar and Andhra Pradesh, the two states accounting for the highest proportion of women marrying and giving first birth before 18 years of age. Our findings revealed that a substantial number of women were married before 18 years and thereby exposed to early pregnancy. Furthermore, a significantly higher proportion of women in the 'thin' category were married before 18 years, both in the Indian sample (33 %, p < 0.001) and in the selected states, Andhra Pradesh (31 %, p < 0.001) and Bihar (43 %, p < 0.001), compared to those women married at higher ages. Similarly, across all our samples women whose first birth was before age 18 years also had a significantly higher probability of being in the 'thin' category across all our samples. This pattern was also observed for associations between early childbirth and anemia levels. We conclude that the net effect of the early age at marriage and age at first birth on nutritional status is significant. Our results underline the need for preventing early marriages and the consequent high adolescent pregnancies in India, particularly in high prevalence states. This will help to improve nutritional status and health care utilisation among women, thereby, prevent maternal and child mortality and thus, achieve the MDGs 4-5. PMID:25656721

  13. Recycling of jejunal effluent to enable enteral nutrition in short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    McCain, Stephen; McCain, Scott; Harris, Andrew; McCallion, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    A 41-year-old woman developed severe abdominal pain, distension and faeculent vomiting. CT of abdomen and pelvis revealed small bowel malrotation with a right paraduodenal hernia. At emergency laparotomy, a right paraduodenal hernia containing jejunum and ileum was identified. She had a viable duodenum with 50 cm of ischaemic proximal jejunum which was exteriorised as an end jejunostomy; 180 cm of infarcted jejunum and ileum was resected. The proximal end of 150 cm of healthy ileum was exteriorised as a closed mucous fistula and 50 cm distally a feeding ileostomy was constructed. On day 5 postoperatively, jejunal effluent began to be recycled via her feeding ileostomy and she never required parenteral nutrition. Despite having only 50 cm of jejunum proximal to her stoma, recycling of effluent enabled her electrolytes to remain normal. She put on weight postoperatively and proceeded to closure of her stomas at 6 months, not requiring laparotomy. PMID:24872491

  14. A Proper Enteral Nutrition Support Improves Sequential Organ Failure Score and Decreases Length of Stay in Hospital in Burned Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ostadrahimi, Alireza; Nagili, Behrooz; Asghari-Jafarabadi, Mohammad; Beigzali, Sanaz; Zalouli, Hossein; Lak, Sima

    2016-01-01

    Background: Severe burned patients developed metabolic imbalances and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), which can lead to malnutrition, impaired immunologic response, multiple organ failure and death. Studies have shown that providing an early and adequate nutrition support can lower hypermetabolic response and improve the outcome. Unfortunately, little emphasis has been given to the role of nutritional support, especially for demonstrating the importance of a proper nutritional support in determining the outcome of critically burned patients. Objectives: This study was designed to determine the possible protective effect of early and adequate nutrition support on sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score and length of stay (LOS) in hospital, in thermal burn victims. Patients and Methods: Thirty patients with severe thermal burn (More than 20% of total body surface area [TBSA] burn), on the first day in the intensive care unit, joined this double-blinded randomized controlled clinical trial. Patients were randomly divided into two groups: control group (group C, 15 patients) received hospital routine diet (liquid and chow diet, ad libitum) while intervention group (group I, 15 patients) received commercially prepared solution, with oral or tube feeding. The caloric requirement for these patients was calculated, according to the Harris-Benedict formula. The SOFA score was also measured on admission (SOFA0), day 2 (SOFA1), day 5 (SOFA2) and day 9 (SOFA3), consequently. The difference between the last measurement (SOFA3) and day 2 (SOFA1) was calculated. Results: The results showed that there was a significant change between SOFA3 and SOFA1, {-1[(-1) – 0], P = 0.013 vs. -1 [(-2) - 0], P = 0.109}. Mean LOS in hospital, for patients consuming commercial standard food, also proved to be shorter than those consuming hospital routine foods (17.64 ± 8.2 vs. 23.07 ± 11.89). Conclusions: This study shows that an adequate nutritional support, in

  15. Paediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Mechanistic Approach to Investigate Exclusive Enteral Nutrition Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Day, Andrew S.; Lemberg, Daniel A.; Leach, Steven T.

    2014-01-01

    The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) include Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis. The disease may present at any age although the peak of presentation is the second and third decades of life. The incidences of these diseases are increasing around the world with the age of presentation getting younger. At present CD is incurable with colectomy being the treatment for severe UC. Although several pharmacological approaches are used to modulate the inflammatory response in IBD, few lead to histological healing and most have side effects. An alternative approach is to use enteral formulae given exclusively (EEN) to treat IBD. EEN requires the consumption of an elemental or polymeric formula, with the exclusion of all other nutrients, for a period of up to 12 weeks. The introduction of EEN as a therapeutic option for IBD was through prudent observation; however, EEN has become an established and reliable option for the treatment of paediatric IBD. Despite this, the mechanisms through which EEN induces disease remission are unknown and remain hypothetical. This review will discuss recent research into EEN both describing clinical features of EEN therapy and discussing the most up-to-date understanding of the mechanisms through which EEN may be reducing intestinal inflammation and inducing disease remission. PMID:24967146

  16. Paediatric inflammatory bowel disease: a mechanistic approach to investigate exclusive enteral nutrition treatment.

    PubMed

    Nahidi, Lily; Day, Andrew S; Lemberg, Daniel A; Leach, Steven T

    2014-01-01

    The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) include Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis. The disease may present at any age although the peak of presentation is the second and third decades of life. The incidences of these diseases are increasing around the world with the age of presentation getting younger. At present CD is incurable with colectomy being the treatment for severe UC. Although several pharmacological approaches are used to modulate the inflammatory response in IBD, few lead to histological healing and most have side effects. An alternative approach is to use enteral formulae given exclusively (EEN) to treat IBD. EEN requires the consumption of an elemental or polymeric formula, with the exclusion of all other nutrients, for a period of up to 12 weeks. The introduction of EEN as a therapeutic option for IBD was through prudent observation; however, EEN has become an established and reliable option for the treatment of paediatric IBD. Despite this, the mechanisms through which EEN induces disease remission are unknown and remain hypothetical. This review will discuss recent research into EEN both describing clinical features of EEN therapy and discussing the most up-to-date understanding of the mechanisms through which EEN may be reducing intestinal inflammation and inducing disease remission. PMID:24967146

  17. Early enteral feeding in severe acute pancreatitis: can it prevent secondary pancreatic (super) infection?

    PubMed

    Lehocky, P; Sarr, M G

    2000-01-01

    Sepsis continues to account for a second peak in mortality in patients with severe acute pancreatitis. The prevention of these septic complications and subsequent development of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome remains a major focus for investigators, yet despite considerable clinical and experimental work addressing its etiology, septic complications remain high. Several studies have been designed to demonstrate the mechanism of origin of these septic complications with an attempt to define strategies for their prevention to improve patient outcomes. There is clear evidence that the origin of this secondary bacterial infection arises from enteric bacterial translocation secondary to disruption of the gut mucosal barrier during acute pancreatitis. Strategies designed to prevent secondary pancreatic infection include aggressive fluid resuscitation to maximize organ perfusion, early systemic antibiotic treatment or selective gut decontamination, and recently attempts to block mediators of the systemic inflammatory response. This discussion will summarize our present understanding of the etiopathogenesis of secondary bacterial 'superinfection' of necrotizing pancreatitis and how the initiation of enteral feeding early in the course of acute pancreatitis may prove to be an effective means of preventing and/or reversing the breakdown of the gut mucosal defense barrier. PMID:11155001

  18. A New Model For Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis in the Rat Utilizing Total Enteral Nutrition to Overfeed a High Polyunsaturated Fat Diet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have used total enteral nutrition (TEN) to moderately overfeed rats high polyunsaturated fat diets to develop a model for non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed by TEN a 187 kcal/kg 3/4 /d diet containing 5% (total calories) corn oil or a 220 kcal/kg 3/4 /d diet i...

  19. Correlates of early substance use and crime among adolescents entering outpatient substance abuse treatment.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Michael S; Kinlock, Timothy W; Battjes, Robert J

    2004-01-01

    Although many studies have examined the relationship between early deviant behavior and subsequent life problems among adolescents drawn from the general population, such relationships have not been examined for youth attending substance abuse treatment. Based on in-depth psychosocial assessments conducted with adolescents entering an outpatient substance abuse treatment program (N = 193), the current study examines individual characteristics, life circumstances, and other behavioral and psychological characteristics that are correlated with the age at which these youth initiated substance use and criminal activity. Early onset of substance use was associated with greater levels of family deviance and a variety of problems including school adjustment, drug use, criminal involvement, bullying and cruelty to people and animals, and involvement in risky sexual activities. In contrast, early onset of crime was related only to male gender, early onset of substance use, and cruelty to people. Findings suggest that treatment providers may need to consider the ages at which their adolescent clients initiated substance use given its association with illegal activity, other deviant behavior, and precocious and high-risk sexual behaviors. PMID:15083553

  20. Towards an integrated understanding of the therapeutic utility of exclusive enteral nutrition in the treatment of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Ó Cuív, Páraic; Begun, Jakob; Keely, Simon; Lewindon, Peter J; Morrison, Mark

    2016-04-20

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic disease characterized by episodic and disabling inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract in genetically susceptible individuals. The incidence and prevalence of CD is rising rapidly across the world emphasising that disease risk is also influenced by environmental and lifestyle factors, as well as the microbial community resident in the gut. Childhood-onset CD is associated with an aggressive disease course that can adversely impact patient growth and development. There is no cure for CD however new onset and recurrent cases of paediatric CD are often responsive to exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN) treatment. EEN treatment involves the exclusive consumption of an elemental or polymeric formula for several weeks and it is well established as a primary intervention strategy. EEN treatments typically achieve remission rates of over 80% and importantly they are associated with a high rate of mucosal healing, far superior to steroids, which is prognostic of improved long-term health outcomes. Furthermore, they are safe, have few side effects, and improve nutritional status and linear growth. Surprisingly, despite the utility of EEN our understanding of the host-microbe-diet interactions that underpin clinical remission and mucosal healing are limited. Here, we review the current state of knowledge and propose that the induction of autophagy, in addition to modulation of the microbiota and coordinated effects on inflammation and epithelial cell biology, may be critical for the therapeutic effects associated with EEN. A better understanding of EEN treatment will provide new opportunities to restore gut homeostasis and prolong periods of remission, as well as provide new insights into the factors that trigger and perhaps prevent CD. PMID:26948398

  1. Early development of electrical excitability in the mouse enteric nervous system.

    PubMed

    Hao, Marlene M; Lomax, Alan E; McKeown, Sonja J; Reid, Christopher A; Young, Heather M; Bornstein, Joel C

    2012-08-01

    Neural activity is integral to the development of the enteric nervous system (ENS). A subpopulation of neural crest-derived cells expresses pan-neuronal markers at early stages of ENS development (at E10.5 in the mouse). However, the electrical activity of these cells has not been previously characterized, and it is not known whether all cells expressing neuronal markers are capable of firing action potentials (APs). In this study, we examined the activity of "neuron"-like cells (expressing pan-neuronal markers or with neuronal morphology) in the gut of E11.5 and E12.5 mice using whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology and compared them to the activity of neonatal and adult enteric neurons. Around 30-40% of neuron-like cells at E11.5 and E12.5 fired APs, some of which were very similar to those of adult enteric neurons. All APs were sensitive to tetrodotoxin (TTX), indicating that they were driven by voltage-gated Na+ currents. Expression of mRNA encoding several voltage-gated Na+ channels by the E11.5 gut was detected using RT-PCR. The density of voltage-gated Na+ currents increased from E11.5 to neonates. Immature active responses, mediated in part by TTX- and lidocaine-insensitive channels, were observed in most cells at E11.5 and E12.5, but not in P0/P1 or adult neurons. However, some cells expressing neuronal markers at E11.5 or E12.5 did not exhibit an active response to depolarization. Spontaneous depolarizations resembling excitatory postsynaptic potentials were observed at E12.5. The ENS is one of the earliest parts of the developing nervous system to exhibit mature forms of electrical activity. PMID:22875929

  2. The Missing Link: Self Study Continuing Education for Nutrition Services Awareness in Early Intervention. Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Lara; And Others

    This workbook is a companion to an 18-minute instructional video on nutrition services in early intervention programs. Both the workbook and the video are designed to assist early intervention professionals concerning nutrition and feeding concerns of children with special health care needs. The following issues are addressed: importance of…

  3. Close to recommended caloric and protein intake by enteral nutrition is associated with better clinical outcome of critically ill septic patients: secondary analysis of a large international nutrition database

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Current international sepsis guidelines recommend low-dose enteral nutrition (EN) for the first week. This contradicts other nutrition guidelines for heterogenous groups of ICU patients. Data on the optimal dose of EN in septic patients are lacking. Our aim was to evaluate the effect of energy and protein amount given by EN on clinical outcomes in a large cohort of critically ill septic patients. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of pooled data collected prospectively from international nutrition studies. Eligible patients had a diagnosis of sepsis and/or pneumonia and were admitted to the ICU for ≥3 days, mechanically ventilated within 48 hours of ICU admission and only receiving EN. Patients receiving parenteral nutrition were excluded. Data were collected from ICU admission up to a maximum of 12 days. Regression models were used to examine the impact of calorie and protein intake on 60-day mortality and ventilator-free days. Results Of the 13,630 patients included in the dataset, 2,270 met the study inclusion criteria. Patients received a mean amount of 1,057 kcal/d (14.5 kcal/kg/day) and 49 g protein/day (0.7 g/kg/d) by EN alone. Patients were mechanically ventilated for a median of 8.4 days and 60-day mortality was 30.5%. An increase of 1,000 kcal was associated with reduced 60-day mortality (odds ratio (OR) 0.61; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.48 to 0.77, P <0.001) and more ventilator-free days (2.81 days, 95% CI 0.53 to 5.08, P = 0.02) as was an increase of 30 g protein per day (OR 0.76; 95% CI 0.65 to 0.87, P <0.001 and 1.92 days, 95% CI 0.58 to 3.27, P = 0.005, respectively). Conclusions In critically ill septic patients, a calorie and protein delivery closer to recommended amounts by EN in the early phase of ICU stay was associated with a more favorable outcome. PMID:24506888

  4. Nutrition in Pancreatic Cancer: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Gärtner, Simone; Krüger, Janine; Aghdassi, Ali A.; Steveling, Antje; Simon, Peter; Lerch, Markus M.; Mayerle, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related mortality in both genders. More than 80% of patients suffer from significant weight loss at diagnosis and over time develop severe cachexia. Early nutritional support is therefore essential. Summary This review evaluates the different nutritional therapies, such as enteral nutrition, parenteral nutrition and special nutritional supplements, on nutritional status, quality of life and survival Key Message Due to the high prevalence of malnutrition and the rapid development of anorexia-cachexia-syndrome, early nutritional intervention is crucial and supported by clinical data Practical Implications Enteral nutrition should be preferred over parenteral nutrition. Omega-3 fatty acids and l-carnitine are promising substances for the prevention of severe cachexia, but further randomized controlled trials are needed to establish generally accepted guidelines on nutrition in pancreatic cancer. PMID:27403414

  5. Enteral supplementation with ornithine alpha ketoglutarate improves the early adaptive response to resection.

    PubMed Central

    Czernichow, B; Nsi-Emvo, E; Galluser, M; Gossé, F; Raul, F

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Polyamine synthesis or uptake, or both, might be an important event that initiates the adaptive hyperplasia seen in the intestinal remnant after partial small bowel resection. AIM: The ability of an enteral diet supplemented with the ornithine salt: ornithine alpha ketoglutarate (OKG), a precursor for polyamine synthesis, to modulate the adaptive response of the remnant ileum after jejunectomy was evaluated. METHODS: Adult Wistar rats underwent a resection of the proximal 50% of the small intestine. Controls underwent a single transection. The rats were fed intragastrically with a nutritive mixture supplemented either with casein hydrolysate or with OKG (1 g/kg). The isoenergetic and isonitrogeneous diets was given continuously for seven days. RESULTS: Villus and crypt hyperplasia was observed in the remnant ileum compared with transfected controls. OKG supplementation started after resection a further increase in villus height. After resection, OKG supplementation increased significantly the putrescine content and the amount of ornithine decarboxylase mRNA. A twofold to threefold increase of sucrase activity was measured in the resected animals compared with the transected rats. In contrast, the amount of sucrase mRNA was significantly lower in the ileum of the resected rats and OKG supplementation initiated a further drop in the amount of sucrase mRNA without pronounced changes in enzyme activity. CONCLUSIONS: The adaptive hypertrophy seen after resection can be accelerated by supplementing the diet with ornithine (OKG) a precursor of polyamine synthesis. In the remnant ileum, the reduced amount of sucrase mRNA, despite the increased level of sucrase activity, suggests a post-translational control of sucrase expression. PMID:9155578

  6. Entering Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawless, Ann; Sedorkin, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a short story of the authors, who show how they have "entered research", that is, entered the earliest conception of research and the early formation of research collaboration. As the authors worked together, they realised they had common concerns and life experiences. Each proudly identifies as working class Australian, each…

  7. Impact of nutrition since early life on cardiovascular prevention

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The cardiovascular disease represents the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Western countries and it is related to the atherosclerotic process. Cardiovascular disease risk factors, such as dyslipidemia, hypertension, insulin resistance, obesity, accelerate the atherosclerotic process which begins in childhood and progresses throughout the life span. The cardiovascular disease risk factor detection and management through prevention delays the atherosclerotic progression towards clinical cardiovascular disease. Dietary habits, from prenatal nutrition, breastfeeding, complementary feeding to childhood and adolescence nutrition play a basic role for this topic. The metabolic and neuroendocrine environment of the fetus is fundamental in the body’s “metabolic programming”. Further several studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of breastfeeding on cardiovascular risk factors reduction. Moreover the introduction of complementary foods represents another important step, with particular regard to protein intake. An adequate distribution between macronutrients (lipids, proteins and carbohydrates) is required for correct growth development from infancy throughout adolescence and for prevention of several cardiovascular disease risk determinants in adulthood. The purpose of this review is to examine the impact of nutrition since early life on disease. La malattia cardiovascolare rappresenta la principale causa di morbilità e mortalità dei paesi occidentali ed è correlata a degenerazione vascolare aterosclerotica. I fattori di rischio cardiovascolari quali dislipidemia, ipertensione, insulino resistenza e obesità accelerano tale processo il cui esordio è noto sin dell’età pediatrica ed evolve nel corso della vita. L’individuazione e la cura dei fattori di rischio cardiovascolari mediante la prevenzione dei fattori causali ritardano la progressione dell’aterosclerosi e l’insorgenza dei sintomi cardiovascolari. La nutrizione svolge un ruolo

  8. Controversies and Misconceptions in Intensive Care Unit Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Michael H; Marik, Paul E

    2015-09-01

    The early initiation of enteral nutrition remains a fundamental component of the management of critically ill and injured patients in the intensive care unit. Trophic feeding is equivalent, if not superior, to full-dose feeding. Parenteral nutrition has no proved benefit over enteral nutrition, which is the preferred route of nutritional support in intensive care unit patients with a functional gastrointestinal tract. Continuous enteral and parental nutrition inhibits the release of important enterohormones. These changes are reversed with intermittent bolus feeding. Whey protein, which is high in leucine, has a greater effect on insulin release and protein synthesis than does a soy- or casein-based enteral formula. PMID:26304278

  9. Mucosal MicroRNAs Expression Profiles before and after Exclusive Enteral Nutrition Therapy in Adult Patients with Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhen; Gong, Jianfeng; Li, Yi; Gu, Lili; Cao, Lei; Wang, Zhiming; Zhu, Weiming; Li, Jieshou

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been shown to be important for the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD). Exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN) is an effective therapy for inducing remission in CD. We aimed to investigate the alteration of miRNAs expression profile in the terminal ileal mucosa of CD patients before and after EEN. Twenty-five patients and ten healthy individuals were included. MiRNAs expression profile was firstly assessed using microarray technology and then validation was performed by qRT-PCR. The correlations between miRNAs and CD activity index (CDAI) score and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) level were also evaluated. Microarray analysis showed that mucosal miRNAs expression profile after EEN therapy was significantly changed compared with inflamed mucosa before treatment, and was most similar to the healthy one among all CD groups. Altered expressions of hsa-miR-192-5p, hsa-miR-423-3p, hsa-miR-99a-5p, hsa-miR-124-3p, hsa-miR-301a-5p, hsa-miR-495-5p, and hsa-let-7b-5p were confirmed by qRT-PCR. hsa-let-7b-5p was significantly correlated with serum CRP levels before and after EEN treatment (r = -0.518, p = 0.008, and r = -0.569, p = 0.003). Our study showed EEN induction therapy was associated with a trend for normalizing of the mucosal miRNAs expression profile, and expression of mucosal hsa-let-7b-5p was correlated with serum CRP level in patients with CD. PMID:27556489

  10. In vitro evaluation, in vivo quantification, and microbial diversity studies of nutritional strategies for reducing enteric methane production.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Adibe Luiz; Louvandini, Helder; Sallam, Sobhy Mohamed Abdallah Hassan; Bueno, Ives Cláudio da Silva; Tsai, Siu Mui; Figueira, Antonio Vargas de Oliveira

    2012-06-01

    The main objective of the present work was to study nutritive strategies for lessening the CH(4) formation associated to ruminant tropical diets. In vitro gas production technique was used for evaluating the effect of tannin-rich plants, essential oils, and biodiesel co-products on CH(4) formation in three individual studies and a small chamber system to measure CH(4) released by sheep for in vivo studies was developed. Microbial rumen population diversity from in vitro assays was studied using qPCR. In vitro studies with tanniniferous plants, herbal plant essential oils derived from thyme, fennel, ginger, black seed, and Eucalyptus oil (EuO) added to the basal diet and cakes of oleaginous plants (cotton, palm, castor plant, turnip, and lupine), which were included in the basal diet to replace soybean meal, presented significant differences regarding fermentation gas production and CH(4) formation. In vivo assays were performed according to the results of the in vitro assays. Mimosa caesalpineaefolia, when supplemented to a basal diet (Tifton-85 hay Cynodon sp, corn grain, soybean meal, cotton seed meal, and mineral mixture) fed to adult Santa Ines sheep reduced enteric CH(4) emission but the supplementation of the basal diet with EuO did not affect (P > 0.05) methane released. Regarding the microbial studies of rumen population diversity using qPCR with DNA samples collected from the in vitro trials, the results showed shifts in microbial communities of the tannin-rich plants in relation to control plant. This research demonstrated that tannin-rich M. caesepineapholia, essential oil from eucalyptus, and biodiesel co-products either in vitro or in vivo assays showed potential to mitigate CH(4) emission in ruminants. The microbial community study suggested that the reduction in CH(4) production may be attributed to a decrease in fermentable substrate rather than to a direct effect on methanogenesis. PMID:22083272

  11. Role of Exclusive Enteral Nutrition in the Preoperative Optimization of Patients With Crohn's Disease Following Immunosuppressive Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Zuo, Lugen; Zhu, Weiming; Gong, Jianfeng; Zhang, Wei; Gu, Lili; Guo, Zhen; Cao, Lei; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We conducted a study to evaluate the impact of the exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN) on perioperative outcome in Crohn's disease (CD) patients following immunosuppressive therapy. Patients with CD followed at a referral center between January 2001 and March 2014 who underwent abdominal surgery were identified. Patients were divided into 4 groups: patients not exposed to immunosuppressive agents in the previous 8 weeks before surgery (group 1); patients received immunosuppressive medications without preoperative drug-free interval (group 2); patients had preoperative immunosuppressants-free interval (group 3); patients treated with adding EEN to preoperative immunosuppressants-free interval regimen (group 4). Urgent operation requirement, stoma creation, postoperative complications, readmission, and reoperation were compared in patients among groups. Overall, 708 abdominal surgeries performed in 498 CD patients were identified. Three hundred seventy-six (53.11%) surgeries performed in those receiving preoperative immunosuppressive medications. Compared with other groups, group 2 had increased postoperative complications, more frequent urgent operation, and higher rate of stoma creation. Patients in group 4 were found to have better outcome including lower rate of stoma creation (P < 0.05), and decreased incidence of postoperative complications (P < 0.05) compared with group 2 and group 3. Additionally, decreased urgent operation requirement (P < 0.05) and extended preoperative drug-free interval (P < 0.001) were observed in the group 4 than those in the group 3. Preoperative optimization of CD following immunosuppressive therapy by EEN prolongs the immunosuppressants-free interval, reduces the risk of urgent surgery and reoperation, and most importantly, decreases complications after abdominal surgery. PMID:25654387

  12. Early Fasting Is Long Lasting: Differences in Early Nutritional Conditions Reappear under Stressful Conditions in Adult Female Zebra Finches

    PubMed Central

    Krause, E. Tobias; Honarmand, Mariam; Wetzel, Jennifer; Naguib, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Conditions experienced during early life can have profound effects on individual development and condition in adulthood. Differences in nutritional provisioning in birds during the first month of life can lead to differences in growth, reproductive success and survival. Yet, under natural conditions shorter periods of nutritional stress will be more prevalent. Individuals may respond differently, depending on the period of development during which nutritional stress was experienced. Such differences may surface specifically when poor environmental conditions challenge individuals again as adults. Here, we investigated long term consequences of differences in nutritional conditions experienced during different periods of early development by female zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) on measures of management and acquisition of body reserves. As nestlings or fledglings, subjects were raised under different nutritional conditions, a low or high quality diet. After subjects reached sexual maturity, we measured their sensitivity to periods of food restriction, their exploration and foraging behaviour as well as adult resting metabolic rate (RMR). During a short period of food restriction, subjects from the poor nutritional conditions had a higher body mass loss than those raised under qualitatively superior nutritional conditions. Moreover, subjects that were raised under poor nutritional conditions were faster to engage in exploratory and foraging behaviour. But RMR did not differ among treatments. These results reveal that early nutritional conditions affect adult exploratory behaviour, a representative personality trait, foraging and adult's physiological condition. As early nutritional conditions are reflected in adult phenotypic plasticity specifically when stressful situations reappear, the results suggest that costs for poor developmental conditions are paid when environmental conditions deteriorate. PMID:19325706

  13. Pilot-Testing CATCH Early Childhood: A Preschool-Based Healthy Nutrition and Physical Activity Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Shreela; Chuang, Ru-Jye; Hedberg, Ann Marie

    2011-01-01

    Background: The literature on theoretically-based programs targeting healthy nutrition and physical activity in preschools is scarce. Purpose: To pilot test CATCH Early Childhood (CEC), a preschool-based nutrition and physical activity program among children ages three to five in Head Start. Methods: The study was conducted in two Head Start…

  14. Do Carrots Make You See Better? A Guide to Food and Nutrition in Early Childhood Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appleton, Julie; McCrea, Nadine; Patterson, Carla

    Noting that young children learn about food and nutrition through food preparation, eating together, play, science activities, and games, this resource guide addresses food learning and nutritional provisions in early childhood programs. The guide is designed to meet the needs of children and adults in child care centers, family child care…

  15. [Guidelines for specialized nutritional and metabolic support in the critically-ill patient. Update. Consensus of the Spanish Society of Intensive Care Medicine and Coronary Units-Spanish Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (SEMICYUC-SENPE): liver failure and transplantation].

    PubMed

    Montejo González, J C; Mesejo, A; Bonet Saris, A

    2011-11-01

    Patients with liver failure have a high prevalence of malnutrition, which is related to metabolic abnormalities due to the liver disease, reduced nutrient intake and alterations in digestive function, among other factors. In general, in patients with liver failure, metabolic and nutritional support should aim to provide adequate nutrient intake and, at the same time, to contribute to patients' recovery through control or reversal of metabolic alterations. In critically-ill patients with liver failure, current knowledge indicates that the organ failure is not the main factor to be considered when choosing the nutritional regimen. As in other critically-ill patients, the enteral route should be used whenever possible. The composition of the nutritional formula should be adapted to the patient's metabolic stress. Despite the physiopathological basis classically described by some authors who consider amino acid imbalance to be a triggering factor and key element in maintaining encephalopathy, there are insufficient data to recommend "specific" solutions (branched-chain amino acid-enriched with low aromatic amino acids) as part of nutritional support in patients with acute liver failure. In patients undergoing liver transplantation, nutrient intake should be started early in the postoperative period through transpyloric access. Prevention of the hepatic alterations associated with nutritional support should also be considered in distinct clinical scenarios. PMID:22309749

  16. Enteral bile acid treatment improves parenteral nutrition-related liver disease and intestinal mucosal atrophy in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is essential for patients with impaired gut function but leads to parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). TPN disrupts the normal enterohepatic circulation of bile acids, and we hypothesized that it would decrease intestinal expression of the newly des...

  17. Pancreatitis, very early compared with normal start of enteral feeding (PYTHON trial): design and rationale of a randomised controlled multicenter trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In predicted severe acute pancreatitis, infections have a negative effect on clinical outcome. A start of enteral nutrition (EN) within 24 hours of onset may reduce the number of infections as compared to the current practice of starting an oral diet and EN if necessary at 3-4 days after admission. Methods/Design The PYTHON trial is a randomised controlled, parallel-group, superiority multicenter trial. Patients with predicted severe acute pancreatitis (Imrie-score ≥ 3 or APACHE-II score ≥ 8 or CRP > 150 mg/L) will be randomised to EN within 24 hours or an oral diet and EN if necessary, after 72 hours after hospital admission. During a 3-year period, 208 patients will be enrolled from 20 hospitals of the Dutch Pancreatitis Study Group. The primary endpoint is a composite of mortality or infections (bacteraemia, infected pancreatic or peripancreatic necrosis, pneumonia) during hospital stay or within 6 months following randomisation. Secondary endpoints include other major morbidity (e.g. new onset organ failure, need for intervention), intolerance of enteral feeding and total costs from a societal perspective. Discussion The PYTHON trial is designed to show that a very early (< 24 h) start of EN reduces the combined endpoint of mortality or infections as compared to the current practice of an oral diet and EN if necessary at around 72 hours after admission for predicted severe acute pancreatitis. Trial Registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN18170985 PMID:21392395

  18. Enhanced early-life nutrition promotes hormone production and reproductive development in Holstein bulls.

    PubMed

    Dance, Alysha; Thundathil, Jacob; Wilde, Randy; Blondin, Patrick; Kastelic, John

    2015-02-01

    Holstein bull calves often reach artificial insemination centers in suboptimal body condition. Early-life nutrition is reported to increase reproductive performance in beef bulls. The objective was to determine whether early-life nutrition in Holstein bulls had effects similar to those reported in beef bulls. Twenty-six Holstein bull calves were randomly allocated into 3 groups at approximately 1 wk of age to receive a low-, medium-, or high-nutrition diet, based on levels of energy and protein, from 2 to 31 wk of age. Calves were on their respective diets until 31 wk of age, after which they were all fed a medium-nutrition diet. To evaluate secretion profiles and concentrations of blood hormones, a subset of bulls was subjected to intensive blood sampling every 4 wk from 11 to 31 wk of age. Testes of all bulls were measured once a month; once scrotal circumference reached 26cm, semen collection was attempted (by electroejaculation) every 2 wk to confirm puberty. Bulls were maintained until approximately 72 wk of age and then slaughtered at a local abattoir. Testes were recovered and weighed. Bulls fed the high-nutrition diet were younger at puberty (high=324.3 d, low=369.3 d) and had larger testes for the entire experimental period than bulls fed the low-nutrition diet. Bulls fed the high-nutrition diet also had an earlier and more substantial early rise in LH than those fed the low-nutrition diet and had increased concentrations of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) earlier than the bulls fed the low-nutrition diet. Furthermore, we detected a temporal association between increased IGF-I concentrations and an early LH rise in bulls fed the high-nutrition diet. Therefore, we inferred that IGF-I had a role in regulating the early gonadotropin rise (in particular, LH) and thus reproductive development of Holstein bulls. Overall, these results support our hypothesis that Holstein bull calves fed a high-nutrition diet reach puberty earlier and have larger testes than

  19. Early Child Development and Nutrition: A Review of the Benefits and Challenges of Implementing Integrated Interventions.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Kristen M; Yousafzai, Aisha K; Lopez-Boo, Florencia

    2016-03-01

    Poor nutrition (substandard diet quantity and/or quality resulting in under- or overnutrition) and the lack of early learning opportunities contribute to the loss of developmental potential and life-long health and economic disparities among millions of children aged <5 y. Single-sector interventions representing either early child development (ECD) or nutrition have been linked to positive child development and/or nutritional status, and recommendations currently advocate for the development and testing of integrated interventions. We reviewed the theoretical and practical benefits and challenges of implementing integrated nutrition and ECD interventions along with the evidence for best practice and benefit-cost and concluded that the strong theoretical rationale for integration is more nuanced than the questions that the published empirical evidence have addressed. For example, further research is needed to 1) answer questions related to how integrated messaging influences caregiver characteristics such as well-being, knowledge, and behavior and how these influence early child nutrition and development outcomes; 2) understand population and nutritional contexts in which integrated interventions are beneficial; and 3) explore how varying implementation processes influence the efficacy, uptake, and cost-benefit of integrated nutrition and ECD interventions. PMID:26980819

  20. Child Nutrition: A Focus on Preschool. Guidance for Early Care and Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut State Dept. of Education, Hartford.

    Because the development of healthy eating and physical activity habits during early childhood can prevent disease and support a lifetime of good health, nutrition services are a critical component of early childhood programs. This publication provides guidance to preschool programs to help them meet the Connecticut state goal of practicing…

  1. Educating Early Childhood Teachers about Nutrition: A Collaborative Venture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotugna, Nancy; Vickery, Connie

    2007-01-01

    Nourishing the young child can be a challenge. This stage of life is critical to the development of positive attitudes toward maintaining a healthy diet and learning to make reasonable food choices. Educators of young children are often the gatekeepers of child nutrition. This article reports on the current nutrient needs of young children,…

  2. What Prevents Nurses from Entering Faculty Positions Early in Their Professional Career: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreland, Jack E.

    2011-01-01

    There is a nursing faculty shortage in the United States today and projections are that over the next decade nurses will retire at a rate faster than they are being replaced. The projected shortage at a time when the largest part of the population will begin to retire and enter the ranks of the elderly could potentially cause serious problems…

  3. Nutrition

    MedlinePlus

    Nutrition Health Education During the 2 years preceding the study: • The percentage of states that provided funding for staff development or offered staff development on nutrition and dietary behavior to those who teach health ...

  4. Nutrition

    MedlinePlus

    ... into your diet. These include brightly colored and dark fruits and vegetables. Balance the food you eat ... can also order your free copy of Nutrition Matters and visit our Ask about Nutrition forum. << Back ...

  5. Evidence supporting nutritional interventions for persons in early stage Alzheimer's disease (AD).

    PubMed

    Burgener, S C; Buettner, L; Coen Buckwalter, K; Beattie, E; Bossen, A L; Fick, D M; Fitzsimmons, S; Kolanowski, A; Richeson, N E; Rose, K; Schreiner, A; Pringle Specht, J K; Testad, I; Yu, F; McKenzie, S

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to grade research evidence supporting nutritional interventions for persons with early stage dementias and to report the recommendations of a consensus panel. Thirty four studies were reviewed in the areas of dietary restriction, antioxidants, and Mediterranean diet with strong support from epidemiological studies found in all three areas. The body of evidence to support nutritional interventions in the prevention and treatment of AD is growing and has potential as a treatment modality following translational studies. PMID:18165840

  6. The Baylor pediatric nutrition handbook for residents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Baylor Pediatric Nutrition Handbook for Residents provides basic resource information about the assessment of growth, the nutritional status assessment and feeding guidelines, biochemical evaluation of nutritional status, infant nutrition, enteral nutrition, parenteral nutrition, nutritional man...

  7. The Role of Intravenous Fluids and Enteral or Parenteral Nutrition in Patients with Life-limiting Illness.

    PubMed

    Lembeck, Meghan E; Pameijer, Colette R; Westcott, Amy M

    2016-09-01

    The decision of whether or not to use artificial nutrition or hydration is one with which many health care providers, patients, and families struggle. These decisions are particularly challenging in the setting of life-limiting illness, which is often associated with a prolonged decline because of medical advances in these patient populations. A patient-centered and family-centered approach helps to attain high-quality care in this special population. PMID:27542432

  8. [Hungarian-made soya-based enteral nutrition solution in the artificial feeding of patients with pharyngo-laryngeal cancer].

    PubMed

    Zemplén, B; Tulok, I; Palásti, I

    1991-09-29

    III.-IV. stage, protein-calorie malnourished, pharyngolaryngeal tumorous patients were artificially fed perioperatively. Protein source (soya-protein concentrate, TOFU-soya-protein-cottage cheese) manufactured in Hungary, was administered in enteral feeding through naso-gastric tube. The metabolism, transport and utility of the soya-based diet were investigated by biochemical methods and compared to the previously administered tube-feeding. The method is advised on the base of the favourable experiences of the authors. PMID:1923486

  9. Essential Amino Acid Enriched High-Protein Enteral Nutrition Modulates Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 System Function in a Rat Model of Trauma-Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xianfeng; Wang, Xinying; Li, Qiurong; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2013-01-01

    Background Nutrition support for critically ill patients supplemented with additional modular protein may promote skeletal muscle protein anabolism in addition to counteracting acute nitrogen loss. The present study was designed to investigate whether the essential amino acid (EAA) enriched high-protein enteral nutrition (EN) modulates the insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) system and activates the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) anabolic signaling pathway in a trauma-hemorrhagic shock (T-HS) rat model. Methodology/Principal Findings Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 90, 278.18±0.94 g) were randomly assigned to 5 groups: (1) normal control, (2) pair-fed, (3) T-HS, (4) T-HS and standard EN, and (5) T-HS and EAA enriched high-protein EN. Six animals from each group were harvested on days 2, 4, and 6 for serum, gastrocnemius, soleus, and extensor digitorum longus sample collection. T-HS significantly reduced muscle mass. Nutrition support maintained muscle mass, especially the EAA enriched high-protein EN. Meanwhile, a pronounced derangement in IGF-1-IGFBPs axis as well as impaired mTOR transduction was observed in the T-HS group. Compared with animals receiving standard EN, those receiving EAA enriched high-protein EN presented 18% higher serum free IGF-1 levels following 3 days of nutrition support and 22% higher after 5 days. These changes were consistent with the concomitant elevation in serum insulin and reduction in corticosterone levels. In addition, phosphorylations of downstream anabolic signaling effectors - including protein kinase B, mTOR, and ribosomal protein S6 kinase1 - increased significantly in rats receiving EAA enriched high-protein EN. Conclusion/Significance Our findings firstly demonstrate the beneficial effect of EAA enriched high-protein EN on the metabolic modulation of skeletal muscle protein anabolism by regulating the IGF-1 system and downstream anabolic signaling transduction. PMID:24204984

  10. Management of a high-output postoperative enterocutaneous fistula with a vacuum sealing method and continuous enteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Hyon, S H; Martinez-Garbino, J A; Benati, M L; Lopez-Avellaneda, M E; Brozzi, N A; Argibay, P F

    2000-01-01

    A postoperative enterocutaneous fistula is one of the most complex medical problems. Its treatment may become long-lasting, wearisome, and its outcome often is disappointing. Here, we describe the use of a novel device to treat a 67-year-old patient with a postoperative, high-output enterocutaneous fistula. A semipermeable barrier was created over the fistula by vacuum packing a synthetic, hydrophobic polymer covered with a self-adherent surgical sheet. To set up the system, we constructed a vacuum chamber equipped with precision instruments that supplied subatmospheric pressures between 350 and 450 mm Hg. The intestinal content was, thus, kept inside the lumen, restoring bowel transit and physiology. The fistula output was immediately reduced from a median of 800 ml/day (range, 400-1,600 ml/day), to a median of 10 ml/day (range, 0-250 ml/day), which was readily collected by the apparatus. Oral feeding was reinitiated while both parenteral nutrition and octreotide were withdrawn. No septic complications occurred, and the perifistular skin stayed protected from irritating intestinal effluents. Both the fistula orifice and the wound defect fully healed after 50 days of treatment. We believe this method may serve as a useful tool to treat selected cases of high-output enterocutaneous fistulas without the need for octreotide or parenteral nutrition. PMID:10926156

  11. Nutrition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, Helen W.

    1990-01-01

    This is a collection of viewgraphs on the Johnson Space Center's work on nutrition for long duration space missions. Nutritional requirements are affected by isolation, workloads, and cold as well as the psychological needs, metabolism, and fluid balance of an individual.

  12. Early life nutritional programming of health and disease in The Gambia.

    PubMed

    Moore, S E

    2016-04-01

    Exposures during the early life (periconceptional, prenatal and early postnatal) period are increasingly recognized as playing an important role in the aetiology of chronic non-communicable diseases (NCD), including coronary heart disease, stroke, hypertension, Type 2 diabetes and osteoporosis. The 'Developmental Origins of Health and Disease' (DOHaD) hypothesis states that these disorders originate through unbalanced nutrition early in life and risk is highest when there is a 'mismatch' between the early- and later-life environments. Thus, the DOHaD hypothesis would predict highest risk in countries where an excess of infants are born with low birth weight and where there is a rapid transition to nutritional adequacy or excess in adulthood. Here, I will review data from work conducted in rural Gambia, West Africa. Using demographic data dating back to the 1940s, the follow-up of randomized controlled trials of nutritional supplementation in pregnancy and the 'experiment of nature' that seasonality in this region provides, we have investigated the DOHaD hypothesis in a population with high rates of maternal and infant under-nutrition, a high burden from infectious disease, and an emerging risk of NCDs. PMID:26503192

  13. A Case Study of Students Entering an Early College High School: Changes in Academic Behavior Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healy, James J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to learn more about the transition experiences of one group of high school students (N = 75) as they began attending one alternative pathway: an Early College High School program on a community college campus. A four-part conceptual framework of college readiness provided a structure from which to explore the…

  14. Survey Examines Experiences of Families Entering Early Intervention. FPG Snapshot #14

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FPG Child Development Institute, University of North Carolina, 2004

    2004-01-01

    A recent FPG study looked at families' initial experiences in determining their child's eligibility for early intervention (EI) services as mandated by Part C (IDEA), interactions with medical professionals, effort required to get services, participation in planning for services, satisfaction with services, and interactions with professionals. A…

  15. Nutrition

    MedlinePlus

    ... you would like to see a registered dietitian nutritionist for nutritional guidance when you have lung cancer. ... seek out the expertise of a registered dietitian nutritionist (RDN) who works with lung cancer patients. This ...

  16. Radiation enteritis

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, P.H.; Jenrette, J.M. III; Garvin, A.J.

    1987-09-01

    As the population receiving radiation therapy grows, so does the incidence of chronic radiation enteritis. A review of the pathology of chronic radiation enteritis reveals fibrosis, endarteritis, edema, fragility, perforation, and partial obstruction. Conservative management of patients with this disease is common. Because the obstruction is only partial, decompression is easily achieved with nasogastric suction and parenteral support. The patient is then often discharged on a liquid-to-soft diet. This therapeutic strategy does nothing for the underlying pathology. The problem, sooner or later, will return with the patient further depleted by the chronic radiation enteritis. We think surgical intervention is appropriate when the diagnosis of chronic radiation enteritis is assumed. The surgery in relation to this disease is high risk with a 30% mortality and 100% expensive morbidity. Early intervention seems to decrease these figures. All anastomoses, if possible, should be outside the irradiated area. Trapped pelvic loops of intestine should be left in place and a bypass procedure with decompressing enterostomies accomplished. The surgery should be performed by a surgeon with extensive experience with all kinds of bowel obstruction as well as experience in performing surgery in radiated tissue.

  17. Is There a Role for the Enteral Administration of Serum-Derived Immunoglobulins in Human Gastrointestinal Disease and Pediatric Critical Care Nutrition?

    PubMed

    Van Arsdall, Melissa; Haque, Ikram; Liu, Yuying; Rhoads, J Marc

    2016-05-01

    Twenty years ago, there was profound, international interest in developing oral human, bovine, or chicken egg-derived immunoglobulin (Ig) for the prevention and nutritional treatment of childhood malnutrition and gastrointestinal disease, including acute diarrhea and necrotizing enterocolitis. Although such Ig products were shown to be effective, with both nutritional and antidiarrheal benefits, interest waned because of their cost and because of the perceived risk of bovine serum encephalitis (BSE). BSE is no longer considered a barrier to use of oral Ig, because the WHO has declared the United States to be BSE-free since the early 2000s. Low-cost bovine-derived products with high Ig content have been developed and are regulated as medical foods. These new products, called serum bovine Igs (SBIs), facilitate the management of chronic or severe gastrointestinal disturbances in both children and adults and are regulated by the US Food and Drug Administration. Well-established applications for use of SBIs include human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated enteropathy and diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. However, SBIs and other similar products could potentially become important components of the treatment regimen for other conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, by aiding in disease control without immunosuppressive side effects. In addition, SBIs may be helpful in conditions associated with the depletion of circulating and luminal Igs and could potentially play an important role in critical care nutrition. The rationale for their use is to facilitate intraluminal microbial antibody coating, an essential process in immune recognition in the gut which is disturbed in these conditions, thereby leading to intestinal inflammation. Thus, oral Ig may emerge as an important "add-on" therapy for a variety of gastrointestinal and nutritional problems during the next decade. PMID:27184280

  18. Delayed initiation of enteral formula feeding reduces the incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in preterm piglets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a major complication of enteral feeding in premature infants with a high morbidity and mortality. Early enteral feeding of fortified human milk is considered optimal nutrition for the preterm infant. However, human milk is not always available, and commercial formu...

  19. The role of early life nutrition in programming of reproductive function.

    PubMed

    Chadio, S; Kotsampasi, B

    2014-02-01

    Accumulating evidence suggest that the concept of programming can also be applied to reproductive development and function, representing an ever expanding research area. Recently issues such as peri- or even preconceptional nutrition, transgenerational effects and underlying mechanisms have received considerable attention. The present chapter presents the existed evidence and reviews the available data from numerous animal and human studies on the effects of early life nutritional environment on adult reproductive function. Specific outcomes depend on the severity, duration and stage of development when nutritional perturbations are imposed, while sex-specific effects are also manifested. Apart from undernutrition, effects of relative overnutrition as well as the complex interactions between pre- and postnatal nutrition is of high importance, especially in the context of our days obesity epidemic. Mechanisms underlying reproductive programming are yet unclear, but may include a role for epigenetic modifications. Epigenetic modulation of critical genes involved in the control of reproductive function and potential intergenerational effects represent an exciting area of interdisciplinary research toward the development of new nutritional approaches during pre- and postnatal periods to ensure reproductive health in later life. PMID:24847686

  20. Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saur, Susan

    An elementary level nutrition unit provides teachers with student background information, suggested activities, and student worksheets. Part 1 focuses on the relationship of food to growth, health, and energy. In part 2, students learn about the four main food groups. Part 3 deals with nutrients and provides information about carbohydrates, fats,…

  1. Refinement of a macaque transplantation model: application of a subcutaneous port as a means for long-term enteral drug administration and nutritional supplementation.

    PubMed

    Fante, F; Baldan, N; De Benedictis, G M; Boldrin, M; Furian, L; Sgarabotto, D; Ravarotto, L; Besenzon, F; Ramon, D; Cozzi, E

    2012-04-01

    A new application of a device enabling the long-term enteral administration of drugs or nutritional supplementation was developed for implementing in research entailing the use of macaques (Macaca fascicularis). After implanting a subcutaneous port, a surgically-placed gastrostomy (SPG) was completed to afford access to the gastric lumen and enable the administration of substances. In this study, the device was left in place for a period ranging between two and 12 months in macaques (n= 16). In five cases, the SPG was used successfully for 8-12 months, until the experimental endpoint was reached. In six cases, the SPG had to be removed earlier due to local infection at the implant site, which promptly regressed after the SPG was removed and antibiotic treatment was administered. One SPG-implanted macaque was euthanized for reasons unrelated to the SPG or the xenotransplantation procedure. In four cases, the SPG was implanted without any complications but has yet to be used to administer substances to the animals. From an ethical standpoint, the SPG device described here minimizes the forced handling of macaques otherwise needed for the oral administration of viscous or unpalatable substances by gavage. The device thus represents an effective refinement that fully complies with the tenet of the '3 Rs' that should be considered by primate centres exposing non-human primates to the long-term daily administration of substances by oral gavage. PMID:22334877

  2. Changes in fecal microbiota and metabolomics in a child with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) responding to two treatment periods with exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN).

    PubMed

    Berntson, Lillemor; Agback, Peter; Dicksved, Johan

    2016-06-01

    The microbiome and immune system of the digestive tract are highly important in both health and disease. Exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN) is a common anti-inflammatory treatment in children with Crohn's disease in the European countries, and the mechanism is most likely linked to changes in the intestinal microbiome. In the present study, EEN was given in two treatment periods several months apart to a patient with very severe, disabling juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), with a remarkable clinical response as the result. The aim of the present study was to study how the EEN treatment influenced the microbiome and metabolome of this patient. Fecal samples from before, during, and between treatments with EEN were studied. The microbiome was analyzed by sequencing of 16S rRNA amplicons using Illumina MiSeq, and the metabolome was analyzed using nuclear magnetic resonance. The microbiome changed markedly from treatment with EEN, with a strong reduction of the Bacteroidetes phylum. Metabolic profiles showed clear differences before, during, and between treatment with EEN, where butyrate, propionate, and acetate followed a cyclic pattern with the lowest levels at the end of each treatment period. This patient with JIA showed remarkable clinical improvement after EEN treatment, and we found corresponding changes in both the fecal microbiome and the metabolome. Further studies are needed to explore the pathophysiological role of the intestinal canal in children with JIA. PMID:27021336

  3. Investigation of iodine deficient state and iodine supplementation in patients with severe motor and intellectual disabilities on long-term total enteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Takako; Kamasaki, Hotaka; Yoto, Yuko; Honjo, Takashi; Tsugawa, Satoshi; Hotsubo, Tomoyuki; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Iodine concentrations of enteral nutrition (EN) formulae available in Japan are very low and long-term total EN (TEN) might result in hypothyroidism due to iodine deficiency (HID). Our aim of this study was to determine the degree of iodine deficiency (ID) and need for iodine supplementation (IS) in patients with severe motor and intellectual disabilities (SMID) on long-term TEN. Thyroid function including urinary iodine concentration (UIC) was monitored, and powdered kelp was provided as a source of iodine supplement. Thirty-five SMID on TEN participated in our study. UIC less than 100 μg /L, representing ID, were detected in 97 % of them. Their TSH ranged from 0.5 to 90 μIU/mL. IS using powdered kelp raised their UIC to the normal range. Thyroid function also recovered in the five hypothyroidism cases, which were diagnosed as HID, was also detected. In Japan, there must be many cases with ID associated with long term TEN. We also discuss the regulation of thyroid function in the iodine deficient state. PMID:22673532

  4. Enteral approaches in malabsorption.

    PubMed

    Avitzur, Yaron; Courtney-Martin, Glenda

    2016-04-01

    Enteral autonomy and freedom from parenteral nutrition dependency is the ultimate therapeutic goal in children with intestinal failure. This can be achieved following attainment of bowel adaptation in conditions such as short bowel syndrome. Enteral nutrition is a major therapeutic cornerstone in the management of children with intestinal failure. It promotes physiological development, bowel adaptation and enhances weaning from parenteral nutrition. The optimal method of delivery, type of nutrients, timing of initiation, promotion of feeds and transition to solid food in children with short bowel syndrome are debated. Lack of high quality human data hampers evidence based conclusions and impacts daily practices in the field. Clinical approaches and therapeutic decisions are regularly influenced by expert opinion and center practices. This review summarizes the physiological principles, medical evidence and practice recommendations on enteral nutrition approaches in short bowel syndrome and provides a practical framework for daily treatment of this unique group of patients. Oral and tube feeding, bolus and continuous feeding, type of nutrients, formulas, trace elements and solid food options are reviewed. Future collaborative multicenter, high quality clinical trials are needed to support enteral nutrition approaches in intestinal failure. PMID:27086892

  5. PPARs Link Early Life Nutritional Insults to Later Programmed Hypertension and Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tain, You-Lin; Hsu, Chien-Ning; Chan, Julie Y. H.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is an important component of metabolic syndrome. Adulthood hypertension and metabolic syndrome can be programmed in response to nutritional insults in early life. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) serve as a nutrient-sensing signaling linking nutritional programming to hypertension and metabolic syndrome. All three members of PPARs, PPARα, PPARβ/δ, and PPARγ, are expressed in the kidney and involved in blood pressure control. This review provides an overview of potential clinical applications of targeting on the PPARs in the kidney to prevent programmed hypertension and metabolic syndrome, with an emphasis on the following areas: mechanistic insights to interpret programmed hypertension; the link between the PPARs, nutritional insults, and programmed hypertension and metabolic syndrome; the impact of PPAR signaling pathway in a maternal high-fructose model; and current experimental studies on early intervention by PPAR modulators to prevent programmed hypertension and metabolic syndrome. Animal studies employing a reprogramming strategy via targeting PPARs to prevent hypertension have demonstrated interesting results. It is critical that the observed effects on developmental reprogramming in animal models are replicated in human studies, to halt the globally-growing epidemic of metabolic syndrome-related diseases. PMID:26712739

  6. Long-term consequences of nutrition and growth in early childhood and possible preventive interventions.

    PubMed

    Adair, Linda S

    2014-01-01

    Maternal nutritional deficiencies and excesses during pregnancy, and faster infant weight gain in the first 2 years of life are associated with increased risk of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) in adulthood. The first 1,000 days of life (from conception until the child reaches age 2 years) represent a vulnerable period for programming of NCD risk, and are an important target for prevention of adult disease. This paper takes a developmental perspective to identify periconception, pregnancy, and infancy nutritional stressors, and to discuss mechanisms through which they influence later disease risk with the goal of informing age-specific interventions. Low- and middle-income countries need to address the dual burden of under- and overnutrition by implementing interventions to promote growth and enhance survival and intellectual development without increasing chronic disease risk. In the absence of good evidence from long-term follow-up of early life interventions, current recommendations for early life prevention of adult disease presume that interventions designed to optimize pregnancy outcomes and promote healthy infant growth and development will also reduce chronic disease risk. These include an emphasis on optimizing maternal nutrition prior to pregnancy, micronutrient adequacy in the preconception period and during pregnancy, promotion of breastfeeding and high-quality complementary foods, and prevention of obesity in childhood and adolescence. PMID:24504211

  7. Early childhood nutrition in an American Indian community: educational strategy for obesity prevention.

    PubMed

    Hoffhines, Heather; Whaley, Kelleigh Dean; Blackett, Piers R; Palumbo, Karen; Campbell-Sternloff, Dana; Glore, Stephen; Lee, Elisa T

    2014-02-01

    Prevailing infant and toddler feeding practices in an American Indian community were assessed to explore the feasibility of improvement by implementation of a maternal education program. A survey of prevailing nutritional practice was the basis for design of an instruction program on infant nutrition for mothers during pregnancy. Follow-up assessments provided information on feasibility, and requirements for an effective program. Failure to sustain breast-feeding, low fruit and vegetable intake, low fiber intake, consumption of sweetened beverages, low milk consumption and low vitamin D intake were identified as persisting problems. We conclude that infant and toddler feeding practices are comparable to national trends, but suboptimal and conducive to promoting early obesity and diabetes in a susceptible community. A successful education-based intervention strategy beginning in pregnancy appears feasible if psychosocial, environmental, and economic barriers can be addressed. PMID:24761552

  8. Metabolic programming of puberty: sexually dimorphic responses to early nutritional challenges.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Garrido, M A; Castellano, J M; Ruiz-Pino, F; Garcia-Galiano, D; Manfredi-Lozano, M; Leon, S; Romero-Ruiz, A; Diéguez, C; Pinilla, L; Tena-Sempere, M

    2013-09-01

    Body energy stores and metabolic cues influence the onset of puberty. However, the pubertal impact of early nutritional challenges has been only fragmentarily addressed. We evaluated here the consequences, in terms of pubertal timing and hormonal markers, of various nutritional manipulations during pre- or postnatal maturation in rats of both sexes. Males and females were submitted to gestational undernutrition (UNG) or peripubertal (SUB) subnutrition or were raised in large (LL; underfeeding) or small (SL; overfeeding) litters. In addition, groups of UNG, LL, and SL rats were fed on a high-fat diet (HFD) after weaning. Postnatal overfeeding resulted in higher body weights (BWs) during pubertal transition in both sexes, but only SL males displayed overtly advanced external signs of puberty. Postnatal underfeeding persistently decreased BW gain during puberty, yet the magnitude of pubertal delay was greater in LL males. In contrast, regardless of postnatal nutrition, HFD tended to advance the onset of puberty in females but did not alter pubertal timing in males. Likewise, SUB females displayed a marked delay in BW gain and puberty onset, whereas despite similar reduction in BW, SUB males showed normal timing of puberty. These sex divergences were also detected in various hormonal and metabolic indices so that postnatal overnutrition consistently increased LH, FSH, leptin, and insulin levels only in pubertal females, whereas HFD decreased gonadotropin levels in SL females but increased them in SL males. Notably, UNG rats did not show signs of delayed puberty but displayed a striking sex dimorphism in serum insulin/glucose levels, regardless of the diet, so that only UNG males had signs of presumable insulin resistance. Our data disclose important sex differences in the impact of various early nutritional challenges on the timing of puberty, which may help to explain the different trends of altered puberty and related comorbidities between sexes. PMID:23751873

  9. Enteral nutrition - child - managing problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... your child is sitting up. Check the tube placement. If your child has diarrhea and cramping: Make ... provider about choice of formula and adding more fiber. If your child is dried out (dehydrated), ask ...

  10. Mucosal MicroRNAs Expression Profiles before and after Exclusive Enteral Nutrition Therapy in Adult Patients with Crohn’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhen; Gong, Jianfeng; Li, Yi; Gu, Lili; Cao, Lei; Wang, Zhiming; Zhu, Weiming; Li, Jieshou

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been shown to be important for the pathogenesis of Crohn’s disease (CD). Exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN) is an effective therapy for inducing remission in CD. We aimed to investigate the alteration of miRNAs expression profile in the terminal ileal mucosa of CD patients before and after EEN. Twenty-five patients and ten healthy individuals were included. MiRNAs expression profile was firstly assessed using microarray technology and then validation was performed by qRT-PCR. The correlations between miRNAs and CD activity index (CDAI) score and serum C–reactive protein (CRP) level were also evaluated. Microarray analysis showed that mucosal miRNAs expression profile after EEN therapy was significantly changed compared with inflamed mucosa before treatment, and was most similar to the healthy one among all CD groups. Altered expressions of hsa-miR-192-5p, hsa-miR-423-3p, hsa-miR-99a-5p, hsa-miR-124-3p, hsa-miR-301a-5p, hsa-miR-495-5p, and hsa-let-7b-5p were confirmed by qRT-PCR. hsa-let-7b-5p was significantly correlated with serum CRP levels before and after EEN treatment (r = −0.518, p = 0.008, and r = −0.569, p = 0.003). Our study showed EEN induction therapy was associated with a trend for normalizing of the mucosal miRNAs expression profile, and expression of mucosal hsa-let-7b-5p was correlated with serum CRP level in patients with CD. PMID:27556489

  11. Nutrition in Patients with Gastric Cancer: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Rosania, Rosa; Chiapponi, Costanza; Malfertheiner, Peter; Venerito, Marino

    2016-01-01

    Background Nutritional management of patients with gastric cancer (GC) represents a challenge. Summary This review provides an overview of the present evidence on nutritional support in patients with GC undergoing surgery as well as in those with advanced disease Key Message For patients undergoing surgery, the preoperative nutritional condition directly affects postoperative prognosis, overall survival and disease-specific survival. Perioperative nutritional support enriched with immune-stimulating nutrients reduces overall complications and hospital stay but not mortality after major elective gastrointestinal surgery. Early enteral nutrition after surgery improves early and long-term postoperative nutritional status and reduces the length of hospitalization as well. Vitamin B12 and iron deficiency are common metabolic sequelae after gastrectomy and warrant appropriate replacement. In malnourished patients with advanced GC, short-term home complementary parenteral nutrition improves the quality of life, nutritional status and functional status. Total home parenteral nutrition represents the only modality of caloric intake for patients with advanced GC who are unable to take oral or enteral nutrition Practical Implications Early evaluations of nutritional status and nutritional support represent key aspects in the management of GC patients with both operable and advanced disease. PMID:27403412

  12. Pulse Wave Velocity at Early Adulthood: Breastfeeding and Nutrition during Pregnancy and Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Gigante, Denise Petrucci; de Barros, Fernando Celso Lopes Fernandes

    2016-01-01

    Background Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is an early marker of arterial stiffness. Low birthweight, infant feeding and childhood nutrition have been associated with cardiovascular disease in adulthood. In this study, we evaluated the association of PWV at 30 years of age with birth condition and childhood nutrition, among participants of the 1982 Pelotas birth cohort. Methods In 1982, the hospital births in Pelotas, southern Brazil, were identified just after delivery. Those liveborn infants whose family lived in the urban area of the city were examined and have been prospectively followed. At 30 years of age, we tried to follow the whole cohort and PWV was assessed in 1576 participants. Results Relative weight gain from 2 to 4 years was positively associated with PWV. Regarding nutritional status in childhood, PWV was higher among those whose weight-for-age z-score at 4 years was >1 standard deviation above the mean. On the other hand, height gain, birthweight and duration of breastfeeding were not associated with PWV. Conclusion Relative weight gain after 2 years of age is associated with increased PWV, while birthweight and growth in the first two years of life were not associated. These results suggest that the relative increase of weight later in childhood is associated with higher cardiovascular risk. PMID:27073916

  13. Nutritional screening and early intervention in children, adolescents, and young adults with cancer.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Deborah L; Loman, Deborah G; Balakas, Karen; Flowers, Marsha

    2012-01-01

    Children and adolescents with cancer who receive chemotherapy and/or radiation treatments are at risk for malnutrition due to side effects such as nausea, vomiting, anorexia, and mouth sores. Malnutrition during treatment for childhood cancer increases the risk of infection, decreases tolerance to treatment, and even affects overall survival. A retrospective analysis of 79 children, adolescents, and young adults was conducted to evaluate nutritional screening at baseline and for the first 6 months of treatment. Interventions were also documented. Forty-nine participants had a positive screen for risk of malnutrition. In the patients with a positive screen, 78% had intervention within 24 hours of the identified risk for malnutrition. Thirty-five patients had a nutritional referral, which resulted in a full nutritional assessment and plan. Key independent variables were analyzed to determine if they were associated with an increased risk of malnutrition. In addition, individual risk factors were analyzed to determine their association with malnutrition. Future studies should find whether early intervention is effective in reversing the risk of malnutrition during treatment for childhood cancer. PMID:23087250

  14. The role of an early Salmonella Typhimurium infection as a predisposing factor for necrotic enteritis in a laboratory challenge model.

    PubMed

    Shivaramaiah, S; Wolfenden, R E; Barta, J R; Morgan, M J; Wolfenden, A D; Hargis, B M; Téllez, G

    2011-06-01

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) caused by Clostridium perfringens (CP) in poultry is an important bacterial disease in terms of economic implications. The disease is multifactorial and is invariably associated with predisposing factors. In the present experiments, we investigated the potential predisposing role of neonatal Salmonella Typhimurium (ST) infection for NE-associated mortality in a laboratory challenge model. In two experiments, day-of-hatch chicks were randomly assigned to four groups: Group 1, nonchallenged control; Group 2, chickens received Eimeria maxima (EM) and CP; Group 3, chickens received EM and CP and were also challenged with ST at day 1 of age; Group 4, chickens received EM and CP and were also challenged with ST at day 17 of age. Challenged groups received an oral dose of EM at 18 days of age and CP (10(8) colony-forming units/chick) at 22-23 days of age. When compared to EM and CP, chicks challenged with ST (day 1) had increased NE-associated mortality and CP-associated lesion scores (P < 0.05) in both experiments. Furthermore, body weight and body weight gain were lower (P < 0.05) in chicks infected with ST (day 1) in the first experiment, even though no differences (P > 0.05) were observed in weight gain in the second experiment. Chicks challenged with ST (day 17) were similar to the EM and CP group in all of the above-mentioned parameters, indicating that a paratyphoid infection in younger chicks remarkably alters the susceptibility to secondary bacterial infections. Based on this work, the authors suggest that an ST infection early in the age of a chick may be important for altering susceptibility to NE, an observation that may be useful from the perspective of experimental reproduction of this disease and, perhaps, as an economically important reason to address the problem of paratyphoid Salmonella infections in young chicks. PMID:21793451

  15. Nutrition in pregnancy and early childhood and associations with obesity in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenyu; Huffman, Sandra L

    2013-01-01

    Concerns about the increasing rates of obesity in developing countries have led many policy makers to question the impacts of maternal and early child nutrition on risk of later obesity. The purposes of the review are to summarise the studies on the associations between nutrition during pregnancy and infant feeding practices with later obesity from childhood through adulthood and to identify potential ways for preventing obesity in developing countries. As few studies were identified in developing countries, key studies in developed countries were included in the review. Poor prenatal dietary intakes of energy, protein and micronutrients were shown to be associated with increased risk of adult obesity in offspring. Female offspring seem to be more vulnerable than male offspring when their mothers receive insufficient energy during pregnancy. By influencing birthweight, optimal prenatal nutrition might reduce the risk of obesity in adults. While normal birthweights (2500-3999 g) were associated with higher body mass index (BMI) as adults, they generally were associated with higher fat-free mass and lower fat mass compared with low birthweights (<2500 g). Low birthweight was associated with higher risk of metabolic syndrome and central obesity in adults. Breastfeeding and timely introduction of complementary foods were shown to protect against obesity later in life in observational studies. High-protein intake during early childhood however was associated with higher body fat mass and obesity in adulthood. In developed countries, increased weight gain during the first 2 years of life was associated with a higher BMI in adulthood. However, recent studies in developing countries showed that higher BMI was more related to greater lean body mass than fat mass. It appears that increased length at 2 years of age was positively associated with height, weight and fat-free mass, and was only weakly associated with fat mass. The protective associations between breastfeeding

  16. Early Life Nutrition and Energy Balance Disorders in Offspring in Later Life

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Clare M.; Gray, Clint; Li, Minglan; Segovia, Stephanie A.; Vickers, Mark H.

    2015-01-01

    The global pandemic of obesity and type 2 diabetes is often causally linked to changes in diet and lifestyle; namely increased intake of calorically dense foods and concomitant reductions in physical activity. Epidemiological studies in humans and controlled animal intervention studies have now shown that nutritional programming in early periods of life is a phenomenon that affects metabolic and physiological functions throughout life. This link is conceptualised as the developmental programming hypothesis whereby environmental influences during critical periods of developmental plasticity can elicit lifelong effects on the health and well-being of the offspring. The mechanisms by which early environmental insults can have long-term effects on offspring remain poorly defined. However there is evidence from intervention studies which indicate altered wiring of the hypothalamic circuits that regulate energy balance and epigenetic effects including altered DNA methylation of key adipokines including leptin. Studies that elucidate the mechanisms behind these associations will have a positive impact on the health of future populations and adopting a life course perspective will allow identification of phenotype and markers of risk earlier, with the possibility of nutritional and other lifestyle interventions that have obvious implications for prevention of non-communicable diseases. PMID:26402696

  17. Issues in the timing of integrated early interventions: contributions from nutrition, neuroscience and psychological research

    PubMed Central

    Wachs, Theodore D.; Georgieff, Michael; Cusick, Sarah; McEwen, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    A central issue when designing multi-dimensional biological and psychosocial interventions for children who are exposed to multiple developmental risks is identification of the age period(s) in which such interventions will have the strongest and longest lasting impact (sensitive periods). In this paper we review nutritional, neuroscience and psychological evidence on this issue. Nutritional evidence is used to identify nutrient sensitive periods of age-linked dimensions of brain development, with specific reference to iron deficiency. Neuroscience evidence is used to assess the importance of timing of exposures to environmental stressors for maintaining neural, neuroendocrine and immune systems integrity. Psychological evidence illustrates the sensitivity of cognitive and social-emotional development to contextual risk and protective influences encountered at different ages. Evidence reviewed documents that the early years of life are a sensitive period where biological or psychosocial interventions or exposure to risk or protective contextual influences can produce unique long-term influences upon human brain, neuroendocrine and cognitive or psychosocial development. However, the evidence does not identify the early years as the sole sensitive time period within which to have a significant influence upon development. Choice of age(s) to initiate interventions should be based on what outcomes are targeted and what interventions are used. PMID:24354763

  18. Nutrition in neurologically impaired children

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Malnutrition, either under- or overnutrition, is a common condition among neurologically impaired children. Energy needs are difficult to define in this heterogeneous population, and there is a lack of information on what normal growth should be in these children. Non-nutritional factors may influence growth, but nutritional factors such as insufficient caloric intake, excessive nutrient losses and abnormal energy metabolism also contribute to growth failure. Malnutrition is associated with significant morbidity, while nutritional rehabilitation improves overall health. Nutritional support should be an integral part of the management of neurologically impaired children, and should focus not only on improving nutritional status but also on improving quality of life for patients and their families. When considering nutritional intervention, oromotor dysfunction, gastroesophageal reflux and pulmonary aspiration must be addressed and a multidisciplinary team should be involved. Children at risk for nutrition-related problems should be identified early. An assessment of nutritional status should be performed at least yearly, and more frequently in infants and young children, or in children at risk for malnutrition. Oral intake should be optimized if safe, but enteral tube feedings should be initiated in children with oromotor dysfunction, leading to clinically significant aspiration, or in children unable to maintain an adequate nutritional status with oral intake. Nasogastric tube feeding should be used for short-term intervention, but if long-term nutritional intervention is required, a gastrostomy should be considered. Antireflux procedures should be reserved for children with significant gastroesophageal reflux. The patient’s response to nutritional intervention should be carefully monitored to avoid excessive weight gain after initiation of enteral nutrition, and paediatric formulas should be used to avoid micronutrient deficiencies. PMID:20592978

  19. Water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH), environmental enteropathy, nutrition, and early child development: making the links.

    PubMed

    Ngure, Francis M; Reid, Brianna M; Humphrey, Jean H; Mbuya, Mduduzi N; Pelto, Gretel; Stoltzfus, Rebecca J

    2014-01-01

    There is scarce research and programmatic evidence on the effect of poor water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) conditions of the physical environment on early child cognitive, sensorimotor, and socioemotional development. Furthermore, many common WASH interventions are not specifically designed to protect babies in the first 3 years of life, when gut health and linear growth are established. We review evidence linking WASH, anemia, and child growth, and highlight pathways through which WASH may affect early child development, primarily through inflammation, stunting, and anemia. Environmental enteropathy, a prevalent subclinical condition of the gut, may be a key mediating pathway linking poor hygiene to developmental deficits. Current early child development research and programs lack evidence-based interventions to provide a clean play and infant feeding environment in addition to established priorities of nutrition, stimulation, and child protection. Solutions to this problem will require appropriate behavior change and technologies that are adapted to the social and physical context and conducive to infant play and socialization. We propose the concept of baby WASH as an additional component of early childhood development programs. PMID:24571214

  20. Rethinking Nutrition: Connecting Science and Practice in Early Childhood Settings, Revised Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nitzke, Susan; Riley, Dave; Ramminger, Ann; Jacobs, Georgine

    2015-01-01

    Nutrition has vital and long-lasting effects on children's development. Good nutrition helps children learn better and promotes lifelong healthy eating habits. Connecting current scientific research with best practices, "Rethinking Nutrition" provides information to help you meet and understand children's nutritional and developmental…

  1. Highlighting the evidence gap: how cost-effective are interventions to improve early childhood nutrition and development?

    PubMed Central

    Batura, Neha; Hill, Zelee; Haghparast-Bidgoli, Hassan; Lingam, Raghu; Colbourn, Timothy; Kim, Sungwook; Sikander, Siham; Pulkki-Brannstrom, Anni-Maria; Rahman, Atif; Kirkwood, Betty; Skordis-Worrall, Jolene

    2015-01-01

    There is growing evidence of the effectiveness of early childhood interventions to improve the growth and development of children. Although, historically, nutrition and stimulation interventions may have been delivered separately, they are increasingly being tested as a package of early childhood interventions that synergistically improve outcomes over the life course. However, implementation at scale is seldom possible without first considering the relative cost and cost-effectiveness of these interventions. An evidence gap in this area may deter large-scale implementation, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. We conduct a literature review to establish what is known about the cost-effectiveness of early childhood nutrition and development interventions. A set of predefined search terms and exclusion criteria standardized the search across five databases. The search identified 15 relevant articles. Of these, nine were from studies set in high-income countries and six in low- and middle-income countries. The articles either calculated the cost-effectiveness of nutrition-specific interventions (n = 8) aimed at improving child growth, or parenting interventions (stimulation) to improve early childhood development (n = 7). No articles estimated the cost-effectiveness of combined interventions. Comparing results within nutrition or stimulation interventions, or between nutrition and stimulation interventions was largely prevented by the variety of outcome measures used in these analyses. This article highlights the need for further evidence relevant to low- and middle-income countries. To facilitate comparison of cost-effectiveness between studies, and between contexts where appropriate, a move towards a common outcome measure such as the cost per disability-adjusted life years averted is advocated. Finally, given the increasing number of combined nutrition and stimulation interventions being tested, there is a significant need for evidence of cost

  2. Gender differences in nutritional behavior and weight status during early and late adolescence.

    PubMed

    Askovic, Branka; Kirchengast, Sylvia

    2012-07-01

    The current study aimed to determine gender differences in nutritional habits, eating behaviour, weight status, body image and weight control practices during early and late adolescence. 677 Viennese pupils (253 boys and 424 girls) between the ages 10 and 18 years (x = 14.1 yrs; +/- 2.2) were enrolled in the study. Weight status was determined by means of body mass index percentiles. To assess eating behavior, food preferences, body image and weight control practices, a 48 item questionnaire was developed. Significant gender differences in weight status were observable during late adolescence only. Girls are significantly less satisfied with their body weight. Furthermore, girls practice dieting and weight control to avoid any weight gain more frequently than boys. Gender differences in eating behavior intensified from early to late adolescence. From early to late adolescence, meal size decreased among girls, while it remains stabile or increased among boys. Boys eat generally more than girls. Furthermore, boys preferred meat and fast food while girls consumed fruits, vegetables and healthy food significantly more frequently. These gender differences are explained by gender specific energetic demands and culture typical beauty ideals. PMID:22928352

  3. Early Career Survival: Many Find It Harder to Enter the Profession than It Sounds in the Recruitment Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodgers, Lala

    2004-01-01

    Many find it harder to enter the profession than it sounds in the recruitment literature. This article outlines how one librarian's job searching strategies after she experienced a layoff from her dream job due to budget cuts, can help others gain, or regain, a foothold in the profession. The author of this article offers many suggestions for…

  4. Parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Thibault, Ronan; Pichard, Claude

    2013-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) is a technique of nutritional support, which consists of intravenous administration of macronutrients (glucose, amino acids, and triglycerides), micronutrients (vitamins and trace elements), water, and electrolytes. Early studies indicate that the use of total PN was associated with increased mortality and infectious morbidity. These detrimental effects of PN were related to hyperglycemia and overfeeding at a period when PN was administered according to the principle that the higher calories the patients received, the better their outcome would be. Enteral nutrition (EN) then replaced PN as the gold standard of nutritional care in the intensive care unit (ICU). However, EN alone is frequently associated with insufficient energy coverage, and subsequent protein-energy deficit is correlated with a worse clinical outcome. Infectious and metabolic complications of PN could be prevented if PN is used by a trained team using a validated protocol, only when indicated, not within the first 2 days following ICU admission, and limited through the time. In addition, energy delivery has to be matched to the energy target, and adapted glucose control should be obtained. In patients with significant energy deficit (>40%), the combination of PN and EN, i.e. supplemental PN, from day 4 of the ICU stay, could improve the clinical outcome of ICU patients as compared with EN alone. Therefore, PN should be integrated in the management of ICU patients with the aim of prevent the worsening of energy deficits, allowing the preservation of lean body mass loss, and reducing the risk of undernutrition-related complications. PMID:23075587

  5. Influence of early-life nutrition on mortality and reproductive success during a subsequent famine in a preindustrial population.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Adam D; Rickard, Ian J; Lummaa, Virpi

    2013-08-20

    Individuals with insufficient nutrition during development often experience poorer later-life health and evolutionary fitness. The Predictive Adaptive Response (PAR) hypothesis proposes that poor early-life nutrition induces physiological changes that maximize fitness in similar environments in adulthood and that metabolic diseases result when individuals experiencing poor nutrition during development subsequently encounter good nutrition in adulthood. However, although cohort studies have shown that famine exposure in utero reduces health in favorable later-life conditions, no study on humans has demonstrated the predicted fitness benefit under low later-life nutrition, leaving the evolutionary origins of such plasticity unexplored. Taking advantage of a well-documented famine and unique datasets of individual life histories and crop yields from two preindustrial Finnish populations, we provide a test of key predictions of the PAR hypothesis. Known individuals from fifty cohorts were followed from birth until the famine, where we analyzed their survival and reproductive success in relation to the crop yields around birth. We were also able to test whether the long-term effects of early-life nutrition differed between individuals of varying socioeconomic status. We found that, contrary to predictions of the PAR hypothesis, individuals experiencing low early-life crop yields showed lower survival and fertility during the famine than individuals experiencing high early-life crop yields. These effects were more pronounced among young individuals and those of low socioeconomic status. Our results do not support the hypothesis that PARs should have been favored by natural selection and suggest that alternative models may need to be invoked to explain the epidemiology of metabolic diseases. PMID:23918366

  6. [Effect of dietotherapy with food-stuffs for enteral nutrition on the dynamic of clinical and biochemic parameters in biliary tract diseases].

    PubMed

    Plotnikova, O A; Meshcheriakova, V A; Sharfetdinov, Kh Kh; Petrovskaia, O B; Mokhova, E O

    2005-01-01

    It was investigated the influence of dietary therapy with enteral formula "Nutricomp AND Braum fiber" on clinical and biochemic parameters in biliary tract diseases. Also it was carried out the comparative estimation of the gallbladder motility in this contingent of patients in process of the standard food loading and the loading with the tested enteral formula (25 g carbohydrates). It was indicated that the including of enteral formula "Nutricomp AND Braum fiber" (209 g/day) in traditional hypocaloric diet promotes the decrease of cholesterol level and activity of alkaline phosphatase. The gallbladder motility was some smaller after the consuming of enteral formula "Nutricomp AND Braum Diabetes" compared with the standard food loading (25 g carbohydrates). PMID:16313133

  7. Early weaning and postweaning nutritional management affect feedlot performance of angus x simmental heifers and the relationship of 12th rib fat and marbling score to feed efficiency.

    PubMed

    Wertz, E; Berge, L L; Walker, P M; Faulkner, D B; McKeith, F K; Rodriguez-Zas, S

    2001-07-01

    Early-weaned Angus x Simmental heifers were used to evaluate the effects of postweaning nutritional management on feedlot performance, carcass merit, and the relationship of intramuscular and subcutaneous fat deposition to the feed efficiency among heifers fed for a high-quality market. Sixteen heifers were weaned at 73+/-5.5 d of age and grazed on endophyte-infected tall fescue for 18 mo before entering the feedlot (early-weaned-P). Eighty heifers from the following year's calf crop were weaned at 71+/-5.5 d of age and allowed either ad libitum access to a 25% concentrate diet (early-weaned-25C) or limit-fed a 90% concentrate diet (early-weaned-90C) to achieve a similar ADG. Following a 119-d growing period, 16 early-weaned-90C and 16 early-weaned-25C calves were paired based on BW and growth rate and individually fed during the finishing period along with the early-weaned-P heifers. Ultrasound measurements of s.c. and i.m. fat were recorded at approximately 60-d intervals throughout the finishing period. Feed efficiency was regressed against s.c. and i.m. fat, and i.m. fat was regressed on s.c. fat. Despite a similar ADG, early-weaned-90C calves gained more efficiently (P < or = 0.05) in the feedlot than early-weaned-25C calves. Heifers finished as yearlings tended (P < or = 0.10) to gain faster but gained less efficiently (P < or = 0.01) than early-weaned-90C heifers finished as calves. The rate of s.c. and i.m. fat deposition was similar between early-weaned-90C and early-weaned-25C heifer calves. The calves were grouped together for comparison to yearlings. Feed efficiency decreased quadratically (P < or = 0.01) as s.c. fat cover increased. The rate at which feed efficiency decreased relative to increasing s.c. fat cover was similar regardless of age at feedlot entry. However, heifers finished as calves gained more efficiently (P < or = 0.01) than yearlings at any given fat thickness. Feed efficiency decreased linearly (P < or = 0.01) as i.m. fat increased

  8. The interplay of early-life stress, nutrition, and immune activation programs adult hippocampal structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Hoeijmakers, Lianne; Lucassen, Paul J.; Korosi, Aniko

    2015-01-01

    Early-life adversity increases the vulnerability to develop psychopathologies and cognitive decline later in life. This association is supported by clinical and preclinical studies. Remarkably, experiences of stress during this sensitive period, in the form of abuse or neglect but also early malnutrition or an early immune challenge elicit very similar long-term effects on brain structure and function. During early-life, both exogenous factors like nutrition and maternal care, as well as endogenous modulators, including stress hormones and mediator of immunological activity affect brain development. The interplay of these key elements and their underlying molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. We discuss here the hypothesis that exposure to early-life adversity (specifically stress, under/malnutrition and infection) leads to life-long alterations in hippocampal-related cognitive functions, at least partly via changes in hippocampal neurogenesis. We further discuss how these different key elements of the early-life environment interact and affect one another and suggest that it is a synergistic action of these elements that shapes cognition throughout life. Finally, we consider different intervention studies aiming to prevent these early-life adversity induced consequences. The emerging evidence for the intriguing interplay of stress, nutrition, and immune activity in the early-life programming calls for a more in depth understanding of the interaction of these elements and the underlying mechanisms. This knowledge will help to develop intervention strategies that will converge on a more complete set of changes induced by early-life adversity. PMID:25620909

  9. The interplay of early-life stress, nutrition, and immune activation programs adult hippocampal structure and function.

    PubMed

    Hoeijmakers, Lianne; Lucassen, Paul J; Korosi, Aniko

    2014-01-01

    Early-life adversity increases the vulnerability to develop psychopathologies and cognitive decline later in life. This association is supported by clinical and preclinical studies. Remarkably, experiences of stress during this sensitive period, in the form of abuse or neglect but also early malnutrition or an early immune challenge elicit very similar long-term effects on brain structure and function. During early-life, both exogenous factors like nutrition and maternal care, as well as endogenous modulators, including stress hormones and mediator of immunological activity affect brain development. The interplay of these key elements and their underlying molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. We discuss here the hypothesis that exposure to early-life adversity (specifically stress, under/malnutrition and infection) leads to life-long alterations in hippocampal-related cognitive functions, at least partly via changes in hippocampal neurogenesis. We further discuss how these different key elements of the early-life environment interact and affect one another and suggest that it is a synergistic action of these elements that shapes cognition throughout life. Finally, we consider different intervention studies aiming to prevent these early-life adversity induced consequences. The emerging evidence for the intriguing interplay of stress, nutrition, and immune activity in the early-life programming calls for a more in depth understanding of the interaction of these elements and the underlying mechanisms. This knowledge will help to develop intervention strategies that will converge on a more complete set of changes induced by early-life adversity. PMID:25620909

  10. Early Nutrition as a Major Determinant of 'Immune Health': Implications for Allergy, Obesity and Other Noncommunicable Diseases.

    PubMed

    Prescott, Susan L

    2016-01-01

    Early-life nutritional exposures are significant determinants of the development and future health of all organ systems. The dramatic rise in infant immune diseases, most notably allergy, indicates the specific vulnerability of the immune system to early environmental changes. Dietary changes are at the center of the emerging epigenetic paradigms that underpin the rise in many modern inflammatory and metabolic diseases. There is growing evidence that exposures in pregnancy and the early postnatal period can modify gene expression and disease susceptibility. Although modern dietary changes are complex and involve changing patterns of many nutrients, there is also interest in the developmental effects of specific nutrients. Oligosaccharides (soluble fiber), antioxidants, polyunsaturated fatty acids, folate and other vitamins have documented effects on immune function as well as metabolism. Some have also been implicated in modified risk of allergic diseases in observational studies. Intervention studies are largely limited to trials with polyunsaturated fatty acids and oligosaccharides, showing preliminary but yet unconfirmed benefits in allergy prevention. Understanding how environmental influences disrupt the finely balanced development of immune and metabolic programming is of critical importance. Diet-sensitive pathways are likely to be crucial in these processes. While an epigenetic mechanism provides a strong explanation of how nutritional exposures can affect fetal gene expression and subsequent disease risk, other diet-induced tissue compositional changes may also contribute directly to altered immune and metabolic function - including diet-induced changes in the microbiome. A better understanding of nutritional programming of immune health, nutritional epigenetics and the biological processes sensitive to nutritional exposures early in life may lead to dietary strategies that provide more tolerogenic conditions during early immune programming and reduce the

  11. Early complementary feeding is associated with low nutritional status of young infants recovering from diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Haider, R; Islam, A; Kabir, I; Habte, D

    1996-06-01

    Young infants admitted to hospital for diarrhoea were studied to identify and understand the reasons for early complementary feeding and to examine its effect on nutritional status. Of 132 infants, 71 percent were being breastfed, 24 percent had already stopped, and 5 percent had never been breastfed. Complementary feeds were started by the mothers when infants' median age (range) was 27 (1-180) days. Mothers' perceptions regarding breastmilk being insufficient (53 per cent) or causing diarrhoea (19 percent), were the major reasons for complementary feeding. The mean weight-for-age of the infants given complementary feeds before the age of 2 months was 72 percent of the National Centre for Health Statistics (NCHS) standards, compared to 82 percent in those starting after 2 months of age (P = 0.01). Similarly, the mean weight-for-length in these two groups were 86 and 91 percent, respectively (P = 0.04). Initiation of early complementary feeding is associated with infant malnutrition and this alarming trend should be strongly discouraged. PMID:8699586

  12. Total parenteral nutrition induces liver steatosis and apoptosis in neonatal piglets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) induces a high rate of liver disease in infants, yet the pathogenesis remains elusive. We used neonatal piglets as an animal model to assess early events leading to TPN-mediated liver injury. Newborn piglets (n = 7) were nourished for 7 d on TPN or enteral nutrition ...

  13. Cows' milk protein-sensitive enteropathy. An important factor in prolonging diarrhoea of acute infective enteritis in early infancy.

    PubMed Central

    Iyngkaran, N; Robinson, M J; Sumithran, E; Lam, S K; Puthucheary, S D; Yadav, M

    1978-01-01

    The possible role of cows' milk protein in prolonging diarrhoea in very young infants with acute infective enteritis was studied in 14 infants, 9 under the age of 2 months and 5 older than 6 months. Bacterial pathogens were isolated from the stools of 4 infants from the younger age group. After appropriate initial treatment the infants were maintained on a cows' milk protein-free formula. 6 weeks later jejunal biopsies were performed before and 24 hours after challenge with a low lactose cows' milk protein formula. The immunoglobulin and complement levels in the serum and duodenal juice were also estimated at these times. Attempts to isolate bacterial and viral pathogens in stools were again made in all patients. The 5 older infants clinically tolerated cows' milk protein and their pre- and postchallenge jejunal biopsies were within normal limits. However, significant histological changes were observed in the postchallenge jejunal biopsies of all 9 infants under 2 months of age. In addition, 5 of these infants developed diarrhoea. This suggests that the jejunal mucosa of very young infants previously fed a cows' milk protein-based formula and who contract infective enteritis suffers damage when rechallenged with cows' milk protein. PMID:646417

  14. Enteral feeding: how, when, how much?

    PubMed

    De Nisi, G

    2010-06-01

    In a NICU early enteral feeding is usually possible only when the newborn clinical conditions permit it. Because of the frequent need of umbilical/central catheters, they usually start with parenteral feeding and/or with minimal enteral feeding (trophic feeding). This kind of management is even more frequent in VLBWIs, in which the risk of NEC is very high. In this work we describe a model of early enteral exclusive feeding (EEEF) based on the use of banking human milk followed by mother In the Centre of Neonatology of Trento, as in other milk. Centers, the newborns weighing less than 750 g or with a GE <27 weeks, are treated with parenteral nutrition and minimal enteral feeding. The newborn weighing 750-1249g and with GE >26 weeks define a group in which we find critical neonates, who can not be treated with enteral feeding, and neonates whose clinical conditions permit EEEF. In particular, in a period of 16 years (1994-2009) in Trento, 308 newborns weighing 750-1249 g and GE >26 weeks were admitted. The 90.9% has been treated with prenatal steroids, the 91.9% was inborn, the 96.1% survived. In the 59.1% of the cases (175) we gave EEEF. We could continue with a complete EEEF in the 40.2% of the total (119 cases). The characteristics of these neonates and our centre management, based mainly on early use of banking human milk and mother milk, are detailed described. PMID:21089743

  15. CALORIC INTAKE AND DIETARY FAT TO CARBOHYDRATE RATIO INFLUENCE BODY WEIGHT ACCRETION AND ADIPOSITY IN RATS FED BY TOTAL ENTERAL NUTRITION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consumption of high energy high-fat diets leads to weight gain and adiposity in rodents. However the relative roles of higher caloric intake vs. increased dietary fat remain unclear. Low carbohydrate high fat diets, like the Atkins diet, claim to promote weight loss. We employed a total enteral nutr...

  16. A conceptual framework for organizational readiness to implement nutrition and physical activity programs in early childhood education settings.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shreela V; Upadhyaya, Mudita; Schober, Daniel J; Byrd-Williams, Courtney

    2014-01-01

    Across multiple sectors, organizational readiness predicts the success of program implementation. However, the factors influencing readiness of early childhood education (ECE) organizations for implementation of new nutrition and physical activity programs is poorly understood. This study presents a new conceptual framework to measure organizational readiness to implement nutrition and physical activity programs in ECE centers serving children aged 0 to 5 years. The framework was validated for consensus on relevance and generalizability by conducting focus groups; the participants were managers (16 directors and 2 assistant directors) of ECE centers. The framework theorizes that it is necessary to have "collective readiness," which takes into account such factors as resources, organizational operations, work culture, and the collective attitudes, motivation, beliefs, and intentions of ECE staff. Results of the focus groups demonstrated consensus on the relevance of proposed constructs across ECE settings. Including readiness measures during program planning and evaluation could inform implementation of ECE programs targeting nutrition and physical activity behaviors. PMID:25357258

  17. [Nutritional support in stroke patients].

    PubMed

    Burgos Peláez, Rosa; Segurola Gurrutxaga, Hegoi; Bretón Lesmes, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a public health problem of the first order. In developed countries is one of the leading causes of death, along with cardiovascular disease and cancer. In addition, stroke is the leading cause of permanent disability in adulthood. Many of the patients who survive do so with significant sequelae that limit them in their activities of daily living. Most strokes (80-85%) are due to ischemia, while the rest are hemorrhagic. We have identified many modifiable risk factors, some with an important relationship with dietary factors or comorbidities in wich the diet has a significant impact. The incidence of malnutrition in stroke patients is not well known, but most likely impacts on patient prognosis. Furthermore, the nutritional status of patients admitted for stroke often deteriorates during hospitalization. It is necessary to perform a nutritional assessment of the patient in the early hours of admission, to determine both the nutritional status and the presence of dysphagia. Dysphagia, through alteration of the safety and efficacy of swallowing, is a complication that has an implication for nutritional support, and must be treated to prevent aspiration pneumonia, which is the leading cause of mortality in the stroke patient. Nutritional support should begin in the early hours. In patients with no or mild dysphagia that can be controlled by modifying the texture of the diet, they will start oral diet and oral nutritional supplementation will be used if the patient does not meet their nutritional requirements. There is no evidence to support the use of nutritional supplements routinely. Patients with severe dysphagia, or decreased level of consciousness will require enteral nutrition. Current evidence indicates that early nutrition should be initiated through a nasogastric tube, with any advantages of early feeding gastrostomy. Gastrostomy will be planned when the enteral nutrition support will be expected for long-term (4 weeks). Much evidence points to the

  18. Nutritional support for acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Pisters, P W; Ranson, J H

    1992-09-01

    The current review has summarized current data relevant to the nutritional support of patients with acute pancreatitis. Selection of the most appropriate form of nutritional support for patients with acute pancreatitis is intimately linked to a thorough understanding of the effects of various forms of enteral and parenteral nutrition on physiologic exocrine secretory mechanisms. Two basic concepts have emerged from the multiple studies that have addressed these issues to date: 1, enteral feeds should have low fat composition and be delivered distal to the ligament of Treitz to minimize exocrine pancreatic secretion and 2, parenteral substrate infusions, alone or in combinations similar to those administered during TPN, do not stimulate exocrine pancreatic secretion. From a practical standpoint, most patients with acute pancreatitis are diagnosed by nonoperative means and will manifest some degree of paralytic ileus during the early phase of the disease. Therefore, jejunal feeds are usually not a therapeutic option early in the course of this disease. On the basis of the clinical studies reviewed herein we propose general guidelines for the nutritional support of patients with acute pancreatitis: 1, most patients with mild uncomplicated pancreatitis (one to two prognostic signs) do not benefit from nutritional support; 2, nutritional support should begin early in the course of patients with moderate to severe disease (as soon as hemodynamic and cardiorespiratory stability permit); 3, initial nutritional support should be through the parenteral route and include fat emulsion in amounts sufficient to prevent essential fatty acid deficiency (no objective data exist to recommend specific amino acid formulations); 4, patients requiring operation for diagnosis or complications of the disease should have a feeding jejunostomy placed at the time of operation for subsequent enteral nutrition using a low fat formula, such as Precision HN (Sandoz, 1.3 percent calories as fat

  19. Advancing the nutrition and early childhood development agenda: indicators and guidance.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, David; Neuman, Michelle J

    2014-01-01

    The importance of early childhood development (ECD) is scientifically established and is increasingly recognized by governments and international organizations. However, progress in protecting and improving ECD is constrained by multisectoral influences on ECD, the multiple sectors and venues for delivering services, the lack of a common fiscal and policy space, and weak or fragmented data and monitoring systems. This paper describes two tools and strategies to strengthen multisectoral, system-wide policy environments for ECD. One is the Systems Approach for Better Education Results (SABER)-ECD framework for tracking progress toward an integrated ECD system. Developed by the World Bank, SABER-ECD assists governments and their partners to take stock of their existing ECD policies and programs, analyze strengths and areas for improvement using common metrics, and learn from international examples. The other tool is an Agenda-Setting and Commitments framework, based on research in global health and nutrition that can guide national-level actors in their advocacy and strategic efforts to strengthen the integrated ECD system. These represent practical and research-based tools to translate scientific evidence concerning ECD into effective and large-scale actions. PMID:24152149

  20. Nutrition and metabolism in poultry: role of lipids in early diet.

    PubMed

    Cherian, Gita

    2015-01-01

    Modern strains of broiler chickens are selected for fast growth and are marketed anywhere from 36 to 49 days after a 21-day incubational period. For a viable healthy chick, all the necessary nutrients required for growth and development must be provided by the hen through the fertilized egg. The current feeding strategies for improved growth, health and productivity are targeted towards chicks after hatching. Considering the fact that developing chick embryo spends over 30 % of its total life span inside the hatching egg relying on nutrients deposited by the breeder hen, investigations on nutritional needs during pre-hatch period will improve embryonic health, hatchability and chick viability. In this context, investigations on hatching egg lipid quality is of utmost importance because, during incubation, egg fat is the major source of energy and sole source of essential omega-6 (n-6) and omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids to the chick embryo. Due to the unique roles of n-3 and n-6 fatty acids in growth, immune health, and development of central nervous system, this review will focus on the role of early exposure to essential fatty acids through maternal diet and hatching egg and its impact on progeny in meat-type broiler chickens. PMID:26137219

  1. Outcomes of Good Practice in Transition Processes for Children Entering Primary School. Working Papers in Early Childhood Development, No. 42

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fabian, Hilary; Dunlop, Aline-Wendy

    2007-01-01

    The transition to primary school is one of the greatest challenges of early childhood. Handled well, it can set children into virtuous cycle of learning. But how can transitions be made more effective? Based on a background paper for UNESCO's Education for All Global Monitoring Report 2007, this paper assesses the literature and draws lessons…

  2. Systematic review: The relation between nutrition and nosocomial pneumonia: randomized trials in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    1997-01-01

    Objective To review the effect of enteral nutrition on nosocomial pneumonia in critically ill patients as summarized in randomized clinical trials. Study identification and selection Studies were identified through MEDLINE, SCISEARCH, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, bibliographies of primary and review articles, and personal files. Through duplicate independent review, we selected randomized trials evaluating approaches to nutrition and their relation to nosocomial pneumonia. Data abstraction In duplicate, independently, we abstracted key data on the design features, population, intervention and outcomes of the studies. Results We identified four trials of enteral vs total parenteral nutrition, one trial of early enteral nutrition vs delayed enteral nutrition, one trial of gastric vs jejunal tube feeding, one trial of intermittent vs continuous enteral feeding, and three trials evaluating different enteral feeding formulae. Sample sizes were small, pneumonia definitions were variable and blinded outcome assessment was infrequent. Randomized trial evidence is insufficient to draw conclusions about the relation between enteral nutrition and nosocomial pneumonia. Conclusions Nutritional interventions in critically ill patients appear to have a modest and inconsistent effect on nosocomial pneumonia. This body of evidence neither supports nor refutes the gastropulmonary route of infection. PMID:11094461

  3. Tuberculous Enteritis

    PubMed Central

    Hill, George S.; Tabrisky, Joseph; Peter, Michael E.

    1976-01-01

    Tuberculous enteritis occurs in about 2 percent of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. Although it is uncommon in the United States, tuberculous enteritis should be considered in any patient with active pulmonary tuberculosis and abdominal complaints. Eight cases of T. enteritis have been treated at Harbor General Hospital in the last 25 years. Associated pulmonary disease was shown radiologically to be present in seven of eight patients. Findings on contrast studies of the gastrointestinal tract showed disease in six of six patients examined. In five patients, surgical operation was required for diagnosis or complications. Resection of diseased bowel with primary anastomosis was done in five patients. Although medical therapy is the mainstay in the treatment of both pulmonary and intestinal tuberculosis, one staged resection of diseased bowel with primary anastomosis is the procedure of choice for complications such as obstruction, hemorrhage or perforation. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:936600

  4. Can nutrition support interfere with recovery from acute critical illness?

    PubMed

    Schulman, Rifka C; Mechanick, Jeffrey I

    2013-01-01

    Malnutrition, following critical illness-related metabolic and immune neuroendocrine derangements, is exacerbated by energy and protein deficits beginning early in the intensive care unit (ICU) stay. While nutrition support is an important component of ICU care, adverse effects can occur. Underfeeding, due to insufficient energy and/or protein is associated with poor patient outcomes. Overfeeding carbohydrates, lipids, and/or protein can result in hyperglycemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hepatic dysfunction, and/or azotemia. Individualization of the nutritional prescription with clinical monitoring and repeated adjustment is necessary to avoid harm. Appropriate use of tight glycemic control protocols in combination with nutrition support can prevent hyperglycemia, while minimizing glycemic variability and hypoglycemic events. While the enteral route is favored for nutrition support, early supplemental parenteral nutrition should be considered in selected high-risk patients. Thus, risk stratification of patients upon admission to the ICU can be helpful to design individualized nutritional prescriptions maximizing benefit while avoiding potential interference with recovery. PMID:23075588

  5. Serum albumin levels in burn people are associated to the total body surface burned and the length of hospital stay but not to the initiation of the oral/enteral nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Guisado, Joaquín; de Haro-Padilla, Jesús M; Rioja, Luis F; DeRosier, Leo C; de la Torre, Jorge I

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Serum albumin levels have been used to evaluate the severity of the burns and the nutrition protein status in burn people, specifically in the response of the burn patient to the nutrition. Although it hasn’t been proven if all these associations are fully funded. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the relationship of serum albumin levels at 3-7 days after the burn injury, with the total body surface area burned (TBSA), the length of hospital stay (LHS) and the initiation of the oral/enteral nutrition (IOEN). Subject and methods: It was carried out with the health records of patients that accomplished the inclusion criteria and were admitted to the burn units at the University Hospital of Reina Sofia (Córdoba, Spain) and UAB Hospital at Birmingham (Alabama, USA) over a 10 years period, between January 2000 and December 2009. We studied the statistical association of serum albumin levels with the TBSA, LHS and IOEN by ANOVA one way test. The confidence interval chosen for statistical differences was 95%. Duncan’s test was used to determine the number of statistically significantly groups. Results: Were expressed as mean±standard deviation. We found serum albumin levels association with TBSA and LHS, with greater to lesser serum albumin levels found associated to lesser to greater TBSA and LHS. We didn’t find statistical association with IOEN. Conclusion: We conclude that serum albumin levels aren’t a nutritional marker in burn people although they could be used as a simple clinical tool to identify the severity of the burn wounds represented by the total body surface area burned and the lenght of hospital stay. PMID:23875122

  6. Changes in Oxidative Stress and Inflammatory Biomarkers in Fragile Adults over Fifty Years of Age and in Elderly People Exclusively Fed Enteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Mesa, Maria D.; Olza, Josune; Gonzalez-Anton, Carolina; Aguilera, Concepcion M.; Moreno-Torres, Rosario; Jimenez, Africa; Perez de la Cruz, Antonio; Ruperez, Azahara I.; Gil, Angel

    2016-01-01

    We aim to evaluate whether exclusive feeding of an enteral formula enriched with n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LC-PUFA) affects oxidative stress and the antioxidant defence system and may improve the levels of some relevant inflammatory, and cardiovascular biomarkers in frail adults over fifty years of age and in elderly subjects. Fifty-five patients were divided into two groups and were exclusively fed a newly designed normoproteic and isocaloric enteral formula enriched with eicosapentaenoic (98 mg/d) and docosahexaenoic acids (46 mg/d) (n = 26) or a reference enteral diet (n = 29). Oxidative, inflammatory and cardiovascular risk biomarkers and red blood cell fatty acid profiles were determined at the beginning and after 90 and 180 days of feeding. The n-3 LC-PUFA percentage tended to be higher (P = 0.053) in the experimental group than in the reference group. Administration of the n-3 LC-PUFA diet did not increase oxidative stress or modify plasma antioxidant capacity but decreased antioxidant enzymatic activities. MMP-9 plasma concentration decreased with both formulae, whereas tPAI-1 tended to decrease (P = 0.116) with the administration of the experimental formula. In conclusion, administration of the new n-3 LC-PUFA-enriched product for 6 months did not negatively alter the oxidative status and improved some cardiovascular risk biomarkers. PMID:26697137

  7. Nutrition and pubertal development.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Ashraf; De Sanctis, Vincenzo; Elalaily, Rania

    2014-11-01

    Nutrition is one of the most important factors affecting pubertal development. Puberty entails a progressive nonlinear process starting from prepubescent to full sexual maturity through the interaction and cooperation of biological, physical, and psychological changes. Consuming an adequate and balanced healthy diet during all phases of growth (infancy, childhood and puberty) appears necessary both for proper growth and normal pubertal development. Girls begin puberty at an earlier age compared to past decades. Excessive eating of many processed, high-fat foods, may be the cause of this phenomenon. Overweight or obese children are more likely to enter puberty early. Some evidence suggests that obesity can accelerate the onset of puberty in girls and may delay the onset of puberty in boys. Moreover, the progression of puberty is affected by nutrition. On the other hand, puberty triggers a growth spurt, which increases nutritional needs including macro and micronutrients. Increased caloric, protein, iron, calcium, zinc and folate needs have to be provided during this critical period of rapid growth. Severe primary or secondary malnutrition also can delay the onset and progression of puberty. The higher incidence of anorexia nervosa and bulimia in adolescents imposes a nutritional risk on pubertal development. Moreover, many environmental endocrine disruptors (EDs) have been identified that can significantly impair the normal course of puberty. This mini-review sums up some important findings in this important complex that link nutrition and pubertal development. PMID:25538876

  8. Nutrition and pubertal development

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Ashraf; De Sanctis, Vincenzo; Elalaily, Rania

    2014-01-01

    Nutrition is one of the most important factors affecting pubertal development. Puberty entails a progressive nonlinear process starting from prepubescent to full sexual maturity through the interaction and cooperation of biological, physical, and psychological changes. Consuming an adequate and balanced healthy diet during all phases of growth (infancy, childhood and puberty) appears necessary both for proper growth and normal pubertal development. Girls begin puberty at an earlier age compared to past decades. Excessive eating of many processed, high-fat foods, may be the cause of this phenomenon. Overweight or obese children are more likely to enter puberty early. Some evidence suggests that obesity can accelerate the onset of puberty in girls and may delay the onset of puberty in boys. Moreover, the progression of puberty is affected by nutrition. On the other hand, puberty triggers a growth spurt, which increases nutritional needs including macro and micronutrients. Increased caloric, protein, iron, calcium, zinc and folate needs have to be provided during this critical period of rapid growth. Severe primary or secondary malnutrition also can delay the onset and progression of puberty. The higher incidence of anorexia nervosa and bulimia in adolescents imposes a nutritional risk on pubertal development. Moreover, many environmental endocrine disruptors (EDs) have been identified that can significantly impair the normal course of puberty. This mini-review sums up some important findings in this important complex that link nutrition and pubertal development. PMID:25538876

  9. Enteral feeding in critical care, gastrointestinal diseases, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Kirby, D F; Teran, J C

    1998-07-01

    This article discusses the many advantages and changes that have occurred in the nutritional management of critically-ill patients, patients with gastrointestinal diseases, and patients with selected cancers. Mechanical obstruction is the only absolute contraindication to enteral nutrition. This article reviews the present aggressive approach to the use of enteral nutrition. PMID:9654573

  10. Enteric viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Characteristic clinical signs associated with viral enteritis in young poultry include diarrhea, anorexia, litter eating, ruffled feathers, and poor growth. Intestines may have lesions; intestines are typically dilated and are filled with fluid and gaseous contents. The sequela to clinical disease...