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Sample records for early flare response

  1. X-ray flares in early GRB afterglows.

    PubMed

    Burrows, D N; Falcone, A; Chincarini, G; Morris, D; Romano, P; Hill, J E; Godet, O; Moretti, A; Krimm, H; Osborne, J P; Racusin, J; Mangano, V; Page, K; Perri, M; Stroh, M

    2007-05-15

    The Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT) has discovered that flares are quite common in early X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), being observed in roughly 50% of afterglows with prompt follow-up observations. The flares range in fluence from a few per cent to approximately 100% of the fluence of the prompt emission (the GRB). Repetitive flares are seen, with more than four successive flares detected by the XRT in some afterglows. The rise and fall times of the flares are typically considerably smaller than the time since the burst. These characteristics suggest that the flares are related to the prompt emission mechanism, but at lower photon energies. We conclude that the most likely cause of these flares is late-time activity of the GRB central engine. PMID:17293338

  2. Predicting the Response of the Mars Ionosphere to Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallows, K.; Withers, P.; Gonzalez, G.

    2015-12-01

    The increased soft X-ray irradiance during solar flares generates increased electron densities in the lower ionosphere of Mars. The relative changes in electron density during a flare are greater for larger flares and also at lower altitudes and larger flares, due to the wavelength dependence of both the flux increase during the flare and the absorption of flux by the neutral atmosphere. These relationships have been explored [Bougher et al. 2001, Fox et al. 2004, Mendillo et al. 2006, Mahajan et al. 2011, Lollo et al. 2012] but not quantified, which has impeded the validation of simulations of the ionospheric effects of solar flares. Such simulations are necessary for developing accurate descriptions of the physical processes governing ionospheric behavior under extreme conditions. We present a response function, a mathematical expression for the change in electron density during a solar flare as a function of the change in solar flux and an optical depth proxy. This response function is based on analysis of 20 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) radio occultation electron density profiles measured during solar flares. Characterizing the response as a function of optical depth, rather than altitude, provides the best description of ionospheric variability during a flare; otherwise non-negligible solar zenith angle effects are present. We demonstrate that the response function can be used to predict ionospheric electron densities during a specified solar flare by reproducing profiles known to be disturbed by a solar flare. We also demonstrate that the response function can be used to infer the strength of solar flares not visible at Earth by finding the flux enhancement required to reproduce an apparently flare affected profile given an undisturbed profile on the same date.

  3. Models of the Solar Atmospheric Response to Flare Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allred, Joel

    2011-01-01

    I will present models of the solar atmospheric response to flare heating. The models solve the equations of non-LTE radiation hydrodynamics with an electron beam added as a flare energy source term. Radiative transfer is solved in detail for many important optically thick hydrogen and helium transitions and numerous optically thin EUV lines making the models ideally suited to study the emission that is produced during flares. I will pay special attention to understanding key EUV lines as well the mechanism for white light production. I will also present preliminary results of how the model solar atmosphere responds to Fletcher & Hudson type flare heating. I will compare this with the results from flare simulations using the standard thick target model.

  4. Variability of Thermosphere and Ionosphere Responses to Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qian, Liying; Burns, Alan G.; Chamberlin, Philip C.; Solomon, Stanley C.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated how the rise rate and decay rate of solar flares affect the thermosphere and ionosphere responses to them. Model simulations and data analysis were conducted for two flares of similar magnitude (X6.2 and X5.4) that had the same location on the solar limb, but the X6.2 flare had longer rise and decay times. Simulated total electron content (TEC) enhancements from the X6.2 and X5.4 flares were 6 total electron content units (TECU) and approximately 2 TECU, and the simulated neutral density enhancements were approximately 15% -20% and approximately 5%, respectively, in reasonable agreement with observations. Additional model simulations showed that for idealized flares with the same magnitude and location, the thermosphere and ionosphere responses changed significantly as a function of rise and decay rates. The Neupert Effect, which predicts that a faster flare rise rate leads to a larger EUV enhancement during the impulsive phase, caused a larger maximum ion production enhancement. In addition, model simulations showed that increased E x B plasma transport due to conductivity increases during the flares caused a significant equatorial anomaly feature in the electron density enhancement in the F region but a relatively weaker equatorial anomaly feature in TEC enhancement, owing to dominant contributions by photochemical production and loss processes. The latitude dependence of the thermosphere response correlated well with the solar zenith angle effect, whereas the latitude dependence of the ionosphere response was more complex, owing to plasma transport and the winter anomaly.

  5. FLARES PRODUCING WELL-ORGANIZED POST-FLARE ARCADES (SLINKIES) HAVE EARLY PRECURSORS

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutova, M. P.

    2011-06-01

    Exploding loop systems producing X-ray flares often, but not always, bifurcate into a long-living, well-organized system of multi-threaded loop arcades resembling solenoidal slinkies. The physical conditions that cause or prevent this process are not known. To address this problem, we examined most of the major (X-class) flares that occurred during the last decade and found that the flares that bifurcate into long-living slinky arcades have different signatures than those that do not 'produce' such structures. The most striking difference is that, in all cases of slinky formation, GOES high energy proton flux becomes significantly enhanced 10-24 hr before the flare occurs. No such effect was found prior to the 'non-slinky' flares. This fact may be associated with the difference between energy production by a given active region and the amount of energy required to bring the entire system into the form of well-organized, self-similar loop arcades. As an example illustrating the process of post-flare slinky formation, we present observations taken with the Hinode satellite, in several wavelengths, showing a time sequence of pre-flare and flare activity, followed by the formation of dynamically stable, well-organized structures. One of the important features revealed is that post-flare coronal slinky formation is preceded by scale invariant structure formation in the underlying chromosphere/transition region. We suggest that the observed regularities can be understood within the framework of self-organized critical dynamics characterized by scale invariant structure formation with critical parameters largely determined by energy saturation level. The observed regularities per se may serve as a long-term precursor of strong flares and may help to study predictability of system behavior.

  6. Nonthermal X-ray Spectral Flattening toward Low Energies in Early Impulsive Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2007-01-01

    The determination of the low-energy cutoff to nonthermal electron distributions is critical to the calculation of the nonthermal energy in solar flares. The most direct evidence for low-energy cutoffs is flattening of the power-law, nontherma1 X-ray spectra at low energies. However, because of the plasma preheating often seen in flares, the thermal emissions at low energies may hide such spectral flattening of the nonthermal component. We select a category of flares, which we call "early impulsive flares", in which the > 25 keV hard X-ray (HXR) flux increase is delayed by less than 30 s after the flux increase at lower energies. Thus, the plasma preheating in these flares is minimal, so the nonthermal spectrum can be determined to lower energies than in flares with significant preheating. Out of a sample of 33 early impulsive flares observed by the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopy Imager (RHESSI), 9 showed spectral flattening toward low energies. In these events, the break energy of the double power-law fit to the HXR spectra lies in the range of 10-50 keV, significantly lower than the value we have seen for other flares that do not show such early impulsive emissions. In particular, it correlates with the HXR flux. After correcting the spatially-integrated spectra for albedo from isotropically emitted X-rays and using RHESSI imaging spectroscopy to exclude the extended albedo halo, we find that albedo associated with isotropic or nearly isotropic electrons can only account for the spectral flattening in 3 flares near Sun center. The spectral flattening in the remaining 6 flares is found to be consistent with the existence of a low-energy cutoff in the electron spectrum, falling in the range of 15-50 keV, which also correlates with the HXR flux.

  7. Detecting early IR emission from dust heated by a tidal disruption flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Velzen, Sjoert; Gezari, Suvi; Hung, Tiara; Cenko, Bradley; Gorjian, Varoujan

    2016-06-01

    A stellar tidal disruption flare (TDF) occurs when a star gets too close to a supermassive black hole and is shredded into streams that are accreted. New TDFs can be discovered by their transient optical or X-ray emission. We have recently made a discovery that opens a new wavelength regime for the study of these flares: transient emission at 3 micron in WISE multi-epoch imaging. This emission is best understood as originating from dust that has been heated by the intense UV and X-ray emission of the flare. However, the 6-month cadence of the WISE observations is too low to critically test this dust reprocessing model. Using optical observations of the iPTF survey, we recently discovered a very strong TDF candidate that is currenlty only a few weeks past maximum light. Since TDFs are rare, this new source provides an unique oppurtunity for Spitzer to make a very important contribution to this field. We proposed 7 Spitzer follow-up observations of this flare, which would yield the first early-time light curve of IR emission from a tidal flare. This data will be crucial to estabilish (or rule-out) dust reprocessing as the origin of IR emission from TDFs.

  8. ASASSN-16ae: A Powerful White-light Flare on an Early-L Dwarf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Sarah J.; Shappee, Benjamin J.; Gagné, Jonathan; Stanek, K. Z.; Prieto, José L.; Holoien, Thomas W.-S.; Kochanek, C. S.; Chomiuk, Laura; Dong, Subo; Seibert, Mark; Strader, Jay

    2016-09-01

    We report the discovery and classification of SDSS J053341.43+001434.1 (SDSS0533), an early-L dwarf first discovered during a powerful ΔV < ‑11 magnitude flare observed as part of the ASAS-SN survey. Optical and infrared spectroscopy indicate a spectral type of L0 with strong Hα emission and a blue NIR spectral slope. Combining the photometric distance, proper motion, and radial velocity of SDSS0533 yields three-dimensional velocities of (U, V, W) = (14 ± 13, ‑35 ± 14, ‑94 ± 22) km s‑1, indicating that it is most likely part of the thick disk population and probably old. The three detections of SDSS0533 obtained during the flare are consistent with a total V-band flare energy of at least 4.9 × 1033 erg (corresponding to a total thermal energy of at least E tot > 3.7 × 1034 erg), placing it among the strongest detected M dwarf flares. The presence of this powerful flare on an old L0 dwarf may indicate that stellar-type magnetic activity persists down to the end of the main sequence and on older ML transition dwarfs.

  9. GUVI observations of the airglow response to solar flares: Results from the CAWSES campaign period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolven, B. C.; Paxton, L. J.; Morrison, D.

    2006-05-01

    GUVI limb and disk observations of oxygen and nitrogen airglow emissions show strong variability during solar events; both the intensity and the altitude of peak limb emission vary in response to the brightened and hardened solar spectrum. We present the observed response, and compare it to model predictions generated using a flare-type solar input spectrum. We examine the difference in atmospheric response to consecutive flare events, owing to the modification of thermospheric density and composition by the initial flare and subsequent geomagnetic disturbances.

  10. Spectral response of the solar atmosphere to an X-class flare event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacatus, Daniela Adriana; Donea, Alina

    2016-05-01

    The only X-class flare of 2015 observed by IRIS occurred at 16:22 UT on 11 March 2015, in AR 12297. This flare generated significant seismic transients in the photosphere at the eastern location of the flare. IRIS observations of the chromosphere and transition region help us understand the physics of the sunquake. In this work we will analyse this event using data from IRIS, SDO, and RHESSI. The IRIS rasters scanned the area between the main footpoints of the solar flare, and a wealth of chromospheric information has been inferred about the dynamics of the event. The main X-ray emission dominates the eastern flare footpoint, being missed by the IRIS slit. Significant enhancements in the chromospheric and TR lines intensities were identified. The forbidden line of Fe XXI 1354.1 Å is detected after the flare peak revealing the coronal responses to the flare. Plasma downflows of up to 300 km/s were identified in the majority of the observed lines, consistent with magnetic field local reconfiguration. We have also analysed an erupting filament developing at an earlier time, which moved rapidly towards the eastern part of the active region. We discuss the possibility that this filament might have pre-conditioned the chromosphere for the flare process.

  11. Where is the chromospheric response to conductive energy input from a hot pre-flare coronal loop?

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, Marina; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Simões, Paulo J. A.

    2014-07-01

    Before the onset of a flare is observed in hard X-rays, there is often a prolonged pre-flare or pre-heating phase with no detectable hard X-ray emission but pronounced soft X-ray emission, which suggests that energy is already being released and deposited into the corona and chromosphere at this stage. This work analyzes the temporal evolution of coronal source heating and the chromospheric response during this pre-heating phase to investigate the origin and nature of early energy release and transport during a solar flare. Simultaneous X-ray, EUV, and microwave observations of a well-observed flare with a prolonged pre-heating phase are analyzed to study the time evolution of the thermal emission and to determine the onset of particle acceleration. During the 20 minute duration of the pre-heating phase we find no hint of accelerated electrons in either hard X-rays or microwave emission. However, the total energy budget during the pre-heating phase suggests that energy must be supplied to the flaring loop to sustain the observed temperature and emission measure. Under the assumption of this energy being transported toward the chromosphere via thermal conduction, significant energy deposition at the chromosphere is expected. However, no detectable increase of the emission in the AIA wavelength channels sensitive to chromospheric temperatures is observed. The observations suggest energy release and deposition in the flaring loop before the onset of particle acceleration, yet a model in which energy is conducted to the chromosphere and subsequent heating of the chromosphere is not supported by the observations.

  12. Xrt And Shinx Joint Flare Study: Ar 11024

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engell, Alexander; Sylwester, J.; Siarkowski, M.

    2010-05-01

    From 12:00 UT on July 3 through July 7, 2009 SphinX (Solar Photometer IN X-rays) observes 130 flares with active region (AR) 11024 being the only AR on disk. XRT (X-Ray Telescope) is able to observe 64 of these flare events. The combination of both instruments results in a flare study revealing (1) a relationship between flux emergence and flare rate, (2) that the presence of active region loops typically results in different flare morphologies (single and multiple loop flares) then when there is a lack of an active region loop environment where more cusp and point-like flares are observed, (3) cusp and point-like flares often originate from the same location, and (4) a distribution of flare temperatures corresponding to the different flare morphologies. The differences between the observed flare morphologies may occur as the result of the heated plasma through the flaring process being confined by the proximity of loop structures as for the single and multiple loop flares, while for cusp and point-like flares they occur in an early-phase environment that lack loop presence. The continuing flux emergence of AR 11024 likely provides different magnetic interactions and may be the source responsible for all of the flares.

  13. Study of the Influences of the Ionospheric Responses to the Solar Flares by the Solar Flare Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J.; Ridley, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    Electron densities in the ionosphere increase during solar flares due to the sudden increase in the solar irradiance at soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet wavelengths. In this study, we perform simulations for a list of solar flares with different classes and locations on the solar disk (center-to-limb variations) using the Global Ionosphere and Thermosphere Model (GITM). First, we make an analysis of magnitudes and distribution of the TEC perturbations due to different solar flares. Solar flares occurring in different seasons are chosen from the list in order to examine how perturbations of electron densities depend on altitudes (E and F regions), latitudes (seasonal variations) and longitudes (sunrise, dayside and sunset), as well as the time dependences of the increasing and decaying of the electron densities around the flares. Also, we investigate the TEC data by the global GPS network from the Madrigal database for the solar flares on the list, determining the characteristics of solar flare that would allow them to be detected by the ground-based GPS observations. The TEC data by GPS and by GITM are compared to determine how well the modeling and observations match each other during different solar flares.

  14. THE DISCOVERY OF AN X-RAY/UV STELLAR FLARE FROM THE LATE-K/EARLY-M DWARF LMC 335

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, B. T. H.; Pun, C. S. J.; Kong, A. K. H.; Di Stefano, R.; Li, K. L.

    2012-08-01

    We report the discovery of an X-ray/UV stellar flare from the source LMC 335, captured by XMM-Newton in the field of the Large Magellanic Cloud. The flare event was recorded continuously in X-ray for its first 10 hr from the precursor to the late decay phases. The observed fluxes increased by more than two orders of magnitude at its peak in X-ray and at least one in the UV as compared to quiescence. The peak 0.1-7.0 keV X-ray flux is derived from the two-temperature APEC model to be {approx}(8.4 {+-} 0.6) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Combining astrometric information from multiple X-ray observations in the quiescent and flare states, we identify the NIR counterpart of LMC 335 as the Two Micron All Sky Survey source J05414534-6921512. The NIR color relations and spectroscopic parallax characterize the source as a Galactic K7-M4 dwarf at a foreground distance of (100-264) pc, implying a total energy output of the entire event of {approx}(0.4-2.9) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 35} erg. This report comprises detailed analyses of this late-K/early-M dwarf flare event that has the longest time coverage yet reported in the literature. The flare decay can be modeled with two exponential components with timescales of {approx}28 minutes and {approx}4 hr, with a single-component decay firmly ruled out. The X-ray spectra during flare can be described by two components, a dominant high-temperature component of {approx}40-60 MK and a low-temperature component of {approx}10 MK, with a flare loop length of about 1.1-1.3 stellar radius.

  15. Response of the low ionosphere to X-ray and Lyman-α solar flare emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raulin, Jean-Pierre; Trottet, GéRard; Kretzschmar, Matthieu; Macotela, Edith L.; Pacini, Alessandra; Bertoni, Fernando C. P.; Dammasch, Ingolf E.

    2013-01-01

    Using soft X-ray measurements from detectors onboard the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and simultaneous high-cadence Lyman-α observations from the Large Yield Radiometer (LYRA) onboard the Project for On-Board Autonomy 2 (PROBA2) ESA spacecraft, we study the response of the lower part of the ionosphere, the D region, to seven moderate to medium-size solar flares that occurred in February and March of 2010. The ionospheric disturbances are analyzed by monitoring the resulting sub-ionospheric wave propagation anomalies detected by the South America Very Low Frequency (VLF) Network (SAVNET). We find that the ionospheric disturbances, which are characterized by changes of the VLF wave phase, do not depend on the presence of Lyman-α radiation excesses during the flares. Indeed, Lyman-α excesses associated with flares do not produce measurable phase changes. Our results are in agreement with what is expected in terms of forcing of the lower ionosphere by quiescent Lyman-α emission along the solar activity cycle. Therefore, while phase changes using the VLF technique may be a good indicator of quiescent Lyman-α variations along the solar cycle, they cannot be used to scale explosive Lyman-α emission during flares.

  16. Response of the auroral lower ionosphere to solar flares in March 2012 according to ELF observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebed', O. M.; Fedorenko, Yu. V.; Larchenko, A. V.; Pil'gaev, S. V.

    2015-11-01

    The response of the lower ionosphere to the solar flares that occurred in March 2012 is considered. Measurements of the propagation velocity and wave impedance of ELF electromagnetic pulses (atmospherics) performed at Lovozero and Barentsburg high-latitude observatories were used to estimate this response. It was shown that the daily average propagation velocity of atmospherics decreased by 20-30 thousand km/s under disturbed heliogeophysical conditions as compared to the velocity measured under quiet conditions. This is related to a decrease in the effective waveguide height that results from the change in the ionospheric conductivity profile during a solar flare. It was detected that pronounced bursts of wave impedance, the maximums of which exceed the impedance average value by a factor of more than 2, are observed during strong heliogeophysical disturbances. This fact cannot be explained in the scope of a spherically layered model; consequently, such deviations indicate an increase in the D-layer conductivity inhomogeneities.

  17. PLASMA HEATING IN THE VERY EARLY AND DECAY PHASES OF SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Falewicz, R.; Rudawy, P.; Siarkowski, M. E-mail: rudawy@astro.uni.wroc.pl

    2011-05-20

    In this paper, we analyze the energy budgets of two single-loop solar flares under the assumption that non-thermal electrons (NTEs) are the only source of plasma heating during all phases of both events. The flares were observed by RHESSI and GOES on 2002 September 20 and 2002 March 17, respectively. For both investigated flares we derived the energy fluxes contained in NTE beams from the RHESSI observational data constrained by observed GOES light curves. We showed that energy delivered by NTEs was fully sufficient to fulfill the energy budgets of the plasma during the pre-heating and impulsive phases of both flares as well as during the decay phase of one of them. We concluded that in the case of the investigated flares there was no need to use any additional ad hoc heating mechanisms other than heating by NTEs.

  18. Earth FUV Dayglow Response to the 20 January 2005 Solar Flare: TIMED and IMAGE Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retherford, K. D.; Gladstone, R.; Solomon, S. C.; Immel, T. J.

    2005-05-01

    An X-class solar flare occurred on 20 January 2005 when the TIMED and IMAGE spacecraft were both well positioned to observe the response of Earth's dayglow emission intensity. Brightness enhancements during the flare relative to just before were determined at tangent altitudes of peak emission viewed toward the limb with TIMED. The TIMED observations were made at low solar zenith angles and show flare enhancements of roughly 15%, 30%, 30%, and 60%, respectively, for OI 130.4 nm, OI 135.6 nm, N2 LBH Short, and N2 LBH Long modes of the TIMED/GUVI instrument. However, GUVI observations of HI Lyman-alpha emission brightness do not show a significant brightness change. This lack of change in HI Lyman-alpha dayglow brightness is consistent with no significant change (<2%) in the solar Lyman-alpha flux observed with TIMED/SEE. Enhancements of emissions produced by photodissociation and photoelectron impact excitation sources are studied with IMAGE observations following Immel et al., JGR, 2003. Simulations of dayglow limb profiles to compare with the observations are produced using the NRLMSIS atmosphere model, the IRI90 ionosphere model, the GLOW photoelectron model, and the REDISTER radiative transfer model. The combined datasets enable a better study of the airglow sources most affected by the EUV and x-ray components of solar irradiance variability. We report our preliminary analysis of the response of FUV dayglow emissions to this event.

  19. Study of latitudinal response of solar x-ray flares associated with strong radio bursts using multi-technique observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, M.; Astafyeva, E.

    2013-12-01

    The ionospheric effects due to solar flares (SF) have been intensively studied for several decades. It is now known that the SF effects can be observed from pre-dawn to post-dusk regions, with most pronounced signatures in the noon region (solar zenith angle is close to zero). It is generally demonstrated that enhancements in X-ray or EUV during solar flares cause an abrupt increase of the ionospheric electron density throughout the whole sunlit hemisphere. However, investigations of the ionospheric response to solar flares suggest that their impact on the ionosphere varies from event to event. The solar radio bursts (SRBs), a source of radio frequency interference are also generally associated with x-ray solar flare and acts as a threat to the trans-ionospheric signals. Considering this, we examined the SRBs using Nobeyama observations and found 34 radio burst events (>1000 sfu at 1GHz) to be closely associated with x-ray flares and CMEs during 2000-2012. We found 2 C-, 18 M- and 14 X-class solar flares are associated with these events. The 8 events out of these are very strong radio events (>10,000 sfu) and occurred with X-class of solar flares. The response of these flares on the ionosphere is investigated by using the data of vertical total electron content (TEC) measured by satellite altimeters TOPEX, Jason-1 and Jason-2. The preliminary results of observations from satellite altimeters show that the sudden enhancement in TEC is not simultaneous at the same time at all regions when the flare occurs and this also varies with the strength of the flare. In most of M and C- class flare events, we found an increase in TEC at most of the latitudes and time during the flare. We found that some of the X-class solar events weaken the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) moving equator ward and then disappears with the decrease in TEC. Other X-class events, on the contrary, showed a tendency to increase the EIA. To understand and support our results, multi

  20. Early warning for VHE gamma-ray flares with the ARGO-YBJ detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ARGO-YBJ Collaboration; Bartoli, B.; Bernardini, P.; Bi, X. J.; Bleve, C.; Bolognino, I.; Branchini, P.; Budano, A.; Calabrese Melcarne, A. K.; Camarri, P.; Cao, Z.; Cappa, A.; Cardarelli, R.; Catalanotti, S.; Cattaneo, C.; Celio, P.; Chen, S. Z.; Chen, T. L.; Chen, Y.; Creti, P.; Cui, S. W.; Dai, B. Z.; D'Alí Staiti, G.; Danzengluobu; Dattoli, M.; de Mitri, I.; D'Ettorre Piazzoli, B.; di Girolamo, T.; Ding, X. H.; di Sciascio, G.; Feng, C. F.; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Zhenyong; Galeazzi, F.; Galeotti, P.; Giroletti, E.; Gou, Q. B.; Guo, Y. Q.; He, H. H.; Hu, Haibing; Hu, Hongbo; Huang, Q.; Iacovacci, M.; Iuppa, R.; James, I.; Jia, H. Y.; Labaciren; Li, H. J.; Li, J. Y.; Li, X. X.; Liguori, G.; Liu, C.; Liu, C. Q.; Liu, J.; Liu, M. Y.; Lu, H.; Ma, X. H.; Mancarella, G.; Mari, S. M.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Mastroianni, S.; Montini, P.; Ning, C. C.; Pagliaro, A.; Panareo, M.; Panico, B.; Perrone, L.; Pistilli, P.; Qu, X. B.; Rossi, E.; Ruggieri, F.; Salvini, P.; Santonico, R.; Shen, P. R.; Sheng, X. D.; Shi, F.; Stanescu, C.; Surdo, A.; Tan, Y. H.; Vallania, P.; Vernetto, S.; Vigorito, C.; Wang, B.; Wang, H.; Wu, C. Y.; Wu, H. R.; Xu, B.; Xue, L.; Yan, Y. X.; Yang, Q. Y.; Yang, X. C.; Yao, Z. G.; Yuan, A. F.; Zha, M.; Zhang, H. M.; Zhang, Jilong; Zhang, Jianli; Zhang, L.; Zhang, P.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhaxiciren; Zhaxisangzhu; Zhou, X. X.; Zhu, F. R.; Zhu, Q. Q.; Zizzi, G.

    2011-12-01

    Detecting and monitoring emissions from flaring gamma-ray sources in the very-high-energy (VHE, > 100 GeV) band is a very important topic in gamma-ray astronomy. The ARGO-YBJ detector is characterized by a high duty cycle and a wide field of view. Therefore, it is particularly capable of detecting flares from extragalactic objects. Based on fast reconstruction and analysis, real-time monitoring of 33 selected VHE extragalactic sources is implemented. Flares exceeding a specific threshold are reported timely, hence enabling the follow-up observation of these objects using more sensitive detectors, such as Cherenkov telescopes.

  1. Modeling the Response of the Martian Upper Atmosphere to Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlowski, D. J.; Bougher, S. W.; Chamberlin, P. C.

    2011-12-01

    Over the past decade, observations and models of Mars' atmosphere have enabled scientists to begin to focus not only on the climatology and global behavior of the atmosphere, but also on time-dependent behavior that extends over multiple spatial scales. The ability to study the effects of transient phenomena is not only important from a scientific perspective, but also from an operational one, since spacecraft are often asked to sample the atmosphere well below the exobase. Previous works have already begun to study the effects of solar flares on the ionosphere using observations (e.g. Mendillo et al., 2006; Mahajan et al, 2009). In this study, we utilize the recently developed and initially validated 3-D Mars Global Ionosphere-Thermopshere Model (M-GITM) to examine the effects of a large solar flare on the martian thermosphere and ionosphere. M-GITM simulates the atmosphere from the ground to exobase in spherical coordinates while relaxing the hydrostatic assumption and utilizing a terrain-following coordinate system. The model makes use of required physical processes, formulations, and subroutines that have been taken from existing lower and upper atmosphere Mars GCMs. In this study, we focus on the perturbation of the mass and electron densities caused by solar flares and examine the role that preconditioning plays in the response of the atmosphere.

  2. THE LOCATION OF NON-THERMAL VELOCITY IN THE EARLY PHASES OF LARGE FLARES-REVEALING PRE-ERUPTION FLUX ROPES

    SciTech Connect

    Harra, Louise K.; Matthews, Sarah; Culhane, J. L.; Cheung, Mark C. M.; Hara, Hirohisa

    2013-09-10

    Non-thermal velocity measurements of the solar atmosphere, particularly from UV and X-ray emission lines have demonstrated over the decades that this parameter is important in understanding the triggering of solar flares. Enhancements have often been observed before intensity enhancements are seen. However, until the launch of Hinode, it has been difficult to determine the spatial location of the enhancements to better understand the source region. The Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer has the spectral and spatial resolution to allow us to probe the early stages of flares in detail. We analyze four events, all of which are GOES M- or X-classification flares, and all are located toward the limb for ease of flare geometry interpretation. Three of the flares were eruptive and one was confined. In all events, pre-flare enhancement in non-thermal velocity at the base of the active region and its surroundings has been found. These enhancements seem to be consistent with the footpoints of the dimming regions, and hence may be highlighting the activation of a coronal flux rope for the three eruptive events. In addition, pre-flare enhancements in non-thermal velocity were found above the looptops for the three eruptive events.

  3. On the unique divergent response of the equatorial electrojet vertical polarization electric field to different solar flare events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manju, G.

    2016-02-01

    The response of ionospheric E region to different flare events is investigated using coherent HF backscatter radar to bring out divergent observations. The study reveals the following aspects: (i) increase of absolute mean Doppler frequency by ~25-52% during the initial phase of the morning time flares of 9 September 2005 with concurrent fall in backscattered power and (ii) decrease of absolute mean Doppler frequency by ~11.6-16.2% during the initial phase of the flare of 20 February 2002 with concurrent fall in backscattered power. The Doppler frequency is directly related to vertical polarization electric field. Therefore, these observations are unique and in contrast to earlier works which have, in general, reported only a decrease in equatorial electrojet (EEJ) vertical polarization electric field during the initial phase of flare events. The present study also brings out the possible important role played by the height-integrated conductivities in producing the divergent response of the EEJ. The large reduction in backscattered power for weak M class flare events is also observed in this study. In view of the importance of the ionosphere as a major source of error in GPS-based navigation, the present result assumes significance.

  4. Extreme Postinjection Flare in Response to Intra-Articular Triamcinolone Acetonide (Kenalog).

    PubMed

    Young, Porter; Homlar, Kelly C

    2016-01-01

    As intra-articular corticosteroid injections (CSIs) are a common treatment for osteoarthritis, physicians must well understand their potential side effects. Postinjection flares are an acute side effect of intra-articular CSIs, with symptoms ranging from mild joint effusion to disabling pain. The present case involved a severe postinjection flare that occurred after the patient, a 56-year-old woman with moderate osteoarthritis in the left knee, received 2 mL of 1% lidocaine and 2 mL (40 mg) of triamcinolone acetonide (Kenalog). Two hours after injection, she experienced swelling and intense pain in the knee and was unable to ambulate. The knee was aspirated with a return of 25 mL of "butterscotch"-colored fluid. This case is novel in that its acuity of onset, severity of symptoms, and synovial fluid analysis mimicked septic arthritis, which was ultimately ruled out with negative cultures and confirmation of triamcinolone acetonide crystals in the synovial aspirate, viewed by polarized light microscopy. Thus, the patient's reaction represents an acute crystal-induced inflammatory response. Although reactions to an intra-articular CSI of this severity are rare, it is important for treating physicians to inform patients of this potential side effect. PMID:26991574

  5. Observation of Sudden Ionospheric Disturbances over Istanbul in Response to X-Ray Flare Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceren Kalafatoglu Eyiguler, Emine; Kaymaz, Zerefsan; Ceren Moral, Aysegul

    2016-07-01

    Sudden ionospheric disturbances (SID) are the enhanced electron density structures in the D region ionosphere which occur in response to the increase in X-ray flares and EUV flux. SIDs can be monitored using Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio signals (3-30 kHz) which travel between the D-region and the surface of the Earth. In this study, we use SID monitors obtained from the Stanford University Solar Center and two antennas which were built at the Istanbul Technical University to track the ionospheric disturbances in the VLF range. Our antennas are capable of capturing signals from several VLF transmitting stations. In this work, we focus on the variations in the signal strength of the closest VLF transmitting station 'TBB' which is operating at 26.7 kHz frequency at BAFA, Turkey (37.43N, 27.15E). We present ITU SID observations from both antennas; show the daily variation, general structure and the typical patterns we observe as well as case studies of significant events. Our initial analysis shows close relationship between observed X-ray flares from geosynchronous GOES 13 and GOES 15 satellites and VLF station signal strength received by the monitors.

  6. Solar Flare Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmahl, Edward J.; Kundu, Mukul R.

    2000-01-01

    During the past year we have been working with the HESSI (High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager) team in preparation for launch in early 2001. HESSI has as its primary scientific goal photometric imaging and spectroscopy of solar flares in hard X-rays and gamma-rays with an approx. 2 sec angular resolution, approx. keV energy resolution and approx. 2 s time resolution over the 6 keV to 15 MeV energy range. We have performed tests of the imager using a specially designed experiment which exploits the second-harmonic response of HESSI's sub-collimators to an artificial X-ray source at a distance of 1550 cm from its front grids. Figures show the response to X-rays at energies in the range where HESSI is expected to image solar flares. To prepare the team and the solar user community for imaging flares with HESSI, we have written a description of the major imaging concepts. This paper will be submitted for publication in a referred journal.

  7. Ionospheric and dayglow responses to the radiative phase of the Bastille Day flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, R. R.; Warren, H. P.; Nicholas, A. C.; Bishop, J.; Huba, J. D.; Drob, D. P.; Lean, J. L.; Picone, J. M.; Mariska, J. T.; Joyce, G.; Judge, D. L.; Thonnard, S. E.; Dymond, K. F.; Budzien, S. A.

    2002-05-01

    The Sun's Bastille Day flare on July 14, 2000 produced a variety of geoeffective events. This solar eruption consisted of an X-class flare followed by a coronal mass ejection that produced a major geomagnetic storm. We have undertaken a study of this event beginning with an analysis of the effects of the radiative phase of the flare on the dayglow and the ionosphere. The key new enabling work is a novel method of evaluating the X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) solar spectral irradiance changes associated with the flare. We find that the solar radiative output enhancements modeled during the flare are consistent with measurements of both solar EUV irradiance and far UV Earth thermospheric dayglow. We use the SAMI2 model to predict global ionospheric changes along a magnetic meridian that show significantly different northern and southern effects, suggesting that flares can be used to study ionospheric dynamics.

  8. Characterising the immune profile of the kidney biopsy at lupus nephritis flare differentiates early treatment responders from non-responders

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Samir V; Malvar, Ana; Song, Huijuan; Alberton, Valeria; Lococo, Bruno; Vance, Jay; Zhang, Jianying; Yu, Lianbo; Rovin, Brad H

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The kidney biopsy is used to diagnose and guide initial therapy in patients with lupus nephritis (LN). Kidney histology does not correlate well with clinical measurements of kidney injury or predict how patients will respond to standard-of-care immunosuppression. We postulated that the gene expression profile of kidney tissue at the time of biopsy may differentiate patients who will from those who will not respond to treatment. Methods The expression of 511 immune-response genes was measured in kidney biopsies from 19 patients with proliferative LN and 4 normal controls. RNA was extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded kidney biopsies done at flare. After induction therapy, 5 patients achieved a complete clinical response (CR), 10 had a partial response (PR) and 4 patients were non-responders (NRs). Transcript expression was compared with normal controls and between renal response groups. Results A principal component analysis showed that intrarenal transcript expression from normal kidney, CR biopsies and NR biopsies segregated from each other. The top genes responsible for CR clustering included several interferon pathway genes (STAT1, IRF1, IRF7, MX1, STAT2, JAK2), while complement genes (C1R, C1QB, C6, C9, C5, MASP2) were mainly responsible for NR clustering. Overall, 35 genes were uniquely expressed in NR compared with CR. Pathway analysis revealed that interferon signalling and complement activation pathways were upregulated in both groups, while BAFF, APRIL, nuclear factor-κB and interleukin-6 signalling were increased in CR but suppressed in NR. Conclusions These data suggest that molecular profiling of the kidney biopsy at LN flare may be useful in predicting treatment response to induction therapy. PMID:26629350

  9. Flare response to the thermospheric diurnal neutral wind measured by the OMTIs' Fabry-Perot Interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatagai, A. I.; Shiokawa, K.

    2014-12-01

    This research aims at investigating the influence of flare events to the thermospheric tidal wind in order to grasp the EUV effect of the solar activity to upper atmospheric circulation. The neutral wind at about 250km level observed with the 630nm airglow by Fabry-Perot interferometers of the Optical Mesosphere Thermosphere Imagers (OMTIs) is analyzed. We used the 15-minutes interval data at Shigaraki for the year 2000 to 2013. 10953 of 59881 samples became usable after a quality control. We used the flare list issued by NOAA extracted from the X-rays from GOES satellites. There are 131 of X-class flares and 1510 of M-class flares during the 14 years. However, the number of samples to which effective observation of FPI is carried out at the flare peak time was 51. Before composite of the wind at the time of solar flare (so-called superimposed epoc analysis), monthly climatological wind is made. First, the valid data of every month were averaged in every 15 minutes for 9-21 UTC, then, three months data were averaged. Further, the 15-minutes temporal variation data was smoothed with a Gaussian filter. From the 51 sample data containing the flare peak time, the zonal wind (Ve) and the meridional wind (Vn) were composed after deducted the above mentioned climatology with a flare peak time as the starting point (t=0). Supposing the atmosphere on the daytime side expands under the influence of the flare temporarily and the advection current to the night side is strengthened, the eastward (westward) wind should be strengthened before (after) midnight. Since the influence of the increment of the air expansion in mid-night may have been offset, the samples which flare occurs before midnight (39 samples) were composited. As a result, as for Ve, significant change of eastward wind to westward wind compared to the standard deviation is observed after 3hrs and a half after solar flare occurred, while as for Vn, significant enhancement of southward component is observed after 4

  10. Flare Hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomczak, M.; Dubieniecki, P.

    2015-12-01

    On the basis of the Solar Maximum Mission observations, Švestka ( Solar Phys. 121, 399, 1989) introduced a new class of flares, the so-called flare hybrids. When they start, they look like typical compact flares (phase 1), but later on, they look like flares with arcades of magnetic loops (phase 2). We summarize the characteristic features of flare hybrids in soft and hard X-rays as well as in the extreme ultraviolet; these features allow us to distinguish flare hybrids from other flares. In this article, additional energy release or long plasma cooling timescales are suggested as possible causes of phase 2. We estimate the frequency of flare hybrids, and study the magnetic configurations favorable for flare hybrid occurrence. Flare hybrids appear to be quite frequent, and the difference between the lengths of magnetic loops in the two interacting loop systems seem to be a crucial parameter for determining their characteristics.

  11. Early detection and rapid response

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Westbrooks, Randy G.; Eplee, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    Prevention is the first line of defense against introduced invasive species - it is always preferable to prevent the introduction of new invaders into a region or country. However, it is not always possible to detect all alien hitchhikers imported in cargo, or to predict with any degree of certainty which introduced species will become invasive over time. Fortunately, the majority of introduced plants and animals don't become invasive. But, according to scientists at Cornell University, costs and losses due to species that do become invasive are now estimated to be over $137 billion/year in the United States. Early detection and rapid response (EDRR) is the second line of defense against introduced invasive species - EDRR is the preferred management strategy for preventing the establishment and spread of invasive species. Over the past 50 years, there has been a gradual shift away from large and medium scale federal/state single-agency-led weed eradication programs in the United States, to smaller interagency-led projects involving impacted and potential stakeholders. The importance of volunteer weed spotters in detecting and reporting suspected new invasive species has also been recognized in recent years.

  12. Solar Flares: Magnetohydrodynamic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Kazunari; Magara, Tetsuya

    2011-12-01

    This paper outlines the current understanding of solar flares, mainly focused on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) processes responsible for producing a flare. Observations show that flares are one of the most explosive phenomena in the atmosphere of the Sun, releasing a huge amount of energy up to about 10^32 erg on the timescale of hours. Flares involve the heating of plasma, mass ejection, and particle acceleration that generates high-energy particles. The key physical processes for producing a flare are: the emergence of magnetic field from the solar interior to the solar atmosphere (flux emergence), local enhancement of electric current in the corona (formation of a current sheet), and rapid dissipation of electric current (magnetic reconnection) that causes shock heating, mass ejection, and particle acceleration. The evolution toward the onset of a flare is rather quasi-static when free energy is accumulated in the form of coronal electric current (field-aligned current, more precisely), while the dissipation of coronal current proceeds rapidly, producing various dynamic events that affect lower atmospheres such as the chromosphere and photosphere. Flares manifest such rapid dissipation of coronal current, and their theoretical modeling has been developed in accordance with observations, in which numerical simulations proved to be a strong tool reproducing the time-dependent, nonlinear evolution of a flare. We review the models proposed to explain the physical mechanism of flares, giving an comprehensive explanation of the key processes mentioned above. We start with basic properties of flares, then go into the details of energy build-up, release and transport in flares where magnetic reconnection works as the central engine to produce a flare.

  13. Solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.

    1974-01-01

    A review of the knowledge about solar flares which has been obtained through observations from the earth and from space by various methods. High-resolution cinematography is best carried out at H-alpha wavelengths to reveal the structure, time history, and location of flares. The classification flares in H alpha according to either physical or morphological criteria is discussed. The study of flare morphology, which shows where, when, and how flares occur, is important for evaluating theories of flares. Consideration is given to studies of flares by optical spectroscopy, radio emissions, and at X-ray and XUV wavelengths. Research has shown where and possibly why flares occur, but the physics of the instability involved, of the particle acceleration, and of the heating are still not understood.

  14. How Solar Flare Spectral Characteristics Determine the Thermosphere-Ionosphere Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, S. C.; Qian, L.

    2011-12-01

    Measurements of flare irradiance in the X-ray and EUV spectral regions by the Solar EUV Experiment on the TIMED satellite, the X-ray Photometer System on the SORCE satellite, and the X-ray monitors on the GOES spacecraft, have been used to demonstrate the importance of different flare spectral characteristics and temporal development in causing rapid changes in the thermosphere and ionosphere. Now, observations by the EUV Variability Experiment on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), show striking variability of coronal lines in the crucial 7-37 nm region during different types and phases of flares. Very limited measurements of this spectral region were made by TIMED and SORCE, so these new observations yield insight into the magnitude and distribution of flare-driven changes in the thermosphere and ionosphere. We present results of simulations using flare spectra measured by TIMED, SORCE, and SDO as input to the NCAR Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model, and compare the results to measurements of thermosphere and ionosphere density changes.

  15. Creating Responsive Schools: Contextualizing Early Warning, Timely Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dwyer, Kevin P.; Osher, David; Hoffman, Catherine C.

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of the Department of Education's 1998 publication, "Early Warning, Timely Response: A Guide to Safe Schools," stresses the importance of violence prevention by providing a supportive schoolwide climate and responding early to at-risk students' academic and behavioral problems. Early imminent warning signs are highlighted, as are…

  16. RESPONSE OF THE PHOTOSPHERIC MAGNETIC FIELD TO THE X2.2 FLARE ON 2011 FEBRUARY 15

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Shuo; Liu Chang; Liu Rui; Deng Na; Wang Haimin; Liu Yang

    2012-02-15

    It is well known that the long-term evolution of the photospheric magnetic field plays an important role in building up free energy to power solar eruptions. Observations, despite being controversial, have also revealed a rapid and permanent variation of the photospheric magnetic field in response to the coronal magnetic field restructuring during the eruption. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager instrument (HMI) on board the newly launched Solar Dynamics Observatory produces seeing-free full-disk vector magnetograms at consistently high resolution and high cadence, which finally makes possible an unambiguous and comprehensive study of this important back-reaction process. In this study, we present a near disk-center, GOES-class X2.2 flare, which occurred in NOAA AR 11158 on 2011 February 15. Using the magnetic field measurements made by HMI, we obtained the first solid evidence of a rapid (in about 30 minutes) and irreversible enhancement in the horizontal magnetic field at the flaring magnetic polarity inversion line (PIL) by a magnitude of {approx}30%. It is also shown that the photospheric field becomes more sheared and more inclined. This field evolution is unequivocally associated with the flare occurrence in this sigmoidal active region, with the enhancement area located in between the two chromospheric flare ribbons and the initial conjugate hard X-ray footpoints. These results strongly corroborate our previous conjecture that the photospheric magnetic field near the PIL must become more horizontal after eruptions, which could be related to the newly formed low-lying fields resulting from the tether-cutting reconnection.

  17. Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Sabrina

    2013-01-01

    Because the Earth resides in the atmosphere of our nearest stellar neighbor, events occurring on the Sun's surface directly affect us by interfering with satellite operations and communications, astronaut safety, and, in extreme circumstances, power grid stability. Solar flares, the most energetic events in our solar system, are a substantial source of hazardous space weather affecting our increasingly technology-dependent society. While flares have been observed using ground-based telescopes for over 150 years, modern space-bourne observatories have provided nearly continuous multi-wavelength flare coverage that cannot be obtained from the ground. We can now probe the origins and evolution of flares by tracking particle acceleration, changes in ionized plasma, and the reorganization of magnetic fields. I will walk through our current understanding of why flares occur and how they affect the Earth and also show several examples of these fantastic explosions.

  18. Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Albert

    2011-01-01

    Solar flares accelerate both ions and electrons to high energies, and their X-ray and gamma-ray signatures not only probe the relationship between their respective acceleration, but also allow for the measurement of accelerated and ambient abundances. RHESSI observations have shown a striking close linear correlation of gamma-ray line fluence from accelerated ions > approx.20 MeV and bremsstrahlung emission from relativistic accelerated electrons >300 keV, when integrated over complete flares, suggesting a common acceleration mechanism. SMM/GRS observations, however, show a weaker correlation, and this discrepancy might be associated with previously observed electron-rich episodes within flares and/or temporal variability of gamma-ray line fluxes over the course of flares. We use the latest RHESSI gamma-ray analysis techniques to study the temporal behavior of the RHESSI flares, and determine what changes can be attributed to an evolving acceleration mechanism or to evolving abundances.

  19. Ambient ultrafine particles provide a strong adjuvant effect in the secondary immune response: implication for traffic-related asthma flares

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Harkema, Jack R.; Lewandowski, Ryan P.; Wang, Meiying; Bramble, Lori A.; Gookin, Glenn R.; Ning, Zhi; Kleinman, Michael T.; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2010-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that intranasal administration of ambient ultrafine particles (UFP) acts as an adjuvant for primary allergic sensitization to ovalbumin (OVA) in Balb/c mice. It is important to find out whether inhaled UFP exert the same effect on the secondary immune response as a way of explaining asthma flares in already-sensitized individuals due to traffic exposure near a freeway. The objective of this study is to determine whether inhalation exposure to ambient UFP near an urban freeway could enhance the secondary immune response to OVA in already-sensitized mice. Prior OVA-sensitized animals were exposed to concentrated ambient UFP at the time of secondary OVA challenge in our mobile animal laboratory in Los Angeles. OVA-specific antibody production, airway morphometry, allergic airway inflammation, cytokine gene expression, and oxidative stress marker were assessed. As few as five ambient UFP exposures were sufficient to promote the OVA recall immune response, including generating allergic airway inflammation in smaller and more distal airways compared with the adjuvant effect of intranasally instilled UFP on the primary immune response. The secondary immune response was characterized by the T helper 2 and IL-17 cytokine gene expression in the lung. In summary, our results demonstrated that inhalation of prooxidative ambient UFP could effectively boost the secondary immune response to an experimental allergen, indicating that vehicular traffic exposure could exacerbate allergic inflammation in already-sensitized subjects. PMID:20562226

  20. Ambient ultrafine particles provide a strong adjuvant effect in the secondary immune response: implication for traffic-related asthma flares.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Harkema, Jack R; Lewandowski, Ryan P; Wang, Meiying; Bramble, Lori A; Gookin, Glenn R; Ning, Zhi; Kleinman, Michael T; Sioutas, Constantinos; Nel, Andre E

    2010-09-01

    We have previously demonstrated that intranasal administration of ambient ultrafine particles (UFP) acts as an adjuvant for primary allergic sensitization to ovalbumin (OVA) in Balb/c mice. It is important to find out whether inhaled UFP exert the same effect on the secondary immune response as a way of explaining asthma flares in already-sensitized individuals due to traffic exposure near a freeway. The objective of this study is to determine whether inhalation exposure to ambient UFP near an urban freeway could enhance the secondary immune response to OVA in already-sensitized mice. Prior OVA-sensitized animals were exposed to concentrated ambient UFP at the time of secondary OVA challenge in our mobile animal laboratory in Los Angeles. OVA-specific antibody production, airway morphometry, allergic airway inflammation, cytokine gene expression, and oxidative stress marker were assessed. As few as five ambient UFP exposures were sufficient to promote the OVA recall immune response, including generating allergic airway inflammation in smaller and more distal airways compared with the adjuvant effect of intranasally instilled UFP on the primary immune response. The secondary immune response was characterized by the T helper 2 and IL-17 cytokine gene expression in the lung. In summary, our results demonstrated that inhalation of prooxidative ambient UFP could effectively boost the secondary immune response to an experimental allergen, indicating that vehicular traffic exposure could exacerbate allergic inflammation in already-sensitized subjects. PMID:20562226

  1. Modeling the Thermosphere/Ionosphere Response to Large Solar Flares and Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, S. C.; Lu, G.; Qian, L.; Richmond, A. D.; Woods, T. N.

    2004-05-01

    During October-November 2003, a series of large coronal mass ejections and solar flares caused significant changes in the terrestrial upper atmosphere and ionosphere. We have simulated these effects using the NCAR Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIE-GCM). Solar photon inputs to the model were obtained from solar irradiance instruments on the TIMED and SORCE satellites, and auroral forcing obtained using the AMIE procedure. This study enables quantification of the relative importance of photon and auroral forcing of ionosphere/thermosphere density and temperature. Ion density enhancements and airglow intensities derived from the model results can be compared to observations to investigate the simulation fidelity during these extraordinary events.

  2. Relativistic electrons associated with solar flares.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, K.

    1972-01-01

    Solar flares which produce relativistic electrons generally occur within sunspot groups which are active in the emission of meter type I noise storms. It is suggested that relativistic electrons in solar flares are accelerated from the keV-energy electrons responsible for the type I noise storms. The relationship between flare developments and the ejection of keV-electrons is briefly considered.

  3. Combined Modeling of Acceleration, Transport, and Hydrodynamic Response in Solar Flares. 1; The Numerical Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Wei; Petrosian, Vahe; Mariska, John T.

    2009-01-01

    Acceleration and transport of high-energy particles and fluid dynamics of atmospheric plasma are interrelated aspects of solar flares, but for convenience and simplicity they were artificially separated in the past. We present here self consistently combined Fokker-Planck modeling of particles and hydrodynamic simulation of flare plasma. Energetic electrons are modeled with the Stanford unified code of acceleration, transport, and radiation, while plasma is modeled with the Naval Research Laboratory flux tube code. We calculated the collisional heating rate directly from the particle transport code, which is more accurate than those in previous studies based on approximate analytical solutions. We repeated the simulation of Mariska et al. with an injection of power law, downward-beamed electrons using the new heating rate. For this case, a -10% difference was found from their old result. We also used a more realistic spectrum of injected electrons provided by the stochastic acceleration model, which has a smooth transition from a quasi-thermal background at low energies to a non thermal tail at high energies. The inclusion of low-energy electrons results in relatively more heating in the corona (versus chromosphere) and thus a larger downward heat conduction flux. The interplay of electron heating, conduction, and radiative loss leads to stronger chromospheric evaporation than obtained in previous studies, which had a deficit in low-energy electrons due to an arbitrarily assumed low-energy cutoff. The energy and spatial distributions of energetic electrons and bremsstrahlung photons bear signatures of the changing density distribution caused by chromospheric evaporation. In particular, the density jump at the evaporation front gives rise to enhanced emission, which, in principle, can be imaged by X-ray telescopes. This model can be applied to investigate a variety of high-energy processes in solar, space, and astrophysical plasmas.

  4. Early physiologic responses to hemorrhagic hypotension.

    PubMed

    Torres Filho, Ivo P; Torres, Luciana N; Pittman, Roland N

    2010-02-01

    The identification of early indicators of hemorrhagic hypotension (HH) severity may support early therapeutic approaches and bring insights into possible mechanistic implications. However, few systematic investigations of physiologic variables during early stages of hemorrhage are available. We hypothesized that, in certain subjects, early physiologic responses to blood loss are associated with the ability to survive hemorrhage levels that are lethal to subjects that do not present the same responses. Therefore, we examine the relevance of specific systemic changes during and after the bleeding phase of HH. Stepwise hemorrhage, representing prehospital situations, was performed in 44 rats, and measurements were made after each step. Heart and respiratory rates, arterial and venous blood pressures, gases, acid-base status, glucose, lactate, electrolytes, hemoglobin, O(2) saturation, tidal volume, and minute volume were measured before, during, and after bleeding 40% of the total blood volume. Fifty percent of rats survived 100 min (survivors, S) or longer; others were considered nonsurvivors (NS). Our findings were as follows: (1) S and NS subjected to a similar hemorrhage challenge showed significantly different responses during nonlethal levels of bleeding; (2) survivors showed higher blood pressure and ventilation than NS; (3) although pH was lower in NS at later stages, changes in bicarbonate and base excess occurred already during the hemorrhage phase and were higher in NS; and (4) plasma K(+) levels and glucose extraction were higher in NS. We conclude that cardiorespiratory and metabolic responses, essential for the survival at HH, can differentiate between S and NS even before a lethal bleeding was reached. PMID:20129488

  5. Combined Modeling of Acceleration, Transport, and Hydrodynamic Response in Solar Flares. II. Inclusion of Radiative Transfer with RADYN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio da Costa, Fatima; Liu, Wei; Petrosian, Vahé; Carlsson, Mats

    2015-11-01

    Solar flares involve complex processes that are coupled and span a wide range of temporal, spatial, and energy scales. Modeling such processes self-consistently has been a challenge in the past. Here we present results from simulations that couple particle kinetics with hydrodynamics (HD) of the atmospheric plasma. We combine the Stanford unified Fokker-Planck code that models particle acceleration and transport with the RADYN HD code that models the atmospheric response to collisional heating by accelerated electrons through detailed radiative transfer calculations. We perform simulations using two different electron spectra, one an ad hoc power law and the other predicted by the model of stochastic acceleration by turbulence or plasma waves. Surprisingly, the later model, even with energy flux \\ll {10}10 {erg} {{{s}}}-1 {{cm}}-2, can cause “explosive” chromospheric evaporation and drive stronger up- and downflows (and HD shocks). This is partly because our acceleration model, like many others, produces a spectrum consisting of a quasi-thermal component plus a power-law tail. We synthesize emission-line profiles covering different heights in the lower atmosphere, including Hα 6563 Å, He ii 304 Å, Ca ii K 3934 Å, and Si iv 1393 Å. One interesting result is the unusual high temperature (up to a few times 105 K) of the formation site of He ii 304 Å, which is expected owing to photoionization-recombination under flare conditions, compared to those in the quiet Sun dominated by collisional excitation. When compared with observations, our results can constrain the properties of nonthermal electrons and thus the poorly understood particle acceleration mechanism.

  6. Flare-antenna unit for system in which flare is remotely activated by radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiltz, Frederick F.; Wilson, Charles E.

    1995-06-01

    A flare-antenna assembly has flare material enclosed in a cylindrical antenna and forms part of a marker beacon. The flare aids in the search for the marker beacon by providing means for both visual and infrared detection. The flare is actuated in response to a specific remote radio signal being received by the antenna. The received signal is decoded by the electronic system within the marker beacon. If the received signal meets the necessary criteria the electronic system generates an electrical signal that detonates a squib embedded in the flare material. The detonation of the squib activates the flare.

  7. Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rust, David

    1998-01-01

    The Sun is constantly changing. Not an hour goes by without a rise or fall in solar x-radiation or radio emission. Not a day goes by without a solar flare. Our active star, this inconsistent Sun, this gaseous cloud that blows in all directions, warms the air we breathe and nourishes the food we eat. From Earth, it seems the very model of stability, but in space it often creates havoc. Over the past century, solar physicists have learned how to detect even the weakest of solar outbursts or flares. We know that flares must surely trace their origins to the magnetic strands stretched and tangled by the rolling plasma of the solar interior. Although a century of astrophysical research has produced widely accepted, fundamental understanding about the Sun, we have yet to predict successfully the emergence of any magnetic fields from inside the Sun or the ignition of any flare. As in any physical experiment, the ability to predict events not only validates the scientific ideas, it also has practical value. In astrophysics, a demonstrated understanding of sunspots, flares, and ejections of plasma would allow us to approach many other mysteries, such as stellar X-ray bursters, with tested theories.

  8. Implications of X-Ray Observations for Electron Acceleration and Propagation in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, G. D.; Aschwanden, M. J.; Aurass, H.; Battaglia, M.; Grigis, P. C.; Kontar, E. P.; Liu, W.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Zharkova, V. V.

    2011-01-01

    High-energy X-rays and gamma-rays from solar flares were discovered just over fifty years ago. Since that time, the standard for the interpretation of spatially integrated flare X-ray spectra at energies above several tens of keV has been the collisional thick-target model. After the launch of the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) in early 2002, X-ray spectra and images have been of sufficient quality to allow a greater focus on the energetic electrons responsible for the X-ray emission, including their origin and their interactions with the flare plasma and magnetic field. The result has been new insights into the flaring process, as well as more quantitative models for both electron acceleration and propagation, and for the flare environment with which the electrons interact. In this article we review our current understanding of electron acceleration, energy loss, and propagation in flares. Implications of these new results for the collisional thick-target model, for general flare models, and for future flare studies are discussed.

  9. Fine Structure in Solar Flares.

    PubMed

    Warren

    2000-06-20

    We present observations of several large two-ribbon flares observed with both the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) and the soft X-ray telescope on Yohkoh. The high spatial resolution TRACE observations show that solar flare plasma is generally not confined to a single loop or even a few isolated loops but to a multitude of fine coronal structures. These observations also suggest that the high-temperature flare plasma generally appears diffuse while the cooler ( less, similar2 MK) postflare plasma is looplike. We conjecture that the diffuse appearance of the high-temperature flare emission seen with TRACE is due to a combination of the emission measure structure of these flares and the instrumental temperature response and does not reflect fundamental differences in plasma morphology at the different temperatures. PMID:10859129

  10. KEPLER FLARES. II. THE TEMPORAL MORPHOLOGY OF WHITE-LIGHT FLARES ON GJ 1243

    SciTech Connect

    Davenport, James R. A.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Johnson, Emily C.; Peraza, Jesus; Jansen, Tiffany C.; Larsen, Daniel M.; Hebb, Leslie; Wisniewski, John P.; Malatesta, Michael; Keil, Marcus; Silverberg, Steven M.; Scheffler, Matthew S.; Berdis, Jodi R.; Kowalski, Adam F.; Hilton, Eric J.

    2014-12-20

    We present the largest sample of flares ever compiled for a single M dwarf, the active M4 star GJ 1243. Over 6100 individual flare events, with energies ranging from 10{sup 29} to 10{sup 33} erg, are found in 11 months of 1 minute cadence data from Kepler. This sample is unique for its completeness and dynamic range. We have developed automated tools for finding flares in short-cadence Kepler light curves, and performed extensive validation and classification of the sample by eye. From this pristine sample of flares we generate a median flare template. This template shows that two exponential cooling phases are present during the white-light flare decay, providing fundamental constraints for models of flare physics. The template is also used as a basis function to decompose complex multi-peaked flares, allowing us to study the energy distribution of these events. Only a small number of flare events are not well fit by our template. We find that complex, multi-peaked flares occur in over 80% of flares with a duration of 50 minutes or greater. The underlying distribution of flare durations for events 10 minutes and longer appears to follow a broken power law. Our results support the idea that sympathetic flaring may be responsible for some complex flare events.

  11. Particle/fluid simulations of an eruptive flare: Identifying the field-aligned currents responsible for the hard x-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    While magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) can provide a reasonable description of the overall magnetic reconnection that is believed to drive flares, additional, and often separate processes have to be envoked to in order to explain the electron acceleration that is responsible for many of the observed flare emissions. A new model that incorporates the dynamic coronal current sheets, the reconnection site, and possible electron acceleration processes is developed through the use of two-dimensional particle and modified two-fluid simulations. The specific example of an eruptive flare driven by the coalescence of flux tubes supported by prescribed photospheric current elements is evaluated. It is shown that the electrons and ions have differential trajectories through the coronal current sheet which leads to the development of additonal plasma currents that flow around the surface of the current sheet. These surface currents are explicitly neglected in MHD but they are vital to the flare dynamics because they divert current from the coronal current sheet into the chromosphere, producing an effective resistivity that aids the development of fast reconnection. Because the surface currents are in the plane of the magnetic field, electrons in them experience strong acceleration and can account for the observed hard X-ray emissions. Model predictions are compared with observed time profiles of hard X-ray emissions and Doppler shifts seen in soft X-ray line emissions and are able to account for such features as (1) the asymmetry in the rise and decay time of the hard X-rays, (2) the apparent delay between the largest Doppler shifts and the hard X-ray peak, and (3) the relatively low intensity of the blue-shifted component. The use of particle and fluid simulations is important because it provides different, but complementary treatments of the electron acceleration, the global magnetic morphology, and the flare current system.

  12. Flare models: Chapter 9 of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, P. A. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    By reviewing the properties of solar flares analyzed by each of the seven teams of the Skylab workshop, a set of primary and secondary requirements of flare models are derived. A number of flare models are described briefly and their properties compared with the primary requirements. It appears that, at this time, each flare model has some strong points and some weak points. It has not yet been demonstrated that any one flare model meets all the proposed requirements.

  13. The early stress responses in fish larvae.

    PubMed

    Pederzoli, Aurora; Mola, Lucrezia

    2016-05-01

    During the life cycle of fish the larval stages are the most interesting and variable. Teleost larvae undergo a daily increase in adaptability and many organs differentiate and become active. These processes are concerted and require an early neuro-immune-endocrine integration. In larvae communication among the nervous, endocrine and immune systems utilizes several known signal molecule families which could be different from those of the adult fish. The immune-neuroendocrine system was studied in several fish species, among which in particular the sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax), that is a species of great commercial interest, very important in aquaculture and thus highly studied. Indeed the immune system of this species is the best known among marine teleosts. In this review the data on main signal molecules of stress carried out on larvae of fish are considered and discussed. For sea bass active roles in the early immunological responses of some well-known molecules involved in the stress, such as ACTH, nitric oxide, CRF, HSP-70 and cortisol have been proposed. These molecules and/or their receptors are biologically active mainly in the gut before complete differentiation of gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), probably acting in an autocrine/paracrine way. An intriguing idea emerges from all results of these researches; the molecules involved in stress responses, expressed in the adult cells of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, during the larval life of fish are present in several other localizations, where they perform probably the same role. It may be hypothesized that the functions performed by hypothalamic-pituitary system are particularly important for the survival of the larva and therefore they comprises several other localizations of body. Indeed the larval stages of fish are very crucial phases that include many physiological changes and several possible stress both internal and environmental. PMID:26968620

  14. Early growth response-1 in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Khachigian, Levon M

    2016-07-01

    This article reviews the regulatory roles of the immediate-early gene product and prototypic zinc finger transcription factor, early growth response-1 in models of cardiovascular pathobiology, focusing on insights using microRNA, DNAzymes, small hairpin RNA, small interfering RNA, oligonucleotide decoy strategies and mice deficient in early growth response-1. PMID:27251707

  15. On the source of flare-ejecta responsible for geomagnetic storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, K.

    1974-01-01

    It is shown that magnetic bottles as the sources of moving metric type 4 bursts are not responsible for the development of geomagnetic storms, despite the fact that shock waves producing type 2 bursts are the sources of the interplanetary shock waves, which produce SSC's on the geomagnetic field. These magnetic bottles, in general, tend to move in the solar envelope with the speed of several hundred Km/sec at most, which is much slower than that of the motion of type 2 radio sources.

  16. Energy input and response from prompt and early optical afterglow emission in gamma-ray bursts.

    PubMed

    Vestrand, W T; Wren, J A; Wozniak, P R; Aptekar, R; Golentskii, S; Pal'shin, V; Sakamoto, T; White, R R; Evans, S; Casperson, D; Fenimore, E

    2006-07-13

    The taxonomy of optical emission detected during the critical first few minutes after the onset of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) defines two broad classes: prompt optical emission correlated with prompt gamma-ray emission, and early optical afterglow emission uncorrelated with the gamma-ray emission. The standard theoretical interpretation attributes prompt emission to internal shocks in the ultra-relativistic outflow generated by the internal engine; early afterglow emission is attributed to shocks generated by interaction with the surrounding medium. Here we report on observations of a bright GRB that, for the first time, clearly show the temporal relationship and relative strength of the two optical components. The observations indicate that early afterglow emission can be understood as reverberation of the energy input measured by prompt emission. Measurements of the early afterglow reverberations therefore probe the structure of the environment around the burst, whereas the subsequent response to late-time impulsive energy releases reveals how earlier flaring episodes have altered the jet and environment parameters. Many GRBs are generated by the death of massive stars that were born and died before the Universe was ten per cent of its current age, so GRB afterglow reverberations provide clues about the environments around some of the first stars. PMID:16838015

  17. Simulation Training in Early Emergency Response (STEER).

    PubMed

    Generoso, Jose Roberto; Latoures, Renee Elizabeth; Acar, Yahya; Miller, Dean Scott; Ciano, Mark; Sandrei, Renan; Vieira, Marlon; Luong, Sean; Hirsch, Jan; Fidler, Richard Lee

    2016-06-01

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ISSUE Instructions: 1.3 contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded after you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. In order to obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "Simulation Training in Early Emergency Response (STEER)," found on pages 255-263, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name, contact information, and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until May 31, 2019. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. OBJECTIVES Define the purpose of the Simulation Training in Early Emergency Response (STEER) study. Review the outcome of the STEER study. DISCLOSURE

  18. Responsibility of a Filament Eruption for the Initiation of a Flare, CME, and Blast Wave, and its Possible Transformation into a Bow Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grechnev, V. V.; Uralov, A. M.; Kuzmenko, I. V.; Kochanov, A. A.; Chertok, I. M.; Kalashnikov, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    Multi-instrument observations of two filament eruptions on 24 February and 11 May 2011 suggest the following updated scenario for eruptive flare, coronal mass ejection (CME), and shock wave evolution. An initial destabilization of a filament results in stretching out of the magnetic threads belonging to its body that are rooted in the photosphere along the inversion line. Their reconnection leads to i) heating of parts of the filament or its environment, ii) an initial development of the flare cusp, arcade, and ribbons, iii) an increasing similarity of the filament to a curved flux rope, and iv) to its acceleration. Then the pre-eruption arcade enveloping the filament becomes involved in reconnection according to the standard model and continues to form the flare arcade and ribbons. The poloidal magnetic flux in the curved rope developing from the filament progressively increases and forces its toroidal expansion. This flux rope impulsively expands and produces a magnetohydrodynamical disturbance, which rapidly steepens into a shock. The shock passes through the arcade that expands above the filament and then freely propagates for some time ahead of the CME like a decelerating blast wave. If the CME is slow, then the shock eventually decays. Otherwise, the frontal part of the shock changes into the bow-shock regime. This was observed for the first time in the 24 February 2011 event. When reconnection ceases, the flux rope relaxes and constitutes the CME core-cavity system. The expanding arcade develops into the CME frontal structure. We also found that reconnection in the current sheet of a remote streamer forced by the shock passage results in a running flare-like process within the streamer responsible for a type II burst. The development of dimming and various associated phenomena are discussed.

  19. Solar flare nomenclature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cliver, E. W.

    1995-03-01

    The evolution of solar flare nomenclature is reviewed in the context of the paradigm shift, in progress, from flares to coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in solar-terrestrial physics. Emphasis is placed on: the distinction between eruptive (Class II) flares and confined (Class I) flares; and the underlying similarity of eruptive flares inside (two-ribbon flares) and outside (flare-like brightenings accompanying disappearing filaments) of active regions. A list of reserach questions/ problems raised, or brought into focus, by the new paradigm is suggested; in general, these questions bear on the inter- relationships and associations of the two classes (or phases) or flares. Terms such as 'eruptive flare' and 'eruption' (defined to encompass both the CME and its associated eruptive flare) may be useful as nominal links between opposing viewpoints in the 'flares vs CMEs' controversy.

  20. Measuring Response to Early Literacy Intervention with Preschoolers at Risk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanDerHeyden, Amanda M.; Snyder, Patricia A.; Broussard, Carmen; Ramsdell, Kerrie

    2008-01-01

    Response to intervention (RTI) is characterized as a logical science of decision making that has applicability for early childhood, particularly in the context of multitiered intervention models. This study examined the utility of using curriculum-based early literacy measures as screening tools and for evaluating whether growth in early literacy…

  1. A Rayleigh Scatter-Based Ocular Flare Analysis Meter for Flare Photometry of the Anterior Chamber

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Deborah L.; Axtelle, Jim; Rath, Susan; Dyer, Andrew; Harrison, Benjamin; Rogers, Claude; Menon, Naresh; Van Gelder, Russell N.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Existing flare photometers are based on the Tyndall effect, which requires sophisticated laser photometry. The ocular flare analysis meter (OFAM) is a nonlaser photometer that uses quantitative Rayleigh scatter and absorption from visible light to compute a flare value. This study is designed to correlate OFAM measurements with qualitative measurements of flare in vitro and in vivo. Methods Following validation of the device on artificial anterior chambers containing known protein concentrations, flare readings were obtained from 90 subjects (46 with and 44 without uveitis) in one eye. Subjects were graded by the Standardization of Uveitis Nomenclature (SUN) working group flare scoring system and received the OFAM flare measurements. Results The OFAM showed linear response in vitro to protein concentrations ranging from 0 to 0.5 mg/ml. In clinical use in subjects ranging from SUN flare scores of 0+ to 2+, OFAM showed statistically significant measurement accuracy (P = 0.0008 of flare 0 versus flare 2; P = 0.031 of flare 0 versus flare 1). Distinction of SUN scores 1 and 2 was borderline significant (P = 0.057). Conclusion The OFAM photometry correlates with the standard SUN scoring system. This method may provide an objective method to diagnosis and monitor uveitis. Further longitudinal studies are warranted. Translational Relevance Currently, ocular flare is assessed qualitatively in most clinical settings. The existing methodology uses only Tyndall effect to measure flare. The OFAM uses an alternate, nonlaser means for measurement of anterior chamber flare by measure of Raleigh scatter. This pilot clinical study suggests that the OFAM device may be useful in measurement of uveitis activity. PMID:26688778

  2. Solar flare discovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Hugh S.

    1987-01-01

    This paper considers the discoveries that have appreciably changed our understanding of the physics of solar flares. A total of 42 discoveries from all disciplines, ranging from Galileo's initial observation of faculae to the recent discovery of strong limb brightening in 10-MeV gamma-radiation, are identified. The rate of discovery increased dramatically over the past four decades as new observational tools became available. The assessment of significance suggests that recent discoveries -though more numerous - are individually less significant; perhaps this is because the minor early discoveries tend to be taken for granted.

  3. COMBUSTION EFFICIENCY OF FLARES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a study to provide data on industrial flare emissions. (Emissions of incompletely burned hydrocarbons from industrial flares may contribute to air pollution. Available data on flare emissions are sparse, and methods to sample operating flares are unavai...

  4. Identifying flares in rheumatoid arthritis: reliability and construct validation of the OMERACT RA Flare Core Domain Set

    PubMed Central

    Bykerk, Vivian P; Bingham, Clifton O; Choy, Ernest H; Lin, Daming; Alten, Rieke; Christensen, Robin; Furst, Daniel E; Hewlett, Sarah; Leong, Amye; March, Lyn; Woodworth, Thasia; Boire, Gilles; Haraoui, Boulos; Hitchon, Carol; Jamal, Shahin; Keystone, Edward C; Pope, Janet; Tin, Diane; Thorne, J Carter

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the reliability of concurrent flare identification using 3 methods (patient, rheumatologist and Disease Activity Score (DAS)28 criteria), and construct validity of candidate items representing the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials (OMERACT) RA Flare Core Domain Set. Methods Candidate flare questions and legacy measures were administered at consecutive visits to Canadian Early Arthritis Cohort (CATCH) patients between November 2011 and November 2014. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) core set indicators were recorded. Concordance to identify flares was assessed using the agreement coefficient. Construct validity of flare questions was examined: convergent (Spearman's r); discriminant (mean differences between flaring/non-flaring patients); and consequential (proportions with prior treatment reductions and intended therapeutic change postflare). Results The 849 patients were 75% female, 81% white, 42% were in remission/low disease activity (R/LDA), and 16–32% were flaring at the second visit. Agreement of flare status was low–strong (κ's 0.17–0.88) and inversely related to RA disease activity level. Flare domains correlated highly (r's≥0.70) with each other, patient global (r's≥0.66) and corresponding measures (r's 0.49–0.92); and moderately highly with MD and patient-reported joint counts (r's 0.29–0.62). When MD/patients agreed the patient was flaring, mean flare domain between-group differences were 2.1–3.0; 36% had treatment reductions prior to flare, with escalation planned in 61%. Conclusions Flares are common in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and are often preceded by treatment reductions. Patient/MD/DAS agreement of flare status is highest in patients worsening from R/LDA. OMERACT RA flare questions can discriminate between patients with/without flare and have strong evidence of construct and consequential validity. Ongoing work will identify optimal scoring and cut points to identify RA flares. PMID

  5. SWUSV: a microsatellite mission for space weather early forecasting of major flares and CMEs and the complete monitoring of the ultraviolet solar variability influence on climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damé, Luc

    The SWUSV (Space Weather & Ultraviolet Solar Variability) proposed microsatellite mission encompasses three major scientific objectives: (1) Space Weather including the prediction and detection of major eruptions and coronal mass ejections (using Lyman-Alpha and Herzberg continuum imaging and H-Alpha ground support); (2) solar forcing on the climate through radiation and their interactions with the local stratosphere (UV spectral irradiance from 180 to 400 nm by bands of 10 to 20 nm, including ozone, plus Lyman-Alpha and the CN bandhead); (3) simultaneous local radiative budget of the Earth, UV to IR, with an accuracy better than 1% in differential. The mission is on a sun-synchronous polar orbit and proposes 5 instruments to the model payload: SUAVE (Solar Ultraviolet Advanced Variability Experiment), an optimized telescope for FUV (Lyman-Alpha) and MUV (200-220 nm Herzberg continuum) imaging (sources of variability); UPR (Ultraviolet Passband Radiometers), with 64 UV filter radiometers; a vector magnetometer; thermal plasma measurements and Langmuir probes; and a total and spectral solar irradiance and Earth radiative budget ensemble (SERB, Solar irradiance & Earth Radiative Budget). SWUSV is proposed as a small mission to CNES and to ESA for a possible flight as early as 2020-2021. With opening to Chinese collaboration (ESA-CAS Small Mission) a further instrument could be added (HEBS, High Energy Burst Spectrometers) to reinforced Space Weather flares prediction objectives.

  6. The inhibition by levocetirizine and fexofenadine of the histamine-induced wheal and flare response in healthy Caucasian and Japanese volunteers.

    PubMed

    Schoepke, Nicole; Church, Martin K; Maurer, Marcus

    2013-05-01

    This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study compared inhibition by one 5 mg dose of levocetirizine with two 60 mg doses of fexofenadine separated by 12 h of histamine-induced wheal and flare responses in 9 Caucasian and 9 Japanese healthy male volunteers. Levocetirizine was more inhibitory than fexofenadine on wheal, flare and pruritus (p < 0.005). Variability, evaluated from the standard deviation of inhibition, ranged from 14% to 23.2% for levocetirizine and 65.4% to 112.4% for fexofenadine. Levocetirizine had a faster onset of action (30-90 min versus 2 h), shorter time to maximum effect (3-4 versus 3-6 h) and longer duration of action (at least 24 h versus ~12 h) than fexofenadine. The plasma levels of levocetirizine rose more quickly, reached higher levels, were more consistent and decreased slower than those of fexofenadine. There were no clinically significant ethnic differences in responsiveness to the drugs. PMID:23147964

  7. Early cellular signaling responses to axonal injury

    PubMed Central

    Lukas, Thomas J; Wang, Ai Ling; Yuan, Ming; Neufeld, Arthur H

    2009-01-01

    Background We have used optic nerve injury as a model to study early signaling events in neuronal tissue following axonal injury. Optic nerve injury results in the selective death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). The time course of cell death takes place over a period of days with the earliest detection of RGC death at about 48 hr post injury. We hypothesized that in the period immediately following axonal injury, there are changes in the soma that signal surrounding glia and neurons and that start programmed cell death. In the current study, we investigated early changes in cellular signaling and gene expression that occur within the first 6 hrs post optic nerve injury. Results We found evidence of cell to cell signaling within 30 min of axonal injury. We detected differences in phosphoproteins and gene expression within the 6 hrs time period. Activation of TNFα and glutamate receptors, two pathways that can initiate cell death, begins in RGCs within 6 hrs following axonal injury. Differential gene expression at 6 hrs post injury included genes involved in cytokine, neurotrophic factor signaling (Socs3) and apoptosis (Bax). Conclusion We interpret our studies to indicate that both neurons and glia in the retina have been signaled within 30 min after optic nerve injury. The signals are probably initiated by the RGC soma. In addition, signals activating cellular death pathways occur within 6 hrs of injury, which likely lead to RGC degeneration. PMID:19284657

  8. KEPLER FLARES. I. ACTIVE AND INACTIVE M DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Hawley, Suzanne L.; Davenport, James R. A.; Kowalski, Adam F.; Wisniewski, John P.; Deitrick, Russell; Hilton, Eric J.; Hebb, Leslie

    2014-12-20

    We analyzed Kepler short-cadence M dwarf observations. Spectra from the Astrophysical Research Consortium 3.5 m telescope identify magnetically active (Hα in emission) stars. The active stars are of mid-M spectral type, have numerous flares, and have well-defined rotational modulation due to starspots. The inactive stars are of early M type, exhibit less starspot signature, and have fewer flares. A Kepler to U-band energy scaling allows comparison of the Kepler flare frequency distributions with previous ground-based data. M dwarfs span a large range of flare frequency and energy, blurring the distinction between active and inactive stars designated solely by the presence of Hα. We analyzed classical and complex (multiple peak) flares on GJ 1243, finding strong correlations between flare energy, amplitude, duration, and decay time, with only a weak dependence on rise time. Complex flares last longer and have higher energy at the same amplitude, and higher energy flares are more likely to be complex. A power law fits the energy distribution for flares with log E{sub K{sub p}}> 31 erg, but the predicted number of low-energy flares far exceeds the number observed, at energies where flares are still easily detectable, indicating that the power-law distribution may flatten at low energy. There is no correlation of flare occurrence or energy with starspot phase, the flare waiting time distribution is consistent with flares occurring randomly in time, and the energies of consecutive flares are uncorrelated. These observations support a scenario where many independent active regions on the stellar surface are contributing to the observed flare rate.

  9. Understanding flaring solar-type stars seen by Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderblom, David

    2012-02-01

    The early Kepler data show unambiguous and dramatic evidence of large-scale, massive white-light stellar flares on G and early-K dwarfs. The energies released in these flares are at least 103?104 times that of the largest solar flares ever seen, meaning that they put substantial energy into their circumstellar environments, and much of that energy may be in hard x-rays. At the same time, it is not clear from the Kepler data alone why these particular stars flare because there are many other stars with no evident flares that have similar rotation periods and amplitudes of variation. Are bouts of massive flaring episodic? Do the flaring stars have other properties (activity, v sin i, lithium, inter alia) that distinguish them? Are the flaring stars in close binaries? Keck HIRES spectra can address all these questions and more, and help us to more fully understand this important phenomenon that has critical implications for the formation and evolution of planets and, e! specially, for chemistry and astrobiology in those regions. These stars are also of potential great importance for understanding the flaring behavior of the Sun because white-light flares have not been seen on G stars before, and it is crucial to understand if these flaring stars are unusually young, in close pairs, or if they represent a broader phenomenon that has not yet been appreciated.

  10. Menarche: Responses of Early Adolescent Females.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrory, Arlene

    1990-01-01

    Investigated responses of menarcheal age females to menarche. Results from 95 girls indicated that premenarcheal girls thought menses was more debilitating than did postmenarcheal girls. Subjects who had been menstruating longer considered menses natural event but denied its effects. Found no significant difference in overall self-esteem and…

  11. Early Campus Response to Disruptive Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stump, Linda J.; Zdziarski, Eugene L.

    2008-01-01

    As major events define generations and tragedies define and refine protocol response to significant incidents, a sense of comfort and confidence is attained as the authors train individually and organizationally to respond to extreme events, and yet those who have experienced them know that no plan goes as it should. There are, however, steps or…

  12. Understanding Solar Flare Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheatland, M. S.

    2005-12-01

    A review is presented of work aimed at understanding solar flare statistics, with emphasis on the well known flare power-law size distribution. Although avalanche models are perhaps the favoured model to describe flare statistics, their physical basis is unclear, and they are divorced from developing ideas in large-scale reconnection theory. An alternative model, aimed at reconciling large-scale reconnection models with solar flare statistics, is revisited. The solar flare waiting-time distribution has also attracted recent attention. Observed waiting-time distributions are described, together with what they might tell us about the flare phenomenon. Finally, a practical application of flare statistics to flare prediction is described in detail, including the results of a year of automated (web-based) predictions from the method.

  13. Exploring early public responses to geoengineering.

    PubMed

    Pidgeon, Nick; Corner, Adam; Parkhill, Karen; Spence, Alexa; Butler, Catherine; Poortinga, Wouter

    2012-09-13

    Proposals for geoengineering the Earth's climate are prime examples of emerging or 'upstream' technologies, because many aspects of their effectiveness, cost and risks are yet to be researched, and in many cases are highly uncertain. This paper contributes to the emerging debate about the social acceptability of geoengineering technologies by presenting preliminary evidence on public responses to geoengineering from two of the very first UK studies of public perceptions and responses. The discussion draws upon two datasets: qualitative data (from an interview study conducted in 42 households in 2009), and quantitative data (from a subsequent nationwide survey (n=1822) of British public opinion). Unsurprisingly, baseline awareness of geoengineering was extremely low in both cases. The data from the survey indicate that, when briefly explained to people, carbon dioxide removal approaches were preferred to solar radiation management, while significant positive correlations were also found between concern about climate change and support for different geoengineering approaches. We discuss some of the wider considerations that are likely to shape public perceptions of geoengineering as it enters the media and public sphere, and conclude that, aside from technical considerations, public perceptions are likely to prove a key element influencing the debate over questions of the acceptability of geoengineering proposals. PMID:22869796

  14. Characterization of early host responses in adults with dengue disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background While dengue-elicited early and transient host responses preceding defervescence could shape the disease outcome and reveal mechanisms of the disease pathogenesis, assessment of these responses are difficult as patients rarely seek healthcare during the first days of benign fever and thus data are lacking. Methods In this study, focusing on early recruitment, we performed whole-blood transcriptional profiling on denguevirus PCR positive patients sampled within 72 h of self-reported fever presentation (average 43 h, SD 18.6 h) and compared the signatures with autologous samples drawn at defervescence and convalescence and to control patients with fever of other etiology. Results In the early dengue fever phase, a strong activation of the innate immune response related genes were seen that was absent at defervescence (4-7 days after fever debut), while at this second sampling genes related to biosynthesis and metabolism dominated. Transcripts relating to the adaptive immune response were over-expressed in the second sampling point with sustained activation at the third sampling. On an individual gene level, significant enrichment of transcripts early in dengue disease were chemokines CCL2 (MCP-1), CCL8 (MCP-2), CXCL10 (IP-10) and CCL3 (MIP-1α), antimicrobial peptide β-defensin 1 (DEFB1), desmosome/intermediate junction component plakoglobin (JUP) and a microRNA which may negatively regulate pro-inflammatory cytokines in dengue infected peripheral blood cells, mIR-147 (NMES1). Conclusions These data show that the early response in patients mimics those previously described in vitro, where early assessment of transcriptional responses has been easily obtained. Several of the early transcripts identified may be affected by or mediate the pathogenesis and deserve further assessment at this timepoint in correlation to severe disease. PMID:21810247

  15. New Data on mid-Miocene Rhyolite Volcanism in Eastern Oregon Extend Early, co-CRBG Rhyolite Flare up and Constrain Storage Sites of Grande Ronde Flood Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streck, M. J.; Ferns, M. L.; McIntosh, W. C.

    2015-12-01

    The classical view of relating mid-Miocene rhyolites of the tri-state area of Oregon, Nevada, and Idaho to the flood basalts of the Columbia River Basalt was that a mantle plume impinging along the Oregon-Idaho border first causes eruption of the flood basalts but shortly thereafter causes generation of rhyolites at the McDermitt volcanic field from which then hot-spot track rhyolites developed progressively younging towards Yellowstone. More recent work reveals rhyolites as old as found at McDermitt (~16.5 Ma) to occur along a wide E-W tangent along the Oregon-Nevada-Idaho border. And now, our data extend such early rhyolites (>16 Ma) to several locations further north within and in the periphery of the Lake Owyhee Volcanic Field (LOVF) adding to the geographically orphaned old age of 16.7 Ma of the Silver City Rhyolite, Idaho. Hence, the rhyolite flare-up associated with flood basalt magmatism occurred within a circular area of ~400 km centered 100 km NNE of McDermitt. Consequently, no south-to-north progression exists in the onset of rhyolite volcanism; instead, rhyolites started up at the same time over this large area. Province-wide rhyolite volcanism was strongest between ~16.4 and 15.4 Ma coincident with eruptions of the most voluminous member of the CRBG - the Grande Ronde Basalt (GRB). Field evidence for such bimodal volcanism consists of intercalated local GRB units with the Dinner Creek Tuff and Littlefield Rhyolite in the Malheur River Gorge corridor. GRB eruption sites exist and were likely fed from reservoirs residing below or near rhyolitic chambers. Presently, we have petrological evidence for pinning down GRB storages sites to areas from where rhyolites of the Dinner Creek Tuff and lava flows of the Littlefield Rhyolite erupted. In summary, input of GRG and other CRBG magmas were driving co-CRBG rhyolite volcanism which in turn may have influenced whether flood basalt magmas erupted locally or travelled in dikes to more distally located areas.

  16. A Statistical Analysis of Loop-Top Motion in Solar Limb Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Sui, Linhui; Brosius, D. G.; Dennis, Brian R.

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies of hot, thermal solar flare loops imaged with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) have identified several flares for which the loop top shrinks downward early in the impulsive phase and then expands upward later in the impulsive phase (Sui & Holman 2003; Sui, Holman & Dennis 2004; Veronig et al. 2005). This early downward motion is not predicted by flare models. We study a statistical sample of RHESSI flares to assess how common this evolution is and to better characterize it. In a sample of 88 flares near the solar lin$ that show identifiable loop structure in RHESSI images, 66% (58 flares) showed downward loop-top motion followed by upward motion. We therefore conclude that the early downward motion is a frequent characteristic of flare loops. We obtain the distribution of the timing of the change from downward to upward motion relative to flare start and peak times. We also obtain the distributions of downward and upward speeds.

  17. Using subsurface helicity measurements to predict flare occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinard, A. A.; Henthorn, J.; Komm, R.; Hill, F.

    2009-12-01

    Solar flares are responsible for a number of hazardous effects including disabling high-frequency radio communications, interfering with GPS measurements, and disrupting satellites. Forecasting flare occurrence is very difficult, giving little advanced notice of these events. One possible means for predicting flare occurrence lies in helioseismology, i.e. analysis of the region below the active region for signs of an impending flare. Time series helioseismic data collected by the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) have been analyzed for a subset of active regions that produce large flares and a subset with very high magnetic field strength that produce no flares. A predictive parameter has been developed and analyzed using discriminant analysis as well as traditional forecasting tools such as the Heidke skill score. Preliminary results indicate this parameter predicts flare occurrence with a high success rate.

  18. Towards Predicting Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Lisa; Balasubramaniam, Karatholuvu S.

    2015-04-01

    We present a statistical study of solar X-ray flares observed using GOES X-ray observations of the ~50,000 fares that occurred from 1986 - mid-2014. Observed X-ray parameters are computed for each of the flares, including the 24-hour non-flare X-ray background in the 1-8 A band and the maximum ratio of the short (0.5 - 4 A) to long band (1-8 A) during flares. These parameters, which are linked to the amount of active coronal heating and maximum flare temperature, reveal a separation between the X-, M-, C-, and B- class fares. The separation was quantified and verified through machine-learning algorithms (k nearest neighbor; nearest centroid). Using the solar flare parameters learned from solar cycles 22-23, we apply the models to predict flare categories of solar cycle 24. Skill scores are then used to assess the success of our models, yielding correct predictions for ~80% of M-, C-, and B-class flares and 100% correct predictions for X-flares. We present details of the analysis along with the potential uses of our model in flare forecasting.

  19. Electrodynamical response of the Indian low-mid latitude ionosphere to the very large solar flare of 28 October 2003 - a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manju, G.; Pant, T. K.; Devasia, C. V.; Ravindran, S.; Sridharan, R.

    2009-10-01

    The electrodynamic effects on the low-mid latitude ionospheric region have been investigated using GPS (global positioning system) data, ionosonde data and ΔH values, during the very large solar flare (X17.2/4B) of 28 October 2003. The results bring out the flare induced unusual behaviour of the equatorial ionosphere on this day just prior to sunset. The important observations are i) Large and prolonged Ne enhancements observed from ionosonde data just after the flare-related peak enhancement in EUV flux. The observed enhancement in Ne is due to the increase in ionization production due to the enhanced EUV flux and the persistence of the enhancement is probably due to the prompt penetration related upliftment of the F layer (just prior to the flare peak phase) to higher altitudes, where recombination rates are lower. ii) A significant enhancement in total electron content (TEC) (~10 TEC units) at regions around the Equatorial Ionization Anomaly (EIA) crest region (Ahmedabad) during the flare in association with the flare related EUV flux enhancement. iii) Similar enhancements seen at stations of Jodhpur and Delhi in the mid latitude sector. iv)The flare related flux enhancements in different longitude sectors in the equatorial electrojet region have been shown to produce positive and negative variations in electrojet strength indicating the presence of current systems having positive and negative polarities in different longitude sectors. Thus the flare effect reveals the longitudinal variation of the counter electrojet events in the Equatorial Electrojet (EEJ) region.

  20. A Framework for Providing Culturally Responsive Early Intervention Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a framework that offers a way for early intervention (EI) service providers to better meet the needs of the culturally diverse children and families they serve. This framework was created to organize existing research and literature on cultural responsiveness in a way that fit the unique context of EI. The…

  1. A Comparison of Responsive Interventions on Kindergarteners' Early Reading Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Mary E.; Rawlinson, D'Ann; Simmons, Deborah C.; Kim, Minjung; Kwok, Oi-man; Hagan-Burke, Shanna; Simmons, Leslie E.; Fogarty, Melissa; Oslund, Eric; Coyne, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the effects of Tier 2 reading interventions that operated in response-to-intervention contexts. Kindergarten children (N = 90) who were identified as at risk for reading difficulties were stratified by school and randomly assigned to receive (a) Early Reading Intervention (ERI; Pearson/Scott Foresman, 2004) modified in response…

  2. Conceptualizing Developmentally Responsive Teaching in Early Field Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Penny B.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive qualitative study was to examine case study as a pedagogical tool used to scaffold the conceptualization of developmentally responsive pedagogy for middle level preservice teachers in early field experiences. Child study projects (CSP) completed by middle level preservice candidates were analyzed to determine if…

  3. Early Twentieth Century Responses to the Drug Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfennig, Dennis Joseph

    1991-01-01

    Describes early twentieth-century responses to the drug problem in the United States. Discusses pressure from the media and reformers to control the availability of drugs such as opium and cocaine that were widely available in over-the-counter medications. Focuses on New York State, which took the lead in enacting drug control legislation. (DK)

  4. The Reasons behind Early Adolescents' Responses to Peer Victimization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellmore, Amy; Chen, Wei-Ting; Rischall, Emily

    2013-01-01

    Victims of school-based peer harassment face a range of risks including psycho-social, physical, and academic harm. The aim of the present study was to examine the behavioral coping responses used by early adolescents when they face peer victimization. To meet this aim, 216 sixth grade students (55% girls) from two urban middle schools and 254…

  5. Emergency flare tip repair

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, G.A.

    1982-07-01

    Two damaged propane storage tank flares serving a large LPG storage facility near the Arabian Gulf were given emergency service. A diagram of over-all layout and spatial relationships between tanks and piping, and tables with general information relevant to selecting an acceptable radiant heat load factor and flare line flow characteristics were presented. The general equation for predicting radiant heat flux from a point source was used. The ignition of the temporary flare was discussed.

  6. Recent Advances in Plant Early Signaling in Response to Herbivory

    PubMed Central

    Arimura, Gen-Ichiro; Ozawa, Rika; Maffei, Massimo E.

    2011-01-01

    Plants are frequently attacked by herbivores and pathogens and therefore have acquired constitutive and induced defenses during the course of their evolution. Here we review recent progress in the study of the early signal transduction pathways in host plants in response to herbivory. The sophisticated signaling network for plant defense responses is elicited and driven by both herbivore-induced factors (e.g., elicitors, effectors, and wounding) and plant signaling (e.g., phytohormone and plant volatiles) in response to arthropod factors. We describe significant findings, illuminating the scenario by providing broad insights into plant signaling involved in several arthropod-host interactions. PMID:21747702

  7. Particle acceleration in flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, Arnold O.; Kosugi, Takeo; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benka, Steve G.; Chupp, Edward L.; Enome, Shinzo; Garcia, Howard; Holman, Gordon D.; Kurt, Victoria G.; Sakao, Taro

    1994-01-01

    Particle acceleration is intrinsic to the primary energy release in the impulsive phase of solar flares, and we cannot understand flares without understanding acceleration. New observations in soft and hard X-rays, gamma-rays and coherent radio emissions are presented, suggesting flare fragmentation in time and space. X-ray and radio measurements exhibit at least five different time scales in flares. In addition, some new observations of delayed acceleration signatures are also presented. The theory of acceleration by parallel electric fields is used to model the spectral shape and evolution of hard X-rays. The possibility of the appearance of double layers is further investigated.

  8. Flared tube attachment fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkire, I. D.; King, J. P., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Tubes can be flared first, then attached to valves and other flow line components, with new fitting that can be disassembled and reused. Installed fitting can be disassembled so parts can be inspected. It can be salvaged and reused without damaging flared tube; tube can be coated, tempered, or otherwise treated after it has been flared, rather than before, as was previously required. Fitting consists of threaded male portion with conical seating surface, hexagonal nut with hole larger than other diameter of flared end of tube, and split ferrule.

  9. Solar flares. [plasma physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    The present paper deals with explosions in a magnetized solar plasma, known as flares, whose effects are seen throughout the electromagnetic spectrum, from gamma-rays through the visible and to the radio band. The diverse phenomena associated with flares are discussed, along with the physical mechanisms that have been advanced to explain them. The impact of solar flare research on the development of plasma physics and magnetohydrodynamics is noted. The rapid development of solar flare research during the past 20 years, owing to the availability of high-resolution images, detailed magnetic field measurements, and improved spectral data, is illustrated.

  10. GeV flares observations with GLAST LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Galli, A.; Omodei, N.; Piro, L.

    2007-07-12

    Early X-ray afterglow observations show that X-ray flares are very common features in GRB light curves. X-ray flares may reflect long duration central engine activity. The delayed flare photons are expected to interact with relativistic electrons by Inverse Compton giving delayed high energy counterparts that potentially will be detected by GLAST LAT, which could observe GRB from 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV. The nature oh high energy spectral components from GRB detected by EGRET is still debated. Observations with GLAST LAT will give useful information to constrain the origin of X-ray flares. In this work we simulate a set of possible GeV emitting flares in the context of External Shock model to study the capability of GLAST LAT to detect GeV flares at different intensities and durations.

  11. Properties of the 15 February 2011 Flare Seismic Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkov, S.; Green, L. M.; Matthews, S. A.; Zharkova, V. V.

    2013-06-01

    The first near-side X-class flare of Solar Cycle 24 occurred in February 2011 (SOL2011-02-05T01:55) and produced a very strong seismic response in the photosphere. One sunquake was reported by Kosovichev ( Astrophys. J. Lett. 734, L15, 2011), followed by the discovery of a second sunquake by Zharkov, Green, Matthews et al. ( Astrophys. J. Lett. 741, L35, 2011). The flare had a two-ribbon structure and was associated with a flux-rope eruption and a halo coronal mass ejection (CME) as reported in the CACTus catalogue. Following the discovery of the second sunquake and the spatial association of both sources with the locations of the feet of the erupting flux rope (Zharkov, Green, Matthews et al., Astrophys. J. Lett. 741, L35, 2011), we present here a more detailed analysis of the observed photospheric changes in and around the seismic sources. These sunquakes are quite unusual, taking place early in the impulsive stage of the flare, with the seismic sources showing little hard X-ray (HXR) emission, and strongest X-ray emission sources located in the flare ribbons. We present a directional time-distance diagram computed for the second source, which clearly shows a ridge corresponding to the travelling acoustic-wave packet and find that the sunquake at the second source happened about 45 seconds to one minute earlier than the first source. Using acoustic holography we report different frequency responses of the two sources. We find strong downflows at both seismic locations and a supersonic horizontal motion at the second site of acoustic-wave excitation.

  12. New Results from the Flare Genesis Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rust, D. M.; Bernasconi, P. N.; Eaton, H. A.; Keller, C.; Murphy, G. A.; Schmieder, B.

    2000-05-01

    From January 10 to 27, 2000, the Flare Genesis solar telescope observed the Sun while suspended from a balloon in the stratosphere above Antarctica. The goal of the mission was to acquire long time series of high-resolution images and vector magnetograms of the solar photosphere and chromosphere. Images were obtained in the magnetically sensitive Ca I line at 6122 Angstroms and at H-alpha (6563 Angstroms). The FGE data were obtained in the context of Max Millennium Observing Campaign #004, the objective of which was to study the ``Genesis of Solar Flares and Active Filaments/Sigmoids." Flare Genesis obtained about 26,000 usable images on the 8 targeted active regions. A preliminary examination reveals a good sequence on an emerging flux region and data on the M1 flare on January 22, as well as a number of sequences on active filaments. We will present the results of our first analysis efforts. Flare Genesis was supported by NASA grants NAG5-4955, NAG5-5139, and NAG5-8331 and by NSF grant OPP-9615073. The Air Force Office of Scientific Research and the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization supported early development of the Flare Genesis Experiment.

  13. Flares in childhood eczema.

    PubMed

    Langan, S M

    2009-01-01

    Eczema is a major public health problem affecting children worldwide. Few studies have directly assessed triggers for disease flares. This paper presents evidence from a published systematic review and a prospective cohort study looking at flare factors in eczema. This systematic review suggested that foodstuffs in selected groups, dust exposure, unfamiliar pets, seasonal variation, stress, and irritants may be important in eczema flares. We performed a prospective cohort study that focused on environmental factors and identified associations between exposure to nylon clothing, dust, unfamiliar pets, sweating, shampoo, and eczema flares. Results from this study also demonstrated some new key findings. First, the effect of shampoo was found to increase in cold weather, and second, combinations of environmental factors were associated with disease exacerbation, supporting a multiple component disease model. This information is likely to be useful to families and may lead to the ability to reduce disease flares in the future. PMID:20054505

  14. Early responses of vascular endothelial cells to topographic cues

    PubMed Central

    Dreier, Britta; Gasiorowski, Joshua Z.; Morgan, Joshua T.; Nealey, Paul F.; Russell, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells in vivo are exposed to multiple biophysical cues provided by the basement membrane, a specialized extracellular matrix through which vascular endothelial cells are attached to the underlying stroma. The importance of biophysical cues has been widely reported, but the signaling pathways that mediate cellular recognition and response to these cues remain poorly understood. Anisotropic topographically patterned substrates with nano- through microscale feature dimensions were fabricated to investigate cellular responses to topographic cues. The present study focuses on early events following exposure of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to these patterned substrates. In serum-free medium and on substrates without protein coating, HUVECs oriented parallel to the long axis of underlying ridges in as little as 30 min. Immunocytochemistry showed clear differences in the localization of the focal adhesion proteins Src, p130Cas, and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in HUVECs cultured on topographically patterned surfaces and on planar surfaces, suggesting involvement of these proteins in mediating the response to topographic features. Knockdown experiments demonstrated that FAK was not necessary for HUVEC alignment in response to topographic cues, although FAK knockdown did modulate HUVEC migration. These data identify key events early in the cellular response to biophysical stimuli. PMID:23703527

  15. Early visual cortical responses produced by checkerboard pattern stimulation.

    PubMed

    Shigihara, Yoshihito; Hoshi, Hideyuki; Zeki, Semir

    2016-07-01

    Visual evoked potentials have been traditionally triggered with flash or reversing checkerboard stimuli and recorded with electroencephalographic techniques, largely but not exclusively in clinical or clinically related settings. They have been crucial in determining the healthy functioning or otherwise of the visual pathways up to and including the cerebral cortex. They have typically given early response latencies of 100ms, the source of which has been attributed to V1, with the prestriate cortex being secondarily activated somewhat later. On the other hand, magnetoencephalographic studies using stimuli better tailored to the physiology of individual, specialized, visual areas have given early latencies of <50ms with the sources localized in both striate (V1) and prestriate cortex. In this study, we used the reversing checkerboard pattern as a stimulus and recorded cortical visual evoked magnetic fields with magnetoencephalography, to establish whether very early responses can be traced to (estimated) in both striate and prestriate cortex, since such a demonstration would enhance considerably the power of this classical approach in clinical investigations. Our results show that cortical responses evoked by checkerboard patterns can be detected before 50ms post-stimulus onset and that their sources can be estimated in both striate and prestriate cortex, suggesting a strong parallel input from the sub-cortex to both striate and prestriate divisions of the visual cortex. PMID:27083528

  16. Flare build-up study - Homologous flares group. I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martres, M.-J.; Mein, N.; Mouradian, Z.; Rayrole, J.; Schmieder, B.; Simon, G.; Soru-Escaut, I.; Woodgate, B. E.

    1984-01-01

    Solar Maximum Mission observations have been used to study the origin and amount of energy, mechanism of storage and release, and conditions for the occurrence of solar flares, and some results of these studies as they pertain to homologous flares are briefly discussed. It was found that every set of flares produced 'rafales' of homologous flares, i.e., two, three, four, or more flares separated in time by an hour or less. No great changes in macroscopic photospheric patterns were observed during these flaring periods. A quantitative brightness parameter of the relation between homologous flares is defined. Scale changes detected in the dynamic spectrum of flare sites are in good agreement with a theoretical suggestion by Sturrock. Statistical results for different homologous flare active regions show the existence in homologous flaring areas of a 'pivot' of previous filaments interpreted as a signature of an anomaly in the solar rotation.

  17. The Early Endocrine Stress Response in Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Nyberg, Christoffer; Karlsson, Torbjörn; Hillered, Lars; Stridsberg, Mats; Ronne Engström, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In patients with severe illness, such as aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), a physiologic stress response is triggered. This includes activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the sympathetic nervous system. The aim of this study was to investigate the very early responses of these systems. Methods A porcine animal model of aneurysmal SAH was used. In this model, blood is injected slowly to the basal cisterns above the anterior skull base until the cerebral perfusion pressure is 0 mm Hg. Sampling was done from blood and urine at -10, +15, +75 and +135 minutes from time of induction of SAH. Analyses of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), cortisol, aldosterone, catecholamines and chromogranin-A were performed. Results Plasma ACTH, serum cortisol and plasma aldosterone increased in the samples following induction of SAH, and started to decline after 75 minutes. Urine cortisol also increased after SAH. Urine catecholamines and their metabolites were found to increase after SAH. Many samples were however below detection level, not allowing for statistical analysis. Plasma chromogranin-A peaked at 15 minutes after SAH, and thereafter decreased. Conclusions The endocrine stress response after aneurysmal SAH was found to start within 15 minutes in the HPA axis with early peak values of ACTH, cortisol and aldosterone. The fact that the concentrations of the HPA axis hormones decreased 135 minutes after SAH may suggest that a similar pattern exists in SAH patients, thus making it difficult to catch these early peak values. There were also indications of early activation of the sympathetic nervous system, but the small number of valid samples made interpretation difficult. PMID:27007694

  18. The reasons behind early adolescents' responses to peer victimization.

    PubMed

    Bellmore, Amy; Chen, Wei-Ting; Rischall, Emily

    2013-02-01

    Victims of school-based peer harassment face a range of risks including psycho-social, physical, and academic harm. The aim of the present study was to examine the behavioral coping responses used by early adolescents when they face peer victimization. To meet this aim, 216 sixth grade students (55 % girls) from two urban middle schools and 254 students (50 % girls) from one suburban middle school completed structured open-ended questions about a recent peer victimization experience. In both school settings, the results supported both previously- and newly-identified coping responses that fit within the approach-avoidance coping framework, reasoning that maps on to social information processing models, and systematic associations between reasoning and the coping responses adopted by the adolescents. In both school settings, approach responses were associated with having the goal of defending oneself against the victimization whereas avoidance responses were associated with wanting to prevent the escalation of the peer victimization event. The discussion argues that knowledge about the link between reasoning and coping responses can be informative to understanding what coping responses are effective for victims. PMID:23014851

  19. Stomatal Blue Light Response Is Present in Early Vascular Plants.

    PubMed

    Doi, Michio; Kitagawa, Yuki; Shimazaki, Ken-ichiro

    2015-10-01

    Light is a major environmental factor required for stomatal opening. Blue light (BL) induces stomatal opening in higher plants as a signal under the photosynthetic active radiation. The stomatal BL response is not present in the fern species of Polypodiopsida. The acquisition of a stomatal BL response might provide competitive advantages in both the uptake of CO2 and prevention of water loss with the ability to rapidly open and close stomata. We surveyed the stomatal opening in response to strong red light (RL) and weak BL under the RL with gas exchange technique in a diverse selection of plant species from euphyllophytes, including spermatophytes and monilophytes, to lycophytes. We showed the presence of RL-induced stomatal opening in most of these species and found that the BL responses operated in all euphyllophytes except Polypodiopsida. We also confirmed that the stomatal opening in lycophytes, the early vascular plants, is driven by plasma membrane proton-translocating adenosine triphosphatase and K(+) accumulation in guard cells, which is the same mechanism operating in stomata of angiosperms. These results suggest that the early vascular plants respond to both RL and BL and actively regulate stomatal aperture. We also found three plant species that absolutely require BL for both stomatal opening and photosynthetic CO2 fixation, including a gymnosperm, C. revoluta, and the ferns Equisetum hyemale and Psilotum nudum. PMID:26307440

  20. Comment on 'The solar flare myth' by J. T. Gosling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Hugh; Haisch, Bernhard; Strong, Keith T.

    1995-01-01

    In a recent paper Gosling (1993) claims that solar flares are relatively unimportant for understanding the terrestrial consequences of solar activity, and argues that coronal mass ejections (CMEs) produce the most powerful terrestrial disturbances. This opinion conflicts with observation, as it is well known that CMEs and flares are closely associated, and we disagree with Gosling's insistence on a simplistic cause-and-effect description of the interrelated phenomena of a solar flare. In this brief response we present new Yohkoh data and review older results that demonstrate the close relationships among CMEs, flares, filament eruptions, and other forms of energy release such as particle acceleration.

  1. Polarization evidence for the isotropy of electrons responsible for the production of 5-20 keV X-rays in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tramiel, L. J.; Novick, R.; Chanan, G. A.

    1984-05-01

    We have flown a solar flare X-ray polarimeter on the third flight (STS 3) of the Space Shuttle Columbia as part of the OSS-1 pallet of instruments. We observed eight solar flares in the 5-20 keV band on 1982 March 28. The signal-to-background ratio in all cases exceeded 25. A preflight contamination problem invalidated the earlier laboratory calibration, and the instrument had to be calibrated in-flight against two flares near the center of the solar disk, which are expected to be unpolarized on geometric grounds in a variety of models. No statistically significant polarization was then detected in any of the other six flares. Upper limits (99% confidence level) range from 2.5% to 12.7%. For two of the observed flares these results disagree with the predictions of a simple radially beamed, linear bremsstrahlung model at greater than 99% confidence. One of these flares had a hard impulsive burst; the measured upper limit on this burst (10%) also disagrees with the predictions of the beamed hypothesis. If the calibration flares were polarized, then the above upper limits can be interpreted as limits on the changes in polarization from flare to flare. Because the observed flares spanned a large longitude range and because the predictions of the beamed models depend fairly sensitively on viewing angle, the small relative polarizations are still difficult to reconcile with simple beamed models. The results are also compared with recent, more sophisticated models of Leach and Petrosian, which generally predict lower polarizations. We find that the observations are marginally inconsistent with a model in which the electrons are initially strongly beamed, but subsequently become largely isotropic as a result of the effects of a converging magnetic field; they are consistent with a model in which the electrons are injected isotropically, but in which the preference for motion along the magnetic field lines is explicitly taken into account. The results are also consistent

  2. COMPTEL solar flare observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J. M.; Aarts, H.; Bennett, K.; Debrunner, H.; Devries, C.; Denherder, J. W.; Eymann, G.; Forrest, D. J.; Diehl, R.; Hermsen, W.

    1992-01-01

    COMPTEL as part of a solar target of opportunity campaign observed the sun during the period of high solar activity from 7-15 Jun. 1991. Major flares were observed on 9 and 11 Jun. Although both flares were large GOES events (greater than or = X10), they were not extraordinary in terms of gamma-ray emission. Only the decay phase of the 15 Jun. flare was observed by COMPTEL. We report the preliminary analysis of data from these flares, including the first spectroscopic measurement of solar flare neutrons. The deuterium formation line at 2.223 MeV was present in both events and for at least the 9 Jun. event, was comparable to the flux in the nuclear line region of 4-8 MeV, consistent with Solar-Maximum Mission (SSM) Observations. A clear neutron signal was present in the flare of 9 Jun. with the spectrum extending up to 80 MeV and consistent in time with the emission of gamma-rays, confirming the utility of COMPTEL in measuring the solar neutron flux at low energies. The neutron flux below 100 MeV appears to be lower than that of the 3 Jun. 1982 flare by more than an order of magnitude. The neutron signal of the 11 Jun. event is under study. Severe dead time effects resulting from the intense thermal x-rays require significant corrections to the measured flux which increase the magnitude of the associated systematic uncertainties.

  3. Flare Activity on Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskanian, V. S.

    A review of the existing flare data analyses indicates that most probably the flare phenomenon should be considered as one of the manifestation forms of solar-type chromospheric activity on stars and therefore has to be investigated in common with other phenomena specifying this activity. In order to estimate the reliability of such an approach different types of observational data are discussed. It could be shown that most of the phenomena specifying the solar chromospheric activity (BY Dra syndrome, indicating the spottedness of the stellar surface, long-term cyclic variations of emission line intensities, variable local magnetic fields, flares, coronal phenomena, etc.) are observable on a constantly growing number of stars of almost all spectral types and luminosity classes. This fact indicates that the proposed approach could be the right way to solve the problem of the flare phenomenon.

  4. The great flare of 1982 June 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanaka, K.; Zirin, H.

    1985-01-01

    The great soft X-ray (SXR) flare (X12) of the past solar maximum was observed by Hinotori and by Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) on June 6, 1982. Hinotori data consist of hard X-ray (HXR) and SXR images in the rise and decay of the flare, high-resolution soft X-ray spectra throughout the flare, and HXR and gamma-ray data. The BBSO data include films of H-alpha, H-alpha blue wing, D3 and longitudinal magnetic field, as well as video tapes of continuum. Images in HXR, SXR, H-alpha, D3 and the continuum are compared and SXR spectra analyzed. The flare resulted from extended motion of a large spot shearing the magnetic field. D3 and white-light images exhibit a progression from fast flashes to two ribbons, while both HXR and SXR are centered on the optical kernels. The continuum emission shows the same temporal behavior as the HXR at 160 keV. In its early phases, the Fe XXV line was double-peaked, and a decreasing blueshifted (up to 400 km/sec) component was observed, from which the evaporation rate of chromospheric material was estimated. It is suggested that this upflow is adequate to supply the coronal cloud. Flare energetics are discussed in detail, and it is concluded that a significant amount of energy was deposited in the corona, and that nonthermal electrons are the major energy input.

  5. Solar flare particle radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanzerotti, L. J.

    1972-01-01

    The characteristics of the solar particles accelerated by solar flares and subsequently observed near the orbit of the earth are studied. Considered are solar particle intensity-time profiles, the composition and spectra of solar flare events, and the propagation of solar particles in interplanetary space. The effects of solar particles at the earth, riometer observations of polar cap cosmic noise absorption events, and the production of solar cell damage at synchronous altitudes by solar protons are also discussed.

  6. Flare ignition system

    SciTech Connect

    Sorelle, R.R.

    1984-05-22

    A flare ignition system is claimed for oil well flaring of combustible gases. It includes a central control unit, low voltage interconnect line and plural remote igniter units which include alternate first and second spark gaps coordinated in fail-safe operation. Coordination is carried out by pulse counting and validating circuitry which assures that one of the spark gaps will always be ignitable or alarm condition will exist.

  7. A kinematic model of a solar flare.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakagawa, Y.; Wu, S. T.; Han, S. M.

    1973-01-01

    Hyder advocated the idea that the optical (H-alpha) flares can be identified with the response of the solar chromosphere to an infalling material stream resulting from the 'disparition brusque' of a prominence. Since some flares are observed without any apparent association with infalling streams, in this paper we examine the possibility of identifying the optical flare with the response of the chromosphere to a supersonic disturbance, i.e., a shock, propagating downward. The undisturbed chromosphere is represented by the Harvard-Smithsonian Reference Atmosphere and the evolution of the shock is evaluated with the use of the CCW (Chisnell, Chester, Whitham) approximation based on the theory of characteristics. It is shown that the chromosphere is heated by the shock, that radiation is enhanced, and that the enhanced radiation terminates the shock around the height of the temperature minimum.

  8. Responsiveness of the core set, response criteria, and utilities in early rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Verhoeven, A; Boers, M; van der Linden, S

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Validation of responsiveness and discriminative power of the World Health Organisation/International League of Associations for Rheumatology (WHO/ILAR) core set, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), and European League for Rheumatology (EULAR) criteria for improvement/response, and other single and combined measures (indices) in a trial in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
METHODS—Ranking of measures by response (standardised response means and effect sizes) and between-group discrimination (unpaired t test and χ2 values) at two time points in the COBRA study. This study included 155 patients with early RA randomly allocated to two treatment groups with distinct levels of expected response: combined treatment, high response; sulfasalazine treatment, moderate response.
RESULTS—At week 16, standardised response means of core set measures ranged between 0.8 and 3.5 for combined treatment and between 0.4 and 1.2 for sulfasalazine treatment (95% confidence interval ±0.25). Performance of patient oriented measures (for example, pain, global assessment) was best when the questions were focused on the disease. The most responsive single measure was the patient's assessment of change in disease activity, at 3.5. Patient utility, a generic health status measure, was moderately (rating scale) to poorly (standard gamble) responsive. Response means of most indices (combined measures) exceeded 2.0, the simple count of core set measures improved by 20% was most responsive at 4.1. Discrimination performance yielded similar but not identical results: best discrimination between treatment groups was achieved by the EULAR response and ACR improvement criteria (at 20% and other percentage levels), the pooled index, and the disease activity score (DAS), but also by the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and grip strength.
CONCLUSIONS—Responsiveness and discrimination between levels of response are not identical concepts, and

  9. The solar flare myth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosling, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    Many years of research have demonstrated that large, nonrecurrent geomagnetic storms, shock wave disturbances in the solar wind, and energetic particle events in interplanetary space often occur in close association with large solar flares. This result has led to a pradigm of cause and effect - that large solar flares are the fundamental cause of these events in the near-Earth space environmemt. This paradigm, which I call 'the solar flare myth,' dominates the popular perception of the relationship between solar activity and interplanetary and geomagnetic events and has provided much of the pragmatic rationale for the study of the solar flare phenomenon. Yet there is good evidence that this paradigm is wrong and that flares do not generally play a central role in producing major transient disturbances in the near-Earth space environment. In this paper I outline a different paradigm of cause and effect that removes solar flares from their central position in the chain of events leading from the Sun to near-Earth space. Instead, this central role is given to events known as coronal mass ejections.

  10. Flares on Mira stars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.

    1991-01-01

    Fourteen cases of flares reported on Mira type stars have been collected. These flares typically have an amplitude of over half a magnitude, a rise time of minutes, and a duration of tens of minutes. Nine of the 11 stars represent a normal cross section of the Mira population, while the remaining two are in symbiotic systems (CH Cyg and RX Pup). The flares were observed photographically (five cases), photometrically (three cases), visually (three cases), and with radio telescopes (two cases), while CH Cyg has had flares observed by many techniques. The evidence for the existence of flares on Miras is strong but not definitive. It is possible to hypothesize a variety of background or instrumental effects that could explain all 14 events; however, there is no evidence that suggests the data should be taken at other than face value, and there are good arguments for rejecting the possibility of artifacts. It is felt that the current data warrant systematic observational and theoretical investigation of the possibility of flares on Mira stars.

  11. Plasma-Sprayed Titanium Patterns for Enhancing Early Cell Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yunqi; Xie, Youtao; Pan, Houhua; Zheng, Xuebin; Huang, Liping; Ji, Fang; Li, Kai

    2016-06-01

    Titanium coating has been widely used as a biocompatible metal in biomedical applications. However, the early cell responses and long-term fixation of titanium implants are not satisfied. To obviate these defects, in this paper, micro-post arrays with various widths (150-1000 μm) and intervals (100-300 μm) were fabricated on the titanium substrate by template-assisted plasma spraying technology. In vitro cell culture experiments showed that MC3T3-E1 cells exhibited significantly higher osteogenic differentiation as well as slightly improved adhesion and proliferation on the micro-patterned coatings compared with the traditional one. The cell number on the pattern with 1000 µm width reached 130% after 6 days of incubation, and the expressions of osteopontin (OPN) as well as osteocalcin (OC) were doubled. No obvious difference was found in cell adhesion on various size patterns. The present micro-patterned coatings proposed a new modification method for the traditional plasma spraying technology to enhance the early cell responses and convenience for the bone in-growth.

  12. Implementation of responsiveness to intervention in early education settings.

    PubMed

    Justice, Laura M; McGinty, Anita; Guo, Ying; Moore, Douglas

    2009-05-01

    This article provides an overview of how response to intervention (RTI) may be used effectively within early childhood settings. Discussion is organized to address such issues regarding RTI implementation as (1) how to design and implement a high-quality Tier 1 learning environment that systematically improves children's language and literacy outcomes, (2) how to design and implement a high-quality Tier 2 supplemental learning intervention that systematically improves the language and literacy outcomes of children who are unresponsive to Tier 1, and (3) how to design and implement a comprehensive and cohesive assessment system that appropriately identifies children who show inadequate response to the Tier 1 and Tier 2 learning opportunities. A model for implementing RTI using the supplemental curriculum by Justice and McGinty, READ IT AGAIN-PREK! (2008), is presented. This tool was developed to meet the needs of early childhood programs as they seek to implement RIA in a cost-effective and scalable manner. PMID:19399693

  13. Detection of early plant stress responses in hyperspectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behmann, Jan; Steinrücken, Jörg; Plümer, Lutz

    2014-07-01

    Early stress detection in crop plants is highly relevant, but hard to achieve. We hypothesize that close range hyperspectral imaging is able to uncover stress related processes non-destructively in the early stages which are invisible to the human eye. We propose an approach which combines unsupervised and supervised methods in order to identify several stages of progressive stress development from series of hyperspectral images. Stress of an entire plant is detected by stress response levels at pixel scale. The focus is on drought stress in barley (Hordeum vulgare). Unsupervised learning is used to separate hyperspectral signatures into clusters related to different stages of stress response and progressive senescence. Whereas all such signatures may be found in both, well watered and drought stressed plants, their respective distributions differ. Ordinal classification with Support Vector Machines (SVM) is used to quantify and visualize the distribution of progressive stages of senescence and to separate well watered from drought stressed plants. For each senescence stage a distinctive set of most relevant Vegetation Indices (VIs) is identified. The method has been applied on two experiments involving potted barley plants under well watered and drought stress conditions in a greenhouse. Drought stress is detected up to ten days earlier than using NDVI. Furthermore, it is shown that some VIs have overall relevance, while others are specific to particular senescence stages. The transferability of the method to the field is illustrated by an experiment on maize (Zea mays).

  14. Plasma-Sprayed Titanium Patterns for Enhancing Early Cell Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yunqi; Xie, Youtao; Pan, Houhua; Zheng, Xuebin; Huang, Liping; Ji, Fang; Li, Kai

    2016-05-01

    Titanium coating has been widely used as a biocompatible metal in biomedical applications. However, the early cell responses and long-term fixation of titanium implants are not satisfied. To obviate these defects, in this paper, micro-post arrays with various widths (150-1000 μm) and intervals (100-300 μm) were fabricated on the titanium substrate by template-assisted plasma spraying technology. In vitro cell culture experiments showed that MC3T3-E1 cells exhibited significantly higher osteogenic differentiation as well as slightly improved adhesion and proliferation on the micro-patterned coatings compared with the traditional one. The cell number on the pattern with 1000 µm width reached 130% after 6 days of incubation, and the expressions of osteopontin (OPN) as well as osteocalcin (OC) were doubled. No obvious difference was found in cell adhesion on various size patterns. The present micro-patterned coatings proposed a new modification method for the traditional plasma spraying technology to enhance the early cell responses and convenience for the bone in-growth.

  15. Solar flares, flare particles and geomagnetic disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, T.

    1986-03-01

    Geomagnetic disturbances related to solar-terrestrial events during the period June-September 1982 are described. The cause of these activities is investigated using solar phenomena and solar flare particles observed by the geostationary satellite GMS-2/SEM (Space Environment Monitor). It is noted that the geomagnetic disturbances in June were weak, two big geomagnetic storms occurred in September, and the largest storm, caused by a large flare, occurred on July 13-14. The July 13-14, 1972 storm is compared to the February 11-12, 1958 storm observed by Hakura and Nagai (1964, 1965) and the August 4-5, 1972 storm data of Hakura (1976). The July storm was characterized by a deep depression of the H-component caused by an abnormal expansion of the substorm-associated current system in the auroral zone toward the Far East and was short-lived.

  16. Urologic Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome Symptom Flares: Characterization of the Full Spectrum of Flares at Two Sites of the Mapp Research Network

    PubMed Central

    Sutcliffe, Siobhan; Colditz, Graham A.; Goodman, Melody S.; Pakpahan, Ratna; Vetter, Joel; Ness, Timothy J.; Andriole, Gerald L.; Lai, H. Henry

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To describe the full spectrum of symptom exacerbations defined by interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome patients as flares, and to investigate their associated health-care utilization and bother at two sites of the Trans-Multidisciplinary Approaches to the Study of Chronic Pelvic Pain (Trans-MAPP) Epidemiology and Phenotyping study. Patients and methods Participants completed a flare survey that asked them: 1) whether they had ever had flares (“symptoms that are much worse than usual”) that lasted <1 hr, >1 hr and <1 day, and >1 day; and 2) for each duration of flare, to report their: a) average length and frequency; b) typical levels of urologic and pelvic pain symptoms; and c) levels of health-care utilization and bother. We compared participants' responses to their non-flare Trans-MAPP values and across flares using generalized linear mixed models. Results Seventy six of 85 participants (89.4%) completed the flare survey, 72 of whom reported having flares (94.7%). Flares varied widely in terms of their duration (seconds to months), frequency (several times per day to once per year or less), and intensity and type of symptoms (e.g., pelvic pain versus urologic symptoms). Flares of all duration were associated with greater pelvic pain, urologic symptoms, disruption to participants' activities, and bother, with increasing severity of each of these factors as the duration of flares increased. Days-long flares were also associated with greater health-care utilization. In addition to duration, symptoms (pelvic pain, in particular) were also significant determinants of flare-related bother. Conclusions Our findings suggest that flares are common and associated with greater symptoms, health-care utilization, disruption, and bother. Our findings also inform the characteristics of flares most bothersome to patients (i.e., increased pelvic pain and duration), and thus of greatest importance to

  17. A solar tornado triggered by flares?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panesar, N. K.; Innes, D. E.; Tiwari, S. K.; Low, B. C.

    2013-01-01

    Context. Solar tornados are dynamical, conspicuously helical magnetic structures that are mainly observed as a prominence activity. Aims: We investigate and propose a triggering mechanism for the solar tornado observed in a prominence cavity by SDO/AIA on September 25, 2011. Methods: High-cadence EUV images from the SDO/AIA and the Ahead spacecraft of STEREO/EUVI are used to correlate three flares in the neighbouring active-region (NOAA 11303) and their EUV waves with the dynamical developments of the tornado. The timings of the flares and EUV waves observed on-disk in 195 Å are analysed in relation to the tornado activities observed at the limb in 171 Å. Results: Each of the three flares and its related EUV wave occurred within ten hours of the onset of the tornado. They have an observed causal relationship with the commencement of activity in the prominence where the tornado develops. Tornado-like rotations along the side of the prominence start after the second flare. The prominence cavity expands with the accelerating tornado motion after the third flare. Conclusions: Flares in the neighbouring active region may have affected the cavity prominence system and triggered the solar tornado. A plausible mechanism is that the active-region coronal field contracted by the "Hudson effect" through the loss of magnetic energy as flares. Subsequently, the cavity expanded by its magnetic pressure to fill the surrounding low corona. We suggest that the tornado is the dynamical response of the helical prominence field to the cavity expansion. Movies are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. Ribavirin improves early responses to peginterferon through enhanced interferon signaling

    PubMed Central

    Feld, Jordan J.; Lutchman, Glen A.; Heller, Theo; Hara, Koji; Pfeiffer, Julie K.; Leff, Richard D; Meek, Claudia; Rivera, Maria; Ko, Myung; Koh, Christopher; Rotman, Yaron; Ghany, Marc G.; Haynes-Williams, Vanessa; Neumann, Avidan U.; Liang, T. Jake; Hoofnagle, Jay H.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims: The therapeutic mechanisms of ribavirin for hepatitis C are unclear. Microarray analyses have shown that ribavirin increases induction of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs). We evaluated viral kinetics, serum cytokine expression, and viral mutagenesis during early stages of peginterferon therapy with and without ribavirin. Methods: Fifty patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection genotype 1 were randomly assigned to groups that were given peginterferon alfa-2a, with or without ribavirin, for 4 weeks; all patients then received an additional 44 weeks of combination therapy. First- and second-phase viral kinetics were evaluated. Serum levels of IP10, MIG, and MCP1 were quantified as measures of the ISG response. NS5A and NS5B were partially sequenced and mutation rates were calculated. Results: The first-phase decrease in HCV RNA was similar between groups. Patients that received ribavirin had a more rapid second-phase decrease, compared with patients that did not receive ribavirin—particularly those with an adequate first-phase decrease (0.61 vs. 0.35 log10 IU/mL/week, p=0.018). At 12 hrs, fold induction of serum IP10 was higher in patients given the combination therapy than those given only peginterferon (7.6- vs. 3.8-fold, p=0.01); however, the difference was greatest in patients with an adequate first-phase decrease in HCV RNA. IP10-induction correlated with first- and second-phase kinetics and with ribavirin serum concentrations on day 3. HCV mutation rates were similar between groups. Conclusion: Ribavirin improves the kinetics of the early response to therapy in patients with an adequate initial response to peginterferon. Induction of interferon-stimulated cytokines correlates with viral kinetics following ribavirin therapy, suggesting that ribavirin promotes interferon signaling. PMID:20303352

  19. The centrosome is a dynamic structure that ejects PCM flares.

    PubMed

    Megraw, Timothy L; Kilaru, Sandhya; Turner, F Rudolf; Kaufman, Thomas C

    2002-12-01

    The Drosophila Centrosomin (Cnn) protein is an essential core component of centrosomes in the early embryo. We have expressed a Cnn-GFP fusion construct in cleavage stage embryos, which rescues the maternal effect lethality of cnn mutant animals. The localization patterns seen with GFP-Cnn are identical to the patterns we see by immunofluorescent staining with anti-Cnn antibodies. Live imaging of centrosomes with Cnn-GFP reveals surprisingly dynamic features of the centrosome. Extracentrosomal particles of Cnn move radially from the centrosome and frequently change their direction. D-TACC colocalized with Cnn at these particles. We have named these extrusions 'flares'. Flares are dependent on microtubules, since disruption of the microtubule array severs the movement of these particles. Movement of flare particles is cleavage-cycle-dependent and appears to be attributed mostly to their association with dynamic astral microtubules. Flare activity decreases at metaphase, then increases at telophase and remains at this higher level of activity until the next metaphase. Flares appear to be similar to vertebrate PCM-1-containing 'centriolar satellites' in their behavior. By injecting rhodamine-actin, we observed that flares extend no farther than the actin cage. Additionally, disruption of the microfilament array increased the extent of flare movement. These observations indicate that centrosomes eject particles of Cnn-containing pericentriolar material that move on dynamic astral microtubules at a rate that varies with the cell cycle. We propose that flare particles play a role in organizing the actin cytoskeleton during syncytial cleavage. PMID:12415014

  20. Enhancing early child care quality and learning for toddlers at risk: the responsive early childhood program.

    PubMed

    Landry, Susan H; Zucker, Tricia A; Taylor, Heather B; Swank, Paul R; Williams, Jeffrey M; Assel, Michael; Crawford, April; Huang, Weihua; Clancy-Menchetti, Jeanine; Lonigan, Christopher J; Phillips, Beth M; Eisenberg, Nancy; Spinrad, Tracy L; de Villiers, Jill; de Villiers, Peter; Barnes, Marcia; Starkey, Prentice; Klein, Alice

    2014-02-01

    Despite reports of positive effects of high-quality child care, few experimental studies have examined the process of improving low-quality center-based care for toddler-age children. In this article, we report intervention effects on child care teachers' behaviors and children's social, emotional, behavioral, early literacy, language, and math outcomes as well as the teacher-child relationship. The intervention targeted the use of a set of responsive teacher practices, derived from attachment and sociocultural theories, and a comprehensive curriculum. Sixty-five childcare classrooms serving low-income 2- and 3-year-old children were randomized into 3 conditions: business-as-usual control, Responsive Early Childhood Curriculum (RECC), and RECC plus explicit social-emotional classroom activities (RECC+). Classroom observations showed greater gains for RECC and RECC+ teachers' responsive practices including helping children manage their behavior, establishing a predictable schedule, and use of cognitively stimulating activities (e.g., shared book reading) compared with controls; however, teacher behaviors did not differ for focal areas such as sensitivity and positive discipline supports. Child assessments demonstrated that children in the interventions outperformed controls in areas of social and emotional development, although children's performance in control and intervention groups was similar for cognitive skills (language, literacy, and math). Results support the positive impact of responsive teachers and environments providing appropriate support for toddlers' social and emotional development. Possible explanations for the absence of systematic differences in children's cognitive skills are considered, including implications for practice and future research targeting low-income toddlers. PMID:23772822

  1. Early immune responses to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and atopic predisposition.

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, R G; Kemeny, D M; Mariani, F; Price, J F

    1992-01-01

    Responses to the house dust mite during infancy may be important determinants of asthma in susceptible individuals. This study assessed early IgG subclass antibody responses to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus in children of atopic parents. Sixteen atopic and 15 non-atopic children were selected from a birth cohort, and atopic status was established according to follow up over the first two years. IgG1 and IgG4 antibodies to D pteronyssinus were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay at 7 days and 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. In all children D pteronyssinus IgG1 fell at 3 months (indicating maternal antibody loss), rose progressively to 12 months, and waned at 24 months. D pteronyssinus IgG4 was only detectable at 7 days. Children who were atopic by 2 years and therefore at greater risk of asthma, tended to have higher D pteronyssinus IgG1 at 6 and 12 months. These data suggest greater exposure or responsiveness to dust mite during infancy than in the second year. PMID:1520005

  2. Flare model sensitivity of the Balmer spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falchi, A.; Falciani, R.; Smaldone, L. A.; Tozzi, G. P.

    1989-01-01

    Careful studies of various chromospheric spectral signatures are very important in order to explore their possible sensitivity to the modifications of the thermodynamic quantities produced by the flare occurrence. Pioneer work of Canfield and co-workers have shown how the H alpha behavior is able to indicate different changes in the atmospheric parameters structure associated to the flare event. It was decided to study the behavior of the highest Balmer lines and of the Balmer continuum in different solar flare model atmospheres. These spectral features, originating in the deep photosphere in a quiet area, may have a sensitivity different from H alpha to the modification of a flare atmosphere. The details of the method used to compute the Stark profile of the higher Balmer line (n is greater than or equal to 6) and their merging were extensively given elsewhere (Donati-Falchi et al., 1985; Falchi et al., 1989). The models used were developed by Ricchiazzi in his thesis (1982) evaluating the chromospheric response to both the nonthermal electron flux, for energy greater than 20 kev, (F sub 20) and to the thermal conduction, (F sub c). The effect of the coronal pressure values (P sub O) at the apex of the flare loop is also included.

  3. Solar Flare Impacts on Ionospheric Electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qian, Liying; Burns, Alan G.; Solomon, Stanley C.; Chamberlin, Phillip C.

    2012-01-01

    The sudden increase of X-ray and extreme ultra-violet irradiance during flares increases the density of the ionosphere through enhanced photoionization. In this paper, we use model simulations to investigate possible additional contributions from electrodynamics, finding that the vertical E X B drift in the magnetic equatorial region plays a significant role in the ionosphere response to solar flares. During the initial stage of flares, upward E X B drifts weaken in the magnetic equatorial region, causing a weakened equatorial fountain effect, which in turn causes lowering of the peak height of the F2 region and depletion of the peak electron density of the F2 region. In this initial stage, total electron content (TEC) enhancement is predominantly determined by solar zenith angle control of photoionization. As flares decay, upward E X B drifts are enhanced in the magnetic equatorial region, causing increases of the peak height and density of the F2 region. This process lasts for several hours, causing a prolonged F2-region disturbance and TEC enhancement in the magnetic equator region in the aftermath of flares. During this stage, the global morphology of the TEC enhancement becomes predominantly determined by these perturbations to the electrodynamics of the ionosphere.

  4. Early inflammatory response in epithelial ovarian tumor cyst fluids.

    PubMed

    Kristjánsdóttir, Björg; Partheen, Karolina; Fung, Eric T; Yip, Christine; Levan, Kristina; Sundfeldt, Karin

    2014-10-01

    Mortality rates for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) are high, mainly due to late-stage diagnosis. The identification of biomarkers for this cancer could contribute to earlier diagnosis and increased survival rates. Given that chronic inflammation plays a central role in cancer initiation and progression, we selected and tested 15 cancer-related cytokines and growth factors in 38 ovarian cyst fluid samples. We used ovarian cyst fluid since it is found in proximity to the pathology and mined it for inflammatory biomarkers suitable for early detection of EOC. Immunoprecipitation and high-throughput sample fractionation were obtained by using tandem antibody libraries bead and mass spectrometry. Two proteins, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2) and interleucin-8 (IL-8/CXCL8), were significantly (P < 0.0001) higher in the malignant (n = 16) versus benign (n = 22) tumor cysts. Validation of MCP-1, IL-8, and growth-regulated protein-α (GROα/CXCL1) was performed with ELISA in benign, borderline, and malignant cyst fluids (n = 256) and corresponding serum (n = 256). CA125 was measured in serum from all patients and used in the algorithms performed. MCP-1, IL-8, and GROα are proinflammatory cytokines and promoters of tumor growth. From 5- to 100-fold higher concentrations of MCP-1, IL-8 and GROα were detected in the cyst fluids compared to the serum. Significant (P < 0.001) cytokine response was already established in borderline cyst fluids and stage I EOC. In serum a significant (P < 0.01) increase of IL-8 and GROα was found, but not until stage I and stage III EOC, respectively. These findings confirm that early events in tumorigenesis can be analyzed and detected in the tumor environment and we conclude that ovarian cyst fluid is a promising source in the search for new biomarkers for early ovarian tumors. PMID:24947406

  5. The progress of early growth response factor 1 and leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jing; Li, Ziwei; Han, Yang; Jiang, Tao; Song, Xiaoming; Jiang, Guosheng

    2016-05-01

    Early growth response gene-1 (EGR1) widely exists in the cell nucleus of such as, zebrafish, mice, chimpanzees and humans, an it also can be observed in the cytoplasm of some tumors. EGR1 was named just after its brief and rapid expression of different stimuli. Accumulating studies have extensively demonstrated that the widespread dysregulation of EGR1 is involved in hematological malignancies such as human acute myeloid leukemia (AML), chronic myelogenous leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, multiple myeloma, and B cell lymphoma. With the deep research on EGR1, its expression, function and regulatory mechanism has been gradually elucidated, and provides more possibilities for treatment strategies of patients with leukemia. Herein, we summarize the roles of EGR1 in its biological function and relationship with leukemia. PMID:27195189

  6. The progress of early growth response factor 1 and leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jing; Li, Ziwei; Han, Yang; Jiang, Tao; Song, Xiaoming; Jiang, Guosheng

    2016-01-01

    Summary Early growth response gene-1 (EGR1) widely exists in the cell nucleus of such as, zebrafish, mice, chimpanzees and humans, an it also can be observed in the cytoplasm of some tumors. EGR1 was named just after its brief and rapid expression of different stimuli. Accumulating studies have extensively demonstrated that the widespread dysregulation of EGR1 is involved in hematological malignancies such as human acute myeloid leukemia (AML), chronic myelogenous leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, multiple myeloma, and B cell lymphoma. With the deep research on EGR1, its expression, function and regulatory mechanism has been gradually elucidated, and provides more possibilities for treatment strategies of patients with leukemia. Herein, we summarize the roles of EGR1 in its biological function and relationship with leukemia. PMID:27195189

  7. Oviductal response to gametes and early embryos in mammals.

    PubMed

    Maillo, Veronica; Sánchez-Calabuig, Maria Jesus; Lopera-Vasquez, Ricaurte; Hamdi, Meriem; Gutierrez-Adan, Alfonso; Lonergan, Patrick; Rizos, Dimitrios

    2016-10-01

    The oviduct is a complex and organized thin tubular structure connecting the ovary with the uterus. It is the site of final sperm capacitation, oocyte fertilization and, in most species, the first 3-4days of early embryo development. The oviductal epithelium is made up of ciliary and secretory cells responsible for the secretion of proteins and other factors which contribute to the formation of the oviductal fluid. Despite significant research, most of the pathways and oviductal factors implicated in the crosstalk between gametes/early embryo and the oviduct remain unknown. Therefore, studying the oviductal environment is crucial to improve our understanding of the regulatory mechanisms controlling fertilization and embryo development. In vitro systems are a valuable tool to study in vivo pathways and mechanisms, particularly those in the oviducts which in livestock species are challenging to access. In studies of gamete and embryo interaction with the reproductive tract, oviductal epithelial cells, oviductal fluid and microvesicles co-cultured with gametes/embryos represent the most appropriate in vitro models to mimic the physiological conditions in vivo. PMID:27512123

  8. Flare Plasma Iron Abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Dan, Chau; Jain, Rajmal; Schwartz, Richard A.; Tolbert, Anne K.

    2008-01-01

    The equivalent width of the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV seen in flare X-ray spectra suggests that the iron abundance of the hottest plasma at temperatures >approx.10 MK may sometimes be significantly lower than the nominal coronal abundance of four times the photospheric value that is commonly assumed. This conclusion is based on X-ray spectral observations of several flares seen in common with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) on the second Indian geostationary satellite, GSAT-2. The implications of this will be discussed as it relates to the origin of the hot flare plasma - either plasma already in the corona that is directly heated during the flare energy release process or chromospheric plasma that is heated by flare-accelerated particles and driven up into the corona. Other possible explanations of lower-than-expected equivalent widths of the iron-line complex will also be discussed.

  9. Flares and habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrevaya, Ximena C.; Cortón, Eduardo; Mauas, Pablo J. D.

    2012-07-01

    At present, dwarf M stars are being considered as potential hosts for habitable planets. However, an important fraction of these stars are flare stars, which among other kind of radiation, emit large amounts of UV radiation during flares, and it is unknown how this events can affect life, since biological systems are particularly vulnerable to UV. In this work we evaluate a well known dMe star, EV Lacertae (GJ 873) as a potential host for the emergence and evolution of life, focusing on the effects of the UV emission associated with flare activity. Since UV-C is particularly harmful for living organisms, we studied the effect of UV-C radiation on halophile archaea cultures. The halophile archaea or haloarchaea are extremophile microorganisms, which inhabit in hypersaline environments and which show several mechanisms to cope with UV radiation since they are naturally exposed to intense solar UV radiation on Earth. To select the irradiance to be tested, we considered a moderate flare on this star. We obtained the mean value for the UV-C irradiance integrating the IUE spectrum in the impulsive phase, and considering a hypothetical planet in the center of the liquid water habitability zone. To select the irradiation times we took the most frequent duration of flares on this star which is from 9 to 27 minutes. Our results show that even after considerable UV damage, the haloarchaeal cells survive at the tested doses, showing that this kind of life could survive in a relatively hostile UV environment.

  10. Flare build-up study: Homologous flares group - Interim report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodgate, B. E.

    1982-01-01

    When homologous flares are broadly defined as having footpoint structures in common, it is found that a majority of flares fall into homologous sets. Filament eruptions and mass ejection in members of an homologous flare set show that maintainance of the magnetic structure is not a necessary condition for homology.

  11. Thermal Fronts in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlický, Marian

    2015-12-01

    We studied the formation of a thermal front during the expansion of hot plasma into colder plasma. We used a three-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell model that includes inductive effects. In early phases, in the area of the expanding hot plasma, we found several thermal fronts, which are defined as a sudden decrease of the local electron kinetic energy. The fronts formed a cascade. Thermal fronts with higher temperature contrast were located near plasma density depressions, generated during the hot plasma expansion. The formation of the main thermal front was associated with the return-current process induced by hot electron expansion and electrons backscattered at the front. A part of the hot plasma was trapped by the thermal front while another part, mainly with the most energetic electrons, escaped and generated Langmuir and electromagnetic waves in front of the thermal front, as shown by the dispersion diagrams. Considering all of these processes and those described in the literature, we show that anomalous electric resistivity is produced at the location of the thermal front. Thus, the thermal front can contribute to energy dissipation in the current-carrying loops of solar flares. We estimated the values of such anomalous resistivity in the solar atmosphere together with collisional resistivity and electric fields. We propose that the slowly drifting reverse drift bursts, observed at the beginning of some solar flares, could be signatures of the thermal front.

  12. Towards understanding solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, L. W.

    1982-01-01

    Instrumentation and spacecraft payloads developed at Lockheed for solar flare studies are reviewed, noting the significance of the observations for adding to a data base for eventual prediction of the occurrence of flares and subsequent radiation hazards to people in space. Developmental work on the two solar telescopes on board the Skylab pallet was performed at a Lockheed facility, as was the fabrication of very-large-area proportional counter for flights on the Aerobee rocket in 1967. The rocket work led to the fabrication of the Mapping X Ray Heliometer on the Orbiting Solar Observatory and the X Ray Polychromator for the Solar Maximum Mission. The Polychromator consists of a bent crystal spectrometer for high time resolution flare studies over a wide field of view, and a flat crystal spectrometer for simultaneous polychromatic imaging at 7 different X ray wavelengths.

  13. Early hormonal changes affect the catabolic response to trauma.

    PubMed Central

    Bessey, P Q; Lowe, K A

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors sought to determine how temporary insulin suppression might alter the catabolic effects of cortisol, glucagon, and epinephrine. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The metabolic responses to injury include hypermetabolism, accelerated net skeletal muscle protein breakdown, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance. These alterations are associated with increased stress hormone concentrations. Insulin elaboration is usually suppressed immediately after an injury but is abundant later during convalescence. An infusion of hydrocortisone, glucagon, and epinephrine increases both stress hormone concentrations and insulin levels. It induces many of the metabolic alterations seen in critically ill patients, but it does not affect net muscle breakdown. METHODS: Seven healthy adults received a stress hormone infusion for 3 days in two separate studies. During one study they, also received an infusion of the somatostatin analogue, octreotide (0.005 micrograms/kg/min), to suppress insulin elaboration for the first 24 hours. During the other study (control), insulin was permitted to rise unchecked. RESULTS: Stress hormone concentrations, hypermetabolism (+/- 20% above basal), and leukocytosis were similar during both study periods. When insulin elaboration was temporarily suppressed, whole-body nitrogen loss was increased during the first 48 hours, and the efflux of amino acids from the forearm after 72 hours of infusion was 60% greater than the control level. CONCLUSIONS: Temporary insulin suppression during physiologic increases in stress hormone concentrations amplified whole-body nitrogen loss and led to the development of accelerated net skeletal muscle protein breakdown. Early hormonal changes after an injury may affect the development of later catabolic responses. PMID:8215639

  14. Solar flare model atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawley, Suzanne L.; Fisher, George H.

    1993-01-01

    Solar flare model atmospheres computed under the assumption of energetic equilibrium in the chromosphere are presented. The models use a static, one-dimensional plane parallel geometry and are designed within a physically self-consistent coronal loop. Assumed flare heating mechanisms include collisions from a flux of non-thermal electrons and x-ray heating of the chromosphere by the corona. The heating by energetic electrons accounts explicitly for variations of the ionized fraction with depth in the atmosphere. X-ray heating of the chromosphere by the corona incorporates a flare loop geometry by approximating distant portions of the loop with a series of point sources, while treating the loop leg closest to the chromospheric footpoint in the plane-parallel approximation. Coronal flare heating leads to increased heat conduction, chromospheric evaporation and subsequent changes in coronal pressure; these effects are included self-consistently in the models. Cooling in the chromosphere is computed in detail for the important optically thick HI, CaII and MgII transitions using the non-LTE prescription in the program MULTI. Hydrogen ionization rates from x-ray photo-ionization and collisional ionization by non-thermal electrons are included explicitly in the rate equations. The models are computed in the 'impulsive' and 'equilibrium' limits, and in a set of intermediate 'evolving' states. The impulsive atmospheres have the density distribution frozen in pre-flare configuration, while the equilibrium models assume the entire atmosphere is in hydrostatic and energetic equilibrium. The evolving atmospheres represent intermediate stages where hydrostatic equilibrium has been established in the chromosphere and corona, but the corona is not yet in energetic equilibrium with the flare heating source. Thus, for example, chromospheric evaporation is still in the process of occurring.

  15. Fields, Flares, And Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucheron, L.; Al-Ghraibah, Amani; McAteer, J.; Cao, H.; Jackiewicz, J.; McNamara, B.; Voelz, D.; Calabro, B.; DeGrave, K.; Kirk, M.; Madadi, A.; Petsov, A.; Taylor, G.

    2011-05-01

    Solar active regions are the source of many energetic and geo-effective events such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Understanding how these complex source regions evolve and produce these events is of fundamental importance, not only to solar physics, but also to the demands of space weather forecasting. We propose to investigate the physical properties of active region magnetic fields using fractal-, gradient-, neutral line-, emerging flux-, wavelet- and general image-based techniques, and to correlate them to solar activity. The combination of these projects with solarmonitor.org and the international Max Millenium Campaign presents an opportunity for accurate and timely flare predictions for the first time. Many studies have attempted to relate solar flares to their concomitant magnetic field distributions. However, a consistent, causal relationship between the magnetic field on the photosphere and the production of solar flares is unknown. Often the local properties of the active region magnetic field - critical in many theories of activity - are lost in the global definition of their diagnostics, in effect smoothing out variations that occur on small spatial scales. Mindful of this, our overall goal is to create measures that are sensitive to both the global and the small-scale nature of energy storage and release in the solar atmosphere in order to study solar flare prediction. This set of active region characteristics will be automatically explored for discriminating features through the use of feature selection methods. Such methods search a feature space while optimizing a criterion - the prediction of a flare in this case. The large size of the datasets used in this project make it well suited for an exploration of a large feature space. This work is funded through a New Mexico State University Interdisciplinary Research Grant.

  16. Valentines Day X2 Flare

    NASA Video Gallery

    Active region 1158 let loose with an X2.2 flare at 0153 UT or 8:50 pm ET on February 15, 2011, the largest flare since Dec. 2006 and the biggest flare so far in Solar Cycle 24. This video was taken...

  17. Activation of solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Cargill, P.J.; Migliuolo, S.; Hood, A.W.

    1984-11-01

    The physics of the activation of two-ribbon solar flares via the MHD instability of coronal arcades is presented. The destabilization of a preflare magnetic field is necessary for a rapid energy release, characteristic of the impulsive phase of the flare, to occur. The stability of a number of configurations are examined, and the physical consequences and relative importance of varying pressure profiles and different sets of boundary conditions (involving field-line tying) are discussed. Instability modes, driven unstable by pressure gradients, are candidates for instability. Shearless vs. sheared equilibria are also discussed. (ESA)

  18. Early-response cytokine expression in adult middle ear effusions.

    PubMed

    Ondrey, F G; Juhn, S K; Adams, G L

    1998-10-01

    Various cytokines are presently known to be associated with the regulation of inflammatory responses. In pediatric otitis media, cytokines that correlate with various degrees of inflammation are present in middle ear effusions as inflammatory mediators. The present study was undertaken to examine the potential role of the early-response cytokines, interleukin-1beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, in adult otitis media. Fifty-nine adults with otitis media underwent tympanocentesis, and the effusion specimens were analyzed for the presence of both cytokines by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods. Eighty-eight percent of the effusions were serous in nature. Sixty-seven percent of the patients had a known history of head and neck malignancy and radiation to the temporal bone. Twelve percent of the effusions were positive for interleukin-1beta expression, compared with 85% of effusions in children with otitis media. Eight percent of the effusions contained tumor necrosis factor-alpha, compared with 85% of those collected in pediatric otitis media. All of the specimens that contained tumor necrosis factor-alpha also contained interleukin-1beta. In the present study, there was no correlation with head and neck malignancy/radiation or the clinical degree of inflammation with the presence of either cytokine. We conclude that adult otitis media is associated with lower expression of an acute inflammatory response, as judged by the levels of interleukin-1beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in the effusions. Additionally, adult otitis probably represents a less severe and more chronic inflammatory state in comparison with pediatric otitis media. Further analysis of inflammatory mediators in adult otitis media is necessary to evaluate the contribution of cytokines in relation to various etiologic factors. PMID:9781987

  19. GAMMA-RAY BURST FLARES: ULTRAVIOLET/OPTICAL FLARING. I

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, C. A.; Roming, P. W. A.; De Pasquale, M.; Oates, S. R.

    2013-09-01

    We present a previously unused method for the detection of flares in gamma-ray burst (GRB) light curves and use this method to detect flares in the ultraviolet/optical. The algorithm makes use of the Bayesian Information Criterion to analyze the residuals of the fitted light curve, removing all major features, and to determine the statistically best fit to the data by iteratively adding additional ''breaks'' to the light curve. These additional breaks represent the individual components of the detected flares: T{sub start}, T{sub stop}, and T{sub peak}. We present the detection of 119 unique flaring periods detected by applying this algorithm to light curves taken from the Second Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) GRB Afterglow Catalog. We analyzed 201 UVOT GRB light curves and found episodes of flaring in 68 of the light curves. For those light curves with flares, we find an average number of {approx}2 flares per GRB. Flaring is generally restricted to the first 1000 s of the afterglow, but can be observed and detected beyond 10{sup 5} s. More than 80% of the flares detected are short in duration with {Delta}t/t of <0.5. Flares were observed with flux ratios relative to the underlying light curve of between 0.04 and 55.42. Many of the strongest flares were also seen at greater than 1000 s after the burst.

  20. Gamma-Ray Burst Flares: Ultraviolet/Optical Flaring. I.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, C. A.; Roming, P. W. A.; De Pasquale, M.; Oates, S. R.

    2013-09-01

    We present a previously unused method for the detection of flares in gamma-ray burst (GRB) light curves and use this method to detect flares in the ultraviolet/optical. The algorithm makes use of the Bayesian Information Criterion to analyze the residuals of the fitted light curve, removing all major features, and to determine the statistically best fit to the data by iteratively adding additional "breaks" to the light curve. These additional breaks represent the individual components of the detected flares: T start, T stop, and T peak. We present the detection of 119 unique flaring periods detected by applying this algorithm to light curves taken from the Second Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) GRB Afterglow Catalog. We analyzed 201 UVOT GRB light curves and found episodes of flaring in 68 of the light curves. For those light curves with flares, we find an average number of ~2 flares per GRB. Flaring is generally restricted to the first 1000 s of the afterglow, but can be observed and detected beyond 105 s. More than 80% of the flares detected are short in duration with Δt/t of <0.5. Flares were observed with flux ratios relative to the underlying light curve of between 0.04 and 55.42. Many of the strongest flares were also seen at greater than 1000 s after the burst.

  1. Very Early PSA Response to Abiraterone in mCRPC Patients: A Novel Prognostic Factor Predicting Overall Survival

    PubMed Central

    Facchini, Gaetano; Caffo, Orazio; Ortega, Cinzia; D'Aniello, Carmine; Di Napoli, Marilena; Cecere, Sabrina C.; Della Pepa, Chiara; Crispo, Anna; Maines, Francesca; Ruatta, Fiorella; Iovane, Gelsomina; Pisconti, Salvatore; Montella, Maurizio; Berretta, Massimiliano; Pignata, Sandro; Cavaliere, Carla

    2016-01-01

    Background: Abiraterone Acetate (AA) is approved for the treatment of mCRPC after failure of androgen deprivation therapy in whom chemotherapy is not yet clinically indicated and for treatment of mCRPC progressed during or after docetaxel-based chemotherapy regimen. The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of early PSA decline for detection of therapy success or failure in mCRPC patients treated with AA in post chemotherapy setting. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 87 patients with mCRPC treated with AA. Serum PSA levels were evaluated after 15, 90 days and then monthly. The PSA flare phenomenon was evaluated, according to a confirmation value at least 1 week apart. The primary endpoint was to demonstrate that an early PSA decline correlates with a longer progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). The secondary endpoind was to demonstrate a correlation between better outcome and demographic and clinical patient characteristics. Results: We have collected data of 87 patients between Sep 2011 and Sep 2014. Early PSA response (≥50% from baseline at 15 days) was found in 56% evaluated patients and confirmed in 29 patients after 90 days. The median PFS was 5.5 months (4.6–6.5) and the median OS was 17.1 months (8.8–25.2). In early responders patients (PSA RR ≥ 50% at 15 days), we found a significant statistical advantage in terms of PFS at 1 year, HR 0.28, 95%CI 0.12–0.65, p = 0.003, and OS, HR 0.21 95% CI 0.06–0.72, p = 0.01. The results in PFS at 1 years and OS reached statistical significance also in the evaluation at 90 days. Conclusion: A significant proportion (78.6%) of patients achieved a rapid response in terms of PSA decline. Early PSA RR (≥50% at 15 days after start of AA) can provide clinically meaningful information and can be considered a surrogate of longer PFS and OS. PMID:27242530

  2. Statistical aspects of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    1987-01-01

    A survey of the statistical properties of 850 H alpha solar flares during 1975 is presented. Comparison of the results found here with those reported elsewhere for different epochs is accomplished. Distributions of rise time, decay time, and duration are given, as are the mean, mode, median, and 90th percentile values. Proportions by selected groupings are also determined. For flares in general, mean values for rise time, decay time, and duration are 5.2 + or - 0.4 min, and 18.1 + or 1.1 min, respectively. Subflares, accounting for nearly 90 percent of the flares, had mean values lower than those found for flares of H alpha importance greater than 1, and the differences are statistically significant. Likewise, flares of bright and normal relative brightness have mean values of decay time and duration that are significantly longer than those computed for faint flares, and mass-motion related flares are significantly longer than non-mass-motion related flares. Seventy-three percent of the mass-motion related flares are categorized as being a two-ribbon flare and/or being accompanied by a high-speed dark filament. Slow rise time flares (rise time greater than 5 min) have a mean value for duration that is significantly longer than that computed for fast rise time flares, and long-lived duration flares (duration greater than 18 min) have a mean value for rise time that is significantly longer than that computed for short-lived duration flares, suggesting a positive linear relationship between rise time and duration for flares. Monthly occurrence rates for flares in general and by group are found to be linearly related in a positive sense to monthly sunspot number. Statistical testing reveals the association between sunspot number and numbers of flares to be significant at the 95 percent level of confidence, and the t statistic for slope is significant at greater than 99 percent level of confidence. Dependent upon the specific fit, between 58 percent and 94 percent of

  3. Energetics of impulsive solar flares: Correlating BATSE hard x-ray bursts and the solar atmosphere's soft x-ray response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newton, Elizabeth

    1996-01-01

    This investigation has involved the correlation of BATSE-observed solar hard X-ray emission with the characteristics of soft X-ray emitting plasma observed by the Yohkoh Bragg Crystal Spectrometers. The goal was to test the hypothesis that localized electron beam heating is the dominant energy transport mechanism in impulsive flares, as formulated in the thick-target electron-heated model of Brown.

  4. Recurrent flares in active region NOAA 11283

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, P.; Zuccarello, F.; Guglielmino, S. L.; Berrilli, F.; Bruno, R.; Carbone, V.; Consolini, G.; de Lauretis, M.; Del Moro, D.; Elmhamdi, A.; Ermolli, I.; Fineschi, S.; Francia, P.; Kordi, A. S.; Landi Degl'Innocenti, E.; Laurenza, M.; Lepreti, F.; Marcucci, M. F.; Pallocchia, G.; Pietropaolo, E.; Romoli, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vellante, M.; Villante, U.

    2015-10-01

    Context. Flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are solar phenomena that are not yet fully understood. Several investigations have been performed to single out their related physical parameters that can be used as indices of the magnetic complexity leading to their occurrence. Aims: In order to shed light on the occurrence of recurrent flares and subsequent associated CMEs, we studied the active region NOAA 11283 where recurrent M and X GOES-class flares and CMEs occurred. Methods: We use vector magnetograms taken by HMI/SDO to calculate the horizontal velocity fields of the photospheric magnetic structures, the shear and the dip angles of the magnetic field, the magnetic helicity flux distribution, and the Poynting fluxes across the photosphere due to the emergence and the shearing of the magnetic field. Results: Although we do not observe consistent emerging magnetic flux through the photosphere during the observation time interval, we detected a monotonic increase of the magnetic helicity accumulated in the corona. We found that both the shear and the dip angles have high values along the main polarity inversion line (PIL) before and after all the events. We also note that before the main flare of X2.1 GOES class, the shearing motions seem to inject a more significant energy than the energy injected by the emergence of the magnetic field. Conclusions: We conclude that the very long duration (about 4 days) of the horizontal displacement of the main photospheric magnetic structures along the PIL has a primary role in the energy release during the recurrent flares. This peculiar horizontal velocity field also contributes to the monotonic injection of magnetic helicity into the corona. This process, coupled with the high shear and dip angles along the main PIL, appears to be responsible for the consecutive events of loss of equilibrium leading to the recurrent flares and CMEs. A movie associated to Fig. 4 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  5. Diagnostics of Solar Flare Energetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallik, Procheta; Brown, J. C.; MacKinnon, A. L.

    2009-05-01

    For work on my thesis dissertation, we have been studying some energetic processes in solar flares. On our work on Hard X-ray (HXR) emission from flares, we have shown that recombination emission can exceed the bremsstrahlung HXR flux for certain flare conditions. We will show some spectral features characteristic of non-thermal recombination HXR emission and will suggest how it plays a significant role in the flare HXR continuum, something that has been ignored in the past. It is important to note that these results could demand a reconsideration of the numbers of accelerated electrons since recombination can be much more efficient in producing HXR photons than bremsstrahlung. In related work on diagnosing particle acceleration in flares, we also have an interest in studying solar neutrons. To this end, we will present our work done with new-age neutron detectors developed by our colleagues at the University of New Hampshire. Using laboratory and simulated data from the detector to produce its response matrix, we then employ regularisation and deconvolution techniques to produce encouraging results for data inversion. As a corollary, we have also been reconsidering the role of inverse Compton (IC) scattering of photospheric photons. Gamma-ray observations clearly show the presence of 100 MeV electrons and positrons in the solar corona, by-products of GeV energy ions. Here we will present results of IC scattering of such photons taking proper account of radiation field geometry near the solar surface. If observed, such radiation would let us determine the number of secondary positrons produced in large flares, contributing to a full picture of ion acceleration and to predicting neutron fluxes to be encountered by future inner heliosphere space missions. This work is supported by a UK STFC Rolling Grant and a Dorothy Hodgkin's Scholarship (PM).

  6. FLARE EFFICIENCY STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a full-scale experimental study to determine the efficiencies of flare burners for disposing of hydrocarbon (HC) emissions from refinery and petrochemical processes. With primary objectives of determining the combustion efficiency and HC destruction ef...

  7. Early growth response 1 regulates glucose deprivation-induced necrosis

    PubMed Central

    JEON, HYUN MIN; LEE, SU YEON; JU, MIN KYUNG; KIM, CHO HEE; PARK, HYE GYEONG; KANG, HO SUNG

    2013-01-01

    Necrosis is commonly found in the core region of solid tumours due to metabolic stress such as hypoxia and glucose deprivation (GD) resulting from insufficient vascularization. Necrosis promotes tumour growth and development by releasing the tumour-promoting cytokine high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1); however, the molecular mechanism underlying necrotic cell death remains largely unknown. In this study, we show that early growth response 1 (Egr-1) is induced in a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent manner by GD in several cell lines such as A549, MDA-MB-231 and HepG2 cells that exhibit necrosis upon GD. We found that Egr-1 short hairpin RNA (shRNA) prevented GD-induced necrosis and HMGB1 release. Necrosis-inhibiting activity of Egr-1 shRNA was also seen in multicellular tumour spheroids (MTSs), an in vitro tumour model system. In contrast, Egr-1 overexpression appeared to make tumour cells more susceptible to GD-induced necrosis. Finally, Egr-1 shRNA suppressed the growth of MTSs. These findings demonstrate that Egr-1 is implicated in GD-induced necrosis and tumour progression. PMID:23152075

  8. Early morphofunctional plasticity of microglia in response to acute lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Madore, C; Joffre, C; Delpech, J C; De Smedt-Peyrusse, V; Aubert, A; Coste, L; Layé, S; Nadjar, A

    2013-11-01

    Within the central nervous system (CNS) the traditional role of microglia has been in brain infection and disease, phagocytosing debris and secreting factors to modify disease progression. This led to the concept of "resting" versus "activated" microglia. However, this is misleading because multiple phenotypic and morphological stages of microglia can influence neuronal structure and function in any condition and recent evidence extends their role to healthy brain homeostasis. The present work was thus aimed at reappraising the concept of morphofunctional activity of microglia in a context of peripheral acute immune challenge, where microglial activity is known to be modified, using the new state-of-the-art techniques available. To do so, mice were injected peripherally with lipopolysaccharide, a potent inducer of cerebral inflammation, and we assessed early cytokines production, phenotype, motility and morphology of microglial cells. Our results showed that LPS induced a widespread inflammatory response both peripherally and centrally, as revealed by the quantification of cytokines levels. We also found an alteration of microglial motility that was confirmed by in vivo studies showing an overall reduction of microglial processes length in the hippocampus of LPS-treated animals. Finally, analysis of various surface receptors expression revealed that LPS did not significantly impact microglial phenotype 2h after the injection but rather induced an increase of CD11b(+)/CD45(high) cells. These latter may be at the vasculature, at the CNS vicinity, or may have invaded the CNS. PMID:23994463

  9. Language experience enhances early cortical pitch-dependent responses

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Ananthanarayan; Gandour, Jackson T.; Ananthakrishnan, Saradha; Vijayaraghavan, Venkatakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Pitch processing at cortical and subcortical stages of processing is shaped by language experience. We recently demonstrated that specific components of the cortical pitch response (CPR) index the more rapidly-changing portions of the high rising Tone 2 of Mandarin Chinese, in addition to marking pitch onset and sound offset. In this study, we examine how language experience (Mandarin vs. English) shapes the processing of different temporal attributes of pitch reflected in the CPR components using stimuli representative of within-category variants of Tone 2. Results showed that the magnitude of CPR components (Na-Pb and Pb-Nb) and the correlation between these two components and pitch acceleration were stronger for the Chinese listeners compared to English listeners for stimuli that fell within the range of Tone 2 citation forms. Discriminant function analysis revealed that the Na-Pb component was more than twice as important as Pb-Nb in grouping listeners by language affiliation. In addition, a stronger stimulus-dependent, rightward asymmetry was observed for the Chinese group at the temporal, but not frontal, electrode sites. This finding may reflect selective recruitment of experience-dependent, pitch-specific mechanisms in right auditory cortex to extract more complex, time-varying pitch patterns. Taken together, these findings suggest that long-term language experience shapes early sensory level processing of pitch in the auditory cortex, and that the sensitivity of the CPR may vary depending on the relative linguistic importance of specific temporal attributes of dynamic pitch. PMID:25506127

  10. A statistic study of ionospheric solar flare activity indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Bo; Ding, Feng; Ning, Baiqi; Wan, Weixing; Yu, You; Hu, Lianhuan

    According to the Chapman ionization theory, an ionospheric solar flare activity indicator (ISFAI) is given by the solar zenith angle and the variation rate of ionospheric vertical total electron content, which is measured from a global network of dual-frequency GPS receivers. The ISFAI is utilized to statistically analyze the ionospheric responses to 1439 M-class and 126 X-class solar flares during solar cycle 23 (1996-2008). The statistical results show that the occurrence of ISFAI peak increases obviously at 3.2 total electron content unit (TECU)/h (1 TECU = 1016 elm-2) and reaches the maximum at 10 TECU/h during M-class flares and 10 TECU/h and 40 TECU/h for X-class flares. ISFAI is closely correlated with the 26-34 nm extreme ultraviolet flux but poorly related to the 0.1-0.8 nm X-ray flux. The central meridian distance (CMD) of flare location is an important reason for depressing relationship between ISFAI and X-ray Flux. Through the CMD effect modification, the ISFAI has a significant dependence on the X-ray flux with a correlation coefficient of 0.76. The ISFAI sensitivity enables to detect the extreme X-class flares, as well as the variations of one order of magnitude or even smaller (such as for C-class flares). Meanwhile, ISFAI is helpful to the calibration of the X-ray flux at 0.1-0.8 nm observed by GOES during some flares. In addition, statistical results demonstrate that ISFAI can detect 80% of all M-class flares and 92% for all X-class ones during 1996-2008. Owing to the high sensitivity and temporal resolution, ISFAI can be utilized as a solar flare detection parameter to monitor space weather.

  11. Gamma-ray burst flares: X-ray flaring. II

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, C. A.; Roming, P. W. A.

    2014-06-10

    We present a catalog of 498 flaring periods found in gamma-ray burst (GRB) light curves taken from the online Swift X-Ray Telescope GRB Catalogue. We analyzed 680 individual light curves using a flare detection method developed and used on our UV/optical GRB Flare Catalog. This method makes use of the Bayesian Information Criterion to analyze the residuals of fitted GRB light curves and statistically determines the optimal fit to the light curve residuals in an attempt to identify any additional features. These features, which we classify as flares, are identified by iteratively adding additional 'breaks' to the light curve. We find evidence of flaring in 326 of the analyzed light curves. For those light curves with flares, we find an average number of ∼1.5 flares per GRB. As with the UV/optical, flaring in our sample is generally confined to the first 1000 s of the afterglow, but can be detected to beyond 10{sup 5} s. Only ∼50% of the detected flares follow the 'classical' definition of Δt/t ≤ 0.5, with many of the largest flares exceeding this value.

  12. Early treatment response predicted subsequent clinical response in patients with schizophrenia taking paliperidone extended-release.

    PubMed

    Yeh, En-Chi; Huang, Ming-Chyi; Tsai, Chang-Jer; Chen, Chun-Tse; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chiu, Chih-Chiang

    2015-11-30

    This 6-week open-labeled study investigated whether early treatment response in patients receiving paliperidone extended-release (paliperidone ER) can facilitate prediction of responses at Week 6. Patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder were administered 9mg/day of paliperidone ER during the first 2 weeks, after which the dose was adjusted clinically. They were assessed on Days 0, 4, 7, 14, 28, and 42 by the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). The serum concentrations of 9-hydroxyrisperidone were examined on Days 14 and 42. Among the 41 patients enrolled, 26 were classified as responders (≧50% improvement on total PANSS scores at Week 6). In the receiver-operator curves (ROC) analyses, the changes in total PANSS scores at Week 2 appeared to show more accurate predictability compared to Day 4 and Day 7. At Week 6, no significant correlation was observed between blood 9-hydroxyrisperidone concentration and the total score or changes of PANSS scores. The results suggest that early treatment response to paliperidone ER, particularly at Week 2, can serve as a suitable outcome predictor at Week 6. Using 9mg/day paliperidone ER as an initial dose for schizophrenia treatment exhibited relatively favorable tolerability and feasibility. PMID:26319696

  13. Implications of the 1400 MHz flare emission from AD Leo for the emission mechanism and flare environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, G. D.; Bookbinder, J.; Golub, L.

    1985-01-01

    High brightness temperature spikes have been observed during a radio flare on the M-dwarf flare star AD Leo (Lang et al., 1983). Their high brightness temperature (greater than 10 to the 13th K) and circular polarization indicate that a coherent radiation mechanism must be responsible for the spike emission. The underlying flare emission, which is identified with a low polarization, gradual component, was found not to be spiky to within the 200 ms time resolution of the observations. This note is concerned primarily with this nonspiky emission.

  14. A static model of chromospheric heating in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricchiazzi, P. J.; Canfield, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    The response of the solar chromosphere to flare processes, namely nonthermal electrons, thermal conduction, and coronal pressure, is modeled. Finite difference methods employing linearization and iteration are used in obtaining simultaneous solutions to the equations of steady-state energy balance, hydrostatic equilibrium, radiative transfer, and atomic statistical equilibrium. The atmospheric response is assumed to be confined to one dimension by a strong vertical magnetic field. A solution is obtained to the radiative transfer equation for the most important optically thick transitions of hydrogen, magnesium, and calcium. The theoretical atmospheres discussed here are seen as elucidating the role of various physical processes in establishing the structure of flare chromospheres. At low coronal pressures, conduction is found to be more important than nonthermal electrons in establishing the position of the transition region. Only thermal conduction can adequately account for the chromospheric evaporation in compact flares. Of the mechanisms considered, only nonthermal electrons bring about significant heating below the flare transition region.

  15. Pre-flare Activity and Magnetic Reconnection during the Evolutionary Stages of Energy Release in a Solar Eruptive Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Bhuwan; Veronig, Astrid M.; Lee, Jeongwoo; Bong, Su-Chan; Tiwari, Sanjiv Kumar; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we present a multi-wavelength analysis of an eruptive white-light M3.2 flare that occurred in active region NOAA 10486 on 2003 November 1. The excellent set of high-resolution observations made by RHESSI and the TRACE provides clear evidence of significant pre-flare activities for ~9 minutes in the form of an initiation phase observed at EUV/UV wavelengths followed by an X-ray precursor phase. During the initiation phase, we observed localized brightenings in the highly sheared core region close to the filament and interactions among short EUV loops overlying the filament, which led to the opening of magnetic field lines. The X-ray precursor phase is manifested in RHESSI measurements below ~30 keV and coincided with the beginning of flux emergence at the flaring location along with early signatures of the eruption. The RHESSI observations reveal that both plasma heating and electron acceleration occurred during the precursor phase. The main flare is consistent with the standard flare model. However, after the impulsive phase, an intense hard X-ray (HXR) looptop source was observed without significant footpoint emission. More intriguingly, for a brief period, the looptop source exhibited strong HXR emission with energies up to ~50-100 keV and significant non-thermal characteristics. The present study indicates a causal relation between the activities in the pre-flare and the main flare. We also conclude that pre-flare activities, occurring in the form of subtle magnetic reorganization along with localized magnetic reconnection, played a crucial role in destabilizing the active region filament, leading to a solar eruptive flare and associated large-scale phenomena.

  16. EGRET High Energy Capability and Multiwavelength Flare Studies and Solar Flare Proton Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, Edward L.

    1997-01-01

    UNH was assigned the responsibility to use their accelerator neutron measurements to verify the TASC response function and to modify the TASC fitting program to include a high energy neutron contribution. Direct accelerator-based measurements by UNH of the energy-dependent efficiencies for detecting neutrons with energies from 36 to 720 MeV in NaI were compared with Monte Carlo TASC calculations. The calculated TASC efficiencies are somewhat lower (by about 20%) than the accelerator results in the energy range 70-300 MeV. The measured energy-loss spectrum for 207 MeV neutron interactions in NaI were compared with the Monte Carlo response for 200 MeV neutrons in the TASC indicating good agreement. Based on this agreement, the simulation was considered to be sufficiently accurate to generate a neutron response library to be used by UNH in modifying the TASC fitting program to include a neutron component in the flare spectrum modeling. TASC energy-loss data on the 1991 June 11 flare was transferred to UNH. Also included appendix: Gamma-rays and neutrons as a probe of flare proton spectra: the solar flare of 11 June 1991.

  17. Applying a Response-to-Intervention Model for Early Literacy Development in Low-Income Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gettinger, Maribeth; Stoiber, Karen

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the design and implementation of a program that incorporates a response-to-intervention (RTI) framework for promoting the development of early literacy and language skills among low-income minority children. The early literacy program, called the Exemplary Model of Early Reading Growth and Excellence, or EMERGE, combines…

  18. Temperature Dependence of the Flare Fluence Scaling Exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kretzschmar, M.

    2015-12-01

    Solar flares result in an increase of the solar irradiance at all wavelengths. While the distribution of the flare fluence observed in coronal emission has been widely studied and found to scale as f(E)˜ E^{-α}, with α slightly below 2, the distribution of the flare fluence in chromospheric lines is poorly known. We used the solar irradiance measurements observed by the SDO/EVE instrument at a 10 s cadence to investigate the dependency of the scaling exponent on the formation region of the lines (or temperature). We analyzed all flares above the C1 level since the start of the EVE observations (May 2010) to determine the flare fluence distribution in 16 lines covering a wide range of temperatures, several of which were not studied before. Our results show a weak downward trend with temperature of the scaling exponent of the PDF that reaches from above 2 at lower temperature (a few 104 K) to {˜ }1.8 for hot coronal emission (several 106 K). However, because colder lines also have fainter contrast, we cannot exclude that this behavior is caused by including more noise for smaller flares for these lines. We discuss the method and its limitations and tentatively associate this possible trend with the different mechanisms responsible for the heating of the chromosphere and corona during flares.

  19. Alteration of somatosensory response in adulthood by early life stress.

    PubMed

    Takatsuru, Yusuke; Koibuchi, Noriyuki

    2015-01-01

    Early life stress is well-known as a critical risk factor for mental and cognitive disorders in adulthood. Such disorders are accompanied by altered neuro- (synapto-) genesis and gene expression. Because psychosomatic disorders induced by early life stress (e.g., physical and/or sexual abuse, and neglect) have become a socio-economic problem, it is very important to clarify the mechanisms underlying these changes. However, despite of intensive clinical and animal studies, such mechanisms have not yet been clarified. Although the disturbance of glucocorticoid and glutamate homeostasis by stress has been well-documented, it has not yet been clarified whether such disturbance by early life stress persists for life. Furthermore, since previous studies have focused on the detection of changes in specific brain regions, such as the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex, it has not been clarified whether early life stress induced changes in the sensory/motor system. Thus, in this review, we introduce recent studies on functional/structural changes in the somatosensory cortex induced by early life stress. We believe that this review provides new insights into the functional alteration of the somatosensory system induced by early life stress. Such information may have clinical relevance in terms of providing effective therapeutic interventions to early life stressed individuals. PMID:26041988

  20. Alteration of somatosensory response in adulthood by early life stress

    PubMed Central

    Takatsuru, Yusuke; Koibuchi, Noriyuki

    2015-01-01

    Early life stress is well-known as a critical risk factor for mental and cognitive disorders in adulthood. Such disorders are accompanied by altered neuro- (synapto-) genesis and gene expression. Because psychosomatic disorders induced by early life stress (e.g., physical and/or sexual abuse, and neglect) have become a socio-economic problem, it is very important to clarify the mechanisms underlying these changes. However, despite of intensive clinical and animal studies, such mechanisms have not yet been clarified. Although the disturbance of glucocorticoid and glutamate homeostasis by stress has been well-documented, it has not yet been clarified whether such disturbance by early life stress persists for life. Furthermore, since previous studies have focused on the detection of changes in specific brain regions, such as the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex, it has not been clarified whether early life stress induced changes in the sensory/motor system. Thus, in this review, we introduce recent studies on functional/structural changes in the somatosensory cortex induced by early life stress. We believe that this review provides new insights into the functional alteration of the somatosensory system induced by early life stress. Such information may have clinical relevance in terms of providing effective therapeutic interventions to early life stressed individuals. PMID:26041988

  1. Explosive evaporation in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, George H.

    1987-01-01

    This paper develops a simple analytical model for the phenomenon of 'explosive evaporation' driven by nonthermal electron heating in solar flares. The model relates the electron energy flux and spectrum, plus details of the preflare atmosphere, to the time scale for explosive evaporation to occur, the maximum pressure and temperature to be reached, rough estimates for the UV pulse emission flux and duration, and the evolution of the blueshifted component of the soft X-ray lines. An expression is given for the time scale for buildup to maximum pressures and the onset of rapid motion of the explosively evaporating plasma. This evaporation can excite a rapid response of UV line and continuum emission. The emission lines formed in the plasma approach a given emissivity-weighted blueshift speed.

  2. Observational Constraints on Stellar Flares and Prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aarnio, Alicia

    2016-07-01

    Multi-wavelength surveys have catalogued a wealth of stellar flare data for stars representing a broad range of masses and ages. Young solar analogs inform our understanding of the Sun's evolution and the influence of its activity on early solar system formation, while field star observations allow us to place its current activity into context within a statistical ensemble of main-sequence G-type stars. At the same time, stellar observations probe a variety of interior and coronal conditions, providing constraints on models of equilibrium (and loss thereof!) for magnetic structures. In this review, I will focus on our current understanding of stellar flares, prominences, and coronal mass ejections as a function of stellar parameters. As our interpretation of stellar data relies heavily on solar-stellar analogy, I will explore how far into extreme stellar parameter spaces this comparison can be invoked.

  3. Altered Evoked Gamma-Band Responses Reveal Impaired Early Visual Processing in ADHD Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenz, Daniel; Krauel, Kerstin; Flechtner, Hans-Henning; Schadow, Jeanette; Hinrichs, Hermann; Herrmann, Christoph S.

    2010-01-01

    Neurophysiological studies yield contrary results whether attentional problems of patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are related to early visual processing deficits or not. Evoked gamma-band responses (GBRs), being among the first cortical responses occurring as early as 90 ms after visual stimulation in human EEG, have…

  4. Energy release in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, John C.; Correia, Emilia; Farnik, Frantisek; Garcia, Howard; Henoux, Jean-Claude; La Rosa, Ted N.; Machado, Marcos E. (Compiler); Nakajima, Hiroshi; Priest, Eric R.

    1994-01-01

    Team 2 of the Ottawa Flares 22 Workshop dealt with observational and theoretical aspects of the characteristics and processes of energy release in flares. Main results summarized in this article stress the global character of the flaring phenomenon in active regions, the importance of discontinuities in magnetic connectivity, the role of field-aligned currents in free energy storage, and the fragmentation of energy release in time and space.

  5. Elevated amygdala response to faces following early deprivation.

    PubMed

    Tottenham, N; Hare, T A; Millner, A; Gilhooly, T; Zevin, J D; Casey, B J

    2011-03-01

    A functional neuroimaging study examined the long-term neural correlates of early adverse rearing conditions in humans as they relate to socio-emotional development. Previously institutionalized (PI) children and a same-aged comparison group were scanned using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while performing an Emotional Face Go/Nogo task. PI children showed heightened activity of the amygdala, a region that supports emotional learning and reactivity to emotional stimuli, and corresponding decreases in cortical regions that support perceptual and cognitive functions. Amygdala activity was associated with decreased eye-contact as measured by eye-tracking methods and during a live dyadic interaction. The association between early rearing environment and subsequent eye-contact was mediated by amygdala activity. These data support the hypothesis that early adversity alters human brain development in a way that can persist into childhood, and they offer insight into the socio-emotional disturbances in human behavior following early adversity. PMID:21399712

  6. Complex linguistic rules modulate early auditory brain responses.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yue; Giavazzi, Maria; Adda-Decker, Martine; Barbosa, Leonardo S; Kouider, Sid; Bachoud-Lévi, Anne-Catherine; Jacquemot, Charlotte; Peperkamp, Sharon

    2015-10-01

    During speech perception, listeners compensate for phonological rules of their language. For instance, English place assimilation causes green boat to be typically pronounced as greem boat; English listeners, however, perceptually compensate for this rule and retrieve the intended sound (n). Previous research using EEG has focused on rules with clear phonetic underpinnings, showing that perceptual compensation occurs at an early stage of speech perception. We tested whether this early mechanism also accounts for the compensation for more complex rules. We examined compensation for French voicing assimilation, a rule with abstract phonological restrictions on the contexts in which it applies. Our results reveal that perceptual compensation for this rule by French listeners modulates an early ERP component. This is evidence that early stages of speech sound categorization are sensitive to complex phonological rules of the native language. PMID:26186230

  7. Evaporative cooling of flare plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, S. K.; Sturrock, P. A.

    1978-01-01

    We investigate a one-dimensional loop model for the evaporative cooling of the coronal flare plasma. The important assumptions are that conductive losses dominate radiative cooling and that the evaporative velocities are small compared with the sound speed. We calculate the profile and evolution of the temperature and verify the accuracy of our assumptions for plasma parameters typical of flare regions. The model is in agreement with soft X-ray observations on the evolution of flare temperatures and emission measures. The effect of evaporation is to greatly reduce the conductive heat flux into the chromosphere and to enhance the EUV emission from the coronal flare plasma.

  8. A statistic study of ionospheric solar flare activity indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Bo; Wan, Weixing; Ning, Baiqi; Ding, Feng; Hu, Lianhuan; Yu, You

    2014-01-01

    According to the Chapman ionization theory, an ionospheric solar flare activity indicator (ISFAI) is given by the solar zenith angle and the variation rate of ionospheric vertical total electron content, which is measured from a global network of dual-frequency GPS receivers. The ISFAI is utilized to statistically analyze the ionospheric responses to 1439 M-class and 126 X-class solar flares during solar cycle 23 (1996-2008). The statistical results show that the occurrence of ISFAI peak increases obviously at 3.2 total electron content unit (TECU)/h (1 TECU = 1016 el m-2) and reaches the maximum at 10 TECU/h during M-class flares and 10 TECU/h and 40 TECU/h for X-class flares. ISFAI is closely correlated with the 26-34 nm extreme ultraviolet flux but poorly related to the 0.1-0.8 nm X-ray flux. The central meridian distance (CMD) of flare location is an important reason for depressing relationship between ISFAI and X-ray Flux. Through the CMD effect modification, the ISFAI has a significant dependence on the X-ray flux with a correlation coefficient of 0.76. The ISFAI sensitivity enables to detect the extreme X-class flares, as well as the variations of one order of magnitude or even smaller (such as for C-class flares). Meanwhile, ISFAI is helpful to the calibration of the X-ray flux at 0.1-0.8 nm observed by GOES during some flares. In addition, the statistical results demonstrate that ISFAI can detect 80% of all M-class flares and 92% for all X-class ones during 1996-2008.

  9. Thermodynamic Spectrum of Solar Flares Based on SDO/EVE Observations: Techniques and First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuming; Zhou, Zhenjun; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Kai; Liu, Rui; Shen, Chenglong; Chamberlin, Phillip C.

    2016-03-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) provides rich information on the thermodynamic processes of solar activities, particularly on solar flares. Here, we develop a method to construct thermodynamic spectrum (TDS) charts based on the EVE spectral lines. This tool could potentially be useful for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) astronomy to learn about the eruptive activities on distant astronomical objects. Through several cases, we illustrate what we can learn from the TDS charts. Furthermore, we apply the TDS method to 74 flares equal to or greater than the M5.0 class, and reach the following statistical results. First, EUV peaks are always behind the soft X-ray (SXR) peaks and stronger flares tend to have faster cooling rates. There is a power-law correlation between the peak delay times and the cooling rates, suggesting a coherent cooling process of flares from SXR to EUV emissions. Second, there are two distinct temperature drift patterns, called Type I and Type II. For Type I flares, the enhanced emission drifts from high to low temperature like a quadrilateral, whereas for Type II flares the drift pattern looks like a triangle. Statistical analysis suggests that Type II flares are more impulsive than Type I flares. Third, for late-phase flares, the peak intensity ratio of the late phase to the main phase is roughly correlated with the flare class, and the flares with a strong late phase are all confined. We believe that the re-deposition of the energy carried by a flux rope, which unsuccessfully erupts out, into thermal emissions is responsible for the strong late phase found in a confined flare. Furthermore, we show the signatures of the flare thermodynamic process in the chromosphere and transition region in the TDS charts. These results provide new clues to advance our understanding of the thermodynamic processes of solar flares and associated solar eruptions, e.g., coronal mass ejections.

  10. The flares of August 1972. [solar flare characteristics and spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.; Tanaka, K.

    1973-01-01

    Observations of the August, 1972 flares at Big Bear and Tel Aviv, involving monochromatic movies, magnetograms, and spectra, are analyzed. The region (McMath 11976) showed inverted polarity from its inception on July 11; the great activity was due to extremely high shear and gradients in the magnetic field, as well as a constant invasion of one polarity into the opposite; observations in lambda 3835 show remarkable fast flashes in the impulsive flare of 18:38 UT on Aug. 2 with lifetimes of 5 sec, which may be due to dumping of particles in the lower chromosphere. Flare loops show evolutionary increases of their tilts to the neutral line in the flares of Aug. 4 and 7. Spectroscopic observations show red asymmetry and red shift of the H alpha emission in the flash phase of the Aug. 7 flare, as well as substantial velocity shear in the photosphere during the flare, somewhat like earthquake movement along a fault. Finally the total H alpha emission of the Aug. 7 flare could be measured accurately as about 2.5 x 10 to the 30th power erg, considerably less than coarser previous estimates for great flares.

  11. Particle acceleration by a solar flare termination shock.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Bastian, Timothy S; Shen, Chengcai; Gary, Dale E; Krucker, Säm; Glesener, Lindsay

    2015-12-01

    Solar flares--the most powerful explosions in the solar system--are also efficient particle accelerators, capable of energizing a large number of charged particles to relativistic speeds. A termination shock is often invoked in the standard model of solar flares as a possible driver for particle acceleration, yet its existence and role have remained controversial. We present observations of a solar flare termination shock and trace its morphology and dynamics using high-cadence radio imaging spectroscopy. We show that a disruption of the shock coincides with an abrupt reduction of the energetic electron population. The observed properties of the shock are well reproduced by simulations. These results strongly suggest that a termination shock is responsible, at least in part, for accelerating energetic electrons in solar flares. PMID:26785486

  12. Early capillary flux homogenization in response to neural activation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jonghwan; Wu, Weicheng; Boas, David A

    2016-02-01

    This Brief Communication reports early homogenization of capillary network flow during somatosensory activation in the rat cerebral cortex. We used optical coherence tomography and statistical intensity variation analysis for tracing changes in the red blood cell flux over hundreds of capillaries nearly at the same time with 1-s resolution. We observed that while the mean capillary flux exhibited a typical increase during activation, the standard deviation of the capillary flux exhibited an early decrease that happened before the mean flux increase. This network-level data is consistent with the theoretical hypothesis that capillary flow homogenizes during activation to improve oxygen delivery. PMID:26661145

  13. Early feeding and early life housing conditions influence the response towards a noninfectious lung challenge in broilers.

    PubMed

    Simon, K; de Vries Reilingh, G; Bolhuis, J E; Kemp, B; Lammers, A

    2015-09-01

    Early life conditions such as feed and water availability immediately post hatch (PH) and housing conditions may influence immune development and therefore immune reactivity later in life. The current study addressed the consequences of a combination of these 2 early life conditions for immune reactivity, i.e., the specific antibody response towards a non-infectious lung challenge. Broiler chicks received feed and water either immediately p.h. or with a 72 h delay and were either reared in a floor or a cage system. At 4 weeks of age, chicks received either an intra-tracheally administered Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/Human Serum Albumin (HUSA) challenge or a placebo, and antibody titers were measured up to day 14 after administration of the challenge. Chicks housed on the floor and which had a delayed access to feed p.h. showed the highest antibody titers against HuSA. These chicks also showed the strongest sickness response and poorest performance in response to the challenge, indicating that chicks with delayed access to feed might be more sensitive to an environment with higher antigenic pressure. In conclusion, results from the present study show that early life feeding strategy and housing conditions influence a chick's response to an immune challenge later in life. These 2 early life factors should therefore be taken into account when striving for a balance between disease resistance and performance in poultry. PMID:26188030

  14. Singaporean Early Childhood Teachers' Responses to Myths about Child Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Freda; Potter, Gillian K.

    2004-01-01

    Prior to attending seminars on child abuse and domestic violence, 86 kindergarten and 64 special education (early childhood) teachers completed a questionnaire seeking views relating to the accuracy of statements relating to all forms of child abuse. This was designed to identify the accuracy of teachers' knowledge of child abuse and neglect…

  15. Elevated Amygdala Response to Faces following Early Deprivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tottenham, N.; Hare, T. A.; Millner, A.; Gilhooly, T.; Zevin, J. D.; Casey, B. J.

    2011-01-01

    A functional neuroimaging study examined the long-term neural correlates of early adverse rearing conditions in humans as they relate to socio-emotional development. Previously institutionalized (PI) children and a same-aged comparison group were scanned using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while performing an Emotional Face Go/Nogo…

  16. Responsibilities and Accountabilities of an Early Childhood E-Instructor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Ni

    2007-01-01

    This qualitative study was intended to explore the roles that an early childhood instructor undertook in a virtual learning environment. Throughout three consecutive semesters, multiple forms of data collection techniques were employed, including: field notes, teacher-student online interaction, the course design, students' online submissions,…

  17. Nuclear processes in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.

    1982-01-01

    The theory of solar gamma-ray line production is reviewed and new calculations of line production yields are presented. Observations, carried out with gamma-ray spectrometers on OSO-7, HEAO-1, HEAO-3 and SMM are reviewed and compared with theory. These observations provide direct evidence for nuclear reactions in flares and furnish unique information on particle acceleration and flare mechanisms.

  18. Signatures of Accelerated Electrons in Solar and Stellar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benz, Arnold O.

    2015-08-01

    Flares energize electrons (and ions) to supra-thermal energies. In most cases the final distribution in momentum or energy space is non-Maxwellian. The non-thermal part of the energy can be the source for various emissions, including hard X-rays, synchrotron radiation and coherent radio emission. Such non-thermal emissions may contain information on the acceleration process. Several acceleration scenarios have been proposed: electric DC field, stochastic, and shock acceleration. There is observational evidence for all three scenarios. The new data come from SDO, X-ray (RHESSI), radio observations (Nobeyama, VLA and e-Callisto). Solar energetic particles are an additional channel of information.Tiny solar microflares and huge stellar flares in binary systems (RS CVns) and dMe dwarfs differ by more than 10 orders of magnitude in released energy. Yet the relation between peak luminosity in thermal (soft) X-ray and non-thermal synchrotron (radio) emission is surprisingly constant. This observational fact indicates that flare acceleration scales with energy release over a large range. Electron acceleration in flares seems to be a universal process. The constraint on simultaneous thermal X-rays and non-thermal (radio) synchrotron emission seems to select on particular kind of flare. In this subset, there seems to be only one type of acceleration.Yet, small deviations are noted: Small solar flares are softer in hard X-rays. Solar nanoflares are relatively weak in synchrotron emission. The recently noted case of radio-poor preflares will also be presented. The deviations suggest that the acceleration is less efficient in small flares and in the early phase of flares. Larger deviations are reported occasionally for solar flares and more often from stellar flares, where either thermal or non-thermal emission seems to be missing completely.The location of the acceleration in solar flares remains disputed. Observations suggesting acceleration in the soft X-ray top-tops, above

  19. Parameterization of solar flare dose

    SciTech Connect

    Lamarche, A.H.; Poston, J.W.

    1996-12-31

    A critical aspect of missions to the moon or Mars will be the safety and health of the crew. Radiation in space is a hazard for astronauts, especially high-energy radiation following certain types of solar flares. A solar flare event can be very dangerous if astronauts are not adequately shielded because flares can deliver a very high dose in a short period of time. The goal of this research was to parameterize solar flare dose as a function of time to see if it was possible to predict solar flare occurrence, thus providing a warning time. This would allow astronauts to take corrective action and avoid receiving a dose greater than the recommended limit set by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP).

  20. Do in-vivo behaviors predict early response in family-based treatment for anorexia nervosa?

    PubMed Central

    Darcy, Alison M; Bryson, Susan W.; Agras, W. Stewart; Fitzpatrick, Kathleen Kara; Le Grange, Daniel; Lock, James

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to explore whether identified parental and patient behaviors observed in the first few sessions of family-based treatment (FBT) predict early response (weight gain of 1.8 kg by session four) to treatment. Therapy film recordings from 21 adolescent participants recruited into the FBT arm of a multi-site randomized clinical trial were coded for the presence of behaviors (length of observed behavior divided by length of session recording) in the first, second and fourth sessions. Behaviors that differed between early responders and non-early responders on univariate analysis were entered into discriminant class analyses. Participants with fewer negative verbal behaviors in the first session and were away from table during the meal session less had the greatest rates of early response. Parents who made fewer critical statements and who did not repeatedly present food during the meal session had children who had the greatest rates of early response. In-vivo behaviors in early sessions of FBT may predict early response to FBT. Adaptations to address participant resistance and to decrease the numbers of critical comments made by parents while encouraging their children to eat might improve early response to FBT. PMID:24091274

  1. Do in-vivo behaviors predict early response in family-based treatment for anorexia nervosa?

    PubMed

    Darcy, Alison M; Bryson, Susan W; Agras, W Stewart; Fitzpatrick, Kathleen Kara; Le Grange, Daniel; Lock, James

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the study is to explore whether identified parental and patient behaviors observed in the first few sessions of family-based treatment (FBT) predict early response (weight gain of 1.8 kg by session four) to treatment. Therapy film recordings from 21 adolescent participants recruited into the FBT arm of a multi-site randomized clinical trial were coded for the presence of behaviors (length of observed behavior divided by length of session recording) in the first, second and fourth sessions. Behaviors that differed between early responders and non-early responders on univariate analysis were entered into discriminant class analyses. Participants with fewer negative verbal behaviors in the first session and were away from table during the meal session less had the greatest rates of early response. Parents who made fewer critical statements and who did not repeatedly present food during the meal session had children who had the greatest rates of early response. In-vivo behaviors in early sessions of FBT may predict early response to FBT. Adaptations to address participant resistance and to decrease the numbers of critical comments made by parents while encouraging their children to eat might improve early response to FBT. PMID:24091274

  2. Early and late mammalian responses to heavy charged particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ainsworth, E. J.

    1986-01-01

    This overview summarizes murine results on acute lethality responses, inactivation of marrow CFU-S and intestinal microcolonies, testes weight loss, life span shortening, and posterior lens opacification in mice irradiated with heavy charged particles. RBE-LET relationships for these mammalian responses are compared with results from in vitro studies. The trend is that the maximum RBE for in vivo responses tends to be lower and occurs at a lower LET than for inactivation of V79 and T-1 cells in culture. Based on inactivation cross sections, the response of CFU-S in vivo conforms to expectations from earlier studies with prokaryotic systems and mammalian cells in culture. Effects of heavy ions are compared with fission spectrum neutrons, and the results are consistent with the interpretation that RBEs are lower than for fission neutrons at about the same LET, probably due to differences in track structure.

  3. FINE STRUCTURE OF FLARE RIBBONS AND EVOLUTION OF ELECTRIC CURRENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Sharykin, I. N.; Kosovichev, A. G.

    2014-06-10

    Emission of solar flares across the electromagnetic spectrum is often observed in the form of two expanding ribbons. The standard flare model explains flare ribbons as footpoints of magnetic arcades, emitting due to interaction of energetic particles with the chromospheric plasma. However, the physics of this interaction and properties of the accelerated particles are still unknown. We present results of multiwavelength observations of the C2.1 flare of 2013 August 15, observed with the New Solar Telescope of the Big Bear Solar Observatory, and the Solar Dynamics Observatory, GOES, and Fermi spacecraft. The observations reveal previously unresolved sub-arcsecond structure of flare ribbons in regions of strong magnetic field consisting from numerous small-scale bright knots. We observe a red-blue asymmetry of H{sub α} flare ribbons with a width as small as ∼100 km. We discuss the relationship between the ribbons and vertical electric currents estimated from vector magnetograms, and show that Joule heating can be responsible for energization of H{sub α} knots in the ribbons.

  4. Fine Structure of Flare Ribbons and Evolution of Electric Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharykin, I. N.; Kosovichev, A. G.

    2014-06-01

    Emission of solar flares across the electromagnetic spectrum is often observed in the form of two expanding ribbons. The standard flare model explains flare ribbons as footpoints of magnetic arcades, emitting due to interaction of energetic particles with the chromospheric plasma. However, the physics of this interaction and properties of the accelerated particles are still unknown. We present results of multiwavelength observations of the C2.1 flare of 2013 August 15, observed with the New Solar Telescope of the Big Bear Solar Observatory, and the Solar Dynamics Observatory, GOES, and Fermi spacecraft. The observations reveal previously unresolved sub-arcsecond structure of flare ribbons in regions of strong magnetic field consisting from numerous small-scale bright knots. We observe a red-blue asymmetry of Hα flare ribbons with a width as small as ~100 km. We discuss the relationship between the ribbons and vertical electric currents estimated from vector magnetograms, and show that Joule heating can be responsible for energization of Hα knots in the ribbons.

  5. Observations and modeling of plasma flows driven by solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brannon, Sean Robert

    One of the fundamental statements that can be made about the solar atmosphere is that it is structured. This structuring is generally believed to be the result of both the arrangement of the magnetic field in the corona and the distribution of plasma along magnetic loops. The standard model of solar flares involves plasma transported into coronal loops via a process known as chromospheric evaporation, and the resulting evolution of the flare loops is believed to be sensitive to the physical mechanism of energy input into the chromosphere by the flare. We present here the results of three investigations into chromospheric plasma flows driven by solar flare energy release and transport. First, we develop a 1-D hydrodynamic code to simulate the response of a simplified model chromosphere to energy input via thermal conduction from reconnection-driven shocks. We use the results from a set of simulations spanning a parameter space in both shock speed and chromospheric-to-coronal temperature ratio to infer power-law relationships between these quantities and observable evaporation properties. Second, we use imaging and spectral observations of a quasi-periodic oscillation of a flare ribbon to determine the phase relationship between Doppler shifts of the ribbon plasma and the oscillation. The phase difference we find leads us to suggest an origin in a current sheet instability. Finally, we use imaging and spectral data of an on-disk flare event and resulting flare loop plasma flows to generally validate the standard picture of flare loop evolution, including evaporation, cooling time, and draining downflows, and we use a simple free-fall model to produce the first direct comparison between observed and synthetic downflow spectra.

  6. Chromospheric Evolution and the Flare Activity of Super-Active Region NOAA 6555

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    PrasadC, Debi; Ambastha, Ashok; Srivastava, Nandita; Tripathy, Sushanta C.; Hagyard, Mona J.

    1997-01-01

    Super-active region NOAA 6555 was highly flare productive during the period March 21st - 27th, 1991 of its disk passage. We have studied its chromospheric activity using high spatial resolution H alpha filtergrams taken at Udaipur along with MSFC vector magnetograms. A possible relationship of flare productivity and the variation in shear has been explored. Flares were generally seen in those subareas of the active region which possessed closed magnetic field configuration, whereas only minor flares and/or surges occurred in subareas showing open magnetic field configuration. Physical mechanisms responsible for the observed surges are also discussed.

  7. Gage tests tube flares quickly and accurately

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, F. D.

    1966-01-01

    Flared tube gage with a test cone that is precisely made with a tapering surface to complement the tube flare is capable of determining the accuracy of a tube flare efficiently and economically. This device should improve the speed, efficiency, and accuracy of tube flare inspections.

  8. Slipping magnetic reconnection during an X-class solar flare observed by SDO/AIA

    SciTech Connect

    Dudík, J.; Del Zanna, G.; Mason, H. E.; Janvier, M.; Aulanier, G.; Schmieder, B.; Karlický, M. E-mail: mjanvier@maths.dundee.ac.uk

    2014-04-01

    We present SDO/AIA observations of an eruptive X-class flare of 2012 July 12, and compare its evolution with the predictions of a three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulation. We focus on the dynamics of flare loops that are seen to undergo slipping reconnection during the flare. In the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) 131 Å observations, lower parts of 10 MK flare loops exhibit an apparent motion with velocities of several tens of km s{sup –1} along the developing flare ribbons. In the early stages of the flare, flare ribbons consist of compact, localized bright transition-region emission from the footpoints of the flare loops. A differential emission measure analysis shows that the flare loops have temperatures up to the formation of Fe XXIV. A series of very long, S-shaped loops erupt, leading to a coronal mass ejection observed by STEREO. The observed dynamics are compared with the evolution of magnetic structures in the 'standard solar flare model in 3D.' This model matches the observations well, reproducing the apparently slipping flare loops, S-shaped erupting loops, and the evolution of flare ribbons. All of these processes are explained via 3D reconnection mechanisms resulting from the expansion of a torus-unstable flux rope. The AIA observations and the numerical model are complemented by radio observations showing a noise storm in the metric range. Dm-drifting pulsation structures occurring during the eruption indicate plasmoid ejection and enhancement of the reconnection rate. The bursty nature of radio emission shows that the slipping reconnection is still intermittent, although it is observed to persist for more than an hour.

  9. RESPONSES OF EARLY LIFE HISTORY STAGES OF THE STRIPED BASS, 'MORONE SAXATILIS' TO CHLORINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The toxicity of total residual chlorination (TRC) to early life stages of the striped bass, Morone saxatilis, was determined using percent embryo hatchability, incipient LC50 bioassays, histopathology, and avoidance responses. Beginning 8 to 9 hours after fertilization, developin...

  10. Frameworks for Response to Intervention in Early Childhood: Description and Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Communication Disorders Quarterly, 2014

    2014-01-01

    In February, 2013, the Division of Early Childhood, the National Association for the Education of Young Children, and the National Head Start Association released a collaborative paper to provide clarification and assistance regarding the relationship of response to intervention (RTI) with the field of early childhood (EC). In addition to…

  11. Parent Involvement in Early Intervening and Responsiveness to Invention (RTI). A Primer for Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mountain Plains Regional Resource Center (MPRRC), 2007

    2007-01-01

    The focus of this primer is to explain Responsiveness to Intervention (RTI) and Early Intervening Services as they pertain to parents and children who are at risk for academic and behavioral problems, explaining changes to special education law and how parents should be involved in each process. Emphasis on early intervening services allows action…

  12. Measuring Early Childhood Teacher Candidates' Conceptualizations of a Culturally Responsive Classroom Ecology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Belinda Bustos; Riojas-Cortez, Mari

    2009-01-01

    With the increase of Latino preschoolers, it is pressing that early childhood teachers are prepared to create a high quality environment in which all children can succeed. Using the frameworks of cultural responsiveness and classroom management, we developed the Early Childhood Ecology Scale (ECES) as an observational and reflective tool to…

  13. Soft X-ray flare spectra. [existence of high temperature plasmas in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doschek, G. A.; Meekins, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    Large solar flares produce intense soft X-ray emission, indicating the existence of high temperature plasmas that coexist in time with the plasmas responsible for the normally observed brightenings in H-alpha. The time behavior of the X-ray flux, as revealed, for example, by ion chamber detectors on the series of Solrad monitoring satellites, appears to roughly mimic the intensity-time behavior of the H-alpha flare, insofar as start times, times of maximum flux, and approximate decay times are concerned. In recent years, soft X-ray spectra of both active regions and solar flares have been obtained by instruments flown on spacecraft such as the Orbiting Solar Observatory (OSO) series. The disbursing elements used were Bragg crystals, and in the 8 Angstrom region the resolution is typically approximately 1200. This paper discusses the observed characteristics of X-ray flare spectra and spectroscopic diagnostics for determining electron temperatures, electron densities, and departures from ionization equilibrium within the soft X-ray emitting plasma.

  14. EGRET High Energy Capability and Multiwavelength Flare Studies and Solar Flare Proton Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, Edward L.

    1998-01-01

    The accomplishments of the participation in the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Guest investigator program is summarized in this report. The work involved the study of Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET)/Total Absorption Shower Counter(TASC) flare data. The specific accomplishments were the use of the accelerator neutron measurements obtained at the University of New Hampshire to verify the TASC response function and to modify the TASC fitting program to include a high energy neutron contribution, and to determine a high energy neutron contribution to the emissions from the 1991 June 11, solar flare. The next step in the analysis of this event was doing fits to the TASC energy-loss spectra as a function of time. A significant hardening of the solar proton spectrum over time was found for the flare. Further data was obtained from the Yohkoh HXT time histories and images for the 1991 October 27 flare. The results to date demonstrate that the TASC spectral analysis contributes crucial information on the particle spectrum interacting at the Sun. The report includes a paper accepted for publication, a draft of a paper to be delivered at the 26th International Cosmic Ray Conference and an abstract of a paper to be presented at the Meeting of the American Physical Society.

  15. Ultraviolet flare on Lambda Andromedae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baliunas, S. L.; Guinan, E. F.; Dupree, A. K.

    1984-01-01

    On November 5, 6, 1982, a luminous, flarelike brightening of the ultraviolet emissions was observed with IUE from the active RS CVn type star Lambda And during the phase of rotation period corresponding to maximum area coverage of the visible hemisphere by starspots and active regions. Enhancements during the flare in the ultraviolet emission lines as large as factors of several and in the ultraviolet continuum up to 80 percent persisted for over 5 hours. The bulk of the radiative output of the flare occurred in Mg II h and k and H I Ly-alpha. Because of the long duration and extreme luminosity of the event, the energy radiated by the flare alone is in excess of 10 to the 35th ergs just in the ultraviolet region. This is the most energetic stellar flare ever recorded in the ultraviolet. In addition, it is the first ultraviolet flare observed from a giant star. In comparison to the largest solar flares, the flare on Lambda And is at least three orders of magnitude more energetic in similar emission lines.

  16. SCATTERING POLARIZATION IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Štěpán, Jiří; Heinzel, Petr

    2013-11-20

    There is ongoing debate about the origin and even the very existence of a high degree of linear polarization of some chromospheric spectral lines observed in solar flares. The standard explanation of these measurements is in terms of the impact polarization caused by non-thermal proton and/or electron beams. In this work, we study the possible role of resonance line polarization due to radiation anisotropy in the inhomogeneous medium of the flare ribbons. We consider a simple two-dimensional model of the flaring chromosphere and we self-consistently solve the non-LTE problem taking into account the role of resonant scattering polarization and of the Hanle effect. Our calculations show that the horizontal plasma inhomogeneities at the boundary of the flare ribbons can lead to a significant radiation anisotropy in the line formation region and, consequently, to a fractional linear polarization of the emergent radiation of the order of several percent. Neglecting the effects of impact polarization, our model can provide a clue for resolving some of the common observational findings, namely: (1) why a high degree of polarization appears mainly at the edges of the flare ribbons; (2) why polarization can also be observed during the gradual phase of a flare; and (3) why polarization is mostly radial or tangential. We conclude that radiation transfer in realistic multi-dimensional models of solar flares needs to be considered as an essential ingredient for understanding the observed spectral line polarization.

  17. The Development of Attention and Response Inhibition in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartgis, Jami; Thomas, David G.; Lefler, Elizabeth K.; Hartung, Cynthia M.

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the development of attention and response inhibition from ages 5 to 7. Forty children (20 5-year-olds and 20 7-year-olds) completed four counterbalanced phases of a continuous performance task. Phase 1 was designed to measure attention without distraction, Phase 2 was designed to measure attention with…

  18. Early Responsivity to Moral Events: Physiological and Behavioral Correlates?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, Sharon; And Others

    This study investigated toddlers' reactions to morally related events to determine whether age was a factor in emotional reaction, whether the middle of the second year was a salient time for the emergence of emotional reactions to such events, and whether heart rate change could be used as a new measure of moral responsivity. While their heart…

  19. Oxidative burst: an early plant response to pathogen infection.

    PubMed Central

    Wojtaszek, P

    1997-01-01

    As plants are confined to the place where they grow, they have to develop a broad range of defence responses to cope with pathogenic infections. The oxidative burst, a rapid, transient, production of huge amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS), is one of the earliest observable aspects of a plant's defence strategy. First this Review describes the chemistry of ROS (superoxide radical, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical). Secondly, the role of ROS in defence responses is demonstrated, and some important issues are considered, such as: (1) which of the ROS is a major building element of the oxidative burst; (2) the spatial and temporal regulation of the oxidative burst; and (3) differences in the plant's responses to biotic and abiotic elicitation. Thirdly, the relationships between the oxidative burst and other plant defence responses are indicated. These include: (1) an oxygen consumption, (2) the production of phytoalexins, (3) systemic acquired resistance, (4) immobilization of plant cell wall proteins, (5) changes in membrane permeability and ion fluxes and (6) a putative role in hypersensitive cell death. Wherever possible, the comparisons with models applicable to animal systems are presented. Finally, the question of the origin of ROS in the oxidative burst is considered, and two major hypotheses, (1) the action of NADPH oxidase system analogous to that of animal phagocytes, and (2) the pH-dependent generation of hydrogen peroxide by a cell wall peroxidase, are presented. On the basis of this material, a third 'unifying' hypothesis is presented, where transient changes in the pH of the cell wall compartment are indicated as a core phenomenon in evoking ROS production. Additionally, a germin/oxalate oxidase system which generates H2O2 in response to pathogenic infection is also described. PMID:9148737

  20. Evaporative cooling of flare plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, S. K.; Sturrock, P. A.

    1976-01-01

    A one-dimensional loop model for the evaporative cooling of the coronal flare plasma was investigated. Conductive losses dominated radiative cooling, and the evaporative velocities were small compared to the sound speed. The profile and evolution of the temperature were calculated. The model was in agreement with soft X-ray observations on the evolution of flare temperatures and emission measures. The effect of evaporation was to greatly reduce the conductive heat flux into the chromosphere and to enhance the EUV emission from the coronal flare plasma.

  1. Flare physics at high energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.

    1990-01-01

    High-energy processes, involving a rich variety of accelerated particle phenomena, lie at the core of the solar flare problem. The most direct manifestation of these processes are high-energy radiations, gamma rays, hard X-rays and neutrons, as well as the accelerated particles themselves, which can be detected in interplanetary space. In the study of astrophysics from the moon, the understanding of these processes should have great importance. The inner solar system environment is strongly influenced by activity on the sun; the physics of solar flares is of great intrinsic interest; and much high-energy astrophysics can be learned from investigations of flare physics at high energies.

  2. An early electrophysiological response associated with expertise in letter perception.

    PubMed

    Wong, Alan C N; Gauthier, Isabel; Woroch, Brion; DeBuse, Casey; Curran, Tim

    2005-09-01

    Expertise with print is likely to optimize visual processes for recognizing characters of a familiar writing system. Although brain activations have been identified for words and letter strings in contrast with other stimuli, relatively little work has focused on the neural basis of single-letter perception. English readers and Chinese-English bilinguals participated in an ERP study and performed a 1-back identity judgment on Roman letters, Chinese characters, pseudofonts, and their string versions. The Chinese-English bilinguals showed an enhanced N170 for both Roman letters and Chinese characters relative to pseudofonts. For the non-Chinese readers, the N170 amplitude was larger for Roman letters relative to Chinese characters and pseudofonts. Our results suggest that changes in relatively early visual processes underlie expert letter perception. PMID:16396092

  3. Solar Flare Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmahl, Edward J.; Kundu, Mukul R.

    1998-01-01

    We have continued our previous efforts in studies of fourier imaging methods applied to hard X-ray flares. We have performed physical and theoretical analysis of rotating collimator grids submitted to GSFC(Goddard Space Flight Center) for the High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI). We have produced simulation algorithms which are currently being used to test imaging software and hardware for HESSI. We have developed Maximum-Entropy, Maximum-Likelihood, and "CLEAN" methods for reconstructing HESSI images from count-rate profiles. This work is expected to continue through the launch of HESSI in July, 2000. Section 1 shows a poster presentation "Image Reconstruction from HESSI Photon Lists" at the Solar Physics Division Meeting, June 1998; Section 2 shows the text and viewgraphs prepared for "Imaging Simulations" at HESSI's Preliminary Design Review on July 30, 1998.

  4. Building Big Flares: Constraining Generating Processes of Solar Flare Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyse Jackson, T.; Kashyap, V.; McKillop, S.

    2015-12-01

    We address mechanisms which seek to explain the observed solar flare distribution, dN/dE ~ E1.8. We have compiled a comprehensive database, from GOES, NOAA, XRT, and AIA data, of solar flares and their characteristics, covering the year 2013. These datasets allow us to probe how stored magnetic energy is released over the course of an active region's evolution. We fit power-laws to flare distributions over various attribute groupings. For instance, we compare flares that occur before and after an active region reaches its maximum area, and show that the corresponding flare distributions are indistinguishable; thus, the processes that lead to magnetic reconnection are similar in both cases. A turnover in the distribution is not detectable at the energies accessible to our study, suggesting that a self-organized critical (SOC) process is a valid mechanism. However, we find changes in the distributions that suggest that the simple picture of an SOC where flares draw energy from an inexhaustible reservoir of stored magnetic energy is incomplete. Following the evolution of the flare distribution over the lifetimes of active regions, we find that the distribution flattens with time, and for larger active regions, and that a single power-law model is insufficient. This implies that flares that occur later in the lifetime of the active region tend towards higher energies. We conclude that the SOC process must have an upper bound. Increasing the scope of the study to include data from other years and more instruments will increase the robustness of these results. This work was supported by the NSF-REU Solar Physics Program at SAO, grant number AGS 1263241, NASA Contract NAS8-03060 to the Chandra X-ray Center and by NASA Hinode/XRT contract NNM07AB07C to SAO

  5. A Cold Flare with Delayed Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleishman, Gregory D.; Pal'shin, Valentin D.; Meshalkina, Natalia; Lysenko, Alexandra L.; Kashapova, Larisa K.; Altyntsev, Alexander T.

    2016-05-01

    Recently, a number of peculiar flares have been reported that demonstrate significant nonthermal particle signatures with low, if any, thermal emission, which implies a close association of the observed emission with the primary energy release/electron acceleration region. This paper presents a flare that appears “cold” at the impulsive phase, while displaying delayed heating later on. Using hard X-ray data from Konus-Wind, microwave observations by SSRT, RSTN, NoRH, and NoRP, context observations, and three-dimensional modeling, we study the energy release, particle acceleration, and transport, and the relationships between the nonthermal and thermal signatures. The flaring process is found to involve the interaction between a small loop and a big loop with the accelerated particles divided roughly equally between them. Precipitation of the electrons from the small loop produced only a weak thermal response because the loop volume was small, while the electrons trapped in the big loop lost most of their energy in the coronal part of the loop, which resulted in coronal plasma heating but no or only weak chromospheric evaporation, and thus unusually weak soft X-ray emission. The energy losses of the fast electrons in the big tenuous loop were slow, which resulted in the observed delay of the plasma heating. We determined that the impulsively accelerated electron population had a beamed angular distribution in the direction of the electric force along the magnetic field of the small loop. The accelerated particle transport in the big loop was primarily mediated by turbulent waves, which is similar to other reported cold flares.

  6. Conduction-driven chromospheric evaporation in a solar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zarro, Dominic M.; Lemen, James R.

    1988-01-01

    Observations of gentle chromospheric evaporation during the cooling phase of a solar flare are presented. Line profiles of the low-temperature (T of about 6 x 10 to the 6th K) coronal Mg XI line, observed with the X-Ray Polychromator on the Solar Maximum Mission, show a blueshift that persisted for several minutes after the impulsive heating phase. This result represents the first detection of an evaporation signature in a soft X-ray line formed at this low temperature. By combining the Mg XI blueshift velocity data with simultaneous measurements of the flare temperature derived from Ca XIX observations, it is demonstrated that the upward flux of enthalpy transported by this gently evaporating plasma varies linearly with the downward flux of thermal energy conducted from the corona. This relationship is consistent with models of solar flares in which thermal conduction drives chromospheric evaporation during the early part of the cooling phase.

  7. Olfaction modulates early neural responses to matching visual objects.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Amanda K; Reinhard, Judith; Mattingley, Jason B

    2015-04-01

    Sensory information is initially registered within anatomically and functionally segregated brain networks but is also integrated across modalities in higher cortical areas. Although considerable research has focused on uncovering the neural correlates of multisensory integration for the modalities of vision, audition, and touch, much less attention has been devoted to understanding interactions between vision and olfaction in humans. In this study, we asked how odors affect neural activity evoked by images of familiar visual objects associated with characteristic smells. We employed scalp-recorded EEG to measure visual ERPs evoked by briefly presented pictures of familiar objects, such as an orange, mint leaves, or a rose. During presentation of each visual stimulus, participants inhaled either a matching odor, a nonmatching odor, or plain air. The N1 component of the visual ERP was significantly enhanced for matching odors in women, but not in men. This is consistent with evidence that women are superior in detecting, discriminating, and identifying odors and that they have a higher gray matter concentration in olfactory areas of the OFC. We conclude that early visual processing is influenced by olfactory cues because of associations between odors and the objects that emit them, and that these associations are stronger in women than in men. PMID:25269111

  8. Multichannel spectrophotometry of stellar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mochnacki, S. W.; Zirin, H.

    1980-01-01

    Stellar flares have been observed using the 32 channel spectrophotometer on the 5 m telescope. Net flare fluxes in the region 3200-7000 A are presented. A simple model of blackbody radiation and hydrogen recombination emission appears to fit the continuum points well. Owing to vignetting problems, only the region between 4200 and 7000 A was used for a detailed fit to the Planck function to obtain apparent temperatures and effective areas. The rise of each flare was associated with an increase of the area, while the initial steep decline of the light was associated with a similar decrease of the blackbody temperature. The maximum temperatures, coincident with maximum light, were 7500-9500 K, similar to values for solar flares. The hydrogen line emission rose simultaneously with the continuum but declined more slowly. The ratio of H sub gamma to H sub alpha was about 1.5 at the peak, declining to about 1.0 after the peak.

  9. Chandra Monitors the Flaring Crab

    NASA Video Gallery

    Scientists hoped that NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory would locate X-ray sources correlated to the gamma-ray flares seen by Fermi and Italy's AGILE satellites. Two observations were made during th...

  10. Radiation hydrodynamics in solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, G.H.

    1985-10-18

    Solar flares are rather violent and extremely complicated phenomena, and it should be made clear at the outset that a physically complete picture describing all aspects of flares does not exist. From the wealth of data which is available, it is apparent that many different types of physical processes are involved during flares: energetic particle acceleration, rapid magnetohydrodynamic motion of complex field structures, magnetic reconnection, violent mass motion along magnetic field lines, and the heating of plasma to tens of millions of degrees, to name a few. The goal of this paper is to explore just one aspect of solar flares, namely, the interaction of hydrodynamics and radiation processes in fluid being rapidly heated along closed magnetic field lines. The models discussed are therefore necessarily restrictive, and will address only a few of the observed or observable phenomena. 46 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Early cell response to contact with biomaterial's surface.

    PubMed

    Komorowski, Piotr; Walkowiak-Przybyło, Magdalena; Walkowiak, Bogdan

    2016-07-01

    Most biomaterials at present have sufficient mechanical properties; however compliance with standards for biocompatibility is often not sufficient in clinical practice. This may be due to the complexity of biological systems in general and the diversity of individual responses to these materials by implant recipients. Significant improvement of biocompatibility must involve surface modification of implants, which in the future will make it possible to introduce individually selected types of surface modification for individual recipients. The key to this technology seems to be understanding the processes occurring at the site of contact of the implant with the tissue. Processes resulting from the stress generated by the contact of the biomaterial surfaces were observed with endothelial cells line EA.hy926, and it was demonstrated that differently modified surfaces of medical steel (polished medical steel and medical steel coated with Parylene C and nanocrystalline diamond) cause diverse cellular response in cells grown on these surfaces, on both the cellular (cell morphology and cell survival) and molecular (transcriptome and proteome profiles) levels. The herein presented observations are a good starting point not only for further research and the development of far-reaching personalization of medical implants, but also to study the potential use of cells as a specific sensor capable of recognizing different surfaces with which these cells come into contact. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 880-893, 2016. PMID:25951795

  12. FLARES IN LONG AND SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon E-mail: arnon@physics.technion.ac.i

    2010-04-01

    The many similarities between the prompt emission pulses in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and X-ray flares during the fast decay and afterglow (AG) phases of GRBs suggest a common origin. In the cannonball (CB) model of GRBs, this common origin is mass accretion episodes of fall-back matter on a newly born compact object. The prompt emission pulses are produced by a bipolar jet of highly relativistic plasmoids (CBs) ejected in the early, major episodes of mass accretion. As the accretion material is consumed, one may expect the engine's activity to weaken. X-ray flares ending the prompt emission and during the AG phase are produced in such delayed episodes of mass accretion. The common engine, environment, and radiation mechanisms (inverse Compton scattering and synchrotron radiation) produce their observed similarities. Flares in both long GRBs and short hard gamma-ray bursts (SHBs) can also be produced by bipolar ejections of CBs following a phase transition in compact objects due to loss of angular momentum and/or cooling. Optical flares, however, are mostly produced in collisions of CBs with massive stellar winds/ejecta or with density bumps along their path. In this paper, we show that the master formulae of the CB model of GRBs and SHBs, which reproduce very well their prompt emission pulses and their smooth AGs, seem to reproduce also very well the light curves and spectral evolution of the prominent X-ray and optical flares that are well sampled.

  13. Activation of oxidative stress-responsive signaling pathways in early splenotoxic response of aniline

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jianling; Wang Gangduo; Ansari, G.A.S.; Khan, M. Firoze

    2008-07-15

    Aniline exposure causes toxicity to the spleen, which leads to a variety of sarcomas, and fibrosis appears to be an important preneoplastic lesion. However, early molecular mechanisms in aniline-induced toxicity to the spleen are not known. Previously, we have shown that aniline exposure results in iron overload and induction of oxidative stress in the spleen, which can cause transcriptional upregulation of fibrogenic/inflammatory cytokines via activation of oxidative stress (OS)-responsive signaling pathways. To test this mechanism, male SD rats were treated with aniline (1mmol/kg/day via gavage) for 7days, an experimental condition that precedes the appearance of fibrosis. Significant increases in both NF-{kappa}B and AP-1 binding activity was observed in the nuclear extracts of splenocytes from aniline-treated rats as determined by ELISAs, and supported by Western blot data showing increases in p-I{kappa}B{alpha}, p-p65 and p-c-Jun. To understand the upstream signaling events which could account for the activation of NF-{kappa}B and AP-1, phosphorylation patterns of I{kappa}B kinases (IKK{alpha} and IKK{beta}) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) were pursued. Our data showed remarkable increases in both p-IKK{alpha} and p-IKK{beta} in the splenocytes from aniline-treated rats, suggesting their role in the phosphorylation of both I{kappa}B{alpha} and p65 subunits. Furthermore, aniline exposure led to activation of all three classes of MAPKs, as evident from increased phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK1/2) and p38 MAPKs, which could potentially contribute to the observed activation of both AP-1 and NF-{kappa}B. Activation of upstream signaling molecules was also associated with simultaneous increases in gene transcription of cytokines IL-1, IL-6 and TNF-{alpha}. The observed sequence of events following aniline exposure could initiate a fibrogenic and/or tumorigenic response in the spleen.

  14. Response of Cross-biome Productivity to the Early 21st Century Drought

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The response of ecosystem productivity to contemporary drought coupled with record warming presents important challenges to predictive ecological modeling. In this study, we investigated the response of annual above-ground net primary production (ANPP) to precipitation variability during the early ...

  15. Predictors of Responsiveness to Early Literacy Intervention: A 10-Year Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Elizabeth A.; McMaster, Kristen L.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review was to update previous reviews on factors related to students' responsiveness to early literacy intervention. The 14 studies in this synthesis used experimental designs, provided small-group or one-on-one reading interventions, and analyzed factors related to responsiveness to those interventions. Participants were…

  16. The Role Played by the Family in Shaping Early and Middle Adolescent Civic Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenzi, Michela; Vieno, Alessio; Santinello, Massimo; Nation, Maury; Voight, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Adopting a multi-informant methodology, the current study examines the relative influence of multiple parental characteristics (civic responsibility, encouragement of civic action, parent-youth closeness) on adolescents' civic responsibility (local and global). The participants were 384 early and middle adolescents (47.9% male), randomly…

  17. Particle acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Forman, M. A.

    1987-01-01

    The most direct signatures of particle acceleration in flares are energetic particles detected in interplanetary space and in the Earth atmosphere, and gamma rays, neutrons, hard X-rays, and radio emissions produced by the energetic particles in the solar atmosphere. The stochastic and shock acceleration theories in flares are reviewed and the implications of observations on particle energy spectra, particle confinement and escape, multiple acceleration phases, particle anistropies, and solar atmospheric abundances are discussed.

  18. Simulating VIIRS Observed Gas Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, F. C.

    2015-12-01

    VIIRS Nightfire (VNF) had been proved being able to effectively detect gas flares at night, and characterize their temperature and source size. [1] However, limited access to generally confidential gas flare operation measurements made it difficult to verify the output. Although flared gas volume is occasionally available, it is not common to log the temperature and flames size which directly links to VNF output. To understand the mechanism of gas flare and how VIIRS perceives the event, a platform is proposed to simulate the gas flare being observed by VIIRS. The methodology can be described in three steps. (1) Use CFD simulation software ISIS-3D to simulate a simple gas flare. [2] Scalar fields of temperature and species concentration related to combustion are extracted from the simulation. The instantaneous scalar can be determined from time-averaging or guess by stochastic time and space series (TASS) from single-point statistics [3]. (2) Model spectral radiance intensity of simulated gas flare using RADCAL. [4] RADCAL developed by NIST can accurately model the spectral radiance emitted on the direction of lineof-sight given the spatial profile of temperature and concentration of species. (3) Use radiative transfer modeling to calculate the energy propagated to VIIRS. The modeled radiation will then be weighted by the MODTRAN [5] modeled transmissivity over predefined atmosphere to the satellite, with geometrical effects considered. Such platform can help understanding how exactly VNF is measuring gas flares, and thus lead to more precise characterization of combustion events. [1] C. D. Elvidge et al, Remote Sensing, 2013[2] IRSN ISIS-3D[3] M. E. Kounalakis et al, ASME J. Heat Transfer, 1991 [4] W. L. Grosshandler, NIST Technical Note 1402, 1993 [5] A. Berk et al, MODTRAN 5.2.0.0 User's Manual

  19. Preliminary Criteria for Global Flares in Childhood-Onset Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, Hermine I.; Mina, Rina; Pilkington, Clarissa; Beresford, Michael W.; Reiff, Andreas; Levy, Deborah M.; Tucker, Lori B.; Eberhard, B. Anne; Ravelli, Angelo; Schanberg, Laura E.; Saad-Magalhaes, Claudia; Higgins, Gloria C.; Onel, Karen; Singer, Nora G.; von Scheven, Emily; Itert, Lukasz; Klein-Gitelman, Marisa S.; Punaro, Marilynn; Ying, Jun; Giannini, Edward H.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To develop widely acceptable preliminary criteria of global flare for childhood-onset SLE (cSLE). Methods Pediatric rheumatologists (n=138) rated a total of 358 unique patient profiles (PP) with information about the cSLE flare descriptors (cSLE-FD) from two consecutive visits: patient global assessment of well-being, physician global assessment of disease activity (MD-global), health-related quality of life, anti-dsDNA antibodies, disease activity index score, protein/creatinine (P/C) ratio, complement levels and ESR. Based on 2996 rater responses about the course of cSLE (baseline vs. follow-up) the accuracy (sensitivity, specificity, area under the receiver operating characteristic curve) of candidate flare criteria was assessed. An international consensus conference was held to rank these candidate flare criteria as per the ACR-recommendations for the development and validation of criteria sets. Results The highest ranked candidate criteria considered absolute changes (Δ) of the SLEDAI or BILAG, MD-global, P/C ratio, and ESR; Flare scores can be calculated [0.5 × ΔSLEDAI + 0.45 × ΔP/C ratio + 0.5 × ΔMD-global + 0.02 × ΔESR], where values ≥ 1.04 are reflective of a flare. Similarly, BILAG-based flare scores [0.4 × ΔBILAG + 0.65 × ΔP/C ratio + 0.5 × ΔMD-global + 0.02 × ΔESR] of ≥ 1.15 were diagnostic of a flare. Flare scores increase with flare severity. Conclusions Consensus has been reached on preliminary criteria for global flares in cSLE. Further validation studies are needed to confirm the usefulness of the cSLE flare criteria in research and for clinical care. PMID:21618452

  20. X-Ray Flare Candidates in Short Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margutti, R.; Chincarini, G.; Granot, J.; Guidorzi, C.; Berger, E.; Bernardini, M. G.; Geherls, N.; Soderberg, A. M.; Stamatikos, M.; Zaninoni, E.

    2012-01-01

    We present the first systematic study of X-ray flare candidates in short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) exploiting the large 6-year Swift database with the aim to constrain the physical nature of such fluctuations. We find that flare candidates appear in different types of SGRB host galaxy environments and show no clear correlation with the X-ray afterglow lifetime; flare candidates are detected both in SGRBs with a bright extended emission in the soft gamma-rays and in SGRBs which do not show such component. We furthermore show that SGRB X-ray flare candidates only partially share the set of observational properties of long GRB (LGRB) flares. In particular, the main parameter driving the duration evolution of X-ray variability episodes in both classes is found to be the elapsed time from the explosion, with very limited dependence on the different progenitors, environments, central engine life-times, prompt variability time-scales and energy budgets. On the contrary, SGRB flare candidates significantly differ from LGRB flares in terms of peak luminosity, isotropic energy, flare-to-prompt luminosity ratio and relative variability flux. However, these differences disappear when the central engine time-scales and energy budget are accounted for, suggesting that (i) flare candidates and prompt pulses in SGRBs likely have a common origin; (ii) similar dissipation and/or emission mechanisms are responsible for the prompt and flare emission in long and short GRBs, with SGRBs being less energetic albeit faster evolving versions of the long class. Finally, we show that in strict analogy to the SGRB prompt emission, flares candidates fall off the lag-luminosity relation defined by LGRBs, thus strengthening the SGRB flare-prompt pulse connection.

  1. Storey building early monitoring based on rapid seismic response analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julius, Musa, Admiral; Sunardi, Bambang; Rudyanto, Ariska

    2016-05-01

    Within the last decade, advances in the acquisition, processing and transmission of data from seismic monitoring has contributed to the growth in the number structures instrumented with such systems. An equally important factor for such growth can be attributed to the demands by stakeholders to find rapid answers to important questions related to the functionality or state of "health" of structures during and immediately of a seismic events. Consequently, this study aims to monitor the storey building based on seismic response i. e. earthquake and tremor analysis at short time lapse using accelerographs data. This study used one of storey building (X) in Jakarta city that suffered the effects of Kebumen earthquake January 25th 2014, Pandeglang earthquake July 9th 2014, and Lebak earthquake November 8th 2014. Tremors used in this study are tremors after the three following earthquakes. Data processing used to determine peak ground acceleration (PGA), peak ground velocity (PGV), peak ground displacement (PGD), spectral acceleration (SA), spectral velocity (SV), spectral displacement (SD), A/V ratio, acceleration amplification and effective duration (te). Then determine the natural frequency (f0) and peak of H/V ratio using H/V ratio method.The earthquakes data processing result shows the value of peak ground motion, spectrum response, A/V ratio and acceleration amplification increases with height, while the value of the effective duration give a different viewpoint of building dynamic because duration of Kebumen earthquake shows the highest energy in the highest floor but Pandeglang and Lebak earthquake in the lowest floor. Then, tremors data processing result one month after each earthquakes shows the natural frequency of building in constant value. Increasing of peak ground motion, spectrum response, A/V ratio, acceleration amplification, then decrease of effective duration following the increase of building floors shows that the building construction supports the

  2. Rotational modulation and flares on the RS Canum Venaticorum binary II Pegasi in July/September 1990: Spots and flares on II Peg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, J. G.; Mathioudakis, M.; Murphy, H. M.; Avgoloupis, S.; Mavridis, L. N.; Seiradakis, J. H.

    1993-11-01

    During ultraviolet spectroscopic observations of the RS CVn star II Peg in September 1990 a long duration (greater than or = 3 hrs.) flare was observed. During the early stage of the event, a feature at 1354 A was present, however, within the spectral resolution of the data it is not possible to identify this line. A contribution from the hot coronal ion Fe XXI is suspected. From line diagnostic ratios, the electron pressure at flare peak was estimated to be 1017/cu cm K, decreasing to 1016/cu cm K towards the end of the flare. One other flare was observed with IUE, and three optical flares (unfortunately none of these were observed simultaneously). The chromospheric and transition region losses from the larger of the two IUE flares was approx. 3 x 1031 erg/s at flare maximum, with total chromospheric/transition region radiative losses over the duration of the event being approx. 1.5 x 1035 erg. Continuum radiative losses over the wavelength region 1150A to 1950A were approximately 3% of the above figure. At flare maximum, the N V 1240 A line showed an enhancement factor of approx. 3 over the preflare value compared to 9 for the C IV 1550 A line. We interpret this difference as due to an underabundance of nitrogen during the flare, possibly related to photoionization of lower chromospheric material by soft X-ray photons sometime prior to the flare. No evidence of rotational modulation was present in any of the transition region lines, although the chromospheric lines did show a phase variation. However, these lines (H-alpha, Ca II K and Mg II h&k) were not consistent with one another although it is clear that the H-alpha equivalent width showed variations faster than the star's rotation period, being perhaps related to the decay/activation of individual active regions.

  3. Early immune response and regulation of IL-2 receptor subunits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, Millie; Sugano, Eiko; Schopper, Thomas; Li, Chai-Fei; Boonyaratanakornkit, J. B.; Cogoli, Augusto

    2005-01-01

    MAPK pathways plays a role in early T-cell activation and induction of IL-2, IL-2R(alpha) and IFN(gamma) gene expression.

  4. Early antiviral response and virus-induced genes in fish.

    PubMed

    Verrier, Eloi R; Langevin, Christelle; Benmansour, Abdenour; Boudinot, Pierre

    2011-12-01

    In fish as in mammals, virus infections induce changes in the expression of many host genes. Studies conducted during the last fifteen years revealed a major contribution of the interferon system in fish antiviral response. This review describes the screening methods applied to compare the impact of virus infections on the transcriptome in different fish species. These approaches identified a "core" set of genes that are strongly induced in most viral infections. The "core" interferon-induced genes (ISGs) are generally conserved in vertebrates, some of them inhibiting a wide range of viruses in mammals. A selection of ISGs -PKR, vig-1/viperin, Mx, ISG15 and finTRIMs - is further analyzed here to illustrate the diversity and complexity of the mechanisms involved in establishing an antiviral state. Most of the ISG-based pathways remain to be directly determined in fish. Fish ISGs are often duplicated and the functional specialization of multigenic families will be of particular interest for future studies. PMID:21414349

  5. Health responsibility and workplace health promotion among women: early detection of cancer.

    PubMed

    Kushnir, T; Rabinowitz, S; Melamed, S; Weisberg, E; Ribak, J

    1995-01-01

    The importance of health responsibility as one aspect of a health-promoting lifestyle has been emphasized repeatedly. Yet there are only a few empirical studies of its role in preventive behavior. We examined the relationship between health responsibility and early-detection practices for breast and cervical cancer. A group of 253 women employees of a large industrial company participated in a cancer screening program subsidized by the employer. They completed questionnaires assessing health responsibility and reported early-detection practices: frequency of breast self-examination and physician breast examinations, frequency of Pap tests, and time lapsed since last Pap test and breast examinations. Health responsibility was a significant independent predictor of breast examination indicators but not of Pap tests. Education level was an important predictor for Pap tests, and age predicted most early-detection practices. The findings lend some support to the role of health responsibility in initiating breast examinations. Better prediction of early-detection practices could be achieved by adding cognitive and emotional components to the existing responsibility scale and by distinguishing between retrospective and prospective responsibility. PMID:7649890

  6. Renal flare prediction and prognosis in lupus nephritis Hispanic patients.

    PubMed

    Mejía-Vilet, J M; Córdova-Sánchez, B M; Arreola-Guerra, J M; Morales-Buenrostro, L E; Uribe-Uribe, N O; Correa-Rotter, R

    2016-03-01

    We performed a retrospective cohort analysis focusing on lupus nephritis renal flare incidence and outcome predictors. One hundred and eighteen patients with biopsy-proven lupus nephritis were segregated by induction/maintenance regimes. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients experiencing renal flare. Secondary assessment included doubling of serum creatinine and development of end-stage renal disease. After a median follow-up of 31 months (interquartile range 21-46) from the date of response to induction therapy, 47 patients (39.8%) developed a renal flare. Azathioprine-maintained patients had a higher risk of renal flare compared with mycophenolate mofetil-maintained patients (hazard ratio 2.53, 95% confidence interval 1.39-4.59, p < 0.01). Age (hazard ratio 0.96, 0.92-0.99, p = 0.03), serum creatinine at presentation (hazard ratio 1.76, 1.13-2.76, p = 0.01), complete remission after induction therapy (hazard ratio 0.28, 0.14-0.56, p < 0.001) and azathioprine maintenance therapy (hazard ratio 4.78, 2.16-10.6, p < 0.001) were associated with renal flare on multivariate analysis. Ten patients progressed to end-stage renal disease (8.5%) by a median 32.5 months. Age (hazard ratio 0.88, 0.77-0.99, p = 0.05), complete remission after induction therapy (hazard ratio 0.08, 0.01-0.94, p = 0.04) and severe nephritic flare (hazard ratio 13.6, 1.72-107.7, p = 0.01) were associated with end-stage renal disease development. Azathioprine maintenance therapy is associated with a higher incidence of relapse in the Mexican-mestizo population. Younger age and nephritic flares predict development of end-stage renal disease. PMID:26405028

  7. Solar flare protection for manned lunar missions - Analysis of the October 1989 proton flare event

    SciTech Connect

    Simonsen, L.C.; Nealy, J.E.; Townsend, L.W.; Sauer, H.H. NOAA, Space Environment Laboratory, Boulder, CL )

    1991-07-01

    Several large solar proton events occurred in the latter half of 1989. For a moderately shielded spacecraft in free space, the potential exposure would have been greatest for the flare which occurred between October 19 to 27, 1989. The temporal variations of the proton energy spectra at approximately 1 AU were monitored by the GOES-7 satellite. These data, recorded and processed at the NOAA-Boulder Space Environment Laboratory, provide the opportunity to analyze dose rates and cumulative doses which might be incurred by astronauts in transit to, or on, the moon. Of particular importance in such an event is the time development of exposure in the early phases of the flare, for which dose rates may range over many orders of magnitude in the first few hours. The cumulative dose as a function of time for the entire event is also predicted. In addition to basic shield calculations, dose rate contours are constructed for flare shelters in free-space and on the lunar surface. 14 refs.

  8. Solar flare protection for manned lunar missions - Analysis of the October 1989 proton flare event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonsen, Lisa C.; Nealy, John E.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Sauer, Herbert H.

    1991-01-01

    Several large solar proton events occurred in the latter half of 1989. For a moderately shielded spacecraft in free space, the potential exposure would have been greatest for the flare which occurred between October 19 to 27, 1989. The temporal variations of the proton energy spectra at approximately 1 AU were monitored by the GOES-7 satellite. These data, recorded and processed at the NOAA-Boulder Space Environment Laboratory, provide the opportunity to analyze dose rates and cumulative doses which might be incurred by astronaus in transit to, or on, the moon. Of particular importance in such an event is the time development of exposure in the early phases of the flare, for which dose rates may range over many orders of magnitude in the first few hours. The cumulative dose as a function of time for the entire event is also predicted. In addition to basic shield calculations, dose rate contours are constructed for flare shelters in free-space and on the lunar surface.

  9. Solar and Stellar Flares over Time: Effects on Hosted Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinan, Edward F.; DeWarf, Laurence E.; Engle, Scott G.; Gropp, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    The effects of flares from the Sun on Earth and other solar-system planets are presented. Also discussed are the flare properties of cooler, commonplace main-sequence K-M stars. Data from our "Sun in Time" program are used to study the flare properties of the Sun and solar-type stars from youth to old age. These studies are based on ground-based observations, UV and X-ray space missions (IUE & HST, ROSAT & Chandra) as well as a wealth of data from the Kepler Mission. The ultra-high precision photometry available from the Kepler Mission (and K2) has made it possible to study starspots, flare properties, and rotations of thousands of G, K, M stars. Superflares (defined as E > 10+33 ergs ~X-100 flares) on hundreds of mostly G and K stars have been found. (See e.g. Shibayama et al. 2013; Maehara et al. 2015; Notsu et al. 2013/15; Saar et al. 2015; Guinan et al. 2015). Using our Age-Rotation relations, we determine correlations of flares properties of the Sun and solar-type over a wide range of ages. We also compare these flare histories with the cooler, more common K- and M-type stars. The analysis of these datasets imply that the young Sun had numerous, very powerful flares that may have played major roles the evolution of the early atmospheres of Earth and other terrestrial planets. The strong X-UV fluxes and proton fluences from flares and associated plasmas from coronal mass ejection events can greatly affect the photochemistry of planetary atmospheres as well as ionizing and possibly eroding their atmospheres. Some examples are given. Also discussed are the effects of superflares from the present Sun on the Earth. Even though solar superflares are rarer (~1 per 300-500 yrs) than from the young Sun (> 1-2 per year), they could cause significant damage to our communication and satellite systems, electrical networks, and threaten the lives of astronauts in space..This research is supported by grants from NSF/RUI and NASA: NSF, AST 1009903; Chandra GO2-13020X, HST GO

  10. NuSTAR Observations of Bright X-ray Flares from Young Stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vievering, Juliana; Glesener, Lindsay; Grefenstette, Brian; Smith, David

    2016-05-01

    Bright x-ray flares are observed to occur on young stellar objects (YSOs) and are presumed to be driven by similar processes as those seen on our sun. Observations of the flaring activity of YSOs can add to our understanding of the early lives of stars and the development of planetary systems. In particular, x-ray observations of these stellar flares are essential for probing the youngest stars, as these stars are most obscured by dense molecular clouds. One such cloud complex of YSOs, rho Ophiuchi, has been a past target for soft x-ray (SXR) missions, including Chandra and XMM-Newton. However, the energy ranges covered by these missions drop off prior to the hard x-ray (HXR) regime, where the crossover to a dominant nonthermal component could be observed. Whether or not this nonthermal emission is strong enough to be observed could then be an indicator of how large an influence these flares have on the surrounding protoplanetary disk. To begin investigating this HXR emission, two 50ks observations of rho Ophiuchi have been taken with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), which is optimized over the energy range of 3-79 keV. Multiple stellar flares have been identified in the observations; here we present the preliminary analysis, including light curves and spectra, of the brightest of these flaring events. We explore the implications of the data for flaring activity of YSOs and compare the results to typical flaring activity of the sun.

  11. Starspots on flare stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    Sizes of starspots on flare stars can be derived from the author's convection-cell hypothesis. The sizes are in fair agreement with those observed on YY Gem, CC Eri, and BY Dra by Bopp and Evans (1973). The hypothesis predicts that periodic brightness variations due to starspots are restricted to stars brighter than a critical absolute visual magnitude. A convective model of a starspot on YY Gem has been computed, assuming that the missing flux is in the form of Alfven waves. It is found that the surface field must exceed 10,000 G, and is probably less than about 30,000 G. With a surface field of 20,000 G, the effective temperature of the spot is in the range from 1590 to 1890 K, depending on the field gradient. These figures are to be compared with an effective temperature of 2000 K estimated from observations by Bopp and Evans. Efficient dynamo action is shown to be a possible mechanism for generating such large surface fields. There is a possibility that tidal effects may influence starspot formation.

  12. Exposure to dim light at night during early development increases adult anxiety-like responses.

    PubMed

    Borniger, Jeremy C; McHenry, Zachary D; Abi Salloum, Bachir A; Nelson, Randy J

    2014-06-22

    Early experiences produce effects that may persist throughout life. Therefore, to understand adult phenotype, it is important to investigate the role of early environmental stimuli in adult behavior and health. Artificial light at night (LAN) is an increasingly common phenomenon throughout the world. However, animals, including humans, evolved under dark night conditions. Many studies have revealed affective, immune, and metabolic alterations provoked by aberrant light exposure and subsequent circadian disruption. Pups are receptive to entraining cues from the mother and then light early during development, raising the possibility that the early life light environment may influence subsequent behavior. Thus, to investigate potential influences of early life exposure to LAN on adult phenotype, we exposed mice to dim (~5 lux; full spectrum white light) or dark (~0 lux) nights pre- and/or postnatally. After weaning at 3 weeks of age, all mice were maintained in dark nights until adulthood (9 weeks of age) when behavior was assessed. Mice exposed to dim light in early life increased anxiety-like behavior and fearful responses on the elevated plus maze and passive avoidance tests. These mice also displayed reduced growth rates, which ultimately normalized during adolescence. mRNA expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophin previously linked to early life environment and adult phenotype, was not altered in the prefrontal cortex or hippocampus by early life LAN exposure. Serum corticosterone concentrations were similar between groups at weaning, suggesting that early life LAN does not elicit a long-term physiologic stress response. Dim light exposure did not influence behavior on the open field, novel object, sucrose anhedonia, or forced swim tests. Our data highlight the potential deleterious consequences of low levels of light during early life to development and subsequent behavior. Whether these changes are due to altered maternal behavior

  13. Ultraviolet Spectral Comparison of "Quiescent" M-dwarf Flares with Solar and "Active" M-dwarf Flares and the Implications for an Earth-like Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parke Loyd, R. O.; France, Kevin; Youngblood, Allison

    2015-08-01

    All flares are not created equal. In particular, flares on low-mass stars are notable for their diversity, even between events on the same star. To better characterize these differences and the range of flare morphologies possible on low-mass stars, we analyzed a sample of such flares in detail using temporally resolved UV spectroscopy from the growing body of MUSCLES Treasury Survey data. Specifically, we used the data to analyze the response of several UV emission lines (e.g. C II, Si III, Si IV) and the UV continuum following each impulsive event. From this analysis, we present a qualitative picture of energy deposition and propagation in the stellar atmosphere during a few representative events. These data also permitted a spectral comparison with flares typical of the Sun, and we describe the most prominent differences that emerged from this comparison. Additionally, by including flares from all the observed MUSCLES stars, we create an energy-frequency plot for flares on “quiescent” M-dwarfs and compare it to that of the Sun and of well-studied “active” M-dwarfs such as AD Leo. Flares like those we detected and analyzed can strip some atmosphere from closely orbiting planets, adversely affecting the long-term habitability of planets that might have initially supported liquid surface water. To gauge the amplitude of this effect, we used the flare data to make an empirically driven estimate of how much mass each representative flare might remove from the atmosphere of an Earth-like planet.

  14. A Unified Computational Model for Solar and Stellar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allred, Joel C.; Kowalski, Adam F.; Carlsson, Mats

    2015-08-01

    We present a unified computational framework that can be used to describe impulsive flares on the Sun and on dMe stars. The models assume that the flare impulsive phase is caused by a beam of charged particles that is accelerated in the corona and propagates downward depositing energy and momentum along the way. This rapidly heats the lower stellar atmosphere causing it to explosively expand and dramatically brighten. Our models consist of flux tubes that extend from the sub-photosphere into the corona. We simulate how flare-accelerated charged particles propagate down one-dimensional flux tubes and heat the stellar atmosphere using the Fokker-Planck kinetic theory. Detailed radiative transfer is included so that model predictions can be directly compared with observations. The flux of flare-accelerated particles drives return currents which additionally heat the stellar atmosphere. These effects are also included in our models. We examine the impact of the flare-accelerated particle beams on model solar and dMe stellar atmospheres and perform parameter studies varying the injected particle energy spectra. We find the atmospheric response is strongly dependent on the accelerated particle cutoff energy and spectral index.

  15. A Unified Computational Model for Solar and Stellar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allred, Joel C.; Kowalski, Adam F.; Carlsson, Mats

    2015-01-01

    We present a unified computational framework that can be used to describe impulsive flares on the Sun and on dMe stars. The models assume that the flare impulsive phase is caused by a beam of charged particles that is accelerated in the corona and propagates downward depositing energy and momentum along the way. This rapidly heats the lower stellar atmosphere causing it to explosively expand and dramatically brighten. Our models consist of flux tubes that extend from the sub-photosphere into the corona. We simulate how flare-accelerated charged particles propagate down one-dimensional flux tubes and heat the stellar atmosphere using the Fokker-Planck kinetic theory. Detailed radiative transfer is included so that model predictions can be directly compared with observations. The flux of flare-accelerated particles drives return currents which additionally heat the stellar atmosphere. These effects are also included in our models. We examine the impact of the flare-accelerated particle beams on model solar and dMe stellar atmospheres and perform parameter studies varying the injected particle energy spectra. We find the atmospheric response is strongly dependent on the accelerated particle cutoff energy and spectral index.

  16. A Unified Computational Model for Solar and Stellar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allred, Joel; Kowalski, Adam; Carlsson, Mats

    2015-04-01

    We describe a unified computational framework which can be used to model impulsive flares on the Sun and on dMe stars. The models are constructed assuming that the flare impulsive phase is caused by a beam of charged particles (primarily electrons and protons) that is accelerated in the corona and propagates downward depositing energy and momentum along the way. This rapidly heats the lower stellar atmosphere causing it to explosively expand and emission to dramatically brighten. Our models consist of flux tubes that extend from the sub-photosphere into the corona. We simulate how these flare-accelerated particles propagate down one dimensional flux tubes and heat the stellar atmosphere using Fokker-Planck kinetic theory. Detailed radiative transfer is included so that model predictions can be directly compared with observations. The flux of flare-accelerated particles drives return currents which additionally heat the stellar atmosphere, and these effects are also included in our models. We examine the impact of the flare-accelerated particle beams on model solar and dMe stellar atmospheres and perform parameter studies varying the injected particle energy spectra. We find the atmospheric response is strongly dependent on the accelerated particle cutoff energy and spectral index.

  17. Impulsive Heating of Solar Flare Ribbons Above 10 MK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simões, P. J. A.; Graham, D. R.; Fletcher, L.

    2015-12-01

    The chromospheric response to the input of flare energy is marked by extended extreme ultraviolet (EUV) ribbons and hard X-ray (HXR) footpoints. These are usually explained as the result of heating and bremsstrahlung emission from accelerated electrons colliding in the dense chromospheric plasma. We present evidence of impulsive heating of flare ribbons above 10 MK in a two-ribbon flare. We analyse the impulsive phase of SOL2013-11-09T06:38, a C2.6 class event using data from Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) to derive the temperature, emission measure and differential emission measure of the flaring regions and investigate the evolution of the plasma in the flaring ribbons. The ribbons were visible at all SDO/AIA EUV/UV wavelengths, in particular, at 94 and 131 Å filters, sensitive to temperatures of 8 MK and 12 MK. The time evolution of the emission measure of the plasma above 10 MK at the ribbons has a peak near the HXR peak time. The presence of hot plasma in the lower atmosphere is further confirmed by a RHESSI imaging spectroscopy analysis, which shows resolved sources at 11 - 13 MK that are associated with at least one ribbon. We found that collisional beam-heating can only marginally explain the power necessary to heat the 10 MK plasma at the ribbons.

  18. International consensus for a definition of disease flare in lupus.

    PubMed

    Ruperto, N; Hanrahan, L M; Alarcón, G S; Belmont, H M; Brey, R L; Brunetta, P; Buyon, J P; Costner, M I; Cronin, M E; Dooley, M A; Filocamo, G; Fiorentino, D; Fortin, P R; Franks, A G; Gilkeson, G; Ginzler, E; Gordon, C; Grossman, J; Hahn, B; Isenberg, D A; Kalunian, K C; Petri, M; Sammaritano, L; Sánchez-Guerrero, J; Sontheimer, R D; Strand, V; Urowitz, M; von Feldt, J M; Werth, V P; Merrill, J T

    2011-04-01

    The Lupus Foundation of America (LFA) convened an international working group to obtain a consensus definition of disease flare in lupus. With help from the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organization (PRINTO), two web-based Delphi surveys of physicians were conducted. Subsequently, the LFA held a second consensus conference followed by a third Delphi survey to reach a community-wide agreement for flare definition. Sixty-nine of the 120 (57.5%) polled physicians responded to the first survey. Fifty-nine of the responses were available to draft 12 preliminary statements, which were circulated in the second survey. Eighty-seven of 118 (74%) physicians completed the second survey, with an agreement of 70% for 9/12 (75%) statements. During the second conference, three alternative flare definitions were consolidated and sent back to the international community. One hundred and sixteen of 146 (79.5%) responded, with agreement by 71/116 (61%) for the following definition: "A flare is a measurable increase in disease activity in one or more organ systems involving new or worse clinical signs and symptoms and/or laboratory measurements. It must be considered clinically significant by the assessor and usually there would be at least consideration of a change or an increase in treatment." The LFA proposes this definition for lupus flare on the basis of its high face validity. PMID:21148601

  19. Solar Flare Effects on the Thermosphere and Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, S.; Qian, L.; Rodgers, E.; Bailey, S.

    The Solar Extreme-ultraviolet Experiment SEE on the TIMED satellite and by the X-ray Photometer System XPS on the SORCE satellite provide the first comprehensive irradiance measurements of the complete solar spectrum during large solar flares However the soft X-ray portion of these observations are performed using silicon photodiodes coated with metallic filters to provide photometric measurements with multiple band passes which leads to complexities in obtaining spectral information A new analysis technique developed specifically for flare conditions is used to infer flare spectra in this region These are combined with spectrographic measurements in the extreme ultraviolet and far ultraviolet and applied to the NCAR Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model TIE-GCM The electron content neutral density and airglow response to large flares during the declining phase of solar cycle 23 are calculated using this model and compared to several measurement sets obtaining good agreement This supports both the validity of the solar X-ray analysis and the modeling methodology showing that although flare-driven effects in the upper atmosphere are significant they are shorter and of much smaller magnitude than geomagnetic disturbances

  20. Evidence for Magnetic Reconnection in Three Homologous Solar Flares Observed by RHESSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sui, Lin-Hui; Holman, Gordon D.; Dennis, Brian R.

    2004-01-01

    We present RHESSI observF5oss of three homologous flares, which occurred between April 14 and 16, 2002. We find that the RHESSI images of all three flares at energies between 6 and 25 keV had some common features: (1) A. separate coronal source up to approx. 30 deg. above the flare loop appeared in the early impulsive phase and stayed stationary for several minutes. (2) Before the flare loop moved upward; previously reported by others, the flare loop-top centroid moved downward for 2-4 minutes during the early impulsive phase of the Ears: falling by 13 - 30% of its initial height with a speed between 8 and 23 km/s. We conclude that these features are associated with the formation and development of a current sheet between the loop-top and the coronal source. In the April 14-15 flare, we find that the hard X-ray flux (greater than 25 keV) is correlated with the rate at which the flare loop moves upward, indicating that the faster the loop grows, the faster the reconnection rate, and therefore, the greater the flux of accelerated electrons. Subject headings: Sun: L'iaies-Sun: X-1-ay-s -

  1. Multifractal analysis of visualized room impulse response for detecting early reflections.

    PubMed

    Pavlović, Milan; Ristić, Dragan M; Reljin, Irini; Mijić, Miomir

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes an improved method for detecting early reflections in the initial part of the room impulse response using multifractals. The proposed method uses the two-dimensional multifractal analysis. The room impulse response is visualized as a spectrogram image which is then subjected to the multifractal analysis. The algorithm is based on describing local regularity in the image using distribution of Hölder exponents. The time positions of the selected Hölder exponents in the image are utilized in detecting early reflections. The obtained results show better efficiency of the proposed algorithm compared to the previous one-dimensional multifractal analysis based algorithm. PMID:27250194

  2. THE SOLAR FLARE IRON ABUNDANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, K. J. H.; Dennis, B. R. E-mail: Brian.R.Dennis@nasa.gov

    2012-03-20

    The abundance of iron is measured from emission line complexes at 6.65 keV (Fe line) and 8 keV (Fe/Ni line) in RHESSI X-ray spectra during solar flares. Spectra during long-duration flares with steady declines were selected, with an isothermal assumption and improved data analysis methods over previous work. Two spectral fitting models give comparable results, viz., an iron abundance that is lower than previous coronal values but higher than photospheric values. In the preferred method, the estimated Fe abundance is A(Fe) = 7.91 {+-} 0.10 (on a logarithmic scale, with A(H) = 12) or 2.6 {+-} 0.6 times the photospheric Fe abundance. Our estimate is based on a detailed analysis of 1898 spectra taken during 20 flares. No variation from flare to flare is indicated. This argues for a fractionation mechanism similar to quiet-Sun plasma. The new value of A(Fe) has important implications for radiation loss curves, which are estimated.

  3. Largest Solar Flare on Record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The largest solar flare ever recorded occurred at 4:51 p.m. EDT, on Monday, April 2, 2001. as Observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) satellite. Solar flares, among the solar systems mightiest eruptions, are tremendous explosions in the atmosphere of the Sun capable of releasing as much energy as a billion megatons of TNT. Caused by the sudden release of magnetic energy, in just a few seconds, solar flares can accelerate solar particles to very high velocities, almost to the speed of light, and heat solar material to tens of millions of degrees. The recent explosion from the active region near the sun's northwest limb hurled a coronal mass ejection into space at a whopping speed of roughly 7.2 million kilometers per hour. Luckily, the flare was not aimed directly towards Earth. Second to the most severe R5 classification of radio blackout, this flare produced an R4 blackout as rated by the NOAA SEC. This classification measures the disruption in radio communications. Launched December 2, 1995 atop an ATLAS-IIAS expendable launch vehicle, the SOHO is a cooperative effort involving NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA). (Image courtesy NASA Goddard SOHO Project office)

  4. Magnetic reconnection in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, T. G.

    1991-01-01

    The magnetic energy stored in the corona is the only plausible source for the energy released during large solar flares. During the last 20 years most theoretical work has concentrated on models which store magnetic energy in the corona in the form of electrical currents, and a major goal of present day research is to understand how these currents are created, and then later dissipated during a flare. Another important goal is to find a flare model which can eject magnetic flux into interplanetary space. Although many flares do not eject magnetic flux, those which do are of special importance for solar-terrestrial relations since the ejected flux can have dramatic effects if it hits the Earth's magnetosphere. Three flare models which have been extensively investigated are the emerging-flux model, the sheared-arcade model, and the magnetic-flux-rope model. All of these models can store and release magnetic energy efficiently provided that rapid magnetic reconnection occurs. However, only the magnetic-flux-rope model appears to provide a plausible mechanism for ejecting magnetic flux into interplanetary space.

  5. A planar broad-band flared microstrip slot antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povinelli, Mark J.

    1987-08-01

    Experimental results have been obtained on a planar multioctave bandwidth flared microstrip slot. When crossed, the element is capable of horizontal, vertical, or circular polarization. A design was fabricated and measurements were taken to define the performance. The input impedance and radiation characteristics are shown to have a broad-band response when configured as a cavity-backed element.

  6. Hooked Flare Ribbons and Flux-rope-related QSL Footprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jie; Gilchrist, Stuart A.; Aulanier, Guillaume; Schmieder, Brigitte; Pariat, Etienne; Li, Hui

    2016-05-01

    We studied the magnetic topology of active region 12158 on 2014 September 10 and compared it with the observations before and early in the flare that begins at 17:21 UT (SOL2014-09-10T17:45:00). Our results show that the sigmoidal structure and flare ribbons of this active region observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly can be well reproduced from a Grad–Rubin nonlinear force-free field extrapolation method. Various inverse-S- and inverse-J-shaped magnetic field lines, which surround a coronal flux rope, coincide with the sigmoid as observed in different extreme-ultraviolet wavelengths, including its multithreaded curved ends. Also, the observed distribution of surface currents in the magnetic polarity where it was not prescribed is well reproduced. This validates our numerical implementation and setup of the Grad–Rubin method. The modeled double inverse-J-shaped quasi-separatrix layer (QSL) footprints match the observed flare ribbons during the rising phase of the flare, including their hooked parts. The spiral-like shape of the latter may be related to a complex pre-eruptive flux rope with more than one turn of twist, as obtained in the model. These ribbon-associated flux-rope QSL footprints are consistent with the new standard flare model in 3D, with the presence of a hyperbolic flux tube located below an inverse-teardrop-shaped coronal QSL. This is a new step forward forecasting the locations of reconnection and ribbons in solar flares and the geometrical properties of eruptive flux ropes.

  7. Context modulates early stimulus processing when resolving stimulus-response conflict.

    PubMed

    Scerif, Gaia; Worden, Michael S; Davidson, Matthew; Seiger, Liat; Casey, B J

    2006-05-01

    When responding to stimuli in our environment, the presence of multiple items associated with task-relevant responses affects both ongoing response selection and subsequent behavior. Computational modeling of conflict monitoring and neuroimaging data predict that the recent context of response competition will bias the selection of certain stimuli over others very early in the processing stream through increased focal spatial attention. We used high-density EEG to test this hypothesis and to investigate the contextual effects on nonspatial, early stimulus processing in a modified flanker task. Subjects were required to respond to a central arrow and to ignore potentially conflicting information from flanking arrows in trials preceded by a series of either compatible or incompatible trials. On some trials, we presented the flanking arrows in the absence of the central target. The visual P1 component was selectively enhanced only for incompatible trials when preceded by incompatible ones, suggesting that contextual effects depend on feature-based processing, and not only simple enhancement of the target location. Context effects also occurred on no-target trials as evidenced by an enhanced early-evoked response when they followed compatible compared to incompatible trials, suggesting that spatial attention was also modulated by recent context. These results support a multi-componential account of spatial and nonspatial attention and they suggest that contextually driven cognitive control mechanisms can operate on specific stimulus features at extremely early stages of processing within stimulus-response conflict tasks. PMID:16768377

  8. Anvil for Flaring PCB Guide Pins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winn, E.; Turner, R.

    1985-01-01

    Spring-loaded anvil results in fewer fractured pins. New anvil for flaring guide pins in printed-circuit boards absorbs approximately 80 percent of press force. As result fewer pins damaged, and work output of flaring press greatly increased.

  9. What's an Asthma Flare-Up?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy What's an Asthma Flare-Up? KidsHealth > For Parents > What's an Asthma ... of a straw that's being pinched. Causes of Asthma Flare-Ups People with asthma have airways that ...

  10. The Flare Genesis Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.

    2002-01-01

    Using the Flare Genesis Experiment (FGE), a balloon-borne observatory with an 80-cm solar telescope we observed the active region NOAA 8844 on January 25, 2000 for several hours. FGE was equipped with a vector polarimeter and a tunable Fabry-Perot narrow-band filter. It recorded time series of filtergrams, vector magnetograms, and Dopplergrams at the Ca(I) 6122.2 angstrom line, and H-alpha filtergrams with a cadence between 2.5 and 7.5 minutes. At the time of the observations, NOAA 8844 was located at approximately 5 N 30 W. The region was rapidly growing during the observations; new magnetic flux was constantly emerging in three supergranules near its center. We describe in detail how the FGE data were analyzed and report on the structure and behavior of peculiar moving dipolar features (MDFs) observed in the active region. In longitudinal magnetograms, the MDFs appeared to be small dipoles in the emerging fields. The east-west orientation of their polarities was opposite that of the sunspots. The dipoles were oriented parallel to their direction of motion, which was in most cases towards the sunspots. Previously, dipolar moving magnetic features have only been observed flowing out from sunspots. Vector magnetograms show that the magnetic field of each MDF negative part was less inclined to the local horizontal than the ones of the positive part. We identify the MDFs as undulations, or stitches, where the emerging flux ropes are still tied to the photosphere. We present a U-loop model that can account for their unusual structure and behavior, and it shows how emerging flux can shed its entrained mass.