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Sample records for early glycemic control

  1. Early treatment revisions by addition or switch for type 2 diabetes: impact on glycemic control, diabetic complications, and healthcare costs

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Phil; Saundankar, Vishal; Bouchard, Jonathan; Wintfeld, Neil; Suehs, Brandon; Moretz, Chad; Allen, Elsie; DeLuzio, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background The study examined the prevalence of early treatment revisions after glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) ≥9.0% (75 mmol/mol) and estimated the impact of early treatment revisions on glycemic control, diabetic complications, and costs. Research design and methods A retrospective cohort study of administrative claims data of plan members with type 2 diabetes and HbA1c ≥9.0% (75 mmol/mol) was completed. Treatment revision was identified as treatment addition or switch. Glycemic control was measured as HbA1c during 6–12 months following the first qualifying HbA1c ≥9.0% (75 mmol/mol) laboratory result. Complications severity (via Diabetes Complication Severity Index (DCSI)) and costs were measured after 12, 24, and 36 months. Unadjusted comparisons and multivariable models were used to examine the relationship between early treatment revision (within 90 days of HbA1c) and outcomes after controlling for potentially confounding factors measured during a 12-month baseline period. Results 8463 participants were included with a mean baseline HbA1c of 10.2% (75 mmol/mol). Early treatment revision was associated with greater reduction in HbA1c at 6–12 months (−2.10% vs −1.87%; p<0.001). No significant relationship was observed between early treatment revision and DCSI at 12, 24, or 36 months (p=0.931, p=0.332, and p=0.418). Total costs, medical costs, and pharmacy costs at 12, 24, or 36 months were greater for the early treatment revision group compared with the delayed treatment revision group (all p<0.05). Conclusions The findings suggest that in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, treatment revision within 90 days of finding an HbA1c ≥9.0% is associated with a greater level of near-term glycemic control and higher cost. The impact on end points such as diabetic complications may not be realized over relatively short time frames. PMID:26925237

  2. Intensive glycemic control and renal outcome.

    PubMed

    Jun, Min; Perkovic, Vlado; Cass, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes is the leading cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in many countries around the world, accounting for up to 50% of people who develop end-stage renal disease. The risk of morbidity and mortality is particularly high in people with both conditions, highlighting the importance of preventing the development and progression of earlier stage CKD in people with diabetes. Inadequate glycemic control has been associated with poor outcomes in diabetes, with early observational studies suggesting that tighter glycemic control may improve microvascular and macrovascular outcomes in patients with diabetes. Since then, large trials assessing the effect of intensive glycemic control in the general diabetic population have provided strong evidence that intensive therapy reduces the incidence and progression of microvascular outcomes including microalbuminuria, a key early marker of diabetic nephropathy (DN). These results have been consistent across both type 1 and type 2 diabetic populations demonstrating that intensive glycemic therapy provides clear benefits, delays the onset or progression of DN, particularly in its early stages. Whilst the benefits of intensive glycemic therapy for people with diabetes and early stage CKD have been well established, controversy remains as to whether intensive therapy slows the progression of established DN, particularly among individuals who have a reduced glomerular filtration rate. In addition, severe hypoglycemia has been associated with intensive glycemic therapy, raising safety concerns that may be of particular relevance for patients with decreased kidney function (CKD stages 3-5). Until further data are available, an individualized approach to glucose management is recommended in people with reduced glomerular filtration rate. PMID:21659772

  3. Understanding basic carbohydrate counting, glycemic index, and glycemic load for improved glycemic control in Hispanic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Lidia Guadalupe Compen; Berry, Diane C; Ruiz, Octelina Castillo; Gonzlez, Eunice Resndiz; Prez, Paulina Aguilera; Rivas, Elva Del ngel

    2014-01-01

    Hispanic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus generally have poor glycemic control. Constant hyperglycemia in individuals with type 2 diabetes can cause microvascular and macrovascular complications that lead to early morbidity and mortality. Good glycemic control requires a balance between diet, exercise, and medication, but dietary balance is difficult to achieve for many patients. Of the macronutrients, carbohydrates mostly affect blood glucose levels. Basic carbohydrate counting, glycemic index, and glycemic load are important tools for patients to master to control their blood glucose levels. PMID:25239210

  4. Dietary pectin and glycemic control in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Gardner, D F; Schwartz, L; Krista, M; Merimee, T J

    1984-01-01

    Seventeen diabetic subjects requiring insulin and who exhibited glycemic stability over a 9-12-mo control period received 5 g of pectin with each meal and at bedtime for 3 mo. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and glycosylated serum protein were measured in each patient on multiple occasions to assess glycemic control. No clear-cut change in these measurements occurred during the period of pectin ingestion. These data are not consistent with a beneficial effect of high-pectin diets in people with diabetes. PMID:6376010

  5. Early enhancements of hepatic and later of peripheral insulin sensitivity combined with increased postprandial insulin secretion contribute to improved glycemic control after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass.

    PubMed

    Bojsen-Mller, Kirstine N; Dirksen, Carsten; Jrgensen, Nils B; Jacobsen, Siv H; Serup, Annette K; Albers, Peter H; Hansen, Dorte L; Worm, Dorte; Naver, Lars; Kristiansen, Viggo B; Wojtaszewski, Jrgen F P; Kiens, Bente; Holst, Jens J; Richter, Erik A; Madsbad, Sten

    2014-05-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) improves glycemic control within days after surgery, and changes in insulin sensitivity and ?-cell function are likely to be involved. We studied 10 obese patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and 10 obese glucose-tolerant subjects before and 1 week, 3 months, and 1 year after RYGB. Participants were included after a preoperative diet-induced total weight loss of -9.2 1.2%. Hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivity were assessed using the hyperinsulinemic- euglycemic clamp combined with the glucose tracer technique, and ?-cell function was evaluated in response to an intravenous glucose-glucagon challenge as well as an oral glucose load. Within 1 week, RYGB reduced basal glucose production, improved basal hepatic insulin sensitivity, and increased insulin clearance, highlighting the liver as an important organ responsible for early effects on glucose metabolism after surgery. Insulin-mediated glucose disposal and suppression of fatty acids did not improve immediately after surgery but increased at 3 months and 1 year; this increase likely was related to the reduction in body weight. Insulin secretion increased after RYGB only in patients with T2D and only in response to oral glucose, underscoring the importance of the changed gut anatomy. PMID:24241533

  6. How important is glycemic control during coronary artery bypass?

    PubMed

    Lazar, Harold L

    2012-01-01

    In summary, poor perioperative glycemic control in patients undergoing CABG is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Maintaining serum glucose less than or equal to 180 mg/dL in patients with diabetes during CABG reduces morbidity and mortality, lowers the incidence of wound infections, reduces hospital length of stay, and enhances long-term survival. In nondiabetic patients undergoing CABG surgery, maintaining serum glucose less than 180 mg/dL has also resulted in improved perioperative outcomes. More aggressive glycemic control (80-120 mg/dL) provides no added improvement in CABG patients with less than or equal to 3 days of ICU care in the absence of ventilatory support or multiorgan failure. Although the precise value for achieving glycemic control in the perioperative period is the subject of much debate, the benefits of perioperative glycemic control with continuous insulin infusions in patients undergoing CABG is no longer debatable. PMID:22873042

  7. Top 10 Facts to Know About Inpatient Glycemic Control.

    PubMed

    Horton, William B; Subauste, Jose S

    2016-02-01

    Uncontrolled hyperglycemia in hospitalized patients with or without a previous diagnosis of diabetes is associated with adverse outcomes and longer lengths of hospital stay. It is estimated that one-third of hospitalized patients will experience significant hyperglycemia, and the cost associated with hospitalization for patients with diabetes accounts for half of all health care expenditures for this disease. Optimizing glycemic control should be a priority for all health care providers in the inpatient setting. Appropriate management strategies should include identification of appropriate glycemic targets, prevention of hypoglycemia, initiation of appropriate basal-plus-bolus insulin regimens, and planning for the transition from inpatient to outpatient therapy before hospital discharge. PMID:26522798

  8. The Mealtime Challenge: Nutrition and Glycemic Control in the Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Donna B.; Swift, Carrie S.

    2014-01-01

    In Brief Multiple staff members and departments have a responsibility for various aspects of nutrition therapy for glycemic management in the hospital setting. Implementation is initiated by physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician's assistants and planned and operationalized by registered dietitians. Meals are delivered by food service staff, and nurses monitor and integrate glycemic control components into patients' medical treatment plan. Although nutrition therapy is recognized as an important aspect of care in the hospital setting, it can also be challenging to appropriately coordinate meals with blood glucose monitoring and insulin administration. This article addresses current mealtime practices and recommendations to improve these processes in acute care. PMID:26246774

  9. Is Helicobacter pylori infection associated with glycemic control in diabetics?

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yi-Ning; Yu, Wei-Lai; Zhu, Hua-Tuo; Ding, Jie-Xia; Yu, Chao-Hui; Li, You-Ming

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is associated with glycemic control and whether hyperglycemia is modified by eradication therapy. METHODS: The databases of PubMed, Cochrane Library, Chinese BioMedicine Web Base and Chinese Science and Technology Journals were searched from inception to June 2014. Studies examining the association between H. pylori infection and glycemic control and?or the effect of eradication treatment on glycemic control in diabetic humans were eligible for inclusion. Meta-analyses were conducted using the Review Manager software version 5.2. The outcome measures are presented as weighed mean differences (WMDs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Statistical heterogeneity was assessed by the Cochran Q test and the I2 statistic. RESULTS: A total of 21 relevant publications were identified. A meta-analysis of 11 studies with 513 patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) showed significantly lower glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels in the H. pylori-negative than H. pylori-positive DM participants (WMD = 0.43, 95%CI: 0.07-0.79; P = 0.02). In children and adolescents with type 1 DM (T1DM), there was a positive association between H. pylori infection and HbA1c level (WMD = 0.35, 95%CI: 0.05-0.64; P = 0.02), but there was no difference in those with type 2 DM (T2DM, WMD = 0.51, 95%CI: -0.63-1.65; P = 0.38). A meta-analysis of six studies with 325 T2DM participants showed a significant difference in the fasting plasma glucose levels between H. pylori-positive and H. pylori-negative participants (WMD = 1.20, 95%CI: 0.17-2.23; P = 0.02). Eradication of H. pylori did not improve glycemic control in the T2DM participants in a three-month follow-up period (HbA1c decrease: WMD = -0.03, 95%CI = -0.14-0.08; P = 0.57; fasting plasma glucose decrease: WMD = -0.06, 95%CI: -0.36-0.23; P = 0.68). Glycemic control was significantly better in T1DM participants who were not reinfected than in those who were reinfected (HbA1c: WMD = 0.72, 95%CI: 0.32-1.13: P = 0.00). CONCLUSION: H. pylori infection is associated with poorer glycemic control in T1DM patients, but eradication may not improve glycemic control in DM in a short-term follow-up period. PMID:25954115

  10. Fathers’ Involvement in Preadolescents’ Diabetes Adherence and Glycemic Control*

    PubMed Central

    Rohan, Jennifer M.; Carle, Adam C.; Pendley, Jennifer Shroff; Delamater, Alan; Drotar, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship of paternal involvement in diabetes care with adherence and glycemic control. Methods One hundred and thirty-six mothers and fathers of preadolescents (aged 9–12 years) with type 1 diabetes reported on paternal involvement. Adherence was measured by interview and blood glucose meter downloads. Mothers’ and fathers’ ratings of paternal involvement in diabetes care were compared. We evaluated three structural equation models linking paternal involvement with adherence and glycemic control. Results Mothers and fathers reported similar amounts of paternal involvement, yet mothers rated paternal involvement as more helpful. The data supported a model indicating links between more paternal involvement and higher HbA1c and between lower adherence and higher HbA1c. Mediation and moderation models were not supported. Discussion Although paternal involvement was not directly associated with treatment adherence, it was associated with poorer glycemic control. Some fathers may increase their involvement in response to suboptimal glycemic outcomes. PMID:21515643

  11. The Glycemic Indices in Dialysis Evaluation (GIDE) study: Comparative measures of glycemic control in diabetic dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Williams, Mark E; Mittman, Neal; Ma, Lin; Brennan, Julia I; Mooney, Ann; Johnson, Curtis D; Jani, Chinu M; Maddux, Franklin W; Lacson, Eduardo

    2015-10-01

    The validity of hemoglobin A1c (HgbA1c) is undergoing increasing scrutiny in the advanced CKD/ESRD (chronic kidney disease/end-stage renal disease) population, where it appears to be discordant from other glycemic indices. In the Glycemic Indices in Dialysis Evaluation (GIDE) Study, we sought to assess correlation of HgbA1c with casual glucose, glycated albumin, and serum fructosamine in a large group of diabetic patients on dialysis. From 26 dialysis facilities in the United States, 1758 diabetic patients (hemodialysis?=?1476, peritoneal dialysis?=?282) were enrolled in the first quarter of 2013. The distributions of HgbA1c and the other glycemic indices were analyzed. Intra-patient coefficients of variation and correlations among the four glycemic indices were determined. Patients with low HgbA1c values were both on higher erythropoietin (ESA) doses and more anemic. Serum glucose exhibited the highest intra-patient variability over a 3-month period; variability was modest among the other glycemic indices, and least with HgbA1c. Statistical analyses inclusive of all glycemic markers indicated modest to strong correlations. HgbA1c was more likely to be in the target range than glycated albumin or serum fructosamine, suggesting factors which may or may not be directly related to glycemic control, including anemia, ESA management, and iron administration, in interpreting HgbA1c values. These initial results from the GIDE Study clarify laboratory correlations among glycemic indices and add to concerns about reliance on HgbA1c in patients with diabetes and advanced kidney disease. PMID:25965145

  12. Glycemic Control and Excess Cardiovascular Mortality in Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Teleb, Mohamed; Popp Switzer, Maryna; Elhanafi, Sherif; Elfar, Ahmed; San Juan, Zinnia T

    2016-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic systemic disease with multiple complications ranging from microvascular to macrovascular diseases. Type 1 diabetes comprises 5% of adults with diabetes in the US. This population is shown to be at increased risk of cardiovascular events and mortality. Intensive glycemic control has been consistently associated with decreased microvascular complications but trials on macrovascular benefit yielded mixed results over the years. Recent data from long-term observational follow-up studies of major diabetes cardiovascular events and mortality are showing benefits that were not seen with the initial interventional trials. This article will review evidence on the effect of glycemic control on complications in diabetes mellitus with a focus on cardiovascular mortality in type 1 diabetes. PMID:26886228

  13. Tight glycemic control in the ICU - is the earth flat?

    PubMed

    Steil, Garry M; Agus, Michael S D

    2014-01-01

    Tight glycemic control in the ICU has been shown to reduce mortality in some but not all prospective randomized control trials. Confounding the interpretation of these studies are differences in how the control was achieved and underlying incidence of hypoglycemia, which can be expected to be affected by the introduction of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). In this issue of Critical Care, a consensus panel provides a list of the research priorities they believe are needed for CGM to become routine practice in the ICU. We reflect on these recommendations and consider the implications for using CGM today. PMID:25041720

  14. Intensive Glycemic Control in Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Lillian L; Jensen, Hanna A; Thourani, Vinod H

    2016-04-01

    Hyperglycemia has been found to be associated with increased morbidity and mortality in surgical patients, yet, the optimal glucose management strategy during the perioperative setting remains undetermined. While much has been published about hyperglycemia and cardiac surgery, most studies have used widely varying definitions of hyperglycemia, methods of insulin administration, and the timing of therapy. This has only allowed investigators to make general conclusions in this challenging clinical scenario. This review will introduce the basic pathophysiology of hyperglycemia in the cardiac surgery setting, describe the main clinical consequences of operative hyperglycemia, and take the reader through the published material of intensive and conservative glucose management. Overall, it seems that intensive control has modest benefits with adverse effects often outweighing these advantages. However, some studies have indicated differing results for certain patient subgroups, such as non-diabetics with acute operative hyperglycemia. Future studies should focus on distinguishing which patient populations, if any, would optimally benefit from intensive insulin therapy. PMID:26879308

  15. Effect of Fructose on Glycemic Control in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Cozma, Adrian I.; Sievenpiper, John L.; de Souza, Russell J.; Chiavaroli, Laura; Ha, Vanessa; Wang, D. David; Mirrahimi, Arash; Yu, Matt E.; Carleton, Amanda J.; Di Buono, Marco; Jenkins, Alexandra L.; Leiter, Lawrence A.; Wolever, Thomas M.S.; Beyene, Joseph; Kendall, Cyril W.C.; Jenkins, David J.A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The effect of fructose on cardiometabolic risk in humans is controversial. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled feeding trials to clarify the effect of fructose on glycemic control in individuals with diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library (through 22 March 2012) for relevant trials lasting ?7 days. Data were aggregated by the generic inverse variance method (random-effects models) and expressed as mean difference (MD) for fasting glucose and insulin and standardized MD (SMD) with 95% CI for glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and glycated albumin. Heterogeneity was assessed by the Cochran Q statistic and quantified by the I2 statistic. Trial quality was assessed by the Heyland methodological quality score (MQS). RESULTS Eighteen trials (n = 209) met the eligibility criteria. Isocaloric exchange of fructose for carbohydrate reduced glycated blood proteins (SMD ?0.25 [95% CI ?0.46 to ?0.04]; P = 0.02) with significant intertrial heterogeneity (I2 = 63%; P = 0.001). This reduction is equivalent to a ?0.53% reduction in HbA1c. Fructose consumption did not significantly affect fasting glucose or insulin. A priori subgroup analyses showed no evidence of effect modification on any end point. CONCLUSIONS Isocaloric exchange of fructose for other carbohydrate improves long-term glycemic control, as assessed by glycated blood proteins, without affecting insulin in people with diabetes. Generalizability may be limited because most of the trials were <12 weeks and had relatively low MQS (<8). To confirm these findings, larger and longer fructose feeding trials assessing both possible glycemic benefit and adverse metabolic effects are required. PMID:22723585

  16. Dietary protein impact on glycemic control during weight loss.

    PubMed

    Layman, Donald K; Baum, Jamie I

    2004-04-01

    Diets with higher protein (1.5 g x kg(-1) x d(-1)) and reduced carbohydrates (120 to 200 g/d) appear to enhance weight loss due to a higher loss of body fat and reduced loss of lean body mass. While studies of prolonged use of moderate protein diets are not available, short-term studies report beneficial effects associated with increased satiety, increased thermogenesis, sparing of muscle protein loss, and enhanced glycemic control. Combined impacts of a moderate protein diet are likely derived from lower carbohydrates resulting in lower postprandial increase in blood glucose and lower insulin response, and higher protein providing increased BCAA leucine levels and gluconeogenic substrates. A key element in the diet appears to be the higher intake of BCAA leucine with unique regulatory actions on muscle protein synthesis, modulation of the insulin signal, and sparing of glucose use by stimulation of the glucose-alanine cycle. This review focuses on the contributions of leucine and the BCAA to regulation of muscle protein synthesis and glycemic control. PMID:15051856

  17. Indicators of glycemic control in patients with gestational diabetes mellitus and pregnant women with diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Kunihiko; Koga, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    Recently, it has become clear that mild abnormal glucose tolerance increases the incidence of perinatal maternal-infant complications, and so the definition and diagnostic criteria of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have been changed. Therefore, in patients with GDM and pregnant women with diabetes mellitus, even stricter glycemic control than before is required to reduce the incidence of perinatal maternal-infant complications. Strict glycemic control cannot be attained without an indicator of glycemic control; this review proposes a reliable indicator. The gold standard indicator of glycemic control in patients with diabetes mellitus is hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c); however, we have demonstrated that HbA1c does not reflect glycemic control accurately during pregnancy because of iron deficiency. It has also become clear that glycated albumin, another indicator of glycemic control, is not influenced by iron deficiency and therefore might be a better indicator of glycemic control in patients with GDM and pregnant women with diabetes mellitus. However, large-population epidemiological studies are necessary in order to confirm our proposal. Here, we outline the most recent findings about the indicators of glycemic control during pregnancy including fructosamine and 1,5-anhydroglucitol. PMID:26240701

  18. Glycemic Control and Implant Stabilization in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Oates, T.W.; Dowell, S.; Robinson, M.; McMahan, C.A.

    2009-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is considered a relative contra-indication for implant therapy. However, the effect of glycemic level on implant integration in persons with diabetes remains poorly understood. The hypothesis of this research was that poor glycemic control is directly related to short-term-impairment implant stabilization. This prospective clinical study evaluated 10 non-diabetic individuals (12 implants) and 20 persons with type 2 diabetes (30 implants). Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels ranged from 4.7-12.6%. Implant stability was assessed by resonance frequency analysis over 4 months following placement. Minimum stability levels were observed 2-6 weeks following placement for all 42 implants. Persons with HbA1c ? 8.1% had a greater maximum decrease in stability from baseline and required a longer time for healing, as indicated by return of stability level to baseline. This study demonstrates alterations in implant stability consistent with impaired implant integration for persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus in direct relation to hyperglycemic conditions. PMID:19407159

  19. Metabolic responses to high glycemic index and low glycemic index meals: a controlled crossover clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The consumption of low glycemic index (LGI) foods before exercise results in slower and more stable glycemic increases. Besides maintaining an adequate supply of energy during exercise, this response may favor an increase in fat oxidation in the postprandial period before the exercise compared to high glycemic index (HGI) foods. The majority of the studies that evaluated the effect of foods differing in glycemic index on substrate oxidation during the postprandial period before the exercise are acute studies in which a single meal is consumed right before the exercise. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of consuming two daily HGI or LGI meals for five consecutive days on substrate oxidation before the exercise and in the concentrations of glucose, insulin and free fatty acids before and during a high intensity exercise. Methods Fifteen male cyclists, aged 24.4 3.8 years, with body mass index of 21.9 1.4 kg.m-2 and a VO2 max of 70.0 5.3 mL.kg-1.min-1, participated in this crossover study. All test meals were consumed in the laboratory. On days 1 and 5, substrate oxidation (30 minutes before and 90 minutes after breakfast (HGI or LGI)) and diet-induced thermogenesis (90 minutes postprandial) were assessed before the exercise. The levels of glucose, insulin, and free fatty acids were determined during 2 h after breakfast on these same days. Ninety minutes after breakfast, subjects completed a 30 min cycloergometric exercise at 85 to 95% of their maximum heart rate, during which lactate concentrations were assessed. Results The consumption of HGI meals resulted in higher areas under the glycemic and insulinemic curves in the postprandial period. However, glycemia did not differ by study treatment during exercise. There were no differences in free fatty acids in the postprandial period or in lactate levels during exercise. LGI meals resulted in lower fat oxidation and higher carbohydrate oxidation than the HGI meal in the postprandial period. Conclusions The results do not support a differential glycemia according to glycemic index during exercise. The ingestion of LGI foods did not lead to higher fat oxidation relative to the ingestion of HGI foods. Trial registration ACTRN: ACTRN12609000522213 PMID:21208446

  20. Glycemic control and diabetes management in hospitalized patients in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The importance of tight blood glucose control among outpatients with diabetes mellitus is well established, however, the management of diabetes in the hospital setting is generally considered secondary in importance. This study sought to assess glycemic control and diabetes management in adult patients admitted to hospitals in Brazil. Methods A cross-sectional and nationwide survey was conducted from July 2010 to January 2012. Eligible cases were 18 years of age or older, had a diagnosis of diabetes and a hospitalization length of stay ≥72 hours. Socio-demographic information, hospitalization details, and data on diabetes diagnosis, management and treatment were collected for all patients by chart review. Information on all blood glucose (BG) readings for a maximum of 20 consecutive days of hospitalization was recorded for each patient. Results Overall, 2,399 patients were surveyed in 24 hospitals located in 13 cities from all five Brazilian regions. The prevalence of patients presenting hyperglycemic (BG >180 mg/dL) or hypoglycemic (BG <70 mg/dL) events was 89.4% and 30.9% in patients in general wards, and 88.2% and 27.7% in those in Intensive Care Units (ICUs), respectively. In addition, a BG measure >180 mg/dL was recorded in two-thirds of the patient-days. A high proportion of patients were treated with sliding-scale insulin regimen alone in the general wards (52.0%) and in the ICUs (69.2%), and only 35.7% and 3.9% received appropriate insulin therapy in general wards (basal + bolus insulin) and in ICUs (continuous IV insulin), respectively. Conclusions Inpatient glycemic control and diabetes management needs improvement. Opportunities to improve care in Brazilian hospitals include expanded use of intravenous insulin and subcutaneous basal-bolus insulin protocols, avoiding use of sliding-scale insulin alone, increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring, and institution wide quality improvement efforts targeting both physician and nursing behavior. PMID:24499564

  1. Designing mobile support for glycemic control in patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Harris, Lynne T; Tufano, James; Le, Tung; Rees, Courtney; Lewis, Ginny A; Evert, Alison B; Flowers, Jan; Collins, Carol; Hoath, James; Hirsch, Irl B; Goldberg, Harold I; Ralston, James D

    2010-10-01

    We assessed the feasibility and acceptability of using mobile phones as part of an existing Web-based system for collaboration between patients with diabetes and a primary care team. In design sessions, we tested mobile wireless glucose meter uploads and two approaches to mobile phone-based feedback on glycemic control. Mobile glucose meter uploads combined with graphical and tabular data feedback were the most desirable system features tested. Participants had a mixture of positive and negative reactions to an automated and tailored messaging feedback system for self-management support. Participants saw value in the mobile system as an adjunct to the Web-based program and traditional office-based care. Mobile diabetes management systems may represent one strategy to improve the quality of diabetes care. PMID:20937484

  2. Association between glycemic control and antidiabetic drugs in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with cardiovascular complications

    PubMed Central

    Huri, Hasniza Zaman; Ling, Doris Yew Hui; Ahmad, Wan Azman Wan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a macrovascular complication in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). To date, glycemic control profiles of antidiabetic drugs in cardiovascular (CV) complications have not been clearly elucidated. Therefore, this study was conducted retrospectively to assess the association of antidiabetic drugs and glycemic control with CV profiles in T2DM patients. The association of concurrent medications and comorbidities with glycemic control was also investigated. Methods A total of 220 T2DM patients from the University of Malaya Medical Centre, Malaysia, who had at least one CV complication and who had been taking at least one antidiabetic drug for at least 3 months, were included. The associations of antidiabetics, cardiovascular diseases, laboratory parameters, concurrent medications, comorbidities, demographics, and clinical characteristics with glycemic control were investigated. Results Sulfonylureas in combination (P=0.002) and sulfonylurea monotherapy (P<0.001) were found to be associated with good glycemic control, whereas insulin in combination (P=0.051), and combination biguanides and insulin therapy (P=0.012) were found to be associated with poor glycemic control. Stroke (P=0.044) was the only type of CVD that seemed to be significantly associated with good glycemic control. Other factors such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (P=0.026), elderly patients (P=0.018), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (P=0.021), and fasting plasma glucose (P<0.001) were found to be significantly correlated with good glycemic control. Conclusion Individualized treatment in T2DM patients with CVDs can be supported through a better understanding of the association between glycemic control and CV profiles in T2DM patients. PMID:26316711

  3. Almond consumption improved glycemic control and lipid profiles in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Almond consumption is associated with ameliorations in obesity, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and hyperglycemia. The hypothesis of this 12-wk randomized crossover clinical trial was that almond consumption would improve glycemic control and decrease risk to cardiovascular disease in 20 Chinese type ...

  4. Can smartphone-based logging support diabetologists in solving glycemic control problems?

    PubMed

    Tiefengrabner, Martin; Domhardt, Michael; Oostingh, Gertie J; Schwenoha, Karin; Stütz, Thomas; Weitgasser, Raimund; Ginzinger, Simon W

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of diabetic patients strongly relies on the continuous logging of parameters relevant to glycemic control. Keeping diabetes diaries can be tedious which can affect the data quality and completeness. Mobile technologies could provide means to overcome these limitations. However, studies analyzing the direct effect on the treatment of patients are rare. In the presented study diabetic patients were supplied with a smartphone application to record various parameters relevant for glycemic control. Questions regarding the completeness of diabetes diaries were answered by the patients before and after the study. The attending diabetologist analyzed the data obtained from the smartphone-based diaries to determine whether these provided solutions for problems in glycemic control. The analysis of the available smartphone data provided the basis for therapeutic recommendations that can improve the daily glycemic control for almost all participants. Importantly, especially the newly developed implicit-activity logging, registering the participants' movements, provided important means to generate these recommendations. PMID:24825702

  5. A brief adherence intervention that improved glycemic control: mediation by patterns of adherence.

    PubMed

    de Vries McClintock, Heather F; Morales, Knashawn H; Small, Dylan S; Bogner, Hillary R

    2015-02-01

    This study examined whether longitudinal adherence profiles mediated the relationship between a brief adherence intervention and glycemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes. Adherence was assessed using the Medication Event Monitoring System. Longitudinal analysis via growth curve mixture modeling was carried out to classify patients according to patterns of adherence to oral hypoglycemic agents. Hemoglobin A1c assays were used to measure glycemic control as the clinical outcome. Across the whole sample, longitudinal adherence profiles mediated 35.2% (13.2, 81.0%) of the effect of a brief adherence intervention on glycemic control [from odds ratio (OR) = 8.48, 95% confidence interval (CI) (3.24, 22.2) to 4.00, 95% CI (1.34, 11.93)]. Our results suggest that patients in the intervention had better glycemic control largely due to their greater likelihood of adherence to oral hypoglycemic agents. PMID:24913600

  6. A Brief Adherence Intervention that Improved Glycemic Control: Mediation by Patterns of Adherence

    PubMed Central

    de Vries McClintock, Heather F.; Morales, Knashawn H.; Small, Dylan S.; Bogner, Hillary R.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined whether longitudinal adherence profiles mediated the relationship between a brief adherence intervention and glycemic control among patients with Type 2 diabetes. Adherence was assessed using the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS). Longitudinal analysis via growth curve mixture modeling was carried out to classify patients according to patterns of adherence to oral hypoglycemic agents. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) assays were used to measure glycemic control as the clinical outcome. Across the whole sample, longitudinal adherence profiles mediated 35.2% (13.2%, 81.0%) of the effect of a brief adherence intervention on glycemic control (from odds ratio (OR) = 8.48, 95% CI (3.24, 22.2) to 4.00, 95% CI (1.34, 11.93)). Our results suggest that patients in the intervention had better glycemic control largely due to their greater likelihood of adherence to oral hypoglycemic agents. PMID:24913600

  7. Veganism Is a Viable Alternative to Conventional Diet Therapy for Improving Blood Lipids and Glycemic Control.

    PubMed

    Trepanowski, John F; Varady, Krista A

    2015-01-01

    The American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) have each outlined a set of dietary recommendations aimed at improving glycemic control and blood lipids, respectively. However, traditional vegan diets (low-fat diets that proscribe animal product consumption) are also effective at improving glycemic control, and dietary portfolios (vegan diets that contain prescribed amounts of plant sterols, viscous fibers, soy protein, and nuts) are also effective at improving blood lipids. The purpose of this review was to compare the effects of traditional vegan diets and dietary portfolios with ADA and NCEP diets on body weight, blood lipids, blood pressure, and glycemic control. The main findings are that traditional vegan diets appear to improve glycemic control better than ADA diets in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), while dietary portfolios have been consistently shown to improve blood lipids better than NCEP diets in hypercholesterolemic individuals. PMID:24922183

  8. Glycemic control and antidiabetic drugs in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with renal complications

    PubMed Central

    Huri, Hasniza Zaman; Lim, Lay Peng; Lim, Soo Kun

    2015-01-01

    Background Good glycemic control can delay the progression of kidney diseases in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients with renal complications. To date, the association between antidiabetic agents and glycemic control in this specific patient population is not well established. Purpose This study aimed to identify antidiabetic regimens as well as other factors that associated with glycemic control in T2DM patients with different stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Patients and methods This retrospective, cross-sectional study involved 242 T2DM inpatients and outpatients with renal complications from January 2009 to March 2014 and was conducted in a tertiary teaching hospital in Malaysia. Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) was used as main parameter to assess patients’ glycemic status. Patients were classified to have good (A1C <7%) or poor glycemic control (A1C ≥7%) based on the recommendations of the American Diabetes Association. Results Majority of the patients presented with CKD stage 4 (43.4%). Approximately 55.4% of patients were categorized to have poor glycemic control. Insulin (57.9%) was the most commonly prescribed antidiabetic medication, followed by sulfonylureas (43%). Of all antidiabetic regimens, sulfonylureas monotherapy (P<0.001), insulin therapy (P=0.005), and combination of biguanides with insulin (P=0.038) were found to be significantly associated with glycemic control. Other factors including duration of T2DM (P=0.004), comorbidities such as anemia (P=0.024) and retinopathy (P=0.033), concurrent medications such as erythropoietin therapy (P=0.047), α-blockers (P=0.033), and antigouts (P=0.003) were also correlated with A1C. Conclusion Identification of factors that are associated with glycemic control is important to help in optimization of glucose control in T2DM patients with renal complication. PMID:26300627

  9. The Importance of Glycemic Control in the Hospital and the Role of the Infusion Nurse.

    PubMed

    Klinkner, Gwen

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is reaching epidemic proportions. Patients undergoing surgery, regardless of diabetes history, are at high risk for complications of poor glycemic control, including infection, mortality, and longer lengths of stay. This article provides an overview of the evidence about glycemic control in the hospital, risk factors for hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia, and the role of infusion nurses in improving outcomes for hospitalized patients with diabetes. PMID:26934163

  10. A primer for achieving glycemic control in the cardiac surgical patient.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, Marie E; Alexanian, Sara M; White, Lynn; Lazar, Harold L

    2012-07-01

    Maintaining glycemic control (blood glucose <180 mg/dL) has been shown to reduce morbidity and enhance long-term survival in patients with diabetes mellitus following coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. In this review we present a management strategy to achieve perioperative glycemic control in all patients undergoing CABG surgery, with and without diabetes mellitus, designed to achieve compliance with current Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP) and Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) guidelines. PMID:22640228

  11. Glycemic Control in Youth with Diabetes: The SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study

    PubMed Central

    Petitti, Diana B.; Klingensmith, Georgeanna J.; Bell, Ronny A.; Andrews, Jeanette S.; Dabelea, Dana; Imperatore, Giuseppina; Marcovina, Santica; Pihoker, Catherine; Standiford, Debra; Waitzfelder, Beth; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess correlates of glycemic control in a diverse population of children and youth with diabetes. Study design This was a cross-sectional analysis of data from a 6-center US study of diabetes in youth, including 3947 individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and 552 with type 2 diabetes (T2D), using hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels to assess glycemic control. Results HbA1c levels reflecting poor glycemic control (HbA1c ? 9.5%) were found in 17% of youth with T1D and in 27% of those with T2D. African-American, American Indian, Hispanic, and Asian/Pacific Islander youth with T1D were significantly more likely to have higher HbA1c levels compared with non-Hispanic white youth (with respective rates for poor glycemic control of 36%, 52%, 27%, and 26% vs 12%). Similarly poor control in these 4 racial/ethnic groups was found in youth with T2D. Longer duration of diabetes was significantly asso*ciated with poorer glycemic control in youth with T1D and T2D. Conclusions The high percentage of US youth with HbA1c levels above the target value and with poor glycemic control indicates an urgent need for effective treatment strategies to improve metabolic status in youth with diabetes. PMID:19643434

  12. ?-2-Macroglobulin in Saliva Is Associated with Glycemic Control in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Aitken, Juan Pablo; Ortiz, Carolina; Morales-Bozo, Irene; Rojas-Alcayaga, Gonzalo; Baeza, Mauricio; Beltran, Caroll

    2015-01-01

    Background. Subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) require an adequate glycemic control to avoid diabetic complications. Currently, saliva biomarkers are used as a diagnostic tool and can be indicative of the degree of progression and control of various diseases. Several studies indicate that ?-2-macroglobulin levels are elevated in diabetic patients. Methods. 120 subjects with DM2 were enrolled and classified into two groups according to their glycemic control (percentage of glycated hemoglobin-A1c (HbA1c), <7% adequate glycemic control group; >7% inadequate glycemic control group). The relationship between ?-2-macroglobulin levels from saliva samples and HbA1c was subsequently evaluated. Results. We found a positive correlation between ?-2-macroglobulin and HbA1c (r = 0.778 and P < 0.0001). Area under the receivers operating characteristic (ROC) curve of ?-2-macroglobulin indicated a positive discrimination threshold of ?-2-macroglobulin (AUC = 0.903, CI 95%: 0.8470.959, P < 0.0001) to diagnose glycemic control. Conclusions. Our data strongly suggest that the level of saliva ?-2-macroglobulin is an indicator for the degree of glycemic control in diabetic patients and represents a promising alternative method to evaluate this parameter. PMID:25821337

  13. Relationship of serum gamma-glutamyltransferase to atherogenic dyslipidemia and glycemic control in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Zoppini, Giacomo; Targher, Giovanni; Trombetta, Maddalena; Lippi, Giuseppe; Muggeo, Michele

    2009-02-01

    We evaluated possible interactions between BMI and serum gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) concentration and their effects on the prevalence of poor glycemic control and common comorbidities of diabetes. We assessed whether the association of BMI with poor glycemic control, hypertension, atherogenic dyslipidemia (i.e., high triglycerides and/or low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol), hypercholesterolemia, and hyperuricemia differed according to serum GGT concentration in a cohort of 3,633 type 2 diabetic individuals. The associations of BMI with different outcome measures were significant, but the associations varied remarkably by GGT concentration. As GGT concentration increased, the association of BMI with atherogenic dyslipidemia and glycemic control strengthened (P = 0.01 and 0.004 for interactions, respectively); in contrast, the association of BMI with hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and hyperuricemia did not change substantially across GGT quartiles. For example, within the lowest GGT quartile, BMI was not associated with atherogenic dyslipidemia or poor glycemic control, whereas in the highest GGT quartile, the prevalence rates ranged from 62.3 to 74.7% for dyslipidemia and from 75.3 to 83% for poor glycemic control. The results remained unchanged after adjustment for sex, age, alcohol consumption, diabetes duration, and diabetes treatment. In conclusion, our findings show that BMI was associated with atherogenic dyslipidemia and poor glycemic control only when serum GGT activity was in its high-normal range. These findings suggest that obesity itself may not be a sufficient risk factor for atherogenic dyslipidemia or poor glycemic control in people with type 2 diabetes. PMID:19057528

  14. Anxiety Symptoms in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes: Association with Blood Glucose Monitoring and Glycemic Control

    PubMed Central

    Herzer, Michele

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine the prevalence of anxiety symptoms and their association with blood glucose monitoring (BGM) and glycemic control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Methods 276 adolescents and their caregivers completed measures of anxiety symptoms. Adolescents completed a measure of depressive symptoms. Demographic and family characteristics were obtained from caregiver report. Diabetes duration, regimen type, BGM frequency, and glycemic control were also collected. Results Trait anxiety symptoms that suggest further clinical assessment is needed were present in 17% of adolescents; the rate was 13% for state anxiety symptoms. Higher levels of state anxiety symptoms were associated with less frequent BGM F(14, 261) = 6.35, p < .0001, R2 = .25, and suboptimal glycemic control, F(15, 260) = 7.97, p < .0001, R2 = .32. State anxiety symptoms were correlates of BGM frequency and glycemic control independent of depressive symptoms. Conclusions State anxiety symptoms are associated with less frequent BGM and suboptimal glycemic control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. PMID:19684117

  15. Acute effects of dietary glycemic index on antioxidant capacity in nutrient-controlled feeding study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxidative stress, caused by an imbalance between antioxidant capacity and reactive oxygen species, may be an early event in a metabolic cascade elicited by a high glycemic index (GI) diet, ultimately increasing the risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. We conducted a feeding study to evalua...

  16. Effects of a Psychoeducational Group on Mood and Glycemic Control in Adults with Diabetes and Visual Impairments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trozzolino, Linda; Thompson, Pamela S.; Tansman, Mara S.; Azen, Stanley P.

    2003-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of a 12-week psychoeducational group therapy program in improving mood and glycemic control in 48 adults with diabetes and visual impairments. Participants made statistically significant gains in glycemic control. There was a significant positive relationship between control and improvement in depression, but

  17. Glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus prevents coronary arterial wall infection

    PubMed Central

    Izadi, Morteza; Fazel, Mojgan; Karbasi-Afshar, Reza; Saadat, Seyed Hassan; Nasseri, Mohammad Hassan; Jonaidi-Jafari, Nematollah; Ranjbar, Reza; Kazemi-Saleh, Davood

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a very well-known risk factor for development of atherosclerosis, and it has been hypothesized that poor glycemic control and hyperglycemia plays a major role in this process. In the current study, we aimed to evaluate the associates of poor glycemic control in Iranian patients who have already undergone coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), with especial focus on the inhabitation of infectious agents within the coronary arterial wall. METHODS In January 2010, 52 consecutive patients with type 2 DM who undergone CABG at the Department of Cardiovascular Surgery of Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences (Tehran, Iran) were included into this cross-sectional study and biopsy specimens from their coronary plaques were taken and analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods for detecting Helicobacter species, cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Chlamydia pneumoniae, and their potential relation to the glycemic control status in these patients. RESULTS Compared to that in diabetic patients with mean fasting blood sugar (FBS) levels FBS < 126, atherosclerotic lesions in type 2 diabetic patients with poor glycemic control (FBS > 126) were significantly more likely to be positive for CMV PCR test (41% vs. 9%, respectively; P = 0.05). In laboratorial test results, mean triglyceride level was significantly higher among patients of poor glycemic control (168 89 vs. 222 125 mg/dl, respectively; P = 0.033). Hypertension was also significantly more prevalent in this population (73% vs. 36%, respectively; P = 0.034). CONCLUSION Type 2 diabetic patients with poor glycemic control can be at higher risk for developing CMV infection in their coronary arterial wall, which can promote atherosclerosis formation process in this patient population. According to the findings of this study, we recommend better control of serum glucose levels in type 2 diabetic patients to prevent formation/progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:25161684

  18. Ethnic disparities in glycemic control among rural older adults with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Quandt, Sara A; Bell, Ronny A; Snively, Beverly M; Smith, Shannon L; Stafford, Jeanette M; Wetmore, Lindsay K; Arcury, Thomas A

    2005-01-01

    Glycemic control is a predictor of diabetes-related morbidity and mortality. However, little is known about how well older adults in rural communities, with limited access to self-care resources and specialty care practitioners, control their diabetes. Even less is known about whether minority, older, rural adults are at increased risk for poor glycemic control. We analyzed data from a cross-sectional survey of randomly selected older (> or =65 years) adults with type 2 diabetes in rural North Carolina. Participants (N=693) were men and women from three ethnic groups: African American, Native American, and White. Capillary blood samples were collected for HbA1C analysis. HbA1C levels (<7%, 7%-<8%, and > or =8%) were compared across ethnic and gender groups. Two multiple logistic regression models (model 1: personal characteristics; model 2: personal and health characteristics) were used to evaluate potential predictors of HbA1C > or =7%. Overall, 36.4% had HbA1C > or =7%. Native Americans and African-American men had the highest proportion at levels of poor glycemic control (> or =7%), and African-American women and White men had the lowest. In bivariate analysis, ethnicity, living arrangements, use of medications for diabetes, having a diabetes-related healthcare visit in the past year, and duration of diabetes were significantly associated with glycemic control. In multivariate analysis (model 1), being Native American, having low income without Medicaid, and being married were associated with poor glycemic control. Adding health characteristics (model 2), longer diabetes duration and diabetes medication therapy were significant predictors. These data indicate that older ethnic minorities in rural communities are at increased risk for diabetes complications and need diabetes management strategies to improve glycemic control. PMID:16259490

  19. Taking a low glycemic index multi-nutrient supplement as breakfast improves glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Li, Di; Zhang, Peiwen; Guo, Honghui; Ling, Wenhua

    2014-12-01

    Dietary therapy is the mainstay of treatment for diabetes. This study examined the effect of a low glycemic index (GI) multi-nutrient supplement, consumed in place of breakfast, on glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A total of 71 participants were randomized at a 2:1 ratio into either a breakfast replacement group or a normal breakfast group for a 12-week interventional study. The primary outcome measure was change in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). Nutrition status and somatometry were studied as secondary outcomes. The breakfast replacement group displayed a -0.2% absolute reduction in HbA1c (95% CI (confidence interval), -0.38% to -0.07%, p = 0.004), while the HbA1c of the control group increased 0.3% (95% CI, 0.1% to 0.5%, p = 0.005). The baseline Mini Nutritional Assessment score for both groups was 26.0 and no significant changes occurred following intervention. However, there was a statistically significant difference in body mass index between the treatment and control groups (p = 0.032) due to the weight gain in the control group (increased 0.5 kg, 95% CI was 0.2 to 0.9, p = 0.007). These data suggest that breakfast replacement with a low GI multi-nutrient supplement can improve glycemic and weight control in T2DM. PMID:25514391

  20. Taking a Low Glycemic Index Multi-Nutrient Supplement as Breakfast Improves Glycemic Control in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Li, Di; Zhang, Peiwen; Guo, Honghui; Ling, Wenhua

    2014-01-01

    Dietary therapy is the mainstay of treatment for diabetes. This study examined the effect of a low glycemic index (GI) multi-nutrient supplement, consumed in place of breakfast, on glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A total of 71 participants were randomized at a 2:1 ratio into either a breakfast replacement group or a normal breakfast group for a 12-week interventional study. The primary outcome measure was change in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). Nutrition status and somatometry were studied as secondary outcomes. The breakfast replacement group displayed a ?0.2% absolute reduction in HbA1c (95% CI (confidence interval), ?0.38% to ?0.07%, p = 0.004), while the HbA1c of the control group increased 0.3% (95% CI, 0.1% to 0.5%, p = 0.005). The baseline Mini Nutritional Assessment score for both groups was 26.0 and no significant changes occurred following intervention. However, there was a statistically significant difference in body mass index between the treatment and control groups (p = 0.032) due to the weight gain in the control group (increased 0.5 kg, 95% CI was 0.2 to 0.9, p = 0.007). These data suggest that breakfast replacement with a low GI multi-nutrient supplement can improve glycemic and weight control in T2DM. PMID:25514391

  1. Mean platelet volume predicts the glycemic control deterioration in diabetes mellitus type 2 patients.

    PubMed

    Kadić, Damira; Hasić, Sabaheta; Spahić, Emina

    2016-02-01

    Aim To investigate association of mean platelet volume (MPV) and glycemic control markers, and whether MPV could be used as a predictor of deterioration of glucoregulation in Diabetes mellitus type 2 (DMT2) patients. Methods The cross-sectional study included 106 DMT2 patients, treated at the Primary Health Care Centre in Zenica, distributed into groups according to glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) values: A(n=44, HbA1c ≤7.0%) and B (n=62, HbA1c>7.0%). Spearman's correlation coefficients were calculated to evaluate the relationships between MPV and glycemic control markers. Binomial logistic regression analysis was performed to estimate the relationship between glycemic control, as dichotomous outcome, and MPV as the main predictor. Diagnostic value of MPV as a marker for poor glucoregulation was estimated by using ROC analysis. Results Mean platelet volume was significantly higher in the group B compared to the group A (p<0.0005). Significant positive correlations of MPV with fasting blood glucose and HbA1c were found in the total sample (rho=0.382, p<0.0005; rho=0.430, p<0.0005, respectively). Mean platelet volume was positively associated with the risk of inadequate glycemic control, with 2 times increased odds of inadequate glycemic control per femtoliter greater MPV (Exp (β) =2.195; 95% CI=1.468 - 3.282, p<0.0005). The area under ROC curve for MPV was 0.726 (95% CI: =0.628- 0.823, p <0.0005). At the best cut-off value 9.55 fL, MPV showed sensitivity of 82% and specificity of 54.5%. Conclusion Mean platelet volume correlates with glycemic control markers in DMT2 patients. It could be used as a simple and cost-effective predictor of deterioration of glucoregulation. PMID:26827701

  2. Cross-sectional study of glycemic control among adults with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Amarasekara, Amarasekara Appuhamillage Thamara Dilhani; Fongkaew, Warunee; Wimalasekera, Savithri Wasundara; Turale, Sue; Chanprasit, Chawapornpan

    2015-06-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a chronic condition, a global concern, and a serious issue in Sri Lanka, where there is little data regarding the influence of dietary control, exercise, and adherence to medication behaviors among adults diabetes. In this cross-sectional, descriptive study, we identified current factors influencing glycemic control and glycemic control behavior among adults with diabetes. A total of 230 people attending diabetes clinics in a tertiary hospital and a primary care institute were administered the self-report Diabetes Information Form, assessing their socioeconomic and medical information and glycemic control behaviors. Data were analyzed by frequency distribution, percentages, mean scores, and standard deviation. The results indicated that most participants had not achieved the recommended fasting blood glucose level (control was practised by 72%, regular exercise was not practised by 85%, and while 77% reported adhering to regular medication, they still had poor glycemic control. The findings highlight the need for health professionals to adopt new strategies for diabetes education to overcome issues related to misconceptions and barriers in providing diabetes care in Sri Lanka. PMID:25496606

  3. Utility of different glycemic control metrics for optimizing management of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kohnert, Klaus-Dieter; Heinke, Peter; Vogt, Lutz; Salzsieder, Eckhard

    2015-02-15

    The benchmark for assessing quality of long-term glycemic control and adjustment of therapy is currently glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Despite its importance as an indicator for the development of diabetic complications, recent studies have revealed that this metric has some limitations; it conveys a rather complex message, which has to be taken into consideration for diabetes screening and treatment. On the basis of recent clinical trials, the relationship between HbA1c and cardiovascular outcomes in long-standing diabetes has been called into question. It becomes obvious that other surrogate and biomarkers are needed to better predict cardiovascular diabetes complications and assess efficiency of therapy. Glycated albumin, fructosamin, and 1,5-anhydroglucitol have received growing interest as alternative markers of glycemic control. In addition to measures of hyperglycemia, advanced glucose monitoring methods became available. An indispensible adjunct to HbA1c in routine diabetes care is self-monitoring of blood glucose. This monitoring method is now widely used, as it provides immediate feedback to patients on short-term changes, involving fasting, preprandial, and postprandial glucose levels. Beyond the traditional metrics, glycemic variability has been identified as a predictor of hypoglycemia, and it might also be implicated in the pathogenesis of vascular diabetes complications. Assessment of glycemic variability is thus important, but exact quantification requires frequently sampled glucose measurements. In order to optimize diabetes treatment, there is a need for both key metrics of glycemic control on a day-to-day basis and for more advanced, user-friendly monitoring methods. In addition to traditional discontinuous glucose testing, continuous glucose sensing has become a useful tool to reveal insufficient glycemic management. This new technology is particularly effective in patients with complicated diabetes and provides the opportunity to characterize glucose dynamics. Several continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) systems, which have shown usefulness in clinical practice, are presently on the market. They can broadly be divided into systems providing retrospective or real-time information on glucose patterns. The widespread clinical application of CGM is still hampered by the lack of generally accepted measures for assessment of glucose profiles and standardized reporting of glucose data. In this article, we will discuss advantages and limitations of various metrics for glycemic control as well as possibilities for evaluation of glucose data with the special focus on glycemic variability and application of CGM to improve individual diabetes management. PMID:25685275

  4. Utility of different glycemic control metrics for optimizing management of diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kohnert, Klaus-Dieter; Heinke, Peter; Vogt, Lutz; Salzsieder, Eckhard

    2015-01-01

    The benchmark for assessing quality of long-term glycemic control and adjustment of therapy is currently glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Despite its importance as an indicator for the development of diabetic complications, recent studies have revealed that this metric has some limitations; it conveys a rather complex message, which has to be taken into consideration for diabetes screening and treatment. On the basis of recent clinical trials, the relationship between HbA1c and cardiovascular outcomes in long-standing diabetes has been called into question. It becomes obvious that other surrogate and biomarkers are needed to better predict cardiovascular diabetes complications and assess efficiency of therapy. Glycated albumin, fructosamin, and 1,5-anhydroglucitol have received growing interest as alternative markers of glycemic control. In addition to measures of hyperglycemia, advanced glucose monitoring methods became available. An indispensible adjunct to HbA1c in routine diabetes care is self-monitoring of blood glucose. This monitoring method is now widely used, as it provides immediate feedback to patients on short-term changes, involving fasting, preprandial, and postprandial glucose levels. Beyond the traditional metrics, glycemic variability has been identified as a predictor of hypoglycemia, and it might also be implicated in the pathogenesis of vascular diabetes complications. Assessment of glycemic variability is thus important, but exact quantification requires frequently sampled glucose measurements. In order to optimize diabetes treatment, there is a need for both key metrics of glycemic control on a day-to-day basis and for more advanced, user-friendly monitoring methods. In addition to traditional discontinuous glucose testing, continuous glucose sensing has become a useful tool to reveal insufficient glycemic management. This new technology is particularly effective in patients with complicated diabetes and provides the opportunity to characterize glucose dynamics. Several continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) systems, which have shown usefulness in clinical practice, are presently on the market. They can broadly be divided into systems providing retrospective or real-time information on glucose patterns. The widespread clinical application of CGM is still hampered by the lack of generally accepted measures for assessment of glucose profiles and standardized reporting of glucose data. In this article, we will discuss advantages and limitations of various metrics for glycemic control as well as possibilities for evaluation of glucose data with the special focus on glycemic variability and application of CGM to improve individual diabetes management. PMID:25685275

  5. Achieving glycemic control in special populations in hospital: perspectives in practice.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Alice Y Y

    2014-04-01

    Achieving and maintaining glycemic control in patients with diabetes admitted to hospital is challenging because of the many competing factors of nutrition, pharmacotherapy and other patient-related and systemic factors. For patients receiving enteral or parenteral feeding, eating irregularly or receiving glucocorticoid therapy, the challenges are even greater. The basic principles to follow when managing glycemia in these populations are as follows: 1) Recognition of those at risk for hyperglycemia; 2) frequent bedside glucose monitoring; 3) a proactive approach with routine insulin administration based on the predicted glucose patterns; 4) constant reassessment of the glycemic status and titration of the routine insulin accordingly. PMID:24690508

  6. Physician and patient management of type 2 diabetes and factors related to glycemic control in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Yurgin, Nicole Rae; Boye, Kristina Secnik; Dilla, Tatiana; Suriach, Nria Lara; Llach, Xavier Badia

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess current treatment patterns, blood glucose test strip usage, and treatment compliance in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in primary care centers in Spain, and to assess factors related to glycemic control. We conducted a retrospective chart review of patients with T2DM and measured treatment compliance using the Morisky-Green questionnaire. 294 patients were included in the study from a population of patients attending 30 primary care centers throughout Spain. Results showed that the majority of patients were treated with oral monotherapy (36%) and oral combination therapy (35%). Less than half of the patients had good glycemic control (HbA1c ? 6.5%). Half of the patients treated pharmacologically reported good compliance with treatment. Logistic regression analyses performed to identify factors associated with glycemic control showed that high body mass index (BMI) and poor compliance were the strongest predictors of poor HbA1c control (OR: 2.198 and 1.789, respectively, p < 0.05). In conclusion, in the course of managing diabetes, physicians and patients should attempt to improve compliance and lower BMI, which could lead to better glycemic control. PMID:19920948

  7. Determinants of glycemic control in youth with type 2 diabetes at randomization in the TODAY study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate insulin sensitivity and secretion indices and determinants of glycemic control in youth with recent-onset type 2 diabetes (T2DM) at randomization in the TODAY study, the largest study of youth with T2DM to date. We examined estimates of insulin sensitivit...

  8. Association of Exercise Stages of Change with Glycemic Control in Individuals with Type 2 Diabetes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natarajan, Sundar; Clyburn, Ernest B.; Brown, Ronald T.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated the distribution of diabetic patients' stages of change to follow an exercise regimen, examining whether later stages of change were associated with better glycemic control. Data on participants from a primary care clinic (who were predominantly black, female, and indigent) indicated that over half of were in pre-contemplation,

  9. Predictors of poor glycemic control in type 2 diabetic patients attending public hospitals in Dar es Salaam

    PubMed Central

    Kamuhabwa, Appolinary R; Charles, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Background Tanzania has recently experienced a significant rise in the burden of diabetes, and it is estimated that more than 400,000 people are living with diabetes. A major concern in the management of diabetes is the occurrence of diabetic complications that occur as a result of poor glycemic control. Identification of the factors associated with poor glycemic control is important in order to institute appropriate interventions for the purpose of improving glycemic control and prevention of chronic complications. Aim The aim of this study was to determine the level of glycemic control and explore the factors associated with poor glycemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methodology A cross-sectional study was carried out at the diabetic clinics for T2DM patients at the national and municipal hospitals in Dar es Salaam. A total of 469 patients were enrolled over a period of 8 weeks from March 2013 to May 2013. Patients information such as sociodemographic characteristics, self-care management behaviors, and medication adherence were obtained through interviews. Blood pressure, weight, and height were measured during the day of the interview. All available last readings for fasting blood glucose (FBG) measurements, lipid profile, and other clinical characteristics were obtained from patients records. Results The mean age of patients was 54.93 years. The majority (63.5%) of patients were females and only eight patients had records of lipid profile measurements. Out of 469 patients, 69.7% had FBG of ?7.2 mmol/L, indicating poor glycemic control. Females aged between 40 years and 59 years had significantly higher poor glycemic control (76.1%) as compared with their male counterparts. Thirty-eight percent of patients had poor medication adherence, which was associated with poor glycemic control. The proportion of poor glycemic control increased with age. A significantly high proportion of poor glycemic control was observed in patients who had had the disease for more than 20 years since diagnosis. Factors associated with poor glycemic control included lack of health insurance, using more than one oral hypoglycemic agent, normal body mass index, obesity, and nonadherence to diabetic medications. Conclusion Patients in this study had generally poor glycemic control. From these findings it is recommended that diabetic patients should be routinely screened for lipid profile to determine levels of cholesterol, triglycerides, and low-density lipoproteins, which are risk factors for cardiovascular events. An education program should be developed to educate patients on the importance of medication adherence and weight management for better glycemic control. PMID:25368533

  10. Low Glycemic Index Carbohydrates versus All Types of Carbohydrates for Treating Diabetes in Pregnancy: A Randomized Clinical Trial to Evaluate the Effect of Glycemic Control

    PubMed Central

    Perichart-Perera, Otilia; Balas-Nakash, Margie; Rodrguez-Cano, Ameyalli; Legorreta-Legorreta, Jennifer; Parra-Covarrubias, Adalberto; Vadillo-Ortega, Felipe

    2012-01-01

    Background. Due to the higher prevalence of obesity and diabetes mellitus (DM), more pregnant women complicated with diabetes are in need of clinical care. Purpose. Compare the effect of including only low glycemic index (GI) carbohydrates (CHO) against all types of CHO on maternal glycemic control and on the maternal and newborn's nutritional status of women with type 2 DM and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Methods. Women (n = 107, ?29 weeks of gestation) were randomly assigned to one of two nutrition intervention groups: moderate energy and CHO restriction (Group 1: all types of CHO, Group 2: low GI foods). Results. No baseline differences in clinical data were observed. Capillary glucose concentrations throughout pregnancy were similar between groups. Fewer women in Group 2 exceeded weight gain recommendations. Higher risk of prematurity was observed in women in Group 2. No differences in glycemic control were observed between women with type 2 DM and those with GDM. Conclusions. Inclusion of low GI CHO as part of a comprehensive nutrition intervention is equally effective in improving glycemic control as compared to all types of CHO. This strategy had a positive effect in preventing excessive maternal weight gain but increased the risk of prematurity. PMID:23251152

  11. Effect of aerobic and anaerobic exercises on glycemic control in type 1 diabetic youths

    PubMed Central

    Lukács, Andrea; Barkai, László

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the long-term effect of aerobic and/or anaerobic exercise on glycemic control in youths with type 1 diabetes. METHODS: Literature review was performed in spring and summer 2014 using PubMed/MEDLINE, Google Scholar, Scopus, and ScienceDirect with the following terms: aerobic, anaerobic, high-intensity, resistance, exercise/training, combined with glycemic/metabolic control, glycated haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and type 1 diabetes. Only peer-reviewed articles in English were included published in the last 15 years. It was selected from 1999 to 2014. Glycemic control was measured with HbA1c. Studies with an intervention lasting at least 12 wk were included if the HbA1c was measured before and after the intervention. RESULTS: A total of nine articles were found, and they were published between the years of 2002-2011. The sample size was 401 diabetic youths (166 males and 235 females) with an age range of 10-19 years except one study, in which the age range was 13-30 years. Study participants were from Australia, Tunisia, Lithuania, Taiwan, Turkey, Brazilia, Belgium, Egypt and France. Four studies were aerobic-based, four were combined aerobic and anaerobic programs, and one compared aerobic exercise to anaerobic one. Available studies had insufficient evidence that any type of exercise or combined training would clearly improve the glycemic control in type 1 diabetic youth. Only three (two aerobic-based and one combined) studies could provide a significant positive change in glycemic control. CONCLUSION: The regular physical exercise has several other valuable physiological and health benefits that justify the inclusion of exercise in pediatric diabetes treatment and care. PMID:25897363

  12. Optimal glycemic control in neurocritical care patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Hyper- and hypoglycemia are strongly associated with adverse outcomes in critical care. Neurologically injured patients are a unique subgroup, where optimal glycemic targets may differ, such that the findings of clinical trials involving heterogeneous critically ill patients may not apply. Methods We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing intensive insulin therapy with conventional glycemic control among patients with traumatic brain injury, ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke, anoxic encephalopathy, central nervous system infections or spinal cord injury. Results Sixteen RCTs, involving 1248 neurocritical care patients, were included. Glycemic targets with intensive insulin ranged from 70-140 mg/dl (3.9-7.8 mmol/L), while conventional protocols aimed to keep glucose levels below 144-300 mg/dl (8.0-16.7 mmol/L). Tight glycemic control had no impact on mortality (RR 0.99; 95% CI 0.83-1.17; p = 0.88), but did result in fewer unfavorable neurological outcomes (RR 0.91; 95% CI 0.84-1.00; p = 0.04). However, improved outcomes were only observed when glucose levels in the conventional glycemic control group were permitted to be relatively high [threshold for insulin administration > 200 mg/dl (> 11.1 mmol/L)], but not with more intermediate glycemic targets [threshold for insulin administration 140-180 mg/dl (7.8-10.0 mmol/L)]. Hypoglycemia was far more common with intensive therapy (RR 3.10; 95% CI 1.54-6.23; p = 0.002), but there was a large degree of heterogeneity in the results of individual trials (Q = 47.9; p<0.0001; I2 = 75%). Mortality was non-significantly higher with intensive insulin in studies where the proportion of patients developing hypoglycemia was large (> 33%) (RR 1.17; 95% CI 0.79-1.75; p = 0.44). Conclusions Intensive insulin therapy significantly increases the risk of hypoglycemia and does not influence mortality among neurocritical care patients. Very loose glucose control is associated with worse neurological recovery and should be avoided. These results suggest that intermediate glycemic goals may be most appropriate. PMID:23082798

  13. Impact of Glycemic Control on Heart Rate Variability in Youth with Type 1 Diabetes: The SEARCH CVD Study

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Mamta; Fingerlin, Tasha E.; Urbina, Elaine M.; Wadwa, R. Paul; Talton, Jennifer W.; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Hamman, Richard F.; Daniels, Stephen R.; Marcovina, Santica M.; Dolan, Larry M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aim: This study explored the role of glycemic control on cardiac autonomic function, measured by heart rate variability (HRV), in youth with type 1 diabetes. Patients and Methods: A retrospective cohort of 345 youth with type 1 diabetes (mean age, 18.5 years; duration, 10 years) participating in the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth study were enrolled in the ancillary SEARCH Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) study. Anthropometric, metabolic, and HRV parameters were collected at the current research visit. Glycemic control over time was assessed by the mean glycated hemoglobin (A1c) levels collected over the past 6 years. Multiple linear regression analysis assessed the association between A1c over time and HRV parameters, independent of demographic and CVD risk factors. Participants were categorized into four glycemic control categories based on their mean A1c over time: Group 1, optimal (mean A1c, ?7.4%); Group 2 (mean A1c, 7.58.4%); Group 3 (mean A1c, 8.59.4%), and Group 4, poor (mean A1c, ?9.5%), and a linear trend was explored across these categories. Results: For every 1% increase in the average A1c over 6 years there was a 5% decrease in the SD of the normal RR interval (SDNN) (P=0.02) and 7% decrease in the root mean square successive difference of the RR interval (RMSSD) (P=0.02), independent of demographic and traditional CVD risk factors. A doseresponse relationship between worsening glucose control categories and measures of overall reduced HRV was found. Conclusions: Chronic hyperglycemia is the main determinant of early cardiac autonomic dysfunction, manifested as reduced overall HRV and parasympathetic loss, among youth with type 1 diabetes. PMID:24010960

  14. Mobile Phone Diabetes Project Led To Improved Glycemic Control And Net Savings For Chicago Plan Participants

    PubMed Central

    Nundy, Shantanu; Dick, Jonathan J.; Chou, Chia-Hung; Nocon, Robert S.; Chin, Marshall H.; Peek, Monica E.

    2014-01-01

    Even with the best health care available, patients with chronic illnesses typically spend no more than a few hours a year in a health care setting, while their outcomes are largely determined by their activities during the remaining 5,000 waking hours of the year. As a widely available, low-cost technology, mobile phones are a promising tool to use in engaging patients in behavior change and facilitating self-care between visits. We examined the impact of a six-month mobile health (mHealth) demonstration project among adults with diabetes who belonged to an academic medical centers employee health plan. In addition to pre-post improvements in glycemic control (p = 0.01) and patients satisfaction with overall care (p = 0.04), we observed a net cost savings of 8.8 percent. Those early results suggest that mHealth programs can support health care organizations pursuit of the triple aim of improving patients experiences with care, improving population health, and reducing the per capita cost of health care. PMID:24493770

  15. Mobile phone diabetes project led to improved glycemic control and net savings for Chicago plan participants.

    PubMed

    Nundy, Shantanu; Dick, Jonathan J; Chou, Chia-Hung; Nocon, Robert S; Chin, Marshall H; Peek, Monica E

    2014-02-01

    Even with the best health care available, patients with chronic illnesses typically spend no more than a few hours a year in a health care setting, while their outcomes are largely determined by their activities during the remaining 5,000 waking hours of the year. As a widely available, low-cost technology, mobile phones are a promising tool to use in engaging patients in behavior change and facilitating self-care between visits. We examined the impact of a six-month mobile health (mHealth) demonstration project among adults with diabetes who belonged to an academic medical center's employee health plan. In addition to pre-post improvements in glycemic control (p=0.01) and patients' satisfaction with overall care (p=0.04), we observed a net cost savings of 8.8 percent. Those early results suggest that mHealth programs can support health care organizations' pursuit of the triple aim of improving patients' experiences with care, improving population health, and reducing the per capita cost of health care PMID:24493770

  16. A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL OF RESISTANCE EXERCISE TRAINING TO IMPROVE GLYCEMIC CONTROL IN OLDER ADULTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVE-To determine the efficacy of high-intensity progressive resistance training (PRT) on glycemic control in older adults with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS-We performed a 16-week randomized controlled trial in 62 Latino older adults (40 women and 22 men; mean +/- SE age 66 +/...

  17. Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess in diabetic patients: association of glycemic control with the clinical characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess (KPLA) has been reported with increasing frequency in East Asian countries in the past 3 decades, especially in Taiwan and Korea. Diabetes is a well-known risk factor for KPLA and highly associated with septic metastatic complications from KPLA. We investigated the association of glycemic control in diabetic patients with the clinical characteristics of KPLA in Taiwan. Methods Adult diabetic patients with KPLA were identified retrospectively in a medical center from January 2007 to January 2012. Clinical characteristics were compared among patients with different levels of current hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). Risk factors for metastatic infection from KPLA were analyzed. Results Patients with uncontrolled glycemia (HbA1c???7%) were significantly younger than those with controlled glycemia (HbA1c < 7%). Patients with uncontrolled glycemia had the trend to have a higher rate of gas-forming liver abscess, cryptogenic liver abscess, and metastatic infection than those with controlled glycemia. Cryptogenic liver abscess and metastatic infection were more common in the poor glycemic control group (HbA1c value >; 10%) after adjustment with age. HbA1c level and abscess < 5 cm were independent risk factors for metastatic complications from KPLA. Conclusions Glycemic control in diabetic patients played an essential role in the clinical characteristics of KPLA, especially in metastatic complications from KPLA. PMID:23363608

  18. The influence of a low glycemic index dietary intervention on maternal dietary intake, glycemic index and gestational weight gain during pregnancy: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Maternal diet is known to impact pregnancy outcome. Following a low glycemic index (GI) diet during pregnancy has been shown to improve maternal glycemia and reduce infant birthweight and may be associated with a higher fibre intake. We assessed the impact of a low GI dietary intervention on maternal GI, nutritional intake and gestational weight gain (GWG) during pregnancy. Compliance and acceptability of the low GI diet was also examined. Method Eight hundred women were randomised in early pregnancy to receive low GI and healthy eating dietary advice or to receive standard maternity care. The intervention group received dietary advice at a group education session before 22weeks gestation. All women completed a 3day food diary during each trimester of pregnancy. Two hundred and thirty five women from the intervention arm and 285 women from the control arm returned complete 3x3d FDs and were included in the present analysis. Results Maternal GI was significantly reduced in the intervention group at trimester 2 and 3. The numbers of women within the lowest quartile of GI increased from 37% in trimester 1 to 52% in trimester 3 (P?early pregnancy had a positive influence on maternal GI, food and nutrient intakes and GWG. Following a low GI diet may be particularly beneficial for women at risk of exceeding the GWG goals for pregnancy. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials Registration Number: ISRCTN54392969. PMID:24175958

  19. Tight Glycemic Control and Cardiovascular Effects in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Moodahadu, Latha Subramanya; Dhall, Ruchi; Zargar, Abdul Hamid; Bangera, Sudhakar; Ramani, Lalitha; Katipally, Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM) with poor glycemic control is one of the leading causes for cardiovascular mortality in diabetic patients. Tight glycemic control with glycosylated haemoglobin of <7 gms% is recommended as a routine and < 6.5 gms% is recommended for young and newly diagnosed diabetics. Treatment goal aims at achieving near normal blood glucose level, and directed at management of other co morbid conditions such as obesity, hypertension and dyslipidemia. Oral hypoglycemic agents are the preferred drugs, alone or in combination. Preference for glitazones is declining due to the increasing evidences of associated adverse events. Gliptins appear as promising agents with lesser tendency to cause hypoglycemia, but their long term safety and efficacy is yet to be established. We emphasize the role of preventive measures in prediabetics and in established DM, treatment should be individualized and customized to minimize hypoglycemic effects and to retain quality of life. PMID:25774253

  20. Diabetes self-management education interventions and glycemic control among hispanics: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Lisanna Stamos; Berry, Diane C; Davison, Jean Ann

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes self-management education interventions have been shown to improve glycemic control in Whites and African Americans with type 2 diabetes. Hispanic women and men, however, sometimes have barriers to management including lack of access to care, low English proficiency, low literacy, and cultural differences. This review examined the state of the science related to the effects of diabetes self-management education interventions on glycemic control in Hispanics. The 8 of 9 studies showed a significant decrease in glycated hemoglobin in experimental patients. The interventions also demonstrated the success of using community health workers, bilingual interventionists, culturally sensitive designs, and accessible interventions. Limitations included weak study designs, high attrition rates, and short duration of studies. PMID:24831069

  1. Perioperative glycemic control using an artificial endocrine pancreas in patients undergoing total pancreatectomy: tight glycemic control may be justified in order to avoid brittle diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hanazaki, Kazuhiro; Yatabe, Tomoaki; Kobayashi, Masaki; Tsukamoto, Yuuki; Kinoshita, Yoshihiko; Munekage, Masaya; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    I dedicate this paper to the late Prof. Yukihiko Nos with all my heart. In 2001, under the direction of Prof. Nos and Prof. Brunicardi at Baylor College of Medicine, we published a review article entitled "Artificial endocrine pancreas" in JACS. Subsequently, we reported that perioperative tight glycemic control (TGC) using an artificial pancreas (AP) with a closed-loop system could stably maintain near-normoglycemia in total-pancreatectomized dogs. Based on this experimental study in Houston, since 2006, we have introduced perioperative TGC using an AP into clinical use in Kochi. As of 2011, this novel TGC method has provided safe and stable blood glucose levels in more than 400 surgical patients. In this paper, we report new clinical findings regarding perioperative TGC using an AP in total-pancreatectomized patients. TGC using an AP enables us to achieve stable glycemic control not only without hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia but also with less variation in blood glucose concentration from the target blood glucose range, even in patients with the most serious form of diabetes, so-called "brittle diabetes", undergoing total pancreatectomy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first clinical report of TGC using an AP in patients undergoing total pancreatic resection. PMID:23442241

  2. Chronotype Is Independently Associated With Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Reutrakul, Sirimon; Hood, Megan M.; Crowley, Stephanie J.; Morgan, Mary K.; Teodori, Marsha; Knutson, Kristen L.; Van Cauter, Eve

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine whether chronotype and daily caloric distribution are associated with glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes independently of sleep disturbances. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Patients with type 2 diabetes had a structured interview and completed questionnaires to collect information on diabetes history and habitual sleep duration, quality, and timing. Shift workers were excluded. A recently validated construct derived from mid-sleep time on weekends was used as an indicator of chronotype. One-day food recall was used to compute the temporal distribution of caloric intake. Hierarchical linear regression analyses controlling for demographic and sleep variables were computed to determine whether chronotype was associated with HbA1c values and whether this association was mediated by a higher proportion of caloric intake at dinner. RESULTS We analyzed 194 completed questionnaires. Multiple regression analyses adjusting for age, sex, race, BMI, insulin use, depressed mood, diabetes complications, and perceived sleep debt found that chronotype was significantly associated with glycemic control (P = 0.001). This association was partially mediated by a greater percentage of total daily calories consumed at dinner. CONCLUSIONS Later chronotype and larger dinner were associated with poorer glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes independently of sleep disturbances. These results suggest that chronotype may be predictive of disease outcomes and lend further support to the role of the circadian system in metabolic regulation. PMID:23637357

  3. Strategies for Optimizing Glycemic Control and Cardiovascular Prognosis in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    O'Keefe, James H.; Abuannadi, Mohammad; Lavie, Carl J.; Bell, David S. H.

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major cardiovascular (CV) risk factor and, as such, is considered a coronary artery disease risk equivalent. Although glycemic control is associated with decreased CV events epidemiologically, many prospective clinical trials have failed to conclusively demonstrate that aggressive glycemic control improves the CV prognosis of patients with type 2 DM, especially those with long-standing DM. Many therapies for type 2 DM with widely divergent mechanisms of action are available. Some of these drugs, in addition to their glucose-lowering actions, have properties that may reduce or increase CV events. Agents that lower both insulin resistance and postprandial hyperglycemia while at the same time avoiding hypoglycemia may be beneficial for CV health. This article reviews the evidence regarding the use of these agents and appropriate glycemic control targets for improving the adverse CV prognosis associated with type 2 DM. We conducted a systematic review of English articles using MEDLINE and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (1970-2010) using the following search terms: cardiovascular disease, randomized trials, hypoglycemia, and insulin resistance. PMID:21270290

  4. Overcoming barriers to glycemic control in African Americans with type-2 diabetes: benefits of insulin therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Merville C.

    2007-01-01

    A disproportionate number of African-American men and women are affected by obesity and diabetes. The documented rate of poor glycemic control in the African-American population may contribute to the high rate of morbidity and mortality due to diabetes observed in these patients. Since the benefits of strict glycemic control have been demonstrated in multiple large trials, the aim of treatment should be to achieve the goals set forth by the American Diabetes Association. Insulin remains an essential therapeutic agent for helping patients achieve glycemic control and preventing long-term comorbidities. However, barriers to insulin therapy exist for both the physician and patient. Strategies to counter this resistance include identifying barriers to treatment, restoring the patient's sense of control, utilizing simple regimens, and reviewing the benefits of insulin and the risk of hypoglycemia. In treating African-American patients with diabetes, providers of various racial and ethnic backgrounds may maximize treatment efficacy by attempting to understand and practice culturally competent care. PMID:17722663

  5. Determinants of Glycemic Control among Insulin Treated Diabetic Patients in Southwest Ethiopia: Hospital Based Cross Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Angamo, Mulugeta Tarekegn; Melese, Belete Habte; Ayen, Wubeante Yenet

    2013-01-01

    Background Good glycemic control reduces the risk of diabetic complications. Despite this, achieving good glycemic control remains a challenge in diabetic patients. The objective of this study is to identify determinants of glycemic control among insulin treated diabetic patients at Jimma University Hospital, Southwest Ethiopia. Methods Hospital-based cross-sectional study was conducted on systematically sampled 284 insulin-treated diabetic patients with a regular follow up. Data was collected by interviewing patients during hospital visits and reviewing respective databases of September 2010 to December 2011. Data collection took place from February 20 to May 20, 2012. Poor glycemic control was defined as fasting blood sugar (FBS) ≥126 mg/dL. Binary logistic regression analysis was conducted to identify predictors of poor glycemic control. Results Patients had a mean age of 41.37 (±15.08) years, 58.5% were males, the mean duration of insulin treatment was 4.9 (±5.1) years, 18.3% achieved good glycemic control (FBS≤126 mg/dL), 95% self-reported repeated use of disposable insulin syringe-needle and 48% correctly rotating insulin injection sites. Most (83.1%) of study participants had one or more complications. On multivariable logistic regression analyses, body weight of >70 Kg (AOR = 0.21; P<0.001), total daily dose of insulin ≤35 IU/day (AOR = 0.26; P<0.001), total daily dose variation without checking glycemic level (AOR = 3.39; P = 0.020), knowledge deficit about signs and symptoms of hyperglycemia (AOR = 3.60; P = 0.004), and non-adherence to dietary management (AOR = 0.35; P = 0.005) were independent predictors of poor glycemic control. Conclusions The proportion of patients with poor glycemic control was high, which resulted in the development of one or more complications regardless of duration on insulin treatment. Hence, appropriate management of patients focusing on the relevant associated factors and independent predictors of poor glycemic control would be of great benefit in glycemic control. PMID:23620789

  6. Potential mechanisms mediating improved glycemic control after bariatric/metabolic surgery.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Kaida, Sachiko; Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Murata, Satoshi; Tani, Masaji; Tani, Tohru

    2016-03-01

    Conservative medical treatment for morbid obesity generally fails to sustain weight loss. On the other hand, surgical operations, so-called bariatric surgery, have evolved due to their long-term effects. The global increase in the overweight population and the introduction of laparoscopic surgery have resulted in the use of bariatric surgery spreading quickly worldwide in recent years. Recent clinical evidence suggests that bariatric surgery not only reduces body weight, but also improves secondary serious diseases, including type 2 diabetes mellitus, in so-called metabolic surgery. Moreover, several potential mechanisms mediating the improvement in glycemic control after bariatric/metabolic surgery have been proposed based on the animal and human studies. These mechanisms include changes in the levels of gastrointestinal hormones, bacterial flora, bile acids, intestinal gluconeogenesis and gastrointestinal motility as well as adipose tissue and inflammatory mediators after surgery. The mechanisms underlying improved glycemic control are expected to accelerate the promotion of both metabolic and bariatric surgery. This article describes the current status of bariatric surgery worldwide and in Japan, reviews the accumulated data for weight loss and diabetic improvements after surgery and discusses the potential mechanisms mediating improved glycemic control. PMID:25700844

  7. Effect of improving glycemic control on low-density lipoprotein particle size in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wgner, Ana Mara; Jorba, Oscar; Rigla, Mercedes; Bonet, Rosa; de Leiva, Alberto; Ordez-Llanos, Jordi; Prez, Antonio

    2003-12-01

    The current study sought to assess the effect of improving glycemic control in type 2 diabetes on the components of diabetic dyslipidemia, especially low-density lipoprotein (LDL) size. A total of 33 type 2 diabetic patients (48.5% women, age 59.6 +/- 11.1 years, body mass index [BMI] 28.9 +/- 4.9, diabetes duration 6 [0 to 40] years, 40.7% on insulin) were seen at the hospital because of poor glycemic control (hemoglobin A(1c) [HbA(1c)] 10.33% +/- 1.89%). Triglyceride, LDL-cholesterol (LDLc, Friedewald/ ultracentrifugation), high-density lipoprotein HDL-cholesterol (HDLc, direct method), apolipoproteins AI (apoAI) and B (apoB) (immunoturbidimetry), and LDL size (gradient gel electrophoresis) were measured at baseline and after improvement in glycemic control (decrease >/= 1 percentage point in HbA(1c) and final HbA(1c) glycemic control (HbA(1c) 7.01% +/- 0.63%, P <.0005 v baseline) after a follow-up of 3.5 (range, 1 to 13) months resulted in a significant reduction in LDLc (3.34 +/- 1.02 v 3.62 +/- 1.15 mmol/L, P <.05) and apoB (1.07 +/- 0.25 v 1.17 +/- 0.29 g/L, P <.01) and an increase in HDLc (1.21 +/- 0.32 v 1.13 +/- 0.34 mmol/L, P <.05) and apoAI (1.36 +/- 0.24 v 1.27 +/- 0.24 mmol/L, P < 0.01) in the whole group, and an increase in LDL particle size (25.61 +/- 0.53 v 25.10 +/- 0.31 nm, P <.005) in the 14 patients showing LDL phenotype B at baseline. No significant changes were seen in body weight or BMI. We conclude that improvement of glycemic control in type 2 diabetes improves most of the components of diabetic dyslipidemia, including a shift towards larger LDL particles in subjects with phenotype B. PMID:14669158

  8. Relationships among sleep timing, sleep duration and glycemic control in Type 2 diabetes in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Reutrakul, Sirimon; Siwasaranond, Nantaporn; Nimitphong, Hataikarn; Saetung, Sunee; Chirakalwasan, Naricha; Ongphiphadhanakul, Boonsong; Thakkinstian, Ammarin; Hood, Megan M; Crowley, Stephanie J

    2015-12-01

    There is evidence that the sleep and circadian systems play a role in glucose metabolism. In addition to physiological factors, sleep is also affected by behavioral, environmental, cultural and social factors. In this study, we examined whether morning or evening preference, sleep timing and sleep duration are associated with glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes residing in Thailand. Two hundred and ten type 2 diabetes patients who were not shift workers completed an interview and questionnaires to collect information on diabetes history, habitual sleep duration and sleep timing. Chronotype, an individual's tendency for being a "morning" or "evening" person, was assessed using the Composite Score of Morningness (CSM), which reflects an individual's subjective preference for activities in the morning or evening, as well as mid-sleep time on weekend nights (MSF), which reflects their actual sleep behavior. Most recent hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) values were retrieved from medical records. Evening preference (as indicated by lower CSM), later bedtime on weekends, and shorter sleep duration correlated with higher HbA1c (r?=?-0.18, p?=?0.01; r?=?0.17, p?=?0.01 and r?=?-0.17, p?=?0.01, respectively), while there was no association between MSF or wake up time and glycemic control. In addition, later bedtime on weekends significantly correlated with shorter sleep duration (r?=?-0.34, p?glycemic control (B?=?0.018, p?=?0.02), while CSM was not. Mediation analysis revealed that this association was fully mediated by sleep duration. In summary, later bedtime on weekends was associated with shorter sleep duration and poorer glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. It is likely that patients with later weekend bedtimes curtail their sleep by waking up earlier. Exploring the potential reasons for this phenomenon (e.g. cultural influences, metropolitan lifestyle, environmental factors, family and social obligations) specific to a Thai population may help identify behavioral modifications (i.e. earlier bedtime and/or sleep duration extension) that could possibly lead to improved glycemic control in this population. PMID:26595483

  9. Evaluating the Effect of U-500 Insulin Therapy on Glycemic Control in Veterans With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Nawarskas, Ann D.; Resch, Nina D.; Vigil, Justina M.

    2015-01-01

    IN BRIEF This article describes a single-center, retrospective chart review to determine the glycemic effect of converting from U-100 to U-500 regular insulin in veterans with type 2 diabetes and the effect of this change, if any, on the frequency of provider contacts. Results showed that U-500 insulin improved glycemic control without significantly increasing the risk of hypoglycemia or total daily insulin dose, even when follow-up contacts with providers were not structured or frequent. PMID:25653468

  10. Acute Effects of Dietary Glycemic Index on Antioxidant Capacity in a Nutrient-controlled Feeding Study

    PubMed Central

    Botero, Diego; Ebbeling, Cara B.; Blumberg, Jeffrey B.; Ribaya-Mercado, Judy D.; Creager, Mark A.; Swain, Janis F.; Feldman, Henry A.; Ludwig, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress, caused by an imbalance between antioxidant capacity and reactive oxygen species, may be an early event in a metabolic cascade elicited by a high glycemic index (GI) diet, ultimately increasing the risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. We conducted a feeding study to evaluate the acute effects of low-GI compared with high-GI diets on oxidative stress and cardiovascular disease risk factors. The crossover study comprised two 10-day in-patient admissions to a clinical research center. For the admissions, 12 overweight or obese (BMI: 2745 kg/m2) male subjects aged 1835 years consumed low-GI or high-GI diets controlled for potentially confounding nutrients. On day 7, after an overnight fast and then during a 5-h postprandial period, we assessed total antioxidant capacity (total and perchloric acid (PCA) protein-precipitated plasma oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay) and oxidative stress status (urinary F2?-isoprostanes (F2IP)). On day 10, we measured cardiovascular disease risk factors. Under fasting conditions, total antioxidant capacity was significantly higher during the low-GI vs. high-GI diet based on total ORAC (11,736 668 vs. 10,381 612 ?mol Trolox equivalents/l, P = 0.002) and PCA-ORAC (1,276 96 vs. 1,210 96 ?mol Trolox equivalents/l, P = 0.02). Area under the postprandial response curve also differed significantly between the two diets for total ORAC and PCA-ORAC. No diet effects were observed for the other variables. Enhancement in plasma total antioxidant capacity occurs within 1 week on a low-GI diet, before changes in other risk factors, raising the possibility that this phenomenon may mediate, at least in part, the previously reported effects of GI on health. PMID:19543205

  11. Perioperative Glycemic Management of Patients Undergoing Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Rometo, David; Korytkowski, Mary

    2016-04-01

    Bariatric surgery in patients with type 2 diabetes has been shown to improve glycemic control and reduce need for glucose-lowering medications. Some of these improvements occur in the early postoperative period prior to any weight loss. These early reductions in circulating glucose can be attributed to primarily perioperative caloric restriction and prolonged fasting. Inpatient glycemic targets for patients undergoing bariatric surgery are similar to those recommended for other surgical procedures as a way of minimizing risk for complications. There is evidence that achieving perioperative and postoperative glycemic targets can improve the ability to achieve remission of type 2 diabetes following gastric bypass surgery. This review provides recommendations regarding glycemic goals, strategies for achieving these goals with minimal risk for hypoglycemia, and an examination of the data suggesting an association between perioperative glycemic management and diabetes remission following bariatric surgery. PMID:26879306

  12. Duodenal-jejunal bypass liner implantation provokes rapid weight loss and improved glycemic control, accompanied by elevated fasting ghrelin levels

    PubMed Central

    Koehestanie, Parweez; Dogan, Kemal; Berends, Frits; Janssen, Ignace; Wahab, Peter; Groenen, Marcel; Mller, Michael; de Wit, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Background and study aims: Endoscopic implantation of a duodenal-jejunal bypass liner (DJBL) is a novel bariatric technique to induce weight loss and remission of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Placement of the DJBL mimics the bypass component of the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) procedure. In this observational study, we evaluated improvement of glycemic control and weight loss in the course of the treatment (0??24 weeks after DJBL implantation) and analyzed accompanying gut hormone responses. Patients and methods: 12 obese individuals with type 2 diabetes were selected for DJBL implantation. Body weight, fat mass, and fasting plasma levels of glucose, insulin, C-peptide, and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), were analyzed at 0, 1, 4 and 24 weeks post-implant. Fasting ghrelin, gastric inhibitory peptide (GIP), and glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1) were determined at 0, 1 and 4 weeks post-implant. Results: Besides significant weight loss, fat mass, fasting insulin, and homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index were also significantly decreased after DJBL implantation and a 42?% reduction was found in diabetes medication (P?early remission of type 2 diabetes, comparable to results seen after RYGB surgery. Gut hormone analyses revealed a potential role of fasting GLP-1 in early remission of type 2 diabetes. Interestingly, the DJBL-induced elevation of ghrelin contradicts the suggested role of reduced ghrelin levels after RYGB in improvement of glycemic control. PMID:26134609

  13. Effect of proton pump inhibitors on glycemic control in patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Takebayashi, Kohzo; Inukai, Toshihiko

    2015-08-25

    Gastrin is a linear peptide hormone which is secreted mostly in the stomach pyloric antrum G cells. Although the main role of this hormone is the promotion of the secretion of gastric acid from the stomach parietal cells, gastrin can also behave as a growth factor and stimulate gastric cell proliferation. It is also reported that gastrin promotes ? cell neogenesis in the pancreatic ductal complex, modest pancreatic ? cell replication, and improvement of glucose tolerance in animal models, in which the remodeling of pancreatic tissues is promoted. These findings suggest the possibility that gastrin has the potential to promote an increase of ? cell mass in pancreas, and therefore that gastrin may improve glucose tolerance. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are wildly used clinically for the therapy of gastro-esophageal reflex disease, gastritis due to excess stomach acid, and gastric ulcers. PPIs indirectly elevate serum gastrin levels via a negative feedback effect. Recent evidence has revealed the beneficial effect of PPIs on glycemic control especially in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), probably via the elevation of the levels of serum gastrin, although the detailed mechanism remains unclear. In addition, the beneficial effects of a combination therapy of gastrin or a PPI with a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist on glycemic control in animal models have been demonstrated. Although PPIs may be possible candidates for a new approach in the therapy of diabetes, a prospective, long-term, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study is needed to establish the effect of PPIs on glycemic control in a large number of patients with T2DM. PMID:26322158

  14. Does Glycemic Control Offer Similar Benefits Among Patients With Diabetes in Different Regions of the World?

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, Mark; Patel, Anushka; Zoungas, Sophia; Liu, Lisheng; Pan, Changyu; Poulter, Neil; Januszewicz, Andrzej; Tandon, Nikhil; Joshi, Prashant; Heller, Simon; Neal, Bruce; Chalmers, John

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Participants in ADVANCE were drawn from many countries. We examined whether the effects of intensive glycemic control on major outcomes in ADVANCE differ between participants from Asia, established market economies (EMEs), and eastern Europe. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS ADVANCE was a clinical trial of 11,140 patients with type 2 diabetes, lasting a median of 5 years. Demographic and clinical characteristics were compared across regions using generalized linear and mixed models. Effects on outcomes of the gliclazide modified releasebased intensive glucose control regimen, targeting an HbAlc of ?6.5%, were compared across regions using Cox proportional hazards models. RESULTS When differences in baseline variables were allowed for, the risks of primary outcomes (major macrovascular or microvascular disease) were highest in Asia (joint hazard ratio 1.33 [95% CI 1.171.50]), whereas macrovascular disease was more common (1.19 [1.001.42]) and microvascular disease less common (0.77 [0.620.94]) in eastern Europe than in EMEs. Risks of death and cardiovascular death were highest in eastern Europe, and the mean difference in glycosylated hemoglobin between the intensive and standard groups was lowest in EMEs. Despite these and other differences, the effects of intensive glycemic control were not significantly different (P ? 0.23) between regions for any outcome, including mortality, vascular end points, and severe hypoglycemic episodes. CONCLUSIONS Irrespective of absolute risk, the effects of intensive glycemic control with the gliclazide MR-based regimen used in ADVANCE were similar across Asia, EMEs, and eastern Europe. This regimen can safely be recommended for patients with type 2 diabetes in all of these regions. PMID:21972410

  15. Effect of proton pump inhibitors on glycemic control in patients with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Takebayashi, Kohzo; Inukai, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    Gastrin is a linear peptide hormone which is secreted mostly in the stomach pyloric antrum G cells. Although the main role of this hormone is the promotion of the secretion of gastric acid from the stomach parietal cells, gastrin can also behave as a growth factor and stimulate gastric cell proliferation. It is also reported that gastrin promotes β cell neogenesis in the pancreatic ductal complex, modest pancreatic β cell replication, and improvement of glucose tolerance in animal models, in which the remodeling of pancreatic tissues is promoted. These findings suggest the possibility that gastrin has the potential to promote an increase of β cell mass in pancreas, and therefore that gastrin may improve glucose tolerance. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are wildly used clinically for the therapy of gastro-esophageal reflex disease, gastritis due to excess stomach acid, and gastric ulcers. PPIs indirectly elevate serum gastrin levels via a negative feedback effect. Recent evidence has revealed the beneficial effect of PPIs on glycemic control especially in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), probably via the elevation of the levels of serum gastrin, although the detailed mechanism remains unclear. In addition, the beneficial effects of a combination therapy of gastrin or a PPI with a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist on glycemic control in animal models have been demonstrated. Although PPIs may be possible candidates for a new approach in the therapy of diabetes, a prospective, long-term, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study is needed to establish the effect of PPIs on glycemic control in a large number of patients with T2DM. PMID:26322158

  16. Effect of Probiotics on Glycemic Control: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized, Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    He, Jie; Chen, Fangyao; Chen, Rongping; Chen, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous clinical trials indicate that probiotic consumption may improve blood glucose control, however, results from randomized trials on glycemic control have been inconsistent. Objective To investigate the effects of probiotics on glycemic control in a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Data Sources PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, and Clinicaltrial.gov through October 2014. Data Extraction and Synthesis Two independent reviewers extracted relevant data and assessed study quality and risk of bias. Data were pooled using a random-effects model and expressed as mean differences (MD) with 95% CI. Heterogeneity was assessed (Cochran Q-statistic) and quantified (I2). Results Seventeen randomized controlled trials were included, in which 17 fasting blood glucose (n = 1105), 11 fasting plasma insulin (n = 788), 8 homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (n = 635) comparisons were reported. Probiotic consumption, compared with placebo, significantly reduced fasting glucose (MD = -0.31 mmol/L; 95% CI 0.56, 0.06; p = 0.02), fasting plasma insulin (MD = -1.29 μU/mL; 95% CI -2.17, -0.41; p = 0.004), and HOMA-IR (MD = 0.48; 95% CI -0.83, -0.13; p = 0.007). Conclusions Probiotic consumption may improve glycemic control modestly. Modification of gut microbiota by probiotic supplementation may be a method for preventing and control hyperglycemia in clinical practice. PMID:26161741

  17. Improved glycemic control and risk of ESRD in patients with type 1 diabetes and proteinuria.

    PubMed

    Skupien, Jan; Warram, James H; Smiles, Adam; Galecki, Andrzej; Stanton, Robert C; Krolewski, Andrzej S

    2014-12-01

    Most patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and proteinuria have poor glycemic control and a high risk of ESRD. We investigated whether long-term improvement of glycemic control reduces risk of ESRD in a prospective 7- to 15-year follow-up observation of 349 patients with CKD stages 1-3 enrolled in the Joslin Proteinuria Cohort of adults with T1D. All patients developed proteinuria between 1990 and 2004 and were followed until 2011 to ascertain onset of ESRD and deaths unrelated to ESRD. Furthermore, we analyzed data from 279 patients with ≥3 years of clinic follow-up available to assess the level of glycemic control after enrollment. Average HbA1c during the 5 years before study enrollment (prebaseline) was compared with HbA1c (postbaseline) averaged during the first half of follow-up (median, 5.1 years). Median prebaseline HbA1c was 9.3%, decreasing to 8.7% postbaseline. Cumulative risk of ESRD after 15 years was significantly lower for patients whose HbA1c decreased than for those whose HbA1c increased or remained poor (29% versus 42%; P<0.001). The difference between these groups was not visible at 5 years of follow-up but became visible at 10 and 15 years of follow-up. In multivariate Cox regression analysis of ESRD risk, the hazard ratio corresponding to a 1-percentage point improvement in postbaseline HbA1c was 0.76 (95% confidence interval, 0.63 to 0.91; P=0.003). In conclusion, results of this study suggest that long-term sustained improvement in HbA1c decelerates eGFR loss and delays the onset of ESRD in patients with T1D and proteinuria. PMID:24904086

  18. Extended-release niacin/laropiprant significantly improves lipid levels in type 2 diabetes mellitus irrespective of baseline glycemic control

    PubMed Central

    Bays, Harold E; Brinton, Eliot A; Triscari, Joseph; Chen, Erluo; Maccubbin, Darbie; MacLean, Alexandra A; Gibson, Kendra L; Ruck, Rae Ann; Johnson-Levonas, Amy O; ONeill, Edward A; Mitchel, Yale B

    2015-01-01

    Background The degree of glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) may alter lipid levels and may alter the efficacy of lipid-modifying agents. Objective Evaluate the lipid-modifying efficacy of extended-release niacin/laropiprant (ERN/LRPT) in subgroups of patients with T2DM with better or poorer glycemic control. Methods Post hoc analysis of clinical trial data from patients with T2DM who were randomized 4:3 to double-blind ERN/LRPT or placebo (n=796), examining the lipid-modifying effects of ERN/LRPT in patients with glycosylated hemoglobin or fasting plasma glucose levels above and below median baseline levels. Results At Week 12 of treatment, ERN/LRPT significantly improved low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and lipoprotein (a), compared with placebo, with equal efficacy in patients above or below median baseline glycemic control. Compared with placebo, over 36 weeks of treatment more patients treated with ERN/LRPT had worsening of their diabetes and required intensification of antihyperglycemic medication, irrespective of baseline glycemic control. Incidences of other adverse experiences were generally low in all treatment groups. Conclusion The lipid-modifying effects of ERN/LRPT are independent of the degree of baseline glycemic control in patients with T2DM (NCT00485758). PMID:25750540

  19. Dietary glycemic index and carbohydrate in relation to early age-related macular degeneration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about the association between dietary carbohydrates and cataract in nondiabetic persons. The aim was to test whether recent dietary carbohydrate intakes or glycemic index (GI; a measure of carbohydrate intake quality) was associated with the presence of cortical or nuclear opacities....

  20. New concepts in diabetes: how multihormonal regulation can improve glycemic control.

    PubMed

    Blonde, Lawrence; Baker, Danial E; Davis, Stephen N; Ratner, Robert E

    2004-12-01

    It is estimated that 18.2 million Americans are currently living with diabetes, a disease that continues to place significant economic burdens on patients, their families, health plans, systems, and society. Recent data from the American Diabetes Association indicates that the annual direct and indirect costs of diabetes are rapidly increasing. Improved glycemic control--which has been repeatedly demonstrated to reduce the risk of developing microvascular complications and is likely to reduce the risk of macrovascular complications associated with type 1 and type 2 diabetes--has the potential to improve quality of life and reduce health care expenditures. However, despite recent advances in oral antidiabetic agents and insulin management (e.g., development of rapid- and long-acting insulin analogs and continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion [CSII]), only a portion of the patient population is able to achieve the goals for glycemic control recommended by the American Diabetes Association, the American College of Endocrinology, and other guideline-setting organizations. Moreover, improved glycemia achieved with present therapeutic modalities may be associated with the risk of hypoglycemic events and undesired weight gain. The latter can negatively affect plasma lipids, blood pressure, and therapy adherence. New research into the pathophysiology of diabetes indicates that multiple hormones--not just insulin and glucagon but amylin, GLP-1 (a glucagon-like peptide), and others--are involved in the regulation of plasma glucose levels, providing insight into why even insulin is often ineffective in helping patient with diabetes achieve their glycemic goals. The use of analogs of these newly recognized, important glucoregulatory hormones; agents that delay the degradation of the hormones and therefore raise their concentration; and/or agents that bind to their receptors may facilitate achievement of improved glycemia. One of these agents, pramlintide, represents the first new potential antihyperglycemic agent for the treatment of type 1 diabetes since insulin was introduced more than 80 years ago. There is substantial potential for these agents to improve glycemic control and patient outcomes and to reduce the personal, societal, and economic burdens of diabetes. Some of these novel multihormonal glucoregulatory therapies will likely soon become important components of the diabetes armamentarium. It is therefore important that managed care pharmacy decision makers learn about them. PMID:23570175

  1. Inhibition of DPP-4 with sitagliptin improves glycemic control and restores islet cell mass and function in a rodent model of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mu, James; Petrov, Aleksandr; Eiermann, George J; Woods, John; Zhou, Yun-Ping; Li, Zhihua; Zycband, Emanuel; Feng, Yue; Zhu, Lan; Roy, Ranabir Sinha; Howard, Andrew D; Li, Cai; Thornberry, Nancy A; Zhang, Bei B

    2009-11-25

    Inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) activity has been shown to improve glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes by prolonging and potentiating the actions of incretin hormones. This study is designed to determine the effects of the DPP-4 inhibitor sitagliptin on improving islet function in a mouse model of insulin resistance and insulin secretion defects. ICR mice were pre-treated with high fat diet and a low dose of streptozotocin to induce insulin resistance and impaired insulin secretion, respectively. Diabetic mice were treated with sitagliptin or the sulfonylurea agent glipizide as admixture to high fat diet for ten weeks. Sustained reduction of blood glucose, HbA(1c), circulating glucagon and improvement in oral glucose tolerance were observed in mice treated with sitagliptin. In contrast, glipizide improved glycemic control only during the early weeks and to a lesser degree compared to sitagliptin, and had no effect on circulating glucagon levels or glucose tolerance. The improvement in glycemic control in sitagliptin-treated mice was associated with a significant increase in glucose-dependent insulin secretion in both perfused pancreas and isolated islets. Importantly, in contrast to the lack of effect by glipizide, sitagliptin significantly restored beta and alpha cell mass as well as alpha/beta cell ratio. These data indicate that DPP-4 inhibition by sitagliptin provided better overall improvement of glycemic control compared to glipizide in the high fat diet/streptozotocin induced diabetic mouse model. The ability of sitagliptin to enhance islet cell function may offer insight into the potential for disease modification. PMID:19765579

  2. Differentiating Approaches to Diabetes Self-Management of Multi-ethnic Rural Older Adults at the Extremes of Glycemic Control

    PubMed Central

    Brewer-Lowry, Aleshia Nichol; Arcury, Thomas A.; Bell, Ronny A.; Quandt, Sara A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of the Study:?This study identified approaches to diabetes self-management that differentiate persons with well-controlled from poorly controlled diabetes. Previous research has focused largely on persons participating in self-management interventions.?Design and Methods:?In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 48 adults, drawn from a population-based sample aged 65 years or older with diabetes. The sample was stratified by sex and ethnic group (African American, American Indian, and White) from the low (A1C <6%) and high (A1C >8%) extremes of the glycemic control distribution. Case-based text analysis was guided by a model, including six self-management domains and four resource types (self-care, informal support, formal services, and medical care).?Results:?A structured approach to self-management differentiated respondents in good glycemic control from those in poor glycemic control. Those in good glycemic control were more likely to practice specific food behaviors to limit food consumption and practice regular blood glucose monitoring with specific target values. This approach was facilitated by a greater use of home aides to assist with diabetes care. Respondents in poor glycemic control demonstrated less structure, naming general food categories and checking blood glucose in reaction to symptoms.?Implications:?Results provide evidence that degree of structure differentiates self-management approaches of persons with good and poor glycemic control. Findings should provide a foundation for further research to develop effective self-management programs for older adults with diabetes. PMID:20110333

  3. The Consumption of Bicarbonate-Rich Mineral Water Improves Glycemic Control.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Shinnosuke; Goto, Yasuaki; Ito, Kyo; Hayasaka, Shinya; Kurihara, Shigeo; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Tomita, Masaru; Fukuda, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Hot spring water and natural mineral water have been therapeutically used to prevent or improve various diseases. Specifically, consumption of bicarbonate-rich mineral water (BMW) has been reported to prevent or improve type 2 diabetes (T2D) in humans. However, the molecular mechanisms of the beneficial effects behind mineral water consumption remain unclear. To elucidate the molecular level effects of BMW consumption on glycemic control, blood metabolome analysis and fecal microbiome analysis were applied to the BMW consumption test. During the study, 19 healthy volunteers drank 500?mL of commercially available tap water (TW) or BMW daily. TW consumption periods and BMW consumption periods lasted for a week each and this cycle was repeated twice. Biochemical tests indicated that serum glycoalbumin levels, one of the indexes of glycemic controls, decreased significantly after BMW consumption. Metabolome analysis of blood samples revealed that 19 metabolites including glycolysis-related metabolites and 3 amino acids were significantly different between TW and BMW consumption periods. Additionally, microbiome analysis demonstrated that composition of lean-inducible bacteria was increased after BMW consumption. Our results suggested that consumption of BMW has the possible potential to prevent and/or improve T2D through the alterations of host metabolism and gut microbiota composition. PMID:26798400

  4. Glycemic control in inpatients with diabetes following august changeover of trainee doctors in England.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Rajesh; Jankovic, Dina; Rayman, Gerry

    2016-03-01

    The first Wednesday of August is the day of changeover of trainee doctors in England. It is widely perceived that inexperience and nonfamiliarity with the new hospital systems and policies in these first few weeks lead to increased medical errors, mismanagement, and mortality. The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of the August changeover of trainee doctors on inpatient glycemic control in a single English hospital. This is currently unknown in England. Overall, 16,870 patient-day capillary glucose reading measures in 2730 inpatients with diabetes were analyzed for 4 weeks before and after the changeover period for the years 2012, 2013, and 2014. Only inpatients hospitalized for longer than 1 day were included. Contrary to expectations, inpatient glycemic control did not worsen in the first 4 weeks after changeover compared to the preceding 4 weeks before changeover in the 3-year period. This may be due to forethought and planning by the deanery foundation school and the inpatient diabetes team in this hospital. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2016;11:206-209. © 2015 Society of Hospital Medicine. PMID:26505469

  5. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors and the ischemic heart: Additional benefits beyond glycemic control.

    PubMed

    Chattipakorn, Nipon; Apaijai, Nattayaporn; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2016-01-01

    Obese-insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have become global health problems, and they are both associated with a higher risk of ischemic heart disease. Although reperfusion therapy is the treatment to increase blood supply to the ischemic myocardium, this intervention potentially causes cardiac tissue damage and instigates arrhythmias, processes known as reperfusion injury. Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are glycemic control drugs commonly used in T2DM patients. Growing evidence from basic and clinical studies demonstrates that a DPP-4 inhibitor could exert cardioprotection and improve left ventricular function by reducing oxidative stress, apoptosis, and increasing reperfusion injury salvage kinase (RISK) activity. However, recent reports also showed potentially adverse cardiac events due to the use of a DPP-4 inhibitor. To investigate this disparity, future large clinical trials are essential in verifying whether DPP-4 inhibitors are beneficial beyond their glycemic control particularly for the ischemic heart in obese-insulin resistant subjects and T2DM patients. PMID:26432493

  6. Quality of Clinical Practice Guidelines for Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Holmer, Haley K.; Ogden, Lauren A.; Burda, Brittany U.; Norris, Susan L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Several studies have reported that clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) in a variety of clinical areas are of modest or variable quality. The objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of an international cohort of CPGs that provide recommendations on pharmaceutical management of glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). Methods and Findings We searched the National Guideline Clearinghouse (NGC) on February 15th and June 4th, 2012 for CPGs meeting inclusion criteria. Two independent assessors rated the quality of each CPG using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research & Evaluation II (AGREE II) instrument. Twenty-four guidelines were evaluated, and most had high scores for clarity and presentation. However, scope and purpose, stakeholder involvement, rigor of development, and applicability domains varied considerably. The majority of guidelines scored low on editorial independence, and only seven CPGs were based on an underlying systematic review of the evidence. Conclusions The overall quality of CPGs for glycemic control in DM2 is moderate, but there is substantial variability among quality domains within and across guidelines. Guideline users need to be aware of this variability and carefully appraise and select the guidelines that they apply to patient care. PMID:23577058

  7. [Dapagliflozin: Beyond glycemic control in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Sanz-Serra, Pol; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Flores-Le Roux, Juana A; Benaiges, David; Chillarón, Juan J

    2015-01-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have a high or very high cardiovascular risk. The clinical practice guidelines focus on the need to achieve optimal glycemic control, and strategies for a multifactorial therapeutic approach have shown significant cardiovascular benefits in these patients. Inhibitors of sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT-2) are a new class of orally administered drugs in the treatment of T2DM, which act by inhibiting reabsorption of glucose in the renal proximal tubule with consequent glycosuric effect and lowering of blood glucose. Dapagliflozin, SGLT-2 inhibitor marketed in Europe and Australia, has been shown to achieve glycosylated hemoglobin reductions similar to other oral agents, as well as beneficial effects on major comorbidities associated with T2DM. Therefore, it is considered of interest to review the clinical efficacy of this new oral hypoglycemic on glycemic control, risk of hypoglycemia, and its impact on body weight, blood pressure, lipid profile and renal function. PMID:25648671

  8. Glycemic Control in US Immigrant and Nonimmigrant Black Youth with Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rebecca O'Connor, M; Dobra, A; Voss, J; Pihoker, C; Doorenbos, A

    2016-02-01

    Differences in glycemic control based on race have been reported in pediatric populations with type 1 diabetes (T1D). It is unknown if differences exist between pediatric populations within the same race classification. This retrospective study identified all immigrant and nonimmigrant Black youth diagnosed with T1D and treated at Seattle Children's Hospital from 2001 to 2011. Demographic characteristics and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels at 12, 24, and 36months post diagnosis were obtained from existing medical records. Immigrant youth had lower mean HbA1c levels at all three time points. The ethnicity effect on mean HbA1c levels approached significance at 36months. When comparing 12 and 36months, the time effect was significant; the ethnicity effect approached significance. Clinically important differences may exist in glycemic control between pediatric populations with T1D from the same race classification. Additional work is needed to confirm these findings and determine potential causes. PMID:24452433

  9. Association of Helicobacter pylori infection with glycemic control in patients with diabetes: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Horikawa, Chika; Kodama, Satoru; Fujihara, Kazuya; Yachi, Yoko; Tanaka, Shiro; Suzuki, Akiko; Hanyu, Osamu; Shimano, Hitoshi; Sone, Hirohito

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. To assess the association between Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection and glycemic control in patients with diabetes through a meta-analytic approach. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS. Electronic literature searches were conducted for cross-sectional studies that examined the hemoglobin A1c (A1C) level by whether patients with diabetes were or were not carriers of HP. Mean differences in A1C between groups with and without HP infection were pooled with a random-effects model. RESULTS. Thirteen eligible studies were included in this meta-analysis. Overall, the HP carriers did not have significantly higher A1C levels compared with HP noncarriers (mean difference (95% CI), 0.19% (-0.18 to 0.46), P = 0.16). When the analysis was limited to studies targeting patients with type 1 diabetes, there was also no significant difference in A1C (0.69% (-0.31 to 1.68), P = 0.18). CONCLUSIONS. There was insufficient evidence that HP infection worsened glycemic control in patients with diabetes. PMID:24901007

  10. Association of Helicobacter pylori Infection with Glycemic Control in Patients with Diabetes: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Horikawa, Chika; Kodama, Satoru; Fujihara, Kazuya; Yachi, Yoko; Tanaka, Shiro; Suzuki, Akiko; Hanyu, Osamu; Shimano, Hitoshi; Sone, Hirohito

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To assess the association between Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection and glycemic control in patients with diabetes through a meta-analytic approach. Research Design and Methods. Electronic literature searches were conducted for cross-sectional studies that examined the hemoglobin A1c (A1C) level by whether patients with diabetes were or were not carriers of HP. Mean differences in A1C between groups with and without HP infection were pooled with a random-effects model. Results. Thirteen eligible studies were included in this meta-analysis. Overall, the HP carriers did not have significantly higher A1C levels compared with HP noncarriers (mean difference (95% CI), 0.19% (?0.18 to 0.46), P = 0.16). When the analysis was limited to studies targeting patients with type 1 diabetes, there was also no significant difference in A1C (0.69% (?0.31 to 1.68), P = 0.18). Conclusions. There was insufficient evidence that HP infection worsened glycemic control in patients with diabetes. PMID:24901007

  11. The Consumption of Bicarbonate-Rich Mineral Water Improves Glycemic Control

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Shinnosuke; Goto, Yasuaki; Ito, Kyo; Hayasaka, Shinya; Kurihara, Shigeo; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Tomita, Masaru; Fukuda, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Hot spring water and natural mineral water have been therapeutically used to prevent or improve various diseases. Specifically, consumption of bicarbonate-rich mineral water (BMW) has been reported to prevent or improve type 2 diabetes (T2D) in humans. However, the molecular mechanisms of the beneficial effects behind mineral water consumption remain unclear. To elucidate the molecular level effects of BMW consumption on glycemic control, blood metabolome analysis and fecal microbiome analysis were applied to the BMW consumption test. During the study, 19 healthy volunteers drank 500 mL of commercially available tap water (TW) or BMW daily. TW consumption periods and BMW consumption periods lasted for a week each and this cycle was repeated twice. Biochemical tests indicated that serum glycoalbumin levels, one of the indexes of glycemic controls, decreased significantly after BMW consumption. Metabolome analysis of blood samples revealed that 19 metabolites including glycolysis-related metabolites and 3 amino acids were significantly different between TW and BMW consumption periods. Additionally, microbiome analysis demonstrated that composition of lean-inducible bacteria was increased after BMW consumption. Our results suggested that consumption of BMW has the possible potential to prevent and/or improve T2D through the alterations of host metabolism and gut microbiota composition. PMID:26798400

  12. A Diabetes Peer Support Intervention That Improved Glycemic Control: Mediators and Moderators of Intervention Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Piette, John D.; Resnicow, Ken; Choi, Hwajung; Heisler, Michele

    2013-01-01

    Objective In a randomized trial, a guided diabetes peer-support intervention improved glycemic control (A1c), with a difference in A1c change between groups of 0.58% (P = 0.004). The current study examined whether improvements in insulin uptake and perceived diabetes social support (DSS) mediated the interventions impact on A1c. We also examined potential moderation by patients health literacy, DSS, or diabetes distress. Methods We conducted secondary analyses for 212 type 2 diabetes patients participating in the trial using accepted methods for testing effect mediation and moderation. Results Roughly half (49%, 95% CI: 3%80%) of the A1c effect was mediated by increased insulin use, while changes in DSS had a negligible impact. A1c impacts varied across subgroups defined by baseline DSS and functional health literacy (both p<0.01). The intervention was particularly beneficial among patients with low baseline diabetes support or literacy levels. The intervention had a greater impact on A1c among patients with more frequent engagement in peer-support calls (p<0.01). Discussion Patients receiving increased peer support had improved glycemic control largely due to their greater likelihood of initiating insulin. Greater intervention engagement was associated with stronger effects. The intervention had its greatest benefits among patients with low support or poorer health literacy. PMID:23585636

  13. THE CONTENT OF MICROELEMENTS IN BLOOD SERUM AND ERYTHROCYTES IN CHILDREN WITH DIABETES MELLITUS TYPE I DEPENDING ON LEVEL OF GLYCEMIC CONTROL.

    PubMed

    Gluschenko, N; Vasylyshyn, Kh; Roschupkin, A; Lekishvili, S; Gladchenko, O

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the content of chromium, cobalt and nickel in serum and erythrocytes in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus, depending on the level of glycemic control. The study was conducted on 68 children with type 1 diabetes mellitus. The patients were divided into four groups based on glycemic control. Group I was composed of 9 children with optimal level of glycemic control. Group II - 25 children with suboptimal level of glycemic control. Group III - 34 children with a high risk to life level of glycemic control. Group IV (control group) consisted of 30 healthy children. Compensation state of type 1 diabetes was evaluated according to ISPAD (Consensus for the Management of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus in Children and Adolescens 2000). The content of trace elements in biological agents was determined by atomic absorbtion spectrophotometry method with C-115M1 mass-spectrophotometer, manufactured by Selmi enterprise (Ukraine). It is found that there is a decrease in serum concentrations of chromium and erythrocyte content of cobalt in patients with optimal level of glycemic control. The deficiency of chromium is accompanied by the deficiency of cobalt in patients with suboptimal level of glycemic control. The lower levels of cobalt and nickel are recorded simultaneously, but there is theexcess of chromium in the erythrocytes of these patients. Patients, who suffer from 1 type diabetes mellitus and high risk for life level of glycemic control have considerable polideficiency of cobalt, nickel and chromium in serum.The increasing level of chromium was recorded only in the erythrocytes. The level of glycemic control and the duration of 1 type diabetes mellitus are important in the forecasting of the development of chronic diabetic complications. It is found that the duration of 1 type diabetes mellitus influences the levels of cobalt and nickel in serum mostly, while the level of glycemic control influences the chromium content. PMID:26870978

  14. Glibenclamide or Metformin Combined with Honey Improves Glycemic Control in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Erejuwa, Omotayo Owomofoyon; Sulaiman, Siti Amrah; Wahab, Mohd Suhaimi Ab; Sirajudeen, Kuttulebbai Nainamohammed Salam; Salleh, Md Salzihan Md; Gurtu, Sunil

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with deterioration of glycemic control and progressive metabolic derangements. This study investigated the effect of honey as an adjunct to glibenclamide or metformin on glycemic control in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced in rats by streptozotocin. The diabetic rats were randomized into six groups and administered distilled water, honey, glibenclamide, glibenclamide and honey, metformin or metformin and honey. The animals were treated orally once daily for four weeks. The diabetic control rats showed hypoinsulinemia (0.27 ± 0.01 ng/ml), hyperglycemia (22.4 ± 1.0 mmol/L) and increased fructosamine (360.0 ± 15.6 µmol/L). Honey significantly increased insulin (0.41 ± 0.06 ng/ml), decreased hyperglycemia (12.3 ± 3.1 mmol/L) and fructosamine (304.5 ± 10.1 µmol/L). Although glibenclamide or metformin alone significantly (p < 0.05) reduced hyperglycemia, glibenclamide or metformin combined with honey produced significantly much lower blood glucose (8.8 ± 2.9 or 9.9 ± 3.3 mmol/L, respectively) compared to glibenclamide or metformin alone (13.9 ± 3.4 or 13.2 ± 2.9 mmol/L, respectively). Similarly, glibenclamide or metformin combined with honey produced significantly (p < 0.05) lower fructosamine levels (301.3 ± 19.5 or 285.8 ± 22.6 µmol/L, respectively) whereas glibenclamide or metformin alone did not decrease fructosamine (330.0 ± 29.9 or 314.6 ± 17.9 µmol/L, respectively). Besides, these drugs or their combination with honey increased insulin levels. Glibenclamide or metformin combined with honey also significantly reduced the elevated levels of creatinine, bilirubin, triglycerides, and VLDL cholesterol. These results indicate that combination of glibenclamide or metformin with honey improves glycemic control, and provides additional metabolic benefits, not achieved with either glibenclamide or metformin alone. PMID:21448302

  15. A Clinical Trial to Maintain Glycemic Control in Youth with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Despite the increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes in youth, there are few data to guide treatment. We compared the efficacy of three treatment regimens to achieve durable glycemic control in children and adolescents with recent-onset type 2 diabetes. METHODS Eligible patients 10 to 17 years of age were treated with metformin (at a dose of 1000 mg twice daily) to attain a glycated hemoglobin level of less than 8% and were randomly assigned to continued treatment with metformin alone or to metformin combined with rosiglitazone (4 mg twice a day) or a lifestyle-intervention program focusing on weight loss through eating and activity behaviors. The primary outcome was loss of glycemic control, defined as a glycated hemoglobin level of at least 8% for 6 months or sustained metabolic decompensation requiring insulin. RESULTS Of the 699 randomly assigned participants (mean duration of diagnosed type 2 diabetes, 7.8 months), 319 (45.6%) reached the primary outcome over an average follow-up of 3.86 years. Rates of failure were 51.7% (120 of 232 participants), 38.6% (90 of 233), and 46.6% (109 of 234) for metformin alone, metformin plus rosiglitazone, and metformin plus lifestyle intervention, respectively. Metformin plus rosiglitazone was superior to metformin alone (P = 0.006); metformin plus lifestyle intervention was intermediate but not significantly different from metformin alone or metformin plus rosiglitazone. Prespecified analyses according to sex and race or ethnic group showed differences in sustained effectiveness, with metformin alone least effective in non-Hispanic black participants and metformin plus rosiglitazone most effective in girls. Serious adverse events were reported in 19.2% of participants. CONCLUSIONS Monotherapy with metformin was associated with durable glycemic control in approximately half of children and adolescents with type 2 diabetes. The addition of rosiglitazone, but not an intensive lifestyle intervention, was superior to metformin alone. (Funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and others; TODAY ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00081328.) PMID:22540912

  16. Evaluation of nutritional profiles of starch and dry matter from early potato varieties and its estimated glycemic impact.

    PubMed

    Pinhero, Reena Grittle; Waduge, Renuka Nilmini; Liu, Qiang; Sullivan, J Alan; Tsao, Rong; Bizimungu, Benoit; Yada, Rickey Y

    2016-07-15

    To identify healthier potatoes with respect to starch profiles, fourteen early varieties were evaluated for their dietary fiber, total starch, rapidly digestible (RDS), slowly digestible (SDS), and resistant (RS) starch for nutrition and with regard to estimated glycemic index (eGI) and glycemic load (eGL). While all these profiles were highly dependent on the potato variety, eleven out of fourteen varieties were classified as low GL foods (p<0.05). A strong positive correlation was observed with eGI and RDS (r=0.975-1.00, 0.96-1.00 and 0.962-0.997 for uncooked, cooked and retrograded varieties, respectively), whereas a strong negative correlation was observed between eGI and RS (r=-0.985 to -0.998, -0.96 to -1.00 and -0.983 to -0.999 for uncooked, cooked and retrograded varieties respectively, p<0.05). For the cultivars examined, the present study identified RDS and RS as major starch factors contributing to eGI. PMID:26948625

  17. Long-Term Glycemic Control as a Result of Initial Education for Children With New Onset Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Susanne M.; Srivastava, Nayan T.; Behzadi, Jennifer M.; Pottorff, Tina M.; DiMeglio, Linda A.; Walvoord, Emily C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the role of initial diabetes education delivery at an academic medical center (AMC) versus non-AMCs on long-term glycemic control. Methods We performed a retrospective study of children with type 1 diabetes referred to an AMC after being educated at non-AMCs. These children were matched to a group of children diagnosed and educated as inpatients at an AMC. The A1C levels at 2, 3, and 5 years from diagnosis were compared between the 2 groups of children. Results Records were identified from 138 children. Glycemic control was comparable in the non-AMC-educated versus AMC-educated patients at 2, 3, and 5 years from diagnosis. The A1C was also highly consistent in each patient over time. Conclusions Long-term glycemic control was independent of whether initial education was delivered at an AMC or non-AMC. Formal education and location at time of diagnosis do not appear to play a significant role in long-term glycemic control. Novel educational constructs, focusing on developmental stages of childhood and reeducation over time, are likely more important than education at time of diagnosis. PMID:23427241

  18. Impact of psychological stress caused by the Great East Japan Earthquake on glycemic control in patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fujihara, K; Saito, A; Heianza, Y; Gibo, H; Suzuki, H; Shimano, H; Saito, K; Kodama, S; Yamada, N; Sone, H

    2012-10-01

    We examined the relationship between psychological stress and the worsening of glycemic control in diabetic patients at the time of the Great East Japan Earthquake. HbA1c levels in diabetic patients before and after the disaster were evaluated with the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) and other questions including those on changes in diet, exercise, psychological stress and drug intake in 320 consecutive diabetic patients who had been followed in a diabetes clinic. Logistic regression analysis revealed that the total GHQ scores (odds ratio [OR] 1.03 [95% confidence interval 1.01-1.06]; p<0.01) and interruption of drug intake (OR 4.48 [1.57-12.7]; p=0.01) were independently associated with worsening of glycemic control defined as an increase in the HbA1c level equal to or greater than 0.5%. Among the scores on the GHQ, those for somatic symptoms (OR 1.18 [1.01-1.38]; p=0.03) and sleep disturbances or anxiety (OR 1.26 [1.08-1.46]; p<0.01) were independently associated with glycemic control. These results suggest that psychological stress during a disaster has independent effects on worsening of glycemic control. PMID:22851189

  19. Efficacy of bromocriptine on glycemic and metabolic control of prediabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Khalilzade, Saied Hossein; Aminorroaya, Ashraf; Hovsepain, Silva; Amini, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is suggested that bromocriptine could be effective in treatment of prediabetic patients and, consequently, in preventing type 2 diabetes (T2DM). In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of bromocriptine on glycemic and metabolic control of prediabetic patients. Materials and Methods: In this double-blind, placebo controlled trial study, prediabetic patients diagnosed during Isfahan Diabetes Prevention Project (IDPP) were enrolled. They randomized in two bromocriptine (2.5 mg) and placebo-treated groups, for 12 weeks. After physical examination, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), HbA1c, Insulin, cholesterol, HDL-c, and triglyceride were measured and glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed. HOMA-IR and LDL-c were calculated. The mean of the data were compared in the bromocriptine and placebo treated groups, before and after intervention by intention to treat analysis using mixed effect model. P values < 0.05 were considered, statistically, significant. Results: In this study, 53 prediabetic patients (27 in the bromocriptine group and 26 in the placebo group) were treated. There were no differences between data of two groups at baseline (P > 0.05). The mean body mass index, systolic blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose and glucose of 30 min, 60 min, 120 min of post OGTT, HbA1c, insulin, HOMA-IR, lipid profile did not change, significantly, in both bromocriptine and placebo-treated groups after 12 weeks (P > 0.05). However, diastolic blood pressure (P = 0.02) and the area under the curve of glucose (P = 0.045) were decreased in the bromocriptine-treated group. Conclusion: Bromocriptine did not have significant effect on glycemic control of prediabetic patients. Further studies, with bigger sample size are recommended. PMID:26918235

  20. Nutritional status, glycemic control and its associated risk factors among a sample of type 2 diabetic individuals, a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Firouzi, Somayyeh; Barakatun-Nisak, Mohd Yusof; Azmi, Kamaruddin Nor

    2015-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing in Malaysia, with most patients poorly controlled. Hence, this study aimed to determine nutritional and metabolic status as well as blood pressure of Malaysian patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and identify associated risk factors for poor glycemic control. Materials and Methods: A total of 104 type 2 diabetic patients were recruited and completed a questionnaire covering socio-demographic status, 3-day diet records, and physical activity. Anthropometry and glycemic control parameters, lipid profile and blood pressure were also measured. Results: Subjects were on average 56.7±9.9 years old with a mean duration of diabetes of 6.5 ± 5.0 years. The mean hemoglobin A1c of the subjects was 7.6% ± 1.4%, with only 20.2% achieving the target goal of <6.5% with no significant differences between genders. The mean body mass index was 26.9 ± 4.7 kg/m2, with 86.5% either were overweight or obese. Only 10.6% of the subjects exercised daily. The proportions of macronutrients relative to total energy intake were consistent with the recommendations of most diabetes associations. The adjusted odds of having poor glycemic control were 3.235 (1.043-10.397) (P < 0.05) higher among those who had high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels below the normal range. Those taking one or two types of oral anti-diabetic drugs had 19.9 (2.959-87.391) (P < 0.01) and 14.3 (2.647-77.500) (P < 0.01) higher odds of poor glycemic control respectively compared to those who were being treated by diet alone. Conclusion: Poor glycemic control was prevalent among Malaysian diabetic patients, and this could be associated with low levels of HDL and being treated with oral anti-diabetes agents. PMID:25767521

  1. The importance of postprandial glycemic control: optimizing add-on therapy to basal insulin.

    PubMed

    Shaefer, Charles F; Anderson, John

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes, mainly type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), is associated with a growing clinical and economic burden in the United States, which is expected to increase in association with an aging population. Sufficient glycemic control in patients with T2DM, in order to reduce the risk of micro- and macrovascular complications associated with diabetes, is mediated by lifestyle modifications and a regimen of increasingly intensive antidiabetes drugs. Several treatments and strategies are available for primary care physicians to select from when choosing the most appropriate therapy for their individual patients with T2DM, but, ultimately, due to the progressive nature of the disease, most of these patients will require insulin therapy to maintain glycemic control. Regimens containing basal and postprandial insulins are widely used, but there is still widespread reluctance to initiate insulin treatment due to fear of weight gain and hypoglycemia. Furthermore, as patients approach recommended glycated hemoglobin targets, postprandial hyperglycemia becomes the main contributor to hyperglycemic exposure, necessitating the timely initiation of prandial treatment. Finally, insulin treatment can be limited by factors like the number of injections, mealtime restrictions, complex titration algorithms and patient adherence. Recent developments in antidiabetes drug research have brought more convenient basal and postprandial regimens closer. Clinical evaluation of the efficacy and safety of basal insulins plus add-on glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs) has yielded promising results. Primary care physicians are continually challenged to optimize insulin treatment strategies to maximize patient outcomes. Emerging strategies such as long-acting basal insulin analogs and short-acting GLP-1 RAs are particularly appealing to address this challenge. PMID:26548422

  2. Chronic kidney disease and intensive glycemic control increase cardiovascular risk in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Papademetriou, Vasilios; Lovato, Laura; Doumas, Michael; Nylen, Eric; Mottl, Amy; Cohen, Robert M; Applegate, William B; Puntakee, Zubin; Yale, Jean Francois; Cushman, William C

    2015-03-01

    Results of the main Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) trial indicate that intensive glucose lowering increases cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. As the contribution of mild-to-moderate chronic kidney disease (CKD) to these risks is not known, we assessed the impact on cardiovascular outcomes in this population. Renal function data were available on 10,136 patients of the original ACCORD cohort. Of those, 6,506 were free of CKD at baseline and 3,636 met the criteria for CKD. Participants were randomly assigned to a treatment strategy of either intensive or standard glycemic goal. The primary outcome, all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, and prespecified secondary outcomes were evaluated. Risk for the primary outcome was 87% higher in patients with than in those without CKD (hazard ratio of 1.866; 95% CI: 1.651-2.110). All prespecified secondary outcomes were 1.5 to 3 times more frequent in patients with than in those without CKD. In patients with CKD, compared with standard therapy, intensive glucose lowering was significantly associated with both 31% higher all-cause mortality (1.306: 1.065-1.600) and 41% higher cardiovascular mortality (1.412: 1.052-1.892). No significant effects were found in patients without CKD. Thus, in high-risk patients with type II diabetes, mild and moderate CKD is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Intensive glycemic control significantly increases the risk of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in this population. PMID:25229335

  3. Closed-Loop Insulin Therapy Improves Glycemic Control in Children Aged <7 Years

    PubMed Central

    Dauber, Andrew; Corcia, Liat; Safer, Jason; Agus, Michael S.D.; Einis, Sara; Steil, Garry M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the possibility of improving nocturnal glycemic control as well as meal glycemic response using closed-loop therapy in children aged <7 years. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This was a randomized controlled crossover trial comparing closed-loop with standard open-loop insulin pump therapy performed in an inpatient clinical research center. Ten subjects aged <7 years with type 1 diabetes for >6 months treated with insulin pump therapy were studied. Closed-loop therapy and standard open-loop therapy were compared from 10:00 p.m. to 12:00 p.m. on 2 consecutive days. The primary outcome was plasma glucose time in range (110200 mg/dL) during the night (10:00 p.m.8:00 a.m.). Secondary outcomes included peak postprandial glucose levels, incidence of hypoglycemia, degree of hyperglycemia, and prelunch glucose levels. RESULTS A trend toward a higher mean nocturnal time within target range was noted for closed- versus open-loop therapy, although not reaching statistical significance (5.3 vs. 3.2 h, P = 0.12). There was no difference in peak postprandial glucose or number of episodes of hypoglycemia. There was significant improvement in time spent >300 mg/dL overnight with closed-loop therapy (0.18 vs. 1.3 h, P = 0.035) and the total area under the curve of glucose >200 mg/dL (P = 0.049). Closed-loop therapy returned prelunch blood glucose closer to target (189 vs. 273 mg/dL on open loop, P = 0.009). CONCLUSIONS Closed-loop insulin delivery decreases the severity of overnight hyperglycemia without increasing the incidence of hypoglycemia. The therapy is better able to reestablish target glucose levels in advance of a subsequent meal. Younger children with type 1 diabetes may reap significant benefits from closed-loop therapy. PMID:23033237

  4. GLYCEMIC CONTROL AND PROSTATE CANCER PROGRESSION: RESULTS FROM THE SEARCH DATABASE

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Howard; Presti, Joseph C.; Aronson, William J.; Terris, Martha K.; Kane, Christopher J.; Amling, Christopher L.; Freedland, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Several studies have examined the association between diabetes mellitus (DM) and prostate cancer (PCa) risk and progression, however nearly all of these studies have compared diabetic vs. non-diabetic men. We sought to investigate the role of glycemic control, as measured by HbA1c, on PCa aggressiveness and prognosis in men with DM and PCa from the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital (SEARCH) database. Methods We identified 247 men in SEARCH with DM and a recorded HbA1c value twelve months prior to radical prostatectomy between 1988 and 2009. We divided men into tertiles by HbA1c level. The association between HbA1c tertiles and risk of adverse pathology and biochemical recurrence were tested using multivariate logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards models, respectively. Results Median HbA1c level was 6.9. On multivariate analysis, HbA1c tertiles were predictive of pathological Gleason score (p-trend=0.001). Relative to the first tertile, men in the second (OR 5.90, p=0.002) and third tertile (OR 7.15, p=0.001) were more likely to have Gleason score ? 4+3. HbA1c tertiles were not associated with margin status, node status, extracapsular extension or seminal vesicle invasion (all p-trend>0.2). In the multivariate Cox proportional hazards model, increasing HbA1c tertiles were not significantly related to risk of biochemical recurrence (p-trend=0.56). Conclusion Men with higher HbA1c levels presented with more biologically aggressive prostate tumors at radical prostatectomy. Although risk of recurrence was unrelated to HbA1c levels, further studies are needed to better explore the importance of glycemic control on long-term outcomes in diabetic men with PCa. PMID:20687228

  5. Potential Overtreatment of Diabetes Mellitus in Older Adults With Tight Glycemic Control

    PubMed Central

    Lipska, Kasia J.; Ross, Joseph S.; Miao, Yinghui; Shah, Nilay D.; Lee, Sei J.; Steinman, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE In older adults with multiple serious comorbidities and functional limitations, the harms of intensive glycemic control likely exceed the benefits. OBJECTIVES To examine glycemic control levels among older adults with diabetes mellitus by health status and to estimate the prevalence of potential overtreatment of diabetes. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Cross-sectional analysis of the data on 1288 older adults (?65 years) with diabetes from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 2001 through 2010 who had a hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) measurement. All analyses incorporated complex survey design to produce nationally representative estimates. EXPOSURES Health status categories: very complex/poor, based on difficulty with 2 or more activities of daily living or dialysis dependence; complex/intermediate, based on difficulty with 2 or more instrumental activities of daily living or presence of 3 or more chronic conditions; and relatively healthy if none of these were present. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Tight glycemic control (HbA1c level, <7%) and use of diabetes medications likely to result in hypoglycemia (insulin or sulfonylureas). RESULTS Of 1288 older adults with diabetes, 50.7% (95% CI, 46.6%54.8%), representing 3.1 million (95% CI, 2.73.5), were relatively healthy, 28.1% (95% CI, 24.8%31.5%), representing 1.7 million (95% CI, 1.42.0), had complex/intermediate health, and 21.2% (95% CI, 18.3%24.4%), representing 1.3 million (95% CI, 1.11.5), had very complex/poor health. Overall, 61.5% (95% CI, 57.5%65.3%), representing 3.8 million (95% CI, 3.44.2), had an HbA1c level of less than 7%; this proportion did not differ across health status categories (62.8% [95% CI, 56.9%68.3%]) were relatively healthy, 63.0% (95% CI, 57.0%68.6%) had complex/intermediate health, and 56.4% (95% CI, 49.7%62.9%) had very complex/poor health (P = .26). Of the older adults with an HbA1c level of less than 7%, 54.9% (95% CI, 50.4%59.3%) were treated with either insulin or sulfonylureas; this proportion was similar across health status categories (50.8% [95% CI, 45.1%56.5%] were relatively healthy, 58.7% [95% CI, 49.4%67.5%] had complex/intermediate health, and 60.0% [95% CI, 51.4%68.1%] had very complex/poor health; P = .14). During the 10 study years, there were no significant changes in the proportion of older adults with an HbA1c level of less than 7% (P = .34), the proportion with an HbA1c level of less than 7% who had complex/intermediate or very complex/poor health (P = .27), or the proportion with an HbA1c level of less than 7% who were treated with insulin or sulfonylureas despite having complex/intermediate or very complex/poor health (P = .65). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Although the harms of intensive treatment likely exceed the benefits for older patients with complex/intermediate or very complex/poor health status, most of these adults reached tight glycemic targets between 2001 and 2010. Most of them were treated with insulin or sulfonylureas, which may lead to severe hypoglycemia. Our findings suggest that a substantial proportion of older adults with diabetes were potentially overtreated. PMID:25581565

  6. Glycemic Control in Kenyan Children and Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Ngwiri, Thomas; Were, Fred; Predieri, Barbara; Ngugi, Paul; Iughetti, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Background. Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is the most common endocrine disorder in children and adolescents worldwide. While data about prevalence, treatment, and complications are recorded in many countries, few data exist for Sub-Saharan Africa. The aim of this study was to determine the degree of control in patients with T1DM aged 1–19 years over a 6-month period in 3 outpatient Kenyan clinics. It also sought to determine how control was influenced by parameters of patient and treatment. Methods. Eighty-two children and adolescents with T1DM were included in the study. Clinical history regarding duration of illness, type and dose of insulin, and recent symptoms of hypoglycemia/hyperglycemia were recorded. Glycaemia, HbA1c, and ketonuria were tested. HbA1c of 8.0% and below was defined as the cut-off for acceptable control. Results. The median HbA1c for the study population was 11.1% (range: 6.3–18.8). Overall, only 28% of patients had reasonable glycemic control as defined in this study. 72% therefore had poor control. It was also found that age above 12 years was significantly associated with poor control. Conclusions. African children and with T1DM are poorly controlled particularly in adolescents. Our data strongly support the necessity of Kenya children to receive more aggressive management and follow-up. PMID:26494998

  7. Prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and relation to glycemic control therapies at baseline in the BARI 2D cohort

    PubMed Central

    Pop-Busui, Rodica; Lu, Jiang; Lopes, Neuza; Jones, Teresa L. Z.

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the associations between glycemic therapies and prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) at baseline among participants in the Bypass-Angioplasty-Revascularization-Investigation-2-Diabetes (BARI 2D) trial on medical and revascularization therapies for coronary artery disease (CAD) and on insulin-sensitizing versus insulin-providing treatments for diabetes. 2368 patients with type 2 diabetes and CAD were evaluated. DPN was defined as clinical examination score >2 using the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument (MNSI). DPN odds ratios across different groups of glycemic therapy were evaluated by multiple logistic regression, adjusted for multiple covariates including age, sex, HbA1c, diabetes duration. 51% BARI 2D subjects with valid baseline characteristics and MNSI scores had DPN. After adjusting for all variables, use of insulin was significantly associated with DPN (OR1.57, 1.15, 2.13). Patients on sulfonylurea or combination of sulfonylurea/metformin/TZD had marginally higher rates of DPN than the metformin/TZD group. This cross-sectional study in a cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes and CAD showed association of insulin use with higher DPN prevalence, independent of disease duration, glycemic control and other characteristics. The causality between a glycemic control strategy and DPN cannot be evaluated in this cross-sectional study, but continued assessment of DPN and randomized therapies in BARI 2D trial may provide further explanations on the development of DPN. PMID:19335534

  8. Level of sustained glycemic control and associated factors among patients with diabetes mellitus in Ethiopia: a hospital-based cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Abebe, Solomon Mekonnen; Berhane, Yemane; Worku, Alemayehu; Alemu, Shitaye; Mesfin, Nebiyu

    2015-01-01

    Background The level of sustained glycemic control in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major determinant of the occurrence of both acute and chronic complications. However, information about the level of glycemic control among patients in the follow-up care at the University of Gondar Referral Hospital is scanty. The study assessed the degree of glycemic control and associated factors among diabetic patients in the study area. Method A hospital-based cross-sectional study was conducted at the University of Gondar Referral Hospital. All diabetic patients aged ?18 years who visited the Diabetes Clinic in January and February 2013 for follow-up medical evaluation and medication participated in the study. Patients with glycosylated hemoglobin test (HbA1c) of ?7% were classified as having a poor level of glycemic control. Propensity score was used to estimate the treatment effect. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was applied to determine the associated factors. Result Two hundred and fifty three (64.7%) of the 391 diabetic patients included in the study had a poor level of glycemic control, as evidenced by HbA1c ?7%. Poor glycemic control was much higher among Type 1 patients (82.9%) compared with Type 2 patients (57.5%). Being on insulin treatment (AOR =2.51; 95% CI =1.25, 5.04) and reporting poor medication adherence (AOR =3.19; 95% CI =1.76, 5.80) were found to be associated with poor glycemic control among Type 2 DM patients. High waist circumference was inversely associated with a poor level of glycemic control in Type 1 DM patients (AOR =0.05; 95% CI =0.01, 0.85). Conclusion The proportion of diabetic patients with a poor level of glycemic control is high. We recommend a comprehensive intervention to improve the overall treatment adherence with special attention to DM patients receiving insulin. PMID:25657591

  9. Impact of Phone Call Intervention on Glycemic Control in Diabetes Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized, Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Suksomboon, Naeti; Poolsup, Nalinee; Nge, Yuu Lay

    2014-01-01

    Background Telephone-delivered intervention can provide many supports in diabetes self-management to improve glycemic control. Several trials showed that telephone intervention was positively associated with glycemic outcomes in diabetes. The objective of this meta-analysis was to assess the impact of telephone contact intervention (intervention group) on glycemic control compared with standard clinical care (control group). Methods Randomized control studies of telephone intervention in diabetes were searched on Medline (Pubmed), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Web of Science (ISI), and Scopus. Electronic search was done from inception to April 2013. The following MeSH terms were used: diabetes mellitus, randomized control trials and telemedicine, together with keywords including phone intervention, diabetes, and glycemic control. Historical search was also conducted on the references of relevant articles. The quality of the trials was assessed using Maastricht-Amsterdam scale. Treatment effect was estimated with mean difference in the change of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) from baseline between the intervention and control groups. Results A total of 203 articles were examined. Five trials involving 953 patients met the inclusion criteria and contributed to the meta-analysis. Telephone contact intervention was no more effective than standard clinical care in improving glycemic control (pooled mean difference in HbA1c −0.38%, 95%CI −0.91 to 0.16%). Conclusions This meta-analysis showed that the phone contact intervention was no more effective than standard clinical care in improving glycemic control in diabetes. However, telephone intervention may still have potential benefits especially for low-and middle-income countries; thus further large sample size and well-controlled studies are needed to evaluate the impact of the intervention. PMID:24586596

  10. Colonic Fermentation of Unavailable Carbohydrates from Unripe Banana and its Influence over Glycemic Control.

    PubMed

    Dan, Milana C T; Cardenette, Giselli H L; Sard, Fabiana A H; Giuntini, Eliana Bistriche; Bello-Prez, Luis Arturo; Carpinelli, ngelo R; Lajolo, Franco M; Menezes, Elizabete Wenzel

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the colonic fermentation of unavailable carbohydrates from unripe banana (mass - UBM - and starch - UBS) over parameters related to glucose and insulin response in rats. Wistar male rats were fed either a control diet, a UBM diet (5 % resistant starch - RS) or a UBS diet (10 % RS) for 28 days. In vivo (oral glucose tolerance test) and in vitro (cecum fecal fermentation, pancreatic islet insulin secretion) analyses were performed. The consumption of UBM and UBS diets by Wistar rats for 28 days improved insulin/glucose ratio. Also, pancreatic islets isolated from the test groups presented significant lower insulin secretion compared to the control group, when the same in vitro glucose stimulation was done. Total short chain fatty acids produced were higher in both experimental groups in relation to the control group. These findings suggest that UBM and UBS diets promote colonic fermentation and can influence glycemic control, improving insulin sensitivity in rats. PMID:26092708

  11. A study of sociodemographic clinical and glycemic control factors associated with co-morbid depression in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Hritu; Raju, M. S. V. K.; Dubey, Vaibhav; Kurrey, Ravindra; Bansal, Shaifali; Malik, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Context: Diabetes affects 9.2% of adults in India. About 816% of its population also suffer from depression. Both diseases pose a serious health challenge at individual and system level. The prevalence of depression in diabetes is much higher than in the general population. Undiagnosed and untreated depression puts people at higher morbidity and mortality risk. Aim: To study the prevalence of depression in diabetes and to identify associated risk factors. Settings and Design: Case control study carried out in an outpatient setting of a tertiary hospital in central India. Materials and Methods: One hundred and nine type 2 diabetes patients and 91 healthy controls formed the subjects of the study. Sociodemographic data were obtained on seven parameters. Comprehensive clinical data were obtained by means of standard procedures. Blood sugar levels and glycosylated hemoglobin levels were measured to assess glycemic control. Data of diabetic patients and controls as well as that of depressed and nondepressed diabetics were subjected to statistical analysis. Results: About 42.2% of diabetes patients and only 4.39% of controls had depression. About 19% of diabetics had peripheral neuropathy but had much higher neuropathic symptoms. Depression was not related to any sociodemographic or clinical factors but was strongly associated with poor glycemic control. Conclusion: Depression is highly prevalent in diabetes. Physical symptoms mask depression. Special attention needs to be paid to diagnose depression in diabetes and treat it appropriately along with effective glycemic control. Diabetes patients need to be treated collaboratively by physicians and psychiatrists. PMID:25788803

  12. Relationships between glucose variability and conventional measures of glycemic control in continuously monitored patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kohnert, K-D; Vogt, L; Augstein, P; Heinke, P; Zander, E; Peterson, K; Freyse, E-J; Salzsieder, E

    2009-02-01

    Given the importance of glucose variability in the development of diabetic complications, the present study used continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) to determine various indices of glucose variability and to investigate their relationships with conventional measures of chronic sustained hyperglycemia. We examined 53 women and 61 men, aged 36-79 years afflicted with type 2 diabetes for 1-24 years. The following indices of glycemic variability were computed from CGM data sets: mean amplitude of glycemic excursions (MAGE), CGM glucose range, interquartile range (IQR), SD-score, and average daily risk range (ADRR). CGM measurements and self-monitored blood glucose (SMBG) records were used to calculate mean CGM sensor glucose and mean SMBG, respectively. In simple correlation analysis, the indices of glucose variability showed weak correlations with HbA1c: MAGE (r=0.27, p <0.01), CGM glucose range (r=0.21, p <0.05), IQR (r=0.31, p <0.01), SD-score (r=0.34, p<0.001), and ADRR (r=0.24, p<0.05). These indices were found to differ at identical HbA1c among several patients, as reflected by diurnal excursions of different frequency and magnitude. With the exception of ADRR, stronger correlations were found between mean SMBG and the other variability indices (r=0.51-0.63, p<0.01 for all). CGM provides various indices of glycemic variability not captured by conventional measures of glycemic control. Detection of the location and the magnitude of glucose fluctuations by CGM should aid in optimal treatment of glycemic disorders in type 2 diabetes. PMID:19214924

  13. Effects of a pharmaceutical care model on medication adherence and glycemic control of people with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Wen Wei; Chua, Siew Siang; Lai, Pauline Siew Mei; Chan, Siew Pheng

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus is a lifelong chronic condition that requires self-management. Lifestyle modification and adherence to antidiabetes medications are the major determinants of therapeutic success in the management of diabetes. Purpose To assess the effects of a pharmaceutical care (PC) model on medication adherence and glycemic levels of people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Patients and methods A total of 241 people with type 2 diabetes were recruited from a major teaching hospital in Malaysia and allocated at random to the control (n=121) or intervention (n=120) groups. Participants in the intervention group received PC from an experienced pharmacist, whereas those in the control group were provided the standard pharmacy service. Medication adherence was assessed using the Malaysian Medication Adherence Scale, and glycemic levels (glycated hemoglobin values and fasting blood glucose [FBG]) of participants were obtained at baseline and after 4, 8, and 12 months. Results At baseline, there were no significant differences in demographic data, medication adherence, and glycemic levels between participants in the control and intervention groups. However, statistically significant differences in FBG and glycated hemoglobin values were observed between the control and intervention groups at months 4, 8, and 12 after the provision of PC (median FBG, 9.0 versus 7.2 mmol/L [P<0.001]; median glycated hemoglobin level, 9.1% versus 8.0% [P<0.001] at 12 months). Medication adherence was also significantly associated with the provision of PC, with a higher proportion in the intervention group than in the control group achieving it (75.0% versus 58.7%; P=0.007). Conclusion The provision of PC has positive effects on medication adherence as well as the glycemic control of people with type 2 diabetes. Therefore, the PC model used in this study should be duplicated in other health care settings for the benefit of more patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:25214772

  14. Effect of Diets Differing in Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load on Cardiovascular Risk Factors: Review of Randomized Controlled-Feeding Trials

    PubMed Central

    Kristo, Aleksandra S.; Matthan, Nirupa R.; Lichtenstein, Alice H.

    2013-01-01

    Despite a considerable amount of data available on the relationship between dietary glycemic index (GI) or load (GL) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, in aggregate, the area remains unsettled. The aim of the present review was to summarize the effect of diets differing in GI/GL on CVD risk factors, by examining randomized controlled-feeding trials that provided all food and beverages to adult participants. The studies included a low and high GI/GL diet phase for a minimum of four weeks duration, and reported at least one outcome related to CVD risk; glucose homeostasis, lipid profile or inflammatory status. Ten publications representing five trials were identified. The low GI/GL compared to the high GI/GL diet unexpectedly resulted in significantly higher fasting glucose concentrations in two of the trials, and a lower area under the curve for glucose and insulin in one of the two studies during an oral glucose tolerance test. Response of plasma total, low density lipoprotein and high density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations was conflicting in two of the studies for which data were available. There was either weak or no effect on inflammatory markers. The results of the five randomized controlled trials satisfying the inclusion criteria suggest inconsistent effects of the GI/GL value of the diet on CVD risk factors. PMID:23538939

  15. Effect of diets differing in glycemic index and glycemic load on cardiovascular risk factors: review of randomized controlled-feeding trials.

    PubMed

    Kristo, Aleksandra S; Matthan, Nirupa R; Lichtenstein, Alice H

    2013-04-01

    Despite a considerable amount of data available on the relationship between dietary glycemic index (GI) or load (GL) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, in aggregate, the area remains unsettled. The aim of the present review was to summarize the effect of diets differing in GI/GL on CVD risk factors, by examining randomized controlled-feeding trials that provided all food and beverages to adult participants. The studies included a low and high GI/GL diet phase for a minimum of four weeks duration, and reported at least one outcome related to CVD risk; glucose homeostasis, lipid profile or inflammatory status. Ten publications representing five trials were identified. The low GI/GL compared to the high GI/GL diet unexpectedly resulted in significantly higher fasting glucose concentrations in two of the trials, and a lower area under the curve for glucose and insulin in one of the two studies during an oral glucose tolerance test. Response of plasma total, low density lipoprotein and high density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations was conflicting in two of the studies for which data were available. There was either weak or no effect on inflammatory markers. The results of the five randomized controlled trials satisfying the inclusion criteria suggest inconsistent effects of the GI/GL value of the diet on CVD risk factors. PMID:23538939

  16. HOMA-IR Values are Associated With Glycemic Control in Japanese Subjects Without Diabetes or Obesity: The KOBE Study

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Takumi; Higashiyama, Aya; Kubota, Yoshimi; Nishimura, Kunihiro; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Kadota, Aya; Nishida, Yoko; Imano, Hironori; Nishikawa, Tomofumi; Miyamatsu, Naomi; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro; Okamura, Tomonori

    2015-01-01

    Background Several studies have reported that insulin resistance was a major risk factor for the onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus in individuals without diabetes or obesity. We aimed to clarify the association between insulin resistance and glycemic control in Japanese subjects without diabetes or obesity. Methods We conducted a community-based cross-sectional study including 1083 healthy subjects (323 men and 760 women) in an urban area. We performed multivariate regression analyses to estimate the association between the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) values and markers of glycemic control, including glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), 1,5-anhydroglucitol (1,5-AG), and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels, after adjustment for potential confounders. Results Compared with the lowest tertile of HOMA-IR values, the highest tertile was significantly associated with HbA1c and FPG levels after adjustment for potential confounders, both in men (HbA1c: ? = 1.83, P = 0.001; FPG: ? = 0.49, P < 0.001) and women (HbA1c: ? = 0.82, P = 0.008; FPG: ? = 0.39, P < 0.001). The highest tertile of HOMA-IR values was inversely associated with 1,5-AG levels compared with the lowest tertile (? = ?18.42, P = 0.009) only in men. Conclusions HOMA-IR values were associated with markers of glycemic control in Japanese subjects without diabetes or obesity. Insulin resistance may influence glycemic control even in a lean, non-diabetic Asian population. PMID:26005064

  17. Effects of High Performance Inulin Supplementation on Glycemic Control and Antioxidant Status in Women with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Pourghassem Gargari, Bahram; Aliasgharzadeh, Akbar; Asghari Jafar-abadi, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of high performance inulin supplementation on blood glycemic control and antioxidant status in women with type 2 diabetes. Methods In a randomized, triple-blind controlled trial, 49 females (fiber intake <30 g/day, 25control, n=25) for 2 months. Fasting blood samples were obtained and both glycemic control and antioxidant status were determined at baseline and at the end of the study. Results At the end of the study period, there were significant decreases in fasting plasma glucose (8.47%), glycosylated hemoglobin (10.43%), and malondialdehyde (37.21%) levels and significant increases in total antioxidant capacity (18.82%) and superoxide dismutase activity (4.36%) in the inulin group when compared to the maltodextrin group (P<0.05). Changes in fasting insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, and catalase activity were not significant in the inulin group when compared with the maltodextrin group. Glutathione peroxidase activity remained unchanged in both groups. Conclusion Inulin supplementation may improve some glycemic and antioxidant indices and decrease malondialdehyde levels in women with type 2 diabetes. Further investigations are needed in order to confirm the positive effects that inulin may have on the glycemic and antioxidant indices of patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:23641355

  18. Effect of Mobile Phone Short Text Messages on Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bin Abbas, Bassam; Al Fares, Abdullah; Jabbari, Musleh; El Dali, Abdelmoneim; Al Orifi, Fahad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mobile phone text messaging has rapidly become a socially popular form of communication. Several studies showed that mobile phone might offer a useful means of providing information between clinic visits and might increase adherence to diabetes therapy regimens. Objectives: We conducted a study to evaluate the effect of mobile phone short message service (SMS) on glycemic control in Saudi patients with type 2 diabetes. Patients and Methods: One hundred patients (mean age, 41 9.5 years) were selected at the Security Forces Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, and provided with daily educational, reminding SMS messages for four months. Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level, frequency of hypoglycemic and hyperglycemic attacks, and compliance with blood glucose monitoring were recorded before and after the trial. Results: In addition to significant improvement in patients knowledge, mean fasting blood glucose level improved from 8.60 3.16 to 7.77 3.11 mmol/L and mean HbA1c decreased from 9.9% 1.8% to 9.5% 1.7%. Conclusions: Mobile phone text messaging increased adherence to diabetes therapy and improved the clinical outcome in Saudi patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:25745493

  19. Management of diabetes mellitus in individuals with chronic kidney disease: therapeutic perspectives and glycemic control.

    PubMed

    Betônico, Carolina C R; Titan, Silvia M O; Correa-Giannella, Maria Lúcia C; Nery, Márcia; Queiroz, Márcia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic options for diabetes treatment and their potential side effects, in addition to analyzing the risks and benefits of tight glycemic control in patients with diabetic kidney disease. For this review, a search was performed using several pre-defined keyword combinations and their equivalents: "diabetes kidney disease" and "renal failure" in combination with "diabetes treatment" and "oral antidiabetic drugs" or "oral hypoglycemic agents." The search was performed in PubMed, Endocrine Abstracts and the Cochrane Library from January 1980 up to January 2015. Diabetes treatment in patients with diabetic kidney disease is challenging, in part because of progression of renal failure-related changes in insulin signaling, glucose transport and metabolism, favoring both hyperglycemic peaks and hypoglycemia. Additionally, the decline in renal function impairs the clearance and metabolism of antidiabetic agents and insulin, frequently requiring reassessment of prescriptions. The management of hyperglycemia in patients with diabetic kidney disease is even more difficult, requiring adjustment of antidiabetic agents and insulin doses. The health team responsible for the follow-up of these patients should be vigilant and prepared to make such changes; however, unfortunately, there are few guidelines addressing the nuances of the management of this specific population. PMID:26872083

  20. Race and Medication Adherence and Glycemic Control: Findings from an Operational Health Information Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Vivienne J.; Tu, Wanzhu; Marrero, David G.; Rosenman, Marc B.; Overhage, J. Marc

    2011-01-01

    The Central Indiana Beacon Community leads efforts for improving adherence to oral hypoglycemic agents (OHA) to achieve improvements in glycemic control for patients with type 2 diabetes. In this study, we explored how OHA adherence affected hemoglobin A1C (HbA1c) level in different racial groups. OHA adherence was measured by 6-month proportion of days covered (PDC). Of 3,976 eligible subjects, 12,874 pairs of 6-month PDC and HbA1c levels were formed between 2002 and 2008. The average HbA1c levels were 7.4% for African-Americans and 6.5% for Whites. The average 6-month PDCs were 40% for African-Americans and 50% for Whites. In mixed effect generalized linear regression analyses, OHA adherence was inversely correlated with HbA1c level for both African-Americans (?0.80, p<0.0001) and Whites (?0.53, p<0.0001). The coefficient was ?0.26 (p<0.0001) for the interaction of 6-month PDC and African-Americans. Significant risk factors for OHA non-adherence were race, young age, non-commercial insurance, newly-treated status, and polypharmacy. PMID:22195231

  1. Management of diabetes mellitus in individuals with chronic kidney disease: therapeutic perspectives and glycemic control

    PubMed Central

    Betônico, Carolina C R; Titan, Silvia M O; Correa-Giannella, Maria Lúcia C; Nery, Márcia; Queiroz, Márcia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic options for diabetes treatment and their potential side effects, in addition to analyzing the risks and benefits of tight glycemic control in patients with diabetic kidney disease. For this review, a search was performed using several pre-defined keyword combinations and their equivalents: “diabetes kidney disease” and “renal failure” in combination with “diabetes treatment” and “oral antidiabetic drugs” or “oral hypoglycemic agents.” The search was performed in PubMed, Endocrine Abstracts and the Cochrane Library from January 1980 up to January 2015. Diabetes treatment in patients with diabetic kidney disease is challenging, in part because of progression of renal failure-related changes in insulin signaling, glucose transport and metabolism, favoring both hyperglycemic peaks and hypoglycemia. Additionally, the decline in renal function impairs the clearance and metabolism of antidiabetic agents and insulin, frequently requiring reassessment of prescriptions. The management of hyperglycemia in patients with diabetic kidney disease is even more difficult, requiring adjustment of antidiabetic agents and insulin doses. The health team responsible for the follow-up of these patients should be vigilant and prepared to make such changes; however, unfortunately, there are few guidelines addressing the nuances of the management of this specific population. PMID:26872083

  2. PERCEIVED WEIGHT DISCRIMINATION AMPLIFIES THE LINK BETWEEN CENTRAL ADIPOSITY AND NONDIABETIC GLYCEMIC CONTROL (HBA1C)

    PubMed Central

    Tsenkova, Vera K.; Carr, Deborah; Schoeller, Dale A.; Ryff, Carol D.

    2010-01-01

    Background While the preclinical development of type 2 diabetes is partly explained by obesity and central adiposity, psychosocial research has shown that chronic stressors such as discrimination have health consequences as well. Purpose We investigated the extent to which the well-established effects of obesity and central adiposity on nondiabetic glycemic control (indexed by HbA1c) were moderated by a targeted psychosocial stressor linked to weight: perceived weight discrimination. Methods Data came from the nondiabetic subsample (n=938) of the Midlife in the United States (MIDUS II) survey. Results Body mass index (BMI), waist-to-hip ratio, and waist circumference were linked to significantly higher HbA1c (p < .001). Multivariate-adjusted models showed that weight discrimination exacerbated the effects of waist-to-hip ratio on HbA1c ( p < .05), such that people who had higher WHR and reported weight discrimination had the highest HbA1c levels. Conclusions Understanding how biological and psychosocial factors interact at nondiabetic levels to increase vulnerability could have important implications for public health and education strategies. Effective strategies may include targeting sources of discrimination, rather than solely targeting health behaviors and practices of overweight and obese persons. PMID:21136227

  3. Beyond Glycemic Control in Diabetes Mellitus: Effects of Incretin-Based Therapies on Bone Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ceccarelli, Elena; Guarino, Elisa G.; Merlotti, Daniela; Patti, Aurora; Gennari, Luigi; Nuti, Ranuccio; Dotta, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) and osteoporosis (OP) are common disorders with a significant health burden, and an increase in fracture risk has been described both in type 1 (T1DM) and in type 2 (T2DM) diabetes. The pathogenic mechanisms of impaired skeletal strength in diabetes remain to be clarified in details and they are only in part reflected by a variation in bone mineral density. In T2DM, the occurrence of low bone turnover together with a decreased osteoblast activity and compromised bone quality has been shown. Of note, some antidiabetic drugs (e.g., thiazolidinediones, insulin) may deeply affect bone metabolism. In addition, the recently introduced class of incretin-based drugs (i.e., GLP-1 receptor agonists and DPP-4 inhibitors) is expected to exert potentially beneficial effects on bone health, possibly due to a bone anabolic activity of GLP-1, that can be either direct or indirect through the involvement of thyroid C cells. Here we will review the established as well as the putative effects of incretin hormones and of incretin-based drugs on bone metabolism, both in preclinical models and in man, taking into account that such therapeutic strategy may be effective not only to achieve a good glycemic control, but also to improve bone health in diabetic patients. PMID:23785355

  4. Preserving Mafa expression in diabetic islet ?-cells improves glycemic control in vivo.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Taka-aki; Kaneto, Hideaki; Kawashima, Satoshi; Miyatsuka, Takeshi; Tochino, Yoshihiro; Yoshikawa, Atsushi; Imagawa, Akihisa; Miyazaki, Jun-ichi; Gannon, Maureen; Stein, Roland; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2015-03-20

    The murine Mafa transcription factor is a key regulator of postnatal islet ?-cell activity, affecting insulin transcription, insulin secretion, and ?-cell mass. Human MAFA expression is also markedly decreased in islet ?-cells of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. Moreover, levels are profoundly reduced in db/db islet ?-cells, a mouse model of T2DM. To examine the significance of this key islet ?-cell-enriched protein to glycemic control under diabetic conditions, we generated transgenic mice that conditionally and specifically produced Mafa in db/db islet ?-cells. Sustained expression of Mafa resulted in significantly lower plasma glucose levels, higher plasma insulin, and augmented islet ?-cell mass. In addition, there was increased expression of insulin, Slc2a2, and newly identified Mafa-regulated genes involved in reducing ?-cell stress, like Gsta1 and Gckr. Importantly, the levels of human GSTA1 were also compromised in T2DM islets. Collectively, these results illustrate how consequential the reduction in Mafa activity is to islet ?-cell function under pathophysiological conditions. PMID:25645923

  5. Prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and relation to glycemic control therapies at baseline in the BARI 2D cohort.

    PubMed

    Pop-Busui, Rodica; Lu, Jiang; Lopes, Neuza; Jones, Teresa L Z

    2009-03-01

    We evaluated the associations between glycemic therapies and prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) at baseline among participants in the Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation 2 Diabetes (BARI 2D) trial on medical and revascularization therapies for coronary artery disease (CAD) and on insulin-sensitizing vs. insulin-providing treatments for diabetes. A total of 2,368 patients with type 2 diabetes and CAD was evaluated. DPN was defined as clinical examination score >2 using the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument (MNSI). DPN odds ratios across different groups of glycemic therapy were evaluated by multiple logistic regression adjusted for multiple covariates including age, sex, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), and diabetes duration. Fifty-one percent of BARI 2D subjects with valid baseline characteristics and MNSI scores had DPN. After adjusting for all variables, use of insulin was significantly associated with DPN (OR = 1.57, 95% CI: 1.15-2.13). Patients on sulfonylurea (SU) or combination of SU/metformin (Met)/thiazolidinediones (TZD) had marginally higher rates of DPN than the Met/TZD group. This cross-sectional study in a cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes and CAD showed association of insulin use with higher DPN prevalence, independent of disease duration, glycemic control, and other characteristics. The causality between a glycemic control strategy and DPN cannot be evaluated in this cross-sectional study, but continued assessment of DPN and randomized therapies in BARI 2D trial may provide further explanations on the development of DPN. PMID:19335534

  6. Family Physician Clinical Inertia in Glycemic Control among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Valerija Brali?; Markovi?, Biserka Bergman; Kranj?evi?, Ksenija

    2015-01-01

    Background Many patients with diabetes do not achieve target values. One of the reasons for this is clinical inertia. The correct explanation of clinical inertia requires a conjunction of patient with physician and health care system factors. Our aim was to determine the rate of clinical inertia in treating diabetes in primary care and association of patient, physician, and health care setting factors with clinical inertia. Material/Methods This was a national, multicenter, observational, cross-sectional study in primary care in Croatia. Each family physician (FP) provided professional data and collected clinical data on 1525 type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients. Clinical inertia was defined as a consultation in which treatment change based on glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels was indicated but did not occur. Results A total of 449 FPs (response rate 89.8%) collected data on 10275 patients. Mean clinical inertia per FP was 55.6% (SD 26.17) of consultations. All of the FPs were clinically inert with some patients, and 9% of the FPs were clinically inert with all patients. The main factors associated with clinical inertia were: higher percentage of HbA1c, oral anti-diabetic drug initiated by diabetologist, increased postprandial glycemia and total cholesterol, physical inactivity of patient, and administration of drugs other than oral antidiabetics. Conclusions Clinical inertia in treating patients with T2DM is a serious problem. Patients with worse glycemic control and those whose therapy was initiated by a diabetologist experience more clinical inertia. More research on causes of clinical inertia in treating patients with T2DM should be conducted to help achieve more effective diabetes control. PMID:25652941

  7. The benefits of tight glycemic control in critical illness: Sweeter than assumed?

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Andrew John

    2014-01-01

    Hyperglycemia has long been observed amongst critically ill patients and associated with increased mortality and morbidity. Tight glycemic control (TGC) is the clinical practice of controlling blood glucose (BG) down to the normal 4.46.1 mmol/L range of a healthy adult, aiming to avoid any potential deleterious effects of hyperglycemia. The ground-breaking Leuven trials reported a mortality benefit of approximately 10% when using this technique, which led many to endorse its benefits. In stark contrast, the multi-center normoglycemia in intensive care evaluationsurvival using glucose algorithm regulation (NICE-SUGAR) trial, not only failed to replicate this outcome, but showed TGC appeared to be harmful. This review attempts to re-analyze the current literature and suggests that hope for a benefit from TGC should not be so hastily abandoned. Inconsistencies in study design make a like-for-like comparison of the Leuven and NICE-SUGAR trials challenging. Inadequate measures preventing hypoglycemic events are likely to have contributed to the increased mortality observed in the NICE-SUGAR treatment group. New technologies, including predictive models, are being developed to improve the safety of TGC, primarily by minimizing hypoglycemia. Intensive Care Units which are unequipped in trained staff and monitoring capacity would be unwise to attempt TGC, especially considering its yet undefined benefit and the deleterious nature of hypoglycemia. International recommendations now advise clinicians to ensure critically ill patients maintain a BG of <10 mmol/L. Despite encouraging evidence, currently we can only speculate and remain optimistic that the benefit of TGC in clinical practice is sweeter than assumed. PMID:25538415

  8. Data Entry Errors and Design for Model-Based Tight Glycemic Control in Critical Care

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Logan; Steel, James; Le Compte, Aaron; Evans, Alicia; Tan, Chia-Siong; Penning, Sophie; Shaw, Geoffrey M; Desaive, Thomas; Chase, J Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Tight glycemic control (TGC) has shown benefits but has been difficult to achieve consistently. Model-based methods and computerized protocols offer the opportunity to improve TGC quality but require human data entry, particularly of blood glucose (BG) values, which can be significantly prone to error. This study presents the design and optimization of data entry methods to minimize error for a computerized and model-based TGC method prior to pilot clinical trials. Method To minimize data entry error, two tests were carried out to optimize a method with errors less than the 5%-plus reported in other studies. Four initial methods were tested on 40 subjects in random order, and the best two were tested more rigorously on 34 subjects. The tests measured entry speed and accuracy. Errors were reported as corrected and uncorrected errors, with the sum comprising a total error rate. The first set of tests used randomly selected values, while the second set used the same values for all subjects to allow comparisons across users and direct assessment of the magnitude of errors. These research tests were approved by the University of Canterbury Ethics Committee. Results The final data entry method tested reduced errors to less than 1–2%, a 60–80% reduction from reported values. The magnitude of errors was clinically significant and was typically by 10.0 mmol/liter or an order of magnitude but only for extreme values of BG < 2.0 mmol/liter or BG > 15.0–20.0 mmol/liter, both of which could be easily corrected with automated checking of extreme values for safety. Conclusions The data entry method selected significantly reduced data entry errors in the limited design tests presented, and is in use on a clinical pilot TGC study. The overall approach and testing methods are easily performed and generalizable to other applications and protocols. PMID:22401331

  9. Effects of dietary fiber supplementation on glycemic control in dogs with alloxan-induced diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Nelson, R W; Ihle, S L; Lewis, L D; Salisbury, S K; Miller, T; Bergdall, V; Bottoms, G D

    1991-12-01

    The effect of a high insoluble-fiber (IF) diet containing 15% cellulose in dry matter, high soluble-fiber (SF) diet containing 15% pectin in dry matter, and low-fiber (LF) diet on glycemic control in 6 dogs with alloxan-induced insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus was evaluated. Each diet contained greater than 50% digestible carbohydrate in dry matter. A crossover study was used with each dog randomly assigned to a predetermined diet sequence. Each dog was fed each diet for 56 days. Caloric intake was adjusted weekly as needed to maintain each dog within 1.5 kg of its body weight measured prior to induction of diabetes mellitus. All dogs were given pork lente insulin and half of their daily caloric intake at 12-hour intervals. Mean (+/- SEM) daily caloric intake was significantly (P less than 0.05) less when dogs consumed the IF diet vs the SF and LF diets (66 +/- 3 kcal/kg, 81 +/- 5 kcal/kg, and 79 +/- 4 kcal/kg, respectively). Serum alkaline phosphatase activity was significantly (P less than 0.05) higher when dogs consumed the LF diet vs the IF and SF diets (182 +/- 37 IU/L, 131 +/- 24 IU/L, and 143 +/- 24 IU/L, respectively). Mean postprandial plasma glucose concentration measured every 2 hours for 24 hours, beginning at the time of the morning insulin injection, was significantly (P less than 0.05) lower at most blood sampling times in dogs fed IF and SF diets, compared with dogs fed the LF diet.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1665025

  10. Effects of diets differing in glycemic index and glycemic load on cardiovascular risk factors: review of randomized controlled-feeing trials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite a considerable amount of data available on the relationship between dietary glycemic index (GI) or load (GL) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, in aggregate, the area remains unsettled. The aim of the present review was to summarize the effect of diets differing in GI/GL on CVD r...

  11. Quality of life and glycemic control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes and the impact of an education intervention

    PubMed Central

    Abolfotouh, Mostafa A; Kamal, Mofida M; El-Bourgy, Mohamed D; Mohamed, Sherine G

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess quality of life (QoL) and glycemic control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes and to investigate the impact of an educational program. Methods: A quasiexperimental study with nonrandomized experimental and control groups was conducted in which a total of 503 adolescents with type 1 diabetes completed a questionnaire using the Diabetes Quality of Life Instrument for Youth. Adolescents were then assigned to experimental and control groups. The experimental group was subjected to four 120-minute sessions of an educational program over a period of 4 months. Extracted medical chart data included the duration of diabetes, insulin dosage, and most recent hemoglobin A1c levels. Analysis of covariance was used to detect the impact of intervention. Results: The overall mean QoL score (%) was 76.51 ± 9.79, with good QoL in 38% of all adolescents. Poorer QoL was significantly associated with older age (P < 0.001), more hospital admissions in the last 6 months (P = 0.006), higher levels of depression (P < 0.001), poor self-esteem (P < 0.001), and poor self-efficacy (P < 0.001). There was significant deterioration in all domains of QoL in the experimental group after intervention. However, this deterioration was significantly less severe than in the control group. Between-group effects on total knowledge, adherence to exercise, glucose monitoring, treatment, self-efficacy, family contribution to management, glycemic control, and satisfaction with life were significantly in favor of the experimental group. Conclusion: Education intervention for adolescents with type 1 diabetes could be a safeguard against possible deterioration in QoL and glycemic control over time. PMID:21475630

  12. Clinical review: Consensus recommendations on measurement of blood glucose and reporting glycemic control in critically ill adults

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The management reporting and assessment of glycemic control lacks standardization. The use of different methods to measure the blood glucose concentration and to report the performance of insulin treatment yields major disparities and complicates the interpretation and comparison of clinical trials. We convened a meeting of 16 experts plus invited observers from industry to discuss and where possible reach consensus on the most appropriate methods to measure and monitor blood glucose in critically ill patients and on how glycemic control should be assessed and reported. Where consensus could not be reached, recommendations on further research and data needed to reach consensus in the future were suggested. Recognizing their clear conflict of interest, industry observers played no role in developing the consensus or recommendations from the meeting. Consensus recommendations were agreed for the measurement and reporting of glycemic control in clinical trials and for the measurement of blood glucose in clinical practice. Recommendations covered the following areas: How should we measure and report glucose control when intermittent blood glucose measurements are used? What are the appropriate performance standards for intermittent blood glucose monitors in the ICU? Continuous or automated intermittent glucose monitoring - methods and technology: can we use the same measures for assessment of glucose control with continuous and intermittent monitoring? What is acceptable performance for continuous glucose monitoring systems? If implemented, these recommendations have the potential to minimize the discrepancies in the conduct and reporting of clinical trials and to improve glucose control in clinical practice. Furthermore, to be fit for use, glucose meters and continuous monitoring systems must match their performance to fit the needs of patients and clinicians in the intensive care setting. See related commentary by Soto-Rivera and Agus, http://ccforum.com/content/17/3/155 PMID:23767816

  13. Clinical review: Consensus recommendations on measurement of blood glucose and reporting glycemic control in critically ill adults.

    PubMed

    Finfer, Simon; Wernerman, Jan; Preiser, Jean-Charles; Cass, Tony; Desaive, Thomas; Hovorka, Roman; Joseph, Jeffrey I; Kosiborod, Mikhail; Krinsley, James; Mackenzie, Iain; Mesotten, Dieter; Schultz, Marcus J; Scott, Mitchell G; Slingerland, Robbert; Van den Berghe, Greet; Van Herpe, Tom

    2013-01-01

    The management reporting and assessment of glycemic control lacks standardization. The use of different methods to measure the blood glucose concentration and to report the performance of insulin treatment yields major disparities and complicates the interpretation and comparison of clinical trials. We convened a meeting of 16 experts plus invited observers from industry to discuss and where possible reach consensus on the most appropriate methods to measure and monitor blood glucose in critically ill patients and on how glycemic control should be assessed and reported. Where consensus could not be reached, recommendations on further research and data needed to reach consensus in the future were suggested. Recognizing their clear conflict of interest, industry observers played no role in developing the consensus or recommendations from the meeting. Consensus recommendations were agreed for the measurement and reporting of glycemic control in clinical trials and for the measurement of blood glucose in clinical practice. Recommendations covered the following areas: How should we measure and report glucose control when intermittent blood glucose measurements are used? What are the appropriate performance standards for intermittent blood glucose monitors in the ICU? Continuous or automated intermittent glucose monitoring - methods and technology: can we use the same measures for assessment of glucose control with continuous and intermittent monitoring? What is acceptable performance for continuous glucose monitoring systems? If implemented, these recommendations have the potential to minimize the discrepancies in the conduct and reporting of clinical trials and to improve glucose control in clinical practice. Furthermore, to be fit for use, glucose meters and continuous monitoring systems must match their performance to fit the needs of patients and clinicians in the intensive care setting. PMID:23767816

  14. Counting Carbs? Understanding Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to know. The glycemic index and load concern carbohydrates, or carbs—one of the main types of ... to support the concept that the more complex carbohydrates will lead to better blood sugar control than ...

  15. Impact of Walking on Glycemic Control and Other Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Type 2 Diabetes: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Shanhu; Cai, Xue; Schumann, Uwe; Velders, Martina; Sun, Zilin; Steinacker, Jürgen Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background Walking is the most popular and most preferred exercise among type 2 diabetes patients, yet compelling evidence regarding its beneficial effects on cardiovascular risk factors is still lacking. The aim of this meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was to evaluate the association between walking and glycemic control and other cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes patients. Methods Three databases were searched up to August 2014. English-language RCTs were eligible for inclusion if they had assessed the walking effects (duration ≥8 weeks) on glycemic control or other cardiovascular risk factors among type 2 diabetes patients. Data were pooled using a random-effects model. Subgroup analyses based on supervision status and meta-regression analyses of variables regarding characteristics of participants and walking were performed to investigate their association with glycemic control. Results Eighteen studies involving 20 RCTs (866 participants) were included. Walking significantly decreased glycosylated haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) by 0.50% (95% confidence intervals [CI]: −0.78% to −0.21%). Supervised walking was associated with a pronounced decrease in HbA1c (WMD −0.58%, 95% CI: −0.93% to −0.23%), whereas non-supervised walking was not. Further subgroup analysis suggested non-supervised walking using motivational strategies is also effective in decreasing HbA1c (WMD −0.53%, 95% CI: −1.05% to −0.02%). Effects of covariates on HbA1c change were generally unclear. For other cardiovascular risk factors, walking significantly reduced body mass index (BMI) and lowered diastolic blood pressure (DBP), but non-significantly lowered systolic blood pressure (SBP), or changed high-density or low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Conclusions This meta-analysis supports that walking decreases HbA1c among type 2 diabetes patients. Supervision or the use of motivational strategies should be suggested when prescribed walking to ensure optimal glycemic control. Walking also reduces BMI and lowers DBP, however, it remains insufficient regarding the association of walking with lowered SBP or improved lipoprotein profiles. Trial Registration PROSPERO CRD42014009515 PMID:25329391

  16. Association between Poor Glycemic Control, Impaired Sleep Quality, and Increased Arterial Thickening in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yoda, Koichiro; Inaba, Masaaki; Hamamoto, Kae; Yoda, Maki; Tsuda, Akihiro; Mori, Katsuhito; Imanishi, Yasuo; Emoto, Masanori; Yamada, Shinsuke

    2015-01-01

    Objective Poor sleep quality is an independent predictor of cardiovascular events. However, little is known about the association between glycemic control and objective sleep architecture and its influence on arteriosclerosis in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus (DM). The present study examined the association of objective sleep architecture with both glycemic control and arteriosclerosis in type-2 DM patients. Design Cross-sectional study in vascular laboratory. Methods The subjects were 63 type-2 DM inpatients (M/F, 32/31; age, 57.5±13.1) without taking any sleeping promoting drug and chronic kidney disease. We examined objective sleep architecture by single-channel electroencephalography and arteriosclerosis by carotid-artery intima-media thickness (CA-IMT). Results HbA1c was associated significantly in a negative manner with REM sleep latency (interval between sleep-onset and the first REM period) (β=-0.280, p=0.033), but not with other measurements of sleep quality. REM sleep latency associated significantly in a positive manner with log delta power (the marker of deep sleep) during that period (β=0.544, p=0.001). In the model including variables univariately correlated with CA-IMT (REM sleep latency, age, DM duration, systolic blood pressure, and HbA1c) as independent variables, REM sleep latency (β=-0.232, p=0.038), but not HbA1c were significantly associated with CA-IMT. When log delta power was included in place of REM sleep latency, log delta power (β=-0.257, p=0.023) emerged as a significant factor associated with CA-IMT. Conclusions In type-2 DM patients, poor glycemic control was independently associated with poor quality of sleep as represented by decrease of REM sleep latency which might be responsible for increased CA-IMT, a relevant marker for arterial wall thickening. PMID:25875738

  17. Dyadic measures of the parent-child relationship during the transition to adolescence and glycemic control in children with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Barbara J; Holmbeck, Grayson; Iannotti, Ronald J; McKay, Siripoom V; Lochrie, Amanda; Volkening, Lisa K; Laffel, Lori

    2009-06-01

    To identify aspects of family behavior associated with glycemic control in youth with type 1 diabetes mellitus during the transition to adolescence, the authors studied 121 9- to 14-year-olds (M = 12.1 yrs) and their parents, who completed the Diabetes Family Conflict Scale (DFCS) and the Diabetes Family Responsibility Questionnaire (DFRQ). From the DFRQ, the authors derived 2 dyadic variables, frequency of agreement (exact parent and child concurrence about who was responsible for a task) and frequency of discordance (opposite parent and child reports about responsibility). The authors divided the cohort into Younger (n = 57, M = 10.6 yrs) and Older (n = 64, M = 13.5 yrs) groups. Family conflict was significantly related to glycemic control in the entire cohort and in both the Younger and Older groups. However, only in the Younger group was Agreement related to glycemic control, with higher Agreement associated with better glycemic control. Findings suggest that Agreement about sharing of diabetes responsibilities may be an important target for family-based interventions aiming to optimize glycemic control in preteen youth. PMID:19630455

  18. Glycemic control, complications, and associated autoimmune diseases in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Agha, Abdulmoein E.; Alafif, Maram; Abd-Elhameed, Ihab A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the relationship between metabolic control, acute and long-term complications, the coexistence of autoimmune diseases, and to assess the different factors that can affect the glycemic control level among children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Methods: This is a cross-sectional study that included 228 T1DM children and adolescents visiting the pediatric diabetes clinic at the King Abdulaziz University Hospital (KAUH), Jeddah, Saudi Arabia from January 2013 to January 2014. The clinical and laboratory characteristics of the patients were recorded. Metabolic control, complications, and associated autoimmune diseases were evaluated. Results: The mean age of patients was 10.99 years, and the glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level was 8.8%. Acute complications included ketoacidosis in 65.4% of patients, and hypoglycemic attacks in 68.9%. Long-term complications were detected in patients including retinopathy (4.4%), microalbuminuria (16.2%), and dyslipidemia (8.3%). Autoimmune thyroiditis was noted in 14%, and celiac disease was found in 19.7% of patients. A significant difference was found in pubertal and pre-pubertal age groups in terms of glycemic control (p=0.01). Conclusion: The level of HbA1c was found to be higher among the pubertal age group. A relationship between autoimmune diseases and gender was determined. PMID:25630001

  19. Dietary insulin index and insulin load in relation to biomarkers of glycemic control, plasma lipids, and inflammation markers123

    PubMed Central

    Nimptsch, Katharina; Brand-Miller, Jennie C; Franz, Mary; Sampson, Laura; Willett, Walter C; Giovannucci, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Background: Dietary glycemic index and load are widely used to estimate the effect of carbohydrate-containing foods on postprandial blood glucose concentrations and as surrogates for insulin response. The food insulin index (II) directly quantifies the postprandial insulin secretion of a food and takes into account foods with a low or no carbohydrate content. Objective: We investigated the average dietary II and insulin load (IL) in relation to biomarkers of glycemic control, plasma lipids, and inflammation markers. Design: In a cross-sectional setting and with the use of data from the Nurses Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, we measured plasma concentrations of C-peptide, glycated hemoglobin (Hb A1c), HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, C-reactive protein (CRP), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in fasting blood samples of 4002 healthy men and women. The dietary II and IL were assessed from food-frequency questionnaires by using directly analyzed or published food II data. Results: After multivariate adjustment, participants in the highest quintile of II had 26% higher triglyceride concentrations than did participants in the lowest quintile of II (P for trend < 0.0001). This association was strongest in obese [body mass index (in kg/m2) ?30] participants (difference between highest and lowest quintiles in the II: 72%; P for trend = 0.01). Dietary II was inversely associated with HDL cholesterol in obese participants (difference: ?18%; P for trend = 0.03). Similar associations were seen for the IL. Dietary II and IL were not significantly associated with plasma C-peptide, Hb A1c, LDL cholesterol, CRP, or IL-6. Conclusion: Dietary II and IL were not associated with fasting biomarkers of glycemic control but may be physiologically relevant to plasma lipids, especially in obese individuals. PMID:21543531

  20. Pancreatic β-cell Function Is a Stronger Predictor of Changes in Glycemic Control After an Aerobic Exercise Intervention Than Insulin Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Malin, Steven K.; Karstoft, Kristian; Kashyap, Sangeeta R.; Haus, Jacob M.; Kirwan, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Understanding intersubject variability in glycemic control following exercise training will help individualize treatment. Objective: Our aim was to determine whether this variability is related to training-induced changes in insulin sensitivity or pancreatic β-cell function. Design, Setting, and Participants: We conducted an observational clinical study of 105 subjects with impaired glucose tolerance or type 2 diabetes. Interventions and Main Outcome Measures: Individual subject changes in fitness (VO2max), glycemia (glycosylated hemoglobin, fasting glucose, oral glucose tolerance test), insulin sensitivity (hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp), oral glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), and disposition index (DI) were measured following 12 to 16 weeks of aerobic exercise training. Regression analyses were used to identify relationships between variables. Results: After training, 86% of subjects increased VO2max and lost weight. Glycosylated hemoglobin, fasting glucose, and 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test were reduced in 69%, 62%, and 68% of subjects, respectively, while insulin sensitivity improved in 90% of the participants. Changes in glycemic control were congruent with changes in GSIS such that 66% of subjects had a reduction in first-phase GSIS, and 46% had reduced second-phase GSIS. Training increased first- and second-phase DI in 83% and 74% of subjects. Training-induced changes in glycemic control were related to changes in GSIS (P < .05), but not insulin sensitivity or DI, and training-induced improvements in glycemic control were largest in subjects with greater pretraining GSIS. Conclusions: Intersubject variability in restoring glycemic control following exercise is explained primarily by changes in insulin secretion. Thus, baseline and training-induced changes in β-cell function may be a key determinant of training-induced improvements in glycemic control. PMID:23966244

  1. Continuous vs interval training on glycemic control and macro- and microvascular reactivity in type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Mitranun, W; Deerochanawong, C; Tanaka, H; Suksom, D

    2014-04-01

    To determine the effects of continuous aerobic exercise training (CON) vs interval aerobic exercise training (INT) on glycemic control and endothelium-dependent vasodilatation, 43 participants with type 2 diabetes were randomly allocated to the sedentary, CON, and INT groups. The CON and INT exercise training programs were designed to yield the same energy expenditure/exercise session and included walking on treadmill for 30 and 40 min/day, 3 times/week for 12 weeks. Body fatness and heart rate at rest decreased and leg muscle strength increased (all P < 0.05) in both the CON and INT groups. Fasting blood glucose levels decreased (P < 0.05) in both exercise groups but glycosylated hemoglobin levels decreased (P < 0.05) only in the INT group. Maximal aerobic capacity, flow-mediated dilation, and cutaneous reactive hyperemia increased significantly in both exercise groups; however, the magnitude of improvements was greater in the INT group. Only the INT group experienced reductions in erythrocyte malondialdehyde and serum von Willebrand factor and increases in plasma glutathione peroxidase and nitric oxide (all P < 0.05). We concluded that both continuous and interval training were effective in improving glycemic control, aerobic fitness, and endothelium-dependent vasodilation, but the interval training program appears to confer greater improvements than the continuous training program. PMID:24102912

  2. Evaluation of Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus using Cytomorphometry of Buccal Cells and Correlation with Glycosylated Hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Karthik, K Raghavendhar; Malathi, N; Poornima, K; Prakash, Sunil; Kadhiresan, R; Arunmozhi, U

    2015-01-01

    Background: To study cytological alterations in the exfoliated buccal cells of diabetic patients. To analyze the cytomorphometric findings in the smears of uncontrolled and controlled diabetic patients and compare it with that of normal healthy controls. To establish a correlation between cytomorphometric changes and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in diabetics and normal controls, for evaluation of glycemic control. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out in 40 confirmed diabetic patients from a hospital out-patient diabetic ward and 20 healthy individuals as controls (Group A: n = 20), in Chennai. Specific exclusion criteria were used to select the study group from a larger group of subjects. Based on HbA1c values, the diabetic patients were categorized into Group B = Controlled diabetics (n = 20) (HbA1c <7%) and Group C = Uncontrolled diabetics (n = 20) (HbA1c >9%). After informed consent, buccal smear was collected from clinically normal appearing mucosa and stained with papanicoloau (PAP) stain. Cytomorphometric analysis of selective PAP stained cells was done using image analysis software, Image Pro Plus 5.5 (Olympus) and parameters determined were average cytoplasmic area (CA), average nuclear area (NA) and cytoplasmic:nuclear (C: N) ratio for an average of 50 cells/patient. Results: Comparing the average NA among three groups, an increase through Group A, B, C, with a maximum significance between Group C and A was seen. The average C: N ratio showed a statistically significant difference between all three groups. Significant correlation existed between the HbA1c values and both the C: N ratio and average NA in all the three groups. Conclusions: Cytomorphometric analysis of buccal smears using the C: N ratio alteration as a reliable criteria, may serve as yet another non-invasive tool for screening programs for diabetic detection. And the technique may possibly be used also for evaluation of glycemic control in known diabetics. PMID:25859101

  3. Study of the effect of vitamin D supplementation on glycemic control in type 2 diabetic prevalent hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mohamed A; Sarhan, Iman I; Halawa, Mohamed R; Afify, Essam N; Hebah, Hayam A; Al-Gohary, Eman A; El-Shazly, Islam O

    2015-10-01

    Vitamin D is claimed to have an adjuvant effect on glycemic control by dual action on pancreatic β-cells and insulin resistance. The aim of this study was to assess the possible effect of short-term alfacalcidol supply on glycemic control in type 2 diabetic hemodialysis (HD) patients. Twenty type 2 diabetic HD patients (using diet and oral drugs but not insulin) were randomly selected from our dialysis unit as well as 20 non-diabetic HD patients as control. A third group of 12 healthy subjects were studied as well. All three groups were similar in age, sex, and body mass index. Oral alfacalcidol therapy was administrated daily as recommended by Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (K/DOQI) guidelines for 12 weeks guided by monthly serum phosphorus and Cax PO4 product. Corrected total calcium, phosphorus, intact parathyroid hormone, 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25[OH]D), and glucoparameters (fasting blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin [HbA1c%], insulin resistance by homeostatic model assessment, and β-cell function by HOMA-β%) were measured under basal conditions and after 3 months of therapy. 25(OH)D was non-significantly lower in diabetic than non-diabetic HD patients, but significantly lower than healthy subjects at the start of the study. However, vitamin D level increased significantly after 3 months of trial, although the levels did not reach normal values. This vitamin D rise was associated with highly significant improvement in concentrations of fasting blood sugar (FBS), fasting insulin, HbA1c%, and HOMA-β-cell function in diabetic and non-diabetic controls. However, there was a significant rise in insulin resistance after treatment. The percentage of change was evident more in diabetics regarding FBS and 25(OH)D concentration. Adjustment of 25(OH)D level in type 2 diabetic prevalent HD patients may improve, at least with short-term therapy, glycemic control mainly through improving β-cell function. PMID:26448381

  4. Diet Is Critical for Prolonged Glycemic Control after Short-Term Insulin Treatment in High-Fat Diet-Induced Type 2 Diabetic Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Aili; Daniels, Nigel A.; Thuma, Jean; McCall, Kelly D.; Malgor, Ramiro; Schwartz, Frank L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinical studies suggest that short-term insulin treatment in new-onset type 2 diabetes (T2DM) can promote prolonged glycemic control. The purpose of this study was to establish an animal model to examine such a legacy effect of early insulin therapy (EIT) in long-term glycemic control in new-onset T2DM. The objective of the study was to investigate the role of diet following onset of diabetes in the favorable outcomes of EIT. Methodology As such, C57BL6/J male mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for 21 weeks to induce diabetes and then received 4 weeks of daily insulin glargine or sham subcutaneous injections. Subsequently, mice were either kept on the HFD or switched to a low-fat diet (LFD) for 4 additional weeks. Principal Findings Mice fed a HFD gained significant fat mass and displayed increased leptin levels, increasing insulin resistance (poor HOMA-IR) and worse glucose tolerance test (GTT) performance in comparison to mice fed a LFD, as expected. Insulin-treated diabetic mice but maintained on the HFD demonstrated even greater weight gain and insulin resistance compared to sham-treated mice. However, insulin-treated mice switched to the LFD exhibited a better HOMA-IR compared to those mice left on a HFD. Further, between the insulin-treated and sham control mice, in spite of similar HOMA-IR values, the insulin-treated mice switched to a LFD following insulin therapy did demonstrate significantly better HOMA-B% values than sham control and insulin-treated HFD mice. Conclusion/Interpretation Early insulin treatment in HFD-induced T2DM in C57BL6/J mice was only beneficial in animals that were switched to a LFD after insulin treatment which may explain why a similar legacy effect in humans is achieved clinically in only a portion of cases studied, emphasizing a vital role for diet adherence in diabetes control. PMID:25633992

  5. The Effects of Free-Living Interval-Walking Training on Glycemic Control, Body Composition, and Physical Fitness in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Karstoft, Kristian; Winding, Kamilla; Knudsen, Sine H.; Nielsen, Jens S.; Thomsen, Carsten; Pedersen, Bente K.; Solomon, Thomas P.J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the feasibility of free-living walking training in type 2 diabetic patients and to investigate the effects of interval-walking training versus continuous-walking training upon physical fitness, body composition, and glycemic control. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Subjects with type 2 diabetes were randomized to a control (n = 8), continuous-walking (n = 12), or interval-walking group (n = 12). Training groups were prescribed five sessions per week (60 min/session) and were controlled with an accelerometer and a heart-rate monitor. Continuous walkers performed all training at moderate intensity, whereas interval walkers alternated 3-min repetitions at low and high intensity. Before and after the 4-month intervention, the following variables were measured: VO2max, body composition, and glycemic control (fasting glucose, HbA1c, oral glucose tolerance test, and continuous glucose monitoring [CGM]). RESULTS Training adherence was high (89 ± 4%), and training energy expenditure and mean intensity were comparable. VO2max increased 16.1 ± 3.7% in the interval-walking group (P < 0.05), whereas no changes were observed in the continuous-walking or control group. Body mass and adiposity (fat mass and visceral fat) decreased in the interval-walking group only (P < 0.05). Glycemic control (elevated mean CGM glucose levels and increased fasting insulin) worsened in the control group (P < 0.05), whereas mean (P = 0.05) and maximum (P < 0.05) CGM glucose levels decreased in the interval-walking group. The continuous walkers showed no changes in glycemic control. CONCLUSIONS Free-living walking training is feasible in type 2 diabetic patients. Continuous walking offsets the deterioration in glycemia seen in the control group, and interval walking is superior to energy expenditure–matched continuous walking for improving physical fitness, body composition, and glycemic control. PMID:23002086

  6. Association Between Specific Depression Symptoms and Glycemic Control Among Patients With Comorbid Type 2 Diabetes and Provisional Depression

    PubMed Central

    Czech, Stephanie J.; Orsillo, Susan M.; Pirraglia, Paul A.; English, Thomas M.; Connell, Alexa J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether specific depression symptoms are associated with glycemic control independent of potential demographic and clinical covariates among primary care patients with comorbid type 2 diabetes and provisional threshold or subthreshold depression. Method: We examined a convenience sample of patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and provisional threshold or subthreshold depression (N = 82) at 2 family health centers. Cases were identified using a population-based registry of patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (ICD-9 codes 250.00 for controlled type 2 diabetes and 250.02 for uncontrolled type 2 diabetes). Data from patients with a primary care provider appointment from the beginning of April 2011 through the end of June 2012 and with at least one 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) depression screener and a glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) laboratory test between 2 weeks before and 10 weeks after PHQ-9 screening were eligible for inclusion. We defined provisional threshold or subthreshold depression using PHQ-9 scoring criteria, which were designed to yield provisional diagnostic information about major depressive disorder based on DSM-5 diagnostic criteria. Results: Patients reporting higher severity of sleep problems on the PHQ-9 had significantly higher HbA1c levels (mean = 8.48, SD = 2.17) compared to patients reporting lower severity or absence of this symptom (mean = 7.19, SD = 1.34, t48.88 = ?3.13, P = .003). Problems with sleep contributed unique variance on glycemic control (? = 0.27, P = .02) when controlling for potential clinical and demographic covariates, with those reporting more sleep difficulties having higher HbA1c levels. Conclusions: For patients with type 2 diabetes and provisional threshold or subthreshold depression, it may be prudent to aggressively address sleep problems as a potential mechanism toward improving diabetes control. PMID:26835160

  7. Glycemic index, glycemic load, and risk of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Willett, Walter; Manson, JoAnn; Liu, Simin

    2002-07-01

    The possibility that high, long-term intake of carbohydrates that are rapidly absorbed as glucose may increase the risk of type 2 diabetes has been a long-standing controversy. Two main mechanisms have been hypothesized, one mediated by increases in insulin resistance and the other by pancreatic exhaustion as a result of the increased demand for insulin. During the past decade, several lines of evidence have collectively provided strong support for a relation between such diets and diabetes incidence. In animals and in short-term human studies, a high intake of carbohydrates with a high glycemic index (a relative measure of the incremental glucose response per gram of carbohydrate) produced greater insulin resistance than did the intake of low-glycemic-index carbohydrates. In large prospective epidemiologic studies, both the glycemic index and the glycemic load (the glycemic index multiplied by the amount of carbohydrate) of the overall diet have been associated with a greater risk of type 2 diabetes in both men and women. Conversely, a higher intake of cereal fiber has been consistently associated with lower diabetes risk. In diabetic patients, evidence from medium-term studies suggests that replacing high-glycemic-index carbohydrates with a low-glycemic-index forms will improve glycemic control and, among persons treated with insulin, will reduce hypoglycemic episodes. These dietary changes, which can be made by replacing products made with white flour and potatoes with whole-grain, minimally refined cereal products, have also been associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease and can be an appropriate component of recommendations for an overall healthy diet. PMID:12081851

  8. Association of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Rapid Eye Movement Sleep With Reduced Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes: Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Grimaldi, Daniela; Beccuti, Guglielmo; Touma, Carol; Van Cauter, Eve; Mokhlesi, Babak

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Severity of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been associated with poorer glycemic control in type 2 diabetes. It is not known whether obstructive events during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep have a different metabolic impact compared with those during non-REM (NREM) sleep. Treatment of OSA is often limited to the first half of the night, when NREM rather than REM sleep predominates. We aimed to quantify the impact of OSA in REM versus NREM sleep on hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) in subjects with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS All participants underwent polysomnography, and glycemic control was assessed by HbA1c. RESULTS Our analytic cohort included 115 subjects (65 women; age 55.2 ± 9.8 years; BMI 34.5 ± 7.5 kg/m2). In a multivariate linear regression model, REM apnea–hypopnea index (AHI) was independently associated with increasing levels of HbA1c (P = 0.008). In contrast, NREM AHI was not associated with HbA1c (P = 0.762). The mean adjusted HbA1c increased from 6.3% in subjects in the lowest quartile of REM AHI to 7.3% in subjects in the highest quartile of REM AHI (P = 0.044 for linear trend). Our model predicts that 4 h of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) use would leave 60% of REM sleep untreated and would be associated with a decrease in HbA1c by approximately 0.25%. In contrast, 7 h of CPAP use would cover more than 85% of REM sleep and would be associated with a decrease in HbA1c by as much as 1%. CONCLUSIONS In type 2 diabetes, OSA during REM sleep may influence long-term glycemic control. The metabolic benefits of CPAP therapy may not be achieved with the typical adherence of 4 h per night. PMID:24101701

  9. Impact of Peer Health Coaching on Glycemic Control in Low-Income Patients With Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Thom, David H.; Ghorob, Amireh; Hessler, Danielle; De Vore, Diana; Chen, Ellen; Bodenheimer, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Peer health coaches offer a potential model for extending the capacity of primary care practices to provide self-management support for patients with diabetes. We conducted a randomized controlled trial to test whether clinic-based peer health coaching, compared with usual care, improves glycemic control for low-income patients who have poorly controlled diabetes. METHOD We undertook a randomized controlled trial enrolling patients from 6 public health clinics in San Francisco. Twenty-three patients with a glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C) level of less than 8.5%, who completed a 36-hour health coach training class, acted as peer coaches. Patients from the same clinics with HbA1C levels of 8.0% or more were recruited and randomized to receive health coaching (n = 148) or usual care (n = 151). The primary outcome was the difference in change in HbA1C levels at 6 months. Secondary outcomes were proportion of patients with a decrease in HbA1C level of 1.0% or more and proportion of patients with an HbA1C level of less than 7.5% at 6 months. Data were analyzed using a linear mixed model with and without adjustment for differences in baseline variables. RESULTS At 6 months, HbA1C levels had decreased by 1.07% in the coached group and 0.3% in the usual care group, a difference of 0.77% in favor of coaching (P = .01, adjusted). HbA1C levels decreased 1.0% or more in 49.6% of coached patients vs 31.5% of usual care patients (P = .001, adjusted), and levels at 6 months were less than 7.5% for 22.0% of coached vs 14.9% of usual care patients (P = .04, adjusted). CONCLUSIONS Peer health coaching significantly improved diabetes control in this group of low-income primary care patients. PMID:23508600

  10. Four-Point Preprandial Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose for the Assessment of Glycemic Control and Variability in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Treated with Insulin and Vildagliptin

    PubMed Central

    Tura, Andrea; Farngren, Johan; Schweizer, Anja; Foley, James E.; Pacini, Giovanni; Ahrn, Bo

    2015-01-01

    The study explored the utility of four-point preprandial glucose self-monitoring to calculate several indices of glycemic control and variability in a study adding the DPP-4 inhibitor vildagliptin to ongoing insulin therapy. This analysis utilized data from a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled crossover study in 29 patients with type 2 diabetes treated with vildagliptin or placebo on top of stable insulin dose. During two 4-week treatment periods, self-monitoring of plasma glucose was undertaken at 4 occasions every day. Glucose values were used to assess several indices of glycemic control quality, such as glucose mean, GRADE, M-VALUE, hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia index, and indices of glycemic variability, such as standard deviation, CONGA, J-INDEX, and MAGE. We found that vildagliptin improved the glycemic condition compared to placebo: mean glycemic levels, and both GRADE and M-VALUE, were reduced by vildagliptin (P < 0.01). Indices also showed that vildagliptin reduced glycemia without increasing the risk for hypoglycemia. Almost all indices of glycemic variability showed an improvement of the glycemic condition with vildagliptin (P < 0.02), though more marked differences were shown by the more complex indices. In conclusion, the study shows that four-sample preprandial glucose self-monitoring is sufficient to yield information on the vildagliptin effects on glycemic control and variability. PMID:26587020

  11. Four-year change in cardiorespiratory fitness and influence on glycemic control in adults with Type 2 diabetes in a randomized trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVE To examine an intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) compared with diabetes support and education (DSE) on 4-year change in fitness and physical activity (PA), and to examine the effect of change in fitness and PA, adjusting for potential confounders, on glycemic control in the Look AHEAD ...

  12. Effects of exercise on glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus in Koreans: the fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES V)

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji-Hye; Lee, Young-Eun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of exercise on glycemic control using data from fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and to provide appropriate exercise guidelines for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Korea. [Subjects and Methods] We selected 1,328 patients from the fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey database who had type 2 diabetes and ranged in age from 30 to 90 years. Statistical analyses included χ2 tests, multiple linear regression, and logistic regression. [Results] Factors found to be significantly related to glycemic control included income level, physical activity based on intensity of aerobic exercise, use of diabetes medicine, presence of hypertension, duration of diabetes, and waist circumference. In addition, engaging in combined low- and moderate-intensity aerobic exercise when adjusted for resistance exercise was found to lower the risk of glycemic control failure. [Conclusion] Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Korea should engage in combined low- and moderate-intensity aerobic exercise such as walking for 30 minutes or more five times a week. Physical activity is likely to improve glycemic control and thus prevent the acute and chronic complications of diabetes mellitus. PMID:26696738

  13. Effects of exercise on glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus in Koreans: the fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES V).

    PubMed

    Park, Ji-Hye; Lee, Young-Eun

    2015-11-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of exercise on glycemic control using data from fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and to provide appropriate exercise guidelines for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Korea. [Subjects and Methods] We selected 1,328 patients from the fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey database who had type 2 diabetes and ranged in age from 30 to 90?years. Statistical analyses included ?(2) tests, multiple linear regression, and logistic regression. [Results] Factors found to be significantly related to glycemic control included income level, physical activity based on intensity of aerobic exercise, use of diabetes medicine, presence of hypertension, duration of diabetes, and waist circumference. In addition, engaging in combined low- and moderate-intensity aerobic exercise when adjusted for resistance exercise was found to lower the risk of glycemic control failure. [Conclusion] Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Korea should engage in combined low- and moderate-intensity aerobic exercise such as walking for 30 minutes or more five times a week. Physical activity is likely to improve glycemic control and thus prevent the acute and chronic complications of diabetes mellitus. PMID:26696738

  14. Three 15-min bouts of moderate postmeal walking significantly improves 24-h glycemic control in older people at risk for impaired glucose tolerance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of three 15-min bouts of postmeal walking with 45 min of sustained walking on 24-h glycemic control in older persons at risk for glucose intolerance. Inactive older (=60 years of age) participants (N = 10) were recruited from the community a...

  15. Achieving glycemic control in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes: a critical comparison of current options

    PubMed Central

    Du, Ye-Fong; Ou, Horng-Yih; Beverly, Elizabeth A; Chiu, Ching-Ju

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is increasing in the elderly. Because of the unique characteristics of elderly people with T2DM, therapeutic strategy and focus should be tailored to suit this population. This article reviews the guidelines and studies related to older people with T2DM worldwide. A few important themes are generalized: 1) the functional and cognitive status is critical for older people with T2DM considering their life expectancy compared to younger counterparts; 2) both severe hypoglycemia and persistent hyperglycemia are deleterious to older adults with T2DM, and both conditions should be avoided when determining therapeutic goals; 3) recently developed guidelines emphasize the avoidance of hypoglycemic episodes in older people, even in the absence of symptoms. In addition, we raise the concern of glycemic variability, and discuss the rationale for the selection of current options in managing this patient population. PMID:25429208

  16. Adenovirus 36 Attenuates Weight Loss from Exercise but Improves Glycemic Control by Increasing Mitochondrial Activity in the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Michael B.; Park, Sooho; Kim, In-Beom; Nam, Jae-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Human adenovirus type 36 (Ad36) as an obesity agent induces adiposity by increasing glucose uptake and promoting chronic inflammation in fat tissues; in contrast, exercise reduces total body fat and inflammation. Our objective was to determine the association between Ad36 and the effects of exercise on inflammation and glycemic control. In the human trials (n?=?54), Korean children (aged 1214 years) exercised for 60 min on three occasions each week for 2 months. We compared the body mass index (BMI) Z-scores before and after exercise. C57BL/6 mice were infected with Ad36 and Ad2 as a control, and these mice exercised for 12 weeks postinfection. After the exercise period, we determined the serum parameters and assessed the presence of inflammation and the mitochondrial function in the organs. Ad36-seropositive children who were subjected to a supervised exercise regimen had high BMI Z-scores whereas Ad36-seronegative children had lower scores. Similarly, Ad36-infected mice were resistant to weight loss and exhibited chronic inflammation of their adipose tissues despite frequent exercise. However, Ad36 combined with exercise reduced the levels of serum glucose, nonesterified fatty acids, total cholesterol, and insulin in virus-infected mice. Interestingly, virus infection increased the mitochondrial function in the liver, as demonstrated by the numbers of mitochondria, cytochrome c oxidase activity, and transcription of key mitochondrial genes. Therefore Ad36 counteracts the weight-loss effect of exercise and maintains the chronic inflammatory state, but glycemic control is improved by exercise synergistically because of increased mitochondrial activity in the liver. PMID:25479564

  17. Epigenetic Changes in Endothelial Progenitors as a Possible Cellular Basis for Glycemic Memory in Diabetic Vascular Complications

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekar, Poojitha; O'Neill, Christina L.; Eeles, Lydia; Stitt, Alan W.; Medina, Reinhold J.

    2015-01-01

    The vascular complications of diabetes significantly impact the quality of life and mortality in diabetic patients. Extensive evidence from various human clinical trials has clearly established that a period of poor glycemic control early in the disease process carries negative consequences, such as an increase in the development and progression of vascular complications that becomes evident many years later. Importantly, intensive glycemic control established later in the disease process cannot reverse or slow down the onset or progression of diabetic vasculopathy. This has been named the glycemic memory phenomenon. Scientists have successfully modelled glycemic memory using various in vitro and in vivo systems. This review emphasizes that oxidative stress and accumulation of advanced glycation end products are key factors driving glycemic memory in endothelial cells. Furthermore, various epigenetic marks have been proposed to closely associate with vascular glycemic memory. In addition, we comment on the importance of endothelial progenitors and their role as endogenous vasoreparative cells that are negatively impacted by the diabetic milieu and may constitute a “carrier” of glycemic memory. Considering the potential of endothelial progenitor-based cytotherapies, future studies on their glycemic memory are warranted to develop epigenetics-based therapeutics targeting diabetic vascular complications. PMID:26106624

  18. Effects of subtracting sitting versus adding exercise on glycemic control and variability in sedentary office workers.

    PubMed

    Blankenship, Jennifer M; Granados, Kirsten; Braun, Barry

    2014-11-01

    Recent evidence suggests that, like adding exercise, reducing sitting time may improve cardiometabolic health. There has not been a direct comparison of the 2 strategies with energy expenditure held constant. The purpose of this study was to compare fasting and postmeal glucose and insulin concentrations in response to a day with frequent breaks from sitting but no exercise versus considerable sitting plus moderate exercise. Ten sedentary overweight/obese office workers were tested in 3 conditions: (i) walking per activity guidelines (AGW): sitting for majority of workday with a 30 min pre-lunch walk; (ii) frequent long breaks (FLB): no structured exercise but frequent breaks from sitting during workday with energy expenditure matched to AGW; and (iii) frequent short breaks (FSB): number of breaks matched to FLB, but duration of breaks were shorter. Plasma glucose and insulin areas under the curve were measured in response to a meal tolerance test (MTT) at the end of the workday and interstitial glucose was evaluated throughout the day and overnight using continuous glucose monitoring. Using repeated-measures linear mixed models, area under the curve of plasma glucose or insulin after the MTT was not different between conditions. Glycemic variability was lower in FLB compared with AGW (p < 0.05), and nocturnal duration of elevated glucose (>7.8 mmol/L) was shorter after FLB (2.5 2.5 min) than AGW (32.7 16.4 min) or FSB (45.6 29.6 min, p = 0.05). When energy expenditure was matched, breaks from sitting approximated the effects of moderate-intensity exercise on postmeal glucose and insulin responses and more effectively constrained glycemic variability. PMID:25166626

  19. Successful implementation of a perioperative glycemic control protocol in cardiac surgery: barrier analysis and intervention using lean six sigma.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Elizabeth A; Chavez-Valdez, Raul; Holt, Natalie F; Grogan, Kelly L; Khalifeh, Katherine W; Slater, Tammy; Winner, Laura E; Moyer, Jennifer; Lehmann, Christoph U

    2011-01-01

    Although the evidence strongly supports perioperative glycemic control among cardiac surgical patients, there is scant literature to describe the practical application of such a protocol in the complex ICU environment. This paper describes the use of the Lean Six Sigma methodology to implement a perioperative insulin protocol in a cardiac surgical intensive care unit (CSICU) in a large academic hospital. A preintervention chart audit revealed that fewer than 10% of patients were admitted to the CSICU with glucose <200?mg/dL, prompting the initiation of the quality improvement project. Following protocol implementation, more than 90% of patients were admitted with a glucose <200?mg/dL. Key elements to success include barrier analysis and intervention, provider education, and broadening the project scope to address the intraoperative period. PMID:22091218

  20. Trajectories in Glycemic Control over Time Are Associated with Cognitive Performance in Elderly Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ravona-Springer, Ramit; Heymann, Anthony; Schmeidler, James; Moshier, Erin; Godbold, James; Sano, Mary; Leroith, Derek; Johnson, Sterling; Preiss, Rachel; Koifman, Keren; Hoffman, Hadas; Silverman, Jeremy M.; Beeri, Michal Schnaider

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the relationships of long-term trajectories of glycemic control with cognitive performance in cognitively normal elderly with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Methods Subjects (n = 835) pertain to a diabetes registry (DR) established in 1998 with an average of 18 HbA1c measurements per subject, permitting identification of distinctive trajectory groups of HbA1c and examining their association with cognitive function in five domains: episodic memory, semantic categorization, attention/working memory, executive function, and overall cognition. Analyses of covariance compared cognitive function among the trajectory groups adjusting for sociodemographic, cardiovascular, diabetes-related covariates and depression. Results Subjects averaged 72.8 years of age. Six trajectories of HbA1c were identified, characterized by HbA1c level at entry into the DR (Higher/Lower), and trend over time (Stable/Decreasing/Increasing). Both groups with a trajectory of decreasing HbA1c levels had high HbA1c levels at entry into the DR (9.2%, 10.7%), and high, though decreasing, HbA1c levels over time. They had the worst cognitive performance, particularly in overall cognition (p<0.02) and semantic categorization (p<0.01), followed by that of subjects whose HbA1c at entry into the DR was relatively high (7.2%, 7.8%) and increased over time. Subjects with stable HbA1c over time had the lowest HbA1c levels at entry (6.0%, 6.8%) and performed best in cognitive tests. Conclusion Glycemic control trajectories, which better reflect chronicity of T2D than a single HbA1c measurement, predict cognitive performance. A trajectory of stable HbA1c levels over time is associated with better cognitive function. PMID:24887092

  1. Associations of Nutrient Intake with Glycemic Control in Youth with Type 1 Diabetes: Differences by Insulin Regimen

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Michelle L.; Mehta, Sanjeev; Nansel, Tonja; Quinn, Heidi; Lipsky, Leah M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Type 1 diabetes management has evolved from meal plans towards flexible eating with carbohydrate counting. With this shift, youth with type 1 diabetes may consume excess fat and insufficient fiber, which may impact glycemic control. Few studies consider whether insulin regimen influences associations between dietary intake and hemoglobin A1c. Patients and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 252 youth (52% male; age, 13.22.8 years; body mass index z-score [z-BMI], 0.70.8) with type 1 diabetes completed 3-day food records. Dietary intake was compared with published guidelines. Logistic regression predicted the odds of suboptimal glycemic control (an A1c level of ?8.5%) related to fat and protein intake or fiber intake according to insulin regimen (pump vs. injection) adjusting for age, sex, diabetes duration, z-BMI, insulin dose, glucose monitoring frequency, and total energy intake (TEI). Results: Youth had a mean TEI of 40.915.4?kcal/kg/day and excess fat and insufficient fiber intake compared against published guidelines. Pump-treated youth consuming the highest quartile of fat intake (as percentage TEI) had 3.6 (95% confidence interval, 1.39.7) times the odds of a suboptimal A1c than those in the lowest quartile. No such association was found in injection-treated youth. In the total sample, youth with the lowest quartile of fiber intake had 3.6 (95% confidence interval, 1.49.0) times the odds of a suboptimal A1c, but this association did not differ by insulin regimen. There was no association between protein intake and A1c. Conclusions: Higher fat intake in pump-treated youth and lower fiber intake in all youth were associated with an A1c level of ?8.5%. Improving dietary quality may help improve A1c. PMID:24766666

  2. Effect of Replacing Animal Protein with Plant Protein on Glycemic Control in Diabetes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Viguiliouk, Effie; Stewart, Sarah E.; Jayalath, Viranda H.; Ng, Alena Praneet; Mirrahimi, Arash; de Souza, Russell J.; Hanley, Anthony J.; Bazinet, Richard P.; Blanco Mejia, Sonia; Leiter, Lawrence A.; Josse, Robert G.; Kendall, Cyril W.C.; Jenkins, David J.A.; Sievenpiper, John L.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research on the effect of replacing sources of animal protein with plant protein on glycemic control has been inconsistent. We therefore conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to assess the effect of this replacement on glycemic control in individuals with diabetes. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases through 26 August 2015. We included RCTs ≥ 3-weeks comparing the effect of replacing animal with plant protein on HbA1c, fasting glucose (FG), and fasting insulin (FI). Two independent reviewers extracted relevant data, assessed study quality and risk of bias. Data were pooled by the generic inverse variance method and expressed as mean differences (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Heterogeneity was assessed (Cochran Q-statistic) and quantified (I2-statistic). Thirteen RCTs (n = 280) met the eligibility criteria. Diets emphasizing a replacement of animal with plant protein at a median level of ~35% of total protein per day significantly lowered HbA1c (MD = −0.15%; 95%-CI: −0.26, −0.05%), FG (MD = −0.53 mmol/L; 95%-CI: −0.92, −0.13 mmol/L) and FI (MD = −10.09 pmol/L; 95%-CI: −17.31, −2.86 pmol/L) compared with control arms. Overall, the results indicate that replacing sources of animal with plant protein leads to modest improvements in glycemic control in individuals with diabetes. Owing to uncertainties in our analyses there is a need for larger, longer, higher quality trials. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov registration number: NCT02037321. PMID:26633472

  3. Weight Loss, Glycemic Control, and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in Response to Differential Diet Composition in a Weight Loss Program in Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rock, Cheryl L.; Flatt, Shirley W.; Pakiz, Bilge; Taylor, Kenneth S.; Leone, Angela F.; Brelje, Kerrin; Heath, Dennis D.; Quintana, Elizabeth L.; Sherwood, Nancy E.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To test whether a weight loss program promotes greater weight loss, glycemic control, and improved cardiovascular disease risk factors compared with control conditions and whether there is a differential response to higher versus lower carbohydrate intake. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This randomized controlled trial at two university medical centers enrolled 227 overweight or obese adults with type 2 diabetes and assigned them to parallel in-person diet and exercise counseling, with prepackaged foods in a planned menu during the initial phase, or to usual care (UC; two weight loss counseling sessions and monthly contacts). RESULTS Relative weight loss was 7.4% (95% CI 5.7–9.2%), 9.0% (7.1–10.9%), and 2.5% (1.3–3.8%) for the lower fat, lower carbohydrate, and UC groups (P < 0.001 intervention effect). Glycemic control markers and triglyceride levels were lower in the intervention groups compared with UC group at 1 year (fasting glucose 141 [95% CI 133–149] vs. 159 [144–174] mg/dL, P = 0.023; hemoglobin A1c 6.9% [6.6–7.1%] vs. 7.5% [7.1–7.9%] or 52 [49–54] vs. 58 [54–63] mmol/mol, P = 0.001; triglycerides 148 [134–163] vs. 204 [173–234] mg/dL, P < 0.001). The lower versus higher carbohydrate groups maintained lower hemoglobin A1c (6.6% [95% CI 6.3–6.8%] vs. 7.2% [6.8–7.5%] or 49 [45–51] vs. 55 [51–58] mmol/mol) at 1 year (P = 0.008). CONCLUSIONS The weight loss program resulted in greater weight loss and improved glycemic control in type 2 diabetes. PMID:24760261

  4. Adding glimepiride to current insulin therapy increases high-molecular weight adiponectin levels to improve glycemic control in poorly controlled type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To observe the efficacy and safety of adding glimepiride to established insulin therapy in poorly controlled type 2 diabetes (T2D) and to assess the relationship of changes in the serum high-molecular weight (HMW) adiponectin levels and glycemic control after glimepiride treatment. Methods Fifty-six subjects with poorly controlled insulin-treated T2D were randomly assigned to either the glimepiride-added group (the group A, n?=?29) or the insulin-increasing group (the group B, n?=?27) while continuing current insulin-based therapy. Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) value, daily insulin dose, body weight, waist circumference, plasma lipid concentration, serum HMW adiponectin level and the number of hypoglycemic events were evaluated before and after treatment. Results At the end of study, insulin doses were significantly reduced, and the mean HbA1c, fasting blood glucose (FBG) and 2-hour postprandial blood glucose (P2BG) were improved greater in the group A compared with the group B. The serum HMW adiponectin levels were significantly increased in the group A compared with the group B. Most importantly, we found that changes in HbA1c were inversely correlated with changes in serum HMW adiponectin in the group A (r?=??0.452, p?=?0.02). Conclusions Adding glimepiride to current insulin treatment led to better improvement in glycemic control with a significant smaller daily insulin dose, and the increases in the serum HMW adiponectin levels may directly contribute to improvement glycemic control. PMID:24650537

  5. Long-term glycemic control using polymer-encapsulated human stem cell-derived beta cells in immune-competent mice.

    PubMed

    Vegas, Arturo J; Veiseh, Omid; Grtler, Mads; Millman, Jeffrey R; Pagliuca, Felicia W; Bader, Andrew R; Doloff, Joshua C; Li, Jie; Chen, Michael; Olejnik, Karsten; Tam, Hok Hei; Jhunjhunwala, Siddharth; Langan, Erin; Aresta-Dasilva, Stephanie; Gandham, Srujan; McGarrigle, James J; Bochenek, Matthew A; Hollister-Lock, Jennifer; Oberholzer, Jose; Greiner, Dale L; Weir, Gordon C; Melton, Douglas A; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G

    2016-03-01

    The transplantation of glucose-responsive, insulin-producing cells offers the potential for restoring glycemic control in individuals with diabetes. Pancreas transplantation and the infusion of cadaveric islets are currently implemented clinically, but these approaches are limited by the adverse effects of immunosuppressive therapy over the lifetime of the recipient and the limited supply of donor tissue. The latter concern may be addressed by recently described glucose-responsive mature beta cells that are derived from human embryonic stem cells (referred to as SC-? cells), which may represent an unlimited source of human cells for pancreas replacement therapy. Strategies to address the immunosuppression concerns include immunoisolation of insulin-producing cells with porous biomaterials that function as an immune barrier. However, clinical implementation has been challenging because of host immune responses to the implant materials. Here we report the first long-term glycemic correction of a diabetic, immunocompetent animal model using human SC-? cells. SC-? cells were encapsulated with alginate derivatives capable of mitigating foreign-body responses in vivo and implanted into the intraperitoneal space of C57BL/6J mice treated with streptozotocin, which is an animal model for chemically induced type 1 diabetes. These implants induced glycemic correction without any immunosuppression until their removal at 174 d after implantation. Human C-peptide concentrations and in vivo glucose responsiveness demonstrated therapeutically relevant glycemic control. Implants retrieved after 174 d contained viable insulin-producing cells. PMID:26808346

  6. The effects of the king oyster mushroom Pleurotus eryngii (higher Basidiomycetes) on glycemic control in alloxan-induced diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Ping; Lei, Ya-li; Zhan, Huan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of Pleurotus eryngii on glycemic metabolism. Alloxan-induced hyperglycemic mice were used to study the effects of P. eryngii on blood glucose, glycohemoglobin, insulin secretion, damaged pancreatic ?-cells, total antioxidant status (TAOS), and hepatic glycogen in hyperglycemic mice. Sixty diabetic mice were divided equally into 5 groups: the alloxan (AX)-induced hyperglycemic group, the AX and glibenclamide (GLI)-treated group, the AX and P. eryngii extracts (PEEs) 50-treated group (PEE 50 mg/kg), the AX and PEE100-treated group (PEE 100 mg/kg), and the AX and PEE200-treated group (PEE 200 mg/kg). The other 12 normal mice were injected intravenously with the normal saline and used as the control group. After PEE (100 and 200 mg/kg) was orally administered to the mice over 5 weeks, blood glucose and HbAlc were significantly decreased in AX-induced hyperglycemic mice (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively), whereas the level of insulin secretion was markedly elevated in (P < 0.05). The pancreatic ?-cells damaged by AX partially and gradually recovered after PPE extract was administered to the hyperglycemic mice for 35 days. In addition, PEE treatment gradually increased the body weight and significantly increased the concentration of hepatic glycogen in hyperglycemic mice (P < 0.05). The results suggest that the action of PPE on glycemic metabolism occurs via increasing glycogen and insulin concentrations as well as recovering injured ?-cells and reducing free radical damage. PPE may become a new potential hypoglycemic food for hyperglycemic people. PMID:24941163

  7. Effect of Tree Nuts on Glycemic Control in Diabetes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Dietary Trials

    PubMed Central

    Viguiliouk, Effie; Kendall, Cyril W. C.; Blanco Mejia, Sonia; Cozma, Adrian I.; Ha, Vanessa; Mirrahimi, Arash; Jayalath, Viranda H.; Augustin, Livia S. A.; Chiavaroli, Laura; Leiter, Lawrence A.; de Souza, Russell J.; Jenkins, David J. A.; Sievenpiper, John L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Tree nut consumption has been associated with reduced diabetes risk, however, results from randomized trials on glycemic control have been inconsistent. Objective To provide better evidence for diabetes guidelines development, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials to assess the effects of tree nuts on markers of glycemic control in individuals with diabetes. Data Sources MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Cochrane databases through 6 April 2014. Study Selection Randomized controlled trials ≥3 weeks conducted in individuals with diabetes that compare the effect of diets emphasizing tree nuts to isocaloric diets without tree nuts on HbA1c, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, and HOMA-IR. Data Extraction and Synthesis Two independent reviewer’s extracted relevant data and assessed study quality and risk of bias. Data were pooled by the generic inverse variance method and expressed as mean differences (MD) with 95% CI’s. Heterogeneity was assessed (Cochran Q-statistic) and quantified (I2). Results Twelve trials (n = 450) were included. Diets emphasizing tree nuts at a median dose of 56 g/d significantly lowered HbA1c (MD = −0.07% [95% CI:−0.10, −0.03%]; P = 0.0003) and fasting glucose (MD = −0.15 mmol/L [95% CI: −0.27, −0.02 mmol/L]; P = 0.03) compared with control diets. No significant treatment effects were observed for fasting insulin and HOMA-IR, however the direction of effect favoured tree nuts. Limitations Majority of trials were of short duration and poor quality. Conclusions Pooled analyses show that tree nuts improve glycemic control in individuals with type 2 diabetes, supporting their inclusion in a healthy diet. Owing to the uncertainties in our analyses there is a need for longer, higher quality trials with a focus on using nuts to displace high-glycemic index carbohydrates. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01630980 PMID:25076495

  8. Glycemic Control among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Countries of Arabic Gulf

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rasheedi, Ahmad Ali

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a growing, worldwide public health concern. The countries of Arabic Gulf appear to have a higher prevalence of diabetes than the global average. The recent and rapid socio-economic development of these countries has been associated with this rising prevalence. Although the rate of type 2 diabetes management based on glycosylated hemoglobin level in the countries of Arabic Gulf is labeled as poor, the outcomes are almost similar to those reported from elsewhere. Unfortunately, overweight and obesity are driving the global diabetes epidemic. A minority of patients with type 2 diabetes had a normal body weight which might make the control of diabetes difficult. Anyhow, Greater efforts are urgently needed to properly manage diabetes early in order to prevent short and long-term complications. Practical strategies aimed at more effective management of type 2 diabetes patients are strongly needed. PMID:26609299

  9. Associations among glycemic excursions, glycated hemoglobin and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    SHI, CHUN-HONG; WANG, CONG; BAI, RAN; ZHANG, XUE-YANG; MEN, LI-LI; DU, JIAN-LING

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the associations among glycemic excursions, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) using a continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS). Sixty-three patients with T2DM whose HbA1c levels were >7% wore a CGMS device for 72 h. According to their HbA1c levels, patients were divided into three groups as follows: Group A (HbA1c ≤9.32%), group B (9.32%< HbA1c ≤11.76%) and group C (HbA1c >11.76%). Patients were also divided into two groups according to the mean amplitude of glycemic excursions (MAGE) as follows: Low glycemic excursion group (MAGE, <3.9 mmol/l) and high glycemic excursion group (MAGE, ≥3.9 mmol/l). Clinical data and the hs-CRP levels in different groups were compared. No significant difference was observed in the MAGE among groups A, B and C (P>0.05). The level of hs-CRP was significantly higher in group C compared with that in groups A and B, and in group B compared with that in group A (P<0.05). Multivariate stepwise regression analysis indicated that HbA1c correlated with hs-CRP (P<0.05). MAGE and HbA1c were independent indices for the assessment of glycemic control. In addition, HbA1c had a considerable effect on the serum hs-CRP level. PMID:26640576

  10. A Novel Behavioral Intervention in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Improves Glycemic Control: Preliminary Results from a Pilot Randomized Control Trial

    PubMed Central

    Maranda, Louise; Lau, May; Stewart, Sunita M; Gupta, Olga T

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to develop and pilot an innovative behavioral intervention in adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) incorporating structured care of a pet to improve glycemic control. Methods Twenty-eight adolescents with A1C > 8.5% (69 mmol/mol) were randomly assigned to either the intervention group (care of a Betta splendens pet fish) or the control group (usual care). Adolescents in the intervention group were given instructions to associate daily and weekly fish care duties with diabetes self-management tasks including blood glucose testing and parent-adolescent communication. Results After 3 months the participants in the intervention group exhibited a statistically significant decrease in A1C levels (−0.5%) compared to their peers in the control group who had an increase in A1C levels (0.8%)(p = 0.04). The younger adolescents (ages 10–13) demonstrated a greater response to the intervention which was statistically significant (−1.5% vs. 0.6%, p = 0.04) compared with the older adolescents (ages 14–17). Conclusions Structured care of a pet fish can improve glycemic control in adolescents with T1DM, likely by providing cues to perform diabetes self-management behaviors. PMID:25614529

  11. Diabetes Care, Glycemic Control, Complications, and Concomitant Autoimmune Diseases in Children with Type 1 Diabetes in Turkey: A Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    ?im?ek, Damla Gk?en; Aycan, Zehra; zen, Samim; etinkaya, Semra; Kara, Cengiz; Abal?, Sayg?n; Demir, Korcan; Tun, zgl; Uaktrk, Ahmet; Asar, Glgn; Ba?, Firdevs; etinkaya, Ergun; Ayd?n, Murat; Karagzel, Glay; Orbak, Zerrin; Orbak, Zerrin; ??klar, Zeynep; Alt?nc?k, Aya; kten, Ay?enur; zkan, Behzat; al, Gnl; Semiz, Serap; Arslano?lu, ?lknur; Evliyao?lu, Olcay; Bundak, Rveyde; Darcan, ?kran

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Epidemiologic and clinical features of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) may show substantial differences among countries. The primary goal in the management of T1DM is to prevent micro- and macrovascular complications by achieving good glycemic control. The present study aimed to assess metabolic control, presence of concomitant autoimmune diseases, and of acute and long-term complications in patients diagnosed with T1DM during childhood and adolescence. The study also aimed to be a first step in the development of a national registry system for T1DM, in Turkey. Methods: Based on hospital records, this cross-sectional, multicenter study included 1 032 patients with T1DM from 12 different centers in Turkey, in whom the diagnosis was established during childhood. Epidemiological and clinical characteristics of the patients were recorded. Metabolic control, diabetes care, complications, and concomitant autoimmune diseases were evaluated. Results: Mean age, diabetes duration, and hemoglobin A1c level were 12.54.1 years, 4.73.2 years, and 8.51.6%, respectively. Acute complications noted in the past year included ketoacidosis in 5.2% of the patients and severe hypoglycemia in 4.9%. Chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis was noted in 12%, Graves disease in 0.1%, and celiac disease in 4.3% of the patients. Chronic complications including neuropathy, retinopathy, and persistent microalbuminuria were present in 2.6%, 1.4%, and 5.4% of the patients, respectively. Diabetic nephropathy was not present in any of the patients. Mean diabetes duration and age of patients with neuropathy, retinopathy and microalbuminuria were significantly different from the patients without these long-term complications (p<0.01). A significant difference was found between pubertal and prepubertal children in terms of persistent microalbuminuria and neuropathy (p=0.02 and p<0.001, respectively). Of the patients, 4.4% (n:38) were obese and 5% had short stature; 17.4% of the patients had dyslipidemia, and 14% of the dyslipidemic patients were obese. Conclusions: Although the majority of the patients in the present study were using insulin analogues, poor glycemic control was common, and chronic complications were encountered. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:23419424

  12. Glycemic index and obesity.

    PubMed

    Brand-Miller, Janette C; Holt, Susanna H A; Pawlak, Dorota B; McMillan, Joanna

    2002-07-01

    Although weight loss can be achieved by any means of energy restriction, current dietary guidelines have not prevented weight regain or population-level increases in obesity and overweight. Many high-carbohydrate, low-fat diets may be counterproductive to weight control because they markedly increase postprandial hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. Many high-carbohydrate foods common to Western diets produce a high glycemic response [high-glycemic-index (GI) foods], promoting postprandial carbohydrate oxidation at the expense of fat oxidation, thus altering fuel partitioning in a way that may be conducive to body fat gain. In contrast, diets based on low-fat foods that produce a low glycemic response (low-GI foods) may enhance weight control because they promote satiety, minimize postprandial insulin secretion, and maintain insulin sensitivity. This hypothesis is supported by several intervention studies in humans in which energy-restricted diets based on low-GI foods produced greater weight loss than did equivalent diets based on high-GI foods. Long-term studies in animal models have also shown that diets based on high-GI starches promote weight gain, visceral adiposity, and higher concentrations of lipogenic enzymes than do isoenergetic, macronutrientcontrolled, low-GI-starch diets. In a study of healthy pregnant women, a high-GI diet was associated with greater weight at term than was a nutrient-balanced, low-GI diet. In a study of diet and complications of type 1 diabetes, the GI of the overall diet was an independent predictor of waist circumference in men. These findings provide the scientific rationale to justify randomized, controlled, multicenter intervention studies comparing the effects of conventional and low-GI diets on weight control. PMID:12081852

  13. Starchy foods and glycemic index.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, D J; Wolever, T M; Jenkins, A L

    1988-02-01

    Different starchy foods produce different glycemic responses when fed individually, and there is some evidence that this also applies in the context of the mixed meal. A major reason appears to relate to the rate at which the foods are digested and the factors influencing this. A similar ranking in terms of glycemic response to specific foods is seen independent of the carbohydrate tolerance status of the groups tested. Potentially clinically useful starchy foods producing relatively flat glycemic responses have been identified. Many of these are considered ethnic or traditional and include legumes; pasta; grains such as barley, parboiled rice, and bulgur (cracked wheat); and whole-grain breads such as pumpernickel. Specific incorporation of these foods into diets has been associated with reductions in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride levels in hyperlipidemia and with improved blood glucose control in insulin-dependent diabetic patients. To facilitate identification of such foods, it has been suggested that the glycemic response should be indexed to a standard (e.g., white bread) to allow comparisons to be made between the glycemic index of foods tested in different groups of subjects. The scope of application of this principle is subject to further investigation. It may be used to expand the range of possibly useful starchy foods for trial in the diets of diabetic patients. PMID:3383733

  14. Effects of Encapsulated Propolis on Blood Glycemic Control, Lipid Metabolism, and Insulin Resistance in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yajing; Chen, Minli; Xuan, Hongzhuan; Hu, Fuliang

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigates the encapsulated propolis on blood glycemic control, lipid metabolism, and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) rats. The animal characteristics and biological assays of body weight, fasting blood glucose (FBG), fasting serum insulin (FINS), insulin act index (IAI), triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) were measured and euglycemic hyperinsulinemic glucose clamp technique were used to determine these effects. Our findings show that oral administration of encapsulated propolis can significantly inhibit the increasing of FBG and TG in T2DM rats and can improve IAI and M value in euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp experiment. There was no significant effects on body weight, TC, HDL-C, and LDL-C in T2DM rats treated with encapsulated propolis. In conclusion, the results indicate that encapsulated propolis can control blood glucose, modulate lipid metabolism, and improve the insulin sensitivity in T2DM rats. PMID:21716678

  15. A Pilot Food Bank Intervention Featuring Diabetes-Appropriate Food Improved Glycemic Control Among Clients In Three States.

    PubMed

    Seligman, Hilary K; Lyles, Courtney; Marshall, Michelle B; Prendergast, Kimberly; Smith, Morgan C; Headings, Amy; Bradshaw, Georgiana; Rosenmoss, Sophie; Waxman, Elaine

    2015-11-01

    Food insecurity--defined as not having adequate quantity and quality of food at all times for all household members to have an active, healthy life--is a risk factor for poor diabetes control, yet few diabetes interventions address this important factor. Food pantries, which receive food from food banks and distribute it to clients in need, may be ideal sites for diabetes self-management support because they can provide free diabetes-appropriate food to people in low-income communities. Between February 2012 and March 2014, we enrolled 687 food pantry clients with diabetes in three states in a six-month pilot intervention that provided them with diabetes-appropriate food, blood sugar monitoring, primary care referral, and self-management support. Improvements were seen in pre-post analyses of glycemic control (hemoglobin A1c decreased from 8.11 percent to 7.96 percent), fruit and vegetable intake (which increased from 2.8 to 3.1 servings per day), self-efficacy, and medication adherence. Among participants with elevated HbA1c (at least 7.5 percent) at baseline, HbA1c improved from 9.52 percent to 9.04 percent. Although food pantries are nontraditional settings for diabetes support, this pilot study suggests a promising health promotion model for vulnerable populations. Policies supporting such interventions may be particularly effective because of food pantries' food access and distribution capacity. PMID:26526255

  16. Effect of adding the novel fiber, PGX®, to commonly consumed foods on glycemic response, glycemic index and GRIP: a simple and effective strategy for reducing post prandial blood glucose levels - a randomized, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Reductions in postprandial glycemia have been demonstrated previously with the addition of the novel viscous polysaccharide (NVP), PolyGlycopleX® (PGX®), to an OGTT or white bread. This study explores whether these reductions are sustained when NVP is added to a range of commonly consumed foods or incorporated into a breakfast cereal. Methods Ten healthy subjects (4M, 6F; age 37.3 ± 3.6 y; BMI 23.8 ± 1.3 kg/m2), participated in an acute, randomized controlled trial. The glycemic response to cornflakes, rice, yogurt, and a frozen dinner with and without 5 g of NVP sprinkled onto the food was determined. In addition, 3 granolas with different levels of NVP and 3 control white breads and one white bread and milk were also consumed. All meals contained 50 g of available carbohydrate. Capillary blood samples were taken fasting and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 min after the start of the meal. The glycemic index (GI) and the glycemic reduction index potential (GRIP) were calculated. The blood glucose concentrations at each time and the iAUC values were subjected to repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) examining for the effect of test meal. After demonstration of significant heterogeneity, differences between individual means was assessed using GLM ANOVA with Tukey test to adjust for multiple comparisons. Results Addition of NVP reduced blood glucose response irrespective of food or dose (p < 0.01). The GI of cornflakes, cornflakes+NVP, rice, rice+NVP, yogurt, yogurt+NVP, turkey dinner, and turkey dinner+NVP were 83 ± 8, 58 ± 7, 82 ± 8, 45 ± 4, 44 ± 4, 38 ± 3, 55 ± 5 and 41 ± 4, respectively. The GI of the control granola, and granolas with 2.5 and 5 g of NVP were 64 ± 6, 33 ± 5, and 22 ± 3 respectively. GRIP was 6.8 ± 0.9 units per/g of NVP. Conclusion Sprinkling or incorporation of NVP into a variety of different foods is highly effective in reducing postprandial glycemia and lowering the GI of a food. Clinical Trial registration NCT00935350. PMID:21092221

  17. Dietary glycemic index and glycemic load in relation to HbA1c in Japanese obese adults: a cross-sectional analysis of the Saku Control Obesity Program

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Dietary glycemic index or load is thought to play an important role in glucose metabolism. However, few studies have investigated the relation between glycemic index (GI) or load (GL) and glycemia in Asian populations. In this cross-sectional analysis of a randomized controlled trial, the Saku Control Obesity Program, we examined the relation between the baseline GI or GL and glycemia (HbA1c and fasting plasma glucose [FPG] levels), insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), ?-cell function (HOMA-?), and other metabolic risk factors (lipid levels, diastolic and systolic blood pressure, and adiposity measures). Methods The participants were 227 obese Japanese women and men. We used multiple linear regression models and logistic regression models to adjust for potential confounding factors such as age, sex, visceral fat area, total energy intake, and physical activity levels. Results After adjustments for potential confounding factors, GI was not associated with HbA1c, but GL was positively associated with HbA1c. For increasing quartiles of GI, the adjusted mean HbA1c were 6.3%, 6.7%, 6.4%, and 6.4% (P for trend?=?0.991). For increasing quartiles of GL, the adjusted mean HbA1c were 6.2%, 6.2%, 6.6%, and 6.5% (P for trend?=?0.044). In addition, among participants with HbA1c???7.0%, 20 out of 28 (71%) had a high GL (? median); the adjusted odds ratio for HbA1c???7.0% among participants with higher GL was 3.1 (95% confidence interval [CI]?=?1.2 to 8.1) compared to the participants with a lower GL (glycemic control tend to have a higher GL in an obese Japanese population. PMID:22963077

  18. Correlation Between Glycemic Control and the Incidence of Peritoneal and Catheter Tunnel and Exit-Site Infections in Diabetic Patients Undergoing Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Rodrguez-Carmona, Ana; Prez-Fontn, Miguel; Lpez-Muiz, Andrs; Ferreiro-Hermida, Tamara; Garca-Falcn, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    ? Background: Diabetes mellitus, especially if complicated by poor glycemic control, portends an increased risk of infection. The significance of this association in the case of diabetic patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD) has not been assessed. ? Methods: Using a retrospective observational design, we analyzed the association between glycemic control at the start of PD (estimated from glycosylated hemoglobin levels) and the risk of peritoneal and catheter tunnel and exit-site infections during follow-up in 183 incident patients on PD. We used the median value of glycosylated hemoglobin to classify patients into good (group A) or poor (group B) glycemic control groups. We applied multivariate strategies of analysis to control for other potential predictors of PD-related infection. ? Results: Groups A and B differed significantly in age, dialysis vintage, use of insulin, and rate of Staphylococcus aureus carriage. Neither the incidence (0.60 episodes in group A vs 0.56 episodes in group B per patient-year) nor the time to a first peritoneal infection (median: 42 months vs 38 months) differed significantly between the study groups. In contrast, group B had a significantly higher incidence of catheter tunnel and exit-site infections (0.23 episodes vs 0.12 episodes per patient-year) and shorter time to a first infection episode (64 months vs 76 months, p = 0.004). The difference persisted in multivariate analysis (adjusted hazard ratio: 2.65; 95% confidence interval: 1.13 to 6.05; p = 0.013). We observed no differences between the study groups in the spectrum of causative organisms or in the outcomes of PD-related infections. ? Conclusions: Poor glycemic control is a consistent predictor of subsequent risk of catheter tunnel and exit-site infection, but not of peritoneal infection, among diabetic patients starting PD therapy. PMID:23818005

  19. Impact of Intensive Glycemic Control on the Incidence of Atrial Fibrillation and Associated Cardiovascular Outcomes in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (from the ACCORD Study)

    PubMed Central

    Fatemi, Omid; Yuriditsky, Eugene; Tsioufis, Costas; Tsachris, Demetrios; Morgan, Timothy; Basile, Jan; Bigger, Thomas; Cushman, William; Goff, David; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Thomas, Abraham; Papademetriou, Vasilios

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is prevalent among individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), and is associated with markers of poor glycemic control; however the impact of glycemic control on incident AF and outcomes is unknown. We sought to prospectively evaluate if intensive glycemic control in individuals with DM impacts incident AF, and to evaluate morbidity and mortality among individuals with DM and incident AF. We studied 10,082 individuals with DM from the ACCORD cohort in a randomized, double-blind fashion. Participants were randomized to an intensive therapeutic strategy targeting a glycated hemoglobin level of <6.0%, or a standard strategy targeting a glycated hemoglobin of 7.0-7.9%. Incident AF occurred in 159 patients (1.58%) over the follow-up period at a rate of 5.9/1,000 person-years in the intensive-therapy group, and a rate of 6.37/1,000 person-years in the standard-therapy group (p=0.52). In a multivariate model, predictors of incident AF were age, weight, diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, and heart failure history. Patients with DM and new-onset AF had a HR of 2.65 for all-cause mortality (95% CI 1.8-3.86, p<0.0001), HR of 2.1 for myocardial infarction (95% CI 1.33-3.31, p=0.0015), and HR of 3.80 for development of heart failure (95% CI 2.48-5.84, p<0.0001). In conclusion, intensive glycemic control did not impact rate of new-onset AF. Patients with DM and incident AF had an increased risk for morbidity and mortality as compared to those without AF. PMID:25159234

  20. Non-High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol in Children with Diabetes: Proposed Treatment Recommendations Based on Glycemic Control, Body Mass Index, Age, Sex, and Generally Accepted Cut Points.

    PubMed

    Schwab, K Otfried; Doerfer, Jrgen; Hungele, Andreas; Scheuing, Nicole; Krebs, Andreas; Dost, Axel; Rohrer, Tilman R; Hofer, Sabine; Holl, Reinhard W

    2015-12-01

    Percentile-based non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were analyzed by glycemic control, weight, age, and sex of children with type 1 diabetes (n=26?358). Ten percent of all children and 25% of overweight adolescent girls require both immediate lipid-lowering medication and lifestyle changes to achieve non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels <120mg/dL and cardiovascular risk reduction. PMID:26427965

  1. The effect of Ginkgo biloba and Camellia sinensis extracts on psychological state and glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Lasaite, Lina; Spadiene, Asta; Savickiene, Nijole; Skesters, Andrejs; Silova, Alise

    2014-09-01

    Interest in finding natural antioxidants for use in food or medical materials to prevent free radical imbalance has increased considerably over the past years. The aim of this research was to evaluate changes in glycemic control and psychological state of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) after use of antioxidant plant preparations. Fifty-six patients with T2DM were randomly allocated to receive standardized Ginkgo biloba L. leaves dry extract, green tea dry extract, or placebo capsules. Diabetes glycemic control measured as glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level, antioxidant state and psychological data were evaluated at baseline, after 9 and 18 months of using either antioxidant preparations or placebo. The level of perceived stress lowered significantly after 9 months (p = 0.038) and 18 months (p = 0.030), and the psychological aspect of quality of life significantly improved after 18 months (p = 0.019) of use of G. biloba extrac. No significant differences were detected after using green tea extract. In patients using placebo, significant lowering of HbA1c level was observed after 18 months (p = 0.017). In conclusion, antioxidant G. biloba leaf extract exhibited a mild effect on psychological state and a trend of improving glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:25918808

  2. Ileal Interposition in Rats with Experimental Type 2 Like Diabetes Improves Glycemic Control Independently of Glucose Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Jurowich, Christian Ferdinand; Otto, Christoph; Rikkala, Prashanth Reddy; Wagner, Nicole; Vrhovac, Ivana; Sabolić, Ivan; Germer, Christoph-Thomas; Koepsell, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric operations in obese patients with type 2 diabetes often improve diabetes before weight loss is observed. In patients mainly Roux-en-Y-gastric bypass with partial stomach resection is performed. Duodenojejunal bypass (DJB) and ileal interposition (IIP) are employed in animal experiments. Due to increased glucose exposition of L-cells located in distal ileum, all bariatric surgery procedures lead to higher secretion of antidiabetic glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) after glucose gavage. After DJB also downregulation of Na+-d-glucose cotransporter SGLT1 was observed. This suggested a direct contribution of decreased glucose absorption to the antidiabetic effect of bariatric surgery. To investigate whether glucose absorption is also decreased after IIP, we induced diabetes with decreased glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in male rats and investigated effects of IIP on diabetes and SGLT1. After IIP, we observed weight-independent improvement of glucose tolerance, increased insulin sensitivity, and increased plasma GLP-1 after glucose gavage. The interposed ileum was increased in diameter and showed increased length of villi, hyperplasia of the epithelial layer, and increased number of L-cells. The amount of SGLT1-mediated glucose uptake in interposed ileum was increased 2-fold reaching the same level as in jejunum. Thus, improvement of glycemic control by bariatric surgery does not require decreased glucose absorption. PMID:26185767

  3. Targeted plasma metabolome response to variations in dietary glycemic load in a randomized, controlled, crossover feeding trial in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Barton, Sally; Navarro, Sandi L; Buas, Matthew F; Schwarz, Yvonne; Gu, Haiwei; Djukovic, Danijel; Raftery, Daniel; Kratz, Mario; Neuhouser, Marian L; Lampe, Johanna W

    2015-09-01

    Low versus high glycemic load (GL) diet patterns are inversely associated with obesity and chronic diseases such as cancer and cardiovascular disease. These associations persist beyond the protection afforded by increased fiber alone, representing an important gap in our understanding of the metabolic effects of GL. We conducted a randomized, controlled, crossover feeding trial of two 28-day diet periods of high and low GL. Using LC-MS, targeted metabolomics analysis of 155 metabolites was performed on plasma samples from 19 healthy adults aged 18-45 years. Fourteen metabolites differed significantly between diets (P < 0.05), with kynurenate remaining significant after Bonferroni correction (P < 4 × 10(-4)). Metabolites with the largest difference in abundance were kynurenate and trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), both significantly higher after consumption of the low GL diet. Partial least squares-discriminant analysis showed clear separation between the two diets; however no specific pathway was identified in pathway analyses. We found significant differences in 14 plasma metabolites suggesting a differing metabolic response to low and high GL diets. Kynurenate is associated with reduced inflammation, and may be one mechanism through which protective effects of a low GL diet are manifested and warrants further evaluation. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00622661. PMID:26165375

  4. The Effect of Ginseng (The Genus Panax) on Glycemic Control: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Shishtar, Esra'; Sievenpiper, John L.; Djedovic, Vladimir; Cozma, Adrian I.; Ha, Vanessa; Jayalath, Viranda H.; Jenkins, David J. A.; Meija, Sonia Blanco; de Souza, Russell J.; Jovanovski, Elena; Vuksan, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Importance Despite the widespread use of ginseng in the management of diabetes, supporting evidence of its anti-hyperglycemic efficacy is limited, necessitating the need for evidence-based recommendations for the potential inclusion of ginseng in diabetes management. Objective To elucidate the effect of ginseng on glycemic control in a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials in people with and without diabetes. Data sources MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library (through July 3, 2013). Study selection Randomized controlled trials ≥30 days assessing the glycemic effects of ginseng in people with and without diabetes. Data extraction Relevant data were extracted by 2 independent reviewers. Discrepancies were resolved by consensus. The Heyland Methodological Quality Score and the Cochrane risk of bias tool were used to assess study quality and risk of bias respectively. Data synthesis Sixteen trials were included, in which 16 fasting blood glucose (n = 770), 10 fasting plasma insulin (n = 349), 9 glycated hemoglobin (n = 264), and 7 homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (n = 305) comparisons were reported. Ginseng significantly reduced fasting blood glucose compared to control (MD =  −0.31 mmol/L [95% CI: −0.59 to −0.03], P = 0.03). Although there was no significant effect on fasting plasma insulin, glycated hemoglobin, or homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, a priori subgroup analyses did show significant reductions in glycated hemoglobin in parallel compared to crossover trials (MD = 0.22% [95%CI: 0.06 to 0.37], P = 0.01). Limitations Most trials were of short duration (67% trials<12wks), and included participants with a relatively good glycemic control (median HbA1c non-diabetes = 5.4% [2 trials]; median HbA1c diabetes = 7.1% [7 trials]). Conclusions Ginseng modestly yet significantly improved fasting blood glucose in people with and without diabetes. In order to address the uncertainty in our effect estimates and provide better assessments of ginseng's anti-diabetic efficacy, larger and longer randomized controlled trials using standardized ginseng preparations are warranted. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01841229 PMID:25265315

  5. Salacia reticulata improves serum lipid profiles and glycemic control in patients with prediabetes and mild to moderate hyperlipidemia: a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Shivaprasad, H N; Bhanumathy, M; Sushma, G; Midhun, T; Raveendra, K R; Sushma, K R; Venkateshwarlu, K

    2013-06-01

    The present randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study evaluated the efficacy and safety of Salacia reticulata leaves and root bark extracts in 29 patients with prediabetes and mild to moderate hyperlipidemia. Patients received either Salacia extracts (500 mg/day) or placebo along with therapeutic lifestyle changes for a period of 6 weeks. Efficacy was evaluated in terms of change in lipid profile and glycemic levels. The safety and tolerability was evaluated by a physical examination and clinical laboratory evaluations. Improvements in lipid profiles and glycemic levels were observed in Salacia extract-treated groups when compared to placebo at week 6. A statistical significant reduction was observed in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and fasting blood sugar (FBS) levels at week 3 and 6 when treated with root bark extract. The leaves extract-treated group showed statistically significant reduction in FBS levels at week 6 only. No adverse events occurred and all safety parameters were within normal ranges during the study. This study revealed that treatment with S. reticulata was safe and well-tolerated and may be beneficial in the management of prediabetes and mild to moderate hyperlipidemia. PMID:23767865

  6. Add-On Treatment with Teneligliptin Ameliorates Glucose Fluctuations and Improves Glycemic Control Index in Japanese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes on Insulin Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Seiichi; Aoki, Chie; Niitani, Mai; Kato, Kanako; Tomotsune, Takanori; Aso, Yoshimasa

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: This study investigated whether teneligliptin, a novel dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, ameliorated glucose fluctuations in hospitalized Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes receiving insulin therapy, with or without other antidiabetes drugs, and using continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). Patients and Methods: Twenty-six patients with type 2 diabetes were admitted for glycemic control. After admission, patients continued to be treated with optimal dietary therapy plus insulin therapy, with or without other antidiabetes drugs, until they achieved stable glycemic control. CGM measurements were made for 7 consecutive days. On Days 13, patients received insulin with or without other antidiabetes drugs, and on Days 47, teneligliptin 20?mg once daily at breakfast was added to ongoing therapy. Doses of insulin were fixed during the study. Levels of serum glycated albumin (GA), 1,5-anhydro-d-glucitol (1,5-AG), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) were measured. Results: Add-on treatment with teneligliptin led to significant improvements in 24-h mean glucose levels, the proportion of time in normoglycemia, mean amplitude of glycemic excursions, and total area under the curve within 2?h after each meal. The proportion of time in hypoglycemia and hsCRP levels did not increase significantly compared with before teneligliptin. Values of 1,5-AG and GA were significantly improved by treatment with teneligliptin. Conclusions: Addition of teneligliptin to insulin therapy led to a significant improvement in diurnal glycemic control and significant reductions in glucose fluctuations in 24-h periods without increasing hypoglycemia in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes on insulin therapy, with or without other antidiabetes agents. PMID:25144424

  7. Cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships of body mass index with glycemic control in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Nansel, T.R.; Lipsky, L.M.; Iannotti, R.J.

    2013-01-01

    Aims Weight gain is an oft-cited outcome of improved glycemic control in adults with type 1 diabetes, though few studies have investigated this in youth. The purpose of this paper was to examine cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of body mass index (BMI, kg/m2) with glycemic control in youth with type 1 diabetes (n=340, 12.51.7y, 49% female, duration ?1year) participating in a 2-year multicenter intervention study targeting family diabetes management. Methods BMI was calculated from height and weight measured at clinic visits. Glycohemoglobin (HbA1c) at each visit was assayed centrally. Cross-sectional associations of baseline BMI with glycemic control, and of change in BMI and HbA1c with baseline values, were examined. Longitudinal associations of time-varying BMI and HbA1c were examined using a multilevel linear mixed effects model controlling for time-varying time (months), insulin dose (units/kg/day), regimen, Tanner stage, and time invariant baseline diabetes duration, BMI, treatment group and sociodemographic characteristics. Results Baseline HbA1c was unrelated to baseline BMI, but was related positively to subsequent BMI change (p=0.04) and inversely to HbA1c change (p=0.002). Baseline BMI was inversely related to BMI change (p=0.01) and unrelated to HbA1c change. In multilevel regression, BMI was related inversely to HbA1c (%) (?SE=?0.110.02,p<0.001) and positively to insulin dose (0.230.07,p=0.001). In the treatment group only, BMI was positively related to pump regimen (0.180.08,p=0.02). Conclusions Increased insulin administered to improve glycemic control may contribute to increased BMI in youth with type 1 diabetes, indicating the importance of determining ways to minimize weight gain while optimizing glycemic control. PMID:23339757

  8. Continuous glucose monitoring to assess the ecologic validity of dietary glycemic index and glycemic load123

    PubMed Central

    Ebbeling, Cara B; Wadden, Thomas A; Ludwig, David S

    2011-01-01

    Background: The circumstances under which the glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) are derived do not reflect real-world eating behavior. Thus, the ecologic validity of these constructs is incompletely known. Objective: This study examined the relation of dietary intake to glycemic response when foods are consumed under free-living conditions. Design: Participants were 26 overweight or obese adults with type 2 diabetes who participated in a randomized trial of lifestyle modification. The current study includes baseline data, before initiation of the intervention. Participants wore a continuous glucose monitor and simultaneously kept a food diary for 3 d. The dietary variables included GI, GL, and intakes of energy, fat, protein, carbohydrate, sugars, and fiber. The glycemic response variables included AUC, mean and SD of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) values, percentage of CGM values in euglycemic and hyperglycemic ranges, and mean amplitude of glycemic excursions. Relations between daily dietary intake and glycemic outcomes were examined. Results: Data were available from 41 d of monitoring. Partial correlations, controlled for energy intake, indicated that GI or GL was significantly associated with each glycemic response outcome. In multivariate analyses, dietary GI accounted for 10% to 18% of the variance in each glycemic variable, independent of energy and carbohydrate intakes (P < 0.01). Conclusions: The data support the ecologic validity of the GI and GL constructs in free-living obese adults with type 2 diabetes. GI was the strongest and most consistent independent predictor of glycemic stability and variability. PMID:22071699

  9. Impact of Glycemic Control on Healthcare Resource Utilization and Costs of Type 2 Diabetes: Current and Future Pharmacologic Approaches to Improving Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Banerji, Mary Ann; Dunn, Jeffrey D.

    2013-01-01

    Background The incidence and prevalence of type 2 diabetes continue to grow in the United States and worldwide, along with the growing prevalence of obesity. Patients with type 2 diabetes are at greater risk for comorbid cardiovascular (CV) disease (CVD), which dramatically affects overall healthcare costs. Objectives To review the impact of glycemic control and medication adherence on morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs of patients with type 2 diabetes, and to highlight the need for new drug therapies to improve outcomes in this patient population. Methods This comprehensive literature search was conducted for the period between 2000 and 2013, using MEDLINE, to identify published articles that report the associations between glycemic control, medication adherence, CV morbidity and mortality, and healthcare utilization and costs. Search terms included type 2 diabetes, adherence, compliance, nonadherence, drug therapy, resource use, cost, and cost-effectiveness. Discussion Despite improvements in the management of CV risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes, outcomes remain poor. The costs associated with the management of type 2 diabetes are increasing dramatically as the prevalence of the disease increases. Medication adherence to long-term drug therapy remains poor in patients with type 2 diabetes and contributes to poor glycemic control in this patient population, increased healthcare resource utilization and increased costs, as well as increased rates of comorbid CVD and mortality. Furthermore, poor adherence to established evidence-based guidelines for type 2 diabetes, including underdiagnosis and undertreatment, contributes to poor outcomes. New approaches to the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes currently in development have the potential to improve medication adherence and consequently glycemic control, which in turn will help to reduce associated costs and healthcare utilization. Conclusions As the prevalence of type 2 diabetes and its associated comorbidities grows, healthcare costs will continue to increase, indicating a need for better approaches to achieve glycemic control and manage comorbid conditions. Drug therapies are needed that enhance patient adherence and persistence levels far above levels reported with currently available drugs. Improvements in adherence to treatment guidelines and greater rates of lifestyle modifications also are needed. A serious unmet need exists for greatly improved patient outcomes, more effective and more tolerable drugs, as well as marked improvements in adherence to treatment guidelines and drug therapy to positively impact healthcare costs and resource use. PMID:24991370

  10. Effect of blood pressure and glycemic control on the plasma cell-free DNA in hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Da Wun; Moon, Ju-Young; Choi, Young-Wook; Moon, Haena; Kim, Kipyo; Lee, Yu-Ho; Kim, Se-Yeun; Kim, Yang-Gyun; Jeong, Kyung-Hwan; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Background The plasma levels of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) are known to be elevated under inflammatory or apoptotic conditions. Increased cfDNA levels have been reported in hemodialysis (HD) patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of cfDNA in HD patients. Methods A total of 95 patients on HD were enrolled. We measured their predialysis cfDNA levels using real-time EIF2C1 gene sequence amplification and analyzed its association with certain clinical parameters. Results The mean plasma cfDNA level in the HD patients was 3,884 ± 407 GE/mL, and the mean plasma cfDNA level in the control group was 1,420 ± 121 GE/mL (P < 0.05). Diabetic patients showed higher plasma cfDNA levels compared with nondiabetic patients (P < 0.01). Patients with cardiovascular complications also showed higher plasma cfDNA levels compared with those without cardiovascular complication (P < 0.05). In univariable analysis, the cfDNA level was associated with 3-month mean systolic blood pressure (SBP), white blood cell, serum albumin, creatinine (Cr), normalized protein catabolic rate in HD patients. In diabetic patients, it was significantly correlated with SBP, hemoglobin A1c, and serum albumin. In multivariate analysis, SBP was the independent determinant for the cfDNA level. In diabetic patients, cfDNA level was independently associated with hemoglobin A1c and SBP. Conclusions In patients with HD, cfDNA is elevated in diabetic patients and patients with cardiovascular diseases. Uncontrolled hypertension and poor glycemic control are independent determinants for the elevated cfDNA. Our data suggest that cfDNA might be a marker of vascular injury rather than proinflammatory condition in HD patients. PMID:26779422

  11. Changes in Insulin Requirements From the Onset of Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion (CSII) Until Optimization of Glycemic Control.

    PubMed

    Chico, Ana; Tundidor, Diana; Jordana, Lluis; Saigi, Ignasi; Maria, Miguel A; Corcoy, Rosa; Leiva, A de

    2014-02-01

    The aim was to evaluate changes in insulin requirements from onset of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) until glucose optimization in type 1 diabetes and to determine patient characteristics to be considered when CSII is implemented. We retrospectively analyzed 74 type 1 diabetic patients over a follow-up of 5 months after starting CSII. Patients without a decrease in HbA1c levels at the end of follow-up were excluded. We compared total daily doses (TDD), basal/bolus distribution, basal diurnal/nocturnal proportion, number of basal segments, and HbA1c levels in relation to sex, age, body mass index (BMI), diabetes duration, and indication for CSII. At follow-up, HbA1c decreased by 0.75%, TDD decreased by 18%, basal rate was 60% of TDD, and diurnal basal rate was 60% of total basal rate. Insulin requirements were higher in males and in obese patients. Female patients and patients with longer diabetes duration showed a higher percentage of basal insulin. The number of basal segments was 4.9 2.9. Basal requirements were higher in the second half of the nocturnal period. The dawn phenomenon was more relevant in men. Improvements in glycemic control were more marked in younger patients, in patients with higher HbA1c, in patients using more basal segments, and in patients initiating CSII for glucose control before pregnancy. Sex, diabetes duration, and BMI should be considered when initiating CSII. Our findings may help clinicians in clinical decision making regarding CSII therapy. PMID:24876590

  12. Impact of symptomatic hypoglycemia on medication adherence, patient satisfaction with treatment, and glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Walz, Lotta; Pettersson, Billie; Rosenqvist, Ulf; Deleskog, Anna; Journath, Gunilla; Wndell, Per

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of symptomatic hypoglycemia on medication adherence, satisfaction with treatment, and glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes based on the treatment goals stated in the Swedish national guidelines. Methods This cross-sectional, multicenter study was carried out between January and August 2009 in 430 consecutive primary health care patients on stable doses of metformin and sulfonylureas for at least 6 months. The patients completed questionnaires covering their experiences of low blood glucose and adherence, as well as barriers to and satisfaction with drug treatment (using the Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication). Physicians collected the data from medical records. Results Patients who experienced moderate or worse symptoms of hypoglycemia reported poorer adherence to medication (46% versus 67%; P<0.01) and were more likely to perceive barriers such as bothered by medication side effects (36% versus 14%; P<0.001) compared with patients with no or mild symptoms. Patients with moderate or worse symptoms of hypoglycemia were less satisfied with their treatment than those with no or mild symptoms as determined by the Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication-Global satisfaction (67.0 versus 71.2; P<0.05). Overall, achievement of target glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) based on the treatment goals stated in the Swedish national guidelines was 40%. Despite poorer adherence, patients who experienced moderate or worse symptoms of hypoglycemia had lower mean HbA1c values than patients with no or mild symptoms (7.0% versus 7.3% [Diabetes Control and Complications Trial standard]; P<0.05). Conclusion Symptomatic hypoglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes on metformin and sulfonylureas was associated with nonadherence and decreased treatment satisfaction despite lower mean HbA1c values. A broader understanding of patient preferences and self-reported outcomes could improve the management of patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:24812495

  13. Liraglutide Improves Glycemic and Blood Pressure Control and Ameliorates Progression of Left Ventricular Hypertrophy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus on Peritoneal Dialysis.

    PubMed

    Hiramatsu, Takeyuki; Ozeki, Akiko; Asai, Kazuki; Saka, Marie; Hobo, Akinori; Furuta, Shinji

    2015-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a multifactorial disease associated with cardiovascular complications. Patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis also experience an increased incidence of cardiovascular disease. To prevent progression of cardiovascular complications in DM patients, glycemic control is important. In this study, we examined the efficacy and safety of the glucagon-like peptide analog liraglutide for treating type 2 diabetes patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis. Sixteen type 2 diabetes patients on peritoneal dialysis were enrolled. Before liraglutide initiation, 11 patients were on insulin therapy, three were on oral antidiabetic agents, and two were on diet therapy. Of the 16 patients, 12 had switched to liraglutide because of severe hypoglycemia and four because of hyperglycemia. Echocardiography was performed at baseline and 12 months after liraglutide initiation. Hemoglobin A1c, glycosylated albumin, and fasting/postprandial glucose levels gradually decreased after liraglutide initiation. After 6 and 12 months of treatment, postprandial glucose levels showed a significant difference from baseline. Moreover, the mean daily glucose level and glycemic fluctuations decreased. Systolic blood pressure upon waking also decreased. In addition, after 12 months, left ventricular mass index (LVMI) decreased and left ventricular ejection fraction increased. Changes in LVMI positively correlated with morning systolic blood pressure and fasting glucose levels. One patient restarted insulin because of anorexia but severe hypoglycemia was not observed. These findings suggest that liraglutide therapy in type 2 diabetes patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis is safe and effective for decreasing glucose levels, glycemic fluctuations, and blood pressure, apart from improving left ventricular function. PMID:26556397

  14. Glycemic Targets in Diabetes Care: Emerging Clarity after Accord

    PubMed Central

    Buse, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Through the 1990s convincing evidence emerged from studies involving relatively recent onset diabetes that glycemic control achieving glycated hemoglobin A1c levels of approximately 7% was associated with improved microvascular outcomes. Based on advocacy groups' statements encouraging lower targets and recognition of cardiovascular disease as the leading cause of death in diabetes, the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) study was funded in 1999 to explore more intensive targets and techniques in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Most surprisingly, intensive management targeting normal levels of glycemia was associated with increased mortality and the ACCORD trial was terminated early in 2008. Post hoc analyses have allowed the emergence of some clarity around the role of glycemic management and targets in diabetes care and are the subject of this review. PMID:26330660

  15. Effect of two dietary fibers on satiety and glycemic parameters: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dietary carbohydrates may affect metabolic and physiologic parameters. The present study evaluated whether a combination of two dietary fibers, oligofructose (OFS) and pectin (P), altered satiety and glycemic parameters. The primary objective of this study was to determine whether dietary supplementation for 3 weeks with OFS + P would produce a greater reduction in energy intake of an ad libitum test meal compared to control. Methods This was a single center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group study in overweight and obese, otherwise healthy, subjects (N = 96). There were two OFS + P treatment groups: high-dose (30 g/d), low-dose (15 g/d), and a control group (maltodextrin 15 g/d). Energy intake, appetite measures based on Satiety Labeled Intensity Magnitude (SLIM) scale, fasting and post-prandial glucose, and insulin levels and body weight were measured at baseline and at the end of 3 weeks. Adverse events and gastrointestinal tolerability of the treatments were also assessed. Results An analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) performed on the primary endpoint change from baseline in energy intake, showed no statistically significant difference in energy intake among the three treatment groups (p = 0.5387). The LS mean changes (SE) in energy intake from baseline to week 3 were −58.3 (42.4) kilocalories (kcal) for the high dose group, −74.2 (43.6) kcal for the low dose group, and −9.0 (42.9) kcal for the control group. For the pairwise comparisons of OFS + P doses and control, confidence intervals were constructed around the difference in LS mean changes. All study products were generally well tolerated. Conclusion There was a directional benefit in ad libitum energy intake for both OFS + P doses compared to control, with a greater reduction in kilocalories in the low dose comparison, but the reductions were not significant. Further studies are warranted. Clinical trial registration GSK Clinical Study Register # W7781293 PMID:24886409

  16. Hydrogen improves glycemic control in type1 diabetic animal model by promoting glucose uptake into skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Amitani, Haruka; Asakawa, Akihiro; Cheng, Kaichun; Amitani, Marie; Kaimoto, Kaori; Nakano, Masako; Ushikai, Miharu; Li, Yingxiao; Tsai, Minglun; Li, Jiang-Bo; Terashi, Mutsumi; Chaolu, Huhe; Kamimura, Ryozo; Inui, Akio

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen (H(2)) acts as a therapeutic antioxidant. However, there are few reports on H(2) function in other capacities in diabetes mellitus (DM). Therefore, in this study, we investigated the role of H(2) in glucose transport by studying cultured mouse C2C12 cells and human hepatoma Hep-G2 cells in vitro, in addition to three types of diabetic mice [Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 1 diabetic mice, high-fat diet-induced type 2 diabetic mice, and genetically diabetic db/db mice] in vivo. The results show that H(2) promoted 2-[(14)C]-deoxy-d-glucose (2-DG) uptake into C2C12 cells via the translocation of glucose transporter Glut4 through activation of phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase (PI3K), protein kinase C (PKC), and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), although it did not stimulate the translocation of Glut2 in Hep G2 cells. H(2) significantly increased skeletal muscle membrane Glut4 expression and markedly improved glycemic control in STZ-induced type 1 diabetic mice after chronic intraperitoneal (i.p.) and oral (p.o.) administration. However, long-term p.o. administration of H(2) had least effect on the obese and non-insulin-dependent type 2 diabetes mouse models. Our study demonstrates that H(2) exerts metabolic effects similar to those of insulin and may be a novel therapeutic alternative to insulin in type 1 diabetes mellitus that can be administered orally. PMID:23326534

  17. Conflicts of Interest among Authors of Clinical Practice Guidelines for Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Susan L.; Holmer, Haley K.; Ogden, Lauren A.; Burda, Brittany U.; Fu, Rongwei

    2013-01-01

    Background Conflict of interest (COI) is an important potential source of bias in the development of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). Objectives To examine rates of disclosure of COI, including financial interests in companies that manufacture drugs that are recommended in CPGs on glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus, and to explore the relationship between recommendations for specific drugs in a guideline and author COI. Methods We identified a cohort of relevant guidelines from the National Guideline Clearinghouse (NGC) and abstracted COI disclosures from all guideline authors for this observational, cross-sectional study. We determined which hypoglycemic drugs were recommended in each guideline, and explored the relationship between specific disclosures and whether a drug was recommended. Results Among 13 included guidelines, the percentage of authors with one or more financial disclosures varied from 0 to 94% (mean 44.2%), and was particularly high for two US-based guidelines (91% and 94%). Three guidelines disclosed no author financial COI. The percentage of authors with disclosures of financial interests in manufacturers of recommended drugs was also high (mean 30%). On average, 56% of manufacturers of patented drugs recommended in each guideline had one or more authors with a financial interest in their company. We did not find a significant relationship between financial interests and whether a drug was recommended in our sample; US-based guidelines were more likely to make recommendations for a specific drug compared to non-US based guidelines. Discussion Authors of this cohort of guidelines have financial interests directly related to the drugs that they are recommending. Although we did not find an association between author COI and drugs recommended in these guidelines and we cannot draw conclusions about the validity of the recommendations, the credibility of many of these guidelines is in doubt. PMID:24155870

  18. Oxamate Improves Glycemic Control and Insulin Sensitivity via Inhibition of Tissue Lactate Production in db/db Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Weiran; Zheng, Yijia; Zhang, Shanshan; Yan, Li; Cheng, Hua; Wu, Muchao

    2016-01-01

    Oxamate (OXA) is a pyruvate analogue that directly inhibits the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)-catalyzed conversion process of pyruvate into lactate. Earlier and recent studies have shown elevated blood lactate levels among insulin-resistant and type 2 diabetes subjects and that blood lactate levels independently predicted the development of incident diabetes. To explore the potential of OXA in the treatment of diabetes, db/db mice were treated with OXA in vivo. Treatment of OXA (350–750 mg/kg of body weight) for 12 weeks was shown to decrease body weight gain and blood glucose and HbA1c levels and improve insulin secretion, the morphology of pancreatic islets, and insulin sensitivity in db/db mice. Meanwhile, OXA reduced the lactate production of adipose tissue and skeletal muscle and serum lactate levels and decreased serum levels of TG, FFA, CRP, IL-6, and TNF-α in db/db mice. The PCR array showed that OXA downregulated the expression of Tnf, Il6, leptin, Cxcr3, Map2k1, and Ikbkb, and upregulated the expression of Irs2, Nfkbia, and Pde3b in the skeletal muscle of db/db mice. Interestingly, LDH-A expression increased in the islet cells of db/db mice, and both treatment of OXA and pioglitazone decreased LDH-A expression, which might be related to the improvement of insulin secretion. Taken together, increased lactate production of adipose tissue and skeletal muscle may be at least partially responsible for insulin resistance and diabetes in db/db mice. OXA improved glycemic control and insulin sensitivity in db/db mice primarily via inhibition of tissue lactate production. Oxamic acid derivatives may be a potential drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:26938239

  19. Hydrogen Improves Glycemic Control in Type1 Diabetic Animal Model by Promoting Glucose Uptake into Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Amitani, Haruka; Asakawa, Akihiro; Cheng, Kaichun; Amitani, Marie; Kaimoto, Kaori; Nakano, Masako; Ushikai, Miharu; Li, Yingxiao; Tsai, Minglun; Li, Jiang-Bo; Terashi, Mutsumi; Chaolu, Huhe; Kamimura, Ryozo; Inui, Akio

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen (H2) acts as a therapeutic antioxidant. However, there are few reports on H2 function in other capacities in diabetes mellitus (DM). Therefore, in this study, we investigated the role of H2 in glucose transport by studying cultured mouse C2C12 cells and human hepatoma Hep-G2 cells in vitro, in addition to three types of diabetic mice [Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 1 diabetic mice, high-fat diet-induced type 2 diabetic mice, and genetically diabetic db/db mice] in vivo. The results show that H2 promoted 2-[14C]-deoxy-d-glucose (2-DG) uptake into C2C12 cells via the translocation of glucose transporter Glut4 through activation of phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase (PI3K), protein kinase C (PKC), and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), although it did not stimulate the translocation of Glut2 in Hep G2 cells. H2 significantly increased skeletal muscle membrane Glut4 expression and markedly improved glycemic control in STZ-induced type 1 diabetic mice after chronic intraperitoneal (i.p.) and oral (p.o.) administration. However, long-term p.o. administration of H2 had least effect on the obese and non-insulin-dependent type 2 diabetes mouse models. Our study demonstrates that H2 exerts metabolic effects similar to those of insulin and may be a novel therapeutic alternative to insulin in type 1 diabetes mellitus that can be administered orally. PMID:23326534

  20. Prolonged leucine supplementation does not augment muscle mass or affect glycemic control in elderly type 2 diabetic men.

    PubMed

    Leenders, Marika; Verdijk, Lex B; van der Hoeven, Letty; van Kranenburg, Janneau; Hartgens, Fred; Wodzig, Will K W H; Saris, Wim H M; van Loon, Luc J C

    2011-06-01

    The loss of muscle mass with aging has been, at least partly, attributed to a blunted muscle protein synthetic response to food intake. Leucine coingestion has been reported to stimulate postprandial insulin release and augment postprandial muscle protein accretion. We assessed the clinical benefits of 6 mo of leucine supplementation in elderly, type 2 diabetes patients. Sixty elderly males with type 2 diabetes (age, 71 ± 1 y; BMI, 27.3 ± 0.4 kg/m(2)) were administered 2.5 g L-leucine (n = 30) or a placebo (n = 30) with each main meal during 6 mo of nutritional intervention (7.5 g/d leucine or placebo). Body composition, muscle fiber characteristics, muscle strength, glucose homeostasis, and basal plasma amino acid and lipid concentrations were assessed prior to, during, and after intervention. Lean tissue mass did not change or differ between groups and at 0, 3, and 6 mo were 61.9 ± 1.1, 62.2 ± 1.1, and 62.0 ± 1.0 kg, respectively, in the leucine group and 62.2 ± 1.3, 62.2 ± 1.3, and 62.2 ± 1.3 kg in the placebo group. There also were no changes in body fat percentage, muscle strength, and muscle fiber type characteristics. Blood glycosylated hemoglobin did not change or differ between groups and was 7.1 ± 0.1% in the leucine group and 7.2 ± 0.2% in the placebo group. Consistent with this, oral glucose insulin sensitivity and plasma lipid concentrations did not change or differ between groups. We conclude that prolonged leucine supplementation (7.5 g/d) does not modulate body composition, muscle mass, strength, glycemic control, and/or lipidemia in elderly, type 2 diabetes patients who habitually consume adequate dietary protein. PMID:21525248

  1. Effects of soy vs. casein protein on body weight and glycemic control in female monkeys and their offspring.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Janice D; Jorgensen, Matthew J; Cline, J Mark; Lees, Cynthia J; Franke, Adrian A; Zhang, Li; Ayers, Melissa R; Schultz, Carrie; Kaplan, Jay R

    2009-09-01

    Nutritional interventions are important for reducing obesity and related conditions. Soy is a good source of protein and also contains isoflavones that may affect plasma lipids, body weight, and insulin action. Described here are data from a monkey breeding colony in which monkeys were initially fed a standard chow diet that is low fat with protein derived from soy. Monkeys were then randomized to a defined diet with a fat content similar to the typical American diet (TAD) containing either protein derived from soy (TAD soy) or casein-lactalbumin (TAD casein). The colony was followed for over two years to assess body weight, and carbohydrate and lipid measures in adult females (n=19) and their offspring (n=25). Serum isoflavone concentrations were higher with TAD soy than TAD casein, but not as high as when monkey chow was fed. Offspring consuming TAD soy had higher serum isoflavone concentrations than adults consuming TAD soy. Female monkeys consuming TAD soy had better glycemic control, as determined by fructosamine concentrations, but no differences in lipids or body weight compared with those consuming diets with TAD casein. Offspring born to dams consuming TAD soy had similar body weights at birth but over a two-year period weighed significantly less, had significantly lower triglyceride concentrations, and like adult females, had significantly lower fructosamine concentrations compared to TAD casein. Glucose tolerance tests in adult females were not significantly different with diet, but offspring eating TAD soy had increased glucose disappearance with overall lower glucose and insulin responses to the glucose challenge compared with TAD casein. Potential reasons for the additional benefits of TAD soy observed in offspring but not in adults may be related to higher serum isoflavone concentrations in offspring, presence of the diet differences throughout more of their lifespan (including gestation), or different tissue susceptibilities in younger animals. PMID:19484707

  2. Effects of High Performance Inulin Supplementation on Glycemic Status and Lipid Profile in Women with Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Dehghan, Parvin; Pourghassem Gargari, Bahram; Asgharijafarabadi, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Background: Type 2 diabetes mellitus, as a noncommunicable disease, is the main public health challenge in the 21st century. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus adjusted for the world population in Iran was 8% until the year 2010.Lipid levels are considered as important parameters to be evaluated, as high serum lipid levels are often reported as a complication in patients with diabetes mellitus.It is claimed that functional foods may improve complications of diabetes mellitus, so this study was designed to evaluate the effects of high performance inulin on glycemic status and lipid profile of women with type 2 diabetes. Methods: The study was a randomized controlled clinical trial. Forty-nine type 2 diabetic females (fiber intake <30g/d, 25control group (n=25) received 10g/d maltodextrin for 8 weeks.Glycemic status and lipid profile indices were measured pre and post intervention. Data were analyzed using SPSS software (verision11.5). Paired, unpaired t-test and ANCOVA were used to compare quantitative variables. Results: Supplementation with inulin caused a significant reduction in FBS (8.50%), HbA1c (10.40%), total cholesterol (12.90%), triglyceride (23.60 %), LDL-c (35.30 %), LDL-c/HDL-c ratio (16.25%) and TC/HDL-c ratio (25.20%) and increased HDL-c (19.90%). The changes for the control group parameters were not significant at the end of study. Conclusion: Inulin may help to control diabetes and its complications via improving glycemic and lipid parameters. PMID:24688953

  3. Effects of regular exercise on obesity and type 2 diabete mellitus in Korean children: improvements glycemic control and serum adipokines level

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Soo; Kang, Sunghwun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the study was to clarify the effects of regular exercise on lipid profiles and serum adipokines in Korean children. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects were divided into controls (n=10), children who were obese (n=10), and children with type 2 diabetes mellitus (n=10). Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), body composition, lipid profiles, glucagon, insulin and adipokines (leptin, resistin, visfatin and retinol binding protein 4) were measured before to and after a 12-week exercise program. [Results] Body weight, body mass index, and percentage body fat were significantly higher in the obese and diabetes groups compared with the control group. Total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and glycemic control levels were significantly decreased after the exercise program in the obese and diabetes groups, while high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were significantly increased. Adipokines were higher in the obese and diabetes groups compared with the control group prior to the exercise program, and were significantly lower following completion. [Conclusion] These results suggest that regular exercise has positive effects on obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus in Korean children by improving glycemic control and reducing body weight, thereby lowering cardiovascular risk factors and adipokine levels. PMID:26180345

  4. Eight Weeks of Cosmos caudatus (Ulam Raja) Supplementation Improves Glycemic Status in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shi-Hui; Ismail, Amin; Anthony, Joseph; Ng, Ooi Chuan; Hamid, Azizah Abdul; Barakatun-Nisak, Mohd Yusof

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Optimizing glycemic control is crucial to prevent type 2 diabetes related complications. Cosmos caudatus is reported to have promising effect in improving plasma blood glucose in an animal model. However, its impact on human remains ambiguous. This study was carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of C. caudatus on glycemic status in patients with type 2 diabetes. Materials and Methods. In this randomized controlled trial with two-arm parallel-group design, a total of 101 subjects with type 2 diabetes were randomly allocated to diabetic-ulam or diabetic controls for eight weeks. Subjects in diabetic-ulam group consumed 15 g of C. caudatus daily for eight weeks while diabetic controls abstained from taking C. caudatus. Both groups received the standard lifestyle advice. Results. After 8 weeks of supplementation, C. caudatus significantly reduced serum insulin (−1.16 versus +3.91), reduced HOMA-IR (−1.09 versus +1.34), and increased QUICKI (+0.05 versus −0.03) in diabetic-ulam group compared with the diabetic controls. HbA1C level was improved although it is not statistically significant (−0.76% versus −0.37%). C. caudatus was safe to consume. Conclusions. C. caudatus supplementation significantly improves insulin resistance and insulin sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:26713097

  5. A case of slowly progressive type 1 diabetes with unstable glycemic control caused by unusual insulin antibody and successfully treated with steroid therapy.

    PubMed

    Matsuyoshi, Akiko; Shimoda, Seiya; Tsuruzoe, Kaku; Taketa, Kayo; Chirioka, Takeshi; Sakamoto, Fumi; Sakakida, Michiharu; Miyamura, Nobuhiro; Araki, Eiichi

    2006-06-01

    A 75-year-old man with type 1 diabetes and history of insulin therapy for previous 3 years using only human recombinant ones was suffering from unstable glycemic control. He had a high level of total insulin and a high titer of insulin antibodies (IA) (bound/total ratio: 89.8%). Low affinity constant (k(1): 0.0312 x 10(8) M(-1)) and high binding capacity (b(1): 51.8 x 10(-8) M) of IA in the patient detected by the Scatchard analysis were not compatible with those of IA associated with exogenous insulin injections in the diabetic patients, but compatible with those of the insulin autoantibodies found in patients with insulin autoimmune syndrome (IAS), although he had DRB1*0405, which may have protection against IAS development. The glucose infusion rate during hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp was 2.84 mg/kg/min, suggesting a high level of insulin resistance. Steroid pulse therapy (1000 mg for 3 days) aimed at reducing the possible effect of the IA on his insulin resistance and glycemic instability successfully decreased IA titer (from 89.8 to 58.3%), lowered its binding capacity (51.8-9.8 x 10(-8) M), increased glucose infusion rate (from 2.84 to 5.55 mg/kg/min) and improved glycemic control (HbA(1c): from 10.0 to 7.4%) with reduced blood glucose excursion. In conclusion, the alteration in insulin pharmacokinetics induced by IA seemed to be the cause of the brittle diabetes of the present case. Steroid treatment might be useful for the improvement of glycamic control in such patients with high IA levels and unstable blood glucose. PMID:16439034

  6. The association of depression and anxiety with glycemic control among Mexican Americans with diabetes living near the U.S.-Mexico border

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevalence of diabetes is alarmingly high among Mexican American adults residing near the U.S.-Mexico border. Depression is also common among Mexican Americans with diabetes, and may have a negative influence on diabetes management. Thus, the purpose of the current study was to evaluate the associations of depression and anxiety with the behavioral management of diabetes and glycemic control among Mexican American adults living near the border. Methods The characteristics of Mexican Americans with diabetes living in Brownsville, TX (N?=?492) were compared by depression/anxiety status. Linear regression models were conducted to evaluate the associations of depression and anxiety with BMI, waist circumference, physical activity, fasting glucose, and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Results Participants with clinically significant depression and/or anxiety were of greater age, predominantly female, less educated, more likely to have been diagnosed with diabetes, and more likely to be taking diabetes medications than those without depression or anxiety. In addition, anxious participants were more likely than those without anxiety to have been born in Mexico and to prefer study assessments in Spanish rather than English. Greater depression and anxiety were associated with poorer behavioral management of diabetes (i.e., greater BMI and waist circumference; engaging in less physical activity) and poorer glycemic control (i.e., higher fasting glucose, HbA1c). Conclusions Overall, depression and anxiety appear to be linked with poorer behavioral management of diabetes and glycemic control. Findings highlight the need for comprehensive interventions along the border which target depression and anxiety in conjunction with diabetes management. PMID:24548487

  7. Impact of Leisure-Time Physical Activity on Glycemic Control and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Japanese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: The Fukuoka Diabetes Registry

    PubMed Central

    Kaizu, Shinako; Kishimoto, Hiro; Iwase, Masanori; Fujii, Hiroki; Ohkuma, Toshiaki; Ide, Hitoshi; Jodai, Tamaki; Kikuchi, Yohei; Idewaki, Yasuhiro; Hirakawa, Yoichiro; Nakamura, Udai; Kitazono, Takanari

    2014-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis The effects of leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) on glycemia and cardiovascular risk factors are not fully understood in Asian type 2 diabetic patients, who are typically non-obese. We studied associations between LTPA and glycemia and cardiovascular risk factors in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients. Methods A total of 4,870 Japanese type 2 diabetic patients aged ?20 years were divided into eight groups according to their LTPA. We investigated associations between the amount and intensity levels of physical activity (PA) and glycemic control, insulin sensitivity, cardiovascular risk factors, and low-grade systemic inflammation in a cross-sectional study. Results LTPA was dose-dependently associated with body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), fasting plasma glucose, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, triglyceride, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, high sensitivity C-reactive protein, and prevalence of metabolic syndrome, but not with blood pressure, low density lipoprotein cholesterol or adiponectin. The amount of PA required to lower HbA1c was greater than that required to improve cardiovascular risk factors. LTPA was inversely associated with HbA1c in non-obese participants but not in obese participants after multivariate adjustments for age, sex, duration of diabetes, current smoking, current drinking, energy intake, cardiovascular diseases, depressive symptoms, and treatment of diabetes. Higher-intensity LTPA, not lower-intensity LTPA was associated with HbA1c after multivariate adjustments with further adjustment including BMI. Conclusions/interpretation LTPA was dose-dependently associated with better glycemic control and amelioration of some cardiovascular risk factors in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients. In addition, increased higher-intensity LTPA may be appropriate for glycemic control. PMID:24897110

  8. The influence of glycemic control on the oral health of children and adolescents with diabetes mellitus type 1.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Vera Lúcia; Fraiz, Fabian Calixto; Ferreira, Fernanda de Morais; Pintarelli, Tatiana Pegoretti; Oliveira, Ana Cristina Borges; Boguszewski, Margaret Cristina da Silva

    2015-12-01

    Objective To evaluate the influence of disease control, expressed by the mean values of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), in the oral health of children and adolescents with diabetes mellitus type 1 (T1DM). Subjects and methods A cross sectional study involving 87 children and adolescents (59 girls), 10 ± 2.6 years old. The participants were divided into three groups: HbA1c ≤ 8%, 8% < HbA1c ≤ 10% and HbA1c > 10%. The duration of the disease, age and average HbA1c were obtained from their medical records. Oral health was evaluated according to the following indexes: Simplified Oral Hygiene Index (OHI-S); Community Periodontal Index (CPI); Decayed, Missing or Filled Teeth Index (DMFT/dmft) for permanent and deciduous teeth; and the stimulated salivary flow rate (SSFR). Results The median SSFR was 1.1 mL/min in the group with HbA1c ≤ 8%, 0.7 mL/min in the intermediary group and 0.6 mL/min in the HbA1c > 10% group. A significant decrease in salivary flow was observed with an increase in HbA1c (p = 0.007). The DMFT/dmft and CPI indexes were higher in individuals with higher HbA1c values. More caries-free individuals were found in the group with HbA1c ≤ 8% compared to those with HbA1c > 10%. The group with HbA1c > 10% exhibited more caries and bleeding gums than the other groups. HbA1c values in girls were higher than in boys. Conclusion Children and adolescents with unsatisfactory glycemic control, represented by higher HbA1c concentrations, exhibited a higher frequency of caries and gingivitis, and a reduction in salivary flow. Arch Endocrinol Metab. 2015;59(6):535-40. PMID:26677088

  9. Cissus sicyoides: analysis of glycemic control in diabetic rats through biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Salgado, Jocelem Mastrodi; Mansi, Dbora Niero; Gagliardi, Antonio

    2009-08-01

    Diabetes is a chronic degenerative disease with no cure, is found in millions of people worldwide, and can cause life-threatening complications at any age. The plant Cissus sicyoides L. is a runner plant found abundantly in Brazil, especially in the Amazon. Its therapeutic properties are widely used in popular medicine as a diuretic, anti-influenza, anti-inflammatory, anticonvulsion, and hypoglycemic agent. The objective of this study was to analyze the effects of aqueous extracts from the leaves and stem of C. sicyoides L., administered for 60 days, for the control of glycemia in alloxan (monohydrate)-induced diabetic rats, monitored by biomarkers. Data obtained in this study confirmed that C. sicyoides has a hypoglycemic effect on diabetic rats. Administration of its aqueous extracts promoted a 45% decrease in glucose levels after 60 days of administration. Furthermore, indices of hepatic glycogen, blood glucose, C-reactive peptide, and fructosamine were found to be efficient biomarkers to monitor diabetes in rats. PMID:19735170

  10. Rapid Improvement of Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes Using Weekly Intensive Multifactorial Interventions: Structured Glucose Monitoring, Patient Education, and Adjustment of Therapy—A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rodbard, David; Zanella, Maria Teresa

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background We evaluated intensive intervention in poorly controlled patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus involving weekly clinic visits and adjustment of therapy with analysis of three seven-point glucose profiles and intervention from an interdisciplinary staff. Methods Sixty-three patients were randomized to an intensive treatment group that obtained self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) profiles (six or seven values per day, 3 days/week) and were seen in the clinic at Weeks 1–6 and 12. SMBG results were downloaded, analyzed using Accu-Chek® 360° software (Roche Diagnostics, Indianapolis, IN), and used to adjust therapy. Control group subjects obtained glucose profiles and had clinic visits only at Weeks 0, 6, and 12. Results There were highly statistically significant improvements in the intensive treatment group compared with the control group between Weeks 0 and 6 with greater reductions in weekly mean glycemia (WMG) (−76.7±8.9 mg/dL vs. −20.5±8.1 mg/dL), glycemic variability (SD) (−16.3±3.1 mg/dL vs. −5.0±3.1 mg/dL), and glycated hemoglobin (−1.82±0.16% vs. −0.66±0.22%) without significant changes in frequency of hypoglycemia or weight. Improvements were sustained in the intensive treatment group through Week 12. A minimal but statistically significant degree of improvement was seen in the control group at Week 12. Conclusions This short-term pilot study of an intensive monitoring, educational, and pharmacological interventions program resulted in dramatic improvement of glycemic control within 6 weeks, and these effects are sustained through Week 12. SMBG glucose profiles, calculation of WMG and SD, and graphical displays of glucose data can improve the effectiveness of adjustment of therapy at weekly clinic visits when combined with intensive support from a multidisciplinary team. PMID:21751888

  11. Inflammatory markers in gingival crevicular fluid of periodontitis patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus according to glycemic control: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Priscila Larcher; Artese, Hilana Paula Carilo; Horliana, Anna Carolina Ratto Tempestini; Gomes, Giovane Hisse; Romito, Giuseppe Alexandre; Dib, Sergio Atala; Mayer, Marcia Pinto Alves

    2015-01-01

    Background: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and periodontitis are inflammatory conditions with a bidirectional association. This pilot study aimed to evaluate whether T2DM and glycemic control interfere in inflammatory markers profiles in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) in periodontitis patients. Materials and Methods: Fourteen diabetic periodontitis patients were enrolled in this study, seven with adequate glycemic control (glycated hemoglobin [HbA1c] <8.0%) (DMA + P) and seven with inadequate control (HbA1c ?8.0%) (DMI + P). Seven chronic periodontitis patients without diabetes formed the control group (P). GCF was obtained from diseased sites (probing depth >6 mm) of an entirely hemiarch, pooled and cytokines levels determined using multiplex beads immunoassay. Clinical periodontal parameters were analyzed by Mann-Whitney test and levels of cytokines by Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's multiple comparison tests with confidence level of 95% (P < 0.05). Results: Cytokines profile of GCF obtained from deep periodontal pockets presented high levels of inflammatory cytokines, and there were no statistical differences between levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8 and tumor necrosis factor-? according to presence of diabetes or percentage of HbA1c among the groups, despite groups with T2DM and periodontitis exhibit higher levels of PD. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, inflammatory mediators in GCF are dependent to the local response and do not correlate with the diabetic status. PMID:26604959

  12. Health-Care Costs, Glycemic Control and Nutritional Status in Malnourished Older Diabetics Treated with a Hypercaloric Diabetes-Specific Enteral Nutritional Formula.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Paris, Alejandro; Boj-Carceller, Diana; Lardies-Sanchez, Beatriz; Perez-Fernandez, Leticia; Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso J

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes-specific formulas are an effective alternative for providing nutrients and maintaining glycemic control. This study assesses the effect of treatment with an oral enteral nutrition with a hypercaloric diabetes-specific formula (HDSF) for one year, on health-care resources use, health-care costs, glucose control and nutritional status, in 93 type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) malnourished patients. Changes in health-care resources use and health-care costs were collected the year before and during the year of intervention. Glucose status and nutritional laboratory parameters were analyzed at baseline and one-year after the administration of HDSF. The administration of HDSF was significantly associated with a reduced use of health-care resources, fewer hospital admissions (54.7%; p < 0.001), days spent at hospital (64.1%; p < 0.001) and emergency visits (57.7%; p < 0.001). Health-care costs were reduced by 65.6% (p < 0.001) during the intervention. Glycemic control (short- and long-term) and the need of pharmacological treatment did not change, while some nutritional parameters were improved at one year (albumin: +10.6%, p < 0.001; hemoglobin: +6.4%, p = 0.026). In conclusion, using HDSF in malnourished older type-2 diabetic patients may allow increasing energy intake while maintaining glucose control and improving nutritional parameters. The use of health-care resources and costs were significantly reduced during the nutritional intervention. PMID:27005661

  13. Effect of bariatric surgery combined with medical therapy versus intensive medical therapy or calorie restriction and weight loss on glycemic control in Zucker diabetic fatty rats.

    PubMed

    Abegg, Kathrin; Corteville, Caroline; Docherty, Neil G; Boza, Camilo; Lutz, Thomas A; Muoz, Rodrigo; le Roux, Carel W

    2015-02-15

    Bariatric surgery rapidly improves Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Our objective was to profile and compare the extent and duration of improved glycemic control following Roux-en-Y gastric (RYGB) bypass surgery and vertical sleeve gastrectomy (SG) and compare against calorie restriction/weight loss and medical combination therapy-based approaches using the Zucker diabetic fatty rat (ZDF) rodent model of advanced T2DM. Male ZDF rats underwent RYGB (n = 15) or SG surgery (n = 10) at 18 wk of age and received postsurgical insulin treatment, as required to maintain mid-light-phase glycemia within a predefined range (10-15 mmol/l). In parallel, other groups of animals underwent sham surgery with ad libitum feeding (n = 6), with body weight (n = 8), or glycemic matching (n = 8) to the RYGB group, using food restriction or a combination of insulin, metformin, and liraglutide, respectively. Both bariatric procedures decreased the daily insulin dose required to maintain mid-light-phase blood glucose levels below 15 mmol/l, compared with those required by body weight or glycemia-matched rats (P < 0.001). No difference was noted between RYGB and SG with regard to initial efficacy. SG was, however, associated with higher food intake, weight regain, and higher insulin requirements vs. RYGB at study end (P < 0.05). Severe hypoglycemia occurred in several rats after RYGB. RYGB and SG significantly improved glycemic control in a rodent model of advanced T2DM. While short-term outcomes are similar, long-term efficacy appears marginally better after RYGB, although this is tempered by the increased risk of hypoglycemia. PMID:25540099

  14. Long-term study of patients with type 2 diabetes and moderate renal impairment shows that dapagliflozin reduces weight and blood pressure but does not improve glycemic control

    PubMed Central

    Kohan, Donald E; Fioretto, Paola; Tang, Weihua; List, James F

    2014-01-01

    In patients with diabetes, glycemic improvement by sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibition depends on the kidney's ability to filter glucose. Dapagliflozin, a sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitor, reduces hyperglycemia in patients with diabetes and normal or mildly impaired renal function. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study we assessed daily treatment with dapagliflozin in 252 patients with inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes and moderate renal impairment. The primary endpoint, the mean change in HbA1c, was not statistically different from placebo after 24 weeks (?0.41% and ?0.44% for 5- and 10-mg doses, respectively, and ?0.32% for placebo). The mean weight change from baseline was ?1.54 and ?1.89?kg for the 5- and 10-mg doses, respectively, and +0.21?kg for placebo. The mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure decreased in the dapagliflozin groups compared to placebo. Through 104 weeks, 13 patients receiving dapagliflozin and no patients receiving placebo experienced bone fracture. At 1 week, the mean serum creatinine increased with dapagliflozin 5?mg (+0.13?mg/dl) and 10?mg (+0.18?mg/dl) and did not change further after 104 weeks. Mean serum electrolytes did not change in any group, and there were fewer episodes of hyperkalemia with dapagliflozin than placebo. Thus, in patients with moderate renal impairment, dapagliflozin did not improve glycemic control, but reduced weight and blood pressure. PMID:24067431

  15. Long-term study of patients with type 2 diabetes and moderate renal impairment shows that dapagliflozin reduces weight and blood pressure but does not improve glycemic control.

    PubMed

    Kohan, Donald E; Fioretto, Paola; Tang, Weihua; List, James F

    2014-04-01

    In patients with diabetes, glycemic improvement by sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibition depends on the kidney's ability to filter glucose. Dapagliflozin, a sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitor, reduces hyperglycemia in patients with diabetes and normal or mildly impaired renal function. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study we assessed daily treatment with dapagliflozin in 252 patients with inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes and moderate renal impairment. The primary endpoint, the mean change in HbA1c, was not statistically different from placebo after 24 weeks (-0.41% and -0.44% for 5- and 10-mg doses, respectively, and -0.32% for placebo). The mean weight change from baseline was -1.54 and -1.89?kg for the 5- and 10-mg doses, respectively, and +0.21?kg for placebo. The mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure decreased in the dapagliflozin groups compared to placebo. Through 104 weeks, 13 patients receiving dapagliflozin and no patients receiving placebo experienced bone fracture. At 1 week, the mean serum creatinine increased with dapagliflozin 5?mg (+0.13?mg/dl) and 10?mg (+0.18?mg/dl) and did not change further after 104 weeks. Mean serum electrolytes did not change in any group, and there were fewer episodes of hyperkalemia with dapagliflozin than placebo. Thus, in patients with moderate renal impairment, dapagliflozin did not improve glycemic control, but reduced weight and blood pressure. PMID:24067431

  16. Polyphenols and Glycemic Control.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoona; Keogh, Jennifer B; Clifton, Peter M

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence from animal studies supports the anti-diabetic properties of some dietary polyphenols, suggesting that dietary polyphenols could be one dietary therapy for the prevention and management of Type 2 diabetes. This review aims to address the potential mechanisms of action of dietary polyphenols in the regulation of glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity based on in vitro and in vivo studies, and to provide a comprehensive overview of the anti-diabetic effects of commonly consumed dietary polyphenols including polyphenol-rich mixed diets, tea and coffee, chocolate and cocoa, cinnamon, grape, pomegranate, red wine, berries and olive oil, with a focus on human clinical trials. Dietary polyphenols may inhibit α-amylase and α-glucosidase, inhibit glucose absorption in the intestine by sodium-dependent glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1), stimulate insulin secretion and reduce hepatic glucose output. Polyphenols may also enhance insulin-dependent glucose uptake, activate 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), modify the microbiome and have anti-inflammatory effects. However, human epidemiological and intervention studies have shown inconsistent results. Further intervention studies are essential to clarify the conflicting findings and confirm or refute the anti-diabetic effects of dietary polyphenols. PMID:26742071

  17. Polyphenols and Glycemic Control

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoona; Keogh, Jennifer B.; Clifton, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence from animal studies supports the anti-diabetic properties of some dietary polyphenols, suggesting that dietary polyphenols could be one dietary therapy for the prevention and management of Type 2 diabetes. This review aims to address the potential mechanisms of action of dietary polyphenols in the regulation of glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity based on in vitro and in vivo studies, and to provide a comprehensive overview of the anti-diabetic effects of commonly consumed dietary polyphenols including polyphenol-rich mixed diets, tea and coffee, chocolate and cocoa, cinnamon, grape, pomegranate, red wine, berries and olive oil, with a focus on human clinical trials. Dietary polyphenols may inhibit α-amylase and α-glucosidase, inhibit glucose absorption in the intestine by sodium-dependent glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1), stimulate insulin secretion and reduce hepatic glucose output. Polyphenols may also enhance insulin-dependent glucose uptake, activate 5′ adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), modify the microbiome and have anti-inflammatory effects. However, human epidemiological and intervention studies have shown inconsistent results. Further intervention studies are essential to clarify the conflicting findings and confirm or refute the anti-diabetic effects of dietary polyphenols. PMID:26742071

  18. Peer Support Training Improved the Glycemic Control, Insulin Management, and Diabetic Behaviors of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes in Rural Communities of Central China: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Kaiqin; Ren, Yanlei; Luo, Zhongmei; Du, Kun; Zhang, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Background The efficacy of peer support in Chinese diabetes patients is still uncertain. The purpose of this study was to observe the effects of a peer support program on the outcomes of patients with type 2 diabetes who received community-based insulin therapy in rural communities of central China. Material/Methods Two hundred and eight eligible patients with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned into the traditional training group (control group, n=111) and peer support intervention group (peer group, n=97) between June 2013 and January 2014 in 2 rural communities of Jingzhou area, China. Both groups received 3-month traditional training, followed by another 4-month traditional training or peer support training, respectively. At baseline and 7 months after treatment, the blood glycemic level was evaluated by biochemical detection. Capacities of self-management and knowledge related to insulin usage were assessed by questionnaire survey. Results Ninety-seven and ninety patients completed this study in the control group and peer group, respectively. There was no significant difference in age, gender, diabetes duration, insulin usage time, and complications between the 2 groups at baseline (P>0.05). Compared with the control group, peer group patients achieved a more significant decrease in blood glycosylated hemoglobin levels (P<0.05), increase in knowledge related to insulin usage, and increase of diabetes self-management ability (P<0.05). Conclusions Peer support intervention effectively improves outcomes of patients with type 2 diabetes in rural communities of central China. PMID:26808489

  19. Peer Support Training Improved the Glycemic Control, Insulin Management, and Diabetic Behaviors of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes in Rural Communities of Central China: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Deng, Kaiqin; Ren, Yanlei; Luo, Zhongmei; Du, Kun; Zhang, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The efficacy of peer support in Chinese diabetes patients is still uncertain. The purpose of this study was to observe the effects of a peer support program on the outcomes of patients with type 2 diabetes who received community-based insulin therapy in rural communities of central China. MATERIAL AND METHODS Two hundred and eight eligible patients with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned into the traditional training group (control group, n=111) and peer support intervention group (peer group, n=97) between June 2013 and January 2014 in 2 rural communities of Jingzhou area, China. Both groups received 3-month traditional training, followed by another 4-month traditional training or peer support training, respectively. At baseline and 7 months after treatment, the blood glycemic level was evaluated by biochemical detection. Capacities of self-management and knowledge related to insulin usage were assessed by questionnaire survey. RESULTS Ninety-seven and ninety patients completed this study in the control group and peer group, respectively. There was no significant difference in age, gender, diabetes duration, insulin usage time, and complications between the 2 groups at baseline (P>0.05). Compared with the control group, peer group patients achieved a more significant decrease in blood glycosylated hemoglobin levels (P<0.05), increase in knowledge related to insulin usage, and increase of diabetes self-management ability (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS Peer support intervention effectively improves outcomes of patients with type 2 diabetes in rural communities of central China. PMID:26808489

  20. Glycemic Responses, Appetite Ratings and Gastrointestinal Hormone Responses of Most Common Breads Consumed in Spain. A Randomized Control Trial in Healthy Humans

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Anton, Carolina; Rico, Maria C.; Sanchez-Rodriguez, Estefania; Ruiz-Lopez, Maria D.; Gil, Angel; Mesa, Maria D.

    2015-01-01

    The present study was carried out to determine the glycemic index (GI), glycemic load (GL), insulinemic index (InI), appetite ratings and postprandial plasma concentrations of gastrointestinal hormones related to the control of food intake after the ingestion of the five most common breads consumed in Spain with different compositions and manufacturing processes. Twenty-two healthy adults participated in a randomized crossover study. The breads tested were Ordinary, Precooked-Frozen, Candeal-flour, Alfacar whites and Wholemeal. All breads portions were calculated to supply 50 g of available carbohydrates. In addition, 50 g of glucose was used as a reference. A linear mixed-effects model was used to compare data calculated for all breads with glucose load. The GI value varied from 61 for the Wholemeal, to Alfacar 68, Ordinary 76, and 78 and 86 for the Precooked-Frozen and Candeal-flour breads, respectively. Wholemeal and Alfacar had lower GI than glucose. All tested breads had a lower GL (ranged 9 to 18) compared with glucose. Wholemeal GL was similar to Alfacar, but lower than the other white breads. InI were significantly lower for all breads (ranged 68 to 73) compared with glucose, and similar among them. The intake of the Wholemeal bread led to a higher release of gastric inhibitory polypeptide compared with the Ordinary and Precooked breads and to a higher release of pancreatic polypeptide compared with the Precooked-Frozen bread. All breads affected appetite ratings similarly. In conclusion, based on GL, the Wholemeal bread would be expected to exert a favorable glycemic response. PMID:26024293

  1. Glycemic responses, appetite ratings and gastrointestinal hormone responses of most common breads consumed in Spain. A randomized control trial in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Anton, Carolina; Rico, Maria C; Sanchez-Rodriguez, Estefania; Ruiz-Lopez, Maria D; Gil, Angel; Mesa, Maria D

    2015-06-01

    The present study was carried out to determine the glycemic index (GI), glycemic load (GL), insulinemic index (InI), appetite ratings and postprandial plasma concentrations of gastrointestinal hormones related to the control of food intake after the ingestion of the five most common breads consumed in Spain with different compositions and manufacturing processes. Twenty-two healthy adults participated in a randomized crossover study. The breads tested were Ordinary, Precooked-Frozen, Candeal-flour, Alfacar whites and Wholemeal. All breads portions were calculated to supply 50 g of available carbohydrates. In addition, 50 g of glucose was used as a reference. A linear mixed-effects model was used to compare data calculated for all breads with glucose load. The GI value varied from 61 for the Wholemeal, to Alfacar 68, Ordinary 76, and 78 and 86 for the Precooked-Frozen and Candeal-flour breads, respectively. Wholemeal and Alfacar had lower GI than glucose. All tested breads had a lower GL (ranged 9 to 18) compared with glucose. Wholemeal GL was similar to Alfacar, but lower than the other white breads. InI were significantly lower for all breads (ranged 68 to 73) compared with glucose, and similar among them. The intake of the Wholemeal bread led to a higher release of gastric inhibitory polypeptide compared with the Ordinary and Precooked breads and to a higher release of pancreatic polypeptide compared with the Precooked-Frozen bread. All breads affected appetite ratings similarly. In conclusion, based on GL, the Wholemeal bread would be expected to exert a favorable glycemic response. PMID:26024293

  2. Premenopausal dietary carbohydrate, glycemic index, glycemic load, and fiber in relation to risk of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eunyoung; Spiegelman, Donna; Hunter, David J; Chen, Wendy Y; Colditz, Graham A; Willett, Walter C

    2003-11-01

    Carbohydrate intake, glycemic index, and glycemic load have been hypothesized to increase risk of breast cancer by raising insulin levels, but these associations have not been studied extensively. The insulin response to dietary carbohydrate is substantially greater among overweight women than among leaner women. Although fiber intake has been hypothesized to reduce the risk of breast cancer, data from early adult life are lacking. We examined dietary carbohydrate, glycemic index, glycemic load, and fiber in relation to breast cancer risk among 90655 premenopausal women in the Nurses' Health Study II aged 26-46 years in 1991. Diet was assessed with a food frequency questionnaire in 1991 and 1995. During 8 years of follow-up, we documented 714 incident cases of invasive breast cancer. Dietary carbohydrate intake, glycemic load, and glycemic index were not related to breast cancer risk in the overall cohort. However, the associations differed by body mass index (BMI): among women with BMI < 25 kg/m(2), the multivariate relative risks for the increasing quintiles of carbohydrate intake were 1.00 (referent), 0.87, 0.77, 0.66, and 0.62 [95% confidence interval, 0.40-0.97; P, test for trend = 0.02]; and among women with BMI >or=25 kg/m(2), the corresponding relative risks were 1.00 (referent), 1.30, 1.35, 1.50, and 1.47 (95% confidence interval, 0.84-2.59; P, test for trend = 0.14; P, test for interaction = 0.02). Similar interaction with BMI was observed for glycemic load, but not for glycemic index. Intakes of total fiber and different types of fiber were not appreciably related to breast cancer risk. Our findings suggest that the associations between carbohydrate intake or glycemic load and breast cancer risk among young adult women differ by body weight. Our data do not support a strong association between fiber intake and breast cancer risk. PMID:14652274

  3. Salmonella Abscess of the Anterior Chest Wall in a Patient With Type 2 Diabetes and Poor Glycemic Control: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Chiao, Hao-Yu; Wang, Chi-Yu; Wang, Chih-Hsin

    2016-03-01

    Salmonella can cause extra-intestinal focal infections as well as gastrointestinal problems. A few cases of Salmonella skin and soft tissue infection have been documented in immunocompromised patients such as persons with type 2 diabetes and poor glycemic control. A case study is presented of a 30-year-old man with a 10-year history of poorly controlled (HbA1C 11.7%) diabetes mellitus who presented with a ruptured nodule resulting in a wound with signs of infection over his anterior chest region of 1-month duration. He had been taking amoxycillin/clavulanate for the week previous to presentation at the authors' facility. Following sharp debridement, the ulcerative wound deteriorated and a chest wall abscess developed. Bacterial culture results were positive for Salmonella group D, resistant to ampicillin and susceptible to ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin. The patient underwent surgical debridement, resulting in a wound 7 cm x 4 cm, and was provided ceftriaxone 2.0 g intravenously daily along with insulin therapy. After surgical debridement, a local rotational flap was created for wound closure and reconstruction. The patient was discharged 1 week later on oral antibiotic therapy for 1 week. His wound was completely healed without recurrence at his 4-month follow-up. For this patient, addressing glycemic issues, identifying the infectious organism, and providing appropriate therapy, radical debridement, and flap surgery helped heal an advanced soft tissue infection. In immunocompromised patients with skin or soft tissue infections, the presence of Salmonella should be considered. PMID:26978859

  4. Effects of a diabetes self-management program on glycemic control, coronary heart disease risk, and quality of life among Thai patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wattana, Chodchoi; Srisuphan, Wichit; Pothiban, Linchong; Upchurch, Sandra L

    2007-06-01

    Uncontrolled diabetes is a major health problem in Thailand. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of a diabetes self-management program on glycemic control, coronary heart disease (CHD) risk, and quality of life in 147 diabetic patients (aged 56.8 +/- 10.2 years). Type 2 diabetic patients who met the research criteria were randomized into two groups for a period of 6 months: the experimental group received the diabetes self-management program and the control group received the usual nursing care. The findings indicated that the experimental group demonstrated a significant decrease in the hemoglobin A(1c) level and CHD risk, with an increase in quality of life (QOL) compared to the control group. The diabetes self-management program was effective for improving metabolic control and the QOL for individuals with diabetes. Further studies should be replicated using larger groups over a longer time frame. PMID:17470188

  5. Survey of the Effect of Biotin on Glycemic Control and Plasma Lipid Concentrations in Type 1 Diabetic Patients in Kermanshah in Iran (2008-2009)

    PubMed Central

    Hemmati, Mitra; Babaei, Homa; Abdolsalehei, Mohammadreza

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Diabetes mellitus is the most common chronic endocrine disease worldwide. Intensive glycemic control plays an important role in decreasing morbidity and mortality rate of the disease. Preclinical studies have shown that biotin has an essential role in regulating blood glucose and serum lipid metabolism. This study aims to evaluate the effect of biotin on glycemic control and plasma lipids concentrations in type 1diabetic patients. Methods: This randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial study was conducted 70 type 1 diabetic patients with an age range 5-25 years old with poorly controlled (glycosylated hemoglobin ≥8%). Subjects were randomly allocated into two groups. In the intervention group biotin (40 microgram/kg) was administered plus daily insulin, while the control group received placebo plus daily insulin regimen for three months. Laboratory tests including glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting blood sugar and plasma lipids were measured at the base and after 3 months. Results: In this study, seventy patients were evaluated, 35 were allocated to each group. There were no statistically significant differences between age, gender, duration of diabetes, BMI and BP between the two groups (p>0.05). HbA1c in the intervention (biotin) group was 9.84±1.80 at base and after 3 months treatment, it declined to 8.88±1.73 (p<0.001). In the control group HbA1c at base was 9.39±1.58, after 3 months it increased to10.11± 1.68. There were statistically significant differences in the mean of HbA1c in both the biotin and the control groups (p<0.001). FBS in the biotin group at base was 275±65.76 mg/dl and after 3 months it had reduced to 226± 41.31 (p<0.001). There were statistically significant differences in the mean of total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride between the two groups at the end of 3 months (p<0.05). Conclusion: Results of this study showed that biotin administration as an adjuvant in addition to insulin regimen can improve glycemic management and decrease plasma lipids concentrations in poorly controlled type 1 diabetic patients. PMID:23772286

  6. Effects of an aquatic physical exercise program on glycemic control and perinatal outcomes of gestational diabetes: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is increasing worldwide and has been associated with adverse perinatal outcomes and high risk for chronic disease both for the mother and for the child. Physical exercise is feasible for diabetic pregnant women and contributes to better glycemic control and to a decrease in adverse perinatal outcomes. However, there are no randomized controlled trials (RCT) assessing the effects of aquatic physical exercise on GDM control and adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Methods/Design An RCT will be conducted at Instituto de Medicina Integral Prof Fernando Figueira (IMIP), Brazil. A total of 72 pregnant women will be studied; 36 gestational diabetics will undergo an aquatic physical exercise program in a thermal pool, 3 times per week over 2 months. The primary endpoint will be glucose level control and use of insulin; secondary endpoints will be the following maternal and fetal outcomes: weight gain during pregnancy, blood pressure, pre-eclampsia diagnosis, intrauterus growth restriction, preterm birth, Cesarean section, macrosomia and maternal or neonatal intensive care admission. Endpoints between intervention and control group will analyzed by t test for unpaired data and χ2 test, and the level of significance will set at <0.05. Discussion The physical proprieties of water make aquatic exercises ideal for pregnant women. An aquatic physical exercise program developed for GDM women will be trialed in a thermal pool and under the supervision of physiotherapist to ensure compliance. It is expected that this study will provide evidence as to the effect of aquatic physical exercise on GDM control. Trial registration ClinicalTrial.gov, NCT01940003. PMID:24245914

  7. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, clinical study on the effect of Diabetinol® on glycemic control of subjects with impaired fasting glucose

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Malkanthi; Judy, William V; Wilson, Dale; Rumberger, John A; Guthrie, Najla

    2015-01-01

    Background This study investigated the efficacy of Diabetinol® in people with diabetes on medication but not meeting the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and American Diabetes Association glycemic, blood pressure, and lipid targets. Subjects and methods Fifty subjects, aged 18–75 years, with fasting blood glucose ≤15.4 mmol/L, hemoglobin A1c levels ≤12%, and a body mass index between 25 and 40 kg/m2, were enrolled in a 24-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel study. Diabetinol® or placebo was administered as 2×525 mg capsules/day. Results In the Diabetinol® group, 14.3% versus 0% in the placebo group, 33.3% versus 15.4% in placebo, 20.0% versus 12.5% in placebo, and 83.3% versus 60% in placebo achieved the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and American Diabetes Association targets for hemoglobin A1c, low-density lipoprotein, total cholesterol, and systolic blood pressure, respectively. There was no difference in the maximum concentration (Cmax) of serum glucose or area under the curve (AUC)0–240 minutes. The time to Cmax was longer for participants on Diabetinol® than placebo group at week 12 (P=0.01). Fasting blood glucose increased from baseline to week 24 in both groups; however, this increase was 14.3 mg/dL lower in the Diabetinol® group versus placebo. The Diabetinol® group showed an increase of 5.53 mg/dL in fasting insulin at week 12 (P=0.09) and 3.2 mg/dL at week 24 (P=0.41) over and above the placebo group. A decrease of 1.5% in total cholesterol, 5.8% in low-density lipoprotein, and a 1.6% increase in high-density lipoprotein concentrations were seen in the Diabetinol® group. Diabetinol® improved 6-month oral glucose tolerance test and 2-hour postprandial glucose profiles in participants between 40 and 60 years of age. Conclusion The current study suggests a role for Diabetinol® as an adjunctive therapy for glycemic maintenance and for decreasing the risk of diabetes-associated comorbidities in type 2 diabetic patients on conventional therapies. PMID:26150732

  8. Consumption of a high glycemic load but not a high glycemic index diet is marginally associated with oxidative stress in young women

    PubMed Central

    Arikawa, Andrea Y.; Jakits, Holly E.; Flood, Andrew; Thomas, William; Gross, Myron; Schmitz, Kathryn H.; Kurzer, Mindy S.

    2014-01-01

    Research studies have suggested that chronic consumption of high glycemic index foods may lead to chronically high oxidative stress. This is important because oxidative stress is suspected to be an early event in the etiology of many disease processes. We hypothesized that dietary glycemic index and glycemic load were positively associated with oxidative stress assessed by plasma F2-isoprostanes in healthy, premenopausal women (BMI = 24.7 4.8 kg/m2 and age 25.3 3.5 years, mean SD). We measured plasma F2-isoprostanes in 306 healthy premenopausal women at the baseline visit for the Women In Steady Exercise Research (WISER) study, using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Dietary glycemic index and load were calculated from the National Cancer Institute Diet History Questionnaire, and participants were divided into quartiles of dietary glycemic index and of glycemic load. Plasma F2-isoprostanes were compared across quartile groups of dietary glycemic index and glycemic load using linear regression models. Plasma F2-isoprostanes (pg/mL) increased with quartile of glycemic load (test for linear trend, p = .033), and also increased with quartile of glycemic index in participants with BMI ? 25 (p = .035) but not in those with BMI < 25 (p = .924). After adjustment for BMI, alcohol consumption and total energy intake, both these positive trends remained marginally significant (p = .123 for quartiles of glycemic index and p=.065 for quartiles of glycemic load). PMID:25453541

  9. Consumption of a high glycemic load but not a high glycemic index diet is marginally associated with oxidative stress in young women.

    PubMed

    Arikawa, Andrea Y; Jakits, Holly E; Flood, Andrew; Thomas, William; Gross, Myron; Schmitz, Kathryn H; Kurzer, Mindy S

    2015-01-01

    Research studies have suggested that chronic consumption of high glycemic index foods may lead to chronically high oxidative stress. This is important because oxidative stress is suspected to be an early event in the etiology of many disease processes. We hypothesized that dietary glycemic index and glycemic load were positively associated with oxidative stress assessed by plasma F2-isoprostanes in healthy, premenopausal women (body mass index [BMI] = 24.7 4.8 kg/m(2) and age 25.3 3.5 years, mean SD). We measured plasma F2-isoprostanes in 306 healthy premenopausal women at the baseline visit for the Women In Steady Exercise Research study, using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Dietary glycemic index and load were calculated from the National Cancer Institute Diet History Questionnaire, and participants were divided into quartiles of dietary glycemic index and of glycemic load. Plasma F2-isoprostanes were compared across quartile groups of dietary glycemic index and glycemic load using linear regression models. Plasma F2-isoprostanes (pg/mL) increased with quartile of glycemic load (test for linear trend, P = .033), and also increased with quartile of glycemic index in participants with BMI ? 25 (P = .035) but not in those with BMI <25 (P = .924). After adjustment for BMI, alcohol consumption and total energy intake, both these positive trends remained marginally significant (P = .123 for quartiles of glycemic index and P = .065 for quartiles of glycemic load). PMID:25453541

  10. Glycemic Control and Mortality in Diabetic Patients Undergoing Dialysis Focusing on the Effects of Age and Dialysis Type: A Prospective Cohort Study in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji In; Bae, Eunjin; Kim, Yong-Lim; Kang, Shin-Wook; Yang, Chul Woo; Kim, Nam-Ho; Lee, Jung Pyo; Kim, Dong Ki; Joo, Kwon Wook; Kim, Yon Su; Lee, Hajeong

    2015-01-01

    Background Active glycemic control has been proven to delay the onset and slow the progression of diabetic retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy in diabetic patients, but the optimal level is obscure in end-stage renal disease. In this study, we evaluated the effect of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) on mortality of diabetic patients on dialysis, focusing on age and dialysis type. Methods Of 3,302 patients enrolled in the prospective cohort for end-stage renal disease in Korea between August 2008 and October 2013, 1,239 diabetic patients who had been diagnosed with diabetes or having HbA1c≥6.5% at the time of enrollment were analyzed. Age was categorized as <55, 55–64 and ≥65 years old. Age, sex, modified Charlson comorbidity index, hemoglobin, primary renal disease, body mass index, and dialysis duration were adjusted. Results A total of 873 patients received hemodialysis (HD) and 366 underwent peritoneal dialysis (PD). During the mean follow-up of 19.1 months, 141 patients died. Patients with poor glucose control (HbA1c≥8%) showed worse survival than patients with HbA1c<8% (hazard ratio [HR], 2.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.48–3.29; P<0.001). Subgroup analysis divided by age revealed that HbA1c≥8% was a predictor of mortality in age <55 (HR, 4.3; 95% CI, 1.78–10.41; P = 0.001) and age 55–64 groups (HR, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.56–7.05; P = 0.002), but not in age ≥65 group. Combining dialysis type and age, poor glucose control negatively affected survival only in age < 55 group among HD patients, but it was significant in age < 55 and age 55–64 groups in PD patients. Deaths from infection were more prevalent in the PD group, and poor glucose control tended to correlate with more deaths from infection in PD patients (P = 0.050). Conclusions In this study, the effect of glycemic control differed according to age and dialysis type in diabetic patients. Thus, the target of glycemic control should be customized; further observational studies may strengthen the clinical relevance. PMID:26285034

  11. Three 15-min Bouts of Moderate Postmeal Walking Significantly Improves 24-h Glycemic Control in Older People at Risk for Impaired Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    DiPietro, Loretta; Gribok, Andrei; Stevens, Michelle S.; Hamm, Larry F.; Rumpler, William

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of three 15-min bouts of postmeal walking with 45 min of sustained walking on 24-h glycemic control in older persons at risk for glucose intolerance. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Inactive older (≥60 years of age) participants (N = 10) were recruited from the community and were nonsmoking, with a BMI <35 kg/m2 and a fasting blood glucose concentration between 105 and 125 mg dL−1. Participants completed three randomly ordered exercise protocols spaced 4 weeks apart. Each protocol comprised a 48-h stay in a whole-room calorimeter, with the first day serving as the control day. On the second day, participants engaged in either 1) postmeal walking for 15 min or 45 min of sustained walking performed at 2) 10:30 a.m. or 3) 4:30 p.m. All walking was on a treadmill at an absolute intensity of 3 METs. Interstitial glucose concentrations were determined over 48 h with a continuous glucose monitor. Substrate utilization was measured continuously by respiratory exchange (VCO2/VO2). RESULTS Both sustained morning walking (127 ± 23 vs. 118 ± 14 mg dL−1) and postmeal walking (129 ± 24 vs. 116 ± 13 mg dL−1) significantly improved 24-h glycemic control relative to the control day (P < 0.05). Moreover, postmeal walking was significantly (P < 0.01) more effective than 45 min of sustained morning or afternoon walking in lowering 3-h postdinner glucose between the control and experimental day. CONCLUSIONS Short, intermittent bouts of postmeal walking appear to be an effective way to control postprandial hyperglycemia in older people. PMID:23761134

  12. High glycemic load diet, milk and ice cream consumption are related to acne vulgaris in Malaysian young adults: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The role of dietary factors in the pathophysiology of acne vulgaris is highly controversial. Hence, the aim of this study was to determine the association between dietary factors and acne vulgaris among Malaysian young adults. Methods A casecontrol study was conducted among 44 acne vulgaris patients and 44 controls aged 18 to 30?years from October 2010 to January 2011. Comprehensive acne severity scale (CASS) was used to determine acne severity. A questionnaire comprising items enquiring into the respondents family history and dietary patterns was distributed. Subjects were asked to record their food intake on two weekdays and one day on a weekend in a three day food diary. Anthropometric measurements including body weight, height and body fat percentage were taken. Acne severity was assessed by a dermatologist. Results Cases had a significantly higher dietary glycemic load (175??35) compared to controls (122??28) (p?controls. Females in the case group had a higher daily energy intake compared to their counterparts in the control group, 1812??331 and 1590??148?kcal respectively (p?control groups (p?>?0.05). Conclusions Glycemic load diet and frequencies of milk and ice cream intake were positively associated with acne vulgaris. PMID:22898209

  13. Metformin as an adjunct to insulin for glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes after CABG surgery: a randomized double blind clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Baradari, Afshin Gholipour; Emami Zeydi, Amir; Aarabi, Mohsen; Ghafari, Rahman

    2011-12-01

    Perioperative hyperglycemia is common in patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Graft (CABG) surgery and there is a direct relation between postoperative hyperglycemia and mortality rate in these patients. The aim of the present study is to determine the efficacy of metformin on glycemic control in diabetic patients after CABG surgery. In a randomized double blind clinical trial, 100 patients with type 2 diabetes admitted in open heart ICU after CABG surgery in Mazandaran Heart Center were enrolled. They were randomly assigned to two intervention and control groups. Three hours after extubation, therapeutic antiglycemic regimens were applied in these two groups and continued for three days. Intervention group received regular insulin infusion along with two metformin 500 mg tablets per twelve hours while control group received regular insulin infusion with two placebo tablets per twelve hours. Blood glucose level and other parameters were measured and recorded in determined intervals. To analyze the data, independent T-test, paired T-test, Mann-Whitney and repeated measure ANOVA tests were employed. Mean blood glucose level was not significantly different in the two groups at the beginning of the ICU admission; however, mean glucose level in insulin-metformin group, twelve hours after the initiation of the study, was significantly lower than insulin group (p < 0.05). In addition, mean doses of potassium and insulin demand as well as mean number of episodes of hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia and glucose levels out of the accepted range were significantly lower in insulin-metformin group (p < 0.05). Alterations in mean levels of lactate, BE, pH and creatinine were not statistically significant in these two groups. It seems that adding metformin to insulin leads to a better glycemic control in type two diabetic patients undergoing CABG surgery without causing metabolic acidosis. Therefore, it might be a potential option in blood glucose control protocol in this group of patients. PMID:22590838

  14. Assessment of Lung Function by Spirometry and Diffusion Study and Effect of Glycemic Control on Pulmonary Function in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients of the Eastern India

    PubMed Central

    Uz-Zaman, Salim; Singhamahapatra, Anilbaran; Dey, Pranab Kumar; Roy, Anindya; Roy, Kaushik; Roy (Basu), Kakali

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: There are so many complications involving eyes, kidneys, lungs and nerves associated with diabetes. But, pulmonary complications are poorly characterized among eastern Indian diabetic populations. Aims and Objectives: To assess pulmonary function in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. To find out correlation of the pulmonary functions test variables with Glycemic control. Materials and Methods: Total of 60 type 2 diabetes patient of age between 35-55 y and same number of age and sex matched apparently healthy control individual were included in the present study. All subjects were evaluated for PFT by flow sensitive spirometer (RMS HELIOS-401), the spirometric parameters were measured as a percentage of predicted and DLCO (by single breath technique). HBA1c of all cases were measured and they were grouped according to HBA1c level (Group-a =>7%, Group-b =6%-7%, Group-c =<6%). Results: Significant differences in the spirometric parameters (FVC, FEV1/FVC) and diffusion capacity (DLCO% and DL/VA%) existed between cases and controls. There was a significant decrease in FVC, DLCO and DL/VA and significant increase in FEV1/FVC in that groups having HBA1c level >7% than the other groups. FEV1, FVC, DLCO, and DL/VA were negatively correlated with HbA1c where as FEV1/FVC has positive association with HbA1c. Conclusion: Significant deterioration of lung function and diffusing capacity was observed in type 2 diabetes patients with poor glycemic control. PMID:25584206

  15. THE EFFECT OF PERIODONTAL THERAPY ON GLYCEMIC CONTROL IN A HISPANIC POPULATION WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Isabel C.; Tran, Duong T.; Cavender, Adriana C.; Weltman, Robin; Chang, Jennifer; Luckenbach, Estelle; Tribble, Gena D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective In the Mexican-American population, the prevalence of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is as high as 50% of the population. This randomized controlled clinical trial was designed to elucidate how treatment of periodontal disease affects HbA1c values in this population. Materials and Methods 154 T2DM patients with periodontal disease were enrolled in the study. The test group was treated with scaling and root planing (SRP); the control group received oral hygiene instructions. At baseline and 4–6 weeks after therapy, a complete periodontal examination was performed. Blood was collected at baseline and 4 months later for HbA1c levels. Results 126 individuals completed the study. Baseline mean ± SD HbA1c for the test and control groups were 9.0 ± 2.3% and 8.4 ± 2.0%, respectively. Non-significant difference in HbA1c reductions (0.6±2.1% and 0.3±1.7%) was found between test and control groups at 4 months. Comparisons of the periodontal clinical parameters between the test and control groups found significant differences with improved results in the test subjects. Conclusions No statistically significant differences were found in the changes of HbA1c levels between test and control groups. Non-surgical periodontal therapy improved the magnitude of change in periodontal parameters as compared to the control subjects. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01128374 PMID:24797222

  16. The glycemic index.

    PubMed

    Wolever, T M

    1990-01-01

    Different starchy foods produce different glycemic responses when fed individually, and there is evidence that this also applies in the context of the mixed meal. Methods of processing, and other factors unrelated to the nutrient composition of foods may also have major effects on the glycemic response. The reason for differences in glycemic response appears to relate to the rate at which the foods are digested and the many factors influencing this. The glycemic index (GI) is a system of classification in which the glycemic responses of foods are indexed against a standard (white bread). This allows the results of different investigators to be pooled. GI values also depend upon a number of nonfood-related variables. The method of calculation of the glycemic response area is most important, but the method of blood sampling and length of time of studies also may have effects. Variability of glycemic responses arises from day-to-day variation in the same subject and variation between different subjects. There is less variability between the GI values of different subjects than there is within the same subject from day to day. Therefore, the mean GI values of foods are independent of the glucose tolerance status of the subjects being tested. Potentially clinically useful starchy foods producing relatively flat glycemic responses have been identified, including legumes, pasta, barley, bulgur, parboiled rice and whole grain breads such as pumpernickel. Specific incorporation of these foods into diets have been associated with reduced blood glucose, insulin, and lipid levels. Low-GI foods may influence amino acid metabolism although the implications of these are unknown. In addition, low GI foods increase colonic fermentation. The physiologic and metabolic implications of this relate to increased bacterial urea utilization, and to the production and absorption of short chain fatty acids in the colon. The application of the GI to therapeutic diets should be in the context of the overall nutrient composition of the diet. High-fat or high-sugar foods may have a low GI, but it may not be prudent to recommend these foods solely on the basis of the GI. It is therefore suggested that the most appropriate use of the GI is to rank the glycemic effects of starchy foods which would already have been chosen for possible inclusion in the diet on the basis of their nutritional attributes, i.e. low-fat, unrefined carbohydrate. PMID:2180214

  17. Sodium glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors for glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus: Quality of reporting of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Niti; Mittal, Rakesh; Kumar, Harish; Medhi, Bikash

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sodium glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors represent a novel class of antidiabetic drugs. The reporting quality of the trials evaluating the efficacy of these agents for glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus has not been explored. Our aim was to assess the reporting quality of such randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and to identify the predictors of reporting quality. Materials and Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted for RCTs published till 12 June 2014. Two independent investigators carried out the searches and assessed the reporting quality on three parameters: Overall quality score (OQS) using Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) 2010 statement, Jadad score and intention to treat analysis. Inter-rater agreements were compared using Cohen's weighted kappa statistic. Multivariable linear regression analysis was used to identify the predictors. Results: Thirty-seven relevant RCTs were included in the present analysis. The median OQS was 17 with a range from 8 to 21. On Jadad scale, the median score was three with a range from 0 to 5. Complete details about allocation concealment and blinding were present in 21 and 10 studies respectively. Most studies lacked an elaborate discussion on trial limitations and generalizability. Among the factors identified as significantly associated with reporting quality were the publishing journal and region of conduct of RCT. Conclusions: The key methodological items remain poorly reported in most studies. Strategies like stricter adherence to CONSORT guidelines by journals, access to full trial protocols to gain valuable information and full collaboration among investigators and methodologists might prove helpful in improving the quality of published RCT reports. PMID:26955572

  18. Effect of scaling and root planing on serum interleukin-10 levels and glycemic control in chronic periodontitis and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Anirudh Balakrishna; Thakur, Srinath; Muddapur, Mahadevayya Veerayya

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Chronic periodontal disease (CPD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) share common pathogenic pathways involving the cytokine network resulting in increased susceptibility to both diseases, leading to increased inflammatory destruction, insulin resistance, and poor glycemic control. Periodontal treatment may improve glycemic control. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of scaling and root planing (SRP) of T2DM patients with CPD on hyperglycemia and the levels of serum interleukin-10 (IL-10). Materials and Methods: Forty-five subjects were divided into three groups comprising 15 subjects each as Group 1 (healthy controls), Group 2 (CPD patients), and Group 3 (T2DM patients with CPD). Plaque index, gingival index (GI), probing pocket depths (PPD), clinical attachment loss (AL), bleeding on probing (BoP), random blood sugar, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C), and serum IL-10 were measured at baseline; SRP was performed on Groups 2 and 3 and the selected parameters recorded again at 6 months. Results: Statistically significant (P < 0.05) differences were observed in the variables at baseline and 6 months after SRP between the three groups using one-way ANOVA. The paired samples t-test for PPD and AL in Group 3 was statistically significant. Group 3 revealed positive correlations between PPD and HbA1C, BoP and IL-10, respectively, at 6 months and a predictable association of HbA1C with PPD and GI, and IL-10 levels with BoP, respectively, at 6 months. Conclusion: Scaling and root planing is effective in reducing blood glucose levels in T2DM patient with pocket depths and effective in elevating systemic IL-10 levels in CPD patients and CPD patients with T2DM. PMID:26015670

  19. Serum 1,5-Anhydroglucitol Concentrations Are a Reliable Index of Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes With Mild or Moderate Renal Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won Jun; Park, Cheol-Young; Lee, Kyu-Beck; Park, Se Eun; Rhee, Eun Jung; Lee, Won Young; Oh, Ki Won; Park, Sung Woo

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the relationship between 1,5-anhydroglucitol (AG) levels, which are a marker of glycemic control, and stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This was a cross-sectional study with 269 subjects with type 2 diabetes who were divided into four groups based on estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) using Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (eGFRMDRD) formula: 57 in control, 111 in CKD stages 12, 78 in stage 3, and 23 in stages 45. RESULTS The study groups differed significantly with respect to 1,5-AG and fasting plasma glucose (FPG), age, duration of diabetes, blood pressure, HDL, and percentage of antihypertension or antidyslipidemia medication use. Stepwise multivariate regression analyses showed that 1,5-AG levels in the control group, the CKD stages 12 group, and the CKD stage 3 group could be explained by HbA1c, age, duration of diabetes, FPG, and antihypertension medication. However, eGFRMDRD was the only independent determinant of 1,5-AG levels in CKD stages 45. Logarithmic transformed 1,5-AG values (ln[1,5-AG]) had significant inverse correlations with HbA1c and FPG levels for CKD stages 12 and CKD stage 3 (all P < 0.001). However, associations between ln(1,5-AG) and HbA1c or FPG were insignificant for CKD stages 45 (P = 0.274 and P = 0.080, respectively). CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrated that 1,5-AG levels do not appear to be influenced by mild or moderate renal dysfunction, suggesting it is a reliable glycemic marker in type 2 diabetes with CKD stages 13. PMID:22210564

  20. The Impact of a Decision Support Tool Linked to an Electronic Medical Record on Glycemic Control in People with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gunathilake, Waruna; Gunawardena, Sajith; Fernando, Ranga; Thomson, George; Fernando, Devaka

    2013-01-01

    Aims We retrospectively compared glycemic control and glycemic burden in type 2 diabetes patients treated by general physicians with access to decision support with those treated by general physicians without access to decision support. Methods A total of 875 patients [471 (53.8%) males] aged 54.3 [standard deviation (SD) 13.1] years followed up over 84 months. A total of 342 patients (39%) were managed with decision support, and effects on glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) were assessed. Results There was no difference between groups in starting HbA1c [7.6 (SD 1.8) versus 7.5 (SD 1.5); p = not significant] at baseline. Patients treated with decision support were more likely to have planned review of HbA1c, adjustment of medication, prescription of statins, dietetic and nurse educator inputs (71.3% versus 58.5%; Chi squared = 14.7; p =.001). The mean HbA1c in the group treated with decision support was not significantly reduced within the first year [7.5% (SD 1.8) versus 7.6% (SD 1.5); p = not significant; 95% confidence interval (CI) ?0.33 to 0.17], but statistically significant differences were apparent at year 2 [7.2% (SD 2.0) versus 8% (SD 3.4); p = .0001; 95% CI ?1.3 to ?0.5] and sustained through year 3 [7.2% (SD 2.0) versus 8.0% (SD 2.0); p = .0001; 95% CI ?1.2 to ?0.6], year 4 [7.2% (SD 2.3) versus 8.2% (SD 2.5); p = .0001; 95% CI ?1.2 to ?0.6], year 5 [7.0% (SD 2.3) versus 8.3% (SD 2.6); p = .001; 95% CI ?1.5 to ?0.8], year 6 [7.0% (SD 2.0) versus 8.2% (SD 2.4); p = .001; 95% CI ?1.5 to ?0.9], and year 7 [6.9% (SD 1.2) versus 8% (SD 1.8); p = .001; 95% CI ?1.4 to ?1.0]. Conclusion Use of a decision support system showed benefits in adherence to clinical care pathways and achieving significant improvements in glycemic control. PMID:23759398

  1. Pramlintide, the synthetic analogue of amylin: physiology, pathophysiology, and effects on glycemic control, body weight, and selected biomarkers of vascular risk

    PubMed Central

    Hoogwerf, Byron J; Doshi, Krupa B; Diab, Dima

    2008-01-01

    Pramlintide is a synthetic version of the naturally occurring pancreatic peptide called amylin. Amylin and pramlintide have similar effects on lowering postprandial glucose, lowering postprandial glucagon and delaying gastric emptying. Pramlintide use in type 1 and insulin requiring type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with modest reductions in HbA1c often accompanied by weight loss. Limited data show a neutral effect on blood pressure. Small studies suggest small reductions in LDL-cholesterol in type 2 DM and modest reductions in triglycerides in type 1 DM. Markers of oxidation are also reduced in conjunction with reductions in postprandial glucose. Nausea is the most common side effect. These data indicate that pramlintide has a role in glycemic control of both type 1 and type 2 DM. Pramlintide use is associated with favorable effects on weight, lipids and other biomarkers for atherosclerotic disease. PMID:18561511

  2. Pramlintide, the synthetic analogue of amylin: physiology, pathophysiology, and effects on glycemic control, body weight, and selected biomarkers of vascular risk.

    PubMed

    Hoogwerf, Byron J; Doshi, Krupa B; Diab, Dima

    2008-01-01

    Pramlintide is a synthetic version of the naturally occurring pancreatic peptide called amylin. Amylin and pramlintide have similar effects on lowering postprandial glucose, lowering postprandial glucagon and delaying gastric emptying. Pramlintide use in type 1 and insulin requiring type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with modest reductions in HbAlc often accompanied by weight loss. Limited data show a neutral effect on blood pressure. Small studies suggest small reductions in LDL-cholesterol in type 2 DM and modest reductions in triglycerides in type 1 DM. Markers of oxidation are also reduced in conjunction with reductions in postprandial glucose. Nausea is the most common side effect. These data indicate that pramlintide has a role in glycemic control of both type 1 and type 2 DM. Pramlintide use is associated with favorable effects on weight, lipids and other biomarkers for atherosclerotic disease. PMID:18561511

  3. Assessment of Blood Glucose Control in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit: Extension of the Glycemic Penalty Index toward Children and Infants

    PubMed Central

    Van Herpe, Tom; Gielen, Marijke; Vanhonsebrouck, Koen; Wouters, Pieter J; Van den Berghe, Greet; De Moor, Bart; Mesotten, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    Background: The glycemic penalty index (GPI) is a measure to assess blood glucose (BG) control in critically ill adult patients but needs to be adapted for children and infants. Method: The squared differences between a clinical expertise penalty function and the corresponding polynomial function are minimized for optimization purposes. The average of all penalties (individually assigned to all BG readings) represents the patient-specific GPI. Results: Penalization in the hypoglycemic range is more severe than in the hyperglycemic range as the developing brains of infants and children may be more vulnerable to hypoglycemia. Similarly, hypoglycemia is also more heavily penalized in infants than in children. Conclusions: Extending the adult GPI toward the age-specific GPI is an important methodological step. Long-term clinical studies are needed to determine the clinically acceptable GPI cut-off level. PMID:21527105

  4. The hypoglycemic effect of pumpkin seeds, Trigonelline (TRG), Nicotinic acid (NA), and D-Chiro-inositol (DCI) in controlling glycemic levels in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Adams, Gary G; Imran, Shahwar; Wang, Sheng; Mohammad, Abubaker; Kok, M Samil; Gray, David A; Channell, Guy A; Harding, Stephen E

    2014-01-01

    In the contemporary society, diabetes mellitus is considered as a common, growing, serious, costly, and potentially preventable public health problem. It is forecasted that in 2030, the number of people with diabetes will go up from 117 million in 2000 to 366 million in 2030. The prevalence of diabetes will place a huge burden on health and financial structures of countries, and these will impact on individuals, as well as families and nations. Polysaccharides, para-aminobenzoic acid, fixed oils, sterol, proteins, and peptides are biologically active ingredients, which are found in pumpkins. The chemicals within pumpkins such as the fruit pulp, oil from ungerminated seeds, and protein from germinated seeds have hypoglycemic properties. Preliminary investigation showed that pumpkin seeds, and the macromolecules, therein, such as Trigonelline (TRG), Nicotinic acid (NA), and D-chiro-inositol (DCI), possess hypoglycemic properties and could assist in maintaining glycemic control. PMID:24564589

  5. Time-dependent changes in insulin requirement for maternal glycemic control during antenatal corticosteroid therapy in women with gestational diabetes: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Arata; Saisho, Yoshifumi; Miyakoshi, Kei; Fukutake, Marie; Kasuga, Yoshifumi; Ochiai, Daigo; Matsumoto, Tadashi; Tanaka, Mamoru; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2016-01-31

    Though recommended for pregnant women at risk of preterm birth to improve perinatal outcomes, antenatal corticosteroid (ACS) treatment can cause maternal hyperglycemia, especially in cases of glucose intolerance. A standardized protocol for preventing hyperglycemia during ACS treatment remains to be established. We herein retrospectively investigated the time-dependent changes in insulin dose required for maternal glycemic control during ACS treatment in gestational diabetes (GDM). Twelve singleton pregnant women with GDM who received 12 mg of betamethasone intramuscularly twice 24 hours apart were included in this analysis. Of those, eight also received ritodrine hydrochloride for preterm labor. The blood glucose levels were maintained at 70-120 mg/dL with continuous intravenous infusion of insulin and nothing by mouth for 48 hours after the first betamethasone administration. After the first dose of betamethasone, the insulin dosage needed for glycemic control gradually increased and reached a maximum (6.6 5.8 units/hr) at 10 hours, then, decreased to 4.1 1.5 units/hr at 24 hours. Similar changes in the insulin requirement were found after the second betamethasone dose (the maximum insulin dosage: 5.5 1.6 units/hr at 9 hours following the second administration). Women treated with ritodrine hydrochloride needed more insulin, than those without ritodrine hydrochloride treatment (130.8 15.0 vs. 76.8 15.2 units/day, respectively, p < 0.05). Our data indicated that the requirement for insulin is highest 9-10 hours after each dose of betamethasone. When GDM is treated with ACS, levels of blood glucose should be carefully monitored, especially in patients treated with ritodrine hydrochloride. PMID:26510662

  6. Impact of an education program on patient anxiety, depression, glycemic control, and adherence to self-care and medication in Type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Al Hayek, Ayman A.; Robert, Asirvatham A.; Al Dawish, Mohamed A.; Zamzami, Marwan M.; Sam, Asirvatham E.; Alzaid, Aus A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM) requires continuous medical care, patients self-management, education, and adherence to prescribed medication to reduce the risk of long-term complications. The aim of this study was to assess the benefits of an education program on diabetes, patient self-management, adherence to medication, anxiety, depression and glycemic control in type 2 diabetics in Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective study, conducted among 104 diabetic patients at a major tertiary hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, between May 2011 and October 2012. Education materials given to diabetic patients included pamphlets/handouts written in Arabic, the national language. Special videotapes about DM were made and distributed to all participants. In addition, specific educational programs through the diabetes educators and one-on-one counseling sessions with the doctor were also arranged. Patients were interviewed using a structured interview schedule both during the baseline, and after 6 months of the program. The interview schedule included, socio-demographics, clinical characteristics, diabetes self-management, adherence to medication, anxiety, and depression. Glycemic control was considered poor, if hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) was ? 7%. Results: The mean age of the study population was 57.3 14.4 years. Seventy one were males (68.3%) and 33 (31.7%) were females. After six months of the diabetes education program, there were significant improvements in patients dietary plan (P = 0.0001), physical exercise (P = 0.0001), self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) (P = 0.0001), HbA1c (P = 0.04), adherence to medication (P = 0.007), and depression (P = 0.03). Conclusions: Implementation of education programs on diabetes among type 2 diabetic patients is associated with better outcomes such as their dietary plan, physical exercise, SMBG, adherence to medication, HbA1c and depression. PMID:23983558

  7. A proprietary alpha-amylase inhibitor from white bean (Phaseolus vulgaris): a review of clinical studies on weight loss and glycemic control.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Marilyn L; Udani, Jay K

    2011-01-01

    Obesity, and resultant health hazards which include diabetes, cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome, are worldwide medical problems. Control of diet and exercise are cornerstones of the management of excess weight. Foods with a low glycemic index may reduce the risk of diabetes and heart disease as well as their complications. As an alternative to a low glycemic index diet, there is a growing body of research into products that slow the absorption of carbohydrates through the inhibition of enzymes responsible for their digestion. These products include alpha-amylase and glucosidase inhibitors. The common white bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) produces an alpha-amylase inhibitor, which has been characterized and tested in numerous clinical studies. A specific and proprietary product named Phase 2® Carb Controller (Pharmachem Laboratories, Kearny, NJ) has demonstrated the ability to cause weight loss with doses of 500 to 3000 mg per day, in either a single dose or in divided doses. Clinical studies also show that Phase 2 has the ability to reduce the post-prandial spike in blood glucose levels. Experiments conducted incorporating Phase 2 into food and beverage products have found that it can be integrated into various products without losing activity or altering the appearance, texture or taste of the food. There have been no serious side effects reported following consumption of Phase 2. Gastro-intestinal side effects are rare and diminish upon extended use of the product. In summary, Phase 2 has the potential to induce weight loss and reduce spikes in blood sugar caused by carbohydrates through its alpha-amylase inhibiting activity. PMID:21414227

  8. A Comparison of Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion vs. Multiple Daily Insulin Injection in Children with Type I Diabetes in Kuwait: Glycemic Control, Insulin Requirement, and BMI

    PubMed Central

    Mousa, Mohammad; Al-Mahdi, Maria; Al-Sanaa, Hala; Al-Kandari, Hessa

    2015-01-01

    Objective Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) and multiple daily insulin injections (MDI) are two methods currently used to manage type I diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Here we compare our experiences with CSII and MDI in a large cohort of pediatric patients in Kuwait. Methods Data on 326 patients with T1DM who were started on CSII between 2007 and 2012 were retrospectively compared with those of 326 patients on MDI. They were matched for sex, age at diagnosis, T1DM duration, glycemic control, insulin requirement, and body mass index (BMI). Data were collected at baseline and every three months and included glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), insulin dose, and adverse events (severe hypoglycemia, diabetic ketoacidosis, and skin problems). Results The main reason for switching to CSII was to achieve better glycemic control (37%), followed by reducing hypoglycemia, and improving the quality of life (13.3% each). Although HbA1c decrease was most significant in the first year, it continued to be significantly lower in the CSII group compared to the MDI throughout the study period. Total daily insulin requirements were significantly lower in the CSII group. BMI increased in both groups, but the difference was significant only at the end of the fifth year. There was no significant change in the rate of diabetic ketoacidosis in either group. The CSII patients had more severe hypoglycemic episodes at baseline; however, it significantly decreased throughout the study period. Only five patients discontinued CSII therapy and two of these restarted within three months. Conclusion CSII is a safe intensive insulin therapy in youngsters with T1DM and achieved markedly fewer severe hypoglycemic episodes and lower daily insulin requirements PMID:26421114

  9. A proprietary alpha-amylase inhibitor from white bean (Phaseolus vulgaris): A review of clinical studies on weight loss and glycemic control

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Obesity, and resultant health hazards which include diabetes, cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome, are worldwide medical problems. Control of diet and exercise are cornerstones of the management of excess weight. Foods with a low glycemic index may reduce the risk of diabetes and heart disease as well as their complications. As an alternative to a low glycemic index diet, there is a growing body of research into products that slow the absorption of carbohydrates through the inhibition of enzymes responsible for their digestion. These products include alpha-amylase and glucosidase inhibitors. The common white bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) produces an alpha-amylase inhibitor, which has been characterized and tested in numerous clinical studies. A specific and proprietary product named Phase 2® Carb Controller (Pharmachem Laboratories, Kearny, NJ) has demonstrated the ability to cause weight loss with doses of 500 to 3000 mg per day, in either a single dose or in divided doses. Clinical studies also show that Phase 2 has the ability to reduce the post-prandial spike in blood glucose levels. Experiments conducted incorporating Phase 2 into food and beverage products have found that it can be integrated into various products without losing activity or altering the appearance, texture or taste of the food. There have been no serious side effects reported following consumption of Phase 2. Gastro-intestinal side effects are rare and diminish upon extended use of the product. In summary, Phase 2 has the potential to induce weight loss and reduce spikes in blood sugar caused by carbohydrates through its alpha-amylase inhibiting activity. PMID:21414227

  10. Food-Insecure Dietary Patterns Are Associated With Poor Longitudinal Glycemic Control in Diabetes: Results From the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiang; Tucker, Katherine L.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether dietary patterns associated with food insecurity are associated with poor longitudinal glycemic control. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In a prospective, population-based, longitudinal cohort study, we ascertained food security (Food Security Survey Module), dietary pattern (Healthy Eating Index2005 [HEI 2005]), and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) in Puerto Rican adults aged 4575 years with diabetes at baseline (20042009) and HbA1c at ?2 years follow-up (20062012). We determined associations between food insecurity and dietary pattern and assessed whether those dietary patterns were associated with poorer HbA1c concentration over time, using multivariable-adjusted repeated subjects mixed-effects models. RESULTS There were 584 participants with diabetes at baseline and 516 at follow-up. Food-insecure participants reported lower overall dietary quality and lower intake of fruit and vegetables. A food insecurity*HEI 2005 interaction (P < 0.001) suggested that better diet quality was more strongly associated with lower HbA1c in food-insecure than food-secure participants. In adjusted models, lower follow-up HbA1c was associated with greater HEI 2005 score (? = ?0.01 HbA1c % per HEI 2005 point, per year, P = 0.003) and with subscores of total vegetables (? = ?0.09, P = 0.04) and dark green and orange vegetables and legumes (? = ?0.06, P = 0.048). Compared with the minimum total vegetable score, a participant with the maximum score showed relative improvements of HbA1c of 0.5% per year. CONCLUSIONS Food insecurity was associated with lower overall dietary quality and lower consumption of plant-based foods, which was associated with poor longitudinal glycemic control. PMID:24969578

  11. Impact of dietary fiber intake on glycemic control, cardiovascular risk factors and chronic kidney disease in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: the Fukuoka Diabetes Registry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dietary fiber is beneficial for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, although it is consumed differently in ethnic foods around the world. We investigated the association between dietary fiber intake and obesity, glycemic control, cardiovascular risk factors and chronic kidney disease in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients. Methods A total of 4,399 patients were assessed for dietary fiber intake using a brief self-administered diet history questionnaire. The associations between dietary fiber intake and various cardiovascular risk factors were investigated cross-sectionally. Results Body mass index, fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, triglyceride and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein negatively associated with dietary fiber intake after adjusting for age, sex, duration of diabetes, current smoking, current drinking, total energy intake, fat intake, saturated fatty acid intake, leisure-time physical activity and use of oral hypoglycemic agents or insulin. The homeostasis model assessment insulin sensitivity and HDL cholesterol positively associated with dietary fiber intake. Dietary fiber intake was associated with reduced prevalence of abdominal obesity, hypertension and metabolic syndrome after multivariate adjustments including obesity. Furthermore, dietary fiber intake was associated with lower prevalence of albuminuria, low estimated glomerular filtration rate and chronic kidney disease after multivariate adjustments including protein intake. Additional adjustments for obesity, hypertension or metabolic syndrome did not change these associations. Conclusion We demonstrated that increased dietary fiber intake was associated with better glycemic control and more favorable cardiovascular disease risk factors including chronic kidney disease in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients. Diabetic patients should be encouraged to consume more dietary fiber in daily life. PMID:24330576

  12. Multiple Indicators of Poor Diet Quality in Children and Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Are Associated with Higher Body Mass Index Percentile but not Glycemic Control

    PubMed Central

    Nansel, Tonja R.; Haynie, Denise L.; Lipsky, Leah M.; Laffel, Lori M. B.; Mehta, Sanjeev N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Diet is a cornerstone of type 1 diabetes treatment, and poor diet quality may affect glycemic control and other health outcomes. Yet diet quality in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes remains understudied. Objective To evaluate multiple indicators of diet quality in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes and their associations with hemoglobin A1c and body mass index percentile. Design In this cross-sectional study, participants completed 3-day diet records, and data were abstracted from participants’ medical records. Diet quality indicators included servings of fruit, vegetables, and whole grains; Healthy Eating Index-2005 (HEI-2005) score; Nutrient Rich Foods 9.3 score (NRF 9.3); and glycemic index. Participants/setting Children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes ≥1 year, aged 8 to 18 years, were recruited at routine clinic visits. Of 291 families enrolled, 252 provided diet data. Statistical analyses Associations of diet quality indicators to HbA1c and body mass index percentile were examined using analysis of covariance and multiple linear regression. Results Participants demonstrated low adherence to dietary guidelines; mean HEI-2005 score was 53.4±11.0 (range = 26.7 to 81.2). Intake of fruit, vegetables, and whole grains was less than half the recommended amount. Almost half of the participants’ daily energy intake was derived from refined-grain products, desserts, chips, and sweetened beverages. Higher fruit (P=0.04) and whole-grain (P=0.03) intake were associated with lower HbA1c in unadjusted, but not adjusted analyses; vegetable intake, HEI-2005 score, NRF 9.3 score, and glycemic index were not associated with HbA1c. Higher fruit (P=0.01) and whole-grain (P=0.04) intake and NRF 9.3 score (P=0.02), but not other diet quality indicators, were associated with lower body mass index percentile in adjusted analyses. Conclusions Data demonstrate poor diet quality in youth with type 1 diabetes and provide support for the importance of diet quality for weight management. Future research on determinants of dietary intake and methods to promote improved diet quality would be useful to inform clinical care. PMID:23102173

  13. Comparison of Ranolazine and Trimetazidine on Glycemic Status in Diabetic Patients with Coronary Artery Disease A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Dkhar, Steven Aibor; Pillai, Ajith Ananthakrishna; George, Melvin; Jayaraman, Balachander; Chandrasekaran, Adithan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Cardiovascular diseases have become the leading cause of death around the globe and diabetes mellitus (DM) is considered to be a coronary artery disease (CAD) risk equivalent. Ranolazine, an anti anginal drug has been found to reduce Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) in diabetes patients with chronic angina. However the effect of another antianginal drug trimetazidine, on glycemic status is not clear. Aim: To compare the effect of ranolazine and trimetazidine on glycemic status in diabetic patients with CAD. Settings and Design: Patients diagnosed with CAD and diabetes mellitus attending Cardiology Out Patient Department (OPD), Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education & Research (JIPMER), Puducherry, India were recruited for this randomized open label parallel arm trial. Materials and Methods: The study conducted from January-2012 to April-2013 had 47 eligible patients diagnosed with CAD and diabetes mellitus. They were randomized to receive either ranolazine 500 mg BD or trimetazidine 35 mg BD for 12 weeks. HbA1c levels, fasting blood glucose (FBG), lipid profile, QT and QTc intervals were measured at baseline and after 12 weeks. Statistical Analysis: Unpaired t-test was used to compare the baseline characteristics of between the groups while comparison within the groups were done using Paired t-test. Wilcoxon and Mann Whitney U-tests were used for non parametric data. Graph pad instat version-3 was used for statistical analysis. Values were expressed as mean SD. A p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The study could not find any change in HbA1c levels in both ranolazine and trimetazidine groups. The adverse effects reported from patients on ranolazine include angina, constipation, postural hypotension, headache, dizziness, nausea and weakness while patients on trimetazidine complained of constipation, weakness, palpitations, angina, dizziness, nausea, dyspepsia, headache, gastric discomfort, joint pain, etc. Conclusion: In patients with chronic angina and diabetes mellitus Ranolazine 500mg BD and Trimetazidine 35mg BD did not show any effect on HbA1c and fasting blood glucose lebel. PMID:25738014

  14. Assessment of serum levels of soluble CD40L in Egyptian children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus: Relationship to microalbuminuria and glycemic control

    PubMed Central

    Metwalley, Kotb Abbass; Farghaly, Hekma Saad; El-Saied, Abdel-Rahman Abdel-Hamed

    2013-01-01

    Context: Soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L) is known to be elevated in different clinical situations including hypercholesterolemia, acute coronary syndromes, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), Data about the relationship between type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and sCD40L is limited. In addition, the potential role ofsCD40Lin the pathogenesis of vascular complications in children and adolescents with T1DM is to be clarified. Hence, the study aimed at assessment of sCD40L levels in children and adolescents with T1DM and correlation of these levels with glycemic control and microalbuminuria. Settings and Design: Cross-sectional controlled study. Materials and Methods: The study was performed in the Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes Unit, Assuit University Children Hospital, Assiut, Egypt. It included 70 children and adolescents with T1DM (mean age 14. 76 ± 2.21 years). Cases were further subdivided into 43 cases with normoalbuminuria and 27 cases with microalbuminuria according to presence or absence or microalbuminuria in fresh urine samples. Twentyfive healthy subjects, age- and sex-matched were included as control group (mean age = 13.62 ± 2.11 years). Studied cases were subjected to medical history, clinical examination, and laboratory assessment of fasting blood glucose (FBG), lipid profile, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and sCD40L were performed. Results: Mean HbA1c and sCD40L were significantly higher in diabetic children (n = 70) compared to control (n = 25) (P < 0.001 for each). Mean HbA1c and sCD40L levels were significantly higher in microalbuminuric cases (n = 27) compared to normoalbuminuric cases (n = 43) (P < 0.05 and <0.01, respectively). We also observed a significant positive correlation between sCD40L levels and the age, diabetes duration, HbA1c, and urinary albumin creatinine ratio. Conclusions: The high serum sCD40L levels in children and adolescents with T1DM particularly in those with microalbminuria and its positive correlation with diabetes duration, urinary albumin excretion, and glycemic control may reflect the role of sCD40L in diabetic vasculopathy in the pediatric age group. Moreover, measurement of serum sCD40L levels in poorly controlled patients would help to identify those at high risk of developing nephropathy. PMID:24381879

  15. Effect of Tocotrienols enriched canola oil on glycemic control and oxidative status in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Vafa, Mohammadreza; Haghighat, Neda; Moslehi, Nazanin; Eghtesadi, Shahriar; Heydari, Iraj

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tocotrienols have been shown to improve glycemic control and redox balance in an animal study, but their effects on patients with diabetes are unknown. The study aimed to investigate whether tocotrienols improves glycemic control, insulin sensitivity, and oxidative stress in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Materials and Methods: This study was a double-blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized trial. A total of 50 patients, aged 35-60 years, with T2DM treated by noninsulin hypoglycemic drugs were randomly assigned to receive either 15 mL/day tocotrienols (200 mg) enriched canola oil (n = 25) or pure canola oil (n = 25) for 8 weeks. Fasting blood sugar (FBS), fasting insulin, total antioxidant capacity (TAC), malondialdehyde (MDA), and homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were determined before and after the intervention. The data were compared between and within groups, before and after the intervention. Results: Baseline characteristics of participants including age, sex, physical activity, disease duration, and type of drug consumption were not significantly different between the two groups. In tocotrienol enriched canola oil, FBS (mean percent change: 15.4% vs. 3.9%; P = 0.006) and MDA (median percent change: 35.6% vs. 16.3%; P = 0.003) were significantly reduced while TAC was significantly increased (median percent change: 21.4% vs. 2.3%; P = 0.001) compared to pure canola oil. At the end of the study, patients who treated with tocotrienols had lower FBS (P = 0.023) and MDA (P = 0.044) compared to the pure canola oil group. However, tocotrienols had no effect on insulin concentrations and HOMA-IR. Conclusion: Tocotrienols can improve FBS concentrations and modifies redox balance in T2DM patients with poor glycemic control and can be considered in combination with hypoglycemic drugs to better control of T2DM. PMID:26600828

  16. Glycemic index, glycemic load and childhood obesity: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Rouhani, Mohammad Hossein; Kelishadi, Roya; Hashemipour, Mahin; Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad; Azadbakht, Leila

    2014-01-01

    Background: Several evidences have been reported so far in terms of the relationship between obesity and glycemic index and glycemic load in children. However, the number of review studies that have dealt with recent findings is quite low. The purpose of present study is to review the existing evidences in this regard. Materials and Methods: First of all, the phrases: Glycaemic index, Glycaemic load, Glycemic index OR Glycemic load accompanied by one of the words: Adolescent, Young, Youth Children OR Child were searched in texts of articles existing in ISI and PUBMED databases which were obtained out of 1001 articles. Among these, some articles, which reviewed the relationship of obesity with glycemic index and glycemic load, were selected. Finally, 20 articles were studied in current review study. Results: The majority of cross-sectional studies have found children's obesity directly linked with glycemic index and glycemic load; however, cohort studies found controversial results. Also, the intervention studies indicate the negative effect of glycemic index and glycemic load on obesity in children. Conclusion: Published evidences reported inconsistent results. It seems that existing studies are not sufficient and more studies are needed in this regard. PMID:24627855

  17. The effectiveness of regular leisure-time physical activities on long-term glycemic control in people with type 2 diabetes: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Pai, Lee-Wen; Li, Tsai-Chung; Hwu, Yueh-Juen; Chang, Shu-Chuan; Chen, Li-Li; Chang, Pi-Ying

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to systematically review the effectiveness of different types of regular leisure-time physical activities and pooled the effect sizes of those activities on long-term glycemic control in people with type 2 diabetes compared with routine care. This review included randomized controlled trials from 1960 to May 2014. A total of 10 Chinese and English databases were searched, following selection and critical appraisal, 18 randomized controlled trials with 915 participants were included. The standardized mean difference was reported as the summary statistic for the overall effect size in a random effects model. The results indicated yoga was the most effective in lowering glycated haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels. Meta-analysis also revealed that the decrease in HbA1c levels of the subjects who took part in regular leisure-time physical activities was 0.60% more than that of control group participants. A higher frequency of regular leisure-time physical activities was found to be more effective in reducing HbA1c levels. The results of this review provide evidence of the benefits associated with regular leisure-time physical activities compared with routine care for lowering HbA1c levels in people with type 2 diabetes. PMID:26822261

  18. Evaluation of the Long-Term Durability and Glycemic Control of Fasting Plasma Glucose and Glycosylated Hemoglobin for Pioglitazone in Japanese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Stringer, Frances; DeJongh, Joost; Koumura, Emiko; Danhof, Meindert; Kaku, Kohei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: This study applied a pharmacodynamic model-based approach to evaluate the long-term durability and glycemic control of pioglitazone in comparison with other oral glucose-lowering drugs in Japanese type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. Subjects and Methods: Japanese T2DM patients were enrolled in a prospective, randomized, open-label, blinded-end point study and received pioglitazone with or without other oral glucose-lowering drugs (excluding another thiazolidinedione [TZD]) (n=293) or oral glucose-lowering drugs excluding TZD (n=294). Treatment was adjusted to achieve glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) <6.9%, and samples for fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and HbA1c were collected over 2.5–4 years. A simultaneous cascading indirect response model structure was applied to describe the time course of FPG and HbA1c. HbA1c levels were described using both an FPG-dependent and an FPG-independent function. To account for titration, drug effects for both treatment groups were implemented using a time-dependent Emax model. Results: Pioglitazone was superior in both time to maximum effect and the magnitude of reduction achieved in FPG and HbA1c. A greater reduction in median FPG (–21 mg/dL vs. −9 mg/dL) was observed with pioglitazone (P<0.05). Maximum drug effect for FPG was predicted to occur earlier (11 months) for pioglitazone than for the control group (14 months). The simulated additional reduction in FPG and HbA1c achieved with pioglitazone was predicted to be maintained beyond the currently observed study duration. Conclusions: Pioglitazone was found to result in improved glycemic control and durability compared with control treatment. This model-based approach enabled the quantification of differences in FPG and HbA1c for both treatment groups and simulation to evaluate longer-term durability on FPG and HbA1c. PMID:25531677

  19. Effect of Linagliptin on Glycemic Control in Chinese Patients with Newly-Diagnosed, Drug-Naïve Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wenjun; Li, Ying; Chen, Xiong; Lin, Dini; Xiang, Songying; Shen, Feixia; Gu, Xuemei

    2015-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of linagliptin (a novel dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitor) on glucose metabolism and β-cell function in Chinese patients with newly-diagnosed, drug-naïve type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Material/Methods Newly-diagnosed and drug-naïve T2DM patients were enrolled. After 4-week lifestyle modulation and 2-week placebo run-in, 57 patients were randomized to double-blind treatment with linagliptin (n=34) or placebo (n=23). The primary endpoint was the change from baseline in glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) after 24 weeks. Fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2-h postprandial plasma glucose (2h-PPG), fasting insulin, proinsulin-to-insulin ratio, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and homeostasis model assessment of β-cell function (HOMA-β) were also evaluated. Results Baseline characteristics were similar between the 2 groups. Compared with placebo, linagliptin therapy resulted in a significant decrease in HbA1C (−1.2±0.7% vs. −0.4±0.4%, P<0.001), FBG (−0.98±1.17 vs. −0.32±0.51 mmol/L, P=0.011, and 2h-PPG (−2.02±0.94 vs. −0.97±0.63 mmol/L, P<0.001). Significant differences were observed for the proinsulin/insulin ratio (P<0.001) and HOMA-β index (P=0.001). Rates of adverse events were similar between the 2 groups (30.3% vs. 27.3%). All adverse events were mild. One patient discontinued participation due to pregnancy. Conclusions Linagliptin treatment resulted in a significant and clinically meaningful improvement of glycemic control in drug-naïve Chinese patients with T2DM, as well as improved parameters of β-cell function. Linagliptin had an excellent safety profile. PMID:26350766

  20. Islet antigen specific IL-10+ immune responses but not CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ cells at diagnosis predict glycemic control in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sanda, Srinath; Roep, Bart O; von Herrath, Matthias

    2008-05-01

    The immune phenotype of the partial remission phase or "honeymoon phase" of type 1 diabetes is not well defined. We compared flow cytometry and cytokine production by ELISPOT assays in children with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes and children in the partial remission phase of type 1 diabetes. Newly diagnosed children had higher levels of FoxP3 expression in CD4 CD25 double positive cells (56.1%+/-24.9 vs. 24.9%+/-24.6 p=0.03) and higher mean numbers of IL-10 producing cells (7.3 cells/2x10(5) cells+/-6.6 vs. 0.86 cells/2x10(5)+/-0.36 p=0.0043) compared to partial remission patients. Higher FoxP3 expression at diagnosis predicted worse future glycemic control while higher mean numbers of IL-10 cells were associated with better future glucose control. These data provide an immune phenotype of the honeymoon phase and suggest that analyzing IL-10 and FoxP3 at diagnosis may identify patients that will experience better glucose control. PMID:18304876

  1. Glycemic response and health: summary of a workshop.

    PubMed

    Howlett, John; Ashwell, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    Interest in the glycemic impact of diet on health and well-being is growing among health care professionals and consumers. Diets with high glycemic impact have been postulated to increase risk of obesity, insulin resistance, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. A reduction in the glycemic impact of the diet has been proposed as a means of assisting body weight management, improving blood glucose control, and reducing diabetic, cardiovascular, and related risks. Foods are increasingly carrying labels that describe their glycemic properties. Yet, a scientific debate exists about whether a relation between the glycemic response to diet and health truly exists, and, if so, which descriptor of a food's glycemic properties best predicts its effect on health outcomes. This article reports the proceedings of a workshop at which a meta-analysis of the relation between the glycemic response to foods and health was presented and the merits of glycemic index (GI), glycemic load (GL), and glycemic glucose equivalent as predictors of health outcomes were discussed. The conclusions include the findings that many studies purporting to investigate lower GI interventions actually studied lower GL interventions; that unavailable carbohydrate (eg, dietary fiber), independent of GI, seems to have at least as big an effect on health outcome as GI itself; that lower GI and GL diets are beneficial for health in persons with impaired glucose metabolism, but that it is as yet unclear what they mean for healthy persons; and that the larger the divergence of glucose metabolism from the norm, the larger the effect of lower GI and GL interventions. PMID:18175760

  2. Initiation of human regular U-500 insulin use is associated with improved glycemic control: a real-world US cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Eby, Elizabeth L; Curtis, Bradley H; Gelwicks, Steven C; Hood, Robert C; Idris, Iskandar; Peters, Anne L; Bergenstal, Richard M; Jackson, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    Aim Describe the characteristics of patients initiating human regular U-500 insulin (U-500R) and their subsequent glycemic control in a real-world setting. Methods US Humedica electronic health record system data (July 2007September 2011) were used to identify patients with diabetes aged ?18?years with ?1 records for U-500R prescriptions, 6?months of preindex data, 12?months following first use of U-500R, and at least one glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) value in both preindex and postindex periods. Paired t tests were used to measure the change in HbA1c from preindex to postindex periods (last or most recent values) and hypoglycemia. Results Among patients initiating U-500R (N=445), 96.9% had type 2 diabetes with mean age 57?years and mean body mass index 40.4?kg/m2. Postindex prescriptions were written for U-500R alone (47.0%, group A) and concomitant U-500R/U-100 insulins (53.0%, group B). Concomitant oral antihyperglycemic agents (AHAs) and non-insulin injectable AHAs were used by 43.4% and 14.6% of patients, respectively. Following initiation of U-500R, mean HbA1c improved 0.68% in all patients (p<0.0001 compared with baseline), but the decrease in HbA1c did not differ significantly between groups (A: 0.78%; B: 0.60%). Overall, hypoglycemic events, largely captured in the outpatient setting, increased in incidence from 6.7% to 11.9% (p?0.0001) and from 0.23 to 0.39 events/patient/year, an increase of 0.16 (p=0.003), from preindex to postindex. Conclusions This real-world outcomes analysis demonstrates that U-500R initiation is associated with a clinically meaningful improvement in glycemic control over the subsequent 12-month period with modest increase in incidence and rate of hypoglycemia. PMID:25969741

  3. Effects of a low–glycemic load diet in overweight and obese pregnant women: a pilot randomized controlled trial1234

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Erinn T; Pawlak, Dorota B; Takoudes, Tamara C; Ebbeling, Cara B; Feldman, Henry A; Lovesky, Margaret M; Cooke, Emily A; Leidig, Michael M

    2010-01-01

    Background: The optimal diet for pregnancy that is complicated by excessive weight is unknown. Objective: We aimed to examine the effects of a low–glycemic load (low-GL) diet in overweight and obese pregnant women. Design: We randomly assigned 46 overweight or obese pregnant women to receive a low-GL or a low-fat diet. Participants received carbohydrate-rich foods, fats, and snack foods through home delivery or study visits. The primary outcome was birth weight z score. Other endpoints included infant anthropometric measurements, gestational duration, maternal weight gain, and maternal metabolic parameters. Results: There were no significant differences in birth weight z score or other measures of infant adiposity between groups. However, in the low-GL compared with the low-fat group, gestational duration was longer (mean ± SD: 39.3 ± 1.1 compared with 37.9 ± 3.1 wk; P = 0.05) and fewer deliveries occurred at ≤38.0 wk (13% compared with 48%, P = 0.02; with exclusion of planned cesarean deliveries: 5% compared with 53%; P = 0.002). Adjusted head circumference was greater in the low-GL group (35.0 ± 0.8 compared with 34.2 ± 1.3 cm, P = 0.01). Women in the low-GL group had smaller increases in triglycerides [median (interquartile range): 49 (19, 70) compared with 93 (34, 129) mg/dL; P = 0.03] and total cholesterol [13 (0, 36) compared with 33 (22, 56) mg/dL, P = 0.04] and a greater decrease in C-reactive protein [−2.5 (−5.5, −0.7) compared with −0.4 (−1.4, 1.5) mg/dL, P = 0.007]. Conclusions: A low-GL diet resulted in longer pregnancy duration, greater infant head circumference, and improved maternal cardiovascular risk factors. Large-scale studies are warranted to evaluate whether dietary intervention during pregnancy aimed at lowering GL may be useful in the prevention of prematurity and other adverse maternal and infant outcomes. This trial is registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00364403. PMID:20962162

  4. Self-Care Behaviors and Glycemic Control in Low-Income Adults in México With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus May Have Implications for Patients of Mexican Heritage Living in the United States.

    PubMed

    Compeán Ortiz, Lidia G; Del Ángel Pérez, Beatriz; Reséndiz González, Eunice; Piñones Martínez, Socorro; González Quirarte, Nora H; Berry, Diane C

    2016-04-01

    This study examined self-care behaviors and their relationship to glycemic control in low-income Mexican adults with type 2 diabetes in Southeastern Tamaulipas, México. A total of 135 patients were enrolled from 17 community health centers. The most frequent self-care behavior was medication management (80%), and the least frequent self-care behavior was self blood glucose monitoring (7%). All the patients demonstrated poor glycemic control, with glycated hemoglobin > 7%. Self-care behaviors were associated with fasting blood glucose (rs = .223, p = .005). Medication management was influenced by cognitive performance, F(1, 130) = 4.49, p = .036, and depression, F(1, 130) = 8.22, p = .005. Dietary behaviors were influenced by previous diabetes education, F(1, 130) = 6.73, p = .011. These findings indicate that education and cognitive behavioral interventions in Spanish for Mexican adults with type 2 diabetes are urgently needed. PMID:26040723

  5. A randomized controlled trial to investigate the impact of a low glycemic index (GI) diet on body mass index in obese adolescents

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The role of a low glycemic index (GI) diet in the management of adolescent obesity remains controversial. In this study, we aim to evaluate the impact of low GI diet versus a conventional Chinese diet on the body mass index (BMI) and other obesity indices of obese adolescents. Methods Obese adolescents aged 1518years were identified from population-recruited, territory-wide surveys. Obesity was defined as BMI ?95th percentile of Hong Kong local age- and sex-specific references. Eligible subjects were randomized to either an intervention with low GI diet (consisting of 45-50% carbohydrate, 30-35% fat and 15-20% protein) or conventional Chinese diet as control (consisting of 55-60% carbohydrate, 25-30% fat and 10-15% protein). We used random intercept mixed effects model to compare the differential changes across the time points from baseline to month 6 between the 2 groups. Results 104 obese adolescents were recruited (52 in low GI group and 52 in control group; 43.3% boys). Mean age was 16.7??1.0years and 16.8 1.0years in low GI and control group respectively. 58.7% subjects completed the study at 6months (65.4% in low GI group and 51.9% in control group). After adjustment for age and sex, subjects in the low GI group had a significantly greater reduction in obesity indices including BMI, body weight and waist circumference (WC) compared to subjects in the control group (all p <0.05). After further adjustment for physical activity levels, WC was found to be significantly lower in the low GI group compared to the conventional group (p?=?0.018). Conclusion Low GI diet in the context of a comprehensive lifestyle modification program may be an alternative to conventional diet in the management of obese adolescents. Trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov Ref. No: NCT01278563 PMID:24552366

  6. Streptozotocin-Induced Early Thermal Hyperalgesia is independent of Glycemic State of Rats: Role of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1(TRPV1) and Inflammatory mediators

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Streptozotocin (STZ) is used as a common tool to induce diabetes and to study diabetes-induced complications including diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Previously, we have reported that STZ induces a direct effect on neurons through expression and function of the Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel in sensory neurons resulting in thermal hyperalgesia, even in non-diabetic STZ-treated mice. In the present study, we investigated the role of expression and function of TRPV1 in the central sensory nerve terminals in the spinal cord in STZ-induced hyperalgesia in rats. Results We found that a proportion of STZ-treated rats were normoglycemic but still exhibited thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. Immunohistochemical data show that STZ treatment, irrespective of glycemic state of the animal, caused microglial activation and increased expression of TRPV1 in spinal dorsal horn. Further, there was a significant increase in the levels of pro-inflammatory mediators (IL-1?, IL-6 and TNF-?) in spinal cord tissue, irrespective of the glycemic state. Capsaicin-stimulated release of calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) was significantly higher in the spinal cord of STZ-treated animals. Intrathecal administration of resiniferatoxin (RTX), a potent TRPV1 agonist, significantly attenuated STZ-induced thermal hyperalgesia, but not mechanical allodynia. RTX treatment also prevented the increase in TRPV1-mediated neuropeptide release in the spinal cord tissue. Conclusions From these results, it is concluded that TRPV1 is an integral component of initiating and maintaining inflammatory thermal hyperalgesia, which can be alleviated by intrathecal administration of RTX. Further, the results suggest that enhanced expression and inflammation-induced sensitization of TRPV1 at the spinal cord may play a role in central sensitization in STZ-induced neuropathy. PMID:21794120

  7. DNA aptamer raised against advanced glycation end products (AGEs) improves glycemic control and decreases adipocyte size in fructose-fed rats by suppressing AGE-RAGE axis.

    PubMed

    Ojima, A; Matsui, T; Nakamura, N; Higashimoto, Y; Ueda, S; Fukami, K; Okuda, S; Yamagishi, S

    2015-04-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) decrease adiponectin expression and suppress insulin signaling in cultured adipocytes through the interaction with a receptor for AGEs (RAGE) via oxidative stress generation. We have recently found that high-affinity DNA aptamer directed against AGE (AGE-aptamer) prevents the progression of experimental diabetic nephropathy by blocking the harmful actions of AGEs in the kidney. This study examined the effects of AGE-aptamer on adipocyte remodeling, AGE-RAGE-oxidative stress axis, and adiponectin expression in fructose-fed rats. Although AGE-aptamer treatment by an osmotic mini pump for 8 weeks did not affect serum insulin levels, it significantly decreased average fasting blood glucose and had a tendency to inhibit body weight gain in fructose-fed rats. Furthermore, AGE-aptamer significantly suppressed the increase in adipocyte size and prevented the elevation in AGEs, RAGE, and an oxidative stress marker, 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), levels in adipose tissues of fructose-fed rats at 14-week-old, while it restored the decrease in adiponectin mRNA levels. Our present study suggests that AGE-aptamer could improve glycemic control and prevent adipocyte remodeling in fructose-fed rats partly by suppressing the AGE-RAGE-mediated oxidative stress generation. AGE-aptamer might be a novel therapeutic strategy for fructose-induced metabolic derangements. PMID:25105541

  8. Coumaglutide, a novel long-acting GLP-1 analog, inhibits ?-cell apoptosis in vitro and invokes sustained glycemic control in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lidan; Wang, Chuandong; Dai, Yuxuan; Chu, Yingying; Han, Jing; Zhou, Jie; Cai, Xingguang; Huang, Wenlong; Qian, Hai

    2015-11-15

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a potential candidate for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. However, native GLP-1 is not suitable for therapy of diabetes due to its short half-life (t1/2=2 min). Our recent discovery of the novel long-acting GLP-1 analog, coumaglutide, elicits favorable hypoglycemic effects. The present study was aimed at determining the protection effect of ?-cell from apoptosis and in vivo pharmacologic properties of coumaglutide in diabetic mice. To determine the protective effect of coumaglutide on INS-1 cell viability and apoptosis, cells were exposed to 1 ?M streptozotocin (STZ) and coumaglutide for 24 h. Moreover, STZ-induced diabetic mice were treated daily with coumaglutide for 20 days and a range of pharmacologic parameters, including hemoglobin A1c (HbA1C), intraperitoneal glucose tolerance, food intake and body weight were assessed before and after the treatment. As with other glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonizts, coumaglutide was able to protect ?-cell from apoptosis in vitro and induce a durable restoration of glycemic control (normalization of both HbA1C and improvement of intraperitoneal glucose tolerance) in diabetic mice. It can be concluded that coumaglutide retains native GLP-1 activities and thus may serve as a promising hypoglycemic drug candidate. PMID:26481165

  9. Long-term ketogenic diet contributes to glycemic control but promotes lipid accumulation and hepatic steatosis in type 2 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; Qin, Juliang; Zhao, Yihan; Shi, Jueping; Lan, Rong; Gan, Yunqiu; Ren, Hua; Zhu, Bing; Qian, Min; Du, Bing

    2016-04-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD) has been widely used in weight and glycemic control, although potential side effects of long-term KD treatment have caused persistent concern. In this study, we hypothesized that the KD would ameliorate the progression of diabetes but lead to disruptions in lipid metabolism and hepatic steatosis in a mouse model of diabetes. In type 2 diabetic mouse model, mice were fed a high-fat diet and administered streptozotocin treatment before given the test diets for 8 weeks. Subsequently, ameliorated glucose and insulin tolerance in KD-fed diabetic mice was found, although the body weight of high-fat diet- and KD-fed mice was similar. Interestingly, the weight of adipose tissue in KD mice was greater than in the other groups. The KD diet resulted in higher serum triacylglycerol and cholesterol levels in diabetic mice. Moreover, the KD-fed mice showed greater hepatic lipid accumulation. Mice fed the KD showed significant changes in several key genes such as sterol regulatory element-binding protein, fibroblast growth factor 21, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α, which are all important in metabolism. In summary, KD ameliorates glucose and insulin tolerance in a mouse model of diabetes, but severe hepatic lipid accumulation and hepatic steatosis were observed, which should be considered carefully in the long-term application of KD. PMID:27001280

  10. Improvement of glycemic control in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats by Atlantic salmon skin gelatin hydrolysate as the dipeptidyl-peptidase IV inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, C H; Wang, T Y; Hung, C C; Chen, M C; Hsu, K C

    2015-06-01

    In our previous study, Atlantic salmon skin gelatin hydrolysed with flavourzyme possessed 42.5% dipeptidyl-peptidase (DPP)-IV inhibitory activity at a concentration of 5 mg mL(-1). The oral administration of the hydrolysate (FSGH) at a single dose of 300 mg per day in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats for 5 weeks was evaluated for its antidiabetic effect. During the 5-week experiment, body weight increased, and the food and water intake was reduced by FSGH in diabetic rats. The daily administration of FSGH for 5 weeks was effective for lowering the blood glucose levels of diabetic rats during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). After the 5-week treatment, plasma DPP-IV activity was inhibited; the plasma activity of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), insulin, and the insulin-to-glucagon ratio were increased by FSGH in diabetic rats. The results indicate that FSGH has the function of inhibiting GLP-1 degradation by DPP-IV, resulting in the enhancement of insulin secretion and improvement of glycemic control in STZ-induced diabetic rats. PMID:25946069

  11. Dose- and Time-Dependent Association of Smoking and Its Cessation with Glycemic Control and Insulin Resistance in Male Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: The Fukuoka Diabetes Registry

    PubMed Central

    Ohkuma, Toshiaki; Iwase, Masanori; Fujii, Hiroki; Kaizu, Shinako; Ide, Hitoshi; Jodai, Tamaki; Kikuchi, Yohei; Idewaki, Yasuhiro; Hirakawa, Yoichiro; Nakamura, Udai; Kitazono, Takanari

    2015-01-01

    Objective Cigarette smoking is an important modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. However, the effect of smoking and its cessation on glycemic control in diabetic patients has not been fully examined yet. The aim of the present study was to examine the association of smoking status with glycemic level and markers of insulin resistance and secretion in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Research Design and Methods A total of 2,490 Japanese male patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus aged ?20 years were divided according to smoking status, amount of cigarettes smoked and years since quitting. The associations with glycemic level and markers of insulin resistance and secretion were examined cross-sectionally. Results HbA1c levels increased progressively with increases in both number of cigarettes per day and pack-years of cigarette smoking compared with never smokers (P for trend = 0.001 and <0.001, respectively), whereas fasting plasma glucose did not. On the other hand, HbA1c, but not fasting plasma glucose, decreased linearly with increase in years after smoking cessation (P for trend <0.001). These graded relationships persisted significantly after controlling for the confounders, including total energy intake, current drinking, regular exercise, depressive symptoms, and BMI. In addition, a homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein also showed similar trends. Conclusions Smoking and its cessation showed dose- and time-dependent relationship with glycemic control and insulin resistance in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. These findings may highlight the importance of smoking cessation in the clinical management of diabetes mellitus. PMID:25822499

  12. Evaluation of the Effects of Cornus mas L. Fruit Extract on Glycemic Control and Insulin Level in Type 2 Diabetic Adult Patients: A Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Rasool; Gorji, Abdollah; Asgary, Sedigheh; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal; Siavash, Mansour

    2015-01-01

    Background. The plant Cornus mas L. (cornelian cherry) is traditionally used as an antidiabetic supplement; however, there is no related clinical trial. In this study, we evaluated the effects of the fruit extract of this plant on biomarkers of glycemic control in adult patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods. Sixty patients with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to two groups to receive either the extract or placebo capsules (2 capsules twice daily) for 6 weeks. Each drug capsule contained 150 mg of anthocyanins. Fasting plasma levels of glucose, insulin, HgbA1C, and triglyceride as well as 2-hour postprandial glucose level (2Hpp) were measured before and after the intervention and finally the mean values were compared between groups. Results. After 6 weeks of intervention, significant increase in insulin level (1.13 1.90 versus ?0.643 1.82, P < 0.05) as well as decrease in HgbA1C (?0.24 0.429 versus 0.023 0.225, P < 0.05) and TG (?23.66 55.40 versus 2.83 15.71, P < 0.05) levels was observed in drug group compared to placebo. Conclusion. Daily consumption of the fruit extract of Cornus mas L. improves glycemic control by increasing insulin level and reduces TG serum level in type 2 diabetic adult patients. PMID:26508984

  13. Skeletal muscle FOXO1 (FKHR) transgenic mice have less skeletal muscle mass, down-regulated Type I (slow twitch/red muscle) fiber genes, and impaired glycemic control.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Yasutomi; Miura, Shinji; Suzuki, Miki; Kai, Yuko; Mizukami, Junko; Taniguchi, Tomoyasu; Mochida, Keiji; Hata, Tomoko; Matsuda, Junichiro; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Nishino, Ichizo; Ezaki, Osamu

    2004-09-24

    FOXO1, a member of the FOXO forkhead type transcription factors, is markedly up-regulated in skeletal muscle in energy-deprived states such as fasting and severe diabetes, but its functions in skeletal muscle have remained poorly understood. In this study, we created transgenic mice specifically overexpressing FOXO1 in skeletal muscle. These mice weighed less than the wild-type control mice, had a reduced skeletal muscle mass, and the muscle was paler in color. Microarray analysis revealed that the expression of many genes related to the structural proteins of type I muscles (slow twitch, red muscle) was decreased. Histological analyses showed a marked decrease in size of both type I and type II fibers and a significant decrease in the number of type I fibers in the skeletal muscle of FOXO1 mice. Enhanced gene expression of a lysosomal proteinase, cathepsin L, which is known to be up-regulated during skeletal muscle atrophy, suggested increased protein degradation in the skeletal muscle of FOXO1 mice. Running wheel activity (spontaneous locomotive activity) was significantly reduced in FOXO1 mice compared with control mice. Moreover, the FOXO1 mice showed impaired glycemic control after oral glucose and intraperitoneal insulin administration. These results suggest that FOXO1 negatively regulates skeletal muscle mass and type I fiber gene expression and leads to impaired skeletal muscle function. Activation of FOXO1 may be involved in the pathogenesis of sarcopenia, the age-related decline in muscle mass in humans, which leads to obesity and diabetes. PMID:15272020

  14. Hepatic FoxO1 Acetylation Is Involved in Oleanolic Acid-Induced Memory of Glycemic Control: Novel Findings from Study 2

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Li, Songpei; Jo, Eunjung; Xue, Charlie C. L.; Tan, Minjia; Molero, Juan C.; Ye, Ji-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Our recent study (referred as Study 1) showed that the triterpenoid oleanolic acid (OA) was able to produce a sustained correction of hyperglycemia beyond treatment period in type 2 diabetes (T2D) mice with liver as a responsible site. To follow up the previous observations, the present study (referred as Study 2) investigated the possible role of acetylation of FoxO1 and associated events in this therapeutic memory by characterizing the pathways regulating the acetylation status during and post-OA treatments. OA treatment (100 mg/kg/day for 4 weeks, during OA treatment) reduced hyperglycemia in T2D mice by ∼87% and this effect was largely (∼70%) maintained even 4 weeks after the cessation of OA administration (post-OA treatment). During OA treatment, the acetylation and phosphorylation of FoxO1 were markedly increased (1.5 to 2.5-fold) while G6Pase expression was suppressed by ∼80%. Consistent with this, OA treatment reversed pyruvate intolerance in high-fat fed mice. Histone acetyltransferase 1 (HAT1) content was increased (>50%) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) 4 and 5 (not HDAC1) were reduced by 30–50%. The OA-induced changes in FoxO1, G6Pase, HAT1 and HDACs persisted during the post-OA treatment period when the increased phosphorylation of AMPK, SIRT1 content and reduced liver triglyceride had subsided. These results confirmed the ability of OA to control hyperglycemia far beyond treatment period in T2D mice. Most importantly, in the present study we demonstrated acetylation of FoxO1 in the liver is involved in OA-induced memory for the control of hyperglycemia. Our novel findings suggest that acetylation of the key regulatory proteins of hepatic gluconeogenesis is a plausible mechanism by the triterpenoid to achieve a sustained glycemic control for T2D. PMID:25222566

  15. The association of lifestyle and stress with poor glycemic control in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2: a Croatian nationwide primary care cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Bralić Lang, Valerija; Bergman Marković, Biserka; Vrdoljak, Davorka

    2015-01-01

    Aim To assess lifestyle habits and self-reported stress levels among type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients and their association with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) in general practitioners' (GP) offices in Croatia. Methods 449 GPs from all Croatian regions from 2008 to 2010 consecutively recruited up to 20-25 participants diagnosed with T2DM at least 3 years prior to the study, aged ≥40 years, and scheduled for diabetes control check-ups. The recruitment period lasted six months. Lifestyle habits and self-reported stress were assessed using the questionnaire from the Croatian Adult Health Survey. Results The study included 10 285 patients with T2DM with mean (±standard deviation) age of 65.7 ± 10.05 years (48.1% men). Mean HbA1c level was 7.57 ± 1.58%. 79% of participants reported insufficient physical activity, 24% reported inappropriate dietary patterns, 56% reported current alcohol consumption, 19% were current smokers, and 85% reported at least medium level of stress. Multivariate analysis showed that having received advice to stop drinking alcohol, inadequate physical activity, consumption of milk and dairy products, adding extra salt, and high level of stress were significantly associated with increased HbA1c (P < 0.05). Conclusion Poor glycemic control was more frequent in patients who had several “unhealthy” lifestyle habits. These results suggest that diabetes patients in Croatia require more specific recommendations on diet, smoking cessation, exercise, and stress control. PMID:26321029

  16. The Effect of Comorbidity on Glycemic Control and Systolic Blood Pressure in Type 2 Diabetes: A Cohort Study with 5 Year Follow-Up in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Luijks, Hilde; Biermans, Marion; Bor, Hans; van Weel, Chris; Lagro-Janssen, Toine; de Grauw, Wim; Schermer, Tjard

    2015-01-01

    Aims To explore the longitudinal effect of chronic comorbid diseases on glycemic control (HbA1C) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) in type 2 diabetes patients. Methods In a representative primary care cohort of patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes in The Netherlands (n = 610), we tested differences in the five year trend of HbA1C and SBP according to comorbidity profiles. In a mixed model analysis technique we corrected for relevant covariates. Influence of comorbidity (a chronic disease already present when diabetes was diagnosed) was tested as total number of comorbid diseases, and as presence of specific disease groups, i.e. cardiovascular, mental, and musculoskeletal disease, malignancies, and COPD. In subgroup effect analyses we tested if potential differences were modified by age, sex, socioeconomic status, and BMI. Results The number of comorbid diseases significantly influenced the SBP trend, with highest values after five years for diabetes patients without comorbidity (p = 0.005). The number of diseases did not influence the HbA1C trend (p = 0.075). Comorbid musculoskeletal disease resulted in lower HbA1C at the time of diabetes diagnosis, but in higher values after five years (p = 0.044). Patients with cardiovascular diseases had sustained elevated levels of SBP (p = 0.014). Effect modification by socioeconomic status was observed in some comorbidity subgroups. Conclusions Presence of comorbidity in type 2 diabetes patients affected the long-term course of HbA1C and SBP in this primary care cohort. Numbers and types of comorbidity showed differential effects: not the simple sum of diseases, but specific types of comorbid disease had a negative influence on long-term diabetes control parameters. The complex interactions between comorbidity, diabetes control and effect modifiers require further investigation and may help to personalize treatment goals. PMID:26426904

  17. Genetic ablation of myelin protein zero-like 3 in mice increases energy expenditure, improves glycemic control, and reduces hepatic lipid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Czyzyk, Traci A; Andrews, Jessica L; Coskun, Tamer; Wade, Mark R; Hawkins, Eric D; Lockwood, John F; Varga, Gabor; Sahr, Allison E; Chen, Yanyun; Brozinick, Joseph T; Kikly, Kristine; Statnick, Michael A

    2013-07-15

    Obesity continues to be a global health problem, and thus it is imperative that new pathways regulating energy balance be identified. Recently, it was reported: (Hayashi K, Cao T, Passmore H, Jourdan-Le Saux C, Fogelgren B, Khan S, Hornstra I, Kim Y, Hayashi M, Csiszar K. J Invest Dermatol 123: 864-871, 2004) that mice carrying a missense mutation in myelin protein zero-like 3 (Mpzl3rc) have reduced body weight. To determine how Mpzl3 controls energy balance in vivo, we generated mice deficient in myelin protein zero-like 3 (Mpzl3-KO). Interestingly, KO mice were hyperphagic yet had reduced body weight and fat mass. Moreover, KO mice were highly resistant to body weight and fat mass gain after exposure to a high-fat, energy-dense diet. These effects on body weight and adiposity were driven, in part, by a pronounced increase in whole body energy expenditure levels in KO mice. KO mice also had reduced blood glucose levels during an intraperitoneal glucose challenge and significant reductions in circulating insulin levels suggesting an increase in insulin sensitivity. In addition, there was an overall increase in oxidative capacity and contractile force in skeletal muscle isolated from KO mice. Hepatic triglyceride levels were reduced by 92% in livers of KO mice, in part due to a reduction in de novo lipid synthesis. Interestingly, Mpzl3 mRNA expression in liver was increased in diet-induced obese mice. Moreover, KO mice exhibited an increase in insulin-stimulated Akt signaling in the liver, further demonstrating that Mpzl3 can regulate insulin sensitivity in this tissue. We have determined that Mpzl3 has a novel physiological role in controlling body weight regulation, energy expenditure, glycemic control, and hepatic triglyceride synthesis in mice. PMID:23715724

  18. Investigating Sources of Heterogeneity in Randomized Controlled Trials of the Effects of Pharmacist Interventions on Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetic Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, Patricia Melo; Brito, Giselle de Carvalho; Lima, Tácio de Mendonça; Santos, Ana Patrícia Alves Lima; Lyra, Divaldo Pereira; Storpirtis, Sílvia

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of pharmacist interventions on glycemic control in type 2 diabetic patients and to examine factors that could explain the variation across studies. Methods A comprehensive literature search was performed in PubMed, Scopus, and LILACS databases for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published up to July 2015. The search strategy included the use of MeSH terms or text words related to pharmacist interventions, type 2 diabetes, and randomized controlled trials. RCTs published in English, Portuguese, or Spanish that evaluated the effect of pharmacist intervention on glycemic control in type 2 diabetic outpatients were included. Two independent authors executed study selection, data extraction, and risk of bias assessment. Mean differences in glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) were estimated using random-effect models, and heterogeneity was evaluated by subgroup and meta-regression analyses. Results The literature search yielded 963 records of potential interest, of which 30 were included in the systematic review and 22 in the meta-analysis. Most of these RCTs were conducted in the United States in patients in outpatient clinics using face-to-face contact only. All RCTs performed patient education, and most executed the medication review. The appraised sample showed uncertain or high risk of bias in most of the items evaluated, resulting in low-quality studies. In comparison with usual care, pharmacist interventions were associated with significant reductions in HbA1c levels (-8.5% [95% CI: -1.06, -0.65]; P < 0.0001; I2 = 67.3%). Subgroup analysis indicated differences of heterogeneity by country, baseline HbA1c levels, setting, intervention frequency, and random allocation. Age and HbA1c levels partly explained the variability across studies by meta-regression. Conclusions Our findings confirmed that pharmacist interventions improve glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes compared with usual care and suggest that younger patients or with higher baseline HbA1c levels may be the main beneficiaries of pharmacist care. Protocol PROSPERO Registration Number CRD42014007457 PMID:26963251

  19. Intraovarian Control of Early Folliculogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Kazuhiro; Cheng, Yuan; Fauser, Bart C. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Although hormonal regulation of ovarian follicle development has been extensively investigated, most studies concentrate on the development of early antral follicles to the preovulatory stage, leading to the successful use of exogenous FSH for infertility treatment. Accumulating data indicate that preantral follicles are under stringent regulation by FSH and local intraovarian factors, thus providing the possibility to develop new therapeutic approaches. Granulosa cell-derived C-type natriuretic factor not only suppresses the final maturation of oocytes to undergo germinal vesicle breakdown before ovulation but also promotes preantral and antral follicle growth. In addition, several oocyte- and granulosa cell-derived factors stimulate preantral follicle growth by acting through wingless, receptor tyrosine kinase, receptor serine kinase, and other signaling pathways. In contrast, the ovarian Hippo signaling pathway constrains follicle growth and disruption of Hippo signaling promotes the secretion of downstream CCN growth factors capable of promoting follicle growth. Although the exact hormonal factors involved in primordial follicle activation has yet to be elucidated, the protein kinase B (AKT) and mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathways are important for the activation of dormant primordial follicles. Hippo signaling disruption after ovarian fragmentation, combined with treating ovarian fragments with phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) inhibitors and phosphoinositide-3-kinase stimulators to augment AKT signaling, promote the growth of preantral follicles in patients with primary ovarian insufficiency, leading to a new infertility intervention for such patients. Elucidation of intraovarian mechanisms underlying early folliculogenesis may allow the development of novel therapeutic strategies for patients diagnosed with primary ovarian insufficiency, polycystic ovary syndrome, and poor ovarian response to FSH stimulation, as well as for infertile women of advanced reproductive age. PMID:25202833

  20. Intraovarian control of early folliculogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Aaron J W; Kawamura, Kazuhiro; Cheng, Yuan; Fauser, Bart C J M

    2015-02-01

    Although hormonal regulation of ovarian follicle development has been extensively investigated, most studies concentrate on the development of early antral follicles to the preovulatory stage, leading to the successful use of exogenous FSH for infertility treatment. Accumulating data indicate that preantral follicles are under stringent regulation by FSH and local intraovarian factors, thus providing the possibility to develop new therapeutic approaches. Granulosa cell-derived C-type natriuretic factor not only suppresses the final maturation of oocytes to undergo germinal vesicle breakdown before ovulation but also promotes preantral and antral follicle growth. In addition, several oocyte- and granulosa cell-derived factors stimulate preantral follicle growth by acting through wingless, receptor tyrosine kinase, receptor serine kinase, and other signaling pathways. In contrast, the ovarian Hippo signaling pathway constrains follicle growth and disruption of Hippo signaling promotes the secretion of downstream CCN growth factors capable of promoting follicle growth. Although the exact hormonal factors involved in primordial follicle activation has yet to be elucidated, the protein kinase B (AKT) and mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathways are important for the activation of dormant primordial follicles. Hippo signaling disruption after ovarian fragmentation, combined with treating ovarian fragments with phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) inhibitors and phosphoinositide-3-kinase stimulators to augment AKT signaling, promote the growth of preantral follicles in patients with primary ovarian insufficiency, leading to a new infertility intervention for such patients. Elucidation of intraovarian mechanisms underlying early folliculogenesis may allow the development of novel therapeutic strategies for patients diagnosed with primary ovarian insufficiency, polycystic ovary syndrome, and poor ovarian response to FSH stimulation, as well as for infertile women of advanced reproductive age. PMID:25202833

  1. Differentiating Approaches to Diabetes Self-Management of Multi-Ethnic Rural Older Adults at the Extremes of Glycemic Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer-Lowry, Aleshia Nichol; Arcury, Thomas A.; Bell, Ronny A.; Quandt, Sara A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: This study identified approaches to diabetes self-management that differentiate persons with well-controlled from poorly controlled diabetes. Previous research has focused largely on persons participating in self-management interventions. Design and Methods: In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 48 adults, drawn

  2. Differentiating Approaches to Diabetes Self-Management of Multi-Ethnic Rural Older Adults at the Extremes of Glycemic Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer-Lowry, Aleshia Nichol; Arcury, Thomas A.; Bell, Ronny A.; Quandt, Sara A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: This study identified approaches to diabetes self-management that differentiate persons with well-controlled from poorly controlled diabetes. Previous research has focused largely on persons participating in self-management interventions. Design and Methods: In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 48 adults, drawn…

  3. Cardiovascular disease and glycemic control in type 2 diabetes: now that the dust is settling from large clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Giorgino, Francesco; Leonardini, Anna; Laviola, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between glucose control and cardiovascular outcomes in type 2 diabetes has been a matter of controversy over the years. Although epidemiological evidence exists in favor of an adverse role of poor glucose control on cardiovascular events, intervention trials have been less conclusive. The Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) study, the Action in Diabetes and Vascular Disease (ADVANCE) study, and the Veterans Affairs Diabetes Trial (VADT) have shown no beneficial effect of intensive glucose control on primary cardiovascular endpoints in type 2 diabetes. However, subgroup analysis has provided evidence suggesting that the potential beneficial effect largely depends on patients characteristics, including age, diabetes duration, previous glucose control, presence of cardiovascular disease, and risk of hypoglycemia. The benefit of strict glucose control on cardiovascular outcomes and mortality may be indeed hampered by the extent and frequency of hypoglycemic events and could be enhanced if glucose-lowering medications, capable of exerting favorable effects on the cardiovascular system, were used. This review examines the relationship between intensive glucose control and cardiovascular outcomes in type 2 diabetes, addressing the need for individualization of glucose targets and careful consideration of the benefit/risk profile of antidiabetes medications. PMID:23387439

  4. A GIP Receptor Agonist Exhibits β-Cell Anti-Apoptotic Actions in Rat Models of Diabetes Resulting in Improved β-Cell Function and Glycemic Control

    PubMed Central

    Widenmaier, Scott B.; Kim, Su-Jin; Yang, Gary K.; De Los Reyes, Thomas; Nian, Cuilan; Asadi, Ali; Seino, Yutaka; Kieffer, Timothy J.; Kwok, Yin Nam; McIntosh, Christopher H. S.

    2010-01-01

    Aims The gastrointestinal hormone GIP promotes pancreatic islet function and exerts pro-survival actions on cultured β-cells. However, GIP also promotes lipogenesis, thus potentially restricting its therapeutic use. The current studies evaluated the effects of a truncated GIP analog, D-Ala2-GIP1–30 (D-GIP1–30), on glucose homeostasis and β-cell mass in rat models of diabetes. Materials and Methods The insulinotropic and pro-survival potency of D-GIP1–30 was evaluated in perfused pancreas preparations and cultured INS-1 β-cells, respectively, and receptor selectivity evaluated using wild type and GIP receptor knockout mice. Effects of D-GIP1–30 on β-cell function and glucose homeostasis, in vivo, were determined using Lean Zucker rats, obese Vancouver diabetic fatty rats, streptozotocin treated rats, and obese Zucker diabetic fatty rats, with effects on β-cell mass determined in histological studies of pancreatic tissue. Lipogenic effects of D-GIP1–30 were evaluated on cultured 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Results Acutely, D-GIP1–30 improved glucose tolerance and insulin secretion. Chronic treatment with D-GIP1–30 reduced levels of islet pro-apoptotic proteins in Vancouver diabetic fatty rats and preserved β-cell mass in streptozotocin treated rats and Zucker diabetic fatty rats, resulting in improved insulin responses and glycemic control in each animal model, with no change in body weight. In in vitro studies, D-GIP1–30 exhibited equivalent potency to GIP1–42 on β-cell function and survival, but greatly reduced action on lipoprotein lipase activity in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that truncated forms of GIP exhibit potent anti-diabetic actions, without pro-obesity effects, and that the C-terminus contributes to the lipogenic actions of GIP. PMID:20231880

  5. Insulin Pump Use and Glycemic Control in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D): Predictors of Change in Method of Insulin Delivery across Two Years

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Jenise C.; Dolan, Lawrence M.; Yang, Tony T.; Hood, Korey K.

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have explored durability of insulin pump use, and none have explored the link between depression and pump discontinuation. To examine the relationship between depressive symptoms (measured by the Childrens Depression Inventory, CDI), method of insulin delivery, and A1c, mixed models were used with data from 150 adolescents with T1D and visits every 6 months for 2 years. Of the 63% who used a pump, compared to multiple daily injections (MDI) at baseline, there were higher proportions who were non-minorities, had caregivers with a college degree, private insurance, and two caregivers in the home (p?0.01). After adjusting for time, sex, age, T1D duration, frequency of blood glucose monitoring, ethnicity, insurance, and caregiver number and education, baseline pump use was associated with ?0.79% lower mean A1c (95% CI ?1.48, ?0.096; p=0.03). For those using a pump at baseline, but switching to MDI during the study (n=9), mean A1c was 1.38% higher (95% CI 0.68, 2.08; p<0.001) than that for those who did not switch method of delivery. A 10-point increase in CDI was associated with a 0.39% increase in A1c (95% CI 0.16, 0.61; p=0.001), independent of pump use. Regarding the temporal relationship between CDI score and changing method of insulin delivery, prior higher CDI score was associated with switching from pump to MDI (OR=1.21; 95% CI 1.05, 1.39 p=0.007). Clinicians should be aware of the associations between depressive symptoms, change in insulin delivery method, and the effect on glycemic control. PMID:25387433

  6. COH-SR4 Reduces Body Weight, Improves Glycemic Control and Prevents Hepatic Steatosis in High Fat Diet-Induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Figarola, James Lester; Singhal, Preeti; Rahbar, Samuel; Gugiu, Bogdan Gabriel; Awasthi, Sanjay; Singhal, Sharad S.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic metabolic disorder caused by imbalance between energy intake and expenditure, and is one of the principal causative factors in the development of metabolic syndrome, diabetes and cancer. COH-SR4 (SR4) is a novel investigational compound that has anti-cancer and anti-adipogenic properties. In this study, the effects of SR4 on metabolic alterations in high fat diet (HFD)-induced obese C57BL/J6 mice were investigated. Oral feeding of SR4 (5 mg/kg body weight.) in HFD mice for 6 weeks significantly reduced body weight, prevented hyperlipidemia and improved glycemic control without affecting food intake. These changes were associated with marked decreases in epididymal fat mass, adipocyte hypertrophy, increased plasma adiponectin and reduced leptin levels. SR4 treatment also decreased liver triglycerides, prevented hepatic steatosis, and normalized liver enzymes. Western blots demonstrated increased AMPK activation in liver and adipose tissues of SR4-treated HFD obese mice, while gene analyses by real time PCR showed COH-SR4 significantly suppressed the mRNA expression of lipogenic genes such as sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (Srebf1), acetyl-Coenzyme A carboxylase (Acaca), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (Pparg), fatty acid synthase (Fasn), stearoyl-Coenzyme A desaturase 1 (Scd1), carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a (Cpt1a) and 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (Hmgcr), as well as gluconeogenic genes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 (Pck1) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6pc) in the liver of obese mice. In vitro, SR4 activates AMPK independent of upstream kinases liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase ? (CaMKK?). Together, these data suggest that SR4, a novel AMPK activator, may be a promising therapeutic compound for treatment of obesity, fatty liver disease, and related metabolic disorders. PMID:24376752

  7. A Comparison of Food-grade Folium mori (?? S?ng Y) Extract and 1-Deoxynojirimycin for Glycemic Control and Renal Function in Streptozotocin-induced Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shiang-Suo; Yan, Yi-Hui; Ko, Chien-Hui; Chen, Ke-Ming; Lee, Shih-Chieh; Liu, Cheng-Tzu

    2014-01-01

    Folium mori (?? S?ng Y, leaf of Morus alba L.; FM) is known to possess hypoglycemic effects, and 1-deoxynojirimycin (1-DNJ) has been proposed as an important functional compound in FM. However, the hypoglycemic activity of purified 1-DNJ has been rarely studied. It is also not known how FM and 1-DNJ affect the development of DM nephropathy. This study compared the antidiabetic effect of a commercial FM product with that of purified 1-DNJ in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Seven days after induction, the diabetic rats were gavaged with FM (1, 3, 10, and 30 mg/kg/day), 1-DNJ (30 mg/kg/day), or vehicle (distilled deionized water; 2 ml/kg/day) for 7 days. All doses of FM ameliorated fasting and post-prandial blood glucose concomitantly with an increase in peripheral and pancreatic levels of insulin and improved homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR) in diabetic rats in a dose-dependent manner. Increased thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and nitrate/nitrite levels in the kidney, liver, and muscle of diabetic rats were reversed by all doses of FM. The renal function of the diabetic rats was normalized by all doses of FM, while blood pressure changes were reversed by FM at doses of 3 mg/kg and above. Moreover, most of the above-mentioned parameters were improved by FM at doses of 3 mg/kg and above to a similar extent as that of 1-DNJ. The results showed superior antidiabetic potential of the commercial FM product for glycemic control and protection against the development of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:25161921

  8. Insulin pump use and glycemic control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes: Predictors of change in method of insulin delivery across two years.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jenise C; Dolan, Lawrence M; Yang, Tony T; Hood, Korey K

    2015-12-01

    Few studies have explored durability of insulin pump use, and none have explored the link between depression and pump discontinuation. To examine the relationship between depressive symptoms [measured by the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI)], method of insulin delivery, and hemoglobin A1c (A1c), mixed models were used with data from 150 adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and visits every 6 months for 2 years. Of the 63% who used a pump, compared with multiple daily injections (MDI) at baseline, there were higher proportions who were non-minorities, had caregivers with a college degree, private insurance, and two caregivers in the home (p ? 0.01). After adjusting for time, sex, age, T1D duration, frequency of blood glucose monitoring, ethnicity, insurance, and caregiver number and education, baseline pump use was associated with -0.79% lower mean A1c [95% confidence interval (CI): -1.48, -0.096; p = 0.03]. For those using a pump at baseline, but switching to MDI during the study (n = 9), mean A1c was 1.38% higher (95% CI: 0.68, 2.08; p < 0.001) than that for those who did not switch method of delivery. A 10-point increase in CDI was associated with a 0.39% increase in A1c (95% CI: 0.16, 0.61; p = 0.001), independent of pump use. Regarding the temporal relationship between CDI score and changing method of insulin delivery, prior higher CDI score was associated with switching from pump to MDI (odds ratio = 1.21; 95% CI: 1.05, 1.39; p = 0.007). Clinicians should be aware of the associations between depressive symptoms, change in insulin delivery method, and the effect on glycemic control. PMID:25387433

  9. A Consensus Perceived Glycemic Variability Metric

    PubMed Central

    Marling, Cynthia R.; Struble, Nigel W.; Bunescu, Razvan C.; Shubrook, Jay H.; Schwartz, Frank L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Glycemic variability (GV) is an important component of overall glycemic control for patients with diabetes mellitus. Physicians are able to recognize excessive GV from continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) plots; however, there is currently no universally agreed upon GV metric. The objective of this study was to develop a consensus perceived glycemic variability (CPGV) metric that could be routinely applied to CGM data to assess diabetes mellitus control. Methods Twelve physicians actively managing patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus rated a total of 250 24 h CGM plots as exhibiting low, borderline, high, or extremely high GV. Ratings were averaged to obtain a consensus and then input into two machine learning algorithms: multilayer perceptrons (MPs) and support vector machines for regression (SVR). In silica experiments were run using each algorithm with different combinations of 12 descriptive input features. Ten-fold cross validation was used to evaluate the performance of each model. Results The SVR models approximated the physician consensus ratings of unseen CGM plots better than the MP models. When judged by the root mean square error, the best SVR model performed comparably to individual physicians at matching consensus ratings. When applied to 262 different CGM plots as a screen for excessive GV, this model had accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of 90.1%, 97.0%, and 74.1%, respectively. It significantly outperformed mean amplitude of glycemic excursion, standard deviation, distance traveled, and excursion frequency. Conclusions This new CPGV metric could be used as a routine measure of overall glucose control to supplement glycosylated hemoglobin in clinical practice. PMID:23911168

  10. Mobile Diabetes Intervention for Glycemic Control in 45- to 64-Year-Old Persons With Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Charlene C; Shardell, Michelle D; Terrin, Michael L; Barr, Erik A; Park, DoHwan; Shaikh, Faraz; Guralnik, Jack M; Gruber-Baldini, Ann L

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess effects of a mobile coaching system on glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels in younger versus older patients over 1 year. Participants (n = 118) included adult patients with Type 2 diabetes cared for by community physicians. Intervention patients received mobile phone coaching and individualized web portal. Control patients received usual care. Patients were stratified into two age groups: younger (<55 years) and older (≥55 years). The intervention resulted in greater 12-month declines in HbA1c, compared with usual care, for patients in both age groups (p < .0001). Among older patients, HbA1c changed by -1.8% (95% confidence interval [CI] = [-2.4, -1.1]) in the intervention group and -0.3% (95% CI = [-0.9, +0.3]) in the control group. Among younger patients, HbA1c changed by -2.0% (95% CI = [-2.5, -1.5]) in the intervention group and -1.0% (95% CI = [-1.6, -0.4]) in the control group. The mobile health intervention was as effective at managing Type 2 diabetes in older adults as younger persons. PMID:25098253

  11. Effect of telenursing (telephone follow-up) on glycemic control and body mass index (BMI) of type 2 diabetes patients

    PubMed Central

    Borhani, Fariba; Lashkari, Tahereh; Sabzevari, Sakineh; Abbaszadeh, Abbas

    2013-01-01

    Background: Telenursing includes every nursing and care-giving services conducted remotely. In telenursing, telephone as a device, which is available for most of the people, is being used increasingly. In a telephone-based system, patients are being contacted by health care providers on regular bases and they would be provided with some information about their illness and their treatment method. This study was conducted to determine the effect of phone-based follow-ups on diabetes patients metabolic control in the city of Kerman in Iran. Materials and Methods: This is a quasi-experimental study conducted on 50 type II diabetes patients in Kerman during 2011. Data were collected using a demographic questionnaire and also by taking physiological measurement of fasting blood suger (FBS), Glycated Hemoglobin (HbA1c), and postprandial glucose (PPG). Participants body mass index (BMI) was calculated by measuring height and weight. Patients completed the questionnaire at the beginning of the study and 12 weeks later. The patients were randomly divided into two groups of experiment and control. Patients in the experimental group received phone calls by the researcher for 12 weeks, and the follow-ups included instructions on self-care and advices to follow their diets, exercise, and insulin titration. Data analysis was done using descriptive and inferential statistical methods (chi-square, analysis of variance [ANOVA], independent t-test, and paired t-test). Results: The decrease of HbA1c and PPG was significantly more in the intervention group compared with the controls (P < 0.001). However, there was no significant difference between the mean of FBS (P = 0.42), and BMI (P = 0.31) in both groups after the intervention. Conclusions: According to the results of this study, telenursing was able to improve the metabolic indices of the patients. Therefore, using this method is recommended for patients with type II diabetes. PMID:24554942

  12. [Improvement in glycemic control, cardiovascular risk factors and anthropometric data in type 2 diabetic patients after the switch from biphasic human insulin to biphasic premix analog insulin aspart].

    PubMed

    Gero, Lszl; Gyimesi, Andrs; Hidvgi, Tibor; Jnosi, Istvn

    2009-08-30

    Long-term studies involving large number of type 2 diabetic patients supplied evidence that constant adequate metabolic control may prevent the late (micro- and macrovascular) diabetic complications. In the present non-interventional, retrospective study, authors performed an analysis of type 2 diabetic patients who had been previously treated with biphasic human insulin (BHI) and their therapy was changed to biphasic analog insulin aspart 30/70 (BIAsp = NovoMix 30). The switch of the insulin therapy was carried out in years 2007 and 2008 with the cooperation of 50 accredited diabetes centers. Data were obtained at the time of therapeutical change and six months later. The number of suitable patients was 2898 with an age of 66.20 +/- 10.10 year, and the duration of diabetes was >10 years in 43% of the patients. After the six-month therapy with NovoMix 30, the mean HbA 1c level decreased statistically significantly from the initial value of 9.10 +/- 1.44% to 7.62 +/- 1.00% ( p < 0.001). The lipid profile also improved although target values were not always attained. A reduction was also observed in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Mean body weight decreased from 84.2 +/- 14.9 kg to 82.6 +/- 13.9 kg ( p < 0.01). All these changes occurred in spite of a significantly reduced daily insulin dose (48.4 +/- 17.6 IU) as compared with the initial value (49.0 +/- 17.4 IU, p < 0.001). A marked decrement was also observed in the frequency of hypoglycemic reactions. These results confirm that treatment with NovoMix 30 insulin leads to a significant amelioration of glycemic control as reflected by the decreased level of HbA 1c and the higher proportion of patients attaining the target value, as well as the lower frequency of hypoglycemic episodes. The significant improvements in cardiovascular risk factors are also important, but the explanation is still missing and would require the accomplishment of prospective, controlled studies. PMID:19692308

  13. Angiotensin IConverting Enzyme Type 2 (ACE2) Gene Therapy Improves Glycemic Control in Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bindom, Sharell M.; Hans, Chetan P.; Xia, Huijing; Boulares, A. Hamid; Lazartigues, Eric

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Several clinical studies have shown the benefits of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) blockade in the development of diabetes, and a local RAS has been identified in pancreatic islets. Angiotensin Iconverting enzyme (ACE)2, a new component of the RAS, has been identified in the pancreas, but its role in ?-cell function remains unknown. Using 8- and 16-week-old obese db/db mice, we examined the ability of ACE2 to alter pancreatic ?-cell function and thereby modulate hyperglycemia. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Both db/db and nondiabetic lean control (db/m) mice were infected with an adenovirus expressing human ACE2 (Ad-hACE2-eGFP) or the control virus (Ad-eGFP) via injection into the pancreas. Glycemia and ?-cell function were assessed 1 week later at the peak of viral expression. RESULTS In 8-week-old db/db mice, Ad-hACE2-eGFP significantly improved fasting glycemia, enhanced intraperitoneal glucose tolerance, increased islet insulin content and ?-cell proliferation, and reduced ?-cell apoptosis compared with Ad-eGFP. ACE2 overexpression had no effect on insulin sensitivity in comparison with Ad-eGFP treatment in diabetic mice. Angiotensin-(17) receptor blockade by d-Ala7Ang-(1-7) prevented the ACE2-mediated improvements in intraperitoneal glucose tolerance, glycemia, and islet function and also impaired insulin sensitivity in both Ad-hACE2-eGFP and Ad-eGFPtreated db/db mice. d-Ala7Ang-(1-7) had no effect on db/m mice. In 16-week-old diabetic mice, Ad-hACE2-eGFP treatment improved fasting blood glucose but had no effect on any of the other parameters. CONCLUSIONS These findings identify ACE2 as a novel target for the prevention of ?-cell dysfunction and apoptosis occurring in type 2 diabetes. PMID:20660625

  14. The effect of purslane seeds on glycemic status and lipid profiles of persons with type 2 diabetes: A randomized controlled cross-over clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad; Zakizadeh, Elahe; Faghihimani, Elham; Gohari, Mahmoodreza; Jazayeri, Shima

    2015-01-01

    Background: We are aware of limited data about the effects of purslane on diabetes. Earlier studies have mostly indicated the beneficial effects in animal models. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of purslane seeds on glycemic status and lipid profiles of persons with type 2 diabetes. Materials and Methods: This cross-over randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted on 48 persons with type 2 diabetes. Participants were randomly assigned to receive either 10 g/day purslane seeds with 240 cc low-fat yogurt (intervention group) or only 240 cc low-fat yogurt (as a control group) for 5 weeks. After a 2-week washout period, subjects were moved to the alternate arm for an additional 5 weeks. At baseline and end of each phase of the study, fasting blood samples were collected to quantify plasma glucose levels, as well as serum insulin and lipid profiles. Within-group and between-group changes in anthropometric measures, as well as biochemical indicators, were compared using a paired-samples t-test. Results: Mean age of study participants was 51.4 6.0 year. We found a significant reduction in weight (?0.57 vs. 0.09 kg, P = 0.003) and body mass index (?0.23 vs. 0.02 kg/m2, P = 0.004) following purslane seeds consumption. Despite a slight reduction in fasting plasma glucose levels (?2.10 vs. ?2.77 mg/dL, P = 0.90), we failed to find any significant effect on serum insulin levels and homeostatic model of assessment of insulin resistance score. Furthermore, purslane consumption decreased serum triglyceride levels (?25.5 vs. ?1.8 mg/dL, P = 0.04) but could not affect serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and total cholesterol levels. We observed a significant reduction in systolic blood pressure (?3.33 vs. 0.5 mmHg, P = 0.01) and a borderline significant decrease in diastolic blood pressure (?3.12 vs. ?0.93 mmHg, P = 0.09) after purslane seeds intake. Conclusion: In summary, consumption of purslane seeds for 5 weeks in persons with type 2 diabetes might improve their anthropometric measures, serum triglyceride levels, and blood pressure. Further studies are required to determine the appropriate dosage for these patients. PMID:25767522

  15. Assessing the impact of a new delivery method of insulin on glycemic control using a novel trial design

    PubMed Central

    Strack, Thomas; Martinez, Luc; Del Prato, Stefano; Blonde, Larry; Gke, Burkhard; Woo, Vincent; Millward, Ann; Gomis, Ramon; Canovatchel, Bill; Lawrence, David; Freemantle, Nick

    2009-01-01

    Objective The purpose of the trial was to examine the impact of inhaled human insulin (INH) on patient or physician willingness to adopt insulin after oral diabetes agent failure. Research design and methods The EXPERIENCE trial was a one-year randomized controlled trial conducted at primary, secondary and tertiary care facilities in Europe and North America. The primary study endpoint was difference in glycated hemoglobin (A1c) between randomized groups at 26 weeks, and results from that phase have been reported previously. The present report concerns results from the second 26-week extension phase. We also consider the applicability of the design. The trial recruited 727 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who, prior to randomization, were using two or more oral diabetes agents and whose A1c was ? 8.0%. Patients were randomized to two treatment settings: Group 1 (usual care with the option of INH) or Group 2 (usual care only). Usual care included adjusting oral therapy (optimizing current regimen or adding/deleting agents) and/or initiating subcutaneous (SC) insulin. Results At baseline, insulin was initiated by more (odds ratio [OR] 6.0;95% confidence interval [CI] 4.2 to 8.8; P < 0.0001) patients in Group 1 (86.2%; 76.7% INH plus 9.5% SC) than in Group 2 (50.7%; SC insulin only). The largest reduction from baseline in A1c was in Group 1 (?2.0 1.2%) at Week 12 and in Group 2 (?1.8 1.3%) at Week 26 (P = 0.003). At 52 weeks, 79.8% were on insulin in Group 1 (67.4% INH; 12.4% SC) vs 58.1% (SC only) in Group 2, and mean (SD) changes in A1c from baseline were ?1.9% (1.2%) and ?1.8% (1.3%) in Groups 1 and 2, respectively (P = 0.05). Hypoglycemic event rates per patient month were 0.3 and 0.1 in Groups 1 and 2, respectively (P < 0.0001). Conclusion The EXPERIENCE trial showed that novel delivery technology can accelerate the adoption of insulin although some attenuation of differences is observed over time. And further, that this was achieved in a population of patients who appeared more ready to move to insulin therapy than observed in standard clinical practice, and a group of physicians who appeared more ready to adopt INH than the majority of physicians. PMID:21437114

  16. Gender-specific Effects of Treatment with Lifestyle, Metformin or Sulfonylurea on Glycemic Control and Body Weight: A German Multicenter Analysis on 9?108 Patients.

    PubMed

    Schtt, M; Zimmermann, A; Hood, R; Hummel, M; Seufert, J; Siegel, E; Tytko, A; Holl, R W

    2015-11-01

    Effects of diabetes treatment are strongly connected to individual factors, but the relevant role of gender has not been addressed so far. This observational study evaluates whether monotherapy with lifestyle, metformin or sulfonylurea has gender-specific effects on glycemic control and/or body weight. Data of 9?108 patients with type 2 diabetes from 129 German diabetes centers were assessed by a standardized, prospective, computer-based diabetes care and outcome documentation system (DPV-Wiss-database; age 63.112.8 years, diabetes duration 5.77.4 years, HbA1c 5517.7?mmol/mol [7.21.6%], BMI 30.66.1?kg/m(2), 49.3% female patients). Antidiabetic concepts included lifestyle intervention (n=5,787), metformin (n=2,180), sulfonylurea (n=943) or other antidiabetic drugs (n=198), respectively. HbA1c and body weight were compared before and after a stable monotherapeutical period of 0.80.4 years. Women had a significantly higher reduction of body weight after treatment with lifestyle (women-0.80.1 vs. men-0.20.1?kg; p<0.05), metformin (women-1.80.2 vs. men-1.20.2?kg; p<0.05) or sulfonylurea drugs (women-0.90.2 vs. men?-?0.10.2?kg; p<0.05), whereas men displayed significantly higher HbA1c-reductions after treatment with lifestyle (women-6.90.2?mmol/mol [-?0.60.02%] vs. men-7.50.2?mmol/mol [0.70.02%]; p<0.05) and metformin only (women-6.30.3?mmol/mol [-?0.60.03%] vs. men?-?7.40.3?mmol/mol [-?0.70.03%]; p<0.05). No differences were seen for sulfonylurea monotherapy concerning the HbA1c-reduction (women?-?5.60.5?mmol/mol [-?0.50.05%] vs. men-6.40.4?mmol/mol [-?0.60.04%]; p=0.196). In summary, antidiabetic treatment concepts might result in gender-specific effects on body weight and HbA1c. Gender might therefore represent another important factor in the context of an individualized treatment management of type 2 diabetes. PMID:26285070

  17. Relationship between adherence to diet, glycemic control and cardiovascular risk factors in patients with type 1 diabetes: a nationwide survey in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To determine the relationship between adherence to the diet reported by patients with type 1 diabetes under routine clinical care in Brazil, and demographic, socioeconomic status, glycemic control and cardiovascular risk factors. Methods This was a cross-sectional, multicenter study conducted between December 2008 and December 2010 in 28 public clinics in 20 Brazilian cities. The data was obtained from 3,180 patients, aged 22 ± 11.8 years (56.3% females, 57.4% Caucasians and 43.6% non-Caucasians). The mean time since diabetes diagnosis was 11.7 ± 8.1 years. Results Overall, 1,722 (54.2%) of the patients reported to be adherent to the diet without difference in gender, duration of diabetes and socioeconomic status. Patients who reported adherence to the diet had lower BMI, HbA1c, triglycerides, LDL-cholesterol, non HDL-cholesterol and diastolic blood pressure and had more HbA1c at goal, performed more frequently self-monitoring of blood glucose (p < 0.001), and reported less difficulties to follow specific schedules of diet plans (p < 0.001). Less patients who reported to be adherent were obese or overweight (p = 0.005). The quantity of food and time schedule of the meals were the most frequent complaints. Logistic regression analysis showed that ethnicity, (Caucasians, (OR 1.26 [1.09-1.47]), number of medical clinical visits in the last year (OR 1.10 [1.06-1.15]), carbohydrate counting, (OR 2.22 [1.49-3.30]) and diets recommended by diabetes societies’, (OR 1.57 [1.02-2.41]) were related to greater patients’ adherence (p < 0.05) and age, [adolescents (OR 0.60 [0.50-0.72]), high BMI (OR 0.58 [0.94-0.98]) and smoking (OR 0.58 [0.41-0.84]) with poor patients’ adherence (p < 0.01). Conclusions Our results suggest that it is necessary to rethink medical nutrition therapy in order to help patients to overcome barriers that impair an optimized adherence to the diet. PMID:24607084

  18. GLYCEMIC INDEX, CHOLECYSTOKININ, SATIETY AND DISINHIBITION: IS THERE AN UNAPPRECIATED PARADOX FOR OVERWEIGHT WOMEN?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The clinical utility of a low glycemic index (GI) diet for appetite and food intake control is controversial. Complicating the issue is psychological and behavioral influences related to eating. The aim of the present study was to investigate the satiety and glycemic response to high and low GI meal...

  19. Is Ramadan fasting safe in type 2 diabetic patients in view of the lack of significant effect of fasting on clinical and biochemical parameters, blood pressure, and glycemic control?

    PubMed

    M'guil, M; Ragala, M A; El Guessabi, L; Fellat, S; Chraibi, A; Chabraoui, L; Chebraoui, L; Israili, Z H; Lyoussi, B

    2008-07-01

    The study objective was to determine if Ramadan fasting was safe in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), based upon a determination of the effect of fasting on a broad range of physiological and clinical parameters, including markers of glycemic control and blood pressure. The study was carried out in Ramadan 1422 (December 2001-January 2002) at the Diabetology Services, Hopital Ibn Sina, Rabat, Morocco. One hundred and twenty T2D Moroccan patients (62 women, 58 men), aged 48-60 yrs with well-controlled diabetes through diet and/or oral hypoglycemic drugs (OHD), received dietary instructions and readjustment of the timing of the dose of OHD (gliclazide modified release) according to the fasting/eating periods. Anthropometric indices and physiological parameters (blood pressure, lipid, hematological, and serum electrolyte profiles, as well as markers of glycemic control, nutrition, renal and hepatic function) were measured on the day before Ramadan and then on the 15(th) and 29(th) day of fasting and thereafter 15 days later. Statistical analysis was done by standard methods. Ramadan fasting had no major effect on energy intake, body weight, body mass index, blood pressure, and liver enzymes. Fasting and post-prandial glucose levels decreased, while insulin levels increased. Diabetes was well controlled, as indicated by HbA1c, fructosamine, C-peptide, HOMA-IR, and IGF-1 values. There were fluctuations in some lipid and hematological parameters, creatinine, urea, uric acid, total protein, bilirubin, and electrolytes; however, all values stayed within the proper physiological range. In conclusion, diabetes was well-controlled in patients with dietary/medical management, without serious complications. With a regimen adjustment of OHD, diet control, and physical activity, most patients with T2D whose diabetes was well-controlled before Ramadan can safely observe Ramadan fasting. PMID:18633757

  20. Effects of Korean White Ginseng (Panax Ginseng C.A. Meyer) on Vascular and Glycemic Health in Type 2 Diabetes: Results of a Randomized, Double Blind, Placebo-controlled, Multiple-crossover, Acute Dose Escalation Trial

    PubMed Central

    Shishtar, Esra'; Jovanovski, Elena; Jenkins, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Korean red ginseng (steam treated Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer), among most prized traditional herbal remedies, has been clinically shown to improve cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. Whether this holds true for the dried non-steamed variety, known as Korean white ginseng (KWG) is unclear. This study therefore, investigated the efficacy and safety of escalating doses of KWG on vascular and glycemic parameters in type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Using an acute, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover design, 25 participants with well-controlled T2DM (12-males: 13-females, age: 63 9 years, A1c: 6.9 0.7%, BMI: 29.3 4.3 kg/m2) underwent five visits during which they received 1 g, 3 g, or 6 g KWG or 3 g wheat-bran control (twice) together with 50 g-glucose load. For the duration of 240 minutes, augmentation index (AI), and central blood pressure were measured at baseline and at 60 min-intervals, and ambulatory blood pressure was assessed at baseline and at 10 min-intervals. Additionally, capillary blood was collected at time zero and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, and 180 minutes post-treatment. A symptoms questionnaire was used to assess safety and adverse events. Two-way ANOVA demonstrated a significant time-treatment interaction effect on AI (p = 0.01) with one-way ANOVA showing significant reductions in AI with 3 g KWG relative to control (p = 0.04). Compared to control, acute administration of KWG appeared to be safe, but did not affect any other postprandial, vascular or glycemic parameters. KWG might have a beneficial effect on AI, a cumulative indicator of arterial health. However, these results are preliminary and highlight the need for long-term investigation with a focus on its accountable components. Clinical Trial Registration: NCT01699074 PMID:25136536

  1. Effect of Intensive Glycemic Lowering on Health-Related Quality of Life in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Roger T.; Narayan, K.M. Venkat; Feeney, Patricia; Goff, David; Ali, Mohammed K.; Simmons, Debra L.; Sperl-Hillen, Jo-Ann; Bigger, Thomas; Cuddihy, Robert; O'Conner, Patrick J.; Sood, Ajay; Zhang, Ping; Sullivan, Mark D.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare the effect of intensive versus standard glycemic control strategies on health-related quality of life (HRQL) in a substudy of the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) trial. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A randomly selected subsample of 2,053 ACCORD participants enrolled in the HRQL substudy was assessed at baseline and 12-, 36-, and 48-month visits. HRQL assessment included general health status (the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey [SF-36]), diabetes symptoms (the Diabetes Symptom Distress Checklist), depression (Patient Health Questionnaire [PHQ]-9), and treatment satisfaction (Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire [DTSQ]). Repeated-measures ANOVA models were used to estimate change in HRQL outcomes by treatment group over 48 months adjusting for model covariates. The effects of early discontinuation of the ACCORD intensive glycemic control arm on study results were explored. RESULTS A total of 1,956 (95%) completed the self-report HRQL instrument(s) at baseline. The intensive arm had a larger decrease in SF-36 physical health component score than the standard arm (?1.6 vs. ?1.1, P = 0.0345). Treatment satisfaction (DTSQ) showed larger improvement with intensive than standard (P = 0.0004). There were no differences in mean scores of the Diabetes Symptom Checklist and PHQ-9. Effects of participant transition following discontinuation of the intensive arm on HRQL were not significant. CONCLUSIONS The ACCORD trial strategy of intensive glycemic control did not lead to benefits in HRQL and was associated with modest improvement in diabetes treatment satisfaction. Thus patient acceptability was apparently not compromised with intensive and complex interventions such as those used in ACCORD. PMID:21346183

  2. A Randomized Controlled Trial Investigating the Effects of a LowGlycemic Index Diet on Pregnancy Outcomes in Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Louie, Jimmy Chun Yu; Markovic, Tania P.; Perera, Nimalie; Foote, Deborah; Petocz, Peter; Ross, Glynis P.; Brand-Miller, Jennie C.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is rising. There is little evidence to demonstrate the effectiveness of one dietary therapy over another. We aimed to investigate the effect of a lowglycemic index (LGI) versus a conventional high-fiber diet on pregnancy outcomes, neonatal anthropometry, and maternal metabolic profile in GDM. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Ninety-nine women (age 2642 years; mean SD prepregnancy BMI 24 5 kg/m2) diagnosed with GDM at 2032 weeks gestation were randomized to follow either an LGI (n = 50; target glycemic index [GI] ~50) or a high-fiber moderate-GI diet (HF) (n = 49; target GI ~60). Dietary intake was assessed by 3-day food records. Pregnancy outcomes were collected from medical records. RESULTS The LGI group achieved a modestly lower GI than the HF group (mean SEM 47 1 vs. 53 1; P < 0.001). At birth, there was no significant difference in birth weight (LGI 3.3 0.1 kg vs. HF 3.3 0.1 kg; P = 0.619), birth weight centile (LGI 52.5 4.3 vs. HF 52.2 4.0; P = 0.969), prevalence of macrosomia (LGI 2.1% vs. HF 6.7%; P = 0.157), insulin treatment (LGI 53% vs. HF 65%; P = 0.251), or adverse pregnancy outcomes. CONCLUSIONS In intensively monitored women with GDM, an LGI diet and a conventional HF diet produce similar pregnancy outcomes. PMID:21900148

  3. Evaluation of the Utility of a Glycemic Pattern Identification System

    PubMed Central

    Tannan, Vinay

    2014-01-01

    Background: With the increasing prevalence of systems allowing automated, real-time transmission of blood glucose data there is a need for pattern recognition techniques that can inform of deleterious patterns in glycemic control when people test. We evaluated the utility of pattern identification with a novel pattern identification system named Vigilant and compared it to standard pattern identification methods in diabetes. Method: To characterize the importance of an identified pattern we evaluated the relative risk of future hypoglycemic and hyperglycemic events in diurnal periods following identification of a pattern in a data set of 536 patients with diabetes. We evaluated events 2 days, 7 days, 30 days, and 61-90 days from pattern identification, across diabetes types and cohorts of glycemic control, and also compared the system to 6 pattern identification methods consisting of deleterious event counts and percentages over 5-, 14-, and 30-day windows. Results: Episodes of hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia, severe hypoglycemia, and severe hyperglycemia were 120%, 46%, 123%, and 76% more likely after pattern identification, respectively, compared to periods when no pattern was identified. The system was also significantly more predictive of deleterious events than other pattern identification methods evaluated, and was persistently predictive up to 3 months after pattern identification. Conclusions: The system identified patterns that are significantly predictive of deleterious glycemic events, and more so relative to many pattern identification methods used in diabetes management today. Further study will inform how improved pattern identification can lead to improved glycemic control. PMID:24876425

  4. Body composition, dietary composition, and components of metabolic syndrome in overweight and obese adults after a 12-week trial on dietary treatments focused on portion control, energy density, or glycemic index

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Given the rise in obesity and associated chronic diseases, it is critical to determine optimal weight management approaches that will also improve dietary composition and chronic disease risk factors. Few studies have examined all these weight, diet, and disease risk variables in subjects participating in recommended multi-disciplinary weight loss programs using different dietary strategies. Methods This study compared effects of three dietary approaches to weight loss on body composition, dietary composition and risk factors for metabolic syndrome (MetS). In a 12-week trial, sedentary but otherwise healthy overweight and obese adults (19?M & 138?F; 38.7??6.7 y; BMI 31.8??2.2) who were attending weekly group sessions for weight loss followed either portion control, low energy density, or low glycemic index diet plans. At baseline and 12?weeks, measures included anthropometrics, body composition, 3-day food diaries, blood pressure, total lipid profile, HOMA, C-reactive protein, and fasting blood glucose and insulin. Data were analyzed by repeated measures analysis of variance. Results All groups significantly reduced body weight and showed significant improvements in body composition (p?control, low energy density, or low glycemic index produced similar, significant short-term improvements in body composition, diet compositin, and MetS components in overweight and obese adults undergoing weekly weight loss meetings. This may allow for flexibility in options for dietary counseling based on patient preference. PMID:22925169

  5. Today`s control systems evolved from early pioneers` dreams

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.J.

    1996-04-01

    In the last 100 years, power plant controls have evolved from manual operation and simple instruments to automatic state-of-the-art computerized control systems using smart instruments. This article traces the evolution of controls. The topics of the article include early control systems, developments in the early 20th century, Bailey controls, and developments in the late 20th century.

  6. Dietary fiber and the glycemic response.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, D J; Jenkins, A L

    1985-12-01

    Addition of purified fiber to carbohydrate test meals has been shown to flatten the glycemic response in both normal and diabetic volunteers, reduce the insulin requirement in patients on the artificial pancreas and in the longer term reduce urinary glucose loss and improve diabetes control. In the context of high fiber-high carbohydrate diets these findings have had a major impact in influencing recommendations for the dietary management of diabetes internationally. The mechanism of action appears in part to be due to the effect of fiber in slowing absorption rather than by increasing colonic losses of carbohydrate. Consequently postprandial GIP and insulin levels are reduced and the more viscous purified fibers (e.g., guar and pectin) appear most effective. In addition it has been suggested that colonic fermentation products of fiber may enhance glucose utilization. More recently it has become clear that many aspects of carbohydrate foods (food form, antinutrients, etc.) in addition to fiber may influence the rate of digestion and has led to a classification especially of starchy foods in terms of glycemic index to define the degree to which equicarbohydrate portions of different foods raise the blood glucose. Use of such data may maximize the effectiveness of high carbohydrate and high fiber diets in the management of diabetes and related disorders. PMID:3001740

  7. [How to measure glycemic instability?].

    PubMed

    Selam, J L

    2000-04-01

    Instability of glycemic levels is "normal" in type 1 diabetes, with different levels of severity, up to the restrictive definition of brittle diabetes (repeated ketoacidosis and/or severe hypoglycemias). Quantification of glycemic instability, in terms of intraday variability and day-to-day reproducibility, is advisable. Standard deviation of blood glucose, though a simple index does not discriminate between slow and brutal variations. Repartition of blood glucose values also only indicates dispersion. M values compares the patient values to an ideal blood glucose level, emphasizing the role of low values. The MAGE index measures the amplitude of the largest glucose excursions, thus evaluating appropriately glycemic variability. The Low Blood Glucose Index (LBGI) is a new index of variability emphasising (as the M value) the low glycemias. Each glycemia is given a value from O (if >=110 mg/dl) to 100 (if 20 mg/dl). It thus integrates the frequency and severity of hypoglycemias. According to its authors the LBGI would be the best indicator of severe hypoglycemias. The Mean of Daily Differences (MODD) evaluates the day-to-day reproducibility of blood glucose values. All the above indexes could easily be incorporated in the programmes of large memory glucose meters. PMID:10804331

  8. Effect of Probiotic Fermented Milk (Kefir) on Glycemic Control and Lipid Profile In Type 2 Diabetic Patients: A Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    OSTADRAHIMI, Alireza; TAGHIZADEH, Akbar; MOBASSERI, Majid; FARRIN, Nazila; PAYAHOO, Laleh; BEYRAMALIPOOR GHESHLAGHI, Zahra; VAHEDJABBARI, Morteza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetes is a global health problem in the world. Probiotic food has anti-diabetic property. The aim of this trial was to determine the effect of probiotic fermented milk (kefir) on glucose and lipid profile control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: This randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted on 60 diabetic patients aged 35 to 65 years.Patients were randomly and equally (n=30) assigned to consume either probiotic fermented milk (kefir) or conventional fermented milk (dough) for 8 weeks. Probiotic group consumed 600 ml/day probiotic fermented milk containing Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacteria and control group consumed 600 ml/day conventional fermented milk.Blood samples tested for fasting blood glucose, HbA1C, triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol, HDL-C and LDL-C at the baseline and end of the study. Results: The comparison of fasting blood glucose between two groups after intervention was statistically significant (P=0.01). After intervention, reduced HbA1C compared with the baseline value in probiotic fermented milk group was statistically significant (P=0.001), also the HbA1C level significantly decreased in probiotic group in comparison with control group (P=0.02) adjusting for serum levels of glucose, baseline values of HbA1c and energy intake according to ANCOVA model. Serum triglyceride, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and HDL- cholesterol levels were not shown significant differences between and within the groups after intervention. Conclusion: Probiotic fermented milk can be useful as a complementary or adjuvant therapy in the treatment of diabetes. PMID:25905057

  9. Nigella sativa Improves Glycemic Control and Ameliorates Oxidative Stress in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Placebo Controlled Participant Blinded Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kaatabi, Huda; Bamosa, Abdullah Omar; Badar, Ahmed; Al-Elq, Abdulmohsen; Abou-Hozaifa, Bodour; Lebda, Fatma; Al-Khadra, Akram; Al-Almaie, Sameeh

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective Oxidative stress plays an important role in pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus and its complications. Our previous study has shown glucose lowering effect produced by 3 months supplementation of Nigella sativa (NS) in combination with oral hypoglycemic drugs among type 2 diabetics. This study explored the long term glucose lowering effect (over one year) of NS in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus on oral hypoglycemic drugs and to study its effect on redox status of such patients. Methods 114 type 2 diabetic patients on standard oral hypoglycemic drugs were assigned into 2 groups by convenience. The control group (n = 57) received activated charcoal as placebo and NS group (n = 57) received 2g NS, daily, for one year in addition to their standard medications. Fasting blood glucose (FBG), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), C- peptide, total antioxidant capacity (TAC), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) at the baseline, and every 3 months thereafter were determined. Insulin resistance and β-cell activity were calculated using HOMA 2 calculator. Results Comparison between the two groups showed a significant drop in FBG (from 180±5.75 to 180±5.59 in control Vs from 195±6.57 to 172 ±5.83 in NS group), HbA1c (from 8.2±0.12 to 8.5±0.14 in control VS from 8.6±0.13 to 8.2±0.14 in NS group), and TBARS (from 48.3±6.89 to 52.9 ±5.82 in control VS from 54.1±4.64 to 41.9 ±3.16 in NS group), in addition to a significant elevation in TAC, SOD and glutathione in NS patients compared to controls. In NS group, insulin resistance was significantly lower, while β-cell activity was significantly higher than the baseline values during the whole treatment period. Conclusion Long term supplementation with Nigella sativa improves glucose homeostasis and enhances antioxidant defense system in type 2 diabetic patients treated with oral hypoglycemic drugs. Trial Registration Clinical Trials Registry-India (CTRI) CTRI/2013/06/003781 PMID:25706772

  10. Glycemic control and weight reduction without causing hypoglycemia: the case for continued safe aggressive care of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and avoidance of therapeutic inertia.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Stanley S; Kohl, Benjamin A

    2010-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major and growing concern in the United States, in large part because of an epidemic of obesity in America and its relation to type 2 DM. In affected patients, postprandial glucose may be an early indicator of glucose intolerance or a prediabetes condition, which may be a better predictor of cardiovascular risk than impaired fasting glucose level. Treating patients who have early signs of hyperglycemia, including elevated postprandial glucose level, with intensive glucose control that does not lead to weight gain, and ideally may be associated with weight reduction, may be vital to preventing or reducing later cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Because hypoglycemia is an important complication of current DM treatments and may cause acute secondary adverse cardiovascular outcomes, not causing hypoglycemia is mandatory. Given that weight loss can significantly lower cardiovascular risk and improve other cardiovascular risk factors in patients with type 2 DM and that medications are available that can result in weight reduction without leading to hypoglycemia, the successful treatment of patients with type 2 DM should be individualized and should address the complete pathophysiologic process. This review is a hypothesis article that presents arguments against general approaches to the treatment of type 2 DM. An algorithm is presented in which the goal for managing patients with type 2 DM is to lower the blood glucose level as much as possible for as long as possible without causing hypoglycemia. In addition, body weight should ideally be improved, reducing cardiovascular risk factors and avoiding therapeutic inertia. PMID:21106867

  11. Preserved Insulin Secretory Capacity and Weight Loss Are the Predominant Predictors of Glycemic Control in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Randomized to Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Kim T; Billington, Charles J; Vella, Adrian; Wang, Qi; Ahmed, Leaque; Bantle, John P; Bessler, Marc; Connett, John E; Inabnet, William B; Thomas, Avis; Ikramuddin, Sayeed; Korner, Judith

    2015-09-01

    Improvement in type 2 diabetes after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) has been attributed partly to weight loss, but mechanisms beyond weight loss remain unclear. We performed an ancillary study to the Diabetes Surgery Study to assess changes in incretins, insulin sensitivity, and secretion 1 year after randomization to lifestyle modification and intensive medical management (LS/IMM) alone (n = 34) or in conjunction with RYGB (n = 34). The RYGB group lost more weight and had greater improvement in HbA1c. Fasting glucose was lower after RYGB than after LS/IMM, although the glucose area under the curve decreased comparably for both groups. Insulin sensitivity increased in both groups. Insulin secretion was unchanged after LS/IMM but decreased after RYGB, except for a rapid increase during the first 30 min after meal ingestion. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) was substantially increased after RYGB, while gastric inhibitory polypeptide and glucagon decreased. Lower HbA1c was most strongly correlated with the percentage of weight loss for both groups. At baseline, a greater C-peptide index and 90-min postprandial C-peptide level were predictive of lower HbA1c at 1 year after RYGB. ?-Cell glucose sensitivity, which improved only after RYGB, and improved disposition index were associated with lower HbA1c in both groups, independent of weight loss. Weight loss and preserved ?-cell function both predominantly determine the greatest glycemic benefit after RYGB. PMID:25901097

  12. An Elevated Glycemic Gap is Associated With Adverse Outcomes in Diabetic Patients With Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Po-Chuan; Liao, Wen-I.; Wang, Ying-Chuan; Chang, Wei-Chou; Hsu, Chin-Wang; Chen, Ying-Hsin; Tsai, Shih-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Several studies argue against the association between admission hyperglycemia and adverse outcomes in infected diabetic patients. When investigating the association, it is necessary to consider preexisting hyperglycemia. The objective of this study was to assess whether stress-induced hyperglycemia, determined by the glycemic gap between admission glucose levels and A1c-derived average glucose levels adversely affects outcomes in diabetic patients admitted to hospital with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). We retrospectively analyzed the glycemic gap and adverse outcomes of diabetic patients hospitalized because of CAP from June 1, 2007 to August 31, 2012 in single medical center in Taiwan. A total of 203 patients admitted with principal diagnosis of CAP and available data of glycemic gap. Patients with glycemic gaps ?40?mg/dL had greater AUROC values for the development of adverse outcomes compared with acute hyperglycemia and long-term glycemic controls. Patients with an elevated glycemic gap had an odds ratio of 3.84 for the incidence of combined adverse outcomes. Incorporation of the glycemic gap into pneumonia severity index, CURB-65 or SMART-COP scores, increased the discriminative performance of predicting the development of adverse outcomes. Glycemic gaps were associated with adverse outcomes of diabetic CAP patients. The discriminative performance of the calculated glycemic gaps was comparable with those of current clinical scoring systems and may further increase the AUROC of each system. PMID:26313809

  13. An Elevated Glycemic Gap is Associated With Adverse Outcomes in Diabetic Patients With Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Chuan; Liao, Wen-I; Wang, Ying-Chuan; Chang, Wei-Chou; Hsu, Chin-Wang; Chen, Ying-Hsin; Tsai, Shih-Hung

    2015-08-01

    Several studies argue against the association between admission hyperglycemia and adverse outcomes in infected diabetic patients. When investigating the association, it is necessary to consider preexisting hyperglycemia. The objective of this study was to assess whether stress-induced hyperglycemia, determined by the glycemic gap between admission glucose levels and A1c-derived average glucose levels adversely affects outcomes in diabetic patients admitted to hospital with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP).We retrospectively analyzed the glycemic gap and adverse outcomes of diabetic patients hospitalized because of CAP from June 1, 2007 to August 31, 2012 in single medical center in Taiwan.A total of 203 patients admitted with principal diagnosis of CAP and available data of glycemic gap.Patients with glycemic gaps ?40?mg/dL had greater AUROC values for the development of adverse outcomes compared with acute hyperglycemia and long-term glycemic controls. Patients with an elevated glycemic gap had an odds ratio of 3.84 for the incidence of combined adverse outcomes. Incorporation of the glycemic gap into pneumonia severity index, CURB-65 or SMART-COP scores, increased the discriminative performance of predicting the development of adverse outcomes.Glycemic gaps were associated with adverse outcomes of diabetic CAP patients. The discriminative performance of the calculated glycemic gaps was comparable with those of current clinical scoring systems and may further increase the AUROC of each system. PMID:26313809

  14. Long–Term Effects of Energy-Restricted Diets Differing in Glycemic Load on Metabolic Adaptation and Body Composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A randomized controlled trial of high glycemic load (HG) and low glycemic load (LG) diets with food provided for 6 months and self-administered for 6 additional months at 30% caloric restriction (CR) was performed in 29 overweight adults (mean+/-SD, age 35+/-5y; BMI 27.5+/-1.5 kg/m2). Total energy e...

  15. Dietary glycemic index, glycemic load and incidence of type 2 diabetes in Japanese men and women: the Japan public health center-based prospective study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Japanese diets contain a relatively high amount of carbohydrates, and its high dietary glycemic index and glycemic load may raise the risk of diabetes in the Japanese population. The current study evaluated the associations between the dietary glycemic index, glycemic load, and the risk of type 2 diabetes in a population based cohort in Japan. Methods We observed 27,769 men and 36,864 women (4575 y) who participated in the second survey of the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study. The dietary glycemic index and glycemic load were estimated using a food-frequency questionnaire. The development of diabetes was reported in a questionnaire administered five years later, and the associations were analyzed using logistic regression after controlling for age, area, total energy intake, smoking status, family history of diabetes, physical activity, hypertension, BMI, alcohol intake, magnesium, calcium, dietary fiber and coffee intake, and occupation. Results The dietary glycemic load was positively associated with the risk of diabetes among women: the multivariable-adjusted odds ratio comparing the highest vs. the lowest quartile was 1.52 (95% CI, 1.13-2.04; P-trend?=?0.01). The association was implied to be stronger among women with BMI?glycemic index was positively associated with the risk of diabetes among men with a high intake of total fat: the multivariable-adjusted odds ratio comparing the highest vs. the lowest quartile was 1.46 (95% CI, 0.94-2.28; P-trend?=?0.04). Among women with a high total fat intake, those in the first and second quartiles of the dietary glycemic index had a significant reduced risk of diabetes, compared with those in the first quartile who had a lower total fat level (multivariable-adjusted odds ratio?=?0.59 with 95% CI, 0.37-0.94, and odds ratio?=?0.63 with 95% CI, 0.40-0.998 respectively). Conclusions The population-based cohort study in Japan indicated that diets with a high dietary glycemic load increase the risk of type 2 diabetes among women. Total fat intake may modify the association between the dietary glycemic index and the risk of type 2 diabetes among men and women. PMID:24370346

  16. The Effects of Berberis vulgaris Fruit Extract on Serum Lipoproteins, apoB, apoA-I, Homocysteine, Glycemic Control and Total Antioxidant Capacity in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shidfar, Farzad; Ebrahimi, Shima Seyyed; Hosseini, Sharieh; Heydari, Iraj; Shidfar, Shahrzad; Hajhassani, Giti

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a well-known endocrine and metabolic disorder which has reached epidemic proportions worldwide and represents a serious public health concern. Hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia are two major abnormalities which are major cardiovascular risk factors. Berberine is a major alkaloid in Berberis vulgaris fruit extract (BVFE) which have important role in regulation of serum glucose and fat metabolism in-vivo and in-vitro but its role in type 2 diabetes have not been extensively examined. The aim of this study was the effect of BVFE on serum lipoproteins, apoB, apoA-I, homocysteine, glycemic control and total antioxidant capacity in type 2 diabetic patients. In a double-blind randomised clinical trial, 31 diabetic patients were randomly assigned to 3 g/d BVFE or placebo for 3 months. Serum glucose, lipoproteins, apoB, apoA-I, insulin, homocysteine and HbA1c were measured at the baseline and also at the end of the 3rd month. At the beginning and end of 1st, 2nd and 3rd months, a 24-h dietary recall questionnaire about each patients was completed. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 16. There were significant decreases in serum TG, TC, LDL-c, apo B, glucose, and insulin and also a significant increase in TAC at the end of the study in BVFE group compared to the control group (p = 0.001, p = 0.001, p = 0.001, p = 0.001, p = 0.002, p = 0.01 and p = 0.0001 respectively). There were significant differences in serum TG (p = 0.0001), TC (p = 0.001), LDL-c (p = 0.001), apoB (p = 0.001), glucose (p = 0.002), insulin (p = 0.01), TAC (p = 0.005), and insulin resistance (p = 0.01) between the two groups at the end of the study; but homocysteine, HbA1c and HDL-c showed no significant changes between the two groups at the end of study. The intake of 3 g/d BVFE for 3 months may have benefical effects on lipoproteins, apoproteins, glycemic control and TAC in type 2 diabetic patients. PMID:24250489

  17. Association of dietary glycemic index and glycemic load with endometrial cancer risk among Chinese women.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wang Hong; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Zhang, Xianglan; Ruan, Zhixian; Cai, Hui; Zheng, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the association of dietary glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) with the risk of endometrial cancer in a population-based, case-control study of 1199 endometrial cancer patients and 1212 age-frequency-matched controls in urban Shanghai, China, where diets are typically high in carbohydrates and have a high GL. Information on dietary habits, physical activity, and other relevant information was collected using a validated questionnaire, and anthropometric measurements were taken. Logistic regression was applied in the analysis. Dietary GI and GL were independently associated with risk for endometrial cancer but carbohydrate intake was unrelated to risk. Multivariable-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for increasing quartiles of intake were 1.0, 1.3, 1.4, and 2.2 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.2-4.0] for dietary GL (P(trend) = 0.02) and 1.0, 1.2, 1.4, and 1.4 (95% CI: 1.0-2.0) for dietary GI (P(trend) = 0.02). High intake of staples, especially rice, was positively associated with endometrial cancer. The association with GI was more evident among lean and normal weight women, although the test for interaction was not significant. This study suggests that intake of high GL or GI foods, but not carbohydrates per se, may increase risk for endometrial cancer. PMID:25495185

  18. Effects of Liraglutide Combined with Short-Term Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion on Glycemic Control and Beta Cell Function in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Weijian; Liu, Liehua; Liu, Juan; Chen, Ailing; Deng, Wanping; Zhang, Pengyuan; Cao, Xiaopei; Liao, Zhihong; Xiao, Haipeng; Liu, Jianbin; Li, Yanbing

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the effects of liraglutide in combination with short-term continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) therapy on glycemic control and beta cell function in patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Thirty-nine eligible newly diagnosed T2DM patients were recruited and randomized to receive either of two therapies: short-term CSII alone (CSII alone group) or CSII in combination with liraglutide (CSII + Lira group) for 12 weeks. Blood glucose control, homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) indices, and acute insulin response (AIR) were compared between the two groups. The patients in CSII + Lira group achieved euglycemia with equivalent insulin dosage in shorter time (1 (0) versus 2 (3) days, P = 0.039). HbA1c at the end of study was comparable between two groups (6.3 ± 0.7% versus 6.0 ± 0.5%, for CSII alone group and CSII + Lira group, resp., P = 0.325). The increment of AIR was higher in CSII + Lira group (177.58 (351.57) μU·min/mL versus 58.15 (51.30) μU·min/mL, P < 0.001). However, after stopping liraglutide, its effect on beta cell function disappeared completely. Liraglutide combined with short-term CSII was effective in further improving beta cell function, but the beneficial effects did not sustain after suspension of the therapy. PMID:26640805

  19. Glycemic Variability and Oxidative Stress: A Link between Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Saisho, Yoshifumi

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with a two to three-fold increase in risk of cardiovascular disease. However, intensive glucose-lowering therapy aiming at reducing HbA1c to a near-normal level failed to suppress cardiovascular events in recent randomized controlled trials. HbA1c reflects average glucose level rather than glycemic variability. In in vivo and in vitro studies, glycemic variability has been shown to be associated with greater reactive oxygen species production and vascular damage, compared to chronic hyperglycemia. These findings suggest that management of glycemic variability may reduce cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes; however, clinical studies have shown conflicting results. This review summarizes the current knowledge on glycemic variability and oxidative stress, and discusses the clinical implications. PMID:25314300

  20. EFFECTS OF DIETARY GLYCEMIC LOAD ON MOOD DURING CALORIC RESTRICTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A 1-yr randomized hypocaloric trial tested the effects of high glycemic load (HG: 60% high glycemic index carbohydrate, 20% fat, 20% protein) and low glycemic load (LG: 40% lower glycemic index carbohydrate, 30% fat, 30% protein) diets on mood parameters in 28 healthy men and women (mean+/-SD, age 3...

  1. Low glycemic index treatment for epilepsy in tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    Larson, Anna M; Pfeifer, Heidi H; Thiele, Elizabeth A

    2012-03-01

    Retrospective chart review of 15 patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) who initiated the low glycemic index treatment (LGIT) for epilepsy management at Massachusetts General Hospital over a five-year period. Prior to dietary therapy, this cohort (average age: 8.5 years) had tried an average of 5.8 anti-epileptic drugs with incomplete seizure control. At 6 months on the LGIT, 7/15 (47%) patients experienced >50% reduction in seizure frequency. PMID:22119636

  2. Glycemic Index, Glycemic Load, Carbohydrates, and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Darren C.; Threapleton, Diane E.; Evans, Charlotte E.L.; Cleghorn, Christine L.; Nykjaer, Camilla; Woodhead, Charlotte; Burley, Victoria J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Diets with high glycemic index (GI), with high glycemic load (GL), or high in all carbohydrates may predispose to higher blood glucose and insulin concentrations, glucose intolerance, and risk of type 2 diabetes. We aimed to conduct a systematic literature review and doseresponse meta-analysis of evidence from prospective cohorts. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We searched the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, MEDLINE in-process, Embase, CAB Abstracts, ISI Web of Science, and BIOSIS for prospective studies of GI, GL, and total carbohydrates in relation to risk of type 2 diabetes up to 17 July 2012. Data were extracted from 24 publications on 21 cohort studies. Studies using different exposure categories were combined on the same scale using linear and nonlinear doseresponse trends. Summary relative risks (RRs) were estimated using random-effects meta-analysis. RESULTS The summary RR was 1.08 per 5 GI units (95% CI 1.021.15; P = 0.01), 1.03 per 20 GL units (95% CI 1.001.05; P = 0.02), and 0.97 per 50 g/day of carbohydrate (95% CI 0.901.06; P = 0.5). Doseresponse trends were linear for GI and GL but more complex for total carbohydrate intake. Heterogeneity was high for all exposures (I2 >50%), partly accounted for by different covariate adjustment and length of follow-up. CONCLUSIONS Included studies were observational and should be interpreted cautiously. However, our findings are consistent with protective effects of low dietary GI and GL, quantifying the range of intakes associated with lower risk. Future research could focus on the type of sugars and other carbohydrates associated with greatest risk. PMID:24265366

  3. Maternal control of early mouse development.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Zheng, Ping; Dean, Jurrien

    2010-03-01

    The hiatus between oocyte and embryonic gene transcription dictates a role for stored maternal factors in early mammalian development. Encoded by maternal-effect genes, these factors accumulate during oogenesis and enable the activation of the embryonic genome, the subsequent cleavage stages of embryogenesis and the initial establishment of embryonic cell lineages. Recent studies in mice have yielded new findings on the role of maternally provided proteins and multi-component complexes in preimplantation development. Nevertheless, significant gaps remain in our mechanistic understanding of the networks that regulate early mammalian embryogenesis, which provide an impetus and opportunities for future investigations. PMID:20179092

  4. Modeling predictors of changes in glycemic control and diabetes-specific quality of life amongst adults with type 1 diabetes 1 year after structured education in flexible, intensive insulin therapy.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Debbie; Bond, Rod; Lawton, Julia; Rankin, David; Heller, Simon; Clark, Marie; Speight, Jane

    2015-10-01

    Few studies have identified determinants of glycemic control (HbA1c) and diabetes-specific quality of life (DSQoL) in adults with type 1 diabetes. To identify factors predicting outcomes following structured diabetes education. 262 participants completed biomedical and questionnaire assessments before, and throughout 1 year of follow-up. The proportion of variance explained ranged from 28 to 62 % (DSQoLS) and 14-20 % (HbA1c). When change in psychosocial variables were examined, reduced hypoglycemia fear, lower 'perceived diabetes seriousness', greater self-efficacy and well-being predicted QoL improvements from baseline to 3-months. Increased frequency of blood glucose testing predicted improvements in HbA1c from baseline to 6-months. Greater benefits may be achieved if programs focus explicitly on psychosocial factors. Self-care behaviours did not predict HbA1c suggesting existing assessment tools need refinement. Evaluation of treatment mechanisms in self-management programs is recommended. PMID:26072044

  5. Genetic Risk Score Modelling for Disease Progression in New-Onset Type 1 Diabetes Patients: Increased Genetic Load of Islet-Expressed and Cytokine-Regulated Candidate Genes Predicts Poorer Glycemic Control

    PubMed Central

    Brorsson, Caroline A.; Nielsen, Lotte B.; Andersen, Marie Louise; Kaur, Simranjeet; Bergholdt, Regine; Hansen, Lars; Mortensen, Henrik B.; Pociot, Flemming; Størling, Joachim; Hvidoere Study Group on Childhood Diabetes

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified over 40 type 1 diabetes risk loci. The clinical impact of these loci on β-cell function during disease progression is unknown. We aimed at testing whether a genetic risk score could predict glycemic control and residual β-cell function in type 1 diabetes (T1D). As gene expression may represent an intermediate phenotype between genetic variation and disease, we hypothesized that genes within T1D loci which are expressed in islets and transcriptionally regulated by proinflammatory cytokines would be the best predictors of disease progression. Two-thirds of 46 GWAS candidate genes examined were expressed in human islets, and 11 of these significantly changed expression levels following exposure to proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β + IFNγ + TNFα) for 48 h. Using the GWAS single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from each locus, we constructed a genetic risk score based on the cumulative number of risk alleles carried in children with newly diagnosed T1D. With each additional risk allele carried, HbA1c levels increased significantly within first year after diagnosis. Network and gene ontology (GO) analyses revealed that several of the 11 candidate genes have overlapping biological functions and interact in a common network. Our results may help predict disease progression in newly diagnosed children with T1D which can be exploited for optimizing treatment. PMID:26904692

  6. Relation of Dietary Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load to Coronary Artery Calcium in Asymptomatic Korean Adults.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yuni; Chang, Yoosoo; Ryu, Seungho; Cho, Juhee; Kim, Mi Kyung; Ahn, Younjhin; Lee, Jung Eun; Sung, Eunju; Kim, Boyoung; Ahn, Jiin; Kim, Chan-Won; Rampal, Sanjay; Zhao, Di; Zhang, Yiyi; Pastor-Barriuso, Roberto; Lima, Joao A C; Chung, Eun Chul; Shin, Hocheol; Guallar, Eliseo

    2015-08-15

    The relation between glycemic index, glycemic load, and subclinical coronary atherosclerosis is unknown. The aim of the study was to evaluate the associations between energy-adjusted glycemic index, glycemic load, and coronary artery calcium (CAC). This study was cross-sectional analysis of 28,429 asymptomatic Korean men and women (mean age 41.4years) without a history of diabetes or cardiovascular disease. All participants underwent a health screening examination between March 2011 and April 2013, and dietary intake over the preceding year was estimated using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Cardiac computed tomography was used for CAC scoring. The prevalence of detectable CAC (CAC score >0) was 12.4%. In multivariable-adjusted models, the CAC score ratios (95% confidence intervals) comparing the highest to the lowest quintile of glycemic index and glycemic load were 1.74 (1.08 to 2.81; p trend= 0.03) and 3.04 (1.43 to 6.46; p trend= 0.005), respectively. These associations did not differ by clinical subgroups, including the participants at low cardiovascular risk. In conclusion, these findings suggest that high dietary glycemic index and glycemic load were associated with a greater prevalence and degree of CAC, with glycemic load having a stronger association. PMID:26073677

  7. Glycemic management of type 2 diabetes: an emerging strategy with oral agents, insulins, and combinations.

    PubMed

    Riddle, Matthew C

    2005-03-01

    The many antihyperglycemic preparations are best used for type 2 diabetes in a logical sequence, using combinations of agents, with clear targets for glycemic control. On the basis of long familiarity, proven benefit and known side effects, and low cost, the sulfonylureas, metformin, and insulin still deserve to be the standard treatments. As shown in the central shaded area of Fig. 4, standard treatment begins with monotherapy and progresses to oral combination therapy and then to two oral agents plus basal insulin. Several triggers for deviation from the standard methods are identified (see Fig. 4). The incidence of each of the conditions that require early individualized treatment has not been studied, but it seems reasonable to estimate no more than 10% each for a strongly symptomatic presentation, inability to use a sulfonylurea or metformin, inability to use insulin, or an early need for prandial therapy. If this estimate is correct, approximately two thirds of patients who are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should do well with standard therapy for up to 10 years using the standard methods shown. Eventually, many more will need individualized treatment to maintain glycemic control. This scheme is certain to evolve as further information on the nonglycemic benefits (or hazards) of the various therapies appears and as new treatments are released. Notably, agents that mimic or potentiate the effects of gastrointestinal peptides, such as amylin and GLP- 1 analogues and dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitors, are likely to alter the current algorithm. For now, systematic application of the scheme (see Fig. 4) should improve the success of treatment greatly from its currently disappointing level. PMID:15752923

  8. Mindfulness and Inhibitory Control in Early Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oberle, Eva; Schonert-Reichl, Kimberly A.; Lawlor, Molly Stewart; Thomson, Kimberly C.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between the executive control process of inhibition and self-reported dispositional mindfulness, controlling for gender, grade, and cortisol levels in 99 (43% female) fourth- and fifth-graders ([X-bar] = 10.23 years, SD = 0.53). Students completed a measure of mindful attention awareness and a computerized…

  9. Mindfulness and Inhibitory Control in Early Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oberle, Eva; Schonert-Reichl, Kimberly A.; Lawlor, Molly Stewart; Thomson, Kimberly C.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between the executive control process of inhibition and self-reported dispositional mindfulness, controlling for gender, grade, and cortisol levels in 99 (43% female) fourth- and fifth-graders ([X-bar] = 10.23 years, SD = 0.53). Students completed a measure of mindful attention awareness and a computerized

  10. Effects of Glycemic Regulation on Chronic Postischemia Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ross-Huot, Marie-Christine; Laferrire, Andr; Gi, Cho Min; Khorashadi, Mina; Schricker, Thomas; Coderre, Terence J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injuries consist of enhanced oxidative and inflammatory responses along with microvascular dysfunction following prolonged ischemia and reperfusion. Since I/R injuries induce chronic postischemia pain (CPIP) in laboratory animals, it is possible that surgical procedures utilizing prolonged ischemia may result in chronic postoperative pain. Glycemic modulation during ischemia and reperfusion could impact pain following I/R injury, as glucose triggers oxidative, inflammatory and thrombotic reactions, whereas insulin has anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory and vasodilatory properties. Methods 110 rats underwent a 3-h period of ischemia followed by reperfusion to produce CPIP. CPIP rats had previously been divided into 6 groups with differing glycemic-modulation paradigms: 1) normal feeding; 2) fasting; 3) fasting with normal saline administration; 4) fasting with dextrose administration; 5) normal feeding with insulin administration; and 6) normal feeding with dextrose and insulin administration. Blood glucose levels were assessed during ischemia and reperfusion in these separate groups of rats, and they were tested for mechanical and cold allodynia over the following 21 days (on days 2, 5, 7, 9, 12 and 21 post-I/R injury). Results I/R injury in rats with normoglycemia or relative hyperglycemia (groups 1, 4) led to significant mechanical and cold allodynia; conversely, relative hypoglycemia associated with insulin treatment or fasting (groups 2, 3, and 5) reduced allodynia induced by I/R injury. Importantly, insulin treatment did not reduce allodynia when administered to fed rats given dextrose (group 6). Conclusion Our results suggest that glycemic levels at the time of I/R injury significantly modulate postinjury pain thresholds in CPIP rats. Strict glycemic control during I/R injury significantly reduces CPIP pain and, and conversely, hyperglycemia significantly enhances it, which could have potential clinical applications especially in the surgical field. PMID:21795964

  11. Glycemic response of mashed potato containing high-viscocity hydroxypropylmethylcellulose.

    PubMed

    Lightowler, Helen J; Henry, C Jeya K

    2009-08-01

    Potatoes generally have one of the highest glycemic index values of any food. Relatively small differences in the glycemic response (GR) of regularly consumed starch foods have shown beneficial effects on health. Lowering the GR of a potato-based meal has potentially wide-reaching health benefits. High-viscosity hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HV-HPMC) is a modified cellulose dietary fiber extensively used in the food industry. We hypothesized that the GR of a high-glycemic index product such as mashed potato would be lower with the addition of HV-HPMC. In a nonblind, randomized, repeat-measure, crossover controlled trial, 15 healthy adults consumed portions of mashed potato with different doses (0%, 1%, 2%, and 4%) of a specially selected and optimized HV-HPMC and a reference food (glucose) on separate occasions. Five subjects were excluded from the final analysis due to noncompliance with study procedures. Capillary blood glucose was measured in fasted subjects and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after starting to eat. For each sample, the incremental area under the blood glucose response curve was calculated and the GR determined. There was a significant lowering effect of HV-HPMC on GR (P < .001) of mashed potato. Glycemic responses for all mashed potato samples with the HV-HPMC were significantly lower than the standard mashed potato: 1% level (P < .05), 2% level (P < .05), and 4% level (P < .05). However, there was no significant effect of the HV-HPMC dose on GR. We conclude that addition of select HV-HPMC to mashed potato blunts GR. PMID:19761889

  12. Relationship Between Standardized Glycemic Protocols and Healthcare Cost.

    PubMed

    Coto, Jeffrey A; Yehle, Karen S; Foli, Karen J

    2016-02-01

    Rising healthcare costs and the management of diabetes are financially straining to healthcare organizations. The study purpose was to examine whether a direct relationship existed between the cost of hospitalization, length of stay, excess admission days, and discharge blood glucose (DC-BG) levels and utilizing a standardized glycemic protocol. A retrospective cohort analysis was conducted of adult diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM-2) patients' pre-diabetic protocol (January 1, 2011-December 31, 2011) and post-diabetic protocol (August 1, 2012-October 31, 2012). The sample included DM-2 inpatients aged ?18 years admitted without complications and/or with abnormal fasting blood glucose. Pre-protocol sample comprised n = 346 subjects and post-protocol sample comprised n = 149 subjects. Patients who received the diabetic protocol in 2012 experienced a decrease in the DC-BG (p < .05) and decrease in excess admission days (p < .05). Evidence supports that utilizing a standardized glycemic protocol improves glycemic control and reduces healthcare cost. PMID:24939931

  13. Personalized Nutrition by Prediction of Glycemic Responses.

    PubMed

    Zeevi, David; Korem, Tal; Zmora, Niv; Israeli, David; Rothschild, Daphna; Weinberger, Adina; Ben-Yacov, Orly; Lador, Dar; Avnit-Sagi, Tali; Lotan-Pompan, Maya; Suez, Jotham; Mahdi, Jemal Ali; Matot, Elad; Malka, Gal; Kosower, Noa; Rein, Michal; Zilberman-Schapira, Gili; Dohnalov, Lenka; Pevsner-Fischer, Meirav; Bikovsky, Rony; Halpern, Zamir; Elinav, Eran; Segal, Eran

    2015-11-19

    Elevated postprandial blood glucose levels constitute a global epidemic and a major risk factor for prediabetes and type II diabetes, but existing dietary methods for controlling them have limited efficacy. Here, we continuously monitored week-long glucose levels in an 800-person cohort, measured responses to 46,898 meals, and found high variability in the response to identical meals, suggesting that universal dietary recommendations may have limited utility. We devised a machine-learning algorithm that integrates blood parameters, dietary habits, anthropometrics, physical activity, and gut microbiota measured in this cohort and showed that it accurately predicts personalized postprandial glycemic response to real-life meals. We validated these predictions in an independent 100-person cohort. Finally, a blinded randomized controlled dietary intervention based on this algorithm resulted in significantly lower postprandial responses and consistent alterations to gut microbiota configuration. Together, our results suggest that personalized diets may successfully modify elevated postprandial blood glucose and its metabolic consequences. VIDEO ABSTRACT. PMID:26590418

  14. Understanding the Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load and Their Practical Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarim, Fernanda Lorenzi; Stancanelli, Mirtes; Brenzikofer, Rene; de Macedo, Denise Vaz

    2009-01-01

    We have introduced the study of synthesis pathways using two experiments: 1--the determination of the glycemic index (GI) of some foods and the effects of fiber and fat on the GI; 2--the determination of blood glucose levels after the ingestion of meals with high and low glycemic loads (GL). After a practice assembly, when the foods and meals that…

  15. Understanding the Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load and Their Practical Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarim, Fernanda Lorenzi; Stancanelli, Mirtes; Brenzikofer, Rene; de Macedo, Denise Vaz

    2009-01-01

    We have introduced the study of synthesis pathways using two experiments: 1--the determination of the glycemic index (GI) of some foods and the effects of fiber and fat on the GI; 2--the determination of blood glucose levels after the ingestion of meals with high and low glycemic loads (GL). After a practice assembly, when the foods and meals that

  16. Control Networks and Neuromodulators of Early Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posner, Michael I.; Rothbart, Mary K.; Sheese, Brad E.; Voelker, Pascale

    2012-01-01

    In adults, most cognitive and emotional self-regulation is carried out by a network of brain regions, including the anterior cingulate, insula, and areas of the basal ganglia, related to executive attention. We propose that during infancy, control systems depend primarily upon a brain network involved in orienting to sensory events that includes…

  17. Control Networks and Neuromodulators of Early Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posner, Michael I.; Rothbart, Mary K.; Sheese, Brad E.; Voelker, Pascale

    2012-01-01

    In adults, most cognitive and emotional self-regulation is carried out by a network of brain regions, including the anterior cingulate, insula, and areas of the basal ganglia, related to executive attention. We propose that during infancy, control systems depend primarily upon a brain network involved in orienting to sensory events that includes

  18. Effects of high-intensity interval exercise versus continuous moderate-intensity exercise on postprandial glycemic control assessed by continuous glucose monitoring in obese adults.

    PubMed

    Little, Jonathan P; Jung, Mary E; Wright, Amy E; Wright, Wendi; Manders, Ralph J F

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of acute high-intensity interval training (HIIT) compared with continuous moderate-intensity (CMI) exercise on postprandial hyperglycemia in overweight or obese adults. Ten inactive, overweight or obese adults (41 11 yrs, BMI = 36 7 kg/m(2)) performed an acute bout of HIIT (10 1 min at approximately 90% peak heart rate (HRpeak) with 1-min recovery periods) or matched work CMI (30 min at approximately 65% HRpeak) in a randomized, counterbalanced fashion. Exercise was performed 2 h after breakfast, and glucose control was assessed by continuous glucose monitoring under standardized dietary conditions over 24 h. Postprandial glucose (PPG) responses to lunch, dinner, and the following day's breakfast were analyzed and compared with a no-exercise control day. Exercise did not affect the PPG responses to lunch, but performing both HIIT and CMI in the morning significantly reduced the PPG incremental area under the curve (AUC) following dinner when compared with control (HIIT = 110 35, CMI = 125 34, control = 162 46 mmol/L 2 h, p < 0.05). The PPG AUC (HIIT = 125 53, CMI = 186 55, control = 194 96 mmol/L 2 h) and the PPG spike (HIIT = ?2.1 0.9, CMI = ?3.0 0.9, control = ?3.0 1.5 mmol/l) following breakfast on the following day were significantly lower following HIIT compared with both CMI and control (p < 0.05). Absolute AUC and absolute glucose spikes were not different between HIIT, CMI, or control for any meal (p > 0.05 for all). We conclude that a single session of HIIT has greater and more lasting effects on reducing incremental PPG when compared with CMI. PMID:24773254

  19. Increased high-density lipoprotein-3 binding to leukocytes following weight loss and improved glycemic control in type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Paniagua, J A; Lpez-Miranda, J; Jansen, S; Zambrana, J L; Lpez Segura, F; Jimnez Pereprez, J A; Prez-Jimnez, F

    2000-06-01

    This study evaluates the effect on high-density lipoprotein (HDL) binding activity in cultured granulocytes before and after metabolic control of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus ([NIDDM] type 2 diabetes) patients. In 20 type 2 diabetic patients, diabetic control was accomplished by administration of oral antidiabetic agents and dietary restrictions. Adequate metabolic control was reflected by a decrease in the fasting glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), mean insulin, and body mass index (BMI). After control of the diabetes, the mean HDL3 cholesterol was increased from 0.918 +/- 0.05 to 1.008 +/- 0.05 mmol/L (P < .05) and apolipoprotein AI (apo AI) was increased from 103 +/- 5.8 to 115 +/- 5.1 mg/dL (P < .01). The HDL3 maximum specific binding was higher after versus before diabetic control, 77 +/- 6 versus 122 +/- 8 ng/mg cell protein (P < .01). This increase was related to an increase in maximum binding ([Bmax] from 4.97 x 10(-10) to 8.3 x 10(-10) mol/L, P < .001), and no significant changes were observed in the Kd (from 1.47 x 10(-7) v 2.04 x 10(-7) mol/L). These results suggest that the metabolic control of type 2 diabetes increases HDL3 binding activity. PMID:10877191

  20. Effects of Improving Glycemic Control with Insulin on Leptin, Adiponectin, Ghrelin and Neuropeptidey Levels in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Katsiki, Niki; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Gotzamani-Psarrakou, Anna; Didangelos, Triantafillos P; Yovos, John G; Karamitsos, Dimitrios T

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Insulin therapy is associated with weight gain in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Several peptides are implicated in appetite control. We evaluated the effects of insulin-induced improved glycaemic control on leptin, adiponectin, ghrelin, neuropeptide Y (NPY) levels and patient characteristics. Method: Consecutive T2DM patients (n = 90) were divided into 2 groups: Group A: 45 insulin-naïve uncontrolled (glycosylated haemoglobin A1c; HbA1c >7%) patients on oral hypoglycaemic agents (OHAs) who converted to insulin monotherapy. Group B: 45 well-controlled (HbA1c <7%) patients on OHAs. Both groups were monitored at baseline, 3 and 6 months. Males and females were analyzed separately because some hormone levels differ between genders. Results: In both genders, insulin therapy (Group A) was associated with significant (p = 0.003 to <0.001) increases in weight, body mass index and leptin levels and significant decreases in glucose, HbA1c and NPY levels. In male insulin-treated patients a significant increase in adiponectin levels (p = 0.008) was observed. There were significant correlations (p = 0.016 to <0.001) between leptin levels, waist circumference and body fat in all patient groups, except group B males. Conclusion: Changes in leptin, adiponectin and NPY levels may occur after insulin-induced improved glycaemic control. These changes may be influenced by gender, weight, body fat and HbA1c. PMID:21760856

  1. Fibroblast growth factor 21 prevents glycemic deterioration in insulin deficient mouse models of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Birgitte; Omar, Bilal A; Rakipovski, Gnaj; Raun, Kirsten; Ahrn, Bo

    2015-10-01

    In type 1 diabetes, there is a rapid loss of glycemic control immediately after onset of the disease. We aimed to determine if the deterioration of glycemic control that occurs early after the onset of insulin-deficient diabetes could be blunted by treatment with recombinant fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21). Normal C57BL/6J mice made diabetic by a single high dose injection of streptozotocin (STZ) were randomized to receive twice daily subcutaneous injection of vehicle or recombinant human FGF21 at doses of 0.3 and 1.0 mg/kg for 10 days. Body weight was recorded daily and 5 h fasted glucose, insulin, glucagon, free fatty acids and ketones were determined at 6 and 10 days post-randomization. The increase in fasting plasma glucose induced by STZ in untreated mice was prevented with FGF21 at 0.3 mg/kg BID. In contrast, at 1.0 mg/kg BID, FGF21 did not prevent the rise in plasma glucose after STZ. At the end of the study, plasma glucagon was significantly higher in the diabetic group treated with FGF21 1.0 mg/kg BID than in the untreated group. This was not seen for the group treated with FGF21 0.3 mg/kg BID. There were significant dose dependent reductions in plasma free fatty acids with FGF21 treatment but no significant change in plasma ketones (?-hydroxybutyrate). FGF21 treatment did not have significant effects on body weight in lean insulin deficient mice. In conclusion, FGF21 prevents increases in glycaemia and has lipid lowering properties in mouse models of insulin deficient diabetes, although by increasing the dose increased glucagon levels are seen and hyperglycemia persists. PMID:26144370

  2. [Glycemic variability and continuous monitoring of glycemia].

    PubMed

    Przn, Martin; Soupal, Jan

    2014-09-01

    Blood glucose levels are not constant in ther human body even in physiological status. It fluctuates depending on food intake, exercise, psychological and other factors. Normally it fluctuates between 3.9 to 7.5 mmol/l and in fasting in the standard conditions it does not exceed even more narrow range 3.9 to 5.5 mmol/l. Fluctuations are more pronounced in patient with diabetes. Hyperglycemia is a common and basic pathology in diabetes, however, antidiabetic drug often cause hypoglycemia, both increasing the range for glucose fluctuations. The level of glucose fluctuation is called glycemic variability (GV). Glycemic variability is now a favorite target of scientific research in dia-betology. Increased glycemic variability is associated with hypoglycemia, possibly may contribute to chronic dia-betes complications and negatively influences quality of life of diabetic patients. Last but not least, thanks to the new technology of continuous glucose monitoring, we can better describe and measure it. Finally, glycemic variability emerges as a potentially important therapeutical target.Key words: continuous glucose monitoring - glycemic variability - insulin pump - sensor augmented pump. PMID:25294765

  3. The Effect of Diabetes Self-Management Education on Body Weight, Glycemic Control, and Other Metabolic Markers in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Christopher W. K.; Chan, Lawrence W. C.; Law, Helen K. W.; Ying, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Aims. To comprehensively evaluate the effect of a short-term diabetes self-management education (DSME) on metabolic markers and atherosclerotic parameters in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods. 76 patients with type 2 diabetes were recruited in this study. They were divided into the intervention group (n = 36) and control group (n = 40). The patients in the intervention group received a 3-month intervention, including an 8-week education on self-management of diabetes mellitus and subsequent 4 weeks of practice of the self-management guidelines. The patients in the control group received standard advice on medical nutrition therapy. Metabolic markers, carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT), and carotid arterial stiffness (CAS) of the patients in both groups were assessed before and after the 3-month intervention. Results. There was a significant reduction in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c, −0.2 ± 0.56% versus 0.08 ± 0.741%; P < 0.05) and body weight (−1.19 ± 1.39 kg versus −0.61 ± 2.04 kg; P < 0.05) in the intervention group as compared to the control group. However, no significant improvements were found in other metabolic markers, CIMT and CAS (P > 0.05). Conclusions. DSME can improve HbA1c and body weight in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:25136645

  4. Glycemic responses and sensory characteristics of whole yellow pea flour added to novel functional foods.

    PubMed

    Marinangeli, Christopher P F; Kassis, Amira N; Jones, Peter J H

    2009-01-01

    A fundamental understanding regarding postprandial glycemic responses to foods containing whole yellow-pea flour (WYPF) remains unknown. This, alongside concerns that WYPF possesses unfavorable sensory characteristics has limited the incorporation of WYPF into new functional food products as a healthy novel ingredient. The objective of this study was to evaluate how WYPF modulates postprandial glycemic responses as well as sensory characteristics in novel foods. In a single-blind crossover trial, the present study assessed postprandial glycemic responses of banana bread, biscotti, and spaghetti containing either WYPF or whole wheat flour (WWF). Boiled yellow peas (BYP) and white bread (WB) were used as positive and negative controls, respectively. On day 1, subjects evaluated appearance, taste, texture, smell as well as overall acceptance of each WYPF and WWF food on a 5-point hedonic scale. WYPF banana bread (97.9 +/- 17.8 mmol x min/L) and biscotti (83 +/- 13 mmol x min/L), as well as BYP (112.3 +/- 19.9 mmol x min/L), reduced (P < 0.05) glycemic responses compared to WB (218.1 +/- 29.5 mmol x min/L). The glycemic response of WYPF pasta (160.7 +/- 19.4 mmol x min/L) was comparable to WB. WYPF biscotti produced a lower (P = 0.019) postprandial glycemic response compared to WWF biscotti (117.2 +/- 13.1 mmol x min/L). Hedonic responses between corresponding foods were similar except for the WYPF pasta (2.9 +/- 0.9) which possessed a lower sensory score (P = 0.02) for smell compared to WWF pasta (3.6 +/- 1). WYPF can be used to produce low-glycemic functional foods possessing sensory attributes that are comparable to identical food products containing WWF. PMID:20492127

  5. Beneficial effect of branched-chain amino acid supplementation on glycemic control in chronic hepatitis C patients with insulin resistance: implications for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Yumie; Takamura, Toshinari; Kita, Yuki; Ando, Hitoshi; Ueda, Teruyuki; Kato, Kenichiro; Misu, Hirofumi; Sunagozaka, Hajime; Sakai, Yoshio; Yamashita, Tatsuya; Mizukoshi, Eishiro; Honda, Masao; Kaneko, Shuichi

    2012-10-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) improve disorders of albumin metabolism, quality of life, subjective symptoms, and prognosis in patients with chronic hepatitis. However, it remains unclear whether they improve insulin resistance. We examined the effects of BCAAs on glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in patients with chronic hepatitis C and insulin resistance. Individuals with a definitive diagnosis of chronic hepatitis C and insulin resistance were eligible for participation. Eligible participants were randomly assigned to the BCAA group or a control group. Participants were then crossed over to the other treatment for a further 12 weeks. Baseline clinical features, laboratory markers, fatty acid levels, and insulin sensitivity, assessed with oral glucose tolerance tests and a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp, were also examined before and 12 and 24 weeks after the beginning of the study. Of the 27 patients who completed the study, 14 began in the BCAA group and 13 began as controls. There were no significant differences in glucose metabolism parameters or lipid profiles between the groups. HbA1c values were improved in 10 patients and worsened or remained unchanged in 17 patients. The only predictive variable for change in HbA1c was the baseline Matsuda index: the lower the index, the greater the improvement in HbA1c values. BCAA therapy did not have adverse effects on glucose tolerance or insulin sensitivity in patients with chronic hepatitis C and insulin resistance. Moreover, it had a therapeutic effect on HbA1c values in patients with marked peripheral (primarily muscle) insulin resistance. PMID:22520843

  6. Effect of Probiotics on Lipid Profile, Glycemic Control, Insulin Action, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammatory Markers in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: A Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mazloom, Zohreh; Yousefinejad, Abbas; Dabbaghmanesh, Mohammad Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Background: The dramatic increase in the incidence of diabetes and its associated complications require a natural and safe solution to control and delay such complications. The present study tested the hypothesis that probiotics may affect biochemical indices of diabetic patients Methods: Thirty four types 2 diabetic patients aged between 25 to 65 years, and diagnosed with diabetes for less than 15 years were selected for this single- blinded clinical trial. Using balanced block random sampling, the patients were divided into two groups of intervention (probiotics) and placebo. Blood samples tested for baseline glucose, insulin, TG, total cholesterol, LDL-C, HDL-C, malondialdehyde, high sensitive CRP (hs-CRP) and IL-6. After six weeks of experiment, fasting blood samples were re-tested and the data obtained were analyzed using SPSS software. Results: There were no significant differences between anthropometric data including body mass index and waist to hip ratio in placebo and treatment groups. There was no significant difference in FBS, Serum TG concentration total cholesterol and LDL-C levels between placebo and treatment groups. HDL-C levels were slightly elevated after probiotic treatment, which were not statistically significant. Insulin, MDA and IL-6 levels were reduced and high sensitive CRP hs.CRP levels were elevated, although, not statistically significant. Conclusion: The result of this study indicates a non- significant declining trend in the level of TG, MDA and IL-6 and insulin resistance after consumption of probiotics. PMID:23645956

  7. Effect of Habitual Khat Chewing on Glycemic Control, Body Mass Index, and Age at Diagnosis of Diabetes in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Yemen.

    PubMed

    Al-Sharafi, Butheinah A; Gunaid, Abdallah A

    2015-01-01

    Khat chewing is common in Yemen. We conducted this study to see if it affected diabetes control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). We studied 1540 patients with type 2 DM attending an endocrinology clinic in Sana'a, Yemen, of which 997 were khat chewers (KC) and 543 were non-khat chewers (NKC). The patients answered a questionnaire regarding khat chewing. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and body mass index (BMI) were measured. KC had a higher mean HbA1c of 9.8 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 9.6-10) than the NKC, with a mean of 9.1 (95% CI 8.9-9.4) (adjusted odds ratios (AOR) 1.74, P < 0.001) after multivariate regression analysis. KC also had a lower mean BMI, 26.9 (95% CI 26.6-27.2), than the NKC, mean BMI 27.6 (95% CI 27.1-28) (P < 0.01). The mean age at diagnosis of DM among the KC group was 43.3 (10.1) and among the NKC group was 45.9 (11.8) (AOR 1.4 P < 0.008) after multivariate regression analysis. KC patients had a higher mean HbA1c, a lower BMI, and a younger age at diagnosis of type 2 DM when compared with NKC. PMID:26064075

  8. Effect of Habitual Khat Chewing on Glycemic Control, Body Mass Index, and Age at Diagnosis of Diabetes in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Yemen

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sharafi, Butheinah A; Gunaid, Abdallah A

    2015-01-01

    Khat chewing is common in Yemen. We conducted this study to see if it affected diabetes control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). We studied 1540 patients with type 2 DM attending an endocrinology clinic in Sanaa, Yemen, of which 997 were khat chewers (KC) and 543 were non-khat chewers (NKC). The patients answered a questionnaire regarding khat chewing. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and body mass index (BMI) were measured. KC had a higher mean HbA1c of 9.8 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 9.610) than the NKC, with a mean of 9.1 (95% CI 8.99.4) (adjusted odds ratios (AOR) 1.74, P < 0.001) after multivariate regression analysis. KC also had a lower mean BMI, 26.9 (95% CI 26.627.2), than the NKC, mean BMI 27.6 (95% CI 27.128) (P < 0.01). The mean age at diagnosis of DM among the KC group was 43.3 (10.1) and among the NKC group was 45.9 (11.8) (AOR 1.4 P < 0.008) after multivariate regression analysis. KC patients had a higher mean HbA1c, a lower BMI, and a younger age at diagnosis of type 2 DM when compared with NKC. PMID:26064075

  9. Temperament, Executive Control, and ADHD across Early Development

    PubMed Central

    Rabinovitz, Beth B.; O’Neill, Sarah; Rajendran, Khushmand; Halperin, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Research examining factors linking early temperament and later ADHD is limited by cross-sectional approaches and having the same informant rate both temperament and psychopathology. We used multi-informant/multi-method longitudinal data to test the hypothesis that negative emotionality during preschool is positively associated with ADHD symptom severity in middle childhood, but developing executive control mediates this relation. Children (N=161) with and without ADHD were evaluated three times: Parent and teacher temperament ratings and NEPSY Visual Attention at ages 3–4 years; WISC-IV Working Memory Index and NEPSY Response Set at age 6 years; and ADHD symptoms using the Kiddie-SADS at age 7 years. Parent and teacher ratings of preschoolers’ temperament were combined to form an Anger/Frustration composite. Similarly, an Executive Functioning composite was derived from age 6 measures. Bootstrapping was used to determine whether age 6 Executive Functioning mediated the relation between early Anger/Frustration and later ADHD symptom severity, while controlling for early executive functioning. Preschoolers’ Anger/Frustration was significantly associated with later ADHD symptoms, with this relation partially mediated by age 6 Executive Functioning. Developing executive control mediates the relation between early Anger/Frustration and later ADHD symptom severity, suggesting that Anger/Frustration influences ADHD symptom severity through its impact on developing executive control. Early interventions targeting the harmful influences of negative emotionality or enhancing executive functioning may diminish later ADHD severity. PMID:26854505

  10. Progressive zinc-induced changes in glycemic responses in lean and obese LAIN-cp rats

    SciTech Connect

    Zwick, D.; Frimpong, N.A.; Tulp, O.L. )

    1991-03-15

    The effect of diet and phenotype on glycemic status was studied in 9-17 week (wk) old female LAIN-cp rats fed isoenergetic diets containing 0, 20 (control), or 100 ppm Zn. At 9, 13 and 17 wks of age, fasting glucose (FG) of obese > lean. At age 13 wks, Fg of obese + 0 ppm Zn < control obese, and by 17 weeks, lean + 0 ppm Zn < controls, consistent with both diet and phenotype effects on FG. Four point glucose tolerance tests were determined via both intraperitoneal (ipGTT) and oral (OGT) routes at periodic intervals. ipGTT glycemic responses of control obese > lean at all ages, and at both 13 and 17 weeks, obese rats fed both 0 ppm and 100 ppm Zn diets had greater glycemic excursions at +30, +60, and +120 minutes than obese controls, and the glycemic excursions became progressively more impaired as the dietary regimens progressed. In contrast, the corresponding plasma glucoses following ipGTT in lean rats fed 0 or 100 ppm Zn diets and the OGT responses of all rats of both phenotypes remained similar to lean controls at those point. Plasma insulin concentrations of obese 0 ppm Zn < controls following ipGTT, and became progressively more impaired in obese rats fed 0 ppm Zn diet as the duration of treatment continued. These observations suggest that the progressive deterioration of glucose homeostasis when fed diets deficient or excessive in Zn content may be due to impaired pancreatic secretion and/or release of insulin.

  11. Acarbose improves glycemic control as add-on or monotherapy in Indian type-2 diabetes: Findings from the GlucoVIP multinational observational study

    PubMed Central

    Philip, Elizabeth; Sundaram, Meenakshi L.; Das, Rupam; Chauhan, Sushil Kumar; Deshpande, Sandeep; Ambhore, Sanjay; Rathod, Rahul; Manjrekar, Pravin

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the efficacy and tolerability of the anti-diabetic agent acarbose (Glucobay) as add-on or monotherapy in a range of patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), including those with cardiovascular morbidities in India. Materials and Methods: This was a part of a prospective, non-interventional, non-controlled, multicentre, multinational, observational study. The study included patients of either gender if they were aged at least 18 years and had untreated or pre-treated type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) or impaired glucose tolerance and no acarbose treatment within the 3 months before study inclusion. Results: In total, 1996 Indian patients were included in the effectiveness and 2010 in the safety analysis. Patients received acarbose (25-150 mg/day). The mean age of the patients was 50.1 years and the mean BMI was 27.2 kg/m2. Mean 2-h post-prandial plasma glucose (PPG) value and fasting blood glucose (FBG) decreased from 243.9 to 169.5 mg/dl and 158.3 to 120.4 mg/dl, respectively after the last follow-up of 12.4 weeks. The mean HbA1c value at initial visit was 8.4% and was 7.4% at the last follow-up visit. FBG, PPG and HbA1c deceased in 90.6%, 94.4% and 52.4% patients respectively, by the last follow-up visit. The mean decrease in weight and waist circumference was 1.4 kg and 1.6 cm, respectively by the last follow-up visit. Physicians assessed the efficacy of drug as positive response in very good to good in 91.08%, sufficient in 7.92% and insufficient in 0.90% of patients. Also, continuation of Acarbose was reported in 97.09% of patients. Adverse events were reported in 2.74% and drug-related adverse events were reported in 2.19% of patients. Majority of them were gastrointestinal adverse events but were not serious. Conclusion: Acarbose is effective and safe in Indian patients with T2DM. Further, it helps in weight reduction and has very good compliance in patients with T2DM. PMID:24910836

  12. Emerging trends in optical sensing of glycemic markers for diabetes monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Rishikesh; Dingari, Narahara Chari; Spegazzini, Nicolas; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Horowitz, Gary L.; Barman, Ishan

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, considerable attention has been focused on the measurement of glycemic markers, such as glycated hemoglobin and glycated albumin, that provide retrospective indices of average glucose levels in the bloodstream. While these biomarkers have been regularly used to monitor long-term glucose control in established diabetics, they have also gained traction in diabetic screening. Detection of such glycemic markers is challenging, especially in a point-of-care setting, due to the stringent requirements for sensitivity and robustness. A number of non-separation based measurement strategies were recently proposed, including photonic tools that are well suited to reagent-free marker quantitation. Here, we critically review these methods while focusing on vibrational spectroscopic methods, which offer highly specific molecular fingerprinting capability. We examine the underlying principles and the utility of these approaches as reagentless assays capable of multiplexed detection of glycemic markers and also the challenges in their eventual use in the clinic. PMID:25598563

  13. Sustained Attention and Age Predict Inhibitory Control during Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reck, Sarah G.; Hund, Alycia M.

    2011-01-01

    Executive functioning skills develop rapidly during early childhood. Recent research has focused on specifying this development, particularly predictors of executive functioning skills. Here we focus on sustained attention as a predictor of inhibitory control, one key executive functioning component. Although sustained attention and inhibitory

  14. The effects of the dietary glycemic load on type 2 diabetes risk factors during weight loss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective. To compare the effects of two calorie-restricted diets that differ in glycemic load (GL) on glucose-insulin dynamics and systemic inflammation. Design. Randomized controlled feeding trial. Setting and Participants. Thirty-four healthy overweight adults aged 24-42 years with normal fasti...

  15. Dietary glycemic load and gastric cancer risk in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Bertuccio, P; Praud, D; Chatenoud, L; Lucenteforte, E; Bosetti, C; Pelucchi, C; Rossi, M; Negri, E; La Vecchia, C

    2009-01-01

    We investigated gastric cancer risk in relation to dietary glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL), which represent indirect measures of carbohydrate absorption and consequently of dietary insulin demand, in a case-control study conducted in northern Italy between 1997 and 2007, including 230 patients with the incident, histologically confirmed gastric cancer and 547 frequency matched controls, admitted to the same hospitals as cases with acute non-neoplastic conditions. We used conditional logistic regression models, including terms for major recognised gastric cancer risk factors and non-carbohydrate energy intake. The odds ratios (ORs) in the highest vs lowest quintile were 1.9 (95% CI: 1.0–3.3) for GI and 2.5 (95% CI: 1.3–4.9) for GL. Compared with participants reporting low GL and high fruits/vegetables intake, the OR rose across strata of high GL and low fruits/vegetables, to reach 5.0 (95% CI: 2.2–11.5) for those reporting low fruits/vegetables intake and high GL. Our study may help to explain the direct relation observed in several studies between starchy foods and gastric cancer risk. PMID:19190635

  16. Diets with High or Low Protein Content and Glycemic Index for Weight-Loss Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Thomas Meinert; Dalskov, Stine-Mathilde; van Baak, Marleen; Jebb, Susan A.; Papadaki, Angeliki; Pfeiffer, Andreas F.H.; Martinez, J. Alfredo; Handjieva-Darlenska, Teodora; Kuneov, Marie; Pihlsgrd, Mats; Stender, Steen; Holst, Claus; Saris, Wim H.M.; Astrup, Arne

    2012-01-01

    Background Studies of weight-control diets that are high in protein or low in glycemic index have reached varied conclusions, probably owing to the fact that the studies had insufficient power. Methods We enrolled overweight adults from eight European countries who had lost at least 8% of their initial body weight with a 3.3-MJ (800-kcal) low-calorie diet. Participants were randomly assigned, in a two-by-two factorial design, to one of five ad libitum diets to prevent weight regain over a 26-week period: a low-protein and low-glycemic-index diet, a low-protein and high-glycemic-index diet, a high-protein and low-glycemic-index diet, a high-protein and high-glycemic-index diet, or a control diet. Results A total of 1209 adults were screened (mean age, 41 years; body-mass index [the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters], 34), of whom 938 entered the low-calorie-diet phase of the study. A total of 773 participants who completed that phase were randomly assigned to one of the five maintenance diets; 548 completed the intervention (71%). Fewer participants in the high-protein and the low-glycemic-index groups than in the low-proteinhigh-glycemic-index group dropped out of the study (26.4% and 25.6%, respectively, vs. 37.4%; P = 0.02 and P = 0.01 for the respective comparisons). The mean initial weight loss with the low-calorie diet was 11.0 kg. In the analysis of participants who completed the study, only the low-proteinhigh-glycemic-index diet was associated with subsequent significant weight regain (1.67 kg; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.48 to 2.87). In an intention-to-treat analysis, the weight regain was 0.93 kg less (95% CI, 0.31 to 1.55) in the groups assigned to a high-protein diet than in those assigned to a low-protein diet (P = 0.003) and 0.95 kg less (95% CI, 0.33 to 1.57) in the groups assigned to a low-glycemic-index diet than in those assigned to a high-glycemic-index diet (P = 0.003). The analysis involving participants who completed the intervention produced similar results. The groups did not differ significantly with respect to diet-related adverse events. Conclusions In this large European study, a modest increase in protein content and a modest reduction in the glycemic index led to an improvement in study completion and maintenance of weight loss. (Funded by the European Commission; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00390637.) PMID:21105792

  17. Dietary fiber, whole grains, carbohydrate, glycemic index, and glycemic load in relation to risk of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rong-jiang; Tang, Jian-er; Chen, Yu; Gao, Jian-guo

    2015-01-01

    Background The relationships between dietary fiber, whole grains, carbohydrate, glycemic index (GI), glycemic load (GL), and prostate cancer risk are unclear. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate these associations. Methods Relevant studies were identified by a search of PubMed database and EMBASE database up to April 2015. A random effects model was used to calculate the summary relative risks (RRs) and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results Twenty-seven epidemiological studies (18 casecontrol studies and nine cohort studies) were included in the final analysis. The pooled RRs of prostate cancer were 0.94 (95% CI 0.851.05, P=0.285), 1.13 (95% CI 0.981.30, P=0.095), 0.96 (95% CI 0.811.14, P=0.672), 1.06 (95% CI 0.961.18, P=0.254), and 1.04 (95% CI 0.911.18, P=0.590) for dietary fiber, whole grains, carbohydrate, GI, and GL, respectively. There was no evidence of significant publication bias based on the Beggs test and Eggers test. Conclusion The findings of this meta-analysis indicate that, based on available information, dietary fiber, whole grains, carbohydrate, GI, and GL are not associated with the risk of prostate cancer. PMID:26366096

  18. Effect of the Glycemic Index of Carbohydrates on Acne vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Rebecca C.; Lee, Stephen; Choi, James Y. J.; Atkinson, Fiona S.; Stockmann, Karola S.; Petocz, Peter; Brand-Miller, Jennie C.

    2010-01-01

    Acne vulgaris may be improved by dietary factors that increase insulin sensitivity. We hypothesized that a low-glycemic index diet would improve facial acne severity and insulin sensitivity. Fifty-eight adolescent males (mean age standard deviation 16.5 1.0 y and body mass index 23.1 3.5 kg/m2) were alternately allocated to high or low glycemic index diets. Severity of inflammatory lesions on the face, insulin sensitivity (homeostasis modeling assessment of insulin resistance), androgens and insulin-like growth factor-1 and its binding proteins were assessed at baseline and at eight weeks, a period corresponding to the school term. Forty-three subjects (n = 23 low glycemic index and n = 20 high glycemic index) completed the study. Diets differed significantly in glycemic index (mean standard error of the mean, low glycemic index 51 1 vs. high glycemic index 61 2, p = 0.0002), but not in macronutrient distribution or fiber content. Facial acne improved on both diets (low glycemic index ?26 6%, p = 0.0004 and high glycemic index ?16 7%, p = 0.01), but differences between diets did not reach significance. Change in insulin sensitivity was not different between diets (low glycemic index 0.2 0.1 and high glycemic index 0.1 0.1, p = 0.60) and did not correlate with change in acne severity (Pearson correlation r = ?0.196, p = 0.244). Longer time frames, greater reductions in glycemic load or/and weight loss may be necessary to detect improvements in acne among adolescent boys. PMID:22253996

  19. Archean komatiite volcanism controlled by the evolution of early continents.

    PubMed

    Mole, David R; Fiorentini, Marco L; Thebaud, Nicolas; Cassidy, Kevin F; McCuaig, T Campbell; Kirkland, Christopher L; Romano, Sandra S; Doublier, Michael P; Belousova, Elena A; Barnes, Stephen J; Miller, John

    2014-07-15

    The generation and evolution of Earth's continental crust has played a fundamental role in the development of the planet. Its formation modified the composition of the mantle, contributed to the establishment of the atmosphere, and led to the creation of ecological niches important for early life. Here we show that in the Archean, the formation and stabilization of continents also controlled the location, geochemistry, and volcanology of the hottest preserved lavas on Earth: komatiites. These magmas typically represent 50-30% partial melting of the mantle and subsequently record important information on the thermal and chemical evolution of the Archean-Proterozoic Earth. As a result, it is vital to constrain and understand the processes that govern their localization and emplacement. Here, we combined Lu-Hf isotopes and U-Pb geochronology to map the four-dimensional evolution of the Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia, and reveal the progressive development of an Archean microcontinent. Our results show that in the early Earth, relatively small crustal blocks, analogous to modern microplates, progressively amalgamated to form larger continental masses, and eventually the first cratons. This cratonization process drove the hottest and most voluminous komatiite eruptions to the edge of established continental blocks. The dynamic evolution of the early continents thus directly influenced the addition of deep mantle material to the Archean crust, oceans, and atmosphere, while also providing a fundamental control on the distribution of major magmatic ore deposits. PMID:24958873

  20. Archean komatiite volcanism controlled by the evolution of early continents

    PubMed Central

    Mole, David R.; Fiorentini, Marco L.; Thebaud, Nicolas; Cassidy, Kevin F.; McCuaig, T. Campbell; Kirkland, Christopher L.; Romano, Sandra S.; Doublier, Michael P.; Belousova, Elena A.; Barnes, Stephen J.; Miller, John

    2014-01-01

    The generation and evolution of Earth’s continental crust has played a fundamental role in the development of the planet. Its formation modified the composition of the mantle, contributed to the establishment of the atmosphere, and led to the creation of ecological niches important for early life. Here we show that in the Archean, the formation and stabilization of continents also controlled the location, geochemistry, and volcanology of the hottest preserved lavas on Earth: komatiites. These magmas typically represent 50–30% partial melting of the mantle and subsequently record important information on the thermal and chemical evolution of the Archean–Proterozoic Earth. As a result, it is vital to constrain and understand the processes that govern their localization and emplacement. Here, we combined Lu-Hf isotopes and U-Pb geochronology to map the four-dimensional evolution of the Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia, and reveal the progressive development of an Archean microcontinent. Our results show that in the early Earth, relatively small crustal blocks, analogous to modern microplates, progressively amalgamated to form larger continental masses, and eventually the first cratons. This cratonization process drove the hottest and most voluminous komatiite eruptions to the edge of established continental blocks. The dynamic evolution of the early continents thus directly influenced the addition of deep mantle material to the Archean crust, oceans, and atmosphere, while also providing a fundamental control on the distribution of major magmatic ore deposits. PMID:24958873

  1. Influence of high glycemic index and glycemic load diets on blood pressure during adolescence.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, Bamini; Flood, Victoria M; Rochtchina, Elena; Baur, Louise A; Smith, Wayne; Mitchell, Paul

    2012-06-01

    We aimed to prospectively examine the association between the glycemic index and glycemic load of foods consumed and the dietary intakes of carbohydrates, sugars, fiber, and principal carbohydrate-containing food groups (eg, breads, cereals, and sugary drinks) with changes in blood pressure during adolescence. A total of 858 students aged 12 years at baseline (422 girls and 436 boys) were examined from 2004-2005 to 2009-2011. Dietary data were assessed from validated semiquantitative food frequency questionnaires. Blood pressure was measured using a standard protocol. In girls, after adjusting for age, ethnicity, parental education, parental history of hypertension, baseline height, baseline blood pressure, change in body mass index, and time spent in physical and sedentary activities, each 1-SD (1-SD = 7.10 g/d) increase in baseline dietary intake of total fiber was associated with a 0.96-, 0.62-, and 0.75-mmHg decrease in mean systolic (P = 0.02), diastolic (P = 0.01), and arterial blood pressures (P = 0.002), respectively, 5 years later. In girls, each 1-SD increase in dietary glycemic index, glycemic load, carbohydrate, and fructose was concurrently related to increases of 1.81 (P = 0.001), 4.02 (P = 0.01), 4.74 (P = 0.01), and 1.80 mm Hg (P = 0.03) in systolic blood pressure, respectively, >5 years. Significant associations between carbohydrate nutrition variables and blood pressure were not observed among boys. Excessive dietary intake of carbohydrates, specifically from high glycemic index/glycemic load foods, could adversely influence blood pressure, particularly in girls, whereas fiber-rich diets may be protective against elevated blood pressure during adolescence. PMID:22493075

  2. Inhibitory Control During Emotional Distraction Across Adolescence and Early Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Gilbert, Julia E.; Thomas, Kathleen M.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the changing relation between emotion and inhibitory control during adolescence. One hundred participants between 11 and 25 years of age performed a go-nogo task in which task-relevant stimuli (letters) were presented at the center of large task-irrelevant images depicting negative, positive, or neutral scenes selected from the International Affective Picture System. Longer reaction times for negative trials were found across all age groups, suggesting that negative but not positive emotional images captured attention across this age range. However, age differences in accuracy on inhibitory trials suggest that response inhibition is more readily disrupted by negative emotional distraction in early adolescence relative to late childhood, late adolescence or early adulthood. PMID:23506340

  3. Effects of nateglinide and acarbose on glycemic excursions in standardized carbohydrate and mixed-meal tests in drug-nave type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Hai; Xu, Wenming; Liu, Juan; Chen, Ailing; Liao, Zhihong; Li, Yanbing

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of nateglinide and acarbose on glycemic excursions and postprandial glucose profiles with different types of meals (standardized carbohydrate and mixed meals) in drug-nave type 2 diabetic patients. A randomized, parallel-group prospective design clinical trial was conducted and a total of 39 drug-nave patients (16 males and 23 females, aged 56.710.2 years) were enrolled. The patients were randomly divided into group A [nateglinide 120 mg three times daily (t.i.d.), n=19] and group B (acarbose 50 mg t.i.d., n=20). The standardized carbohydrate and mixed-meal tests were performed at baseline and at the end of study. Continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) data were recorded. Various parameters that measure glucose variability were derived from the CGMS data. In the standardized carbohydrate meal tests, the postprandial glucose excursions (PPGEs) were significantly decreased in the two groups after 12 weeks of treatment (P<0.05), whereas the decrease was more prominent in the acarbose compared to the nateglinide group (P=0.138). In the mixed-meal tests, the mean sensor glucose values [24-h mean blood glucose (MBG)] were significantly decreased in the two groups after 12 weeks of treatment (P<0.05) and the parameters of glucose excursions, including standardized deviation (SD), largest amplitude of glycemic excursion (LAGE), mean of daily differences (MODD) and mean amplitude of glycemic excursion (MAGE), were reduced in the two groups. However, the decreases in SD and LAGE in the nateglinide group were statistically significant, whereas in the acarbose group only the decreases in LAGE were statistically significant. The efficiency of nateglinide or acarbose in lowering postprandial 120-min hyperglycemia were similar in the standardized carbohydrate meal test. However, acarbose was more efficient in lowering postprandial 30- and 60-min hyperglycemia (P<0.05) compared to nateglinide. The fasting and postprandial total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) had a tendency to decrease from the baseline after 12 weeks of treatment with nateglinide, whereas fasting and postprandial high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) had a tendency to increase. Acarbose did not affect the fasting or postprandial lipid profiles after 12 weeks of treatment (P>0.05). In conclusion, nateglinide and acarbose effectively improved postprandial glycemic control, although acarbose was shown to be more efficient in controlling early (30 and 60 min) postprandial glucose excursions in the carbohydrate meal test, whereas nateglinide was shown to be superior to acarbose in controlling postprandial glucose excursions in the mixed-meal test. PMID:24649052

  4. The effect of magnesium supplements on early post-transplantation glucose metabolism: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Van Laecke, Steven; Nagler, Evi Vanessa; Taes, Youri; Van Biesen, Wim; Peeters, Patrick; Vanholder, Raymond

    2014-09-01

    Post-transplantation hypomagnesemia is common and predicts diabetes. Magnesium improves glycemic control in diabetics and insulin sensitivity in insulin resistant subjects. We aimed to assess the effectiveness of oral magnesium for improving glycemic control and insulin sensitivity at 3months post-transplantation. We conducted a single-center, open-label, randomized parallel group study. We included adults with serum magnesium <1.7mg/dl within 2weeks after kidney transplantation. We randomized participants to 450mg magnesium oxide up to three times daily or no treatment. The primary endpoint was the mean difference in fasting glycemia. Secondary endpoints were the mean difference in area under the curve (AUC) of glucose during an oral glucose tolerance test and insulin resistance measured by Homeostasis Model of Assessment-Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR). Analyses were on intention-to-treat basis. In patients randomized to magnesium oxide (N=27) versus no treatment (N=27), fasting glycemia on average was 11.5mg/dl lower (95% CI 1.7 to 21.3; P=0.02). There was no difference between the two groups neither for 2h AUC, where the mean value was 1164mg/dl/min (95% CI -1884 to 4284; P=0.45) lower in the treatment group nor for HOMA-IR. Magnesium supplements modestly improved fasting glycemia without effect on insulin resistance. Higher baseline glycemia among patients in the control group may have driven the positive outcome (ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT01889576). PMID:24909487

  5. Impact of a Low Glycemic Index Diet in Pregnancy on Markers of Maternal and Fetal Metabolism and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Jennifer M.; Mahony, Rhona M.; Culliton, Marie; Foley, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    This is a secondary analysis of 621 women in ROLO study, a randomized control trial of low glycemic index (GI) diet in pregnancy to prevent the recurrence of macrosomia, which aims to assess the effect of the diet on maternal and fetal insulin resistance, leptin, and markers of inflammation. In early pregnancy and at 28 weeks, serum was analyzed for insulin, leptin, tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF-?), and interleukin 6 (IL-6). At delivery, cord blood concentrations of leptin, TNF-?, IL-6, and C-peptide were recorded. We found no difference between those who did or did not receive low GI advice with respect to the concentrations of any marker in early pregnancy, at 28 weeks or in cord blood. Women in the intervention arm of the study did have a lower overall rise in insulin concentrations from early pregnancy to 28 weeks gestation, P = .04. Of the women in the intervention arm, 20% were in the highest quartile for insulin change (28-week insulin ? insulin at booking) compared to 29% of controls (P = .02). In conclusion, a low GI diet in pregnancy has little effect on leptin and markers of inflammation although an attenuated response to the typical increase in insulin resistance seen in pregnancy with advancing gestation was seen in those who received the low GI advice. PMID:24642719

  6. Impact of a low glycemic index diet in pregnancy on markers of maternal and fetal metabolism and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Jennifer M; Mahony, Rhona M; Culliton, Marie; Foley, Michael E; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M

    2014-11-01

    This is a secondary analysis of 621 women in ROLO study, a randomized control trial of low glycemic index (GI) diet in pregnancy to prevent the recurrence of macrosomia, which aims to assess the effect of the diet on maternal and fetal insulin resistance, leptin, and markers of inflammation. In early pregnancy and at 28 weeks, serum was analyzed for insulin, leptin, tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF-?), and interleukin 6 (IL-6). At delivery, cord blood concentrations of leptin, TNF-?, IL-6, and C-peptide were recorded. We found no difference between those who did or did not receive low GI advice with respect to the concentrations of any marker in early pregnancy, at 28 weeks or in cord blood. Women in the intervention arm of the study did have a lower overall rise in insulin concentrations from early pregnancy to 28 weeks gestation, P = .04. Of the women in the intervention arm, 20% were in the highest quartile for insulin change (28-week insulin - insulin at booking) compared to 29% of controls (P = .02). In conclusion, a low GI diet in pregnancy has little effect on leptin and markers of inflammation although an attenuated response to the typical increase in insulin resistance seen in pregnancy with advancing gestation was seen in those who received the low GI advice. PMID:24642719

  7. Plasma adiponectin concentrations are associated with dietary glycemic index in Malaysian patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Loh, Beng-In; Sathyasuryan, Daniel Robert; Mohamed, Hamid Jan Jan

    2013-01-01

    Adiponectin, an adipocyte-derived hormone has been implicated in the control of blood glucose and chronic inflammation in type 2 diabetes. However, limited studies have evaluated dietary factors on plasma adiponectin levels, especially among type 2 diabetic patients in Malaysia. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of dietary glycemic index on plasma adiponectin concentrations in patients with type 2 diabetes. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 305 type 2 diabetic patients aged 19-75 years from the Penang General Hospital, Malaysia. Socio-demographic information was collected using a standard questionnaire while dietary details were determined by using a pre-validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Anthropometry measurement included weight, height, BMI and waist circumference. Plasma adiponectin concentrations were measured using a commercial ELISA kit. Data were analyzed using multiple linear regression. After multivariate adjustment, dietary glycemic index was inversely associated with plasma adiponectin concentrations (β =-0.272, 95% CI -0.262, - 0.094; p<0.001). It was found that in individuals who consumed 1 unit of foods containing high dietary glycemic index that plasma adiponectin level reduced by 0.3 μg/mL. Thirty two percent (31.9%) of the variation in adiponectin concentrations was explained by age, sex, race, smoking status, BMI, waist circumference, HDL-C, triglycerides, magnesium, fiber and dietary glycemic index according to the multiple linear regression model (R2=0.319). These results support the hypothesis that dietary glycemic index influences plasma adiponectin concentrations in patients with type 2 diabetes. Controlled clinical trials are required to confirm our findings and to elucidate the underlying mechanism. PMID:23635368

  8. Genetic and epigenetic control of early mouse development.

    PubMed

    Albert, Mareike; Peters, Antoine H F M

    2009-04-01

    A decade after cloning the sheep Dolly, the induction of pluripotency by transcription factors has further revolutionized the possibilities of reprogramming a cell's identity, with exciting prospects for personalized medicine. Establishing totipotency during natural reproduction remains, however, exceedingly more efficient than in reproductive cloning or in transcription factor-based reprogramming. Understanding the molecular mechanisms directing acquisition of totipotency during early embryogenesis may enable optimization of protocols for induced reprogramming. Recent studies in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) show that self-renewal and pluripotency are efficiently maintained by a core set of transcription factors when intrinsic differentiation inducing signals are blocked. In early embryos, the specification of the pluripotent epiblast and two differentiating lineages (trophectoderm and primitive endoderm) is controlled by transcription factors that are regulated by autoactivating and reciprocal repressive mechanisms as well as by ERK-mediated signaling. Chromatin-based regulatory mechanisms also contribute to the identity of ESCs and early embryos. During gametogenesis, genomes undergo extensive epigenetic reprogramming. This may underlie the efficient acquisition of totipotency during subsequent preimplantation development. PMID:19359161

  9. Understanding the glycemic index and glycemic load and their practical applications.

    PubMed

    Lazarim, Fernanda Lorenzi; Stancanelli, Mirtes; Brenzikofer, René; de Macedo, Denise Vaz

    2009-09-01

    We have introduced the study of synthesis pathways using two experiments: 1-the determination of the glycemic index (GI) of some foods and the effects of fiber and fat on the GI; 2-the determination of blood glucose levels after the ingestion of meals with high and low glycemic loads (GL). After a practice assembly, when the foods and meals that were eaten by the students were tallied, the students were divided into groups. At the next class, three members of each group, who had fasted for 8 hr, ingested 50 g of carbohydrate in food or a meal. After ingestion, the blood glucose was measured with a portable device every 30 min for a period of 2 hr. Discussion of the data obtained in experiment 1 allowed the students to understand the mechanism of action of insulin and to understand how the GI, as presented in the literature, is determined. The students also concluded that the addition of fiber to food reduces the glycemic response even with high GI foods, and these results could be a useful strategy for diet prescription. Discussion of experiment 2 allowed the students to understand that the amount of food intake is a determining factor for the glycemic response and subsequent release of insulin. These experimental observations allowed the students to transfer theoretical knowledge to their daily lives very easily. The students approved the classes and felt encouraged to study the synthesis pathways and metabolic integration in the fed state. PMID:21567757

  10. Glycemic status in hyperthyroid subjects.

    PubMed

    Paul, D T; Mollah, F H; Alam, M K; Fariduddin, M; Azad, K; Arslan, M I

    2004-01-01

    This was an observational case-control study carried out in the Department of Biochemistry, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU), Dhaka jointly with the 'Thyroid and Endocrine Clinic' of the same institution during the period of January 2002 to December 2002. Sixty-five (65) newly diagnosed hyperthyroid patients between 20-60 years of age were studied, where forty-five (45) were Graves' disease and twenty (20) were TMNG (Toxic multinodular goiter) patients. Thyrotoxicosis was diagnosed by history, clinical examination and biochemical investigations- FT4, TSH, and Radioactive iodine uptake (RAIU) test. Thirty (30) age and sex matched healthy subjects were taken as control. The mean age was 33.02+/-9.24 years in Graves' disease and 37.55+/-9.49 years in TMNG. Female predominance observed in both the diseases. Glucose intolerance was found in 72.3% of thyrotoxic patients, which is much higher than European population. Our study showed Diabetes mellitus (DM) in 11% of Graves' disease patients. The incidence of DM in Graves' disease was slightly higher in our population. Incidence of DM in TMNG in our study was much lower (5%) than that of Graves' disease (11%) but the incidence of IGT (Impaired glucose tolerance) in TMNG was more (85%) in relation to Graves' disease (54%). Percentage of RAIU was more marked in Graves' disease than TMNG. There is a significant positive correlation (p<0.05) between plasma glucose and FT4 in Graves' disease. Glucose intolerance is frequently found in Thyrotoxic patients. PMID:14747791

  11. A low glycemic diet lifestyle intervention improves fat utilization during exercise in older obese humans

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Thomas P.J.; Haus, Jacob M.; Cook, Marc A.; Flask, Chris A.; Kirwan, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the influence of dietary glycemic index on exercise training-induced adaptations in substrate oxidation in obesity. Design and Methods Twenty older, obese individuals undertook 3-months of fully-supervised aerobic exercise and were randomised to low (LoGIX) or high glycemic (HiGIX) diets. Changes in indirect calorimetry (VO2; VCO2) were assessed at rest, during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, and during submaximal exercise (walking: 65% VO2max, 200 kcal energy expenditure). Intramyocellular lipid (IMCL) was measured by 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Results Weight loss (−8.6±1.1%) and improvements (P<0.05) in VO2max, glycemic control, fasting lipemia, and metabolic flexibility were similar for both LoGIX and HiGIX groups. During submaximal exercise, energy expenditure was higher following the intervention (P<0.01) in both groups. Respiratory exchange ratio (RER) during exercise was unchanged in the LoGIX group but increased in the HiGIX group (P<0.05). However, fat oxidation during exercise expressed relative to changes in body weight was increased in the LoGIX group (+10.6±3.6%; P<0.05). Fasting IMLC was unchanged, however extramyocellular lipid was reduced (P<0.05) after LoGIX. Conclusions A low glycemic diet/exercise weight-loss intervention increases fat utilization during exercise independent of changes in energy expenditure. This highlights the potential therapeutic value of low glycemic foods for reversing metabolic defects in obesity. PMID:23512711

  12. 77 FR 66469 - Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and... meeting of the aforementioned committee: Name: Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control..., regarding the early detection and control of breast and cervical cancer. The committee makes...

  13. Effects of High vs Low Glycemic Index of Dietary Carbohydrate on Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors and Insulin Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Sacks, Frank M.; Carey, Vincent J.; Anderson, Cheryl A. M.; Miller, Edgar R.; Copeland, Trisha; Charleston, Jeanne; Harshfield, Benjamin J.; Laranjo, Nancy; McCarron, Phyllis; Swain, Janis; White, Karen; Yee, Karen; Appel, Lawrence J.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Foods that have similar carbohydrate content can differ in the amount they raise blood glucose. The effects of this property, called the glycemic index, on risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetes are not well understood. OBJECTIVE To determine the effect of glycemic index and amount of total dietary carbohydrate on risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Randomized crossover-controlled feeding trial conducted in research units in academic medical centers, in which 163 overweight adults (systolic blood pressure, 120–159 mm Hg) were given 4 complete diets that contained all of their meals, snacks, and calorie-containing beverages, each for 5 weeks, and completed at least 2 study diets. The first participant was enrolled April 1, 2008; the last participant finished December 22, 2010. For any pair of the 4 diets, there were 135 to 150 participants contributing at least 1 primary outcome measure. INTERVENTIONS (1) A high–glycemic index (65% on the glucose scale), high-carbohydrate diet (58% energy); (2) a low–glycemic index (40%), high-carbohydrate diet; (3) a high–glycemic index, low-carbohydrate diet (40% energy); and (4) a low–glycemic index, low-carbohydrate diet. Each diet was based on a healthful DASH-type diet. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The 5 primary outcomes were insulin sensitivity, determined from the areas under the curves of glucose and insulin levels during an oral glucose tolerance test; levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and triglycerides; and systolic blood pressure. RESULTS At high dietary carbohydrate content, the low– compared with high–glycemic index level decreased insulin sensitivity from 8.9 to 7.1 units (−20%, P = .002); increased LDL cholesterol from 139 to 147 mg/dL (6%, P ≤ .001); and did not affect levels of HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, or blood pressure. At low carbohydrate content, the low– compared with high–glycemic index level did not affect the outcomes except for decreasing triglycerides from 91 to 86 mg/dL (−5%, P = .02). In the primary diet contrast, the low–glycemic index, low-carbohydrate diet, compared with the high–glycemic index, high-carbohydrate diet, did not affect insulin sensitivity, systolic blood pressure, LDL cholesterol, or HDL cholesterol but did lower triglycerides from 111 to 86 mg/dL (−23%, P ≤ .001). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE In this 5-week controlled feeding study, diets with low glycemic index of dietary carbohydrate, compared with high glycemic index of dietary carbohydrate, did not result in improvements in insulin sensitivity, lipid levels, or systolic blood pressure. In the context of an overall DASH-type diet, using glycemic index to select specific foods may not improve cardiovascular risk factors or insulin resistance. TRIAL REGISTRATION clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00608049 PMID:25514303

  14. A Randomized Trial about Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load Improves Outcomes among Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Carla K.; Gutschall, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    Glycemic index (GI) represents the postprandial glucose response of carbohydrate foods, and glycemic load (GL) represents the quantity and quality of carbohydrate consumed. A diet lower in GI and GL may improve diabetes management. A 9-week intervention regarding GI and GL was evaluated among adults in the age range of 40-70 years who had had type…

  15. A Randomized Trial about Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load Improves Outcomes among Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Carla K.; Gutschall, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    Glycemic index (GI) represents the postprandial glucose response of carbohydrate foods, and glycemic load (GL) represents the quantity and quality of carbohydrate consumed. A diet lower in GI and GL may improve diabetes management. A 9-week intervention regarding GI and GL was evaluated among adults in the age range of 40-70 years who had had type

  16. Relation between Breast Cancer and High Glycemic Index or Glycemic Load: A Meta-analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies.

    PubMed

    Mullie, Patrick; Koechlin, Alice; Boniol, Mathieu; Autier, Philippe; Boyle, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the commonest form of cancer in women worldwide. It has been suggested that chronic hyperinsulinemia associated with insulin resistance plays a role in breast cancer etiology. To test the hyperinsulinemia hypothesis, a dietary pattern associated with a high glycemic index and glycemic load, both proxies for chronic hyperinsulinemia, should be associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. A meta-analysis restricted to prospective cohort studies was undertaken using a random effects model with tests for statistical significance, publication bias and heterogeneity. The metric for analysis was the risk of breast cancer in the highest relative to the lowest glycemic index and glycemic load dietary pattern. A dietary pattern with a high glycemic index was associated with a summary relative risk (SRR) of 1.05 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.11), and a high glycemic load with a SRR of 1.06 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.13). Adjustments for body mass index [BMI], physical activity and other lifestyle factors did not influence the SRR, nor did menopausal status and estrogen receptor status of the tumor. In conclusion, the current evidence supports a modest association between a dietary pattern with high glycemic index or glycemic load and the risk of breast cancer. PMID:25747120

  17. Kiwifruit, carbohydrate availability, and the glycemic response.

    PubMed

    Monro, John A

    2013-01-01

    An appreciable proportion, about 10%, of the dry weight of kiwifruit consists of primary cell walls. About 80% of dry matter is available carbohydrate consisting of glucose, fructose, and sucrose, and about 10% is digestible protein. The cell wall component, being nonstarch polysaccharide, is undigested in the stomach and small intestine, so the component increases in relative concentration in the gut lumen where its physicochemical properties may be important in modulating carbohydrate digestion and absorption. Released from the constraint of fruit structure, the dietary fiber swells to four times its original volume during in vitro digestion. When the digested remnants are allowed to settle into a packed but uncompressed state, as in the gut, they reduce the rate of glucose diffusion by about 40% and profoundly reduce digesta mixing, especially in the presence of a low background of soluble viscous polysaccharide. An in vitro estimation of the glycemic index (GI) of carbohydrate in kiwifruit, and in vivo estimates show the carbohydrate to be of low GI. On a whole fruit basis because of the high water content of kiwifruit, a 100g kiwifruit would be equivalent to about 5g (1 teaspoon) of glucose in its effect on blood glucose; thus, kiwifruit have low glycemic impact and are suitable for those with diabetes. PMID:23394992

  18. Hallux Valgus Surgery May Produce Early Improvements in Balance Control

    PubMed Central

    Sadra, Saba; Fleischer, Adam; Klein, Erin; Grewal, Gurtej S.; Knight, Jessica; Weil, Lowell Scott; Weil, Lowell; Najafi, Bijan

    2016-01-01

    Background Hallux valgus (HV) is associated with poorer performance during gait and balance tasks and is an independent risk factor for falls in older adults. We sought to assess whether corrective HV surgery improves gait and balance. Methods Using a cross-sectional study design, gait and static balance data were obtained from 40 adults: 19 patients with HV only (preoperative group), 10 patients who recently underwent successful HV surgery (postoperative group), and 11 control participants. Assessments were made in the clinic using body-worn sensors. Results Patients in the preoperative group generally demonstrated poorer static balance control compared with the other two groups. Despite similar age and body mass index, postoperative patients exhibited 29% and 63% less center of mass sway than preoperative patients during double- and single-support balance assessments, respectively (analysis of variance P =.17 and P =.14, respectively [both eyes open condition]). Overall, gait performance was similar among the groups, except for speed during gait initiation, where lower speeds were encountered in the postoperative group compared with the preoperative group (Scheffe P = .049). Conclusions This study provides supportive evidence regarding the benefits of corrective lower-extremity surgery on certain aspects of balance control. Patients seem to demonstrate early improvements in static balance after corrective HV surgery, whereas gait improvements may require a longer recovery time. Further research using a longitudinal study design and a larger sample size capable of assessing the long-term effects of HV surgical correction on balance and gait is probably warranted. PMID:24297985

  19. Landslide Geohazard Monitoring, Early Warning and Stabilization Control Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednarczyk, Zbigniew

    2014-03-01

    This paper is a presentation of landslide monitoring, early warning and remediation methods recommended for the Polish Carpathians. Instrumentation included standard and automatic on-line measurements with the real-time transfer of data to an Internet web server. The research was funded through EU Innovative Economy Programme and also by the SOPO Landslide Counteraction Project. The landslides investigated were characterized by relatively low rates of the displacements. These ranged from a few millimetres to several centimetres per year. Colluviums of clayey flysch deposits were of a soil-rock type with a very high plasticity and moisture content. The instrumentation consisted of 23 standard inclinometers set to depths of 5-21 m. The starting point of monitoring measurements was in January 2006. These were performed every 1-2 months over the period of 8 years. The measurements taken detected displacements from several millimetres to 40 cm set at a depth of 1-17 m. The modern, on-line monitoring and early warning system was installed in May 2010. The system is the first of its kind in Poland and only one of several such real-time systems in the world. The installation was working with the Local Road Authority in Gorlice. It contained three automatic field stations for investigation of landslide parameters to depths of 12-16 m and weather station. In-place tilt transducers and innovative 3D continuous inclinometer systems with sensors located every 0.5 m were used. It has the possibility of measuring a much greater range of movements compared to standard systems. The conventional and real-time data obtained provided a better recognition of the triggering parameters and the control of geohazard stabilizations. The monitoring methods chosen supplemented by numerical modelling could lead to more reliable forecasting of such landslides and could thus provide better control and landslide remediation possibilities also to stabilization works which prevent landslides.

  20. Pathogenesis and glycemic management of type 2 diabetes mellitus: a physiological approach.

    PubMed

    Ismail-Beigi, Faramarz

    2012-04-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is an incompletely understood chronic, progressive multifactorial disease with insulin resistance and decreased ?-cell function playing dominant roles in its genesis. The worldwide incidence of the disease is rapidly increasing to pandemic proportions. The increase in incidence of T2DM is attributable to changes in lifestyle, diet and obesity, but other causes remain to be defined. The disease is a major cause of early mortality due to atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD), and is the leading cause of blindness, leg amputations, and chronic renal disease. Hyperglycemia inT2DM becomes manifest once insulin secretion is no longer adequate for the metabolic demands of the individual. The approach to glycemic management of the disease is increasingly based on understanding the underlying pathophysiology. Efforts to maintain and preserve ?-cell function during the earlier phases of the disease may have important implications in prevention of subsequent complications of T2DM. Finally, the approach to glycemic management of the disease should be individualized by considering the psycho-socio-economic condition of each patient, and glycemic targets should reflect presence of comorbid conditions, age of the patient, the stage of their disease in terms of duration, presence of macro- and micro-vascular complications, and propensity for severe hypoglycemia. PMID:22424044

  1. Glycemic Variability Assessed by Continuous Glucose Monitoring and Short-Term Outcome in Diabetic Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: An Observational Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Nusca, Annunziata; Lauria Pantano, Angelo; Melfi, Rosetta; Proscia, Claudio; Maddaloni, Ernesto; Contuzzi, Rocco; Mangiacapra, Fabio; Palermo, Andrea; Manfrini, Silvia; Pozzilli, Paolo; Di Sciascio, Germano

    2015-01-01

    Poor glycemic control is associated with unfavorable outcome in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), irrespective of diabetes mellitus. However a complete assessment of glycemic status may not be fully described by glycated hemoglobin or fasting blood glucose levels, whereas daily glycemic fluctuations may influence cardiovascular risk and have even more deleterious effects than sustained hyperglycemia. Thus, this paper investigated the effectiveness of a continuous glucose monitoring (CGM), registering the mean level of glycemic values but also the extent of glucose excursions during coronary revascularization, in detecting periprocedural outcome such as renal or myocardial damage, assessed by serum creatinine, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), and troponin I levels. High glycemic variability (GV) has been associated with worse postprocedural creatinine and NGAL variations. Moreover, GV, and predominantly hypoglycemic variations, has been observed to increase in patients with periprocedural myocardial infarction. Thus, our study investigated the usefulness of CGM in the setting of PCI where an optimal glycemic control should be achieved in order to prevent complications and improve outcome. PMID:26273664

  2. [Glycemic response to consumption of a cereals and legume (Phaseolus vulgaris) bar on healthy individuals].

    PubMed

    Zambrano, Rosaura; Granito, Marisela; Valero, Yolmar

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this work was to formulate a cereals and legume (Phaseolus vulgaris) bar and assess its impact on the glycemic response of healthy individuals, in order to contribute to the healthy food supply beneficial to consumers. A mixture of cereals (corn and oats) and different percentages (20 and 30%) of Phaseolus vulgaris was used to formulate the bar. Additionally, a legume cereal bar without legumes (bar control) was prepared. The bar with 30% of Phaseolus vulgaris was selected through sensory evaluation, being scored with better flavor and texture. This combination of cereals and legumes aminoacid improves complementation and reaches the formulation criteria previously established. Chemical characterization indicated a higher protein content in the bar with 30% of Phaseolus vulgaris (13.55%) relative to the bar control (8.5%). The contents of fat, ash and dietary fiber did not differ between the two bars evaluated. However, the soluble fiber and resistant starch of the selected bar was a 32.05% and 18.67%, respectively, than in the control bar; this may contribute to decreasing the rate of glucose uptake. The selected bar presented a low glycemic index (49) and intermediate glycemic load (12.0) in healthy volunteers, which could lead to a possible reduction in the rate of absorption of glucose into the bloodstream, associated with a carbohydrate content of slow absorption. This bar represents a proposal of a healthy snack for the consumer. PMID:24934069

  3. Methodology for adding glycemic index and glycemic load values to 24-hour dietary recall database

    PubMed Central

    Olendzki, Barbara C.; Ma, Yunsheng; Culver, Annie L.; Ockene, Ira S.; Griffith, Jennifer A.; Hafner, Andrea R.; Hebert, James R.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives We describe a method of adding the glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) values to the nutrient database of the 24-hour dietary recall interview (24HR), a widely used dietary assessment. We also calculated daily GI and GL values from the 24HR. Methods Subjects were 641 healthy adults from central Massachusetts who completed 9067 24HRs. The 24HR-derived food data were matched to the International Table of Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load Values. The GI values for specific foods not in the table were estimated against similar foods according to physical and chemical factors that determine GI. Mixed foods were disaggregated into individual ingredients. Results Of 1261 carbohydrate-containing foods in the database, GI values of 602 foods were obtained from a direct match (47.7%), accounting for 22.36% of dietary carbohydrate. GI values from 656 foods (52.1%) were estimated, contributing to 77.64% of dietary carbohydrate. The GI values from three unknown foods (0.2%) could not be assigned. The average daily GI was 84 (SD 5.1, white bread as referent) and the average GL was 196 (SD 63). Conclusion Using this methodology for adding GI and GL values to nutrient databases, it is possible to assess associations between GI and/or GL and body weight and chronic disease outcomes (diabetes, cancer, heart disease). This method can be used in clinical and survey research settings where 24HRs are a practical means for assessing diet. The implications for using this methodology compel a broader evaluation of diet with disease outcomes. PMID:17029903

  4. Glycemic Index, Glycemic Load and Mammographic Breast Density: The EPIC Florence Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Masala, Giovanna; Assedi, Melania; Bendinelli, Benedetta; Ermini, Ilaria; Occhini, Daniela; Sieri, Sabina; Brighenti, Furio; del Turco, Marco Rosselli; Ambrogetti, Daniela; Palli, Domenico

    2013-01-01

    A few studies have evaluated the association between diet and mammographic breast density (MBD) and results are inconsistent. MBD, a well-recognized risk factor for breast cancer, has been proposed as a marker of cumulative exposure to hormones and growth factors. Diets with a high glycemic index (GI) or glycemic load (GL) may increase breast cancer risk, via an effect on the insulin-like growth factor axis. We have investigated the association between carbohydrate intake, GI, GL and MBD in a prospective study. We identified a large series of women, in the frame of the EPIC-Florence cohort, with a mammogram taken five years after enrolment, when detailed information on dietary and lifestyle habits and anthropometric measurements had been collected. Mammograms have been retrieved (1,668, 83%) and MBD assessed according to Wolfes classification. We compared women with high MBD (P2+DY Wolfes categories) with those with low MBD (N1+P1) through logistic models adjusted for age, education, body mass index, menopause, number of children, breast feeding, physical activity, non-alcohol energy, fibers, saturated fat and alcohol. A direct association between GL and high MBD emerged in the highest quintile of intake in comparison with the lowest quintile (OR?=?1.73, 95%CI 1.132.67, p for trend?=?0.048) while no association with glycemic index was evident. These results were confirmed after exclusion of women reporting to be on a diet or affected with diabetes, and when Hormone Replacement Therapy at the date of mammographic examination used to assess MBD was considered. The effect was particularly evident among leaner women, although no interaction was found. A positive association was suggested for increasing simple sugar and total carbohydrates intakes limited to the highest quintiles. In this Italian population we observed an association between glycemic load, total and rapidly absorbed carbohydrates and high MBD. These novel results warrant further investigations. PMID:23951047

  5. DIETARY HYPERGLYCEMIA, GLYCEMIC INDEX AND METABOLIC RETINAL DISEASES

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chung-Jung; Taylor, Allen

    2014-01-01

    The glycemic index (GI) indicates how fast blood glucose is raised after consuming a carbohydrate-containing food. Human metabolic studies indicate that GI is related to patho-physiological responses after meals. Compared with a low-GI meal, a high-GI meal is characterized with hyperglycemia during the early postprandial stage (0~2 h) and a compensatory hyperlipidemia associated with counter-regulatory hormone responses during late postprandial stage (4~6 h). Over the past three decades, several human health disorders have been related to GI. The strongest relationship suggests that consuming low-GI foods prevents diabetic complications. Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a complication of diabetes. In this aspect, GI appears to be useful as a practical guideline to help diabetic people choose foods. Abundant epidemiological evidence also indicates positive associations between GI and risk for type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and more recently, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in people without diabetes. Although data from randomized controlled intervention trials are scanty, these observations are strongly supported by evolving molecular mechanisms which explain the pathogenesis of hyperglycemia. This wide range of evidence implies that dietary hyperglycemia is etiologically related to human aging and diseases, including DR and AMD. In this context, these diseases can be considered metabolic retinal diseases. Molecular theories that explain hyperglycemic pathogenesis involve a mitochondria-associated pathway and four glycolysis-associated pathways, including advanced glycation end products formation, protein kinase C activation, polyol pathway, and hexosamine pathway. While the four glycolysis-associated pathways appear to be universal for both normoxic and hypoxic conditions, the mitochondria-associated mechanism appears to be most relevant to the hyperglycemic, normoxic pathogenesis. For diseases that affect tissues with highly active metabolism and that frequently face challenge from low oxygen tension, such as retina in which metabolism is determined by both glucose and oxygen homeostases, these theories appear to be insufficient. Several lines of evidence indicate that the retina is particularly vulnerable when hypoxia coincides with hyperglycemia. We propose a novel hyperglycemic, hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway, to complement the current theories regarding hyperglycemic pathogenesis. HIF is a transcription complex that responds to decreases in oxygen in the cellular environment. In addition to playing a significant role in the regulation of glucose metabolism, under hyperglycemia HIF has been shown to increase the expression of HIF-inducible genes, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) leading to angiogenesis. To this extent, we suggest that HIF can also be described as a hyperglycemia-inducible factor. In summary, while management of dietary GI appears to be an effective intervention for the prevention of metabolic diseases, specifically AMD and DR, more interventional data is needed to evaluate the efficacy of GI management. There is an urgent need to develop reliable biomarkers of exposure, surrogate endpoints, as well as susceptibility for GI. These insights would also be helpful in deciphering the detailed hyperglycemia-related biochemical mechanisms for the development of new therapeutic agents. PMID:20868767

  6. Gelsolin activity controls efficient early HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background HIV-1 entry into target lymphocytes requires the activity of actin adaptors that stabilize and reorganize cortical F-actin, like moesin and filamin-A. These alterations are necessary for the redistribution of CD4-CXCR4/CCR5 to one pole of the cell, a process that increases the probability of HIV-1 Envelope (Env)-CD4/co-receptor interactions and that generates the tension at the plasma membrane necessary to potentiate fusion pore formation, thereby favouring early HIV-1 infection. However, it remains unclear whether the dynamic processing of F-actin and the amount of cortical actin available during the initial virus-cell contact are required to such events. Results Here we show that gelsolin restructures cortical F-actin during HIV-1 Env-gp120-mediated signalling, without affecting cell-surface expression of receptors or viral co-receptor signalling. Remarkably, efficient HIV-1 Env-mediated membrane fusion and infection of permissive lymphocytes were impaired when gelsolin was either overexpressed or silenced, which led to a loss or gain of cortical actin, respectively. Indeed, HIV-1 Env-gp120-induced F-actin reorganization and viral receptor capping were impaired under these experimental conditions. Moreover, gelsolin knockdown promoted HIV-1 Env-gp120-mediated aberrant pseudopodia formation. These perturbed-actin events are responsible for the inhibition of early HIV-1 infection. Conclusions For the first time we provide evidence that through its severing of cortical actin, and by controlling the amount of actin available for reorganization during HIV-1 Env-mediated viral fusion, entry and infection, gelsolin can constitute a barrier that restricts HIV-1 infection of CD4+ lymphocytes in a pre-fusion step. These findings provide important insights into the complex molecular and actin-associated dynamics events that underlie early viral infection. Thus, we propose that gelsolin is a new factor that can limit HIV-1 infection acting at a pre-fusion step, and accordingly, cell-signals that regulate gelsolin expression and/or its actin-severing activity may be crucial to combat HIV-1 infection. PMID:23575248

  7. NPY signalling in early osteoblasts controls glucose homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nicola J.; Nguyen, Amy D.; Enriquez, Ronaldo F.; Luzuriaga, Jude; Bensellam, Mohammed; Laybutt, Ross; Baldock, Paul A.; Herzog, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Objective The skeleton has recently emerged as an additional player in the control of whole-body glucose metabolism; however, the mechanism behind this is not clear. Methods Here we employ mice lacking neuropeptide Y, Y1 receptors solely in cells of the early osteoblastic lineage (Y1f3.6Cre), to examine the role of osteoblastic Y1 signalling in glycaemic control. Results Y1f3.6Cre mice not only have a high bone mass phenotype, but importantly also display altered glucose homeostasis; significantly decreased pancreas weight, islet number and pancreatic insulin content leading to elevated glucose levels and reduced glucose tolerance, but with no effect on insulin induced glucose clearance. The reduced glucose tolerance and elevated bone mass was corrected in Y1f3.6Cre mice by bone marrow transplant from wildtype animals, reinforcing the osteoblastic nature of this pathway. Importantly, when fed a high fat diet, Y1f3.6Cre mice, while equally gaining body weight and fat mass compared to controls, showed significantly improved glucose and insulin tolerance. Conditioned media from Y1f3.6Cre osteoblastic cultures was unable to stimulate insulin expression in MIN6 cells compared to conditioned media from wildtype osteoblast, indicating a direct signalling pathway. Importantly, osteocalcin a secreted osteoblastic factor previously identified as a modulator of insulin secretion was not altered in the Y1f3.6Cre model. Conclusion This study identifies the existence of other osteoblast-derived regulators of pancreas function and insulin secretion and illustrates a mechanism by which NPY signalling in bone tissue is capable of regulating pancreatic function and glucose homeostasis. PMID:25737952

  8. The effects of hormonal contraceptives on glycemic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Cortés, Manuel E.; Alfaro, Andrea A.

    2014-01-01

    A number of side effects have been linked to the use of hormonal contraceptives, among others, alterations in glucose levels. Hence, the objective of this mini-review is to show the main effects of hormonal contraceptive intake on glycemic regulation. First, the most relevant studies on this topic are described, then the mechanisms that might be accountable for this glycemic regulation impairment as exerted by hormonal contraceptives are discussed. Finally, we briefly discuss the ethical responsibility of health professionals to inform about the potential risks on glycemic homeostasis regarding hormonal contraceptive intake. PMID:25249703

  9. Glucose control in critical care

    PubMed Central

    Clain, Jeremy; Ramar, Kannan; Surani, Salim R

    2015-01-01

    Glycemic control among critically-ill patients has been a topic of considerable attention for the past 15 years. An initial focus on the potentially deleterious effects of hyperglycemia led to a series of investigations regarding intensive insulin therapy strategies that targeted tight glycemic control. As knowledge accumulated, the pursuit of tight glycemic control among critically-ill patients came to be seen as counterproductive, and moderate glycemic control came to dominate as the standard practice in intensive care units. In recent years, there has been increased focus on the importance of hypoglycemic episodes, glycemic variability, and premorbid diabetic status as factors that contribute to outcomes among critically-ill patients. This review provides a survey of key studies on glucose control in critical care, and aims to deliver perspective regarding glycemic management among critically-ill patients. PMID:26265994

  10. Review: starch matrices and the glycemic response.

    PubMed

    Parada, J; Aguilera, J M

    2011-06-01

    Starch is the most important source of energy for humans, and it is present in many products derived from cereals, legumes and tubers. Interestingly, some of these food products can have different metabolic effects (e.g. change of postprandial blood glucose concentration) although the total amount of starch is the same. This review focuses on a microstructural perspective of the glycemic response, in search of an alternative and complementary explanation of this phenomenon. Several starch and food microstructures are responsible for the change in starch bioaccessibility. Aspects such as the characterization of the microstructure of starchy products and, its relation to the metabolic problem, the crucial role of the food matrix and other components in the ingested meal, and the gaps in our present knowledge are discussed. PMID:21593288

  11. Inter- and Intra-Individual Variability in Glycemic Index Values for White Bread Determined Using Standardized Procedures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to evaluate the inter- and intra-individual variability of the GI value when determined under strictly controlled conditions. Twenty-three healthy adults (20-70 y) completed up to three sets of two visits per set. Each pair of visits assessed the glycemic response to 50 g a...

  12. Metabolic and Glycemic Sequelae of Sleep Disturbances in Children and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Koren, Dorit; O'Sullivan, Katie L.; Mokhlesi, Babak

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity in adults and children has increased greatly in the past three decades, as have metabolic sequelae, such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Sleep disturbances are increasingly recognized as contributors to this widespread epidemic in adults, and data are emerging in children as well. The categories of sleep disturbances that contribute to obesity and its glycemic co-morbidities include the following: (1) alterations of sleep duration, chronic sleep restriction and excessive sleep; (2) alterations in sleep architecture; (3) sleep fragmentation; (4) circadian rhythm disorders and disruption (i.e., shift work); and (5) obstructive sleep apnea. This article reviews current evidence supporting the contributions that these sleep disorders play in the development of obesity, insulin resistance, and T2DM as well as possibly influences on glycemic control in type 1 diabetes, with a special focus on data in pediatric populations. PMID:25398202

  13. 24-Hour Glucose Profiles on Diets Varying in Protein Content and Glycemic Index

    PubMed Central

    van Baak, Marleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence is increasing that the postprandial state is an important factor contributing to the risk of chronic diseases. Not only mean glycemia, but also glycemic variability has been implicated in this effect. In this exploratory study, we measured 24-h glucose profiles in 25 overweight participants in a long-term diet intervention study (DIOGENES study on Diet, Obesity and Genes), which had been randomized to four different diet groups consuming diets varying in protein content and glycemic index. In addition, we compared 24-h glucose profiles in a more controlled fashion, where nine other subjects followed in random order the same four diets differing in carbohydrate content by 10 energy% and glycemic index by 20 units during three days. Meals were provided in the lab and had to be eaten at fixed times during the day. No differences in mean glucose concentration or glucose variability (SD) were found between diet groups in the DIOGENES study. In the more controlled lab study, mean 24-h glucose concentrations were also not different. Glucose variability (SD and CONGA1), however, was lower on the diet combining a lower carbohydrate content and GI compared to the diet combining a higher carbohydrate content and GI. These data suggest that diets with moderate differences in carbohydrate content and GI do not affect mean 24-h or daytime glucose concentrations, but may result in differences in the variability of the glucose level in healthy normal weight and overweight individuals. PMID:25093276

  14. 24-hour glucose profiles on diets varying in protein content and glycemic index.

    PubMed

    van Baak, Marleen A

    2014-08-01

    Evidence is increasing that the postprandial state is an important factor contributing to the risk of chronic diseases. Not only mean glycemia, but also glycemic variability has been implicated in this effect. In this exploratory study, we measured 24-h glucose profiles in 25 overweight participants in a long-term diet intervention study (DIOGENES study on Diet, Obesity and Genes), which had been randomized to four different diet groups consuming diets varying in protein content and glycemic index. In addition, we compared 24-h glucose profiles in a more controlled fashion, where nine other subjects followed in random order the same four diets differing in carbohydrate content by 10 energy% and glycemic index by 20 units during three days. Meals were provided in the lab and had to be eaten at fixed times during the day. No differences in mean glucose concentration or glucose variability (SD) were found between diet groups in the DIOGENES study. In the more controlled lab study, mean 24-h glucose concentrations were also not different. Glucose variability (SD and CONGA1), however, was lower on the diet combining a lower carbohydrate content and GI compared to the diet combining a higher carbohydrate content and GI. These data suggest that diets with moderate differences in carbohydrate content and GI do not affect mean 24-h or daytime glucose concentrations, but may result in differences in the variability of the glucose level in healthy normal weight and overweight individuals. PMID:25093276

  15. Effects of flax fiber on laxation and glycemic response in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Wendy J; Lockert, Erin A; Cammer, Allison L; Whiting, Susan J

    2005-01-01

    We investigated whether a flax supplement taken orally or baked in a bakery product would effect the physiological responses characteristic of soluble and insoluble fiber, i.e., laxation and glycemic response, respectively. In Study 1, 26 healthy young adults consumed up to 15 g of fiber from a proprietary flax fiber supplement or as a psyllium supplement for 2 weeks once usual fecal weights were established. Changes in dietary fiber intake and acceptability of both products were evaluated. An increase in fecal weight was found with both fiber treatments. Supplemental fiber at intakes of 9.0 g/day (flax) and 10.4 g/day (psyllium) gave fecal bulking capacity of about 2.9 and 4.8 g of fecal weight/g of fiber, respectively. In Study 2, the effect of flax bread versus control white bread on glycemic response was studied. Eleven fasting subjects completed four test periods (duplicate trials of each bread) under standardized glycemic testing conditions. Paired t tests were used to analyze test compared with control peak blood glucose values (6.6 +/- 0.9 mmol/L compared with 6.9 +/- 0.7 mmol/L, P < .05, respectively) and area under the curve (AUC) (669 +/- 53 compared with 693 +/- 57, P = .015, respectively). Peak blood glucose values and AUC were improved by ingestion of flax fiber in healthy subjects. In conclusion, a flax fiber supplement provides the benefits of soluble and insoluble fiber. PMID:16379563

  16. High hydrostatic pressure processing reduces the glycemic index of fresh mango puree in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Elizondo-Montemayor, Leticia; Hernández-Brenes, Carmen; Ramos-Parra, Perla A; Moreno-Sánchez, Diana; Nieblas, Bianca; Rosas-Pérez, Aratza M; Lamadrid-Zertuche, Ana C

    2015-04-01

    Dietary guidelines recommend the daily consumption of fruits; however, healthy and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) subjects receive conflicting messages regarding ingestion of fruits, such as mango, because of its sugar content. We investigated the effects of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) processing of fresh mango puree (MP) on the glycemic indexes (GIs) and postprandial glycemic responses of 38 healthy Mexican subjects in a randomized cross-over clinical trial. Physicochemical characterization of MP included sugar profiles by HPLC-ELSD, starch, fibers, moisture, viscosity, swelling capacity and solubility properties of alcohol insoluble residue (AIR). The mean GI for HHP-MP was significantly lower (32.7 ± 13.4) than that of unprocessed-MP (42.7 ± 19.5). A significantly higher proportion of subjects showed a low GI following the consumption of HHP-MP compared to unprocessed-MP and none of them showed a high GI for the HHP-MP, compared to a significantly higher proportion for the unprocessed-MP. The viscosity and AIR solubility values of HHP-MP samples were significantly higher, which influenced glucose peaking later (Tmax) at 45 minutes and induced 20% lower AUC values than unprocessed-MP, corresponding to greater retardation indexes. The study findings support data stating that low GI fruits are appropriate for glycemic control and that mango may be included as part of healthy subjects' diets and potentially T2DM subjects' diets. Furthermore, HHP processing of mango may offer additional benefits for glycemic control, as its performance regarding GI, AUC and Tmax was significantly better than that of the unprocessed-MP. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the impact of this commercial non-thermal pasteurization technology on glucose metabolism. PMID:25797308

  17. The Development of Emotional and Behavioral Control in Early Childhood: Heterotypic Continuity and Relations to Early School Adjustment

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hyein; Shaw, Daniel S; Cheong, JeeWon

    2015-01-01

    We examined heterotypic continuity of emotional and behavioral control (EBC) across early childhood and related early manifestations of EBC to childrens school adjustment in 310 low-income, ethnically diverse boys. Multiple informants and methods were used to measure different indicators of EBC at 18, 24, 42, and 60 months, which were chosen to reflect salient regulatory challenges children face across development. Teachers rated boys externalizing and internalizing behaviors, and social skills at 72 months. Results indicated a modest degree of heterotypic continuity of EBC, with different constructs of EBC associated between adjacent time points and, in some instances, across more distant time points. Further, children who had struggled with early EBC demonstrated higher externalizing problems and lower social skills in school. Findings suggest that early deficits in EBC may be a target for early identification and prevention, as they may forecast continued difficulty in later-developing EBC skills and socioemotional problems. PMID:26550611

  18. Glycemic impact and health: new horizons in white bread formulations.

    PubMed

    Burton, Pat M; Monro, John A; Alvarez, Laura; Gallagher, Eimear

    2011-12-01

    The challenge of provision of a much wider range of foods of relatively low glycemic response than is currently available, especially in terms of cereal products, has been highlighted in recent years and this has particular relevance to bread consumption. Although there has been some transition to brown bread consumption, white bread remains a firm feature in the typical average western diet. This review first outlines the relationship between the glycemic impact of foods and health. What is important is that relatively small differences in glycemic potency of regularly consumed starch foods have been shown to have beneficial effects on health outcomes. Second, factors affecting glycemic response with particular application to white bread formulations are discussed. Novel ways of reformulating this highly favored carbohydrate staple, by using composite flours, with the aim of developing products of reduced glycemic response are highlighted in this review. Importantly, a new and significant focus on the role of unavailable carbohydrate in glycemic improvement is emerging. This has important application in increasing accessibility to health benefits by contributing to the prevention of and management of glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, and associated chronic disease to a wider range of consumers. PMID:21955095

  19. Effect of Low Glycemic Index Diet Versus Metformin on Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rajabi, Shirin; Mazloom, Zohreh; Zamani, Ali; Tabatabaee, Hamid Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) continues to be highly prevalent and contributes to a rapidly growing problem worldwide. The most important therapeutic intervention for metabolic syndrome is diet modification, an intervention whose efficacy has been proven for metabolic syndrome. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of low glycemic index diet versus metformin on MetS components in adults with MetS. Patients and Methods: Fifty-one adults with MetS participated in this randomized controlled clinical trial. Patients were randomly allocated to two groups of metformin and low glycemic index diet. The intervention period was eight weeks. The studied participants were compared at baseline and the end of the trial, regarding the following factors: weight, blood pressure, waist circumference, fasting blood sugar, hemoglobin A1c and lipid profiles (Triglyceride (TG), Total Cholesterol (TC), Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, and High-Density Lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol). Results: The anthropometric measurements, Fasting Blood Sugar (FBS), Hemoglobin A1c, serum lipid profiles (TG, TC, LDL-C, HDL-C) and lipoprotein ratio (LDL/HDL) showed a significant decrease after the intervention in both groups (P < 0.05). Comparison of the difference between the two groups was not significant, except for the mean reduction in FBS, which was more in the metformin group although this was not clinically significant. Conclusions: This study supports the assumption that low glycemic index diet as well as metformin can positively affect metabolic syndrome components. PMID:26587028

  20. Hemorheological and Glycemic Parameters and HDL Cholesterol for the Prediction of Cardiovascular Events

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung Woo; Kim, Byung Gyu; Kim, Byung Ok; Byun, Young Sup; Goh, Choong Won; Rhee, Kun Joo; Kwon, Hyuck Moon; Lee, Byoung Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Background Hemorheological and glycemic parameters and high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol are used as biomarkers of atherosclerosis and thrombosis. Objective To investigate the association and clinical relevance of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), fibrinogen, fasting glucose, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and HDL cholesterol in the prediction of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) and coronary heart disease (CHD) in an outpatient population. Methods 708 stable patients who visited the outpatient department were enrolled and followed for a mean period of 28.5 months. Patients were divided into two groups, patients without MACE and patients with MACE, which included cardiac death, acute myocardial infarction, newly diagnosed CHD, and cerebral vascular accident. We compared hemorheological and glycemic parameters and lipid profiles between the groups. Results Patients with MACE had significantly higher ESR, fibrinogen, fasting glucose, and HbA1c, while lower HDL cholesterol compared with patients without MACE. High ESR and fibrinogen and low HDL cholesterol significantly increased the risk of MACE in multivariate regression analysis. In patients with MACE, high fibrinogen and HbA1c levels increased the risk of multivessel CHD. Furthermore, ESR and fibrinogen were significantly positively correlated with HbA1c and negatively correlated with HDL cholesterol, however not correlated with fasting glucose. Conclusion Hemorheological abnormalities, poor glycemic control, and low HDL cholesterol are correlated with each other and could serve as simple and useful surrogate markers and predictors for MACE and CHD in outpatients. PMID:26690693

  1. Adherence to Glycemic Monitoring in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Patton, Susana R.

    2015-01-01

    Glucose monitoring either by self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) or continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) plays an important role in diabetes management and in reducing risk for diabetes-related complications. However, despite evidence supporting the role of glucose monitoring in better patient health outcomes, studies also reveal relatively poor adherence rates to SMBG and CGM use and numerous patient-reported barriers. Fortunately, some promising intervention strategies have been identified that promote at least short-term improvements in patients adherence to SMBG. These include education, problem solving, contingency management, goal setting, cognitive behavioral therapy, and motivational interviewing. Specific to CGM, interventions to promote greater use among patients are currently under way, yet one pilot study provides data suggesting better maintenance of CGM use in patients showing greater readiness for behavior change. The purpose of this review is to summarize the literature specific to glucose monitoring in patients with diabetes focusing specifically on current adherence rates, barriers to monitoring, and promising intervention strategies that may be ready to deploy now in the clinic setting to promote greater patient adherence to glucose monitoring. Yet, to continue to help patients with diabetes adhere to glucose monitoring, future research is needed to identify the treatment strategies and the intervention schedules that most likely lead to long-term maintenance of optimal glycemic monitoring levels. PMID:25591853

  2. Glycemic index, cardiovascular disease, and obesity.

    PubMed

    Morris, K L; Zemel, M B

    1999-09-01

    Although Americans have decreased the percent of energy they consume from fat, obesity and obesity-related comorbidities have progressively increased. Less attention has been paid to the role of carbohydrates, especially carbohydrate source, in these metabolic diseases. However, recent epidemiologic studies demonstrate consistently higher rates of cardiovascular disease and type II diabetes in individuals deriving a greater percentage of energy from refined grains and simple carbohydrates than from whole grains. Differences in the metabolic response to carbohydrates can be classified by glycemic index (GI), the blood glucose response to a given food compared with a standard (typically white bread or glucose). Classification of carbohydrates as "simple" or "complex" is of little use in predicting GI, because GI is influenced by starch structure (amylose versus amylopectin), fiber content, food processing, physical structure of the food, and other macronutrients in the meal. Low-GI diets have been reported to lower postprandial glucose and insulin responses, improve lipid profiles, and increase insulin sensitivity. Moreover, high-GI diets stimulate de novo lipogenesis and result in increased adipocyte size, whereas low-GI diets have been reported to inhibit these responses. Thus, the GI of dietary carbohydrates appears to play an important role in the metabolic fate of carbohydrates and, consequently, may significantly affect the risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and obesity. PMID:10568336

  3. Effects of formulation and surfactant on control of early leaf spot of peanut with tebuconazole

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prior to 1997, control of early leaf spot with the DMI fungicide tebuconazole, applied in a block of 4 mid-season applications scheduled between 2 applications of chlorothalonil, was similar to a full-season program with chlorothalonil. Periodically since 1997, control of early leaf spot with tebuc...

  4. 75 FR 7282 - Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and... Health and Human Services, and the Director, CDC, regarding the early detection and control of breast and... Force guidelines for breast and cervical cancer screening; Impact of the revised clinical...

  5. 76 FR 30723 - Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and... Health and Human Services, and the Director, CDC, regarding the early detection and control of breast and... for breast and cervical cancer screening; updates on the National Breast and Cervical Cancer...

  6. Dietary glycemic index and glycemic load and their relationship to cardiovascular risk factors in Chinese children.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinyu; Zhu, Yanna; Cai, Li; Ma, Lu; Jing, Jin; Guo, Li; Jin, Yu; Ma, Yinghua; Chen, Yajun

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the cross-sectional associations between dietary glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in Chinese children. A total of 234 Chinese schoolchildren aged 8-11 years in Guangdong participated in the study. Dietary intake was assessed via a 3-day dietary record. Seven established cardiovascular indicators were analyzed in this study: fasting plasma glucose (FPG), fasting triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure. Higher dietary GI was significantly associated with higher TG levels (P = 0.037) and lower HDL-C levels (P = 0.005) after adjusting for age, sex, nutritional intake, physical activity, and body mass index z score. LDL-C was found to differ across tertiles of dietary GL. The middle tertile tended to show the highest level of LDL-C. TC, FPG, and blood pressure were independent of both dietary GI and GL. Our findings suggest that higher dietary GI is differentially associated with some CVD risk factors, including lower HDL-C and higher TG, in school-aged children from south China. PMID:26944225

  7. Dietary Glycemic Index, Dietary Glycemic Load, Blood Lipids, and Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Denova-Gutirrez, Edgar; Huitrn-Bravo, Gerardo; Talavera, Juan O.; Castan, Susana; Gallegos-Carrillo, Katia; Flores, Yvonne; Salmern, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    Objective. To examine the associations of dietary glycemic index (GI) and dietary glycemic load (GL) with blood lipid concentrations and coronary heart disease (CHD) in nondiabetic participants in the Health Worker Cohort Study (HWCS). Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional analysis was performed, using data from adults who participated in the HWCS baseline assessment. We collected information on participants' socio-demographic conditions, dietary patterns and physical activity via self-administered questionnaires. Dietary GI and dietary GL were measured using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Anthropometric and clinical measurements were assessed with standardized procedures. CHD risk was estimated according to the sex-specific Framingham prediction algorithms. Results. IIn the 5,830 individuals aged 20 to 70 who were evaluated, dietary GI and GL were significantly associated with HDL-C, LDL-C, LDL-C/HDL-C ratio, and triglycerides serum levels. Subjects with high dietary GI have a relative risk of 1.56 (CI 95%; 1.132.14), and those with high dietary GL have a relative risk of 2.64 (CI 95%; 1.156.58) of having an elevated CHD risk than those who had low dietary GI and GL. Conclusions. Our results suggest that high dietary GI and dietary GL could have an unfavorable effect on serum lipid levels, which are in turn associated with a higher CHD risk. PMID:20700407

  8. Should glycemic index and glycemic load be considered in dietary recommendations?

    PubMed

    Hare-Bruun, Helle; Nielsen, Birgit M; Grau, Katrine; Oxlund, Anne L; Heitmann, Berit L

    2008-10-01

    High glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) have been proposed to be associated with increased risk of lifestyle diseases. Since protein intake varies little in humans, adherence to the common recommendation to reduce fat intake probably leads to increases in carbohydrate intake, which emphasizes the need to investigate the effects of carbohydrate on diet-related conditions and diseases. This review examines the epidemiological literature linking GI and GL to heart disease, insulin sensitivity, type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, and obesity among initially healthy people. The evidence for associations between GI and particularly GL and health among free-living populations is mixed. Only the positive association between GI and development of type 2 diabetes was consistent across cross-sectional and longitudinal studies for both sexes. Low GI/GL may protect against heart disease in women, and cross-sectional studies indicate low GI/GL may reduce high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and triacylglycerol levels in both sexes. Based on the evidence found in this review, it seems premature to include GI/GL in dietary recommendations. PMID:18826453

  9. Glycemic index and glycemic load are associated with some cardiovascular risk factors among the PREMIER study participants

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Pao-Hwa; Chen, Chuhe; Young, Deborah R.; Mitchell, Diane; Elmer, Patricia; Wang, Yanfang; Batch, Bryan; Champagne, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Background The clinical significance of glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) is inconclusive. Objective This study was conducted to examine the association of GI and GL with clinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors including body weight, blood pressure (BP), serum lipids, fasting glucose, insulin and homocysteine over time among the PREMIER participants. Design PREMIER was an 18-month randomized lifestyle intervention trial, conducted from 2000 to 2002, designed to help participants reduce BP by following the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) dietary pattern, losing weight, reducing sodium and increasing physical activity. GI and GL were estimated from 24 h diet recall data at baseline, 6 and 18 months after intervention. PROC MIXED model was used to examine the association of changes in GI or GL with changes in CVD risk factors. Results A total of 756 randomized participants, 62% females and 34% African Americans and who averaged 50.00.3 years old and 95.30.7 kg, were included in this report. Neither GI nor GL changes was associated with changes in any risk factors at 6 months. At 18 months, however, the GI change was significantly and positively associated with total cholesterol (TC) change only (p<0.05, ?=23.8012.11 mg/dL or 0.620.31 mmol/L) with a significant age interaction. The GL change was significantly associated with TC (p=0.02, ?=0.280.15 mg/dL or 0.010.00 mmol/L) positively and with low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) changes negatively (p=0.03, ?=?0.010.00 mg/dL or ?0.000.00 mmol/L), and significant age interactions were observed for both. Conclusions GI and GL was associated with TC and LDL-C after controlling for energy, fat and fiber intake and other potential confounders and the associations were modified by age. Further investigation into this relationship is important because of its potential clinical impact. PMID:22675288

  10. Glycemic responses to sweetened dried and raw cranberries in humans with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Ted; Luebke, Justin L; Morcomb, Erin F; Carrell, Emily J; Leveranz, Megan C; Kobs, Lisa; Schmidt, Travis P; Limburg, Paul J; Vorsa, Nicholi; Singh, Ajay P

    2010-10-01

    This study assessed the metabolic response to sweetened dried cranberries (SDC), raw cranberries (RC), and white bread (WB) in humans with type 2 diabetes. Development of palatable cranberry preparations associated with lower glycemic responses may be useful for improving fruit consumption and glycemic control among those with diabetes. In this trial, type 2 diabetics (n= 13) received WB (57 g, 160 cal, 1 g fiber), RC (55 g, 21 cal, 1 g fiber), SDC (40 g, 138 cal, 2.1 g fiber), and SDC containing less sugar (SDC-LS, 40 g, 113 cal, 1.8 g fiber + 10 g polydextrose). Plasma glucose (mmol/L) peaked significantly at 60 min for WB, and at 30 min for RC, SDC, and SDC-LS at 9.6 ± 0.4, 7.0 ± 0.4, 9.6 ± 0.5, and 8.7 ± 0.5, respectively, WB remained significantly elevated from the other treatments at 120 min. Plasma insulin (pmol/mL) peaked at 60 min for WB and SDC and at 30 min for RC and SDC-LS at 157 ± 15, 142 ± 27, 61 ± 8, and 97 ± 11, respectively. Plasma insulin for SDC-LS was significantly lower at 60 min than either WB or SDC. Insulin area under the curve (AUC) values for RC and SDC-LS were both significantly lower than WB or SDC. Phenolic content of SDC and SDC-LS was determined following extraction with 80% acetone prior to high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and electronspray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and found to be rich in 5-caffeoylquinic cid, quercetin-3-galactoside, and quercetin-3-galactoside, and the proanthocyanidin dimer epicatechin. In conclusion, SDC-LS was associated with a favorable glycemic and insulinemic response in type 2 diabetics. Practical Application: This study compares phenolic content and glycemic responses among different cranberry products. The study seeks to expand the palatable and portable healthy food choices for persons with type 2 diabetes. The novel use of polydextrose as a bulking agent making possible a reduction in caloric content and potential glycemic response is also characterized in this study. PMID:21535498

  11. Early Archean stromatolites: Paleoenvironmental setting and controls on formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, D. R.

    1991-01-01

    The earliest record of terrestrial life is contained in thin, silicified sedimentary layers within enormously thick, predominantly volcanic sequences in South Africa and Western Australia. This record includes bacteria-like microfossils, laminated carbonaceous structures resembling flat bacterial mats and stromatolites, and a morphologically diverse assemblage of carbonaceous particles. These structures and particles and their host sediments provide the only direct source of information on the morphology, paleoecology, and biogeochemistry of early life; the nature of interactions between organisms and surface systems on the early earth; and possible settings within which life might have evolved. The three known occurrences of 3.5 to 3.2 billion-year-old stromalites were evaluated in terms of depositional setting and biogenicity.

  12. Glycemic index predicts individual glucose responses after self-selected breakfasts in free-living, abdominally obese adults.

    PubMed

    Kochan, Angela M; Wolever, Thomas M S; Chetty, V Tony; Anand, Sonia S; Gerstein, Hertzel C; Sharma, Arya M

    2012-01-01

    The degree to which an individual's glycemic response to a meal is determined by the glycemic index (GI) and other components of the meal remains unclear, especially when meals are not consumed in a highly controlled research setting. To address this question, we analyzed data collected during the run-in period of a clinical trial. Free-living, nondiabetic adults (n = 57) aged 53.9 ± 9.8 y (mean ± SD) with a BMI of 33.9 ± 5.3 kg/m(2) and waist circumference of 109 ± 11 cm underwent a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and, on a separate day, wore a continuous glucose-monitoring system (CGMS) for 24 h during which time they recorded all foods consumed. The protein, fat, and available carbohydrate (avCHO) content and GI of the breakfast meals were calculated from the food records and the incremental areas under the glycemic response curves (iAUC) for 2 h after breakfast (iAUC(breakfast)) were calculated from CGMS data. Values for iAUC(breakfast), avCHO, fat, fiber, and BMI were normalized by log-transformation. The ability of participant characteristics and breakfast composition to predict individual iAUC(breakfast) responses was determined using step-wise multiple linear regression. A total of 56% of the variation in iAUC(breakfast) was explained by GI (30%; P < 0.001), iAUC after the OGTT (11%; P < 0.001), avCHO (11%; P < 0.001), and waist circumference (3%; P = 0.049); the effects of fat, protein, dietary fiber, age, sex, and BMI were not significant. We concluded that, in free-living, abdominally obese adults, GI is a significant determinant of individual glycemic responses elicited by self-selected breakfast meals. In this study, GI was a more important determinant of glycemic response than carbohydrate intake. PMID:22090469

  13. Charting Early Trajectories of Executive Control with the Shape School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Caron A. C.; Sheffield, Tiffany D.; Chevalier, Nicolas; Nelson, Jennifer Mize; Wiebe, Sandra A.; Espy, Kimberly Andrews

    2013-01-01

    Despite acknowledgement of the importance of executive control for learning and behavior, there is a dearth of research charting its developmental trajectory as it unfolds against the background of children's sociofamilial milieus. Using a prospective, cohort-sequential design, this study describes growth trajectories for inhibitory control

  14. Carbohydrate Intake, Glycemic Index, Glycemic Load, and Stroke: A Meta-analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xianlei; Wang, Chen; Wang, Shan; Cao, Gaoyang; Jin, Chao; Yu, Jiawei; Li, Xiuyang; Yan, Jing; Wang, Fudi; Yu, Wei; Ding, Fang

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate associations between carbohydrate intake/glycemic index (GI)/glycemic load (GL) and stroke risk. A literature search of MEDLINE, Embase, Web of Science, and CBM databases was performed to retrieve eligible studies published up to March 2014. Pooled relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to evaluate the strength of this association. Publication bias was assessed by the Egger's regression asymmetry test and Begg's rank correlation test with Begg's funnel plot. All analyses were conducted using software STATA 12.0 (StataCorp LP, College Station, TX) and SAS version 9.1 (SAS Institute Inc, Cary, NC). We identified 7 prospective studies that met the inclusion criteria and processed data from cohort studies to update available evidence. There were 25 independent estimates and 225?000 participants free of diabetes from 6 different countries; 3046 stroke events were included; and the follow-up range was 5 to 18 years. High GI was not associated with risk of stroke events (pooled RR = 1.10; 95% CI: 0.99-1.21); GL was a risk factor for stroke (pooled RR = 1.19; 95% CI: 1.05-1.36). There was no significant association between high carbohydrate intake and stroke risk (RR = 1.12; 95% CI: 0.93-1.35). A daily high GL diet is the risk factor of stroke event, and further researches need to verify the meta-analyses results and study associated mechanisms. PMID:25593213

  15. Glycemic index, glycemic load and insulinemic index of Chinese starchy foods

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Meng-Hsueh Amanda; Wu, Ming-Chang; Lu, Shin; Lin, Jenshinn

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To determine the glycemic index (GI), glycemic load (GL) and insulinemic index (II) of five starchy foods that are commonly used in Chinese diets. METHODS: Ten healthy subjects aged between 20-30 years were recruited. Each subject was asked to consume 50 g of available carbohydrate portions of test foods and reference food. Finger capillary blood samples were collected at the start of eating and 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 min after consumption. The GI and II of foods were calculated from the ratio of incremental area under the glucose/insulin response curves of test and reference foods. The GL for each test food was determined from its GI value and carbohydrate content. RESULTS: The results showed that brown rice elicited the highest postprandial glucose and insulin responses, followed by taro, adlay, yam and mung bean noodles, which produced the lowest. Among the five starchy foods, brown rice evoked the highest GI and GL at 82 0.2 and 18 0.2, followed by taro (69 0.4, 12 0.2), adlay (55 0.4, 10 0.2), yam (52 0.3, 9 0.0) and mung bean noodles (28 0.5, 7 0.2), respectively. The II values of the test foods corresponded with GI values. Similarly, brown rice gave the highest II at 81 0.1, followed by taro (73 0.3), adlay (67 0.3), yam (64 0.5) and mung bean noodles (38 0.3). All five starchy foods had lower GI, GL and II than reference bread (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: The GI, GL and II values of starchy foods provide important information for the public to manage their diet and could be useful for the prevention of lifestyle-related diseases such as diabetes mellitus. PMID:20954285

  16. Dietary Glycemic Load and Glycemic Index and Risk of Cerebrovascular Disease in the EPICOR Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Sieri, Sabina; Brighenti, Furio; Agnoli, Claudia; Grioni, Sara; Masala, Giovanna; Bendinelli, Benedetta; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Ricceri, Fulvio; Tumino, Rosario; Giurdanella, Maria Concetta; Pala, Valeria; Berrino, Franco; Mattiello, Amalia; Chiodini, Paolo; Panico, Salvatore; Krogh, Vittorio

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies on the association of stroke risk to dietary glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) have produced contrasting results. Objective To investigate the relation of dietary GI and GL to stroke risk in the large EPIC-Italy cohort (EPICOR) recruited from widely dispersed geographic areas of Italy. Design We studied 44099 participants (13,646 men and 30,453 women) who completed a dietary questionnaire. Multivariable Cox modeling estimated adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of stroke with 95% confidence intervals (95%CI). Over 11 years of follow-up, 355 stroke cases (195 ischemic and 83 hemorrhagic) were identified. Results Increasing carbohydrate intake was associated with increasing stroke risk (HR?=?2.01, 95%CI?=?1.043.86 highest vs. lowest quintile; p for trend 0.025). Increasing carbohydrate intake from high-GI foods was also significantly associated with increasing stroke risk (HR 1.87, 95%CI?=?1.163.02 highest vs. lowest, p trend 0.008), while increasing carbohydrate intake from low-GI foods was not. Increasing GL was associated with significantly increasing stroke risk (HR 2.21, 95%CI?=?1.164.20, highest vs. lowest; p trend 0.015). Dietary carbohydrate from high GI foods was associated with increased both ischemic stroke risk (highest vs. lowest HR 1.92, 95%CI?=?1.013.66) and hemorrhagic stroke risk (highest vs. lowest HR 3.14, 95%CI?=?1.099.04). GL was associated with increased both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke risk (HR 1.44, 95%CI?=?1.091.92 and HR 1.56, 95%CI?=?1.012.41 respectively, continuous variable). Conclusions In this Italian cohort, high dietary GL and carbohydrate from high GI foods consumption increase overall risk of stroke. PMID:23717392

  17. Epidemiologic Relationships Between A1C and All-Cause Mortality During a Median 3.4-Year Follow-up of Glycemic Treatment in the ACCORD Trial

    PubMed Central

    Riddle, Matthew C.; Ambrosius, Walter T.; Brillon, David J.; Buse, John B.; Byington, Robert P.; Cohen, Robert M.; Goff, David C.; Malozowski, Saul; Margolis, Karen L.; Probstfield, Jeffrey L.; Schnall, Adrian; Seaquist, Elizabeth R.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Randomized treatment comparing an intensive glycemic treatment strategy with a standard strategy in the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) trial was ended early because of an unexpected excess of mortality in the intensive arm. As part of ongoing post hoc analyses of potential mechanisms for this finding, we explored whether on-treatment A1C itself had an independent relationship with mortality. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Participants with type 2 diabetes (n = 10,251 with mean age 62 years, median duration of diabetes 10 years, and median A1C 8.1%) were randomly assigned to treatment strategies targeting either A1C <6.0% (intensive) or A1C 7.0–7.9% (standard). Data obtained during 3.4 (median) years of follow-up before cessation of intensive treatment were analyzed using several multivariable models. RESULTS Various characteristics of the participants and the study sites at baseline had significant associations with the risk of mortality. Before and after adjustment for these covariates, a higher average on-treatment A1C was a stronger predictor of mortality than the A1C for the last interval of follow-up or the decrease of A1C in the first year. Higher average A1C was associated with greater risk of death. The risk of death with the intensive strategy increased approximately linearly from 6–9% A1C and appeared to be greater with the intensive than with the standard strategy only when average A1C was >7%. CONCLUSIONS These analyses implicate factors associated with persisting higher A1C levels, rather than low A1C per se, as likely contributors to the increased mortality risk associated with the intensive glycemic treatment strategy in ACCORD. PMID:20427682

  18. Soluble fiber dextrins and pullulans vary in extent of hydrolytic digestion in vitro and in energy value and attenuate glycemic and insulinemic responses in dogs.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Brenda K; Parsons, Carl M; Bauer, Laura L; Swanson, Kelly S; Fahey, George C

    2010-11-10

    The objective of this research was to measure in vitro hydrolytic digestion characteristics, glycemic and insulinemic responses, and true metabolizable energy (TMEn) content of select soluble fiber dextrins (SFDs) and pullulans. The SFDs were derived either from tapioca starch or from corn starch. The pullulans were of low, intermediate, and high molecular weight. Soluble fiber dextrins varied in digestibility, with all substrates resulting in low to intermediate in vitro monosaccharide digestion. Pullulans were nearly completely hydrolyzed after simulated hydrolytic digestion. The glycemic response with dogs varied widely among SFDs, with all but one SFD substrate having lower glycemic response than maltodextrin (Malt). The pullulans all resulted in low glycemic values. Lower relative insulinemic responses (RIR) compared to the Malt control were noted for all SFDs and pullulans. True metabolizable energy (TMEn) values for SFDs obtained using roosters were lower than for Malt, with tapioca-based SFDs having numerically higher values than corn-based SFDs. Pullulans resulted in higher TMEn values than did SFDs. Soluble fiber dextrins and pullulans may be suitable candidates for reduced calorie and glycemic foodstuffs. PMID:20939499

  19. Brewer's Yeast Improves Glycemic Indices in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinzadeh, Payam; Javanbakht, Mohammad Hassan; Mostafavi, Seyed-Ali; Djalali, Mahmoud; Derakhshanian, Hoda; Hajianfar, Hossein; Bahonar, Ahmad; Djazayery, Abolghassem

    2013-01-01

    Background: Brewer's yeast may have beneficial effects on insulin receptors because of itsglucose tolerance factor in diabetic patients. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of brewer's yeast supplementation on glycemic indices in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: In a randomized double-blind controlled clinical trial, 84 adults (21 men and 63 women) aged 46.3 6.1 years old with type 2 diabetes mellitus were recruited and divided randomly into two groups: Supplement group receiving brewer's yeast (six 300mg tablets/day, total 1800 mg) and control group receiving placebo (six 300mg tablets/day) for 12 weeks. Body weight, height, body mass index, food consumption (based on 24h food record), fasting blood sugar (FBS), glycosylated hemoglobin, insulin sensitivity, and insulin resistance were measured before and after the intervention. Data analysis was performed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (version 18.0). Results: The changes in FBS, glycosylated hemoglobin, and insulin sensitivity were significantly different between the two groups during the study (respectively P < 0.001, P < 0.001, P = 0.02 independent sample t-test). There was a significant difference in FBS, glycosylated hemoglobin, and insulin sensitivity at the end of the study between the two groups after removing the effects of baseline values (respectively P = 0.002, P < 0.001, P = 0.02, analysis of covariance). Changes in body mass index, 24h food record, insulin resistance were not significant. Conclusions: Dietary supplementation with brewers yeast besides the usual treatment of diabetes can ameliorate blood glucose variables in type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:24319552

  20. Structured SMBG in early management of T2DM: Contributions from the St Carlos study

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz Gracia, Teresa; García de la Torre Lobo, Nuria; Durán Rodríguez Hervada, Alejandra; Calle Pascual, Alfonso L

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2DM) is a global pandemic that will affect 300 million people in the next decade. It has been shown that early and aggressive treatment of T2DM from the onset decreases complications, and the patient’s active role is necessary to achieve better glycemic control. In order to achieve glycemic control targets, an active attitude in patients is needed, and self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) plays a significant role. Nowadays, SMBG has become an important component of modern therapy for diabetes mellitus, and is even more useful if it is performed in a structured way. SMBG aids physicians and patients to achieve a specific level of glycemic control and to prevent hypoglycemia. In addition, SMBG empowers patients to achieve nutritional and physical activity goals, and helps physicians to optimize the different hypoglycemic therapies as demonstrated in the St Carlos study. This article describes the different ways of using this educational and therapeutic tool from the medical point of view as well as from the patient’s perspective. PMID:25126393

  1. Dietary Glycemic Index, Glycemic Load, and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease, Stroke, and Stroke Mortality: A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jingyao; Song, Yiqing; Wang, Yuyao; Hui, Rutai; Zhang, Weili

    2012-01-01

    Background The relationship between dietary glycemic index, glycemic load and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, and stroke-related mortality is inconsistent. Methods We systematically searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Science Citation Index Expanded databases using glycemic index, glycemic load, and cardiovascular disease and reference lists of retrieved articles up to April 30, 2012. We included prospective studies with glycemic index and glycemic load as the exposure and incidence of fatal and nonfatal CHD, stroke, and stroke-related mortality as the outcome variable. Pooled relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using random-effects models. Results Fifteen prospective studies with a total of 438,073 participants and 9,424 CHD cases, 2,123 stroke cases, and 342 deaths from stroke were included in the meta-analysis. Gender significantly modified the effects of glycemic index and glycemic load on CHD risk, and high glycemic load level was associated with higher risk of CHD in women (RR?=?1.49, 95%CI 1.27?1.73), but not in men (RR?=?1.08, 95%CI 0.91?1.27). Stratified meta-analysis by body mass index indicated that among overweight and obese subjects, dietary glycemic load level were associated with increased risk of CHD (RR?=?1.49, 95%CI 1.27?1.76; P for interaction?=?0.003). Higher dietary glycemic load, but not glycemic index, was positively associated with stroke (RR?=?1.19, 95% CI 1.00?1.43). There is a linear dose-response relationship between dietary glycemic load and increased risk of CHD, with pooled RR of 1.05 (95%CI 1.02?1.08) per 50-unit increment in glycemic load level. Conclusion High dietary glycemic load is associated with a higher risk of CHD and stroke, and there is a linear dose-response relationship between glycemic load and CHD risk. Dietary glycemic index is slightly associated with risk of CHD, but not with stroke and stroke-related death. Further studies are needed to verify the effects of gender and body weight on cardiovascular diseases. PMID:23284926

  2. Mandibular Motor Control during the Early Development of Speech and Nonspeech Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steeve, Roger W.; Moore, Christopher A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The mandible is often portrayed as a primary structure of early babble production, but empiricists still need to specify (a) how mandibular motor control and kinematics vary among different types of multisyllabic babble, (b) whether chewing or jaw oscillation relies on a coordinative infrastructure that can be exploited for early types of

  3. Evaluation of finger millet incorporated noodles for nutritive value and glycemic index.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Kamini; Srivastava, Sarita

    2014-03-01

    The present study was undertaken to develop finger millet incorporated noodles for diabetic patients. Finger millet variety VL-149 was taken. The finger millet flour and refined wheat flour (RWF) were evaluated for nutrient composition. The finger millet flour (FMF) was blended in various proportions (30 to 50%) in refined wheat flour and used for the preparation of noodles. Control consisted of RWF noodles. Sensory quality and nutrient composition of finger millet noodles was evaluated. The 30% finger millet incorporated noodles were selected best on the basis of sensory evaluation. Noodles in that proportion along with control were evaluated for glycemic response. Nutrient composition of noodles showed that 50% finger millet incorporated noodles contained highest amount of crude fat (1.15%), total ash (1.40%), crude fiber (1.28%), carbohydrate (78.54%), physiological energy (351.36 kcal), insoluble dietary fiber (5.45%), soluble dietary fiber (3.71%), iron (5.58%) and calcium (88.39%), respectively. However, control RWF noodles contained highest amount of starch (63.02%), amylose (8.72%) and amylopectin (54.29%). The glycemic index (GI) of 30% finger millet incorporated noodles (best selected by sensory evaluation) was observed significantly lower (45.13) than control noodles (62.59). It was found that finger millet flour incorporated noodles were found nutritious and showed hypoglycemic effect. PMID:24587528

  4. Metamorphic density controls on early-stage subduction dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duesterhoeft, Erik; Oberhnsli, Roland; Bousquet, Romain

    2013-04-01

    Subduction is primarily driven by the densification of the downgoing oceanic slab, due to dynamic P-T-fields in subduction zones. It is crucial to unravel slab densification induced by metamorphic reactions to understand the influence on plate dynamics. By analyzing the density and metamorphic structure of subduction zones, we may gain knowledge about the driving, metamorphic processes in a subduction zone like the eclogitization (i.e., the transformation of a MORB to an eclogite), the breakdown of hydrous minerals and the release of fluid or the generation of partial melts. We have therefore developed a 2D subduction zone model down to 250 km that is based on thermodynamic equilibrium assemblage computations. Our model computes the "metamorphic density" of rocks as a function of pressure, temperature and chemical composition using the Theriak-Domino software package at different time stages. We have used this model to investigate how the hydration, dehydration, partial melting and fractionation processes of rocks all influence the metamorphic density and greatly depend on the temperature field within subduction systems. These processes are commonly neglected by other approaches (e.g., gravitational or thermomechanical in nature) reproducing the density distribution within this tectonic setting. The process of eclogitization is assumed as being important to subduction dynamics, based on the very high density (3.6 g/cm3) of eclogitic rocks. The eclogitization in a MORB-type crust is possible only if the rock reaches the garnet phase stability field. This process is primarily temperature driven. Our model demonstrates that the initiation of eclogitization of the slab is not the only significant process that makes the descending slab denser and is responsible for the slab pull force. Indeed, our results show that the densification of the downgoing lithospheric mantle (due to an increase of pressure) starts in the early subduction stage and makes a significant contribution to the slab pull, where eclogitization does not occur. Thus, the lithospheric mantle acts as additional ballast below the sinking slab shortly after the initiation of subduction. Our calculation shows that the dogma of eclogitized basaltic, oceanic crust as the driving force of slab pull is overestimated during the early stage of subduction. These results improve our understanding of the force budget for slab pull during the intial and early stage of subduction. Therefore, the complex metamorphic structure of a slab and mantle wedge has an important impact on the development and dynamics of subduction zones. Further Reading: Duesterhoeft, Oberhnsli & Bousquet (2013), submitted to Earth and Planetary Science Letters

  5. Early magnetic resonance imaging control after temporomandibular joint arthrocentesis

    PubMed Central

    Ângelo, David Faustino; Sousa, Rita; Pinto, Isabel; Sanz, David; Gil, F. Monje; Salvado, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) lysis and lavage arthrocentesis with viscosupplementation are an effective treatment for acute disc displacement (DD) without reduction. Clinical success seems to be related to multiple factors despite the lack of understanding of its mechanisms. The authors present a case report of 17-year-old women with acute open mouth limitation (12 mm), right TMJ pain-8/10 visual analog scale, right deviation when opening her mouth. The clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diagnosis was acute DD without reduction of right TMJ. Right TMJ arthrocentesis was purposed to the patient with lysis, lavage, and viscosupplementation of the upper joint space. After 5 days, a new MRI was performed to confirm upper joint space distension and disc position. Clinical improvement was obtained 5 days and 1 month after arthrocentesis. Upper joint space increased 6 mm and the disc remained displaced. We report the first early TMJ MRI image postoperative, with measurable upper joint space.

  6. Charting Early Trajectories of Executive Control with the Shape School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Caron A. C.; Sheffield, Tiffany D.; Chevalier, Nicolas; Nelson, Jennifer Mize; Wiebe, Sandra A.; Espy, Kimberly Andrews

    2013-01-01

    Despite acknowledgement of the importance of executive control for learning and behavior, there is a dearth of research charting its developmental trajectory as it unfolds against the background of children's sociofamilial milieus. Using a prospective, cohort-sequential design, this study describes growth trajectories for inhibitory control…

  7. Inhibitory Control during Emotional Distraction across Adolescence and Early Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen-Gilbert, Julia E.; Thomas, Kathleen M.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the changing relation between emotion and inhibitory control during adolescence. One hundred participants between 11 and 25 years of age performed a go-nogo task in which task-relevant stimuli (letters) were presented at the center of large task-irrelevant images depicting negative, positive, or neutral scenes selected from…

  8. Controls on development and diversity of Early Archean stromatolites

    PubMed Central

    Allwood, Abigail C.; Grotzinger, John P.; Knoll, Andrew H.; Burch, Ian W.; Anderson, Mark S.; Coleman, Max L.; Kanik, Isik

    2009-01-01

    The ?3,450-million-year-old Strelley Pool Formation in Western Australia contains a reef-like assembly of laminated sedimentary accretion structures (stromatolites) that have macroscale characteristics suggestive of biological influence. However, direct microscale evidence of biologynamely, organic microbial remains or biosedimentary fabricshas to date eluded discovery in the extensively-recrystallized rocks. Recently-identified outcrops with relatively good textural preservation record microscale evidence of primary sedimentary processes, including some that indicate probable microbial mat formation. Furthermore, we find relict fabrics and organic layers that covary with stromatolite morphology, linking morphologic diversity to changes in sedimentation, seafloor mineral precipitation, and inferred microbial mat development. Thus, the most direct and compelling signatures of life in the Strelley Pool Formation are those observed at the microscopic scale. By examining spatiotemporal changes in microscale characteristics it is possible not only to recognize the presence of probable microbial mats during stromatolite development, but also to infer aspects of the biological inputs to stromatolite morphogenesis. The persistence of an inferred biological signal through changing environmental circumstances and stromatolite types indicates that benthic microbial populations adapted to shifting environmental conditions in early oceans. PMID:19515817

  9. Glycemic indices of five varieties of dates in healthy and diabetic subjects

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This study was designed to determine the glycemic indices of five commonly used varieties of dates in healthy subjects and their effects on postprandial glucose excursions in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods Composition analysis was carried out for five types of dates (Tamer stage). The weights of the flesh of the dates equivalent to 50 g of available carbohydrates were calculated. The study subjects were thirteen healthy volunteers with a mean ( SD) age of 40.2 6.7 years and ten participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus (controlled on lifestyle measures and/or metformin) with a mean HbA1c ( SD) of 6.6 (0.7%) and a mean age ( SD) of 40.8 5.7 years. Each subject was tested on eight separate days with 50 g of glucose (on 3 occasions) and 50 g equivalent of available carbohydrates from the 5 varieties of date (each on one occasion). Capillary glucose was measured in the healthy subjects at 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 min and for the diabetics at 0, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150 and 180 min. The glycemic indices were determined as ratios of the incremental areas under the response curves for the dates compared to glucose. Statistical analyses were performed using the Mann-Whitney U test and repeated measures analysis of variance. Results Mean glycemic indices SEM of the dates for the healthy individuals were 54.0 6.1, 53.5 8.6, 46.3 7.1, 49.1 3.6 and 55.1 7.7 for Fara'd, Lulu, Bo ma'an, Dabbas and Khalas, respectively. Corresponding values for those with type 2 diabetes were very similar (46.1 6.2, 43.8 7.7, 51.8 6.9, 50.2 3.9 and 53.0 6.0). There were no statistically significant differences in the GIs between the control and the diabetic groups for the five types of dates, nor were there statistically significant differences among the dates' GIs (df = 4, F = 0.365, p = 0.83). Conclusion The results show low glycemic indices for the five types of dates included in the study and that their consumption by diabetic individuals does not result in significant postprandial glucose excursions. These findings point to the potential benefits of dates for diabetic subjects when used in a healthy balanced diet. Trial Registration Number ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01307904 PMID:21619670

  10. Effect of Fresh Royal Jelly Ingestion on Glycemic Response in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mobasseri, Majid; Ghiyasvand, Shahram; Ostadrahimi, Alireza; Ghojazadeh, Morteza; Noshad, Hamid; Pourmoradian, Samira

    2015-01-01

    Background: Type 2 diabetes is the fourth major public health problem worldwide. Royal Jelly (RJ) insulin-like activity and blood glucose modulating properties have been reported in animal and healthy volunteers. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the effect of a single dose of fresh RJ as a complementary therapy on glycemic response in patients with type 2 diabetes. Patients and Methods: In this randomized clinical trial, 40 patients with type 2 diabetes were assigned into the RJ (n = 20) and placebo (n = 20) groups and received either 10 g fresh RJ or placebo after overnight fasting. Serum glucose, insulin and C-peptide concentrations were determined at 0, 60, 120 minutes after the intervention. Independent t-tests and repeated measures ANOVA were used to analyze data. Results: The mean serum glucose levels were significantly decreased in RJ and placebo groups; however, mean serum level was different but not statistically. (P = 0.77). One hour after RJ ingestion the mean serum insulin concentrations were increased and after 2 hours it was decreased insignificantly (P = 0.54, P = 0.20). The mean C-peptide concentrations were significantly increased after 1 and 2 hours of RJ ingestion; however, in the placebo group we observed a slight but insignificant reduction at the time of 1 and 2 hours in the mean C-peptide serum levels (P = 0.40). Moreover, there was no significant difference in none of the glycemic control parameters between both studied groups (P > 0.05). Conclusions: It seems that RJ does not appear to have significant immediate effects on glycemic factors in patients with type 2 diabetes. However, further studies with larger sample sizes and different doses of RJ are needed to achieve more precise results. PMID:26473074

  11. Early Implementation of THAM for ICP Control: Therapeutic Hypothermia Avoidance and Reduction in Hypertonics/Hyperosmotics

    PubMed Central

    Zeiler, F. A.; Gillman, L. M.; Teitelbaum, J.; West, M.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Tromethamine (THAM) has been demonstrated to reduce intracranial pressure (ICP). Early consideration for THAM may reduce the need for other measures for ICP control. Objective. To describe 4 cases of early THAM therapy for ICP control and highlight the potential to avoid TH and paralytics and achieve reduction in sedation and hypertonic/hyperosmotic agent requirements. Methods. We reviewed the charts of 4 patients treated with early THAM for ICP control. Results. We identified 2 patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and 2 with traumatic brain injury (TBI) receiving early THAM for ICP control. The mean time to initiation of THAM therapy was 1.8 days, with a mean duration of 5.3 days. In all patients, after 6 to 12 hours of THAM administration, ICP stability was achieved, with reduction in requirements for hypertonic saline and hyperosmotic agents. There was a relative reduction in mean hourly hypertonic saline requirements of 89.1%, 96.1%, 82.4%, and 97.0% for cases 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively, comparing pre- to post-THAM administration. Mannitol, therapeutic hypothermia, and paralytics were avoided in all patients. Conclusions. Early administration of THAM for ICP control could potentially lead to the avoidance of other ICP directed therapies. Prospective studies of early THAM administration are warranted. PMID:25544901

  12. Kinetic controls on early karst aquifer porosity development

    SciTech Connect

    Groves, C.G. ); Howard, A.D. . Dept. of Environmental Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    A series of simulations using the newly developed model KARST has been performed to investigate limiting kinetic controls on limestone dissolution during the earliest stages of karst aquifer porosity development. This FORTRAN model couples fluid flow within and dissolution of circular cross section conduits, and considers surface reaction rates (both far from and close to thermodynamic equilibrium), mass transfer rates of reaction products to the bulk fluid, and rates of homogeneous reactions associated with dissolution of CO[sub 2] gas in water. Mass transfer theory for both laminar and turbulent flow cases is included. Runs were made with a wide variety of initial conditions of passage geometry, head gradient, and initial PCO[sub 2]. Results show a consistent pattern of kinetic control that varies as functions of time as well as position along the conduit. Slow, higher order surface reaction rates (close to equilibrium), diffusion rates, and rapid, lower order reaction rates (far from equilibrium) are found to be limiting steps at various times and location. Under no conditions in the simulations did the rate of CO[sub 2] hydration limit dissolution. Thresholds between the various kinetic regimes were found to be associated with a critical distance from equilibrium, as well as the transition from laminar to turbulent flow. As a result of interactions between flow and chemical conditions, passage growth (measure by fluid discharge rates) can be divided into an initial, slow period initiation and a more rapid one (enlargement). The onset of the enlargement phase was not found to coincide with any single kinetic event.

  13. Large-scale association analyses identify new loci influencing glycemic traits and provide insight into the underlying biological pathways

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Robert A; Lagou, Vasiliki; Welch, Ryan P; Wheeler, Eleanor; Montasser, May E; Luan, Jianan; Mgi, Reedik; Strawbridge, Rona J; Rehnberg, Emil; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Yengo, Loc; Lecoeur, Cecile; Shungin, Dmitry; Sanna, Serena; Sidore, Carlo; Johnson, Paul C D; Jukema, J Wouter; Johnson, Toby; Mahajan, Anubha; Verweij, Niek; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Shah, Sonia; Smith, Albert V; Sennblad, Bengt; Gieger, Christian; Salo, Perttu; Perola, Markus; Timpson, Nicholas J; Evans, David M; Pourcain, Beate St; Wu, Ying; Andrews, Jeanette S; Hui, Jennie; Bielak, Lawrence F; Zhao, Wei; Horikoshi, Momoko; Navarro, Pau; Isaacs, Aaron; OConnell, Jeffrey R; Stirrups, Kathleen; Vitart, Veronique; Hayward, Caroline; Esko, Tnu; Mihailov, Evelin; Fraser, Ross M; Fall, Tove; Voight, Benjamin F; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Chen, Han; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Morris, Andrew P; Rayner, Nigel W; Robertson, Neil; Rybin, Denis; Liu, Ching-Ti; Beckmann, Jacques S; Willems, Sara M; Chines, Peter S; Jackson, Anne U; Kang, Hyun Min; Stringham, Heather M; Song, Kijoung; Tanaka, Toshiko; Peden, John F; Goel, Anuj; Hicks, Andrew A; An, Ping; Mller-Nurasyid, Martina; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Folkersen, Lasse; Marullo, Letizia; Jansen, Hanneke; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Pankow, James S; North, Kari E; Forouhi, Nita G; Loos, Ruth J F; Edkins, Sarah; Varga, Tibor V; Hallmans, Gran; Oksa, Heikki; Antonella, Mulas; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Trompet, Stella; Ford, Ian; Bakker, Stephan J L; Kong, Augustine; Kumari, Meena; Gigante, Bruna; Herder, Christian; Munroe, Patricia B; Caulfield, Mark; Antti, Jula; Mangino, Massimo; Small, Kerrin; Miljkovic, Iva; Liu, Yongmei; Atalay, Mustafa; Kiess, Wieland; James, Alan L; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Palmer, Colin N A; Doney, Alex S F; Willemsen, Gonneke; Smit, Johannes H; Campbell, Susan; Polasek, Ozren; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Hercberg, Serge; Dimitriou, Maria; Bolton, Jennifer L; Fowkes, Gerard R; Kovacs, Peter; Lindstrm, Jaana; Zemunik, Tatijana; Bandinelli, Stefania; Wild, Sarah H; Basart, Hanneke V; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Grallert, Harald; Maerz, Winfried; Kleber, Marcus E; Boehm, Bernhard O; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P; Province, Michael A; Borecki, Ingrid B; Hastie, Nicholas D; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Watkins, Hugh; Farrall, Martin; Stumvoll, Michael; Ferrucci, Luigi; Waterworth, Dawn M; Bergman, Richard N; Collins, Francis S; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Watanabe, Richard M; de Geus, Eco J C; Penninx, Brenda W; Hofman, Albert; Oostra, Ben A; Psaty, Bruce M; Vollenweider, Peter; Wilson, James F; Wright, Alan F; Hovingh, G Kees; Metspalu, Andres; Uusitupa, Matti; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Kaprio, Jaakko; Price, Jackie F; Dedoussis, George V; Deloukas, Panos; Meneton, Pierre; Lind, Lars; Boehnke, Michael; Shuldiner, Alan R; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Morris, Andrew D; Toenjes, Anke; Peyser, Patricia A; Beilby, John P; Krner, Antje; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Bornstein, Stefan R; Schwarz, Peter E H; Lakka, Timo A; Rauramaa, Rainer; Adair, Linda S; Smith, George Davey; Spector, Tim D; Illig, Thomas; de Faire, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kivimaki, Mika; Hingorani, Aroon; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Saaristo, Timo E; Boomsma, Dorret I; Stefansson, Kari; van der Harst, Pim; Dupuis, Jose; Pedersen, Nancy L; Sattar, Naveed; Harris, Tamara B; Cucca, Francesco; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Mohlke, Karen L; Balkau, Beverley; Froguel, Philippe; Pouta, Anneli; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wareham, Nicholas J; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; McCarthy, Mark I; Franks, Paul W; Meigs, James B; Teslovich, Tanya M; Florez, Jose C; Langenberg, Claudia; Ingelsson, Erik; Prokopenko, Inga; Barroso, Ins

    2012-01-01

    Through genome-wide association meta-analyses of up to 133,010 individuals of European ancestry without diabetes, including individuals newly genotyped using the Metabochip, we have raised the number of confirmed loci influencing glycemic traits to 53, of which 33 also increase type 2 diabetes risk (q < 0.05). Loci influencing fasting insulin showed association with lipid levels and fat distribution, suggesting impact on insulin resistance. Gene-based analyses identified further biologically plausible loci, suggesting that additional loci beyond those reaching genome-wide significance are likely to represent real associations. This conclusion is supported by an excess of directionally consistent and nominally significant signals between discovery and follow-up studies. Functional follow-up of these newly discovered loci will further improve our understanding of glycemic control. PMID:22885924

  14. An Examination of Locus of Control, Epistemological Beliefs and Metacognitive Awareness in Preservice Early Childhood Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedel, Emine Ferda

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to explore the locus of control, epistemological beliefs and metacognitive awareness levels of preservice early childhood education teachers and to determine the interrelations among these variables. 206 teacher candidates have been asked to fill out Rotter's Internal-External Locus of Control Scale, Central Epistemological Beliefs…

  15. Relations among Peer Acceptance, Inhibitory Control, and Math Achievement in Early Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oberle, Eva; Schonert-Reichl, Kimberly A.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined relations among peer acceptance, inhibitory control, and math achievement in ninety-nine 4th and 5th grade early adolescents. Teachers rated students on peer acceptance and students completed a computerized executive function task assessing inhibitory control. Math achievement was assessed via end of year math grades. Results…

  16. Promoting Early Intervention Referral through a Randomized Controlled Home-Visiting Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwarz, Donald F.; O'Sullivan, Ann L.; Guinn, Judith; Mautone, Jennifer A.; Carlson, Elyse C.; Zhao, Huaqing; Zhang, Xuemei; Esposito, Tara L.; Askew, Megan; Radcliffe, Jerilynn

    2012-01-01

    The MOM Program is a randomized, controlled trial of an intervention to promote mothers' care for the health and development of their children, including accessing early intervention (EI) services. Study aims were to determine whether, relative to controls, this intervention increased receipt of and referral to EI services. Mothers (N = 302)

  17. 75 FR 57472 - Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC): Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC): Notice of Charter Renewal This gives notice under the...

  18. Relations among Peer Acceptance, Inhibitory Control, and Math Achievement in Early Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oberle, Eva; Schonert-Reichl, Kimberly A.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined relations among peer acceptance, inhibitory control, and math achievement in ninety-nine 4th and 5th grade early adolescents. Teachers rated students on peer acceptance and students completed a computerized executive function task assessing inhibitory control. Math achievement was assessed via end of year math grades. Results

  19. Effect of glycemic treatment and microvascular complications on menopause in women with type 1 diabetes in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial/Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (DCCT/EDIC) cohort.

    PubMed

    Kim, Catherine; Cleary, Patricia A; Cowie, Catherine C; Braffett, Barbara H; Dunn, Rodney L; Larkin, Mary E; Gatcomb, Patricia M; Wessells, Hunter B; Nathan, David M; Sarma, Aruna V

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We examined the imp