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1

Early glycemic control in critically ill patients with burn injury.  

PubMed

Glucose management in patients with burn injury is often difficult because of their hypermetabolic state with associated hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance. Recent studies suggest that time to glycemic control is associated with improved outcomes. The authors sought to determine the influence of early glycemic control on the outcomes of critically ill patients with burn injury. A retrospective analysis was performed at the Ohio State University Medical Center. Patients hospitalized with burn injury were enrolled if they were admitted to the intensive care unit between March 1, 2006, and February 28, 2009. Early glycemic control was defined as the achievement of a mean daily blood glucose of ?150 mg/dl for at least two consecutive days by postburn day 3. Forty-six patients made up the study cohort with 26 achieving early glycemic control and 20 who did not. The two groups were similar at baseline with regard to age, pre-existing diabetes, APACHE II score and burn size and depth. There were no differences in number of surgical interventions, infectious complications, or length of stay between patients who achieved or failed early glycemic control. Failure of early glycemic control was, however, associated with significantly higher mortality both by univariate (35.0 vs 7.7%, P = .03) and multivariate analyses (hazard ratio 6.754 [1.16-39.24], P = .03) adjusting for age, TBSA, and inhalation injury. Failure to achieve early glycemic control in patients with burn injury is associated with an increased risk of mortality. However, further prospective controlled trials are needed to establish causality of this association. PMID:21841493

Murphy, Claire V; Coffey, Rebecca; Cook, Charles H; Gerlach, Anthony T; Miller, Sidney F

2

Brief Report: Trajectories of Glycemic Control over Early to Middle Adolescence  

PubMed Central

Objectives?To identify distinct patterns of glycemic control over early to middle adolescence, and to determine whether psychosocial variables predicted those patterns.?Methods?We used trajectory analysis to examine glycemic control over 5 years among adolescents with type 1 diabetes who were of age 12 on average at study start (n = 132). Well-being, relationships, and self-care behavior were assessed with in-person interviews. Blood glucose testing was determined from blood glucose meters, and missed clinic appointments and glycosolated hemoglobin were obtained from medical records.?Results?We identified two distinct clusters of individuals, a stable good glycemic control group and a poorer deteriorating glycemic control group. Individuals in the deteriorating control group were characterized by higher peer conflict, more negative diabetes emotions, fewer blood glucose tests, and more missed clinic appointments.?Conclusion Psychosocial variables and behavioral markers of self-care may predict the course of glycemic control over early to middle adolescence.

Snyder, Pamela R.; Seltman, Howard; Escobar, Oscar; Becker, Dorothy; Siminerio, Linda

2010-01-01

3

Guidelines for glycemic control  

Microsoft Academic Search

Glycemic control in diabetes patients continues to evolve as new medications are introduced and clinicaltrial data become available. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) guidelines for 2004, for the first time, provide targets for both preprandial and postprandial glucose levels. The ADA, however, does not provide guidelines regarding specific medication therapy. This paper provides a detailed treatment algorithm that is easy

Stephen Clement

2004-01-01

4

Guidelines for glycemic control.  

PubMed

Glycemic control in diabetes patients continues to evolve as new medications are introduced and clinical trial data become available. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) guidelines for 2004, for the first time, provide targets for both preprandial and postprandial glucose levels. The ADA, however, does not provide guidelines regarding specific medication therapy. This paper provides a detailed treatment algorithm that is easy to follow for nurse practitioners as well as primary care providers. Progress in our understanding of diabetes and new therapeutic agents will dictate modifications of treatment targets and guidelines, with the goal of making euglycemia achievable for all patients with diabetes. PMID:15628691

Clement, Stephen

2004-01-01

5

Pharmacologic Factors Affecting Glycemic Control  

Microsoft Academic Search

Among many challenges to achieving and maintaining glycemic control, the impact of pharmacologic agents on glycemia is a significant,\\u000a but often overlooked factor. Numerous medications have been implicated in the development of drug-induced hyperglycemia and\\u000a type 2 diabetes mellitus. Of these, the atypical antipsychotics (for the management of depression and psychosis), the protease-inhibitor\\u000a anti retroviral agents (for the management of

Lillian F. Lien

6

Motivation and glycemic control in diabetes mellitus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although adherence to treatment regimes is clinically important in diabetes mellitus, the best way to improve it is unclear. As a precursor to evaluating the place of a brief intervention (motivational interviewing) in the treatment of diabetes, this study investigated the relation between motivation and glycemic control in 361 diabetic out-patients. Outcome measures were the Stages of Change Readiness and

Peter Trigwell; Peter J. Grant; Allan House

1997-01-01

7

Overcoming the hurdles to achieving glycemic control  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several factors influence diabetes control, and many of these can adversely affect endeavors to obtain optimal glycemic management. For many patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, the passage of time often results in a loss of responsiveness to medication and a greater difficulty in achieving desired target levels. Although these observations in part reflect a natural progression of diabetes, irrespective

Kenneth M. Shaw

2006-01-01

8

Practice of strict glycemic control in critically ill patients.  

PubMed

Blood glucose control aiming at normoglycemia, frequently referred to as "strict glycemic control", decreases mortality and morbidity of critically ill patients. We searched the medical literature for export opinions, surveys, and clinical reports on blood glucose control in intensive care medicine. While strict glycemic control has been recommended standard of care for critically ill patients, the risk of severe hypoglycemia with strict glycemic control is frequently mentioned by experts. Some rationalize this risk, though others strongly point out the high incidence of hypoglycemia to be (one) reason not to perform strict glycemic control. Implementation of strict glycemic control is far from complete in intensive care units across the world. Frequently local guidelines accept higher blood glucose levels than those with strict glycemic control. Only a minority of retrieved manuscripts are on blood glucose regimens with the lower targets as with strict glycemic control. Hypoglycemia certainly is encountered with blood glucose control, in particular with strict glycemic control. Reports show intensive care-nurses can adequately and safely perform strict glycemic control. Implementation of strict glycemic control is far from complete, at least in part because of the feared risks of hypoglycemia. The preference for hyperglycemia over intermittent hypoglycemia is irrational, however, because there is causal evidence of harm for the former but only associative evidence of harm for the latter. For several reasons it is wise to have strict glycemic control being a nurse-based strategy. PMID:18971884

Schultz, Marcus J; de Graaff, Mart J; Royakkers, Annic A N M; van Braam Houckgeest, Floris; van der Sluijs, Johannes P; Kieft, Hans; Spronk, Peter E

2008-11-01

9

Glycemic control during pancreas transplantation: continous infusion versus bolus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pancreas transplantation is a method to restore endogenous insulin secretion in insulin-dependent diabetic patients. Because glycemia >150 mg\\/dL may harm pancreatic graft beta cells, early glucose control using insulin administration is recommended during transplantation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the benefits of strict glycemic control during pancreas transplantation by comparing two types of insulin and glucose administration:

H Halpern; E Miyoshi; L. M Kataoka; R. A Khouri Fo; S. B. P Miranda; C. K Marumo; P. P. P Caravatto; T Genzini; M. P Miranda

2004-01-01

10

Revisiting clinical trials on glycemic control and cardiovascular risk  

Microsoft Academic Search

The most relevant clinical trials, assessing the role of glycemic control in reducing cardiovascular risk, are examined. The UKPDS was the first to address this issue. More recent trials (ACCORD, ADVANCE and VADT) are controversial and evidences did not support that strict glycemic control (reflected by normal glycated hemoglobin) exclusively is sufficient to reduce cardiovascular risk in complicated individuals with

Sandra Roberta Gouvea Ferreira; Sandra Roberta; Gouvea Ferreira

2009-01-01

11

Tight perioperative glycemic control using an artificial endocrine pancreas.  

PubMed

Van den Berghe et al. reported in 2001 that tight glycemic control (maintaining blood glucose levels at 80-110 mg/dl) improved morbidity and mortality in the surgical intensive care unit. This method was termed intensive insulin therapy (IIT), and it is now being adopted worldwide for perioperative care. Recent evidence has suggested that perioperative hyperglycemia significantly contributes to the development of postoperative infection (POI). Many professional societies therefore now recommend IIT over conventional standard glycemic control measures for critically ill adult patients to minimize infectious complications. However, IIT carries a risk of inducing hypoglycemia, which is linked to serious neurological events. We recently demonstrated that achieving perioperative tight glycemic control using an artificial endocrine pancreas for surgical patients was a safe and effective method for decreasing the incidence of POI without increasing the risk of hypoglycemia. We herein review the benefits and requirements of tight glycemic control in surgery, with a focus on infection control. Strict perioperative glycemic control using a closed-loop artificial endocrine pancreas system is recommended for safe and effective performance of IIT. PMID:20037833

Hanazaki, Kazuhiro; Maeda, Hiromichi; Okabayashi, Takehiro

2009-12-29

12

Durability of Glycemic Control using U-500 Insulin  

PubMed Central

Previous short-term studies evaluating U-500 insulin have reported improvements in glycemic control but with significant weight gain. This study was performed to examine the glycemic durability of U-500 insulin in highly insulin resistant subjects, and to determine if weight gain was continuous with use. Patients using U-500 insulin provided consent for chart reviews for up to 3 years prior to and 3 years after use of U-500 insulin. Charts were reviewed for physical and metabolic data from 53 subjects using U-500 insulin of which 20 used U-500 insulin for 3 years. Use of U-500 insulin led to an approximate 1% decrease in HbA1c within 3–6 months of use which was sustained for up to 3 years. Patients required increased insulin doses (by ~80%) over the first 6–12 months with a corresponding weight gain (~10 lbs) and a spike in hypoglycemia symptoms, but then insulin doses and body weight, as well as glycemic control and hypoglycemic symptoms, stabilized over subsequent follow up. Use of U-500 insulin in a clinical diabetes practice leads to sustained improvements in glycemic control following a period of insulin titration and weight gain. Despite the weight gain, glycemic control was sustained for up to 3 years.

Dailey, Alexandria M.; Gibert, Jennifer A.; Tannock, Lisa R.

2011-01-01

13

Relationship between perioperative glycemic control and postoperative infections.  

PubMed

Perioperative hyperglycemia in critically ill surgery patients increases the risk of postoperative infection (POI), which is a common, and often costly, surgical complication. Hyperglycemia is associated with abnormalities in leukocyte function, including granulocyte adherence, impaired phagocytosis, delayed chemotaxis, and depressed bactericidal capacity. These leukocyte deficiencies are the cause of infection and improve with tight glycemic control, which leads to fewer POIs in critically ill surgical patients. Tight glycemic control, such as intensive insulin therapy, has a risk of hypoglycemia. In addition, the optimal targeted blood glucose range to reduce POI remains unknown. Since 2006, we have investigated tight perioperative blood glucose control using a closed-loop artificial endocrine pancreas system, to reduce POI and to avoid hypoglycemia. In this Topic Highlight, we review the relationship between perioperative glycemic control and POI, including the use of the artificial pancreas. PMID:19725144

Hanazaki, Kazuhiro; Maeda, Hiromichi; Okabayashi, Takehiro

2009-09-01

14

Multifaceted Determinants for Achieving Glycemic Control  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE—The International Diabetes Mellitus Practice Study is a 5-year survey documenting changes in diabetes treatment practice in developing regions. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors for achieving A1C <7% in 11,799 patients (1,898 type 1 diabetic and 9,901 type 2 diabetic) recruited by 937 physicians from 17 countries in Eastern Europe (n = 3,519), Asia (n = 5,888), Latin America (n = 2,116), and Africa (n = 276). RESULTS—Twenty-two percent of type 1 diabetic and 36% of type 2 diabetic patients never had A1C measurements. In those with values for A1C, blood pressure, and LDL cholesterol, 7.5% of type 1 diabetic (n = 696) and 3.6% of type 2 diabetic (n = 3,896) patients attained all three recommended targets (blood pressure <130/80 mmHg, LDL cholesterol <100 mg/dl, and A1C <7%). Self-monitoring of blood glucose was the only predictor for achieving the A1C goal in type 1 diabetes (odds ratios: Asia 2.24, Latin America 3.55, and Eastern Europe 2.42). In type 2 diabetes, short disease duration (Asia 0.97, Latin America 0.97, and Eastern Europe 0.82) and treatment with few oral glucose–lowering drugs (Asia 0.64, Latin America 0.76, and Eastern Europe 0.62) were predictors. Other region-specific factors included lack of microvascular complications and old age in Latin America and Asia; health insurance coverage and specialist care in Latin America; lack of obesity and self-adjustment of insulin dosages in Asia; and training by a diabetes educator, self-monitoring of blood glucose in patients who self-adjusted insulin, and lack of macrovascular complications in Eastern Europe. CONCLUSIONS—In developing countries, factors pertinent to patients, doctors, and health care systems all impact on glycemic control.

Chan, Juliana C.N.; Gagliardino, Juan Jose; Baik, Sei Hyun; Chantelot, Jean-Marc; Ferreira, Sandra R.G.; Hancu, Nicolae; Ilkova, Hasan; Ramachandran, Ambady; Aschner, Pablo

2009-01-01

15

Intensive glycemic control and cardiovascular disease: an update  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cardiovascular complications constitute the major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with diabetes. The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) and the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) provided consistent evidence that intensive glycemic control prevents the development and progression of microvascular complications in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. However, whether intensive glucose lowering also prevents

Aparna Brown; L. Raymond Reynolds; Dennis Bruemmer

2010-01-01

16

Glycemic control in diabetic CAPD patients assessed by continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Glycemic control in diabetic CAPD patients assessed by continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS).IntroductionFrom 20% to 40% of all patients commencing dialysis are diabetic. The quality of glycemic control is an important determinant of outcome. The aims of this study were to investigate the use of the continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) to assess overall 24-hour glycemic control and the effects

Jennifer Marshall; Peter Jennings; Adrian Scott; Richard J. Fluck; Christopher W. Mcintyre

2003-01-01

17

A longitudinal study of coping, anxiety and glycemic control in adults with type 1 diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabetes is a unique disorder in how much it requires a high degree of individual self management strategies. Anxiety and stress can affect glycemic control, and thus management of emotions may be key to good glycemic control. This study is the first to examine how anxiety and coping style, and their interaction, can affect long-term glycemic control. We measured anxiety,

Serge Sultan; Elissa Epel; Claude Sachon; Genevieve Vaillant; Agnes Hartemann-Heurtier

2008-01-01

18

Use of Insulin to Improve Glycemic Control in Diabetes Mellitus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  The restoration of normoglycemia ensures the control of diabetic symptoms and reduction in microangiopathic complications\\u000a in type 1 and type 2 diabetes. However, there is no conclusive evidence that intensive glycemic control alone will prevent\\u000a macrovascular disease, the commonest cause of morbidity and mortality in type 2 diabetes. As atherosclerosis is an inflammatory\\u000a condition, it is relevant that the two

Paresh Dandona; Ajay Chaudhuri; Husam Ghanim; Priya Mohanty

2008-01-01

19

The Risks and Benefits of Implementing Glycemic Control Guidelines in Frail Elders with Diabetes  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES To determine the hypo- and hyper-glycemic outcomes associated with implementing the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) guideline for Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c)<8% in frail older patients with diabets. DESIGN/SETTING Guideline Implementation in PACE (Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly) PARTICIPANTS All patients in the Before (10/02–12/04, n=338), Early (1/05–6/06, n=289) and Late phases of guideline implementation (7/06–12/08, n=385) with a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and at least one HbA1c measurement. INTERVENTION Clinician education in 2005 with annual monitoring of the proportion of each clinician’s patients with diabetes with HbA1c<8%. MEASUREMENTS Hypoglycemia (Blood sugar or BS<50), hyperglycemia (BS>400) and severe hypoglycemia (Emergency room or ER visit for hypoglycemia) RESULTS Before, Early and Late groups were similar in mean age, race/ethnicity, comorbidity and functional dependency. Antihyperglycemic medication use increased with more patients using metformin (28% Before versus 42% Late, p<0.001) and insulin (23% Before versus 34% Late, p<0.001), with more patients achieving the AGS glycemic target of HbA1c<8% (74% Before versus 84% Late, p<0.001). Episodes of hyperglycemia (per 100 person-years) decreased dramatically (159 Before versus 46 Late, p<0.001) and episodes of hypoglycemia were unchanged (10.1 versus 9.3, p=0.50). Episodes of severe hypoglycemia were increased in the Early period (1.1 Before versus 2.9 Early, p=0.03). CONCLUSION Implementing the AGS glycemic control guideline for frail elders led to fewer hyperglycemic episodes, but more severe hypoglycemic episodes requiring ER visits in the Early implementation period. Future glycemic control guideline implementation efforts should be coupled with close monitoring for severe hypoglycemia in the early implementation period.

Lee, Sei J.; Boscardin, W. John; Cenzer, Irena Stijacic; Huang, Elbert S.; Rice-Trumble, Kathy; Eng, Catherine

2013-01-01

20

Tight perioperative glycemic control using an artificial endocrine pancreas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Van den Berghe et al. reported in 2001 that tight glycemic control (maintaining blood glucose levels at 80–110 mg\\/dl) improved\\u000a morbidity and mortality in the surgical intensive care unit. This method was termed intensive insulin therapy (IIT), and it\\u000a is now being adopted worldwide for perioperative care. Recent evidence has suggested that perioperative hyperglycemia significantly\\u000a contributes to the development of

Kazuhiro Hanazaki; Hiromichi Maeda; Takehiro Okabayashi

2010-01-01

21

Technical Performance for Glycemic Control in Diabetes Mellitus  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The new treatment approaches in diabetes mellitus target a glycemic control as close to the non-diabetic range, in order to\\u000a prevent or delay long term complications and to maintain a good quality of life. There is growing evidence in relation to\\u000a the advantages of insulin pump therapy, which recent came closer than ever to approximating physi ological insulin secretion.\\u000a The

G. Roman; G. Ghimpeteanu

22

Identifying older diabetic patients at risk of poor glycemic control  

PubMed Central

Background Optimal glycemic control prevents the onset of diabetes complications. Identifying diabetic patients at risk of poor glycemic control could help promoting dedicated interventions. The purpose of this study was to identify predictors of poor short-term and long-term glycemic control in older diabetic in-patients. Methods A total of 1354 older diabetic in-patients consecutively enrolled in a multicenter study formed the training population (retrospective arm); 264 patients consecutively admitted to a ward of general medicine formed the testing population (prospective arm). Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) was measured on admission and one year after the discharge in the testing population. Independent correlates of a discharge glycemia ? 140 mg/dl in the training population were assessed by logistic regression analysis and a clinical prediction rule was developed. The ability of the prediction rule and that of admission HbA1c to predict discharge glycemia ? 140 mg/dl and HbA1c > 7% one year after discharge was assessed in the testing population. Results Selected admission variables (diastolic arterial pressure < 80 mmHg, glycemia = 143–218 mg/dl, glycemia > 218 mg/dl, history of insulinic or combined hypoglycemic therapy, Charlson's index > 2) were combined to obtain a score predicting a discharge fasting glycemia ? 140 mg/dl in the training population. A modified score was obtained by adding 1 if admission HbA1c exceeded 7.8%. The modified score was the best predictor of both discharge glycemia ? 140 mg/dl (sensitivity = 79%, specificity = 63%) and 1 year HbA1c > 7% (sensitivity = 72%, specificity = 71%) in the testing population. Conclusion A simple clinical prediction rule might help identify older diabetic in-patients at risk of both short and long term poor glycemic control.

Incalzi, Raffaele Antonelli; Corsonello, Andrea; Pedone, Claudio; Corica, Francesco; Carosella, Luciana; Mazzei, Bruno; Perticone, Francesco; Carbonin, PierUgo

2002-01-01

23

Glycemic control in pediatric patients on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVES To determine whether glycemic control has an effect on outcomes for pediatric patients on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) therapy, while controlling for multiple factors. METHODS A single-center retrospective chart review was performed on 82 patients who required ECMO from January 1, 2008, to December 31, 2010. All glucose concentrations collected while patients were on ECMO were analyzed; multiple other factors that may have affected mortality were also recorded. Primary outcome was mortality, and secondary outcomes were length of time on ECMO and length of time until death or discharge from the hospital. RESULTS Of 82 patients, 53 patients survived ECMO (64.6%). Glucose control had no effect on survival of patients on ECMO (p=0.56), even when controlling for multiple factors (p=0.48). Similarly, statistical evaluation showed no differences for hospital mortality in relationship to controlled serum glucose (p=0.50). Patients with controlled glucose spent an average of 31.5% more time on ECMO than non-controlled patients (p=0.048). CONCLUSIONS In this study, glycemic control, defined as serum glucose concentration between 60 mg/dL and 250 mg/dL for >95% of the time on ECMO, had no statistically significant effect on mortality for patients on ECMO. Future studies could focus on tighter glucose control or specific dextrose/glucose protocols to evaluate whether improved glucose control would have an effect on morbidity and mortality. PMID:24052786

Wierer, Kathryn L; Pagryzinski, Rachel A; Xiang, Qun

2013-07-01

24

Risk factors for hospital-acquired 'poor glycemic control': a case-control study  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine the patient and hospital characteristics associated with severe manifestations of ‘poor glycemic control’—a ‘no-pay’ hospital-acquired condition defined by the US Medicare program based on hospital claims related to severe complications of diabetes. Design A nested case–control study. Setting California acute care hospitals from 2005 to 2006. Participants All cases (n= 261) with manifestations of poor glycemic control not present on admission admitted to California acute care hospitals from 2005 to 2006 and 261 controls were matched (1:1) using administrative data for age, sex, major diagnostic category and severity of illness. Main Outcome Measure(s) The adjusted odds ratio (OR) for experiencing poor glycemic control. Results Deaths (16 vs. 9%, P= 0.01) and total costs ($26 125 vs. $18 233, P= 0.026) were significantly higher among poor glycemic control cases. Risk-adjusted conditional logistic regression revealed that each additional chronic condition increased the odds of poor glycemic control by 12% (OR: 1.12, 95% CI: 1.04–1.22). The interaction of registered nurse staffing and hospital teaching status suggested that in non-teaching hospitals, each additional nursing hour per adjusted patient day significantly reduced the odds of poor glycemic control by 16% (OR: 0.84, 95% CI: 0.73–0.96). Nurse staffing was not significant in teaching hospitals (OR: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.88–1.11). Conclusions Severe poor glycemic control complications are relatively rare but meaningful events with disproportionately high costs and mortality. Increasing nurse staffing may be an effective strategy in reducing poor glycemic control complications particularly in non-teaching hospitals.

Mchugh, Matthew D.; Shang, Jingjing; Sloane, Douglas M.; Aiken, Linda H.

2011-01-01

25

Glycemic Control for Postoperative Pediatric Cardiac Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study aimed to determine the prevalence of hyperglycemia among pediatric postoperative cardiac patients, its impact on\\u000a outcomes, and whether hyperglycemia can be controlled effectively in this population. A retrospective chart review of 100\\u000a postoperative patients admitted to the authors’ pediatric cardiac intensive care unit (ICU) was conducted. Patients were evaluated\\u000a for incidence of hyperglycemia, defined as blood glucose (BG)

Catherine M. Preissig; Mark R. Rigby; Kevin O. Maher

2009-01-01

26

Creating a Perioperative Glycemic Control Program  

PubMed Central

Hyperglycemia in the surgical population is a recognized risk factor for postoperative complications; however, there is little literature to date regarding the management of hyperglycemia in the perioperative period. Here, we detail the strategies that our institutions have employed to identify and treat hyperglycemia in patients with diabetes who present for surgery. Our approach focuses on the recognition of hyperglycemia and metabolic abnormalities, control of glucose levels via insulin infusion when needed, monitoring for hypoglycemia and a comprehensive multidisciplinary approach that provides standardized recommendations for patients at all points in care as they transition from the preoperative clinic into the operating room, and then into the hospital.

Alexanian, Sara M.; McDonnell, Marie E.; Akhtar, Shamsuddin

2011-01-01

27

Effect of strict glycemic control in patients with diabetes mellitus on frequency of macrovascular events.  

PubMed

Despite a better understanding of cardiovascular risk factors and attempts at optimal management, diabetes-related macrovascular events remain a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States and worldwide. The trials to date have validated strict glycemic control as a method to achieve sustained reductions in the rate of nephropathy, neuropathy, and retinopathy due to diabetes. For these microvascular complications, the closer hemoglobin A1c is to normal levels, the better the outcome. Although reducing hemoglobin A1c levels to 7% has been shown to reduce macrovascular events, demonstrating an additional reduction in macrovascular events with tighter glycemic control has been more difficult to achieve. A careful review of recent trials, however, has demonstrated that treatment early in the disease course and the ability to safely maintain lower hemoglobin A1c levels might be critical factors in further reducing macrovascular events. In conclusion, with the introduction of novel antidiabetic agents, future trials using these drugs might be able to definitively establish the safety and efficacy of reducing cardiovascular events with stringent glycemic control; however, the current evidence is inconsistent. PMID:23768455

Singh, Amita; Donnino, Robert; Weintraub, Howard; Schwartzbard, Arthur

2013-06-14

28

Intraoperative glycemic control procedures and the use of an artificial pancreas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Strict intraoperative glycemic control can significantly decrease the incidence of postoperative infection; however, anesthesiologists must carefully control blood glucose levels as well as properly manage the respiratory and cardiovascular systems. However, standard blood glucose measurement systems and insulin dosing algorithms, which are necessary for achieving strict glycemic control, have not yet been developed. An artificial pancreas (STG-22TM; Nikkiso Co., Tokyo,

Koichi Yamashita; Tomoaki Yatabe

2009-01-01

29

Children's Glycemic Control: Mother's Knowledge and Socioeconomic Status.  

PubMed

The present study was designed to examine the role of socioeconomic status (SES) of the mother's knowledge about different aspects of diabetes and the glycemic control of type 1 children with diabetes. Samples were taken from successive admissions to the outpatient diabetes clinics in Prince Sultan Medical Military City (PSMMC), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. A well designed questionnaire covering different aspects including demographic data, educational background, and socioeconomic status of the care providers was used to collect information from mothers of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) children. The questionnaire was designed on the basis of the Michigan diabetes knowledge scale and also on the basis of food habits of Saudi Arabia and it was validated. The questionnaire was completed after interviewing the mothers during visits to the PSMMC hospital. Every mother was asked with those particular questions. Glycemic control was assessed by glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c). The socio-demographic data of mothers was recorded by self-report. It was found that, there was significant variation in the knowledge of diabetes among mothers with different ages (P 0.05). No significant results were observed between family income and diabetes knowledge (p>0.05).However, a positive relationship was observed with higher income and higher knowledge. There was a significant association between mothers knowledge of diabetes and HbA1C level (r = -0.1739, p. PMID:24171891

Al-Odayani, Abdulrahman Nasser; Alsharqi, Omar Zayyan; Ahmad, Alaeddin Mohammad Khalaf; Khalaf Ahmad, Ala'eddin Mohammad; Al-Borie, Hussein Mohammad; Qattan, Ameerah M N

2013-10-29

30

Vitamin D and glycemic control in diabetes mellitus type 2  

PubMed Central

Objectives: The extraskeletal effects of vitamin D have attracted considerable interest. Vitamin D deficiency appears to be related to the development of diabetes mellitus type 2 and the metabolic syndrome. Vitamin D may affect glucose homeostasis, vitamin D levels having been found to be inversely related to glycosylated hemoglobin levels in gestational diabetes mellitus. In addition, vitamin D appears to protect from the development of gestational diabetes mellitus. The aim was to study levels of 25-hydroxy vitamin D3 [25(OH)D3] and the relationship between 25(OH)D3 levels and glycemic control in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2. Methods: Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and 25(OH)D3 levels were measured in a group of 120 diabetes mellitus type 2 patients. The same measurements were performed in a group of 120 control subjects of the same age and sex. 25(OH)D3 was measured by radioimmunoassay and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. Results: 25(OH)D3 levels were lower in the diabetes mellitus type 2 patients than in the control group, being 19.26 ± 0.95 ng/ml and 25.49 ± 1.02 ng/ml, in the patient and control groups, respectively (p < 0.001, Student’s t-test). 25(OH)D3 levels were found to be inversely associated with HbA1c levels in the diabetic patients (p = 0.008, r2 = 0.058, linear regression). 25(OH)D3 levels were found to be inversely associated with HbA1c when the patient and control groups were analysed together (p < 0.001, r2 = 0.086). Conclusions: Vitamin D levels appeared to be lower in diabetes mellitus type 2 patients than in the control group, vitamin D levels being related to glycemic control in diabetes mellitus type 2. These findings may have therapeutic implications as cautious vitamin D supplementation may improve glycemic control in diabetes mellitus type 2.

Athanassiou, Panagiotis; Gkountouvas, Anastasios; Kaldrymides, Philippos

2013-01-01

31

Effect of glycemic control on periodontitis in type 2 diabetic patients with periodontal disease  

PubMed Central

Aims/Introduction Diabetes mellitus and periodontitis are closely related. A huge number of reports has addressed the effect of periodontal intervention therapy on glycemic control, but no reports have addressed the effect of glycemic intervention therapy on periodontal disease in type 2 diabetic patients. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of improved glycemic control by glycemic intervention therapy on periodontitis in type 2 diabetic patients. Materials and Methods A total of 35 patients underwent intervention therapy to improve glycemic control without periodontal treatment. Glycohemoglobin (HbA1c), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), bleeding on probing (BOP), probing pocket depth (PPD) and intraoral community periodontal index (CPI) codes of the World health Organization (WHO) were examined at baseline, and 2 and 6 months after the intervention therapy to improve glycemic control. Results After the improvement of glycemic control, BOP lesions improved, but deep PPD lesions and WHO CPI codes did not improve. Subanalyses showed that effective glycemic control (average HbA1c reduction 1.8%) improved BOP lesions, but did not affect deep PPD lesions and WHO CPI codes. In addition, high BOP lesions at baseline responded more effectively to glycemic intervention. Further analysis of CPI codes in all individual periodontal sites independent of WHO CPI codes in 35 patients showed that only gingival inflammation without a deep periodontal pocket improved after glycemic intervention. Conclusions Effective glycemic control improves BOP lesions in type 2 diabetic patients with periodontitis through ameliorating inflammation at the gingival sites of periodontal tissue. This trial was registered with the University Hospital Medical Information Network (no. UMIN000007670).

Katagiri, Sayaka; Nitta, Hiroshi; Nagasawa, Toshiyuki; Izumi, Yuichi; Kanazawa, Masao; Matsuo, Akira; Chiba, Hiroshige; Fukui, Michiaki; Nakamura, Naoto; Oseko, Fumishige; Kanamura, Narisato; Inagaki, Koji; Noguchi, Toshihide; Naruse, Keiko; Matsubara, Tatsuaki; Miyazaki, Shigeru; Miyauchi, Takashi; Ando, Yuichi; Hanada, Nobuhiro; Inoue, Shuji

2013-01-01

32

Predictors of glycemic control and short-term adverse outcomes in youth with type 1 diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To examine predictors of glycemic control and to assess how glycemic control affects the incidence of short-term adverse outcomes in a pediatric population with type 1 diabetes. Study design: Three hundred youth, aged 7 to 16 years, with type 1 diabetes who were receiving diabetes specialty care were followed up prospectively for 1 year. Treatment plans and frequency of

Bat-Sheva Levine; Barbara J. Anderson; Deborah A. Butler; Jeanne E. Antisdel; Julienne Brackett; Lori M. B. Laffel

2001-01-01

33

Stochastic Targeted (STAR) Glycemic Control: Design, Safety, and Performance  

PubMed Central

Introduction Tight glycemic control (TGC) has shown benefits but has been difficult to achieve consistently. STAR (Stochastic TARgeted) is a flexible, model-based TGC approach that directly accounts for intra- and interpatient variability with a stochastically derived maximum 5% risk of blood glucose (BG) below 72 mg/dl. This research assesses the safety, efficacy, and clinical burden of a STAR TGC controller modulating both insulin and nutrition inputs in virtual and clinical pilot trials. Methods Clinically validated virtual trials using data from 370 patients in the SPRINT (Specialized Relative Insulin and Nutrition Titration) study were used to design the STAR protocol and test its safety, performance, and required clinical effort prior to clinical pilot trials. Insulin and nutrition interventions were given every 1–3 h as chosen by the nurse to allow them to manage workload. Interventions were designed to maximize the overlap of the model-predicted (5–95th percentile) range of BG outcomes with the 72–117 mg/dl band and thus provide a maximum 5% risk of BG <72 mg/dl. Interventions were calculated using clinically validated computer models of human metabolism and its variability in critical illness. Carbohydrate intake (all sources) was selected to maximize intake up to 100% of the American College of Chest Physicians/Society of Critical Care Medicine (ACCP/SCCM) goal (25 kg/kcal/h). Insulin doses were limited (8 U/h maximum), with limited increases based on current rate (0.5–2.0 U/h). Initial clinical pilot trials involved 3 patients covering ?450 h. Approval was granted by the Upper South A Regional Ethics Committee. Results Virtual trials indicate that STAR provides similar glycemic control performance to SPRINT with 2–3 h (maximum) measurement intervals. Time in the 72–126 mg/dl and 72–145 mg/dl bands was equivalent for all controllers, indicating that glycemic outcome differences between protocols were only shifted in this range. Safety from hypoglycemia was improved. Importantly, STAR using 2–3 h (maximum) intervention intervals reduced clinical burden up to 30%, which is clinically very significant. Initial clinical trials showed glycemic performance, safety, and management of inter- and intrapatient variability that matched or exceeded the virtual trial results. Conclusions In virtual trials, STAR TGC provided tight control that maximized the likelihood of BG in a clinically specified glycemic band and reduced hypoglycemia with a maximum 5% (or lower) expected risk of light hypoglycemia (BG <72 mg/dl) via model-based management of intra- and interpatient variability. Clinical workload was self-managed and reduced up to 30% compared with SPRINT. Initial pilot clinical trials matched or exceeded these virtual results.

Evans, Alicia; Le Compte, Aaron; Tan, Chia-Siong; Ward, Logan; Steel, James; Pretty, Christopher G; Penning, Sophie; Suhaimi, Fatanah; Shaw, Geoffrey M; Desaive, Thomas; Chase, J Geoffrey

2012-01-01

34

Patterns of glycemic control using glycosylated hemoglobin in diabetics  

PubMed Central

Aim: Till now estimation of blood glucose is the highly effective method for diagnosing diabetes mellitus but it provides a short-term picture of control. More evidence is required to prove that plasma glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin levels together gives a better estimate of glycemic control and compliance with treatment. Indian diabetes risk score (IDRS) is a simplified screening tool for identifying undiagnosed diabetic subjects, requires minimum time, and effort and can help to considerably reduce the costs of screening. Objective: To study patterns of glycemic control using glycosylated hemoglobin in diabetic patients. To find out correlation between levels of plasma glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin in diabetics and to calculate IDRS of the study population. Materials and Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted among 300 known diabetic patients attending outpatient department of a rural medical college in Haryana, India. Following standard procedures and protocols FPG and glycosylated hemoglobin were measured to find out a pattern of glycemic control in them after taking their written and informed consent. A correlation between the levels of glycosylated hemoglobin and fasting blood glucose was also calculated. These patients were made to fill a performa and their demographic and clinical risk factors were noted and based on this, their IDRS was calculated. This was done to validate the IDRS in Indian rural population. Results: Fifty-two percent of the population had fasting plasma glucose level between 125-150 mg/dl, 21% had this level between 151-175 mg/dl. Thirteen percent of the study subjects had HbA1C between 6.5-7.5, more than half (57.3%) had this value between 7.5-8.5, 12% and 18% had values between 8.5-9.5 and 9.5-10.5, respectively. Twelve percent of the participants had HbA1C level higher than 10.5. Correlation of fasting plasma glucose level and HbA1C was also studied and found that correlation coefficient came out to be .311. This correlation was found to be statistically significant (P = .007). Sixty-five percent of the case had IDRS higher than 60. Conclusions: Glycaemic control in diabetics can be better assessed with glycosylated hemoglobin and FPG together. A positive correlation between FPG and HbA1c allows for the use of HbA1c along with FPG in diagnosing type 2 DM but the two should not be used interchangeably. IDRS can be used as a screening tool for diabetes.

Kahlon, Arunpreet Singh; Pathak, Rambha

2011-01-01

35

Metabolic responses to high glycemic index and low glycemic index meals: a controlled crossover clinical trial  

PubMed Central

Background The consumption of low glycemic index (LGI) foods before exercise results in slower and more stable glycemic increases. Besides maintaining an adequate supply of energy during exercise, this response may favor an increase in fat oxidation in the postprandial period before the exercise compared to high glycemic index (HGI) foods. The majority of the studies that evaluated the effect of foods differing in glycemic index on substrate oxidation during the postprandial period before the exercise are acute studies in which a single meal is consumed right before the exercise. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of consuming two daily HGI or LGI meals for five consecutive days on substrate oxidation before the exercise and in the concentrations of glucose, insulin and free fatty acids before and during a high intensity exercise. Methods Fifteen male cyclists, aged 24.4 ± 3.8 years, with body mass index of 21.9 ± 1.4 kg.m-2 and a VO2 max of 70.0 ± 5.3 mL.kg-1.min-1, participated in this crossover study. All test meals were consumed in the laboratory. On days 1 and 5, substrate oxidation (30 minutes before and 90 minutes after breakfast (HGI or LGI)) and diet-induced thermogenesis (90 minutes postprandial) were assessed before the exercise. The levels of glucose, insulin, and free fatty acids were determined during 2 h after breakfast on these same days. Ninety minutes after breakfast, subjects completed a 30 min cycloergometric exercise at 85 to 95% of their maximum heart rate, during which lactate concentrations were assessed. Results The consumption of HGI meals resulted in higher areas under the glycemic and insulinemic curves in the postprandial period. However, glycemia did not differ by study treatment during exercise. There were no differences in free fatty acids in the postprandial period or in lactate levels during exercise. LGI meals resulted in lower fat oxidation and higher carbohydrate oxidation than the HGI meal in the postprandial period. Conclusions The results do not support a differential glycemia according to glycemic index during exercise. The ingestion of LGI foods did not lead to higher fat oxidation relative to the ingestion of HGI foods. Trial registration ACTRN: ACTRN12609000522213

2011-01-01

36

Tight glycemic control using an artificial endocrine pancreas may play an important role in preventing infection after pancreatic resection  

PubMed Central

It is well known that perioperative hyperglycemia is the main cause of infectious complications after surgery. To improve perioperative glycemic control, we wish to highlight and comment on an interesting paper published recently by the Annals of Surgery entitled: “Early postoperative hyperglycemia is associated with postoperative complications after pancreatoduodenectomy (PD)” by Eshuis et al. The authors concluded that early postoperative glucose levels more than 140 mg/dL was significantly associated with complications after PD. Since we recommend that perioperative tight glycemic control (TGC) is an effective method to prevent postoperative complications including surgical site infection after distal, proximal, and total pancreatic resection, we support strongly this conclusion drawn in this article. However, if early postoperative glucose control in patients undergoing PD was administrated by conventional method such as sliding scale approach as described in this article, it is difficult to maintain TGC. Therefore, we introduce a novel perioperative glycemic control using an artificial endocrine pancreas against pancreatogenic diabetes after pancreatic resection including PD.

Hanazaki, Kazuhiro

2012-01-01

37

Tight glycemic control using an artificial endocrine pancreas may play an important role in preventing infection after pancreatic resection.  

PubMed

It is well known that perioperative hyperglycemia is the main cause of infectious complications after surgery. To improve perioperative glycemic control, we wish to highlight and comment on an interesting paper published recently by the Annals of Surgery entitled: "Early postoperative hyperglycemia is associated with postoperative complications after pancreatoduodenectomy (PD)" by Eshuis et al. The authors concluded that early postoperative glucose levels more than 140 mg/dL was significantly associated with complications after PD. Since we recommend that perioperative tight glycemic control (TGC) is an effective method to prevent postoperative complications including surgical site infection after distal, proximal, and total pancreatic resection, we support strongly this conclusion drawn in this article. However, if early postoperative glucose control in patients undergoing PD was administrated by conventional method such as sliding scale approach as described in this article, it is difficult to maintain TGC. Therefore, we introduce a novel perioperative glycemic control using an artificial endocrine pancreas against pancreatogenic diabetes after pancreatic resection including PD. PMID:22876028

Hanazaki, Kazuhiro

2012-08-01

38

Beneficial and detrimental effects of glycemic control on cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes.  

PubMed

Epidemiological data demonstrates that improved regulation of blood glucose correlates with better cardiovascular (CV) outcomes. Conversely, some interventional studies have demonstrated that tight glycemic control has no benefit or can even result in worse CV outcomes. These conclusions parallel the paradox that glycemic control has proven beneficial for microvascular outcomes, while few studies have demonstrated significant macrovascular benefits. This imprecise understanding conveys the need to better comprehend the mechanisms of glycemic control and its impact on CV disease. Such variations in data also require a more comprehensive approach to diabetes and CV disease in which multiple biomarkers such as low density lipoprotein (LDL), low adiponectin, elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) and well established clinical parameters such as high blood pressure, weight, and functional status are incorporated into clinical decision making. Reliance on one parameter in isolation such as glycemic control and one biomarker such as HbA1C does not provide an accurate assessment of CV outcomes. PMID:23314689

Taub, Pam R; Higginbotham, Erin; Henry, Robert R

2013-02-01

39

Glycemic control and serum lipoproteins after total pancreatectomy.  

PubMed

Carbohydrate and lipid metabolism were studied in 10 patients who had undergone total pancreatectomy. The results were compared with Type I diabetic patients and normal subjects, all of whom were matched for age, sex and weight. At the same level of glycemic control, the daily need for insulin was significantly lower in the patients with pancreatogenic diabetes than in those with Type I diabetes. Concentrations of serum total VLDL and HDL triglyceride were higher in the pancreatectomized patients than in the diabetic or normal controls, whereas concentrations of serum total and LDL cholesterol were significantly lower. The composition of the VLDL, LDL and HDL particles was abnormal in the totally pancreatectomized patients as all three lipoprotein fractions were enriched in triglyceride. HDL2 cholesterol was similar in the totally pancreatectomized patients to that in the other two groups but HDL3 cholesterol was lower. Postheparin plasma lipoprotein lipase and hepatic lipase activities were normal. It is concluded that in totally pancreatectomized patients the changes in the lipoprotein profile on reflect more the action of various confounding factors, i.e. malabsorption, continuance of alcohol abuse and dietary changes than the impact of the diabetes itself. PMID:4051443

Kiviluoto, T; Schröder, T; Karonen, S L; Kuusi, T; Lempinen, M; Taskinen, M R

1985-01-01

40

Self-Efficacy Links Health Literacy and Numeracy to Glycemic Control  

Microsoft Academic Search

The mechanisms underlying the relationship between health literacy, numeracy, and glycemic control are unclear. We explored the role of diabetes self-efficacy in the predicted pathway linking health literacy and numeracy to glycemic control (A1C). Adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus (N = 383) were enrolled in a cross-sectional study at primary care and diabetes clinics at three medical centers.

Chandra Y. Osborn; Kerri Cavanaugh; Kenneth A. Wallston; Russell L. Rothman

2010-01-01

41

Relationship of Serum ?-Glutamyltransferase to Atherogenic Dyslipidemia and Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

We evaluated possible interactions between BMI and serum ?-glutamyltransferase (GGT) concentration and their effects on the prevalence of poor glycemic control and common comorbidities of diabetes. We assessed whether the association of BMI with poor glycemic control, hypertension, atherogenic dyslipidemia (i.e., high triglycerides and\\/or low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol), hypercholesterolemia, and hyperuricemia differed according to serum GGT concentration in a

Giacomo Zoppini; Giovanni Targher; Maddalena Trombetta; Giuseppe Lippi; Michele Muggeo

2009-01-01

42

Update in Diabetes and CVD: Synthesizing the Evidence from Recent Trials of Glycemic Control to Prevent Cardiovascular Disease  

PubMed Central

Purpose of review To review the recent studies on intensive glucose control and the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in type 2 diabetes, to discuss potential reasons for discordant results among recent trials, and to comment on implications for clinical practice. Recent findings Three large randomized controlled trials on the effect of tight glycemic control (TGC) on CVD in patients with type 2 diabetes have been published within the last year, along with the cardiovascular outcomes from the long-term follow-up of the UKPDS study. This narrative review of the methods and results of these trials reveals cardiovascular benefit from early institution of TGC, and lack of benefit or potential harm with intensification of glucose control late in the course of type 2 diabetes or after CVD has developed. Also, the benefits of TGC may be outweighed by weight gain and hypoglycemia. All trials had fewer cardiovascular events than anticipated due to improvements in other cardiovascular risk factors. Summary In addition to controlling cardiovascular risk factors, patients with type diabetes should aim for good glycemic control (HbA1c<7%) soon after the diagnosis of diabetes to prevent macrovascular as well as microvascular complications. Glycemic targets should be individualized as diabetes progresses, comorbidities develop, and to avoid having the side effects of therapy (hypoglycemia and weight gain) predominate.

Park, Lee; Wexler, Deborah

2010-01-01

43

FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH POOR GLYCEMIC CONTROL IN OLDER MEXICAN AMERICAN DIABETICS AGED 75 YEARS AND OLDER  

PubMed Central

Objective This study examines the prevalence and correlates of poor glycemic control in Mexican Americans aged 75 years and older with diabetes. Methods Data are from the 5th wave (2004–05) of the Hispanic Established Population for the Epidemiological Study of the Elderly (H-EPESE). A total of 2,069 Mexican Americans aged 75 and over were interviewed. Six hundred eighty nine subjects (33.5%) reported having been diagnosed with diabetes and 209 (30.3%) subjects agreed to a blood test of their HbA1c level. Results Of the 209 diabetic subjects with an HbA1c test, 73 (34.9%) had good glycemic control (HbA1c <7%) and 136 (65.1%) had poor glycemic control (HbA1c >7%). Bivariate analysis revealed that subjects with poor control had longer disease duration, had lower education, used the glucometer more frequently, and had more diabetes-complications when compared to those in the good glycemic control group. Multivariable logistic regression analysis found the following factors associated with poor glycemic control: < 8 years of education, foreign-born, smoking, obesity, longer disease duration, daily glucometer use, and having macro-complications. Discussion Prevalence of poor glycemic control is very high in this population with very high and rising prevalence of diabetes. Further studies are needed to explore the effect of these and other characteristics on glycemic control among older Mexican Americans and to develop appropriate interventions to improve diabetes outcomes and increase life-expectancy.

Otiniano, Max E.; Al Snih, Soham; Goodwin, James S.; Ray, Laura; Al Ghatrif, Majd; Markides, Kyriakos S.

2012-01-01

44

Impacting obesity and glycemic control using a culturally-sensitive diabetes education program in Hispanic patients with type 2 diabetes  

PubMed Central

Objectives Diabetes mellitus and obesity are prevalent in the Hispanic community. This group has not benefited greatly from diabetes interventions due to cultural, language and financial constraints. We designed a prospective cohort study to determine the clinical impact on adiposity and glycemic control in Hispanics with type 2 diabetes. Research design and methods The program conducted in Spanish by a multidisciplinary team of health care providers focused on improving glycemic control and complications through cultural lifestyle changes. Outcomes were changes in glycemic control by fasting insulin, glucose and HbA1c, body composition and selected adipokines, adiponectin, leptin and ghrelin. Body composition was measured by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. Changes from baseline at three months were compared using paired t-tests and with Spearman’s correlations. Results Glycemic control improved by HbA1c (7.9% ± 2.0% vs 7.1% ± 1.7%; P = <0.001), and fasting glucose (166.4 ± 66.0 mg/dl vs 143.2 ± 57.9 mg/dl; P = 0.003). Body weight (81.3 ± 17.9 kg vs 80.3 ± 18.0 kg; P = 0.002), waist circumference (101.6 ± 13.4 cm vs 99.1 ± 12.7 cm; P = 0.015), and truncal fat (16.5 ± 5.7 kg vs 15.9 ± 5.6 kg; P = 0.001) decreased. Only leptin (19.6 ± 15.0 ng/ml vs 16.3 ± 12.7 ng/ml; P = 0.002) was reduced and related to change in body weight (r = 0.392; P = 0.022). Conclusions Our program significantly improved glycemic control and decreased obesity in diabetic Hispanic subjects. The early benefits on glycemic control may be related to reductions in leptin through loss of adipose tissue. Success in impacting diabetes and related complications can occur in a culturally focused and multidisciplinary context.

Peterson, Ralph M.; Beeson, Larry; Shulz, Eloy; Firek, Anthony; De Leon, Marino; Balcazar, Hector; Tonstad, Serena; Cordero-MacIntyre, Zaida R.

2011-01-01

45

Impacting obesity and glycemic control using a culturally-sensitive diabetes education program in Hispanic patients with type 2 diabetes.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVES: Diabetes mellitus and obesity are prevalent in the Hispanic community. This group has not benefited greatly from diabetes interventions due to cultural, language and financial constraints. We designed a prospective cohort study to determine the clinical impact on adiposity and glycemic control in Hispanics with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The program conducted in Spanish by a multidisciplinary team of health care providers focused on improving glycemic control and complications through cultural lifestyle changes. Outcomes were changes in glycemic control by fasting insulin, glucose and HbA1c, body composition and selected adipokines, adiponectin, leptin and ghrelin. Body composition was measured by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. Changes from baseline at three months were compared using paired t-tests and with Spearman's correlations. RESULTS: Glycemic control improved by HbA1c (7.9% ± 2.0% vs 7.1% ± 1.7%; P = <0.001), and fasting glucose (166.4 ± 66.0 mg/dl vs 143.2 ± 57.9 mg/dl; P = 0.003). Body weight (81.3 ± 17.9 kg vs 80.3 ± 18.0 kg; P = 0.002), waist circumference (101.6 ± 13.4 cm vs 99.1 ± 12.7 cm; P = 0.015), and truncal fat (16.5 ± 5.7 kg vs 15.9 ± 5.6 kg; P = 0.001) decreased. Only leptin (19.6 ± 15.0 ng/ml vs 16.3 ± 12.7 ng/ml; P = 0.002) was reduced and related to change in body weight (r = 0.392; P = 0.022). CONCLUSIONS: Our program significantly improved glycemic control and decreased obesity in diabetic Hispanic subjects. The early benefits on glycemic control may be related to reductions in leptin through loss of adipose tissue. Success in impacting diabetes and related complications can occur in a culturally focused and multidisciplinary context. PMID:21318090

Peterson, Ralph M; Beeson, Larry; Shulz, Eloy; Firek, Anthony; De Leon, Marino; Balcazar, Hector; Tonstad, Serena; Cordero-Macintyre, Zaida R

2010-01-01

46

Intensive glycemic control in type 2 diabetics at high cardiovascular risk: do the benefits justify the risks?  

PubMed

Perkovic et al. use novel data from the ADVANCE study to report on the potential renal benefits of standard glycemic control, compared with intensive glycemic control (mean hemoglobin A1c 7.3 and 6.5%, respectively). Intensive glycemic control reduced the risk of new-onset microalbuminuria, new-onset macroalbuminuria, and progression of albuminuria. The risk of end-stage renal disease was also reduced in patients treated with intensive glycemic control, although the number of events was small. PMID:23446251

Shurraw, Sabin; Tonelli, Marcello

2013-03-01

47

The effect of a low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet versus a low-glycemic index diet on glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus  

PubMed Central

Objective Dietary carbohydrate is the major determinant of postprandial glucose levels, and several clinical studies have shown that low-carbohydrate diets improve glycemic control. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that a diet lower in carbohydrate would lead to greater improvement in glycemic control over a 24-week period in patients with obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Research design and methods Eighty-four community volunteers with obesity and type 2 diabetes were randomized to either a low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet (<20 g of carbohydrate daily; LCKD) or a low-glycemic, reduced-calorie diet (500 kcal/day deficit from weight maintenance diet; LGID). Both groups received group meetings, nutritional supplementation, and an exercise recommendation. The main outcome was glycemic control, measured by hemoglobin A1c. Results Forty-nine (58.3%) participants completed the study. Both interventions led to improvements in hemoglobin A1c, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, and weight loss. The LCKD group had greater improvements in hemoglobin A1c (-1.5% vs. -0.5%, p = 0.03), body weight (-11.1 kg vs. -6.9 kg, p = 0.008), and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (+5.6 mg/dL vs. 0 mg/dL, p < 0.001) compared to the LGID group. Diabetes medications were reduced or eliminated in 95.2% of LCKD vs. 62% of LGID participants (p < 0.01). Conclusion Dietary modification led to improvements in glycemic control and medication reduction/elimination in motivated volunteers with type 2 diabetes. The diet lower in carbohydrate led to greater improvements in glycemic control, and more frequent medication reduction/elimination than the low glycemic index diet. Lifestyle modification using low carbohydrate interventions is effective for improving and reversing type 2 diabetes.

Westman, Eric C; Yancy, William S; Mavropoulos, John C; Marquart, Megan; McDuffie, Jennifer R

2008-01-01

48

Plasma concentrations of asymmetric-dimethyl-arginine in type 2 diabetes associate with glycemic control and glomerular filtration rate but not with risk factors of vasculopathy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) is an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Increased plasma levels of ADMA may indicate endothelial dysfunction and increased risk of angiopathy. The relation of ADMA to diabetes, glycemic control, and renal function, especially early diabetic hyperfiltration, remains unknown. We tried to evaluate whether there is an association between ADMA and glycosylated hemoglobin (GHbA1c) on the

Juha Laakso; Inkeri Ruokonen; Vappu Rantalaiho; Ole Wirta; Amos Pasternack; Reijo Laaksonen

2003-01-01

49

Troglitazone Monotherapy Improves Glycemic Control in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Randomized, Controlled Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

To assess the effects of troglitazone monotherapy on glycemic con- trol in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, we carried out a 6-month, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in 24 hospital and outpatient clinics in the United States and Canada. Troglitazone 100, 200, 400, or 600 mg or placebo once daily with breakfast was administered to 402 patients with type 2

VIVIAN A. FONSECA; THOMAS R. VALIQUETT; SALING M. HUANG; MAHMOUD N. GHAZZI; RANDALL W. WHITCOMB

2010-01-01

50

Predictors of glycemic control in children with Type 1 diabetes mellitus in Assiut-Egypt  

PubMed Central

Background: Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) may lead to severe long-term health consequences, such as renal failure, blindness, as well as heart and cerebrovascular disease. Although a direct relationship between blood glucose control and diabetes complications remains to be established beyond doubt, most diabetologists aim to achieve the best possible glucose control in their patients with T1DM. The aim of this study was to detect the predictors of glycemic control among children with T1DM in Assiut Governorate-Egypt. Materials and Methods: We enrolled 415 children aged 2 to 18 years with type 1 diabetes of >1-year duration. They were subjected to full history including demographic factors and disease-related factors. Examination was done with determination of the body mass index, and assessment of stage of maturity. Investigations included hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and lipid profile. Patients with HbA1c above the recommended values for age by the American Diabetes Association were considered as poor glycemic control group. Results: Of the studied cases, 190 cases (45.8%) were of poor glycemic control. Patients with poor control had significantly higher mean age (16.83 ± 3.3 vs 9.77 ± 3.7, P<0.000). Girls aged 15 years or more had significantly higher prevalence of poor glycemic control than males of the same age group. As regard the disease-related factors, patients with poor control had significantly longer duration of disease (7.94 ± 2.6 vs 2.40 ± 2.0, P<0.000) and were older in age at onset of disease. Insulin regimen which consists of basal bolus insulin plus three injections of regular insulin was associated with more frequency of good glycemic control than other regimens. Patients with poor control had significantly higher mean of cholesterol, triglyceride (TG), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol than patients with good control. Adjusting for other variables, age of the patients, duration of disease, and serum TG level were significant independent risk factors of poor glycemic control. Conclusions: This study concluded that children more than 15 years, duration of disease more than 5 years, and high serum TG level are the predictors of poor glycemic control of children with T1DM in Assiut - Egypt. Pediatricians need to be aware of factors associated with poor glycemic control in children with T1DM, so that more effective measures can be implemented to prevent deterioration in diabetes control .

Mohammad, Hanaa A.; Farghaly, Hekma S.; Metwalley, Kotb A.; Monazea, Eman M.; Abd El-Hafeez, Heba A.

2012-01-01

51

Acute effects of dietary glycemic index on antioxidant capacity in nutrient-controlled feeding study  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Oxidative stress, caused by an imbalance between antioxidant capacity and reactive oxygen species, may be an early event in a metabolic cascade elicited by a high glycemic index (GI) diet, ultimately increasing the risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. We conducted a feeding study to evalua...

52

Effects of a Psychoeducational Group on Mood and Glycemic Control in Adults with Diabetes and Visual Impairments.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study evaluated the effectiveness of a 12-week psychoeducational group therapy program in improving mood and glycemic control in 48 adults with diabetes and visual impairments. Participants made statistically significant gains in glycemic control. There was a significant positive relationship between control and improvement in depression,…

Trozzolino, Linda; Thompson, Pamela S.; Tansman, Mara S.; Azen, Stanley P.

2003-01-01

53

Effects of a Psychoeducational Group on Mood and Glycemic Control in Adults with Diabetes and Visual Impairments.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study evaluated the effectiveness of a 12-week psychoeducational group therapy program in improving mood and glycemic control in 48 adults with diabetes and visual impairments. Participants made statistically significant gains in glycemic control. There was a significant positive relationship between control and improvement in depression, but…

Trozzolino, Linda; Thompson, Pamela S.; Tansman, Mara S.; Azen, Stanley P.

2003-01-01

54

Erectile function in men with diabetes type 2: correlation with glycemic control  

Microsoft Academic Search

Men with diabetes have an increased risk for erectile dysfunction (ED) than those without diabetes. The diabetes control and complications trial clearly showed that better long-term control of blood glucose in diabetes type 1 is associated with decreased frequency and delayed the onset of microvascular complications. The aim of this study is to explore the role of glycemic control, and

H Awad; A Salem; A Gadalla; N Abou El Wafa; O A Mohamed

2010-01-01

55

Evidence for strict inpatient blood glucose control: time to revise glycemic goals in hospitalized patients.  

PubMed

Inpatient hyperglycemia in patients with and without a history of diabetes is common and is associated with increased hospital morbidity and mortality. The objectives of this communication are to examine results of randomized clinical trials of strict inpatient glucose control in medical and surgical intensive care units and to provide guidelines for achieving and maintaining glycemic control in patients admitted to critical and noncritical settings. We propose a more conservative approach of glycemic control than current American Association of Clinical Endocrinology recommendations until results of prospective, multicenter, randomized studies become available. PMID:18078868

Kitabchi, Abbas E; Freire, Amado X; Umpierrez, Guillermo E

2008-01-01

56

Template to improve glycemic control without reducing adiposity or dietary fat  

PubMed Central

Drugs that improve chronic hyperglycemia independently of insulin signaling or reduction of adiposity or dietary fat intake may be highly desirable. Ad36, a human adenovirus, promotes glucose uptake in vitro independently of adiposity or proximal insulin signaling. We tested the ability of Ad36 to improve glycemic control in vivo and determined if the natural Ad36 infection in humans is associated with better glycemic control. C57BL/6J mice fed a chow diet or made diabetic with a high-fat (HF) diet were mock infected or infected with Ad36 or adenovirus Ad2 as a control for infection. Postinfection (pi), systemic glycemic control, hepatic lipid content, and cell signaling in tissues pertinent to glucose metabolism were determined. Next, sera of 1,507 adults and children were screened for Ad36 antibodies as an indicator of past natural infection. In chow-fed mice, Ad36 significantly improved glycemic control for 12 wk pi. In HF-fed mice, Ad36 improved glycemic control and hepatic steatosis up to 20 wk pi. In adipose tissue (AT), skeletal muscle (SM), and liver, Ad36 upregulated distal insulin signaling without recruiting the proximal insulin signaling. Cell signaling suggested that Ad36 increases AT and SM glucose uptake and reduces hepatic glucose release. In humans, Ad36 infection predicted better glycemic control and lower hepatic lipid content independently of age, sex, or adiposity. We conclude that Ad36 offers a novel tool to understand the pathways to improve hyperglycemia and hepatic steatosis independently of proximal insulin signaling, and despite a HF diet. This metabolic engineering by Ad36 appears relevant to humans for developing more practical and effective antidiabetic approaches.

Krishnapuram, R.; Dhurandhar, E. J.; Dubuisson, O.; Kirk-Ballard, H.; Bajpeyi, S.; Butte, N.; Sothern, M. S.; Larsen-Meyer, E.; Chalew, S.; Bennett, B.; Gupta, A. K.; Greenway, F. L.; Johnson, W.; Brashear, M.; Reinhart, G.; Rankinen, T.; Bouchard, C.; Cefalu, W. T.; Ye, J.; Javier, R.; Zuberi, A.

2011-01-01

57

Effect of mosapride on glycemic control and gastric emptying in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with gastropathy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Delay of gastric emptying is one of the factors responsible for unfavorable glycemic control. We investigated the possible effects of mosapride, a digestive tract prokinetic agent, on glycemic control in diabetic patients complicated with gastropathy. Enrolled were 36 type II diabetic patients presenting with mild digestive tract symptoms. They were given mosapride 15 mg per day for 6 months. Seventeen

Hideki Asakawa; Isao Hayashi; Takeshi Fukui; Katsuo Tokunaga

2003-01-01

58

Evidence for strict inpatient blood glucose control: time to revise glycemic goals in hospitalized patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Inpatient hyperglycemia in patients with and without a history of diabetes is common and is associated with increased hospital morbidity and mortality. The objectives of this communication are to examine results of randomized clinical trials of strict inpatient glucose control in medical and surgical intensive care units and to provide guidelines for achieving and maintaining glycemic control in patients admitted

Abbas E. Kitabchi; Amado X. Freire; Guillermo E. Umpierrez

2008-01-01

59

Explaining the family conflict-glycemic control link through psychological variables in adolescents with type 1 diabetes.  

PubMed

To examine whether individual psychological variables mediate the family conflict-glycemic control relationship. During three study visits spanning 9 months, 147 adolescents with type 1 diabetes completed questionnaires measuring anxiety and depressive symptoms, and diabetes-specific worry. Caregivers similarly completed a measure of diabetes-specific family conflict. Blood glucose monitoring frequency and glycemic control were also obtained during study visits. Separate mediation analyses revealed that anxiety was the only individual psychological variable that mediated the caregiver-reported family conflict-glycemic control link. Anxiety accounted for 20% of the family conflict-glycemic control link, compared to 8.5% for depression and 6% for diabetes-specific worry. Results suggest that anxiety symptoms may be promoted in a family environment characterized by conflict and these symptoms have detrimental effects on glycemic control. Continued monitoring of family functioning and adolescents' anxiety symptoms, as well as refinement of interventions, is needed to promote positive health outcomes. PMID:21222028

Herzer, Michele; Vesco, Anthony; Ingerski, Lisa M; Dolan, Lawrence M; Hood, Korey K

2011-01-08

60

Dietary glycemic index and carbohydrate in relation to early age-related macular degeneration1-4  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Several dietary factors have been linked to age- related maculopathy (ARM), the early form of age-related macular degeneration, and there is reason to think that dietary carbohydrate may play a role in the development of ARM. Objective: The purpose of the present study was to examine the relation between dietary carbohydrate quality, as measured by di- etary glycemic index

Chung-Jung Chiu; Larry D Hubbard; Jane Armstrong; Gail Rogers; Paul F Jacques; Leo T Chylack Jr; Susan E Hankinson; Walter C Willett; Allen Taylor

61

Changes in Treatment Adherence and Glycemic Control During the Transition to Adolescence in Type 1 Diabetes  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To test models of unidirectional and bidirectional change between treatment adherence and glycemic control in youth with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We conducted a 2-year longitudinal, multisite study of 225 youth with type 1 diabetes recruited at the cusp of adolescence (aged 9–11 years) to describe the mutual influences of glycemic control as measured by HbA1c and treatment adherence as measured by blood glucose monitoring frequency (BGMF) during the transition to adolescence. RESULTS HbA1c increased from 8.2 to 8.6% (P < 0.001) and BGMF decreased from 4.9 to 4.5 checks per day (P < 0.02) during the 2-year period. Changes in the BGMF slope predicted changes in HbA1c. A change (increase) in HbA1c was associated with a change (decrease) in BGMF of 1.26 (P < 0.001) after controlling for covariates. CONCLUSIONS The magnitude of the effect of declining treatment adherence (BGMF) on glycemic control in young adolescents may be even greater than declines observed among older adolescents. BGMF offers a powerful tool for targeted management of glycemic control for type 1 diabetes during the critical transition to adolescence.

Rausch, Joseph R.; Hood, Korey K.; Delamater, Alan; Shroff Pendley, Jennifer; Rohan, Jennifer M.; Reeves, Grafton; Dolan, Lawrence; Drotar, Dennis

2012-01-01

62

Physician and patient management of type 2 diabetes and factors related to glycemic control in Spain  

PubMed Central

The objective of this study was to assess current treatment patterns, blood glucose test strip usage, and treatment compliance in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in primary care centers in Spain, and to assess factors related to glycemic control. We conducted a retrospective chart review of patients with T2DM and measured treatment compliance using the Morisky-Green questionnaire. 294 patients were included in the study from a population of patients attending 30 primary care centers throughout Spain. Results showed that the majority of patients were treated with oral monotherapy (36%) and oral combination therapy (35%). Less than half of the patients had good glycemic control (HbA1c ? 6.5%). Half of the patients treated pharmacologically reported good compliance with treatment. Logistic regression analyses performed to identify factors associated with glycemic control showed that high body mass index (BMI) and poor compliance were the strongest predictors of poor HbA1c control (OR: 2.198 and 1.789, respectively, p < 0.05). In conclusion, in the course of managing diabetes, physicians and patients should attempt to improve compliance and lower BMI, which could lead to better glycemic control.

Yurgin, Nicole Rae; Boye, Kristina Secnik; Dilla, Tatiana; Surinach, Nuria Lara; Llach, Xavier Badia

2008-01-01

63

Influence of glycemic control on pulmonary function and heart rate in response to exercise in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Conflicting results exist regarding the impact of glycemic control on peak oxygen uptake (V?o2peak) in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The influence of glycemic control on submaximal oxygen uptake (V?o2) in these subjects is unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of fasting blood glucose (FBG) (short-term glycemic control) and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) (long-term glycemic

Patrice Brassard; Annie Ferland; Peter Bogaty; Marc Desmeules; Jean Jobin; Paul Poirier

2006-01-01

64

Predictors of Glycemic Control in Hispanic Youths with Type 1 Diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study aimed to examine factors that predict glycemic control in Hispanic youths. Secondary aims included developing and evaluating Spanish translations of three measures commonly used in research with youths with type 1 diabetes and examining factors associated with diabetes self-management in this population. Data was collected at three sites through interviews, questionnaires, and medical chart review. Participants included

Jessica Marie Valenzuela

2007-01-01

65

Determinants of glycemic control in youth with type 2 diabetes at randomization in the TODAY study  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The purpose of this study was to investigate insulin sensitivity and secretion indices and determinants of glycemic control in youth with recent-onset type 2 diabetes (T2DM) at randomization in the TODAY study, the largest study of youth with T2DM to date. We examined estimates of insulin sensitivit...

66

Validation of a model-based virtual trials method for tight glycemic control in intensive care  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: In-silico virtual patients and trials offer significant advantages in cost, time and safety for designing effective tight glycemic control (TGC) protocols. However, no such method has fully validated the independence of virtual patients (or resulting clinical trial predictions) from the data used to create them. This study uses matched cohorts from a TGC clinical trial to validate virtual patients

J Geoffrey Chase; Fatanah Suhaimi; Sophie Penning; Jean-Charles Preiser; Aaron J Le Compte; Jessica Lin; Christopher G Pretty; Geoffrey M Shaw; Katherine T Moorhead; Thomas Desaive

2010-01-01

67

Can improved glycemic control slow renal function decline at all stages of diabetic nephropathy?  

PubMed

Observational studies have shown the strong association between level of glycemic control and the key outcome measure, risk of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) loss rather than subsequent course of albumin excretion, in type 1 diabetes patients at all stages of nephropathy. However, it has not been clear if clinical interventions designed to normalize glycemic control are equally effective at all stages, such as primary prevention in normoalbuminuric patients, secondary prevention in microalbuminuria and macroalbuminuria, or tertiary prevention aimed at slowing or reversing further loss of GFR once impaired. Substantial randomized controlled trial data from the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial and Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications exists to support postponement, but not outright prevention, of GFR loss in normoalbuminuric patients. Although secondary and tertiary prevention systematic studies are limited to methodologically insufficient insulin pump and transplantation trials, the reversal of advanced glomerular lesions observed in whole-pancreas transplant recipients who experienced long-term glycemic normalization offers convincing support for further research into glycemic interventions specifically for GFR preservation. In light of existing literature, we encourage the design of secondary and tertiary prevention trials that incorporate biomarker methods for identifying patients at highest risk of GFR loss because interventions to normalize hyperglycemia are resource-intensive and may be applied unnecessarily to clinical populations at low long-term GFR loss risk. PMID:23062982

Goel, Gautam; Perkins, Bruce A

2012-09-01

68

Association of Exercise Stages of Change with Glycemic Control in Individuals with Type 2 Diabetes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Investigated the distribution of diabetic patients' stages of change to follow an exercise regimen, examining whether later stages of change were associated with better glycemic control. Data on participants from a primary care clinic (who were predominantly black, female, and indigent) indicated that over half of were in pre-contemplation,…

Natarajan, Sundar; Clyburn, Ernest B.; Brown, Ronald T.

2002-01-01

69

Use of an Insulin Bolus Advisor Improves Glycemic Control in Multiple Daily Insulin Injection (MDI) Therapy Patients With Suboptimal Glycemic Control: First results from the ABACUS trial.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVE Use of automated bolus advisors is associated with improved glycemic control in patients treated with insulin pump therapy. We conducted a study to assess the impact of using an insulin bolus advisor embedded in a blood glucose (BG) meter on glycemic control and treatment satisfaction in patients treated with multiple daily insulin injection (MDI) therapy. The study goal was to achieve >0.5% A1C reduction in most patients. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This was a 26-week, prospective, randomized, controlled, multinational study that enrolled 218 MDI-treated patients with poorly controlled diabetes (202 with type 1 diabetes, 16 with type 2 diabetes) who were 18 years of age or older. Participants had mean baseline A1C of 8.9% (SD, 1.2 [74 mmol/mol]), mean age of 42.4 years (SD, 14.0), mean BMI of 26.5 kg/m(2) (SD, 4.2), and mean diabetes duration of 17.7 years (SD, 11.1). Control group (CNL) patients used a standard BG meter and manual bolus calculation; intervention group (EXP) patients used the Accu-Chek Aviva Expert meter with an integrated bolus advisor to calculate insulin dosages. Glucose data were downloaded and used for therapy parameter adjustments in both groups. RESULTS A total of 193 patients (CNL, n = 93; EXP, n = 100) completed the study. Significantly more EXP than CNL patients achieved >0.5% A1C reduction (56.0% vs. 34.4%; P < 0.01). Improvement in treatment satisfaction (Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire scale) was significantly greater in EXP patients (11.4 [SD, 6.0] vs. 9.0 [SD, 6.3]; P < 0.01). Percentage of BG values <50 mg/dL was <2% in both groups during the study. CONCLUSIONS Use of an automated bolus advisor resulted in improved glycemic control and treatment satisfaction without increasing severe hypoglycemia. PMID:23900590

Ziegler, Ralph; Cavan, David A; Cranston, Iain; Barnard, Katharine; Ryder, Jacqueline; Vogel, Claudia; Parkin, Christopher G; Koehler, Walter; Vesper, Iris; Petersen, Bettina; Schweitzer, Matthias A; Wagner, Robin S

2013-07-30

70

Hypertension, poor glycemic control, and microalbuminuria in Cuban Americans with type 2 diabetes  

PubMed Central

Purpose: To investigate to what degree the presence of hypertension (HTN) and poor glycemic control (GC) influences the likelihood of having microalbuminuria (MAU) among Cuban Americans with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Methods: A cross-sectional study conducted in Cuban Americans (n = 179) with T2D. Participants were recruited from a randomly generated mailing list purchased from Knowledge-Base Marketing, Inc. Blood pressure (BP) was measured twice and averaged using an adult size cuff. Glycosylated hemoglobin (A1c) levels were measured from whole blood samples with the Roche Tina-quant method. First morning urine samples were collected from each participant to determine MAU by a semiquantitative assay (ImmunoDip). Results: MAU was present in 26% of Cuban Americans with T2D. A significantly higher percentage of subjects with MA had HTN (P = 0.038) and elevated A1C (P = 0.002) than those with normoalbuminuria. Logistic regression analysis showed that after controlling for covariates, subjects with poor GC were 6.76 times more likely to have MAU if they had hypertension compared with those without hypertension (P = 0.004; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.83, 23.05). Conclusion: The clinical significance of these findings emphasizes the early detection of MAU in this Hispanic subgroup combined with BP and good GC, which are fundamentals in preventing and treating diabetes complications and improving individuals’ renal and cardiovascular outcomes.

Zarini, Gustavo G; Exebio, Joel C; Gundupalli, Deva; Nath, Subrata; Huffman, Fatma G

2011-01-01

71

Patterns and Predictors of Long-Term Glycemic Control in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes  

PubMed Central

Aims/Introduction. To describe patterns of long-term glycemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes in Isfahan, Iran and identify factors associated with glycemic control. Methods. During the mean (standard deviation (SD)) follow-up period of 8.4 (4.2) (range 1–18) years, 4,582 patients with type 2 diabetes have been examined to determine glycemic changes. Their glycated hemoglobin (GHb) at the last clinic visit was compared with the initial visit data. The mean (SD) age of participants was 49.3 (9.6) years with a mean (SD) duration of diabetes of 5.0 (5.1) years at initial registration. Results. Mean (SD) GHb was 8.7% (2.3) at baseline and 7.9% (1.9) at the study end and decreased by mean of 0.8% (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.74, 0.87; P < 0.001) and varied by the severity of baseline GHb. 74.6% at the initial visit versus 64.4% at the last clinic visit had GHb values above the target level of 7.0%. Using a stepwise multiple regression models, age, higher GHb, FPG, follow-up period, and number of follow-up visits increased and higher systolic BP and female gender significantly decreased the percent glycemic change. Conclusions. This study highlights that more than 64.4% of the patients have GHb values higher than 7.0% at last clinic visit andindicatesthe difficult challenges physicians face when treating their patients with type 2 diabetes. Clinical efforts should focus on more effective methods for glycemic control in diabetic patients.

Janghorbani, Mohsen; Amini, Masoud

2012-01-01

72

Intraoperative glycemic control procedures and the use of an artificial pancreas.  

PubMed

Strict intraoperative glycemic control can significantly decrease the incidence of postoperative infection; however, anesthesiologists must carefully control blood glucose levels as well as properly manage the respiratory and cardiovascular systems. However, standard blood glucose measurement systems and insulin dosing algorithms, which are necessary for achieving strict glycemic control, have not yet been developed. An artificial pancreas (STG-22; Nikkiso Co., Tokyo, Japan) is considered a highly accurate blood glucose monitoring system capable of closed-loop control of blood glucose. The device has, however, many problems to be addressed since it is a large and expensive system with little versatility, and it requires a large amount of blood to be collected. Therefore, the development of less invasive and inexpensive systems with future technological progress is greatly anticipated. PMID:19725145

Yamashita, Koichi; Yatabe, Tomoaki

2009-09-01

73

A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL OF RESISTANCE EXERCISE TRAINING TO IMPROVE GLYCEMIC CONTROL IN OLDER ADULTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

OBJECTIVE-To determine the efficacy of high-intensity progressive resistance training (PRT) on glycemic control in older adults with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS-We performed a 16-week randomized controlled trial in 62 Latino older adults (40 women and 22 men; mean +/- SE age 66 +/...

74

Evaluation of a novel artificial pancreas: closed loop glycemic control system with continuous blood glucose monitoring.  

PubMed

A closed-loop glycemic control system using an artificial pancreas has been applied with many clinical benefits in Japan since 1987. To update this system incorporating user-friendly features, we developed a novel artificial pancreas (STG-55). The purpose of this study was to evaluate STG-55 for device usability, performance of blood glucose measurement, glycemic control characteristics in vivo in animal experiments, and evaluate its clinical feasibility. There are several features for usability improvement based on the design concepts, such as compactness, display monitor, batteries, guidance function, and reduction of the preparation time. All animal study data were compared with a clinically available artificial pancreas system in Japan (control device: STG-22). We examined correlations of both blood glucose levels between two groups (STG-55 vs. control) using Clarke's error grid analysis, and also compared mean glucose infusion rate (GIR) during glucose clamp. The results showed strong correlation in blood glucose concentrations (Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient: 0.97; n?=?1636). Clarke's error grid analysis showed that 98.4% of the data fell in Zones A and B, which represent clinically accurate or benign errors, respectively. The difference in mean GIRs was less than 0.2?mg/kg/min, which was considered not significant. Clinical feasibility study demonstrated sufficient glycemic control maintaining target glucose range between 80 and 110 (mg/dL), and between 140 and 160 without any hypoglycemia. In conclusion, STG-55 was a clinically acceptable artificial pancreas with improved interface and usability. A closed-loop glycemic control system with STG-55 would be a useful tool for surgical and critical patients in intensive care units, as well as diabetic patients. PMID:23506242

Tsukamoto, Yuuki; Kinoshita, Yoshihiko; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Munekage, Masaya; Munekage, Eri; Takezaki, Yuka; Yatabe, Tomoaki; Yamashita, Koichi; Yamazaki, Rie; Okabayashi, Takehiro; Tarumi, Masatoshi; Kobayashi, Masaki; Mishina, Suguru; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro

2013-03-18

75

Glycemic Control Over 5 Years in 4,900 People With Type 2 Diabetes  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE Glycemic control in type 2 diabetes generally worsens over time, requiring intensification of therapy. The Fenofibrate Intervention and Event Lowering in Diabetes (FIELD) trial provided the opportunity to observe glycemic control in a real-world setting. We assessed the adequacy of metformin, sulfonylureas, and insulin to maintain glycemic control and their effects on weight. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Diabetes control was measured at baseline and yearly for a median of 5 years in the 4,900 patients from the nonintervention arm of this study allocated to placebo. RESULTS Median HbA1c was 6.9% at baseline and increased by an average of 0.22% over 5 years (P < 0.001). Median weight was 86.3 kg at baseline and decreased by 0.4 kg over 5 years (P = 0.002). Baseline therapy was lifestyle measures only in 27%, oral agents without insulin in 59%, and insulin in 14% (7% also taking oral agents). Over 5 years, insulin use increased to 32% (21% also taking oral agents). Use of oral agents remained similar at 56%. Only 2% of patients at baseline and 4% after 5 years were taking oral agents other than metformin or sulfonylureas. Initiation of insulin therapy in 855 patients produced a sustained reduction of HbA1c from a median of 8.2 to 7.7%, with a weight gain of 4.6 kg over 5 years. CONCLUSIONS With intensification of traditional therapies, glycemic control deteriorated very little over 5 years in a large cohort of type 2 diabetes. However, the requirement for insulin therapy doubled, at the expense of significant weight gain and risk of hypoglycemia.

Best, James D.; Drury, Paul L.; Davis, Timothy M.E.; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Kesaniemi, Y. Antero; Scott, Russell; Pardy, Christopher; Voysey, Merryn; Keech, Anthony C.

2012-01-01

76

Carbohydrate intake and glycemic index in relation to the odds of early cortical and nuclear lens opacities1-5  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background:Animalstudiessuggestarolefordietarycarbohydrate in cataractogenesis. However, few published human studies have evaluated associations between carbohydrate nutrition and lens opacification. Objective: Our objective was to test the hypothesis that long-term carbohydrate intake and dietary glycemic index are associated with the odds of early cortical and nuclear opacities. Design: Subjects were 417 Boston-area members of the Nurses' HealthStudycohortaged53-73y.Dietaryinformationwasbasedon an average from 5 semiquantitative food-frequency

Chung-Jung Chiu; Martha S Morris; Gail Rogers; Paul F Jacques; Leo T Chylack Jr; William Tung; Susan E Hankinson; Walter C Willett; Allen Taylor

77

Overcoming barriers to glycemic control in African Americans with type-2 diabetes: benefits of insulin therapy.  

PubMed Central

A disproportionate number of African-American men and women are affected by obesity and diabetes. The documented rate of poor glycemic control in the African-American population may contribute to the high rate of morbidity and mortality due to diabetes observed in these patients. Since the benefits of strict glycemic control have been demonstrated in multiple large trials, the aim of treatment should be to achieve the goals set forth by the American Diabetes Association. Insulin remains an essential therapeutic agent for helping patients achieve glycemic control and preventing long-term comorbidities. However, barriers to insulin therapy exist for both the physician and patient. Strategies to counter this resistance include identifying barriers to treatment, restoring the patient's sense of control, utilizing simple regimens, and reviewing the benefits of insulin and the risk of hypoglycemia. In treating African-American patients with diabetes, providers of various racial and ethnic backgrounds may maximize treatment efficacy by attempting to understand and practice culturally competent care.

Marshall, Merville C.

2007-01-01

78

Perioperative glycemic control using an artificial endocrine pancreas in patients undergoing total pancreatectomy: tight glycemic control may be justified in order to avoid brittle diabetes.  

PubMed

I dedicate this paper to the late Prof. Yukihiko Nosé with all my heart. In 2001, under the direction of Prof. Nosé and Prof. Brunicardi at Baylor College of Medicine, we published a review article entitled "Artificial endocrine pancreas" in JACS. Subsequently, we reported that perioperative tight glycemic control (TGC) using an artificial pancreas (AP) with a closed-loop system could stably maintain near-normoglycemia in total-pancreatectomized dogs. Based on this experimental study in Houston, since 2006, we have introduced perioperative TGC using an AP into clinical use in Kochi. As of 2011, this novel TGC method has provided safe and stable blood glucose levels in more than 400 surgical patients. In this paper, we report new clinical findings regarding perioperative TGC using an AP in total-pancreatectomized patients. TGC using an AP enables us to achieve stable glycemic control not only without hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia but also with less variation in blood glucose concentration from the target blood glucose range, even in patients with the most serious form of diabetes, so-called "brittle diabetes", undergoing total pancreatectomy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first clinical report of TGC using an AP in patients undergoing total pancreatic resection. PMID:23442241

Hanazaki, Kazuhiro; Yatabe, Tomoaki; Kobayashi, Masaki; Tsukamoto, Yuuki; Kinoshita, Yoshihiko; Munekage, Masaya; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki

2013-01-01

79

Explaining the family conflict-glycemic control link through psychological variables in adolescents with type 1 diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

To examine whether individual psychological variables mediate the family conflict-glycemic control relationship. During three\\u000a study visits spanning 9 months, 147 adolescents with type 1 diabetes completed questionnaires measuring anxiety and depressive\\u000a symptoms, and diabetes-specific worry. Caregivers similarly completed a measure of diabetes-specific family conflict. Blood\\u000a glucose monitoring frequency and glycemic control were also obtained during study visits. Separate mediation analyses revealed

Michele Herzer; Anthony Vesco; Lisa M. Ingerski; Lawrence M. Dolan; Korey K. Hood

80

Modification of insulin sensitivity and glycemic control by activity and exercise.  

PubMed

Type 2 diabetes has progressed into a major contributor to preventable death, and developing optimal therapeutic strategies to prevent future type 2 diabetes and its primary clinical manifestation of cardiovascular disease is a major public health challenge. This article will provide a brief overview of the role of activity and exercise in modulating insulin sensitivity and will outline the effect of physical activity, high-intensity interval training, and resistance training on insulin sensitivity and glycemic control. PMID:24048318

Roberts, Christian K; Little, Jonathan P; Thyfault, John P

2013-10-01

81

Adverse effects of depression on glycemic control and health outcomes in people with diabetes: a review.  

PubMed

In the past decades, important advances have been achieved in the psychological aspects of diabetes. This article reviews the associations between diabetes, depression, and adverse health outcomes. The article provides an update on the literature regarding the prevalence of depression in diabetes, discusses the impact of depression on diabetes self-care and glycemic control in people with diabetes, and summarizes the results of longitudinal studies that have investigated depression as a risk factor for adverse health outcomes. PMID:24011885

Pouwer, François; Nefs, Giesje; Nouwen, Arie

2013-09-01

82

Sleep abnormalities in type 2 diabetes may be associated with glycemic control  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sleep disturbances may be associated with impaired glucose metabolism. The aim of this study was to evaluate sleep duration and quality in relation to glycemic control in patients with type 2\\u000a diabetes. In a cross-sectional study, sleep duration and quality were assessed in 47 middle-aged patients with type 2 diabetes\\u000a treated with oral agents and without sleep disturbing complications and

M. Trento; F. Broglio; F. Riganti; M. Basile; E. Borgo; C. Kucich; P. Passera; P. Tibaldi; M. Tomelini; F. Cavallo; E. Ghigo; M. Porta

2008-01-01

83

Actions of insulin beyond glycemic control: A perspective on insulin detemir  

Microsoft Academic Search

The physiologic effects of insulin on carbohydrate metabolism in health in general and in diabetes are well known. Less understood,\\u000a but far more intriguing, are the extrapancreatic effects of insulin that go beyond glycemic control to help sense, integrate,\\u000a and maintain energy balance. Virtually every organ, including the brain, is a target for insulin action. When exogenous insulin\\u000a is administered

Joseph Tibaldi

2007-01-01

84

Benefits of Renin-Angiotensin Blockade on Retinopathy in Type 1 Diabetes Vary With Glycemic Control  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE Optimal glycemic control slows diabetic retinopathy (DR) development and progression and is the standard of care for type 1 diabetes. However, these glycemic goals are difficult to achieve and sustain in clinical practice. The Renin Angiotensin System Study (RASS) showed that renin-angiotensin system (RAS) blockade can slow DR progression. In the current study, we evaluate whether glycemic control influenced the benefit of RAS blockade on DR progression in type 1 diabetic patients. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We used RASS data to analyze the relationships between two-steps or more DR progression and baseline glycemic levels in 223 normotensive, normoalbuminuric type 1 diabetic patients randomized to receive 5 years of enalapril or losartan compared with placebo. RESULTS A total of 147 of 223 patients (65.9%) had DR at baseline (47 of 74 patients [63.5%] in placebo and 100 of 149 patients [67.1%] in the combined treatment groups [P = 0.67]). Patients with two-steps or more DR progression had higher baseline A1C than those without progression (9.4 vs. 8.2%, P < 0.001). There was no beneficial effect of RAS blockade (P = 0.92) in patients with baseline A1C ?7.5%. In contrast, 30 of 112 (27%) patients on the active treatment arms with A1C >7.5% had two-steps or more DR progression compared with 26 of 56 patients (46%) in the placebo group (P = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS RAS blockade reduces DR progression in normotensive, normoalbuminuric type 1 diabetic patients with A1C >7.5%. Whether this therapy could benefit patients with A1C ?7.5% will require long-term studies of much larger cohorts.

Harindhanavudhi, Tasma; Mauer, Michael; Klein, Ronald; Zinman, Bernard; Sinaiko, Alan; Caramori, M. Luiza

2011-01-01

85

Evaluation of Glycemic Variability in Well-Controlled Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus  

PubMed Central

Abstract Aims It is necessary to evaluate glucose variability and postprandial hyperglycemia in patients with well-controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus because of the limitations associated with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) measurements. We evaluated parameters reflecting postprandial hyperglycemia and glycemic variability in patients with optimal HbA1c. Patients and Methods Thirty-nine patients with HbA1c levels below 7% were recruited to the study. A continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) was applied for two 72-h periods. 1,5-Anhydroglucitol (1,5-AG) and fructosamine (FA) were measured as parameters for postprandial hyperglycemia and glucose variability. Using CGMS data, the following postprandial hyperglycemia parameters were calculated: mean postprandial maximum glucose (MPMG) and area under the curve for glucose above 180?mg/dL (AUC-180). To measure glycemic variability, we calculated mean amplitude of glucose excursion (MAGE) using a classical (MAGEc) and new method (MAGE group of sign [MAGEgos]). Results The baseline HbA1c level was 6.3±0.3%. The mean MPMG was 10.34±1.84?mmol/L, and the mean AUC-180 was 0.17±0.23?mmol/L/day. The mean MAGEgos was 3.27±1.29?mmol/L, and MAGEc was 4.30±1.43?mmol/L, indicating glycemic variability in our patients. The mean levels of 1,5-AG and FA were 16.7±7.4??g/mL and 273.0±22.5??mol/L, respectively. In a correlation analysis, FA was significantly correlated with MPMG, AUC-180, MAGEgos, and MAGEc. In contrast, 1,5-AG was only correlated with AUC-180. Conclusions This study demonstrated postprandial hyperglycemia and glycemic variability in subjects with well-controlled diabetes. FA may reflect postprandial hyperglycemia and glycemic variability, but 1,5-AG may be of limited value for assessing glucose variability in patients with well-controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Chon, Suk; Lee, Yun Jung; Fraterrigo, Gemma; Pozzilli, Paolo; Choi, Moon Chan; Kwon, Mi-Kwang; Chin, Sang Ouk; Rhee, Sang Youl; Oh, Seungjoon; Kim, Young-Seol

2013-01-01

86

Acute Effects of Dietary Glycemic Index on Antioxidant Capacity in a Nutrient-controlled Feeding Study  

PubMed Central

Oxidative stress, caused by an imbalance between antioxidant capacity and reactive oxygen species, may be an early event in a metabolic cascade elicited by a high glycemic index (GI) diet, ultimately increasing the risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. We conducted a feeding study to evaluate the acute effects of low-GI compared with high-GI diets on oxidative stress and cardiovascular disease risk factors. The crossover study comprised two 10-day in-patient admissions to a clinical research center. For the admissions, 12 overweight or obese (BMI: 27–45 kg/m2) male subjects aged 18–35 years consumed low-GI or high-GI diets controlled for potentially confounding nutrients. On day 7, after an overnight fast and then during a 5-h postprandial period, we assessed total antioxidant capacity (total and perchloric acid (PCA) protein-precipitated plasma oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay) and oxidative stress status (urinary F2?-isoprostanes (F2IP)). On day 10, we measured cardiovascular disease risk factors. Under fasting conditions, total antioxidant capacity was significantly higher during the low-GI vs. high-GI diet based on total ORAC (11,736 ± 668 vs. 10,381 ± 612 ?mol Trolox equivalents/l, P = 0.002) and PCA-ORAC (1,276 ± 96 vs. 1,210 ± 96 ?mol Trolox equivalents/l, P = 0.02). Area under the postprandial response curve also differed significantly between the two diets for total ORAC and PCA-ORAC. No diet effects were observed for the other variables. Enhancement in plasma total antioxidant capacity occurs within 1 week on a low-GI diet, before changes in other risk factors, raising the possibility that this phenomenon may mediate, at least in part, the previously reported effects of GI on health.

Botero, Diego; Ebbeling, Cara B.; Blumberg, Jeffrey B.; Ribaya-Mercado, Judy D.; Creager, Mark A.; Swain, Janis F.; Feldman, Henry A.; Ludwig, David S.

2009-01-01

87

Exploring the relationship between diabetes self-efficacy, depressive symptoms, and glycemic control among men and women with type 2 diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Depression and low self-efficacy are both associated with worse glycemic control in adults with diabetes, but the relationship\\u000a between these variables is poorly understood. We conducted a cross-sectional study examining associations between depressive\\u000a symptoms, self-efficacy, and glycemic control among men (n = 64) and women (n = 98) with type 2 diabetes to see if self-efficacy mediates the relationship between depression and glycemic control.

Andrea CherringtonKenneth; Kenneth A. Wallston; Russell L. Rothman

2010-01-01

88

Glibenclamide or Metformin Combined with Honey Improves Glycemic Control in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats  

PubMed Central

Diabetes mellitus is associated with deterioration of glycemic control and progressive metabolic derangements. This study investigated the effect of honey as an adjunct to glibenclamide or metformin on glycemic control in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced in rats by streptozotocin. The diabetic rats were randomized into six groups and administered distilled water, honey, glibenclamide, glibenclamide and honey, metformin or metformin and honey. The animals were treated orally once daily for four weeks. The diabetic control rats showed hypoinsulinemia (0.27 ± 0.01 ng/ml), hyperglycemia (22.4 ± 1.0 mmol/L) and increased fructosamine (360.0 ± 15.6 µmol/L). Honey significantly increased insulin (0.41 ± 0.06 ng/ml), decreased hyperglycemia (12.3 ± 3.1 mmol/L) and fructosamine (304.5 ± 10.1 µmol/L). Although glibenclamide or metformin alone significantly (p < 0.05) reduced hyperglycemia, glibenclamide or metformin combined with honey produced significantly much lower blood glucose (8.8 ± 2.9 or 9.9 ± 3.3 mmol/L, respectively) compared to glibenclamide or metformin alone (13.9 ± 3.4 or 13.2 ± 2.9 mmol/L, respectively). Similarly, glibenclamide or metformin combined with honey produced significantly (p < 0.05) lower fructosamine levels (301.3 ± 19.5 or 285.8 ± 22.6 µmol/L, respectively) whereas glibenclamide or metformin alone did not decrease fructosamine (330.0 ± 29.9 or 314.6 ± 17.9 µmol/L, respectively). Besides, these drugs or their combination with honey increased insulin levels. Glibenclamide or metformin combined with honey also significantly reduced the elevated levels of creatinine, bilirubin, triglycerides, and VLDL cholesterol. These results indicate that combination of glibenclamide or metformin with honey improves glycemic control, and provides additional metabolic benefits, not achieved with either glibenclamide or metformin alone.

Erejuwa, Omotayo Owomofoyon; Sulaiman, Siti Amrah; Wahab, Mohd Suhaimi Ab; Sirajudeen, Kuttulebbai Nainamohammed Salam; Salleh, Md Salzihan Md; Gurtu, Sunil

2011-01-01

89

Depression and Glycemic Control in Hispanic Primary Care Patients with Diabetes  

PubMed Central

Context Maintaining optimal glycemic control is an important goal of therapy in patients with diabetes mellitus. Patients of Hispanic ancestry have been shown to have high rates of diabetes and poor glycemic control (PGC). Although depression is common in adults with diabetes, its relationship to glycemic control remains unclear, especially among Hispanics. Objective To assess the association of depression with PGC in Hispanics. Design Data from a cross-sectional mental health survey in primary care were crosslinked to the hospital's computerized laboratory database. Setting Urban general medicine practice at a teaching hospital. Patients Two hundred and nine patients (mean [standard deviation] age, 57.1 [10.3] years; 68% females) with recent International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes for diabetes mellitus, and 1 or more hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) tests. Main Outcome Measure Probability of PGC (HbA1c?8%). Results Probability for PGC steadily increased with severity of depression. Thirty-nine (55.7%) of the 70 patients with major depression had HbA1c?8%, compared with 39/92 (42.4%) in the minimal to mild depression group, and 15/47 (31.9%) in the no depression group (Ptrend=.01; adjusted odds ratio, 3.27; 95% confidence interval, 1.23 to 8.64, for moderate or severe depression vs no depression). Only 29 (41.4%) of the patients with major depression received mental health treatment in the previous year. Conclusions In this primary care sample of Hispanic patients with diabetes, we found a significant association between increasing depression severity and PGC. Yet, less than one half of the patients with moderate or severe depression received mental health treatment in the previous year. Improving identification and treatment of depression in this high-risk population might have favorable effects on diabetic outcomes.

Gross, Raz; Olfson, Mark; Gameroff, Marc J; Carasquillo, Olveen; Shea, Steven; Feder, Adriana; Lantigua, Rafael; Fuentes, Milton; Weissman, Myrna M

2005-01-01

90

DIETARY GLYCEMIC INDEX AND CARBOHYDRATE INTAKE IN RELATION TO EARLY AGE-RELATED MACULOPATHY  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Dietary carbohydrate may play a role in the pathogenesis of age-related maculopathy (ARM). We examined the relationship between ARM and dietary carbohydrate quality, as measured by glycemic index (GI), and total carbohydrate intake. One thousand forty-three eyes from 526 Boston-area participants fro...

91

Telemedical support to improve glycemic control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction  In this paper, we evaluated the feasibility of a telemedical (TM) support program and its effect on glycemic control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Thirty-six adolescents (m=20, median age at the start of the study: 15.3 years (range: 10.7–19.3 years), median age at diagnosis: 9.3 years (2.1–13.8 years), median duration of disease: 6.4 years (1.0–12.8 years), HbA1c>8%,

Birgit Rami; Christian Popow; Werner Horn; Thomas Waldhoer; Edith Schober

2006-01-01

92

Determinants of glycemic control in female diabetic patients: a study from Iran  

PubMed Central

Background Since microvascular and macrovascular complications are reduced through strict glycemic control, this study carried out to identify the factors that affect glycemic control. Methods A cross-sectional design was carried out to examine the role of demographic, anthropometric, clinical and other relevant characteristics in a sample of 103 female diabetic patients in Tehran, Iran. Personal interviews were conducted to collect data. Then blood sampling collected and the patients were divided into two outcome groups (controlled and uncontrolled diabetes). The groups were compared on the basis of their characteristics using both univariate and multivariate analyses. Results In all 103 patients were entered into the study. The mean age of patients was 46.38 (SD = 11.42) years. Overall, the mean value of HbA1c for the whole sample was 7.5 (SD = 2.35) and 56.3% had HbA1c ? 7%. The findings obtained from univariate analysis revealed that there were no significant differences between controlled and uncontrolled patients. However, in multivariate analysis the waist circumference was found to be a significant predictor of increased level of HbA1c (OR = 1.04, 95% CI = 1-1.08, P = 0.04). Conclusions The findings suggest that increased level of HbA1c is associated with waist circumference that is a modifiable factor. It seems that physical activity might be a solution to overcome this health problem. A larger study to identify other factors also is recommended.

2010-01-01

93

Response to Acute Psychophysical Stress and 24-Hour Glycemic Control in Healthy Older People  

PubMed Central

We examined the relation between stress reactivity and 24?h glycemic control in 17 inactive, healthy older people (?60 years) under both a novel psychophysical stress and a seated control condition. Plasma cortisol was measured over the course of the stress and recovery periods. Glycemic control was determined over the subsequent 3?h from an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and over 24?h via continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). We observed significant (P < 0.05) elevations in perceived stress, cardiovascular activity, and peak cortisol response at 30?min (10.6 ± 3.1 versus 8.6 ± 2.6??g·dL?1, resp.) during the stress compared with the control condition; however, 3?h OGTT glucose and insulin responses were similar between conditions. The CGM data suggested a 30–40?min postchallenge delay in peak glucose response and attenuated glucose clearance over the 6?h following the stress condition, but these alterations were not statistically significant. Healthy older people may demonstrate minimal disruption in metabolic resiliency following everyday psychological stress.

DiPietro, Loretta; Yeckel, Catherine W.; Gribok, Andrei

2012-01-01

94

Effects of sitagliptin beyond glycemic control: focus on quality of life  

PubMed Central

Background Recently, incretin hormones, including glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogue and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor, have been found to regulate glucose metabolism. The aim of this study was to elucidate the efficacy and safety of the clinical usage of DPP-4 inhibitors in Japan. Methods This study was designed as a prospective, open-label, multi-center trial. Patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2DM) with poor glycemic profiles (HbA1c???6.2%) in spite of receiving a medical diet, therapeutic exercise, and/or medications were eligible for this study. The participants received 50 to 100 mg of the DPP-4 inhibitor sitagliptin once daily for 12 months. Results One hundred and eighty-eight subjects were enrolled. After 12 months of sitagliptin treatment, HbA1c levels decreased (7.65%?±?1.32% to 7.05%?±?1.10%, p?glycemic control achieved (in accordance with the guidelines of the Japanese Diabetes Society) significantly increased. Blood pressure and serum levels of triglycerides and total cholesterol decreased significantly. Furthermore, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and Diabetes Symptomatic Scores improved significantly. Adverse events such as hypoglycemia and loss of consciousness occurred in twenty three subjects (11%). Conclusions These results suggest that the actions of DPP-4 inhibitors improve not only glycemic control, but also blood pressure, lipid profiles, and quality of life (QOL). Sitagliptin is a sound agent for use in the comprehensive treatment of patients with T2DM.

2013-01-01

95

Pilot study on the additive effects of berberine and oral type 2 diabetes agents for patients with suboptimal glycemic control  

PubMed Central

Background Suboptimal glycemic control is a common situation in diabetes, regardless of the wide range of drugs available to reach glycemic targets. Basic research in diabetes is endeavoring to identify new actives working as insulin savers, use of which could delay the introduction of injectable insulin or reduce the insulin dose needed. Commonly available as a nutraceutical, berberine is a potential candidate. Methods and results Because its low oral bioavailability can be overcome by P-glycoprotein inhibitors like herbal polyphenols, we have tested the nutraceutical combination of Berberis aristata extract and Silybum marianum extract (Berberol®) in type 2 diabetes in terms of its additive effect when combined with a conventional oral regimen for patients with suboptimal glycemic control. After 90 days of treatment, the nutraceutical association had a positive effect on glycemic and lipid parameters, significantly reducing glycosylated hemoglobin, basal insulin, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance, total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides. A relevant effect was also observed in terms of liver function by measuring aspartate transaminase and alanine transaminase. The product had a good safety profile, with distinctive gastrointestinal side effects likely due to its acarbose-like action. Conclusion Although further studies should be carried out to confirm our data, Berberol could be considered a good candidate as an adjunctive treatment option in diabetes, especially in patients with suboptimal glycemic control.

Di Pierro, Francesco; Villanova, Nicola; Agostini, Federica; Marzocchi, Rebecca; Soverini, Valentina; Marchesini, Giulio

2012-01-01

96

Pancreatic ?-cell Function Is a Stronger Predictor of Changes in Glycemic Control After an Aerobic Exercise Intervention Than Insulin Sensitivity.  

PubMed

Context: Understanding intersubject variability in glycemic control following exercise training will help individualize treatment. Objective: Our aim was to determine whether this variability is related to training-induced changes in insulin sensitivity or pancreatic ?-cell function. Design, Setting, and Participants: We conducted an observational clinical study of 105 subjects with impaired glucose tolerance or type 2 diabetes. Interventions and Main Outcome Measures: Individual subject changes in fitness (VO2max), glycemia (glycosylated hemoglobin, fasting glucose, oral glucose tolerance test), insulin sensitivity (hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp), oral glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), and disposition index (DI) were measured following 12 to 16 weeks of aerobic exercise training. Regression analyses were used to identify relationships between variables. Results: After training, 86% of subjects increased VO2max and lost weight. Glycosylated hemoglobin, fasting glucose, and 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test were reduced in 69%, 62%, and 68% of subjects, respectively, while insulin sensitivity improved in 90% of the participants. Changes in glycemic control were congruent with changes in GSIS such that 66% of subjects had a reduction in first-phase GSIS, and 46% had reduced second-phase GSIS. Training increased first- and second-phase DI in 83% and 74% of subjects. Training-induced changes in glycemic control were related to changes in GSIS (P < .05), but not insulin sensitivity or DI, and training-induced improvements in glycemic control were largest in subjects with greater pretraining GSIS. Conclusions: Intersubject variability in restoring glycemic control following exercise is explained primarily by changes in insulin secretion. Thus, baseline and training-induced changes in ?-cell function may be a key determinant of training-induced improvements in glycemic control. PMID:23966244

Solomon, Thomas P J; Malin, Steven K; Karstoft, Kristian; Kashyap, Sangeeta R; Haus, Jacob M; Kirwan, John P

2013-08-21

97

Impact of Carbohydrate Counting on Glycemic Control in Children With Type 1 Diabetes  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To study the association between parent carbohydrate counting knowledge and glycemic control in youth with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We assessed 67 youth ages 4–12 years with type 1 diabetes (duration ?1 year). Parents estimated carbohydrate content of children's meals in diet recalls. Ratios of parent estimates to computer analysis defined carbohydrate counting knowledge; the mean and SD of these ratios defined accuracy and precision, respectively. A1C defined glycemic control. RESULTS Greater accuracy and precision were associated with lower A1C in bivariate analyses (P < 0.05). In a multivariate analysis (R2= 0.25, P = 0.007) adjusting for child age, sex, and type 1 diabetes duration, precision (P = 0.02) and more frequent blood glucose monitoring (P = 0.04), but not accuracy (P = 0.9), were associated with lower A1C. A1C was 0.8% lower (95% CI ?0.1 to ?1.4) among youth whose parents demonstrated precision. CONCLUSIONS Precision with carbohydrate counting and increased blood glucose monitoring were associated with lower A1C in children with type 1 diabetes.

Mehta, Sanjeev N.; Quinn, Nicolle; Volkening, Lisa K.; Laffel, Lori M.B.

2009-01-01

98

Higher glycemic index and glycemic load diet is associated with increased risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: a case-control study.  

PubMed

Several studies have indicated the association between intake of foods high in dietary glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) with an increased risk of digestive tract cancers. We hypothesized that GI and GL may be associated with risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) in a high-risk population in Iran. In total, we interviewed 47 cases with incident of ESCC and 96 frequency-matched hospital controls, then calculated the average dietary GI and GL via a validated food frequency questionnaire. Dietary GL was calculated as a function of GI, carbohydrate content, and frequency of intake of certain foods. Dietary GI and GL levels were significantly higher among the ESCC cases compared with the controls (P < .05). After adjustment for potential confounders, those in the highest tertile of dietary GI had 2.95 times higher risk of ESCC compared with those in the lowest (95% confidence interval, 1.68-3.35; P for trend = .002). In addition, being in the highest tertile of dietary GL was positively associated with an ESCC risk (odds ratio, 3.49; 95% confidence interval, 2.98-4.41; P for trend = .001). Findings of the present study indicate that diets with high GI and GL might have potentially unfavorable effects on ESCC risk and suggest a possible role for excess circulating insulin and related insulin-like growth factor 1 in esophageal cancer development. PMID:24034571

Eslamian, Ghazaleh; Jessri, Mahsa; Hajizadeh, Bahareh; Ibiebele, Torukiri I; Rashidkhani, Bahram

2013-07-23

99

Glycemic control in the burn intensive care unit: focus on the role of anemia in glucose measurement.  

PubMed

Glycemic control with intensive insulin therapy (IIT) has received widespread adoption secondary to findings of improved clinical outcomes and survival in the burn population. Severe burn as a model for trauma is characterized by a hypermetabolic state, hyperglycemia, and insulin resistance. In this article, we review the findings of a burn center research facility in terms of understanding glucose management. The conferred benefits from IIT, our findings of poor outcomes associated with glycemic variability, advantages from preserved diurnal variation of glucose and insulin, and impacts of glucometer error and hematocrit correction factor are discussed. We conclude with direction for further study and the need for a reliable continuous glucose monitoring system. Such efforts will further the endeavor for achieving adequate glycemic control in order to assess the efficacy of target ranges and use of IIT. PMID:20144386

Mann, Elizabeth A; Mora, Alejandra G; Pidcoke, Heather F; Wolf, Steven E; Wade, Charles E

2009-11-01

100

Impact of physical fitness and glycemic control on in vivo insulin action in adolescents with IDDM.  

PubMed

The relationship of in vivo insulin-mediated glucose utilization to the state of physical fitness and the degree of glycemic control was examined in 27 adolescents with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) compared with 10 nondiabetic adolescent control subjects. In vivo total-body insulin-mediated glucose metabolism was evaluated by the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Physical fitness was assessed by maximal oxygen consumption (VO2 max) during cycle ergometry. Patients and control subjects had similar levels of VO2 max (34.9 +/- 8.6 vs. 38.6 +/- 9.9 ml.kg-1.min-1, P = 0.3). Patients had lower total-body insulin-mediated glucose metabolism compared with control subjects (33.9 +/- 14.3 vs. 63.8 +/- 17.2 mumol.kg-1.min-1, P = 0.0002). Among the patients, females had lower total-body insulin-mediated glucose metabolism compared with males (24.2 +/- 2.8 vs. 40.7 +/- 3.4 mumol.kg-1.min-1, P less than 0.001); however, this difference disappeared after correcting for sex differences in fitness levels. Insulin-mediated glucose metabolism correlated with VO2 max in patients and control subjects (r = 0.83, r = 0.81, P less than 0.05). The regression of total-body insulin-mediated glucose metabolism on VO2 max for patients was -2.84 +/- 0.255 VO2 max and for control subjects was 7.12 +/- 0.143 VO2 max, indicating that for similar degrees of physical fitness patients have lower total body insulin-mediated glucose metabolism levels than control subjects. In patients, total-body insulin-mediated glucose metabolism correlated with the degree of glycemic control as assessed by the level of glycosylated hemoglobin (r = -0.63, P less than 0.001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2404722

Arslanian, S; Nixon, P A; Becker, D; Drash, A L

1990-01-01

101

Characteristics of Children with Type 1 Diabetes and Persistent Suboptimal Glycemic Control  

PubMed Central

Objective: This study aims to determine the relationship between the duration of persistent poor glycemic control in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) children and the likelihood of subsequent improvement. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted on T1DM patients aged 6-18 years, followed for at least six visits at Children’s National Medical Center (Washington, DC) with at least one hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) ?10% after the first year since the initial visit (n=151). Medical records of patients with subsequently improved glycemic control were reviewed (n=39). Results: Patients aged 12-18 years, females, and Medicaid patients were twice as likely to be in persistently poor control as patients aged 6-11 years, males, and privately insured patients, respectively. Each additional visit with HbA1c ?10% and one percentage point increase in the mean HbA1c reduced the likelihood of subsequent improvement by 20% and 50%, respectively. Of the 39 patients with improved control, only 5 (13%) sustained their improvement for ?2 years. Multiple contributing factors for improved control were identified, but no one factor explained improved control in >25% of patients. Conclusion This study suggests that the longer the duration of poor control, the more difficult it is to reverse the underlying factors of poor diabetes management. Strategies to improve regular clinic attendance along with reinforcement of changes which resulted in improved control are critical. Adolescents, females, and Medicaid patients in particular should be targeted for sustained intervention. Conflict of interest:None declared.

Kim, Hyuntae; Elmi, Angelo; Henderson, Celia L.; Cogen, Fran R.

2012-01-01

102

Short-Term Effects of Improved Glycemic Control on Cognitive Function in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: According to numerous studies, type 2 diabetes is associated with mild cognitive dysfunction, and there is some evidence suggesting favorable effects of improved metabolic control on the mental capability of elderly diabetic patients. Objective: To compare patients with type 2 diabetes to normal controls with respect to cognitive performance and to investigate the consequences of glycemic adjustment. Methods: 53

W. Hewer; M. Mussell; F. Rist; B. Kulzer; K. Bergis

2003-01-01

103

Glycemic control in the pediatric intensive care unit of Leuven: two years of experience.  

PubMed

Stress hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia are associated with increased mortality and morbidity in critically ill patients. Three randomized controlled trials, in the surgical, medical, and pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) of the Leuven University in Belgium, demonstrated the beneficial response of tightly controlling blood glucose levels within age-adjusted narrow limits by applying intensive insulin therapy. Follow-up studies could not confirm the results obtained in the Leuven studies but revealed the complexity associated with tight glycemic control (TGC). This article gives an overview of the methodological aspects typical of the Leuven TGC concept, with the focus on the PICU. Differences between the adult and the PICU are described. This overview article might help other ICUs by addressing potential differences in clinical practice when implementing TGC. PMID:22401318

Van Herpe, Tom; Vanhonsebrouck, Koen; Mesotten, Dieter; De Moor, Bart; Van den Berghe, Greet

2012-01-01

104

Refill Adherence to Oral Hypoglycemic Agents and Glycemic Control in Veterans  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Although medication nonadherence may contribute to inadequate diabetes control, adherence is not routinely measured. Persistence, the continuous refill of medications, is one metric that could be integrated into clinical care if associated with glycemic control. OBJECTIVE To characterize the association of persistence levels (non-, good, overpersistence) with hemoglobin A1c (A1C) over 1 year in newly medicated diabetics in the Veterans Administration. METHODS Eligible veterans were ?18 years and first filled a prescription for oral hypoglycemic agents (OHA) between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2002. The date the OHA was first dispensed was defined as the baseline date. Subjects must have filled at least 1 prescription for any drug, but no diabetes medications, during the 12 months preceding the baseline date. Persistence was measured in days supply of medication over 365 days and defined as non- (<0.80), good (?0.8–1.10), and over- (>1.10) persistence. The main outcome measure was achieving goal A1C (?7.0%) after 1 year. RESULTS A total of 56,181 veterans were included. Veterans were male (97%) and white (67%) with comorbid hypertension (58%) and hyperlipidemia (40%). Median age was 63 years, while median baseline A1C was 7.7%. Fifty-two percent of patients had good persistence; 25% were overpersistent. Good persistence was associated with achieving goal A1C (RR 1.07; 95% CI 1.06 to 1.09). The association of overpersistence with the same outcome (RR 0.95; 95% CI 0.94 to 0.97) was lower than good persistence, but higher than nonpersistence (RR 0.93; 95% CI 0.92 to 0.94). CONCLUSIONS Good persistence was associated with glycemic control. Over-persistent patients were common and more likely than nonpersistent patients, but less likely than good persisters to attain goal A1C. Estimating these different strata of persistence may be useful in identifying patients at risk of poor glycemic control.

Kim, Nancy; Agostini, Joseph V; Justice, Amy C

2011-01-01

105

Acculturation and glycemic control of Asian Indian adults with type 2 diabetes.  

PubMed

The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is disproportionately high among Asian Indians (AI), one of the fastest growing immigrant groups in the United States (US). Poorly controlled diabetes associated with inadequate self-management increases complications and thus medical costs. Acculturation may be an important determinant of diabetes self-management and hence control. This study examined the association between the degree of acculturation and glycemic control as measured by Hemoglobin A1c in AI adults with type 2 diabetes. A mixed method (quantitative and qualitative) study was conducted among 30 AI adults with type 2 diabetes. Acculturation assessment using the Suinn-Lew Asian Self-identity Instrument was followed by socio-demographic questions, self-reported anthropometric measures, and open ended diabetes self-care questions. A two-step multiple regression analysis and content analysis of verbatim interview transcriptions were conducted. Interactions of acculturation with body mass index (interaction b = 1.11; p = 0.01), annual household income (interaction b = 7.19; p = .01), and diabetes duration (interaction b = .30; p = .02) significantly predicted higher HbA1c levels (R(2) change = .368; F change = 4.21; p = .02). From the qualitative interviews, the following were regarded as US specific facilitators for glycemic control: excellent health care system and facilities, availability of healthy food choices and self-monitoring devices, medical insurance benefits, good quality medications, and improved health awareness. Cultural orientation might be important for patient tailored interventions targeting AI with type 2 diabetes. Therefore, interventions targeted at Asian Indians with diabetes should include culture specific adaptations to nutrition education and support. PMID:22744164

Venkatesh, Sumathi; Weatherspoon, Lorraine J; Kaplowitz, Stan A; Song, Won O

2013-02-01

106

Determinants of Glycemic control in Youth with Type 2 diabetes at randomization in the TODAY study  

PubMed Central

Objective To investigate insulin sensitivity and secretion indices and determinants of glycemic control in youth with recent-onset type 2 diabetes at randomization in the TODAY study, the largest study of youth with type 2 diabetes to date. Research Design and Methods We examined estimates of insulin sensitivity [1/fasting insulin (1/IF), fasting glucose/insulin (GF/IF), 1/fasting C-peptide (1/CF), GF/CF], ?-cell function [insulinogenic index (?I30/?G30), and ?C30/?G30], and disposition index (DI) in the TODAY cohort of 704 youth (14.0±2.0 yr; diabetes duration 7.8±5.8 mo; 64.9% female; 41.1% Hispanic, 31.5% Black, 19.6% White, 6.1% American Indian, and 1.7% Asian) according to HbA1c quartiles at study randomization. The randomization visit followed a run-in period (median 71 days) during which glycemic control (HbA1c? 8% for at least 2 months) was achieved with metformin alone. These measures were also examined in relation to screening HbA1c levels prior to run-in. Results Insulin secretion indices declined with increasing HbA1c quartiles, at randomization and screening, (at randomization: ?C30/?G30: 0.11±0.09, 0.10±0.19, 0.07±0.06, and 0.03±0.03 ng/ml per mg/dl, p<0.0001; DI: 0.03±0.03, 0.03±0.05, 0.02±0.02, and 0.01±0.01 mg/dl?1, p<0.0001) with no significant difference in insulin sensitivity. There were no significant differences in estimates of insulin sensitivity or secretion between genders or across the different racial groups. At randomization and screening, HbA1C correlated with DI (r=?0.3, p<0.001), with ?C30/?G30, but not with insulin sensitivity estimates. Conclusions In youth with recent-onset type 2 diabetes treated with metformin, glycemic control, as measured by HbA1c, appears to be associated with residual ?-cell function, and not insulin sensitivity.

2011-01-01

107

A Clinical Trial to Maintain Glycemic Control in Youth with Type 2 Diabetes  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Despite the increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes in youth, there are few data to guide treatment. We compared the efficacy of three treatment regimens to achieve durable glycemic control in children and adolescents with recent-onset type 2 diabetes. METHODS Eligible patients 10 to 17 years of age were treated with metformin (at a dose of 1000 mg twice daily) to attain a glycated hemoglobin level of less than 8% and were randomly assigned to continued treatment with metformin alone or to metformin combined with rosiglitazone (4 mg twice a day) or a lifestyle-intervention program focusing on weight loss through eating and activity behaviors. The primary outcome was loss of glycemic control, defined as a glycated hemoglobin level of at least 8% for 6 months or sustained metabolic decompensation requiring insulin. RESULTS Of the 699 randomly assigned participants (mean duration of diagnosed type 2 diabetes, 7.8 months), 319 (45.6%) reached the primary outcome over an average follow-up of 3.86 years. Rates of failure were 51.7% (120 of 232 participants), 38.6% (90 of 233), and 46.6% (109 of 234) for metformin alone, metformin plus rosiglitazone, and metformin plus lifestyle intervention, respectively. Metformin plus rosiglitazone was superior to metformin alone (P = 0.006); metformin plus lifestyle intervention was intermediate but not significantly different from metformin alone or metformin plus rosiglitazone. Prespecified analyses according to sex and race or ethnic group showed differences in sustained effectiveness, with metformin alone least effective in non-Hispanic black participants and metformin plus rosiglitazone most effective in girls. Serious adverse events were reported in 19.2% of participants. CONCLUSIONS Monotherapy with metformin was associated with durable glycemic control in approximately half of children and adolescents with type 2 diabetes. The addition of rosiglitazone, but not an intensive lifestyle intervention, was superior to metformin alone. (Funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and others; TODAY ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00081328.)

2012-01-01

108

Circuit Resistance Exercise Improves Glycemic Control and Adipokines in Females with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus  

PubMed Central

The aim of study was to evaluate whether circuit resistance exercise (CE) improves glycemic control and adipokine levels in comparison with walking exercise (WE) in 15 adult postmenopausal Korean females with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The participants were randomly assigned to either the CE or WE group. Subjects exercised for 1 h, three times per week for 12 weeks. The parameters measured were body composition, respiratory rate, blood glucose, insulin and adipokines. The body composition of the CE group showed a significant reduction (all p < 0.05) in body weight, body mass index (BMI), and percentage of body fat and a significant increase in muscle mass. Respiratory function was also significantly increased in the CE group. Additionally, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) changed favorably in the CE group, as were the concentrations of adipokines such as retinol binding protein 4 (RBP-4) (p < 0.05), adiponectin (p < 0.01), and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) (p < 0.01). In addition, significant correlations with CE were evident for homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and glucose (r = 0.69, p < 0.001), muscle mass and glucose (r = 0.45, p < 0.05), and muscle mass and HbA1c (r = 0.39, p < 0.05). The beneficial effects of CE include the development of muscle mass, which effectively increases glucose use and reduces the amount of insulin required. Thus, our results suggest that CE improves glycemic control and adipokines resulting from incrementally increased muscle mass and reductions of body weight, BMI and percentage of body fat for T2DM postmenopausal Korean women. Key points CE-induced weight loss and muscle mass increment increases the level of adiponectin secreted by adipocytes due to heightened glucose utilization and fat oxidation. Aerobic exercise decreases body weight, fat and adipokines in high intensity and frequency, while resistance exercise decreases these parameters in low intensity, time and frequency. CE can improves glycemic control and adipokines resulting from reduction of body fat postmenopausal Korean women with T2DM.

Kang, Sunghwun; Woo, Jin Hee; Shin, Ki Ok; Kim, Dukkuy; Lee, Hye-Jeong; Kim, Young Jun; Yeo, Nam Hwoeh

2009-01-01

109

Control of diabetic patients: Comparison of information obtained from fasting blood sugar level and the glycemic cycle  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  The authors compare the results given by fasting blood sugar and glycemic cycle using the Schlichtkrull formula method in\\u000a diabetic subjects. They conclude that when fasting blood sugar is normal or subnormal, no reliable conclusion concerning control\\u000a can be reached in every cases of treatment (insulin or sulfamido-therapy).

Luc Méjean; Pierre Drouin; Jean-Marie Martin; Gerard Debry

1974-01-01

110

Relationship between Postoperative Infectious Complications and Glycemic Control for Diabetic Patients in an Orthopedic Hospital in Kuwait  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To study the relationship between postoperative infectious complications and glycemic control for diabetic patients in an orthopedic hospital in Kuwait. Subjects and Methods: Patients who underwent surgical orthopedic procedures between 2006 and 2007 were identified to provide demographic and clinical informations including age, gender, type of surgery, length of operation, HbA1c values, nature of specimens and species of the

S. M. Lamloum; L. A. Mobasher; A. H. Karar; L. Basiony; T. H. Abdallah; A. I. Al-Saleh; N. A. Al-Shamali

2009-01-01

111

Optimal Glycemic Control, Pre-eclampsia, and Gestational Hypertension in Women With Type 1 Diabetes in the Diabetes and Pre-eclampsia Intervention Trial  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To assess the relationship between glycemic control, pre-eclampsia, and gestational hypertension in women with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Pregnancy outcome (pre-eclampsia or gestational hypertension) was assessed prospectively in 749 women from the randomized controlled Diabetes and Pre-eclampsia Intervention Trial (DAPIT). HbA1c (A1C) values were available up to 6 months before pregnancy (n = 542), at the first antenatal visit (median 9 weeks) (n = 721), at 26 weeks’ gestation (n = 592), and at 34 weeks’ gestation (n = 519) and were categorized as optimal (<6.1%: referent), good (6.1–6.9%), moderate (7.0–7.9%), and poor (?8.0%) glycemic control, respectively. RESULTS Pre-eclampsia and gestational hypertension developed in 17 and 11% of pregnancies, respectively. Women who developed pre-eclampsia had significantly higher A1C values before and during pregnancy compared with women who did not develop pre-eclampsia (P < 0.05, respectively). In early pregnancy, A1C ?8.0% was associated with a significantly increased risk of pre-eclampsia (odds ratio 3.68 [95% CI 1.17–11.6]) compared with optimal control. At 26 weeks’ gestation, A1C values ?6.1% (good: 2.09 [1.03–4.21]; moderate: 3.20 [1.47–7.00]; and poor: 3.81 [1.30–11.1]) and at 34 weeks’ gestation A1C values ?7.0% (moderate: 3.27 [1.31–8.20] and poor: 8.01 [2.04–31.5]) significantly increased the risk of pre-eclampsia compared with optimal control. The adjusted odds ratios for pre-eclampsia for each 1% decrement in A1C before pregnancy, at the first antenatal visit, at 26 weeks’ gestation, and at 34 weeks’ gestation were 0.88 (0.75–1.03), 0.75 (0.64–0.88), 0.57 (0.42–0.78), and 0.47 (0.31–0.70), respectively. Glycemic control was not significantly associated with gestational hypertension. CONCLUSIONS Women who developed pre-eclampsia had significantly higher A1C values before and during pregnancy. These data suggest that optimal glycemic control both early and throughout pregnancy may reduce the risk of pre-eclampsia in women with type 1 diabetes.

Holmes, Valerie A.; Young, Ian S.; Patterson, Christopher C.; Pearson, Donald W.M.; Walker, James D.; Maresh, Michael J.A.; McCance, David R.

2011-01-01

112

Intensive Glycemic Control Is Not Associated With Fractures or Falls in the ACCORD Randomized Trial  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE Older adults with type 2 diabetes are at high risk of fractures and falls, but the effect of glycemic control on these outcomes is unknown. To determine the effect of intensive versus standard glycemic control, we assessed fractures and falls as outcomes in the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) randomized trial. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS ACCORD participants were randomized to intensive or standard glycemia strategies, with an achieved median A1C of 6.4 and 7.5%, respectively. In the ACCORD BONE ancillary study, fractures were assessed at 54 of the 77 ACCORD clinical sites that included 7,287 of the 10,251 ACCORD participants. At annual visits, 6,782 participants were asked about falls in the previous year. RESULTS During an average follow-up of 3.8 (SD 1.3) years, 198 of 3,655 participants in the intensive glycemia and 189 of 3,632 participants in the standard glycemia group experienced at least one nonspine fracture. The average rate of first nonspine fracture was 13.9 and 13.3 per 1,000 person-years in the intensive and standard groups, respectively (hazard ratio 1.04 [95% CI 0.86–1.27]). During an average follow-up of 2.0 years, 1,122 of 3,364 intensive- and 1,133 of 3,418 standard-therapy participants reported at least one fall. The average rate of falls was 60.8 and 55.3 per 100 person-years in the intensive and standard glycemia groups, respectively (1.10 [0.84–1.43]). CONCLUSIONS Compared with standard glycemia, intensive glycemia did not increase or decrease fracture or fall risk in ACCORD.

Schwartz, Ann V.; Margolis, Karen L.; Sellmeyer, Deborah E.; Vittinghoff, Eric; Ambrosius, Walter T.; Bonds, Denise E.; Josse, Robert G.; Schnall, Adrian M.; Simmons, Debra L.; Hue, Trisha F.; Palermo, Lisa; Hamilton, Bruce P.; Green, Jennifer B.; Atkinson, Hal H.; O'Connor, Patrick J.; Force, Rex W.; Bauer, Douglas C.

2012-01-01

113

Exenatide once weekly: sustained improvement in glycemic control and cardiometabolic measures through 3 years  

PubMed Central

Background Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a progressive metabolic disease necessitating therapies with sustained efficacy and safety over time. Exenatide once weekly (ExQW), an extended-release formulation of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist exenatide, has demonstrated improvements in glycemic and cardiometabolic measures from 30 weeks to 2 years of treatment. Here, the efficacy and safety of treatment with ExQW for 3 years are described. Methods Patients were initially randomized to receive either ExQW (2 mg) or exenatide twice daily for 30 weeks. Following the initial 30 weeks, all patients were treated with ExQW in an open-label extension. Analyses of primary glycemic endpoints, beta-cell function, and cardiometabolic measures were assessed for patients who completed 3 years of ExQW treatment and for the intention-to-treat population. Safety and tolerability analyses were provided for the intention-to-treat population. Results Sixty-six percent of the intention-to-treat population (n = 295) completed 3 years of treatment (n = 194). At 3 years, a significant reduction in hemoglobin A1c (least squares mean ± standard error) of ?1.6% ± 0.08% was observed, with 55% and 33% of patients achieving hemoglobin A1c targets of <7% and ?6.5%, respectively. Consistent with a sustained reduction in hemoglobin A1c, improvements in beta-cell function were also observed. Body weight was significantly reduced by ?2.3 ± 0.6 kg. Reductions in blood pressure, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides were also observed. Adverse events reported most frequently during both controlled and uncontrolled periods included diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting of mostly mild intensity. The incidence of these adverse events decreased over time. Incidence of minor hypoglycemia was low and no major hypoglycemia was observed. Conclusion ExQW produced clinically meaningful improvements in glycemic control that were durable through 3 years of treatment. Significant improvements in cardiometabolic measurements were also observed. ExQW was well-tolerated during long-term treatment and no new adverse events were noted. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00308139.

MacConell, Leigh; Pencek, Richard; Li, Yan; Maggs, David; Porter, Lisa

2013-01-01

114

Glycemic control and surgery-optimizing outcomes for the patient with diabetes.  

PubMed

Diabetes mellitus (DM) has reached epidemic proportions globally, and its incidence continues to rise. Considering the increasing number of patients diagnosed with diabetes and the associated complications, such as cardiovascular and renal disease, the complexity of care for this population can be very challenging. In addition, specific postoperative complications, such as delayed wound healing, infections, and cardiac dysrhythmias, are more likely to occur in the presence of perioperative hyperglycemia. Recognition of the presence of diabetes and implementation of a diabetic management protocol will optimize patient outcomes by providing guidelines for avoiding such complications. Although comparative studies of the current published protocols are limited, there is agreement that health care facilities must have a protocol in place that considers the individual's health history, planned surgery, and glycemic control to guide management of diabetes. PMID:19962105

Ead, Heather

2009-12-01

115

Association of Pretransplant Glycemic Control With Posttransplant Outcomes in Diabetic Kidney Transplant Recipients  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE Observational studies have yielded inconsistent findings regarding the association of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) with survival in diabetic patients on dialysis. The association between pretransplant glycemic control and short- and long-term posttransplant outcomes in kidney transplant recipients is not clear. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Linking the 5-year patient data of a large dialysis organization (DaVita) to the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients, we identified 2,872 diabetic dialysis patients who underwent first kidney transplantation. Mortality or graft failure and delayed graft function (DGF) risks were estimated by Cox regression (hazard ratio [HR]) and logistic regression (odds ratio), respectively. RESULTS Patients were 53 ± 11 years old and included 36% women and 24% African Americans. In our fully adjusted model, allograft failure–censored, all-cause death HR and 95% CI for time-averaged pretransplant HbA1c categories of 7 to <8%, 8 to <9%, 9 to 10%, and ?10%, compared with 6 to <7% (reference), were 0.89 (0.59–1.36), 2.06 (1.31–3.24), 1.41 (0.73–2.74), and 3.43 (1.56–7.56), respectively; and graft failure–censored cardiovascular death HR was 0.38 (0.13–1.05), 1.78 (0.69–4.55), 1.59 (0.44–5.76), and 4.28 (0.85–21.64), respectively. We did not find any difference in risk of death-censored graft failure or DGF with different pretransplant HbA1c levels. CONCLUSIONS Poor pretransplant glycemic control appears associated with decreased posttransplant survival in kidney transplant recipients, whereas allograft outcomes may not be affected.

Molnar, Miklos Z.; Huang, Edmund; Hoshino, Junichi; Krishnan, Mahesh; Nissenson, Allen R.; Kovesdy, Csaba P.; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

2011-01-01

116

Glycemic control among patients in China with type 2 diabetes mellitus receiving oral drugs or injectables  

PubMed Central

Background The prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is increasing rapidly among Chinese adults, and limited data are available on T2DM management and the status of glycemic control in China. We assessed the efficacy of oral antidiabetes drugs (OADs), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists, and insulin for treatment of T2DM across multiple regions in China. Methods This was a multicenter, cross-sectional survey of outpatients conducted in 606 hospitals across China. Data from all the patients were collected between April and June, 2011. Results A total of 238,639 patients were included in the survey. Eligible patients were treated with either OADs alone (n=157,212 [65.88%]), OADs plus insulin (n=80,973 [33.93%]), or OADs plus GLP-1 receptor agonists (n=454 [0.19%]). The OAD monotherapy, OAD + insulin, and OAD + GLP-1 receptor agonist groups had mean glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels (±SD) of 7.67% (±1.58%), 8.21% (±1.91%), and 7.80% (±1.76%), respectively. Among those three groups, 34.63%, 26.21%, and 36.12% met the goal of HbA1c <7.0%, respectively. Mean HbA1c and achievement of A1c <7.0% was related to the duration of T2DM. Conclusions Less than one third of the patients had achieved the goal of HbA1c <7.0%. Glycemic control decreased and insulin use increased with the duration of diabetes.

2013-01-01

117

Prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and relation to glycemic control therapies at baseline in the BARI 2D cohort  

PubMed Central

We evaluated the associations between glycemic therapies and prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) at baseline among participants in the Bypass-Angioplasty-Revascularization-Investigation-2-Diabetes (BARI 2D) trial on medical and revascularization therapies for coronary artery disease (CAD) and on insulin-sensitizing versus insulin-providing treatments for diabetes. 2368 patients with type 2 diabetes and CAD were evaluated. DPN was defined as clinical examination score >2 using the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument (MNSI). DPN odds ratios across different groups of glycemic therapy were evaluated by multiple logistic regression, adjusted for multiple covariates including age, sex, HbA1c, diabetes duration. 51% BARI 2D subjects with valid baseline characteristics and MNSI scores had DPN. After adjusting for all variables, use of insulin was significantly associated with DPN (OR1.57, 1.15, 2.13). Patients on sulfonylurea or combination of sulfonylurea/metformin/TZD had marginally higher rates of DPN than the metformin/TZD group. This cross-sectional study in a cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes and CAD showed association of insulin use with higher DPN prevalence, independent of disease duration, glycemic control and other characteristics. The causality between a glycemic control strategy and DPN cannot be evaluated in this cross-sectional study, but continued assessment of DPN and randomized therapies in BARI 2D trial may provide further explanations on the development of DPN.

Pop-Busui, Rodica; Lu, Jiang; Lopes, Neuza; Jones, Teresa L. Z.

2009-01-01

118

Variables associated with weight loss and improvements in glycemic control in type II diabetic patients in behavioral weight control programs.  

PubMed

Because weight loss is difficult to achieve, it would be helpful to determine whether there are subgroups of obese type II diabetic patients who benefit most from participation in a behavioral weight loss program. We studied 178 obese patients with type II diabetes, who participated in a 12-20 week behavioral weight loss program and were followed for 1 year after the program to determine whether age, gender, percent overweight, medication, duration of diabetes or fasting glucose were related to weight loss and/or to the magnitude of improvement in glycemic control experienced with weight loss. Gender was the only variable related to weight loss; males lost more weight and had greater decreases in percent overweight than females. The variable most strongly related to improvement in glycemic control was pretreatment fasting glucose level; patients with higher initial glucose levels experienced the greatest improvements in control. There was no evidence to support the belief that patients on insulin have poorer weight losses or that patients with long-duration diabetes benefit less from weight reduction than those with recent-onset diabetes. PMID:2401586

Wing, R R; Shoemaker, M; Marcus, M D; McDermott, M; Gooding, W

1990-06-01

119

Glycemic Effects of Once-a-Day Rapid-Acting Insulin Analogue Addition on a Basal Insulin Analogue in Korean Subjects with Poorly Controlled Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus  

PubMed Central

Background The present study investigates the efficacy in glycemic control by adding once-a-day glulisine to glargine as a basal plus regimen and factors influencing glycemic control with the basal plus regimen in Korean subjects with type 2 diabetes. Methods In the present retrospective study, subjects previously treated with the basal plus regimens for at least 6 months were reviewed. Changes in glycemic profiles and clinical parameters were evaluated. Results A total of 87 subjects were ultimately enrolled in this study. At baseline, mean glycated hemoglobin (A1c) and glycated albumin were 8.5% (8.0% to 9.6%) and 25.2±7.6%, respectively. After treatment with the basal plus regimen, patients had significant reductions of A1c at 6 months (0.8±0.1%, P<0.001) and their postprandial glucose levels were decreased by 48.7±10.3 mg/dL (P<0.001). Multiple logistic regression showed old age (odds ratio [OR], 1.25; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02 to 1.55), high initial A1c (OR, 22.21; 95% CI, 2.44 to 201.78), and lower amounts of glargine (OR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.76 to 0.99), and glimepiride (OR, 0.23; 95% CI, 0.06 to 0.93) at baseline were independently associated with good responders whose A1c reduction was more than 0.5%. Conclusion The authors suggest a basal plus regimen may be effective in reducing glucose levels of subjects with old age, high initial A1c, and patients on low doses of glimepiride and glargine. Despite the use of high doses of hypoglycemic agents, elderly patients with poorly-controlled diabetes are preferred for early initiation of the basal plus regimen.

Choe, Eun Yeong; Lee, Yong-ho; Kang, Eun-Seok; Cha, Bong Soo; Lee, Hyun Chul

2012-01-01

120

Long-term effects of 2 energy-restricted diets differing in glycemic load on dietary adherence, body composition, and metabolism in CALERIE: a 1-y randomized controlled trial1-3  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background:Thereremainsnoconsensusabouttheoptimaldietary composition for sustained weight loss. Objective: The objective was to examine the effects of 2 dietary macronutrient patterns with different glycemic loads on adherence to a prescribed regimen of calorie restriction (CR), weight and fat loss, and related variables. Design: A randomized controlled trial (RCT) of diets with a high glycemic load (HG) or a low glycemic load (LG)

Sai Krupa Das; Cheryl H Gilhooly; Julie K Golden; Anastassios G Pittas; Paul J Fuss; Rachel A Cheatham; Stephanie Tyler; Michelle Tsay; Megan A McCrory; Alice H Lichtenstein; Gerard E Dallal; Chhanda Dutta; Manjushri V Bhapkar; James P DeLany; Edward Saltzman; Susan B Roberts

121

Role of community pharmacists in improving knowledge and glycemic control of type 2 diabetes  

PubMed Central

Objective: To study the role of the community pharmacists in improving knowledge and glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes residing in villages of Coimbatore district, Tamil Nadu. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients were interviewed, of whom 39 subjects were included in the study. The literate and chronic diabetic patients were included in the study and illiterate, children below 12 years of age, pregnant women, nursing mothers and subjects with any other chronic disorders were excluded from the study. The subjects were interviewed and divided randomly into two groups. There were 20 subjects in the control group and 19 in the intervention group. The study protocol was explained to all the participants, and written informed consent was obtained from them. Before the initiation of the study, the subjects were interviewedfor 20–40 min to educate them about diabetes. Subjects in the intervention group received continuous counselling and medical advice to improve their awareness about the disease and drugs. During the study period, the Diabetes Care Profile (a questionnaire developed by J.J. Fitzgerald of the Michigan Diabetes Research and Training Center, University of Michigan Medical School, Michigan) was performed to each subject. The interval between visits was 2 months. All the values are expressed in mean ± standard deviation. Results: The intervention group showed better progress in the recovery of diabetics because of the continuous counselling and monitoring. There were significant changes in Diabetes Care Profile subscale scores in both the control and the intervention groups at the end of the study, viz. 1.8 ± 4.52 to 2.75 ± 6.62 and 3.10 ± 3.23 to 1.53 ± 2.66. Similarly, the knowledge test score was found to be increased in the intervention group compared with the baseline values (8.53 ± 1.81 to 12.16 ± 1.34). Conclusions: At the end of the study period, the patients of the intervention group had very good glycemic control. Their health status and understanding of diabetes and its management were better, and they had fewer problems such as episodes of hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia.

Venkatesan, R.; Devi, A. S. Manjula; Parasuraman, S.; Sriram, S.

2012-01-01

122

Effect of rimonabant on glycemic control in insulin-treated type 2 diabetes: the ARPEGGIO trial.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVE To examine the efficacy and safety of rimonabant, a selective cannabinoid receptor type-1 antagonist, in patients with type 2 diabetes receiving insulin monotherapy. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Patients (n = 368; A1C > or =7%) were randomized to 20 mg/day rimonabant or placebo in this 48-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled multicenter trial. Change in baseline A1C to week 48 (primary outcome) and changes in body weight, waist circumference, and lipid levels (secondary outcomes) were assessed. RESULTS Rimonabant significantly reduced baseline A1C versus placebo (-0.89 vs. -0.24%; P < 0.0001), and significantly greater improvements were observed in cardiometabolic risk factors. More rimonabant patients achieved >10% reduction in mean total daily insulin dose versus placebo (P = 0.0012), and fewer required rescue medication (P < 0.0001). Hypoglycemia, nausea, dizziness, anxiety, and depression were more frequent with rimonabant. CONCLUSIONS Rimonabant improved glycemic control and cardiometabolic risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes receiving insulin. PMID:20009090

Hollander, Priscilla A; Amod, Aslam; Litwak, León E; Chaudhari, Umesh

2009-12-15

123

Evaluation of the effects of exenatide administration in patients with type 2 diabetes with worsened glycemic control caused by glucocorticoid therapy.  

PubMed

Glucocorticoid-induced hyperglycemia is common in patients with or without known diabetes mellitus. Exenatide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, improves glycemic control without causing weight gain or hypoglycemia and is currently widely used in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. We herein report four cases of patients with type 2 diabetes with worsened glycemic control due to glucocorticoids who were successfully treated with exenatide administration. PMID:23291680

Matsuo, Koji; Nambu, Takuo; Matsuda, Yuki; Kanai, Yugo; Yonemitsu, Shin; Muro, Seiji; Oki, Shogo

2013-01-01

124

Effect of Diets Differing in Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load on Cardiovascular Risk Factors: Review of Randomized Controlled-Feeding Trials  

PubMed Central

Despite a considerable amount of data available on the relationship between dietary glycemic index (GI) or load (GL) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, in aggregate, the area remains unsettled. The aim of the present review was to summarize the effect of diets differing in GI/GL on CVD risk factors, by examining randomized controlled-feeding trials that provided all food and beverages to adult participants. The studies included a low and high GI/GL diet phase for a minimum of four weeks duration, and reported at least one outcome related to CVD risk; glucose homeostasis, lipid profile or inflammatory status. Ten publications representing five trials were identified. The low GI/GL compared to the high GI/GL diet unexpectedly resulted in significantly higher fasting glucose concentrations in two of the trials, and a lower area under the curve for glucose and insulin in one of the two studies during an oral glucose tolerance test. Response of plasma total, low density lipoprotein and high density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations was conflicting in two of the studies for which data were available. There was either weak or no effect on inflammatory markers. The results of the five randomized controlled trials satisfying the inclusion criteria suggest inconsistent effects of the GI/GL value of the diet on CVD risk factors.

Kristo, Aleksandra S.; Matthan, Nirupa R.; Lichtenstein, Alice H.

2013-01-01

125

Effect of diets differing in glycemic index and glycemic load on cardiovascular risk factors: review of randomized controlled-feeding trials.  

PubMed

Despite a considerable amount of data available on the relationship between dietary glycemic index (GI) or load (GL) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, in aggregate, the area remains unsettled. The aim of the present review was to summarize the effect of diets differing in GI/GL on CVD risk factors, by examining randomized controlled-feeding trials that provided all food and beverages to adult participants. The studies included a low and high GI/GL diet phase for a minimum of four weeks duration, and reported at least one outcome related to CVD risk; glucose homeostasis, lipid profile or inflammatory status. Ten publications representing five trials were identified. The low GI/GL compared to the high GI/GL diet unexpectedly resulted in significantly higher fasting glucose concentrations in two of the trials, and a lower area under the curve for glucose and insulin in one of the two studies during an oral glucose tolerance test. Response of plasma total, low density lipoprotein and high density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations was conflicting in two of the studies for which data were available. There was either weak or no effect on inflammatory markers. The results of the five randomized controlled trials satisfying the inclusion criteria suggest inconsistent effects of the GI/GL value of the diet on CVD risk factors. PMID:23538939

Kristo, Aleksandra S; Matthan, Nirupa R; Lichtenstein, Alice H

2013-03-28

126

Impact of ambulatory, family-focused teamwork intervention on glycemic control in youth with type 1 diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective To evaluate an ambulatory, family-focused intervention aimed at optimizing glycemic control, minimizing diabetes-related family conflict (DFC), and maintaining quality of life in youth with type 1 diabetes (T1DM). Study design We randomly assigned 105 children and adolescents, 8 to 17 years of age, with T1DM for ?6 years, to a family-focused teamwork (TW) intervention or to standard multidisciplinary diabetes

Lori M. B. Laffel; Laura Vangsness; Alexa Connell; Ann Goebel-Fabbri; Deborah Butler; Barbara J. Anderson

2003-01-01

127

Factors Associated with Glycemic Control in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Rural Areas of the United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: According to the US Department of Health and Human Services, an estimated 18.2 million Americans, or 6.3% of the population, has diabetes mellitus (DM). Approximately 90% of these individuals have type 2 DM. The most widely used clinical test for defining glycemic control is measurement of blood glycosylated hemoglobin (AIC).Objective: The goal of this study was to estimate the

Yue-Fang Chang

2007-01-01

128

Differences in glycemic control and cardiovascular risk in primary care patients with type 2 diabetes in West Indies  

Microsoft Academic Search

There are limited resources and facilities at primary care clinics in most developing countries. Medical professionals are\\u000a often faced with the challenges of providing standard health care delivery in the absence of adequate resources. We aimed\\u000a to evaluate the long-term glycemic control and risk of cardiovascular disease in multi-ethnic groups of diabetic patients\\u000a attending primary care clinics in Trinidad. One

C. E. EzenwakaN; N. V. Offiah

2001-01-01

129

The role of knowledge, attitude, and self-efficacy in predicting glycemic control among persons with diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study employed a cross-sectional design (n = 147) to further investigate the roles that diabetes-related knowledge; patient satisfaction; and diabetes self-efficacy play in glycemic control among adult persons with diabetes. The independent variables included: diabetes-related knowledge, satisfaction and self-efficacy. These variables were measured using a paper and pencil instrument developed for the study during the patient's initial visit to

Todd Christopher Sauer

2001-01-01

130

Computer decision support software safely improves glycemic control in the burn intensive care unit: a randomized controlled clinical study  

PubMed Central

Objective The optimal method for glycemic control in the critically burned patient is unknown. The purpose of this randomized controlled study was to determine the safety and efficacy of computer decision support software (CDSS) to control serum glucose concentration in a burn intensive care unit. Methods Eighteen adult burn/trauma patients receiving continuous insulin infusion were initially randomized to receive glucose management via a traditional paper-based protocol (PP) or a computer protocol (CP) for 72 hours, then crossed over to the alternate method for an additional 72 hours. Results Time in target glucose range (80-110 mg/dl) was higher in the CP group (47 ± 17% versus 41 ± 16.6%; p ? 0.05); time over target range was not significantly reduced in the CP group (49 ± 17.8% versus 54 ± 17.1; p = 0.08); and no difference was noted in time under target range of 80 mg/dl (CP 4.5 ± 2.8, PP 4.8 ± 3.3%; p = 0.8), under 60 mg/dl (p = 0.7), and under 40 mg/dl (p = 1.0). Severe hypoglycemic events (< 40 mg/dl) did not differ from the CP group compared to historical controls for patients receiving no insulin (p = 0.6). More glucose measurements were performed in the CP group (p = 0.0003), and nursing staff compliance with CP recommendations was greater (p < 0.0001). Conclusions Glycemic control using CDSS is safe and effective for the critically burned patient. Time in target range improved without increase in hypoglycemic events. CDSS enhanced consistency in practice, providing standardization among nursing staff.

Mann, Elizabeth A.; Jones, John A.; Wolf, Steven E.; Wade, Charles E.

2011-01-01

131

Influences of The Great Hanshin-Awaji Earthquake on glycemic control in diabetic patients.  

PubMed

We investigated influences on glycemic control in 177 diabetic patients after The Great Hanshin-Awaji Earthquake which occurred on January 17, 1995. Changes in serum HbA(1c) level were studied according to the worsen rate of dietary and living conditions. A significant temporary increase in the mean value of HbA(1c) level was found after the earthquake (8.34 +/- 2.07% in March, 1995 vs. 7.74 +/- 1.82% in December, 1994, P < 0.01). Ninety nine of them showed more than 0.5% in the rate of increase. Multiple regression analysis was applied to the following factors: inappropriate diet, discontinuation of drug uptake, reduction of exercise, destruction of house, long stay at shelter, sex, age, and pre-earthquake therapy. Among them, inappropriate diet demonstrated the highest partial regression coefficient to raise the mean value of the HbA(1c) level. The increased level of HbA(1c) declined gradually to the pre-earthquake level in September, 1995. This study emphasizes the importance of appropriate diet for diabetic patients during a natural disaster. To fulfil it, medical staff have to educate diabetic patients of their disorders tediously in ordinary time. In addition, it seems quite useful to supply a medical information card and a small medical bag containing essential drugs to each patient. PMID:9237786

Kirizuka, K; Nishizaki, H; Kohriyama, K; Nukata, O; Arioka, Y; Motobuchi, M; Yoshiki, K; Tatezumi, K; Kondo, T; Tsuboi, S

1997-06-01

132

Psychosocial and quality of life correlates of glycemic control during intensive treatment of type 1 diabetes.  

PubMed

To identify emotional and attitudinal barriers to improved glycemic control (HbA1c) during intensive diabetes treatment, 55 patients attending a 4-5 month intensive diabetes medical/education clinic were followed. Subjects completed a battery of psychological surveys, had HbA1c and body mass index measured, and rated their attitude toward weight gain and the extent of problems with specific self-management behaviors before and after the medical intervention. Although HbA1c improved on average, 29% had only modest improvement and 16% showed no improvement. The number of diabetes-related annoyances, worry about hypoglycemia, and diabetes-related emotional distress diminished. Only the satisfaction subscale of the Diabetes Quality of Life survey, diabetes-related emotional distress, and problems with self-management behaviors correlated with HbA1c. Treatment-related frustration and emotional distress may initially act as motivators to improve glycemia but can later become barriers to that goal. Interventions designed to help patients overcome attitudinal barriers should be incorporated into medical programs geared toward improving glycemia. PMID:11118778

Weinger, K; Jacobson, A M

2001-02-01

133

Beyond glycemic control in diabetes mellitus: effects of incretin-based therapies on bone metabolism.  

PubMed

Diabetes mellitus (DM) and osteoporosis (OP) are common disorders with a significant health burden, and an increase in fracture risk has been described both in type 1 (T1DM) and in type 2 (T2DM) diabetes. The pathogenic mechanisms of impaired skeletal strength in diabetes remain to be clarified in details and they are only in part reflected by a variation in bone mineral density. In T2DM, the occurrence of low bone turnover together with a decreased osteoblast activity and compromised bone quality has been shown. Of note, some antidiabetic drugs (e.g., thiazolidinediones, insulin) may deeply affect bone metabolism. In addition, the recently introduced class of incretin-based drugs (i.e., GLP-1 receptor agonists and DPP-4 inhibitors) is expected to exert potentially beneficial effects on bone health, possibly due to a bone anabolic activity of GLP-1, that can be either direct or indirect through the involvement of thyroid C cells. Here we will review the established as well as the putative effects of incretin hormones and of incretin-based drugs on bone metabolism, both in preclinical models and in man, taking into account that such therapeutic strategy may be effective not only to achieve a good glycemic control, but also to improve bone health in diabetic patients. PMID:23785355

Ceccarelli, Elena; Guarino, Elisa G; Merlotti, Daniela; Patti, Aurora; Gennari, Luigi; Nuti, Ranuccio; Dotta, Francesco

2013-06-18

134

Type 1 diabetes and celiac disease in adults: glycemic control and diabetic complications.  

PubMed

The prevalence of celiac disease (CD) in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is 4.5 %. Objective of the study is to investigate (1) the course of glycemic control at CD diagnosis and after the initiation of a gluten-free diet (GFD) in T1DM patients; (2) the prevalence of diabetic complications in T1DM patients with adult onset of CD. In 20 hospitals in the Netherlands, we identified T1DM patients diagnosed with CD at adult age. We retrospectively collected glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels before CD diagnosis, at CD diagnosis, and the most recent HbA1c levels as well as the presence of nephropathy and retinopathy. The control group consisted of patients with T1DM and negative CD serology matched for age, gender, T1DM duration, and HbA1c levels. Thirty-one patients were eligible with a median duration of T1DM and CD of 27 years (IQR 14-37) and 3 years (IQR 1-8), respectively. The matched control group consisted of 46 patients. HbA1c levels at the moment of CD diagnosis were 7.5 % (IQR 7.1-8) [58 mmol/mol] and at the most recent visit 7.4 % (IQR 6.9-7.9, P = 0.15) [57 mmol/mol] indicating no difference. Prevalence of retinopathy was lower in T1DM + CD group compared with controls, (38.7 vs 67.4 %, P < 0.05), whereas no difference in the prevalence of nephropathy was found between the groups (P = 0.09). In conclusion, T1DM + CD patients have less retinopathy compared to T1DM patients without CD. A GFD possibly favorable affects the development of vascular complications in T1DM patients. PMID:22539236

Bakker, Sjoerd F; Tushuizen, Maarten E; von Blomberg, Mary E; Mulder, Chris J; Simsek, Suat

2012-04-27

135

Impact of plasmatic lipids in glycemic control and its influence in the cardiometabolic risk in morbidly obese subjects Impacto dos lipídios plasmáticos no controle glicêmico e sua influência no risco cardiometabólico em pacientes obesos mórbidos  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To evaluate whether biochemical parameters are associated with a good glycemic control and to identify the occurrence of cardiometabolic risk variables. Material and methods: One hundred forty Brazilians were evaluated. The subjects were characterized with regard to glycemic control as good, fair and poor and were divided into tertiles by TG and HbA 1c . We use the ROC

Ary Serpa Neto; Felipe Martin; Bianco Rossi; Rodrigo Dal; Moro Amarante; Nara Alves Buriti; Marçal Rossi

2009-01-01

136

Prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and relation to glycemic control therapies at baseline in the BARI 2D cohort.  

PubMed

We evaluated the associations between glycemic therapies and prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) at baseline among participants in the Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation 2 Diabetes (BARI 2D) trial on medical and revascularization therapies for coronary artery disease (CAD) and on insulin-sensitizing vs. insulin-providing treatments for diabetes. A total of 2,368 patients with type 2 diabetes and CAD was evaluated. DPN was defined as clinical examination score >2 using the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument (MNSI). DPN odds ratios across different groups of glycemic therapy were evaluated by multiple logistic regression adjusted for multiple covariates including age, sex, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), and diabetes duration. Fifty-one percent of BARI 2D subjects with valid baseline characteristics and MNSI scores had DPN. After adjusting for all variables, use of insulin was significantly associated with DPN (OR = 1.57, 95% CI: 1.15-2.13). Patients on sulfonylurea (SU) or combination of SU/metformin (Met)/thiazolidinediones (TZD) had marginally higher rates of DPN than the Met/TZD group. This cross-sectional study in a cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes and CAD showed association of insulin use with higher DPN prevalence, independent of disease duration, glycemic control, and other characteristics. The causality between a glycemic control strategy and DPN cannot be evaluated in this cross-sectional study, but continued assessment of DPN and randomized therapies in BARI 2D trial may provide further explanations on the development of DPN. PMID:19335534

Pop-Busui, Rodica; Lu, Jiang; Lopes, Neuza; Jones, Teresa L Z

2009-03-01

137

Effect of the carbohydrate counting method on glycemic control in patients with type 1 diabetes  

PubMed Central

Background The importance of achieving and maintaining an appropriate metabolic control in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1) has been established in many studies aiming to prevent the development of chronic complications. The carbohydrate counting method can be recommended as an additional tool in the nutritional treatment of diabetes, allowing patients with DM1 to have more flexible food choices. This study aimed to evaluate the influence of nutrition intervention and the use of multiple short-acting insulin according to the carbohydrate counting method on clinical and metabolic control in patients with DM1. Methods Our sample consisted of 51 patients with DM1, 32 females, aged 25.3 ± 1.55 years. A protocol of nutritional status evaluation was applied and laboratory analysis was performed at baseline and after a three-month intervention. After the analysis of the food records, a balanced diet was prescribed using the carbohydrate counting method, and short-acting insulin was prescribed based on the total amount of carbohydrate per meal (1 unit per 15 g of carbohydrate). Results A significant decrease in A1c levels was observed from baseline to the three-month evaluation after the intervention (10.40 ± 0.33% and 9.52 ± 0.32%, respectively, p = 0.000). It was observed an increase in daily insulin dose after the intervention (0.99 ± 0.65 IU/Kg and 1.05 ± 0.05 IU/Kg, respectively, p = 0.003). No significant differences were found regarding anthropometric evaluation (BMI, waist, hip or abdominal circumferences and waist to hip ratio) after the intervention period. Conclusions The use of short-acting insulin based on the carbohydrate counting method after a short period of time resulted in a significant improvement of the glycemic control in patients with DM1 with no changes in body weight despite increases in the total daily insulin doses.

2010-01-01

138

Plasma Lipopolysaccharide Is Closely Associated With Glycemic Control and Abdominal Obesity: Evidence from bariatric surgery.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVE It is of vital importance to elucidate the triggering factors of obesity and type 2 diabetes to improve patient care. Bariatric surgery has been shown to prevent and even cure diabetes, but the mechanism is unknown. Elevated levels of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) predict incident diabetes, but the sources of LPS are not clarified. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the potential impact of plasma LPS on abdominal obesity and glycemic control in subjects undergoing bariatric surgery. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This was a prospective observational study involving a consecutive sample of 49 obese subjects undergoing bariatric surgery and 17 controls. Main assessments were plasma LPS, HbA1c, adipose tissue volumes (computed tomography), and quantified bacterial DNA in adipose tissue compartments. RESULTS Plasma levels of LPS were elevated in obese individuals compared with controls (P < 0.001) and were reduced after bariatric surgery (P = 0.010). LPS levels were closely correlated with HbA1c (r = 0.56; P = 0.001) and intra-abdominal fat volumes (r = 0.61; P < 0.001), but only moderately correlated with subcutaneous fat volumes (r = 0.33; P = 0.038). Moreover, there was a decreasing gradient (twofold) in bacterial DNA levels going from mesenteric via omental to subcutaneous adipose tissue compartments (P = 0.041). Finally, reduced LPS levels after bariatric surgery were directly correlated with a reduction in HbA1c (r = 0.85; P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS Our findings support a hypothesis of translocated gut bacteria as a potential trigger of obesity and diabetes, and suggest that the antidiabetic effects of bariatric surgery might be mechanistically linked to, and even the result of, a reduction in plasma levels of LPS. PMID:23835694

Trøseid, Marius; Nestvold, Torunn K; Rudi, Knut; Thoresen, Hanne; Nielsen, Erik W; Lappegård, Knut T

2013-07-08

139

A proprietary alpha-amylase inhibitor from white bean (Phaseolus vulgaris): A review of clinical studies on weight loss and glycemic control  

Microsoft Academic Search

Obesity, and resultant health hazards which include diabetes, cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome, are worldwide\\u000a medical problems. Control of diet and exercise are cornerstones of the management of excess weight. Foods with a low glycemic\\u000a index may reduce the risk of diabetes and heart disease as well as their complications. As an alternative to a low glycemic\\u000a index diet, there

Marilyn L Barrett; Jay K Udani

2011-01-01

140

EFFECT OF CAMEL MILK ON GLYCEMIC CONTROL, RISK FACTORS AND DIABETES QUALITY OF LIFE IN TYPE1 DIABETES: A RANDOMISED PROSPECTIVE CONTROLLED STUDY  

Microsoft Academic Search

The efficacy of camel milk on glycemic control risk factors and diabetes quality of life in patients of type 1 diabetes was evaluated. Twenty four randomly selected patients with type 1 diabetes were enrolled in the study. These patients were devided into two groups. Group 1 (N=12) received usual care (diet, exercise and insulin) and group 2 (N=12) received 500

P. P. Agrawal; S. C. Swami; R. Beniwal; D. K. Kochar; M. S. Sahani; F. C. Tuteja; S. K. Ghouri

141

A randomized controlled trial of strict glycemic control and tertiary level obstetric care versus routine obstetric care in the management of gestational diabetes: A pilot study  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to determine whether strict maternal glycemic control for the treatment of gestational diabetes lessened the risk of fetal macrosomia, birth trauma, neonatal hypoglycemia, and operative delivery. The aim of the pilot study was to prepare for a multicenter trial by assessing patient acceptance of the study, by determining realistic accrual rates, and by

Peter Garner; Nan Okun; Erin Keely; George Wells; Sherry Perkins; Jacques Sylvain; Judy Belcher

1997-01-01

142

Vagal blocking improves glycemic control and elevated blood pressure in obese subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus.  

PubMed

Background. An active device that downregulates abdominal vagal signalling has resulted in significant weight loss in feasibility studies. Objective. To prospectively evaluate the effect of intermittent vagal blocking (VBLOC) on weight loss, glycemic control, and blood pressure (BP) in obese subjects with DM2. Methods. Twenty-eight subjects were implanted with a VBLOC device (Maestro Rechargeable System) at 5 centers in an open-label study. Effects on weight loss, HbA1c, fasting blood glucose, and BP were evaluated at 1 week to 12 months. Results. 26 subjects (17 females/9 males, 51 ± 2 years, BMI 37 ± 1?kg/m(2), mean?±?SEM) completed 12 months followup. One serious adverse event (pain at implant site) was easily resolved. At 1 week and 12 months, mean excess weight loss percentages (% EWL) were 9 ± 1% and 25 ± 4% (P < 0.0001), and HbA1c declined by 0.3 ± 0.1% and 1.0 ± 0.2% (P = 0.02, baseline 7.8 ± 0.2%). In DM2 subjects with elevated BP (n = 15), mean arterial pressure reduced by 7 ± 3?mmHg and 8 ± 3?mmHg (P = 0.04, baseline 100 ± 2?mmHg) at 1 week and 12 months. All subjects MAP decreased by 3 ± 2?mmHg (baseline 95 ± 2?mmHg) at 12 months. Conclusions. VBLOC was safe in obese DM2 subjects and associated with meaningful weight loss, early and sustained improvements in HbA1c, and reductions in BP in hypertensive DM2 subjects. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00555958. PMID:23984050

Shikora, S; Toouli, J; Herrera, M F; Kulseng, B; Zulewski, H; Brancatisano, R; Kow, L; Pantoja, J P; Johnsen, G; Brancatisano, A; Tweden, K S; Knudson, M B; Billington, C J

2013-07-30

143

Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care, Glycemic Control and the Utilization of Community Health Care among the Patients with Type 2 Diabetes in Shanghai, China  

PubMed Central

Objectives To evaluate the relationship between Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care in community health centers and self-management behaviors and glycemic control and to examine the relationship between Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care in community health centers and the utilization of community health centers for monitoring and treating diabetes among the patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods A questionnaire including self-management behaviors, glycemic control, Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care in community health centers and the most often utilized medical institutions for monitoring and treating diabetes (community health centers vs. hospitals) was administered to 960 patients with type 2 diabetes in Shanghai, China. The relationships between Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care and self-management behaviors, self-management behaviors and glycemic control, Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care and glycemic control, Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care and the most often utilized medical institutions for monitoring and treating diabetes were examined. Results Wilcoxon rank sum tests showed that the high scores of total Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care and five subscales in community health centers were positively related to almost all the proper self-management behaviors and good glycemic control (p<0.05). Almost all of the proper self-management behaviors were positively related to good glycemic control (p<0.01). High summary score of the Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care was positively associated with the utilization of community health centers for monitoring and treating diabetes (p<0.001). Conclusions Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (implementation of the Chronic Care Model) in community health centers was associated with patients' self-management behaviors and glycemic control, and finally was associated with the utilization of community health centers for monitoring and treating diabetes.

Liu, Li-Juan; Li, Yun; Sha, Kun; Wang, Yue; He, Xiang

2013-01-01

144

Benefits of Low Glycemic and High Satiety Index Foods for Obesity and Diabetes Control and Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a • \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Cardiovascular disease risk may be reduced by consuming a low glycemic index diet.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a • \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Studies have shown clients can successfully incorporate the glycemic index in their dietary ­routine with positive outcomes.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a • \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Weight loss may be another benefit found with choosing low glycemic index foods.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a • \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Diets with high glycemic impact have been postulated to increase risk of obesity,

Pankaj Modi

145

Effects of diets differing in glycemic index and glycemic load on cardiovascular risk factors: review of randomized controlled-feeing trials  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Despite a considerable amount of data available on the relationship between dietary glycemic index (GI) or load (GL) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, in aggregate, the area remains unsettled. The aim of the present review was to summarize the effect of diets differing in GI/GL on CVD r...

146

The role of health behaviors in mediating the relationship between depressive symptoms and glycemic control in type 2 diabetes: a structural equation modeling approach  

PubMed Central

Objectives We investigated the longitudinal association between depressive symptoms and glycemic control (HbA1c) in adults with type 2 diabetes, and the extent to which that association was explained by health behaviors. Methods This study assessed data on 998 adults (aged 51 and above) with type 2 diabetes in the US nationally representative Health and Retirement Study and its diabetes-specific mail survey. Participants’ depressive symptoms and baseline health behaviors (exercise, body weight control, and smoking status) were collected in 1998. Follow-up health behaviors and the glycemic control outcome were measured at a 2- and 5-year intervals, respectively. Results Nearly one in four of participants (23%) reported moderate or high levels of depressive symptoms at baseline (CES-D score ?3). Adults with higher levels of depressive symptoms at baseline showed lower scores on baseline and follow-up health behaviors as well as higher HbA1c levels at a 5-year follow-up. Structural equation models (SEM) reveal that health behaviors accounted for 13% of the link between depressive symptoms and glycemic control. Conclusions The long-term relationship between depressive symptoms and glycemic control was supported in the present study. Health behaviors, including exercise, body weight control, and smoking status, explained a sizable amount of the association between depressive symptoms and glycemic control. More comprehensive diabetes self-care behaviors should be examined with available data. Other competing explicators for the link, such as endocrinological process and antidepressant effects, also warrant further examination.

Wray, Linda A.; Beverly, Elizabeth A.; Dominic, Oralia G.

2009-01-01

147

Language Barriers, Physician-Patient Language Concordance, and Glycemic Control Among Insured Latinos with Diabetes: The Diabetes Study of Northern California (DISTANCE)  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT BACKGROUND A significant proportion of US Latinos with diabetes have limited English proficiency (LEP). Whether language barriers in health care contribute to poor glycemic control is unknown. OBJECTIVE To assess the association between limited English proficiency (LEP) and glycemic control and whether this association is modified by having a language-concordant physician. DESIGN Cross-sectional, observational study using data from the 2005–2006 Diabetes Study of Northern California (DISTANCE). Patients received care in a managed care setting with interpreter services and self-reported their English language ability and the Spanish language ability of their physician. Outcome was poor glycemic control (glycosylated hemoglobin A1c?>?9%). KEY RESULTS The unadjusted percentage of patients with poor glycemic control was similar among Latino patients with LEP (n?=?510) and Latino English-speakers (n?=?2,683), and higher in both groups than in whites (n?=?3,545) (21% vs 18% vs. 10%, p?glycemic control (27.8% vs 16.1% p?=?0.02). After controlling for potential demographic and clinical confounders, LEP Latinos with language-concordant physicians had similar odds of poor glycemic control as Latino English speakers (OR 0.89; CI 0.53–1.49), whereas LEP Latinos with language-discordant physicians had greater odds of poor control than Latino English speakers (OR 1.76; CI 1.04–2.97). Among LEP Latinos, having a language discordant physician was associated with significantly poorer glycemic control (OR 1.98; CI 1.03–3.80). CONCLUSIONS Language barriers contribute to health disparities among Latinos with diabetes. Limited English proficiency is an independent predictor for poor glycemic control among insured US Latinos with diabetes, an association not observed when care is provided by language-concordant physicians. Future research should determine if strategies to increase language-concordant care improve glycemic control among US Latinos with LEP.

Schillinger, Dean; Warton, E. Margaret; Adler, Nancy; Moffet, Howard H.; Schenker, Yael; Salgado, M. Victoria; Ahmed, Ameena; Karter, Andrew J.

2010-01-01

148

Glycemic variability: Clinical implications  

PubMed Central

Glycemic control and its benefits in preventing microvascular diabetic complications are convincingly proved by various prospective trials. Diabetes control and complications trial (DCCT) had reported variable glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C) as a cause of increased microvascular complications in conventional glycemic control group versus intensive one. However, in spite of several indirect evidences, its link with cardiovascular events or macrovascular complications is still not proved. Glycemic variability (GV) is one more tool to explain relation between hyperglycemia and increased cardiovascular risk in diabetic patients. In fact GV along with fasting blood sugar, postprandial blood sugar, HbA1C, and quality of life has been proposed to form glycemic pentad, which needs to be considered in diabetes management. Postprandial spikes in blood glucose as well as hypoglycemic events, both are blamed for increased cardiovascular events in Type 2 diabetics. GV includes both these events and hence minimizing GV can prevent future cardiovascular events. Modern diabetes management modalities including improved sulfonylureas, glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-based therapy, newer basal insulins, and modern insulin pumps address the issue of GV effectively. This article highlights mechanism, clinical implications, and measures to control GV in clinical practice.

Satya Krishna, Surabhi Venkata; Kota, Sunil K.; Modi, Kirtikumar D.

2013-01-01

149

Enhanced Fitness: A Randomized Controlled Trial of the Effects of Home-Based Physical Activity Counseling on Glycemic Control in Older Adults with Prediabetes  

PubMed Central

Background/Objective To determine whether a home-based multi-component physical activity counseling (PAC) intervention is effective in reducing glycemic measures in older prediabetic outpatients. Design, Setting, and Participants Controlled clinical trial of 302 overweight (body mass index 25–45 kg/m2), older (ages 60–89) outpatients with impaired glucose tolerance (fasting blood glucose 100–125 mg/dL, HbA1c <7%), randomly assigned to a PAC intervention group (n=180), compared to a Usual Care (UC) control group (n=122) and recruited through primary care clinics of the Durham VA Medical Center between September 29, 2008 and March 25, 2010. Intervention A 12 month, home-based multi-component PAC program including one in-person baseline counseling session, regular telephone counseling, physician endorsement in clinic with monthly automated encouragement, and tailored mailed materials. All study participants, including UC, received a consult to a VA weight management program. Measurements The primary outcome was HOMA-IR, calculated from fasting insulin and glucose levels at baseline, 3 and 12 months. Hemoglobin A1C was the secondary indicator of glycemic control. Other secondary outcomes included anthropometric measures, and self-reported physical activity, health-related quality of life, and physical function. Results There were no significant differences between the PAC or Usual Care groups over time for any of the glycemic indicators. Both groups had small declines over time of approximately 6% in fasting blood glucose, p< 0.001, while other glycemic indicators remained stable. The declines in glucose were not sufficient to affect the change in HOMA-IR scores due to fluctuations in insulin over time. Endurance physical activity increased significantly in PAC group, P<0.001 compared to UC. Conclusion Home-based telephone counseling increased physical activity levels but was insufficient for improving glycemic indicators among older prediabetic outpatients.

Morey, Miriam C.; Pieper, Carl F.; Edelman, David E.; Yancy, William S.; Green, Jennifer B.; Lum, Helen; Peterson, Matthew J.; Sloane, Richard; Cowper, Patricia A.; Bosworth, Hayden B.; Huffman, Kim M.; Cavanaugh, James T.; Hall, Katherine S.; Pearson, Megan P.; Taylor, Gregory A.

2012-01-01

150

Counting Carbs? Understanding Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load  

MedlinePLUS

... to know. The glycemic index and load concern carbohydrates, or carbs—one of the main types of ... to support the concept that the more complex carbohydrates will lead to better blood sugar control than ...

151

Changes in Diabetes Distress Related to Participation in an Internet-Based Diabetes Care Management Program and Glycemic Control  

PubMed Central

Background This article investigated how changes in diabetes distress relate to receiving care management through an Internet-based care management (IBCM) program for diabetes and level of participation in this program. Further, it examined the relationship between diabetes distress and changes in glycemic control. Methods We enrolled patients of the Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System with diabetes who had hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels of ?9.0%. Subjects were randomized to usual care (n = 52) or IBCM (n = 52) for 1 year. We measured diabetes distress at baseline and quarterly thereafter using the Problem Areas in Diabetes (PAID) questionnaire. Glycemic control was determined by baseline and quarterly HbA1c. For subjects randomized to IBCM, we measured participation by observing frequency and consistency of their usage of the IBCM patient portal over 12 months. Linear mixed models were used to analyze THE data. Results PAID scores declined over time for both treatment groups. Among subjects randomized to IBCM, the decline in PAID scores over time was significant for sustained users of the IBCM patient portal but not for nonusers. Moreover, subjects whose usage of the patient portal was sustained throughout the study had lower PAID scores at baseline. With respect to changes in glycemic control, HbA1c reduced individual differences in PAID scores by 44%; a lower baseline HbA1c was associated with lower baseline PAID scores, and over time, the decrease in HbA1c was associated with further decreases in the PAID score. Conclusions Participation in IBCM varies by initial diabetes distress, with people with less distress participating more. For people who participate, IBCM further mitigates diabetes distress. There is also a relationship between achievements in glycemic control and subsequent lowering of diabetes distress. Future research should identify how to maximize fit between patient needs and the provisions of IBCM, with the aim of increasing patient engagement in the active management of their health using this care modality. A key to maximizing fit might be first addressing metabolic control aggressively and then using IBCM for sustainment of health.

Fonda, Stephanie J.; McMahon, Graham T.; Gomes, Helen E.; Hickson, Sara; Conlin, Paul R.

2009-01-01

152

Dyadic measures of the parent-child relationship during the transition to adolescence and glycemic control in children with type 1 diabetes.  

PubMed

To identify aspects of family behavior associated with glycemic control in youth with type 1 diabetes mellitus during the transition to adolescence, the authors studied 121 9- to 14-year-olds (M = 12.1 yrs) and their parents, who completed the Diabetes Family Conflict Scale (DFCS) and the Diabetes Family Responsibility Questionnaire (DFRQ). From the DFRQ, the authors derived 2 dyadic variables, frequency of agreement (exact parent and child concurrence about who was responsible for a task) and frequency of discordance (opposite parent and child reports about responsibility). The authors divided the cohort into Younger (n = 57, M = 10.6 yrs) and Older (n = 64, M = 13.5 yrs) groups. Family conflict was significantly related to glycemic control in the entire cohort and in both the Younger and Older groups. However, only in the Younger group was Agreement related to glycemic control, with higher Agreement associated with better glycemic control. Findings suggest that Agreement about sharing of diabetes responsibilities may be an important target for family-based interventions aiming to optimize glycemic control in preteen youth. PMID:19630455

Anderson, Barbara J; Holmbeck, Grayson; Iannotti, Ronald J; McKay, Siripoom V; Lochrie, Amanda; Volkening, Lisa K; Laffel, Lori

2009-06-01

153

Effects of Twice-Daily Injections of Premixed Insulin Analog on Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetic Patients  

PubMed Central

Purpose Premixed insulin is effective to improve glycemic control; however, clinicians may be less likely to know which premixed insulin is appropriate for which patients. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of twice-daily injections of premixed insulin lispro on glycemic control in type 2 diabetic patients. Materials and Methods Forty type 2 diabetic patients, who had been treated with twice-daily injections of human protamine mixture 30/70 insulin for at least 12 months, were divided into two groups; one group whose blood glucose 2 hours after breakfast was greater than 200 mg/dL, was switched to lispro mix50, and the other group whose blood glucose 2 hours after breakfast < 200 was switched to lispro mix25. Results Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) significantly improved in the Mix50 group from 8.3% to 7.5% (at 12 weeks; p < 0.05), and to 7.5% (at 24 weeks; p < 0.05). On the other hand, HbA1c levels in the Mix25 group were slightly decreased from 8.1% to 7.7% at 12 weeks (p < 0.05), and to 7.9% at 24 weeks (not significant). Both postprandial plasma glucose and fasting plasma glucose levels were significantly improved in the Mix50 group, but not in the Mix25 group. Overall, 95% of subjects preferred premixed lispro insulin from human insulin in the viewpoint of the timing of insulin injection by questionnaire analysis. Conclusion Switching from human protamine mixture 30/70 insulin to lispro mix50 twice-daily injection therapy in patients with high postprandial plasma glucose could improve their glycemic control and quality of life.

Shimizu, Hiroaki; Matsumura, Mihoko; Domeki, Nozomi; Kasai, Kikuo

2010-01-01

154

Good Glycemic Control Is Associated with Better Survival in Diabetic Patients on Peritoneal Dialysis: A Prospective Observational Study  

PubMed Central

Background The effect of glycemic control after starting peritoneal dialysis (PD) on the survival of diabetic PD patients has largely been unexplored, especially in Asian population. Methods We conducted a prospective observational study, in which 140 incident PD patients with diabetes were recruited. Patients were divided into tertiles according to the means of quarterly HbA1C levels measured during the first year after starting PD. We examined the association between HbA1C and all-cause mortality using Cox proportional hazards models. Results The mean age was 58.7 years, 59.3% were male, and the mean follow-up duration was 3.5 years (range 0.4–9.5 years). The mean HbA1C levels were 6.3%, 7.1%, and 8.5% in the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd tertiles, respectively. Compared to the 1st tertile, the all-cause mortality rates were higher in the 2nd [hazard ratio (HR), 4.16; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.91–18.94; p?=?0.065] and significantly higher in the 3rd (HR, 13.16; 95% CI, 2.67–64.92; p?=?0.002) tertiles (p for trend?=?0.005), after adjusting for confounding factors. Cardiovascular mortality, however, did not differ significantly among the tertiles (p for trend?=?0.682). In contrast, non-cardiovascular deaths, most of which were caused by infection, were more frequent in the 2nd (HR, 7.67; 95% CI, 0.68–86.37; p?=?0.099) and the 3rd (HR, 51.24; 95% CI, 3.85–681.35; p?=?0.003) tertiles than the 1st tertile (p for trend?=?0.007). Conclusions Poor glycemic control is associated with high mortality rates in diabetic PD patients, suggesting that better glycemic control may improve the outcomes of these patients.

Yoo, Dong Eun; Park, Jung Tak; Oh, Hyung Jung; Kim, Seung Jun; Lee, Mi Jung; Shin, Dong Ho; Han, Seung Hyeok; Yoo, Tae-Hyun; Choi, Kyu Hun; Kang, Shin-Wook

2012-01-01

155

The Impact of Fasting during Ramadan on the Glycemic Control of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.  

PubMed

Millions of Muslims fast from dawn until dusk during the annual Islamic holy month of Ramadan. Most of the studies evaluating biochemical changes in diabetic patients during Ramadan showed little changes in the glycemic control. In this study, our aim was to assess the impact of fasting during Ramadan on glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes.We examined 122 patients with type 2 diabetes (82 female, 40 male, age 56.93±9.57 years) before and after the Ramadan. 66.4% of the patients were treated with oral antidiabetic (OAD) alone, 6.5% with a combination of insulin plus OAD and 19.7% with insulin alone. 88 of 122 patients fasted during Ramadan (26.98±5.93 days). Weight, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), postprandial glucose (PPG), fructosamine, HbA1c, fasting insulin and lipid parameters were measured.The frequencies of both severe hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia were higher in the fasting group, but the difference was not significant (p=0.18). Weight, BMI, waist circumference, blood pressure, FPG (143.38±52.04 vs. 139.31±43.47 mg/dl) PPG (213.40±98.56 vs. 215.66+109.31 mg/dl) , fructosamine (314.18±75.40 vs. 314.49±68.36 µmol/l), HbA1c (6.33±0.98 vs. 6.22±0.92%) and fasting insulin (12.61±8.94 vs. 10.51±6.26 µU/ml) were unchanged in patients who fasted during Ramadan. Microalbuminuria significantly decreased during Ramadan (132.85±197.11 vs. 45.03±73.11 mg/dl).In this study, we concluded that fasting during Ramadan did not worsen the glycemic control of patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:23934679

Sahin, S B; Ayaz, T; Ozyurt, N; Ilkkilic, K; Kirvar, A; Sezgin, H

2013-08-09

156

Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial to Evaluate Effectiveness of Registered Dietitian-Led Diabetes Management on Glycemic and Diet Control in a Primary Care Setting in Taiwan  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE In this randomized controlled trial we evaluated the effect of registered dietitian–led management of diabetes on glycemic control and macronutrient intake in type 2 diabetic patients in primary care clinics in Taiwan and studied the association between changes in macronutrient intake and glycemic measures. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We recruited 154 adult patients with type 2 diabetes and randomly assigned them to a routine care control group (n = 79) or a registered dietitian–led intervention group (n = 75) who received on-site diabetic self-management education every 3 months over 12 months. RESULTS Over the 1-year period, neither the intervention group (n = 75) nor the control group (n = 79) had significant changes in A1C, whereas the intervention patients with poorly controlled baseline A1C (?7%) (n = 56) had significantly greater improvements in A1C and fasting plasma glucose than the control subjects (n = 60) (?0.7 vs. ?0.2%, P = 0.034; ?13.4 vs. 16.9 mg/dl, P = 0.007) during the same period. We also found significant net intervention-control group differences in overall energy intake (?229.06 ± 309.16 vs. 56.10 ± 309.41 kcal/day) and carbohydrate intake (?31.24 ± 61.53 vs. 7.15 ± 54.09 g/day) (P < 0.001) in patients with poorly controlled A1C. Multivariable adjusted modeling revealed an independent association between changes in carbohydrate intake and A1C in the intervention group (n = 56; ? = 0.10, SEM = 0.033, P = 0.004). CONCLUSIONS On-site registered dietitian–led management of diabetes can improve glycemic control in patients with poorly managed type 2 diabetes in primary care clinics in Taiwan. A reduction in carbohydrate intake may improve glycemic status.

Huang, Meng-Chuan; Hsu, Chih-Cheng; Wang, Huan-Sen; Shin, Shyi-Jang

2010-01-01

157

Glycemic control influences lung membrane diffusion and oxygen saturation in exercise-trained subjects with type 1 diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lung diffusing capacity (DLCO) is influenced by alveolar-capillary membrane conductance (D\\u000a M) and pulmonary capillary blood volume (V\\u000a C), both of which can be impaired in sedentary type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) subjects due to hyperglycemia. We sought to\\u000a determine if T1DM, and glycemic control, affected DLNO, DLCO, D\\u000a M, V\\u000a C and SaO2 during maximal exercise in aerobically fit

Courtney M. Wheatley; James C. Baldi; Nicholas A. Cassuto; William T. Foxx-Lupo; Eric M. Snyder

2011-01-01

158

Improved glycemic control among Thai children and young adults with type 1 diabetes participating in the diabetes camp.  

PubMed

Diabetes Education Program, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital has provided summer camps for Thai children with type 1 diabetes since 1990. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the diabetes camp in glycemic control. Twenty male and forty-two female patients participated in the 5-day diabetes camp held in Karnchanaburi, Thailand in 2003. The mean age was 14.1 +/- 4.3 years and the mean duration of disease was 4.5 +/- 3.5 years. Fifty out of sixty-two patients returned for a 3-month-postcamp visit. The glycemic control improved significantly. The mean precamp and postcamp HbA1c levels were 10.0 +/- 3.1% and 9.0 +/- 2.6% (p = 0.008) respectively. The diabetes camp is a valuable program for patients to learn diabetes-self management skills, especially in countries where the diabetes education programs are not always available. PMID:16856424

Santiprabhob, Jeerunda; Likitmaskul, Supawadee; Sriwijitkamol, Apiradee; Peerapatdit, Thavatchai; Sawathiparnich, Pairunyar; Nitiyanant, Wannee; Angsusingha, Kitti; Tuchinda, Chanika; Tandhanand, Sunthorn

2005-11-01

159

Effects of pioglitazone and glimepiride on glycemic control and insulin sensitivity in Mexican patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: A multicenter, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Pioglitazone and glimepiride improve glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus by different mechanisms. Pioglitazone is a thiazolidinedione that reduces insulin resistance, and glimepiride is a sulfonylurea insulin secretagogue.Objective: The goals of this study were to compare changes in measures of glycemic control and insulin sensitivity in Mexican patients with type 2 diabetes who received pioglitazone or

Meng Tan; Don Johns; Guillermo González Gálvez; Oscar Antúnez; Guadalupe Fabián; Fernando Flores-Lozano; Sergio Zúñiga Guajardo; Eduardo Garza; Hector Morales; Christopher Konkoy; Matthias Herz

2004-01-01

160

Pilot proof of concept clinical trials of Stochastic Targeted (STAR) glycemic control  

PubMed Central

Introduction Tight glycemic control (TGC) has shown benefits but has been difficult to achieve consistently. STAR (Stochastic TARgeted) is a flexible, model-based TGC approach directly accounting for intra- and inter- patient variability with a stochastically derived maximum 5% risk of blood glucose (BG) < 4.0 mmol/L. This research assesses the safety, efficacy, and clinical burden of a STAR TGC controller modulating both insulin and nutrition inputs in pilot trials. Methods Seven patients covering 660 hours. Insulin and nutrition interventions are given 1-3 hourly as chosen by the nurse to allow them to manage workload. Interventions are calculated by using clinically validated computer models of human metabolism and its variability in critical illness to maximize the overlap of the model-predicted (5-95th percentile) range of BG outcomes with the 4.0-6.5 mmol/L band while ensuring a maximum 5% risk of BG < 4.0 mmol/L. Carbohydrate intake (all sources) was selected to maximize intake up to 100% of SCCM/ACCP goal (25 kg/kcal/h). Maximum insulin doses and dose changes were limited for safety. Measurements were made with glucometers. Results are compared to those for the SPRINT study, which reduced mortality 25-40% for length of stay ?3 days. Written informed consent was obtained for all patients, and approval was granted by the NZ Upper South A Regional Ethics Committee. Results A total of 402 measurements were taken over 660 hours (~14/day), because nurses showed a preference for 2-hourly measurements. Median [interquartile range, (IQR)] cohort BG was 5.9 mmol/L [5.2-6.8]. Overall, 63.2%, 75.9%, and 89.8% of measurements were in the 4.0-6.5, 4.0-7.0, and 4.0-8.0 mmol/L bands. There were no hypoglycemic events (BG < 2.2 mmol/L), and the minimum BG was 3.5 mmol/L with 4.5% < 4.4 mmol/L. Per patient, the median [IQR] hours of TGC was 92 h [29-113] using 53 [19-62] measurements (median, ~13/day). Median [IQR] results: BG, 5.9 mmol/L [5.8-6.3]; carbohydrate nutrition, 6.8 g/h [5.5-8.7] (~70% goal feed median); insulin, 2.5 U/h [0.1-5.1]. All patients achieved BG < 6.1 mmol/L. These results match or exceed SPRINT and clinical workload is reduced more than 20%. Conclusions STAR TGC modulating insulin and nutrition inputs provided very tight control with minimal variability by managing intra- and inter- patient variability. Performance and safety exceed that of SPRINT, which reduced mortality and cost in the Christchurch ICU. The use of glucometers did not appear to impact the quality of TGC. Finally, clinical workload was self-managed and reduced 20% compared with SPRINT.

2011-01-01

161

A Telemedicine System That Includes a Personal Assistant Improves Glycemic Control in Pump-Treated Patients with Type 1 Diabetes  

PubMed Central

Background The DIABTel system, a Web-based telemedicine application, integrates a whole communication system (glucometer, insulin pump, wireless hand-held assistant) for medical remote advice. We sought to evaluate, in terms of glycemic control, the DIABTel system in a randomized crossover clinical study. Methods Ten patients with type 1 diabetes [5 women, age 40.6 (21–62) years, diabetes duration 14.7 (3–52) years] were included. During the 4-week active phase, data sent by patients were analyzed by the physician and modifications of the basal rate and bolus were advised in the following 24 hours. During the control phase, patients sent glucose data without any feedback from the medical center. Results The mean numbers of daily glucose values and bolus sent by patients during the active period were 4.46 ± 0.91 and 4.58 ± 0.89, respectively. The personal digital assistant functionalities used more frequently by patients were (times per week) data visualization (8.1 ± 6.8), data download from the insulin pump (6.8 ± 3.3), and synchronization with the telemedicine server (8.5 ± 4.9). After the experimental phase, serum fructosamine decreased significantly (393 ± 32 vs 366 ± 25 µmol/liter; p < 0.05) and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) tended to decrease (8.0 ± 0.6 vs 7.78 ± 0.6; p = 0.073), whereas no changes were observed during the control phase. The number of treatment modifications proposed and performed by the patients correlated with the change observed in HbA1c during the active phase (r = ?0.729, p = 0.017). Conclusions The DIABTel system, a telemedicine system that includes a wireless personal assistant for remote treatment advising, allows better glycemic control in pump-treated patients with type 1 diabetes. To our knowledge, this is the first study that demonstrates improved glycemic control with the use of a telemedicine system that incorporates insulin delivery data.

Rigla, Mercedes; Hernando, M. Elena; Gomez, Enrique J.; Brugues, Eulalia; Garcia-Saez, Gema; Torralba, Veronica; Prados, Agustina; Erdozain, Luisa; Vilaverde, Joana; de Leiva, Alberto

2007-01-01

162

Evaluation of glutathione S-transferase P1 genetic variants affecting type-2 diabetes susceptibility and glycemic control  

PubMed Central

Introduction Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with increased production of reactive oxygen species and a reduction in antioxidant defenses leading to oxidative stress. Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) modulate oxidative stress. The present cross-sectional study was aimed at investigating the association between the GSTP1 gene polymorphism and T2DM and to clarify their effect on the glycemic control parameters. Material and methods From the Egyptian population, we enrolled 112 T2DM patients and 188 healthy controls matched for age, sex and origin. Serum lipid profile, blood-glucose level, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and body mass index (BMI) were measured. DNA was extracted from the blood samples. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was used to measure GSTP1 Ile105Val gene polymorphism of study participants. Results The frequency of the Val allele in exon 5 of the GSTP1 gene in patients with T2DM was higher than that observed in healthy controls (15.2% vs. 9.6%); the difference was considered statistically significant when compared to Ile allele carriers (p = 0.03). The presence of the GSTP1 heterozygous mutant allele Ile/Val was more common in subjects with T2DM than in the control group (30.4% and 19.2%, respectively; p = 0.02). Variation in the GSTP1 gene was associated with BMI (p = 0.02) and not associated with glycemic control parameters (fasting serum glucose and HbA1c) or smoking-related risk of T2DM. Conclusions GSTP1 gene polymorphism may play a significant role in increasing the susceptibility to and risk of T2DM and obesity regardless of smoking status and had no apparent effect on HbA1c in patients with diabetes mellitus.

Amer, Mahmoud A.; Abo-ElMatty, Dina M.; Abou-El-Ela, Soad H.

2012-01-01

163

Effects of Pioglitazone and rosiglitazone on blood lipid levels and glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: A retrospective review of randomly selected medical records  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The antihyperglycemic effects of pioglitazone hydrochloride and rosiglitazone maleate are well documented. The results of clinical trials and observational studies have suggested, however, that there are individual differences in the effects of these drugs on blood lipid levels.Objective: The present study evaluated the effects of pioglitazone and rosiglitazone on blood lipid levels and glycemic control in patients with type

Patrick J. Boyle; Allen Bennett King; Leann Olansky; Albert Marchetti; Helen Lau; Raf Magar; John Martin

2002-01-01

164

A Comparative Study of Diet in Good and Poor Glycemic Control Groups in Elderly Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus  

PubMed Central

Background Identification of dietary patterns is important for glycemic management in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods Elderly T2DM patients (> 65 years of age, n = 48) were categorized based on their concentration of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Subjects with HbA1c levels below 7% were placed in the good control (GC) group and those with HbA1c levels equal to or above 8% were placed in the poor control (PC) group. Anthropometric data, blood parameters, and dietary intake records were compared between the groups. Statistical analysis included Student's t-test, chi-square test, and Pearson correlation coefficient test. Results Anthropometric data, including body mass index (24.7 ± 2.9 kg/m2), did not differ between the GC and PC groups. Significant abnormalities in blood glucose levels (P < 0.01), lean body mass (P < 0.01), and plasma protein and albumin levels (P < 0.05, P < 0.01) were found in the PC group. In contrast to the GC group, the PC group depended on carbohydrate (P = 0.014) rather than protein (P = 0.013) or fat (P = 0.005) as a major source of energy, and had a lower index of nutritional quality for nutrients such as protein (P = 0.001), and all vitamins and minerals (P < 0.001, 0.01, or 0.05 for individual nutrients), except vitamin C, in their usual diet. Negative correlations between HbA1c levels and protein (r = -0.338, P < 0.05) or fat (r = -0.385, P < 0.01) intakes were also found. Conclusions Healthcare professionals should encourage elderly diabetic patients to consume a balanced diet to maintain good glycemic control.

Woo, Mi-Hye; Park, Soojin; Woo, Jeong-Taek

2010-01-01

165

Successful implementation of a perioperative glycemic control protocol in cardiac surgery: barrier analysis and intervention using lean six sigma.  

PubMed

Although the evidence strongly supports perioperative glycemic control among cardiac surgical patients, there is scant literature to describe the practical application of such a protocol in the complex ICU environment. This paper describes the use of the Lean Six Sigma methodology to implement a perioperative insulin protocol in a cardiac surgical intensive care unit (CSICU) in a large academic hospital. A preintervention chart audit revealed that fewer than 10% of patients were admitted to the CSICU with glucose <200?mg/dL, prompting the initiation of the quality improvement project. Following protocol implementation, more than 90% of patients were admitted with a glucose <200?mg/dL. Key elements to success include barrier analysis and intervention, provider education, and broadening the project scope to address the intraoperative period. PMID:22091218

Martinez, Elizabeth A; Chavez-Valdez, Raul; Holt, Natalie F; Grogan, Kelly L; Khalifeh, Katherine W; Slater, Tammy; Winner, Laura E; Moyer, Jennifer; Lehmann, Christoph U

2011-09-06

166

Successful Implementation of a Perioperative Glycemic Control Protocol in Cardiac Surgery: Barrier Analysis and Intervention Using Lean Six Sigma  

PubMed Central

Although the evidence strongly supports perioperative glycemic control among cardiac surgical patients, there is scant literature to describe the practical application of such a protocol in the complex ICU environment. This paper describes the use of the Lean Six Sigma methodology to implement a perioperative insulin protocol in a cardiac surgical intensive care unit (CSICU) in a large academic hospital. A preintervention chart audit revealed that fewer than 10% of patients were admitted to the CSICU with glucose <200?mg/dL, prompting the initiation of the quality improvement project. Following protocol implementation, more than 90% of patients were admitted with a glucose <200?mg/dL. Key elements to success include barrier analysis and intervention, provider education, and broadening the project scope to address the intraoperative period.

Martinez, Elizabeth A.; Chavez-Valdez, Raul; Holt, Natalie F.; Grogan, Kelly L.; Khalifeh, Katherine W.; Slater, Tammy; Winner, Laura E.; Moyer, Jennifer; Lehmann, Christoph U.

2011-01-01

167

Sodium-dependent glucose transporter protein as a potential therapeutic target for improving glycemic control in diabetes.  

PubMed

Glucose is transported across the cell membrane by two different types of glucose transporters: glucose-facilitated transporters and sodium-dependent glucose transport (SGLT) proteins. Regulation of SGLT activity (namely, inhibition of SGLT1 and SGLT2 activity and stimulation of SGLT3 activity) represents a potential means of managing hyperglycemia and diabetes, thus preventing complications of diabetes. The purpose of the present review is to discuss the role of SGLT proteins in the pathophysiology of diabetes and to describe the mechanisms by which these transporters may be used for glycemic control and the treatment of diabetes. The regulatory processes involved in SGLT-mediated glucose uptake are also described briefly. This information provides new insight into the complementary mechanisms involved in the regulation of SGLT-mediated glucose transport as well as a basis for further investigation. PMID:22133196

Castaneda-Sceppa, Carmen; Castaneda, Francisco

2011-12-01

168

Association of IGF1 with glycemic control and occurrence of severe hypoglycemia in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus  

PubMed Central

Objective GH is implicated in the counter-regulatory response to hypoglycemia. We tested whether IGF1 levels are associated with occurrence of severe hypoglycemic events in patients with type 1 diabetes and whether the IGF1 concentration is influenced by glycemic control. Methods A total of 228 outpatients with type 1 diabetes were included in a post hoc analysis of a 1-year observational study on severe hypoglycemia. Serum total IGF1 was measured at entry into the study. The occurrence of severe episodes of hypoglycemia, mild symptomatic, and biochemical as well as hypoglycemia awareness status was assessed. Also patients were included in a multiple regression analysis to investigate the role of HbA1c in the IGF1 concentration. Results IGF1 levels were associated with neither severe hypoglycemia in the entire cohort (P=0.30) nor in any gender nor when confining the analysis to those with long-standing diabetes (>20 years) (n=112, P=0.68) and those with both long-standing diabetes and undetectable C-peptide (n=51, P=0.067). Levels of IGF1 were associated with neither mild symptomatic hypoglycemia (P=0.24) nor biochemical hypoglycemia (0.089) nor hypoglycemia awareness (P=0.16). At a multiple regression analysis, HbA1c was negatively associated with IGF1 (P=0.001). Conclusion In type 1 diabetes, circulating IGF1 levels are negatively associated with glycemic control. However, IGF1 levels were not associated with occurrence of hypoglycemia or hypoglycemia awareness in these patients.

Faerch, Louise; Juul, Anders; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik; Thorsteinsson, Birger

2012-01-01

169

Risk Factors for Childhood Overweight in Offspring of Type 1 Diabetic Women With Adequate Glycemic Control During Pregnancy  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE Pregnancy in type 1 diabetic women remains a high-risk situation for both mother and child. In this study, we investigated long-term effects on body composition, prevalence of overweight, and insulin resistance in children of type 1 diabetic women who had had adequate glycemic control during pregnancy (mean A1C 6.2%), and we related their outcome to perinatal factors, including macrosomia (birth weight >90th percentile). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Anthropometric measurements were performed at 6–8 years of age in 213 offspring of type 1 diabetic mothers who participated in a previous nationwide study. Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was determined from a fasting blood sample in 155 of these children. In addition, we studied BMI standard deviation score (SDS) growth trajectories. Results were compared with national reference data. RESULTS The prevalence of overweight in the study population was not different from that in the reference population. However, children who were born macrosomic showed twice as much overweight as nonmacrosomic children. Macrosomia and maternal overweight were independent predictors of childhood overweight. Overweight children showed an increase in BMI SDS starting already after 6 months of age and had a significantly increased HOMA-IR. CONCLUSIONS In type 1 diabetic women with adequate glycemic control during pregnancy, long-term effects on body composition and overweight in their offspring at school age are limited and related mainly to macrosomia at birth. Possible targets for prevention of childhood overweight are fetal macrosomia, maternal overweight, and an increase in BMI SDS during the first years of life.

Rijpert, Maarten; Evers, Inge M.; de Vroede, Monique A.M.J.; de Valk, Harold W.; Heijnen, Cobi J.; Visser, Gerard H.A.

2009-01-01

170

Effects of MK-0941, a Novel Glucokinase Activator, on Glycemic Control in Insulin-Treated Patients With Type 2 Diabetes  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To assess the efficacy and safety of MK-0941, a glucokinase activator (GKA), when added to stable-dose insulin glargine in patients with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In this double-blind study, 587 patients taking stable-dose insulin glargine (±metformin ?1,500 mg/day) were randomized (1:1:1:1:1) to MK-0941 10, 20, 30, or 40 mg or matching placebo t.i.d. before meals (a.c.). This study included an initial 14-week, dose-ranging phase followed by a 40-week treatment phase during which patients were to be uptitrated as tolerated to 40 mg (or placebo) t.i.d. a.c. The primary efficacy end point was change from baseline in A1C at Week 14. RESULTS At Week 14, A1C and 2-h postmeal glucose (PMG) improved significantly versus placebo with all MK-0941 doses. Maximal placebo-adjusted least squares mean changes from baseline in A1C (baseline A1C 9.0%) and 2-h PMG were ?0.8% and ?37 mg/dL (?2 mmol/L), respectively. No significant effects on fasting plasma glucose were observed at any dose versus placebo. By 30 weeks, the initial glycemic responses noted at 14 weeks were not sustained. MK-0941 at one or more doses was associated with significant increases in the incidence of hypoglycemia, triglycerides, systolic blood pressure, and proportion of patients meeting criteria for predefined limits of change for increased diastolic blood pressure. CONCLUSIONS In patients receiving stable-dose insulin glargine, the GKA MK-0941 led to improvements in glycemic control that were not sustained. MK-0941 was associated with an increased incidence of hypoglycemia and elevations in triglycerides and blood pressure.

Meininger, Gary E.; Scott, Russell; Alba, Maria; Shentu, Yue; Luo, Edmund; Amin, Himal; Davies, Michael J.; Kaufman, Keith D.; Goldstein, Barry J.

2011-01-01

171

Colesevelam HCl Improves Glycemic Control and Reduces LDL Cholesterol in Patients With Inadequately Controlled Type 2 Diabetes on Sulfonylurea-Based Therapy  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE—Hyperglycemia is a risk factor for microvascular complications and may increase the risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes. This study tested the LDL cholesterol–lowering agent colesevelam HCl (colesevelam) as a potential novel treatment for improving glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes on sulfonylurea-based therapy. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—A 26-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, multicenter study was carried out between August 2004 and August 2006 to evaluate the efficacy and safety of colesevelam for reducing A1C in adults with type 2 diabetes whose glycemic control was inadequate (A1C 7.5–9.5%) with existing sulfonylurea monotherapy or sulfonylurea in combination with additional oral antidiabetes agents. In total, 461 patients were randomized (230 given colesevelam 3.75 g/day and 231 given placebo). The primary efficacy measurement was mean placebo-corrected change in A1C from baseline to week 26 in the intent-to-treat population (last observation carried forward). RESULTS—The least squares (LS) mean change in A1C from baseline to week 26 was ?0.32% in the colesevelam group and +0.23% in the placebo group, resulting in a treatment difference of ?0.54% (P < 0.001). The LS mean percent change in LDL cholesterol from baseline to week 26 was ?16.1% in the colesevelam group and +0.6% in the placebo group, resulting in a treatment difference of ?16.7% (P < 0.001). Furthermore, significant reductions in fasting plasma glucose, fructosamine, total cholesterol, non–HDL cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B were demonstrated in the colesevelam relative to placebo group at week 26. CONCLUSIONS—Colesevelam improved glycemic control and reduced LDL cholesterol levels in patients with type 2 diabetes receiving sulfonylurea-based therapy.

Fonseca, Vivian A.; Rosenstock, Julio; Wang, Antonia C.; Truitt, Kenneth E.; Jones, Michael R.

2008-01-01

172

Diabetic status and the relation of the three domains of glycemic control to mortality in critically ill patients: an international multicenter cohort study  

PubMed Central

Introduction Hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, and increased glycemic variability have each been independently associated with increased risk of mortality in critically ill patients. The role of diabetic status on modulating the relation of these three domains of glycemic control with mortality remains uncertain. The purpose of this investigation was to determine how diabetic status affects the relation of hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, and increased glycemic variability with the risk of mortality in critically ill patients. Methods This is a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data involving 44,964 patients admitted to 23 intensive care units (ICUs) from nine countries, between February 2001 and May 2012. We analyzed mean blood glucose concentration (BG), coefficient of variation (CV), and minimal BG and created multivariable models to analyze their independent association with mortality. Patients were stratified according to the diagnosis of diabetes. Results Among patients without diabetes, mean BG bands between 80 and 140 mg/dl were independently associated with decreased risk of mortality, and mean BG bands >140 mg/dl, with increased risk of mortality. Among patients with diabetes, mean BG from 80 to 110 mg/dl was associated with increased risk of mortality and mean BG from 110 to 180 mg/dl with decreased risk of mortality. An effect of center was noted on the relation between mean BG and mortality. Hypoglycemia, defined as minimum BG <70 mg/dl, was independently associated with increased risk of mortality among patients with and without diabetes and increased glycemic variability, defined as CV >20%, was independently associated with increased risk of mortality only among patients without diabetes. Derangements of more than one domain of glycemic control had a cumulative association with mortality, especially for patients without diabetes. Conclusions Although hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, and increased glycemic variability is each independently associated with mortality in critically ill patients, diabetic status modulates these relations in clinically important ways. Our findings suggest that patients with diabetes may benefit from higher glucose target ranges than will those without diabetes. Additionally, hypoglycemia is independently associated with increased risk of mortality regardless of the patient's diabetic status, and increased glycemic variability is independently associated with increased risk of mortality among patients without diabetes. See related commentary by Krinsley, http://ccforum.com/content/17/2/131 See related commentary by Finfer and Billot, http://ccforum.com/content/17/2/134

2013-01-01

173

Pulmonary function tests in type 2 diabetes mellitus and their association with glycemic control and duration of the disease  

PubMed Central

Background: Pulmonary complications of diabetes mellitus (DM) have been poorly characterized. Some authors have reported normal pulmonary functions and even concluded that spirometry is not at all necessary in diabetic patients. Some studies have shown abnormal respiratory parameters in patients of DM. Moreover, the duration of DM and glycemic control have varied impact on the pulmonary functions. Aims and Objectives: The study was undertaken to analyze the pulmonary function parameters in diabetic patients and compare them with age and gender matched healthy subjects. We correlated forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) in diabetic patients with duration of the disease and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Materials and Methods: Pulmonary function tests (PFTs) were recorded in 60 type 2 diabetic male patients and 60 normal healthy male controls aged 40-60 years by using Helios 702 spirometer. The PFTs recorded were - FVC, FEV1, FEV1/FVC, FEF25, FEF50, FEF75, FEF25–75, FEF0.2–1.2, and peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR). HbA1c of all the patients was estimated by ion exchange resin method, which is a very standard method of estimation. PFTs of diabetic patients and controls were compared by applying Student?s unpaired t test. Associations between FVC and FEV1 and HbA1c and duration of illness in diabetic patients were analyzed by applying Pearson?s coefficient. Results: The PFTs were significantly decreased in diabetic patients compared with the healthy controls except FEV1/FVC. There was no correlation found between FVC and FEV1 and duration of illness as well as HbA1c. Conclusion: DM being a systemic disease, which also affects lungs causing restrictive type of ventilatory changes probably because of glycosylation of connective tissues, reduced pulmonary elastic recoil and inflammatory changes in lungs. We found glycemic levels and duration of disease are probably not the major determinants of lung pathology, which requires further research.

Shah, Swati H.; Sonawane, Pranali; Nahar, Pradeep; Vaidya, Savita; Salvi, Sundeep

2013-01-01

174

Glycemic Index and Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... food? Is the GI a better tool than carbohydrate counting? Glycemic index examples of foods. What is ... The glycemic index, or GI, measures how a carbohydrate-containing food raises blood glucose. Foods are ranked ...

175

Impact of thiazolidinedione safety warnings on medication use patterns and glycemic control among veterans with diabetes mellitus  

Microsoft Academic Search

AimsIn 2007, safety warnings were publicized regarding the association between thiazolidinediones (TZDs) and cardiovascular risks. This study investigated the impact of the publicized safety warnings on glycemic outcomes in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM).

Lizheng Shi; Yingnan Zhao; Keith Szymanski; Lillian Yau; Vivian Fonseca

2011-01-01

176

Permanent Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus: Same Mutation, Different Glycemic Control with Sulfonylurea Therapy on Long-Term Follow-up  

PubMed Central

Permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus (PNDM) is a rare condition presenting before six months of age. Mutations in the genes encoding the ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel are the most common causes. Sulfonylurea (SU) therapy leads to dramatic improvement in diabetes control and quality of life in most patients who carry these mutations. Here, we report the long-term follow-up results of two siblings with PNDM who were treated with insulin until ABCC8 gene mutation was identified, and were successfully transferred to oral SU therapy. After 3.5 years of follow-up on SU, one patient had a very good response, while the other one had a poor response. Bad compliance to diet was thought to be the most probable reason for poor glycemic control in this patient. In conclusion, molecular genetic diagnosis in all patients with PNDM is recommended. Compliance to treatment should be an important aspect of the follow-up of these patients. Conflict of interest:None declared.

Bundak, Ruveyde; Bas, Firdevs; Maras, Hulya; Saka, Nurcin; Gunoz, Hulya; Darendeliler, Feyza

2012-01-01

177

Permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus: same mutation, different glycemic control with sulfonylurea therapy on long-term follow-up.  

PubMed

Permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus (PNDM) is a rare condition presenting before six months of age. Mutations in the genes encoding the ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel are the most common causes. Sulfonylurea (SU) therapy leads to dramatic improvement in diabetes control and quality of life in most patients who carry these mutations. Here, we report the long-term follow-up results of two siblings with PNDM who were treated with insulin until ABCC8 gene mutation was identified, and were successfully transferred to oral SU therapy. After 3.5 years of follow-up on SU, one patient had a very good response, while the other one had a poor response. Bad compliance to diet was thought to be the most probable reason for poor glycemic control in this patient. In conclusion, molecular genetic diagnosis in all patients with PNDM is recommended. Compliance to treatment should be an important aspect of the follow-up of these patients. PMID:22672870

Aydin, Banu Kücükemre; Bundak, Rüveyde; Ba?, Firdevs; Mara?, Hülya; Saka, Nurçin; Günöz, Hülya; Darendeliler, Feyza

2012-06-01

178

Effects of Encapsulated Propolis on Blood Glycemic Control, Lipid Metabolism, and Insulin Resistance in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Rats  

PubMed Central

The present study investigates the encapsulated propolis on blood glycemic control, lipid metabolism, and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) rats. The animal characteristics and biological assays of body weight, fasting blood glucose (FBG), fasting serum insulin (FINS), insulin act index (IAI), triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) were measured and euglycemic hyperinsulinemic glucose clamp technique were used to determine these effects. Our findings show that oral administration of encapsulated propolis can significantly inhibit the increasing of FBG and TG in T2DM rats and can improve IAI and M value in euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp experiment. There was no significant effects on body weight, TC, HDL-C, and LDL-C in T2DM rats treated with encapsulated propolis. In conclusion, the results indicate that encapsulated propolis can control blood glucose, modulate lipid metabolism, and improve the insulin sensitivity in T2DM rats.

Li, Yajing; Chen, Minli; Xuan, Hongzhuan; Hu, Fuliang

2012-01-01

179

Fenofibrate treatment is associated with better glycemic control and lower serum leptin and insulin levels in type 2 diabetic patients with hypertriglyceridemia.  

PubMed

Background: Hertriglyceridemia is commonly encountered in type 2 diabetic patients. Fibrates are a group of drugs that efficiently decrease triglycerides, increase HDL, and improve the prognosis in both diabetic and nondiabetic patients. However, the effects of fibrates on glycemic control, blood pressure, fasting serum insulin, and leptin concentrations are not clear. The present study addresses the question of whether fenofibrate treatment in hypertriglyceridemic type 2 diabetic patients leads to changes in metabolic control, body mass index, leptin, free fatty acids, plasma insulin, and blood pressure. Methods: Thirty-one type 2 diabetic patients who had serum triglyceride levels between 250 and 400 mg/dl were included in the study. They were given 250 mg/day fenofibrate once daily for 3 months. Antidiabetic and antihypertensive treatments were kept unchanged throughout the study. Results: Fenofibrate treatment resulted in better glycemic control, as evidenced by lower fasting and postprandial blood glucose and HbAlc, decreased fasting serum insulin and leptin levels, as well as a reduction in hypertrigyceridemia and serum free fatty acids, and an increase in HDL cholesterol. Blood pressure, body mass index, and LDL remained unchanged. Fenofibrate was well tolerated in all patients. Conclusion: Fenofibrate treatment in hypertriglyceridemic type 2 diabetic patients is beneficial not only in terms of lipid profile, but also for glycemic control and insulin resistance. PMID:14769493

Damci, Taner; Tatliagac, Serkan; Osar, Zeynep; Ilkova, Hasan

2003-10-01

180

Glycemic Control and Blood Glucose Monitoring Over Time in a Sample of Young Australians With Type 1 Diabetes: The role of personality.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVE To determine whether personality traits (conscientiousness, agreeableness, emotional regulation, extraversion, and openness to experience) are associated with glycemic control and blood glucose monitoring behavior, and change or stability of these outcomes over time, in young people with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A 3-year longitudinal study was conducted using data from 142 individuals with type 1 diabetes, 8-19 years of age. Personality was assessed at baseline using the Five-Factor Personality Inventory for Children. Data relating to glycemic control (HbA1c) and frequency of blood glucose monitoring (based on meter memory) were collected annually. Relationships between personality traits and HbA1c and monitoring frequency were examined using regression models and mixed-design ANOVA. RESULTS Three of the Five-Factor domains were independently associated with glycemic control. Individuals high in conscientiousness and agreeableness had a lower and more stable HbA1c across the 3-year study period. In contrast, the HbA1c of individuals scoring low on these traits was either consistently worse or deteriorated over time. Low or high emotional regulation scores were also associated with worse glycemic control. By the third year, these domains, together with initial HbA1c, accounted for 39% of HbA1c variance. Conscientiousness was the only personality factor associated with blood glucose monitoring behavior. CONCLUSIONS Results of this study underline the importance of personality in contributing to diabetes outcomes. Attention to a young person's personality, and appropriate tailoring of diabetes management to ensure an individualized approach, may help to optimize diabetes outcomes. PMID:23835696

Waller, Daniel; Johnston, Christine; Molyneaux, Lynda; Brown-Singh, Lin; Hatherly, Kristy; Smith, Lorraine; Overland, Jane

2013-07-08

181

Improvement in glycemic control following a diabetes education intervention is associated with change in diabetes distress but not change in depressive symptoms  

Microsoft Academic Search

In diabetes patients, depression is correlated with diabetes-specific emotional distress, and observational studies have suggested\\u000a that diabetes distress may have a greater impact on diabetes outcomes than depression itself. To examine the relative effects\\u000a of change in depressive symptoms and change in diabetes distress on change in glycemic control, we conducted a diabetes self-management\\u000a education intervention in 234 type 2

Sofija E. ZagarinsNancy; Nancy A. Allen; Jane L. Garb; Garry Welch

182

A comparison of insulin use, glycemic control, and health care costs with insulin detemir and insulin glargine in insulin-naive patients with type 2 diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: The goal of this study was to compare daily insulin use, glycemic control, and health care costs in insulin-naive patients with type 2 diabetes who initiated treatment with either insulin detemir or insulin glargine.Methods: This was a retrospective cohort analysis of health care claims data and laboratory results for adult, insulin-naive patients with type 2 diabetes who were enrolled

Bijan J. Borah; Theodore Darkow; Jonathan Bouchard; Mark Aagren; Felicia Forma; Berhanu Alemayehu

2009-01-01

183

Self-report and parent-report of physical and psychosocial well-being in Dutch adolescents with type 1 diabetes in relation to glycemic control  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: To determine physical and psychosocial well-being of adolescents with type 1 diabetes by self-report and parent report and to explore associations with glycemic control and other clinical and socio-demographic characteristics. METHODS: Demographic, medical and psychosocial data were gathered from 4 participating outpatient pediatric diabetes clinics in the Netherlands. Ninety-one patients completed the Child Health Questionnaire-CF87 (CHQ-CF87), Centre for Epidemiological

Maartje de Wit; Henriette A Delemarre-van de Waal; Jan Alle Bokma; Krijn Haasnoot; Mieke C Houdijk; Reinoud J Gemke; Frank J Snoek

2007-01-01

184

Effects of insulin glargine versus metformin on glycemic variability, microvascular and beta-cell function in early type 2 diabetes.  

PubMed

We investigated whether basal insulin as first-line treatment in recently diagnosed type 2 diabetes (T2D) can improve glucose control, microvascular function and preserve insulin secretion in comparison with metformin (MET). In this open-label, randomized, prospective 36-week study, 75 patients (44 m, 31 f, mean age 60.7 ± 9.2 year) were allocated to treatment with either MET 1,000 mg b.i.d. (n = 36) or insulin glargine (GLA) at bedtime (n = 39). At baseline and study end, we performed a continuous glucose monitoring for assessment of interstitial glucose (IG) and measured microvascular function using Laser-Doppler fluxmetry. GLA versus MET treatment resulted in a more pronounced reduction in FPG (?: 3.1 ± 2.5 vs. 1.4 ± 1.5 mmol/l; p < 0.001) and overall IG (? AUC. 671 ± 507 vs. 416 ± 537 mmol/l min; p = 0.04). Postprandial PG and IG differences after a standardized test meal did not reach significance. Proinsulin/C-peptide and HOMA B as marker of endogenous insulin secretion were significantly more improved by GLA. Microvascular blood flow improved only in MET-treated patients. Early basal insulin treatment with GLA in T2D patients provided a better control of FPG, overall IG load and biomarker of beta-cell function compared to the standard treatment with MET. MET treatment resulted in an improvement of microvascular function. Studies of longer duration are needed to evaluate the durability of glucose control and ? cell protection with early GLA treatment. PMID:23430192

Pistrosch, F; Köhler, C; Schaper, F; Landgraf, W; Forst, T; Hanefeld, M

2013-02-21

185

In search of quality evidence for lifestyle management and glycemic control in children and adolescents with type 2 diabetes: A systematic review  

PubMed Central

Background Our purpose was to evaluate the impact of lifestyle behavior modification on glycemic control among children and youth with clinically defined Type 2 Diabetes (T2D). Methods We conducted a systematic review of studies (randomized trials, quasi-experimental studies) evaluating lifestyle (diet and/or physical activity) modification and glycemic control (HbA1c). Our data sources included bibliographic databases (EMBASE, CINAHL®, Cochrane Library, Medline®, PASCAL, PsycINFO®, and Sociological Abstracts), manual reference search, and contact with study authors. Two reviewers independently selected studies that included any intervention targeting diet and/or physical activity alone or in combination as a means to reduce HbA1c in children and youth under the age of 18 with T2D. Results Our search strategy generated 4,572 citations. The majority of citations were not relevant to the study objective. One study met inclusion criteria. In this retrospective study, morbidly obese youth with T2D were treated with a very low carbohydrate diet. This single study received a quality index score of < 11, indicating poor study quality and thus limiting confidence in the study's conclusions. Conclusions There is no high quality evidence to suggest lifestyle modification improves either short- or long-term glycemic control in children and youth with T2D. Additional research is clearly warranted to define optimal lifestyle behaviour strategies for young people with T2D.

2010-01-01

186

Associations Between Media Consumption Habits, Physical Activity, Socioeconomic Status, and Glycemic Control in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults With Type 1 Diabetes  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the relationship between media consumption habits, physical activity, socioeconomic status, and glycemic control in youths with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In the cross-sectional study, self-report questionnaires were used to assess media consumption habits, physical activity, and socioeconomic status in 296 children, adolescents, and young adults with type 1 diabetes. Clinical data and HbA1c levels were collected. Risk factors were analyzed by multiple regression. RESULTS Youths with type 1 diabetes (aged 13.7 ± 4.1 years, HbA1c 8.7 ± 1.6%, diabetes duration 6.1 ± 3.3 years) spent 2.9 ± 1.8 h per day watching television and using computers. Weekly physical activity was 5.1 ± 4.5 h. Multiple regression analysis identified diabetes duration, socioeconomic status, and daily media consumption time as significant risk factors for glycemic control. CONCLUSIONS Diabetes duration, socioeconomic status, and daily media consumption time, but not physical activity, were significant risk factors for glycemic control in youths with type 1 diabetes.

Galler, Angela; Lindau, Maren; Ernert, Andrea; Thalemann, Ralf; Raile, Klemens

2011-01-01

187

Glycemic control with insulin prevents progression of dental caries and caries-related periodontitis in diabetic WBN/KobSlc rats.  

PubMed

We have previously reported that dental caries progress in spontaneously and chemically induced diabetic rodent models. The aim of this study was to clarify the relationship between hyperglycemia and dental caries by evaluating the preventive effect of glycemic control with insulin on the progression of the lesions in diabetic rats. Male WBN/KobSlc rats aged 15 weeks were divided into groups of spontaneously diabetic rats (intact group), spontaneously diabetic rats with insulin treatment (INS group), alloxan-induced prolonged diabetic rats (AL group), and alloxan-induced prolonged diabetic rats with insulin treatment (AL + INS group). The animals were killed at 90 weeks of age, and their oral tissue was examined. Dental caries and periodontitis were frequently detected in the intact group, and the lesions were enhanced in the AL group (in which there was an increased duration of diabetes). Meanwhile, glycemic control with insulin reduced the incidence and severity of dental caries and periodontitis in the INS group, and the effects became more pronounced in the AL + INS group. In conclusion, glycemic control by insulin prevented the progression of dental caries and caries-related periodontitis in the diabetic rats. PMID:23076036

Nakahara, Yutaka; Sano, Tomoya; Kodama, Yasushi; Ozaki, Kiyokazu; Matsuura, Tetsuro

2012-10-17

188

Mental health issues in adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes: prevalence and impact on glycemic control.  

PubMed

Mental health comorbidities can negatively affect disease management in adolescents with chronic illnesses. This study sought to determine the prevalence and impact of mental health issues in a population of adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes. A cross-sectional study of 150 patients aged 11 to 25 years with type 1 diabetes from an urban, academic diabetes center was conducted. Participants completed 3 validated mental health disorder screening instruments: Beck's Depression Inventory, the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders-41 anxiety screen, and the Eating Disorder Screen for Primary Care. More than a third screened positive: 11.3% for depression, 21.3% for anxiety, and 20.7% for disordered eating (14.7% had ?2 positive screens). Patients with a positive screen had twice the odds of having poor glycemic control as those without, as measured by HgbA1c. This study supports screening for mental health issues in adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes. PMID:22988007

Bernstein, Carrie M; Stockwell, Melissa S; Gallagher, Mary Pat; Rosenthal, Susan L; Soren, Karen

2012-09-17

189

Evaluation of the fructosamine test in obesity: consequences for the assessment of past glycemic control in diabetes.  

PubMed

The effect of obesity in diabetic and nondiabetic states on serum fructosamine levels, as measured by the nitro blue tetrazolium reduction method, was investigated. In 26 nondiabetic obese subjects, the mean (SD) fructosamine (1.78 +/- 0.16 mmol/L) and protein corrected fructosamine concentrations (25.7 +/- 2.5 mumol/g) were significantly lower than in nondiabetic lean control subjects (2.06 +/- 0.18 mmol/L and 30.5 +/- 2.5 mumol/g, respectively; p less than 0.01). Hemoglobin A1C, blood glucose and serum protein concentrations were normal in obese subjects. Interference from hypertriglyceridemia, hemolysis, or drugs was excluded. In diabetic subjects, fructosamine correlated with hemoglobin A1C, but the least-squares regression lines were different in 16 nonobese and in 19 obese patients, so that for the same hemoglobin A1C value, fructosamine level was 16% lower in obese compared to nonobese diabetic subjects. In vitro studies showed a significant decrease in 14C-glucose incorporation in serum proteins of obese nondiabetic subjects compared to control subjects. Similarly, the rate of formation of fructosamine in sera of obese nondiabetic subjects incubated with 12 mmol/L and 30 mmol/L glucose concentrations was slower than in sera of control subjects. In conclusion, fructosamine is underestimated in obesity, both in diabetic and nondiabetic patients, and its validity as an index of glycemic control may be impaired in obese subjects. This decrease is due to an alteration in the glycation process itself. PMID:2040093

Broussolle, C; Tricot, F; Garcia, I; Orgiazzi, J; Revol, A

1991-04-01

190

Effect of obesity and glycemic control on serum lipocalins and insulin-like growth factor axis in type 2 diabetic patients.  

PubMed

Obesity, insulin resistance (IR), and progressive decline in pancreatic ?-cell function are major features of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Altered adipokines contribute to obesity-induced IR. Hence understanding of adipokines' relation to obesity and glycemic control could be useful to improve disease outcomes. We aimed at determination of serum retinol binding protein-4 (RBP-4), lipocalin-2 (LCN-2), insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), and its binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) levels in T2DM patients with the impact of obesity and glycemic control on them and their relation to ?-cell function. Serum insulin, RBP-4, LCN-2, IGF-I, and IGFBP-3 estimated by ELISA were examined in 32 T2DM patients and age- and sex-matched 20 healthy controls. Significant elevation was observed in serum RBP-4 (P < 0.001), LCN-2 (P < 0.01), and IGF-I/IGFBP-3 molar ratio (P < 0.05) in T2DM patients in comparison with healthy controls. There was no significant difference in them between nonobese and obese diabetics. However, RBP-4 and IGF/IGFBP-3 molar ratio were higher in uncontrolled than in controlled diabetic patients at P < 0.001 and P < 0.01, respectively. Moreover, RBP-4, LCN-2, and IGF-I/IGFBP-3 molar ratio were negatively correlated with ?-cell function. In conclusion, serum RBP-4 and IGF-I/IGFBP-3 molar ratio but not LCN-2 were prominently elevated with poor glycemic control rather than obesity in T2DM patients. Whereas, declining ?-cell function is associated with elevation of serum RBP-4, LCN-2 as well as IGF-I/IGFBP-3 molar ratio. PMID:22307870

El-Mesallamy, Hala O; Hamdy, Nadia M; Sallam, Al-Aliaa M

2012-02-04

191

Conflicts of Interest among Authors of Clinical Practice Guidelines for Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus  

PubMed Central

Background Conflict of interest (COI) is an important potential source of bias in the development of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). Objectives To examine rates of disclosure of COI, including financial interests in companies that manufacture drugs that are recommended in CPGs on glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus, and to explore the relationship between recommendations for specific drugs in a guideline and author COI. Methods We identified a cohort of relevant guidelines from the National Guideline Clearinghouse (NGC) and abstracted COI disclosures from all guideline authors for this observational, cross-sectional study. We determined which hypoglycemic drugs were recommended in each guideline, and explored the relationship between specific disclosures and whether a drug was recommended. Results Among 13 included guidelines, the percentage of authors with one or more financial disclosures varied from 0 to 94% (mean 44.2%), and was particularly high for two US-based guidelines (91% and 94%). Three guidelines disclosed no author financial COI. The percentage of authors with disclosures of financial interests in manufacturers of recommended drugs was also high (mean 30%). On average, 56% of manufacturers of patented drugs recommended in each guideline had one or more authors with a financial interest in their company. We did not find a significant relationship between financial interests and whether a drug was recommended in our sample; US-based guidelines were more likely to make recommendations for a specific drug compared to non-US based guidelines. Discussion Authors of this cohort of guidelines have financial interests directly related to the drugs that they are recommending. Although we did not find an association between author COI and drugs recommended in these guidelines and we cannot draw conclusions about the validity of the recommendations, the credibility of many of these guidelines is in doubt.

Norris, Susan L.; Holmer, Haley K.; Ogden, Lauren A.; Burda, Brittany U.; Fu, Rongwei

2013-01-01

192

Effects of soy vs. casein protein on body weight and glycemic control in female monkeys and their offspring.  

PubMed

Nutritional interventions are important for reducing obesity and related conditions. Soy is a good source of protein and also contains isoflavones that may affect plasma lipids, body weight, and insulin action. Described here are data from a monkey breeding colony in which monkeys were initially fed a standard chow diet that is low fat with protein derived from soy. Monkeys were then randomized to a defined diet with a fat content similar to the typical American diet (TAD) containing either protein derived from soy (TAD soy) or casein-lactalbumin (TAD casein). The colony was followed for over two years to assess body weight, and carbohydrate and lipid measures in adult females (n=19) and their offspring (n=25). Serum isoflavone concentrations were higher with TAD soy than TAD casein, but not as high as when monkey chow was fed. Offspring consuming TAD soy had higher serum isoflavone concentrations than adults consuming TAD soy. Female monkeys consuming TAD soy had better glycemic control, as determined by fructosamine concentrations, but no differences in lipids or body weight compared with those consuming diets with TAD casein. Offspring born to dams consuming TAD soy had similar body weights at birth but over a two-year period weighed significantly less, had significantly lower triglyceride concentrations, and like adult females, had significantly lower fructosamine concentrations compared to TAD casein. Glucose tolerance tests in adult females were not significantly different with diet, but offspring eating TAD soy had increased glucose disappearance with overall lower glucose and insulin responses to the glucose challenge compared with TAD casein. Potential reasons for the additional benefits of TAD soy observed in offspring but not in adults may be related to higher serum isoflavone concentrations in offspring, presence of the diet differences throughout more of their lifespan (including gestation), or different tissue susceptibilities in younger animals. PMID:19484707

Wagner, Janice D; Jorgensen, Matthew J; Cline, J Mark; Lees, Cynthia J; Franke, Adrian A; Zhang, Li; Ayers, Melissa R; Schultz, Carrie; Kaplan, Jay R

2009-09-01

193

The Relationship Between Adult Neuropsychological Profiles and Diabetic Patients' Glycemic Control  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to assess, in relation to metabolic control, the cognitive, depressive, and anxiety symptoms among 40 adult patients (age: 18–60 years) with either type 1 (n = 28) or type 2 (n = 12) diabetes mellitus (DM1, DM2). Nineteen healthy subjects matched for age, gender, and education served as the control group. For most cognitive domains, no significant performance

Josef Zihl; Ludwig Schaaf; Eric A. Zillmer

2010-01-01

194

Glycemic Control Influences Serum Angiogenin Concentrations in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE Because diabetes is the most frequent factor responsible for microvascular and macrovascular disease, we investigated angiogenin serum levels within the diabetic patient group. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We investigated 49 patients who met the criteria to be in the diabetic group. Forty nondiabetic patients were included in the control group. We set A1C <7% as well-controlled diabetes. Serum angiogenin level was measured using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. RESULTS Serum angiogenin levels of poorly controlled patients with type 2 diabetes were significantly lower than those of group with well-controlled diabetes (361.23 ± 126.03 ng/ml vs. 446.37 ± 134.10 ng/ml; P = 0.001). Moreover, they were characterized by a significantly longer duration of the disease (P = 0.006), higher BMI (P = 0.0003), and higher systolic blood pressure (P = 0.01). Levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL, and HDL were not significantly different in both groups. CONCLUSIONS Patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes (A1C >7%) have lower angiogenin levels than patients with well-controlled diabetes.

Siebert, Janusz; Reiwer-Gostomska, Magdalena; Mysliwska, Jolanta; Marek, Natalia; Raczynska, Krystyna; Glasner, Leopold

2010-01-01

195

Improved Glycemic Control Without Hypoglycemia in Elderly Diabetic Patients Using the Ubiquitous Healthcare Service, a New Medical Information System  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To improve quality and efficiency of care for elderly patients with type 2 diabetes, we introduced elderly-friendly strategies to the clinical decision support system (CDSS)-based ubiquitous healthcare (u-healthcare) service, which is an individualized health management system using advanced medical information technology. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We conducted a 6-month randomized, controlled clinical trial involving 144 patients aged >60 years. Participants were randomly assigned to receive routine care (control, n = 48), to the self-monitored blood glucose (SMBG, n = 47) group, or to the u-healthcare group (n = 49). The primary end point was the proportion of patients achieving A1C <7% without hypoglycemia at 6 months. U-healthcare system refers to an individualized medical service in which medical instructions are given through the patient’s mobile phone. Patients receive a glucometer with a public switched telephone network-connected cradle that automatically transfers test results to a hospital-based server. Once the data are transferred to the server, an automated system, the CDSS rule engine, generates and sends patient-specific messages by mobile phone. RESULTS After 6 months of follow-up, the mean A1C level was significantly decreased from 7.8 ± 1.3% to 7.4 ± 1.0% (P < 0.001) in the u-healthcare group and from 7.9 ± 1.0% to 7.7 ± 1.0% (P = 0.020) in the SMBG group, compared with 7.9 ± 0.8% to 7.8 ± 1.0% (P = 0.274) in the control group. The proportion of patients with A1C <7% without hypoglycemia was 30.6% in the u-healthcare group, 23.4% in the SMBG group (23.4%), and 14.0% in the control group (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS The CDSS-based u-healthcare service achieved better glycemic control with less hypoglycemia than SMBG and routine care and may provide effective and safe diabetes management in the elderly diabetic patients.

Lim, Soo; Kang, Seon Mee; Shin, Hayley; Lee, Hak Jong; Won Yoon, Ji; Yu, Sung Hoon; Kim, So-Youn; Yoo, Soo Young; Jung, Hye Seung; Park, Kyong Soo; Ryu, Jun Oh; Jang, Hak C.

2011-01-01

196

Absence of diabetic retinopathy in a patient who has had diabetes mellitus for 69 years, and inadequate glycemic control: case presentation  

PubMed Central

The main risk factors for the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy (DR) are chronic hyperglycemia, disease duration and systemic blood pressure. So far chronic hyperglycemia is the strongest evidence concerning the risk of developing DR. However there are some patients with poor metabolic control who never develop this diabetic complication. We present a case of a 73-year-old woman with type 1 diabetes mellitus, diagnosed 69 years ago. The patient is 73 years old, with no evidence of DR, despite poor glycemic control and several risk factors for DR. This case suggests the presence of a possible protection factor, which could be genetic.

Esteves, Jorge; da Rosa, Carolina Maurente; Kramer, Caroline Kaercher; Osowski, Luiz Eduardo; Milano, Stefano; Canani, Luis Henrique

2009-01-01

197

Intensive glycemic control and cardiovascular disease: are there patients who may benefit?  

PubMed

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Recent major publications, such as the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes trial, the Advance in Diabetes and Vascular Disease: Preterax and Diamicron MR Controlled Evaluation trial, and the Veterans Affairs Diabetes Trial, found that intensive glucose control in patients with T2DM did not reduce CVD outcomes. However, in this article, we review observational studies and clinical trials that, on aggregate, indicate how glucose lowering appears to reduce risks of CVD in certain subgroups, but can be harmful in other individuals. Based on available evidence, we suggest that younger patients with a shorter duration of T2DM, without CVD, and with few comorbid conditions may experience the greatest cardiovascular benefit from intensive glucose control. In contrast, more aggressive glucose lowering in older patients with a longer duration of T2DM, a history of CVD, and/or multiple comorbidities does not translate to reduced cardiovascular events, and may cause harm. The target goal and therapeutic strategy for intensive glucose control should be established for each individual after a careful review of his or her medical and psychosocial history, and should not reflect a "one-size-fits-all" approach. PMID:22104460

Chokrungvaranon, Nalurporn; Deer, James; Reaven, Peter D

2011-11-01

198

REDUCTION OF NOSOCOMIAL INFECTIONS IN THE SURGICAL INTENSIVE-CARE UNIT BY STRICT GLYCEMIC CONTROL  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To investigate whether hyperglycemia in glucose-intolerant patients without diabetes could lead to increased nosocomial infections in the surgical intensive- care unit (ICU). Methods: A prospective, randomized, controlled clin- ical trial was conducted in the surgical ICU of a large teaching hospital in Hartford, Connecticut. Adult patients admitted to a 12-bed surgical ICU requiring treatment of hyperglycemia (glucose values ?140

Neil J. Grey; George A. Perdrizet

2004-01-01

199

Promoting glycemic control through diabetes self-management: evaluating a patient activation intervention  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study compared an activation intervention to passive education in a randomized attention-control trial of 232 patients with type 2 diabetes. The activation intervention was based on Expanding Patient Involvement in Care (EPIC) trials, and was compared to time-matched passive education viewing of ADA video-tapes. Patient demographics and clinical characteristics of their diabetes were assessed with questionnaires, active involvement was

Geoffrey C. Williams; Holly McGregor; Allan Zeldman; Zachary R. Freedman; Edward L. Deci; Daniel Elder

2005-01-01

200

Periodontal treatment by Arestin and its effects on glycemic control in type 1 diabetes patients.  

PubMed

Studies indicate that a dual pathway between diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease exists. Elimination of periodontal infection by using systemic antibiotics in conjunction with scaling and root planing (SRP) improved metabolic control in diabetic patients, as defined by reduction in glycated haemoglobin or reduction in insulin requirements (Grossi and Genco, 1998). The aim of this randomised pilot clinical trial was to determine if type 1 diabetes patients with periodontitis will experience a reduction in HbA1c levels when treated with locally delivered minocycline microspheres (Arestin) as an adjunct to scaling and root planing. Twenty adult patients with poorly controlled diabetes (HbA1c 7.5%) and adult periodontitis, as determined by the presence of four teeth with 5 mm periodontal pockets, two of which had 6-9 mm pockets and bleeding on probing, were included in the study. All patients received full mouth SRP at baseline. Arestin was administered to all pockets > or => or = 5 mm at baseline and again at 12 weeks in the test group. Probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), and HbA1c were evaluated at baseline and at weeks 6, 12, 18 and 24. The results demonstrated that local administration of Arestin as an adjunct to scaling and root planing is significantly more effective in reducing probing depths and providing a gain in clinical attachment levels than scaling and root planing alone in type 1 diabetic patients. Hb1Ac was reduced in all patients; however the difference between the test and control groups was not significant. PMID:15536785

Skaleric, Uros; Schara, Rok; Medvescek, Marko; Hanlon, Alexandra; Doherty, Frances; Lessem, Jan

2004-10-01

201

Dapagliflozin Versus Glipizide as Add-on Therapy in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Who Have Inadequate Glycemic Control With Metformin  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE Although initially effective, sulfonylureas are associated with poor glycemic durability, weight gain, and hypoglycemia. Dapagliflozin, a selective inhibitor of sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2), reduces hyperglycemia by increasing urinary glucose excretion independent of insulin and may cause fewer of these adverse effects. We compared the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of dapagliflozin with the sulfonylurea glipizide in patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with metformin monotherapy. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This 52-week, double-blind, multicenter, active-controlled, noninferiority trial randomized patients with type 2 diabetes (baseline mean HbA1c, 7.7%), who were receiving metformin monotherapy, to add-on dapagliflozin (n = 406) or glipizide (n = 408) up-titrated over 18 weeks, based on glycemic response and tolerability, to ?10 or ?20 mg/day, respectively. RESULTS The primary end point, adjusted mean HbA1c reduction with dapagliflozin (?0.52%) compared with glipizide (?0.52%), was statistically noninferior at 52 weeks. Key secondary end points: dapagliflozin produced significant adjusted mean weight loss (?3.2 kg) versus weight gain (1.2 kg; P < 0.0001) with glipizide, significantly increased the proportion of patients achieving ?5% body weight reduction (33.3%) versus glipizide (2.5%; P < 0.0001), and significantly decreased the proportion experiencing hypoglycemia (3.5%) versus glipizide (40.8%; P < 0.0001). Events suggestive of genital infections and lower urinary tract infections were reported more frequently with dapagliflozin compared with glipizide but responded to standard treatment and rarely led to study discontinuation. CONCLUSIONS Despite similar 52-week glycemic efficacy, dapagliflozin reduced weight and produced less hypoglycemia than glipizide in type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with metformin. Long-term studies are required to further evaluate genital and urinary tract infections with SGLT2 inhibitors.

Nauck, Michael A.; Del Prato, Stefano; Meier, Juris J.; Duran-Garcia, Santiago; Rohwedder, Katja; Elze, Martina; Parikh, Shamik J.

2011-01-01

202

Low-carbohydrate diet in type 2 diabetes. Stable improvement of bodyweight and glycemic control during 22 months follow-up  

PubMed Central

Background Low-carbohydrate diets in the management of obese patients with type 2 diabetes seem intuitively attractive due to their potent antihyperglycemic effect. We previously reported that a 20 % carbohydrate diet was significantly superior to a 55–60 % carbohydrate diet with regard to bodyweight and glycemic control in 2 non-randomised groups of obese diabetes patients observed closely over 6 months. The effect beyond 6 months of reduced carbohydrate has not been previously reported. The objective of the present study, therefore, was to determine to what degree the changes among the 16 patients in the low-carbohydrate diet group at 6-months were preserved or changed 22 months after start, even without close follow-up. In addition, we report that, after the 6 month observation period, two thirds of the patients in the high-carbohydrate changed their diet. This group also showed improvement in bodyweight and glycemic control. Method Retrospective follow-up of previously studied subjects on a low carbohydrate diet. Results The mean bodyweight at the start of the initial study was 100.6 ± 14.7 kg. At six months it was 89.2 ± 14.3 kg. From 6 to 22 months, mean bodyweight had increased by 2.7 ± 4.2 kg to an average of 92.0 ± 14.0 kg. Seven of the 16 patients (44%) retained the same bodyweight from 6 to 22 months or reduced it further; all but one had lower weight at 22 months than at the beginning. Initial mean HbA1c was 8.0 ± 1.5 %. After 6 and 12 months it was 6.6 ± 1.0 % and 7.0 ± 1.3 %, respectively. At 22 months, it was still 6.9 ± 1.1 %. Conclusion Advice on a 20 % carbohydrate diet with some caloric restriction to obese patients with type 2 diabetes has lasting effect on bodyweight and glycemic control.

Nielsen, J?rgen Vesti; Joensson, Eva

2006-01-01

203

ESR1 , FTO , and UCP2 Genes Interact with Bariatric Surgery Affecting Weight Loss and Glycemic Control in Severely Obese Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Significant variability in weight loss and glycemic control has been observed in obese patients receiving bariatric surgery.\\u000a Genetic factors may play a role in the different outcomes.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Five hundred and twenty severely obese patients with body mass index (BMI) ?35 were recruited. Among them, 149 and 371 subjects\\u000a received laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) and laparoscopic mini-gastric bypass (LMGB), respectively.

Tsan-Hon Liou; Hsin-Hung Chen; Weu Wang; Shu-Fen Wu; Yi-Chih Lee; Wei-Shiung Yang; Wei-Jei Lee

204

Cissus sicyoides: analysis of glycemic control in diabetic rats through biomarkers.  

PubMed

Diabetes is a chronic degenerative disease with no cure, is found in millions of people worldwide, and can cause life-threatening complications at any age. The plant Cissus sicyoides L. is a runner plant found abundantly in Brazil, especially in the Amazon. Its therapeutic properties are widely used in popular medicine as a diuretic, anti-influenza, anti-inflammatory, anticonvulsion, and hypoglycemic agent. The objective of this study was to analyze the effects of aqueous extracts from the leaves and stem of C. sicyoides L., administered for 60 days, for the control of glycemia in alloxan (monohydrate)-induced diabetic rats, monitored by biomarkers. Data obtained in this study confirmed that C. sicyoides has a hypoglycemic effect on diabetic rats. Administration of its aqueous extracts promoted a 45% decrease in glucose levels after 60 days of administration. Furthermore, indices of hepatic glycogen, blood glucose, C-reactive peptide, and fructosamine were found to be efficient biomarkers to monitor diabetes in rats. PMID:19735170

Salgado, Jocelem Mastrodi; Mansi, Débora Niero; Gagliardi, Antonio

2009-08-01

205

Inpatient diabetes education is associated with less frequent hospital readmission among patients with poor glycemic control.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVE To explore the relationship between inpatient diabetes education (IDE) and hospital readmissions in patients with poorly controlled diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Patients with a discharge diagnosis of diabetes (ICD-9 code 250.x) and HbA1c >9% who were hospitalized between 2008 and 2010 were retrospectively identified. All-cause first readmissions were determined within 30 days and 180 days after discharge. IDE was conducted by a certified diabetes educator or trainee. Relationships between IDE and hospital readmission were analyzed with stepwise backward logistic regression models. RESULTS In all, 2,265 patients were included in the 30-day analysis and 2,069 patients were included in the 180-day analysis. Patients who received IDE had a lower frequency of readmission within 30 days than did those who did not (11 vs. 16%; P = 0.0001). This relationship persisted after adjustment for sociodemographic and illness-related factors (odds ratio 0.66 [95% CI 0.51-0.85]; P = 0.001). Medicaid insurance and longer stay were also independent predictors in this model. IDE was also associated with reduced readmissions within 180 days, although the relationship was attenuated. In the final 180-day model, no IDE, African American race, Medicaid or Medicare insurance, longer stay, and lower HbA1c were independently associated with increased hospital readmission. Further analysis determined that higher HbA1c was associated with lower frequency of readmission only among patients who received a diabetes education consult. CONCLUSIONS Formal IDE was independently associated with a lower frequency of all-cause hospital readmission within 30 days; this relationship was attenuated by 180 days. Prospective studies are needed to confirm this association. PMID:23835695

Healy, Sara J; Black, Dawn; Harris, Cara; Lorenz, Andrew; Dungan, Kathleen M

2013-07-08

206

Strict glycemic control in diabetic dogs with closed-loop intraperitoneal insulin infusion algorithm designed for an artificial endocrine pancreas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ultimate goal of the development of an artificial endocrine pancreas is to achieve long-term strict glycemic regulation.\\u000a To establish the physiological insulin delivery route of the artificial endocrine pancreas, intraperitoneal insulin infusion\\u000a may be important. For this purpose, we tried to develop a closed-loop intraperitoneal insulin infusion algorithm by analyzing\\u000a the pharmacokinetics of intraperitoneal regular insulin absorption using a

Yasuto Matsuo; Seiya Shimoda; Michiharu Sakakida; Kenro Nishida; Taiji Sekigami; Shinji Ichimori; Kenshi Ichinose; M. Shichiri; E. Araki

2003-01-01

207

Skin Advanced Glycation End Product Accumulation Is Poorly Reflected by Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetic Patients (ZODIAC9)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Glycemic memory can be reflected by tissue accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). In type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) patients, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels over various time periods poorly predicted the accumulation of different AGEs in skin biopsies. Our aim was to investigate whether HbA1c assessments can predict the change in skin AGEs during time in type 2

Esther G. Gerrits; Helen L. Lutgers; Nanne Kleefstra; Klaas H. Groenier; Andries J. Smit; Rijk O. B. Gans; Henk J. G. Bilo

208

Effect of scaling and root planing combined with systemic doxycycline therapy on glycemic control in diabetes mellitus subjects with chronic generalized periodontitis: a clinical study  

PubMed Central

Purpose The purpose of study was to compare glycemic control using glycated hemoglobin levels (HbA1c) in diabetic patients with chronic generalized periodontitis (CGP) undergoing scaling and root planing (SRP) with and without systemic doxycycline. Methods Fifty subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and CGP receiving antidiabetic therapy were selected for study. The selected subjects were randomly assigned to two groups (test group [TG] and control group [CG]) comprising 25 patients each. The TG received SRP followed by systemic doxycycline. The CG received treatment with SRP only. The periodontal parameters were recorded at baseline (day zero), and every 1 month for 4 months and included probing depth, clinical attachment level, plaque index, gingival index, and HbA1c level were recorded at baseline (day zero) and at the end of 4 months. Results A statistically significant effect was demonstrated for the periodontal parameters for both the TG and CG. HbA1c values did not show a statistically significant difference in the treatment group as compared to the CG. Conclusions The authors concluded that nonsurgical periodontal therapy improved glycemic control in patients with T2DM in both groups, but no statistical difference was observed with adjunctive systemic doxycycline therapy. A further study with a larger sample size is required.

Gurav, Abhijit N.; Shete, Abhijeet R.; Desarda, Hitesh M.

2013-01-01

209

Evaluation of an intra-institutional diabetes disease management program for the glycemic control of elderly long-term care diabetic patients.  

PubMed

AIM: Increasing numbers of nursing home elderly patients suffer from diabetes requiring individually optimized glycemic control. This is a complicated challenge because of their high comorbidity level, and heterogeneous and changing eating status varying from independent to dysphagia and enteral feeding. In order to cope with these complex needs, we developed and implemented a diabetes disease management program. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate this program. METHODS: We used the point prevalence approach by checking for fasting blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin and other routine biochemical tests. Eating status was evaluated by the Functional Outcome Swallowing Scale. Details about the diabetes disease management program are given in the text. RESULTS: A total of 86 (36%) of the 234 patients on the study day were diabetics. Of these, 80 were eligible for the study. Their mean fasting blood glucose was 143.1?±?60.6?mg/dL. The mean glycated hemoglobin level was 7.23?±?1.39%. CONCLUSION: No case of hypoglycemia was detected on the examination day, or during the preceding 3 weeks. No significant difference was found among the different Functional Outcome Swallowing Scale categories. These results are within satisfactory range for this category of patients suggesting that our diabetes disease management program contributes to a better glycemic control. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2013; ??: ??-??. PMID:23750823

Lubart, Emily; Segal, Refael; Wainstein, Julio; Marinov, Galina; Yarovoy, Alexandra; Leibovitz, Arthur

2013-06-10

210

CARBOHYDRATE INTAKE, GLYCEMIC INDEX, GLYCEMIC LOAD AND RISK OF GASTRIC CANCER  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY The aim of this study was to examine relationship between dietary carbohydrate, glycemic index, glycemic load and gastric cancer risk. This hospital based case-control study was conducted in Niš (Serbia) between 2005 and 2006. Subjects (n=102) with histologically confirmed gastric cancer and controls (n=204) selected from non-cancer patients were interviewed. The structured questionnaire included information on socio-demo- graphic and

Aleksandar Nagorni; Miroslav Jeremi?; Center Niš

2009-01-01

211

Survey of the Effect of Biotin on Glycemic Control and Plasma Lipid Concentrations in Type 1 Diabetic Patients in Kermanshah in Iran (2008-2009)  

PubMed Central

Objective: Diabetes mellitus is the most common chronic endocrine disease worldwide. Intensive glycemic control plays an important role in decreasing morbidity and mortality rate of the disease. Preclinical studies have shown that biotin has an essential role in regulating blood glucose and serum lipid metabolism. This study aims to evaluate the effect of biotin on glycemic control and plasma lipids concentrations in type 1diabetic patients. Methods: This randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial study was conducted 70 type 1 diabetic patients with an age range 5-25 years old with poorly controlled (glycosylated hemoglobin ?8%). Subjects were randomly allocated into two groups. In the intervention group biotin (40 microgram/kg) was administered plus daily insulin, while the control group received placebo plus daily insulin regimen for three months. Laboratory tests including glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting blood sugar and plasma lipids were measured at the base and after 3 months. Results: In this study, seventy patients were evaluated, 35 were allocated to each group. There were no statistically significant differences between age, gender, duration of diabetes, BMI and BP between the two groups (p>0.05). HbA1c in the intervention (biotin) group was 9.84±1.80 at base and after 3 months treatment, it declined to 8.88±1.73 (p<0.001). In the control group HbA1c at base was 9.39±1.58, after 3 months it increased to10.11± 1.68. There were statistically significant differences in the mean of HbA1c in both the biotin and the control groups (p<0.001). FBS in the biotin group at base was 275±65.76 mg/dl and after 3 months it had reduced to 226± 41.31 (p<0.001). There were statistically significant differences in the mean of total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride between the two groups at the end of 3 months (p<0.05). Conclusion: Results of this study showed that biotin administration as an adjuvant in addition to insulin regimen can improve glycemic management and decrease plasma lipids concentrations in poorly controlled type 1 diabetic patients.

Hemmati, Mitra; Babaei, Homa; Abdolsalehei, Mohammadreza

2013-01-01

212

EFFECT OF INTENSIVE GLYCEMIC THERAPY ON ERECTILE FUNCTION IN MEN WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES IN THE DIABETES CONTROL AND COMPLICATIONS TRIAL/EPIDEMIOLOGY OF DIABETES INTERVENTIONS AND COMPLICATIONS STUDY  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To determine whether intensive glycemic therapy reduces the risk of erectile dysfunction (ED) in men with type 1 diabetes enrolled in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT). MATERIALS AND METHODS DCCT randomized 761 males with type 1 diabetes to intensive or conventional glycemic therapy in 28 sites between 1983–1989, of whom 366 had diabetes for 1–5 years and no microvascular complications (primary prevention cohort) and 395 for 1–15 years with non-proliferative retinopathy or microablbuminuria (secondary intervention cohort). Subjects were treated until 1993 and followed in the Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC) study. In 2003, we conducted an ancillary study using a validated assessment of ED in 571 men (80% participation rate); 291 in the primary cohort and 280 in the secondary cohort. RESULTS Twenty-three percent of participants reported ED. The prevalence was significantly lower in the intensive versus conventional treatment group in the secondary cohort (12.8% versus 30.8%, p=0.001); but not the primary cohort (17% versus 20.3%, p=0.49). The risk of ED in both primary and secondary cohorts was directly associated with mean HbA1c during DCCT and EDIC combined. Age, peripheral neuropathy, and lower urinary tract symptoms were other risk factors. CONCLUSIONS A period of intensive therapy significantly reduced the prevalence of ED ten years later among those in the secondary intervention cohort, but not the primary prevention cohort; higher HbA1c was significantly associated with risk in both cohorts. These findings provide further support for early implementation of intensive insulin therapy in young men with type 1 diabetes.

Wessells, Hunter; Penson, David F.; Cleary, Patricia; Rutledge, Brandy N.; Lachin, John M.; McVary, Kevin T.; Schade, David S.; Sarma, Aruna V.

2011-01-01

213

Baseline Factors Associated With Glycemic Control and Weight Loss When Exenatide Twice Daily Is Added to Optimized Insulin Glargine in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To determine variables associated with glycemic and body weight responses when adding exenatide to basal insulin–treated type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Exploratory subgroup analyses based on baseline A1C, disease duration, and BMI of a 30-week study comparing exenatide twice daily to placebo, added to optimized insulin glargine (intent-to-treat analysis: 137 exenatide; 122 placebo). RESULTS Exenatide participants had greater A1C reductions compared with optimized insulin glargine alone, irrespective of baseline A1C (P < 0.001). Exenatide participants with longer diabetes duration and those with lower BMI had greater A1C reductions (P < 0.01). Exenatide participants lost more weight, regardless of baseline A1C or BMI (P < 0.05). Exenatide participants with longer diabetes duration lost the most weight (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS Exenatide added to optimized basal insulin was associated with improved glycemic control and weight loss, irrespective of baseline A1C, diabetes duration, and BMI. Changes were evident in modestly obese patients and in those with longer diabetes duration.

Rosenstock, Julio; Shenouda, Sylvia K.; Bergenstal, Richard M.; Buse, John B.; Glass, Leonard C.; Heilmann, Cory R.; Kwan, Anita Y.M.; MacConell, Leigh A.; Hoogwerf, Byron James

2012-01-01

214

Three 15-min Bouts of Moderate Postmeal Walking Significantly Improves 24-h Glycemic Control in Older People at Risk for Impaired Glucose Tolerance.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of three 15-min bouts of postmeal walking with 45 min of sustained walking on 24-h glycemic control in older persons at risk for glucose intolerance. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Inactive older (?60 years of age) participants (N = 10) were recruited from the community and were nonsmoking, with a BMI <35 kg/m(2) and a fasting blood glucose concentration between 105 and 125 mg dL(-1). Participants completed three randomly ordered exercise protocols spaced 4 weeks apart. Each protocol comprised a 48-h stay in a whole-room calorimeter, with the first day serving as the control day. On the second day, participants engaged in either 1) postmeal walking for 15 min or 45 min of sustained walking performed at 2) 10:30 a.m. or 3) 4:30 p.m. All walking was on a treadmill at an absolute intensity of 3 METs. Interstitial glucose concentrations were determined over 48 h with a continuous glucose monitor. Substrate utilization was measured continuously by respiratory exchange (VCO2/VO2). RESULTS Both sustained morning walking (127 ± 23 vs. 118 ± 14 mg dL(-1)) and postmeal walking (129 ± 24 vs. 116 ± 13 mg dL(-1)) significantly improved 24-h glycemic control relative to the control day (P < 0.05). Moreover, postmeal walking was significantly (P < 0.01) more effective than 45 min of sustained morning or afternoon walking in lowering 3-h postdinner glucose between the control and experimental day. CONCLUSIONS Short, intermittent bouts of postmeal walking appear to be an effective way to control postprandial hyperglycemia in older people. PMID:23761134

Dipietro, Loretta; Gribok, Andrei; Stevens, Michelle S; Hamm, Larry F; Rumpler, William

2013-06-11

215

A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, clinical trial of the effects of pioglitazone on glycemic control and dyslipidemia in oral antihyperglycemic medication-naive patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The goal of this study was to compare the effects of 2 doses of pioglitazone hydrochloride (a thiazolidinedione insulin sensitizer) with placebo on glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), insulin sensitivity, and lipid profiles in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who had suboptimal glycemic control and mild dyslipidemia.Methods: Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (HbA1c ?6.5% and ?9.8%) who had not

Matthias Herz; Don Johns; Jesus Reviriego; Loren D Grossman; Chantal Godin; Santiago Duran; Federico Hawkins; Heather Lochnan; Fernando Escobar-Jiménez; Philip A Hardin; Christopher S Konkoy; Meng H Tan

2003-01-01

216

Effect of Caloric Intake 25 or 30 kcal/kg/day on the Glycemic Control in Obese Patients With Type 2 Diabetes  

PubMed Central

Background The recommended total dietary energy intake prescribed medical nutrition therapy for obese or overweight patients with type 2 diabetes in Japan is often set at 25 kcal/kg ideal body weight (IBW)/day. This study was conducted to determine the impact of the total dietary energy intake (25 or 30 kcal/kg IBW/day) on the glycemic control, lipid profile, and satisfaction level in overweight patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods We performed interview and a designed prospective, randomized, controlled, multicenter study trial. Recruitment for interview for doctors and hospitalization of the obese or overweight patients with type 2 diabetes began from September 2008 and continued until June 2010. The subjects were randomly assigned to 25 kcal/kg IBW/day group (25 kcal group) or 30 kcal/kg IBW/day group (30 kcal group). The primary endpoint was the body weight of the subjects at the time of hospitalization, at the time of discharge from the hospital, and at 3, 6 and 12 months after discharge from the hospital. Results The glycemic control, lipid control and body weight were similar between the 25 and 30 kcal groups during the 12-month follow-up, and the degree of satisfaction in respect of the medical treatment was significantly higher in the 30 kcal group than in the 25 kcal group at 1 year after discharge. Conclusions It is considered to be preferable for the caloric intake to be set at 30kcal/kg IBW/day rather than at 25 kcal/kg IBW/day for obese or overweight patients with type 2 diabetes.

Masuda, Kiyomi; Aoki, Kazutaka; Kawaguchi, Junko; Yamakawa, Tadashi; Matsuba, Ikuro; Terauchi, Yasuo

2013-01-01

217

Intensive Structured Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose and Glycemic Control in Noninsulin-Treated Type 2 Diabetes: The PRISMA randomized trial.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVE We aimed to evaluate the added value of intensive self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG), structured in timing and frequency, in noninsulin-treated patients with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The 12-month, randomized, clinical trial enrolled 1,024 patients with noninsulin-treated type 2 diabetes (median baseline HbA1c, 7.3% [IQR, 6.9-7.8%]) at 39 diabetes clinics in Italy. After standardized education, 501 patients were randomized to intensive structured monitoring (ISM) with 4-point glycemic profiles (fasting, preprandial, 2-h postprandial, and postabsorptive measurements) performed 3 days/week; 523 patients were randomized to active control (AC) with 4-point glycemic profiles performed at baseline and at 6 and 12 months. Two primary end points were tested in hierarchical order: HbA1c change at 12 months and percentage of patients at risk target for low and high blood glucose index. RESULTS Intent-to-treat analysis showed greater HbA1c reductions over 12 months in ISM (-0.39%) than in AC patients (-0.27%), with a between-group difference of -0.12% (95% CI, -0.210 to -0.024; P = 0.013). In the per-protocol analysis, the between-group difference was -0.21% (-0.331 to -0.089; P = 0.0007). More ISM than AC patients achieved clinically meaningful reductions in HbA1c (>0.3, >0.4, or >0.5%) at study end (P < 0.025). The proportion of patients reaching/maintaining the risk target at month 12 was similar in ISM (74.6%) and AC (70.1%) patients (P = 0.131). At visits 2, 3, and 4, diabetes medications were changed more often in ISM than in AC patients (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS Use of structured SMBG improves glycemic control and provides guidance in prescribing diabetes medications in patients with relatively well-controlled noninsulin-treated type 2 diabetes. PMID:23735724

Bosi, Emanuele; Scavini, Marina; Ceriello, Antonio; Cucinotta, Domenico; Tiengo, Antonio; Marino, Raffaele; Bonizzoni, Erminio; Giorgino, Francesco

2013-06-04

218

Effects of a low-fat diet compared with those of a high-monounsaturated fat diet on body weight, plasma lipids and lipoproteins, and glycemic control in type 2 diabetes1-3  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: An important therapeutic goal for patients with type 2 diabetes is weight loss, which improves metabolic abnormalities. Ad libitum low-fat diets cause weight loss in nondiabetic popula- tions. Compared with diets higher in monounsaturated fat, however, eucaloric low-fat diets may increase plasma triacylglycerol concen- trations and worsen glycemic control in persons with type 2 diabetes. Objective: We investigated whether,

Glenn T Gerhard; Andrew Ahmann; Kaatje Meeuws; Martha P McMurry; P Barton Duell; William E Connor

219

Insulin Detemir Is Associated With More Predictable Glycemic Control and Reduced Risk of Hypoglycemia Than NPH Insulin in Patients With Type 1 Diabetes on a Basal-Bolus Regimen With Premeal Insulin Aspart  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE — Insulin detemir is a soluble basal insulin analog with a unique mechanism of protracted action designed to reduce the variability associated with conventional basal insulins. This trial compared the glycemic control, risk of hypoglycemia, and effect on body weight of insulin detemir and NPH insulin in patients with type 1 diabetes treated with rapid-acting insulin aspart at meals.

PHILIPPE VAGUE; JEAN-LOUIS SELAM; SVEIN SKEIE; IVO DE LEEUW; JAN W. F. ELTE; HANNE HAAHR; ALLAN KRISTENSEN; EBERHARD DRAEGER

220

Glycemic response and health: summary of a workshop1-3  

Microsoft Academic Search

Interest in the glycemic impact of diet on health and well-being is growingamonghealthcareprofessionalsandconsumers.Dietswith high glycemic impact have been postulated to increase risk of obe- sity, insulin resistance, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. A re- duction in the glycemic impact of the diet has been proposed as a means of assisting body weight management, improving blood glu- cose control, and reducing diabetic,

John Howlett; Margaret Ashwell

221

Glycemic index, glycemic load, and pancreatic cancer risk (Canada)  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is some evidence that plasma insulin and postload plasma glucose may be associated with risk of pancreatic cancer. Glycemic index and glycemic load are measures, which allow the carbohydrate content of individual foods to be classified according to their postprandial glycemic effects and hence their effects on circulating insulin levels. Therefore, we examined pancreatic cancer risk in association with

Stephanie A. N. Silvera; Thomas E. Rohan; Meera Jain; Paul D. Terry; Geoffrey R. Howe; Anthony B. Miller

2005-01-01

222

A proprietary alpha-amylase inhibitor from white bean (Phaseolus vulgaris): A review of clinical studies on weight loss and glycemic control  

PubMed Central

Obesity, and resultant health hazards which include diabetes, cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome, are worldwide medical problems. Control of diet and exercise are cornerstones of the management of excess weight. Foods with a low glycemic index may reduce the risk of diabetes and heart disease as well as their complications. As an alternative to a low glycemic index diet, there is a growing body of research into products that slow the absorption of carbohydrates through the inhibition of enzymes responsible for their digestion. These products include alpha-amylase and glucosidase inhibitors. The common white bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) produces an alpha-amylase inhibitor, which has been characterized and tested in numerous clinical studies. A specific and proprietary product named Phase 2® Carb Controller (Pharmachem Laboratories, Kearny, NJ) has demonstrated the ability to cause weight loss with doses of 500 to 3000 mg per day, in either a single dose or in divided doses. Clinical studies also show that Phase 2 has the ability to reduce the post-prandial spike in blood glucose levels. Experiments conducted incorporating Phase 2 into food and beverage products have found that it can be integrated into various products without losing activity or altering the appearance, texture or taste of the food. There have been no serious side effects reported following consumption of Phase 2. Gastro-intestinal side effects are rare and diminish upon extended use of the product. In summary, Phase 2 has the potential to induce weight loss and reduce spikes in blood sugar caused by carbohydrates through its alpha-amylase inhibiting activity.

2011-01-01

223

Effect of Pramlintide on Prandial Glycemic Excursions During Closed-Loop Control in Adolescents and Young Adults With Type 1 Diabetes  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE Even under closed-loop (CL) conditions, meal-related blood glucose (BG) excursions frequently exceed target levels as a result of delays in absorption of insulin from the subcutaneous site of infusion. We hypothesized that delaying gastric emptying with preprandial injections of pramlintide would improve postprandial glycemia by allowing a better match between carbohydrate and insulin absorptions. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Eight subjects (4 female; age, 15–28 years; A1C, 7.5 ± 0.7%) were studied for 48 h on a CL insulin-delivery system with a proportional integral derivative algorithm with insulin feedback: 24 h on CL control alone (CL) and 24 h on CL control plus 30-?g premeal injections of pramlintide (CLP). Target glucose was set at 120 mg/dL; timing and contents of meals were identical on both study days. No premeal manual boluses were given. Differences in reference BG excursions, defined as the incremental glucose rise from premeal to peak, were compared between conditions for each meal. RESULTS CLP was associated with overall delayed time to peak BG (2.5 ± 0.9 vs. 1.5 ± 0.5 h; P < 0.0001) and reduced magnitude of glycemic excursion (88 ± 42 vs. 113 ± 32 mg/dL; P = 0.006) compared with CL alone. Pramlintide effects on glycemic excursions were particularly evident at lunch and dinner, in association with higher premeal insulin concentrations at those mealtimes. CONCLUSIONS Pramlintide delayed the time to peak postprandial BG and reduced the magnitude of prandial BG excursions. Beneficial effects of pramlintide on CL may in part be related to higher premeal insulin levels at lunch and dinner compared with breakfast.

Weinzimer, Stuart A.; Sherr, Jennifer L.; Cengiz, Eda; Kim, Grace; Ruiz, Jessica L.; Carria, Lori; Voskanyan, Gayane; Roy, Anirban; Tamborlane, William V.

2012-01-01

224

A proprietary alpha-amylase inhibitor from white bean (Phaseolus vulgaris): a review of clinical studies on weight loss and glycemic control.  

PubMed

Obesity, and resultant health hazards which include diabetes, cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome, are worldwide medical problems. Control of diet and exercise are cornerstones of the management of excess weight. Foods with a low glycemic index may reduce the risk of diabetes and heart disease as well as their complications. As an alternative to a low glycemic index diet, there is a growing body of research into products that slow the absorption of carbohydrates through the inhibition of enzymes responsible for their digestion. These products include alpha-amylase and glucosidase inhibitors. The common white bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) produces an alpha-amylase inhibitor, which has been characterized and tested in numerous clinical studies. A specific and proprietary product named Phase 2® Carb Controller (Pharmachem Laboratories, Kearny, NJ) has demonstrated the ability to cause weight loss with doses of 500 to 3000 mg per day, in either a single dose or in divided doses. Clinical studies also show that Phase 2 has the ability to reduce the post-prandial spike in blood glucose levels. Experiments conducted incorporating Phase 2 into food and beverage products have found that it can be integrated into various products without losing activity or altering the appearance, texture or taste of the food. There have been no serious side effects reported following consumption of Phase 2. Gastro-intestinal side effects are rare and diminish upon extended use of the product. In summary, Phase 2 has the potential to induce weight loss and reduce spikes in blood sugar caused by carbohydrates through its alpha-amylase inhibiting activity. PMID:21414227

Barrett, Marilyn L; Udani, Jay K

2011-03-17

225

Efficacy of liraglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogue, on body weight, eating behavior, and glycemic control, in Japanese obese type 2 diabetes  

PubMed Central

Background We recently reported that short-term treatment with liraglutide (20.0?±?6.4?days) reduced body weight and improved some scales of eating behavior in Japanese type 2 diabetes inpatients. However, it remained uncertain whether such liraglutide-induced improvement is maintained after discharge from the hospital. The aim of the present study was to determine the long-term effects of liraglutide on body weight, glycemic control, and eating behavior in Japanese obese type 2 diabetics. Methods Patients with obesity (body mass index (BMI) >25?kg/m2) and type 2 diabetes were hospitalized at Osaka University Hospital between November 2010 and December 2011. BMI and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) were examined on admission, at discharge and at 1, 3, and 6?months after discharge. For the liraglutide group (BMI; 31.3?±?5.3?kg/m2, n?=?29), patients were introduced to liraglutide after correction of hyperglycemic by insulin or oral glucose-lowering drugs and maintained on liraglutide after discharge. Eating behavior was assessed in patients treated with liraglutide using The Guideline For Obesity questionnaire issued by the Japan Society for the Study of Obesity, at admission, discharge, 3 and 6?months after discharge. For the insulin group (BMI; 29.1?±?3.0?kg/m2, n?=?28), each patient was treated with insulin during hospitalization and glycemic control maintained by insulin after discharge. Results Liraglutide induced significant and persistent weight loss from admission up to 6?months after discharge, while no change in body weight after discharge was noted in the insulin group. Liraglutide produced significant improvements in all major scores of eating behavior questionnaire items and such effect was maintained at 6?months after discharge. Weight loss correlated significantly with the decrease in scores for recognition of weight and constitution, sense of hunger, and eating style. Conclusion Liraglutide produced meaningful long-term weight loss and significantly improved eating behavior in obese Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes.

2012-01-01

226

Impact of Glycemic Control Strategies on the Progression of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy in the Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation 2 Diabetes (BARI 2D) Cohort.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVE The Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation 2 Diabetes (BARI 2D) trial demonstrated similar long-term clinical effectiveness of insulin-sensitizing (IS) versus insulin-providing (IP) treatments for type 2 diabetes on cardiovascular outcomes in a cohort with documented coronary artery disease. We evaluated the effects of randomized glycemic control strategy (IS vs. IP) on the prevalence and incidence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS DPN (defined as Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument [MNSI] clinical examination score >2) was assessed at baseline and yearly for 4 years. DPN prevalence and incidence were compared by intention-to-treat modeling by logistic generalized estimating equation models for prevalence and Kaplan-Meier estimates and Cox regression models for incidence rates. RESULTS Results are reported for 2,159 BARI 2D participants (70% males) with valid baseline and at least one follow-up MNSI score (mean age 62 ± 9 years, mean HbA1c 7.7 ± 1.6%, diabetes duration 10 ± 9 years). There were no differences in the prevalence of DPN between the IS and the IP groups throughout the 4 years of follow-up. In 1,075 BARI 2D participants with no DPN at baseline, the 4-year cumulative incidence rate of DPN was significantly lower in the IS (66%) than in the IP (72%) strategy group (P = 0.02), which remained significant after adjusting for the in-trial HbA1c (P = 0.04). In subgroup analyses, IS strategy had a greater benefit in men (hazard ratio 0.75 [99% CI 0.58-0.99], P < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS Among patients with type 2 diabetes followed for up to 4 years during BARI 2D, a glycemic control therapy with IS significantly reduced the incidence of DPN compared with IP therapy and may add further benefit for men. PMID:23757426

Pop-Busui, Rodica; Lu, Jiang; Brooks, Maria Mori; Albert, Stewart; Althouse, Andrew D; Escobedo, Jorge; Green, Jenifer; Palumbo, Pasquale; Perkins, Bruce A; Whitehouse, Fred; Jones, Teresa L Z

2013-06-11

227

The reduced form of coenzyme Q10 improves glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes: an open label pilot study.  

PubMed

Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) provides the energy for vital cellular functions and is known to act as an antioxidant. We conducted an open label study to examine the clinical effects of supplementation of the reduced form of CoQ10, ubiquinol, in addition to conventional glucose-lowering agents in patients with type 2 diabetes. Nine subjects (3 males and 6 females) with type 2 diabetes and receiving conventional medication were recruited. The subjects were assigned to receive an oral dose of 200 mg ubiquinol daily for 12 weeks. The effect of ubiquinol on blood pressure, lipid profile, glycemic control, oxidative stress, and inflammation were examined before and after ubiquinol supplementation. In addition, five healthy volunteers were also assigned to receive an oral dose of 200 mg ubiquinol daily for 4 weeks to examine the effects of ubiquinol on insulin secretion. In patients with diabetes, there were no differences with respect to blood pressure, lipid profile, oxidative stress marker, and inflammatory markers. However, there were significant improvements in glycosylated hemoglobin (53.0 ± 4.3 to 50.5 ± 3.7 mmol/mol, P = 0.01) (7.1 ± 0.4 to 6.8 ± 0.4%, P = 0.03). In healthy volunteers, the insulinogenic index (0.65 ± 0.29 to 1.23 ± 0.56, P = 0.02) and the ratio of proinsulin to insulin were significantly improved (3.4 ± 1.8 to 2.1 ± 0.6, P = 0.03). The results of our study are consistent with the suggestion that the supplementation of ubiquinol in subjects with type 2 diabetes, in addition to conventional antihyperglycemic medications, improves glycemic control by improving insulin secretion without any adverse effects PMID:22887051

Mezawa, Morito; Takemoto, Minoru; Onishi, Shunichiro; Ishibashi, Ryoichi; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Yamaga, Masaya; Fujimoto, Masaki; Okabe, Emiko; He, Peng; Kobayashi, Kazuki; Yokote, Koutaro

2012-08-08

228

Impact of an education program on patient anxiety, depression, glycemic control, and adherence to self-care and medication in Type 2 diabetes  

PubMed Central

Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM) requires continuous medical care, patients’ self-management, education, and adherence to prescribed medication to reduce the risk of long-term complications. The aim of this study was to assess the benefits of an education program on diabetes, patient self-management, adherence to medication, anxiety, depression and glycemic control in type 2 diabetics in Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective study, conducted among 104 diabetic patients at a major tertiary hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, between May 2011 and October 2012. Education materials given to diabetic patients included pamphlets/handouts written in Arabic, the national language. Special videotapes about DM were made and distributed to all participants. In addition, specific educational programs through the diabetes educators and one-on-one counseling sessions with the doctor were also arranged. Patients were interviewed using a structured interview schedule both during the baseline, and after 6 months of the program. The interview schedule included, socio-demographics, clinical characteristics, diabetes self-management, adherence to medication, anxiety, and depression. Glycemic control was considered poor, if hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) was ? 7%. Results: The mean age of the study population was 57.3 ± 14.4 years. Seventy one were males (68.3%) and 33 (31.7%) were females. After six months of the diabetes education program, there were significant improvements in patients’ dietary plan (P = 0.0001), physical exercise (P = 0.0001), self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) (P = 0.0001), HbA1c (P = 0.04), adherence to medication (P = 0.007), and depression (P = 0.03). Conclusions: Implementation of education programs on diabetes among type 2 diabetic patients is associated with better outcomes such as their dietary plan, physical exercise, SMBG, adherence to medication, HbA1c and depression.

Al Hayek, Ayman A.; Robert, Asirvatham A.; Al Dawish, Mohamed A.; Zamzami, Marwan M.; Sam, Asirvatham E.; Alzaid, Aus A.

2013-01-01

229

Altered expression of O-GlcNAc-modified proteins in a mouse model whose glycemic status is controlled by a low carbohydrate ketogenic diet.  

PubMed

Abnormal modification of proteins by O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) is known to be associated with the pathology induced by hyperglycemia. However, the dynamic mechanism of O-GlcNAc modification under hyperglycemic conditions in vivo has not been fully characterized. To understand the mechanism, we established an animal model in which the glycemic status is controlled by the diet. A mutant mouse (ob/ob) which exhibits diet-induced hyperglycemia when fed a regular chow (chow) was used to establish this model; the mice were fed a very low carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD) to improve hyperglycemia. Using this model, we evaluated the levels of O-GlcNAc-modified proteins in tissues under a hyperglycemic or its improved condition. ELISA and Western blot analyses revealed that altered expression of certain proteins modified by O-GlcNAc were found in the mice tissues, although global O-GlcNAc levels in the tissues remained unaltered by improvement of hyperglycemia. We also found the Akt protein kinase was modified by O-GlcNAc in the liver of ob/ob mice, and the modification levels were decreased by improvement of hyperglycemia. Furthermore, aberrant phosphorylation of Akt was found in the liver of ob/ob mice under hyperglycemic condition. In conclusion, our established mouse model is useful for evaluating the dynamics of O-GlcNAc-modified proteins in tissues associated with glycemic status. This study revealed that the expression level of certain proteins modified by O-GlcNAc is altered when KD improves the hyperglycemia. These proteins could be prospective indexes for nutritional therapy for hyperglycemia-associated diseases, such as diabetes mellitus. PMID:23793825

Okuda, Tetsuya; Fukui, Asami; Morita, Naoki

2013-06-21

230

Lower bone mineral density in children with type 1 diabetes is associated with poor glycemic control and higher serum ICAM-1 and urinary isoprostane levels.  

PubMed

The purpose of the study was to investigate bone mineral density (BMD) in children with type 1 diabetes (DM1) and to establish the relationships between BMD, physical activity, glycemic control, and markers of systemic oxidative stress and inflammation. We studied 30 children with DM1, aged 4.7-18.6 years, and 30 healthy subjects, matched by sex, age, and body mass index (BMI). Mean duration of DM1 was 5.4 +/- 3.4 years and mean glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)) level over 12 months was 9.8 +/- 1.5%. Lumbar and total bone mineral density (BMD, g/cm(2)) were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). We calculated the apparent volumetric lumbar BMD (BMDvol, g/cm(3)) and total mineral content adjusted for age and height (BMCadj), and measured plasma intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and urinary 8-iso-prostaglandin F(2a) (F(2)-IsoPs). Calcium (Ca) intake was assessed by questionnaire and physical activity by questionnaire and accelerometer (ActiGraph, count/h). Total BMCadj and lumbar BMDvol were significantly lower in children with DM1 than in controls (101.8 +/- 7.7 vs. 107 +/- 5.7%, P = 0.005; 0.32 +/- 0.08 vs. 0.36 +/- 0.09 g/cm(3), P = 0.05, respectively). These differences were mostly caused by the differences in boys. Plasma ICAM-1 and hs-CRP levels were significantly higher in the DM1 group compared to the controls. Ca intake and urine F(2)-IsoPs levels were similar between the groups. Diabetic boys were less active than controls (18231 +/- 6613 vs. 24145 +/- 7449 count/h, P = 0.04). In the DM1 group, lumbar BMDvol correlated inversely with urinary F(2)-IsoPs (r = -0.5; P = 0.005) and plasma ICAM-1 levels (r = -0.4; P = 0.02), and also with HbA(1c) levels after adjustment for age (r = -0.45; P < 0.05). Total BMCadj correlated inversely with HbA(1c) levels (r = -0.4; P = 0.02). We conclude that children with DM1, particularly boys, have lower BMD. Poor glycemic control, elevated markers of oxidative stress, and inflammation are associated with lower BMD. PMID:19373518

Heilman, Kaire; Zilmer, Mihkel; Zilmer, Kersti; Tillmann, Vallo

2009-04-17

231

Targeting Dietary Fat or Glycemic Load in the Treatment of Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Trial  

PubMed Central

Aims To compare the effects of lifestyle modification programs that prescribe low-glycemic load (GL) vs. low-fat diets in a randomized trial. Methods Seventy-nine obese adults with type 2 diabetes received low-fat or low-GL dietary instruction, delivered in 40-week lifestyle modification programs with identical goals for calorie intake and physical activity. Changes in weight, HbA1c, and other metabolic parameters were compared at weeks 20 and 40. Results Weight loss did not differ between groups at week 20 (low-fat: ?5.7 ± 3.7%, low-GL: ?6.7 ± 4.4%, p = .26) or week 40 (low-fat: ?4.5 ± 7.5%, low-GL: ?6.4 ± 8.2%, p = .28). Adjusting for changes in antidiabetic medications, subjects on the low-GL diet had larger reductions in HbA1c than those on the low-fat diet at week 20 (low-fat: ?0.3 ± 0.6%, low-GL: ?0.7 ± 0.6%, p = .01), and week 40 (low-fat: ?0.1 ± 1.2%, low-GL: ?0.8 ± 1.3%, p = .01). Groups did not differ significantly on any other metabolic outcomes (p ? .06). Conclusions Results suggest that targeting GL, rather than dietary fat, in a low-calorie diet can significantly enhance the effect of weight loss on HbA1c in patients with type 2 diabetes.

Fabricatore, AN; Wadden, TA; Ebbeling, CB; Thomas, JG; Stallings, VA; Schwartz, S; Ludwig, DS

2011-01-01

232

A high-fiber, moderate-glycemic-index, Mexican style diet improves dyslipidemia in individuals with type 2 diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The typical Mexican diet includes beans and tortillas, which are foods with a low glycemic index. The objective of this paper was to compare the effects of a lower and a higher glycemic index Mexican style diet on metabolic control. In a randomized, controlled crossover design, eight subjects with type 2 diabetes were assigned to either a high glycemic index

Arturo Jiménez-Cruz; Wilfred H. Turnbull; Montserrat Bacardi-Gascón

2004-01-01

233

Traffic Control in Early Miami  

Microsoft Academic Search

Traffic congestion has been an intractable problem in urban American history. The narrow, garbage-strewn roads which hosted as many ani- mals and pedestrians as vehicles during the early years of the republic became the site of epic traffic snarls in the bustling period following the Civil War. The advent of the automobile at the beginning of the twentieth century exacerbated

Paul S. George

234

Effect of varying glycemic index meals on blood glucose control assessed with continuous glucose monitoring in youth with type 1 diabetes on basal-bolus insulin regimens  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to test the effect of high glycemic index (HGI) and low glycemic index (LGI) meals on blood glucose levels using continuous blood glucose monitoring in youths with type 1 diabetes.\\u000aRESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A total of 20 youths on basal-bolus regimens consumed macronutrient-matched HGI and LGI meals 1 day each in a

Tonja R. Nansel; Lauren A. Gellar; Adrienne McGill

2008-01-01

235

Evaluation of vildagliptin and fixed dose combination of vildagliptin and metformin on glycemic control and insulin dose over 3 months in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus  

PubMed Central

Objective: Addition of vildagliptin to ongoing insulin therapy may help in terms of overall glycemic control as well as reduction in dose of insulin and weight. This study sought to evaluate the effect of vildagliptin and fixed dose combination (FDC) of vildagliptin and metformin in patients in ongoing insulin therapy for Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods: This was an open label, prospective, non-randomised, multicentric observational study. In this study 400 patients with T2DM on insulin were enrolled and allocated with the treatment of vildagliptin 50 mg in monotherapy and FDC of vildagliptin 50 mg and metformin strengths as 500/ 850 / 1000 mg. Baseline investigations included fasting blood glucose (FBG) and post prandial plasma glucose (PPPG) Estimation and glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c). Results: The combined analysis was carried out on 300 completed patients in this study, who were treated with vildagliptin or FDC of vildagliptin and metformin. The difference in mean value of insulin dose (MID) showed a highly significant decrease (P <0.0001) from baseline to end of the treatment i.e. from 36.26 ± 18.21 to 26.87 ± 16.49 IU. A highly significant decrease (P <0.0001) in FBG from 194.94 ± 56.19 to 124.93 ± 30.11 mg/dl was observed. Similarly PPPG showed a highly significant (P <0.0001) decrease from baseline to end of the treatment i.e. from 287.60 mg/dl to 172.05 mg/dl and there was highly significant (P <0.0001) decrease in HbA1c i.e. from 9.01% to 7.65% respectively. At the same time, highly significant decrease (P <0.0001) in mean weight also observed from baseline to end of the treatment i.e. from 71.23 ± 11.06 kg to 70.06 ± 10.62 Kg. Conclusion: Addition of vildagliptin and FDC of vildagliptin and metformin is an effective strategy in glycemic control, reduction in dose of insulin and weight of patients suffering with T2DM.

Ved, Paresh; Shah, Samrat

2012-01-01

236

Effects of an engineered human anti-TNF-alpha antibody (CDP571) on insulin sensitivity and glycemic control in patients with NIDDM.  

PubMed

Inhibition of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha action has recently been shown to reverse insulin resistance dramatically and to improve glycemic control in obese rodents. This double-blind study was designed to assess the effects of a recombinant-engineered human TNF-alpha-neutralizing antibody (CDP571) on glucose homeostasis in obese NIDDM patients. Glycemic control and insulin sensitivity were monitored in 21 NIDDM subjects for a 2-week run-in and then for 6 weeks after treatment in a randomized fashion with a single intravenous dose of either CDP571 (5 mg/kg) or an equivalent volume of normal saline. The prolonged half-life of the antibody ensured adequate plasma levels as measured throughout the study. Concentrations of fasting glucose (CDP571: 10.0 +/- 0.8, 10.1 +/- 0.8, 10.0 +/- 1.0; placebo: 8.5 +/- 0.6, 8.1 +/- 0.5, 8.7 +/- 0.8 mmol/l at baseline, day 1, and week 4, respectively), fasting serum insulin (CDP571: 21.2 +/- 2.8, 21.0 +/- 2.8, 24.8 +/- 3.3; placebo: 19.0 +/- 2.8, 20.8 +/- 2.9, 17.5 +/- 2.2 pmol/l, respectively), and C-peptide remained unaffected by the type of treatment throughout the study. The percentage rate of glucose clearance per minute (KITT) during intravenous insulin sensitivity tests was identical in the CDP571 and placebo groups at baseline and also at 1 and 4 weeks after treatment (mean +/- SE; CDP571: 1.33 +/- 0.21, 1.44 +/- 0.25, 1.26 +/- 0.18; placebo: 1.38 +/- 0.15, 1.47 +/- 0.20, 1.52 +/- 0.20; P = 0.85, 0.93, and 0.36, respectively). TNF-alpha neutralization over a period of 4 weeks had no effect on insulin sensitivity in obese NIDDM subjects. PMID:8666137

Ofei, F; Hurel, S; Newkirk, J; Sopwith, M; Taylor, R

1996-07-01

237

Efficacy of Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Improving Glycemic Control and Reducing Hypoglycemia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials  

PubMed Central

Objective We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the efficacy of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) in improving glycemic control and reducing hypoglycemia compared to self-monitored blood glucose (SMBG). Methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central, Web of Science, and Scopus for randomized trials of adults and children with type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus (T1DM or T2DM). Pairs of reviewers independently selected studies, assessed methodological quality, and extracted data. Meta-analytic estimates of treatment effects were generated using a random-effects model. Results Nineteen trials were eligible and provided data for meta-analysis. Overall, CGM was associated with a significant reduction in mean hemoglobin A1c [HbA1c; weighted mean difference (WMD) of -0.27% (95% confidence interval [CI] -0.44 to -0.10)]. This was true for adults with T1DM as well as T2DM [WMD -0.50% (95% CI -0.69 to -0.30) and -0.70 (95% CI, -1.14 to -0.27), respectively]. No significant effect was noted in children and adolescents. There was no significant difference in HbA1c reduction between studies of real-time versus non-realtime devices (WMD -0.22%, 95% CI, -0.59 to 0.15 versus -0.30%, 95% CI, -0.49 to -0.10; p for interaction 0.71). The quality of evidence was moderate due to imprecision, suggesting increased risk for bias. Data for the incidence of severe or nocturnal hypoglycemia were sparse and imprecise. In studies that reported patient satisfaction, users felt confident about the device and gave positive reviews. Conclusion Continuous glucose monitoring seems to help improve glycemic control in adults with T1DM and T2DM. The effect on hypoglycemia incidence is imprecise and unclear. Larger trials with longer follow-up are needed to assess the efficacy of CGM in reducing patient-important complications without significantly increasing the burden of care for patients with diabetes.

Gandhi, Gunjan Y; Kovalaske, Michelle; Kudva, Yogish; Walsh, Kristin; Elamin, Mohamed B; Beers, Melody; Coyle, Cathy; Goalen, Melissa; Murad, Mohammad Safwan; Erwin, Patricia J; Corpus, Joshua; Montori, Victor M; Murad, M. Hassan

2011-01-01

238

Glycemic and oxidative status of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus following oral administration of alpha-lipoic acid: a randomized double-blinded placebo-controlled study.  

PubMed

Despite well-controlled blood glucose levels, diabetic complications still inevitably take place via several mechanisms including excessive generation of free radicals in patients who suffer from diabetes mellitus (DM). A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial to investigate the effectiveness of oral supplementation of DL-alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) on glycemic and oxidative status in DM patients was conducted. Thirty eight outpatients with type 2 DM were recruited and randomly assigned to either placebo or treatment in various doses of ALA (300, 600, 900, and 1200 mg/day) for 6 months. Following the treatment, all subjects were evaluated for glucose status and oxidative biomarkers. Results showed that fasting blood glucose, HbA1c trended to decrease in a dose-dependent manner. Increase of urinary PGF2?-Isoprostanes (F2?-IsoP) was noted in placebo but not ALA-treated groups, indicating possible suppressing action of ALA on lipid peroxidation in DM subjects. 8-Hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels, however, were similar in both placebo and ALA groups as well as urinary microalbumin and serum creatinine. Safety evaluation was monitored and treatment was found to be well tolerated despite some minor side effects. Results from this study reflected the benefits of ALA in glucose status with slight efficiency on oxidative stress-related deterioration in DM patients. PMID:22374556

Porasuphatana, Supatra; Suddee, Suthi; Nartnampong, Atinuch; Konsil, Julraht; Harnwong, Busakorn; Santaweesuk, Adichai

2012-01-01

239

Effects of a low-glycemic load diet in overweight and obese pregnant women: a pilot randomized controlled trial1234  

PubMed Central

Background: The optimal diet for pregnancy that is complicated by excessive weight is unknown. Objective: We aimed to examine the effects of a low–glycemic load (low-GL) diet in overweight and obese pregnant women. Design: We randomly assigned 46 overweight or obese pregnant women to receive a low-GL or a low-fat diet. Participants received carbohydrate-rich foods, fats, and snack foods through home delivery or study visits. The primary outcome was birth weight z score. Other endpoints included infant anthropometric measurements, gestational duration, maternal weight gain, and maternal metabolic parameters. Results: There were no significant differences in birth weight z score or other measures of infant adiposity between groups. However, in the low-GL compared with the low-fat group, gestational duration was longer (mean ± SD: 39.3 ± 1.1 compared with 37.9 ± 3.1 wk; P = 0.05) and fewer deliveries occurred at ?38.0 wk (13% compared with 48%, P = 0.02; with exclusion of planned cesarean deliveries: 5% compared with 53%; P = 0.002). Adjusted head circumference was greater in the low-GL group (35.0 ± 0.8 compared with 34.2 ± 1.3 cm, P = 0.01). Women in the low-GL group had smaller increases in triglycerides [median (interquartile range): 49 (19, 70) compared with 93 (34, 129) mg/dL; P = 0.03] and total cholesterol [13 (0, 36) compared with 33 (22, 56) mg/dL, P = 0.04] and a greater decrease in C-reactive protein [?2.5 (?5.5, ?0.7) compared with ?0.4 (?1.4, 1.5) mg/dL, P = 0.007]. Conclusions: A low-GL diet resulted in longer pregnancy duration, greater infant head circumference, and improved maternal cardiovascular risk factors. Large-scale studies are warranted to evaluate whether dietary intervention during pregnancy aimed at lowering GL may be useful in the prevention of prematurity and other adverse maternal and infant outcomes. This trial is registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00364403.

Rhodes, Erinn T; Pawlak, Dorota B; Takoudes, Tamara C; Ebbeling, Cara B; Feldman, Henry A; Lovesky, Margaret M; Cooke, Emily A; Leidig, Michael M

2010-01-01

240

Additive effect of the mutations in the ?3-adrenoceptor gene and UCP3 gene promoter on body fat distribution and glycemic control after weight reduction in overweight subjects with CAD or metabolic syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: To analyze the effects of the mutations in the ?3-adrenoceptor (?3-AR) gene and\\/or uncoupling protein3 (UCP3) gene promoter on body fat distribution and glycemic control after mild weight reduction in overweight-obese subjects with coronary artery disease (CAD) or metabolic syndrome.DESIGN: Clinical intervention study of the ?300 kcal\\/day mild weight reduction program for 12 weeks.SUBJECTS: A total of 224 overweight-obese

O Y Kim; E Y Cho; H Y Park; Y Jang; J H Lee; JH Lee

2004-01-01

241

Glycemic control, growth and complications in children with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus — a study of children enrolled in a Summer camp program for diabetics in Kinki district, Japan  

Microsoft Academic Search

The influence of glycemic control on growth and on the development of complications in diabetic children was studied. The subjects of the study were 107 children with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), who were enrolled in a Summer camp program for diabetic children in Kinki District, Japan from 1972 to 1990, and who had at least three determinations of HbA1 during

Kanji Izumi; Mitsuru Hoshi; Shotaro Kuno; Giichi Okuno; Yoshimitsu Yamazaki; Gen Isshiki; Akira Sasaki

1995-01-01

242

Reduced Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load Diets Do Not Increase the Effects of Energy Restriction on Weight Loss and Insulin Sensitivity in Obese Men and Women1,2  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reducing the dietary glycemic load and the glycemic index was proposed as a novel approach to weight reduction. A parallel-design, randomized 12-wk controlled feeding trial with a 24-wk follow-up phase was conducted to test the hypothesis that a hypocaloric diet designed to reduce the glycemic load and the glycemic index would result in greater sustained weight loss than other hypocaloric

Susan K. Raatz; Carolyn J. Torkelson; J. Bruce Redmon; Kristell P. Reck; Christine A. Kwong; Joyce E. Swanson; Chengcheng Liu; William Thomas; John P. Bantle

243

Pinto bean, navy bean, and black-eyed pea consumption do not significantly lower the glycemic response to a high glycemic index treatment in normoglycemic adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the effects of pinto bean, black-eyed pea, and navy bean consumed in 2 amounts, low dose (?1\\/2 cup) and high dose (?1 cup), on the glycemic response to a high glycemic index (GI) treatment (calculated glycemic index = 96) in insulin-sensitive adult men and women. In a randomized, crossover, placebo-controlled design, 12 participants consumed each of the

Donna M. Winham; Andrea M. Hutchins; Cynthia L. Melde

2007-01-01

244

Adiponectin levels in south Indian children with type 1 diabetes mellitus and nondiabetic children and its correlation with anthropometry and glycemic control.  

PubMed

Studies have reported high adiponectin levels in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Adiponectin has been found to have anti-atherogenic action and other protective functions. We wanted to estimate adiponectin level in south Indian T1DM children and compare it with that of non-diabetic children and study its correlation with anthropometry and glycemic status. Sixty children with T1DM and forty non-diabetic children of age less than 15 years were analysed. Mean adiponectin level was higher in T1DM group than in non diabetic group (p < 0.001) irrespective of the age group or sex. Negative correlation was observed between SFT- triceps and adiponectin in diabetic and control group. Multiple regression coefficient analysis of various parameters showed SFT- triceps as a statistically significant predictor of adiponectin level (p = 0.001). We conclude that, children with T1DM had higher adiponectin level than non-diabetic children. Low SFT- triceps measuremet may be a predictor of higher adiponectin level. PMID:24079077

Solomon, J Ritchie Sharon; Varadarajan, V Poovazhagi

2013-09-01

245

Glycemic index, glycemic load and risk of gastric cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Dietary carbohydrates have been directly associated with gastric cancer risk and have been considered general indicators of a poor diet. However, elevated levels of glucose and insulin elicited by con- sumption of high amounts of refined carbohydrates may stimulate mitogenic and cancer-promoting insulin-like growth factors (IGF). Glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL), which represent indirect measures of dietary

L. S. A. Augustin; S. Gallus; E. Negri; C. La Vecchia

2004-01-01

246

Glycemic Indices and Glycemic Load of Some Nigerian Foods  

Microsoft Academic Search

The concept of glycemic index (GI) lists food items by virtue of their influence on postprandia l glucose. Though the glycemic index of common food items has been determined, the GI of the popularly processed and commonly consumed foods in Nigeria is not known. This study determined the GI of ten processed Nigerian foods and revealed their similarity in the

E. S. Omoregie; A. U. Osagie

2008-01-01

247

Genetic ablation of myelin protein zero-like 3 in mice increases energy expenditure, improves glycemic control, and reduces hepatic lipid synthesis.  

PubMed

Obesity continues to be a global health problem, and thus it is imperative that new pathways regulating energy balance be identified. Recently, it was reported: (Hayashi K, Cao T, Passmore H, Jourdan-Le Saux C, Fogelgren B, Khan S, Hornstra I, Kim Y, Hayashi M, Csiszar K. J Invest Dermatol 123: 864-871, 2004) that mice carrying a missense mutation in myelin protein zero-like 3 (Mpzl3rc) have reduced body weight. To determine how Mpzl3 controls energy balance in vivo, we generated mice deficient in myelin protein zero-like 3 (Mpzl3-KO). Interestingly, KO mice were hyperphagic yet had reduced body weight and fat mass. Moreover, KO mice were highly resistant to body weight and fat mass gain after exposure to a high-fat, energy-dense diet. These effects on body weight and adiposity were driven, in part, by a pronounced increase in whole body energy expenditure levels in KO mice. KO mice also had reduced blood glucose levels during an intraperitoneal glucose challenge and significant reductions in circulating insulin levels suggesting an increase in insulin sensitivity. In addition, there was an overall increase in oxidative capacity and contractile force in skeletal muscle isolated from KO mice. Hepatic triglyceride levels were reduced by 92% in livers of KO mice, in part due to a reduction in de novo lipid synthesis. Interestingly, Mpzl3 mRNA expression in liver was increased in diet-induced obese mice. Moreover, KO mice exhibited an increase in insulin-stimulated Akt signaling in the liver, further demonstrating that Mpzl3 can regulate insulin sensitivity in this tissue. We have determined that Mpzl3 has a novel physiological role in controlling body weight regulation, energy expenditure, glycemic control, and hepatic triglyceride synthesis in mice. PMID:23715724

Czyzyk, Traci A; Andrews, Jessica L; Coskun, Tamer; Wade, Mark R; Hawkins, Eric D; Lockwood, John F; Varga, Gabor; Sahr, Allison E; Chen, Yanyun; Brozinick, Joseph T; Kikly, Kristine; Statnick, Michael A

2013-05-28

248

A Comparative Study of the Effects of a Dipeptidyl Peptidase-IV Inhibitor and Sulfonylurea on Glucose Variability in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes with Inadequate Glycemic Control on Metformin.  

PubMed

Abstract Background: This study aimed to compare the effects of sitagliptin on glycemic change and 24-h blood glucose variability with those of the sulfonylurea glimepiride. Subjects and Methods: A 4-week randomized double blind-labeled prospective design was used. We recruited 33 patients who had been treated with metformin for at least 2 months. Each participant prescribed with metformin was randomly assigned to either the sitagliptin (100?mg) or the glimepiride (2?mg) group. Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) was used to monitor glycemic changes for 3 successive days in both groups at baseline and at the 4-week follow-up. Glycemic changes and glucose variability were obtained using CGM, and these data were averaged over all subjects. Results: The comparison of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) between baseline and the 4-week follow-up showed that HbA1c was significantly reduced in the sitagliptin group (7.0±0.5% to 6.6±0.4%, P<0.001) and the glimepiride group (7.3±0.4% to 6.9±0.4%, P<0.001). The sitagliptin and glimepiride groups had similar HbA1c levels after 4 weeks, and there were no significant differences between the two groups. The mean amplitude of glycemic excursions (MAGE) decreased significantly in the sitagliptin group (4.9±1.0 to 3.7±0.9?mmol/L, P<0.001), but no significant difference was observed in the glimepiride group (5.7±1.5 to 5.0±1.4?mmol/L, P=0.175). The SD and oxidative stress markers did not differ significantly between the two groups. Conclusions: When sitagliptin was combined with metformin, the patients showed much more efficient blood glucose controlling effects, not only the three indexes of fasting blood glucose, postprandial blood glucose, and glycated hemoglobin, but also MAGE. PMID:24050737

Kim, Hun-Sung; Shin, Jeong-Ah; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Kim, Eun-Sook; Cho, Jae-Hyoung; Son, Ho-Young; Yoon, Kun-Ho

2013-10-01

249

Mosapride improves food intake, while not worsening glycemic control and obesity, in ob\\/ ob obese mice with decreased gastric emptying  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many patients with diabetes mellitus complain of early satiety and postprandial gastric fullness and discomfort. Mosapride citrate, a 5-HT4 receptor agonist, enhances gastric emptying and alleviates gastrointestinal discomfort in patients with diabetic gastroparesis. This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of mosapride citrate on feeding behavior in ob\\/ob obese mice with decreased gastric emptying. Mosapride citrate (1 mg\\/kg\\/day) was

Akihiro Asakawa; Naohiko Ueno; Miwako Katagi; Yuka Ijuin; Yoshinori Morita; Shigeto Mizuno; Toshio Inui; Ruka Sakamaki; Naotaka Shinfuku; Msaharu Uemoto

2006-01-01

250

The Benefit of Subcutaneous Glucagon During Closed-Loop Glycemic Control in Rats With Type 1 Diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because of its prolonged action, subcutaneously administered insulin has a potential for overcorrection hypoglycemia during closed-loop glucose control. For this reason, we hypothesized that subcutaneous glucagon, whose action is faster, could lessen the risk for hypoglycemia during closed-loop control. We therefore compared insulin alone versus insulin plus glucagon in diabetic rats in a controlled closed-loop study. Both hormones were delivered

W. Kenneth Ward; Julia Engle; Heather M. Duman; Colin P. Bergstrom; Sonia F. Kim; Isaac F. Federiuk

2008-01-01

251

Differentiating Approaches to Diabetes Self-Management of Multi-Ethnic Rural Older Adults at the Extremes of Glycemic Control  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Purpose of the Study: This study identified approaches to diabetes self-management that differentiate persons with well-controlled from poorly controlled diabetes. Previous research has focused largely on persons participating in self-management interventions. Design and Methods: In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 48 adults,…

Brewer-Lowry, Aleshia Nichol; Arcury, Thomas A.; Bell, Ronny A.; Quandt, Sara A.

2010-01-01

252

Cardiovascular disease and glycemic control in type 2 diabetes: now that the dust is settling from large clinical trials  

PubMed Central

The relationship between glucose control and cardiovascular outcomes in type 2 diabetes has been a matter of controversy over the years. Although epidemiological evidence exists in favor of an adverse role of poor glucose control on cardiovascular events, intervention trials have been less conclusive. The Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) study, the Action in Diabetes and Vascular Disease (ADVANCE) study, and the Veterans Affairs Diabetes Trial (VADT) have shown no beneficial effect of intensive glucose control on primary cardiovascular endpoints in type 2 diabetes. However, subgroup analysis has provided evidence suggesting that the potential beneficial effect largely depends on patients’ characteristics, including age, diabetes duration, previous glucose control, presence of cardiovascular disease, and risk of hypoglycemia. The benefit of strict glucose control on cardiovascular outcomes and mortality may be indeed hampered by the extent and frequency of hypoglycemic events and could be enhanced if glucose-lowering medications, capable of exerting favorable effects on the cardiovascular system, were used. This review examines the relationship between intensive glucose control and cardiovascular outcomes in type 2 diabetes, addressing the need for individualization of glucose targets and careful consideration of the benefit/risk profile of antidiabetes medications.

Giorgino, Francesco; Leonardini, Anna; Laviola, Luigi

2013-01-01

253

Effect of high-dose zinc supplementation with oral hypoglycemic agents on glycemic control and inflammation in type-2 diabetic nephropathy patients  

PubMed Central

Objective: The study aims to evaluate the effect of zinc sulfate on markers of glycemic control, lipid profile and inflammation in type-2 diabetes with microalbuminuria patients. Materials and Methods: Type-2 diabetes with microalbuminuria patients on oral hypoglycemic agents (OHA) and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors were selected and divided into 2 groups: One group (n = 27) continued with OHA alone, second group (n = 27) was on OHA and in addition 50 mg elemental zinc as zinc sulphate supplementation for 12 weeks. Fasting, post-prandial blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, lipid profiles, inflammatory marker hs-CRP and urine microalbumin were measured. Results: There were no significant differences in biochemical status among groups at baseline. After receiving zinc, the mean fasting blood glucose (FBS), post-prandial blood glucose (PPBS) and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) were decreased significantly (P = 0.0001). Significant decrease was observed in TG (P = 0.002) and VLDL-cholesterol (P = 0.002), whereas there was no significant decrease in TC and LDL-cholesterol. The high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol was significantly (P = 0.0001) increased from baseline. Zinc supplementation had significant effects in decreasing serum hs-CRP from 10.51 ± 1.68 mg/L to 7.75 ± 1.56 mg/L (P = 0.0001) and microalbumin level from 146.87 ± 30.83 mg/day to 80.70 ± 33.99 mg/day (P = 0.0001). There were no significant changes in the levels of all these parameters in OHA group. Conclusion: Our results conclude that supplementation of zinc improved the effectiveness of OHA and may be beneficial in decreasing blood glucose, TG, urinary albumin excretion and inflammation in diabetic nephropathy patients and thus reducing the risk of complications.

Khan, Mohd Idreesh; Siddique, Kauser Usman; Ashfaq, Fauzia; Ali, Wahid; Reddy, Himanshu D.; Mishra, Arvind

2013-01-01

254

Assessing glycemic variation: why, when and how?  

PubMed

In the post-Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) and Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC) era of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) care, glycosylated hemoglobin (A1C) has enjoyed primacy as the clinical outcome variable (1). Metabolic control as defined by A1C, however, only defines approximately 25% of the risk of subsequent microvascular pathology (2) and, hence, other glycemic outcome variables are also being canvassed as being of potential significance. Transcription-regulating actions of glucose and the phenomenon of "metabolic memory" have recently become recognized (3,4). Simultaneously, ambulant continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) technologies have become available. The convergence of these factors has increased the interest in the impacts of fluctuations in glycemia, otherwise known as glycemic variation (GV). Initially, this interest was focused upon the effects of post-prandial glycemic excursions (5), but more recently, associations of GV and oxidative stress, microvascular pathology (6), and GV prediction associated with closedloop insulin delivery (7) have evolved. Notwithstanding this emerging interest in GV, there still remains a lack of consensus as to the importance of GV, in what circumstances it can be measured, and what GV metrics are best suited for various purposes. The aim of this review is to discuss these 3 key areas: Why measure GV? When can GV be meaningfully assessed?; How to measure to GV?. PMID:20877258

Cameron, Fergus J; Baghurst, Peter A; Rodbard, David

2010-08-01

255

Failure to achieve glycemic control despite intensive insulin therapy in a medical ICU: incidence and influence on ICU mortality  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective  Intensive insulin therapy reduces mortality in subgroups of intensive care unit (ICU) patients, and awareness of the importance\\u000a of blood glucose level (BGL) control has increased among ICU physicians and nurses. The impact of insulin treatment strategies\\u000a on mortality may be influenced by their efficacy in achieving the target BGL range. We assessed the efficacy of an insulin\\u000a treatment strategy

Jean-Claude Lacherade; Patricia Jabre; Sylvie Bastuji-Garin; David Grimaldi; Pascal Fangio; Valerie Théron; Hervé Outin; Bernard De Jonghe

2007-01-01

256

Dietary Glycemic Index of Human Immunodeficiency Virus–Positive Men with and without Fat Deposition  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study focused on dietary glycemic index because insulin resistance can be important in the pathogenesis of fat deposition in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We evaluated differences in past dietary glycemic intake between men with HIV who developed fat deposition and those who did not. This was a nested case-control study consisting of 37 cases and 37 controls from the

Kimberly R. Dong; Christine A. Wanke; Alice M. Tang; Bei Ding; Kristy M. Hendricks

2006-01-01

257

Peer-Led Diabetes Education Programs in High-Risk Mexican Americans Improve Glycemic Control Compared With Standard Approaches  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effect of a culturally sensitive diabetes self-management education program that uses a low-cost, peer-educator format (Project Dulce) on glucose control and metabolic parameters in low-income Mexican Americans with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 207 Mexican-American patients recruited from federally funded community health centers in San Diego County with HbA1c >8% were randomly assigned to the Project Dulce peer intervention or continuation of standard diabetes care. The primary outcome of interest was HbA1c. RESULTS The majority of subjects were born in Mexico, were female, were middle-aged, had less than an eighth-grade education, and had high baseline HbA1c levels. Significant time-by-group interaction effects for HbA1c (P = 0.02) and diastolic blood pressure (P = 0.04) indicated that the Project Dulce group exhibited greater improvement (i.e., decreases) across time. Within-group analyses showed that the intervention group exhibited significant improvements from baseline to month 4 in absolute levels of HbA1c (?1.7%, P = 0.001) and HDL cholesterol (+1.4 mg/dL, P = 0.01) and from baseline to month 10 in absolute levels of HbA1c (?1.5%, P = 0.01), total cholesterol (?7.2 mg/dL, P = 0.04), HDL cholesterol (+1.6 mg/dL, P = 0.01), and LDL cholesterol (?8.1 mg/dL, P = 0.02). No significant changes were noted in the control group. CONCLUSIONS This randomized trial, using the Project Dulce model of culturally sensitive, peer-led education, demonstrates improvement in glucose and metabolic control and suggests that this low-cost approach to self-management education for high-risk diabetic populations is effective.

Philis-Tsimikas, Athena; Fortmann, Adelaide; Lleva-Ocana, Leticia; Walker, Chris; Gallo, Linda C.

2011-01-01

258

Updated Review: Improved Glycemic Control with Repaglinide-Metformin in Fixed Combination for Patients with Type 2 Diabetes  

PubMed Central

As the prevalence of type 2 diabetes continues to rise, new drug therapies will need to be explored to prevent morbidity and mortality associated with diabetes as well as growing health care costs. Type 2 diabetes is characterized by decreased insulin secretion and sensitivity. Numerous oral medications are currently approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. A treat-to-failure approach has traditionally been adopted with step-wise additions of oral medications; however, a growing frequency of treatment failures with monotherapy has led to the use of combination therapies earlier in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. One such combination regimen is repaglinide (a prandial glucose optimizer that increases insulin release) plus metformin (an insulin sensitizer that inhibits hepatic glucose output and increases peripheral glucose uptake while minimizing weight gain). Findings from several clinical trials have shown repaglinide plus metformin combination therapy to be superior to either monotherapy with significant reductions in hemoglobin A1C and fasting glucose values. Repaglinide used in combination also has shown less incidence of hypoglycemia compared with other combination therapies such as sulphonylureas plus metformin. Repaglinide plus metformin combination therapy appears to be a valuable therapeutic option for type 2 diabetic patients seeking a less complex drug regimen while potentially achieving better glucose control if currently inadequately controlled on monotherapy.

Richard, John W.; Raskin, Philip

2011-01-01

259

Efficacy and safety of sitagliptin as add-on therapy on glycemic control and blood glucose fluctuation in Japanese type 2 diabetes subjects ongoing with multiple daily insulin injections therapy.  

PubMed

To assess the efficacy and safety of adding sitagliptin, an oral dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, in subjects with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with multiple daily insulin injections therapy (MDI). HbA1c, 1,5-anhydroglucitol (1,5-AG), body mass index (BMI), insulin doses, six-point self-measured plasma glucose (SMPG) profiles were assessed before, after 12 weeks, and after 24 weeks of MDI with 50 mg/day of sitagliptin in 40 subjects with type 2 diabetes. Safety endpoints included hypoglycemia and any adverse events. HbA1c significantly decreased during the first 12 weeks ( -0.64 ± 0.60 %), and was sustained over 24 weeks ( -0.69 ± 0.85 %). 1,5-AG increased significantly from 7.5 ± 4.5 ?g/mL at baseline to 9.6 ± 5.5 ?g/mL after 24 weeks. The bolus insulin dose at 12 weeks was decreased, and the mean plasma glucose, the SD of daily glucose, M-value, and the mean amplitude of glycemic excursions (MAGE) also decreased significantly as compared with baseline values. BMI and frequency of hypoglycemia were not changed significantly. Univariate linear regression analyses revealed that % change in HbA1c was significantly associated with BMI, and % changes in the indexes of glycemic instability (SD of daily glucose and MAGE) were significantly associated with age. In conclusion, adding sitagliptin to MDI significantly improved glycemic control and decreased the daily glucose fluctuation in subjects with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with MDI, without weight gain or an increase in the incidence of hypoglycemia. This trial was registered with UMIN (no. UMIN000010157). PMID:23912974

Shimoda, Seiya; Iwashita, Shinsuke; Ichimori, Shinji; Matsuo, Yasuto; Goto, Rieko; Maeda, Takako; Matsuo, Tomoko; Sekigami, Taiji; Kawashima, Junji; Kondo, Tatsuya; Matsumura, Takeshi; Motoshima, Hiroyuki; Furukawa, Noboru; Nishida, Kenro; Araki, Eiichi

2013-08-03

260

[Involvement of glycemic control in the inhibiting effect of Morinda citrifolia on cerebral ischemia-induced neuronal damage].  

PubMed

Fruit juice of Morinda citrifolia (Rubiaceae, Noni juice) is a well-known healthy drink and has various pharmacological properties including antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. We have hitherto found the protective effect of Noni juice on neuronal damage caused by ischemic stress in mice. In addition, we have also recently reported that suppression of post-ischemic glucose intolerance might be important for good prognosis. Here, we focused on the effect of Noni juice on the development of the post-ischemic glucose intolerance as a cerebral protective mechanism. Noni juice was obtained from the mature fruit grown in Okinawa (ONJ). Male ddY mice were given 10% ONJ in drinking water for 7 d. Then, mice were subjected to 2 h of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). We found that 10% ONJ treatment suppressed the development of neuronal damage after MCAO. Interestingly, glucose intolerance observed on 1 d after MCAO completely disappeared by 10% ONJ. Furthermore, 10% ONJ treatment significantly increased serum insulin levels much further than the control group on 1 d, while serum adiponectin levels were not affected at all. These results suggest that ONJ could facilitate insulin secretion and may attenuate the development of glucose intolerance under ischemic stress. These functions may contribute to the neuronal protective effect of ONJ against ischemic stress. PMID:20460868

Harada, Shinichi; Fujita-Hamabe, Wakako; Kamiya, Kohei; Satake, Toshiko; Tokuyama, Shogo

2010-05-01

261

Resveratrol Increases Glucose Induced GLP-1 Secretion in Mice: A Mechanism which Contributes to the Glycemic Control  

PubMed Central

Resveratrol (RSV) is a potent anti-diabetic agent when used at high doses. However, the direct targets primarily responsible for the beneficial actions of RSV remain unclear. We used a formulation that increases oral bioavailability to assess the mechanisms involved in the glucoregulatory action of RSV in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed diabetic wild type mice. Administration of RSV for 5 weeks reduced the development of glucose intolerance, and increased portal vein concentrations of both Glucagon-like peptid-1 (GLP-1) and insulin, and intestinal content of active GLP-1. This was associated with increased levels of colonic proglucagon mRNA transcripts. RSV-mediated glucoregulation required a functional GLP-1 receptor (Glp1r) as neither glucose nor insulin levels were modulated in Glp1r-/- mice. Conversely, levels of active GLP-1 and control of glycemia were further improved when the Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor sitagliptin was co-administered with RSV. In addition, RSV treatment modified gut microbiota and decreased the inflammatory status of mice. Our data suggest that RSV exerts its actions in part through modulation of the enteroendocrine axis in vivo.

Dao, Thi-Mai Anh; Waget, Aurelie; Klopp, Pascale; Serino, Matteo; Vachoux, Christelle; Pechere, Laurent; Drucker, Daniel J.; Champion, Serge; Barthelemy, Sylvain; Barra, Yves; Burcelin, Remy; Seree, Eric

2011-01-01

262

In vitro investigation of 2',4'-dihydroxy-6'-methoxy-3',5'-dimethylchalcone for glycemic control.  

PubMed

2',4'-Dihydroxy-6'-methoxy-3',5'-dimethylchalcone (DMC), a compound isolated and purified from the dried flower buds of Cleistocalyx operculatus (Roxb.) Merr. et Perry (Myrtaceae), was investigated for its glucose control benefits using in vitro methods. DMC showed strong noncompetitive (IC(50) of 43 ?M) inhibition of pancreatic ?-amylase; it was, however, ineffective against intestinal ?-glucosidase. In addition, DMC exhibited remarkable glucose transport inhibition effects in both simulated fasting and fed states in Caco-2 cell monolayers (P < 0.05). Besides, exposure of MIN6 cells to 250 ?M H(2)O(2) for 1 h caused a significant viability loss and insulin secretion reduction. Pretreatment of MIN6 cells with DMC for 2 h protected against the H(2)O(2)-induced decrease in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in a dose-dependent manner and also enhanced the impaired basal insulin secretion. Such effects highlight the therapeutic potential of DMC in the management of hyperglycemia. PMID:23013379

Hu, Ying-Chun; Luo, Ying-Di; Li, Lin; Joshi, Manoj Kumar; Lu, Yan-Hua

2012-10-10

263

Transgenic mice expressing the human GLUT4/muscle-fat facilitative glucose transporter protein exhibit efficient glycemic control.  

PubMed Central

To examine the physiological role of the GLUT4/muscle-fat specific facilitative glucose transporter in regulating glucose homeostasis, we have generated transgenic mice expressing high levels of this protein in an appropriate tissue-specific manner. Examination of two independent founder lines demonstrated that high-level expression of GLUT4 protein resulted in a marked reduction of fasting glucose levels (approximately 70 mg/dl) compared to wild-type mice (approximately 130 mg/dl). Surprisingly, 30 min following an oral glucose challenge the GLUT4 transgenic mice had only a slight elevation in plasma glucose levels (approximately 90 mg/dl), whereas wild-type mice displayed a typical 2- to 3-fold increase (approximately 250-300 mg/dl). In parallel to the changes in plasma glucose, insulin levels were approximately 2-fold lower in the transgenic mice compared to the wild-type mice. Furthermore, isolated adipocytes from the GLUT4 transgenic mice had increased basal glucose uptake and subcellular fractionation indicated elevated levels of cell surface-associated GLUT4 protein. Consistent with these results, in situ immunocytochemical localization of GLUT4 protein in adipocytes and cardiac myocytes indicated a marked increase in plasma membrane-associated GLUT4 protein in the basal state. Taken together these data demonstrate that increased expression of the human GLUT4 gene in vivo results in a constitutively high level of cell surface GLUT4 protein expression and more efficient metabolic control over fluctuations in plasma glucose concentrations. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5

Liu, M L; Gibbs, E M; McCoid, S C; Milici, A J; Stukenbrok, H A; McPherson, R K; Treadway, J L; Pessin, J E

1993-01-01

264

Relationship Between Baseline Glycemic Control and Cognitive Function in Individuals With Type 2 Diabetes and Other Cardiovascular Risk Factors  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE—Diabetes is associated with cognitive decline and dementia. However, the relationship between the degree of hyperglycemia and cognitive status remains unclear. This was explored using baseline cognitive measures collected in the ongoing Memory in Diabetes (MIND) substudy of the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) trial. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—The relationship of A1C and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels to performance on four cognitive tests was assessed, adjusting for age and other determinants of cognitive status. The tests were the Digit Symbol Substitution Test (DSST), Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE), Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test, and Stroop Test. RESULTS—A statistically significant age-adjusted association was observed between the A1C level and the score on all four cognitive tests. Specifically, a 1% higher A1C value was associated with a significant 1.75-point lower DSST score (95% CI ?1.22 to ?2.28; P < 0.0001), a 0.20-point lower MMSE score (?0.11 to ?0.28; P < 0.0001), a 0.11-point lower memory score (?0.02 to ?0.19, P = 0.0142), and a worse score (i.e., 0.75 s more) on the Stroop Test (1.31–0.19, P = 0.0094). The association between the DSST score and A1C persisted in all multiple linear regression models. FPG was not associated with test performance. CONCLUSIONS—Higher A1C levels are associated with lower cognitive function in individuals with diabetes. The effect of glucose lowering on cognitive function will be determined by the ongoing ACCORD-MIND trial.

Cukierman-Yaffe, Tali; Gerstein, Hertzel C.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Lazar, Ronald M.; Lovato, Laura; Miller, Michael E.; Coker, Laura H.; Murray, Anne; Sullivan, Mark D.; Marcovina, Santica M.; Launer, Lenore J.

2009-01-01

265

Glycemic load effect on fasting and post-prandial serum glucose, insulin, IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 in a randomized, controlled feeding study  

PubMed Central

Background/Objectives The effect of a low glycemic load (GL) diet on insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) concentration is still unknown but may contribute to lower chronic disease risk. We aimed to assess the impact of GL on concentrations of IGF-1 and IGFBP-3. Subjects/Methods We conducted a randomized, controlled crossover feeding trial in 84 overweight-obese and normal weight healthy individuals using two 28-day weight-maintaining high- and low-GL diets. Measures were fasting and post-prandial concentrations of insulin, glucose, IGF-1 and IGFBP-3. 20 participants completed post-prandial testing by consuming a test breakfast at the end of each feeding period. We used paired t-tests for diet-component and linear mixed models for biomarker analyses. Results The 28-day low-GL diet led to 4% lower fasting concentrations of IGF-1 (10.6 ng/mL, p=0.04) and a 4% lower ratio of IGF-1/IGFBP-3 (0.24, p=0.01) compared to the high-GL diet. The low-GL test breakfast led to 43% and 27% lower mean post-prandial glucose and insulin responses, respectively; mean incremental areas under the curve for glucose and insulin, respectively, were 64.3±21.8 (mmol/L/240min) (p<0.01) and 2253±539 (?U/mL/240min) (p<0.01) lower following the low- compared to the high-GL test meal. There was no effect of GL on mean HOMA-IR or on mean integrated post-prandial concentrations of glucose-adjusted insulin, IGF-1 or IGFBP-3. We did not observe modification of the dietary effect by adiposity. Conclusions Low-GL diets resulted in 43% and 27% lower post-prandial responses of glucose and insulin, respectively, and modestly lower fasting IGF-1 concentrations. Further intervention studies are needed to weigh the impact of dietary GL on risk for chronic disease.

Runchey, Shauna S.; Pollak, Michael N.; Valsta, Liisa M.; Coronado, Gloria D.; Schwarz, Yvonne; Breymeyer, Kara L.; Wang, Chiachi; Wang, Ching-Yun; Lampe, Johanna W.; Neuhouser, Marian L.

2012-01-01

266

Relation between psychosocial variables and the glycemic control of patients with type 2 diabetes: A cross-sectional and prospective study  

PubMed Central

Background This cross-sectional and prospective study used a variety of psychological inventories to evaluate the relationship between psychosocial factors and the glycemic control of patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods Participants were 304 patients with type 2 diabetes who were treated as outpatients at diabetes clinics. All participants were assessed for HbA1c and completed the following self-report psychological inventories: 1) Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire (DTSQ), 2) Problem Areas in Diabetes Survey (PAID), 3) Well-being Questionnaire 12 (W-BQ12), 4) Self-Esteem Scale (SES), 5) Social Support Scale, and 6) Self-Efficacy Scale. HbA1c was again measured one year later. The relationships between the psychosocial variables obtained by analysis of the psychological inventories and baseline or one-year follow-up HbA1c were determined. Results Baseline HbA1cwas significantly correlated with age, diet treatment regimen, number of microvascular complication of diabetes, and the total scores of DTSQ, W-BQ12, PAID, SES and the Self-Efficacy Scale. Hierarchical stepwise multiple regression revealed that significant predictors of baseline HbA1c were total DTSQ and PAID scores, along with age, diet treatment regimen, and number of microvascular complication of diabetes after adjustment for demographic, clinical and other psychosocial variables. Two hundred and ninety patients (95.4% of 304) were followed and assessed one year after baseline. Hierarchical stepwise multiple regression analysis showed the significant predictors of follow-up HbA1c to be total DTSQ and PAID scores, along with age and diet treatment regimen. However, the correlation between baseline and follow-up HbA1c was so high that the only other variable to retain significance was diet treatment regimen once baseline HbA1c was included in the regression of follow-up HbA1c. Conclusion The DTSQ and the PAID predicted both current and future HbA1c to a similar and significant degree in patients with type 2 diabetes.

Nozaki, Takehiro; Morita, Chihiro; Matsubayashi, Sunao; Ishido, Koich; Yokoyama, Hiroaki; Kawai, Keisuke; Matsumoto, Masahiro; Takii, Masato; Kubo, Chiharu

2009-01-01

267

Does Glycemic Variability Impact Mood and Quality of Life?  

PubMed Central

Abstract Background Diabetes is a chronic condition that significantly impacts quality of life. Poor glycemic control is associated with more diabetes complications, depression, and worse quality of life. The impact of glycemic variability on mood and quality of life has not been studied. Methods A descriptive exploratory design was used. Twenty-three women with type 2 diabetes wore a continuous glucose monitoring system for 72?h and completed a series of questionnaires. Measurements included (1) glycemic control shown by glycated hemoglobin and 24-h mean glucose, (2) glycemic variability shown by 24-h SD of the glucose readings, continuous overall net glycemic action (CONGA), and Fourier statistical models to generate smoothed curves to assess rate of change defined as “energy,” and (3) mood (depression, anxiety, anger) and quality of life by questionnaires. Results Women with diabetes and co-morbid depression had higher anxiety, more anger, and lower quality of life than those without depression. Certain glycemic variability measures were associated with mood and quality of life. The 24-h SD of the glucose readings and the CONGA measures were significantly associated with health-related quality of life after adjusting for age and weight. Fourier models indicated that certain energy components were significantly associated with depression, trait anxiety, and overall quality of life. Finally, subjects with higher trait anxiety tended to have steeper glucose excursions. Conclusions Data suggest that greater glycemic variability may be associated with lower quality of life and negative moods. Implications include replication of the study in a larger sample for the assessment of blood glucose fluctuations as they impact mood and quality of life.

Quinn, Lauretta; Byrn, Mary; Ferrans, Carol; Miller, Michael; Strange, Poul

2012-01-01

268

Available Carbohydrate and Glycemic Index Combined in New Data Sets for Managing Glycemia and Diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Available carbohydrate data have long been used as a basis for food exchanges in controlling glycemia, but are not entirely appropriate because the same quantity of available carbohydrate in different foods can induce very different degrees of glycemic response. As an additional aid to food selection the glycemic index (GI) is now being increasingly used in diabetes management. GI is

J. A. Monro

1999-01-01

269

GLYCEMIC INDEX, CHOLECYSTOKININ, SATIETY AND DISINHIBITION: IS THERE AN UNAPPRECIATED PARADOX FOR OVERWEIGHT WOMEN?  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The clinical utility of a low glycemic index (GI) diet for appetite and food intake control is controversial. Complicating the issue is psychological and behavioral influences related to eating. The aim of the present study was to investigate the satiety and glycemic response to high and low GI meal...

270

Glycemic index and load and risk of upper aero-digestive tract neoplasms (Italy)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The ability of dietary carbohydrates to affect blood glucose and insulin levels by dietary carbohydrates is best measured by the glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) which have been directly associated with risk of several chronic conditions, including cancer. Patients and methods: Three case–control studies were conducted between 1992 and 2000 in Italy. The first one included 598

Livia S. A. Augustin; Silvano Gallus; Silvia Franceschi; Eva Negri; David J. A. Jenkins; Cyril W. C. Kendall; Luigino Dal Maso; Renato Talamini; Carlo La Vecchia

2003-01-01

271

Microalbuminuria in type 1 diabetes: Rates, risk factors and glycemic threshold  

Microsoft Academic Search

Microalbuminuria in type 1 diabetes: Rates, risk factors and glycemic threshold.BackgroundThe occurrence of microalbuminuria in type 1 diabetes is strongly predictive of renal and cardiovascular disease and is still likely to occur despite improvements in glycemic control. A better understanding of microalbuminuria is required to inform new interventions. We determined the incidence and risk factors for microalbuminuria [albumin excretion rate

Nish Chaturvedi; Simona Bandinelli; Ruggero Mangili; Guiseppe Penno; Raoul E Rottiers; John H Fuller

2001-01-01

272

Dietary Carbohydrate, Glycemic Index, and Glycemic Load in Relation to Risk of Colorectal Cancer in Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diets with a high glycemic index and glycemic load have been hypothesized to be implicated in the etiology of colorectal cancer owing to their potential to increase postprandial glucose and insulin levels. Prospective data on glycemic index and glycemic load in relation to colorectal cancer risk are limited and inconsistent. Therefore, the authors prospectively investigated the associations of dietary carbohydrate,

Susanna C. Larsson; Edward Giovannucci; Alicja Wolk

2007-01-01

273

Is Ramadan fasting safe in type 2 diabetic patients in view of the lack of significant effect of fasting on clinical and biochemical parameters, blood pressure, and glycemic control?  

PubMed

The study objective was to determine if Ramadan fasting was safe in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), based upon a determination of the effect of fasting on a broad range of physiological and clinical parameters, including markers of glycemic control and blood pressure. The study was carried out in Ramadan 1422 (December 2001-January 2002) at the Diabetology Services, Hopital Ibn Sina, Rabat, Morocco. One hundred and twenty T2D Moroccan patients (62 women, 58 men), aged 48-60 yrs with well-controlled diabetes through diet and/or oral hypoglycemic drugs (OHD), received dietary instructions and readjustment of the timing of the dose of OHD (gliclazide modified release) according to the fasting/eating periods. Anthropometric indices and physiological parameters (blood pressure, lipid, hematological, and serum electrolyte profiles, as well as markers of glycemic control, nutrition, renal and hepatic function) were measured on the day before Ramadan and then on the 15(th) and 29(th) day of fasting and thereafter 15 days later. Statistical analysis was done by standard methods. Ramadan fasting had no major effect on energy intake, body weight, body mass index, blood pressure, and liver enzymes. Fasting and post-prandial glucose levels decreased, while insulin levels increased. Diabetes was well controlled, as indicated by HbA1c, fructosamine, C-peptide, HOMA-IR, and IGF-1 values. There were fluctuations in some lipid and hematological parameters, creatinine, urea, uric acid, total protein, bilirubin, and electrolytes; however, all values stayed within the proper physiological range. In conclusion, diabetes was well-controlled in patients with dietary/medical management, without serious complications. With a regimen adjustment of OHD, diet control, and physical activity, most patients with T2D whose diabetes was well-controlled before Ramadan can safely observe Ramadan fasting. PMID:18633757

M'guil, M; Ragala, M A; El Guessabi, L; Fellat, S; Chraibi, A; Chabraoui, L; Chebraoui, L; Israili, Z H; Lyoussi, B

2008-07-01

274

Equivalent glycemic load (EGL): a method for quantifying the glycemic responses elicited by low carbohydrate foods  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Glycemic load (GL) is used to quantify the glycemic impact of high-carbohydrate (CHO) foods, but cannot be used for low-CHO foods. Therefore, we evaluated the accuracy of equivalent-glycemic-load (EGL), a measure of the glycemic impact of low-CHO foods defined as the amount of CHO from white-bread (WB) with the same glycemic impact as one serving of food. METHODS: Several

Alison L Gibbs; Matt Spolar; Elinor V Hitchner; Colette Heimowitz

2006-01-01

275

Glycemic index in chronic disease: a review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aim: The intent of this review is to critically analyze the scientific evidence on the role of the glycemic index in chronic Western disease and to discuss the utility of the glycemic index in the prevention and management of these disease states. Background: The glycemic index ranks foods based on their postprandial blood glucose response. Hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance, as

LS Augustin; S Franceschi; DJA Jenkins; CWC Kendall; C La Vecchia

276

Glycemic index in chronic disease: a review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aim: The intent of this review is to critically analyze the scientific evidence on the role of the glycemic index in chronic Western disease and to discuss the utility of the glycemic index in the prevention and management of these disease states.Background: The glycemic index ranks foods based on their postprandial blood glucose response. Hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance, as well

LS Augustin; S Franceschi; DJA Jenkins; CWC Kendall; C La Vecchia

2002-01-01

277

The Glycemic Index: Methodology and Use  

Microsoft Academic Search

The glycemic index concept owes much to the dietary fiber hypothesis that fiber would reduce the rate of nutrient absorption and increase the value of carbohydrate foods in the maintenance of health and treatment of disease. However, properties and components of food other than its fiber content contribute to the glycemic and endocrine responses postprandially. The aim of the glycemic

C. Kendall; L. Augustin; A. Emam; A. Josse; N. Saxena; D. Jenkins

2006-01-01

278

Dietary Glycemic Index, Glycemic Load, and Risk of Cancer: A Prospective Cohort Study  

PubMed Central

Previous studies have provided limited evidence for a harmful effect of high glycemic index and dietary glycemic load on cancer. The authors analyzed associations among glycemic index, glycemic load, and risk of cancer in women and men in the National Institutes of Health–AARP Diet and Health Study. Published glycemic index values were assigned to 225 foods/food groups. Glycemic load was calculated by multiplying the glycemic index, carbohydrate content, and intake frequency of individual foods reported on a food frequency questionnaire. From 1995 through 2003, the authors identified 15,215 and 33,203 cancer cases in women and men, respectively. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate multivariate relative risks and 95% confidence intervals. For women and men, respectively, the relative risks for total cancer for high versus low glycemic index were 1.03 (Ptrend?=?0.217) and 1.04 (Ptrend?=?0.012) and, for glycemic load, were 0.90 (Ptrend?=?0.024) and 0.93 (Ptrend = 0.01). Associations with total cancer held only among the overweight for glycemic index and among those of healthy weight for glycemic load. These findings suggest that glycemic index and glycemic load are not strong predictors of cancer incidence. The direction and small magnitude of associations might be explained by the manner in which high glycemic index and glycemic load track with overall diet and lifestyle patterns.

George, Stephanie Materese; Mayne, Susan T.; Leitzmann, Michael F.; Park, Yikyung; Schatzkin, Arthur; Flood, Andrew; Hollenbeck, Albert

2009-01-01

279

Effect of Intensive Glycemic Lowering on Health-Related Quality of Life in Type 2 Diabetes  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To compare the effect of intensive versus standard glycemic control strategies on health-related quality of life (HRQL) in a substudy of the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) trial. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A randomly selected subsample of 2,053 ACCORD participants enrolled in the HRQL substudy was assessed at baseline and 12-, 36-, and 48-month visits. HRQL assessment included general health status (the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey [SF-36]), diabetes symptoms (the Diabetes Symptom Distress Checklist), depression (Patient Health Questionnaire [PHQ]-9), and treatment satisfaction (Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire [DTSQ]). Repeated-measures ANOVA models were used to estimate change in HRQL outcomes by treatment group over 48 months adjusting for model covariates. The effects of early discontinuation of the ACCORD intensive glycemic control arm on study results were explored. RESULTS A total of 1,956 (95%) completed the self-report HRQL instrument(s) at baseline. The intensive arm had a larger decrease in SF-36 physical health component score than the standard arm (?1.6 vs. ?1.1, P = 0.0345). Treatment satisfaction (DTSQ) showed larger improvement with intensive than standard (P = 0.0004). There were no differences in mean scores of the Diabetes Symptom Checklist and PHQ-9. Effects of participant transition following discontinuation of the intensive arm on HRQL were not significant. CONCLUSIONS The ACCORD trial strategy of intensive glycemic control did not lead to benefits in HRQL and was associated with modest improvement in diabetes treatment satisfaction. Thus patient acceptability was apparently not compromised with intensive and complex interventions such as those used in ACCORD.

Anderson, Roger T.; Narayan, K.M. Venkat; Feeney, Patricia; Goff, David; Ali, Mohammed K.; Simmons, Debra L.; Sperl-Hillen, Jo-Ann; Bigger, Thomas; Cuddihy, Robert; O'Conner, Patrick J.; Sood, Ajay; Zhang, Ping; Sullivan, Mark D.

2011-01-01

280

Glycemic memory associated epigenetic changes.  

PubMed

It is evident that metabolic memory, whereby diabetic complications continue to develop and progress in individuals who returned to normal glycemic control after a period of transient hyperglycemia, can have long lasting effects. We have primary findings that transient hyperglycemia causes profound transcriptional changes in vascular endothelial cells. We hypothesized that ambient hyperglycemia triggers gene-activating events of the NF?B p65 promoter that are mediated by changes in epigenetic modifications. In a follow-up study we identified two histone-specific writing and erasing enzymes involved in the underlying regulation of gene expression during transient hyperglycemia and subsequent return to normoglycemia. Experimental evidence indicates that previous hyperglycemia is associated with persistent expression of the NF?B p65 gene, which activates NF?B-dependent proteins, such as MCP-1, which are implicated in diabetes-associated vascular injury. Increased gene transcription is correspondent with H3K4m1, but not H3K4m2 and H3K4m3, on the NF?B p65 gene. In vascular endothelial cells the histone methyltransferase Set7 can write the mono-methylation mark H3K4m1 and this methyl-writing enzyme is recruited as a gene co-activator in response to glucose. Furthermore, Set7 knockdown prevents glucose-induced p65 expression. We hypothesize that these molecular events represent an integrated response of the epigenome that lead to changes in the expression of genes and proteins that regulate the development and progression of diabetic vascular complications. Further characterisation of these glucose-induced epigenetic events and the identification of key enzymes involved will improve our understanding of the pathways implicated in diabetic vascular injury. PMID:20599797

Siebel, Andrew L; Fernandez, Ana Z; El-Osta, Assam

2010-06-19

281

Dietary carbohydrate, glycemic index, and glycemic load and the risk of colorectal cancer in the BCDDP cohort  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  There is considerable support for associations between insulin and IGF-I levels and colorectal cancer. Diet may relate to\\u000a colorectal cancer through this mechanism, for example, diets high in glycemic index, glycemic load and\\/or carbohydrate are\\u000a hypothesized to increase insulin load and the risk of insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia. Case–control studies support this\\u000a hypothesis, but prospective cohorts have had mixed results.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  In

Lori Strayer; David R. Jacobs Jr; Catherine Schairer; Arthur Schatzkin; Andrew Flood

2007-01-01

282

A Randomized Controlled Trial Investigating the Effects of a Low-Glycemic Index Diet on Pregnancy Outcomes in Gestational Diabetes Mellitus  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE The prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is rising. There is little evidence to demonstrate the effectiveness of one dietary therapy over another. We aimed to investigate the effect of a low–glycemic index (LGI) versus a conventional high-fiber diet on pregnancy outcomes, neonatal anthropometry, and maternal metabolic profile in GDM. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Ninety-nine women (age 26–42 years; mean ± SD prepregnancy BMI 24 ± 5 kg/m2) diagnosed with GDM at 20–32 weeks’ gestation were randomized to follow either an LGI (n = 50; target glycemic index [GI] ~50) or a high-fiber moderate-GI diet (HF) (n = 49; target GI ~60). Dietary intake was assessed by 3-day food records. Pregnancy outcomes were collected from medical records. RESULTS The LGI group achieved a modestly lower GI than the HF group (mean ± SEM 47 ± 1 vs. 53 ± 1; P < 0.001). At birth, there was no significant difference in birth weight (LGI 3.3 ± 0.1 kg vs. HF 3.3 ± 0.1 kg; P = 0.619), birth weight centile (LGI 52.5 ± 4.3 vs. HF 52.2 ± 4.0; P = 0.969), prevalence of macrosomia (LGI 2.1% vs. HF 6.7%; P = 0.157), insulin treatment (LGI 53% vs. HF 65%; P = 0.251), or adverse pregnancy outcomes. CONCLUSIONS In intensively monitored women with GDM, an LGI diet and a conventional HF diet produce similar pregnancy outcomes.

Louie, Jimmy Chun Yu; Markovic, Tania P.; Perera, Nimalie; Foote, Deborah; Petocz, Peter; Ross, Glynis P.; Brand-Miller, Jennie C.

2011-01-01

283

Attentional control of early perceptual learning.  

PubMed Central

The performance of adult humans in simple visual tasks improves dramatically with practice. This improvement is highly specific to basic attributes of the trained stimulus, suggesting that the underlying changes occur at low-level processing stages in the brain, where different orientations and spatial frequencies are handled by separate channels. We asked whether these practice effects are determined solely by activity in stimulus-driven mechanisms or whether high-level attentional mechanisms, which are linked to the perceptual task, might control the learning process. We found that practicing one task did not improve performance in an alternative task, even though both tasks used exactly the same visual stimuli but depended on different stimulus attributes (either orientation of local elements or global shape). Moreover, even when the experiment was designed so that the same responses were associated with the same stimuli (although subjects were instructed to attend to the attribute underlying one task), learning did not transfer from one task to the other. These results suggest that specific high-level attentional mechanisms, controlling changes at early visual processing levels, are essential in perceptual learning. Images Fig. 3

Ahissar, M; Hochstein, S

1993-01-01

284

Body composition, dietary composition, and components of metabolic syndrome in overweight and obese adults after a 12-week trial on dietary treatments focused on portion control, energy density, or glycemic index  

PubMed Central

Background Given the rise in obesity and associated chronic diseases, it is critical to determine optimal weight management approaches that will also improve dietary composition and chronic disease risk factors. Few studies have examined all these weight, diet, and disease risk variables in subjects participating in recommended multi-disciplinary weight loss programs using different dietary strategies. Methods This study compared effects of three dietary approaches to weight loss on body composition, dietary composition and risk factors for metabolic syndrome (MetS). In a 12-week trial, sedentary but otherwise healthy overweight and obese adults (19?M & 138?F; 38.7?±?6.7 y; BMI 31.8?±?2.2) who were attending weekly group sessions for weight loss followed either portion control, low energy density, or low glycemic index diet plans. At baseline and 12?weeks, measures included anthropometrics, body composition, 3-day food diaries, blood pressure, total lipid profile, HOMA, C-reactive protein, and fasting blood glucose and insulin. Data were analyzed by repeated measures analysis of variance. Results All groups significantly reduced body weight and showed significant improvements in body composition (p?control, low energy density, or low glycemic index produced similar, significant short-term improvements in body composition, diet compositin, and MetS components in overweight and obese adults undergoing weekly weight loss meetings. This may allow for flexibility in options for dietary counseling based on patient preference.

2012-01-01

285

Dietary hyperglycemia, glycemic index and metabolic retinal diseases  

Microsoft Academic Search

The glycemic index (GI) indicates how fast blood glucose is raised after consuming a carbohydrate-containing food. Human metabolic studies indicate that GI is related to patho-physiological responses after meals. Compared with a low-GI meal, a high-GI meal is characterized with hyperglycemia during the early postprandial stage (0–2h) and a compensatory hyperlipidemia associated with counter-regulatory hormone responses during late postprandial stage

Chung-Jung Chiu; Allen Taylor

2011-01-01

286

Dietary fiber and the glycemic response.  

PubMed

Addition of purified fiber to carbohydrate test meals has been shown to flatten the glycemic response in both normal and diabetic volunteers, reduce the insulin requirement in patients on the artificial pancreas and in the longer term reduce urinary glucose loss and improve diabetes control. In the context of high fiber-high carbohydrate diets these findings have had a major impact in influencing recommendations for the dietary management of diabetes internationally. The mechanism of action appears in part to be due to the effect of fiber in slowing absorption rather than by increasing colonic losses of carbohydrate. Consequently postprandial GIP and insulin levels are reduced and the more viscous purified fibers (e.g., guar and pectin) appear most effective. In addition it has been suggested that colonic fermentation products of fiber may enhance glucose utilization. More recently it has become clear that many aspects of carbohydrate foods (food form, antinutrients, etc.) in addition to fiber may influence the rate of digestion and has led to a classification especially of starchy foods in terms of glycemic index to define the degree to which equicarbohydrate portions of different foods raise the blood glucose. Use of such data may maximize the effectiveness of high carbohydrate and high fiber diets in the management of diabetes and related disorders. PMID:3001740

Jenkins, D J; Jenkins, A L

1985-12-01

287

Glycemic Index, Obesity, and Diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Prescribing diets to treat obese patients and to prevent type 2 diabetes poses a challenge to clinicians. Overemphasis on\\u000a carbohydrate-to-fat ratio, with insufficient attention directed toward diet quality, may partially explain disappointing outcomes\\u000a with available approaches. The glycemic index (GI) is an alternative system for classifying carbohydrate-containing foods\\u000a according to postprandial blood glucose responses to portions containing a standard amount

Cara B. Ebbeling; David S. Ludwig

288

The influence of chromium chloride–containing milk to glycemic control of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect and safety of chromium-containing milk powder in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted in Taiwan. A total of 60 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, aged 30 to 75 years, and on a dose of gliclazide sulfonylurea agent (?160 mg\\/d) for at least

Dee Pei; Chang-Hsun Hsieh; Yi-Jen Hung; Jer-Chuang Li; Chien-Hsing Lee; Shi-Wen Kuo

2006-01-01

289

The effectiveness of peer health coaching in improving glycemic control among low-income patients with diabetes: protocol for a randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background Although self-management support improves diabetes outcomes, it is not consistently provided in health care settings strained for time and resources. One proposed solution to personnel and funding shortages is to utilize peer coaches, patients trained to provide diabetes education and support to other patients. Coaches share similar experiences about living with diabetes and are able to reach patients within and beyond the health care setting. Given the limited body of evidence that demonstrates peer coaching significantly improves chronic disease care, this present study examines the impact of peer coaching delivered in a primary care setting on diabetes outcomes. Methods/Design The aim of this multicenter, randomized control trial is to evaluate the effectiveness of utilizing peer coaches to improve clinical outcomes and self-management skills in low-income patients with poorly controlled diabetes. A total of 400 patients from six primary health centers based in San Francisco that serve primarily low-income populations will be randomized to receive peer coaching (n = 200) or usual care (n = 200) over 6 months. Patients in the peer coach group receive coaching from patients with diabetes who are trained and mentored as peer coaches. The primary outcome is change in HbA1c. Secondary outcomes include change in: systolic blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), LDL cholesterol, diabetes self-care activities, medication adherence, diabetes-related quality of life, diabetes self-efficacy, and depression. Clinical values (HbA1c, LDL cholesterol and blood pressure) and self-reported diabetes self-efficacy and self-care activities are measured at baseline and after 6 months for patients and coaches. Peer coaches are also assessed at 12 months. Discussion Patients with diabetes, who are trained as peer health coaches, are uniquely poised to provide diabetes self management support and education to patients. This study is designed to investigate the impact of peer health coaching in patients with poorly controlled diabetes. Additionally, we will assess disease outcomes in patients with well controlled diabetes who are trained and work as peer health coaches. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01040806

2011-01-01

290

Glycemic Control and Weight Reduction Without Causing Hypoglycemia: The Case for Continued Safe Aggressive Care of Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Avoidance of Therapeutic Inertia  

PubMed Central

Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major and growing concern in the United States, in large part because of an epidemic of obesity in America and its relation to type 2 DM. In affected patients, postprandial glucose may be an early indicator of glucose intolerance or a prediabetes condition, which may be a better predictor of cardiovascular risk than impaired fasting glucose level. Treating patients who have early signs of hyperglycemia, including elevated postprandial glucose level, with intensive glucose control that does not lead to weight gain, and ideally may be associated with weight reduction, may be vital to preventing or reducing later cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Because hypoglycemia is an important complication of current DM treatments and may cause acute secondary adverse cardiovascular outcomes, not causing hypoglycemia is mandatory. Given that weight loss can significantly lower cardiovascular risk and improve other cardiovascular risk factors in patients with type 2 DM and that medications are available that can result in weight reduction without leading to hypoglycemia, the successful treatment of patients with type 2 DM should be individualized and should address the complete pathophysiologic process. This review is a hypothesis article that presents arguments against general approaches to the treatment of type 2 DM. An algorithm is presented in which the goal for managing patients with type 2 DM is to lower the blood glucose level as much as possible for as long as possible without causing hypoglycemia. In addition, body weight should ideally be improved, reducing cardiovascular risk factors and avoiding therapeutic inertia.

Schwartz, Stanley S.; Kohl, Benjamin A.

2010-01-01

291

The Effect of High and Low Glycemic Index Diets on Urinary Chromium in Healthy Individuals: A Cross-Over Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Insufficient dietary intake of chromium as an essential nutrient leads to signs and symptoms that are similar to those observed for diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. We postulate that in healthy individuals, urinary chromium excretion following a high glycemic index diet is higher than after a low glycemic index diet. Methods: A sequential randomized controlled cross-over study was carried out

Majid Hajifaraji; Anthony R. Leeds RNutr

2008-01-01

292

Effects of glycemic index and dietary variety on appetite, food intake and satiety factors in healthy adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Short-term studies suggest that ingestion of high glycemic index foods and of dietary variety lead to an increase in energy consumption, favoring an increase in body weight. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of controlled chronic consumption of a monotonous or varied diet composed of foods differing in glycemic index on appetite and food intake. For

Rita de Cassia Goncalves Alfenas

2003-01-01

293

The glycemic index: methodology and clinical implications\\  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is controversy regarding the clinical utility ofclassifying foods according to their glycemic responses by using the glycemic index (GI). Part ofthe controversy is due to methodologic variables that can markedly affect the inter- pretation ofglycemic responses and the GI values obtained. Re- cent studies support the clinical utility of the GI. Within limits determined by the expected GI difference

David JA; Alexandra L Jenkins Jenkins; Robert G Josse

294

Application of glycemic index to mixed meals1'2  

Microsoft Academic Search

glycemic indices correlated well with the predicted glycemic indices (r = 0.88, p < 0.01) and insulin responses paralleled the glycemic responses (r = 0.83, p < 0.05). These results suggest that the glycemic index approach will be useful in planning diets for diabetic people. Am J Clin Nutr l988;47:53-6.

Irene Chew; Janette C Brand; Anne W Thorburn

295

EFFECTS OF DIETARY GLYCEMIC LOAD ON MOOD DURING CALORIC RESTRICTION  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A 1-yr randomized hypocaloric trial tested the effects of high glycemic load (HG: 60% high glycemic index carbohydrate, 20% fat, 20% protein) and low glycemic load (LG: 40% lower glycemic index carbohydrate, 30% fat, 30% protein) diets on mood parameters in 28 healthy men and women (mean+/-SD, age 3...

296

Metabolic effects of a low-glycemic-index diet13  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACF Six healthy male volunteers underwent 2-wk metabolically controlled high- glycemic-index (GI) and low-GI diets in random order. Over the low-UI diet significant reductions were seen in serum fructosamine (7.0 ± 1.0%, p < 0.01), 12-h blood glucose profile (37 ± 7%, p < 0.01), and total serum cholesterol (1 5 ± 3%, p < 0.01). As a measure of

David JA Jenkins; Gregory R Collier; Anthony Ocana; Gloria Buckley; Yun Lam; Amnon Mayer; Lilian U Thompson

297

Mindfulness and Inhibitory Control in Early Adolescence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study examined the relationship between the executive control process of inhibition and self-reported dispositional mindfulness, controlling for gender, grade, and cortisol levels in 99 (43% female) fourth- and fifth-graders ([X-bar] = 10.23 years, SD = 0.53). Students completed a measure of mindful attention awareness and a computerized…

Oberle, Eva; Schonert-Reichl, Kimberly A.; Lawlor, Molly Stewart; Thomson, Kimberly C.

2012-01-01

298

Glycemic index and glycemic load of selected Chinese traditional foods  

PubMed Central

AIM: To determine the glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) values of Chinese traditional foods in Hong Kong. METHODS: Fifteen healthy subjects (8 males and 7 females) volunteered to consume either glucose or one of 23 test foods after 10-14 h overnight fast. The blood glucose concentrations were analyzed immediately before, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 min after food consumption using capillary blood samples. The GI value of each test food was calculated by expressing the incremental area under the blood glucose response curve (IAUC) value for the test food as a percentage of each subject’s average IAUC value for the glucose. The GL value of each test food was calculated as the GI value of the food multiplied by the amount of the available carbohydrate in a usual portion size, divided by 100. RESULTS: Among all the 23 Chinese traditional foods tested, 6 of them belonged to low GI foods (Tuna Fish Bun, Egg Tart, Green Bean Dessert, Chinese Herbal Jelly, Fried Rice Vermicelli in Singapore-style, and Spring Roll), 10 of them belonged to moderate GI foods (Baked Barbecued Pork Puff, Fried Fritter, “Mai-Lai” Cake, “Pineapple” Bun, Fried Rice Noodles with Sliced Beef, Barbecue Pork Bun, Moon Cakes, Glutinous Rice Ball, Instant Sweet Milky Bun, and Salted Meat Rice Dumpling), the others belonged to high GI foods (Fried Rice in Yangzhou-Style, Sticky Rice Wrapped in Lotus Leaf, Steamed Glutinous Rice Roll, Jam and Peanut Butter Toast, Plain Steamed Vermicelli Roll, Red Bean Dessert, and Frozen Sweet Milky Bun). CONCLUSION: The GI and GL values for these Chinese traditional foods will provide some valuable information to both researchers and public on their food preference.

Chen, Ya-Jun; Sun, Feng-Hua; Wong, Stephen Heung-sang; Huang, Ya-Jun

2010-01-01

299

Carbohydrates, glycemic index, glycemic load, and colorectal cancer risk : a systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background Dietary carbohydrate, glycemic index, and glycemic load are thought to influence colorectal cancer risk through hyperinsulinemia. We review and quantitatively summarize in a meta-analysis the evidence from prospective cohort studies. Methods We searched the PubMed database for prospective studies of carbohydrate, glycemic index, and glycemic load and colorectal cancer risk, up to October 2011. Summary relative risks were estimated

D. Aune; D. S. M. Chan; R. Lau; R. Vieira; D. C. Greenwood; E. Kampman; T. Norat

2012-01-01

300

Glycemic response in children with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus after high- or low-glycemic-index  

Microsoft Academic Search

To examine the effects ofvarious carbohydrate foods on postprandial glycemia in diabetic children, we fed a mixed, isocaloric diet containing either high- or low-glycemic- index (GI) breakfast foods to 22 children with poorly controlled insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and measured blood sugar response with and without adjustment of insulin doses. We found that IDDM children fed a high-GI meal showed

Michelle Weyman-Daum; Pavel Fort; Bridget Recker; Roberto Lanes; Fima Lifshitz

301

Early Experience with a Computerized Robotically Controlled Catheter System  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Recently, the use of robotic assisted surgery has been utilized in cardiac surgical procedures. The use of robotics may offer benefits in precision, stability and control of instruments remotely. We report early experience with a novel remote robotic catheter control system (CCS).Methods: We used a computerized robotically controlled catheter system that enables the user to remotely manipulate the tip

Amin Al-Ahmad; Jessica D. Grossman; Paul J. Wang

2005-01-01

302

Effects of a reduced-glycemic-load diet on body weight, body composition, and cardiovascular disease risk markers in overweight  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Lowering the dietary glycemic load and increasing protein intake may be advantageous for weight management. Objective: This randomized controlled trial was designed to eval- uate the effects of an ad libitum reduced-glycemic-load (RGL) diet on body weight, body composition, and cardiovascular disease (CVD)riskmarkersinoverweightandobeseadultsduringaninitial weight-loss phase (12 wk) and a weight-loss maintenance phase (weeks 24-36). Design:SubjectswereassignedtoRGL(n43)orlow-fat,portion- controlled (control; n 43)

Kevin C Maki; Tia M Rains; Valerie N Kaden; Kathleen R Raneri; Michael H Davidson

303

Postprandial Hyperglycemia and Glycemic Variability  

PubMed Central

The aim of this article is to evaluate the pros and cons of a specific impact of postprandial hyperglycemia and glycemic variability on the—mainly cardiovascular (CV)—complications of diabetes, above and beyond the average blood glucose (BG) as measured by HbA1c or fasting plasma glucose (FPG). The strongest arguments in favor of this hypothesis come from impressive pathophysiological studies, also in the human situation. Measures of oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction seem to be especially closely related to glucose peaks and even more so to fluctuating high and low glucose concentrations and can be restored to normal by preventing those glucose peaks or wide glucose excursions. The epidemiological evidence, which is more or less confined to postprandial hyperglycemia and postglucose load glycemia, is also rather compelling in favor of the hypothesis, although certainly not fully conclusive as there are also a number of conflicting results. The strongest cons are seen in the missing evidence as derived from randomized prospective intervention studies targeting postprandial hyperglycemia longer term, i.e., over several years, and seeking to reduce hard CV end points. In fact, several such intervention studies in men have recently failed to produce the intended beneficial outcome results. As this evidence by intervention is, however, key for the ultimate approval of a treatment concept in patients with diabetes, the current net balance of attained evidence is not in favor of the hypothesis here under debate, i.e., that we should care about postprandial hyperglycemia and glycemic variability. The absence of a uniformly accepted standard of how to estimate these parameters adds a further challenge to this whole debate.

Standl, Eberhard; Schnell, Oliver; Ceriello, Antonio

2011-01-01

304

Control Networks and Neuromodulators of Early Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In adults, most cognitive and emotional self-regulation is carried out by a network of brain regions, including the anterior cingulate, insula, and areas of the basal ganglia, related to executive attention. We propose that during infancy, control systems depend primarily upon a brain network involved in orienting to sensory events that includes…

Posner, Michael I.; Rothbart, Mary K.; Sheese, Brad E.; Voelker, Pascale

2012-01-01

305

The Bibliographical Control of Early Books.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Examples are given of the kinds of machine-readable data bases that should be developed in order to extend attempts at universal bibliographical control into neglected areas, the results of which can be used by researchers in the humanities, specifically ...

W. J. Cameron

1976-01-01

306

Emerging control and disruptive behavior disorders during early childhood.  

PubMed

The current study evaluates associations between control processes and Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) during early childhood. Participants were 98 children between ages 3 and 6 and their primary caregivers. Diagnostic information on ODD and ADHD symptoms was available from parents and teachers/caregivers via standardized rating forms. Affective, effortful, and cognitive control processes were measured using parent and examiner ratings via standardized questionnaires, observational ratings, and child performance on laboratory tasks of cognitive control. Affective control, but not effortful control, was significantly associated with cognitive control. A latent factor of control was significantly associated with ADHD, but not ODD, symptoms. PMID:23573794

Martel, Michelle M; Roberts, Bethan; Gremillion, Monica L

2013-01-01

307

The glycemic index and cardiovascular disease risk  

Microsoft Academic Search

Postprandial hyperglycemia is increasingly recognized as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Glycemic “spikes”\\u000a may adversely affect vascular structure and function via multiple mechanisms, including (acutely and\\/or chronically) oxidative\\u000a stress, inflammation, low-density lipoprotein oxidation, protein glycation, and procoagulant activity. Postprandial glycemia\\u000a can be reliably predicted by considering both the amount and type of carbohydrate. In particular, the glycemic index

Jennie Brand-Miller; Scott Dickinson; Alan Barclay; David Celermajer

2007-01-01

308

Dietary glycemic load and atherothrombotic risk  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia are central features of the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus, which contribute\\u000a to the pathogenesis of coronary heart disease (CHD). Recent data indicate that increased dietary glycemic load (GL) due to\\u000a replacing fats with carbohydrates or increasing intake of rapidly absorbed carbohydrates (ie, high glycemic index [GI]) can create a self-perpetuating insulin resistance state and

Simin Liu; Walter C. Willett

2002-01-01

309

The Canadian Trial of Carbohydrates in Diabetes (CCD), a 1-y controlled trial of low-glycemic-index dietary carbohydrate in type 2 diabetes: no effect on glycated hemoglobin but reduction in  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The optimal source and amount of dietary carbohy- drate for managing type 2 diabetes (T2DM) are unknown. Objective:Weaimedtocomparetheeffectsofalteringtheglycemic index or the amount of carbohydrate on glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), plasma glucose, lipids, and C-reactive protein (CRP) in T2DM patients. Design:SubjectswithT2DMmanagedbydietalone(n162)were randomly assigned to receive high-carbohydrate, high-glycemic- index (high-GI), high-carbohydrate, low-glycemic-index (low-GI), or low-carbohydrate, high-monounsaturated-fat (low-CHO) diets for 1y . Results:

Alison L Gibbs; Christine Mehling; Jean-Louis Chiasson; Philip W Connelly; Robert G Josse; Lawrence A Leiter; Remi Rabasa-Lhoret; N Wilson Rodger; Edmond A Ryan

310

Glycemic response of mashed potato containing high-viscocity hydroxypropylmethylcellulose.  

PubMed

Potatoes generally have one of the highest glycemic index values of any food. Relatively small differences in the glycemic response (GR) of regularly consumed starch foods have shown beneficial effects on health. Lowering the GR of a potato-based meal has potentially wide-reaching health benefits. High-viscosity hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HV-HPMC) is a modified cellulose dietary fiber extensively used in the food industry. We hypothesized that the GR of a high-glycemic index product such as mashed potato would be lower with the addition of HV-HPMC. In a nonblind, randomized, repeat-measure, crossover controlled trial, 15 healthy adults consumed portions of mashed potato with different doses (0%, 1%, 2%, and 4%) of a specially selected and optimized HV-HPMC and a reference food (glucose) on separate occasions. Five subjects were excluded from the final analysis due to noncompliance with study procedures. Capillary blood glucose was measured in fasted subjects and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after starting to eat. For each sample, the incremental area under the blood glucose response curve was calculated and the GR determined. There was a significant lowering effect of HV-HPMC on GR (P < .001) of mashed potato. Glycemic responses for all mashed potato samples with the HV-HPMC were significantly lower than the standard mashed potato: 1% level (P < .05), 2% level (P < .05), and 4% level (P < .05). However, there was no significant effect of the HV-HPMC dose on GR. We conclude that addition of select HV-HPMC to mashed potato blunts GR. PMID:19761889

Lightowler, Helen J; Henry, C Jeya K

2009-08-01

311

Mosapride improves food intake, while not worsening glycemic control and obesity, in ob\\/ob obese mice with decreased gastric emptying  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many patients with diabetes mellitus complain of early satiety and postprandial gastric fullness and discomfort. Mosapride citrate, a 5-HT4 receptor agonist, enhances gastric emptying and alleviates gastrointestinal discomfort in patients with diabetic gastroparesis. This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of mosapride citrate on feeding behavior in ob\\/ob obese mice with decreased gastric emptying. Mosapride citrate (1 mg\\/kg\\/day) was

Akihiro Asakawaa

312

Overall Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load of Vegan Diets in Relation to Plasma Lipoproteins and Triacylglycerols  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: To investigate the overall glycemic index (GI), glycemic load (GL), and intake of dietary fiber, and to examine the associations between these factors and plasma lipoproteins and triacylglycerols in adult vegans in the German Vegan Study (GVS). Methods: Cross-sectional study, Germany. Healthy men (n = 67) and women (n = 87), who fulfilled the study criteria (vegan diet for

Annika Waldmann; Alexander Ströhle; Jochen W. Koschizke; Claus Leitzmann; Andreas Hahn

2007-01-01

313

Understanding the Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load and Their Practical Applications  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|We have introduced the study of synthesis pathways using two experiments: 1--the determination of the glycemic index (GI) of some foods and the effects of fiber and fat on the GI; 2--the determination of blood glucose levels after the ingestion of meals with high and low glycemic loads (GL). After a practice assembly, when the foods and meals…

Lazarim, Fernanda Lorenzi; Stancanelli, Mirtes; Brenzikofer, Rene; de Macedo, Denise Vaz

2009-01-01

314

Glycemic Load, Glycemic Index, and the Risk of Breast Cancer Among Mexican Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The amount and composition of dietary carbohydrates is a major determinant of postprandial blood glucose and insulin, and risk of breast cancer has been positively associated with plasma levels of insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1. We sought to evaluate dietary glycemic load (GL) and overall glycemic index (GI) in relation to breast cancer risk in Mexican women.

Martin Lajous; Walter Willett; Eduardo Lazcano-Ponce; Luisa Maria Sanchez-Zamorano; Mauricio Hernandez-Avila; Isabelle Romieu

2005-01-01

315

Baseline results indicate poor glycemic control and delay in initiation and optimization of insulin therapy: results from the improving management practices and clinical outcomes in type 2 diabetes study  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Improving management practices and clinical outcomes in type 2 diabetes (IMPACT), was a prospective, open-label, 26- week, comparative, multi-center study to compare efficacy and safety of the Indian insulin guideline (IIG) group versus routine clinical practice (RCP) group in patients with type 2 diabetes. Materials and Methods: A total of 20,653 patients from 885 centers across India were enrolled and treated with premixed insulin therapy as per IIG or routine care. Results: Most of the participating centers (81.7%) reported following a diabetes guideline in their practice routinely but only 20.4% targeted HbA1c <7%. Very few of the physicians (2.7%) reported that most of their patients (>75%) achieved an HbA1c <7%. Most of the physicians (39.8%) also agreed that only 10-25% of the patients agree to start insulin therapy at the first counseling. Mean duration of diabetes before initiating insulin in patients using oral anti-diabetic drugs (OADs) was 7 years, indicating a delay in initiating insulin therapy. The difference in mean daily dose of insulin at initiation vs. at 26 weeks was only 0.8 U (25.8 ± 11.3 at initiation compared to 26.6 ± 9.5, respectively, p = ns) suggesting lack of treatment optimization. Weekly titration till achieving HbA1c <7% was done in 51.1% of the patients and only 8.9% performed self-titration. Conclusion: Baseline glycemic control in these patients was poor and reflects a delay in initiating insulin therapy. Data also reflect a lack of optimization of insulin doses.

Moses, C. R. Anand; Seshiah, V.; Sahay, B. K.; Kumar, A.; Asirvatham, A. J.; Balaji, V.; Kalra, S.; Akhtar, S.; Shetty, R.; Das, A. K.

2012-01-01

316

Family system dynamics and type 1 diabetic glycemic variability: a vector-auto-regressive model.  

PubMed

Statistical approaches rooted in econometric methodology, so far foreign to the psychiatric and psychological realms have provided exciting and substantial new insights into complex mind-body interactions over time and individuals. Over 120 days, this structured diary study explored the mutual interactions of emotions within a classic 3-person family system with its Type 1 diabetic adolescent's daily blood glucose variability. Glycemic variability was measured through daily standard deviations of blood glucose determinations (at least 3 per day). Emotions were captured individually utilizing the self-assessment manikin on affective valence (negative-positive), activation (calm-excited), and control (dominated-dominant). Auto- and cross-correlating the stationary absolute (level) values of the mutually interacting parallel time series data sets through vector autoregression (VAR, grounded in econometric theory) allowed for the formulation of 2 concordant models. Applying Cholesky Impulse Response Analysis at a 95% confidence interval, we provided evidence for an adolescent being happy, calm, and in control to exhibit less glycemic variability and hence diabetic derailment. A nondominating mother and a happy father seemed to also reduce glycemic variability. Random shocks increasing glycemic variability affected only the adolescent and her father: In 1 model, the male parent felt in charge; in the other, he calmed down while his daughter turned sad. All reactions to external shocks lasted for less than 4 full days. Extant literature on affect and glycemic variability in Type 1 diabetic adolescents as well as challenges arising from introducing econometric theory to the field were discussed. PMID:23795630

Günther, Moritz Philipp; Winker, Peter; Böttcher, Claudia; Brosig, Burkhard

2013-06-01

317

One-Year Glycemic Control With a Sulfonylurea Plus Pioglitazone Versus a Sulfonylurea Plus Metformin in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE — The goal was to assess the 1-year efficacy and safety of the addition of pio- glitazone or metformin to existing sulfonylurea (SU) therapy in patients with inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS — In this multicenter, double-blind study, patients were randomized to receive either pioglitazone 15 mg (n 319) or metformin 850 mg (n 320)

MARKOLF HANEFELD; PAOLO BRUNETTI; GUNTRAM H. SCHERNTHANER; DAVID R. MATTHEWS; BERNARD H. CHARBONNEL

2004-01-01

318

Effects of Exenatide (Exendin-4) on Glycemic Control Over 30 Weeks in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Treated With Metformin and a Sulfonylurea  

Microsoft Academic Search

controlled study was performed in 733 subjects (aged 55 10 years, BMI 33.6 5.7 kg\\/m 2 , A1C 8.5 1.0%; means SD) randomized to 5 g subcutaneous exenatide b.i.d. (arms A and B) or placebo for 4 weeks. Thereafter, arm A remained at 5 g b.i.d. and arm B escalated to 10 g b.i.d. Subjects continued taking their dose of

DAVID M. KENDALL; MATTHEW C. RIDDLE; JULIO ROSENSTOCK; DONGLIANG ZHUANG; DENNIS D. KIM; MARK S. FINEMAN; ALAIN D. BARON

2005-01-01

319

Lipoprotein profile, glycemic control and physical fitness after strength and aerobic training in post-menopausal women with type 2 diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

We studied the effects on blood lipids and physical fitness after a training program that combined strength and aerobic exercise\\u000a in postmenopausal women with type 2 diabetes. Ten patients (55.0 ± 5.2 years) followed four exercise sessions per week, two\\u000a strength and two aerobic, and ten (59.4 ± 3.2 years) served as a control group. Lipid profile, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), HOMA2 index, exercise stress and muscular

Zois E. Christos; Savvas P. Tokmakidis; Konstantinos A. Volaklis; Kalliopi Kotsa; Anna-Maria Touvra; Eleni Douda; Ioannis G. Yovos

2009-01-01

320

Progressive zinc-induced changes in glycemic responses in lean and obese LAIN-cp rats  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of diet and phenotype on glycemic status was studied in 9-17 week (wk) old female LAIN-cp rats fed isoenergetic diets containing 0, 20 (control), or 100 ppm Zn. At 9, 13 and 17 wks of age, fasting glucose (FG) of obese > lean. At age 13 wks, Fg of obese + 0 ppm Zn < control obese, and

D. Zwick; N. A. Frimpong; O. L. Tulp

1991-01-01

321

Sustained Attention and Age Predict Inhibitory Control during Early Childhood  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Executive functioning skills develop rapidly during early childhood. Recent research has focused on specifying this development, particularly predictors of executive functioning skills. Here we focus on sustained attention as a predictor of inhibitory control, one key executive functioning component. Although sustained attention and inhibitory…

Reck, Sarah G.; Hund, Alycia M.

2011-01-01

322

Early history space astronomy. Issues of patronage, management and control  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The history of space astronomy is usually written from the perspective of the remarkable scientific findings garnered by space astronomers and the ways these findings have enriched and guided new views of the universe. This paper examines some aspects of the history of space astronomy in the early years of NASA, but takes patronage, management and control as its key issues.

Smith, Robert W.

2009-08-01

323

The glucogram: A new quantitative tool for glycemic analysis in the surgical intensive care unit.  

PubMed

BACKGROUND: Glycemic control is an important aspect of patient care in the surgical intensive care unit (SICU). This is a pilot study of a novel glycemic analysis tool - the glucogram. We hypothesize that the glucogram may be helpful in quantifying the clinical significance of acute hyperglycemic states (AHS) and in describing glycemic variability (GV) in critically ill patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Serial glucose measurements were analyzed in SICU patients with lengths of stay (LOS) >30 days. Glucose data were formatted into 12-hour epochs and graphically analyzed using stochastic and momentum indicators. Recorded clinical events were classified as major or minor (control). Examples of major events include cardiogenic shock, acute respiratory failure, major hemorrhage, infection/sepsis, etc. Examples of minor (control) events include non-emergent bedside procedures, blood transfusion given to a hemodynamically stable patient, etc. Positive/negative indicator status was then correlated with AHS and associated clinical events. The conjunction of positive indicator/major clinical event or negative indicator/minor clinical event was defined as clinical "match". GV was determined by averaging glucose fluctuations (maximal - minimal value within each 12-hour epoch) over time. In addition, event-specific glucose excursion (ESGE) associated with each positive indicator/AHS match (final minus initial value for each occurrence) was calculated. Descriptive statistics, sensitivity/specificity determination, and student's t-test were used in data analysis. RESULTS: Glycemic and clinical data were reviewed for 11 patients (mean SICU LOS 74.5 days; 7 men/4 women; mean age 54.9 years; APACHE II of 17.7 ± 6.44; mortality 36%). A total of 4354 glucose data points (1254 epochs) were analyzed. There were 354 major clinical events and 93 minor (control) events. The glucogram identified AHS/indicator/clinical event "matches" with overall sensitivity of 84% and specificity of 65%. We noted that while the mean GV was greater for non-survivors than for survivors (19.3 mg/dL vs. 10.3 mg/dL, P = 0.02), there was no difference in mean ESGE between survivors (154.7) and non-survivors (160.8, P = 0.67). CONCLUSIONS: The glucogram was able to quantify the correlation between AHS and major clinical events with a sensitivity of 84% and a specificity of 65%. In addition, mean GV was nearly two times higher for non-survivors. The glucogram may be useful both clinically (i.e., in the electronic ICU or other "early warning" systems) and as a research tool (i.e., in model development and standardization). Results of this study provide a foundation for further, larger-scale, multi-parametric, prospective evaluations of the glucogram. PMID:22096767

Stawicki, Spa; Schuster, D; Liu, Jf; Kamal, J; Erdal, S; Gerlach, At; Whitmill, Ml; Lindsey, DE; Murphy, C; Steinberg, Sm; Cook, Ch

2011-01-01

324

77 FR 66469 - Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC)  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Disease Control and Prevention Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control...aforementioned committee: Name: Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control...detection and control of breast and cervical cancer. The committee makes...

2012-11-05

325

Randomized Trial on the Influence of the Length of Two Insulin Pen Needles on Glycemic Control and Patient Preference in Obese Patients with Diabetes  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective This study determined the influence of needle length for insulin administration on metabolic control and patient preference in obese patients with diabetes mellitus. Methods In this multicenter, open-label crossover study, insulin pen needles of two different lengths (5?mm and 8?mm) were compared. A total of 130 insulin-treated type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients with a body mass index ?30?kg/m2 were randomized, and 126 patients completed the study. Patients started using the 5-mm needle for 3 months, after which they switched to injecting insulin with the 8-mm needle for another 3 months, or vice versa. Hemoglobin A1c (A1C), fructosamine, and 1,5-anhydroglucitol were measured, and self-reported side effects and patient preference were recorded. Results No within-group changes were observed with respect to A1C, serum fructosamine, 1,5-anhydroglucitol, hypoglycemic events, bruising, and pain. When data of all 126 subjects were pooled, there was a small, but significant, difference between needle lengths (5-mm, A1C 7.47?±?0.9%; 8-mm, 7.59?±?1.0%; P?=?0.02). Patients reported less bleeding with the 5-mm needle (P?=?0.04) and less insulin leakage from the skin with the 8-mm needle (P?=?0.01). There were no significant differences in patient preference, with 46% of the patients preferring the 5-mm needle, 41% the 8-mm needle, and 13% not preferring a particular needle length. Conclusions A 5-mm needle is similar to an 8-mm needle in obese patients with diabetes with respect to metabolic control, injection-related complaints, or patient preference and can be used safely.

Kreugel, Gillian; Keers, Joost C.; Kerstens, Michiel N.

2011-01-01

326

Effect of Probiotics on Lipid Profile, Glycemic Control, Insulin Action, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammatory Markers in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: A Clinical Trial  

PubMed Central

Background: The dramatic increase in the incidence of diabetes and its associated complications require a natural and safe solution to control and delay such complications. The present study tested the hypothesis that probiotics may affect biochemical indices of diabetic patients Methods: Thirty four types 2 diabetic patients aged between 25 to 65 years, and diagnosed with diabetes for less than 15 years were selected for this single- blinded clinical trial. Using balanced block random sampling, the patients were divided into two groups of intervention (probiotics) and placebo. Blood samples tested for baseline glucose, insulin, TG, total cholesterol, LDL-C, HDL-C, malondialdehyde, high sensitive CRP (hs-CRP) and IL-6. After six weeks of experiment, fasting blood samples were re-tested and the data obtained were analyzed using SPSS software. Results: There were no significant differences between anthropometric data including body mass index and waist to hip ratio in placebo and treatment groups. There was no significant difference in FBS, Serum TG concentration total cholesterol and LDL-C levels between placebo and treatment groups. HDL-C levels were slightly elevated after probiotic treatment, which were not statistically significant. Insulin, MDA and IL-6 levels were reduced and high sensitive CRP hs.CRP levels were elevated, although, not statistically significant. Conclusion: The result of this study indicates a non- significant declining trend in the level of TG, MDA and IL-6 and insulin resistance after consumption of probiotics.

Mazloom, Zohreh; Yousefinejad, Abbas; Dabbaghmanesh, Mohammad Hossein

2013-01-01

327

The ABCG5 ABCG8 Sterol Transporter Opposes the Development of Fatty Liver Disease and Loss of Glycemic Control Independently of Phytosterol Accumulation*  

PubMed Central

ABCG5 and ABCG8 form a complex (G5G8) that opposes the absorption of plant sterols but is also expressed in liver where it promotes the excretion of cholesterol into bile. Hepatic G5G8 is transcriptionally regulated by a number of factors implicated in the development of insulin resistance and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Therefore, we hypothesized that G5G8 may influence the development of diet-induced obesity phenotypes independently of its role in opposing phytosterol absorption. G5G8 knock-out (KO) mice and their wild type (WT) littermates were challenged with a plant sterol-free low fat or high fat (HF) diet. Weight gain and the rise in fasting glucose were accelerated in G5G8 KO mice following HF feeding. HF-fed G5G8 KO mice had increased liver weight, hepatic lipids, and plasma alanine aminotransferase compared with WT controls. Consistent with the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, macrophage infiltration, the number of TUNEL-positive cells, and the expression of proinflammatory cytokines were also increased in G5G8 KO mice. Hepatic lipid accumulation was associated with increased peroxisome proliferator activated receptor ?, CD36, and fatty acid uptake. Phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2? (eiF2?) and expression of activating transcription factor 4 and tribbles 3 were elevated in HF-fed G5G8 KO mice, a pathway that links the unfolded protein response to the development of insulin resistance through inhibition of protein kinase B (Akt) phosphorylation. Phosphorylation of Akt and insulin receptor was reduced, whereas serine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 was elevated.

Su, Kai; Sabeva, Nadezhda S.; Liu, Jingjing; Wang, Yuhuan; Bhatnagar, Saloni; van der Westhuyzen, Deneys R.; Graf, Gregory A.

2012-01-01

328

Small- and Large-Fiber Neuropathy After 40 Years of Type 1 Diabetes: Associations with glycemic control and advanced protein glycation: the Oslo Study.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVE To study large- and small-nerve fiber function in type 1 diabetes of long duration and associations with HbA1c and the advanced glycation end products (AGEs) N-?-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) and methylglyoxal-derived hydroimidazolone. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In a long-term follow-up study, 27 persons with type 1 diabetes of 40 ± 3 years duration underwent large-nerve fiber examinations, with nerve conduction studies at baseline and years 8, 17, and 27. Small-fiber functions were assessed by quantitative sensory thresholds (QST) and intraepidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD) at year 27. HbA1c was measured prospectively through 27 years. Serum CML was measured at year 17 by immunoassay. Serum hydroimidazolone was measured at year 27 with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. RESULTS Sixteen patients (59%) had large-fiber neuropathy. Twenty-two (81%) had small-fiber dysfunction by QST. Heat pain thresholds in the foot were associated with hydroimidazolone and HbA1c. IENFD was abnormal in 19 (70%) and significantly lower in diabetic patients than in age-matched control subjects (4.3 ± 2.3 vs. 11.2 ± 3.5 mm, P < 0.001). IENFD correlated negatively with HbA1c over 27 years (r = -0.4, P = 0.04) and CML (r = -0.5, P = 0.01). After adjustment for age, height, and BMI in a multiple linear regression model, CML was still independently associated with IENFD. CONCLUSIONS Small-fiber sensory neuropathy is a major manifestation in type 1 diabetes of 40 years duration and more prevalent than large-fiber neuropathy. HbA1c and the AGEs CML and hydroimidazolone are important risk factors in the development of large- and small-fiber dysfunction in long-term type 1 diabetes. PMID:24026557

Sveen, Kari Anne; Karimé, Bassam; Jørum, Ellen; Mellgren, Svein Ivar; Fagerland, Morten Wang; Monnier, Vincent M; Dahl-Jørgensen, Knut; Hanssen, Kristian F

2013-09-11

329

Oral L-glutamine increases active GLP-1 (7-36) amide secretion and improves glycemic control in stretpozotocin-nicotinamide induced diabetic rats.  

PubMed

L-glutamine is a non-essential amino acid. It decreased blood sugar, stimulated insulin secretion in type 2 diabetic patients. The objective of the present investigation was to evaluate L-glutamine increases glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) (7-36) amide secretion in streptozotocin-nicotinamide (STZ-NTM) induced diabetic Sprague Dawley rats. Molecular docking study was performed to elucidate the molecular basis for GLP-1 receptor agonistic activity. Type 2 diabetes was induced in overnight fasted Sprague Dawley rats pre-treated with nicotinamide (100 mg/kg, i.p.) followed by 20 min after administration of streptozotocin (55 mg/kg, i.p.). The rats were divided into; I - nondiabetic, II - diabetic control, III - sitagliptin (5 mg/kg, p.o.), IV - L-glutamine (250 mg/kg, p.o.), V - L-glutamine (500 mg/kg, p.o.) and VI - L-glutamine (1000 mg/kg, p.o.). The L-glutamine and sitagliptin treatment was 8 week. Plasma glucose was estimated every week. Body weight, food and water intake were recorded daily. Glycosylated haemoglobin, lipid profile, plasma and colonic active (GLP-1) (7-36) amide, mRNA expression of proglucagon GLP-1, plasma and pancreatic insulin, histology of pancreata and biomarkers of oxidative stress (superoxidase dismutase, reduced glutathione, malondialdehyde, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione S transferase) were measured after 8 week. In acute study, the rats were divided into I - glucose (2.5 g/kg, p.o.), II - sitagliptin (5 mg/kg, p.o.), III - L-glutamine (250 mg/kg, p.o.), IV - L-glutamine (500 mg/kg, p.o.) and V - L-glutamine (1000 mg/kg, p.o.). Plasma glucose, active GLP-1 (7-36) amide concentration and insulin levels were measured after glucose loading. The docking data indicated that l-glutamine bind to the GLP-1 receptor. L-glutamine decreased plasma glucose, increased plasma and pancreatic insulin, increased plasma and colonic active GLP-1 (7-36) amide secretion as well as decreased oxidative stress in streptozotocin-nicotinamide induced diabetic rats. PMID:23466488

Badole, Sachin L; Bagul, Pranita P; Mahamuni, Sagar P; Khose, Rekha D; Joshi, Anuja C; Jangam, Ganesh B; Ghule, Arvindkumar E; Raut, Chandrashekhar G; Khedkar, Vijay M; Coutinho, Evans C

2013-03-04

330

Dietary glycemic index, dietary glycemic load and mortality among men with established cardiovascular disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background\\/objectives:In men with established cardiovascular disease, the effect of diets with high glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that diets with higher GI and GL are associated with increased mortality in men with established cardiovascular disease.Subjects\\/methods:We measured dietary GI and GL using food-frequency questionnaires in 4617 men, 45–79 years old, with a history

E B Levitan; M A Mittleman; A Wolk

2009-01-01

331

Relations of glycemic index and glycemic load with plasma oxidative stress markers1-3  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Recent data suggest that acute hyperglycemia may increase in vivo free radical production. This increased production has been implicated in many disease processes. Objective: The objective was to investigate whether a diet with a high glycemic index (GI) or glycemic load (GL) is associated with greateroxidativestressasmeasuredby2lipidperoxidationmarkers, malondialdehyde (MDA) and F2-isoprostanes (IsoPs). Design: Plasma MDA and IsoP concentrations were measured

Youqing Hu; Gladys Block; Edward P Norkus; Jason D Morrow; Marion Dietrich; Mark Hudes

332

Predictors of Longitudinal Growth in Inhibitory Control in Early Childhood  

PubMed Central

In the current study, we examined latent growth in 731 young children’s inhibitory control from ages 2 to 4, and whether demographic characteristics or parenting behaviors were related to initial levels and growth in inhibitory control. As part of an ongoing longitudinal evaluation of the Family Check-Up (FCU), children’s inhibitory control was assessed yearly at ages 2, 3, and 4. Inhibitory control was initially low and increased linearly to age 4. High levels of harsh parenting and male gender were associated with low initial status in inhibitory control. High levels of supportive parenting were associated with faster growth. Extreme family poverty and African American ethnicity were also associated with slower growth. The results highlight parenting as a target for early interventions in contexts of high socioeconomic risk.

Moilanen, Kristin L.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Dishion, Thomas J.; Gardner, Frances; Wilson, Melvin

2009-01-01

333

High Glycemic Index Foods, Overeating, and Obesity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. The prevalence of obesity has increased dramatically in recent years. However, the role of dietary composition in body weight regulation re- mains unclear. The purpose of this work was to investi- gate the acute effects of dietary glycemic index (GI) on energy metabolism and voluntary food intake in obese subjects. Methods. Twelve obese teenage boys were evaluated on three

David S. Ludwig; Joseph A. Majzoub; Ahmad Al-Zahrani; Gerard E. Dallal; Isaac Blanco; Susan B. Roberts

1999-01-01

334

Glycemic Index and Serum High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Concentration Among US Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Dietary glycemic index, an indicator of the ability of the carbohydrate to raise blood glucose lev- els, and glycemic load, the product of glycemic index and carbohydrate intake, have been positively related to risk of coronary heart disease. However, the relationships be- tween glycemic index and glycemic load and high- density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentration in the US population

Earl S. Ford; Simin Liu

2001-01-01

335

Translational Control of Protein Synthesis: The Early Years  

PubMed Central

For the past fifty-five years, much of my research has focused on the function and biogenesis of red blood cells, including the cloning and study of many membrane proteins such as glucose and anion transporters and the erythropoietin receptor. We have also elucidated the mechanisms of membrane insertion, folding, and maturation of many plasma membrane and secreted proteins. Despite all of this work and more, I remain extremely proud of our very early work on the regulation of mRNA translation: work on bacteriophage f2 RNA in the 1960s and on translation of ?- and ?-globin mRNAs in the early 1970s. Using techniques hopelessly antiquated by today's standards, we correctly elucidated many important aspects of translational control, and I thought readers would be interested in learning how we did these experiments.

Lodish, Harvey F.

2012-01-01

336

Diets with High or Low Protein Content and Glycemic Index for Weight-Loss Maintenance  

PubMed Central

Background Studies of weight-control diets that are high in protein or low in glycemic index have reached varied conclusions, probably owing to the fact that the studies had insufficient power. Methods We enrolled overweight adults from eight European countries who had lost at least 8% of their initial body weight with a 3.3-MJ (800-kcal) low-calorie diet. Participants were randomly assigned, in a two-by-two factorial design, to one of five ad libitum diets to prevent weight regain over a 26-week period: a low-protein and low-glycemic-index diet, a low-protein and high-glycemic-index diet, a high-protein and low-glycemic-index diet, a high-protein and high-glycemic-index diet, or a control diet. Results A total of 1209 adults were screened (mean age, 41 years; body-mass index [the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters], 34), of whom 938 entered the low-calorie-diet phase of the study. A total of 773 participants who completed that phase were randomly assigned to one of the five maintenance diets; 548 completed the intervention (71%). Fewer participants in the high-protein and the low-glycemic-index groups than in the low-protein–high-glycemic-index group dropped out of the study (26.4% and 25.6%, respectively, vs. 37.4%; P = 0.02 and P = 0.01 for the respective comparisons). The mean initial weight loss with the low-calorie diet was 11.0 kg. In the analysis of participants who completed the study, only the low-protein–high-glycemic-index diet was associated with subsequent significant weight regain (1.67 kg; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.48 to 2.87). In an intention-to-treat analysis, the weight regain was 0.93 kg less (95% CI, 0.31 to 1.55) in the groups assigned to a high-protein diet than in those assigned to a low-protein diet (P = 0.003) and 0.95 kg less (95% CI, 0.33 to 1.57) in the groups assigned to a low-glycemic-index diet than in those assigned to a high-glycemic-index diet (P = 0.003). The analysis involving participants who completed the intervention produced similar results. The groups did not differ significantly with respect to diet-related adverse events. Conclusions In this large European study, a modest increase in protein content and a modest reduction in the glycemic index led to an improvement in study completion and maintenance of weight loss. (Funded by the European Commission; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00390637.)

Larsen, Thomas Meinert; Dalskov, Stine-Mathilde; van Baak, Marleen; Jebb, Susan A.; Papadaki, Angeliki; Pfeiffer, Andreas F.H.; Martinez, J. Alfredo; Handjieva-Darlenska, Teodora; Kunesova, Marie; Pihlsgard, Mats; Stender, Steen; Holst, Claus; Saris, Wim H.M.; Astrup, Arne

2012-01-01

337

Low glycemic index diets and body weight  

Microsoft Academic Search

In their review (low-glycaemic index diets and body weight regulation (2006)), McMillan-Price and Brand-Miller argue that the low glycemic index (GI) diet is a simple and more popular diet that will successfully improve cardiovascular risk factors and reduce body weight. We do not find that there is convincing evidence in the existing literature to suggest that a low GI diet

B Sloth; A Astrup

2006-01-01

338

Determinants of diet glycemic index calculated retrospectively from diet records of 342 individuals with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus?3  

Microsoft Academic Search

Controlled trials have shown that a diet with a low glycemic index improves blood glucose and lipid control in patients with diabetes. To study the distribution and determinants of diet glycemic index, we obtained two 3-d diet records from 342 free-living subjects with non-insulin-dependent diabetes. Mean ± SD 24-h intakes were as follows: energy, 7170 ± 1890 kJ; fat, 33.6

Phu-My Nguyen; Jean-Louis Chiasson; John A Hunt; Robert G Josse; Carol Palmason; N Wilson Rodger; Stuart A Ross; Edmond A Ryan; Meng H Tan

339

The glycemic index. A current controversy.  

PubMed

The nutrition community is divided over de rol of de Glycemic Index (GI) or Glycemic Load (GL) in the dietetic management of Diabetes Mellitus (DM) and in the prevention of chronic diseases as DM, Obesity, Insulin Resistance (IR), Cardiovascular diseases and Cancer. The concept of GI and GL of food and diet is defined. Methodological problem are analyzed: poor standardization, bad reproducibility and high variability. The factors that determines the food glycemic index and the causes of it variability are analyzed. Recent and qualified clinical and epidemiological evidences about the relation between the GI and GL of food and diet, on the management of DM, and prevention of Obesity, DM, RI, Cardiovascular disease and Cancer, are discussed. Is concluded that there are insufficient evidences of clinical efficacy in the use of this concept for the prevention of Obesity, IR, Cardiovascular diseases and Cancer. In relation to the treatment of DM, ADA states that the most important dietetic tool is the reduction of the total amount of carbohydrates, but accepts that the use of the GI could give additional benefits. Although de GI has the potential to be a valuable clinical tool. For now consumers should focus on eating a diet plant-based, with a variety of vegetables, fruits, whole grain and legumes. At the moment we must be caution in making dietary changes based solely in this concept. PMID:16771073

Arteaga Llona, A

2006-05-01

340

Effect of the Glycemic Index of Carbohydrates on Acne vulgaris  

PubMed Central

Acne vulgaris may be improved by dietary factors that increase insulin sensitivity. We hypothesized that a low-glycemic index diet would improve facial acne severity and insulin sensitivity. Fifty-eight adolescent males (mean age ± standard deviation 16.5 ± 1.0 y and body mass index 23.1 ± 3.5 kg/m2) were alternately allocated to high or low glycemic index diets. Severity of inflammatory lesions on the face, insulin sensitivity (homeostasis modeling assessment of insulin resistance), androgens and insulin-like growth factor-1 and its binding proteins were assessed at baseline and at eight weeks, a period corresponding to the school term. Forty-three subjects (n = 23 low glycemic index and n = 20 high glycemic index) completed the study. Diets differed significantly in glycemic index (mean ± standard error of the mean, low glycemic index 51 ± 1 vs. high glycemic index 61 ± 2, p = 0.0002), but not in macronutrient distribution or fiber content. Facial acne improved on both diets (low glycemic index ?26 ± 6%, p = 0.0004 and high glycemic index ?16 ± 7%, p = 0.01), but differences between diets did not reach significance. Change in insulin sensitivity was not different between diets (low glycemic index 0.2 ± 0.1 and high glycemic index 0.1 ± 0.1, p = 0.60) and did not correlate with change in acne severity (Pearson correlation r = ?0.196, p = 0.244). Longer time frames, greater reductions in glycemic load or/and weight loss may be necessary to detect improvements in acne among adolescent boys.

Reynolds, Rebecca C.; Lee, Stephen; Choi, James Y. J.; Atkinson, Fiona S.; Stockmann, Karola S.; Petocz, Peter; Brand-Miller, Jennie C.

2010-01-01

341

Influence of high glycemic index and glycemic load diets on blood pressure during adolescence.  

PubMed

We aimed to prospectively examine the association between the glycemic index and glycemic load of foods consumed and the dietary intakes of carbohydrates, sugars, fiber, and principal carbohydrate-containing food groups (eg, breads, cereals, and sugary drinks) with changes in blood pressure during adolescence. A total of 858 students aged 12 years at baseline (422 girls and 436 boys) were examined from 2004-2005 to 2009-2011. Dietary data were assessed from validated semiquantitative food frequency questionnaires. Blood pressure was measured using a standard protocol. In girls, after adjusting for age, ethnicity, parental education, parental history of hypertension, baseline height, baseline blood pressure, change in body mass index, and time spent in physical and sedentary activities, each 1-SD (1-SD = 7.10 g/d) increase in baseline dietary intake of total fiber was associated with a 0.96-, 0.62-, and 0.75-mmHg decrease in mean systolic (P = 0.02), diastolic (P = 0.01), and arterial blood pressures (P = 0.002), respectively, 5 years later. In girls, each 1-SD increase in dietary glycemic index, glycemic load, carbohydrate, and fructose was concurrently related to increases of 1.81 (P = 0.001), 4.02 (P = 0.01), 4.74 (P = 0.01), and 1.80 mm Hg (P = 0.03) in systolic blood pressure, respectively, >5 years. Significant associations between carbohydrate nutrition variables and blood pressure were not observed among boys. Excessive dietary intake of carbohydrates, specifically from high glycemic index/glycemic load foods, could adversely influence blood pressure, particularly in girls, whereas fiber-rich diets may be protective against elevated blood pressure during adolescence. PMID:22493075

Gopinath, Bamini; Flood, Victoria M; Rochtchina, Elena; Baur, Louise A; Smith, Wayne; Mitchell, Paul

2012-04-09

342

Estimated glycemic index and dietary fiber content of cookies elaborated with extruded wheat bran.  

PubMed

The increasing demand for high-fiber products has favored the design of numerous bakery products rich in fiber such as bread, cookies, and cakes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the dietary fiber and estimated glycemic index of cookies containing extruded wheat bran. Wheat bran was subjected to extrusion process under three temperature profiles: TP1;(60, 75, 85 and 100 °C), TP2;(60, 80, 100 and 120 °C), and TP3;(60, 80, 110 and 140 °C) and three moisture contents: (15, 23, and 31 %). Cookies were elaborated using extruded wheat bran (30 %), separated into two fractions (coarse and fine). The dietary fiber content of cookies elaborated with extruded wheat bran was higher than the controls; C0 (100 % wheat flour) and C1 (30 % of no extruded bran coarse fraction) and C2 (30 % of no extruded bran fine fraction). The higher values of dietary fiber were observed on cookies from treatments 5 (TP1, 31 % moisture content and coarse fraction) and 11 (TP2, 31 % moisture content and coarse fraction). The estimated glycemic index of cookies ranged from 68.54 to 80.16. The dietary fiber content of cookies was increased and the lowest glycemic index corresponded to the cookies elaborated with extruded wheat bran. Cookie made with the treatment 11 had a better dietary fiber content and lower estimated glycemic index. PMID:23359085

Reyes-Pérez, Faviola; Salazar-García, María Guadalupe; Romero-Baranzini, Ana Lourdes; Islas-Rubio, Alma Rosa; Ramírez-Wong, Benjamín

2013-03-01

343

Dietary carbohydrate, glycemic index, and glycemic load in relation to colorectal cancer risk in the Women’s Health Initiative  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evidence implicating hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance in the etiology of colorectal cancer suggests that a diet characterized\\u000a by a high glycemic index and load may increase the risk of this disease, but previous studies have yielded inconsistent results.\\u000a We assessed the association between intake of total carbohydrates, sugars, fiber, and the glycemic index (GI) and glycemic\\u000a load (GL) of individual

Geoffrey C. Kabat; James M. Shikany; Shirley A. A. Beresford; Bette Caan; Marian L. Neuhouser; Lesley F. Tinker; Thomas E. Rohan

2008-01-01

344

Glycemic load, glycemic index, and body mass index in Spanish adults 1-5  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Studies on obesity and glycemic index (GI) or glyce- mic load (GL) have had inconsistent results, perhaps in part because of underreporting or to heterogeneous dietary patterns across food cultures. Objectives: We examined associations between body mass index (BMI) and GI or GL in a Mediterranean population, accounting for underreporting. We also constructed dietary factors related to GI and

Michelle A Mendez; Maria Isabel Covas; Jaume Marrugat; Joan Vila; Helmut Schroder

2009-01-01

345

Equivalent glycemic load (EGL): a method for quantifying the glycemic responses elicited by low carbohydrate foods  

PubMed Central

Background Glycemic load (GL) is used to quantify the glycemic impact of high-carbohydrate (CHO) foods, but cannot be used for low-CHO foods. Therefore, we evaluated the accuracy of equivalent-glycemic-load (EGL), a measure of the glycemic impact of low-CHO foods defined as the amount of CHO from white-bread (WB) with the same glycemic impact as one serving of food. Methods Several randomized, cross-over trials were performed by a contract research organization using overnight-fasted healthy subjects drawn from a pool of 63 recruited from the general population by newspaper advertisement. Incremental blood-glucose response area-under-the-curve (AUC) elicited by 0, 5, 10, 20, 35 and 50 g CHO portions of WB (WB-CHO) and 3, 5, 10 and 20 g glucose were measured. EGL values of the different doses of glucose and WB and 4 low-CHO foods were determined as: EGL = (F-B)/M, where F is AUC after food and B is y-intercept and M slope of the regression of AUC on grams WB-CHO. The dose-response curves of WB and glucose were used to derive an equation to estimate GL from EGL, and the resulting values compared to GL calculated from the glucose dose-response curve. The accuracy of EGL was assessed by comparing the GL (estimated from EGL) values of the 4 doses of oral-glucose with the amounts actually consumed. Results Over 0–50 g WB-CHO (n = 10), the dose-response curve was non-linear, but over the range 0–20 g the curve was indistinguishable from linear, with AUC after 0, 5, 10 and 20 g WB-CHO, 10 ± 1, 28 ± 2, 58 ± 5 and 100 ± 6 mmol × min/L, differing significantly from each other (n = 48). The difference between GL values estimated from EGL and those calculated from the dose-response curve was 0 g (95% confidence-interval, ± 0.5 g). The difference between the GL values of the 4 doses of glucose estimated from EGL, and the amounts of glucose actually consumed was 0.2 g (95% confidence-interval, ± 1 g). Conclusion EGL, a measure of the glycemic impact of low-carbohydrate foods, is valid across the range of 0–20 g CHO, accurate to within 1 g, and at least sensitive enough to detect a glycemic response equivalent to that produced by 3 g oral-glucose in 10 subjects.

Wolever, Thomas MS; Gibbs, Alison L; Spolar, Matt; Hitchner, Elinor V; Heimowitz, Colette

2006-01-01

346

Human glycemic response and phenolic content of unsweetened cranberry juice.  

PubMed

This cross-sectional study determined the phenolic composition of an over-the-counter cranberry juice (CBJ) with high-performance liquid chromatography and examined the effects of low- and normal-calorie CBJ formulations on the postprandial glycemic response in healthy humans. The CBJ used in this study contained seven phenolic acids, with 3- and 5-caffeoylquinic acid being the primary components, and 15 flavonol glycosides, with myricetin-3-galactoside and quercetin-3-galactoside being the most prevalent. CBJ proanthocyanidins consisted of three different tetramers and a heptamer, which were confirmed with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry analysis. Participants received one of the following six treatments: nothing (no water/beverage), water (480 mL), unsweetened low-calorie CBJ (38 Cal/480 mL), normal-calorie CBJ (280 Cal/480 mL), isocaloric normal calorie (high fructose corn syrup [HFCS]), or isocaloric low-calorie beverages. No significant differences in postprandial blood glucose or insulin were observed in the groups receiving nothing, water, or low-calorie treatments. In contrast, the ingestion of normal-calorie CBJ and normal-calorie control beverage resulted in significantly higher blood glucose concentrations 30 minutes postprandially, although the differences were no longer significant after 180 minutes. Plasma insulin of normal-calorie CBJ and control (HFCS) recipients was significantly higher 60 minutes postprandially, but not significantly different 120 minutes postprandially. CBJ ingestion did not affect heart rate or blood pressure. This study suggests that the consumption of a low-calorie CBJ rich in previously uncharacterized trimer and heptamer proanthocyanidins is associated with a favorable glycemic response and may be beneficial for persons with impaired glucose tolerance. PMID:18361737

Wilson, Ted; Singh, Ajay P; Vorsa, Nicholi; Goettl, Christopher D; Kittleson, Katrina M; Roe, Cindy M; Kastello, Gary M; Ragsdale, Frances R

2008-03-01

347

Attenuation of glycemic responses by oat ?-glucan solutions and viscoelastic gels is dependent on molecular weight distribution.  

PubMed

Oat ?-glucan attenuates postprandial glycemic responses when solubilized to form viscous solutions. High molecular weight (MW) ?-glucan is associated with high solution viscosity, which is in turn associated with lower glycemic responses. However, low MW ?-glucan is also able to form viscoelastic gels. The effect of low (145,000 g mol(-1)) and high (580,000 g mol(-1)) MW ?-glucan presented as liquid drinks and gels on glycemic responses was determined. Healthy subjects (n = 15) consumed 50 g glucose drinks with no ?-glucan; 4 g low MW; or 4 g high MW ?-glucan; and gels containing 4 g low MW; 2 g low plus 2 g high MW; or 3 g high plus 1 g low MW ?-glucan. Overall, ?-glucan solutions elicited lower glycemic responses than gels. For gels, peak blood glucose rise (PBGR) decreased with increasing dose of high MW ?-glucan (r(2) = 0.976, P > 0.05), and PBGR for the gel with 3 g high-MW was lower than for the control (P < 0.05). However, ?-glucan gels retained glucose better than solutions under in vitro analysis. Observed effects were found to be related to the rheological properties of the foods. ?-Glucan solutions and not gels effectively attenuated in vivo glycemic responses. PMID:23187607

Kwong, Melissa G Y; Wolever, Thomas M S; Brummer, Yolanda; Tosh, Susan M

2013-02-26

348

Glycemic index, glycemic load, and chronic disease risk—a meta- analysis of observational studies1,2  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Inconsistent findings from observational studies have prolonged the controversy over the effects of dietary glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) on the risk of certain chronic diseases. Objective: The objective was to evaluate the association between GI, GL, and chronic disease risk with the use of meta-analysis tech- niques. Design: A systematic review of published reports identified a

Alan W Barclay; Peter Petocz; Tania Prvan; Paul Mitchell; Jennie C Brand-Miller

349

Second-meal effect: low-glycemic-index foods eaten at dinner improve subsequent breakfast glycemic response13  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of the glycemic index (GI) of carbohydrate eaten the previous night on the glycemic response to a standard test meal eaten subsequently in the morning (breakfast) was studied. On separate evenings normal subjects ate low- or high-GI test meals of the same nutrient composition. The dinners consisted of single foods in two experiments and mixed meals containing several

Anthony M Ocana; Venketeshwer A Rao; Gregory R Collier

350

A Randomized Trial about Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load Improves Outcomes among Adults with Type 2 Diabetes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Glycemic index (GI) represents the postprandial glucose response of carbohydrate foods, and glycemic load (GL) represents the quantity and quality of carbohydrate consumed. A diet lower in GI and GL may improve diabetes management. A 9-week intervention regarding GI and GL was evaluated among adults in the age range of 40-70 years who had had…

Miller, Carla K.; Gutschall, Melissa

2009-01-01

351

76 FR 30723 - Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC)  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Disease Control and Prevention Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control...detection and control of breast and cervical cancer. The committee makes recommendations...Reform and its impact for breast and cervical cancer screening; updates on...

2011-05-26

352

75 FR 7282 - Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC)  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Disease Control and Prevention Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control...detection and control of breast and cervical cancer. The committee makes recommendations...Task Force guidelines for breast and cervical cancer screening; Impact of...

2010-02-18

353

Postmastication digestion factors influence glycemic variability in humans.  

PubMed

The glycemic response (GR) to food is influenced by both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. A consistent observation in GR studies is the wide within- and between-individual variations. The authors hypothesize that between-individual variations in the GR, insulin response (IR) and gastric emptying occur even when food particle size is standardized. Volunteers were tested on 2 nonconsecutive days after an overnight fast in randomized order. On 1 day, the volunteers consumed large (>2000 ?m) rice particles, and on the second day, small rice particles (500-1000 ?m). Subsequently, gastric emptying using the sodium [(13)C] acetate breath test (for 240 minutes) and GR and IR (for 120 minutes) from finger-prick blood samples were measured. The incremental area under the curve (IAUC) for the GR for small particles varied 45% more compared with whole rice. The small particles elicited a significantly greater GR IAUC than the large particles. The standard deviations associated with the IR IAUC for the small particles was 140% greater than that of the large particles. The total IAUC for IR was also significantly greater for the small particles than the large particles. The between-individual variations associated with gastric emptying times were similar for both samples. The gastric emptying latency phase, lag, and half time were significantly shorter for the small particles. Ingesting small particles causes faster gastric emptying and produces greater glycemic and IRs. Between-individual variations in GR and IR can be observed even when all the food associated factors including ingested particle size (mastication) are controlled for in humans. PMID:21745627

Ranawana, Viren; Clegg, Miriam E; Shafat, Amir; Henry, C Jeya

2011-06-17

354

Glycemic index, carbohydrate and fiber intakes and risk of reflux esophagitis, Barrett’s esophagus, and esophageal adenocarcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective  To examine the association between dietary glycemic index (GI), glycemic load (GL), total carbohydrate, sugars, starch, and\\u000a fiber intakes and the risk of reflux esophagitis, Barrett’s esophagus, and esophageal adenocarcinoma.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  In an all-Ireland study, dietary information was collected from patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma (n = 224), long-segment Barrett’s esophagus (n = 220), reflux esophagitis (n = 219), and population-based controls (n = 256). Multiple logistic regression analysis examined

Helen G. Mulholland; Marie M. Cantwell; Lesley A. Anderson; Brian T. Johnston; R. G. Peter Watson; Seamus J. Murphy; Heather R. Ferguson; Jim McGuigan; John V. Reynolds; Harry Comber; Liam J. Murray

2009-01-01

355

Clinical Improvement After Duodenojejunal Bypass for Nonobese Type 2 Diabetes Despite Minimal Improvement in Glycemic Homeostasis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Glycemic control of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) remains a dilemma to physicians. Although gastric bypass surgery undertaken\\u000a for morbid obesity has been shown to resolve this disease well, data on the effectiveness of duodenojejunal bypass in improving\\u000a or resolving T2DM and the metabolic syndrome (MS), especially in nonobese patients are scarce. This study was intended to\\u000a evaluate the clinical

G. S. Ferzli; E. Dominique; M. Ciaglia; M. H. Bluth; A. Gonzalez; A. Fingerhut

2009-01-01

356

Dietary hyperglycemia, glycemic index and metabolic retinal diseases.  

PubMed

The glycemic index (GI) indicates how fast blood glucose is raised after consuming a carbohydrate-containing food. Human metabolic studies indicate that GI is related to patho-physiological responses after meals. Compared with a low-GI meal, a high-GI meal is characterized with hyperglycemia during the early postprandial stage (0-2h) and a compensatory hyperlipidemia associated with counter-regulatory hormone responses during late postprandial stage (4-6h). Over the past three decades, several human health disorders have been related to GI. The strongest relationship suggests that consuming low-GI foods prevents diabetic complications. Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a complication of diabetes. In this aspect, GI appears to be useful as a practical guideline to help diabetic people choose foods. Abundant epidemiological evidence also indicates positive associations between GI and risk for type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and more recently, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in people without diabetes. Although data from randomized controlled intervention trials are scanty, these observations are strongly supported by evolving molecular mechanisms which explain the pathogenesis of hyperglycemia. This wide range of evidence implies that dietary hyperglycemia is etiologically related to human aging and diseases, including DR and AMD. In this context, these diseases can be considered as metabolic retinal diseases. Molecular theories that explain hyperglycemic pathogenesis involve a mitochondria-associated pathway and four glycolysis-associated pathways, including advanced glycation end products formation, protein kinase C activation, polyol pathway, and hexosamine pathway. While the four glycolysis-associated pathways appear to be universal for both normoxic and hypoxic conditions, the mitochondria-associated mechanism appears to be most relevant to the hyperglycemic, normoxic pathogenesis. For diseases that affect tissues with highly active metabolism and that frequently face challenge from low oxygen tension, such as retina in which metabolism is determined by both glucose and oxygen homeostases, these theories appear to be insufficient. Several lines of evidence indicate that the retina is particularly vulnerable when hypoxia coincides with hyperglycemia. We propose a novel hyperglycemic, hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway, to complement the current theories regarding hyperglycemic pathogenesis. HIF is a transcription complex that responds to decrease oxygen in the cellular environment. In addition to playing a significant role in the regulation of glucose metabolism, under hyperglycemia HIF has been shown to increase the expression of HIF-inducible genes, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) leading to angiogenesis. To this extent, we suggest that HIF can also be described as a hyperglycemia-inducible factor. In summary, while management of dietary GI appears to be an effective intervention for the prevention of metabolic diseases, specifically AMD and DR, more interventional data is needed to evaluate the efficacy of GI management. There is an urgent need to develop reliable biomarkers of exposure, surrogate endpoints, as well as susceptibility for GI. These insights would also be helpful in deciphering the detailed hyperglycemia-related biochemical mechanisms for the development of new therapeutic agents. PMID:20868767

Chiu, Chung-Jung; Taylor, Allen

2010-09-22

357

Inter- and Intra-Individual Variability in Glycemic Index Values for White Bread Determined Using Standardized Procedures  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

This study was conducted to evaluate the inter- and intra-individual variability of the GI value when determined under strictly controlled conditions. Twenty-three healthy adults (20-70 y) completed up to three sets of two visits per set. Each pair of visits assessed the glycemic response to 50 g a...

358

Low Glycemic Load Experimental Diet More Satiating Than High Glycemic Load Diet  

Microsoft Academic Search

Effective strategies for reducing food intake are needed to reduce risk of obesity-related cancers. We investigated the effect of low and high glycemic load (GL) diets on satiety and whether satiety varied by body mass index (BMI), gender, and serum leptin. Eighty normal weight (BMI = 18.5–24.9 kg\\/m) and overweight\\/ obese (BMI = 28.0–40.0 kg\\/m) adults participated in a randomized,

Kevin T. Chang; Johanna W. Lampe; Yvonne Schwarz; Kara L. Breymeyer; Karen A. Noar; Xiaoling Song; Marian L. Neuhouser

2012-01-01

359

Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load of Carbohydrates in the Diabetes Diet  

Microsoft Academic Search

Medical nutrition therapy is the first line of treatment for the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes and plays an\\u000a essential part in the management of type 1 diabetes. Although traditionally advice was focused on carbohydrate quantification,\\u000a it is now clear that both the amount and type of carbohydrate are important in predicting an individual’s glycemic response\\u000a to a

Kate Marsh; Alan Barclay; Stephen Colagiuri; Jennie Brand-Miller

2011-01-01

360

No difference in body weight decrease between a low-glycemic- index and a high-glycemic-index diet but reduced LDL cholesterol after 10-wk ad libitum intake of the low-glycemic-index diet1-3  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The role of glycemic index (GI) in appetite and body- weight regulation is still not clear. Objective: The objective of the study was to investigate the long- term effects of a low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet with either low glycemic index (LGI) or high glycemic index (HGI) on ad libitum energy intake, body weight, and composition, as well as on risk

Birgitte Sloth; Inger Krog-Mikkelsen; Anne Flint; Inge Tetens; Inger Björck; Sophie Vinoy; Helena Elmståhl; Arne Astrup; Vincent Lang; Anne Raben

361

Evaluation of 1,5-anhydroglucitol as a marker for glycemic variability in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.  

PubMed

1,5-anhydroglucitol (1,5-AG) has been suggested as a marker for short-term glycemic control and postprandial hyperglycemia. However, the role of 1,5-AG in glycemic variability has not been established. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the usefulness of 1,5-AG as a marker for glycemic variability in patients with type 2 diabetes. Sixty patients with type 2 diabetes were enrolled, and a continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) was applied for 72 h. Continuous overlapping net glycemic action (CONGA), mean amplitude of glycemic excursion (MAGE), and mean of the daily differences (MODD) were calculated for the assessment of glycemic variability and compared with 1,5-AG. Urinary 8-iso prostaglandin F2? (8-isoPGF2?) was measured to assess oxidative stress. 1,5-AG was correlated with fasting blood glucose, HbA1c, postprandial area under the curve for glucose above 180 mg/dL (AUC-180), and mean post-meal maximum glucose (MPMG). However, 1,5-AG did not show significant correlation with CONGA-1, MAGE, and MODD (R = -0.053, P = 0.689; R = -0.148, P = 0.259; R = -0.123, P = 0.350). In patients with HbA1c ? 8.0% (n = 35), 1,5-AG was significantly correlated with HbA1c, mean glucose, postprandial AUC-180, and MPMG. However, in patients with HbA1c > 8.0% (n = 25), 1,5-AG did not show correlation with any glycemic markers. Oxidative stress measured as urine 8-isoPGF2? showed positive correlations with CONGA-1, MAGE, AUC-180, postprandial AUC-180, and MPMG only in men. However, 1,5-AG did not correlate with oxidative stress. Our data suggested a limited usefulness of 1,5-AG in estimating glycemic variability and oxidative stress. 1,5-AG was able to represent mean glucose and postprandial hyperglycemia only in well-controlled diabetic patients. PMID:21688018

Kim, Min Joo; Jung, Hye Seung; Hwang-Bo, Yul; Cho, Sun Wook; Jang, Hak Chul; Kim, Seong Yeon; Park, Kyong Soo

2011-06-18

362

Glycemic load, glycemic index, and carbohydrate intake in relation to pancreatic cancer risk in a large US cohort  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Consumption of diets with high glycemic load has been hypothesized to increase pancreatic cancer risk by raising postprandial\\u000a glucose levels and insulin secretion.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  The authors analyzed data from the American Cancer Society Cancer Prevention Study II (CPS-II) Nutrition Cohort to examine\\u000a the association between pancreatic cancer and glycemic load, glycemic index (GI), and intake of carbohydrates. Diet was assessed\\u000a among

Alpa V. Patel; Marjorie L. McCullough; Alexandre L. Pavluck; Eric J. Jacobs; Michael J. Thun; Eugenia E. Calle

2007-01-01

363

75 FR 57472 - Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC): Notice of...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC): Notice of Charter Renewal This gives notice...

2010-09-21

364

Effects of formulation and surfactant on control of early leaf spot of peanut with tebuconazole  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Prior to 1997, control of early leaf spot with the DMI fungicide tebuconazole, applied in a block of 4 mid-season applications scheduled between 2 applications of chlorothalonil, was similar to a full-season program with chlorothalonil. Periodically since 1997, control of early leaf spot with tebuc...

365

A prospective randomized control trial comparing medical and surgical treatment for early pregnancy failure  

Microsoft Academic Search

A prospective randomized control trial was designed to assess the effectiveness of single dose, 800 µg misoprostol administered p.v. compared with surgical evacuation for the treatment of early pregnancy failure. A total of 80 women with a diagnosis of early pregnancy failure were randomized to study (vaginal misoprostol) and control (surgical curettage) groups. Success of treatment, side-effects as assessed during,

Constantinos Demetroulis; Ertan Saridogan; Dattakumar Kunde; Alan A. Naftalin

366

The Development of Catalysts for Emission Control from Motor Vehicles: Early Research at Johnson Matthey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Catalytic converters for the control of vehicle emissions have been in use since 1975 and are now an established part of the vehicle scene. However, in the early days of emissions control, catalysts were foreign concepts to the vehicle engineer and there was some resistance to fitting them to motor vehicles. Early catalysts were relatively simple in concept compared with

G. J. K. Acres; B. Harrison

2004-01-01

367

A Low-Glycemic Diet Lifestyle Intervention Improves Fat Utilization during Exercise in Older Obese Humans.  

PubMed

Objective: To determine the influence of dietary glycemic index on exercise training-induced adaptations in substrate oxidation in obesity. Design and Methods: Twenty older, obese individuals undertook 3 months of fully supervised aerobic exercise and were randomized to low- (LoGIX) or high-glycemic (HiGIX) diets. Changes in indirect calorimetry (VO2 ; VCO2 ) were assessed at rest, during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, and during submaximal exercise (walking: 65% VO2 max, 200 kcal energy expenditure). Intramyocellular lipid (IMCL) was measured by (1) H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Results: Weight loss (-8.6 ± 1.1%) and improvements (P < 0.05) in VO2 max, glycemic control, fasting lipemia, and metabolic flexibility were similar for both LoGIX and HiGIX groups. During submaximal exercise, energy expenditure was higher following the intervention (P < 0.01) in both groups. Respiratory exchange ratio during exercise was unchanged in the LoGIX group but increased in the HiGIX group (P < 0.05). However, fat oxidation during exercise expressed in relation to changes in body weight was increased in the LoGIX group (+10.6 ± 3.6%; P < 0.05). Fasting IMCL was unchanged, however, extramyocellular lipid was reduced (P < 0.05) after LoGIX. Conclusions: A LoGIX/exercise weight-loss intervention increased fat utilization during exercise independent of changes in energy expenditure. This highlights the potential therapeutic value of low-glycemic foods for reversing metabolic defects in obesity. PMID:23512711

Solomon, Thomas P J; Haus, Jacob M; Cook, Marc A; Flask, Chris A; Kirwan, John P

2013-03-20

368

77 FR 60703 - Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee: Notice of Charter Renewal  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee...L. 92-463) of October 6, 1972, that the Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory...

2012-10-04

369

Enhanced glycemic responsiveness to epinephrine in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus is the result of the inability to secrete insulin. Augmented insulin secretion normally limits the glycemic, but not the lipolytic or ketogenic, response to epinephrine in humans.  

PubMed Central

To determine if the enhanced glycemic response to epinephrine in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) is the result of increased adrenergic sensitivity per se, increased glucagon secretion, decreased insulin secretion, or a combination of these, plasma epinephrine concentration-response curves were determined in insulin-infused (initially euglycemic) patients with IDDM and nondiabetic subjects on two occasions: once when insulin and glucagon were free to change (control study), and again when insulin and glucagon were held constant (islet clamp study). During the control study, plasma C-peptide doubled, and glucagon did not change in the nondiabetic subjects, whereas plasma C-peptide did not change but glucagon increased in the patients. The patients with IDDM exhibited threefold greater increments in plasma glucose, largely the result of greater increments in glucose production. This enhanced glycemic response was apparent with 30-min increments in epinephrine to plasma concentrations as low as 100-200 pg/ml, levels that occur commonly under physiologic conditions. During the islet clamp study (somatostatin infusion with insulin and glucagon replacement at fixed rates), the heightened glycemic response was unaltered in the patients with IDDM, but the nondiabetic subjects exhibited an enhanced glycemic response to epinephrine indistinguishable from that of patients with IDDM. In contrast, the FFA, glycerol, and beta-hydroxybutyrate responses were unaltered. Thus, we conclude the following: Short, physiologic increments in plasma epinephrine cause greater increments in plasma glucose in patients with IDDM than in nondiabetic subjects, a finding likely to be relevant to glycemic control during the daily lives of such patients as well as during the stress of intercurrent illness. Enhanced glycemic responsiveness of patients with IDDM to epinephrine is not the result of increased sensitivity of adrenergic receptor-effector mechanisms per se nor of their increased glucagon secretory response; rather, it is the result of their inability to augment insulin secretion. Augmented insulin secretion, albeit restrained, normally limits the glycemic response, but not the lipolytic or ketogenic responses, to epinephrine in humans. Images

Berk, M A; Clutter, W E; Skor, D; Shah, S D; Gingerich, R P; Parvin, C A; Cryer, P E

1985-01-01

370

Carbohydrate Intake, Glycemic Index, Glycemic Load, and Dietary Fiber in Relation to Risk of Stroke in Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

The associations of dietary carbohydrate, glycemic index, and glycemic load with stroke risk were examined among 78,779 US women who were free of cardiovascular disease and diabetes in 1980 and completed a food frequency questionnaire. During an 18-year follow-up, 1,020 stroke cases were documented (including 515 ischemic and 279 hemorrhagic). In analyses adjusting for nondietary risk factors and cereal fiber,

Kyungwon Oh; Frank B. Hu; Eunyoung Cho; Kathryn M. Rexrode; Meir J. Stampfer; JoAnn E. Manson; Simin Liu; Walter C. Willett

2005-01-01

371

Dietary Glycemic Load, Glycemic Index, and Carbohydrate and Risk of Breast Cancer in the Women's Health Initiative  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dietary glycemic load (GL), glycemic index (GI), and carbohydrate could be associated with breast cancer risk by influencing long-term blood glucose and insulin concentrations. We examined associations between GL, GI, and carbohydrate and incident breast cancer in 148,767 Women's Heath Initiative (WHI) participants. Dietary variables were estimated from food frequency questionnaires administered at baseline. Self-reported breast cancers during follow-up were

James M. Shikany; David T. Redden; Marian L. Neuhouser; Rowan T. Chlebowski; Thomas E. Rohan; Michael S. Simon; Simin Liu; Lesley Tinker

2011-01-01

372

Dietary glycemic index, glycemic load, insulin index, fiber and whole-grain intake in relation to risk of prostate cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective  Insulin may play a role in prostate cancer tumorigenesis. Postprandial blood glucose and insulin responses of foods depend\\u000a importantly on the carbohydrate quality and quantity, represented by glycemic index (GI), glycemic load (GL), fiber and whole-grain\\u000a content, but are also influenced by intake of protein and other characteristics. The recently developed insulin index (II)\\u000a quantifies the postprandial insulin secretion, also

K. Nimptsch; S. Kenfield; M. K. Jensen; M. J. Stampfer; M. Franz; L. Sampson; J. C. Brand-Miller; W. C. Willett; E. Giovannucci

2011-01-01

373

Carbohydrate, glycemic index, and glycemic load and colorectal adenomas in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Screening  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: It is possible that high-glycemic-load diets, through their hyperinsulinemic effects, can increase the risk of colorectal cancer. Objective: We analyzed data from a cancer screening study to determine whether persons with high-glycemic-load diets would be at an increased risk of distal adenomas. Design:Weincludedsubjectswithnoprioradenomaorcancerfrom the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian screening trial and whose results from flexible sigmoidoscopy exams indicated

Andrew Flood; Ulrike Peters; David JA Jenkins; Nilanjan Chatterjee; Amy F Subar; Timothy R Church

374

Controlling Feeding Practices: Cause or Consequence of Early Child Weight?  

Microsoft Academic Search

INTRODUCTION.The exertion of control during child feeding has been associated with both underweight and overweight during childhood. What is as-yet unclear is whether controlling child feeding practices causally affect child weight or whether the use of control may be a reactive response to concerns about high or low child weight. The aims of this study were to explore the direction

Claire Victoria Farrow; Jacqueline Blissett

375

Glycemic variability and glucose complexity in critically ill patients: a retrospective analysis of continuous glucose monitoring data  

PubMed Central

Introduction Glycemic variability as a marker of endogenous and exogenous factors, and glucose complexity as a marker of endogenous glucose regulation are independent predictors of mortality in critically ill patients. We evaluated the impact of real time continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) on glycemic variability in critically ill patients on intensive insulin therapy (IIT), and investigated glucose complexity - calculated using detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) - in ICU survivors and non-survivors. Methods Retrospective analysis were conducted of two prospective, randomized, controlled trials in which 174 critically ill patients either received IIT according to a real-time CGM system (n = 63) or according to an algorithm (n = 111) guided by selective arterial blood glucose measurements with simultaneously blinded CGM for 72 hours. Standard deviation, glucose lability index and mean daily delta glucose as markers of glycemic variability, as well as glucose complexity and mean glucose were calculated. Results Glycemic variability measures were comparable between the real time CGM group (n = 63) and the controls (n = 111). Glucose complexity was significantly lower (higher DFA) in ICU non-survivors (n = 36) compared to survivors (n = 138) (DFA: 1.61 (1.46 to 1.68) versus 1.52 (1.44 to 1.58); P = 0.003). Diabetes mellitus was significantly associated with a loss of complexity (diabetic (n = 33) versus non-diabetic patients (n = 141) (DFA: 1.58 (1.48 to 1.65) versus 1.53 (1.44 to 1.59); P = 0.01). Conclusions IIT guided by real time CGM did not result in significantly reduced glycemic variability. Loss of glucose complexity was significantly associated with mortality and with the presence of diabetes mellitus.

2012-01-01

376

Diabetic Autonomic Imbalance and Glycemic Variability  

PubMed Central

Diabetic autonomic neural imbalance is a severe complication of long-term diabetes patients and may progress to diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN). The prevalence of DAN is reported to be between 20 and 70%, depending on the studies. The pathogenesis of DAN remains unresolved. However, emerging evidence suggests that glycemic variability (GV) may be associated with autonomic imbalance in patients with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. As symptoms are initially weak and uncharacteristic, the condition often remains undiagnosed until late manifestations present themselves. Predominant symptoms may include nausea, vomiting, gastroparesis, involuntary diarrhea, postural hypotension, voiding difficulties, and sexual dysfunction. Analyzing the patterns of heart rate variability carries the potential for detection of autonomic imbalance in the subclinical and asymptomatic stages. In this context, GV may affect the sympathovagal balance by increasing oxidative stress and proinflammatory cytokines. Establishing a GV risk profile could therefore be important in determining risk factors in diabetes patients. This review addresses the issues above and in particular the possible association between diabetic autonomic imbalance and GV.

Fleischer, Jesper

2012-01-01

377

[Glycemic, insulinemic index, glycemic load of soy beverage with low and high content of carbohydrates].  

PubMed

Consumption of soy has increased in Western countries due to the benefits on health and the attitude of the people to consume natural products as alternative to the use of pharmacological therapies. However, there is no evidence whether the consumption of 25 g of soy protein as recommended by the Food and Drug Administration has some effect on glucose absorption and consequently on insulin secretion. The aim of the present study was to determine glycemic index (GI), insulinemic index (InIn), and glycemic load (GL) of several soy beverages containing low or high concentration of carbohydrates, and compare them with other foods such as peanuts, whole milk, soluble fiber and a mixed meal on GI and InIn. The results showed that soy beverages had low or moderate GI, depending of the presence of other compounds like carbohydrates and fiber. Consumption of soy beverages with low concentration of carbohydrates produced the lowest insulin secretion. Therefore, these products can be recommended in obese and diabetic patients. Finally soy beverages should contain low maltodextrins concentration and be added of soluble fiber. PMID:17408110

Torres y Torres, Nimbe; Palacios-González, Berenice; Noriega-López, Lilia; Tovar-Palacio, Armando R

378

Dietary Glycemic Index, Dietary Glycemic Load, Blood Lipids, and Coronary Heart Disease  

PubMed Central

Objective. To examine the associations of dietary glycemic index (GI) and dietary glycemic load (GL) with blood lipid concentrations and coronary heart disease (CHD) in nondiabetic participants in the Health Worker Cohort Study (HWCS). Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional analysis was performed, using data from adults who participated in the HWCS baseline assessment. We collected information on participants' socio-demographic conditions, dietary patterns and physical activity via self-administered questionnaires. Dietary GI and dietary GL were measured using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Anthropometric and clinical measurements were assessed with standardized procedures. CHD risk was estimated according to the sex-specific Framingham prediction algorithms. Results. IIn the 5,830 individuals aged 20 to 70 who were evaluated, dietary GI and GL were significantly associated with HDL-C, LDL-C, LDL-C/HDL-C ratio, and triglycerides serum levels. Subjects with high dietary GI have a relative risk of 1.56 (CI 95%; 1.13–2.14), and those with high dietary GL have a relative risk of 2.64 (CI 95%; 1.15–6.58) of having an elevated CHD risk than those who had low dietary GI and GL. Conclusions. Our results suggest that high dietary GI and dietary GL could have an unfavorable effect on serum lipid levels, which are in turn associated with a higher CHD risk.

Denova-Gutierrez, Edgar; Huitron-Bravo, Gerardo; Talavera, Juan O.; Castanon, Susana; Gallegos-Carrillo, Katia; Flores, Yvonne; Salmeron, Jorge

2010-01-01

379

Glycemic index and glycemic load are associated with some cardiovascular risk factors among the PREMIER study participants  

PubMed Central

Background The clinical significance of glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) is inconclusive. Objective This study was conducted to examine the association of GI and GL with clinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors including body weight, blood pressure (BP), serum lipids, fasting glucose, insulin and homocysteine over time among the PREMIER participants. Design PREMIER was an 18-month randomized lifestyle intervention trial, conducted from 2000 to 2002, designed to help participants reduce BP by following the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) dietary pattern, losing weight, reducing sodium and increasing physical activity. GI and GL were estimated from 24 h diet recall data at baseline, 6 and 18 months after intervention. PROC MIXED model was used to examine the association of changes in GI or GL with changes in CVD risk factors. Results A total of 756 randomized participants, 62% females and 34% African Americans and who averaged 50.0±0.3 years old and 95.3±0.7 kg, were included in this report. Neither GI nor GL changes was associated with changes in any risk factors at 6 months. At 18 months, however, the GI change was significantly and positively associated with total cholesterol (TC) change only (p<0.05, ?=23.80±12.11 mg/dL or 0.62±0.31 mmol/L) with a significant age interaction. The GL change was significantly associated with TC (p=0.02, ?=0.28±0.15 mg/dL or 0.01±0.00 mmol/L) positively and with low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) changes negatively (p=0.03, ?=?0.01±0.00 mg/dL or ?0.00±0.00 mmol/L), and significant age interactions were observed for both. Conclusions GI and GL was associated with TC and LDL-C after controlling for energy, fat and fiber intake and other potential confounders and the associations were modified by age. Further investigation into this relationship is important because of its potential clinical impact.

Lin, Pao-Hwa; Chen, Chuhe; Young, Deborah R.; Mitchell, Diane; Elmer, Patricia; Wang, Yanfang; Batch, Bryan; Champagne, Catherine

2012-01-01

380

Glycemic responses to sweetened dried and raw cranberries in humans with type 2 diabetes.  

PubMed

This study assessed the metabolic response to sweetened dried cranberries (SDC), raw cranberries (RC), and white bread (WB) in humans with type 2 diabetes. Development of palatable cranberry preparations associated with lower glycemic responses may be useful for improving fruit consumption and glycemic control among those with diabetes. In this trial, type 2 diabetics (n= 13) received WB (57 g, 160 cal, 1 g fiber), RC (55 g, 21 cal, 1 g fiber), SDC (40 g, 138 cal, 2.1 g fiber), and SDC containing less sugar (SDC-LS, 40 g, 113 cal, 1.8 g fiber + 10 g polydextrose). Plasma glucose (mmol/L) peaked significantly at 60 min for WB, and at 30 min for RC, SDC, and SDC-LS at 9.6 ± 0.4, 7.0 ± 0.4, 9.6 ± 0.5, and 8.7 ± 0.5, respectively, WB remained significantly elevated from the other treatments at 120 min. Plasma insulin (pmol/mL) peaked at 60 min for WB and SDC and at 30 min for RC and SDC-LS at 157 ± 15, 142 ± 27, 61 ± 8, and 97 ± 11, respectively. Plasma insulin for SDC-LS was significantly lower at 60 min than either WB or SDC. Insulin area under the curve (AUC) values for RC and SDC-LS were both significantly lower than WB or SDC. Phenolic content of SDC and SDC-LS was determined following extraction with 80% acetone prior to high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and electronspray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and found to be rich in 5-caffeoylquinic cid, quercetin-3-galactoside, and quercetin-3-galactoside, and the proanthocyanidin dimer epicatechin. In conclusion, SDC-LS was associated with a favorable glycemic and insulinemic response in type 2 diabetics. Practical Application: This study compares phenolic content and glycemic responses among different cranberry products. The study seeks to expand the palatable and portable healthy food choices for persons with type 2 diabetes. The novel use of polydextrose as a bulking agent making possible a reduction in caloric content and potential glycemic response is also characterized in this study. PMID:21535498

Wilson, Ted; Luebke, Justin L; Morcomb, Erin F; Carrell, Emily J; Leveranz, Megan C; Kobs, Lisa; Schmidt, Travis P; Limburg, Paul J; Vorsa, Nicholi; Singh, Ajay P

2010-10-01

381

Mandibular Motor Control during the Early Development of Speech and Nonspeech Behaviors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Purpose: The mandible is often portrayed as a primary structure of early babble production, but empiricists still need to specify (a) how mandibular motor control and kinematics vary among different types of multisyllabic babble, (b) whether chewing or jaw oscillation relies on a coordinative infrastructure that can be exploited for early types…

Steeve, Roger W.; Moore, Christopher A.

2009-01-01

382

[The glycemic index of some foods common in Mexico].  

PubMed

To investigate the increase of glycemia due to the ingestion of usual food in Mexico, portions with 50 g of carbohydrate form white corn tortilla, yellow corn tortilla, spaghetti, rice, potatoes, beans brown and black, nopal (prickle pear cactus) and peanuts, compared with white bread, were given to 21 healthy and 27 non-insulin-dependent diabetic subjects. Serum glucose and insulin were measured every 30 min for 180 min long. Glycemic index was obtained as: (area under curve of glucose with test food/area under curve of glucose with white bread) X 100. A corrected index was calculated subtracting the area corresponding to initial values. Insulin index was obtained similarly. Each sample was studied 14-18 times. Glycemic and insulin indexes of white and yellow corn tortilla, spaghetti, rice and potatoes were not different from bread (P greater than 0.05). Corrected glycemic indexes of brown beans (54 +/- 15, +/- SE) and black beans (43 +/- 17) were low (p less than 0.05), as well as corrected insulin indexes (69 +/- 11 and 64 +/- 10 respectively, (P less than 0.02). Peanuts had low glycemic (33 +/- 17, P less than 0.01), but normal insulin index. Nopal had very low glycemic and insulin indexes (10 +/- 17 and 10 +/- 16, P less than 0.0001). These data might be useful in prescribing diets for diabetic subjects. PMID:1959761

Frati-Munari, A C; Roca-Vides, R A; López-Pérez, R J; de Vivero, I; Ruiz-Velazco, M

383

Dietary glycemic index, glycemic load and ovarian cancer risk: a case-control study in Italy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Results: Ovarian cancer was directly associated with dietary GI (OR for highest versus lowest quartile = 1.7, 95% CI 1.3-2.1) and GL (OR = 1.7, 95% CI 1.3-2.1). The associations were observed in pre- and post- menopausal women, and they remained consistent across strata of major covariates identified. Conclusions: This study supports the hypothesis of a direct association between GI

L. S. A. Augustin; J. Polesel; C. Bosetti; C. W. C. Kendall; C. La Vecchia; M. Parpinel; E. Conti; M. Montella; S. Franceschi; D. J. A. Jenkins; L. Dal Maso

2003-01-01

384

Chemical compositions and glycemic responses to banana varieties.  

PubMed

Chemical compositions and glycemic indices of four varieties of banana (Musa spp.) (kolikuttu-Silk AAB, embul-Mysore AAB, anamalu-Gros Michel AAA, seeni kesel-Pisang Awak ABB) were determined. Silk, Gros Michel, Pisang Awak and Mysore contained the highest percentages of starch (14%), sucrose (38%), free glucose (29%) and fructose (58%) as a percentage of the total available carbohydrate content respectively. Total dietary fiber contents of four varieties ranged from 2.7 to 5.3%. Glycemic indices of Silk, Mysore, Gros Michel and Pisang Awak were 61 ± 5, 61 ± 6, 67 ± 7, 69 ± 9 and can be categorized as low against white bread as the standard. A single banana of the four varieties elicited a low glycemic load. Thus, consumption of a banana from any of these varieties can be recommended as a snack for healthy or diabetic patients who are under dietary management or pharmacological drugs to regulate blood glucose responses in between meals. PMID:21250902

Hettiaratchi, U P K; Ekanayake, S; Welihinda, J

2011-01-20

385

Inconsistency between glycemic and insulinemic responses to regular and fermented milk products 1-3  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Foods with a low glycemic index are increasingly being acknowledged as beneficial in relation to the insulin resis- tance syndrome. Certain organic acids can lower the glycemic index of bread products. However, the possible effect of acids in fermented milk products on the glycemic index and on insuline- mic characteristics has not been addressed. The metabolic effects of fermented

Elin M Östman

386

Familial liability, obstetric complications and childhood development abnormalities in early onset schizophrenia: a case control study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Genetic and environmental risk factors and gene-environment interactions are linked to higher likelihood of developing schizophrenia\\u000a in accordance with the neurodevelopmental model of disease; little is known about risk factors and early development in early-onset\\u000a schizophrenia (EOS) and very early-onset schizophrenia (VEOS).\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  We present a case-control study of a sample of 21 patients with EOS\\/VEOS and a control group of

Francesco Margari; Maria G Petruzzelli; Paola A Lecce; Orlando Todarello; Andrea De Giacomo; Elisabetta Lucarelli; Domenico Martinelli; Lucia Margari

2011-01-01

387

Early Indications of Future Cognitive Decline: Stable versus Declining Controls.  

PubMed

This study aimed to identify baseline features of normal subjects that are associated with subsequent cognitive decline. Publicly available data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative was used to find differences in baseline clinical assessments (ADAScog, AVLT, FAQ) between cognitively healthy individuals who will suffer cognitive decline within 48 months and those who will remain stable for that period. Linear regression models indicated an individual's conversion status was significantly associated with certain baseline neuroimaging measures, including posterior cingulate glucose metabolism. Linear Discriminant Analysis models built with baseline features derived from MRI and FDG-PET measures were capable of successfully predicting whether an individual will convert to MCI within 48 months or remain cognitively stable. The findings from this study support the idea that there exist informative differences between normal people who will later develop cognitive impairments and those who will remain cognitively stable for up to four years. Further, the feasibility of developing predictive models that can detect early states of cognitive decline in seemingly normal individuals was demonstrated. PMID:24040166

Rizk-Jackson, Angela; Insel, Philip; Petersen, Ronald; Aisen, Paul; Jack, Clifford; Weiner, Michael

2013-09-09

388

Controls on development and diversity of Early Archean stromatolites  

PubMed Central

The ?3,450-million-year-old Strelley Pool Formation in Western Australia contains a reef-like assembly of laminated sedimentary accretion structures (stromatolites) that have macroscale characteristics suggestive of biological influence. However, direct microscale evidence of biology—namely, organic microbial remains or biosedimentary fabrics—has to date eluded discovery in the extensively-recrystallized rocks. Recently-identified outcrops with relatively good textural preservation record microscale evidence of primary sedimentary processes, including some that indicate probable microbial mat formation. Furthermore, we find relict fabrics and organic layers that covary with stromatolite morphology, linking morphologic diversity to changes in sedimentation, seafloor mineral precipitation, and inferred microbial mat development. Thus, the most direct and compelling signatures of life in the Strelley Pool Formation are those observed at the microscopic scale. By examining spatiotemporal changes in microscale characteristics it is possible not only to recognize the presence of probable microbial mats during stromatolite development, but also to infer aspects of the biological inputs to stromatolite morphogenesis. The persistence of an inferred biological signal through changing environmental circumstances and stromatolite types indicates that benthic microbial populations adapted to shifting environmental conditions in early oceans.

Allwood, Abigail C.; Grotzinger, John P.; Knoll, Andrew H.; Burch, Ian W.; Anderson, Mark S.; Coleman, Max L.; Kanik, Isik

2009-01-01

389

Motivational Interviewing Early After Acute Stroke A Randomized, Controlled Trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and Purpose—The purpose of this study was to determine whether motivational interviewing, a patient- centered counseling technique, can benefit patients' mood 3 months after stroke. Methods—A single-center, open, randomized, controlled trial was conducted at a single hospital with a stroke unit. Subjects consisted of 411 consecutive patients on the stroke register who were over 18 years of age and

Caroline L. Watkins; Malcolm F. Auton; Carol F. Deans; Hazel A. Dickinson; Cathy I. A. Jack; C. Elizabeth Lightbody; Christopher J. Sutton; Martin D. van den Broek; Michael J. Leathley

390

Association between glycemic index, glycemic load, and fructose with insulin resistance: the CDC of the Canary Islands study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  The involvement of carbohydrates in triggering insulin resistance (IR) remains a source of controversy.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Aim of the study  To study the relation between glycemic index (GI), glycemic load (GL), and fructose with insulin resistance in a predominantly\\u000a rural population in the Canary Islands.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Cross-sectional study carried out in 668 nondiabetic people aged 18–75. IR was estimated with serum glucose and C-peptide

Santiago Domínguez Coello; Antonio Cabrera de León; María C. Rodríguez Pérez; Carlos Borges Álamo; Lourdes Carrillo Fernández; Delia Almeida González; Jezabel García Yanes; Ana González Hernández; Buenaventura Brito Díaz; Armando Aguirre-Jaime

2010-01-01

391

Promoting Early Intervention Referral through a Randomized Controlled Home-Visiting Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The MOM Program is a randomized, controlled trial of an intervention to promote mothers' care for the health and development of their children, including accessing early intervention (EI) services. Study aims were to determine whether, relative to controls, this intervention increased receipt of and referral to EI services. Mothers (N = 302)…

Schwarz, Donald F.; O'Sullivan, Ann L.; Guinn, Judith; Mautone, Jennifer A.; Carlson, Elyse C.; Zhao, Huaqing; Zhang, Xuemei; Esposito, Tara L.; Askew, Megan; Radcliffe, Jerilynn

2012-01-01

392

Randomised controlled trial of the Lidcombe programme of early stuttering intervention  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives To evaluate the efficacy of the Lidcombe programme of early stuttering intervention by comparison to a control group. Design A pragmatic, open plan, parallel group, randomised controlled trial with blinded outcome assessment. Setting Two public speech clinics in New Zealand. Participants Stuttering preschool children who presented to the speech clinics for treatment. Inclusion criteria were age 3-6 years and

Mark Jones; Mark Onslow; Ann Packman; Shelley Williams; Tika Ormond; Ilsa Schwarz; Val Gebski; Princess Alexandra

2005-01-01

393

Relations among Peer Acceptance, Inhibitory Control, and Math Achievement in Early Adolescence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study examined relations among peer acceptance, inhibitory control, and math achievement in ninety-nine 4th and 5th grade early adolescents. Teachers rated students on peer acceptance and students completed a computerized executive function task assessing inhibitory control. Math achievement was assessed via end of year math grades. Results…

Oberle, Eva; Schonert-Reichl, Kimberly A.

2013-01-01

394

Comparison of multiple and novel measures of dietary glycemic carbohydrate with insulin resistant status in older women  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Previous epidemiological investigations of associations between dietary glycemic intake and insulin resistance have used average daily measures of glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL). We explored multiple and novel measures of dietary glycemic intake to determine which was most predictive of an association with insulin resistance. METHODS: Usual dietary intakes were assessed by diet history interview in women

Therese A O'Sullivan; Alexandra P Bremner; Sheila O'Neill; Philippa Lyons-Wall

2010-01-01

395

Dietary glycemic index and load, measures of glucose metabolism, and body fat distribution in older adults1-3  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Recent evidence suggests that the rate of carbohy- drate digestion and absorption may influence the development of type 2 diabetes. Objective: The aim of this study was to examine associations of dietary glycemic index and glycemic load with predictors of type 2 diabetes in older adults. Design: This study evaluated cross-sectional relations of dietary glycemic index and glycemic load

Nadine R Sahyoun; Amy L Anderson; Alka M Kanaya; Pauline Koh-Banerjee; Stephen B Kritchevsky; Nathalie de Rekeneire; Frances A Tylavsky; Ann V Schwartz; Jung Sun Lee; Tamara B Harris

396

Diets high and low in glycemic index versus high monounsaturated fat diets: effects on glucose and lipid metabolism in NIDDM  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To examine the relative effects of high and low glycemic index (GI) carbohydrates, and mono-unsaturated fats on blood glucose and lipid metabolism in NIDDM subjects.Subjects: Fourteen male and seven female variably controlled NIDDM subjects recruited by advertisement.Setting: Free living outpatients.Research design: A repeated measures, within-subject design was used such that each subject consumed three diets: (a) a high-GI diet

ND Luscombe; M Noakes; PM Clifton

1999-01-01

397

The influence of dietary protein on market barrows and gilts supplemented creatine monohydrate in conjunction with a high glycemic carbohydrate  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of the study was to determine if additional dietary protein improves the lean tissue deposition and carcass merit of pigs supplemented creatine monohydrate in combination with a high glycemic carbohydrate (dextrose). Forty-eight crossbred barrows and gilts (91±0.18kg) were blocked by sex assigned to 1 of 12 pens (4 pigs\\/pen, 16 pigs\\/treatment). Treatments included: control (CON; basal diet consisting

E. P. Berg; C. A. Stahl; M. S. Shannon; D. L. McNamara-Perry; T. B. Schmidt; B. R. Wiegand