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Sample records for early puerperal complications

  1. Early complications. Chylothorax.

    PubMed

    Vallières, E; Karmy-Jones, R; Wood, D E

    1999-08-01

    Postpneumonectomy chylothorax is a very common but serious complication. Drainage of the pneumonectomy space, metabolic and nutritional support with TPN, and absolute enteral rest may lead to control of the leak. Failure of these measures to obtain a rapid resolution of the chyle losses should be followed by early surgical intervention in most instances in an effort to alleviate the chronic metabolic, nutritional, and immunological consequences of prolonged chyle losses. PMID:10459431

  2. Early complications with the holmium laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaghler, Marc A.; Stewart, Steven C.; Ruckle, Herbert C.; Poon, Michael W.

    1997-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to report early complications in our initial experience with the holmium laser in 133 patients. A retrospective study of patients undergoing endourological procedures with the holmium laser was performed. Complications included urinary tract infection (3), post-operative bradycardia (1), inverted T-waves (1), intractable flank pain (1), urinary retention (1), inability to access a lower pole calyx with a 365 micron fiber (9), stone migration (5), termination of procedure due to poor visualization (2). No ureteral perforations or strictures occurred. The holmium laser was capable of fragmenting all urinary calculi in this study. In our initial experience, the holmium laser is safe and effective in the treatment of genitourinary pathology. Use of laser fibers larger than 200 microns occasionally limit deflection into a lower pole or dependent calyx.

  3. The role of the Doran Building in puerperal fever in Canada.

    PubMed

    Low, James A

    2007-03-01

    The Doran Building at the Kingston General Hospital, opened in 1894, represents an early Canadian initiative to apply the principles of sanitation, antisepsis, and asepsis to prevent puerperal fever ina freestanding lying-in hospital. This initiative was a response to maternal mortality during the 17th and 18th centuries, when approximately half of maternal deaths were due to puerperal fever. During the 250 years leading up to 1890, an understanding of the clinical nature of puerperal fever, its cause, mode of spread, and means of prevention had gradually developed. Despite this progress, puerperal fever remained a major cause of maternal mortality in the latter part of the 19th century. The Doran Building is a compact example of a pavilion hospital,built as a freestanding facility for women and children, with its own staff. Kenneth Fenwick, who was Professor of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at Queen's University and a vigorous advocate of sanitation, antisepsis, and asepsis, established the principles of patient care in the Doran Building during the period 1894 to 1928.His goal was the prevention of maternal mortality due to puerperal fever. During this period, there was a modest increase in the number of deliveries each year to a total of 3111 by 1928. There were 26 direct and indirect maternal deaths, representing a maternal mortality rate of 8.25 per 1000 live births. Puerperal fever accounted for the deaths of three women: one who had delivered in hospital and two who had delivered in the community and had been admitted following delivery. The application of the principles of isolation, sanitation, antisepsis, and asepsis limited the mortality in hospital due to puerperal fever in a manner consistent with the best hospitals elsewhere at that time. PMID:17346491

  4. Phasic disappearance of left circumflex coronary artery from an early complication of mitral valve surgery

    PubMed Central

    Devabhaktuni, Subodh; Sunkara, Nirmal; Ahsan, Chowdhury

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message LV pseudoaneurysm can be a late complication of mitral valve replacement. In our case, it was an early postoperative complication. This pseudoaneurysm was causing compression of LCX artery during systole, leading to presentation of NSTEMI two weeks after the surgery. PMID:26576286

  5. Puerperal and intrapartum group A streptococcal infection.

    PubMed Central

    Anteby, E Y; Yagel, S; Hanoch, J; Shapiro, M; Moses, A E

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the demographic and clinical variables characteristic of non-epidemic intrapartum or puerperal group A streptococcal (GAS) infection. METHODS: The records of 47 patients diagnosed with intrapartum or puerperal GAS infection over a 6 1/2 year period at Hadassah-University Hospital-Mt. Scopus, Jerusalem were reviewed. Data regarding 25,811 women, the general population of women that delivered during that period, were obtained from their computerized medical records. Frequency distributions, t-test, chi-square, and Spearman's Rank Correlation were used, as appropriate, to analyze and compare demographic and clinical variables associated with development of GAS infection, its clinical course and subsequent development of septic shock. RESULTS: Mean age of mothers with GAS infection was higher than that of our general pregnant population (30.4 versus 27.4 years, P = 0.0019), and a higher proportion of GAS infected patients (30% versus 12%, P < 0.005) experienced PROM. Thirty-one (66%) women had fever as their sole presenting symptom, eight (17%) had fever and abdominal pain, seven (15%) had fever and abnormal vaginal bleeding, and one patient (2%) presented with a rash. Three patients (6%) developed a septic shock. Two of these patients presented with symptoms more than 14 days after delivery. CONCLUSIONS: We describe the characteristics of non-epidemic intrapartum or puerperal GAS infection. Data from our study and review of the literature suggest that some patients who develop septic shock may present later in the puerperium than patients with an uncomplicated GAS infection. PMID:10598916

  6. [Puerperal sepsis in the 19th century and Trendlenburg's ligature of the internal iliacal vein].

    PubMed

    Hach, W

    2007-05-01

    With the establishment of institutions for child delivery in city hospitals and with incorporation of routine autopsy into the field of activity of assistants at birth, childbed fever spread epidemically and was fatal in most cases. Nearly every third woman in childbed died of puerperal sepsis in the Hôtel Dieu in Paris and in the Erste Wiener Gebärklinik in Vienna. The tragic fate of obstetrician Ignaz Semmelweis began here, he recognized disease transmission from pus and body parts by physicians during the process of delivery. At the end of the 19(th) century puerperal sepsis occurred less frequently, its course was nevertheless equally dramatic. Pathophysiologically a septic thrombophlebitis of the ovarian vein was seen as the primary cause of the pyaemia. Yet, the ligature of the vessel did not alter the deadly course of the disease. Based on sections Trendlenburg realized that the internal iliacal vein plays a much greater role in protracted pyaemia. Thereupon he performed a ligature of this vessel. The long course of a complicated infection took a good turn with this operation. Trendlenburg's ligature and resection of the ovarian and internal iliacal vein were usually combined with hysterectomy. In the following decades this great operation of seriously ill women in childbed found agreement as well as rejection. Most interventions did not save the lives of the patients. Before antibiotic therapy was introduced, physicians were almost helpless against puerperal pyaemia. PMID:17479174

  7. Neonatal infected subgaleal hematoma: an unusual complication of early-onset E. coli sepsis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hung-Yang; Cheng, Kun-Shan; Liu, Yu-Peng; Hung, Hsiao-Fang; Fu, Hua-Wen

    2015-04-01

    Subgaleal hematoma (SGH) is an uncommon but potentially lethal medical emergency in newborns. Delay in diagnosis may lead to mortality and morbidity. Infection of an SGH is extremely rare. We report an infected SGH with abscess formation as a complication of early-onset Escherichia coli sepsis in a term neonate. The patient was discovered to have SGH soon after birth. Early-onset E. coli sepsis developed on Day 3 of life. The SGH became infected, with abscess formation 1 week later. The infected SGH was probably due to direct hematogenous spreading of sepsis. The patient was successfully treated without complications. Clinicians should be aware that SGH is a potential site of infection and infection may be caused either by direct hematogenous extension or from traumatic scalp lesions. Appropriate antibiotic treatment and surgical debridement are necessary when an infected SGH occurs. PMID:23597516

  8. [Role of local lymphatic stimulation in the prevention of early complications after stomach surgeries].

    PubMed

    Dzhumbaev, E S

    1993-12-01

    Experiments were conducted on 120 albino rats and 16 dogs with the use of scanning and electron microscopy as well as the radionuclide method of microcirculation study to substantiate the method of regional lymphostimulation after operations on the stomach for the prevention of early postoperative complications. Some lymphagogues (lidase, heparin, procaine hydrochloride) were infused in the early postoperative period through a catheter introduced into the hepatoduodenal ligament. This zone is represented by a large group of lymph nodes receiving lymph from the stomach and the adjacent organs and the intercellular space of the hepatoduodenal ligament. The study showed that lymphostimulation improves the circulation of lymph and blood which are disturbed as the result of the operation and improves the local homeokinesis in the wall of the stomach after its resection and vagotomy. Lymphostimulation increases the resorption and transport activity of the lymphatic system and improves drainage of the edema fluid and the products of disturbed metabolism from the interstitium of the gastric mucosa. The results of using the method of regional lymphostimulation in 441 patients after various operations on the stomach for peptic ulcer showed the possibility of reducing the number of early postoperative complications, such as inadequacy of the sutures of the gastroduodeno--entero--anastomosis, anastomositis, infectious-inflammatory complications, and others. PMID:8158953

  9. Early Enteral Feeding After Living Donor Liver Transplantation Prevents Infectious Complications: A Prospective Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Man; Joh, Jae-Won; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Sung-Hye; Rha, Miyong; Sinn, Dong Hyun; Choi, Gyu-Seong; Kwon, Choon Hyuck David; Cho, Young Yun; Suh, Jeong-Meen; Lee, Suk-Koo

    2015-11-01

    Infectious complications, including bacteria, virus, and fungus, often occur after liver transplantation and are the most frequent causes of in-hospital mortality. The current study prospectively analyze the effect of early enteral feeding in patients after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT)Between January 2013 and August 2013, 36 patients underwent LDLT. These patients were randomly assigned to receive enteral formula via nasointestinal feeding tubes [enteral feeding (EN) group, n?=?17] or maintenance on intravenous fluid until oral diets were initiated (control group, n?=?19). All patients completed the study.The pretransplant and perioperative characteristics of patients did not differ between the 2 groups. The incidence of bacterial infection was significantly lower in the EN group (29.4%) than in the control group (63.2%) (P?=?0.043). In addition, the incidence of bile duct complications in the EN group was lower than in the control group (5.9% versus 31.6%, P?=?0.041). Multivariate analysis showed that early enteral feeding was closely associated with bacterial infections (odds ratio, 0.178; P?=?0.041). There was no statistically significant difference in nutritional status between the 2 groups. There were no cases of in-hospital mortality.Early enteral feeding after LDLT prevents posttransplant bacterial infection, suggesting the possibility of a reduction of in-hospital mortality as a result of decreased infectious complications. PMID:26554774

  10. Obesity Increases Early Complications After High-Energy Pelvic and Acetabular Fractures.

    PubMed

    Morris, Brent Joseph; Richards, Justin Edward; Guillamondegui, Oscar Dean; Sweeney, Kyle Robert; Mir, Hassan Riaz; Obremskey, William Todd; Kregor, Philip James

    2015-10-01

    Elevated body mass index has been identified as a potential risk factor for complications in operatively treated pelvic trauma. Although obesity is an independent risk factor for morbidity and mortality following high-energy blunt force trauma, there is little information on the immediate complications following isolated pelvic and acetabular fractures in obese patients with trauma. The authors hypothesized that obesity (body mass index ?30 kg/m(2)) is a risk factor for complications in both operative and nonoperative pelvic and acetabular fractures. The authors conducted a 5-year retrospective data collection of all patients with isolated pelvic and acetabular fractures presenting to a Level I trauma center, excluding pediatric (age <18 years) patients, those with ballistic injuries, and those with concomitant long bone fractures or an Abbreviated Injury Scale score of greater than 2 in any other body region. Complications during the immediate hospitalization period were identified by the institution's Trauma Registry of the American College of Surgeons database, including wound infection, dehiscence, deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolus, pneumonia, and development of decubitus ulcers. Mean body mass index was 27.4±6.8 kg/m(2), with 68 (27.0%) obese patients. Mean body mass index of patients with complications was significantly higher (31.9±9.5 vs 27.0±6.5 kg/m(2); P=.001). Logistic regression showed that obesity was a significant risk factor for complications (odds ratio, 2.87; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-8.04), after adjusting for age (odds ratio, 1.03; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.06) and Injury Severity Score (odds ratio, 1.20; 95% confidence interval, 1.10-1.32). Obesity is associated with increasing complications following operative fixation of pelvic and acetabular fractures. However, it is important to recognize that even nonoperative management of pelvic and acetabular fractures in obese patients can have early complications. This study showed a significant obesity-related risk of complications after trauma in both operative and nonoperative pelvic injuries. [Orthopedics. 2015; 38(10):e881-e887.]. PMID:26488782

  11. Dental complications of rickets in early childhood: case report on 2 young girls.

    PubMed

    Davit-Béal, Tiphaine; Gabay, Julie; Antoniolli, Pauline; Masle-Farquhar, Jeanne; Wolikow, Maryse

    2014-04-01

    Vitamin D is an essential hormone for calcium gut absorption. It is also involved in child growth, cancer prevention, immune system responses, and tooth formation. Due to inadequate vitamin D intake and/or decreased sunlight exposure, vitamin D deficiency has resurfaced in developed countries despite known inexpensive and effective preventive methods. Vitamin D deficiency is a common cause of rickets, a condition that affects bone development in children and that can have serious dental complications. Deficiency during pregnancy can cause enamel hypoplasia of primary teeth. Enamel regeneration is currently impossible; hypoplasia is therefore irreversible, and once affected, teeth are prone to fast caries development. Deficiency during early childhood can affect permanent teeth and ensuing caries can sometimes lead to tooth loss at a young age. Oral manifestations of rickets should be diagnosed early by both physicians and dentists to prevent severe dental complications. This case study presents 2 young girls with rickets in early childhood who suffered from subsequent serious tooth decay. PMID:24616355

  12. Drug resistance and molecular epidemiology of aerobic bacteria isolated from puerperal infections in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Salma; Kawaguchiya, Mitsuyo; Ghosh, Souvik; Paul, Shyamal Kumar; Urushibara, Noriko; Mahmud, Chand; Nahar, Kamrun; Hossain, Mohammad Akram; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

    2015-06-01

    Puerperal infection is a common complication during postnatal period in developing countries. Bacterial species, drug resistance, and genetic characteristics were investigated for a total of 470 isolates from puerperal infections in Bangladesh for a 2-year period (2010-2012). The most common species was Escherichia coli (n=98), followed by Enterococcus faecalis (n=54), Staphylococcus haemolyticus (n=33), Proteus mirabilis (n=32), Staphylococcus aureus (n=27), Klebsiella pneumoniae (n=22), and Enterobacter cloacae (n=21). S. aureus and Acinetobacter baumannii were isolated at a higher frequency from wound infections after cesarean section, while E. coli, E. cloacae, and K. pneumoniae were isolated from community-acquired endometritis and urinary tract infections. Resistance to third-generation cephalosporins was frequent for Enterobacteriacae, and was mainly mediated by blaCTX-M-1 group beta-lactamases. The CTX-M gene in E. coli from the four phylogroups was identified as blaCTX-M-15, and phylogroup B2 isolates with blaCTX-M-15 were classified into ST131 with O25b allele, harboring aac(6')-Ib-cr and various virulence factors. Carbapenemase genes blaNDM-1 and blaNDM-7 were identified in one isolate each of phylogroup A E. coli. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolates had type IV or V SCCmec, including isolates of ST361 (CC672), which is related to an emerging ST672 clone in the Indian subcontinent. This study revealed the recent epidemiological status of aerobic bacteria causing puerperal infections in Bangladesh, providing useful information to improve clinical practice and infection control. PMID:25555043

  13. Early and Late Complications Related to Central Venous Catheters in Hematological Malignancies: a Retrospective Analysis of 1102 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Morano, Salvatore Giacomo; Coppola, Lorenzo; Latagliata, Roberto; Berneschi, Paola; Chistolini, Antonio; Micozzi, Alessandra; Girmenia, Corrado; Breccia, Massimo; Brunetti, Gregorio; Massaro, Fulvio; Rosa, Giovanni; Guerrisi, Pietro; Mandelli, Franco; Foà, Roberto; Alimena, Giuliana

    2014-01-01

    Several severe complications may be associated with the use of central venous catheters (CVC). We retrospectively evaluated on a large cohort of patients the incidence of CVC-related early and late complications. From 7/99 to 12/2005, 1102 CVC have been implanted at our Institution in 881 patients with hematological malignancies (142,202 total day number of implanted CVC). Early mechanic complications were 79 (7.2% - 0.55/1,000 days/CVC). Thirty-nine episodes of early infective complications (<1 week from CVC implant) occurred (3.5% - 0.3/1000 days/CVC): furthermore, 187 episodes of CVC-related sepsis (17% - 1.3/1000 days/CVC) were recorded. There were 29 episodes (2.6%) of symptomatic CVC-related thrombotic complications, with a median interval from CVC implant of 60 days (range 7 – 395). The rate of CVC withdrawal due to CVC-related complications was 26%. The incidence of CVC-related complications in our series is in the range reported in the literature notwithstanding cytopenia often coexisting in hematological patients. PMID:24678388

  14. Early and late complications related to central venous catheters in hematological malignancies: a retrospective analysis of 1102 patients.

    PubMed

    Morano, Salvatore Giacomo; Coppola, Lorenzo; Latagliata, Roberto; Berneschi, Paola; Chistolini, Antonio; Micozzi, Alessandra; Girmenia, Corrado; Breccia, Massimo; Brunetti, Gregorio; Massaro, Fulvio; Rosa, Giovanni; Guerrisi, Pietro; Mandelli, Franco; Foà, Roberto; Alimena, Giuliana

    2014-01-01

    Several severe complications may be associated with the use of central venous catheters (CVC). We retrospectively evaluated on a large cohort of patients the incidence of CVC-related early and late complications. From 7/99 to 12/2005, 1102 CVC have been implanted at our Institution in 881 patients with hematological malignancies (142,202 total day number of implanted CVC). Early mechanic complications were 79 (7.2% - 0.55/1,000 days/CVC). Thirty-nine episodes of early infective complications (<1 week from CVC implant) occurred (3.5% - 0.3/1000 days/CVC): furthermore, 187 episodes of CVC-related sepsis (17% - 1.3/1000 days/CVC) were recorded. There were 29 episodes (2.6%) of symptomatic CVC-related thrombotic complications, with a median interval from CVC implant of 60 days (range 7 - 395). The rate of CVC withdrawal due to CVC-related complications was 26%. The incidence of CVC-related complications in our series is in the range reported in the literature notwithstanding cytopenia often coexisting in hematological patients. PMID:24678388

  15. Early hospital readmission for gastrointestinal-related complications predicts long-term mortality after pancreatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Caitlin W.; Tosoian, Jeffrey J.; Craig-Schapiro, Rebecca; Valero, Vicente; Cameron, John L.; Eckhauser, Frederic E.; Hirose, Kenzo; Makary, Martin A.; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Ahuja, Nita; Weiss, Matthew J.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The purpose of this study was to investigate the prognostic significance of early (30-day) hospital readmission (EHR) on mortality after pancreatectomy. METHODS Using a prospectively collected institutional database linked with a statewide dataset, we evaluated the association between EHR and overall mortality in all patients undergoing pancreatectomy at our tertiary institution (2005 to 2010). RESULTS Of 595 pancreatectomy patients, EHR occurred in 21.5%. Overall mortality was 29.4% (median follow-up 22.7 months). Patients with EHR had decreased survival compared with those who were not readmitted (P = .011). On multivariate analysis adjusting for baseline group differences, EHR for gastrointestinal-related complications was a significant independent predictor of mortality (hazard ratio 2.30, P = .001). CONCLUSIONS In addition to known risk factors, 30-day readmission for gastrointestinal-related complications following pancreatectomy independently predicts increased mortality. Additional studies are necessary to identify surgical, medical, and social factors contributing to EHR, as well as interventions aimed at decreasing postpancreatectomy morbidity and mortality. PMID:26384793

  16. Intraoperative and early postoperative flap-related complications of laser in situ keratomileusis using two types of Moria microkeratomes.

    PubMed

    Karabela, Yunus; Muftuoglu, Orkun; Gulkilik, Ibrahim Gokhan; Kocabora, Mehmet Selim; Ozsutcu, Mustafa

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the incidence, management, and visual outcomes of intraoperative and early postoperative flap-related complications of laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) surgery using two types of Moria M2 microkeratomes. This retrospective analysis was performed on 806 primary LASIK cases. The intraoperative and early postoperative flap-related complications were identified and categorized according to type of Moria microkeratome. There were 52 intraoperative and early postoperative complications--one case of partial flap (0.124 %), one case of free flap (0.124 %), one case of small flap (0.124 %), 13 cases of epithelial defect (1.61 %), 12 cases of flap striae (1.49 %), 10 cases of diffuse lamellar keratitis (1.24 %), 10 cases of interface debris (1.24 %), three cases of epithelial ingrowth (0.37 %), and one case of microbial infection (0.124 %). The overall incidence of flap complications was 6.45 %. There were 27 right eye (6.73 %) and 25 left eye (6.17 %) complications. The incidence of complications with the Moria automated metallic head 130 microkeratome was 4.22 % and with the Moria single-use head 90 microkeratome was 2.23 %. We observed one culture-negative interface abscess which was cured with surgical cleaning and intensive medical treatment. The most common complication encountered was epithelial defects, followed by flap striae. Our study showed that LASIK with a microkeratome has a relatively low incidence of intraoperative and early postoperative flap complications. The authors have no financial interest in any of the issues contained in this article and have no proprietary interest in the development of marketing of or materials used in this study. PMID:24531872

  17. Early diagnosis of diabetic vascular complications: impairment of red blood cell deformability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Sehyun; Ku, Yunhee; Park, Cheol-Woo; Suh, Jang-Soo

    2006-02-01

    Reduced deformability of red blood cells (RBCs) may play an important role on the pathogenesis of chronic vascular complications of diabetes mellitus. However, available techniques for measuring RBC deformability often require washing process after each measurement, which is not optimal for day-to-day clinical use at point of care. The objectives of the present study are to develop a device and to delineate the correlation of impaired RBC deformability with diabetic nephropathy. We developed a disposable ektacytometry to measure RBC deformability, which adopted a laser diffraction technique and slit rheometry. The essential features of this design are its simplicity (ease of operation and no moving parts) and a disposable element which is in contact with the blood sample. We studied adult diabetic patients divided into three groups according to diabetic complications. Group I comprised 57 diabetic patients with normal renal function. Group II comprised 26 diabetic patients with chronic renal failure (CRF). Group III consisted of 30 diabetic subjects with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on hemodialysis. According to the renal function for the diabetic groups, matched non-diabetic groups were served as control. We found substantially impaired red blood cell deformability in those with normal renal function (group I) compared to non-diabetic control (P = 0.0005). As renal function decreases, an increased impairment in RBC deformability was found. Diabetic patients with chronic renal failure (group II) when compared to non-diabetic controls (CRF) had an apparently greater impairment in RBC deformability (P = 0.07). The non-diabetic cohort (CRF), on the other hand, manifested significant impairment in red blood cell deformability compared to healthy control (P = 0.0001). The newly developed slit ektacytometer can measure the RBC deformability with ease and accuracy. In addition, progressive impairment in cell deformability is associated with renal function loss in all patients regardless of the presence or absence of diabetes. In diabetic patients, early impairment in RBC deformability appears in patients with normal renal function.

  18. Hypertensive phase and early complications after Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation with intraoperative subtenon triamcinolone acetonide

    PubMed Central

    Turalba, Angela V; Pasquale, Louis R

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate intraoperative subtenon triamcinolone acetonide (TA) as an adjunct to Ahmed glaucoma valve (AGV) implantation. Design Retrospective comparative case series. Participants Forty-two consecutive cases of uncontrolled glaucoma undergoing AGV implantation: 19 eyes receiving intraoperative subtenon TA and 23 eyes that did not receive TA. Methods A retrospective chart review was performed on consecutive pseudophakic adult patients with uncontrolled glaucoma undergoing AGV with and without intraoperative subtenon TA injection by a single surgeon. Clinical data were collected from 42 eyes and analyzed for the first 6 months after surgery. Main outcome measures Primary outcomes included intraocular pressure (IOP) and number of glaucoma medications prior to and after AGV implantation. The hypertensive phase (HP) was defined as an IOP measurement of greater than 21 mmHg (with or without medications) during the 6-month postoperative period that was not a result of tube obstruction, retraction, or malfunction. Postoperative complications and visual acuity were analyzed as secondary outcome measures. Results Five out of 19 (26%) TA cases and 12 out of 23 (52%) non-TA cases developed the HP (P=0.027). Mean IOP (14.2±4.6 in TA cases versus [vs] 14.7±5.0 mmHg in non-TA cases; P=0.78), and number of glaucoma medications needed (1.8±1.3 in TA cases vs 1.6±1.1 in the comparison group; P=0.65) were similar between both groups at 6 months. Although rates of serious complications did not differ between the groups (13% in the TA group vs 16% in the non-TA group), early tube erosion (n=1) and bacterial endophthalmitis (n=1) were noted with TA but not in the non-TA group. Conclusions Subtenon TA injection during AGV implantation may decrease the occurrence of the HP but does not alter the ultimate IOP outcome and may pose increased risk of serious complications within the first 6 months of surgery. PMID:25050061

  19. Perioperative complications and early follow-up with 100 TVT-SECUR procedures.

    PubMed

    Neuman, Menahem

    2008-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the complications and early follow-up of the tension-free vaginal tape (TVT)-SECUR, a new minimally invasive anti-incontinence operative procedure. A prospective, observational, and consecutive patient series was conducted. Perioperative and 12-month postoperative data were prospectively collected for the first 50 patients against the next consecutive 50 patients, among which TVT-SECUR specific surgical measurements were adopted (Canadian Task Force classification 2). In private hospital operative theatres, the TVT-SECUR operation was performed. Patients with urodynamically proved stress urinary incontinence were enrolled in this study after detailed informed consent was given. The TVT-SECUR, in the hammock shape to mimic the TVT-obturator placement, yet with no skin incisions, required neither bladder catheterization nor intraoperative diagnostic cystoscopy. The clinical and surgical data of 100 consecutive patients with TVT-SECUR were collected prospectively. Two patients had urinary obstructions and needed surgical tape-tension relief. One patient had a 50 mL paravesical self-remitting hematoma. At the first-month postoperative follow-up appointment, the objective therapeutic failure rate for the TVT-SECUR procedure among the 50 patients was 20.0% (10 patients). But when the tape was placed close to the urethra with no space allowed in between, the failure rate in the second patient group went down to 8.0% (4 patients); yet no further postoperative bladder outlet obstruction was diagnosed. Four (8.0%) patients in the first group had vaginal wall penetration with the inserters, requiring withdrawal, reinsertion, and vaginal wall repair. This was avoided with the second patient group by facilitating the inserters' introduction by widening the submucosal tunnel to 12 mm. Six (12.0%) other patients in the first group needed postoperative trimming of a vaginally extruded tape segment, performed in the office with satisfactory results. This problem was addressed later by making the submucosal dissection deeper to avoid intimate proximity of the tape with the vaginal mucosa. Consequently the tape protrusion rate was reduced to 8% (4 patients). Five (10.0%) patients in the first group had unintended tape removal at the time of inserter removal, necessitating the use of a second TVT-SECUR. This was addressed by meticulous detachment of the inserter before its withdrawal, after which no further unintended tape displacements were recorded. No clinical signs for bowel, bladder, or urethral injuries; intraoperative bleeding; or postoperative infections were evident. Telephone interview at the end of 12 months postoperatively was completed with 44 (88.0%) of the first patient group and 46 (92%) of the second patient group. In all, 39 (88.6%) and 43 (93.5%) of the telephone-interviewed patients of the first and second groups, respectively, reported objective urinary continence. The TVT-SECUR, a new midurethral sling, was associated with early safety and efficacy problems. These were identified and rectified, to make the TVT-SECUR a safe and effective anti-incontinence procedure. Operative complications associated with the TVT, such as bladder penetration and postoperative outlet obstruction, and TVT-obturator complications, such as postoperative thigh pain and bladder outlet obstruction, may be reduced with the TVT-SECUR. The first 100 operations' cumulative data analysis yielded some insights, including the necessity of meticulous and proper dissection before placement of the tape and the need for applying minimal extra tension to the tape. However, long-term comparative data collection will be required to draw solid conclusions regarding the appropriate position of this operative technique within the spectrum of anti-incontinence operations. PMID:18539095

  20. The Association of Birth Complications and Externalizing Behavior in Early Adolescents: Direct and Mediating Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Jianghong; Raine, Adrian; Wuerker, Anne; Venables, Peter H.; Mednick, Sarnoff

    2009-01-01

    Prior studies have shown that birth complications interact with psychosocial risk factors in predisposing to increased externalizing behavior in childhood and criminal behavior in adulthood. However, little is known about the direct relationship between birth complications and externalizing behavior. Furthermore, the mechanism by which the birth…

  1. Early and late residual renal function and surgical complications in living donors: a 15-year experience at a single institution.

    PubMed

    Sansalone, C V; Maione, G; Aseni, P; Rossetti, O; Mangoni, I; Soldano, S; De Roberto, A; Minetti, M E; Perrino, M L; Civati, G

    2006-05-01

    Living donation in the field of renal transplantation has increased over time as well as the use of laparoscopic nephrectomy. We present a 15-year experience on 162 living donors (105 women, 57 men; mean age, 46.7 years; range, 31-74 years) who underwent nephrectomy using different surgical approaches as open lombotomic nephrectomy (OLN), open transperitoneal nephrectomy (OTN), and laparoscopic hand-assisted nephrectomy (LHAN). We collected data on residual donor and recipient renal function, as well as early versus late medical and surgical complications. With a mean follow-up of about 8 years, we observed normal residual renal function in all donors and similar results of early and late graft function independent of the surgical procedure. Long-term incidence of hypertension and noninsulin-dependent diabetes in living donors was similar to the general population. OLN and OTN donors showed higher incidences of early and late complications, readmissions, and reoperations than LHAN donors. Our results confirmed that living donor nephrectomy is a safe procedure without serious side effects in terms of renal function and long-term quality of life. LHAN should be the preferred technique because of a lower incidence of early and late complications. PMID:16757241

  2. Post-cesarean section puerperal morbidity. The incidence and risk factors at Srinagarind Hospital.

    PubMed

    Pothinam, S; Chanpoo, T; Lumbiganon, P

    1992-03-01

    We found that the incidence of post-cesarean puerperal morbidity at Srinagarind Hospital, Khon Kaen University was 5.5 per cent, which is very low compared to other reports. Statistically significant risk factors for post-cesarean puerperal morbidity included having less than 4 antenatal care visits, duration of labour longer than 12 hours and absence of prophylactic antibiotics. PMID:1506796

  3. Complexity, complicity and fluidity: early years provision in Tamil Nadu (India) 

    E-print Network

    Aruldoss, Vinnarasan

    2013-11-27

    Early years provision, which combines childcare and preschool education, has been considered vital for child development by theorists and practitioners. Within early years provision pedagogy is assumed to be both an ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Non-Puerperal Complete Uterine Inversion

    PubMed Central

    Mihmanli, Veli; Kilic, Fahrettin; Pul, Soner; Kilinc, Aydin; Kilickaya, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Uterine inversion is shortly described as the indentation and depression of the fundic area extending downwards up to the different levels of the birth canal till vaginal opening. Clinical diagnosis of uterine inversion is difficult due to its non-specific symptoms and physical examination. Ultrasonography is the most practical modality for radiological evaluation, but it is inadequate to determine the exact nature of this condition and making the differential diagnosis. In this case, we present the main MRI findings of non-puerperal complete uterine inversion caused by a giant leiomyoma. PMID:26715983

  5. Can Early Rehabilitation after Total Hip Arthroplasty Reduce Its Major Complications and Medical Expenses? Report from a Nationally Representative Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Chiung-Jui Su, Daniel; Yuan, Kuo-Shu; Weng, Shih-Feng; Hong, Rong-Bin; Wu, Ming-Ping; Wu, Hing-Man; Chou, Willy

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To investigate whether early rehabilitation reduces the occurrence of posttotal hip arthroplasty (THA) complications, adverse events, and medical expenses within one postoperative year. Method. We retrospectively retrieve data from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. Patients who had undergone THA during the period from 1998 to 2010 were recruited, matched for propensity scores, and divided into 2 groups: early rehabilitation (Early Rehab) and delayed rehabilitation (Delayed Rehab). Results. Eight hundred twenty of 999 THA patients given early rehabilitation treatments were matched to 205 of 233 THA patients given delayed rehabilitation treatments. The Delayed Rehab group had significantly (all p < 0.001) higher medical and rehabilitation expenses and more outpatient department (OPD) visits than the Early Rehab group. In addition, the Delayed Rehab group was associated with more prosthetic infection (odds ratio (OR): 3.152; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.211–8.203; p < 0.05) than the Early Rehab group. Conclusions. Early rehabilitation can significantly reduce the incidence of prosthetic infection, total rehabilitation expense, total medical expenses, and number of OPD visits within the first year after THA. PMID:26146625

  6. Early complications and late sequelae of induced abortion: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Edström, Karin G. B.

    1975-01-01

    An attempt to evaluate the recent literature on somatic complications of induced abortion shows that a great amount of data of widely varying quality has been collected. Many areas of research are still not covered in a way that permits valid conclusions to be drawn. Two important points emerge from the review: first, there is a need for uniform definitions of complications and some uniformity in the analysis of data collected; secondly, carefully selected control groups are needed in this kind of research. The areas most urgently requiring further study differ from country to country. From a global point of view, the existence or inexistence of significant late sequelae and the influence of the patient's health status on the complication rate seem to be of the highest priority. PMID:770027

  7. Treatment of Acute Puerperal Mastitis and Breast Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Cantlie, Helene Bertrand

    1988-01-01

    Mastitis is a benign infection of the breast if it is treated early. If two days elapse before treatment is started, it can lead to serious complications such as chronic or recurrent mastitis or breast abscess. Treatment consists in frequent nursing and massaging or stripping the breast to keep it empty of milk or pus, and appropriate antibiotics. Incision and drainage of a breast abscess can be done in the office under local anesthesia, and the drainage continued at home by the mother. PMID:21253250

  8. Performing Women’s Speech in Early Modern Drama: Troubling Silence, Complicating Voice 

    E-print Network

    Van Note, Beverly Marshall

    2012-10-19

    This dissertation attempts to fill a void in early modern English drama studies by offering an in-depth, cross-gendered comparative study emphasizing representations of women’s discursive agency. Such an examination ...

  9. [Portal thrombosis: early complication of azygo-portal disconnection in the treatment of bleeding esophageal varices].

    PubMed

    Chaib, E; Pugliesi, V; Capacci, M de L; D'Albuquerque, L C; Widman, A; Bernardini, A P; Silva, A de O; Saad, W A; Machado, M C; Pinotti, H W

    1990-01-01

    The authors studied 30 patients with bleeding from esophageal varices due to portal hypertension. They underwent the disconnection of portal and azygos veins and splenectomy. The immediate postoperative complications were: portal thrombosis in four patients (13.3%); subphrenic abscess in two (6.6%); pulmonary embolism in one (3.3%) and esophageal perforation in one (3.3%). The manifestations of portal thrombosis were ascites, and fever (without leukocytosis). One patient with portal thrombosis who had intractable ascite was submitted to peritoneovenous shunting. PMID:2133172

  10. Use of Inflated Foley Catheters to Prevent Early Empty Pelvis Complications Following Pelvic Exenteration.

    PubMed

    Bacalbasa, Nicolae; Tomescu, Dana; Balescu, Irina

    2015-10-01

    For most patients with bulky pelvic tumors, pelvic exenteration remains the only curative option. Although initially reported as a palliative procedure, nowadays it is rather performed with curative intent. Once the resectional phase is ended, a large defect will remain at the level of the pelvic diaphragm, predisposing to severe complications which are generically included under the name of empty pelvis syndrome. It has been widely demonstrated that this type of complication is associated with severe mortality, even if the patient is free of any pelvic recurrence. We present the case of a 56-year-old patient submitted to total pelvic exenteration for locally invasive previously chemo-irradiated cervical cancer who presented six months after surgery with a severe enteroperineal fistula. We decided to reoperate on the patient; intraoperatively we found recurrence on both pelvic walls and an enteroperineal fistula caused by tumoral invasion. We performed an intestinal resection with enteroenteral anastomosis. In order to isolate the intestinal loops from the unresectable pelvic recurrence, in the pelvis we placed three Foley catheters inflated with 60 ml of saline each, in order to hold the intestinal loops away from the pelvic wall. The postoperative course was uneventful. The urinary cathethers were removed after six weeks. PMID:26408723

  11. Early Percutaneous Cholecystostomy in Severe Acute Cholecystitis Reduces the Complication Rate and Duration of Hospital Stay

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Chung-Kai; Lee, Kuei-Chuan; Chan, Che-Chang; Perng, Chin-Lin; Chen, Chun-Ku; Fang, Wen-Liang; Lin, Han-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The optimal timing of percutaneous cholecystostomy for severe acute cholecystitis is unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the timing of percutaneous cholecystostomy and its relationship to clinical outcomes in patients with inoperable acute severe cholecystitis. From 2008 to 2010, 209 consecutive patients who were admitted to our hospital due to acute cholecystitis and were treated by percutaneous cholecystostomy were retrospectively reviewed. The time periods from symptom onset to when percutaneous cholecystostomy was performed and when patients were discharged were recorded. In the 209 patients, the median time period between symptom onset and percutaneous cholecystostomy was 23?hours (range, 3–95?hours). The early intervention group (?24?hours, n?=?109) had a significantly lower procedure-related bleeding rate (0.0% vs 5.0%, P?=?0.018) and shorter hospital stay (15.8?±?12.9 vs 21.0?±?17.5 days) as compared with the late intervention group (>24?hours, n?=?100). Delayed percutaneous cholecystostomy was a significant independent factor for a longer hospital stay (odds ratio 3.03, P?=?0.001). In inoperable patients with acute severe cholecystitis, early percutaneous cholecystostomy reduced hospital stay and procedure-related bleeding without increasing the mortality rate. PMID:26166097

  12. Uterine prolapse in pregnancy: risk factors, complications and management.

    PubMed

    Tsikouras, Panagiotis; Dafopoulos, Alexandros; Vrachnis, Nikolaos; Iliodromiti, Zoe; Bouchlariotou, Sofia; Pinidis, Petros; Tsagias, Nikolaos; Liberis, Vasileios; Galazios, Georgios; Von Tempelhoff, Georg Friedrich

    2014-02-01

    Presentation of uterine prolapse is a rare event in a pregnant woman, which can be pre-existent or else manifest in the course of pregnancy. Complications resulting from prolapse of the uterus in pregnancy vary from minor cervical infection to spontaneous abortion, and include preterm labor and maternal and fetal mortality as well as acute urinary retention and urinary tract infection. Moreover, affected women may be at particular risk of dystocia during labor that could necessitate emergency intervention for delivery. Recommendations regarding the management of this infrequent but potentially harmful condition are scarce and outdated. This review will examine the causative factors of uterine prolapse and the antepartum, intrapartum and puerperal complications that may arise from this condition as well as therapeutic options available to the obstetrician. While early recognition and appropriate prenatal management of uterine prolapse during pregnancy is imperative, implementation of conservative treatment modalities throughout pregnancy, these applied in accordance with the severity of the uterus prolapse and the patient's preference, may be sufficient to achieve uneventful pregnancy and normal, spontaneous delivery. PMID:23692627

  13. Correlation of early postoperative blood glucose levels with postoperative complications, hospital costs, and length of hospital stay in patients with gastrointestinal malignancies.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pei-ying; Lin, Ming-zhu; Wen, Jun-ping; Li, Xue-jun; Shi, Xiu-lin; Zhang, Hui-jie; Chen, Ning; Li, Xiao-ying; Yang, Shu-yu; Chen, Gang

    2015-02-01

    Early postoperative hyperglycemia in non-diabetic patients is an important risk factor affecting postoperative complications and mortality. This study aimed at investigating the effects of early postoperative hyperglycemia on postoperative complications, hospital costs, and length of hospital stay in non-diabetic patients with gastrointestinal malignancies; data of 1,015 non-diabetic patients with gastrointestinal malignancies, who underwent surgical intervention between January 2010 and January 2012, were retrospectively evaluated. Records on fasting plasma glucose (FPG), liver function, and kidney function were collected before and one day after surgery. Correlation of early postoperative FPG levels with postoperative complications, hospital costs, and length of hospital stay was further assessed in non-diabetic patients with gastrointestinal malignancies. One day after surgery, FPG results were significantly increased compared to preoperative values. FPG levels greater than or equal to 9.13 mmol/L (or 164.34 mg/dL) were associated with significant increases in the incidence of postoperative complications, length of hospital stay, and hospital costs. An association is shown between FPG and postoperative hyperglycemia in non-diabetic patients undergoing surgery for gastrointestinal malignancies. Significant increases in postoperative complications among these patients suggest that measurement of early postoperative FPG levels is critical to identify patients with postoperative hyperglycemia. PMID:24853883

  14. A comparison between early maternal and neonatal complications of restrictive episiotomy and routine episiotomy in primiparous vaginal delivery

    PubMed Central

    Shahraki, Azar Danesh; Aram, Shahnaz; Pourkabirian, Soodabeh; Khodaee, Sepideh; Choupannejad, Shekofeh

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Routine episiotomy is a controversial issue among gynecologists. The aim of this study was to compare early maternal and neonatal complications of restrictive episiotomy and routine episiotomy in primiparus vaginal delivery. METHODS: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, two groups of primiparus normal vaginal delivery (NVD) cases with routine and restrictive episiotomy were studied. Immediately and in the first 24 and 48 hours after delivery, specific charts were used to compare the two groups in terms of perineal laceration size, neonatal Apgar score and post-delivery. For data analysis, SPSS was used to conduct student t-test and Kruskal-Wallis test. A p-value < 0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS: Forty primiparus pregnant women were studied in each group. Episiotomy was performed in 7.5% of the restrictive group. Perineal laceration was measured as 3.68 ± 0.47 cm and 1.21 ± 1.1 in routine and restrictive episiotomy groups, respectively (p < 0.05). Intact perineum or first-degree laceration was seen in 80% of the restrictive group. However, second- and third-degree laceration were respectively observed in 75% and 15% of the routine episiotomy group (p < 0.05). Pain relief (immediately, 24 and 48 hours after delivery) was significantly higher in the restrictive group (p < 0.05). On the contrary, no significant difference in Apgar scores at the first and fifth minutes after birth was found between the two groups (p > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Restrictive episiotomy results in low maternal complications. Therefore, avoiding routine episiotomy in unnecessary conditions would increase the rate of intact perineal and minor perineal trauma and reduce postpartum delivery pain with no adverse effects neither on maternal nor neonatal morbidities. PMID:22973367

  15. Dose-Volume Histogram Predictors of Chronic Gastrointestinal Complications After Radical Hysterectomy and Postoperative Concurrent Nedaplatin-Based Chemoradiation Therapy for Early-Stage Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Mabuchi, Seiji; Konishi, Koji; Koizumi, Masahiko; Takahashi, Yutaka; Ogata, Toshiyuki; Division of Medical Physics, Oncology Center, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka ; Maruoka, Shintaroh; Kimura, Tadashi; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate dose-volume histogram (DVH) predictors for the development of chronic gastrointestinal (GI) complications in cervical cancer patients who underwent radical hysterectomy and postoperative concurrent nedaplatin-based chemoradiation therapy. Methods and Materials: This study analyzed 97 patients who underwent postoperative concurrent chemoradiation therapy. The organs at risk that were contoured were the small bowel loops, large bowel loop, and peritoneal cavity. DVH parameters subjected to analysis included the volumes of these organs receiving more than 15, 30, 40, and 45 Gy (V15-V45) and their mean dose. Associations between DVH parameters or clinical factors and the incidence of grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications were evaluated. Results: Of the clinical factors, smoking and low body mass index (BMI) (<22) were significantly associated with grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications. Also, patients with chronic GI complications had significantly greater V15-V45 volumes and higher mean dose of the small bowel loops compared with those without GI complications. In contrast, no parameters for the large bowel loop or peritoneal cavity were significantly associated with GI complications. Results of the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis led to the conclusion that V15-V45 of the small bowel loops has high accuracy for prediction of GI complications. Among these parameters, V40 gave the highest area under the ROC curve. Finally, multivariate analysis was performed with V40 of the small bowel loops and 2 other clinical parameters that were judged to be potential risk factors for chronic GI complications: BMI and smoking. Of these 3 parameters, V40 of the small bowel loops and smoking emerged as independent predictors of chronic GI complications. Conclusions: DVH parameters of the small bowel loops may serve as predictors of grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications after postoperative concurrent nedaplatin-based chemoradiation therapy for early-stage cervical cancer.

  16. Association Between Early Helicobacter pylori Eradication and a Lower Risk of Recurrent Complicated Peptic Ulcers in End-Stage Renal Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shen-Shong; Hu, Hsiao-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract End-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients exhibit an increased incidence of peptic ulcer disease. Helicobacter pylori plays a central role in the development of peptic ulcers. The effect of early H pylori eradication on the recurrence of complicated peptic ulcer disease in ESRD patients remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to explore whether early H pylori eradication therapy in ESRD patients can reduce the risk of recurrent complicated peptic ulcers. We conducted a population-based cohort study and recruited patients with ESRD who had developed peptic ulcers. We categorized patients into early (time lag ?120 days after peptic ulcer diagnosis) and late H pylori eradication therapy groups. The Cox proportional hazards model was used. The endpoint was based on hospitalization for complicated recurrent peptic ulcers. The early and late H pylori eradication therapy groups consisted of 2406 and 1356 ESRD patients, respectively, in a time lag of 120 days. After adjusting for possible confounders, the early eradication group exhibited a lower rate of complicated recurrent peptic ulcer disease (hazard ratio [HR]?=?0.76, 95% confidence interval [CI]?=?0.64–0.91, P?=?0.003) in a time lag of ?120 days, but a similar rate of complicated recurrent peptic ulcer disease in time lags of ?1 year (HR?=?0.97, 95% CI 0.79–1.19, P?=?0.758) and 2 years (HR?=?1.11, 95% CI 0.86–1.44, P?=?0.433) compared with the late eradication group. We recommend administering H pylori eradication within 120 days after peptic ulcer diagnosis to H pylori infected ESRD patients who have developed peptic ulcers. PMID:25569660

  17. Early Postoperative Complications following Gracilis Free Muscle Transfer for Facial Reanimation: A Systematic Review and Pooled Data Analysis.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Ryan M; Gosain, Arun K; Zenn, Michael R; Marcus, Jeffrey R

    2015-10-01

    Background?Multiple studies have detailed promising smile restoration following gracilis free muscle transfer for facial reanimation but information detailing the potential complications is lacking. The aim of this study is to systematically review the literature to evaluate the reported complication rate associated with this procedure. We also aim to determine the most common occurring complications. Methods?The PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science databases were queried with multiple search strategies for published articles between January 1950 and February 2013 that detailed gracilis free muscle transfer for facial reanimation. Title, abstract, and full text review was performed. Complications were defined as any reported, identifiable adverse outcome that required an alteration in treatment for correction. Results?The literature search yielded 62 studies of gracilis free muscle transfer for facial reanimation. Overall, 36 articles (58%) reported whether or not a complication had occurred. The overall complication rate based on pooled proportions was 9.6% and the most commonly occurring complications were postoperative hematoma (3.6%) and infection (3.5%). Conclusions?Our data suggests that complications after gracilis free muscle transfer for facial reanimation may be underreported and this complex procedure may in fact be associated with significant adverse outcomes as high as 9.6%. PMID:26220430

  18. Observational study on the efficacy of the supplementation with a preparation with several minerals and vitamins in improving mood and behaviour of healthy puerperal women.

    PubMed

    Paoletti, Anna Maria; Orrù, Marisa Margherita; Marotto, Maria Francesca; Pilloni, Monica; Zedda, Pierina; Fais, Maria Francesca; Piras, Bruno; Piano, Camilla; Pala, Silvia; Lello, Stefano; Coghe, Ferdinando; Sorge, Roberto; Melis, Gian Benedetto

    2013-08-01

    We investigated whether a formulation containing vitamins and minerals (vit&min) could improve the worsening of mood changes occurring after delivery ("a.d."). The study was performed in 552 healthy non-anaemic puerperal women ("p.w") without risk factors for puerperal depression ("p.d"). They were at their first full-term pregnancy, and spontaneously delivered healthy newborns. The Edinburgh Depression Postnatal scale (EPDS) evaluates the psychological status of "p.w". EPDS was administered the 3rd (visit 1), 15th (visit 2) and 30th (visit 3) day "a.d.". An EPDS >12 indicates a major susceptibility to "p.d". At the same time intervals, haemoglobin, iron and ferritin (haematological parameters) levels were evaluated. After visit 1, the subjects were randomized to vit&min treatment (group A; N.274) or to calcium/vitamin D3 treatment (group B; N.278). In both groups haematological parameters significantly increased without differences between the groups. EPDS score improved in both groups, but in the group A, the EPDS decrease was significantly larger (p < 0.05) in comparison to the group B. This effect is mainly evident in subjects with a basal EPDS ? 12. An early examination of psychological condition could select "p.w." with a high susceptibility to neuronal changes occurring postpartum. Vit&min favourably modulates brain functions antagonizing the evolution to "p.d". PMID:23782001

  19. Management of late preterm and early-term pregnancies complicated by mild gestational hypertension/pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Sibai, Baha M

    2011-10-01

    Gestational hypertension/pre-eclampsia is the most frequent obstetrical complication, complicating 26%-29% of all gestations in nulliparous women. In general, the diagnosis of mild gestational hypertension/pre-eclampsia is made at 38 weeks or more in approximately 80% of cases. For many years, the optimal timing of delivery for patients with mild gestational hypertension/pre-eclampsia at 37-0/7 to 39-6/7 weeks was unclear. Recently, investigators of the HYPITAT (Pregnancy-induced hypertension and pre-eclampsia after 36 weeks: induction of labor versus expectant monitoring: A comparison of maternal and neonatal outcome, maternal quality of life and costs) randomized trial evaluated maternal and neonatal complications in patients at 36-40 weeks' gestation who were randomized to either induction of labor or expectant monitoring. The results of this trial revealed that induction of labor at or after 37-0 weeks was associated with lower rate of maternal complications without increased rates of either cesarean delivery or neonatal complications. In contrast, the optimum management for those with mild hypertension/pre-eclampsia with stable maternal and fetal conditions at 34-0/7 to 36-6/7 weeks remains uncertain. Therefore, there is urgent need for research to evaluate the reasons for late preterm birth in such women as well as for a randomized trial to evaluate the optimal timing for delivery in such patients. PMID:21962629

  20. Rare complication of ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Early onset of distal catheter migration into scrotum in an adult male: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bryan S.; Vadera, Sumeet; Gonzalez-Martinez, Jorge A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The role of shunt placement is to divert cerebrospinal fluid from within the ventricles to an alternative location in the setting of hydrocephalus. One of the rare shunt complications is distal catheter migration, and various body sites have been reported, including the scrotum. Although cases of scrotal migration of distal catheter have been reported in pediatric patients, cases in adult patients are rare due to obliterated processus vaginalis. Furthermore, there has not been a case reported for scrotal migration in an adult at an early onset. Presentation of case 65-year-old male underwent shunt placement for normal-pressure hydrocephalus-like symptoms. On post-operative day seven patient developed right testicular edema, for which ultrasound was performed, revealing hydrocele along with the presence of distal catheter in the scrotum. On post-operative day nine patient underwent distal catheter trimming via laparoscopic approach with general surgery, with post-operative imaging showing satisfactory location of distal catheter in the peritoneal cavity. Discussion/Conclusion Early onset of distal catheter migration into scrotum in an adult male is a unique case, as most cases are reported in pediatric patients, and it is the first case reported in the English literature to have occurrence at an early onset during the peri-operative period. As our case demonstrates, early occurrence and detection of scrotal migration of the distal catheter prevent shunt malfunction. Prompt surgical management of catheter repositioning is therefore recommended to avoid the risk of further complications. PMID:25553524

  1. Surgical Anatomy, Transperitoneal Approach, and Early Postoperative Complications of a Ventral Lumbar Spine Surgical Model in Lewis Rats

    PubMed Central

    Damle, Sheela R; Krzyzanowska, Agata; Frawley, Robert J; Cunningham, Matthew E

    2013-01-01

    Surgical models in animals are used extensively to study small molecules and devices for lumbar intervertebral disc repair, replacement, and fusion. Although the ventral lumbar animal models themselves are well described, critical assessment of morbidity and mortality avoidance when using the models have not been reported. Hypothesizing that technique modifications and the relative prevalence and severity of complications would be correlated, we collected and examined peri- and postoperative data stratified by surgical technique. We here report complications associated with the transperitoneal approach to the lumbar spine in 268 Lewis rats and offer data-driven suggestions regarding complication avoidance through technique modification. Compared with wider exposure, limiting the width of exposure to a maximum of 3 mm resulted in fewer neurologic complications in the lower limbs. In addition, avoiding extracorporeal reflection of the small intestine during the exposure was associated with lower incidence of postoperative gastrointestinal distress and fewer situations requiring euthanasia. These findings underscore the importance of detailed approaches in minimizing postoperative morbidity and attrition in surgical models. PMID:24210017

  2. Taxonomic map of the schizophrenias, with special reference to puerperal psychosis.

    PubMed Central

    Hays, P

    1978-01-01

    Data collected by a single observer on 147 schizophrenic patients were subjected to clustering analysis. The results produced the hypothesis that schizophrenic illnesses directly after childbirth are a separate disease entity. This hypothesis was not disproved by experimental testing. Several disease entities may be included in the term schizophrenia. If this is so, the methods used in generating and testing the hypothesis that puerperal schizophrenia is a separate disease may provide a systematic method of classifying the various illnesses. PMID:698707

  3. Bacteriological and cytological findings during the late puerperal period after two different treatments of retained placenta followed by acute puerperal metritis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the effect of two acute puerperal metritis (APM) treatment protocols on uterine condition during the late puerperal period (5th to 7th week). Late gestation healthy cows (n = 21) were divided randomly in three equal groups. Parturitions were induced. Treatments of APM were started on the third day postpartum (PP). Group A was treated with an oxytocin analogue carbetocin for three days and intrauterine administration of cephapirin between days 15 and 17. Group B was given intramuscular injection of ceftiofur for five days followed by two injections of prostaglandin F2?, at an interval of 12 h, on the eighth day PP. Group C served as the control group with no treatment. Body temperature was recorded daily for 14 days PP. Uterine biopsies for bacteriology, and uterobrush samples for cytology, were taken once a week from the 5th to 7th week postpartum. No differences were found in body temperature on day 14 PP, presence of bacteriological infections and disappearance of uterine inflammatory signs diagnosed by cytological examination between experimental groups. PMID:20550666

  4. Bacteriological and cytological findings during the late puerperal period after two different treatments of retained placenta followed by acute puerperal metritis.

    PubMed

    Jeremejeva, Julia; Orro, Toomas; Valdmann, Merle; Kask, Kalle

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the effect of two acute puerperal metritis (APM) treatment protocols on uterine condition during the late puerperal period (5th to 7th week). Late gestation healthy cows (n = 21) were divided randomly in three equal groups. Parturitions were induced. Treatments of APM were started on the third day postpartum (PP). Group A was treated with an oxytocin analogue carbetocin for three days and intrauterine administration of cephapirin between days 15 and 17. Group B was given intramuscular injection of ceftiofur for five days followed by two injections of prostaglandin F2alpha, at an interval of 12 h, on the eighth day PP. Group C served as the control group with no treatment. Body temperature was recorded daily for 14 days PP. Uterine biopsies for bacteriology, and uterobrush samples for cytology, were taken once a week from the 5th to 7th week postpartum. No differences were found in body temperature on day 14 PP, presence of bacteriological infections and disappearance of uterine inflammatory signs diagnosed by cytological examination between experimental groups. PMID:20550666

  5. Patient-related independent clinical risk factors for early complications following Nd: YAG laser resection of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Perin, Branislav; Zaric, Bojan; Jovanovic, Svetlana; Matijasevic, Jovan; Stanic, Jelena; Kopitovic, Ivan; Zvezdin, Biljana; Antonic, Milan

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser resection is one of the most established interventional pulmonology techniques for immediate debulking of malignant central airway obstruction (CAO). The major aim of this study was to investigate the complication rate and identify clinical risk factors for complications in patients with advanced lung cancer. METHODS: In the period from January 2006 to January 2011, data sufficient for analysis were identified in 464 patients. Nd:YAG laser resection due to malignant CAO was performed in all patients. The procedure was carried out in general anesthesia. Complications after laser resection were defined as severe hypoxemia, global respiratory failure, arrhythmia requiring treatment, hemoptysis, pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum, pulmonary edema, tracheoesophageal fistulae, and death. Risk factors were defined as acute myocardial infarction within 6 months before treatment, hypertension, chronic arrhythmia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), stabilized cardiomyopathy, previous external beam radiotherapy, previous chemotherapy, and previous interventional pulmonology treatment. RESULTS: There was 76.1% male and 23.9% female patients in the study, 76.5% were current smokers, 17.2% former smokers, and 6.3% of nonsmokers. The majority of patients had squamous cell lung cancer (70%), small cell lung cancer was identified in 18.3%, adenocarcinoma in 3.4%, and metastases from lung primary in 8.2%. The overall complication rate was 8.4%. Statistically significant risk factors were age (P = 0.001), current smoking status (P = 0.012), arterial hypertension (P < 0.0001), chronic arrhythmia (P = 0.034), COPD (P < 0.0001), and stabilized cardiomyopathy (P < 0.0001). Independent clinical risk factors were age over 60 years (P = 0.026), arterial hypertension (P < 0.0001), and COPD (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: Closer monitoring of patients with identified risk factors is advisable prior and immediately after laser resection. In order to avoid or minimize complications, special attention should be directed toward patients who are current smokers, over 60 years of age, with arterial hypertension or COPD. PMID:23189101

  6. EMR is not inferior to ESD for early Barrett's and EGJ neoplasia: An extensive review on outcome, recurrence and complication rates.

    PubMed

    Komeda, Yoriaki; Bruno, Marco; Koch, Arjun

    2014-06-01

    Background and study aims In recent years, it has been reported that early Barrett's and esophagogastric junction (EGJ) neoplasia can be effectively and safely treated using endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). Multiband mucosectomy (MBM) appears to be the safest EMR method. The aim of this systematic review is to assess the safety and efficacy of MBM compared with ESD for the treatment of early neoplasia in Barrett's or at the EGJ. Methods A literature review of studies published up to May 2013 on EMR and ESD for early Barrett's esophagus (BE) neoplasia and adenocarcinoma at the EGJ was performed through MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library. Results on outcome parameters such as number of curative resections, complications and procedure times are compared and reported. Results A total of 16 studies met the inclusion criteria for analysis in this study. There were no significant differences in recurrence rates when comparing EMR (10/380, 2.6?%) to ESD (1/333, 0.7?%) (OR 8.55; 95?%CI, 0.91?-?80.0, P?=?0.06). All recurrences after EMR were treated with additional endoscopic resection. The risks of delayed bleeding, perforation and stricture rates in both groups were similar. The procedure was considerably less time-consuming in the EMR group (mean time 36.7?min, 95?%CI, 34.5?-?38.9) than in the ESD group (mean time 83.3?min, 95?%CI, 57.4?-?109.2). Conclusions The MBM technique for EMR is as effective as ESD when comparing outcomes related to recurrence and complication rates for the treatment of early Barrett's or EGJ neoplasia. The MBM technique is considerably less time-consuming. PMID:26135261

  7. EMR is not inferior to ESD for early Barrett’s and EGJ neoplasia: An extensive review on outcome, recurrence and complication rates

    PubMed Central

    Komeda, Yoriaki; Bruno, Marco; Koch, Arjun

    2014-01-01

    Background and study aims In recent years, it has been reported that early Barrett’s and esophagogastric junction (EGJ) neoplasia can be effectively and safely treated using endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). Multiband mucosectomy (MBM) appears to be the safest EMR method. The aim of this systematic review is to assess the safety and efficacy of MBM compared with ESD for the treatment of early neoplasia in Barrett’s or at the EGJ. Methods A literature review of studies published up to May 2013 on EMR and ESD for early Barrett’s esophagus (BE) neoplasia and adenocarcinoma at the EGJ was performed through MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library. Results on outcome parameters such as number of curative resections, complications and procedure times are compared and reported. Results A total of 16 studies met the inclusion criteria for analysis in this study. There were no significant differences in recurrence rates when comparing EMR (10/380, 2.6?%) to ESD (1/333, 0.7?%) (OR 8.55; 95?%CI, 0.91?–?80.0, P?=?0.06). All recurrences after EMR were treated with additional endoscopic resection. The risks of delayed bleeding, perforation and stricture rates in both groups were similar. The procedure was considerably less time-consuming in the EMR group (mean time 36.7?min, 95?%CI, 34.5?–?38.9) than in the ESD group (mean time 83.3?min, 95?%CI, 57.4?–?109.2). Conclusions The MBM technique for EMR is as effective as ESD when comparing outcomes related to recurrence and complication rates for the treatment of early Barrett’s or EGJ neoplasia. The MBM technique is considerably less time-consuming. PMID:26135261

  8. Obstetric Outcome in Early and Late Onset Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Easmin, S; Chowdhury, T A; Islam, M R; Beg, A; Jahan, M K; Latif, T; Dhar, S; Alam, M N; Akhter, M

    2015-07-01

    Obstetric outcome in early onset and late onset GDM was compared in a prospective study conducted at the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology in BIRDEM, Dhaka, Bangladesh. A total 120 pregnant women were recruited purposively for the study in which 60 were early onset GDM and 60 were late onset GDM during study period of January 2008 to December 2009. Patients were followed up in different periods of gestation, during delivery and early postpartum period & findings were compared between two groups. BMI & family history of diabetes were significantly higher in early GDM group (p<0.05). Evidence of increased glycaemia was observed in early GDM group & difference of glycaemic status was statistically significant (p<0.05). Insulin was needed in 85% of early onset GDM and 55% in late onset GDM. There was also significant difference (p<0.05). In this study, 23.3% of early onset GDM group developed pre-eclampsia while in late onset GDM it was 10% and was statistically significant (p<0.05). Regarding intrapartum & postpartum complications - perineal tear, PPH wound infection, puerperal sepsis were more in early onset than late onset GDM group with no significant difference. Regarding foetal outcome, 8.3% early GDM group delivered asphyxiated baby in comparison to 3.3% in late GDM group. Twenty percent (20%) of early onset GDM group had to admit their babies in neonatal unit while in late onset group it was 5%. There was significant difference between two groups (p<0.05). Neonatal hypoglycaemia was also statistically significantly (p<0.05) higher in early GDM group. Neonatal hyper-bilirubinaemia, RDS, perinatal death was more in early onset GDM subjects. Early onset GDM subjects are high risk subgroup & have significant deleterious effect on maternal and perinatal outcome than late GDM groups. PMID:26329938

  9. Comparison of Propofol and Ketamine versus Propofol and Fentanyl for Puerperal Sterilization, A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Cherian, Anusha; Balachander, Hemavathi; Kumar C, Yashavantha

    2014-01-01

    Background: Puerperal sterilization requires a rapid recovery of the mother so that she can take care of her child. Propofol with fentanyl (PF) is an option, but is associated with intraoperative hypotension, respiratory depression and an unsatisfactory postoperative recovery profile. Propofol with ketamine (PK) appears to be an alternative in terms of haemodynamic stability and analgesia. Materials and Methods: This randomized clinical trial involved 60 patients who were scheduled to undergo puerperal sterilization, who belonged to American society of anaesthesiologists (ASA) physical status 1. Patients were randomly allocated to receive either ketamine – propofol infusion in a concentration of 8mg/ml each (group PK) or fentanyl 2?g/kg intravenously, followed by an infusion of propofol in a concentration of 8mg/ml (group PF). In both the groups, the infusion was started at 300ml/hr till patient lost consciousness. Subsequently, the rate was set at 1.5ml/kg/hr for group PF and at 0.75ml/kg/hr for group PK. After the initial 10 minutes, the infusion rate was reduced to 1ml/kg/hr for group PF and to 0.5ml/kg/hr for group PK. Blood pressure and saturation were the primary outcomes which were measured. Results: Patients from group PF recorded a significant drop in the systolic blood pressure from the 5th minute, in diastolic pressure from the 10th minute and transient oxygen desaturation, as compared to group PK. Patients in group PK had adequate surgical conditions and better recovery profiles in terms of pain and sedation. Conclusion: The combination of ketamine and propofol is a safe and possibly superior alternative to propofol – fentanyl combination in patients who undergo puerperal sterilization, in terms of haemodynamic stability and respiratory depression. PMID:24995191

  10. Difference in the rate of rectal complications following prostate brachytherapy based on the prostate-rectum distance and the prostate longitudinal length among early prostate cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Moon Hyung; Yu, Young Dong; Shin, Hyun Soo; Oh, Jong Jin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the difference in rectal complications rate following prostate low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy based on prostate-rectum distance and prostate longitudinal length among early prostate cancer patients. Materials and Methods From March 2008 to February 2013, 245 prostate cancer patients with a Gleason score ?7 were treated with 125-I LDR brachytherapy. Among them, 178 patients with prostate volume 20-35 mL and a follow-up period ?6 months were evaluated for radiation proctitis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed for a prebrachytherapy evaluation, and prostate-rectum distance and prostate longitudinal length were measured. The radiation proctitis was confirmed and graded via colonoscopy based on the radiation therapy oncology group (RTOG) toxicity criteria. Results Twenty-three patients received a colonoscopy for proctitis evaluation, and 12 were identified as grade 1 on the RTOG scale. Nine patients were diagnosed as grade 2 and 2 patients were grade 3. No patient developed grade 4 proctitis. The rectal-complication group had a mean prostate-rectum distance of 2.51±0.16 mm, while non-rectal-complication control group had 3.32±0.31 mm. The grade 1 proctitis patients had a mean prostate-rectum distance of 2.80±0.15 mm, which was significantly longer than 2.12±0.31 mm of grades 2 and 3 patient groups (p=0.045). All 11 patients of grades 2 and 3 had a prostate longitudinal length of 35.22±2.50 mm, which was longer than group 1, but the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.214). Conclusions As the prostate-rectum distance increased, fewer postimplantation rectal symptoms were observed. Patients with a shorter prostate-rectum distance in MRI should receive modified implantation techniques or radical prostatectomy. PMID:26366276

  11. Complications of nephrotic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Park, Se Jin

    2011-01-01

    Nephrotic syndrome (NS) is one of the most common glomerular diseases that affect children. Renal histology reveals the presence of minimal change nephrotic syndrome (MCNS) in more than 80% of these patients. Most patients with MCNS have favorable outcomes without complications. However, a few of these children have lesions of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, suffer from severe and prolonged proteinuria, and are at high risk for complications. Complications of NS are divided into two categories: disease-associated and drug-related complications. Disease-associated complications include infections (e.g., peritonitis, sepsis, cellulitis, and chicken pox), thromboembolism (e.g., venous thromboembolism and pulmonary embolism), hypovolemic crisis (e.g., abdominal pain, tachycardia, and hypotension), cardiovascular problems (e.g., hyperlipidemia), acute renal failure, anemia, and others (e.g., hypothyroidism, hypocalcemia, bone disease, and intussusception). The main pathomechanism of disease-associated complications originates from the large loss of plasma proteins in the urine of nephrotic children. The majority of children with MCNS who respond to treatment with corticosteroids or cytotoxic agents have smaller and milder complications than those with steroid-resistant NS. Corticosteroids, alkylating agents, cyclosporin A, and mycophenolate mofetil have often been used to treat NS, and these drugs have treatment-related complications. Early detection and appropriate treatment of these complications will improve outcomes for patients with NS. PMID:22087198

  12. Knowledge of symptoms and signs of puerperal sepsis in a community in north-eastern Nigeria: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Yahaya, S J; Bukar, M

    2013-02-01

    Puerperal sepsis is a leading cause of mortality in developing countries. The objective of this study is to determine the knowledge of symptoms and signs of puerperal sepsis. It was a cross-sectional community-based study. Of the 400 respondents interviewed, 289 (72.2%) were between the ages of 20 and 39 years, and most, 374 (93.5%), were married. Only 14 (3.5%) had tertiary education. Most respondents, 224 (56.0%) were farmers and grandmultiparae accounted for 187 (46.7%). A reassuring number of respondents, 265 (66.3%), knew that fever with abnormal vaginal discharge; 252 (63%) fever with foul smelling lochia; 346 (86.4%) fever occurring with lower abdominal pain and 182 (45.5%) knew that fever occurring with prolonged flow of lochia, are all indicators of puerperal sepsis. A total of 53% of respondents were not aware of the causes of puerperal sepsis; 10% believed it is caused by evil spirits. The knowledge of the causes of puerperal sepsis is poor. There is the need to put more emphasis on the causes of puerperal sepsis during antenatal health talks. This could help reduce morbidity and mortality associated with puerperal sepsis. PMID:23445137

  13. A retrospective analysis of early and late term complications in patients who underwent application of retention sutures for gastrointestinal tract malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Bayraktar, Bar??; Özemir, ?brahim Ali; Sa??ro?lu, Julide; Demiral, Gökhan; Çelik, Yahya; Aslan, Sinan; Tombalak, Ercüment; Y?lmaz, Ahmet; Yi?itba??, Rafet

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Complications associated with wound healing after abdominal tumor operations continue to be a significant problem. This study aimed to determine the significance of retention sutures in preventing these complications. For this purpose, early and late term results of patients who underwent application of polydioxanone (PDS) and additional retention sutures for abdominal closure were retrospectively evaluated. Material and Methods: Clinical files of 172 patients who were operated due to gastrointestinal tract malignancies in our clinic between January 2007 and January 2011 were retrospectively analyzed. Patients in whom the fascia was repaired only with PDS (Group 1) were compared to patients in whom the fascia was repaired with PDS and retention sutures (Group 2) in terms of age, gender, postoperative evisceration-wound infection (<1 month), incisional hernia (>1 month), incision type, co-morbid factors, and operative time. Results: There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of age or gender (p=0.680 and p=0.763). No significant difference was detected in terms of postoperative incisional hernia (p=0.064). Evisceration and post-operative wound infection were significantly lower in Group 2 as compared to Group 1 (p=0.008 and p=0.002). Operative time was significantly longer in Group 1 than in Group 2 (p<0.0001). Co-morbid features were significantly higher in Group 2 than in Group 1 (p<0.0001). There were no significant differences between the groups in terms of incision type (p=0.743). Conclusion: In the presence of co-morbid factors that disrupt wound healing in surgical patients with gastrointestinal malignancy, retention suture can be safely used as a supplement for optimal wound care. PMID:25931939

  14. Foot Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... your feet or toes may also cause problems. Neuropathy Although it can hurt, diabetic nerve damage can ... Diabetes Forecast® magazine: cc-feet-and-hands-peripheral-neuropathy, In this section Living With Diabetes Complications Skin ...

  15. Hepatic transplantation: postoperative complications.

    PubMed

    Itri, Jason N; Heller, Matthew T; Tublin, Mitchell E

    2013-12-01

    Advances in surgical techniques and immunosuppression have made orthotopic liver transplantation a first-line treatment for many patients with end-stage liver disease. The early detection and treatment of postoperative complications has contributed significantly to improved graft and patient survival with imaging playing a critical role in detection. Complications that can lead to graft failure or patient mortality include vascular abnormalities, biliary abnormalities, allograft rejection, and recurrent or post-transplant malignancy. Vascular abnormalities include stenosis and thrombosis of the hepatic artery, portal vein, and inferior vena cava, as well as hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm, arteriovenous fistula, and celiac stenosis. Biliary abnormalities include strictures, bile leak, obstruction, recurrent disease, and infection. While imaging is not used to diagnose allograft rejection, it plays an important role in identifying complications that can mimic rejection. Ultrasound is routinely performed as the initial imaging modality for the detection and follow-up of both early and delayed complications. Cholangiography and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography are used to characterize biliary complications and computed tomography is used to confirm abnormal findings on ultrasound or for the evaluation of postoperative collections. The purpose of this article is to describe and illustrate the imaging appearances and management of complications associated with liver transplantation. PMID:23644931

  16. Ocular complications of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Sayin, Nihat; Kara, Necip; Pekel, Gökhan

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a important health problem that induces ernestful complications and it causes significant morbidity owing to specific microvascular complications such as, retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy, and macrovascular complications such as, ischaemic heart disease, and peripheral vasculopathy. It can affect children, young people and adults and is becoming more common. Ocular complications associated with DM are progressive and rapidly becoming the world’s most significant cause of morbidity and are preventable with early detection and timely treatment. This review provides an overview of five main ocular complications associated with DM, diabetic retinopathy and papillopathy, cataract, glaucoma, and ocular surface diseases. PMID:25685281

  17. Early-switch/early-discharge opportunities for hospitalized patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus complicated skin and soft tissue infections: proof of concept in the United Arab Emirates

    PubMed Central

    El Houfi, Ashraf; Javed, Nadeem; Solem, Caitlyn T; Macahilig, Cynthia; Stephens, Jennifer M; Raghubir, Nirvana; Chambers, Richard; Li, Jim Z; Haider, Seema

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To describe real-world treatment patterns and health care resource use and to estimate opportunities for early-switch (ES) from intravenous (IV) to oral (PO) antibiotics and early-discharge (ED) for patients hospitalized in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) complicated skin and soft tissue infections. Methods This retrospective observational medical chart review study enrolled physicians from four UAE sites to collect data for 24 patients with documented MRSA complicated skin and soft tissue infections, hospitalized between July 2010 and June 2011, and discharged alive by July 2011. Data include clinical characteristics and outcomes, hospital length of stay (LOS), MRSA-targeted IV and PO antibiotic use, and ES and ED eligibility using literature-based and expert-validated criteria. Results Five included patients (20.8%) were switched from IV to PO antibiotics while being inpatients. Actual length of MRSA-active treatment was 10.8±7.0 days, with 9.8±6.6 days of IV therapy. Patients were hospitalized for a mean 13.9±9.3 days. The most frequent initial MRSA-active therapies used were vancomycin (37.5%), linezolid (16.7%), and clindamycin (16.7%). Eight patients were discharged with MRSA-active antibiotics, with linezolid prescribed most frequently (n=3; 37.5%). Fifteen patients (62.5%) met ES criteria and potentially could have discontinued IV therapy 8.3±6.0 days sooner, and eight (33.3%) met ED criteria and potentially could have been discharged 10.9±5.8 days earlier. Conclusion While approximately one-fifth of patients were switched from IV to PO antibiotics in the UAE, there were clear opportunities for further optimization of health care resource use. Over half of UAE patients hospitalized for MRSA complicated skin and soft tissue infections could be eligible for ES, with one-third eligible for ED opportunities, resulting in substantial potential for reductions in IV days and bed days. PMID:26124673

  18. Antibiotic treatment patterns across Europe in patients with complicated skin and soft-tissue infections due to meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: a plea for implementation of early switch and early discharge criteria.

    PubMed

    Eckmann, Christian; Lawson, Wendy; Nathwani, Dilip; Solem, Caitlyn T; Stephens, Jennifer M; Macahilig, Cynthia; Simoneau, Damien; Hajek, Petr; Charbonneau, Claudie; Chambers, Richard; Li, Jim Z; Haider, Seema

    2014-07-01

    This retrospective observational medical chart review aimed to describe country-specific variations across Europe in real-world meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) complicated skin and soft-tissue infection (cSSTI) treatment patterns, antibiotic stewardship activity, and potential opportunities for early switch (ES) from intravenous (i.v.) to oral formulations and early discharge (ED) from hospital using standardised data collection and criteria and economic implications of these opportunities. Patients were randomly sampled from 12 countries (Austria, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain and the UK), aged ?18 years, with documented MRSA cSSTI, hospitalised between 1 July 2010 and 30 June 2011, discharged alive by 31 July 2011. Of 1502 patients, 1468 received MRSA-targeted therapy. Intravenous-to-oral switch rates ranged from 2.0% to 20.2%, i.v. length of therapy from 10.1 to 18.6 days and hospital length of stay (LoS) from 15.2 to 25.0 days across Europe. Of 341 sites, 82.9% had antibiotic steering committees, 23.7% had i.v.-to-oral switch antibiotic protocols and 12.9% had ED protocols for MRSA cSSTI. ES and ED eligibility ranged from 12.0% (Slovakia) to 56.3% (Greece) and from 10% (Slovakia) to 48.2% (Portugal), respectively. Potential cost savings per ED-eligible patient ranged from €414 (Slovakia) to €2703 (France). MRSA cSSTI treatment patterns varied widely across countries, but further reductions in i.v. therapy, hospital LoS and associated costs could be realised. These data provide insight into clinical practice patterns across diverse European healthcare systems and identify potential opportunities for local clinicians and policy-makers to improve clinical care and cost-effectiveness of this therapeutic area. PMID:24928311

  19. Thrombophilia and Pregnancy Complications

    PubMed Central

    Simcox, Louise E.; Ormesher, Laura; Tower, Clare; Greer, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of strong evidence associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes and thrombophilia in pregnancy. These problems include both early (recurrent miscarriage) and late placental vascular-mediated problems (fetal loss, pre-eclampsia, placental abruption and intra-uterine growth restriction). Due to poor quality case-control and cohort study designs, there is often an increase in the relative risk of these complications associated with thrombophilia, particularly recurrent early pregnancy loss, late fetal loss and pre-eclampsia, but the absolute risk remains very small. It appears that low-molecular weight heparin has other benefits on the placental vascular system besides its anticoagulant properties. Its use is in the context of antiphospholipid syndrome and recurrent pregnancy loss and also in women with implantation failure to improve live birth rates. There is currently no role for low-molecular weight heparin to prevent late placental-mediated complications in patients with inherited thrombophilia and this may be due to small patient numbers in the studies involved in summarising the evidence. There is potential for low-molecular weight heparin to improve pregnancy outcomes in women with prior severe vascular complications of pregnancy such as early-onset intra-uterine growth restriction and pre-eclampsia but further high quality randomised controlled trials are required to answer this question. PMID:26633369

  20. Successful Reduction of Acute Puerperal Uterine Inversion with the Use of a Bakri Postpartum Balloon

    PubMed Central

    Ida, Akinori; Ito, Koichi; Kubota, Yoko; Nosaka, Maiko; Kato, Hiroshi; Tsuji, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Uterine inversion is a state wherein the endometrial surface is inverted. Although this condition may be observed in nonpregnant women, it most commonly develops at the time of delivery. In the present case, a 37-year-old woman without any remarkable history developed acute puerperal uterine inversion after the successful induction of labor. Following the delivery, she complained twice of severe lower abdominal pain; subsequently, hemorrhage was noted at the site of partial detachment of the placenta. These findings led to a diagnosis of placenta accreta, and the patient developed a state of shock. A Bakri postpartum balloon was inserted into the uterine cavity under ultrasonographic guidance and was filled with physiological saline for treatment of this condition. With this procedure, the uterine inversion was completely reduced and the hemorrhage was stopped. Moreover, no reinversion was observed in the postoperative period. These findings suggest that a Bakri postpartum balloon can be used to noninvasively reduce uterine inversion and prevent its recurrence. PMID:25954560

  1. Cardiovascular Complications of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Gongora, Maria Carolina; Wenger, Nanette K.

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy causes significant metabolic and hemodynamic changes in a woman’s physiology to allow for fetal growth. The inability to adapt to these changes might result in the development of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (hypertension, preeclampsia or eclampsia), gestational diabetes and preterm birth. Contrary to previous beliefs these complications are not limited to the pregnancy period and may leave permanent vascular and metabolic damage. There is in addition, a direct association between these disorders and increased risk of future cardiovascular disease (CVD, including hypertension, ischemic heart disease, heart failure and stroke) and diabetes mellitus. Despite abundant evidence of this association, women who present with these complications of pregnancy do not receive adequate postpartum follow up and counseling regarding their increased risk of future CVD. The postpartum period in these women represents a unique opportunity to intervene with lifestyle modifications designed to reduce the development of premature cardiovascular complications. In some cases it allows early diagnosis and treatment of chronic hypertension or diabetes mellitus. The awareness of this relationship is growing in the medical community, especially among obstetricians and primary care physicians, who play a pivotal role in detecting these complications and assuring appropriate follow up. PMID:26473833

  2. Orbital Complications of Sinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Radovani, Pjerin; Vasili, Dritan; Xhelili, Mirela; Dervishi, Julian

    2013-01-01

    Background: Despite the modern antibiotherapies applied in the practice of otorhinolaryngology, the orbital complications of sinusitis are still considered a serious threat to essential functions of the eye, including loss of vision, and at worst, life threatening symptoms. Aims: The goal of this study is to consider and analyse patients who were treated for these complications in the last decade in our hospital, which is the only tertiary hospital in our country. Study Design: Retrospective analysis of cases. Methods: In our practice, cases treated in the hospital are rhinosinusitis cases where surgical intervention is necessary, or those with a suspicion of complications. Between the years 1999 and 2009 there were 177 cases, the clinical charts of which were reviewed. The cases that are omitted from this study are those involving soft tissues, bone, and intracranial complications. The diagnoses were determined based on anamnesis, anterior rhinoscopy, x-rays of the sinuses with the Water’s projection or where there was a suspicion of a complication, and CT scans with coronal and axial projections. In all cases, intensive treatment was initiated with a combination of cefalosporines, aminoglycosides and Proetz manoeuvre. When an improvement in the conditions did not occur within 24–48 hours, we intervened with a surgical procedure, preferably the Lynch-Patterson external frontoethmoidectomy. Results: In our study, we encountered 35 cases (19.8%) of orbital complications with an average age of 25 (range: 3–75); Palpebral inflammatory oedema (15), orbital cellulitis (10), subperiosteal abscess (6), orbital abscess (3), and cavernous sinus thrombosis (1 patient). The average time that patients remained in hospital was 4.6 days; for those with orbital complications this was 7 days. Conclusion: Orbital complications of sinusitis are considered to be severe pathologies. The appearance of oedema in the corner of the eye should be evaluated immediately and the means to exclude acute sinusitis should be taken under serious consideration. Early diagnosis and aggressive treatment are key to the reduction of these unwanted manifestations. PMID:25207092

  3. Neurological Complications of Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Jerry Clay

    2015-12-01

    Obesity has attained pandemic proportions, and bariatric surgery is increasingly being employed resulting in turn to more neurological complications which must be recognized and managed. Neurological complications may result from mechanical or inflammatory mechanisms but primarily result from micro-nutritional deficiencies. Vitamin B12, thiamine, and copper constitute the most frequent deficiencies. Neurological complications may occur at reasonably predictable times after bariatric surgery and are associated with the type of surgery used. During the early post-operative period, compressive or stretch peripheral nerve injury, rhabdomyolysis, Wernicke's encephalopathy, and inflammatory polyradiculoneuropathy may occur. Late complications ensue after months to years and include combined system degeneration (vitamin B12 deficiency) and hypocupric myelopathy. Bariatric surgery patients require careful nutritional follow-up with routine monitoring of micronutrients at 6 weeks and 3, 6, and 12 months post-operatively and then annually after surgery and multivitamin supplementation for life. Sustained vigilance for common and rare neurological complications is essential. PMID:26493558

  4. Cabergoline for suppression of puerperal lactation in a prevention of mother-to-child HIV-transmission programme in rural Malawi.

    PubMed

    Buhendwa, L; Zachariah, R; Teck, R; Massaquoi, M; Kazima, J; Firmenich, P; Harries, A D

    2008-01-01

    This study shows that cabergoline (single oral-dose) is an acceptable, safe and effective drug for suppressing puerperal lactation. It could be of operational benefit not only for artificial feeding, but also for weaning in those that breast-feed within preventive mother-to-child HIV transmission programmes in resource-limited settings. PMID:18302861

  5. Pregnancy Complications/Health Problems Complication Explanation

    E-print Network

    Stromswold, Karin

    1 Pregnancy Complications/Health Problems Complication Explanation Preterm Labor Labor that starts and uterine tenderness. Gestational Diabetes Pregnancy induced high blood sugar. Diabetes that begins in pregnancy and goes away after delivery. Preeclampsia (hypertension) Pregnancy induced high blood pressure

  6. Complications of Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Katzen, Barry T. MacLean, Alexandra A.

    2006-12-15

    The endovascular procedure for repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms has had an enormous impact on the treatment of this challenging disease. Complications, however, do occur and it is important to have a thorough understanding of the array of complications and appropriate management strategies. In this review of endovascular complications, we describe early and late complications paying particular attention to preventive, treatment and surveillance strategies.

  7. A rare stoma-related complication: parastomal evisceration.

    PubMed

    Yucel, Ahmet Fikret; Pergel, Ahmet; Aydin, Ibrahim; Sahin, Dursun Ali

    2014-04-01

    Defunctioning stoma is a commonly used colorectal surgical procedures. The stomal complications recorded are usually classified as early and late complications. Parastomal hernia is a common complication of stomal surgery. We present a very rare stoma-related complication developed after parastomal hernia and described parastomal evisceration. PMID:24891785

  8. Neurological complications of childhood leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, R H; Marshall, W C; Chessells, J M

    1977-01-01

    We have reviewed the neurological complications not directly attributable to leukaemic infiltration in a group of 438 children with leukaemia or lymphoma. 61 children had one or more complications due chiefly to bleeding, infection, or drug toxicity. Early death from intracranial haemorrhage occurred in 1% of children with lymphoblastic leukaemia and 7% of children with myeloblastic leukaemia. Measles and chicken pox were the most serious infective complications; one child remains severely retarded after presumed measles encephalitis, one child with chicken pox died, and a second remains disabled. 2 additional cases of measles encephalitis and one of progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy are described. Drugs which caused neurotoxicity included vincristine, cytosine arabinoside, L-asparaginase, and phenothiazines, but most problems were caused by methotrexate. Methotrexate toxicity was more prevalent and more serious in children who had had previous central nervous system leukaemia. We conclude that viral infections and methotrexate pose the greatest neurological hazards to children with leukaemia. PMID:596922

  9. Rare complications of cesarean scar

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Divyesh; Kang, Mandeep; Sandhu, Manavjit Singh; Jain, Vanita; Kalra, Naveen; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2013-01-01

    Cesarean scar pregnancy (CSP) and cesarean scar dehiscence (CSD) are the most dreaded complications of cesarean scar (CS). As the incidence of CS is increasing worldwide, so is the incidence of CSP, especially in cases with assisted reproduction techniques. It is of utmost importance to diagnose CSP in the early first trimester, as it can lead to myometrial rupture with fatal outcome. On the other hand, CSD may be encountered during pregnancy or in the postpartum period. CSD in the postpartum period is very rare and can cause secondary postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) leading to increased maternal morbidity or even death if not diagnosed and managed promptly. Both complications can be diagnosed on ultrasonography (USG) and confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These two conditions carry high morbidity and mortality. In this article, we highlight the role of imaging in the early diagnosis and management of these conditions. PMID:24347858

  10. Severe complications of herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Volpi, Antonio

    2007-09-01

    The usual presentation of herpes zoster is as a self-limiting vesicular rash, often accompanied by post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN), its most common complication. However, herpes zoster can give rise to other complications, many of which have unusual presentations and serious sequelae. The incidence and burden of many of these less common complications are poorly understood. Ocular complications of ophthalmic zoster are relatively frequent but, with early antiviral therapy, need not be sight-threatening. Delayed contralateral hemiparesis is a rare complication of ophthalmic zoster that may present as stroke, temporally remote from the zoster episode. Ramsay Hunt syndrome is caused by reactivation of varicella zoster virus (VZV) involving the facial nerve; facial paralysis, ear pain and vesicles in the ear are diagnostic. Facial paralysis in the absence of vesicles may indicate zoster sine herpete, which can be mistaken for Bell's palsy. Herpetic facial palsies may respond to combination therapy with an antiviral plus steroid, but further research is needed to determine the benefit of such treatments. PMID:17939894

  11. Skin Complications of IBD

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Home > Resources > Skin Complications of IBD Go Back Skin Complications of IBD Email Print + Share After arthritis, ... about 5% of people with inflammatory bowel disease. SKIN DISORDERS COMMONLY SEEN IN IBD ERHTHEMA NODOSUM The ...

  12. Eye Complications in IBD

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Home > Resources > Eye Complications in IBD Go Back Eye Complications in IBD Email Print + Share Approximately 10% ... doctor’s attention sooner rather than later. TYPES OF EYE DISORDERS UVEITIS One of the most common eye ...

  13. Neurological Complications of AIDS

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Find People About NINDS NINDS Neurological Complications of AIDS Information Page Feature Federal domestic HIV/AIDS information ... resources from MedlinePlus What are Neurological Complications of AIDS? AIDS is primarily an immune system disorder caused ...

  14. Periprocedural complications in endovascular stroke treatment.

    PubMed

    Akpinar, Suha H; Yilmaz, Guliz

    2016-01-01

    Endovascular stroke treatment is a neurointerventional emergency where the main goal is the early recanalization of the occlusion within the critical time window, as safely as possible. Although the time window and rate of complications for endovascular stroke treatment differ with anterior and posterior circulation strokes, awareness of potential periprocedural complications is important, as they affect patient morbidity and mortality. Periprocedural complications are classified as haemorrhagic complications, procedure-/device-related, puncture site complications, and late-onset events including vascular stenosis. We present the digital subtraction angiography and CT imaging findings related to these complications in a study of 56 stroke patients, as they relate to previous findings in the literature. PMID:26529228

  15. Chronic complications of spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Sezer, Nebahat; Akku?, Selami; U?urlu, Fatma Gülçin

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a serious medical condition that causes functional, psychological and socioeconomic disorder. Therefore, patients with SCI experience significant impairments in various aspects of their life. The goals of rehabilitation and other treatment approaches in SCI are to improve functional level, decrease secondary morbidity and enhance health-related quality of life. Acute and long-term secondary medical complications are common in patients with SCI. However, chronic complications especially further negatively impact on patients’ functional independence and quality of life. Therefore, prevention, early diagnosis and treatment of chronic secondary complications in patients with SCI is critical for limiting these complications, improving survival, community participation and health-related quality of life. The management of secondary chronic complications of SCI is also important for SCI specialists, families and caregivers as well as patients. In this paper, we review data about common secondary long-term complications after SCI, including respiratory complications, cardiovascular complications, urinary and bowel complications, spasticity, pain syndromes, pressure ulcers, osteoporosis and bone fractures. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of risk factors, signs, symptoms, prevention and treatment approaches for secondary long-term complications in patients with SCI. PMID:25621208

  16. [Diagnosis and treatment of complications of selective proximal vagotomy].

    PubMed

    Rzaev, N M; Seidov, V D; Rustamov, E A

    1993-09-01

    The authors analyse the causes of 170 (38.3%) complications which occurred after 435 interventions for selective proximal vagotomy (SPV) with or without a stomach-draining operation. Specific complications were encountered in 31.9% and unspecific complications in 7.0% of cases. Intraoperative complications happened in 6 (3.6%) patients who had complications after vagotomy, early complications--in 54 (31.5%), and late complications--in 79 (46.8%) patients. The main causes of the specific complications were technical faults in performing SPV, disorder of gastric secretory, motor-evacuation, and barrier activity due to incomplete, inadequate vagotomy. Inadequate drainage and disorders of the immune system and dietary regimen, gastroduodenal reflux are conducive to the development of complications after SPV. Reconstructive-restorative operations and resection of the stomach are the operations of choice in organic complications after SPV and produce good late-term results. PMID:8283852

  17. Facial Filler Complications.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Julie; Khan, Tanya; Martin, John

    2015-11-01

    The use of facial fillers has greatly expanded over the past several years. Along with increased use comes a rise in documented complications, ranging from poor cosmetic result to nodules, granulomas, necrosis, and blindness. Awareness of the potential types of complications and options for management, in addition to the underlying facial anatomy, are imperative to delivering the best patient care. This article defines the complications and how to treat them and provides suggestions to avoid serious adverse outcomes. PMID:26505541

  18. Neurologic Complications in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Cuero, Mauricio Ruiz; Varelas, Panayiotis N

    2016-01-01

    Pregnant women are subject to the same complications as the general population, as well to specific neurologic complications associated with pregnancy, such as preeclampsia or eclampsia. The hormonal and physiologic changes during pregnancy lead to altered incidences of these complications, which usually present during the late period of pregnancy, labor, or the puerperium. In addition, the treatment of these conditions is different from that of nonpregnant women, because special attention is paid to avoid any abnormalities or death of the fetus. This article discusses the most common of these neurologic complications. PMID:26600443

  19. Retroperitoneal haemorrhage and neuropathy complicating anticoagulant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Curry, P. V. L.; Bacon, P. A.

    1974-01-01

    Nine cases of retroperitoneal haemorrhage complicating anticoagulant therapy are reported. Six cases were receiving heparin for myocardial infarction: an incidence of 4·3% of patients on such treatment. All the cases presented with pain, six had neurological involvement and one patient died. The incidence of this complication is higher than previously noted. Retroperitoneal haemorrhage requires a high index of clinical suspicion for early diagnosis and treatment if serious sequaelae are to be prevented. PMID:4464499

  20. Does uterine gauze packing increase the risk of puerperal morbidity in the management of postpartum hemorrhage during caesarean section: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yu-Na; Ma, Jue; Wang, Xiao-Jin; Wang, Bing-Shun

    2015-01-01

    Background: To compare the outcomes especially the puerperal morbidity of uterine gauze packing (UGP) with those of uterine balloon tamponade (UBT) in the management of postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) during caesarean section (c-section). Methods: It was considered success as no requirement for either a further therapy or hysterectomy for PPH. The postpartum infection risk was pragmatically measured as puerperal morbidity. Results: The identified PPH subjects were subdivided into two groups for comparison, in which UGP or UBT was used as second-line therapy for women undergoing c-sections between January 2010 and September 2014. Of the 318 c-section subjects initially treated by basic managements for expected PPH, 99 cases underwent UGP and 66 UBT as the second-line therapies to stop persistent bleeding. The success rates of the UGP and UBT groups were 90.91 and 87.88%, respectively. Only one patient in UBT group resorted to hysterectomy. The respective rates of puerperal morbidity were 10.10 and 13.64%, with risk ratio of 0.74 (95% CI: 0.32, 1.72). There were no significant differences between the two groups even after the adjustment for potential confounding factors. Conclusion: UGP appears to be effective in treating PPH during c-section without an observed increase in the risk of potential postpartum infection when compared with UBT. UGP could be recommended as routine for patients who are not responding to conventional basic therapies in addressing PPH, along with the provision of appropriate training. PMID:26550320

  1. Amniocentesis: indications and complications.

    PubMed

    Vrettos, A S; Koliopoulos, C; Panayotou, P P

    1975-02-01

    Transabdominal amniocentesis is described and our experience with this method is presented. No severe maternal complications were recorded. In two cases accidental puncture of fetal blood vessels in pregnancies over 40 weeks led to delivery by cesarean section. We believe that, although fetal complications are rare, the indications for amniocentesis should be significant enough to discount the hazards of the procedure. PMID:1116906

  2. UCD Diabetes Complications Research Centre

    E-print Network

    UCD Diabetes Complications Research Centre The UCD Diabetes Complications Research Centre (DCRC) investigates the microvascular complications of diabetes. Our work focuses on identifying novel drivers innovative therapeutic paradigms and biomarkers. Diabetes Complications Research Centre The DCRC comprises

  3. Management of postoperative complications: general approach.

    PubMed

    Sanguineti, V Ana; Wild, Jason R; Fain, Mindy J

    2014-05-01

    The goal of postoperative management is to promote early mobility and avoid postoperative complications, recognizing the potentially devastating impact of complications on elderly patients with hip fracture. The recommended approach involves early mobilization; freedom from tethers (indwelling urinary catheters and other devices); effective pain control; treating malnutrition; preventing pressure ulcers; reducing risk for pulmonary, urinary, and wound infections; and managing cognition. This carefully structured and patient-centered management provides older, vulnerable patients their best chance of returning to their previous level of functioning as quickly and safety as possible. PMID:24721365

  4. Management of complicated duodenal diverticula.

    PubMed

    Oukachbi, N; Brouzes, S

    2013-06-01

    The duodenum is the second most common location of intestinal diverticula after the colon. Duodenal diverticulum (DD) is usually located in the second portion of the duodenum (D2), close to the papilla. Most duodenal diverticula are extraluminal and acquired rather than congenital; more rare is the congenital, intraluminal diverticulum. DD is usually asymptomatic and discovered incidentally, but can become symptomatic in 1% to 5% of cases when complicated by gastroduodenal, biliary and/or pancreatic obstruction, by perforation or by hemorrhage. Endoscopic treatment is the most common first-line treatment for biliopancreatic complications caused by juxtapapillary diverticula and also for bleeding. Conservative treatment of perforated DD based on fasting and broad-spectrum antibiotics may be offered in some selected cases when diagnosis is made early in stable patients, or in elderly patients with comorbidities who are poor operative candidates. Surgical treatment is currently reserved for failure of endoscopic or conservative treatment. The main postoperative complication of diverticulectomy is duodenal leak or fistula, which carries up to a 30% mortality rate. PMID:23810155

  5. Complications of Pathologic Myopia.

    PubMed

    Cho, Bum-Joo; Shin, Joo Young; Yu, Hyeong Gon

    2016-01-01

    Pathologic myopia (PM) is one of the leading causes of visual impairment worldwide. The pathophysiology of PM is not fully understood, but the axial elongation of the eye followed by chorioretinal thinning is suggested as a key mechanism. Pathologic myopia may lead to many complications such as chorioretinal atrophy, foveoschisis, choroidal neovascularization, rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, cataract, and glaucoma. Some complications affect visual acuity significantly, showing poor visual prognosis. This article aims to review the types, pathophysiology, treatment, and visual outcome of the complications of PM. PMID:26649982

  6. Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... friendly Fact Sheet Pertussis Vaccination Pregnancy and Whooping Cough Clinicians Disease Specifics Treatment Clinical Features Clinical Complications ...

  7. Dental Implant Complications.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Kevin; Delfini, Ronald H; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants have increased in the last few decades thus increasing the number of complications. Since many of these complications are easily diagnosed on postsurgical images, it is important for radiologists to be familiar with them and to be able to recognize and diagnose them. Radiologists should also have a basic understanding of their treatment. In a pictorial fashion, this article will present the basic complications of dental implants which we have divided into three general categories: biomechanical overload, infection or inflammation, and other causes. Examples of implant fracture, loosening, infection, inflammation from subgingival cement, failure of bone and soft tissue preservation, injury to surround structures, and other complications will be discussed as well as their common imaging appearances and treatment. Lastly, we will review pertinent dental anatomy and important structures that are vital for radiologists to evaluate in postoperative oral cavity imaging. PMID:26589696

  8. Complications of Mumps

    MedlinePLUS

    ... IgM Serology Publications and Resources MMWR Articles Outbreak Articles Related Links World Health Organization Medline Plus Complications of Mumps Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ...

  9. Management of medical complications.

    PubMed

    Dohle, Carolin I; Reding, Michael J

    2011-06-01

    Medical comorbidities and complications are expected following stroke, traumatic brain injury, and spinal cord injury. The neurorehabilitation physician's role is to manage these comorbidities, prevent complications, and serve as a medical and neurologic resource for the patient, family, and neurorehabilitation team. The most common comorbidities are similar to those found in the general population, namely hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, and ischemic heart disease. Frequent complications encountered in the neurorehabilitation unit relate to medication side effects, medical comorbidities, and the direct effect of the neurologic injury. They include orthostatic hypotension; syncope or presyncope; cardiac arrhythmia; bowel and bladder dysfunction; seizures; pressure sores; dysphagia-related pneumonia, dehydration, and malnutrition; venous thromboembolism; falls; and sexual dysfunction. This article discusses strategies for managing comorbidities and avoiding complications. PMID:22810865

  10. Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... but some less serious ones occur more frequently. Kidney stones These are probably the most commonly encountered kidney complications of IBD—particularly oxalate stones. Kidney stones are more common in Crohn's patients with disease ...

  11. Pregnancy Complications: Bacterial Vaginosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Global Map Premature birth report card Careers Archives Pregnancy Before or between pregnancies Nutrition, weight & fitness Prenatal ... complications > Bacterial vaginosis and pregnancy Bacterial vaginosis and pregnancy Now playing: E-mail to a friend Please ...

  12. Complications of shoulder dystocia.

    PubMed

    Dajani, Nafisa K; Magann, Everett F

    2014-06-01

    Complications of shoulder dystocia are divided into fetal and maternal. Fetal brachial plexus injury (BPI) is the most common fetal complication occurring in 4-40% of cases. BPI has also been reported in abdominal deliveries and in deliveries not complicated by shoulder dystocia. Fractures of the fetal humerus and clavicle occur in about 10.6% of cases of shoulder dystocia and usually heal with no sequel. Hypoxic ischemic brain injury is reported in 0.5-23% of cases of shoulder dystocia. The risk correlates with the duration of head-to-body delivery and is especially increased when the duration is >5 min. Fetal death is rare and is reported in 0.4% of cases. Maternal complications of shoulder dystocia include post-partum hemorrhage, vaginal lacerations, anal tears, and uterine rupture. The psychological stress impact of shoulder dystocia is under-recognized and deserves counseling prior to home discharge. PMID:24863025

  13. Intestinal Complications of IBD

    MedlinePLUS

    ... treated with topical creams or sitz baths. MALABSORPTION & MALNUTRITION Another complication in people with Crohn’s disease is ... the gut that absorbs most nutrients. Malabsorption and malnutrition usually do not develop unless the disease is ...

  14. Tetanus: Symptoms and Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of the muscles of the jaw, or "lockjaw". Tetanus symptoms include: Headache Jaw cramping Sudden, involuntary muscle ... sweating High blood pressure and fast heart rate Tetanus complications include: Uncontrolled/involuntary muscular contraction of the ...

  15. Complications of Radical Cystectomy and Orthotopic Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Wei Shen; Lamb, Benjamin W.; Kelly, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Radical cystectomy and orthotopic reconstruction significant morbidity and mortality despite advances in minimal invasive and robotic technology. In this review, we will discuss early and late complications, as well as describe efforts to minimize morbidity and mortality, with a focus on ileal orthotopic bladder substitute (OBS). We summarise efforts to minimize morbidity and mortality including enhanced recovery as well as early and late complications seen after radical cystectomy and OBS. Centralisation of complex cancer services in the UK has led to a fall in mortality and high volume institutions have a significantly lower rate of 30-day mortality compared to low volume institutions. Enhanced recovery pathways have resulted in shorter length of hospital stay and potentially a reduction in morbidity. Early complications of radical cystectomy occur as a direct result of the surgery itself while late complications, which can occur even after 10 years after surgery, are due to urinary diversion. OBS represents the ideal urinary diversion for patients without contraindications. However, all patients with OBS should have regular long term follow-up for oncological surveillance and to identify complications should they arise. PMID:26697063

  16. From Folklore to Scientific Evidence: Breast-Feeding and Wet-Nursing in Islam and the Case of Non-Puerperal Lactation

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Lia; Gilad, Jacob

    2007-01-01

    Breast-feeding practice has an important medical and socio-cultural role. It has many anthropological aspects concerning the “power structures” that find their expression in breast-feeding and the practices that formed around it, both socially, scientifically, and legally-speaking. Breast-feeding has been given much attention by religions and taboos, folklore, and misconception abound around it making it a topic of genuine curiosity. This paper aims at expanding the spectrum of folklore associated with breast-feeding. The paper deals with historical, religious, and folkloristic aspects of breast-feeding, especially wet-nursing, in Islam and focuses on an intriguing Islamic tale on breast-feeding - lactation by non-pregnant women (or non-puerperal lactation). Apparently, accounts of non-puerperal lactation are not restricted to Islam but have been documented in various societies and religions throughout centuries. Two medical situations - hyperprolactinemia and induced lactation, appear as possible explanations for this phenomenon. This serves as an excellent example for the value of utilizing contemporary scientific knowledge in order to elucidate the origin, anthropology and evolvement of ancient myth and superstition. PMID:23675050

  17. [Type 2 diabetes complications].

    PubMed

    Schlienger, Jean-Louis

    2013-05-01

    People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of many complications, which are mainly due to complex and interconnected mechanisms such as hyperglycemia, insulino-resistance, low-grade inflammation and accelerated atherogenesis. Cardi-cerebrovascular disease are frequently associated to type 2 diabetes and may become life threatening, particularly coronaropathy, stroke and heart failure. Their clinical picture are sometimes atypical and silencious for a long time. Type 2 diabetes must be considered as an independent cardiovascular risk factor. Nephropathy is frequent in type 2 diabetes but has a mixed origin. Now it is the highest cause of end-stage renal disease. Better metabolic and blood pressure control and an improved management of microalbuminuria are able to slowdown the course of the disease. Retinopathy which is paradoxically slightly progressive must however be screened and treated in these rather old patients which are globally at high ophthalmologic risk. Diabetic foot is a severe complication secondary to microangiopathy, microangiopathy and neuropathy. It may be considered as a super-complication of several complications. Its screening must be done on a routine basis. Some cancer may be considered as an emerging complication of type 2 diabetes as well as cognitive decline, sleep apnea syndrome, mood disorders and bone metabolism impairments. Most of the type 2 diabetes complications may be prevented by a strategy combining a systematic screening and multi-interventional therapies. PMID:23528336

  18. HIV and the Risk of Direct Obstetric Complications: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Calvert, Clara; Ronsmans, Carine

    2013-01-01

    Background Women of reproductive age in parts of sub-Saharan Africa are faced both with high levels of HIV and the threat of dying from the direct complications of pregnancy. Clinicians practicing in such settings have reported a high incidence of direct obstetric complications among HIV-infected women, but the evidence supporting this is unclear. The aim of this systematic review is to establish whether HIV-infected women are at increased risk of direct obstetric complications. Methods and findings Studies comparing the frequency of obstetric haemorrhage, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, dystocia and intrauterine infections in HIV-infected and uninfected women were identified. Summary estimates of the odds ratio (OR) for the association between HIV and each obstetric complication were calculated through meta-analyses. In total, 44 studies were included providing 66 data sets; 17 on haemorrhage, 19 on hypertensive disorders, five on dystocia and 25 on intrauterine infections. Meta-analysis of the OR from studies including vaginal deliveries indicated that HIV-infected women had over three times the risk of a puerperal sepsis compared with HIV-uninfected women [pooled OR: 3.43, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.00–5.85]; this figure increased to nearly six amongst studies only including women who delivered by caesarean (pooled OR: 5.81, 95% CI: 2.42–13.97). For other obstetric complications the evidence was weak and inconsistent. Conclusions The higher risk of intrauterine infections in HIV-infected pregnant and postpartum women may require targeted strategies involving the prophylactic use of antibiotics during labour. However, as the huge excess of pregnancy-related mortality in HIV-infected women is unlikely to be due to a higher risk of direct obstetric complications, reducing this mortality will require non obstetric interventions involving access to ART in both pregnant and non-pregnant women. PMID:24124458

  19. Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Find People About NINDS NINDS Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease Information Page Synonym(s): Lyme Disease - Neurological Complications ... resources from MedlinePlus What are Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease? Lyme disease is caused by a bacterial ...

  20. Anesthetic Complications in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Hoefnagel, Amie; Yu, Albert; Kaminski, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Anesthesia complications in the parturient can be divided into 2 categories: those related to airway manipulation and those related to neuraxial anesthesia. Physiologic changes of pregnancy can lead to challenging intubating conditions in a patient at risk of aspiration. Neuraxial techniques are used to provide analgesia for labor and anesthesia for surgical delivery. Therefore, complications associated with neuraxial techniques are often seen in this population. In the event of maternal cardiac arrest, modification to advanced cardiac life support algorithms must be made to accommodate the gravid uterus and to deliver the fetus if return of maternal circulation is not prompt. PMID:26600441

  1. Orthopedic complications in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Gehling, Daniel J; Lecka-Czernik, Beata; Ebraheim, Nabil A

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with a number of lower extremity orthopedic conditions and complications including fractures, Charcot neuroarthropathy, plantar ulcers, and infection. These complications are of significant clinical concern in terms of morbidity, mortality, and socioeconomic costs. A review of each condition is discussed, with particular emphasis on the clinical importance, diagnostic considerations, and orthopedic treatment recommendations. The goal of the article is to provide a clinical picture of the challenges that orthopedic surgeons confront, and highlight the need for specific clinical guidelines in diabetic patients. PMID:26211990

  2. Complicating Visual Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daiello, Vicki; Hathaway, Kevin; Rhoades, Mindi; Walker, Sydney

    2006-01-01

    Arguing for complicating the study of visual culture, as advocated by James Elkins, this article explicates and explores Lacanian psychoanalytic theory and pedagogy in view of its implications for art education practice. Subjectivity, a concept of import for addressing student identity and the visual, steers the discussion informed by pedagogical…

  3. Neurological Complications of Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Amy A.; Graus, Francesc; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is the preferred treatment for an expanding range of neoplastic and nonmalignant conditions. Increasing numbers of solid organ transplantations (SOTs) add an additional population of immunosuppressed patients with multiple potential neurological problems. While the spectrum of neurological complications varies with conditioning procedure and hematopoietic cell or solid organ source, major neurological complications occur with all transplantation procedures. This 2 part review emphasizes a practical consultative approach to central and peripheral nervous system problems related to HCT or SOT with clinical and neuroimaging examples from the authors’ institutional experience with the following conditions: the diversity of manifestations of common infections such as varicella zoster virus, Aspergillus, and progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), drug therapy-related complications, stroke mechanisms, the spectrum of graft versus host disease (GVHD), and neurologically important syndromes of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), and posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD). These complications preferentially occur at specific intervals after HCT and SOT, and neurological consultants must recognize an extensive spectrum of syndromes in order to effect timely diagnosis and expedite appropriate treatment. PMID:23983885

  4. Classification of Surgical Complications

    PubMed Central

    Dindo, Daniel; Demartines, Nicolas; Clavien, Pierre-Alain

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Although quality assessment is gaining increasing attention, there is still no consensus on how to define and grade postoperative complications. This shortcoming hampers comparison of outcome data among different centers and therapies and over time. Patients and Methods: A classification of complications published by one of the authors in 1992 was critically re-evaluated and modified to increase its accuracy and its acceptability in the surgical community. Modifications mainly focused on the manner of reporting life-threatening and permanently disabling complications. The new grading system still mostly relies on the therapy used to treat the complication. The classification was tested in a cohort of 6336 patients who underwent elective general surgery at our institution. The reproducibility and personal judgment of the classification were evaluated through an international survey with 2 questionnaires sent to 10 surgical centers worldwide. Results: The new ranking system significantly correlated with complexity of surgery (P < 0.0001) as well as with the length of the hospital stay (P < 0.0001). A total of 144 surgeons from 10 different centers around the world and at different levels of training returned the survey. Ninety percent of the case presentations were correctly graded. The classification was considered to be simple (92% of the respondents), reproducible (91%), logical (92%), useful (90%), and comprehensive (89%). The answers of both questionnaires were not dependent on the origin of the reply and the level of training of the surgeons. Conclusions: The new complication classification appears reliable and may represent a compelling tool for quality assessment in surgery in all parts of the world. PMID:15273542

  5. Hypertension and the pregnancy complicated by diabetes.

    PubMed

    Leguizamón, Gustavo F; Zeff, Natalia P; Fernández, Alberto

    2006-08-01

    Diabetes is a frequent complication of pregnancy. Type 1 diabetes is associated with an increased incidence of preeclampsia and pregnancy-induced hypertension. When renal dysfunction is present, the incidence of these complications is remarkably increased. White's class, poor glycemic control during the first half of pregnancy, and early blood pressure elevation are also independent risk factors for developing preeclampsia. Whether gestational diabetes increases the background incidence of preeclampsia is still debated. Because therapeutic interventions such as low-dose aspirin and antioxidants have not been shown to be effective, preventive measures rely on tight blood glucose control, as well as adequate blood pressure treatment. PMID:16879782

  6. Obstetrical Complications and Violent Delinquency: Testing Two Developmental Pathways.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arseneault, Louise; Tremblay, Richard E.; Boulerice, Bernard; Saucier, Jean-Francois

    2002-01-01

    Assessed interaction between obstetrical complications and early family adversity in predicting violent behavior during childhood and adolescence among 849 boys from low SES areas. Found that elevated scores on scale of obstetrical complications (preeclampsia, umbilical cord prolapse, induced labor) increased risk of being violent at 6 and 17…

  7. Subcutaneous immunization with inactivated bacterial components and purified protein of Escherichia coli, Fusobacterium necrophorum and Trueperella pyogenes prevents puerperal metritis in Holstein dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Machado, Vinícius Silva; Bicalho, Marcela Luccas de Souza; Meira Junior, Enoch Brandão de Souza; Rossi, Rodolfo; Ribeiro, Bruno Leonardo; Lima, Svetlana; Santos, Thiago; Kussler, Arieli; Foditsch, Carla; Ganda, Erika Korzune; Oikonomou, Georgios; Cheong, Soon Hon; Gilbert, Robert Owen; Bicalho, Rodrigo Carvalho

    2014-01-01

    In this study we evaluate the efficacy of five vaccine formulations containing different combinations of proteins (FimH; leukotoxin, LKT; and pyolysin, PLO) and/or inactivated whole cells (Escherichia coli, Fusobacterium necrophorum, and Trueperella pyogenes) in preventing postpartum uterine diseases. Inactivated whole cells were produced using two genetically distinct strains of each bacterial species (E. coli, F. necrophorum, and T. pyogenes). FimH and PLO subunits were produced using recombinant protein expression, and LKT was recovered from culturing a wild F. necrophorum strain. Three subcutaneous vaccines were formulated: Vaccine 1 was composed of inactivated bacterial whole cells and proteins; Vaccine 2 was composed of proteins only; and Vaccine 3 was composed of inactivated bacterial whole cells only. Two intravaginal vaccines were formulated: Vaccine 4 was composed of inactivated bacterial whole cells and proteins; and Vaccine 5 was composed of PLO and LKT. To evaluate vaccine efficacy, a randomized clinical trial was conducted at a commercial dairy farm; 371 spring heifers were allocated randomly into one of six different treatments groups: control, Vaccine 1, Vaccine 2, Vaccine 3, Vaccine 4 and Vaccine 5. Late pregnant heifers assigned to one of the vaccine groups were each vaccinated twice: at 230 and 260 days of pregnancy. When vaccines were evaluated grouped as subcutaneous and intravaginal, the subcutaneous ones were found to significantly reduce the incidence of puerperal metritis. Additionally, subcutaneous vaccination significantly reduced rectal temperature at 6±1 days in milk. Reproduction was improved for cows that received subcutaneous vaccines. In general, vaccination induced a significant increase in serum IgG titers against all antigens, with subcutaneous vaccination again being more effective. In conclusion, subcutaneous vaccination with inactivated bacterial components and/or protein subunits of E. coli, F. necrophorum and T. pyogenes can prevent puerperal metritis during the first lactation of dairy cows, leading to improved reproduction. PMID:24638139

  8. Bereavement and Complicated Grief

    PubMed Central

    Ghesquiere, Angela; Glickman, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Bereavement is a common experience in adults age 60 and older. Loss of a loved one usually leads to acute grief characterized by yearning and longing, decreased interest in ongoing activities, and frequent thoughts of the deceased. For most, acute grief naturally evolves into a state of integrated grief, where the bereaved is able to reengage with everyday activities and find interest or pleasure. About 7% of bereaved older adults, however, will develop the mental health condition of Complicated Grief (CG). In CG, the movement from acute to integrated grief is derailed, and grief symptoms remain severe and impairing. This article reviews recent publications on the diagnosis of CG, risk factors for the condition, and evidenced-based treatments for CG. Greater attention to complicated grief detection and treatment in older adults is needed. PMID:24068457

  9. [Respiratory complications after transfusion].

    PubMed

    Bernasinski, M; Mertes, P-M; Carlier, M; Dupont, H; Girard, M; Gette, S; Just, B; Malinovsky, J-M

    2014-05-01

    Respiratory complications of blood transfusion have several possible causes. Transfusion-Associated Circulatory Overload (TACO) is often the first mentioned. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI), better defined since the consensus conference of Toronto in 2004, is rarely mentioned. French incidence is low. Non-hemolytic febrile reactions, allergies, infections and pulmonary embolism are also reported. The objective of this work was to determine the statistical importance of the different respiratory complications of blood transfusion. This work was conducted retrospectively on transfusion accidents in six health centers in Champagne-Ardenne, reported to Hemovigilance between 2000 and 2009 and having respiratory symptoms. The analysis of data was conducted by an expert committee. Eighty-three cases of respiratory complications are found (316,864 blood products). We have counted 26 TACO, 12 TRALI (only 6 cases were identified in the original investigation of Hemovigilance), 18 non-hemolytic febrile reactions, 16 cases of allergies, 5 transfusions transmitted bacterial infections and 2 pulmonary embolisms. Six new TRALI were diagnosed previously labeled TACO for 2 of them, allergy and infection in 2 other cases and diagnosis considered unknown for the last 2. Our study found an incidence of TRALI 2 times higher than that reported previously. Interpretation of the data by a multidisciplinary committee amended 20% of diagnoses. This study shows the imperfections of our system for reporting accidents of blood transfusion when a single observer analyses the medical records. PMID:24814817

  10. Pathophysiology of pulmonary complications of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Browne, George W; Pitchumoni, CS

    2006-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis in its severe form is complicated by multiple organ system dysfunction, most importantly by pulmonary complications which include hypoxia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, atelectasis, and pleural effusion. The pathogenesis of some of the above complications is attributed to the production of noxious cytokines. Clinically significant is the early onset of pleural effusion, which heralds a poor outcome of acute pancreatitis. The role of circulating trypsin, phospholipase A2, platelet activating factor, release of free fatty acids, chemoattractants such as tumor necrsosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, IL-8, fMet-leu-phe (a bacterial wall product), nitric oxide, substance P, and macrophage inhibitor factor is currently studied. The hope is that future management of acute pancreatitis with a better understanding of the pathogenesis of lung injury will be directed against the production of noxious cytokines. PMID:17131469

  11. Vascular complications in the diabetic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Leguizamón, Gustavo; Trigubo, Denise; Pereira, Juan Ignacio; Vera, María Fernanda; Fernández, José Alberto

    2015-04-01

    Long-standing hyperglycemia frequently leads to vasculopathy. Microvascular disease is characterized by retinopathy and nephropathy, while macrovascular involvement can affect coronary arteries. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy, when present, is generally associated with retinal and/or renal involvement. Early identification of these diabetic complications allows appropriate counseling and early treatment. Among women with diabetic vasculopathy, nephropathy, chronic hypertension, preeclampsia, preterm delivery, and fetal growth restriction are frequently observed. Furthermore, women with impaired renal function in early pregnancy have increased risk of long-term deterioration of glomerular filtration rate. Proliferative retinopathy can progress during pregnancy and 1 year after delivery, but long-term effects are not likely to occur. When coronary artery disease or gastroparesis diabeticorum are present, excessive maternal and fetal morbidity is observed. When modern management is synchronized with early medical care, favorable maternal and perinatal outcomes can be expected. PMID:25732848

  12. [Infectious complications of lymphedema].

    PubMed

    Vaillant, L; Gironet, N

    2002-06-01

    Erysipelas and lymphangitis are frequent complications of lymphedemas (20 to 30%). The most important risk factor for erysipelas is lymphedema since this is a protein rich edema that contributes to the risk of infection. In case of lymphedema the treatment is the usual consensus treatment for erysipelas. A prophylactic treatment with penicillin is requested as soon as the first recurrence. This prophylactic treatment includes skin care, particularly treatment of injuries and intertrigos. Hyperplastic skin leads to maceration and then mycoses. Physiotherapy does not increase the risk for infection. Moreover an infection needs a complex decongestive physiotherapy which decreases risks of recurrence. PMID:12162204

  13. Complications of Macular Peeling

    PubMed Central

    Asencio-Duran, Mónica; Manzano-Muñoz, Beatriz; Vallejo-García, José Luis; García-Martínez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Macular peeling refers to the surgical technique for the removal of preretinal tissue or the internal limiting membrane (ILM) in the macula for several retinal disorders, ranging from epiretinal membranes (primary or secondary to diabetic retinopathy, retinal detachment…) to full-thickness macular holes, macular edema, foveal retinoschisis, and others. The technique has evolved in the last two decades, and the different instrumentations and adjuncts have progressively advanced turning into a safer, easier, and more useful tool for the vitreoretinal surgeon. Here, we describe the main milestones of macular peeling, drawing attention to its associated complications. PMID:26425351

  14. Overweight and pregnancy complications.

    PubMed

    Abrams, B; Parker, J

    1988-01-01

    The association between increased prepregnancy weight for height and seven pregnancy complications was studied in a multi-racial sample of more than 4100 recent deliveries. Body mass indices were calculated and used to classify women as average weight (90-119 percent of ideal or BMI 19.21-25.60), moderately overweight (120-135 percent ideal or BMI 25.61-28.90), and very overweight (greater than 135 percent ideal or BMI greater than 28.91) prior to pregnancy. Compared to women of average weight for height, very overweight women had a higher risk of diabetes, hypertension, pregnancy-induced hypertension and primary cesarean section delivery. Moderately overweight women were also at higher risk than average for diabetes, pregnancy-induced hypertension and primary cesarean deliveries but the relative risks were of a smaller magnitude than for very overweight women. With women of average prepregnancy body mass as reference, moderately elevated, but not significant relative risks were found for perinatal mortality in the very overweight group, for urinary tract infections in both overweight groups, and a decreased risk for anemia was found in the very overweight group. However, post-hoc power analyses indicated that the number of overweight women in the sample did not allow adequate statistical power to detect these small differences in risk. To overcome limitations associated with low statistical power, the results of three recent studies of these outcomes in very overweight pregnant women were combined and summarized using Mantel-Haenzel techniques. This second, larger analysis suggested that very overweight women are at significantly higher risk for all seven outcomes studied. Summary results for moderately overweight women could not be calculated, since only two of the studies had evaluated moderately overweight women separately. These latter results support other findings that both moderate overweight and very overweight are risk factors during pregnancy, with the highest risk occurring in the heaviest group. Although these results indicate that moderate overweight is a risk factor during pregnancy, additional studies are needed to confirm the impact of being 20-35 percent above ideal weight prior to pregnancy. The results of this analysis also imply that since the baseline incidence of many perinatal complications is low, studies relating overweight and pregnancy complications should include large enough samples of overweight women so that there is adequate statistical power to reliably detect differences in complication rates. PMID:3058615

  15. Common surgery, uncommon complication

    PubMed Central

    Akdeniz, Hande; Ozer, Kadri; Dikmen, Adile; Kocer, Uger

    2015-01-01

    Ingrown nail surgery is the one of the most common surgeries in outpatient clinics that are generally perfomed in response to patient complaints. Still, making simple observations, taking patient histories and conducting further tests are often neglected by outpatient clinics. Consequently, it is important to be aware if ingrown nail is associated with any underlying diseases that can lead to major complications. In this article, we report on two cases ending in amputation that were performed with Winograd’s partial matrix excision procedure for ingrown nails. Such a complication is rare, unexpected, and most unwanted in forefoot surgery. After a detailed analysis of the situation, we discovered that both patients were smokers, and one of them had Buerger’s disease. These conditions led to the ingrown nails in addition to poor wound healing. This case report emphasizes the fact that even when performing minor procedures, obtaining a detailed history and conducting an examination are of paramount importance. Patient selection is also a considerable factor, especially for patients who are smokers, who may experience a worst case surgical scenario. PMID:26693080

  16. Common surgery, uncommon complication.

    PubMed

    Akdeniz, Hande; Ozer, Kadri; Dikmen, Adile; Kocer, Uger

    2015-10-01

    Ingrown nail surgery is the one of the most common surgeries in outpatient clinics that are generally perfomed in response to patient complaints. Still, making simple observations, taking patient histories and conducting further tests are often neglected by outpatient clinics. Consequently, it is important to be aware if ingrown nail is associated with any underlying diseases that can lead to major complications. In this article, we report on two cases ending in amputation that were performed with Winograd's partial matrix excision procedure for ingrown nails. Such a complication is rare, unexpected, and most unwanted in forefoot surgery. After a detailed analysis of the situation, we discovered that both patients were smokers, and one of them had Buerger's disease. These conditions led to the ingrown nails in addition to poor wound healing. This case report emphasizes the fact that even when performing minor procedures, obtaining a detailed history and conducting an examination are of paramount importance. Patient selection is also a considerable factor, especially for patients who are smokers, who may experience a worst case surgical scenario. PMID:26693080

  17. Long term complications of diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... much you need. DO NOT smoke. Smoking makes diabetes complications worse. If you do smoke, work with your ... Brownlee M, Aiello LP, Cooper ME, et al. Complications of diabetes mellitus. In: Mehmed S, Polonsky KS, Larsen PR, Kronenberg ...

  18. Complicated bile duct stones

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Ashwin; Martin, Derrick

    2013-01-01

    Common bile duct stones (CBDSs) are solid deposits that can either form within the gallbladder or migrate to the common bile duct (CBD), or form de novo in the biliary tree. In the USA around 15% of the population have gallstones and of these, 3% present with symptoms annually. Because of this, there have been major advancements in the management of gallstones and related conditions. Management is based on the patient's risk profile; young and healthy patients are likely to be recommended for surgery and elderly patients with comorbidities are usually recommended for endoscopic procedures. Imaging of gallstones has advanced in the last 30?years with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography evolving from a diagnostic to a therapeutic procedure in removing CBDSs. We present a complicated case of a patient with a CBDS and periampullary diverticulum and discuss the techniques used to diagnose and remove the stone from the biliary system. PMID:23946532

  19. Stage IB carcinoma of the cervix, the Norwegian Radium Hospital: results and complications. III. Urinary and gastrointestinal complications

    SciTech Connect

    Kjorstad, K.E.; Martimbeau, P.W.; Iversen, T.

    1983-02-01

    The combination of surgery and radiotherapy for early cases of cancer of the cervix has been accused of producing prohibitive complication rates. In a series of 612 patients with cancer of the cervix, Stage IB, the frequency of major complications from the urinary and gastrointestinal tract has been studied, and an attempt has been made in determining the most probable etiology of these complications. No significant increase in complications can be attributed to the use of preoperative intracavitary irradiation. In patients with pelvic lymph node metastases the combination of radical surgery and a full course of radiotherapy is associated with a high complication risk, as 12% of these patients developed major complications. Their 5-year survival, however, was high: 54%.

  20. Zebrafish sex: a complicated affair

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Woei Chang

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we provide a detailed overview of studies on the elusive sex determination (SD) and gonad differentiation mechanisms of zebrafish (Danio rerio). We show that the data obtained from most studies are compatible with polygenic sex determination (PSD), where the decision is made by the allelic combinations of several loci. These loci are typically dispersed throughout the genome, but in some teleost species a few of them might be located on a preferential pair of (sex) chromosomes. The PSD system has a much higher level of variation of SD genotypes both at the level of gametes and the sexual genotype of individuals, than that of the chromosomal sex determination systems. The early sexual development of zebrafish males is a complicated process, as they first develop a ‘juvenile ovary’, that later undergoes a transformation to give way to a testis. To date, three major developmental pathways were shown to be involved with gonad differentiation through the modulation of programmed cell death. In our opinion, there are more pathways participating in the regulation of zebrafish gonad differentiation/transformation. Introduction of additional powerful large-scale genomic approaches into the analysis of zebrafish reproduction will result in further deepening of our knowledge as well as identification of additional pathways and genes associated with these processes in the near future. PMID:24148942

  1. Urinary diversion metabolic complications - underestimated problem.

    PubMed

    Krajewski, Wojciech; Piszczek, Rados?aw; Krajewska, Magdalena; Dembowski, Janusz; Zdrojowy, Romuald

    2014-01-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most frequent human cancers. In 2011 more than six thousand people in Poland developed BC and more than three thousand died because of it. Treatment of bladder cancer depends on its stage. In less advanced tumours (Ta, Tcis, T1) transurethral resection of bladder tumor with adjuvant immunotherapy is often therapeutic. In more advanced cases (? T2) radical cystectomy is needed. There are several surgical types of post-cystectomy urinary diversion divided into two fundamental types - enabling and not enabling urine continence. The most common procedures include ureterocutaneostomy, ileal or colon conduit, orthopic ileal bladder, heterotopic continent bladder replacement (pouch) and urinary diversion via the rectum. Depending on type of cystectomy, various metabolic complications occur, because the absorptive-secretory function of used bowel segment is intact. Complications include bowel dysfunction, malabsorption of various vitamins, acid-base imbalance, electrolyte imbalance, abnormalities in bone metabolism, formation of renal calculi, secondary malignancies and disturbances in function of kidneys or liver. Early diagnosed complications can be treated easier, recognised in advanced stages are often irreversible. In our paper we present review of different approaches to bladder cancer treatment and metabolic complications occurring after these procedures. PMID:25166450

  2. Complications of radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dalinka, M.K.; Mazzeo, V.P. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The skeletal effects of radiation are dependent upon many variables, but the pathologic features are consistent. Radiation may cause immediate or delayed cell death, cellular injury with recovery, arrest of cellular division, or abnormal repair with neoplasia. Radiation necrosis and radiation-induced neoplasm still occur despite the use of supervoltage therapy. Complications of radiotherapy are well known and have led to more judicious use of this therapeutic modality. With few exceptions, benign bone tumors are no longer treated with irradiation. Radiation necrosis may be difficult to differentiate from sarcoma arising in irradiated bone. They both occur within the field of irradiation. Radiation necrosis often has a long latent period which is, of course, the rule in radiation-induced neoplasia. A soft tissue mass favors the diagnosis of neoplasia, while its absence suggests radiation necrosis. Lack of pain favors necrosis. Calcification may occur in radiation necrosis and does not indicate neoplasia. A lack of progression on serial roentgenograms also favors radiation necrosis. 76 references.

  3. Technical note: Intraobserver, interobserver, and test-retest reliabilities of an assessment of vaginal discharge from cows with and without acute puerperal metritis.

    PubMed

    Sannmann, I; Heuwieser, W

    2015-08-01

    Acute puerperal metritis (APM) in dairy cows is a common disease occurring in the first 10 d after calving. According to a widely accepted definition, the diagnosis is primarily based on body temperature and sensorial assessment of vaginal discharge. The scope of this study was to evaluate the reliability for color, smell, and viscosity of vaginal discharge from healthy cows and cows with APM. Fifteen investigators evaluated 6 vaginal discharge samples 10 times. Subsequently, the investigators rated the health status of the cows and the diagnostic value of color, smell, and viscosity. In a final questionnaire, the investigators estimated their ability to diagnose APM correctly and the influence of experience. Reliability was tested using Cohen's kappa (?). Our study revealed slight to moderate reliabilities concerning the assessment of vaginal discharge. Overall interobserver reliability for color, smell, and viscosity was ?=0.15, 0.27, and 0.44, respectively. Overall intraobserver reliability for color, smell, and viscosity was ?=0.35, 0.39, and 0.6, respectively. By means of a questionnaire, overall personal expertise to detect cows suffering from APM correctly as such was estimated to be 59%, whereas the diagnostic value of a combination of color, smell, and viscosity to detect cows with APM correctly was estimated to be 91.1% perfect. We found a discrepancy between reliability and the personal perception of diagnostic value. Our study shows that the sensorial assessment of color, smell, and viscosity of vaginal discharge in cows postpartum is subjective. PMID:26026759

  4. Pulmonary complications of AIDS: radiologic features. [AIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.A.; Pomeranz, S.; Rabinowitz, J.G.; Rosen, M.J.; Train, J.S.; Norton, K.I.; Mendelson, D.S.

    1984-07-01

    Fifty-two patients with pulmonary complications of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) were studied over a 3-year period. The vast majority of the patients were homosexual; however, a significant number were intravenous drug abusers. Thirteen different organisms were noted, of which Pneumocystis carinii was by far the most common. Five patients had neoplasia. Most patients had initial abnormal chest films; however, eight patients subsequently shown to have Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia had normal chest films. A significant overlap in chest radiographic findings was noted among patients with different or multiple organisms. Lung biopsy should be an early consideration for all patients with a clinical history consistent with the pulmonary complications of AIDS. Of the 52 patients, 41 had died by the time this report was completed.

  5. Renal complications of Fabry disease in children.

    PubMed

    Najafian, Behzad; Mauer, Michael; Hopkin, Robert J; Svarstad, Einar

    2013-05-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked ?-galactosidase A deficiency, resulting in accumulation of glycosphingolipids, especially globotriaosylceramide, in cells in different organs in the body. Renal failure is a serious complication of this disease. Fabry nephropathy lesions are present and progress in childhood while the disease commonly remains silent by routine clinical measures. Early and timely diagnosis of Fabry nephropathy is crucial since late initiation of enzyme replacement therapy may not halt progressive renal dysfunction. This may be challenging due to difficulties in diagnosis of Fabry disease in children and absence of a sensitive non-invasive biomarker of early Fabry nephropathy. Accurate measurement of glomerular filtration rate and regular assessment for proteinuria and microalbuminuria are useful, though not sensitive enough to detect early lesions in the kidney. Recent studies support the value of renal biopsy in providing histological information relevant to kidney function and prognosis, and renal biopsy could potentially be used to guide treatment decisions in young Fabry patients. This review aims to provide an update of the current understanding, challenges, and needs to better approach renal complications of Fabry disease in children. PMID:22898981

  6. [Medical complications of extracorporeal lithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Legrand, F; Idrissi Kaitouni, M; Roumeguère, T

    2013-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is one of the most frequently applied procedures for the treatment of urolithiasis. ESWL breaks and splits stones by the means of repeated acoustic shock waves. Despite its non invasive nature, ESWL has been intuitively associated with potential complications, mostly related to residual stone fragments. While non stone-related complications are rare (< 1 %), awareness and identification of these complications could help clinicians to prevent and manage them safely and effectively. The current study reviews the pathophysiology, predicting factors and possible preventive measures of non stone-related medical complications after ESWL. PMID:23951856

  7. Interventional Radiological Treatment of Renal Transplant Complications: A Pictorial Review

    PubMed Central

    la Torre, Michele Fabio; Santoro, Marco; Dattesi, Roberta; Nestola, Massimiliano; Posa, Alessandro; Romagnoli, Jacopo; Citterio, Franco; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice for patients with chronic renal failure, which produces a dramatic improvement in the quality of life and survival rates, in comparison to long-term dialysis. Nowadays, new imaging modalities allow early diagnosis of complications, and thanks to the recent developments of interventional techniques, surgery may be avoided in most cases. Knowledge in the types of renal transplant complications is fundamental for a correct pre-operative planning. In this article, we described the most common or clinically relevant renal transplant complications and explained their interventional management. PMID:25995689

  8. A rare complication after renal transplantation: Forgotten stent.

    PubMed

    Karab?cak, Mustafa; Ipekci, Tumay; Isoglu, Cemal Selcuk; Keskin, Mehmet Zeynel; Ekin, Rahmi Gokhan; Budak, Salih; Turk, Hakan; Celik, Orcun; Ilbey, Yusuf Ozlem

    2015-06-01

    In renal transplantation surgery, double J stents (DJS) are often used to reduce complications, protect the anastomosis between ureter and bladder, provide drainage in ureteral obstructions and enhance healing if there is an ureter injury. Urinary tract infections, hematuria and irritative voiding symptoms are the early complications of DJS. Migration, fragmentation, encrustation and rarely sepsis are among the late complications of DJS. In this report we describe a renal transplantation case whose DJS stent was forgotten because the patient did not attend the regular follow-up and noticed 5 years after surgery. PMID:26150043

  9. Bone and metabolic complications of urinary diversions.

    PubMed

    Cano Megías, Marta; Muñoz Delgado, Eva Golmayo

    2015-02-01

    Hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis is a complication of urinary diversion using ileum or colon. Its prevalence ranges from 25% and 46% depending on the procedure used and renal function of the patient. It is a consequence of intestinal fluid and electrolyte exchange between intestinal mucosa and urine. The main mechanism is absorption of ammonium and chloride from urine. Long-term chronic metabolic acidosis in these patients may lead to impaired bone metabolism and osteomalacia. Regular monitoring of pH, chlorine, bicarbonate, and calcium-phosphorus metabolism is therefore essential for early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25481805

  10. Pulmonary complications of cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Huffmyer, Julie L; Groves, Danja S

    2015-06-01

    Pulmonary complications after the use of extracorporeal circulation are common, and they range from transient hypoxemia with altered gas exchange to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), with variable severity. Similar to other end-organ dysfunction after cardiac surgery with extracorporeal circulation, pulmonary complications are attributed to the inflammatory response, ischemia-reperfusion injury, and reactive oxygen species liberated as a result of cardiopulmonary bypass. Several factors common in cardiac surgery with extracorporeal circulation may worsen the risk of pulmonary complications including atelectasis, transfusion requirement, older age, heart failure, emergency surgery, and prolonged duration of bypass. There is no magic bullet to prevent or treat pulmonary complications, but supportive care with protective ventilation is important. Targets for the prevention of pulmonary complications include mechanical, surgical, and anesthetic interventions that aim to reduce the contact activation, systemic inflammatory response, leukocyte sequestration, and hemodilution associated with extracorporeal circulation. PMID:26060028

  11. Ocular Complications of Leprosy in Yemen

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Raga A. A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This study was conducted to identify the main ocular- and vision-threatening complications of leprosy in Yemen. Methods: This is a cross-sectional observational study which took place from February to July 2010. Leprosy patients attending the Skin and Venereal Diseases Hospital in the City of Light in Taiz, Yemen, who consented to participate in the study, were enrolled. Detailed demographic and medical histories were taken and clinical examination findings were recorded. A detailed eye examination, including visual acuity (VA), slit-lamp, and fundus examinations, was conducted on each patient by a qualified ophthalmologist. Results: A total of 192 patients (180 male, 12 female, with a male to female ratio of 15:1) were included in the study. The majority of the patients (157; 81.8%) were over 40 years. Over two-thirds of the patients (129; 67.2%) had had leprosy for more than 20 years. Ocular complications were found in 97% of cases; 150 (39.1%) of the patients’ eyes had at least one pathology. Eyelid involvement was the most common problem observed in 102 (26.5%) patients. Half of the eyes (192; 50%) had a VA of <6/60. The main cause of blindness among these patients was corneal opacity detected in 69 out of 192 patients (35.9%). Conclusion: Ocular complications are frequent among leprosy patients in Yemen. They are true vision-threatening lesions. It is important to prevent these lesions through early diagnosis and adequate treatment. PMID:23275842

  12. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis to determine the diagnostic performance of serum haptoglobin concentration for the diagnosis of acute puerperal metritis in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Burfeind, O; Sannmann, I; Voigtsberger, R; Heuwieser, W

    2014-10-01

    Acute puerperal metritis (APM) in dairy cows is characterized by fever and fetid vaginal discharge within 21 days in milk (DIM). Increased serum haptoglobin concentration (Hp) can support the diagnosis of APM. However, there is a dearth of information of the test performance of Hp as a measure for APM with a consistent definition and considering parity. The objective of this trial was to study the test performance of Hp to distinguish healthy cows from cows with APM. A total of 33 of 60 (55.0%) primiparous cows and 43 of 133 (32.3%) multiparous cows developed APM. Primiparous cows with APM had the greatest Hp. However, in primiparous cows Hp did not significantly differ between healthy cows (DIM 2: 1.49 ± 0.64 mg/mL; DIM 5: 2.13 ± 0.66 mg/mL; DIM 10: 1.46 ± 0.85 mg/mL) and cows with APM (DIM 2: 1.78 ± 0.62 mg/mL; DIM 5: 2.48 ± 0.64 mg/mL; DIM 10: 1.60 ± 0.81 mg/mL). In multiparous cows, Hp was greater in cows with APM (DIM 2: 1.27 ± 0.68 mg/mL; DIM 5: 1.89 ± 0.94 mg/mL; DIM 10: 1.23 ± 0.78 mg/mL) than in healthy cows (DIM 2: 0.99 ± 0.68 mg/mL; DIM 5: 1.10 ± 0.80 mg/mL; DIM 10: 0.83 ± 0.68 mg/mL). Sensitivity and specificity of Hp to diagnose APM in multiparous cows ranged from 72% to 79% and 54% to 71% on DIM 2, 5 and 10, respectively. PMID:25128191

  13. Psychological complications of pediatric obesity.

    PubMed

    Vander Wal, Jillon S; Mitchell, Elisha R

    2011-12-01

    Psychological complications associated with pediatric obesity include low self-esteem, depression, body dissatisfaction, loss-of-control eating, unhealthy and extreme weight control behaviors, impaired social relationships, obesity stigma, and decreased health-related quality of life. Bioecological models offer a framework for understanding the interaction between pediatric obesity and psychological complications and illustrate system-level approaches for prevention and intervention. As the medical setting is often the first point of contact for families, pediatricians are instrumental in the identification and referral of children with psychological complications. Motivational interviewing, patient talking points, brief screening measures, and referral resources are important tools in this process. PMID:22093858

  14. PEG tubes: dealing with complications.

    PubMed

    Malhi, Hardip; Thompson, Rosie

    A percutaneous endoscopic gastronomy tube can be used to deliver nutrition, hydration and medicines directly into the patient's stomach. Patients will require a tube if they are unable to swallow safely, putting them at risk of aspiration of food, drink and medicines into their lungs. It is vital that nurses are aware of the complications that may arise when caring for a patient with a PEG tube. It is equally important that nurses know how to deal with these complications or from where tc seek advice. This article provides a quick troubleshooting guide to help nurses deal with complications that can arise with PEG feeding. PMID:26016095

  15. Diabetic Complications and Amputation Prevention

    MedlinePLUS

    ... because of two complications of diabetes: nerve damage (neuropathy) and poor circulation. Neuropathy causes loss of feeling in your feet, taking ... to the bone. Because of poor circulation and neuropathy in the feet, cuts or blisters can easily ...

  16. Intramuscular injection-site complications.

    PubMed

    Greenblatt, D J; Allen, M D

    1978-08-11

    Among 26,294 hospitalized medical patients monitored by the Boston Collaborative Drug Surveillance Program, 46% received at least one intramuscular (IM) injection. Drugs for which IM injection was the route of administration in more than 80% of all exposures included penicillin G procaine, mercurial diuretics, cyanocobalamin, streptomycin sulfate, colistimethate sodium, meperidine hydrochloride, cephaloridine, scopolamine hydrobromide, kanamycin sulfate, and iron dextran injection. Local complications of IM injection were reported in a total of only 48 patients (0.4% of all IM recipients). Local complications were most commonly associated with IM injection of cephalothin sodium. Clinically important local complications are uncommonly associated with IM injections in general. However, certain drugs, eg, cephalothin, produce injection-site complications with relatively high frequency; the clinical role of IM injection of such drugs should be reevaluated. PMID:671665

  17. Complications in cochlear implant surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gheorghe, DC; Zamfir-Chiru-Anton, A

    2015-01-01

    For the last 6 years, cochlear implantation has become a standard practice in our department. The number of patients rose from 5 to 21/ year. Using multiple types of cochlear implants and indicating the surgery also to malformed inner ears led to the encounter of some complications. Objective: to present the surgical complications from our department. Material: all the patients admitted and operated in our clinic have been reviewed. Results: 9 complications (8,86%) have occurred: the impossibility of establishing a reliable cochleostomy (due to ossification), air in the cochlea through lack of sealing of the cochleostomy (exteriorization of the electrode array), cochlear implant postoperative migration from its bed, weak hearing discrimination due to “double electrodes” in the scala tympani, gusher. Conclusions: cochlear implanting needs to respect the technical steps of the surgery and the best technical/ tactical solution has to be found to whatever complications arise in complex or malformed cases! PMID:26351535

  18. Complications in Pediatric Facial Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Mimi T.; Losee, Joseph E.

    2009-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of pediatric facial fractures, little has been published on the complications of these fractures. The existing literature is highly variable regarding both the definition and the reporting of adverse events. Although the incidence of pediatric facial fractures is relative low, they are strongly associated with other serious injuries. Both the fractures and their treatment may have long-term consequence on growth and development of the immature face. This article is a selective review of the literature on facial fracture complications with special emphasis on the complications unique to pediatric patients. We also present our classification system to evaluate adverse outcomes associated with pediatric facial fractures. Prospective, long-term studies are needed to fully understand and appreciate the complexity of treating children with facial fractures and determining the true incidence, subsequent growth, and nature of their complications. PMID:22110803

  19. Ultrasound evaluation of vascular complications in pancreas transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Karamehi?, Jasenko; Scoutt, Leslie; Gavrankapetanovi?, Faris; Subasi?, Demo

    2005-01-01

    Transplantation of the pancreas is progressively becoming one of the preferred options of treating the insulin addicted diabetes mellitus. Pancreas can be transplanted alone, or together with a kidney, the latter option becoming more successful in recent years. In this case, the successfully transplanted pancreas with the regulation of sugar, protects the kidney from further damage. Among the more important complications in the recipient of the graft, we can certainly include vascular complications. One of the most important non-invasive methods of early discovery of vascular complications on the pancreas is in the first place ultrasound. Early diagnosis with ultrasound enables timely appropriate treatment and therefore the survival of the transplant. Especially unavoidable and useful in everyday practice is the role of the modern forms of ultrasound such as the Gray-scale sonography, duplex Doppler imaging and sonographic guidance for percutaneous biopsy. Color and Doppler ultrasound have proved themselves in everyday use as a precious source of information for diagnosis of eventual vascular complications and the status of regional vasculature. Early diagnosis resulting from the ultrasound and the concurrent use of other laboratory and clinical findings enables us to timely recognize and preempt the consequences of vascular complications thereby increasing the chances of pancreatic survival. PMID:16134749

  20. Pancreaticoduodenectomy: expected post-operative anatomy and complications

    PubMed Central

    Lavelle, L P; Hoare, S M; O'Neill, A C; Awan, F N; Malone, D E; Ryan, E R; McCann, J W; Heffernan, E J

    2014-01-01

    Pancreaticoduodenectomy is a complex, high-risk surgical procedure performed for tumours of the pancreatic head and other periampullary structures. The rate of perioperative mortality has decreased in the past number of years but perioperative morbidity remains high. This pictorial review illustrates expected findings in early and late post-operative periods, including mimickers of pathology. It aims to familiarize radiologists with the imaging appearances of common and unusual post-operative complications. These are classified into early non-vascular complications such as delayed gastric emptying, post-operative collections, pancreatic fistulae and bilomas; late non-vascular complications, for example, biliary strictures and hepatic abscesses; and vascular complications including haemorrhage and ischaemia. Options for minimally invasive image-guided management of vascular and non-vascular complications are discussed. Familiarity with normal anatomic findings is essential in order to distinguish expected post-operative change from surgical complications or recurrent disease. This review summarizes the normal and abnormal radiological findings following pancreaticoduodenectomy. PMID:25026968

  1. Unusual Complications of Quinalphos Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Stalin

    2013-01-01

    This 40-year-old man was treated for suicidal quinalphos 25%EC consumption. He developed intermediate syndrome with normal response to repetitive nerve stimulation, pancreatitis with high enzyme elevations, and normal computed tomography and excreted black, brown, and orange urine sequentially over the first nine days of hospitalization. The last complication has not been previously reported with any organophosphate compound. He finally succumbed to complication of ventilator associated pneumonia related septic shock and ventricular tachycardia. PMID:23762661

  2. Pregnancy Complications: Umbilical Cord Abnormalities

    MedlinePLUS

    ... with cells and generally contain remnants of early embryonic structures. False cysts are fluid-filled sacs that can ... with cells and generally contain remnants of early embryonic structures. False cysts are fluid-filled sacs that can ...

  3. BCG vaccination in SCID patients: complications, risks and vaccination policies

    PubMed Central

    Marciano, Beatriz E; Huang, Chiung-Yu; Joshi, Gyan; Rezaei, Nima; Carvalho, Beatriz Costa; Allwood, Zoe; Ikinciogullari, Aydan; Reda, Shereen M; Gennery, Andrew; Thon, Vojtech; Espinosa-Rosales, Francisco; Al-Herz, Waleed; Porras, Oscar; Shcherbina, Anna; Szaflarska, Anna; Kiliç, ?ebnem; Franco, Jose L; Raccio, Andrea C Gómez; Roxo-Jr, Persio; Esteves, Isabel; Galal, Nermeen; Grumach, Anete Sevciovic; Al-Tamemi, Salem; Yildiran, Alisan; Orellana, Julio C; Yamada, Masafumi; Morio, Tomohiro; Liberatore, Diana; Ohtsuka, Yoshitoshi; Lau, Yu-Lung; Nishikomori, Ryuta; Torres-Lozano, Carlos; Mazzucchelli, Juliana TL; Vilela, Maria MS; Tavares, Fabiola S; Cunha, Luciana; Pinto, Jorge A; Espinosa-Padilla, Sara E; Hernandez-Nieto, Leticia; Elfeky, Reem A; Ariga, Tadashi; Toshio, Heike; Dogu, Figen; Cipe, Funda; Formankova, Renata; Nuñez-Nuñez, M Enriqueta; Bezrodnik, Liliana; Marques, Jose Gonçalo; Pereira, María I; Listello, Viviana; Slatter, Mary A; Nademi, Zohreh; Kowalczyk, Danuta; Fleisher, Thomas A.; Davies, Graham; Neven, Bénédicte; Rosenzweig, Sergio D

    2014-01-01

    Background SCID is a syndrome characterized by profound T cell deficiency. BCG vaccine is contraindicated in SCID patients. Because most countries encourage BCG vaccination at birth, a high percent of SCID patients are vaccinated before their immune defect is detected. Objectives To describe the complications and risks associated with BCG vaccination in SCID patients. Methods An extensive standardized questionnaire evaluating complications, therapeutics, and outcome regarding BCG in patients diagnosed with SCID was widely distributed. Summary statistics and association analysis was performed. Results Data on 349 BCG vaccinated SCID patients from 28 centers in 17 countries was analyzed. Fifty-one percent of the patients developed BCG complications, 34% disseminated and 17% localized (a 33,000 and 400 fold increase, respectively, over the general population). Patients receiving early vaccination (? 1 month) showed an increased prevalence of complications (p=0.006) and death due to BCG complications (p<0.0001). The odds of experiencing complications among patients with T cells ? 250/uL at diagnosis was 2.1 times higher (95% CI, 1.4-3.4; p = 0.001) than among those with T cells > 250/uL. BCG complications were reported in 2/78 patients who received anti-mycobacterial therapy while asymptomatic and no deaths due to BCG complications occurred in this group. In contrast 46 BCG-associated deaths were reported among 160 patients treated with anti-mycobacterial therapy for a symptomatic BCG infection (p<0.0001). Conclusions BCG vaccine has a very high rate of complications in SCID patients, which increase morbidity and mortality rates. Until safer and more efficient anti-tuberculosis vaccines become available, delay in BCG vaccination should be considered to protect highly vulnerable populations from preventable complications. PMID:24679470

  4. Toxic stress, inflammation and symptomatology of chronic complications in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Downs, Charles A; Faulkner, Melissa Spezia

    2015-05-15

    Diabetes affects at least 382 million people worldwide and the incidence is expected to reach 592 million by 2035. The incidence of diabetes in youth is skyrocketing as evidenced by a 21% increase in type 1 diabetes and a 30.5% increase in type 2 diabetes in the United States between 2001 and 2009. The effects of toxic stress, the culmination of biological and environmental interactions, on the development of diabetes complications is gaining attention. Stress impacts the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis and contributes to inflammation, a key biological contributor to the pathogenesis of diabetes and its associated complications. This review provides an overview of common diabetic complications such as neuropathy, cognitive decline, depression, nephropathy and cardiovascular disease. The review also provides a discussion of the role of inflammation and stress in the development and progression of chronic complications of diabetes, associated symptomatology and importance of early identification of symptoms of depression, fatigue, exercise intolerance and pain. PMID:25987953

  5. Toxic stress, inflammation and symptomatology of chronic complications in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Charles A; Faulkner, Melissa Spezia

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes affects at least 382 million people worldwide and the incidence is expected to reach 592 million by 2035. The incidence of diabetes in youth is skyrocketing as evidenced by a 21% increase in type 1 diabetes and a 30.5% increase in type 2 diabetes in the United States between 2001 and 2009. The effects of toxic stress, the culmination of biological and environmental interactions, on the development of diabetes complications is gaining attention. Stress impacts the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis and contributes to inflammation, a key biological contributor to the pathogenesis of diabetes and its associated complications. This review provides an overview of common diabetic complications such as neuropathy, cognitive decline, depression, nephropathy and cardiovascular disease. The review also provides a discussion of the role of inflammation and stress in the development and progression of chronic complications of diabetes, associated symptomatology and importance of early identification of symptoms of depression, fatigue, exercise intolerance and pain. PMID:25987953

  6. Bilateral chylothorax as a complication of internal jugular vein cannulation

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Puneet; Shankar, Subramanian; Kumar, Vivek; Naithani, Nardeep

    2015-01-01

    Central venous catheterization is one of the most prevalent procedures in the Intensive Care Unit. Complications are reported in about 15% of the patients and usually comprise of infection, arterial puncture, malpositioning, pneumothorax, local hematoma, hemothorax, and so on. Chylothorax is a rare complication of this procedure. We present a 42-year-old lady, who developed bilateral massive chylothorax after cannulation of her left internal jugular vein (IJV), due to direct injury to the thoracic duct during the procedure. The patient was successfully managed with bilateral chest tube drainage and omission of oral feeds for four days. Development of bilateral chylothorax as a complication of IJV cannulation is rare, but merits reporting, in view of a large number of central venous cannulations being undertaken. Critical care professionals should be aware of this rare complication of a common procedure to facilitate early identification and institute appropriate therapy. PMID:26180388

  7. Fasting: The History, Pathophysiology and Complications

    PubMed Central

    Kerndt, Peter R.; Naughton, James L.; Driscoll, Charles E.; Loxterkamp, David A.

    1982-01-01

    An appreciation of the physiology of fasting is essential to the understanding of therapeutic dietary interventions and the effect of food deprivation in various diseases. The practice of prolonged fasting for political or religious purposes is increasing, and a physician is likely to encounter such circumstances. Early in fasting weight loss is rapid, averaging 0.9 kg per day during the first week and slowing to 0.3 kg per day by the third week; early rapid weight loss is primarily due to negative sodium balance. Metabolically, early fasting is characterized by a high rate of gluconeogenesis with amino acids as the primary substrates. As fasting continues, progressive ketosis develops due to the mobilization and oxidation of fatty acids. As ketone levels rise they replace glucose as the primary energy source in the central nervous system, thereby decreasing the need for gluconeogenesis and sparing protein catabolism. Several hormonal changes occur during fasting, including a fall in insulin and T3 levels and a rise in glucagon and reverse T3 levels. Most studies of fasting have used obese persons and results may not always apply to lean persons. Medical complications seen in fasting include gout and urate nephrolithiasis, postural hypotension and cardiac arrhythmias. ImagesFigure 4. PMID:6758355

  8. Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... My Health Advisor Tools To Know Your Risk Alert Day Diabetes Basics Home Symptoms Diagnosis America's Diabetes ... Volunteer Center American Diabetes Month® American Diabetes Association Alert Day® Become a Member Advocacy Home Take Action ...

  9. Neurological complications of underwater diving.

    PubMed

    Rosi?ska, Justyna; ?ukasik, Maria; Kozubski, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    The diver's nervous system is extremely sensitive to high ambient pressure, which is the sum of atmospheric and hydrostatic pressure. Neurological complications associated with diving are a difficult diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. They occur in both commercial and recreational diving and are connected with increasing interest in the sport of diving. Hence it is very important to know the possible complications associated with this kind of sport. Complications of the nervous system may result from decompression sickness, pulmonary barotrauma associated with cerebral arterial air embolism (AGE), otic and sinus barotrauma, high pressure neurological syndrome (HPNS) and undesirable effect of gases used for breathing. The purpose of this review is to discuss the range of neurological symptoms that can occur during diving accidents and also the role of patent foramen ovale (PFO) and internal carotid artery (ICA) dissection in pathogenesis of stroke in divers. PMID:25666773

  10. Attachment, loss, and complicated grief.

    PubMed

    Shear, Katherine; Shair, Harry

    2005-11-01

    Bereavement is a highly disruptive experience that is usually followed by a painful but time-limited period of acute grief. An unfortunate minority of individuals experience prolonged and impairing complicated grief, an identifiable syndrome that differs from usual grief, major depression, and other DSM IV diagnostic entities. Underlying processes guiding symptoms are not well understood for either usual or complicated grief. We propose a provisional model of bereavement, guided by Myron Hofer's question "What exactly is lost when a loved one dies?" We integrate insights about biobehavioral regulation from Hofer's animal studies of infant separation, research on adult human attachment, and new ideas from bereavement research. In this model, death of an attachment figure produces a state of traumatic loss and symptoms of acute grief. These symptoms usually resolve following revision of the internalized representation of the deceased to incorporate the reality of the death. Failure to accomplish this integration results in the syndrome of complicated grief. PMID:16252293

  11. Diabetic retinopathy - ocular complications of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Nentwich, Martin M; Ulbig, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    In industrialized nations diabetic retinopathy is the most frequent microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus and the most common cause of blindness in the working-age population. In the next 15 years, the number of patients suffering from diabetes mellitus is expected to increase significantly. By the year 2030, about 440 million people in the age-group 20-79 years are estimated to be suffering from diabetes mellitus worldwide (prevalence 7.7%), while in 2010 there were 285 million people with diabetes mellitus (prevalence 6.4%). This accounts for an increase in patients with diabetes in industrialized nations by 20% and in developing countries by 69% until the year 2030. Due to the expected rise in diabetic patients, the need for ophthalmic care of patients (i.e., exams and treatments) will also increase and represents a challenge for eye-care providers. Development of optimized screening programs, which respect available resources of the ophthalmic infrastructure, will become even more important. Main reasons for loss of vision in patients with diabetes mellitus are diabetic macular edema and proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Incidence or progression of these potentially blinding complications can be greatly reduced by adequate control of blood glucose and blood pressure levels. Additionally, regular ophthalmic exams are mandatory for detecting ocular complications and initiating treatments such as laser photocoagulation in case of clinical significant diabetic macular edema or early proliferative diabetic retinopathy. In this way, the risk of blindness can considerably be reduced. In advanced stages of diabetic retinopathy, pars-plana vitrectomy is performed to treat vitreous hemorrhage and tractional retinal detachment. In recent years, the advent of intravitreal medication has improved therapeutic options for patients with advanced diabetic macular edema. PMID:25897358

  12. Major vascular injuries complicating knee arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bancu, Serban; Muresan, Mircea; Sala, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Starting with a case report, we made a detailed review of the literature, with the purpose of identifying and analyzing the type of iatrogenic vascular lesion following knee arthroscopy and the method of vascular repair. A PubMed literature search was undertaken to locate all reported cases of major vascular iatrogenic injuries during arthroscopic knee procedures. We identified 39 papers which report a total of 62 cases of major iatrogenic popliteal lesions after knee arthroscopy, between 1985 and 2014. The type of arthroscopic intervention performed, the type of iatrogenic vascular lesion encountered, the time passed until its discovery and treatment, the method of vascular reconstruction, and the postoperative course are presented. Postarthroscopy vascular complications are infrequent but potentially disastrous for the condition of the affected inferior limb. An early diagnosis and reintervention are mandatory for a good postoperative outcome. PMID:26240627

  13. Pleural procedural complications: prevention and management

    PubMed Central

    Psallidas, Ioannis; Wrightson, John M.; Hallifax, Robert J.; Rahman, Najib M.

    2015-01-01

    Pleural disease is common with a rising case frequency. Many of these patients will be symptomatic and require diagnostic and/or therapeutic procedures. Patients with pleural disease present to a number of different medical specialties, and an equally broad range of clinicians are therefore required to have practical knowledge of these procedures. There is often underestimation of the morbidity and mortality associated with pleural interventions, even those regarded as being relatively straightforward, with potentially significant implications for processes relating to patient safety and informed consent. The advent of thoracic ultrasound (TUS) has had a major influence on patient safety and the number of physicians with the necessary skill set to perform pleural procedures. As the variety and complexity of pleural interventions increases, there is increasing recognition that early specialist input can reduce the risk of complications and number of procedures a patient requires. This review looks at the means by which complications of pleural procedures arise, along with how they can be managed or ideally prevented. PMID:26150919

  14. Not to Complicate Matters, but ...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacoby, Russell

    2008-01-01

    The writer discusses the current academic enthrallment with complicating seemingly every aspect of every event or phenomenon, arguing that the fashion elevates confusion from a transitional stage into an end goal. Rather than scholarly clarification, says Jacoby, people celebrate the fact that everything can be "problematized," rejoicing in…

  15. Surgical complications of amyloid disease.

    PubMed Central

    O'Doherty, D. P.; Neoptolemos, J. P.; Bouch, D. C.; Wood, K. F.

    1987-01-01

    The case of a man with primary systemic amyloidosis without myelomatosis and long-term survival is described. The patient has had major surgical complications from large amyloid deposits in the colon, dorsal spine and peritoneal cavity. The patient remains well 14 years after diagnosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3684836

  16. Major Depression and Complicated Grief

    MedlinePLUS

    ... grief process Next Topic Coping with loss Major depression and complicated grief Depression It’s common for people to have sadness, pain, ... might be getting worse—going into a major depression. About 1 in 5 bereaved people will develop ...

  17. Anaesthetic complications in plastic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Soumya Sankar; Roy, Debashis; Ansari, Farrukh; Pawar, Sundeep T.

    2013-01-01

    Anaesthesia related complications in plastic surgeries are fortunately rare, but potentially catastrophic. Maintaining patient safety in the operating room is a major concern of anaesthesiologists, surgeons, hospitals and surgical facilities. Circumventing preventable complications is essential and pressure to avoid these complications in cosmetic surgery is increasing. Key aspects of patient safety in the operating room are outlined, including patient positioning, airway management and issues related to some specific conditions, essential for minimizing post-operative morbidity. Risks associated with extremes of age in the plastic surgery population, may be minimised by a better understanding of the physiologic changes as well as the pre-operative and post-operative considerations in caring for this special group of patients. An understanding of the anaesthesiologist's concerns during paediatric plastic surgical procedures can facilitate the coordination of efforts between the multiple services involved in the care of these children. Finally, the reader will have a better understanding of the perioperative care of unique populations including the morbidly obese and the elderly. Attention to detail in these aspects of patient safety can help avoid unnecessary complication and significantly improve the patients’ experience and surgical outcome. PMID:24501480

  18. Neurological Complications of VZV Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the review Varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation results in zoster, which may be complicated by postherpetic neuralgia, myelitis, meningoencephalitis and VZV vasculopathy. This review highlights the clinical features, laboratory abnormalities, imaging changes and optimal treatment of each of those conditions. Because all of these neurological disorders produced by VZV reactivation can occur in the absence of rash, the virological tests proving that VZV caused disease are discussed. Recent findings After primary infection, VZV becomes latent in ganglionic neurons along the entire neuraxis. With a decline in VZV-specific cell-mediated immunity, VZV reactivates from ganglia and travels anterograde to the skin to cause zoster, which is often complicated by postherpetic neuralgia. VZV can also travel retrograde to produce meningoencephaltis, myelitis and stroke. When these complications occur without rash, VZV-induced disease can be diagnosed by detection of VZV DNA or anti-VZV antibody in CSF and treated with intravenous acyclovir. Summary Awareness of the expanding spectrum of neurological complications caused by VZV reactivation with and without rash will improve diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24792344

  19. Practical approach to management of respiratory complications in neurological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Mangera, Zaheer; Panesar, Gurkirat; Makker, Himender

    2012-01-01

    Patients with certain neurological diseases are at increased risk of developing chest infections as well as respiratory failure due to muscular weakness. In particular, patients with certain neuromuscular disorders are at higher risk. These conditions are often associated with sleep disordered breathing. It is important to identify patients at risk of respiratory complications early in the course of their disease, although patients with neuromuscular disorders often present in the acute setting with respiratory involvement. This review of the respiratory complications of neurological disorders, with a particular focus on neuromuscular disorders, explores why this happens and looks at how to recognize, investigate, and manage these patients effectively. PMID:22505823

  20. The current role of endourologic management of renal transplantation complications.

    PubMed

    Duty, Brian D; Conlin, Michael J; Fuchs, Eugene F; Barry, John M

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Complications following renal transplantation include ureteral obstruction, urinary leak and fistula, urinary retention, urolithiasis, and vesicoureteral reflux. These complications have traditionally been managed with open surgical correction, but minimally invasive techniques are being utilized frequently. Materials and Methods. A literature review was performed on the use of endourologic techniques for the management of urologic transplant complications. Results. Ureterovesical anastomotic stricture is the most common long-term urologic complication following renal transplantation. Direct vision endoureterotomy is successful in up to 79% of cases. Urinary leak is the most frequent renal transplant complication early in the postoperative period. Up to 62% of patients have been successfully treated with maximal decompression (nephrostomy tube, ureteral stent, and Foley catheter). Excellent outcomes have been reported following transurethral resection of the prostate shortly after transplantation for patients with urinary retention. Vesicoureteral reflux after renal transplant is common. Deflux injection has been shown to resolve reflux in up to 90% of patients with low-grade disease in the absence of high pressure voiding. Donor-gifted and de novo transplant calculi may be managed with shock wave, ureteroscopic, or percutaneous lithotripsy. Conclusions. Recent advances in equipment and technique have allowed many transplant patients with complications to be effectively managed endoscopically. PMID:24023541

  1. Complications of immobilization and bed rest. Part 2: Other complications.

    PubMed Central

    Teasell, R.; Dittmer, D. K.

    1993-01-01

    Prolonged immobilization affects almost every organ system. Respiratory complications include decreased ventilation, atelectasis, and pneumonia. Decreased basal metabolic rate, increased diuresis, natriuresis, and nitrogen and calcium depletion affect metabolism. Genitourinary problems include renal stones and more frequent urinary tract infections. Glucose intolerance, anorexia, constipation, and pressure sores might develop. Central nervous system changes could affect balance and coordination and lead to increasing dependence on caregivers. Images Figure 1 PMID:8324412

  2. Placental exosomes in normal and complicated pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Murray D; Peiris, Hassendrini N; Kobayashi, Miharu; Koh, Yong Q; Duncombe, Gregory; Illanes, Sebastian E; Rice, Gregory E; Salomon, Carlos

    2015-10-01

    While there is considerable contemporary interest in elucidating the role of placenta-derived extracellular vesicles in normal and complicated pregnancies and their utility as biomarkers and therapeutic interventions, progress in the field is hindered by a lack of standardized extracellular vesicle taxonomy and isolation protocols. The term "extracellular vesicle" is nonspecific and refers to all membrane-bound vesicles from nanometer to micrometer diameters and of different biogenic origins. To meaningfully ascribe biological function and/or diagnostic and therapeutic utility to extracellular vesicles, and in particular exosomes, greater specificity and vesicle characterization is required. The current literature relating to exosome biology must be interpreted in this context. Exosomes are a subtype of extracellular vesicle that are specifically defined by an endosomal biogenesis and particle size (40-120 nm) and density (1.13-1.19 g/mL(-1)). Exosomes are specifically package with signaling molecules (including protein, messenger RNA, microRNA, and noncoding RNA) and are released by exocytosis into biofluid compartments. Exosomes regulate the activity of both proximal and distal target cells, including translational activity, angiogenesis, proliferation, metabolism, and apoptosis. As such, exosomal signaling represents an integral pathway mediating intercellular communication. During pregnancy, the placenta releases exosomes into the maternal circulation from as early as 6 weeks of gestation. Release is regulated by factors that include both oxygen tension and glucose concentration and correlates with placental mass and perfusion. The concentration of placenta-derived exosomes in maternal plasma increases progressively during gestation. Exosomes isolated from maternal plasma are bioactive in vitro and are incorporated into target cells by endocytosis. While the functional significance of placental exosomes in pregnancy remains to be fully elucidated, available data support a role in normal placental development and maternal immunotolerance. Similarly, the role of exosomes in the etiology and progression of complications of pregnancy remains in a formative stage. Changes in the release of placenta- and nonplacenta-derived exosomes, their concentration in maternal plasma, composition, and bioactivity have been reported in association with pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes and preeclampsia. The data, however, are confounded by the use of different isolation methodologies and vesicle subpopulations. The application of specific and well-characterized isolation methodologies is requisite to resolving the precise role of exosomes in complications of pregnancies and their ultimate clinical utility. PMID:26428497

  3. Urological complications: analysis and management of 1525 consecutive renal transplantations.

    PubMed

    Zavos, G; Pappas, P; Karatzas, T; Karidis, N P; Bokos, J; Stravodimos, K; Theodoropoulou, E; Boletis, J; Kostakis, A

    2008-06-01

    Urological complications after renal transplantation increase morbidity, delay graft function, and occasionally lead to graft and/or patient loss. The aim of this study was to analyze the causes of and therapeutic approaches to urological complications in renal transplantation as they related to patient outcomes. A series of 1525 consecutive renal transplantations were performed over a 24-year period. Renal grafts were obtained in 814 cases from living-related and in 711 from cadaveric donors. A Lich-Gregoire ureterovesical reimplantation technique with minimal bladder wall dissection was employed in all cases. Ureteral stents were routinely used in cadaveric transplants and exceptionally among living-related grafts. Urological complications were classified according to the mechanism and site of urinary tract involvement: graft ureteropelvic junction obstruction/stenosis (A), ureteral obstruction/stenosis (B), ureterovesical anastomosis obstruction/stenosis (C), urinary leakage (D), and other (E). Overall, we encountered 96 urological complications (6.3%). Group C complications occurred in 29 cases (30.2%), followed by 27 cases (28.1%) for group B patients, 25 cases (26.0%) for group D, 12 cases (12.5%) for group A, and 3 cases (3.1%) for group E patients. Surgical intervention was required in 49 (51.0%) of all urological complications. The others (n = 47, 49.0%) were treated either conservatively or by minimally invasive procedures. A rapid diagnosis of urological complications, assisted by early posttransplant DTPA scans, routine ultrasonography, and especially prompt treatment, resulted in compensation of renal graft dysfunction in the vast majority (n = 90, 93.8%) of cases. Surgical techniques of graft retrieval and reimplantation are of utmost importance to minimize the incidence of urological complications. PMID:18589113

  4. Suicide bereavement and complicated grief

    PubMed Central

    Tal Young, Ilanit; Iglewicz, Alana; Glorioso, Danielle; Lanouette, Nicole; Seay, Kathryn; Ilapakurti, Manjusha; Zisook, Sidney

    2012-01-01

    Losing a loved to suicide is one is one of life's most painful experiences. The feelings of loss, sadness, and loneliness experienced after any death of a loved one are often magnified in suicide survivors by feelings of quilt, confusion, rejection, shame, anger, and the effects of stigma and trauma. Furthermore, survivors of suicide loss are at higher risk of developing major depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and suicidal behaviors, as well as a prolonged form of grief called complicated grief. Added to the burden is the substantial stigma, which can keep survivors away from much needed support and healing resources. Thus, survivors may require unique supportive measures and targeted treatment to cope with their loss. After a brief description of the epidemiology and circumstances of suicide, we review the current state of research on suicide bereavement, complicated grief in suicide survivors, and grief treatment for survivors of suicide. PMID:22754290

  5. [Body piercing complications in otorhinolaryngology].

    PubMed

    García Callejo, F J; Martínez Beneito, M P; Ortega Navarro, M C

    1998-05-01

    Piercing is used to designate an ornamentation technique used on skin and mucosa in any site of the body, which consists of perforation and placement of studs, hoops, or earrings for esthetic or attention-seeking purposes. This fashion has spread in Spain in the last decade and although practitioners and users consider it to be inoffensive, we have observed an increasing number of hospital consultations resulting from the placement of such ornaments in ears, nose, tongue and lips. Local infection, bleeding, and contact dermatitis are the most frequent complications. The lack of legislation and health education of the practitioners can be expected to increase the number and intensity of the complications. PMID:9707749

  6. Prevalence Estimates of Complicated Syphilis.

    PubMed

    Dombrowski, Julia C; Pedersen, Rolf; Marra, Christina M; Kerani, Roxanne P; Golden, Matthew R

    2015-12-01

    We reviewed 68 cases of possible neurosyphilis among 573 syphilis cases in King County, WA, from 3rd January 2012 to 30th September 2013; 7.9% (95% confidence interval, 5.8%-10.5%) had vision or hearing changes, and 3.5% (95% confidence interval, 2.2%-5.4%) had both symptoms and objective confirmation of complicated syphilis with either abnormal cerebrospinal fluid or an abnormal ophthalmologic examination. PMID:26562700

  7. [Infectious complications in patients after cardiac arrest undergoing therapeutic hypothermia].

    PubMed

    Sýkora, R

    2011-05-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia is currently recommended neuroprotective therapeutic measure for comatose patients after cardiac arrest. Hypothermia has been proven not only to affect the neurological outcomes but also the survival of patients after cardiac arrest. This communication summarizes the issue of early infectious complications in patients after cardiac arrest undergoing therapeutic hypothermia. Diagnosis of infectious events is complicated in patients after cardiac arrest not only by the physiological effects of therapeutic hypothermia but also by the consequences of reperfusion injury and development of postresuscitation disease associated with systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Furthermore, there are discussed limited diagnostic options of infectious complications. The significance of the usual symptoms of infections is reduced, as well as the value of laboratory markers such as procalcitonin and C-reactive protein. Finally, the possibility of antibiotic treatment and eventual antibiotic prophylaxis during therapeutic hypothermia in patients after cardiac arrest outside hospitals is mentioned. PMID:21695930

  8. Effect of intrauterine infusion of an organic-certified product on uterine health, survival, and fertility of dairy cows with toxic puerperal metritis.

    PubMed

    Pinedo, P J; Velez, J S; Bothe, H; Merchan, D; Piñeiro, J M; Risco, C A

    2015-05-01

    The objective was to evaluate the effect of intrauterine infusion of an organic certified product (Optimum UterFlush, Van Beek Natural Science, Orange City, IA) on uterine health, survival, and fertility of cows affected with toxic puerperal metritis (TPM) in an organic dairy farm. Cows with TPM were defined as having an abnormally enlarged uterus and a fetid watery red-brown vaginal discharge, associated with systemic illness and fever (rectal temperature ?39.5°C), within 12 d postpartum. Cows diagnosed with TPM (n=220; study d 0) were blocked by parity (1 and ?2) and randomly assigned into 1 of 2 intrauterine treatments applied every other day for a total of 3 applications: (1) control (CON)=200mL of povidone iodine diluted in 2L of distilled water (n=113); (2) Optimum UterFlush (UF)=3.75mL diluted in 117mL of distilled water (n=107). All enrolled cows received hypertonic saline solution (500mL 7.2% i.v.), dextrose (500mL 50% i.v.), and oral aspirin (5 boluses/d). Outcome variables for treatment efficacy included fever and presence of fetid vaginal discharge at study d 6 and 14, survival at study d 6 and 14 and at 30 and 100 DIM, and reproductive performance. Control variables were parity, BCS at enrollment, calving season, and milk yield. Occurrence of fever at d 6 and 14 was not different between the 2 treatment groups. Presence of fetid vaginal discharge at d 6 and 14 was lower in cows treated with UF compared with cows in the CON group (10.7 vs. 28% and 1.1 vs. 9.1%). The odds (95% confidence interval) for survival and remaining in the farm at study d 6 and 14 and at 30 and 100 DIM for cows in the UF treatment were 4.67 (1.38-15.8), 2.77 (1.25-6.10), 3.13 (1.22-8.02), and 2.82 (1.38-5.71) times the odds of cows in the CON group, respectively. The odds of AI until 150 DIM and the interval from calving to first AI were not different between the 2 treatments. However, pregnancy was affected by treatment; the odds (95% confidence interval) of pregnancy at the first AI, 150 DIM, and 300 DIM for cows treated with UF were 2.15 (1.05-4.40), 1.81 (1.04-3.15), and 1.92 (1.09-3.38) times the odds of cows in the CON group, respectively. Days to pregnancy were similar in both treatment groups, but the number of artificial inseminations per pregnancy were different (2.69 vs. 2.02 for cows in the CON and UF treatments). Results indicate that cows with TPM administered intrauterine infusion of Optimum UterFlush had higher odds of recovering and improved reproductive performance compared with cows treated with povidone iodine. PMID:25771053

  9. Pseudoaneurysm of pulmonary artery: rare complication of systemic chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Shivani; King, Gentry; Varadi, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Pulmonary artery pseudoaneurysm is an uncommon yet fatal clinical entity. Its presentation can mimic a number of common diseases and can be easily missed. As pseudoaneurysm is associated with a number of fatal complications, clinicians should be aware of imaging features which distinguishes pseudoaneurysms from its close differentials. Early recognition and treatment of pseudoaneurysm can prevent fatal outcomes including hemothorax, rupture, or death. PMID:26509021

  10. Limb threatening neuropathic complications from ankle fractures in patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Connolly, J F; Csencsitz, T A

    1998-03-01

    Although less common than neuropathic (Charcot) deformities in feet, ankle deformities can occur and produce significant limb threatening complications after injury in patients with longstanding diabetes. A series of six such complications, including one that resulted in amputation and several near amputations, are presented. The authors' primary purpose is to alert or remind physicians and orthopaedic surgeons of the often unanticipated but significant complications of these rare and seemingly mild ankle injuries. A secondary purpose is to point out that complications may be avoided or mitigated with early stabilization and possibly with treatment of bone resorbing, inflammatory processes characteristic of neuroarthropathies. PMID:9553555

  11. Late complications of operative hysteroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cooper, J M; Brady, R M

    2000-06-01

    The late complications of operative hysteroscopy result from either persistent endometrium after ablation or myometrial damage during surgery. Residual endometrium can become neoplastic, cause pain, or support a pregnancy. Myometrial damage can produce catastrophic consequences during a later pregnancy. These long-term problems place the impetus on the operating physician to select patients carefully, prepare the endometrium, and operate in such a way as to minimize the likelihood of residual endometrium and unnecessary myometrial damage. The value of operative hysteroscopy for infertility secondary to adhesions and uterine septa is unequivocal. Hysteroscopic surgery offers increased fertility rates while avoiding the risks of open surgery. For the treatment of abnormal uterine bleeding, endometrial ablation can be performed safely, and the long-term benefits are durable. As more operative hysteroscopy is performed, more delayed complications will arise. Easy-to-perform global ablation techniques and multifunctional operative hysteroscopes have enticed more gynecologists to test the waters of endometrial ablation and operative hysteroscopy. Although they empower the hysteroscopist to offer more advanced and more valuable minimally invasive options to patients, these tools simultaneously can tempt the surgeon to forego meticulous preoperative evaluation. Evidence exists that too often women undergo surgery without complete diagnostic assessment. In one study, 50% of women underwent hysterectomy without any diagnostic evaluation of the endometrium. Hysterectomy possesses a saving grace in that it provides cover for many missed diagnoses. Conservative, nonextirpative procedures offer no such life raft. Meticulous diagnostic assessment and preoperative consideration of risk factors for residual endometrium and future pregnancy remain the keys to minimizing late complications. PMID:10857126

  12. Amyopathic Dermatomyositis Complicated by Pneumomediastinum

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Randy; Green, Justin J.

    2013-01-01

    Dermatomyositis is an inflammatory disease of unclear etiology with characteristic cutaneous and musculoskeletal findings. Amyopathic dermatomyositis is a subtype without musculoskeletal involvement. Many cases of dermatomyositis are associated with underlying malignancy, but pulmonary manifestations can also be seen, the most common of which is interstitial lung disease. Pneumomediastinum is a rare complication that is important for clinicians to recognize, as it may be fatal if left untreated. The sudden onset of facial edema and shortness of breath in the setting of dermatomyositis should raise the suspicion of this condition. PMID:23556036

  13. Neurological complications of coeliac disease

    PubMed Central

    Pengiran, T; Wills, A; Holmes, G

    2002-01-01

    A variety of neurological disorders have been reported in association with coeliac disease including epilepsy, ataxia, neuropathy, and myelopathy. The nature of this association is unclear and whether a specific neurological complication occurs in coeliac disease remains unproved. Malabsorption may lead to vitamin and trace element deficiencies. Therefore, patients who develop neurological dysfunction should be carefully screened for these. However, malabsorption does not satisfactorily explain the pathophysiology and clinical course of many of the associated neurological disorders. Other mechanisms proposed include altered autoimmunity, heredity, and gluten toxicity. This review attempts to summarise the literature and suggests directions for future research. PMID:12151653

  14. Perioperative thrombotic complications in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Feltracco, Paolo; Barbieri, Stefania; Cillo, Umberto; Zanus, Giacomo; Senzolo, Marco; Ori, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Although the perioperative bleeding complications and the major side effects of blood transfusion have always been the primary concern in liver transplantation (OLT), the possible cohesion of an underestimated intrinsic hypercoagulative state during and after the transplant procedure may pose a major threat to both patient and graft survival. Thromboembolism during OLT is characterized not only by a complex aetiology, but also by unpredictable onset and evolution of the disease. The initiation of a procoagulant process may be triggered by various factors, such as inflammation, venous stasis, ischemia-reperfusion injury, vascular clamping, anatomical and technical abnormalities, genetic factors, deficiency of profibrinolytic activity, and platelet activation. The involvement of the arterial system, intracardiac thrombosis, pulmonary emboli, portal vein thrombosis, and deep vein thrombosis, are among the most serious thrombotic events in the perioperative period. The rapid detection of occlusive vascular events is of paramount importance as it heavily influences the prognosis, particularly when these events occur intraoperatively or early after OLT. Regardless of the lack of studies and guidelines on anticoagulant prophylaxis in this setting, many institutions recommend such an approach especially in the subset of patients at high risk. However, the decision of when, how and in what doses to use the various chemical anticoagulants is still a difficult task, since there is no common consensus, even for high-risk cases. The risk of postoperative thromboembolism causing severe hemodynamic events, or even loss of graft function, must be weighed and compared with the risk of an important bleeding. In this article we briefly review the risk factors and the possible predictors of major thrombotic complications occurring in the perioperative period, as well as their incidence and clinical features. Moreover, the indications to pharmacological prophylaxis and the current treatment strategies are also summarized. PMID:26185371

  15. [Special surgical complications in chronic inflammatory bowel diseases].

    PubMed

    Kroesen, A J

    2015-04-01

    After colorectal and anorectal interventions for chronic inflammatory bowel diseases, specific complications can occur.In Crohn's disease these complications mainly occur after proctocolectomy. Pelvic sepsis can be prevented by omentoplasty with fixation inside the pelvis. A persisting sepsis of the sacral cavity can be treated primarily by dissection of the anal sphincter which ensures better drainage. In cases of chronic sacral sepsis, transposition of the gracilis muscle is a further effective option. Early recurrence of a transsphincteric anal fistula should be treated by reinsertion of a silicon seton drainage.Complications after restorative proctocolectomy are frequent and manifold (35%). The main acute complications are anastomotic leakage and pelvic sepsis. Therapy consists of transperineal drainage of the abscess with simultaneous transanal drainage. Late complications due to technical and septic reasons are still a relevant problem even 36 years after introduction of this operative technique. A consistent approach with detailed diagnostic and surgical therapy results in a 75% rescue rate of ileoanal pouches. PMID:25693779

  16. Complications of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Papakonstantinou, Olympia; Chung, Christine B; Chanchairujira, Kullanuch; Resnick, Donald L

    2003-05-01

    Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using autografts or allografts is being performed with increasing frequency, particularly in young athletes. Although the procedure is generally well tolerated, with good success rates, early and late complications have been documented. As clinical manifestations of graft complications are often non-specific and plain radiographs cannot directly visualize the graft and the adjacent soft tissues, MR imaging has a definite role in the diagnosis of complications after ACL reconstruction and may direct subsequent therapeutic management. Our purpose is to review the normal MR imaging of the ACL graft and present the MR imaging findings of a wide spectrum of complications after ACL reconstruction, such as graft impingement, graft rupture, cystic degeneration of the graft, postoperative infection of the knee, diffuse and localized (i.e., cyclops lesion) arthrofibrosis, and associated donor site abnormalities. Awareness of the MR imaging findings of complications as well as the normal appearances of the normal ACL graft is essential for correct interpretation. PMID:12695835

  17. Infrared Thermal Imaging for Automated Detection of Diabetic Foot Complications

    PubMed Central

    van Netten, Jaap J.; van Baal, Jeff G.; Liu, Chanjuan; van der Heijden, Ferdi; Bus, Sicco A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Although thermal imaging can be a valuable technology in the prevention and management of diabetic foot disease, it is not yet widely used in clinical practice. Technological advancement in infrared imaging increases its application range. The aim was to explore the first steps in the applicability of high-resolution infrared thermal imaging for noninvasive automated detection of signs of diabetic foot disease. Methods The plantar foot surfaces of 15 diabetes patients were imaged with an infrared camera (resolution, 1.2 mm/pixel): 5 patients had no visible signs of foot complications, 5 patients had local complications (e.g., abundant callus or neuropathic ulcer), and 5 patients had diffuse complications (e.g., Charcot foot, infected ulcer, or critical ischemia). Foot temperature was calculated as mean temperature across pixels for the whole foot and for specified regions of interest (ROIs). Results No differences in mean temperature >1.5 °C between the ipsilateral and the contralateral foot were found in patients without complications. In patients with local complications, mean temperatures of the ipsilateral and the contralateral foot were similar, but temperature at the ROI was >2 °C higher compared with the corresponding region in the contralateral foot and to the mean of the whole ipsilateral foot. In patients with diffuse complications, mean temperature differences of >3 °C between ipsilateral and contralateral foot were found. Conclusions With an algorithm based on parameters that can be captured and analyzed with a high-resolution infrared camera and a computer, it is possible to detect signs of diabetic foot disease and to discriminate between no, local, or diffuse diabetic foot complications. As such, an intelligent telemedicine monitoring system for noninvasive automated detection of signs of diabetic foot disease is one step closer. Future studies are essential to confirm and extend these promising early findings. PMID:24124937

  18. Complications of Rigid Internal Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Chris A.; Lin, Kant Y.

    2009-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, there have been many advances in the development of bone fixation systems used in the practice of craniomaxillofacial surgery. As surgical practices have evolved, the complications of each technologic advance have changed accordingly. Interfragmentary instability of interosseous wiring has been replaced by the risk of exposure, infection, and palpability of plate and screw fixation systems. The improved rigidity of plate fixation requires anatomic alignment of fracture fragments. Failure to obtain proper alignment has led to the phenomenon known as “open internal fixation” of fracture fragments without proper reduction. The size of the plates has decreased to minimize palpability and exposure. However limitations in their application have been encountered due to the physiologic forces of the muscles of mastication and bone healing. In the pediatric population, the long-standing presence of plates in the cranial vault resulted in reports of transcranial migration and growth restriction. These findings led to the development of resorbable plating systems, which are associated with self-limited plate palpability and soft tissue inflammatory reactions. Any rigid system including these produces growth restriction in varying amounts. In this discussion, we review the reported complication rates of miniplating and microplating systems as well as absorptive plating systems in elective and traumatic craniofacial surgery. PMID:22110796

  19. Bacterial infections complicating tongue piercing

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Catherine HY; Minnema, Brian J; Gold, Wayne L

    2010-01-01

    Tongue piercing has become an increasingly popular form of body art. However, this procedure can occasionally be complicated by serious bacterial infections. The present article reports a case of prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by a Gemella species in a patient with a pierced tongue, and reviews 18 additional cases of local and systemic bacterial infections associated with tongue piercing. Infections localized to the oral cavity and head and neck region included molar abscess, glossal abscess, glossitis, submandibular lymphadenitis, submandibular sialadenitis, Ludwig’s angina and cephalic tetanus. Infections distal to the piercing site included eight cases of infective endocarditis, one case of chorioamnionitis and one case of cerebellar abscess. Oropharyngeal flora were isolated from all cases. While bacterial infections following tongue piercing are rare, there are reports of potentially life-threatening infections associated with the procedure. Both piercers and their clients should be aware of these potential complications, and standardized infection prevention and control practices should be adopted by piercers to reduce the risk. PMID:21358880

  20. Long-Term Complications of Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... only thing that determines a person's risk for diabetes complications. Other factors, like genes, can also play a ... the body that can be most affected by diabetes complications are the: eyes kidneys nerves heart and blood ...

  1. Managing Complications of Diabetes in Later Life

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Download PDF Managing Complications of Diabetes in Later Life Download Join our e-newsletter! Resources Managing Complications of Diabetes in Later Life Tools and Tips Printer-friendly PDF Click here ...

  2. Post-operative pulmonary complications after thoracotomy.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Saikat

    2015-09-01

    Pulmonary complications are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the post-operative period after thoracotomy. The type of complications and the severity of complications depend on the type of thoracic surgery that has been performed as well as on the patient's pre-operative medical status. Risk stratification can help in predicting the possibility of the post-operative complications. Certain airway complications are more prone to develop with thoracic surgery. Vocal cord injuries, bronchopleural fistulae, pulmonary emboli and post-thoracic surgery non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema are some of the unique complications that occur in this subset of patients. The major pulmonary complications such as atelectasis, bronchospasm and pneumonia can lead to respiratory failure. This review was compiled after a search for search terms within 'post-operative pulmonary complications after thoracic surgery and thoracotomy' on search engines including PubMed and standard text references on the subject from 2000 to 2015. PMID:26556921

  3. Twin gestations: I. Antenatal care and complications.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, B W; Kirschbaum, T H; Paul, R H

    1989-09-01

    In order to determine the occurrence of antenatal complications in twin pregnancies, we examined the medical records of 939 consecutive twin gestations delivered at Women's Hospital, Los Angeles County/University of Southern California Medical Center between 1980-1985. The rates of occurrence of the eight most common antenatal complications were determined and compared with their incidence in singleton gestations. In addition, complication rates were related to zygosity, levels of antenatal care, and time of antenatal diagnosis. Twin gestations had an 83% incidence of antenatal complications, in contrast to a 32% incidence in singleton gestations. The increased complication rate was due to the disproportionate increase in three complications: preterm labor, pregnancy-induced hypertension, and fetal death. Other complications did not occur more frequently in twin gestations than in singleton gestations. Monozygotic gestations were more frequently complicated by fetal death, and dizygotic gestations by pregnancy-induced hypertension. PMID:2761906

  4. Post-operative pulmonary complications after thoracotomy

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Saikat

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary complications are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the post-operative period after thoracotomy. The type of complications and the severity of complications depend on the type of thoracic surgery that has been performed as well as on the patient's pre-operative medical status. Risk stratification can help in predicting the possibility of the post-operative complications. Certain airway complications are more prone to develop with thoracic surgery. Vocal cord injuries, bronchopleural fistulae, pulmonary emboli and post-thoracic surgery non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema are some of the unique complications that occur in this subset of patients. The major pulmonary complications such as atelectasis, bronchospasm and pneumonia can lead to respiratory failure. This review was compiled after a search for search terms within ‘post-operative pulmonary complications after thoracic surgery and thoracotomy’ on search engines including PubMed and standard text references on the subject from 2000 to 2015. PMID:26556921

  5. Kawasaki Disease: Complications, Treatment and Prevention

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Resources Stroke More Kawasaki Disease: Complications, Treatment and Prevention Updated:Jul 24,2013 Complications The possibility of ... problems that did not show up right away. Prevention There is no known prevention for Kawasaki disease. ...

  6. Progeria syndrome with cardiac complications.

    PubMed

    Ilyas, Saadia; Ilyas, Hajira; Hameed, Abdul; Ilyas, Muhammad

    2013-09-01

    A case report of 6-year-old boy with progeria syndrome, with marked cardiac complications is presented. The boy had cardiorespiratory failure. Discoloured purpuric skin patches, alopecia, prominent forehead, protuberant eyes, flattened nasal cartilage, malformed mandible, hypodentition, and deformed rigid fingers and toes were observed on examination. The boy was unable to speak. A sclerotic systolic murmur was audible over the mitral and aortic areas. Chest x-rays showed cardiac enlargement and the electrocardiogram (ECG) showed giant peaked P waves (right atrial hypertrophy) and right ventricular hypertrophy. Atherosclerotic dilated ascending aorta, thickened sclerotic aortic, mitral, and tricuspid valves with increased echo texture, left and right atrial and right ventricular dilatation, reduced left ventricular cavity, and thickened speckled atrial and ventricular septa were observed on echocardiography. PMID:24601202

  7. Skeletal complications of eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Abigail A; Gordon, Catherine M

    2015-09-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric illness with profound medical consequences. Among the many adverse physical sequelae of AN, bone health is impacted by starvation and can be permanently impaired over the course of the illness. In this review of skeletal complications associated with eating disorders, we discuss the epidemiology, neuroendocrine changes, adolescent vs. adult skeletal considerations, orthopedic concerns, assessment of bone health, and treatment options for individuals with AN. The focus of the review is the skeletal sequelae associated with anorexia nervosa, but we also briefly consider other eating disorders that may afflict adolescents and young adults. The review presents updates to the field of bone health in AN, and also suggests knowledge gaps and areas for future investigation. PMID:26166318

  8. Can statins prevent pregnancy complications?

    PubMed

    Girardi, Guillermina

    2014-03-01

    Statins are potent inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis. The beneficial effects of the statins in preventing cardiovascular diseases are not entirely due to cholesterol reduction. Numerous studies suggest that the benefits observed with statins may be mediated by pleiotropic effects that are cholesterol-independent. There is now compelling evidence that statin therapy may diminish inflammation and oxidative stress, increase angiogenesis, inhibit the coagulation cascade and protect the endothelium. Several animal studies demonstrated that statins prevent pregnancy complications such as recurrent miscarriages and preeclampsia. Epidemiological data collected to date suggest that statins are not major teratogens. Clinical trials should be performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of statins in preventing bad pregnancy outcomes in women. Some of these trials recently started. This article summarizes the numerous effects of statins that can contribute to the pregnancy protection observed in animal models. PMID:24012117

  9. Pulmonary hypertension complicating multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Mark, Tomer M.; Niesvizky, Ruben; Sobol, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is an infrequently reported complication of multiple myeloma (MM). PH has been more commonly associated with amyloidosis, myeloproliferative diseases, and the POEMS (polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal protein, skin changes) syndrome. PH in MM is typically mild to moderate and may be secondary to a variety of conditions, which include left ventricular dysfunction, high-output cardiac failure, chronic kidney disease, treatment-related toxicities, and precapillary involvement. We describe 3 patients with MM and severe PH. Each patient underwent right heart catheterization. All patients demonstrated elevated pulmonary pressures, transpulmonary gradients, and pulmonary vascular resistance. Each patient was ultimately treated with pulmonary vasodilator therapy with improvement in cardiopulmonary symptoms. Additional studies are needed to define the prevalence, prognosis, and pathogenesis of PH in this complex population and to help clarify who may benefit from targeted PH therapy. PMID:26401262

  10. Cesarean delivery: counseling issues and complication management.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, Jeffrey D; Murphy, Neil J

    2015-02-01

    Nearly one-third of all deliveries in the United States are cesarean deliveries. Compared with spontaneous vaginal delivery, cesarean delivery is associated with increased maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Interventions that decrease the chance of a cesarean delivery include avoiding non-medically indicated induction of labor, avoiding amniotomy, and having a doula present. In North America, the most common reasons for cesarean delivery include elective repeat cesarean delivery, dystocia or failure to progress, malpresentation, and fetal heart rate tracings that suggest fetal distress. Post-cesarean delivery complications include pain, endomyometritis, wound separation/infection, urinary tract infection, gastrointestinal problems, deep venous thrombosis, and septic thrombophlebitis. Women with no risk factors for deep venous thrombosis other than the postpartum state and the operative delivery do not require thromboembolism prophylaxis other than early ambulation. A pregnant woman's decision to attempt a trial of labor after cesarean delivery or have a planned repeat cesarean delivery involves a balancing of maternal and neonatal risks, as well as personal preference after counseling by her physician. Approximately 75% of attempted trials of labor after cesarean delivery are successful. Provision of advanced maternity care practices by family physicians, including serving as primary surgeons for cesarean deliveries, is consistent with the goals of the patient-centered medical home. PMID:25822271

  11. Surgical Treatments for Infantile Purulent Meningitis Complicated by Subdural Effusion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xianshu; Zhang, Xiaoru; Cao, Hongbin; Jing, Shiyuan; Yang, Zhiguo; Cheng, Zhenghai; Liu, Ye; Li, Xin; Gao, Feifei; Ji, Yuanqi

    2015-01-01

    Background Infantile purulent meningitis (PM) is a commonly severe intracranial infectious disease in infants under age 1 year. In recent years, several diagnostic and treatment methods were reported, but in these cases the neurological complications and sequel were often observed, among which subdural effusion (SE) is the most common complication in PM. Timely diagnosis and early intervention are vital for better outcomes. In this study, the surgical treatments for infantile PM complicated by SE were investigated. Material/Methods Patients who had PM complicated by SE in the Children’s Hospital of Hebei Province from June 2000 to June 2012 were retrospectively analyzed and 170 patients were enrolled in the study. Surgical treatment for each patient was adopted according to producing effusion time, leucocyte count, protein content, intracranial pressure, and bacteria culture, coupled with cranial ultrasound examination, CT, and MRI scans. Results Nearly, 15 patients were cured using serial taps, with a 50% cure rate. Seventeen out of 30 (56.6%) patients receiving subcutaneous reservoir drainage had better outcome. Nearly 80% of patients (55/69) who underwent minimally invasive trepanation and drainage were positive. Surgical procedure of minimally invasive trepanation and drainage combined with drug douche was effective in 63% of patients (19/30). In addition, 6 patients were cured with subdural-peritoneal shunt. Only 1 patient died, after the recurrence of meningitis, and the remaining 4 patients were cured by craniotomy. Conclusions For infantile PM complicated with SE, treatment needs be chosen according to the specific situation. Surgical procedure of minimally invasive trepanation and drainage is a very effective treatment in curing PM complicated by SE. The treatment was highly effective with the use of drug douche. Subdural-peritoneal shunt and craniotomy were as effective as in refractory cases. PMID:26482715

  12. Cranioplasty after decompressive craniectomy: the effect of timing on postoperative complications.

    PubMed

    Schuss, Patrick; Vatter, Hartmut; Marquardt, Gerhard; Imöhl, Lioba; Ulrich, Christian T; Seifert, Volker; Güresir, Erdem

    2012-04-10

    Decompressive craniectomy (DC) due to intractably elevated intracranial pressure mandates later cranioplasty (CP). However, the optimal timing of CP remains controversial. We therefore analyzed our prospectively conducted database concerning the timing of CP and associated post-operative complications. From October 1999 to August 2011, 280 cranioplasty procedures were performed at the authors' institution. Patients were stratified into two groups according to the time from DC to cranioplasty (early, ?2 months, and late, >2 months). Patient characteristics, timing of CP, and CP-related complications were analyzed. Overall CP was performed early in 19% and late in 81%. The overall complication rate was 16.4%. Complications after CP included epidural or subdural hematoma (6%), wound healing disturbance (5.7%), abscess (1.4%), hygroma (1.1%), cerebrospinal fluid fistula (1.1%), and other (1.1%). Patients who underwent early CP suffered significantly more often from complications compared to patients who underwent late CP (25.9% versus 14.2%; p=0.04). Patients with ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt had a significantly higher rate of complications after CP compared to patients without VP shunt (p=0.007). On multivariate analysis, early CP, the presence of a VP shunt, and intracerebral hemorrhage as underlying pathology for DC, were significant predictors of post-operative complications after CP. We provide detailed data on surgical timing and complications for cranioplasty after DC. The present data suggest that patients who undergo late CP might benefit from a lower complication rate. This might influence future surgical decision making regarding optimal timing of cranioplasty. PMID:22201297

  13. Expectant management of PPROM and major complications before planned delivery: A retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Bendix, J M; Hegaard, H K; Bergholt, T; Langhoff-Roos, J

    2015-08-01

    Women with pre-term pre-labour rupture of membranes (PPROM) 22-33 weeks' gestation were included in a retrospective cohort study with a structured audit to identify risk factors of major complications following PPROM and to assess whether these complications are predictable. Of the 234 women analysed, 106 (45%) delivered within three days. Eighty-four women (36%) had at least one major complication and 45% of these complications occurred within three days. The complication rate was 64% in early PPROM before 28 weeks' gestation and 11% in late PPROM at 28 weeks' gestation or later. Nulliparous women had an increased risk of major complications (adjusted hazards ratio: 3.07 (95% confidence interval: 1.28-7.37)). The complication rates were highest in early PPROM and during the first three days after PPROM. Multiparous women with late PPROM, who do not deliver within the first three days, have the lowest risk of major complications and are suitable for home care. PMID:25517017

  14. Thermal stress and diabetic complications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsuka, Yoshinori; Yabunaka, Noriyuki; Watanabe, Ichiro; Noro, Hiroshi; Fujisawa, Hiroyuki; Agishi, Yuko

    1995-06-01

    Activities of erythrocyte aldose reductase were compared in 34 normal subjects, 45 diabetic patients, and nine young men following immersion in water at 25, 39, and 42° C. Mean basal enzyme activity was 1.11 (SEM 0.12) U/g Hb and 2.07 (SEM 0.14) U/g Hb in normal controls and diabetic patients, respectively ( P<0.0001). Activities of the enzyme showed a good correlation with hemaglobin A1 (HbA1) concentrations ( P<0.01) but not with fasting plasma glucose concentrations. After immersion at 42° C for 10 min, enzyme activity was increased by 37.6% ( P<0.01); however, the activity decreased by 52.2% ( P<0.005) after immersion for 10 min at 39° C and by 47.0% ( P<0.05) at 25° C. These changes suggest that heat stress might aggravate diabetic complications, and body exposure to hot environmental conditions is not recommended for diabetic patients.

  15. [Complications of synthetic hair implantation].

    PubMed

    Lange-Ionescu, S; Frosch, P J

    1995-01-01

    Five men (average age 35 years) suffering from the sequelae of hair implants were examined in the course of claims for legal compensation. Polyether amide hair fibres had been implanted, 1000 per patient and session. In all cases the improved implantation technique with a fine needle and subcutaneous knotting had been used in a total of three institutions. Three patients developed bacterial folliculitis after 4-8 weeks; in the other two patients this developed later, after 3-6 months. In two patients the possible triggering event was the wearing of a motorcycle helmet and a vacation in a tropical climate respectively. In another patient the artificial hair curled considerably after he visited a sauna. The implanted hair had fallen out almost completely in all cases (100% in two patients after 9-12 months, 50-75% in three patients after 7 months to 2 years). All patients showed cosmetically disturbing small scars and pigmentary changes. Despite an apparently improved complication rate, the new technique of hair fibre implantation remains a doubtful procedure and cannot be recommended in view of possible permanent sequelae. PMID:7875965

  16. Complications and management of breast enhancement using hyaluronic acid.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Hidenori; Sakata, Kazuaki

    2014-01-01

    The authors report on their experience with using hyaluronic acid of non-animal origin manufactured using commercially available technology (Macrolane, Q-Med AB, Sweden) for breast enhancement in 4000 women treated since 2004 and describe the most common complications and their successful treatment. On average, 30 mL to 40 mL of Macrolane was injected into each breast. Of 274 women who returned to the clinic during 2007, <10% experienced local adverse events (eg, gel dislocation, Macrolane nodules and rare cases of infection). There were no serious systemic events and treatment was well tolerated. To prevent local complications, such as infection, an aseptic injection technique was required and early treatment of adverse events is recommended. While only small volumes of Macrolane were injected, it is comparatively easy and safe to perform breast enhancement of up to one cup size to correct asymmetry between breasts and to create fullness in the upper portion of the breast. PMID:25332644

  17. Management of cardiogenic shock complicating acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Van Herck, Jozef L; Claeys, Marc J; De Paep, Rudi; Van Herck, Paul L; Vrints, Christiaan J; Jorens, Philippe G

    2015-06-01

    Cardiogenic shock complicates approximately 5-10% of cases with acute myocardial infarction and carries a poor prognosis. Early revascularization remains the cornerstone treatment of cardiogenic shock complicating myocardial infarction. Inotropic and/or vasopressor agents can be used for haemodynamic stabilization, although this comes at the expense of increased myocardial oxygen consumption and extended myocardial ischaemia. In recent years, the use of mechanical circulatory support has significantly increased. However, there is only limited data available from randomized trials evaluating the different percutaneous support systems. This review summarizes the available literature concerning the management of cardiogenic shock and gives an overview of the recommendations of the European and German-Austrian guidelines on cardiogenic shock. PMID:25624526

  18. Intraoperative laparoscopic complications for urological cancer procedures

    PubMed Central

    Montes, Sergio Fernández-Pello; Rodríguez, Ivan Gonzalez; Ugarteburu, Rodrigo Gil; Villamil, Luis Rodríguez; Mendez, Begoña Diaz; Gil, Patricio Suarez; Madera, Javier Mosquera

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To structure the rate of intraoperative complications that requires an intraoperative or perioperative resolution. METHODS: We perform a literature review of Medline database. The research was focused on intraoperative laparoscopic procedures inside the field of urological oncology. General rate of perioperative complications in laparoscopic urologic surgery is described to be around 12.4%. Most of the manuscripts published do not make differences between pure intraoperative, intraoperative with postoperative consequences and postoperative complications. RESULTS: We expose a narrative statement of complications, possible solutions and possible preventions for most frequent retroperitoneal and pelvic laparoscopic surgery. We expose the results with the following order: retroperitoneal laparoscopic surgery (radical nephrectomy, partial nephrectomy, nephroureterectomy and adrenalectomy) and pelvic laparoscopic surgery (radical prostatectomy and radical cystectomy). CONCLUSION: Intraoperative complications vary from different series. More scheduled reports should be done in order to better understand the real rates of complications. PMID:25984519

  19. Extravascular complications following abdominal organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Low, G; Jaremko, J L; Lomas, D J

    2015-08-01

    A variety of transplants have been performed in the abdomen including liver, kidney, pancreas and islet, bowel, and multivisceral transplants. Imaging plays an important role in graft surveillance particularly to exclude post-transplant complications. When complications occur, therapeutic image-guided interventions are invaluable as these may be graft-saving and even life-saving. Vascular complications following transplantation have been extensively reported in recent reviews. The focus of this review is to discuss post-transplant complications that are primarily extravascular in location. This includes biliary, urological, intestinal, malignancy, infections, and miscellaneous complications. Familiarity with the imaging appearances of these complications is helpful for radiologists as accurate diagnosis and expedient treatment has an impact on graft and patient survival. PMID:25979853

  20. Skull base fractures and their complications.

    PubMed

    Baugnon, Kristen L; Hudgins, Patricia A

    2014-08-01

    Basilar skull fractures are a relatively frequent occurrence in significant head trauma, and their detection is important, as even linear nondisplaced fractures can be associated with critical complications. The management of skull base fractures depends on the location and extent of these associated complications. This article reviews skull base anatomy; morphology of the common fracture patterns within the anterior, central, and posterior skull base; associated complications; imaging findings; and possible pitfalls in imaging of skull base trauma. PMID:25086806

  1. Management of biliary complications after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Memeo, Riccardo; Piardi, Tullio; Sangiuolo, Federico; Sommacale, Daniele; Pessaux, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Biliary complications (BC) currently represent a major source of morbidity after liver transplantation. Although refinements in surgical technique and medical therapy have had a positive influence on the reduction of postoperative morbidity, BC affect 5% to 25% of transplanted patients. Bile leak and anastomotic strictures represent the most common complications. Nowadays, a multidisciplinary approach is required to manage such complications in order to prevent liver failure and retransplantation. PMID:26689137

  2. Video-assisted thoracic surgery complications

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Józef

    2014-01-01

    Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is a miniinvasive technique commonly applied worldwide. Indications for VATS are very broad and include the diagnosis of mediastinal, lung and pleural diseases, as well as large resection procedures such as pneumonectomy. The most frequent complication is prolonged postoperative air leak. The other significant complications are bleeding, infections, postoperative pain and recurrence at the port site. Different complications of VATS procedures can occur with variable frequency in various diseases. Despite the large number of their types, such complications are rare and can be avoided through the proper selection of patients and an appropriate surgical technique. PMID:25561984

  3. Complications of implantation of synthetic fibers into scalps for "hair" replacement: experience with fourteen cases.

    PubMed

    Lepaw, M I

    1979-03-01

    Fourteen cases of complications from implantation of acrylic fibers into scalps for correction of male-pattern baldness were studied. The complications were severe enough in all of them to force attempts to remove the fibers, many of which from the nature of their knotted insertion could not be extracted. Thus, immediate complications were encountered and serious, delayed, bad effects are anticipated. Among the early complications already observed are marked edema of the face; hemorrhagic oozing; microbial infection; foreign-body reactions; scarring; acneform comedones and pustules; pain, pruritus, and numbness; and loss of natural hair. Complications in the furture are likely to be progressive sclerosis from irretrievable fragments and knots of the artificial materials and conceivably malignant degeneration of tissues of the scalp. For all of these known and possible bad effects, implantation of present-day synthetic fibers into the scalp must be judged to be a dangerous practice that must be stopped at once. PMID:429673

  4. Pulmonary Hypertension Complicating Fibrosing Mediastinitis.

    PubMed

    Seferian, Andrei; Steriade, Alexandru; Jaïs, Xavier; Planché, Olivier; Savale, Laurent; Parent, Florence; Amar, David; Jovan, Roland; Fadel, Elie; Sitbon, Olivier; Simonneau, Gérald; Humbert, Marc; Montani, David

    2015-11-01

    Fibrosing mediastinitis is caused by a proliferation of fibrous tissue in the mediastinum with encasement of mediastinal viscera and compression of mediastinal bronchovascular structures. Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a severe complication of fibrosing mediastinitis caused by extrinsic compression of the pulmonary arteries and/or veins.We have conducted a retrospective observational study reviewing clinical, functional, hemodynamic, radiological characteristics, and outcome of 27 consecutive cases of PH associated with fibrosing mediastinitis diagnosed between 2003 and 2014 at the French Referral Centre for PH.Fourteen men and 13 women with a median age of 60 years (range 18-84) had PH confirmed on right heart catheterization. The causes of fibrosing mediastinitis were sarcoidosis (n?=?13), tuberculosis-infection confirmed or suspected (n?=?9), mediastinal irradiation (n?=?2), and idiopathic (n?=?3). Sixteen patients (59%) were in NYHA functional class III and IV. Right heart catheterization confirmed moderate to severe PH with a median mean pulmonary artery pressure of 42 mm Hg (range 27-90) and a median cardiac index of 2.8 L/min/m (range 1.6-4.3). Precapillary PH was found in 22 patients, postcapillary PH in 2, and combined postcapillary and precapillary PH in 3. Severe extrinsic compression of pulmonary arteries (>60% reduction in diameter) was evidenced in 2, 8, and 12 patients at the main, lobar, or segmental levels, respectively. Fourteen patients had at least one severe pulmonary venous compression with associated pleural effusion in 6 of them. PAH therapy was initiated in 7 patients and corticosteroid therapy (0.5-1?mg/kg/day) was initiated in 3 patients with sarcoidosis, with 9 other being already on low-dose corticosteroids. At 1-year follow-up, 3 patients had died and among the 21 patients evaluated, 3 deteriorated, 14 were stable, and only 4 patients with sarcoidosis improved (4 receiving corticosteroids and 1 receiving corticosteroids and PAH therapy). Survival was 88%, 73%, and 56% at 1, 3, and 5 years, respectively.We found no clear clinical improvement with the use of specific PAH therapy. Corticosteroid therapy may be associated with clinical improvement, in some patients with fibrosing mediastinitis due to sarcoidosis. Although never performed for this indication, lung transplantation may be proposed in eligible patients with severe PH and fibrosing mediastinitis. PMID:26554778

  5. Management of complications associated with total ear canal ablation and bulla osteotomy in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Smeak, Daniel D

    2011-09-01

    Total ear canal ablation combined with bulla osteotomy is a salvage procedure recommended primarily for end-stage inflammatory ear canal disease but also for neoplasia and severe traumatic injuries. Due to the complexity of the procedure and the poor exposure associated with the surgical approach, there is significant risk for a variety of complications. This review discusses intraoperative, early postoperative, and late postoperative complications reported in large retrospective studies, the causes for these complications, and recommendations about how to prevent them. PMID:21889696

  6. Acute Complications of Myocardial Infarction in the Current Era: Diagnosis and Management.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Anurag; Sethi, Ankur; Rathor, Parul; Suppogu, Nissi; Sethi, Arjinder

    2015-10-01

    Coronary heart disease is a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. The incidence of mechanical complications of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) has gone down to less than 1% since the advent of percutaneous coronary intervention, but although mortality resulting from AMI has gone down in recent years, the burden remains high. Mechanical complications of AMI include cardiogenic shock, free wall rupture, ventricular septal rupture, acute mitral regurgitation, and right ventricular infarction. Detailed knowledge of the complications and their risk factors can help clinicians in making an early diagnosis. Prompt diagnosis with appropriate medical therapy and timely surgical intervention are necessary for favorable outcomes. PMID:26295381

  7. Managing complications II: conduit failure and conduit airway fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Christopher K.

    2014-01-01

    Conduit failure and conduit airway fistula are rare complications after esophagectomy, however they can be catastrophic resulting in high mortality. Survivors can expect a prolonged hospital course with multiple interventions and an extended period of time prior to being able to resume oral nutrition. High index of suspicion can aid in early diagnosis. Conduit failure usually requires a period of proximal esophageal diversion and staged reconstruction. Conduit airway fistulas may be amenable to endoscopic repair but this has a high failure rate and many patients will require surgical repair with closure of the fistula and interposition of vascularized tissue to minimize recurrence. PMID:24876943

  8. Bleeding complications in immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Donald M

    2015-12-01

    Bleeding manifestations in patients with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) range from mild skin bruises to life-threatening intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). Severe bleeding is distinctly uncommon when the platelet count is >30 × 10(9)/L and usually only occurs when the platelet count falls <10 × 10(9)/L. Based on estimates from clinical studies, ITP registries and administrative databases, the frequency of ICH in patients with ITP is ?0.5% in children and 1.5% in adults. Estimates of severe (non-ICH) bleeding are difficult to obtain because of the lack of standardized case definitions; the lack of a universally accepted, ITP-specific bleeding assessment tool; and the omission of reporting bleeding outcomes in many clinical studies. In practice, the presence of bleeding should dictate whether or not treatment is needed because many patients, especially children, can be safely managed with observation alone. Guiding principles for the management of ITP, based on the bleeding risk are: (1) Decide when treatment is needed and when it can safely be withheld; (2) for patients with chronic ITP, use the least toxic treatment at the lowest dose; (3) emergency treatment of severe thrombocytopenia-associated bleeding requires combination therapy; and (4) early aggressive therapy may result in durable platelet count responses. PMID:26637728

  9. [Complication management in prolapse and incontinence surgery].

    PubMed

    Hampel, C; Roos, F; Neisius, A; Thüroff, J W; Thomas, C

    2014-07-01

    Tension-free alloplastic slings (TFAS) have revolutionized surgery for female stress urinary incontinence for more than 20 years. The procedure is easy to perform, minimally invasive with a short operating time in an outpatient setting and has proven efficacy comparable to retropubic colposuspension. The frequency of surgery for female stress incontinence has tripled within one decade which has to have an impact on the number of complications. In contrast, sacrocolpopexy has remained the gold standard in urological prolapse surgery as none of the new techniques has reached similar efficacy or safety; however, possible complications have to be named and their causes have to be understood to maintain the highest quality of care in the future. Possible complications of TFAS are potentially underestimated with respect to prevalence and manageability. Possible complications of prolapse and incontinence surgery are presented and the underlying causes are identified. Knowledge of the pathophysiology and the cause of complications together with the results of a postoperative diagnostic work-up, allow complication management to be tailored to each individual patient. To prevent complications all conservative treatment options should have been tried preoperatively and a complete evaluation (including urodynamics) should have been carried out for every patient. Postoperative urodynamics may help to document treatment success and to identify and quantify complications. PMID:25023238

  10. Complications with Outpatient Angiography and Interventional Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Noel; Chi, Ka-Kit; Ajaka, Joe; McKay, Lesa; O'Neill, Diane; Wong, Kai Ping

    2002-03-15

    Purpose: To prospectively identify the complications, and rates of complication, in outpatient angiography and interventional procedures. Methods: There were 1050 consecutive patients, 646 men and 404 women, aged 17-89 years, with a total of 1239 procedures studied in a 2-year period, 1997 to 1999. Results: There were 560 cases of aorto-femoral angiography,resulting in 124 complications (22%), with pain or hematoma in 110.There were 206 cases of neck and cerebral angiography, resulting in 51 complications (25%), with pain and hematoma in 34, transient ischemic attack in 2 and cerebrovascular accident in 1. There were 197 interfentional procedures, with 177 being balloon dilatations, resulting in 68 complications (35%), with 2 having hematomas and 1 having hematoma/abscess requiring active treatment. There were 276 cases having various 'other' procedures (e.g., renal angiography),resulting in 65 complications (24%), with pain and hematoma in 61. No procedure-related death occurred. Eighteen cases (1.5%) had significant complications, with contrast allergy in eight. Conclusion: Outpatient angiography and intervention are relatively safe, with low significant complication rates.

  11. [Neurological complications of surgery for spinal deformities].

    PubMed

    Michel, F; Rubini, J; Grand, C; Bérard, J; Kohler, R; Michel, C R

    1992-01-01

    The aim of this study was to precisely analyse the physio-pathogenic mechanisms, bring to light the risk factors, and find a more practical way of proceeding in spinal surgery. Out of 667 spinal instrumentation surgical operations carried out between 1980-1989, we found 33 (4.8 per cent) neurological complications and have divided them into 2 groups: 7 peripheral complications, 26 cord and central complications. After further analysis, especially of the cord complications (2.5 per cent), we were able to pick out the factors which influence the rate of neurological complications and their evolution: secondary aetiology and the kyphotic composition of spinal deformation, and above all the notion of cord at risk. The delay of cord complications and especially the relation between the severity of the neurological syndrome and its evolution is extremely important. Somesthesic evoked potential monitoring confirmed that per operative diagnosis of a cord injury is possible. The steps to take when confronted with neurological complications, depend on the results of many examinations: pre and post-operative neurological evaluations electrophysiological exploration of the cord and neuro radiological explorations (myelography, scanner and IRM). This helps to complete aetiology and eliminate mechanical causes, which are the only positive indications of iterative surgery. The problems of instrumentation removal in emergency and the legal-medical aspect brought on by this type of complication are discussed. PMID:1410727

  12. Sedation-related complications in gastrointestinal endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Amornyotin, Somchai

    2013-01-01

    Sedation practices for gastrointestinal endoscopic (GIE) procedures vary widely in different countries depending on health system regulations and local circumstances. The goal of procedural sedation is the safe and effective control of pain and anxiety, as well as to provide an appropriate degree of memory loss or decreased awareness. Sedation-related complications in gastrointestinal endoscopy, once occurred, can lead to significant morbidity and occasional mortality in patients. The risk factors of these complications include the type, dose and mode of administration of sedative agents, as well as the patient’s age and underlying medical diseases. Complications attributed to moderate and deep sedation levels are more often associated with cardiovascular and respiratory systems. However, sedation-related complications during GIE procedures are commonly transient and of a mild degree. The risk for these complications while providing any level of sedation is greatest when caring for patients already medically compromised. Significant unwanted complications can generally be prevented by careful pre-procedure assessment and preparation, appropriate monitoring and support, as well as post-procedure management. Additionally, physicians must be prepared to manage these complications. This article will review sedation-related complications during moderate and deep sedation for GIE procedures and also address their appropriate management. PMID:24255744

  13. Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation (PDQ)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Research Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation (PDQ®) General Information About Oral Complications Key Points ... bleeding in the mouth. Nerve damage. Complications of radiation therapy Oral complications caused by radiation therapy to ...

  14. Complications of surgery for radiotherapy skin damage

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph, R.

    1982-08-01

    Complications of modern surgery for radiotherapy skin damage reviewed in 28 patients who had 42 operations. Thin split-thickness skin grafts for ulcer treatment had a 100 percent complication rate, defined as the need for further surgery. Local flaps, whether delayed or not, also had a high rate of complications. Myocutaneous flaps for ulcers had a 43 percent complication rate, with viable flaps lifting off radiated wound beds. Only myocutaneous flaps for breast reconstruction and omental flaps with skin grafts and Marlex mesh had no complications. The deeper tissue penetration of modern radiotherapy techniques may make skin grafts and flaps less useful. In reconstruction of radiation ulcers, omental flaps and myocutaneous flaps are especially useful, particularly if the radiation damage can be fully excised. The pull of gravity appears detrimental to myocutaneous flap healing and, if possible, should be avoided by flap design.

  15. Ocular Complications of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mady, Rana; Grover, Will; Butrus, Salim

    2015-01-01

    Though inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has a specific predilection for the intestinal tract, it is a systemic inflammatory disorder affecting multiple organs, including the eye. Ocular complications directly related to IBD are categorized as primary and secondary. Primary complications are usually temporally associated with IBD exacerbations and tend to resolve with systemic treatment of the intestinal inflammation. These include keratopathy, episcleritis, and scleritis. Secondary complications arise from primary complications. Examples include cataract formation due to treatment with corticosteroids, scleromalacia due to scleritis, and dry eye due to hypovitaminosis A following gut resection. Some ocular manifestations of IBD can lead to significant visual morbidity and temporally associated complications can also be a herald of disease control. Furthermore, ocular manifestations of IBD can occasionally manifest before the usual intestinal manifestations, leading to an earlier diagnosis. Thus, it is important to understand the clinical presentation of possible ocular manifestations in order to initiate appropriate treatment and to help prevent significant visual morbidity. PMID:25879056

  16. The role of interventional radiology in complications associated with liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ng, S; Tan, K A L; Anil, G

    2015-12-01

    The evolution of liver transplantation (LT) from an unusual procedure to a practical therapeutic option for patients with life-threatening liver diseases has brought with it several unique challenges. Although the patient survival rates have been steadily improving, with more complex surgeries being performed and increasing duration of graft survival, the overall post LT complication rate continues to stay high. They include inflow complications related to portal vein (PV) or hepatic artery, outflow complications related to hepatic vein or inferior vena cava, biliary leaks or strictures, postoperative collections or abscesses, graft rejection or post-transplant malignancy. These post-transplant complications provide a fertile ground for interventional radiology (IR) to flourish as it can contribute towards the management of each of these, and on most occasions, except for in graft rejection, it can circumvent a major surgery or even re-transplantation. The minimally invasive nature and lower morbidity associated with IR procedures make them preferable to similar surgical procedures. In post-transplant biliary complications, IR and therapeutic endoscopy have almost completely replaced surgery as the first-line treatments. The same can be said regarding the important role that IR plays in the management of most non-acute vascular complications. Meanwhile, more evidence and experience needs to be accumulated in the endovascular treatment of acute vascular complications encountered in the early post-operative period. This review primarily focuses on the various IR strategies in the management of the LT-related vascular and biliary complications with illustrative cases. PMID:26296831

  17. Nutrition in the management of cirrhosis and its neurological complications.

    PubMed

    Bémeur, Chantal; Butterworth, Roger F

    2014-06-01

    Malnutrition is a common feature of chronic liver diseases that is often associated with a poor prognosis including worsening of clinical outcome, neuropsychiatric complications as well as outcome following liver transplantation. Nutritional assessment in patients with cirrhosis is challenging owing to confounding factors related to liver failure. The objectives of nutritional intervention in cirrhotic patients are the support of liver regeneration, the prevention or correction of specific nutritional deficiencies and the prevention and/or treatment of the complications of liver disease per se and of liver transplantation. Nutritional recommendations target the optimal supply of adequate substrates related to requirements linked to energy, protein, carbohydrates, lipids, vitamins and minerals. Some issues relating to malnutrition in chronic liver disease remain to be addressed including the development of an appropriate well-validated nutritional assessment tool, the identification of mechanistic targets or therapy for sarcopenia, the development of nutritional recommendations for obese cirrhotic patients and liver-transplant recipients and the elucidation of the roles of vitamin A hepatotoxicity, as well as the impact of deficiencies in riboflavin and zinc on clinical outcomes. Early identification and treatment of malnutrition in chronic liver disease has the potential to lead to better disease outcome as well as prevention of the complications of chronic liver disease and improved transplant outcomes. PMID:25755550

  18. Complications of Intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin

    PubMed Central

    Macleod, Liam C.; Ngo, Tin C.; Gonzalgo, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is an important treatment for the management of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer because of its proven efficacy and favourable safety profile. The most common complications associated with BCG treatment are relatively minor. They include urinary frequency, cystitis, fever, and hematuria. Although serious complications are rare, patients can develop severe, life-threatening sepsis with disseminated mycobacterial infection. We report a rare case of periurethral diverticulum formation after intravesical BCG and review the literature on the potential complications of this treatment modality. PMID:25210559

  19. Medical Complications of Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia.

    PubMed

    Westmoreland, Patricia; Krantz, Mori J; Mehler, Philip S

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are serious psychiatric illnesses related to disordered eating and distorted body images. They both have significant medical complications associated with the weight loss and malnutrition of anorexia nervosa, as well as from the purging behaviors that characterize bulimia nervosa. No body system is spared from the adverse sequelae of these illnesses, especially as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa become more severe and chronic. We review the medical complications that are associated with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, as well as the treatment for the complications. We also discuss the epidemiology and psychiatric comorbidities of these eating disorders. PMID:26169883

  20. Complications and Outcomes of Primary Phacotrabeculectomy with Mitomycin C in a Multi-Ethnic Asian Population

    PubMed Central

    Sng, Chelvin; Aquino, Maria C.; Chew, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the occurrence of intraoperative and postoperative complications up to three years after primary phacotrabeculectomy with intraoperative use of Mitomycin C (MMC) in primary open angle (POAG) and primary angle closure glaucoma (PACG) patients, and the effect of postoperative complications on surgical outcome. Methods Retrospective review of 160 consecutive patients with POAG (n = 105) and PACG (n = 55), who underwent primary phacotrabeculectomy with MMC at the National University Hospital, Singapore, from January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2010. Data was collected using a standardized form that included patient demographic information, ocular characteristics and postoperative complications, including hypotony (defined as intraocular pressure < 6 mmHg), shallow anterior chamber (AC) and hyphema. Results The mean age ± standard deviation (SD) of patients was 68.2 ± 8.2 years. No patient lost light perception during duration of follow-up. 77% of the postoperative complications occurred within the first month only. The commonest complications were hypotony (n = 41, 25.6%), hyphema (n = 16, 10.0%) and shallow AC (n = 16, 10.0%). Five patients (3.1%) required reoperation for their complications. Early hypotony (defined as hypotony < 30 days postoperatively) was an independent risk factor for surgical failure (hazard ratio [HR], 5.1; 95% CI, 1.6–16.2; p = 0.01). Hypotony with another complication was also a risk factor for surgical failure (p < 0.02). Conclusions Hypotony, hyphema and shallow AC were the commonest postoperative complications in POAG and PACG patients after phacotrabeculectomy with MMC. Most complications were transient and self-limiting. Early hypotony within the first month was a significant risk factor for surgical failure. PMID:25775362

  1. Late complication of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Dakwar, Anthony; Assalia, Ahmad; Khamaysi, Iyad; Kluger, Yoram; Mahajna, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is gaining popularity for the treatment of morbid obesity. It is a simple, low-cost procedure resulting in significant weight loss within a short period of time. LSG is a safe procedure with a low complication rate. The complications encountered nevertheless can result in morbidity and even mortality. The most significant complications are staple-line bleeding, stricture, and staple-line leak. The purpose of this paper is to present a patient who suffered from a staple-line leak presenting 16 months after LSG. Review of the current literature regarding this complication as well as outline of a strategy for the management of post-LSG gastric leaks is suggested. PMID:23662218

  2. Late Complication of Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Assalia, Ahmad; Kluger, Yoram

    2013-01-01

    Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is gaining popularity for the treatment of morbid obesity. It is a simple, low-cost procedure resulting in significant weight loss within a short period of time. LSG is a safe procedure with a low complication rate. The complications encountered nevertheless can result in morbidity and even mortality. The most significant complications are staple-line bleeding, stricture, and staple-line leak. The purpose of this paper is to present a patient who suffered from a staple-line leak presenting 16 months after LSG. Review of the current literature regarding this complication as well as outline of a strategy for the management of post-LSG gastric leaks is suggested. PMID:23662218

  3. Post-transplant urological and vascular complications.

    PubMed

    Safa, Javid; Nezami, Nariman; Tarzamni, Mohammd K; Zarforooshan, Shahriyar; Rahimi-Ardabili, Babak; Bohlouli, Abolfazl

    2009-09-01

    To determine the prevalence of urological and vascular complications in renal trans-plant recipients (RTx) at Tabriz Renal Transplant Center, we studied 55 recipients of renal allo-grafts (25 male and 29 female patients with a mean age of 38.3 +/- 13.4 years) from October 2005 to November 2006. The surgical complications in our study included hematomas: 20.4%, renal artery stenosis: 20.4%, calculi: 7.4%, hydronephrosis or ureteral stricture: 5.6%, urinary leakage: 5.6%, lymphoceles: 1.9%, and renal vein thrombosis: 1.9%. We conclude that the most common urologic complications in our center were ureteric strictures and urine leaks, and the most common vascular complication was renal artery stenosis. PMID:19736494

  4. Antibiotics May Not Help After 'Complicated' Appendectomy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_155473.html Antibiotics May Not Help After 'Complicated' Appendectomy Use of ... 2, 2015 MONDAY, Nov. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Antibiotics may not reduce the risk of infections in ...

  5. [Temporal bone surgery. Surgical sequelae and complications].

    PubMed

    Linder, T E; Lin, F

    2011-10-01

    The saying "no surgery, no surgical complications" is certainly true for all specialties. Three categories of undesired events may occur following surgery: surgical sequelae, failure to cure and complications. A critical self-analysis of surgical complications often reveals that these arise in vexing fashion according to Murphy's law, i.e. "what can go wrong, will go wrong". Incomplete preoperative evaluation, insufficient exposure of the surgical field, failure to identify surgical landmarks and misjudgment of the patient's preoperative complaints may culminate in an undesired surgical outcome. Modern preoperative radiology, the possibilities of actual or even virtual temporal bone drilling in the laboratory and the surgeon's level of experience all ensure the relative rarity of relevant surgical complications in otology. PMID:21858517

  6. Prevention of Complications in Chemical Peeling

    PubMed Central

    Anitha, B

    2010-01-01

    Chemical peeling is a simple, safe and cost-effective office procedure. Complications can be best avoided by proper patient selection, proper patient counseling, adequate priming and good intra-peel and post-peel care. PMID:21430836

  7. Diabetes Complications - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... List of All Topics All Diabetes Complications - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Chinese - Simplified (????) French (français) Hindi (??????) Japanese (???) Korean (???) Russian (???????) Somali (af Soomaali) Spanish (español) ...

  8. Haemophilus influenzae Disease (Including Hib) Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is known as "invasive disease." Depending on what type of invasive infection the bacteria cause, the complications can be different. For example, if meningitis (infection of the covering of the brain and ...

  9. Treatment of biliary complications after liver transplant: results of a single center.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Sedat; Ayvazoglu Soy, Ebru Hatice; Akdur, Aydincan; Kirnap, Mahir; Boyvat, Fatih; Karakayali, Feza; Torgay, Adnan; Moray, Gokhan; Haberal, Mehmet

    2015-04-01

    Biliary complications are major sources of morbidity after liver transplant due to vulnerable vascularization of the bile ducts. Biliary complications are the "Achilles' heel" of liver transplant with their high incidence, need for repeated and prolonged treatment, and potential effects on graft and patient survival. Although standardization of reconstruction techniques and improvements in immunosuppression and organ preservation have reduced the incidence of biliary complications, in early reports the morbidity rates are 50%, with related mortality rate 25% to 30%. Prophylaxis is a major issue. Although many risk factors (old donor age, marginal graft, prolonged ischemia time, living-donor liver transplant, partial liver transplant, donation after cardiac death, hepatic arterial thrombosis, organ preservation, chronic rejection, and other donor and recipient characteristics) do not directly affect biliary complications, accumulation of the factors mentioned above, should be avoided. However, no accepted standard has been established. Treatment strategy is a subject of debate. Recently, nonoperative treatment of biliary complications have been preferred for diagnosis and therapy, because percutaneous or endoscopic treatment may prevent the need for surgical intervention. In this study, we reviewed our treatment of early and late biliary complications after liver transplant. PMID:25894131

  10. Streptococcus pneumoniae-associated pneumonia complicated by purulent pericarditis: case series *

    PubMed Central

    Cillóniz, Catia; Rangel, Ernesto; Barlascini, Cornelius; Piroddi, Ines Maria Grazia; Torres, Antoni; Nicolini, Antonello

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: In the antibiotic era, purulent pericarditis is a rare entity. However, there are still reports of cases of the disease, which is associated with high mortality, and most such cases are attributed to delayed diagnosis. Approximately 40-50% of all cases of purulent pericarditis are caused by Gram-positive bacteria, Streptococcus pneumoniae in particular. Methods: We report four cases of pneumococcal pneumonia complicated by pericarditis, with different clinical features and levels of severity. Results: In three of the four cases, the main complication was cardiac tamponade. Microbiological screening (urinary antigen testing and pleural fluid culture) confirmed the diagnosis of severe pneumococcal pneumonia complicated by purulent pericarditis. Conclusions: In cases of pneumococcal pneumonia complicated by pericarditis, early diagnosis is of paramount importance to avoid severe hemodynamic compromise. The complications of acute pericarditis appear early in the clinical course of the infection. The most serious complications are cardiac tamponade and its consequences. Antibiotic therapy combined with pericardiocentesis drastically reduces the mortality associated with purulent pericarditis. PMID:26398760

  11. Section 8. Management of portal venous complications in pediatric living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Fan; Ou, Hsin-You; Yu, Chun-Yen; Tsang, Leo Leung-Chit; Huang, Tung-Liang; Chen, Tai-Yi; Concejero, Allan; Wang, Chih-Chi; Wang, Shih-Ho; Lin, Tsan-Shiun; Liu, Yueh-Wei; Yang, Chin-Hsiang; Yong, Chee-Chien; Chiu, King-Wah; Jawan, Bruno; Eng, Hock-Liew; Chen, Chao-Long

    2014-04-27

    Portal vein (PV) complications after living donor liver transplant (LDLT) have been a major concern in pediatric liver transplantation. The incidence of PV complications is more in pediatric (0%-33%) than in adult recipients. Early diagnosis and treatment of PV complications may ensure optimal graft function and good recipient survival. Small preoperation PV size (<4 mm) and slow portal flow (<10 cm/s) combined with lower hepatic artery resistance index (<0.65) are strong warning signs that may predict the development of post LDLT PV complications. Portal vein angioplasty/stenting is conventionally performed through the percutaneous transhepatic approach; however, this can also be performed through transjugular, trans-splenic, and intraoperative approaches. Depending on the situation, using optimal method is the key point to minimize complication (5%) and gain high success rate (80%). PV occlusion of greater than 1 year with cavernous transformation seems to be a factor causing technical failure. Good patency rate (100%) with self-expandable metallic stents was noted in long-term follow-up. In conclusion, PV stent placement is an effective, long-term treatment modality to manage PV complications after pediatric LDLT. Early diagnosis and treatment are essential to maximize the use of stent placement and achieve good success rates. PMID:24849830

  12. [Complications of purulent meningoencephalitis in children].

    PubMed

    Rubin, A N; Shcherbuk, Yu A; Lyapin, A P

    2015-01-01

    An analysis of 19 cases of meningoencephalitis was made in infants aged under one year old. The disease was complicated by chronic subdural hematomas in 11 patients and by hydrocephalus in 8 patients. The article presents the strategy, treatment results and diagnostic procedures volume. Based on their work, the authors made a conclusion that meningoencephalitis required an emergency neurosurgical interference in order to avoid complications in convalescence period. PMID:25962294

  13. Complications of pericardiocentesis: A clinical synopsis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rajan; Sinha, Archana; Lin, Maggie J; Uchino, Reina; Butryn, Tracy; O’Mara, M Shay; Nanda, Sudip; Shirani, Jamshid; Stawicki, Stanislaw P

    2015-01-01

    Pericardiocentesis (PC) is both a diagnostic and a potentially life-saving therapeutic procedure. Currently echocardiography-guided pericardiocentesis is considered the standard clinical practice in the treatment of large pericardial effusions and cardiac tamponade. Although considered relatively safe, this invasive procedure may be associated with certain risks and potentially serious complications. This review provides a summary of pericardiocentesis and a focused overview of the potential complications of this procedure. PMID:26557491

  14. Pleural space complications associated with lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Arndt, Andrew; Boffa, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Lung transplantation represents a life-saving option for some end-stage lung diseases. Despite the magnitude of anatomic manipulation and the fragility of the patient population, the procedures have become progressively safer. Perioperative morbidity, however, remains high. Pleural space complications are particularly common. This article discusses hemothorax, chylothorax, air leak or pneumothorax, recurrent effusion, empyema, trapped lung, and chronic pleural complications. PMID:25430432

  15. Complication Avoidance in Endoscopic Skull Base Surgery.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Peleg M; DiNapoli, Vincent; Su, Shirley Y; Raza, Shaan M

    2016-02-01

    Endoscopic endonasal approaches to the skull base pathology have developed and evolved dramatically over the past 2 decades, particularly with collaboration between neurosurgery and otolaryngology physicians. These advances have increased significantly the use of such approaches beyond just resection of pituitary adenomas, including a variety of skull base pathologies. As the field has evolved, so has our understanding of the complications accompanying endoscopic skull base surgery, as well as techniques to both avoid and manage these complications. These are discussed here. PMID:26614840

  16. Vascular ring complicates accidental button battery ingestion.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Ronald W; Schwartz, Matthew C; Stephany, Joshua; Donnelly, Lane F; Franciosi, James P; Epelman, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Button battery ingestion can lead to dangerous complications, including vasculoesophageal fistula formation. The presence of a vascular ring may complicate battery ingestion if the battery lodges at the level of the ring and its important vascular structures. We report a 4-year-old boy with trisomy 21 who was diagnosed with a vascular ring at the time of button battery ingestion and died 9 days after presentation due to massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding from esophageal erosion and vasculoesophageal fistula formation. PMID:25662210

  17. Diabetic complications and dysregulated innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Graves, Dana T; Kayal, Rayyan A

    2008-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that leads to the development of a number of complications. The etiology of each diabetic complication is undoubtedly multifactorial. We will focus on one potential component that may be common in many diabetic complications, dysregulation of innate immunity associated with an increased inflammatory response. High glucose levels lead to shunting through the polyol pathway, an increase in diacylglycerol which activates protein kinase C, an increase in the release of electrons that react with oxygen molecules to form superoxides, and the non-enzymatic glycosylation of proteins that result in greater formation of advanced glycation end products. Each of these can lead to aberrant cell signalling that affects innate immunity for example, by activating the MAP kinase pathway or inducing activation of transcription factors such as NF-kappaB. This may be a common feature of several complications including periodontal disease, atherosclerosis, nephropathy, impaired healing and retinopathy. These complications are frequently associated with increased expression of inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-alpha, IL-1beta and IL-6 and enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species. Cause and effect relationship between dysregulation of key components of innate immunity and diabetic complications in many instances have been demonstrated with the use of cytokine blockers and antioxidants. PMID:17981625

  18. [Complications during myelographic examination in dogs].

    PubMed

    Sevcík, A; Ledecký, V; Legáth, J

    1996-06-01

    The occurrence of spinal disease in dogs is quite frequent. Clinical examination and survey radiography do not allow to make an exact diagnosis in many cases. Therefore the radiographic method-myelograhy is used to make an exact diagnosis and to locate the pathological process in the spinal cord. Myelography can be accompanied by some complications caused by a contrast medium of anaesthesia. In this study, the occurrence of complications was evaluated when the contrast medium Dimer X and three types of general anaesthesia were used: xylazine-ketamine, chlorpromazine-piritramide, chlorpromazine-pentobarbital. Certain relations between the origin of complications, dog weight and total time of anaesthesia are indicated. The results obtained show that the highest number of cases with complicated regeneration was observed after the use of the combination xylazine-ketamine when the average duration of anesthesia was 31.1 minutes comparing to the combination chlorpromazine-pentobarbitale with average duration of anaesthesia was 127.7 minutes with the lowest number of complications. We also refer to certain relations between weight and the occurrence of complications where the highest correlation (r = 0.59) was recorded for xylazine-ketamine anaesthesia. The correlation coefficient (r = 0.27) for chlorpromazine-pentobarbital documents very low correlations of the followed values. PMID:8711878

  19. From Pre-Clinical Studies to Clinical Trials: Generation of Novel Therapies for Pregnancy Complications

    PubMed Central

    Cottrell, Elizabeth C.; Sibley, Colin P.

    2015-01-01

    Complications of pregnancy represent a significant disease burden, with both immediate and lasting consequences for mother and baby. Two key pregnancy complications, fetal growth restriction (FGR) and preeclampsia (PE), together affect around 10%–15% of all pregnancies worldwide. Despite this high incidence, there are currently no therapies available to treat these pregnancy disorders. Early delivery remains the only intervention to reduce the risk of severe maternal complications and/or stillbirth of the baby; however early delivery itself is associated with increased risk of neonatal mortality and morbidity. As such, there is a pressing need to develop new and effective treatments that can prevent or treat FGR and PE. Animal models have been essential in identifying and screening potential new therapies in this field. In this review, we address recent progress that has been made in developing therapeutic strategies for pregnancy disorders, some of which are now entering clinical trials. PMID:26062129

  20. Small bowel diverticulosis complicated by diverticulitis and paralytic ileus. Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Nazir, M; Saebø, A

    1991-01-01

    Small bowel diverticulosis occurs in 0.3-4.4% of all autopsies. Generally the condition is clinically silent; but acute diverticulitis with peritonitis and paralytic ileus may occur in elderly people. This complication has a high mortality and its successful management requires early diagnosis and surgery. PMID:1950308

  1. Management of Mesh Complications after SUI and POP Repair: Review and Analysis of the Current Literature

    PubMed Central

    Deng, D. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the surgical treatment concepts for the complications related to the implantation of mesh material for urogynecological indications. Materials and Methods. A review of the current literature on PubMed was performed. Results. Only retrospective studies were detected. The rate of mesh-related complications is about 15–25% and mesh erosion is up to 10% for POP and SUI repair. Mesh explantation is necessary in about 1-2% of patients due to complications. The initial approach appears to be an early surgical treatment with partial or complete mesh resection. Vaginal and endoscopic access for mesh resection is favored. Prior to recurrent surgeries, a careful examination and planning for the operation strategy are crucial. Conclusions. The data on the management of mesh complication is scarce. Revisions should be performed by an experienced surgeon and a proper follow-up with prospective documentation is essential for a good outcome. PMID:25973425

  2. Liver regeneration after liver resection: Clinical aspects and correlation with infective complications

    PubMed Central

    Pagano, Duilio; Spada, Marco; Parikh, Vishal; Tuzzolino, Fabio; Cintorino, Davide; Maruzzelli, Luigi; Vizzini, Giovanni; Luca, Angelo; Mularoni, Alessandra; Grossi, Paolo; Gridelli, Bruno; Gruttadauria, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether early liver regeneration after resection in patients with hepatic tumors might be influenced by post-operative infective complications. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of 27 liver resections for tumors performed in a single referral center from November 2004 to January 2010. Regeneration was evaluated by multidetector computed tomography at a mean follow-up of 43.85 d. The Clavien-Dindo classification was used to evaluate postoperative events in the first 6 mo after transplantation, and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention definitions were used for healthcare associated infections data. Generalized linear regression models with Gaussian family distribution and log link function were used to reveal the principal promoters of early liver regeneration. RESULTS: Ten of the 27 patients (37%) underwent chemotherapy prior to surgery, with a statistically significant prevalence of patients with metastasis (P = 0.007). Eight patients (30%) underwent embolization, 3 with primary tumors, and 5 with secondary tumors. Twenty patients (74%) experienced complications, with 12 (60%) experiencing Clavien-Dindo Grade 3a to 5 complications. Regeneration ? 100% occurred in 10 (37%) patients. The predictors were smaller future remnant liver volume (-0.002; P < 0.001), and a greater spleen volume/future remnant liver volume ratio (0.499; P = 0.01). Patients with a resection of ? 5 Couinaud segments experienced greater early regeneration (P = 0.04). Nine patients experienced surgical site infections, and in 7 cases Clavien-Dindo Grade 3a to 4 complications were detected (P = 0.016). There were no significant differences between patients with primary or secondary tumors, and either onset or infections or severity of surgical complications. CONCLUSION: Regardless of the onset of infective complications, future remnant liver and spleen volumes may be reliable predictors of early liver regeneration after hepatic resection on an otherwise healthy liver. PMID:24944488

  3. A prospective study of complications from comprehensive abortion care services in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In March 2002, Nepal's Parliament approved legislation to permit abortion on request up to 12 weeks of pregnancy. Between 2004 and 2007, 176 comprehensive abortion care (CAC) service sites were established in Nepal, leading to a rise in safe, legal abortions. Though monitoring systems have been developed, reporting of complications has not always been complete or accurate. The purpose of this study was to report the frequency and type of abortion complications arising from CAC procedures in different types of facilities in Nepal. Methods A total of 7,386 CAC clients from a sample of facilities across Nepal were enrolled over a three-month period in 2008. Data collection included an initial health questionnaire at the time of abortion care and a follow-up questionnaire assessing complications, administered two weeks after the abortion procedure. A total of 7,007 women (95%) were successfully followed up. Complication rates were assessed overall and by facility type. Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess the association between experiencing a complication and client demographic and facility characteristics. Results Among the 7,007 clients who were successfully followed, only 1.87% (n = 131) experienced signs and symptoms of complications at the two-week follow up, the most common being retained products of conception (1.37%), suspected sepsis (0.39%), offensive discharge (0.51%) and moderate bleeding (0.26%). Women receiving care at non-governmental organization (NGO) facilities were less likely to experience complications than women at government facilities, adjusting for individual and facility characteristics (AOR = 0.18; 95% CI: 0.08-0.40). Compared to women receiving CAC at 4-5 weeks gestation, women at 10-12 weeks gestation were more likely to experience complications, adjusting for individual and facility characteristics (AOR = 4.21; 95% CI: 1.38-12.82). Conclusions The abortion complication rate in Nepali CAC facilities is low and similar to other settings; however, significant differences in complication rates were observed by facility type and gestational age. Interventions such as supportive supervision to improve providers' uterine evacuation skills and investment in equipment for infection control may lower complication rates in government facilities. In addition, there should be increased focus on early pregnancy detection and access to CAC services early in pregnancy in order to prevent complications. PMID:22221895

  4. Complications Following Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Tear Repair

    PubMed Central

    Audigé, Laurent; Blum, Raphael; Müller, Andreas M.; Flury, Matthias; Durchholz, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Background Valid comparison of outcomes after surgical procedures requires consensus on which instruments and parameters should be used, including the recording and evaluation of surgical complications. An international standard outlining the terminology and definitions of surgical complications in orthopaedics is lacking. Purpose This study systematically reviewed the literature for terms and definitions related to the occurrence of negative events or complications after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (ARCR) with specific focus on shoulder stiffness. Study Design Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and Scopus databases were searched for reviews, clinical studies, and case reports of complications associated with ARCR. Reference lists of selected articles were also screened. The terminology of complications and their definitions were extracted from all relevant original articles by a single reviewer and verified by a second reviewer. Definitions of shoulder stiffness or equivalent terms were tabulated. Results Of 654 references published after 2007 and obtained from the search, 233 full-text papers (44 reviews, 155 studies, 31 case reports, and 3 surgical technique presentations) were reviewed. Twenty-two additional references cited for a definition were checked. One report defined the term surgical complication. There were 242 different terms used to describe local events and 64 to describe nonlocal events. Furthermore, 16 definitions of terms such as frozen shoulder, shoulder stiffness, or stiff painful shoulder were identified. Diagnosis criteria for shoulder stiffness differed widely; 12 various definitions for restriction in range of motion were noted. One definition included a gradation of stiffness severity, whereas another considered the patient’s subjective assessment of motion. Conclusion The literature does not consistently report on complications after ARCR, making valid comparison of the incidence of these events among published reports impossible. Specifically, the variation in criteria used to diagnose shoulder stiffness is problematic for valid and accurate reporting of this event. A standard for reporting this event and other complications after ARCR is needed. Clinical Relevance This review serves as the basis for the development of a uniform documentation process for shoulder stiffness and the standardization of complication definitions in ARCR following international consensus.

  5. Gut microbiota-related complications in cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Hurtado, Isabel; Such, José; Sanz, Yolanda; Francés, Rubén

    2014-01-01

    Gut microbiota plays an important role in cirrhosis. The liver is constantly challenged with commensal bacteria and their products arriving through the portal vein in the so-called gut-liver axis. Bacterial translocation from the intestinal lumen through the intestinal wall and to mesenteric lymph nodes is facilitated by intestinal bacterial overgrowth, impairment in the permeability of the intestinal mucosal barrier, and deficiencies in local host immune defences. Deranged clearance of endogenous bacteria from portal and systemic circulation turns the gut into the major source of bacterial-related complications. Liver function may therefore be affected by alterations in the composition of the intestinal microbiota and a role for commensal flora has been evidenced in the pathogenesis of several complications arising in end-stage liver disease such as hepatic encephalopathy, splanchnic arterial vasodilatation and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis. The use of antibiotics is the main therapeutic pipeline in the management of these bacteria-related complications. However, other strategies aimed at preserving intestinal homeostasis through the use of pre-, pro- or symbiotic formulations are being studied in the last years. In this review, the role of intestinal microbiota in the development of the most frequent complications arising in cirrhosis and the different clinical and experimental studies conducted to prevent or improve these complications by modifying the gut microbiota composition are summarized. PMID:25400446

  6. Avoiding Complications in Endoscopic Third Ventriculostomy.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Yad Ram; Parihar, Vijay Singh; Ratre, Shailendra; Kher, Yatin

    2015-11-01

    Endoscopic neurosurgical techniques hold the potential for reducing morbidity. But they are also associated with limitations such as the initial learning curve, proximal blind spot, visual obscurity, difficulty in controlling bleeding, disorientation, and loss of stereoscopic image. Although some of the surgical techniques in neuroendoscopy and microsurgery are similar, endoscopy requires additional skills. A thorough understanding of endoscopic techniques and their limitations is required to get maximal benefit. Knowledge of possible complications and techniques to avoid such complications can improve results in endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV). The surgeon must be able to manage complications and have a second strategy such as a cerebrospinal fluid shunt if ETV fails. It is better to abandon the procedure if there is disorientation or a higher risk of complications such as bleeding or a thick and opaque floor without any clear visualization of anatomy. Attending live workshops, practice on models and simulators, simpler case selection in the initial learning curve, and hands-on cadaveric workshops can reduce complications. Proper case selection, good surgical technique, and better postoperative care are essential for a good outcome in ETV. Although it is difficult to make a preoperative diagnosis of complex hydrocephalus (combination of communicating and obstructive), improving methods to detect the exact type of hydrocephalus before surgery could increase the success rate of ETV and avoid an unnecessary ETV procedure in such cases. PMID:26140421

  7. Acute complications of spinal cord injuries

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Ellen Merete

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to give an overview of acute complications of spinal cord injury (SCI). Along with motor and sensory deficits, instabilities of the cardiovascular, thermoregulatory and broncho-pulmonary system are common after a SCI. Disturbances of the urinary and gastrointestinal systems are typical as well as sexual dysfunction. Frequent complications of cervical and high thoracic SCI are neurogenic shock, bradyarrhythmias, hypotension, ectopic beats, abnormal temperature control and disturbance of sweating, vasodilatation and autonomic dysreflexia. Autonomic dysreflexia is an abrupt, uncontrolled sympathetic response, elicited by stimuli below the level of injury. The symptoms may be mild like skin rash or slight headache, but can cause severe hypertension, cerebral haemorrhage and death. All personnel caring for the patient should be able to recognize the symptoms and be able to intervene promptly. Disturbance of respiratory function are frequent in tetraplegia and a primary cause of both short and long-term morbidity and mortality is pulmonary complications. Due to physical inactivity and altered haemostasis, patients with SCI have a higher risk of venous thromboembolism and pressure ulcers. Spasticity and pain are frequent complications which need to be addressed. The psychological stress associated with SCI may lead to anxiety and depression. Knowledge of possible complications during the acute phase is important because they may be life threatening and/ or may lead to prolonged rehabilitation. PMID:25621207

  8. Acute complications of spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Ellen Merete

    2015-01-18

    The aim of this paper is to give an overview of acute complications of spinal cord injury (SCI). Along with motor and sensory deficits, instabilities of the cardiovascular, thermoregulatory and broncho-pulmonary system are common after a SCI. Disturbances of the urinary and gastrointestinal systems are typical as well as sexual dysfunction. Frequent complications of cervical and high thoracic SCI are neurogenic shock, bradyarrhythmias, hypotension, ectopic beats, abnormal temperature control and disturbance of sweating, vasodilatation and autonomic dysreflexia. Autonomic dysreflexia is an abrupt, uncontrolled sympathetic response, elicited by stimuli below the level of injury. The symptoms may be mild like skin rash or slight headache, but can cause severe hypertension, cerebral haemorrhage and death. All personnel caring for the patient should be able to recognize the symptoms and be able to intervene promptly. Disturbance of respiratory function are frequent in tetraplegia and a primary cause of both short and long-term morbidity and mortality is pulmonary complications. Due to physical inactivity and altered haemostasis, patients with SCI have a higher risk of venous thromboembolism and pressure ulcers. Spasticity and pain are frequent complications which need to be addressed. The psychological stress associated with SCI may lead to anxiety and depression. Knowledge of possible complications during the acute phase is important because they may be life threatening and/ or may lead to prolonged rehabilitation. PMID:25621207

  9. Spinal cord injury rehabilitation. 2. Medical complications.

    PubMed

    Bergman, S B; Yarkony, G M; Stiens, S A

    1997-03-01

    This self-directed learning module highlights new advances in understanding medical complications of spinal cord injury through the lifespan. It is part of the chapter on spinal cord injury rehabilitation in the Self-Directed Physiatric Education Program for practitioners and trainees in physical medicine and rehabilitation. This article covers reasons for transferring patients to specialized spinal cord injury centers once they have been stabilized, and the management of common medical problems, including fever, autonomic dysreflexia, urinary tract infection, acute and chronic abdominal complications, deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary complications, and heterotopic ossification. Formulation of an educational program for prevention of late complications is also discussed, including late renal complications, syringomyelia, myelomalacia, burns, pathologic fractures, pressure ulcers, and cardiovascular disease. New advances covered in this section include new information on old problems, and a discussion of exercise tolerance in persons with tetraplegia, the pathophysiology of late neurologic deterioration after spinal cord injury, and a view of the care of these patients across the lifespan. PMID:9084368

  10. Complications of Microsurgery of Vestibular Schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Zv??ina, Eduard; Balogová, Zuzana; Sk?ivan, Ji?í; Kraus, Josef; Syka, Josef; Chovanec, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to analyze complications of vestibular schwannoma (VS) microsurgery. Material and Methods. A retrospective study was performed in 333 patients with unilateral vestibular schwannoma indicated for surgical treatment between January 1997 and December 2012. Postoperative complications were assessed immediately after VS surgery as well as during outpatient followup. Results. In all 333 patients microsurgical vestibular schwannoma (Koos grade 1: 12, grade 2: 34, grade 3: 62, and grade 4: 225) removal was performed. The main neurological complication was facial nerve dysfunction. The intermediate and poor function (HB III–VI) was observed in 124 cases (45%) immediately after surgery and in 104 cases (33%) on the last followup. We encountered disordered vestibular compensation in 13%, permanent trigeminal nerve dysfunction in 1%, and transient lower cranial nerves (IX–XI) deficit in 6%. Nonneurological complications included CSF leakage in 63% (lateral/medial variant: 99/1%), headache in 9%, and intracerebral hemorrhage in 5%. We did not encounter any case of meningitis. Conclusions. Our study demonstrates that despite the benefits of advanced high-tech equipment, refined microsurgical instruments, and highly developed neuroimaging technologies, there are still various and significant complications associated with vestibular schwannomas microsurgery. PMID:24987677

  11. Liver biopsy: complications and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Thampanitchawong, Pornpen; Piratvisuth, Teerha

    1999-01-01

    AIM: To study the complications and the risk factors of percutaneous liver biopsy, and to compare the complication rate between the periods o f 1987-1993 and 1994-1996. METHODS: Medical records of all patients undergoing percutaneous liver biopsy between January 1, 1987 to September 31, 1996 in Songklanagarind Hospital were reviewed retrospectively. RESULTS: There were 484 percutaneous liver biopsies performed. The total complication rate was 6.4%, of which 4.5% were due to major bleeding; the death rate was 1.6%. The important risk factors correlated with bleeding complications and deaths were a platelet count of 70 × 109/L or less, a prolonged prothrombin time of > 3 s over control, or a prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time of > 10 s over control. Although physician inexperience was not statistically significantly associated with bleeding complications and deaths, there was a reduction of death rate from 2.2% in 1987-1993 to 0% in 1993-1996. This reduction is thought to result from both increased experience o f senior staff and increased supervision of residents. CONCLUSIONS: Screening of platelet count, prothrombin time, and activated partial thromboplastin time should be done and need to be corrected in case of abnormality before liver biopsy. Percutaneous liver biopsy should be performed or supervised by an expert in gastrointestinal diseases, especially in high risk cases. PMID:11819452

  12. Complications of cataract and refractive surgery: a clinicopathological documentation.

    PubMed Central

    Apple, D J; Werner, L

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: To present selected complications of keratorefractive and phakic intraocular lens (IOL) surgery and a series of IOLs that required explantation because of various postimplantation opacification of the IOL optic. METHODS: Two specimens obtained after keratorefractive surgery, 2 phakic IOLs, and a total of 23 explanted IOLs from cases in which postimplantation opacification of the IOL optic had occurred were studied. These included 6 Bausch and Lomb (B&L) Hydroview H60 M designs, 9 Medical Developmental Research (MDR) SC60B-OUV designs, and 24 IOLs with rigid PMMA optics that had been implanted in the 1980s and early 1990s. Of the latter, 8 required late explantation because of decreased visual acuity. Analyses performed included gross and light microscopic evaluation, histochemical staining, electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive spectroscopy. RESULTS: We provide examples of 3 postrefractive surgery complications: (1) fungal keratitis after LASIK, (2) post-LASIK corneal decompensation, and (3) cataract formation after implantation of phakic posterior chamber IOLs. Regarding the IOL optic opacities, classifications of 3 types are described: (1) a surface calcification of the B&L Hydroview IOL; (2) diffusion of calcium into the substance of the optic of the hydrophilic "acrylic" SC60B-OUV MDR foldable IOL design, sometimes leading to total opacification of the IOL optic and also its haptics; (3) a distinct pattern of intraoptical opacification with rigid PMMA designs that we term a snowflake degeneration. This term is based on the clinical and pathologic appearance of the individual lesions. Each snowflake lesion represents a focal breakdown of PMMA material as opposed to deposition of exogenous material. CONCLUSIONS: Analysis of complications of refractive surgery represents a new field of ocular pathology. The clinicopathological reports presented here provide an overview of selected complications after refractive surgery. We also help define 3 newly recognized, clinically significant conditions based on postoperative IOL optic opacification. The calcification processes noted on the 2 modern foldable designs studied here (B&L and MDR lenses) need further review by the manufacturers in order to reassess production processes, especially in terms of polymer selection, manufacturing techniques, and other factors required to produce a safe and effective lens. Any lens not meeting today's high standards should not be marketed. The important fact in recognizing the snowflake complication of PMMA IOLs as described here is to alert surgeons about the nature of the lesion so that they will not alarm patients or require extensive and unnecessary testing in trying to determine its pathogenesis. There is no reason why successful explantation cannot be performed in cases where severe visual decrease or loss has occurred. PMID:11797325

  13. Growth hormone and early treatment.

    PubMed

    Antoniazzi, F; Cavarzere, P; Gaudino, R

    2015-06-01

    Growth hormone (GH) treatment is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) not only for GH deficiency (GHD) but also for other childhood growth disorders with growth failure and/or short stature. GHD is the most frequent endocrine disorder presenting with short stature in childhood. During neonatal period, metabolic effects due to congenital GHD require a prompt replacement therapy to avoid possible life-threatening complications. In childhood and adolescence, growth impairment is the most evident effect of GHD and early treatment has the aim of restore normal growth and to reach normal adult height. We reassume in this review the conditions causing GHD and the diagnostic challenge to reach an early diagnosis, and an early treatment, necessary to obtain the best results. Finally, we summarize results obtained in clinical studies about pediatric patients with GHD treated at an early age, in which a marked early catch-up growth and a normalization of adult height were obtained. PMID:25734895

  14. Curcumin: a pleiotropic phytonutrient in diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Jeenger, Manish Kumar; Shrivastava, Shweta; Yerra, Veera Ganesh; Naidu, V G M; Ramakrishna, Sistla; Kumar, Ashutosh

    2015-02-01

    Curcumin is the major polyphenolic constituent of an indigenous herb, Curcuma longa, found to have a wide range of applications right from its kitchen use as a spicy ingredient to therapeutic and medicinal applications in various diseases. Curcumin has been identified to have a plethora of biologic and pharmacologic properties owing to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. This pleiotropic regulation of redox balance of cell and inflammation might be the basis of curcumin's beneficial activities in various pathologic conditions including diabetic complications. This review summarizes various in vitro, in vivo studies done on curcumin and its therapeutic utility in diabetic micro-vascular complications. This review also emphasizes the importance of curcumin in addition to the existing therapeutic modalities in diabetic complications. PMID:25441584

  15. Ventriculomammary shunt: an unusual ventriculoperitoneal shunt complication.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Nauman S; Johnson, Jeremiah N; Morcos, Jacques J

    2015-02-01

    Ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt malfunctions are common and can result in significant consequences for patients. Despite the prevalence of breast augmentation surgery and breast surgery for other pathologies, few breast related VP shunt complications have been reported. A 54-year-old woman with hydrocephalus post-subarachnoid hemorrhage returned 1 month after VP shunt placement complaining of painful unilateral breast enlargement. After investigation, it was determined that the distal VP shunt catheter had migrated from the peritoneal cavity into the breast and wrapped around her breast implant. The breast enlargement was the result of cerebrospinal fluid retention. We detail this unusual case and review all breast related VP shunt complications reported in the literature. To avoid breast related complications related to VP shunt procedures, it is important to illicit pre-procedural history regarding breast implants, evade indwelling implants during catheter tunneling and carefully securing the abdominal catheter to prevent retrograde catheter migration to the breast. PMID:25127261

  16. Hemorrhagic vascular complications of endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery.

    PubMed

    Cavallo, L M; Briganti, F; Cappabianca, P; Maiuri, F; Valente, V; Tortora, F; Volpe, A; Messina, A; Elefante, A; De Divitiis, E

    2004-06-01

    Two hundred and fifty consecutive patients operated on by an endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach were retrospectively analyzed in order to evaluate hemorrhagic vascular complications occurring during or after the surgical procedure and their appropriate management. Vascular complications of endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery are identical to those of a microsurgical transsphenoidal approach. Damage to the sphenopalatine artery and to the internal carotid artery (ICA), which are the most frequent vascular troubles, may require technical tricks because of some aspects connected to the approach itself and of the physical properties of the endoscope. Furthermore, the progress in interventional neuroradiology in the last decades offers new solutions in respect to the past, where the use of the surgical microscope was already a tremendous progress. The anatomic substrate of each complication is discussed, along with the peculiar surgical details related to it. PMID:15343429

  17. Management of gallstones and its related complications.

    PubMed

    Portincasa, P; Di Ciaula, A; de Bari, O; Garruti, G; Palmieri, V O; Wang, Dq-H

    2016-01-01

    The majority of gallstone patients remain asymptomatic; however, interest toward the gallstone disease is continuing because of the high worldwide prevalence and management costs and the development of gallstone symptoms and complications. For cholesterol gallstone disease, moreover, a strong link exists between this disease and highly prevalent metabolic disorders such as obesity, dyslipidemia, type 2 diabetes, hyperinsulinemia, hypertriglyceridemia and the metabolic syndrome. Information on the natural history as well as the diagnostic, surgical (mainly laparoscopic cholecystectomy) and medical tools available to facilitate adequate management of cholelithiasis and its complications are, therefore, crucial to prevent the negative outcomes of gallstone disease. Moreover, some risk factors for gallstone disease are modifiable and some preventive strategies have become necessary to reduce the onset and the severity of complications. PMID:26560258

  18. Neurological Complications of Solid Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Amy A.; Graus, Francesc; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.

    2013-01-01

    Solid organ transplantation (SOT) is the preferred treatment for an expanding range of conditions whose successful therapy has produced a growing population of chronically immunosuppressed patients with potential neurological problems. While the spectrum of neurological complications varies with the type of organ transplanted, the indication for the procedure, and the intensity of long-term required immunosuppression, major neurological complications occur with all SOT types. The second part of this 2-part article on transplantation neurology reviews central and peripheral nervous system problems associated with SOT with clinical and neuroimaging examples from the authors’ institutional experience. Particular emphasis is given to conditions acquired from the donated organ or tissue, problems specific to types of organs transplanted and drug therapy-related complications likely to be encountered by hospitalists. Neurologically important syndromes such as immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), and posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) are readdressed in the context of SOT. PMID:24167649

  19. Complications and Great Escapes: Equipment and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    McPherson, Rory; Buckenham, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    All endovascular procedures have the potential for complications. The primary aims should always be avoidance of preventable complications and to minimize the impact of any complication. The core principles of an effective preventive strategy are: involving the interventional and clinical teams in a clear outline of the procedure and its potential adverse outcomes; ensuring an adequate inventory of required and backup equipment; the use of “time-out” to minimize wrong patient/wrong side adverse events; and an active audit program to identify areas of improvement. In the event of an adverse outcome there are many strategies that can be employed to rectify the situation or minimize the iatrogenic injury. This article provides a case-based discussion highlighting some of these techniques and how they can be used in a clinical setting. PMID:25435662

  20. Complications of cirrhosis. A 50 years flashback.

    PubMed

    Møller, Søren; Bendtsen, Flemming

    2015-06-01

    In patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension, it is largely the frequency and severity of complications relating to the diseased liver, degree of portal hypertension and hemodynamic derangement that determine the prognosis. It can be considered as a multiple organ failure that apart from the liver involves the heart, lungs, kidneys, the immune systems and other organ systems. Progressive fibrosis of the liver and subsequent metabolic impairment leads to a systemic and splanchnic arteriolar vasodilatation. With the progression of the disease development of portal hypertension leads to formation of esophageal varices and ascites. The circulation becomes hyperdynamic with cardiac, pulmonary as well as renal consequences for dysfunction and reduced survival. Infections and a changed cardiac function known as cirrhotic cardiomyopathy may be involved in further aggravation of other complications such as renal failure precipitating the hepatorenal syndrome. Patients with end-stage liver disease and related complications as for example the hepatopulmonary syndrome can only radically be treated by liver transplantation. PMID:25881709

  1. Multiple Gastrointestinal Complications of Crack Cocaine Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Carlin, Neal; Nguyen, Nhat; DePasquale, Joseph R.

    2014-01-01

    Cocaine and its alkaloid free base “crack-cocaine” have long since been substances of abuse. Drug abuse of cocaine via oral, inhalation, intravenous, and intranasal intake has famously been associated with a number of medical complications. Intestinal ischemia and perforation remain the most common manifestations of cocaine associated gastrointestinal disease and have historically been associated with oral intake of cocaine. Here we find a rare case of two relatively uncommon gastrointestinal complications of hemorrhage and pancreatitis presenting within a single admission in a chronic crack cocaine abuser. PMID:24839446

  2. [Intravitreal injection. Monitoring to avoid postoperative complications].

    PubMed

    Meyer, C H; Ziemssen, F; Heimann, H

    2008-02-01

    Intravitreal injection is generally regarded as safe. Many of the potential complications caused by this procedure are extremely rare and can be avoided by careful inspection beforehand and proper performance of the injection. In rare cases, however, the administered drugs may cause various pharmacological side effects. This article summarizes the safety profiles of Macugen and Lucentis from the drug approval studies and describes initial findings on possible or observed side effects after intravitreal administration of Avastin. In addition, important points to observe in order to avoid intra- and postoperative complications are provided. PMID:18256842

  3. Neuromuscular complications of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ruzhansky, Katherine M; Brannagan, Thomas H

    2015-10-01

    Neuromuscular diseases such as polymyositis, dermatomyositis, peripheral neuropathy, and disorders of neuromuscular transmission are reported to be complications of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Although cases have been reported with allogeneic HSCT in the setting of chronic graft versus host disease, they are also known to occur without evidence thereof and even occur in the setting of autologous HSCT. The 2005 National Institutes of Health Consensus Criteria classify polymyositis and dermatomyositis as "distinctive" features, and neuropathy and MG as "other" features. These neuromuscular complications present very similarly to the idiopathic autoimmune disorders and respond to similar treatment modalities. Muscle Nerve, 2015 Muscle Nerve 52: 480-487, 2015. PMID:26044357

  4. Characteristics, Complications, and Treatment of Acute Pericarditis.

    PubMed

    Kloos, Janet A

    2015-12-01

    Acute pericarditis occurs most frequently after a viral attack. Other causes are autoimmune conditions, infection, chest trauma, cardiac surgery, or cardiac procedure. The presenting symptom is retrosternal chest pain. A pericardial rub is characteristic. Diffuse upward sloping ST segments are found with electrocardiogram. Pericardial effusions may be demonstrated with an echocardiogram. High-dose nonsteroidal antiinflammatory medications are the primary treatment. Adding colchicine reduces recurrence. It responds well to pharmacologic therapy within 1 to 2 weeks. Monitoring for complications is essential. The most serious complication is cardiac tamponade. For this, prompt diagnosis and treatment can be life-saving. PMID:26567493

  5. Late complications of Hodgkin's disease management

    SciTech Connect

    Young, R.C.; Bookman, M.A.; Longo, D.L. )

    1990-01-01

    In the past several decades, Hodgkin's disease has been transformed from a uniformly fatal illness to one that can be treated with the expectation of long-term remission or cure in the majority of patients. Because patients now survive for long periods after curative intervention, various complications have been identified. The spectrum of complications following curative therapy is quite diverse and includes immunologic, cardiovascular, pulmonary, thyroid, and gonadal dysfunction. In addition, second malignant neoplasms in the form of acute leukemia as well as secondary solid tumors have now been documented to occur with increased frequency in patients cured of Hodgkin's disease. 80 references.

  6. Endocrine and Metabolic Complications After Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jammah, Anwar A.

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is the most effective therapeutic option for obese patients; however, it carries substantial risks, including procedure-related complications, malabsorption, and hormonal disturbance. Recent years have seen an increase in the bariatric surgeries performed utilizing either an independent or a combination of restrictive and malabsorptive procedures. We review some complications of bariatric procedures more specifically, hypoglycemia and osteoporosis, the recommended preoperative assessment and then regular follow up, and the therapeutic options. Surgeon, internist, and the patient must be aware of the multiple risks of this kind of surgery and the needed assessment and follow up. PMID:26458852

  7. Complications when augmenting the posterior maxilla.

    PubMed

    Fugazzotto, Paul; Melnick, Philip R; Al-Sabbagh, Mohanad

    2015-01-01

    The maxillary posterior edentulous region presents a challenge when planning for restoring missing teeth with a dental implant. The available bone in such cases is often not dense and not adequate for the placement of a properly sized implant because of maxillary sinus pneumatization and alveolar bone loss. Maxillary sinus lift is a predictable procedure to provide adequate bone height for the purpose of implant placement. However, complications are encountered during or after the execution of the sinus lift procedure. In this article, the prevention and management of maxillary sinus complications are discussed. PMID:25434561

  8. [Incidence of postoperative complications in geriatric gynecology].

    PubMed

    Rummler, S

    1984-01-01

    The results of a retrospective-study concerning postoperative complications after gynecologic geriatric surgery (506 patients, aged 60 years and over) at the Departement of Gynecology and Obstetrics of the District Hospital Stralsund/GDR are presented. In 106 patients (10,94 per cent) we have registered post-operative complications, in particular anaemia, fever and wound-period (1967 to 1971 = 8,22%, 1977 to 1981 = 13,29%). Gynecologic surgery in the aged requires a carefully clinical management in preoperative diagnostic and an intensive postoperative care. PMID:6475112

  9. Complications of trichobezoars: a 30-year experience.

    PubMed

    Wadlington, W B; Rose, M; Holcomb, G W

    1992-10-01

    We have reported the case of a mildly retarded woman in whom an obsessive-compulsive disorder of hair eating (trichophagia) had begun between 2 and 3 years of age. Over the next 30 years, multiple complications of trichophagia included trichobezoars, malnutrition, intestinal obstruction, and ulceration with bleeding. One of the bouts of intestinal obstruction was associated with the superior mesenteric artery blocking the duodenum. This complication has not been reported previously in this disorder. The patient's trichotillomania (hair pulling) was treated with psychotherapy, behavior modification, and various medications, without success. The tricyclic antidepressant clomipramine (Anafranil) may be of benefit in such cases. PMID:1411722

  10. Neurological complications of Anderson-Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Tuttolomondo, Antonino; Pecoraro, Rosaria; Simonetta, Irene; Miceli, Salvatore; Arnao, Valentina; Licata, Giuseppe; Pinto, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Characteristic clinical manifestations of AFD such as acroparesthesias, angiokeratoma, corneal opacity, hypo/ and anhidrosis, gastrointestinal symptoms, renal and cardiac dysfunctions can occur in male and female patients, although heterozygous females with AFD usually seem to be less severely affected. The most prominent CNS manifestations consist of cerebrovascular events such as transient ischaemic attacks (TIAs) and (recurrent) strokes. For the most part, CNS complications in AFD have been attributed to cerebral vasculopathy, including anatomical abnormalities. The natural history of Fabry patients includes transitory cerebral ischaemia and strokes, even in very young persons of both genders. The mechanism is partly due to vascular endothelial accumulation of Gb-3. White matter lesions (WML) on occur MRI. Both males and females can be safely treated with enzyme replacement; and thus screening for Fabry disease of young stroke populations should be considered. There are, however, no hard data of treatment effect on mortality and morbidity. Stroke in Anderson-Fabry disease study of 721 patients with cryptogenic stroke, aged 18-55 years, showed a high prevalence of Fabry disease in this group: 5% (21/432) of men and 3% (7/289) of women. Combining results of both sexes showed that 4% of young patients with stroke of previously unknown cause had Fabry disease, corresponding to about 1-2% of the general population of young stroke patients. Cerebral micro- and macro-vasculopathy have been described in Fabry disease. Neuronal globotriaosylceramide accumulation in selective cortical and brain stem areas including the hippocampus has been reported by autopsy studies in FD, but clinical surrogates as well as the clinical relevance of these findings have not been investigated so far. Another Neurologic hallmark of Fabry disease (FD) includes small fiber neuropathy as well as cerebral micro- and macroangiopathy with premature stroke. Cranial MRI shows progressive white matter lesions (WML) at an early age, increased signal intensity in the pulvinar, and tortuosity and dilatation of the larger vessels. Conventional MRI shows a progressive load of white matter lesions (WMLs) due to cerebral vasculopathy in the course of FD. Another study has been conducted to quantify brain structural changes in clinically affected male and female patients with FD. The peripheral neuropathy in Fabry disease manifests as neuropathic pain, reduced cold and warm sensation and possibly gastrointestinal disturbances. Patients with Fabry disease begin having pain towards the end of the first decade of life or during puberty. Children as young as 6 years of age have complained of pain often associated with febrile illnesses with reduced heat and exercise tolerance. The patients describe the pain as burning that is often associated with deep ache or paresthesiae. Some patients also have joint pain. A high proportion of patients with Fabry disease is at increased risk of developing neuropsychiatric symptoms, such as depression and neuropsychological deficits. Due to both somatic and psychological impairment, health-related quality of life (QoL) is considerably reduced in patients with Fabry disease. Targeted screening for Fabry disease among young individuals with stroke seems to disclose unrecognized cases and may therefore very well be recommended as routine in the future. Furthermore, ischemic stroke is related to inflammation and arterial stiffness and no study had addressed this relationship in patients with AF disease and cerebrovascular disease, so this topic could represent a possible future research line. PMID:23448452

  11. The cost of diabetes chronic complications among Iranian people with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To evaluate the cost of diabetes related micro- and macrovascular complications in Iranian people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods In routine clinical practice, people with type 2 diabetes mellitus were assessed for 10 years at a diabetes care center. The type of medications and clinical data were extracted from patients’ documents. Mortality rate and the incidence of micro- and macrovascular complications recorded in patients’ documents were analyzed. Cost analysis was comprised of 1) para clinic costs as well as laboratory, medications, clinical visits and nonmedical costs 2) inpatient costs as well as hospital admission costs, disability, and mortality costs. Results From 1562 people with type 2 diabetes mellitus, a total of 1000 patients with mean duration disease of 11.2 years, who had completed information in their documents, were studied. All people were free from complications at baseline. Mean cumulative incidence of diabetes-related complications over 10 years were 10.9?±?3.5%, 8.0?±?3.1%, 4.6?±?1.7%, 9.1?±?3.6% and 2.3?±?0.9% for peripheral neuropathy and diabetic foot ulcer, nephropathy, ophthalmic complications, cardiovascular disease and death, respectively. People with better glycemic control had less complication and also related expenditures. Average para clinic cost per patient was 393.6?±?47.8 and average inpatient cost per patient was 1520.7?±?104.5 USD. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate considerable incidence of diabetes chronic complications and also high health care expenditure for related complications among our patients. As the number of people with diabetes continues to rise, early detection of the disease and implementation of timely and appropriate therapeutic strategies could decrease the burden of diabetes chronic complications and also huge related expenditures. PMID:24593991

  12. Early Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, M.

    2015-05-01

    Earth has continents, subduction and mobile lid plate tectonics, but details of the early evolution are poorly understood. Here I summarize the Hadean-Archean record, review evidence for a hotter Earth and consider geodynamic models for early Earth.

  13. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts and portal hypertension-related complications

    PubMed Central

    Siramolpiwat, Sith

    2014-01-01

    Portal hypertension (PH) plays an important role in the natural history of cirrhosis, and is associated with several clinical consequences. The introduction of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (TIPS) in the 1980s has been regarded as a major technical advance in the management of the PH-related complications. At present, polytetrafluoroethylene-covered stents are the preferred option over traditional bare metal stents. TIPS is currently indicated as a salvage therapy in patients with bleeding esophageal varices who fail standard treatment. Recently, applying TIPS early (within 72 h after admission) has been shown to be an effective and life-saving treatment in those with high-risk variceal bleeding. In addition, TIPS is recommended as the second-line treatment for secondary prophylaxis. For bleeding gastric varices, applying TIPS was able to achieve hemostasis in more than 90% of patients. More trials are needed to clarify the efficacy of TIPS compared with other treatment modalities, including cyanoacrylate injection and balloon retrograde transvenous obliteration of gastric varices. TIPS should also be considered in bleeding ectopic varices and refractory portal hypertensive gastropathy. In patients with refractory ascites, there is growing evidence that TIPS not only results in better control of ascites, but also improves long-term survival in appropriately selected candidates. In addition, TIPS is a promising treatment for refractory hepatic hydrothorax. However, the role of TIPS in the treatment of hepatorenal and hepatopulmonary syndrome is not well defined. The advantage of TIPS is offset by a risk of developing hepatic encephalopathy, the most relevant post-procedural complication. Emerging data are addressing the determination the optimal time and patient selection for TIPS placement aiming at improving long-term treatment outcome. This review is aimed at summarizing the published data regarding the application of TIPS in the management of complications related to PH. PMID:25493012

  14. Subcutaneous mucor zygomycosis with potential life-threatening visceral complication.

    PubMed

    Hanifah, M; Balachandran, G; Rajesh, N G

    2013-01-01

    A mass in right supraclavicular fossa in a diabetic patient mimicking tuberculosis (TB) adenitis that ultimately proved to be subcutaneous zygomycosis. A high degree of clinical suspicion is needed for diagnosis especially when these lesions occur at typical sites for the more common indolent infections like TB. This case is being presented not only because of its rarity, but to emphasize the role of early diagnosis and appropriate treatment to prevent serious complications due to proximity to major structures. Fluconazole was used despite not being the ideal drug, solely due to cost constraints. Our patient responded well. However, we do emphasize that response to fluconazole is the exception rather than the rule. PMID:23867678

  15. The bacteriology and septic complication of patients with appendicitis.

    PubMed Central

    Lau, W Y; Teoh-Chan, C H; Fan, S T; Yam, W C; Lau, K F; Wong, S H

    1984-01-01

    A detailed bacteriologic study was done on 161 patients operated for appendicitis. Aerobic and anaerobic cultures were taken from the blood, the appendicular lumen, mucosa, serosa, fossa, and from the wound after closure of the peritoneum. There is no correlation between the degree of appendicitis and the incidence of positive blood culture. The infection spread through the appendicular wall as the disease progressed. Aerobic infection was common in early appendicitis but a mixed aerobic and anaerobic infection was predominant in late cases. Late appendicitis, a positive wound culture at the end of the operation, the duration of symptoms of over 36 hours before operation and the age of the patient over 50 years were all associated with an increased incidence of septic complication. From the antibiotic sensitivity on the bacteria isolated, the most effective agent against anaerobes was metronidazole. Effective agents against the aerobes were aminoglycosides and cephalosporins. The best single agent against both anaerobes and aerobes was moxalactum. PMID:6486906

  16. A case of pregnancy complicated with dilated cardiomyopathy 1X

    PubMed Central

    Oki, Shinya; Nagamatsu, Takeshi; Iriyama, Takayuki; Komatsu, Atsushi; Osuga, Yutaka; Fujii, Tomoyuki

    2015-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy 1X (CMD1X) is characterized by dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) with mildest limb-girdle muscle symptoms and normal intelligence. Compound heterozygous mutation in fukutin gene is known as its genetic cause. Here, we report a pregnancy case complicated with CMD1X. A 25-year-old primiparous woman, who had been diagnosed as CMD1X at the age of 19, was referred to our hospital at 6 weeks of gestation. In early pregnancy, the evaluation of her cardiac function showed ejection fraction 47% and NYHA class II. Worsening of cardiac function was observed from 30 weeks, manifesting reduced cardiac load with left ventricular dilatation and in-hospital bed rest was necessary. Elective cesarean section was performed at 35 weeks to prevent deterioration of cardiac function. The parameters of her cardiac function returned to the pre-pregnancy status in a month after delivery, whereas she realized persistent worsening of muscular weakness at postpartum. PMID:26566449

  17. Complications from Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Kylie H.; Okoye, Christian C.; Patel, Ravi B.; Siva, Shankar; Biswas, Tithi; Ellis, Rodney J.; Yao, Min; Machtay, Mitchell; Lo, Simon S.

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has become a standard treatment option for early stage, node negative non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in patients who are either medically inoperable or refuse surgical resection. SBRT has high local control rates and a favorable toxicity profile relative to other surgical and non-surgical approaches. Given the excellent tumor control rates and increasing utilization of SBRT, recent efforts have focused on limiting toxicity while expanding treatment to increasingly complex patients. We review toxicities from SBRT for lung cancer, including central airway, esophageal, vascular (e.g., aorta), lung parenchyma (e.g., radiation pneumonitis), and chest wall toxicities, as well as radiation-induced neuropathies (e.g., brachial plexus, vagus nerve and recurrent laryngeal nerve). We summarize patient-related, tumor-related, dosimetric characteristics of these toxicities, review published dose constraints, and propose strategies to reduce such complications. PMID:26083933

  18. Acute concentrated phenol dermal burns: Complications and management

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Tapan Jayantilal

    2015-01-01

    Phenol burns can result in multiple organ failure. This is a case report of acute severe phenol dermal burn after accidental splash of 94% phenol on 35-year-old patient's body who was brought to hospital after 90 min of exposure. Decontamination was done with high-density water and glycerol. Early complications in form of metabolic acidosis and acute renal failure required hemodialysis. Extensive protein denaturation was managed with IV albumin and high protein diet. Patient also developed pleural effusion and acute respiratory distress syndrome, but these were successfully managed by intercostal drain tube insertion and noninvasive ventilation. The patient survived after multiple organ failures and widespread burns despite the fact that it has been observed that outcome of phenol burns with >602 inches of skin affected or two or more organs failure involving renal system is nearly fatal. PMID:25983436

  19. [HELLP syndrome--a life-threatening pregnancy complication].

    PubMed

    Aune, B; Oian, P

    1992-10-20

    A serious complication to pregnancy-induced hypertension and preeclampsia is the HELLP syndrome (H - haemolysis, EL - elevated liver enzymes, LP - low platelet count). Perinatal and maternal mortality are reported to be high, 7-60% and 2-24%, respectively. A non-obstetric diagnosis is often made, such as gastrointestinal or haematologic disease. Typical symptoms are epigastric and right upper-quadrant pain and tenderness, nausea and vomiting. Recognition of the clinical and laboratory findings is important, so that early, aggressive therapy can be initiated in order to prevent maternal and perinatal death. We present data from 14 patients with the HELLP syndrome treated in our hospital. There was one intrauterine death. The other infants were discharged in good condition. Two of the patients had eclampsia. PMID:1462289

  20. A case of pregnancy complicated with dilated cardiomyopathy 1X.

    PubMed

    Oki, Shinya; Nagamatsu, Takeshi; Iriyama, Takayuki; Komatsu, Atsushi; Osuga, Yutaka; Fujii, Tomoyuki

    2015-11-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy 1X (CMD1X) is characterized by dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) with mildest limb-girdle muscle symptoms and normal intelligence. Compound heterozygous mutation in fukutin gene is known as its genetic cause. Here, we report a pregnancy case complicated with CMD1X. A 25-year-old primiparous woman, who had been diagnosed as CMD1X at the age of 19, was referred to our hospital at 6 weeks of gestation. In early pregnancy, the evaluation of her cardiac function showed ejection fraction 47% and NYHA class II. Worsening of cardiac function was observed from 30 weeks, manifesting reduced cardiac load with left ventricular dilatation and in-hospital bed rest was necessary. Elective cesarean section was performed at 35 weeks to prevent deterioration of cardiac function. The parameters of her cardiac function returned to the pre-pregnancy status in a month after delivery, whereas she realized persistent worsening of muscular weakness at postpartum. PMID:26566449

  1. [Complication of ascites in pregnancy-induced hypertension].

    PubMed

    Cong, K J; Wang, T T

    1994-01-01

    Twenty three pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) patients with ascites were treated in Beijing Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital from Jan. 1981 to April 1992. The incidence of ascites in PIH was 1.9/1000 in total in this study, and 21.6/1000 in severe PIH. Clinical manifestations showed an early onset of PIH at 29.4 +/- 4.8 weeks, and ascites occurred at 32.4 +/- 7.4 weeks. There were 18 cases out of 23 who had no routine antenatal care, all of them had complications with IUGR. Laboratory studies: ascites showed transudate in all of them except one with chronic nephritis exhibiting milky appearance. 10% of patients had abnormal complete blood count (CBC) and 13%-17% abnormal electrolytes. 17.0% of the patients had GPT > 30IU, 21.0% urea nitrogen > 35 g/L, 95.7% had plasma albumin < 35 g/L. The ratio of A/G was < 1.5 in all patients. We conclude that once PIH was 1.5 in all patients. We conclude that once PIH was complicated by ascites, it can not be cured by active treatment. It is an indication for termination of pregnancy. After delivery the ascites and pleural effusion gradually disappeared in 2 weeks. Perinatal mortality rate was as high as 42.1% because of premature induced labor and IUGR. PMID:8033624

  2. Atypical and complicated Kawasaki disease in infants. Do we need criteria?

    PubMed Central

    Joffe, A; Kabani, A; Jadavji, T

    1995-01-01

    Case reports suggest that infants with Kawasaki disease have atypical presentations and a high complication rate, likely related to delayed diagnosis and treatment. To date, no study of consecutive cases has compared infants with older children who have both atypical and typical Kawasaki disease. We retrospectively reviewed 44 cases of Kawasaki disease treated at our hospital from March 1980 to 1990: 11 (25%) were infants; 9 (20%) had atypical Kawasaki disease, of which 5 (56%) were infants; the male to female ratio was 1.7:1. Infants had a higher incidence of atypical Kawasaki disease (5 [45%] versus 4 [12%]; P = .007) and of coronary artery complications (7 [64%] versus 3 [9%]; P = .002), and coronary artery complications developed in all of the infants with atypical Kawasaki disease (5 [100%] versus 0 [0%]; P < .01). Yet, the other manifestations and laboratory changes were at least as common as in the older children. Coronary artery complications did not develop in any patient who received early intravenous immune globulin therapy. We suggest that in infants with Kawasaki disease, accepted criteria are too restrictive to allow early diagnosis and effective treatment. Until a definitive test is available, clinical judgment is required in the diagnosis of atypical Kawasaki disease. Intravenous immune globulin is known to be safe, and its early use in patients with suspected atypical Kawasaki disease is appropriate. PMID:7747497

  3. Selecting a Principal: Keep It Complicated!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naso, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    When searching for a new principal, many search committees tend to use the lists of competencies published in the literature and provided by state departments of education as if they were checklists. Instead, they should focus on more complicated competencies, such as acumen, judgment, and ability to manage the dilemmas of practice.

  4. Minimal Brain Dysfunction: Associations with Perinatal Complications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Paul L.

    Examined with over 28,000 7-year-old children whose mothers registered for prenatal care was the relationship between perinatal complications and such characteristics as poor school achievement, hyperactivity, and neurological soft signs associated with the diagnosis of minimal brain dysfunction (MBD). Ten perinatal antecedents were studied:…

  5. Acute transverse myelopathy complicating systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Propper, D J; Bucknall, R C

    1989-01-01

    A sixteen year old girl with systemic lupus erythematosus developed acute transverse myelopathy. She was treated with high dose steroids, cyclophosphamide, and plasma exchange and regained partial neurological function. Previous descriptions of transverse myelopathy complicating systemic lupus erythematosus are reviewed, with particular reference to the efficacy of high dose steroid treatment. PMID:2662918

  6. Myocardial infarction complicated by ventricular septal rupture.

    PubMed

    Sahjian, Michael; Ventriglia, Rich; Bolton, Lauri

    2012-01-01

    Transporting patients with an ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is a fairly common practice for most critical care transport teams. When a STEMI is complicated by ventricular septal rupture, the care can become more challenging, especially if the rupture is not yet diagnosed. This article describes such a transport and reviews the pathophysiology of the process along with treatment options. PMID:22225564

  7. Lymphatic Leak Complicating Central Venous Catheter Insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Barnacle, Alex M. Kleidon, Tricia M.

    2005-12-15

    Many of the risks associated with central venous access are well recognized. We report a case of inadvertent lymphatic disruption during the insertion of a tunneled central venous catheter in a patient with raised left and right atrial pressures and severe pulmonary hypertension, which led to significant hemodynamic instability. To our knowledge, this rare complication is previously unreported.

  8. [Bulimia nervosa, a pathology with multiple complications].

    PubMed

    Mignot-Bedetti, Mathilde; Blanchet-Collet, Corinne; Moro, Marie Rose

    2015-01-01

    Bulimia nervosa is an eating disorder associating binge eating with inappropriate compensatory methods. Patients suffer from multiple organic, psychological and social complications. Of these, the somatic consequences are numerous and of varying degrees of seriousness. Regular monitoring is therefore essential in order to identify them and treat them. PMID:26381068

  9. Adult hydrocoele complicating a lumboperitoneal shunt.

    PubMed

    Pollak, T A; Marcus, H J; James, G; Dorward, N; Thorne, L

    2011-10-01

    We report an adult patient who developed a right-sided hydrocoele following a lumboperitoneal shunt. While hydrocoeles have been described as a rare complication following ventriculo- and lumboperitoneal shunts in children, we are unaware of any previously reported cases of hydrocoeles resulting from such shunts in adults. PMID:21344965

  10. Pituitary Macroadenoma Presenting with Multiple Psychiatric Complications

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Mamta; Patra, Bichitra Nanda; Agrawal, Alok; Khandelwal, Sudhir K.

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of pituitary macroadenoma with multiple physical and psychiatric complications, which posed a significant diagnostic dilemma and management challenge for the treating teams of neurosurgery, endocrinology and psychiatry. A pragmatic approach comprising of interdisciplinary collaboration resulted in satisfactory management of the case.

  11. Complications of lower blepharoplasty and midface lifting.

    PubMed

    Schwarcz, Robert M; Kotlus, Brett

    2015-01-01

    Lower eyelid blepharoplasty and midface lifting share a complex anatomy, which should be mastered before attempting these types of surgeries. In recent years, there have been significant contributions to rejuvenating this area. A thorough understanding of the rejuvenative approaches and their outcomes is imperative. Thus, the problem must be preoperatively evaluated to offer the appropriate technique and minimize complications. PMID:25440742

  12. Complications of complexity: integrating environmental, genetic and

    E-print Network

    Bradshaw, William E.

    a day. Circadian rhythms consist of two elements, a period and an amplitude of oscillation, without which there is no rhythm. The circadian clock is involved in the daily control of a diverse array to complications in understanding the role of the circadian clock in the control of diapause in Drosophila

  13. Circulatory support for shock complicating myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Deepak; Loyaga-Rendon, Renzo Y; Tallaj, Jose A; Pamboukian, Salpy V; Sasse, Mark F

    2014-08-01

    We discuss a patient with acute myocardial infarction complicated by cardiogenic shock (AMI-CS) who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention and hemodynamic support with a new short-term percutaneously inserted device, the Impella CP (Abiomed). We also review the evidence for mechanical circulatory support and management strategies in patients with AMI-CS. PMID:25091104

  14. Fulminant Bacterial Meningitis Complicating Sphenoid Sinusitis

    E-print Network

    Nizet, Victor

    , PhD,y and Victor Nizet, MD* Key Words: sphenoid sinus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, sinusitis cultures grew Streptococcus pneumoniae sensitive to penicillin (MIC 0.03 mg/mL); vancomy- cin, Streptococcus pyogenes, meningitis Intracranial complications of sinusitis, including meningitis, are uncommon

  15. Gastrointestinal Complications of Laparoscopic/Robot-Assisted Urologic Surgery and a Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Karadag, Mert Ali; Cecen, Kursat; Demir, Aslan; Bagcioglu, Murat; Kocaaslan, Ramazan; Kadioglu, Teoman Cem

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal injuries that occur during or after laparoscopic and robot-assisted surgery are serious side effects that affect patient outcome. In this review, we attempt to highlight the identification, incidence and management of gastrointestinal and visceral complications of laparoscopic and robot-assisted surgery. A search of Medline and PubMed databases was performed using the following terms: gastrointestinal complications of laparoscopy, laparoscopic, kidney and robotic surgery. A total of 1,072 papers related to the subject were analyzed. Forty-six of these papers were included in the present review. These papers reported high numbers of participants and had a high level of evidence. Gastrointestinal complications during laparoscopic and robot-assisted surgery are rare, but similar, and can occur at any time between access and closure. Despite their infrequency, these complications can result in mortality. The early recognition and management of gastrointestinal complications is very important. Unrecognized or delayed identification of gastrointestinal complications may cause sepsis and death. PMID:25699115

  16. Incidence and Predictors of Cardiovascular Complications and Death after Vascular Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Smeili, Luciana Andrea Avena; Lotufo, Paulo Andrade

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients undergoing arterial vascular surgery are considered at increased risk for post-operative complications. Objective To assess the incidence and predictors of complications and death, as well as the performance of two models of risk stratification, in vascular surgery. Methods This study determined the incidence of cardiovascular complications and deaths within 30 days from surgery in adults. Univariate comparison and logistic regression assessed the risk factors associated with the outcomes, and the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve assessed the discriminatory capacity of the revised cardiac risk index (RCRI) and vascular study group of New England cardiac risk index (VSG-CRI). Results 141 patients (mean age, 66 years; 65% men) underwent the following surgeries: carotid (15); lower limbs (65); abdominal aorta (56); and others (5). Cardiovascular complications and death occurred within 30 days in 28 (19.9%) and 20 (14.2%) patients, respectively. The risk predictors were: age, obesity, stroke, poor functional capacity, altered scintigraphy, surgery of the aorta, and troponin change. The scores RCRI and VSG-CRI had area under the curve of 0.635 and 0.639 for early cardiovascular complications, and 0.562 and 0.610 for death in 30 days. Conclusion In this small and selected group of patients undergoing arterial vascular surgery, the incidence of adverse events was elevated. The risk assessment indices RCRI and VSG-CRI did not perform well for complications within 30 days. PMID:26421535

  17. Fungal complications after Candida preservation fluid contamination in liver transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Levesque, Eric; Paugam-Burtz, Catherine; Saliba, Faouzi; Khoy-Ear, Linda; Merle, Jean-Claude; Jung, Boris; Stecken, Laurent; Ferrandiere, Martine; Mihaila, Liliana; Botterel, Francoise

    2015-11-01

    Donor-derived fungal infections can be associated with severe complications in transplant recipients. Donor-derived candidiasis has been described in kidney transplant recipients where contamination of the preservation fluid (PF) was a commonly proposed source. In liver transplantation, these fungal infections have been less explored. The aim of this study was therefore to determine the incidence and clinical relevance of Candida contamination of preservation fluid in the context of liver transplantation. A 5-year (2008-2012) retrospective multicentre study involving six French liver transplantation centers was performed to determine the incidence of Candida PF contamination. Postoperative clinical features, outcomes in recipients, and risk factors for Candida-related complications of liver transplantation were studied. Candida sp. was isolated from 28 of 2107 preservation fluid samples (1.33%). Candida albicans was the most common yeast (n = 18, 64%). Twenty-two recipients (78.5%) received antifungal therapy (echinocandins in 68%) for 7-37 days. Eight patients developed yeast-related complications (28.6%) including hepatic artery aneurysms (n = 6) and Candida peritonitis (n = 2). The 1-year mortality rate among patients after a yeast-related complication was 62.5%. The incidence of Candida PF contamination was low, but was associated with dramatic postoperative complications and high mortality. Close radiological follow-up may enable early recognition of the arterial complications associated with PF contamination by Candida. PMID:26147662

  18. Abductor digiti minimi muscle flap transfer to prevent wound healing complications after ORIF of calcaneal fractures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao-Liang; Huang, Su-Fang; Sun, Xue-Sheng; Zhu, Tao; Lin, Chu; Li, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the transfer of abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscle flaps as a method for preventing wound healing complications in cases of closed calcaneal fractures treated with open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF). Method: Design: Retrospective review. Patients: Twenty-six cases of acute closed calcaneal fracture in patients at risk for serious wound complications or with serious fractures. Intervention: During the ORIF surgery, an ADM muscle flap was removed and used to cover the plate, filling the gap between the plate and skin. Main Outcome Measures: Wound healing rates, postoperative complications, and time to heal. Results: All wounds healed uneventfully, except for one case of minor superficial epithelial necrosis during the early postoperative period, which was treated conservatively. All patients regained ambulatory status with regular foot apparel. At last follow-up, the patients presented no clinical, laboratory, or radiological signs of complications. Conclusions: This ADM muscle flap transfer technique appeared to successfully prevent wound healing complications among patients undergoing ORIF for closed calcaneal fractures. This method offers a promising treatment option for calcaneal fractures in patients at high risk for serious wound complications, and future studies with greater numbers of cases are needed to further investigate its clinical application. PMID:26550221

  19. Rate of complications in scoliosis surgery – a systematic review of the Pub Med literature

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Hans-Rudolf; Goodall, Deborah

    2008-01-01

    Background Spinal fusion surgery is currently recommended when curve magnitude exceeds 40–45 degrees. Early attempts at spinal fusion surgery which were aimed to leave the patients with a mild residual deformity, failed to meet such expectations. These aims have since been revised to the more modest goals of preventing progression, restoring 'acceptability' of the clinical deformity and reducing curvature. In view of the fact that there is no evidence that health related signs and symptoms of scoliosis can be altered by spinal fusion in the long-term, a clear medical indication for this treatment cannot be derived. Knowledge concerning the rate of complications of scoliosis surgery may enable us to establish a cost/benefit relation of this intervention and to improve the standard of the information and advice given to patients. It is also hoped that this study will help to answer questions in relation to the limiting choice between the risks of surgery and the "wait and see – observation only until surgery might be recommended", strategy widely used. The purpose of this review is to present the actual data available on the rate of complications in scoliosis surgery. Materials and methods Search strategy for identification of studies; Pub Med and the SOSORT scoliosis library, limited to English language and bibliographies of all reviewed articles. The search strategy included the terms; 'scoliosis'; 'rate of complications'; 'spine surgery'; 'scoliosis surgery'; 'spondylodesis'; 'spinal instrumentation' and 'spine fusion'. Results The electronic search carried out on the 1st February 2008 with the key words "scoliosis", "surgery", "complications" revealed 2590 titles, which not necessarily attributed to our quest for the term "rate of complications". 287 titles were found when the term "rate of complications" was used as a key word. Rates of complication varied between 0 and 89% depending on the aetiology of the entity investigated. Long-term rates of complications have not yet been reported upon. Conclusion Scoliosis surgery has a varying but high rate of complications. A medical indication for this treatment cannot be established in view of the lack of evidence. The rate of complications may even be higher than reported. Long-term risks of scoliosis surgery have not yet been reported upon in research. Mandatory reporting for all spinal implants in a standardized way using a spreadsheet list of all recognised complications to reveal a 2-year, 5-year, 10-year and 20-year rate of complications should be established. Trials with untreated control groups in the field of scoliosis raise ethical issues, as the control group could be exposed to the risks of undergoing such surgery. PMID:18681956

  20. Complications of Chronic Suppurative Otitis Media and Their Management: A Single Institution 12 Years Experience.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Neeta; Jaiswal, Ashwin Ashok; Banerjee, Praveer Kumar; Garg, Amrish Kumar

    2015-12-01

    To determine the incidence of otogenic complications of Chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM) and its management. The study was conducted at the tertiary referral centre and teaching hospital. An analysis was made about the clinical and operative findings, surgical techniques and approaches, the overall management and recovery of the patient. The data were then compared with the relevant and available literature. Over the study period of 12 years, a total 45 cases of CSOM with complications were reviewed. Out of these 45 cases, 20 cases had extracranial (EC) while 25 cases had intracranial (IC) complications. The prevalence of each complication was 0.17 and 0.13 %, IC and EC respectively. The commonly encountered IC complications were brain abscess, meningitis and lateral sinus thrombophlebitis. Among the EC complications, mastoid abscess followed by labyrinthitis and facial nerve palsy were encountered. The reliable warning signs and symptoms of IC complications were fever, headache, earache vestibular symptoms, meningeal signs and impairment of consciousness. Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis were the common organism isolated. Cholesteatoma and granulation in the middle ear were the major findings in both groups of cases. Surgery was main modality of management of these conditions. We observed that two patients fail to regain full facial nerve function despite of surgery. Mortality rate was zero but morbidity was seen in 15 % (3) and 28 % (7) of cases in EC and IC group respectively. The epidemiological presentation, clinical features and results of treatment are discussed. CSOM complications, despite its reduced incidence still pose a great challenge in developing countries, as the disease present in the advanced stage leading to difficulty in management and consequently higher morbidity. In this study we emphasize the importance of the accurate and early diagnosis followed by adequate surgical therapy with multidisciplinary approach. PMID:26693451

  1. Transcatheter Embolization of Pseudoaneurysms Complicating Pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Golzarian, Jafar; Nicaise, Nicole; Deviere, Jacques; Ghysels, Marc; Wery, Didier; Dussaussois, Luc; Gansbeke, Daniel van; Struyven, Julien

    1997-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the therapeutic role of angiography in patients with pseudoaneurysms complicating pancreatitis. Methods: Thirteen symptomatic pseudoaneurysms were treated in nine patients with pancreatitis. Eight patients had chronic pancreatitis and pseudocyst and one had acute pancreatitis. Clinical presentation included gastrointestinal bleeding in seven patients and epigastric pain without bleeding in two. All patients underwent transcatheter embolization. Results: Transcatheter embolization resulted in symptomatic resolution in all patients. Rebleeding occurred in two patients, 18 and 28 days after embolization respectively, and was successfully treated by repeated emnbolization. One patient with severe pancreatitis died from sepsis 28 days after embolization. Follow-up was then available for eight patients with no relapse of bleeding after a mean follow-up of 32 months (range 9-48 months). Conclusion: Transcatheter embolization is safe and effective in the management of pseudoaneurysms complicating pancreatitis.

  2. Nasal myiasis with orbital and palatal complications.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Shaji; Nair, Preeti; Hegde, Karthik; Kulkarni, Abhay

    2010-01-01

    A 15-year-old girl presented with a chief complaint of bleeding from her nose. She had noticed worms emerging from her right nostril. She had a continuous dull ache on the right side of her nose, spreading over the maxillary sinus area, and on the infra-orbital margin on the same side. She complained of difficulty breathing through her right nostril and a foul smell, which was associated with orbital oedema. Intra-oral examination revealed erythema of the soft palate on the same side, which was tender on palpation. Her condition was diagnosed as nasal myiasis with orbital and palatal extension. Nasal myiasis was treated by surgical removal of the maggots and with Ivermectin and local application of turpentine. The symptoms resolved and the dangers of orbital complications and penetration into the intracranial cavity were averted. The serious short-term complications of nasal myiasis were prevented by prompt treatment. PMID:22802476

  3. [Immobilization hypercalcemia as a complication of polyneuropathy].

    PubMed

    Riehl, J; Brandenburg, V M; Dietrich, C G; Block, F

    2000-08-01

    Prolonged immobilization or physical inactivity has been shown to produce increased bone resorption due to enhanced osteoclastic activity and diminished bone formation. These skeletal changes are a typical complication in tetraplegic patients, who are at risk of developing hypocalcemia. Hypercalciuria is the most characteristic symptom. However, some patients develop hypercalcemia, which is infrequent in these patients, and the hypercalcemia can become a life-threatening complication. Until now, it has been unclear why a small percentage of immobilized patients develop hypercalcemia. Here we present a case of symptomatic hypercalcemia (serum calcium: 3.5 mM/l) following immobilization due to a critical illness polyneuropathy. The diagnosis could be established after malignant hypercalcemia, primary hyperparathyroidism, and other causes of hypercalcemia were excluded. Treatment with intravenous saline, furosemide, and calcitonin was not effective in lowering serum calcium. Treatment with pamidronate (Aredia) was successful and reduced the serum calcium to normal values. PMID:10996916

  4. Endometriosis causing acute appendicitis complicated with hemoperitoneum

    PubMed Central

    Curbelo-Peña, Yuhamy; Guedes-De la Puente, Xavier; Saladich-Cubero, Maria; Molinas-Bruguera, Joan; Molineros, Jose; De Caralt-Mestres, Enric

    2015-01-01

    Endometriosis is a painful disorder characterized by endometrial tissue outside the uterine cavity. It usually affects the pelvis, but in rare cases it might extend to other parts of the body. The report is based on a case of a 39-year-old woman, who presented symptoms of acute appendicitis and diagnosis confirmed with ultrasonography and a computed tomography scan procedures. Laparoscopic appendicectomy was performed. After entering the abdominal cavity, hemoperitoneum was discovered with no associated pelvic or abdominal lesions. Biopsy confirmed acute appendicitis with endometrial glands and stroma infiltrating its muscular tissue. Patient recovered without complications and was discharged 48 h after surgery. The appendix is rarely affected by endometrial infiltration. The literature describes an incidence of 0.8%, just a few cases have been associated with acute appendicitis; however, none of them are described to present hemoperitoneum, being our patient the first one reported with such complication. PMID:26253154

  5. Complications and challenges associated with polycystic ovary syndrome: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Palomba, Stefano; Santagni, Susanna; Falbo, Angela; La Sala, Giovanni Battista

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) represents the most common endocrine dysfunction in fertile women and it is considered a heterogeneous and multifaceted disorder, with multiple reproductive and metabolic phenotypes which differently affect the early- and long-term syndrome's risks. Women with PCOS present an adverse reproductive profile, including a high risk of pregnancy-induced hypertension, preeclampsia, and gestational diabetes mellitus. Patients with PCOS present not only a higher prevalence of classic cardiovascular risk factors, such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, and type-2 diabetes mellitus, but also of nonclassic cardiovascular risk factors, including mood disorders, such as depression and anxiety. Moreover, at the moment, clinical data on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in women with PCOS are controversial. Finally, women with PCOS show an increased risk of endometrial cancer compared to non-PCOS healthy women, particularly during premenopausal period. Currently, we are unable to clarify if the increased PCOS early- and long-term risks are totally due to PCOS per se or mostly due to obesity, in particular visceral obesity, that characterized the majority of PCOS patients. In any case, the main endocrine and gynecological scientific societies agree to consider women with PCOS at increased risk of obstetric, cardiometabolic, oncology, and psychological complications throughout life, and it is recommended that these women be accurately assessed with periodic follow-up. PMID:26261426

  6. Complications and challenges associated with polycystic ovary syndrome: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Palomba, Stefano; Santagni, Susanna; Falbo, Angela; La Sala, Giovanni Battista

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) represents the most common endocrine dysfunction in fertile women and it is considered a heterogeneous and multifaceted disorder, with multiple reproductive and metabolic phenotypes which differently affect the early- and long-term syndrome’s risks. Women with PCOS present an adverse reproductive profile, including a high risk of pregnancy-induced hypertension, preeclampsia, and gestational diabetes mellitus. Patients with PCOS present not only a higher prevalence of classic cardiovascular risk factors, such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, and type-2 diabetes mellitus, but also of nonclassic cardiovascular risk factors, including mood disorders, such as depression and anxiety. Moreover, at the moment, clinical data on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in women with PCOS are controversial. Finally, women with PCOS show an increased risk of endometrial cancer compared to non-PCOS healthy women, particularly during premenopausal period. Currently, we are unable to clarify if the increased PCOS early- and long-term risks are totally due to PCOS per se or mostly due to obesity, in particular visceral obesity, that characterized the majority of PCOS patients. In any case, the main endocrine and gynecological scientific societies agree to consider women with PCOS at increased risk of obstetric, cardiometabolic, oncology, and psychological complications throughout life, and it is recommended that these women be accurately assessed with periodic follow-up. PMID:26261426

  7. Oral complications of cancer therapies. Description and incidence of oral complications

    SciTech Connect

    Dreizen, S. )

    1990-01-01

    No part of the body reflects the complications of cancer chemotherapy as visibly and as vividly as the mouth. The infectious, hemorrhagic, cytotoxic, nutritional, and neurologic signs of drug toxicity are reflected in the mouth by changes in the color, character, comfort, and continuity of the mucosa. The stomatologic complications of radiotherapy for oral cancer are physical and physiological in nature, transient or lasting in duration, and reversible or irreversible in type. Some linger as permanent mementos long after the cancer has been destroyed. They stem from radiation injury to the salivary glands, oral mucosa, oral musculature, alveolar bone, and developing teeth. They are expressed clinically by xerostomia, trismus, radiation dermatitis, nutritional stomatitis, and dentofacial malformation. In both cancer chemotherapy and cancer radiotherapy, the oral complications vary in pattern, duration, intensity, and number, with not every patient developing every complication. 21 references.

  8. Complications and mortality in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    McKeever, Tricia M.; Hall, Ian P.; Hubbard, Richard B.; Fogarty, Andrew W.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Studies report that the risks of significant neurologic complications (including stroke, cerebral abscess, and migraine) and hemorrhagic sequelae are high in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), and that life expectancy in this cohort is reduced. However, most published cohorts derive from specialist centers, which may be susceptible to bias. Methods: We used a population-based approach to estimate the risks of developing neurologic and hemorrhagic complications of HHT, the association of a diagnosis of HHT with common cardiovascular and malignant comorbidities, and also long-term survival of those with the disease. Results: From a UK primary care database of 3.5 million patients (The Health Improvement Network), we identified 675 cases with a diagnosis of HHT and compared them with 6,696 controls matched by age, sex, and primary care practice. Risks of stroke (odds ratio [OR] 1.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2–2.6), cerebral abscess (OR 30.0, CI 3.1–288), and migraine (OR 1.7, CI 1.3–2.2) were elevated over controls. Bleeding complications including epistaxis (OR 11.6, CI 9.1–14.7) and gastrointestinal hemorrhage (OR 6.1, CI 2.8–13.4) were more common in cases with HHT. Survival of cases with HHT was poorer than controls with a hazard ratio for death of 2.0 (CI 1.6–2.6) and a median age at death 3 years younger. Conclusions: Patients with HHT are at substantially increased risk of serious neurologic and hemorrhagic complications of the disease. Because a diagnosis of HHT is associated with a significantly poorer survival compared with those who have no disease, evaluation of new strategies to improve clinical management is required. PMID:25862798

  9. Noncoding RNAs in diabetes vascular complications.

    PubMed

    Beltrami, Cristina; Angelini, Timothy G; Emanueli, Costanza

    2015-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the most common metabolic disorder and is recognised as a dominant health threat of our time. Diabetes induces a widespread damage of the macro- and microvasculature in different organs and tissues and disrupts the endogenous vascular repair mechanisms, thus causing diffuse and severe complications. Moreover, diabetic patients respond poorly to surgical interventions aiming to "revascularise" (i.e., to restore blood flow supply) the ischemic myocardium or lower limbs. The molecular causes underpinning diabetes vascular complications are still underappreciated and druggable molecular targets for therapeutic interventions have not yet clearly emerged. Moreover, diabetes itself and diabetes complications are often silent killers, requiring new prognostic, diagnostic and predictive biomarkers for use in the clinical practice. Noncoding RNA (ncRNAs) are emerging as new fundamental regulators of gene expression. The small microRNAs (miRNAs, miRs) have opened the field capturing the attention of basic and clinical scientists for their potential to become new therapeutic targets and clinical biomarkers. More recently, long ncRNAs (lncRNAs) have started to be actively investigated, leading to first exciting reports, which further suggest their important and yet largely unexplored contribution to vascular physiology and disease. This review introduces the different ncRNA types and focuses at the ncRNA roles in diabetes vascular complications. Furthermore, we discuss the potential value of ncRNAs as clinical biomarkers, and we examine the possibilities for therapeutic intervention targeting ncRNs in diabetes. This article is part of a Special Issue titled: Non-coding RNAs. PMID:25536178

  10. Pulmonary gangrene as a complication of mucormycosis

    SciTech Connect

    Zagoria, R.J.; Choplin, R.H.; Karstaedt, N.

    1985-06-01

    Pulmonary gangrene, a rare complication of pneumonia occurs when vascular thrombosis leads to necrosis of a large portion of lung. The devitalized lung is then sloughed into a cavity, resulting in a characteristic radiographic appearance. The previously reported cases of pulmonary gangrene have been associated with either bacterial or tuberculous pneumonia; the authors describe a case resulting from mucormycosis. In addition to the plain-film findings, the computed tomographic (CT) appearance is described.

  11. Pulmonary complications of AIDS: a clinical strategy.

    PubMed Central

    Edelson, J D; Hyland, R H

    1989-01-01

    Infectious and noninfectious forms of pulmonary disease are the most common complications of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), and many are amenable to treatment. We describe the clinical and radiologic features of the most common causes of lung disease in AIDS patients and review the drugs available for treatment. In addition, we provide a strategy for the clinical assessment and management of patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection who have lung infiltrates. PMID:2655853

  12. Unusual Bilateral Paramolars Associated with Clinical Complications

    PubMed Central

    Sulabha, A. N.; Sameer, C.

    2015-01-01

    Paramolars are rare supernumerary structures of maxillofacial complex that occur buccally or lingually near the molar row. Predominantly these occur singly; bilateral presentation is very rare. This paper reports two unusual bilateral presentations of paramolars with clinical complication and its management. One of the cases in the present paper also documents the cooccurrence of bilateral paramolars and microdontia of single tooth and one of its paramolars presented with multilobed crown with an anomalous buccal tubercle. PMID:26078890

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of diabetic foot complications

    PubMed Central

    Low, Keynes TA; Peh, Wilfred CG

    2015-01-01

    This pictorial review aims to illustrate the various manifestations of the diabetic foot on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The utility of MR imaging and its imaging features in the diagnosis of pedal osteomyelitis are illustrated. There is often difficulty encountered in distinguishing osteomyelitis from neuroarthropathy, both clinically and on imaging. By providing an accurate diagnosis based on imaging, the radiologist plays a significant role in the management of patients with complications of diabetic foot. PMID:25640096

  14. Intra cranial complications of tuberculous otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, M.; Johnny, J. Carlton

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the most common infections in the world. It is seen that tuberculous otitis media (TOM) is almost secondary to pulmonary tuberculosis. In this review we have tried to deal with all the aspects of the intra cranial complications of TOM such as tuberculoma, otitic hydrocephalus, brain abscess and tuberculous meningitis. The aspects covered in this review are the pathology, clinical features, and investigations of the intra cranial manifestations. PMID:26015748

  15. [The complications of pulmonary resection treatment of lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Pereszlenyi, A; Harustiak, S; Benej, R; Bohucky, S

    2001-01-01

    This article discusses the complications of the pulmonary resection treatment in lung cancer. A significant decrease in incidence of cardiovascular and respiratory complications has already been achieved during the last decades. However, infectious complications, mainly pneumonias and postpneumonectomy empyemas still remain and belong among treacherous complications which are often associated with significant mortality. This article devotes special attention to the possibilities of influencing and decreasing the incidence of these complications. PMID:11725397

  16. Complex dynamics in learning complicated games

    E-print Network

    Tobias Galla; J. Doyne Farmer

    2011-09-20

    Game theory is the standard tool used to model strategic interactions in evolutionary biology and social science. Traditional game theory studies the equilibria of simple games. But is traditional game theory applicable if the game is complicated, and if not, what is? We investigate this question here, defining a complicated game as one with many possible moves, and therefore many possible payoffs conditional on those moves. We investigate two-person games in which the players learn based on experience. By generating games at random we show that under some circumstances the strategies of the two players converge to fixed points, but under others they follow limit cycles or chaotic attractors. The dimension of the chaotic attractors can be very high, implying that the dynamics of the strategies are effectively random. In the chaotic regime the payoffs fluctuate intermittently, showing bursts of rapid change punctuated by periods of quiescence, similar to what is observed in fluid turbulence and financial markets. Our results suggest that such intermittency is a highly generic phenomenon, and that there is a large parameter regime for which complicated strategic interactions generate inherently unpredictable behavior that is best described in the language of dynamical systems theory

  17. Complications Following BellaGen™ Injection

    PubMed Central

    Park, Mi Kyung; Kim, Hyun Kyu; Park, Kui Young; Li, Kapsok; Hong, Chang Kwun

    2011-01-01

    BellaGen™ is an injectable acellular dermal matrix granule derived from donated human skin tissue that was recently developed for soft tissue augmentation. Its use has been sporadically reported in penile girth enhancement procedures. Many cases of complications have been reported after injecting acellular dermal matrices like AlloDerm or SureDerm™ but few reports on complications associated with BellaGen™ injection. We report here on penile skin inflammation and necrosis following augmentation phalloplasty with BellaGen™, which developed 3 days after the injection and persisted for more than 2 weeks. The patient had a 15 year history of type 2 diabetes mellitus, and he was treated with oral antibiotics and wet dressings with KMNO4 solution to combine preservation of the remaining penile soft tissue with debridement of avascular tissue. The lesion improved with this treatment, but the patient experienced pain for about 2 weeks. All patients should be informed of the potential complications with the use of injectable acellular dermal matrices before treatment. Patient selection for augmentation is also important to have the most desirable results. PMID:22346264

  18. Advances, problems, and complications of polypectomy

    PubMed Central

    Anderloni, Andrea; Jovani, Manol; Hassan, Cesare; Repici, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    The major role of colonoscopy with polypectomy in reducing the incidence of and mortality from colorectal cancer has been firmly established. Yet there is cause to be uneasy. One of the most striking recent findings is that there is an alarmingly high incomplete polyp removal rate. This phenomenon, together with missed polyps during screening colonoscopy, is thought to be responsible for the majority of interval cancers. Knowledge of serrated polyps needs to broaden as well, since they are quite often missed or incompletely removed. Removal of small and diminutive polyps is almost devoid of complications. Cold snare polypectomy seems to be the best approach for these lesions, with biopsy forcep removal reserved only for the tiniest of polyps. Hot snare or hot biopsy forcep removal of these lesions is no longer recommended. Endoscopic mucosal resection and endoscopic submucosal dissection have proven to be effective in the removal of large colorectal lesions, avoiding surgery in the majority of patients, with acceptably low complication rates. Variants of these approaches, as well as new hybrid techniques, are being currently tested. In this paper, we review the current status of the different approaches in removing polypoid and nonpolypoid lesions of the colon, their complications, and future directions in the prevention of colorectal cancer. PMID:25210470

  19. Laryngeal complications by orotracheal intubation: Literature review

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Luiz Alberto Alves; de Cavalho, Glauber Barbosa; Brito, Valeska Almeida

    2012-01-01

    Sumamry Introduction:?The injuries caused for the orotracheal intubation are common in our way and widely told by literature. Generally the pipe rank of or consequence of its permanence in the aerial ways of the patient is caused by accidents in. It has diverse types of larynx injuries, caused for multiple mechanisms. Objective:?To verify, in literature, the main causes of laryngeal complications after- orotracheal intubation and its mechanisms of injury. Revision of Literature:?The searched databases had been LILACS, BIREME and SCIELO. Were updated, books and theses had been used, delimiting itself the period enters 1953 the 2009. The keywords used for the search of articles had been: complications, injuries, larynx, intubation, endotracheal, orotracheal, granulomas, stenosis. 59 references had been selected. The used criteria of inclusion for the choice of articles had been the ones that had shown to the diverse types of injuries caused for the orotracheal intubation and its pathophysiology. Final Considerations:?This revision of literature was motivated by the comment in the practical clinic of a great number of laryngeal sequels in patients submitted to the orotracheal intubation. Of that is ahead important the knowledge, for the professionals of the area of health, the types of complications and its causes, with intention to prevent them, adopting measured of prevention of these injuries. PMID:25991942

  20. [Invasive electrophysiology: complications, nightmares and their management].

    PubMed

    Reithmann, C; Hahnefeld, A; Fiek, M; Ulbrich, M; Steinbeck, G

    2007-12-01

    Most minor side effects of ablation in the right atrium and right ventricle relate to femoral venous catheterization but there is a small risk of severe complications including atrioventricular (AV) block, damage of surrounding structures and thromboembolic events. Impairment of AV conduction can occur during ablation of atrioventricular re-entrant tachycardia, ablation of anteroseptal, mid-septal and parahisian accessory pathways, ablation of ectopic atrial tachycardia originating from the vicinity of the atrioventricular node and when ablating the septal isthmus for typical atrial flutter. Damage of the right coronary artery is a very rare complication after inferior isthmus ablation with high energy. The thromboembolic risk during and after cardioversion and ablation of atrial flutter is higher than previously recognized and anticoagulation therapy decreases this risk. The risk of perforation and tamponade during ablation in the right atrium and right ventricle is very low but particular caution is necessary in thin-walled structures such as the coronary sinus and the upper right ventricular outflow tract. Phrenic nerve injury can be avoided by pacing from the mapping electrode before application of radiofrequency energy at the right atrial free wall. Limitation of power output depending on the site of ablation and titration of energy application with continuous control of temperature and impedance should be considered to minimize the risk of complications. PMID:18084794

  1. Advanced Glycation End Products and Diabetic Complications

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Varun Parkash; Bali, Anjana; Singh, Nirmal

    2014-01-01

    During long standing hyperglycaemic state in diabetes mellitus, glucose forms covalent adducts with the plasma proteins through a non-enzymatic process known as glycation. Protein glycation and formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) play an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications like retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy, cardiomyopathy along with some other diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis and aging. Glycation of proteins interferes with their normal functions by disrupting molecular conformation, altering enzymatic activity, and interfering with receptor functioning. AGEs form intra- and extracellular cross linking not only with proteins, but with some other endogenous key molecules including lipids and nucleic acids to contribute in the development of diabetic complications. Recent studies suggest that AGEs interact with plasma membrane localized receptors for AGEs (RAGE) to alter intracellular signaling, gene expression, release of pro-inflammatory molecules and free radicals. The present review discusses the glycation of plasma proteins such as albumin, fibrinogen, globulins and collagen to form different types of AGEs. Furthermore, the role of AGEs in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications including retinopathy, cataract, neuropathy, nephropathy and cardiomyopathy is also discussed. PMID:24634591

  2. Management of acute diverticulitis and its complications.

    PubMed

    Welbourn, Hannah L; Hartley, John E

    2014-12-01

    Colonic diverticular disease is a common condition, and around a quarter of people affected by it will experience acute symptoms at some time. The most common presentation is uncomplicated acute diverticulitis that can be managed conservatively with bowel rest and antibiotics. However, some patients will present with diverticular abscesses or purulent or faeculent peritonitis due to perforated diverticular disease. Whilst most mesocolic abscesses can be managed with percutaneous drainage alone, pelvic abscesses are associated with a higher rate of future complications and usually require percutaneous drainage followed by interval sigmoid resection. Patients who require emergency surgery for complicated acute diverticulitis most commonly undergo a Hartmann's procedure, although resection with primary anastomosis and laparoscopic peritoneal lavage have emerged as alternative treatment options for patients with purulent peritonitis in recent years. However, robust evidence from randomized trials is lacking for these alternative procedures, and the studies that have reported good outcomes from them have included carefully selected patient groups. There has been a move away from recommending elective prophylactic colectomy after two episodes of acute diverticulitis in the light of evidence that most patients will not experience a significant recurrence of their symptoms; elective surgery is indicated for those with ongoing symptoms, pelvic abscesses, complications-such as fistulating disease, strictures or recurrent diverticular bleeding-and those who are at high risk of perforation during future episodes, for example, due to immunosuppression, chronic renal failure or collagen-vascular diseases. PMID:25614717

  3. Complications of type I coronoid fractures in competitive athletes: report of two cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Liu, S H; Henry, M; Bowen, R

    1996-01-01

    Coronoid fractures have been classified into three types. Elbow instability is a well-recognized complication of type III and less so in type II fractures. Type I fractures have generally been considered to heal uneventfully, with early range of motion. We present two cases of type I fractures in athletes that failed to improve with conservative management. One developed loose body formation and the other a fibrous nonunion with mechanical blockage of elbow flexion. Both patients responded to arthroscopic intervention and returned to full athletic activities. These cases illustrate potential complications with type I coronoid fractures in competitive athletes that should be recognized and treated early. PMID:8816344

  4. Role of endoscopy in the conservative management of biliary complications after deceased donor liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lisotti, Andrea; Fusaroli, Pietro; Caletti, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    The clinical outcome of patients receiving liver transplantation could be significantly affected by biliary complications, including strictures, leaks, stones and bilomas; early diagnosis and treatment of these conditions lead to markedly reduction in morbidity and mortality. Therapeutic gold standard is represented by conservative approaches, both endoscopic and percutaneous, based on the type of biliary reconstruction, the local availability of the procedures and specific expertise. In patients with previous transplantation, the difficult biliary access and the possible presence of concomitant complications (mainly strictures) further restrict the efficacy of the endoscopic and percutaneous treatments; on the other hand, surgery should generally be avoided because of the even increased morbidity and mortality due to technical and clinical issues. Here we review the most common biliary complications occurring after liver transplantation and discuss available treatment options including future perspectives such as endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary access in patients with Roux-en-Y choledocho-jejunostomy or extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy for difficult stones.

  5. Female genital mutilations: genito-urinary complications and ethical-legal aspects.

    PubMed

    Vella, Marco; Argo, Antonina; Costanzo, Angela; Tarantino, Lucia; Milone, Livio; Pavone, Carlo

    2015-09-18

    Many women in the world are still undergoing female genital mutilations (FGMs) even if in almost all the countries, the practice of FGM is illegal. The increase of immigration, particularly from African Countries, to Europe, and Italy too, led to consider this phenomenon with particular attention and skill. All the operators in health services need to know the different types of FGMs and the related complications and the psychological and sexual sequels. Urological complications, in particular, are not rare and the changing anatomy of the external genital apparatus can also make the catheter insertion sometimes difficult. This review analyzes the epidemiology of FGMs, the reasons why the practice is still made, the complications, the ethical, and the principal legal aspects of this practise that must be hopefully early banned. PMID:25744709

  6. Impact of Sequencing of Postmastectomy Radiotherapy and Breast Reconstruction on Timing and Rate of Complications and Patient Satisfaction

    SciTech Connect

    Adesiyun, Tolulope A.; Lee, Bernard T.; Yueh, Janet H.; Chen, Chen; Colakoglu, Salih; Anderson, Katarina E.M.; Nguyen, Minh-Doan T.; Recht, Abram

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: There are few long-term studies of how the sequencing of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) and breast reconstruction (BR) affects the time to development of complications or patient satisfaction with BR. We therefore studied this issue. Methods and Materials: One hundred thirteen women who underwent BR at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (Boston, MA) from 1999-2006 and also received PMRT were included. Complications requiring surgery were categorized as early (within 90 days of BR) or late. The median length of follow-up after BR was 46.5 months. Patients' general and esthetic satisfaction was assessed with a validated questionnaire. Results: Complications occurred among 32% of 57 women receiving PMRT before BR and 44% of 57 patients having BR before PMRT (p = 0.176). Early complications were more frequent in patients who had PMRT first (18%) than for those with BR first (11%) (p = 0.210); conversely, late complication rates in the two groups were 14% and 33%, respectively (p = 0.009). General satisfaction was comparable between the PMRT-first and BR-first groups (68% and 68%, respectively; p = 0.995); esthetic satisfaction rates were also similar (50% and 62%, respectively; p = 0.238). Conclusions: The sequencing of PMRT and BR did not have a substantial impact on the total risk of complications or patients' general and esthetic satisfaction. However, early complications tended to develop in patients having PMRT first, whereas patients having BR first had a higher risk of late complications. Additional study of the effects of sequencing of PMRT on particular types of reconstructions may help devise strategies for reducing these risks.

  7. Complications of neck dissection at a tertiary level hospital: study of 30 cases.

    PubMed

    Masud, M K; Ahmad, S M; Karim, M A; Ferdouse, F; Fakir, A Y; Hanif, M A; Abdullah, M; Roy, A S

    2014-10-01

    Metastatic dissemination into lymph nodes of neck occurs frequently in head neck cancers which down grade the patient's curability and survival. Neck dissection is a curable option for its management. To evaluate the complications following different types of neck dissection. This cross sectional study was conducted among patients undergone different types of neck dissection due to cervical nodal metastasis and attended follow up during July 2010 to June 2011 in Department of ENTs and Head-Neck surgery Dhaka Medical College Hospital, Dhaka, Bangladesh. Among 30 selected patient, 23 were male (76.67%) and 7 were female (23.33%), age ranged from 31-72 years (Mean=59.1±5.44). In different modalities of neck dissection 11 were modified neck dissection (36.67%) and 10(33.33%) were radical neck dissection. Common indication was carcinoma of unknown origin (66.67%). Involved neck nodes were commonly level II-IV (69.99%). Nodal stage was N2(50%) and N3 (40%).Common immediate complications were bleeding 03(10%), facial oedema 02 (6.67%) and thoracic duct injury 02(6.67%). Intermediate complications were seroma 05(16.67%), wound infection 04(13.33%) and chylous fistula 02(6.67%), Late Complications were hypertrophic scar 07(23.33%) and shoulder syndrome 06(20%). Proper indications, skilled surgery along with early recognize and treatment in both early and late manifestations of neck dissection preventing its grave sequence. PMID:25481582

  8. Vascular Complications of Pancreatitis: Imaging and Intervention

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, John M. Vora, Parag; Midia, Mehran; Rawlinson, John

    2008-09-15

    The objective of this study was to highlight technical challenges and potential pitfalls of diagnostic imaging, intervention, and postintervention follow-up of vascular complications of pancreatitis. Diagnostic and interventional radiology imaging from patients with pancreatitis from 2002 to 2006 was reviewed. We conclude that biphasic CT is the diagnostic modality of choice. Catheter angiography may (still) be required to diagnose small pseudoaneurysms. Endovascular coiling is the treatment of choice for pseudoaneurysms. Close clinical follow-up is required, as patients may rebleed/develop aneurysms elsewhere.

  9. Complications of Proximal Biceps Tenotomy and Tenodesis.

    PubMed

    Virk, Mandeep S; Nicholson, Gregory P

    2016-01-01

    The long head of biceps tendon (LHBT) is a well-recognized cause of anterior shoulder pain. Tenotomy or tenodesis of the LHBT is an effective surgical solution for relieving pain arising from the LHBT. Cosmetic deformity of the arm, cramping or soreness in the biceps muscle, and strength deficits in elbow flexion and supination are the three most common adverse events associated with tenotomy of the LHBT. Complications associated with tenodesis of the LHBT include loss of fixation resulting in cosmetic deformity, residual groove pain, pain or soreness in the biceps muscle, infection, stiffness, hematoma, neurologic injury, vascular injury, proximal humerus fracture, and reflex sympathetic dystrophy. PMID:26614476

  10. Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome complicating pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    González-Mesa, Ernesto; Blasco, Marta; Andérica, José; Herrera, José

    2012-01-01

    The Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome is a rare congenital disorder that affects one or more limbs. It is characterised by cutaneous vascular nevi, venous malformations and hypertrophy of soft tissues and bone. There are very few cases reported in pregnant women, so the level of uncertainty is high when it appears during gestation. It is a disease that increases obstetric risk and can exacerbate complications, mainly thromboembolic and haemorrhagic. We report below the case of a pregnant woman diagnosed with this syndrome and the multidisciplinary management held in our centre. PMID:22854239

  11. Digestive Tract Complications of Renal Cryoablation.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Kanichiro; Mogami, Takuji; Michimoto, Kenkichi; Kameoka, Yoshihiko; Tokashiki, Tadashi; Kurata, Naoki; Miki, Jun; Kishimoto, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    We report a case each of duodenorenal and colorenal fistula that arose after computed tomography-guided percutaneous cryoablation (PCA) for renal cell carcinoma and use imaging and endoscopic findings to analyze their causes and mechanisms. Both complications occurred though the edge of the iceball did not touch the intestinal wall, and patients' symptoms and fistula formation occurred several days after the PCA procedure. Based on imaging and endoscopy findings, we suspected the colorenal fistula resulted from bowel injury caused by ischemia from the occlusion of small vessels at the procedure's low temperature. Both cases were resolved conservatively without surgical intervention. PMID:25944148

  12. [INTENSIVE CARE OF COMPLICATED ACUTE PORPHYRIA].

    PubMed

    Yatskovi, K V; Gorodetskiy, V M; Shulutko, E M; Glukhova, T E; Pusqtovoit, Ya S

    2015-01-01

    The experience of anesthesia and intensive care departments of Hematological center Russia for intensive care management in 13 patients with acute porphyria, from 1996 till 2013 was summarized ion this pape4: Main causes of life-threatening complications of acute porphyria and its frequency were revealed Advantages of mechanical lung ventilation in respiratory failure, algorithms of clinical nutrition, correction of water-electrolyte disorders were represented. Importance of kinesiotherapy in successful treatment in these category of patients was revealed. It is shown that the whole complex of intensive care methods with the specific pathogenetical therapy brings success in 84,6 % of patients. PMID:26596031

  13. Carcinoma of the lung complicating lipoid pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Felson, B.; Ralaisomay, G.

    1983-11-01

    The authors have encountered four cases of oil aspiration pneumonia complicated by carcinoma. Each had a clear-cut history of chronic intake of an oily substance, radiographic changes, and histologically documented oil aspiration pneumonia. Lung cancer later appeared in the involved area. A small number of similar cases also have been reported. The implication is that oil aspiration pneumonitis may induce bronchogenic carcinoma, particularly either the alveolar cell or the squamous cell variety. The radiographic diagnosis of the malignant transformation is difficult, and consequently the prognosis is poor.

  14. IL-6 in diabetes and cardiovascular complications

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Dan; Liu, Jian; Lau, Chi Wai; Huang, Yu

    2014-01-01

    IL-6 is a pleiotropic cytokine that participates in normal functions of the immune system, haematopoiesis, metabolism, as well as in the pathogenesis of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. Both pro- and anti-inflammatory roles of IL-6 have been described, which are distinguished by different cascades of signalling transduction, namely classic and trans-signalling. The present review summarizes the basic principles of IL-6 signalling and discusses its roles in diabetes and associated cardiovascular complications, with emphasis on the different outcomes mediated by the two modes of IL-6 signalling and the value of developing therapeutic strategies to specifically target the deleterious trans-signalling of IL-6. PMID:24697653

  15. Complications of radiofrequency ablation of hepatic tumors: Frequency and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Alexandre Zanchenko; Santin, Stephanie; Gomes, Luiz Guilherme Lisboa; Waisberg, Jaques; Ribeiro Jr., Marcelo Augusto Fontenelle

    2014-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has become an important option in the therapy of primary and secondary hepatic tumors. Surgical resection is still the best treatment option, but only a few of these patients are candidates for surgery: multilobar disease, insufficient liver reserve that will lead to liver failure after resection, extra-hepatic disease, proximity to major bile ducts and vessels, and co-morbidities. RFA has a low mortality and morbidity rate and is considered to be safe. Thus, complications occur and vary widely in the literature. Complications are caused by thermal damage, direct needle injury, infection and the patient’s co-morbidities. Tumor type, type of approach, number of lesions, tumor localization, underlying hepatic disease, the physician’s experience, associated hepatic resection and lesion size have been described as factors significantly associated with complications. The physician in charge should promptly recognize high-risk patients more susceptible to complications, perform a close post procedure follow-up and manage them early and adequately if they occur. We aim to describe complications from RFA of hepatic tumors and their risk factors, as well as a few techniques to avoid them. This way, others can decrease their morbidity rates with better outcomes. PMID:24672640

  16. Use of intraoperative indocyanin-green angiography to minimize wound healing complications in abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ketan M; Bhanot, Parag; Franklin, Brenton; Albino, Frank; Nahabedian, Maurice Y

    2013-12-01

    Complication rates following abdominal wall reconstruction (AWR) remain high. Early complications are related to skin necrosis and delayed healing, whereas late complications are related to recurrence. When concomitant body contouring procedures are performed, complication rates can be further increased. It is hypothesised that fluorescent angiography using indocyanin green (ICG) can identify poorly perfused tissues and thus reduce the incidence of delayed healing. A retrospective review was conducted of all patients who underwent AWR with concomitant panniculectomy from 2007-2012. Intraoperative ICG angiography with the SPY system (LifeCell Corp.) was used to determine the amount of resection for body contouring in patients who underwent reconstruction in a cohort of patients. SPY-Q was used to assess relative perfusion of analysed areas. Preoperative, postoperative, and operative details were analyzed. Seventeen patients met inclusion criteria, 12 patients were included in the non-ICG cohort, while five patients were included in the ICG cohorts. Wound-healing complications occurred in 5/12 (42%) patients in the non-ICG cohort vs 1/5 (20%) of the ICG cohorts. A description of the sole patient with complications in the ICG cohort is illustrated. Operative debridement and wound infection development occurred more frequently in the non-ICG cohort compared with the ICG cohort (17%, 17% vs 0%, 0%, respectively). Average time to wound healing was 41.1 days. Intraoperative ICG angiography can accurately detect perfusion abnormalities and can decrease wound healing related complications in complex hernia repair with concomitant panniculectomy. Assessing and ensuring skin viability can decrease the need for operative debridement. PMID:23596988

  17. Advanced polymeric matrix for valvular complications.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Gayathri; Hopkins, Richard A; Lee, Chi H

    2012-05-01

    Poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) matrix systems incorporated with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) containing nitric oxide (NO) donors (DETA NONOate) were developed for prevention of heart valve complications through sustained and controlled release of NO. PLLA matrices were prepared using the salt leaching method and the properties and drug release profiles were characterized. For assessment of the effects of PLLA systems on the pharmacological responses and cytotoxicity, various factors, such as calcium content, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) expression, intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1) expression and cell viability of porcine aortic valve interstitial cells (PAVICs), were evaluated. PLLA matrices embedded with PLGA- NPs demonstrated its usefulness in alleviating the calcification rate of the VICs. The cGMP levels under osteoblastic conditions significantly increased, supporting that anticalcification activity of NO is mediated through NO-cGMP signaling pathway. The level of ICAM-1 expression in cells exposed to NO was lowered, suggesting that NO has an inhibitory activity against tissue inflammation. NO releases from PLLA matrix embedded with PLGA NPs prevented valvular calcification and inflammation without causing any cytotoxic activities. PLLA matrix system loaded with NPs containing NO donors could provide a new platform for sustained and controlled delivery of NO, significantly reducing valvular complications. PMID:22337643

  18. Severe biliary complications after hepatic artery embolization

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiao-Qiang; Huang, Zhi-Qiang; Duan, Wei-Dong; Zhou, Nin-Xing; Feng, Yu-Quan

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To study the mechanism and treatment of severe biliary complications arising from hepatic artery embolization (HAE). METHODS: Of seven cases of intra- and extrahepatic biliary damage resulting from hepatic artery embolization reported since 1987 , 6 patients suffered from hepatic haemangioma, the other case was due to injection of TH compound into the hepatic artery during operation. The hepatic artery was injected with ethanol so as to evaluate the liver damage in experimental rats. RESULTS: All the cases were found to have destructive damage of intra- and extrahepatic bile duct at the hilum with biliary hepatocirrhosis. Experimental results revealed necrosis of the liver parenchyma, especially around the portal tract and obliteration of intrahepatic bile duct. CONCLUSIONS: To prevent the severe biliary complications of HAE, the use of HAE for hepatic haemangioma which was widely practiced in China, should be re-evaluated. Hepatic arterial embolization of hepatic haemangioma may resulte in severe destructive biliary damages and its indiscriminate use should be prohibited. PMID:11833085

  19. Acute pyelonephritis can have serious complications.

    PubMed

    Shields, Joanne; Maxwell, Alexander P

    2010-04-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) may predominantly involve the lower urinary tract, i.e. acute cystitis, or upper urinary tract consisting of the renal pelvis and kidney,, i.e. acute pyelonephritis The incidence of acute pyelonephritis is higher in young women than in men but the incidence in men over 65 is similar to that in older women. Women have up to a 10% risk of recurrent acute pyelonephritis in the year following a first acute episode. The equivalent risk in men is 6%. Acute pyelonephritis may be uncomplicated and resolve without serious sequelae. A minority of episodes may be complicated by acute kidney injury, papillary necrosis, renal or perinephric abscess or the development of emphysematous pyelonephritis. Acute pyelonephritis is generally caused by microorganisms ascending from the urethra via the bladder into the upper urinary tract. Rarely the kidney may be seeded by blood-borne infection. Ecoli is the most common uropathogen causing pyelonephritis accounting for 70-90% of infections. Species of Enterococci, Klebsiella, Pseudomonas, Proteus and Staphylococci are responsible for the remaining infections. There is a rising incidence in the community of UTI with bacteria that produce extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) enzymes. These ESBL bacteria have developed resistance to antibiotics such as penicillin, cephalosporins and increasingly to quinolones. Risk factors for uncomplicated acute pyelonephritis include recent sexual intercourse, acute cystitis, stress incontinence and diabetes and for complicated acute pyelonephritis include pregnancy, diabetes, anatomical abnormalities of the urinary tract and renal calculi. PMID:20486480

  20. Urological complications of illicit drug use.

    PubMed

    Skeldon, Sean C; Goldenberg, S Larry

    2014-03-01

    Illicit drug use is prevalent worldwide; over 24 million people are estimated to have used recreational drugs during the past month in the UK and USA alone. Illicit drug use can result in a wide spectrum of potential medical complications that include many urological manifestations. To ensure optimal care and treatment, urologists need to be cognizant of these complications in their patients, particularly among youths. Ketamine uropathy is thought to affect over one-quarter of ketamine users and can lead to severe lower urinary tract symptoms, as well as upper tract obstruction. Cannabis use has been associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer, prostate cancer and nonseminomatous germ cell tumours in case-control studies. Fournier's gangrene has been reported following injection of heroin and cocaine into the penis. Excessive use of cough medicines can lead to the development of radiolucent stones composed of ephedrine, pseudoephedrine and guaifenesin. As the current evidence is mostly limited to case reports and case series, future epidemiological studies are needed to fully address this issue. PMID:24535583

  1. Treatment of levodopa-induced motor complications.

    PubMed

    Stocchi, Fabrizio; Tagliati, Michele; Olanow, C Warren

    2008-01-01

    Chronic levodopa treatment for Parkinson's disease patients is frequently associated with the development of motor complications such as end-of-dose wearing-off and dyskinesias. In this review, we provide an overview of the strategies available for dealing with these problems. Medical management includes manipulation of levodopa dosing to establish the optimum treatment schedule, improving levodopa absorption, catechol-O-methyl transferase-inhibition (COMT), Monoamine oxidase-B (MAO-B) inhibition, dopaminergic agonists, amantadine, and continuous dopaminergic infusions. Surgical procedures and particularly deep brain stimulation are also reviewed. It should be noted that none of these treatments has been shown to provide anti-parkinsonian efficacy that is greater than what can be achieved with levodopa. We highlight the importance of initiating therapy with a treatment strategy that reduces the risk that a Parkinson's disease patient will develop motor complications in the first place. Key Words: Advanced PD, dyskinesias, motor fluctuations, levodopa, dopamine agonists, COMT inhibitors, MAO-B inhibitors. PMID:18781681

  2. Scrub typhus complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute liver failure: a case report from Northeast India.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Dibyajyoti; Hing, Arlangki; Das, Ananta; Lyngdoh, Monaliza

    2013-08-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a serious complication of scrub typhus. Only a few cases of scrub typhus complicated by ARDS have been discussed in the literature to date. Herein we report the case of a patient who presented with scrub typhus complicated by ARDS and acute liver failure (ALF) and who was successfully treated in our institute. Due to the non-specificity and diversity of the initial presenting symptoms, a lack of awareness about the disease amongst physicians, and the lack of accessibility to facilities for serodiagnosis in developing countries, there is a chance of misdiagnosis during the early stage. At the same time, early diagnosis and prompt treatment are crucial to prevent life-threatening complications. Our patient was initially misdiagnosed with a common cold and then malaria. By the time a correct diagnosis was made, complications had already developed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of scrub typhus complicated by ARDS and ALF to be reported from the northeastern region of India. PMID:23402799

  3. What Are Some Common Complications During Labor and Delivery?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... What are some common complications during labor and delivery? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Labor and delivery are different for everyone. Complications sometimes happen. Possible ...

  4. Managment of orbital complications of sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Ozkurt, Fazil Emre; Ozkurt, Zeynep Gursel; Gul, Aylin; Akdag, Mehmet; Sengul, Engin; Yilmaz, Beyhan; Yuksel, Harun; Meric, Faruk

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: We reported on the clinical approaches of ophthalmology and otorhinolaryngology departments in the treatment of the orbital complications of sinusitis. We also included an in-depth literature review. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical files of 51 patients from January 2008 to January 2014. The records were evaluated for age, gender, type of orbital complications, symptoms, predisposing factors, imaging studies, medical and surgical management, culture results, and follow-up information. SPSS version 15.0 software (Statistical Analysis, The Statistical Package for Social Sciences Inc, Chicago, IL) was used for the statistical analysis. Results: Fifty-one patients met the criteria, with available medical records, for the study (29 male, 22 female). Thirty-two (62.7%) were diagnosed with preseptal cellulitis and 19 (37.3%) with postseptal cellulitis. After a detailed evaluation, 15 were diagnosed with a subperiosteal abscess (SPA), and 4 were diagnosed with orbital cellulitis. The age and gender was similar for the two groups. Five patients with medial SPA were treated with endoscopic sinus surgery, one patient with inferior SPA was treated with external surgery, and six patients with other localizations were treated with a combination of endoscopic sinus surgery and external surgery. All patients presented with periorbital erythema and edema. The length of hospitalization and duration of symptoms were similar in both groups. Visual acuity was between 1/10 to 10/10 (mean 7/10) and statistically significant for preseptal and postseptal cellulitis groups (p<0.001). All patients received intravenous antibiotics upon the first day of admission. Conclusion: Orbital complications of acute sinusitis required intensive follow-up and a multidisciplinary approach. A contrast-enhanced paranasal sinus computerized tomography (CT) scan can detect the extent of the infection. An initial trial of intravenosus (IV) antibiotics may be appropriate when close monitoring is possible. Surgery may be indicated when there has been no improvement within 48 hours of intravenous treatment, loss of visual acuity (under 8/10), and a non-medial abscess. PMID:25494374

  5. Perioperative Surgical Complications and Learning Curve Associated with Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: A Single-Institute Experience

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soo Bin; Seok, Sang Ok; Jo, Byung Woo; Ha, Joong Won

    2015-01-01

    Background As surgical complications tend to occur more frequently in the beginning stages of a surgeon's career, knowledge of perioperative complications is important to perform a safe procedure, especially if the surgeon is a novice. We sought to identify and describe perioperative complications and their management in connection with minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). Methods We performed a retrospective chart review of our first 124 patients who underwent minimally invasive TLIF. The primary outcome measure was adverse events during the perioperative period, including neurovascular injury, implant-related complications, and wound infection. Pseudarthroses and adjacent segment pathologies were not included in this review. Adverse events that were not specifically related to spinal surgery and did not affect recovery were also excluded. Results Perioperative complications occurred in 9% of patients (11/124); including three cases of temporary postoperative neuralgia, two deep wound infections, two pedicle screw misplacements, two cage migrations, one dural tear, and one grafted bone extrusion. No neurologic deficits were reported. Eight complications occurred in the first one-third of the series and only 3 complications occurred in the last two-thirds of the series. Additional surgeries were performed in 6% of patients (7/124); including four reoperations (two for cage migrations, one for a misplaced screw, and one for an extruded graft bone fragment) and three hardware removals (one for a misplaced screw and two for infected cages). Conclusions We found perioperative complications occurred more often in the early period of a surgeon's experience with minimally invasive TLIF. Implant-related complications were common and successfully managed by additional surgeries in this series. We suggest greater caution should be exercised to avoid the potential complications, especially when surgeon is a novice to this procedure. PMID:25729524

  6. Complicated Grief and Suicidal Ideation in Adult Survivors of Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Ann M.; Kim, Yookyung; Prigerson, Holly G.; Mortimer, Mary Kay

    2005-01-01

    While the prevalence of complicated grief has been demonstrated to be elevated in survivors of suicide, the association between complicated grief and suicidal ideation among adult survivors of suicide has not been explored. The purpose of the present study is to examine the association between complicated grief and suicidal ideation in suicide…

  7. The Complicate Observations and Multi-Parameter Land Information Constructions on Allied Telemetry Experiment (COMPLICATE)

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xin; Li, Zengyuan; Chen, Erxue; Liu, Qinhuo; Yan, Guangjian; Wang, Jindi; Niu, Zheng; Zhao, Shaojie; Li, Xin; Pang, Yong; Su, Zhongbo; van der Tol, Christiaan; Liu, Qingwang; Wu, Chaoyang; Xiao, Qing; Yang, Le; Mu, Xihan; Bo, Yanchen; Qu, Yonghua; Zhou, Hongmin; Gao, Shuai; Chai, Linna; Huang, Huaguo; Fan, Wenjie; Li, Shihua; Bai, Junhua; Jiang, Lingmei; Zhou, Ji

    2015-01-01

    The Complicate Observations and Multi-Parameter Land Information Constructions on Allied Telemetry Experiment (COMPLICATE) comprises a network of remote sensing experiments designed to enhance the dynamic analysis and modeling of remotely sensed information for complex land surfaces. Two types of experimental campaigns were established under the framework of COMPLICATE. The first was designed for continuous and elaborate experiments. The experimental strategy helps enhance our understanding of the radiative and scattering mechanisms of soil and vegetation and modeling of remotely sensed information for complex land surfaces. To validate the methodologies and models for dynamic analyses of remote sensing for complex land surfaces, the second campaign consisted of simultaneous satellite-borne, airborne, and ground-based experiments. During field campaigns, several continuous and intensive observations were obtained. Measurements were undertaken to answer key scientific issues, as follows: 1) Determine the characteristics of spatial heterogeneity and the radiative and scattering mechanisms of remote sensing on complex land surfaces. 2) Determine the mechanisms of spatial and temporal scale extensions for remote sensing on complex land surfaces. 3) Determine synergist inversion mechanisms for soil and vegetation parameters using multi-mode remote sensing on complex land surfaces. Here, we introduce the background, the objectives, the experimental designs, the observations and measurements, and the overall advances of COMPLICATE. As a result of the implementation of COMLICATE and for the next several years, we expect to contribute to quantitative remote sensing science and Earth observation techniques. PMID:26332035

  8. Management of refractory and complicated reflux esophagitis.

    PubMed Central

    Hirschowitz, B. I.

    1996-01-01

    Simple intermittent heartburn with minor or no esophagitis can be treated with simple measures including lifestyle changes and antacids as needed, or H2 receptor antagonists (H2RA), and has a good outcome. Problematic reflux includes resistance to therapy, stricture, Barrett's esophagus and aspiration. Severe reflux esophagitis, often resistant to H2RA therapy, requires more potent treatment with potent acid suppression using proton pump inhibitors, often indefinitely. When complicated by stricture, dilatations with potent acid suppression are needed. Barrett's esophagus is subject to esophagitis, which is no more difficult to treat than other cases of esophagitis. Reflux in Barrett's esophagus should be treated on its own merits without regard to the presence of Barrett's epithelium. Dysplasia leading to adenocarcinoma is a different problem, apparently not influenced by reduced exposure to acid. Indications for antireflux surgery are quite limited and should be carefully analyzed as a cost/risk/benefit problem. PMID:9165696

  9. Gaucher disease: haematological presentations and complications.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Alison S; Mehta, Atul; Hughes, Derralynn A

    2014-05-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease, caused by deficiency of the enzyme glucocerebrosidase, required for the degradation of glycosphingolipids. Clinical manifestations include hepatosplenomegaly, thrombocytopenia, bone disease and a bleeding diathesis, frequently resulting in presentation to haematologists. Historically managed by splenectomy, transfusions and orthopaedic surgery, the development of specific therapy in the form of intravenous enzyme replacement therapy in the 1990s has resulted in dramatic improvements in haematological and visceral disease. Recognition of complications, including multiple myeloma and Parkinson disease, has challenged the traditional macrophage-centric view of the pathophysiology of this disorder. The pathways by which enzyme deficiency results in the clinical manifestations of this disorder are poorly understood; altered inflammatory cytokine profiles, bioactive sphingolipid derivatives and alterations in the bone marrow microenvironment have been implicated. Further elucidating these pathways will serve to advance our understanding not only of GD, but of associated disorders. PMID:24588457

  10. Fibrosing mediastinitis: a rare complication of histoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Milesh; Lu, Frederic; Hannaway, Maria; Hochman, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 29-year-old man who presented with intermittent haemoptysis for about 18?months. Previously, his symptoms had been diagnosed as musculoskeletal pain and later as pneumonia. CT found a venous infarct in the right lung in addition to extensive lymphadenopathy in the mediastinum and pulmonary hila, with associated calcifications almost completely occluding the superior vena cava and azygos vein. Further questioning revealed that the patient had once worked on an organic farm in Colorado. Subsequent work up was positive for histoplasmosis yeast antibodies. The patient was diagnosed with fibrosing mediastinitis (FM) and started on itraconazole for 3?months. We note that FM is a rare complication of histoplasmosis and can present as chronic haemoptysis. Travel history is an important aspect of the clinical evaluation. Antifungal agents have shown some efficacy in treating histoplasmosis-related FM. PMID:26538131

  11. Systemic lupus erythematosus complicating simple silicosis.

    PubMed

    Lucas, C D; Amft, N; Reid, P T

    2014-07-01

    Inhalation of crystalline silica is known to result in silicosis: an irreversible, disabling and potentially fatal occupational lung disease, which is associated with a variety of pulmonary and non-pulmonary complications including autoimmunity. A potential link between silicosis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is currently recognized only in cases of acute or accelerated silicosis. We report a case of SLE, a disease which usually affects young females, arising in a male former stonemason with simple silicosis. Epidemiological and clinical literature on the association of silica exposure and development of SLE are briefly reviewed. This case report and literature review highlight the link between occupational silica exposure and autoimmune disease including SLE, establishes that even simple silicosis appears linked to development of autoimmunity and emphasizes the importance of an occupational history, especially in male patients who develop SLE. PMID:24919786

  12. Alimentary tract complications after renal transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, W C; Harris, N; Stein, S; Brooks, M; Jones, R S; Thompson, W M; Stickel, D L; Seigler, H F

    1979-01-01

    A computer analysis of post renal transplantation gastrointestinal problems was performed to identify important associated clinical factors. Thirty-seven per cent of all transplant recipients developed one or more significant problems. Hemorrhage, nondiverticular intestinal perforation, and esophagitis occurred most frequently in hospitalized patients. Pancreatitis, diverticulitis, and gastroduodenal perforation occurred characteristically in long-term survivors with well functioning allografts. Eleven of 32 HLA identical recipients treated with maintenance corticosteroids during stable kidney function developed gastrointestinal disease while only one of 13 HLA identical recipients not given maintenance steroids developed a problem, which strongly suggests a causal role for steroids in the development of late complications. The association of preexisting peptic ulcer and diverticular disease with hemorrhage and perforation supports previous recommendations that documented peptic ulcer disease or diverticulitis should be corrected surgically prior to transplantation. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 5. PMID:384945

  13. [Vascular complications after pelvic rami fracture].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Lombardía, J; Paz-Aparicio, A; Hernández-Vaquero, D

    2014-01-01

    The case is presented of a 78 year-old patient who suffered a right ileo- and ischiopubic rami fracture after a casual fall. A few hours later, she presented with sudden abdominal pain and hypotension. Imaging test showed extraperitoneal hemorrhage with active bleeding and hemodynamic compromise. The progressive worsening, with anemia and hemodynamic instability, required her being sent to the reference hospital for selective embolization of the bleeding point. After embolization, the patient?s situation stabilized, and she was then able to sit down one week later. The fracture consolidated 3 months later. Although low-energy pelvic fractures by lateral compression do not usually present with complications, sometimes they require a strict control due to the potential risk of vascular injuries. PMID:25242728

  14. Multicystic dysplastic kidney complicated by pyelonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Chad J.; Said, Sarmad; Khalillullah, Sayeed; Salameh, Hasan J.; Hernandez, German T.

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Female, 21 Final Diagnosis: Multicystic Dysplastic Kidney Disease complicated by pyelonephritis Symptoms: Left flank pain (CVAT) • dysuria • fever Medication: Levofloxacin Clinical Procedure: Dimercaptosuccinic acid scan • voiding cystouretrogram Specialty: Nephrology Objective: Rare disease Background: Multicystic dysplastic kidney (MCDK) is a renal dysplasia characterized by the presence of multiple cysts that are non-communicating, separated by dysplastic parenchyma that consumes the renal cortex resulting in a nonfunctional kidney. MCDK has an incidence of 1: 4300 of live births and is usually unilateral, most commonly occurring in the left kidney. Simple MCDK is defined as unilateral dysplasia with a normal contralateral kidney but with compensatory hypertrophy of the contralateral kidney, and no associated genitourinary anomalies. Case Report: A 21 year old Hispanic American female, presented with intermittent, sharp, severe left flank pain, fever and dysuria for two days but had gradually worsened within the last 24 hours prior to presentation. Previous history of multicystic dysplastic kidney, diagnosed four years ago. No pertinent physical examination findings except left costovertebral angle tenderness (CVAT). Urinalysis findings were positive for infection and urine culture grew pan sensitive Escherichia coli. A CT scan of abdominal and pelvis without contrast revealed a normal right kidney and left kidney had multiple non-communicating dilated cystic spaces, but no hydronephrosis, left ureteropelvic junction obstruction and finding were consistent with multicystic dysplastic kidney and also noted perinephric stranding. Conclusions: VUR is the most common renal abnormality in patients with MCDK, occurring in about 25% of contralateral kidney. Infections involving the MCDK are rare. In fact, cases of infections such as pyelonephritis or an infected renal cyst of MCDK are almost non-existent in the current literature. This patient presented with findings consistent with MCDK complicated by pyelonephritis. PMID:24349603

  15. Hyponatremia in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Complicating with Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, Hiroki; Kita, Ryuichi; Kimura, Toru; Ohara, Yoshiaki; Sakamoto, Azusa; Saito, Sumio; Nishijima, Norihiro; Nasu, Akihiro; Komekado, Hideyuki; Osaki, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims: We aimed to investigate the effect of serum sodium level on survival in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients complicating with liver cirrhosis (LC). Methods: A total of 1170 HCC patients with LC were analysed. We classified these patients into three groups according to serum sodium level at HCC diagnosis: group A (n=96); serum sodium ?135 mmol/L, group B (n=520); 135 mmol/L < serum sodium ?140 mmol/L, group C (n=554); serum sodium >140 mmol/L. We compared the baseline characteristics and overall survival (OS) among these three groups. Furthermore, we examined the factors linked to OS using univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: In our results, decreased baseline serum sodium level was significantly associated with Child-Pugh classification and HCC stage along with several laboratory parameters in groups A, B and C. The median follow-up period was 1.1 years in group A, 2.4 years in group B and 3.3 years in group C. The 1-, 3- and 5-year cumulative OS rates in groups A, B and C were 64.8%, 46.9% and 25.7%, respectively, in group A, 85.5%, 60.5% and 41.1%, respectively, in group B and 90.7%, 66.6% and 48.2%, respectively, in group C (P<0.001). The multivariate analyses showed that Child-Pugh classification (P<0.001), HCC stage (P<0.001), serum sodium (P<0.001), aspartate aminotransferase ?57 IU/L (P=0.002), alkaline phosphatase ?348 IU/L (P<0.001), alpha-fetoprotein ?29.2 ng/mL (P=0.019) and des-?-carboxy prothrombin ?55 mAU/mL (P<0.001) were significant independent predictors linked to OS. Conclusion: Lower serum sodium concentration is a useful predictor in HCC patients complicating with LC. PMID:25874013

  16. C-reactive protein is a predictor of complications after elective laparoscopic colorectal surgery: five-year experience

    PubMed Central

    Karnusevicius, Ignas; Andreikaite, Gintare; Mikalauskas, Saulius; Poskus, Tomas; Strupas, Kestutis

    2015-01-01

    Introduction With the development and improvement of laparoscopic surgery, procedures have become common. However, post-operative complications occur when patients are released from hospital. These complications increase patients’ morbidity and mortality. They also lead to re-hospitalization, an extended recovery period, and an increase in the cost of treatment. Aim To evaluate and determine the prognostic properties of C-reactive protein in the early diagnosis of postoperative complications after a laparoscopic colon resection. Material and methods The prospective study included patients who underwent laparoscopic colorectal surgery in 2010–2014. The patients were divided into two groups – uncomplicated ones and those with complications. C-reactive protein concentrations in their blood serum were measured on the 2nd, 4th and 6th day after surgery. Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the relation between C-reactive protein values measured on the 2nd, 4th and 6th postoperative day and related complications. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to determine the sensitivity and specificity of each C-reactive protein value measured on the 2nd, 4th and 6th postoperative day. Results One hundred and six patients were included in the trial; 14 of them had complications. On the second day, a C-reactive protein cut-off value of 88.6 mmol/l provided the highest sensitivity and specificity for predicting evolving complications, being 71.4% and 84.8% respectively (p = 0.003). The significant predictive cut-off value decreases and becomes more sensitive and specific each post-operative day. Conclusions It is possible to detect developing post-operative complications early on by monitoring C-reactive protein concentration levels in the blood serum on the 2nd, 4th, and 6th post-operative days.

  17. Diverticula of Kommerell and Aberrant Subclavian Arteries Complicated by Aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, R. G. Whigham, C. J.; Trinh, C.

    2005-06-15

    This is a retrospective evaluation of the incidence of aberrant subclavian arteries (ASAs) and diverticula of Kommerell, as well as the occurrence and significance of associated aneurysms. Thoracic aortograms obtained during a 12.5-year period were reviewed, seeking the presence of aberrant right and left subclavian arteries (ARSAs/ALSAs), diverticula of Kommerell, and the incidence of associated aortic aneurysms. Several cases were evaluated with computed tomography concomitantly. Results were correlated with a literature review. Twenty-two ASAs were identified. Nineteen were on the right (ARSAs) and three were on the left (ALSAs). A diverticulum of Kommerell (DOK) was also present on the right in seven and on the left in three. Five of these patients had complicating aneurysms. Four of these were associated with ARSAs and their diverticula. Two were atherosclerotic; one was a limited dissection and one of uncertain etiology was ruptured. One additional aneurysm (atherosclerotic) involved an ALSA/DOK. The patient with the ruptured aneurysm died in surgery; three were managed conservatively because of concomitant disease; and one is being followed because of the small size (2.5 cm) of the aneurysm. ARSAs are relatively uncommon and ALSAs are rare. Both ARSA and ALSA are frequently associated with a DOK. Aneurysms rarely involve ASAs (with or without a DOK), but they are associated with a high mortality rate if they are not discovered before rupture. Early diagnosis plus surgical and/or endovascular management can be lifesaving.

  18. Spontaneous fungal peritonitis: a devastating complication of cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Bremmer, Derek N; Garavaglia, Jeffrey M; Shields, Ryan K

    2015-07-01

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is a well-known complication of cirrhosis; however, spontaneous fungal peritonitis (SFP) is less well-recognised and described. Our objective was to determine the clinical characteristics, treatment outcomes and factors associated with death among patients with SFP. We performed a retrospective cohort study using the primary outcome of all-cause mortality at 28 days. Twenty-five patients were included; Candida species were the causative pathogen in all cases. At the onset of SFP, patients were critically ill, median APACHE II and MELD scores were 22 and 30.3, respectively. The 28-day mortality rate was 56%; six patients died prior to culture positivity. Among the remaining patients, there were no differences in rates of death by treatment regimen (P = 0.55). APACHE II score at the onset of SFP was an independent predictor of death (OR = 1.46, 95% CI = 1.02-2.08, P = 0.04). In conclusion, SFP develops among critically ill patients with cirrhosis and is associated with high rates of death. Directed antifungal therapy did not improve patient outcomes. Future studies assessing the benefit of early or pre-emptive antifungal therapy are warranted. PMID:25851525

  19. Post-operative pulmonary complications after non-cardiothoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kelkar, Kalpana Vinod

    2015-01-01

    Post-operative pulmonary complications (PPCs) occur in 5–10% of patients undergoing non-thoracic surgery and in 22% of high risk patients. PPCs are broadly defined as conditions affecting the respiratory tract that can adversely influence clinical course of the patient after surgery. Prior risk stratification, risk reduction strategies, performing short duration and/or minimally invasive surgery and use of anaesthetic technique of combined regional with general anaesthesia can reduce the incidence of PPCs. Atelectasis is the main cause of PPCs. Atelectasis can be prevented or treated by adequate analgesia, incentive spirometry (IS), deep breathing exercises, continuous positive airway pressure, mobilisation of secretions and early ambulation. Pre-operative treatment of IS is more effective. The main reason for post-operative pneumonia is aspiration along the channels formed by longitudinal folds in the high volume, low pressure polyvinyl chloride cuffs of the endotracheal tubes. Use of tapered cuff, polyurethane cuffs and selective rather than the routine use of nasogastric tube can decrease chances of aspiration. Acute lung injury is the most serious PPC which may prove fatal. PMID:26556919

  20. Dyskeratosis congenita- management and review of complications: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Shivam; Trivedi, Vikas; Krishna, Arvind; Rao, Nidhi

    2013-07-01

    Among the inherited bone marrow failure disorders, dyskeratosis congenita is an X-linked inherited disorder arising as a consequence of short telomere and mutations in telomere biology. Production of the altered protein dyskerin, leads to vulnerable skin, nails, and teeth which lead to higher permeability for noxious agents which can induce carcinogenesis accounting for the classical triad of skin pigmentation, nail dystrophy and oral leukoplakia. This condition is fatal and patients succumb to aplastic anemia, malignancy or immunocompromised state. We present a young male with the classic clinical triad and avascular necrosis of both femoral heads, with no evidence of hematologic anomaly or any malignancy. He was managed for osteonecrosis with uncemented total hip arthroplasty for the symptomatic left hip. Our case represents a benign form of such a fatal and rare condition, which if detected and managed early can result in improved quality of life for the patient suffering from this disorder. This patient is under our meticulous follow-up for the last 2 years in order to determine any late development of complications before being labelled as a variant of this syndrome. PMID:23904924

  1. Total hip arthroplasty with acetabular fixation: an unexpected complication.

    PubMed

    Khoriati, Al-Achraf

    2014-04-01

    The incidence of vascular injuries associated with total hip arthroplasty (THA) is low. However, several vascular structures are at risk of injury within the pelvis. These include the external iliac, femoral, and obturator vessels. Both reaming of the acetabulum and drilling of the acetabular screw holes may place these structures at risk. If left untreated, injuries to these vessels may be associated with severe morbidity and mortality. In this report, an acute vascular complication that had an unusual presentation is highlighted. A 72-year-old woman presented to the emergency department following a road traffic accident in which she sustained a combined fracture of the right acetabulum and femoral head. Her treatment involved a combination of THA and pelvic open reduction and internal fixation. The immediate perioperative recovery period was uncomplicated. However, the patient developed a deep venous thrombus in her right calf 7 days after surgery. Further investigation revealed a second thrombus, occluding the right common femoral vein. Surgical exploration revealed that a screw placed during the initial surgery was pressing against the vessel and occluding it. The discrepancy in incidence between the development of deep venous thrombosis and vascular compression or injury means that the association between the 2 events is unlikely to be made. The author highlights this unusual presentation to improve early recognition and prompt management of similar cases. The importance of adequate preoperative planning and intraoperative imaging with a C-arm is also stressed. PMID:24762850

  2. Complications of video-mediastinoscopy--successful management in four cases.

    PubMed

    Pereszlenyi, A; Niks, M; Danko, J; Radulov, S; Zernovicky, F; Harustiak, S

    2003-01-01

    The authors describe complications of video-mediastinoscopy in a number of clinical cases and present case reports of four patients, where this complication occurred. The following types of complications were recorded: one case of esophageal perforation, one case of tracheal lesion and two cases of massive bleeding from central greater vessel. Possibilities of treatment methods of these complications, possible ways how to manage and decrease the incidence of life-threatening complication are being discussed in this paper. (Fig. 5, Ref. 9.). PMID:14594354

  3. Lumbar spine surgery positioning complications: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Shriver, Michael F; Zeer, Valerie; Alentado, Vincent J; Mroz, Thomas E; Benzel, Edward C; Steinmetz, Michael P

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT There are a variety of surgical positions that provide optimal exposure of the dorsal lumbar spine. These include the prone, kneeling, knee-chest, knee-elbow, and lateral decubitus positions. All are positions that facilitate exposure of the spine. Each position, however, is associated with an array of unique complications that result from excessive pressure applied to the torso or extremities. The authors reviewed clinical studies reporting complications that arose from positioning of the patient during dorsal exposures of the lumbar spine. METHODS MEDLINE, Scopus, and Web of Science database searches were performed to find clinical studies reporting complications associated with positioning during lumbar spine surgery. For articles meeting inclusion criteria, the following information was obtained: publication year, study design, sample size, age, operative time, type of surgery, surgical position, frame or table type, complications associated with positioning, time to first observed complication, long-term outcomes, and evidence-based recommendations for complication avoidance. RESULTS Of 3898 articles retrieved from MEDLINE, Scopus, and Web of Science, 34 met inclusion criteria. Twenty-four studies reported complications associated with use of the prone position, and 7 studies investigated complications after knee-chest positioning. Complications associated with the knee-elbow, lateral decubitus, and supine positions were each reported by a single study. Vision loss was the most commonly reported complication for both prone and knee-chest positioning. Several other complications were reported, including conjunctival swelling, Ischemic orbital compartment syndrome, nerve palsies, thromboembolic complications, pressure sores, lower extremity compartment syndrome, and shoulder dislocation, highlighting the assortment of possible complications following different surgical positions. For prone-position studies, there was a relationship between increased operation time and position complications. Only 3 prone-position studies reported complications following procedures of less than 120 minutes, 7 studies reported complications following mean operative times of 121-240 minutes, and 9 additional studies reported complications following mean operative times greater than 240 minutes. This relationship was not observed for knee-chest and other surgical positions. CONCLUSIONS This work presents a systematic review of positioning-related complications following prone, knee-chest, and other positions used for lumbar spine surgery. Numerous evidence-based recommendations for avoidance of these potentially severe complications associated with intraoperative positioning are discussed. This investigation may serve as a framework to educate the surgical team and decrease rates of intraoperative positioning complications. PMID:26424340

  4. Complications and management in Descemet's stripping endothelial keratoplasty: Analysis of consecutive 430 cases

    PubMed Central

    Basak, Samar K; Basak, Soham

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the complications and their managements in Descemet's stripping endothelial keratoplasty (DSEK) in consecutive 430 cases by single surgeon in a tertiary eye hospital. Materials and Methods: 430 eyes of 366 patients with endothelial dysfunctions scheduled for DSEK, were analyzed retrospectively. In all cases donor dissection was performed manually, and ‘Taco’ insertion and unfolding technique was used. Intra-operative and postoperative complications with their managements and outcomes were reviewed retrospectively. Periodic endothelial cell density was analyzed for each patient till the last visit. Follow-up period was between 3 to 60 months (mean 18.7 months). Results: 13 (3.0%) eyes had operative complications during donor dissection and 16 (3.7%) had during recipient procedure. In 7 (1.6%) eyes, donor lenticule was replaced with a new one during the surgery. In early postoperative period, 21 (4.9%) eyes had donor dislocation and 12 (2.8%) eyes had air-induced pupillary block; and they were managed immediately. 2 cases had primary graft failure and in 1 case had postoperative bacterial endophthalmitis requiring evisceration. In late postoperative period, 48 (11.3%) eyes had secondary glaucoma and 14 (3.3%) eyes had late secondary graft failure. Endothelial rejection occurred in 5 (1.2%) cases. Mean endothelial cell loss was 19.7% after 3 months and 54.2% after 5 years. Total graft failure in this series was 31 (7.2%) and in 17 cases re-DSEK was performed successfully. Conclusions: Both operative and postoperative complications do occur in DSEK. Most of these complications can be managed by medical or appropriate surgical means. Some of the complications can be avoided and reduced with experience. PMID:24008797

  5. Ultrasound assessment of thrombotic complications in pediatric patients with tunneled central venous catheters

    PubMed Central

    Kosiak, Wojciech; Irga, Ninela; Po?czy?ska, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    Central venous access consists in inserting a vascular catheter to the vena cava and placing its tip in the vicinity of the opening to the right atrium. In the patients of the Clinic of Pediatrics, Hematology and Oncology at the Academic Clinical Centre of the Medical University in Gda?sk, such implantation procedures are conducted 40–50 times in a year using Broviac/Hickman catheters that are placed in the subclavian vein. In the Ultrasound and Biopsy Laboratory at the clinic mentioned above, approximately 200–250 examinations have been conducted since 2005 to assess the central venous access. Implantation of a catheter considerably increases the comfort of patients who require a long-term venous access. Nevertheless, it is an invasive procedure, burdened with a risk of numerous, early and late complications. The late complications are associated with implanted catheters and include catheter-related thrombosis. The aim of this paper was to present three patients of the Clinic of Pediatrics, Hematology and Oncology at the Academic Clinical Centre of the Medical University in Gda?sk, in whom thrombotic complications occurred as a result of long-term central venous catheters. The paper also discusses the possibilities of using sonography in the assessment of such complications. In the presented patients, it was possible to determine the size and localization of a thrombus which enabled effective treatment in two cases. The pathomechanism of catheter-related thrombosis was explained and the risk factors of such complications were discussed. The attention was paid to the necessity of conducting ultrasound examinations in pediatric patients with inserted catheters as soon as the first symptoms of thrombosis appear. Based on own observations and despite the lack of validation of ultrasound imaging in the assessment of central catheters, we believe that this method is highly promising and can be recommended for the assessment of thrombotic complications in pediatric patients with central venous catheters. PMID:26673005

  6. ADHD, autism and neuroradiological complications among phenylketonuric children in Upper Egypt.

    PubMed

    Saad, Khaled; Elserogy, Yasser; Abdel Rahman, Ahmed A; Al-Atram, Abdulrahman Abdullah; Mohamad, Ismail L; ElMelegy, Tarek T H; Bjørklund, Geir; El-Houfy, Amira A

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the neuropsychological status in a cohort of children with early and continuously treated phenylketonuria in Assiut, Upper Egypt. The study was implemented in seventy-eight phenylketonuria (PKU) children. Only 34 patients met the inclusion criteria. Investigated patients were evaluated according to detailed history, neurological examination, Childhood Autism Rating Scale, full scale Intelligence Quotient, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, electroencephalography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study concluded that the prognosis for early diagnosed children with PKU treated from the first weeks of life is generally good. However, they are at increased risk for neurological complications and behavioral problems. So, neonatal screening for PKU is highly recommended in Egypt, for early detection and management. In addition, neuropsychological and MRI assessments in PKU children should be done. PMID:25576444

  7. [Celioscopic cholecystectomy. 2 cases of infectious complications].

    PubMed

    Caron, F; Fayeulle, V; Peillon, C; Roullée, N; Koning, E; Bénozio, M; Testart, J; Humbert, G

    1994-06-11

    Despite the low morbidity and mortality of laparoscopic cholecystectomy, trauma and infection have been reported. Such complications can produce a misleading clinical picture, as in two cases we observed. Case 1. A symptomatic 56-year-old female patient underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy. During the operation, the gall bladder ruptured and the contents had to be aspirated from the abdominal cavity. The patient complained of hepatalgia 2 weeks after the operation, then was not seen again for more than 1 year when fever and hepatalgia did not respond to symptomatic treatment. An inter-hepato-renal collection (6 cm in diameter) was punctured under echography. Aspirate culture yielded Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Adapted antibiotic therapy was unsuccessful and surgery was required to empty the abscess then remove a fibrous conjunctive tissue formation. Case 2. A 55-year-old female patient with a history of complete remission after mammectomy for breast cancer underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy in 1991. Two days after the operation, fever (39 degrees C) was accompanied by abdominal defence. Biliary peritonitis due to imperfect suture of the bile duct was repaired followed by peritoneal lavage-drainage. Per-operative blood samples revealed type 6 Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Despite adapted parenteral antibiotics, fever persisted at 39 degrees C and intense jaundice was observed. A second laparoscopy 14 days later showed inflammatory narrowing of the main bile duct which was drained into a small bowel loop. Eight days later computed tomography revealed multiple abscess in the liver. Transparietal cholangiography was performed and showed that the contrast medium entered the abscesses via the biliary canals. The state of sepsis persisted, jaundice worsened and hepatic encephalopathy developed with obnubilation and flapping tremor. After 1 month of general antibiotherapy, no improvement was seen on computed tomography images and needle biopsy of an abscess led to the identification of resistant type 6 P. aeruginosa. Antibiotics were adapted and administered iv with no clinical improvement. Selective catheterism of the hepatic artery via the femoral access was performed to allow intra-hepatic antibiotic delivery. Three weeks later clinical situation remained unchanged when acute respiratory distress highly suggestive of pulmonary embolism led to death. Autopsy was not performed. In both of these rare cases of infectious complications due to P. aeruginosa after laparoscopic cholecystectomy, the source of contamination remained unknown. Nosocomial infection was suspected. PMID:7971806

  8. Imaging of the postoperative liver: review of normal appearances and common complications.

    PubMed

    Mulé, S; Colosio, A; Cazejust, J; Kianmanesh, R; Soyer, P; Hoeffel, C

    2015-10-01

    Several benign and malignant liver diseases may require surgical treatment for cure, including anatomical resections based on the segmental anatomy of the liver, non-anatomical (wedge) resections, and surgical management of biliary cysts. The type of surgery depends not only on the location and the nature of the disease, but also on the expertise of the surgeon. Whereas ultrasonography is often the first-line imaging examination in case of suspected postoperative complication, multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is of greater value for identifying normal findings after surgery, early postoperative pathologic fluid collections and vascular thromboses, and tumor recurrence in patients who have undergone hepatic surgery. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) is the imaging modality of choice for depicting early postoperative bile duct injuries and ischemic cholangitis that may occur in the late postoperative phase. Both MDCT and MRCP can accurately depict tumor recurrence. Radiologists should become familiar with these surgical procedures to better understand postoperative changes, and with the normal imaging appearances of various postoperative complications to better differentiate between complications and normal findings. PMID:26023007

  9. Secondary frozen shoulder following septic arthritis – An unusual complication of magnetic resonance arthrogram

    PubMed Central

    Rajeev, Aysha; Andronic, Adrian; Mohamed, Abdalla; Newby, Mike; Chakravathy, Jagannath

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Magnetic resonance (MR) arthrogram is a commonly used investigation tool to detect various pathologies in the shoulder. The complications following this procedure is minor and rare. Septic arthritis is one of the rare complications which can develop after MR arthrogram. We report a case of secondary frozen shoulder after MR arthrogram induced septic arthritis. Presentation of case A young, fit and well female patient underwent MR arthrogram to detect any labral tears. Two days following the procedure, she developed signs and symptoms suggestive of septic arthritis of the shoulder. The patient underwent repeated arthroscopic debridement and washout. The organisms isolated was Staphylococcus epidermidis. She was treated with six weeks of intravenous antibiotics. The patient developed stiffness of the shoulder due to secondary frozen shoulder which was treated with arthroscopic capsular release with good functional outcomes at three months. Discussion MR arthrogram is a rare cause of septic arthritis of the shoulder. The common method introducing the organisms is from the skin flora or contaminated arthrogram trays. The treatment is repeated arthroscopic washouts and six weeks of appropriate intravenous antibiotics. Residual pain, stiffness and chondrolysis are common sequelae of septic arthritis. Conclusion Septic arthritis is a recognised and rare complication of MR arthrogram. Early and prompt diagnosis with arthroscopic washout and debridement combined with intravenous antibiotics helps to eradicate the infection. Secondary frozen shoulder is a late complication of sepsis in the joint. PMID:25884758

  10. Venous Access Ports: Indications, Implantation Technique, Follow-Up, and Complications

    SciTech Connect

    Walser, Eric M.

    2012-08-15

    The subcutaneous venous access device (SVAD or 'port') is a critical component in the care of patients with chronic disease. The modern SVAD provides reliable access for blood withdrawal and medication administration with minimal disruption to a patient's lifestyle. Because of improved materials and catheter technology, today's ports are lighter and stronger and capable of high-pressure injections of contrast for cross-sectional imaging. The majority of SVAD placement occurs in interventional radiology departments due to their ability to provide this service at lower costs, lower, complication rates, and greater volumes. Port-insertion techniques vary depending on the operator, but all consist of catheter placement in the central venous circulation followed by subcutaneous pocket creation and port attachment to the catheter with fixation and closure of the pocket. Venous access challenges occasionally occur in patients with central vein occlusions, necessitating catheterization of collateral veins or port placement in alternate locations. Complications of SVADs include those associated with the procedure as well as short- (<30 days) and long-term problems. Procedural and early complications are quite rare due to the near-universal use of real-time ultrasound guidance for vein puncture, but they can include hematoma, catheter malposition, arrhythmias, and pneumothorax. Late problems include both thrombotic complications (native venous or port-catheter thrombosis) and infections (tunnel or pocket infections or catheter-associated bloodstream infections). Most guidelines suggest that 0.3 infections/1000 catheter days is an appropriate upper threshold for the insertion of SVADs.

  11. Risk of cardiovascular, cardiac and arrhythmic complications in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Ballestri, Stefano; Lonardo, Amedeo; Bonapace, Stefano; Byrne, Christopher D; Loria, Paola; Targher, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has emerged as a public health problem of epidemic proportions worldwide. Accumulating clinical and epidemiological evidence indicates that NAFLD is not only associated with liver-related morbidity and mortality but also with an increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), abnormalities of cardiac function and structure (e.g., left ventricular dysfunction and hypertrophy, and heart failure), valvular heart disease (e.g., aortic valve sclerosis) and arrhythmias (e.g., atrial fibrillation). Experimental evidence suggests that NAFLD itself, especially in its more severe forms, exacerbates systemic/hepatic insulin resistance, causes atherogenic dyslipidemia, and releases a variety of pro-inflammatory, pro-coagulant and pro-fibrogenic mediators that may play important roles in the pathophysiology of cardiac and arrhythmic complications. Collectively, these findings suggest that patients with NAFLD may benefit from more intensive surveillance and early treatment interventions to decrease the risk for CHD and other cardiac/arrhythmic complications. The purpose of this clinical review is to summarize the rapidly expanding body of evidence that supports a strong association between NAFLD and cardiovascular, cardiac and arrhythmic complications, to briefly examine the putative biological mechanisms underlying this association, and to discuss some of the current treatment options that may influence both NAFLD and its related cardiac and arrhythmic complications. PMID:24587651

  12. Linking uric acid metabolism to diabetic complications

    PubMed Central

    Kushiyama, Akifumi; Tanaka, Kentaro; Hara, Shigeko; Kawazu, Shoji

    2014-01-01

    Hyperuricemia have been thought to be caused by the ingestion of large amounts of purines, and prevention or treatment of hyperuricemia has intended to prevent gout. Xanthine dehydrogenase/xanthine oxidase (XDH/XO) is rate-limiting enzyme of uric acid generation, and allopurinol was developed as a uric acid (UA) generation inhibitor in the 1950s and has been routinely used for gout prevention since then. Serum UA levels are an important risk factor of disease progression for various diseases, including those related to lifestyle. Recently, other UA generation inhibitors such as febuxostat and topiroxostat were launched. The emergence of these novel medications has promoted new research in the field. Lifestyle-related diseases, such as metabolic syndrome or type 2 diabetes mellitus, often have a common pathological foundation. As such, hyperuricemia is often present among these patients. Many in vitro and animal studies have implicated inflammation and oxidative stress in UA metabolism and vascular injury because XDH/XO act as one of the major source of reactive oxygen species Many studies on UA levels and associated diseases implicate involvement of UA generation in disease onset and/or progression. Interventional studies for UA generation, not UA excretion revealed XDH/XO can be the therapeutic target for vascular injury and renal dysfunction. In this review, the relationship between UA metabolism and diabetic complications is highlighted. PMID:25512781

  13. Pulmonary complications of smoked substance abuse.

    PubMed Central

    Tashkin, D P

    1990-01-01

    After tobacco, marijuana is the most widely smoked substance in our society. Studies conducted within the past 15 years in animals, isolated tissues, and humans indicate that marijuana smoke can injure the lungs. Habitual smoking of marijuana has been shown to be associated with chronic respiratory tract symptoms, an increased frequency of acute bronchitic episodes, extensive tracheobronchial epithelial disease, and abnormalities in the structure and function of alveolar macrophages, key cells in the lungs' immune defense system. In addition, the available evidence strongly suggests that regularly smoking marijuana may predispose to the development of cancer of the respiratory tract. "Crack" smoking has become increasingly prevalent in our society, especially among habitual smokers of marijuana. New evidence is emerging implicating smoked cocaine as a cause of acute respiratory tract symptoms, lung dysfunction, and, in some cases, serious, life-threatening acute lung injury. A strong physician message to users of marijuana, cocaine, or both concerning the harmful effects of these smoked substances on the lungs and other organs may persuade some of them, especially those with drug-related respiratory complications, to quit smoking. PMID:2190420

  14. Catastrophic gastrointestinal complication of systemic immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lyn Alexandra; Gangopadhyay, Mitali; Gaya, Daniel R

    2015-02-28

    We present a case of acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage in a patient with systemic vasculitis immunosuppressed on cyclophosphamide and prednisolone. The patient presented with a diffuse haemorrhagic oesophagitis and a non-specific duodenitis. Biopsies taken from the oesophagus and duodenum demonstrated infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) respectively. Viral infection of the upper gastrointestinal tract is a recognised complication of immunosuppression and HSV is one of the most common pathogens. CMV on the other hand most commonly causes a colitis or less commonly oesophagitis. CMV enteritis is rare as is the synchronous infection with two viral agents in an immunocompromised patient having being described in a few case series only. Viral infection of the gastrointestinal tract in immunocompromised patients should be treated with systemic anti-viral medication and consideration to withdrawal of the immunosuppressive therapy if possible and appropriate. The authors highlight the need for a high suspicion of viral infection in immunosuppressed patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:25741165

  15. A Dermal Piercing Complicated by Mycobacterium fortuitum

    PubMed Central

    Scroggins-Markle, Leslie; Kelly, Brent

    2013-01-01

    Background. Dermal piercings have recently become a fashion symbol. Common complications include hypertrophic scarring, rejection, local infection, contact allergy, and traumatic tearing. We report a rare case of Mycobacterium fortuitum following a dermal piercing and discuss its medical implications and treatments. Case. A previously healthy 19-year-old woman presented complaining of erythema and edema at the site of a dermal piercing on the right fourth dorsal finger. She was treated with a 10-day course of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and one course of cephalexin by her primary care physician with incomplete resolution. The patient stated that she had been swimming at a local water park daily. A punch biopsy around the dermal stud was performed, and cultures with sensitivities revealed Mycobacterium fortuitum. The patient was treated with clarithromycin and ciprofloxacin for two months receiving full resolution. Discussion. Mycobacterium fortuitum is an infrequent human pathogen. This organism is a Runyon group IV, rapidly growing nontuberculous mycobacteria, often found in water,soil, and dust. Treatment options vary due to the size of the lesion. Small lesions are typically excised, while larger lesions require treatment for 2–6 months with antibiotics. We recommend a high level of suspicion for atypical mycobacterial infections in a piercing resistant to other therapies. PMID:24073343

  16. Complications of Hysteroscopic and Uterine Resectoscopic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Munro, Malcolm G; Christianson, Lee A

    2015-12-01

    Adverse events associated with hysteroscopic procedures are generally rare, but, with increasing operative complexity, it is now apparent that they are experienced more often. There exists a spectrum of complications that relate to generic components of procedures, such as patient positioning, anesthesia, and analgesia, to a number that are specific to intraluminal endoscopic surgery that largely comprise perforation and injuries to surrounding structures and blood vessels. Whereas a number of endoscopic procedures require the use of distending media, the response of premenopausal women to excessive absorption of nonionic fluids used for hysteroscopy is somewhat unique, and deserves special attention on the part the surgeon. There is also an increasing awareness of uncommon but problematic sequelae related to the use of monopolar radiofrequency uterine resectoscopes that involve thermal injury to the vulva and vagina. Furthermore, the uterus that has previously undergone hysteroscopic surgery may behave in unusual ways, at least in premenopausal women who experience menstruation or who become pregnant. Fortunately, better understanding of the mechanisms involved in these adverse events, as well as the use or development of a number of innovative devices, have collectively provided the opportunity to perform hysteroscopic and resectoscopic surgery in a manner that minimizes risk to the patient. PMID:26457853

  17. Previous gastric bypass surgery complicating total thyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Bianca; Jacobson, Adam S; Alon, Eran E; Via, Michael A

    2015-03-01

    Hypocalcemia is a well-known complication of total thyroidectomy. Patients who have previously undergone gastric bypass surgery may be at increased risk of hypocalcemia due to gastrointestinal malabsorption, secondary hyperparathyroidism, and an underlying vitamin D deficiency. We present the case of a 58-year-old woman who underwent a total thyroidectomy for the follicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma. Her history included Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery. Following the thyroid surgery, she developed postoperative hypocalcemia that required large doses of oral calcium carbonate (7.5 g/day), oral calcitriol (up to 4 ?g/day), intravenous calcium gluconate (2.0 g/day), calcium citrate (2.0 g/day), and ergocalciferol (50,000 IU/day). Her serum calcium levels remained normal on this regimen after hospital discharge despite persistent hypoparathyroidism. Bariatric surgery patients who undergo thyroid surgery require aggressive supplementation to maintain normal serum calcium levels. Preoperative supplementation with calcium and vitamin D is strongly recommended. PMID:25738720

  18. Optimal management of complications associated with achondroplasia

    PubMed Central

    Ireland, Penny J; Pacey, Verity; Zankl, Andreas; Edwards, Priya; Johnston, Leanne M; Savarirayan, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Achondroplasia is the most common form of skeletal dysplasia, resulting in disproportionate short stature, and affects over 250,000 people worldwide. Individuals with achondroplasia demonstrate a number of well-recognized anatomical features that impact on growth and development, with a complex array of medical issues that are best managed through a multidisciplinary team approach. The complexity of this presentation, whereby individual impairments may impact upon multiple activity and participation areas, requires consideration and discussion under a broad framework to gain a more thorough understanding of the experience of this condition for individuals with achondroplasia. This paper examines the general literature and research evidence on the medical and health aspects of individuals with achondroplasia and presents a pictorial model of achondroplasia based on The International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF). An expanded model of the ICF will be used to review and present the current literature pertaining to the musculoskeletal, neurological, cardiorespiratory, and ear, nose, and throat impairments and complications across the lifespan, with discussion on the impact of these impairments upon activity and participation performance. Further research is required to fully identify factors influencing participation and to help develop strategies to address these factors. PMID:25053890

  19. Grave Complication of Pharyngitis: Lemierre syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ankit Kumar B.; Patel, Kimmyben; Doshi, Raj Kumar P.; Patel, Narottam A.

    2015-01-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum is the causative agent in the pharyngitis. After invasion of the oropharyngeal mucosa by the organism leads to the development of the grave complications like superficial thrombophlebitis of internal jugular vein, septic emboli in the lung and coagulopathy. A 23-year-old male presented with chief complaints of sore throat, headache and high grade fever with past history of upper respiratory tract infection one month ago. On examination, he had high grade fever, tachycardia, hypotension and tender cervical lymph nodes. Oropharyngeal mucosa appeared ooedematous and congested. Leucocytosis with raised ESR was present. Blood culture positive for Fusobacterium necrophorum. Dilated right IJV with the hypoechoic thrombosis seen on Ultrasonography & Doppler. Patient was diagnosed as a case of Lemierre syndrome secondary to oropharyngeal infection was made. He was treated with intravenous imipenem and metronidazole, and then shifted to oral amoxicillin. After completion of full course of the therapy of 6 weeks, patient was improved clinically and all routine blood investigations were normalized. Blood culture was negative for Fusobacterium necrophorum. No evidence of thrombosis within the right internal jugular vein on Doppler. PMID:26266187

  20. Pregnancy complications in polycystic ovary syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Katulski, Krzysztof; Czyzyk, Adam; Podfigurna-Stopa, Agnieszka; Genazzani, Andrea R; Meczekalski, Blazej

    2015-02-01

    Infertility is a widely disputed problem affecting patients suffering from polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). As a serious dysfunction, it frequently occurs in PCOS patients. It is, therefore, important to devote more attention to pregnancy in PCOS sufferers. According to various data, the risk of miscarriage in PCOS women is three times higher than the risk of miscarriage in healthy women. Unfortunately, the risk of most frequent pregnancy pathologies is also higher for PCOS patients, as gestational diabetes (GD), pregnancy-induced hypertension and pre-eclampsia, and small for gestational age (SGA) children. Impaired glucose tolerance and GD in pregnant PCOS patients occur more frequently than in healthy women. A quadruple increase in the risk of pregnancy-induced hypertension linked to arterial wall stiffness has also been observed in PCOS patients. The risk of pre-eclampsia, the most severe of all complications, is also four times higher in those suffering from PCOS. Pre-eclampsia is also more frequent in patients presenting additional risk factors accompanying PCOS, such as obesity or GD. At that point, it should be mentioned that PCOS patients are under 2.5 higher risk of giving birth to SGA children than healthy women. It appears that SGA can be linked to insulin resistance and insulin-dependent growth dysfunction. Therefore, PCOS pregnant women are patients of special obstetrical care. PMID:25356655

  1. Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: An unusual complication in disseminated Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Padhi, Somanath; Ravichandran, Kandasamy; Sahoo, Jayaprakash; Varghese, Renu G’Boy; Basheer, Aneesh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is an uncommon, potentially fatal, hyperinflammatory syndrome that may rarely complicate the clinical course of disseminated Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). The clinical course of tuberculosis-associated HLH (TB-HLH) has been reported to be unpredictable. Materials and Methods: Here we describe the clinicopathological features, laboratory parameters, management, and outcome data of a patient who satisfied the 2004 diagnostic criteria for HLH secondary to disseminated MTB; we also do a systematic review of the international literature on TB-HLH. The literature review (January 1975–March 2014) found that HLH complicated the clinical course of 63 tuberculosis patients (41 males, 22 females, mean age = 45 ± 23.5 years) with a high mortality rate of 49% (31/63 died). The mean serum ferritin level (n = 44/63) was 5963 ng/mL (range 500–38,539 ng/mL); and a higher proportion (54.2%) of patients had pancytopenia at presentation. On univariate analysis (n = 53/63), age >30 years [hazard ratio (HR): 2.79, 95% confidence interval (CI):1.03–7.56, P = 0.03], presence of comorbidities (HR 4.59, CI: 1.08–19.52, P = 0.04), marked hemophagocytosis in bone marrow (HR: 2.65, CI: 1.16–6.05, P = 0.02), and nonusage/delayed usage of antitubercular therapy (ATT) (HR: 3.44, CI: 1.51–7.87, P = 0.003) were associated with decreased survival, though none of these parameters attained statistical significance (P > 0.05) in multivariate analysis. Usage of corticosteroids and/or immunomodulator drugs (HR 1.00, CI: 0.66–3.22, P = 0.35) did not alter the outcome in these patients. Conclusion: HLH should be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients with tuberculosis who present with cytopenias, organomegaly, and coagulopathy. Strong clinical suspicion and early usage of ATT might be useful in reducing the morbidity and mortality. The utility of immunosuppressive/immunomodulator therapy lacks general concensus among treating physicians, and warrants further studies.

  2. Complicated pancreatic inflammatory disease: Diagnostic and therapeutic role of interventional radiology

    SciTech Connect

    vanSonnenberg, E.; Wittich, G.R.; Casola, G.; Stauffer, A.E.; Polansky, A.D.; Coons, H.G.; Cabrera, O.A.; Gerver, P.S.

    1985-05-01

    Diagnostic and therapeutic interventional radiology techniques in 41 patients with complications of pancreatic inflammatory disease are described. Computed tomography or ultrasound-guided aspiration or percutaneous pancreatic ductography enabled specific diagnoses in 43 of 45 patients (96%). Single-step needle aspiration of noninfected pseudocysts was successful in only three of ten patients (30%). Catheter drainage cured six of seven noninfected pseudocysts (85.7%) and seven of nine infected pseudocysts (77.7%). Pancreatic abscesses were drained successfully in nine of 13 patients (69.2%); temporizing benefit was achieved in the other four who eventually underwent surgery in improved condition. Early diagnosis of the complications of pancreatitis may be established almost uniformly, and at least 70% of patients with infected or noninfected pseudocysts and pancreatic abscesses may be cured by nonoperative drainage.

  3. Neuroimaging of Natalizumab Complications in Multiple Sclerosis: PML and Other Associated Entities

    PubMed Central

    Honce, Justin M.; Nagae, Lidia; Nyberg, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Natalizumab (Tysabri) is a monoclonal antibody (?4 integrin antagonist) approved for treatment of multiple sclerosis, both for patients who fail therapy with other disease modifying agents and for patients with aggressive disease. Natalizumab is highly effective, resulting in significant decreases in rates of both relapse and disability accumulation, as well as marked decrease in MRI evidence of disease activity. As such, utilization of natalizumab is increasing, and the presentation of its associated complications is increasing accordingly. This review focuses on the clinical and neuroimaging features of the major complications associated with natalizumab therapy, focusing on the rare but devastating progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Associated entities including PML associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (PML-IRIS) and the emerging phenomenon of rebound of MS disease activity after natalizumab discontinuation are also discussed. Early recognition of neuroimaging features associated with these processes is critical in order to facilitate prompt diagnosis, treatment, and/or modification of therapies to improve patient outcomes. PMID:26483978

  4. Liver Trauma During Combined Liposuction and Abdominoplasty: A Rare but Potentially Lethal Complication.

    PubMed

    Gialamas, Eleftherios; Oldani, Graziano; Modarressi, Ali; Morel, Philippe; Toso, Christian

    2015-09-01

    Liposuction is a well-established procedure that is generally safe. However, rare complications can occur. The authors report on a 38-year-old woman who underwent combined abdominoplasty and liposuction at a private clinic. Four hours after the procedure, severe hypovolemic shock developed and required emergency transfer to a tertiary-care center. After primary fluid resuscitation, abdominal ultrasonography and computerized tomography revealed severe right-sided liver trauma, with active bleeding and free intra-abdominal fluid. Two attempts at right hepatic artery embolization failed to fully control the bleeding, and surgical hemostasis was required. After a 2-week hospitalization, the patient was discharged, and she returned to work 3 months later. Although it appears that this is the first reported case of liver trauma during liposuction, this potential complication should be kept in mind and identified early to permit efficient and effective management. PMID:26254474

  5. Emerging and Underrecognized Complications of Illicit Drug Use.

    PubMed

    Wurcel, Alysse G; Merchant, Elisabeth A; Clark, Roger P; Stone, David R

    2015-12-15

    Illicit drug use can result in a wide range of medical complications. As the availability, synthesis, and popularity of illicit drugs evolve over time, new syndromes associated with their use may mimic infections. Some of these symptoms are anticipated drug effects, and others are complications of adulterants mixed with drugs or complications from the method of using drugs. Some illicit drugs are associated with rare infections, which are difficult to diagnosis with standard microbiological techniques. The goal of this review is to orient a wide range of clinicians-including general practitioners, emergency medicine providers, and infectious diseases specialists-to complications of illicit drug use that may be underrecognized. Improving awareness of infectious and noninfectious complications of illicit drug can expedite diagnosis and medical treatment of persons who use drugs and facilitate targeted harm reduction counseling to prevent future complications. PMID:26270683

  6. Complications of tibial plateau levelling osteotomy in dogs.

    PubMed

    Bergh, M S; Peirone, B

    2012-01-01

    The tibial plateau levelling osteotomy (TPLO) is one of the most common surgical procedures used to treat cranial cruciate ligament disease in dogs. Complications occurring during or after TPLO can range in severity from swelling and bruising to fracture and osteomyelitis. Ten to 34% of TPLO surgical procedures are reported to experience a complication and approximately two to four percent require revision surgery to address a complication. Although the risk factors for many complications have not been fully assessed, the best available evidence suggests that complications of TPLO can be reduced with increased surgeon experience, careful surgical planning, and accurate execution of the surgical procedure. Identification of known or suspected risk factors and intra-operative technical errors allow subsequent action to be taken that is aimed at decreasing postoperative morbidity. There is a need for prospective studies with consistent data reporting in order to fully reveal the incidence risk factors for complications associated with TPLO. PMID:22534675

  7. Atypical Presentation of Intracardiac Floating Thrombi in Hypereosinophilic Syndrome Complicated With Stroke and Systemic Embolization: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chih-Hung; Chang, Szu-Ling; Lin, Wei-Wen; Hsiung, Ming-Chon; Juan, Yu-Hsiang; Wang, Tzu-Lin

    2015-10-01

    Hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) describes a disorder characterized by persistent peripheral blood eosinophilia with evidence of multiple target organs damage caused by eosinophilia. HES most commonly involves the heart, and cardiac involvement typically presents in the form of endomyocarditis or myocarditis with apical mural thrombus formation.We present a case with atypical cardiac presentation with massive intracardiac fragile thrombi, causing peripheral emboli and strokes.HES can present as floating thrombi with thin attachment to the left ventricle, and clinicians should also be vigilant of thromboembolic complications and initiate early therapy to prevent or reduce the potential complications of HES. PMID:26512591

  8. Acute pancreatitis complicated by acute myocardial infarction – A rare association

    PubMed Central

    Vasantha Kumar, Allam; Mohan Reddy, G.; Anirudh Kumar, A.

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis complicated by acute myocardial infarction has been reported very rarely. The exact mechanism of the cause of myocardial injury is not known. We report a case of 36 year old male presenting with acute pancreatitis complicated by ST elevation acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The administration of thrombolytic therapy in such patients can have deleterious effects. We report successful performance of primary angioplasty in this complicated patient. PMID:23993014

  9. Acute pancreatitis complicated by acute myocardial infarction - a rare association.

    PubMed

    Vasantha Kumar, Allam; Mohan Reddy, G; Anirudh Kumar, A

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis complicated by acute myocardial infarction has been reported very rarely. The exact mechanism of the cause of myocardial injury is not known. We report a case of 36 year old male presenting with acute pancreatitis complicated by ST elevation acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The administration of thrombolytic therapy in such patients can have deleterious effects. We report successful performance of primary angioplasty in this complicated patient. PMID:23993014

  10. Is Acute Carotid Artery Stent Thrombosis an Avoidable Complication?

    PubMed

    Köklü, Erkan; Yüksel, ?sa Öner; Bayar, Nermin; Arslan, ?akir

    2015-10-01

    The most serious complication of carotid artery stenting (CAS) is acute carotid artery stent thrombosis (ACAST). ACAST is a very rare complication, but it may lead to dramatic and catastrophic consequences. The most important cause is inadequate or ineffective antiaggregant therapy. It is very important to identify, before CAS, those patients who might be candidates for ACAST and to start antiplatelet therapy for them. Testing patients who are candidates for CAS for acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel resistance may prevent this complication. PMID:26303788

  11. Massive ischemic stroke as a complication of otitis media.

    PubMed

    Pasha, Hamza M; Mirsky, David M; Streubel, Sven O

    2015-10-01

    Cerebral artery infarction as a complication of acute otitis media is a rare complication. The mechanism appears to be the spread of meningeal inflammation to involve the walls of intracranial vessels, resulting in arterial thrombosis with ischemia or rupture with hemorrhage. We report the case of a 3 year old female with a history of global developmental delay who sustained a large left hemispheric stroke after middle cerebral artery infarction as a complication of an acute otitis media. PMID:26304069

  12. Renal cortical necrosis complicating laundry detergent ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Riella, Leonardo Vidal; Golla, Sunitha; Dogaru, Grigore; Rennke, Helmut G.; Christopher, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Accidental oral detergent ingestion usually causes mild gastrointestinal manifestations including nausea, vomiting and diarrhea as well as upper airway irritation. There are a limited number of reported oral detergent ingestions leading to acute kidney injury, mainly due to rhabdomyolysis. We present an ultimately fatal case of laundry detergent ingestion leading to biopsy proven severe cortical necrosis and irreversible renal damage. Detergent ingestion was associated with widespread endothelial injury leading to a picture of thrombotic microangiopathy. Among the detergent ingredients ingested by the patient, sodium borate raised the highest concern as a potential toxin exacerbated further by severe hypovolaemia and consequent decrease in renal toxin excretion. As sodium borate is dialyzable, haemodialysis should be a consideration early after laundry detergent ingestion. PMID:25949283

  13. Anatomical and functional outcomes after Densiron 68 heavy silicone oil tamponade for complicated retinal detachment in Chinese eyes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Li, Hui; Feng, Le; Wang, Fang

    2014-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the safety and efficacy of Densiron 68 heavy silicone oil (HSO) tamponade for complicated retinal detachment (RD) in Chinese eyes. METHODS Twenty-one eyes of 21 patients with complicated RD were included in this retrospective study. All patients underwent pars plana vitrectomy with an internal tamponade using Densiron 68 HSO. Anatomical and functional results and complications were evaluated, including retinal status, visual acuity (VA), intraocular pressure (IOP), intraocular inflammation, lens opacity, and HSO emulsification. RESULTS All the patients were followed up for 3mo to 1y (5.8±1.16mo). Retinal reattachment was achieved in 19 of 21 patients (90.5%). VA improved in 18 of 21 patients (85.7%), from 1.93 logMAR (±0.48) to 1.52 logMAR (±0.45) (P=0.001). Postoperative complications included early dispersion of HSO in 7 eyes (38.8%), cataract in 10 of 18 phakic eyes (55.5%), moderate postoperative inflammation reaction in 10 eyes (47.6%), and elevated IOP in 5 eyes (23.8%), all of which were controlled by medication or by surgery. CONCLUSION High anatomical and functional success rates can be achieved with primary vitrectomy for complicated RD by using Densiron 68 HSO; however, it should not be ignored that Densiron 68 HSO can cause some complications in the eye. PMID:24967193

  14. [Catheter ablation of ventricular arrhythmias : Complications and emergency situations].

    PubMed

    Wasmer, Kristina; Eckardt, Lars

    2015-12-01

    Catheter ablation of ventricular arrhythmias is an established treatment for patients with and without structural heart disease. For patients without structural heart disease, the aim is symptomatic relief, while the ultimate goals for patients with underlying structural heart disease are reduction of ICD therapies and improved prognosis. Rates for major complications range between 6-10?% in patients with structural heart disease. Vascular complications are most common; life-threatening complications (e.g., pericardial tamponade and stroke) are less frequent. Procedure-associated mortality is reported to be 0-3?%. In patients with idiopathic ventricular tachycardia, the complication rate is much lower compared to patients with structural heart disease. PMID:26602759

  15. Local complications in dental implant surgery: prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    ANNIBALI, S.; RIPARI, M.; LA MONACA, G.; TONOLI, F.; CRISTALLI, M.P.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY There are many detailed articles regarding accidents and local complications in dental implantation. Comparison of the data they report is not always easy because different criteria have been followed in the various classifications and there is confusion between the terms accident and complication. The aim of this paper is to propose a classification that considers the timing of the events and makes a distinction between the two terms. Accidents are events that occur during surgery and complications are all the pathological conditions that appear postoperatively. The proper diagnostic procedures and surgical techniques for complications prevention and treatment are also described. PMID:23285333

  16. Complications in Surgery: Root Cause Analysis and Preventive Measures

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kevin C.; Kotsis, Sandra V.

    2012-01-01

    Patients expect to receive quality medical care by relying on the concepts of evidence-based medicine. This quality care is expected to be provided at decreased costs for payors, some of whom have stopped reimbursement for cases involving “reasonably preventable” surgical complications. The purpose of this paper is to introduce root cause analysis as a tool for identifying the causes of surgical complications. We also discuss preventive measures such as improved communication, checklists, reporting systems, and the use of evidence-based medicine that have been implemented to decrease surgical complications. These preventive measures can be used alone or together to decrease complications and improve overall patient care. PMID:22634659

  17. Acute respiratory distress syndrome complicating Plasmodium vivax malaria.

    PubMed

    Tanios, M A; Kogelman, L; McGovern, B; Hassoun, P M

    2001-03-01

    Malaria is one of the most common infectious diseases in the world, and severe respiratory complications have been described mainly in association with Plasmodium falciparum. We describe a case of acute respiratory distress syndrome complicating infection with P. vivax in the setting of relatively low parasitemia in a 47-yr-old woman after a brief trip to Papua New Guinea. A review of the literature shows that pulmonary complications of P. vivax are rare but occur more frequently than generally acknowledged. Pathogenic mechanisms of these complications are discussed. PMID:11373440

  18. Complications of Medium Depth and Deep Chemical Peels

    PubMed Central

    Nikalji, Nanma; Godse, Kiran; Sakhiya, Jagdish; Patil, Sharmila; Nadkarni, Nitin

    2012-01-01

    Superficial and medium depth peels are dynamic tools when used as part of office procedures for treatment of acne, pigmentation disorders, and photo-aging. Results and complications are generally related to the depth of wounding, with deeper peels providing more marked results and higher incidence of complications. Complications are also more likely with darker skin types, certain peeling agents, and sun exposure. They can range from minor irritations, uneven pigmentation to permanent scarring. In very rare cases, complications can be life-threatening. PMID:23378707

  19. A Simple But Effective Evolutionary Algorithm for Complicated Optimization Problems

    E-print Network

    Xu, Y.G.

    A simple but effective evolutionary algorithm is proposed in this paper for solving complicated optimization problems. The new algorithm presents two hybridization operations incorporated with the conventional genetic ...

  20. Research and complicity: the case of Julius Hallervorden.

    PubMed

    Miller, Franklin G

    2012-01-01

    The charge of complicity has been raised in debates over the ethics of fetal tissue transplantation and embryonic stem cell research. However, the applicability of the concept of complicity to these types of research is neither clear nor uncontroversial. This article discusses the historical case of Julius Hallervorden, a distinguished German neuropathologist who conducted research on brains of mentally handicapped patients killed in the context of the Nazi 'euthanasia' programme. It is argued that this case constitutes a paradigm of complicity in research that is useful in assessing complicity in contemporary research ethics. PMID:21693567

  1. Complications Associated with Decompressive Craniectomy: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Kurland, David B.; Khaladj-Ghom, Ariana; Stokum, Jesse A.; Carusillo, Brianna; Karimy, Jason K.; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Sahuquillo, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Decompressive craniectomy (DC) has been used for many years in the management of patients with elevated intracranial pressure and cerebral edema. Ongoing clinical trials are investigating the clinical and cost effectiveness of DC in trauma and stroke. While DC has demonstrable efficacy in saving life, it is accompanied by a myriad of non-trivial complications that have been inadequately highlighted in prospective clinical trials. Missing from our current understanding is a comprehensive analysis of all potential complications associated with DC. Here, we review the available literature, we tabulate all reported complications, and we calculate their frequency for specific indications. Of over 1500 records initially identified, a final total of 142 eligible records were included in our comprehensive analysis. We identified numerous complications related to DC that have not been systematically reviewed. Complications were of three major types: (1) Hemorrhagic (2) Infectious/Inflammatory, and (3) Disturbances of the CSF compartment. Complications associated with cranioplasty fell under similar major types, with additional complications relating to the boneflap. Overall, one of every ten patients undergoing DC may suffer a complication necessitating additional medical and/or neurosurgical intervention. While DC has received increased attention as a potential therapeutic option in a variety of situations, like any surgical procedure, DC is not without risk. Neurologists and neurosurgeons must be aware of all the potential complications of DC in order to properly advise their patients. PMID:26032808

  2. Nodding syndrome in Ugandan children—clinical features, brain imaging and complications: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Idro, Richard; Opoka, Robert Opika; Aanyu, Hellen T; Kakooza-Mwesige, Angelina; Piloya-Were, Theresa; Namusoke, Hanifa; Musoke, Sarah Bonita; Nalugya, Joyce; Bangirana, Paul; Mwaka, Amos Deogratius; White, Steven; Chong, Kling; Atai-Omoruto, Anne D; Mworozi, Edison; Nankunda, Jolly; Kiguli, Sarah; Aceng, Jane Ruth; Tumwine, James K

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Nodding syndrome is a devastating neurological disorder of uncertain aetiology affecting children in Africa. There is no diagnostic test, and risk factors and symptoms that would allow early diagnosis are poorly documented. This study aimed to describe the clinical, electrophysiological and brain imaging (MRI) features and complications of nodding syndrome in Ugandan children. Design Case series. Participants 22 children with nodding syndrome brought to Mulago National Referral Hospital for assessment. Outcome measures Clinical features, physical and functional disabilities, EEG and brain MRI findings and a staging system with a progressive development of symptoms and complications. Results The median age of symptom onset was 6 (range 4–10) years and median duration of symptoms was 8.5 (range 2–11) years. 16 of 22 families reported multiple affected children. Physical manifestations and complications included stunting, wasting, lip changes and gross physical deformities. The bone age was delayed by 2 (range 1–6) years. There was peripheral muscle wasting and progressive generalised wasting. Four children had nodding as the only seizure type; 18 in addition had myoclonic, absence and/or generalised tonic–clonic seizures developing 1–3?years after the onset of illness. Psychiatric manifestations included wandering, aggression, depression and disordered perception. Cognitive assessment in three children demonstrated profound impairment. The EEG was abnormal in all, suggesting symptomatic generalised epilepsy in the majority. There were different degrees of cortical and cerebellar atrophy on brain MRI, but no hippocampal changes. Five stages with worsening physical, EEG and brain imaging features were identified: a prodrome, the development of head nodding and cognitive decline, other seizure types, multiple complications and severe disability. Conclusions Nodding syndrome is a neurological disorder that may be characterised as probably symptomatic generalised epilepsy. Clinical manifestations and complications develop in stages which might be useful in defining treatment and rehabilitation. Studies of risk factors, pathogenesis, management and outcome are urgently needed. PMID:23645924

  3. Fresh look at the Doppler changes in pregnancies with placental-based complications.

    PubMed

    Dikshit, S

    2011-01-01

    Placental-based complications of pregnancy can be classified as acute and chronic. An example of acute placental complication is abruptio placenta. The chronic placental complications include pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH) and idiopathic Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). The fetus is at risk for perinatal complications in both acute and chronic conditions. Here we take a look at the natural history of the Doppler parameters in chronic conditions. The techniques used for assessing the fetal well-being include, clinical methods, biophysical tests, conventional ultrasonography, and fetal Doppler studies. Arterial Doppler studies are used to assess the well-being of the fetus and to determine the timing of delivery. However, arterial Dopplers predict only the subset of fetuses at risk of having perinatal complications. Venous Dopplers have been used to improve upon the prognostication. However, by the time the commonly used venous Doppler signs, that is, 'A' wave reversal in ductus venosus (DV) is present, the fetus is likely to be already compromised. The fetus tries to adapt to the environment of deprivation by making a series of changes in the umbilical artery circulation, cerebral circulation, and hepatic circulation. As a result of these adaptations, the fetus overcomes the state of chronic hypoxia. This article takes a look at these changes and also the effect of these adaptations. It is suggested that serial comparisons of the venous flow characteristics of the DV and inferior vena cava (IVC) can provide an early indication of the impending decompensation and can be used to predict the time the delivery. PMID:21654141

  4. Transhepatic vascular access for diagnostic and interventional procedures: techniques, outcome, and complications.

    PubMed

    Ebeid, Makram R

    2007-03-01

    Early or multiple cardiac catheterizations may result in occlusion of the femoral veins prohibiting their use. The internal jugular or sub-clavian approach may be an appropriate alternative. However, these approaches may not be suitable in patients with surgical interruption of the superior vena cava. In other patients, they may not allow easy access to certain areas of the heart. The transhepatic approach is an important alternative route for performing cardiac catheterization and interventions. Depending on the planned procedure, it may be the preferred route to perform the cardiac catheterization even in the presence of patent femoral veins. The indications, technical details and potential complications of this approach are discussed. PMID:17152092

  5. Gastric Wall Dissection as a Complication of Percutaneous Gastrostomy

    SciTech Connect

    Reimer, Wolfgang; Farres, Maria Teresa; Lammer, Johannes

    1996-04-15

    A percutaneous gastrostomy (PG) was complicated by gastric wall dissection and partial tube malposition. It occurred after tangential puncture along the greater curvature of the stomach which was performed in order to avoid an enlarged left lobe of the liver. To prevent this complication we recommend not using hydrophilic guidewires during PG.

  6. Buried bumper syndrome: a rare complication of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy

    PubMed Central

    Baniukiewicz, Andrzej; ?widnicka-Siergiejko, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Feeding via percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is the preferred form of alimentation when oral feeding is impossible. Although it is a relatively safe method, some complications may occur. One uncommon PEG complication is buried bumper syndrome. In this paper we report a case of buried bumper syndrome, successfully managed with PEG tube repositioning.

  7. Complications in the treatment with alveolar extraosseous distractors. Literature review

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Grandjean, Alfredo; Reininger, David

    2015-01-01

    Background To review the literature that analyses the types and frequency of complications associated with the use of extraosseous alveolar distraction from 2007 to 2013. Material and Methods Review of the literature in PubMed, using these keywords; alveolar ridge, alveolar distraction osteogenesis, complication, literature review. Inclusion criteria were: articles published between 2007 and 2013 that included the distraction protocol, the complications encountered and the time when they occurred. Results According to the above criteria, 12 articles were included in this review, where 334 extraosseous distractors were placed and 395 complications were encountered, of which 19 (4.81%) were intraoperative, 261 (66.07%) postoperative and 115 (29.11 %) were postdistraction. The most common complication was the incorrect distraction vector found in 105 cases (26.58%), in 23 cases (5.82%) there were severe complications, of which 14 (3.54%) were mandibular fracture and 9 (2.27%) were fractures of the distractor elements. Conclusions According to this review, although alveolar distraction is a safe and predictable technique, it can cause complications; however, they are usually minor and easily resolved without affecting the treatment outcome. Key words: Alveolar ridge, alveolar distraction osteogenesis, complication, literature review. PMID:25858083

  8. Understanding and preventing complications in repairing rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Osti, Leonardo; Papalia, Rocco; Del Buono, Angelo; Denaro, Vincenzo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    Repair of rotator cuff tears is a common procedure. Prior to approaching this surgery, it should be realized that each surgical step can lead to complications, including those related to positioning and anaesthesia. Stiffness, infection and failure of repair are the more frequent complications reported. PMID:21986055

  9. Complications associated with prone positioning in elective spinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    DePasse, J Mason; Palumbo, Mark A; Haque, Maahir; Eberson, Craig P; Daniels, Alan H

    2015-01-01

    Complications associated with prone surgical positioning during elective spine surgery have the potential to cause serious patient morbidity. Although many of these complications remain uncommon, the range of possible morbidities is wide and includes multiple organ systems. Perioperative visual loss (POVL) is a well described, but uncommon complication that may occur due to ischemia to the optic nerve, retina, or cerebral cortex. Closed-angle glaucoma and amaurosis have been reported as additional etiologies for vision loss following spinal surgery. Peripheral nerve injuries, such as those caused by prolonged traction to the brachial plexus, are more commonly encountered postoperative events. Myocutaneous complications including pressure ulcers and compartment syndrome may also occur after prone positioning, albeit rarely. Other uncommon positioning complications such as tongue swelling resulting in airway compromise, femoral artery ischemia, and avascular necrosis of the femoral head have also been reported. Many of these are well-understood and largely avoidable through thoughtful attention to detail. Other complications, such as POVL, remain incompletely understood and thus more difficult to predict or prevent. Here, the current literature on the complications of prone positioning for spine surgery is reviewed to increase awareness of the spectrum of potential complications and to inform spine surgeons of strategies to minimize the risk of prone patient morbidity. PMID:25893178

  10. Obstructive jaundice: a rare complication of laparoscopic greater curvature plication

    PubMed Central

    Almulaifi, Abdullah; Mohammad, Waleed M.

    2013-01-01

    Laparoscopic greater curvature plication (LGCP) is relatively a new procedure. We report a novel complication of obstructive jaundice in a 24-year-old patient post LGCP. This was secondary to gastric mucosa prolapse with obstruction of the ampulla of Vater. A literature review revealed no previous reports of similar complication. PMID:24964469

  11. Imaging Findings of Liposuction with an Emphasis on Postsurgical Complications

    PubMed Central

    You, Je Sung; Baek, Song-Ee; Chung, Sung Phil; Kim, Myeong-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Liposuction is one of the most frequently performed cosmetic surgeries worldwide for reshaping the body contour. Although liposuction is minimally invasive and relatively safe, it is a surgical procedure, and it carries the risk of major and minor complications. These complications vary from postoperative nausea to life-threatening events. Common complications include infection, abdominal wall injury, bowel herniation, bleeding, haematoma, seroma, and lymphoedema. Life-threatening complications such as necrotizing fasciitis, deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism have also been reported. In this paper, we provide a brief introduction to liposuction with the related anatomy and present computed tomography and ultrasonography findings of a wide spectrum of postoperative complications associated with liposuction. PMID:26576108

  12. [Radiologic aspects of the complications of duodenal diverticula].

    PubMed

    Oddo, F; Chevallier, P; Souci, J; Baque, J; Buckley, M J; Fabiani, P; Diaine, B; Coussement, A

    1999-02-01

    The duodenum is the second most common site, after the colon, for intestinal diverticulae. This condition is most often asymptomatic and is usually an accidental finding. Complications, with variable clinical presentations, may occur in up to 5% of such individuals. We report a retrospective analysis of 5 patients who presented with complicated duodenal diverticular disease. The complications, either isolated or multiple, consisted of bezoar formation (n = 2), diverticulitis (n = 2), extrinsic compression of the common bile duct (n = 3), perforation (n = 1), choledocholithiasis (n = 1), and an abnormality of the bilio-pancreatic ductal convergence (n = 1). The radiological aspects, in particular, the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features are reviewed. These are, to our knowledge, the first descriptions of MRI and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatographic (MRCP) findings in complicated duodenal diverticular disease. MRI facilitates precise delineation of the complicated duodenal diverticulum while MRCP allows assessment of the effects on the biliary and pancreatic ducts. PMID:10209709

  13. Clinical complications after transvaginal oocyte retrieval: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Siristatidis, C; Chrelias, C; Alexiou, A; Kassanos, D

    2013-01-01

    There are little systematic data reported in the literature on complications observed after transvaginal oocyte retrieval (OR) guided by ultrasound. We report our experience in 542 in vitro fertilisation cycles. The frequency of severe complications in our patients was 0.72%; of these, two cases were bronchospasm during anaesthesia (0.36%) and two were cases of intraperitoneal bleeding (0.36%); minor vaginal bleeding was the most frequent complication (18.08%), which was treated easily. Through this retrospective analysis, it is evident that clinical suspicion is of particular importance in detecting post-OR complications on one hand, but on the other these complications are rare and most are treated conservatively. PMID:23259882

  14. [Problems, complications, and emergencies during pacemaker implantation : Importance of access].

    PubMed

    Israel, Carsten W; Ekosso-Ejangue, Lucy

    2015-12-01

    Pacemaker implantation represents a standard procedure with a perceived 100?% success rate, without mortality and with extremely rare complications. However, some pacemaker implantations may develop into a very difficult procedure or even be associated with significant complications. Good venous access is crucial and may distinguish between comfortable, successful implantation and futile implantation with severe complications (e.g., pneumo- or hematothorax, venous dissection or perforation, accidental arterial implantation, or air embolism). This review summarizes acute problems and complications during lead implantation and provides tips and hints for prevention and acute reaction during implantation. If these simple precautions are considered, the majority of acute complications during implantation of pacemaker leads can be prevented. PMID:26631083

  15. Immediate postoperative complications in transsphenoidal pituitary surgery: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Tumul; Prabhakar, Hemanshu; Bithal, Parmod K.; Schaller, Bernhard; Dash, Hari Hara

    2014-01-01

    Background: Considering the important role of pituitary gland in regulating various endocrine axes and its unique anatomical location, various postoperative complications can be anticipated resulting from surgery on pituitary tumors. We examined and categorized the immediate postoperative complications according to various tumor pathologies. Materials and Methods: We carried out a prospective study in 152 consecutive patients and noted various postoperative complications during neurosurgical intensive care unit stay (within 48 hrs of hospital stay) in patients undergoing transsphenoidal removal of pituitary tumors. Results: In our series, various groups showed different postoperative complications out of which, cerebrospinal fluid leak was the commonest followed by diabetes insipidus, postoperative nausea and vomiting, and hematoma at operation site. Conclusion: Various immediate postoperative complications can be anticipated in transsphenoidal pituitary surgery even though, it is considered to be relatively safe. PMID:25191182

  16. Imaging Findings of Liposuction with an Emphasis on Postsurgical Complications.

    PubMed

    You, Je Sung; Chung, Yong Eun; Baek, Song-Ee; Chung, Sung Phil; Kim, Myeong-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Liposuction is one of the most frequently performed cosmetic surgeries worldwide for reshaping the body contour. Although liposuction is minimally invasive and relatively safe, it is a surgical procedure, and it carries the risk of major and minor complications. These complications vary from postoperative nausea to life-threatening events. Common complications include infection, abdominal wall injury, bowel herniation, bleeding, haematoma, seroma, and lymphoedema. Life-threatening complications such as necrotizing fasciitis, deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism have also been reported. In this paper, we provide a brief introduction to liposuction with the related anatomy and present computed tomography and ultrasonography findings of a wide spectrum of postoperative complications associated with liposuction. PMID:26576108

  17. Complications associated with cheek tooth extraction in the horse.

    PubMed

    Earley, Edward T; Rawlinson, Jennifer E; Baratt, Robert M

    2013-01-01

    Common indications for cheek tooth extraction in the horse include dental fracture, periodontal disease, severe decay/ caries, mandibular fracture with alveolar/tooth involvement, and periapical abscess. Complications secondary to extraction of cheek teeth are prevalent. Typical complications may include retained root tip(s), collateral damage of neighboring teeth and alveolar bone, mandibular fracture non-union or delayed union, cemental ankylosis, dilacerated root(s), oroantral/oronasal fistula, palatal deviation of cheek teeth, bone sequestration, sinus involvement, alveolar plug failure, and palatine artery laceration. This paper presents a series of cases that had complications following cheek tooth extraction. Anticipation of problematic extractions, recognition of complications, and appropriate treatment will aid the clinician in managing the inevitable cheek tooth extraction complication. PMID:24660307

  18. Surviving a delayed trans-diaphragmatic hepatic rupture complicated by an acute superior vena cava and thoracic compartment syndromes.

    PubMed

    Parra, Michael W; Rodas, Edgar B; Bartnik, Jakub P; Puente, Ivan

    2011-07-01

    We describe the first reported survivor of a delayed trans-diaphragmatic hepatic rupture complicated by acute superior vena cava (SVCS) and thoracic compartment syndromes (TCS). A thirty one year old male was involved in a boating accident. The patient was diagnosed with a grade IV liver laceration, which was initially managed with both angio-embolization and open surgical repair. Exactly one month from admission, the patient presented with an abrupt cardiac arrest, which was further complicated by a SVCS and TCS. The SVCS was managed with bilateral thoracostomies which revealed a delayed trans-diaphragmatic hepatic rupture into the right chest cavity. The TCS was managed with a decompressive thoraco-abdominal incision. The patient survived and is now leading a normal life. Our success was largely due to an integrated trauma system of physicians, nurses and technicians that prompted the early recognition of two potentially life threatening complications of a delayed trans-diaphragmatic hepatic rupture. PMID:21887041

  19. Acute Cholecystitis Complicated with Portal Vein Thrombosis: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Muneer, Mohammed; Abdelrahman, Husham; El-Menyar, Ayman; Zarour, Ahmad; Awad, Ahmed; Al-Thani, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 31 Final Diagnosis: Acute cholecystitis complicated with portal vein thrombosis Symptoms: Abdominal discomfort • fever • vomiting Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Abdominal ultrasound and MRI Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is an infrequent clinical condition usually associated with multiple etiological factors and diseases. In some cases, PVT remains undiagnosed and is incidentally detected during routine examination for a known etiology. Case Report: Here, we present a rare case of portal vein thrombosis associated with acute cholecystitis in a 31-year-old man. Conclusions: Conservative treatment may be a feasible and safe approach for the management of PVT with acute cholecystitis, if treated at an early stage. Moreover, initial diagnosis based on radiological evaluation is possible only if the surgeons are familiar with this unusual condition. Therefore, a high index of suspicion is required for early diagnosis and management of patients with acute cholecystitis-associated PVT. PMID:26378714

  20. [Pulmonary zygomycosis in a diabetic child complicated with thrombus of the left atrial auricle].

    PubMed

    Ayadi-Kaddour, A; Ammar, J; Ismail, O; Braham, E; Hamzaoui, A; Kilani, T; Zidi, A; El Mezni, F

    2014-11-01

    Mucormycosis is a rare but fatal, opportunistic fungal infection caused by fungi of the order of mucorales in the class of Zygomycetes. Isolated pulmonary mucormycosis is rare and occurs principally in particular conditions, especially in patients with uncontrolled diabetes. The fungi invades the blood vessels and causes distal ischemic necrosis. We report a case in a 13-year-old girl with diabetes mellitus who developed pulmonary zygomycosis complicated with thrombus of the left atrial auricle. The diagnosis of mucormycosis was confirmed by histologic examination of endobronchial biopsies. Combined treatment with systemic amphotericin B and surgery resulted in a favorable outcome. This difficult diagnosis must be raised in diabetic patients with unresponsive lung infections in order to apply early aggressive therapy. Successful management continues to be early diagnosis, followed by systemic antifungal therapy and surgical resection combined with control of the underlying disease. PMID:25282464

  1. Early Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurston, Hugh

    The earliest investigations that can be called scientific are concerned with the sky: they are the beginnings of astronomy. Many early civilizations produced astronomical texts, and several cultures that left no written records left monuments and artifacts-ranging from rock paintings to Stonehenge-that show a clear interest in astronomy. Civilizations in China, Mesopotamia, India and Greece had highly developed astronomies, and the astronomy of the Mayas was by no means negligible. Greek astronomy, as developed by the medieval Arab philosophers, evolved into the astronomy of Copernicus. This displaced the earth from the central stationary position that almost all earlier astronomies had assumed. Soon thereafter, in the first decades of the seventeenth century, Kepler found the true shape of the planetary orbits and Galileo introduced the telescope for astronomical observations.

  2. Silver nanoparticles cause complications in pregnant mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xi-Feng; Park, Jung-Hyun; Choi, Yun-Jung; Kang, Min-Hee; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2015-01-01

    Background Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have attracted much interest and have been used for antibacterial, antifungal, anticancer, and antiangiogenic applications because of their unique properties. The increased usage of AgNPs leads to a potential hazard to human health. However, the potential effects of AgNPs on animal models are not clear. This study was designed to investigate the potential impact of AgNPs on pregnant mice. Methods The synthesis of AgNPs was performed using culture extracts of Bacillus cereus. The synthesized AgNPs were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. AgNPs were administrated into pregnant mice via intravenous infusion at 1.0 mg/kg doses at 6.5 days postcoitum (dpc). At 13.5, 15.5, and 17.5 dpc, the pregnant mice were euthanized, and the embryo and placenta were isolated. The meiotic status of oocytes was evaluated. DNA methylation studies were performed, and aberrant imprinting disrupted fetal, placental, and postnatal development. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis and Western blot were used to analyze various gene expressions. Results The synthesized AgNPs were uniformly distributed and were spherical in shape with an average size of 8 nm. AgNPs exposure increased the meiotic progression of female germ cells in the fetal mouse ovaries, and maternal AgNP exposure significantly disrupted imprinted gene expression in 15.5 dpc embryos and placentas, such as Ascl2, Snrpn, Kcnq1ot1, Peg3, Zac1, H19, Igf2r, and Igf2; DNA methylation studies revealed that AgNPs exposure significantly altered the methylation levels of differentially methylated regions of Zac1. Conclusion The results from this study indicated that early exposure to AgNPs has the potential to disrupt fetal and postnatal health through epigenetic changes in the embryo and abnormal development of the placenta. These results can contribute to research involved in the safe use of various biomedical applications of AgNPs and improves the understanding of the development of AgNPs in biomedical applications. PMID:26622177

  3. Neurologic Complications of HIV-1 Infection and Its Treatment in the Era of Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kranick, Sarah M.; Nath, Avindra

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of Review: Neurologic complications of HIV infection are unfortunately common, even in the era of effective antiretroviral treatment (ART). The consulting neurologist is often asked to distinguish among neurologic deterioration due to opportunistic infection (OI), immune reconstitution, or the effect of the virus itself, and to comment on the role of immunomodulatory agents in patients with HIV infection. Additionally, as successful virologic control has extended the life span of patients with HIV infection, neurologists are called upon to manage long-term complications, such as neurocognitive disorders and peripheral neuropathy. Recent Findings: Despite the use of ART, significant numbers of patients continue to be affected by HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders, although with milder forms compared to the pre-ART era. Regimens of ART have been ranked according to CNS penetration and are being studied with regard to neuropsychological outcomes. Nucleoside analogs with the greatest potential for peripheral neurotoxicity are no longer considered first-line agents for HIV treatment. Efavirenz, a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, has the greatest frequency of neurologic side effects among newer ART regimens. The spectrum of clinical manifestations of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) continues to grow, including IRIS without underlying OI. A greater understanding of pathophysiology and risk factors has shown that while HIV should be treated early to prevent severe immunocompromise, delayed initiation of ART may be helpful while treating OIs. Summary: This article reviews the neurologic complications of HIV infection, or its treatment, most commonly encountered by neurologists. PMID:23221843

  4. Reprint of: Nutrition in the Management of Cirrhosis and its Neurological Complications.

    PubMed

    Bémeur, Chantal; Butterworth, Roger F

    2015-03-01

    Malnutrition is a common feature of chronic liver diseases that is often associated with a poor prognosis including worsening of clinical outcome, neuropsychiatric complications as well as outcome following liver transplantation. Nutritional assessment in patients with cirrhosis is challenging owing to confounding factors related to liver failure. The objectives of nutritional intervention in cirrhotic patients are the support of liver regeneration, the prevention or correction of specific nutritional deficiencies and the prevention and/or treatment of the complications of liver disease per se and of liver transplantation. Nutritional recommendations target the optimal supply of adequate substrates related to requirements linked to energy, protein, carbohydrates, lipids, vitamins and minerals. Some issues relating to malnutrition in chronic liver disease remain to be addressed including the development of an appropriate well-validated nutritional assessment tool, the identification of mechanistic targets or therapy for sarcopenia, the development of nutritional recommendations for obese cirrhotic patients and liver-transplant recipients and the elucidation of the roles of vitamin A hepatotoxicity, as well as the impact of deficiencies in riboflavin and zinc on clinical outcomes. Early identification and treatment of malnutrition in chronic liver disease has the potential to lead to better disease outcome as well as prevention of the complications of chronic liver disease and improved transplant outcomes. PMID:26041952

  5. Distal tibial fractures are a poorly recognised complication with fibula free flaps.

    PubMed

    Durst, A; Clibbon, J; Davis, B

    2015-09-01

    The fibula free flap is ideal for complex jaw reconstructions, with low reported donor and flap morbidity. We discuss a distal tibial stress fracture two months following a vascularised fibula free flap procedure. Despite being an unrecognised complication, a literature review produced 13 previous cases; only two were reported in the reconstructive surgery literature, with the most recent claiming to be the first. The majority of these studies treated this fracture non-operatively; none reported their patient follow-up. Each case presented with ipsilateral leg pain, which has been cited as an early donor site morbidity in as many as 40% of fibula free flap cases. It is known that the fibula absorbs at least 15% of leg load on weight bearing. Studies have shown severe valgus deformities in up to 25% of patients with fibulectomies. We treated our patient operatively, first correcting his worsening valgus deformity with an external fixator, then reinforcing his healed fracture with a long distal tibial plate. We believe that this complication is underreported, unexpected and not mentioned during the consenting process. By highlighting the management of our case and the literature, we aim to increase awareness (and thus further reporting and appropriate management) of this debilitating complication. PMID:26274757

  6. Asymmetric dimethylarginine, a biomarker of cardiovascular complications in diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Konya, Hiroyuki; Miuchi, Masayuki; Satani, Kahori; Matsutani, Satoshi; Yano, Yuzo; Tsunoda, Taku; Ikawa, Takashi; Matsuo, Toshihiro; Ochi, Fumihiro; Kusunoki, Yoshiki; Tokuda, Masaru; Katsuno, Tomoyuki; Hamaguchi, Tomoya; Miyagawa, Jun-ichiro; Namba, Mitsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) complications are an essential causal element of prospect in diabetes mellitus (DM), with carotid atherosclerosis being a common risk factor for prospective crisis of coronary artery diseases and/or cerebral infarction in DM subjects. From another point of view, asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) has been established as an inhibitor of endogenous nitric oxide synthesis and the relationship between ADMA and arteriosclerosis has been reported. In our study with 87 type 2 DM (T2DM) patients, we have examined whether ADMA and other CV risk factors are the useful predictors of DMCV complications. After the measurement of the respective CV risk factors, we have followed the enrolled T2DM patients for 5 years. We have finally analyzed 77 patients. DMCV complications developed in 15 cases newly within 5 years, and 4 cases recurred. The concentrations of ADMA in plasma were markedly more elevated in 19 DM patients with CV complications than in 58 DM patients without CV complications. Urinary albumin (U-Alb), mean intimal-medial thickness (IMT) and ankle brachial index (ABI) were also higher in patients with CV complications. Multiple regression analyses showed that U-Alb had an influence on the high level of ADMA (standardized ? = 6.59, P = 0.00014) independently of age, systolic BP, fibrinogen, mean IMT, plaque score, and ABI. The review indicates what is presently known regarding plasma ADMA that might be a new and meaningful biomarker of CV complications in DM subjects. PMID:25992325

  7. Detection of pulmonary complications in common variable immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Touw, Catharina M L; van de Ven, Annick A; de Jong, Pim A; Terheggen-Lagro, Suzanne; Beek, Erik; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; van Montfrans, Joris M

    2010-08-01

    Touw CML, van de Ven AA, de Jong PA, Terheggen-Lagro S, Beek E, Sanders EAM, van Montfrans JM. Detection of pulmonary complications in common variable immunodeficiency. Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2010: 21: 793-805. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons A/S Pulmonary complications are frequently observed in common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). We reviewed the literature related to radiologic imaging techniques and pulmonary function tests (PFT) for diagnosing pulmonary complications in CVID. Scientific publications related to CVID (or primary hypogammaglobulinemia), pulmonary complications, PFT, chest X-ray (CXR), and high-resolution computed tomography scan (HRCT) were detected in PubMed, Embase and in reference lists of selected articles. Twenty-six articles including 1047 patients (587 patients with CVID) were reviewed. Up to 73% of CVID patients develop chronic structural pulmonary complications, of which bronchiectasis and bronchial wall thickening are most frequently detected. HRCT is the most sensitive method for identification of structural abnormalities, detecting pulmonary complications that were missed on CXR and PFT in 2-59% of patients. On PFT, obstructive flow-volume curves were most commonly found, eventually occurring in 50-94% of patients. HRCT is an important diagnostic tool for pulmonary complications in CVID at the time of diagnosis and at regular time-points during follow-up, with the proper follow-up interval yet to be determined. PMID:19912551

  8. Asplenic fulminant sepsis secondary to a dog bite complicated by toxic epidermal necrolysis/Stevens-Johnson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Teo, Ken G; Anavekar, Namrata S; Yazdabadi, Anosha; Ricketts, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of asplenic fulminant sepsis in Australia following a dog bite which was complicated by toxic epidermal necrolysis/Stevens-Johnson syndrome (TENS/SJS). Capnocytophaga canimorsus, the infective organism, is a rare cause of septicaemia: a high degree of suspicion of this unusual organism and its early aggressive management is paramount. The diagnostic and management difficulties of TENS/SJS in the context of a patient with fulminant sepsis, DIC and on inotropes are also highlighted. PMID:22864159

  9. Generator and Lead-Related Complications of Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators

    PubMed Central

    Yaminisharif, Ahmad; Soofizadeh, Nader; Shafiee, Akbar; Kazemisaeid, Ali; Jalali, Arash; Vasheghani-Farahani, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Increase in the number of patients treated with Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) requests more attention regarding its complications. Objectives: This study aimed to assess the generator- and lead-related complications at implantation and during follow-up in the patients who were treated with ICD for primary and secondary prevention reasons. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 255 consecutive patients who underwent transvenous ICD implantation for the first time in a 7-year period and were followed-up for 3 years at Tehran Heart Center. The personal and clinical data of the patients as well as specific data on the ICD implantation were retrieved. The frequency of each of the complications was reported and the study variables were compared between the patients with and without complications using Student’s t-test and chi-square test where appropriate. P values less than 0.05 were considered as statistically significant. Results: Out of a total of 525 implanted leads and 255 implanted devices in 255 patients (mean age = 62.57 ± 13.50 years; male = 196 [76.9%]), complications leading to generator or lead replacement occurred in 32 patients (12.5%). The results revealed no significant difference between the patients with and without complications regarding gender and age (P = 0.206 and P = 0.824, respectively). Also, no significant difference was found between the two groups concerning the ejection fraction (P = 0.271). Lead fracture was the most frequent lead-related complication and was observed in 17 patients (6.6%). Besides, it was mainly observed in the RV leads. Generator-related complications leading to generator replacement were observed in 2 patients (0.7%). Conclusions: Despite considerable improvements in the ICD technology, the rate of the ICD complications leading to device replacement and surgical revision, especially those related to the leads, is still clinically important. PMID:24936484

  10. Predictors of Postoperative Complications After Trimodality Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jingya; Wei, Caimiao; Tucker, Susan L.; Myles, Bevan; Palmer, Matthew; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing; Lin, Steven H.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: While trimodality therapy for esophageal cancer has improved patient outcomes, surgical complication rates remain high. The goal of this study was to identify modifiable factors associated with postoperative complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2011, 444 patients were treated at our institution with surgical resection after chemoradiation. Postoperative (pulmonary, gastrointestinal [GI], cardiac, wound healing) complications were recorded up to 30 days postoperatively. Kruskal-Wallis tests and ?{sup 2} or Fisher exact tests were used to assess associations between continuous and categorical variables. Multivariate logistic regression tested the association between perioperative complications and patient or treatment factors that were significant on univariate analysis. Results: The most frequent postoperative complications after trimodality therapy were pulmonary (25%) and GI (23%). Lung capacity and the type of radiation modality used were independent predictors of pulmonary and GI complications. After adjusting for confounding factors, pulmonary and GI complications were increased in patients treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT; odds ratio [OR], 2.018; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.104-3.688; OR, 1.704; 95% CI, 1.03-2.82, respectively) and for patients treated with 3D-CRT versus proton beam therapy (PBT; OR, 3.154; 95% CI, 1.365-7.289; OR, 1.55; 95% CI, 0.78-3.08, respectively). Mean lung radiation dose (MLD) was strongly associated with pulmonary complications, and the differences in toxicities seen for the radiation modalities could be fully accounted for by the MLD delivered by each of the modalities. Conclusions: The radiation modality used can be a strong mitigating factor of postoperative complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiation.

  11. Tapia's syndrome — a rare complication following cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nalladaru, Zubin; Wessels, Andre; DuPreez, Leon

    2012-01-01

    Tapia's syndrome is a rare complication following cardiac surgery. It includes the extracranial involvement of the recurrent laryngeal nerve and the hypoglossal nerve and results in ipsilateral paralysis of the vocal cord and the tongue. It is usually a complication related to anaesthesia and positioning of the head of the patient during surgery. We describe this rare complication which occurred at our institute. A 49-year old man developed Tapia's syndrome after an uneventful coronary artery bypass surgery. He complained of dysphonia, hoarseness of voice and an inability to swallow soon after extubation. The syndrome resolved completely over the following weeks with no neurological deficit. PMID:22108947

  12. Complications of Tendon Surgery in the Foot and Ankle.

    PubMed

    Barp, Eric A; Erickson, John G

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses four subsets of patients that have an increased risk of complications from tendon surgery in the foot and ankle: smokers, diabetics, and patients with peroneal or Achilles tendon pathology. Very little has been published on the complications of other tendon surgeries in the foot and ankle other than Achilles tendon repair. Data can be extrapolated from the general orthopedic literature and animal studies to help guide therapy and treatment options. The foot and ankle surgeon must take into account the entirety of the history and physical examination to develop a treatment plan that optimizes each patient's chance for a complication-free recovery. PMID:26590733

  13. Fluoroscopic Management of Complications after Colorectal Stent Placement

    PubMed Central

    Lopera, Jorge E

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal self-expanding metal stents have been widely used as a bridge to surgery in patients with acute malignant colonic obstruction by allowing a single-stage operation, or as a definitive palliative procedure in patients with inoperable tumors. Colonic stents are placed under either fluoroscopic or combined endoscopic and fluoroscopic guidance, with similar technical-success and complication rates. Placement of colonic stents is a very safe procedure with a low procedure-related mortality rate, but serious complications can develop and reinterventions are not uncommon. Most of the complications can be treated by minimally invasive or conservative techniques, while surgical interventions are required for most patients with perforation. PMID:21103302

  14. Treatment- and Disease-Related Complications of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Simoneau, Anne R

    2006-01-01

    One of the highlights of the 16th International Prostate Cancer Update was a session on treatment- and disease-related complications of prostate disease. It began with presentation of a challenging case of rising prostate-specific antigen levels after radical prostatectomy, followed by an overview of the use of zoledronic acid in prostate cancer, a review of side effects of complementary medicines, an overview of complications of cryotherapy, an assessment of complications of brachytherapy and external beam radiation therapy, and a comparison of laparoscopy versus open prostatectomy. PMID:17021643

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Complications of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Dayan, Etan; Maderazo, Alex; Fitzpatrick, Darren

    2015-12-01

    The incidence of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R) has increased in recent years. ACL-R plays an important role in the prevention of secondary osteoarthritis from resultant joint instability. Magnetic resonance imaging is the preferred modality in the evaluation of ACL-R complications. Complications after ACL-R may be broadly characterized as those resulting in decreased range of motion (arthrofibrosis, impingement) and resulting in increased laxity (graft disruption). Other miscellaneous complications that do not fall into these categories will also be discussed in this article. PMID:26665245

  16. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation complicated by acute pericardial tamponade

    PubMed Central

    Suwalski, Piotr; Pawlak, Agnieszka; Kulawik, Tomasz; Byczkowska, Katarzyna; Gil, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is now an accepted standard of care for patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis who are not candidates for surgery or have high surgical risk. Despite its more widespread adoption as a treatment option and increasing experience of centers, TAVR is still associated with several complications. We therefore report a case of TAVR complicated by acute pericardial tamponade, one of the most severe potential complications of this procedure. We describe the way we approached the problem and we try to give a potential take-home message for others who might encounter such a situation in their own cath lab. PMID:24799924

  17. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation complicated by acute pericardial tamponade.

    PubMed

    Mo?e?ska, Olga; Suwalski, Piotr; Pawlak, Agnieszka; Kulawik, Tomasz; Byczkowska, Katarzyna; Gil, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is now an accepted standard of care for patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis who are not candidates for surgery or have high surgical risk. Despite its more widespread adoption as a treatment option and increasing experience of centers, TAVR is still associated with several complications. We therefore report a case of TAVR complicated by acute pericardial tamponade, one of the most severe potential complications of this procedure. We describe the way we approached the problem and we try to give a potential take-home message for others who might encounter such a situation in their own cath lab. PMID:24799924

  18. Complications of Continuous-Flow Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Harsh; Madanieh, Raef; Kosmas, Constantine E; Vatti, Satya K; Vittorio, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs), more importantly the continuous-flow subclass, have revolutionized the medical field by improving New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class status, quality of life, and survival rates in patients with advanced systolic heart failure. From the first pulsatile device to modern day continuous-flow devices, LVADs have continued to improve, but they are still associated with several complications. These complications include infection, bleeding, thrombosis, hemolysis, aortic valvular dysfunction, right heart failure, and ventricular arrhythmias. In this article, we aim to review these complications to understand the most appropriate approach for their prevention and to discuss the available therapeutic modalities. PMID:26052234

  19. Transcatheter arterial embolization - major complications and their prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, F.J. Jr.; Mineau, D.E.

    1983-08-01

    A thorough account is given of the complications of embolization techniques in nonneurovascular areas, including hepatic infarction, renal and splenic abscess formation. Infarction of the urinary bladder, gallbladder, stomach, and bowel are discussed. Suggestions are offered to prevent complications from embolization where possible. Specific agents for embolization are detailed and their relative merits are compared; ethyl alcohol has recently gained popularity for treating esophageal varices and infarcting renal tumors. Care is advocated when using alcohol in the renal arteries; employing this agent is currently contraindicated in the celiac and mesenteric arteries. Coils and balloon systems are also described along with their potential complications.

  20. Urethral complications after tension-free vaginal tape procedures: A surgical management case series

    PubMed Central

    Sergouniotis, Fotios; Jarlshammar, Björn; Larsson, Per-Göran

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the clinical features, diagnostic modalities, and the surgical management of urethral complications after tension-free vaginal tape procedures. METHODS: This study encompasses a retrospective review of nine patients presented with urethral complications after midurethral sling procedures. The patients underwent the procedures during a period from 1999 to 2012 in three different regional hospitals in the southwest part of Sweden. The time from sling placement to diagnosis, the risk factors, clinical features, diagnosis, surgical management, and functional outcome are presented. The presenting symptoms were described as either early onset (< 12 mo) or late onset (> 12 mo) according to when they were first reported. RESULTS: Eight cases of urethral erosion and one case of bladder-neck erosion were detected. The mean interval for diagnoses of the erosions ranged from 3 mo to 11 years. The most common presenting symptoms included de novo urgency with or without incontinence (7/9 patients), urinary retention/voiding dysfunction (4/9 patients), urethritis (4/9 patients), relapse of stress-incontinence (3/9 patients), recurrent urinary tract infections (5/9 patients), and hematuria (1/9 patient). In most cases, voiding dysfunction and urethritis occurred early after the operation. The surgical management applied in most cases was transurethral resection of the intraurethral part of the mesh. The removal of the intraurethral mesh resulted in improvement or complete cure of urgency symptoms in 5/7 patients with urgency. Four patients were reoperated with a new stress-incontinence surgery, one with laparoscopic Burch, and three with retropubic tension-free vaginal tape procedures. CONCLUSION: Urethral complications should be suspected in the case of de novo urgency and relapse of stress-incontinence. Transurethral excision of the intraurethral mesh is the recommended treatment. PMID:26167464

  1. Advances in endoscopic management of biliary tract complications after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Arain, Mustafa A; Attam, Rajeev; Freeman, Martin L

    2013-05-01

    Biliary tract complications after liver transplantation (LT) most commonly include biliary leaks, strictures, and stone disease. Living donor recipients and donation after cardiac death recipients are at an increased risk of developing biliary complications. Biliary leaks usually occur early after transplantation, whereas strictures and stone disease occur later. The diagnosis of biliary complications relies on a combination of clinical presentation, laboratory abnormalities, and imaging modalities. Biliary leaks are usually diagnosed on the basis of bilious output from a surgical drain, fluid collections on imaging, or a cholescintigraphy scan demonstrating a leak. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) is noninvasive, does not require the administration of an intravenous contrast agent, and provides detailed imaging of the entire biliary system both above and below the anastomosis. The latter not only helps in the diagnosis of biliary strictures and stones before patients undergo invasive procedures such as endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) but also allows treating physicians to plan the optimal treatment approach. MRCP has, therefore, replaced invasive therapeutic modalities such as ERCP as the modality of choice for the diagnosis of biliary strictures and stones. There have been significant advances in endoscopic accessories, including biliary catheters, wires, and stents, as well as endoscopic technologies such as overtube-assisted endoscopy over the last decade. These developments have resulted in almost all patients, including those with difficult strictures or altered surgical anatomies (eg, Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy), being treated via an endoscopic approach with percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, which is more invasive and associated with significant morbidity, with surgery being reserved for a small minority of patients. Advances in the diagnosis and endoscopic management of patients with biliary complications after LT are discussed in this review. PMID:23417867

  2. Long-Term Complications of Diabetes (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and health problems. Back Continue Nerve Damage (Diabetic Neuropathy) Another complication that people who have had diabetes ... younger people with poor blood sugar control. Diagnosing Neuropathy Talk to your doctor if your child has ...

  3. Indications and complications of intravenous devices for chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Freytes, C O

    2000-07-01

    Vascular access devices (VADs) are frequently used in patients with cancer. Vascular access devices can be divided into external catheters and subcutaneous venous access ports. Each type of device has its advantages and disadvantages, but the indications and optimal use of specific VADs remain to be defined. There are multiple complications of VADs but, with the exception of catheter-related bloodstream infections and thrombosis, most complications are rare. The use of VADs impregnated with antibiotic reduces the rates of catheter colonization and catheter-related bloodstream infections as compared with the use of unimpregnated catheters for short-term use. Thrombosis remains a major complication of VADs, and prospective, controlled studies are needed to clearly define the risk factors, natural history, and optimal treatment of this complication. PMID:10888414

  4. Plants Used in the Management of Diabetic Complications

    PubMed Central

    Dodda, D.; Ciddi, V.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a disease, which has assumed vital public health importance because of the complications associated with it. Various mechanisms including polyol pathway along with a complex integrating paradigm have been implicated in glucose-mediated complications. Though polyol pathway was established as a major mechanism, precise pathogenesis of these complications is not yet completely elucidated. Thus research focus was shifted towards key enzyme, aldose reductase in the pathway. Even though various compounds with aldose reductase inhibitory activity were synthesised, a very few compounds are under clinical use. However, studies on these compounds were always under conflicting results and an attempt has been made to review various natural substances with aldose reductase inhibitory activity and their role in management of diabetic complications. PMID:24843182

  5. An integrative predictive model for hospital acquired complications

    E-print Network

    Liu, Jenny, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2015-01-01

    Hospital Acquired Complications (HACs) are a serious problem affecting modern day healthcare institutions. It is estimated that in US hospitals, HACs cause an approximately 10% increase in total inpatient hospital costs. ...

  6. Diabetes Complications | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes Complications Learning a Healthier Way to Live Past ... it's too late. When were you diagnosed with diabetes? I was diagnosed 11 years ago, when I ...

  7. Diabetes Complications | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes Complications Tailoring Diabetes Treatment to the Patient Past Issues / Fall 2012 ... been reported for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. How was the NIH involved? These are guidelines ...

  8. Diffuse soft tissue emphysema as a complication of anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Hatzitolios, AI; Sion, ML; Kounanis, AD; Toulis, EN; Dimitriadis, A; Ioannidis, I; Ziakas, GN

    1997-01-01

    We describe a case of a young woman with anorexia nervosa with a 35% weight loss, amenorrhea and behavioural disturbances complicated by spontaneous diffuse soft tissue emphysema (subcutaneous, pneumomediastinum, epidural and retroperitoneal). ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:9497985

  9. Symmetrical peripheral gangrene: A rare complication of plasmodium falciparum malaria

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Atul; Singh, DP; Kaur, Gurdeep; Verma, SK; Mahur, Hemant

    2015-01-01

    Malaria, the most important of the parasitic diseases of humans, is transmitted in 108 countries containing 3 billion people and causes nearly 1 million deaths each year. With the re-emergence of malaria various life-threatening complications of malaria have been observed. Unarousable coma/cerebral malaria, severe normochromic, normocytic anemia, renal failure, pulmonary edema/adult respiratory distress syndrome, hypoglycemia, hypotension/shock, bleeding/disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), hemoglobinuria and jaundice are few of the common complications of severe malaria. Symmetrical peripheral gangrene (SPG) has been reported as a rare complication of malaria. We report a rare and unique case of Plasmodium falciparum malaria complicated by DIC, severe normocytic normochromic anemia, and SPG. PMID:26629458

  10. Oral Complications and Management Strategies for Patients Undergoing Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    With cancer survival rate climbing up over the past three decades, quality of life for cancer patients has become an issue of major concern. Oral health plays an important part in one's overall quality of life. However, oral health status can be severely hampered by side effects of cancer therapies including surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Moreover, prevention and treatment of these complications are often overlooked in clinical practice. The present paper aims at drawing health care professionals' attention to oral complications associated with cancer therapy by giving a comprehensive review. Brief comments on contemporary cancer therapies will be given first, followed by detailed description of oral complications associated with cancer therapy. Finally, a summary of preventive strategies and treatment options for common oral complications including oral mucositis, oral infections, xerostomia, and dysgeusia will be given. PMID:24511293

  11. Isolated sacral injuries: Postoperative length of stay, complications, and readmission

    PubMed Central

    Sathiyakumar, Vasanth; Shi, Hanyuan; Thakore, Rachel V; Lee, Young M; Joyce, David; Ehrenfeld, Jesse; Obremskey, William T; Sethi, Manish K

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate inpatient length of stay (LOS), complication rates, and readmission rates for sacral fracture patients based on operative approach. METHODS: All patients who presented to a large tertiary care center with isolated sacral fractures in an 11-year period were included in a retrospective chart review. Operative approach (open reduction internal fixation vs percutaneous) was noted, as well as age, gender, race, and American Society of Anesthesiologists’ score. Complications included infection, nonunion and malunion, deep venous thrombosis, and hardware problems; 90-d readmissions were broken down into infection, surgical revision of the sacral fracture, and medical complications. LOS was collected for the initial admission and readmission visits if applicable. Fisher’s exact and non-parametric t-tests (Mann-Whitney U tests) were employed to compare LOS, complications, and readmissions between open and percutaneous approaches. RESULTS: Ninety-four patients with isolated sacral fractures were identified: 31 (30.4%) who underwent open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) vs 63 (67.0%) who underwent percutaneous fixation. There was a significant difference in LOS based on operative approach: 9.1 d for ORIF patients vs 6.1 d for percutaneous patients (P = 0.043), amounting to a difference in cost of $13590. Ten patients in the study developed complications, with no significant difference in complication rates or reasons for complications between the two groups (19.4% for ORIF patients vs 6.3% for percutaneous patients). Eight patients were readmitted, with no significant difference in readmission rates or reasons for readmission between the two groups (9.5% percutaneous vs 6.5% ORIF). CONCLUSION: There is a significant difference in LOS based on operative approach for sacral fracture patients. Given similar complications and readmission rates, we recommend a percutaneous approach. PMID:26396939

  12. Reporting ureteroscopy complications using the modified clavien classification system

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Ahmed Khalil

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Perioperative complications are one of the surrogate indicators of surgical outcomes. However, reporting these complications need a precise grading system. Our aim is to report and grade the complications of semirigid ureteroscopy in ureteral stone management according to the modified Clavien classification system. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective study conducted From January 2012 to June 2013. All patients with ureteral stones who were indicated for semirigid URS were evaluated. All procedures were performed by the same surgeon. The data recorded including patient demographics, clinical indication, stone size and location, operative time and complications were classified according to the modified Clavien classification system. The patients were followed for 8 weeks postoperatively. Results: 148 patients included, Stone distribution was: 89 (60.1%) lower ureteral, 26 (17.6%) mid ureteral, and 33 (22.3%) upper ureteral. the mean stone size was 8.6 mm. Urgent URS done in 23% of patient. The overall stone free rate was 88.5%, the individual stone free rate for the upper, middle and lower ureter were 87.9%, 84.6%, and 89.9%, respectively. The mean operative time was 31.9 min (20-50 min.). Complications occurred in 26.35% of patients. Grade I complications occurred in 32 patients (26.1%), grade II in 9 (6.1%), grade IIIa in 7 (4.7%), grade IIIb in 8 (5.4%), grade IVa in two patient (1.35%), and grade IVb in one patient (0.7%). No grade V complication was encountered. Conclusion: Ureteroscopy becomes the vanguard interventional therapy for ureteral stones with well-established efficacy and safety. It is of paramount importance to adopt a precise structured classification system for reporting surgical complications, that should be flexible and comprehensive in order to accommodate the various and rapidly expanding surgical fields. PMID:25657545

  13. [Prelabour uterine torsion complicated by partial abruption and fetal death].

    PubMed

    Agar, N; Canis, M; Accoceberry, M; Bourdel, N; Lafaye, A-L; Gallot, D

    2014-06-01

    Uterine torsion is a rare obstetrical complication whose diagnosis remains challenging. We report a case of 180 degrees dextrogyre torsion at 36(+5) weeks of gestation complicated by partial abruption and in utero fetal death. Emergency cesarean section was performed through an unintentional posterior hysterotomy. Literature reports a few similar cases. Vertical hysterotomy should be advised in this context avoiding incision on lateral sides associated with increased risk of vascular or ureteral injury. PMID:24411298

  14. Complications of Hair Restoration Surgery: A Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Loganathan, Eswari; Sarvajnamurthy, Sacchidanand; Gorur, Divya; Suresh, Deepak Hurkudli; Siddaraju, Maheshwari Nallur; Narasimhan, Revathi Thimmanhalli

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hair restoration surgery (HRS) is a very promising and sought after aesthetic procedure with very few complications. Complications may occur in the donor or the recipient area, and it may be due to surgical or idiopathic causes. Aim: The aim was to analyze the complications in male patients who underwent HRS for androgenetic alopecia (AGA). Materials and Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of male patients who underwent HRS for AGA from December 2010 to August 2014. Data were collected from the registers, telephonic enquiry and electronic mails. All complications during and after surgery, and their subjective feeling about hair growth was recorded. Results: Seventy-three patients were included in the analysis. A total of 65 patients had undergone follicular unit transplant, 7 patients underwent FUE, and one patient had body hair transplantation. Postoperative edema was found in 42.47% of patients, followed by sterile folliculitis in 23.29% of patients, wide donor scar in 15.07% of patients, bacterial folliculitis and numbness/paresthesia in 10.96% of patients. Other complications such as raised scar, hiccups, pruritus, excessive bleeding were found in isolated cases. Conclusion: Thorough preoperative evaluation, skillful surgical techniques, good communication and postoperative follow-up go a long way in giving satisfactory outcome with fewer complications in HRS. PMID:25368473

  15. Ceftazidime-avibactam for the treatment of complicated urinary tract infections and complicated intra-abdominal infections.

    PubMed

    Mawal, Yogesh; Critchley, Ian A; Riccobene, Todd A; Talley, Angela K

    2015-11-01

    Treatment of complicated urinary tract infections and complicated intra-abdominal infections is increasingly difficult due to the rising prevalence of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Ceftazidime-avibactam is a combination of the established third-generation cephalosporin ceftazidime with avibactam, a novel non-?-lactam ?-lactamase inhibitor, which restores the activity of ceftazidime against many ?-lactamase-producing Gram-negative bacteria, including extended-spectrum ?-lactamases and Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemases. Clinical and nonclinical studies supporting the safety and efficacy of ceftazidime-avibactam include microbiological surveillance studies of clinically relevant pathogens, in vivo animal models of infection, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic target attainment analyses, Phase I clinical pharmacology studies, and Phase II/III studies in the treatment of complicated intra-abdominal infections and complicated urinary tract infections, including patients with ceftazidime-nonsusceptible Gram-negative infections. PMID:26420166

  16. Clinical features, acute complications, and outcome of Salmonella meningitis in children under one year of age in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Salmonella meningitis remains a threat to children below two years of age in both developing and developed countries. However, information on such infections has not been well characterized. We analyzed data related to twelve years of experience in order to clarify the comprehensive features of Salmonella meningitis in our patients, including admission characteristics, acute complications, and long-term outcome. Methods The records of patients with spontaneous Salmonella meningitis from 1982 to 1994 were retrospectively reviewed. The long-term outcome was prospectively determined for survivors at school age by the developmental milestones reported by their parents and detailed neurological evaluation along with intelligence, hearing, visual, speech and language assessments. Results Of the twenty-four patients, seizures were noted in fifteen (63%) before admission and thirteen (54%) during hospitalization. Acute complications mainly included hydrocephalus (50%), subdural collection (42%), cerebral infarction (33%), ventriculitis (25%), empyema (13%), intracranial abscess (8%), and cranial nerve palsy (8%). Three patients (13%) died during the acute phase of Salmonella meningitis. The twenty-one survivors, on whom we followed up at school age, have sequelae consisting of language disorder (52%), motor disability (48%), intelligence quotient < 80 (43%), epilepsy (33%), sensorineural hearing loss (17%), visual deficits (10%), abducens nerve palsy (5%), microcephaly (5%), and hydrocephalus (5%). Overall, good outcome was noted in six (28.6%) of twenty-one survivors, mild sequelae in three (14.2%), moderate in six (28.6%), and severe in six (28.6%). Conclusion Salmonella meningitis in neonates and infants had a wide spectrum of morbidity and acute complications, leading to a complicated hospital course and subsequently a high prevalence of permanent adverse outcome. Thus, early recognition of acute complications of Salmonella meningitis and a follow-up plan for early developmental assessment of survivors are vital. PMID:21272341

  17. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy: indications, technique, complications and management.

    PubMed

    Rahnemai-Azar, Ata A; Rahnemaiazar, Amir A; Naghshizadian, Rozhin; Kurtz, Amparo; Farkas, Daniel T

    2014-06-28

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is the preferred route of feeding and nutritional support in patients with a functional gastrointestinal system who require long-term enteral nutrition. Besides its well-known advantages over parenteral nutrition, PEG offers superior access to the gastrointestinal system over surgical methods. Considering that nowadays PEG tube placement is one of the most common endoscopic procedures performed worldwide, knowing its indications and contraindications is of paramount importance in current medicine. PEG tubes are sometimes placed inappropriately in patients unable to tolerate adequate oral intake because of incorrect and unrealistic understanding of their indications and what they can accomplish. Broadly, the two main indications of PEG tube placement are enteral feeding and stomach decompression. On the other hand, distal enteral obstruction, severe uncorrectable coagulopathy and hemodynamic instability constitute the main absolute contraindications for PEG tube placement in hospitalized patients. Although generally considered to be a safe procedure, there is the potential for both minor and major complications. Awareness of these potential complications, as well as understanding routine aftercare of the catheter, can improve the quality of care for patients with a PEG tube. These complications can generally be classified into three major categories: endoscopic technical difficulties, PEG procedure-related complications and late complications associated with PEG tube use and wound care. In this review we describe a variety of minor and major tube-related complications as well as strategies for their management and avoidance. Different methods of percutaneous PEG tube placement into the stomach have been described in the literature with the "pull" technique being the most common method. In the last section of this review, the reader is presented with a brief discussion of these procedures, techniques and related issues. Despite the mentioned PEG tube placement complications, this procedure has gained worldwide popularity as a safe enteral access for nutrition in patients with a functional gastrointestinal system. PMID:24976711

  18. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy: Indications, technique, complications and management

    PubMed Central

    Rahnemai-Azar, Ata A; Rahnemaiazar, Amir A; Naghshizadian, Rozhin; Kurtz, Amparo; Farkas, Daniel T

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is the preferred route of feeding and nutritional support in patients with a functional gastrointestinal system who require long-term enteral nutrition. Besides its well-known advantages over parenteral nutrition, PEG offers superior access to the gastrointestinal system over surgical methods. Considering that nowadays PEG tube placement is one of the most common endoscopic procedures performed worldwide, knowing its indications and contraindications is of paramount importance in current medicine. PEG tubes are sometimes placed inappropriately in patients unable to tolerate adequate oral intake because of incorrect and unrealistic understanding of their indications and what they can accomplish. Broadly, the two main indications of PEG tube placement are enteral feeding and stomach decompression. On the other hand, distal enteral obstruction, severe uncorrectable coagulopathy and hemodynamic instability constitute the main absolute contraindications for PEG tube placement in hospitalized patients. Although generally considered to be a safe procedure, there is the potential for both minor and major complications. Awareness of these potential complications, as well as understanding routine aftercare of the catheter, can improve the quality of care for patients with a PEG tube. These complications can generally be classified into three major categories: endoscopic technical difficulties, PEG procedure-related complications and late complications associated with PEG tube use and wound care. In this review we describe a variety of minor and major tube-related complications as well as strategies for their management and avoidance. Different methods of percutaneous PEG tube placement into the stomach have been described in the literature with the “pull” technique being the most common method. In the last section of this review, the reader is presented with a brief discussion of these procedures, techniques and related issues. Despite the mentioned PEG tube placement complications, this procedure has gained worldwide popularity as a safe enteral access for nutrition in patients with a functional gastrointestinal system. PMID:24976711

  19. Primary prevention of cardiovascular complications in type II diabetes patients using aspirin: a complicated tale.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Brian M; Arora, Rohit

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is a disease that affects 23 million in the United States alone. Within the past 20 years, there has been remarkable research performed concerning primary prevention of cardiovascular events in type II diabetes patients. The American Diabetes Association along with a government panel made recommendations that diabetes patients at a high risk of cardiovascular events should be on a low-dose aspirin regimen. However, more recent data show that aspirin has no clinical benefit to the diabetic patient as compared with a control group. Looking at research performed by groups in Japan, the United States, namely, the Primary Prevention Project, and a group in Ireland, we learn that there is no significant difference between diabetes patients who take aspirin and those who do not with respect to cardiovascular events. These studies are criticized by some newer research, and the prevailing thought about them call into question the results they obtained.Furthermore, we learn that many type II diabetes patients are not properly participating in an aspirin regimen or they are overusing aspirin, and these variables appear to confound the situation. One study showed that up to 50% of diabetes patients do not have their diabetes under control and are therefore increasing their risk for a multitude of complications arising from diabetes, including cardiovascular events.Finally, we learn of an upcoming project studying aspirin from Bayer, Inc. Much of the information presented in this article demonstrates the need for more and better research revolving around primary prevention of cardiovascular events in type II diabetes patients using aspirin. PMID:19797944

  20. An outcomes evaluation of an emergency department early pregnancy assessment service and early pregnancy assessment protocol

    PubMed Central

    Wendt, Kim; Crilly, Julia; May, Chris; Bates, Kym; Saxena, Rakhee

    2014-01-01

    Background Complications in early pregnancy, such as threatened or actual miscarriage is a common occurrence resulting in many women presenting to the emergency department (ED). Early pregnancy service delivery models described in the literature vary in terms of approach, setting and outcomes. Our objective was to determine outcomes of women who presented to an Australian regional ED with diagnoses consistent with early pregnancy complications following the implementation of an early pregnancy assessment service (EPAS) and early pregnancy assessment protocol (EPAP) in July 2011. Methods A descriptive, comparative (6?months before and after) study was undertaken. Data were extracted from the hospital ED information system and medical healthcare records. Outcome measures included: time to see a clinician, ED length of stay, admission rate, re-presentation rate, hospital admission and types of pathology tests ordered. Results Over the 12?-month period, 584 ED presentations were made to the ED with complications of early pregnancy (268 PRE and 316 POST EPAS–EPAP). Outcomes that improved statistically and clinically following implementation included: time to see a clinician (decreased by 6?min from 35 to 29?min), admission rate (decreased 6% from 14.5% to 8.5%), increase in ?-human chorionic gonadotrophin ordering by 10% (up to 80% POST), increase in ultrasound (USS) performed by 10% (up to 73% POST) and increase in pain score documentation by 23% (up to 36% POST). Conclusions The results indicate that patient and service delivery improvements can be achieved following the implementation of targeted service delivery models such as EPAS and EPAP in the ED. PMID:24136123

  1. Porous polyethylene implants in facial reconstruction: Outcome and complications.

    PubMed

    Ridwan-Pramana, Angela; Wolff, Jan; Raziei, Ashkan; Ashton-James, Claire E; Forouzanfar, Tymour

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the indications, results and complications of patients treated with porous polyethylene (Medpor(®)) implants in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery of VU Medical Centre, Amsterdam over 17 years. A total of 69 high-density porous polyethylene implants (Medpor(®) Biomaterial; Porex Surgical, Newman, GA) were used in forty patients (22 males, 18 females). All patients were analysed for gender, age, diagnosis, indications for surgery, follow-up period and postoperative complications. A mean age of 34.1 years was observed. The main reason for implant surgery was post-traumatic functional impairment (27.5%). Most implants were placed at the mandibular angel and the orbital floor. Unsatisfactory appearance scored the highest in postoperative complications (10.1%) followed by infection rate (7.2%). Comparing the number of implants placed over the years and the incidence of complications, makes the overall complications rate of porous polyethylene very low. A consensus about antibiotic prophylaxis is needed. The objective measurements in patient satisfaction and proper implant design would be of great use. PMID:26276064

  2. Endoscopic management of bariatric complications: A review and update

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Caolan; Karmali, Shahzeer

    2015-01-01

    With over a third of Americans being considered obese, bariatric procedures have now become the most performed operation be general surgeons in the United States. The most common operations are the Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass, the Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy, and the Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Band. With over 340000 bariatric procedures preformed worldwide in 2011, the absolute number of complications related to these operations is also increasing. Complications, although few, can be life threatening. One of the most dreaded acute complication is the anastomotic/staple line leak. If left undiagnosed or untreated they can lead to sepsis, multi organ failure, and death. Smaller or contained leaks can develop into fistulas. Although most patients with an acute anastomotic leak return to the operating room, there has been a trend to manage the stable patient with an endoscopic stent. They offer an advantage by creating a barrier between enteric content and the leak, and will allow the patients to resume enteral feeding much earlier. Fistulas are a complex and chronic complication with high morbidity and mortality. Postoperative bleeding although rare may also be treated locally with endoscopy. Stenosis is a more frequent late complication and is best-managed with endoscopic therapy. Stents may not heal every fistula or stenosis, however they may prevent certain patients the need for additional revisional surgery. PMID:25992190

  3. Spectrum of supraesophageal complications of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Hogan, W J

    1997-11-24

    There is a growing body of clinical and research evidence to support the role of gastroesophageal reflux in the etiology of certain disorders occurring in structures located above the body of the esophagus. These supraesophageal complications have only recently been identified but substantiation of the role of gastroesophageal reflux has been difficult and sometimes impossible with the technology currently available. This introductory article to the clinical issues involved in supraesophageal complications of GERD presents several index cases and asks far more questions than it gives answers about these patients. Clinical evidence supporting the role of GERD is discussed and the results of therapy reviewed. Education of the practicing physician to the role of supraesophageal complications of GERD is urged to help recognize the likelihood of such clinical conditions. There is a real need for additional clinical use and evaluation of multi site intraesophageal and pharyngeal pH probes in patients with suspected supraesophageal complications of GERD. More importantly, development of new techniques for measuring micro reflux events and sophisticated methods for determining the duration of acid exposure in tissues above the esophagus is essential. Finally, more prospective controlled outcome studies of patients with supraesophageal complications of GERD are needed utilizing specific treatment algorithms. PMID:9422629

  4. Posterior sagittal approach in complicated Swenson's pull-through

    PubMed Central

    Sowande, O. A.; Adejuyigbe, O.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Swenson's pull-through is one of the standard operations for the treatment of children with Hirschsprung's disease. Complications arising from the operation are difficult to treat because of fibrosis in the pelvis. The posterior sagittal approach may be a safer alternative. Aims: The aim of this paper is to highlight our experience with the use of the posterior sagittal trans-sphincteric approach to treat unusual complications of Swenson's pull-through. Settings and Design: A retrospective study of four patients who had posterior sagittal repair of their complications of Swenson pull-through at the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital, Ile Ife, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: Four cases of Hirschsprung's disease that developed post-Swenson pull-through complications are presented. There were three males and one female. Their age ranged between 10 months and 15 years. The patients had rectovaginal fistula, rectourethral fistula, high trans-sphincteric fistula-in-ano and complete anastomotic disruption. Result: All the patients were successfully treated using the posterior sagittal approach. The approach was used twice in one patient without significant sequelae. The three patients were old enough to be assessed and had a Kelly score of 4-6 at follow-up. Conclusion: The posterior sagittal technique offers a safe approach to treat the complications of Swenson pull-through. PMID:20177480

  5. Environmental pollutants in relation to complications of pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Tabacova, S; Balabaeva, L

    1993-01-01

    Certain complications of pregnancy, e.g., threatened spontaneous abortion, toxemia, emesis, and anemia, were studied in pregnant women living in industrial areas contaminated by smelters and the petrochemical industry. Exposure to lead or aromatic hydrocarbons was assessed in parallel by the determination of these agents or their metabolites in blood and urine. Comparison of respective exposure levels was made between women with normal pregnancies and those with complications. Significantly higher levels of lead in blood and increased excretion of the metabolic products of organic solvents were found in women with complicated pregnancies compared to those with normal pregnancies. Threatened spontaneous abortion, toxemia, and anemia were associated with higher lead exposure in the vicinity of smelters. In these patients, evidence of disturbances of blood glutathione equilibrium and increased lipid peroxidation were found indicating a decreased ability to compensate for the effects of exposure. Styrene exposure in a petrochemical industrial area was associated mainly with late toxemia and nephropathy. Patients with these complications also had a tendency to elevated exposure to other aromatic hydrocarbons. It is suggested that complications of pregnancy may be induced by environmental agents at levels lower than those that result in pregnancy loss or preterm birth. PMID:8243397

  6. Prevalence of risk factors for diabetic foot complications

    PubMed Central

    Al-Maskari, Fatma; El-Sadig, Mohammed

    2007-01-01

    Background Foot complications are common in diabetic patients and are considered one of the most expensive diabetes (DM) complications to treat. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and risk factors for foot complications among diabetic patients in Al-Ain district, United Arab Emirates (UAE). Methods The study was part of a general cross-sectional survey carried out to assess the prevalence of DM complications in Al-Ain district, UAE. A sample of 513 diabetic patients with a mean age of 53 years (SD: ± 13) were randomly selected during 2003/2004. All completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire and underwent medical assessment including foot examination and assessment of presence of peripheral neuropathy (PN) and peripheral vascular disease (PVD). Results Forty nine percent of the study populations were diagnosed to have DM without presenting with symptoms of diabetes and 35% had hypertension. The majority (86%) had type 2 DM. Of the total sample, 39% (95% CI: 35.1-43.7%) had PN and 12% (95% CI: 8.8–14.4%) had PVD. There were no cases of amputation and only one case had previous history of lower extremity ulceration. Significant risk factors for PN and PVD were: male gender, poor level of education, UAE nationality, increased duration of diabetes, type 2 DM, presence of hypertension and microalbuminuria (MA). Conclusion Despite the low prevalence of foot ulceration and amputation among the study population, nevertheless, a substantial proportion had potential risk factors for foot complications. PMID:17927826

  7. Complications associated with central venous catheters in a haematology unit.

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, P. C.; Morris, T. C.

    1994-01-01

    The use of central venous catheters in patients suffering from haematological disorders has brought enormous benefits, but has been associated with an increase in septicaemia. We have reviewed septic and other complications in 43 patients who received one of three different forms of central venous catheters (type A-Hickman, type B-Portacath, type C-Pasport) during 1991. All complications were reviewed up to 18 months following insertion. The total complication rate was 31% (0.97 per 100 catheter days), and the total sepsis complication rate was 18.8% (0.49 per 100 catheter days). Type A catheters had the greatest sepsis complication rate of 29.5% (0.84 per 100 catheter days), with type B 15% (0.39 per 100 catheter days) and type C 9.9% (0.32 per 100 catheter days). Prophylactic antibiotics on the day of catheter insertion did not reduce the sepsis rate or prolong catheter survival. PMID:8650826

  8. Complications associated with central venous catheters in a haematology unit.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, P C; Morris, T C

    1994-10-01

    The use of central venous catheters in patients suffering from haematological disorders has brought enormous benefits, but has been associated with an increase in septicaemia. We have reviewed septic and other complications in 43 patients who received one of three different forms of central venous catheters (type A-Hickman, type B-Portacath, type C-Pasport) during 1991. All complications were reviewed up to 18 months following insertion. The total complication rate was 31% (0.97 per 100 catheter days), and the total sepsis complication rate was 18.8% (0.49 per 100 catheter days). Type A catheters had the greatest sepsis complication rate of 29.5% (0.84 per 100 catheter days), with type B 15% (0.39 per 100 catheter days) and type C 9.9% (0.32 per 100 catheter days). Prophylactic antibiotics on the day of catheter insertion did not reduce the sepsis rate or prolong catheter survival. PMID:8650826

  9. Increasing incidence of empyema complicating childhood community-acquired pneumonia in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Grijalva, Carlos G.; Nuorti, J. Pekka; Zhu, Yuwei; Griffin, Marie R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Childhood pneumonia declined following introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) in the United States. Recent reports suggest an increase in childhood pneumonia complicated by empyema. We assessed whether early declines in pneumonia hospitalization rates were sustained and trends in such hospitalizations complicated by empyema in United States children aged <5 years. Methods Nationwide Inpatient Sample and Census data were used to calculate annual all-cause and pneumococcal pneumonia hospitalization rates for pre-PCV7(1996–1999) and post-PCV7 years(2001–2007) and to analyze trends in total and pathogen-specific pneumonia-associated empyema. Results Among children aged <2 years, all-cause pneumonia hospitalizations decreased 33% (95%CI: 28–37) from 1267 per 100000 in pre-PCV7 years to 852 in post-PCV7 years. Pneumococcal pneumonia hospitalization rates declined 61% (95%CI: 55–67) post-PCV7 compared with pre-PCV7 years. Pneumonia hospitalizations complicated by empyema increased 2.01-fold from 3.5 per 100000 in 1996–1998 to 7.0 in 2005–2007. Rates of pneumococcal and streptococcal empyema remained stable, whereas rates of staphylococcal and other or unspecified empyema increased 4.08 and 1.89-fold. Among children aged 2–4 years, all-cause pneumonia rates remained stable, whereas pneumococcal pneumonia decreased by 26% (95%CI: 16–34). Pneumonia complicated by empyema increased 2.81-fold from 3.7 per 100000 in 1996–1998 to 10.3 in 2005–2007. In this age group, there were 2.17, 2.80, 3.76 and 3.09-fold increases in rates of pneumococcal, streptococcal, staphylococcal and other or unspecified empyema, respectively. Conclusion Declines in childhood pneumonia hospitalizations following PCV7 introduction were sustained. Although empyema complicated only a small fraction of pneumonia hospitalizations, the observed increases were due to several pathogens and warrant monitoring. PMID:20166818

  10. Early marriage and early motherhood in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Choe, Minja Kim; Thapa, Shyam; Mishra, Vinod

    2005-03-01

    This paper examines age patterns of first marriage and motherhood and covariates of early marriage, delayed consummation of marriage and early motherhood in Nepal using data from the 2000 Nepal Adolescent and Young Adult Survey (NAYA). Both unmarried and married male and female youths (age 14-22) were included in the survey. The analysis is based on 2800 urban youths and 5075 rural youths with complete information on the variables examined. Proportional hazard models are used to estimate covariates of early marriage and early motherhood, and logistic regression models are used to estimate covariates of delayed consummation of marriage. The results show that early marriage and early motherhood are quite common among Nepalese women, especially in rural areas. Early marriage is much less common among men. Delayed consummation of marriage is common among very young brides, especially in rural areas. The main covariates associated with early marriage and early motherhood are respondent's education, region of residence and ethnicity. The main covariates of delayed consummation of marriage are age at first marriage, region of residence and ethnicity. The study highlights the need to focus on less educated female youths in the Terai region in order to reduce the reproductive and child health risks associated with early marriage and early childbearing. PMID:15768770

  11. Diabetes and Associated Complications in the South Asian Population

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Arti; Kanaya, Alka M.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of diabetes in South Asians has significant health and economic implications. South Asians are predisposed to the development of diabetes due to biologic and lifestyle factors. Furthermore, they experience significant morbidity and mortality from complications of diabetes, most notably coronary artery disease, cerebrovascular disease and chronic kidney disease. Therefore, understanding the pathophysiology and genetics of diabetes risk factors and its associated complications in South Asians is paramount to curbing the diabetes epidemic. With this understanding, the appropriate screening, preventative and therapeutic strategies can be implemented and further developed. In this review, we discuss in detail the biologic and lifestyle factors that predispose South Asians to diabetes and review the epidemiology and pathophysiology of microvascular and macrovascular complications of diabetes in South Asians. We also review the ongoing and completed diabetes prevention and management studies in South Asians. PMID:24643902

  12. Long-term complications of past glucocorticoid use.

    PubMed

    Seguro, Luciana P C; Rosario, Cristina; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2013-03-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are essential in the management of several medical conditions but its long-term use is associated with complications in diverse organs and systems. The aim of the present study is to review the long-term complications of past GC use. Permanent damage related to GC can affect patient's life even years after its withdrawal. Classical examples are cataracts and esthetic problems like skin atrophy, striae, acne and obesity. Interestingly, for some complications, the risk of an incident event can persist for past GC use. Higher risks of osteoporosis, osteonecrosis, cardiovascular disease, infections and cancer have been associated with prior GC therapy. These evidences reinforce the importance of limiting our GC prescriptions at its lower possible dose. PMID:23261815

  13. Endoscopic management of post-liver transplant biliary complications.

    PubMed

    Girotra, Mohit; Soota, Kaartik; Klair, Jagpal S; Dang, Shyam M; Aduli, Farshad

    2015-05-16

    Biliary complications are being increasingly encountered in post liver transplant patients because of increased volume of transplants and longer survival of these recipients. Overall management of these complications may be challenging, but with advances in endoscopic techniques, majority of such patients are being dealt with by endoscopists rather than the surgeons. Our review article discusses the recent advances in endoscopic tools and techniques that have proved endoscopic retrograde cholangiography with various interventions, like sphincterotomy, bile duct dilatation, and stent placement, to be the mainstay for management of most of these complications. We also discuss the management dilemmas in patients with surgically altered anatomy, where accessing the bile duct is challenging, and the recent strides towards making this prospect a reality. PMID:25992185

  14. PPAR-? – a possible drug target for complicated pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Fergus P; Delany, Aoife C; Kenny, Louise C; Walsh, Sarah K

    2013-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors expressed in trophoblasts, which regulate both cell differentiation and proliferation. In recent years, evidence has linked PPARs to playing an integral role in pregnancy; specifically, PPAR-? and PPAR-? have been shown to play an integral role in placentation, with PPAR-? additionally serving to regulate trophoblast differentiation. Recent evidence has shown that PPAR-? expression is altered in many complications of pregnancy such as intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), preterm birth, pre-clampsia and gestational diabetes. Thus, at present, accumulating evidence from the literature suggests both a pivotal role for PPAR-? in the progression of a healthy pregnancy and the possibility that PPAR-? may act as a therapeutic target in complicated pregnancies. This review aims to provide a succinct and comprehensive assessment of the role of PPAR-? in normal pregnancy and pregnancy complications, and finally its potential as a therapeutic target in the treatment and/or prevention of adverse pregnancy outcomes. PMID:23186152

  15. Iatrogenic Submandibular Duct Rupture Complicating Sialography: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sharouny, Hadi; Omar, Rahmat Bin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Sialolithiasis is the most common disease of salivary glands. Sialography is particularly important for the assessment of the outflow tract and in diagnosing obstructive salivary gland lesions including calculi. Case Presentation: We report on a 38-year-old female with sialolithiasis whom had Wharton’s duct perforation, complicating the sialography. She was treated conservatively with a course of co-amoxiclav, oral prednisolone for three days and pain-killers. The patient was clinically well on follow-up reassessments at the end of the first week and three weeks post procedure. Conclusions: Perforation of salivary duct complicating the sialography is rare. Awareness of this potential complication and utilizing a good sialography technique need to be advocated amongst radiologists. Response to treatment by conservative management is preferred as illustrated in this case. PMID:25593739

  16. A Complication in Hypospadias Surgery Due to Anchoring Suture

    PubMed Central

    Gollu, Gulnur; Kucuk, Gonul; Karabulut, Ayse An?l; Yagmurlu, Aydin; Cakmak, Murat

    2015-01-01

    The complication rates are still 1–90% both in proximal and distal hypospadias regardless of the surgeon’s experience and the usage of most developed techniques. The literature survey revealed few complications of glans penis including meatal stenosis, prolapsus and retraction. Despite our literature survey, we could not find any article concerning the permanent scar tissue at the dorsal part of glans following hypospadias surgeries. A new complication can be added to these, concerning glans which is the formation of postoperative scar tissue as a reaction to suture material used in traction, stent anchoring or both. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate four cases which had glanular scar due to traction suture following the surgical procedures for hypospadias repair. PMID:26180503

  17. [A case of hepatocellular carcinoma complicated with Caroli's disease].

    PubMed

    Ijima, Masashi; Shimoda, Ryuya; Katakai, Kenji; Seki, Asako; Oshimoto, Hirokazu; Masuda, Jun; Morinaga, Nobuhiro; Suzuki, Yutaka; Kakizaki, Satoru; Arai, Taido

    2010-09-01

    A 29-year-old man was admitted with right hypochondralgia and fever. Markedly dilated bile ducts were observed, mainly in the right lobe of the liver. Based on both the clinical findings and imaging, we diagnosed Caroli's disease and choledochal cyst complicated with cholangitis. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was also observed in segment 3, and the tumor measured 4cm in diameter. The patient was successfully treated with hepatectomy of the right lobe, partial hepatectomy of the left lateral lobe, and bile duct reconstruction. A histopathological examination revealed moderately differentiated HCC without any components of cholangiocellular carcinoma (CCC). Although Caroli's disease is complicated with CCC, a case of Caroli's disease complicated with HCC, as in the present case, is quite rare and therefore is considered to be worthy of reporting. PMID:20827046

  18. Thoracostomy tubes: A comprehensive review of complications and related topics

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatt, Michael; Tarbox, Abigail; Seamon, Mark J.; Swaroop, Mamta; Cipolla, James; Allen, Charles; Hallenbeck, Stacinoel; Davido, H. Tracy; Lindsey, David E.; Doraiswamy, Vijay A.; Galwankar, Sagar; Tulman, David; Latchana, Nicholas; Papadimos, Thomas J.; Cook, Charles H.; Stawicki, Stanislaw P.

    2014-01-01

    Tube thoracostomy (TT) placement belongs among the most commonly performed procedures. Despite many benefits of TT drainage, potential for significant morbidity and mortality exists. Abdominal or thoracic injury, fistula formation and vascular trauma are among the most serious, but more common complications such as recurrent pneumothorax, insertion site infection and nonfunctioning or malpositioned TT also represent a significant source of morbidity and treatment cost. Awareness of potential complications and familiarity with associated preventive, diagnostic and treatment strategies are fundamental to satisfactory patient outcomes. This review focuses on chest tube complications and related topics, with emphasis on prevention and problem-oriented approaches to diagnosis and treatment. The authors hope that this manuscript will serve as a valuable foundation for those who wish to become adept at the management of chest tubes. PMID:25024942

  19. Pulmonary Abscess as a Complication of Transbronchial Lung Cryobiopsy.

    PubMed

    Skalski, Joseph H; Kern, Ryan M; Midthun, David E; Edell, Eric S; Maldonado, Fabien

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 49-year-old man who developed pulmonary abscess as a complication of transbronchial lung cryobiopsy. He had been receiving prednisone therapy, but otherwise had no specific risk factors for lung abscess. Cryobiopsy is a novel technique for obtaining peripheral lung parenchymal tissue for the evaluation of diffuse parenchymal lung diseases. Cryobiopsy is being increasingly proposed as an alternative to surgical lung biopsy or conventional bronchoscopic transbronchial forceps biopsy, but the safety profile of the procedure has not been fully appreciated. Pulmonary abscess has been rarely reported as a complication of other bronchoscopic procedures such as endobronchial ultrasound-guided needle biopsy, however, to our knowledge this is the first reported case of pulmonary abscess complicating peripheral lung cryobiopsy. PMID:26705015

  20. Endoscopic management of post-liver transplant biliary complications

    PubMed Central

    Girotra, Mohit; Soota, Kaartik; Klair, Jagpal S; Dang, Shyam M; Aduli, Farshad

    2015-01-01

    Biliary complications are being increasingly encountered in post liver transplant patients because of increased volume of transplants and longer survival of these recipients. Overall management of these complications may be challenging, but with advances in endoscopic techniques, majority of such patients are being dealt with by endoscopists rather than the surgeons. Our review article discusses the recent advances in endoscopic tools and techniques that have proved endoscopic retrograde cholangiography with various interventions, like sphincterotomy, bile duct dilatation, and stent placement, to be the mainstay for management of most of these complications. We also discuss the management dilemmas in patients with surgically altered anatomy, where accessing the bile duct is challenging, and the recent strides towards making this prospect a reality. PMID:25992185

  1. Ectopic intraocular lens: an unusual complication of cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mehul A; Shah, Shreya A; Aggarwal, Parul M

    2014-06-01

    We wish to report an unusual complication of intraocular lens (IOL) insertion following uneventful phacoemulsification. After successful phacoemulsification surgery, a hydrophobic acrylic IOL was loaded in the injector for insertion into the capsular bag. During insertion, the IOL inadvertently extended into the corneal stromal lamella. The complication was recognized at a late stage, and the foldable acrylic lens was retrieved and reinserted correctly in the bag. The anterior chamber was made viscoelastically taut and was maintained in this state for 10 min, followed by a routine viscoelastic wash and air bubble injection. Cornea was slightly edematous with stromal haze, and the corneal thickness was 908 ?m. At the 1-month follow-up visit, the patient's vision was 20/40, the stromal haze had subsided, the corneal thickness was 572 ?m, and the patient was comfortable. Though it was unknown complication, following proper management patient recovered satisfactorily. PMID:25005208

  2. [Follow-up in kidney transplantation. Which complications are likely?].

    PubMed

    Werner, W; Wilhelm, St; Pöschel, K; Börner, R; Schubert, J

    2003-01-16

    Kidney transplantations are being performed in every increasing numbers, and, in addition to specialist centres, nephrologists, general practitioners and urologists are more frequently being involved in the provision of aftercare. The major urological complications seen after transplantation include ureteral stenosis and necrosis, incontinence and impotence, lymphoceles, arterial stenosis, infections of the urinary tract and adnexa, as well as--the most serious complication--malignant tumours. In addition, the immunosuppression required by these patients is often associated with secondary disorders such as hypertension, steroid-related diabetes, hyperlipidemia and infections. Against the background of progressive organic deficiency it is of particular importance to identify such complications and to treat them adequately, or to prevent them from occurring, thus ensuring the longest possible survival of transplant and patient and improved quality of life. PMID:12638437

  3. Pharmacologic management of types 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus and their complications in women of childbearing age.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Mimi S; Coppenrath, Valerie A; Dallinga, Bree A

    2015-02-01

    The numbers of women of childbearing age with pregestational diabetes mellitus (diabetes existing before pregnancy) are increasing, primarily because more patients are developing type 2 diabetes at younger ages. The teratogenicity associated with hyperglycemia in early pregnancy is well documented, and tight glucose control minimizes the risk of congenital malformation. Preconception planning is essential; thus contraception that does not worsen complications of diabetes is desirable. In addition, because contraceptives are not 100% effective, the treatment of elevated blood glucose levels, hypertension, and dyslipidemia in these women requires consideration of unplanned pregnancy. We summarized the literature to aid clinicians in choosing individualized treatment that minimizes risk in case pregnancy occurs and maximizes benefit in preventing the complications of diabetes. In women with well-controlled diabetes without vascular disease, all contraceptive methods are safe. Intrauterine devices are recommended due to their minimal effects on risk factors for diabetic complications and their lack of reliance on patient adherence for efficacy. Among insulins, the insulin analogs-insulin lispro, insulin aspart, and insulin detemir-offer patients greater convenience than regular insulin and NPH insulin, and they are safe in case of unplanned pregnancy. Of the noninsulin agents, glyburide and metformin are the safest during pregnancy, but many of the other agents pose minimal risk as long as they are withdrawn during early pregnancy. The risks and benefits of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors in women with compelling indications must be weighed individually. In hypertensive patients at a high risk for unplanned pregnancy, nifedipine should be considered due to literature supporting its safety during early pregnancy. Pravastatin is recommended for women with dyslipidemia who are using effective contraception because there have been no reports of birth defects with this statin when used during early pregnancy in humans and animals. PMID:25644781

  4. 77 FR 59928 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Complicated Intra-Abdominal Infections: Developing Drugs for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ...Industry on Complicated Intra-Abdominal Infections: Developing Drugs for Treatment; Availability...entitled ``Complicated Intra-Abdominal Infections: Developing Drugs for Treatment...treatment of complicated intra-abdominal infections (cIAIs). Specifically, this...

  5. 77 FR 11133 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Complicated Urinary Tract Infections: Developing Drugs for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ...Industry on Complicated Urinary Tract Infections: Developing Drugs for Treatment; Availability...entitled ``Complicated Urinary Tract Infections: Developing Drugs for Treatment...treatment of complicated urinary tract infections (cUTIs). Specifically, this...

  6. 78 FR 79469 - Strategies To Address Hemolytic Complications of Immune Globulin Infusions; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-30

    ...Hemolytic Complications of Immune Globulin Infusions; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug...Hemolytic Complications of Immune Globulin Infusions.'' The purpose of the public workshop...Globulin Intravenous (IGIV) (Human) infusion. Complications of hemolysis...

  7. Health complications of female genital mutilation in Sierra Leone

    PubMed Central

    Bjälkander, Owolabi; Bangura, Laurel; Leigh, Bailah; Berggren, Vanja; Bergström, Staffan; Almroth, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Sierra Leone has one of the highest rates of female genital mutilation (FGM) in the world, and yet little is known about the health consequences of the practice. Purpose To explore whether and what kind of FGM-related health complications girls and women in Sierra Leone experience, and to elucidate their health care-seeking behaviors. Patients and methods A feasibility study was conducted to test and refine questionnaires and methods used for this study. Thereafter, a cross-section of girls and women (n = 258) attending antenatal care and Well Women Clinics in Bo Town, Bo District, in the southern region and in Makeni Town, Bombali District, in the northern region of Sierra Leone were randomly selected. Participants answered interview-administrated pretested structured questionnaires with open- ended-questions, administrated by trained female personnel. Results All respondents had undergone FGM, most between 10 and 14 years of age. Complications were reported by 218 respondents (84.5%), the most common ones being excessive bleeding, delay in or incomplete healing, and tenderness. Fever was significantly more often reported by girls who had undergone FGM before 10 years of age compared with those who had undergone the procedure later. Out of those who reported complications, 187 (85.8%) sought treatment, with 89 of them visiting a traditional healer, 75 a Sowei (traditional circumciser), and 16 a health professional. Conclusion The high prevalence rate of FGM and the proportion of medical complications show that FGM is a matter for public health concern in Sierra Leone. Girls who undergo FGM before 10 years of age seem to be more vulnerable to serious complications than those who are older at the time of FGM. It is important that health care personnel are aware of, and look for possible complications from FGM, and encourage girls and women to seek medical care for their problems. PMID:22870046

  8. Process of care compliance is associated with fewer diabetes complications

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, Felicia J.; Galusha, Deron; Slade, Martin; Chu, Isabella M.; Taiwo, Oyebode; Cullen, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between processes measures of diabetes care and time to progression for four complications of diabetes - Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Stroke, Heart Failure (HF), and Renal Disease (RD). Study Design This retrospective study followed outcomes from 2003 through 2009 in a cohort of 1,797 employees with diabetes who worked for a large US manufacturer and were enrolled in the same health insurance plan. Methods Quality of care was measured by consensus standards for testing A1C, lipids and microalbuminuria. Employees with diabetes who received all three measures of care in the baseline year (2003) were compared to those who received less complete testing. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to assess potential associations between diabetes care and time to complication, controlling for potential confounders. Results Observed differences between the two groups in time-to-event were significant for two of the four complications: HF (HR 0.39, 95% CI [0.19 – 0.81], p = 0.0117), and RD (HR 0.48, 95% CI [0.24 – 0.95], p = 0.0339) and any of the four complications (HR 0.66, 95% CI [0.48 – 0.91], p = 0.0101). Differences in time to complication for CAD (HR 0.70, 95% CI [0.49 – 1.02], p = 0.0635) and Stroke (HR 0.63, 95% CI [0.38 – 1.07], p = 0.0891) showed the same trend but were not significant. Conclusions In this cohort, employees with diabetes who received all three quality measures experienced reduced complication risk - adjusting for other factors. These results provide support for the importance of care quality and its assessment. PMID:24512164

  9. Patterns of complications following intraoperative radiofrequency ablation for liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    Desolneux, Grégoire; Vara, Jeremy; Razafindratsira, Tsiriniaina; Isambert, Milène; Brouste, Véronique; McKelvie-Sebileau, Pippa; Evrard, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Background Intraoperative radiofrequency ablation (IRFA) is added to surgery to obtain hepatic clearance of liver metastases. Complications occurring in IRFA should differ from those associated with wedge or anatomic liver resection. Methods Patients with liver metastases treated with IRFA from 2000 to 2010 were retrospectively analysed. Postoperative outcomes are reported according to the Clavien–Dindo system of classification. Results A total of 151 patients underwent 173 procedures for 430 metastases. Of these, 97 procedures involved IRFA plus liver resection and 76 involved IRFA only. The median number of lesions treated by IRFA was two (range: 1–11). A total of 123 (71.1%) procedures were carried out in patients who had received preoperative chemotherapy. The mortality rate was 1.2%. Thirty (39.5%) IRFA-only patients and 45 (46.4%) IRFA-plus-resection patients presented complications. Immediate complications (n = 4) were associated with IRFA plus resection. American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class, previous abdominal surgery or hepatic resection, body mass index, number of IRFA procedures, portal pedicle clamping, total vascular exclusion and preoperative chemotherapy were not associated with a greater number of complications of Grade III or higher severity. Length of surgery >4?h [odds ratio (OR) 2.67, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1–6.3; P < 0.05] and an associated contaminating procedure (OR 3.72, 95% CI 1.53–9.06; P < 0.005) led to a greater frequency of complications of Grade III or higher. Conclusions Mortality and morbidity after IRFA, with or without resection, are low. Nevertheless, long interventions and concurrent bowel operations increase the risk for septic complications. PMID:24830798

  10. Paternal influences on pregnancy complications and birth outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Cleghorn de Rohrmoser, D.C.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of selected characteristics of the paternal work environment and occupational history to the incidence of complications in pregnancy, complications in labor and anomalies in birth outcomes. The literature suggested that male exposure to teratogenic hazards in the form of radiation and chemical compounds, primarily in the form of solvents, has been implicated in reproductive disorders and malformed offspring in animals. Similarly, some recent research suggests that the exposure of male workers to such hazards on their job may have consequences for their spouses and children. Based on these experimental research studies and analyses of persons working in high risk occupations, a broader study of the potential contribution of paternal work environment variables to the success of pregnancy and birth outcomes seemed warranted. Based upon the literature review, a model was proposed for predicting complications in pregnancy, complications in labor and birth outcome (normal birth, low birth weight, congenital malformations and fetal death). From the 1980 National Natality Survey and the 1980 National Fetal Mortality Survey, four sub-samples of married couples, with both husband and wife employed, were selected on the basis of one of the four birth outcomes. The model called for controlling a range of maternal intrinsic and extrinsic health and behavioral variables known to be related to birth outcomes. Multiple logistic regression procedures were used to analyze the effects of father's exposure to radiation and solvents on the job, to complications in pregnancy and labor, and to birth outcome, while controlling for maternal variables. The results indicated that none of the paternal variables were predictors of complications in labor. Further, there was no clear pattern of results, though father's degree of exposure to solvents, and exposures to radiation did reach significance in some analyses.

  11. Delayed massive hydrothorax following subclavian catheter insertion: an unusual complication.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Richa; Soni, Kapil Dev

    2015-01-01

    Complications of central venous catheter can become life threatening if not managed timely. We present a case of massive hydrothorax that developed few hours after placement of the central venous pressure line. The diagnosis was little delayed because the catheter was normally placed initially and later got displaced within few hours of shifting to the intensive care unit. However, the patient was managed timely. Our case report suggests that the position of the catheter should be checked frequently in the intensive care unit and particularly so after shifting and positioning of the patient and the associated complications should be kept in mind. PMID:26335220

  12. Chickenpox complicated by pneumococcal meningitis: a rare coinfection.

    PubMed

    Rebahi, H; Mouaffak, Y; Soraa, N; Younous, S

    2014-11-01

    Bacterial complications, particularly skin superinfections, are common during chickenpox. However, reports of acute bacterial meningitis associated with chickenpox are unusual and amount to only a very few observations. For the most part, they are caused by Neisseria meningitidis or Streptococcus pyogenes. We report an infrequent occurrence of pneumococcal meningitis 2 days after the onset of a chickenpox rash in a 7-year-old previously healthy boy. Based on data from the literature, we attempt to understand the possible mechanisms resulting in bacterial complications, particularly meningitis, during chickenpox and to determine the means to prevent it. PMID:25282451

  13. [Endovascular treatment of haemorrhagic complication of HELLP syndrome].

    PubMed

    Garcarek, Jerzy; Kurcz, Jacek; Guzi?ski, Maciej; Orchowska-Jedrzejewska, Agnieszka; Janczak, Dariusz

    2012-01-01

    HELLP syndrome, which consists of haemolytic anaemia, elevated liver enzymes and thrombocytopenia, typically occurs in women in perinatal period. Rare life-threatening complications of this syndrome include haemorrhages, in particular these originating from hepatic artery branches for they usually result in subcapsular hematoma formation. The rupture of hepatic capsule secondary to hepatomegaly results in intraperitoneal haemorrhage. In case of suspicion of HELLP syndrome complicated by hepatic haemorrhage it is crucial to perform imaging modalities as emergency, first of all US and CT of abdomen and pelvis. Selective embolization of hepatic artery branches seems to be a valuable, alternative or complementary to surgery method of stopping the bleeding. PMID:23276043

  14. Purulent pericarditis complicating septicaemia: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Musa, A A; Salami, B A; Tade, A O

    2003-06-01

    Intrapericardial (Pericardial) abscess is quite rare as a complication of sepsis and as a cardiac complication of typhoid septicaemia. It is rapidly fatal if untreated. We report two cases of a schoolboy eight years old with septicaemia from pyomyositis of the right thigh and another of nine and a half years with typhoid perforation and typhoid septicaemia that developed pericardial abscesses. In well-developed centres, computerised tomography, ultrasonography and other radiological investigations are employed for both diagnosis and therapy. We emphasise that these can be accomplished by good clinical examination, radiography of chest and the use of 18-G intra-venous cannula for percutaneous pericardiocentesis without aggressive surgical intervention. PMID:12953744

  15. Vascular Complications of Pancreatitis: Role of Interventional Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lopera, Jorge E.

    2012-01-01

    Major vascular complications related to pancreatitis can cause life-threatening hemorrhage and have to be dealt with as an emergency, utilizing a multidisciplinary approach of angiography, endoscopy or surgery. These may occur secondary to direct vascular injuries, which result in the formation of splanchnic pseudoaneurysms, gastrointestinal etiologies such as peptic ulcer disease and gastroesophageal varices, and post-operative bleeding related to pancreatic surgery. In this review article, we discuss the pathophysiologic mechanisms, diagnostic modalities, and treatment of pancreatic vascular complications, with a focus on the role of minimally-invasive interventional therapies such as angioembolization, endovascular stenting, and ultrasound-guided percutaneous thrombin injection in their management. PMID:22563287

  16. Vascular complications of pancreatitis: role of interventional therapy.

    PubMed

    Barge, Jaideep U; Lopera, Jorge E

    2012-01-01

    Major vascular complications related to pancreatitis can cause life-threatening hemorrhage and have to be dealt with as an emergency, utilizing a multidisciplinary approach of angiography, endoscopy or surgery. These may occur secondary to direct vascular injuries, which result in the formation of splanchnic pseudoaneurysms, gastrointestinal etiologies such as peptic ulcer disease and gastroesophageal varices, and post-operative bleeding related to pancreatic surgery. In this review article, we discuss the pathophysiologic mechanisms, diagnostic modalities, and treatment of pancreatic vascular complications, with a focus on the role of minimally-invasive interventional therapies such as angioembolization, endovascular stenting, and ultrasound-guided percutaneous thrombin injection in their management. PMID:22563287

  17. Anticipated and unanticipated complications of severe dengue in a primigravida

    PubMed Central

    Hashmi, Madiha; Zainab, Ghulam; Khan, Farah

    2015-01-01

    As the incidence of dengue is rising among adults more cases of dengue fever are being reported during pregnancy. Physiological changes of pregnancy mask the pathognomonic features of severe dengue such as increased hematocrit, thrombocytopenia, and leukopenia and a high index of suspicion are required in endemic areas. Massive hemorrhage may complicate operative deliveries in unsuspected patients. World Health Organization recommends that all patients with severe dengue should be admitted to a hospital with access to intensive care facilities and blood transfusion. We present the successful management of hemorrhage and unanticipated complications of severe dengue in a young primigravida admitted to the Intensive Care Unit after an emergency cesarean section.

  18. Laparoscopy in trauma: An overview of complications and related topics

    PubMed Central

    Kindel, Tammy; Latchana, Nicholas; Swaroop, Mamta; Chaudhry, Umer I; Noria, Sabrena F; Choron, Rachel L; Seamon, Mark J; Lin, Maggie J; Mao, Melissa; Cipolla, James; El Chaar, Maher; Scantling, Dane; Martin, Niels D; Evans, David C; Papadimos, Thomas J; Stawicki, Stanislaw P

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of laparoscopy has provided trauma surgeons with a valuable diagnostic and, at times, therapeutic option. The minimally invasive nature of laparoscopic surgery, combined with potentially quicker postoperative recovery, simplified wound care, as well as a growing number of viable intraoperative therapeutic modalities, presents an attractive alternative for many traumatologists when managing hemodynamically stable patients with selected penetrating and blunt traumatic abdominal injuries. At the same time, laparoscopy has its own unique complication profile. This article provides an overview of potential complications associated with diagnostic and therapeutic laparoscopy in trauma, focusing on practical aspects of identification and management of laparoscopy-related adverse events. PMID:26557490

  19. Inferior phrenic artery pseudoaneurysm complicating drug-induced acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Jean F; Haydar, Ali; Hallal, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Inferior phrenic artery (IPA) pseudoaneurysm is an extremely rare complication of chronic pancreatitis with only three cases reported in the literature so far. It is a serious condition that can be life-threatening if not diagnosed promptly. Recent advances in endovascular interventions made angiography with embolisation the modality of choice for diagnosis and treatment. We presented the first report of a case of ruptured IPA pseudoaneurysm complicating a drug-induced acute pancreatitis that was successfully treated by transcatheter arterial embolisation. Despite its rarity, rupture of pseudoaneurysm due to drug-induced pancreatitis should be suspected and included in the differential diagnosis when associated with haemodynamic instability. PMID:24385392

  20. Prevention and management of complications in frontal sinus surgery.

    PubMed

    Javer, Amin R; Alandejani, Talal

    2010-08-01

    Frontal sinus surgery continues to remain one of the most challenging areas for sinus surgeons. Many different techniques have been introduced for dealing with the frontal sinus. These can range from conservative, mucus membrane-preserving, strictly endoscopic techniques to radical endoscopic and open procedures using drills and burrs to create large openings, all with the aim of keeping the frontal sinus aerated, disease free, and functional in the long-term. This article deals not only with ways in which surgical techniques can be used to minimize or prevent complications in this difficult area but also on how to deal with complications when they occur. PMID:20599087