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Sample records for early puerperal complications

  1. [Corynebacteria isolated in colpitis and puerperal complications].

    PubMed

    Martikaĭnen, Z M

    1995-01-01

    The role of microorganisms belonging to the genus Corynebacterium in normalization of vaginal biocenosis by creating acid medium is discussed. A total of 300 samples of lochia and vaginal and cervical secretion were examined, 140 of these taken from women without gynecological diseases and women with a normal course of the postpartum period (controls) and 160 from patients with colpitis of various origins and a complicated course of the puerperium. An appreciable increase of the level of diphtheroids was observed in the lochia of control subjects and in all samples of patients (p < 0.01). Eight species of Corynebacterium were isolated. Urease-negative C. minutissimum, C. equi, C. aquaticum, and C. xerosis predominated in both controls and patients (p < 0.01). Opportunistic C. bovis, C. enzymicum, C. kutshevi, and C. sp. possessing urease activity were seldom isolated. No differences between the 2 groups in the species composition of the isolated bacteria were detected (p > 0.05). Two species of Corynebacterium were sometimes isolated from the same sample, this being more frequently with vaginal and cervical secretion samples than with lochia both in controls and patients (p < 0.01). The most incident association was C. aquaticum and C. equi. 59.6 +/- 2.7 isolated strains proved to be sensitive to antibiotics manufactured in this country. PMID:7670823

  2. CT and MR imaging findings of systemic complications occurring during pregnancy and puerperal period, adversely affected by natural changes

    PubMed Central

    Himoto, Yuki; Kido, Aki; Moribata, Yusaku; Yamaoka, Toshihide; Okumura, Ryosuke; Togashi, Kaori

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic physiological and anatomical changes for delivery may adversely induce various specific non-obstetric complications during pregnancy and puerperal period. These complications can be fatal to both the mother and the fetus, thus a precise and early diagnosis ensued by an early treatment is essential. Along with ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have assumed an increasing role in the diagnosis. This article aims to discuss the pathophysiology of these complications, the indications for CT and MRI, and the imaging findings. PMID:26937442

  3. CT and MR imaging findings of systemic complications occurring during pregnancy and puerperal period, adversely affected by natural changes.

    PubMed

    Himoto, Yuki; Kido, Aki; Moribata, Yusaku; Yamaoka, Toshihide; Okumura, Ryosuke; Togashi, Kaori

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic physiological and anatomical changes for delivery may adversely induce various specific non-obstetric complications during pregnancy and puerperal period. These complications can be fatal to both the mother and the fetus, thus a precise and early diagnosis ensued by an early treatment is essential. Along with ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have assumed an increasing role in the diagnosis. This article aims to discuss the pathophysiology of these complications, the indications for CT and MRI, and the imaging findings. PMID:26937442

  4. Characteristics of bovine early puerperal uterine contractility recorded under farm conditions.

    PubMed

    Bajcsy, Arpád Csaba; Szenci, Ottó; Doornenbal, Arie; van der Weijden, Gijsbert C; Csorba, Csaba; Kocsis, László; Szucs, Imre; Ostgard, Stig; Taverne, Marcel A M

    2005-07-01

    A non-invasive, digital technique was used to measure and quantify intrauterine pressure (IUP) changes in early postpartum dairy cows kept under farm conditions in order to document physiological changes in uterine contractility after uncomplicated calvings. In addition, possible relationships between characteristics of uterine contractility and blood ionized calcium (Ca(2+))-concentrations were investigated. Recordings of uterine contractility were made by using a transcervically inserted open tip catheter in 12 healthy cows during their first 48h after calving. The IUP recording technique appeared easily applicable under farm conditions. Although mean frequency (FREQ), amplitude (AMP) and area under the curve (AUC) of the myometrial contractions significantly decreased due to time, untreated early postpartum cows showed a high variability in characteristics of uterine contractility. There was no correlation between blood Ca2+ -concentrations and any of the contractility parameters. PMID:15935846

  5. [Early postoperative complications after scoliosis surgery].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Caballero Macarrón, C; Burgos Flores, J; Martos Sánchez, I; Pérez Palomino, A; Vázquez Martínez, J L; Alvarez Rojas, E; Fernández Pineda, L; Vellibre Vargas, D

    2006-03-01

    Several medical complications can occur after scoliosis surgery in children and adolescents. New surgical techniques have allowed greater degrees of scoliosis correction but have also increased the possibility of postsurgical deficit due to their greater aggressivity. We analyzed the early postsurgical complications of scoliosis surgery in a pediatric intensive care unit over a 10-year period. Seventy-six surgical procedures were performed. Of these, no complications occurred in 55 (73%). Chest X-ray revealed pulmonary atelectasia in 8 patients (10%) and pleural effusion in 7 patients (9%). Symptoms and signs of infection related to surgery were observed in only 6 children (8%). The absence of severe medical complications may be related to new surgical techniques and an experienced team. PMID:16527092

  6. Sonographic and MR features of puerperal uterine inversion.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Shruti; Sharma, Sanjiv; Jhobta, Anupam; Aggarwal, Neeti; Thakur, Charu S

    2014-06-01

    Puerperal uterine inversion is a rare and potentially life-threatening complication of a mismanaged third stage of labour. Early diagnosis is mandatory for proper management of the patient. Complete uterine inversion is a clinical diagnosis. However, incomplete uterine inversion is difficult to identify and warrants further workup. Sonographic evaluation, although a bedside procedure, may be confusing. The conspicuity of findings is much greater on MR examination than on ultrasound. Only a few diagnostic imaging findings in uterine inversion have been described in previous reports. We present the case of a 26-year-old woman who had a full-term vaginal delivery and presented after 20 days with acute urinary retention and mild vaginal bleeding. She was diagnosed as a case of neglected subacute incomplete uterine inversion. Both greyscale and Doppler sonographic and MR features of the case are described with an emphasis on better delineation of uterine and adnexal anatomy on MR imaging. PMID:24619161

  7. Early complications with the holmium laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaghler, Marc A.; Stewart, Steven C.; Ruckle, Herbert C.; Poon, Michael W.

    1997-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to report early complications in our initial experience with the holmium laser in 133 patients. A retrospective study of patients undergoing endourological procedures with the holmium laser was performed. Complications included urinary tract infection (3), post-operative bradycardia (1), inverted T-waves (1), intractable flank pain (1), urinary retention (1), inability to access a lower pole calyx with a 365 micron fiber (9), stone migration (5), termination of procedure due to poor visualization (2). No ureteral perforations or strictures occurred. The holmium laser was capable of fragmenting all urinary calculi in this study. In our initial experience, the holmium laser is safe and effective in the treatment of genitourinary pathology. Use of laser fibers larger than 200 microns occasionally limit deflection into a lower pole or dependent calyx.

  8. Early complications following haematopoietic SCT in children.

    PubMed

    Miano, M; Faraci, M; Dini, G; Bordigoni, P

    2008-06-01

    Early complications can be defined as those occurring within 100 days after transplant. Both epithelial and endothelial damage represent the pathogenetic basis for the onset of the most frequent complications. Clinical features related to endothelial damage depend on the involved district or on the grade and type of general distribution. Veno-occlusive disease (VOD) most often occurs within the first 20 days of haematopoietic SCT (HSCT) and is characterized by the obstruction of small intrahepatic venules and is caused by an initial injury of the sinusoid endothelial cells. The incidence in children ranges between 27 and 40%, and symptoms include hepatomegaly, portal hypertension and ascites. Early intervention with defibrotide (DF) proved to be effective for the treatment; however, overall mortality ranges between 20 and 50%. Thrombotic microangiopathy (TAM) incidence is 4-13%. It is often associated with the use of CYA or tacrolimus, and symptoms include haemolytic anaemia, thrombocytopenia and renal and/or central nervous system impairment. Treatment includes plasmapheresis and supportive care. The promising role of DF needs to be confirmed. The onset of engraftment syndrome may occur 1 or 2 days before the neutrophil count in peripheral blood increases. Clinical symptoms include fever not related to infection, respiratory involvement with pulmonary infiltrates or hypoxia and skin rash. Treatment consists of steroid administration for a few days. Haemorrhagic cystitis (HC) may occur early or later following transplant. Early-onset HC is related to mucosal damage caused by the catabolites of chemotherapy drugs, and late-onset HC is mostly caused by viral infections. The incidence ranges between 1 and 25%. Clinical symptoms include haematuria and dysuria without infections. Treatment includes hyperhydration and platelet support. In case of vescical clots, bladder irrigation is indicated. In advanced cases, hyperbaric oxygen administration or surgery may be useful

  9. Carbapenem Resistant Organisms: An Unusual Aetiology for Puerperal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Vijayaselvi, Reeta; Balaji, V; Benjamin, Santosh J.; Sahni, Rani Diana

    2015-01-01

    Puerperal infection is a common complication of labour. It occurs universally and is usually responsive to first line antibiotics. However, resistance to first line antibiotics and even second line antibiotics is becoming more wide spread. We report a case of puerperal infection caused by carbapenem resistant organisms leading to prolonged fever and hospitalisation. A 28-year-old primigravida, following caesarean section done elsewhere, for elevated blood pressure presented with high grade fever. The patient was treated with antibiotic to which she failed to respond. She underwent laparotomy twice and only improved after Colistin was combined with Meropenam, based on urine and pus culture reports. PMID:26393170

  10. A late complication of augmentation mammoplasty by polyacrylamide hydrogel injection: ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging findings of huge galactocele formation in a puerperal woman with pathological correlation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wen-Chiung; Hsu, Giu-Cheng; Hsu, Yi-Chih; Hsu, Hsian-He; Li, Chao-Shiang; Chen, Tom Yun-Cheng; Huang, Guo-Shu

    2008-01-01

    Polyacrylamide hydrogel (PAAG) was widely used for injection augmentation mammoplasty in Eastern Europe and China although uncommon in the western countries. However, the safety of this procedure remained controversial. Herein, we report a 30-year-old woman with a history of augmentation mammoplasty by PAAG injection developed galactoceles during her pregnancy. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging showed huge cystic lesions in bilateral breasts; as a result, the normal breast tissue was almost completely replaced. On the basis of the imaging findings, the patient underwent mastectomy as well as immediate breast reconstruction with satisfactory outcome. It is important to be familiar with the imaging findings of this rare yet severe complication after augmentation mammoplasty in order to make an accurate diagnosis and a proper management. PMID:19054003

  11. Early Diagnosis of a Large Vesical Calculus Complicating Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Pricilla, Ruby Angeline; David, Kirubah Vasandhi; Venkatesan, Sankarapandian; Benjamin, Santosh Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Vesical calculus-complicating pregnancy is rare. This is a case report of a large vesical calculus-complicating pregnancy. The early diagnosis and appropriate surgical management of the large vesical calculus prevented complications like recurrent urinary tract infections and obstructed labor. It enabled the mother to have an uneventful vaginal delivery. PMID:24479053

  12. EARLY COMPLICATIONS IN THE ORTHOPEDIC TREATMENT OF BONE METASTASES

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Luiz Eduardo Moreira; Miranda, Ricardo Horta; Ghedini, Daniel Ferreira; Aguilar, Rafael Bazílio; Novais, Eduardo Nilo Vasconcelos; de Abreu e Silva, Guilherme Moreira; Araújo, Ivana Duval; de Andrade, Marco Antônio Percope

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the early complications in the orthopedic treatment of metastatic bone lesions and the factors associated with these complications. Method: There were assessed, retrospectively, 64 patients that underwent surgical treatment for bone metastases, analyzing the complications that occurred in the pre-operative and early post- operative period and associating them with the tumor origin, type of procedure done, the need of blood reposition before the surgery, the need of new surgical procedures and the mortality due to the complications. Results: Early complications in the treatment were observed in 17 (26.6%) patients, of which six (35.2%) ended up dying due to these complications. Regarding the type, 15 (23.8%) cases were due to surgical complications, four (6.3%) clinical and three (4.7%) patients showed clinical and surgical complications. There was no significant difference in the frequency of complications or mortality when assessed the type of reconstruction or affected region. The tumors with a renal origin needed more blood reposition and showed a bigger frequency of complications. Conclusion: The complications occurred in 26.6%. The complications are not related to the kind of treatment performed or to the region affected. The renal origin tumors showed a higher risk of hemorrhage. PMID:27077063

  13. Puerperal uterine inversion managed by the uterine balloon tamponade

    PubMed Central

    Thiam, Mariétou; Niang, Mouhamadou Mansour; Gueye, Lamine; Sarr, Fatou Rachel; Dieme, Marie Edouard Faye; Cisse, Mamadou Lamine

    2015-01-01

    The uterine inversion is a rare and severe puerperal complication. Uncontrolled cord traction and uterine expression are the common causes described. We report a case of uterine inversion stage III caused by poor management of the third stage of labor. It was about a 20 years old primigravida referred in our unit for postpartum hemorrhage due to uterine atony. After manual reduction of the uterus, the use of intra uterine balloon tamponade helped to stop the hemorrhage. The uterine inversion is a rare complication that may cause maternel death. The diagnosis is clinical and its management must be immediate to avoid maternal complications. PMID:26977239

  14. Neglected puerperal inversion of the uterus: ignorance makes acute a chronic form

    PubMed Central

    Minakshi, Sardha; Shivani, Atri; Arshad, Anjum

    2012-01-01

    Inversion of uterus is a rare complication of vaginal delivery. The reported incidence of puerperal inversion varies from approximately 1 in 550 to 1 in several thousand normal deliveries. Maternal mortality has been reported to be as high as 15%, mainly because of associated life threatening blood loss and shock. Early diagnosis, prompt and aggressive management decrease the morbidity and mortality to minimal. We report a case of 21 year old primi, who presented to us with uterine inversion after delivery at a rural set up by untrained birth attendant (“Dai”). She was managed surgically with Haultain's operation and discharged after 5 days. She didn't turn up for follow up and was readmitted after 4 weeks with uterine reinversion associated with endometritis. A recent case is described, followed by a short review of literature. PMID:23077710

  15. Neglected puerperal inversion of the uterus: ignorance makes acute a chronic form.

    PubMed

    Minakshi, Sardha; Shivani, Atri; Arshad, Anjum

    2012-01-01

    Inversion of uterus is a rare complication of vaginal delivery. The reported incidence of puerperal inversion varies from approximately 1 in 550 to 1 in several thousand normal deliveries. Maternal mortality has been reported to be as high as 15%, mainly because of associated life threatening blood loss and shock. Early diagnosis, prompt and aggressive management decrease the morbidity and mortality to minimal. We report a case of 21 year old primi, who presented to us with uterine inversion after delivery at a rural set up by untrained birth attendant ("Dai"). She was managed surgically with Haultain's operation and discharged after 5 days. She didn't turn up for follow up and was readmitted after 4 weeks with uterine reinversion associated with endometritis. A recent case is described, followed by a short review of literature. PMID:23077710

  16. Maternal and neonatal complications of elective early-term deliveries.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jani R; White, Wendy M; Coddington, Charles C

    2013-11-01

    Approximately 10% to 15% of all deliveries in the United States are performed before 39 completed weeks of gestation without a true medical indication for early delivery, despite long-standing recommendations against this practice. Early-term deliveries are those that occur between 3707 and 3867 weeks. It is now recognized that maternal and neonatal complications have increased for deliveries that occur at early- vs late-term gestation. The reasons for the increase in the rate of elective early-term deliveries are unclear but likely involve both patient and physician factors. Various strategies have been used to increase awareness of the morbidities associated with the practice of elective early-term delivery and to reduce its frequency. Insurers and quality accrediting agencies are increasingly holding hospitals accountable for their rates of elective early-term deliveries, and this pressure will likely continue to lead to widespread change in the practice of obstetrics. The interventions to increase adherence to evidence-based medicine guidelines that are described within this review may also be applicable to other areas of medicine. PMID:24182707

  17. Early complications after interventions in patients with acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ai-Lin; Guo, Qiang; Wang, Ming-Jun; Hu, Wei-Ming; Zhang, Zhao-Da

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To identify the possible predictors of early complications after the initial intervention in acute necrotizing pancreatitis. METHODS: We collected the medical records of 334 patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis who received initial intervention in our center. Complications associated with predictors were analyzed. RESULTS: The postoperative mortality rate was 16% (53/334). Up to 31% of patients were successfully treated with percutaneous catheter drainage alone. The rates of intra-abdominal bleeding, colonic fistula, and progressive infection were 15% (50/334), 20% (68/334), and 26% (87/334), respectively. Multivariate analysis indicated that Marshall score upon admission, multiple organ failure, preoperative respiratory infection, and sepsis were the predictors of postoperative progressive infection (P < 0.05). Single organ failure, systemic inflammatory response syndrome upon admission, and C-reactive protein level upon admission were the risk factors of postoperative colonic fistula (P < 0.05). Moreover, preoperative Marshall score, organ failure, sepsis, and preoperative systemic inflammatory response syndrome were the risk factors of postoperative intra-abdominal bleeding (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Marshall score, organ failures, preoperative respiratory infection, sepsis, preoperative systemic inflammatory response syndrome, and C-reactive protein level upon admission are associated with postoperative complications. PMID:26973421

  18. The Effect of Surveillance and Appreciative Inquiry on Puerperal Infections: A Longitudinal Cohort Study in India

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Julia; Ramani, K. V.; Kanguru, Lovney; Patel, Kalpesh; Bell, Jacqueline; Patel, Purvi; Walker, Leighton; Mehta, Rajesh; Mavalankar, Dileep

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of an intervention comprising surveillance and an organisational change called Appreciative Inquiry on puerperal infections in hospitals in Gujarat state, India. Methods This longitudinal cohort study with a control group was conducted over 16 months between 2010 and 2012. Women who delivered in six hospitals were followed-up. After a five month pre-intervention period, the intervention was introduced in three hospitals. Monthly incidence of puerperal infection was recorded throughout the study in all six hospitals. A chi-square test and logistic regression were used to examine for associations, trends and interactions between the intervention and control groups. Findings Of the 8,124 women followed up, puerperal infections were reported in 319 women (3.9%) over the course of the study. Puerperal sepsis/genital tract infections and urinary tract infections were the two most common puerperal infections. At the end of the study, infection incidence in the control group halved from 7.4% to 3.5%. Levels in the intervention group reduced proportionately even more, from 4.3% to 1.7%. A chi-square test for trend confirmed the reduction of infection in the intervention and control groups (p<0.0001) but the trends were not statistically different from one another. There was an overall reduction of infection by month (OR = 0.94 95% CI 0.91–0.97). Risk factors like delivery type, complications or delivery attendant showed no association with infection. Conclusion Interruption of resource flows in the health system occurred during the intervention phase, which may have affected the findings. The incidence of infection fell in both control and intervention groups during the course of the study. It is not clear if appreciative inquiry contributed to the reductions observed. A number of practical and methodological limitations were faced. Trial Registration Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN03513186 PMID:24498089

  19. Early biliary complications following pancreaticoduodenectomy: prevalence and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Malgras, Brice; Duron, Sandrine; Gaujoux, Sébastien; Dokmak, Safi; Aussilhou, Béatrice; Rebours, Vinciane; Palazzo, Maxime; Belghiti, Jacques; Sauvanet, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Background Early biliary complications (EBC) following pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) are poorly known. This study aimed to assess incidence, predictive factors, and treatment of EBC including bilio-enteric stricture, transient jaundice, biliary leak, and cholangitis. Method From 2007 to 2011, 352 patients underwent PD. Statistical analysis including logistic regression was performed to determine EBC predictive factors. Results 49 patients (14%) developed 51 EBC, including 7(2%) bilio-enteric strictures, 15(4%) transient jaundices, 9(3%) biliary leaks, and 20(6%) cholangitis with no mortality and a 18% reoperation rate. In multivariate analysis, male gender, benign disease, malignancy with preoperative chemoradiation, and common bile duct (CBD) diameter ≤5 mm were predictive of EBC. Of the 7 strictures, all were associated with CBD ≤5 mm and 5(71%) required reoperation. Transient jaundice resolved spontaneously in all 15 cases. Among 8 patients with serum bilirubin level >50 μmol/L (3 mg/dL) at POD3, 7(88%) developed bilio-enteric stricture. Biliary leak resolved spontaneously in 5(56%); otherwise, it required reoperation. Cholangitis recurred after antibiotics discontinuation in 5(25%). Conclusions EBC following PD do not increase mortality. EBC are more frequent with male gender, benign disease, malignancy with preoperative chemoradiation, and CBD ≤5 mm. Transient jaundice or cholangitis has a favorable outcome, whereas bilio-enteric stricture or biliary leak can require reintervention. PMID:27037207

  20. Complicated variations in the early optical afterglow of GRB 090726

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šimon, V.; Polášek, C.; Jelínek, M.; Hudec, R.; Štrobl, J.

    2010-02-01

    Aims: We report on the detection of an early rising phase of optical afterglow (OA) of a long GRB 090726. We resolve a complicated profile of the optical light curve. We also investigate the relation of the optical and X-ray emission of this event. Methods: We made use of the optical photometry of this OA obtained by the 0.5 m telescope of AI AS CR, supplemented by the data obtained by other observers, and the X-ray Swift/XRT data. Results: The optical emission peaked at ˜17.5 mag(R) at t - T0 ≈ 500 s. We find a complex profile of the light curve during the early phase of this OA: an approximately power-law rise, a rapid transition to a plateau, a weak flare superimposed on the center of this plateau, and a slowly steepening early decline followed by a power-law decay. We discuss several possibilities for explaining the short flare on the flat top of the optical light curve at t-T0 ≈ 500 s. Activity of the central engine is favored, although reverse shock cannot be ruled out. We show that power-law outflow with Θ_obs/Θc > 2.5 is the best case for the OA of GRB 090726. The initial Lorentz factor is Γ0 ≈ 230-530 in the case of propagation of the blast wave in a homogeneous medium, while propagation of this wave in a wind environment gives Γ0 ≈ 80-300. The value of Γ0 in GRB 090726 thus falls into the lower half of the range observed in GRBs and it may even lie on the lower end. We also show that both the optical and X-ray emission decayed simultaneously and that the spectral profile from X-ray to the optical band did not vary. This is true for both the time periods before and after the break in the X-ray light curve. This break can be regarded as achromatic. The available data show that neither the dust nor the gaseous component of the circumburst medium underwent any evolution during the decay of this OA, that is, after t-T0 < 3000 s. We also show that this OA belongs to the least luminous ones in the phase of its power-law decay, corresponding to what

  1. Puerperal sepsis in the 21st century: progress, new challenges and the situation worldwide.

    PubMed

    Buddeberg, Bigna S; Aveling, Wynne

    2015-10-01

    Puerperal sepsis is one of the five leading causes of maternal mortality worldwide, and accounts for 15% of all maternal deaths. The WHO defined puerperal sepsis in 1992 as an infection of the genital tract occurring at any time between the rupture of membranes or labour and the 42nd day post partum; in which, two or more of the following are present: pelvic pain, fever, abnormal vaginal discharge and delay in the reduction of the size of the uterus. At the same time, the WHO introduced the term puerperal infections, which also include non-genital infections in the obstetric population. Recent epidemiological data shows that puerperal sepsis and non-genital tract infections are a major area of concern. In puerperal sepsis, group A streptococcus (GAS) is the most feared pathogen. Up to 30% of the population are asymptomatic carriers of GAS. GAS commonly causes throat infections. Women who died from GAS-positive sepsis all had signs of a throat infection themselves or one of their family members suffered from a throat infection. The pathway of infection is from the hands of the pregnant women or the mother to her perineum. In non-genital tract infections, influenza viruses and the HIV pandemic in the developing part of the world are responsible for many maternal deaths, and demand our attention. The physiological changes of pregnancy and the puerperium can obscure the signs and symptoms of sepsis in the obstetric population. A high level of suspicion is, therefore, needed in the care for the sick pregnant patient. If sepsis is suspected, timely administration of antibiotics, sepsis care bundles, multidisciplinary discussion and early involvement of senior staff members are important to improve outcome. PMID:26310266

  2. Comprehensive risk assessment for early neurologic complications after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Si-Yuan; Chen, Teng-Wei; Feng, An-Chieh; Fan, Hsiu-Lung; Hsieh, Chung-Bao; Chung, Kuo-Piao

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine risk factors for early neurologic complications (NCs) after liver transplantation from perspective of recipient, donor, and surgeon. METHODS: In all, 295 adult recipients were enrolled consecutively between August 2001 and February 2014 from a single medical center in Taiwan. Any NC in the first 30 d post-liver transplantation, and perioperative variables from multiple perspectives were collected and analyzed. The main outcome was a 30-d NC. Generalized additive models were used to detect the non-linear effect of continuous variables on outcome, and to determine cut-off values for categorizing risk. Risk factors were identified using multiple logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: In all, 288 recipients were included, of whom 142 (49.3%) experienced at least one NC, with encephalopathy being the most common 106 (73%). NCs prolonged hospital stay (35.15 ± 43.80 d vs 20.88 ± 13.58 d, P < 0.001). Liver recipients’ age < 29 or ≥ 60 years, body mass index < 21.6 or > 27.6 kg/m2, Child-Pugh class C, history of preoperative hepatoencephalopathy or mental disorders, day 7 tacrolimus level > 8.9 ng/mL, and postoperative intra-abdominal infection were more likely associated with NCs. Novel risk factors for NCs were donor age < 22 or ≥ 40 years, male-to-male gender matching, graft-recipient weight ratio 0.9%-1.9%, and sequence of transplantation between 31 and 174. CONCLUSION: NCs post- liver transplantation occurs because of factors related to recipient, donor, and surgeon. Our results provide a basis of risk stratification for surgeon to minimize neurotoxic factors during transplantation. PMID:27350733

  3. EARLY SURGICAL COMPLICATIONS AFTER GASTRIC BY-PASS: A LITERATURE REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    ACQUAFRESCA, Pablo A.; PALERMO, Mariano; ROGULA, Tomasz; DUZA, Guillermo E.; SERRA, Edgardo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Gastric bypass is today the most frequently performed bariatric procedure,but, despite of it, several complications can occur with varied morbimortality. Probably all bariatric surgeons know these complications, but, as bariatric surgery continues to spread, general surgeon must be familiarized to it and its management. Gastric bypass complications can be divided into two groups: early and late complications, taking into account the two weeks period after the surgery. This paper will focus the early ones. Method Literature review was carried out using Medline/PubMed, Cochrane Library, SciELO, and additional information on institutional sites of interest crossing the headings: gastric bypass AND complications; follow-up studies AND complications; postoperative complications AND anastomosis, Roux-en-Y; obesity AND postoperative complications. Search language was English. Results There were selected 26 studies that matched the headings. Early complications included: anastomotic or staple line leaks, gastrointestinal bleeding, intestinal obstruction and incorrect Roux limb reconstruction. Conclusions Knowledge on strategies on how to reduce the risk and incidence of complications must be acquired, and every surgeon must be familiar with these complications in order to achieve an earlier recognition and perform the best intervention. PMID:25861076

  4. Medicine in stamps-Ignaz Semmelweis and Puerperal Fever

    PubMed Central

    Ataman, Ahmet Doğan; Vatanoğlu-Lutz, Emine Elif; Yıldırım, Gazi

    2013-01-01

    Puerperal fever was common in mid-19th-century hospitals and often fatal, with mortality at 10%–35%. Ignaz Philipp Semmelweis was a Hungarian gynecologist who is known as a pioneer of antiseptic procedures. Semmelweis discovered that the incidence of puerperal fever could be drastically cut by the use of hand disinfection in obstetrical clinics. He is also described as the “savior of mothers” and “father of infection control”. This paper provides an overview on the process of preventing puerperal fever and the life story of the physician behind this attempt, Ignaz Semmelweis, through philately. PMID:24592068

  5. Early Practice: External Sinus Surgery and Procedures and Complications.

    PubMed

    Schneider, John S; Day, Andrew; Clavenna, Matthew; Russell, Paul T; Duncavage, James

    2015-10-01

    External approaches to the paranasal sinuses are rarely used in the endoscopic era. However, their indications for use have not changed, and in every surgeon's career those indications may present themselves. For residents training in the endoscopic era, these procedures are also very rarely seen. In this article, the external approaches to the maxillary, ethmoid, and frontal sinuses are described: their original descriptions, modern use, and potential complications. It is hoped that this article will serve to instruct residents and practitioners alike in these techniques. PMID:26143105

  6. ["Sweet" hydrothorax--the early complication of CAPD: case report].

    PubMed

    Sain, Milenka; Filipović, Tomislav; Pehar, Gordan; Ljutić, Dragan

    2008-01-01

    Hydrothorax is a rare or late complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD). As often patients are asymptomatic or with mild shortness of breath, hydrothorax is overlooked in many cases. The patient is 72-years old female who was hospitalized in 2005 with clinical and laboratory signs of end stage renal disease (ESRD). Peritoneal catheter was implanted by laparoscopic technique. First postimplantation washouts didn't provoke any symptoms. Shortness of breath appeared on the second day of CAPD and worsened next five days accompanied with right-sided chest pain. Chest X-ray showed massive right-sided pleural effusion which was complitely evacuated by thoracentesis. The laboratory findings showed simmilar glucose levels in dialysate and pleural fluid and normal glucose in serum. The treatment with CAPD was discontinued and later haemodialysis (HD) was commenced. PMID:18578339

  7. Early embolic events complicating intravenous thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Chou, Ping Song; Lin, Chien Hung; Chao, Hai Lun; Chao, A Ching

    2012-11-01

    Intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (IV rt-PA) is the only established thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke. However, secondary embolism after IV rt-PA for acute ischemic stroke is recognized as an uncommon complication, and the pathophysiology is unclear. We describe a 72-year-old man with acute infarction in the territory of left anterior cerebral artery who developed new infarction in the territory of right middle cerebral artery and acute peripheral arterial occlusion after IV rt-PA therapy. It suggested a central embolic source. Because the patient has paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (Af), the possible embolic sources may come from fragmentation of pre-existing intra-atrial clot. Although Af and the presence of cardiac thrombus are not contraindication for IV rt-PA in acute ischemic stroke, our case and review suggested that the administration of IV rt-PA to patients with known Af and intracardiac thrombus could represent a particular risk situation and should be carefully evaluated. PMID:22205004

  8. The Effect of Neoadjuvant Therapy on Early Complications of Esophageal Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rajabi Mashhadi, Mohammadtaghi; Bagheri, Reza; Abdollahi, Abbas; Ghamari, Mohammad Javad; Shahidsales, Soudabeh; Salehi, Maryam; Shahkaram, Reza; Majidi, Mohamad Reza; Sheibani, Shima

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment is required in esophageal cancer due to its invasive nature. The aim of this study was to evaluate early post-esophagectomy complications in patients with esophageal cancer who received neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (NACR). Materials and Methods: This randomized clinical trial was carried out between 2009 and 2011. Patients with lower-third esophageal cancer were randomly assigned to one of two groups. The first group consisted of 50 patients receiving standard chemoradiotherapy (Group A) and then undergoing surgery, and the second group consisted of 50 patients undergoing surgery only (Group B). Patients were evaluated with respect to age, gender, clinical symptoms, type of pathology, time of surgery, perioperative blood loss, and number of lymph nodes resected as well as early post-operative complicate including leakage at the anastomosis site, chylothorax and pulmonary complications, hospitalization period, and mortality rate within the first 30 days after surgery. Results: The mean age of patients was 55 years. Seventy-two patients had squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and 28 patients had adenocarcinoma (ACC). There was no significant difference between the two groups with respect to age, gender, time of surgery, complications including anastomotic leakage, chylothorax, pulmonary complications, cardiac complications, deep venous thrombosis (DVT), or mortality. However, there was a significant difference between the two groups regarding hospital stay, time of surgery, perioperative blood loss, and number of lymph nodes resected. Conclusion: The use of NACR did not increase early post-operative complications or mortality among patients with esophageal cancer. PMID:26788476

  9. The Association of Birth Complications and Externalizing Behavior in Early Adolescents: Direct and Mediating Effects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianghong; Raine, Adrian; Wuerker, Anne; Venables, Peter H; Mednick, Sarnoff

    2009-03-01

    Prior studies have shown that birth complications interact with psychosocial risk factors in predisposing to increased externalizing behavior in childhood and criminal behavior in adulthood. However, little is known about the direct relationship between birth complications and externalizing behavior. Furthermore, the mechanism by which the birth complications predispose to externalizing behavior is not well explored. This study aims to assess whether birth complications predispose to early adolescent externalizing behavior and to test whether Intelligence Quotient (IQ) mediates relationships between predictor and outcome variables. We used data from a prospective, longitudinal birth cohort of 1,795 3-year-old boys and girls from Mauritius to test hypotheses. Birth complications were assessed from hospital record data, malnutrition from a pediatric exam at age 3 years, psychosocial adversity from parental interviews at age 3 years, and externalizing behavior problems from parental ratings at age 11 years. We found that babies with birth complications are more likely to develop externalizing behavior problems at age 11. Low IQ was associated with birth complications and was found to mediate the link between early predictors and later externalizing behavior. These prospective, longitudinal findings have potential clinical implications for the identification of early adolescent externalizing behavior and for public health attempts to prevent the occurrence of child externalizing behavior problems. PMID:22485069

  10. Perigastric Abscess as a Complication of Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection for Early Gastric Cancer: First Case Report.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ji Yun; Kim, Joon Sung; Kim, Byung Wook; Park, Sung Min; Kim, Gi Jun; Ryu, Seung Ji; Kim, Young Wook; Ji, Jeong Seon; Choi, Hwang

    2016-03-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for early gastric cancer (EGC) is a widely accepted and well established procedure because of its curative potential and low invasiveness compared with surgery. Perforation is a potential major complication during ESD, and non-surgical treatments such as endoscopic closure with clips are sufficient in most cases. Here, we report a case of perigastric abscess that occurred as a complication of ESD for EGC. The patient improved with administration of antibiotics without surgical intervention. PMID:26996184

  11. Treatment of Sporadic Acute Puerperal Mastitis

    PubMed Central

    Barton, John R.

    1996-01-01

    Objective: The purposes of this study were to compare the efficacy of amoxicillin and cephradine for the treatment of sporadic acute puerperal mastitis (SAPM) and to evaluate the microbiology and clinical parameters of this infection. Methods: We conducted a prospective, randomized, single-blinded study comparing amoxicillin, 500 mg orally q 8 h for 7 days, and cephradine, 500 mg orally q 6 h for 7 days. The diagnostic criteria for SAPM included a temperature of ≥37.56℃ (≥99.6℉) and erythema and tenderness of the breast(s). Results: Twenty-seven consecutive outpatients with SAPM were evaluated for admission to the study, and 25 of these were enrolled. The mean temperature at enrollment was 38.17℃ (100.7℉), with a mean WBC count of 11,440/μl. The most frequent bacterial isolates from expressed milk were Staphylococcus aureus (7), staphylococcal species (coagulase negative) (8), and α-hemolytic streptococci (4). There were no significant differences between the 2 antibiotic regimens in cure rate, mean days to resolution of symptoms, or recurrence within 30 days. Both of the treatment failures and 1 of the 3 recurrences within 30 days were amoxicillin-treated patients whose cultures grew S. aureus. Conclusions: Oral amoxicillin and cephradine appear equally effective in the treatment of SAPM. Staphylococci were the most frequent isolates from the milk of women with mastitis. PMID:18476075

  12. Drug resistance and molecular epidemiology of aerobic bacteria isolated from puerperal infections in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Salma; Kawaguchiya, Mitsuyo; Ghosh, Souvik; Paul, Shyamal Kumar; Urushibara, Noriko; Mahmud, Chand; Nahar, Kamrun; Hossain, Mohammad Akram; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

    2015-06-01

    Puerperal infection is a common complication during postnatal period in developing countries. Bacterial species, drug resistance, and genetic characteristics were investigated for a total of 470 isolates from puerperal infections in Bangladesh for a 2-year period (2010-2012). The most common species was Escherichia coli (n=98), followed by Enterococcus faecalis (n=54), Staphylococcus haemolyticus (n=33), Proteus mirabilis (n=32), Staphylococcus aureus (n=27), Klebsiella pneumoniae (n=22), and Enterobacter cloacae (n=21). S. aureus and Acinetobacter baumannii were isolated at a higher frequency from wound infections after cesarean section, while E. coli, E. cloacae, and K. pneumoniae were isolated from community-acquired endometritis and urinary tract infections. Resistance to third-generation cephalosporins was frequent for Enterobacteriacae, and was mainly mediated by blaCTX-M-1 group beta-lactamases. The CTX-M gene in E. coli from the four phylogroups was identified as blaCTX-M-15, and phylogroup B2 isolates with blaCTX-M-15 were classified into ST131 with O25b allele, harboring aac(6')-Ib-cr and various virulence factors. Carbapenemase genes blaNDM-1 and blaNDM-7 were identified in one isolate each of phylogroup A E. coli. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolates had type IV or V SCCmec, including isolates of ST361 (CC672), which is related to an emerging ST672 clone in the Indian subcontinent. This study revealed the recent epidemiological status of aerobic bacteria causing puerperal infections in Bangladesh, providing useful information to improve clinical practice and infection control. PMID:25555043

  13. [Prevention and treatment of early complications of surgical treatment of peptic ulcer].

    PubMed

    Gorbashko, A I; Savich, L V; Egorov, N V; Medvedev, E D

    1989-02-01

    An experience with the operative treatment of 1620 patients has shown that incidence of postoperative complications can be reduced by using active aspiration of the gastric stump content, early intestinal feeding, autohemotransfusions for the substitution of the intraoperative blood loss. PMID:2728254

  14. Scrub typhus masquerading as HELLP syndrome and puerperal sepsis in an asymptomatic malaria patient

    PubMed Central

    Karim, Habib Md. Reazaul; Bhattacharyya, Prithwis; Kakati, Sonai Datta; Borah, Tridip Jyoti; Yunus, Md.

    2016-01-01

    Scrub typhus and malaria can involve multiple organ systems and are notoriously known for varied presentations. However, clinical malaria or scrub typhus is unusual without fever. On the other hand, altered sensorium with or without fever, dehydration, hemorrhage and hemolysis may lead to low blood pressure. Presence of toxic granules and elevated band forms in such patients can even mimic sepsis. When such a patient is in the peripartum period, it creates a strong clinical dilemma for the physician especially in unbooked obstetric cases. We present such a case where a 26-year-old unbooked female presented on second postpartum day with severe anemia, altered sensorium, difficulty in breathing along with jaundice and gum bleeding without history of fever. Rapid diagnostic test for malaria was negative and no eschar was seen. These parameters suggested a diagnosis of HELLP (Hemolysis, Elevated Liver enzymes, Low Platelet) syndrome with or without puerperal sepsis. Subsequently she was diagnosed as having asymptomatic malaria and scrub typhus and responded to the treatment of it. The biochemical changes suggestive of HELLP syndrome also subsided. We present this case to emphasize the fact that mere absence of fever and eschar does not rule out scrub typhus. It should also be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients with symptoms and signs suggesting HELLP syndrome. Asymptomatic malaria can complicate case scenario towards puerperal sepsis by giving false toxic granules and band form in such situations. PMID:27413718

  15. Early sac shrinkage predicts a low risk of late complications after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Bastos Gonçalves, F; Baderkhan, H; Verhagen, H J M; Wanhainen, A; Björck, M; Stolker, R J; Hoeks, S E; Mani, K

    2014-01-01

    Background Aneurysm shrinkage has been proposed as a marker of successful endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Patients with early postoperative shrinkage may experience fewer subsequent complications, and consequently require less intensive surveillance. Methods Patients undergoing EVAR from 2000 to 2011 at three vascular centres (in 2 countries), who had two imaging examinations (postoperative and after 6–18 months), were included. Maximum diameter, complications and secondary interventions during follow-up were registered. Patients were categorized according to early sac dynamics. The primary endpoint was freedom from late complications. Secondary endpoints were freedom from secondary intervention, postimplant rupture and direct (type I/III) endoleaks. Results Some 597 EVARs (71·1 per cent of all EVARs) were included. No shrinkage was observed in 284 patients (47·6 per cent), moderate shrinkage (5–9 mm) in 142 (23·8 per cent) and major shrinkage (at least 10 mm) in 171 patients (28·6 per cent). Four years after the index imaging, the rate of freedom from complications was 84·3 (95 per cent confidence interval 78·7 to 89·8), 88·1 (80·6 to 95·5) and 94·4 (90·1 to 98·7) per cent respectively. No shrinkage was an independent risk factor for late complications compared with major shrinkage (hazard ratio (HR) 3·11; P < 0·001). Moderate compared with major shrinkage (HR 2·10; P = 0·022), early postoperative complications (HR 3·34; P < 0·001) and increasing abdominal aortic aneurysm baseline diameter (HR 1·02; P = 0·001) were also risk factors for late complications. Freedom from secondary interventions and direct endoleaks was greater for patients with major sac shrinkage. Conclusion Early change in aneurysm sac diameter is a strong predictor of late complications after EVAR. Patients with major sac shrinkage have a very low risk of complications for up to 5 years. This parameter may be used to tailor postoperative surveillance. PMID:24752772

  16. Prospective analysis of indications and early complications of emergency temporary loop ileostomies for perforation peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Poras; Nabi, Ishaq; Ranjan, Gyan; Tiwari, Alok Kumar; Kumar, Sanjay; Kapur, Arun; Arora, Mohinder P.

    2015-01-01

    Background To determine the indications, nature, and rate of early complications of temporary loop ileostomy created in emergency for benign diseases, their management, and to find out the associated risk factors. Methods A total of 630 patients undergoing temporary loop ileostomy for benign diseases were studied prospectively over a period of 6 years. Stoma-related early complications occurring within 6-8 weeks were analyzed. Only emergency cases were included in this study. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the data and statistical significance was evaluated by applying the Pearson’s chi-square test. Results Typhoid perforation (n=402) was the most commonpathology, followed by tuberculosis (n=106); trauma (n=81); and intestinal obstruction with gangrenous bowel (n=41). 299 patients had no stoma-related complications. Skin excoriation was the most commonstoma-related complication. Age more than 50 years; shock at presentation; delay in presentation; delay in surgery; presence of comorbidities; and surgery done out of working hours, were associated with increased complications. Conclusion Temporary loop ileostomy for perforation peritonitis due to benign systemic diseases like typhoid fever and tuberculosis confers a very high morbidity. PMID:25609137

  17. [Early jejunal feeding in acute pancreatitis: prevention of septic complications and multiorgan failure].

    PubMed

    Oláh, A; Pardavi, G; Belágyi, T

    2000-02-01

    Authors evaluate the effect of early jejunal feeding on septic complications and mortality in acute pancreatitis, based on the results of a two-phase, prospective, randomized study. In the first part of the study they compared the conventional parenteral nutrition with early (started within 24 hours) enteral nutrition in a prospective, randomized trial on 89 patients. Forty-eight patients were randomized into the parenteral group "A" (Rindex 10, Infusamin S, Intralipid 10%: 30 kcal/kg) and 41 patients into the enteral group "B" (fed by nasogastric jejunal tube Survimed OPD, 30 kcal/kg). The rate of septic complications (infected necrosis, abscess, infected pseudocyst) were significantly lower in the enteral group (p = 0.08 chi-square test). In the second phase of the study early jejunal feeding was combined with imipenem prophylaxis (Tienam, 2 x 500 mg i.v.) in the necrotizing cases detected by CT scan. According to the results of 92 patients the rate of septic complications (p = 0.03), multiple organ failure (p = 0.14), and mortality (p = 0.13) were further reduced in this group. Authors believe that combination of early enteral nutrition and a selective, adequate antibiotic therapy may give a chance for prevention of multiple organ failure. PMID:11299593

  18. Value of early cholescintigraphy in detection of biliary complications after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Kulber, D A; Berci, G; Paz-Partlow, M; Ashok, G; Hiatt, J R

    1994-03-01

    Cholescintigraphy using technetium-99m disofenin tracer is accepted as a routine component of preoperative evaluation of the biliary tract in selected patients but is not used regularly in postoperative management. This is a retrospective analysis of the utility of the nuclide scan in 27 patients after laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC). Most patients had vague postoperative symptoms such as nausea, pain, and low grade fever. Two patients developed jaundice. Seven of the 27 patients had biliary leaks, and two had common bile duct obstructions. We conclude that cholescintigraphy is a sensitive noninvasive test for the evaluation of biliary complications after LC and is a pivotal component of an algorithmic approach to postoperative complications. Because of the subtle clinical findings and the potential for delayed diagnosis of biliary complications after LC, early performance of this test will minimize patient morbidity. PMID:8116979

  19. Early Enteral Feeding After Living Donor Liver Transplantation Prevents Infectious Complications

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Man; Joh, Jae-Won; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Sung-Hye; Rha, Miyong; Sinn, Dong Hyun; Choi, Gyu-Seong; Kwon, Choon Hyuck David; Cho, Young Yun; Suh, Jeong-Meen; Lee, Suk-Koo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Infectious complications, including bacteria, virus, and fungus, often occur after liver transplantation and are the most frequent causes of in-hospital mortality. The current study prospectively analyze the effect of early enteral feeding in patients after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) Between January 2013 and August 2013, 36 patients underwent LDLT. These patients were randomly assigned to receive enteral formula via nasointestinal feeding tubes [enteral feeding (EN) group, n = 17] or maintenance on intravenous fluid until oral diets were initiated (control group, n = 19). All patients completed the study. The pretransplant and perioperative characteristics of patients did not differ between the 2 groups. The incidence of bacterial infection was significantly lower in the EN group (29.4%) than in the control group (63.2%) (P = 0.043). In addition, the incidence of bile duct complications in the EN group was lower than in the control group (5.9% versus 31.6%, P = 0.041). Multivariate analysis showed that early enteral feeding was closely associated with bacterial infections (odds ratio, 0.178; P = 0.041). There was no statistically significant difference in nutritional status between the 2 groups. There were no cases of in-hospital mortality. Early enteral feeding after LDLT prevents posttransplant bacterial infection, suggesting the possibility of a reduction of in-hospital mortality as a result of decreased infectious complications. PMID:26554774

  20. Effect of Early Statin Treatment in Patients with Cardiogenic Shock Complicating Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Doo Sun; Cho, Kyung Hoon; Ahn, Youngkeun; Kim, Young Jo; Chae, Shung Chull; Hong, Taek Jong; Seong, In Whan; Chae, Jei Keon; Kim, Chong Jin; Cho, Myeong Chan; Rha, Seung-Woon; Bae, Jang Ho; Seung, Ki Bae; Park, Seung Jung

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives The benefit of early statin treatment following acute myocardial infarction (MI) complicated with cardiogenic shock (CS) has not been well studied. We sought to assess the effect of early statin therapy in patients with CS complicating acute MI. Subjects and Methods We studied 553 statin-naive patients with acute MI and CS (Killip class IV) who underwent revascularization therapy between November 2005 and January 2008 at 51 hospitals in the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry. Patients were divided into 2 groups: those who received statins during hospitalization (n=280) and those who did not (n=273). The influence of statin treatment on a 12-month clinical outcome was examined using a matched-pairs analysis (n=200 in each group) based on the propensity for receiving statin therapy during hospitalization. Results Before adjustment, patients receiving statin, compared to those not receiving statin, had a more favorable clinical profile, were less likely to suffer procedural complications, and more likely to receive adequate medical therapy. Patients receiving statin had lower unadjusted in-hospital mortality and composite rate of mortality, MI, and repeat revascularization at 12 months, which remained significantly lower after adjustment for patient risk, procedural characteristics, and treatment propensity. Conclusion In CS patients with acute MI undergoing revascularization therapy, early statin treatment initiated during hospitalization was associated with lower rates of in-hospital death and 12-month adverse cardiac events. PMID:23508129

  1. Blood rheology and platelet function in untreated early-stage essential hypertensives complicated with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sugimori, Hiroko; Tomoda, Fumihiro; Koike, Tsutomu; Kinuno, Hiroyuki; Kurosaki, Hiroko; Masutani, Toshitaka; Inoue, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    We examined whether hemorheology and platelet function are affected in essential hypertensives (EHTs) of the World Health Organization stage I when complicated with metabolic syndrome (Mets). In 156 untreated EHTs, blood viscosity and platelet surface markers were determined. Blood viscosity was significantly elevated in 54 subjects with Mets compared with 102 subjects without Mets. Hematocrit and plasma viscosity increased in the group with Mets, although red blood cell rigidity index "k" did not differ between groups. As a whole group, blood viscosity correlated positively with hematocrit and plasma viscosity. Additionally, plasma viscosity correlated positively with plasma leptin, triglyceride, homeostasis model assessment index, C-reactive protein, and plasma fibrinogen, but negatively with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. In contrast, no differences were seen in platelet surface markers between groups. In conclusion, EHTs of the early stage complicated with Mets are characterized by increased blood viscosity due to hemoconcentration and increased plasma viscosity. PMID:22570768

  2. Dental complications of rickets in early childhood: case report on 2 young girls.

    PubMed

    Davit-Béal, Tiphaine; Gabay, Julie; Antoniolli, Pauline; Masle-Farquhar, Jeanne; Wolikow, Maryse

    2014-04-01

    Vitamin D is an essential hormone for calcium gut absorption. It is also involved in child growth, cancer prevention, immune system responses, and tooth formation. Due to inadequate vitamin D intake and/or decreased sunlight exposure, vitamin D deficiency has resurfaced in developed countries despite known inexpensive and effective preventive methods. Vitamin D deficiency is a common cause of rickets, a condition that affects bone development in children and that can have serious dental complications. Deficiency during pregnancy can cause enamel hypoplasia of primary teeth. Enamel regeneration is currently impossible; hypoplasia is therefore irreversible, and once affected, teeth are prone to fast caries development. Deficiency during early childhood can affect permanent teeth and ensuing caries can sometimes lead to tooth loss at a young age. Oral manifestations of rickets should be diagnosed early by both physicians and dentists to prevent severe dental complications. This case study presents 2 young girls with rickets in early childhood who suffered from subsequent serious tooth decay. PMID:24616355

  3. Early Surgery for Endocarditis Complicated by Preoperative Cerebral Emboli Is Not Associated With Worsened Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Sorabella, Robert A.; Han, Sang Myung; Grbic, Mark; Wu, Yeu Sanz; Takyama, Hiroo; Kurlansky, Paul; Borger, Michal A.; Argenziano, Michael; Gordon, Rachel; George, Isaac

    2015-01-01

    Background Valve surgery for patients presenting with infective endocarditis (IE) complicated by stroke is thought to carry elevated risk of postoperative complications. Our aim is to compare outcomes of IE patients who undergo surgery early after diagnosis of septic cerebral emboli with patients without preoperative emboli. Methods All patients undergoing surgery for left-sided IE between 1996–2013 at our institution were reviewed. Patients undergoing surgery > 14 days after embolic stroke diagnosis (n=11) and those with purely hemorrhagic lesions were excluded from analysis (n=7). In total, 308 were included in the study and stratified according to the presence (STR, n=54) or absence of a preoperative septic cerebral embolus (NoSTR, n=254). Primary outcomes of interest were development of new postoperative stroke and 30-day mortality. Results Mean time to surgical intervention from stroke onset was 6.0 ± 4.1 days. S. aureus (39% STR vs. 21% NoSTR, p = 0.004) and annular abscess at surgery (52% STR vs. 27% NoSTR, p < 0.001) were more prevalent in STR patients. There was no significant difference in 30-day mortality (9.3% STR vs. 7.1% NoSTR, p = 0.57) or rate of new postoperative stroke [5 (9.4%) STR vs. 12 (4.7%) NoSTR, p = 0.19] between groups. Additionally, there was no difference in 10-year survival between groups (log rank p = 0.74). Conclusions Early surgical intervention in patients with IE complicated by preoperative septic cerebral emboli does not lead to significantly worse postoperative outcomes. Early surgery for IE following embolic stroke warrants consideration, particularly in patients with high-risk features such as S. aureus and/or annular abscess. PMID:26116483

  4. Plasma levels of IL-8 predict early complications in patients with coronary heart disease after percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiaoyong; Li, Junyong; Gu, Jian; Li, Shuren; Dang, Yi; Wang, Tianhong

    2003-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the prognostic value of plasma interleukin-8 (IL-8) for early complications after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The pre- and postprocedural plasma levels of IL-8 and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) were examined by immunoassay, and the expression of CD11b/CD18 on neutrophils was assessed by flow cytometry. Early complications (abrupt occlusion, threatened abrupt occlusion, early recurrence of ischemia, myocardial infarction, cardiac sudden death, and target vessel revascularization) occurred intra-procedure and 30 days after PCI and were observed in 121 consecutive patients with coronary heart disease. Sixteen patients with early complications had high preprocedural levels and high postprocedural differentials of IL-8, CRP, and CD11b/CD18 compared to those without complications (all P < 0.05). The occurrence of complications showed a significant increase in the patients according to the tertiles of IL-8, CRP, and CD11b/CD18. Preprocedural levels of IL-8 (RR = 5.864, CI = 1.658-20.734, P = 0.006) and diabetes (RR = 1.587, CI = 1.246-2.132, P = 0.038) were independent predictors of early complications. There were significant correlations in the postprocedural differential between IL-8 and CD11b/CD18 (r = 0.776, P = 0.002) in patients with complications. The results reveal that the early complications after PCI contribute to preprocedural inflammatory responses. Normal levels of IL-8 may be powerful negative predictors of early complications in patients with CHD following PCI. PMID:12906027

  5. Osteonecrosis in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: An Early, Frequent, and Not Always Symptomatic Complication

    PubMed Central

    Caramaschi, Paola; Biasi, Domenico; Dal Forno, Ilaria; Adami, Silvano

    2012-01-01

    Osteonecrosis may complicate the course of systemic lupus erythematosus and may contemporaneously affect multiple joints. The major risk factor associated with the development of osteonecrosis is the use of glucocorticoid at high doses. Recent studies using serial MRI, which represents the “gold standard” for the early detection of osteonecrosis, yielded some interesting findings about the natural history of this clinical entity. Osteonecrosis in the majority of the cases is asymptomatic and occurs early in the course of the disease. Its later occurrence is associated with lupus flare that requires the increase of corticosteroid dose. The optimal treatment of osteonecrosis is controversial. In case of silent osteonecrosis involving a small area conservative strategy is usually adequate. When lesions are symptomatic surgical treatment as core decompression or free vascularized fibular grafting is required; extracorporeal shockwave treatment may represent an alternative therapeutic approach. When the lesion has a medium-large dimension or involves a weight-bearing area bone collapse is a common complication requiring total joint replacement. Coadministration of bisphosphonate or warfarin with high doses of corticosteroid might be a promising preventive strategy of osteonecrosis. PMID:22919470

  6. [Immunocorrection in combined prevention of early postoperative complications in patients with systemic vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Andrievskikh, I A; Omel'ianiuk, M Iu

    2015-01-01

    The authors studied peculiarities of the immune status in angiosurgical patients with systemic vasculitis, as well as possibilities of immunodiagnosis and immunocorrection in prevention of early coagulopathic and reparative complications after angiosurgical interventions in this cohort of patients. A total of 172 angiosurgical patients presenting with systemic vasculitis were subdivided into two groups depending on the preoperative preparation methods used. In Group One (Study Group) comprising 81 patients preoperative preparation was carried out using immunosuppressive therapy with hormones and cytostatics according to the rheumatologist's indications. In Group Two (n=91) hormones and/or cytostatics were replaced by the proposed four-component immunocorrection including various combinations of correcting the lifestyle, use of antioxidative-activity immunomodulators, plasmapheresis and intravenous administration of immunoglobulins. It was determined that using this method of correction made it possible to achieve a good anti-inflammatory effect in angiosurgical patients with systemic vasculitis, thus avoiding negative aftermaths of immunosuppression. The developed method of immunocorrection makes it possible to decrease the rate of early postoperative coagulopathic and reparative complications in angiosurgical patients as compared to therapy with hormones and/or cytostatics. PMID:26673291

  7. Obesity and early complications following reduction mammaplasty: an analysis of 4545 patients from the 2005-2011 NSQIP datasets.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Jonas A; Fischer, John P; Chung, Cyndi U; West, Ari; Tuggle, Charles T; Serletti, Joseph M; Kovach, Stephen J

    2014-10-01

    Reduction mammoplasty is a proven treatment for symptomatic macromastia, but the association between obesity and early postoperative complications is unclear. The purpose of this study was to perform a population level analysis in an effort to determine the impact of obesity on early complications after reduction mammaplasty. This study examined the 2005-2011 NSQIP datasets and identified all patients who underwent reduction mammoplasty. Patients were then categorised according to the World Health Organisation obesity classification. Demographics, comorbidities, and perioperative risk factors were identified among the NSQIP variables. Data was then analysed for surgical complications, wound complications, and medical complications within 30 days of surgery. In total, 4545 patients were identified; 54.4% of patients were obese (BMI > 30 kg/m(2)), of which 1308 (28.8%) were Class I (BMI = 30-34.9 kg/m(2)), 686 (15.1%) were Class II (BMI = 35-39.9 kg/m(2)), and 439 (9.7%) were Class III (BMI > 40 kg/m(2)). The presence of comorbid conditions increased across obesity classifications (p < 0.001), with significant differences noted in all cohort comparisons except when comparing class I to class II (p = 0.12). Early complications were rare (6.1%), with superficial skin and soft tissue infections accounting for 45.8% of complications. Examining any complication, a significant increase was noted with increasing obesity class (p < 0.001). This was further isolated when comparing morbidly obese patients to non-obese (p < 0.001), class I (p < 0.001), and class II (p = 0.01) patients. This population-wide analysis - the largest and most heterogeneous study to date - has demonstrated that increasing obesity class is associated with increased early postoperative complications. Morbidly obese patients are at the highest risk, with complications occurring in nearly 12% of this cohort. PMID:24506446

  8. Review of early clinical results and complications associated with oblique lumbar interbody fusion (OLIF).

    PubMed

    Phan, Kevin; Maharaj, Monish; Assem, Yusuf; Mobbs, Ralph J

    2016-09-01

    Lumbar interbody fusion represents an effective surgical intervention for patients with lumbar degenerative diseases, spondylolisthesis, disc herniation, pseudoarthrosis and spinal deformities. Traditionally, conventional open anterior lumbar interbody fusion and posterior/transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion techniques have been employed with excellent results, but each with their own advantages and caveats. Most recently, the antero-oblique trajectory has been introduced, providing yet another corridor to access the lumbar spine. Termed the oblique lumbar interbody fusion, this approach accesses the spine between the anterior vessels and psoas muscles, avoiding both sets of structures to allow efficient clearance of the disc space and application of a large interbody device to afford distraction for foraminal decompression and endplate preparation for rapid and thorough fusion. This review aims to summarize the early clinical results and complications of this new technique and discusses potential future directions of research. PMID:27349468

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Non-Puerperal Complete Uterine Inversion.

    PubMed

    Mihmanli, Veli; Kilic, Fahrettin; Pul, Soner; Kilinc, Aydin; Kilickaya, Ahmet

    2015-10-01

    Uterine inversion is shortly described as the indentation and depression of the fundic area extending downwards up to the different levels of the birth canal till vaginal opening. Clinical diagnosis of uterine inversion is difficult due to its non-specific symptoms and physical examination. Ultrasonography is the most practical modality for radiological evaluation, but it is inadequate to determine the exact nature of this condition and making the differential diagnosis. In this case, we present the main MRI findings of non-puerperal complete uterine inversion caused by a giant leiomyoma. PMID:26715983

  10. Dendrobium officinale Prevents Early Complications in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Hou, Shao-Zhen; Liang, Chu-Yan; Liu, Hua-Zhen; Zhu, Dong-Mei; Wu, Ya-Yun; Liang, Jian; Zhao, Ya; Guo, Jian-Ru; Huang, Song; Lai, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background. Dendrobium officinale (DO) Kimura et Migo is a precious Chinese herb that is considered beneficial for health due to its antioxidant and antidiabetes properties, and so on. In this research, we try to determine the preventive effect of DO on the early complications of STZ-induced diabetic rats. Methods. Type 1 diabetic rats were produced with a single intraperitoneal injection of STZ (50 mg/kg). DO (1 g/kg/day) was then orally administered for 5 weeks. Blood glucose, TC, TG, BUN, CREA, and GSH-PX levels were determined, and electroretinographic activity and hypoalgesia were investigated. Pathological sections of the eyes, hearts, aortas, kidneys, and livers were analyzed. Results. Treatment with DO significantly attenuated the serum levels of TC, TG, BUN, and CREA, markedly increased the amplitudes of ERG a- and b-waves and Ops, and reduced the hypoalgesia and histopathological changes of vital organs induced by hyperglycemia. The protective effect of DO in diabetic rats may be associated with its antioxidant activity, as evidenced by the marked increase in the serum level of glutathione peroxidase. However, DO had no significant effect on blood glucose levels and bodyweight of diabetic rats. Conclusions. DO supplementation is an effective treatment to prevent STZ-induced diabetic complications. PMID:27034693

  11. Dendrobium officinale Prevents Early Complications in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Shao-zhen; Liang, Chu-yan; Liu, Hua-zhen; Zhu, Dong-mei; Wu, Ya-yun; Liang, Jian; Zhao, Ya; Guo, Jian-ru; Huang, Song; Lai, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background. Dendrobium officinale (DO) Kimura et Migo is a precious Chinese herb that is considered beneficial for health due to its antioxidant and antidiabetes properties, and so on. In this research, we try to determine the preventive effect of DO on the early complications of STZ-induced diabetic rats. Methods. Type 1 diabetic rats were produced with a single intraperitoneal injection of STZ (50 mg/kg). DO (1 g/kg/day) was then orally administered for 5 weeks. Blood glucose, TC, TG, BUN, CREA, and GSH-PX levels were determined, and electroretinographic activity and hypoalgesia were investigated. Pathological sections of the eyes, hearts, aortas, kidneys, and livers were analyzed. Results. Treatment with DO significantly attenuated the serum levels of TC, TG, BUN, and CREA, markedly increased the amplitudes of ERG a- and b-waves and Ops, and reduced the hypoalgesia and histopathological changes of vital organs induced by hyperglycemia. The protective effect of DO in diabetic rats may be associated with its antioxidant activity, as evidenced by the marked increase in the serum level of glutathione peroxidase. However, DO had no significant effect on blood glucose levels and bodyweight of diabetic rats. Conclusions. DO supplementation is an effective treatment to prevent STZ-induced diabetic complications. PMID:27034693

  12. Early and late complications related to central venous catheters in hematological malignancies: a retrospective analysis of 1102 patients.

    PubMed

    Morano, Salvatore Giacomo; Coppola, Lorenzo; Latagliata, Roberto; Berneschi, Paola; Chistolini, Antonio; Micozzi, Alessandra; Girmenia, Corrado; Breccia, Massimo; Brunetti, Gregorio; Massaro, Fulvio; Rosa, Giovanni; Guerrisi, Pietro; Mandelli, Franco; Foà, Roberto; Alimena, Giuliana

    2014-01-01

    Several severe complications may be associated with the use of central venous catheters (CVC). We retrospectively evaluated on a large cohort of patients the incidence of CVC-related early and late complications. From 7/99 to 12/2005, 1102 CVC have been implanted at our Institution in 881 patients with hematological malignancies (142,202 total day number of implanted CVC). Early mechanic complications were 79 (7.2% - 0.55/1,000 days/CVC). Thirty-nine episodes of early infective complications (<1 week from CVC implant) occurred (3.5% - 0.3/1000 days/CVC): furthermore, 187 episodes of CVC-related sepsis (17% - 1.3/1000 days/CVC) were recorded. There were 29 episodes (2.6%) of symptomatic CVC-related thrombotic complications, with a median interval from CVC implant of 60 days (range 7 - 395). The rate of CVC withdrawal due to CVC-related complications was 26%. The incidence of CVC-related complications in our series is in the range reported in the literature notwithstanding cytopenia often coexisting in hematological patients. PMID:24678388

  13. Early and Late Complications Related to Central Venous Catheters in Hematological Malignancies: a Retrospective Analysis of 1102 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Morano, Salvatore Giacomo; Coppola, Lorenzo; Latagliata, Roberto; Berneschi, Paola; Chistolini, Antonio; Micozzi, Alessandra; Girmenia, Corrado; Breccia, Massimo; Brunetti, Gregorio; Massaro, Fulvio; Rosa, Giovanni; Guerrisi, Pietro; Mandelli, Franco; Foà, Roberto; Alimena, Giuliana

    2014-01-01

    Several severe complications may be associated with the use of central venous catheters (CVC). We retrospectively evaluated on a large cohort of patients the incidence of CVC-related early and late complications. From 7/99 to 12/2005, 1102 CVC have been implanted at our Institution in 881 patients with hematological malignancies (142,202 total day number of implanted CVC). Early mechanic complications were 79 (7.2% - 0.55/1,000 days/CVC). Thirty-nine episodes of early infective complications (<1 week from CVC implant) occurred (3.5% - 0.3/1000 days/CVC): furthermore, 187 episodes of CVC-related sepsis (17% - 1.3/1000 days/CVC) were recorded. There were 29 episodes (2.6%) of symptomatic CVC-related thrombotic complications, with a median interval from CVC implant of 60 days (range 7 – 395). The rate of CVC withdrawal due to CVC-related complications was 26%. The incidence of CVC-related complications in our series is in the range reported in the literature notwithstanding cytopenia often coexisting in hematological patients. PMID:24678388

  14. [Institutional iatrogeny and maternal death: Semmelweis and puerperal fever].

    PubMed

    Salaverry García, Oswaldo

    2013-07-01

    Puerperal fever is a disease that becomes epidemic in the eighteenth century as a result of two factors: the urban working masses generated by the industrial revolution and the progressive hegemonization and medicalization of birth care in large public hospitals. Institutionalized maternal death reached figures above 30%, while in the case of birth care provided by midwives, it was than 2%. Semmelweis, an Hungarian physician, sustained that physicians contaminated women in labor due to insufficient hygiene after performing necropsies and established prophylactic measures in the Vienna Hospital that reduced mortality dramatically. However, his ideas were rejected because they affected the institutionalization process of medicine, based on altruism and honor, which would make it impossible to cause harm to patients. He was forced to leave Vienna Hospital and he continued his struggle in Budapest, but the rejection and disagreement of his peers with his doctrine affected his mental health. He died in an asylum, a few years before Pasteur and Koch proved the existence of the bacteria that caused diseases such as puerperal fever. PMID:24100831

  15. Intraoperative and early postoperative flap-related complications of laser in situ keratomileusis using two types of Moria microkeratomes.

    PubMed

    Karabela, Yunus; Muftuoglu, Orkun; Gulkilik, Ibrahim Gokhan; Kocabora, Mehmet Selim; Ozsutcu, Mustafa

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the incidence, management, and visual outcomes of intraoperative and early postoperative flap-related complications of laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) surgery using two types of Moria M2 microkeratomes. This retrospective analysis was performed on 806 primary LASIK cases. The intraoperative and early postoperative flap-related complications were identified and categorized according to type of Moria microkeratome. There were 52 intraoperative and early postoperative complications--one case of partial flap (0.124 %), one case of free flap (0.124 %), one case of small flap (0.124 %), 13 cases of epithelial defect (1.61 %), 12 cases of flap striae (1.49 %), 10 cases of diffuse lamellar keratitis (1.24 %), 10 cases of interface debris (1.24 %), three cases of epithelial ingrowth (0.37 %), and one case of microbial infection (0.124 %). The overall incidence of flap complications was 6.45 %. There were 27 right eye (6.73 %) and 25 left eye (6.17 %) complications. The incidence of complications with the Moria automated metallic head 130 microkeratome was 4.22 % and with the Moria single-use head 90 microkeratome was 2.23 %. We observed one culture-negative interface abscess which was cured with surgical cleaning and intensive medical treatment. The most common complication encountered was epithelial defects, followed by flap striae. Our study showed that LASIK with a microkeratome has a relatively low incidence of intraoperative and early postoperative flap complications. The authors have no financial interest in any of the issues contained in this article and have no proprietary interest in the development of marketing of or materials used in this study. PMID:24531872

  16. [Influence of laser -- infrared irradiation on local complications of early postoperative period in hernias of anterior abdominal wall].

    PubMed

    Gasymov, E M

    2005-01-01

    Results of laser-infrared irradiation (LIRI) of postoperative wound after surgical treatment of recurrent hernias of anterior abdominal wall were analyzed. LIRI decreased number of local complications in early postoperative period in patients both with recurrent and primary hernias. The method was more effective for the treatment of local complication in patients with recurrent hernia that is confirmed by reduced of frequency of infiltrates, seromas and suppurations. PMID:16247383

  17. Early diagnosis of diabetic vascular complications: impairment of red blood cell deformability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Sehyun; Ku, Yunhee; Park, Cheol-Woo; Suh, Jang-Soo

    2006-02-01

    Reduced deformability of red blood cells (RBCs) may play an important role on the pathogenesis of chronic vascular complications of diabetes mellitus. However, available techniques for measuring RBC deformability often require washing process after each measurement, which is not optimal for day-to-day clinical use at point of care. The objectives of the present study are to develop a device and to delineate the correlation of impaired RBC deformability with diabetic nephropathy. We developed a disposable ektacytometry to measure RBC deformability, which adopted a laser diffraction technique and slit rheometry. The essential features of this design are its simplicity (ease of operation and no moving parts) and a disposable element which is in contact with the blood sample. We studied adult diabetic patients divided into three groups according to diabetic complications. Group I comprised 57 diabetic patients with normal renal function. Group II comprised 26 diabetic patients with chronic renal failure (CRF). Group III consisted of 30 diabetic subjects with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on hemodialysis. According to the renal function for the diabetic groups, matched non-diabetic groups were served as control. We found substantially impaired red blood cell deformability in those with normal renal function (group I) compared to non-diabetic control (P = 0.0005). As renal function decreases, an increased impairment in RBC deformability was found. Diabetic patients with chronic renal failure (group II) when compared to non-diabetic controls (CRF) had an apparently greater impairment in RBC deformability (P = 0.07). The non-diabetic cohort (CRF), on the other hand, manifested significant impairment in red blood cell deformability compared to healthy control (P = 0.0001). The newly developed slit ektacytometer can measure the RBC deformability with ease and accuracy. In addition, progressive impairment in cell deformability is associated with renal function loss in all

  18. Rising Trend of Use of Antidepressants Induced Non- Puerperal Lactation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Wazid; Jiloha, R.C.

    2016-01-01

    Non puerperal lactation or galactorrhea is a well known side effect of antipsychotic drugs but has been infrequently described with the use of antidepressants. In past few decades, there have been emerging trend of isolated case reports of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors induced non puerperal lactation. We report a case of non puerperal lactation following usage of second generation tricyclic antidepressant, nortriptyline and resolution on withdrawing the drug. Literature review has been done for antidepressant induced galactorrhea to understand the current trends, putative mechanism as different from one implicated for antipsychotics and its clinical utility. PMID:27504388

  19. Randomized Clinical Trial for Early Postoperative Complications of Ex-PRESS Implantation versus Trabeculectomy: Complications Postoperatively of Ex-PRESS versus Trabeculectomy Study (CPETS)

    PubMed Central

    Arimura, Shogo; Takihara, Yuji; Miyake, Seiji; Iwasaki, Kentaro; Gozawa, Makoto; Matsumura, Takehiro; Tomomatsu, Takeshi; Takamura, Yoshihiro; Inatani, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    We compared early postoperative complications between trabeculectomy and Ex-PRESS implantation. Enrolled patients with 39 primary open-angle or 25 exfoliative glaucoma were randomly assigned to receive trabeculectomy (trabeculectomy group) or Ex-PRESS implantation (Ex-PRESS group). Primary outcomes were early postoperative complications, including postoperative anterior chamber inflammation, frequencies of hyphema, flat anterior chamber, choroidal detachment, hypotonic maculopathy, and the change of visual acuity. The postoperative flare values in trabeculectomy group were higher than those in the Ex-PRESS group (overall, P = 0.004; and 10 days, P = 0.02). Hyphema occurred significantly more frequently in the trabeculectomy group (P = 0.0025). There were no significant differences of the other primary outcomes between the two groups. Additionally, duration of anterior chamber opening was significantly shorter in the Ex-PRESS group (P = 0.0002) and the eyes that had iris contact with Ex-PRESS tube had significantly shallower anterior chambers than did the eyes without the iris contact (P = 0.013). The Ex-PRESS implantation prevented early postoperative inflammation and hyphema in the anterior chamber and shortened the duration of anterior chamber opening. Iris contact with the Ex-PRESS tube occurred more frequently in eyes with open-angle glaucoma and shallow anterior chambers. PMID:27184606

  20. Perioperative complications and early follow-up with 100 TVT-SECUR procedures.

    PubMed

    Neuman, Menahem

    2008-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the complications and early follow-up of the tension-free vaginal tape (TVT)-SECUR, a new minimally invasive anti-incontinence operative procedure. A prospective, observational, and consecutive patient series was conducted. Perioperative and 12-month postoperative data were prospectively collected for the first 50 patients against the next consecutive 50 patients, among which TVT-SECUR specific surgical measurements were adopted (Canadian Task Force classification 2). In private hospital operative theatres, the TVT-SECUR operation was performed. Patients with urodynamically proved stress urinary incontinence were enrolled in this study after detailed informed consent was given. The TVT-SECUR, in the hammock shape to mimic the TVT-obturator placement, yet with no skin incisions, required neither bladder catheterization nor intraoperative diagnostic cystoscopy. The clinical and surgical data of 100 consecutive patients with TVT-SECUR were collected prospectively. Two patients had urinary obstructions and needed surgical tape-tension relief. One patient had a 50 mL paravesical self-remitting hematoma. At the first-month postoperative follow-up appointment, the objective therapeutic failure rate for the TVT-SECUR procedure among the 50 patients was 20.0% (10 patients). But when the tape was placed close to the urethra with no space allowed in between, the failure rate in the second patient group went down to 8.0% (4 patients); yet no further postoperative bladder outlet obstruction was diagnosed. Four (8.0%) patients in the first group had vaginal wall penetration with the inserters, requiring withdrawal, reinsertion, and vaginal wall repair. This was avoided with the second patient group by facilitating the inserters' introduction by widening the submucosal tunnel to 12 mm. Six (12.0%) other patients in the first group needed postoperative trimming of a vaginally extruded tape segment, performed in the office with satisfactory results

  1. Management of angioplasty complications, unsuccessful procedures and early and late failures.

    PubMed Central

    Samson, R H; Sprayregen, S; Veith, F J; Scher, L A; Gupta, S K; Ascer, E

    1984-01-01

    Limb-salvage was the indication for 90% of 206 attempted PTAs in 175 patients between 1976 and 1982. Life-table patency rates at 4 years for the angiographically successful iliac PTA and femoropopliteal PTA were 78% and 50%, respectively. PTA of eight iliac, seven femoropopliteal, nine tibial, and two subclavian arteries and one autogenous saphenous vein graft (ASV) were unsuccessful. Of these, 17 subsequently underwent successful bypass grafts and five required below-knee amputations. Ten iliac, 37 femoropopliteal, four tibial, and two ASV graft PTAs failed. Of 20 repeat attempts at PTA, only two have achieved long-term patency. Appropriate surgery allowed limb salvage in 23 of 36 early failures (less than 3 months) and 12 of 14 late failures (greater than 3 months), and usually consisted of the same operation that would have been performed had PTA not been attempted. Fifty-two complications were classified according to the method of treatment. Fourteen warranted surgery, but in 10 this was successfully achieved by the same operation that would have been required had PTA not been performed. PMID:6230061

  2. [Puerperal inhibition of lactation with metergoline or bromocriptine].

    PubMed

    Fischer, T; Streitmatter, A; Gerede, A; Frauendorf, A; Krause, M; Feige, A

    1995-01-01

    In a controlled, randomised, prospective, clinical study, the effect of prolactin suppression and clinical course of the lactation suppressors Bromocriptine and Metergoline were investigated. During 7 months 150 patients were studied. 81 of those patients, who did not nurse, were treated by Bromocriptine (primary lactation suppression: n = 62, secondary suppression: n = 19) and 69 of the patients were treated by Metergoline (primary suppression: n = 54, secondary suppression: n = 15). The drugs were administrated orally to all subjects, dosed 2 x 2.5 mg/d of Bromocriptine for 14 days and 3 x 4 mg/d of Metergoline for 10 days, starting in average after 13 hours. Puerperal suppression of prolactine were compared with randomised breast feeding subjects (n = 30). In Bromocriptine treated women the average plasma prolactin level decreased from 78.4 +/- 22 ng/ml to 17.0 +/- 3.3 ng/ml during five days of treatment. In Metergoline treated women the plasma prolactin level decreased from 129.7 +/- 15.1 ng/ml to 56.9 +/- 10.0 ng/ml during the first days of treatment. Prolactin level of breast feeding subjects decreased from 233.6 +/- 21.4 ng/ml to 185.8 +/- 23.7 ng/ml during the same period (p < 0.05). There is no statistical significancy of clinical difference of both drugs, but a statistical trend was seen. With Bromocriptine treated women were suppressed efficiently in 71 of 81 cases, 10 refused. Refusals were divided in two quality levels, level I with subjects with moderate complaints and little puerperal lactation, level II with subjects with considerable complaints including strong puerperal lactation. With Metergoline suppressed women, treatment was efficiently in 51 of 69 cases, but refusals of level I were observed in 11 cases and refusals of level II were observed in 7 cases. The results show that Bromocriptine and Metergoline are effective on suppression of lactation. Under the current drug dose of Metergoline an advantage of Bromocriptine were observed. Only

  3. Failure to rescue patients from early critical complications of oesophagogastric cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weledji, Elroy P.; Verla, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    ‘Failure to rescue’ is a significant cause of mortality in gastrointestinal surgery. Differences in mortality between high and low-volume hospitals are not associated with large difference in complication rates but to the ability of the hospital to effectively rescue patients from the complications. We reviewed the critical complications following surgery for oesophageal and gastric cancer, their prevention and reasons for failure to rescue. Strategies focussing on perioperative optimization, the timely recognition and management of complications may be essential to improving outcome in low-volume hospitals. PMID:27054032

  4. Failure to rescue patients from early critical complications of oesophagogastric cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Weledji, Elroy P; Verla, Vincent

    2016-05-01

    'Failure to rescue' is a significant cause of mortality in gastrointestinal surgery. Differences in mortality between high and low-volume hospitals are not associated with large difference in complication rates but to the ability of the hospital to effectively rescue patients from the complications. We reviewed the critical complications following surgery for oesophageal and gastric cancer, their prevention and reasons for failure to rescue. Strategies focussing on perioperative optimization, the timely recognition and management of complications may be essential to improving outcome in low-volume hospitals. PMID:27054032

  5. Treatment of Acute Puerperal Mastitis and Breast Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Cantlie, Helene Bertrand

    1988-01-01

    Mastitis is a benign infection of the breast if it is treated early. If two days elapse before treatment is started, it can lead to serious complications such as chronic or recurrent mastitis or breast abscess. Treatment consists in frequent nursing and massaging or stripping the breast to keep it empty of milk or pus, and appropriate antibiotics. Incision and drainage of a breast abscess can be done in the office under local anesthesia, and the drainage continued at home by the mother. PMID:21253250

  6. The Association of Birth Complications and Externalizing Behavior in Early Adolescents: Direct and Mediating Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Jianghong; Raine, Adrian; Wuerker, Anne; Venables, Peter H.; Mednick, Sarnoff

    2009-01-01

    Prior studies have shown that birth complications interact with psychosocial risk factors in predisposing to increased externalizing behavior in childhood and criminal behavior in adulthood. However, little is known about the direct relationship between birth complications and externalizing behavior. Furthermore, the mechanism by which the birth…

  7. Remote cerebellar hemorrhage as an early and potentially lethal complication of a discal lumbar herniation surgery.

    PubMed

    Royon, V; Rabehenoina, C; Tourrel, F; Compère, V; Dureuil, B

    2014-01-01

    Remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH) is an infrequent but serious complication after lumbar herniation surgery. Little is known about this complication but excessive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage is thought to be a leading cause of RCH. We describe the case of a patient suffering from a life-threatening RCH, which occurred a few hours after lumbar disc herniation surgery. PMID:24439492

  8. Early complications of the Nuss procedure for pectus excavatum: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Castellani, Christoph; Schalamon, Johannes; Saxena, Amulya K; Höellwarth, Michael E

    2008-06-01

    The Nuss procedure is a minimally invasive method for the correction of pectus excavatum, with several centers reporting its successful application. Complications related to the Nuss procedure are not uncommon and life-threatening complications have been reported. This study focuses on the incidence and management of complications in a series of 167 children and adults with funnel chest corrected by Nuss procedure. Guidelines and strategies to avoid the most common and typical complications are proposed. All patients with funnel chest, operated between April 2000 and 2006 were evaluated prospectively. Our surgical approach involved the submuscular insertion of the pectus bar under right-sided thoracoscopic control. The bar was secured in most cases with one stabilizer on the right side on the underlying rib to prevent bar displacement. Postoperative pain was primarily managed by epidural catheters. All data in the patient report forms was prospectively entered in a database. All complications were documented and classified into major or minor complication. A major complication was noted, if an organ injury occurred or if a significant surgical intervention became necessary. A minor complication was documented, if either an endoscopy or an evacuation of fluid or gas from the thorax by puncture were necessary. One hundred and sixty seven patients (136 males and 31 females) with a mean age of 16.3 (range 5-40 years) were included in this study. Major complications occurred in seven patients (4.2%) and consisted of one intraoperative heart perforation, one piercing of the liver with the trocar, bar infections (n = 2) and significant bar displacement (n = 3). Minor complications were seen in 122 patients (73.1%) and consisted of breakage of wires used to secure the lateral stabilizer plate (n = 48), pleural effusions (n = 28), intraoperative rupture of the intercostal muscle (n = 15), pericardial tears without clinical significance (n = 7) and lung atelectasia (n = 4

  9. [Influence of the kind of anesthesia and length of hospitalization on the frequency of early complications of abortion].

    PubMed

    Andolsek, L; Hren, M

    1976-01-01

    A case-control study of the safety of early vacuum aspiration, when performed as an outpatient/inpatient procedure in local/general anaesthesia was undertaken in Ljubljana. Three thousand and four healthy women were observed. General anaesthesia was applied to 1509 women and local to 1495 women. The inpatient procedure required at least overnight stay, the outpatient one only five hours. No differences in complication rates of any clinical importance between the different types of services and anaesthesia were observed. The overnight stay resulted in no decrease in complications but in an even greater bed occupancy beyond that expected. PMID:1004001

  10. Complications of combined radical hysterectomy-postoperative radiation therapy in women with early stage cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Barter, J.F.; Soong, S.J.; Shingleton, H.M.; Hatch, K.D.; Orr, J.W. Jr.

    1989-03-01

    Fifty patients with cervical cancer were treated with radical hysterectomy and lymphadenectomy followed by postoperative radiation therapy for high risk factors (nodal metastases, lymphvascular space invasion, close or involved margins) at the University of Alabama at Birmingham Medical Center from 1969 to 1984. Fifteen (30%) of the patients treated had serious complications, 8 (16%) requiring an operation, and 1 (2%) dying as a result of treatment-related problems. This combined modality approach is associated with significant complications.

  11. The incidence of early post-operative complications following uvulopalatopharyngoplasty: identification of predictive risk factors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective Characterize complications following uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) for obstructive sleep apnea. Study design Retrospective chart review. Subjects and methods Charts of patients undergoing UPPP at an academic teaching hospital from 1999 to 2005 were reviewed. Results 345 consecutive patients (248 inpatients; 97 outpatients) were studied. The most common post-operative complication in the entire study was oxyhemoglobin desaturation (12.8%). Three patients suffered major complications (airway obstruction, pulmonary edema, arrhythmia). Regarding complications limited to the post-anaesthetic care unit alone, only 8.2% of patients had oxyhemoglobin desaturation after discontinuation of oxygen supplementation. Inpatients requiring supplemental oxygen on the ward had significantly higher mean AHI (37.4 vs. 31.4; p=0.05) and BMI (32.3 kg/m2 vs. 28.9 kg/m2; p=0.004) than those who did not. Those inpatients who were obese (BMI > 30 kg/m2) with an AHI≥22 were associated with an increased risk of requiring oxygen on the ward (odds ratio = 3.48, 95% CI = 1.56 – 7.78). Conclusion The incidence of post-UPPP complications is much lower than the literature has historically suggested. Selected patients should be able to safely undergo outpatient UPPP. Patients with higher AHI, higher BMI, or multiple comorbidities are at higher risk for postoperative complications and are most appropriate for overnight monitoring. PMID:23570393

  12. [Proteolytic enzymes in the prevention and treatment of early ventilatory complications following lung resection in patients with tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Ershov, V N; Krylov, V V; Zolotarev, V P

    1989-01-01

    The authors examined 259 patients with tuberculosis of the lungs before and after partial resection of the lungs. Proteolytic enzymes were administered endotracheally in the pre- and postoperative periods to 132 patients (main group), 127 patients (control group) received a placebo. Endotracheal administration of proteolytic enzymes in the main group reduced the number of early pleuropulmonary complications of the type of atelectasis and hypoventilation by half to one third and accelerated their resolution by 3-4 times as compared to these values in the control group. Fibrous changes and pleural adhesions on the side of the operation formed from the early pleuropulmonary complications more often in the control than in the main group. The function of external respiration was restored under the effect of the proteolytic enzymes in the control group 1-2 months after segmental and combined resection, in the control group it was restored 3-4 months and later after the operation. PMID:2687135

  13. Early enteral feeding, compared with parenteral, reduces postoperative septic complications. The results of a meta-analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, F A; Feliciano, D V; Andrassy, R J; McArdle, A H; Booth, F V; Morgenstein-Wagner, T B; Kellum, J M; Welling, R E; Moore, E E

    1992-01-01

    This two-part meta-analysis combined data from eight prospective randomized trials designed to compare the nutritional efficacy of early enteral (TEN) and parenteral (TPN) nutrition in high-risk surgical patients. The combined data gave sufficient patient numbers (TEN, n = 118; TPN, n = 112) to adequately address whether route of substrate delivery affected septic complication incidence. Phase I (dropouts excluded) meta-analysis confirmed data homogeneity across study sites, that TEN and TPN groups were comparable, and that significantly fewer TEN patients experienced septic complications (TEN, 18%; TPN, 35%; p = 0.01). Phase II meta-analysis, an intent-to-treat analysis (dropouts included), confirmed that fewer TEN patients developed septic complications. Further breakdown by patient type showed that all trauma and blunt trauma subgroups had the most significant reduction in septic complications when fed enterally. In conclusion, this meta-analysis attests to the feasibility of early postoperative TEN in high-risk surgical patients and that these patients have reduced septic morbidity rates compared with those administered TPN. PMID:1386982

  14. Early complications and late sequelae of induced abortion: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Edström, Karin G. B.

    1975-01-01

    An attempt to evaluate the recent literature on somatic complications of induced abortion shows that a great amount of data of widely varying quality has been collected. Many areas of research are still not covered in a way that permits valid conclusions to be drawn. Two important points emerge from the review: first, there is a need for uniform definitions of complications and some uniformity in the analysis of data collected; secondly, carefully selected control groups are needed in this kind of research. The areas most urgently requiring further study differ from country to country. From a global point of view, the existence or inexistence of significant late sequelae and the influence of the patient's health status on the complication rate seem to be of the highest priority. PMID:770027

  15. Common complications of deep lamellar keratoplasty in the early phase of the learning curve

    PubMed Central

    Hosny, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and record the common complications that face surgeons when they perform their first few series of deep lamellar keratoplasty and measures to avoid these. Setting: Dar El Oyoun Hospital, Cairo, Egypt. Methods: Retrospective study of the first 40 eyes of 40 patients carried out by two corneal surgeons working in the same center. All patients were planned to undergo a deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty using the big bubble technique. Twelve patients suffered from keratoconus while 28 patients had anterior corneal pathologies. Recorded complications were classified as either intraoperative or postoperative. Results: Perforation of Descemet’s membrane was the most common intraoperative complication. It occurred in nine eyes (22.5%): five eyes (12.5%) had microperforations while four eyes (10%) had macroperforations, three eyes (7.5%) had central perforations, and six eyes (15%) had peripheral perforations. Other complications included incomplete separation of Descemet’s membrane and remnants of peripheral stromal tissue. Postoperative complications included double anterior chamber which occurred in four eyes (10%) and Descemet’s membrane corrugations. Postoperative astigmatism ranged from 1.25 to 4.5 diopters with a mean of 2.86 diopters in the whole series, but in the six cases with identified residual stroma in the periphery of the host bed, the astigmatism ranged from 2.75 to 4.5 diopters with a mean of 3.62 diopters. Conclusion: Deep lamellar keratoplasty is sensitive to procedural details. Learning the common complications and how to avoid them helps novice surgeons to learn the procedure faster. PMID:21750612

  16. Can Early Rehabilitation after Total Hip Arthroplasty Reduce Its Major Complications and Medical Expenses? Report from a Nationally Representative Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Chiung-Jui Su, Daniel; Yuan, Kuo-Shu; Weng, Shih-Feng; Hong, Rong-Bin; Wu, Ming-Ping; Wu, Hing-Man; Chou, Willy

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To investigate whether early rehabilitation reduces the occurrence of posttotal hip arthroplasty (THA) complications, adverse events, and medical expenses within one postoperative year. Method. We retrospectively retrieve data from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. Patients who had undergone THA during the period from 1998 to 2010 were recruited, matched for propensity scores, and divided into 2 groups: early rehabilitation (Early Rehab) and delayed rehabilitation (Delayed Rehab). Results. Eight hundred twenty of 999 THA patients given early rehabilitation treatments were matched to 205 of 233 THA patients given delayed rehabilitation treatments. The Delayed Rehab group had significantly (all p < 0.001) higher medical and rehabilitation expenses and more outpatient department (OPD) visits than the Early Rehab group. In addition, the Delayed Rehab group was associated with more prosthetic infection (odds ratio (OR): 3.152; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.211–8.203; p < 0.05) than the Early Rehab group. Conclusions. Early rehabilitation can significantly reduce the incidence of prosthetic infection, total rehabilitation expense, total medical expenses, and number of OPD visits within the first year after THA. PMID:26146625

  17. Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson’s Disease with Early Motor Complications: A UK Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fundament, Tomasz; Eldridge, Paul R.; Green, Alexander L.; Whone, Alan L.; Taylor, Rod S.; Williams, Adrian C.; Schuepbach, W. M. Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a debilitating illness associated with considerable impairment of quality of life and substantial costs to health care systems. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established surgical treatment option for some patients with advanced PD. The EARLYSTIM trial has recently demonstrated its clinical benefit also in patients with early motor complications. We sought to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of DBS, compared to best medical therapy (BMT), among PD patients with early onset of motor complications, from a United Kingdom (UK) payer perspective. Methods We developed a Markov model to represent the progression of PD as rated using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) over time in patients with early PD. Evidence sources were a systematic review of clinical evidence; data from the EARLYSTIM study; and a UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) dataset including DBS patients. A mapping algorithm was developed to generate utility values based on UPDRS data for each intervention. The cost-effectiveness was expressed as the incremental cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY). One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were undertaken to explore the effect of parameter uncertainty. Results Over a 15-year time horizon, DBS was predicted to lead to additional mean cost per patient of £26,799 compared with BMT (£73,077/patient versus £46,278/patient) and an additional mean 1.35 QALYs (6.69 QALYs versus 5.35 QALYs), resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of £19,887 per QALY gained with a 99% probability of DBS being cost-effective at a threshold of £30,000/QALY. One-way sensitivity analyses suggested that the results were not significantly impacted by plausible changes in the input parameter values. Conclusion These results indicate that DBS is a cost-effective intervention in PD patients with early motor complications when compared with existing interventions, offering additional health

  18. [An unusual early complication in cementless replacement of the hip joint. Case report].

    PubMed

    Kauschke, T; Zilch, H

    1994-12-01

    This is the first description of a dislocation of the polyethyleninlay from the cup of a cementless hip prosthesis. Due to a fall of the patient 8 months after the implantation an unspecific complaint arised. In spite of detailed diagnostic no reason could have been found. During the renewed operation we saw the dislocated inlay by mechanical anchorage of the cup and the shaft. Retrospective there were made suggestions how the described complication could be recognized earlier. PMID:7871611

  19. Early and late complications after liver transplantation for propionic acidemia in children: a two centers study.

    PubMed

    Charbit-Henrion, F; Lacaille, F; McKiernan, P; Girard, M; de Lonlay, P; Valayannopoulos, V; Ottolenghi, C; Chakrapani, A; Preece, M; Sharif, K; Chardot, C; Hubert, P; Dupic, L

    2015-03-01

    Propionic acidemia (PA) is a severe metabolic disorder with cardiac and neurologic complications and a poor quality of life. Liver transplantation (LT) was thus proposed in PA to increase enzyme activity. We studied retrospectively LT in PA in two European centers. Twelve patients underwent 17 LTs between 1991 and 2013. They developed severe, unusual and unexpected complications, with high mortality (58%). When present, the cardiomyopathy resolved and no acute metabolic decompensation occurred allowing dietary relaxation. Renal failure was present in half of the patients before LT and worsened in all of them. We suggest that cardiac and renal functions should be assessed before LT and monitored closely afterward. A renal sparing immunosuppression should be used. We speculate that some complications may be related to accumulated toxicity of the disease and that earlier LT could prevent some of these consequences. As kidney transplantation has been performed successfully in methylmalonic acidemia, a metabolic disease in the same biochemical pathway, the choice of the organ to transplant could be further discussed. PMID:25683683

  20. Early post-transplant complications following ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Naciri Bennani, Hamza; Abdulrahman, Zhyiar; Allal, Asma; Sallusto, Federico; Delarche, Antoine; Game, Xavier; Esposito, Laure; Doumerc, Nicolas; Debiol, Bénédicte; Kamar, Nassim; Rostaing, Lionel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Living-kidney transplantation is increasing because of the scarcity of kidneys from deceased donors and the increasing numbers of patients on waiting lists for a kidney transplant. Living-kidney transplantation is now associated with increased long-term patient- and allograft-survival rates. Objectives: The purpose of this retrospective study was to identify, in a cohort of 44 ABO-incompatible (ABOi) live-kidney transplant patients, the main complications that occurred within 6 months post-transplantation, and to compare these findings with those from 44 matched ABO-compatible (ABOc) live-kidney transplant patients who were also from our center. Patients and Methods: This single-center retrospective study assessed post-transplantation complications in 44 ABO-i versus 44 matched ABO-c patients. All patients were comparable at baseline except that ABO-i patients had greater immunological risks. Results: During the 6-month post-transplant period, more ABO-i patients presented with postoperative bleeds, thus requiring significantly more blood transfusions. Bleeds were associated with significantly lower values of fibrinogen, platelets, prothrombin time, and hemoglobin levels. Surgical complications, patient- and graft-survival rates, and kidney-function statuses were similar between both groups at 6 months post-transplantation. Conclusions: We conclude that impairment of hemostatic factors at pre-transplant explained the increased risk of a post-transplant bleed in ABO-i patients. PMID:27047806

  1. Puerperal influence of bovine uterine health status on the mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory factors.

    PubMed

    Peter, S; Michel, G; Hahn, A; Ibrahim, M; Lubke-Becker, A; Jung, M; Einspanier, R; Gabler, C

    2015-06-01

    After parturition, uterine bacterial infections lead to inflammatory processes such as subclinical/clinical endometritis with high prevalence in dairy cows. Endometrial epithelial cells participate in this immune response with the production of pro-inflammatory factors. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the endometrial mRNA expression pattern of pro-inflammatory factors during a selected postpartum (pp) period. Dairy cows with three different uterine health conditions on days 24-30 pp (healthy: n = 11, subclinical endometritis: n = 10, clinical endometritis: n = 10) were sampled using the cytobrush technique. Subsequently, each cow was sampled 3 more times in weekly intervals (days 31-37 pp; days 38-44 pp; days 45-51 pp). Samples were subjected to mRNA analysis performed by RT-qPCR. Additionally, an analysis of cultivable bacteria was performed at the early/late stage of the selected puerperal period. mRNA expression of 16 candidate genes was analyzed by using two different approaches. The first approach referred to the initial grouping on days 24-30 pp to reveal long-term effects of the uterine health on the subsequent puerperal period. The second approach considered the current uterine health status at each sampling to elucidate the impact of different points in time. Long-term effects seem to appear for chemokines, prostacyclin synthase and prostaglandin D2 synthase. If related to the current uterine health, the majority of candidate genes were significantly higher expressed in endometritic cows on days 45-51 pp in contrast to earlier stages of the puerperium. Microbiological analysis revealed the significantly higher prevalence of Trueperella pyogenes findings in cows with clinical endometritis on days 24-30 pp, but no correlations were found on days 45-51 pp. In conclusion, a strong immune response to subclinical/clinical endometritis in the late puerperium may be related to the negative impact of these conditions on reproductive performance

  2. Medical and surgical management after spinal cord injury: vasopressor usage, early surgerys, and complications.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Tomoo; Manley, Geoffrey T; Patel, Nihari; Whetstone, William D

    2014-02-01

    The optimal mean arterial blood pressure for maintenance of spinal cord perfusion is not known. Our aim was to describe vasopressor usage and examine their effects in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). We undertook a retrospective cohort study of 131 patients with SCI who received any kind of vasopressors to maintain blood pressure in the neurocritical care unit of a Level 1 trauma center (2005-2011). Vasopressor usage and complications were obtained from the medical record. Neurological outcomes were evaluated by the American Spinal Injury Association score. Dopamine was the most commonly used vasopressor (48.0%), followed by phenylephrine (45.0%), norepinephrine (5.0%), epinephrine (1.5%), and vasopressin (0.5%). Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that complications (e.g., ventricular tachycardia, troponin elevation, atrial fibrillation, heart rate >130 or <50, etc.) due to vasopressors were independently associated with the overall usages of dopamine (odds ratio [OR] 8.97; p<0.001) and phenylephrine (OR, 5.92; p=0.004), age ≥60 years old (OR, 5.16; p=0.013), and complete SCI (OR, 3.23; p=0.028). There was no difference in neurological improvement with either dopamine (OR, 1.16; p=0.788) or phenylephrine (OR 0.96; p=0.940). Incomplete SCI (OR, 2.64; p=0.019) and surgery <24 h after SCI (OR, 4.25; p=0.025) were independently associated with improved outcome. In summary, vasopressors are associated with increased complications in SCI patients. Further prospective studies are required in order to determine the potential benefits and risks of blood pressure management in patients with SCI. PMID:24020382

  3. Early complications and performance of 327 heat-pressed lithium disilicate crowns up to five years

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The prospective follow-up aimed to assess the performance of lithium disilicate crowns and clinical reasons of adverse events compromising survival and quality. MATERIALS AND METHODS 58 patients were treated with 375 heat-pressed monolithic crowns, which were bonded with resin cement. Annual recalls up to five years included a complete dental examination as well as quality assessment using CDA-criteria. Any need for clinical intervention led to higher complication rate and any failure compromised the survival rate. Kaplan-Meier-method was applied to all crowns and a dataset containing one randomly selected crown from each patient. RESULTS Due to drop-outs, 45 patients (31 females, 14 males) with the average age of 43 years (range = 17–73) who had 327 crowns (176 anterior, 151 posterior; 203 upper jaw, 124 lower jaw) were observed and evaluated for between 4 and 51 months (median = 28). Observation revealed 4 chippings, 3 losses of retention, 3 fractures, 3 secondary caries, 1 endodontic problem, and 1 tooth fracture. Four crowns had to be removed. Survival and complication rate was estimated 98.2% and 5.4% at 24 months, and 96.8% and 7.1% at 48 months. The complication rate was significantly higher for root canal treated teeth (12%, P<.01) at 24 months. At the last observation, over 90% of all crowns showed excellent ratings (CDA-rating Alfa) for color, marginal fit, and caries. CONCLUSION Heat pressed lithium disilicate crowns showed an excellent performance. Besides a careful luting, dentists should be aware of patients' biological prerequisites (grade of caries, oral hygiene) to reach full success with these crowns. PMID:27350853

  4. Proper care of early wounds to optimize healing and prevent complications.

    PubMed

    Pitzer, Geoffrey B; Patel, Krishna G

    2011-08-01

    Proper wound care has broad applications for all clinicians. Much of the future direction for enhancing wound repair focuses on key cells and growth factors, which is why possessing a strong understanding of the basic physiology of wound healing is imperative. This article first provides a thorough review of the phases of wound healing followed by a discussion on the latest wound management strategies. Wound conditions and surgical techniques are important components for optimizing wound healing and preventing complications. Special consideration has been given to the unique settings of contaminated wounds, open wounds, or avulsed tissue. PMID:21856537

  5. Left Lung Torsion: Complication of Lobar Resection for an Early Stage Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Moussaly, Elias; Abou Yassine, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Lobar torsion is a fatal but fortunately rare occurrence following lung resection. Early clinical signs and radiographic features may be nonspecific resulting in diagnostic delay. A high index of suspicion is vital for early diagnosis and intervention to avoid further parenchymal necrosis and deadly gangrene. We report a case of left lower lobe torsion in a 76-year-old female following elective upper lobectomy for underlying lung adenocarcinoma. Diagnosis was made following highly suggestive radiographic findings prompting bronchoscopy and revision thoracotomy. An emergency detorsion failed to restore lung viability and was followed by completion pneumonectomy. The patient recovered and was discharged on the seventh postoperative day. PMID:27293912

  6. Left Lung Torsion: Complication of Lobar Resection for an Early Stage Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Wissam; Moussaly, Elias; Abou Yassine, Ali; Nabagiez, John; Maroun, Rabih

    2016-01-01

    Lobar torsion is a fatal but fortunately rare occurrence following lung resection. Early clinical signs and radiographic features may be nonspecific resulting in diagnostic delay. A high index of suspicion is vital for early diagnosis and intervention to avoid further parenchymal necrosis and deadly gangrene. We report a case of left lower lobe torsion in a 76-year-old female following elective upper lobectomy for underlying lung adenocarcinoma. Diagnosis was made following highly suggestive radiographic findings prompting bronchoscopy and revision thoracotomy. An emergency detorsion failed to restore lung viability and was followed by completion pneumonectomy. The patient recovered and was discharged on the seventh postoperative day. PMID:27293912

  7. Medical Complications of the Critically Ill Newborn: A Review for Early Intervention Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNab, Theresa C.; Blackman, James A.

    1998-01-01

    Provides early-intervention professionals with a basic familiarity and understanding of some of the newest technologies employed in the neonatal intensive care units for neonates with respiratory distress syndrome, persistent fetal circulation, retinopathy of prematurity, intraventricular hemorrhage, and periventricular leukomalacia. Early…

  8. Factors predicting early postoperative liver cirrhosis-related complications after lung cancer surgery in patients with liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Takashi; Inoue, Kiyotoshi; Nishiyama, Noritoshi; Nagano, Koshi; Izumi, Nobuhiro; Tsukioka, Takuma; Hanada, Shoji; Suehiro, Shigefumi

    2007-12-01

    We aimed to determine the factors predicting liver cirrhosis-related complications in the early postoperative period after lung cancer surgery in patients with liver cirrhosis. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients who underwent curative surgery for primary lung cancer in our institute from January 1990 to March 2007, finding 37 cases with comorbid liver cirrhosis. These patients were divided into two groups, according to whether liver failure, bleeding, and critical infection had occurred postoperatively. Various clinical parameters were analyzed statistically between the bigeminal groups. Liver cirrhosis-related complications occurred in seven of the 37 patients (18.9%). Transient liver failure occurred in two patients (5.4%) after pulmonary resection. Acute intrathoracic bleeding occurred in four cases (10.8%). Two patients died (5.4%) in both cases due to sepsis. Preoperative total bilirubin (P<0.05), and indocyanine green retention rate at 15 min (P<0.05) were significantly higher in patients with liver failure. Only serum value of total bilirubin was an independent risk factor (P<0.05) by multivariate analysis. In predicting death from infection, only preoperative nutritional status was a significant risk factor (P<0.05). To avoid postoperative cirrhosis-related complications, preoperative preparation to improve their liver function and nutrition status is essential. PMID:17766277

  9. Routine prophylaxis with proton pump inhibitors and post-transplant complications in kidney transplant recipients undergoing early corticosteroid withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Courson, Alesa Y; Lee, John R; Aull, Meredith J; Lee, Jennifer H; Kapur, Sandip; McDermott, Jennifer K

    2016-06-01

    Surgical stress, corticosteroids, and mycophenolate may contribute to gastrointestinal ulcers/bleeding after kidney transplantation. Prophylactic acid suppression with H2RAs or PPIs is often utilized after transplantation, although unclear if truly indicated after early corticosteroid withdrawal (CSWD). PPIs have been associated with increased risks of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), pneumonia, and acute rejection. This retrospective cohort study investigated benefits and risks of prolonged PPI use following kidney transplantation and included 286 kidney recipients undergoing CSWD within five d of transplant who were maintained on tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil/sodium. Patients on PPI before transplant, H2RA before/after transplant, and/or those with pre-transplant GI complications were excluded. A total of 171 patients received PPI>30 d, mean duration 287 ± 120 d (PPI group); 115 patients were not maintained on acid suppression (No-PPI group). GI ulceration and bleeding events were rare in PPI group (1.2% and 2.3%, respectively) and not observed in No-PPI group (p = NS). The incidence of infectious or hematological complications was not significantly different between groups. The PPI group experienced more biopsy-proven acute rejection (9.4% vs. 2.6%, p = 0.03). No direct benefit was observed with PPI in reducing the incidence of GI ulcers and bleeding events in kidney transplant recipients undergoing early CSWD. Further studies are needed to investigate the association of PPI and acute rejection. PMID:27004722

  10. Importance of an early tissue transfer in the treatment of complicated injuries of lower extremities.

    PubMed

    Nejedlý, A; Tvrdek, M; Kletenský, J; Pros, Z

    1994-01-01

    3rd degree fractures with extensive defects of soft tissues represent a major therapeutical problem. The technique of free tissue transfer makes it possible to adopt an active access to primary treatment to this injuries. Radical necrectomies may be performed without respect to the extent of the defect that will arise. The authors present their experience regarding an early coverage of the defect of the lower extremity by means of a free flap. The time period between the accident and tissue transfer as well as a suitable flap type are taken in consideration. PMID:7618393

  11. Early Pulmonary Complications following Total Knee Arthroplasty under General Anesthesia: A Prospective Cohort Study Using CT Scan

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kai; Rong, Zhen; Yang, Xianfeng; Yao, Yao; Shen, Yeshuai; Shi, Dongquan; Xu, Zhihong; Chen, Dongyang; Zheng, Minghao; Jiang, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs) are common after major surgeries. However, the number of studies regarding PPCs following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is limited. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of early PPCs following TKA by computed tomography (CT) scan and to identify associated risk factors. Methods. Patients, who were diagnosed with osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis and underwent primary TKA at our institution, were included in this prospective cohort study. Patients received a standard procedure of TKA under general anesthesia. Chest CT scan was performed during 5–7 days postoperatively. Univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression analysis were employed to identify the risk factors. Results. The total incidence of early PPCs following TKA was 45.9%. Rates of pneumonia, pleural effusion, and atelectasis were 14.4%, 38.7%, and 12.6%, respectively. Lower body mass index and perioperative blood transfusion were independent risk factors for PPCs as a whole and associated with atelectasis. Postoperative acute episode of hypoxemia increased the risk of pneumonia. Blood transfusion alone was related to pleural effusion. Conclusions. The incidence of early PPCs following TKA was high. For patients with relevant risk factors, positive measures should be adopted to prevent PPCs. PMID:27069922

  12. Observational study on the efficacy of the supplementation with a preparation with several minerals and vitamins in improving mood and behaviour of healthy puerperal women.

    PubMed

    Paoletti, Anna Maria; Orrù, Marisa Margherita; Marotto, Maria Francesca; Pilloni, Monica; Zedda, Pierina; Fais, Maria Francesca; Piras, Bruno; Piano, Camilla; Pala, Silvia; Lello, Stefano; Coghe, Ferdinando; Sorge, Roberto; Melis, Gian Benedetto

    2013-08-01

    We investigated whether a formulation containing vitamins and minerals (vit&min) could improve the worsening of mood changes occurring after delivery ("a.d."). The study was performed in 552 healthy non-anaemic puerperal women ("p.w") without risk factors for puerperal depression ("p.d"). They were at their first full-term pregnancy, and spontaneously delivered healthy newborns. The Edinburgh Depression Postnatal scale (EPDS) evaluates the psychological status of "p.w". EPDS was administered the 3rd (visit 1), 15th (visit 2) and 30th (visit 3) day "a.d.". An EPDS >12 indicates a major susceptibility to "p.d". At the same time intervals, haemoglobin, iron and ferritin (haematological parameters) levels were evaluated. After visit 1, the subjects were randomized to vit&min treatment (group A; N.274) or to calcium/vitamin D3 treatment (group B; N.278). In both groups haematological parameters significantly increased without differences between the groups. EPDS score improved in both groups, but in the group A, the EPDS decrease was significantly larger (p < 0.05) in comparison to the group B. This effect is mainly evident in subjects with a basal EPDS ≥ 12. An early examination of psychological condition could select "p.w." with a high susceptibility to neuronal changes occurring postpartum. Vit&min favourably modulates brain functions antagonizing the evolution to "p.d". PMID:23782001

  13. Is Mid-trimester Insulin Resistance Predictive of Subsequent Puerperal Infection? A Secondary Analysis of Randomized Trial Data.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Brenna L; Clifton, Rebecca G; Hauth, John C; Leveno, Kenneth J; Myatt, Leslie; Reddy, Uma M; Varner, Michael W; Wapner, Ronald J; Mercer, Brian M; Peaceman, Alan M; Ramin, Susan M; Tolosa, Jorge E; Saade, George; Sorokin, Yoram

    2016-08-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to examine whether there is an association between insulin resistance and subsequent development of puerperal infection by measuring insulin resistance in the mid-trimester using the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA:IR). Methods Secondary analysis of low-risk nulliparas enrolled in a multicenter preeclampsia prevention trial. HOMA:IR was measured on fasting plasma glucose and insulin concentrations among low-risk nulliparas between 22 and 26 weeks' gestation. Median HOMA:IR was compared between women who did and did not develop puerperal infection using Wilcoxon rank sum test. Logistic regression was used to control for potential confounders. Results Of 1,180 women with fasting glucose and insulin available, 121 (10.3%) had a puerperal infection. Median HOMA:IR was higher among those with subsequent puerperal infection (4.3 [interquartile, IQR: 2.2-20.5] vs. 2.6 [IQR: 1.5-6.7], p < 0.0001). After controlling for potentially confounding variables HOMA:IR was only marginally associated with an increased risk of development of puerperal infection, adjusted odds ratio: 1.01 (95% confidence interval: 1.00-1.02; p = 0.04) per unit increase. Elevated HOMA:IR performed poorly as a predictor of puerperal infection, with a positive predictive value of 15% and a negative predictive value of 92%. Conclusion Though associated with an increased risk of puerperal infection, insulin resistance, measured by HOMA:IR, is not a clinically useful predictor of puerperal infection. PMID:27120478

  14. Total ureteral avulsion leading to early nephrectomy as a rare complication of simple lumbar discectomy; a case report

    PubMed Central

    Omidi-Kashani, Farzad; Mousavi, Seyed Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Lumbar discectomy constitutes the most common and probably easiest spine surgery but it is not without complications. The aim of this work is to report a case with total ureteral avulsion during lumbar discectomy due to careless advancement of the pituitary rongeur. Methods: A 59-year-old male presented with refractory left L5-S1 lumbar disc herniation. During the surgery, left sided total ureteral avulsion occurred. Early postoperative progressive abdominal pain was the main clue for further investigation and diagnostic work-up. Results: Abdominal ultrasonography, intravenous pyelography, and abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) detected a left ureteral injury. Although the injury was detected early, ureteral repair or renal autotransplantation was not possible and nephrectomy was finally indicated, due to a significant ureteral loss. Discussion: Careful use of discectomy instruments, avoidance of excessive advancement of pituitary rongeurs (more than 3 cm), and thorough knowledge of the relevant anatomy are critical in preventing ureteral injury. PMID:27163085

  15. [Early complications and long-term results of the LeVeen peritoneo-venous shunt in the treatment of refractory ascites].

    PubMed

    Arciero, G; Di Blasio, V; Botta, V; Rossi, M; Pigna, F; Di Tora, A

    1996-11-01

    Results concerning 14 cirrhotic patients who underwent LeVeen peritoneo-venous shunt for refractory or complicated ascites are discussed. The most relevant early complications regard coagulation disorders (35.7%) with a 14.3% postoperative mortality. The functional result appears largely satisfactory, also in terms of long-term efficiency. Utility of a wide evacuation of ascitic fluid during the operation is underlined. Ascites drainage at operation doesn't compromise shunt function or renal resumption, furthermore it may prevent some life-threatening complications like DIC, esophageal varices rupture and congestive heart failure. PMID:9072716

  16. [Health education in pregnancy and postpartum: meanings attributed by puerperal women].

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, Eryjosy Marculino; Rodrigues, Dafne Paiva; Queiroz, Ana Beatriz Azevedo; Ferreira, Márcia de Assunção

    2014-01-01

    Descriptive study, qualitative, that aimed to capture the content of social representations of puerperal women on health education in pregnancy and postpartum in primary health care. Users were 31 Family Health Centers in Fortaleza, Ceará, over 18 years in the postpartum period, with at least six visits to prenatal and one postpartum consultation. It was held a lexical analysis of data from semi-structured interviews with the software ALCESTE. The representations of puerperal women on health education are linked to institutional educational practices, with emphasis on lectures, family and school education, and community education. It predominate the traditional pedagogy, with the transmission of information, punctual and widespread. It is necessary to change the pedagogical logic, expanding educational groups with knowledge sharing. PMID:24676063

  17. Bacteriological and cytological findings during the late puerperal period after two different treatments of retained placenta followed by acute puerperal metritis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the effect of two acute puerperal metritis (APM) treatment protocols on uterine condition during the late puerperal period (5th to 7th week). Late gestation healthy cows (n = 21) were divided randomly in three equal groups. Parturitions were induced. Treatments of APM were started on the third day postpartum (PP). Group A was treated with an oxytocin analogue carbetocin for three days and intrauterine administration of cephapirin between days 15 and 17. Group B was given intramuscular injection of ceftiofur for five days followed by two injections of prostaglandin F2α, at an interval of 12 h, on the eighth day PP. Group C served as the control group with no treatment. Body temperature was recorded daily for 14 days PP. Uterine biopsies for bacteriology, and uterobrush samples for cytology, were taken once a week from the 5th to 7th week postpartum. No differences were found in body temperature on day 14 PP, presence of bacteriological infections and disappearance of uterine inflammatory signs diagnosed by cytological examination between experimental groups. PMID:20550666

  18. Prevalence of and risk factors for postoperative pulmonary complications after lung cancer surgery in patients with early-stage COPD

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Sun; Kim, Young Tae; Kang, Chang Hyun; Park, In Kyu; Bae, Won; Choi, Sun Mi; Lee, Jinwoo; Park, Young Sik; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Sang-Min; Yim, Jae-Joon; Kim, Young Whan; Han, Sung Koo; Yoo, Chul-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to investigate whether the prevalence of postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs) in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is even higher in the early stages of COPD than in such patients with normal lung function and to verify the usefulness of symptom- or quality of life (QoL)-based scores in predicting risk for PPCs. Patients and methods Patients undergoing pulmonary resection for NSCLC between July 2012 and October 2014 were prospectively enrolled. Preoperative measurements of lung function, dyspnea, and QoL, operative characteristics, PPCs, duration of postoperative hospitalization, and in-hospital mortality were assessed. Results Among 351 consecutive patients with NSCLC, 343 patients with forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) ≥70% of predicted value were enrolled. At least one PPC occurred in 57 (16.6%) patients. Prevalence of PPC was higher in patients with COPD (30.1%) than in those with normal spirometry (10.0%; P<0.001). However, in patients with COPD, the prevalence of PPC was not different in patients with FEV1 ≥70% compared to those with FEV1 <70% and between group A (low risk and less symptoms) and group B (low risk and more symptoms) patients with COPD, based on the new Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease 2011 guidelines. In patients with COPD, body mass index (odds ratio [OR]: 0.80, P=0.007), carbon monoxide diffusing capacity of the lung (DLCO), % predicted value (OR: 0.97, P=0.024), and operation time (OR: 1.01, P=0.003), but not COPD assessment test or St George Respiratory Questionnaire scores, were significantly associated with PPCs. Conclusion Even in patients with early-stage COPD, the prevalence of PPCs is higher than in patients with NSCLC with normal spirometry. However, this rate is not different between group A and group B patients with COPD. In accordance with this, scores based on symptoms or QoL are not predictors of risk of PPCs in patients with early-stage COPD

  19. Dose-Volume Histogram Predictors of Chronic Gastrointestinal Complications After Radical Hysterectomy and Postoperative Concurrent Nedaplatin-Based Chemoradiation Therapy for Early-Stage Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Mabuchi, Seiji; Konishi, Koji; Koizumi, Masahiko; Takahashi, Yutaka; Ogata, Toshiyuki; Maruoka, Shintaroh; Kimura, Tadashi; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate dose-volume histogram (DVH) predictors for the development of chronic gastrointestinal (GI) complications in cervical cancer patients who underwent radical hysterectomy and postoperative concurrent nedaplatin-based chemoradiation therapy. Methods and Materials: This study analyzed 97 patients who underwent postoperative concurrent chemoradiation therapy. The organs at risk that were contoured were the small bowel loops, large bowel loop, and peritoneal cavity. DVH parameters subjected to analysis included the volumes of these organs receiving more than 15, 30, 40, and 45 Gy (V15-V45) and their mean dose. Associations between DVH parameters or clinical factors and the incidence of grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications were evaluated. Results: Of the clinical factors, smoking and low body mass index (BMI) (<22) were significantly associated with grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications. Also, patients with chronic GI complications had significantly greater V15-V45 volumes and higher mean dose of the small bowel loops compared with those without GI complications. In contrast, no parameters for the large bowel loop or peritoneal cavity were significantly associated with GI complications. Results of the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis led to the conclusion that V15-V45 of the small bowel loops has high accuracy for prediction of GI complications. Among these parameters, V40 gave the highest area under the ROC curve. Finally, multivariate analysis was performed with V40 of the small bowel loops and 2 other clinical parameters that were judged to be potential risk factors for chronic GI complications: BMI and smoking. Of these 3 parameters, V40 of the small bowel loops and smoking emerged as independent predictors of chronic GI complications. Conclusions: DVH parameters of the small bowel loops may serve as predictors of grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications after postoperative

  20. Cocaine-associated increase of atrial natriuretic peptides: an early predictor of cardiac complications in cocaine users?

    PubMed Central

    Casartelli, Alessandro; Dacome, Lisa; Tessari, Michela; Pascali, Jennifer; Bortolotti, Federica; Trevisan, Maria Teresa; Bosco, Oliviero; Cristofori, Patrizia; Tagliaro, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cocaine is known to produce life-threatening cardiovascular complications, and the investigation of the causes of death may be challenging in forensic medicine. The increasing knowledge of the cardiac function biomarkers and the increasing sensitivity of assays provide new tools in monitoring the cardiac life-threatening pathological conditions and in the sudden death investigation in chronic abusers. In this work, cardiac dysfunction was assessed in an animal model by measuring troponin I and natriuretic peptides as biomarkers, and considering other standard endpoints used in preclinical toxicology studies. Methods Lister Hooded rats were treated with cocaine in chronic self-administration studies. Troponin I (cTnI) and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) were evaluated at different time points and heart weight and histopathology were assessed at the end of the treatment period. Furthermore, cocaine and its main metabolites were measured in the rat fur to assess rats’ cocaine exposure. All the procedures and endpoints considered were designed to allow an easy and complete translation from the laboratory animals to human beings, and the same approach was also adopted with a group of 10 healthy cocaine abuse volunteers with no cardiac pathologies. Results Cardiac troponin I values were unaffected, and ANP showed an increasing trend with time in all cocaine-treated animals considered. Similarly, in the healthy volunteers, no changes were observed in troponin serum levels, whereas the N-terminal brain natriuretic pro-peptide (NT proBNP) showed variations comparable with the changes observed in rats. Conclusions In conclusion, natriuretic peptides could represent an early indicator of heart dysfunction liability in chronic cocaine abusers. PMID:27326180

  1. Postoperative Infectious Complications in Our Early Experience With Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Kazushi; Haraguchi, Takahiro; Yamamichi, Fukashi; Muramaki, Mototsugu; Miyake, Hideaki; Fujisawa, Masato

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to retrospectively investigate postoperative infectious complications (PICs) in our early experience with holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) followed by mechanical morcellation for symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia. Materials and Methods A retrospective review was performed of the clinical data for 90 consecutive patients who underwent HoLEP at our institution between February 2008 and March 2011. All patients were evaluated for the emergence of PICs, including prophylactic antibiotic administration (PAA) and the influence of the kind or duration of PAA on PIC. The details of cases with PICs were also examined. Results The patients' mean age was 71 years (range, 50 to 95 years), and their mean prostate volume was 60 mL (range, 2 to 250 mL). There were 7 cases (7.78%) with PICs; in detail, 3 patients were diagnosed with prostatitis, 2 with pyelonephritis, and 2 with epididymitis. Three patients had positive urine cultures: 1 had Serratia marcescens/Proteus mirabilis, 1 had S. marcescens, and 1 had Klebsiella pneumonia; only one case had urological sepsis. Our statistical data showed no significant differences between 2 or fewer days and 3 or more days of PAA and PIC occurrence. There was also no significant effect on PIC occurrence of sulbactam/ampicillin compared with other antibiotics. Conclusions The results of this retrospective study showed that PIC occurrence did not depend on the duration or the kind of PAA. Further prospective study is necessary for the evaluation and establishment of prophylactic measures for PICs. PMID:23526729

  2. Early experience using an online reporting system for interventional radiology procedure-related complications integrated with a digital dictation system.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sanjay; Patel, Jay; McEnery, Kevin; Wallace, Michael J; Ahrar, Kamran; Suitor, Chuck; Hicks, Marshall E

    2011-08-01

    The absence of user-friendly systems for reporting complications is a major barrier to improving quality assurance (QA) programs in interventional radiology (IR) services. We describe the implementation of a QA application that is completely integrated with the radiology dictation system. We implemented an IR QA process as a module within the electronic medical record and radiologist dictation system applications used at our institution. After a radiologist completes a dictation, he or she must select from a drop-down list of complications before proceeding to the next case. Delayed QA events can be entered using the same applications. All complication entries are sent to a database, which is queried to run reports. During the study period, all the 20,034 interventional procedures were entered in the QA database, 1,144 complications were reported, 110 (9.6%) of which were classified as major. Although majority of the complications (996) were entered at the time of dictation, 148 complications (12.9%) were entered afterwards. All major complications were referred to the IR peer review committee, and 30 of these were discussed in the morbidity and mortality meetings. We studied post-lung-biopsy pneumothorax and chest tube rates and initiated a quality improvement process based on the results.The integration of the IR QA reporting system into the workflow process and the mandatory requirements for completion has the potential to minimize the work effort required to enter complication data, and improve participation in the QA process. PMID:20717701

  3. Long-term impact of puerperal metritis on the profiles of peripheral blood leukocytes in peripartum dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Magata, Fumie; Kitaoka, Ryuji; Morino, Ikumi; Teramura, Makoto; Kawashima, Chiho; Haneda, Shingo; Shimizu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    To determine the effects of puerperal metritis on the immune response, changes in the differential peripheral blood leukocyte counts were analyzed during the peripartum period in cows with or without metritis. Multiparous Holstein cows were examined for uterine health disorders and classified into two groups: healthy (n = 11) or metritis (n = 5) cows. The lymphocyte and monocyte counts and the proportion of CD8(+) lymphocytes were higher in cows with metritis compared to healthy cows. Moreover, the effects of puerperal metritis on the lymphocyte counts and CD4(+) /CD8(+) ratio persisted weeks after the uterine inflammation had self-resolved. Taken together, the findings of the present study indicate the possible long-term alterations of systemic immune responses in cows with puerperal uterine inflammation. © 2015 Japanese Society of Animal Science. PMID:26387573

  4. A longitudinal study of the interactive effects of perinatal complications and early family adversity on cognitive ability.

    PubMed

    Stanton, W R; McGee, R O; Silva, P A

    1989-06-01

    The effects of high, medium and low levels of perinatal complications and family adversity on intelligence quotient (IQ) scores were examined in a large sample of Dunedin children tested every second year in the age group 3-13 years. The aim was to test the hypothesis that favourable environmental circumstances attenuate the effects of perinatal complications on later cognitive ability. The results did not support this hypothesis but rather suggested that perinatal complications and family adversity have independent adverse effects on the development of children's cognitive ability. PMID:2764834

  5. Management of late preterm and early-term pregnancies complicated by mild gestational hypertension/pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Sibai, Baha M

    2011-10-01

    Gestational hypertension/pre-eclampsia is the most frequent obstetrical complication, complicating 26%-29% of all gestations in nulliparous women. In general, the diagnosis of mild gestational hypertension/pre-eclampsia is made at 38 weeks or more in approximately 80% of cases. For many years, the optimal timing of delivery for patients with mild gestational hypertension/pre-eclampsia at 37-0/7 to 39-6/7 weeks was unclear. Recently, investigators of the HYPITAT (Pregnancy-induced hypertension and pre-eclampsia after 36 weeks: induction of labor versus expectant monitoring: A comparison of maternal and neonatal outcome, maternal quality of life and costs) randomized trial evaluated maternal and neonatal complications in patients at 36-40 weeks' gestation who were randomized to either induction of labor or expectant monitoring. The results of this trial revealed that induction of labor at or after 37-0 weeks was associated with lower rate of maternal complications without increased rates of either cesarean delivery or neonatal complications. In contrast, the optimum management for those with mild hypertension/pre-eclampsia with stable maternal and fetal conditions at 34-0/7 to 36-6/7 weeks remains uncertain. Therefore, there is urgent need for research to evaluate the reasons for late preterm birth in such women as well as for a randomized trial to evaluate the optimal timing for delivery in such patients. PMID:21962629

  6. Obstetric Outcome in Early and Late Onset Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Easmin, S; Chowdhury, T A; Islam, M R; Beg, A; Jahan, M K; Latif, T; Dhar, S; Alam, M N; Akhter, M

    2015-07-01

    Obstetric outcome in early onset and late onset GDM was compared in a prospective study conducted at the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology in BIRDEM, Dhaka, Bangladesh. A total 120 pregnant women were recruited purposively for the study in which 60 were early onset GDM and 60 were late onset GDM during study period of January 2008 to December 2009. Patients were followed up in different periods of gestation, during delivery and early postpartum period & findings were compared between two groups. BMI & family history of diabetes were significantly higher in early GDM group (p<0.05). Evidence of increased glycaemia was observed in early GDM group & difference of glycaemic status was statistically significant (p<0.05). Insulin was needed in 85% of early onset GDM and 55% in late onset GDM. There was also significant difference (p<0.05). In this study, 23.3% of early onset GDM group developed pre-eclampsia while in late onset GDM it was 10% and was statistically significant (p<0.05). Regarding intrapartum & postpartum complications - perineal tear, PPH wound infection, puerperal sepsis were more in early onset than late onset GDM group with no significant difference. Regarding foetal outcome, 8.3% early GDM group delivered asphyxiated baby in comparison to 3.3% in late GDM group. Twenty percent (20%) of early onset GDM group had to admit their babies in neonatal unit while in late onset group it was 5%. There was significant difference between two groups (p<0.05). Neonatal hypoglycaemia was also statistically significantly (p<0.05) higher in early GDM group. Neonatal hyper-bilirubinaemia, RDS, perinatal death was more in early onset GDM subjects. Early onset GDM subjects are high risk subgroup & have significant deleterious effect on maternal and perinatal outcome than late GDM groups. PMID:26329938

  7. An unusual presentation of a submucous leiomyoma accounting to a non-puerperal uterine inversion: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Atalay, Mehmet Aral; Demir, Bilge Çetinkaya; Solak, Neşe; Atalay, Fatma Oz; Küçükkömürcü, Şakir

    2013-01-01

    Non-puerperal uterine inversion is an extremely rare gynaecological event that is usually associated with uterine tumours such as submucous or cervical leiomyomas. In this report, we describe a case of uterine inversion due to a large submucous leiomyoma in a 42-year-old multiparous and obese Caucasian woman. PMID:24592087

  8. Is photodynamic therapy a selective treatment? Analysis of local complications after endoscopic photodynamic therapy of early stage tumors of gastrointestinal, tracheobronchial, and urinary tracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinelli, Pasquale; Dal Fante, Marco; Mancini, Andrea

    1995-03-01

    Selectivity is the most emphasized advantage of photodynamic therapy (PDT). However, at drug and light doses used for clinical applications, response from normal tissue surrounding the tumor reduces the real selectivity of the drug-light system and increases the surface of the area responding to the treatment. It is now evident that light irradiation of a sensitized patient produces damage at a various degree not only in the tumor but also in non-neoplastic tissues included in the field of irradiation. We report our experience in endoscopic PDT of early stage tumors in tracheobronchial, gastrointestinal and urinary tracts, describing early and late local complications caused by the damage of normal tissues adjacent to the tumors and included in the field of light irradiation. Among 44 patients treated, local complications, attributable to a poor selectivity of the modality, occurred in 6 patients (14%). In particular, the rate of local complications was 9% in patients treated for esophageal tumors, 14% in patients with gastric tumors, 9% in patients with tracheobronchial tumors, and 67% in bladder cancer patients. Clinical pictures as well as endoscopic findings at various intervals from treatment showed that mucositis is a common event following endoscopic PDT. It causes exudation and significant tissue inflammatory response, whose consequences are different in the various organs treated. Photoradiation must be, as much as possible, limited to the malignant area.

  9. Radiological contribution to the diagnosis of early postoperative complications after lung resection for primary tumor: a revisional study

    PubMed Central

    Priola, Adriano Massimiliano; Priola, Sandro Massimo; Boccuzzi, Francesco; Dervishi, Najada; Lisi, Elena; Veltri, Andrea; Ardissone, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    In the post-operative course of the interventions of lung resection for primary tumor, complications of different nature and severity can arise, recognizing different pathogenetic mechanisms and differing according to the type of resection performed and to the time elapsed after surgery. The low diagnostic accuracy of chest radiography requires a thorough knowledge of the radiologist about all radiographic findings, both normal and pathological, which can be found in the immediate post-operative period (within 30 days after surgery). This article aims to describe the incidence, the clinical features and the radiological aspects of immediate complications following pulmonary resections, with specific reference to those in which the diagnostic imaging provides a fundamental contribution. PMID:27621893

  10. Use of Databases for Early Recognition of Risk of Diabetic Complication by Analysis of Liver Enzymes in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Malenica, Maja; Prnjavorac, Besim; Causevic, Adlija; Dujic, Tanja; Bego, Tamer; Semiz, Sabina

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Because of increasing prevalence of T2MD worldwide, it’s very important to recognize risk factors for diabetic complications, as soon as possible. Symptoms of complications appear a few or many years after tissue damage. So, it’s imperative to establish surveillance of diabetics with laboratory and other diagnostic procedures for early recognition of diabetic complications. Follow up of clinical curs of diabetes, by using databases of patients, provide possibility for permanent analysis of important laboratory parameters and any changes could be registered. Although an emerging evidence suggests a strong association of ALT (alanine aminotransferase) and γGT (gamma glutamyl transferase) activity with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), only a limited number of studies have analyzed the association of AST (aspartate aminotransferase), ALT, γGT, and ALP (alkaline phosphatase) activities in controlled T2DM. Material and Methods: Gender differences are of special interest in trying to follow diabetes progression and development of its complications. Here the activities of ALT, AST, γGT, ALP were analyzed as well as levels of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) in 40 T2DM patients and 40 age-matched healthy subjects. Blood samples were collected from all participants in regular 3-months intervals up to 6 months period. Standard IFCC enzyme protocols were used to determine enzyme activities. Results and discussion: In first measured interval, significantly higher activities of ALT (p= 0,050) and glucose levels (p=0,045) were shown in male. A significant correlation was shown between ALT and AST activity with FPG and HbA1c levels in first and third measured interval. ALT activity was much higher in the group of patients with poor glycemia control. Average levels of activities of enzymes stay nearly in normal limits, but changes of enzymes activities should be recognized as soon as possible, earlier than tissue changes and

  11. Not the Ceiling, but the Floor: Innovative Harlem Early Childhood Education Effort Complicated by Varying Government Regulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costa, Kristina

    2012-01-01

    This case study was produced in conjunction with the Center for American Progress's accompanying report on these issues, "Increasing the Effectiveness and Efficiency of Existing Public Investments in Early Childhood Education." This report establishes a set of policies and administrative changes on the federal level that will begin to address…

  12. Clinical aspects of intraoperative radiotherapy in early breast cancer: short-term complications after IORT in women treated with low energy x-rays

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To assess postoperative complications, clinical outcome and histological findings in patients undergoing intraoperative radiotherapy with low energy x-rays for early breast cancer. Methods We retrospectively analysed data of 208 women who underwent intraoperative irradiation during breast conserving surgery (BCS) between 2002 and 2007. Demographic, clinical and surgical parameters as well as short-term complications within the first postoperative week and histological findings were evaluated. Toxicities were assessed using the CTC/EORTC Score. Results Postoperative complications were rare and the immediate toxicity low, without any grade 3/4 acute toxicity. The most frequent postoperative side effects were suggillation (24%) and palpable seroma (17.3%). In 78.6% of the axillary seroma and in 25% of the breast seroma a needle aspiration was inevitable. Erythema grade I-II of the breast was found in 27 women (13%); whereas in 7 patients (3.4%), mastitis was confirmed. In 57.7% of the cases, the pathological assessment revealed ductal invasive breast cancer and tumour size ranged between 0.1 and 4.5 cm (mean = 1.6 cm). Conclusion IORT using Intrabeam® during BCS is safe, although it is associated with postoperative adverse events such as seroma. These should be mentioned and explained to women in detail during the preoperative discussion. This explicitly clinical description is useful for daily clinical practice; especially for giving a detailed analysis of the postoperative side effects during preoperative counselling. PMID:23607703

  13. [Diagnosis and therapy of retained fetal membranes, puerperal metritis and clinical endometritis in cattle: Results of the Online-survey among Swiss practitioners. II. Puerperal metritis and clinical endometritis].

    PubMed

    Hehenberger, E M; Doherr, M G; Bodmer, M; Steiner, A; Hirsbrunner, G

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the study was to obtain the diagnostic and therapeutic approach among Swiss practitioners in cows with puerperal metritis and clinical endometritis (part 2). All members of the Association for ruminant health were contacted per email via the newsletter. The survey was completed by 128 veterinarians, partially responded by 140 veterinarians. The following main symptoms of puerperal metritis were stated by the practitioners: purulent vaginal discharge, fever and reduced appetite. A vaginal and rectal examination was performed to diagnose the disease. Usually, an intrauterine treatment with tetracycline or cefapirin was done. Parenteral administration of tetracycline or penicillin was often combined with PGF(2α), NSAIDS or cortisone. Clinical endometritis was also diagnosed by vaginal and rectal examination and the main symptom indicated was purulent vaginal discharge. The therapy consisted of the administration of PGF(2α), uterine infusions predominantly with cefapirin, and rarely with parenteral administration of antibiotics. Further diagnostic tools were not used and normally cows were not rechecked. The success of the therapy of puerperal metritis and clinical endometritis was judged to be satisfactory to excellent. PMID:26757591

  14. [Peloid therapy in the complex sanatorium treatment of children of early age with complications of perinatal brain damage].

    PubMed

    Ponomareva, S O; Babina, L M

    2003-01-01

    The search for novel approaches to multimodality prophylaxis and treatment of sequelae of perinatal nervous system affection as well as introduction of the early diagnostic criteria are topical problems in present-day pediatric neurology. Peloid therapy efficacy in combined sanatorium treatment was studied (Peloterm unit) in 44 infants aged 1 to 3 years. They suffered from sequelae of perinatal affections of the central nervous system including infantile cerebral paralysis. A positive effect (improvement of motor and psychic-speech development) was achieved in 98% cases. This indicates validity of this method in the treatment of CNS affections following perinatal affection of the brain in infants over 1 year of age. PMID:14753007

  15. Lost opportunities to prevent early onset type 2 diabetes mellitus after a pregnancy complicated by gestational diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Judith A; McCloskey, Lois; Gebel, Christina M; Iverson, Ronald E; Lee-Parritz, Aviva

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) greatly increases the risk of developing diabetes in the decade after delivery, but few women receive appropriately timed postpartum glucose testing (PPGT) or a referral to primary care (PC) for continued monitoring. This qualitative study was designed to identify barriers and facilitators to testing and referral from patient and providers' perspectives. Methods We interviewed patients and clinicians in depth about knowledge, values, priorities, challenges, and recommendations for increasing PPGT rates and PC linkage. Interviews were coded with NVIVO data analysis software, and analyzed using an implementation science framework. Results Women reported motivation to address GDM for the health of the fetus. Most women did not anticipate future diabetes for themselves, and focused on delivery outcomes rather than future health risks. Patients sought and received reassurance from clinicians, and were unlikely to discuss early onset following GDM or preventive measures. PPGT barriers described by patients included provider not mentioning the test or setting it up, transportation difficulties, work responsibilities, fatigue, concerns about fasting while breastfeeding, and timing of the test after discharge from obstetrics, and no referral to PC for follow-up. Practitioners described limited communication among multiple care providers during pregnancy and delivery, systems issues, and separation of obstetrics from PC. Conclusions Patients' barriers to PPGT included low motivation for self-care, structural obstacles, and competing priorities. Providers reported the need to balance risk with reassurance, and identified systems failures related to test timing, limitations of electronic medical record systems (EMR), lack of referrals to PC, and inadequate communication between specialties. Prevention of early onset has great potential for medical cost savings and improvements in quality of life. PMID:27347422

  16. Early coronary angioplasty for acute myocardial infarction complicated by cardiogenic shock: have novel therapies led to better results?

    PubMed

    Moreno, R; Garcia, E; Abeytua, M; Soriano, J; Acosta, J; Perez De Isla, L; Lopez De Sa, E; Rubio, R; Lopez-Sendon, J

    2000-12-01

    Patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI) and cardiogenic shock constitute a very high risk subset despite an aggressive management. The objective of this study was to evaluate if the results of early coronary angioplasty in patients with acute myocardial infarction and cardiogenic shock have changed over the last years, and to address which role the recent adjuvant therapies have played in this evolution. From 1991 to April 1999, 94 patients with acute MI and cardiogenic shock were treated with coronary angioplasty within the first 12 hours from the onset of symptoms. Temporal changes of the utilization of adjuvant therapies and operators experience were studied over these years, as well as their impact on the angiographic results and in-hospital outcome. Over the years, a progressive and significant increase on the use of coronary stents and c7E3Fab was observed, as well as an increased number of primary angioplasties performed per month. The proportion of patients treated with intraaortic balloon pump did not changed significantly over the years. An angiographic successful result (< 50% residual stenosis and TIMI flow 2 or 3) and a final TIMI grade 3 flow were obtained in 76 (80.9%) and 61 (64.9%) patients, respectively. The angiographic success rate progressively increased over the years, from 72.3% in patients treated before 1994 to 94.1% in those admitted in 1998Eth 1999 (p for trend 0.0409). The proportion of patients with a final TIMI grade 3 flow also grew progressively over the years: from 36.4% before 1994 to 76.5% after 1997 (p for trend 0. 0209). The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 63.8% (60 patients), and there was no significant change in mortality rate over the years. Therefore, apart from the growing operators experience, we have observed an incremental change in the use of coronary stents and c7E3 Fab (abciximab) in patients with acute myocardial infarction and cardiogenic shock treated with early coronary angioplasty. All these

  17. Discordance between MRI and bone scan findings in a child with acute complicated osteomyelitis: scintigraphic features that contribute to the early diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Mpalaris, V; Arsos, G; Iakovou, I; Dalpa, E; Karatzas, N

    2014-01-01

    Early diagnosis and prompt treatment of acute osteomyelitis are of paramount importance in children because they can prevent irreversible bone damage. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with its superior spatial resolution and lack of ionizing radiation is routinely preferred over bone scan for this purpose. Increased blood flow, hyperemia and focally increased tracer uptake shown by "three phase" bone scan are the typical scintigraphic findings of acute osteomyelitis. In addition, diffuse uptake along the shaft of long bones and focal "cold" lesions are two special features that may be highly suggestive of infective periostitis, soft tissue sepsis and subperiosteal abscess formation, due to the loose attachment of periosteum to bone during childhood. We present a case of complicated osteomyelitis in a child with inconclusive MRI correctly diagnosed on the basis of these special scintigraphic findings resulting in treatment change from double i.v. Vancomycin--Ceftriaxone scheme to surgical intervention. PMID:23938190

  18. Early Percutaneous Heparin-Free Veno-Venous Extra Corporeal Life Support (ECLS) is a Safe and Effective Means of Salvaging Hypoxemic Patients with Complicated Chest Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Thay-Hsiung; Shih, James Yao-Ming; Shih, Joseph Juey-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to assess the feasibility and safety of heparin-free veno-venous extracorporeal life support (VV ECLS) as a means of salvaging polytrauma patients with life-threatening hypoxemia. Methods This is a retrospective observational study on 7 consecutive trauma patients who underwent VV ECLS for severe chest trauma unresponsive to conventional measures. Results The median time to ECLS was within 10 hrs (IQR 2-53) of mechanical ventilation. Surgical interventions were performed before and during ECLS based on management priorities consistent with advanced trauma life support guidelines. No heparin was used for at least 4 days in this group with activated coagulation time (ACT) approximating 170 seconds by the 3rd and 4th day. There were no thromboembolic complications. Four patients were successfully discharged and three of these survivors had concomitant traumatic brain injury (TBI) without neurologic sequel. Conclusions Early VV ECLS can be used for salvage of patients with traumatic lung injury. Acute trauma care can be continued as needed under heparin-free ECLS without the fear of thromboembolic complications. PMID:27122937

  19. Effect of puerperal metritis on reproductive and productive performance in dairy cows in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Piccardi, M; Romero, G; Veneranda, G; Castello, E; Romero, D; Balzarini, M; Bó, G A

    2016-03-15

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the reproductive and productive performance of dairy cows with and without puerperal metritis and to evaluate the effectiveness of using a long-acting ceftiofur preparation. Dairy cows in one dairy farm, calving from July 2009 to January 2010, were examined between 3 and 14 days postpartum and classified on the basis of vaginal discharge into three groups: cows with normal discharge (control; C); cows with a bloody mucus purulent or pathologic nonfetid discharge (PnFD), and cows with bloody mucopurulent or purulent fetid discharge (PFD). Cows in C and PnFD groups were not treated, whereas those in the PFD group were randomly allocated to receive 2.2 mg/kg of ceftiofur subcutaneously behind the ear (PFD-T) or remain untreated (PFD-No T). From the 640 cows examined, 58.2% formed the C group, 13.4% formed the PnFD group, and 28.4% formed the PFD group. Survival curves differed between cows in the C group and PFD-No T group (P = 0.0013) and between PFD-No T versus PFD-T group (P = 0.0006). Survival curves of PnFD were intermediate and did not differ from those in the C group (P = 0.2) and PFD-T group (P = 0.1) but tended to be different from the PFD-No T group (P = 0.056). The postpartum interval to achieve a 25% pregnancy rate was 72 days for cows in the C group, 73 days for the PFD-T group, 83 days for PnFD group, and 95 days for the PFD-No T group. The chance of pregnancy in a cow in the C group was 1.98 times higher (95% confidence interval = 1.33, 3.08) and in cows in the PFD-T group was 2.16 times higher (95% confidence interval = 1.37, 3.50) than that in the PFD-No T group. Finally, the chance of pregnancy in cows in the PnFD group tended to be higher (P = 0.08) than that in the PFD-No T group but did not differ from the other two groups. Cumulative 305-day milk production was higher (P < 0.0001) in C group than those with vaginal discharge, regardless of fetidness and regardless of treatment. It is concluded that

  20. Early diagnosis and follow-up of chronic active Epstein–Barr-virus-associated cardiovascular complications with cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shu; Li, Xiao; Cao, Jian; Wu, Di; Kong, Lingyan; Lin, Lu; Jin, Zhengyu; An, Jing; Wang, Yining

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Chronic active Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infection (CAEBV) is characterized as chronic or recurrent mononucleosis-like symptoms and elevated EBV deoxyribonucleic acid (EBV-DNA) copies. Cardiovascular complications have high morbidity and mortality. The treatment regimen for CAEBV has not been established yet, resulting in poor prognoses. Herein, we present a case of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) evaluation with a series of sequences for CAEBV-associated cardiovascular involvement, which has never been reported. Case presentation: A 16-year-old female (body weight, 55 kg) developed a persistent fever and a positive EBV-DNA level of 28,000 copies/mL. Computed tomography angiography (CTA) showed aneurysms involving the aorta and its major branches, as well as multiple aneurysms and stenoses of the coronary arteries. CMRI of the coronary arteries depicted the dilution and stenosis of the arterial lumen as well as the thickening of the arterial wall. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) showed subendocardial and transmural delayed enhancement of the left ventricle, suggesting myocardial infarction. CAEBV and associated cardiovascular complications were diagnosed. After treatment with Medrol and Leflunomide, the clinical manifestation and serological parameters reversed to normal. However, the EBV-DNA level increased again to 13,900 copies/mL 2 months later. A follow-up with aorta CTA showed that the arterial walls of the bilateral common iliac artery aneurysms were thicker with new-onset mural thrombi. The aorta CTA also showed new-onset occlusion of the right coronary artery, but a follow-up of CMRI at the same day did not find new-onset delayed enhancement lesion. Conclusion: This case reminds clinicians of the vital importance of early diagnosis and close follow-up of CAEBV-associated cardiovascular complications. With cine imaging, coronary artery imaging, LGE imaging, and other novel techniques, CMRI can effectively and

  1. Successful Reduction of Acute Puerperal Uterine Inversion with the Use of a Bakri Postpartum Balloon

    PubMed Central

    Ida, Akinori; Ito, Koichi; Kubota, Yoko; Nosaka, Maiko; Kato, Hiroshi; Tsuji, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Uterine inversion is a state wherein the endometrial surface is inverted. Although this condition may be observed in nonpregnant women, it most commonly develops at the time of delivery. In the present case, a 37-year-old woman without any remarkable history developed acute puerperal uterine inversion after the successful induction of labor. Following the delivery, she complained twice of severe lower abdominal pain; subsequently, hemorrhage was noted at the site of partial detachment of the placenta. These findings led to a diagnosis of placenta accreta, and the patient developed a state of shock. A Bakri postpartum balloon was inserted into the uterine cavity under ultrasonographic guidance and was filled with physiological saline for treatment of this condition. With this procedure, the uterine inversion was completely reduced and the hemorrhage was stopped. Moreover, no reinversion was observed in the postoperative period. These findings suggest that a Bakri postpartum balloon can be used to noninvasively reduce uterine inversion and prevent its recurrence. PMID:25954560

  2. Complications of nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Park, Se Jin; Shin, Jae Il

    2011-08-01

    Nephrotic syndrome (NS) is one of the most common glomerular diseases that affect children. Renal histology reveals the presence of minimal change nephrotic syndrome (MCNS) in more than 80% of these patients. Most patients with MCNS have favorable outcomes without complications. However, a few of these children have lesions of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, suffer from severe and prolonged proteinuria, and are at high risk for complications. Complications of NS are divided into two categories: disease-associated and drug-related complications. Disease-associated complications include infections (e.g., peritonitis, sepsis, cellulitis, and chicken pox), thromboembolism (e.g., venous thromboembolism and pulmonary embolism), hypovolemic crisis (e.g., abdominal pain, tachycardia, and hypotension), cardiovascular problems (e.g., hyperlipidemia), acute renal failure, anemia, and others (e.g., hypothyroidism, hypocalcemia, bone disease, and intussusception). The main pathomechanism of disease-associated complications originates from the large loss of plasma proteins in the urine of nephrotic children. The majority of children with MCNS who respond to treatment with corticosteroids or cytotoxic agents have smaller and milder complications than those with steroid-resistant NS. Corticosteroids, alkylating agents, cyclosporin A, and mycophenolate mofetil have often been used to treat NS, and these drugs have treatment-related complications. Early detection and appropriate treatment of these complications will improve outcomes for patients with NS. PMID:22087198

  3. Anorexia nervosa - medical complications.

    PubMed

    Mehler, Philip S; Brown, Carrie

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to other mental health disorders, eating disorders have a high prevalence of concomitant medical complications. Specifically, patients suffering from anorexia nervosa (AN) have a litany of medical complications which are commonly present as part of their eating disorders. Almost every body system can be adversely, affected by this state of progressive malnutrition. Moreover, some of the complications can have permanent adverse effects even after there is a successful program of nutritional rehabilitation and weight restoration. Within this article we will review all body systems affected by AN. There is also salient information about both, how to diagnose these medical complications and which are the likely ones to result in permanent sequelae if not diagnosed and addressed early in the course of AN. In a subsequent article, the definitive medical treatment for these complications will be presented in a clinically practical manner. PMID:25834735

  4. Puerperal and parental experiences alter rat preferences for pup odors via changes in the oxytocin system

    PubMed Central

    MUNETOMO, Arisa; ISHII, Hirotaka; MIYAMOTO, Takenori; SAKUMA, Yasuo; KONDO, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    In the rat, induction of maternal behavior depends on the parity of the female. For example, nulliparous (NP) females need longer exposure to pups than multiparous (MP) or lactating (L) females to exhibit similar maternal behavior. In this study, we investigated the role of brain oxytocin in the approaching behavior of these female rats. Olfactory preferences for pup odors were examined for 8 consecutive days. Each preference test was followed by direct overnight exposure to pups. On the 8th day, MP and L, but not NP females showed robust pup-odor preferences. After the behavioral test, half of the females were exposed to pups for 2 h, whereas the other half were not. The females were then sacrificed to analyze brain oxytocin (OXT) and vasopressin (AVP) activities by cFos immunohistochemistry and to quantify their receptor mRNA expression using real-time PCR. In the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), the percentage of cFos-positive OXT neurons was significantly larger in MP and L females than in NP females after pup exposure. No significant differences were found in cFos expression in OXT neurons of the supraoptic nucleus (SON) or in AVP neurons of either the PVN or SON. Expression of OXT receptor mRNA in the medial preoptic area and amygdala of the control groups was also higher in MP females than in NP females. Finally, we demonstrated that infusion of OXT into the lateral ventricle of NP females promoted preferences for pup odors. These results indicate that puerperal and parental experiences enhance the responsiveness of OXT neurons in the PVN to pup stimuli and establish olfactory preferences for these odors in a parity-dependent manner. PMID:26460689

  5. Leukotriene B4 enhances innate immune defense against the puerperal sepsis agent Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Soares, Elyara M; Mason, Katie L; Rogers, Lisa M; Serezani, Carlos H; Faccioli, Lucia H; Aronoff, David M

    2013-02-15

    Puerperal sepsis is a leading cause of maternal mortality worldwide. Streptococcus pyogenes [group A Streptococcus; (GAS)] is a major etiologic agent of severe postpartum sepsis, yet little is known regarding the pathogenesis of these infections. Tissue macrophages provide innate defense against GAS, and their actions are highly regulated. The intracellular second messenger cAMP can negatively regulate macrophage actions against GAS. Because leukotriene (LT) B(4) has been shown to suppress intracellular cAMP in macrophages, we hypothesized that it could enhance innate defenses against GAS. We assessed the capacity of LTB(4) to modulate antistreptococcal actions of human macrophages, including placental and decidual macrophages and used a novel intrauterine infection model of GAS in mice lacking the 5-lipoxygenase enzyme to determine the role of endogenous LTs in host defense against this pathogen. Animals lacking 5-lipoxygenase were significantly more vulnerable to intrauterine GAS infection than were wild-type mice and showed enhanced dissemination of bacteria out of the uterus and a more robust inflammatory response than did wild-type mice. In addition, LTB(4) reduced intracellular cAMP levels via the BLT1 receptor and was a potent stimulant of macrophage phagocytosis and NADPH oxidase-dependent intracellular killing of GAS. Importantly, interference was observed between the macrophage immunomodulatory actions of LTB(4) and the cAMP-inducing lipid PGE(2), suggesting that interplay between pro- and anti-inflammatory compounds may be important in vivo. This work underscores the potential for pharmacological targeting of lipid mediator signaling cascades in the treatment of invasive GAS infections. PMID:23325886

  6. HHV-6 encephalitis may complicate the early phase after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Detection by qualitative multiplex PCR and subsequent quantitative real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Inazawa, Natsuko; Hori, Tsukasa; Yamamoto, Masaki; Hatakeyama, Naoki; Yoto, Yuko; Nojima, Masanori; Yasui, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Shimizu, Norio; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki

    2016-02-01

    Viral reactivation following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) can cause various complications especially viral encephalitis. In this prospective study, we investigated the correlation of post-HSCT viral reactivation in blood with CNS dysfunction. We employed a multiplex PCR that detects 13 kinds of viruses as a first-line screening test and real-time PCR for subsequent quantitative evaluation. Five hundred ninety-one whole blood samples were collected from 105 patients from before until 42 days after HSCT. Seven patients developed CNS dysfunction such as altered consciousness. In six of the seven, the multiplex PCR test detected HHV-6 DNA in at least one sample. In contrast, DNA from other viruses, such as CMV, EBV, HHV-7, adenovirus, and HBV was never detected in any of the seven patients throughout the study period. Quantitative measurement of whole blood HHV-6 DNA levels demonstrated four of the six HHV-6 DNA loads were elevated at successive time points during the CNS dysfunction. In addition, the virus DNA peaks were temporally associated with the development of CNS dysfunction. CSF was tested in two of the four patients and high HHV-6 DNA levels comparable to those in whole blood were confirmed in both. These four patients were, thus, suspected to have developed HHV-6 encephalitis, a rate of 3.8% in the study population. Our results suggest that early diagnosis of probable HHV-6 encephalitis can be improved by confirming high HHV-6 DNA load in blood. PMID:26241219

  7. Early-switch/early-discharge opportunities for hospitalized patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus complicated skin and soft tissue infections: proof of concept in the United Arab Emirates

    PubMed Central

    El Houfi, Ashraf; Javed, Nadeem; Solem, Caitlyn T; Macahilig, Cynthia; Stephens, Jennifer M; Raghubir, Nirvana; Chambers, Richard; Li, Jim Z; Haider, Seema

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To describe real-world treatment patterns and health care resource use and to estimate opportunities for early-switch (ES) from intravenous (IV) to oral (PO) antibiotics and early-discharge (ED) for patients hospitalized in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) complicated skin and soft tissue infections. Methods This retrospective observational medical chart review study enrolled physicians from four UAE sites to collect data for 24 patients with documented MRSA complicated skin and soft tissue infections, hospitalized between July 2010 and June 2011, and discharged alive by July 2011. Data include clinical characteristics and outcomes, hospital length of stay (LOS), MRSA-targeted IV and PO antibiotic use, and ES and ED eligibility using literature-based and expert-validated criteria. Results Five included patients (20.8%) were switched from IV to PO antibiotics while being inpatients. Actual length of MRSA-active treatment was 10.8±7.0 days, with 9.8±6.6 days of IV therapy. Patients were hospitalized for a mean 13.9±9.3 days. The most frequent initial MRSA-active therapies used were vancomycin (37.5%), linezolid (16.7%), and clindamycin (16.7%). Eight patients were discharged with MRSA-active antibiotics, with linezolid prescribed most frequently (n=3; 37.5%). Fifteen patients (62.5%) met ES criteria and potentially could have discontinued IV therapy 8.3±6.0 days sooner, and eight (33.3%) met ED criteria and potentially could have been discharged 10.9±5.8 days earlier. Conclusion While approximately one-fifth of patients were switched from IV to PO antibiotics in the UAE, there were clear opportunities for further optimization of health care resource use. Over half of UAE patients hospitalized for MRSA complicated skin and soft tissue infections could be eligible for ES, with one-third eligible for ED opportunities, resulting in substantial potential for reductions in IV days and bed days. PMID

  8. Diphtheria Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Diphtheria Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Diphtheria Home About Diphtheria Causes and Transmission Symptoms Complications ...

  9. Ocular complications of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Sayin, Nihat; Kara, Necip; Pekel, Gökhan

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a important health problem that induces ernestful complications and it causes significant morbidity owing to specific microvascular complications such as, retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy, and macrovascular complications such as, ischaemic heart disease, and peripheral vasculopathy. It can affect children, young people and adults and is becoming more common. Ocular complications associated with DM are progressive and rapidly becoming the world’s most significant cause of morbidity and are preventable with early detection and timely treatment. This review provides an overview of five main ocular complications associated with DM, diabetic retinopathy and papillopathy, cataract, glaucoma, and ocular surface diseases. PMID:25685281

  10. Ocular complications of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Sayin, Nihat; Kara, Necip; Pekel, Gökhan

    2015-02-15

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a important health problem that induces ernestful complications and it causes significant morbidity owing to specific microvascular complications such as, retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy, and macrovascular complications such as, ischaemic heart disease, and peripheral vasculopathy. It can affect children, young people and adults and is becoming more common. Ocular complications associated with DM are progressive and rapidly becoming the world's most significant cause of morbidity and are preventable with early detection and timely treatment. This review provides an overview of five main ocular complications associated with DM, diabetic retinopathy and papillopathy, cataract, glaucoma, and ocular surface diseases. PMID:25685281

  11. Diagnosis of acute puerperal metritis by electronic nose device analysis of vaginal discharge in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Burfeind, O; Bruins, M; Bos, A; Sannmann, I; Voigtsberger, R; Heuwieser, W

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the diagnostic accuracy of an electronic nose device using vaginal discharge samples to diagnose acute puerperal metritis (APM) in dairy cows. Uterine fluid was sampled manually with a gloved hand and under sterile conditions for electronic nose device analysis (day in milk (DIM) 2, 5, and 10) and bacteriologic examination (DIM 5), respectively, and on additional days, if APM was diagnosed during the daily clinical examinations. A dataset containing samples from 70 cows was used to create a model and to validate the APM status predicted by this model, respectively. Half of the dataset (n = 35; 14 healthy and 21 metritic cows) was provided with information regarding the APM diagnosis and contained all three measurements (DIM 2, 5, and 10) for each cow and was used as a training set whereas the second half was blinded (n = 35; 14 healthy and 21 metritic cows) and contained only the samples collected on DIM 5 of each cow and was used to validate the created prediction model. A receiver operating characteristic curve was calculated using the prediction results of the validation test. The best observed sensitivity was 100% with specificity of 91.6% when using a threshold value of 0.3. The calculated P-value for the receiver operating characteristic curve was less than 0.01. Overall, Escherichia coli was isolated in eight of 28 (28.6%) and 22 of 42 (52.4%) samples collected from healthy and metritic cows, respectively. Trueperella pyogenes and Fusobacterium necrophorum were isolated in 14 and six of 28 (50.0% and 21.4%) and 17 and 16 of 42 (40.5% and 38.1%) samples collected from healthy and metritic cows, respectively. The prevalence of Escherichia coli and Trueperella pyogenes was similar in the samples obtained from metritic cows used for the training set and the validation test. The results are promising especially because of the objective nature of the measurements obtained by the electronic nose device. PMID:24746098

  12. Complications of foam sclerotherapy.

    PubMed

    Cavezzi, A; Parsi, K

    2012-03-01

    Foam sclerotherapy may result in drug and/or gas-related complications of a generalized or localized nature. Significant complications include anaphylactic/anaphylactoid reactions (very rare), deep vein thrombosis (1-3%), stroke (0.01%), superficial venous thrombosis (4.4%), tissue necrosis (variable frequency), oedema (0.5%) and nerve damage (0.2%). Cosmetic complications include telangiectatic matting (15-24%) and pigmentation (10-30%). Patent foramen ovale and other cardio-pulmonary right-to-left shunts seem to play a role in the systemic gas-related complications. In conclusion, foam sclerotherapy is characterized by an overall high degree of safety, though special attention should be given to the embolic and thrombotic complications. Good technique, adequate imaging, general precautions and compliance with post-treatment instructions may help avoid some of the adverse events and an appropriate early intervention may minimize possible sequelae. Higher volumes of sclerosant foam have been attributed to local and distant thrombotic complications and should be avoided. PMID:22312067

  13. Early Urinary Markers of Diabetic Kidney Disease: A Nested Case-Control Study From the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT)

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Elizabeth O; Erhard, Penny; Sun, Wanjie; Genuth, Saul; Weiss, Miriam F

    2010-01-01

    Background Urinary markers were tested as predictors of macroalbuminuria or microalbuminuria in type 1 diabetes. Study Design Nested case:control of participants in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) Setting & Participants Eighty-seven cases of microalbuminuria were matched to 174 controls in a 1:2 ratio, while 4 cases were matched to 4 controls in a 1:1 ratio, resulting in 91 cases and 178 controls for microalbuminuria. Fifty-five cases of macroalbuminuria were matched to 110 controls in a 1:2 ratio. Controls were free of micro/macroalbuminuria when their matching case first developed micro/macroalbuminuria. Predictors Urinary N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase, pentosidine, AGE fluorescence, albumin excretion rate (AER) Outcomes Incident microalbuminuria (two consecutive annual AER > 40 but <= 300 mg/day), or macroalbuminuria (AER > 300 mg/day) Measurements Stored urine samples from DCCT entry, and 1–9 years later when macroalbuminuria or microalbuminuria occurred, were measured for the lysosomal enzyme, N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase, and the advanced glycosylation end-products (AGEs) pentosidine and AGE-fluorescence. AER and adjustor variables were obtained from the DCCT. Results Sub-microalbuminuric levels of AER at baseline independently predicted microalbuminuria (adjusted OR 1.83; p<.001) and macroalbuminuria (adjusted OR 1.82; p<.001). Baseline N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase independently predicted macroalbuminuria (adjusted OR 2.26; p<.001), and microalbuminuria (adjusted OR 1.86; p<.001). Baseline pentosidine predicted macroalbuminuria (adjusted OR 6.89; p=.002). Baseline AGE fluorescence predicted microalbuminuria (adjusted OR 1.68; p=.02). However, adjusted for N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase, pentosidine and AGE-fluorescence lost predictive association with macroalbuminuria and microalbuminuria, respectively. Limitations Use of angiotensin converting-enzyme inhibitors was not directly ascertained, although their use was proscribed during the

  14. Comparative Microbial Analysis of Paired Amniotic Fluid and Cord Blood from Pregnancies Complicated by Preterm Birth and Early-Onset Neonatal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaowei; Buhimschi, Catalin S.; Temoin, Stephanie; Bhandari, Vineet; Han, Yiping W.; Buhimschi, Irina A.

    2013-01-01

    Background 16S rRNA-based genomic analyses have revolutionized our understanding of infectious diseases. Many cases which were recognized as “idiopathic” are now known to have an infectious etiology. Here, we present a proof-of-concept study to examine the microbial link between intra-amniotic infection (IAI) and early-onset neonatal sepsis (EONS). Results Using culture independent methods, we analyzed paired amniotic fluid (AF) and cord blood (CB) samples from 36 singleton pregnancies complicated by preterm birth (PTB), IAI, and/or EONS. PTB cases were grouped as 1) Group 1– neonatal blood culture-positive EONS (n = 6). 2) Group 2– neonatal blood culture-negative presumed EONS with positive IAI (n = 16). 3) Group 3– neonatal blood culture-negative presumed EONS with no IAI (n = 7); 4) Group 4– no EONS or IAI (n = 7). In addition, samples from term healthy deliveries (n = 8) served as technical controls. A total of 31 species (15 non-redundant) were identified in AF, of which only 1/3 were cultivated. Significantly fewer microorganisms were detected in CB, with a total of 18 species (7 non-redundant) identified, of which only 2 (Escherichia coli, Streptococcus agalactiae) were cultivated. Of those, Bergeyella, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Sneathia sanguinegens had not been detected in EONS before. The novel species identified in AF by PCR include Peptoniphilus harei and Lachnospiraceae sp. The majority (72%) of CB species were also detected in the matching AF, with E. coli and F. nucleatum as the most prevalent. The 16S rRNA sequences of paired AF and CB were 99.9–100% identical, while no identical sequences were found between different pregnancies. Conclusions Previously unrecognized, uncultivated or difficult-to-cultivate species are implicated in EONS. Microbial species in paired AF and CB likely share the same infectious origin. Given its prevalence in EONS, F. nucleatum should be placed on the same importance scale as E. coli

  15. Benzoyl-L-arginine methyl ester (BAME)-esterase activity in human plasma during the gravidic-puerperal cycle.

    PubMed

    Salles Meirelles, R

    1977-01-01

    Benzoyl-L-arginine methyl ester (BAME)-esterase activity of plasma was measured in women going through the gravidic-puerperal cycle and compared with plasma of non-pregnant women. Plasma from women in the 36th to 40th week of pregnancy hydrolyzes BAME two times more rapidly than that from non-pregnant women. During pregnancy, BAME-esterase activity in plasma increases progressively up to the 40th week, decreases during labor, and after delivery reaches the same level as in non-pregnant women. The BAME-esterase activity of plasma was affected by the storage temperature, with differences demonstrable between -20 and -4 C and between pregnant and non-pregnant women. PMID:754510

  16. The effect of puerperal uterine disease on uterine involution in cows assessed by Doppler sonography of the uterine arteries.

    PubMed

    Heppelmann, M; Weinert, M; Brömmling, A; Piechotta, M; Hoedemaker, M; Bollwein, H

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of puerperal uterine disease on uterine blood flow using trans-rectal Doppler sonography. Lactating Holstein Friesian cows (n=44) were divided into two groups based on whether they were healthy (UD-; n=23) or had uterine disease (UD+; n=21) defined as retained fetal membranes and/or metritis. General clinical examination, vaginoscopy, trans-rectal palpation, and trans-rectal B-Mode sonography were conducted on Days 8, 11, 18, 25 and then every 10 days until Day 65 after calving. Doppler sonography of the uterine arteries was conducted on Day 8, during diestrus after the second ovulation (Days 40-60 after calving) and during diestrus before breeding (Days 63-75 after calving). Cows with uterine disease had greater (P<0.05) uterine size as assessed trans-rectally compared with cows of the UD group. Sonographic measurements on Day 11 after parturition revealed a greater (P<0.05) horn diameter in cows of the UD+ than in the UD- group. Both uterine size and uterine horn diameter decreased more earlier following parturition (P<0.05) in cows of the UD- group. Blood flow volume (BFV) was greater and pulsatility index was less on Day 8 after calving in cows of UD+ than UD- group (P<0.05). In cows of the UD-, but not in those of the UD+ group, there was a further reduction in BFV subsequent to Day 45 after calving (P<0.05). The results of this study show that uterine blood flow measures by trans-rectal Doppler sonography are affected by puerperal uterine disease. PMID:24275717

  17. Thrombophilia and Pregnancy Complications

    PubMed Central

    Simcox, Louise E.; Ormesher, Laura; Tower, Clare; Greer, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of strong evidence associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes and thrombophilia in pregnancy. These problems include both early (recurrent miscarriage) and late placental vascular-mediated problems (fetal loss, pre-eclampsia, placental abruption and intra-uterine growth restriction). Due to poor quality case-control and cohort study designs, there is often an increase in the relative risk of these complications associated with thrombophilia, particularly recurrent early pregnancy loss, late fetal loss and pre-eclampsia, but the absolute risk remains very small. It appears that low-molecular weight heparin has other benefits on the placental vascular system besides its anticoagulant properties. Its use is in the context of antiphospholipid syndrome and recurrent pregnancy loss and also in women with implantation failure to improve live birth rates. There is currently no role for low-molecular weight heparin to prevent late placental-mediated complications in patients with inherited thrombophilia and this may be due to small patient numbers in the studies involved in summarising the evidence. There is potential for low-molecular weight heparin to improve pregnancy outcomes in women with prior severe vascular complications of pregnancy such as early-onset intra-uterine growth restriction and pre-eclampsia but further high quality randomised controlled trials are required to answer this question. PMID:26633369

  18. Neurologic complications following pediatric renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Partha S; Kwon, Charles; Klein, Melanie; Corder, Julie; Ghosh, Debabrata

    2014-06-01

    We reviewed neurologic complications after renal transplantation in children over a 20-year period. Neurologic complications were classified as early (within 3 months) and delayed (beyond 3 months). Of 115 children, 10 (8.7%) had complications. Early complications were found in 4.35% of patients: seizures in 4 (posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy syndrome due to immunosuppressant toxicity, sepsis/presumed meningitis, and indeterminate) and headaches in 1. One patient with seizures received levetiracetam for 6 months and 1 with headaches received amitriptyline prophylaxis. Late complications were noted in 4.35% of patients: seizures in 3 (posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy syndrome due to hypertension, hypertensive encephalopathy), headaches in 2, and tremors in 1. Two patients with seizures were treated with anti-epilepsy medications; 1 with migraine received cyproheptadine prophylaxis. Neurologic complications develop in children after renal transplantation. Seizures due to posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy syndrome were the commonest complication. Early detection and appropriate management of these complications is important. PMID:23752071

  19. Late complications of tracheotomy.

    PubMed

    Wood, D E; Mathisen, D J

    1991-09-01

    Complications of tracheotomy are largely preventable. Although some authors cite these complications as indications for prolonged endotracheal intubation to avoid tracheotomy, others believe that the laryngotracheal complications of prolonged endotracheal intubation warrant early tracheotomy. Obviously, unnecessary tracheotomies should not be performed, and the controversy regarding the timing of conversion of endotracheal intubation to tracheotomy is handled in an earlier article in this issue. We feel, however, that a properly performed tracheotomy has a low incidence of complications that are more easily managed than are the complex laryngotracheal complications of prolonged endotracheal intubation. Significant post-tracheotomy tracheal stenosis occurs in 8% of patients and is secondary to an overly large tracheotomy stoma or damage at the tracheostomy tube cuff site. Stoma stenosis can be minimized by not making an overly large tracheal stoma and by prevention of undue leverage on the tracheostomy tube. Cuff stenosis can be minimized by the use of the high-volume low-pressure cuffs with careful prevention of overdistention of the cuff. Bronchoscopic dilatation, laser resection, and Silastic T-tube placement provide control of the airway until definitive surgical resection and reconstruction can be performed safely. Tracheoesophageal fistula is an uncommon but life-threatening complication that can be prevented by avoiding overdistention of the tracheostomy tube cuff and by avoiding the concomitant use of a stiff nasogastric tube. These patients are best managed conservatively until they are able to be weaned from a ventilator. A single-stage repair of both the esophagus and the trachea should then be done. Tracheoinnominate artery fistula can be avoided by correct placement of the tracheostomy stoma through the second and third tracheal rings rather than lower in the trachea and by avoidance of overinflation of tracheostomy tube cuffs. PMID:1934960

  20. Hypoglycemia: The neglected complication

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Mukherjee, Jagat Jyoti; Venkataraman, Subramanium; Bantwal, Ganapathi; Shaikh, Shehla; Saboo, Banshi; Das, Ashok Kumar; Ramachandran, Ambady

    2013-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is an important complication of glucose-lowering therapy in patients with diabetes mellitus. Attempts made at intensive glycemic control invariably increases the risk of hypoglycemia. A six-fold increase in deaths due to diabetes has been attributed to patients experiencing severe hypoglycemia in comparison to those not experiencing severe hypoglycemia Repeated episodes of hypoglycemia can lead to impairment of the counter-regulatory system with the potential for development of hypoglycemia unawareness. The short- and long-term complications of diabetes related hypoglycemia include precipitation of acute cerebrovascular disease, myocardial infarction, neurocognitive dysfunction, retinal cell death and loss of vision in addition to health-related quality of life issues pertaining to sleep, driving, employment, recreational activities involving exercise and travel. There is an urgent need to examine the clinical spectrum and burden of hypoglycemia so that adequate control measures can be implemented against this neglected life-threatening complication. Early recognition of hypoglycemia risk factors, self-monitoring of blood glucose, selection of appropriate treatment regimens with minimal or no risk of hypoglycemia and appropriate educational programs for healthcare professionals and patients with diabetes are the major ways forward to maintain good glycemic control, minimize the risk of hypoglycemia and thereby prevent long-term complications. PMID:24083163

  1. Cardiovascular Complications of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Gongora, Maria Carolina; Wenger, Nanette K.

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy causes significant metabolic and hemodynamic changes in a woman’s physiology to allow for fetal growth. The inability to adapt to these changes might result in the development of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (hypertension, preeclampsia or eclampsia), gestational diabetes and preterm birth. Contrary to previous beliefs these complications are not limited to the pregnancy period and may leave permanent vascular and metabolic damage. There is in addition, a direct association between these disorders and increased risk of future cardiovascular disease (CVD, including hypertension, ischemic heart disease, heart failure and stroke) and diabetes mellitus. Despite abundant evidence of this association, women who present with these complications of pregnancy do not receive adequate postpartum follow up and counseling regarding their increased risk of future CVD. The postpartum period in these women represents a unique opportunity to intervene with lifestyle modifications designed to reduce the development of premature cardiovascular complications. In some cases it allows early diagnosis and treatment of chronic hypertension or diabetes mellitus. The awareness of this relationship is growing in the medical community, especially among obstetricians and primary care physicians, who play a pivotal role in detecting these complications and assuring appropriate follow up. PMID:26473833

  2. Early goal-directed therapy after major surgery reduces complications and duration of hospital stay. A randomised, controlled trial [ISRCTN38797445

    PubMed Central

    Pearse, Rupert; Dawson, Deborah; Fawcett, Jayne; Rhodes, Andrew; Grounds, R Michael; Bennett, E David

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Goal-directed therapy (GDT) has been shown to improve outcome when commenced before surgery. This requires pre-operative admission to the intensive care unit (ICU). In cardiac surgery, GDT has proved effective when commenced after surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of post-operative GDT on the incidence of complications and duration of hospital stay in patients undergoing general surgery. Methods This was a randomised controlled trial with concealed allocation. High-risk general surgical patients were allocated to post-operative GDT to attain an oxygen delivery index of 600 ml min-1 m-2 or to conventional management. Cardiac output was measured by lithium indicator dilution and pulse power analysis. Patients were followed up for 60 days. Results Sixty-two patients were randomised to GDT and 60 patients to control treatment. The GDT group received more intravenous colloid (1,907 SD ± 878 ml versus 1,204 SD ± 898 ml; p < 0.0001) and dopexamine (55 patients (89%) versus 1 patient (2%); p < 0.0001). Fewer GDT patients developed complications (27 patients (44%) versus 41 patients (68%); p = 0.003, relative risk 0.63; 95% confidence intervals 0.46 to 0.87). The number of complications per patient was also reduced (0.7 SD ± 0.9 per patient versus 1.5 SD ± 1.5 per patient; p = 0.002). The median duration of hospital stay in the GDT group was significantly reduced (11 days (IQR 7 to 15) versus 14 days (IQR 11 to 27); p = 0.001). There was no significant difference in mortality (seven patients (11.3%) versus nine patients (15%); p = 0.59). Conclusion Post-operative GDT is associated with reductions in post-operative complications and duration of hospital stay. The beneficial effects of GDT may be achieved while avoiding the difficulties of pre-operative ICU admission. PMID:16356219

  3. Pulmonary complications of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ng, M Y; Flight, W; Smith, E

    2014-03-01

    The life expectancy of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) has steadily increased over recent decades with a corresponding increase in the frequency of complications of the disease. Radiologists are increasingly involved with managing and identifying the pulmonary complications of CF. This article reviews the common manifestations of CF lung disease as well as updating radiologists with a number of less well-known complications of the condition. Early and accurate detection of the pulmonary effects of CF are increasingly important to prevent irreversible lung damage and give patients the greatest possibility of benefiting from the new therapies becoming available, which correct the underlying defect causing CF. PMID:24361142

  4. Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion for the Correction of Spondylolisthesis and Adult Degenerative Scoliosis in High-Risk Patients: Early Radiographic Results and Complications

    PubMed Central

    Waddell, Brad; Briski, David; Qadir, Rabah; Godoy, Gustavo; Houston, Allison Howard; Rudman, Ernest; Zavatsky, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Background Lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) is not associated with many of the complications seen in other interbody fusion techniques. This study used computed tomography (CT) scans, the radiographic gold standard, to assess interbody fusion rates achieved utilizing the LLIF technique in high-risk patients. Methods We performed a retrospective review of patients who underwent LLIF between January 2008 and July 2013. Forty-nine patients underwent nonstaged or staged LLIF on 119 levels with posterior correction and augmentation. Per protocol, patients received CT scans at their 1-year follow-up. Of the 49 patients, 21 patients with LLIF intervention on 54 levels met inclusion criteria. Two board-certified musculoskeletal radiologists and the senior surgeon (JZ) assessed fusion. Results Of the 21 patients, 6 patients had had previous lumbar surgery, and the cohort's comorbidities included osteoporosis, diabetes, obesity, and smoking, among others. Postoperative complications occurred in 12 (57.1%) patients and included anterior thigh pain and weakness in 6 patients, all of which resolved by 6 months. Two cases of proximal junctional kyphosis occurred, along with 1 case of hardware pullout. Two cases of abdominal atonia occurred. By CT scan assessment, each radiologist found fusion was achieved in 53 of 54 levels (98%). The radiologists' findings were in agreement with the senior surgeon. Conclusion Several studies have evaluated LLIF fusion and reported fusion rates between 88%-96%. Our results demonstrate high fusion rates using this technique, despite multiple comorbidities in the patient population. Spanning the ring apophysis with large LLIF cages along with supplemental posterior pedicle screw augmentation can enhance stability of the fusion segment and increase fusion rates. PMID:24688329

  5. [Inhibition of initial puerperal and postabortion lactation using oral prostaglandin E2 (Dinoprostone)].

    PubMed

    Berić, B; Mitreski, A; Kuzmancev, O; Curcić, A; Ilić, V; Vukelić, J; Budakov, D

    1992-01-01

    Authors present their experience in oral administration of Prostaglandin E2 (Dinoproston, Upjohn) during postpartal and postabortal period (à 0.5 mg after legal pregnancy interruption) in suppression of lactation. Indications for postpartal lactation suppression were such as: stillbirth, postpartal neonatal death and maternal negative attitude towards breast feeding. The patients in whom the suppression of lactation was applied were of generative age (18-40 years) either primiparas or multiparas. All were delivered vaginally with no extra intrapartal or postpartal complications being the same in legal pregnancy interruptions which were performed by application of intravaginal, intracervical and intramuscular Prostaglandin preparations. The patients were administered 1 tbl od 0.5 mg Dinoproston preparation every 6-7 hours, 48 h after the delivery, i.e. 2 tbl in total (after meal). This method of lactation suppression was applied in 50 patients during 1990. Satisfactory results were achieved in all cases, while negative side effects and complications were not noted. Oral administration of PGE2 was found very efficient in postpartal and postabortal lactation suppression while compared with previously applied methods such as Estrogen-Testosterone preparation, i.e. small doses of Bromergon applied during 10-14 days. Oral administration of PG2 is more efficient and in a certain way more comfortable in relation to the previously applied methods. PMID:1344441

  6. Does uterine gauze packing increase the risk of puerperal morbidity in the management of postpartum hemorrhage during caesarean section: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yu-Na; Ma, Jue; Wang, Xiao-Jin; Wang, Bing-Shun

    2015-01-01

    Background: To compare the outcomes especially the puerperal morbidity of uterine gauze packing (UGP) with those of uterine balloon tamponade (UBT) in the management of postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) during caesarean section (c-section). Methods: It was considered success as no requirement for either a further therapy or hysterectomy for PPH. The postpartum infection risk was pragmatically measured as puerperal morbidity. Results: The identified PPH subjects were subdivided into two groups for comparison, in which UGP or UBT was used as second-line therapy for women undergoing c-sections between January 2010 and September 2014. Of the 318 c-section subjects initially treated by basic managements for expected PPH, 99 cases underwent UGP and 66 UBT as the second-line therapies to stop persistent bleeding. The success rates of the UGP and UBT groups were 90.91 and 87.88%, respectively. Only one patient in UBT group resorted to hysterectomy. The respective rates of puerperal morbidity were 10.10 and 13.64%, with risk ratio of 0.74 (95% CI: 0.32, 1.72). There were no significant differences between the two groups even after the adjustment for potential confounding factors. Conclusion: UGP appears to be effective in treating PPH during c-section without an observed increase in the risk of potential postpartum infection when compared with UBT. UGP could be recommended as routine for patients who are not responding to conventional basic therapies in addressing PPH, along with the provision of appropriate training. PMID:26550320

  7. The effect of puerperal uterine disease on histopathologic findings and mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines of the endometrium in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Heppelmann, M; Weinert, M; Ulbrich, S E; Brömmling, A; Piechotta, M; Merbach, S; Schoon, H-A; Hoedemaker, M; Bollwein, H

    2016-04-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of puerperal uterine disease on histopathologic findings and gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines in the endometrium of postpuerperal dairy cows; 49 lactating Holstein-Friesian cows were divided into two groups, one without (UD-; n = 29) and one with uterine disease (UD+; n = 21), defined as retained fetal membranes and/or clinical metritis. General clinical examination, vaginoscopy, transrectal palpation, and transrectal B-mode sonography were conducted on days 8, 11, 18, and 25 and then every 10 days until Day 65 (Day 0 = day of calving). The first endometrial sampling (ES1; swab and biopsy) was done during estrus around Day 42 and the second endometrial sampling (ES2) during the estrus after synchronization (cloprostenol between days 55 and 60 and GnRH 2 days later). The prevalence of histopathologic evidence of endometritis, according to the categories used here, and positive bacteriologic cultures was not affected by group (P > 0.05), but cows with uterine disease had a higher prevalence of chronic purulent endometritis (ES1; P = 0.07) and angiosclerosis (ES2; P ≤ 0.05) than healthy cows. Endometrial gene expression of IL1α (ES2), IL1β (ES2), and TNFα (ES1 and ES2) was higher (P ≤ 0.05) in the UD+ group than in the UD- group. In conclusion, puerperal uterine disease had an effect on histopathologic parameters and on gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines in the endometrium of postpuerperal cows, indicating impaired clearance of uterine inflammation in cows with puerperal uterine disease. PMID:26810831

  8. [Concentrations of carnitine and further biochemical parameters in the blood serum of healthy dairy cows and cows with abomasal displacement (dislocatio abomasi) and puerperal disorders].

    PubMed

    Citil, Mehmet; Harmeyer, Johein; Fürll, Manfred

    2003-01-01

    It was the aim of this study to compare the concentrations of total (TC) and free L-carnitine (FC) in blood serum of different groups of lactating cows. The animals were allotted into three groups, a) control animals (N = 11), b) cows with abomasal displacement (AD) (N = 5) and c) cows with puerperal disorders (PD) (N = 5). TC and FC were measured with an radioenzymatic assay. Blood samples were collected from 5 to 0 d before parturition (a. p.) and from 0 to 28 d after parturition (p. p.). It was of interest to examine whether L-carnitine might be limiting under certain conditions of metabolic stress which are typical for high yielding lactating cows. Concentrations of TC and FC (mumol/l) in control cows before and after parturition were 10.0* and 8.6* and 6.0-8.9 and 3.7-4.9, respectively. The corresponding TC and FC values for cows with AD were 19.6* and 8.9* and 10.5-20.7 and 4.8-6.9, respectively. Cows with PD showed TC and FC concentrations a. p. and p. p. of 15.7* and 9.2* and 10.3-13.0 and 4.8-6.3, h other puerperal disorders PD respectively (* only one value). TC and FC concentrations in serum of normal cows were higher before than after parturition. Cows, which developed post partal puerperal disorders had a higher prepartum concentrations of TC and CE, on the other hand, serum concentrations of FC was lower. Post partum cows with metabolic disorders showed higher CE levels than control animals. Cows which developed DA had significantly higher concentrations of TC and CE in serum only on d 7 p.p. than animals with other PD. It appeared that increased fat mobilization was regularly associated with responsive increases of CE concentrations in blood serum. PMID:12894688

  9. Early Complication in Sickle Cell Anemia Children due to A(TA)nTAA Polymorphism at the Promoter of UGT1A1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Chaouch, Leila; Talbi, Emna; Moumni, Imen; Ben Chaabene, Arij; Kalai, Miniar; Chaouachi, Dorra; Mallouli, Fethi; Ghanem, Abderraouf; Abbes, Salem

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To determine the implication of the polymorphism, namely, A(TA)nTAA of UGT1A1 in lithogenesis for the first time in Tunisia among sickle cell anemia (SCA) children patients. Material and Methods. Our study was performed in 2010 and it involved 76 subjects chosen as control group characterized with normal hemoglobin status and presence of cholelithiasis and 102 SCA pediatric patients among whom 52 have cholelithiasis. We analyzed the polymorphism A(TA)nTAA at the UGT1A1 promoter and the relationships between the various A(TA)nTAA genotypes and alleles and bilirubin levels and occurrence of cholelithiasis. Results and Discussion. The repartition of genotypes found according to serum bilirubin level shows a significant association between genotypes carrying variant (TA)7 and hyperbilirubinemia (P < 0.05). We demonstrated the association of two genotypes with gallstones formation among SCA children patients: (TA)7/(TA)7 and (TA)7/(TA)8 with P = 8.1 × 10−8 and P = 0.01, respectively. (TA)7 and (TA)8 allele variants act as a risk factor for early gallstones formation in SCA patients with P = 5.8 × 10−9 and P = 0.01, respectively. As for the control group only the genotype (TA)7/(TA)7 presented a risk factor for gallstones formation. Conclusion. The novelty of this report is that it is the first time that a similar study was made on the Tunisian children sickle cell population and that the results show a clear association of (TA)7 variant in early gallstones formation in Tunisian SCA children. Interestingly our findings highlighted the association of (TA)8 variant as well, which was not found in previous studies. PMID:24167350

  10. 3.0 Tesla MRI in the early evaluation of inferior alveolar nerve neurological complications after mandibular third molar extraction: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Pranno, N; Barchetti, F; Sorrentino, V; Lo Mele, L

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the use of 3.0 T MRI in the prognosis of inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) sensory disorders after mandibular third molar extraction, in the early post-operative period. Methods: 343 IANs were examined before and 3 days after surgery. Two radiologists evaluated the course of the nerve and the relative signal intensity (RSI). Cohen's kappa coefficient (κ) and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) were used to evaluate the interobserver (k = 0.891) and intra-observer variability (ICC = 0.927; 0.914, respectively). The IANs were divided into four groups on the basis of neurosensory disorders recovery time. ANOVA was used to evaluate the differences among the RSIs of the four groups, and multiple comparisons were performed with Tukey's range test. Results: No differences in the course of IANs were found before and after surgery. In 280 IANs, no iatrogenic paraesthesia was found (Group A). 63 IANs showed a neurosensory impairment. 38 IANs showed recovery of post-operative paraesthesia at 3-month follow-up (Group B). 16 IANs showed a full recovery of iatrogenic paraesthesia at 6-month follow-up (Group C). Seven IANs displayed a full recovery at 12-month follow-up and two IANs showed persistence of neurosensory disorders at 18-month follow-up (Group D). The one-way ANOVA results indicated statistically significant difference among all groups (p < 0.05), except between Groups C and D (p = 0.504). Conclusions: The early evaluation of RSI values represents a valid tool to determine the prognosis of IAN sensory disorders after mandibular third molar extraction. PMID:24947977

  11. Complications of Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Katzen, Barry T. MacLean, Alexandra A.

    2006-12-15

    The endovascular procedure for repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms has had an enormous impact on the treatment of this challenging disease. Complications, however, do occur and it is important to have a thorough understanding of the array of complications and appropriate management strategies. In this review of endovascular complications, we describe early and late complications paying particular attention to preventive, treatment and surveillance strategies.

  12. From Folklore to Scientific Evidence: Breast-Feeding and Wet-Nursing in Islam and the Case of Non-Puerperal Lactation

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Lia; Gilad, Jacob

    2007-01-01

    Breast-feeding practice has an important medical and socio-cultural role. It has many anthropological aspects concerning the “power structures” that find their expression in breast-feeding and the practices that formed around it, both socially, scientifically, and legally-speaking. Breast-feeding has been given much attention by religions and taboos, folklore, and misconception abound around it making it a topic of genuine curiosity. This paper aims at expanding the spectrum of folklore associated with breast-feeding. The paper deals with historical, religious, and folkloristic aspects of breast-feeding, especially wet-nursing, in Islam and focuses on an intriguing Islamic tale on breast-feeding - lactation by non-pregnant women (or non-puerperal lactation). Apparently, accounts of non-puerperal lactation are not restricted to Islam but have been documented in various societies and religions throughout centuries. Two medical situations - hyperprolactinemia and induced lactation, appear as possible explanations for this phenomenon. This serves as an excellent example for the value of utilizing contemporary scientific knowledge in order to elucidate the origin, anthropology and evolvement of ancient myth and superstition. PMID:23675050

  13. Complications in Eyelid Surgery.

    PubMed

    Karimnejad, Kaveh; Walen, Scott

    2016-05-01

    Eyelid surgery consists of challenging reconstructive and cosmetic procedures. Because of the complex anatomy and corresponding vital functions of the upper and lower eyelids, the avoidance of eyelid complications is of vital importance. Complications after eyelid surgery include basic complications (infection, granuloma) and vision-threatening complications. Preoperative history, physical examination, surgical planning, and meticulous surgical technique must be undertaken to prevent complications after eyelid surgery. In addition, patient knowledge, expectations, and motivations must be determined before surgery is performed. PMID:27105805

  14. Complications of otoplasty: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Limandjaja, G C; Breugem, C C; Mink van der Molen, A B; Kon, M

    2009-01-01

    Over 200 otoplasty techniques have been described in the current literature. However, relatively few articles focus on the associated complication rates. The goal of this review is to examine the incidence of complication rates associated with otoplasty procedures. An electronic search of the Pubmed database yielded 205 articles with significant overlap in search results. Twenty articles published between 2000 and 2007 adhered to our inclusion criteria. Early complications included in this review were haematoma, bleeding, infection, skin necrosis and wound dehiscence; late complications included suture extrusion, scarring, hypersensitivity, asymmetry and inaesthetic results. The cumulative incidence of early complications was low and varied from 0% to 8.4%, with the exception of two outliers. Although cumulative late complication incidences varied greatly from 0% to 47.3%, complication rates on the higher end of the spectrum were not accompanied with revision rates of the same magnitude. Comparison of the different articles was made difficult by the lack of a uniform calculation method for complication incidence, variable follow-up length and data collection, inconsistent use of operation technique and publication bias. Recommendations for future studies include: consistent use of operative technique or at least differentiate between the used surgical techniques when presenting complication rates, inclusion of only patients with bilateral primary procedures, considering each operated ear as an independent variable when calculating complication incidence and a minimum follow-up period of 2 years, with both objective and subjective data collection. PMID:18952516

  15. Central line complications

    PubMed Central

    Kornbau, Craig; Lee, Kathryn C; Hughes, Gwendolyn D; Firstenberg, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Central venous access is a common procedure performed in many clinical settings for a variety of indications. Central lines are not without risk, and there are a multitude of complications that are associated with their placement. Complications can present in an immediate or delayed fashion and vary based on type of central venous access. Significant morbidity and mortality can result from complications related to central venous access. These complications can cause a significant healthcare burden in cost, hospital days, and patient quality of life. Advances in imaging, access technique, and medical devices have reduced and altered the types of complications encountered in clinical practice; but most complications still center around vascular injury, infection, and misplacement. Recognition and management of central line complications is important when caring for patients with vascular access, but prevention is the ultimate goal. This article discusses common and rare complications associated with central venous access, as well as techniques to recognize, manage, and prevent complications. PMID:26557487

  16. [Postoperative pulmonary complications: prophylaxis after noncardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Hofer, S; Plachky, J; Fantl, R; Schmidt, J; Bardenheuer, H J; Weigand, M A

    2006-04-01

    Postoperative pulmonary complications are a major problem after upper abdominal or thoracoabdominal surgery. They lead to a prolonged ICU stay as well as increased costs and are one of the main causes of early postoperative mortality. Even after uncomplicated operations, postoperative hypoxemia occurs in 30-50% of patients. Acute respiratory failure involves a disturbance in gas exchange. The mortality ranges from 10 to 60% according to the severity of respiratory failure. The most important complications are interstitial and alveolar pulmonary edema, atelectasis, postoperative pneumonia, hypoventilation, and aspiration. Preoperative optimization, postoperative prophylaxis according to a stepwise approach, and early mobilization decrease the rate of complications. PMID:16575614

  17. ESCAPS study protocol: a feasibility randomised controlled trial of ‘Early electrical stimulation to the wrist extensors and wrist flexors to prevent the post-stroke complications of pain and contractures in the paretic arm’

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher-Smith, Joanna C; Walker, Dawn-Marie; Sprigg, Nikola; James, Marilyn; Walker, Marion F; Allatt, Kate; Mehta, Rajnikant; Pandyan, Anand D

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Approximately 70% of patients with stroke experience impaired arm function, which is persistent and disabling for an estimated 40%. Loss of function reduces independence in daily activities and impacts on quality of life. Muscles in those who do not recover functional movement in the stroke affected arm are at risk of atrophy and contractures, which can be established as early as 6 weeks following stroke. Pain is also common. This study aims to evaluate the feasibility of a randomised controlled trial to test the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of delivering early intensive electrical stimulation (ES) to prevent post-stroke complications in the paretic upper limb. Methods and analysis This is a feasibility randomised controlled trial (n=40) with embedded qualitative studies (patient/carer interviews and therapist focus groups) and feasibility economic evaluation. Patients will be recruited from the Stroke Unit at the Nottingham University Hospitals National Health Service (NHS) Trust within 72 h after stroke. Participants will be randomised to receive usual care or usual care and early ES to the wrist flexors and extensors for 30 min twice a day, 5 days a week for 3 months. The initial treatment(s) will be delivered by an occupational therapist or physiotherapist who will then train the patient and/or their nominated carer to self-manage subsequent treatments. Ethics and dissemination This study has been granted ethical approval by the National Research Ethics Service, East Midlands Nottingham1 Research Ethics Committee (ref: 15/EM/0006). To our knowledge, this is the first study of its kind of the early application (within 72 h post-stroke) of ES to both the wrist extensors and wrist flexors of stroke survivors with upper limb impairment. The results will inform the design of a definitive randomised controlled trial. Dissemination will include 2 peer-reviewed journal publications and presentations at national conferences. Trial

  18. Human Granulocytic Ehrlichiosis Complicating Early Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Muffly, Tyler; McCormick, T. Chad; Cook, Christopher; Wall, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    Background. The goal of this case is to review the zoonotic infection, human granulocytic ehrlichiosis, presenting with pyrexia. Case. A 22-year-old multigravid female presented to the emergency department with a painful skin rash, high fever, and severe myalgias. The patient underwent a diagnostic evaluation for zoonotic infections due to her geographical and seasonal risk factors. Treatment of human granulocytic ehrlichiosis was successful though the patient spontaneously aborted presumably due to the severity of the acute illness. Conclusion. Treatment of human granulocytic ehrlichiosis in pregnancy presents unique challenges. Management of pyrexia during pregnancy is limited to external cooling in the setting of thrombocytopenia and elevated aminotransferases. Extensive counseling regarding teratogenic potential of medications allows the patient to weigh the pros and cons of treatment. PMID:18509484

  19. Chickenpox (Varicella) Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Varicella Complications . Serious complications from chickenpox include bacterial infections of the skin and soft tissues in children including Group A streptococcal infections pneumonia infection or inflammation of the brain (encephalitis, cerebellar ...

  20. Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders Go Back Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders Email Print + Share The kidneys filter the ... but some less serious ones occur more frequently. Kidney stones These are probably the most commonly encountered ...

  1. Pregnancy Complications: Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Close X Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Anemia Anemia E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... anemia at a prenatal care visit . What causes anemia? Usually, a woman becomes anemic (has anemia) because ...

  2. Pregnancy Complications: Preexisting Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Preexisting diabetes Preexisting diabetes E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... and your baby are healthy. What is preexisting diabetes? About 9 out of 100 women (9 percent) ...

  3. Perioperative complications in infant cleft repair

    PubMed Central

    Fillies, Thomas; Homann, Christoph; Meyer, Ulrich; Reich, Alexander; Joos, Ulrich; Werkmeister, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Background Cleft surgery in infants includes special risks due to the kind of the malformation. These risks can be attributed in part to the age and the weight of the patient. Whereas a lot of studies investigated the long-term facial outcome of cleft surgery depending on the age at operation, less is known about the complications arising during a cleft surgery in early infancy. Methods We investigated the incidence and severity of perioperative complications in 174 infants undergoing primary cleft surgery. The severity and the complications were recorded during the intraoperative and the early postoperative period according to the classification by Cohen. Results Our study revealed that minor complications occurred in 50 patients. Severe complications were observed during 13 operations. There was no fatal complication in the perioperative period. The risk of complications was found to be directly correlated to the body weight at the time of the surgery. Most of the problems appeared intraoperatively, but they were also followed by complications immediately after the extubation. Conclusion In conclusion, cleft surgery in infancy is accompanied by frequent and sometimes severe perioperative complications that may be attributed to this special surgical field. PMID:17280602

  4. Hair implant complications.

    PubMed

    Hanke, C W; Norins, A L; Pantzer, J G; Bennett, J E

    1981-04-01

    Four men who underwent hair implantation for pattern baldness were treated for complications such as infection, foreign-body reaction, pruritus, and scarring. The complications were similar to those reported with synthetic modacrylic fiber implants that have been used for the same purpose. Although we believe this is the first article to report complications from hair implants, the illogical basis of the procedure suggests that complications will occur in many unsuspecting patients who undergo hair implantation. PMID:7009899

  5. Complications of skin biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Abhishek, Kumar; Khunger, Niti

    2015-01-01

    Skin biopsy is the most commonly performed procedure by the dermatologist. Though it is a safe and easy procedure yet complications may arise. Post operative complications like wound infection and bleeding may occur. It is essential to keep the potential complications of skin biopsy in mind and be meticulous in the technique, for better patient outcomes. PMID:26865792

  6. Complications of Strabismus Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Olitsky, Scott E.; Coats, David K.

    2015-01-01

    All surgeries carry risks of complications, and there is no way to avoid ever having a complication. Strabismus surgery is no different in this regard. There are methods to reduce the risk of a complication during or after surgery, and these steps should always be taken. When a complication occurs, it is important to first recognize it and then manage it appropriately to allow for the best outcome possible. This article will discuss some of the more common and/or most devastating complications that can occur during or after strabismus surgery as well as thoughts on how to avoid them and manage them should they happen. PMID:26180463

  7. Subcutaneous immunization with inactivated bacterial components and purified protein of Escherichia coli, Fusobacterium necrophorum and Trueperella pyogenes prevents puerperal metritis in Holstein dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Machado, Vinícius Silva; Bicalho, Marcela Luccas de Souza; Meira Junior, Enoch Brandão de Souza; Rossi, Rodolfo; Ribeiro, Bruno Leonardo; Lima, Svetlana; Santos, Thiago; Kussler, Arieli; Foditsch, Carla; Ganda, Erika Korzune; Oikonomou, Georgios; Cheong, Soon Hon; Gilbert, Robert Owen; Bicalho, Rodrigo Carvalho

    2014-01-01

    In this study we evaluate the efficacy of five vaccine formulations containing different combinations of proteins (FimH; leukotoxin, LKT; and pyolysin, PLO) and/or inactivated whole cells (Escherichia coli, Fusobacterium necrophorum, and Trueperella pyogenes) in preventing postpartum uterine diseases. Inactivated whole cells were produced using two genetically distinct strains of each bacterial species (E. coli, F. necrophorum, and T. pyogenes). FimH and PLO subunits were produced using recombinant protein expression, and LKT was recovered from culturing a wild F. necrophorum strain. Three subcutaneous vaccines were formulated: Vaccine 1 was composed of inactivated bacterial whole cells and proteins; Vaccine 2 was composed of proteins only; and Vaccine 3 was composed of inactivated bacterial whole cells only. Two intravaginal vaccines were formulated: Vaccine 4 was composed of inactivated bacterial whole cells and proteins; and Vaccine 5 was composed of PLO and LKT. To evaluate vaccine efficacy, a randomized clinical trial was conducted at a commercial dairy farm; 371 spring heifers were allocated randomly into one of six different treatments groups: control, Vaccine 1, Vaccine 2, Vaccine 3, Vaccine 4 and Vaccine 5. Late pregnant heifers assigned to one of the vaccine groups were each vaccinated twice: at 230 and 260 days of pregnancy. When vaccines were evaluated grouped as subcutaneous and intravaginal, the subcutaneous ones were found to significantly reduce the incidence of puerperal metritis. Additionally, subcutaneous vaccination significantly reduced rectal temperature at 6±1 days in milk. Reproduction was improved for cows that received subcutaneous vaccines. In general, vaccination induced a significant increase in serum IgG titers against all antigens, with subcutaneous vaccination again being more effective. In conclusion, subcutaneous vaccination with inactivated bacterial components and/or protein subunits of E. coli, F. necrophorum and T. pyogenes

  8. Subcutaneous Immunization with Inactivated Bacterial Components and Purified Protein of Escherichia coli, Fusobacterium necrophorum and Trueperella pyogenes Prevents Puerperal Metritis in Holstein Dairy Cows

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Vinícius Silva; Bicalho, Marcela Luccas de Souza; Meira Junior, Enoch Brandão de Souza; Rossi, Rodolfo; Ribeiro, Bruno Leonardo; Lima, Svetlana; Santos, Thiago; Kussler, Arieli; Foditsch, Carla; Ganda, Erika Korzune; Oikonomou, Georgios; Cheong, Soon Hon; Gilbert, Robert Owen; Bicalho, Rodrigo Carvalho

    2014-01-01

    In this study we evaluate the efficacy of five vaccine formulations containing different combinations of proteins (FimH; leukotoxin, LKT; and pyolysin, PLO) and/or inactivated whole cells (Escherichia coli, Fusobacterium necrophorum, and Trueperella pyogenes) in preventing postpartum uterine diseases. Inactivated whole cells were produced using two genetically distinct strains of each bacterial species (E. coli, F. necrophorum, and T. pyogenes). FimH and PLO subunits were produced using recombinant protein expression, and LKT was recovered from culturing a wild F. necrophorum strain. Three subcutaneous vaccines were formulated: Vaccine 1 was composed of inactivated bacterial whole cells and proteins; Vaccine 2 was composed of proteins only; and Vaccine 3 was composed of inactivated bacterial whole cells only. Two intravaginal vaccines were formulated: Vaccine 4 was composed of inactivated bacterial whole cells and proteins; and Vaccine 5 was composed of PLO and LKT. To evaluate vaccine efficacy, a randomized clinical trial was conducted at a commercial dairy farm; 371 spring heifers were allocated randomly into one of six different treatments groups: control, Vaccine 1, Vaccine 2, Vaccine 3, Vaccine 4 and Vaccine 5. Late pregnant heifers assigned to one of the vaccine groups were each vaccinated twice: at 230 and 260 days of pregnancy. When vaccines were evaluated grouped as subcutaneous and intravaginal, the subcutaneous ones were found to significantly reduce the incidence of puerperal metritis. Additionally, subcutaneous vaccination significantly reduced rectal temperature at 6±1 days in milk. Reproduction was improved for cows that received subcutaneous vaccines. In general, vaccination induced a significant increase in serum IgG titers against all antigens, with subcutaneous vaccination again being more effective. In conclusion, subcutaneous vaccination with inactivated bacterial components and/or protein subunits of E. coli, F. necrophorum and T. pyogenes

  9. Chronic complications of spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Sezer, Nebahat; Akkuş, Selami; Uğurlu, Fatma Gülçin

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a serious medical condition that causes functional, psychological and socioeconomic disorder. Therefore, patients with SCI experience significant impairments in various aspects of their life. The goals of rehabilitation and other treatment approaches in SCI are to improve functional level, decrease secondary morbidity and enhance health-related quality of life. Acute and long-term secondary medical complications are common in patients with SCI. However, chronic complications especially further negatively impact on patients’ functional independence and quality of life. Therefore, prevention, early diagnosis and treatment of chronic secondary complications in patients with SCI is critical for limiting these complications, improving survival, community participation and health-related quality of life. The management of secondary chronic complications of SCI is also important for SCI specialists, families and caregivers as well as patients. In this paper, we review data about common secondary long-term complications after SCI, including respiratory complications, cardiovascular complications, urinary and bowel complications, spasticity, pain syndromes, pressure ulcers, osteoporosis and bone fractures. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of risk factors, signs, symptoms, prevention and treatment approaches for secondary long-term complications in patients with SCI. PMID:25621208

  10. Complication of antiquated tuberculosis treatment.

    PubMed

    Husta, Bryan; Devarajan, Sunjay; Reichner, Cristina A

    2014-01-01

    In the early 20th century, the rapid spread of tuberculosis (TB) invited novel therapies for treatment. A surgical procedure known as plombage was one such method where lobes were forced to collapse by placing an inert object such as mineral oil, paraffin wax, gauze or Lucite (methyl methacylate) balls. The collapse would lead to isolation of TB infection and decrease aeration of the affected lung. Removal of these objects had initially been, usually after 24 months, however this fell out of favor after the patient had recovered without commonly seen late complications. Decades later, reports have been made illustrating complications such as migration and infection of the plombe as well as expanding oleothorax. PMID:26029549

  11. Complicated Perianal Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Abhishek; Yadav, Amitabh; Mehta, Naimish; Varma, Vibha; Kumaran, Vinay; Nundy, Samiran

    2015-12-01

    Management of benign anorectal conditions like abscesses and haemorrhoids is usually uneventful. However, complicated perianal complications can result and have sparsely been reported in literature. Hereby, we report a series of seven patients who presented with rare sequelae like necrotising fasciitis, intraperitoneal or retroperitoneal involvement. All patients responded well to surgical management. Accordingly, complicated perianal sepsis warrants a timely and aggressive surgical intervention. PMID:27011454

  12. Facial Filler Complications.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Julie; Khan, Tanya; Martin, John

    2015-11-01

    The use of facial fillers has greatly expanded over the past several years. Along with increased use comes a rise in documented complications, ranging from poor cosmetic result to nodules, granulomas, necrosis, and blindness. Awareness of the potential types of complications and options for management, in addition to the underlying facial anatomy, are imperative to delivering the best patient care. This article defines the complications and how to treat them and provides suggestions to avoid serious adverse outcomes. PMID:26505541

  13. HIV and the Risk of Direct Obstetric Complications: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Calvert, Clara; Ronsmans, Carine

    2013-01-01

    Background Women of reproductive age in parts of sub-Saharan Africa are faced both with high levels of HIV and the threat of dying from the direct complications of pregnancy. Clinicians practicing in such settings have reported a high incidence of direct obstetric complications among HIV-infected women, but the evidence supporting this is unclear. The aim of this systematic review is to establish whether HIV-infected women are at increased risk of direct obstetric complications. Methods and findings Studies comparing the frequency of obstetric haemorrhage, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, dystocia and intrauterine infections in HIV-infected and uninfected women were identified. Summary estimates of the odds ratio (OR) for the association between HIV and each obstetric complication were calculated through meta-analyses. In total, 44 studies were included providing 66 data sets; 17 on haemorrhage, 19 on hypertensive disorders, five on dystocia and 25 on intrauterine infections. Meta-analysis of the OR from studies including vaginal deliveries indicated that HIV-infected women had over three times the risk of a puerperal sepsis compared with HIV-uninfected women [pooled OR: 3.43, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.00–5.85]; this figure increased to nearly six amongst studies only including women who delivered by caesarean (pooled OR: 5.81, 95% CI: 2.42–13.97). For other obstetric complications the evidence was weak and inconsistent. Conclusions The higher risk of intrauterine infections in HIV-infected pregnant and postpartum women may require targeted strategies involving the prophylactic use of antibiotics during labour. However, as the huge excess of pregnancy-related mortality in HIV-infected women is unlikely to be due to a higher risk of direct obstetric complications, reducing this mortality will require non obstetric interventions involving access to ART in both pregnant and non-pregnant women. PMID:24124458

  14. Intestinal complications of round worms in children.

    PubMed

    Surendran, N; Paulose, M O

    1988-10-01

    One hundred forty-two patients with surgical complications of Ascaris lumbricoides were treated in our hospital over a period of 5 years. Included were 120 patients with subacute intestinal obstruction that were treated conservatively, and 22 patients with acute intestinal obstruction that required surgical intervention. Four of the 22 patients that were operated on died following various postoperative complications. However, there were no deaths among those presenting with subacute obstruction. In our experience, early recognition of the condition avoided serious complications and morbidity. PMID:3236163

  15. Complications of Transjugular Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Navuluri, Rakesh; Ahmed, Osman

    2015-01-01

    Transvenous biopsy was first performed in 1964 by Charles Dotter. Now routinely performed in the liver and kidney by interventional radiologists, the transjugular approach to biopsy has assumed a central role in coagulopathic patients. Major arterial complications from transjugular liver and renal biopsy are rare. In this article, the authors describe such complications in both organs that necessitated selective endovascular coil embolization. PMID:25762847

  16. Complications in knee arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Reigstad, Ole; Grimsgaard, Christian

    2006-05-01

    All simple arthroscopic procedures during 1999 through 2001 performed at Baerum community hospital were retrospectively examined. Procedures were excluded when being part of more complex procedures. A total of 876 procedures performed on 785 patients were left for examination. Complications were registered from the patient record and all received a written questionnaire or phone call. The answer was obtained from 97.6%. The overall complications rate was low, giving total of 5.00%. A total of 0.68% of the complications had therapeutic consequences. There were two superficial infections, one thromboembolic event/pulmonary embolus and one reoperation due to scar tissue. Other complications were considered minor, and had none or little consequence for the patient comprising preoperative bradycardial episodes, asthmatic events, subcutaneous infusion of total intravenous anaesthetics (TIVA), instrument breakage and conversion to arthrotomi. Postoperatively registered complications included swelling, haemarthros, portal bleeding and fistulation, temporary sensory loss and longstanding pain. Duration of surgery was the only predicting factor for postoperative complications. Simple arthroscopic surgery is safe and has few serious complications. The use of TIVA or tourniquet does not increase the morbidity or complication rate, and prophylaxis against thromboembolism was not necessary. PMID:16208459

  17. "Complicating" Educational Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Colleen S.

    Administrators desiring to lead organizations that will adapt and survive in a complex environment like today's public schools need to develop what Karl Weick calls "complicated" understanding of "requisite variety." The law of requisite variety states that a diverse and complicated environment demands similar diversity from its inhabitants if…

  18. Pellagra complicating Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, I.; Millard, L.

    1995-01-01

    We report a 53-year-old patient with clinical features of pellagra as a complication of Crohn's disease. His symptoms improved rapidly on taking oral nicotinic acid and vitamin B complex. We suggest the paucity of reported cases of pellagra in Crohn's disease is a reflection of poor recognition of this complication. Images Figure PMID:7567761

  19. COMPLICATIONS IN HIP ARTHROSCOPY

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Marcos Emílio Kuschnaroff; Hoffmann, Rafael Barreiros; de Araújo, Lúcio Cappelli Toledo; Dani, William Sotau; José Berral, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of complications in a series of consecutive cases of hip arthroscopy; to assess the progression of the sample through a learning curve; and to recognize the causes of complications in arthroscopic hip operations. Method: 150 consecutive cases that underwent hip arthroscopy between May 2004 and December 2008 were evaluated. The complications encountered were classified in three ways: organic system affected, severity and groups of 50 consecutive cases. The data were analyzed by means of descriptive statistics and Fisher's exact test. Results: We observed 15 complications in this study (10%): ten were neurological, two were osteoarticular, one was vascular-ischemic and two were cutaneous. In the classification of severity, three were classified as major, 12 as intermediate and none as minor. The incidence of complications over the course of the learning curve did not present any statistically significant difference (p = 0.16). Conclusions: Hip arthroscopy is a surgical procedure that involves low morbidity, but which presents complications in some cases. These complications are frequently neurological and transitory, and mainly occur because of joint traction. The complication rate did not decrease with progression of our sample. PMID:27022521

  20. Complications of ovariohysterectomy and orchiectomy in companion animals.

    PubMed

    Adin, Christopher A

    2011-09-01

    Complications following elective spay or neuter procedures are particularly feared by new graduates. However, even the most experienced surgeons may encounter surgical or postoperative complications. At best, complications associated with elective procedures can harm the doctor-client relationship. At worst, these can present legal and financial problems. Veterinary surgeons should be aware of the potential complications associated with elective sterilization, these should be communicated to the client, and there should be a clear plan for action when a complication occurs. This article reviews the reported complications encountered in elective sterilization surgery in companion animals, with a special focus on early detection and prevention. PMID:21889699

  1. Complications in septoplasty.

    PubMed

    Rettinger, Gerhard; Kirsche, Hanspeter

    2006-11-01

    The most frequent complications of septoplasty are deformities, infections, and perforations. The effects of each of these complications, however, can be very different. Dislocations and deformities of the septum may result not only in an impaired airway but also in visible deformities of the entire nasal base and dorsum. A patient who underwent septoplasty can be "stigmatized." Infections may lead not only to septal abscess but also to endocranial complications such as meningitis or septicemia with endocarditis. Permanent perforations of the nasal septum can result in significant symptoms if they are located in the anterior part of the nose. Surgical closure is the treatment of choice, with a high success rate if the patients are selected properly. Besides these three major types of complications there are many others, from smell disturbances to blindness. Causes, prevention, and correction of selected complications are presented and data of the recent literature reported. PMID:17131271

  2. [Stomatologic complications of eating disorders].

    PubMed

    Resch, Mária; Nagy, Agnes

    2012-11-11

    Since the 1990s numerous international experts have reported about the somatic complications of eating disorders including those having a dental and stomatological nature. Several reports emphasised that deformations in the oral cavity resulting from this grave nutritional disease typical of the young generation could already appear in the early stage and, therefore, dentists are among the first to diagnose them. Dentists are still often unaware of the importance of their role in multidisciplinary treatment. Even if they knew what the disease was about and recognised it on the basis of deformations in the oral cavity in time, their advice that their patients should brush their teeth more often would fail to eliminate the root cause of the problem. Not only the earliest possible treatment of the complications of the bingeing-purging mechanism and the maintenance of oral hygiene are important, but controlling and curing pathological habits with active participation of psychiatrists are also required to ensure full recovery. Due to the multidisciplinary nature of the disease, manifold communication is required. For this reason, publishing the dental ramifications of organic and systemic diseases at dental conferences and in technical journals, as well as providing information about oral complications of eating disorders for general practitioners and specialists are particularly important. PMID:23123325

  3. Gastrointestinal complications of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Babu; Babu, Shithu; Walker, Jessica; Walker, Adrian B; Pappachan, Joseph M

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus affects virtually every organ system in the body and the degree of organ involvement depends on the duration and severity of the disease, and other co-morbidities. Gastrointestinal (GI) involvement can present with esophageal dysmotility, gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), gastroparesis, enteropathy, non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and glycogenic hepatopathy. Severity of GERD is inversely related to glycemic control and management is with prokinetics and proton pump inhibitors. Diabetic gastroparesis manifests as early satiety, bloating, vomiting, abdominal pain and erratic glycemic control. Gastric emptying scintigraphy is considered the gold standard test for diagnosis. Management includes dietary modifications, maintaining euglycemia, prokinetics, endoscopic and surgical treatments. Diabetic enteropathy is also common and management involves glycemic control and symptomatic measures. NAFLD is considered a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome and treatment is mainly lifestyle measures, with diabetes and dyslipidemia management when coexistent. Glycogenic hepatopathy is a manifestation of poorly controlled type 1 diabetes and is managed by prompt insulin treatment. Though GI complications of diabetes are relatively common, awareness about its manifestations and treatment options are low among physicians. Optimal management of GI complications is important for appropriate metabolic control of diabetes and improvement in quality of life of the patient. This review is an update on the GI complications of diabetes, their pathophysiology, diagnostic evaluation and management. PMID:23772273

  4. Dengue-associated neuromuscular complications.

    PubMed

    Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Malhotra, Hardeep Singh; Jain, Amita; Malhotra, Kiran Preet

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is associated with many neurological dysfunctions. Up to 4% of dengue patients may develop neuromuscular complications. Muscle involvement can manifest with myalgias, myositis, rhabdomyolysis and hypokalemic paralysis. Diffuse myalgia is the most characteristic neurological symptom of dengue fever. Dengue-associated myositis can be of varying severity ranging from self-limiting muscle involvement to severe dengue myositis. Dengue-associated hypokalemic paralysis often has a rapidly evolving course; benign nature; excellent response to potassium; and, often leads to diagnostic confusion with other dengue-associated neuromuscular disorders. Rhabdomyolysis is the most severe form of muscle involvement and may be life-threatening. Guillain-Barrι syndrome is another frequent neuromuscular dengue-associated complication. Dengue-associated Guillain-Barrι syndrome responds very well to intravenous immunoglobulins. Predominant spinal gray matter involvement has been reported in a patient presenting with areflexic paraparesis. Mononeuropathies often manifest with paralysis of the diaphragm due to phrenic nerve dysfunction. Brachial plexopathy, in the form of neuralgic amyotrophy, has been described much more frequently than lumbo-sacral plexopathy. Early recognition of these neuromuscular complications is needed for successful treatment and to prevent further disabilities. PMID:26238884

  5. Complications in late pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Meguerdichian, David

    2012-11-01

    Complications of late pregnancy are managed infrequently in the emergency department and, thus, can pose a challenge when the emergency physician encounters acute presentations. An expert understanding of the anatomic and physiologic changes and possible complications of late pregnancy is vital to ensure proper evaluation and care for both mother and fetus. This article focuses on the late pregnancy issues that the emergency physician will face, from the bleeding and instability of abruptio placentae to the wide spectrum of complications and management strategies encountered with preterm labor. PMID:23137403

  6. Anesthetic Complications and Deaths

    PubMed Central

    Pender, John W.

    1968-01-01

    Anesthesiologists should fully inform patients of the possible complications from anesthesia. For rapport with the patient, with whom they usually have no acquaintance until a day or so before an operative procedure, the anesthesiologist should enlist the help of the internist or surgeon who already has established an atmosphere of trust. The extent of morbidity and minor complications from anesthesia has not been adequately recorded. One out of every 1,000 to 2,000 anesthetized patients dies of complications primarily due to or contributed to by anesthesia. Leading causes of death vary from study to study and from year to year. PMID:5652756

  7. [Complications of hip arthroscopies].

    PubMed

    Dienst, M; Grün, U

    2008-11-01

    Surgical complications of hip arthroscopies are rare in the hands of experienced hip arthroscopists. However, when performed by beginners and in more demanding situations such as marginal distraction of the head and socket and technically advanced procedures, the risk increases. This report describes possible complications which may happen during positioning and traction, portal placement, and diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Possible causes of soft tissue lesions of the portal area, perineum and foot, intra-articular lesions of the labrum and cartilage, direct and traction-related indirect neurovascular lesions, and other rare complications are analyzed. PMID:18854972

  8. Complications of Pathologic Myopia.

    PubMed

    Cho, Bum-Joo; Shin, Joo Young; Yu, Hyeong Gon

    2016-01-01

    Pathologic myopia (PM) is one of the leading causes of visual impairment worldwide. The pathophysiology of PM is not fully understood, but the axial elongation of the eye followed by chorioretinal thinning is suggested as a key mechanism. Pathologic myopia may lead to many complications such as chorioretinal atrophy, foveoschisis, choroidal neovascularization, rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, cataract, and glaucoma. Some complications affect visual acuity significantly, showing poor visual prognosis. This article aims to review the types, pathophysiology, treatment, and visual outcome of the complications of PM. PMID:26649982

  9. Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... friendly Fact Sheet Pertussis Vaccination Pregnancy and Whooping Cough Clinicians Disease Specifics Treatment Clinical Features Clinical Complications ...

  10. Complications of Measles (Rubeola)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Links Measles and Rubella Initiative World Health Organization Pan American Health Organization Complications of Measles Language: English ... Links Measles and Rubella Initiative World Health Organization Pan American Health Organization Language: English Español (Spanish) File ...

  11. Infection and Other Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stage 3 Infection and Other Complications NLN Position Papers Lymphedema Awareness Campaign Education Kits Educational Videos What ... Patients (8) LymphLink Articles (175) FAQ's (6) Position Papers (9) LSAP Perspective (9) Become a member now » ...

  12. [Complications of cocaine addiction].

    PubMed

    Karila, Laurent; Lowenstein, William; Coscas, Sarah; Benyamina, Amine; Reynaud, Michel

    2009-06-20

    Addiction is a chronic relapsing disorder characterized by repetitive and compulsive drug-seeking behavior and drug abuse despite negative health or social consequences. Cocaine addiction is a significant worldwide public health problem, which has somatic, psychological, psychiatric, socio-economic and judicial complications. Some of the most frequent complications are cardiovascular effects (acute coronary syndrome, cardiac arrhythmias, increased blood pressure); respiratory effects (fibrosis, interstitial pneumonitis, pulmonary hypertension, alveolar haemorrhage, asthma exacerbation; emphysema), neurological effects (strokes, aneurysms, seizures, headaches); risk for contracting HIV/AIDS, hepatitis B and C, sexual transmitted disease and otolaryngologic effects. Other complications are not discussed here. The vast majority of studies indicate that there are cognitive deficits induced by cocaine addiction. Attention, visual and working memories, executive functioning are affected in cocaine users. Psychiatric complications found in clinical practice are major depressive disorders, cocaine-induced paranoia, cocaine-induced compulsive foraging and panic attacks. PMID:19642439

  13. Intestinal Complications of IBD

    MedlinePlus

    ... treated with topical creams or sitz baths. MALABSORPTION & MALNUTRITION Another complication in people with Crohn’s disease is ... the gut that absorbs most nutrients. Malabsorption and malnutrition usually do not develop unless the disease is ...

  14. Obstetric (nonfetal) complications.

    PubMed

    Shanbhogue, Alampady K P; Menias, Christine O; Lalwani, Neeraj; Lall, Chandana; Khandelwal, Ashish; Nagar, Arpit

    2013-11-01

    Pregnancy predisposes women to a wide array of obstetric and gynecological complications which are often complex, challenging and sometimes life-threatening. While some of these are unique to pregnancy, a few that occur in nonpregnant women are more common during pregnancy. Imaging plays a crucial role in the diagnosis and management of pregnancy-related obstetric and gynecologic complications. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging confer the least risk to the fetus and should be the preferred examinations for evaluating these complications. Multidetector computed tomography should be used after carefully weighing the risk-benefit ratio based on the clinical condition in question. Interventional radiology is emerging as a preferred, noninvasive or minimally invasive treatment option that can obviate surgery and its antecedent short term and long term complications. Knowledge of appropriateness of imaging and image guided intervention is necessary for accurate patient management. PMID:24210440

  15. [Neurological complications in uremia].

    PubMed

    Fong, Chin-Shih

    2008-06-01

    Neurological complications due to the uremic state or hemodialysis, contribute to the important cause of mortality in patients with uremia. Despite continuous advances in uremic treatment, many neurological complications of uremia, like uremic encephalopathy, peripheral neuropathy and myopathy fail to fully respond to hemodialysis. Moreover, hemodialysis or kidney transplantation may even induce neurological complications. Hemodialysis can directly or indirectly be associated with Wernicke's encephalopathy, dialytic dementia, dysequilibrium syndrome, cerebrovascular accidents, osmotic myelinolysis and mononeuropathy. Renal transplantation can give rise to rejection encephalopathy and acute femoral neuropathy. The use of immunosuppressive drugs after renal transplantation can cause reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy encephalopathy. The clinical, pathophysiological and therapeutical aspects of central nervous system, peripheral nervous system and myopathy complications in uremia are reviewed. PMID:18686653

  16. Tetanus: Symptoms and Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Links Tetanus Vaccination Maternal and Neonatal Tetanus Elimination Symptoms and Complications Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... the muscles of the jaw, or "lockjaw". Tetanus symptoms include: Headache Jaw cramping Sudden, involuntary muscle tightening ...

  17. [Type 2 diabetes complications].

    PubMed

    Schlienger, Jean-Louis

    2013-05-01

    People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of many complications, which are mainly due to complex and interconnected mechanisms such as hyperglycemia, insulino-resistance, low-grade inflammation and accelerated atherogenesis. Cardi-cerebrovascular disease are frequently associated to type 2 diabetes and may become life threatening, particularly coronaropathy, stroke and heart failure. Their clinical picture are sometimes atypical and silencious for a long time. Type 2 diabetes must be considered as an independent cardiovascular risk factor. Nephropathy is frequent in type 2 diabetes but has a mixed origin. Now it is the highest cause of end-stage renal disease. Better metabolic and blood pressure control and an improved management of microalbuminuria are able to slowdown the course of the disease. Retinopathy which is paradoxically slightly progressive must however be screened and treated in these rather old patients which are globally at high ophthalmologic risk. Diabetic foot is a severe complication secondary to microangiopathy, microangiopathy and neuropathy. It may be considered as a super-complication of several complications. Its screening must be done on a routine basis. Some cancer may be considered as an emerging complication of type 2 diabetes as well as cognitive decline, sleep apnea syndrome, mood disorders and bone metabolism impairments. Most of the type 2 diabetes complications may be prevented by a strategy combining a systematic screening and multi-interventional therapies. PMID:23528336

  18. On complicity theory.

    PubMed

    Kline, A David

    2006-04-01

    The received account of whistleblowing, developed over the last quarter century, is identified with the work of Norman Bowie and Richard DeGeorge. Michael Davis has detailed three anomalies for the received view: the paradoxes of burden, missing harm and failure. In addition, he has proposed an alternative account of whistleblowing, viz., the Complicity Theory. This paper examines the Complicity Theory. The supposed anomalies rest on misunderstandings of the received view or misreadings of model cases of whistleblowing, for example, the Challenger disaster and the Ford Pinto. Nevertheless, the Complicity Theory is important for as in science the contrast with alternative competing accounts often helps us better understand the received view. Several aspects of the received view are reviewed and strengthened through comparison with Complicity Theory, including why whistleblowing needs moral justification. Complicity Theory is also critiqued. The fundamental failure of Complicity Theory is its failure to explain why government and the public encourage and protect whistleblowers despite the possibility of considerable harm to the relevant company in reputation, lost jobs, and lost shareholder value. PMID:16609713

  19. Complications of Radical Cystectomy and Orthotopic Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Wei Shen; Lamb, Benjamin W.; Kelly, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Radical cystectomy and orthotopic reconstruction significant morbidity and mortality despite advances in minimal invasive and robotic technology. In this review, we will discuss early and late complications, as well as describe efforts to minimize morbidity and mortality, with a focus on ileal orthotopic bladder substitute (OBS). We summarise efforts to minimize morbidity and mortality including enhanced recovery as well as early and late complications seen after radical cystectomy and OBS. Centralisation of complex cancer services in the UK has led to a fall in mortality and high volume institutions have a significantly lower rate of 30-day mortality compared to low volume institutions. Enhanced recovery pathways have resulted in shorter length of hospital stay and potentially a reduction in morbidity. Early complications of radical cystectomy occur as a direct result of the surgery itself while late complications, which can occur even after 10 years after surgery, are due to urinary diversion. OBS represents the ideal urinary diversion for patients without contraindications. However, all patients with OBS should have regular long term follow-up for oncological surveillance and to identify complications should they arise. PMID:26697063

  20. Technical note: Intraobserver, interobserver, and test-retest reliabilities of an assessment of vaginal discharge from cows with and without acute puerperal metritis.

    PubMed

    Sannmann, I; Heuwieser, W

    2015-08-01

    Acute puerperal metritis (APM) in dairy cows is a common disease occurring in the first 10 d after calving. According to a widely accepted definition, the diagnosis is primarily based on body temperature and sensorial assessment of vaginal discharge. The scope of this study was to evaluate the reliability for color, smell, and viscosity of vaginal discharge from healthy cows and cows with APM. Fifteen investigators evaluated 6 vaginal discharge samples 10 times. Subsequently, the investigators rated the health status of the cows and the diagnostic value of color, smell, and viscosity. In a final questionnaire, the investigators estimated their ability to diagnose APM correctly and the influence of experience. Reliability was tested using Cohen's kappa (κ). Our study revealed slight to moderate reliabilities concerning the assessment of vaginal discharge. Overall interobserver reliability for color, smell, and viscosity was κ=0.15, 0.27, and 0.44, respectively. Overall intraobserver reliability for color, smell, and viscosity was κ=0.35, 0.39, and 0.6, respectively. By means of a questionnaire, overall personal expertise to detect cows suffering from APM correctly as such was estimated to be 59%, whereas the diagnostic value of a combination of color, smell, and viscosity to detect cows with APM correctly was estimated to be 91.1% perfect. We found a discrepancy between reliability and the personal perception of diagnostic value. Our study shows that the sensorial assessment of color, smell, and viscosity of vaginal discharge in cows postpartum is subjective. PMID:26026759

  1. Treating Complicated Grief

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Naomi M.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The death of a loved one is one of life’s greatest, universal stressors to which most bereaved individuals successfully adapt without clinical intervention. For a minority of bereaved individuals, grief is complicated by superimposed problems and healing does not occur. The resulting syndrome of complicated grief causes substantial distress and functional impairment even years after a loss, yet knowing when and how to intervene can be a challenge. OBJECTIVE To discuss the differential diagnosis, risk factors for and management of complicated grief based on available evidence and clinical observations. EVIDENCE REVIEW MEDLINE was searched from January 1990 to October 2012. Additional citations were procured from references of select research and review articles. Available treatment studies targeting complicated grief were included. RESULTS A strong research literature led to inclusion of complicated grief in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Fifth Edition) (termed persistent complex bereavement disorder as a subtype of other specified trauma and stressor-related disorders), although it is a condition for which more research is formally recommended, and there is still ongoing discussion about the optimal name and diagnostic criteria for the disorder. Reliable screening instruments are available, and the estimated prevalence rate is 7% of bereaved people. Randomized controlled data support the efficacy of a targeted psychotherapy including elements that foster resolution of complicating problems and facilitate the natural healing process. Preliminary studies suggest antidepressant medications may be helpful. CONCLUSION AND RELEVANCE Individuals with complicated grief have greater risk of adverse health outcomes, should be diagnosed and assessed for suicide risk and comorbid conditions such as depression and posttraumatic stress disorder, and should be considered for treatment. PMID:23917292

  2. Management of complications after rotator cuff surgery.

    PubMed

    Parada, Stephen A; Dilisio, Matthew F; Kennedy, Colin D

    2015-03-01

    Rotator cuff repair (RCR) is a common procedure performed by orthopedic surgeons via arthroscopic, open, or mini-open techniques. While this surgery is considered to be of low morbidity, several potential complications can arise either intraoperatively or during the postoperative time period. Some of these complications are related to the surgical approach (arthroscopic or open), while others are patient dependent. Many of these complications can be managed through nonoperative means; however, early recognition and timely treatment is essential in limiting the long-term sequela and improving patient outcome. There are several different ways to classify complications after RCR repair: timing, severity, preventability, whether or not the pathology is intra- or extra-articular, and the type of treatment necessary. It is essential that the surgeon is cognizant of the etiology contributing to the failed RCR surgery in order to provide timely and proper management. PMID:25532916

  3. Perinatal Complications and Aging Indicators by Midlife

    PubMed Central

    Caspi, Avshalom; Ambler, Antony; Belsky, Daniel W.; Chapple, Simon; Cohen, Harvey Jay; Israel, Salomon; Poulton, Richie; Ramrakha, Sandhya; Rivera, Christine D.; Sugden, Karen; Williams, Benjamin; Wolke, Dieter; Moffitt, Terrie E.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Perinatal complications predict increased risk for morbidity and early mortality. Evidence of perinatal programming of adult mortality raises the question of what mechanisms embed this long-term effect. We tested a hypothesis related to the theory of developmental origins of health and disease: that perinatal complications assessed at birth predict indicators of accelerated aging by midlife. METHODS: Perinatal complications, including both maternal and neonatal complications, were assessed in the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study cohort (N = 1037), a 38-year, prospective longitudinal study of a representative birth cohort. Two aging indicators were assessed at age 38 years, objectively by leukocyte telomere length (TL) and subjectively by perceived facial age. RESULTS: Perinatal complications predicted both leukocyte TL (β = −0.101; 95% confidence interval, −0.169 to −0.033; P = .004) and perceived age (β = 0.097; 95% confidence interval, 0.029 to 0.165; P = .005) by midlife. We repeated analyses with controls for measures of family history and social risk that could predispose to perinatal complications and accelerated aging, and for measures of poor health taken in between birth and the age-38 follow-up. These covariates attenuated, but did not fully explain the associations observed between perinatal complications and aging indicators. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings provide support for early-life developmental programming by linking newborns’ perinatal complications to accelerated aging at midlife. We observed indications of accelerated aging “inside,” as measured by leukocyte TL, an indicator of cellular aging, and “outside,” as measured by perceived age, an indicator of declining tissue integrity. A better understanding of mechanisms underlying perinatal programming of adult aging is needed. PMID:25349321

  4. Metabolomics in diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Filla, Laura A; Edwards, James L

    2016-04-22

    With a global prevalence of 9%, diabetes is the direct cause of millions of deaths each year and is quickly becoming a health crisis. Major long-term complications of diabetes arise from persistent oxidative stress and dysfunction in multiple metabolic pathways. The most serious complications involve vascular damage and include cardiovascular disease as well as microvascular disorders such as nephropathy, neuropathy, and retinopathy. Current clinical analyses like glycated hemoglobin and plasma glucose measurements hold some value as prognostic indicators of the severity of complications, but investigations into the underlying pathophysiology are still lacking. Advancements in biotechnology hold the key to uncovering new pathways and establishing therapeutic targets. Metabolomics, the study of small endogenous molecules, is a powerful toolset for studying pathophysiological processes and has been used to elucidate metabolic signatures of diabetes in various biological systems. Current challenges in the field involve correlating these biomarkers to specific complications to provide a better prediction of future risk and disease progression. This review will highlight the progress that has been made in the field of metabolomics including technological advancements, the identification of potential biomarkers, and metabolic pathways relevant to macro- and microvascular diabetic complications. PMID:26891794

  5. Post dengue neurological complication.

    PubMed

    Hasliza, A H; Tohid, H; Loh, K Y; Santhi, P

    2015-01-01

    Dengue infection is highly endemic in many tropical countries including Malaysia. However, neurological complications arising from dengue infection is not common; Gullain-Barre syndrome (GBS) is one of these infrequent complications. In this paper, we have reported a case in which a 39-year-old woman presented with a neurological complication of dengue infection without typical symptoms and signs of dengue fever. She had a history of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) followed by an upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) weeks prior to her presentation rendering GBS secondary to the post viral URTI and AGE as the most likely diagnosis. Presence of thrombocytopenia was the only clue for dengue in this case. PMID:27099661

  6. Complications of dental surgery.

    PubMed

    Lillich, J D

    1998-08-01

    Both retrospective data and clinical experience indicate that complications of dental surgery are occasionally encountered and, to some extent, are inevitable. Many of the reported complications related to dental surgery such as incomplete removal of diseased teeth or removal of the wrong tooth can be avoided with sound preoperative planning and intraoperative technique. Diseased teeth should be properly identified prior to and during surgery. In addition, complete removal of the diseased tooth must be performed. Use of intraoperative radiographic examination to confirm the location of the diseased tooth and to document its removal cannot be overemphasized. Iatrogenic fracture of the maxillary or mandibular alveolar walls or palatine bone can be avoided by proper placement of the dental punch. The chances of developing incisional drainage or secondary sinusitis can be reduced by use of appropriate systemic antibiotics. These factors should guide the surgical approach to dental surgery to reduce the likelihood of developing common complications. PMID:9742671

  7. Complications of cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Chan, Elsie; Mahroo, Omar A R; Spalton, David J

    2010-11-01

    Modern cataract surgery is safe in more than 95 per cent of patients. In the small number of cases where a serious complication occurs, the most common is an intra-operative posterior capsular rupture. This can lead to vitreous loss or a dropped nucleus and can increase the risk of post-operative cystoid macular oedema or retinal detachment. Post-operatively, posterior capsular opacification is the most common complication and can be readily treated with a YAG capsulotomy. The most devastating complication is endophthalmitis, the rate of which is now significantly decreased through the use of intracameral antibiotics. As a clinician, the most important step is to assess the patient pre-operatively to predict higher risk individuals and to counsel them appropriately. In these patients, various pre- or intra-operative management steps can be taken in addition to routine phacoemulsification to optimise their visual outcome. PMID:20735786

  8. Osteoarticular complications of brucellosis.

    PubMed Central

    Colmenero, J D; Reguera, J M; Fernández-Nebro, A; Cabrera-Franquelo, F

    1991-01-01

    Two hundred and sixty three patients with a diagnosis of brucellosis between January 1984 and December 1987 were studied prospectively. Sixty five patients (25%) developed osteoarticular complications. These patients had a more prolonged course than those with no complications. Spondylitis in 38 (58%) and sacroiliitis in 29 (45%) were the most prevalent. There were no significant laboratory, serological, or bacteriological differences between patients with and without osteoarticular complications. At diagnosis 47 patients (72%) showed radiographic abnormalities, commonly in axial sites but rarely in peripheral sites. Radionuclide bone scan was positive with no radiographic abnormalities in 17 (26%) of cases. Fifty seven patients received medical treatment alone, 51 (89%) being cured with a single course of treatment. Treatment failed or there was a relapse in six patients (11%), of whom five had spondylitis. Eight of the 65 patients (12%), all of whom had spondylitis and paravertebral or epidural abscesses, also required surgical treatment. Images PMID:1994863

  9. First Trimester complications in pregnancy with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bhowmik, Bishwajit

    2016-09-01

    Diabetes is the most prevalent medical condition complicating pregnancy in the world. It carries both acute and long-term health consequences for the mother and her offspring. Both preexisting (type 1 and type 2) and gestational diabetes are a high-risk state for miscarriage, stillbirths and congenital malformations in early pregnancy. Like normal pregnancy, vaginal bleeding, urinary tract infection, abdominopelvic pain, nausea, and vomiting are common presenting symptoms in early pregnancy with preexisting and gestational diabetes. Early diagnosis and appropriate management of the condition is important for improving pregnancy outcomes. PMID:27582160

  10. Intradialytic complications during hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Andrew

    2006-04-01

    With the advent of developments and advances in hemodialysis machine technology, dialysate water purification, and dialyzers, the clinical spectrum of intradialytic complications has changed over the decades. In the pioneering days of hemodialysis, patients could develop allergic reactions to dialyzer membranes, sterilizing and reprocessing agents, coupled with machines that could not accurately control ultrafiltration rates, and chemically and bacterially contaminated dialysate. Whereas today, although cardiovascular problems remain the most common intradialytic complication, these are mainly due to the time restraints of trying to cope with excessive dialytic weight gains and achieve target dry weight on a thrice weekly schedule, coupled with an aging elderly dialysis population with increasing co-morbidity. PMID:16623668

  11. Avoiding Complications in Gigantomastia.

    PubMed

    Kling, Russell E; Tobler, William D; Gusenoff, Jeffrey A; Rubin, J Peter

    2016-04-01

    Gigantomastia is a disabling condition for patients and presents unique challenges to plastic surgeons. Presentation can occur throughout different phases of life, and treatment often begins with nonoperative measures; however, the most effective way to relieve symptoms is surgical breast reduction. Because of the large amount of tissue removed, surgeons can encounter different intraoperative and postoperative complications. By understanding this disease process and these complications, surgeons can attempt to minimize their occurrences. The authors present an overview of the cause, preoperative evaluation, techniques, and outcomes. Additionally, they present outcomes data from their center on 40 patients. PMID:27012802

  12. Complications of hip fractures: A review.

    PubMed

    Carpintero, Pedro; Caeiro, Jose Ramón; Carpintero, Rocío; Morales, Angela; Silva, Samuel; Mesa, Manuel

    2014-09-18

    Nowadays, fracture surgery represents a big part of the orthopedic surgeon workload, and usually has associated major clinical and social cost implications. These fractures have several complications. Some of these are medical, and other related to the surgical treatment itself. Medical complications may affect around 20% of patients with hip fracture. Cognitive and neurological alterations, cardiopulmonary affections (alone or combined), venous thromboembolism, gastrointestinal tract bleeding, urinary tract complications, perioperative anemia, electrolytic and metabolic disorders, and pressure scars are the most important medical complications after hip surgery in terms of frequency, increase of length of stay and perioperative mortality. Complications arising from hip fracture surgery are fairly common, and vary depending on whether the fracture is intracapsular or extracapsular. The main problems in intracapsular fractures are biological: vascularization of the femoral head, and lack of periosteum -a major contributor to fracture healing- in the femoral neck. In extracapsular fractures, by contrast, the problem is mechanical, and relates to load-bearing. Early surgical fixation, the role of anti-thromboembolic and anti-infective prophylaxis, good pain control at the perioperative, detection and management of delirium, correct urinary tract management, avoidance of malnutrition, vitamin D supplementation, osteoporosis treatment and advancement of early mobilization to improve functional recovery and falls prevention are basic recommendations for an optimal maintenance of hip fractured patients. PMID:25232517

  13. Is the cold loop hysteroscopic technique a myometrial sparing treatment for placenta accreta residuals in a puerperal uterus?

    PubMed

    Mazzon, Ivano; Favilli, Alessandro; Grasso, Mario; Horvath, Stefano; Gerli, Sandro

    2016-01-01

    Placenta accreta is a life-threatening obstetric pathology characterized by an abnormal invasion of chorionic villi into the uterine wall. The management represents a challenge for the gynecologist, especially in patients desiring to preserve their fertility. Several methods have been proposed to avoid hysterectomy. A case of a hysteroscopic conservative management with the cold loop technique in a puerpera with a large mass of placenta accreta residuals is described. The chorionic tissue was safely detached and it was subsequently removed by an electric cutting loop. Even in the absence of a clear cleavage plane, the thermal damage of surrounding healthy myometrium and dreadful complications as uterine perforation due to the electric cutting loop were avoided. The cold-loop hysteroscopic resection seems to be a safe and effective choice for the treatment of retained placenta accreta in patients desiring to preserve fertility. Moreover, it can also be proposed to patients who need to be treated immediately after delivery. PMID:26212585

  14. Medical complications following splenectomy.

    PubMed

    Buzelé, R; Barbier, L; Sauvanet, A; Fantin, B

    2016-08-01

    Splenectomy is attended by medical complications, principally infectious and thromboembolic; the frequency of complications varies with the conditions that led to splenectomy (hematologic splenectomy, trauma, presence of portal hypertension). Most infectious complications are caused by encapsulated bacteria (Meningococcus, Pneumococcus, Hemophilus). These occur mainly in children and somewhat less commonly in adults within the first two years following splenectomy. Post-splenectomy infections are potentially severe with overwhelming post-splenectomy infection (OPSI) and this justifies preventive measures (prophylactic antibiotics, appropriate immunizations, patient education) and demands prompt antibiotic management with third-generation cephalosporins for any post-splenectomy fever. Thromboembolic complications can involve both the caval system (deep-vein thrombophlebitis, pulmonary embolism) and the portal system. Portal vein thrombosis occurs more commonly in patients with myeloproliferative disease and cirrhosis. No thromboembolic prophylaxis is recommended apart from perioperative low molecular weight heparin. However, some authors choose to prescribe a short course of anti-platelet medication if the post-splenectomy patient develops significant thrombocytosis. Thrombosis of the portal or caval venous system requires prolonged warfarin anticoagulation for 3 to 6 months. Finally, some studies have suggested an increase in the long-term incidence of cancer in splenectomized patients. PMID:27289254

  15. Complicating Methodological Transparency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridges-Rhoads, Sarah; Van Cleave, Jessica; Hughes, Hilary E.

    2016-01-01

    A historical indicator of the quality, validity, and rigor of qualitative research has been the documentation and disclosure of the behind-the-scenes work of the researcher. In this paper, we use what we call "methodological data" as a tool to complicate the possibility and desirability of such transparency. Specifically, we draw on our…

  16. Treatment of complicated grief

    PubMed Central

    Rosner, Rita; Pfoh, Gabriele; Kotoučová, Michaela

    2011-01-01

    Following the death of a loved one, a small group of grievers develop an abnormal grieving style, termed complicated or prolonged grief. In the effort to establish complicated grief as a disorder in DSM and ICD, several attempts have been made over the past two decades to establish symptom criteria for this form of grieving. Complicated grief is different from depression and PTSD yet often comorbid with other psychological disorders. Meta-analyses of grief interventions show small to medium effect sizes, with only few studies yielding large effect sizes. In this article, an integrative cognitive behavioral treatment manual for complicated grief disorder (CG-CBT) of 25 individual sessions is described. Three treatment phases, each entailing several treatment strategies, allow patients to stabilize, explore, and confront the most painful aspects of the loss, and finally to integrate and transform their grief. Core aspects are cognitive restructuring and confrontation. Special attention is given to practical exercises. This article includes the case report of a woman whose daughter committed suicide. PMID:22893810

  17. Complications and Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... successfully cure SCD. Complications from hydroxyurea therapy and stem cell transplants are rare but can be serious or life-threatening. People with SCD and their families should ask their doctors about the benefits and risks of each. Read more about treatment ...

  18. Complicating Visual Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daiello, Vicki; Hathaway, Kevin; Rhoades, Mindi; Walker, Sydney

    2006-01-01

    Arguing for complicating the study of visual culture, as advocated by James Elkins, this article explicates and explores Lacanian psychoanalytic theory and pedagogy in view of its implications for art education practice. Subjectivity, a concept of import for addressing student identity and the visual, steers the discussion informed by pedagogical…

  19. Tension chylothorax complicating acute malignant airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Piastra, Marco; Pietrini, Domenico; Ruggiero, Antonio; Rizzo, Daniela; Marzano, Laura; Attinà, Giorgio; De Luca, Daniele; De Rosa, Gabriella; Conti, Giorgio

    2011-05-01

    Acute upper airway obstruction represents one of the most challenging emergencies in pediatric practice. In particular, a tension chylothorax complicating a malignant airway obstruction is a rare and life-threatening complication. We report a rapidly progressing tension chylothorax associated with a cervical mass in a 10-month-old male infant. To our knowledge, the extension of a cervical mass to the supraclavear region resulting in a compressive chylothorax represents an exceptional event in pediatrics. Early recognition and prompt treatment resulted to be essential to relieve the compression and to avoid end-stage hemodynamic and respiratory function derangement. PMID:21546802

  20. Rare extrapulmonary complications of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection.

    PubMed

    Dhaliwal, Kiran; Enright, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Stevens-Johnsons syndrome (SJS) is a rare extra-pulmonary complication of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. We present the case of a 26-year-old man with fever, cough, extensive oral mucosal ulceration and a widespread truncal rash. He was diagnosed with M. pneumoniae-induced SJS. He responded well to antibiotics and steroids initially, but went on to develop pseudomembranous conjunctivitis requiring bilateral amniotic membrane grafting. SJS is most commonly drug-induced, however, M. pneumoniae is the commonest infectious cause and should be considered in the differential diagnosis. It is also important to get specialist care involved early to minimise the long-term effects of any complications. PMID:26837942

  1. Imaging Manifestations of Neurologic Complications in Anemia.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ritesh; Sabat, Shyam; Kanekar, Sangam

    2016-08-01

    The hallmark signs and symptoms of anemia are directly related to a decrease in oxygen delivery to vital tissues and organs and include pallor, fatigue, lightheadedness, and shortness of breath. Neurologic complications are often nonspecific and can include poor concentration, irritability, faintness, tinnitus, and headache. If undiagnosed or untreated, anemia can progress to cognitive dysfunction, psychosis, encephalopathy, myelopathy, peripheral neuropathy, and more focal syndromes, such as stroke, seizures, chorea, and transverse myelitis. Imaging can play an important role in the early diagnosis and treatment of these neurologic and systemic complications associated with anemia, and hence, better outcome. PMID:27443995

  2. Complicated Gallstones after Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Sioka, Eleni; Zacharoulis, Dimitris; Zachari, Eleni; Katsogridaki, Georgia; Tzovaras, George

    2014-01-01

    Background. The natural history of gallstone formation after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG), the incidence of symptomatic gallstones, and timing of cholecystectomy are not well established. Methods. A retrospective review of prospectively collected database of 150 patients that underwent LSG was reviewed. Results. Preoperatively, gallbladder disease was identified in 32 of the patients (23.2%). Postoperatively, eight of 138 patients (5.8%) became symptomatic. Namely, three of 23 patients (13%) who had evident cholelithiasis preoperatively developed complicated cholelithiasis. From the cohort of patients without preoperative cholelithiasis, five of 106 patients (4.7%) experienced complicated gallstones after LSG. Total cumulative incidence of complicated gallstones was 4.7% (95% CI: 1.3–8.1%). The gallbladder disease-free survival rate was 92.2% at 2 years. No patient underwent cholecystectomy earlier than 9 months or later than 23 months indicating the post-LSG effect. Conclusion. A significant proportion of bariatric patients compared to the general population became symptomatic and soon developed complications after LSG, thus early cholecystectomy is warranted. Routine concomitant cholecystectomy could be considered because the proportion of patients who developed complications especially those with potentially significant morbidities is high and the time to develop complications is short and because of the real technical difficulties during subsequent cholecystectomy. PMID:25105023

  3. [Acute otitis media and short-term complications].

    PubMed

    Juilland, Naline; Vinckenbosch, Pauline; Richard, Céline

    2016-02-17

    Oral antibiotic have changed the incidence of otitic intracranial complications. In spite of therapeutic progress, these complications remain serious, potentially life-threatening and may result in long-life consequences. Acute otitis media diagnosis and knowledge of intracranial complications' symptoms are required for early and adapted therapeutics. Care strategies evolve with the continuously improvement of medical technologies, development of new vaccines and targeted use of antibiotics. PMID:27039457

  4. Complications of percutaneous vertebroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Saracen, Agnieszka; Kotwica, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) is a minimally invasive procedure widely used for the treatment of pain due to vertebral fractures of different origins—osteoporotic, traumatic, or neoplastic. PVP is minimally invasive, but the complications are not rare; however, they are in most cases not significant clinically. The most frequent is cement leakage, which can occur onto veins, paravertebral soft tissue, into the intervertebral disk, or to the spinal canal, affecting foraminal area or epidural space. We analyzed results of treatment and complications of vertebroplasty performed with the use of polimethylomethylacrylate cement (PMMA) on 1100 vertebrae, with a special regard to the severity of complication and eventual clinical manifestation. One thousand one hundred PVP were analyzed, performed in 616 patients. There were 468 (76%) women and 148 men (24%), 24 to 94-year old, mean age 68 years. From 1100 procedures, 794 treated osteporotic and 137 fractures due to malignant disease, 69 PVP were made in traumatic fractures. One hundred patients had painful vertebral hemangiomas. Seven hundred twenty-six (66%) lesions were in thoracic, and 374 (34%) in lumbar area. Results of treatment were assessed using 10 cm Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) 12 hours after surgery, 7 days, 30 days, and then each 6 months, up to 3 years. Before surgery all patients had significant pain 7 to 10 in VAS scale, mean 8.9 cm. Twelve  hours after surgery 602 (97.7%) reported significant relief of pain, with mean VAS of 2,3 cm. Local complications occurred in 50% of osteoporotic, 34% of neoplastic, 16% of traumatic fractures, and 2% of vertebral hemangiomas. The most common was PMMA leakage into surrounding tissues—20%; paravertebral vein embolism—13%; intradiscal leakage—8%; and PMMA leakage into the spinal canal—0.8%. Results of treatment did not differ between patients with and without any complications. From 104 patients who had chest X-ray or CT study performed

  5. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis to determine the diagnostic performance of serum haptoglobin concentration for the diagnosis of acute puerperal metritis in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Burfeind, O; Sannmann, I; Voigtsberger, R; Heuwieser, W

    2014-10-01

    Acute puerperal metritis (APM) in dairy cows is characterized by fever and fetid vaginal discharge within 21 days in milk (DIM). Increased serum haptoglobin concentration (Hp) can support the diagnosis of APM. However, there is a dearth of information of the test performance of Hp as a measure for APM with a consistent definition and considering parity. The objective of this trial was to study the test performance of Hp to distinguish healthy cows from cows with APM. A total of 33 of 60 (55.0%) primiparous cows and 43 of 133 (32.3%) multiparous cows developed APM. Primiparous cows with APM had the greatest Hp. However, in primiparous cows Hp did not significantly differ between healthy cows (DIM 2: 1.49 ± 0.64 mg/mL; DIM 5: 2.13 ± 0.66 mg/mL; DIM 10: 1.46 ± 0.85 mg/mL) and cows with APM (DIM 2: 1.78 ± 0.62 mg/mL; DIM 5: 2.48 ± 0.64 mg/mL; DIM 10: 1.60 ± 0.81 mg/mL). In multiparous cows, Hp was greater in cows with APM (DIM 2: 1.27 ± 0.68 mg/mL; DIM 5: 1.89 ± 0.94 mg/mL; DIM 10: 1.23 ± 0.78 mg/mL) than in healthy cows (DIM 2: 0.99 ± 0.68 mg/mL; DIM 5: 1.10 ± 0.80 mg/mL; DIM 10: 0.83 ± 0.68 mg/mL). Sensitivity and specificity of Hp to diagnose APM in multiparous cows ranged from 72% to 79% and 54% to 71% on DIM 2, 5 and 10, respectively. PMID:25128191

  6. Acute Lower Leg Compartment Syndrome: A Rare Complication following CABG

    PubMed Central

    Galvin, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Compartment syndrome of lower legs following coronary artery bypass grafting is a rare complication which results from a combination of local and systemic factors. Early recognition is vital for good outcome. The case discussed describes this rare complication of CABG resulting in long term disability. PMID:27525152

  7. Obstetrical Complications and Violent Delinquency: Testing Two Developmental Pathways.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arseneault, Louise; Tremblay, Richard E.; Boulerice, Bernard; Saucier, Jean-Francois

    2002-01-01

    Assessed interaction between obstetrical complications and early family adversity in predicting violent behavior during childhood and adolescence among 849 boys from low SES areas. Found that elevated scores on scale of obstetrical complications (preeclampsia, umbilical cord prolapse, induced labor) increased risk of being violent at 6 and 17…

  8. Genetics of diabetes complications.

    PubMed

    Doria, Alessandro

    2010-12-01

    A large body of evidence indicates that the risk for developing chronic diabetic complications is under the control of genetic factors. Previous studies using a candidate gene approach have uncovered a number of genetic loci that may shape this risk, such as the VEGF gene for retinopathy, the ELMO1 gene for nephropathy, and the ADIPOQ gene for coronary artery disease. Recently, a new window has opened on identifying these genes through genome-wide association studies. Such systematic approach has already led to the identification of a major locus for coronary artery disease on 9p21 as well three potential genes for nephropathy on 7p, 11p, and 13q. Further insights are expected from a broader application of this strategy. It is anticipated that the identification of these genes will provide novel insights on the etiology of diabetic complications, with crucial implications for the development of new drugs to prevent the adverse effects of diabetes. PMID:20835900

  9. Mediastinal dysgerminoma complicating pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Manikandan, K; Veena, P; Elamurugan, S; Soundararaghavan, S

    2012-01-01

    Malignancy complicating pregnancy represents one of the most challenging clinical situations. Lack of evidence and the presence of the dependent fetus contribute to the management dilemma. A 26-year-old primigravida presented at 23 weeks of gestation with a bulging substernal mass. Fine-needle aspiration was reported as mediastinal dysgerminoma. She was treated with weekly bleomycin and three weekly cisplatin and etoposide (BEP). Maternal neutropenia after 11 weeks of bleomycin required colony stimulator factor. Fetal growth restriction necessitated delivery at 31 weeks. Significant clinical and radiological tumour regression was noted after chemotherapy. Postnatally mother received external beam radiotherapy but the disease worsened two weeks after the completion of radiotherapy. Mediastinal dysgerminoma differs from the ovarian counterpart and therefore therapeutic success reports on ovarian germ cell tumours complicating pregnancy cannot be extrapolated. The safety of the BEP regimen for the fetus is yet to be established.

  10. Complications of Lyme borreliosis.

    PubMed

    Cooke, W D; Dattwyler, R J

    1992-01-01

    Lyme borreliosis is the multisystem infectious disease caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. Complications of this infection can involve many organ systems, especially the skin, joints, nervous system, and heart. These manifestations may be acute, or evolve slowly over months or years. Diagnosis is not always straightforward, and is currently hampered by lack of a specific serologic assay. This review discusses the syndromes associated with Lyme borreliosis and addresses issues of diagnosis and treatment. PMID:1580609

  11. Pleuropulmonary complications of pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Michael D.

    1968-01-01

    Pancreatitis, in common with many other upper abdominal diseases, often leads to pleuropulmonary complications. Radiological evidence of pleuropulmonary abnormality was found in 55% of 58 cases examined retrospectively. The majority of such abnormalities are not specific for pancreatitis; but a particular category of pleural effusions, rich in pancreatic enzymes, is a notable exception. A patient with this type of effusion, complicated by a spontaneous bronchopleural fistula and then by an empyema, is reported. The literature relating to pancreatic enzyme-rich pleural effusions (pathognomonic of pancreatitis) is reviewed. Of several possible mechanisms involved in pathogenesis, transdiaphragmatic lymphatic transfer of pancreatic enzymes, intrapleural rupture of mediastinal extensions of pseudocysts, and diaphragmatic perforation are the most important. The measurement of pleural fluid amylase, at present little employed in this country, has considerable diagnostic value. Enzyme-rich effusions are more commonly left-sided, are often blood-stained, are frequently associated with pancreatic pseudocysts, and—if long standing—may be complicated by a bronchopleural fistula. Images PMID:4872925

  12. Keratomycosis complicating pterygium excision.

    PubMed

    Merle, Harold; Guyomarch, Jérôme; Joyaux, Jean-Christophe; Dueymes, Maryvonne; Donnio, Angélique; Desbois, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe a case of keratomycosis that appeared after the exeresis of a pterygium. A 48-year-old patient had been referred with a red right eye associated with an abscess of the cornea along the ablation zone of the pterygium. The surgery had been performed a month beforehand. The abscess was 6 mm high and 4 mm wide. The authors instigated a treatment that included amphotericin B (0.25%) after noticing a clinical aspect evoking a fungal keratitis and finding several septate filaments on direct examination. On day 10, a Fusarium dimerum was isolated on Sabouraud agar. After 15 days of treatment, the result was favorable and the size of the ulceration as well as the size of the abscess had progressively decreased. The antifungal treatment was definitively stopped at 14 weeks. Infectious-related complications of the pterygium surgery are rare and are essentially caused by bacterial agents. Secondary infections by fungus are rare. There have been two previous cases reported: one that appeared 15 years after radiotherapy and another that appeared at 3 weeks post surgery, consecutive to the use of mitomycin C. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first case of a keratomycosis due to F. dimerum reported that complicated the exeresis of a pterygium without the use of an adjuvant antihealing treatment. Pterygium surgery is a common procedure; nevertheless, ophthalmologists need to be aware of the existence of potential infectious complications. PMID:22034566

  13. Keratomycosis complicating pterygium excision

    PubMed Central

    Merle, Harold; Guyomarch, Jérôme; Joyaux, Jean-Christophe; Dueymes, Maryvonne; Donnio, Angélique; Desbois, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe a case of keratomycosis that appeared after the exeresis of a pterygium. A 48-year-old patient had been referred with a red right eye associated with an abscess of the cornea along the ablation zone of the pterygium. The surgery had been performed a month beforehand. The abscess was 6 mm high and 4 mm wide. The authors instigated a treatment that included amphotericin B (0.25%) after noticing a clinical aspect evoking a fungal keratitis and finding several septate filaments on direct examination. On day 10, a Fusarium dimerum was isolated on Sabouraud agar. After 15 days of treatment, the result was favorable and the size of the ulceration as well as the size of the abscess had progressively decreased. The antifungal treatment was definitively stopped at 14 weeks. Infectious-related complications of the pterygium surgery are rare and are essentially caused by bacterial agents. Secondary infections by fungus are rare. There have been two previous cases reported: one that appeared 15 years after radiotherapy and another that appeared at 3 weeks post surgery, consecutive to the use of mitomycin C. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first case of a keratomycosis due to F. dimerum reported that complicated the exeresis of a pterygium without the use of an adjuvant antihealing treatment. Pterygium surgery is a common procedure; nevertheless, ophthalmologists need to be aware of the existence of potential infectious complications. PMID:22034566

  14. Genetics of diabetes complications.

    PubMed

    Alkayyali, Sami; Lyssenko, Valeriya

    2014-10-01

    Chronic hyperglycemia and duration of diabetes are the major risk factors associated with development of micro- and macrovascular complications of diabetes. Although it is believed that hyperglycemia induces damage to the particular cell subtypes, e.g., mesangial cells in the renal glomerulus, capillary endothelial cells in the retina, and neurons and Schwann cells in peripheral nerves, the exact mechanisms underlying these damaging defects are not yet well understood. Clustering of micro- and macrovascular complications in families of patients with diabetes suggests a strong genetic susceptibility. However, until now only a handful number of genetic variants were reported to be associated with either nephropathy (ACE, ELMO1, FRMD3, and AKR1B1) or retinopathy (VEGF, AKR1B1, and EPO), and only a few studies were carried out for genetic susceptibility to cardiovascular diseases (ADIPOQ, GLUL) in patients with diabetes. It is, therefore, obvious that the accumulation of more data from larger studies and better phenotypically characterized cohorts is needed to facilitate genetic discoveries and unravel novel insights into the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. PMID:25169573

  15. [Respiratory complications after transfusion].

    PubMed

    Bernasinski, M; Mertes, P-M; Carlier, M; Dupont, H; Girard, M; Gette, S; Just, B; Malinovsky, J-M

    2014-05-01

    Respiratory complications of blood transfusion have several possible causes. Transfusion-Associated Circulatory Overload (TACO) is often the first mentioned. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI), better defined since the consensus conference of Toronto in 2004, is rarely mentioned. French incidence is low. Non-hemolytic febrile reactions, allergies, infections and pulmonary embolism are also reported. The objective of this work was to determine the statistical importance of the different respiratory complications of blood transfusion. This work was conducted retrospectively on transfusion accidents in six health centers in Champagne-Ardenne, reported to Hemovigilance between 2000 and 2009 and having respiratory symptoms. The analysis of data was conducted by an expert committee. Eighty-three cases of respiratory complications are found (316,864 blood products). We have counted 26 TACO, 12 TRALI (only 6 cases were identified in the original investigation of Hemovigilance), 18 non-hemolytic febrile reactions, 16 cases of allergies, 5 transfusions transmitted bacterial infections and 2 pulmonary embolisms. Six new TRALI were diagnosed previously labeled TACO for 2 of them, allergy and infection in 2 other cases and diagnosis considered unknown for the last 2. Our study found an incidence of TRALI 2 times higher than that reported previously. Interpretation of the data by a multidisciplinary committee amended 20% of diagnoses. This study shows the imperfections of our system for reporting accidents of blood transfusion when a single observer analyses the medical records. PMID:24814817

  16. Complications of obesity in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Daniels, S R

    2009-04-01

    The increasing prevalence and severity of obesity in children and adolescents has provided greater emphasis on the wide variety of comorbid conditions and complications that can be experienced as a consequence of obesity. These complications can occur both in the short term and in the long term. Some complications, earlier thought to be long-term issues, which would only occur in adulthood, have now been shown to occur in children and adolescents. These findings have raised concerns about the overall health experience of those who develop obesity early in life and have even raised questions about whether the obesity epidemic might shorten the life span of the current generation of children. In this paper, I will examine current knowledge regarding the different organ systems that may be impacted by childhood obesity. PMID:19363511

  17. [Amniotic fluid embolism: report of the successful outcome of a case with inaugural cardiac arrest and early DIVC complicated by hemoperitoneum of iatrogen origin and bleeding of an hepatic adenoma].

    PubMed

    Falzone, E; Ricard, J-D; Pachy, F; Mandelbrot, L; Keïta, H

    2012-10-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism is a relatively rare clinical entity and with difficult medical recognition. However, it is the second leading cause of maternal mortality. We report here the case of a 32-year-old patient who underwent elective caesarean section complicated by an amniotic fluid embolism with cardiac arrest. The presence of a major disseminated intravascular coagulation favored the occurrence of a retroperitoneal hematoma of iatrogenic origin on attempt of femoral venous catheterization and that of hemoperitoneum on bleeding of an hepatic adenoma. The diagnostic of amniotic fluid embolism was confirmed by the presence of amniotic cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage. The patient survived without sequelae. PMID:22925937

  18. Cryptococcal meningitis complicating sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Leonhard, Sonja E.; Fritz, Daan; van de Beek, Diederik; Brouwer, Matthijs C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cryptococcal meningitis is an uncommon but severe complication of sarcoidosis. Methods: We present 2 patients with cryptococcal meningitis complicating sarcoidosis and compared findings with 38 cases reported in the literature. Results: When analyzing our patients and 38 cases reported in the literature, we found that median age of sarcoidosis patients with cryptococcal meningitis was 39 years (range 30–48); 27 of 33 reported cases (82%) had a history of sarcoidosis. Only 16 of 40 patients (40%) received immunomodulating therapy at the time of diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis. The diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis was delayed in 17 of 40 patients (43%), mainly because of the initial suspicion of neurosarcoidosis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination showed mildly elevated white blood cell count (range 23–129/mm3). Twenty-nine of 32 cases (91%) had a positive CSF culture for Cryptococcus neoformans and 25 of 27 cases (93%) had a positive CSF C neoformans antigen test. CD4 counts were low in all patients in whom counts were performed (84–228/mL). Twelve patients had an unfavorable outcome (32%), of which 7 died (19%) and 24 patients (65%) had a favorable outcome. The rate of unfavorable outcome in patients with a delayed diagnosis was 7 of 17 (41%) compared to 5 of 28 (21%) in patients in whom diagnosis was not delayed. Conclusion: Cryptococcal meningitis is a rare but life-threatening complication of sarcoidosis. Patients were often initially misdiagnosed as neurosarcoidosis, which resulted in considerable treatment delay and worse outcome. CSF cryptococcal antigen tests are advised in patients with sarcoidosis and meningitis. PMID:27583871

  19. Complications of Macular Peeling.

    PubMed

    Asencio-Duran, Mónica; Manzano-Muñoz, Beatriz; Vallejo-García, José Luis; García-Martínez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Macular peeling refers to the surgical technique for the removal of preretinal tissue or the internal limiting membrane (ILM) in the macula for several retinal disorders, ranging from epiretinal membranes (primary or secondary to diabetic retinopathy, retinal detachment…) to full-thickness macular holes, macular edema, foveal retinoschisis, and others. The technique has evolved in the last two decades, and the different instrumentations and adjuncts have progressively advanced turning into a safer, easier, and more useful tool for the vitreoretinal surgeon. Here, we describe the main milestones of macular peeling, drawing attention to its associated complications. PMID:26425351

  20. Complicated Burn Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Harrington, David T

    2016-10-01

    More than 4 decades after the creation of the Brooke and Parkland formulas, burn practitioners still argue about which formula is the best. So it is no surprise that there is no consensus about how to resuscitate a thermally injured patient with a significant comorbidity such as heart failure or cirrhosis or how to resuscitate a patient after an electrical or inhalation injury or a patient whose resuscitation is complicated by renal failure. All of these scenarios share a common theme in that the standard rule book does not apply. All will require highly individualized resuscitations. PMID:27600129

  1. Complications of Macular Peeling

    PubMed Central

    Asencio-Duran, Mónica; Manzano-Muñoz, Beatriz; Vallejo-García, José Luis; García-Martínez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Macular peeling refers to the surgical technique for the removal of preretinal tissue or the internal limiting membrane (ILM) in the macula for several retinal disorders, ranging from epiretinal membranes (primary or secondary to diabetic retinopathy, retinal detachment…) to full-thickness macular holes, macular edema, foveal retinoschisis, and others. The technique has evolved in the last two decades, and the different instrumentations and adjuncts have progressively advanced turning into a safer, easier, and more useful tool for the vitreoretinal surgeon. Here, we describe the main milestones of macular peeling, drawing attention to its associated complications. PMID:26425351

  2. Complications of denver shunt.

    PubMed

    Perera, Eranga; Bhatt, Shweta; Dogra, Vikram S

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic hydrothorax secondary to transdiaphragmatic spread of peritoneal fluid can cause respiratory discomfort to the patient. Draining of hydrothorax helps relieve these symptoms. Pleurovenous shunt (Denver shunt) is a relatively non-invasive method of shunting the pleural fluid to the central venous system. Reported complications of pleurovenous shunts are shunt failure, pulmonary edema, post shunt coagulopathy, deep vein thrombosis, and infection. We report a rare case of a leak at the venous end of the catheter that was placed within the right internal jugular vein, resulting in a large collection in the neck. PMID:21915387

  3. Medical complications of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Allen, M C; Jones, M D

    1986-03-01

    The improved survival of extremely premature infants has generated intense interest in the quality of life of the survivors. This review focuses on the major long-term complications of prematurity (developmental disability, retinopathy of prematurity, chronic lung disease) and concludes with an overview of the broader spectrum of morbidity. Severe impairment (cerebral palsy, mental retardation, retrolental fibroplasia, severe chronic lung disease) fortunately occurs in a small proportion of survivors. However, the prevalence of the lesser morbidities (minimal cerebral dysfunction/learning disability, poor growth, postneonatal illnesses, rehospitalization) is less clearly defined. These problems all have an impact on families, and on medical and educational services. PMID:2935764

  4. [Complications after hip osteotomy].

    PubMed

    Renner, L; Perka, C; Zahn, R

    2014-01-01

    Complex deformities of the acetabulum are one of the most common reasons for secondary pelvic osteoarthritis. One option of treatment is osteotomy of the acetabulum close to the joint. The correction of the spatially reduced roof of the femoral head resulting from pelvic dysplasia can minimize the risk of developing secondary osteoarthritis or reduce the progression of an already existing osteoarthritis. The Ganz periacetabular osteotomy (PAO) and Tönnis triple osteotomy procedures are the predominant methods used to correct hip dysplasia in adolescents. Both are complex procedures which bear specific risks and complications, thus requiring very experienced surgeons. PMID:24356819

  5. Radiology of cardiac devices and their complications.

    PubMed

    Dipoce, J; Bernheim, A; Spindola-Franco, H

    2015-02-01

    This article familiarizes the reader with several different cardiac devices including pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators, intra-aortic balloon pumps, ventricular assist devices, valve replacements and repairs, shunt-occluding devices and passive constraint devices. Many cardiac devices are routinely encountered in clinical practice. Other devices are in the early stages of development, but circumstances suggest that they too will become commonly found. The radiologist must be familiar with these devices and their complications. PMID:25411826

  6. Unusual septoplasty complication: Streptococcus viridans endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Leonard, D W; Thompson, D H

    1998-10-01

    Infection is an infrequently reported complication following septoplasty and septorhinoplasty. Among the recognized but rare infections are toxic shock syndrome, spinal osteomyelitis, meningitis, septic cavernous sinus thrombosis and endocarditis. A high index of suspicion is required to diagnose these infections early and thereby minimize morbidity and mortality. We present a case of endocarditis following septoplasty in a patient who had no identifiable preoperative risk factors but who experienced recurrent fever and chills postoperatively. PMID:9818534

  7. Femtosecond-assisted LASIK: Complications and Management.

    PubMed

    Perez-Straziota, Claudia; Randleman, J Bradley

    2016-01-01

    FS-assisted LASIK has become the preferred method for LASIK flap creation due to the precision, accuracy, and reproducibility of the flap creation. Thinner, planar flaps may help prevent cases of post-LASIK ectasia and may have a superior refractive outcome. However, FS flap creation has several unique complications that require early recognition and optimal timely management for the best visual outcomes. PMID:26938338

  8. Radiology of cardiac devices and their complications

    PubMed Central

    Dipoce, J; Spindola-Franco, H

    2015-01-01

    This article familiarizes the reader with several different cardiac devices including pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators, intra-aortic balloon pumps, ventricular assist devices, valve replacements and repairs, shunt-occluding devices and passive constraint devices. Many cardiac devices are routinely encountered in clinical practice. Other devices are in the early stages of development, but circumstances suggest that they too will become commonly found. The radiologist must be familiar with these devices and their complications. PMID:25411826

  9. Acute abdominal complications following hip surgery.

    PubMed

    Deleanu, B; Prejbeanu, R; Vermesan, D; Haragus, H; Icma, I; Predescu, V

    2014-01-01

    Hip surgeries are some of the most common and successful orthopedic procedures. Although rarely, abdominal complications do occur and are associated with unfavorable outcomes.We aimed to identify and describe the severe abdominal complications that appear in patients under-going elective or traumatic hip surgery. A four year retrospective electronic database research identified 408 elective primary hip replacements,51 hip revisions and 1040 intra and extracapsular proximal femur fractures. Out of these, three males and 4 females between 64 - 84 years old were identified to have developed acute abdominal complications: perforated acute ulcer (3),acute cholecystitis (2), volvulus (1), toxic megacolon with peritonitis (1) and acute colonic pseudo-obstruction (1).Complications debuted 3 - 10 days after index orthopedic surgery. Acute perioperative abdominal complications are rarely encountered during orthopedic surgery. When these do occur, they do so almost exclusively in patients with hippathology, comorbidities and most often lead to life threatening situations. We thus emphasize the need for early identification and appropriate management by both orthopedic and general surgery doctors in order to improve patient safety. PMID:24742414

  10. Intracranial complications following mastoidectomy.

    PubMed

    Migirov, Lela; Eyal, Ana; Kronenberg, Jona

    2004-01-01

    Mastoidectomy is a common surgical procedure in otology. However, postoperative complications of various degrees of severity may occur. We present 4 children who underwent mastoidectomy for middle ear and mastoid disease and developed postoperative intracranial complications. One child was operated on for brain abscess 1 week after the initial mastoidectomy. Another child appeared with seizures 5 days after the initial mastoidectomy and a subdural empyema was drained during revision surgery. Large bone defects with exposed middle cranial fossa dura were found at revision surgery in both cases and Proteus vulgaris and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus were isolated from the mastoid and abscess cavities in these children. A small epidural collection was diagnosed in the third patient 2 days after initial mastoid surgery and was managed with intravenous antibiotics only. The other child was found to have sigmoid sinus thrombosis the day after mastoidectomy that was performed for nonresponsive acute mastoiditis. This child received both intravenous antibiotics and anticoagulants. Timely revision surgery, combinations of third- or fourth-generation cephalosporins with vancomycin or metronidazole and the addition of anticoagulants in cases of sinus thrombosis can lead to full recovery. PMID:15689642

  11. Complications after third molar surgery.

    PubMed

    Pitekova, L; Satko, I; Novotnakova, D

    2010-01-01

    The authors describe the incidence of postoperative complications after the surgical removal of third molars, most common postoperative complications and their symptoms as well as risk factors leading to greater incidence of postoperative complications (Ref. 17). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk. PMID:20568422

  12. Neurological complications of transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pustavoitau, Aliaksei; Bhardwaj, Anish; Stevens, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Recipients of solid organ or hematopoietic cell transplants are at risk of life-threatening neurological disorders including encephalopathy, seizures, infections and tumors of the central nervous system, stroke, central pontine myelinolysis, and neuromuscular disorders-often requiring admission to, or occurring in, the intensive care unit (ICU). Many of these complications are linked directly or indirectly to immunosuppressive therapy. However, neurological disorders may also result from graft versus host disease, or be an expression of the underlying disease which prompted transplantation, as well as injury induced during radiation, chemotherapy, surgery, and ICU stay. In rare cases, neuroinfectious pathogens may be transmitted with the transplanted tissue or organ. Diagnosis may be a challenge because clinical symptoms and findings on neuroimaging lack specificity, and a biological specimen or tissue diagnosis is often needed for definitive diagnosis. Management is centered on preventing further neurological injury, etiology-targeted therapy, and balancing the benefits and toxicities of specific immunosuppressive agents. PMID:21764765

  13. Neuromuscular complications in cancer.

    PubMed

    Grisold, W; Grisold, A; Löscher, W N

    2016-08-15

    Cancer is becoming a treatable and even often curable disease. The neuromuscular system can be affected by direct tumor invasion or metastasis, neuroendocrine, metabolic, dysimmune/inflammatory, infections and toxic as well as paraneoplastic conditions. Due to the nature of cancer treatment, which frequently is based on a DNA damaging mechanism, treatment related toxic side effects are frequent and the correct identification of the causative mechanism is necessary to initiate the proper treatment. The peripheral nervous system is conventionally divided into nerve roots, the proximal nerves and plexus, the peripheral nerves (mono- and polyneuropathies), the site of neuromuscular transmission and muscle. This review is based on the anatomic distribution of the peripheral nervous system, divided into cranial nerves (CN), motor neuron (MND), nerve roots, plexus, peripheral nerve, the neuromuscular junction and muscle. The various etiologies of neuromuscular complications - neoplastic, surgical and mechanic, toxic, metabolic, endocrine, and paraneoplastic/immune - are discussed separately for each part of the peripheral nervous system. PMID:27423586

  14. Complicated bile duct stones.

    PubMed

    Roy, Ashwin; Martin, Derrick

    2013-01-01

    Common bile duct stones (CBDSs) are solid deposits that can either form within the gallbladder or migrate to the common bile duct (CBD), or form de novo in the biliary tree. In the USA around 15% of the population have gallstones and of these, 3% present with symptoms annually. Because of this, there have been major advancements in the management of gallstones and related conditions. Management is based on the patient's risk profile; young and healthy patients are likely to be recommended for surgery and elderly patients with comorbidities are usually recommended for endoscopic procedures. Imaging of gallstones has advanced in the last 30 years with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography evolving from a diagnostic to a therapeutic procedure in removing CBDSs. We present a complicated case of a patient with a CBDS and periampullary diverticulum and discuss the techniques used to diagnose and remove the stone from the biliary system. PMID:23946532

  15. [Cardiovascular complications of obesity].

    PubMed

    Cascella, Teresa; Giallauria, Francesco; Tafuri, Domenico; Lombardi, Gaetano; Colao, Annamaria; Vigorito, Carlo; Orio, Francesco

    2006-12-01

    Obesity is one of the major coronary risk factor representing an increasingly important worldwide health problem. The increased prevalence of obesity among younger population is likely to have long-term implications for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Obesity plays a central role in the insulin resistance syndrome and contributes to increase the risk of atherosclerotic CVD. The present review will examine the relationships among cardiovascular risk factors during the childhood-adolescence-adulthood transition. In fact, the relationship between obesity (especially visceral obesity) and CVD appears to develop at a relatively young age. The foremost physical consequence of obesity is atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and polycystic ovary syndrome represents an intriguing example of obesity-related cardiovascular complications affecting young women. PMID:17312846

  16. Complicated bile duct stones

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Ashwin; Martin, Derrick

    2013-01-01

    Common bile duct stones (CBDSs) are solid deposits that can either form within the gallbladder or migrate to the common bile duct (CBD), or form de novo in the biliary tree. In the USA around 15% of the population have gallstones and of these, 3% present with symptoms annually. Because of this, there have been major advancements in the management of gallstones and related conditions. Management is based on the patient's risk profile; young and healthy patients are likely to be recommended for surgery and elderly patients with comorbidities are usually recommended for endoscopic procedures. Imaging of gallstones has advanced in the last 30 years with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography evolving from a diagnostic to a therapeutic procedure in removing CBDSs. We present a complicated case of a patient with a CBDS and periampullary diverticulum and discuss the techniques used to diagnose and remove the stone from the biliary system. PMID:23946532

  17. Serum Adiponectin and hsCRP Levels and Non-InvasiveRadiological Methods in the Early Diagnosis ofCardiovascular System Complications in Children andAdolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Gökşen, Damla; Levent, Ertürk; Kar, Sakine; Özen, Samim; Darcan, Şükran

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Adiponectin and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) can be used as early biochemical markers of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Radiologically, non-invasive flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) measurements may be used as indicators in the early diagnosis of CVDs. To compare the biochemical markers of atherosclerosis with radiological markers of CVDs (CIMT, FMD, ventricular systolic and diastolic functions) and to assess the relationship of these parameters with metabolic control in diabetic children and adolescents. Methods: A total of 55 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) of at least 5-year duration and 30 healthy subjects were included in the study. Serum adiponectin, hsCRP, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), and lipid levels were evaluated in the patients and in the controls. CIMT, FMD, ventricular systolic and diastolic functions were assessed by echocardiography. Results: Mean age of the patients with diabetes was 17.6 years; mean diabetes duration was 10.4 years. Mean serum hsCRP was elevated in children with diabetes (0.21±0.31 vs. 0.10±0.16 μg/mL, p=0.00), while no significant difference from the controls was found in adiponectin levels. Mean CIMT was significantly higher in diabetic children compared to the control group (0.53±0.11 vs. 0.34±0.46 mm, p=0.00). Mean FMD of the diabetic children was significantly lower than that of the controls (6.86±2.85% vs. 12.13±1.99%, p=0.00). Diabetes duration was positively correlated with CIMT and negatively correlated with FMD. Right ventricular (RV) and left ventricular (LV) myocardial performance index (MPI) were higher in the patient group (p=0.00). Conclusions: Our data suggest that in addition to standard echocardiography, tissue Doppler echocardiography, FMD, and CIMT can be used as early-stage radiological markers and hsCRP as an early-stage biochemical marker of atherosclerosis in the routine follow-up of T1DM patients

  18. [Intervention-specific complications of hernia surgery].

    PubMed

    Dietz, U A; Wiegering, A; Germer, C T

    2014-02-01

    Hernia surgery is generally a rewarding task, patient satisfaction is high and the long-term results are generally good. Incisional hernias are more heterogeneous and there is a higher variability of morphologies to be matched with the available therapeutic approaches but the majority of patients are also satisfied with the results. This positive scenario for hernia surgery can be largely attributable to careful preoperative planning, effective surgical techniques and a high degree of standardization. The picture is somewhat clouded by the complications associated with hernia surgery. If complications do arise, the outcome largely depends on how well the surgeon responds. For inguinal and femoral hernias, the risk profile of the patient is crucial to the surgical planning and the wrong operation on the wrong patient can be disastrous. Open procedures have complication risks in common but the question of how best to deal with the nerves has yet to be answered. Endoscopic procedures are an indispensable part of the hernia surgery repertoire and the hernia specialist should be proficient in TEP and TAPP techniques. Ventral and incisional hernias have higher complication rates and the treatment is similar despite differences in etiology and pathophysiology. Although open procedures are better for morphological reconstruction they are accompanied by a higher complication rate. Laparoscopic procedures had a severe complication profile early on but the situation has greatly improved today due to continued refinement of the learning curve. A critical approach to the application of methods and meshes, a deep knowledge of anatomical peculiarities and the careful planning of tactics for dealing with intraoperative problems are the hallmarks of today's good hernia surgeon. PMID:24435828

  19. Dermatological complications of obesity.

    PubMed

    García Hidalgo, Linda

    2002-01-01

    Obesity is a health problem of considerable magnitude in the Western world. Dermatological changes have been reported in patients with obesity, including: acanthosis nigricans and skin tags (due to insulin resistance); hyperandrogenism; striae due to over extension; stasis pigmentation due to peripheral vascular disease; lymphedema; pathologies associated with augmented folds; morphologic changes in the foot anatomy due to excess load; and complications that may arise from hospitalization. Acanthosis nigricans plaques can be managed by improved control of hyperinsulinemia; the vitamin D3 analog calcipitriol has also been shown to be effective. Skin tags can be removed by snipping with curved scissors, by cryotherapy or by electrodesiccation. Hyperandrogenism, a result of increased production of endogenous androgens due to increased volumes of adipose tissue (which synthesizes testosterone) and hyperinsulinemia (which increases the production of ovarian androgens) needs to be carefully assessed to ensure disorders such as virilizing tumors and congenital adrenal hyperplasia are treated appropriately. Treatment of hyperandrogenism should be centred on controlling insulin levels; weight loss, oral contraceptive and antiandrogenic therapies are also possible treatment options. The etiology of striae distensae, also known as stretch marks, is yet to be defined and treatment options are unsatisfactory at present; striae rubra and alba have been treated with a pulsed dye laser with marginal success. The relationship between obesity and varicose veins is controversial; symptoms are best prevented by the use of elastic stockings. Itching and inflammation associated with stasis pigmentation, the result of red blood cells escaping into the tissues, can be treated with corticosteroids. Lymphedema is associated with dilatation of tissue channels, reduced tissue oxygenation and provides a culture medium for bacterial growth. Lymphedema treatment is directed towards reducing the

  20. Complications of pediatric trauma.

    PubMed

    Czerwinski, S J

    1991-09-01

    MSOF is a life-threatening complication of trauma. The body is a dynamic interrelated group of systems that work together efficiently. Changes in one system generally have a widespread impact, and soon the entire system is changed. In children with MSOF, the normal equilibrium that is maintained between organ systems does not exist. Generalized disruption of organ functions occur, and the body attempts to compensate and regain its homeostasis. This activity will often benefit certain organs and harm others. If the disruption continues and compensation fails, organ dysfunction occurs and general chaos reigns. Medical and nursing interventions are directed toward supporting individual organ systems before failure occurs. Attempts to provide this support for one system can cause adverse effects to occur in other systems. Although this is a potential result of medical and nursing interventions, often there is no other choice. It is essential that nurses be aware of the systemic consequences of these interventions and carefully evaluate them. Although overall mortality rates are high, children have a better chance for survival than adults. Expert nursing assessments, interventions, and evaluations are essential to maximize this outcome. More research in the area of MSOF in children is necessary, with specific attention to nursing management and the effect on patient outcome. PMID:1883588

  1. Pregnancy complicating Wegener's granulomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Soh, May Ching; Hart, Hamish H; Bass, Eileen; Wilkinson, Lucille

    2009-01-01

    Pregnancy associated with Wegener's granulomatosis is rare. Therapeutic options are limited. There is a paucity of published literature to guide clinical decision-making in these complex patients. Two cases are presented. Firstly, a 33-year-old woman with generalized Wegener's in remission and off all medications presented with a flare in the third trimester with haemoptysis, raised C-reactive protein and c-anti-neutrophilic cytoplasmic antibody (c-ANCA) levels. Her care was complicated by florid steroid-induced psychosis. With deteriorating disease control, she was treated with pulsed-intravenous cyclophosphamide with a good response. She delivered a healthy baby at 38 weeks. She had a severe postpartum flare. Secondly, a 37-year-old woman with limited Wegener's in remission for the last two years and off all treatment became pregnant after pre-conception counselling. A normal baby was delivered at term. An exhaustive review of all published literature on Wegener's activity in pregnancy is presented along with therapeutic options and recommendations.

  2. Hematologic complications of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Townsley, Danielle M

    2013-07-01

    Pregnancy induces a number of physiologic changes that affect the hematologic indices, either directly or indirectly. Recognizing and treating hematologic disorders that occur during pregnancy is difficult owing to the paucity of evidence available to guide consultants. This review discusses specifically the diagnosis and management of benign hematologic disorders occurring during pregnancy. Anemia secondary to iron deficiency is the most frequent hematologic complication and is easily treated with oral iron formulations; however, care must be taken not to miss other causes of anemia, such as sickle cell disease. Thrombocytopenia is also a common reason for consulting the hematologist, and distinguishing gestational thrombocytopenia from immune thrombocytopenia (ITP), preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets), or thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is essential since the treatment differs widely. Occasionally the management of mother and infant involves the expeditious recognition of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT), a condition that is responsible for severe life-threatening bleeding of the newborn. Additionally, inherited and acquired bleeding disorders affect pregnant women disproportionately and often require careful monitoring of coagulation parameters to prevent bleeding in the puerperium. Finally, venous thromboembolism (VTE) during pregnancy is still largely responsible for mortality during pregnancy, and the diagnosis, treatment options and guidelines for prevention of VTE during pregnancy are explored. PMID:23953339

  3. Hematologic Complications of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Townsley, Danielle M.

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy induces a number of physiologic changes that affect the hematologic indices, either directly or indirectly. Recognizing and treating hematologic disorders that occur during pregnancy is difficult owing to the paucity of evidence available to guide consultants. This paper specifically reviews the diagnosis and management of benign hematologic disorders occurring during pregnancy. Anemia secondary to iron deficiency is the most frequent hematologic complication and is easily treated with oral iron formulations,; however care must be taken not to miss other causes of anemia, such as sickle cell disease. Thrombocytopenia is also a common reason for consulting the hematologist and distinguishing gestational thrombocytopenia from immune thrombocytopenia (ITP), preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome, or thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is essential since the treatment differs widely. Occasionally the management of mother and infant involves the expeditious recognition of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT), a condition that is responsible for severe life-threatening bleeding of the newborn. Additionally, inherited and acquired bleeding disorders affect pregnant women disproportionately and often require careful monitoring of coagulation parameters in order to prevent bleeding in the puerperium. Finally, venous thromboembolism (VTE) during pregnancy is still largely responsible for mortality during pregnancy and the diagnosis, treatment options and guidelines for prevention of VTE during pregnancy are explored. PMID:23953339

  4. A clinical study comparing BIVAP saline vaporization of the prostate with bipolar TURP in patients with prostate volume 30 to 80 mL: Early complications, physiological changes and postoperative follow-up outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Aydogdu, Ozgu; Karakose, Ayhan; Atesci, Yusuf Ziya

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: We compare BIVAP saline vaporization of the prostate with bipolar transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Methods: In total, we included 86 patients treated with BIVAP (n = 44) and bipolar TURP (n = 42). The inclusion criteria were maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax) ≤10 mL/s, International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) ≥16, and prostate volume measured with transrectal ultrasound scan between 30 and 80 mL. Serum electrolyte, hemoglobin, and hematocrit levels were determined preoperatively and postoperatively. All patients were evaluated at the postoperative first and third months and the IPSS score, post-void residual urinary volume (PVR), Qmax, and average urinary flow rate (Qave) were compared. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 16.0 program and statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. Results: Preoperative demographic characteristics were similar in the 2 groups. The mean operation time was significantly higher (p = 0.02) and hospitalization time was significantly lower (p = 0.04) in the BIVAP group when compared to the bipolar TURP group. There was no significant difference between 2 groups in terms of preoperative and postoperative serum electrolyte, hemoglobin and hematocrit levels. Postoperative complication rates were similar in the 2 groups. The only exception was the rate of severe dysuria, which was significantly higher in the BIVAP group. No statistical difference was noted between the groups in terms of postoperative follow-up results. Conclusion: Bipolar TURP is a safe and highly effective technique which can be used in the surgical treatment of benign prostatic obstruction with minimal side effects. BIVAP saline vaporization of the prostate seems to be a potential alternative to bipolar TURP with shorter hospitalization time. PMID:25132894

  5. Urinary diversion metabolic complications - underestimated problem.

    PubMed

    Krajewski, Wojciech; Piszczek, Radosław; Krajewska, Magdalena; Dembowski, Janusz; Zdrojowy, Romuald

    2014-01-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most frequent human cancers. In 2011 more than six thousand people in Poland developed BC and more than three thousand died because of it. Treatment of bladder cancer depends on its stage. In less advanced tumours (Ta, Tcis, T1) transurethral resection of bladder tumor with adjuvant immunotherapy is often therapeutic. In more advanced cases (≥ T2) radical cystectomy is needed. There are several surgical types of post-cystectomy urinary diversion divided into two fundamental types - enabling and not enabling urine continence. The most common procedures include ureterocutaneostomy, ileal or colon conduit, orthopic ileal bladder, heterotopic continent bladder replacement (pouch) and urinary diversion via the rectum. Depending on type of cystectomy, various metabolic complications occur, because the absorptive-secretory function of used bowel segment is intact. Complications include bowel dysfunction, malabsorption of various vitamins, acid-base imbalance, electrolyte imbalance, abnormalities in bone metabolism, formation of renal calculi, secondary malignancies and disturbances in function of kidneys or liver. Early diagnosed complications can be treated easier, recognised in advanced stages are often irreversible. In our paper we present review of different approaches to bladder cancer treatment and metabolic complications occurring after these procedures. PMID:25166450

  6. [Intraoperative and postoperative complications of splenectomy].

    PubMed

    Petrović, M; Popovic, M; Knezević, S; Matić, S; Gotić, M; Milovanović, A; Zuvela, M; Artiko, V; Dugalić, V; Ranković, V

    2002-01-01

    Spleen is being surgically removed because of trauma, in diagnostic and-or therapeutical purposes because of the benignant and malignant diseases. The percentage of morbidity during and after splenectomy is relatively low. During surgery might occur bleeding, trauma of the pancreatic tail, stomach, lineal flexure of the colon, left hemidiafragm, left suprarenal gland and upper pole of the left kidney, which must be correspondingly reclaimed during the same intervention. In the early postoperative period, postoperative bleeding, subfrenic abscess, pulmonal atelectasis, bronchopneumonia and left pleural extravasations might occur. Especially is important notification of these events in due time and adequate conservative and surgical treatment. After splenectomy, there is an increase of the number of trombocytes, which might lead to the tromboembolic complications. In the prevention of these complications in the postoperative period prolonged antiagregation therapy is suggested. Postsplenectomy sepsis is very late, general complication of splenectomy, which occurs because of the lower immunity in the child age. To prevent these complications, partial splenectomies, reimplantations of the spleen, prolonged application of the penicillin medicines after splenectomy and antipneumococcal vaccine are performed. PMID:12587454

  7. Infantile hemangiomas, complications and treatments.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Carol Erin; Friedlander, Sheila Fallon

    2016-03-01

    Infantile hemangiomas (IHs) are the most common vascular tumors of infancy. While the majority regress without the need for intervention, approximately 10%, often site dependent, can cause serious complications and require treatment. IH complications can be categorized as life threatening, obstructive, ulcerative or disfiguring. Life threatening complications include airway and hepatic IHs. Functional complications obstructing vital structures or impairing function include periocular, nasal, labial, parotid, auricular, and breast IHs. Local complications arise from ulceration or those in cosmetically sensitive areas. Therapeutic options for complicated IHs include pharmacologic (topical or systemic), surgical, or laser interventions. Topical agents are best employed for small, superficial, and localized IHs; while systemic therapy is reserved for larger IHs and those with more aggressive growth characteristics with propranolol as first-line therapy. PMID:27607318

  8. Iatrogenic aortic pseudoaneurysm: a forgotten complication.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Samuel; Bico, Pedro; Almeida, António R; Laranjeira Santos, Álvaro; Banazol, Nuno; Fragata, José; Rabaçal, Carlos

    2014-02-01

    Pseudoaneurysms of the ascending aorta are a rare complication of cardiac surgery. However, the poor prognosis associated with this condition if untreated makes early diagnosis and treatment important. We present the case of a 66-year-old woman who had undergone mitral valvuloplasty 12 days previously, who was admitted with a diagnosis of new-onset atrial fibrillation. The transthoracic echocardiogram showed a clot in the right atrium and anticoagulation was initiated, followed by antibiotic therapy. After further investigation, the patient was diagnosed with a pseudoaneurysm of the ascending aorta and underwent surgical repair, followed by six weeks of antibiotic therapy. She was readmitted six months later for an abscess of the lower sternum and mediastinum. After a conservative approach with antibiotics and local drainage failed, recurrence of a large pseudoaneurysm compressing the superior vena cava was documented. A third operation was performed to debride the infected tissue and to place an aortic allograft. There were no postoperative complications. PMID:24508151

  9. Pulmonary complications of AIDS: radiologic features. [AIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.A.; Pomeranz, S.; Rabinowitz, J.G.; Rosen, M.J.; Train, J.S.; Norton, K.I.; Mendelson, D.S.

    1984-07-01

    Fifty-two patients with pulmonary complications of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) were studied over a 3-year period. The vast majority of the patients were homosexual; however, a significant number were intravenous drug abusers. Thirteen different organisms were noted, of which Pneumocystis carinii was by far the most common. Five patients had neoplasia. Most patients had initial abnormal chest films; however, eight patients subsequently shown to have Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia had normal chest films. A significant overlap in chest radiographic findings was noted among patients with different or multiple organisms. Lung biopsy should be an early consideration for all patients with a clinical history consistent with the pulmonary complications of AIDS. Of the 52 patients, 41 had died by the time this report was completed.

  10. Maxillary odontogenic sinusitis, complicated with cerebral abscess--case report.

    PubMed

    Onişor-Gligor, F; Lung, T; Pintea, B; Mureşan, O; Pop, P B; Juncar, M

    2012-01-01

    Maxillary sinus inflammation, when untreated or incorrectly treated, may extend locoregionally, the remaining paranasal sinuses being the first affected anatomical structures. This is why the understanding of the inflammatory pathology of the maxillary sinus, and particularly of the complications it can generate, is extremely important. The purpose of this presentation is to point out that inflammations of the paranasal sinuses are susceptible to develop complications in certain conditions and threaten the patient's life due to the proximity of vital structures. This is the case of a 16 years old male patient who developed a left maxillary and frontal sinusitis, complicated with cerebral abscess. Early detection, multidisciplinary approach and proper indication of surgical treatment, as well as early suspicion of complication, especially in young male adolescents, are extremely important. PMID:22712359

  11. Pulmonary Complications of Drug Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, Leon S.; Boylen, Thomas C.

    1974-01-01

    Complications resulting from drug abuse more frequently affect the lung than any other organ. The spectrum of pulmonary complications associated with drug abuse is wide. The current practice of using mixtures of drugs is mainly responsible for the increase in pulmonary complications. The chief complications observed in a series of 241 drug abuse patients were aspiration pneumonitis (12.9 percent), pulmonary edema (10.0 percent), and pneumonia (7.5 percent). ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10. PMID:4812215

  12. Effect of intrauterine infusion of an organic-certified product on uterine health, survival, and fertility of dairy cows with toxic puerperal metritis.

    PubMed

    Pinedo, P J; Velez, J S; Bothe, H; Merchan, D; Piñeiro, J M; Risco, C A

    2015-05-01

    The objective was to evaluate the effect of intrauterine infusion of an organic certified product (Optimum UterFlush, Van Beek Natural Science, Orange City, IA) on uterine health, survival, and fertility of cows affected with toxic puerperal metritis (TPM) in an organic dairy farm. Cows with TPM were defined as having an abnormally enlarged uterus and a fetid watery red-brown vaginal discharge, associated with systemic illness and fever (rectal temperature ≥39.5°C), within 12 d postpartum. Cows diagnosed with TPM (n=220; study d 0) were blocked by parity (1 and ≥2) and randomly assigned into 1 of 2 intrauterine treatments applied every other day for a total of 3 applications: (1) control (CON)=200mL of povidone iodine diluted in 2L of distilled water (n=113); (2) Optimum UterFlush (UF)=3.75mL diluted in 117mL of distilled water (n=107). All enrolled cows received hypertonic saline solution (500mL 7.2% i.v.), dextrose (500mL 50% i.v.), and oral aspirin (5 boluses/d). Outcome variables for treatment efficacy included fever and presence of fetid vaginal discharge at study d 6 and 14, survival at study d 6 and 14 and at 30 and 100 DIM, and reproductive performance. Control variables were parity, BCS at enrollment, calving season, and milk yield. Occurrence of fever at d 6 and 14 was not different between the 2 treatment groups. Presence of fetid vaginal discharge at d 6 and 14 was lower in cows treated with UF compared with cows in the CON group (10.7 vs. 28% and 1.1 vs. 9.1%). The odds (95% confidence interval) for survival and remaining in the farm at study d 6 and 14 and at 30 and 100 DIM for cows in the UF treatment were 4.67 (1.38-15.8), 2.77 (1.25-6.10), 3.13 (1.22-8.02), and 2.82 (1.38-5.71) times the odds of cows in the CON group, respectively. The odds of AI until 150 DIM and the interval from calving to first AI were not different between the 2 treatments. However, pregnancy was affected by treatment; the odds (95% confidence interval) of pregnancy at

  13. Hemorheology in complicated hypertension.

    PubMed

    Cicco, G; Vicenti, P; Stingi, G D; Tarallo; Pirrelli, A

    1999-01-01

    hypertensives especially if suffering from vascular disease which correlates significantly (p < 0.01) with a reduction in red blood cell deformability. This itself can increase peripheral resistances and favour the onset of hemorheological complications, at a cerebral-vascular level, which are frequent in hypertensives. PMID:10711762

  14. Radiologist's perspective for the Meckel's diverticulum and its complications

    PubMed Central

    Kotha, V K; Saboo, S S; Shanbhogue, A K P; Virmani, V; Marginean, E C; Menias, C O

    2014-01-01

    The Meckel's diverticulum is the commonest congenital anomaly of the gastrointestinal tract, often presenting with complications such as gastrointestinal bleeding, intussusception, bowel obstruction and diverticulitis, which are often misdiagnosed. Imaging plays an important role in the early diagnosis and characterization of these conditions and is very helpful in decision making. The Meckel's diverticulum and its complications have myriad presentations and appearances on various imaging modalities. Thus, sound knowledge of the anatomy, embryology, clinical presentation, imaging characteristics and complications is crucial to the practice of abdominal imaging. We present a review of the literature and current radiological practices in the diagnosis and management of the Meckel's diverticulum and its various complications with special emphasis on the imaging of various complications, mimickers and pathological correlation. PMID:24611767

  15. Diabetes Complications in Childhood Diabetes—New Biomarkers and Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Bjornstad, Petter; Maahs, David M.

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in preventing vascular complications in diabetes is the inability to identify high-risk patients at an early stage, emphasizing the importance of discovering new risk factors, technologies and therapeutic targets to reduce the development and progression of complications. Promising biomarkers which may improve risk stratification and serve as therapeutic targets, include: uric acid, insulin sensitivity, copeptin, SGLT-2 and Klotho/FGF-23. Non-invasive measures of macrovasuclar disease in youth, include: 1) pulse wave velocity to examine arterial stiffness; 2) carotid intima-media thickness to evaluate arterial thickness; 3) cardiac MRI to investigate cardiac function and structure. Novel microvascular measures include: GFR by iohexol clearance using filter paper to directly measure GFR, retinal vascular geometry to predict early retinal changes and corneal confocal microscopy to improve detection of early nerve loss to better predict diabetic neuropathy. Herein we will review technologies, novel biomarkers, and therapeutic targets in relation to vascular complications of diabetes. PMID:26425403

  16. Complications after procedures of photorefractive keratectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gierek-Ciaciura, Stanislawa

    1998-10-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the saveness of the PRK procedures. Material and method: 151 eyes after PRK for correction of myopia and 112 after PRK for correction of myopic astigmatism were examined. All PRK procedures have been performed with an excimer laser manufactured by Aesculap Meditec. Results: Haze, regression, decentration infection and overcorrection were found. Conclusions: The most often complication is regression. Corneal inflammation in the early postoperative period may cause the regression or haze. The greater corrected refractive error the greater haze degree. Haze decreases with time.

  17. Complications of sinusitis: what to watch for.

    PubMed

    Sheffield, R W; Cassisi, N J; Karlan, M S

    1978-03-01

    Sinus infection remains a common cause of orbital inflammatory disease, and prompt diagnosis is essential. A team approach early in the course of the disease, with an otolaryngologist serving as coordinator, is recommended. If vigorous medical therapy fails, abscess formation should be suspected and surgical drainage instituted without delay. Of 24 patients hospitalized with complications of sinusitis, 13 were found to have acute inflammatory disease and 11 had mucocele formation. Mortality in patients with acute inflammatory was 30%; in those with intracranial extension of infection it was 67%. PMID:628655

  18. Serious Vascular Complications after Nonsurgical Rhinoplasty: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiqing; Liu, Yu; Fan, Dongliang

    2016-04-01

    There has been an increased global demand for dermal filler injections in recent years. Although hyaluronic acid-based dermal fillers generally have a good safety profile, serious vascular complications have been reported. Here we present a typical case of skin necrosis following a nonsurgical rhinoplasty using hyaluronic acid filler. Despite various rescuing managements, unsightly superficial scars were left. It is critical for plastic surgeons and dermatologists to be familiar with the vascular anatomy and the staging of vascular complications. Any patients suspected to experience a vascular complication should receive early management under close monitoring. Meanwhile, the potentially devastating outcome caused by illegal practice calls for stricter regulations and law enforcement. PMID:27200245

  19. Fractured metallic tracheostomy tube: A rare complication of tracheostomy.

    PubMed

    So-Ngern, Apichart; Boonsarngsuk, Viboon

    2016-01-01

    Although tracheostomy is a well-accepted procedure for airway management, some early and late complications may occur. Fracture of the tracheostomy tube (TT) is a rare complication, particularly in a patient with long-term use. Herein we report a case of fractured metallic TT migrating into the tracheobronchial tree. Rigid bronchoscopy was performed through the tracheostomy stoma and the fractured tube was successfully removed by a balloon catheter. Appropriate cleaning, routine careful examination, and scheduled replacement of the TT may help prevent this complication. PMID:27489759

  20. Dealing with surgical left ventricular assist device complications

    PubMed Central

    Kilic, Arman; Acker, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) will undoubtedly have an increasing role due to the aging population, anticipated concomitant increase in the prevalence of end-stage heart failure, and improvements in LVAD technology and outcomes. As with any surgical procedure, LVAD implantation is associated with an adverse event profile. Such complications of LVAD therapy include bleeding, infection, pump thrombosis, right heart failure, device malfunction, and stroke. Although each has a unique management, early recognition and diagnosis of these complications is uniformly paramount. In this review, we provide an overview of managing surgical complications of LVADs. PMID:26793336

  1. Complications of Laparoscopic Gynecologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Mariña Naveiro; Naveiro Rilo, José Cesáreo; Paredes, Aida González; Aguilar Romero, María Teresa; Parra, Jorge Fernández

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: To analyze the frequency of complications during laparoscopic gynecologic surgery and identify associated risk factors. Methods: A descriptive observational study was performed between January 2000 and December 2012 and included all gynecologic laparoscopies performed at our center. Variables were recorded for patient characteristics, indication for surgery, length of hospital stay (in days), major and minor complications, and conversions to laparotomy. To identify risk factors and variables associated with complications, crude and adjusted odds ratios were calculated with unconditional logistic regression. Results: Of all 2888 laparoscopies included, most were procedures of moderate difficulty (adnexal surgery) (54.2%). The overall frequency of major complications was 1.93%, and that of minor complications was 4.29%. The level of technical difficulty and existence of prior abdominal surgery were associated with a higher risk of major complications and conversions to laparotomy. Conclusion: Laparoscopic gynecologic surgery is associated with a low frequency of complications but is a procedure that is not without risk. Greater technical difficulty and prior surgery were factors associated with a higher frequency of complications. PMID:25392659

  2. [Urinary complications after anorectal surgery].

    PubMed

    Iusuf, T; Sârbu, V; Cristache, C; Popescu, R; Botea, F; Panait, L

    2000-01-01

    The prevalence of urinary complications after various anorectal operations was studied in a group of 273 patients. The overall prevalence of urinary complications was 26.7%; most of these complications affected men between 41 and 50, mainly after hemorrhoidectomy. In 10.6% of patients, bladder catheterization was needed. These urinary complications result from nervous reflexes originating from the anus and determined by the operative trauma and/or rectal distinction. In the treatment of these urinary complications, the role of the muses is essential for reassuring the patients. Parasympathomimetic drugs are often efficient. Urinary catheterization must be delayed until the 18th hour. Fluid restriction may be useful to prevent urinary retention. PMID:14870531

  3. Wernicke's Encephalopathy Complicating Hyperemesis during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Berdai, Mohamed Adnane; Labib, Smael; Harandou, Mustapha

    2016-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is caused by severe thiamine deficiency; it is mostly observed in alcoholic patients. We report the case of a 28-year-old woman, at 17 weeks of gestational age, with severe hyperemesis gravidarum. She presented with disturbance of consciousness, nystagmus, ophthalmoplegia, and ataxia. The resonance magnetic imagery showed bilaterally symmetrical hyperintensities of thalamus and periaqueductal area. The case was managed with very large doses of thiamine. The diagnosis of Wernicke's encephalopathy was confirmed later by a low thiamine serum level. The patient was discharged home on day 46 with mild ataxia and persistent nystagmus. Wernicke's encephalopathy is a rare complication of hyperemesis gravidarum. It should be diagnosed as early as possible to prevent long-term neurological sequela or death. Thiamine supplementation in pregnant women with prolonged vomiting should be initiated, especially before parenteral dextrose infusion. Early thiamine replacement will reduce maternal morbidity and fetal loss rate. PMID:26989522

  4. Wernicke's Encephalopathy Complicating Hyperemesis during Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Berdai, Mohamed Adnane; Labib, Smael; Harandou, Mustapha

    2016-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is caused by severe thiamine deficiency; it is mostly observed in alcoholic patients. We report the case of a 28-year-old woman, at 17 weeks of gestational age, with severe hyperemesis gravidarum. She presented with disturbance of consciousness, nystagmus, ophthalmoplegia, and ataxia. The resonance magnetic imagery showed bilaterally symmetrical hyperintensities of thalamus and periaqueductal area. The case was managed with very large doses of thiamine. The diagnosis of Wernicke's encephalopathy was confirmed later by a low thiamine serum level. The patient was discharged home on day 46 with mild ataxia and persistent nystagmus. Wernicke's encephalopathy is a rare complication of hyperemesis gravidarum. It should be diagnosed as early as possible to prevent long-term neurological sequela or death. Thiamine supplementation in pregnant women with prolonged vomiting should be initiated, especially before parenteral dextrose infusion. Early thiamine replacement will reduce maternal morbidity and fetal loss rate. PMID:26989522

  5. Cerebrovascular Complications After Heart Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Alejaldre, Aída; Delgado-Mederos, Raquel; Santos, Miguel Ángel; Martí-Fàbregas, Joan

    2010-01-01

    Neurological complications in orthotopic heart transplantation represent a major cause of morbidity and mortality despite successful transplantation. The most frequent perioperative neurological complications are delirium or encephalopathy. In this period cerebrovascular complication ranges between 5-11%. After the perioperative period, the 5-year stroke risk after cardiac transplantation is 4.1%. In a retrospective study conducted with 314 patients who underwent cardiac transplantation, it was found that 20% of cerebrovascular complications occurred within the first two weeks after transplantation, while 80% occurred in the late postoperative phase. Of these, ischemic stroke is the most common subtype. In the perioperative periode, hemodynamic instability, cardiac arrest, extracorporeal circulation over 2 hours, prior history of stroke, and carotid stenosis greater than 50% have been reported to be risk factors for the occurrence of cerebrovascular complications. Perioperative cerebrovascular complications are associated with higher mortality and poor functional outcome at one year follow-up. After the perioperative period, the only factor that has been significantly associated with an increased risk of cerebrovascular complications is a history of prior stroke, either ischemic or hemorrhagic. Other associated factors include unknown atrial fibrillation, septic emboli from endocarditis, cardiac catheterization and perioperative hemodynamic shock. According to the TOAST etiologic classification, the most prevalent etiologic subtype of ischemic stroke is undetermined cause. PMID:21804780

  6. Ocular Complications of Leprosy in Yemen

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Raga A. A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This study was conducted to identify the main ocular- and vision-threatening complications of leprosy in Yemen. Methods: This is a cross-sectional observational study which took place from February to July 2010. Leprosy patients attending the Skin and Venereal Diseases Hospital in the City of Light in Taiz, Yemen, who consented to participate in the study, were enrolled. Detailed demographic and medical histories were taken and clinical examination findings were recorded. A detailed eye examination, including visual acuity (VA), slit-lamp, and fundus examinations, was conducted on each patient by a qualified ophthalmologist. Results: A total of 192 patients (180 male, 12 female, with a male to female ratio of 15:1) were included in the study. The majority of the patients (157; 81.8%) were over 40 years. Over two-thirds of the patients (129; 67.2%) had had leprosy for more than 20 years. Ocular complications were found in 97% of cases; 150 (39.1%) of the patients’ eyes had at least one pathology. Eyelid involvement was the most common problem observed in 102 (26.5%) patients. Half of the eyes (192; 50%) had a VA of <6/60. The main cause of blindness among these patients was corneal opacity detected in 69 out of 192 patients (35.9%). Conclusion: Ocular complications are frequent among leprosy patients in Yemen. They are true vision-threatening lesions. It is important to prevent these lesions through early diagnosis and adequate treatment. PMID:23275842

  7. Endothelial Dysfunction and Microvascular Complications in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Seon Mi; Yang, Sei Won; Bae, Eun Jung; Shin, Choong Ho; Chung, Hae Rim; Kim, You Yeh; Yun, Yong Soo

    2008-01-01

    We examined whether alterations in vascular endothelial function and early structural changes in atherosclerosis are associated with microvascular complications in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) measurement were performed in 70 young adults (aged 19 to 35 yr), 48 with type 1 DM, and 22 normal controls. Patients with diabetes had a lower peak FMD response (7.8±3.9 vs. 11.1±1.9%, p<0.001) and increased IMT (0.51±0.10 vs. 0.42±0.07 mm, p<0.001) compared with controls. Twenty (41.7%) of the patients had microvascular complications including neuropathy, nephropathy, or retinopathy. In these complicated diabetic patients, we found a lower FMD response (6.1±2.5 vs. 9.9±3.5%, p=0.001) compared with diabetics without microvascular complications. The presence of microvascular complications was also associated with older age and longer duration of the disease. However, no differences were observed in IMT, body size, blood pressure, HbA1c, C-reactive protein, low-density lipoprotein or high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels between complicated and non-complicated patients. Endothelial dysfunction and early structural atherosclerotic changes are common manifestations in type 1 DM, and endothelial dysfunction is thought to be an early event in the atherosclerotic process and important in the pathogenesis of microvascular complications. PMID:18303203

  8. Management and complications of stomas.

    PubMed

    Bafford, Andrea C; Irani, Jennifer L

    2013-02-01

    Stomas are created for a wide range of indications such as temporary protection of a high-risk anastomosis, diversion of sepsis, or permanent relief of obstructed defecation or incontinence. Yet this seemingly benign procedure is associated with an overall complication rate of up to 70%. Therefore, surgeons caring for patients with gastrointestinal diseases must be proficient not only with stoma creation but also with managing postoperative stoma-related complications. This article reviews the common complications associated with ostomy creation and strategies for their management. PMID:23177069

  9. PEG tubes: dealing with complications.

    PubMed

    Malhi, Hardip; Thompson, Rosie

    A percutaneous endoscopic gastronomy tube can be used to deliver nutrition, hydration and medicines directly into the patient's stomach. Patients will require a tube if they are unable to swallow safely, putting them at risk of aspiration of food, drink and medicines into their lungs. It is vital that nurses are aware of the complications that may arise when caring for a patient with a PEG tube. It is equally important that nurses know how to deal with these complications or from where tc seek advice. This article provides a quick troubleshooting guide to help nurses deal with complications that can arise with PEG feeding. PMID:26016095

  10. Long term complications of diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000327.htm Long term complications of diabetes To use the sharing ... sores and infections. If it goes on too long, your toes, foot, or leg may need to ...

  11. Liver Transplant: Complications/Medications

    MedlinePlus

    ... can develop a complication requiring return to the operating room for repair or other procedures to open up the new connections. Rejection: Your immune system helps fight infections. It does this by recognizing ...

  12. Medical complications of anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Shuttleworth, E; Sharma, S; Lal, S; Allan, P J

    2016-05-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a psychiatric disorder with potential life-threatening medical sequelae. This article reviews the principal medical complications associated with anorexia nervosa, highlights associated diagnostic pitfalls and emphasizes the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to management. PMID:27166107

  13. Coal workers pneumoconiosis, complicated (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the lungs. Diseases which may explain these X-ray findings include complicated coal workers pneumoconiosis (CWP), silico-tuberculosis, disseminated tuberculosis, metastatic lung cancer, and other diffuse infiltrative pulmonary diseases.

  14. Diabetic Complications and Amputation Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... two complications of diabetes: nerve damage (neuropathy) and poor circulation. Neuropathy causes loss of feeling in your ... you may not detect an injury or irritation. Poor circulation in your feet reduces your ability to ...

  15. Uncommon complications of laparoscopic sterilisation.

    PubMed

    Denton, G W; Schofield, J B; Gallagher, P

    1990-05-01

    We present three unusual complications of laparoscopic sterilisation with clinical presentation, pathology and management. We discuss the possible aetiological factors, pathogenesis and clinical importance in relation to each case. PMID:2141462

  16. Uncommon complications of laparoscopic sterilisation.

    PubMed Central

    Denton, G. W.; Schofield, J. B.; Gallagher, P.

    1990-01-01

    We present three unusual complications of laparoscopic sterilisation with clinical presentation, pathology and management. We discuss the possible aetiological factors, pathogenesis and clinical importance in relation to each case. PMID:2141462

  17. Chronic Pulmonary Complications of Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Mehari, Alem; Klings, Elizabeth S

    2016-05-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD), the most common genetic hemolytic anemia worldwide, affects 250,000 births annually. In the United States, SCD affects approximately 100,000 individuals, most of African descent. Hemoglobin S (HbS) results from a glutamate-to-valine mutation of the sixth codon of the β-hemoglobin allele; the homozygous genotype (HbSS) is associated with the most prevalent and severe form of the disease. Other SCD genotypes include HbSC, composed of one HbS allele and one HbC (glutamate-to-lysine mutation) allele; and HbS-β-thalassemia(0) or HbS-β-thalassemia(+), composed of one HbS allele and one β-thalassemia allele with absent or reduced β-chain production, respectively. Despite advances in care, median survival remains in the fifth decade, due in large part to chronic complications of the disease. Chronic pulmonary complications in SCD are major contributors to this early mortality. Although our understanding of these conditions has improved much over the past 10 to 15 years, there remains no specific treatment for pulmonary complications of SCD. It is unclear whether conventional treatment regimens directed at non-SCD populations have equivalent efficacy in patients with SCD. This represents a critical research need. In this review, the authors review the state-of-the-art understanding of the following pulmonary complications of SCD: (1) pulmonary hypertension; (2) venous thromboembolic disease; (3) sleep-disordered breathing; (4) asthma and recurrent wheezing; and (5) pulmonary function abnormalities. This review highlights the advances as well as the knowledge gaps in this field to update clinicians and other health care providers and to garner research interest from the medical community. PMID:26836905

  18. The management of complicated glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Clement, C I; Goldberg, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Complicated glaucomas present considerable diagnostic and management challenges. Response to treatment can be unpredictable or reduced compared with other glaucomas. However, target intraocular pressure and preservation of vision may be achieved with selected medical, laser and surgical treatment. The evidence for such treatment is expanding and consequently affords clinicians a better understanding of established and novel techniques. Herein we review the mechanisms involved in the development of complicated glaucoma and the current evidence supporting its management. PMID:21150026

  19. Unusual Complications of Quinalphos Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Stalin

    2013-01-01

    This 40-year-old man was treated for suicidal quinalphos 25%EC consumption. He developed intermediate syndrome with normal response to repetitive nerve stimulation, pancreatitis with high enzyme elevations, and normal computed tomography and excreted black, brown, and orange urine sequentially over the first nine days of hospitalization. The last complication has not been previously reported with any organophosphate compound. He finally succumbed to complication of ventilator associated pneumonia related septic shock and ventricular tachycardia. PMID:23762661

  20. Neurologic Complications in Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Basiri, Abbas; Soltani, Mohammad Hossein; Kamranmanesh, Mohammadreza; Tabibi, Ali; Mohsen Ziaee, Seyed Amir; Nouralizadeh, Akbar; Sharifiaghdas, Farzaneh; Poorzamani, Mahtab; Gharaei, Babak; Ozhand, Ardalan; Lashay, Alireza; Ahanian, Ali; Aminsharifi, Alireza; Sichani, Mehrdad Mohammadi; Asl-Zare, Mohammad; Ali Beigi, Faramarz Mohammad; Najjaran, Vahid; Abedinzadeh, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) has been the preferred procedure for the removal of large renal stones in Iran since 1990. Recently, we encountered a series of devastating neurologic complications during PCNL, including paraplegia and hemiplegia. There are several reports of neurologic complications following PCNL owing to paradoxical air emboli, but there are no reports of paraplegia following PCNL. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients who had undergone PCNL in 13 different endourologic centers and retrieved data related to neurologic complications after PCNL, including coma, paraplegia, hemiplegia, and quadriplegia. Results The total number of PCNL procedures in these 13 centers was 30,666. Among these procedures, 11 cases were complicated by neurologic events, and four of these cases experienced paraplegia. All events happened with the patient in the prone position with the use of general anesthesia and in the presence of air injection. There were no reports of neurologic complications in PCNL procedures performed with the patient under general anesthesia and in the prone position and with contrast injection. Conclusions It can be assumed that using room air to opacify the collecting system played a major role in the occurrence of these complications. Likewise, the prone position and general anesthesia may predispose to these events in the presence of air injection. PMID:23526482

  1. Complications of abdominoplasty after weight loss as a result of bariatric surgery or dieting/postpregnancy.

    PubMed

    Staalesen, Trude; Olsén, Monika Fagevik; Elander, Anna

    2012-12-01

    It is well known that the risk of complications after abdominal contouring surgery is high. Sparse data in published reports exist, suggesting that complication rates are higher in postbariatric patients compared with patients who have lost weight by dieting. The aim of this study was to analyse the incidence of complications after abdominoplasty in postbariatric patients compared with in patients who have not had weight loss surgery. The aim was also to identify predictive factors associated with the development of postoperative complications. This study retrospectively analysed 190 consecutive patients operated on with abdominoplasty due to abdominal tissue excess from January 2006 to December 2008 at Sahlgrenska University Hospital. Variables analysed were sex, age, max body mass index (BMI), delta BMI (max BMI minus preoperative BMI), preoperative BMI, method of weight reduction, resection weight, and complications. The early complication rates were significantly higher in postbariatric patients (48%) than in patients who had not had weight loss surgery (29%). Resection weight was significantly higher for patients with early local complications compared with patients without early local complications. Max BMI, delta BMI, or preoperative BMI had no influence on the incidence of complications. In conclusion, this study confirms in a fairly large sample that the complication rate after abdominoplasty seems to be higher in postbariatric patients compared with patients who have not had weight loss surgery. However, no predictive factors could be identified explaining these differences. Further studies need to be conducted to identify predictive factors for the occurrence of complications after abdominal contouring surgery. PMID:23088637

  2. BCG vaccination in SCID patients: complications, risks and vaccination policies

    PubMed Central

    Marciano, Beatriz E; Huang, Chiung-Yu; Joshi, Gyan; Rezaei, Nima; Carvalho, Beatriz Costa; Allwood, Zoe; Ikinciogullari, Aydan; Reda, Shereen M; Gennery, Andrew; Thon, Vojtech; Espinosa-Rosales, Francisco; Al-Herz, Waleed; Porras, Oscar; Shcherbina, Anna; Szaflarska, Anna; Kiliç, Şebnem; Franco, Jose L; Raccio, Andrea C Gómez; Roxo-Jr, Persio; Esteves, Isabel; Galal, Nermeen; Grumach, Anete Sevciovic; Al-Tamemi, Salem; Yildiran, Alisan; Orellana, Julio C; Yamada, Masafumi; Morio, Tomohiro; Liberatore, Diana; Ohtsuka, Yoshitoshi; Lau, Yu-Lung; Nishikomori, Ryuta; Torres-Lozano, Carlos; Mazzucchelli, Juliana TL; Vilela, Maria MS; Tavares, Fabiola S; Cunha, Luciana; Pinto, Jorge A; Espinosa-Padilla, Sara E; Hernandez-Nieto, Leticia; Elfeky, Reem A; Ariga, Tadashi; Toshio, Heike; Dogu, Figen; Cipe, Funda; Formankova, Renata; Nuñez-Nuñez, M Enriqueta; Bezrodnik, Liliana; Marques, Jose Gonçalo; Pereira, María I; Listello, Viviana; Slatter, Mary A; Nademi, Zohreh; Kowalczyk, Danuta; Fleisher, Thomas A.; Davies, Graham; Neven, Bénédicte; Rosenzweig, Sergio D

    2014-01-01

    Background SCID is a syndrome characterized by profound T cell deficiency. BCG vaccine is contraindicated in SCID patients. Because most countries encourage BCG vaccination at birth, a high percent of SCID patients are vaccinated before their immune defect is detected. Objectives To describe the complications and risks associated with BCG vaccination in SCID patients. Methods An extensive standardized questionnaire evaluating complications, therapeutics, and outcome regarding BCG in patients diagnosed with SCID was widely distributed. Summary statistics and association analysis was performed. Results Data on 349 BCG vaccinated SCID patients from 28 centers in 17 countries was analyzed. Fifty-one percent of the patients developed BCG complications, 34% disseminated and 17% localized (a 33,000 and 400 fold increase, respectively, over the general population). Patients receiving early vaccination (≤ 1 month) showed an increased prevalence of complications (p=0.006) and death due to BCG complications (p<0.0001). The odds of experiencing complications among patients with T cells ≤ 250/uL at diagnosis was 2.1 times higher (95% CI, 1.4-3.4; p = 0.001) than among those with T cells > 250/uL. BCG complications were reported in 2/78 patients who received anti-mycobacterial therapy while asymptomatic and no deaths due to BCG complications occurred in this group. In contrast 46 BCG-associated deaths were reported among 160 patients treated with anti-mycobacterial therapy for a symptomatic BCG infection (p<0.0001). Conclusions BCG vaccine has a very high rate of complications in SCID patients, which increase morbidity and mortality rates. Until safer and more efficient anti-tuberculosis vaccines become available, delay in BCG vaccination should be considered to protect highly vulnerable populations from preventable complications. PMID:24679470

  3. Preventing microvascular complications in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Vijay

    2015-04-01

    Patients with complications of diabetes such as retinopathy, nephropathy, and cardiovascular complications have increased hospital stay with greater economic burden. Prevention of complications should be started before the onset of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) by working on risk factors and thereafter by intervention upon confirmatory diagnosis which can prevent further damage to β-cells. The actual risk of getting microvascular complications like microalbuminuria and retinopathy progression starts at glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level of 7%. As per the American Diabetes Association, a new pediatric glycemic control target of HbA1c <7.5% across all ages replaces previous guidelines that had called for different targets by age. Evidence shows that prevalence of microvascular complications is greater in patients with age >20 years as compared to patients <10 years of age. Screening of these complications should be done regularly, and appropriate preventive strategies should be followed. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blocker reduce progression from microalbuminuria to macroalbuminuria and increase the regression rate to normoalbuminuria. Diabetic microvascular complications can be controlled with tight glycemic therapy, dyslipidemia management and blood pressure control along with renal function monitoring, lifestyle changes, including smoking cessation and low-protein diet. An integrated and personalized care would reduce the risk of development of microvascular complications in T1DM patients. The child with diabetes who receives limited care is more likely to develop long-term complications at an earlier age. Screening for subclinical complications and early interventions with intensive therapy is the need of the hour. PMID:25941647

  4. Laparoscopic morcellator-related complications.

    PubMed

    Milad, Magdy P; Milad, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    Morcellation at laparoscopy is a commonly used minimally invasive method to extract bulky tissue from the abdomen without extending abdominal incisions. Despite widespread use of morcellation, complications still remain underreported and poorly understood. We performed a systematic review of surgical centers in the United States to identify, collate and update the morcellator-related injuries and near misses associated with powered tissue removal. We searched articles on morcellator-related injuries published from 1993 through June 2013. In addition, all cases reported to MedSun and the FDA device database (MAUDE) were evaluated for inclusion. We used the search terms "morcellation," "morcellator," "parasitic," and "retained" and model name keywords "Morcellex," "MOREsolution," "PlasmaSORD," "Powerplus," "Rotocut," "SAWALHE," "Steiner," and "X-Tract." During the past 15 years, 55 complications were identified. Injuries involved the small and large bowels (n = 31), vascular system (n = 27), kidney (n = 3), ureter (n = 3), bladder (n = 1), and diaphragm (n = 1). Of these injuries, 11 involved more than 1 organ. Complications were identified intraoperatively in most patients (n = 37 [66%]); however, the remainder were not identified until up to 10 days postoperatively. Surgeon inexperience was a contributing factor in most cases in which a cause was ascribed. Six deaths were attributed to morcellator-related complications. Nearly all major complications were identified from the FDA device database and not from the published literature. The laparoscopic morcellator has substantially expanded our ability to complete procedures using minimally invasive techniques. Associated with this opportunity have been increasing reports of major and minor intraoperative complications. These complications are largely unreported, likely because of publication bias associated with catastrophic events. Surgeon experience likely confers some protection against these injuries

  5. Severe hemorrhage complicating early transplant nephrectomy due to sepsis.

    PubMed

    Akoh, Jacob A; Rana, Tahawar

    2016-05-01

    Compared to the general population, transplant patients receiving immuno- suppression have an increased risk of wound and systemic infection that might lead to hemorrhage. We present a case of severe bleeding from the external iliac artery secondary to a pelvic abscess following renal transplantation and transplant nephrectomy. A 73-year-old man received an extended criteria donor organ from a 49-year-old person who died from systemic sepsis. The patient bled from the Carrel's patch while awaiting a computed tomographic scan- guided drainage of an infected peritransplant collection. At exploration, a nonviable allograft surrounded by about 1 L of thick pus was removed. Bleeding from a 2 mm hole in the Carrel's patch was repaired by prolene suture as the external iliac vessels could not be mobilized due to a frozen pelvis. The patient died 72 h later from a massive bleed confirmed at postmortem to have originated from the external iliac artery distal to the anastomosis. Diversion of blood flow away from an affected area (with or without excision of the infected vessels) through a bypass procedure probably represents the best option in avoiding such sequelae. PMID:27215254

  6. Toxic stress, inflammation and symptomatology of chronic complications in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Charles A; Faulkner, Melissa Spezia

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes affects at least 382 million people worldwide and the incidence is expected to reach 592 million by 2035. The incidence of diabetes in youth is skyrocketing as evidenced by a 21% increase in type 1 diabetes and a 30.5% increase in type 2 diabetes in the United States between 2001 and 2009. The effects of toxic stress, the culmination of biological and environmental interactions, on the development of diabetes complications is gaining attention. Stress impacts the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis and contributes to inflammation, a key biological contributor to the pathogenesis of diabetes and its associated complications. This review provides an overview of common diabetic complications such as neuropathy, cognitive decline, depression, nephropathy and cardiovascular disease. The review also provides a discussion of the role of inflammation and stress in the development and progression of chronic complications of diabetes, associated symptomatology and importance of early identification of symptoms of depression, fatigue, exercise intolerance and pain. PMID:25987953

  7. [Endoscopic Duodenal Snare Papillectomy Induced Complication: Prevention and Management].

    PubMed

    Cho, Young Deok; Cha, Sang Woo

    2016-08-25

    Tumors of the major duodenal papilla are being recognized more often because of the increased use of diagnostic upper endoscopy and ERCP. The standard of management for ampullary tumor is local surgical excision or pancreaticoduodenectomy, but these procedures are associated with significant mortality, as well as post-operative and long-term morbidity. Endoscopic snare papillectomy was introduced as an alternative to surgery, but post-procedure complications are serious drawback. The most serious complications are perforation, delayed bleeding and pancreatitis. Identification of high risk patients, early recognition of complications, and aggressive management abates frequency and severity. Prevention and management of endoscopic duodenal papillectomy-induced complications will be reviewed in this article. PMID:27554212

  8. Management of the complications of BPH/BOO

    PubMed Central

    Speakman, Mark J.; Cheng, Xi

    2014-01-01

    Most men will develop histological BPH if they live long enough. Approximately, half will develop benign prostatic enlargement (BPE) and about half of these will get BOO with high bladder pressures and low flow, this in turn leads to detrusor wall hypertrophy. Many of these men will only have lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) but a significant number will also suffer the other complications of BPH. These include urinary retention (acute and chronic), haematuria, urinary tract infection, bladder stones, bladder wall damage, renal dysfunction, incontinence and erectile dysfunction. Recognition of the complications of BPH/BOO early allows more effective management of these complications. This is particularly important for the more serious urinary infections and also for high-pressure chronic retention (HPCR). Complications of LUTS/BPH are very rare in clinical trials because of their strict inclusion and exclusion criteria but are more common in real life practice. PMID:24744522

  9. Pancreatic surgery: indications, complications, and implications for nutrition intervention.

    PubMed

    Berry, Amy J

    2013-06-01

    Pancreatic surgery is a complicated procedure leaving postoperative patients with an altered gastrointestinal (GI) anatomy and a potential for further surgical complications such as leaks and fistulas. Beyond surgical complications, these patients are prone to delayed gastric emptying, fat malabsorption, and hyperglycemia, with early satiety and poor appetite further compromising nutrition status. Many of these patients are malnourished prior to this major surgical procedure, and significant weight loss is common postoperatively. Does this affect their outcome? There seems to be a lack of consensus in this patient population regarding how to optimize nutrition and limit potential deleterious effects of this surgery. It is important to first understand the underlying disease condition and the effects to the gland, different forms of surgery with subsequent GI alterations, and common surgical and digestive complications. Once this is reviewed, existing nutrition support literature will be explored in attempts to determine the best nutrition management in this patient population. PMID:23609476

  10. The management of urological complications in renal transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Al-Shaer, M B; Al-Midani, A

    2005-01-01

    To determine the incidence and management of urological complications after live-donor renal transplantations at our center, we studied the medical records of 122 patients who underwent live kidney transplantation with a stented Lich-Gregoire anastomosis for ureteric reimplantation. The overall incidence of urological complications was 7.3 %. The early complications included four cases of ureteric stenosis, two cases of urinary leaks (one vesical fistula and one ureterovesical fistula) and one case of lymphocele causing ureteric obstruction. On the other hand, the late complications (> 6 months after surgery) included two cases of vesicoureteral reflux. No graft was lost and there was no urinary complication-related mortality. There was no association with recipient age, related or non-related donor or cold ischemic time. The urinary complications were mostly caused by ureteral ischemia and extrinsic compression by lymphocele; the stent caused vesicular fistula in one patient and clot anuria caused ureteral obstruction in another. In conclusion, the Lich-Gregoire technique has low complication rate and technical ease to perform compared with Barry's extravesical technique. PMID:18202495

  11. Urological surgery in elderly patients: results and complications

    PubMed Central

    Brodak, Milos; Tomasek, Jan; Pacovsky, Jaroslav; Holub, Lukas; Husek, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Owing to the large aging population, a growing number of elderly patients are undergoing surgical treatment. Surgical procedures in elderly patients are associated with a higher risk of complications. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of urological surgeries in old patients. Methods The authors carried out a retrospective study, evaluating results and early postoperative complications in patients aged 75 years and older. The cohort of patients included 221 patients who underwent surgical procedures in the department of urology between January 2011 and December 2012. The average age of patients was 78. The results and complications were categorized based on the type of surgery performed, and the Dindo–Clavien scale. Results The median follow-up was 18 months. All surgeries for malignant tumors were performed successfully with no residual disease. Totally, 48 (22%) complications were recorded. The most serious were as follows: one patient (<0.5%) died; and four (<2%) patients underwent reoperation. The most common complications involved infection, mainly sepsis and surgical site infections. Other complications included mild respiratory insufficiency, delirium, bleeding, etc. Conclusion Surgeries in elderly patients were effective and safe. The cornerstone of safety is careful preparation and treatment of comorbidities. Complications occurred mainly as a result of emergency procedures during emergency procedures and in major surgeries such as cystectomy and nephrectomy. The standard use of low molecular-weight heparin caused no incidence of thromboembolic disease. PMID:25673978

  12. Evaluation of Complications of Extracapsular Cataract Extraction Performed by Trainees

    PubMed Central

    Ezegwui, IR; Aghaji, AE; Okpala, NE; Onwasigwe, EN

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cataract extraction is the most common intraocular surgery taught to residents. Aim: This study aims to review the complications of trainee-performed extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE) so as to identify the steps in which the trainee can benefit from closer supervision and practice. Subjects and Methods: This was a descriptive retrospective study of complications in the initial 150 ECCE with intraocular lens implant performed by two Ophthalmologists, from the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, who visited a high volume training center. Both the intraoperative and early post-operative complications were studied. Data entry and analysis were performed descriptively using the Statiscal Package for the Social Sciences, SPSS version 15.0 (Chicago, IL, USA). Results: The age range of the patients was 40-95 years. The intraoperative complications included capsular flaps 12/161 (7.5%), posterior capsule rent, 10/161 (6.2%) and vitreous loss, 8/161 (5.0%). Corneal complications (striate keratopathy, superior corneal edema, generalized corneal edema and corneal folds) ranked highest in post-operative complications accounting for 34% (56/164). Conclusions: Performance of adequate and proper anterior capsulotomy, minimal handling of the cornea and avoidance of posterior capsular rent are some of the challenges of the trainee in mastering ECCE. Stepwise supervised training can help a trainee master these steps while keeping the complications at acceptably low levels. PMID:24669342

  13. Complications of Minimally Invasive Cosmetic Procedures: Prevention and Management

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Lauren L; Emer, Jason J

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade, facial rejuvenation procedures to circumvent traditional surgery have become increasingly popular. Office-based, minimally invasive procedures can promote a youthful appearance with minimal downtime and low risk of complications. Injectable botulinum toxin (BoNT), soft-tissue fillers, and chemical peels are among the most popular non-invasive rejuvenation procedures, and each has unique applications for improving facial aesthetics. Despite the simplicity and reliability of office-based procedures, complications can occur even with an astute and experienced injector. The goal of any procedure is to perform it properly and safely; thus, early recognition of complications when they do occur is paramount in dictating prevention of long-term sequelae. The most common complications from BoNT and soft-tissue filler injection are bruising, erythema and pain. With chemical peels, it is not uncommon to have erythema, irritation and burning. Fortunately, these side effects are normally transient and have simple remedies. More serious complications include muscle paralysis from BoNT, granuloma formation from soft-tissue filler placement and scarring from chemical peels. Thankfully, these complications are rare and can be avoided with excellent procedure technique, knowledge of facial anatomy, proper patient selection, and appropriate pre- and post-skin care. This article reviews complications of office-based, minimally invasive procedures, with emphasis on prevention and management. Practitioners providing these treatments should be well versed in this subject matter in order to deliver the highest quality care. PMID:23060707

  14. Complications

    MedlinePlus

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  15. Fasting: The History, Pathophysiology and Complications

    PubMed Central

    Kerndt, Peter R.; Naughton, James L.; Driscoll, Charles E.; Loxterkamp, David A.

    1982-01-01

    An appreciation of the physiology of fasting is essential to the understanding of therapeutic dietary interventions and the effect of food deprivation in various diseases. The practice of prolonged fasting for political or religious purposes is increasing, and a physician is likely to encounter such circumstances. Early in fasting weight loss is rapid, averaging 0.9 kg per day during the first week and slowing to 0.3 kg per day by the third week; early rapid weight loss is primarily due to negative sodium balance. Metabolically, early fasting is characterized by a high rate of gluconeogenesis with amino acids as the primary substrates. As fasting continues, progressive ketosis develops due to the mobilization and oxidation of fatty acids. As ketone levels rise they replace glucose as the primary energy source in the central nervous system, thereby decreasing the need for gluconeogenesis and sparing protein catabolism. Several hormonal changes occur during fasting, including a fall in insulin and T3 levels and a rise in glucagon and reverse T3 levels. Most studies of fasting have used obese persons and results may not always apply to lean persons. Medical complications seen in fasting include gout and urate nephrolithiasis, postural hypotension and cardiac arrhythmias. ImagesFigure 4. PMID:6758355

  16. Septic complications of hemorrhoidal banding.

    PubMed

    Quevedo-Bonilla, G; Farkas, A M; Abcarian, H; Hambrick, E; Orsay, C P

    1988-05-01

    Rubber band ligation is an efficacious and cost-effective alternative to conventional hemorrhoidectomy for symptomatic internal hemorrhoids. Even though the well-recognized complications of bleeding and thrombosis occur infrequently, far more serious septic complications have only recently been described, as evidenced in five of our patients: four cases were serious enough to necessitate surgical intervention, and one patient died. Pain followed by urinary dysfunction with or without toxic symptoms should alert the physician to the probability of localized perianal or systemic sepsis. Acute awareness of these rare but potentially life-threatening complications and immediate aggressive treatment is mandatory if death is to be prevented. Rubber band ligation of internal hemorrhoids need not be abandoned; however, the indications should be clear, the technique mastered, and a close patient follow-up maintained. PMID:3358691

  17. Neurologic Complications in Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Nicholas A.; Matiello, Marcelo; Samuels, Martin A.

    2014-01-01

    Neurologic complications of infective endocarditis (IE) are common and frequently life threatening. Neurologic events are not always obvious. The prediction and management of neurologic complications of IE are not easily approached algorithmically, and the impact they have on timing and ability to surgically repair or replace the affected valve often requires a painstaking evaluation and joint effort across multiple medical disciplines in order to achieve the best possible outcome. Although specific recommendations are always tailored to the individual patient, there are some guiding principles that can be used to help direct the decision-making process. Herein, we review the pathophysiology, epidemiology, manifestations, and diagnosis of neurological complications of IE and further consider the impact they have on clinical decision making. PMID:25360207

  18. Neurological complications of underwater diving.

    PubMed

    Rosińska, Justyna; Łukasik, Maria; Kozubski, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    The diver's nervous system is extremely sensitive to high ambient pressure, which is the sum of atmospheric and hydrostatic pressure. Neurological complications associated with diving are a difficult diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. They occur in both commercial and recreational diving and are connected with increasing interest in the sport of diving. Hence it is very important to know the possible complications associated with this kind of sport. Complications of the nervous system may result from decompression sickness, pulmonary barotrauma associated with cerebral arterial air embolism (AGE), otic and sinus barotrauma, high pressure neurological syndrome (HPNS) and undesirable effect of gases used for breathing. The purpose of this review is to discuss the range of neurological symptoms that can occur during diving accidents and also the role of patent foramen ovale (PFO) and internal carotid artery (ICA) dissection in pathogenesis of stroke in divers. PMID:25666773

  19. [Pulmonary hemorrhage complicating transthoracic puncture].

    PubMed

    Febvre, M; de Fenoyl, O; Capron, F; Vadrot, D; Rochemaure, J

    1989-01-01

    Fine needle transthoracic aspiration (FNTA) of pulmonary opacities under guidance of computerized tomography (CT) is a simple procedure yielding conclusive results in many patients with malignant lung tumours. The small caliber of the needles utilized and the CT control make this increasingly popular procedure both accurate and safe. Yet a number of complications have occurred; most of them were benign (e.g. pneumothorax) but some were potentially dangerous (e.g. pulmonary haemorrhage), so that the pros and cons of the procedure must carefully be weighed. We report the case of a patient in whom FNTA was complicated by copious haemoptysis and a pulmonary haematoma clearly visible at CT. The literature concerning the potential complications of transthoracic puncture is reviewed. PMID:2633295

  20. Pulmonary Complications due to Esophagectomy

    PubMed Central

    Shirinzadeh, Abulfazl; Talebi, Yashar

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Esophageal carcinoma is the scourge of human beings. Pulmonary complications in patients who have undergone operation are common (20-30% of cases) and there are no suitable tools and ways to predict these complications. Methods During a period of 10 years, from March 1998 to February 2007, 200 patients (150 male and 50 female) underwent Esophagectomy due to esophageal carcinoma in thoracic surgery ward retrospectively. Complications include the length of hospitalization, mechanical ventilation, morbidity and mortality. Patients’ risk factors include age, preoperative chemo-radiotherapy, stage of the disease and preoperative spirometry condition. Results We grouped our patients into three categories: Normal (FEV1 ≥ 80% predicted), mildly impaired (FEV1 65% to 79% predicted), more severely impaired (FEV1 < 65% predicted).Although almost all patients had radiographic pulmonary abnormalities, significant pulmonary complications occurred in 40 patients (20%) which underwent Esophagectomy. Pleural effusion and atelectasia in 160 patients (80%). 24 patients needed chest-tube insertion. 20 patients (10%) developed ARDS. 14 patients (7%) developed chylothorax. 20 patients (10%) of patients died during their postoperative hospital stay. 30 patients (15%) required mechanical ventilation for greater than 48 hours. Conclusion We reviewed a number of preoperative clinical variables to determine whether they contributed to postoperative pulmonary complications as well as other outcomes. In general, age, impaired pulmonary function especially in those patients with FEV1 less than 65% predicted was associated with prolonged hospital length of stay (LOS). In fact pulmonary complications rate after Esophagectomy are high and there was associated mortality and morbidity. PMID:24250962

  1. TAVR: Imaging Spectrum of Complications.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satinder P; Alli, Oluseun; Melby, Spencer; Lessar, Massoud; Sasse, Mark; Booker, Julian; Davies, James

    2015-11-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement has recently become a suitable alternative for senile aortic stenosis in patients not suitable for surgery. With growing operative experience, appropriate patient selection, advances in imaging evaluation, and technical refinements, the outcomes have improved. Despite its less invasive nature, a unique set of complications and events are encountered during the transcatheter aortic valve replacement procedure and in the postoperative period. Knowledge of these complications, their prompt detection, and quick adequate treatment are critical in reducing the mortality and morbidity. PMID:26488207

  2. Managing complications in cirrhotic patients

    PubMed Central

    Angeli, Paolo; Cordoba, Juan; Farges, Oliver; Valla, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is a serious and potentially life-threatening condition. This life-threatening condition usually arises from complications of cirrhosis. While variceal bleeding is the most acute and probably best studied, several other complications of liver cirrhosis are more insidious in their onset but nevertheless more important for the long-term management and outcome of these patients. This review summarizes the topics discussed during the UEG-EASL Hepatology postgraduate course of the United European Gastroenterology Week 2013 and discusses emergency surgical conditions in cirrhotic patients, the management of hepatic encephalopathy, ascites and hepatorenal syndrome, coagulation disorders, and liver cancer. PMID:25653862

  3. Caregiving, bereavement and complicated grief

    PubMed Central

    Boerner, Kathrin; Schulz, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Most deaths are preceded by chronic illness and disability and the provision of support by family caregivers. The purpose of this article is to describe how the caregiving experience affects bereavement, with an emphasis on the relationship between challenging caregiving situations and difficult grieving processes – often referred to as `complicated grief'. The article starts with a brief summary of the general literature on caregiving and bereavement. It then defines complicated grief and discusses why some caregivers may struggle with the death of their loved one. Finally, it offers practical suggestions for what professionals can do to help caregivers both before and after the death has occurred. PMID:20463850

  4. Neurological complications of rabies vaccines.

    PubMed

    Tullu, Millind S; Rodrigues, Sean; Muranjan, Mamta N; Bavdekar, Sandeep B; Kamat, Jaishree R; Hira, Priya R

    2003-02-01

    The rabies vaccines containing neural elements are used in some countries including India. We report three cases that presented with various neurological complications following the use of these vaccines. The presenting manifestations included those of encephalitis, radiculitis and acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. These neurological complications are highlighted so that scientific evidence compels the community to discontinue the use of the neural tissue rabies vaccines. Newer generation cell culture rabies vaccines should be preferred over the neural tissue rabies vaccines for post-exposure prophylaxis. PMID:12626831

  5. Surgical Complications of Gynecologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weekes, Leroy R.; Gandhi, Shobhana Anil; Gandhi, Anil Krishnakumar

    1977-01-01

    Complications of gynecological surgery are considerable and when reviewed in detail are almost frightening. There is no substitute for experience and intimate knowledge of the intricate pelvic structures in health and disease. Anyone who is active in the field is sooner or later going to experience some difficulty whether it be due to his miscalculation or to innate conditions in the patient which are beyond his/her control. It is the responsibility of the pelvic surgeon to recognize the complication and apply proper corrective measures. The patient should not be given false hopes of sure success nor should she be deprived of whatever hope for success does exist. PMID:572875

  6. [Psychiatric complications of cannabis use].

    PubMed

    Coscas, Sarah; Benyamina, Amine; Reynaud, Michel; Karila, Laurent

    2013-12-01

    Cannabis is the most widely used illicit substance, especially among young people. Cannabis use is extremely commonplace and frequently comorbid with psychiatric disorders that raise questions about the etiology. The use of cannabis is an aggravating factor of all psychiatric disorders. Psychiatric complications are related to the age of onset, duration of exposure and individual risk factors of the individual (mental and social health). The panic attack is the most common complication. The link with psychosis is narrow that leads to increased prevention for vulnerable populations. Cannabis is also an indicator of increased depressive vulnerability and an aggravating factor for bipolar disorder. PMID:24579344

  7. Complications of the diabetic foot.

    PubMed

    Kim, Paul J; Steinberg, John S

    2013-12-01

    The diabetic foot is at high risk for complications because of its role in ambulation. Peripheral neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease can lead to chronic foot ulcers, which are at high risk for infection, in part attributable to areas of high pressure caused by lack of tolerance of the soft tissue and bone and joint deformity. If left untreated, infection and ischemia lead to tissue death, culminating in amputation. Treatment strategies include antibiosis, topical therapies, offloading, debridement, and surgery. A multidisciplinary team approach is necessary in the prevention and treatment of complications of the diabetic foot. PMID:24286952

  8. Dengue fever complicated by hemophagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Koshy, Maria; Mishra, Ajay Kumar; Agrawal, Bhumi; Kurup, Akhil Rajendra; Hansdak, Samuel George

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a common acute viral febrile illness in the tropics. Although the usual presentation is that of a self-limiting illness, its complications are protean. We report a 29-year-old man who presented with an acute febrile illness and was diagnosed with dengue hemorrhagic fever. Despite appropriate supportive therapy, the patient initially improved, but subsequently had clinical deterioration. Evaluation revealed features of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. He was successfully treated with glucocorticoids and had an uneventful recovery. This case adds to the limited adult cases of virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome in the literature and the need for prompt recognition and treatment of this rare complication. PMID:27274854

  9. [Plasmapheresis: technique, complications and indications].

    PubMed

    Pruijm, M T; Cherpillod, A; Vogt, B; Burnier, M

    2008-03-01

    Plasmapheresis is an extracorporeal technique used to remove pathogenic macromolecules from the plasma. Plasmapheresis is used to treat neurological, renal, hematological as well as systemic diseases, which explains why many different specialties in medicine can be involved. Plasmapheresis has evolved in forty years into a frequently used, relatively safe procedure. Nowadays a large spectrum of different techniques exists, each with its own possible complications. In this article we will give an overview of these different techniques, their complications and indications, in order to familiarize the reader with this fascinating treatment. PMID:18402016

  10. Complications from international surgery tourism.

    PubMed

    Melendez, Mark M; Alizadeh, Kaveh

    2011-08-01

    Medical tourism is an increasing trend, particularly in cosmetic surgery. Complications resulting from these procedures can be quite disruptive to the healthcare industry in the United States since patients often seek treatment and have no compensation recourse from insurance. Despite the increasing number of plastic surgery patients seeking procedures abroad, there have been little reported data concerning outcomes, follow-up, or complication rates. Through a survey of American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) members, the authors provide data on trends to help define the scope of the problem. PMID:21813883

  11. Complications in hair restoration surgery.

    PubMed

    Perez-Meza, David; Niedbalski, Robert

    2009-02-01

    Hair loss affects more than 1.2 billion people worldwide. As the technology and artistry of hair restoration surgery has improved including natural results, so too has the popularity of this procedure. As with any other surgical procedure, complications may occur and this presents a major challenge for the surgeon and the patient. This article provides an overview of the complications most likely to occur during the pre, intra, and postoperative periods with modern hair transplant surgery (single follicular unit or multifollicular unit) including scalp surgery, and discusses their treatment and most importantly their prevention. PMID:19185800

  12. Dengue fever complicated by hemophagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Koshy, Maria; Mishra, Ajay Kumar; Agrawal, Bhumi; Kurup, Akhil Rajendra; Hansdak, Samuel George

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a common acute viral febrile illness in the tropics. Although the usual presentation is that of a self-limiting illness, its complications are protean. We report a 29-year-old man who presented with an acute febrile illness and was diagnosed with dengue hemorrhagic fever. Despite appropriate supportive therapy, the patient initially improved, but subsequently had clinical deterioration. Evaluation revealed features of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. He was successfully treated with glucocorticoids and had an uneventful recovery. This case adds to the limited adult cases of virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome in the literature and the need for prompt recognition and treatment of this rare complication. PMID:27274854

  13. Rarely seen complications of circumcision, and their management

    PubMed Central

    İnce, Bilsev; Dadacı, Mehmet; Altuntaş, Zeynep; Bilgen, Fatma

    2016-01-01

    Objective Circumcision, performed for religious or medical reasons is the procedure of surgical excision of the skin covering the glans penis, preputium in a certain shape and dimension so as to expose the tip of the glans penis. Short- and long- term complication rates of up to 50% have been reported, varying due to the recording system of different countries in which the procedure has been accepted as a widely performed simple surgical procedure. In this study, treatment procedures in patients presented to our clinic with complications after circumcision are described and methods to decrease the rate of the complications are reviewed. Material and metods Cases that presented to our clinic between 2010 and 2013 with early complications of circumcision were retrospectively reviewed. Cases with acceptedly major complications as excess skin excision, skin necrosis and total amputation of the glans were included in the study, while cases with minor complications such as bleeding, hematoma and infection were excluded from the study. Results Repair with full- thickness skin grafts was performed in patients with excess skin excision. In cases with skin necrosis, following the debridement of the necrotic skin, primary repair or repair with full- thickness graft was performed in cases where full- thickness skin defects developed and other cases with partial skin loss were left to secondary healing. Repair with an inguinal flap was performed in the case with glans amputation. Conclusion Circumcisions performed by untrained individuals are to be blamed for the complications of circumcision reported in this country. The rate of complications increases during the “circumcision feasts” where multiple circumcisions were performed. This also predisposes to transmission of various diseases, primarily hepatitis B/C and AIDS. Circumcision is a surgical procedure that should be performed by specialists under appropriate sterile circumstances in which the rate of complications

  14. Risk Factors for Complications of Traumatic Injuries.

    PubMed

    de Aguiar Júnior, Wagner; Saleh, Carmen Mohamad Rida; Whitaker, Iveth Yamaguchi

    2016-01-01

    Complications in hospitalized trauma patients are major causes of morbidity and mortality. The aims of this study were to identify the in-hospital trauma patients' complications and identify the risk factors for complications in this population. A retrospective analysis was conducted in a sample from a Brazilian hospital. The sample consisted of 407 patients, 194 (47.66%) of whom had records of complications. The most common complications were infections (41.80%). The risk factors related to the complications were age, length of hospital stay, external causes, and injury severity. The complications were frequent in this sample, and the risk for complications was characterized by multiple factors. PMID:27618375

  15. Diabetic retinopathy - ocular complications of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Nentwich, Martin M; Ulbig, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    In industrialized nations diabetic retinopathy is the most frequent microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus and the most common cause of blindness in the working-age population. In the next 15 years, the number of patients suffering from diabetes mellitus is expected to increase significantly. By the year 2030, about 440 million people in the age-group 20-79 years are estimated to be suffering from diabetes mellitus worldwide (prevalence 7.7%), while in 2010 there were 285 million people with diabetes mellitus (prevalence 6.4%). This accounts for an increase in patients with diabetes in industrialized nations by 20% and in developing countries by 69% until the year 2030. Due to the expected rise in diabetic patients, the need for ophthalmic care of patients (i.e., exams and treatments) will also increase and represents a challenge for eye-care providers. Development of optimized screening programs, which respect available resources of the ophthalmic infrastructure, will become even more important. Main reasons for loss of vision in patients with diabetes mellitus are diabetic macular edema and proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Incidence or progression of these potentially blinding complications can be greatly reduced by adequate control of blood glucose and blood pressure levels. Additionally, regular ophthalmic exams are mandatory for detecting ocular complications and initiating treatments such as laser photocoagulation in case of clinical significant diabetic macular edema or early proliferative diabetic retinopathy. In this way, the risk of blindness can considerably be reduced. In advanced stages of diabetic retinopathy, pars-plana vitrectomy is performed to treat vitreous hemorrhage and tractional retinal detachment. In recent years, the advent of intravitreal medication has improved therapeutic options for patients with advanced diabetic macular edema. PMID:25897358

  16. A rare complication following radiofrequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Rajakulasingam, Ramyah; Francis, Rohin; Ghuran, Azad

    2013-01-01

    Atrial-oesophageal fistula (AOF) formation is a rare but often fatal complication post radio frequency ablation (RFA). Mortality ranges from 67% to 100%, with a rapid progression from symptom onset to death. We report a case of a healthy man in his early 40s who presented with a Glasgow Coma Scale  of 5/15, clinical evidence of sepsis and Streptococcus viridans bacteraemia, 14 days following uncomplicated RFA for atrial fibrillation. Establishing a diagnosis of AOF can be difficult, as patients may have bacteraemia, but are consequently misdiagnosed with infective endocarditis, as in this case. One should have a high-index of suspicion for AOF in patients presenting with the aforementioned constellation of symptoms following ablation. There are no established predictors of mortality, but prompt detection, emergent operative intervention and prolonged antibiotic therapy are vital for survival. PMID:23420721

  17. [Vascular complications associated with lumbar spinal surgery].

    PubMed

    Riedemann-Wistuba, M; Alonso-Pérez, M; Llaneza-Coto, J M

    2016-01-01

    Although there are currently less invasive techniques available for the treatment of spinal injuries, open surgery is still required in many cases. Vascular injuries occurring during lumbar spine surgery, although uncommon, are of great importance due to their potential gravity. Clinical manifestations vary from an acute hemorrhagic shock that needs urgent treatment to save the patient's life, to insidious injuries or an asymptomatic evolution, and should be studied to choose the best therapeutic alternative. Four cases are reported that represent this range of possibilities and emphasize the importance of a careful surgical technique during lumbar spine interventions, and the need for high clinical suspicion, essential for the early diagnosis of these vascular complications. The current therapeutic options are also discussed. PMID:25662569

  18. Major vascular injuries complicating knee arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bancu, Serban; Muresan, Mircea; Sala, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Starting with a case report, we made a detailed review of the literature, with the purpose of identifying and analyzing the type of iatrogenic vascular lesion following knee arthroscopy and the method of vascular repair. A PubMed literature search was undertaken to locate all reported cases of major vascular iatrogenic injuries during arthroscopic knee procedures. We identified 39 papers which report a total of 62 cases of major iatrogenic popliteal lesions after knee arthroscopy, between 1985 and 2014. The type of arthroscopic intervention performed, the type of iatrogenic vascular lesion encountered, the time passed until its discovery and treatment, the method of vascular reconstruction, and the postoperative course are presented. Postarthroscopy vascular complications are infrequent but potentially disastrous for the condition of the affected inferior limb. An early diagnosis and reintervention are mandatory for a good postoperative outcome. PMID:26240627

  19. [Preventive measures of diabetic foot complications].

    PubMed

    Malacarne, Sarah; Chappuis, Bernhard; Egli, Marc; Hagon-Traub, Isabelle; Schimke, Katrin; Schönenweid, Claude; Peter-Riesch, Bettina

    2016-06-01

    Diabetic foot complications are a public health challenge and preventive measures although simple are often not enforced, as evidenced by the lack of decrease in the rate of ulcers and amputation in Switzerland. This article proposes a risk score to grade individual risk of the diabetic patient and an individualized prevention measures as this risk. We discuss the importance of collaboration of various specialists. Two areas are important, first the early involvement of specialists in revascularization because the diabetic population with feet at risk of ulcération risk nowadays primarily has neuro-ichemic ulcerations and also the close collaboration with podiatrists and orthopedic shoemakers who are full partners of the multidisciplinary team. PMID:27487677

  20. CARDIAC COMPLICATIONS OF CHEMOTHERAPY: ROLE OF IMAGING

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Timothy C.; Scherrer-Crosbie, Marielle

    2014-01-01

    Opinion Statement New advances in cancer diagnosis and treatment have increased survival rates in patients with cancer. In parallel with the increase in the number of cancer survivors is an increasing prevalence of cardiac complications from cancer treatment. Chemotherapy-induced cardiac dysfunction is a major contributor to adverse morbidity and mortality rates in cancer patients. Evidence suggests that both clinical symptoms and the traditional left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) may lack sensitivity as measures of cardiotoxicity. The early identification of subclinical LV dysfunction is becoming increasingly important, as this may allow cancer patients and their physicians to make informed decisions about therapeutic options. The features of echocardiography make it a useful tool in the diagnosis and monitoring of cardiotoxicity. This review will examine the role of cardiac imaging in detecting cardiotoxicity, focusing primarily on the conventional and more recent echocardiographic approaches for assessing subclinical cardiotoxicity. PMID:24519487

  1. Neurological Complications of VZV Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the review Varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation results in zoster, which may be complicated by postherpetic neuralgia, myelitis, meningoencephalitis and VZV vasculopathy. This review highlights the clinical features, laboratory abnormalities, imaging changes and optimal treatment of each of those conditions. Because all of these neurological disorders produced by VZV reactivation can occur in the absence of rash, the virological tests proving that VZV caused disease are discussed. Recent findings After primary infection, VZV becomes latent in ganglionic neurons along the entire neuraxis. With a decline in VZV-specific cell-mediated immunity, VZV reactivates from ganglia and travels anterograde to the skin to cause zoster, which is often complicated by postherpetic neuralgia. VZV can also travel retrograde to produce meningoencephaltis, myelitis and stroke. When these complications occur without rash, VZV-induced disease can be diagnosed by detection of VZV DNA or anti-VZV antibody in CSF and treated with intravenous acyclovir. Summary Awareness of the expanding spectrum of neurological complications caused by VZV reactivation with and without rash will improve diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24792344

  2. Anaesthetic complications in plastic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Soumya Sankar; Roy, Debashis; Ansari, Farrukh; Pawar, Sundeep T.

    2013-01-01

    Anaesthesia related complications in plastic surgeries are fortunately rare, but potentially catastrophic. Maintaining patient safety in the operating room is a major concern of anaesthesiologists, surgeons, hospitals and surgical facilities. Circumventing preventable complications is essential and pressure to avoid these complications in cosmetic surgery is increasing. Key aspects of patient safety in the operating room are outlined, including patient positioning, airway management and issues related to some specific conditions, essential for minimizing post-operative morbidity. Risks associated with extremes of age in the plastic surgery population, may be minimised by a better understanding of the physiologic changes as well as the pre-operative and post-operative considerations in caring for this special group of patients. An understanding of the anaesthesiologist's concerns during paediatric plastic surgical procedures can facilitate the coordination of efforts between the multiple services involved in the care of these children. Finally, the reader will have a better understanding of the perioperative care of unique populations including the morbidly obese and the elderly. Attention to detail in these aspects of patient safety can help avoid unnecessary complication and significantly improve the patients’ experience and surgical outcome. PMID:24501480

  3. The complication of pneumatic retinopexy.

    PubMed Central

    Hilton, G F; Tornambe, P E; Brinton, D A; Flood, T P; Green, S; Grizzard, W S; Hammer, M E; Leff, S R; Mascuilli, L; Morgan, C M

    1990-01-01

    There have been 26 published series with a total of 1274 detachments operated with pneumatic retinopexy. Eighty percent were reattached with a single procedure and 98% with reoperations. New breaks occurred in 13% and PVR in 4%. The complications published in 101 papers on pneumatic retinopexy in the last 5 years are analyzed as to frequency, prevention, management, and results. PMID:2095021

  4. Anaesthetic complications in plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Nath, Soumya Sankar; Roy, Debashis; Ansari, Farrukh; Pawar, Sundeep T

    2013-05-01

    Anaesthesia related complications in plastic surgeries are fortunately rare, but potentially catastrophic. Maintaining patient safety in the operating room is a major concern of anaesthesiologists, surgeons, hospitals and surgical facilities. Circumventing preventable complications is essential and pressure to avoid these complications in cosmetic surgery is increasing. Key aspects of patient safety in the operating room are outlined, including patient positioning, airway management and issues related to some specific conditions, essential for minimizing post-operative morbidity. Risks associated with extremes of age in the plastic surgery population, may be minimised by a better understanding of the physiologic changes as well as the pre-operative and post-operative considerations in caring for this special group of patients. An understanding of the anaesthesiologist's concerns during paediatric plastic surgical procedures can facilitate the coordination of efforts between the multiple services involved in the care of these children. Finally, the reader will have a better understanding of the perioperative care of unique populations including the morbidly obese and the elderly. Attention to detail in these aspects of patient safety can help avoid unnecessary complication and significantly improve the patients' experience and surgical outcome. PMID:24501480

  5. Constraints complicate centrifugal compressor depressurization

    SciTech Connect

    Key, B. ); Colbert, F.L. )

    1993-05-10

    Blowdown of a centrifugal compressor is complicated by process constraints that might require slowing the depressurization rate and by mechanical constraints for which a faster rate might be preferred. The paper describes design constraints such as gas leaks; thrust-bearing overload; system constraints; flare extinguishing; heat levels; and pressure drop.

  6. Not to Complicate Matters, but ...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacoby, Russell

    2008-01-01

    The writer discusses the current academic enthrallment with complicating seemingly every aspect of every event or phenomenon, arguing that the fashion elevates confusion from a transitional stage into an end goal. Rather than scholarly clarification, says Jacoby, people celebrate the fact that everything can be "problematized," rejoicing in…

  7. Teaching Energy Geography? It's Complicated

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The premise of this essay is that energy geographies are complicated, and this in itself presents some pedagogical difficulties. As someone who wants students to critically examine and confront the complexity of energy systems, it can be frustrating when students react to demonstrate frustration, apathy, or even confusion. In what follows, I will…

  8. Complicating the Concept of Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson-Levitt, Kathryn M.

    2012-01-01

    This essay argues against a simple, reified view of culture as a set of ideas and norms belonging to a group or nation, and considers the implications of a more complicated concept for discussion of world culture and the global/local nexus. Most anthropologists define culture as the making of meaning, with an emphasis on the process itself as…

  9. Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... may begin with flu-like symptoms such as fever, chills, swollen lymph nodes, headaches, fatigue, muscle aches, and joint pain. Neurological complications most often occur in the second stage ... such as fever, stiff neck, and severe headache. Other problems, which ...

  10. Pneumococcal Disease: Symptoms and Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... bacteremia and sepsis are blood infections. Symptoms include: Fever Chills Low alertness Pneumococcus bacteria causes up to half of middle ear infections (otitis media). Symptoms include: Ear pain A red, swollen ear drum Fever Sleepiness  Top of Page Complications Some pneumococcal ...

  11. Manufacturing Complicated Shells And Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobol, Paul J.; Faucher, Joseph E.

    1993-01-01

    Explosive forming, wax filling, and any one of welding, diffusion bonding, or brazing used in method of manufacturing large, complicated shell-and-liner vessels or structures. Method conceived for manufacture of film-cooled rocket nozzles but applicable to joining large coaxial shells and liners in general.

  12. Pleural procedural complications: prevention and management

    PubMed Central

    Psallidas, Ioannis; Wrightson, John M.; Hallifax, Robert J.; Rahman, Najib M.

    2015-01-01

    Pleural disease is common with a rising case frequency. Many of these patients will be symptomatic and require diagnostic and/or therapeutic procedures. Patients with pleural disease present to a number of different medical specialties, and an equally broad range of clinicians are therefore required to have practical knowledge of these procedures. There is often underestimation of the morbidity and mortality associated with pleural interventions, even those regarded as being relatively straightforward, with potentially significant implications for processes relating to patient safety and informed consent. The advent of thoracic ultrasound (TUS) has had a major influence on patient safety and the number of physicians with the necessary skill set to perform pleural procedures. As the variety and complexity of pleural interventions increases, there is increasing recognition that early specialist input can reduce the risk of complications and number of procedures a patient requires. This review looks at the means by which complications of pleural procedures arise, along with how they can be managed or ideally prevented. PMID:26150919

  13. [Cholinesterase inhibitor poisoning: a complicated medical challenge].

    PubMed

    Lavon, Ophir; Sagi, Ram

    2013-07-01

    Exposure to insecticides, mainly cholinesterase inhibitors, is a global problem with substantial morbidity and mortality. Risk of intoxication is increased in rural areas where there is high availability and proximity of insecticides to families and children. Neglected storage and inadequate practice lead to dangerous exposure. Strict regulations and appropriate safety measures are needed for the prevention of exposure to insecticides. Broad toxicological knowledge is necessary in order to treat organophosphate and carbamate poisoned patients. Diagnosis is not trivial, since the identity of the poison is not always apparent. Multiple exposures including organic solvents are possible. The clinical presenting can be confusing. Measurement of cholinesterase activity is mandatory in establishing the diagnosis. Prompt treatment with proper antidotes and respiratory support is indicated. Early administration of anticonvulsants may mitigate central neurologic complications. Monitoring neurologic and cardiac function is advised for rapid identification of complications and prognosis evaluation. Meticulous preparedness of health care providers for insecticide poisoning is needed from the pre-hospital phase to emergency departments and the different hospital wards. PMID:23957084

  14. Lymphatic complications after vascular interventions

    PubMed Central

    Obara, Andrzej; Maruszynski, Marek; Witkowski, Adam; Dąbrowski, Maciej; Chmielak, Zbigniew

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Lymphorrhea due to classical and mini-invasive surgical interventions on femoral and popliteal arteries is a serious hindrance to patient treatment. Depending on the experience of a particular center, the incidence and frequency of this type of complication may constitute a serious clinical problem. While the level of lymphorrhea intensity and its duration result in certain foreseeable consequences, their treatment can be a time-consuming and multistep procedure. Aim To compare different types of vascular interventions with lymphorrhea occurrence. Material and methods The authors conducted a retrospective analysis of lymphatic complications based on the material collected between 2005 and 2012 at the Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery of the Military Institute of Medicine in Warsaw and in the Department of Interventional Cardiology and Angiology of the Institute of Cardiology in Anin, Warsaw, in 2009–2012. Results Maintaining due thoroughness when dissecting tissues and treating the cutting line in this area with ligatures and tissue puncture are the most reliable methods of minimizing the risk of lymphatic leakage after surgical procedures performed in a classical way. The lymphatic complication under analysis is far less likely to occur when procedures are performed as planned and an endovascular technique is used – statistical significance p < 0.05. Minimally invasive and fully percutaneous procedures performed via needle puncture, including the use of the fascial closure technique to close the femoral artery, eliminate the likelihood of the occurrence of this vascular complication – statistical significance was found with p value less than 0.05. Conclusions We concluded that in every case by minimizing the vascular approach we protected the patient against lymphatic complications. PMID:25337168

  15. Complications of immobilization and bed rest. Part 2: Other complications.

    PubMed Central

    Teasell, R.; Dittmer, D. K.

    1993-01-01

    Prolonged immobilization affects almost every organ system. Respiratory complications include decreased ventilation, atelectasis, and pneumonia. Decreased basal metabolic rate, increased diuresis, natriuresis, and nitrogen and calcium depletion affect metabolism. Genitourinary problems include renal stones and more frequent urinary tract infections. Glucose intolerance, anorexia, constipation, and pressure sores might develop. Central nervous system changes could affect balance and coordination and lead to increasing dependence on caregivers. Images Figure 1 PMID:8324412

  16. Management of Complications Following Emergency and Elective Surgery for Diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Holmer, Christoph; Kreis, Martin E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The clinical spectrum of sigmoid diverticulitis (SD) varies from asymptomatic diverticulosis to symptomatic disease with potentially fatal complications. Sigmoid colectomy with restoration of continuity has been the prevailing modality for treating acute and recurrent SD, and is often performed as a laparoscopy-assisted procedure. For elective sigmoid colectomy, the postoperative morbidity rate is 15-20% whereas morbidity rates reach up to 30% in patients who undergo emergency surgery for perforated SD. Some of the more common and serious surgical complications after sigmoid colectomy are anastomotic leaks and peritonitis, wound infections, small bowel obstruction, postoperative bleeding, and injuries to the urinary tract structures. Regarding the management of complications, it makes no difference whether the complication is a result of an emergency or an elective procedure. Methods The present work gives an overview of the management of complications in the surgical treatment of SD based on the current literature. Results To achieve successful management, early diagnosis is mandatory in cases of deviation from the normal postoperative course. If diagnostic procedures fail to deliver a correlate for the clinical situation of the patient, re-laparotomy or re-laparoscopy still remain among the most important diagnostic and/or therapeutic principles in visceral surgery when a patient's clinical status deteriorates. Conclusion The ability to recognize and successfully manage complications is a crucial part of the surgical treatment of diverticular disease and should be mastered by any surgeon qualified in this field. PMID:26989382

  17. Anastomotic Airway Complications After Lung Transplant: Clinical, Bronchoscopic and CT Correlation.

    PubMed

    Luecke, Kyle; Trujillo, Camilo; Ford, Jonathan; Decker, Summer; Pelaez, Andres; Hazelton, Todd R; Rojas, Carlos A

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the normal appearance and common complications of the airway anastomosis in lung transplant patients with emphasis on computed tomography images with bronchoscopic correlation. The spectrum of complications will be presented as early (<1 mo after transplant) or late (>1 mo). Variations in surgical technique as well as presentation and management options for airway complications will also be discussed. PMID:27428022

  18. Causes and managements of postoperative complications after degenerative scoliosis treatments with internal fixation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yong-Hong; Zheng, Jie; Lou, Shu-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the causes and managements of early postoperative complications of degenerative scoliosis (DS) treated with internal pedicle screw fixation. Methods: From Jan 2000 to Apr 2013, 325 DS patients treated with internal pedicle screw fixation in our hospital were retrospectively involved. The categories, causes, managements and outcomes of early postoperative complications were statistically analyzed. Results: Early postoperative complications occurred in 10.76% of the patients including 16 cases of lower limb numb or pain, 6 cases of decreased lower limb sensitivity and motor functions, which accounted for 62.86% of all complications, followed by incision infections (4/35, 11.43%) and rare cases of cerebrospinal fluid leakage, cardiac and renal inadequacy, urinary system and pulmonary infections. The incidence of overall complications (19.79%, p = 0.001) and nerve injuries (11.46%, p = 0.000) were significantly higher in long-segment than in short-segment fixations. Improper screw implanting, over correction of scoliosis and insufficient blood supply of the spinal cord during operation were risk factors for early postoperative complications and most of them were cured by anti-infection medication, incision dressing change, nerve nourishment, adjusting the screws and anti-osteoporosis treatments within 6 months after surgery. Only three cases with severe nerve injury did not improve until the 6 months postoperative follow-up. Conclusions: Most of the postoperative complications in our DS patients disappeared within 6 months after surgery and more than half of complications were nerve injuries. PMID:25550945

  19. Complications of Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Zhang, Hong-Liang; Wu, Xiujuan; Zhu, Jie

    2016-04-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is an immune-mediated disorder in the peripheral nervous system with a wide spectrum of complications. A good understanding of the complications of GBS assists clinicians to recognize and manage the complications properly thereby reducing the mortality and morbidity of GBS patients. Herein, we systemically review the literature on complications of GBS, including short-term complications and long-term complications. We summarize the frequency, severity, clinical manifestations, managements and possible mechanisms of different kinds of complications, and point out the flaws of current studies as well as demonstrate the further investigations needed. PMID:26642351

  20. Suicide bereavement and complicated grief.

    PubMed

    Tal Young, Ilanit; Iglewicz, Alana; Glorioso, Danielle; Lanouette, Nicole; Seay, Kathryn; Ilapakurti, Manjusha; Zisook, Sidney

    2012-06-01

    Losing a loved to suicide is one is one of life's most painful experiences. The feelings of loss, sadness, and loneliness experienced after any death of a loved one are often magnified in suicide survivors by feelings of quilt, confusion, rejection, shame, anger, and the effects of stigma and trauma. Furthermore, survivors of suicide loss are at higher risk of developing major depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and suicidal behaviors, as well as a prolonged form of grief called complicated grief. Added to the burden is the substantial stigma, which can keep survivors away from much needed support and healing resources. Thus, survivors may require unique supportive measures and targeted treatment to cope with their loss. After a brief description of the epidemiology and circumstances of suicide, we review the current state of research on suicide bereavement, complicated grief in suicide survivors, and grief treatment for survivors of suicide. PMID:22754290

  1. [Consequences and complications of obesity].

    PubMed

    Simon-Vermot, I; Keller, U

    2000-08-01

    Obesity increases the risk of metabolic complications such as diabetes, dyslipidemia, systemic hypertension and cardiovascular disease. These are mainly responsible for the increased mortality of obese people. Other metabolic consequences of obesity are: gallstones, steatosis of the liver and the polycystic ovary syndrome. Beside the body mass index the distribution of body fat is important. Centralized obesity, as measured by the waist-to-hip circumference ratio (WHR), is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. Insulin resistance and hyperinsulinaemia seem to play a central role in the pathogenesis of this association. Obesity has not only metabolic complications. There is a relationship between obesity and impaired respiratory function. Furthermore is obesity a risk factor for osteoarthrosis of the knee, the hip and even the hand and for pulmonary embolism and venous thrombosis. Obesity can also lead to psycho-social problems such as depression, social discrimination and isolation. PMID:11026085

  2. Suicide bereavement and complicated grief

    PubMed Central

    Tal Young, Ilanit; Iglewicz, Alana; Glorioso, Danielle; Lanouette, Nicole; Seay, Kathryn; Ilapakurti, Manjusha; Zisook, Sidney

    2012-01-01

    Losing a loved to suicide is one is one of life's most painful experiences. The feelings of loss, sadness, and loneliness experienced after any death of a loved one are often magnified in suicide survivors by feelings of quilt, confusion, rejection, shame, anger, and the effects of stigma and trauma. Furthermore, survivors of suicide loss are at higher risk of developing major depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and suicidal behaviors, as well as a prolonged form of grief called complicated grief. Added to the burden is the substantial stigma, which can keep survivors away from much needed support and healing resources. Thus, survivors may require unique supportive measures and targeted treatment to cope with their loss. After a brief description of the epidemiology and circumstances of suicide, we review the current state of research on suicide bereavement, complicated grief in suicide survivors, and grief treatment for survivors of suicide. PMID:22754290

  3. [Prevention of complications of IUDs].

    PubMed

    Henrion, R

    1980-11-01

    Complications resulting from IUD use are essentially of 4 types: 1) uterine perforation, either at the time of insertion or by translocation of the device. Perforations can be avoided by exercising the utmost attention at time of insertion, and by choosing the proper time of insertion, usually postmentruation. It is also imperative that the IUD be right for the uterine cavity size; 2) pelvic infection, the most serious of IUD complications, since it can, however rarely, cause death; it is absolutely necessary to observe the strictest asepsy during IUD insertion; 3) menorrhagia, which, when severe, can cause anemia. Women with heavy menstrual flow should not wear an IUD; and, 4) ectopic pregnancy, which usually ends in spontaneous abortion, but which can cause infection. PMID:12336586

  4. Oral complications in cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Carl, W.

    1983-02-01

    Ionizing radiation used in treating the head and neck area produces oral side effects such as mucositis, salivary changes, trismus and radiation caries. Sequelae of cancer chemotherapy often include oral stomatitis, myelosuppression and immunosuppression. Infections of dental origin in compromised patients are potentially lethal. Specific programs to eliminate dental pathology before radiation and chemotherapy, and to maintain oral hygiene during and after therapy, will minimize these complications.

  5. Hemorrhagic complications in dermatologic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bunick, Christopher G.; Aasi, Sumaira Z.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to recognize, manage, and, most importantly, prevent hemorrhagic complications is critical to performing dermatologic procedures that have safe and high quality outcomes. This article reviews the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors and patient dynamics that are central to preventing such an adverse outcome. Specifically, the role that anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents, hypertension, and other medical conditions play in the development of postoperative hemorrhage are discussed. In addition, this article provides practical guidelines on managing bleeding during and after surgery. PMID:22515669

  6. Anorectal Complications During Neutropenic Period in Patients with Hematologic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Solmaz, Soner; Korur, Aslı; Gereklioğlu, Çiğdem; Asma, Süheyl; Büyükkurt, Nurhilal; Kasar, Mutlu; Yeral, Mahmut; Kozanoğlu, İlknur; Boğa, Can; Ozdoğu, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Background Neutropenic patients are susceptible to any anorectal disease, and symptomatic anorectal disease afflicts 2–32% of oncology patients. Perianal infections are the most feared complication, considering the lack of natural defense against infectious microorganisms. When septic complications develop, the anorectal disease is potentially fatal, especially in neutropenic patients in whom mortality rates range between 11–57%. Although anorectal diseases are a frequent complication with potentially fatal outcomes among patients with hematologic diseases, sufficient data are not available in the literature. In this study, we aimed to investigate the anorectal complications developing during the neutropenic period in patients with hematologic diseases. Methods A total of 79 patients whose neutropenic period (absolute neutrophil count <500/mcL) continued for 7 days, or longer were included in the study. Results A total of 34 patients out of 79 (43%) were detected to develop anorectal complications, of them 6 (7.6%) developed an anorectal infection. The patients were characterized according to the hematological disease and its status (active or not), the type of treatment and the presence of a history of an anorectal pathology before the onset of the hematologic disease. Nineteen (24.1%) patients had the history of anorectal disturbances before diagnosis of the hematologic disease, and recurrence of an anorectal pathology was found in 14 out of 19 patients(73.7%). In addition, the overall mortality rate was higher among the patients who developed anorectal complications compared to another group (41.2% vs. 22.2%, p=0.059). Conclusion Anorectal pathology is a common complication with high recurrence rate in neutropenic patients. Perianal infections are important as they can cause life-threatening outcomes although they are relatively rare among all anorectal complications. Therefore perianal signs and symptoms should be meticulously evaluated concerning early

  7. Complications of chronic suppurative otitis media: a retrospective review.

    PubMed

    Yorgancılar, E; Yildirim, M; Gun, R; Bakir, S; Tekin, R; Gocmez, C; Meric, F; Topcu, I

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to review our patients with complications of chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM) and compare with literature. This retrospective study was performed over 10 years in our tertiary referral university hospital. During this period 4,630 patients with CSOM were admitted to the department and 906 patients underwent a surgery. From the records of the 4,630 patients, 121 patients (2.6%) with complications were identified. Of the 906 CSOM patients that underwent a surgery, 511 had cholesteatoma, and 395 had granulation and/or polyp tissue. Ninety-four of 511 (18.4%) patients with cholesteatoma and 27 of 395 (6.8%) patients with granulation and/or polyp tissue had a complication. Of the 121 complicated CSOM patients, 57 extracranial (47.1%) and 37 intracranial (30.6%). Multiple combined complications were occurred in 27 (22.3%) patients. The mastoid abscess was the commonest extracranial complication (28.3%); it was followed by labyrinthitis (9%), facial nerve paralysis (8.4%), and Bezold's abscess (1.3%). The most common intracranial complication was lateral sinus thrombophlebitis (19.5%), followed by perisigmoid sinus abscess (13.5%), meningitis (9%), brain abscess (6.5%), and extradural abscess (4.5%). Most frequent intraoperative finding of complicated CSOM patients was cholesteatoma, with the exception of patients with facial nerve paralysis. There was no mortality in any of our patients. The additional morbidities were recorded in 25 patients (20.6%). In this study, we emphasize the importance of an accurate and early diagnosis, followed by adequate surgical therapy and a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:22249835

  8. CROI 2016: Neurologic Complications of HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Spudich, Serena S; Ances, Beau M

    2016-01-01

    The brain remains a major target for HIV infection and a site of potential complications for HIV-infected individuals. Emerging data presented at the 2016 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections suggest that during the early stages of infection, activated CD4+ cells may traffic the virus into the central nervous system (CNS). HIV is detectable in cells and tissues of the CNS in some individuals despite suppressive antiretroviral treatment. A potential source of cerebrospinal fluid HIV escape may be compartmentalized HIV replication within macrophage lineage cells. Virally infected cells can traffic out of the CNS and may have the potential to reseed the systemic compartment. Additional modifiers of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) were identified, including female sex and hepatic dysfunction. Large epidemiologic studies reported an elevated risk of stroke among HIV-infected individuals, related to traditional vascular risk factors, history of recreational drug use, and HIV measures (lower CD4+ cell nadir and higher viral load). Brain imaging may provide a noninvasive means for detecting early changes in the brain associated with HIV infection and may assist in prognosis of HAND. Some potential adjunctive therapies to standard antiretroviral therapy for HIV-infected individuals were considered. PMID:27398860

  9. Hematologic effects and complications of snake envenoming.

    PubMed

    Berling, Ingrid; Isbister, Geoffrey K

    2015-04-01

    Hematologic abnormalities are the most common effects of snake envenoming globally. Venom-induced consumption coagulopathy (VICC) is the commonest and most important. Other hematologic abnormalities are an anticoagulant coagulopathy and thrombotic microangiopathy. Venom-induced consumption coagulopathy is a venom-induced activation of the clotting pathway by procoagulant toxins, resulting in clotting factor consumption and coagulopathy. The type of procoagulant toxin differs between snakes and can activate prothrombin, factor X, and factor V or consume fibrinogen. The most useful investigation in VICC is a prothrombin time/international normalized ratio. The d-dimer may assist in early diagnosis, but fibrinogen levels often add little in the clinical setting. Bedside investigations would be ideal, but point-of-care testing international normalized ratio and whole blood clotting tests have been shown to be unreliable in VICC. The major complication of VICC is hemorrhage, including intracranial hemorrhage which is often fatal. The role of antivenom in VICC is controversial and may only be beneficial for some types of snakes including Echis spp where the duration of abnormal clotting is reduced from more than a week to 24 to 48 hours. In contrast, antivenom does not appear to speed the recovery of VICC in Australian snake envenoming. Other treatments for VICC include factor replacement, observation and prevention of trauma, and heparin. An Australian study showed that fresh-frozen plasma speeds recovery of VICC, but early use may increase consumption. There is no evidence to support heparin. PMID:25556574

  10. [Hemorrhagic complications during warfarin treatment].

    PubMed

    Gumulec, J; Kessler, P; Penka, M; Klodová, D; Králová, S; Brejcha, M; Wróbel, M; Sumná, E; Blatný, J; Klaricová, K; Riedlová, P; Lasota, Z

    2006-03-01

    Bleeding is probably the major complication of anticoagulant treatment with vitamin K antagonists represented nowadays mostly by warfarin in the Czech Republic. The main risk factors in hemorrhagic complications of warfarinisation are the intensity and instability of the anticoagulant treatment, individual patient characteristics, warfarin interactions with other drugs and the length of the anticoagulant therapy. Severe bleeding in warfarin patients is most effectively brought about by a fast and complete undoing of the anticoagulation effect of the drug employing the prothrombin complex concentrate and slow i.v. vitamin K1 infusion regardless of the reason for the anticoagulation. This approach can secure the minimalisation of the bleeding's negative consequences. A less severe bleeding or asymptomatic increase in the international normalized ratio can be treated effectively by skipping or decreasing of the warfarin dosage and/or oral administration of vitamin K1 (i.v. administration only in selected higher risk cases) that does result only in a partial consolidation of coagulopathy but of such type that the risk of thrombotic event requires. The article's goal is to contribute to the treatment standardization in patients with warfarin overdose and/or with hemorrhagic complications due to warfarin treatment and it is available at www.thrombosis.cz. The guidelines include a ready-reference chart whose objective is immediate and quick crash course in the clinical practice. PMID:16637455

  11. Neurologic complications after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Živković, Saša A

    2013-01-01

    Neurologic complications are relatively common after solid organ transplantation and affect 15%-30% of liver transplant recipients. Etiology is often related to immunosuppressant neurotoxicity and opportunistic infections. Most common complications include seizures and encephalopathy, and occurrence of central pontine myelinolysis is relatively specific for liver transplant recipients. Delayed allograft function may precipitate hepatic encephalopathy and neurotoxicity of calcineurin inhibitors typically manifests with tremor, headaches and encephalopathy. Reduction of neurotoxic immunosuppressants or conversion to an alternative medication usually result in clinical improvement. Standard preventive and diagnostic protocols have helped to reduce the prevalence of opportunistic central nervous system (CNS) infections, but viral and fungal CNS infections still affect 1% of liver transplant recipients, and the morbidity and mortality in the affected patients remain fairly high. Critical illness myopathy may also affect up to 7% of liver transplant recipients. Liver insufficiency is also associated with various neurologic disorders which may improve or resolve after successful liver transplantation. Accurate diagnosis and timely intervention are essential to improve outcomes, while advances in clinical management and extended post-transplant survival are increasingly shifting the focus to chronic post-transplant complications which are often encountered in a community hospital and an outpatient setting. PMID:24023979

  12. Neurologic complications after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zivković, Saša A

    2013-08-27

    Neurologic complications are relatively common after solid organ transplantation and affect 15%-30% of liver transplant recipients. Etiology is often related to immunosuppressant neurotoxicity and opportunistic infections. Most common complications include seizures and encephalopathy, and occurrence of central pontine myelinolysis is relatively specific for liver transplant recipients. Delayed allograft function may precipitate hepatic encephalopathy and neurotoxicity of calcineurin inhibitors typically manifests with tremor, headaches and encephalopathy. Reduction of neurotoxic immunosuppressants or conversion to an alternative medication usually result in clinical improvement. Standard preventive and diagnostic protocols have helped to reduce the prevalence of opportunistic central nervous system (CNS) infections, but viral and fungal CNS infections still affect 1% of liver transplant recipients, and the morbidity and mortality in the affected patients remain fairly high. Critical illness myopathy may also affect up to 7% of liver transplant recipients. Liver insufficiency is also associated with various neurologic disorders which may improve or resolve after successful liver transplantation. Accurate diagnosis and timely intervention are essential to improve outcomes, while advances in clinical management and extended post-transplant survival are increasingly shifting the focus to chronic post-transplant complications which are often encountered in a community hospital and an outpatient setting. PMID:24023979

  13. Unusual Complications of Incisional Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Emegoakor, CD; Dike, EI; Emegoakor, FC

    2014-01-01

    Incisional hernia represents a breakdown or loss of continuity of a fascial closure. These hernias are of particular concern not only for the high recurrence rates among them but also for the challenges that follow their repair. It is known to occur in 11-23% of laparotomies. This paper presents two unusual complications of incisional hernia managed by the authors. One ruptured incisional hernia with evisceration of gut and a case of incarcerated gravid uterus in a woman in labour. The case records of the two patients with unusual complications of incisional hernia were pooled and presented to highlight the clinical presentation and management options of this condition. The patient with ruptured hernia and eviscerated gut presented immediately and was resuscitated and the hernia repaired with polypropylene mesh. The patient with incarcerated uterus had caesarean section and mesh repair of the hernia. Incisional hernia can present with unusual complications. The management is very challenging. Good knowledge and skills are required to deal with this condition. PMID:25506498

  14. Unusual complications of incisional hernia.

    PubMed

    Emegoakor, Cd; Dike, Ei; Emegoakor, Fc

    2014-11-01

    Incisional hernia represents a breakdown or loss of continuity of a fascial closure. These hernias are of particular concern not only for the high recurrence rates among them but also for the challenges that follow their repair. It is known to occur in 11-23% of laparotomies. This paper presents two unusual complications of incisional hernia managed by the authors. One ruptured incisional hernia with evisceration of gut and a case of incarcerated gravid uterus in a woman in labour. The case records of the two patients with unusual complications of incisional hernia were pooled and presented to highlight the clinical presentation and management options of this condition. The patient with ruptured hernia and eviscerated gut presented immediately and was resuscitated and the hernia repaired with polypropylene mesh. The patient with incarcerated uterus had caesarean section and mesh repair of the hernia. Incisional hernia can present with unusual complications. The management is very challenging. Good knowledge and skills are required to deal with this condition. PMID:25506498

  15. The Cardiac Complications of Methamphetamines.

    PubMed

    Paratz, Elizabeth D; Cunningham, Neil J; MacIsaac, Andrew I

    2016-04-01

    Methamphetamines are increasingly popular drugs of abuse in Australia, and are rising in purity. The rising popularity and purity of methamphetamines has notably increased demands upon Australian medical services. Methamphetamines are sympathomimetic amines with a range of adverse effects upon multiple organ systems. Cardiovascular complications are the second leading cause of death in methamphetamine abusers, and there appears to be a high prevalence of cardiac pathology. Cardiovascular pathology frequently seen in methamphetamine abusers includes hypertension, aortic dissection, acute coronary syndromes, pulmonary arterial hypertension and methamphetamine-associated cardiomyopathy. The rising prevalence of methamphetamine abuse is likely to increase the burden of cardiovascular pathology in Australians. A National Parliamentary Enquiry was opened in March 2015 to address concerns regarding the medical and social impacts of methamphetamine abuse. From April 2015, a National 'Ice Taskforce' was also created in parallel. Reversal of cardiac pathology appears to be achievable with abstinence from methamphetamines and initiation of appropriate treatment. It is key to appreciate that the pathogenesis of methamphetamine-induced cardiac complications arises as a result of the specific toxic effects of methamphetamines. Clinical management is hence individualised; suggested management approaches for methamphetamine-induced cardiac complications are detailed within this article. PMID:26706652

  16. Pulmonary complications of hepatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Surani, Salim R; Mendez, Yamely; Anjum, Humayun; Varon, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Severe chronic liver disease (CLD) may result from portal hypertension, hepatocellular failure or the combination of both. Some of these patients may develop pulmonary complications independent from any pulmonary pathology that they may have. Among them the hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS), portopulmonary hypertension (PPH) and hepatic hydrothorax (HH) are described in detail in this literature review. HPS is encountered in approximately 15% to 30% of the patients and its presence is associated with increase in mortality and also requires liver transplantation in many cases. PPH has been reported among 4%-8% of the patient with CLD who have undergone liver transplantation. The HH is another entity, which has the prevalence rate of 5% to 6% and is associated in the absence of cardiopulmonary disease. These clinical syndromes occur in similar pathophysiologic environments. Most treatment modalities work as temporizing measures. The ultimate treatment of choice is liver transplant. This clinical review provides basic concepts; pathophysiology and clinical presentation that will allow the clinician to better understand these potentially life-threatening complications. This article will review up-to-date information on the pathophysiology, clinical features and the treatment of the pulmonary complications among liver disease patients. PMID:27468192

  17. Serious Vascular Complications after Nonsurgical Rhinoplasty: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiqing; Liu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Summary There has been an increased global demand for dermal filler injections in recent years. Although hyaluronic acid-based dermal fillers generally have a good safety profile, serious vascular complications have been reported. Here we present a typical case of skin necrosis following a nonsurgical rhinoplasty using hyaluronic acid filler. Despite various rescuing managements, unsightly superficial scars were left. It is critical for plastic surgeons and dermatologists to be familiar with the vascular anatomy and the staging of vascular complications. Any patients suspected to experience a vascular complication should receive early management under close monitoring. Meanwhile, the potentially devastating outcome caused by illegal practice calls for stricter regulations and law enforcement. PMID:27200245

  18. Cardiovascular Complications in CKD Patients: Role of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Gosmanova, Elvira O.; Le, Ngoc-Anh

    2011-01-01

    Starting with the early stages, patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) experience higher burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Moreover, CVD complications are the major cause of mortality in CKD patients as compared with complications from chronic kidney failure. While traditional CVD risk factors, including diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, obesity, physical inactivity, may be more prevalent among CKD patients, these factors seem to underestimate the accelerated cardiovascular disease in the CKD population. Search for additional biomarkers that could explain the enhanced CVD risk in CKD patients has gained increasing importance. Although it is unlikely that any single nontraditional risk factor would fully account for the increased CVD risk in individuals with CKD, oxidative stress appears to play a central role in the development and progression of CVD and its complications. We will review the data that support the contribution of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of CVD in patients with chronic kidney failure. PMID:21253517

  19. Immune-Mediated Complications after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhuoyan; Rubinstein, Samuel M; Thota, Ramya; Savani, Malvi; Brissot, Eolia; Shaw, Bronwen E; Majhail, Navneet S; Mohty, Mohamad; Savani, Bipin N

    2016-08-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has an integral role in the treatment of malignant and nonmalignant diseases. Long-term complications after HSCT have been well established and include graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), conditioning regimen-related toxicities, disease relapse, and infections. Immune-mediated phenomena are increasingly described after HSCT with clinically significant sequelae. Diagnosis is challenging because of features that overlap with other commonly reported post-transplantation complications. Patients who experience immune-mediated disease after HSCT tend to have poor outcomes. Early recognition of immune-mediated complications is imperative to reduce preventable morbidity and mortality. This review looks at the currently available literature on pathogenesis, incidence, risk factors, treatment, and outcomes of immune-mediated disease (other than GVHD) after HSCT. PMID:27095688

  20. Microvascular complications of diabetes mellitus: renal protection accompanies cardiovascular protection.

    PubMed

    Brown, W Virgil

    2008-12-22

    The microvascular complications of diabetes mellitus confer substantial morbidity and impair patient quality of life. Dyslipidemia and prolonged hyperglycemia promote an increase in oxidative stress, inflammation, and vascular damage, which together promote endothelial dysfunction and are associated with macrovascular and microvascular complications. Microalbuminuria is an early marker of diabetic nephropathy and an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Diabetic nephropathy is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease in developed countries, and its prevalence is increasing. Preventing or limiting the progression of diabetic nephropathy, as demonstrated in the Fenofibrate Intervention and Event Lowering in Diabetes (FIELD) trial, may prevent or delay renal complications, as well as convey important cardioprotective benefits in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:19084084

  1. Management of complications by uniportal video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fieira Costa, Eva; Delgado Roel, María; Fernández, Lucía Méndez; Paradela de la Morena, Marina; de la Torre, Mercedes; Gonzalez-Rivas, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Since the video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) anatomic lobectomy for lung cancer was described two decades ago, many units have successfully adopted this technique. VATS lobectomy is a safe and effective approach for the treatment not only of early stage lung cancer but also for more advanced disease. It represents a technical challenge. As the surgeon’s experience grows, more complex or advanced cases are approached using the VATS approach. However, as VATS lobectomy has been applied to more advanced cases, the rate of conversion to open thoracotomy has increased, particularly early in the surgeon’s learning curve, mostly due to the occurrence of complications. The best strategy for facing complications of VATS lobectomy is to prevent them from happening. Avoiding complications is subject to an appropriate preoperative workup and patient selection. Planning for a VATS resection as safely as possible involves the consideration of the patient´s characteristics and the anticipated technical aspects of the case. Awareness of the possibility of intraoperative complications of VATS lobectomy is mandatory to avoid them, and the development of management strategies is necessary to limit morbidity if they occur. PMID:25379209

  2. Management of complications by uniportal video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Fernández Prado, Ricardo; Fieira Costa, Eva; Delgado Roel, María; Fernández, Lucía Méndez; Paradela de la Morena, Marina; de la Torre, Mercedes; Gonzalez-Rivas, Diego

    2014-10-01

    Since the video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) anatomic lobectomy for lung cancer was described two decades ago, many units have successfully adopted this technique. VATS lobectomy is a safe and effective approach for the treatment not only of early stage lung cancer but also for more advanced disease. It represents a technical challenge. As the surgeon's experience grows, more complex or advanced cases are approached using the VATS approach. However, as VATS lobectomy has been applied to more advanced cases, the rate of conversion to open thoracotomy has increased, particularly early in the surgeon's learning curve, mostly due to the occurrence of complications. The best strategy for facing complications of VATS lobectomy is to prevent them from happening. Avoiding complications is subject to an appropriate preoperative workup and patient selection. Planning for a VATS resection as safely as possible involves the consideration of the patient´s characteristics and the anticipated technical aspects of the case. Awareness of the possibility of intraoperative complications of VATS lobectomy is mandatory to avoid them, and the development of management strategies is necessary to limit morbidity if they occur. PMID:25379209

  3. Neurologic complications of infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Lerner, P I

    1985-03-01

    Neurologic complications continue to occur in approximately 30 per cent of all patients with infective endocarditis and represent a major factor associated with an increased mortality rate in that disease. Of these complications, cerebral embolism is the most common and the most important, occurring in as many as 30 per cent of all patients, most of whom ultimately die. Emboli that are infected also account for all the other complications (mycotic aneurysm, meningitis or meningoencephalitis, brain abscess) that may develop. Emboli are more common in patients with mitral valve infection and in those infected with more virulent organisms. Mycotic aneurysms (often preceded by an embolic event) occur more frequently and earlier in the course of acute endocarditis, rather than later, which is more common in the course of subacute disease. The management of a cerebral mycotic aneurysm depends on the presence or absence of hemorrhage, its anatomic location and the clinical course. Healing can occur during the course of effective antimicrobial therapy and thus will preclude the need for automatic surgery in all angiographically demonstrated aneurysms. The indication for surgical intervention must be evaluated on an individual basis. Meningitis is usually purulent when associated with virulent organisms, but the CSF may present an aseptic formula when associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage or multiple microscopic embolic lesions, infected or otherwise. Macroscopic brain abscesses are rare, but multiple microscopic abscesses are not uncommon in patients with acute endocarditis due to virulent organisms. Seizures are not uncommon in patients with infective endocarditis. Focal seizures are more commonly associated with acute emboli, whereas generalized seizures are more commonly associated with systemic metabolic factors. Penicillin neurotoxicity should be considered in seizure patients with compromised renal function who are receiving high doses of penicillin. The CSF tends

  4. [Operative treatment of complicated duodenal and pyloric ulcer disease].

    PubMed

    Oparin, S O; Korotkyï, V M; Kolosovych, I V; Spitsyn, R Iu; Furmanenko, M F; Kartashov, B T; Martynovych, L D; Krasovs'kyĭ, V O; Butyrin, S O; Zinchenko, I I; Rupitsev, O O; Dzhurko, M G

    2000-11-01

    There were examined 135 patients with perforative ulcer of the gastric terminal portion (GTP) and of duodenum. Performance of duodeno- or gastroduodenoplasty without vagotomy, the correcting therapy conduction in early postoperative period had promoted the normalization of the GTP motor function and the gastric acid output reduction in late follow-up period, trusting the expediency of organ-preserving operation conduction without vagotomy as radical method of the complicated ulcer disease treatment. PMID:11247447

  5. Charcot neuroarthropathy: An often overlooked complication of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Botek, Georgeanne; Anderson, Martha A; Taylor, Ryan

    2010-09-01

    In patients with long-standing, poorly controlled diabetes and peripheral neuropathy, a red, hot, swollen foot without open ulceration should raise the suspicion of Charcot neuroarthropathy, an often-overlooked diabetic foot complication. The authors discuss key diagnostic features and how to differentiate this condition from cellulitis, osteomyelitis, and other conditions. They review key elements of the workup and emphasize the importance of early diagnosis and prompt treatment to preserve a functioning foot. PMID:20810870

  6. Megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome complicated by perforation.

    PubMed

    Jain, Vishal K; Garge, Saurabh; Singh, Sangram; Lahoti, Brijesh

    2011-01-01

    Megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (MMIHS) is a quite rare congenital and fatal disease. The disease is three to four times more prevalent in females than males. Most of the cases die within the early months of their lives. We present the case of a newborn male with antenatal ultrasound suggesting the diagnosis of MMIHS. The case was admitted for perforation complicated with prematurity after birth. This case is th e only one where MMIHS presented as perforation. PMID:21478590

  7. Oral Complications of HIV Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leao, Jair C.; Ribeiro, Camila M. B.; Carvalho, Alessandra A. T.; Frezzini, Cristina; Porter, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Oral lesions are among the early signs of HIV infection and can predict its progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). A better understanding of the oral manifestations of AIDS in both adults and children has implications for all health care professionals. The knowledge of such alterations would allow for early recognition of HIV-infected patients. The present paper reviews epidemiology, relevant aspects of HIV infection related to the mouth in both adults and children, as well as current trends in antiretroviral therapy and its connection with orofacial manifestations related to AIDS. PMID:19488613

  8. Complications associated with laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for morbid obesity: a surgeon’s guide

    PubMed Central

    Sarkhosh, Kourosh; Birch, Daniel W.; Sharma, Arya; Karmali, Shahzeer

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a common disease affecting adults and children. The incidence of obesity in Canada is increasing. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is a relatively new and effective procedure for weight loss. Owing to an increase in the number of bariatric surgical procedures, general surgeons should have an understanding of the complications associated with LSG and an approach for dealing with them. Early postoperative complications following LSG that need to be identified urgently include bleeding, staple line leak and development of an abscess. Delayed complications include strictures, nutritional deficiencies and gastresophageal reflux disease. We discuss the principles involved in the management of each complication. PMID:24067520

  9. Distal tibia fractures: management and complications of 101 cases.

    PubMed

    Joveniaux, Pierre; Ohl, Xavier; Harisboure, Alain; Berrichi, Aboubekr; Labatut, Ludovic; Simon, Patrick; Mainard, Didier; Vix, Nicolas; Dehoux, Emile

    2010-04-01

    Distal tibia fractures are complex injuries with a high complication rate. In this retrospective and multicentre study we attempted to detail complications and outcomes of this type of injury in order to determine predictive factors of poor results. Between 2002 and 2004, 104 patients were admitted for 105 distal tibia fractures. One hundred patients (101 fractures) were reviewed with an average follow-up of 19 months (range, 12-46). Internal fixation, external fixation, limited internal fixation (K-wires or screws), intramedullary nailing and conservative treatment were used. Outcome parameters included occurrence of complications, radiographic analysis, evaluation of the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle score and measures of the ankle range of motion. The average functional score was 76 points (range, 30-100 points), and complications occurred in 30 patients. Predictive factors of poor results were fracture severity, complications, malunion and the use of external fixation. We believe that external fixation must be reserved for trauma with severe skin injury, as a temporary solution in a two-staged protocol. For other cases, we recommend ORIF with early mobilisation. PMID:19554328

  10. Distal tibia fractures: management and complications of 101 cases

    PubMed Central

    Joveniaux, Pierre; Harisboure, Alain; Berrichi, Aboubekr; Labatut, Ludovic; Simon, Patrick; Mainard, Didier; Vix, Nicolas; Dehoux, Emile

    2009-01-01

    Distal tibia fractures are complex injuries with a high complication rate. In this retrospective and multicentre study we attempted to detail complications and outcomes of this type of injury in order to determine predictive factors of poor results. Between 2002 and 2004, 104 patients were admitted for 105 distal tibia fractures. One hundred patients (101 fractures) were reviewed with an average follow-up of 19 months (range, 12–46). Internal fixation, external fixation, limited internal fixation (K-wires or screws), intramedullary nailing and conservative treatment were used. Outcome parameters included occurrence of complications, radiographic analysis, evaluation of the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle score and measures of the ankle range of motion. The average functional score was 76 points (range, 30–100 points), and complications occurred in 30 patients. Predictive factors of poor results were fracture severity, complications, malunion and the use of external fixation. We believe that external fixation must be reserved for trauma with severe skin injury, as a temporary solution in a two-staged protocol. For other cases, we recommend ORIF with early mobilisation. PMID:19554328

  11. Infrared Thermal Imaging for Automated Detection of Diabetic Foot Complications

    PubMed Central

    van Netten, Jaap J.; van Baal, Jeff G.; Liu, Chanjuan; van der Heijden, Ferdi; Bus, Sicco A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Although thermal imaging can be a valuable technology in the prevention and management of diabetic foot disease, it is not yet widely used in clinical practice. Technological advancement in infrared imaging increases its application range. The aim was to explore the first steps in the applicability of high-resolution infrared thermal imaging for noninvasive automated detection of signs of diabetic foot disease. Methods The plantar foot surfaces of 15 diabetes patients were imaged with an infrared camera (resolution, 1.2 mm/pixel): 5 patients had no visible signs of foot complications, 5 patients had local complications (e.g., abundant callus or neuropathic ulcer), and 5 patients had diffuse complications (e.g., Charcot foot, infected ulcer, or critical ischemia). Foot temperature was calculated as mean temperature across pixels for the whole foot and for specified regions of interest (ROIs). Results No differences in mean temperature >1.5 °C between the ipsilateral and the contralateral foot were found in patients without complications. In patients with local complications, mean temperatures of the ipsilateral and the contralateral foot were similar, but temperature at the ROI was >2 °C higher compared with the corresponding region in the contralateral foot and to the mean of the whole ipsilateral foot. In patients with diffuse complications, mean temperature differences of >3 °C between ipsilateral and contralateral foot were found. Conclusions With an algorithm based on parameters that can be captured and analyzed with a high-resolution infrared camera and a computer, it is possible to detect signs of diabetic foot disease and to discriminate between no, local, or diffuse diabetic foot complications. As such, an intelligent telemedicine monitoring system for noninvasive automated detection of signs of diabetic foot disease is one step closer. Future studies are essential to confirm and extend these promising early findings. PMID:24124937

  12. Infectious complications of regional anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Horlocker, Terese T; Wedel, Denise J

    2008-09-01

    Although individual cases have been reported in the literature, serious infections of the central nervous system (CNS) such as arachnoiditis, meningitis, and abscess following spinal or epidural anesthesia are rare. However, recent epidemiologic series from Europe suggest that the frequency of infectious complications associated with neuraxial techniques may be increasing. Importantly, while meningitis and epidural abscess are both complications of neuraxial block, the risk factors and causative organisms are disparate. For example, staphylococcus is the organism most commonly associated epidural abscess; often these infections occurred in patients with impaired immunity. Conversely, meningitis follows dural puncture, and is typically caused by alpha-hemolytic streptococci, with the source of the organism the nasopharynx of the proceduralist. In order to reduce the risk of serious infection following neuraxial blockade, the clinician must be knowledgeable in the pathogenesis of CNS infections, patient selection, and use of meticulous aseptic technique. Finally, since delay in the diagnosis may result in morbidity and even death, it is crucial to be aware of the presenting signs and symptoms of meningitis and epidural abscess. PMID:18831298

  13. Bacterial infections complicating tongue piercing

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Catherine HY; Minnema, Brian J; Gold, Wayne L

    2010-01-01

    Tongue piercing has become an increasingly popular form of body art. However, this procedure can occasionally be complicated by serious bacterial infections. The present article reports a case of prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by a Gemella species in a patient with a pierced tongue, and reviews 18 additional cases of local and systemic bacterial infections associated with tongue piercing. Infections localized to the oral cavity and head and neck region included molar abscess, glossal abscess, glossitis, submandibular lymphadenitis, submandibular sialadenitis, Ludwig’s angina and cephalic tetanus. Infections distal to the piercing site included eight cases of infective endocarditis, one case of chorioamnionitis and one case of cerebellar abscess. Oropharyngeal flora were isolated from all cases. While bacterial infections following tongue piercing are rare, there are reports of potentially life-threatening infections associated with the procedure. Both piercers and their clients should be aware of these potential complications, and standardized infection prevention and control practices should be adopted by piercers to reduce the risk. PMID:21358880

  14. Infectious Complications After Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Maria Del Pilar; Martin, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is the standard of care for patients with decompensated cirrhosis and for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. More than 6000 liver transplants are performed annually in the United States. High patient and graft survival rates have been achieved in great part due to the availability of potent immunosuppressive agents. Systemic immunosuppression has rendered the liver recipient susceptible to de novo infections as well as reactivation of preexisting latent infections. Infections occurring during the first month post-OLT are usually nosocomial, donor-derived, or the result of a perioperative complication. The development of opportunistic infections (OIs) such as Aspergillus and the reactivation of latent infections such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis are more frequent 1 to 6 months posttransplant, when the net state of immunosuppression is the highest. Immunosuppressive therapy is tapered 6 to 12 months post-OLT; therefore, infections occurring during that time period and afterward generally resemble those of the general population. Screening strategies applied to determine the risk of an infection after transplantation and the use of prophylactic antimicrobial therapy have reduced the incidence of OIs after OLT. This article will review the various causes of infection post-OLT and the therapies used to manage complications. PMID:27134589

  15. Current Treatment Modalities of JIA-associated Uveitis and its Complications: Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Abu Samra, Khawla; Maghsoudlou, Armin; Roohipoor, Ramak; Valdes-Navarro, Manuel; Lee, Stacey; Foster, C Stephen

    2016-08-01

    Uveitis is a common and serious complication of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Up to 75% of all cases of anterior uveitis in childhood are associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Despite the remarkable progress in early detection and treatment of inflammation, vision-threatening complications of uveitis still occur in almost 60% of patients. Structural complications include band keratopathy, maculopathy (macular edema, macular cysts, and epiretinal membrane), glaucomatous optic neuropathy, and cataracts. The management of complications in juvenile idiopathic arthritis is usually complex and requires early surgical intervention. In this paper, we review the general concepts of common ocular complications seen in patients with JIA-associated uveitis, with special attention to the recent diagnostic and preferred treatment approaches at the Massachusetts Eye Research and Surgery Institution. Received 9 March 2015; revised 30 September 2015; accepted 30 October 2015; published online 14 January 2016. PMID:26765345

  16. Late surgical complications after gastric by-pass: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    PALERMO, Mariano; ACQUAFRESCA, Pablo A.; ROGULA, Tomasz; DUZA, Guillermo E.; SERRA, Edgardo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Gastric bypass is today the most frequently performed bariatric procedure, but, despite of it, several complications can occur with varied morbimortality. Probably all bariatric surgeons know these complications, but, as bariatric surgery continues to spread, general surgeon must be familiarized to it and its management. Gastric bypass complications can be divided into two groups: early and late complications, taking into account the two weeks period after the surgery. This paper will focus the late ones. Method Literature review was carried out using Medline/PubMed, Cochrane Library, SciELO, and additional information on institutional sites of interest crossing the headings: gastric bypass AND complications; follow-up studies AND complications; postoperative complications AND anastomosis, Roux-en-Y; obesity AND postoperative complications. Search language was English. Results There were selected 35 studies that matched the headings. Late complications were considered as: anastomotic strictures, marginal ulceration and gastrogastric fistula. Conclusion Knowledge on strategies on how to reduce the risk and incidence of complications must be acquired, and every surgeon must be familiar with these complications in order to achieve an earlier recognition and perform the best intervention. PMID:26176254

  17. Sleep Apnea Tied to Complications After Angioplasty

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159391.html Sleep Apnea Tied to Complications After Angioplasty Nightly breathing ... 15, 2016 WEDNESDAY, June 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Sleep apnea may increase the risk of serious complications ...

  18. Kawasaki Disease: Complications, Treatment and Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Stroke More Kawasaki Disease: Complications, Treatment and Prevention Updated:Apr 27,2016 Complications The possibility of ... problems that did not show up right away. Prevention There is no known prevention for Kawasaki disease. ...

  19. Sleep Apnea Tied to Complications After Angioplasty

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159391.html Sleep Apnea Tied to Complications After Angioplasty Nightly breathing ... 15, 2016 WEDNESDAY, June 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Sleep apnea may increase the risk of serious complications ...

  20. Post-operative pulmonary complications after thoracotomy

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Saikat

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary complications are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the post-operative period after thoracotomy. The type of complications and the severity of complications depend on the type of thoracic surgery that has been performed as well as on the patient's pre-operative medical status. Risk stratification can help in predicting the possibility of the post-operative complications. Certain airway complications are more prone to develop with thoracic surgery. Vocal cord injuries, bronchopleural fistulae, pulmonary emboli and post-thoracic surgery non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema are some of the unique complications that occur in this subset of patients. The major pulmonary complications such as atelectasis, bronchospasm and pneumonia can lead to respiratory failure. This review was compiled after a search for search terms within ‘post-operative pulmonary complications after thoracic surgery and thoracotomy’ on search engines including PubMed and standard text references on the subject from 2000 to 2015. PMID:26556921

  1. Complications in Musculoskeletal Intervention: Important Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, David T.; Dubois, Melissa; Tutton, Sean M.

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal (MSK) intervention has proliferated in recent years among various subspecialties in medicine. Despite advancements in image guidance and percutaneous technique, the risk of complication has not been fully eliminated. Overall, complications in MSK interventions are rare, with bleeding and infection the most common encountered. Other complications are even rarer. This article reviews various complications unique to musculoskeletal interventions, assists the reader in understanding where pitfalls lie, and highlights ways to avoid them. PMID:26038623

  2. Common complications of pediatric neuromuscular disorders.

    PubMed

    Skalsky, Andrew J; Dalal, Pritha B

    2015-02-01

    Children with pediatric neuromuscular disorders experience common complications, primarily due to immobility and weakness. Musculoskeletal complications include hip dysplasia with associated hip subluxation or dislocation, neuromuscular scoliosis, and osteoporosis and resulting fractures. Constipation, gastroesophageal reflux, and obesity and malnutrition are commonly experienced gastrointestinal complications. Disordered sleep also is frequently observed, which affects both patients and caregivers. PMID:25479776

  3. Skeletal complications of eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Abigail A; Gordon, Catherine M

    2015-09-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric illness with profound medical consequences. Among the many adverse physical sequelae of AN, bone health is impacted by starvation and can be permanently impaired over the course of the illness. In this review of skeletal complications associated with eating disorders, we discuss the epidemiology, neuroendocrine changes, adolescent vs. adult skeletal considerations, orthopedic concerns, assessment of bone health, and treatment options for individuals with AN. The focus of the review is the skeletal sequelae associated with anorexia nervosa, but we also briefly consider other eating disorders that may afflict adolescents and young adults. The review presents updates to the field of bone health in AN, and also suggests knowledge gaps and areas for future investigation. PMID:26166318

  4. Pulmonary hypertension complicating multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Mark, Tomer M.; Niesvizky, Ruben; Sobol, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is an infrequently reported complication of multiple myeloma (MM). PH has been more commonly associated with amyloidosis, myeloproliferative diseases, and the POEMS (polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal protein, skin changes) syndrome. PH in MM is typically mild to moderate and may be secondary to a variety of conditions, which include left ventricular dysfunction, high-output cardiac failure, chronic kidney disease, treatment-related toxicities, and precapillary involvement. We describe 3 patients with MM and severe PH. Each patient underwent right heart catheterization. All patients demonstrated elevated pulmonary pressures, transpulmonary gradients, and pulmonary vascular resistance. Each patient was ultimately treated with pulmonary vasodilator therapy with improvement in cardiopulmonary symptoms. Additional studies are needed to define the prevalence, prognosis, and pathogenesis of PH in this complex population and to help clarify who may benefit from targeted PH therapy. PMID:26401262

  5. Complicated grief in Aboriginal populations

    PubMed Central

    Spiwak, Rae; Sareen, Jitender; Elias, Brenda; Martens, Patricia; Munro, Garry; Bolton, James

    2012-01-01

    To date there have been no studies examining complicated grief (CG) in Aboriginal populations. Although this research gap exists, it can be hypothesized that Aboriginal populations may be at increased risk for CG, given a variety of factors, including increased rates of all-cause mortality and death by suicide. Aboriginal people also have a past history of multiple stressors resulting from the effects of colonization and forced assimilation, a significant example being residential school placement. This loss of culture and high rates of traumatic events may place Aboriginal individuals at increased risk for suicide, as well as CG resulting from traumatic loss and suicide bereavement. Studies are needed to examine CG in Aboriginal populations. These studies must include cooperation with Aboriginal communities to help identify risk factors for CG, understand the role of culture among these communities, and identify interventions to reduce poor health outcomes such as suicidal behavior. PMID:22754293

  6. Neurologic complications of scuba diving.

    PubMed

    Newton, H B

    2001-06-01

    Recreational scuba diving has become a popular sport in the United States, with almost 9 million certified divers. When severe diving injury occurs, the nervous system is frequently involved. In dive-related barotrauma, compressed or expanding gas within the ears, sinuses and lungs causes various forms of neurologic injury. Otic barotrauma often induces pain, vertigo and hearing loss. In pulmonary barotrauma of ascent, lung damage can precipitate arterial gas embolism, causing blockage of cerebral blood vessels and alterations of consciousness, seizures and focal neurologic deficits. In patients with decompression sickness, the vestibular system, spinal cord and brain are affected by the formation of nitrogen bubbles. Common signs and symptoms include vertigo, thoracic myelopathy with leg weakness, confusion, headache and hemiparesis. Other diving-related neurologic complications include headache and oxygen toxicity. PMID:11417773

  7. Pulmonary hypertension complicating pulmonary sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Huitema, M P; Grutters, J C; Rensing, B J W M; Reesink, H J; Post, M C

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a severe complication of sarcoidosis, with an unknown prevalence. The aetiology is multifactorial, and the exact mechanism of PH in the individual patient is often difficult to establish. The diagnostic work-up and treatment of PH in sarcoidosis is complex, and should therefore be determined by a multidisciplinary expert team in a specialised centre. It is still a major challenge to identify sarcoidosis patients at risk for developing PH. There is no validated algorithm when to refer a patient suspected for PH, and PH analysis itself is difficult. Until present, there is no established therapy for PH in sarcoidosis. Besides optimal treatment for sarcoidosis, case series evaluating new therapeutic options involving PH-targeted therapy are arising for a subgroup of patients. This review summarises the current knowledge regarding the aetiology, diagnosis and possible treatment options for PH in sarcoidosis. PMID:27194118

  8. Ocular Complications of Chloroquine Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Lois A.; Hiltz, John W.

    1965-01-01

    Ocular complications of long-term chloroquine therapy were observed in 18 of 45 patients so treated. This therapy was used in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, lupus erythematosus, sarcoidosis, discoid lupus and other chronic “collagen disease”. Thirteen patients had reversible corneal opacifications, and seven had irreversible retinal changes, with visual loss and visual field defects. Pathological evidence of chloroquine retinopathy was obtained in one patient. Physicians are therefore warned to use this drug only after careful consideration. If it is used, repeated ocular examinations should include assessment of visual acuity, visual fields on a tangent screen and fundus examination through a dilated pupil. ImagesFig. 4Fig. 7Fig. 8 PMID:14275038

  9. Complicated grief in Aboriginal populations.

    PubMed

    Spiwak, Rae; Sareen, Jitender; Elias, Brenda; Martens, Patricia; Munro, Garry; Bolton, James

    2012-06-01

    To date there have been no studies examining complicated grief (CG) in Aboriginal populations. Although this research gap exists, it can be hypothesized that Aboriginal populations may be at increased risk for CG, given a variety of factors, including increased rates of all-cause mortality and death by suicide. Aboriginal people also have a past history of multiple stressors resulting from the effects of colonization and forced assimilation, a significant example being residential school placement. This loss of culture and high rates of traumatic events may place Aboriginal individuals at increased risk for suicide, as well as CG resulting from traumatic loss and suicide bereavement. Studies are needed to examine CG in Aboriginal populations. These studies must include cooperation with Aboriginal communities to help identify risk factors for CG, understand the role of culture among these communities, and identify interventions to reduce poor health outcomes such as suicidal behavior. PMID:22754293

  10. [Living donor transplantation. Surgical complications].

    PubMed

    Karam, Georges

    2008-02-01

    Although nephrectomy by open surgery is the most used technique for the extraction of kidney transplants in the living donor, nephrectomy under laparaoscopy is increasingly practiced. Laparoscopic nephrectomy is less invasive and performed under videoscopy control, after insufflation of the peritoneal cavity. Three to four incisions are done in order to enter the surgical instruments. The kidney is extracted through a horizontal sus-pubic incision. The exposition is either exclusively transperitoneal, retroperitoneal or hand assisted. The advantages of laparoscopy are esthetical, financial due to a shorter hospitalisation and a quicker recovery, as well a confort for the donor. The disadvantages are a longer warm ischemia time and possibly a higher risk of delayed graft function. Randomised studies having compared laparoscopy and open surgery in the living donor have not find any significant difference regarding the per- and perioperative in the complications. PMID:18160357

  11. ORTHOPEDIC COMPLICATIONS IN HIV PATIENTS.

    PubMed

    Lima, Ana Lúcia Lei Munhoz; Godoy, Alexandre Leme; Oliveira, Priscila Rosalba Domingos; Gobbi, Ricardo Gomes; de Almeida Silva, Camila; Martino, Patricia Bernardelli; Gutierrez, Eliana Bataggia; Gianna, Maria Clara; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2009-01-01

    The considerable increase of the life expectancy of HIV-infected patients in the age of highly-powerful antiretroviral treatment results in important metabolic and bone-joint changes resulting from a long-lasting viral infection time and from this treatment. The most common orthopaedic complications are bone mineralization changes, osteonecrosis, carpal tunnel syndrome and gleno-humeral adhesive capsulitis, with different clinical presentation features, natural disease progression and therapeutic response compared to the overall population. Literature reports are initial, and the experience of the multidisciplinary service of the University of Sao Paulo's Institute of Orthopaedics and Traumatology enables us a more indepth knowledge about the various pathologies involved and the development of treatment protocols that are appropriate to these diagnoses. PMID:27004170

  12. ORTHOPEDIC COMPLICATIONS IN HIV PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Ana Lúcia Lei Munhoz; Godoy, Alexandre Leme; Oliveira, Priscila Rosalba Domingos; Gobbi, Ricardo Gomes; de Almeida Silva, Camila; Martino, Patricia Bernardelli; Gutierrez, Eliana Bataggia; Gianna, Maria Clara; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2015-01-01

    The considerable increase of the life expectancy of HIV-infected patients in the age of highly-powerful antiretroviral treatment results in important metabolic and bone-joint changes resulting from a long-lasting viral infection time and from this treatment. The most common orthopaedic complications are bone mineralization changes, osteonecrosis, carpal tunnel syndrome and gleno-humeral adhesive capsulitis, with different clinical presentation features, natural disease progression and therapeutic response compared to the overall population. Literature reports are initial, and the experience of the multidisciplinary service of the University of Sao Paulo's Institute of Orthopaedics and Traumatology enables us a more indepth knowledge about the various pathologies involved and the development of treatment protocols that are appropriate to these diagnoses. PMID:27004170

  13. Skeletal Complications of Eating Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Abigail A.; Gordon, Catherine M.

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric illness with profound medical consequences. Among the many adverse physical sequelae of AN, bone health is impacted by starvation and can be permanently impaired over the course of the illness. In this review of skeletal complications associated with eating disorders, we discuss the epidemiology, neuroendocrine changes, adolescent vs. adult skeletal considerations, orthopedic concerns, assessment of bone health, and treatment options for individuals with AN. The focus of the review is the skeletal sequelae associated with anorexia nervosa, but we also briefly consider other eating disorders that may afflict adolescents and young adults. The review presents updates to the field of bone health in AN, and also suggests knowledge gaps and areas for future investigation. PMID:26166318

  14. Pulmonary hypertension complicating multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Udhay; Mark, Tomer M; Niesvizky, Ruben; Sobol, Irina

    2015-09-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is an infrequently reported complication of multiple myeloma (MM). PH has been more commonly associated with amyloidosis, myeloproliferative diseases, and the POEMS (polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal protein, skin changes) syndrome. PH in MM is typically mild to moderate and may be secondary to a variety of conditions, which include left ventricular dysfunction, high-output cardiac failure, chronic kidney disease, treatment-related toxicities, and precapillary involvement. We describe 3 patients with MM and severe PH. Each patient underwent right heart catheterization. All patients demonstrated elevated pulmonary pressures, transpulmonary gradients, and pulmonary vascular resistance. Each patient was ultimately treated with pulmonary vasodilator therapy with improvement in cardiopulmonary symptoms. Additional studies are needed to define the prevalence, prognosis, and pathogenesis of PH in this complex population and to help clarify who may benefit from targeted PH therapy. PMID:26401262

  15. Neurologic complication after a roller coaster ride.

    PubMed

    Sa Leitao, Davi; Mendonca, Dercio; Iyer, Harish; Kao, Cheng-Kai

    2012-01-01

    Neurologic complications after roller coaster rides are uncommon but potentially catastrophic. Physicians should have a high index of suspicion and prompt appropriate investigation. A 22-year-old healthy African American man presented with a 2-day history of constant occipital headache associated with vertigo, nausea, vomiting, and ambulatory dysfunction. Physical examination showed gait ataxia, slight dysmetria, and vertical nystagmus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain showed early subacute ischemic infarct in the right cerebellum in the distribution of the right posterior inferior cerebellar artery. Magnetic resonance angiography of the neck showed focal dissection of the right vertebral artery at C1 through C2 level. On subsequent questioning, the patient recollected riding a roller coaster 2 weeks before the onset of symptoms. Anticoagulation with heparin was started, and the patient was bridged to oral warfarin. After a 5-day uneventful hospital course, symptoms improved and patient was discharged on oral anticoagulation. Cervicocephalic arterial dissections after roller coaster rides are rarely described in literature. The acceleration and abrupt changes of direction might lead to indirect trauma that is applied to mobile portions of the cervicocephalic arteries leading to intimal tears. Magnetic resonance angiography combined with axial T1-weighted cervical MRI is preferred because it is a high-sensitive, noninvasive test. The rationale for the use of anticoagulants or antiplatelets in patients with cervicocephalic arterial dissection is to prevent early recurrence and infarction. However, a meta-analysis failed to show significant difference in the rates of disability or death between both groups. Therefore, the decision for medical treatment should be made in a case-by-case basis. PMID:20980120

  16. Infection as a complication of heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Linder, J

    1988-01-01

    Infection and cardiac rejection are the most significant causes of morbidity and mortality after heart transplantation. At some transplant centers, more than half of the early transplantation-related deaths are the result of infection. The infectious agents may be transmitted to the host by means of the allograft, through blood transfusion, by nosocomial or environmental routes, or they may represent endogenous microbial flora or reactivation of a prior infection. The frequency of infectious complications is generally related to the degree of immunosuppressive therapy required to prevent graft rejection. Both the composition of the immunosuppressive regimen and the dosage of the immunosuppressive drugs affect the infection rate. Recent protocols, employing a combination of cyclosporine, steroids, and azathioprine cause less toxicity and lower infection rates than protocols that rely solely on cyclosporine and steroids or protocols utilized in the 1970s, which did not contain cyclosporine. A literature review of data reported from 12 transplant centers, encompassing 384 patients who received their transplantation in the era of cyclosporine, revealed infections in 221 patients (57.6%), with 20 infection-related deaths (5.2%). All classes of microorganisms infected the heart transplant recipients. The most frequent agents included staphylococci, gram-negative enteric, Nocardia (bacterial); Aspergillus, Candida, Cryptococcus (fungal); cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex, herpes zoster (viral); and Pneumocystis carinii, Toxoplasma gondii (protozoal). The respiratory tract, urinary tract, and skin were the most common sites of infection.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3058911

  17. Neurologic Complications in the Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Rubinos, Clio; Ruland, Sean

    2016-06-01

    Complications involving the central and peripheral nervous system are frequently encountered in critically ill patients. All components of the neuraxis can be involved including the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerves, neuromuscular junction, and muscles. Neurologic complications adversely impact outcome and length of stay. These complications can be related to underlying critical illness, pre-existing comorbid conditions, and commonly used and life-saving procedures and medications. Familiarity with the myriad neurologic complications that occur in the intensive care unit can facilitate their timely recognition and treatment. Additionally, awareness of treatment-related neurologic complications may inform decision-making, mitigate risk, and improve outcomes. PMID:27098953

  18. Complications of orthopaedic surgery in horses.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Dean W

    2008-12-01

    Complications are a price all surgeons eventually pay. Experience and increasing skill will decrease many of them but certainly not all. The most important thing is for the surgeon to react correctly to a complication. Acknowledge the mistake (or bad luck) quickly and take whatever steps you can to correct the problem. Because so many equine orthopaedic cases have the potential for complications, recognizing and responding properly to these complications are imperative for successful outcomes. Discussion of the most common complications, their prevention and corrections, is presented. PMID:19203703

  19. Hemoglobin and Hematocrit Levels in the Prediction of Complicated Crohn's Disease Behavior – A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Rieder, Florian; Paul, Gisela; Schnoy, Elisabeth; Schleder, Stephan; Wolf, Alexandra; Kamm, Florian; Dirmeier, Andrea; Strauch, Ulrike; Obermeier, Florian; Lopez, Rocio; Achkar, Jean-Paul; Rogler, Gerhard; Klebl, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Background Markers that predict the occurrence of a complicated disease behavior in patients with Crohn's disease (CD) can permit a more aggressive therapeutic regimen for patients at risk. The aim of this cohort study was to test the blood levels of hemoglobin (Hgb) and hematocrit (Hct) for the prediction of complicated CD behavior and CD related surgery in an adult patient population. Methods Blood samples of 62 CD patients of the German Inflammatory Bowel Disease-network “Kompetenznetz CED” were tested for the levels of Hgb and Hct prior to the occurrence of complicated disease behavior or CD related surgery. The relation of these markers and clinical events was studied using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and adjusted COX-proportional hazard regression models. Results The median follow-up time was 55.8 months. Of the 62 CD patients without any previous complication or surgery 34% developed a complication and/or underwent CD related surgery. Low Hgb or Hct levels were independent predictors of a shorter time to occurrence of the first complication or CD related surgery. This was true for early as well as late occurring complications. Stable low Hgb or Hct during serial follow-up measurements had a higher frequency of complications compared to patients with a stable normal Hgb or Hct, respectively. Conclusions Determination of Hgb or Hct in complication and surgery naïve CD patients might serve as an additional tool for the prediction of complicated disease behavior. PMID:25116048

  20. Surgical Treatments for Infantile Purulent Meningitis Complicated by Subdural Effusion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xianshu; Zhang, Xiaoru; Cao, Hongbin; Jing, Shiyuan; Yang, Zhiguo; Cheng, Zhenghai; Liu, Ye; Li, Xin; Gao, Feifei; Ji, Yuanqi

    2015-01-01

    Background Infantile purulent meningitis (PM) is a commonly severe intracranial infectious disease in infants under age 1 year. In recent years, several diagnostic and treatment methods were reported, but in these cases the neurological complications and sequel were often observed, among which subdural effusion (SE) is the most common complication in PM. Timely diagnosis and early intervention are vital for better outcomes. In this study, the surgical treatments for infantile PM complicated by SE were investigated. Material/Methods Patients who had PM complicated by SE in the Children’s Hospital of Hebei Province from June 2000 to June 2012 were retrospectively analyzed and 170 patients were enrolled in the study. Surgical treatment for each patient was adopted according to producing effusion time, leucocyte count, protein content, intracranial pressure, and bacteria culture, coupled with cranial ultrasound examination, CT, and MRI scans. Results Nearly, 15 patients were cured using serial taps, with a 50% cure rate. Seventeen out of 30 (56.6%) patients receiving subcutaneous reservoir drainage had better outcome. Nearly 80% of patients (55/69) who underwent minimally invasive trepanation and drainage were positive. Surgical procedure of minimally invasive trepanation and drainage combined with drug douche was effective in 63% of patients (19/30). In addition, 6 patients were cured with subdural-peritoneal shunt. Only 1 patient died, after the recurrence of meningitis, and the remaining 4 patients were cured by craniotomy. Conclusions For infantile PM complicated with SE, treatment needs be chosen according to the specific situation. Surgical procedure of minimally invasive trepanation and drainage is a very effective treatment in curing PM complicated by SE. The treatment was highly effective with the use of drug douche. Subdural-peritoneal shunt and craniotomy were as effective as in refractory cases. PMID:26482715

  1. Risk factors for complications in patients with ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Borovicka, Jan; Seibold, Frank; Vavricka, Stephan R; Lakatos, Peter L; Fried, Michael; Rogler, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with ulcerative colitis may develop extraintestinal manifestations like erythema nodosum or primary sclerosing cholangitis or extraintestinal complications like anaemia, malabsorption or they may have to undergo surgery. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate potential risk factors for complications like anaemia, malabsorption or surgery in ulcerative colitis. Methods Data on 179 patients with ulcerative colitis were retrieved from our cross-sectional and prospective Swiss Inflammatory Bowel Disease Cohort Study data base for a median observational time of 4.2 years. Data were compared between patients with (n = 140) or without (n = 39) complications. Gender, age at diagnosis, smoking status, disease extent, delay of diagnosis or therapy, mesalamine (5-ASA) systemic and topical therapy, as well as other medication were analysed as potential impact factors. Results In the multivariate regression analysis a delay of 5-ASA treatment by at least two months (odds ratio (OR) 6.21 (95% confidence interval (CI) 2.13–18.14), p = 0.001) as well as a delay with other medication with thiopurines (OR 6.48 (95% CI 2.01–20.91), p = 0.002) were associated with a higher risk for complications. This significant impact of a delay of 5-ASA therapy was demonstrated for extraintestinal manifestations (EIMs) as well as extraintestinal complications (EICs). Extensive disease as well as therapy with methotrexate showed a significantly increased risk for surgery (extensive disease: OR 2.62 (1.02–6.73), p = 0.05, methotrexate: OR 5.36 (1.64–17.58), p = 0.006). Conclusions A delay of 5-ASA therapy of more than two months in the early stage of ulcerative colitis (UC) constitutes a risk for complications during disease course. Extensive disease is associated with a higher risk for surgery. PMID:27087958

  2. Cranioplasty after decompressive craniectomy: the effect of timing on postoperative complications.

    PubMed

    Schuss, Patrick; Vatter, Hartmut; Marquardt, Gerhard; Imöhl, Lioba; Ulrich, Christian T; Seifert, Volker; Güresir, Erdem

    2012-04-10

    Decompressive craniectomy (DC) due to intractably elevated intracranial pressure mandates later cranioplasty (CP). However, the optimal timing of CP remains controversial. We therefore analyzed our prospectively conducted database concerning the timing of CP and associated post-operative complications. From October 1999 to August 2011, 280 cranioplasty procedures were performed at the authors' institution. Patients were stratified into two groups according to the time from DC to cranioplasty (early, ≤2 months, and late, >2 months). Patient characteristics, timing of CP, and CP-related complications were analyzed. Overall CP was performed early in 19% and late in 81%. The overall complication rate was 16.4%. Complications after CP included epidural or subdural hematoma (6%), wound healing disturbance (5.7%), abscess (1.4%), hygroma (1.1%), cerebrospinal fluid fistula (1.1%), and other (1.1%). Patients who underwent early CP suffered significantly more often from complications compared to patients who underwent late CP (25.9% versus 14.2%; p=0.04). Patients with ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt had a significantly higher rate of complications after CP compared to patients without VP shunt (p=0.007). On multivariate analysis, early CP, the presence of a VP shunt, and intracerebral hemorrhage as underlying pathology for DC, were significant predictors of post-operative complications after CP. We provide detailed data on surgical timing and complications for cranioplasty after DC. The present data suggest that patients who undergo late CP might benefit from a lower complication rate. This might influence future surgical decision making regarding optimal timing of cranioplasty. PMID:22201297

  3. Doppler ultrasonography in living donor liver transplantation recipients: Intra- and post-operative vascular complications

    PubMed Central

    Abdelaziz, Omar; Attia, Hussein

    2016-01-01

    Living-donor liver transplantation has provided a solution to the severe lack of cadaver grafts for the replacement of liver afflicted with end-stage cirrhosis, fulminant disease, or inborn errors of metabolism. Vascular complications remain the most serious complications and a common cause for graft failure after hepatic transplantation. Doppler ultrasound remains the primary radiological imaging modality for the diagnosis of such complications. This article presents a brief review of intra- and post-operative living donor liver transplantation anatomy and a synopsis of the role of ultrasonography and color Doppler in evaluating the graft vascular haemodynamics both during surgery and post-operatively in accurately defining the early vascular complications. Intra-operative ultrasonography of the liver graft provides the surgeon with useful real-time diagnostic and staging information that may result in an alteration in the planned surgical approach and corrections of surgical complications during the procedure of vascular anastomoses. The relevant intra-operative anatomy and the spectrum of normal and abnormal findings are described. Ultrasonography and color Doppler also provides the clinicians and surgeons early post-operative potential developmental complications that may occur during hospital stay. Early detection and thus early problem solving can make the difference between graft survival and failure. PMID:27468207

  4. Doppler ultrasonography in living donor liver transplantation recipients: Intra- and post-operative vascular complications.

    PubMed

    Abdelaziz, Omar; Attia, Hussein

    2016-07-21

    Living-donor liver transplantation has provided a solution to the severe lack of cadaver grafts for the replacement of liver afflicted with end-stage cirrhosis, fulminant disease, or inborn errors of metabolism. Vascular complications remain the most serious complications and a common cause for graft failure after hepatic transplantation. Doppler ultrasound remains the primary radiological imaging modality for the diagnosis of such complications. This article presents a brief review of intra- and post-operative living donor liver transplantation anatomy and a synopsis of the role of ultrasonography and color Doppler in evaluating the graft vascular haemodynamics both during surgery and post-operatively in accurately defining the early vascular complications. Intra-operative ultrasonography of the liver graft provides the surgeon with useful real-time diagnostic and staging information that may result in an alteration in the planned surgical approach and corrections of surgical complications during the procedure of vascular anastomoses. The relevant intra-operative anatomy and the spectrum of normal and abnormal findings are described. Ultrasonography and color Doppler also provides the clinicians and surgeons early post-operative potential developmental complications that may occur during hospital stay. Early detection and thus early problem solving can make the difference between graft survival and failure. PMID:27468207

  5. Ocular Complications of Chloroquine Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tamler, Edward

    1965-01-01

    Long-term therapy with chloroquine can lead to irreversible retinal damage and serious loss of visual acuity and visual field. Not only are the retinal changes irreversible but they may continue to progress after discontinuance of the drug. Work is proceeding on the development of electrophysiological techniques for early detection of toxic effect before significant retinal damage occurs. Another possibility for minimizing the toxic effect of chloroquine is the use of other drugs which increase the excretion of chloroquine from the body. ImagesFigure 1. PMID:14336789

  6. Neurological complications in hyperemesis gravidarum.

    PubMed

    Zara, Gabriella; Codemo, Valentina; Palmieri, Arianna; Schiff, Sami; Cagnin, Annachiara; Citton, Valentina; Manara, Renzo

    2012-02-01

    Hyperemesis gravidarum can impair correct absorption of an adequate amount of thiamine and can cause electrolyte imbalance. This study investigated the neurological complications in a pregnant woman with hyperemesis gravidarum. A 29-year-old pregnant woman was admitted for hyperemesis gravidarum. Besides undernutrition, a neurological examination disclosed weakness with hyporeflexia, ophthalmoparesis, multidirectional nystagmus and optic disks swelling; the patient became rapidly comatose. Brain MRI showed symmetric signal hyperintensity and swelling of periaqueductal area, hypothalamus and mammillary bodies, medial and posterior portions of the thalamus and columns of fornix, consistent with Wernicke encephalopathy (WE). Neurophysiological studies revealed an axonal sensory-motor polyneuropathy, likely due to thiamine deficiency or critical illness polyneuropathy. Sodium and potassium supplementation and parenteral thiamine were administered with improvement of consciousness state in a few days. WE evolved in Korsakoff syndrome. A repeat MRI showed a marked improvement of WE-related alterations and a new hyperintense lesion in the pons, suggestive of central pontine myelinolysis. No sign or symptom due to involvement of the pons was present. PMID:21720901

  7. Cardiovascular complications of respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Chowdhuri, Susmita; Crook, Errol D; Taylor, Herman A; Badr, M Safwan

    2007-11-01

    A major burden of morbidity and mortality due to respiratory diseases can be directly related to the cardiovascular (CV) complications of these disorders. Evidence from cross-sectional and longitudinal studies link reduced lung function and cardiovascular diseases. However, the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are unclear. Hypoxia-induced increased sympathetic activity, blood viscosity, or inflammation, among other factors, may mediate the underlying pathogenesis. In addition, sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) has been implicated by association in multiple CV diseases including hypertension, ischemic heart disease, congestive heart failure, arrhythmias, and stroke. However, the exact contribution of SDB, including obstructive and central sleep apneas, to the development of cardiovascular diseases is not fully understood. In this context, the contribution of the new large, prospective, Jackson Heart Study could be significant in that it is designed to answer several of these questions, specifically in the African American population. This review examines the current evidence that links both reduced lung function and SDB to CV diseases. PMID:18004091

  8. Vascular Complications of Cancer Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Alan C; Touyz, Rhian M; Lang, Ninian N

    2016-07-01

    Development of new anticancer drugs has resulted in improved mortality rates and 5-year survival rates in patients with cancer. However, many of the modern chemotherapies are associated with cardiovascular toxicities that increase cardiovascular risk in cancer patients, including hypertension, thrombosis, heart failure, cardiomyopathy, and arrhythmias. These limitations restrict treatment options and might negatively affect the management of cancer. The cardiotoxic effects of older chemotherapeutic drugs such as alkylating agents, antimetabolites, and anticancer antibiotics have been known for a while. The newer agents, such as the antiangiogenic drugs that inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor signalling are also associated with cardiovascular pathology, especially hypertension, thromboembolism, myocardial infarction, and proteinuria. Exact mechanisms by which vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors cause these complications are unclear but impaired endothelial function, vascular and renal damage, oxidative stress, and thrombosis might be important. With increasing use of modern chemotherapies and prolonged survival of cancer patients, the incidence of cardiovascular disease in this patient population will continue to increase. Accordingly, careful assessment and management of cardiovascular risk factors in cancer patients by oncologists and cardiologists working together is essential for optimal care so that prolonged cancer survival is not at the expense of increased cardiovascular events. PMID:26968393

  9. [Arterial complications of hydatic disease].

    PubMed

    Mayoussi, C; El Mesnaoui, A; Lekehal, B; Sefiani, Y; Benosman, A; Bensaid, Y

    2002-04-01

    We report two cases of hydatic cyst with rupture into the aorta in two young patients cared for at the Ibn Sina hospital in Rabat, Morocco. In the first patient, a false hydatic aneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta was discovered at surgery performed for suspected hydatic cyst of the lower lobe of the left lung. Despite reconstruction with a prosthetic graft, the patient died peroperatively due to exsanguination via uncontrollable bleeding through the aneurysmal sac. The second case was a 20-year-old woman whose false hydatic aneurysm of the thoracoabdominal aorta was disclosed by embolic ischemia of the lower limbs. Aorto-aortic reconstruction was followed by medical treatment with albendazol. During follow-up, the patient developed a hydatic cyst of the kidney and a parietal cyst. Both were treated surgically. An analysis of these two cases and 9 others reported in the literature concerning arterial involvement in hydatic disease revealed the characteristic clinical, radiological and therapeutic features of this rare but serious complication. PMID:12015489

  10. [Postoperative hypoparathyroidism: risk of complications].

    PubMed

    Sawicki, A

    For assessing the risk of adverse complications of surgery the group of 130 patients with post-operational hypoparathyroidism was analysed. Surgical hypoparathyroidism has been diagnosed in 51% of operated on thyroid gland patients. Laryngeal nerves have been damaged in 46.6% of patients. The injury to laryngeal nerves has been irreversible in 2/3 of patients, and reversible in the remaining 1/3. Cataract, nephrolithiasis and vitamin D3 intoxication have been observed in some cases before surgery. Their incidence increased in severe surgical hypoparathyroidism. Osteoporosis of the spine has been diagnosed in 49% of patients including some with vertebral fractures. No correlation between the degree of spine osteoporosis and diagnosis before surgery, number of operations on thyroid gland, and type of therapy has been noted. The symptoms of hypercalcemia have been diagnosed in 5 patients out of which hypercalcemia has been transient in 2 patients, and lasted for 1-5 months in the remaining 3 patients. The results of 7,873 analyses of mineral metabolism have been assessed. Hypocalcemia has been found in 38.4%, hypercalcemia in 1.6%, hypomagnesemia in 25.7%, hyperphosphatemia in 41.5%, decreased alkaline phosphatase serum activity in 28.7%, and hypercalciuria in 22.4% of cases. Surgical hypoparathyroidism is frequently accompanied by surgical hypothyroidism and injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerves. PMID:1669168

  11. Cognitive Functioning in Complicated Grief

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Charles A.; Butters, Meryl; Zisook, Sidney; Simon, Naomi; Corey-Bloom, Jody; Lebowitz, Barry D.; Begley, Amy; Mauro, Christine; Shear, M. Katherine

    2014-01-01

    Complicated grief (CG) is increasingly recognized as a debilitating outcome of bereavement. Given the intensity of the stressor, its chronicity, and its association with depression, it is important to know the impact CG may have on cognitive functioning. This exploratory and descriptive study examined global and domain-specific cognitive functioning in a help-seeking sample of individuals with CG (n=335) compared to a separately ascertained control sample (n=250). Cognitive functioning was assessed using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). Controlling for age, sex and education effects, CG participants had lower total MoCA, visuospatial and attention scores relative to control participants. The two groups did not differ significantly in the domains of executive function, language, memory or orientation. Age, sex, and education accounted for much of the variance in MoCA scores, while CG severity and chronicity accounted for a very small percentage of MoCA score variance. Major depression was not a significant predictor of MoCA scores. This study is consistent with previous work demonstrating lower attention and global cognitive performance in individuals with CG compared to control participants. This study newly identifies the visuospatial domain as a target for future studies investigating cognitive functioning in CG. PMID:25088285

  12. Thermal stress and diabetic complications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsuka, Yoshinori; Yabunaka, Noriyuki; Watanabe, Ichiro; Noro, Hiroshi; Fujisawa, Hiroyuki; Agishi, Yuko

    1995-06-01

    Activities of erythrocyte aldose reductase were compared in 34 normal subjects, 45 diabetic patients, and nine young men following immersion in water at 25, 39, and 42° C. Mean basal enzyme activity was 1.11 (SEM 0.12) U/g Hb and 2.07 (SEM 0.14) U/g Hb in normal controls and diabetic patients, respectively ( P<0.0001). Activities of the enzyme showed a good correlation with hemaglobin A1 (HbA1) concentrations ( P<0.01) but not with fasting plasma glucose concentrations. After immersion at 42° C for 10 min, enzyme activity was increased by 37.6% ( P<0.01); however, the activity decreased by 52.2% ( P<0.005) after immersion for 10 min at 39° C and by 47.0% ( P<0.05) at 25° C. These changes suggest that heat stress might aggravate diabetic complications, and body exposure to hot environmental conditions is not recommended for diabetic patients.

  13. Maternal and fetal complications of the hypothyroidism-related pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Tudosa, Rodica; Vartej, P; Horhoianu, Irina; Ghica, C.; Mateescu, Stela; Dumitrache, I

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Thyroid pathology worsens during pregnancy. Hypothyroidism can be pre-existent or may begin during pregnancy period. Most of the patients who presented hypothyroidism during pregnancy have a history of thyroid disease for which they have undergone treatment (medical, surgical or radioisotopes). Hypothyroidism is difficult to be diagnosed during pregnancy as the signs can belong to pregnancy itself. Changes in thyroid function have a major negative impact on both mother and fetus. Complications that arise depend on the severity of hypothyroidism, on how appropriately and early the treatment will be initiated, on other obstetrical and extragenital pathologies associated with the present pregnancy. Clinical symptoms are polymorphic, often nonspecific, and are related mainly to the time of occurrence and to the severity of thyroid hormone deficiency. The appropriate, early administered treatment and maintenance of a normal level of thyroid hormones minimize the risk of maternal and fetal complications and make it possible that the pregnancy may be carried to term without severe complications. PMID:21977134

  14. Gastrointestinal complications of systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xin-Ping; Zhang, Xuan

    2013-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is an autoimmune disease characterized by progressive skin thickening and tightness. Pulmonary interstitial fibrosis and kidney damage are the most important indicators for mortality; however, the gastrointestinal tract is the most commonly damaged system. Virtually all parts of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract can be involved, although the esophagus is the most frequently reported. The mechanisms that cause such extensive damage are generally unclear, but vascular changes, immunological abnormalities, excessive accumulation of collagen in the submucosa, smooth muscle atrophy and neuropathy may participate because these are the most common histological findings in biopsies and autopsies. Most patients with GI tract involvement complain about dyspepsia, nausea, vomiting, abdominal bloating/distension, and fecal incontinence. These symptoms are generally mild during the early stage of the disease and are likely ignored by physicians. As the disease becomes more advanced, however, patient quality of life is markedly influenced, whereby malnutrition and shortened survival are the usual consequences. The diagnosis for systemic sclerosis is based on manometry measurements and an endoscopy examination. Supportive and symptomatic treatment is the main therapeutic strategy; however, an early diagnosis is critical for successful management. PMID:24222949

  15. Distal Femoral Complications Following Antegrade Intramedullary Nail Placement

    PubMed Central

    Fantry, Amanda J.; Elia, Gregory; Vopat, Bryan G.; Daniels, Alan H.

    2015-01-01

    While antegrade nailing for proximal and diaphyseal femur fractures is a commonly utilized fixation method with benefits including early mobilization and high rates of fracture union, both intraoperative and postoperative complications may occur. Intraoperative errors include leg length discrepancy, anterior cortical perforation, malreduction of the fracture, and neurovascular injury, and postoperative complications include nonunion, malunion, infection, and hardware failure. This case series reviews complications affecting the distal femur after intramedullary nailing including fracture surrounding a distal femoral interlocking screw (Case #1), nonunion after dynamization with nail penetration into the knee joint (Case #2), and anterior cortical perforation (Case #3). Prevention of intraoperative and postoperative complications surrounding intramedullary nailing requires careful study of the femoral anatomy and nail design specifications (radius of curvature), consideration of the necessity of distal interlocking screws, the need for close radiographic follow-up after nail placement with X-rays of the entire length of the nail, and awareness of possible nail penetration into the knee joint after dynamization. PMID:25874066

  16. Mediterranean spotted fever and hearing impairment: a rare complication.

    PubMed

    Rossio, Raffaella; Conalbi, Valeria; Castagna, Valentina; Recalcati, Sebastiano; Torri, Adriana; Coen, Massimo; Cassulini, Lucia Restano; Peyvandi, Flora

    2015-06-01

    Mediterranean spotted fever (MSF) is caused by Rickettsia conorii and transmitted by the brown dog tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus. It is prevalent in southern Europe, Africa and central Asia. The disease usually has a benign course and is characterized by fever, myalgia and a characteristic papular rash with an inoculation eschar ('tache noir') at the site of the tick bite. Severe forms of disease can have cardiac, neurologic or renal involvement. Nervous system complications are unusual and may develop in the early phase of disease or as a delayed complication. Neurological symptoms include headache and alterations of the level of consciousness, and some cases of meningoenchefalitis and Guillain-Barrè syndrome have been also reported. Peripheral nerve involvement is reported only in a limited number of case reports. We describe a case of Rickettsia conorii that was complicated with hearing loss and did not respond to specific treatment. Hearing loss is a rare event, but clinicians should be aware of this complication. PMID:25892247

  17. Alcohol abuse-related severe acute pancreatitis with rhabdomyolysis complications

    PubMed Central

    SU, MAO-SHENG; JIANG, YING; YAN, XIAO-YUAN HU; ZHAO, QING-HUA; LIU, ZHI-WEI; ZHANG, WEN-ZHI; HE, LEI

    2013-01-01

    Non-traumatic rhabdomyolysis is a rare complication of acute pancreatitis. One of the major risk factors of both acute pancreatitis and rhabdomyolysis is alcohol abuse. However, only a few studies have reported the prognosis and association of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and rhabdomyolysis in alcohol abuse patients. In the present study, we report two cases presenting with SAP complicated by rhabdomyolysis following high-dose alcohol intake. The disease onset, clinical manifestations, laboratory data, diagnosis and treatment procedure of each patient were recorded, and the association with rhabdomyolysis was analyzed. Alcohol consumption was the most predominant cause of SAP and rhabdomyolysis in these patients. SAP-related rhabdomyolysis was primarily induced by the toxicity associated with pancreatic necrosis. The laboratory tests revealed that the concentration of serum creatine kinase (CK) and myoglobin increased and acute renal failure symptoms were present, which provided an exact diagnosis for SAP-induced rhabdomyolysis. Rhabdomyolysis and subsequent hypermyoglobinuria severely impaired kidney function and aggravated hypocalcemia. The therapy of early stage SAP complicated by rhabdomyolysis involved liquid resuscitation support. When first stage treatment fails, blood purification should be performed immediately. Both patients developed multiple organ failure (MOF) and succumbed to the disease. Considering the two cases presented, we conclude that alcohol-related SAP complicated by rhabdomyolysis may have a poor clinical prognosis. PMID:23251265

  18. The gastrointestinal manifestations and complications of malignant lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Sherlock, P

    1980-07-01

    Malignant lymphoma involves the gastrointestinal tract as a primary or secondary in the course of disseminated lymphoma. Although primary lymphoma has received the most attention in the literature, secondary lymphoma of the gastrointestinal tract is much more common. The gastrointestinal manifestations and complications are a common problem and there is a lack of information as to diagnosis, management and prognosis. Intensive application of currently-available diagnostic techniques including radiology, cytology, endoscopy, biopsy and gastric secretory studies should be pursued for the evaluation of patients with lymphoma. The management of the multiple gastrointestinal complications such as monilial esophagitis, hemorrhagic gastritis, stress erosions, intestinal perforation, diarrhea, malabsorption and radiation damage that may then affect the gastrointestinal tract in the course of malignant lymphoma or its treatment requires very careful supportive management. Each modality of tretment for lymphoma may be associated with a variety of complications which compromise the structure and function of the gastrointestinal tract and which may be at times more devastating than the underlying neoplasm. Early recognition and active treatment of these complications is vital. PMID:6999613

  19. Complications of fast neutron therapy.

    PubMed

    Cohen, L

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify the tissues and organs at risk following high-energy neutron-beam therapy for selected radioresistant tumors, estimating the separate probabilities of both normal tissue injury and of tumor recurrence, each in relation to the absorbed dose. Published statistical and anecdotal reports on the incidence of serious complications observed following fast neutron treatment directed to the cranium, head and neck, chest, upper abdomen, pelvis, and extremities are reviewed and dose-response parameters derived using bivariate probit or logistic analyses. We then calculate the conditional probability of uncomplicated control (PUC) at various doses, assuming that tumor cure and late injury are stochastically independent events. The median effective doses and coefficients of variation, derived for neutron irradiation of human brain and spinal cord, oropharynx, lung, stomach and bowel, rectum and bladder, and extremities, are tabulated and tentative "tolerance limits" estimated. Tolerance doses are shown to depend on several factors including beam quality, chemical composition, cell cycling rate, fraction-size, and follow-up time. In patients followed over 5 years, safe tolerance doses appear to range from < 14 GY for the central nervous system up to 22 GY in the oropharynx and mandible. Given well-determined dose-response data for specific normal tissues and the associated tumors, the separate probabilities of tumor control and of normal tissue injury at a given dose can be estimated. The particular treatment scheme yielding the highest PUC can usually be identified. The maximum PUC for neutron therapy, compared with other modalities, is a measure of both efficacy and safety for the procedure under study and thus provides a useful guide for comparing various modalities and treatment plans and for designing more effective treatment strategies. PMID:9670290

  20. Fournier's gangrene complicating ulcerative pancolitis.

    PubMed

    Katsanos, Konstantinos H; Ignatiadou, Eleftheria; Sarandi, Maria; Godevenos, Dimitrios; Asproudis, Ioannis; Fatouros, Michael; Tsianos, Epameinondas V

    2010-06-01

    Fournier gangrene is a very rare and a rapidly progressing, polymicrobial necrotizing faciitis or myonecrosis of the perineal, perianal and genital regions, with a high mortality rate. Infection is associated with superficial traum, urological and colorectal diseases and operations. The most commonly found bacteria are Escherichia coli followed by Bacteroides and streptococcal species. Diabetes mellitus, alcoholism, and immunosuppression are perpetuating co-factors. Fournier's gangrene complicating inflammatory bowel disease has been reported in three patients so far, two with Crohn's disease. A 78-year-old man diagnosed with ulcerative pancolitis was referred for fever, and painful perianal and scrotal swelling after perianal surgery for a horseshoe-type perianal abscess. Since bowel disease diagnosis, patient was on mesalazine and achieved long-term remission. Perianal abscess occurred suddenly one week before perianal surgery without any evidence of pre-existing fistula or other abnormalities. Physical examination showed extensive edema and crepitus of perineum and genitalia and patient had symptoms of significant toxicity. The diagnosis of Fournier's gangrene was made and patient underwent emergency surgery with extensive surgical debridement of the scrotal and perianal area and Hartman procedure with a diverting colostomy. In addition, patient started on therapy with mesalazine 3gr, methylprednisolone 16 mg, parenteral nutrition and broad spectrum of antibiotics. Two days after the first operation the patient needed a second operation for perianal debridement. On the fourth day, blood cultures showed E. coli. Patient had an uneventful recovery and was discharged after 34 days of hospitalization. On follow up, disease review is scheduled and colostomy closure is planned. PMID:21122507

  1. Frequent Hemodialysis Fistula Infectious Complications

    PubMed Central

    Lok, Charmaine E.; Sontrop, Jessica M.; Faratro, Rose; Chan, Christopher T.; Zimmerman, Deborah Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Background Few studies have examined if infectious arteriovenous access complications vary with the cannulation technique and whether this is modified by dialysis frequency. We compared the infection rate between fistulas cannulated using buttonhole versus stepladder techniques for patients treated with short daily (SDH) or nocturnal hemodialysis at home (NHD). We also compared patients receiving conventional intermittent hemodialysis (CIHD) using stepladder cannulation. Methods Data were prospectively collected from 631 patients dialyzed with a fistula from 2001 to 2010 (Toronto and Ottawa, Canada). We compared the person-time incidence rate of bacteremia and local fistula infections using the exact binomial test. Results Forty-six (7.3%) patients received SDH (≥5 sessions/week, 2-4 h/session), 128 (20.3%) NHD (≥4 sessions/week, ≥5 h/session) and 457 (72%) CIHD (3 sessions/week, ≤4 h/session). Fifty percent of SDH and 72% of NHD patients used the buttonhole technique. There were 39 buttonhole-related bacteremias (rate: 0.196/1,000 fistula days) and at least 2 local buttonhole site infections. Staphylococcus aureus accounted for 85% of the bacteremias. There were 5 (13%) infection-related hospitalizations and 3 (10%) serious metastatic infections, including fistula loss. In comparison, there was 1 possible fistula-related infection in CIHD during follow-up (rate: 0.002/1,000 fistula days). Conclusions The rate of buttonhole-related infections was high among patients on frequent hemodialysis and more than 50 times greater than that among patients on CIHD with the stepladder technique. Most bacteremias were due to S. aureus – with serious consequences. The risks and benefits of buttonhole cannulation require individual consideration with careful monitoring, prophylaxis and management. PMID:25473405

  2. Intraoperative laparoscopic complications for urological cancer procedures

    PubMed Central

    Montes, Sergio Fernández-Pello; Rodríguez, Ivan Gonzalez; Ugarteburu, Rodrigo Gil; Villamil, Luis Rodríguez; Mendez, Begoña Diaz; Gil, Patricio Suarez; Madera, Javier Mosquera

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To structure the rate of intraoperative complications that requires an intraoperative or perioperative resolution. METHODS: We perform a literature review of Medline database. The research was focused on intraoperative laparoscopic procedures inside the field of urological oncology. General rate of perioperative complications in laparoscopic urologic surgery is described to be around 12.4%. Most of the manuscripts published do not make differences between pure intraoperative, intraoperative with postoperative consequences and postoperative complications. RESULTS: We expose a narrative statement of complications, possible solutions and possible preventions for most frequent retroperitoneal and pelvic laparoscopic surgery. We expose the results with the following order: retroperitoneal laparoscopic surgery (radical nephrectomy, partial nephrectomy, nephroureterectomy and adrenalectomy) and pelvic laparoscopic surgery (radical prostatectomy and radical cystectomy). CONCLUSION: Intraoperative complications vary from different series. More scheduled reports should be done in order to better understand the real rates of complications. PMID:25984519

  3. [Ablation of supraventricular tachycardias : Complications and emergencies].

    PubMed

    Sawan, N; Eitel, C; Thiele, H; Tilz, R

    2016-06-01

    Catheter ablation is an established treatment of supraventricular tachycardias (SVT) with high success rates of > 95 %. Complication rates range from 3 to 5 %, with serious complications occurring in about 0.8 %. There are general complications caused either by the vascular access or the catheters (e. g. hematomas, hemo-pneumothorax, embolism, thrombosis and aspiration) und specific ablation related complications (e. g. AV block during ablation of the slow pathway). The complication risk is elevated in elderly and multimorbid patients. Furthermore, the experience of the treating physician and the respective team plays an essential role. The purpose of this article is to give an overview on incidences, causes and management as well as prevention strategies of complications associated with catheter ablation of SVT. PMID:27206630

  4. The function of heparanase in diabetes and its complications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Wan, Andrea; Rodrigues, Brian

    2013-10-01

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans are ubiquitous glycoproteins that contain several heparan sulfate polysaccharide side chains attached to a core protein. They function not only as a primary structural component of the extracellular matrix, but also provide a storage depot for bioactive molecules, such as basic fibroblast growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor and lipoprotein lipase. Heparanase is an endoglycosidase that specifically hydrolyzes heparan sulfate into oligosaccharides. Recent studies have indicated that heparanase is engaged in the initiation and progression of diabetes, in addition to its associated complications. This review focuses on the participation of heparanase in the cleavage of heparan sulfate proteoglycans in pancreatic islets promoting beta cell death, promotion of atherosclerosis, and its role in cardiac metabolic switching in the early stage of cardiomyopathy during diabetes. Understanding the mechanisms by which heparanase is regulated in diabetes could provide a drug target to prevent diabetes and its complications. PMID:24500561

  5. Chronic complications of diabetes mellitus related to the respiratory system.

    PubMed

    Vojtková, Jarmila; Ciljaková, Miriam; Michnová, Zuzana; Turčan, Tomá

    2012-01-01

    The quality of life in patients with diabetes mellitus is mainly determined by chronic diabetic complications which may affect all organ tissues including respiratory system. Microangiopathy of pulmonary capillaries, autonomic neuropathy, myopathy of respiratory muscles or changes in collagen belong to supposed pathophysiological pathways. This paper brings brief review about reported functional consequences in subjects with diabetes - decreased vital lung capacity and pulmonary volumes, decreased diffuse lung capacity for carbon monoxide, lower basal bronchial tone, lower cough reflex sensitivity, increased incidence of sleep obstructive apnea, increase in respiratory infections, disorders in respiratory muscles or phrenical nerve. Examination of pulmonary functions may serve for early detection of chronic complications in patients with diabetes. PMID:23146790

  6. Respiratory complications of the rheumatological diseases in childhood.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Anne E; Warrier, Kishore; Vyas, H

    2016-08-01

    Pleuropulmonary manifestations of rheumatological diseases are rare in children but pose a significant risk to overall morbidity and mortality. We have reviewed the literature to provide an overview of the respiratory complications of the commonest rheumatological diseases to occur in children (juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, juvenile dermatomyositis, mixed connective tissue disease, granulomatosis with polyangitis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis). Pulmonary function testing in these patients can be used to refine the differential diagnosis and establish disease severity, but also has a role in ongoing monitoring for respiratory complications. Early detection of pulmonary involvement allows for prompt and targeted therapies to achieve the best outcome for the child. This is best achieved with joint specialist paediatric rheumatology and respiratory reviews in a multidisciplinary setting. PMID:26768831

  7. Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Indications, Outcomes, and Complications.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Brian; Kim, David Hanwuk

    2016-02-01

    Lateral lumbar interbody fusion is a minimally invasive spinal fusion technique that uses the retroperitoneal approach to the anterior spinal column. Mechanical and technical results of the technique compare favorably with those of anterior lumbar interbody fusion in regard to large graft placement, graft volumes, and early initial stability. Lateral lumbar interbody fusion uses the transpsoas approach and traverses near the lumbar plexus. It is not, however, without its unique complications. Groin pain or numbness is well tolerated and often temporary; however, quadriceps palsy can be long-lasting and debilitating. Rarer but serious complications include vascular and visceral injury. Lateral lumbar interbody fusion has been used successfully to treat common degenerative spinal conditions such as spinal instability, stenosis, scoliosis, and degenerative disk disease. While understanding of the lumbar plexus and the technical challenges of the procedure improves, lateral lumbar interbody fusion will continue to provide safe and successful clinical outcomes with less morbidity than traditional procedures. PMID:26803545

  8. The Pott's puffy tumor: a dangerous sign for intracranial complications.

    PubMed

    Ketenci, Ibrahim; Unlü, Yaşar; Tucer, Bülent; Vural, Alperen

    2011-12-01

    The Pott's puffy tumor is a subperiosteal abscess of the frontal bone associated with osteomyelitis. The purpose of this article is to alert the physician to the severe complications of this entity. The records of six patients were reviewed retrospectively. There were four adults and two adolescents. Nasal endoscopy showed edematous, polypoid mucosa in middle meatus in three and nasal polyps in the rest. At initial admission, two had orbital subperiosteal abscess, but normal cranial CT findings. During hospitalization, three experienced frontal lobe abscess and one frontal cerebritis. Endoscopic sinus surgery was performed in all with external drainage of Pott's puffy tumor in addition to antibiotherapy. Three patients underwent craniotomy/craniectomy for removal of frontal lobe abscesses. One patient with frontal lobe abscess died. Pott's puffy tumor may result in potentially dangerous intracranial complications. Early diagnosis and treatment are essential to reduce morbidity and mortality. PMID:21660452

  9. Periorbital Injectables: Understanding and Avoiding Complications

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Catherine J

    2016-01-01

    Periorbital rejuvenation with neurotoxins and dermal fillers address several aging changes. Safe and effective results require a thorough understanding of periorbital anatomy, proper injection techniques, and complications of these products. Prompt recognition and treatment of complications can minimize their adverse impacts. Complications can be divided into ischaemic and non-ischaemic effects. Hylauronidase, an enzyme that degrades hyaluronic acid, may improve outcomes after intravascular hyaluronic acid fillers. PMID:27398006

  10. Management of biliary complications after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Memeo, Riccardo; Piardi, Tullio; Sangiuolo, Federico; Sommacale, Daniele; Pessaux, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Biliary complications (BC) currently represent a major source of morbidity after liver transplantation. Although refinements in surgical technique and medical therapy have had a positive influence on the reduction of postoperative morbidity, BC affect 5% to 25% of transplanted patients. Bile leak and anastomotic strictures represent the most common complications. Nowadays, a multidisciplinary approach is required to manage such complications in order to prevent liver failure and retransplantation. PMID:26689137

  11. A rare complication of tracheal intubation.

    PubMed

    Shukeri, Wan Fadzlina Wan Muhd; Hassan, Wan Mohd Nazaruddin Wan; Nadarajan, Chandran

    2016-05-01

    Accidental endobronchial intubation is a frequent complication in critically ill patients requiring tracheal intubation (TI). If such complication occurs, it is more often the right main bronchus that is intubated due to anatomical reasons. Left main bronchus (LMB) intubation is rare. Here, we report a case with auscultatory, bronchoscopic, and radiographic evidence of accidental LMB intubation in a pregnant woman with dengue shock syndrome. We highlight this case to increase awareness about this possible-but-rare complication of TI. PMID:27275080

  12. A rare complication of tracheal intubation

    PubMed Central

    Shukeri, Wan Fadzlina Wan Muhd; Hassan, Wan Mohd Nazaruddin Wan; Nadarajan, Chandran

    2016-01-01

    Accidental endobronchial intubation is a frequent complication in critically ill patients requiring tracheal intubation (TI). If such complication occurs, it is more often the right main bronchus that is intubated due to anatomical reasons. Left main bronchus (LMB) intubation is rare. Here, we report a case with auscultatory, bronchoscopic, and radiographic evidence of accidental LMB intubation in a pregnant woman with dengue shock syndrome. We highlight this case to increase awareness about this possible-but-rare complication of TI. PMID:27275080

  13. Periorbital Injectables: Understanding and Avoiding Complications.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Catherine J

    2016-01-01

    Periorbital rejuvenation with neurotoxins and dermal fillers address several aging changes. Safe and effective results require a thorough understanding of periorbital anatomy, proper injection techniques, and complications of these products. Prompt recognition and treatment of complications can minimize their adverse impacts. Complications can be divided into ischaemic and non-ischaemic effects. Hylauronidase, an enzyme that degrades hyaluronic acid, may improve outcomes after intravascular hyaluronic acid fillers. PMID:27398006

  14. [Respiratory complications after oesophagectomy for cancer].

    PubMed

    D'journo, X-B; Michelet, P; Avaro, J-P; Trousse, D; Giudicelli, R; Fuentes, P; Doddoli, C; Thomas, P

    2008-06-01

    Surgery is the cornerstone of treatment for resectable tumours of the oesophagus. Recent advances of surgical techniques and anaesthesiology have led to a substantial decrease in mortality and morbidity. Respiratory complications affect about 30% of patients after oesophagectomy and 80% of these complications occur within the first five days. Respiratory complications include sputum retention, pneumonia and ARDS. They are the major cause of morbidity and mortality after oesophageal resection and numerous studies have identified the factors associated with these complications. The mechanisms are not very different from those observed after pulmonary resection. Nevertheless, there is an important lack of definition, and evaluation of the incidence is particularly difficult. Furthermore, respiratory complications are related to many factors. Careful medical history, physical examination and pulmonary function testing help to identify the risk factors and provide strategies to reduce the risk of pulmonary complications. Standardized postoperative management and a better understanding of the pathogenesis of pulmonary complications are necessary to reduce hospital mortality. This article discusses preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors affecting respiratory complications and strategies to reduce the incidence of these complications after oesophagectomy. PMID:18772826

  15. Video-assisted thoracic surgery complications

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Józef

    2014-01-01

    Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is a miniinvasive technique commonly applied worldwide. Indications for VATS are very broad and include the diagnosis of mediastinal, lung and pleural diseases, as well as large resection procedures such as pneumonectomy. The most frequent complication is prolonged postoperative air leak. The other significant complications are bleeding, infections, postoperative pain and recurrence at the port site. Different complications of VATS procedures can occur with variable frequency in various diseases. Despite the large number of their types, such complications are rare and can be avoided through the proper selection of patients and an appropriate surgical technique. PMID:25561984

  16. Massive hiatus hernia complicated by jaundice

    PubMed Central

    Furtado, Ruelan V.; D'Netto, Trevor J.; Hook, Henry C.; Falk, Gregory L.; Vivian, SarahJayne

    2015-01-01

    Giant para-oesophageal hernia may include pancreas with pancreatic complication and rarely jaundice. Repair is feasible and durable by laparoscopy. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography is diagnostic. PMID:26246452

  17. Management of Complications of Distal Radius Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kevin C.; Mathews, Alexandra L.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Treating a fracture of the distal radius may require the surgeon to make a difficult decision between surgical treatment and nonsurgical management. The use of surgical fixation has recently increased owing to complications associated with conservative treatment. However, conservative action may be necessary depending on certain patient factors. The treating surgeon must be aware of the possible complications associated with distal radius fracture treatments to prevent their occurrence. Prevention can be achieved with a proper understanding of the mechanism of these complications. This article discusses the most recent evidence on how to manage and prevent complications following a fracture of the distal radius. PMID:25934197

  18. Discovering Diabetes Complications: an Ontology Based Model

    PubMed Central

    Daghistani, Tahani; Shammari, Riyad Al; Razzak, Muhammad Imran

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetes is a serious disease that spread in the world dramatically. The diabetes patient has an average of risk to experience complications. Take advantage of recorded information to build ontology as information technology solution will help to predict patients who have average of risk level with certain complication. It is helpful to search and present patient’s history regarding different risk factors. Discovering diabetes complications could be useful to prevent or delay the complications. Method: We designed ontology based model, using adult diabetes patients’ data, to discover the rules of diabetes with its complications in disease to disease relationship. Result: Various rules between different risk factors of diabetes Patients and certain complications generated. Furthermore, new complications (diseases) might be discovered as new finding of this study, discovering diabetes complications could be useful to prevent or delay the complications. Conclusion: The system can identify the patients who are suffering from certain risk factors such as high body mass index (obesity) and starting controlling and maintaining plan. PMID:26862251

  19. Common neurologic complications of HIV-1 infection and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Newton, H B

    1995-02-01

    Complications of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome may involve any level of the central or peripheral nervous system. Acute encephalitis, aseptic meningitis and acute demyelinating polyneuropathy may occur early in the course of HIV infection, while dementia, central nervous system-related cancer, opportunistic infections and autonomic neuropathy typically present later. Headache and mental status changes are common early manifestations of central nervous system involvement. Most severe headaches are related to an identifiable cause, including a mass lesion, opportunistic cerebral infection and medication side effect. Memory deficits, concentration difficulties and abnormalities on mental status testing may represent early AIDS dementia complex (HIV encephalopathy), the most common neurologic complication. In patients with AIDs, the differential diagnosis of cerebral mass lesions on computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging includes cerebral toxoplasmosis, tuberculous or fungal abscess, focal viral encephalitis, metastatic resonance imaging includes cerebral toxoplasmosis, tuberculous or fungal abscess, focal viral encephalitis, metastatic Kaposi's sarcoma and primary CNS lymphoma. Peripheral neuromuscular disease, including distal symmetric polyneuropathy, autonomic neuropathy, and HIV and chronic zidovudine myopathy, affects 15 to 40 percent of all persons with HIV infection or AIDS. PMID:7840035

  20. Pulmonary Hypertension Complicating Fibrosing Mediastinitis

    PubMed Central

    Seferian, Andrei; Steriade, Alexandru; Jaïs, Xavier; Planché, Olivier; Savale, Laurent; Parent, Florence; Amar, David; Jovan, Roland; Fadel, Elie; Sitbon, Olivier; Simonneau, Gérald; Humbert, Marc; Montani, David

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Fibrosing mediastinitis is caused by a proliferation of fibrous tissue in the mediastinum with encasement of mediastinal viscera and compression of mediastinal bronchovascular structures. Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a severe complication of fibrosing mediastinitis caused by extrinsic compression of the pulmonary arteries and/or veins. We have conducted a retrospective observational study reviewing clinical, functional, hemodynamic, radiological characteristics, and outcome of 27 consecutive cases of PH associated with fibrosing mediastinitis diagnosed between 2003 and 2014 at the French Referral Centre for PH. Fourteen men and 13 women with a median age of 60 years (range 18–84) had PH confirmed on right heart catheterization. The causes of fibrosing mediastinitis were sarcoidosis (n = 13), tuberculosis-infection confirmed or suspected (n = 9), mediastinal irradiation (n = 2), and idiopathic (n = 3). Sixteen patients (59%) were in NYHA functional class III and IV. Right heart catheterization confirmed moderate to severe PH with a median mean pulmonary artery pressure of 42 mm Hg (range 27–90) and a median cardiac index of 2.8 L/min/m2 (range 1.6–4.3). Precapillary PH was found in 22 patients, postcapillary PH in 2, and combined postcapillary and precapillary PH in 3. Severe extrinsic compression of pulmonary arteries (>60% reduction in diameter) was evidenced in 2, 8, and 12 patients at the main, lobar, or segmental levels, respectively. Fourteen patients had at least one severe pulmonary venous compression with associated pleural effusion in 6 of them. PAH therapy was initiated in 7 patients and corticosteroid therapy (0.5–1 mg/kg/day) was initiated in 3 patients with sarcoidosis, with 9 other being already on low-dose corticosteroids. At 1-year follow-up, 3 patients had died and among the 21 patients evaluated, 3 deteriorated, 14 were stable, and only 4 patients with sarcoidosis improved (4 receiving corticosteroids and 1

  1. The Use of Delta Neutrophil Index and Myeloperoxidase Index for Predicting Acute Complicated Appendicitis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Oh Hyun; Cha, Yong Sung; Hwang, Sung Oh; Jang, Ji Young; Choi, Eun Hee; Kim, Hyung Il; Cha, KyoungChul; Kim, Hyun; Lee, Kang Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Background In children with acute appendicitis, 30% to 75% present with a complication, such as perforation, and the early diagnosis of complications is known to improve outcomes. Serum delta neutrophil index (DNI) and myeloperoxidase index (MPXI) are new inflammatory markers, and thus, in the present study, the authors evaluated the predictive values of these two markers for the presence of a complication in children with acute appendicitis. Methods This retrospective observational study was conducted on 105 consecutive children (<12 years old) with acute appendicitis treated over a 31-month period. DNI, MPXI, C-reactive protein (CRP), and white blood cells (WBCs) were measured in an emergency department and investigated with respect to their abilities to predict the presence of acute complicated appendicitis. Results Twenty-nine of the 105 patients (median age, 9 years) were allocated to the complicated group (27.6%) and 76 to the non-complicated group (72.4%). Median serum DNI and CRP were significantly higher in the complicated group [0% vs. 2.2%, p<0.001 and 0.65 mg/dL vs. 8.0 mg/dL, p<0.001], but median MPXI was not (p = 0.316). Area under curve (AUC) for the ability of serum DNI and CRP to predict the presence of acute complicated appendicitis were 0.738 and 0.840, respectively. Multiple logistic regression analyses showed initial CRP [odds ratio 1.301, 95% confidence interval (1.092–1.549), p = 0.003] significantly predicted the presence of a complication. The optimal cutoff for serum CRP was 4.0 mg/dL (sensitivity 69%, specificity 83%, AUC 0.840). Conclusions Although serum DNI values were significantly higher in children with acute complicated appendicitis, no evidence was obtained to support the notion that serum DNI or serum MPXI aid the differentiation of acute complicated and non-complicated appendicitis in the ED setting. PMID:26859663

  2. Acute acalculous cholecystitis: a rare complication of snake bite.

    PubMed

    Senthilkumaran, Subramanian; Menezes, Ritesh G; Pant, Sadip; Thirumalaikolundusubramanian, Ponniah

    2013-09-01

    Snake bite is an environmental and occupational hazard in many tropical and subtropical countries. It demands a high level of knowledge and skill in managing the envenomation syndrome. Herein, we describe a rare case of acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC) that developed in a 36-year-old man after an Indian cobra (Naja naja) bite in the absence of any other predisposing factors for AAC. The probable mechanisms for the occurrence of AAC have been highlighted. Recognizing the possibility of such a complication after envenomation will definitely aid in early diagnosis and, subsequently, a better outcome. PMID:23473791

  3. Melioidosis mycotic aneurysm: An uncommon complication of an uncommon disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Philip H.; Chau, Chi Hung; Wong, Poon Chuen

    2014-01-01

    Melioidosis is often considered an exotic and uncommon disease in most parts of the world. However it is an endemic disease in Southeast Asia and Northern Australia with an expanding distribution. Melioidosis can involve almost any organ and can deteriorate rapidly. In this report, we describe a rapidly fatal case of a mycotic aneurysm associated with melioidosis despite aggressive antibiotic therapy. The morbidity and mortality of this uncommon complication remains high despite prompt diagnosis and treatment. Especially when treating persistent/recurrent melioidosis, the physician's caution to the development of mycotic aneurysms is imperative so that early treatment and surgical intervention may be considered. PMID:26029577

  4. Gastrointestinal Complications in Patients Who Undergo Radical Cystectomy with Enhanced Recovery Protocol.

    PubMed

    Djaladat, Hooman; Daneshmand, Siamak

    2016-07-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) complications are among the most common complications following radical cystectomy and urinary diversion. The most common is postoperative ileus, although its precise pathophysiology is not completely understood. Enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) protocols include evidence-based steps to optimize postoperative recovery and shorten hospital stay, mainly through expedited GI function recovery. They include avoiding bowel preparation and postoperative nasogastric tube, early feeding, non-narcotic pain management, and the use of cholinergic and mu-receptor opioid antagonists. We reviewed the literature in regard to GI complications using enhanced recovery protocols and share our institutional experience with over 300 patients. PMID:27125653

  5. Endometriosis-associated Maternal Pregnancy Complications – Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Petresin, J.; Wolf, J.; Emir, S.; Müller, A.; Boosz, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of endometriosis is increasing. Particularly during pregnancy and labour, clinicians should be alert to possible endometriosis-associated complications or complications of previous endometriosis treatment, despite a low relative risk. In addition to an increased rate of early miscarriage, complications such as spontaneous bowel perforation, rupture of ovarian cysts, uterine rupture and intraabdominal bleeding from decidualised endometriosis lesions or previous surgery are described in the literature. Unfavourable neonatal outcomes have also been discussed. We report on an irreducible ovarian torsion in the 16th week of pregnancy following extensive endometriosis surgery, and an intraabdominal haemorrhage due to endometriosis of the bowel in the 29th week of pregnancy. PMID:27570252

  6. A very unusual complication of amniocentesis

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Munawar; Hill, Michael; Kelly, David; Tubbs, R Shane; Loukas, Marios

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message The uses of amniocentesis are numerous, including determination of chromosomal abnormalities, lung maturity, and infections. A common complication of amniocentesis is loss of the pregnancy, but rare complications should be considered. The role of patient history and clinical observation of uncommon presentations are critical in the management of the patient. PMID:26185625

  7. Necrotizing fasciitis: a rare complication of appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Mazza, J F; Augenstein, J S; Kreis, D J

    1987-09-01

    The mortality of acute appendicitis increases sixfold if perforation occurs. We have reported a case of perforated appendix complicated by necrotizing fasciitis of the abdominal wall and retroperitoneum. We believe this complication has not been previously described in the English literature. PMID:2957793

  8. Tube Thoracostomy: Complications and Its Management

    PubMed Central

    Kesieme, Emeka B.; Dongo, Andrew; Ezemba, Ndubueze; Irekpita, Eshiobo; Jebbin, Nze; Kesieme, Chinenye

    2012-01-01

    Background. Tube thoracostomy is widely used throughout the medical, surgical, and critical care specialities. It is generally used to drain pleural collections either as elective or emergency. Complications resulting from tube thoracostomy can occasionally be life threatening. Aim. To present an update on the complications and management of complications of tube thoracostomy. Methods. A review of the publications obtained from Medline search, medical libraries, and Google on tube thoracostomy and its complications was done. Results. Tube thoracostomy is a common surgical procedure which can be performed by either the blunt dissection technique or the trocar technique. Complication rates are increased by the trocar technique. These complications have been broadly classified as either technical or infective. Technical causes include tube malposition, blocked drain, chest drain dislodgement, reexpansion pulmonary edema, subcutaneous emphysema, nerve injuries, cardiac and vascular injuries, oesophageal injuries, residual/postextubation pneumothorax, fistulae, tumor recurrence at insertion site, herniation through the site of thoracostomy, chylothorax, and cardiac dysrhythmias. Infective complications include empyema and surgical site infection. Conclusion. Tube thoracostomy, though commonly performed is not without risk. Blunt dissection technique has lower risk of complications and is hence recommended. PMID:22028963

  9. Tube thoracostomy: complications and its management.

    PubMed

    Kesieme, Emeka B; Dongo, Andrew; Ezemba, Ndubueze; Irekpita, Eshiobo; Jebbin, Nze; Kesieme, Chinenye

    2012-01-01

    Background. Tube thoracostomy is widely used throughout the medical, surgical, and critical care specialities. It is generally used to drain pleural collections either as elective or emergency. Complications resulting from tube thoracostomy can occasionally be life threatening. Aim. To present an update on the complications and management of complications of tube thoracostomy. Methods. A review of the publications obtained from Medline search, medical libraries, and Google on tube thoracostomy and its complications was done. Results. Tube thoracostomy is a common surgical procedure which can be performed by either the blunt dissection technique or the trocar technique. Complication rates are increased by the trocar technique. These complications have been broadly classified as either technical or infective. Technical causes include tube malposition, blocked drain, chest drain dislodgement, reexpansion pulmonary edema, subcutaneous emphysema, nerve injuries, cardiac and vascular injuries, oesophageal injuries, residual/postextubation pneumothorax, fistulae, tumor recurrence at insertion site, herniation through the site of thoracostomy, chylothorax, and cardiac dysrhythmias. Infective complications include empyema and surgical site infection. Conclusion. Tube thoracostomy, though commonly performed is not without risk. Blunt dissection technique has lower risk of complications and is hence recommended. PMID:22028963

  10. [Complications in the therapy of spontaneous pneumothorax].

    PubMed

    Eggeling, S

    2015-05-01

    The therapy of spontaneous pneumothorax is a common necessity in hospitals of all care hierarchies In addition to sufficient primary treatment by placement of a thorax drainage, knowledge of complicationg constellations, recognition of complications and irregular courses during the therapy of spontaneous pneumothorax are of fundamental importance for achieving a satisfactory treatment outcome. Furthermore, the enlightenment of patients regarding the pathogenesis of the disease, possible measures for influencing the recurrence rate and information about future behavioral and lifestyle modifications are important. The principal complications during hospital treatment can be subdivided into complications of the surgical placement of the thorax drain and relief of the pleural cavity, problems in the management of treatment of the pleural negative pressure, the possibly demanding management of a persisting air leak and the individualized decision-making with respect to an interventional or operative procedure. The most common complicating constellations and possible complications during the inpatient hospital stay are described, the. PMID:25995086

  11. Complications of surgery for radiotherapy skin damage

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph, R.

    1982-08-01

    Complications of modern surgery for radiotherapy skin damage reviewed in 28 patients who had 42 operations. Thin split-thickness skin grafts for ulcer treatment had a 100 percent complication rate, defined as the need for further surgery. Local flaps, whether delayed or not, also had a high rate of complications. Myocutaneous flaps for ulcers had a 43 percent complication rate, with viable flaps lifting off radiated wound beds. Only myocutaneous flaps for breast reconstruction and omental flaps with skin grafts and Marlex mesh had no complications. The deeper tissue penetration of modern radiotherapy techniques may make skin grafts and flaps less useful. In reconstruction of radiation ulcers, omental flaps and myocutaneous flaps are especially useful, particularly if the radiation damage can be fully excised. The pull of gravity appears detrimental to myocutaneous flap healing and, if possible, should be avoided by flap design.

  12. Complications of immobilization and bed rest. Part 1: Musculoskeletal and cardiovascular complications.

    PubMed Central

    Dittmer, D. K.; Teasell, R.

    1993-01-01

    Prolonged bed rest and immobilization inevitably lead to complications. Such complications are much easier to prevent than to treat. Musculoskeletal complications include loss of muscle strength and endurance, contractures and soft tissue changes, disuse osteoporosis, and degenerative joint disease. Cardiovascular complications include an increased heart rate, decreased cardiac reserve, orthostatic hypotension, and venous thromboembolism. Images Figures 1-2 Figures 3-4 PMID:8324411

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging features of complications following hip replacement: A pictorial review

    PubMed Central

    Pilania, Khushboo; Jankharia, Bhavin

    2016-01-01

    Hip replacement surgery helps millions of people worldwide walk painlessly each year. With increasing life spans and decreased clinical threshold for surgery, this number will continue to rise. With the increase in the number of surgeries and the longevity of implants, the need for early and prompt diagnosis of complications is also rising. This essay underlines the fact that magnetic resonance imaging on a 1.5T scanner with specialized metal artefact reduction sequences is a viable technique to image the post-arthroplasty hip and has vast potential in the prompt and early diagnosis of complications in these patients.

  14. Gastrointestinal variant of Lemierre's syndrome complicating ruptured appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Akhrass, Fadi Al; Abdallah, Lina; Berger, Steven; Sartawi, Rami

    2015-01-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum is a non-spore-forming, obligate anaerobic, filamentous, gramnegative bacillus that frequently colonizes the human oral cavity, respiratory tract, and gastrointestinal tract. Fusobacterium species have rarely been implicated in cases of gastrointestinal variant of Lemierre's syndrome. We describe a case of F. necrophorum bacteremia associated with suppurative porto-mesenteric vein thrombosis (PVT) following acute ruptured appendicitis. In addition, we list the documented twelve cases of Fusobacterium pylephlebitis. Recanalization of the porto-mesenteric veins and relief of the extrahepatic portal hypertension were achieved with early empiric antibiotic and local thrombolytic therapy. Our patient's case underscores the importance of recognizing Fusobacterium bacteremia as a possible cause of suppurative PVT after disruption of the gastrointestinal mucosa following an acute intraabdominal infectious process. Early treatment of this condition using anticoagulation and endovascular thrombolysis as adjunctive therapies may prevent PVT complications. PMID:26793462

  15. Gastrointestinal variant of Lemierre's syndrome complicating ruptured appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Akhrass, Fadi Al; Abdallah, Lina; Berger, Steven; Sartawi, Rami

    2015-01-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum is a non-spore-forming, obligate anaerobic, filamentous, gramnegative bacillus that frequently colonizes the human oral cavity, respiratory tract, and gastrointestinal tract. Fusobacterium species have rarely been implicated in cases of gastrointestinal variant of Lemierre's syndrome. We describe a case of F. necrophorum bacteremia associated with suppurative porto-mesenteric vein thrombosis (PVT) following acute ruptured appendicitis. In addition, we list the documented twelve cases of Fusobacterium pylephlebitis. Recanalization of the porto-mesenteric veins and relief of the extrahepatic portal hypertension were achieved with early empiric antibiotic and local thrombolytic therapy. Our patient's case underscores the importance of recognizing Fusobacterium bacteremia as a possible cause of suppurative PVT after disruption of the gastrointestinal mucosa following an acute intraabdominal infectious process. Early treatment of this condition using anticoagulation and endovascular thrombolysis as adjunctive therapies may prevent PVT complications. PMID:26793462

  16. Common complications in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Wollschlager, C M; Conrad, A R; Khan, F A

    1988-05-01

    Patients in intensive care units (ICUs) are subject to many complications connected with the advanced therapy required for their serious illnesses. Complications of ventilatory support include problems associated with short-term and long-term intubation, barotrauma, gastrointestinal tract bleeding, and weaning errors. Cardiac tachyarrhythmias can arise from a patient's intrinsic cardiac disease, as well as from drug therapy itself. Hemodynamic monitoring is crucial to careful patient management, but it is associated with technical complications during insertion such as pneumothorax, as well as interpretive errors such as those caused by positive end-inspiratory pressure. Acute renal failure can develop as a result both of therapy with drugs such as aminoglycosides and hypotension of many etiologies, as well as the use of contrast media. Nosocomial infection, which is a dreaded complication in ICU patients, usually arises from sources in the urinary tract, bloodstream, or lung. Complications frequently can arise if the interactions of drugs commonly used in the ICU are not recognized. Further, the ICU patient is subject to nutritional complications, acid base problems, and psychological disturbances. This monograph deals with the frequency, etiology, and prevention of these common ICU complications. PMID:3286162

  17. Neurological complications in adult spinal deformity surgery.

    PubMed

    Iorio, Justin A; Reid, Patrick; Kim, Han Jo

    2016-09-01

    The number of surgeries performed for adult spinal deformity (ASD) has been increasing due to an aging population, longer life expectancy, and studies supporting an improvement in health-related quality of life scores after operative intervention. However, medical and surgical complication rates remain high, and neurological complications such as spinal cord injury and motor deficits can be especially debilitating to patients. Several independent factors potentially influence the likelihood of neurological complications including surgical approach (anterior, lateral, or posterior), use of osteotomies, thoracic hyperkyphosis, spinal region, patient characteristics, and revision surgery status. The majority of ASD surgeries are performed by a posterior approach to the thoracic and/or lumbar spine, but anterior and lateral approaches are commonly performed and are associated with unique neural complications such as femoral nerve palsy and lumbar plexus injuries. Spinal morphology, such as that of hyperkyphosis, has been reported to be a risk factor for complications in addition to three-column osteotomies, which are often utilized to correct large deformities. Additionally, revision surgeries are common in ASD and these patients are at an increased risk of procedure-related complications and nervous system injury. Patient selection, surgical technique, and use of intraoperative neuromonitoring may reduce the incidence of complications and optimize outcomes. PMID:27250041

  18. Nutrition in the Management of Cirrhosis and its Neurological Complications

    PubMed Central

    Bémeur, Chantal; Butterworth, Roger F.

    2013-01-01

    Malnutrition is a common feature of chronic liver diseases that is often associated with a poor prognosis including worsening of clinical outcome, neuropsychiatric complications as well as outcome following liver transplantation. Nutritional assessment in patients with cirrhosis is challenging owing to confounding factors related to liver failure. The objectives of nutritional intervention in cirrhotic patients are the support of liver regeneration, the prevention or correction of specific nutritional deficiencies and the prevention and/or treatment of the complications of liver disease per se and of liver transplantation. Nutritional recommendations target the optimal supply of adequate substrates related to requirements linked to energy, protein, carbohydrates, lipids, vitamins and minerals. Some issues relating to malnutrition in chronic liver disease remain to be addressed including the development of an appropriate well-validated nutritional assessment tool, the identification of mechanistic targets or therapy for sarcopenia, the development of nutritional recommendations for obese cirrhotic patients and liver-transplant recipients and the elucidation of the roles of vitamin A hepatotoxicity, as well as the impact of deficiencies in riboflavin and zinc on clinical outcomes. Early identification and treatment of malnutrition in chronic liver disease has the potential to lead to better disease outcome as well as prevention of the complications of chronic liver disease and improved transplant outcomes. PMID:25755550

  19. Thyroid Storm Complicated by Bicytopenia and Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Tokushima, Yoshinori; Sakanishi, Yuta; Nagae, Kou; Tokushima, Midori; Tago, Masaki; Tomonaga, Motosuke; Yoshioka, Tsuneaki; Hyakutake, Masaki; Sugioka, Takashi; Yamashita, Shu-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Male, 23 Final Diagnosis: Thyroid storm Symptoms: Delirium • diarrhea • fever • hypertension • hyperventilation • tachycardia • weight loss Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Endocrinology and Metabolic Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: The clinical presentation of thyroid storm includes fever, tachycardia, hypertension, and neurological abnormalities. It is a serious condition with a high mortality rate. Furthermore, some other complications affect the clinical course of thyroid storm. Although it is reported that prognosis is poor when thyroid storm is complicated by disseminated intravascular coagulation syndrome (DIC) and leukopenia, reports of such cases are rare. Case Report: A 23-year-old man presented with delirium, high pyrexia, diarrhea, and weight loss of 18 kg over 2 months. According to the criteria of Burch and Wartofsky, he was diagnosed with thyroid storm on the basis of his symptom-complex and laboratory data that confirmed the presence of hyperthyroidism. Investigations also found leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and disseminated intravascular coagulation, all of which are very rare complications of thyroid storm. We successfully treated him with combined therapy including anti-thyroid medication, despite leukopenia. Conclusions: Early diagnosis and treatment are essential in ensuring a good outcome for patients with this rare combination of medical problems. PMID:25072662

  20. Complications in 100 living-liver donors.

    PubMed Central

    Grewal, H P; Thistlewaite, J R; Loss, G E; Fisher, J S; Cronin, D C; Siegel, C T; Newell, K A; Bruce, D S; Woodle, E S; Brady, L; Kelly, S; Boone, P; Oswald, K; Millis, J M

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A review of 100 living-liver donors was performed to evaluate the perisurgical complications of the procedure and thus to help quantify the risks to the donor. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Despite the advantages of living-donor liver transplantation (LDLT), the procedure has received criticism for the risk it imposes on healthy persons. A paucity of data exists regarding the complications and relative safety of the procedure. METHODS: One hundred LDLTs performed between November 1989 and November 1996 were reviewed. Donor data were obtained by chart review, anesthesia records, and the computerized hospital data base. Patient variables were compared by Fisher's exact test and the Student's t test. RESULTS: There were 57 women and 43 men with a median age of 29. Donors were divided into two groups: group A (first 50 donors), and group B (last 50 donors). There were 91 left lateral segments and 9 left lobes. There were no deaths. Fourteen major complications occurred in 13 patients; 9 occurred in group A and 5 in group B. Biliary complications consisted of five bile duct injuries (group A = 4, group B = 1) and two cut edge bile leaks. Complications were more common in left lobe resections (55%) than in left lateral segment grafts (10%). Minor complications occurred in 20% of patients. A significant reduction in overall complications (major and minor) was observed between the groups (group A, n = 24 [45%] vs. group B, n = 10 [20%]). In addition, surgical time and hospital stay were both significantly reduced. CONCLUSIONS: Although the procedure is safe, many LDLT donors have a perisurgical complication. Surgical experience and technical modifications have resulted in a significant reduction in these complications, however. To minimize the risks for these healthy donors, LDLT should be performed at institutions with extensive experience. PMID:9712567

  1. Complications and Continuation of Intrauterine Device Use Among Commercially Insured Teenagers

    PubMed Central

    Berenson, Abbey B.; Tan, Alai; Hirth, Jacqueline M.; Wilkinson, Gregg S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Many U.S. providers remain reluctant to prescribe intrauterine devices (IUDs) to teenagers due to concerns about serious complications. This study examined whether 15–19 year-old IUD users were more likely to experience complications, failure, or early discontinuation than adult users aged 20–24 and 25–44 years and whether there were differences in between users of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine systems and copper IUDs. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted using health insurance claims obtained from a private insurance company of 90,489 women who had an IUD inserted between 2002 and 2009. Logistic regression models were used to estimate the odds of experiencing complications, method failure, or early discontinuation within 12 months of insertion by age group and type of IUD inserted. Results Serious complications, including ectopic pregnancy and pelvic inflammatory disease, occurred in less than 1% of patients regardless of age or IUD type. Women aged 15–19 years were more likely than those aged 25–44 years to have a claim for dysmenorrhea OR=1.4, CI=1.1, 1.6), amenorrhea (OR=1.3, CI=1.1, 1.5), or normal pregnancy (OR=1.4, CI=1.1, 1.8). Overall, early discontinuation did not differ between teenagers and women aged 25–44 years (13% vs. 11%, p>.05). However, use of the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system was associated with fewer complications and less early discontinuation than the copper IUD in all age groups. Conclusions The IUD is as appropriate for teenagers to use as it is for older women, with serious complications occurring infrequently in all groups. The levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system may be a better choice than copper IUD due to lower odds of complications, discontinuation, and failure. PMID:23635730

  2. Maternal complications in pregnancy with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kulshrestha, Vidushi; Agarwal, Nutan

    2016-09-01

    Maternal complications of diabetes in pregnancy include obstetric complications such as pre-eclampsia, preterm labour, polyhydramnios, increased operative delivery and increased infective morbidity. These can be minimized with optimal glycaemic control. Additionally, pregnancies with overt/pregestational diabetes may have diabetes related complications such as hypoglycaemia, worsening of retinopathy, nephropathy and diabetic ketoacidosis. Women with pre-existing diabetic vasculopathy should be managed with multi-disciplinary approach with maternal and foetal surveillance to detect any deterioration. Such patients have a poor pregnancy outcome. Gastropathy and coronary artery disease in diabetics is a contraindication to pregnancy. PMID:27582159

  3. [Complications of breast augmentation - a case report].

    PubMed

    Zedníková, I; Třešková, I; Schmiedhuber, P; Hes, O

    2012-08-01

    As with any surgery, breast augmentation does have certain risks and complications. The aim of this article is to point out a rare complication of breast augmentation - axillary silicone lymphadenopathy (defined as the presence of silicone in the lymph nodes). The authors present a case report of silicone lymphadenopathy in a young woman after the rupture of a silicone breast implant. As the number of women with breast implants is increasing, it is necessary to bear this rare complication of breast augmentation in mind in differential diagnosis of axillary lymphadenopathy. PMID:23153428

  4. Stillbirth in the pregnancy complicated by diabetes.

    PubMed

    Starikov, Roman; Dudley, Donald; Reddy, Uma M

    2015-03-01

    Pregestational diabetes currently complicates 4% of pregnancies, while gestational diabetes complicates approximately 8% of pregnancies. Increased risk of stillbirth in diabetic pregnancies has been a well-known and recognized complication for decades. While stillbirth rates for diabetic pregnancies have decreased due to screening, treatment, and antenatal surveillance of these patients, about 4% of all stillbirths remain attributable to diabetes, and diabetic pregnancies continue to be at increased risk for perinatal mortality. The purpose of this article is to review the literature on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and prevention, as well as future research, of diabetes-associated perinatal mortality. PMID:25667005

  5. Pregnancy complications and neuropsychological outcomes: A review.

    PubMed

    Gerner, Gwendolyn; Baron, Ida Sue

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy complications elevate risk of associated adverse medical, socioenvironmental, and behavioral outcomes in children. These are likely to have a substantial impact on neuropsychological functioning and mental health across the child's lifespan. Thus, an understanding of the complex relationships between pregnancy complications and neuropsychological outcomes is critical for both practitioners and researchers. This review summarizes prevalent pregnancy complications and the associated psychological and neuropsychological findings, highlighting methodological challenges that have restricted investigations of these outcomes and identifying opportune areas for future study. PMID:24801883

  6. Complications in hair-restoration surgery.

    PubMed

    Konior, Raymond J

    2013-08-01

    Most complications associated with hair restoration are completely preventable and arise from variables that are directly controlled by the surgeon and the patient. Physicians who thoroughly grasp the nuances of modern surgical techniques and fully understand the physiologic dynamics of the balding process are least likely to generate a physician-controlled error. Highly motivated, well-educated patients who carefully follow instructions and take an active role in the postoperative recovery process minimize the chance of patient-controlled errors. This article discusses potential complications associated with surgical hair restoration, and the roles of the patient and physician in minimizing the risk of complications. PMID:24017992

  7. Prevention and management of complications in sphenoidotomy.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Carl W; Welch, Kevin C

    2010-08-01

    Endoscopic sphenoidotomy is a common surgical procedure that often accompanies routine sinus surgery. Safe completion of a sphenoidotomy depends on a thorough understanding of the surrounding anatomy, reviewing preoperative imaging, and maintaining intraoperative orientation. Intraoperative complications include local hemorrhage, catastrophic hemorrhage caused by internal carotid injury, optic nerve injury, and CSF leak. Postoperative complications tend to be less severe and include postoperative stenosis and mucocele formation. Regarding surgery of the sphenoid sinuses, the best management of complications truly is prevention, making pre- and intraoperative vigilance vital to a successful outcome. PMID:20599088

  8. Management of complications in glaucoma surgery

    PubMed Central

    Vijaya, Lingam; Manish, Panday; Ronnie, George; Shantha, B

    2011-01-01

    Surgical option for glaucoma is considered when other modalities are not working out to keep the intraocular pressure under control. Since the surgical procedures for glaucoma disrupt the integrity of the globe, they are known to produce various complications. Some of those complications can be vision-threatening. To minimize the morbidity, it is very important that one should know how to prevent them, recognize them and treat them. The objective of this article is to provide insight into some of those complications that will help the ophthalmologists in treating glaucoma patients in their clinical practice. PMID:21150025

  9. Complications Following Carinal Resections and Sleeve Resections.

    PubMed

    Tapias, Luis F; Ott, Harald C; Mathisen, Douglas J

    2015-11-01

    Pulmonary resections with concomitant circumferential airway resection and resection and reconstruction of carina and main stem bronchi remain challenging operations in thoracic surgery. Anastomotic complications range from mucosal sloughing and formation of granulation tissue, anastomotic ischemia promoting scar formation and stricture, to anastomotic breakdown leading to bronchopleural or bronchovascular fistulae or complete dehiscence. Careful attention to patient selection and technical detail results in acceptable morbidity and mortality as well as good long-term survival. In this article, we focus on the technical details of the procedures, how to avoid complications and most importantly how to manage complications when they occur. PMID:26515944

  10. Medical Complications of Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia.

    PubMed

    Westmoreland, Patricia; Krantz, Mori J; Mehler, Philip S

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are serious psychiatric illnesses related to disordered eating and distorted body images. They both have significant medical complications associated with the weight loss and malnutrition of anorexia nervosa, as well as from the purging behaviors that characterize bulimia nervosa. No body system is spared from the adverse sequelae of these illnesses, especially as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa become more severe and chronic. We review the medical complications that are associated with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, as well as the treatment for the complications. We also discuss the epidemiology and psychiatric comorbidities of these eating disorders. PMID:26169883

  11. Early years.

    PubMed

    2011-04-01

    Healthcare professionals in Scotland who are involved in early years work now have an additional resource in the shape of NHS Scotland's Maternal and Early Years website, aimed at practitioners at all levels. The site includes evidence updates, news and events, and can be accessed at www.maternal-and-early-years.org.uk. PMID:27368523

  12. [Early Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pawl, Jeree, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This newsletter focuses on the theme of early intervention which infants and young children with special needs in nine brief articles: "Early Intervention: A Matter of Context" (Samuel J. Meisels); "Early Intervention Research: Asking and Answering Meaningful Questions" (Jack P. Shonkoff); "From Case Management to Service Coordination: Families,…

  13. Early Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abery, Brian, Ed.; McConnell, Scott, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    This "feature issue" focuses on early intervention with handicapped children, with an emphasis on: Project EDGE (Expanding Developmental Growth through Education), an early intervention research project initiated in 1968; strategies for developing family-friendly early intervention services; and progress reports from various states and programs.…

  14. Divergent Gene Expression Responses to Complicated Grief and Non-complicated Grief

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Michael R.; Arevalo, Jesusa M. G.; Cole, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    The “widowhood effect” (i.e., morbidity/mortality in recently bereaved spouses) may be related to changes in immune function, but little is known about the impact of bereavement on gene transcription in immune cells. This study examined how Complicated Grief and Non-complicated Grief responses to bereavement differentially affect leukocyte gene expression. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling and bioinformatic analyses were completed on 63 older adults. Thirty-six of them had lost their spouse/partner on average 2 years ago, and 27 were nonbereaved, married controls. Twelve of the bereaved participants met criteria for Complicated Grief. Compared to nonbereaved controls, bereavement (both Complicated Grief and Non-complicated Grief) was associated with upregulated expression of genes involved in general immunologic activation and a selective downregulation of genes involved in B lymphocyte responses. However, Complicated Grief and Non-complicated Grief differed markedly in their expression of Type I interferon-related transcripts, with Non-complicated Grief subjects showing substantial upregulation relative to nonbereaved controls and Complicated Grief subjects showing substantial downregulation. Bereavement significantly modulates immune function gene expression. The magnitude of bereavement-related distress (i.e., Complicated Grief vs. Non-complicated Grief) is linked to differential patterns of transcription factor activation and gene expression involved in innate antiviral responses. These findings provide a molecular framework for understanding the health effects of bereavement, as well as new insights into the particular gene modules that are most sensitive to the individual's psychological response to loss. PMID:24380850

  15. Complications and Outcomes of Primary Phacotrabeculectomy with Mitomycin C in a Multi-Ethnic Asian Population

    PubMed Central

    Sng, Chelvin; Aquino, Maria C.; Chew, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the occurrence of intraoperative and postoperative complications up to three years after primary phacotrabeculectomy with intraoperative use of Mitomycin C (MMC) in primary open angle (POAG) and primary angle closure glaucoma (PACG) patients, and the effect of postoperative complications on surgical outcome. Methods Retrospective review of 160 consecutive patients with POAG (n = 105) and PACG (n = 55), who underwent primary phacotrabeculectomy with MMC at the National University Hospital, Singapore, from January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2010. Data was collected using a standardized form that included patient demographic information, ocular characteristics and postoperative complications, including hypotony (defined as intraocular pressure < 6 mmHg), shallow anterior chamber (AC) and hyphema. Results The mean age ± standard deviation (SD) of patients was 68.2 ± 8.2 years. No patient lost light perception during duration of follow-up. 77% of the postoperative complications occurred within the first month only. The commonest complications were hypotony (n = 41, 25.6%), hyphema (n = 16, 10.0%) and shallow AC (n = 16, 10.0%). Five patients (3.1%) required reoperation for their complications. Early hypotony (defined as hypotony < 30 days postoperatively) was an independent risk factor for surgical failure (hazard ratio [HR], 5.1; 95% CI, 1.6–16.2; p = 0.01). Hypotony with another complication was also a risk factor for surgical failure (p < 0.02). Conclusions Hypotony, hyphema and shallow AC were the commonest postoperative complications in POAG and PACG patients after phacotrabeculectomy with MMC. Most complications were transient and self-limiting. Early hypotony within the first month was a significant risk factor for surgical failure. PMID:25775362

  16. [The Semmelweis reasoning and the puerperal fever].

    PubMed

    Sabbatani, Sergio

    2008-03-01

    Ignaz Philipp Semmelweis is probably one of the most important personalities of the history of medicine in nineteenth century before the microbiological Pasteur's revolution. Young doctor, troubled by the numerous deaths occurring at the obstetrician department in Wien, were he had been temporarily employed, despite the unavailability of laboratory instruments, he could get, by means of empirical observation and deductive reasoning, what all the other contemporary scientists had not been able to perceive: the responsibility of puerperae's mortality was to ascribe to genital contamination that occurred through the hands of doctors visiting them after having performed autopsies. Semmelweis is a romantic figure, who also paid for his political and cultural engagement in Wien in 1848 with social isolation. His uneasy temperament, and some difficulties in the relationship with his colleagues, didn't promote his ideas to be accepted and spread. Few years following his death, prematurely occurred in unclear circumstances, thanks to Pasteur's discoveries, his battle was eventually recognized. PMID:18367885

  17. Cirrhosis and its complications: Evidence based treatment

    PubMed Central

    Nusrat, Salman; Khan, Muhammad S; Fazili, Javid; Madhoun, Mohammad F

    2014-01-01

    Cirrhosis results from progressive fibrosis and is the final outcome of all chronic liver disease. It is among the ten leading causes of death in United States. Cirrhosis can result in portal hypertension and/or hepatic dysfunction. Both of these either alone or in combination can lead to many complications, including ascites, varices, hepatic encephalopathy, hepatocellular carcinoma, hepatopulmonary syndrome, and coagulation disorders. Cirrhosis and its complications not only impair quality of life but also decrease survival. Managing patients with cirrhosis can be a challenge and requires an organized and systematic approach. Increasing physicians’ knowledge about prevention and treatment of these potential complications is important to improve patient outcomes. A literature search of the published data was performed to provide a comprehensive review regarding the management of cirrhosis and its complications. PMID:24833875

  18. Complications of deep brain stimulation surgery.

    PubMed

    Beric, A; Kelly, P J; Rezai, A; Sterio, D; Mogilner, A; Zonenshayn, M; Kopell, B

    2001-01-01

    Although technological advances have reduced device-related complications, DBS surgery still carries a significant risk of transient and permanent complications. We report our experience in 86 patients and 149 DBS implants. Patients with Parkinson's disease, essential tremor and dystonia were treated. There were 8 perioperative, 8 postoperative, 9 hardware-related complications and 4 stimulation-induced side effects. Only 5 patients (6%) sustained some persistent neurological sequelae, however, 26 of the 86 patients undergoing 149 DBS implants in this series experienced some untoward event with the procedure. Although there were no fatalities or permanent severe disabilities encountered, it is important to extend the informed consent to include all potential complications. PMID:12378060

  19. Macrovascular complications in pregnancy and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sahay, Rakesh Kumar; Pydi, Venu Madhavi

    2016-09-01

    This review discusses macrovascular conditions which may occur during pregnancy complicated by diabetes. It describes the effect of dyslipidaemia and hypertension on foeto-maternal outcomes and explores the pathogenesis of these states. PMID:27582155

  20. [The surgery of laparoceles. The postoperative complications].

    PubMed

    Garavello, A; Tuccimei, U; Sadighi, A; Belardi, A; Remedi, M; Antonellis, D

    1997-05-01

    The use of prosthetic meshes in incisional hernias repairs is now very attractive, particularly for wide fascial defects; nevertheless the presence of a foreign body and placement technique may be responsible for complications sometimes leading to failure. To evaluate technical problems and complications in incisional hernia surgery the authors reviewed their 5 year experience in 70 patients; 39 mesh repairs and 31 direct sutures of the abdominal wall were performed. Local complications (fistulas, wound hematoma or infections) were more frequent in the former group; PTFE meshes showed a lower resistance to infections, particularly in diabetics, and in three patients partial or total removal was mandatory. Prosthetic meshes showed a marked reduction of recurrences in incisional hernia surgery, but their use leads to more local complications than direct repair; the authors believe that mesh placement must be evaluated for every single patient and not used as a routine procedure. PMID:9297143