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1

Wind and Rotation Enhanced Escape From the Early Terrestrial Atmospheres  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The earliest atmospheres of the terrestrial planets are thought to have been hotter, have stronger winds and rotate faster than atmospheres of today. Since these primitive atmospheres were weakly bound, they evolved rapidly because atmospheric escape was very strong, often referred to as "blowoff." Such escape has been treated as hydrodynamic, transonic flow, similar to solar wind flow dynamics. However, in many cases the outward flow is hydrodynamic at low altitudes only to become collisionless at higher altitudes, well before sonic speeds are ever attained. Recent models dealing with such transition from fluid to kinetic flow have applied the Jeans escape flux at the exobase. This approach has lead to escape rates that are too low due to the fact that thermospheric winds and planetary rotation increase escape fluxes considerably over the corresponding Jeans fluxes (1). In particular, for a given density and temperature at the exobase, the escape flux increases as the wind speed and/or the rotation rate increase. Also, for a given wind speed and rotation rate, the escape flux enhancement over the Jeans flux increases as the mass of an escaping constituent increases, an important factor in isotope fractionation, especially the enrichment of deuterium on Mars. Accounting for a range of possible temperatures, thermospheric wind speeds and planetary rotation rates in the primitive atmospheres of the terrestrial planets, estimates are made of light constituent escape flux increases over the corresponding Jeans fluxes. (1) Hartle, R. E. and H. G. Mayr, J. Geophys. Res., 81, 1207, 1976.

Hartle, R. E.

2001-05-01

2

Introduction: On the Early Evolution of the Atmosphere of Terrestrial Planets: COST Action CM#0805  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The early setting and evolution of planetary atmospheres of rocky planets is a hot, but still immature research topic. A better understanding of the processes at work at that early epoch in the history of our solar system is certainly required, particularly at this historical juncture when we are just discovering the first exoplanets similar to Earth. These new worlds need to be put in their astrophysical and cosmochemical context, as we understand stars in the Cosmos as physical entities similar to the Sun, but with different masses, composition, and distinctive evolutionary stages. Exoplanets discovered so far exhibit large diversity as a direct consequence of having experienced differing births, evolutionary stages, and being subjected to stochastic processes in the early stages of their growth and evolution. To understand what is going on in the first stages of planetary evolution we must promote interdisciplinary research. That should yield better answers about the role played in planetary setting and evolution by processes such as accretion, chemical differentiation, outgassing, impacts, and the different energy fluxes from their host stars. Our current knowledge regarding the initial atmospheric evolution of the Earth is scarce. State-of-the-art analyses of primitive meteorites, together with returned asteroidal and cometary materials will be able to offer us more realistic starting chemical compositions for the primordial building blocks of terrestrial planets. Searching for chemical signatures in Earth-like exoplanets could be an interesting future field of research, and the matches found will provide new points to be compared with increasingly sophisticated atmospheric models. Then, new evidence in other worlds can contribute to a better understanding of the transition point from a hostile to a habitable world. To define the role of N in such context was one of the main goals to promote this COST CM0805 workshop.

Trigo-Rodríguez, Josep M.; Muller, Christian; Nixon, Conor; Raulin, François

3

The Atmospheres of the Terrestrial Planets:Clues to the Origins and Early Evolution of Venus, Earth, and Mars  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We review the current state of knowledge of the origin and early evolution of the three largest terrestrial planets - Venus, Earth, and Mars - setting the stage for the chapters on comparative climatological processes to follow. We summarize current models of planetary formation, as revealed by studies of solid materials from Earth and meteorites from Mars. For Venus, we emphasize the known differences and similarities in planetary bulk properties and composition with Earth and Mars, focusing on key properties indicative of planetary formation and early evolution, particularly of the atmospheres of all three planets. We review the need for future in situ measurements for improving our understanding of the origin and evolution of the atmospheres of our planetary neighbors and Earth, and suggest the accuracies required of such new in situ data. Finally, we discuss the role new measurements of Mars and Venus have in understanding the state and evolution of planets found in the habitable zones of other stars.

Baines, Kevin H.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Bullock, Mark A.; Grinspoon, David H,; Mahaffy, Paul; Russell, Christopher T.; Schubert, Gerald; Zahnle, Kevin

2015-01-01

4

Terrestrial Planet Atmospheres and Biosignatures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The search for terrestrial exoplanets - rocky worlds in orbit around stars other than the Sun - is one of humanity's most exciting science goals. The discovery of super Earths, terrestrial planets more massive than Earth, has opened a new era in exoplanet science, confirming the basic idea that our solar system is not the only planetary system to harbor terrestrial planets. Terrestrial exoplanets will expand planetary diversity, with masses and compositions likely very different from those found in our solar system. Most significantly, terrestrial exoplanets have the potential to host habitable environments on or below their solid surfaces, and are the most likely places beyond our solar system to search for signs of life. In the coming decades, instrumentation will be developed to expand our census of terrestrial exoplanets and directly characterize the atmospheres and biosignatures of these worlds. In the meantime, scientific progress in this field is made via extensive photochemical, climate, and radiative transfer modeling of terrestrial planetary environments together with remote sensing studies of solar system terrestrial planets, including Earth. This chapter provides an overview of terrestrial exoplanet atmosphere modeling techniques, a review of the scientific advances to date, and a discussion of outstanding questions and future directions.

Meadows, V.; Seager, S.

5

Impact erosion of terrestrial planetary atmospheres  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

I review current ideas about the nature of the planetesimals - composition, size distribution, and the planetary encounter velocity. Previous papers on accretion and erosion of planetary atmospheres as a result of multiple impacts are reviewed. Finally, the effects of blowing off a substantial fraction of the atmosphere from a terrestrial planet due to a single giant body impact are discussed.

Ahrens, Thomas J.

1992-01-01

6

Impact erosion of terrestrial planetary atmospheres  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

I review current ideas about the nature of the planetesimals - composition, size distribution, and the planetary encounter velocity. Previous papers on accretion and erosion of planetary atmospheres as a result of multiple impacts are reviewed. Finally, the effects of blowing off a substantial fraction of the atmosphere from a terrestrial planet due to a single giant body impact are discussed.

Ahrens, Thomas J.

1993-01-01

7

Early Formation of Terrestrial Crust  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Early (?4.5 Ga) Formation of Terrestrial Crust T.M. Harrison1, A.K. Schmitt1, M.T. McCulloch2, and O.M. Lovera1 1Department of Earth and Space Sciences and IGPP, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA; 2Research School of Earth Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra, A.C.T. 2601 AUSTRALIA Large deviations in ?repsilonHf(T) from bulk silicate Earth seen in >4 Ga detrital zircons from Jack Hills, Western Australia, have been interpreted as reflecting a major differentiation of the silicate Earth at ca. 4.4 to 4.5 Ga. We have expanded the characterization of 176Hf/177Hf (Hf) in Hadean zircons by acquiring a further 116 laser ablation Lu-Hf measurements on 87 grains with ion microprobe 207Pb/206Pb ages up to 4.36 Ga. Most measurements employed concurrent Lu-Hf and 207Pb/206Pb analyses, permitting assessment of the use of ion microprobe data to characterize the age of the volumetrically larger domain sampled by laser drilling. Our new results confirm and extend the earlier observation of significant negative deviations in ?repsilonHf(T) throughout the Hadean, although no positive ?repsilonHf(T) values were documented in this study. These data yields an essentially uniform spectrum of single-stage model ages between 4.54 and 4.20 Ga for extraction of the zircons' protoliths from a chondritic reservoir. We derived the full error propagation expression for a parameter, ?repsilono, which measures the difference of a sample from solar system initial (Hf) (Hfo), and from this conclude that data plotting close to (Hfo), are statistically meaningful and consistent with silicate differentiation at 4.540±0.006 Ga. ?18O and Ti thermometry for these Hadean zircons show little obvious correlation with initial (Hf), consistent with their derivation through fusion of a broad suite of crustal rock types under near water-saturated conditions. Together with the inclusion assemblage and other isotopic and trace element data obtained from these ancient zircons, our results indicate essentially continuous derivation of crust from the mantle from 4.5 to 4.2 Ga, concurrent with recycling into the mantle and internal crustal re-working. These results represent further evidence that by 4.35 Ga, portions of the crust had taken on continental characteristics.

Harrison, T. M.; Schmitt, A. K.; McCulloch, M. T.; Lovera, O. M.

2007-12-01

8

Linkages between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The primary research issue in understanding the role of terrestrial ecosystems in global change is analyzing the coupling between processes with vastly differing rates of change, from photosynthesis to community change. Representing this coupling in models is the central challenge to modeling the terrestrial biosphere as part of the earth system. Terrestrial ecosystems participate in climate and in the biogeochemical cycles on several temporal scales. Some of the carbon fixed by photosynthesis is incorporated into plant tissue and is delayed from returning to the atmosphere until it is oxidized by decomposition or fire. This slower (i.e., days to months) carbon loop through the terrestrial component of the carbon cycle, which is matched by cycles of nutrients required by plants and decomposers, affects the increasing trend in atmospheric CO2 concentration and imposes a seasonal cycle on that trend. Moreover, this cycle includes key controls over biogenic trace gas production. The structure of terrestrial ecosystems, which responds on even longer time scales (annual to century), is the integrated response to the biogeochemical and environmental constraints that develop over the intermediate time scale. The loop is closed back to the climate system since it is the structure of ecosystems, including species composition, that sets the terrestrial boundary condition in the climate system through modification of surface roughness, albedo, and, to a great extent, latent heat exchange. These separate temporal scales contain explicit feedback loops which may modify ecosystem dynamics and linkages between ecosystems and the atmosphere. The long-term change in climate, resulting from increased atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases (e.g., CO2, CH4, and nitrous oxide (N2O)) will further modify the global environment and potentially induce further ecosystem change. Modeling these interactions requires coupling successional models to biogeochemical models to physiological models that describe the exchange of water, energy, and biogenic trace gases between the vegetation and the atmosphere at fine time scales. There does not appear to be any obvious way to allow direct reciprocal coupling of atmospheric general circulation models (GCM's), which inherently run with fine time steps, to ecosystem or successional models, which have coarse temporal resolution, without the interposition of physiological canopy models. This is equally true for biogeochemical models of the exchange of carbon dioxide and trace gases. This coupling across time scales is nontrivial and sets the focus for the modeling strategy.

Bretherton, Francis; Dickinson, Robert E.; Fung, Inez; Moore, Berrien, III; Prather, Michael; Running, Steven W.; Tiessen, Holm

1992-01-01

9

Solar-terrestrial coupling through atmospheric electricity  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

There are a number of measurements of electrical variations that suggest a solar-terrestrial influence on the global atmospheric electrical circuit. The measurements show variations associated with solar flares, solar magnetic sector boundary crossings, geomagnetic activity, aurorae, differences between ground current and potential gradients at high and low latitudes, and solar cycle variations. The evidence for each variation is examined. Both the experimental evidence and the calculations made with a global model of atmospheric electricity indicate that there is solar-terrestrial coupling through atmospheric electricity which operates by altering the global electric current and field distribution. A global redistribution of currents and fields can be caused by large-scale changes in electrical conductivity, by alteration of the columnar resistance between thunderstorm cloud tops and the ionosphere, or by both. If the columnar resistance is altered above thunderstorms, more current will flow in the global circuit, changing the ionospheric potential and basic circuit variables such as current density and electric fields. The observed variations of currents and fields during solar-induced disturbances are generally less than 50% of mean values near the earth's surface.

Roble, R. G.; Hays, P. B.

1979-01-01

10

Terrestrial sources and distribution of atmospheric sulphur  

PubMed Central

The general circulation model ECHAM has been coupled to a chemistry and sulphur cycle model to study the impact of terrestrial, i.e. mostly anthropogenic sulphur dioxide (SO2), sources on global distributions of sulphur species in the atmosphere. We briefly address currently available source inventories. It appears that global estimates of natural emissions are associated with uncertainties up to a factor of 2, while anthropogenic emissions have uncertainty ranges of about +/- 30 per cent. Further, some recent improvements in the model descriptions of multiphase chemistry and deposition processes are presented. Dry deposition is modelled consistently with meteorological processes and surface properties. The results indicate that surface removal of SO2 is less efficient than previously assumed, and that the SO2 lifetime is thus longer. Coupling of the photochemistry and sulphur chemistry schemes in the model improves the treatment of multiphase processes such as oxidant (hydrogen peroxide) supply in aqueous phase SO2 oxidation. The results suggest that SO2 oxidation by ozone (O3) in the aqueous phase is more important than indicated in earlier work. However, it appears that we still overestimate atmospheric SO2 concentrations near the surface in the relatively polluted Northern Hemisphere. On the other hand, we somewhat underestimate sulphate levels in these regions, which suggests that additional heterogeneous reaction mechanisms, e.g. on aerosols, enhance SO2 oxidation.

Lelieveld, J.; Roelofs, G.-J.; Ganzeveld, L.; Feichter, J.; Rodhe, H.

1997-01-01

11

Ions in the Terrestrial Atmosphere and Other Solar System Atmospheres  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Charged molecular clusters, traditionally called small ions, carry electric currents in atmospheres. Charged airborne particles, or aerosol ions, play an important role in generation and evolution of atmospheric aerosols. Growth of ions depends on the trace gas content, which is highly variable in the time and space. Even at sub-ppb concentrations, electrically active organic compounds (e.g. pyridine derivatives) can affect the ion composition and size. The size and mobility are closely related, although the form of the relationship varies depending on the critical diameter, which, at 273 K, is about 1.6 nm. For ions smaller than this the separation of quantum levels exceeds the average thermal energy, allowing use of a molecular aggregate model for the size-mobility relation. For larger ions the size-mobility relation approaches the Stokes-Cunningham-Millikan law. The lifetime of a cluster ion in the terrestrial lower atmosphere is about one minute, determined by the balance between ion production rate, ion-ion recombination, and ion-aerosol attachment.

Harrison, R. Giles; Tammet, Hannes

12

Ions in the Terrestrial Atmosphere and Other Solar System Atmospheres  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Charged molecular clusters, traditionally called small ions, carry electric currents in atmospheres. Charged airborne particles, or aerosol ions, play an important role in generation and evolution of atmospheric aerosols. Growth of ions depends on the trace gas content, which is highly variable in the time and space. Even at sub-ppb concentrations, electrically active organic compounds ( e.g. pyridine derivatives) can affect the ion composition and size. The size and mobility are closely related, although the form of the relationship varies depending on the critical diameter, which, at 273 K, is about 1.6 nm. For ions smaller than this the separation of quantum levels exceeds the average thermal energy, allowing use of a molecular aggregate model for the size-mobility relation. For larger ions the size-mobility relation approaches the Stokes-Cunningham-Millikan law. The lifetime of a cluster ion in the terrestrial lower atmosphere is about one minute, determined by the balance between ion production rate, ion-ion recombination, and ion-aerosol attachment.

Harrison, R. Giles; Tammet, Hannes

2008-06-01

13

Exploring the Sensitivity of Terrestrial Ecosystems and Atmospheric Exchange  

E-print Network

Exploring the Sensitivity of Terrestrial Ecosystems and Atmospheric Exchange of CO2 to Global, USA December 5-9, 2011 #12;ISAM Estimated Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) Winter (DJF) Summer (JJA) 1996- 1997 1999- 2000 1990s negative is net C gain by the terrestrial ecosystems #12;Environmental Factors

Jain, Atul K.

14

Energetic Metastable Oxygen and Nitrogen Atoms in the Terrestrial Atmosphere  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We have investigated the energy distributions of the metastable oxygen atoms in the terrestrial thermosphere. Nascent O(lD) atoms play a fundamental role in the energy balance and chemistry of the terrestrial atmosphere, because they are produced by photo-chemical reactions in the excited electronic states and carry significant translational energies.

Kharchenko, Vasili

2003-01-01

15

Formation and Internal Structure of Terrestrial Planets, and Atmospheric Escape  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As of 2014 April 21, over 1490 confirmed exoplanets and 3705 Kepler candidates have been detected. This implies that exoplanets may be ubiquitous in the universe. In this paper, we focus on the formation, evolution, and internal structure of terrestrial planets, and the atmospheric escape of close-in planets. In chapter 2, we investigate the dynamical evolution of planetary system after the protoplanetary disk has dissipated. We find that in the final assembly stage, the occurrence of terrestrial planets is quite common and in 40% of our simulations finally at least one planet is formed in the habitable zone. We also find that if there is a highly-inclined giant planet in the system, a great many bodies will be either driven out of the system, or collide with the giant planet or the central star. This will lead to the difficulty in planetary accretion. Moreover, our results show that planetary migration can lead to the formation of close-in planets. Besides migration, close-in terrestrial planets can also be formed by a collision-merger mechanism, which means that planetary embryos can kick terrestrial planets directly into orbits that are extremely close to their parent stars. In chapter 3, we construct numerically an internal structure model for terrestrial planets, and provide three kinds of possible internal structures of Europa (Jupiter's moon) based on this model. Then, we calculate the radii of low-mass exoplanets for various mass combinations of core and mantle, and find that some of them are inconsistent with the observed radius of rocky planets. This phenomenon can be explained only if there exists a large amount of water in the core, or they own gaseous envelopes. In chapter 4, we improve our planetary evolution codes using the semi-gray model of Guillot (2010), which includes the incident flux from the host star as a heating source in planetary atmosphere. The updated codes can solve the structure of the top radiative zone of intensely irradiated planets, and thus can simulate the atmospheric escape of close-in planets driven by strong stellar X-ray or EUV emissions. We find that low-mass planets are sensitive to the atmospheric escape, and they could lose all their initial H/He envelopes during the evolution. On the other hand, gas giant can only lose a small fraction of their initial envelopes. We then carry out a parameter study of atmospheric escape at the planetary core mass, envelope mass fraction, and semi-major axis space. We find that the most intense phase of evaporation occurs within the early 100 Myr. Afterwards, atmospheric escape only has a small impact on the planetary evolution. In chapter 5, we apply our new planetary evolution model to different synthetic planet populations that are directly produced by the core-accretion paradigm (Mordasini et al. 2012a,b). We show that although the mass distribution of the planet populations is hardly affected by evaporation, the radius distribution clearly shows a break around 2 R_{?}. This break leads to a bimodal distribution in planet sizes (Owen & Wu 2013). Furthermore, the bimodal distribution is related to the initial characteristics of the planetary populations. We find that in two extreme cases, namely without any evaporation or with a 100% heating efficiency in the evaporation model, the final radius distributions show significant differences compared to the radius distribution of Kepler candidates. In chapter 6, we introduce a radiative transfer model that can calculate the radiation spectrum of close-in exoplanets.

Jin, S.

2014-11-01

16

Space, Atmospheric, and Terrestrial Radiation Environments  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The progress on developing models of the radiation environment since the 1960s is reviewed with emphasis on models that can be applied to predicting the performance of microelectronics used in spacecraft and instruments. Space, atmospheric, and ground environments are included. It is shown that models must be adapted continually to account for increased understanding of the dynamics of the radiation environment and the changes in microelectronics technology. The IEEE Nuclear and Space Radiation Effects Conference is a vital forum to report model progress to the radiation effects research community.

Barth, Janet L.; Dyer, C. S.; Stassinopoulos, E. G.

2003-01-01

17

Kinetics of Fast Atoms in the Terrestrial Atmosphere  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report summarizes our investigations performed under NASA Grant NAG5-8058. The three-year research supported by the Geospace Sciences SR&T program (Ionospheric, Thermospheric, and Mesospheric Physics) has been designed to investigate fluxes of energetic oxygen and nitrogen atoms in the terrestrial thermosphere. Fast atoms are produced due to absorption of the solar radiation and due to coupling between the ionosphere and the neutral thermospheric gas. We have investigated the impact of hot oxygen and nitrogen atoms on the thermal balance, chemistry and radiation properties of the terrestrial thermosphere. Our calculations have been focused on the accurate quantitative description of the thermalization of O and N energetic atoms in collisions with atom and molecules of the ambient neutral gas. Upward fluxes of oxygen and nitrogen atoms, the rate of atmospheric heating by hot oxygen atoms, and the energy input into translational and rotational-vibrational degrees of atmospheric molecules have been evaluated. Altitude profiles of hot oxygen and nitrogen atoms have been analyzed and compared with available observational data. Energetic oxygen atoms in the terrestrial atmosphere have been investigated for decades, but insufficient information on the kinetics of fast atmospheric atoms has been a main obstacle for the interpretation of observational data and modeling of the hot geocorona. The recent development of accurate computational methods of the collisional kinetics is seen as an important step in the quantitative description of hot atoms in the thermosphere. Modeling of relaxation processes in the terrestrial atmosphere has incorporated data of recent observations, and theoretical predictions have been tested by new laboratory measurements.

Kharchenko, Vasili A.; Dalgarno, A.; Mellott, Mary (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

18

The Atmospheric and Terrestrial Mobile Laboratory (ATML).  

SciTech Connect

The ionospheric disturbance dynamo signature in geomagnetic variations is investigated using the National Center for Atmospheric Research Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model. The model results are tested against reference magnetically quiet time observations on 21 June 1993, and disturbance effects were observed on 11 June 1993. The model qualitatively reproduces the observed diurnal and latitude variations of the geomagnetic horizontal intensity and declination for the reference quiet day in midlatitude and low-latitude regions but underestimates their amplitudes. The patterns of the disturbance dynamo signature and its source 'anti-Sq' current system are well reproduced in the Northern Hemisphere. However, the model significantly underestimates the amplitude of disturbance dynamo effects when compared with observations. Furthermore, the largest simulated disturbances occur at different local times than the observations. The discrepancies suggest that the assumed high-latitude storm time energy inputs in the model were not quantitatively accurate for this storm.

Zak, Bernard Daniel; Rahn, Thom (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Nitschke, Kim (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Ivey, Mark D.; Mora, Claudia (Los Alamos National Laboratory); McDowell, Nate (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Love, Steve (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Dubey, M. (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Michelsen, Hope A.; Guilderson, Tom (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory); Schubert, William Kent; Costigan, Keeley (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Chylek, Petr (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Bambha, Ray P.; Roskovensky, John K.

2010-04-01

19

Sulphur cycling between terrestrial agroecosystem and atmosphere.  

PubMed

Central gas station of the natural gas borehole system Podravina is located near the village Molve. It delivers more than a quarter of total energy used in Croatia to its consumers. Over the years, adapting technology to increasingly demanding and rigorous standards in environmental protection has become paramount. Yet, despite all the industry has undertaken to address the risk of harmful substances entering the food chain, a multidisciplinary research team of independent scientists monitors the content of specific substances in all components of the ecosystem. This paper presents measurements of total sulphur contents in soil surface [(0 to 3) cm] and subsurface [(3 to 8) cm] layers (study period: autumn 2006 - spring 2010) and in plants (study period: spring 2000 - spring 2010), and the concentration of gaseous sulphur compounds in the air. Concentrations of hydrogen sulphide (H2S) and mercaptans (RSH) were measured from the summer of 2002 until the autumn of 2010, while concentrations of sulphur dioxide (SO2) were measured from the spring of 2008 until the autumn of 2010. The paper also shows total annual atmospheric sulphur (S-SO4) deposition at Bilogora measuring station (study period: 2001 - 2010). Average monthly concentrations of H2S in air varied between 0.2 ?g m-3 and 2.0 ?g m-3, RSH between 0.1 ?g m-3 and 24.5 ?g m-3, and SO2 between 0.4 ?g m-3 and 2.8 ?g m-3 depending on the location and the season of sampling. Mean values of total sulphur in soil and in Plantago lanceolata plant ranged between 610 mg kg-1 and 1,599 mg kg-1 and between 3,614 mg kg-1 and 4,342 mg kg-1, respectively, depending on the soil type, location, and sampling depth. Average values of total sulphur mass ratio for all examined single soil samples (n=80) were 1,080 mg kg-1 for both studied layers, and 4,108 mg kg-1 for all analysed plant samples (n=85). Average total annual atmospheric sulphur deposition at Bilogora measuring station was 6.3 kg of S-SO4 per hectare. PMID:23152380

Zgorelec, Zeljka; Pehnec, Gordana; Baši?, Ferdo; Kisi?, Ivica; Mesi?, Milan; Zužul, Silva; Juriši?, Aleksandra; Sestak, Ivana; Va?i?, Vladimira; Ca?kovi?, Mirjana

2012-09-01

20

Terrestrial biogeochemical cycles - Global interactions with the atmosphere and hydrology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A review is presented of developments in ecosystem theory, remote sensing, and geographic information systems that support new endeavors in spatial modeling. A paradigm has emerged to predict ecosystem behavior based on understanding responses to multiple resources. Ecosystem models couple primary production to decomposition and nutrient availability utilizing this paradigm. It is indicated that coupling of transport and ecosystem processes alters the behavior of earth system components (terrestrial ecosystems, hydrology, and the atmosphere) from that of an uncoupled model.

Schimel, David S.; Parton, William J.; Kittel, Timothy G. F.

1991-01-01

21

Constraints on Early Mars atmospheric pressure  

E-print Network

Constraints on Early Mars atmospheric pressure from small ancient craters impactors, so impact crater size is a probe of atmospheric pressure. ebar4bar Diameter (m) Fractionofcraterssmallerthan ! Atmospheric pressure upper limit

Kite, Edwin

22

Early Martian environments - The antarctic and other terrestrial analogs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The comparability of the early environments of Mars and earth, and the biological evolution which occurred on early earth, motivates serious consideration of the possibility of an early Martian biota. Environments which could have contained this early Martian life and which may presently contain evidence of this former life include aquatic, ice, soil, and rock habitats. Several analogs of these potential early Martian environments, which can provide useful information in searching for extinct life on Mars, are currently available for study on earth. These terrestrial analogs include the perennially ice-covered lakes and sandstone rocks in the polar deserts of Antarctica, surface of snowfields and glaciers, desert soils, geothermal springs, and deep subsurface environments.

Wharton, R. A., Jr.; Mckay, C. P.; Mancinelli, R. L.; Simmons, G. M., Jr.

1989-01-01

23

Coupling Terrestrial and Atmospheric Water Dynamics to Improve Prediction in a Changing Environment  

E-print Network

Fluxes across the land surface directly influence predictions of ecological processes, atmospheric dynamics, and terrestrial hydrology. However, many simplifications are made in numerical models when considering ...

Lyon, Steve W.; Dominguez, Francina; Gochis, David J.; Brunsell, Nathaniel A.; Castro, Christopher; Chow, Fotini K.; Fan, Ying; Fuka, Daniel; Hong, Yang; Kucera, Paul A.; Nesbitt, Stephen W.; Salzmann, Nadine; Schmidli, Juerg; Snyder, Peter K.; Teuling, Adriaam J.; Twine, Tracy E.; Levis, Samuel; Lundquist, Jessica D.; Salvucci, Guido D.; Sealy, Andrea M.; Walter, M. Todd

2008-09-01

24

Terrestrial ecosystem regulation of interannual variability in atmospheric CO2  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Linking interannual variability in the global carbon dioxide, CO2, growth rate to its ecological and physical drivers may provide a means to improve predictions of long-term carbon-climate feedbacks. Many studies have attributed variability in the global CO2 record to a single factor, such as temperature, drought, or fire, or have asserted a combination of controls using complex ecosystem models. The evolving temporal and spatial structure of atmospheric CO2 may enable a more effective attribution of these processes, but has not been used systematically for this purpose. Here we simulated the fingerprints that terrestrial fluxes of carbon originating from temperature and drought stress and biomass burning imprint on the latitudinal and temporal distribution atmospheric CO2 for the 1997-2009 period using the GEOS-Chem atmospheric model. In general, temperature, precipitation, and drought signatures were highly correlated across different latitude bands, indicating that no single factor was the dominant mechanism explaining most of the CO2 variability. Fires had a unique signature, particularly in the northern hemisphere as a consequence of large events in the boreal forest during 1998, 2004, and 2008. Statistical models that combined these factors were able to explain between 20% and 40% of the CO2 variability in the northern hemisphere and 40-50% in the southern hemisphere. Net ecosystem exchange fluxes from the tropics, temperature, precipitation, and drought time series explained a considerable amount of flux variability in the NH and SH extra-tropics. Fires accounted for 25% to 30% of the total modeled variability in the NH (north of 23N) with this amount decreasing to about 20% in the SH (south of 23S). We also examined results from CMIP5 coupled Earth System Models to quantify patterns of variability in atmospheric CO2 originating from terrestrial ecosystems. We compared the variations correlated with temperature and precipitation variability to estimate the apparent climate sensitivity over the historical period, and examined the implications for long term carbon storage as climate changes. The results from these generalized simulations show that accounting for the latitudinal variability in atmospheric CO2 as well as the time-lag from transport facilitates a better relationship between fluxes and observed variations.

Keppel-Aleks, G.; Randerson, J. T.; Mu, M.; Doney, S. C.; van der Werf, G.; Collatz, G. J.; Morton, D. C.

2013-12-01

25

Radiative transfer through terrestrial atmosphere and ocean: Software package SCIATRAN  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

SCIATRAN is a comprehensive software package for the modeling of radiative transfer processes in the terrestrial atmosphere and ocean in the spectral range from the ultraviolet to the thermal infrared (0.18-40 ?m) including multiple scattering processes, polarization, thermal emission and ocean-atmosphere coupling. The software is capable of modeling spectral and angular distributions of the intensity or the Stokes vector of the transmitted, scattered, reflected, and emitted radiation assuming either a plane-parallel or a spherical atmosphere. Simulations are done either in the scalar or in the vector mode (i.e. accounting for the polarization) for observations by space-, air-, ship- and balloon-borne, ground-based, and underwater instruments in various viewing geometries (nadir, off-nadir, limb, occultation, zenith-sky, off-axis). All significant radiative transfer processes are accounted for. These are, e.g. the Rayleigh scattering, scattering by aerosol and cloud particles, absorption by gaseous components, and bidirectional reflection by an underlying surface including Fresnel reflection from a flat or roughened ocean surface. The software package contains several radiative transfer solvers including finite difference and discrete-ordinate techniques, an extensive database, and a specific module for solving inverse problems. In contrast to many other radiative transfer codes, SCIATRAN incorporates an efficient approach to calculate the so-called Jacobians, i.e. derivatives of the intensity with respect to various atmospheric and surface parameters. In this paper we discuss numerical methods used in SCIATRAN to solve the scalar and vector radiative transfer equation, describe databases of atmospheric, oceanic, and surface parameters incorporated in SCIATRAN, and demonstrate how to solve some selected radiative transfer problems using the SCIATRAN package. During the last decades, a lot of studies have been published demonstrating that SCIATRAN is a valuable tool for a wide range of remote sensing applications. Here, we present some selected comparisons of SCIATRAN simulations to published benchmark results, independent radiative transfer models, and various measurements from satellite, ground-based, and ship instruments. Methods for solving inverse problems related to remote sensing of the Earth's atmosphere using the SCIATRAN software are outside the scope of this study and will be discussed in a follow-up paper. The SCIATRAN software package along with a detailed User's Guide is freely available for non-commercial use via the webpage of the Institute of Environmental Physics (IUP), University of Bremen: http://www.iup.physik.uni-bremen.de/sciatran.

Rozanov, V. V.; Rozanov, A. V.; Kokhanovsky, A. A.; Burrows, J. P.

2014-01-01

26

Atmospheric dynamics of terrestrial exoplanets over a wide range of orbital and atmospheric parameters  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The recent discoveries of terrestrial exoplanets and super Earths extending over a broad range of orbital and physical parameters, suggests that these planets will span a wide range of climatic regimes. Characterization of the atmospheres of warm super Earths has already begun and will be extended to smaller and more distant planets over the coming decade. The habitability of these worlds may be strongly affected by their three-dimensional atmospheric circulation regimes, since the global climate feedbacks that control the inner and outer edges of the habitable zone--including transitions to Snowball-like states and runaway-greenhouse feedbacks--depend on the equator-to-pole temperature differences, pattern of relative humidity, and other aspects of the dynamics. Here, using an idealized moist atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) including a hydrological cycle, we study the dynamical principles governing the atmospheric dynamics on such planets. We show how the planetary rotation rate, planetary mass, surface gravity, heat flux from a parent star, atmospheric mass and optical thickness affect the atmospheric circulation and temperature distribution on such planets. We elucidate the possible climatic regimes and diagnose the mechanisms controlling the formation of atmospheric jet streams, Hadley cells, and the equator-to-pole temperature differences. Finally, we discuss the implications for understanding how the atmospheric circulation influences the global-scale climate feedbacks that control the width of the habitable zone.

Kaspi, Yohai; Showman, Adam

2014-05-01

27

A massive early atmosphere on Triton  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The idea of an early greenhouse atmosphere for Triton is presented and the conditions under which it may have been sustained are quantified. The volatile content of primordial Triton is modeled, and tidal heating rates are assessed to set bounds on the available energy. The atmospheric model formalism is presented, and it is shown how a massive atmosphere could have been raised by modest tidal heating fluxes. The implications of the model atmospheres for the atmospheric escape rates, the chemical evolution, and the cratering record are addressed.

Lunine, Jonathan I.; Nolan, Michael C.

1992-01-01

28

North America's net terrestrial CO2 exchange with the atmosphere 1990-2009  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Scientific understanding of the global carbon cycle is required for developing national and international policy to mitigate fossil fuel CO2 emissions by managing terrestrial carbon uptake. Toward that understanding and as a contribution to the REgional Carbon Cycle Assessment and Processes (RECCAP) project, this paper provides a synthesis of net land-atmosphere CO2 exchange for North America (Canada, United States, and Mexico) over the period 1990-2009. Only CO2 is considered, not methane or other greenhouse gases. This synthesis is based on results from three different methods: atmospheric inversion, inventory-based methods and terrestrial biosphere modeling. All methods indicate that the North American land surface was a sink for atmospheric CO2, with a net transfer from atmosphere to land. Estimates ranged from -890 to -280 Tg C yr-1, where the mean of atmospheric inversion estimates forms the lower bound of that range (a larger land sink) and the inventory-based estimate using the production approach the upper (a smaller land sink). This relatively large range is due in part to differences in how the approaches represent trade, fire and other disturbances and which ecosystems they include. Integrating across estimates, "best" estimates (i.e., measures of central tendency) are -472 ± 281 Tg C yr-1 based on the mean and standard deviation of the distribution and -360 Tg C yr-1 (with an interquartile range of -496 to -337) based on the median. Considering both the fossil fuel emissions source and the land sink, our analysis shows that North America was, however, a net contributor to the growth of CO2 in the atmosphere in the late 20th and early 21st century. With North America's mean annual fossil fuel CO2 emissions for the period 1990-2009 equal to 1720 Tg C yr-1 and assuming the estimate of -472 Tg C yr-1 as an approximation of the true terrestrial CO2 sink, the continent's source : sink ratio for this time period was 1720:472, or nearly 4:1.

King, A. W.; Andres, R. J.; Davis, K. J.; Hafer, M.; Hayes, D. J.; Huntzinger, D. N.; de Jong, B.; Kurz, W. A.; McGuire, A. D.; Vargas, R.; Wei, Y.; West, T. O.; Woodall, C. W.

2015-01-01

29

Atmospheric Dynamics of Terrestrial Exoplanets Over a Wide Range of Orbital and Atmospheric Parameters  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since the mid-1990s, nearly 1800 exoplanets have been discovered around other stars. Exoplanet discovery and characterization began with giant planets, but as the observational techniques are advancing the emphasis is gradually shifting to smaller worlds. The recent discoveries of terrestrial exoplanets and super Earths extending over a broad range of orbital and physical parameters suggests that these planets will span a wide range of climatic regimes. Characterization of the atmospheres of warm super Earths has already begun and will be extended to smaller and more distant planets over the coming decade. The habitability of these worlds may be strongly affected by their three-dimensional atmospheric circulation regimes, since the global climate feedbacks that control the inner and outer edges of the habitable zone---including transitions to Snowball-like states and runaway-greenhouse feedbacks---depend on the equator-to-pole temperature differences, pattern of relative humidity, and other aspects of the dynamics. Here, using an idealized moist atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) including a hydrological cycle, we discuss the dynamical principles governing the atmospheric dynamics on such planets. We show how the planetary rotation rate, planetary mass, surface gravity, heat flux from a parent star, optical thickness and atmospheric mass affect the atmospheric circulation and temperature distribution on such planets. Our simulations demonstrate that equator-to-pole temperature differences, meridional heat transport rates, structure and strength of the winds, and the hydrological cycle vary strongly with these parameters, implying that the sensitivity of the planet to global climate feedbacks will depend significantly on the atmospheric circulation. We elucidate the possible climatic regimes and diagnose the mechanisms controlling the formation of atmospheric jet stream, Hadley and Ferrel cells and latitudinal temperature differences. Finally, we will discuss how the atmospheric dynamics influence the global-scale climate feedbacks that control the width of the habitable zone, and their effects on the global climate.

Kaspi, Yohai; Showman, Adam P.

2014-11-01

30

Seven years of recent European net terrestrial carbon dioxide exchange constrained by atmospheric observations  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present an estimate of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2 in Europe for the years 2001–2007. It is derived with a data assimilation that uses a large set of atmospheric CO2 mole fraction observations (?70 000) to guide relatively simple descriptions of terrestrial and oceanic net exchange, while fossil fuel and fire emissions are prescribed. Weekly terrestrial sources and

W. Peters; M. C. Krol; G. R. van der Werf; S. Houweling; C. D. Jones; J. Hughes; K. Schaefer; K. A. Masarie; A. R. Jacobson; J. B. Miller; C. H. Cho; M. Ramonet; M. Schmidt; L. Ciattaglia; F. Apadula; D. Heltai; F. Meinhardt; A. G. di Sarra; S. Piacentino; D. Sferlazzo; T. Aalto; J. Hatakka; J. Ström; L. Haszpra; H. A. J. Meijer; S. van der Laan; R. E. M. Neubert; A. Jordan; X. Rodó; J.-A. Morguí; A. T. Vermeulen; E. Popa; K. Rozanski; M. Zimnoch; A. C. Manning; M. Leuenberger; C. Uglietti; A. J. Dolman; P. Ciais; M. Heimann; P. P. Tans

2010-01-01

31

Photochemistry in Terrestrial Exoplanet Atmospheres. I. Photochemistry Model and Benchmark Cases  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a comprehensive photochemistry model for exploration of the chemical composition of terrestrial exoplanet atmospheres. The photochemistry model is designed from the ground up to have the capacity to treat all types of terrestrial planet atmospheres, ranging from oxidizing through reducing, which makes the code suitable for applications for the wide range of anticipated terrestrial exoplanet compositions. The one-dimensional chemical transport model treats up to 800 chemical reactions, photochemical processes, dry and wet deposition, surface emission, and thermal escape of O, H, C, N, and S bearing species, as well as formation and deposition of elemental sulfur and sulfuric acid aerosols. We validate the model by computing the atmospheric composition of current Earth and Mars and find agreement with observations of major trace gases in Earth's and Mars' atmospheres. We simulate several plausible atmospheric scenarios of terrestrial exoplanets and choose three benchmark cases for atmospheres from reducing to oxidizing. The most interesting finding is that atomic hydrogen is always a more abundant reactive radical than the hydroxyl radical in anoxic atmospheres. Whether atomic hydrogen is the most important removal path for a molecule of interest also depends on the relevant reaction rates. We also find that volcanic carbon compounds (i.e., CH4 and CO2) are chemically long-lived and tend to be well mixed in both reducing and oxidizing atmospheres, and their dry deposition velocities to the surface control the atmospheric oxidation states. Furthermore, we revisit whether photochemically produced oxygen can cause false positives for detecting oxygenic photosynthesis, and find that in 1 bar CO2-rich atmospheres oxygen and ozone may build up to levels that have conventionally been accepted as signatures of life, if there is no surface emission of reducing gases. The atmospheric scenarios presented in this paper can serve as the benchmark atmospheres for quickly assessing the lifetime of trace gases in reducing, weakly oxidizing, and highly oxidizing atmospheres on terrestrial exoplanets for the exploration of possible biosignature gases.

Hu, Renyu; Seager, Sara; Bains, William

2012-12-01

32

Atmospheric transport of persistent pollutants governs uptake by holarctic terrestrial biota  

SciTech Connect

The atmospheric deposition of PCBs, DDT, and lindane, governed uptake in terrestrial biota in the Scandinavian peninsula. Mammalian herbivores and predators as well as predatory insects contained higher levels of pollutants at locations where the fallout load was high than at stations where atmospheric deposition was lower, and the two variables were significantly correlated.

Larsson, P.; Okla, L.; Woin, Per (Limnology, Lund (Sweden))

1990-10-01

33

Effects of atmospheric ammonia (NH 3) on terrestrial vegetation: a review  

Microsoft Academic Search

At the global scale, among all N (nitrogen) species in the atmosphere and their deposition on to terrestrial vegetation and other receptors, NH3 (ammonia) is considered to be the foremost. The major sources for atmospheric NH3 are agricultural activities and animal feedlot operations, followed by biomass burning (including forest fires) and to a lesser extent fossil fuel combustion. Close to

S. V Krupa

2003-01-01

34

The Center for the Study of Terrestrial and Extraterrestrial Atmospheres (CSTEA)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Center for the Study of Terrestrial and Extraterrestrial Atmospheres (CSTEA) was established in 1992. The center began with 14 active Principal Investigators (PI's). The research of the Center's PIs has, for the most part, continued in the same four areas as presented in the original proposal: Remote Sensing, Atmospheric Chemistry, Sensors and Detectors, and Spacecraft Dynamics.

Thorpe, Arthur N.; Morris, Vernon R.

1997-01-01

35

Evaluation of terrestrial carbon cycle models with atmospheric CO2 measurements: Results from transient simulations considering increasing CO2, climate, and land-use effects  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An atmospheric transport model and observations of atmospheric CO2 are used to evaluate the performance of four Terrestrial Carbon Models (TCMs) in simulating the seasonal dynamics and interannual variability of atmospheric CO2 between 1980 and 1991. The TCMs were forced with time varying atmospheric CO2 concentrations, climate, and land use to simulate the net exchange of carbon between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere. The monthly surface CO2 fluxes from the TCMs were used to drive the Model of Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry and the simulated seasonal cycles and concentration anomalies are compared with observations from several stations in the CMDL network. The TCMs underestimate the amplitude of the seasonal cycle and tend to simulate too early an uptake of CO2 during the spring by approximately one to two months. The model fluxes show an increase in amplitude as a result of land-use change, but that pattern is not so evident in the simulated atmospheric amplitudes, and the different models suggest different causes for the amplitude increase (i.e., CO2 fertilization, climate variability or land use change). The comparison of the modeled concentration anomalies with the observed anomalies indicates that either the TCMs underestimate interannual variability in the exchange of CO2 between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere, or that either the variability in the ocean fluxes or the atmospheric transport may be key factors in the atmospheric interannual variability.

Dargaville, R.J.; Heimann, M.; McGuire, A.D.; Prentice, I.C.; Kicklighter, D.W.; Joos, F.; Clein, J.S.; Esser, G.; Foley, J.; Kaplan, J.; Meier, R.A.; Melillo, J.M.; Moore, B., III; Ramankutty, N.; Reichenau, T.; Schloss, A.; Sitch, S.; Tian, H.; Williams, L.J.; Wittenberg, U.

2002-01-01

36

Planetary Atmospheres Earth and the Other Terrestrial Worlds  

E-print Network

of molecular nitrogen (N2 - 78%) and oxygen (O2 - 21%) Atmospheric Pressure Gas pressure depends on both increases the pressure. #12;2 Atmospheric Pressure · Pressure and density decrease with altitude because of Atmospheres · Create pressure that determines whether liquid water can exist on surface · Absorb and scatter

Crenshaw, Michael

37

On the (anticipated) diversity of terrestrial planet atmospheres  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

On our way toward the characterization of smaller and more temperate planets, missions dedicated to the spectroscopic observation of exoplanets will teach us about the wide diversity of classes of planetary atmospheres, many of them probably having no equivalent in the Solar System. But what kind of atmospheres can we expect? To start answering this question, many theoretical studies have tried to understand and model the various processes controlling the formation and evolution of planetary atmospheres, with some success in the Solar System. Here, we shortly review these processes and we try to give an idea of the various type of atmospheres that these processes can create. As will be made clear, current atmosphere evolution models have many shortcomings yet, and need heavy calibrations. With that in mind, we will thus discuss how observations with a mission similar to EChO would help us unravel the link between a planet's environment and its atmosphere.

Leconte, Jérémy; Forget, François; Lammer, Helmut

2014-07-01

38

The Upper Valanginian (Early Cretaceous) positive carbon–isotope event recorded in terrestrial plants  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our understanding of the ancient ocean-atmosphere system has focused on oceanic proxies. However, the study of terrestrial proxies is equally necessary to constrain our understanding of ancient climates and linkages between the terrestrial and oceanic carbon reservoirs. We have analyzed carbon–isotope ratios from fossil plant material through the Valanginian and Lower Hauterivian from a shallow-marine, ammonite-constrained succession in the Crimean

Darren R. Gröcke; Gregory D. Price; Stuart A. Robinson; Evgenij Y. Baraboshkin; Jörg Mutterlose; Alastair H. Ruffell

2005-01-01

39

The Upper Valanginian (Early Cretaceous) positive carbon-isotope event recorded in terrestrial plants [rapid communication  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our understanding of the ancient ocean-atmosphere system has focused on oceanic proxies. However, the study of terrestrial proxies is equally necessary to constrain our understanding of ancient climates and linkages between the terrestrial and oceanic carbon reservoirs. We have analyzed carbon isotope ratios from fossil plant material through the Valanginian and Lower Hauterivian from a shallow-marine, ammonite-constrained succession in the

Darren R. Gröcke; Gregory D. Price; Stuart A. Robinson; Evgenij Y. Baraboshkin; Jörg Mutterlose; Alastair H. Ruffell

2005-01-01

40

The early atmosphere: a new picture.  

PubMed

Over the last several years, many of the fundamental ideas concerning the composition and chemical evolution of the Earth's early atmosphere have changed. While many aspects of this subject are clouded--either uncertain or unknown, a new picture is emerging. We are just beginning to understand how astronomical, geochemical, and atmospheric processes each contributed to the development of the gaseous envelope around the third planet from the sun some 4.6 billion years ago and how that envelope chemically evolved over the history of our planet. Simple compounds in that gaseous envelope, energized by atmospheric lightning and/or solar ultraviolet radiation, formed molecules of increasing complexity that eventually evolved into the first living systems on our planet. This process is called "chemical evolution" and immediately preceded biological evolution; once life developed and evolved, it began to alter the chemical composition of the atmosphere that provided the very essence of its creation. Photosynthetic organisms which have the ability to biochemically transform carbon dioxide and water to carbohydrates, which they use for food, produce large amounts of molecular oxygen (O2) as a by-product of the reaction. Atmospheric oxygen photochemically formed ozone, which absorbs ultraviolet radiation from the sun and shields the Earth's surface from this biologically lethal radiation. Once atmospheric ozone levels increased sufficiently, life could leave the safety of the oceans and go ashore for the first time. Throughout the history of our planet, there has been strong interaction between life and the atmosphere. Understanding our cosmic roots is particularly relevant as we embark on a search for life outside the Earth. At this very moment, several radio telescopes around the world are searching for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI). PMID:11542093

Levine, J S

1986-01-01

41

In situ observations of the atmospheres of terrestrial planetary bodies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Direct observations of planetary atmospheres are scarce and significantly more data are needed for the understanding of their behavior. The principal theme of this dissertation is the exploration of planetary atmospheres by means of in situ observations, focusing on investigations performed by payloads operating on the planetary surface. The contextual frame includes the whole palette of planetary exploration including definition of scientific objectives, observational strategies, scientific payload and data analysis, as well as development of technological solutions and simulation models for planetary missions. Thus approach also led to the initiation of the planetary missions MetNet and NetLander to Mars. This work contributes to both in situ atmospheric observations and atmospheric modeling, which are strongly intertwined. Modeling efforts require observations to give solid background and foundation for the simulations, and on the other hand, definition of observational strategies and instrumentation gets guidance from modeling efforts to optimize the use of mission resources, as is successfully demonstrated in this dissertation. The dissertation consists of Summary and nine original scientific publications. Publications 1 to 7 and Summary address the development of new atmospheric science payloads for exploration missions to Mars and Titan, a Saturnian moon. Actual and planned missions included are the Mars-96 Program and its Small Surface Stations and Penetrators during the years 1988-1996, PPI/HASI onboard the Cassini/Huygens spacecraft to Saturn and its moon Titan in 1989-2005, the MET-P payload onboard the Mars Polar Lander in 1997-1999, the BAROBIT instrument for the Beagle 2 lander in 2001-2003, the NetLander Mars Mission in 1997-2001 and the ongoing Mars MetNet Mission, started in 2000. Specifically, Publication 4 reviews the sensor qualification process that facilitated the use of new type of atmospheric sensors at Mars, while Publications 2 and 7, as well as Summary, address the highly successful determination of the Titan atmospheric pressure profile. Publication 8 combines in situ observations and simulations by analyzing Mars Pathfinder measurements with the help of a Martian mesoscale atmospheric model. Finally, in Publication 9 the effect of airborne dust and CO 2 on the radiative transfer in the Martian atmosphere is assessed and a new radiative transfer paramerization scheme for the mesoscale model is introduced.

Harri, Ari-Matti

2005-11-01

42

Paleolimnological archives of environmental change in aquatic, terrestrial, and atmospheric systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lake sediments accumulate material derived from the atmosphere, the lake catchment, and the lake itself, and these materials can be used to infer the history of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, the climate system, and global biogeochemical cycling. Several case-studies will be presented to discuss the reconstruction of environmental variability from the paleolimnological record including studies of (1) Climate history: Closed-basin

S. C. Fritz; D. R. Engstrom

1993-01-01

43

Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 68 (2006) 539557 Ionogram heighttimeintensity observations of descending  

E-print Network

Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 68 (2006) 539­557 Ionogram height rates and tidal periodicities of Es, is applied on ionogram recordings made during a summer period from solstice to equinox on the island of Milos (36.71N; 24.51E). On the average, the ionogram HTI analysis

Christakis, Nikolaos

44

Large impact events and atmospheric evolution on the terrestrial planets  

Microsoft Academic Search

An examination is given of the effects of the collision of large asteriods and comets on the atmosphere of the Earth and Earth-like planets. The first task undertaken is the characterization of the impact rates in the inner solar system during the present time, and during the first billion years of Solar System history when the flux was changing rapidly.

David Harry Grinspoon

1989-01-01

45

A New Photochemistry Code for Terrestrial Exoplanet Atmospheres  

E-print Network

-state concentration of CH4, NH3, N2O, SO2, H2S, H2SO4 · Mars CO2 atmosphere stabilized by odd hydrogens Renyu Hu, 2012-transport equation for 111 molecules and aerosols · Eddy diffusion · Chemical kinetics · Photolysis · Boundary to 1 Pa. · Equivalent water loss rate due to H diffusion-limited escape is 5.1�1014 kg yr-1

Johnson, Robert E.

46

Gamma-ray bursts and terrestrial planetary atmospheres  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe results of modelling the effects on Earth-like planets of long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) within a few kiloparsecs. A primary effect is generation of nitrogen oxide compounds which deplete ozone. Ozone depletion leads to an increase in solar UVB radiation at the surface, enhancing DNA damage, particularly in marine microorganisms such as phytoplankton. In addition, we expect increased atmospheric

B. C. Thomas; A. L. Melott

2006-01-01

47

Time-Dependent Simulations of the Formation and Evolution of Disk-Accreted Atmospheres Around Terrestrial Planets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the early, embedded phase of evolution of terrestrial planets, the planetary core accumulates gas from the circumstellar disk into a planetary envelope. This atmosphere is very significant for the further thermal evolution of the planet by forming an insulation around the rocky core. The disk-captured envelope is also the staring point for the atmospheric evolution where the atmosphere is modified by outgassing from the planetary core and atmospheric mass loss once the planet is exposed to the radiation field of the host star. The final amount of persistent atmosphere around the evolved planet very much characterizes the planet and is a key criterion for habitability. The established way to study disk accumulated atmospheres are hydrostatic models, even though in many cases the assumption of stationarity is unlikely to be fulfilled. We present, for the first time, time-dependent radiation hydrodynamics simulations of the accumulation process and the interaction between the disk-nebula gas and the planetary core. The calculations were performed with the TAPIR-Code (short for The adaptive, implicit RHD-Code) in spherical symmetry solving the equations of hydrodynamics, gray radiative transport, and convective energy transport. The models range from the surface of the solid core up to the Hill radius where the planetary envelope merges into the surrounding protoplanetary disk. Our results show that the time-scale of gas capturing and atmospheric growth strongly depends on the mass of the solid core. The amount of atmosphere accumulated during the lifetime of the protoplanetary disk (typically a few Myr) varies accordingly with the mass of the planet. Thus, a core with Mars-mass will end up with about 10 bar of atmosphere while for an Earth-mass core, the surface pressure reaches several 1000 bar. Even larger planets with several Earth masses quickly capture massive envelopes which in turn become gravitationally unstable leading to runaway accretion and the eventual formation of a gas planet.

Stoekl, Alexander; Dorfi, Ernst

2014-05-01

48

Gamma-ray bursts and terrestrial planetary atmospheres  

E-print Network

We describe results of modeling the effects of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) within a few kiloparsecs of an Earth-like planet. A primary effect is generation of nitrogen oxide compounds which deplete ozone. Ozone depletion leads to an increase in solar UVB radiation at the surface, enhancing DNA damage, particularly in marine microorganisms such as phytoplankton. In addition, we expect increased atmospheric opacity due to buildup of nitrogen dioxide produced by the burst and enhanced precipitation of nitric acid. We review here previous work on this subject and discuss recent developments.

Thomas, B C; Thomas, Brian C.; Melott, Adrian L.

2006-01-01

49

Synchronized Terrestrial-Atmospheric Deglacial Records Around the North Atlantic  

Microsoft Academic Search

On the basis of synchronization of three carbon-14 (14C)-dated lacustrine sequences from Sweden with tree ring and ice core records, the absolute age of the Younger Dryas-Preboreal climatic shift was determined to be 11,450 to 11,390 ± 80 years before the present. A 150-year-long cooling in the early Preboreal, associated with rising delta14C values, is evident in all records and

Svante Bjorck; Bernd Kromer; Sigfus Johnsen; Ole Bennike; Dan Hammarlund; Geoffrey Lemdahl; Goran Possnert; Tine Lander Rasmussen; Barbara Wohlfarth; Claus Uffe Hammer; Marco Spurk

1996-01-01

50

XUV-Exposed, Non-Hydrostatic Hydrogen-Rich Upper Atmospheres of Terrestrial Planets. Part I: Atmospheric Expansion and Thermal Escape  

PubMed Central

Abstract The recently discovered low-density “super-Earths” Kepler-11b, Kepler-11f, Kepler-11d, Kepler-11e, and planets such as GJ 1214b represent the most likely known planets that are surrounded by dense H/He envelopes or contain deep H2O oceans also surrounded by dense hydrogen envelopes. Although these super-Earths are orbiting relatively close to their host stars, they have not lost their captured nebula-based hydrogen-rich or degassed volatile-rich steam protoatmospheres. Thus, it is interesting to estimate the maximum possible amount of atmospheric hydrogen loss from a terrestrial planet orbiting within the habitable zone of late main sequence host stars. For studying the thermosphere structure and escape, we apply a 1-D hydrodynamic upper atmosphere model that solves the equations of mass, momentum, and energy conservation for a planet with the mass and size of Earth and for a super-Earth with a size of 2 REarth and a mass of 10 MEarth. We calculate volume heating rates by the stellar soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet radiation (XUV) and expansion of the upper atmosphere, its temperature, density, and velocity structure and related thermal escape rates during the planet's lifetime. Moreover, we investigate under which conditions both planets enter the blow-off escape regime and may therefore experience loss rates that are close to the energy-limited escape. Finally, we discuss the results in the context of atmospheric evolution and implications for habitability of terrestrial planets in general. Key Words: Stellar activity—Low-mass stars—Early atmospheres—Earth-like exoplanets—Energetic neutral atoms—Ion escape—Habitability. Astrobiology 13, 1011–1029. PMID:24251443

Lammer, Helmut; Odert, Petra; Kulikov, Yuri N.; Kislyakova, Kristina G.; Khodachenko, Maxim L.; Güdel, Manuel; Hanslmeier, Arnold; Biernat, Helfried

2013-01-01

51

Carbon Fluxes Between the Atmosphere, Terrestrial, and River Systems Across a Glacier-Dominated Landscape in Southcentral Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The coastal Gulf of Alaska region is experiencing rapid and accelerating changes due to local and regional warming. Predicted high latitude warming may result in rapid recession of glaciers with subsequent changes in river discharge, nutrient fluxes into the rivers, shifts in landscape vegetation cover, and altered CO2 fluxes affecting the regional carbon balance. As glaciers recede an increase in glacier-dominated river discharge and a change in seasonality of the river discharge are expected. Recently deglaciated landscapes will, over time, be occupied by a succession of vegetation cover that are likely to alter the fluxes of carbon both between the atmosphere and terrestrial ecosystems, and between terrestrial ecosystems and stream and river systems. As the landscape evolves from deglaciated forelands it is expected that there is low to no CO2 fluxes between the atmosphere and the recently deglaciated landscape, as well as dissolved organic and inorganic carbon inputs into rivers and streams. These recently deglaciated landscapes will transition to early successional plant species and on towards mature spruce forests. Each transitional terrestrial ecosystem will have different carbon cycling between the atmosphere, terrestrial, and aquatic systems until the mature spruce forests which is expected to have high carbon uptake and sequestration as well as increased inputs of dissolved organic and inorganic carbon into the rivers and streams. A new research project was initiated in the summer of 2011 focusing on glacier-dominated landscapes within the Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve in southcentral Alaska with the objective to quantify how the transition from deglaciated forelands to mature spruce forests (a successional sequence) alters the patterns and magnitudes of CO2 exchange, the dissolved carbon inputs from terrestrial to aquatic systems and the extent to which these are manifested due to changes in glacier coverage. We seek to examine present-day carbon cycling along a vegetation successional sequence and plan to use a space-for-time substitution to make predictions about the future evolution of carbon cycling between the atmosphere, terrestrial landscape, and the river and stream systems This year we have established a 30m eddy covariance tower in a mature spruce forest to investigate the magnitude and patterns of carbon exchange between the atmosphere and terrestrial ecosystem as well as water sampling from adjacent rivers and streams to analyze for dissolved organic and inorganic carbon fluxes from the forested ecosystem into the river and stream systems. High rates of carbon sequestration into the mature spruce forests indicate that these forests along the glacier-dominated Copper River watershed are important sinks for carbon and may be contributing large amounts of inorganic carbon to the rivers which are transported downstream to and eventually into the marine ecosystem of the Gulf of Alaska.

Zulueta, R. C.; Welker, J. M.; Tomco, P. L.

2011-12-01

52

Gamma-ray bursts and terrestrial planetary atmospheres  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We describe results of modelling the effects on Earth-like planets of long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) within a few kiloparsecs. A primary effect is generation of nitrogen oxide compounds which deplete ozone. Ozone depletion leads to an increase in solar UVB radiation at the surface, enhancing DNA damage, particularly in marine microorganisms such as phytoplankton. In addition, we expect increased atmospheric opacity due to build-up of nitrogen dioxide produced by the burst and enhanced precipitation of nitric acid. We review here previous work on this subject and discuss recent developments, including further discussion of our estimates of the rates of impacting GRBs and the possible role of short-duration bursts.

Thomas, B. C.; Melott, A. L.

2006-07-01

53

Gamma-ray bursts and terrestrial planetary atmospheres  

E-print Network

We describe results of modeling the effects on Earth-like planets of long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) within a few kiloparsecs. A primary effect is generation of nitrogen oxide compounds which deplete ozone. Ozone depletion leads to an increase in solar UVB radiation at the surface, enhancing DNA damage, particularly in marine microorganisms such as phytoplankton. In addition, we expect increased atmospheric opacity due to buildup of nitrogen dioxide produced by the burst and enhanced precipitation of nitric acid. We review here previous work on this subject and discuss recent developments, including further discussion of our estimates of the rates of impacting GRBs and the possible role of short-duration bursts.

Brian C. Thomas; Adrian L. Melott

2006-05-04

54

The Terrestrial Planets Large Bodies  

E-print Network

: Greenhouse Effect: Solar heating & atmospheric cooling balance Helps determine if H2O is liquid, ice atmosphere. May have had early oceans that evaporated resulting in a Runaway Greenhouse Effect. Gravity elements. #12;The evolution of Terrestrial Planet atmospheres is driven by three primary effects

Gaudi, B. Scott

55

Greening the terrestrial biosphere: simulated feedbacks on atmospheric heat and energy circulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Much research focuses on how the terrestrial biosphere influences climate through changes in surface albedo (reflectivity), stomatal conductance and leaf area index (LAI). By using a fully-coupled GCM (HadCM3LC), our research objective was to induce an increase in the growth of global vegetation to isolate the effect of increased LAI on atmospheric exchange of heat and moisture. Our C ontrol

S. A. Cowling; C. D. Jones; P. M. Cox

2009-01-01

56

Correlation of Early Tertiary Terrestrial Deposits of the Amaga Basin, Cauca Depression, Colombian Andes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Amaga Formation of the Amaga Basin preserves early Tertiary terrestrial deposits of many facies: channel, crevasse splay, paludal, flood plain, point bar, etc. These deposits lie between two major strike-slip fault zones, the Cauca and the Romeral in the Cauca Valley of the northern Andes of Colombia. Coal deposits characterize the lower part of the stratigraphic section; fine to

G. M. Sierra; W. D. MacDonald

2001-01-01

57

Evaluation of atmospheric aerosol and tropospheric ozone effects on global terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The increasing human activities have produced large amounts of air pollutants ejected into the atmosphere, in which atmospheric aerosols and tropospheric ozone are considered to be especially important because of their negative impacts on human health and their impacts on global climate through either their direct radiative effect or indirect effect on land-atmosphere CO2 exchange. This dissertation dedicates to quantifying and evaluating the aerosol and tropospheric ozone effects on global terrestrial ecosystem dynamics using a modeling approach. An ecosystem model, the integrated Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (iTem), is developed to simulate biophysical and biogeochemical processes in terrestrial ecosystems. A two-broad-band atmospheric radiative transfer model together with the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measured atmospheric parameters are used to well estimate global downward solar radiation and the direct and diffuse components in comparison with observations. The atmospheric radiative transfer modeling framework were used to quantify the aerosol direct radiative effect, showing that aerosol loadings cause 18.7 and 12.8 W m -2 decrease of direct-beam Photosynthetic Active Radiation (PAR) and Near Infrared Radiation (NIR) respectively, and 5.2 and 4.4 W m -2 increase of diffuse PAR and NIR, respectively, leading to a total 21.9 W m-2 decrease of total downward solar radiation over the global land surface during the period of 2003-2010. The results also suggested that the aerosol effect may be overwhelmed by clouds because of the stronger extinction and scattering ability of clouds. Applications of the iTem with solar radiation data and with or without considering the aerosol loadings shows that aerosol loading enhances the terrestrial productions [Gross Primary Production (GPP), Net Primary Production (NPP) and Net Ecosystem Production (NEP)] and carbon emissions through plant respiration (RA) in global terrestrial ecosystems over the period of 2003-2010. Ecosystem heterotrophic respiration (RH) was negatively affected by the aerosol loading. These results support previous conclusions of the advantage of aerosol light scattering effect on plant productions in other studies but suggest there is strong spatial variation. This study finds indirect aerosol effects on terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics through affecting plant phenology, thermal and hydrological environments. All these evidences suggested that the aerosol direct radiative effect on global terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics should be considered to better understand the global carbon cycle and climate change. An ozone sub-model is developed in this dissertation and fully coupled with iTem. The coupled model, named iTemO3 considers the processes of ozone stomatal deposition, plant defense to ozone influx, ozone damage and plant repairing mechanism. By using a global atmospheric chemical transport model (GACTM) estimated ground-level ozone concentration data, the model estimated global annual stomatal ozone deposition is 234.0 Tg O3 yr-1 and indicates which regions have high ozone damage risk. Different plant functional types, sunlit and shaded leaves are shown to have different responses to ozone. The model predictions suggest that ozone has caused considerable change on global terrestrial ecosystem carbon storage and carbon exchanges over the study period 2004-2008. The study suggests that uncertainty of the key parameters in iTemO3 could result in large errors in model predictions. Thus more experimental data for better model parameterization is highly needed.

Chen, Min

58

Net primary production of terrestrial ecosystems in China and its equilibrium response to changes in climate and atmospheric CO? concentration  

E-print Network

The Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM, version 4.0) was used to estimate net primary production (NPP) in China for contemporary climate and NPP responses to elevated CO? and climate changes projected by three atmospheric ...

Xiao, Xiangming.; Melillo, Jerry M.; Kicklighter, David W.; Pan, Yude.; McGuire, A. David.; Helfrich III, J.V.K.

59

Terrestrial ecosystems response to future changes in climate and atmospheric CO2 concentration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The response of the terrestrial carbon cycle to future changes in climate and atmospheric CO2 is assessed by analysing simulation results for the 2006-2100 period made with the second generation Canadian Earth system model (CanESM2) for the RCP 2.6, RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 climate change scenarios. Our interest is in the extent to which global terrestrial carbon pools and sinks, in particular those of the Amazonian region, are vulnerable to the adverse effects of climate change. CanESM2 results indicate that land remains an overall sink of atmospheric carbon for the 2006-2100 period. The net carbon uptake by land in response to changes in climate and atmospheric CO2 is close to 20, 80 and 140 Pg C for the RCP 2.6, 4.5 and 8.5 scenarios, respectively. The latitudinal structure of future atmosphere-land CO2 flux remains similar to that observed for the historical period with northern mid- to high-latitude regions gaining carbon from the atmosphere while the tropics remain either carbon neutral or a modest source of atmospheric carbon depending on scenario. These changes occur in conjunction with simulated precipitation and soil moisture increases over northern mid- and high-latitude land regions and precipitation and soil moisture decreases over the South American continent in all scenarios. Compared to other regions of the globe, which are either carbon sinks or near neutral, the Amazonian region is simulated to be a net source of carbon during the 21st century. Moreover, and unexpectedly, the rate of carbon loss to the atmosphere from the Amazonian region is largely independent of the differences between the three scenarios considered.

Arora, V. K.; Boer, G. J.

2014-08-01

60

Terrestrial ecosystems response to future changes in climate and atmospheric CO2 concentration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The response of the terrestrial carbon cycle to future changes in climate and atmospheric CO2 is assessed by analyzing simulations, for the 2006-2100 period, made with the second generation Canadian Earth system model (CanESM2) for the RCP 2.6, RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 climate change scenarios. Our interest is in the extent to which global terrestrial carbon pools and sinks, in particular those of the Amazonian region, are vulnerable to the adverse effects of climate change. CanESM2 results indicate that land remains an overall sink of atmospheric carbon for the 2006-2100 period. The net carbon uptake by land in response to changes in climate and atmospheric CO2 is close to 20, 80 and 140 Pg C for the RCP 2.6, 4.5 and 8.5 scenarios, respectively. The latitudinal structure of future atmosphere-land CO2 flux remains similar to that observed for the historical period with northern mid- to high-latitude regions gaining carbon from the atmosphere while the tropics remain either carbon neutral or a modest source of atmospheric carbon depending on scenario. These changes occur in conjunction with simulated precipitation and soil moisture increases over northern mid- and high-latitude land regions and precipitation and soil moisture decreases over the South American continent in all scenarios. Compared to other regions of the globe, which are either carbon sinks or near neutral, the Amazonian region is simulated to be a net source of carbon during the 21st century. Moreover, and unexpectedly, the rate of carbon loss to the atmosphere from the Amazonian region is largely independent of the differences between the three scenarios considered.

Arora, V. K.; Boer, G. J.

2014-03-01

61

Atmospheric Carbonyl Sulfide Constraints on Terrestrial Carbon Cycling in the C4MIP Models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In order for terrestrial ecosystem models to have predictive capacity when embedded in carbon-climate models, the underlying processes of gross primary production (GPP) and respiration must be better understood. However, GPP and respiration flux estimates have generally been made at small spatial scales using eddy flux techniques. One emerging approach to large-scale GPP analysis is to leverage the relationship between terrestrial GPP and observations of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide. Here we evaluate the eleven C4MIP carbon-climate models using historical observations of carbonyl sulfide. The COS observations were most consistent with C4MIP models that exhibited large historical and future growth in global GPP. This conclusion was not sensitive to alternative parameterizations for the COS-GPP relationship as well as to a wide range of carbonyl sulfide source and sink estimates.

Campbell, J. E.; Berry, J. A.; Seibt, U.; Smith, S. J.; Montzka, S. A.

2012-12-01

62

CO2 greenhouse in the early martian atmosphere: SO2 inhibits condensation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Many investigators of the early martian climate have suggested that a dense carbon dioxide atmosphere was present and warmed the surface above the melting point of water (J.B. Pollack, J.F. Kasting, S.M. Richardson, and K. Poliakoff 1987. Icarus 71, 203-224). However, J.F. Kasting (1991. Icarus 94, 1-13) pointed out that previous thermal models of the primitive martian atmosphere had not considered the condensation of CO2. When this effect was incorporated, Kasting found that CO2 by itself is inadequate to warm the surface. SO2 absorbs strongly in the near UV region of the solar spectrum. While a small amount of SO2 may have a negligible effect by itself on the surface temperature, it may have significantly warmed the middle atmosphere of early Mars, much as ozone warms the terrestrial stratosphere today. If this region is kept warm enough to inhibit the condensation of CO2, then CO2 remains a viable greenhouse gas. Our preliminary radiative modeling shows that the addition of 0.1 ppmv of SO2 in a 2 bar CO2 atmosphere raises the temperature of the middle atmosphere by approximately 10 degrees, so that the upper atmosphere in a 1 D model remains above the condensation temperature of CO2. In addition, this amount of SO2 in the atmosphere provides an effective UV shield for a hypothetical biosphere on the martian surface.

Yung, Y. L.; Nair, H.; Gerstell, M. F.

1997-01-01

63

Sulfur Chemistry in the Early and Present Atmosphere of Mars  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Atmospheric sulfur species resulting from volcanic emissions impact the composition and chemistry of the atmosphere, impact the climate, and hence, the habitability of Mars and impact the mineralogy and composition of the surface of Mars. The geochemical/ photochemical cycling of sulfur species between the interior (via volcanism), the atmosphere (atmospheric photochemical and chemical processes) and the deposition of sulfuric acid on the surface of Mars is an important, but as yet poorly understood geochemical/ photochemical cycle on Mars. There is no observational evidence to indicate that Mars is volcanically active at the present time, however, there is strong evidence that volcanism was an important and widespread process on early Mars. The chemistry and photochemistry of sulfur species in the early and present atmosphere of Mars will be assessed using a one-dimensional photochemical model. Since it is generally assumed that the atmosphere of early Mars was significantly denser than the present 6-millibar atmosphere, photochemical calculations were performed for the present atmosphere and for the atmosphere of early Mars with assumed surface pressures of 60 and 350-millibars, where higher surface pressure resulted from enhanced atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2). The following sections include the results of earlier modeling studies, a summary of the one-dimensional photochemical model used in this study, a summary of the photochemistry and chemistry of sulfur species in the atmosphere of Mars and some of the results of the calculations.

Levine, Joel S.; Summers, M. E.

2011-01-01

64

A proxy for the SEP incoming in the high-latitude terrestrial atmosphere  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events are able to increase NOX and HOX species inside the terrestrial polar cap regions. The low background values of OH molecules during the winter Polar mesosphere makes the atmospheric response to the external forcing easier to single out (Storini and Damiani, ICRC'07 - Merida - Mexico). More precisely, the short life of HOx species allows the hydrogen radicals to follow the SEP incoming in the terrestrial atmosphere, being their variability only linked to the atmospheric chemistry (i.e. not to both chemical and transport phenomena, such as for other minor species). The proxy sensibility up to few hundreds of pfu (with proton flux at energies > 10 MeV) makes clear not only extreme particle events but also those with low flux peak and fluence. The OH data are available since November 2004, from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instrument on the nearly polar orbit of EOS AURA satellite (the vertical data resolution ranges from the stratosphere up to the mesopause region). This work shows the behaviour of MLS OH data at different altitudes, locations and seasons and the identified changes induced by some SEP events.

Damiani, Alessandro; Marisa, Storini; Claudio, Rafanelli

65

Chernobyl radionuclides in the environment: Tracers for the tight coupling of atmospheric, terrestrial, and aquatic geochemical processes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Observations of the temporal trend in concentrations of Chernobyl radionuclides in atmospheric, terrestrial, and aquatic reservoirs near Duebendorf (Zurich) aided in quantifying fluxes and transfer velocities from one reservoir to another. Radionuclide dry and wet deposition rates and velocities from the atmosphere, washout from the catchment basins into surface waters, and deposition rates and mechanisms in lakes were determined. The

P. H. Santschl; Silvia Bollhalder; Klaus Farrenkothen; Alfred Lueck; Stefan Zingg; Michael Sturm

1988-01-01

66

Constraining the Terrestrial Carbon Cycle With Atmospheric Measurements of Carbonyl Sulfide.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Carbonly sulfide (OCS), an analog of carbon dioxide, is emerging as a useful atmospheric tracer of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Previous studies have shown that OCS is taken up by leaves and soils, and its principle source to the atmosphere is oxidation of sulfur compounds produced in the oceans. Industrial activity and biomass burning are additional sources and oxidation in the stratosphere is an additional sink. In leaves, the rate of its uptake is closely linked to the rate of CO2 uptake in gross primary production (GPP). In soils, OCS uptake is controlled by diffusion and enzyme activity which is assumed to scale with heterotrophic respiration. Thus, ecosystem uptake of OCS can be related to the sum of photosynthesis and respiration while that of CO2 reflects the difference between these two processes. Flask samples and IR absorption spectroscopy are used to measure OCS concentration in the global atmosphere. A global modeling framework is needed to make use of these measurements for carbon cycle studies. We have incorporated the biochemical and biophysical mechanisms controlling OCS exchange into a land surface/terrestrial carbon cycle model (SIB), and we have used this model to simulate global OCS and CO2 fluxes and transported these together with other known sources and sinks in a chemical transport model (PCTM). The ocean source was adjusted to optimize the fit to the seasonal cycle of OCS concentration measurements at 13 background atmospheric stations sampled by NOAA. This modeling framework exhibits good skill in simulating vertical profiles of CO2 and OCS measured routinely by NOAA and by several atmospheric sampling campaigns.

Berry, J. A.; Montzka, S. A.; Campbell, J.; Kawa, S. R.; Baker, I.; Denning, A. S.; Seibt, U.; Wolf, A.

2008-12-01

67

Flux of water vapor in the terrestrial stratosphere and in the Martian atmosphere  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A summary of the terrestrial satellite data is presented. The observations indicate that at equatorial latitudes, relatively dry air is introduced at the tropopause and carried to the upper stratosphere. At that altitude, any methane present in the ascending air mass is oxidized photochemically into water vapor. This vapor is eventually transported to high latitudes, where it is carried to the lower stratosphere by the descending leg of the diabatic circulation. The Pressure Modulator Infrared Radiometer instrument aboard the Mars Observer should provide a comparable picture of vapor transport in the martian atmosphere.

Leovy, Conway; Hitchman, Matthew; Mccleese, Daniel J.

1988-01-01

68

?18O of Atmospheric CO2: Interannual Variability and the Terrestrial Carbon Cycle  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The stable oxygen isotope 18O is unique to isotope ecology in that it links the hydrosphere to the carbon cycle. Since the two gross land biosphere fluxes- photosynthesis and ecosystem respiration- are the dominant influences on the ?18O of atmospheric CO2 on decadal timescales, analysis of atmospheric ?18O trends may provide useful insight into the terrestrial carbon cycle. Data from numerous global sites show a global decadal oscillation in atmospheric ?18O, but reasons for this variability remain unclear. We compare trends in ?18O with climate records, examining correlations and proposing associated mechanisms through a simple mechanistic model. Significant positive correlation is found with the El Niño indices and with surface solar radiation, and linear regression analysis suggests that ?18O in atmospheric CO2 can be well-predicted by climate. Significant negative correlation is found with tropical precipitation and tropical humidity. Modeling of the ?18O in atmospheric CO2 shows that the ?18O of precipitation and relative humidity are the most significant drivers of ?18O variance. Net ecosystem exchange (NEE), a previously hypothesized primary mechanism of ?18O variance, does not sufficiently vary ?18O to match the observed anomalies. However, the climatological influence on the terrestrial hydrosphere is communicated to the ?18O of the atmosphere through the terrestrial biosphere carbon fluxes. Differences between model predictions and observations are a diminution of ENSO influence and a generally rising ?18O trend in the model. The former may be related to the global dataset of the ?18O of groundwater (GNIP), which may not be spatially comprehensive enough to capture global patterns. The latter mismatch may reflect a general poleward increase in the latitudinal distribution of global NEE with increased deforestation of the tropics, reforestation in temperate latitudes, and/or the increase of boreal NEE due to a warming planet. With this as an assumed mechanism, we can calculate the time trend of the relative fractions of global NEE occurring in the tropics and temperate latitudes.

Zakem, E.; White, J. W.

2011-12-01

69

Modeling the terrestrial hydrology for the global atmosphere - The future role of satellite data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A global terrestrial hydrology model has been developed for the transport and storage of moisture and heat in the ground surface layer where the hydrological parameters react to diurnal and seasonal changes in the atmosphere. The spatial and temporal variability of land surface features is considered in the model by means of large scale parameterizations. The model can be either forced by the atmosphere using conventional meteorological data or coupled to an atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) for interactive studies. The global surface is divided into 4 deg longitude by 5 deg latitude cells while the ground is represented by a thin surface layer, a bulk layer (the root zone), and a deep layer (the ground water zone). Results are presented from a seven-day global experiment which was conducted utilizing the GLAS GCM (NASA Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheric Sciences). The model has demonstrated its capability to predict, over a large region, the overall soil moisture storage and major flux exchanges with the atmosphere above and the ground water below.

Lin, J. D.; Bock, P.; Alfano, J. J.

1981-01-01

70

Constraining terrestrial ecosystem CO2 fluxes by integrating models of biogeochemistry and atmospheric transport and data of surface carbon fluxes and atmospheric CO2 concentrations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Regional net carbon fluxes of terrestrial ecosystems could be estimated with either biogeochemistry models by assimilating surface carbon flux measurements or atmospheric CO2 inversions by assimilating observations of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Here we combine the ecosystem biogeochemistry modeling and atmospheric CO2 inverse modeling to investigate the magnitude and spatial distribution of the terrestrial ecosystem CO2 sources and sinks. First, we constrain a terrestrial ecosystem model (TEM) at site level by assimilating the observed net ecosystem production (NEP) for various plant functional types. We find that the uncertainties of model parameters are reduced up to 90% and model predictability is greatly improved for all the plant functional types (coefficients of determination are enhanced up to 0.73). We then extrapolate the model to a global scale at a 0.5° × 0.5° resolution to estimate the large-scale terrestrial ecosystem CO2 fluxes, which serve as prior for atmospheric CO2 inversion. Second, we constrain the large-scale terrestrial CO2 fluxes by assimilating the GLOBALVIEW-CO2 and mid-tropospheric CO2 retrievals from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) into an atmospheric transport model (GEOS-Chem). The transport inversion estimates that: (1) the annual terrestrial ecosystem carbon sink in 2003 is -2.47 Pg C yr-1, which agrees reasonably well with the most recent inter-comparison studies of CO2 inversions (-2.82 Pg C yr-1); (2) North America temperate, Europe and Eurasia temperate regions act as major terrestrial carbon sinks; and (3) The posterior transport model is able to reasonably reproduce the atmospheric CO2 concentrations, which are validated against Comprehensive Observation Network for TRace gases by AIrLiner (CONTRAIL) CO2 concentration data. This study indicates that biogeochemistry modeling or atmospheric transport and inverse modeling alone might not be able to well quantify regional terrestrial carbon fluxes. However, combining the two modeling approaches and assimilating data of surface carbon flux as well as atmospheric CO2 mixing ratios might significantly improve the quantification of terrestrial carbon fluxes.

Zhu, Q.; Zhuang, Q.; Henze, D.; Bowman, K.; Chen, M.; Liu, Y.; He, Y.; Matsueda, H.; Machida, T.; Sawa, Y.; Oechel, W.

2014-09-01

71

Detection of oxygen isotopic anomaly in terrestrial atmospheric carbonates and its implications to Mars  

PubMed Central

The debate of life on Mars centers around the source of the globular, micrometer-sized mineral carbonates in the ALH84001 meteorite; consequently, the identification of Martian processes that form carbonates is critical. This paper reports a previously undescribed carbonate formation process that occurs on Earth and, likely, on Mars. We identified micrometer-sized carbonates in terrestrial aerosols that possess excess 17O (0.4–3.9‰). The unique O-isotopic composition mechanistically describes the atmospheric heterogeneous chemical reaction on aerosol surfaces. Concomitant laboratory experiments define the transfer of ozone isotopic anomaly to carbonates via hydrogen peroxide formation when O3 reacts with surface adsorbed water. This previously unidentified chemical reaction scenario provides an explanation for production of the isotopically anomalous carbonates found in the SNC (shergottites, nakhlaites, chassignites) Martian meteorites and terrestrial atmospheric carbonates. The anomalous hydrogen peroxide formed on the aerosol surfaces may transfer its O-isotopic signature to the water reservoir, thus producing mass independently fractionated secondary mineral evaporites. The formation of peroxide via heterogeneous chemistry on aerosol surfaces also reveals a previously undescribed oxidative process of utility in understanding ozone and oxygen chemistry, both on Mars and Earth. PMID:21059939

Shaheen, R.; Abramian, A.; Horn, J.; Dominguez, G.; Sullivan, R.; Thiemens, Mark H.

2010-01-01

72

Detection of oxygen isotopic anomaly in terrestrial atmospheric carbonates and its implications to Mars.  

PubMed

The debate of life on Mars centers around the source of the globular, micrometer-sized mineral carbonates in the ALH84001 meteorite; consequently, the identification of Martian processes that form carbonates is critical. This paper reports a previously undescribed carbonate formation process that occurs on Earth and, likely, on Mars. We identified micrometer-sized carbonates in terrestrial aerosols that possess excess (17)O (0.4-3.9‰). The unique O-isotopic composition mechanistically describes the atmospheric heterogeneous chemical reaction on aerosol surfaces. Concomitant laboratory experiments define the transfer of ozone isotopic anomaly to carbonates via hydrogen peroxide formation when O(3) reacts with surface adsorbed water. This previously unidentified chemical reaction scenario provides an explanation for production of the isotopically anomalous carbonates found in the SNC (shergottites, nakhlaites, chassignites) Martian meteorites and terrestrial atmospheric carbonates. The anomalous hydrogen peroxide formed on the aerosol surfaces may transfer its O-isotopic signature to the water reservoir, thus producing mass independently fractionated secondary mineral evaporites. The formation of peroxide via heterogeneous chemistry on aerosol surfaces also reveals a previously undescribed oxidative process of utility in understanding ozone and oxygen chemistry, both on Mars and Earth. PMID:21059939

Shaheen, R; Abramian, A; Horn, J; Dominguez, G; Sullivan, R; Thiemens, Mark H

2010-11-23

73

Understanding the early Mesozoic world: New geochronological data from terrestrial and marine strata  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The first ~50 Ma of the Mesozoic (the Triassic Period) are marked by two major mass extinctions at the end-Permian and end-Triassic, extensive flood volcanic events (the Siberian Traps and the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province), perturbations of the ocean chemistry, paleoenvironmental changes in a greenhouse world and the origin of modern terrestrial ecosystems. Marine records of events leading to the end-Permian extinction as well as subsequent recovery during the Early and Middle Triassic are now well understood in terms of their relative and absolute timing, mainly due to significant advances in both the quantity and quality of geochronological data. This includes a detailed understanding of the Middle and end-Permian extinction events and their potential causes, their aftermath, and also the timing of large scale perturbations of the global carbon cycle in the Early Triassic. For the remaining ~30 Ma of the Triassic, however, there was until recently virtually no chronostratigraphic framework, and hence there is a major lag in our understanding of major events such as the origin and early diversification of dinosaurs, major reef building episodes in marine ecosystems, paleoenvironmental changes (e.g., the Carnian Pluvial Event), and a large extraterrestrial bolide impact (the Manicouagan impact). In absence of high-resolution radioisotopic ages, assumptions about causal inference and the role of these events, remain poorly constrained. We have therefore started to build a chronostratigraphic framework by applying U-Pb CA-TIMS analyses to zircon from primary and redeposited volcanic strata within both marine and terrestrial sequences of Late Triassic age. In particular, the potential of geochronological techniques applied to redeposited volcanic layers has long been ignored because the time lag between zircon crystallization and deposition is unknown; however, our initial results calibrating terrestrial sequences in North and South America are very promising and many of the obtained maximum ages are in agreement with stratigraphic order. Our new marine ages support the hypothesis of a long Norian Stage (~20 Ma), and new data suggest a wholly Norian age for the fossiliferous terrestrial Chinle Formation in the southwestern US. Thus, previous correlations based on terrestrial biostratigraphy with deposits in South American sequences are now thought to be flawed, suggesting that the rise of dinosaurs was diachronous, and occurred later in North America than in South America. Further complementary geochronological analyses from marine sequences are currently underway and are aimed at correlating and understanding key events and processes that are recorded both marine and terrestrial sedimentary archives of Late Triassic age.

Mundil, Roland; Irmis, Randall B.; Ickert, Ryan B.

2013-04-01

74

Stability of CO2 Atmospheres on Terrestrial Exoplanets in the Proximity of M Dwarfs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

M dwarfs are promising targets for the search and characterization of terrestrial exoplanets that might be habitable, as the habitable planets around M dwarfs are in much more close-in orbits compared to their counterparts around Sun-like stars. CO2, one of the most important greenhouse gases on our planet, is conventionally adopted as a major greenhouse gas in studying the habitability of terrestrial exoplanets around M dwarfs. However, the stability of CO2 in terrestrial atmospheres has been called into question due to the high FUV/NUV flux ratio of some M dwarfs in comparison to that of Sun-like stars. While CO2 is photolyzed into CO and O by photons in the FUV, with O2 forming from the O atoms through third body catalytic reactions, NUV photons are able to photolyze water, producing HOx radicals which go on to catalytically recombine the relatively stable CO and O2 molecules back into CO2. The comparatively low NUV flux of some M dwarfs leads to a significantly reduced efficiency of catalytic recombination of CO and O2 and the possible net destruction of CO2 and the build up of CO and O2. In this work we test the above hypothesis using a 1D photochemical kinetics model for a Mars-sized planet with an initial atmospheric composition similar to that of Mars and the incoming stellar flux of a weakly active M dwarf, assuming the exoplanet is 0.1 AU away from its parent star, in proximity of its habitable zone. We show that a CO2-dominated atmosphere can be converted into a CO2/CO/O2-dominated atmosphere in 10^3-10^4 years by CO2 photolysis. This process is kept from running away by a combination of O2 photolysis, three body reactions of O, O2, and another species to form O3, and reactions of CO with OH to form CO2 and H. However, such a large amount of O2 and CO, combined with some amount of H and H2, may be susceptible to spontaneous combustion or detonation, and thus could prove to be an especially unstable state in itself. Thus there could arise a situation whereby a CO2 atmosphere dissociating into CO and O2 would be periodically and violently converted back into mostly CO2 due to some "spark". Our simulation results suggest that it is unlikely that CO2 atmospheres can remain stable on terrestrial planets around M dwarfs with high FUV/NUV flux ratios unless it is extremely quiescent. Furthermore, any detection of O2 and O3 in such atmospheres is far more likely to be due to photochemical processes rather than as a result of biology.

Gao, P.; Hu, R.; Yung, Y. L.

2013-12-01

75

On the Climatic Impact of CO2 Ice Particles in Atmospheres of Terrestrial Exoplanets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Clouds play a significant role for the energy budget in planetary atmospheres. They can scatter incident stellar radiation back to space, effectively cooling the surface of terrestrial planets. On the other hand, they may contribute to the atmospheric greenhouse effect by trapping outgoing thermal radiation. For exoplanets near the outer boundary of the habitable zone, condensation of CO2 can occur due to the low atmospheric temperatures. These CO2 ice clouds may play an important role for the surface temperature and, therefore, for the question of habitability of those planets. However, the optical properties of CO2 ice crystals differ significantly from those of water droplets or water ice particles. Except for a small number of strong absorption bands, they are almost transparent with respect to absorption. Instead, they are highly effective scatterers at long and short wavelengths. Therefore, the climatic effect of a CO2 ice cloud will depend on how much incident stellar radiation is scattered to space in comparison to the amount of thermal radiation scattered back towards the planetary surface. This contribution aims at the potential greenhouse effect of CO2 ice particles. Their scattering and absorption properties are calculated for assumed particle size distributions with different effective radii and particle densities. An accurate radiative transfer model is used to determine the atmospheric radiation field affected by such CO2 particles. These results are compared to less detailed radiative transfer schemes employed in previous studies.

Kitzmann, D.; Patzer, A. B. C.; Rauer, H.

2014-04-01

76

The photochemistry of the early atmosphere  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The composition of the earth's present atmosphere is described. The formation of the earth from the coalescence and accretion of the refractory elements of the solar nebula is examined. Two possible compositions of the prebiological paleoatmosphere, which are a reducing atmosphere of CH4, NH3, and H2 or a mildly reducing atmosphere of H2O, CO2, and N2, and their photochemistry are analyzed. General photochemical and chemical processes are reviewed. The use of the coupled continuity-transport equation to calculate the vertical distribution of each species is discussed. A study of the photochemical process of CH4 and NH3 reveals that the reducing atmosphere could not possibly exist. An analysis of the photochemistry and chemistry of the H2O, CO2, and N2 atmosphere reveals that the photodissociation of H2O and CO2 results in a prebiotic source of O2, H2CO, and HCN, which are the components for the evolution of photosynthetic organisms and a strongly oxidizing atmosphere. The reactions which produce O2 and H2CO from H2O and CO2, and the relation between H2O and CO2 concentrations and O2 levels are investigated. The formation of O3 photochemically from O2 is explained.

Levine, J. S.

1985-01-01

77

The chemical composition and climatology of the earth's early atmosphere  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The earth's climate as it relates to the evolution of life is discussed.. Seven fundamental characteristics of the early evolutionary environment are examined, including a carbon dioxide and water vapor atmosphere, atmospheric mass between 500 and 1000 mb, a global hydrosphere, lowered solar luminosity, hospitable average global temperatures, a convectively active atmosphere, and trace gases. The influence of the early earth's extensive hydrosphere on the origin of life is considered. The warming of that hydrosphere due to radiative fluxes and the greenhouse effect is examined, and the nature of the feedback between clouds and climate is addressed.

Henderson-Sellers, A.

1983-01-01

78

Beyond the Atmosphere: Early Years of Space Science  

Microsoft Academic Search

Homer Newell's book, Beyond the Atmosphere: Early Years of Space Science, provides the reader with an excellent history of space science and the intricate governmental as well as personal travails that brought the U.S. space program from its beginnings in the early V-2 days to its enviable state (in today's terms) in the early seventies.The account is developed and well

N. W. Spencer

1982-01-01

79

Optimization of a prognostic biosphere model for terrestrial biomass and atmospheric CO2 variability  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study investigates the capacity of a prognostic biosphere model to simulate global variability in atmospheric CO2 concentrations and vegetation carbon dynamics under current environmental conditions. Global data sets of atmospheric CO2 concentrations, above-ground biomass (AGB), and net primary productivity (NPP) in terrestrial vegetation were assimilated into the biosphere model using an inverse modeling method combined with an atmospheric transport model. In this process, the optimal physiological parameters of the biosphere model were estimated by minimizing the misfit between observed and modeled values, and parameters were generated to characterize various biome types. Results obtained using the model with the optimized parameters correspond to the observed seasonal variations in CO2 concentration and their annual amplitudes in both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. In simulating the mean annual AGB and NPP, the model shows improvements in estimating the mean magnitudes and probability distributions for each biome, as compared with results obtained using prior simulation parameters. However, the model is less efficient in its simulation of AGB for forest type biomes. This misfit suggests that more accurate values of input parameters, specifically, grid mean AGB values and seasonal variabilities in physiological parameters, are required to improve the performance of the simulation model.

Saito, M.; Ito, A.; Maksyutov, S.

2014-08-01

80

Paleolimnological archives of environmental change in aquatic, terrestrial, and atmospheric systems  

SciTech Connect

Lake sediments accumulate material derived from the atmosphere, the lake catchment, and the lake itself, and these materials can be used to infer the history of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, the climate system, and global biogeochemical cycling. Several case-studies will be presented to discuss the reconstruction of environmental variability from the paleolimnological record including studies of (1) Climate history: Closed-basin lakes are sensitive recorders of changes in the hydrologic budget and are used in and semi-arid regions to assess patterns of long- and short-term variability in moisture availability; (2) Biogeochemical cycling/pollution history: Basin-wide measurement of mercury accumulation in lake sediments is used to estimate modem and pre-industrial rates of mercury deposition and the contribution of global vs regional sources; and (3) Acidification history: Lake-pH is reconstructed from aquatic microfossils and correlated with changes in pollutant deposition and terrestrial vegetation to evaluate the extent, timing, and causes of acidification.

Fritz, S.C.; Engstrom, D.R. (Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis (United States))

1993-06-01

81

Climate and atmospheric drivers of historical terrestrial carbon uptake in the province of British Columbia, Canada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The impacts of climate change and increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration on the terrestrial uptake of carbon dioxide since 1860 in the Canadian province of British Columbia are estimated using the process-based Canadian Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (CTEM). Model simulations show that these two factors yield an enhanced carbon uptake of around 44 gC m-2 yr-1 (or equivalently 63 gC m-2 yr-1 over the province's forested area), during the 1980s and 1990s, and continuing into the 2000s. About three-quarters of the simulated sink enhancement in our study compared to pre-industrial conditions is attributed to changing climate, and the rest is attributed to increase in CO2 concentration. The model response to changing climate and increasing CO2 is corroborated by comparing simulated stem wood growth rates with ground-based measurements from inventory plots in coastal British Columbia. The simulated sink is not an estimate of the net carbon balance because the effects of harvesting, insect disturbances and land-use change are not considered.

Peng, Y.; Arora, V. K.; Kurz, W. A.; Hember, R. A.; Hawkins, B. J.; Fyfe, J. C.; Werner, A. T.

2014-02-01

82

Climate and atmospheric drivers of historical terrestrial carbon uptake in the province of British Columbia, Canada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The impacts of climate change and increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration on the terrestrial uptake of carbon dioxide since 1900 in the Canadian province of British Columbia are estimated using the process-based Canadian Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (CTEM). Model simulations show that these two factors yield a carbon uptake of around 44 g C m-2 yr-1, during the 1980s and 1990s, and continuing into 2000s, compared to pre-industrial conditions. The increased carbon uptake translates into an increased sink of 41 Tg C yr-1, when multiplied with the 944 700 km2 area of the province. About three-quarters of the simulated sink enhancement in our study is attributed to changing climate, and the rest is attributed to increase in CO2 concentration. The model response to changing climate and increasing CO2 is corroborated by comparing simulated stem wood growth rates with ground-based measurements from inventory plots in coastal British Columbia. The simulated sink is not an estimate of the net carbon balance because the effect of harvesting and insect disturbances is not considered.

Peng, Y.; Arora, V. K.; Kurz, W. A.; Hember, R. A.; Hawkins, B.; Fyfe, J. C.; Werner, A. T.

2013-08-01

83

Terrestrial microorganisms at an altitude of 20,000 m in Earth's atmosphere  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A joint effort between the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Global Desert Dust and NASA's Stratospheric and Cosmic Dust Programs identified culturable microbes from an air sample collected at an altitude of 20,000 m. A total of 4 fungal (Penicillium sp.) and 71 bacteria colonyforming units (70 colonies of Bacillus luciferensis believed to have originated from a single cell collected at altitude and one colony of Bacillus sphaericus) were enumerated, isolated and identified using a morphological key and 16S rDNA sequencing respectively. All of the isolates identified were sporeforming pigmented fungi or bacteria of terrestrial origin and demonstrate that the presence of viable microorganisms in Earth's upper atmosphere may not be uncommon.

Griffin, Dale W.

2004-01-01

84

Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes, Relativistic Runaway, and High-Energy Radiation in the Atmosphere  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High energy radiation from tens of keV to tens of MeV in energy, the transition region from x-rays to gamma rays, has been observed in association with high electric fields in air in many contexts: from the ground, associated with thunderstorms and with individual flashes of natural and rocket-triggered lightning [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8] from sparks in the laboratory [9, 10, 11, 12], from Earth orbit in the form of millisecond Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) [13, 14], and at intermediate altitudes from aircraft and balloons [15, 16, 17, 18, 19]. The gamma radiation in all cases is almost certainly bremsstrahlung generated by the collision of accelerated electrons with nuclei in the atmosphere. The penetrating gamma-rays can provide a mechanism for coupling between the troposphere, mesosphere, ionosphere and magnetosphere in the form of energetic particles and ionization.

Smith, David M.

2009-04-01

85

A terrestrial vegetation turnover in the middle of the Early Triassic  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Land-plant productivity was greatly reduced after the end-Permian mass extinction, causing a pronounced "coal gap" worldwide during the Early Triassic. Newly obtained organic geochemistry data from the Chaohu area, south China, indicated an abrupt and profound terrestrial vegetation change over the middle part of the Early Triassic Smithian-Spathian (S-S) interval. Herbaceous lycopsids and/or bryophytes dominated terrestrial vegetation from Griesbachian to Smithian times. The terrestrial ecosystem underwent an abrupt change, and woody conifers became dominant over the S-S interval. Several important biomarkers, namely retene, simonellite, and dehydroabietane (with multiple sources: conifer, lycopsid, and/or herbaceous bryophyte), were relatively abundant during Griesbachian, Dienerian, and Smithian times. The relatively low C/N ratio values during the Griesbachian-Smithian interval indicate that these biomarkers were likely sourced from herbaceous lycopsids and/or bryophytes. The extremely abundant conifer-sourced pimanthrene, combined with relatively high C/N ratio values, suggested the recovery of woody conifers after the S-S boundary. The new data revealed that the switch from herbaceous vegetation to woody coniferous vegetation marked a terrestrial plant recovery, which occurred globally within 3 million years after the end-Permian crisis rather than at a later date estimated in previous studies. In Chaohu, the S-S terrestrial event was marked by a reappearance of woody vegetation, while the S-S marine event was marked by an increase in ichnodiversity, trace complexity, burrow size, infaunal tiering level, and bioturbation level, and a possible intense upwelling event indicated by the extended tricyclic terpane ratios (ETR). Coeval vegetation changes with comparable patterns have also been documented in Europe and Pakistan based on palynologic studies. The S-S boundaries in Asia and Europe are associated with a positive ?13C excursion, the rebound of woody vegetation, a turnover of ammonoid faunas, and possible global climate cooling. This is the first study to document the S-S event using biomarkers and C/N ratios.

Saito, Ryosuke; Kaiho, Kunio; Oba, Masahiro; Takahashi, Satoshi; Chen, Zhong-Qiang; Tong, Jinnan

2013-06-01

86

Middle atmosphere electrodynamics: Report of the workshop on the Role of the Electrodynamics of the Middle Atmosphere on Solar Terrestrial Coupling  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Significant deficiencies exist in the present understanding of the basic physical processes taking place within the middle atmosphere (the region between the tropopause and the mesopause), and in the knowledge of the variability of many of the primary parameters that regulate Middle Atmosphere Electrodynamics (MAE). Knowledge of the electrical properties, i.e., electric fields, plasma characteristics, conductivity and currents, and the physical processes that govern them is of fundamental importance to the physics of the region. Middle atmosphere electrodynamics may play a critical role in the electrodynamical aspects of solar-terrestrial relations. As a first step, the Workshop on the Role of the Electrodynamics of the Middle Atmosphere on Solar-Terrestrial Coupling was held to review the present status and define recommendations for future MAE research.

Maynard, N. C. (editor)

1979-01-01

87

A terrestrial biosphere model optimized to atmospheric CO2 concentration and above ground woody biomass  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study documents an optimization of a prognostic biosphere model (VISIT; Vegetation Integrative Similator for Trace gases) to observations of atmospheric CO2 concentration and above ground woody biomass by using a Bayesian inversion method combined with an atmospheric tracer transport model (NIES-TM; National Institute for Environmental Studies / Frontier Research Center for Global Change (NIES/FRCGC) off-line global atmospheric tracer transport model). The assimilated observations include 74 station records of surface atmospheric CO2 concentration and aggregated grid data sets of above ground woody biomass (AGB) and net primary productivity (NPP) over the globe. Both the biosphere model and the atmospheric transport model are used at a horizontal resolution of 2.5 deg x 2.5 deg grid with temporal resolutions of a day and an hour, respectively. The atmospheric transport model simulates atmospheric CO2 concentration with nine vertical levels using daily net ecosystem CO2 exchange rate (NEE) from the biosphere model, oceanic CO2 flux, and fossil fuel emission inventory. The models are driven by meteorological data from JRA-25 (Japanese 25-year ReAnalysis) and JCDAS (JMA Climate Data Assimilation System). Statistically optimum physiological parameters in the biosphere model are found by iterative minimization of the corresponding Bayesian cost function. We select thirteen physiological parameter with high sensitivity to NEE, NPP, and AGB for the minimization. Given the optimized physiological parameters, the model shows error reductions in seasonal variation of the CO2 concentrations especially in the northern hemisphere due to abundant observation stations, while errors remain at a few stations that are located in coastal coastal area and stations in the southern hemisphere. The model also produces moderate estimates of the mean magnitudes and probability distributions in AGB and NPP for each biome. However, the model fails in the simulation of the terrestrial vegetation compositions in some grids. These misfits are assumed to derive from simplified representation in the biosphere model without the impact of land use change and dire disturbance and the seasonal variability in the physiological parameters.

Saito, M.; Ito, A.; Maksyutov, S. S.

2013-12-01

88

Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 67 (2005) 18211826 Hall effect on magnetic reconnection at the Earth's  

E-print Network

(Sonnerup et al., 1981). The appearance of a kink in the newly reconnected lines produces jets of plasma away from the diffusion region. Although these plasma jets have been previously detected ``in situJournal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 67 (2005) 1821­1826 Hall effect on magnetic

Dasso, Sergio

89

The composition, spatial patterns, and influencing factors of atmospheric wet nitrogen deposition in Chinese terrestrial ecosystems.  

PubMed

Atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition is an important component of the global N cycle, and is a key source of biologically available N. Understanding the spatio-temporal patterns and influencing factors of N deposition is essential to evaluate its ecological effects on terrestrial ecosystems, and to provide a scientific basis for global change research. In this study, we monitored the monthly atmospheric N deposition in rainfall at 41 stations from the Chinese Ecosystem Research Network through measuring total N (TN), total dissolved N (TDN), ammonium (NH4(+)-N), and nitrate (NO3(-)-N). The results showed that the atmospheric wet deposition of TDN, NH4(+)-N, and NO3(-)-N were 13.69, 7.25, and 5.93kgNha(-1)yr(-1), respectively. The deposition of TN and total particulate N (TPN) was 18.02 and 4.33kgNha(-1)yr(-1) respectively, in 2013. TPN accounted for 24% of TN, while NH4(+)-N and NO3(-)-N made up 40% and 33%, respectively, confirming the assumption that atmospheric wet N deposition would be underestimated without particulate N in rainfall. The N deposition was higher in Central and Southern China, and lower in North-west, North-east, Inner Mongolia, and Qinghai-Tibet regions. Precipitation, N fertilizer use, and energy consumption were significantly correlated with wet N deposition (all p<0.01). Models that included precipitation and N fertilizer can explain 80-91% of the variability in wet N deposition. Our findings reveal, for the first time, the composition of the wet N deposition in China at different scales and highlight the importance of TPN. PMID:25617702

Zhu, Jianxing; He, Nianpeng; Wang, Qiufeng; Yuan, Guofu; Wen, Ding; Yu, Guirui; Jia, Yanlong

2015-04-01

90

Dermal bone in early tetrapods: a palaeophysiological hypothesis of adaptation for terrestrial acidosis.  

PubMed

The dermal bone sculpture of early, basal tetrapods of the Permo-Carboniferous is unlike the bone surface of any living vertebrate, and its function has long been obscure. Drawing from physiological studies of extant tetrapods, where dermal bone or other calcified tissues aid in regulating acid-base balance relating to hypercapnia (excess blood carbon dioxide) and/or lactate acidosis, we propose a similar function for these sculptured dermal bones in early tetrapods. Unlike the condition in modern reptiles, which experience hypercapnia when submerged in water, these animals would have experienced hypercapnia on land, owing to likely inefficient means of eliminating carbon dioxide. The different patterns of dermal bone sculpture in these tetrapods largely correlates with levels of terrestriality: sculpture is reduced or lost in stem amniotes that likely had the more efficient lung ventilation mode of costal aspiration, and in small-sized stem amphibians that would have been able to use the skin for gas exchange. PMID:22535781

Janis, Christine M; Devlin, Kelly; Warren, Daniel E; Witzmann, Florian

2012-08-01

91

Simple global carbon model: The atmosphere-terrestrial biosphere-ocean interaction  

SciTech Connect

A simple global carbon model has been developed for scenario analysis, and research needs prioritization. CO{sub 2} fertilization and temperature effects are included in the terrestrial biosphere compartment, and the ocean compartment includes inorganic chemistry which, with ocean water circulation, enables the calculation of time-variable oceanic carbon uptake. Model-derived Q{sub 10} values (the increasing rate for every 10{degrees}C increase of temperature) are 1.37 for land biota photosynthesis, 1.89 for land biota respiration, and 1.95 for soil respiration, and feedback temperature is set at 0.01{degrees}C/ppm of CO{sub 2}. These could be the important parameters controlling the carbon cycle in potential global warming scenarios. Scenario analysis, together with sensitivity analysis of temperature feedback, suggests that if CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil fuel combustion continue at the present increasing rate of {approximately}1.5% per year, a CO{sub 2} doubling (to 560 ppm) will appear in year 2060. Global warming would be responsible for 40 Gt as carbon (Gt C) accumulation in the land biota, 88 Gt C depletion from the soil carbon, a 7 Gt C accumulation in the oceans, and a 19 ppm increase in atmospheric CO{sub 2}. The ocean buffering capacity to take up the excess CO{sub 2} will decrease with the increasing atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration. 51 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

Kwon, O.Y.; Schnoor, J.L. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)] [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

1994-09-01

92

Greening the terrestrial biosphere: simulated feedbacks on atmospheric heat and energy circulation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Much research focuses on how the terrestrial biosphere influences climate through changes in surface albedo (reflectivity), stomatal conductance and leaf area index (LAI). By using a fully-coupled GCM (HadCM3LC), our research objective was to induce an increase in the growth of global vegetation to isolate the effect of increased LAI on atmospheric exchange of heat and moisture. Our C ontrol simulation had a mean global net primary production (NPP) of 56.3 GtCyr-1 which is half that of our scenario value of 115.1 GtCyr-1. LAI and latent energy ( Q E) were simulated to increase globally, except in areas around Antarctica. A highly productive biosphere promotes mid-latitude mean surface cooling of ~2.5°C in the summer, and surface warming of ~1.0°C in the winter. The former response is primarily the result of reduced Bowen ratio (i.e. increased production of Q E) in combination with small increases in planetary albedo. Response in winter temperature is likely due to decreased planetary albedo that in turn permits a greater amount of solar radiation to reach the Earth’s surface. Energy balance calculations show that between 75° and 90°N latitude, an additional 2.4 Wm-2 of surface heat must be advected into the region to maintain energy balance, and ultimately causes high northern latitudes to warm by up to 3°C. We postulate that large increases in Q E promoted by increased growth of terrestrial vegetation could contribute to greater surface-to-atmosphere exchange and convection. Our high growth simulation shows that convective rainfall substantially increases across three latitudinal bands relative to C ontrol; in the tropics, across the monsoonal belt, and in mid-latitude temperate regions. Our theoretical research has implications for applied climatology; in the modeling of past “hot-house” climates, in explaining the greening of northern latitudes in modern-day times, and for predicting future changes in surface temperature with continued increases in atmospheric CO2.

Cowling, S. A.; Jones, C. D.; Cox, P. M.

2009-02-01

93

Photochemical model for NH3 in an early Martian atmosphere  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A warm and wet climate scenario for early Mars has been explained by invoking a 5-bar CO2 atmosphere; however, Kasting has shown that CO2 will condense in the Martian atmosphere at these pressures. The formation of CO2 clouds will reduce the convection lapse rate and reduce the magnitude of the greenhouse effect. It is possible that additional greenhouse gases such as methane and ammonia were present in the early Mars atmosphere. We are using a one dimensional photochemical model to estimate the magnitude of the ammonia source required to maintain a given ammonia concentration in a dense CO2 atmosphere. Because CO2 is 2.5 times more efficient at Rayleigh scattering than Earth's N2 atmosphere, we anticipate increased scattering opacities and decreased photolytic destruction rates of ammonia on early Mars. The reduced gravity on Mars means that a 1 bar atmosphere will be approximately 3 times as thick as on Earth. It is possible that ammonia could have been shielded from photolysis by hydrocarbon aerosols which form as a product of methane photolysis.

Brown, L. L.; Kasting, J. F.

1992-01-01

94

The rise of oxygen in Earth's early ocean and atmosphere.  

PubMed

The rapid increase of carbon dioxide concentration in Earth's modern atmosphere is a matter of major concern. But for the atmosphere of roughly two-and-half billion years ago, interest centres on a different gas: free oxygen (O2) spawned by early biological production. The initial increase of O2 in the atmosphere, its delayed build-up in the ocean, its increase to near-modern levels in the sea and air two billion years later, and its cause-and-effect relationship with life are among the most compelling stories in Earth's history. PMID:24553238

Lyons, Timothy W; Reinhard, Christopher T; Planavsky, Noah J

2014-02-20

95

Short-lived radionuclides as monitors of early crust-mantle differentiation on the terrestrial planets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The kinetic energy from large impacts, the gravitational energy released by core formation, and the heat provided by the decay of short-lived radioactive isotopes all drive extensive melting and chemical differentiation of silicate planets/planetesimals during and shortly after their formation. This early differentiation is best preserved on small objects such as the parent bodies of the eucrite and angrite meteorites where silicate melts were produced within 3 million years of solar system formation. The W isotopic composition of some iron meteorites testifies to core segregation on small planetesimals within as little as one million years or less of solar system formation. On larger objects, such as the Moon, Mars and Earth, the evidence for early differentiation provided by long-lived radioisotope systems has been variably overprinted by the continuing differentiation of these objects, but a clear signature of extensive early planet-scale differentiation is preserved in a variety of short-lived radioisotope systems, particularly, I-Pu-Xe, Hf-W and 146Sm- 142Nd. All these systems suggest that global differentiation of planetesimals and the terrestrial planets occurred during the first hundred million years of solar system history. This early processing of the Moon, Mars and Earth, may have fundamentally affected the evolution of these planets and their current internal compositional structure.

Carlson, Richard W.; Boyet, Maud

2009-03-01

96

The sensitivity of terrestrial carbon storage to historical climate variability and atmospheric CO2 in the United States  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We use the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM, Version 4.1) and the land cover data set of the international geosphere-biosphere program to investigate how increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration and climate variability during 1900-1994 affect the carbon storage of terrestrial ecosystems in the conterminous USA, and how carbon storage has been affected by land-use change. The estimates of TEM indicate that over the past 95 years a combination of increasing atmospheric CO2 with historical temperature and precipitation variability causes a 4.2% (4.3 Pg C) decrease in total carbon storage of potential vegetation in the conterminous US, with vegetation carbon decreasing by 7.2% (3.2 Pg C) and soil organic carbon decreasing by 1.9% (1.1 Pg C). Several dry periods including the 1930s and 1950s are responsible for the loss of carbon storage. Our factorial experiments indicate that precipitation variability alone decreases total carbon storage by 9.5%. Temperature variability alone does not significantly affect carbon storage. The effect of CO2 fertilization alone increases total carbon storage by 4.4%. The effects of increasing atmospheric CO2 and climate variability are not additive. Interactions among CO2, temperature and precipitation increase total carbon storage by 1.1%. Our study also shows substantial year-to-year variations in net carbon exchange between the atmosphere and terrestrial ecosystems due to climate variability. Since the 1960s, we estimate these terrestrial ecosystems have acted primarily as a sink of atmospheric CO2 as a result of wetter weather and higher atmospheric CO2 concentrations. For the 1980s, we estimate the natural terrestrial ecosystems, excluding cropland and urban areas, of the conterminous US have accumulated 78.2 Tg C yr-1 because of the combined effect of increasing atmospheric CO2 and climate variability. For the conterminous US, we estimate that the conversion of natural ecosystems to cropland and urban areas has caused a 18.2% (17.7 Pg C) reduction in total carbon storage from that estimated for potential vegetation. The carbon sink capacity of natural terrestrial ecosystems in the conterminous US is about 69% of that estimated for potential vegetation.

Tian, H.; Melillo, J.M.; Kicklighter, D.W.; McGuire, A.D.; Helfrich, J.

1999-01-01

97

Meteorites and the Timing, Mechanisms, and Conditions of Terrestrial Planet Accretion and Early Differentiation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Isotopic studies of meteorites provide the fundamental data for determining how the terrestrial planets, including Earth, accreted. Over the past few years there have been major advances in our understanding of both the timescales and processes of terrestrial planet accretion, largely as a result of better definition of initial solar system abundances of short-lived nuclides and their daughters, as determined from meteorites. Cosmogenic effects, cross calibrations with other isotopic systems, and decay constant uncertainties are also critical in many instances. Recent improvements to 182Hf-182W chronology in all these areas have been particularly noteworthy. Uncertainty has surrounded the initial Hf- and W-isotopic composition of the solar system and the meaning of the unradiogenic W-isotopic compositions of iron meteorite data, rendered complicated by cosmogenic effects. However, the timescales for the formation of certain iron meteorite parent bodies would appear to be very fast (<1 m.y.). Similarly, the accretion of Mars would appear to have been very fast, consistent with rapid accretion via runaway growth. Precise quantification is difficult, however, because martian meteorites display variable W-isotopic compositions that relate in part to the levels of depletion in siderophile elements. This is as expected from a planet that never achieved a well-mixed silicate reservoir characterized by uniform siderophile-element depletion, as is found on Earth. Therefore, attempts to apply W-isotopic models to martian meteorites need to be treated with caution because of this demonstrable variability in early source Hf/W presumably resulting from partial metal or core segregation. The current best estimates for martian reservoirs as represented by Zagami would imply formation within the first 1 m.y. of the solar system. The modeled timescales for metal segregation from the source of other meteorites, Nakhla, for example, would appear to be more like 10 m.y. These estimates are based on trace-element and isotopic data obtained from different and probably unrepresentative aliquots. Further high-quality combined trace-element and isotopic studies are needed to confirm this. Nevertheless, the chondritic 142Nd abundance for Zagami provides powerful supporting evidence that the W-isotopic effects record extremely rapid (<1 m.y.) accretion and core formation on Mars. The timescales for Earth accretion are significantly more protracted. The last major stage of accretion is thought to be the Moon-forming giant impact,the most recent Hf-W age estimates for which are in the range 40-50 m.y. after the start of the solar system. Applying this to accretion models for Earth provides evidence that some of the accreted metal did not fully equilibrate with silicate reservoirs. This cannot explain the very late apparent accretion ages deduced from other chronometers, in particular U-Pb. Either all the estimates for the Pb-isotopic composition of the bulk silicate Earth are in error or there was some additional late-stage U/Pb fractionation that removed Pb from the silicate Earth. If the latter was the case there was either late segregation of Pb to the core after W removal, or removal of Pb via atmospheric escape following the "giant impact." Changes in the mechanisms and partitioning associated with core formation are indeed predicted from the stability in the mantle of S-rich metal before, and sulfide after, the giant impact. However, losses from Earth also need to be evaluated. Strontium-isotopic data provide evidence of major late (>10 m.y.) losses of moderately volatile elements from the material that formed the Moon and probably Earth. The Earth's nonchondritic Mg/Fe may similarly reflect silicate losses during growth of Earth itself or the protoplanets that accreted to Earth. The budgets for plutonogenic Xe provide evidence that some erosion was extremely late (>100 m.y.), clearly postdating the giant impact and presumably related to irradiation and bombardment during the Hadean.

Halliday, A. N.; Kleine, T.

98

Effects of non-tidal atmospheric loading on a Kalman filter-based terrestrial reference frame  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) adopts a piece-wise linear model to parameterize regularized station positions and velocities. The space-geodetic (SG) solutions from VLBI, SLR, GPS and DORIS global networks used as input in the ITRF combination process account for tidal loading deformations, but ignore the non-tidal part. As a result, the non-linear signal observed in the time series of SG-derived station positions in part reflects non-tidal loading displacements not introduced in the SG data reduction. In this analysis, the effect of non-tidal atmospheric loading (NTAL) corrections on the TRF is assessed adopting a Remove/Restore approach: (i) Focusing on the a-posteriori approach, the NTAL model derived from the National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) surface pressure is removed from the SINEX files of the SG solutions used as inputs to the TRF determinations. (ii) Adopting a Kalman-filter based approach, a linear TRF is estimated combining the 4 SG solutions free from NTAL displacements. (iii) Linear fits to the NTAL displacements removed at step (i) are restored to the linear reference frame estimated at (ii). The velocity fields of the (standard) linear reference frame in which the NTAL model has not been removed and the one in which the model has been removed/restored are compared and discussed.

Abbondanza, C.; Altamimi, Z.; Chin, T. M.; Collilieux, X.; Dach, R.; Heflin, M. B.; Gross, R. S.; König, R.; Lemoine, F. G.; MacMillan, D. S.; Parker, J. W.; van Dam, T. M.; Wu, X.

2013-12-01

99

New atmospheric pCO 2 estimates from palesols during the late Paleocene/early Eocene global warming interval  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The late Paleocene to early Eocene was one of the warmest intervals in Earth's history. Superimposed on this long-term warming was an abrupt short-term extreme warm event at or near the Paleocene/Eocene boundary and centered in the higher latitudes. This short-term climate warming was associated with a major benthic foraminiferal extinction and a dramatic 3-4% drop in the ocean's carbon isotopic composition. It has been suggested that the late paleocene/early Eocene global warming was caused by an enhanced greenhouse effect associated with higher levels of atmospheric CO 2 relative to present levels. We present carbon isotopic data from the co-existing paleosols organic matter and carbonates from a terrestrial sequence in the Paris Basin, France that contradict the notion that an increase in atmospheric CO 2 level was the cause of extreme warming for this time interval. Atmospheric pCO 2 estimates for the Late Paleocene/early Eocene estimated from the terrestrial carbon isotopic record spanning the Paleocene/Eocene transition, are indistinguishable from each other and were generally between 300 and 700 ppm.

Sinha, Ashish; Stott, Lowell D.

1994-12-01

100

A carbon dioxide/methane greenhouse atmosphere on early Mars  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

One explanation for the formation of fluvial surface features on early Mars is that the global average surface temperature was maintained at or above the freezing point of water by the greenhouse warming of a dense CO2 atmosphere; however, Kasting has shown that CO2 alone is insufficient because the formation of CO2 clouds reduces the magnitude of the greenhouse effect. It is possible that other gases, such as NH3 and CH4, were present in the early atmosphere of Mars and contributed to the greenhouse effect. Kasting et al. investigated the effect of NH3 in a CO2 atmosphere and calculated that an NH3 mixing ratio of approximately 5 x 10 (exp -4) by volume, combined with a CO2 partial pressure of 4-5 bar, could generate a global average surface temperature of 273 K near 3.8 b.y. ago when the fluvial features are believed to have formed. Atmospheric NH3 is photochemically converted to N2 by ultraviolet radiation at wavelengths shortward of 230 nm; maintenance of sufficient NH3 concentrations would therefore require a source of NH3 to balance the photolytic destruction. We have used a one-dimensional photochemical model to estimate the magnitude of the NH3 source required to maintain a given NH3 concentration in a dense CO2 atmosphere. We calculate that an NH3 mixing ratio of 10(exp -4) requires a flux of NH3 on the order of 10(exp 12) molecules /cm-s. This figure is several orders of magnitude greater than estimates of the NH3 flux on early Mars; thus it appears that NH3 with CO2 is not enough to keep early Mars warm.

Brown, L. L.; Kasting, J. F.

1993-01-01

101

Land Use Effects on Atmospheric C-13 Imply a Sizable Terrestrial CO2 Sink in Tropical Latitudes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Records of atmospheric CO2 and 13-CO2, can be used to distinguish terrestrial vs. oceanic exchanges of CO2 with the atmosphere. However, this approach has proven difficult in the tropics, partly due to extensive land conversion from C-3 to C-4 vegetation. We estimated the effects of such conversion on biosphere-atmosphere C-13 exchange for 1991 through 1999, and then explored how this 'land-use disequilibrium' altered the partitioning of net atmospheric CO2 exchanges between ocean and land using NOAA-CMDL data and a 2D, zonally averaged atmospheric transport model. Our results show sizable CO2 uptake in C-3-dominated tropical regions in seven of the nine years; 1997 and 1998, which included a strong ENSO event, are near neutral. Since these fluxes include any deforestation source, our findings imply either that such sources are smaller than previously estimated, and/or the existence of a large terrestrial CO2 sink in equatorial latitudes.

Townsend, Alan R.; Asner, Gregory P.; Tans, Pieter P.; White, James W. C.

2000-01-01

102

Hydrogen-nitrogen greenhouse warming in Earth's early atmosphere.  

PubMed

Understanding how Earth has sustained surface liquid water throughout its history remains a key challenge, given that the Sun's luminosity was much lower in the past. Here we show that with an atmospheric composition consistent with the most recent constraints, the early Earth would have been significantly warmed by H(2)-N(2) collision-induced absorption. With two to three times the present-day atmospheric mass of N(2) and a H(2) mixing ratio of 0.1, H(2)-N(2) warming would be sufficient to raise global mean surface temperatures above 0°C under 75% of present-day solar flux, with CO(2) levels only 2 to 25 times the present-day values. Depending on their time of emergence and diversification, early methanogens may have caused global cooling via the conversion of H(2) and CO(2) to CH(4), with potentially observable consequences in the geological record. PMID:23288536

Wordsworth, Robin; Pierrehumbert, Raymond

2013-01-01

103

Early attempts at atmospheric simulations for the Cherenkov Telescope Array  

E-print Network

The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) will be the world's first observatory for detecting gamma-rays from astrophysical phenomena and is now in its prototyping phase with construction expected to begin in 2015/16. In this work we present the results from early attempts at detailed simulation studies performed to assess the need for atmospheric monitoring. This will include discussion of some lidar analysis methods with a view to determining a range resolved atmospheric transmission profile. We find that under increased aerosol density levels, simulated gamma-ray astronomy data is systematically shifted leading to softer spectra. With lidar data we show that it is possible to fit atmospheric transmission models needed for generating lookup tables, which are used to infer the energy of a gamma-ray event, thus making it possible to correct affected data that would otherwise be considered unusable.

Rulten, Cameron B

2014-01-01

104

Contrasting roles of interception and transpiration in the hydrological cycle - Part 1: Simple Terrestrial Evaporation to Atmosphere Model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Terrestrial evaporation consists of biophysical (i.e., transpiration) and physical fluxes (i.e., interception, soil moisture, and open water). The partitioning between them depends on both climate and the land surface, and determines the time scale of evaporation. However, few land-surface models have analysed and evaluated evaporative partitioning based on land use, and no studies have examined their subsequent paths in the atmosphere. This paper constitutes the first of two companion papers that investigate the contrasting effects of interception and transpiration in the hydrological cycle. Here, we present STEAM (Simple Terrestrial Evaporation to Atmosphere Model) used to produce partitioned evaporation and analyse the characteristics of different evaporation fluxes on land. STEAM represents 19 land-use types (including irrigated land) at sub-grid level with a limited set of parameters, and includes phenology and stress functions to respond to changes in climate conditions. Using ERA-Interim reanalysis forcing for the years 1999-2008, STEAM estimates a mean global terrestrial evaporation of 73 800 km3 year-1, with a transpiration ratio of 59%. We show that the terrestrial residence time scale of transpiration (days to months) has larger inter-seasonal variation and is substantially longer than that of interception (hours). Furthermore, results from an offline land-use change experiment illustrate that land-use change may lead to significant changes in evaporative partitioning even when total evaporation remains similar. In agreement with previous research, our simulations suggest that the vegetation's ability to transpire by retaining and accessing soil moisture at greater depth is critical for sustained evaporation during the dry season. Despite a relatively simple model structure, validation shows that STEAM produces realistic evaporative partitioning and hydrological fluxes that compare well with other global estimates over different locations, seasons and land-use types. We conclude that the simulated evaporation partitioning by STEAM is useful for understanding the links between land use and water resources, and can with benefit be employed for atmospheric moisture tracking.

Wang-Erlandsson, L.; van der Ent, R. J.; Gordon, L. J.; Savenije, H. H. G.

2014-03-01

105

Satellite observations of terrestrial water storage provide early warning information about drought and fire season severity in the Amazon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

risk in the Amazon can be predicted several months before the onset of the dry season using sea surface temperatures in the tropical north Atlantic and tropical Pacific. The lead times between ocean state and the period of maximum burning (4-11 months) may enable the development of forecasts with benefits for forest conservation, yet the underlying physical and biological mechanisms responsible for these temporal offsets are not well known. Here, we examined the hypothesis that year-to-year variations in soil water recharge during the wet season modify atmospheric water vapor and fire behavior during the following dry season. We tested this hypothesis by analyzing terrestrial water storage observations from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), active fires from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), and several other satellite and atmospheric reanalysis datasets during 2002-2011. We found that terrestrial water storage deficits preceded severe fire seasons across the southern Amazon. The most significant relationships between monthly terrestrial water storage and the sum of active fires during the dry season occurred during April-August (p < 0.02), corresponding to 1-5 month lead times before the peak month of burning (September). Analysis of other datasets provided evidence for a cascade of processes during drought events, with lower cumulative precipitation (and higher cumulative evapotranspiration) in the wet season substantially reducing terrestrial water storage, and subsequently, surface and column atmospheric water vapor. Our results suggest that terrestrial water storage observations from GRACE have the potential to improve fire season forecasts for the southern Amazon.

Chen, Yang; Velicogna, Isabella; Famiglietti, James S.; Randerson, James T.

2013-06-01

106

Formation of the early atmosphere from late-accreting planetesimals Sujoy Mukhopadhyay*  

E-print Network

1 Formation of the early atmosphere from late-accreting planetesimals Sujoy Mukhopadhyay* , Rita, Cambridge MA 02138, USA. * Corresponding author Abstract The composition of Earth's early atmosphere strongly influenced chemical reactions on our planet's surface. For example, an early reducing atmosphere

Mukhopadhyay, Sujoy

107

Devonian rise in atmospheric oxygen correlated to the radiations of terrestrial plants and large predatory fish  

PubMed Central

The evolution of Earth’s biota is intimately linked to the oxygenation of the oceans and atmosphere. We use the isotopic composition and concentration of molybdenum (Mo) in sedimentary rocks to explore this relationship. Our results indicate two episodes of global ocean oxygenation. The first coincides with the emergence of the Ediacaran fauna, including large, motile bilaterian animals, ca. 550–560 million year ago (Ma), reinforcing previous geochemical indications that Earth surface oxygenation facilitated this radiation. The second, perhaps larger, oxygenation took place around 400 Ma, well after the initial rise of animals and, therefore, suggesting that early metazoans evolved in a relatively low oxygen environment. This later oxygenation correlates with the diversification of vascular plants, which likely contributed to increased oxygenation through the enhanced burial of organic carbon in sediments. It also correlates with a pronounced radiation of large predatory fish, animals with high oxygen demand. We thereby couple the redox history of the atmosphere and oceans to major events in animal evolution. PMID:20884852

Dahl, Tais W.; Hammarlund, Emma U.; Anbar, Ariel D.; Bond, David P. G.; Gill, Benjamin C.; Gordon, Gwyneth W.; Knoll, Andrew H.; Nielsen, Arne T.; Schovsbo, Niels H.; Canfield, Donald E.

2010-01-01

108

Global 3-D model analysis of the seasonal cycle of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide: Implications for terrestrial vegetation uptake  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We use a global 3-D simulation of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide (COS) to interpret observations at a network of surface sites. We aim to identify the primary factors underlying observed seasonal variations and to constrain COS uptake by terrestrial vegetation. Model simulations are based on a recent estimate of global COS fluxes, with closure between sources and sinks. We find that the dominant influences on seasonal variation of COS are terrestrial vegetation uptake in the northern extratropics, and ocean fluxes in the southern extratropics. Simulations underestimate the amplitude of the observed seasonal cycle in the northern hemisphere, particularly at terrestrial sites, indicating that COS uptake by terrestrial vegetation has been underestimated in recent budgets. Fitting the observed seasonal variation at northern hemisphere sites in the model requires a doubling of the global vegetation sink to ~490 Gg S y-1, while fitting the southern hemisphere data suggests a reduction of ~50 Gg S y-1 in the southern extratropical ocean source. Balancing these changes in COS fluxes requires an additional source (~235 Gg S y-1, equivalent to 40% of identified sources) missing from present budget estimates. Discrepancies between annual mean observations and simulated concentrations, derived from our best estimates of seasonal fluxes, are largest in the tropics, suggesting an underestimate of COS sources at these latitudes.

Suntharalingam, Parvadha; Kettle, A. J.; Montzka, S. M.; Jacob, D. J.

2008-10-01

109

Sea surface temperatures and terrestrial water storage provide early warning information about fire season severity in the Amazon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fires in South America cause forest degradation and contribute to carbon emissions associated with land use change. We investigated the relationship between year-to-year changes in satellite observations of active fires in South America and sea surface temperatures. We found that the Oceanic Niño Index was correlated with interannual fire activity in the eastern Amazon whereas the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation index was more closely linked with fires in the southern and southwestern Amazon. Combining these two climate indices, we developed an empirical model that predicted regional fire season severity with 3-5 month lead times. We further examined the hypothesis that year-to-year variations in soil water recharge during the wet season modifies atmospheric water vapor and fire behavior during the following dry season. We tested this hypothesis by analyzing terrestrial water storage (TWS) observations from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), active fires from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), and other satellite and climate data during 2002-2011. We found that TWS anomalies at the end of the wet season were negatively correlated with the number of active fires during the dry season for three regions across the southern Amazon. The most significant relationships (p < 0.02) were observed for TWS anomalies during April-August, several months before the peak month of burning (September). Analysis of other datasets provided evidence for a cascade of processes during drought events, with lower cumulative precipitation (and higher cumulative evapotranspiration) in the wet season substantially reducing TWS, and subsequently surface and column water vapor. Our results indicate that TWS from GRACE also has the potential to provide early warning information about fire season severity in the Amazon.

Chen, Y.; Randerson, J. T.; Morton, D. C.; DeFries, R. S.; Collatz, G. J.; Kasibhatla, P. S.; Giglio, L.; Jin, Y.; Marlier, M. E.; Velicogna, I.; Famiglietti, J. S.

2012-12-01

110

The "terminal Triassic catastrophic extinction event" in perspective: a review of carboniferous through Early Jurassic terrestrial vertebrate extinction patterns  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A catastrophic terminal Triassic extinction event among terrestrial vertebrates is not supported by available evidence. The current model for such an extinction is based on at least eight weak or untenable assumptions: (1) a terminal Triassic extinction-inducing asteroid impact occurred, (2) a terminal Triassic synchronous mass extinction of terrestrial vertebrates occurred, (3) a concurrent terminal Triassic marine extinction occurred, (4) all terrestrial vertebrate families have similar diversities and ecologies, (5) changes in familial diversity can be gauged accurately from the known fossil record, (6) extinction of families can be compared through time without normalizing for changes in familial diversity through time, (7) extinction rates can be compared without normalizing for differing lengths of geologic stages, and (8) catastrophic mass extinctions do not select for small size. These assumptions have resulted in unsupportable and (or) erroneous conclusions. Carboniferous through Early Jurassic terrestrial vertebrate families mostly have evolution and extinction patterns unlike the vertebrate evolution and extinction patterns during the terminal Cretaceous event. Only the Serpukhovian (mid Carboniferous) extinction event shows strong analogy to the terminal Cretaceous event. Available data suggest no terminal Triassic extinction anomaly, but rather a prolonged and nearly steady decline in the global terrestrial vertebrate extinction rate throughout the Triassic and earliest Jurassic. ?? 1992.

Weems, R.E.

1992-01-01

111

Correlation of Early Tertiary Terrestrial Deposits of the Amaga Basin, Cauca Depression, Colombian Andes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Amaga Formation of the Amaga Basin preserves early Tertiary terrestrial deposits of many facies: channel, crevasse splay, paludal, flood plain, point bar, etc. These deposits lie between two major strike-slip fault zones, the Cauca and the Romeral in the Cauca Valley of the northern Andes of Colombia. Coal deposits characterize the lower part of the stratigraphic section; fine to medium clastic sediments otherwise dominate the sections. Within the basin, correlation between sections is difficult because various discontinuities interrupt the continuity of the strata. These include Tertiary intrusives, folding and faulting. Rapid lateral facies changes further complicate the correlations. Detailed studies on five stratigraphic sections are underway. Multiple methods of correlating sections are being used, including fluvial sequence stratigraphy in outcrops, architectural facies analysis, heavy mineral separates, grain-size and grain-ratio variations, paleocurrent directions, and magnetic property variations. Distinctive regional variations in magnetic anisotropic susceptibility indicate areas in which tectonic effects overprint sedimentary fabrics. The presence of secondary hematite and siderite is related to that overprinting. A major compositional break (identified by grain-ratio variations) has been found in the middle of the section. The integrated correlation results are summarized.

Sierra, G. M.; Sierra, G. M.; MacDonald, W. D.

2001-05-01

112

Terrestrial Planets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The four terrestrial planets (Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars) and Earth's Moon display similar compositions, interior structures, and geologic histories. The terrestrial planets formed by accretion ˜ 4.5 Ga ago out of the solar nebula, whereas the Moon formed through accretion of material ejected off Earth during a giant impact event shortly after Earth formed. Geophysical investigations (gravity anomalies, seismic analysis, heat flow measurements, and magnetic field studies) reveal that all five bodies have differentiated into a low-density silicate crust, an intermediate density silicate mantle, and an iron-rich core. Seismic and heat flow measurements are only available for Earth and its Moon, and only Earth and Mercury currently exhibit actively produced magnetic fields (although Mars and the Moon retain remanent fields). Surface evolutions of all five bodies have been influenced by impact cratering, volcanism, tectonism, and mass wasting. Aeolian activity only occurs on bodies with a substantial atmosphere (Venus, Earth, and Mars) and only Earth and Mars display evidence of fluvial and glacial processes. Earth's volcanic and tectonic activity is largely driven by plate tectonics, whereas those processes on Venus result from vertical motions associated with hotspots and mantle upwellings. Mercury displays a unique tectonic regime of global contraction caused by gradual solidification of its large iron core. Early large impact events stripped away much of Mercury's crust and mantle, produced Venus' slow retrograde rotation, ejected material off Earth that became the Moon, and may have created the Martian hemispheric dichotomy. The similarities and differences between the interiors and surfaces of these five bodies provide scientists with a better understanding of terrestrial planet evolutionary paths.

Barlow, Nadine G.

113

Multiple Tectonic Regimes and Diverging Geologic Histories of Terrestrial Planets: The Importance of the Early Years  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We use 3D mantle convection and planetary tectonics simulations to explore the links between tectonic regimes, the age of a planet, and its surface evolution. We demonstrate that the tectonic regime of a planet is dependant on its thermal and climatic evolution. A young planet with a high degree of internal heating has a strong susceptibility to climate-induced transitions in tectonic styles. The amplitude of a long lived surface temperature perturbation needed to initiate a transition from a mobile- to a stagnant-lid mode of tectonics decreases with increasing degrees of internal heating. As surface temperatures increase, episodic convection occurs over a larger range of lid strengths, suggesting that young and high temperature planetary bodies have a higher potential to exist in a long-lived mode of episodic tectonics. Once the system transitions into a stagnant-lid, the reverse transition is not attainable by a return to the original surface temperature, which indicates that the climate-tectonic system is bi-stable [multiple tectonic states are possible for the same parameter values]. As a planet ages, the system becomes increasingly insensitive to surface temperature induced transitions after ~30 - 50% of the original radiogenics decay. For a planet to transition from mobile- into episodic-, or stagnant-lid modes through the mechanism of increasing surface temperatures, the implication is that the change would have to occur early in its evolution, within the first 1-2 giga years. While the sensitivity to climatic perturbations decreases with the age of the planet, decreasing internal heat production can usher in a transition in tectonic regimes from a stagnant-lid state, into an episodic- and finally mobile-/sluggish-lid regimes. The implications are that terrestrial worlds can alternate between multiple tectonic states over giga-year timescales. The implications for the early Earth and Earth-Venus differences will be discussed.

Weller, M. B.; Lenardic, A.

2013-12-01

114

Mentors, networks, and resources for early career female atmospheric scientists  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Atmospheric Science Collaborations and Enriching NeTworks (ASCENT) is a workshop series designed to bring together early career female scientists in the field of atmospheric science and related disciplines. ASCENT is a multi-faceted approach to retaining these junior scientists through the challenges in their research and teaching career paths. During the workshop, senior women scientists discuss their career and life paths. They also lead seminars on tools, resources and methods that can help early career scientists to be successful. Networking is a significant aspect of ASCENT, and many opportunities for both formal and informal interactions among the participants (of both personal and professional nature) are blended in the schedule. The workshops are held in Steamboat Springs, Colorado, home of a high-altitude atmospheric science laboratory - Storm Peak Laboratory, which also allows for nearby casual outings and a pleasant environment for participants. Near the conclusion of each workshop, junior and senior scientists are matched in mentee-mentor ratios of two junior scientists per senior scientist. An external evaluation of the three workshop cohorts concludes that the workshops have been successful in establishing and expanding personal and research-related networks, and that seminars have been useful in creating confidence and sharing resources for such things as preparing promotion and tenure packages, interviewing and negotiating job offers, and writing successful grant proposals.

Hallar, A. G.; Avallone, L. M.; Edwards, L. M.; Thiry, H.; Ascent

2011-12-01

115

The armoured dissorophid Cacops from the Early Permian of Oklahoma and the exploitation of the terrestrial realm by amphibians.  

PubMed

Cacops, one of the most distinctive Paleozoic amphibians, is part of a clade of dissorophoid temnospondyls that diversified in the equatorial region of Pangea during the Late Carboniferous and Early Permian, persisting into the Late Permian in Central Russia and China. Dissorophids were a successful group of fully terrestrial, often spectacularly armoured predators, the only amphibians apparently able to coexist with amniotes when the latter started to dominate terrestrial ecosystems. In this paper, we describe excellent new skulls from the Early Permian of Oklahoma attributed to Cacops, Cacops morrisi sp. nov. and provide for the first time detailed information about this iconic dissorophid. These specimens show anatomical and ontogenetic features that will impact on future studies on the evolution of terrestriality in tetrapods. For example, the large, posteriorly closed tympanic embayment has fine striations on an otherwise smooth surface, documenting the oldest known clear evidence for the presence of a tympanic membrane in the fossil record, a structure that is used for hearing airborne sound in extant tetrapods. The skull of C. morrisi also has several features associated with predatory behaviour, indicating that this dissorophid may have been one of the top terrestrial predators of its time. PMID:19347261

Reisz, Robert R; Schoch, Rainer R; Anderson, Jason S

2009-07-01

116

The armoured dissorophid Cacops from the Early Permian of Oklahoma and the exploitation of the terrestrial realm by amphibians  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cacops, one of the most distinctive Paleozoic amphibians, is part of a clade of dissorophoid temnospondyls that diversified in the equatorial region of Pangea during the Late Carboniferous and Early Permian, persisting into the Late Permian in Central Russia and China. Dissorophids were a successful group of fully terrestrial, often spectacularly armoured predators, the only amphibians apparently able to coexist with amniotes when the latter started to dominate terrestrial ecosystems. In this paper, we describe excellent new skulls from the Early Permian of Oklahoma attributed to Cacops, Cacops morrisi sp. nov. and provide for the first time detailed information about this iconic dissorophid. These specimens show anatomical and ontogenetic features that will impact on future studies on the evolution of terrestriality in tetrapods. For example, the large, posteriorly closed tympanic embayment has fine striations on an otherwise smooth surface, documenting the oldest known clear evidence for the presence of a tympanic membrane in the fossil record, a structure that is used for hearing airborne sound in extant tetrapods. The skull of C. morrisi also has several features associated with predatory behaviour, indicating that this dissorophid may have been one of the top terrestrial predators of its time.

Reisz, Robert R.; Schoch, Rainer R.; Anderson, Jason S.

2009-07-01

117

PHOTOCHEMISTRY IN TERRESTRIAL EXOPLANET ATMOSPHERES. III. PHOTOCHEMISTRY AND THERMOCHEMISTRY IN THICK ATMOSPHERES ON SUPER EARTHS AND MINI NEPTUNES  

E-print Network

Some super Earths and mini Neptunes will likely have thick atmospheres that are not H2-dominated. We have developed a photochemistry-thermochemistry kinetic-transport model for exploring the compositions of thick atmospheres ...

Hu, Renyu

118

Heat flow vs. atmospheric greenhouse on early Mars  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Researchers derived a quantitative relationship between the effectiveness of an atmospheric greenhouse and internal heat flow in producing the morphological differences between earlier and later Martian terrains. The derivation is based on relationships previously derived by other researchers. The reasoning may be stated as follows: the CO2 mean residence time in the Martian atmosphere is almost certainly much shorter than the total time span over which early climate differences are thought to have been sustained. Therefore, recycling of previously degassed CO2 quickly becomes more important than the ongoing supply of juvenile CO2. If so, then the atmospheric CO2 pressure, and thereby the surface temperature, may be approximated mathematically as a function of the total degassed CO2 in the atmosphere plus buried material and the ratio of the atmospheric and regolith mean residence times. The latter ratio can also be expressed as a function of heat flow. Hence, it follows that the surface temperature may be expressed as a function of heat flow and the total amount of available CO2. However, the depth to the water table can simultaneously be expressed as a function of heat flow and the surface temperature (the boundary condition). Therefore, for any given values of total available CO2 and regolith conductivity, there exist coupled independent equations which relate heat flow, surface temperature, and the depth to the water table. This means we can now derive simultaneous values of surface temperature and the depth of the water table for any value of the heat flow. The derived relationship is used to evaluate the relative importance of the atmospheric greenhouse effect and the internal regolith thermal gradient in producing morphological changes for any value of the heat flow, and to assess the absolute importance of each of the values of the heat flow which are thought to be reasonable on independent geophysical grounds.

Fanale, F. P.; Postawko, S. E.

1991-01-01

119

Photochemistry in Terrestrial Exoplanet Atmospheres. III. Photochemistry and Thermochemistry in Thick Atmospheres on Super Earths and Mini Neptunes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Some super Earths and mini Neptunes will likely have thick atmospheres that are not H2-dominated. We have developed a photochemistry-thermochemistry kinetic-transport model for exploring the compositions of thick atmospheres on super Earths and mini Neptunes, applicable for both H2-dominated atmospheres and non-H2-dominated atmospheres. Using this model to study thick atmospheres for wide ranges of temperatures and elemental abundances, we classify them into hydrogen-rich atmospheres, water-rich atmospheres, oxygen-rich atmospheres, and hydrocarbon-rich atmospheres. We find that carbon has to be in the form of CO2 rather than CH4 or CO in a H2-depleted water-dominated thick atmosphere and that the preferred loss of light elements from an oxygen-poor carbon-rich atmosphere leads to the formation of unsaturated hydrocarbons (C2H2 and C2H4). We apply our self-consistent atmosphere models to compute spectra and diagnostic features for known transiting low-mass exoplanets GJ 1214 b, HD 97658 b, and 55 Cnc e. For GJ 1214 b, we find that (1) C2H2 features at 1.0 and 1.5 ?m in transmission and C2H2 and C2H4 features at 9-14 ?m in thermal emission are diagnostic for hydrocarbon-rich atmospheres; (2) a detection of water-vapor features and a confirmation of the nonexistence of methane features would provide sufficient evidence for a water-dominated atmosphere. In general, our simulations show that chemical stability has to be taken into account when interpreting the spectrum of a super Earth/mini Neptune. Water-dominated atmospheres only exist for carbon to oxygen ratios much lower than the solar ratio, suggesting that this kind of atmospheres could be rare.

Hu, Renyu; Seager, Sara

2014-03-01

120

The armoured dissorophid Cacops from the Early Permian of Oklahoma and the exploitation of the terrestrial realm by amphibians  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cacops, one of the most distinctive Paleozoic amphibians, is part of a clade of dissorophoid temnospondyls that diversified in the\\u000a equatorial region of Pangea during the Late Carboniferous and Early Permian, persisting into the Late Permian in Central Russia\\u000a and China. Dissorophids were a successful group of fully terrestrial, often spectacularly armoured predators, the only amphibians\\u000a apparently able to coexist

Robert R. Reisz; Rainer R. Schoch; Jason S. Anderson

2009-01-01

121

A possible global covariance between terrestrial gross primary production and 13C discrimination: Consequences for the atmospheric 13C budget and its response to ENSO  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is well known that terrestrial photosynthesis and 13C discrimination vary in response to a number of environmental and biological factors such as atmospheric humidity and genotypic differences in stomatal regulation. Small changes in the global balance between diffusive conductances to CO2 and photosynthesis in C3 vegetation have the potential to influence the 13C budget of the atmosphere because these

J. T. Randerson; G. J. Collatz; J. E. Fessenden; A. D. Munoz; C. J. Still; J. A. Berry; I. Y. Fung; N. Suits; A. S. Denning

2002-01-01

122

Evolving Oxygen Landscape of the Early Atmosphere and Oceans  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The past decade has witnessed remarkable advances in our understanding of oxygen on the early Earth, and a new framework, the topic of this presentation, is now in place to address the controls on spatiotemporal distributions of oxygen and their potential relationships to deep-Earth processes. Recent challenges to the Archean biomarker record have put an added burden on inorganic geochemistry to fingerprint and quantify the early production, accumulation, and variation of biospheric oxygen. Fortunately, a wide variety of techniques now point convincingly to photosynthetic oxygen production and dynamic accumulation well before the canonical Great Oxidation Event (GOE). Recent modeling of sulfur recycling over this interval allows for transient oxygen accumulation in the atmosphere without the disappearance of non-mass-dependent (NMD) sulfur isotope anomalies from the stratigraphic record and further allows for persistent accumulation in the atmosphere well before the permanent disappearance of NMD signals. This recent work suggests that the initial rise of oxygen may have occurred in fits and starts rather than a single step, and that once permanently present in the atmosphere, oxygen likely rose to high levels and then plummeted, in phase with the Paleoproterozoic Lomagundi positive carbon isotope excursion. More than a billion years of oxygen-free conditions in the deep ocean followed and set a challenging course for life, including limited abundances and diversity of eukaryotic organisms. Despite this widespread anoxia, sulfidic (euxinic) conditions were likely limited to productive ocean margins. Nevertheless, euxinia was sufficiently widespread to impact redox-dependent nutrient relationships, particularly the availability of bioessential trace metals critical in the nitrogen cycle, which spawned feedbacks that likely maintained oxygen at very low levels in the ocean and atmosphere and delayed the arrival of animals. Then, in the mid, pre-glacial Neoproterozoic we see evidence for an oxygenation event that significantly predated recent evidence for ocean ventilation in the post-glacial Ediacaran ocean. The trigger that facilitated the transition out of the oxygen-lean ';boring billion' is an area of active study. Additional evidence points to the likelihood of rising and falling oxygen levels through the later Neoproterozoic, which would have had a strong impact on early animal diversification and development of oxygen-demanding ecologies marked by large animals with complex trophic relationships. These observations now provide a context for interpreting the cause-and-effect relationships among the late Proterozoic rise in oxygen, the onset and dynamics of global-scale Neoproterozoic glaciation, metazoan diversification, and large-scale tectonic processes as surface expressions of deep-Earth processes.

Lyons, T. W.; Reinhard, C. T.; Planavsky, N. J.

2013-12-01

123

Argon isotopic composition of Archaean atmosphere probes early Earth geodynamics.  

PubMed

Understanding the growth rate of the continental crust through time is a fundamental issue in Earth sciences. The isotopic signatures of noble gases in the silicate Earth (mantle, crust) and in the atmosphere afford exceptional insight into the evolution through time of these geochemical reservoirs. However, no data for the compositions of these reservoirs exists for the distant past, and temporal exchange rates between Earth's interior and its surface are severely under-constrained owing to a lack of samples preserving the original signature of the atmosphere at the time of their formation. Here, we report the analysis of argon in Archaean (3.5-billion-year-old) hydrothermal quartz. Noble gases are hosted in primary fluid inclusions containing a mixture of Archaean freshwater and hydrothermal fluid. Our analysis reveals Archaean atmospheric argon with a (40)Ar/(36)Ar value of 143?±?24, lower than the present-day value of 298.6 (for which (40)Ar has been produced by the radioactive decay of the potassium isotope (40)K, with a half-life of 1.25 billion years; (36)Ar is primordial in origin). This ratio is consistent with an early development of the felsic crust, which might have had an important role in climate variability during the first half of Earth's history. PMID:23739427

Pujol, Magali; Marty, Bernard; Burgess, Ray; Turner, Grenville; Philippot, Pascal

2013-06-01

124

Changes in the terrestrial atmosphere-ionosphere-magnetosphere system due to ion propulsion for solar power satellite placement  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Preliminary estimates of the effects massive Ar(+) injections on the ionosphere-plasmasphere system with specific emphasis on potential communications disruptions are given. The effects stem from direct Ar(+) precipitation into the atmosphere and from Ar(+) beam induced precipitation of MeV radiation belt protons. These injections result from the construction of Solar Power Satellites using earth-based materials in which sections of a satellite must be lifted from low earth to geosynchronous orbit by means of ion propulsion based on the relatively abundant terrestrial atmospheric component, Ar. The total amount of Ar(+) injected in transporting the components for each Solar Power Satellite is comparable to the total ion content of the ionosphere-plasmasphere system while the total energy injected is larger than that of this system. It is suggested that such effects may be largely eliminated by using lunar-based rather than earth-based satellite construction materials.

Curtis, S. A.; Grebowsky, J. M.

1979-01-01

125

Integration of ice core, marine and terrestrial records: new insights into Holocene atmospheric circulation dynamics over NW Europe  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We analyzed the oxygen (?18O) and carbon (?13C) isotope composition of lacustrine carbonates (Chara sp. and Bithynia tentaculata) from a lake sediment sequence (Lake Bjärsträsk) on the island of Gotland, southern Sweden. Our new isotopic records show a significant consistency with existing regional climatic reconstructions, as well as with paleorecords reflecting large-scale circulation dynamics. By comparing our data to ice core records from Greenland and to regional- and global-scale terrestrial and marine climate records, we explore potential couplings of Mid- and Late Holocene extreme summer climate conditions in northwestern Europe to orbital forcing and low-latitude atmospheric circulation dynamics. Specifically, we discuss the relationship between long-term changes in the position of the North Atlantic subtropical front and the frequency of summer blocking anticyclones over southern Sweden. Furthermore, we tentatively outline the spatial structure of predominant modes of atmospheric variability over the North Atlantic sector throughout the Holocene.

Muschitiello, F.; Hammarlund, D.; Wohlfarth, B.

2012-12-01

126

Constraints on early Mars atmospheric pressure1 inferred from small ancient craters2  

E-print Network

1 Constraints on early Mars atmospheric pressure1 inferred from small ancient craters2-dominated atmosphere, but direct constraints on paleoatmospheric11 pressure P are lacking. Of particular doubtful that increasing CO2 pressure (total atmospheric pressure, P) is enough to raise early39 Mars

Kite, Edwin

127

Constraints on early Mars atmospheric pressure1 inferred from small ancient craters2  

E-print Network

1 Constraints on early Mars atmospheric pressure1 inferred from small ancient craters2-dominated atmosphere, but direct constraints on paleoatmospheric11 pressure P are lacking1 that increasing CO240 pressure (total atmospheric pressure, P) is enough to raise early Mars mean

Kite, Edwin

128

Increasing retention of early career female atmospheric scientists  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Atmospheric Science Collaborations and Enriching NeTworks (ASCENT) is a workshop series designed to bring together early career female scientists in the field of atmospheric science and related disciplines. ASCENT uses a multi-faceted approach to provide junior scientists with tools that will help them meet the challenges in their research and teaching career paths and will promote their retention in the field. During the workshop, senior women scientists discuss their career and life paths. They also lead seminars on tools, resources and methods that can help early career scientists to be successful and prepared to fill vacancies created by the “baby boomer” retirees. Networking is a significant aspect of ASCENT, and many opportunities for both formal and informal interactions among the participants (of both personal and professional nature) are blended in the schedule. The workshops are held in Steamboat Springs, Colorado, home of a high-altitude atmospheric science laboratory, Storm Peak Laboratory, which also allows for nearby casual outings and a pleasant environment for participants. Near the conclusion of each workshop, junior and senior scientists are matched in mentee-mentor ratios of two junior scientists per senior scientist. Post-workshop reunion events are held at national scientific meetings to maintain connectivity among each year’s participants, and for collaborating among participants of all workshops held to date. Evaluations of the two workshop cohorts thus far conclude that the workshops have been successful in achieving the goals of establishing and expanding personal and research-related networks, and that seminars have been useful in creating confidence and sharing resources for such things as preparing promotion and tenure packages, interviewing and negotiating job offers, and writing successful grant proposals.

Edwards, L. M.; Hallar, A. G.; Avallone, L. M.; Thiry, H.

2010-12-01

129

Greening the terrestrial biosphere: simulated feedbacks on atmospheric heat and energy circulation  

E-print Network

CO2. Keywords Vegetation Á Latent heat Á Sensible heat Á Convection Á Convective rainfall Á Polar was to induce an increase in the growth of global vegetation to isolate the effect of increased LAI promoted by increased growth of terrestrial vegetation could contribute to greater surface

Cowling, Sharon A.

130

Dynamic oxygenation of the early atmosphere and oceans  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The traditional view of the oxygenation of the early atmosphere and oceans depicts irreversibly rising abundances in two large steps: one at the Great Oxidation Event (GOE) ca. 2.3-2.4 billion years ago (Ga) and another near the end of the Neoproterozoic. This talk will explore how the latest data challenge this paradigm. Recent results reveal a far more dynamic history of early oxygenation, one with both rising and falling levels, long periods of sustained low concentrations even after the GOE, complex feedback relationships that likely coupled nutrients and ocean redox, and dramatic changes tied through still-emerging cause-and-effect relationships to first-order tectonic, climatic, and evolutionary events. In the face of increasing doubt about the robustness of organic biomarker records from the Archean, researchers are increasingly reliant on inorganic geochemical proxies for the earliest records of oxygenic photosynthesis. Proxy data now suggest oxygenesis at ca. 3.0 Ga with a likelihood of local oxygen build up in the surface ocean long before the GOE, as well as low (and perhaps transient) accumulation in the atmosphere against a backdrop of mostly less than ca. 0.001% of the present atmospheric concentration. By the GOE, the balance between oxygen sources and sinks shifted in favor of persistent accumulation, although sedimentary recycling of non-mass-dependent sulfur isotope signatures allows for the possibility of rising and falling atmospheric oxygen before the GOE as traditionally defined by the sulfur isotope record. Recycling may also hinder our ability to precisely date the transition to permanent oxygen accumulation beyond trace levels. Diverse data point to a dramatic increase in biospheric oxygen following the GOE, coincident with the largest positive carbon isotope excursion in Earth history, followed by an equally dramatic drop. This decline in Earth surface redox potential ushered in more than a billion years of dominantly low oxygen levels in the atmosphere—at perhaps much less than 1% of modern levels, as suggested by new chromium isotope data—and persistent anoxia in the deep ocean with euxinia limited to productive ocean margins. Under conditions of ca. 1-10% euxinic seafloor, bioessential trace metals would have been drawn down to levels that may have deleteriously impacted the availability of fixed nitrogen in the oceans and, through associated redox-dependent feedbacks, sustained comparatively low global levels of primary production and corresponding deficiencies in biospheric oxygen. This episode of intermediate redox gave way to increases in ocean-atmosphere oxygen that appear to predate the Sturtian glaciation. Although the causes behind this transition are not well understood, they are certain to reflect relationships among large-scale tectonic, climatic, and biotic drivers of nutrient availability and organic carbon production and burial. Oxygen during the Ediacaran, following the Marinoan glaciation, likely rose and fell episodically in ways that must have impacted the diversity and ecological relationships among early animals. Also, the low oxygen concentrations purported for the mid-Proterozoic are consistent with the long-held, but recently challenged, suggestion that the rise of animals was ultimately coincident with, and likely causally related to, a Neoproterozoic rise in oxygen.

Lyons, Timothy W.; Planavsky, Noah J.; Reinhard, Christopher T.

2014-05-01

131

The Net Exchange Between Terrestrial Ecosystems and the Atmosphere as a Result of Changes in Land Use  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The general purpose of this research was to improve and update (to 1990) estimates of the net flux of carbon between the world's terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere from changes in land use (e.g., deforestation and reforestation). The estimates are important for understanding the global carbon cycle, and for predicting future concentrations of atmospheric CO2 that will result from emissions. The emphasis of the first year's research was on the northern temperate zone and boreal forests, where the greatest discrepancy exists between estimates of flux. Forest inventories suggest net sinks of 0.6 PgC/yr; inversion analyses based on atmospheric data and models suggest much larger sinks 2-3.6 PgC/yr (e.g., Tans et al. 1990, Ciais et al. 1995). The work carried out with this grant calculated the flux attributable to changes in land use. The estimated flux was somewhat smaller than the flux calculated from inventory data suggesting that environmental changes have led to a small accumulation of carbon in forests that exceeds the accumulation expected from past rates of harvest. Two publications have described these results (Houghton 1996, 1998). The large difference between these estimates and those obtained with atmospheric data and models remains unexplained. The recent estimate of a 1.7 PgC/yr sink in North America, alone (Fan et al. 1998), is particularly difficult to explain. That part of the sink attributable to land-use change, however, is defined as a result of this grant.

Houghton, R. A.

1998-01-01

132

OUTSTANDING ISSUES REGARDING THE ROLE OF ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS ON TERRESTRIAL BIOSPHERE AND REGIONAL CLIMATE  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Atmospheric aerosols have a complex feedback on the earth’s climate. Past studies related to studying the impact of aerosols on the earth’s climate had focused on upper atmospheric processes including cloud-aerosol- radiative interactions. Recent evidence from field and model studies indicates that ...

133

Fractionation of terrestrial neon by hydrodynamic hydrogen escape from ancient steam atmospheres  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Atmospheric neon is isotopically heavier than mantle neon. By contrast, nonradiogenic mantle Ar, Kr, and Xe are not known to differ from the atmosphere. These observations are most easily explained by selective neon loss to space; however, neon is much too massive to escape from the modern atmosphere. Steam atmospheres are a likely, if intermittent, feature of the accreting Earth. They occur because, on average, the energy liberated during accretion places Earth above the runaway greenhouse threshold, so that liquid water is not stable at the surface. It is found that steam atmospheres should have lasted some ten to fifty million years. Hydrogen escape would have been vigorous, but abundant heavy constituents would have been retained. There is no lack of plausible candidates; CO2, N2, or CO could all suffice. Neon can escape because it is less massive than any of the likely pollutants. Neon fractionation would have been a natural byproduct. Assuming that the initial Ne-20/Ne-22 ratio was solar, it was found that it would have taken some ten million years to effect the observed neon fractionation in a 30 bar steam atmosphere fouled with 10 bars of CO. Thicker atmospheres would have taken longer; less CO, shorter. This mechanism for fractionating neon has about the right level of efficiency. Because the lighter isotope escapes much more readily, total neon loss is pretty minimal; less than half of the initial neon endowment escapes.

Zahnle, K.

1991-01-01

134

The early development of Gastrotheca riobambae and Colostethus machalilla, frogs with terrestrial reproductive modes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A Lecture (in English) on using two local (Equador) terrestrial frogs to learn about development; from the Model Organisms and Innovative Approaches in Developmental Biology Short Course in Sao Paolo, Brazil, April 2005. These are the PPT slides only, no associated audio or text is available.

Eugenia del Pino (Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Ecuador Biology)

2005-04-27

135

Early Giant Planet Migration in the Solar System: Geochemical and Cosmochemical Implications for Terrestrial Planet Formation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new terrestrial planet formation model (Walsh et al., this meeting) explores the effects of a two-stage, inward-then-outward migration of Jupiter and Saturn, as found in numerous hydrodynamical simulations of giant planet formation (Masset & Snellgrove 2001, Morbidelli & Crida 2007, Pierens & Nelson 2008). Walsh et al. show that the inward migration of Jupiter truncates the disk of planetesimals and embryos in the terrestrial planet region. Subsequent accretion in that region then forms a realistic system of terrestrial planets, in particular giving a low-mass Mars, which has been difficult to reproduce in simulations with a self-consistent set of initial conditions (see, eg. Raymond et al. 2009). Additionally, the outward migration of the giant planets populates the asteroid belt with distinct populations of bodies, with the inner belt filled by bodies originating inside of 3 AU, and the outer belt filled with bodies originating from beyond the giant planets. From a geochemical and cosmochemical point of view, this scenario differs significantly from the "standard model" in which essentially all of the material in the inner Solar System initially formed there. Specifically, the assumption that the current radial distribution of material in the inner Solar System is reflective of the primordial distribution of material in that region is no longer necessary. This is important for understanding the chemical and isotopic diversity of the inner Solar System as inferred from studies of the terrestrial planets, asteroids, and meteorites, as well as for understanding the origin of Earth's water. We will discuss the geochemical and cosmochemical implications of this model in relation to available constraints, as well as to previous models of terrestrial planet formation. Masset & Snellgrove (2001), MNRAS 320, L55. Morbidelli & Crida (2007), Icarus 191, 158. Pierens & Nelson (2008), A&A 482, 333. Raymond et al. (2009), Icarus 203, 644.

O'Brien, David P.; Walsh, K. J.; Morbidelli, A.; Raymond, S. N.; Mandell, A. M.; Bond, J. C.

2010-10-01

136

The seasonal exchange of carbon dioxide between the atmosphere and the terrestrial biosphere: Extrapolation from site-specific models to regional models  

SciTech Connect

Ecological models of the seasonal exchange of carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/) between the atmosphere and the terrestrial biosphere are needed in the study of changes in atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentration. In response to this need, a set of site-specific models of seasonal terrestrial carbon dynamics was assembled from open-literature sources. The collection was chosen as a base for the development of biome-level models for each of the earth's principal terrestrial biomes or vegetation complexes. The primary disadvantage of this approach is the problem of extrapolating the site-specific models across large regions having considerable biotic, climatic, and edaphic heterogeneity. Two methods of extrapolation were tested. 142 refs., 59 figs., 47 tabs

King, A.W.; DeAngelis, D.L.; Post, W.M.

1987-12-01

137

Ann. Geophysicae 14, 1103--1110 (1996) EGS --Springer-Verlag 1996 Detection of nitric acid and nitric oxides in the terrestrial atmosphere  

E-print Network

Ann. Geophysicae 14, 1103--1110 (1996) EGS -- Springer-Verlag 1996 Detection of nitric acid observations of the vertical distributions and the column densities of nitric acid and nitric oxide concentra and nitric oxides in the terrestrial atmosphere in the middle-infrared spectral region M. I. Ble11 cka, M. De

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

138

The oxidation state of Hadean magmas and implications for early Earth's atmosphere.  

PubMed

Magmatic outgassing of volatiles from Earth's interior probably played a critical part in determining the composition of the earliest atmosphere, more than 4,000 million years (Myr) ago. Given an elemental inventory of hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and sulphur, the identity of molecular species in gaseous volcanic emanations depends critically on the pressure (fugacity) of oxygen. Reduced melts having oxygen fugacities close to that defined by the iron-wüstite buffer would yield volatile species such as CH(4), H(2), H(2)S, NH(3) and CO, whereas melts close to the fayalite-magnetite-quartz buffer would be similar to present-day conditions and would be dominated by H(2)O, CO(2), SO(2) and N(2) (refs 1-4). Direct constraints on the oxidation state of terrestrial magmas before 3,850?Myr before present (that is, the Hadean eon) are tenuous because the rock record is sparse or absent. Samples from this earliest period of Earth's history are limited to igneous detrital zircons that pre-date the known rock record, with ages approaching ?4,400?Myr (refs 5-8). Here we report a redox-sensitive calibration to determine the oxidation state of Hadean magmatic melts that is based on the incorporation of cerium into zircon crystals. We find that the melts have average oxygen fugacities that are consistent with an oxidation state defined by the fayalite-magnetite-quartz buffer, similar to present-day conditions. Moreover, selected Hadean zircons (having chemical characteristics consistent with crystallization specifically from mantle-derived melts) suggest oxygen fugacities similar to those of Archaean and present-day mantle-derived lavas as early as ?4,350?Myr before present. These results suggest that outgassing of Earth's interior later than ?200?Myr into the history of Solar System formation would not have resulted in a reducing atmosphere. PMID:22129728

Trail, Dustin; Watson, E Bruce; Tailby, Nicholas D

2011-12-01

139

Development of a model of atmospheric oxygen variations to estimate terrestrial carbon storage and release  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Two years of work has been completed towards the development of a model of atmospheric oxygen variations on seasonal to decadal timescales. During the first year we (1) constructed a preliminary monthly-mean climatology of surface ocean oxygen anomalies, (2) began modeling studies to assess the importance of short term variability on the monthly-mean oxygen flux, and (3) conducted preliminary simulations of the annual mean cycle of oxygen in the atmosphere. Most of the second year was devoted to improving the monthly mean climatology of oxygen in the surface ocean.

Najjar, Raymond G.; Keeling, Ralph F.; Erickson, David J., III

1995-01-01

140

Soil surface acidity plays a determining role in the atmospheric-terrestrial exchange of nitrous acid.  

PubMed

Nitrous acid (HONO) is an important hydroxyl (OH) radical source that is formed on both ground and aerosol surfaces in the well-mixed boundary layer. Recent studies report the release of HONO from nonacidic soils, although it is unclear how soil that is more basic than the pKa of HONO (?3) is capable of protonating soil nitrite to serve as an atmospheric HONO source. Here, we used a coated-wall flow tube and chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) to study the pH dependence of HONO uptake onto agricultural soil and model substrates under atmospherically relevant conditions (1 atm and 30% relative humidity). Experiments measuring the evolution of HONO from pH-adjusted surfaces treated with nitrite and potentiometric titrations of the substrates show, to our knowledge for the first time, that surface acidity rather than bulk aqueous pH determines HONO uptake and desorption efficiency on soil, in a process controlled by amphoteric aluminum and iron (hydr)oxides present. The results have important implications for predicting when soil nitrite, whether microbially derived or atmospherically deposited, will act as a net source or sink of atmospheric HONO. This process represents an unrecognized mechanism of HONO release from soil that will contribute to HONO emissions throughout the day. PMID:25512517

Donaldson, Melissa A; Bish, David L; Raff, Jonathan D

2014-12-30

141

Transient simulations of Holocene atmospheric carbon dioxide and terrestrial carbon since the Last Glacial Maximum  

Microsoft Academic Search

Conflicting hypotheses are investigated for the observed atmospheric CO2 increase of 20 ppm between 8 ka BP and preindustrial time. The carbon component of the Bern Carbon Cycle Climate (Bern CC) model, which couples the LundPotsdamJena Dynamic Global Vegetation Model to an atmosphereoceansediment component, is driven by climate fields from timeslice simulations of the past 21 ka with the Hadley

Fortunat Joos; Stefan Gerber; I. C. Prentice; Bette L. Otto-Bliesner; Paul J. Valdes

2004-01-01

142

Verification of Atmospheric Signals Associated with Major Seismicity by Space and Terrestrial Observations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Observations from the last twenty years suggest the existence of electromagnetic (EM) phenomena during or preceding some earthquakes [Haykawa et a!, 2004; Pulinets at al, 1999,2004, 2006, Ouzounov et all 2007 and Liu et all 20041. Both our previous studies [Pulinets at al, 2005, 2006, Ouzounov et al, 2006, 20071 and the latest review by the Earthquake Remote Precursor Sensing panel [ERPS; 2003- 20051; have shown that there were precursory atmospheric TIR signals observed on the ground and in space associated with several recent earthquakes. [Tramutoli at al, 2005, 2006, Cervone et al, 2006, Ouzounov et all 2004,2006JT.o study these signals, we applied both multi parameter statistical analysis and data mining methods that require systematic measurements from an Integrated Sensor Web of observations of several physical and environmental parameters. These include long wave earth infra-red radiation, ionospheric electrical and magnetic parameters, temperature and humidity of the boundary layer, seismicity and may be associated with major earthquakes. Our goal is to verify the earthquake atmospheric correlation in two cases: (i) backward analysis - 2000-2008 hindcast monitoring of multi atmospheric parameters over the Kamchatka region, Russia ; and (ii) forward real-time alert analysis over different seismo-tectonic regions for California, Turkey, Taiwan and Japan. Our latest results, from several post-earthquake independent analyses of more then 100 major earthquakes, show that joint satellite and some ground measurements, using an integrated web, could provide a capability for observing pre-earthquake atmospheric signals by combining the information from multiple sensors into a common framework. Using our methodology, we evaluated and compared the observed signals preceding the latest M7.9 Sichuan earthquake (0511212008), M8.0 earthquake in Peru (0811512007), M7.6 Kashmir earthquake (1010812005) and M9.0 Sumatra earthquake (1212812004). We found evidence of the systematic appearance of both atmospheric and ionospheric anomalies preceding most of the major events during the period of our analysis 2001 -2008.

Taylor, Patrick

2008-01-01

143

Studies of Constraints from the Terrestrial Planets, Asteroid Belt and Giant Planet Obliquities on the Early Solar System Instability  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The planetary instability has been invoked as a convenient way to explain several observables in the present Solar System. This theory, frequently referred to under a broad and somewhat ill-defined umbrella as the ‘Nice model’, postulates that at least one of the ice giants suffered scattering encounters with Jupiter and Saturn. This could explain several things, including the excitation of the proper eccentric mode in Jupiter's orbit, survival of the terrestrial planets during giant planet migration, and, if the instability was conveniently delayed, also the Late Heavy Bombardment of the Moon. These properties/events would be unexpected if the migration histories of the outer planets were ideally smooth (at least no comprehensive model has yet been fully developed to collectively explain them). Additional support for the planetary instability comes from the dynamical properties of the asteroid and Kuiper belts, Trojans, and planetary satellites. We created a large database of dynamical evolutions of the outer planets through and 100 Myr past the instability (Nesvorny and Morbidelli 2012. Many of these dynamical histories have been found to match constraints from the orbits of the outer planets themselves. We now propose to test these different scenarios using constraints from the terrestrial planets, asteroid belt and giant planet obliquities. As we explain in the proposal narrative, we will bring all these constraints together in an attempt to develop a comprehensive model of early Solar System's evolution. This will be a significant improvement over the past work, where different constraints were considered piecewise and in various approximations. Our work has the potential to generate support for the Nice-type instability, or to rule it out, which could help in sparking interest in developing better models. RELEVANCE The proposed research is fundamental to understanding the formation and early evolution of the Solar System. This is a central theme of NASA's Strategic Goals and the OSS program. Specifically, the NRA for the OSS program states that the program solicits basic research proposals to conduct scientific investigations related to understanding the formation and early evolution of planetary systems, and that the OSS objectives include ‘theoretical investigations related to the formation and evolution of planetary systems.’ Here we propose to study the effects of early Solar System's instability on the terrestrial planets, asteroid belt, and giant planet obliquities. Our goal is to constrain planetary formation processes and the events that have taken place in the Solar System over its history.

Nesvorny, David

144

Evidence for propagation of aerobic bacteria in particles suspended in gaseous atmospheres. [Terrestrial microorganism contamination of Jupiter atmosphere  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

One factor involved in the possibility that airborne microbes might contaminate the Jovian atmosphere is whether microbes have the capacity to propagate in air. Prior to these studies, the evidence was that the airborne state was lethal to microbes. An aerosol of aerobic bacteria was mixed with another containing C-14-glucose, and the presence of C-14-CO2 was subsequently detected, which indicates that the airborne cells were metabolically active. In the same type of experiment, it was shown that thymidine was incorporated into the acid-insoluble fraction of samples, indicating the formation of DNA. It was also shown, both by an increase in the numbers of viable cells and a parallel increase in particle numbers, that at least two new generations of cells could occur. Evidence for propagation of anaerobic bacteria has so far been negative.

Dimmick, R. L.; Chatigny, M. A.; Wolochow, H.; Straat, P.

1977-01-01

145

Impact of Aquatic and Terrestrial Emissions on Atmospheric N2O Variability  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Atmospheric concentrations of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) have increased by about 20% since the preindustrial era, an increase that has been driven largely by use of anthropogenic nitrogen fertilizers. The N2O source associated with agriculture was historically underestimated by assessments that considered only direct emissions from fertilized fields, but more recently it has been recognized that 'indirect' emissions associated with N leaching and runoff to rivers and may account for as much as half of total agricultural N2O emissions. Meanwhile, recent regional atmospheric N2O inversions have inferred large North American agricultural N2O sources that are difficult to reconcile with global budget constraints. At the same time, it is not clear whether the inversions can detect indirect N2O emissions associated with nitrogen leaching and runoff. Here, we will present forward model simulations aimed at quantifying the relative magnitude, spatial distribution and timing of direct and indirect agricultural N2O emissions. The model simulations will be based on the Community Land Model (CLM), with new agricultural and trace N gas parameterizations, coupled to the River Transport Model (RTM), with a module for estimating river N transport and N2O production associated with in-stream sediment denitrification. The coupled CLM-RTM N2O fluxes will be used to force atmospheric chemistry tracer transport model (ACTM) simulations, with direct and indirect emissions carried as separate tracers. The ACTM results will be used to evaluate the impact of both types of emissions on site-specific variability in atmospheric N2O at United States monitoring sites and to assess the likelihood that current atmospheric monitoring networks can detect these signals. Locations of selected NOAA monitoring sites for atmospheric N2O over the continental United States, showing both aircraft (triangles) and surface flask or tower sites (filled circles). Site locations are superimposed on a map of present-day N fertilizer use, one of the primary drivers of N2O fluxes in our CLM-RTM simulations.

Nevison, C. D.; Riddick, S. N.; Saikawa, E.; Hess, P. G.

2013-12-01

146

Effects of long-period solar activity fluctuation on temperature and pressure of the terrestrial atmosphere  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The present state of research on the influence of solar sunspot activity on tropospheric temperature and pressure is reviewed. The existence of an 11-year temperature cycle of 5 different types is affirmed. A cyclic change in atmospheric pressure, deducing characteristic changes between 11-year cycles is discussed. The existence of 80-year and 5-to-6-year cycles of temperature is established, and physical causes for birth are suggested.

Rubashev, B. M.

1978-01-01

147

Observed and Modeled Tritium Concentrations in the Terrestrial Food Chain near a Continuous Atmospheric Source  

SciTech Connect

Tritium concentrations were measured in a large number of environmental and biological samples collected during 2002 at two dairy farms and a hobby farm near Pickering Nuclear Generating Station in Ontario, Canada. The data cover most compartments of the terrestrial food chain in an agricultural setting and include detailed information on the diets of the local farm animals. Ratios of plant OBT concentration to air moisture HTO varied between 0.12 and 0.56, and were generally higher for the forage crops collected at the dairy farms than for the garden vegetables sampled at the hobby farm. Animal OBT to air HTO ratios were more uniform, ranging from 0.18 to 0.45, and were generally higher for the milk and beef samples from the dairy farms than for the chicken products from the hobby farm. The observed OBT concentrations in plants and animals were compared with predictions of IMPACT, the model used by the Canadian nuclear industry to calculate annual average doses due to routine releases. The model performed well on average for the animal endpoints but overestimated concentrations in plants by a factor of 2.

Davis, P.A.; Kim, S.B.; Chouhan, S.L.; Workman, W.J.G. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (Canada)

2005-07-15

148

Oxygen Isotopic Anomaly in Terrestrial Atmospheric Carbonates and its Implications to Understand the Role of Water on Mars  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mineral aerosols produced from wind-blown soils are an important component of the earth system and comprise about 1000-3000 Tg.yr-1 compared to 400 Tg.yr-1 of secondary aerosols (e.g. carbonaceous substances, organics, sulfate and nitrates). Aerosols have important consequences for health, visibility and the hydrological cycle as they provide reactive surfaces for heterogeneous chemical transformation that may influence gas phase chemistry in the atmosphere. Tropospheric ozone produced in a cascade of chemical reactions involving NOx and VOC’s, can interact with aerosol surfaces to produce new compounds. Oxygen triple isotopic compositions of atmospheric carbonates have been used for the first time to track heterogeneous chemistry at the aerosol surfaces and to resolve a chemical mechanism that only occurs on particle surfaces. Fine and coarse aerosol samples were collected on filter papers in La Jolla, CA for one week. Aerosol samples were digested with phosphoric acid and released CO2 was purified chromatographically and analyzed for O isotopes after fluorination. Data indicated oxygen isotopic anomaly (?17O = ?17O - 0.524 ?18O) ranging from 0.9 to 3.9 per mill. Laboratory experiments revealed that adsorbed water on particle surfaces facilitates the interaction of the gaseous CO2 and O3 with formation of anomalous hydrogen peroxide and carbonates. This newly identified chemical reaction scenario provides a new explanation for production of the isotopically anomalous carbonates found in the SNC Martian meteorites and terrestrial atmospheric carbonates and it also amplifies understanding of water related processes on the surface of Mars. The formation of peroxide via this heterogeneous reaction on aerosols surface suggests a new oxidative process of utility in understanding ozone and oxygen chemistry both at Mars and Earth.

Thiemens, M. H.; Shaheen, R.

2010-12-01

149

Modeling coupled interactions of carbon, water, and ozone exchange between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. I: model description.  

PubMed

A new biophysical model (FORFLUX) is presented to study the simultaneous exchange of ozone, carbon dioxide, and water vapor between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. The model mechanistically couples all major processes controlling ecosystem flows trace gases and water implementing recent concepts in plant eco-physiology, micrometeorology, and soil hydrology. FORFLUX consists of four interconnected modules-a leaf photosynthesis model, a canopy flux model, a soil heat-, water- and CO2- transport model, and a snow pack model. Photosynthesis, water-vapor flux and ozone uptake at the leaf level are computed by the LEAFC3 sub-model. The canopy module scales leaf responses to a stand level by numerical integration of the LEAFC3model over canopy leaf area index (LAI). The integration takes into account (1) radiative transfer inside the canopy, (2) variation of foliage photosynthetic capacity with canopy depth, (3) wind speed attenuation throughout the canopy, and (4) rainfall interception by foliage elements. The soil module uses principles of the diffusion theory to predict temperature and moisture dynamics within the soil column, evaporation, and CO2 efflux from soil. The effect of soil heterogeneity on field-scale fluxes is simulated employing the Bresler-Dagan stochastic concept. The accumulation and melt of snow on the ground is predicted using an explicit energy balance approach. Ozone deposition is modeled as a sum of three fluxes- ozone uptake via plant stomata, deposition to non-transpiring plant surfaces, and ozone flux into the ground. All biophysical interactions are computed hourly while model projections are made at either hourly or daily time step. FORFLUX represents a comprehensive approach to studying ozone deposition and its link to carbon and water cycles in terrestrial ecosystems. PMID:12713923

Nikolov, Ned; Zeller, Karl F

2003-01-01

150

Helium as a tracer of terrestrial planet upper atmosphere dynamics : Predictions for Mars  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The comparative approach to planetary problems is becoming increasingly fruitful as new information from various planet atmospheres is assimilated. In particular, Earth, Venus and Mars upper atmosphere observations and modeling studies over the past 35-years provide a useful platform for addressing similar processes in other planetary environments. It is well known from thermospheric studies that light species (e.g. H, He) are efficiently redistributed about Venus and Earth by the global scale thermospheric circulation patterns that prevail. These observed helium distributions in fact can be used as a first order tracer of the seasonal thermospheric wind patterns on these two planets. For Earth, large winter bulges of helium are observed by satellite drag and mass spectrometer data (Keating and Prior, 1968; Reber et al., 1968; Mayr et. al., 1978). For Venus (a slow retrograde rotating planet), a helium bulge is observed on the nightside, consistent with a combined subsolar- to-antisolar plus retrograde superrotating zonal flow (e.g. Niemann et al.. 1980; Bougher et al., 1997). Likewise, we anticipate that helium will serve as first order tracer of the Mars thermospheric circulation. We present new Mars Thermospheric General Circulation Model (MTGCM) simulations that provide predictions of the expected helium distribution in the Mars upper atmosphere over 100 to 300 km. A winter polar helium bulge is anticipated which could dominate total densities above about 300 km. This seasonal feature could impact spacecraft drag if orbits pass through the winter polar night region (e.g. Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter). Data are needed to confirm these MTGCM predictions and measure the global scale wind patterns at Mars. The impact of exospheric return flow upon the Mars helium distribution remains to be estimated.

Bougher, S.; Roble, R.

2003-04-01

151

A Lookup Table to Compute High Energy Cosmic Ray Effects on Terrestrial Atmospheric Chemistry  

E-print Network

at altitudes of 10-35 km [16] with considerable latitude dependence [15]. Our data is inaccurate from 46-90 km because CORSIKA runs on a linear column density scale starting with 1 gcm 2 , but main e ects of atmospheric chemistry changes on the biosphere occur... : ==kusmos:phsx:ku:edu= melott=Astrobiology:htm. 25 Bibliography [1] B.D. Fields, T. Athanassiadou, and S.R. Johnson, Supernova Collisions with the Heliosphere, Astrophys. J. 678, 549 (2008). [2] B.C. Thomas, A.L. Melott, C.H. Jackman, C.M. Laird, M...

Atri, Dimitra

2009-04-27

152

The National Ecological Observatory Network's Atmospheric and Terrestrial Instrumentation: Quality Control Approaches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The National Ecological Observatory Network's Fundamental Instrument Unit (NEON-FIU) is responsible for making automated terrestrial observations at 60 different sites across the continent. FIU will provide data on key local physical, chemical, and climate forcing, as well as associated biotic responses (CO2, H2O, and energy exchanges). The sheer volume of data that will be generated far exceeds that of any other observatory network or agency, (i.e., > 45 Tb/year from 10's of thousands of remotely deployed sensors). We address the question of how to develop and implement a large ecological observatory that can accommodate such a large volume of data while maintaining high quality. Here, we describe our quality assurance and quality control (QA/QC) program to produce quality data while leveraging cyber infrastructure tools and optimizing technician time. Results focus on novel approaches that advance the quality control techniques that have been historically employed in other networks (DOE-ARM, AmeriFlux, USDA ARS, OK Mesonet) to new state-of-the-art functionality. These automated and semi-automated approaches are also used to inform automated problem tracking to efficiently deploy field staff. Ultimately, NEON will define its own standards for QA/QC and maintenance by building upon these existing frameworks. The overarching philosophy relies on attaining the highest levels of accuracy, precision, and operational time, while efficiently optimizing the effort needed to produce quality data products. Our preliminary results address the challenges associated with automated implementation of sensor command/control, plausibility testing, despiking, and data verification of FIU observations.

Taylor, J. R.; Luo, H.; Ayres, E.; Metzger, S. R.; Loescher, H. W.

2012-12-01

153

Measurements of biosphere-atmosphere exchange of CH? in terrestrial ecosystems.  

PubMed

This chapter focuses on methods for measuring CH(4) exchange between the biosphere and the atmosphere. In the context of the global importance of the biosphere as a source and a sink of atmospheric CH(4,) special emphasis is given to details of gas flux measurements. Due to their widespread use and suitability for targeted process studies, chamber techniques as a means for measuring CH(4) fluxes are highlighted. Besides detailed recommendations for measurements of fluxes with chambers, potential problems of the chamber technique are also discussed, such as changes in environmental conditions due to chamber installations. Further, a short overview is provided of how different pathways of CH(4) exchange, specifically plant-mediated transport, ebullition or diffusion, can be separated and quantified under field conditions. Finally, a short summary of micrometeorological CH(4) measuring techniques such as the eddy covariance method is provided. This technique relies on fast-response sonic anemometers and CH(4) analyzers (~10Hz) to make direct measurements of the vertical CH(4) flux at a point above the vegetation surface. PMID:21419928

Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Kiese, Ralf; Liu, Chunyan

2011-01-01

154

Transit Observations of Venus's Atmosphere in 2012 from Terrestrial and Space Telescopes as Exoplanet Analogs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We extensively observed the 8 June 2012 transit of Venus from several sites on Earth; we provide this interim status report about this and about two subsequent ToVs observed from space. From Haleakala Obs., we observed the entire June transit over almost 7 h with a coronagraph of the Venus Twilight Experiment B filter) and with a RED Epic camera to compare with simultaneous data from ESA's Venus Express, to study the Cytherean mesosphere; from Kitt Peak, we have near-IR spectropolarimetry at 1.6 µm from the aureole and during the disk crossing that compare well with carbon dioxide spectral models; from Sac Peak/IBIS we have high-resolution imaging of the Cytherean aureole for 22 min, starting even before 1st contact; from Big Bear, we have high-resolution imaging of Venus's atmosphere and the black-drop effect through 2nd contact; and we had 8 other coronagraphs around the world. For the Sept 21 ToV as seen from Jupiter, we had 14 orbits of HST to use Jupiter's clouds as a reflecting surface to search for an 0.01% diminution in light and a differential drop that would result from Venus's atmosphere by observing in both IR/UV, for which we have 170 HST exposures. As of this writing, preliminary data reduction indicates that variations in Jovian clouds and the two periods of Jupiter's rotation will be too great to allow extraction of the transit signal. For the December 20 ToV as seen from Saturn, we had 22 hours of observing time with VIMS on Cassini, for which we are looking for a signal of the 10-hr transit in total solar irradiance and of Venus's atmosphere in IR as an exoplanet-transit analog. Our Maui & Sac Peak expedition was sponsored by National Geographic Society's Committee for Research and Exploration; HST data reduction by NASA: HST-GO-13067. Some of the funds for the carbon dioxide filter for Sac Peak provided by NASA through AAS's Small Research Grant Program. We thank Rob Ratkowski of Haleakala Amateur Astronomers; Rob Lucas, Aram Friedman, Eric Pilger, Stan Truitt, and Steve Bisque/Software Bisque for Haleakala support/operations; Vasyl Yurchyshyn and Joseph Gangestad '06 of The Aerospace Corp. at Big Bear Solar Obs; LMSAL and Hinode science/operations team.

Pasachoff, Jay M.; Schneider, G.; Babcock, B. A.; Lu, M.; Penn, M. J.; Jaeggli, S. A.; Galayda, E.; Reardon, K. P.; Widemann, T.; Tanga, P.; Ehrenreich, D.; Vidal-Madjar, A.; Nicholson, P. D.; Dantowitz, R.

2013-06-01

155

Biospheric-atmospheric coupling on the early Earth  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Theoretical calculations performed with a one-dimensional photochemical model have been performed to assess the biospheric-atmospheric transfer of gases. Ozone reached levels to shield the Earth from biologically lethal solar ultraviolet radiation (220-300 nm) when atmospheric oxygen reached about 1/10 of its present atmospheric level. In the present atmosphere, about 90 percent of atmospheric nitrous oxide is destroyed via solar photolysis in the stratosphere with about 10 percent destroyed via reaction with excited oxygen atoms. The reaction between nitrous oxide and excited oxygen atoms leads to the production of nitric oxide in the stratosphere, which is responsible for about 70 percent of the global destruction of oxygen in the stratosphere. In the oxygen/ozone deficient atmosphere, solar photolysis destroyed about 100 percent of the atmospheric nitrous oxide, relegating the production of nitric oxide via reaction with excited oxygen to zero. Our laboratory and field measurements indicate that atmospheric oxygen promotes the biogenic production of N2O and NO via denitrification and the biogenic production of methane by methanogenesis.

Levine, J. S.

1991-01-01

156

Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences EARLY ONLINE RELEASE  

E-print Network

: Symmetric and Asymmetric Structures of Hurricane Boundary Layer in Coupled Atmosphere-Wave-Ocean Models structure through the atmospheric boundary layer in TCs4 is not well understood. This study investigates AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY #12;1 Symmetric and Asymmetric Structures of Hurricane Boundary Layer

Miami, University of

157

The terrestrial plant and herbivore arms race -- A major control of Phanerozoic atmospheric CO[sub 2  

SciTech Connect

Much recent work points to chemical weathering of continental silicates as the principal control of atmospheric CO[sub 2]. Presently, chemical weathering is mediated by plants. Vascular plants increase chemical weathering by drastically increasing acid leaching through respiration, decay, and microbial symbionts. Through the Phanerozoic the continuing evolution of terrestrial plant communities must have had a major effect on weathering rates. However, the efficacy of plant-induced-weathering is decreased by herbivory, which in turn decreases the invasion of soil by roots and leads to increased physical weathering. The author proposes that the major ice house--hot house cycles of the Devonian-Quaternary were caused by the lag between plant innovations and complete compensation by herbivore-detritivore response. In this way, it seems possible that: (1) the Carboniferous coals are a consequence of limited herbivory and soil litter decomposition and the Permo-Carboniferous glaciations were caused by dramatically increased chemical weathering caused by the previous global spread of vascular plants; (2) the Mesozoic hot house was brought on by massive increases in megaherbivores and litter decomposers; and (3) Cenozoic cooling and Quaternary glaciations resulted from the spread of herbaceous angiosperms and most recently grasslands. Earth's own superherbivory, if continued for tens of millions of years, will brings one back to mid-Mesozoic hot house conditions, not by the burning of fossil fuels, but rather by a global increase in physical over chemical weathering.

Olsen, P.E. (Columbia Univ., Palisades, NY (United States))

1993-03-01

158

Arctic Climate and Terrestrial Vegetation Responses During the Middle to Late Eocene and Early Oligocene: Colder Winters Preceded Cool-Down  

Microsoft Academic Search

The late Eocene to early Oligocene is recognized as an interval of substantial change in the global climate, with isotopic proxies of climate indicating a significant drop in sea surface temperatures. Other studies have shown, however that at middle latitudes that terrestrial mean annual temperature did not change significantly over this interval, and that the major change was likely a

D. R. Greenwood; J. Eldrett

2006-01-01

159

A Study of the Abundance and 13C/12C Ratio of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide to Advance the Scientific Understanding of Terrestrial Processes Regulating the Global Carbon Cycle  

SciTech Connect

The primary goal of our research program, consistent with the goals of the U.S. Climate Change Science Program and funded by the terrestrial carbon processes (TCP) program of DOE, has been to improve understanding of changes in the distribution and cycling of carbon among the active land, ocean and atmosphere reservoirs, with particular emphasis on terrestrial ecosystems. Our approach is to systematically measure atmospheric CO2 to produce time series data essential to reveal temporal and spatial patterns. Additional measurements of the 13C/12C isotopic ratio of CO2 provide a basis for distinguishing organic and inorganic processes. To pursue the significance of these patterns further, our research also involved interpretations of the observations by models, measurements of inorganic carbon in sea water, and of CO2 in air near growing land plants.

Stephen C. Piper

2005-10-15

160

Carbon residence time dominates uncertainty in terrestrial vegetation responses to future climate and atmospheric CO2  

PubMed Central

Future climate change and increasing atmospheric CO2 are expected to cause major changes in vegetation structure and function over large fractions of the global land surface. Seven global vegetation models are used to analyze possible responses to future climate simulated by a range of general circulation models run under all four representative concentration pathway scenarios of changing concentrations of greenhouse gases. All 110 simulations predict an increase in global vegetation carbon to 2100, but with substantial variation between vegetation models. For example, at 4 °C of global land surface warming (510–758 ppm of CO2), vegetation carbon increases by 52–477 Pg C (224 Pg C mean), mainly due to CO2 fertilization of photosynthesis. Simulations agree on large regional increases across much of the boreal forest, western Amazonia, central Africa, western China, and southeast Asia, with reductions across southwestern North America, central South America, southern Mediterranean areas, southwestern Africa, and southwestern Australia. Four vegetation models display discontinuities across 4 °C of warming, indicating global thresholds in the balance of positive and negative influences on productivity and biomass. In contrast to previous global vegetation model studies, we emphasize the importance of uncertainties in projected changes in carbon residence times. We find, when all seven models are considered for one representative concentration pathway × general circulation model combination, such uncertainties explain 30% more variation in modeled vegetation carbon change than responses of net primary productivity alone, increasing to 151% for non-HYBRID4 models. A change in research priorities away from production and toward structural dynamics and demographic processes is recommended. PMID:24344265

Friend, Andrew D.; Lucht, Wolfgang; Rademacher, Tim T.; Keribin, Rozenn; Betts, Richard; Cadule, Patricia; Ciais, Philippe; Clark, Douglas B.; Dankers, Rutger; Falloon, Pete D.; Ito, Akihiko; Kahana, Ron; Kleidon, Axel; Lomas, Mark R.; Nishina, Kazuya; Ostberg, Sebastian; Pavlick, Ryan; Peylin, Philippe; Schaphoff, Sibyll; Vuichard, Nicolas; Warszawski, Lila; Wiltshire, Andy; Woodward, F. Ian

2014-01-01

161

Carbon residence time dominates uncertainty in terrestrial vegetation responses to future climate and atmospheric CO2.  

PubMed

Future climate change and increasing atmospheric CO2 are expected to cause major changes in vegetation structure and function over large fractions of the global land surface. Seven global vegetation models are used to analyze possible responses to future climate simulated by a range of general circulation models run under all four representative concentration pathway scenarios of changing concentrations of greenhouse gases. All 110 simulations predict an increase in global vegetation carbon to 2100, but with substantial variation between vegetation models. For example, at 4 °C of global land surface warming (510-758 ppm of CO2), vegetation carbon increases by 52-477 Pg C (224 Pg C mean), mainly due to CO2 fertilization of photosynthesis. Simulations agree on large regional increases across much of the boreal forest, western Amazonia, central Africa, western China, and southeast Asia, with reductions across southwestern North America, central South America, southern Mediterranean areas, southwestern Africa, and southwestern Australia. Four vegetation models display discontinuities across 4 °C of warming, indicating global thresholds in the balance of positive and negative influences on productivity and biomass. In contrast to previous global vegetation model studies, we emphasize the importance of uncertainties in projected changes in carbon residence times. We find, when all seven models are considered for one representative concentration pathway × general circulation model combination, such uncertainties explain 30% more variation in modeled vegetation carbon change than responses of net primary productivity alone, increasing to 151% for non-HYBRID4 models. A change in research priorities away from production and toward structural dynamics and demographic processes is recommended. PMID:24344265

Friend, Andrew D; Lucht, Wolfgang; Rademacher, Tim T; Keribin, Rozenn; Betts, Richard; Cadule, Patricia; Ciais, Philippe; Clark, Douglas B; Dankers, Rutger; Falloon, Pete D; Ito, Akihiko; Kahana, Ron; Kleidon, Axel; Lomas, Mark R; Nishina, Kazuya; Ostberg, Sebastian; Pavlick, Ryan; Peylin, Philippe; Schaphoff, Sibyll; Vuichard, Nicolas; Warszawski, Lila; Wiltshire, Andy; Woodward, F Ian

2014-03-01

162

Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology EARLY ONLINE RELEASE  

E-print Network

: Hashimoto, T., K. Nishimura, M. Tsutsumi, and T. Sato, 2014: Meteor Trail Echo Rejection in Atmospheric of Polar Research, Tachikawa, Japan Masaki Tsutsumi, National Institute of Polar Research, Tachikawa, Japan

Sato, Toru

163

An investigation of the small ice cap instability in the Southern Hemisphere with a coupled atmosphere-sea ice-ocean-terrestrial ice model  

Microsoft Academic Search

A simple climate model has been developed to investigate the existence of the small ice cap instability in the Southern Hemisphere.\\u000a The model consists of four coupled components: an atmospheric energy balance model, a thermodynamic snow-sea ice model, an\\u000a oceanic mixed layer model and a terrestrial ice model. Results from a series of experiments involving different degrees of\\u000a coupling in

M. A. Morales Maqueda; A. J. Willmott; J. L. Bamber; M. S. Darby

1998-01-01

164

Seasonal exchange of carbon dioxide between the atmosphere and the terrestrial biosphere: extrapolation from site-specific models to regional models  

SciTech Connect

Ecological models of the seasonal exchange of carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/) between the atmosphere and the terrestrial biosphere are needed in the study of changes in atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentration. In response to this need, a set of site-specific models of seasonal terrestrial carbon dynamics was assembled from open-literature sources. The collection was chosen as a base for the development of biome-level models for each of the earth's principal terrestrial biomes or vegetation complexes. The primary disadvantage of this approach is the problem of extrapolating the site-specific models across large regions having considerable biotic, climatic, and edaphic heterogeneity. Two methods of extrapolation were tested. The first approach was a simple extrapolation that assumed relative within-biome homogeneity, and generated CO/sub 2/ source functions that differed dramatically from published estimates of CO/sub 2/ exchange. The second extrapolation explicitly incorporated within-biome variability in the abiotic variables that drive seasonal biosphere-atmosphere CO/sub 2/ exchange.

King, A.W.

1986-01-01

165

Carbon dioxide clouds in an early dense Martian atmosphere  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We use a time-dependent, microphysical cloud model to study the formation of carbon dioxide clouds in the Martian atmosphere. Laboratory studies by Glandorf et al. [2002] show that high critical supersaturations are required for CO2 cloud particle nucleation and that surface kinetic growth is not limited. These conditions, which are similar to those for cirrus clouds on Earth, lead to the formation of carbon dioxide ice particles with radii greater than 500 ?m and concentrations less than 0.1 cm-3 for typical atmospheric conditions. Within the current Martian atmosphere, CO2 cloud formation is possible at the poles during winter and possibly at high altitudes in the tropics. In both cases, temperature perturbations of several degrees below the CO2 saturation temperature are required to nucleate new cloud particles, suggesting that dynamical processes are the most common initiators of carbon dioxide clouds rather than diabatic cooling. The microphysical cloud model, coupled to a two-stream radiative transfer model, is used to reexamine the impact of CO2 clouds on the surface temperature within a dense CO2 atmosphere. The formation of carbon dioxide clouds leads to a warmer surface than what would be expected for clear sky conditions, but it also warms the atmosphere. The amount of surface warming is sensitive to the presence of dust and water vapor in the atmosphere, both of which act to dampen cloud effects. The radiative warming of the atmosphere associated with cloud formation, as well as latent heating, work to dissipate the clouds when present. In these simulations, clouds never last for periods much longer than several days, limiting their overall effectiveness for warming the surface. The time average cloud optical depth is approximately unity leading to a 5-10 K surface warming, depending on the surface pressure. The surface temperature does not rise above the freezing point of liquid water even for pressures as high as 5 bars, at a solar luminosity of 75% the current value. Our model shows that warming of the surface-atmosphere system by carbon dioxide clouds is self-limiting, since by heating the air the clouds cause themselves to dissipate. However, further analysis of the climatic effects of carbon dioxide clouds considering their global distribution and properties is warranted.

Colaprete, Anthony; Toon, Owen B.

2003-04-01

166

Carbon dioxide clouds in an early dense Martian atmosphere  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We use a time dependent, microphysical cloud model to study the formation of carbon dioxide clouds in the Martian atmosphere. Laboratory studies by Glandorf et al. (2002) show that high critical supersaturations are required for cloud particle nucleation and that surface kinetic growth is not limited. These conditions, which are similar to those for cirrus clouds on Earth, lead to the formation of carbon dioxide ice particles with radii greater than 500 ?m and concentrations less than 0.1 cm-3 for typical atmospheric conditions. Within the current Martian atmosphere, CO2 cloud formation is possible at the poles during winter and possibly at high altitudes in the tropics. In both cases, temperature perturbations of several degrees below the CO2 saturation temperature are required to nucleate new cloud particles suggesting that dynamical processes are the most common initiators of carbon dioxide clouds rather than diabatic cooling. The microphysical cloud model, coupled to a two-stream radiative transfer model, is used to reexamine the impact of CO2 clouds on the surface temperature within a dense CO2 atmosphere. The formation of carbon dioxide clouds leads to a warmer surface than what would be expected for clear sky conditions, but it also warms the atmosphere. The amount of surface warming is sensitive to the presence of dust and water vapor in the atmosphere, both of which act to dampen cloud effects. The radiative warming of the atmosphere associated with cloud formation, as well as latent heating, work to dissipate the clouds when present. In these simulations, clouds never last for periods much longer than several days, limiting their overall effectiveness for warming the surface. The time average cloud optical depth is approximately unity leading to a 5 - 10 K surface warming, depending on the surface pressure. The surface temperature does not rise above the freezing point of liquid water even for pressures as high as 5 bars, at a solar luminosity of 75% the current value. Our model shows that warming of the surface-atmosphere system by carbon dioxide clouds is self-limiting, since by heating the air the clouds cause themselves to dissipate. However, further analysis of the climatic effects of carbon dioxide clouds considering their global distribution and properties is warranted.

Colaprete, A.; Toon, O. B.

2002-12-01

167

Net terrestrial CO2 exchange over China during 2001-2010 estimated with an ensemble data assimilation system for atmospheric CO2  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

this paper we present an estimate of net ecosystem CO2 exchange over China for the years 2001-2010 using the CarbonTracker Data Assimilation System for CO2 (CTDAS). Additional Chinese and Asian CO2 observations are used in CTDAS to improve our estimate. We found that the combined terrestrial ecosystems in China absorbed about -0.33 Pg C yr-1 during 2001-2010. The uncertainty on Chinese terrestrial carbon exchange estimates as derived from a set of sensitivity experiments suggests a range of -0.29 to -0.64 Pg C yr-1. This total Chinese terrestrial CO2 sink is attributed to the three major biomes (forests, croplands, and grass/shrublands) with estimated CO2 fluxes of -0.12 Pg C yr-1 (range from -0.09 to -0.19 Pg C yr-1), -0.12 Pg C yr-1 (range from -0.09 to -0.26 Pg C yr-1), and -0.09 Pg C yr-1 (range from -0.09 to -0.17 Pg C yr-1), respectively. The peak-to-peak amplitude of interannual variability of the Chinese terrestrial ecosystem carbon flux is 0.21 Pg C yr-1 (~64% of mean annual average), with the smallest CO2 sink (-0.19 Pg C yr-1) in 2003 and the largest CO2 sink (-0.40 Pg C yr-1) in 2007. We stress that our estimate of terrestrial ecosystem CO2 uptake based on inverse modeling strongly depends on a limited number of atmospheric CO2 observations used. More observations in China specifically and in Asia in general are needed to improve the accuracy of terrestrial carbon budgeting for this region.

Zhang, H. F.; Chen, B. Z.; Laan-Luijkx, I. T.; Chen, J.; Xu, G.; Yan, J. W.; Zhou, L. X.; Fukuyama, Y.; Tans, P. P.; Peters, W.

2014-03-01

168

Early Cretaceous terrestrial ecosystems in East Asia based on food-web and energy-flow models  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In recent years, there has been global interest in the environments and ecosystems around the world. It is helpful to reconstruct past environments and ecosystems to help understand them in the present and the future. The present environments and ecosystems are an evolving continuum with those of the past and the future. This paper demonstrates the contribution of geology and paleontology to such continua. Using fossils, we can make an estimation of past population density as an ecosystem index based on food-web and energy-flow models. Late Mesozoic nonmarine deposits are distributed widely on the eastern Asian continent and contain various kinds of fossils such as fishes, amphibians, reptiles, dinosaurs, mammals, bivalves, gastropods, insects, ostracodes, conchostracans, terrestrial plants, and others. These fossil organisms are useful for late Mesozoic terrestrial ecosystem reconstruction using food-web and energy-flow models. We chose Early Cretaceous fluvio-lacustrine basins in the Choyr area, southeastern Mongolia, and the Tetori area, Japan, for these analyses and as a potential model for reconstruction of other similar basins in East Asia. The food-web models are restored based on taxa that occurred in these basins. They form four or five trophic levels in an energy pyramid consisting of rich primary producers at its base and smaller biotas higher in the food web. This is the general energy pyramid of a typical ecosystem. Concerning the population densities of vertebrate taxa in 1 km2 in these basins, some differences are recognized between Early Cretaceous and the present. For example, Cretaceous estimates suggest 2.3 to 4.8 times as many herbivores and 26.0 to 105.5 times the carnivore population. These differences are useful for the evaluation of past population densities of vertebrate taxa. Such differences may also be caused by the different metabolism of different taxa. Preservation may also be a factor, and we recognize that various problems occur in past ecosystem reconstructions. Counts of small numbers of confirmed species and estimates of maximum numbers of species present in the basin are used for the analysis and estimation of energy flow. This approach applies the methods of modern ecosystem analysis. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Matsukawa, M.; Saiki, K.; Ito, M.; Obata, I.; Nichols, D.J.; Lockley, M.G.; Kukihara, R.; Shibata, K.

2006-01-01

169

Early public impressions of terrestrial carbon capture and storage in a coal-intensive state.  

PubMed

While carbon capture and storage (CCS) is considered to be critical to achieving long-term climate-protection goals, public concerns about the CCS practice could pose significant obstacles to its deployment. This study reports findings from the first state-wide survey of public perceptions of CCS in a coal-intensive state, with an analysis of which factors predict early attitudes toward CCS. Nearly three-quarters of an Indiana sample (N = 1001) agree that storing carbon underground is a good approach to protecting the environment, despite 80% of the sample being unaware of CCS prior to participation in the two-wave survey. The majority of respondents do not hold strong opinions about CCS technology. Multivariate analyses indicate that support for CCS is predicted by a belief that humankind contributes to climate change, a preference for increased use of renewable energy, and egalitarian and individualistic worldviews, while opposition to CCS is predicted by self-identified political conservatism and by selective attitudes regarding energy and climate change. Knowledge about early impressions of CCS can help inform near-term technology decisions at state regulatory agencies, utilities, and pipeline companies, but follow-up surveys are necessary to assess how public sentiments evolve in response to image-building efforts with different positions on coal and CCS. PMID:22681614

Carley, Sanya R; Krause, Rachel M; Warren, David C; Rupp, John A; Graham, John D

2012-07-01

170

Water loss from Venus: Implications for the Earth's early atmosphere  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The atmosphere of Venus outgassed rapidly as a result of planetary heating during accretion, resulting in massive water loss. The processes affecting atmospheric chemistry following accretion have consisted largely of hydrogen escape and internal re-equilibrium. The initial bulk composition of Venus and Earth are assumed to have been roughly similar. Chemical speciation on Venus was controlled by the temperature and oxygen buffering capacity of the surface magma. It is also assumed that the surfaces of planetary bodies of the inner solar system were partly or wholly molten during accretion with a temperature estimated at 1273 to 1573 K. To investigate the range of reasonable initial atmospheric compositions on Venus, limits have to be set for the proportion of total hydrogen and the buffered fugacity of oxygen. Using the C/H ratio of 0.033 set for Earth, virtually all of the water generated during outgassing must later have been lost in order to bring the current CO2/H2O ratio for Venus up to its observed value of 10 sup 4 to 10 sup 5. The proportion of H2O decreases in model atmospheres with successfully higher C/H values, ultimately approaching the depleted values currently observed on Venus. Increasing C/H also results in a rapid increase in CO/H2O and provides an efficient mechanism for water loss by the reaction CO+H2O = CO2 + H2. This reaction, plus water loss mechanisms involving crustal iron, could have removed a very large volume of water from the Venusian atmosphere, even at a low C/H value.

Richardson, S. M.; Pollack, J. B.; Reynolds, R. T.

1985-01-01

171

Integrated Estimates of Global Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

Assessing the contribution of terrestrial carbon sequestration to international climate change mitigation requires integration across scientific and disciplinary boundaries. As part of a scenario analysis for the US Climate Change Technology Program, measurements and geographic data were used to develop terrestrial carbon sequestration estimates for agricultural soil carbon, reforestation and pasture management. These estimates were then applied in the MiniCAM integrated assessment model to evaluate mitigation strategies within policy and technology scenarios aimed at achieving atmospheric CO2 stabilization by 2100. Adoption of terrestrial sequestration practices is based on competition for land and economic markets for carbon. Terrestrial sequestration reach a peak combined rate of 0.5 to 0.7 Gt carbon yr-1 in mid-century with contributions from agricultural soil (0.21 Gt carbon yr-1), reforestation (0.31 Gt carbon yr-1) and pasture (0.15 Gt carbon yr-1). Sequestration rates vary over time period and with different technology and policy scenarios. The combined contribution of terrestrial sequestration over the next century ranges from 31 to 41 GtC. The contribution of terrestrial sequestration to mitigation is highest early in the century, reaching up to 20% of total carbon mitigation. This analysis provides insight into the behavior of terrestrial carbon mitigation options in the presence and absence of climate change mitigation policies.

Thomson, Allison M.; Izaurralde, R Cesar; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.

2008-02-01

172

The role of terrestrial vegetation in atmospheric Hg deposition: Pools and fluxes of spike and ambient Hg from the METAALICUS experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As part of the Mercury Experiment to Assess Atmospheric Loading in Canada and the U.S. (METAALICUS), different stable Hg(II) isotope spikes were applied to the upland and wetland areas of a boreal catchment between 2001 and 2006 to examine retention of newly deposited Hg(II). In the present study, a Geographical Information Systems (GIS)-based approach was used to quantify canopy and ground vegetation pools of experimentally applied upland and wetland spike Hg within the METAALICUS watershed over the terrestrial loading phase of the experiment. A chemical kinetic model was also used to describe the changes in spike Hg concentrations of canopy and ground vegetation over time. An examination of the fate of spike Hg initially present on canopy vegetation using a mass balance approach indicated that the largest percentage flux from the canopy over one year post-spray was emission to the atmosphere (upland: 45%; wetland: 71%), followed by litterfall (upland: 14%; wetland: 10%) and throughfall fluxes (upland: 12%; wetland: 9%) and longer term retention of spike in the forest canopy (11% for both upland and wetland). Average half-lives (t1/2) of spike on deciduous (110 ± 30 days) and coniferous (180 ± 40 days) canopy and ground vegetation (890 ± 620 days) indicated that retention of new atmospheric Hg(II) on terrestrial (especially ground) vegetation delays downward transport of new atmospheric Hg(II) into the soil profile and runoff into lakes.

Graydon, Jennifer A.; St. Louis, Vincent L.; Lindberg, Steve E.; Sandilands, Ken A.; Rudd, John W. M.; Kelly, Carol A.; Harris, Reed; Tate, Michael T.; Krabbenhoft, Dave P.; Emmerton, Craig A.; Asmath, Hamish; Richardson, Murray

2012-03-01

173

Constraints on early atmosphere from planetary accretion processes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Evidence for composition and dynamics of release of the earliest volatiles was in lack of anything better being sought from the most ancient sediments known at the time, although they were recognized to be younger than three billion years. Origin of life on Earth was considered to require a lasting atmosphere with hydrogen and methane as major components. The new observations together with theoretical studies generated by the space program and by systematic exploration of the Earth's oceanic crust changed the climate of opinion in which the questions of the primordial atmosphere are discussed. Even though existing evidence does not permit conclusive choice of any specific scenario, the acceptance of specific model elements now forces the consideration of a series of consequences, some of which may be tested by observation.

Arrhenius, G.

1985-01-01

174

Terrestrial Planets: Comparative Planetology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Papers were presented at the 47th Annual Meteoritical Society Meeting on the Comparative planetology of Terrestrial Planets. Subject matter explored concerning terrestrial planets includes: interrelationships among planets; plaentary evolution; planetary structure; planetary composition; planetary Atmospheres; noble gases in meteorites; and planetary magnetic fields.

1985-01-01

175

Early hominin diet included diverse terrestrial and aquatic animals 1.95 Ma in East Turkana, Kenya.  

PubMed

The manufacture of stone tools and their use to access animal tissues by Pliocene hominins marks the origin of a key adaptation in human evolutionary history. Here we report an in situ archaeological assemblage from the Koobi Fora Formation in northern Kenya that provides a unique combination of faunal remains, some with direct evidence of butchery, and Oldowan artifacts, which are well dated to 1.95 Ma. This site provides the oldest in situ evidence that hominins, predating Homo erectus, enjoyed access to carcasses of terrestrial and aquatic animals that they butchered in a well-watered habitat. It also provides the earliest definitive evidence of the incorporation into the hominin diet of various aquatic animals including turtles, crocodiles, and fish, which are rich sources of specific nutrients needed in human brain growth. The evidence here shows that these critical brain-growth compounds were part of the diets of hominins before the appearance of Homo ergaster/erectus and could have played an important role in the evolution of larger brains in the early history of our lineage. PMID:20534571

Braun, David R; Harris, John W K; Levin, Naomi E; McCoy, Jack T; Herries, Andy I R; Bamford, Marion K; Bishop, Laura C; Richmond, Brian G; Kibunjia, Mzalendo

2010-06-01

176

Atmospheric composition and climate on the early Earth  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oxygen isotope data from ancient sedimentary rocks appear to suggest that the early Earth was significantly warmer than today, with estimates of surface temperatures between 45 and 858C. We argue, following others, that this interpretation is incorrect—the same data can be explained via a change in isotopic composition of seawater with time. These changes in the isotopic composition could result

James F. Kasting; M. Tazewell Howard

2006-01-01

177

Seasonal exchange of carbon dioxide between the atmosphere and the terrestrial biosphere: extrapolation from site-specific models to regional models  

SciTech Connect

Ecological models of the seasonal exchange of carbon dioxide between the atmosphere and the terrestrial biosphere are needed in the study of changes in atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentration. In response to this need, a set of site-specific models of seasonal terrestrial carbon dynamics was assembled from open-literature sources. The collection was chosen as a base for the development of biome-level models for each of the earth's principal terrestrial biomes or vegetation complexes. Two methods of extrapolation were tested. The first approach was a simple extrapolation that assumed relative within-biome homogeneity, and generated CO/sub 2/ source functions that differed dramatically from published estimates of CO/sub 2/ exchange. The differences were so great that the simple extrapolation was rejected as a means of incorporating site-specific models in a global CO/sub 2/ source function. The second extrapolation explicitly incorporated within-biome variability in the abiotic variables that drive seasonal biosphere-atmosphere CO/sub 2/ exchange. Simulated site-specific CO/sub 2/ dynamics were treated as a function of multiple random variables. The predicated regional CO/sub 2/ exchange is the computed expected value of simulated site-specific exchanges for that region times the area of the region. The test involved the regional extrapolation of tundra and a coniferous forest carbon exchange model. Comparisons between the CO/sub 2/ exchange estimated by extrapolation and published estimates of regional exchange for the latitude belt support the appropriateness of extrapolation by expected value.

King, A.W.

1986-01-01

178

Model atmospheres for novae during the early stages  

SciTech Connect

Continuum and line blanketing models for the photospheres of novae in the early stages of their outbursts are presented. The expanding envelopes are characterized by a very slow increase of density with decreasing radius which leads to very large geometrical extensions and large temperature differences between the inner and outer parts. The spectra show a large IR excess and a small Balmer jump which may be either in absorption or in emission. For the parameters considered (T{sub eff} = 10{sup 4}, 1.5 {times} 10{sup 4}, 2 {times} 10{sup 4}K, R = 10{sup 11} cm, solar composition), most lines are in absorption. The effects of both modifications in the temperature structure (e.g. by heating from shock fronts) and changes in the abundances of the heavy elements on the emergent spectra are briefly discussed. 13 refs., 11 figs.

Wehrse, R.; Hauschildt, P.H. (Heidelberg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Theoretische Astrophysik); Shaviv, G. (Technion-Israel Inst. of Tech., Haifa (Israel). Dept. of Physics); Starrfield, S. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA) Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (USA). Dept. of Physics)

1989-01-01

179

Production of nitrogen oxides by lightning in a methane-rich early atmosphere  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The composition of the early Earth's atmosphere is not known. Assuming that rapid weathering of fragments from impacts took placed and efficient sequestration of carbon occurred in the Earth's mantle, the early atmosphere would have been mostly composed of molecular nitrogen with low concentrations of carbon dioxide (less than percent). In order preserve the existence of oceans, it is required to warm up the atmosphere almost exclusively with methane [1]. Predicted methane concentrations in the distant past range from few ppm to several thousand ppm. Photochemical models predict a production rate of hydrogen cyanide of the order of 6 Tg/yr in a 3 percent carbon dioxide atmosphere with 1000 ppm of methane [2]. When the atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide dropped to 0.3 percent but with the methane levels of 1000 ppm, the production rate of hydrogen cyanide increased up to 20 Tg/yr [2]. The nitrogen fixation rate by lightning in atmospheres dominated bymolecula nitrogen, less than 10 percent carbon dioxide, and the absence of methane has been reported by Navarro-Gonzalez et al. [3]. Here we report an experimental study of the effects of lightning discharges on the nitrogen fixation rate during the evolution of the Earth's early atmosphere from 10 to 0.5percent of carbon dioxide with methane concentrations from 0 to 10,000 ppm in molecular nitrogen. Our results show that the main nitrogen fixation products by lightning are nitric oxide, nitrous oxide and methyl nitrite. Preliminary estimates indicate that the production of nitric oxide is not dependent on the initial concentration of methane and that its production rate decreases from about 0.02 Tg/yr to about 0.003 Tg/yr in atmospheres ranging from 10 to 0.5 percent of carbon dioxide, respectively. Nitrous oxide is produced by lightning is the contemporaneous oxygenated Earth's atmosphere [4], but has not been detected in nitrogen-carbon dioxide mixtures in the absence of oxygen [5]. This is the first report for the production of methylnitrate by lightning in the early atmosphere. Further analyses are underway to accurately determine the production rates of these nitrogen oxides by lightning, and to understand their role for chemical evolution and early Earth's climate. Zahnle, K. J. Photochemistry of methane and the formation of hydrocyanic acid (HCN) in the Earths early atmosphere. J. Geophys. Res. 91, 2819-2834 (1986); [2] Tian, F., Kasting, J.F., and Zahnle, K. Revisiting HCN formation in Earth's early atmosphere. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 308, 417-423 (2011); [3] Navarro-González, R., McKay, C.P. and Nna Mvondo, D. A possible nitrogen crisis for archaean life due to reduced nitrogen fixation by lightning, Nature 412, 61-64 (2001); [4] Levine, J.S., Hughes, R.E., Chameides, W.L., and Howell, W.E. N20 and CO Production by Electrical Discharges: Atmospheric Implications, Geophys. Res. Lett.,6, 557-559 (1979); [5] Nna Mvondo, D. Navarro-González, R, McKay, C.P., Coll, P. and Raulin, F. Production of nitrogen oxides by lightning and coronae discharges in simulated early Earth, Venus and Mars environments. Adv Space Res. 27(2), 217-223 (2001).

Navarro, Karina; Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; McKay, Christopher

2013-04-01

180

EFFECTS OF ELEVATED ATMOSPHERIC CO2 ON INVASIVE WEED SPECIES IN MANAGED TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS OF THE SOUTHEASTERN U.S.  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Invasive weeds are estimated to cost U.S. agricultural and forest producers 34 billion dollars each year from decreased productivity and weed control efforts. Invasive plant pests, via their competitive aggression and absence of natural controls, have the ability to disrupt terrestrial ecosystems a...

181

Latitudinal distribution of terrestrial lipid biomarkers and n-alkane compound-specific stable carbon isotope ratios in the atmosphere over the western Pacific and Southern Ocean  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigated the latitudinal changes in atmospheric transport of organic matter to the western Pacific and Southern Ocean (27.58°N-64.70°S). Molecular distributions of lipid compound classes (homologous series of C 15 to C 35n-alkanes, C 8 to C 34n-alkanoic acids, C 12 to C 30n-alkanols) and compound-specific stable isotopes (? 13C of C 29 and C 31n-alkanes) were measured in marine aerosol filter samples collected during a cruise by the R/V Hakuho Maru. The geographical source areas for each sample were estimated from air-mass back-trajectory computations. Concentrations of TC and lipid compound classes were several orders of magnitude lower than observations from urban sites in Asia. A stronger signature of terrestrial higher plant inputs was apparent in three samples collected under conditions of strong terrestrial winds. Unresolved complex mixtures (UCM) showed increasing values in the North Pacific, highlighting the influence of the plume of polluted air exported from East Asia. n-Alkane average chain length (ACL) distribution had two clusters, with samples showing a relation to latitude between 28°N and 47°S (highest ACL values in the tropics), whilst a subset of southern samples had anomalously high ACL values. Compound-specific carbon isotopic analysis of the C 29 (-25.6‰ to -34.5‰) and C 31n-alkanes (-28.3‰ to -37‰) revealed heavier ? 13C values in the northern latitudes with a transition to lighter values in the Southern Ocean. By comparing the isotopic measurements with back-trajectory analysis it was generally possible to discriminate between different source areas. The terrestrial vegetation source for a subset of the southernmost Southern Ocean is enigmatic; the back-trajectories indicate eastern Antarctica as the only intercepted terrestrial source area. These samples may represent a southern hemisphere background of well mixed and very long range transported higher plant organic material.

Bendle, James; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Yamazaki, Koji; Niwai, Takeji

2007-12-01

182

Study of the Role of Terrestrial Processes in the Carbon Cycle Based on Measurements of the Abundance and Isotopic Composition of Atmospheric CO2  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of this project was to continue research to develop carbon cycle relationships related to the land biosphere based on remote measurements of atmospheric CO2 concentration and its isotopic ratios 13C/12C, 18O/16O, and 14C/12C. The project continued time-series observations of atmospheric carbon dioxide and isotopic composition begun by Charles D. Keeling at remote sites, including Mauna Loa, the South Pole, and eight other sites. Using models of varying complexity, the concentration and isotopic measurements were used to study long-term change in the interhemispheric gradients in CO2 and 13C/12C to assess the magnitude and evolution of the northern terrestrial carbon sink, to study the increase in amplitude of the seasonal cycle of CO2, to use isotopic data to refine constraints on large scale changes in isotopic fractionation which may be related to changes in stomatal conductance, and to motivate improvements in terrestrial carbon cycle models. The original proposal called for a continuation of the new time series of 14C measurements but subsequent descoping to meet budgetary constraints required termination of measurements in 2007.

Stephen C. Piper; Ralph F. Keeling

2012-01-03

183

Parallel Computing for Terrestrial Ecosystem Carbon Modeling  

Microsoft Academic Search

Terrestrial ecosystems are a primary component of research on global environmental change. Observational and modeling research on terrestrial ecosystems at the global scale, however, has lagged behind their counterparts for oceanic and atmospheric systems, largely because the unique challenges associated with the tremendous diversity and complexity of terrestrial ecosystems. There are 8 major types of terrestrial ecosystem: tropical rain forest,

Dali Wang; Wilfred M Post; Daniel M Ricciuto; Michael Berry

2011-01-01

184

Terrestrial biogeochemical feedbacks in the climate system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The terrestrial biosphere is a key regulator of atmospheric chemistry and climate. During past periods of climate change, vegetation cover and interactions between the terrestrial biosphere and atmosphere changed within decades. Modern observations show a similar responsiveness of terrestrial biogeochemistry to anthropogenically forced climate change and air pollution. Although interactions between the carbon cycle and climate have been a central

A. Arneth; S. P. Harrison; S. Zaehle; K. Tsigaridis; S. Menon; P. J. Bartlein; J. Feichter; A. Korhola; M. Kulmala; D. O'Donnell; G. Schurgers; S. Sorvari; T. Vesala

2010-01-01

185

Shock-induced CO2 loss from CaCO3: Implications for early planetary atmospheres  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Recovered samples from shock recovery experiments on single crystal calcite were subjected to thermogravimetric analysis to determine the amount of post-shock CO2, the decarbonization interval and the activation energy, for the removal of remaining CO2 in shock-loaded calcite. Comparison of post-shock CO2 with that initially present determines shock-induced CO2 loss as a function of shock pressure. Incipient to complete CO2 loss occurs over a pressure range of approximately 10 to approximately 70 GPa. Optical and scanning electron microscopy reveal structural changes, which are related to the shock-loading. The occurrence of dark, diffuse areas, which can be resolved as highly vesicular areas as observed with a scanning electron microscope are interpreted as representing quenched partial melts, into which shock-released CO2 was injected. The experimental results are used to constrain models of shock-produced, primary CO2 atmospheres on the accreting terrestrial planets.

Lange, M. A.; Ahrens, T. J.

1984-01-01

186

Photochemical and thermal modeling in the early atmosphere of the earth  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The simplest carbon compounds, present in the terrestrial and planetary atmospheres, exhibit a wide range of oxidation states, carbon dioxide and methane being the most oxidized and the most reduced form of carbon, respectively. The question arises as to the origin and the interconversion among the carbon species. The chemical pathways for the conversion of CH4 to CO and CO2 are for the most part known. The reverse process, the reduction of CO to CH4 is however, poorly understood. A new reaction is proposed, H2CO + H + M yields CH3O + M, which might play a fundamental role in the reduction of CO or CH4. An update is presented of nitrile photochemistry on Titan.

Yung, Yuk L.

1988-01-01

187

Complex Spatiotemporal Responses of Global Terrestrial Primary Production to Climate Change and Increasing Atmospheric CO2 in the 21st Century.  

PubMed

Quantitative information on the response of global terrestrial net primary production (NPP) to climate change and increasing atmospheric CO2 is essential for climate change adaptation and mitigation in the 21st century. Using a process-based ecosystem model (the Dynamic Land Ecosystem Model, DLEM), we quantified the magnitude and spatiotemporal variations of contemporary (2000s) global NPP, and projected its potential responses to climate and CO2 changes in the 21st century under the Special Report on Emission Scenarios (SRES) A2 and B1 of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). We estimated a global terrestrial NPP of 54.6 (52.8-56.4) PgC yr-1 as a result of multiple factors during 2000-2009. Climate change would either reduce global NPP (4.6%) under the A2 scenario or slightly enhance NPP (2.2%) under the B1 scenario during 2010-2099. In response to climate change, global NPP would first increase until surface air temperature increases by 1.5°C (until the 2030s) and then level-off or decline after it increases by more than 1.5°C (after the 2030s). This result supports the Copenhagen Accord Acknowledgement, which states that staying below 2°C may not be sufficient and the need to potentially aim for staying below 1.5°C. The CO2 fertilization effect would result in a 12%-13.9% increase in global NPP during the 21st century. The relative CO2 fertilization effect, i.e. change in NPP on per CO2 (ppm) bases, is projected to first increase quickly then level off in the 2070s and even decline by the end of the 2080s, possibly due to CO2 saturation and nutrient limitation. Terrestrial NPP responses to climate change and elevated atmospheric CO2 largely varied among biomes, with the largest increases in the tundra and boreal needleleaf deciduous forest. Compared to the low emission scenario (B1), the high emission scenario (A2) would lead to larger spatiotemporal variations in NPP, and more dramatic and counteracting impacts from climate and increasing atmospheric CO2. PMID:25401492

Pan, Shufen; Tian, Hanqin; Dangal, Shree R S; Zhang, Chi; Yang, Jia; Tao, Bo; Ouyang, Zhiyun; Wang, Xiaoke; Lu, Chaoqun; Ren, Wei; Banger, Kamaljit; Yang, Qichun; Zhang, Bowen; Li, Xia

2014-01-01

188

Early multiplatform results from the International Solar Terrestrial Physics\\/Global Geospace Science (ISTP\\/GGS) Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

This issue of the Geophysical Research Letters is the third† to contain a special section devoted to science results from the Global Geospace Science (GGS) Program [Acuna et al, 1995], a key component of the International Solar Terrestrial Physics Program. Designed to provide coverage of key regions of geospace, the GGS suite of spacecraft (WIND, POLAR, and GEOTAIL), along with

M. Desch; K. Ogilvie; M. Acuna; D. Fairfield; R. Hoffman

1997-01-01

189

The young sun and the atmosphere and photochemistry of the early earth  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The origin and evolution of the earth's early atmosphere depend crucially on the dissipation time of the primitive solar nebula (SN). Using different theories of turbulence, the dissipation time of an SN of 0.1 solar mass is estimated as 2.5-8.3 Myr. Because accretion times are usually much longer, it is concluded that most planetary accretion must have occurred in a gas-free environment. Using new IUE data, a wavelength-dependent UV flux is constructed for the young sun which is then used to study the photochemistry and concentrations of O, O2, O3, OH, H, HCO and formaldehyde H2CO in the earth's early prebiological atmosphere.

Canuto, V. M.; Levine, J. S.; Augustsson, T. R.; Imhoff, C. L.; Giampapa, M. S.

1983-01-01

190

Evidence for ancient atmospheric xenon in Archean rocks and implications for the early evolution of the atmosphere  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The initial atmospheric xenon isotopic composition has been much debated over the last 4 decades. A Non radiogenic Earth Atmospheric xenon (NEA-Xe) composition has been proposed to be the best estimate of the initial signature ([1]). NEA-Xe consists of modern atmospheric Xe without fission (131-136Xe) or radioactive decay (129Xe) products. However, the isotope composition of such non-radiogenic xenon is very different to that of potential cosmochemical precursors such as solar or meteoritic Xe, as it is mass-fractionated by up to 3-4 % per amu relative to the potential precursors, and it is also elementally depleted relative to other noble gases. Because the Xe isotopic composition of the Archean appears to be intermediate between that of these cosmochemical end-members and that of the modern atmosphere, we argued that isotopic fractionation of atmospheric xenon did not occur early in Earth's history by hydrodynamic escape, as postulated by all other models ([1], [2], [3]), but instead was a continuous, long term process that lasted during at least the Hadean and Archean eons. Taken at face value, the decrease of the Xe isotopic fractionation from 1.6-2.1 % amu-1 3.5 Ga ago ([4]) to 1 % amu-1 3.0 Ga ago (Ar-Ar age in fluid inclusions trapped in quartz from the same Dresser Formation, [5]) could reflect a secular variation of the atmospheric Xe signature. Nevertheless, up until now, all data showing an isotopic mass fractionation have been measured in rocks and fluids from the same formation (Dresser Formation, Western Australia, aged 3.5 Ga), and have yet to be confirmed in rocks from different locations. In order to better constrain xenon isotopic fractionation of the atmosphere through time, we decided to analyze barites from different ages, geological environments and metamorphism grade. We started this study with barite from the Fig Tree Formation (South Africa, aged 3.26 Ga). This barite was sampled in old mines so have negligible modern exposure time. It is well preserved (no apparent metamorphism) and was deposited in a shallow submarine environment ("Finger type" barites) associated with hydrothermal circulation (white smokers). Compared to barite from the Dresser formation, Fig Tree barite had a long ancient exposure time in the subsurface (under shallow water for example) resulting in huge excesses of 131Xe (131Xe/130Xe ratio ~38 compared to 5.213 for the modern atmosphere one) due to 130Ba(n,?) reactions. Fissiogenic products (132 to 136Xe) are also more present than in barites from the Dresser Formation and are compatible with the age of the Fig Tree formation. Despite corrections for secondary productions that are hard to constrain, the Fig Tree barite still shows an isotopic mass fractionation of about 1% amu-1, consistent with our expected atmospheric fractionation evolution. [1] Pepin R. O. (1991) Icarus 92(1), 2-79. [2] Dauphas N. (2003) Icarus 165, 326-339. [3] Tolstikhin I. and O'Nions R.K. (1994) Chem. Geol. 115, 1-6. [4] Pujol M., Marty B., Burnard P. and Philippot P. (2009) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 73, 6834-46. [5] Pujol M., Marty B. and Burgess R. (2011) Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 308, 298-306

Pujol, M.; Marty, B.; Burnard, P.; Hofmann, A.

2012-12-01

191

Atmospheric 14C variations derived from tree rings during the early Younger Dryas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Atmospheric radiocarbon variations over the Younger Dryas interval, from ˜13,000 to 11,600 cal yr BP, are of immense scientific interest because they reveal crucial information about the linkages between climate, ocean circulation and the carbon cycle. However, no direct and reliable atmospheric 14C records based on tree rings for the entire Younger Dryas have been available. In this paper, we present (1) high-precision 14C measurements on the extension of absolute tree-ring chronology from 12,400 to 12,560 cal yr BP and (2) high-precision, high-resolution atmospheric 14C record derived from a 617-yr-long tree-ring chronology of Huon pine from Tasmania, Australia, spanning the early Younger Dryas. The new tree-ring 14C records bridge the current gap in European tree-ring radiocarbon chronologies during the early Younger Dryas, linking the floating Lateglacial Pine record to the absolute tree-ring timescale. A continuous and reliable atmospheric 14C record for the past 14,000 cal yr BP including the Younger Dryas is now available. The new records indicate that the abrupt rise in atmospheric ? 14C associated with the Younger Dryas onset occurs at ˜12,760 cal yr BP, ˜240 yrs later than that recorded in Cariaco varves, with a smaller magnitude of ˜40‰ followed by several centennial ? 14C variations of 20-25‰. Comparing the tree-ring ? 14C to marine-derived ? 14C and modelled ? 14C based on ice-core 10Be fluxes, we conclude that changes in ocean circulation were mainly responsible for the Younger Dryas onset, while a combination of changes in ocean circulation and 14C production rate were responsible for atmospheric ? 14C variations for the remainder of the Younger Dryas.

Hua, Quan; Barbetti, Mike; Fink, David; Kaiser, Klaus Felix; Friedrich, Michael; Kromer, Bernd; Levchenko, Vladimir A.; Zoppi, Ugo; Smith, Andrew M.; Bertuch, Fiona

2009-12-01

192

Observation of wavelength-sensitive mass-independent sulfur isotope effects during SO2 photolysis: Implications for the early atmosphere  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mass-independent isotopic signatures for ?33S, ?34S, and ?36S produced in the photolysis of sulfur dioxide exhibit a strong wavelength dependence. Photolysis experiments with three light sources (ArF excimer laser (193 nm), mercury resonance lamp (184.9 and 253.7 nm), and KrF excimer laser (248 nm) are presented. Products of sulfur dioxide photolysis undertaken with 193-nm radiation exhibit characteristics that are similar to sulfur multiple-isotope data for terrestrial sedimentary rock samples older than 2450 Ma (reported by Farquhar et al. [2000a]), while photolysis experiments undertaken with radiation at other wavelengths (longer than 220 nm and at 184.9 nm) exhibit different characteristics. The spectral window between 190 and 220 nm falls between the Schumann-Runge bands of oxygen and the Hartley bands of ozone, and its absorption is therefore more sensitive to changes in altitude and atmospheric oxygen content than neighboring wavelengths. These two observations are used to suggest a link between sulfur dioxide photolysis at 193 nm and sulfur isotope anomalies in Archean rocks. This hypothesis includes the suggestion that UV wavelengths shorter than 200 nm penetrated deep in the Earth's atmosphere during the Archean. Potential implications of this hypothesis for the chemistry, composition, and UV absorption of the atmosphere are explored. We also explore the implications of these observations for documentation of bacterial sulfur metabolisms early in Earth's history.

Farquhar, James; Savarino, Joel; Airieau, Sabine; Thiemens, Mark H.

2001-12-01

193

Atmosphere and water loss from early Mars under extreme solar wind and extreme ultraviolet conditions.  

PubMed

The upper limits of the ion pickup and cold ion outflow loss rates from the early martian atmosphere shortly after the Sun arrived at the Zero-Age-Main-Sequence (ZAMS) were investigated. We applied a comprehensive 3-D multi-species magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model to an early martian CO(2)-rich atmosphere, which was assumed to have been exposed to a solar XUV [X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (EUV)] flux that was 100 times higher than today and a solar wind that was about 300 times denser. We also assumed the late onset of a planetary magnetic dynamo, so that Mars had no strong intrinsic magnetic field at that early period. We found that, due to such extreme solar wind-atmosphere interaction, a strong magnetic field of about approximately 4000 nT was induced in the entire dayside ionosphere, which could efficiently protect the upper atmosphere from sputtering loss. A planetary obstacle ( approximately ionopause) was formed at an altitude of about 1000 km above the surface due to the drag force and the mass loading by newly created ions in the highly extended upper atmosphere. We obtained an O(+) loss rate by the ion pickup process, which takes place above the ionopause, of about 1.5 x 10(28) ions/s during the first < or =150 million years, which is about 10(4) times greater than today and corresponds to a water loss equivalent to a global martian ocean with a depth of approximately 8 m. Consequently, even if the magnetic protection due to the expected early martian magnetic dynamo is neglected, ion pickup and sputtering were most likely not the dominant loss processes for the planet's initial atmosphere and water inventory. However, it appears that the cold ion outflow into the martian tail, due to the transfer of momentum from the solar wind to the ionospheric plasma, could have removed a global ocean with a depth of 10-70 m during the first < or =150 million years after the Sun arrived at the ZAMS. PMID:19216683

Terada, Naoki; Kulikov, Yuri N; Lammer, Helmut; Lichtenegger, Herbert I M; Tanaka, Takashi; Shinagawa, Hiroyuki; Zhang, Tielong

2009-01-01

194

Isotopic and anatomical evidence of an herbivorous diet in the Early Tertiary giant bird Gastornis. Implications for the structure of Paleocene terrestrial ecosystems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The mode of life of the early Tertiary giant bird Gastornis has long been a matter of controversy. Although it has often been reconstructed as an apex predator feeding on small mammals, according to other interpretations, it was in fact a large herbivore. To determine the diet of this bird, we analyze here the carbon isotope composition of the bone apatite from Gastornis and contemporaneous herbivorous mammals. Based on 13C-enrichment measured between carbonate and diet of carnivorous and herbivorous modern birds, the carbonate ?13C values of Gastornis bone remains, recovered from four Paleocene and Eocene French localities, indicate that this bird fed on plants. This is confirmed by a morphofunctional study showing that the reconstructed jaw musculature of Gastornis was similar to that of living herbivorous birds and unlike that of carnivorous forms. The herbivorous Gastornis was the largest terrestrial tetrapod in the Paleocene biota of Europe, unlike the situation in North America and Asia, where Gastornis is first recorded in the early Eocene, and the largest Paleocene animals were herbivorous mammals. The structure of the Paleocene terrestrial ecosystems of Europe may have been similar to that of some large islands, notably Madagascar, prior to the arrival of humans.

Angst, D.; Lécuyer, C.; Amiot, R.; Buffetaut, E.; Fourel, F.; Martineau, F.; Legendre, S.; Abourachid, A.; Herrel, A.

2014-04-01

195

Arctic Climate and Terrestrial Vegetation Responses During the Middle to Late Eocene and Early Oligocene: Colder Winters Preceded Cool-Down.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The late Eocene to early Oligocene is recognized as an interval of substantial change in the global climate, with isotopic proxies of climate indicating a significant drop in sea surface temperatures. Other studies have shown, however that at middle latitudes that terrestrial mean annual temperature did not change significantly over this interval, and that the major change was likely a shift towards a greater range of seasonal temperatures; colder winters and warmer summers. Previous analyses of high latitude (Arctic) middle Eocene climate using both leaf physiognomic analysis and qualitative analysis of identified nearest living relatives of terrestrial floras indicated upper microthermal environments (mean annual temp. or MAT ca 10°C but perhaps as high as 15°C, coldest month mean temp. or CMMT ca 0°C) for Axel Heiberg Island in the Arctic Archipelago, but did not address precipitation nor provide data on the Eocene-Oligocene transition in the Arctic. Presented here are new estimates of temperature and precipitation (annual and season amounts) for the Arctic based on NLR analysis of terrestrial plant palynomorphs (spores and pollen) from the ODP 913B and 985 cores from near Greenland. The record of climate for the Greenland cores show a similar climate in the middle Eocene to that previously estimated for Axel Heiberg Island further to the west, with MAT 10- 15°C but with CMMT >5°C. Precipitation was high (mean annual precip. or MAP >180 cm/yr), although with large uncertainties attached to the estimate. The climate proxy record for the late Eocene to early Oligocene shows a lack of change in MAT and MAP over the time interval. Consistent with other published records at middle latitudes, however, winter temperatures (as CMMT) show greater variability leading up to the E-O boundary, and consistently cooler values in the early Oligocene (CMMT <5°C) than recorded for most of the middle to late Eocene record (CMMT >5°C). Plant groups sensitive to freezing such as palms and the floating water fern Azolla were present in the warm parts of the record, but are absent from the latest Eocene and early Oligocene record. These data provide further evidence that the primary change in the global climate system in the E-O transition was a shift towards more extreme seasonal temperature ranges, rather than a drop in the mean temperature.

Greenwood, D. R.; Eldrett, J.

2006-12-01

196

A Preliminary Study of the Application of Some Predictive Modeling Techniques to Assess Atmospheric Mercury Emissions from Terrestrial Surfaces  

Microsoft Academic Search

Predictive modeling techniques are applied to investigate their potential usefulness in providing first order estimates on atmospheric emission flux of gaseous soil mercury and in identifying those parameters most critical in controlling such emissions. Predicted data by simulation and statistical techniques are compared to previously published observational data. Results showed that simulation techniques using air\\/soil coupling may provide a plausible

Ioannis X. Tsiros; Ioannis F. Dimopoulos

2003-01-01

197

The young sun, the early earth and the photochemistry of oxygen, ozone and formaldehyde in the early atmosphere  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Recent work on the evolution of the solar nebula and the subsequent formation of planets is reviewed, and the stages of star formation thought to lead to a protosun and an accompanying solar nebula are considered. Photochemical results suggest that concentrations of O2, O3, and H2CO, and the ratio of CO/CO2 in the prebiological paleoatmosphere are very sensitive to atmospheric levels of H2O and CO2 and to the flux of incident solar ultraviolet. For enhanced levels of CO2 and solar UV, surface levels of O2 may have approached the parts per billion level in the prebiological paleoatmosphere. It is suggested that 10 percent or more of the enhanced H2CO production could have been rained out of the atmosphere into the early oceans where synthesis into more complex organic molecules could have taken place. CO/CO2 values of greater than unity could have been possible for enhanced levels of solar UV flux.

Canuto, V. M.; Levine, J. S.; Augustsson, T. R.; Imhoff, C. L.; Goldman, I.; Hubickyj, O.

1986-01-01

198

Methane fluxes between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere at northern high latitudes during the past century: A retrospective analysis with a process-based biogeochemistry model  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We develop and use a new version of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) to study how rates of methane (CH4) emissions and consumption in high-latitude soils of the Northern Hemisphere have changed over the past century in response to observed changes in the region's climate. We estimate that the net emissions of CH4 (emissions minus consumption) from these soils have increased by an average 0.08 Tg CH4 yr-1 during the twentieth century. Our estimate of the annual net emission rate at the end of the century for the region is 51 Tg CH4 yr-1. Russia, Canada, and Alaska are the major CH4 regional sources to the atmosphere, responsible for 64%, 11%, and 7% of these net emissions, respectively. Our simulations indicate that large interannual variability in net CH4 emissions occurred over the last century. Our analyses of the responses of net CH4 emissions to the past climate change suggest that future global warming will increase net CH4 emissions from the Pan-Arctic region. The higher net CH4 emissions may increase atmospheric CH 4 concentrations to provide a major positive feedback to the climate system. Copyright 2004 by the American Geophysical Union.

Zhuang, Q.; Melillo, J.M.; Kicklighter, D.W.; Prinn, R.G.; McGuire, A.D.; Steudler, P.A.; Felzer, B.S.; Hu, S.

2004-01-01

199

Solar terrestrial observatory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Eight basic solar-terrestrial scientific objectives that benefit from the Shuttle/Platform approach and a program of measurements for each are discussed. The objectives are to understand: (1) solar variability, (2) wave-particle processes, (3) magnetosphere-ionosphere mass transport, (4) the global electric circuit, (5) upper atmospheric dynamics, (6) middle atmospheric chemistry and energetics, (7) lower atmospheric turbidity, and (8) planetary atmospheric waves. A two stage approach to a multidisciplinary payload is developed: an initial STO, that uses a single platform in a low-Earth orbit, and an advanced STO that uses two platforms in differing orbits.

1981-01-01

200

Wet surface and dense atmosphere on early Mars suggested by the bomb sag at Home Plate, Mars  

E-print Network

Wet surface and dense atmosphere on early Mars suggested by the bomb sag at Home Plate, Mars Spirit observation of a bomb sag produced by an explosive volcanic eruption to infer the atmospheric) of bomb sags, 2) the morphology of the impact crater, and 3) the penetration depth of the clast

Kite, Edwin

201

Influence of Carbonic Anhydrase Activity in Terrestrial Vegetation on the 18O Content of Atmospheric CO2  

Microsoft Academic Search

The oxygen-18 (18O) content of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) is an important indicator of CO2 uptake on land. It has generally been assumed that during photosynthesis, oxygen in CO2 reaches isotopic equilibrium with oxygen in 18O-enriched water in leaves. We show, however, large differences in the activity of carbonic anhydrase (which catalyzes CO2 hydration and 18O exchange in leaves) among

Jim Gillon; Dan Yakir

2001-01-01

202

Early Validation Analyses of Atmospheric Profiles from EOS MLS on the Aura Satellite  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We present results of early validation studies using retrieved atmospheric profiles from the Earth Observing System Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instrument on the Aura satellite. 'Global' results are presented for MLS measurements of atmospheric temperature, ozone, water vapor, hydrogen chloride, nitrous oxide, nitric acid, and carbon monoxide, with a focus on the January-March 2005 time period. These global comparisons are made using long-standing global satellites and meteorological datasets, as well as some measurements from more recently launched satellites. Comparisons of MLS data with measurements from the Ft. Sumner, NM, September 2004 balloon flights are also presented. Overall, good agreeement is obtained, often within 5% to 10%, but we point out certain issues to resolve and some larger systematic differences; some artifacts in the first publicly released MLS (version 1.5) dataset are noted.We comment briefly on future plans for validation and software improvements.

Froidevaux, Lucien; Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Read, William G.; Jiang, Yibo B.; Jimenez, Carlos; Filipiak, Mark J.; Schwartz, Michael J.; Santee, Michelle L.; Pumphrey, Hugh C.; Jiang, Jonathan H.; Wu, Dong L.; Manney, Gloria L.; Drouin, Brian J.; Waters, Joe W.; Fetzer, Eric J.; Bernath, Peter F.; Boone, Chris D.; Walker, Kaley A.; Jucks, Kenneth W.; Geoffrey, C. Toon; Margitan, James J.; Sen, Bhaswar; Webster, Christopher R.; Christensen, Lance E.; Elkins, James W.

2006-01-01

203

Global terrestrial carbon cycle  

SciTech Connect

There is great uncertainty with regard to the future role of the terrestrial biosphere in the global carbon cycle. The uncertainty arises from both an inadequate understanding of current pools and fluxes as well as the potential effects of rising atmospheric concentrations of CO2 on natural ecosystems. Despite these limitations, a number of studies have estimated current and future patterns of terrestrial carbon storage. Future estimates focus on the effects of a climate change associated with a doubled atmospheric concentration of CO2. Available models for examining the dynamics of terrestrial carbon storage and the potential role of forest management and landuse practices on carbon conservation and sequestration are discussed. (Copyright (c) 1993 Kluwer Academic Publishers.)

Smith, T.M.; Cramer, W.P.; Dixon, R.K.; Leemans, R.; Neilson, R.P.

1993-01-01

204

Simulation of the capabilities of an orbiter for monitoring the entry of interplanetary matter into the terrestrial atmosphere  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In comparison with existing ground-based camera networks for meteors monitoring, a space-based optical system would escape dependency on weather and atmospheric conditions and would offer a wide spatial coverage and an unrestricted and extinction-free spectral domain. The potential rates of meteor detections by such systems are evaluated in this paper as a function of observations parameters (optical system capabilities, orbital parameters) and considering a reasonable range of meteoroids properties (e.g., mass, velocity, composition) determining their luminosity. A numerical tool called SWARMS (Simulator for Wide Area Recording of Meteors from Space) has been developed. SWARMS is also intended to be used in an operational phase to facilitate the comparison of observations with up-do-date constraints on the flux and characteristics of the interplanetary matter entering our planet's atmosphere. The laws governing the conversion of a fraction of the meteor kinetic energy into radiation during atmospheric entry have been revisited and evaluated based on an analysis of previously published meteor trajectories. Rates of detection were simulated for two different systems: the SPOSH (Smart Panoramic Optical Sensor Head) camera optimized for the observation of transient luminous events, and the JEM-EUSO (Japanese Experiment Module-Extreme Universe Space Observatory) experiment on the ISS (International Space Station). We conclude that up to 6 events per hour in the case of SPOSH, and up to 0.67 events in the case of JEM-EUSO may be detected. The optimal orbit for achieving such rates of detections depends on the mass index of the meteoroid populations. The determination of this parameter appears therefore critical before an optimal orbiting system might be designed for meteors monitoring.

Bouquet, Alexis; Baratoux, David; Vaubaillon, Jérémie; Gritsevich, Maria I.; Mimoun, David; Mousis, Olivier; Bouley, Sylvain

2014-11-01

205

Exposure age, terrestrial age and pre-atmospheric radius of the Chinguetti mesosiderite: Not part of a much larger mass  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We measured the concentrations of the cosmogenic radionuclides 14C (half-life = 5.73 x 103 years) in the bulk and of 10Be (1.5 x 106 years), 26Al (7.05 x 105 years), 36Cl (3.01 x 105 years) and the light noble gases in metal and stone fractions of the Chinguetti meteorite to investigate the controversial claim that the 4.5 kg mesosiderite is part of a much larger mass in the Mauritanian desert. Based on the 36Cl-36Ar, 10Be-21Ne and 26Al-21Ne pairs in the metal fraction, we derive an average cosmic-ray exposure age of 66 +/- 7 million years (Ma). Chinguetti is now the third out of 20 mesosiderites with an exposure age between 60 and 70 Ma. This may be the first hint of a major impact on the parent body of the mesosiderites, which show ages ranging from 10-300 Ma (Terribilini et al., 2000). From the 14C-10Be pair we derive a terrestrial age of 18 which seems too recent to be consistent with the original description of the main mass having a heavily wind eroded base, overhung by the upper part of the meteorite. Finally, from the radionuclide concentrations in combination with Monte Carlo based calculations, we conclude that our sample of Chinguetti was irradiated at a depth of ~15 cm in an object not larger than 80 cm in radius. This is the most compelling evidence against the reports that the Chinguetti mesosiderite is a small fragment of a mass 100 m long and 40 m high.

Welten, K. C.; Bland, P. A.; Russell, S. S.; Grady, M. M.; Caffee, M. W.; Masarik, J.; Jull, A. J. T.; Weber, H. W.; Schultz, L.

2001-07-01

206

Radionuclides in the terrestrial ecosystem near a Canadian uranium mill -- Part 3: Atmospheric deposition rates (pilot test)  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric deposition rates of uranium series radionuclides were directly measured at three sites near the operating Key Lake uranium mill in northern Saskatchewan. Sites impacted by windblown tailings and mill dusts had elevated rates of uranium deposition near the mill and elevated {sup 226}Ra deposition near the tailings compared to a control site. Rainwater collectors, dust jars, and passive vinyl collectors previously used at the Ranger Mine in Australia were pilot-tested. Adhesive vinyl surfaces (1 m{sup 2}) were oriented horizontally, vertically, and facing the ground as a means of measuring gravitational settling, wind impaction, and soil resuspension, respectively. Although the adhesive glue on the vinyls proved difficult to digest, relative differences in deposition mode were found among radionuclides and among sites. Dry deposition was a more important transport mechanism for uranium, {sup 226}Ra, and {sup 210}Pb than rainfall, while more {sup 210}Po was deposited with rainfall.

Thomas, P.A.

2000-06-01

207

Early stages in the evolution of the atmosphere and climate on the Earth-group planets  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The early evolution of the atmospheres and climate of the Earth, Mars and Venus is discussed, based on a concept of common initial conditions and main processes (besides known differences in chemical composition and outgassing rate). It is concluded that: (1) liquid water appeared on the surface of the earth in the first few hundred million years; the average surface temperature was near the melting point for about the first two eons; CO2 was the main component of the atmosphere in the first 100-500 million years; (2) much more temperate outgassing and low solar heating led to the much later appearance of liquid water on the Martian surface, only one to two billion years ago; the Martian era of rivers, relatively dense atmosphere and warm climate ended as a result of irreversible chemical bonding of CO2 by Urey equilibrium processes; (3) a great lack of water in the primordial material of Venus is proposed; liquid water never was present on the surface of the planet, and there was practically no chemical bonding of CO2; the surface temperature was over 600 K four billion years ago.

Moroz, V. I.; Mukhin, L. M.

1977-01-01

208

In-situ Measurements of Sedimentary Graphites and Sulfides in Early Archean (>3.7 Ga) Banded Iron-Formations from West Greenland: Biological and Atmospheric Influences  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Stable isotopes of carbon [13C, 12C] and sulfur [32S, 33S, 34S and 36S] are used as tracers for igneous, hydrothermal and biological processes on Earth. Carbon and sulfur are abundant in marine systems and they have been utilized as biomarkers in ancient sediments. Kinetic isotope fractionations between inorganic and bioorganic carbon and sulfur during metabolic cycling results in a marked enrichment of the light isotope in the biological component by several percent. Graphitic inclusions from early Archean banded iron-formations are isotopically light [range ? 13CVPDB = -20 to -50‰ ]; these results are consistent with a biological origin. Bacterial sulfate reduction has been linked to the range of over 150‰ in ? 34S from sulfate and sulfide in the rock record. Mass-dependent sulfur isotope fractionations, commonly expressed as ? 34SCDT values for sulfur-containing minerals, exhibit a small range centered at ~0‰ for terrestrial igneous [0+/-5‰ ] and hydrothermal [0+/-10‰ ] systems. Atmospheric chemical reactions on the low pO2 early Earth are implicated in non-mass-dependent sulfur isotope anomalies [expressed as: ? 33S=? 33S-0.520? 34S] reported from whole-rock analyses of sulfur-containing phases in Precambrian sediments. Only atmospheric processes in planetary environments, and nucleosynthetic, spallation or ion-molecule reactions in the stellar or near-stellar environment, appear capable of producing non-mass-dependent isotope fractionations. To explore how sulfur signatures are preserved in early Archean BIFs new techniques have been developed to obtain precise 32S, 33S and 34S measurements in situ of sulfide grains from sedimentary rocks ranging in age from early Archean [ ~3.83 Ga] to Proterozoic [ ~1.8 Ga]. High-precision simultaneous measurements of multiple sulfur isotopes enable ? 33S to be evaluated at the sub-grain scale [<30 ?m ]. These results may then be compared with previous carbon isotope measurements from the same rocks. How might atmospheric and biological evolutionary links be evaluated by studying the carbon and sulfur isotope compositions of ancient sediments? New data reveal well-resolved non-mass-dependent ? 33S anomalies in an early Archean [3.77-3.83 Ga] banded iron-formation and a metapelite from West Greenland [total range in ? 33S=+1.10+/-0.07‰ to +1.23+/-0.05‰ , 2? ] previously analyzed for carbon isotopes. Data from sulfides in a diverse collection of stromatolithic cherts, banded iron-formation and shales of Proterozoic to late Archean age [1.8-3.2 Ga] displayed only mass-dependent [? 33S ~0‰ ] sulfur isotope relationships within the precision of the measurements [typically +/-0.06‰ , 2? ]. Results reveal that non-mass-dependent sulfur isotope anomalies [i.e. ? 33S>0] are preserved in sulfide phases contained in the oldest known rocks of sedimentary origin. That these rocks contain a record of gas-phase reactions in an early atmosphere would support the interpretation that atmospheric partial pressures of oxygen were low and the effects of UV-photolysis on atmospheric sulfur from a UV-active young Sun were widespread and commonplace on the Archean Earth. This might also be reflected in the long-term [billion-year timescale] changes to the isotope composition of bioorganic carbon. Further studies warrant coupling sulfur, carbon [and nitrogen] measurements in ancient sediments to explore this relationship.

Mojzsis, S. J.

2001-05-01

209

Stratospheric balloon flight experiment campaign for the simulation of the Huygens probe mission: verification of HASI (Huygens Atmospheric Structure Instrument) performance in terrestrial atmosphere  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A stratospheric balloon flight experiment campaign is in progress, in collaboration with the Italian Space Agency (ASI), simulate the Huygens probe descent on Titan. The main purposes of this campaign of experiments are: - to verify sensors for planetary atmosphere entry probes effective performance in conditions similar to those of the actual mission descent - to obtain a set of data useful for the analysis of the probe trajectory as well as for the attitude reconstruction - to determine the atmospheric vertical profiles. A mock up of the Huygens probe carrying onboard HASI instrument and other Huygens instrumentation is launched with a stratospheric balloon from the ASI launch base of Trapani for a local flight on Sicily. The probe is lifted up to an altitude higher than 32 kilometres by means of a stratospheric balloon. Once the balloon is cut away, the probe starts to descent dragged by the parachute till the impact on ground. During the descent phase the probe spins at a rate inside the range of velocities expected for the mission thanks to straight line cascade and the de-coupling of the probe rotation from that one of the parachute. The measurements carried out during all the ascending and descending phases are transmitted in real time to ground by telemetry to check the system functionality and send telecommand, if needed. At the same time data are recorded and stored on board for post-flight processing. After landing the gondola and payload are recovered. Both the 2002 and 2003 flights have been extremely successful in terms of quantity and quality of acquired data, furthermore the equipment has been recovered working properly so that it will possible to re-use it in future flight.

Lion Stoppato, P. F.; Ferri, F.; Bettanini, C.; Colombatti, G.; Antonello, M.; Bastianello, S.; Aboudan, A.; Flamini, E.; Gaborit, V.; Zarnecki, J. C.; Hathi, B.; Harri, A. M.; Lehto, A.; Bianchini, G.; Angrilli, F.; Fulchignomi, M.

2004-02-01

210

Sensitivity of terrestrial ecosystems to elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2}: Comparisons of model simulation studies to CO{sub 2} effect  

SciTech Connect

In the context of a project to compare terrestrial ecosystem models, the Vegetation/Ecosystem Modeling and Analysis Project (VEMAP), we have analyzed how three biogeochemistry models link plant growth to doubled atmospheric CO{sub 2}. A common set of input data was used to drive three biogeochemistry models, BIOME-BGC, CENTURY and TEM. For the continental United States the simulation results show that with doubled CO{sub 2}, NPP increased by 8.7%, 5.0% and 10.8% for TEM, CENTURY and BIOME-BGC, respectively. At the biome level the range of NPP estimates varied considerably among models. TEM-simulated enhancement of NPP ranged from 2% to 28%; CENTURY, from 2% to 9%; and BIOME-BGC, from 4% to 27%. A transect analysis across several biomes along a latitude at 41.5 N shows that the TEM-simulated CO{sub 2} enhancement of NPP ranged from 0% to 22%; CENTURY, from 1% to 10% and BIOME-BGC, from 1% to 63%. In this study, we have investigated the underlying mechanisms of the three models to reveal how increased CO{sub 2} affects photosynthesis rate, water using efficiency and nutrient cycles. The relative importance of these mechanisms in each of the three biogeochemistry models will be discussed.

Pan, Y. [Marine Biological Lab., Woods Hole, MA (United States)

1995-06-01

211

Influences of Forest Tree Species and Early Spring Temperature on Surface-Atmosphere Transfers of Water and Carbon in the Northeastern U.S.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Influences of Forest Tree Species and Early Spring Temperature on Surface-Atmosphere Transfers of Water and Carbon in the Northeastern U.S. Julian Hadley, Paul Kuzeja, Safina Singh and Thomas Mulcahy Transfers of water vapor from terrestrial ecosystems to the atmosphere affect regional hydrology, weather and climate over short time scales, and forest-atmosphere CO2 exchange affects global climate over long timescales. To better understand these effects for forests dominated by two very different tree species, we measured forest-atmosphere water vapor and CO2 transfers by the eddy flux technique to at two sites in central Massachusetts USA for three years. Average annual evapotranspiration (ET) for a young deciduous forest dominated by red oak (Quercus rubra L., the most abundant tree species in the area), was about 430 mm or 25 percent greater than for a coniferous forest dominated by 100 to 230 year old eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis L.). The difference in ET was most pronounced in July and August when the deciduous forest lost about 50 percent more water by ET in the average year (192 mm for oak forest versus 130 mm for hemlock). These data indicate that if deciduous trees with similar physiology to red oak replace hemlocks, summertime ET will increase while summer streamflow, soil water content and the extent of year- round wetlands will decrease. Increased summertime ET should also lead to slightly higher regional atmospheric humidity and precipitation. Hemlock-to-deciduous forest conversion has occurred from North Carolina to southern New England and is continuing northward as a lethal insect pest, the hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae Annand) continues to kill hemlocks. Average annual carbon storage for the old hemlock forest in our study was about 3.3 Mg C/ha, nearly equal to the average for the deciduous forest, 3.5 Mg C/ha. This calls into question ecological theory that predicts large declines in the rate of carbon uptake for old forests, and indicates that annual carbon storage will not necessarily increase over the long term after hemlock trees are killed by the hemlock woolly adelgid and replaced by deciduous species. Maximum monthly carbon storage in the hemlock forest occurred in spring (April and May) and was enhanced by early soil thawing and cessation of nighttime frost. This pattern is probably common to many evergreen conifers in the northeastern U.S., so climate warming that includes an earlier end to freezing temperatures in spring should increase C storage by conifer forests in the northeastern U.S. - unless this effect is canceled out by reduced C uptake or enhanced C loss due to changes in summer and fall climate.

Hadley, J. L.; Kuzeja, P.; Mulcahy, T.; Singh, S.

2008-12-01

212

Deficit irrigation strategies combined with controlled atmosphere preserve quality in early peaches.  

PubMed

Due to the water scarcity in the Mediterranean countries, irrigation must be optimized while keeping fruit quality. The effect of deficit irrigation strategies on changes in quality parameters of the early "Flordastar" peaches was studied. The deficit irrigation was programmed according to signal intensity of the maximum daily trunk shrinkage; deficit irrigation plants were irrigated to maintain maximum daily trunk shrinkage signal intensity values close to 1.4 or 1.3 in the case of DI1 or DI2 plants, respectively. Results were compared to a control watered at 150% crop evapotranspiration. Fruits were stored up to 14 days at 0?? and 95% Relative Humidity (RH) in air or in controlled atmosphere (controlled atmosphere; 3-4?kPa O2 and 12-14?kPa CO2), followed by a retail sale period of 4 days at 15?? and 90-95% Relative Humidity in air. Weight losses were lower in controlled atmosphere stored peaches from deficit irrigation. Air-stored fruits developed a more intense red color due to a faster ripening, which was not affected by the type of watering. At harvest, deficit irrigation peaches showed higher soluble solids content, which provided a better sensory evaluation. The soluble phenolic content was initially higher (55.26?±?0.18?mg gallic acid equivalents/100?g fresh weight) and more stable throughout postharvest life in DI1 fruits than in those from the other irrigation treatments. Concerning vitamin C, control fruits at harvest showed higher ascorbic acid than dehydroascorbic acid content (5.43 versus 2.43?mg/100?g fresh weight, respectively), while water stressed peaches showed the opposite results. The combination of DI2 and controlled atmosphere storage allowed saving a significant amount of water and provided peaches with good overall quality, maintaining the bioactive compounds analyzed. PMID:25280939

Falagán, Natalia; Artés, Francisco; Gómez, Perla A; Artés-Hernández, Francisco; Conejero, Wenceslao; Aguayo, Encarna

2014-10-01

213

The "Meteor - 3M" Satellite No.1 Observations of Electron Precipitation Events to Outer Terrestrial Atmosphere for 2002-2005.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

National meteorological "Meteor - 3M" satellite No. 1 operated on the polar quasi-circular orbit at the altitude of about 1000 km during 2002-2005 years. The Geiger counter was included in the payload to register >100 keV electron flux. The counter has registered more than 1000 electron precipitation events from the outer radiation belt into the atmosphere. Constructed were histograms of the precipitation event number in dependence on the Mac-Ilwain parameter (L). According to the histograms, precipitations occurred most often on L-shells from 3.1 to 3.9 and from 5.1 to 5.9 during 2002-2005. For both intervals constructed were histograms for the electron precipitation event appearance frequency in dependence on the device count rate: the frequency of weak events is always much greater than the frequency of strong events, i.e. the dependence can be approximated by an exponential function. This allows estimating the probability of predetermined rate electron precipitation. Exponential distribution law means that the current precipitation event intensity does not depend on the intensity of previous events so that the sequence of events is the Markov random process in the view sample (2002-2005).

Zinkina, Marina

214

Regional atmospheric deposition patterns of Ag, As, Bi, Cd, Hg, Mo, Sb and Tl in a 188,000 km 2 area in the European arctic as displayed by terrestrial moss samples-long-range atmospheric transport vs local impact  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The regional atmospheric deposition patterns of Ag, As, Bi, Cd, Hg, Mo, Sb and Tl have been mapped in a 188,000 km2 area of the European Arctic (N Finland, N Norway, NW Russia) using the moss technique. The Russian nickel mining and smelting industry (Nikel and Zapoljarnij (Pechenganikel) and Monchegorsk (Severonikel)) in the eastern part of the survey area represents two of the largest point sources for S0 2 and metal emissions on a world wide basis. In contrast, parts of northern Finland and northern Norway represent still some of the most pristine areas in Europe. The terrestrial mosses Hylocomium splendens and Pleurozium schreberi were used as monitors of airborne deposition. Samples in all three countries were collected during the summer of 1995 and analysed in one laboratory using ICP-MS. Maps for most elements clearly show elevated element concentrations near the industrial sites and delineate the extent of contamination. Pollution follows the main wind and topographical directions in the area (N-S). The gradients of deposition are rather steep. Background levels for all the elements are reached within 150-200 km from the industrial plants. The relative importance of long-range atmospheric transport of air pollutants from industrial point sources on the world wide increase of heavy metals observed in the atmosphere is thus debatable for many elements. Increasing population and traffic density, accompanied by increasing local dust levels, may play a much more important role than industrial emissions. The regional distribution patterns as displayed in the maps show some striking differences between the elements. The regional distribution of Hg and TI in the survey area is completely dominated by sources other than industry.

Reimann, Clemens; De Caritat, Patrice; Halleraker, Jo H.; Finne, Tor Erik; Boyd, Rognvald; Jæger, Øystein; Volden, Tore; Kashulina, Galina; Bogatyrev, Igor; Chekushin, Viktor; Pavlov, Vladimir; Äyräs, Matti; Räisänen, Marja Liisa; Niskavaara, Heikki

215

Terrestrial sequestration  

SciTech Connect

Terrestrial sequestration is the enhancement of CO2 uptake by plants that grow on land and in freshwater and, importantly, the enhancement of carbon storage in soils where it may remain more permanently stored. Terrestrial sequestration provides an opportunity for low-cost CO2 emissions offsets.

Charlie Byrer

2008-03-10

216

Terrestrial sequestration  

ScienceCinema

Terrestrial sequestration is the enhancement of CO2 uptake by plants that grow on land and in freshwater and, importantly, the enhancement of carbon storage in soils where it may remain more permanently stored. Terrestrial sequestration provides an opportunity for low-cost CO2 emissions offsets.

Charlie Byrer

2010-01-08

217

The (146,147)Sm-(142,143)Nd systematics of early terrestrial differentiation and the lost continents of the early Earth  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The very early history of the Earth has been one of the great enduring puzzles in the history of geology. We report evidence which clearly can be described as a vestige of a beginning, because the evidence that we report cannot be interpreted in any other way except as a geochemical signal of processes active in the very early history of the Earth. The evidence itself is a very small anomaly in the abundance of SM-146. The primary aims of this study were to: (1) verify the existence of the 'lost continents' of the Hadean era; and (2) determine their mean age.

Harper, Charles L., Jr.; Jacobsen, Stein B.

1992-01-01

218

Sulfur in the Early Martian Atmosphere Revisited: Experiments with a 3-D Global Climate Model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Data returned from the surface of Mars during the 1970s revealed intriguing geological evidence for a warmer and wetter early martian climate. Dendritic valley networks were discovered by Mariner 9 on ancient Noachian terrain [1], indicating that liquid water had flowed across the surface in the distant past. Since this time, geological investigations into early Martian history have attempted to ascertain the nature and level of activity of the early Martian hydrological cycle [e.g. 2-5] while atmospheric modeling efforts have focused on how the atmosphere could be warmed to temperatures great enough to sustain such activity [see 6-7 for reviews]. Geological and spectroscopic investigations have refined the history and chronology of Noachian Mars over time, and circulation of liquid water has been invoked to explain several spatially and temporally distinct morphological and chemical signatures found in the geological record. Detections of iron and magnesium-rich clays are widespread in the oldest Martian terrains, suggesting a period of pH-neutral aqueous alteration [e.g., 8]. Valley network incision also took place during the Noachian period [9]. Some chains of river valleys and craters lakes extend for thousands of kilometers, suggesting temperatures at least clement enough for sustained ice-covered flow [3,10]. The commencement of valley network incision is not well constrained, but the period of Mg/Fe clay formation appears to have ended before the termination of valley network formation, as the visible fluvial systems appear to have remobilized existing clays rather than forming them [5,8]. There is also evidence that the cessation of valley network formation was abrupt [11]. Towards the end of the Noachian, erosion rates appear to have been significantly higher than during subsequent periods, a process that has also been attributed to aqueous processes [12]. A period of sulfate formation followed, likely characterized by acidic, evaporitic playa environments [8]. A successful working model for the early Martian atmosphere and hydrosphere must be able not only to produce conditions suitable for liquid water at the surface, but also to explain how the nature of this aqueous activity changed over time and eventually diminished. There are two major end-member hypotheses: first, that early Mars was wet and warm, with a sustained greenhouse that made it possible for liquid water to be stable on the surface for extended periods [e.g., 2, 12-14], and second, that early Mars was generally cold, and that most of the aqueous alteration took place underground [3,5] or during transient warm periods tied to impact cratering [15], or volcanism [16]. In both of these scenarios it is generally agreed that in order to make valley networks and sulfate deposits, a hydrological cycle is needed which is able to recycle water from the lowlands back to the highlands (i.e., the one-time emptying of a regional aquifer would not be sufficient to create the observed features) [4,17]. This would require some precipitation to fall on the southern highlands, either flowing overland or filtering into groundwater aquifers. In both cases, volcanic gases (especially SO2) have been suggested as a possible way of creating either a sustained or transient greenhouse. Several researchers have tested the addition of SO2 to climate models in order to assess whether it would provide an adequate amount of greenhouse warming to allow liquid water to flow across the surface [18-21], with differing results. Postawko and Kuhn [18] found a warming effect of 14 K in a 0.1 bar atmosphere with an SO2 abundance of 1000 ppm. Johnson et al. [20] used a 3-D global circulation model and found a warming of 15-25 K for 245 ppm of SO2 in a dry 0.5 bar atmosphere. Tian et al. [21] used a 1-D model to explore a wide range of SO2 mixing values and CO2 partial pressures, finding a warming of around ~25 K for 100 ppm in a 0.5 bar atmosphere with a fully saturated troposphere (~40 K for a 1 bar atmosphere). These authors also included the effect of sulfate aerosol particles, whi

Kerber, L.; Forget, F.; Wordsworth, R.

2013-09-01

219

Comparing early twentieth century and present-day atmospheric pollution in SW France: A story of lichens.  

PubMed

Lichens have long been known to be good indicators of air quality and atmospheric deposition. Xanthoria parietina was selected to investigate past (sourced from a herbarium) and present-day trace metal pollution in four sites from South-West France (close to Albi). Enrichment factors, relationships between elements and hierarchical classification indicated that the atmosphere was mainly impacted by coal combustion (as shown by As, Pb or Cd contamination) during the early twentieth century, whereas more recently, another mixture of pollutants (e.g. Sb, Sn, Pb and Cu) from local factories and car traffic has emerged. The Rare Earth Elements (REE) and other lithogenic elements indicated a higher dust content in the atmosphere in the early twentieth century and a specific lithological local signature. In addition to long-range atmospheric transport, local urban emissions had a strong impact on trace element contamination registered in lichens, particularly for contemporary data. PMID:23063614

Agnan, Y; Séjalon-Delmas, N; Probst, A

2013-01-01

220

Toward understanding early Earth evolution: Prescription for approach from terrestrial noble gas and light element records in lunar soils  

PubMed Central

Because of the almost total lack of geological record on the Earth's surface before 4 billion years ago, the history of the Earth during this period is still enigmatic. Here we describe a practical approach to tackle the formidable problems caused by this lack. We propose that examinations of lunar soils for light elements such as He, N, O, Ne, and Ar would shed a new light on this dark age in the Earth's history and resolve three of the most fundamental questions in earth science: the onset time of the geomagnetic field, the appearance of an oxygen atmosphere, and the secular variation of an Earth–Moon dynamical system. PMID:19001263

Ozima, Minoru; Yin, Qing-Zhu; Podosek, Frank A.; Miura, Yayoi N.

2008-01-01

221

Evidence for 182Hf in the early Solar System and constraints on the timescale of terrestrial accretion and core formation  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present evidence from tungsten (W) isotopic measurements consistent with the presence of live 182Hf (T1\\/2 = 9 Ma) in the early solar system. This is based on the observation of a well-resolved deficit of about four parts in ten thousand in the ratio 182W\\/183W in W separated from the Toluca iron meteorite. This deficit is interpreted as an excess

Charles L. Harper; Stein B. Jacobsen

1996-01-01

222

Use of stable isotopes in the study of CO2 fluxes between terrestrial vegetation and the atmosphere in shortgrass steppe  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The shortgrass steppe ecosystem is ecologically sensitive to climate change due the mixture of C3 and C4 plant species and the semi-arid environment. In order to make reliable predictions about effects of climate change on plant communities, it is prerequisite to understand how individual C3 and C4 plant functional groups contribute gross photosynthetic activity and respiration in the semi-arid grassland. We observed diurnal and seasonal changes of CO2, CH4 and N2O fluxes, and associated isotopic signatures of 13C and 18O from air flasks above canopy at 1 and 2m heights, to estimate changes in activity of C3 andC4 plants and gross photosynthesis and respiration fluxes during the growing seasons of 2000 and 2001 in the shortgrass steppe region of north-eastern Colorado. Flasks were collected from a tower instrumented with Bowen ratio equipment, allowing us to evaluate latent heat fluxes simultaneously with flask measurements. We partitioned gross fluxes using the 13C and 18O isotopic mass balance method outlined by Yakir and Wang (1996). The results indicated that the grass canopy was a sink for CO2 during the daytime, as we expected, but peak times for CO2 uptake varied seasonally. Peak patterns of daily photosynthesis were attributed microclimatic variables such as leaf to air vapor pressure deficit related to stomatal conductance. The diurnal patterns of gradients for d13 C were similar to those for d18O. Discrimination against 13 C associated with CO2 fixation and isotopic exchange with 18O-enriched leaf water during daytime may be correlated process in this ecosystem. Seasonally, gross photosynthesis was positively correlated to magnitude of depleted d13C of CO2 from all sources, latent heat flux at night, and total greenness of plants. Seasonal changes in atmospheric d13C and d18O values, CO2 fluxes and gross photosynthesis reflected changes in plant biomass and its composition by functional groups (C3, C4 and CAM) and environmental variables especially related to hydrological cycling such as evapotranspiration. We compared local-scale (10 to 100 m) flask results with observations from chambers to assess fine-scale (0.1 to 1 m) differences in respiration and ä13C and ä18O values from selected species and bare ground.

Shim, J. H.; Pendall, E.; Ojima, D. S.

2001-12-01

223

The 2007 sea ice minimum: Impacts on the Northern Hemisphere atmosphere in late autumn and early winter  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the past several decades, the minimum Northern Hemisphere summer sea ice extent has decreased substantially. We present an analysis of the influence of declining Arctic sea ice cover on the atmosphere, specifically during the autumn\\/early winter following an extreme summer minimum event. Using ensemble simulations from the Weather Research and Forecast model (v 3.0.1), we compare the atmospheric response

Sara T. Strey; William L. Chapman; John E. Walsh

2010-01-01

224

A methodology for estimating seasonal cycles of atmospheric CO2 resulting from terrestrial net ecosystem exchange (NEE) fluxes using the Transcom T3L2 pulse-response functions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a method for translating modeled terrestrial net ecosystem exchange (NEE) fluxes of carbon into the corresponding seasonal cycles in atmospheric CO2. The method is based on the pulse-response functions from the Transcom 3 Level 2 (T3L2) atmospheric tracer transport model (ATM) intercomparison. The new pulse-response method is considerably faster than a full forward ATM simulation, allowing CO2 seasonal cycles to be computed in seconds, rather than the days or weeks required for a forward simulation. Further, the results provide an estimate of the range of transport uncertainty across 13 different ATMs associated with the translation of surface NEE fluxes into an atmospheric signal. We evaluate the method against the results of archived forward ATM simulations from T3L2. The latter are also used to estimate the uncertainties associated with oceanic and fossil fuel influences. We present a regional breakdown at selected monitoring sites of the contribution to the atmospheric CO2 cycle from the 11 different T3L2 land regions. A test case of the pulse-response code, forced by NEE fluxes from the Community Land Model, suggests that for many terrestrial models, discrepancies between model results and observed atmospheric CO2 cycles will be large enough to clearly transcend ATM uncertainties.

Nevison, C. D.; Baker, D. F.; Gurney, K. R.

2012-09-01

225

Earth's early atmosphere as seen from carbon and nitrogen isotopic analysis of Archean sediments  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The origin and evolution of the Earth's early atmosphere has long been a topic of great interest but determination of actual compositions over geologic time is a difficult problem. However, recent systematic studies of stromatolite deposits (Precambrian Paleobiology Research Group) has extended our knowledge of Archean ecosystems. It has been shown that many stromatolite deposits have undergone negligible alteration since their time of formation. The discovery of primary fluid inclusions within unaltered 3.5 b.y. old Archiean sediments and the observation that the 3.3 b.y. old Barberton cherts have remained closed to argon loss and have not been subjected to thermal metamorphism suggests that an opportunity exists for the direct measurement of the volatile constituents present at their time of formation. Of primary interest to this study was the possibility that the stromatolites and other Archean sediments might retain a vestige of the atmosphere and thus afford an indication of the variations in carbon dioxide and nitrogen isotopic compositions with time. A suite of essentially unaltered Archean stromatolites and the cherts of different ages and geologic sites have been analyzed for their trapped carbon dioxide and nitrogen compositions by the stepped combustion extraction tech nique utilizing static mass spectrometers for the isotope measurements.

Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Carr, L. P.; Gilmour, I.; Pillinger, C. T.

1986-01-01

226

Fragmentation of metal diapirs in terrestrial magma oceans  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Due to mechanisms such as impact heating, early atmospheric thermal blanketing or radioactive heating, the presence of at least one global magma ocean stage in the early histories of terrestrial planets seems unavoidable. In such a context, a key question is whether (and how much) iron diapirs provided by differentiated impactors have emulsified during their sinking towards the bottom of an early magma ocean. Addressing this problem allows one to put strong constraints on metal-silicate equilibration processes as well as heat distribution within a young terrestrial planet. Previous theoretical studies have focused on this question, however no dynamic studies have conducted a systematic exploration of the relevant parameter space corresponding to terrestrial magma oceans. We therefore perform a series of numerical experiments where we follow the sinking of iron diapirs until they fragment (or not) into smaller bodies. Metal-silicate thermal and chemical exchanges are also monitored during the sinking process. Our models include an accurate treatment of surface tension, inertial effects, as well as viscous heating and we investigate systematically the effect of rheological properties and diapir sizes on the conditions and on the consequences of metal diapir fragmentation in terrestrial magma oceans.

Samuel, H.; Rubie, D. C.; Melosh, H. J.

2010-12-01

227

Evaluation of terrestrial carbon cycle models through simulations of the seasonal cycle of atmospheric CO2: First results of a model intercomparison study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Results of an intercomparison among terrestrial biogeochemical models (TBMs) are reported, in which one diagnostic and five prognostic models have been run with the same long-term climate forcing. Monthly fields of net ecosystem production (NEP), which is the difference between net primary production (NPP) and heterotrophic respiration RH, at 0.5° resolution have been generated for the terrestrial biosphere. The monthly

M. Heimann; R. D. Otto; I. C. Prentice; W. Sauf; A. Schloss; S. Sitch; U. Wittenberg; G. Würth; J. Melillo; B. Moore

1998-01-01

228

Aqueous Chemical Modeling of Sedimentation on Early Mars with Application to Surface-Atmosphere Evolution  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This project was to investigate models for aqueous sedimentation on early Mars from fluid evaporation. Results focused on three specific areas: (1) First, a fluid evaporation model incorporating iron minerals was developed to compute the evaporation of a likely solution on early Mars derived from the weathering of mafic rock. (2) Second, the fluid evaporation model was applied to salts within Martian meteorites, specifically salts in the nakhlites and ALH84001. Evaporation models were found to be consistent with the mineralogy of salt assemblages-anhydrite, gypsum, Fe-Mg-Ca carbonates, halite, clays-- and the concentric chemical fractionation of Ca-to Mg-rich carbonate rosettes in ALH84001. We made progress in further developing our models of fluid concentration by contributing to updating the FREZCHEM model. (3) Third, theoretical investigation was done to determine the thermodynamics and kinetics involved in the formation of gray, crystalline hematite. This mineral, of probable ancient aqueous origin, has been observed in several areas on the surface of Mars by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer on Mars Global Surveyor. The "Opportunity" Mars Exploration Rover has also detected gray hematite at its landing site in Meridiani Planum. We investigated how gray hematite can be formed via atmospheric oxidation, aqueous precipitation and subsequent diagenesis, or hydrothermal processes. We also studied the geomorphology of the Aram Chaos hematite region using Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) images.

Catling, David C.

2004-01-01

229

The Terrestrial Silica Pump  

PubMed Central

Silicon (Si) cycling controls atmospheric CO2 concentrations and thus, the global climate, through three well-recognized means: chemical weathering of mineral silicates, occlusion of carbon (C) to soil phytoliths, and the oceanic biological Si pump. In the latter, oceanic diatoms directly sequester 25.8 Gton C yr?1, accounting for 43% of the total oceanic net primary production (NPP). However, another important link between C and Si cycling remains largely ignored, specifically the role of Si in terrestrial NPP. Here we show that 55% of terrestrial NPP (33 Gton C yr?1) is due to active Si-accumulating vegetation, on par with the amount of C sequestered annually via marine diatoms. Our results suggest that similar to oceanic diatoms, the biological Si cycle of land plants also controls atmospheric CO2 levels. In addition, we provide the first estimates of Si fixed in terrestrial vegetation by major global biome type, highlighting the ecosystems of most dynamic Si fixation. Projected global land use change will convert forests to agricultural lands, increasing the fixation of Si by land plants, and the magnitude of the terrestrial Si pump. PMID:23300825

Carey, Joanna C.; Fulweiler, Robinson W.

2012-01-01

230

Overview of terrestrial thermionics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The application of the thermionic energy conversion systems first designed for spacecraft to terrestrial energy systems entails the development of a method for the protection of the high temperature refractory metals employed from the ambient air. A trilayer structure consisting of a tungsten emitter, a silicon carbide protective layer, and an intermediate graphite substrate, has been fabricated by means of chemical vapor deposition. Performance tests have demonstrated excellent results in combustion atmospheres.

Huffman, F.

231

Atmosphere  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

What is this atmosphere that surrounds the Earth? This instructional tutorial, part of an interactive laboratory series for grades 8-12, introduces students to the structure, effects, and components of the atmosphere. Here students investigate the composition of the atmosphere; effects of temperature, pressure, and ozone; the greenhouse effect; and how Earth compares with other planets. Interactive activities present students with opportunities to explore ideas and answer questions about the atmosphere, including its structure, the making of ozone, rocket launching, and measuring the atmosphere. Pop-up boxes provide additional information on topics such as dust, rain, and atmospheric composition. Students complete a final written review of six questions about the atmosphere. Copyright 2005 Eisenhower National Clearinghouse

University of Utah. Astrophysics Science Project Integrating Research and Education (ASPIRE)

2003-01-01

232

Early plume expansion in atmospheric pressure midinfrared laser ablation of water-rich targets Zhaoyang Chen and Akos Vertes*  

E-print Network

to a temperature far be- yond its thermodynamic boiling point. When the temperature of a layer reaches the phase explosion temperature 28 , then it may be directly transformed from liquid water into a mix- ture of vaporEarly plume expansion in atmospheric pressure midinfrared laser ablation of water-rich targets

Vertes, Akos

233

Terrestrial Biomarkers for Early Life on Earth as Analogs for Possible Martian Life Forms: Examples of Minerally Replaced Bacteria and Biofilms From the 3.5 - 3.3-Ga Barberton Greenstone Belt, South Africa  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The search for extraterrestrial life and especially martian life hinges on a variety of methods used to identify vestiges of what we could recognize as life, including chemical signatures, morphological fossils, and biogenic precipitates. Although the possibility of extant life on Mars (subsurface) is being considered, most exploration efforts may be directed toward the search for fossil life. Geomorphological evidence points to a warmer and wetter Mars early on in its history, a scenario that encourages comparison with the early Earth. For this reason, study of the early terrestrial life forms and environment in which they lived may provide clues as to how to search for extinct martian life. As a contribution to the early Archean database of terrestrial microfossils, we present new data on morphological fossils from the 3.5-3.3-Ga Barberton greenstone belt (BGB), South Africa. This study underlines the variety of fossil types already present in some of the oldest, best-preserved terrestrial sediments, ranging from minerally replaced bacteria and bacteria molds of vaRious morphologies (coccoid, coccobacillus, bacillus) to minerally replaced biofilm. Biofilm or extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) is produced by bacteria and appears to be more readily fossilisable than bacteria themselves. The BGB fossils occur in shallow water to subaerial sediments interbedded with volcanic lavas, the whole being deposited on oceanic crust. Penecontemporaneous silicification of sediments and volcanics resulted in the chertification of the rocks, which were later subjected to low-grade metamorphism (lower greenschist).

Westall, F.; McKay, D. S.; Gibson, E. K.; deWit, M. J.; Dann, J.; Gerneke, D.; deRonde, C. E. J.

1998-01-01

234

Evidence for a (15)N positive excursion in terrestrial foodwebs at the Middle to Upper Palaeolithic transition in south-western France: Implications for early modern human palaeodiet and palaeoenvironment.  

PubMed

The Middle to Upper Palaeolithic transition around 35,000 years ago coincides with the replacement of Neanderthals by anatomically modern humans in Europe. Several hypotheses have been suggested to explain this replacement, one of them being the ability of anatomically modern humans to broaden their dietary spectrum beyond the large ungulate prey that Neanderthals consumed exclusively. This scenario is notably based on higher nitrogen-15 amounts in early Upper Palaeolithic anatomically modern human bone collagen compared with late Neanderthals. In this paper, we document a clear increase of nitrogen-15 in bone collagen of terrestrial herbivores during the early Aurignacian associated with anatomically modern humans compared with the stratigraphically older Châtelperronian and late Mousterian fauna associated with Neanderthals. Carnivores such as wolves also exhibit a significant increase in nitrogen-15, which is similar to that documented for early anatomically modern humans compared with Neanderthals in Europe. A shift in nitrogen-15 at the base of the terrestrial foodweb is responsible for such a pattern, with a preserved foodweb structure before and after the Middle to Upper Palaeolithic transition in south-western France. Such an isotopic shift in the terrestrial ecosystem may be due to an increase in aridity during the time of deposition of the early Aurignacian layers. If it occurred across Europe, such a shift in nitrogen-15 in terrestrial foodwebs would be enough to explain the observed isotopic trend between late Neanderthals and early anatomically modern humans, without any significant change in the diet composition at the Middle to Upper Palaeolithic transition. PMID:24630359

Bocherens, Hervé; Drucker, Dorothée G; Madelaine, Stéphane

2014-04-01

235

Paleoclimatic and paleoecological reconstruction of early Miocene terrestrial equatorial deposits, Rusinga and Mfangano Islands, Lake Victoria, Kenya  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Biological responses to climatic shifts are often studied to inform us on future anthropogenic-driven climate change. However, few of these climatic shifts occur over time scales appropriate to modern change and few occur with biota similar to modern. The Miocene Climatic Optimum is an ideal interval to study because of its rapid duration and because it occurred during the rise and proliferation of apes. The sediments on Rusinga and Mfangano Islands, Lake Victoria, Kenya were deposited between 18 and 20 Ma and record a changing equatorial climate just prior to the Miocene Climate Optimum. This location also offers an opportunity to use multiple proxies to constrain climate and landscape, including paleosol geochemistry, paleobotany and paleontology. Additionally, due to the rich fossil preservation on the islands, climatic shifts are framed within the context of early caterrhine evolution. Here, we report a climate shift recorded through three time slices spanning two formations over ~2 myr. The oldest unit, the Wayando Formation, records an arid, probably open ecosystem with pedogenic calcite rhizoliths, a high groundwater table, poorly-formed paleosols and permineralized sedges. The middle time slice, the Grit Member-Fossil Bed Member contact of the Hiwegi Formation, shows evidence of a local saline lake, with desiccation features, satin-spar after gypsum deposits and salt hoppers. Paleobotanical and sedimentological data from roughly contemporaneous strata indicate a warm, highly seasonal environment that supported a mixture of woodland and forested elements across the landscape. The youngest unit, which is within the Kibanga Member of the Hiwegi Formation, displays demonstrable evidence for a closed-canopy multistoried forest with the presence of tree-stump casts and permineralized root systems within a red-brown paleosol. Within the same paleosol horizon, the dental remains of the catarrhines Proconsul and Dendropithecus have been discovered in situ. This stratum is overlain by a sandstone with preserved leaves. Bulk soil geochemistry and paleobotanical proxies suggest the climate was warm (MAT estimates range = 22.6 - 34.5 °C) and relatively wet (MAP estimates range = 700 - 2,620 mm). This study suggests that tropical Africa may have had a much more dynamic climate leading up to the Miocene Climatic Optimum than previously suggested, and underwent considerable ecosystem reorganization both before and after the Miocene Climatic Optimum.

Michel, L. A.; Peppe, D. J.; McNulty, K. P.; Driese, S. G.; Lutz, J.; Nightingale, S.; Maxbauer, D. P.; Horner, W. H.; DiPietro, L. M.; Lehmann, T.; Dunsworth, H. M.; Harcourt-Smith, W. E.; Ogondo, J.

2012-12-01

236

Mercury in the Canadian Arctic Terrestrial Environment: An Update.  

PubMed

Contaminants in the Canadian Arctic have been studied over the last twenty years under the guidance of the Northern Contaminants Program. This paper provides the current state of knowledge on mercury (Hg) in the Canadian Arctic terrestrial environment. Snow, ice, and soils on land are key reservoirs for atmospheric deposition and can become sources of Hg through the melting of terrestrial ice and snow and via soil erosion. In the Canadian Arctic, new data have been collected for snow and ice that provide more information on the net accumulation and storage of Hg in the cryosphere. Concentrations of total Hg (THg) in terrestrial snow are highly variable but on average, relatively low (<5ngL(-1)), and methylmercury (MeHg) levels in terrestrial snow are also generally low (<0.1ngL(-1)). On average, THg concentrations in snow on Canadian Arctic glaciers are much lower than those reported on terrestrial lowlands or sea ice. Hg in snow may be affected by photochemical exchanges with the atmosphere mediated by marine aerosols and halogens, and by post-depositional redistribution within the snow pack. Regional accumulation rates of THg in Canadian Arctic glaciers varied little during the past century but show evidence of an increasing north-to-south gradient. Temporal trends of THg in glacier cores indicate an abrupt increase in the early 1990s, possibly due to volcanic emissions, followed by more stable, but relatively elevated levels. Little information is available on Hg concentrations and processes in Arctic soils. Terrestrial Arctic wildlife typically have low levels of THg (<5?gg(-1) dry weight) in their tissues, although caribou (Rangifer tarandus) can have higher Hg because they consume large amounts of lichen. THg concentrations in the Yukon's Porcupine caribou herd vary among years but there has been no significant increase or decrease over the last two decades. PMID:24861531

Gamberg, Mary; Chételat, John; Poulain, Alexandre J; Zdanowicz, Christian; Zheng, Jiancheng

2014-05-23

237

Filling-in of Far-Red and Near-Infrared Solar Lines by Terrestrial and Atmospheric Effects: Simulations and Space-Based Observations from SCHIAMACHY and GOSAT  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Mapping of terrestrial vegetation fluorescence from space is of interest because it can potentially provide global information on the functional status of vegetation including light use efficiency and global primary productivity that can be used for global carbon cycle modeling. Space-based measurement of solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence is challenging, because its signal is small as compared with the much larger reflectance signal. Ground- and aircraft-based approaches have made use of the dark and spectrally-wide 02-A (approx 760 nm) and O2-B (approx 690 nm) atmospheric features to detect the weak fluorescence signal. More recently, Joiner et a1. and Frankenberg et a1. focused on longer-wavelength solar Fraunhofer lines that can be observed with space-based instruments such as the currently operational GOSAT. They showed that fluorescence can be detected using Fraunhofer lines away from the far-red chlorophyll-a fluorescence peak even when the surface is relatively bright. Here, we build on that work by developing methodology to correct for instrumental artifacts that produce false filling-in signals that can bias fluorescence retrievals. We also examine other potential sources of filling-in at far-red and NIR wavelengths. Another objective is to explore the possibility of making fluorescence measurements from space with lower spectral resolution instrumentation than the GOSAT interferometer. We focus on the 866 nm Ca II solar Fraunhofer line. Very few laboratory and ground-based measurements of vegetation fluorescence have been reported at wavelengths longer than 800 mn. Some results of fluorescence measurements of corn leaves acquired in the laboratory using polychromatic excitation at wavelengths shorter than 665 nm show that at 866 nm, the measured signal is of the order of 0.1-0.2 mw/sq m/nm/sr. In this work we use the following satellite observations: We use SCIAMACHY channel 5 in nadir mode that covers wavelengths between 773 and 1063 nm at a spectral resolution of 0.54 nm. GOSAT has two instrument packages: the Thermal And Near-infrared Sensor for carbon Observation-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (TANSO-FTS) and the Cloud and Aerosol Imager (CAI). We use TANSO-FTS band 1, which extends from approximately 758 to 775 mn and we use cloud fraction derived from the CAL We compare satellite-derived fluorescence with the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI), an Aqua/MODIS-derived vegetation reflectance-based index that indicates relative greenness and is used to infer photosynthetic function.

Joiner, J.; Yoshida, Y.; Vasilkov, A. P.; Middleton, E. M.; Campbell, P. K. E.; Kuze, A.; Corp, L. A.

2012-01-01

238

Filling-in of Far-Red and Near-Infrared Solar Lines by Terrestrial and Atmospheric Effects: Simulations and Space-Based Observations from SCIAMACHY and GOSAT  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Mapping of terrestrial vegetation fluorescence from space is of interest because it can potentially provide global information on the functional status of vegetation including light use efficiency and global primary productivity that can be used for global carbon cycle modeling. Space-based measurement of solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence is challenging, because its signal is small as compared with the much larger reflectance signal. Ground- and aircraft-based approaches have made use of the dark and spectrally-wide O2-A ( approx 760 nm) and O2-B (approx 690 nm) atmospheric features to detect the weak fluorescence signal. More recently, Joiner et al. and Frankenberg et al. focused on longer-wavelength solar Fraunhofer lines that can be observed with space-based instruments such as the currently operational GOSAT. They showed that fluorescence can be detected using Fraunhofer lines away from the far-red chlorophyll-a fluorescence peak even when the surface is relatively bright. Here, we build on that work by developing methodology to correct for instrumental artifacts that produce false filling-in signals that can bias fluorescence retrievals. We also examine other potential sources of filling-in at far-red and NIR wavelengths. Another objective is to explore the possibility of making fluorescence measurements from space with lower spectral resolution instrumentation than the GOSAT interferometer. We focus on the 866nm Ca II solar Fraunhofer line. Very few laboratory and ground-based measurements of vegetation fluorescence have been reported at wavelengths longer than 800 nm. Some results of fluorescence measurements of corn leaves acquired in the laboratory using polychromatic excitation at wavelengths shorter than 665nm show that at 866 nm, the measured signal is of the order of 0.1-0.2 mW/sq m/nm/sr. In this work, we use the following satellite observations: We use SCIAMACHY channel 5 in nadir mode that covers wavelengths between 773 and 1063nm at a spectral resolution of 0.54 nm. GOSAT has two instrument packages: the Thermal And Near-infrared Sensor for carbon Observation-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (TANSO-FTS) and the Cloud and Aerosol Imager (CAI). We use TANSO-FTS band 1, which extends from approximately 758 to 775nm and we use cloud fraction derived from the CAI. We compare satellite-derived fluorescence with the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI), an Aqua/MODIS-derived vegetation reflectance-based index that indicates relative greenness and is used to infer photosynthetic function.

Joiner, J.; Yoshida, Y.; Vasilkov, A. P.; Middleton, E. M.; Campbell, P. K. E.; Yoshida, Y.; Kuse, A.; Corp, L. A.

2012-01-01

239

Terrestrial ecology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Terrestrial studies continue to contribute ideas and ecological data ; relevant to nuclear-power plant siting and the management of stored radioactive ; wastes in the semi-arid steppe region of Washington. These ideas and data are ; also largely applicable to steppe regions of Oregon, Idaho, and Nevada. Much of ; the available information concerning the ecology of steppe ecosystems has

1974-01-01

240

TERRESTRIAL ECOTOXICOLOGY  

EPA Science Inventory

Terrestrial ecotoxicology is the study of how environmental pollutants affect land-dependent organisms and their environment. It requires three elements: (1) a source, (2) a receptor, and (3) an exposure pathway. This article reviews the basic principles of each of each element...

241

Effects of high CO 2 levels on surface temperature and atmospheric oxidation state of the early Earth  

Microsoft Academic Search

One-dimensional radiative-convective and photochemical models are used to examine the effects of enhanced CO2 concentrations on the surface temperature of the early Earth and the composition of the prebiotic atmosphere. Carbon dioxide concentrations of the order of 100–1000 times the present level are required to compensate for an expected solar luminosity decrease of 25–30%, if CO2 and H2O were the

James F. Kasting; James B. Pollack; David Crisp

1984-01-01

242

3D modelling of the early Martian Climate under a denser CO2 atmosphere: Temperatures and CO2 ice clouds  

E-print Network

On the basis of geological evidence, it is often stated that the early martian climate was warm enough for liquid water to flow on the surface thanks to the greenhouse effect of a thick atmosphere. We present 3D global climate simulations of the early martian climate performed assuming a faint young sun and a CO2 atmosphere with pressure between 0.1 and 7 bars. The model includes a detailed radiative transfer model using revised CO2 gas collision induced absorption properties, and a parameterisation of the CO2 ice cloud microphysical and radiative properties. A wide range of possible climates is explored by using various values of obliquities, orbital parameters, cloud microphysic parameters, atmospheric dust loading, and surface properties. Unlike on present day Mars, for pressures higher than a fraction of a bar, surface temperatures vary with altitude because of the adiabatic cooling and warming of the atmosphere when it moves vertically. In most simulations, CO2 ice clouds cover a major part of the planet...

Forget, Francois; Millour, Ehouarn; Madeleine, Jean-Baptiste; Kerber, Laura; Leconte, Jeremy; Marcq, Emmanuel; Haberle, Robert M

2012-01-01

243

Reconciling estimates of the contemporary North American carbon balance among terrestrial biosphere models, atmospheric inversions and a new approach for estimating net ecosystem exchange from inventory-based data  

SciTech Connect

While fossil fuel emissions are calculated with relatively high precision, understanding the fate of those emissions with respect to sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems requires data and methods that can reduce uncertainties in the diagnosis of land-based CO2 sinks. The wide range in the land surface flux estimates is related to a number of factors, but most generally because of the different methodologies used to develop estimates of carbon stocks and flux, and the uncertainties inherent in each approach. The alternative approaches to estimating continental scale carbon fluxes that we explored here can be broadly classified as applying a top-down or bottom-up perspective. Top-down approaches calculate land-atmosphere carbon fluxes based on atmospheric budgets and inverse modeling. Bottom-up approaches rely primarily on measurements of carbon stock changes (the inventory approach) or on spatially distributed simulations of carbon stocks and/or fluxes using process-based modeling (the forward modelapproach).

Hayes, D. J.; Turner, D. P.; Stinson, Graham; McGuire, A. David; Wei, Yaxing; West, Tristram O.; Heath, L.; deJong, B.; McConkey, Brian; Birdsey, Richard A.; Kurz, Werner; Jacobson, Andy; Huntzinger, Deborah N.; Pan, Y.; Post, W. M.; Cook, R. B.

2012-04-02

244

Geochemical and biologic constraints on the Archaean atmosphere and climate - A possible solution to the faint early Sun paradox.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There is ample geological evidence that Earth's climate resembled the present during the Archaean, despite a much lower solar luminosity. This was cast as a paradox by Sagan and Mullen in 1972. Several solutions to the paradox have been suggested, mostly focusing on adjustments of the radiative properties of Earth's atmosphere e.g. Kasting (1993), by increasing the mixing ratio of CO2 and/or adding various other greenhouse gasses. We have used banded iron formation (BIF), which are chemical sediments precipitated out of the Archaean ocean to characterize the composition of the atmosphere. The stability relations of magnetite, which is ubiquitous in Archaean BIFs, preclude CO2 mixing ratios much higher than the present atmospheric level. Likewise, magnetite stability is consistent with atmospheric H2 controlled at the lower limit for H2 metabolism by methanogenic phototrophic organisms. In the absence of substantial compensation for the lower solar irradiance by greenhouse gasses in the atmosphere, we have examined the factors that controlled Earth's albedo. These are primarily the surface albedo of Earth and the abundance and properties of clouds. We have applied a model that takes into account the apparent growth of Earth continents (Collerson and Kamber 1999) and the absence of land vegetation during the Precambrian for the evolution of the surface albedo, and a model for the abundance and properties of clouds that takes into account the lower abundance of biogenic cloud condensation nuclei in a less productive prokaryotic world. The higher transparency of the atmosphere for short wave incoming solar radiation and the lower surface albedo on an early Earth dominated by oceans, provided sufficient compensation for the lower solar irradiance to allow the presence of liquid oceans, even at greenhouse gas concentrations broadly similar to the present day values. We therefore suggest that the thermostasis during Earth geologic record, is not paradoxical, but is the combined effect of many factors, which are to a large part biologically controlled. References Collerson, K. D. and B. S. Kamber (1999). "Evolution of the continents and the atmosphere inferred from Th-U-Nb systematics of the depleted mantle." Science 283(5407): 1519-1522. Kasting, J. F. (1993). "Earths Early Atmosphere." Science 259(5097): 920-926. Sagan, C. and G. Mullen (1972). "Earth and Mars - Evolution of Atmospheres and Surface Temperatures." Science 177(4043): 52-&.

Rosing, Minik T.; Bird, Dennis K.; Sleep, Norman H.; Bjerrum, Christian J.

2010-05-01

245

Terrestrial Mammalian Herbivore Response to Declining Levels of Atmospheric CO 2 During the Cenozoic: Evidence from North American Fossil Horses (Family Equidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The fossil record preserves a wonderfully rich sequence spanning 65 million years of Cenozoic mammals that lived in ancient terrestrial ecosystems. During this time in Earth history, major global climate changes undoubtedly affected the course of mammalian evolution. Similarly, countless biotic interactions, such as competition, contributed to the struggle for existence of particular species. One of the interesting challenges for

Bruce J. MacFadden

246

The Geology of the Terrestrial Planets  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The geologic history of the terrestrial planets is outlined in light of recent exploration and the revolution in geologic thinking. Among the topics considered are planet formation; planetary craters, basins, and general surface characteristics; tectonics; planetary atmospheres; and volcanism.

Carr, M. H. (editor); Saunders, R. S.; Strom, R. G.; Wilhelms, D. E.

1984-01-01

247

Space Vehicle Terrestrial Environment Design Requirements Guidelines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The terrestrial environment is an important driver of space vehicle structural, control, and thermal system design. NASA is currently in the process of producing an update to an earlier Terrestrial Environment Guidelines for Aerospace Vehicle Design and Development Handbook. This paper addresses the contents of this updated handbook, with special emphasis on new material being included in the areas of atmospheric thermodynamic models, wind dynamics, atmospheric composition, atmospheric electricity, cloud phenomena, atmospheric extremes, and sea state. In addition, the respective engineering design elements are discussed relative to terrestrial environment inputs that require consideration. Specific lessons learned that have contributed to the advancements made in the application and awareness of terrestrial environment inputs for aerospace engineering applications are presented.

Johnson, Dale L.; Keller, Vernon W.; Vaughan, William W.

2006-01-01

248

Atmospheric control on ground and space based early warning system for hazard linked to ash injection into the atmosphere  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Violent volcanic eruptions are common in the Southeast Asia which is bordered by active subduction zones with hundreds of active volcanoes. The physical conditions at the eruptive vent are difficult to estimate, especially when there are only a few sensors distributed around the volcano. New methods are therefore required to tackle this problem. Among them, satellite imagery and infrasound may rapidly provide information on strong eruptions triggered at volcanoes which are not closely monitored by on-site instruments. The deployment of an infrasonic array located at Singapore will increase the detection capability of the existing IMS network. In addition, the location of Singapore with respect to those volcanoes makes it the perfect site to identify erupting blasts based on the wavefront characteristics of the recorded signal. There are ~750 active or potentially active volcanoes within 4000 kilometers of Singapore. They have been combined into 23 volcanic zones that have clear azimuth with respect to Singapore. Each of those zones has been assessed for probabilities of eruptive styles, from moderate (Volcanic Explosivity Index of 3) to cataclysmic (VEI 8) based on remote morphologic analysis. Ash dispersal models have been run using wind velocity profiles from 2010 to 2012 and hypothetical eruption scenarios for a range of eruption explosivities. Results can be used to estimate the likelihood of volcanic ash at any location in SE Asia. Seasonal changes in atmospheric conditions will strongly affect the potential to detect small volcanic eruptions with infrasound and clouds can hide eruption plumes from satellites. We use the average cloud cover for each zone to estimate the probability of eruption detection from space, and atmospheric models to estimate the probability of eruption detection with infrasound. Using remote sensing in conjunction with infrasound improves detection capabilities as each method is capable of detecting eruptions when the other is 'blind' or 'defened' by adverse atmospheric conditions. According to its location, each volcanic zone will be associated with a threshold value (minimum VEI detectable) depending on the seasonality of the wind velocity profile in the region and the cloud cover.

Caudron, Corentin; Taisne, Benoit; Whelley, Patrick; Garces, Milton; Le Pichon, Alexis

2014-05-01

249

Atmospheric carbon dioxide linked with Mesozoic and early Cenozoic climate change  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relationship between atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and climate in the Quaternary period has been extensively investigated, but the role of CO2 in temperature changes during the rest of Earth's history is less clear. The range of geological evidence for cool periods during the high CO2 Mesozoic `greenhouse world' of high atmospheric CO2 concentrations, indicated by models and fossil soils,

Benjamin J. Fletcher; Stuart J. Brentnall; Clive W. Anderson; Robert A. Berner; David J. Beerling

2008-01-01

250

Overview of terrestrial thermionics  

SciTech Connect

Thermionic energy conversion addresses important national objectives such as fossil fuel conservation and space reactors. Historically, thermionics was first developed for space applications where the refractory materials required at emitter temperatures could operate indefinitely in the vacuum. Translation of this space technology to terrestrial applications required that a means of protecting the high temperature refractory metals from the air be found. A trilayer structure (tungsten emitter, silicon carbide protective layer and intermediate graphite substrate) made by chemical vapor deposition has given excellent results in combustion atmospheres.

Huffman, F.

1983-08-01

251

Bolide impacts and the oxidation state of carbon in the Earth's early atmosphere  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A one-dimensional photochemical model was used to examine the effect of bolide impacts on the oxidation state of Earth's primitive atmosphere. The impact rate should have been high prior to 3.8 Ga before present, based on evidence derived from the Moon. Impacts of comets or carbonaceous asteroids should have enhanced the atmospheric CO/CO2 ratio by bringing in CO ice and/or organic carbon that can be oxidized to CO in the impact plume. Ordinary chondritic impactors would contain elemental iron that could have reacted with ambient CO2 to give CO. Nitric oxide (NO) should also have been produced by reaction between ambient CO2 and N2 in the hot impact plumes. High NO concentrations increase the atmospheric CO/CO2 ratio by increasing the rainout rate of oxidized gases. According to the model, atmospheric CO/CO2 ratios of unity or greater are possible during the first several hundred million years of Earth's history, provided that dissolved CO was not rapidly oxidized to bicarbonate in the ocean. Specifically, high atmospheric CO/CO2 ratios are possible if either: (1) the climate was cool (like today's climate), so that hydration of dissolved CO to formate was slow, or (2) the formate formed from CO was efficiently converted into volatile, reduced carbon compounds, such as methane. A high atmospheric CO/CO2 ratio may have helped to facilitate prebiotic synthesis by enhancing the production rates of hydrogen cyanide and formaldehyde. Formaldehyde may have been produced even more efficiently by photochemical reduction of bicarbonate and formate in Fe(++)-rich surface waters.

Kasting, J. F.

1992-01-01

252

Carbon Dioxide Clouds at High Altitude in the Tropics and in an Early Dense Martian Atmosphere  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We use a time dependent, microphysical cloud model to study the formation of carbon dioxide clouds in the Martian atmosphere. Laboratory studies by Glandor et al. show that high critical supersaturations are required for cloud particle nucleation and that surface kinetic growth is not limited. These conditions, which are similar to those for cirrus clouds on Earth, lead to the formation of carbon dioxide ice particles with radii greater than 500 micrometers and concentrations of less than 0.1 cm(exp -3) for typical atmospheric conditions. Within the current Martian atmosphere, CO2 cloud formation is possible at the poles during winter and at high altitudes in the tropics during periods of increased atmospheric dust loading. In both cases, temperature perturbations of several degrees below the CO2 saturation temperature are required to nucleate new cloud particles suggesting that dynamical processes are the most common initiators of carbon dioxide clouds rather than diabatic cooling. The microphysical cloud model, coupled to a two-stream radiative transfer model, is used to reexamine the impact of CO2 clouds on the surface temperature within a dense CO2 atmosphere. The formation of carbon dioxide clouds leads to a warmer surface than what would be expected for clear sky conditions. The amount of warming is sensitive to the presence of dust and water vapor in the atmosphere, both of which act to dampen cloud effects. The radiative warming associated with cloud formation, as well as latent heating, work to dissipate the clouds when present. Thus, clouds never last for periods much longer than several days, limiting their overall effectiveness for warming the surface. The time average cloud optical depth is approximately unity leading to a 5-10 K warming, depending on the surface pressure. However, the surface temperature does not rise about the freezing point of liquid water even for pressures as high as 5 bars, at a solar luminosity of 75% the current value.

Colaprete, Anthony; Toon, Owen B.

2001-01-01

253

Bolide impacts and the oxidation state of carbon in the earth's early atmosphere  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A one-dimensional photochemical model was used to examine the effect of bolide impacts on the oxidation state of earth's primitive atmosphere. The impact rate should have been high prior to 3.8 Ga before present, based on evidence derived from the moon. Impacts of comets or carbonaceous asteroids should have enhanced the atmospheric CO/CO2 ratio by bringing in CO ice and/or organic carbon that can be oxidized to CO in the impact plume. Ordinary chondritic impactors would contain elemental iron that could have reacted with ambient CO2 to give CO. Nitric oxide (NO) should also have been produced by reaction between ambient CO2 and N2 in the hot impact plumes. High NO concentrations increase the atmospheric CO/CO2 ratio by increasing the rainout rate of oxidized gases. According to the model, atmospheric CO/CO2 ratios of unity or greater are possible during the first several hundred million years of earth's history, provided that dissolved CO was not rapidly oxidized to bicarbonate in the ocean.

Kasting, James F.

1990-01-01

254

Ontong Java volcanism initiated long-term climate warming that caused substantial changes in terrestrial vegetation several tens of thousand years before the onset of OAE1a (Early Aptian, Cretaceous)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During Cretaceous times, several intense volcanic episodes are proposed as trigger for episodic climate warming, for changes in marine circulation patterns and for elevated marine productivity, which resulted in the widespread black shale deposits of the Oceanic Anoxic Events (OAE). In the sediments underlying the early Aptian OAE1a black shales, a prominent negative carbon isotope excursion is recorded. Its origin had long been controversial (e.g. Arthur, 2000; Jahren et al., 2001) before recent studies attributed it to the Ontong Java volcanism (Méhay et al., 2009; Tejada et al., 2009). Volcanic outgassing results in an increased pCO2 and should lead to a rise in global temperatures. We therefore investigated if the volcanically-induced increase in pCO2 at the onset of OAE1a in the early Aptian led to a temperature rise that was sufficient to affect terrestrial vegetation assemblages. In order to analyse changes in terrestrial palynomorph assemblages, we examined 15 samples from 12 black shale horizons throughout the early Aptian negative C-isotope spike interval of the Pusiano section (Maiolica Formation; N-Italy). These sediments were deposited at the southern continental margin of the alpine Tethys Ocean and have been bio- and magnetostratigraphically dated by Channell et al. (1995). In order to obtain a continuous palynological record of the negative C-isotope spike interval and the base of OAE1a, we combined this pre-OAE1a interval of Pusiano with the OAE1a interval of the nearby Cismon section (Hochuli et al., 1999). The sporomorph assemblages at the base of this composite succession feature abundant bisaccate pollen, which reflects a warm-temperate climate. Rather arid conditions are inferred from low trilete spore percentages. Several tens of thousand years before the onset of OAE1a, C-isotope values started to decrease. Some thousand years later, bisaccate pollen began to decrease, whereas an increase of Classopollis spp. and Araucariacites spp. percentages indicate a rise in temperatures. Maximum temperatures (suggested by a dominance of Classopollis spp.) were only reached after the most negative inorganic C-isotope values and after the onset of OAE1a. Our study shows that the volcanically-induced increase in pCO2, which ultimately led to OAE1a caused a substantial climate warming that seriously affected terrestrial vegetation. References: Arthur, M.A., 2000, Volcanic contributions to the carbon and sulfur geochemical cycles and global change, in Sigurdsson, H., Houghton, B., McNutt, S.R., Rymer, H., and Stix, J., eds., Encyclopedia of Volcanoes, Academic Press, p. 1045-1056. Channell, J.E.T., Cecca, F., and Erba, E., 1995, Correlations of Hauterivian and Barremian (Early Cretaceous) stage boundaries to polarity chrons: Earth and Planetary Science Letters, v. 134, p. 125-140. Hochuli, P.A., Menegatti, A.P., Weissert, H., Riva, A., Erba, E., and Silva, I.P., 1999, Episodes of high productivity and cooling in the early Aptian Alpine Tethys: Geology, v. 27, p. 657-660. Jahren, A.H., Arens, N.C., Sarmiento, G., Guerrero, J., and Amundson, R., 2001, Terrestrial record of methane hydrate dissociation in the Early Cretaceous: Geology, v. 29, p. 159-162. Méhay, S., Keller, C.E., Bernasconi, S.M., Weissert, H., Erba, E., Bottini, C., and Hochuli, P.A., 2009, A volcanic CO2 pulse triggered the Cretaceous Oceanic Anoxic Event 1a and a biocalcification crisis: Geology, v. 37, p. 819-822. Tejada, M.L.G., Suzuki, K., Junichiro, K., Rodolfo, C., J., M.J., Naohiko, O., Tatsuhiko, S., and Yoshiyuki, T., 2009, Ontong Java Plateau eruption as a trigger for the early Aptian oceanic anoxic event: Geology, v. 37, p. 855-858.

Keller, Christina E.; Hochuli, Peter A.; Giorgioni, Martino; Garcia, Therese I.; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Weissert, Helmut

2010-05-01

255

The composition of the primitive atmosphere and the synthesis of organic compounds on the early Earth  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The generally accepted theory for the origin of life on the Earth requires that a large variety of organic compounds be present to form the first living organisms and to provide the energy sources for primitive life either directly or through various fermentation reactions. This can provide a strong constraint on discussions of the formation of the Earth and on the composition of the primitive atmosphere. In order for substantial amounts of organic compounds to have been present on the prebiological Earth, certain conditions must have existed. There is a large body of literature on the prebiotic synthesis of organic compounds in various postulated atmospheres. In this mixture of abiotically synthesized organic compounds, the amino acids are of special interest since they are utilized by modern organisms to synthesize structural materials and a large array of catalytic peptides.

Bada, J. L.; Miller, S. L.

1985-01-01

256

Early Results from the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On 6 September, 2013, a near-perfect launch of the first Minotaur V rocket successfully carried NASA's Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) into a high-eccentricity geocentric orbit. After 30 days of phasing, LADEE arrived at the Moon on 6 October, 2013. LADEE's science objectives are twofold: (1) Determine the composition of the lunar atmosphere, investigate processes controlling its distribution and variability, including sources, sinks, and surface interactions; (2) Characterize the lunar exospheric dust environment, measure its spatial and temporal variability, and effects on the lunar atmosphere, if any. After a successful commissioning phase, the three science instruments have made systematic observations of the lunar dust and exospheric environment. These include initial observations of argon, neon and helium exospheres, and their diurnal variations; the lunar micrometeoroid impact ejecta cloud and its variations; spatial and temporal variations of the sodium exosphere; and the search for sunlight extinction caused by dust. LADEE also made observations of the effects of the Chang'e 3 landing on 14 December 2013.

Elphic, R. C.; Hine, B.; Delory, G. T.; Mahaffy, Paul; Benna, Mehdi; Horanyi, Mihaly; Colaprete, Anthony; Noble, Sarah

2014-01-01

257

Early Results from the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

On 6 September, 2013, a near-perfect launch of the first Minotaur V rocket success-fully carried NASA's Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) into a high-eccentricity geocentric orbit. After 30 days of phasing, LADEE arrived at the Moon on 6 October, 2013. LADEE's science objectives are twofold: (1) Determine the composition of the lunar atmosphere, investigate processes controlling its distribution and variability, including sources, sinks, and surface interactions; (2) Characterize the lunar exospheric dust environment, measure its spatial and temporal variability, and effects on the lunar atmosphere, if any. After a successful commissioning phase, the three science instruments have made systematic observations of the lunar dust and exospheric environment. These include initial observations of argon, neon and helium exospheres, and their diurnal variations; the lunar micrometeoroid impact ejecta cloud and its variations; spatial and temporal variations of the sodium exosphere; and the search for sunlight extinction caused by dust. LADEE also made observations of the effects of the Chang'e 3 landing on 14 December 2013.

Elphic, Richard C.; Hine, Butler; Delory, Gregory T.; Mahaffy, Paul; Benna, Mehdi; Horanyi, Mihaly; Colaprete, Anthony; Noble, Sarah

2014-05-01

258

Late Archean to Early Paleoproterozoic global tectonics, environmental change and the rise of atmospheric oxygen  

Microsoft Academic Search

Analysis of the tectonostratigraphic records of Late Archean to Early Paleoproterozoic terranes indicates linkage between global tectonics, changing sea levels and environmental conditions. A Late Archean tectonic cycle started at ?2.78 Ga involving the breakup of a pre-existing continent (Vaalbara) and the most prodigious period of generation and preservation of juvenile continental crust recorded in Earth history during a period

Mark E. Barley; Andrey Bekker; Bryan Krapez

2005-01-01

259

Assessing the impact of elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} and climate change scenarios of two and three dimensional general circulation models on primary production and toatl carbon storage of global terrestrial ecosystems  

SciTech Connect

The Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM version 4) was applied to simulate primary production and total carbon storage for two atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations (315ppm and 630ppm) and three climate scenarios (contemporary, 2-dimensional MIT L-O climate model and 3-dimensional GISS). For contemporary climate (Cramer & Leemans dataset) at 315ppm CO{sub 2}, global annual NPP was 47.9 Pg C.yr{sup {minus}1} and total carbon storage was 1658.2 Pg C. Under atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration of 630ppm and projected double CO{sub 2} climate by the MIT L-O climate model, global annual NPP increased by 12%, and total carbon storage increased by 11%. Global annual NPP and total carbon storage under the GISS were about 1% to 2% higher than those under the MIT L-O model. The difference in annual NPP and total carbon storage between the GISS and MIT L-O models varied among the 18 biomes, in the range of 0% to 20%. The differences were greatest in the high latitude ecosystems.

Xiao, X.; Kicklighter, D.W.; Melillo, J.M. [Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, MA (United States)] [and others

1995-09-01

260

A Closer Comparison of Early and Late-Winter Atmospheric Trends in the Northern Hemisphere  

Microsoft Academic Search

Decadal trends are compared in various fields between Northern Hemisphere early winter, November-December (ND), and late-winter, February-March (FM), months using reanalysis data. It is found that in the extratropics and polar region the decadal trends display nearly opposite tendencies between ND and FM during the period from 1979 to 2003. Dynamical trends in late winter (FM) reveal that the polar

Yongyun Hu; Ka Kit Tung; Jiping Liu

2005-01-01

261

Fossil worm burrows reveal very early terrestrial animal activity and shed light on trophic resources after the end-cretaceous mass extinction.  

PubMed

The widespread mass extinctions at the end of the Cretaceous caused world-wide disruption of ecosystems, and faunal responses to the one-two punch of severe environmental perturbation and ecosystem collapse are still unclear. Here we report the discovery of in situ terrestrial fossil burrows from just above the impact-defined Cretaceous-Paleogene (K/Pg) boundary in southwestern North Dakota. The crisscrossing networks of horizontal burrows occur at the interface of a lignitic coal and silty sandstone, and reveal intense faunal activity within centimeters of the boundary clay. Estimated rates of sedimentation and coal formation suggest that the burrows were made less than ten thousand years after the end-Cretaceous impact. The burrow characteristics are most consistent with burrows of extant earthworms. Moreover, the burrowing and detritivorous habits of these annelids fit models that predict the trophic and sheltering lifestyles of terrestrial animals that survived the K/Pg extinction event. In turn, such detritus-eaters would have played a critical role in supporting secondary consumers. Thus, some of the carnivorous vertebrates that radiated after the K/Pg extinction may owe their evolutionary success to thriving populations of earthworms. PMID:23951041

Chin, Karen; Pearson, Dean; Ekdale, A A

2013-01-01

262

Fossil Worm Burrows Reveal Very Early Terrestrial Animal Activity and Shed Light on Trophic Resources after the End-Cretaceous Mass Extinction  

PubMed Central

The widespread mass extinctions at the end of the Cretaceous caused world-wide disruption of ecosystems, and faunal responses to the one-two punch of severe environmental perturbation and ecosystem collapse are still unclear. Here we report the discovery of in situ terrestrial fossil burrows from just above the impact-defined Cretaceous-Paleogene (K/Pg) boundary in southwestern North Dakota. The crisscrossing networks of horizontal burrows occur at the interface of a lignitic coal and silty sandstone, and reveal intense faunal activity within centimeters of the boundary clay. Estimated rates of sedimentation and coal formation suggest that the burrows were made less than ten thousand years after the end-Cretaceous impact. The burrow characteristics are most consistent with burrows of extant earthworms. Moreover, the burrowing and detritivorous habits of these annelids fit models that predict the trophic and sheltering lifestyles of terrestrial animals that survived the K/Pg extinction event. In turn, such detritus-eaters would have played a critical role in supporting secondary consumers. Thus, some of the carnivorous vertebrates that radiated after the K/Pg extinction may owe their evolutionary success to thriving populations of earthworms. PMID:23951041

Chin, Karen; Pearson, Dean; Ekdale, A. A.

2013-01-01

263

Oxygen Isotope Distribution in the Early Solar System: An Ion Microscopic View of a Big Issue  

Microsoft Academic Search

The discovery of oxygen isotope anomalies changed forever our picture of the early solar system: Allende refractory inclusions were found to have a 4% excess in 16O relative to terrestrial. While originally ascribed to nucleosynthetic addition, these anomalies appear to be best explained by a chemical fractionation mechanism, either a symmetry effect (as in the Earth atmosphere ozone), or photodissociation

T. R. Ireland

2009-01-01

264

Modeled responses of terrestrial ecosystems to elevated atmospheric CO 2 : a comparison of simulations by the biogeochemistry models of the Vegetation\\/Ecosystem Modeling and Analysis Project (VEMAP)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although there is a great deal of information concerning responses to increases in atmospheric CO2 at the tissue and plant levels, there are substantially fewer studies that have investigated ecosystem-level responses in\\u000a the context of integrated carbon, water, and nutrient cycles. Because our understanding of ecosystem responses to elevated\\u000a CO2 is incomplete, modeling is a tool that can be used

Yude Pan; Jerry M. Melillo; A. David McGuire; David W. Kicklighter; Louis F. Pitelka; Kathy Hibbard; Lars L. Pierce; Steven W. Running; Dennis S. Ojima; William J. Parton; David S. Schimel

1998-01-01

265

FINAL REPORT: A Study of the Abundance and 13C/12C Ratio of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide to Advance the Scientific Understanding of Terrestrial Processes Regulating the GCC  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of this project was to continue research to develop carbon cycle relationships related to the land biosphere based on remote measurements of atmospheric CO2 concentration and its isotopic composition. The project continued time-series observations of atmospheric carbon dioxide and isotopic composition begun by Charles D. Keeling at remote sites, including Mauna Loa, the South Pole, and eight other sites. The program also included the development of methods for measuring radiocarbon content in the collected CO2 samples and carrying out radiocarbon measurements in collaboration with Tom Guilderson of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LLNL). The radiocarbon measurements can provide complementary information on carbon exchange rates with the land and oceans and emissions from fossil-fuel burning. Using models of varying complexity, the concentration and isotopic measurements were used to establish estimates of the spatial and temporal variations in the net CO2 exchange with the atmosphere, the storage of carbon in the land and oceans, and variable isotopic discrimination of land plants.

Keeling, R. F.; Piper, S. C.

2008-12-23

266

Early signals of synoptic-scale atmospheric anomalies associated with the summer low temperature events in Northeast China  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Following a description of the climatology of the boreal summer persistent low temperature (LT) events of the Northeast (NE) China, this paper explores the synoptic characteristics of these events by decomposing atmospheric variables into three components: the daily climate, the zonal-averaged anomaly and the synoptic-scale anomaly. The synoptic-scale anomaly is used to construct the anomalous synoptic charts which tend to perform better compared to traditionally defined synoptic charts in terms of revealing synoptic characteristics of these LT events. Based on the analysis of 21 persistent LT events occurring during summers of 1961-2008 in NE China, we show that temperature anomaly at 850 hPa and geopotential height anomaly at 300 hPa were two critical early signals prior to the occurrences of these persistent LT events.

Qian, Weihong; Jiang, Man

2014-04-01

267

Reconciling estimates of the contemporary North American carbon balance among terrestrial biosphere models, atmospheric inversions, and a new approach for estimating net ecosystem exchange from inventory-based data  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We develop an approach for estimating net ecosystem exchange (NEE) using inventory-based information over North America (NA) for a recent 7-year period (ca. 2000–2006). The approach notably retains information on the spatial distribution of NEE, or the vertical exchange between land and atmosphere of all non-fossil fuel sources and sinks of CO2, while accounting for lateral transfers of forest and crop products as well as their eventual emissions. The total NEE estimate of a -327 ± 252 TgC yr-1 sink for NA was driven primarily by CO2 uptake in the Forest Lands sector (-248 TgC yr-1), largely in the Northwest and Southeast regions of the US, and in the Crop Lands sector (-297 TgC yr-1), predominantly in the Midwest US states. These sinks are counteracted by the carbon source estimated for the Other Lands sector (+218 TgC yr-1), where much of the forest and crop products are assumed to be returned to the atmosphere (through livestock and human consumption). The ecosystems of Mexico are estimated to be a small net source (+18 TgC yr-1) due to land use change between 1993 and 2002. We compare these inventory-based estimates with results from a suite of terrestrial biosphere and atmospheric inversion models, where the mean continental-scale NEE estimate for each ensemble is -511 TgC yr-1 and -931 TgC yr-1, respectively. In the modeling approaches, all sectors, including Other Lands, were generally estimated to be a carbon sink, driven in part by assumed CO2 fertilization and/or lack of consideration of carbon sources from disturbances and product emissions. Additional fluxes not measured by the inventories, although highly uncertain, could add an additional -239 TgC yr-1 to the inventory-based NA sink estimate, thus suggesting some convergence with the modeling approaches.

Hayes, Daniel J.; Turner, David P.; Stinson, Graham; McGuire, A. David; Wei, Yaxing; West, Tristram O.; Heath, Linda S.; de Jong, Bernardus; McConkey, Brian G.; Birdsey, Richard A.; Kurz, Werner A.; Jacobson, Andrew R.; Huntzinger, Deborah N.; Pan, Yude; Post, W. Mac; Cook, Robert B.

2012-01-01

268

Reconciling estimates of the contemporary North American carbon balance among terrestrial biosphere models, atmospheric inversions and a new approach for estimating net ecosystem exchange from inventory-based data  

SciTech Connect

We develop an approach for estimating net ecosystem exchange (NEE) using inventory-based information over North America (NA) for a recent 7-year period (ca. 2000 2006). The approach notably retains information on the spatial distribution of NEE, or the vertical exchange between land and atmosphere of all non-fossil fuel sources and sinks of CO2, while accounting for lateral transfers of forest and crop products as well as their eventual emissions. The total NEE estimate of a 327 252 TgC yr1 sink for NA was driven primarily by CO2 uptake in the Forest Lands sector (248 TgC yr1), largely in the Northwest and Southeast regions of the US, and in the Crop Lands sector (297 TgC yr1), predominantly in the Midwest US states. These sinks are counteracted by the carbon source estimated for the Other Lands sector (+218 TgC yr1), where much of the forest and crop products are assumed to be returned to the atmosphere (through livestock and human consumption). The ecosystems of Mexico are estimated tobe a small net source (+18 TgC yr1) due to land use change between 1993 and 2002. We compare these inventorybased estimates with results from a suite of terrestrial biosphere and atmospheric inversion models, where the mean continental-scale NEE estimate for each ensemble is 511 TgC yr1 and 931 TgC yr1, respectively. In the modeling approaches, all sectors, including Other Lands, were generally estimated to be a carbon sink, driven in part by assumed CO2 fertilization and/or lack of consideration of carbon sources from disturbances and product emissions. Additional fluxes not measured by the inventories, although highly uncertain, could add an additional 239 TgC yr1 to the inventory-based NA sink estimate, thus suggesting some convergence with the modeling approaches.

Hayes, Daniel J [ORNL; Turner, David P [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Stinson, Graham [Pacific Forestry Centre, Canadian Forest Service; Mcguire, David [University of Alaska; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL; West, Tristram O. [Joint Global Change Research Institute, PNNL; Heath, Linda S. [USDA Forest Service; De Jong, Bernardus [ECOSUR; McConkey, Brian G. [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada; Birdsey, Richard A. [U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service; Kurz, Werner [Canadian Forest Service; Jacobson, Andrew [NOAA ESRL and CIRES; Huntzinger, Deborah [University of Michigan; Pan, Yude [U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Cook, Robert B [ORNL

2012-01-01

269

Solar-terrestrial models and application software  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The empirical models related to solar-terrestrial sciences are listed and described which are available in the form of computer programs. Also included are programs that use one or more of these models for application specific purposes. The entries are grouped according to the region of the solar-terrestrial environment to which they belong and according to the parameter which they describe. Regions considered include the ionosphere, atmosphere, magnetosphere, planets, interplanetary space, and heliosphere. Also provided is the information on the accessibility for solar-terrestrial models to specify the magnetic and solar activity conditions.

Bilitza, Dieter

1990-01-01

270

A relatively reduced Hadean continental crust and implications for the early atmosphere and crustal rheology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is widely believed that the Earth was strongly reduced during its early accretion, however, the transition from the reduced state that prevailed during Earth's early period to the modern oxidized crust and mantle has never been captured by geochemical surveys on Earth materials as old as ?4.0 billion years ago. By combining available trace-elements data of igneous zircons of crustal origin, we show that the Hadean continental crust was significantly more reduced than its modern counterpart and experienced progressive oxidation till ?3.6 billions years ago. We suggest that the increase in the oxidation state of the Hadean continental crust is related to the progressive decline in the intensity of chondritic addition during the late veneer. Inputs of carbon- and hydrogen-rich chondritic materials during the formation of Hadean granitic crust must have favored strongly reduced magmatism. The conjunction of cold, wet and reduced granitic magmatism during the Hadean implies the production of methane-rich fluids, in addition to the CO- and H2-rich volcanic species produced by degassing of hot reduced basaltic melts as modified by delivered materials during the late veneer. When the late veneer events ended, magma produced by normal decompression melting of the mantle imparted more oxidizing conditions to erupted lavas and the related crust, emitting CO2- and H2O-rich gases. Our model suggests that the Hadean continental crust was possibly much weaker than present-day, facilitating intrusion of underplating magma and thus allowing faster crustal growth in the early Earth.

Yang, Xiaozhi; Gaillard, Fabrice; Scaillet, Bruno

2014-05-01

271

Transient climate change and net ecosystem production of the terrestrial biosphere  

E-print Network

The Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM version 4.1) is applied to assess the sensitivity of net ecosystem production (NEP) of the terrestrial biosphere to transient changes in atmospheric CO2 concentration and climate in the ...

Xiao, Xiangming.; Melillo, Jerry M.; Kicklighter, David W.; McGuire, A. David.; Prinn, Ronald G.; Wang, Chien.; Stone, Peter H.; Sokolov, Andrei P.

272

Statistical equilibrium calculations for silicon in early-type model stellar atmospheres  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Line profiles of 36 multiplets of silicon (Si) II, III, and IV were computed for a grid of model atmospheres covering the range from 15,000 to 35,000 K in effective temperature and 2.5 to 4.5 in log (gravity). The computations involved simultaneous solution of the steady-state statistical equilibrium equations for the populations and of the equation of radiative transfer in the lines. The variables were linearized, and successive corrections were computed until a minimal accuracy of 1/1000 in the line intensities was reached. The common assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) was dropped. The model atmospheres used also were computed by non-LTE methods. Some effects that were incorporated into the calculations were the depression of the continuum by free electrons, hydrogen and ionized helium line blocking, and auto-ionization and dielectronic recombination, which later were found to be insignificant. Use of radiation damping and detailed electron (quadratic Stark) damping constants had small but significant effects on the strong resonance lines of Si III and IV. For weak and intermediate-strength lines, large differences with respect to LTE computations, the results of which are also presented, were found in line shapes and strengths. For the strong lines the differences are generally small, except for the models at the hot, low-gravity extreme of our range. These computations should be useful in the interpretation of the spectra of stars in the spectral range B0-B5, luminosity classes III, IV, and V.

Kamp, L. W.

1976-01-01

273

Atmospheric CO2 from the late Oligocene to early Miocene reconstructed from photosynthesis data and leaf characteristics of fossil plants  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the Cenozoic era, global climate changed from greenhouse to icehouse conditions. During the Oligocene, the comparatively cool phase in the earlier part of the late Oligocene is followed by the Late Oligocene Warming and a major glaciation event at the Oligocene-Miocene transition (Mi-1). Various studies indicate that these climate events were coupled to changes in atmospheric CO2 levels. In this study, atmospheric CO2 from the late Oligocene to the early Miocene was reconstructed by using photosynthesis data and fossil leaf characteristics. We used plant material from various sites located in Germany and Austria comprising fossil leaves of four angiosperm plant species: Platanus neptuni (Platanaceae), Quercus rhenana, Q. praerhenana and Eotrigonobalanus furcinervis (all Fagaceae). A mechanistic-theoretical approach based on stomatal parameters, photosynthesis data and gas exchange parameters was applied to model palaeoatmospheric CO2 levels. Detailed climate data of the considered sites were reconstructed as well since the mechanistic-theoretical approach requires climate data as input parameters for calculating both assimilation rate and transpiration rate. Our results indicate a steady CO2 level of about 400 ppm for all sites and therefore suggest a decoupling of CO2 and cooling/warming events for the considered time slices.

Grein, Michaela; Oehm, Christoph; Konrad, Wilfried; Utescher, Torsten; Kunzmann, Lutz; Roth-Nebelsick, Anita

2013-04-01

274

Unusually strong nitric oxide descent in the Arctic middle atmosphere in early 2013 as observed by Odin/SMR  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The middle atmosphere has been affected by an exceptionally strong midwinter stratospheric sudden warming (SSW) during the Arctic winter 2012/2013. These unusual meteorological conditions led to a breakdown of the polar vortex, followed by the reformation of a strong upper stratospheric vortex associated with particularly efficient descent of air. Measurements by the Sub-Millimetre Radiometer (SMR), on board the Odin satellite, show that very large amounts of nitric oxide (NO), produced by Energetic Particle Precipitation (EPP) in the mesosphere/lower thermosphere (MLT), could thus enter the polar stratosphere in early 2013. The mechanism referring to the downward transport of EPP generated-NOx during winter is generally called the EPP indirect effect. SMR observed up to 20 times more NO in the upper stratosphere than the average NO measured at the same latitude, pressure and time during three previous winters where no mixing between mesospheric and stratospheric air was noticeable. This event turned out to be an unprecedently strong case of this effect. Our study is based on a comparison with the Arctic winter 2008/2009, when a similar situation was observed and which was so far considered as a record-breaking winter for this kind of events. This outstanding situation is the result of the combination between a relatively high geomagnetic activity and an unusually high dynamical activity, which makes this case a prime example to study the EPP impacts on the atmospheric composition.

Pérot, K.; Urban, J.; Murtagh, D. P.

2014-02-01

275

Unusually strong nitric oxide descent in the Arctic middle atmosphere in early 2013 as observed by Odin/SMR  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The middle atmosphere was affected by an exceptionally strong midwinter stratospheric sudden warming (SSW) during the Arctic winter 2012/2013. These unusual meteorological conditions led to a breakdown of the polar vortex, followed by the reformation of a strong upper stratospheric vortex associated with particularly efficient descent of air. Measurements by the submillimetre radiometer (SMR), on board the Odin satellite, show that very large amounts of nitric oxide (NO), produced by energetic particle precipitation (EPP) in the mesosphere/lower thermosphere (MLT), could thus enter the polar stratosphere in early 2013. The mechanism referring to the downward transport of EPP-generated NOx during winter is generally called the EPP indirect effect. SMR observed up to 20 times more NO in the upper stratosphere than the average NO measured at the same latitude, pressure and time during three previous winters where no mixing between mesospheric and stratospheric air was noticeable. This event turned out to be the strongest in the aeronomy-only period of SMR (2007-present). Our study is based on a comparison with the Arctic winter 2008/2009, when a similar situation was observed. This outstanding situation is the result of the combination of a relatively high geomagnetic activity and an unusually high dynamical activity, which makes this case a prime example to study the EPP impacts on the atmospheric composition.

Pérot, K.; Urban, J.; Murtagh, D. P.

2014-08-01

276

Anomalous Xenon in the Precambrian Nuclear Reactor in Okelobondo (Gabon): A Possible Connection to the Fission Component in the Terrestrial Atmosphere  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Some CFF-Xe (Chemically Fractionated Fission Xenon), whose isotopic composition is established by simultaneous decay and migration of radioactive fission products, is probably present in the Earth's lithosphere, a conclusion based on available Xe data from various crustal and mantle rocks . Our recent isotopic analysis of Xe in alumophosphate from zone 13 of Okelobondo (southern extension of Oklo), along with the independent estimation of the isotopic composition of atmospheric fission Xe , supports the hypothesis that CFF-Xe was produced on a planetary scale. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

Meshik, A. P.; Kehm, K.; Hohenberg, C. M.

1999-01-01

277

Changes in terrestrial carbon storage in China induced by multiple environmental stresses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

China, with a land area about equal to the United States and home to 1.3 billion people, is one of the less well understood regions of the world with respect to the global carbon cycle. Much uncertainty exists in the magnitudes, spatial and temporal patterns of terrestrial carbon sources and sinks in China and the underlying mechanisms. In the past decades, China's terrestrial ecosystems have experienced a complex set of multiple environmental stresses including changes in land-cover and land use, climate, chemistry of the atmosphere and precipitation, and magnitude of disturbances. However, little is known about how these multiple environmental stresses have affected terrestrial carbon dynamics in this region. Here we have developed a partnership between Chinese and US scientists to combine remote-sensing data and a set of ecosystem simulation models to examine how ecosystem carbon storage has changed as a result of multiple stresses and interactions among those stresses including land-cover change, climate variability, atmospheric composition (carbon dioxide and tropospheric ozone), precipitation chemistry (nitrogen composition), and fire disturbance using estimates of gross primary production (GPP), net primary production (NPP) and carbon storage from factorial simulation experiments with three terrestrial ecosystem models (Biome-BGC, DLEM and TEM). Model estimates along with spatial and temporal patterns of GPP, NPP and carbon storage have been compared to satellite-derived estimates of these carbon fluxes and pools. We have also evaluated our simulated results against data from field studies and forest and soil inventories in China. Our simulated results indicate that China's terrestrial ecosystems have acted as a small carbon sink since early 1980s, which largely results from contribution of elevated N deposition, CO2 fertilization, land management and afforestation. Carbon accumulation from above factors substantially exceeds carbon release due to extreme climate events, increasing O3, deforestation and urbanization. Our study implies that the capacity of carbon sequestration by China's terrestrial ecosystems could be enhanced by managing the air and land.

Tian, H.; Melillo, J.; Running, S.; Liu, J.; Liu, M.; Kicklighter, D.; Mu, Q.; Ren, W.; Lu, C.; Chen, G.; Xu, X.; Zhang, C.; Pan, S.; Zhao, M.; Myneni, R.; Song, X.

2008-12-01

278

Terrestrial Environment (Climatic) Criteria Handbook For Use in Aerospace Vehicle Development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An update of the NASA 'Terrestrial Environment (Climatic) Criteria Handbook for Use in Aerospace Vehicle Development' (NASA-HDBK-1001) is currently in the final process of completion for release in late-2004 or early 2005. The current version of the Handbook was approved by the NASA Chief Engineer in 2000 as a NASA Preferred Technical Standard. However, it was based on natural environment criteria developed mostly in the early 1990's. Therefore, a task was approved to completely update the Handbook in order to reflect the current state-of-the-art in the various terrestrial environmental climatic criteria areas. The technical areas include: Winds, atmospheric constituents, thermodynamic parameters/models/extremes, humidity, electricity, precipitation/fog/icing, cloud phenomena/cover, diffusion/toxic release, severe weather/tornado/hurricane, solar/thermal radiation, geologic hazards, and sea state. A summary of this extensive update will be presented along with some key examples of the new contents. Earlier versions of this publication have been extensively used by the aerospace community, especially program managers and design engineers for required natural terrestrial environment inputs to use in mission planning, development studies and trades, plus by those concerned with terrestrial environment descriptions for the major test ranges within the United States.

Johnson, Dale; Vaughan, William W.

2004-01-01

279

Nanophase Iron Oxides as an Ultraviolet Sunscreen for Ancient Photosynthetic Microbes: A Possible Link Between Early Organisms, Banded-Iron Formations, and the Oxygenation of the Atmosphere  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We propose that nanophase iron oxide-bearing materials provided important niches for ancient photosynthetic microbes on the early Earth that ultimately led to the oxygenation of the Earth s atmosphere and the formation of iron oxide deposits. Atmospheric oxygen and ozone attenuate UV radiation on the Earth today providing substantial protection for photosynthetic organisms. With ultraviolet radiation fluxes likely to have been even higher on the early Earth than today, accessing solar radiation was particularly risky for early organisms. Yet, we know that photosynthesis arose then and played a critical role in subsequent evolution. Of primary importance was protection at approx.250-290 nm, where peak nucleic acid (approx.260 nm) and protein (approx.280 nm) absorptions occur. Nanophase ferric oxide/oxyhydroxide minerals absorb, and thus block, the lethal UV radiation, while transmitting light through much of the visible and near-infrared regions of interest to photosynthesis (400 to 1100 nm). Further, they were available in early environments, and are synthesized by many organisms. Based on ferric oxide/oxyhydroxide spectral properties, likely geologic processes, and the results of experiments with the photosynthetic organisms, Euglena sp. and Chlumydomonus reinhardtii, we propose a scenario where photosynthesis, and ultimately the oxygenation of the atmosphere, depended on the protection of early microbes by nanophase ferric oxides/oxyhydroxides. The results of this study are also applicable to other potentially habitable iron-bearing planetary bodies because of the evolutionary pressure to utilize solar radiation when available as an energy source.

Bishop, Janice L.; Rothschild, Lynn J.; Rothschild, Lynn J.; Rogoff, Dana A.

2006-01-01

280

Spaceborne Microwave Remote Sensing of Seasonal Freeze-Thaw Processes in the Terrestrial High Latitudes: Relationships with Land-Atmosphere CO2 exchange  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Landscape transitions between seasonally frozen and thawed conditions occur each year over roughly 50 million square kilometers of Earth's Northern Hemisphere. These relatively abrupt transitions represent the closest analog to a biospheric and hydrologic on/off switch existing in nature, affecting surface meteorological conditions, ecological trace gas dynamics, energy exchange and hydrologic activity profoundly. We utilize time series satellite-borne microwave remote sensing measurements from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) to examine spatial and temporal variability in seasonal freeze/thaw cycles for the pan-Arctic basin and Alaska. Regional measurements of spring thaw timing are derived using daily brightness temperature measurements from the 19 GHz, horizontally polarized channel, separately for overpasses with 6 AM and 6 PM equatorial crossing times. Spatial and temporal patterns in regional freeze/thaw dynamics show distinct differences between North America and Eurasia, and boreal forest and Arctic tundra biomes. Annual anomalies in the timing of thawing in spring also correspond closely to seasonal atmospheric CO2 concentration anomalies derived from NOAA CMDL arctic and subarctic monitoring stations. Classification differences between AM and PM overpass data average approximately 5 days for the region, though both appear to be effective surrogates for monitoring annual growing seasons at high latitudes.

McDonald, Kyle C.; Kimball, John S.; Zhao, Maosheng; Njoku, Eni; Zimmermann, Reiner; Running, Steven W.

2004-01-01

281

Identification of Terrestrial Reflectance From Remote Sensing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Correcting for atmospheric effects is an essential part of surface-reflectance recovery from radiance measurements. Model-based atmospheric correction techniques enable an accurate identification and classification of terrestrial reflectances from multi-spectral imagery. Successful and efficient removal of atmospheric effects from remote-sensing data is a key factor in the success of Earth observation missions. This report assesses the performance, robustness and sensitivity of two atmospheric-correction and reflectance-recovery techniques as part of an end-to-end simulation of hyper-spectral acquisition, identification and classification.

Alter-Gartenberg, Rachel; Nolf, Scott R.; Stacy, Kathryn (Technical Monitor)

2000-01-01

282

The Influence of Terrestrial Environment on Meteorite Magnetic Records  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In early solar system history there are several electromagnetic processes expected that may be capable of magnetizing the primitive solid particles condensating from the Solar Nebula. The record of these magnetic events can be observed during laboratory studies of meteorites found on the Earth. Different terrestrial processes can affect the magneto mineralogy, can cause changes in magnetic parameters, and can overprint the primary magnetic record. The effect of surface heating (when falling through the atmosphere) was the subject of the study with the Murchison meteorite. Using the Allende meteorite we studied the effect of the shock pressure generated by the friction of the atmosphere during the meteorite fall. Some of the meteorites are found several days after the fall, some of them are deposited in the desert or on the Antarctic ice for thousands of years. Most of them contain visible traces of terrestrial oxidation and weathering. We used the sample of the LL chondrite found in the Libya desert (perhaps thousands years ago), sample of the iron meteorite Campo del Cielo (found in Argentina 5000 years after the fall), and sample of the H 5 Zebrak meteorite (found only several days after the fall) for weathering simulations. To document the results of our experiments we used low and high temperature measurements of magnetic susceptibility, measurements of magnetic remanence and its stability and hysteresis parameters. The results tell us, that the terrestrial processes are efficient factor in changing magnetic properties and can overprint the primary magnetic record. Therefore extreme care has to be taken when selecting samples for primary magnetic component study. Acknowledgements: This work is supported by Charles University Grant Agency, Czech Republic and would not be possible without the help of following people: Jakub Haloda, Petr Jakes, Marcela Bukovanska, Jaroslav Kadlec, Libuse Kohoutova, Vladimir Kohout.

Kohout, T.; Kletetschka, G.; Kobr, M.; Pruner, P.; Wasilewski, P. J.

2003-04-01

283

Expansion of voltage-dependent Na+ channel gene family in early tetrapods coincided with the emergence of terrestriality and increased brain complexity.  

PubMed

Mammals have ten voltage-dependent sodium (Nav) channel genes. Nav channels are expressed in different cell types with different subcellular distributions and are critical for many aspects of neuronal processing. The last common ancestor of teleosts and tetrapods had four Nav channel genes, presumably on four different chromosomes. In the lineage leading to mammals, a series of tandem duplications on two of these chromosomes more than doubled the number of Nav channel genes. It is unknown when these duplications occurred and whether they occurred against a backdrop of duplication of flanking genes on their chromosomes or as an expansion of ion channel genes in general. We estimated key dates of the Nav channel gene family expansion by phylogenetic analysis using teleost, elasmobranch, lungfish, amphibian, avian, lizard, and mammalian Nav channel sequences, as well as chromosomal synteny for tetrapod genes. We tested, and exclude, the null hypothesis that Nav channel genes reside in regions of chromosomes prone to duplication by demonstrating the lack of duplication or duplicate retention of surrounding genes. We also find no comparable expansion in other voltage-dependent ion channel gene families of tetrapods following the teleost-tetrapod divergence. We posit a specific expansion of the Nav channel gene family in the Devonian and Carboniferous periods when tetrapods evolved, diversified, and invaded the terrestrial habitat. During this time, the amniote forebrain evolved greater anatomical complexity and novel tactile sensory receptors appeared. The duplication of Nav channel genes allowed for greater regional specialization in Nav channel expression, variation in subcellular localization, and enhanced processing of somatosensory input. PMID:21148285

Zakon, Harold H; Jost, Manda C; Lu, Ying

2011-04-01

284

Estimating precipitation on early Mars using a radiative-convective model of the atmosphere and comparison with inferred runoff from geomorphology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We compare estimates of atmospheric precipitation during the Martian Noachian-Hesperian boundary 3.8 Gyr ago as calculated in a radiative-convective column model of the atmosphere with runoff values estimated from a geomorphological analysis of dendritic valley network discharge rates. In the atmospheric model, we assume CO2-H2O-N2 atmospheres with surface pressures varying from 20 mb to 3 bar with input solar luminosity reduced to 75% the modern value. Results from the valley network analysis are of the order of a few mm d-1 liquid water precipitation (1.5-10.6 mm d-1, with a median of 3.1 mm d-1). Atmospheric model results are much lower, from about 0.001-1 mm d-1 of snowfall (depending on CO2 partial pressure). Hence, the atmospheric model predicts a significantly lower amount of precipitated water than estimated from the geomorphological analysis. Furthermore, global mean surface temperatures are below freezing, i.e. runoff is most likely not directly linked to precipitation. Therefore, our results strongly favor a cold early Mars with episodic snowmelt as a source for runoff. Our approach is challenged by mostly unconstrained parameters, e.g. greenhouse gas abundance, global meteorology (for example, clouds) and planetary parameters such as obliquity - which affect the atmospheric result - as well as by inherent problems in estimating discharge and runoff on ancient Mars, such as a lack of knowledge on infiltration and evaporation rates and on flooding timescales, which affect the geomorphological data. Nevertheless, our work represents a first step in combining and interpreting quantitative tools applied in early Mars atmospheric and geomorphological studies.

von Paris, P.; Petau, A.; Grenfell, J. L.; Hauber, E.; Breuer, D.; Jaumann, R.; Rauer, H.; Tirsch, D.

2015-01-01

285

PASCAL - Planetary Atmospheres Spectral Catalog  

Microsoft Academic Search

Spectroscopic observation of planetary atmospheres, stellar atmospheres, comets, and the interstellar medium is the most powerful tool for extracting detailed information concerning the properties of these objects. The HITRAN molecular spectroscopic database1 has traditionally served researchers involved with terrestrial atmospheric problems, such as remote-sensing of constituents in the atmosphere, pollution monitoring at the surface, identification of sources seen through the

Laurence Rothman; Iouli Gordon

2010-01-01

286

Climate change effects on environment (marine, atmospheric and terrestrial) and human perception in an Italian Region (Marche) and the nearby northern Adriatic Sea.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An integrated analysis of recent climate change, including atmosphere, sea and land, as well as some of the impacts on society, has been conducted on the Marche Region in central Italy and the northern portion of the Adriatic Sea. The Marche Region is one of the 20 administrative divisions of Italy, located at a latitude approximately 43° North, with a total surface area of 9,366 km2 and 1,565,000 residents. The northern Adriatic Sea is the northernmost area of the Mediterranean Sea, and it has peculiar relevance for several aspects (environment, tourism, fisheries, economy). The collected environmental data included meteorological stations (daily maximum and minimum air temperature, daily precipitation), oceanographic stations (sea temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, nutrient salts concentration, chlorophyll) and river flows, over the last 50 years. The collected social data include 800 questionnaires and interviews carried out on selected samples of residents, decision-makers and emergency managers. These questionnaires and interviews aimed at highlighting the perception of climate change risks. The trend analysis of air temperature and precipitation data detailed an overall temperature increase in all seasons and rainfall decreases in Winter, Spring and Summer with Autumn increases, influencing river flow changes. Marine data showed a relevant warming of the water column in the period after 1990 in comparison with the previous period, particularly in the cold season. Surface salinity increased in Spring and Summer and strongly decreased in Autumn and Winter (according with the precipitation and river flow changes). These last mentioned changes, combined with anthropogenic effects, also influenced the marine ecosystems, with changes of nutrient salts, chlorophyll and dissolved oxygen. Changes in nutrient discharge from rivers influenced the average marine chlorophyll concentration reduction and the consequent average reduction of warm season hypoxic conditions. Indeed, all these changes influence several other aspects of the North Adriatic marine environment, such as coastal erosion, ecosystems, biological productivity, mucilage phenomena, harmful algal blooms, etc.. These impacts in the coastal areas are also evident inland. For example, the analysis of agro-meteorological extreme indices (aridity index, potential water deficit) suggests negative impacts in terms of soil deterioration and agricultural productivity, particularly evident in the area close to the coast. Finally, the analysis of social data revealed awareness among local residents of these impacts and associated risks connected to climate change. Yet, this awareness does not appear translated into long term adaptation plans. Apparently, the inability to define shared collective strategies is the result of a feeble sense of individual and institutional responsibility about climate matters, and ineffective information exchange among citizens, public administrators and the scientific community.

Appiotti, F.; Krzelj, M.; Marincioni, F.; Russo, A.

2012-04-01

287

Carbon dioxide exchange and early old-field succession  

Microsoft Academic Search

Old-field succession is a widespread process active in shaping landscapes in the eastern United States, contributing significantly to the terrestrial sink of atmospheric carbon dioxide, particularly at midlatitudes. However, few studies document ecosystem-scale carbon dioxide exchange during the early years of old-field succession, particularly during the temporal transition from cultivation to abandonment. Rates of carbon dioxide exchange were measured for

Ryan E. Emanuel; John D. Albertson; Howard E. Epstein; Christopher A. Williams

2006-01-01

288

Experimental investigation of anaerobic nitrogen fixation rates with varying pressure, temperature and metal concentration with application to the atmospheric evolution of early Earth and Mars.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The atmosphere of the early Earth is thought to have been significantly different than the modern composition of 21% O2 and 78% N2, yet the planet has been clearly established as hosting microbial life as far back as 3.8 billion years ago. As such, constraining the atmospheric composition of the early Earth is fundamental to establishing a database of habitable atmospheric compositions. A similar argument can be made for the planet Mars, where nitrates have been hypothesized to exist in the subsurface. During the early period on Mars when liquid water was likely more abundant, life may have developed to take advantage of available nitrates and a biologically-driven Martian nitrogen cycle could have evolved. Early Earth atmospheric composition has been investigated numerically, but only recently has the common assumption of a pN2 different than modern been investigated. Nonetheless, these latest attempts fail to take into account a key atmospheric parameter: life. On modern Earth, nitrogen is cycled vigorously by biology. The nitrogen cycle likely operated on the early Earth, but probably differed in the metabolic processes responsible, dominantly due to the lack of abundant oxygen which stabilizes oxidized forms of N that drive de-nitrification today. Recent advances in evolutionary genomics suggest that microbial pathways that are relatively uncommon today (i.e. vanadium and iron-based nitrogen fixation) probably played important roles in the early N cycle. We quantitatively investigate in the laboratory the effects of variable pressure, temperature and metal concentration on the rates of anoxic nitrogen fixation, as possible inputs for future models investigating atmospheric evolution, and better understand the evolution of the nitrogen cycle on Earth. A common anaerobic methanogenic archaeal species with i) a fully sequenced genome, ii) all three nitrogenases (molybdenum, vanadium and iron-based) and iii) the ability to be genetically manipulated will be used as a model species. This species will be genetically modified to create knock-out mutants lacking one or more nitrogenase genes. These mutants will be used in variable pressure, temperature and metal-concentration experiments. Nitrogen fixation rate and nitrogenase gene expression will be measured using isotope dilution and quantitative polymerase chain reaction, respectively.

Gupta, Prateek

2012-07-01

289

Terrestrial Environment (Climatic) Criteria Handbook for Use in Aerospace Vehicle Development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Aerospace Meteorology provides the identification of that aspect of meteorology that is concerned with the definition and modeling of atmospheric parameters for use in aerospace vehicle development, mission planning and operational capability assessments. One of the principal sources of this information is the NASA-HDBK-1001 "Terrestrial Environment (Climatic) Criteria Handbook for Use in Aerospace Vehicle Development'. This handbook was approved by the NASA Chief Engineer in 2000 as a NASA Preferred Technical Standard . Its technical contents were based on natural environment statistics/models and criteria developed mostly in the early 1990's. A task was approved to completely update the handbook to reflect the current state-of-the-art in the various terrestrial environment climatic areas.

Johnson, Dale L.; Vaughan, William W.

2004-01-01

290

The impact of early Holocene Arctic shelf flooding on climate in an atmosphere-ocean-sea-ice model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Glacial terminations are characterized by a strong rise in sea level related to melting ice sheets. This rise in sea level is not uniform all over the world, because regional effects (uplift and subsidence of coastal zones) are superimposed on global trends. During the early Holocene the Siberian Shelf became flooded before 7.5 ka BP and the coastline reached modern-day high stands at 5 ka BP. This area is currently known as a sea-ice production area and contributes significantly to the sea-ice exported from the Arctic through the Fram Strait. This leads to the following hypothesis: during times of rising sea levels, shelves become flooded, increasing sea-ice production on these shelves, increasing sea-ice volume and export through the Fram Strait and causing the sea-ice extent to advance in the Nordic Seas, yielding cooler and fresher sea surface conditions. We have tested this hypothesis in an atmosphere-ocean-sea-ice coupled model of intermediate complexity (LOVECLIM). Our experiment on early Holocene Siberian Shelf flooding shows that in our model sea-ice production in the Northern Hemisphere increases (15%) and that sea-ice extent in the Northern Hemisphere increases (14%) but sea-ice export decreases (-15%) contrary to our hypothesis. The reason of this unexpected behaviour has its origin in a weakened polar vortex, induced by the land-ocean changes due to the shelf flooding, and a resulting decrease of zonality in the Nordic Seas pressure regime. Hence the winter Greenland high and the Icelandic low strengthen, yielding stronger winds on both sides of the Nordic Seas. Increased winds along the East Greenland Current support local sea-ice production and transport towards the South, resulting in a wider sea-ice cover and a southward shift of convection areas. The overall strength of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation is reduced by 4% and the heat transport in the Atlantic basin by 7%, resulting in an annual cooling pattern over the Nordic Seas by up to -4 °C. We find that the flooding of the Siberian shelf resulting from an orbitally induced warming and related glacioeustatic sea level rise causes a Nordic Seas cooling feedback opposed to this warming.

Blaschek, M.; Renssen, H.

2013-11-01

291

The impact of early Holocene Arctic Shelf flooding on climate in an atmosphere-ocean-sea-ice model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Glacial terminations are characterized by a strong rise in sea level related to melting ice sheets. This rise in sea level is not uniform all over the world, because regional effects (uplift and subsidence of coastal zones) are superimposed on global trends. During the early Holocene the Siberian Shelf became flooded before 7.5 ka BP and the coastline reached modern-day high stands at 5 ka BP. This area is currently known as a sea-ice production area and contributes significantly to the sea-ice exported from the Arctic through the Fram Strait. This leads to the following hypothesis: during times of rising sea levels, shelves become flooded, increasing sea-ice production on these shelves, increasing sea-ice volume and export through Fram Strait and causing the sea-ice extent to advance in the Nordic Seas, yielding cooler and fresher sea surface conditions. We have tested this hypothesis in an ocean-sea-ice-atmosphere coupled model of intermediate complexity (LOVECLIM). Our results of an early Holocene Siberian Shelf flooding show that in our model the Northern Hemisphere sea-ice production is increased (15%) and that the Northern Hemisphere sea-ice extent increases (14%) contrary to our hypothesis with lower sea-ice export through Fram Strait (-15%). The reason of this unexpected behaviour has its origin in a weakened polar vortex, induced by the land-ocean changes due to the shelf flooding, and a resulting decrease of zonality in the Nordic Seas pressure regime. Hence the winter Greenland high and the Icelandic low strengthen, yielding stronger winds on both sides of the Nordic Seas. Increased winds along the East Greenland Current support local sea-ice production and transport towards the south, resulting in a wider sea-ice cover and a southward shift of convection areas. The overall strength of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation is reduced by 4% and the heat transport in the Atlantic basin by 7%, resulting in an annual cooling pattern over the Nordic Seas by up to -4 °C. We find that the flooding of the Siberian shelf as a result of an orbital induced warming, causing Northern Hemisphere ice sheets to melt and global sea level to rise, causes a Nordic Seas cooling feedback opposed to this warming.

Blaschek, M.; Renssen, H.

2013-07-01

292

Testing the opacity and equation of state of LTE and non-LTE model atmospheres with OPAL and OP data for early-type stars  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Context. Complex investigations of stars are made by studying their atmospheres, evolutionary states and oscillation properties, but the opacities and equation of state are still uncertain. Aims: Compatibility of model atmospheres with internal structure of early-type stars are investigated at photospheric and sub-photospheric regions. Methods: The problem was studied quantitatively by means of diagrams that involve the Rosseland-mean opacities, temperatures, densities, and gradients of radiation pressure as functions of depth using stellar atmosphere and envelope models. Results: Two new grids of radiative-equilibrium models of atmospheres were calculated assuming the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). The first one is based on Kurucz's ATLAS12 computer code implemented with the occupation probability formalism, which accounts for the destruction of loosely bound states of atoms by interactions with particles in the plasma. The second grid of models is based on monochromatic opacities and equations of state taken from the well-known international opacity project (OP). Non-LTE model atmospheres are also calculated and some aspects of the modeling are pointed out to improve agreement with ATLAS12, OP data, as well as with results of the Rogers & Iglesias OPAL opacity computing code (OPAL). The model atmospheres are also discussed by analyzing emerging fluxes of radiation. Conclusions: Commonly used LTE and non-LTE models of stellar atmospheres of early-type stars differ markedly from each other and do not fit OPAL or OP stellar envelope models at great optical depths. The results of the OP project distributed as the OPCD v 3.3 base are useful for calculating not only stellar envelopes but also fully line-blanketed LTE model atmospheres. These models have diagnostic values for studying the atomic physics used for modeling of photospheric and sub-photospheric regions of stars. The OPAL and OP opacities are markedly underestimated in comparison with the Rosseland-mean opacities taken from the Castelli & Kurucz (2003, IAU Symp., 210, 10) atmosphere models in which a new opacity bump appears at lgT ? 5.06. This additional opacity bump affects the OPAL- and OP-driving zone for stellar pulsations and therefore the new envelope models may markedly change predicted spectra of unstable oscillation modes. Differences between current non-LTE and LTE models based on the TLUSTY200 and ATLAS codes, respectively, cannot be assigned entirely to non-LTE effects, but for B stars they reflect mainly opacity effects.

Cugier, H.

2012-11-01

293

The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS): An Overview and Early Results from the 1994 Field Year  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Boreal Ecosystem Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) is large-scale international field experiment that has the goal of improving our understanding of the exchanges of radiative energy, heat water, CO2, and trace gases between the boreal forest and the lower atmosphere. An important objective of BORES is collect the data needed to improve computer simulation models of the processes controlling these exchanges

Piers Sellers; Forrest Hall; K. Jon Ranson; Hank Margolis; Bob Kelly; Dennis Baldocchi; Gerry den Hartog; Josef Cihlar; Michael G. Ryan; Barry Goodison; Patrick Crill; Dennis Lettenmaier; Diane E. Wickland

1995-01-01

294

Modern Microbial Ecosystems are a Key to Understanding Our Biosphere's Early Evolution and its Contributions To The Atmosphere and Rock Record  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The survival of our early biosphere depended upon efficient coordination anion- diverse microbial populations. Microbial mats exhibit a 3.46-billion-year fossil record, thus they are the oldest known ecosystems. Photosynthetic microbial mats were key because, today, sunlight powers more than 99 percent of global primary productivity. Thus photosynthetic ecosystems have affected the atmosphere profoundly and have created the most pervasive, easily-detected fossils. Photosynthetic biospheres elsewhere will be most detectible via telescopes or spacecraft. As a part of the Astrobiology Institute, our Ames Microbial Ecosystems group examines the roles played by ecological processes in the early evolution of our biosphere, as recorded in geologic fossils and in the macromolecules of living cells: (1) We are defining the microbial mat microenvironment, which was an important milieu for early evolution. (2) We are comparing mats in contrasting environments to discern strategies of adaptation and diversification, traits that were key for long-term survival. (3) We have selected sites that mimic key environmental attributes of early Earth and thereby focus upon evolutionary adaptations to long-term changes in the global environment. (4) Our studies of gas exchange contribute to better estimates of biogenic gases in Earth's early atmosphere. This group therefore directly addresses the question: How have the Earth and its biosphere influenced each other over time Our studies strengthen the systematics for interpreting the microbial fossil record and thereby enhance astrobiological studies of martian samples. Our models of biogenic gas emissions will enhance models of atmospheres that might be detected on inhabited extrasolar planets. This work therefore also addresses the question: How can other biospheres be recogniZed" Our choice of field sites helps us explore Earth's evolving early environment. For example, modern mats that occupy thermal springs and certain freshwater environments experience conditions such as low O2 and sulfate and high inorganic carbon and sulfide levels that resemble those of ancient marine environments. Later in history, both biologically-induced carbonate precipitation and the trapping and binding of suspended grains of carbonate became a dominant mechanism for carbonate deposition. Modern marine carbonate platforms and alkaline offer good examples of microbiologically-induced calcification. Both marine platforms and solar salterns illustrate microbially-driven trapping and binding. We are also exploring the effects of water composition upon the exchange of biogenic gases with the atmosphere.

DesMarais, David J.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

2000-01-01

295

How Mars lost its atmosphere  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

There is a widespread suspicion that Mars thin atmosphere is in some way attributable to the planet's size. Another possibility is that the atmosphere was never degassed or outgassed in the first place. I prefer escape. Hydrodynamic escape (vigorous thermal escape) and impact erosion (expulsion of atmosphere by impacts) are two processes that should have been operative early. Although in principle hydrodynamic escape could have shrunk Mars atmosphere a hundredfold while leaving the composition of the remnant atmosphere nearly unaltered, very high escape fluxes are required. The implicated escape mechanism must have been efficient, nearly non-fractionating, and vastly more potent for Mars than for Earth or Venus. Impact erosion is an appealing candidate. Noble gases are the obvious first test. Noble gases are the most volatile elements and so are the most likely to have been affected by impact erosion and the easiest to address quantitatively. Xenon in particular imposes three constraints on how Mars lost its atmosphere: (1) the very low abundance of nonradiogenic Xe abundance of nonradiogenic Xe compared to Earth, Venus, and likely meteoritic sources; (2) its nonradiogenic isotopes distinct from likely meteoritic sources; and (3) the relatively high absolute abundance of radiogenic daughter of the extinct radionuclide I-129 (half-life 17 Myr). In impact erosion, the first two become constraints on the composition, mass distribution, and orbital elements of the impactors. The third requires that Mars lost its nonradiogenic Xe early, probably before it was 100 Myr old. Impact erosion can explain Mars by any of three stories. (1) Mars in unlikely. In a sort of planetary brinkmanship, impact erosion almost removed the entire atmosphere but was arrested just in time. (2) Martian noble gases are cometary and cometary Xe is as isotopically mass fractionated as Martian and terrestrial Xe. This is most easily accomplished if a relatively thick geochemically controlled CO2 atmosphere protected trace atmophiles against escape. (3) Mars was indeed stripped of its early atmosphere but a small remnant was safely stored in the regolith, later released as a byproduct of water mobilization.

Zahnle, Kevin

1992-01-01

296

Possible climates on terrestrial exoplanets.  

PubMed

What kind of environment may exist on terrestrial planets around other stars? In spite of the lack of direct observations, it may not be premature to speculate on exoplanetary climates, for instance, to optimize future telescopic observations or to assess the probability of habitable worlds. To begin with, climate primarily depends on (i) the atmospheric composition and the volatile inventory; (ii) the incident stellar flux; and (iii) the tidal evolution of the planetary spin, which can notably lock a planet with a permanent night side. The atmospheric composition and mass depends on complex processes, which are difficult to model: origins of volatiles, atmospheric escape, geochemistry, photochemistry, etc. We discuss physical constraints, which can help us to speculate on the possible type of atmosphere, depending on the planet size, its final distance for its star and the star type. Assuming that the atmosphere is known, the possible climates can be explored using global climate models analogous to the ones developed to simulate the Earth as well as the other telluric atmospheres in the solar system. Our experience with Mars, Titan and Venus suggests that realistic climate simulators can be developed by combining components, such as a 'dynamical core', a radiative transfer solver, a parametrization of subgrid-scale turbulence and convection, a thermal ground model and a volatile phase change code. On this basis, we can aspire to build reliable climate predictors for exoplanets. However, whatever the accuracy of the models, predicting the actual climate regime on a specific planet will remain challenging because climate systems are affected by strong positive feedbacks. They can drive planets with very similar forcing and volatile inventory to completely different states. For instance, the coupling among temperature, volatile phase changes and radiative properties results in instabilities, such as runaway glaciations and runaway greenhouse effect. PMID:24664919

Forget, F; Leconte, J

2014-04-28

297

Recent patterns and mechanisms of carbon exchange by terrestrial ecosystems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Knowledge of carbon exchange between the atmosphere, land and the oceans is important, given that the terrestrial and marine environments are currently absorbing about half of the carbon dioxide that is emitted by fossil-fuel combustion. This carbon uptake is therefore limiting the extent of atmospheric and climatic change, but its long-term nature remains uncertain. Here we provide an overview of

J. I. House; K. A. Hibbard; P. Bousquet; P. Ciais; P. Peylin; B. H. Braswell; M. J. Apps; D. Baker; A. Bondeau; J. Canadell; G. Churkina; W. Cramer; A. S. Denning; C. B. Field; P. Friedlingstein; C. Goodale; M. Heimann; R. A. Houghton; J. M. Melillo; B. Moore; D. Murdiyarso; I. Noble; S. W. Pacala; I. C. Prentice; M. R. Raupach; P. J. Rayner; R. J. Scholes; W. L. Steffen; C. Wirth; D. S. Schimel

2001-01-01

298

Sources of Terrestrial Volatiles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Atmospheres are found enveloping those planets and satellites best able to hold them. The obvious conclusion is that volatile escape must have played nearly as great a role as volatile supply. A consequence of this view is that volatile supplies were probably much greater than the atmospheres that remain. The likeliest candidates are sources associated with the main events of planetary accretion itself such as volatile-rich planetesimals, or direct gravitational capture of nebular gases. Late asteroidal or cometary volatile-rich veneers are attractive, but they present quantitative difficulties. Comets in particular are inadequate, because the associated mass of stray comets that would have been scattered to the Oort Cloud or beyond is excessive. This difficulty applies to Uranus-Neptune planetesimals as well as to a putative massive early Kuiper Belt. Another potential problem with comets is that the D/H ratio in the three comets for which this has been measured is about twice that of Earth's oceans. Objects falling from a much augmented ancient asteroid belt remain a viable option, but timing is an issue: Can the depopulation of the asteroid belt be delayed long enough that it makes sense to talk of asteroids as a late veneer? Early accretion of asteroids as objects scattered into the maw of infant Earth makes more sense. Another appealing candidate population of volatile-rich objects for the inner solar system would be scattered planetesimals associated with the accretion of Jupiter, for two reasons: (1) Before there was Jupiter, there was no object in the solar system capable of expelling comets efficiently, and (2) the cross section of the inner solar system to stray objects was Greater when there were m many planetesimals.

Zahnle, K. J.; Dones, L.

1998-01-01

299

Responses of terrestrial aridity to global warming  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

dryness of terrestrial climate can be measured by the ratio of annual precipitation (P) to potential evapotranspiration (PET), where the latter represents the evaporative demand of the atmosphere, which depends on the surface air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, and available energy. This study examines how the terrestrial mean aridity responds to global warming in terms of P/PET using the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 transient CO2 increase to 2 × CO2 simulations. We show that the (percentage) increase (rate) in P averaged over land is ~1.7%/°C ocean mean surface air temperature increase, while the increase in PET is 5.3%/°C, leading to a decrease in P/PET (i.e., a drier terrestrial climate) by ~3.4%/°C. Noting a similar rate of percentage increase in P over land to that in evaporation (E) over ocean, we propose a framework for examining the change in P/PET, in which we compare the change in PET over land and E over ocean, both expressed using the Penman-Monteith formula. We show that a drier terrestrial climate is caused by (i) enhanced land warming relative to the ocean, (ii) a decrease in relative humidity over land but an increase over ocean, (iii) part of increase in net downward surface radiation going into the deep ocean, and (iv) different responses of PET over land and E over ocean for given changes in atmospheric conditions (largely associated with changes in temperatures). The relative contributions to the change in terrestrial mean aridity from these four factors are about 35%, 35%, 15%, and 15%, respectively. The slight slowdown of the surface wind over both land and ocean has little impact on the terrestrial mean aridity.

Fu, Qiang; Feng, Song

2014-07-01

300

Air atmospheric-pressure plasma-jet treatment enhances the attachment of human gingival fibroblasts for early peri-implant soft tissue seals on titanium dental implant abutments.  

PubMed

Abstract Objective. Although dental implants are commonly used for tooth restoration, there is a lack of studies of treatment regimens for preventing extra-oral infection and decreasing osseointegration failures by establishing early peri-implant soft tissue seals on titanium dental implant abutments. In this study, air atmospheric-pressure plasma-jet (AAPPJ) treatment was applied to titanium disks to assay the potential for early peri-implant soft tissue seals on titanium dental implant abutment. Materials and methods. After titanium disks were treated with AAPPJ for 10 s at 250, 500, 1000 and 1500 sccm, surface analysis was performed; the control group received air only or no treatment. Human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) were seeded onto the specimens for evaluating cell attachment and proliferation and adherent-cell morphology was visualized via confocal microscopy. Results. In AAPPJ-treated specimens, the water contact angle decreased according to increased flow rate. Oxygen composition increased in XPS, but no topographical changes were detected. The effect of AAPPJ treatment at 1000 sccm was apparent 2 mm from the treated spot, with a 20% increase in early cell attachment and proliferation. Adherent HGF on AAPPJ-treated specimens displayed a stretched phenotype with more vinculin formation than the control group. Conclusions. Within the limitations of this study, the results indicate that AAPPJ treatment may enhance the early attachment and proliferation of HGF for establishing early peri-implant soft tissue seals on titanium dental implant abutments with possible favorable effects of osseointegration of dental implant. PMID:25183251

Lee, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Yong-Hee; Choi, Eun-Ha; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

2015-01-01

301

Effects of an Early-Time Impact Generated Vapor Blast in the Martian Atmosphere: Formation of High-Latitude Pedestal Craters  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Following impact, vapor expansion creates an intense airblast that interacts with the ambient atmosphere. The resulting hemi-spherical shock wave leaves a signature on the surface that is dependent on initial atmospheric and surface conditions. Here we propose that the formation of pedestal craters (craters surrounded by an erosion-resistant pedestal) may be a direct consequence of extreme winds and elevated temperatures generated by such an impact-induced atmospheric blast. Pedestal craters, first recognized in Mariner 9 data, are a unique feature on Mars and likely a signature of near-surface volatiles. They are found at high latitudes (small pedestals, Amazonian to Late Hesperian in age) and in thick equatorial mantling deposits (larger pedestals, early Hesperian to Noachian in age). Previously suggested mechanisms for pedestal crater formation (e.g., wind: ejecta curtain vortices or vapor blast; and ejecta dust: armoring) do not provide a complete picture. The clear evidence for near-surface volatiles at high latitudes requires a re-evaluation of these alternative models. The results presented here suggest that a combined atmospheric blast/thermal model provides a plausible formation hypothesis.

Wrobel, K. E.; Schultz, P. H.; Crawford, D. A.

2005-01-01

302

Limitations of terrestrial life.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Questions of the suitability of other planets in the solar system for terrestrial organisms are discussed. It is found that life forms similar to terrestrial organisms but modified to fit the prevailing conditions could exist on Venus, Mars, and Jupiter. Of these, only in the case of Jupiter is there any evidence that life would have been able to evolve. Life on Jupiter would be restricted to the clouds. It is pointed out that life may have developed on other celestial bodies in forms which are quite dissimilar to terrestrial organisms with regard to their biochemistry.

Molton, P.

1973-01-01

303

Terrestrial Planet Finder  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Integrating and testing the proposed Terrestrial Planet Finder imposes constraints on the design. Some of these will be discussed including the dimensions of existing test facilities, the effects of gravity, ambient vibrations and the size of GSE optics.

Smith, Andrew

2004-01-01

304

Terrestrial photovoltaic measurements, 2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The following major topics are discussed; (1) Terrestrial solar irradiance; (2) Solar simulation and reference cell calibration; and (3) Cell and array measurement procedures. Numerous related subtopics are also discussed within each major topic area.

1976-01-01

305

Effect of increasing CO2 on the terrestrial carbon cycle.  

PubMed

Feedbacks from the terrestrial carbon cycle significantly affect future climate change. The CO2 concentration dependence of global terrestrial carbon storage is one of the largest and most uncertain feedbacks. Theory predicts the CO2 effect should have a tropical maximum, but a large terrestrial sink has been contradicted by analyses of atmospheric CO2 that do not show large tropical uptake. Our results, however, show significant tropical uptake and, combining tropical and extratropical fluxes, suggest that up to 60% of the present-day terrestrial sink is caused by increasing atmospheric CO2. This conclusion is consistent with a validated subset of atmospheric analyses, but uncertainty remains. Improved model diagnostics and new space-based observations can reduce the uncertainty of tropical and temperate zone carbon flux estimates. This analysis supports a significant feedback to future atmospheric CO2 concentrations from carbon uptake in terrestrial ecosystems caused by rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. This feedback will have substantial tropical contributions, but the magnitude of future carbon uptake by tropical forests also depends on how they respond to climate change and requires their protection from deforestation. PMID:25548156

Schimel, David; Stephens, Britton B; Fisher, Joshua B

2015-01-13

306

Global change and terrestrial hydrology - A review  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper reviews the role of terrestrial hydrology in determining the coupling between the surface and atmosphere. Present experience with interactive numerical simulation is discussed and approaches to the inclusion of land hydrology in global climate models ae considered. At present, a wide range of answers as to expected changes in surface hydrology is given by nominally similar models. Studies of the effects of tropical deforestation and global warming illustrate this point.

Dickinson, Robert E.

1991-01-01

307

Terrestrial and Extraterrestrial Fullerenes  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reviews reports of occurrences of fullerenes in circumstellar media, interstellar media, meteorites, interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), lunar rocks, hard terrestrial rocks from Shunga (Russia), Sudbury (Canada) and Mitov (Czech Republic), coal, terrestrial sediments from the Cretaceous?Tertiary?Boundary and Permian?Triassic?Boundary, fulgurite, ink sticks, dinosaur eggs, and a tree char. The occurrences are discussed in the context of known and postulated

D. Heymann; L. W. Jenneskens; J. Jehli?ka; Carola Koper; E. J. Vlietstra

2003-01-01

308

Methane production in terrestrial arthropods  

SciTech Connect

The authors have screened more than 110 representatives of the different taxa of terrestrial arthropods for methane production in order to obtain additional information about the origins of biogenic methane. Methanogenic bacteria occur in the hindguts of nearly all tropical representatives of millipedes (Diplopoda), cockroaches (Blattaria), termites (Isoptera), and scarab beetles (Scarabaeidae), while such methanogens are absent from 66 other arthropod species investigated. Three types of symbiosis were found: in the first type, the arthropod's hindgut is colonized by free methanogenic bacteria; in the second type, methanogens are closely associated with chitinous structures formed by the host's hindgut; the third type is mediated by intestinal anaerobic protists with intracellular methanogens. Such symbiotic associations are likely to be a characteristic property of the particular taxon. Since these taxa represent many families with thousands of species, the world populations of methane-producing arthropods constitute an enormous biomass. The authors show that arthropod symbionts can contribute substantially to atmospheric methane.

Hackstein, J.H.P.; Stumm, C.K. (Catholic Univ. of Nijmegen (Netherlands))

1994-06-07

309

Methane production in terrestrial arthropods.  

PubMed Central

We have screened more than 110 representatives of the different taxa of terrestrial arthropods for methane production in order to obtain additional information about the origins of biogenic methane. Methanogenic bacteria occur in the hindguts of nearly all tropical representatives of millipedes (Diplopoda), cockroaches (Blattaria), termites (Isoptera), and scarab beetles (Scarabaeidae), while such methanogens are absent from 66 other arthropod species investigated. Three types of symbiosis were found: in the first type, the arthropod's hindgut is colonized by free methanogenic bacteria; in the second type, methanogens are closely associated with chitinous structures formed by the host's hindgut; the third type is mediated by intestinal anaerobic protists with intracellular methanogens. Such symbiotic associations are likely to be a characteristic property of the particular taxon. Since these taxa represent many families with thousands of species, the world populations of methane-producing arthropods constitute an enormous biomass. We show that arthropod symbionts can contribute substantially to atmospheric methane. Images PMID:8202505

Hackstein, J H; Stumm, C K

1994-01-01

310

Abstracts for the International Workshop on Meteorite Impact on the Early Earth  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This volume contains abstracts that were accepted for presentation at the International Workshop on Meteorite Impact on the Early Earth, September 21-22, 1990, in Perth, Western Australia. The effects these impacts had on the young Earth are emphasized and a few of the topics covered are as follows: impact induced hot atmosphere, crater size and distribution, late heavy bombardment, terrestrial mantle and crust, impact damage, continental growth, volcanism, climate catastrophes, shocked quartz, and others.

1990-01-01

311

Abstracts for the International Workshop on Meteorite Impact on the Early Earth  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains abstracts that were accepted for presentation at the International Workshop on Meteorite Impact on the Early Earth, September 21-22, 1990, in Perth, Western Australia. The effects these impacts had on the young Earth are emphasized and a few of the topics covered are as follows: impact induced hot atmosphere, crater size and distribution, late heavy bombardment, terrestrial mantle and crust, impact damage, continental growth, volcanism, climate catastrophes, shocked quartz, and others.

Not Available

1990-09-01

312

The influence of terrestrial processes on meteorite magnetic records Tomas Kohout a,b,*, Gunther Kletetschka b,c,d  

E-print Network

The influence of terrestrial processes on meteorite magnetic records Tomas Kohout a,b,*, Gunther laboratory studies of meteorites found on the Earth. However, terrestrial environment can affect the magneto of a meteorite into the terrestrial atmosphere causes surface heating and pressure effects due to large initial

Kletetschka, Gunther

313

Remote sensing of the terrestrial environment using middle infrared radiation (3.0-5.0 µm)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The middle infrared (MIR) spectral region, between 3.0 and 5.0?µm in the electromagnetic spectrum, features a myriad of atmospheric windows. The favourable atmospheric penetration of electromagnetic radiation at MIR wavelengths has been readily noted. To exploit this atmospheric window, there have been several remote sensing instruments acquiring radiation from the terrestrial environment. However, these data remain under-utilized for terrestrial environmental

Doreen S. Boyd; Francois Petitcolin

2004-01-01

314

Terrestrial teleconnections link global rivers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present analyses of river discharge data from across the world, which we used to identify links between annual river flow regimes across different continents. Our hypothesis was that, as atmospheric processes are subject to large-scale teleconnection patterns, and because these atmospheric processes are inherently linked to precipitation regimes across the world, there should be identifiable links between river flow regimes driven by these atmospheric processes. We used discharge data from the Global Runoff Data Centre (GRDC) to identify cross-correlations (and accounted for serial dependence) between 23 of the world's largest river basins where overlapping data were available over a period of 12 years or more: two in South America; five in Africa; one in Australasia; five in North America and ten in Eurasia. The selected river basins drain approximately a third of the Earth's landmass at their furthest downstream gauging station. Where significant cross-correlations were found, we compared these to known patterns associated with the ENSO and NAO teleconnections. In total, 85 of the 253 possible correlations were deemed significant at p<0.05, this reduced to 36 at p<0.01 and 21 at p<0.001. Of the significant correlations (p<0.05), 22 were classified as strong (r ?× 0.5), 45 as moderate (×0.5< r ?×0.25) and 18 as weak (×0.25< r >0). We compared these significant cross-correlations with known atmospheric teleconnection patterns, and while these were consistent for the majority of cases, we found a number of significant correlations that are inconsistent with the anticipated effects of known atmospheric teleconnections. Our results provide new insight into the inter-continental links between global river systems and the way in which these are controlled by large-scale atmospheric processes. We suggest this may be useful for global industries, such as insurers or aid agencies, who seek to understand correlations between the magnitudes of extreme events across different regions of the world. For the former, this may enable more efficient management of global liabilities, for the latter it may enable better logistical planning of disaster relief requirements. Aside from these practical applications, the results also suggest teleconnections exist between terrestrial, as well as ocean and atmospheric water systems.

O'Loughlin, F.; Howden, N. J.; Woods, R. A.; Bates, P. D.

2013-12-01

315

Cometary origin of carbon and water on the terrestrial planets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An early high-temperature phase of the protosolar accretion disk is implied by at least three different telltales in chondrites and confirmed by peculirities in the dust grains of comet Halley. The existence of this high-temperature phase implies a large accretion rate hence a massive early disk. This clarifies the origin of the Kuiper Belt and of the Oort cloud, those two cometary populations of different symmetry that subsist today. Later, when the dust sedimented and was removed from the thermal equilibrium with the gas phase, a somewhat lower temperature of the disk explains the future planets' densities as well as the location beyond 2.6 AU of the carbonaceous chondrite chemistry. This lower temperature remains however large enough to require an exogenous origin for all carbon and all water now present in the Earth. The later orbital diffusion of planetesimals, which is required by protoplanetary growth, is needed to explain the origin of the terrestrial biosphere (atmosphere, oceans, carbonates and organic compounds) by a veneer mostly made of comets.

Delsemme, A. H.

1992-07-01

316

Effects Of An Extreme Arctic Sea Ice Minimum On the Northern Hemisphere Atmosphere During Late Autumn and Early Winter  

Microsoft Academic Search

Substantial decreases in the minimum Northern Hemisphere summer sea ice extent have been observed over the past several decades. An analysis of the influence of declining Arctic Sea Ice cover on the atmosphere is presented, specifically during the October\\/November following an extreme summer minimum event. Using ensemble simulations from the Weather Research and Forecast model (v 3.0.1), we compare the

S. T. Strey; W. Chapman; J. Walsh

2009-01-01

317

Atmospheric Spread of Foot-and-mouth Disease During The Early Phase of The Uk Epidemic 2001  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious viral disease in cloven-hoofed domesticated and wild animals. The highly contagious nature of FMD is a reflection of the wide range of species which are susceptible, the enormous quantities of virus liberated by infected animals, the range of excretions and secretions which can be infectious, the stability of the virus in the environment, the multiplicity of routes of infection and the very small doses of virus that can initiate infection in susceptible hosts. One of the routes for the spread of the disease is the atmospheric dispersion of virus exhaled by infected animals. Such spread can be rapid and extensive, and it is known in certain circumstances to have occurred over a distance of several hundred kilometres. For the FMD epidemic in UK in 2001, atmospheric dispersion models were applied in real time in order to describe the atmospheric dispersion of virus for the larger outbreaks of the disease. The operational value of such modelling is first of all to identify risk zones, which is helpful to the emergency management. The paper addresses the modelling techniques and presents results related with the epidemic in UK in 2001.

Sørensen, J. H.; Mikkelsen, T.; Astrup, P.; Alexandersen, S.; Donaldson, A. I.

318

Constraining uncertainties in terrestrial carbon cycle modeling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Global climate models differ in their representation of uptake of CO2 in the biosphere. Our study focuses on constraining the uncertainty in terrestrial carbon cycle modeling by comparing climate model results to observed atmospheric CO2 concentrations. The goal is to improve the representations of the seasonal cycle of terrestrial carbon uptake in the land model. We use the NCAR Community Earth System Model (CESM) climate components CLM4CN and CAM4 to run a prognostic version of the coupled land-atmosphere model where the atmospheric CO2 concentration in CAM4 is interactively calculated. Atmospheric CO2 concentrations from the model are compared to observations provided by flux towers in the AMERIFLUX network through the FLUXNET database and from the WDCGG for year 2000. We compare model results from sensitivity studies using different Q10 and Vcmax parameterizations, which are important functions in calculating plant growth. The carbon uptake in the biosphere is also under anthropogenic influence through emission of nitrogen and ozone from air pollution. Whereas nitrogen limitations in the soil reduce land ecosystem response to increasing CO2 concentrations, nitrogen from anthropogenic emissions increases the nitrogen availability and hence stimulates plant growth. These two nitrogen effects as well as the damaging impact on plants due to tropospheric ozone fertilization have been included in this study.

Kvalevåg, M.; Myhre, G.

2011-12-01

319

Interworking evolution of mobile satellite and terrestrial networks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

There is considerable interest among mobile satellite service providers in interworking with terrestrial networks to provide a universal global network. With such interworking, subscribers may be provided a common set of services such as those planned for the Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN), the Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN), and future Intelligent Networks (IN's). This paper first reviews issues in satellite interworking. Next the status and interworking plans of terrestrial mobile communications service providers are examined with early examples of mobile satellite interworking including a discussion of the anticipated evolution towards full interworking between mobile satellite and both fixed and mobile terrestrial networks.

Matyas, R.; Kelleher, P.; Moller, P.; Jones, T.

1993-01-01

320

Abiotic nitrogen fixation on terrestrial planets: reduction of NO to ammonia by FeS.  

PubMed

Understanding the abiotic fixation of nitrogen and how such fixation can be a supply of prebiotic nitrogen is critical for understanding both the planetary evolution of, and the potential origin of life on, terrestrial planets. As nitrogen is a biochemically essential element, sources of biochemically accessible nitrogen, especially reduced nitrogen, are critical to prebiotic chemistry and the origin of life. Loss of atmospheric nitrogen can result in loss of the ability to sustain liquid water on a planetary surface, which would impact planetary habitability and hydrological processes that shape the surface. It is known that NO can be photochemically converted through a chain of reactions to form nitrate and nitrite, which can be subsequently reduced to ammonia. Here, we show that NO can also be directly reduced, by FeS, to ammonia. In addition to removing nitrogen from the atmosphere, this reaction is particularly important as a source of reduced nitrogen on an early terrestrial planet. By converting NO directly to ammonia in a single step, ammonia is formed with a higher product yield (~50%) than would be possible through the formation of nitrate/nitrite and subsequent conversion to ammonia. In conjunction with the reduction of NO, there is also a catalytic disproportionation at the mineral surface that converts NO to NO? and N?O. The NO? is then converted to ammonia, while the N?O is released back in the gas phase, which provides an abiotic source of nitrous oxide. PMID:22283408

Summers, David P; Basa, Ranor C B; Khare, Bishun; Rodoni, David

2012-02-01

321

Terrestrial cooling in Northern Europe during the Eocene–Oligocene transition  

PubMed Central

Geochemical and modeling studies suggest that the transition from the “greenhouse” state of the Late Eocene to the “icehouse” conditions of the Oligocene 34–33.5 Ma was triggered by a reduction of atmospheric pCO2 that enabled the rapid buildup of a permanent ice sheet on the Antarctic continent. Marine records show that the drop in pCO2 during this interval was accompanied by a significant decline in high-latitude sea surface and deep ocean temperature and enhanced seasonality in middle and high latitudes. However, terrestrial records of this climate transition show heterogeneous responses to changing pCO2 and ocean temperatures, with some records showing a significant time lag in the temperature response to declining pCO2. We measured the ?47 of aragonite shells of the freshwater gastropod Viviparus lentus from the Solent Group, Hampshire Basin, United Kingdom, to reconstruct terrestrial temperature and hydrologic change in the North Atlantic region during the Eocene–Oligocene transition. Our data show a decrease in growing-season surface water temperatures (?10 °C) during the Eocene–Oligocene transition, corresponding to an average decrease in mean annual air temperature of ?4–6 °C from the Late Eocene to Early Oligocene. The magnitude of cooling is similar to observed decreases in North Atlantic sea surface temperature over this interval and occurs during major glacial expansion. This suggests a close linkage between atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations, Northern Hemisphere temperature, and expansion of the Antarctic ice sheets. PMID:23610424

Hren, Michael T.; Sheldon, Nathan D.; Grimes, Stephen T.; Collinson, Margaret E.; Hooker, Jerry J.; Bugler, Melanie; Lohmann, Kyger C.

2013-01-01

322

Overview of terrestrial thermionics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The application of the thermionic energy conversion systems first designed for spacecraft to terrestrial energy systems entails the development of a method for the protection of the high temperature refractory metals employed from the ambient air. A trilayer structure consisting of a tungsten emitter, a silicon carbide protective layer, and an intermediate graphite substrate, has been fabricated by means of

F. Huffman

1983-01-01

323

Solar-Terrestrial Predictions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Volume 1: The following subject areas are covered: the magnetosphere environment; forecasting magnetically quiet periods; radiation hazards to human in deep space (a summary with special reference to large solar particle events); solar proton events (review and status); problems of the physics of solar-terrestrial interactions; prediction of solar proton fluxes from x-ray signatures; rhythms in solar activity and the prediction

R. J. Thompson; D. G. Cole; P. J. Wilkinson; M. A. Shea; D. Smart

1990-01-01

324

Terrestrials Dwarf Planets  

E-print Network

Terrestrials Gas Giants Ice Giants Dwarf Planets The Solar System #12;Neptune Uranus Saturn Jupiter Density: 3900 ­ 5500 kg m-3 #12;Jupiter 318 ME 5.2 AU Uranus 15 ME 19.6 AUSaturn 95 ME 9.5 AU Neptune 17 3.88 RE Uranus Neptune Uranus and Neptune are Ice Giants made mostly of ices with thin Hydrogen

Gaudi, B. Scott

325

ExtraTerrestrial Intelligence  

E-print Network

SETI Search for ExtraTerrestrial Intelligence I know perfectly well that at this moment the whole, The Madwoman of Chaillot #12;Options Passive SETI: Listen Active SETI: Transmit #12;Search Strategies Suppose you find a civilization. You want to communicate. How? #12;Search Strategies There are two issues: A

Walter, Frederick M.

326

Terrestrial cosmic rays  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reviews the basic physics of those cosmic rays which can affect terrestrial electronics. Cosmic rays at sea level consist mostly of neutrons, protons, pions, muons, electrons, and photons. The particles which cause significant soft fails in electronics are those particles with the strong interaction: neutrons, protons, and pions. At sea level, about 95% of these particles are neutrons.

James F. Ziegler

1996-01-01

327

Terrestrial analogs to Mars  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

It is well recognized that interpretations of Mars must begin with the Earth as a reference. The most successful comparisons have focused on understanding geologic processes on the Earth well enough to extrapolate to Mars' environment. Several facets of terrestrial analog studies have been pursued and are continuing.

Farr, T. G.; Arcone, S.; Arvidson, R.; Baker, V.; Barlow, N.; Beaty, D.; Bell, M.; Blankenship, D.; Bridges, N.; Briggs, G.; Bulmer, M.; Carsey, F.; Clifford, S.; Craddock, R.; Dickerson, P.; Duxbury, N.

2002-01-01

328

A catalog of atmospheric densities from the drag on five balloon satellites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A catalog of atmospheric densities derived for the drag on five balloon satellites is presented. Much of the catalog was based on precisely reduced Baker-Nunn observations and, for that reason, provides much improved time resolution. The effect of direct solar radiation pressure was precisely evaluated, and that of terrestrial radiation pressure was included in every case. The interval covered for each satellite varies between 3.1 and 7.6 years, with the data extending from early 1961 to early 1973.

Jacchia, L. G.; Slowey, J. W.

1975-01-01

329

Biological fixation of atmospheric nitrogen in the Mediterranean Sea  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nutrient concentration in the Mediterranean Sea is controlled by water exchanges through the Strait of Gibraltar and by atmospheric and terrestrial inputs. Various peculiarities in the nitrogen and phosphorus geochemical cycles are pointed out, namely a low N:P atomic ratio (6.4) in terrestrial discharges, and a budget well balanced for phosphorus (where terrestrial discharges amount to about 80% of the

J. PIERRE BÉTHOUX; G. Copin-Montegut

1986-01-01

330

Volcanic ash - Terrestrial versus extraterrestrial  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A principal difference between terrestrial and extraterrestrial lavas may consist in the greater ability of terrestrial lavas to form thin films (like those of soap bubbles) and hence foams. It would follow that, in place of the pumice and spiny shards found in terrestrial volcanic ash, an extraterrestrial ash should contain minute spherules. This hypothesis may help to explain lunar microspherules.

Okeefe, J. A.

1976-01-01

331

Arsenic Speciation of Terrestrial Invertebrates  

Microsoft Academic Search

The distribution and chemical form (speciation) of arsenic in terrestrial food chains determines both the amount of arsenic available to higher organisms, and the toxicity of this metalloid in affected ecosystems. Invertebrates are part of complex terrestrial food webs. This paper provides arsenic concentrations and arsenic speciation profiles for eight orders of terrestrial invertebrates collected at three historical gold mine

Maeve M. Moriarty; Iris Koch; Robert A. Gordon; Kenneth J. Reimer

2009-01-01

332

Early Spacelab physics and astronomy missions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Some of the scientific problems which will be investigated during the early Spacelab physics and astronomy missions are reviewed. The Solar Terrestrial Programs will include the Solar Physics Spacelab Payloads (SPSP) and the Atmospheres, Magnetospheres and Plasmas in Space (AMPS) missions. These missions will study the sun as a star and the influence of solar phenomena on the earth, including sun-solar wind interface, the nature of the solar flares, etc. The Astrophysics Spacelab Payloads (ASP) programs are divided into the Ultraviolet-Optical Astronomy and the High Energy Astrophysics areas. The themes of astrophysics Spacelab investigations will cover the nature of the universe, the fate of matter and the life cycles of stars. The paper discusses various scientific experiments and instruments to be used in the early Spacelab missions.

Chapman, R. D.

1976-01-01

333

Evidence for decadal variation in global terrestrial evapotranspiration between 1982 and 2002: 2. Results  

Microsoft Academic Search

Terrestrial evapotranspiration (ET) cools the surface and moistens the atmosphere near the Earth's surface. Variations in this important climate factor have major environmental and socioeconomic impacts. How terrestrial ET has varied in the past and what caused the variations, however, have remained quite uncertain. These issues are addressed by calculating monthly global ET from 1982 to 2002 at 1120 globally

Kaicun Wang; Robert E. Dickinson; Martin Wild; Shunlin Liang

2010-01-01

334

Reconciling apparent inconsistencies in estimates of terrestrial CO2 sources and sinks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The magnitude and location of terrestrial carbon sources and sinks remains subject to large uncertainties. Estimates of terrestrial CO2 fluxes from ground-based inventory measurements typically find less carbon uptake than inverse model calculations based on atmospheric CO2 measurements, while a wide range of results have been obtained using models of different types. However, when full account is taken of the

J. I. House; I. C. Prentice; N. Ramankutty; R. A. Houghton; M. Heimann

2003-01-01

335

Assessment of Present-Day vs. Lateglacial/Early Holocene climate variability and atmospheric CO2 changes from tree-ring stable isotope time series  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Younger Dryas interval during the Last Glacial Termination was an abrupt return to glacial-like conditions punctuating the transition to a warmer, interglacial climate. Despite recent advances in the layer counting of ice-core records of the termination, the timing and length of the Younger Dryas remain controversial. Late Glacial and early Holocene tree-ring chronologies are rare, however, they contain valuable information about past environmental conditions at annual time resolution. Changes in tree-ring growth rates can be related to past climate anomalies and changes in the carbon and oxygen isotope composition of tree-ring cellulose reflect atmospheric and hydrospheric changes. We are investigating a 600-year (13100 - 12500 cal BP) absolutely dated dendrochronological record of Late Glacial and Early Holocene chronologies of scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) from subfossil tree remnants from Barbiers River (Moyenne Durance, Southern French Alps), as well as from Swiss (Dättnau, Landikon and Gänziloh) and German (Cottbus) sites. Dendro-ecological parameters, such as ring width and stable isotope variations (? 13C und ? 18O) are used to infer past environmental conditions. We will present our first oxygen isotope records from tree rings reflecting the environmental changes of a ca. 300 year period between 12790 - 12478 cal BP.

Pieper, H.; Helle, G.; Brauer, A.; Kaiser, K. F.; Miramont, C.

2012-12-01

336

Terrestrial-marine teleconnections in the Devonian: links between the evolution of land plants, weathering processes, and marine anoxic events  

PubMed Central

The Devonian Period was characterized by major changes in both the terrestrial biosphere, e.g. the evolution of trees and seed plants and the appearance of multi-storied forests, and in the marine biosphere, e.g. an extended biotic crisis that decimated tropical marine benthos, especially the stromatoporoid-tabulate coral reef community. Teleconnections between these terrestrial and marine events are poorly understood, but a key may lie in the role of soils as a geochemical interface between the lithosphere and atmosphere/hydrosphere, and the role of land plants in mediating weathering processes at this interface. The effectiveness of terrestrial floras in weathering was significantly enhanced as a consequence of increases in the size and geographic extent of vascular land plants during the Devonian. In this regard, the most important palaeobotanical innovations were (1) arborescence (tree stature), which increased maximum depths of root penetration and rhizoturbation, and (2) the seed habit, which freed land plants from reproductive dependence on moist lowland habitats and allowed colonization of drier upland and primary successional areas. These developments resulted in a transient intensification of pedogenesis (soil formation) and to large increases in the thickness and areal extent of soils. Enhanced chemical weathering may have led to increased riverine nutrient fluxes that promoted development of eutrophic conditions in epicontinental seaways, resulting in algal blooms, widespread bottomwater anoxia, and high sedimentary organic carbon fluxes. Long-term effects included drawdown of atmospheric pCO2 and global cooling, leading to a brief Late Devonian glaciation, which set the stage for icehouse conditions during the Permo-Carboniferous. This model provides a framework for understanding links between early land plant evolution and coeval marine anoxic and biotic events, but further testing of Devonian terrestrial-marine teleconnections is needed.

Algeo, T. J.

1998-01-01

337

Terrestrial Fe-oxide Concretions and Mars Blueberries: Comparisons of Similar Advective and Diffusive Chemical Infiltration Reaction Mechanisms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Abundant iron oxide concretions occurring in Navajo Sandstone of southern Utah and those discovered at Meridiani Planum, Mars share many common observable physical traits such as their spheriodal shapes, occurrence, and distribution patterns in sediments. Terrestrial concretions are products of interaction between oxygen-rich aquifer water and basin-derived reducing (iron-rich) water. Water-rock interaction simulations show that diffusion of oxygen and iron supplied by slow-moving water is a reasonable mechanism for producing observed concretion patterns. In short, southern Utah iron oxide concretions are results of Liesegang-type diffusive infiltration reactions in sediments. We propose that the formation of blueberry hematite concretions in Mars sediments followed a similar diagenetic mechanism where iron was derived from the alteration of volcanic substrate and oxygen was provided by the early Martian atmosphere. Although the terrestrial analog differs in the original host rock composition, both the terrestrial and Mars iron-oxide precipitation mechanisms utilize iron and oxygen interactions in sedimentary host rock with diffusive infiltration of solutes from two opposite sources. For the terrestrial model, slow advection of iron-rich water is an important factor that allowed pervasive and in places massive precipitation of iron-oxide concretions. In Mars, evaporative flux of water at the top of the sediment column may have produced a slow advective mass-transfer mechanism that provided a steady source and the right quantity of iron. The similarities of the terrestrial and Martian systems are demonstrated using a water-rock interaction simulator Sym.8, initially in one-dimensional systems. Boundary conditions such as oxygen content of water, partial pressure of oxygen, and supply rate of iron were varied. The results demonstrate the importance of slow advection of water and diffusive processes for producing diagenetic iron oxide concretions.

Park, A. J.; Chan, M. A.

2006-12-01

338

75 FR 57263 - New Policy Announcing That Traditional Horizontal Survey Projects Performed With Terrestrial...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Survey Projects Performed With Terrestrial Survey Techniques Will No Longer Be Accepted for Processing or Loading Into NGS Databases AGENCY: National Geodetic Survey (NGS), National Ocean Service (NOS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric...

2010-09-20

339

THE DEFINITION AND INTERPRETATION OF TERRESTRIAL ENVIRONMENT DESIGN INPUTS FOR VEHICLE DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The description and interpretation of the terrestrial environment (0-90 km altitude) is an important driver of aerospace vehicle structural, control, and thermal system design. NASA is currently in the process of reviewing the meteorological information acquired over the past decade and producing an update to the 1993 Terrestrial Environment Guidelines for Aerospace Vehicle Design and Development handbook. This paper addresses the contents of this updated handbook, with special emphasis on new material being included in the areas of atmospheric thermodynamic models, wind dynamics, atmospheric composition, atmospheric electricity, cloud phenomena, atmospheric extremes, sea state, etc. In addition, the respective engineering design elements will be discussed relative to the importance and influence of terrestrial environment inputs that require consideration and interpretation for design applications. Specific lessons learned that have contributed to the advancements made in the acquisition, interpretation, application and awareness of terrestrial environment inputs for aerospace engineering applications are discussed.

Johnson, Dale L.; Keller, Vernon W.; Vaughan, William W.

2005-01-01

340

Classification and generation of terrestrial rare gases  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A Kr-84/Xe-130 versus Ne-20/Ar-36 diagram is a very useful format with which to study the elemental ratios of rare gases from terrestrial materials. It can separate not only the three types of rare gases which Ozima and Alexander (1976) classified but also the 'planetary' type rare gases from the other three types of rare gases. When all the available terrestrial rare gas data are plotted in a Kr-84/Xe-130 versus Ne-20/Ar-36 diagram, several observations can be made. First, most of the analyses of rare gases from shales yield Kr-84/Xe-130 ratios between the 'planetary' and atmospheric values. If, however, the atmosphere's high Kr-84/Xe-130 ratio was produced by the selective adsorption of xenon onto shales from an initially 'planetary' atmosphere, as is widely accepted, then the Kr-84/Xe-130 ratio in shales should be even lower than the 'planetary' value. Second, the rare gas pattern in the quenched rims of submarine basalts may be explained as fractionated samples of the rare gases in sea water.

Saito, K.

1978-01-01

341

The Terrestrial Planet Finder  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) missions has as its goal the detection and characterization of earth-like planets around nearby stars. NASA is currently funding a number of small studies to look at the trade-offs in the design of TPF. The possible trade-offs include orbit location (1 to 5 AU), aperture size (6 to 1.5m), physically connected baselines or separated spacecraft flying in close formation.

Beichman, Charles

1997-01-01

342

Photochemistry in planetary atmospheres  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Widely varying paths of evolutionary history, atmospheric processes, solar fluxes, and temperatures have produced vastly different planetary atmospheres. The similarities and differences between the earth atmosphere and those of the terrestrial planets (Venus and Mars) and of the Jovian planets are discussed in detail; consideration is also given to the photochemistry of Saturn, Uranus, Pluto, Neptune, Titan, and Triton. Changes in the earth's ancient atmosphere are described, and problems of interest in the earth's present troposphere are discussed, including the down wind effect, plume interactions, aerosol nucleation and growth, acid rain, and the fate of terpenes. Temperature fluctuations in the four principal layers of the earth's atmosphere, predicted decreases in the ozone concentration as a function of time, and spectra of particles in the earth's upper atmosphere are also presented. Finally, the vertical structure of the Venus cloud system and the thermal structure of the Jovian planets are shown graphically.

Levine, J. S.; Graedel, T. E.

1981-01-01

343

Ozone generation by rock fracture: Earthquake early warning?  

SciTech Connect

We report the production of up to 10 ppm ozone during crushing and grinding of typical terrestrial crust rocks in air, O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} at atmospheric pressure, but not in helium or nitrogen. Ozone is formed by exoelectrons emitted by high electric fields, resulting from charge separation during fracture. The results suggest that ground level ozone produced by rock fracture, besides its potential health hazard, can be used for early warning in earthquakes and other catastrophes, such as landslides or land shifts in excavation tunnels and underground mines.

Baragiola, Raul A.; Dukes, Catherine A.; Hedges, Dawn [Engineering Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)

2011-11-14

344

Terrestrial Effects of High Energy Cosmic Rays  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

On geological timescales, the Earth is likely to be exposed to an increased flux of high energy cosmic rays (HECRs) from astrophysical sources such as nearby supernovae, gamma ray bursts or by galactic shocks. These high-energy particles strike the Earth's atmosphere initiating an extensive air shower. As the air shower propagates deeper, it ionizes the atmosphere by producing charged secondary particles. Increased ionization could lead to changes in atmospheric chemistry, resulting in ozone depletion. This could increase the flux of solar UVB radiation at the surface, which is potentially harmful to living organisms. Increased ionization affects the global electrical circuit can could possibly enhance the low-altitude cloud formation rate. Secondary particles such as muons and thermal neutrons produced as a result of nuclear interactions are able to reach the ground, enhancing the biological radiation dose. The muon flux dominates radiation dose from cosmic rays causing DNA damage and increase in the mutation rates, which can have serious biological implications for terrestrial and sub-terrestrial life. This radiation dose is an important constraint on the habitability of a planet. Using CORSIKA, we perform massive computer simulations and construct lookup tables from 10 GeV - 1 PeV primaries (1 PeV - 0.1 ZeV in progress), which can be used to quantify these effects. These tables are freely available to the community and can be used for other studies, not necessarily relevant to Astrobiology. We use these tables to study the terrestrial implications of galactic shock generated by the infall of our galaxy toward the Virgo cluster. This could be a possible mechanism explaining the observed periodicity in biodiversity in paleobiology databases.

Atri, Dimitra

2011-01-01

345

Siberian Peatlands a Net Carbon Sink and Global Methane Source Since the Early Holocene  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Interpolar methane gradient (IPG) data from ice cores suggest the ``switching on'' of a major Northern Hemisphere methane source in the early Holocene. Extensive data from Russia's West Siberian Lowland show (i) explosive, widespread peatland establishment between 11.5 and 9 thousand years ago, predating comparable development in North America and synchronous with increased atmospheric methane concentrations and IPGs, (ii) larger carbon stocks than previously thought (70.2 Petagrams, up to ~26% of all terrestrial carbon accumulated since the Last Glacial Maximum), and (iii) little evidence for catastrophic oxidation, suggesting the region represents a long-term carbon dioxide sink and global methane source since the early Holocene.

Smith, L. C.; MacDonald, G. M.; Velichko, A. A.; Beilman, D. W.; Borisova, O. K.; Frey, K. E.; Kremenetski, K. V.; Sheng, Y.

2004-01-01

346

NSF's solar-terrestrial research program and RISE. [RISE (Radiative Inputs of the Sun to Earth)  

Microsoft Academic Search

SunRISE has become a top priority proposed initiative for solar terrestrial science at NSF. NSF's priorities include People, Education, Infrastructure, and Competitiveness in Science. Within NSF's Atmospheric Division, the Solar Terrestrial (ST) Program considers the Sun as the principle driver of dynamic phenomena in the atmospheric and geospace environments. The ST [open quotes]Core[close quotes] program will place increased emphasis on

Schatten

1992-01-01

347

On the chaotic nature of solar-terrestrial environment: Interplanetary Alfvén intermittency  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present an overview of observational and theoretical evidence of chaos and intermittency in the solar-terrestrial environment including solar dynamo, solar atmosphere, solar wind, and terrestrial magnetosphere-ionosphere-atmosphere. The chaotic nature of space plasmas is studied by a nonlinear model of Alfvén waves described by the low-dimensional limit of the derivative nonlinear Schrödinger equation given by its stationary solutions in the

A. C.-L. Chian; Y. Kamide; E. L. Rempel; W. M. Santana

2006-01-01

348

Transient climate change and net ecosystem production of the terrestrial biosphere  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this sensitivity study, we have applied the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model ((TEM) version 4.1) to examine the responses of terrestrial ecosystems to transient changes in atmospheric CO2 concentration and climate in the 21st century at the scales of the globe, biomes, latitudinal gradient, and economic regions. Three predictions of transient change in climate and atmospheric CO2 concentration in the 21st

Xiangming Xiao; J. M. Melillo; D. W. Kicklighter; A. D. McGuire; R. G. Prinn; Chien Wang; P. H. Stone; Andrei P. Sokolov

1998-01-01

349

The precambrian evolution of terrestrial life.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The early appearance of life on Earth suggests that under appropriate environmental conditions the probability of chemical evolution proceeding to the point of biogenesis may be reasonably high. Most of biological history has been the history of microorganisms, with tissue-grade plants and animals characterizing only the most recent 15% or so of the fossil record. Intelligent life has occupied only the latest instant in geological time. The time table of terrestrial evolution is governed more by the particulars of our planet's physical and biological history than by some universal tempo of evolutionary change. One aspect of terrestrial life that is likely to be universal is the organization of populations into efficient biogeochemical systems.

Knoll, A. H.

350

LIFETIME OF EXCESS ATMOSPHERIC CARBON DIOXIDE  

EPA Science Inventory

We explore the effects of a changing terrestrial biosphere on the atmospheric residende time of carbon dioxide using three simple ocean carbon cycling models and a model of global terrestrial carbon cycling. e find differences in model behavior associated with the assumption of a...

351

Terrestrial adaptations in the hands of Equatorius africanus revisited.  

PubMed

Interpretations of the postcranial anatomy of East African early and middle Miocene large-bodied hominoids (e.g., Proconsul, Afropithecus, Turkanapithecus, Nacholapithecus) have suggested that these diverse primates utilized positional behaviors dominated by arboreal quadrupedalism. Preliminary descriptions of the Equatorius africanus partial skeleton (KNM-TH 28860) and other forelimb specimens, however, have argued that this animal relied more on terrestrial locomotion compared to its contemporaries, possibly similar to extant large papionin monkeys. In this paper, we reevaluate this interpretation by examining intrinsic hand proportions based on the lengths of the third proximal phalanx and fifth metacarpal in Equatorius in reference to a large sample of extant catarrhine primate taxa. We focused on the lengths of these hand bones because the ratio between phalanx and metacarpal lengths has been previously documented to discriminate terrestrial from arboreal mammalian taxa, including primates. The Equatorius hand displays semi-terrestrial hand proportions with a relatively shorter proximal phalanx compared to most arboreal monkeys. Its proximal phalanx, however, is relatively longer than those of habitually terrestrial monkeys (e.g., Theropithecus, Papio). Accordingly, although Equatorius retains some arboreal quadrupedal characteristics, these results corroborate the previous inference that it engaged in more terrestrial locomotion than earlier Miocene apes such as Proconsul. We suggest that the postcranial skeleton of Equatorius evinces the earliest signs of semi-terrestriality in the hominoid fossil record. It is likely that the terrestrial specialization utilized by living hominoids, e.g., knuckle-walking, evolved separately. PMID:19879632

Patel, Biren A; Susman, Randall L; Rossie, James B; Hill, Andrew

2009-12-01

352

Space and Terrestrial Photovoltaics: Synergy and Diversity  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A historical view of the research and development in photovoltaics from the perspective of both the terrestrial and the space communities is presented from the early days through the '70s and '80s and the '90s and beyond. The synergy of both communities in the beginning and once again in the present and hopefully future are highlighted, with examples of the important features in each program. The space community which was impressed by the light-weight and reliability of photovoltaics drove much of the early development. Even up to today, nearly every satellites and other scientific space probe that has been launched has included some solar power. However, since the cost of these power systems were only a small fraction of the satellite and launch cost, the use of much of this technology for the terrestrial marketplace was not feasible. It was clear that the focus of the terrestrial community would be best served by reducing costs. This would include addressing a variety of manufacturing issues and raising the rate of production. Success in these programs and a resulting globalization of effort resulted in major strides in the reduction of PV module costs and increased production. Although, the space community derived benefit from some of these advancements, its focus was on pushing the envelope with regard to cell efficiency. The gap between theoretical efficiencies and experimental efficiencies for silicon, gallium arsenide and indium phosphide became almost non-existent. Recent work by both communities have focused on the development thin film cells of amorphous silicon, CuInSe2 and CdTe. These cells hold the promise of lower costs for the terrestrial community as well as possible flexible substrates, better radiation resistance, and higher specific power for the space community. It is predicted that future trends in both communities will be directed toward advances through the application of nanotechnology. A picture is emerging in which the space and terrestrial solar cell communities shall once again share many common goals and, in fact, companies may manufacture both space and terrestrial solar cells in III-V materials and thin film materials. Basic photovoltaics research including these current trends in nanotechnology provides a valuable service for both worlds in that fundamental understanding of cell processes is still vitally important, particularly with new materials or new cell structures. It is entirely possible that one day we might have one solar array design that will meet the criteria for success in both space and on the Earth or perhaps the Moon or Mars.

Bailey, Sheila; Raffaelle, Ryne; Emery, Keith

2002-01-01

353

Space and Terrestrial Photovoltaics: Synergy and Diversity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A historical view of the research and development in photovoltaics from the perspective of both the terrestrial and the space communities is presented from the early days through the '70s and '80s and the '90s and beyond. The synergy of both communities in the beginning and once again in the present and hopefully future are highlighted, with examples of the important features in each program. The space community which was impressed by the light-weight and reliability of photovoltaics drove much of the early development. Even up to today, nearly every satellites and other scientific space probe that has been launched has included some solar power. However, since the cost of these power systems were only a small fraction of the satellite and launch cost, the use of much of this technology for the terrestrial marketplace was not feasible. It was clear that the focus of the terrestrial community would be best served by reducing costs. This would include addressing a variety of manufacturing issues and raising the rate of production. Success in these programs and a resulting globalization of effort resulted in major strides in the reduction of PV module costs and increased production. Although, the space community derived benefit from some of these advancements, its focus was on pushing the envelope with regard to cell efficiency. The gap between theoretical efficiencies and experimental efficiencies for silicon, gallium arsenide and indium phosphide became almost non-existent. Recent work by both communities have focused on the development thin film cells of amorphous silicon, CuInSe2 and CdTe. These cells hold the promise of lower costs for the terrestrial community as well as possible flexible substrates, better radiation resistance, and higher specific power for the space community. It is predicted that future trends in both communities will be directed toward advances through the application of nanotechnology. A picture is emerging in which the space and terrestrial solar cell communities shall once again share many common goals and, in fact, companies may manufacture both space and terrestrial solar cells in III-V materials and thin film materials. Basic photovoltaics research including these current trends in nanotechnology provides a valuable service for both worlds in that fundamental understanding of cell processes is still vitally important, particularly with new materials or new cell structures. It is entirely possible that one day we might have one solar array design that will meet the criteria for success in both space and on the Earth or perhaps the Moon or Mars.

Bailey, Sheila; Raffaelle, Ryne; Emery, Keith

2002-10-01

354

Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems  

SciTech Connect

The Maritime and Continental Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems are considered in the context of environmental impacts - habitat destruction, alien introductions, and pollution. Four types of pollution are considered: nutrients, radionuclides, inert materials, and noxious chemicals. Their ability to recover from perturbation is discussed in the light of present scientific knowledge, and the methods used to control impacts are reviewed. It is concluded that techniques of waste disposal are still inadequate, adequate training in environmental and conservation principles for Antarctic personnel in many countries is lacking, and scientific investigations may be a much more serious threat than tourism to the integrity of these ecosystems. Some priorities crucial to future management are suggested.

Walton, D.W.H.

1987-01-01

355

Accelerated Sequestration of Terrestrial Plant Biomass in the Deep Ocean  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of the most efficient uses of aboveground agricultural residues to reduce atmospheric CO2 is burial in sites removed from contact with the atmosphere and in which degradation of lignocellulose is inhibited (Strand and Benford 2009). Similarly by burying forest residues greater benefits for atmospheric carbon accrue compared to incineration or bioethanol production. Accessible planetary sites that are most removed from contact with the atmosphere are primarily the deep ocean sediments. Many deep ocean sediment ecologies are acclimated to massive inputs of terrestrial plant biomass. Nonetheless, marine degradation rates of lignocellulose are slower than terrestrial rates (Keil et al. 2010). Additionally, anaerobic conditions are easily achieved in many deep ocean sediments, inhibiting lignocellulose degradation further, while the dominance of sulfate in the water column as electron acceptor prevents the release of methane from methanogenesis to the atmosphere. The potential benefit of massive removal of excess terrestrial biomass to the deep ocean will be estimated and compared to other uses including biochar and BECS. The impact of the biomass on the marine environment will be discussed and potential sequestration sites in the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic compared. Keil, R. G., J. M. Nuwer, et al. (2010). "Burial of agricultural byproducts in the deep sea as a form of carbon sequestration: A preliminary experiment." Marine Chemistry (In Press, online 6 August 2010). Strand, S. E. and G. Benford (2009). "Ocean sequestration of crop residue carbon: recycling fossil fuel carbon back to deep sediments." Environ. Sci. Technol. 43(4): 1000-1007.

Strand, S. E.

2010-12-01

356

Evolution of the Atmosphere and Climate of Venus  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We will review the evolution of the atmosphere and climate of Venus, with a focus on the apparent divergence from early more Earth-like conditions. We will examine what constraints can be put on the nature and timing of this divergence, and in particular on the history and role of water in affecting the evolution of Venus. Venus, in comparison with Earth, is strikingly dry. As our understanding of terrestrial planet evolution has increased, the importance of water abundance as a substance controlling many evolutionary factors has become increasingly clear. This is true of biological evolution, as the presence of liquid water is widely regarded as the key to the possibility of finding "life as we know it" on other worlds. It is also true of geological and climatic evolution. Water is among the most important climatically active atmospheric gasses on the terrestrial planets. It is also a controlling variable for tectonic style and geologic processes, as well as a mediator of surfaceatmosphere chemical reactions. First, we will discuss what is known about the accretion process, the initial conditions of a primordial Venusian atmosphere, and how the differing history of late large impacts (lack of a moon-forming impact, or combination of large impacts that largely cancelled angular momentum) may have affected these initial conditions. Then we will review what is known about atmospheric loss processes and in particular the constraints on loss of water over time. The current state of modeling of the runaway or moist greenhouse will be reviewed, in the context of recent work trying to establish theoretical limits for the inner radius of the circumstellar habitable zone and its movement with stellar evolution. The coupling between of geological and tectonic evolution and the atmosphere and climate will be reviewed, including climate feedbacks, which are operating today, depending on the level of current geological activity. Finally we will discuss the prospects for improving constraints on the atmospheric and climatic evolution of Venus with measurements made by future missions.

Grinspoon, D.; Bullock, M.

2014-04-01

357

Earth and Terrestrial Planet Formation  

E-print Network

The growth and composition of Earth is a direct consequence of planet formation throughout the Solar System. We discuss the known history of the Solar System, the proposed stages of growth and how the early stages of planet formation may be dominated by pebble growth processes. Pebbles are small bodies whose strong interactions with the nebula gas lead to remarkable new accretion mechanisms for the formation of planetesimals and the growth of planetary embryos. Many of the popular models for the later stages of planet formation are presented. The classical models with the giant planets on fixed orbits are not consistent with the known history of the Solar System, fail to create a high Earth/Mars mass ratio, and, in many cases, are also internally inconsistent. The successful Grand Tack model creates a small Mars, a wet Earth, a realistic asteroid belt and the mass-orbit structure of the terrestrial planets. In the Grand Tack scenario, growth curves for Earth most closely match a Weibull model. The feeding zon...

Jacobson, Seth A

2015-01-01

358

Titan's Lower Atmosphere  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Saturn's largest moon, Titan, sports an atmosphere 10 times thicker than Earth's. Like Earth, the moon's atmosphere is N2 based and possesses a rich organic chemistry. In addition, similar to the terrestrial hydrological cycle, Titan has a methane cycle, with methane clouds, rain and seas. Presently, there is a revolution in our understanding of the moon, as data flows in and is analyzed from the NASA and ESA Cassini-Huygens mission. For example, seas were detected only this year. Here I will discuss the evolution of our understanding of Titan's atmosphere, its composition, chemistry, dynamics and origin. Current open questions will also be presented. Studies of Titan's atmosphere began and evolved to the present state in less time than that of a single scientist's career. This short interlude of activity demonstrates the rigors of the scientific method, and raises enticing questions about the workings and evolution of an atmosphere.

Griffith, Caitlin Ann

2007-09-01

359

SOLAR PHYSICS AND TERRESTRIAL EFFECTS Solar-Terrestrial Interactions  

E-print Network

SOLAR PHYSICS AND TERRESTRIAL EFFECTS Chapter 4 Chapter 4 Solar-Terrestrial Interactions from the charged particles that reach the planet steadily as part of the solar wind and the much it will be deflected into a circular or spiral path by the Lorentz Force. Most charged particles in the solar wind

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

360

Temporal variations in atmospheric CO2 on Rishiri Island in 2006-2013: responses of the interannual variation in amplitude to climate and the terrestrial sink in East Asia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Surface observation of the atmospheric CO2 mixing ratio implies the combined influences of both natural fluctuations and anthropogenic activities on the carbon cycle. Atmospheric CO2 has been measured on Rishiri Island in the outflow region of Eurasia since May 2006. We report the first 7 year temporal atmospheric CO2 variations from diurnal to interannual scales. In the diurnal scale, an obvious cycle appeared as a minimum in the afternoon and maximum at midnight in the summer months. Seasonally, the maximum CO2 concentration appeared around the beginning of April, while the minimum appeared around the middle of August. A mean growing season length of ~126 days was estimated. In the period from 2007 to 2012, the peak-to-peak amplitude increased until 2009 and decreased thereafter, with a mean value of 19.7 ppm. In the long term, atmospheric CO2 is increasing by a mean growth rate of 2.1 ppm year-1. Investigations on the driving climatic factors on the interannual variation in amplitude indicated that temperature in East Asia (40-60° N, 90-150° E) affected the CO2 amplitude by affecting the seasonal maximum, with a time lag of 1-2 years. On the contrary, precipitation did not likely affect CO2 amplitudes. The amplitude also responded to a natural carbon source/sink variation in East Asia. We suggest that temperature in the first year would affect carbon sinks in the second year in the fetch regions, which further affect CO2 amplitude mainly through ecosystem respiration. Circulation changes also likely contributed to the decreasing amplitude since 2009, as indicated by the simultaneous decrease in the 222Rn concentration in spring and summer.

Zhu, C.; Yoshikawa-Inoue, H.

2014-06-01

361

Early Eocene's climate and ocean circulation from coupled model simulations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

While proxy data provide a snapshot of climate conditions at a specific location, coupled atmosphere-ocean models are able to expand this knowledge over the globe. Therefore, they are indispensable tools for understanding past climate conditions. We model the dynamical state of atmosphere and ocean during the Early Eocene and pre-industrial times, using the coupled atmosphere-ocean model ECHAM5/MPIOM with realistic reconstructions of vegetation and CO2. The resulting simulated climate variables are compared to terrestrial and oceanic proxies. The Early Eocene climate is in the global mean warmer (~13°C) and wetter (~1 mm/d) than in pre-industrial times. Especially temperatures in the Southern Ocean, the Greenland Sea and Arctic Ocean raise by up to 25K, being in accordance with surface temperature estimates from terrestrial and marine proxy data. The oceans are hereby rendered ice-free, leading to a decrease of polar albedo and thereby facilitating polar warming. This leads to a by 5K diminished equator-to-pole temperature gradient. Warmer temperatures as well as changed bathymetry have an effect on ocean dynamics in the Early Eocene. Although deep-water formation can be found in the Greenland Sea, Weddell Sea, and Tethys Sea, it is weaker than in the pre-industrial run and the resulting circulation is shallower. This is not only visible in water transport through sea gates but also in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), adopting its maximum at 700m depths in the Early Eocene, while maximum transport is reached in the pre-industrial control run at 1200m. Albeit a shallow and weak thermohaline circulation, a global ocean conveyor belt is being triggered, causing a transport from the areas of subduction through the Atlantic and Southern Oceans into the Indian and Pacific Oceans.

Weber, Tobias; Thomas, Maik

2014-05-01

362

The Oldest Caseid Synapsid from the Late Pennsylvanian of Kansas, and the Evolution of Herbivory in Terrestrial Vertebrates  

PubMed Central

The origin and early evolution of amniotes (fully terrestrial vertebrates) led to major changes in the structure and hierarchy of terrestrial ecosystems. The first appearance of herbivores played a pivotal role in this transformation. After an early bifurcation into Reptilia and Synapsida (including mammals) 315 Ma, synapsids dominated Paleozoic terrestrial vertebrate communities, with the herbivorous caseids representing the largest vertebrates on land. Eocasea martini gen. et sp. nov., a small carnivorous caseid from the Late Carboniferous, extends significantly the fossil record of Caseidae, and permits the first clade-based study of the origin and initial evolution of herbivory in terrestrial tetrapods. Our results demonstrate for the first time that large caseid herbivores evolved from small, non-herbivorous caseids. This pattern is mirrored by three other clades, documenting multiple, independent, but temporally staggered origins of herbivory and increase in body size among early terrestrial tetrapods, leading to patterns consistent with modern terrestrial ecosystem. PMID:24739998

Reisz, Robert R.; Fröbisch, Jörg

2014-01-01

363

The oldest caseid synapsid from the Late Pennsylvanian of Kansas, and the evolution of herbivory in terrestrial vertebrates.  

PubMed

The origin and early evolution of amniotes (fully terrestrial vertebrates) led to major changes in the structure and hierarchy of terrestrial ecosystems. The first appearance of herbivores played a pivotal role in this transformation. After an early bifurcation into Reptilia and Synapsida (including mammals) 315 Ma, synapsids dominated Paleozoic terrestrial vertebrate communities, with the herbivorous caseids representing the largest vertebrates on land. Eocasea martini gen. et sp. nov., a small carnivorous caseid from the Late Carboniferous, extends significantly the fossil record of Caseidae, and permits the first clade-based study of the origin and initial evolution of herbivory in terrestrial tetrapods. Our results demonstrate for the first time that large caseid herbivores evolved from small, non-herbivorous caseids. This pattern is mirrored by three other clades, documenting multiple, independent, but temporally staggered origins of herbivory and increase in body size among early terrestrial tetrapods, leading to patterns consistent with modern terrestrial ecosystem. PMID:24739998

Reisz, Robert R; Fröbisch, Jörg

2014-01-01

364

Terrestrial Coordinate Systems and Frames  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A terrestrial reference system (TRS) is a spatial reference system corotating with the Earth in its DIURNAL MOTION in space. In such a system, the positions of points anchored on the Earth's solid surface have coordinates which have only small variations with time, as a result of geophysical effects (tectonic or tidal deformations; see TECTONICS, EARTH'S INTERIOR, TIDES). A terrestrial reference ...

Boucher, C.; Murdin, P.

2000-11-01

365

Deciphering thermal phase curves of tidally locked terrestrial planets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Next-generation space telescopes will allow us to characterize terrestrial exoplanets. To do so effectively it will be crucial to make use of all available data. We therefore investigate which atmospheric properties can, and cannot, be inferred from a tidally locked planet’s broadband thermal phase curve. First, we use dimensional analysis to show that phase curves are controlled by six nondimensional parameters. Second, we use an idealized general circulation model (GCM) to explore the relative sensitivity of phase curves to these parameters. We find that the feature of phase curves most sensitive to its atmospheric parameters is the peak-to-trough amplitude. Moreover, except for hot and rapidly rotating planets, the phase amplitude is primarily sensitive to only two nondimensional parameters: 1) the ratio of dynamical to radiative timescales, and 2) the longwave optical thickness at the surface. As an application of this technique, we show how phase curve measurements could be combined with transit or emission spectroscopy to constrain the surface pressure and atmospheric mass of terrestrial planets. Such constraints will be important for studying the atmospheric evolution of terrestrial exoplanets, and for characterizing the surface conditions on habitable planets.

Koll, Daniel D. B.; Abbot, Dorian S.

2015-01-01

366

Major Disturbance Events in Terrestrial Ecosystems Detected using Global Satellite Data Sets  

E-print Network

contribute to the current rise of carbon dioxide (CO2) levels in the atmosphere (Potter, 1999; Schimel et al., 2001). Because major `pulses' of CO2 from terrestrial biomass loss can be emitted to the atmosphere biogenic sources of CO2 have global implications for climatic change, which can in turn affect a vast

Kumar, Vipin

367

Spatiotemporal patterns of terrestrial carbon cycle during the 20th century  

Microsoft Academic Search

We evaluated how climate change, rising atmospheric CO2 concentration, and land use change influenced the terrestrial carbon (C) cycle for the last century using a process-based ecosystem model. Over the last century, the modeled land use change emitted about 129 Pg of C to the atmosphere. About 76% (or 98 Pg C) of this emission, however, was offset by net

Shilong Piao; Philippe Ciais; Pierre Friedlingstein; Nathalie de Noblet-Ducoudré; Patricia Cadule; Nicolas Viovy; Tao Wang

2009-01-01

368

Assessing net ecosystem carbon exchange of U.S. terrestrial ecosystems by integrating eddy covariance flux measurements and satellite observations  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

More accurate projections of future carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere and associated climate change as well as carbon accounting and climate policy-making depend on improved scientific understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Despite the consensus that U.S. terrestrial ecosystems...

369

Global response of the terrestrial biosphere to CO2 and climate change using a coupled climate-carbon cycle model  

E-print Network

feedback in the climate-carbon cycle system. INDEX TERMS: 0315 Atmospheric Composition and Structure: Impact phenomena; KEYWORDS: climate change impact, terrestrial carbon cycle Citation: Berthelot, M., P of the terrestrial biosphere to CO2 and climate change using a coupled climate-carbon cycle model, Global Biogeochem

Dufresne, Jean-Louis

370

Decadal Variability in the Terrestrial Carbon Budget Caused by the Pacific Decadal Oscillation and Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The terrestrial carbon dioxide (CO2) budget interacts with the Earth's climate system on diurnal to centennial and longer time scales, making it critical for climatic prediction and stabilization. Atmospheric observations and global syntheses of CO2 data indicate that the terrestrial biosphere is one the major sources of interannual variability, but the underlying mechanisms operating on different time-scales and the potential

Akihiko Ito

2011-01-01

371

Comparison of Jovian and Terrestrial lightning as observed from space.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We compare the images of Jovian lightning taken by Galileo spacecraft with the images of terrestrial lightning observed by Lightning Imaging Spectrometer (LIS) onboard of the TERRA spacecraft. Both data sets have good spatial resolution: Galileo's pixel is 25 km, or about half the atmospheric scale height, LIS pixel is 3-6 km, also about half of the scale height. This good resolution allows us to see that both Jovian and terrestrial lightning spots look diffuse because of the scattering in the clouds above. Previously we used the appearance of the diffuse spots on Jupiter to model lightning depths and the opacity and shape of the overlying clouds (Dyudina and Ingersoll, 2000). The comparison with LIS data allowed us to verify that the model is valid for terrestrial lightning. The irregular shapes of large terrestrial lightning suggests 30-km scale horizontal bolts. On Jupiter the spots, projected onto the horizontal plane, are nearly circular suggesting that the large size of the spots is mostly due to the horizontal diffusion of the photons scattered in the clouds. Unlike the Galileo observations, LIS has fine temporal resolution of 2 ms, or about 250 frames per single lightning flash. We will discuss the temporal evolution of terrestrial flashes and its implications for Jupiter. U. A. Dyudina and A. P Ingersoll, ``Modeling of Jovian Lightning Imaged by Galileo SSI Camera", B.A.S.S. 32(3) 997, (2000)

Dyudina, U. A.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Boccippio, D.

2001-11-01

372

Consequences of Considering Carbon/Nitrogen Interactions on the Feedbacks between Climate and the Terrestrial Carbon Cycle  

E-print Network

A number of observational studies indicate that carbon sequestration by terrestrial ecosystems in a world with an atmosphere richer in carbon dioxide and a warmer climate depends on the interactions between the carbon and ...

Sokolov, Andrei P.

373

Pre-terrestrial origin of rust in the Nakhla meteorite  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The authors present quantative elemental compositions and summarize textural evidence for the pre-terrestrial origin of rust on the Nakhla meteorite. The material in question is called 'rust' because its phase composition remains unknown. Compelling evidence for the pre-terrestrial origin of the rust is found in rust veins truncated by fusion crust and preserved as faults in sutured igneous crystals. Rust veins that approach the meteorite's fusion crust become discontinuous and exhibit vugs that suggest partial decrepitation; no veins that penetrate the fusion crust have been found. Because the rust probably contains volatile compounds, it is reasonable to expect that heating near the ablation surface (formed during atmospheric entry to Earth) would encourage devolatilization of the rust. Hence, the absence of rust veins in fusion crust and vugs in rust veins near fusion crust clearly imply that the rust existed in the meteorite before atmospheric entry.

Wentworth, Susan J.; Gooding, James L.

1990-01-01

374

Utility terrestrial biodiversity issues  

SciTech Connect

Results from a survey of power utility biologists indicate that terrestrial biodiversity is considered a major issued by only a few utilities; however, a majority believe it may be a future issue. Over half of the respondents indicated that their company is involved in some management for biodiversity, and nearly all feel that it should be a goal for resource management. Only a few utilities are funding biodiversity research, but a majority felt more research was needed. Generally, larger utilities with extensive land holdings had greater opportunities and resources for biodiversity management. Biodiversity will most likely be a concern with transmission rights-of-way construction and maintenance, endangered species issues and general land resource management, including mining reclamation and hydro relicensing commitments. Over half of the companies surveyed have established voluntary partnerships with management groups, and biodiversity is a goal in nearly all the joint projects. Endangered species management and protection, prevention of forest fragmentation, wetland protection, and habitat creation and protection are the most common partnerships involving utility companies. Common management practices and unique approaches are presented, along with details of the survey. 4 refs.

Breece, G.A. [Southern Company, Atlanta, GA (United States); Ward, B.J. [Carolina Power and Light Company, Raleigh, NC (United States)

1996-11-01

375

Nitrogen-enhanced greenhouse warming on early Earth  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Early in Earth's history, the Sun provided less energy to the Earth than it does today. However, the Earth was not permanently glaciated, an apparent contradiction known as the faint young Sun paradox. By implication, the Earth must have been warmed by a stronger greenhouse effect or a lower planetary albedo. Here we use a radiative-convective climate model to show that more N2 in the atmosphere would have increased the warming effect of existing greenhouse gases by broadening their absorption lines. With the atmospheric CO2 and CH4 levels estimated for 2.5billion years ago, a doubling of the present atmospheric nitrogen (PAN) level would cause a warming of 4.4?C. Our new budget of Earth's geological nitrogen reservoirs indicates that there is a sufficient quantity of nitrogen in the crust (0.5 PAN) and mantle (>1.4 PAN) to have supported this, and that this nitrogen was previously in the atmosphere. In the mantle, N correlates with 40Ar, the daughter product of 40K, indicating that the source of mantle N is subducted crustal rocks in which NH4+ has been substituted for K+. We thus conclude that a higher nitrogen level probably helped warm the early Earth, and suggest that the effects of N2 should be considered in assessing the habitable zone for terrestrial planets.

Goldblatt, Colin; Claire, Mark W.; Lenton, Timothy M.; Matthews, Adrian J.; Watson, Andrew J.; Zahnle, Kevin J.

2009-12-01

376

Radiocarbon dating of terrestrial carbonates  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Terrestrial carbonates encompass a wide range of materials that potentially could be used for radiocarbon (14C) dating. Biogenic carbonates, including shells and tests of terrestrial and aquatic gastropods, bivalves, ostracodes, and foraminifera, are preserved in a variety of late Quaternary deposits and may be suitable for 14C dating. Primary calcareous deposits (marls, tufa, speleothems) and secondary carbonates (rhizoliths, fracture fill, soil carbonate) may also be targeted for dating when conditions are favorable. This chapter discusses issues that are commonly encountered in 14C dating of terrestrial carbonates, including isotopic disequilibrium and open-system behavior, as well as methods used to determine the reliability of ages derived from these materials. Recent methodological advancements that may improve the accuracy and precision of 14C ages of terrestrial carbonates are also highlighted.

Pigati, Jeffrey S.

2014-01-01

377

Contaminant Exposure in Terrestrial Vertebrates  

EPA Science Inventory

Manuscript is a critical review of the state of the science for quantifying exposures of terrestrial wildlife species to chemical contamination. It describes the unique aspects of birds, mammals, reptiles, amphibians and threatened and endangered species. Fate and transport of ...

378

Proterozoic oxygen rise linked to shifting balance between seafloor and terrestrial weathering.  

PubMed

A shift toward higher atmospheric oxygen concentration during the late Proterozoic has been inferred from multiple indirect proxies and is seen by many as a prerequisite for the emergence of complex animal life. However, the mechanisms controlling the level of oxygen throughout the Proterozoic and its eventual rise remain uncertain. Here we use a simple biogeochemical model to show that the balance between long-term carbon removal fluxes via terrestrial silicate weathering and ocean crust alteration plays a key role in determining atmospheric oxygen concentration. This balance may be shifted by changes in terrestrial weatherability or in the generation rate of oceanic crust. As a result, the terrestrial chemical weathering flux may be permanently altered--contrasting with the conventional view that the global silicate weathering flux must adjust to equal the volcanic CO2 degassing flux. Changes in chemical weathering flux in turn alter the long-term supply of phosphorus to the ocean, and therefore the flux of organic carbon burial, which is the long-term source of atmospheric oxygen. Hence we propose that increasing solar luminosity and a decrease in seafloor spreading rate over 1,500-500 Ma drove a gradual shift from seafloor weathering to terrestrial weathering, and a corresponding steady rise in atmospheric oxygen. Furthermore, increased terrestrial weatherability during the late Neoproterozoic may explain low temperature, increases in ocean phosphate, ocean sulfate, and atmospheric oxygen concentration at this time. PMID:24927553

Mills, Benjamin; Lenton, Timothy M; Watson, Andrew J

2014-06-24

379

Proterozoic oxygen rise linked to shifting balance between seafloor and terrestrial weathering  

PubMed Central

A shift toward higher atmospheric oxygen concentration during the late Proterozoic has been inferred from multiple indirect proxies and is seen by many as a prerequisite for the emergence of complex animal life. However, the mechanisms controlling the level of oxygen throughout the Proterozoic and its eventual rise remain uncertain. Here we use a simple biogeochemical model to show that the balance between long-term carbon removal fluxes via terrestrial silicate weathering and ocean crust alteration plays a key role in determining atmospheric oxygen concentration. This balance may be shifted by changes in terrestrial weatherability or in the generation rate of oceanic crust. As a result, the terrestrial chemical weathering flux may be permanently altered—contrasting with the conventional view that the global silicate weathering flux must adjust to equal the volcanic CO2 degassing flux. Changes in chemical weathering flux in turn alter the long-term supply of phosphorus to the ocean, and therefore the flux of organic carbon burial, which is the long-term source of atmospheric oxygen. Hence we propose that increasing solar luminosity and a decrease in seafloor spreading rate over 1,500–500 Ma drove a gradual shift from seafloor weathering to terrestrial weathering, and a corresponding steady rise in atmospheric oxygen. Furthermore, increased terrestrial weatherability during the late Neoproterozoic may explain low temperature, increases in ocean phosphate, ocean sulfate, and atmospheric oxygen concentration at this time. PMID:24927553

Mills, Benjamin; Lenton, Timothy M.; Watson, Andrew J.

2014-01-01

380

Gamma-Ray Localization of Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are very short bursts of high-energy photons and electrons originating in Earth's atmosphere. We present here a localization study of TGFs carried out at gamma-ray energies above 20 MeV based on an innovative event selection method. We use the AGILE satellite Silicon Tracker data that for the first time have been correlated with TGFs detected by

M. Marisaldi; A. Argan; A. Trois; A. Giuliani; M. Tavani; C. Labanti; F. Fuschino; A. Bulgarelli; F. Longo; G. Barbiellini; E. Del Monte; E. Moretti; M. Trifoglio; E. Costa; P. Caraveo; P. W. Cattaneo; A. Chen; F. D'Ammando; G. de Paris; G. Di Cocco; G. di Persio; I. Donnarumma; Y. Evangelista; M. Feroci; A. Ferrari; M. Fiorini; T. Froysland; M. Galli; F. Gianotti; I. Lapshov; F. Lazzarotto; P. Lipari; S. Mereghetti; A. Morselli; L. Pacciani; A. Pellizzoni; F. Perotti; P. Picozza; G. Piano; M. Pilia; M. Prest; G. Pucella; M. Rapisarda; A. Rappoldi; A. Rubini; S. Sabatini; P. Soffitta; E. Striani; E. Vallazza; S. Vercellone; V. Vittorini; A. Zambra; D. Zanello; L. A. Antonelli; S. Colafrancesco; S. Cutini; P. Giommi; F. Lucarelli; C. Pittori; P. Santolamazza; F. Verrecchia; L. Salotti

2010-01-01

381

Studies of the terrestrial O{sub 2} and carbon cycles in sand dune gases and in biosphere 2  

SciTech Connect

Molecular oxygen in the atmosphere is coupled tightly to the terrestrial carbon cycle by the processes of photosynthesis, respiration, and burning. This dissertation examines different aspects of this coupling in four chapters. Chapter 1 explores the feasibility of using air from sand dunes to reconstruct atmospheric O{sub 2} composition centuries ago. Such a record would reveal changes in the mass of the terrestrial biosphere, after correction for known fossil fuel combustion, and constrain the fate of anthropogenic CO{sub 2}.

Severinghaus, J.P.

1995-12-31

382

An Imaging Interferometer for Terrestrial Remote Sensing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A prototype imaging interferometer called DASI (digital array scanned interferometer) is under development at our laboratories. Our objective is to design an instrument for remote sensing of Earth's atmosphere and surface. This paper describes the unusual characteristics of DASIs which make them promising candidates for ground and aircraft-based terrestrial measurements. These characteristics include superior signal-to-noise, design simplicity and compactness, relative to dispersion based imaging spectrometers. Perhaps one of the most notable features of DASIs is their ability to acquire an entire interferogram simultaneously without any moving optical elements. We also describe selected laboratory and ground based field measurements using the prototype DASI. A CCD detector array was placed at the DASI detector plane for wavelength coverage from 0.4 to 1.0 micron. A NICMOS MCT detector was used for coverage from 1.1 to 2.2 micron. The DASI was configured to have a spectral resolution of about 300 1/cm, a spatial field of view of 5 degrees, and a constant number of transverse spatial elements (detector dependent) for each exposure frame. Frame exposure rates were up to 0.6 Hz with the potential to achieve 5 Hz. Image cube measurements of laboratory targets and terrestrial scenes were obtained by multiple frame scanning over the field of view. These data sets reveal the potential science yields from obtaining simultaneous high resolution spatial and spectral information.

Hammer, Philip D.; Valero, Francisco P. J.; Peterson, David L.; Smith, William Hayden

1993-01-01

383

Terrestrial nitrogen cycles: Some unanswered questions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Nitrogen is generally considered to be the element which most often limits the growth of plants in both natural and agricultural ecosystems. It regulates plant growth because photosynthetic rates are strongly dependent on the concentration of nitrogen in leaves, and because relatively large mounts of protein are required for cell division and growth. Yet nitrogen is abundant in the biosphere - the well-mixed pool in the atmosphere is considered inexhaustible compared to biotic demand, and the amount of already fixed organic nitrogen in soils far exceeds annual plant uptake in terrestrial ecosystems. In regions where natural vegetation is not nitrogen limited, continuous cultivation induces nitrogen deficiency. Nitrogen loss from cultivated lands is more rapid than that of other elements, and nitrogen fertilization is generally required to maintain crop yield under any continuous system. The pervasiveness of nitrogen deficiency in many natural and most managed sites is discussed.

Vitousek, P.

1984-01-01

384

Terrestrial Planet Finder: Technology Development Plans  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

One of humanity's oldest questions is whether life exists elsewhere in the universe. The Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) mission will survey stars in our stellar neighborhood to search for planets and perform spectroscopic measurements to identify potential biomarkers in their atmospheres. In response to the recently published President's Plan for Space Exploration, TPF has plans to launch a visible-light coronagraph in 2014, and a separated-spacecraft infrared interferometer in 2016. Substantial funding has been committed to the development of the key technologies that are required to meet these goals for launch in the next decade. Efforts underway through industry and university contracts and at JPL include a number of system and subsystem testbeds, as well as components and numerical modeling capabilities. The science, technology, and design efforts are closely coupled to ensure that requirements and capabilities will be consistent and meet the science goals.

Lindensmith, Chris

2004-01-01

385

Guntersville Workshop on Solar-Terrestrial Studies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The separation of purely solar physics from magnetospheric physics, and the effects of solar activity on geomagnetic activity are investigations which can be accomplished using the shuttle orbiter in an extended sortie mode, or an unmanned solar terrestrial observatory powered by the power module in an extended duration mode. When the power module is used with the shuttle in a sortie support mode, both the instrument capacity and the time in orbit of the orbiter can be increased several fold. In the free-flyer mode, the power module would be capable of providing power, basic attitude control, basic thermal control and housekeeping communications for unmanned, large, independent mission payloads in low earth orbit for periods of 6 months or longer. Instrument requirements for interdisciplinary joint observational programs are discussed for studies of the magnetosphere, the atmosphere, sun-weather relationships. Description summary charts of the power module are included.

1977-01-01

386

Visual interface for space and terrestrial analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The management of large geophysical and celestial data bases is now, more than ever, the most critical path to timely data analysis. With today's large volume data sets from multiple satellite missions, analysts face the task of defining useful data bases from which data and metadata (information about data) can be extracted readily in a meaningful way. Visualization, following an object-oriented design, is a fundamental method of organizing and handling data. Humans, by nature, easily accept pictorial representations of data. Therefore graphically oriented user interfaces are appealing, as long as they remain simple to produce and use. The Visual Interface for Space and Terrestrial Analysis (VISTA) system, currently under development at the Naval Research Laboratory's Backgrounds Data Center (BDC), has been designed with these goals in mind. Its graphical user interface (GUI) allows the user to perform queries, visualization, and analysis of atmospheric and celestial backgrounds data.

Dombrowski, Edmund G.; Williams, Jason R.; George, Arthur A.; Heckathorn, Harry M.; Snyder, William A.

1995-01-01

387

Mid Miocene Terrestrial Ecosystems: Information from Mammalian Herbivore Communities.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In present day ecosystems the numbers and proportions of different kinds of ecologically distinct ungulates (hoofed mammals) provide an indicator of the nature of the vegetation in the habitat. Different vegetation types (such as forest, savanna, or grassland) are characteristically associated with different arrays of ungulates, with species exhibiting differences in diet, body size, and type of digestive fermentation system. These biological attributes can also be inferred for fossil ungulate species, the first two from quantitative assessment of skull and dental anatomy, and the last from phylogenetic affinity. Thus fossil ungulate communities may be used as indicators of the vegetation types of the habitats in which they lived. Vegetation types, in turn, are determined largely by a number of physical environmental factors. Typical ungulate communities of the late early to early middle Miocene (17 - 15 Ma) from the Great Plains of North America contained a diversity of browsing (leaf-eating) and grazing (grass-eating) species, with proportions of dietary types and a diversity of body sizes indicative of a woodland savanna habitat. Paleobotanical evidence also indicates a woodland savanna type of vegetation. However, these communities included a much larger number of ungulate species than can be found in any present-day community. The "excess" ungulate species were primarily browsers. Throughout the rest of the middle Miocene both species numbers and the proportion of browsers in ungulate communities appear to have declined steadily. During this decline in browser species the numbers of grazer species remained relatively constant. Within-community species numbers comparable to the present day were attained by the late Miocene. We suggest that the early Miocene browser-rich communities, and their subsequent decline, carry an important paleoenvironmental signal. In particular, communities "over rich" in browsers may reflect higher levels of primary productivity in mid Miocene vegetation types in comparison with corresponding, structurally equivalent present-day vegetation types. The observed decline in species numbers may represent a gradual decline in terrestrial primary productivity, which would be consistent with one current hypothesis of a mid-Miocene decrease in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations from higher mid-Cenozoic values.

Janis, C. M.; Damuth, J.; Theodor, J. M.

2001-05-01

388

The Virtual Solar-Terrestrial Observatory: A Deployed Semantic Web Application Case Study for Scientific Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Virtual Solar-Terrestrial Observatory is a production semantic web data framework providing access to observational datasets from fields spanning upper atmospheric terrestrial physics to solar physics. The observatory allows virtual access to a highly distributed and heterogeneous set of data that appears as if all resources are organized, stored and retrieved\\/used in a common way. The end-user community comprises scientists,

Deborah L. Mcguinness; Peter Fox; Luca Cinquini; Patrick West; Jose Garcia; James L. Benedict; Don Middleton

2007-01-01

389

Stop hitting yourself: did most terrestrial impactors originate from the terrestrial planets?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although the asteroid belt is the main source of impactors in the inner solar system today, it contains only 0.0006 Earth mass, or 0.05 Lunar mass. While the asteroid belt would have been more massive when it formed, it is unlikely to have had greater than 0.5 Lunar mass since the formation of Jupiter and the dissipation of the solar nebula. By comparison, giant impacts onto the terrestrial planets typically release debris equal to several per cent of the planets mass. The Moon-forming impact on Earth and the dichotomy forming impact on Mars, to consider but two of these major events, released 1.3 and 0.3 Lunar mass in debris respectively, many times the mass of the present day asteroid belt. This escaping impact debris is less long lived than the main asteroid belt, as it is injected on unstable, planet-crossing orbits, but this same factor also increases the impact probability with the terrestrial planets and asteroids. We show that as a result terrestrial ejecta played a major role in the impact history of the early inner solar system, and we expect the same is also likely to be true in other planetary systems.

Jackson, Alan; Asphaug, Erik; Elkins-Tanton, Linda

2014-11-01

390

Intermittent Astrophysical Radiation Sources and Terrestrial Life  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Terrestrial life is exposed to a variety of radiation sources. Astrophysical observations suggest that strong excursions in cosmic ray flux and spectral hardness are expected. Gamma-ray bursts and supernovae are expected to irradiate the atmosphere with keV to GeV photons at irregular intervals. Supernovae will produce large cosmic ray excursions, with time development varying with distance from the event. Large fluxes of keV to MeV protons from the Sun pose a strong threat to electromagnetic technology. The terrestrial record shows cosmogenic isotope excursions which are consistent with major solar proton events, and there are observations of G-stars suggesting that the rate of such events may be much higher than previously assumed. In addition there are unknown and unexplained astronomical transients which may indicate new classes of events. The Sun, supernovae, and gamma-ray bursts are all capable of producing lethal fluences, and some are expected on intervals of 10^8 years or so. The history of life on Earth is filled with mass extinctions at a variety of levels of intensity. Most are not understood. Astrophysical radiation may play a role, particularly from large increases in muon irradiation on the ground, and changes in atmospheric chemistry which deplete ozone, admitting increased solar UVB. UVB is strongly absorbed by DNA and proteins, and breaks the chemical bonds---it is a known carcinogen. High muon fluxes will also be damaging to such molecules, but experiments are needed to pin down the rate. Solar proton events which are not directly dangerous for the biota may nevertheless pose a major threat to modern electromagnetic technology through direct impact on satellites and magnetic induction of large currents in power grids, disabling transformers. We will look at the kind of events that are expected on timescales from human to geological, and their likely consequences.

Melott, Adrian

2013-04-01

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