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Sample records for earth atmosphere

  1. Earth's changeable atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-06-01

    Billions of years ago, high atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations were vital to life's tenuous foothold on Earth. Despite new constraints, the composition and evolution of Earth's early atmosphere remains hazy.

  2. Early Earth: Atmosphere's solar shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Ramses

    2016-06-01

    Frequent storms on the young Sun would have ejected energetic particles and compressed Earth's magnetosphere. Simulations suggest that the particles penetrated the atmosphere and initiated reactions that warmed the planet and fertilized life.

  3. Solar energy and its interaction with Earth`s atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Tulunay, Y. ||

    1993-12-31

    The Sun is responsible for many of the phenomena on Earth, including the maintenance of life. In addition, magnetic storms, capable of disrupting radio communication, and auroral displays are associated with solar events. Man-made electrical, satellite, and communication systems are affected strongly by the near-Earth space environments. The purpose of this paper is to review briefly the interaction of solar activity with the near-Earth environment. These processes can be studied by examing two sets of interactions. That is, the interaction of the solar electromagnetic output with the Earth`s neutral atmosphere, and the solar corpuscular output with the geomagnetic field. In order to understand the types of interactions one needs to know more details of the interacting components. Therefore, the near-Earth environments which comprise neutral atmospheric, ionospheric and magnetospheric regions will be discussed in relation to the direct and indirect influences of solar activity.

  4. Simulating super earth atmospheres in the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claudi, R.; Erculiani, M. S.; Galletta, G.; Billi, D.; Pace, E.; Schierano, D.; Giro, E.; D'Alessandro, M.

    2016-01-01

    Several space missions, such as JWST, TESS and the very recently proposed ARIEL, or ground-based experiments, as SPHERE and GPI, have been proposed to measure the atmospheric transmission, reflection and emission spectra of extrasolar planets. The planet atmosphere characteristics and possible biosignatures will be inferred by studying planetary spectra in order to identify the emission/absorption lines/bands from atmospheric molecules such as water (H2O), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4), ammonia (NH3), etc. In particular, it is important to know in detail the optical characteristics of gases in the typical physical conditions of the planetary atmospheres and how these characteristics could be affected by radiation driven photochemical and biochemical reaction. The main aim of the project `Atmosphere in a Test Tube' is to provide insights on exoplanet atmosphere modification due to biological intervention. This can be achieved simulating planetary atmosphere at different pressure and temperature conditions under the effects of radiation sources, used as proxies of different bands of the stellar emission. We are tackling the characterization of extrasolar planet atmospheres by mean of innovative laboratory experiments described in this paper. The experiments are intended to reproduce the conditions on warm earths and super earths hosted by low-mass M dwarfs primaries with the aim to understand if a cyanobacteria population hosted on a Earth-like planet orbiting an M0 star is able to maintain its photosynthetic activity and produce traceable signatures.

  5. Atmospheric electricity and aerosol-cloud interactions in earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manninen, Hanna E.; Tammet, Hannes; Mäkelä, Antti; Haapalainen, Jussi; Mirme, Sander; Nieminen, Tuomo; Franchin, Alessandro; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Hõrrak, Urmas

    2013-05-01

    Firstly, atmospheric ions play an important role in the fair weather electricity in Earth's atmosphere. Small ions, or charged molecular clusters, carry electric currents in the atmosphere. These small ions are continuously present, and their lifetime in lower atmosphere is about one minute. It's essential to find out a connection between the production rate of cluster ions, ion-ion recombination, and ion-aerosol attachment, and their ambient concentrations, in order to understand electrical properties of air. Secondly, atmospheric ions are important for Earth's climate, due to their potential role in secondary aerosol formation, which can lead to increased number of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), which in turn can change the cloud properties. Our aim is to quantify the connections between these two important roles of air ions based on field observations.

  6. Earth Atmosphere Observatory Formation at L2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mettler, Edward; Acikmese, A. Behcet; Breckenridge, William G.; Mecenka, Steven A.; Tubbs, Eldred F.

    2004-01-01

    This paper is a product of research supported by NASA under RASC (the Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts) program. It presents an overall system architecture, and covers issues of deployment, navigation, and control related to a formation of two spacecraft in the neighborhood of the Sun-Earth L2 Lagrange point (on the Sun-Earth line), that serves as an observatory of Earth's atmosphere. The observatory concept definition study was a multi-center NASA effort conducted in 2003, and covered a much wider scope than is presented in this focused paper.The Earth observatory at L2 is a unique design concept that can improve the knowledge and understanding of dynamic, chemical and radiative mechanisms that cause changes in the atmosphere, and can lead to the development of models and techniques to predict short and long-term climate changes.

  7. Evolution of the Earth's Atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Rasool, S I

    1967-09-22

    We living things are a late outgrowth of the metabolism of our Galaxy. The carbon that enters so importantly into our composition was cooked in the remote past in a dying star. From it at lower temperatures nitrogen and oxygen were formed. These, our indispensable elements, were spewed out into space in the exhalations of red giants and such stellar catastrophes as supernovae, there to be mixed with hydrogen, to form eventually the substance of the sun and planets, and ourselves. The waters of ancient seas set the pattern of ions in our blood. The ancient atmospheres molded our metabolism. PMID:17819549

  8. ATMOSPHERES OF HOT SUPER-EARTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Castan, Thibaut; Menou, Kristen

    2011-12-20

    Hot super-Earths likely possess minimal atmospheres established through vapor saturation equilibrium with the ground. We solve the hydrodynamics of these tenuous atmospheres at the surface of CoRot-7b, Kepler-10b, and 55 Cnc-e, including idealized treatments of magnetic drag and ohmic dissipation. We find that atmospheric pressures remain close to their local saturation values in all cases. Despite the emergence of strongly supersonic winds which carry sublimating mass away from the substellar point, the atmospheres do not extend much beyond the day-night terminators. Ground temperatures, which determine the planetary thermal (infrared) signature, are largely unaffected by exchanges with the atmosphere and thus follow the effective irradiation pattern. Atmospheric temperatures, however, which control cloud condensation and thus albedo properties, can deviate substantially from the irradiation pattern. Magnetic drag and ohmic dissipation can also strongly impact the atmospheric behavior, depending on atmospheric composition and the planetary magnetic field strength. We conclude that hot super-Earths could exhibit interesting signatures in reflection (and possibly in emission) which would trace a combination of their ground, atmospheric, and magnetic properties.

  9. Infrared Heterodyne Earth Atmospheric Remote Spectrometer (IHEARS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostiuk, T.; Hanisco, T. F.; Newman, P. A.; Olsen, M. A.; Hewagama, T.; Livengood, T. A.

    2013-12-01

    We will describe the design and capability of the Goddard Space Flight Center Infrared Heterodyne Earth Atmospheric Remote Spectrometer (IHEARS) capable of unique altitude-resolved measurements of chemical and physical processes within the Earth's upper troposphere through the lower mesosphere. Ultra-high spectral resolving power (R>1,000,000) and frequency precision in the 7 to 11 μm wavelength band enables measuring true molecular spectral line shapes with no instrumental effects, thus retrieving small changes in major atmospheric gases, detecting trace species, retrieving temperatures, and measuring Doppler-shift due to winds. These parameters can be obtained from the same set of measurements, a unique capability for Earth remote-sensing. In solar occultation, e.g., from the International Space Station, measurements of abundance changes in <0.5 km layers can yield extremely high sensitivity, e.g., O3 (1ppb), CO2 (1ppm), H2O (<0.5ppm), all at >15-sigma confidence level, enhancing the study of transport and chemistry in upper-troposphere/lower-stratosphere and tropical-transition-layer regions, thereby addressing and constraining GCMs and climate-change models. The technique has a long heritage in ground-based instrumentation and measurements of planetary atmospheres, with proven results paralleling the capability for Earth observations. The proposed detection concept, instrument design and its remote operation and capabilities from Earth orbit will be presented. The proposed instrument will have lower volume, mass, and power requirements compared to existing Earth-science instruments, while enabling new and unique Earth observation measurements from a variety of space platforms. The ultimate projected space flight application will be on Earth Venture Class science missions, the ISS, and future Earth and planetary missions such as GACM.

  10. Atmospheric nitrogen evolution on Earth and Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wordsworth, R. D.

    2016-08-01

    Nitrogen is the most common element in Earth's atmosphere and also appears to be present in significant amounts in the mantle. However, its long-term cycling between these two reservoirs remains poorly understood. Here a range of biotic and abiotic mechanisms are evaluated that could have caused nitrogen exchange between Earth's surface and interior over time. In the Archean, biological nitrogen fixation was likely strongly limited by nutrient and/or electron acceptor constraints. Abiotic fixation of dinitrogen becomes efficient in strongly reducing atmospheres, but only once temperatures exceed around 1000 K. Hence if atmospheric N2 levels really were as low as they are today 3.0-3.5 Ga, the bulk of Earth's mantle nitrogen must have been emplaced in the Hadean, most likely at a time when the surface was molten. The elevated atmospheric N content on Venus compared to Earth can be explained abiotically by a water loss redox pump mechanism, where oxygen liberated from H2O photolysis and subsequent H loss to space oxidises the mantle, causing enhanced outgassing of nitrogen. This mechanism has implications for understanding the partitioning of other Venusian volatiles and atmospheric evolution on exoplanets.

  11. Atmospheric neutrino oscillations for Earth tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Walter

    2016-07-01

    Modern proposed atmospheric neutrino oscillation experiments, such as PINGU in the Antarctic ice or ORCA in Mediterranean sea water, aim for precision measurements of the oscillation parameters including the ordering of the neutrino masses. They can, however, go far beyond that: Since neutrino oscillations are affected by the coherent forward scattering with matter, neutrinos can provide a new view on the interior of the earth. We show that the proposed atmospheric oscillation experiments can measure the lower mantle density of the earth with a precision at the level of a few percent, including the uncertainties of the oscillation parameters and correlations among different density layers. While the earth's core is, in principle, accessible by the angular resolution, new technology would be required to extract degeneracy-free information.

  12. Energetic Particle Influence on the Earth's Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironova, Irina A.; Aplin, Karen L.; Arnold, Frank; Bazilevskaya, Galina A.; Harrison, R. Giles; Krivolutsky, Alexei A.; Nicoll, Keri A.; Rozanov, Eugene V.; Turunen, Esa; Usoskin, Ilya G.

    2015-11-01

    This manuscript gives an up-to-date and comprehensive overview of the effects of energetic particle precipitation (EPP) onto the whole atmosphere, from the lower thermosphere/mesosphere through the stratosphere and troposphere, to the surface. The paper summarizes the different sources and energies of particles, principally galactic cosmic rays (GCRs), solar energetic particles (SEPs) and energetic electron precipitation (EEP). All the proposed mechanisms by which EPP can affect the atmosphere are discussed, including chemical changes in the upper atmosphere and lower thermosphere, chemistry-dynamics feedbacks, the global electric circuit and cloud formation. The role of energetic particles in Earth's atmosphere is a multi-disciplinary problem that requires expertise from a range of scientific backgrounds. To assist with this synergy, summary tables are provided, which are intended to evaluate the level of current knowledge of the effects of energetic particles on processes in the entire atmosphere.

  13. Earth's Climate: The Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifland, Jonathan

    2004-11-01

    A new AGU book, Earth's Climate: The Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction, edited by Chunzai Wang, Shang-Ping Xie, and James A. Carton, presents current observations, theories, and models of ocean-atmosphere interaction that helps shape climate and its variations over the global ocean. The book represents the climate community's first effort to summarize the modern science of ocean-atmosphere interaction and the roles that the interaction play in climate variability in the Pacific, Atlantic, and Indian Oceans as well as interactions across basins and between the tropics and extratropics. In this issue, Eos talks with lead editor Chunzai Wang. Wang is a research oceanographer at the Physical Oceanography Division of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory, in Miami, Florida.

  14. Oxidants and oxidation in the Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The 1994 BOC Priestley Conference was held at Bucknell University in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, from June 24 through June 27, 1994. This conference, managed by the American Chemical Society (ACS), was a joint celebration with the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) commemorating Joseph Priestley's arrival in the U.S. and his discovery of oxygen. The basic theme of the conference was 'Oxidants and Oxidation in the Earth's Atmosphere,' with a keynote lecture on the history of ozone. A distinguished group of U.S. and international atmospheric chemists addressed the issues dominating current research and policy agendas. Topics crucial to the atmospheric chemistry of global change and local and regional air pollution were discussed. The program for the conference included four technical sessions on the following topics: (1) Oxidative Fate of Atmospheric Pollutants; (2) Photochemical Smog and Ozone; (3) Stratospheric Ozone; and (4) Global Tropospheric Ozone.

  15. [How did the earth's oxygen atmosphere originate?].

    PubMed

    Schäfer, G

    2004-09-01

    The planet earth did not carry an oxygen atmosphere from the beginning. Though oxygen could arise from radiation mediated water splitting, these processes were not efficient enough to create a global gas atmosphere. Oxygen in the latter is a product of the photosynthetic activity of early green organisms. Only after biological mass-formation of oxygen the UV-protective ozone layer could develop, then enabeling life to move from water onto land. This took billions of years. The basics of the processes of biological oxygen liberation and utilization are described in the following as well as the importance of their steady state equilibrium. Also a hint is given to oxygen as a toxic compound though being a chemical prerequisite for aerobic life on earth. PMID:15490337

  16. Background Lamb waves in the Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, K.; Kobayashi, N.; Fukao, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Lamb waves of the Earth's atmosphere in the millihertz band have been considered as transient phenomena excited only by large events [e.g. the major volcanic eruption of Krakatoa in 1833, the impact of Siberian meteorite in 1908, the testing of large nuclear tests and the huge earthquakes, Garrett1969]. In a case of the solid Earth, observation of background free oscillations in the millihertz band-now known as Earth's background free oscillations or seismic hum, has been firmly established. Above 5 mHz, their dominant excitation sources are oceanic infragravity waves. At 3.7 and 4.4 mHz an elasto-acoustic resonance between the solid Earth and the atmosphere was observed [Nishida et al., 2000]. These seismic observations show that the contribution of atmospheric disturbances to the seismic hum is dominant below 5 mHz. Such contribution implies background excitations of acoustic-gravity waves in this frequency range. For direct detection of the background acoustic-gravity waves, our group conducted observations using an array of barometers [Nishida et al. 2005]. However, the spatial scale of the array of about 10 km was too small to detect acoustic modes below 10 mHz. Since then, no direct observations of these waves have been reported. In 2011, 337 high-resolution microbarometers were installed on a continental scale at USArray Transportable Array. The large and dense array enables us to detect the background atmospheric waves. Here, we show the first evidence of background Lamb waves in the Earth's atmosphere from 0.2 to 10 mHz, based on the array analysis of microbarometer data from the USArray in 2012. The observations suggest that the excitation sources are atmospheric disturbances in the troposphere. Theoretically, their energy in the troposphere tunnels into the thermosphere at a resonant frequency via thermospheric gravity wave, where the observed amplitudes indeed take a local minimum. The energy leak through the frequency window could partly contribute to

  17. Cosmic dust in the earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plane, John M. C.

    2012-04-01

    This review discusses the magnitude of the cosmic dust input into the earth's atmosphere, and the resulting impacts from around 100 km to the earth's surface. Zodiacal cloud observations and measurements made with a spaceborne dust detector indicate a daily mass input of interplanetary dust particles ranging from 100 to 300 tonnes, which is in agreement with the accumulation rates of cosmic-enriched elements (Ir, Pt, Os and super-paramagnetic Fe) in polar ice cores and deep-sea sediments. In contrast, measurements in the middle atmosphere - by radar, lidar, high-flying aircraft and satellite remote sensing - indicate that the input is between 5 and 50 tonnes per day. There are two reasons why this huge discrepancy matters. First, if the upper range of estimates is correct, then vertical transport in the middle atmosphere must be considerably faster than generally believed; whereas if the lower range is correct, then our understanding of dust evolution in the solar system, and transport from the middle atmosphere to the surface, will need substantial revision. Second, cosmic dust particles enter the atmosphere at high speeds and undergo significant ablation. The resulting metals injected into the atmosphere are involved in a diverse range of phenomena, including: the formation of layers of metal atoms and ions; the nucleation of noctilucent clouds, which are a sensitive marker of climate change; impacts on stratospheric aerosols and O3 chemistry, which need to be considered against the background of a cooling stratosphere and geo-engineering plans to increase sulphate aerosol; and fertilization of the ocean with bio-available Fe, which has potential climate feedbacks.

  18. Cosmic dust in the earth's atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Plane, John M C

    2012-10-01

    This review discusses the magnitude of the cosmic dust input into the earth's atmosphere, and the resulting impacts from around 100 km to the earth's surface. Zodiacal cloud observations and measurements made with a spaceborne dust detector indicate a daily mass input of interplanetary dust particles ranging from 100 to 300 tonnes, which is in agreement with the accumulation rates of cosmic-enriched elements (Ir, Pt, Os and super-paramagnetic Fe) in polar ice cores and deep-sea sediments. In contrast, measurements in the middle atmosphere - by radar, lidar, high-flying aircraft and satellite remote sensing - indicate that the input is between 5 and 50 tonnes per day. There are two reasons why this huge discrepancy matters. First, if the upper range of estimates is correct, then vertical transport in the middle atmosphere must be considerably faster than generally believed; whereas if the lower range is correct, then our understanding of dust evolution in the solar system, and transport from the middle atmosphere to the surface, will need substantial revision. Second, cosmic dust particles enter the atmosphere at high speeds and undergo significant ablation. The resulting metals injected into the atmosphere are involved in a diverse range of phenomena, including: the formation of layers of metal atoms and ions; the nucleation of noctilucent clouds, which are a sensitive marker of climate change; impacts on stratospheric aerosols and O(3) chemistry, which need to be considered against the background of a cooling stratosphere and geo-engineering plans to increase sulphate aerosol; and fertilization of the ocean with bio-available Fe, which has potential climate feedbacks. PMID:22678029

  19. Comparing Earth and Titan's atmospheric inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bampasidis, Georgios; Coustenis, Athena; Solomonidou, Anezina; Moussas, Xenophon; Preka-Papadema, Panagiota

    2010-05-01

    Titan is currently the only confirmed exobiotic environment known to us. It is also perhaps the most intriguing object in our Solar System. Our understanding of Titan, and of the kronian system as a whole, has been greatly enhanced by the data returned by the Cassini/Huygens mission since 2004 and still operating on the spot. Thus, we know today that the thick atmosphere layer - covering the satellite's mysterious surface - is essentially made of nitrogen, with small amounts of methane and hydrogen. The combination among these mother molecules produces an exciting organic chemistry in Titan's atmosphere, with hydrocarbons and nitriles (one of the latter, HCN, is a prebiotic molecule). The organic chemistry, climate conditions, meteorology, methane cycle and other aspects of the surface make Titan an extremely important astrobiological place. We will summarize our current understanding of the analogues between Titan and Earth's atmospheres focusing on some compositional and climatological issues. After the Cassini/Huygens mission, there will remain several unanswered questions on the astrobiological aspects of the satellite that will require a future mission with an optimized orbital tour, specific in situ elements and advanced instrumentation, such as the Titan Saturn System Mission (Coustenis et al, 2009; Reh et al., 2009) studied in 2008. The TSSM orbiter with hi-resolution imagers and IR spectrometers onboard and the TSSM Montgolfier with an aerosol analyser and a meteorology package aboard will deeply investigate the Titan organic factory and its atmospheric diversity by performing long-term observations. Definitely, as Titan is a unique earth-like body in the solar system, the long experience of studying the terrestrial atmosphere gives us the tools to unveil the satellite's mysteries. On the other hand, Titan's science will significally contribute to the Earth's atmospheric knowledge, its evolution and chemistry and to the origin of life, as it certainly

  20. Chemistry of Earth's Putative Steam Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fegley, B.; Schaefer, L.

    2007-12-01

    The concept of a steam atmosphere generated by impact devolatilization of planetesimals accreted during Earth's formation is over 20 years old (Matsui and Abe, 1986; Lange and Ahrens, 1982). Surprisingly, with the possible exception of a few qualitative remarks, no one has critically assessed this scenario. We use thermochemical equilibrium and, where relevant, thermochemical kinetic calculations to model the chemistry of the "steam" atmosphere produced by impact volatilization of different types of accreting material. We present results for our nominal conditions (1500 K, total P = 100 bar). We also studied the effects of variable temperature and total pressure. The composition of the accreting material is modeled using average compositions of the Orgueil CI chondrite, the Murchison CM2 chondrite, the Allende CV3 chondrite, average ordinary (H, L, LL) chondrites, and average enstatite (EH, EL) chondrites. The major gases released from CI and CM chondritic material are H2O, CO2, H2, H2S, CO, CH4, and SO2 in decreasing order of abundance. About 10% of the atmosphere is CO2. The major gases released from CV chondritic material are CO2, H2O, CO, H2, and SO2 in decreasing order of abundance. About 20% of the total atmosphere is steam. The major gases released from average ordinary chondritic material are H2, CO, H2O, CO2, CH4, H2S, and N2 in decreasing order of abundance. The "steam" atmosphere is predominantly H2 + CO with steam being about 10% of the total atmosphere. The major gases released from EH chondritic material are H2, CO, H2O, CO2, N2, and CH4 in decreasing order of abundance. The "steam" atmosphere is predominantly H2 + CO with about 10% of the total atmosphere as steam. This work was supported by the NASA Astrobiology and Origins Programs.

  1. First Super-Earth Atmosphere Analysed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-12-01

    The atmosphere around a super-Earth exoplanet has been analysed for the first time by an international team of astronomers using ESO's Very Large Telescope. The planet, which is known as GJ 1214b, was studied as it passed in front of its parent star and some of the starlight passed through the planet's atmosphere. We now know that the atmosphere is either mostly water in the form of steam or is dominated by thick clouds or hazes. The results will appear in the 2 December 2010 issue of the journal Nature. The planet GJ 1214b was confirmed in 2009 using the HARPS instrument on ESO's 3.6-metre telescope in Chile (eso0950) [1]. Initial findings suggested that this planet had an atmosphere, which has now been confirmed and studied in detail by an international team of astronomers, led by Jacob Bean (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics), using the FORS instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope. "This is the first super-Earth to have its atmosphere analysed. We've reached a real milestone on the road toward characterising these worlds," said Bean. GJ 1214b has a radius of about 2.6 times that of the Earth and is about 6.5 times as massive, putting it squarely into the class of exoplanets known as super-Earths. Its host star lies about 40 light-years from Earth in the constellation of Ophiuchus (the Serpent Bearer). It is a faint star [2], but it is also small, which means that the size of the planet is large compared to the stellar disc, making it relatively easy to study [3]. The planet travels across the disc of its parent star once every 38 hours as it orbits at a distance of only two million kilometres: about seventy times closer than the Earth orbits the Sun. To study the atmosphere, the team observed the light coming from the star as the planet passed in front of it [4]. During these transits, some of the starlight passes through the planet's atmosphere and, depending on the chemical composition and weather on the planet, specific wavelengths of light are

  2. Atmospheric heat engines on earth and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, J. R.

    1987-06-01

    The character of the earth's atmospheric heat engine depends, inter alia, on the relatively tight linkage between surface fluxes of energy and of H2O. On Mars, on the other hand, H2O-based latent heat fluxes are only a trivial fraction of total surface energy fluxes, and the dominant component of the working fluid is CO2. These considerations are made quantitative through evaluation of Lambda, the equivalent temperature excess at the surface for a particular component of the working fluid. The very different values (and latitudinal distribution) of Lambda on the two planets signalize vividly their different meteorology. Preliminary study of the climatology of Lambda on earth brings out, in particular, the tightness of the H2O-energy linkage in the tropics.

  3. Dynamic model of the Earth's upper atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slowey, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    An initial modification to the MSF/J70 Thermospheric Model, in which the variations due to sudden geomagnetic disturbances upon the Earth's upper atmospheric density structure were modeled is presented. This dynamic model of the geomagnetic variation included is an improved version of one which SAO developed from the analysis of the ESRO 4 mass spectrometer data that was incorporated in the Jacchia 1977 model. The variation with geomagnetic local time as well as with geomagnetic latitude are included, and also the effects due to disturbance of the temperature profiles in the region of energy deposition.

  4. NASA Now: Earth’s Atmosphere: Earth Science Week

    NASA Video Gallery

    Dr. Kenneth Pickering talks about the composition of Earth’s atmosphere, how it protects life on Earth, and how it is interconnected with the Earth system. Pickering discusses findings from the D...

  5. NASA Now Minute: Earth’s Atmosphere: Earth Science Week

    NASA Video Gallery

    Dr. Kenneth Pickering talks about the composition of Earth’s atmosphere,how it protects life on Earth, and how it is interconnected with theEarth system. Pickering discusses findings from the D...

  6. Evolution of Earth&'s Atmosphere and Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasting, J. F.

    2004-12-01

    Earth's climate prior to 2.5 Ga seems to have been, if anything, warmer than today (1,2), despite the faintness of the young Sun (3). The idea that the young Sun was 25-30 percent less bright has been bolstered by data on mass loss from young, solar-type stars (4). Sagan and Mullen (1) suggested many years ago that the warming required to offset low solar luminosity was provided by high concentrations of reduced greenhouse gases. Ammonia has since been shown to be photochemically unstable in low-O2 atmospheres (5), but methane is a viable candidate. Methane photolyzes only at wavelengths shorter than 145 nm, so it is long-lived in the absence of O2 and O3. Furthermore, it is produced by anaerobic bacteria (methanogens) that are thought to have evolved early in Earth history (6). A biological methane flux comparable to today's flux, ~500 Tg CH4/yr, could have been generated by methanogens living in an anaerobic early ocean and sediments (7). This flux should have increased once oxygenic photosynthesis evolved because of increased production and recycling of organic matter (8). An Archean methane flux equal to today's flux could have generated atmospheric CH4 concentrations in excess of 1000 ppmv (9). This, in turn, could have provided 30 degrees or more of greenhouse warming (10) enough to have kept the early Earth warm even if atmospheric CO2 was no higher than today. All of this does not imply that CO2 concentrations must have been low throughout the Archean. Indeed, siderite-coated stream pebbles imply that pCO2 was greater than 2.5,e10-3 bar, or ~7 times present, at 3.2 Ga (11). Atmospheric CO2 could have been much higher than this if the continents had formed slowly (12) and/or if subduction of carbonates was inhibited (13). The rise in O2 at ~2.3 Ga (14,15) brought an end to the methane greenhouse and may have triggered the Huronian glaciation (10). Although methane concentrations declined with the rise of O2, they may still have remained much higher than

  7. New Data for Early Earth Atmospheric Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackie, D.; Stark, G.; Lyons, J. R.; Pickering, J.; Smith, P. L.; Thorne, A.

    2010-12-01

    The timing of the oxygenation of the Earth’s atmosphere is a central issue in understanding the Earth’s paleoclimate. The discovery of mass-independent fractionation (MIF) of sulphur isotopes deposited within Archean and Paleoproterozoic rock samples (> 2.4 Gyrs) and the transition to mass-dependent fractionation found in younger samples, could provide a marker for the rise in oxygen concentrations in the Earth’s atmosphere [1]. Laboratory experiments [2; 3] suggest isotopic self shielding during gas phase photolysis of SO2 present at wavelengths shorter than 220 nm as the dominant mechanism for MIF. The UV absorption of SO2 is dominated by the C1B2-X1A1 electronic system which comprises strong vibrational bands extending from 170 - 230 nm. Within an atmosphere consisting of low O2 and O3 concentrations, such as that predicted for the early Earth, UV radiation would penetrate deep into the ancient Earth’s atmosphere in the 180 - 220 nm range driving the photolysis of SO2. We have conducted the first ever high resolution measurements of the photo absorption cross sections of several isotopologues of SO2, namely 32SO2, 33SO2, 34SO2 and 36SO2, using the Imperial College UV Fourier transform spectrometer [4] which is ideal for high resolution, broad-band, VIS/UV measurements. The cross sections are being measured at Imperial College at initial resolutions of 1.0 cm-1 which will be increased to resolutions < 0.5 cm-1 for inclusion in photochemical models of the early Earth’s atmosphere in order to more reliably interpret the sulphur isotope ratios found in ancient rock samples [5]. For discussion and interpretation of the photochemical models see the abstract by Lyons et al.(this meeting). References [1] J. Farquhar and B.A. Wing. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 213:1-13, 2003. [2] J. Farquhar, J. Savarino, S. Airieau, and M.H Thiemens. Journal of Geophysical Research,106:32829-32839, 2001. [3] A. Pen and R. N. Clayton.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta

  8. Atmospheric breakup of a small comet in the Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teterev, A. V.; Misychenko, N. I.; Rudak, L. V.; Romanov, G. S.; Smetannikov, A. S.; Nemchinov, I. V.

    1993-01-01

    The aerodynamic stresses can lead to the deformation and even to destruction of the meteoroids during their flight through the atmosphere. The pressure at the blunt nose of the cosmic body moving at very high speed through the dense layers of the atmosphere may be much larger than the tensile or the compressive strength of the body. So the usage of the hydrodynamics theory is validated. The estimates show that the transverse velocity of the substance of the body U is of the order of (rho(sub a)/rho(sub o))(sup 1/2)V where V is the velocity of the body and rho(sub o) is its density, rho(sub a) is the density of the atmosphere. The separation of the fragments is larger than the diameter of the body D if D is less than D(sub c) = 2H(square root of rho(sub a)/rho(sub o)), where H is the characteristic scale of the atmosphere. For an icy body one obtains U = 1/30(V) and critical diameter D(sub C) = 500 m. The process of the disintegration of the body is still not fully understood and so one can use the numerical simulation to investigate it. Such simulations where conducted for the Venusian atmosphere and the gaseous equation of state of the body was used. For the Earth atmosphere for the velocity V = 50 km/s the pressure at the blunt nose of the body is 25 kbar, and is of the order of bulk modulus of compressibility of the water or ice. The realistic EOS of water in tabular form was used. It was assumed that the initial shape of the body was spherical and the initial diameter D(sub o) of the body is 200 m and so it is smaller than the critical diameter D(sub C). The initial kinetic energy of the icy body is equivalent to the energy of the explosion 1200 Mt of TNT. The results of the simulation of the deformation of the body during its vertical flight through the atmosphere and during its impact into the ocean are presented.

  9. Simulation of ablation in Earth atmospheric entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keenan, James A.; Candler, Graham V.

    1993-01-01

    The process of ablation for Earth atmospheric entry is simulated using a computational approach that allows thermo-chemical nonequilibrium of the flow field and ablation gases. The heat pulse into the heat shield is modeled. The flowfield and graphite heat shield are coupled through surface mass and energy balances. The surface thermochemistry involves the oxidation of graphite and allows for catalytic recombination of diatomic oxygen. Steady-state simulations are performed on a one meter nose radius sphere at an altitude of 65/km and at freestream velocities of 8 km/s and 10 km/s. A transient simulation is performed at 65 km altitude and a freestream velocity of 10 km/s.

  10. Extraterrestrial matter in the Earth atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, Olga

    The Sub-Millimetre Radiometer (SMR) on board the Odin satellite, launched in February 2001, observes thermal emissions of stratospheric nitric oxide (NO) at the Earth limb in a band centred at 551.7GHz. As member of the NOx family, this species plays an important role in stratospheric ozone chemistry. At high altitudes in the thermosphere, NO is formed when N2 is dissociated by solar radiation and through energetic particle precipitation (e.g. auroral activity). Its spatio-temporal distribution is influenced by the global meridional circulation, in particular during polar night when the lifetime of NOx species is long enough that downward transported NOx can contribute to the NOy budget in the mesosphere and stratosphere. Global measurements of NO were performed by Odin/SMR on approximately one observation day per month from October 2003 to April 2007 and on a nearly weekly basis thereafter. This presentation focuses on a detailed description of the characteristics of the Odin observations. The derived Odin NO climatology is then analysed in relation to observed variability of middle atmospheric transport and solar radiation. Odin is a Swedish-led satellite project funded jointly by Sweden (SNSB), Canada (CSA), Fin-land (TEKES), and France (CNES), with support by the 3rd party mission programme of the European Space Agency (ESA).

  11. Interferometric Characterization of the Earth's Atmosphere from Lagrange Point 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, J. R.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Part of the NASA plans for future Earth-Science missions calls for observations using novel vantage points that can produce science products otherwise unobtainable. Observations of the Earth from the Lagrange-2 point, L-2, (1.5 million kilometers behind the Earth on the Earth-Sun line) affords a unique vantage point for atmospheric science. Special observation of the Earth's atmosphere using solar occultation techniques in the near infrared (1 to 4 microns) provides one of the most accurate method of passively sensing altitude profiles of the major species (CO2, O3, O2, CH4, H2O, N2O). In addition to observation of the Earth's atmosphere, it will be possible to observe a portion of the solar disk at moderate spatial resolution without interference from the Earth.

  12. Atmospheric attenuation relative to earth-viewing orbital sensors. [atmospheric moisture effects on microwaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, S. C.; Jayroe, R. R., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Earth viewing space missions offer exciting new possibilities in several earth resources disciplines - geography, hydrology, agriculture, geology, and oceanography, to name a few. A most useful tool in planning experiments and applying space technology to earth observation is a statistical description of atmospheric parameters. Four dimensional atmospheric models and a world wide cloud model are used to produce atmospheric attenuation models to predict degradation effects for all classes of sensors for application to earth sensing experiments from spaceborne platforms. To insure maximum utility and application of these products, the development of an interaction model of microwave energy and atmospheric variables provides a complete description of the effects of atmospheric moisture upon microwaves.

  13. Atmospheric effects on measurements of distance to Earth artificial satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kablak, N.; Klimyk, V.; Shvalagin, I.; Kablak, U.

    2005-06-01

    This paper is devoted to the problem of accuracy increasing in allowing for Earth's atmosphere influences on results of daily ranging observations of the Earth artificial satellites (ASE). Atmosphere delays and their spatial-timely variations for spherical-symmetrical and nonspherical models of atmosphere were determined radiosounding data gathered during a year in Ukraine region using, developed valuing and analysis of models reductions to over of atmosphere, which recommended of IERS for processing distance-ranging observations of the Earth artificial satellites. Investigated and improved models of reductions to over of the atmosphere on the basis of discovered regional and local peculiarity's of influence atmosphere on the laser and radio ranging observations of the Earth artificial satellites.

  14. Global Change in Earth's Atmosphere: Natural and Anthropogenic Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lean, J.

    2013-12-01

    To what extent is human activity, such as the emission of carbon dioxide and other 'greenhouse' gases, influencing Earth's atmosphere, compared with natural variations driven by, for example, the Sun or volcanoes? Why has Earth's surface warmed barely, if at all, in the last decade? Why is the atmosphere at just 20 km above the surface cooling instead of warming? When - and will - the ozone layer recover from its two-decade decline due to chlorofluorocarbon depletion? Natural and anthropogenic factors are changing Earth's atmosphere, each with distinct temporal, geographical and altitudinal signatures. Increasing greenhouse gases, for example, warm the surface but cool the stratosphere and upper atmosphere. Aerosols injected into the stratosphere during a volcanic eruption warm the stratosphere but cool the surface. Increases in the Sun's brightness warm Earth's atmosphere, throughout. This talk will quantify and compare a variety of natural and human influences on the Earth's atmosphere, extracted statistically from multiple datasets with the goal of understanding how and why Earth's atmosphere is changing. The extent to which responses to natural influences are presently masking or exacerbating ongoing responses to human activity is examined. Scenarios for future levels of anthropogenic gases and solar activity are then used to speculate how Earth's atmosphere might evolve in future decades, according to both statistical models of the databases and physical general circulation models.

  15. Telescope Formation at L2 for Observing Earth's Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mettler, Edward; Acikmese, Behcet; Breckenridge, William; Macenka, Steven; Hein, Randall; Tubbs, Eldred

    2007-01-01

    Two documents describe a proposed Earth-atmosphere observatory to orbit the Sun at the Sun-Earth L2 Lagrange point -- a point of unstable equilibrium in the shadow of the Earth, about 1.5 million km from the Earth along an outward projection of the Earth-Sun axis. The observatory would comprise two spacecraft flying in precision formation: (1) a primary-aperture spacecraft, from which would be deployed a 25-m diameter membrane primary mirror aimed at the Earth, and (2) a secondary-telescope spacecraft at the focal plane of the primary mirror, 125-m distant along the axis towards the Earth. The secondary telescope would be aimed at the primary mirror and slowly rotated to scan the focused annular image of the visible illuminated portion of the Earth's atmosphere during continuous occultation of the Sun.

  16. ATMOS: Long term atmospheric measurements for mission to planet Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    A long-term, space-based measurement program, together with continued balloon and aircraft-borne investigations, is essential to monitor the predicted effects in the atmosphere, to determine to what extent the concentration measurements agree with current models of stratospheric chemistry, and to determine the condition of the ozone layer. The Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) Experiment is currently making comprehensive, global measurements of Earth's atmosphere as part of the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS) program on the Space Shuttle. Part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth, ATLAS is a continuing series of missions to study Earth and the Sun and provide a more fundamental understanding of the solar influences on Earth's atmosphere. The ATMOS program, instruments, and science results are presented.

  17. Atmospheres and evolution. [of microbial life on earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margulis, L.; Lovelock, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    Studies concerning the regulation of the earth atmosphere and the relation of atmospheric changes to the evolution of microbial life are reviewed. The improbable nature of the composition of the earth atmosphere in light of the atmospheric compositions of Mars and Venus and equilibrium considerations is pointed out, and evidence for the existence of microbial (procaryotic) life on earth as far back as 3.5 billion years ago is presented. The emergence of eucaryotic life in the Phanerozoic due to evolving symbioses between different procaryotic species is discussed with examples given of present-day symbiotic relationships between bacteria and eucaryotes. The idea that atmospheric gases are kept in balance mainly by the actions of bacterial cells is then considered, and it is argued that species diversity is necessary for the maintenance and origin of life on earth in its present form.

  18. STS-39 Earth observation of Earth's limb at sunset shows atmospheric layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-39 Earth observation taken aboard Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, shows the Earth's limb at sunset with numerous atmospheric scattering layers highlighted. The layers consist of fine particles suspended in very stable layers of the atmosphere. The layers act as a prism for the sunlight.

  19. ON THE STABILITY OF SUPER-EARTH ATMOSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Heng, Kevin; Kopparla, Pushkar

    2012-07-20

    We investigate the stability of super-Earth atmospheres around M stars using a seven-parameter, analytical framework. We construct stability diagrams in the parameter space of exoplanetary radius versus semimajor axis and elucidate the regions in which the atmospheres are stable against the condensation of their major constituents, out of the gas phase, on their permanent nightside hemispheres. We find that super-Earth atmospheres that are nitrogen-dominated (Earth-like) occupy a smaller region of allowed parameter space, compared to hydrogen-dominated atmospheres, because of the dual effects of diminished advection and enhanced radiative cooling. Furthermore, some super-Earths which reside within the habitable zones of M stars may not possess stable atmospheres, depending on the mean molecular weight and infrared photospheric pressure of their atmospheres. We apply our stability diagrams to GJ 436b and GJ 1214b, and demonstrate that atmospheric compositions with high mean molecular weights are disfavored if these exoplanets possess solid surfaces and shallow atmospheres. Finally, we construct stability diagrams tailored to the Kepler data set, for G and K stars, and predict that about half of the exoplanet candidates are expected to harbor stable atmospheres if Earth-like conditions are assumed. We include 55 Cancri e and CoRoT-7b in our stability diagram for G stars.

  20. Catalytic processes in the atmospheres of Earth and venus.

    PubMed

    Demore, W B; Yung, Y L

    1982-09-24

    Photochemical processes in planetary atmospheres are strongly influenced by catalytic effects of minor constituents. Catalytic cycles in the atmospheres of Earth and Venus are closely related. For example, chlorine oxides (CIOx) act as catalysts in the two atmospheres. On Earth, they serve to convert odd oxygen (atomic oxygen and ozone) to molecular oxygen. On Venus they have a similar effect, but in addition they accelerate the reactions of atomic and molecular oxygen with carbon monoxide. The latter process occurs by a unique combination of CIOx catalysis and sulfur dioxide photosensitization. The mechanism provides an explanation for the very low extent of carbon dioxide decomposition by sunlight in the Venus atmosphere. PMID:17837628

  1. Crossing the Boundaries in Planetary Atmospheres - From Earth to Exoplanets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Genio, Anthony Del

    2013-01-01

    The past decade has been an especially exciting time to study atmospheres, with a renaissance in fundamental studies of Earths general circulation and hydrological cycle, stimulated by questions about past climates and the urgency of projecting the future impacts of humankinds activities. Long-term spacecraft and Earth-based observation of solar system planets have now reinvigorated the study of comparative planetary climatology. The explosion in discoveries of planets outside our solar system has made atmospheric science integral to understanding the diversity of our solar system and the potential habitability of planets outside it. Thus, the AGU Chapman Conference Crossing the Boundaries in Planetary Atmospheres From Earth to Exoplanets, held in Annapolis, MD from June 24-27, 2013 gathered Earth, solar system, and exoplanet scientists to share experiences, insights, and challenges from their individual disciplines, and discuss areas in which thinking broadly might enhance our fundamental understanding of how atmospheres work.

  2. Earth Global Reference Atmospheric Model 2007 (Earth-GRAM07)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leslie, Fred W.; Justus, C. G.

    2008-01-01

    GRAM is a Fortran software package that can run on a variety of platforms including PC's. GRAM provides values of atmospheric quantities such as temperature, pressure, density, winds, constituents, etc. GRAM99 covers all global locations, all months, and heights from the surface to approx. 1000 km). Dispersions (perturbations) of these parameters are also provided and are spatially and temporally correlated. GRAM can be run in a stand-alone mode or called as a subroutine from a trajectory program. GRAM07 is diagnostic, not prognostic (i.e., it describes the atmosphere, but it does not forecast). The source code is distributed free-of-charge to eligible recipients.

  3. Space Science in Action: Earth's Atmosphere [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    In this videotape recording, students learn about the layers of the atmosphere and why each is important to the survival of life on the planet. Students discover why the atmosphere is responsible for weather and see how special aircraft actually fly into hurricanes. Students build their own working barometer in a hands-on activity. Contents…

  4. Energetic particle influences in Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aplin, Karen; Harrison, R. Giles; Nicoll, Keri; Rycroft, Michael; Briggs, Aaron

    2016-04-01

    Energetic particles from outer space, known as galactic cosmic rays, constantly ionise the entire atmosphere. During strong solar storms, solar energetic particles can also reach the troposphere and enhance ionisation. Atmospheric ionisation generates cluster ions. These facilitate current flow in the global electric circuit, which arises from charge separation in thunderstorms driven by meteorological processes. Energetic particles, whether solar or galactic in origin, may influence the troposphere and stratosphere through a range of different mechanisms, each probably contributing a small amount. Some of the suggested processes potentially acting over a wide spatial area in the troposphere include enhanced scavenging of charged aerosol particles, modification of droplet or droplet-droplet behavior by charging, and the direct absorption of infra-red radiation by the bending and stretching of hydrogen bonds inside atmospheric cluster-ions. As well as reviewing the proposed mechanisms by which energetic particles modulate atmospheric properties, we will also discuss new instrumentation for measurement of energetic particles in the atmosphere.

  5. Atmospherics: A Look at the Earth's Airy Shell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byalko, A. V.

    1991-01-01

    Describes differences in the composition, pressure, and temperature at distinct altitudes of the Earth's atmosphere from the point of view of physical laws. Discusses the genesis and importance of ozone, thermal radiation and the "layer cake" arrangement of the atmosphere, and solar energy in connection with thermal equilibrium. (JJK)

  6. Expedition Seven Takes Breathtaking Photo of Earth's Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This Expedition Seven image, taken while aboard the International Space Station (ISS), shows the limb of the Earth at the bottom transitioning into the orange-colored stratosphere, the lowest and most dense portion of the Earth's atmosphere. The troposphere ends abruptly at the tropopause, which appears in the image as the sharp boundary between the orange- and blue-colored atmosphere. The silvery blue noctilucent clouds extend far above the Earth's troposphere. The silver of the setting moon is visible at upper right.

  7. CHEMISTRY OF SILICATE ATMOSPHERES OF EVAPORATING SUPER-EARTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, Laura; Fegley, Bruce E-mail: bfegley@levee.wustl.ed

    2009-10-01

    We model the formation of silicate atmospheres on hot volatile-free super-Earths. Our calculations assume that all volatile elements such as H, C, N, S, and Cl have been lost from the planet. We find that the atmospheres are composed primarily of Na, O{sub 2}, O, and SiO gas, in order of decreasing abundance. The atmospheric composition may be altered by fractional vaporization, cloud condensation, photoionization, and reaction with any residual volatile elements remaining in the atmosphere. Cloud condensation reduces the abundance of all elements in the atmosphere except Na and K. We speculate that large Na and K clouds such as those observed around Mercury and Io may surround hot super-Earths. These clouds would occult much larger fractions of the parent star than a closely bound atmosphere, and may be observable through currently available methods.

  8. The rise of oxygen in Earth's early ocean and atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Timothy W; Reinhard, Christopher T; Planavsky, Noah J

    2014-02-20

    The rapid increase of carbon dioxide concentration in Earth's modern atmosphere is a matter of major concern. But for the atmosphere of roughly two-and-half billion years ago, interest centres on a different gas: free oxygen (O2) spawned by early biological production. The initial increase of O2 in the atmosphere, its delayed build-up in the ocean, its increase to near-modern levels in the sea and air two billion years later, and its cause-and-effect relationship with life are among the most compelling stories in Earth's history. PMID:24553238

  9. The chemical composition and climatology of the earth's early atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson-Sellers, A.

    1983-01-01

    The earth's climate as it relates to the evolution of life is discussed.. Seven fundamental characteristics of the early evolutionary environment are examined, including a carbon dioxide and water vapor atmosphere, atmospheric mass between 500 and 1000 mb, a global hydrosphere, lowered solar luminosity, hospitable average global temperatures, a convectively active atmosphere, and trace gases. The influence of the early earth's extensive hydrosphere on the origin of life is considered. The warming of that hydrosphere due to radiative fluxes and the greenhouse effect is examined, and the nature of the feedback between clouds and climate is addressed.

  10. Study of the Interaction of Micrometeoroids with Earth's Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briani, G.; Pupillo, G.; Aiello, S.; Pace, E.; Shore, S.; Passaro, A.

    Submillimetric micrometeoroids dominates the annual extraterrestrial mass flux toward the Earth. Indeed these bodies show an unexpected ability to survive the interaction with the terrestrial atmosphere. In this work it is suggested a new general numerical model for the micrometeoroids-atmosphere interaction: this is the first step of a more extended study \\citep{aiello} that includes also experiments for the next few years in laboratories as well in atmosphere (microsatellites or balloon-borne experiments).

  11. Propagation of sound through the Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meredith, R. W.; Becher, J.

    1983-01-01

    The data collected at a pressure of one atmosphere for the different temperatures and relative humidities of the air-water vapor mixtures is summarized. The dew point hygrometer used in these measurements did not give reliable results for dew points much above the ambient room temperature. For this reason measurements were not attempted at the higher temperatures and humidities. Viscous wall losses in the resonant tube at 0 C so dominate the molecular relaxation of nitrogen, in the air-water vapor mixture, that reliable data could not be obtained using the free decay method in a resonant tube at one atmosphere. In an effort to obtain viable data at these temperatures, measurements were performed at a pressure of 10 atmospheres. Since the molecular relaxation peak is proportional to the pressure and the viscous losses are proportional to the inverse square root of the pressure the peak height should be measurable at the higher pressure. The tradeoff here is that at 10 atmospheres; the highest relative humidity attainable is 10 percent. The data collected at 10 atmospheres is also summarized.

  12. Optical Instability of the Earth's Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kucherov, N. I. (Editor)

    1966-01-01

    The atmosphere is not stationary: it changes continuously and its optical properties are inherently unstable. This optical instability of the air medium is of considerable significance in various fields of research and observation where light transmission through the atmosphere plays a basic role. Under the category of optical instabilities we mainly have the different atmospheric perturbations whose integrated effect constitutes the astroclimate: these are image pulsation, scintillation, and the blurring of the diffraction disk. The artificial satellites and space probes collected a great amount of new data on the upper atmosphere and on the outer space environment. New interesting and important problems arose, which attracted the attention of many geophysicists and astronomers. This shift in the center of gravity of scientific interests and efforts is observed mainly among scientists specializing in atmospheric physics. Recently, scientific organizations engaged on optical instability research switched to astroclimatic topics. Twelve scientific organizations were represented at the Soviet astronomers have recently been charged with a very difficult and responsible task: to select suitable sites for the erection of new observatories, including an astrophysical observatory with the largest telescope in the USSR. A considerable number of research groups were dispatched into various areas of the Soviet Union, and many astronomical observatories took part in the astroclimatic survey. The work of these expeditions remains un-paralleled by any other country in the world. On the other hand, these researches aroused a definite interest in astroclimate in Soviet astronomical observatories. International astronomical circles pay an ever growing attention to the problems of astroclimate.

  13. Earth Global Reference Atmospheric Model (GRAM99): Short Course

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leslie, Fred W.; Justus, C. G.

    2007-01-01

    Earth-GRAM is a FORTRAN software package that can run on a variety of platforms including PC's. For any time and location in the Earth's atmosphere, Earth-GRAM provides values of atmospheric quantities such as temperature, pressure, density, winds, constituents, etc.. Dispersions (perturbations) of these parameters are also provided and have realistic correlations, means, and variances - useful for Monte Carlo analysis. Earth-GRAM is driven by observations including a tropospheric database available from the National Climatic Data Center. Although Earth-GRAM can be run in a "stand-alone" mode, many users incorporate it into their trajectory codes. The source code is distributed free-of-charge to eligible recipients.

  14. Evolution of a steam atmosphere during earth's accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahnle, K. J.; Kasting, J. F.; Pollack, J. B.

    1988-04-01

    The evolution of an impact-generated steam atmosphere around an accreting earth is presently modeled under the assumption of Safronov (1978) accretion, in a scheme that encompasses the degassing of planetesimals on impact, thermal blanketing by the steam atmosphere, surface-to-interior water exchange, the shock heating and convective cooling of the earth's interior, and hydrogen escape due both to solar EUV-powered planetary wind and impact erosion. The model yields four distinct classes of impact-generated atmospheres: the first, on which emphasis is placed, has as its salient feature a molten surface that is maintained by the opacity of a massive water vapor atmosphere; the second occurs when the EUV-limited escape exceeds the impact degassing rate, while the third is dominated by impact erosion and the fourth is characterized by an atmosphere more massive than any thus far encountered.

  15. Evolution of a steam atmosphere during earth's accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, Kevin J.; Kasting, James F.; Pollack, James B.

    1988-01-01

    The evolution of an impact-generated steam atmosphere around an accreting earth is presently modeled under the assumption of Safronov (1978) accretion, in a scheme that encompasses the degassing of planetesimals on impact, thermal blanketing by the steam atmosphere, surface-to-interior water exchange, the shock heating and convective cooling of the earth's interior, and hydrogen escape due both to solar EUV-powered planetary wind and impact erosion. The model yields four distinct classes of impact-generated atmospheres: the first, on which emphasis is placed, has as its salient feature a molten surface that is maintained by the opacity of a massive water vapor atmosphere; the second occurs when the EUV-limited escape exceeds the impact degassing rate, while the third is dominated by impact erosion and the fourth is characterized by an atmosphere more massive than any thus far encountered.

  16. Impacts and atmospheric erosion on the early Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vickery, A. M.

    1991-01-01

    It was suggested that heating and/or vaporization of accreting carbonaceous-chondrite-type planetestimals could result in the release of their volatile components. Modeling of this process strongly suggests that substantial atmospheres/hydrospheres could develop this way. During most of the accretionary process, impact velocities generally differed from the escape velocity of the growing proto-planet because most of the collisions were between bodies in nearly matching orbits. Toward the end of accretion, however, collisions were rarer but more energetic, involving large planetestimals and higher impact velocities. Such impacts result in a net loss of atmosphere from a planet, and the cumulative effect impacts during the period of heavy bombardment might have dramatically depleted the original atmospheres. Models developed to study atmospheric erosion by impacts on Mars and the interaction of the vapor plume produced by KT impactor on Earth are applied to the case of the evolution of Earth's atmosphere.

  17. Clouds in Super-Earth Atmospheres: Chemical Equilibrium Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbarek, Rostom; Kempton, Eliza M.-R.

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies have unequivocally proven the existence of clouds in super-Earth atmospheres. Here we provide a theoretical context for the formation of super-Earth clouds by determining which condensates are likely to form under the assumption of chemical equilibrium. We study super-Earth atmospheres of diverse bulk composition, which are assumed to form by outgassing from a solid core of chondritic material, following Schaefer & Fegley. The super-Earth atmospheres that we study arise from planetary cores made up of individual types of chondritic meteorites. They range from highly reducing to oxidizing and have carbon to oxygen (C:O) ratios that are both sub-solar and super-solar, thereby spanning a range of atmospheric composition that is appropriate for low-mass exoplanets. Given the atomic makeup of these atmospheres, we minimize the global Gibbs free energy of formation for over 550 gases and condensates to obtain the molecular composition of the atmospheres over a temperature range of 350–3000 K. Clouds should form along the temperature–pressure boundaries where the condensed species appear in our calculation. We find that the composition of condensate clouds depends strongly on both the H:O and C:O ratios. For the super-Earth archetype GJ 1214b, KCl and ZnS are the primary cloud-forming condensates at solar composition, in agreement with previous work. However, for oxidizing atmospheres, K2SO4 and ZnO condensates are favored instead, and for carbon-rich atmospheres with super-solar C:O ratios, graphite clouds appear. For even hotter planets, clouds form from a wide variety of rock-forming and metallic species.

  18. The atmospheres of Venus, earth, and Mars - A critical comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinn, Ronald G.; Fegley, Bruce, Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The physical conditions and structures, chemical compositions, origins, and evolutions of the earth, Mars, and Venus atmospheres are compared, summarizing the results of recent theoretical and observational investigations. Data are compiled in extensive tables, graphs, and diagrams and characterized in detail. Consideration is given to the roles of chemical cycles and biology; global changes in atmospheric composition; the secondary origin of all three atmospheres; volatile retention by solid grains in the solar nebula; volatile degassing and atmosphere formation; and evolutionary processes, sources, cycles, and sinks.

  19. Clouds Composition in Super-Earth Atmospheres: Chemical Equilibrium Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempton, Eliza M.-R.; Mbarek, Rostom

    2015-12-01

    Attempts to determine the composition of super-Earth atmospheres have so far been plagued by the presence of clouds. Yet the theoretical framework to understand these clouds is still in its infancy. For the super-Earth archetype GJ 1214b, KCl, Na2S, and ZnS have been proposed as condensates that would form under the condition of chemical equilibrium, if the planet’s atmosphere has a bulk composition near solar. Condensation chemistry calculations have not been presented for a wider range of atmospheric bulk composition that is to be expected for super-Earth exoplanets. Here we provide a theoretical context for the formation of super-Earth clouds in atmospheres of varied composition by determining which condensates are likely to form, under the assumption of chemical equilibrium. We model super-Earth atmospheres assuming they are formed by degassing of volatiles from a solid planetary core of chondritic material. Given the atomic makeup of these atmospheres, we minimize the global Gibbs free energy of over 550 gases and condensates to obtain the molecular composition of the atmospheres over a temperature range of 350-3,000 K. Clouds should form along the temperature-pressure boundaries where the condensed species appear in our calculations. The super-Earth atmospheres that we study range from highly reducing to oxidizing and have carbon to oxygen (C:O) ratios that are both sub-solar and super-solar, thereby spanning a diverse range of atmospheric composition that is appropriate for low-mass exoplanets. Some condensates appear across all of our models. However, the majority of condensed species appear only over specific ranges of H:O and C:O ratios. We find that for GJ 1214b, KCl is the primary cloud-forming condensate at solar composition, in agreement with previous work. However, for oxidizing atmospheres, where H:O is less than unity, K2SO4 clouds form instead. For carbon-rich atmospheres with super-solar C:O ratios, graphite clouds additionally appear. At

  20. VAPORIZATION OF THE EARTH: APPLICATION TO EXOPLANET ATMOSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, Laura; Lodders, Katharina; Fegley, Bruce E-mail: lschaefer@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: bfegley@wustl.edu

    2012-08-10

    Currently, there are about three dozen known super-Earths (M < 10 M{sub Circled-Plus }), of which eight are transiting planets suitable for atmospheric follow-up observations. Some of the planets are exposed to extreme temperatures as they orbit close to their host stars, e.g., CoRot-7b, and all of these planets have equilibrium temperatures significantly hotter than the Earth. Such planets can develop atmospheres through (partial) vaporization of their crustal and/or mantle silicates. We investigated the chemical equilibrium composition of such heated systems from 500 to 4000 K and total pressures from 10{sup -6} to 10{sup +2} bars. The major gases are H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} over broad temperature and pressure ranges, and Na, K, O{sub 2}, SiO, and O at high temperatures and low pressures. We discuss the differences in atmospheric composition arising from vaporization of SiO{sub 2}-rich (i.e., felsic) silicates (like Earth's continental crust) and MgO-, FeO-rich (i.e., mafic) silicates (like the bulk silicate Earth). The computational results will be useful in planning spectroscopic studies of the atmospheres of Earth-like exoplanets.

  1. Earth Global Reference Atmospheric Model 2007 (Earth-GRAM07) Applications for the NASA Constellation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leslie, Fred W.; Justus, C. G.

    2008-01-01

    Engineering models of the atmosphere are used extensively by the aerospace community for design issues related to vehicle ascent and descent. The Earth Global Reference Atmosphere Model version 2007 (Earth-GRAM07) is the latest in this series and includes a number of new features. Like previous versions, Earth-GRAM07 provides both mean values and perturbations for density, temperature, pressure, and winds, as well as monthly- and geographically-varying trace constituent concentrations. From 0 km to 27 km, thermodynamics and winds are based on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Global Upper Air Climatic Atlas (GUACA) climatology. For altitudes between 20 km and 120 km, the model uses data from the Middle Atmosphere Program (MAP). Above 120 km, EarthGRAM07 now provides users with a choice of three thermosphere models: the Marshall Engineering Thermosphere (MET-2007) model; the Jacchia-Bowman 2006 thermosphere model (JB2006); and the Naval Research Labs Mass Spectrometer, Incoherent Scatter Radar Extended Model (NRL MSIS E-OO) with the associated Harmonic Wind Model (HWM-93). In place of these datasets, Earth-GRAM07 has the option of using the new 2006 revised Range Reference Atmosphere (RRA) data, the earlier (1983) RRA data, or the user may also provide their own data as an auxiliary profile. Refinements of the perturbation model are also discussed which include wind shears more similar to those observed at the Kennedy Space Center than the previous version Earth-GRAM99.

  2. Catalytic processes in the atmospheres of earth and Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demore, W. B.; Yung, Y. L.

    1982-09-01

    Photochemical processes in planetary atmospheres are strongly influenced by catalytic effects of minor constituents. Catalytic cycles in the atmospheres of Earth and Venus are closely related. For example, chlorine oxides (ClOx) act as catalysts in the two atmospheres. On earth, they serve to convert odd oxygen (atomic oxygen and ozone) to molecular oxygen. On Venus they have a similar effect, but in addition they accelerate the reactions of atomic and molecular oxygen with carbon monoxide. The latter process occurs by a unique combination of ClOx catalysis and sulful dioxide photosensitization. The mechanism provides an explanation for the very low extent of carbon dioxide decomposition by sunlight in the Venus atmosphere.

  3. Catalytic processes in the atmospheres of earth and Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demore, W. B.; Yung, Y. L.

    1982-01-01

    Photochemical processes in planetary atmospheres are strongly influenced by catalytic effects of minor constituents. Catalytic cycles in the atmospheres of Earth and Venus are closely related. For example, chlorine oxides (ClOx) act as catalysts in the two atmospheres. On earth, they serve to convert odd oxygen (atomic oxygen and ozone) to molecular oxygen. On Venus they have a similar effect, but in addition they accelerate the reactions of atomic and molecular oxygen with carbon monoxide. The latter process occurs by a unique combination of ClOx catalysis and sulful dioxide photosensitization. The mechanism provides an explanation for the very low extent of carbon dioxide decomposition by sunlight in the Venus atmosphere.

  4. Impact on the earth, ocean and atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.; O'Keefe, John D.

    1987-01-01

    On the basis of finite-difference techniques, cratering flow calculations are used to obtain the spatial attenuation of shock pressure with radius along the impact axis for the impact of silicate rock and iron impactors on a silicate half-space at speeds of 5 to 45 km/sec. Upon impact of a 10 to 30 km diameter silicate or water object onto a 5 km deep ocean overlying a silicate half-space planet at 30 km/sec, it is found that from 12 to 15 percent of the incident energy is coupled into the water. The mass of atmosphere lost due to impacts of 1 to 5 km radius projectiles is calculated.

  5. COMPOSITIONS OF HOT SUPER-EARTH ATMOSPHERES: EXPLORING KEPLER CANDIDATES

    SciTech Connect

    Miguel, Y.; Kaltenegger, L.; Fegley, B.; Schaefer, L.

    2011-12-15

    This paper outlines a simple approach to evaluate the atmospheric composition of hot rocky planets by assuming different types of planetary composition and using corresponding model calculations. To explore hot atmospheres above 1000 K, we model the vaporization of silicate magma and estimate the range of atmospheric compositions according to the planet's radius and semi-major axis for the Kepler 2011 February data release. Our results show five atmospheric types for hot, rocky super-Earth atmospheres, strongly dependent on the initial composition and the planet's distance to the star. We provide a simple set of parameters that can be used to evaluate atmospheric compositions for current and future candidates provided by the Kepler mission and other searches.

  6. Water inventories on Earth and Mars: Clues to atmosphere formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, M. H.

    1992-01-01

    Water is distributed differently on Earth and on Mars and the differences may have implications for the accretion of the two planets and the formation of their atmospheres. The Earth's mantle appears to contain at least several times the water content of the Martian mantle even accounting for differences in plate tectonics. One explanation is that the Earth's surface melted during accretion, as a result of development of a steam atmosphere, thereby allowing impact-devolitalized water at the surface to dissolve into the Earth's interior. In contrast, because of Mars' smaller size and greater distance from the Sun, the Martian surface may not have melted, so that the devolatilized water could not dissolve into the surface. A second possibility is suggested by the siderophile elements in the Earth's mantle, which indicates the Earth acquired a volatile-rich veneer after the core formed. Mars may have acquired a late volatile-rich veneer, but it did not get folded into the interior as with the Earth, but instead remained as a water rich veneer. This perception of Mars with a wet surface but dry interior is consistent with our knowledge of Mars' geologic history.

  7. Lunar laser ranging and limits due to the Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, Douglas; Prochazka, Ivan

    2015-10-01

    The ultimate limits on high accuracy laser ranging to satellites from the ground appear to be caused by the effects of the earth's atmosphere. Other impediments in terms of lasers, timing equipment and calibration seem to be evolving to the point of providing very high accuracy. We shall address the role of the earth's atmosphere for lunar laser ranging. In the near future, the robotic deployment of next generation lunar laser retroreflectors is planned. With proper robotic deployment, these retroreflectors may support single photo-electron ranging accuracy at the 100 micron level or better. In particular, there are questions of the random and systematic delays and broadening of a very narrow laser pulse. Theoretical and experimental results will be discussed that address estimates of the magnitudes of these effects and the issue of precision vs. accuracy. These effects may be roughly divided into three domains: High frequency effects due to atmospheric turbulence, low frequency effects due to atmospheric "slopes" and atmospheric waves and tides and spectral dispersion of the narrow pulse. In conclusion, the route to better ranging through the earth's atmosphere appears to be more advance modeling of local meteorological effects, in a program that can be implemented at a reasonable cost.

  8. Passive ranging through the Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasson, Victor H.; Dupuis, Christopher R.

    2002-02-01

    Many luminous sources provide continuous or quasi-continuous radiation at near IR and longer wavelengths. The radiation continuum serves as a source of background photons, which can be used for discrete line-of-site absorption measurements by-known atmospheric constituents. The intensity ratio is uniquely determined by the absorption coefficient and range, is independent of broadband attenuations and scattering. The absorption coefficients are known and/or can be accurately calculated for a wide range of practical viewing conditions (i.e., sensor height, viewing angle, etc.). Hence, the intensity ratio and/or integrated intensity ratio can be used to uniquely derive the range of the radiating source. Fabry-Perot interferometers can provide the high throughputs and resolving powers required in compact packages. The measurements and analyses show that ranging accuracies representing down to 1 - 2% of the total range should be achievable at stand-off ranges of upto hundreds of kilometers depending on the size of the collection optics, brightness of the source and available observation times. The paper will provide an overview of the patented Textron concepts, trade-offs associated with instrument resolving powers and hardware implementation issues.

  9. Biological modulation of planetary atmospheres: The early Earth scenario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schidlowski, M.

    1985-01-01

    The establishment and subsequent evolution of life on Earth had a profound impact on the chemical regime at the planet's surface and its atmosphere. A thermodynamic gradient was imposed on near-surface environments that served as the driving force for a number on important geochemical transformations. An example is the redox imbalance between the modern atmosphere and the material of the Earth's crust. Current photochemical models predict extremely low partial pressures of oxygen in the Earth's prebiological atmosphere. There is widespread consensus that any large-scale oxygenation of the primitive atmosphere was contingent on the advent of biological (autotrophic) carbon fixation. It is suggested that photoautotrophy existed both as a biochemical process and as a geochemical agent since at least 3.8 Ga ago. Combining the stoichiometry of the photosynthesis reaction with a carbon isotope mass balance and current concepts for the evolution of the stationary sedimentary mass as a funion of time, it is possible to quantify, the accumulation of oxygen and its photosynthetic oxidation equivalents through Earth history.

  10. Earth's Mysterious Atmosphere: Atlas 1 Teacher's Guide with Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Essex Corp., Huntsville, AL.

    This atmospheric studies teacher's guide for use with middle school students blends lessons in chemistry, physics, and the life, earth, and space sciences in an attempt to accomplish the following: to nurture students' natural curiosity and excitement about science, mathematics, and technology; to encourage career exploration in science,…

  11. Earth orientation parameters: excitation by atmosphere, oceans and geomagnetic jerks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vondrak, Jan; Ron, Cyril

    2015-08-01

    It is well known that geophysical fluids (atmosphere, oceans) excite Earth orientation. The influence is known to be dominant for polar motion, partly responsible for length-of-day changes, and very small effects are now observable also in nutation. Very recently several authors (Holme and de Viron 2005, Gibert and le Mouel 2008, Malkin 2013) noted that sudden changes of Earth's speed of rotation and phase/amplitude of the free motions of its spin axis (Chandler wobble, Free core nutation) occur near the epochs of geomagnetic jerks (GMJ - rapid changes of the secular variations of geomagnetic field). By using the numerical integration of broad-band Liouville equations (Brzezinski 1994) we demonstrate that if non-periodical bell-like excitations of limited length (app. 1 year) around the epochs of GMJ are added to atmospheric and oceanic excitations, the agreement between observed and calculated Earth orientation parameters is improved significantly.

  12. The evolution of the atmosphere of the earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, M. H.

    1978-01-01

    Computer simulations of the evolution of the earth's atmospheric composition and surface temperature have been carried out. The program took into account changes in the solar luminosity, variations in the earth's albedo, the greenhouse effect, variation in the biomass, and a variety of geochemical processes. Results indicate that prior to two billion years ago the earth had a partially reduced atmosphere, which included N2, CO2, reduced carbon compounds, some NH3, but no free H2. Surface temperatures were higher than now, due to a large greenhouse effect. When free O2 appeared the temperature fell sharply. Had earth been only slightly further from the sun, runaway glaciation would have occurred at that time. Simulations also indicate that a runaway greenhouse would have occurred early in earth's history had earth been only a few percent closer to the sun. It therefore appears that, taking into account the possibilities of either runaway glaciation or a runaway greenhouse effect, the continuously habitable zone about a solar-type star is rather narrow, extending only from roughly 0.95 to 1.01 AU.

  13. Earth's mysterious atmosphere. ATLAS 1: Teachers guide with activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    One of our mission's primary goals is to better understand the physics and chemistry of our atmosphere, the thin envelope of air that provides for human life and shields us from the harshness of space. The Space Shuttle Atlantis will carry the ATLAS 1 science instruments 296 km above Earth, so that they can look down into and through the various layers of the atmosphere. Five solar radiometers will precisely measure the amount of energy the Sun injects into Earth's environment. The chemistry at different altitudes will be measured very accurately by five other instruments called spectrometers. Much of our time in the cockpit of Atlantis will be devoted to two very exciting instruments that measure the auroras and the atmosphere's electrical characteristics. Finally, our ultraviolet telescope will probe the secrets of fascinating celestial objects. This Teacher's Guide is designed as a detective story to help you appreciate some of the many questions currently studied by scientists around the world. Many complex factors affect our atmosphere today, possibly even changing the course of global climate. All of us who live on Earth must recognize that we play an ever-growing role in causing some of these changes. We must solve this great atmospheric mystery if we are to understand all these changes and know what to do about them.

  14. Earth's mysterious atmosphere. ATLAS 1: Teachers guide with activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-11-01

    One of our mission's primary goals is to better understand the physics and chemistry of our atmosphere, the thin envelope of air that provides for human life and shields us from the harshness of space. The Space Shuttle Atlantis will carry the ATLAS 1 science instruments 296 km above Earth, so that they can look down into and through the various layers of the atmosphere. Five solar radiometers will precisely measure the amount of energy the Sun injects into Earth's environment. The chemistry at different altitudes will be measured very accurately by five other instruments called spectrometers. Much of our time in the cockpit of Atlantis will be devoted to two very exciting instruments that measure the auroras and the atmosphere's electrical characteristics. Finally, our ultraviolet telescope will probe the secrets of fascinating celestial objects. This Teacher's Guide is designed as a detective story to help you appreciate some of the many questions currently studied by scientists around the world. Many complex factors affect our atmosphere today, possibly even changing the course of global climate. All of us who live on Earth must recognize that we play an ever-growing role in causing some of these changes. We must solve this great atmospheric mystery if we are to understand all these changes and know what to do about them.

  15. Earth's mysterious atmosphere. ATLAS 1: Teachers guide with activities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    One of our mission's primary goals is to better understand the physics and chemistry of our atmosphere, the thin envelope of air that provides for human life and shields us from the harshness of space. The Space Shuttle Atlantis will carry the ATLAS 1 science instruments 296 km above Earth, so that they can look down into and through the various layers of the atmosphere. Five solar radiometers will precisely measure the amount of energy the Sun injects into Earth's environment. The chemistry at different altitudes will be measured very accurately by five other instruments called spectrometers. Much of our time in the cockpit of Atlantis will be devoted to two very exciting instruments that measure the auroras and the atmosphere's electrical characteristics. Finally, our ultraviolet telescope will probe the secrets of fascinating celestial objects. This Teacher's Guide is designed as a detective story to help you appreciate some of the many questions currently studied by scientists around the world. Many complex factors affect our atmosphere today, possibly even changing the course of global climate. All who live on Earth must recognize that they play an ever-growing role in causing some of these changes. People must solve this great atmospheric mystery if they are to understand all these changes and know what to do about them.

  16. Atmospheric CO2: Principal Control Knob Governing Earth's Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacis, Andrew A.; Schmidt, Gavin A.; Rind, David; Ruedy, Reto A.

    2010-01-01

    Ample physical evidence shows that carbon dioxide (CO2) is the single most important climate-relevant greenhouse gas in Earth s atmosphere. This is because CO2, like ozone, N2O, CH4, and chlorofluorocarbons, does not condense and precipitate from the atmosphere at current climate temperatures, whereas water vapor can and does. Noncondensing greenhouse gases, which account for 25% of the total terrestrial greenhouse effect, thus serve to provide the stable temperature structure that sustains the current levels of atmospheric water vapor and clouds via feedback processes that account for the remaining 75% of the greenhouse effect. Without the radiative forcing supplied by CO2 and the other noncondensing greenhouse gases, the terrestrial greenhouse would collapse, plunging the global climate into an icebound Earth state.

  17. Atmospheric CO2: principal control knob governing Earth's temperature.

    PubMed

    Lacis, Andrew A; Schmidt, Gavin A; Rind, David; Ruedy, Reto A

    2010-10-15

    Ample physical evidence shows that carbon dioxide (CO(2)) is the single most important climate-relevant greenhouse gas in Earth's atmosphere. This is because CO(2), like ozone, N(2)O, CH(4), and chlorofluorocarbons, does not condense and precipitate from the atmosphere at current climate temperatures, whereas water vapor can and does. Noncondensing greenhouse gases, which account for 25% of the total terrestrial greenhouse effect, thus serve to provide the stable temperature structure that sustains the current levels of atmospheric water vapor and clouds via feedback processes that account for the remaining 75% of the greenhouse effect. Without the radiative forcing supplied by CO(2) and the other noncondensing greenhouse gases, the terrestrial greenhouse would collapse, plunging the global climate into an icebound Earth state. PMID:20947761

  18. Atmospheric circulation of hot Jupiters and super Earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataria, Tiffany

    This dissertation explores the atmospheric circulation of extrasolar planets ranging from hot Jupiters to super Earths. For each of these studies, I utilize a three-dimensional circulation model coupled to a state-of-the-art, plane-parallel, two-stream, non-grey radiative transfer model dubbed the SPARC/MITgcm. First, I present models of the atmospheric circulation of eccentric hot Jupiters, a population which undergoes large variations in flux throughout their orbits. I demonstrate that the eccentric hot Jupiter regime is qualitatively similar to that of planets on circular orbits. For a select number of model integrations, I generate full-orbit lightcurves and find that the timing of transit and secondary eclipse viewed from Earth with respect to periapse and apoapse can greatly affect what is seen in infrared (IR) lightcurves. Next, I present circulation models of WASP-43b, a transiting hot Jupiter that is joining the ranks of HD 189733b and HD 209458b as a 'benchmark' hot Jupiter, with a wide array of observational constraints from the ground and space. Here I utilize the robust dataset of spectrophotometric observations taken with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to interpret my model results. I find that an atmospheric composition of 5x solar provides the best match to the data, particularly in emission. Lastly, I present atmospheric simulations of the super Earth GJ 1214b, exploring the planet's circulation as a function of atmospheric metallicity and composition. I find that atmospheres with a low mean-molecular weight have strong day-night temperature variations at pressures above the infrared photosphere that lead to equatorial superrotation. For these atmospheres, the enhancement of atmospheric opacities with increasing metallicity leads to shallower atmospheric heating, larger day-night temperature variations and hence stronger superrotation. In comparison, atmospheres with a high mean-molecular weight have larger

  19. Earth-atmosphere evolution based on new determination of Devonian atmosphere Ar isotopic composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, Finlay M.; Mark, Darren F.; Gandanger, Pierre; McConville, Paul

    2016-07-01

    The isotopic composition of the noble gases, in particular Ar, in samples of ancient atmosphere trapped in rocks and minerals provides the strongest constraints on the timing and rate of Earth atmosphere formation by degassing of the Earth's interior. We have re-measured the isotopic composition of argon in the Rhynie chert from northeast Scotland using a high precision mass spectrometer in an effort to provide constraints on the composition of Devonian atmosphere. Irradiated chert samples yield 40Ar/36Ar ratios that are often below the modern atmosphere value. The data define a 40Ar/36Ar value of 289.5 ± 0.4 at K/36Ar = 0. Similarly low 40Ar/36Ar are measured in un-irradiated chert samples. The simplest explanation for the low 40Ar/36Ar is the preservation of Devonian atmosphere-derived Ar in the chert, with the intercept value in 40Ar-39Ar-36Ar space representing an upper limit. In this case the Earth's atmosphere has accumulated only 3% (5.1 ± 0.4 ×1016 mol) of the total 40Ar inventory since the Devonian. The average accumulation rate of 1.27 ± 0.09 ×108 mol40Ar/yr overlaps the rate over the last 800 kyr. This implies that there has been no resolvable temporal change in the outgassing rate of the Earth since the mid-Palaeozoic despite the likely episodicity of Ar degassing from the continental crust. Incorporating the new Devonian atmosphere 40Ar/36Ar into the Earth degassing model of Pujol et al. (2013) provides the most precise constraints on atmosphere formation so far. The atmosphere formed in the first ∼100 Ma after initial accretion during a catastrophic degassing episode. A significant volume of 40Ar did not start to accumulate in the atmosphere until after 4 Ga which implies that stable K-rich continental crust did not develop until this time.

  20. Origin and evolution of the Earth's atmosphere and hydrosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari, G.E.

    1984-01-01

    The composition of the outgassed fluid has been a point of serious debate. A model developed by Melton and Giardini has been used. In this model, the fluid inclusions in diamonds have been taken as original samples of the outgassed fluids. The model uses first order kinetics of the degassing processes of H2, CH4, N2, CO and Ar, and zero order kinetics for the degassing processes of H2O and CO2. Samples with compositions similar to the fluid included in diamonds were exposed to electric discharge, UV radiation and gamma radiation to formulate the equilibrium composition of the Earth's atmosphere. Small amounts of organic and inorganic compounds were formed in the samples by the radiation. The Melton/Giardini model was used to calculate the composition and pressure of primitive atmosphere of the Earth as a function of time, beginning 4.5 b.y. ago. Since light gases such as H2 and He escape from the Earth, and other degassed material undergoes numerous chemical and physical reactions, the Earth's atmosphere was quite different from the predicted composition using the uncorrected Melton/Giardini model.

  1. Life of the Earth in the solar atmosphere (multimedia manual)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kononovich, E. V.; Smirnova, O. B.; Matveychuk, T. V.; Jakunina, G. V.; Krasotkin, S. A.

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this manual is to illustrate the major physical processes occurring in the Sun - Earth system and ecology of the planet life. The material includes three individual parts: "The Earth", "The Sun" and "The solar-terrestrial connections". Sections do not require cross-references since each of them is self-complete. Inside the sections the material is located in sequences based on the principle: from simple to complex. The material is designed for students of the senior classes of high school and junior university level interested by the problem. The section "The Earth" is devoted to the description of the basic characteristics of the planet: internal structure, magnetic field, lithosphere and an atmosphere together with various occurring in them tectonic, hydro- and atmospheric processes. The top layers of an atmosphere, an ionosphere, a zone of polar lights, radiating belts, magnetosphere are also considered. The section "The Sun" includes the following subsections: the Sun as a star, internal structure of the Sun, Solar atmosphere, solar activity, cyclicity of the solar activity, helioseismology. In the section "The solar-terrestrial connections" the previous material is used to present the influence of the active solar processes on the most various aspects of a terrestrial life: ecological, biological, mental, social, economic and so forth. The problem of forecasting of the solar activity as the key parameter determining a condition of the so-called space weather is considered.

  2. Surface and atmosphere parameter maps from earth-orbiting radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloersen, P.

    1976-01-01

    Earlier studies have shown that an earth-orbiting electrically scanned microwave radiometer (ESMR) is capable of inferring the extent, concentration, and age of sea ice; the extent, concentration, and thickness of lake ice; rainfall rates over oceans; surface wind speeds over open water; particle size distribution in the deep snow cover of continental ice sheets; and soil moisture content in unvegetated fields. Most other features of the surface of the earth and its atmosphere require multispectral imaging techniques to unscramble the combined contributions of the atmosphere and the surface. Multispectral extraction of surface parameters is analyzed on the basis of a pertinent equation in terms of the observed brightness temperature, the emissivity of the surface which depends on wavelength and various parameters, the sensible temperature of the surface, and the total atmospheric opacity which is also wavelength dependent. Implementation of the multispectral technique is examined. Properties of the surface of the earth and its atmosphere to be determined from a scanning multichannel microwave radiometer are tabulated.

  3. Biospheric-atmospheric coupling on the early Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, J. S.

    1991-01-01

    Theoretical calculations performed with a one-dimensional photochemical model have been performed to assess the biospheric-atmospheric transfer of gases. Ozone reached levels to shield the Earth from biologically lethal solar ultraviolet radiation (220-300 nm) when atmospheric oxygen reached about 1/10 of its present atmospheric level. In the present atmosphere, about 90 percent of atmospheric nitrous oxide is destroyed via solar photolysis in the stratosphere with about 10 percent destroyed via reaction with excited oxygen atoms. The reaction between nitrous oxide and excited oxygen atoms leads to the production of nitric oxide in the stratosphere, which is responsible for about 70 percent of the global destruction of oxygen in the stratosphere. In the oxygen/ozone deficient atmosphere, solar photolysis destroyed about 100 percent of the atmospheric nitrous oxide, relegating the production of nitric oxide via reaction with excited oxygen to zero. Our laboratory and field measurements indicate that atmospheric oxygen promotes the biogenic production of N2O and NO via denitrification and the biogenic production of methane by methanogenesis.

  4. Constraining Archean Earth's Atmosphere with the Geological Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horan, A. M.; Domagal-Goldman, S. D.; Claire, M.

    2014-12-01

    A warm, water-bearing Archean Earth, when the Sun was young and faint, remains a paradox to the scientific world. Abundant geological data suggests that Archean Earth had standing water at the surface, despite the fainter Sun. An explanation of this paradox is vital to the understanding of Earth's history and coevolution with life. If the surface of the planet was not being kept warm by the Sun, which was 25% less luminous than now, it must have been kept warm a different way—by an atmospheric composition high in greenhouse gases. Constraints on these gases come from the geological record, which have provided proxies for the redox state of the atmosphere (limiting H2 and O2), the total atmospheric pressure, and the partial pressure of certain gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4). Previous attempts at solutions to the paradox are consistent with some, but not all, of the geological proxies. The constraints are used as inputs for a 1-D photochemical code, which calculates atmospheric composition and predicts the abundances of atmospheric gases that affect climate, particularly methane (CH4) and gaseous hydrogen (H2). A coupled 1-D radiative-convective climate code is then used to calculate the corresponding surface temperature. Critically, the improved photochemical code maintains strict redox boundary conditions, and is being further updated to ensure that the redox fluxes from volcanoes and mid-ocean ridge vents are consistent with both each other and the redox state of the mantle. These code improvements will lead to changes in both the inputs to the atmosphere from volcanoes and the sink for oxidants at mid-ocean ridges, in turn affecting the abundance of redox-sensitive greenhouse gases such as CH4 and H2. The main purpose of this project is to extend simulations of the Archean surface environment down into the mantle, and to search for a solution to the faint young sun paradox that is consistent with the geological proxies. Beyond having

  5. Structure and Abundance of Nitrous Oxide Complexes in Earth's Atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Steven R; de Lange, Katrina M; Lane, Joseph R

    2016-04-01

    We have investigated the lowest energy structures and binding energies of a series of atmospherically relevant nitrous oxide (N2O) complexes using explicitly correlated coupled cluster theory. Specifically, we have considered complexes with nitrogen (N2-N2O), oxygen (O2-N2O), argon (Ar-N2O), and water (H2O-N2O). We have calculated rotational constants and harmonic vibrational frequencies for the complexes and the constituent monomers. Statistical mechanics was used to determine the thermodynamic parameters for complex formation as a function of temperature and pressure. These results, in combination with relevant atmospheric data, were used to estimate the abundance of N2O complexes in Earth's atmosphere as a function of altitude. We find that the abundance of N2O complexes in Earth's atmosphere is small but non-negligible, and we suggest that N2O complexes may contribute to absorption of terrestrial radiation and be relevant for understanding the atmospheric fate of N2O. PMID:26983553

  6. Nonlinear dynamics of global atmospheric and earth system processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Taiping; Verbitsky, Mikhail; Saltzman, Barry; Mann, Michael E.; Park, Jeffrey; Lall, Upmanu

    1995-01-01

    During the grant period, the authors continued ongoing studies aimed at enhancing their understanding of the operation of the atmosphere as a complex nonlinear system interacting with the hydrosphere, biosphere, and cryosphere in response to external radiative forcing. Five papers were completed with support from the grant, representing contributions in three main areas of study: (1) theoretical studies of the interactive atmospheric response to changed biospheric boundary conditions measurable from satellites; (2) statistical-observational studies of global-scale temperature variability on interannual to century time scales; and (3) dynamics of long-term earth system changes associated with ice sheet surges.

  7. Interactions of CH4 and CO in the earth's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wofsy, S. C.

    1976-01-01

    Global distributions, sources, and sinks of methane and carbon monoxide in upper and lower levels of the earth's atmosphere, and the global budgets of methane and carbon monoxide, are studied, with emphasis on cumulative pollution. Stratospheric contents, vertical profiles of concentrations, simulation of vertical transport through the atmosphere, and latitudinal distributions are examined. Diffuse and localized (urban) concentrations of CO as pollutant are studied, and anthropogenic sources and sinks for CH4 and CO are considered. Perturbation of the CH4-CO-CO2 cycle, crucial to self-cleansing mechanisms of the troposphere, by anthropogenic CO emissions, and the effect of CO long life as global pollutant, are investigated.

  8. Quantitative infrared spectroscopy of minor constituents of the Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chackerian, C., Jr.; Giver, L. P.; Goorvitch, D.; Spencer, M.; Valero, F. P. J.

    1990-01-01

    We obtain quantitative laboratory spectroscopic measurements of molecular constituents which are of importance in understanding the health of the Earth's atmosphere, and, in particular, emphasize those species which are important for understanding stratospheric kinetics or are used for long term monitoring of the stratosphere. Our measurements provide: (1) line and band intensity values which are needed to establish limits of detectability for as yet unobserved species and to quantify the abundance of those species which are observed; (2) line-positions, -half widths and pressure induced shifts are all needed for remote sensing techniques, and (3) data on the above basic molecular parameters at temperatures and pressures appropriate for the real atmosphere.

  9. Atmospheric Infrared Sounder on the Earth Observing System

    SciTech Connect

    Aumann, H.H.; Pagano, R.J. . Jet Propulsion Lab.)

    1994-03-01

    Recent breakthroughs in IR detector array and cryocooler technology have made it possible to convert the concepts of optimum, passive, IR sounding to a practical satellite-borne instrument: the Atmospheric infrared Sounder (AIRS), a grating array IR spectrometer temperature sounder. AIRS, together with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit and the Microwave Humidity Sounder, will form a complementary sounding system for the Earth Observing System to be launched in the year 2000. The three instruments are expected to become the new operational sounding system for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

  10. Photochemical production of formaldehyde in earth's primitive atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, J. P.; Gladstone, G. R.; Yung, Y. L.

    1980-10-01

    Formaldehyde could have been produced by photochemical reactions in the earth's primitive atmosphere, at a time when it consisted mainly of molecular nitrogen, water vapor, carbon dioxide, and trace amounts of molecular hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Removal of formaldehyde from the atmosphere by precipitation can provide a source of organic carbon to the oceans at the rate of 100 billion moles per year. Subsequent reactions of formaldehyde in primeval aquatic environments would have implications for the abiotic synthesis of complex organic molecules and the origin of life.

  11. Photochemical production of formaldehyde in earth's primitive atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinto, J. P.; Gladstone, G. R.; Yung, Y. L.

    1980-01-01

    Formaldehyde could have been produced by photochemical reactions in the earth's primitive atmosphere, at a time when it consisted mainly of molecular nitrogen, water vapor, carbon dioxide, and trace amounts of molecular hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Removal of formaldehyde from the atmosphere by precipitation can provide a source of organic carbon to the oceans at the rate of 100 billion moles per year. Subsequent reactions of formaldehyde in primeval aquatic environments would have implications for the abiotic synthesis of complex organic molecules and the origin of life.

  12. Microwave emission and scattering from Earth surface and atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kong, J. A.; Lee, M. C.

    1986-01-01

    Nonlinear Electromagnetic (EM) wave interactions with the upper atmosphere were investigated during the period 15 December 1985 to 15 June 1986. Topics discussed include: the simultaneous excitation of ionospheric density irregularities and Earth's magnetic field fluctuations; the electron acceleration by Langmuir wave turbulence; and the occurrence of artificial spread F. The role of thermal effects in generating ionospheric irregularities by Whistler waves, intense Quasi-DC electric fields, atmospheric gravity waves, and electrojets was investigated. A model was developed to explain the discrete spectrum of the resonant ultralow frequency (ULF) waves that are commonly observed in the magnetosphere.

  13. Observing atmospheric tides in Earth rotation parameters with VLBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girdiuk, Anastasiia; Böhm, Johannes; Schindelegger, Michael

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we assess the contribution of diurnal (S1) and semi-diurnal (S2) atmospheric tides to variations in Earth rotation by analyzing Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations. Particular emphasis is placed on the dependency of S1 and S2 estimates on varying settings in the a priori delay model. We use hourly Earth rotation parameters (ERP) of polar motion and UT1 as determined with the Vienna VLBI Software (VieVS) from 25 years of VLBI observations and we adjust diurnal and semi-diurnal amplitudes to the hourly ERP estimates after disregarding the effect of high-frequency ocean tides. Prograde and retrograde polar motion coefficients are obtained for several solutions differing in processing strategies (with/without thermal deformation, time span of observations, choice of a priori ERP model and celestial pole offsets) and we compare the corresponding harmonics with those derived from atmospheric and non-tidal oceanic angular momentum estimates.

  14. Contributions of icy planetesimals to the Earth's early atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Owen, T C; Bar-Nun, A

    2001-01-01

    Laboratory experiments on the trapping of gases by ice forming at low temperatures implicate comets as major carriers of the heavy noble gases to the inner planets. These icy planetesimals may also have brought the nitrogen compounds that ultimately produced atmospheric N2. However, if the sample of three comets analyzed so far is typical, the Earth's oceans cannot have been produced by comets alone, they require an additional source of water with low D/H. The highly fractionated neon in the Earth's atmosphere may also indicate the importance of non-icy carriers of volatiles. The most important additional carrier is probably the rocky material comprising the bulk of the mass of these planets. Venus may require a contribution from icy planetesimals formed at the low temperatures characteristic of the Kuiper Belt. PMID:11599179

  15. Geospatial visualization of atmospheric chemistry satellite data using Google Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, John

    2008-08-01

    Earth observation satellites employ various types of remote-sensing instruments to peer into the secrets of the atmosphere. Many of these instruments collect two-dimensional data stored as raster images which can be easily georeferenced and overlaid onto a virtual globe, with stunning results. However, certain instruments collect threedimensional science data which can pose a significant challenge for visualization efforts. The Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) is such an instrument which collects scientific data about atmospheric chemistry and stores the outputs in an Oracle database. With some imaginative programming, the data is transformed into interesting and information-packed visualizations using shell scripts, SQL scripts and Oracle stored procedures to yield Google Earthformatted files. This Google Earth content is hosted on the TES external web site for use by the public.

  16. Digital elevation model visibility including Earth's curvature and atmosphere refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santossilva, Ewerton; Vieiradias, Luiz Alberto

    1990-03-01

    There are some instances in which the Earth's curvature and the atmospheric refraction, optical or electronic, are important factors when digital elevation models are used for visibility calculations. This work deals with this subject, suggesting a practical approach to solve this problem. Some examples, from real terrain data, are presented. The equipment used was an IBM-PC like computer with a SITIM graphic card.

  17. Nonlinear dynamics of global atmospheric and Earth system processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saltzman, Barry

    1993-01-01

    During the past eight years, we have been engaged in a NASA-supported program of research aimed at establishing the connection between satellite signatures of the earth's environmental state and the nonlinear dynamics of the global weather and climate system. Thirty-five publications and four theses have resulted from this work, which included contributions in five main areas of study: (1) cloud and latent heat processes in finite-amplitude baroclinic waves; (2) application of satellite radiation data in global weather analysis; (3) studies of planetary waves and low-frequency weather variability; (4) GCM studies of the atmospheric response to variable boundary conditions measurable from satellites; and (5) dynamics of long-term earth system changes. Significant accomplishments from the three main lines of investigation pursued during the past year are presented and include the following: (1) planetary atmospheric waves and low frequency variability; (2) GCM studies of the atmospheric response to changed boundary conditions; and (3) dynamics of long-term changes in the global earth system.

  18. A Comparative Study of Super-Earth Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragomir, Diana; Benneke, Bjoern; Crossfield, Ian; Howard, Andrew; Knutson, Heather

    2014-12-01

    Ongoing transit surveys such as Kepler have resulted in the discovery of more than a dozen super?Earth planets with measured masses and radii. These planets are challenging targets for atmospheric characterization studies, and to date only one (GJ 1214b) has been studied in detail. In this proposal we focus on three additional super-Earths that are amenable to transmission spectroscopy studies due to their bright host stars (HD 97658b and 55 Cnc e) or their exceptionally low density (Kepler-138d). Our Spitzer measurements of these planets' transit depths will complement our already approved HST observations and contribute to distinguishing between clear hydrogen?dominated atmospheres and compact high-metallicity atmospheres, as well as constraining the composition of any high-altitude clouds. We will also search for evidence of carbon-bearing molecules, in particular for 55 Cnc e, a planet for which a carbon-rich composition has been suggested. Our observations will probe the poorly understood transition region between gas giant planets and terrestrial worlds, and provide constraints on the formation regions of these super-Earths. The results of this program will inform the direction to be taken by large-scale studies of these worlds with JWST.

  19. Atmospheric Production of Perchlorate on Earth and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claire, M.; Catling, D. C.; Zahnle, K. J.

    2009-12-01

    Natural production and preservation of perchlorate on Earth occurs only in arid environments. Isotopic evidence suggests a strong role for atmospheric oxidation of chlorine species via pathways including ozone or its photochemical derivatives. As the Martian atmosphere is both oxidizing and drier than the driest places on Earth, we propose an atmospheric origin for the Martian perchlorates measured by NASA's Phoenix Lander. A variety of hypothetical formation pathways can be proposed including atmospheric photochemical reactions, electrostatic discharge, and gas-solid reactions. Here, we investigate gas phase formation pathways using a 1-D photochemical model (Catling et al. 2009, accepted by JGR). Because perchlorate-rich deposits in the Atacama desert are closest in abundance to perchlorate measured at NASA's Phoenix Lander site, we start with a study of the means to produce Atacama perchlorate. We found that perchlorate can be produced in sufficient quantities to explain the abundance of perchlorate in the Atacama from a proposed gas phase oxidation of chlorine volatiles to perchloric acid. These results are sensitive to estimated reaction rates for ClO3 species. The feasibility of gas phase production for the Atacama provides justification for further investigations of gas phase photochemistry as a possible source for Martian perchlorate. In addition to the Atacama results, we will present a preliminary study incorporating chlorine chemistry into an existing Martian photochemical model (Zahnle et al. JGR 2008).

  20. Solar Variability, Lunar Spectroscopy and Earth's Upper Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judge, Philip G.

    Solar EUV radiation and its variability is of central importance to the earths upper atmosphere. Variability of the earths upper atmosphere is a major concern to NASAs satellite missions. This LARGE PROJECT (2 year) proposal asks for continued measurments of solar EUV variability using EUVE to observe solar light scattered from the moon. Existing EUVE data prove that we can enhance ourunderstanding of the physics of the upper atmosphere at a time when solar EUV measurements are scarce. Our aims include: (i) to understand the phase and polarization dependence of solar light scattered from the moon, (ii) to quantify variations in solar EUV irradiance, (iii) to calibrate these data with a rocket--launched EUV payload, and (iv) to use these data with simultaneous UV measurements from UARS as inputs to upper atmospheric models. Very short exposures (<30 min) are required. We request TYPE 2 observations twice a lunar month, and a variety of TYPE 1 observations to permit us to take the necessary steps towards converting lunar intensity data to absolute solar irradiances.

  1. Global-scale teleconnections in the Earth's middle atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, T. G.

    2009-05-01

    The global-scale circulation of the Earth's middle atmosphere is driven by angular momentum transfers effected by waves propagating up from the more turbulent, thermally-driven troposphere. The resulting effects on the middle atmosphere are largest in polar regions. This 'mechanical forcing' is an indirect response to the direct thermal forcing of the atmosphere by the Sun, and can act in a thermally-indirect manner, i.e. as a refrigerator. As it involves wave propagation, it can also act anti-diffusively, and non-locally. The basic physics of the process is described and examples given of how it can lead to global-scale teleconnections, both vertically and latitudinally. Parallels with the dynamics of the Sun will be mentioned.

  2. Chemical effects of large impacts on the earth's primitive atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegley, B., Jr.; Prinn, R. G.; Hartman, H.; Watkins, G. H.

    1986-01-01

    The production of HCN and H2CO by large impacts on the earth's primitive atmosphere is modelled using thermochemical equilibrium and chemical kinetic calculations of the composition of shocked air parcels for a wide range of temperatures, pressures, and initial compositions. For atmospheres with C/O of one or more, the results suggest that bolide impacts cause HCN volume mixing ratios of approximately 10 to the -3rd to -5th in the impact region and global average ratios of 10 to the -5th to the -12th. The corresponding H2CO mixing ratios in the impact region are 10 to the -7th to -9th; nonglobal mixing can occur, however, as H2CO is rapidly destroyed or rained out of the atmosphere within days to hours. Rainout to the oceans of 3-15 percent of the HCN produced can provide 3-14 x 10 to the 11th mol HCN per year.

  3. Evolution of a steam atmosphere during Earth's accretion.

    PubMed

    Zahnle, K J; Kasting, J F; Pollack, J B

    1988-01-01

    We have modeled the evolution of an impact-generated steam atmosphere surrounding an accreting Earth. The model assumes Safronov accretion; it includes degassing of planetesimals upon impact, thermal blanketing by a steam atmosphere, interchange of water between the surface and the interior, shock heating and convective cooling of Earth's interior, and hydrogen escape, both by a solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) powered planetary wind and by impact erosion (atmospheric cratering). The model does not include atmophiles other than water, chemical reaction of water with metallic iron, core formation, compression, and spatial and temporal inhomogeneity of accretion. If the incoming planetesimals were too dry or the EUV flux too high, very little water would accumulate at the surface. Essentially all water retained by such a planet would be through rehydration of silicates. If rehydration were inefficient, very little water would be retained in any form. Degassing of wetter planetesimals produces a steam atmosphere over a magma ocean, the energy of accretion being sufficient to maintain a runaway greenhouse atmosphere. The mass of the atmosphere is limited by water's solubility in the (partial) melt. This type of solution is produced for a wide range of model parameters. During accretion, approximately 30 bars of water could have kept the surface at 1500 degrees K. As the accretional energy input declined below the runaway greenhouse threshold, the steam atmosphere rained out. Outgassing of dissolved water at the close of accretion is quantitatively important. These models can leave from approximately 100 to more than 300 bars of water at the surface at the close of accretion. In general, most of the water accreted remains dissolved in the mantle. H2 could have escaped as rapidly as it formed only if the planetesimals were relatively dry. Consequently H2 should have accumulated until it reached chemical equilibrium with water vapor. Impact erosion (escape caused by impact

  4. The role of impacting processes in the chemical evolution of the atmosphere of primordial Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhin, Lev M.; Gerasimov, M. V.

    1991-01-01

    The role of impacting processes in the chemical evolution of the atmosphere of primordial Earth is discussed. The following subject areas are covered: (1) Earth's initial atmosphere; (2) continuous degassing; (3) impact processes and the Earth's protoatmosphere; and (4) the evolution of an impact-generated atmosphere.

  5. Quantifying Atmospheric Moist Processes from Earth Observations. Really?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, G. L.

    2015-12-01

    The amount of water in the Earth's atmosphere is tiny compared to all other sources of water on our planet, fresh or otherwise. However, this tiny amount of water is fundamental to most aspects of human life. The tiny amount of water that cycles from the Earth's surface, through condensation into clouds in the atmosphere returning as precipitation falling is not only natures way of delivering fresh water to land-locked human societies but it also exerts a fundamental control on our climate system producing the most important feedbacks in the system. The representation of these processes in Earth system models contain many errors that produce well now biases in the hydrological cycle. Surprisingly the parameterizations of these important processes are not well validated with observations. Part of the reason for this situation stems from the fact that process evaluation is difficult to achieve on the global scale since it has commonly been assumed that the static observations available from snap-shots of individual parameters contain little information on processes. One of the successes of the A-Train has been the development of multi-parameter analysis based on the multi-sensor data produced by the satellite constellation. This has led to new insights on how water cycles through the Earth's atmosphere. Examples of these insights will be highlighted. It will be described how the rain formation process has been observed and how this has been used to constrain this process in models, with a huge impact. How these observations are beginning to reveal insights on deep convection and examples of the use these observations applied to models will also be highlighted as will the effects of aerosol on clouds on radiation.

  6. Interferometric Characterization of the Earth's Atmosphere from Lagrange Point 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Jay R.; Komar, George (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Part of the NASA plans for future Earth Science missions calls for observations using novel vantage points that can produce science products otherwise unobtainable. Observations of the Earth from the Lagrange-2 point, L-2, (1.5 million km behind the Earth on the Earth-Sun line) affords a unique vantage point for atmospheric science. Spectral observation of the Earth's atmosphere using solar occultation techniques in the near infrared (1 to 4 microns) provides one of the most accurate methods of passively sensing attitude profiles of the major species (CO2, O3, O2, CH4, H2O N2O). While traditional polar orbiting occultation measurements can obtain about 14 measurements per day (2 per orbit), solar occultation observations from the Lagrange-2 point will yield hourly profile measurements at all latitudes. The expected spatial resolution is 2 km in altitude, 0.5 degrees in latitude, and 2 degrees in longitude. The result from 24 hours of observations will be a three-dimensional map of atmospheric composition. To accomplish this task from L-2 requires the development of a large moderate spectral resolution instrument whose entrance aperture is about 10 meters. Use of a standard telescope design with a 10-meter circular mirror or a 10-meter strip mirror would be prohibitively expensive and excessively massive. Instead, we are proposing the development of a 10-meter linear interferometer coupled to a Fourier transform imaging spectrometer. The result will be a highly efficient design with sufficient sensitivity, while having both spatial and spectral resolution to produce the desired results. Preliminary calculations show that seven species (CO2, O3, O2, CH4, H2O N2O) have clearly separated spectral features in the I to 4 microns range with sufficient absorption to produce profile information from near the Earth's surface to the middle stratosphere. For CO2 the estimated sensitivity to change is 0.33% or 1 part in 330. This should be sufficient to detect changes that are

  7. Atmospheric composition and climate on the early Earth.

    PubMed

    Kasting, James F; Howard, M Tazewell

    2006-10-29

    Oxygen isotope data from ancient sedimentary rocks appear to suggest that the early Earth was significantly warmer than today, with estimates of surface temperatures between 45 and 85 degrees C. We argue, following others, that this interpretation is incorrect-the same data can be explained via a change in isotopic composition of seawater with time. These changes in the isotopic composition could result from an increase in mean depth of the mid-ocean ridges caused by a decrease in geothermal heat flow with time. All this implies that the early Earth was warm, not hot.A more temperate early Earth is also easier to reconcile with the long-term glacial record. However, what triggered these early glaciations is still under debate. The Paleoproterozoic glaciations at approximately 2.4Ga were probably caused by the rise of atmospheric O2 and a concomitant decrease in greenhouse warming by CH4. Glaciation might have occurred in the Mid-Archaean as well, at approximately 2.9Ga, perhaps as a consequence of anti-greenhouse cooling by hydrocarbon haze. Both glaciations are linked to decreases in the magnitude of mass-independent sulphur isotope fractionation in ancient rocks. Studying both the oxygen and sulphur isotopic records has thus proved useful in probing the composition of the early atmosphere. PMID:17008214

  8. Atmospheric composition and climate on the early Earth

    PubMed Central

    Kasting, James F; Howard, M. Tazewell

    2006-01-01

    Oxygen isotope data from ancient sedimentary rocks appear to suggest that the early Earth was significantly warmer than today, with estimates of surface temperatures between 45 and 85°C. We argue, following others, that this interpretation is incorrect—the same data can be explained via a change in isotopic composition of seawater with time. These changes in the isotopic composition could result from an increase in mean depth of the mid-ocean ridges caused by a decrease in geothermal heat flow with time. All this implies that the early Earth was warm, not hot. A more temperate early Earth is also easier to reconcile with the long-term glacial record. However, what triggered these early glaciations is still under debate. The Paleoproterozoic glaciations at approximately 2.4 Ga were probably caused by the rise of atmospheric O2 and a concomitant decrease in greenhouse warming by CH4. Glaciation might have occurred in the Mid-Archaean as well, at approximately 2.9 Ga, perhaps as a consequence of anti-greenhouse cooling by hydrocarbon haze. Both glaciations are linked to decreases in the magnitude of mass-independent sulphur isotope fractionation in ancient rocks. Studying both the oxygen and sulphur isotopic records has thus proved useful in probing the composition of the early atmosphere. PMID:17008214

  9. Notes on Earth Atmospheric Entry for Mars Sample Return Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivell, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    The entry of sample return vehicles (SRVs) into the Earth's atmosphere is the subject of this document. The Earth entry environment for vehicles, or capsules, returning from the planet Mars is discussed along with the subjects of dynamics, aerodynamics, and heat transfer. The material presented is intended for engineers and scientists who do not have strong backgrounds in aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics and flight mechanics. The document is not intended to be comprehensive and some important topics are omitted. The topics considered in this document include basic principles of physics (fluid mechanics, dynamics and heat transfer), chemistry and engineering mechanics. These subjects include: a) fluid mechanics (aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics, compressible fluids, shock waves, boundary layers, and flow regimes from subsonic to hypervelocity; b) the Earth s atmosphere and gravity; c) thermal protection system design considerations; d) heat and mass transfer (convection, radiation, and ablation); e) flight mechanics (basic rigid body dynamics and stability); and f) flight- and ground-test requirements; and g) trajectory and flow simulation methods.

  10. Potential Biosignatures in Super-Earth Atmospheres II. Photochemical Responses

    PubMed Central

    Gebauer, S.; Godolt, M.; Palczynski, K.; Rauer, H.; Stock, J.; von Paris, P.; Lehmann, R.; Selsis, F.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Spectral characterization of super-Earth atmospheres for planets orbiting in the habitable zone of M dwarf stars is a key focus in exoplanet science. A central challenge is to understand and predict the expected spectral signals of atmospheric biosignatures (species associated with life). Our work applies a global-mean radiative-convective-photochemical column model assuming a planet with an Earth-like biomass and planetary development. We investigated planets with gravities of 1g and 3g and a surface pressure of 1 bar around central stars with spectral classes from M0 to M7. The spectral signals of the calculated planetary scenarios have been presented by in an earlier work by Rauer and colleagues. The main motivation of the present work is to perform a deeper analysis of the chemical processes in the planetary atmospheres. We apply a diagnostic tool, the Pathway Analysis Program, to shed light on the photochemical pathways that form and destroy biosignature species. Ozone is a potential biosignature for complex life. An important result of our analysis is a shift in the ozone photochemistry from mainly Chapman production (which dominates in Earth's stratosphere) to smog-dominated ozone production for planets in the habitable zone of cooler (M5–M7)-class dwarf stars. This result is associated with a lower energy flux in the UVB wavelength range from the central star, hence slower planetary atmospheric photolysis of molecular oxygen, which slows the Chapman ozone production. This is important for future atmospheric characterization missions because it provides an indication of different chemical environments that can lead to very different responses of ozone, for example, cosmic rays. Nitrous oxide, a biosignature for simple bacterial life, is favored for low stratospheric UV conditions, that is, on planets orbiting cooler stars. Transport of this species from its surface source to the stratosphere where it is destroyed can also be a key process

  11. Earth Rotation and Coupling to Changes in Atmospheric Angular Momentum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Richard D.; Frey, H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The research supported under the contract dealt primarily with: (a) the mechanisms responsible for the exchange of angular momentum between the solid Earth and atmosphere; (b) the quality of the data sets used to estimate atmospheric angular momentum; and (c) the ability of these data and of global climate models to detect low-frequency signals in the momentum and, hence, circulation of the atmosphere. Three scientific papers reporting on the results of this research were produced during the course of the contract. These papers identified the particular torques responsible for the peak in atmospheric angular momentum and length-of-day during the 1982-93 El Nino event, and, more generally, the relative roles of torques over land and ocean in explaining the broad spectrum of variability in the length-of-day. In addition, a tendency for interannual variability in atmospheric angular momentum to increase during the last several decades of the 20th century was found in both observations and a global climate model experiment.

  12. Water loss from Venus: Implications for the Earth's early atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, S. M.; Pollack, J. B.; Reynolds, R. T.

    1985-01-01

    The atmosphere of Venus outgassed rapidly as a result of planetary heating during accretion, resulting in massive water loss. The processes affecting atmospheric chemistry following accretion have consisted largely of hydrogen escape and internal re-equilibrium. The initial bulk composition of Venus and Earth are assumed to have been roughly similar. Chemical speciation on Venus was controlled by the temperature and oxygen buffering capacity of the surface magma. It is also assumed that the surfaces of planetary bodies of the inner solar system were partly or wholly molten during accretion with a temperature estimated at 1273 to 1573 K. To investigate the range of reasonable initial atmospheric compositions on Venus, limits have to be set for the proportion of total hydrogen and the buffered fugacity of oxygen. Using the C/H ratio of 0.033 set for Earth, virtually all of the water generated during outgassing must later have been lost in order to bring the current CO2/H2O ratio for Venus up to its observed value of 10 sup 4 to 10 sup 5. The proportion of H2O decreases in model atmospheres with successfully higher C/H values, ultimately approaching the depleted values currently observed on Venus. Increasing C/H also results in a rapid increase in CO/H2O and provides an efficient mechanism for water loss by the reaction CO+H2O = CO2 + H2. This reaction, plus water loss mechanisms involving crustal iron, could have removed a very large volume of water from the Venusian atmosphere, even at a low C/H value.

  13. Integrating the Earth, Atmospheric, and Ocean Sciences at Millersville University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, R. D.

    2005-12-01

    For nearly 40 years, the Department of Earth Sciences at Millersville University (MU-DES) of Pennsylvania has been preparing students for careers in the earth, atmospheric, and ocean sciences by providing a rigorous and comprehensive curricula leading to B.S. degrees in geology, meteorology, and oceanography. Undergraduate research is a hallmark of these earth sciences programs with over 30 students participating in some form of meritorious research each year. These programs are rich in applied physics, couched in mathematics, and steeped in technical computing and computer languages. Our success is measured by the number of students that find meaningful careers or go on to earn graduate degrees in their respective fields, as well as the high quality of faculty that the department has retained over the years. Student retention rates in the major have steadily increased with the introduction of a formal learning community and peer mentoring initiatives, and the number of new incoming freshmen and transfer students stands at an all-time high. Yet until recently, the disciplines have remained largely disparate with only minor inroads made into integrating courses that seek to address the Earth as a system. This is soon to change as the MU-DES unveils a new program leading to a B.S. in Integrated Earth Systems. The B.S. in Integrated Earth Systems (ISS) is not a reorganization of existing courses to form a marketable program. Instead, it is a fully integrated program two years in development that borrows from the multi-disciplinary backgrounds and experiences of faculty, while bringing in resources that are tailored to visualizing and modeling the Earth system. The result is the creation of a cross-cutting curriculum designed to prepare the 21st century student for the challenges and opportunities attending the holistic study of the Earth as a system. MU-DES will continue to offer programs leading to degrees in geology, meteorology, and ocean science, but in addition

  14. Aerosol in the upper layer of earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozhenko, A. V.; Vidmachenko, A. P.; Nevodovskii, P. V.

    2013-09-01

    Aerosol layers exist in the upper atmospheres of Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn and the Earth. The reason for their existence may be meteorites, rings, and removal of particles of planetary origin. Observations from 1979 to 1992 showed that the optical thickness of aerosol over the Earth's polar regions changed from tau =0.0002 up to tau =.1 for lambda = 1000 nm. The greatest values of tau were in 1984 and 1992 and they were preceded by a strong volcanic activity of El Chichon (1982) and Pinatubo (1991). We show that the above-mentioned increase in the optical thickness of the stratosphere aerosol can lead to the ozone layer decrease detected in 1970. The stratospheric aerosol nature (real part of refractive index), effective particle size r and changing tau with latitude remain un solved. Among distance methods for the determination of nr and r efficient is the analysis of the phase dependence of the polarization degree. The observational values of the intensity and pol arization degree invisible light are due to optical properties of the surface and optical thickness of the atmosphere, the values of which vary with latitude, longitude and time. Therefore, it is impossible to identify accurately the stratospheric aerosol contribution. When observing in UV at lambda < 300 nm, the ozone layer cuts off the influence of the surface and the Earth's atmosphere to an altitude from 20 to 25 km. In this spectral region some negative factors can take place, namely, the emission of various gases playing depolarizing role, horizontal inhomogeneity of the effective optical thickness of ozone layer, and oriented particles (the polarization plane variation points to their presence).

  15. ACE infrared spectral atlases of the Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Ryan; Bernath, Peter; Boone, Chris

    2014-11-01

    Five infrared atmospheric atlases are presented using solar occultation spectra from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) in low earth orbit. The spectral atlases were created for Arctic summer, Arctic winter, mid-latitude summer, mid-latitude winter and the tropics. Each covers the spectral range from 700 to 4400 cm-1 and consists of 31 spectra that span an altitude range of 6-126 km in 4-km altitude intervals. To improve the signal-to-noise ratio, each spectrum in the atlas is an average of at least several hundred individual ACE-FTS limb transmission spectra. Representative plots in pdf format at 10 km (troposphere), 30 km (stratosphere), 70 km (mesosphere), and 110 km (lower thermosphere) are also available.

  16. Carbon monoxide in the earth's atmosphere - Increasing trend

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khalil, M. A. K.; Rasmussen, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    The results of an analysis of more than 60,000 atmospheric measurements of carbon monoxide taken over 3-1/2 years at Cape Meares, Oregon (45 deg N, 125 deg W), indicate that the background concentration of this gas is increasing. The rate of increase, although uncertain, is about 6 percent per year on average. Human activities are the likely cause of a substantial portion of this observed increase; however, because of the short atmospheric lifetime of carbon monoxide and the relatively few years of observations, fluctuations of sources and sinks related to the natural variability of climate may have affected the observed trend. Increased carbon monoxide may deplete tropospheric hydroxyl radicals, slowing down the removal of dozens of man-made and anthropogenic trace gases and thus indirectly affecting the earth's climate and possibly the stratospheric ozone layer.

  17. Potential biosignatures in super-Earth atmospheres II. Photochemical responses.

    PubMed

    Grenfell, J L; Gebauer, S; Godolt, M; Palczynski, K; Rauer, H; Stock, J; von Paris, P; Lehmann, R; Selsis, F

    2013-05-01

    Spectral characterization of super-Earth atmospheres for planets orbiting in the habitable zone of M dwarf stars is a key focus in exoplanet science. A central challenge is to understand and predict the expected spectral signals of atmospheric biosignatures (species associated with life). Our work applies a global-mean radiative-convective-photochemical column model assuming a planet with an Earth-like biomass and planetary development. We investigated planets with gravities of 1g and 3g and a surface pressure of 1 bar around central stars with spectral classes from M0 to M7. The spectral signals of the calculated planetary scenarios have been presented by in an earlier work by Rauer and colleagues. The main motivation of the present work is to perform a deeper analysis of the chemical processes in the planetary atmospheres. We apply a diagnostic tool, the Pathway Analysis Program, to shed light on the photochemical pathways that form and destroy biosignature species. Ozone is a potential biosignature for complex life. An important result of our analysis is a shift in the ozone photochemistry from mainly Chapman production (which dominates in Earth's stratosphere) to smog-dominated ozone production for planets in the habitable zone of cooler (M5-M7)-class dwarf stars. This result is associated with a lower energy flux in the UVB wavelength range from the central star, hence slower planetary atmospheric photolysis of molecular oxygen, which slows the Chapman ozone production. This is important for future atmospheric characterization missions because it provides an indication of different chemical environments that can lead to very different responses of ozone, for example, cosmic rays. Nitrous oxide, a biosignature for simple bacterial life, is favored for low stratospheric UV conditions, that is, on planets orbiting cooler stars. Transport of this species from its surface source to the stratosphere where it is destroyed can also be a key process. Comparing 1g with

  18. Photochemistry of methane in the earth's early atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasting, J. F.; Zahnle, K. J.; Walker, J. C. G.

    The photochemical behavior of methane in the early terrestrial atmosphere is investigated with a detailed model in order to determine how much CH4 might have been present and what types of higher hydroocarbons could have been formed. It is found that any primordial methane accumulated during the course of earth accretion would have been dissipated by photochemical reactions in the atmosphere in a geologically short period of time after the segregation of the core. Abiotic sources of methane are not likely to have been large enough to sustain CH4 mixing ratios as high as 10 to the -6th, the threshold for a possible methane greenhouse, with a CO-rich atmosphere being a possible exception. After the origin of life an increasing biogenic source of methane may have driven CH4 mixing ratios well above 10 to the 6th. The rise of atmospheric oxygen in the early Proterozoic may have led to a more rapid photochemical destruction of methane, lowering the mixing ratio to its present value.

  19. Particle motion in atmospheric boundary layers of Mars and Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, B. R.; Iversen, J. D.; Greeley, R.; Pollack, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    To study the eolian mechanics of saltating particles, both an experimental investigation of the flow field around a model crater in an atmospheric boundary layer wind tunnel and numerical solutions of the two- and three-dimensional equations of motion of a single particle under the influence of a turbulent boundary layer were conducted. Two-dimensional particle motion was calculated for flow near the surfaces of both Earth and Mars. For the case of Earth both a turbulent boundary layer with a viscous sublayer and one without were calculated. For the case of Mars it was only necessary to calculate turbulent boundary layer flow with a laminar sublayer because of the low values of friction Reynolds number; however, it was necessary to include the effects of slip flow on a particle caused by the rarefied Martian atmosphere. In the equations of motion the lift force functions were developed to act on a single particle only in the laminar sublayer or a corresponding small region of high shear near the surface for a fully turbulent boundary layer. The lift force functions were developed from the analytical work by Saffman concerning the lift force acting on a particle in simple shear flow.

  20. Formation of the Aerosol of Space Origin in Earth's Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozak, P. M.; Kruchynenko, V. G.

    2011-01-01

    The problem of formation of the aerosol of space origin in Earth s atmosphere is examined. Meteoroids of the mass range of 10-18-10-8 g are considered as a source of its origin. The lower bound of the mass range is chosen according to the data presented in literature, the upper bound is determined in accordance with the theory of Whipple s micrometeorites. Basing on the classical equations of deceleration and heating for small meteor bodies we have determined the maximal temperatures of the particles, and altitudes at which they reach critically low velocities, which can be called as velocities of stopping . As a condition for the transformation of a space particle into an aerosol one we have used the condition of non-reaching melting temperature of the meteoroid. The simplified equation of deceleration without earth gravity and barometric formula for the atmosphere density are used. In the equation of heat balance the energy loss for heating is neglected. The analytical solution of the simplified equations is used for the analysis.

  1. The NASA MSFC Earth Global Reference Atmospheric Model-2007 Version

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leslie, F.W.; Justus, C.G.

    2008-01-01

    Reference or standard atmospheric models have long been used for design and mission planning of various aerospace systems. The NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Global Reference Atmospheric Model (GRAM) was developed in response to the need for a design reference atmosphere that provides complete global geographical variability, and complete altitude coverage (surface to orbital altitudes) as well as complete seasonal and monthly variability of the thermodynamic variables and wind components. A unique feature of GRAM is that, addition to providing the geographical, height, and monthly variation of the mean atmospheric state, it includes the ability to simulate spatial and temporal perturbations in these atmospheric parameters (e.g. fluctuations due to turbulence and other atmospheric perturbation phenomena). A summary comparing GRAM features to characteristics and features of other reference or standard atmospheric models, can be found Guide to Reference and Standard Atmosphere Models. The original GRAM has undergone a series of improvements over the years with recent additions and changes. The software program is called Earth-GRAM2007 to distinguish it from similar programs for other bodies (e.g. Mars, Venus, Neptune, and Titan). However, in order to make this Technical Memorandum (TM) more readable, the software will be referred to simply as GRAM07 or GRAM unless additional clarity is needed. Section 1 provides an overview of the basic features of GRAM07 including the newly added features. Section 2 provides a more detailed description of GRAM07 and how the model output generated. Section 3 presents sample results. Appendices A and B describe the Global Upper Air Climatic Atlas (GUACA) data and the Global Gridded Air Statistics (GGUAS) database. Appendix C provides instructions for compiling and running GRAM07. Appendix D gives a description of the required NAMELIST format input. Appendix E gives sample output. Appendix F provides a list of available

  2. Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, M. H.

    1984-01-01

    The following aspects of the planet Earth are discussed: plate tectonics, the interior of the planet, the formation of the Earth, and the evolution of the atmosphere and hydrosphere. The Earth's crust, mantle, and core are examined along with the bulk composition of the planet.

  3. Nonlinear dynamics of global atmospheric and Earth-system processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saltzman, Barry; Ebisuzaki, Wesley; Maasch, Kirk A.; Oglesby, Robert; Pandolfo, Lionel

    1990-01-01

    Researchers are continuing their studies of the nonlinear dynamics of global weather systems. Sensitivity analyses of large-scale dynamical models of the atmosphere (i.e., general circulation models i.e., GCM's) were performed to establish the role of satellite-signatures of soil moisture, sea surface temperature, snow cover, and sea ice as crucial boundary conditions determining global weather variability. To complete their study of the bimodality of the planetary wave states, they are using the dynamical systems approach to construct a low-order theoretical explanation of this phenomenon. This work should have important implications for extended range forecasting of low-frequency oscillations, elucidating the mechanisms for the transitions between the two wave modes. Researchers are using the methods of jump analysis and attractor dimension analysis to examine the long-term satellite records of significant variables (e.g., long wave radiation, and cloud amount), to explore the nature of mode transitions in the atmosphere, and to determine the minimum number of equations needed to describe the main weather variations with a low-order dynamical system. Where feasible they will continue to explore the applicability of the methods of complex dynamical systems analysis to the study of the global earth-system from an integrative viewpoint involving the roles of geochemical cycling and the interactive behavior of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere.

  4. Sensitivity on earth core and mantle densities using atmospheric neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Borriello, E.; Marotta, A.; Miele, G.; Pisanti, O.; Strolin, P.; Mangano, G.; Migliozzi, P.; Moura, C.A.; Pastor, S. E-mail: mangano@na.infn.it E-mail: miele@na.infn.it E-mail: moura@na.infn.it E-mail: pisanti@na.infn.it

    2009-06-01

    Neutrino radiography may provide an alternative tool to study the very deep structures of the Earth. Though these measurements are unable to resolve the fine density layer features, nevertheless the information which can be obtained are independent and complementary to the more conventional seismic studies. The aim of this paper is to assess how well the core and mantle averaged densities can be reconstructed through atmospheric neutrino radiography. We find that about a 2% sensitivity for the mantle and 5% for the core could be achieved for a ten year data taking at an underwater km{sup 3} Neutrino Telescope. This result does not take into account systematics related to the details of the experimental apparatus.

  5. Day time flight of micrometeoroid in upper earth atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Shikha; Mishra, S. K.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, the flight of micro (μ)-meteoroid in the day time earth environment has been discussed and the role of photoemission due to solar radiation, in addition to other relevant emission processes, viz. thermionic/charge desorption has been explored. Following Mendis et al., the meteoroid flight has been described by a consistent analytical model which manifests the continuity equations for the momentum, energy, charge and mass of micrometeoroids entering in the earth environment with a finite speed and at a finite angle. The altitude profiles of the characteristic features during flight, viz. surface heating, particle size, mass-loss, charging and its consequence on local atmospheric plasma has been examined in terms of the angle of entrance, entry speed, size, material work function/photoefficiency and incident solar flux. The numerical results show that the photoemission from micrometeoroid significantly contributes in meteoric electrons generation in its path in beginning and end phase of the flight; of course the energetics over the meteoroid in its travel is dominated by mass ablation process.

  6. Day time flight of micrometeoroid in upper earth atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Shikha; Mishra, S. K.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper the flight of micro (μ)-meteoroid in the day time earth environment has been discussed and the role of photoemission due to solar radiation, in addition to other relevant emission processes viz. thermionic/ charge desorption has been explored. Following Mendis et al. (JASTP 67, 1178, 2005), the meteoroid flight has been described by a consistent analytical model which manifest the continuity equations for the momentum, energy, charge and mass of μ-meteoroids entering in the earth environment with a finite speed and at a finite angle. The altitude profiles of the characteristic features during flight viz. surface heating, particle size, mass loss, charging and its consequence on local atmospheric plasma has been examined in terms of the angle of entrance, entry speed, size, material work function/ photo-efficiency and incident solar flux. The numerical results show that the photoemission from μ-meteoroid significantly contributes in meteoric electrons generation in its path in beginning and end phase of the flight; of course the energetics over the meteoroid in its travel is dominated by mass ablation process.

  7. LAWS (Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder) earth observing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Wind profiles can be measured from space using current technology. These wind profiles are essential for answering many of the interdisciplinary scientific questions to be addressed by EOS, the Earth Observing System. This report provides guidance for the development of a spaceborne wind sounder, the Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS), discussing the current state of the technology and reviewing the scientific rationale for the instrument. Whether obtained globally from the EOS polar platform or in the tropics and subtropics from the Space Station, wind profiles from space will provide essential information for advancing the skill of numerical weather prediction, furthering knowledge of large-scale atmospheric circulation and climate dynamics, and improving understanding of the global biogeochemical and hydrologic cycles. The LAWS Instrument Panel recommends that it be given high priority for new instrument development because of the pressing scientific need and the availability of the necessary technology. LAWS is to measure wind profiles with an accuracy of a few meters per second and to sample at intervals of 100 km horizontally for layers km thick.

  8. Radiation Transfer Model for Aerosol Events in the Earth Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, Sonoyo; Yokomae, Takuma; Nakata, Makiko; Sano, Itaru

    Recently large scale-forest fire, which damages the Earth environment as biomass burning and emission of carbonaceous particles, frequently occurs due to the unstable climate and/or global warming tendency. It is also known that the heavy soil dust is transported from the China continent to Japan on westerly winds, especially in spring. Furthermore the increasing emis-sions of anthropogenic particles associated with continuing economic growth scatter serious air pollutants. Thus atmospheric aerosols, especially in Asia, are very complex and heavy loading, which is called aerosol event. In the case of aerosol events, it is rather difficult to do the sun/sky photometry from the ground, however satellite observation is an effective for aerosol monitoring. Here the detection algorithms from space for such aerosol events as dust storm or biomass burn-ing are dealt with multispectral satellite data as ADEOS-2/GLI, Terra/Aqua/MODIS and/or GOSAT/CAI first. And then aerosol retrieval algorithms are examined based on new radiation transfer code for semi-infinite atmosphere model. The derived space-based results are validated with ground-based measurements and/or model simulations. Namely the space-or surface-based measurements, multiple scattering calculations and model simulations are synthesized together for aerosol retrieval in this work.

  9. Photoevaporation of Earth and Super-Earth Atmospheres in the Habitable Zones of M Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Subhanjoy

    2015-08-01

    Kepler data show that multiple terrestrial-sized planets (i.e., Earths / super-Earths), packed in very close to the central star, are the norm in exoplanetary systems around low-mass stars. Around M dwarfs, a significant fraction of these planets reside within the Habitable Zone (HZ). This has kindled intense excitement about the possibility of finding habitable planets around these cool red stars. However, M dwarfs also remain extremely magnetically active for much longer than solar-type stars: e.g., an M3 dwarf evinces saturated levels of coronal and chromospheric activity over Gyr timescales, compared to ~100 Myr for solar-mass stars. Thus, basal levels of coronal/chromospheric X-ray/EUV emission from M dwarfs, integrated over their saturated activity lifetimes, may severely photoevaporate the atmospheres of terrestrial planets in M dwarf HZs; this would only be exacerbated by flares (which are correspondingly more intense in active M dwarfs). Here we present detailed hydrodynamic calculations of such photoevaporation for planets spanning a range of Earth/super-Earth sizes, residing in the HZ of M dwarfs of various spectral sub-types, over Gyr evolutionary timescales. Our calculations include the effects of: (1) simultaneous X-ray and EUV heating, using state-of-the-art stellar XUV SED models; (2) the change in the stellar XUV SED over evolutionary timescales; (3) realistic radiative losses (which can both dominate and vary in time); (4) thermal evolution of the planetary core; and (5) a range of initial planetary entropies (i.e.,`hot' or `cold' start) and core compositions. The analysis yields the location and extent of the HZ as a function of planetary mass, core composition, initial conditions and M sub-type. We will focus on H/He dominated (i.e., solar abundance) atmospheres; however, we will also discuss qualtitative trends for CO2 / H2O dominated atmospheres, which we are beginning to explore by coupling a detailed photochemical code with our hydrodynamic

  10. Catching Comet's Particles in the Earth's Atmosphere by Using Balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potashko, Oleksandr; Viso, Michel

    The project is intended to catch cometary particles in the atmosphere by using balloons. The investigation is based upon knowledge that the Earth crosses the comet’s tails during the year. One can catch these particles at different altitudes in the atmosphere. So, we will be able to gradually advance in the ability to launch balloons from low to high altitudes and try to catch particles from different comet tails. The maximum altitude that we have to reach is 40 km. Both methods - distance observation and cometary samples from mission Stardust testify to the presence of organic components in comet’s particles. It would be useful to know more details about this organic matter for astrobiology; besides, the factor poses danger to the Earth. Moreover, it is important to prove that it is possible to get fundamental scientific results at low cost. In the last 5 years launching balloons has become popular and this movement looks like hackers’ one - as most of them occur without launch permission to airspace. The popularity of ballooning is connected with low cost of balloon, GPS unit, video recording unit. If you use iPhone, you have a light solution with GPS, video, picture and control function in one unit. The price of balloon itself begins from $50; it depends on maximum altitude, payload weight and material. Many university teams realized balloon launching and reached even stratosphere at an altitude of 33 km. But most of them take only video and picture. Meanwhile, it is possible to carry out scientific experiments by ballooning, for example to collect comet particles. There is rich experience at the moment of the use of mineral, chemical and isotopic analysis techniques and data of the comet’s dust after successful landing of StarDust capsule with samples in 2006. Besides, we may use absolutely perfect material to catch particles in the atmosphere, which was used by cosmic missions such as Stardust and Japanese Hayabusa. As to balloon launches, we could use

  11. Three-Dimensional Orbits of Earth Satellites, Including Effects of Earth Oblateness and Atmospheric Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Jack N.; Goodwin, Frederick K.; Mersman, William A.

    1958-01-01

    The principal purpose of the present paper is to present sets of equations which may be used for calculating complete trajectories of earth satellites from outer space to the ground under the influence of air drag and gravity, including oblateness effects, and to apply these to several examples of entry trajectories starting from a circular orbit. Equations of motion, based on an "instantaneous ellipse" technique, with polar angle as independent variable, were found suitable for automatic computation of orbits in which the trajectory consists of a number of revolutions. This method is suitable as long as the trajectory does not become nearly vertical. In the terminal phase of the trajectories, which are nearly vertical, equations of motion in spherical polar coordinates with time as the independent variable were found to be more suitable. In the first illustrative example the effects of the oblateness component of the earth's gravitational field and of atmospheric rotation were studied for equatorial orbits. The satellites were launched into circular orbits at a height of 120 miles, an altitude sufficiently high that a number of revolutions could be studied. The importance of the oblateness component of the earth's gravitational field is shown by the fact that a satellite launched at circular orbital speed, neglecting oblateness, has a perigee some 67,000 feet lower when oblateness forces are included in the equations of motion than when they are not included. Also, the loss in altitude per revolution is double that of a satellite following an orbit not subject to oblateness. The effect of atmospheric rotation on the loss of altitude per revolution was small. As might be surmised, the regression of the line of nodes as predicted by celestial mechanics is unchanged when drag is included. It is clear that the inclination of the orbital plane to the equator will be relatively unaffected by drag for no atmospheric rotation since the drag lies in the orbital plane in

  12. The equilibrium of atmospheric sodium. [in atmospheres of Earth, Io, Mercury and Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunten, Donald M.

    1992-01-01

    We now have four examples of planetary objects with detectable sodium (and potassium) in their atmospheres: Earth, Io, Mercury and the moon. After a summary of the observational data, this survey discusses proposed sources and sinks. It appears that Io's surface material is rich in frozen SO2, but with around 1 percent of some sodium compound. The Io plasma torus contains ions of S, O and Na, also with at least one molecular ion containing Na. In turn, impact by these ions probably sustains the torus, as well as an extended neutral corona. A primary source for the Earth, Mercury and the moon is meteoroidal bombardment; at Mercury and perhaps the moon it may be supplemented by degassing of atoms from the regolith. Photoionization is important everywhere, although hot electrons are dominant at Io.

  13. National Chemistry Week 2003: Earth's Atmosphere and Beyond. JCE Resources for Chemistry and the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Erica K.

    2003-10-01

    This annotated bibliography collects the best that past issues of the Journal of Chemical Education have to offer for use with this year's National Chemistry Week theme: Earth's Atmosphere and Beyond. Each article has been characterized as a demonstration, experiment, activity, informational, or software/video item; several fit in more than one classification. The most recent articles are listed first. Also included is an evaluation as to which levels the article may serve. Articles that appeared adaptable to other levels, but are not designed explicitly for those levels, are labeled "poss. h.s." "poss. elem.", and so forth.

  14. High-resolution transmission spectrum of the Earth's atmosphere-seeing Earth as an exoplanet using a lunar eclipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, F.; Fosbury, R. A. E.; Petr-Gotzens, M. G.; Zhao, G.; Wang, W.; Wang, L.; Liu, Y.; Pallé, E.

    2015-04-01

    With the rapid developments in the exoplanet field, more and more terrestrial exoplanets are being detected. Characterizing their atmospheres using transit observations will become a key datum in the quest for detecting an Earth-like exoplanet. The atmospheric transmission spectrum of our Earth will be an ideal template for comparison with future exo-Earth candidates. By observing a lunar eclipse, which offers a similar configuration to that of an exoplanet transit, we have obtained a high-resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) transmission spectrum of the Earth's atmosphere. This observation was performed with the High Resolution Spectrograph at Xinglong Station, China during the total lunar eclipse in December 2011. We compare the observed transmission spectrum with our atmospheric model, and determine the characteristics of the various atmospheric species in detail. In the transmission spectrum, O2, O3, O2 . O2, NO2 and H2O are detected, and their column densities are measured and compared with the satellites data. The visible Chappuis band of ozone produces the most prominent absorption feature, which suggests that ozone is a promising molecule for the future exo-Earth characterization. Due to the high resolution and high SNR of our spectrum, several novel details of the Earth atmosphere's transmission spectrum are presented. The individual O2 lines are resolved and O2 isotopes are clearly detected. Our new observations do not confirm the absorption features of Ca II or Na I which have been reported in previous lunar eclipse observations. However, features in these and some other strong Fraunhofer line positions do occur in the observed spectrum. We propose that these are due to a Raman-scattered component in the forward-scattered sunlight appearing in the lunar umbral spectrum. Water vapour absorption is found to be rather weak in our spectrum because the atmosphere we probed is relatively dry, which prompts us to discuss the detectability of water

  15. ATMOSPHERIC RETRIEVAL FOR SUPER-EARTHS: UNIQUELY CONSTRAINING THE ATMOSPHERIC COMPOSITION WITH TRANSMISSION SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Benneke, Bjoern; Seager, Sara

    2012-07-10

    We present a retrieval method based on Bayesian analysis to infer the atmospheric compositions and surface or cloud-top pressures from transmission spectra of exoplanets with general compositions. In this study, we identify what can unambiguously be determined about the atmospheres of exoplanets from their transmission spectra by applying the retrieval method to synthetic observations of the super-Earth GJ 1214b. Our approach to inferring constraints on atmospheric parameters is to compute their joint and marginal posterior probability distributions using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique in a parallel tempering scheme. A new atmospheric parameterization is introduced that is applicable to general atmospheres in which the main constituent is not known a priori and clouds may be present. Our main finding is that a unique constraint of the mixing ratios of the absorbers and two spectrally inactive gases (such as N{sub 2} and primordial H{sub 2}+ He) is possible if the observations are sufficient to quantify both (1) the broadband transit depths in at least one absorption feature for each absorber and (2) the slope and strength of the molecular Rayleigh scattering signature. A second finding is that the surface pressure or cloud-top pressure can be quantified if a surface or cloud deck is present at low optical depth. A third finding is that the mean molecular mass can be constrained by measuring either the Rayleigh scattering slope or the shapes of the absorption features, thus enabling one to distinguish between cloudy hydrogen-rich atmospheres and high mean molecular mass atmospheres. We conclude, however, that without the signature of molecular Rayleigh scattering-even with robustly detected infrared absorption features (>10{sigma})-there is no reliable way to tell from the transmission spectrum whether the absorber is a main constituent of the atmosphere or just a minor species with a mixing ratio of X{sub abs} < 0.1%. The retrieval method leads us to a

  16. Solar activity impact on the Earth's upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutiev, Ivan; Tsagouri, Ioanna; Perrone, Loredana; Pancheva, Dora; Mukhtarov, Plamen; Mikhailov, Andrei; Lastovicka, Jan; Jakowski, Norbert; Buresova, Dalia; Blanch, Estefania; Andonov, Borislav; Altadill, David; Magdaleno, Sergio; Parisi, Mario; Miquel Torta, Joan

    2013-02-01

    The paper describes results of the studies devoted to the solar activity impact on the Earth's upper atmosphere and ionosphere, conducted within the frame of COST ES0803 Action. Aim: The aim of the paper is to represent results coming from different research groups in a unified form, aligning their specific topics into the general context of the subject. Methods: The methods used in the paper are based on data-driven analysis. Specific databases are used for spectrum analysis, empirical modeling, electron density profile reconstruction, and forecasting techniques. Results: Results are grouped in three sections: Medium- and long-term ionospheric response to the changes in solar and geomagnetic activity, storm-time ionospheric response to the solar and geomagnetic forcing, and modeling and forecasting techniques. Section 1 contains five subsections with results on 27-day response of low-latitude ionosphere to solar extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) radiation, response to the recurrent geomagnetic storms, long-term trends in the upper atmosphere, latitudinal dependence of total electron content on EUV changes, and statistical analysis of ionospheric behavior during prolonged period of solar activity. Section 2 contains a study of ionospheric variations induced by recurrent CIR-driven storm, a case-study of polar cap absorption due to an intense CME, and a statistical study of geographic distribution of so-called E-layer dominated ionosphere. Section 3 comprises empirical models for describing and forecasting TEC, the F-layer critical frequency foF2, and the height of maximum plasma density. A study evaluates the usefulness of effective sunspot number in specifying the ionosphere state. An original method is presented, which retrieves the basic thermospheric parameters from ionospheric sounding data.

  17. The atmospheric excitation of earth orientation changes during MERIT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eubanks, T. M.; Steppe, J. A.; Dickey, J. O.

    1986-01-01

    Geodetic estimates of earth orientation variations detected during the MERIT campaign (September 1983-November 1984) are compared with corresponding meteorological data. The geodetic data were obtained using VLBI, lunar laser ranging, and satellite laser ranging and the meteorological data were from the NMC in the U.S. and the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (ECMRWF) in the U.K. The effects of changes in pressure, wind, and the inverted barometer ocean response on the excitation of the polar motion and the length of day are examined. The comparison between the meteorological and geodetic data reveals that the equatorial vector component of the atmospheric angular momentum (AAM) has significant annual and semiannual variations. Good correlation is detected between the geodetic polar motion data and the NMC pressure inverted barometer data combined with the ECMRWF wind estimates and semiannual agreement with the NMC pressure data is observed. There is also good correlation between the ECMRWF and NMC polar vector component of the AAM data and the geodetic length of day estimates, and good semiannual agreement with NMC pressure data is noted.

  18. The Impact of Energetic Particle Precipitation on the Earths Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funke, B.; López-Puertas, M.; García-Comas, M.; Bermejo-Pantaleón, D.; Stiller, G. P.; von Clarmann, T.

    Energetic particle precipitation (EPP) represents an important Sun-Earth coupling mechanism with important implications on polar stratospheric ozone chemistry. Solar protons generated during solar storms cause sporadically in situ production of stratospheric NO x and HO x radicals involved in catalytic ozone destruction. Further, NO produced continuously in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere by medium energy electron precipitation (EEP) descends to the stratosphere during the polar winter, where it represents an additional, though variable source of NO x . The capability of the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) to measure all important NO y species, as well as ClO and HOCl with global coverage including the polar night regions make it an ideal instrument for studying EPP effects on stratospheric chemistry. We present a quantitative assessment of EPP-induced composition changes as observed by MIPAS during 2002-2004, including the unusually strong solar proton event in October/November 2003. The impact of EPP on the stratospheric ozone budget has been studied with chemical models. The stratospheric ozone loss in the polar regions reached 18DU and lasted over months to years.

  19. Possible Nuclear Transmutation of Nitrogen in the Earth's Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuhara, Mikio

    2006-02-01

    An attempt to give a possible answer to a question why nitrogen exists so abundantly in Earth's atmosphere and how it was formed in Archean era (3.8-2.5 billion years ago) is presented. The nitrogen is postulated to be the result of an endothermic nuclear transmutation of carbon and oxygen nuclei confined in carbonate MgCO3 lattice of the mantle with an enhanced rate by attraction effect of catalysis of neutral pions, produced by electron emission: 12C + 16O - 2π0 → 2 14N. The excited electrons were generated by rapid fracture or sliding of carbonate crystals due to volcanic earthquake, and many of the neutrinos were derived from stars, mainly the young sun. The formation of nitrogen would continued for 1.3 billion years from 2.5 to 3.8 billion years in Archean era, until the active volcanism or storm of neutrinos ceased. The transformation is possible by the combined effects of the screening attraction of free electrons and thermal activation in deeper mantle. The possible nuclear transmutation rate of nitrogen atoms could be calculated as 2.3 × 106 atom/s.

  20. Runaway greenhouse atmospheres: Applications to Earth and Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasting, James F.

    1991-01-01

    Runaway greenhouse atmospheres are discussed from a theoretical standpoint and with respect to various practical situation in which they might occur. The following subject areas are covered: (1) runaway greenhouse atmospheres; (2) moist greenhouse atmospheres; (3) loss of water from Venus; (4) steam atmosphere during accretion; and (5) the continuously habitable zone.

  1. Oxidants and oxidation in the Earth`s atmosphere. Final technical report, 1 June 1994-30 May 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    The 1994 BOC Priestley Conference was held at Bucknell University in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, from June 24 through June 27, 1994. This conference, managed by the American Chemical Society (ACS), was a joint celebration with the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) commemorating Joseph Priestley`s arrival in the U.S. and his discovery of oxygen. The basic theme of the conference was `Oxidants and Oxidation in the Earth`s Atmosphere,` with a keynote lecture on the history of ozone. A distinguished group of U.S. and international atmospheric chemists addressed the issues dominating current research and policy agendas. Topics crucial to the atmospheric chemistry of global change and local and regional air pollution were discussed. The program for the conference included four technical sessions on the following topics: (1) Oxidative Fate of Atmospheric Pollutants; (2) Photochemical Smog and Ozone; (3) Stratospheric Ozone; and (4) Global Tropospheric Ozone.

  2. The atmospheres of the earth and the other planets: Origin, evolution and composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Joel S.

    1988-01-01

    The current understanding of the composition, chemistry, and structure of the atmospheres of the other planets and the origin, early history, and evolution of the earth's atmosphere is reviewed. The information on the atmospheres of the other planets is based on the successful Mariner, Viking, Pioneer, and Voyager missions to these planets. The information on the origin, early history, and evolution of the atmosphere, which is somewhat speculative, is largely based on numerical studies with geochemical and photochemical models.

  3. Massive impact-induced release of carbon and sulfur gases in the early Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchi, S.; Black, B. A.; Elkins-Tanton, L. T.; Bottke, W. F.

    2016-09-01

    Recent revisions to our understanding of the collisional history of the Hadean and early-Archean Earth indicate that large collisions may have been an important geophysical process. In this work we show that the early bombardment flux of large impactors (>100 km) facilitated the atmospheric release of greenhouse gases (particularly CO2) from Earth's mantle. Depending on the timescale for the drawdown of atmospheric CO2, the Earth's surface could have been subject to prolonged clement surface conditions or multiple freeze-thaw cycles. The bombardment also delivered and redistributed to the surface large quantities of sulfur, one of the most important elements for life. The stochastic occurrence of large collisions could provide insights on why the Earth and Venus, considered Earth's twin planet, exhibit radically different atmospheres.

  4. Challenges of Using Earth's Atmosphere as a Proxy for Detecting Biosignatures on Extrasolar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMarines, J.

    2012-06-01

    Assessing the challenges associated with the detectability of primitive biosignatures present on early Earth (methane and ethane) and addressing the observational difficulties when we begin to observe extrasolar atmospheres with a TPF-O mission.

  5. Lightning-made Waves in Earth's Atmosphere Leak Into Space

    NASA Video Gallery

    As lightning flashes, it creates low frequency waves that circle Earth, a phenomenon known as Schumann resonance. Much of the energy from the waves is trapped between the ground and the ionosphere ...

  6. Earth curvature and atmospheric refraction effects on radar signal propagation.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2013-01-01

    The earth isn't flat, and radar beams don't travel straight. This becomes more noticeable as range increases, particularly at shallow depression/grazing angles. This report explores models for characterizing this behavior.

  7. Modeling of atmospheric-coupled Rayleigh waves on planets with atmosphere: From Earth observation to Mars and Venus perspectives.

    PubMed

    Lognonné, Philippe; Karakostas, Foivos; Rolland, Lucie; Nishikawa, Yasuhiro

    2016-08-01

    Acoustic coupling between solid Earth and atmosphere has been observed since the 1960s, first from ground-based seismic, pressure, and ionospheric sensors and since 20 years with various satellite measurements, including with global positioning system (GPS) satellites. This coupling leads to the excitation of the Rayleigh surface waves by local atmospheric sources such as large natural explosions from volcanoes, meteor atmospheric air-bursts, or artificial explosions. It contributes also in the continuous excitation of Rayleigh waves and associated normal modes by atmospheric winds and pressure fluctuations. The same coupling allows the observation of Rayleigh waves in the thermosphere most of the time through ionospheric monitoring with Doppler sounders or GPS. The authors review briefly in this paper observations made on Earth and describe the general frame of the theory enabling the computation of Rayleigh waves for models of telluric planets with atmosphere. The authors then focus on Mars and Venus and give in both cases the atmospheric properties of the Rayleigh normal modes and associated surface waves compared to Earth. The authors then conclude on the observation perspectives especially for Rayleigh waves excited by atmospheric sources on Mars and for remote ionospheric observations of Rayleigh waves excited by quakes on Venus. PMID:27586770

  8. Atmosphere, ocean, and land: Critical gaps in Earth system models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinn, Ronald G.; Hartley, Dana

    1992-01-01

    We briefly review current knowledge and pinpoint some of the major areas of uncertainty for the following fundamental processes: (1) convection, condensation nuclei, and cloud formation; (2) oceanic circulation and its coupling to the atmosphere and cryosphere; (3) land surface hydrology and hydrology-vegetation coupling; (4) biogeochemistry of greenhouse gases; and (5) upper atmospheric chemistry and circulation.

  9. Climatic consequences of very high carbon dioxide levels in the earth's early atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Kasting, J F; Ackerman, T P

    1986-12-12

    The possible consequences of very high carbon dioxide concentrations in the earth's early atmosphere have been investigated with a radiative-convective climate model. The early atmosphere would apparently have been stable against the onset of a runaway greenhouse (that is, the complete evaporation of the oceans) for carbon dioxide pressures up to at least 100 bars. A 10- to 20-bar carbon dioxide atmosphere, such as may have existed during the first several hundred million years of the earth's history, would have had a surface temperature of approximately 85 degrees to 110 degrees C. The early stratosphere should have been dry, thereby precluding the possibility of an oxygenic prebiotic atmosphere caused by photodissociation of water vapor followed by escape of hydrogen to space. Earth's present atmosphere also appears to be stable against a carbon dioxide-induced runaway greenhouse. PMID:11539665

  10. Ionization in Earth's atmosphere following the solar storm on January 20, 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seripienlert, A.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Saiz, A.; Ruffolo, D. J.; Mangeard, P. S.; Tortermpun, U.

    2014-12-01

    To estimate possible effects of atmospheric ionization on clouds and Earth's climate as well as radiation exposure of air travelers and aircraft electronics due to space weather, relativistic solar ions are the only solar particles of concern because the less energetic particles do not penetrate to cloud/aircraft altitudes. Some solar storms produce relativistic ions that lead to showers of secondary particles in Earth's atmosphere and generate signals in ground-based detectors such as neutron monitors at a rate that can be observed above the background due to galactic cosmic rays, hence the term ground-level enhancements (GLEs). In this work we study the January 20, 2005 event, one of the most intense GLEs ever observed. From the bare counter to neutron monitor count rate ratio at South Pole, we estimate a spectral index in rigidity of 5.0. From the Spaceship Earth network, supplemented to comprise 13 polar neutron monitors, we model the time profile of relativistic solar ions impinging on Earth's atmosphere in the polar regions. We then perform Monte Carlo simulations using a realistic atmospheric model to determine ionization as a function of altitude and time in Earth's atmosphere. The results will allow us to investigate a possible connection between solar activity and Earth's climate as mediated by the cosmic ray flux, atmospheric ionization, and cloud formation. This work is partially supported by Thailand Research Fund and a Postdoctoral Fellowship from Mahidol University.

  11. Determining How Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Concentrations Have Changed during the History of the Earth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badger, Marcus P. S.; Pancost, Richard D.; Harrison, Timothy G.

    2011-01-01

    The reconstruction of ancient atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations is essential to understanding the history of the Earth and life. It is also an important guide to identifying the sensitivity of the Earth system to this greenhouse gas and, therefore, constraining its future impact on climate. However, determining the concentration of…

  12. L2 Earth atmosphere observatory : formation guidance, metrology, and control synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acikmese, Behcet A.; Mettler, Edward; Breckenridge, William G.; Macenka, Steven A.; Tubbs, Eldred F.

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the results of research sponsored by the NASA Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts (RASC) program, and includes the synthesis and analysis of the guidance, metrology and control for a two-spacecraft formation in a unique continuously powered orbit near the Sun-Earth L2 Lagrange point observing the illuminated atmosphere of the Earth while it is continuously occulting the Sun.

  13. Impact of atmospheric refraction: how deeply can we probe exo-earth's atmospheres during primary eclipse observations?

    SciTech Connect

    Bétrémieux, Yan; Kaltenegger, Lisa

    2014-08-10

    Most models used to predict or fit exoplanet transmission spectra do not include all the effects of atmospheric refraction. Namely, the angular size of the star with respect to the planet can limit the lowest altitude, or highest density and pressure, probed during primary eclipses as no rays passing below this critical altitude can reach the observer. We discuss this geometrical effect of refraction for all exoplanets and tabulate the critical altitude, density, and pressure for an exoplanet identical to Earth with a 1 bar N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmosphere as a function of both the incident stellar flux (Venus, Earth, and Mars-like) at the top of the atmosphere and the spectral type (O5-M9) of the host star. We show that such a habitable exo-Earth can be probed to a surface pressure of 1 bar only around the coolest stars. We present 0.4-5.0 μm model transmission spectra of Earth's atmosphere viewed as a transiting exoplanet, and show how atmospheric refraction modifies the transmission spectrum depending on the spectral type of the host star. We demonstrate that refraction is another phenomenon that can potentially explain flat transmission spectra over some spectral regions.

  14. Photochemistry in terrestrial exoplanet atmospheres. III. Photochemistry and thermochemistry in thick atmospheres on super Earths and mini Neptunes

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Renyu; Seager, Sara

    2014-03-20

    Some super Earths and mini Neptunes will likely have thick atmospheres that are not H{sub 2}-dominated. We have developed a photochemistry-thermochemistry kinetic-transport model for exploring the compositions of thick atmospheres on super Earths and mini Neptunes, applicable for both H{sub 2}-dominated atmospheres and non-H{sub 2}-dominated atmospheres. Using this model to study thick atmospheres for wide ranges of temperatures and elemental abundances, we classify them into hydrogen-rich atmospheres, water-rich atmospheres, oxygen-rich atmospheres, and hydrocarbon-rich atmospheres. We find that carbon has to be in the form of CO{sub 2} rather than CH{sub 4} or CO in a H{sub 2}-depleted water-dominated thick atmosphere and that the preferred loss of light elements from an oxygen-poor carbon-rich atmosphere leads to the formation of unsaturated hydrocarbons (C{sub 2}H{sub 2} and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}). We apply our self-consistent atmosphere models to compute spectra and diagnostic features for known transiting low-mass exoplanets GJ 1214 b, HD 97658 b, and 55 Cnc e. For GJ 1214 b, we find that (1) C{sub 2}H{sub 2} features at 1.0 and 1.5 μm in transmission and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} features at 9-14 μm in thermal emission are diagnostic for hydrocarbon-rich atmospheres; (2) a detection of water-vapor features and a confirmation of the nonexistence of methane features would provide sufficient evidence for a water-dominated atmosphere. In general, our simulations show that chemical stability has to be taken into account when interpreting the spectrum of a super Earth/mini Neptune. Water-dominated atmospheres only exist for carbon to oxygen ratios much lower than the solar ratio, suggesting that this kind of atmospheres could be rare.

  15. What can we learn by comparing Earth and Titan's upper atmospheres?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galand, M.; Yelle, R.; Coates, A.; Cunningham, E.; Dougherty, M.

    2006-05-01

    The Saturnian moon, Titan, is the only moon in the Solar System to sustain a dense, permanent atmosphere. Its dominant atmospheric constituent, molecular nitrogen, is a major species in the terrestrial atmosphere. Earth and Titan also share a similar obliquity (near 25 degrees) yielding season cycle and a similar surface pressure (of the order of one bar). Bearing in mind this common basis, differences in distance from the Sun, in forcing from the magnetized environment and from below, in atmospheric composition (molecular nitrogen apart), and in gravity make a comparison of Earth and Titan's upper atmospheres a very relevant and constructive undertaking. Is Titan's atmosphere "just" colder than the present terrestrial atmosphere? We will present a quantitative comparison of Earth and Titan's upper atmospheres in the context of the Cassini/TA flyby. In particular, we will focus on the contribution of solar forcing and induced photoelectron flux to the upper atmospheres of both bodies. The contribution of various energy sources to Titan's upper atmosphere will be derived from comparison of modelling results against Cassini/CAPS plasma observations.

  16. Kinetic Monte Carlo models for the study of chemical reactions in the Earth's upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchak, L. I.; Shematovich, V. I.

    2016-06-01

    A stochastic approach to study the non-equilibrium chemistry in the Earth's upper atmosphere is presented, which has been developed over a number of years. Kinetic Monte Carlo models based on this approach are an effective tool for investigating the role of suprathermal particles both in local variations of the atmospheric chemical composition and in the formation of the hot planetary corona.

  17. Advancing Solid Earth Science through Improved Atmosphere Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niell, A. E.

    2004-01-01

    We proposed to investigate and develop better models for the effect of the hydrostatic and water vapor components of the neutral atmosphere on delay for VLBI and GPS by using a Numerical Weather Model to better simulate realistic atmosphere conditions. By using a raytrace calculation through the model atmosphere at the times of actual VLBI observations, the potential improvement in geodetic results can be evaluated. Also, by calculating the actual variation of delays with elevation and azimuth, the errors in current mapping function models can be assessed. The VLBI data to be initially analyzed are the fifteen days of the CONT02 sessions of 2002 October which included eight stations. There are three segments to the research. 1) The PSU/NCAR fifth generation mesoscale numerical weather model (MM5) will be used to provide the state of the atmosphere with highest horizontal resolution of 3 km. 2) A three-dimensional raytrace program will be developed to determine the delays through the model atmosphere at the times and in the directions of the VLBI observations for each of the sites. 3) The VLBI data will be analyzed using both standard models for the atmosphere mapping functions and the mapping functions derived from the NWM raytracing.

  18. The atmospheric circulation of the super Earth GJ 1214b: Dependence on composition and metallicity

    SciTech Connect

    Kataria, T.; Showman, A. P.; Fortney, J. J.; Marley, M. S.; Freedman, R. S.

    2014-04-20

    We present three-dimensional atmospheric circulation models of GJ 1214b, a 2.7 Earth-radius, 6.5 Earth-mass super Earth detected by the MEarth survey. Here we explore the planet's circulation as a function of atmospheric metallicity and atmospheric composition, modeling atmospheres with a low mean molecular weight (MMW; i.e., H{sub 2}-dominated) and a high MMW (i.e., water- and CO{sub 2}-dominated). We find that atmospheres with a low MMW have strong day-night temperature variations at pressures above the infrared photosphere that lead to equatorial superrotation. For these atmospheres, the enhancement of atmospheric opacities with increasing metallicity lead to shallower atmospheric heating, larger day-night temperature variations, and hence stronger superrotation. In comparison, atmospheres with a high MMW have larger day-night and equator-to-pole temperature variations than low MMW atmospheres, but differences in opacity structure and energy budget lead to differences in jet structure. The circulation of a water-dominated atmosphere is dominated by equatorial superrotation, while the circulation of a CO{sub 2}-dominated atmosphere is instead dominated by high-latitude jets. By comparing emergent flux spectra and light curves for 50× solar and water-dominated compositions, we show that observations in emission can break the degeneracy in determining the atmospheric composition of GJ 1214b. The variation in opacity with wavelength for the water-dominated atmosphere leads to large phase variations within water bands and small phase variations outside of water bands. The 50× solar atmosphere, however, yields small variations within water bands and large phase variations at other characteristic wavelengths. These observations would be much less sensitive to clouds, condensates, and hazes than transit observations.

  19. The Atmospheric Circulation of the Super Earth GJ 1214b: Dependence on Composition and Metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataria, T.; Showman, A. P.; Fortney, J. J.; Marley, M. S.; Freedman, R. S.

    2014-04-01

    We present three-dimensional atmospheric circulation models of GJ 1214b, a 2.7 Earth-radius, 6.5 Earth-mass super Earth detected by the MEarth survey. Here we explore the planet's circulation as a function of atmospheric metallicity and atmospheric composition, modeling atmospheres with a low mean molecular weight (MMW; i.e., H2-dominated) and a high MMW (i.e., water- and CO2-dominated). We find that atmospheres with a low MMW have strong day-night temperature variations at pressures above the infrared photosphere that lead to equatorial superrotation. For these atmospheres, the enhancement of atmospheric opacities with increasing metallicity lead to shallower atmospheric heating, larger day-night temperature variations, and hence stronger superrotation. In comparison, atmospheres with a high MMW have larger day-night and equator-to-pole temperature variations than low MMW atmospheres, but differences in opacity structure and energy budget lead to differences in jet structure. The circulation of a water-dominated atmosphere is dominated by equatorial superrotation, while the circulation of a CO2-dominated atmosphere is instead dominated by high-latitude jets. By comparing emergent flux spectra and light curves for 50× solar and water-dominated compositions, we show that observations in emission can break the degeneracy in determining the atmospheric composition of GJ 1214b. The variation in opacity with wavelength for the water-dominated atmosphere leads to large phase variations within water bands and small phase variations outside of water bands. The 50× solar atmosphere, however, yields small variations within water bands and large phase variations at other characteristic wavelengths. These observations would be much less sensitive to clouds, condensates, and hazes than transit observations.

  20. Greenhouse warming by CH4 in the atmosphere of early Earth.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, A A; Kasting, J F; Brown, L L; Rages, K A; Freedman, R

    2000-05-25

    Earth appears to have been warm during its early history despite the faintness of the young Sun. Greenhouse warming by gaseous CO2 and H2O by itself is in conflict with constraints on atmospheric CO2 levels derived from paleosols for early Earth. Here we explore whether greenhouse warming by methane could have been important. We find that a CH4 mixing ratio of 10(-4) (100 ppmv) or more in Earth's early atmosphere would provide agreement with the paleosol data from 2.8 Ga. Such a CH4 concentration could have been readily maintained by methanogenic bacteria, which are thought to have been an important component of the biota at that time. Elimination of the methane component of the greenhouse by oxidation of the atmosphere at about 2.3-2.4 Ga could have triggered the Earth's first widespread glaciation. PMID:11543544

  1. On the abundances of carbon dioxide isotopologues in the atmospheres of mars and earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shved, G. M.

    2016-03-01

    The isotopic composition of carbon dioxide in the Martian atmosphere from the measurements of Mars Science Laboratory have been used to estimate the relative abundances of CO2 isotopologues in the Martian atmosphere. Concurrently, this study has revealed long-standing errors in the amounts of some of low-abundance CO2 isotopologues in the Earth's atmosphere in the databases of spectroscopic parameters of gases (HITRAN, etc.).

  2. Atmospheric Correction Prototype Algorithm for High Spatial Resolution Multispectral Earth Observing Imaging Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the creation of a prototype algorithm for atmospheric correction using high spatial resolution earth observing imaging systems. The objective of the work was to evaluate accuracy of a prototype algorithm that uses satellite-derived atmospheric products to generate scene reflectance maps for high spatial resolution (HSR) systems. This presentation focused on preliminary results of only the satellite-based atmospheric correction algorithm.

  3. X-38: Artist Concept of Re-Entering Earth's Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This is an artist's depiction of NASA's proposed Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) re-entering the earth's atmosphere. A team of NASA researchers began free flight tests of the X-38, a technology demonstrator for the CRV, at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in 1998. The CRV is being designed as a 'lifeboat' for the International Space Station The X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) research project is designed to develop the technology for a prototype emergency crew return vehicle, or lifeboat, for the International Space Station. The project is also intended to develop a crew return vehicle design that could be modified for other uses, such as a joint U.S. and international human spacecraft that could be launched on the French Ariane-5 Booster. The X-38 project is using available technology and off-the-shelf equipment to significantly decrease development costs. Original estimates to develop a capsule-type crew return vehicle were estimated at more than $2 billion. X-38 project officials have estimated that development costs for the X-38 concept will be approximately one quarter of the original estimate. Off-the-shelf technology is not necessarily 'old' technology. Many of the technologies being used in the X-38 project have never before been applied to a human-flight spacecraft. For example, the X-38 flight computer is commercial equipment currently used in aircraft and the flight software operating system is a commercial system already in use in many aerospace applications. The video equipment for the X-38 is existing equipment, some of which has already flown on the space shuttle for previous NASA experiments. The X-38's primary navigational equipment, the Inertial Navigation System/Global Positioning System, is a unit already in use on Navy fighters. The X-38 electromechanical actuators come from previous joint NASA, U.S. Air Force, and U.S. Navy research and development projects. Finally, an existing special coating developed by NASA will be used

  4. Evaluation of upwelling infrared radiance from earth's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, S. K.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1975-01-01

    Basic equations for calculating the upwelling atmospheric radiation are presented which account for various sources of radiation coming out at the top of the atmosphere. The theoretical formulation of the transmittance models (line-by-line and quasi-random band model) and the computational procedures used for the evaluation of the transmittance and radiance are discussed in detail. By employing the Lorentz line-by-line and quasi-random computer programs, model calculations were made to determine the upwelling radiance and signal change in the wave number interval of CO fundamental band. These results are useful in determining the effects of different interfering molecules, water vapor profiles, ground temperatures, and ground emittances on the upwelling radiance and signal change. This information is of vital importance in establishing the feasibility of measuring the concentrations of pollutants in the atmosphere from a gas filter correlation instrument flown on an aircraft or mounted on a satellite.

  5. Analysis of longwave radiation for the Earth-atmosphere system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Venuru, C. S.; Subramanian, S. V.

    1983-01-01

    Accurate radiative transfer models are used to determine the upwelling atmospheric radiance and net radiative flux in the entire longwave spectral range. The validity of the quasi-random band model is established by comparing the results of this model with those of line-by-line formulations and with available theoretical and experimental results. Existing radiative transfer models and computer codes are modified to include various surface and atmospheric effects (surface reflection, nonequilibrium radiation, and cloud effects). The program is used to evaluate the radiative flux in clear atmosphere, provide sensitivity analysis of upwelling radiance in the presence of clouds, and determine the effects of various climatological parameters on the upwelling radiation and anisotropic function. Homogeneous and nonhomogeneous gas emissivities can also be evaluated under different conditions.

  6. Atmospheric Infrared Sounder on the Earth Observing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, H. H.

    1995-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a high spectral resolution IR spectrometer. AIRS, together with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) and the Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS), is designed to meet the operational weather prediction requirements of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the global change research objectives of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The three instruments will be launched in the year 2000 on the EOS-PM spacecraft. Testing of the AIRS engineering model will start in 1996.

  7. Nonlinear dynamics of global atmospheric and Earth-system processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saltzman, Barry; Ebisuzaki, Wesley; Maasch, Kirk A.; Oglesby, Robert; Pandolfo, Lionel

    1991-01-01

    General Circulation Model (GCM) studies of the atmospheric response to change boundary conditions are discussed. Results are reported on an extensive series of numerical studies based on the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate Model (CCM) general circulation model. In these studies the authors determined the response to systematic changes in atmospheric CO2 ranging from 100 to 1000 ppm; to changes in the prescribed sea surface temperature (SST) in the Gulf of Mexico, such as occurred during the deglaciation phase of the last ice age; to changes in soil moisture over North America; and to changes in sea ice extent in the Southern Hemisphere. Study results show that the response of surface temperature and other variables is nearly logarithmic, with lower levels of CO2 implying greater sensitivity of the atmospheric state to changes in CO2. It was found that the surface temperature of the Gulf of Mexico exerts considerable control over the storm track and behavior of storm systems over the North Atlantic through its influence on evaporation and the source of latent heat. It was found that reductions in soil moisture can play a significant role in amplifying and maintaining North American drought, particularly when a negative soil moisture anomaly prevails late in the spring.

  8. Models of earth's atmosphere (90 to 2500 km)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    This monograph replaces a monograph on the upper atmosphere which was a computerized version of Jacchia's model. The current model has a range from 90 to 2500 km. In addition to the computerized model, a quick-look prediction method is given that may be used to estimate the density for any time and spatial location without using a computer.

  9. Comparing atmospheric chemical disequilibrium of Earth and Mars to detect the traces of Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoncini, Eugenio; Brucato, John Robert; Grassi, Tommaso

    Thanks to rover explorations, satellite mapping and in loco measurements, there are many evidence nowadays that early Mars could have hold extended oceans of liquid water. This makes early Mars similar to early Earth, and a deeper understanding of the conditions which led to the emergence of Life on Earth is needed. It has long been observed that Earth's atmosphere is uniquely far from its thermochemical equilibrium state in terms of its chemical composition. Studying this state of disequilibrium is important for its potential role in the detection of life on other suitable planets [1][2][3]. We developed a methodology to calculate the extent of atmospheric chemical disequilibrium [3][4]. This tool allows us to understand, on a thermodynamic basis, how life affected - and still affects - geochemical processes on Earth, and if other planetary atmospheres are habitable or have a disequilibrium similar to the Earth's one. A new computational framework called KROME has been applied to atmospheric models in order to give a correct computation of reactionś kinetics [5]. In this work we present a first computation of the extent of disequilibrium for the present and early Earth and Mars atmospheres, considering the specific contribution of the different atmospheric processes, such as thermochemical reactions, eddy diffusion, photochemistry, deposition, and the effect of the biosphere. We then assess the effect of life on atmospheric disequilibrium of the Earth and provide a comparison between “alive” and “dead” Earth, present and (plausible) early Mars. Our results provide a comprehensive analysis of atmospheric disequilibrium for rocky and habitable planets, which can be also used for the detection of habitable conditions on farther planetary bodies. [1] Lovelock, J. E.: A physical basis for life detection experiments, Nature, 207, 568 (1965) [2] Kleidon, A., Physics of Life Reviews, 7, 424 (2010) [3] Simoncini E., Grassi T., Disequilibrium in planetary

  10. Secondary Cosmic Ray Particles Due to GCR Interactions in the Earth's Atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Battistoni, G.; Cerutti, F.; Fasso, A.; Ferrari, A.; Garzelli, M.V.; Lantz, M.; Muraro, S. Pinsky, L.S.; Ranft, J.; Roesler, S.; Sala, P.R.; /Milan U. /INFN, Milan

    2009-06-16

    Primary GCR interact with the Earth's atmosphere originating atmospheric showers, thus giving rise to fluxes of secondary particles in the atmosphere. Electromagnetic and hadronic interactions interplay in the production of these particles, whose detection is performed by means of complementary techniques in different energy ranges and at different depths in the atmosphere, down to the Earth's surface. Monte Carlo codes are essential calculation tools which can describe the complexity of the physics of these phenomena, thus allowing the analysis of experimental data. However, these codes are affected by important uncertainties, concerning, in particular, hadronic physics at high energy. In this paper we shall report some results concerning inclusive particle fluxes and atmospheric shower properties as obtained using the FLUKA transport and interaction code. Some emphasis will also be given to the validation of the physics models of FLUKA involved in these calculations.

  11. Atmospheric radiative transfer generalised for use on Earth and other planets: ARTS 2.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendrok, Jana; Eriksson, Patrick; Buehler, Stefan; Perrin, Agnes; Hartogh, Paul; Rezac, Ladislav; Lemke, Oliver

    2015-04-01

    Microwave and (sub)millimetre-wave frequencies have long been of interest for remote sensing of the Earth and space objects. They suffer less from interference by small particles (dust, clouds), hence penetrate deeper into atmospheres revealing their deeper structures hidden to shorter wavelengths, and possess characteristic line absorption features of many gaseous species, which are of interest for the understanding of atmospheric chemistry and dynamics. Models simulating radiative transfer and wave propagation (RT/WP) have been developed by many institutions. Most of them are designed for a particular, narrow region of the electromagnetic spectrum, certain instrument types or missions, and specific atmospheric conditions. In particular, they are usually set up for a specific planetary body. This high level of specialisation allows for accurate modelling results. However, it also limits the flexibility of those models and comparability between them. One of the major differences in radiative transfer modeling in the atmospheres of Earth and other planets arises from the different composition of the atmospheres. When interested in measuring total abundance or even vertical distribution of atmospheric constituents, knowledge of parameters describing spectrally dependent absorption in dependence of atmospheric state is required. When modeling radiative transfer for different planets, the line shapes are often accounted for by scaling the parameters valid for Earth's ``air'' or by building a spectroscopic catalogue specific to the planet in question and its main atmospheric composition. This strongly limits applicability of these models. Based on the ARTS model [1], a sophisticated, flexible RT model for Earth atmosphere (3D spherical geometry, diverse absorption models, scattering, polarization, Jacobians), we have developed a toolbox for microwave atmospheric radiative transfer in solar system planets. As part of this, we developed and implemented a more generalized

  12. NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS): Observing the Atmosphere, Land, Oceans, and Ice from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.

    2005-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) is a space-based observing system comprised of a series of satellite sensors by whch scientists can monitor the Earth, a Data and Information System (EOSDIS) enabling researchers worldwide to access the satellite data, and an interdisciplinary science research program to interpret the satellite data. During this year, the last of the first series of EOS missions, Aura, was launched. Aura is designed exclusively to conduct research on the composition, chemistry, and dynamics of the Earth's upper and lower atmosphere, employing multiple instruments on a single spacecraft. Aura is the third in a series of major Earth observing satellites to study the environment and climate change and is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise. The first and second missions, Terra and Aqua, are designed to study the land, oceans, atmospheric constituents (aerosols, clouds, temperature, and water vapor), and the Earth's radiation budget. The other seven EOS spacecraft include satellites to study (i) land cover & land use change, (ii) solar irradiance and solar spectral variation, (iii) ice volume, (iv) ocean processes (vector wind and sea surface topography), and (v) vertical variations of clouds, water vapor, and aerosols up to and including the stratosphere. Aura's chemistry measurements will also follow up on measurements that began with NASA's Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite and continue the record of satellite ozone data collected from the TOMS missions. In this presentation I will describe how scientists are using EOS data to examine the health of the earth's atmosphere, including atmospheric chemistry, aerosol properties, and cloud properties, with a special look at the latest earth observing mission, Aura.

  13. NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS): Observing the Atmosphere, Land, Oceans, and Ice from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) is a space-based observing system comprised of a series of satellite sensors by which scientists can monitor the Earth, a Data and Information System (EOSDIS) enabling researchers worldwide to access the satellite data, and an interdisciplinary science research program to interpret the satellite data. During this year, the last of the first series of EOS missions, Aura, was launched. Aura is designed exclusively to conduct research on the composition, chemistry, and dynamics of the Earth's upper and lower atmosphere, employing multiple instruments on a single spacecraft. Aura is the third in a series of major Earth observing satellites to study the environment and climate change and is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise. The first and second missions, Terra and Aqua, are designed to study the land, oceans, atmospheric constituents (aerosols, clouds, temperature, and water vapor), and the Earth's radiation budget. The other seven EOS spacecraft include satellites to study (i) land cover & land use change, (ii) solar irradiance and solar spectral variation, (iii) ice volume, (iv) ocean processes (vector wind and sea surface topography), and (v) vertical variations of clouds, water vapor, and aerosols up to and including the stratosphere. Aura's chemistry measurements will also follow up on measurements that began with NASA's Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite and continue the record of satellite ozone data collected from the TOMS missions. In this presentation I will describe how scientists are using EOS data to examine the health of the earth's atmosphere, including atmospheric chemistry, aerosol properties, and cloud properties, with a special but not exclusive look at the latest earth observing mission, Aura.

  14. Hydrogen and climate in primitive terrestrial and super-Earth atmospheres (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wordsworth, R.

    2013-12-01

    For the three terrestrial planets with significant atmospheres in the Solar System (Earth, Venus and Mars), present-day conditions are oxidizing, with combinations of CO2, N2, O2 and H2O dominating by mass and in terms of the greenhouse effect. However, primitive terrestrial or ';super-Earth' exoplanet atmospheres may be much more reducing (i.e., hydrogen-rich), with major implications for climate, composition, and pre-biotic chemistry. Here I discuss recent work on the role of hydrogen in terrestrial planetary atmospheres, with a particular focus on the early Earth. I describe how collision-induced absorption (CIA) by hydrogen may have significantly warmed Earth's surface in the Archean and Hadean by blocking the critical water vapour absorption window at 800-1200 cm-1. This warming may have helped mitigate the faint young Sun effect early on. After the emergence of widespread methanogenesis, the consumption of H2 and CO2 should have led to a global shift in climate, with potentially observable consequences in the geological record. Because of variations in planetary mass, stellar XUV input and outgassing rates, hydrogen is also likely to be an important component of many super-Earth atmospheres. As I will discuss, this should have a significant effect on climate evolution and the carbon cycle on such planets, which should be considered in future predictions of atmospheric spectra and biosignatures.

  15. Advanced sensors for spaceborne measurements of the earth's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkley, E. D.

    1982-01-01

    Concepts involved in remote sensing from space are reviewed, together with performance requirements of proposed and planned equipment. Attention is focused on measurements of the troposphere, particularly meteorological variables and chemical species. The principles of absorption, using either passive or active sensors, emission detection, fluorescence measurements, and EM radiation scattering are outlined. The proposed NASA Windsat, using a CO2 laser from the Orbiter or from an 800 km orbit spacecraft to measure low-level wind speeds is described, as are the uses of the AMTS atmospheric sounder instrument for IR atmospheric temperature sensing and a 20-channel microwave radiometer to detect moisture profiles in the water vapor bands. Additionally, a microwave pressure sounder to detect backscattered signals at 60 GHz is outlined, along with lidar pressure and wind speed measurement methods.

  16. The oxygen and carbon dioxide balance in the earth's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, F. S.

    1975-01-01

    The oxygen-carbon dioxide cycle is described in detail, and steps which are sensitive to perturbation or instability are identified. About half of the carbon dioxide consumption each year in photosynthesis occurs in the oceans. Phytoplankton, which are the primary producers, have been shown to assimilate insecticides and herbicides. The impact of such materials on phytoplankton photosynthesis, both direct and as the indirect result of detrimental effects higher up in the food chain, cannot be assessed. Net oxygen production is very small in comparison with the total production and occurs almost exclusively in a few ocean areas with anoxic bottom conditions and in peat-forming marshes which are sensitive to anthropogenic disturbances. The carbon dioxide content of the atmosphere is increasing at a relatively rapid rate as the result of fossil fuel combustion. Increases in photosynthesis as the result of the hothouse effect may in turn reduce the carbon dioxide content of the atmosphere, leading to global cooling.

  17. Revised Atmospheric Angular Momentum Series Related to Earth's Variable Rotation under Consideration of Surface Topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Y. H.; Salstein, D. A.; Chen, J. L.

    2006-01-01

    The atmospheric angular momentum is closely related to variations in the Earth rotation. The atmospheric excitation function (AEF), or namely atmospheric effective angular momentum function, is introduced in studying the atmospheric excitation of the Earth's variable rotation. It may be separated into two portions, i.e, the "wind" terms due to the atmospheric motion relative to the mantle and the "pressure" terms due to the variations of atmospheric mass distribution evident through surface pressure changes. The AEF wind terms during the period of 1948-2004 are re-processed from the NCEP/NCAR (National Centers for Environmental Prediction-National Center for Atmospheric Research) reanalysis 6-hourly wind and pressure fields. Some previous calculations were approximate, in that the wind terms were integrated from an isobaric lower boundary of 1000 hPa. To consider the surface topography effect, however, the AEF is computed by integration using the winds from the Earth's surface to 10 hPa, the top atmospheric model level, instead of from 1000 hPa. For these two cases, only a minor difference, equivalent to approx. 0.004 milliseconds in length-of-day variation, exists with respect to the axial wind term. However, considerable differences, equivalent to 5-6 milliarcseconds in polar motion, are found regarding equatorial wind terms. We further compare the total equatorial AEF (with and without the topographic effect) with the polar motion excitation function (PMEF) during the period of 1980-2003. The equatorial AEF gets generally closer to the PMEF, and improved coherences are found between them when the topography effect is included. Keywords: Atmospheric angular momentum, Atmospheric excitation function, Earth rotation, Topography, Wind, Pressure.

  18. Estimate of the 42Ar content in the Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barabash, A. S.; Kornoukhov, V. N.; Jants, V. E.

    1997-02-01

    42Ar is a potential source of background in large volume argon-based detectors. The production of the 42Ar isotope both by cosmic rays and by neutrons produced by testing of nuclear weapons is discussed. We demonstrate that main channel of the 42Ar production is from atmospheric testing of nuclear bombs from 1945 to 1962 and the 42Ar content must be less than 1.3 × 10 -23 parts of 42Ar per part of natAr.

  19. Three-dimensional random earth atmospheres for Monte Carlo trajectory analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    A set of four computer tapes containing random three dimensional Earth atmospheres is available for Monte Carlo trajectory analyses. The tapes contain sufficient atmospheric tables to allow replications of any trajectory below an altitude of 99 km. The atmospheres were provided by an empirical model designed to generate random atmospheres whose distributions match those in a data base of sounding rocket measurements. A readily implementable means of linking the tapes to any existing trajectory simulation computer program is described involving the addition of three subroutines which are listed in an appendix.

  20. Regional earth-atmosphere energy balance estimates based on assimilations with a GCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Michael A.; Schubert, Siegfried D.

    1990-01-01

    The Oort and Vonder Haar (1976) column-budget technique is presently used to evaluate the physical consistency and accuracy of regional earth-atmosphere energy balance estimates for (1) atmospheric budget terms, (2) net radiation at the top of the atmosphere, and (3) time tendency and flux divergence of energy, for Special Observing Periods of the FGGE year. It is found that, during winter, the midlatitude oceans supply large quantities of energy to the overlying atmosphere, which then transports the energy to the continental heat-sinks; the energy flows in the opposite direction during summer.

  1. Abiotic ozone and oxygen in atmospheres similar to prebiotic Earth

    SciTech Connect

    Domagal-Goldman, Shawn D.; Segura, Antígona; Claire, Mark W.; Robinson, Tyler D.; Meadows, Victoria S.

    2014-09-10

    The search for life on planets outside our solar system will use spectroscopic identification of atmospheric biosignatures. The most robust remotely detectable potential biosignature is considered to be the detection of oxygen (O{sub 2}) or ozone (O{sub 3}) simultaneous to methane (CH{sub 4}) at levels indicating fluxes from the planetary surface in excess of those that could be produced abiotically. Here we use an altitude-dependent photochemical model with the enhanced lower boundary conditions necessary to carefully explore abiotic O{sub 2} and O{sub 3} production on lifeless planets with a wide variety of volcanic gas fluxes and stellar energy distributions. On some of these worlds, we predict limited O{sub 2} and O{sub 3} buildup, caused by fast chemical production of these gases. This results in detectable abiotic O{sub 3} and CH{sub 4} features in the UV-visible, but no detectable abiotic O{sub 2} features. Thus, simultaneous detection of O{sub 3} and CH{sub 4} by a UV-visible mission is not a strong biosignature without proper contextual information. Discrimination between biological and abiotic sources of O{sub 2} and O{sub 3} is possible through analysis of the stellar and atmospheric context—particularly redox state and O atom inventory—of the planet in question. Specifically, understanding the spectral characteristics of the star and obtaining a broad wavelength range for planetary spectra should allow more robust identification of false positives for life. This highlights the importance of wide spectral coverage for future exoplanet characterization missions. Specifically, discrimination between true and false positives may require spectral observations that extend into infrared wavelengths and provide contextual information on the planet's atmospheric chemistry.

  2. CHClF2 /F-22/ in the earth's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, R. A.; Khalil, M. A. K.; Penkett, S. A.; Prosser, N. J. D.

    1980-01-01

    Recent global measurements of CHClF2 (F-22) are reported. Originally, GC/MS techniques were used to obtain these data. Since then, significant advances using an O2-doped electron capture detector have been made in the analytical techniques, so that F-22 can be measured by EC/GC methods at ambient concentrations. The atmospheric burden of F-22 calculated from these measurements (average mixing ratio, mid-1979, approximately 45 pptv) is considerably greater than that expected from the estimates of direct industrial emissions (average mixing ratio, mid-1979, approximately 30 pptv). This difference is probably due to underestimates of F-22 emissions.

  3. CHClF2 (F-22) in the Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, R. A.; Khalil, M. A. K.; Penkett, S. A.; Prosser, N. J. D.

    1980-10-01

    Recent global measurements of CHClF2 (F-22) are reported. Originally, GC/MS techniques were used to obtain these data. Since then, significant advances using an O2-doped electron capture detector have been made in the analytical techniques, so that F-22 can be measured by EC/GC methods at ambient concentrations. The atmospheric burden of F-22 calculated from these measurements (average mixing ratio, mid-1979, ˜45 pptv) is considerably greater than that expected from the estimates of direct industrial emissions (average mixing ratio, mid-1979, ˜30 pptv). This difference is probably due to underestimates of F-22 emissions.

  4. Ozone formation due to interaction of meteoroids with Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bibarsov, R. SH.

    1987-01-01

    In a previous paper, it was shown that concentration of atomic oxygen in overdense meteor trails may exceed that of the normal atmosphere by a factor of several hundred times. This may lead to the formation of meteoric ozone. Therefore, it is imperative to estimate the concentration of ozone in the trails of meteor bodies with different masses. It seems that meteoric ozone must be taken into account when studying the balance of ionization in the meteor trails formed by particles with masses more than .01 g. The predicted levels of atomic oxygen and ozone seem sufficient to greatly influence the rate of meteoric plasma deionization.

  5. Clouds in the atmosphere of the super-Earth exoplanet GJ 1214b.

    PubMed

    Kreidberg, Laura; Bean, Jacob L; Désert, Jean-Michel; Benneke, Björn; Deming, Drake; Stevenson, Kevin B; Seager, Sara; Berta-Thompson, Zachory; Seifahrt, Andreas; Homeier, Derek

    2014-01-01

    Recent surveys have revealed that planets intermediate in size between Earth and Neptune ('super-Earths') are among the most common planets in the Galaxy. Atmospheric studies are the next step towards developing a comprehensive understanding of this new class of object. Much effort has been focused on using transmission spectroscopy to characterize the atmosphere of the super-Earth archetype GJ 1214b (refs 7 - 17), but previous observations did not have sufficient precision to distinguish between two interpretations for the atmosphere. The planet's atmosphere could be dominated by relatively heavy molecules, such as water (for example, a 100 per cent water vapour composition), or it could contain high-altitude clouds that obscure its lower layers. Here we report a measurement of the transmission spectrum of GJ 1214b at near-infrared wavelengths that definitively resolves this ambiguity. The data, obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope, are sufficiently precise to detect absorption features from a high mean-molecular-mass atmosphere. The observed spectrum, however, is featureless. We rule out cloud-free atmospheric models with compositions dominated by water, methane, carbon monoxide, nitrogen or carbon dioxide at greater than 5σ confidence. The planet's atmosphere must contain clouds to be consistent with the data. PMID:24380954

  6. Earth atmospheric entry studies for manned Mars missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tauber, M. E.; Palmer, G. E.; Yang, Lily

    1990-01-01

    Decelerations, heating rates, and total heat loads encountered when returning from Mars to earth at entry speeds of 12 km/sec to 16 km/sec are studied. For entry at 14 km/sec, it is found that a lift/drag ratio (L/D) of 0.5 is required to provide a guidance corridor margin near 1 deg for the specified deceleration limit of 5 g. For a blunted, raked cone with an L/D = 0.5, the peak heating rate near the aft end of the forebody varies from 0.14 to 0.23 kW/sq cm for laminar flow. If ablation triggers boundary layer transition, the peak heating can rise to 0.5 or up to 0.72 kW/sq cm. All heating rates are sufficiently high to make ablative heat shields necessary.

  7. A statistical look at the retrieval of exoplanetary atmospheres of super Earths and giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocchetto, Marco; Waldmann, Ingo Peter; Tinetti, Giovanna; Yurchenko, Sergey; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2015-08-01

    Over the past decades transit spectroscopy has become one of the pioneering methods to characterise exoplanetary atmospheres. With the increasing number of observations, and the advent of new ground and spaced based instruments, it is now crucial to find the most optimal and objective methodologies to interpret these data, and understand the information content they convey. This is particularly true for smaller and fainter super Earth type planets.In this conference we will present a new take on the spectral retrieval of transiting planets, with particular focus on super Earth atmospheres. TauREx (Waldmann et al. 2015a,b.) is a new line-by-line radiative transfer atmospheric retrieval framework for transmission and emission spectroscopy of exoplanetary atmospheres, optimised for hot Jupiters and super Earths. The code has been built from scratch with the ideas of scalability, flexibility and automation. This allows to run retrievals with minimum user input that can be scaled to large cluster computing. Priors on the number and types of molecules considered are automatically determined using a custom built pattern recognition algorithm able to identify the most likely absorbers/emitters in the exoplanetary spectra, minimising the human bias in selecting the major atmospheric constituents.Using these tools, we investigate the impact of signal to noise, spectral resolution and wavelength coverage on the retrievability of individual model parameters from transit spectra of super Earths, and put our models to test (Rocchetto et al. 2015). Characterisation of the atmospheres of super Earths through transit spectroscopy is paramount, as it can provide an indirect - and so far unique - way to probe the nature of these planets. For the first time we analyse in a systematic way large grids of spectra generated for different observing scenarios. We perform thousands of retrievals aimed to fully map the degeneracies and understand the statistics of current exoplanetary

  8. High-energy cosmic ray muons in the Earth's atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Kochanov, A. A.; Sinegovskaya, T. S.; Sinegovsky, S. I.

    2013-03-15

    We present the calculations of the atmospheric muon fluxes at energies 10-10{sup 7} GeV based on a numerical-analytical method for solving the hadron-nucleus cascade equations. It allows the non-power-law behavior of the primary cosmic ray (PCR) spectrum, the violation of Feynman scaling, and the growth of the total inelastic cross sections for hadron-nucleus collisions with increasing energy to be taken into account. The calculations have been performed for a wide class of hadron-nucleus interaction models using directly the PCR measurements made in the ATIC-2 and GAMMA experiments and the parameterizations of the primary spectrum based on a set of experiments. We study the dependence of atmospheric muon flux characteristics on the hadronic interaction model and the influence of uncertainties in the PCR spectrum and composition on the muon flux at sea level. Comparison of the calculated muon energy spectra at sea level with the data from a large number of experiments shows that the cross sections for hadron-nucleus interactions introduce the greatest uncertainty in the energy region that does not include the knee in the primary spectrum.

  9. Effects of atmospheric breakup on crater field formation. [on earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Passey, Q. R.; Melosh, H. J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper investigates the physics of meteoroid breakup in the atmosphere and its implications for the observed features of strewn fields. There are several effects which cause dispersion of the meteoroid fragments: gravity, differential lift of the fragments, bow shock interaction just after breakup, centripetal separation by a rotating meteroid, and possibly a dynamical transverse separation resulting from the crushing deceleration in the atmosphere. Of these, it is shown that gravity alone can produce the common pattern in which the largest crater occurs at the downrange end of the scatter ellipse. The average lift-to-drag ratio of the tumbling fragments must be less than about 0.001, otherwise small fragments would produce small craters downrange of the main crater, and this is not generally observed. The cross-range dispersion is probably due to the combined effects of bow shock interaction, crushing deceleration, and possibly spinning of the meteoroid. A number of terrestrial strewn fields are discussed in the light of these ideas, which are formulated quantitatively for a range of meteoroid velocities, entry angles, and crushing strengths. It is found that when the crater size exceeds about 1 km, the separation between the fragments upon landing is a fraction of their own diameter, so that the crater formed by such a fragmented meteoroid is almost indistinguishable from that formed by a solid body of the same total mass and velocity.

  10. Earth Orientation and Its Excitations by Atmosphere, Oceans, and Geomagnetic Jerks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vondrák, J.; Ron, C.

    2015-12-01

    In addition to torques exerted by the Moon, Sun, and planets, changes of the Earth orientation parameters (EOP) are known to be caused also by excitations by the atmosphere and oceans. Recently appeared studies, hinting that geomagnetic jerks (GMJ, rapid changes of geomagnetic field) might be associated with sudden changes of phase and amplitude of EOP (Holme and de Viron 2005, 2013, Gibert and Le Mouël 2008, Malkin 2013). We (Ron et al. 2015) used additional excitations applied at the epochs of GMJ to derive its influence on motion of the spin axis of the Earth in space (precession-nutation). We demonstrated that this effect, if combined with the influence of the atmosphere and oceans, improves substantially the agreement with celestial pole offsets observed by Very Long-Baseline Interferometry. Here we concentrate our efforts to study possible influence of GMJ on temporal changes of all five Earth orientation parameters defining the complete Earth orientation in space. Numerical integration of Brzeziński's broad-band Liouville equations (Brzeziński 1994) with atmospheric and oceanic excitations, combined with expected GMJ effects, is used to derive EOP and compare them with their observed values. We demonstrate that the agreement between all five Earth orientation parameters integrated by this method and those observed by space geodesy is improved substantially if the influence of additional excitations at GMJ epochs is added to excitations by the atmosphere and oceans.

  11. An Instrument Concept for Atmospheric Infrared Sounding from Medium Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Baron, Richard l.

    2004-01-01

    Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) offers a unique vantage point for atmospheric infrared sounding. The orbit allows the entire globe to be covered each day with one satellite. The orbit is slow enough to allow multiple views of a single target to be made on each pass. this paper discusses the advantages in coverage and revisit rate from MEO for a particular concept for a Medium Earth Orbit Infrared Atmospheric Sounder (MIRIS). The requirements for this instrument in terms of spectral range, spatial resolution, field of view, and calibration are presented as well as the radiometric performance expectations.

  12. Effects of Large Solar Events on Atmospheric Drag of Earth Artificial Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mircea, Liviu

    2008-09-01

    Sharp bursts of Solar activity, in the form of highly energetic radiation (extreme UV and X-rays), mass transfers (coronal mass ejections) and energetic charged particles (electrons, protons and ions), act on the upper atmosphere of the Earth, and change its state parameters (temperature, structure-altitude distribution, chemical composition and density) and also interact with Earth's magnetic field. This solar outputs increase dramatically during cyclic periods of intensive solar activity or due to irregular major storm events. This are causing high temporary correlation with above mentioned state parameters perturbations, inducing thermospheric expansion and density increasing, generating atmospheric brake off terrestrial artificial satellites.

  13. Atmospheric excitation of the earth's annual wobble - 1980-1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, B. Fong; Au, Andrew Y.

    1991-01-01

    Global meteorological analyses from the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasts are employed to compute the atmospheric excitation psi of the polar motion for the 9-year period of 1980-1988. Both the matter component psi(matter) and the motion component psi (motion) are computed, the former with and without the oceanic inverted barometer (IB) effect. It is found that psi(motion) contributes significantly to the total excitation psi overall and nonnegligibly to the annual signal in psi, or the annual wobble excitation in particular. The results for the annual wobble excitation, in terms of the prograde component psi(t) and the retrogade component phsi(-) for January 1, are within the (rather large) range of previous estimates. The IB effect has a small impact on psi(+), whereas its impact on psi(-) is considerable.

  14. Heating and thermal transformation of micrometeoroids entering the earth's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, S. G.; Brownlee, D. E.

    1991-01-01

    The present numerical solutions for the atmospheric entry of 10 micron-1 mm diameter micrometeoroids gave attention to ablative mass loss and cooling, together with gravitational and curvature effects, for entry velocities in the 11.2-72 km/sec range. Maximum temperature and mass-loss rates are found to generally occur at altitudes between 85 and 90 km, during about 1 sec of peak heating; the survival of all particles in the 70 micron-1 mm size range is noted to be limited to those with minimal entry velocity. Virtually all of the 'cosmic spherules' of more than 70-mm diameter, as well as giant unmelted micrometeorites, are implied by the present results to be of asteroidal origin.

  15. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the Earth Observing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, Hartmut H.; Pagano, Thomas S.; Strow, Larrabee

    2001-01-01

    AIRS, the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder on the EOS-Aqua, produces global high precision spectra from 3.7 - 15.4 micron with spectral resolving power mu/delta mu = 1200 twice each day from 708 km orbital altitude. AIRS is the first hyperspectral infrared spectrometer designed to support NOAA/NCEP's operational requirements for medium range weather forecasting during its nominal 7 year lifetime. AIRS, together with the AMSU and HSB microwave radiometers, will achieve global retrieval accuracy of better then 1K rms in the lower troposphere under clear and partly cloudy condition. Based on the excellent radiometric and spectral performance demonstrated during the pre-launch testing, the assimilation of AIRS data into the forecast model is expected to result in major forecast improvements. Launch of AIRS on the EOS AQUA is scheduled for May 2001.

  16. Climatic effects due to halogenated compounds in the earth's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, W.-C.; Pinto, J. P.; Yung, Y. L.

    1980-01-01

    Using a one-dimensional radiative-convective model, a sensitivity study is performed of the effect of ozone depletion in the stratosphere on the surface temperature. There could be a cooling of the surface temperature by approximately 0.2 K due to chlorofluoromethane-induced ozone depletion at steady state (assuming 1973 release rates). This cooling reduces significantly the greenhouse effect due to the presence of chlorofluoromethanes. Carbon tetrafluoride has a strong nu sub 3 band at 7.8 microns, and the atmospheric greenhouse effect is shown to be 0.07 and 0.12 K/ppbv with and without taking into account overlap with CH4 and N2O bands. At concentrations higher than 1 ppbv, absorption by the nu sub 3 band starts to saturate and the greenhouse effect becomes less efficient.

  17. Comparing the Atmospheres of Mercury and the Earth's Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Thomas H.; Killen, Rosemary M.; Hurley, Dana M.

    2012-01-01

    The exospheres of Mercury and the Earth's Moon are fundamentally similar, but the differences that do exist between them can help us to develop a better understanding of the processes at work on the two bodies that produce and remove volatiles. The major differences are derived from (1) the different compositions of the two surfaces, (2) the different particle and field em'ironments above the surface of each body (particularly the presence of intrinsic magnetic field of Mercury), and (3) the larger flux of interplanetary dust incident at the orbit of Mercury. The first difference, surface composition, is the most intractable problem, but the most challenging part of that problem, the composition of the Hermean regolith, may be at least partially addressed as the MESSENGER mission completes work over the next year. Much progress has been made with respect to exploring the second difference above--spacecraft such as Helios, Ulysses, WIND, and ACE have measured the solar wind and its composition both in Earth orbit and at distances encompassing the orbit of Mercury. While our knowledge of the solar wind is incomplete, again it is far more detailed than a simple 1/R(sup 2) law would predict. Another problem is that of the flux of charged particles to the surfaces. While Mercury's magnetosphere is the subject of current study with MESSENGER, the influx of charged particles on the Moon has gone beyond a cos (psi) picture, where psi is the solar zenith angle. We know that the influx of ions at the Moon is affected by magnetic anomalies, by craters, and by surface charging. The third external difference is the differing flux of interplanetary dust incident on the two surfaces. In this talk we will consider: (1) the species that one can compare now for these two exospheres (Na, K, and He); (2) the species that you might be able to compare with future measurements (Ca and Mg); arid (3) how intensive ground-based observations of the easiest lunar species to observe from the

  18. Combined 2-micron Dial and Doppler Lidar: Application to the Atmosphere of Earth or Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Koch, Grady J.; Ismail, Syed; Kavaya, Michael; Yu, Jirong; Wood, Sidney A.; Emmitt, G. David

    2006-01-01

    A concept is explored for combining the Doppler and DIAL techniques into a single, multifunctional instrument. Wind, CO2 concentration, and aerosol density can all be measured. Technology to build this instrument is described, including the demonstration of a prototype lidar. Applications are described for use in the Earth science. The atmosphere of Mars can also be studied, and results from a recently-developed simulation model of performance in the Martian atmosphere are presented.

  19. The mechanism of temperature and pressure changes in the Earth's atmosphere during solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reshetov, V. D.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of solar flares on the weather on Earth is examined. It is concluded that the processes which arise in the atmosphere are so intricate that a single calculation of solar activity is insufficient for long-range forecasting. However, combined consideration of processes dependent upon the dynamic instability of the atmosphere and the effect of solar activity will contribute to the improvement of long-range forecasts.

  20. Atmospheric correction of ocean-color sensors: effects of the Earth's curvature.

    PubMed

    Ding, K; Gordon, H R

    1994-10-20

    We investigate the influence of the curvature of the Earth on a proposed atmospheric-correction scheme for the Sea-Viewing Wide-Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) by simulating the radiance exiting the top of a spherical-shell atmosphere and inserting the result into the proposed correction algorithm. The error in the derived water-leaving reflectance suggests that the effects of the curvature are negligible for solar zenith angles (θ(0)) ≤ 70°. Furthermore, for θ(0) > 70° the error in atmospheric correction can usually be reduced if the molecular-scattering component of the top of the atmosphere reflectance (ρ(r)) is computed with a spherical-shell atmosphere radiative transfer code. Also, for θ(0) > 70° the error in atmospheric correction in a spherical-shell atmosphere, when ρ(r) is computed with a spherical-shell model, can be predicted reasonably well from computations made with plane-parallel atmosphere radiative transfer codes. This implies that studies aimed at improving atmospheric correction can be made assuming plane-parallel geometry and that the investigator can be confident when θ(0)> 70° that any improvements will still be valid for a spherical-shell atmosphere as long as ρ(r) is computed in spherical-shell geometry. Finally, a scheme for computing ρ(r) in a spherical-shell atmosphere in a relatively simple manner is developed. PMID:20941262

  1. Atmospheric Ar and Ne returned from mantle depths to the Earth's surface by forearc recycling.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Suzanne L; Das, J P

    2015-11-17

    In subduction zones, sediments, hydrothermally altered lithosphere, fluids, and atmospheric gases are transported into the mantle, where ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metamorphism takes place. However, the extent to which atmospheric noble gases are trapped in minerals crystallized during UHP metamorphism is unknown. We measured Ar and Ne trapped in phengite and omphacite from the youngest known UHP terrane on Earth to determine the composition of Ar and Ne returned from mantle depths to the surface by forearc recycling. An (40)Ar/(39)Ar age [7.93 ± 0.10 My (1σ)] for phengite is interpreted as the timing of crystallization at mantle depths and indicates that (40)Ar/(39)Ar phengite ages reliably record the timing of UHP metamorphism. Both phengite and omphacite yielded atmospheric (38)Ar/(36)Ar and (20)Ne/(22)Ne. Our study provides the first documentation, to our knowledge, of entrapment of atmospheric Ar and Ne in phengite and omphacite. Results indicate that a subduction barrier for atmospheric-derived noble gases does not exist at mantle depths associated with UHP metamorphism. We show that the crystallization age together with the isotopic composition of nonradiogenic noble gases trapped in minerals formed during subsolidus crystallization at mantle depths can be used to unambiguously assess forearc recycling of atmospheric noble gases. The flux of atmospheric noble gas entering the deep Earth through subduction and returning to the surface cannot be fully realized until the abundances of atmospheric noble gases trapped in exhumed UHP rocks are known. PMID:26542683

  2. Monitoring the Earth's Atmosphere with the Global IMS Infrasound Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brachet, Nicolas; Brown, David; Mialle, Pierrick; Le Bras, Ronan; Coyne, John; Given, Jeffrey

    2010-05-01

    The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) is tasked with monitoring compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) which bans nuclear weapon explosions underground, in the oceans, and in the atmosphere. The verification regime includes a globally distributed network of seismic, hydroacoustic, infrasound and radionuclide stations which collect and transmit data to the International Data Centre (IDC) in Vienna, Austria shortly after the data are recorded at each station. The infrasound network defined in the Protocol of the CTBT comprises 60 infrasound array stations. Each array is built according to the same technical specifications, it is typically composed of 4 to 9 sensors, with 1 to 3 km aperture geometry. At the end of 2000 only one infrasound station was transmitting data to the IDC. Since then, 41 additional stations have been installed and 70% of the infrasound network is currently certified and contributing data to the IDC. This constitutes the first global infrasound network ever built with such a large and uniform distribution of stations. Infrasound data at the IDC are processed at the station level using the Progressive Multi-Channel Correlation (PMCC) method for the detection and measurement of infrasound signals. The algorithm calculates the signal correlation between sensors at an infrasound array. If the signal is sufficiently correlated and consistent over an extended period of time and frequency range a detection is created. Groups of detections are then categorized according to their propagation and waveform features, and a phase name is assigned for infrasound, seismic or noise detections. The categorization complements the PMCC algorithm to avoid overwhelming the IDC automatic association algorithm with false alarm infrasound events. Currently, 80 to 90% of the detections are identified as noise by the system. Although the noise detections are not used to build events in the context of CTBT monitoring

  3. Characterizing the Atmosphere of Benchmark Super-Earth HD 97658b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knutson, Heather

    2012-10-01

    Super-Earth planets are ubiquitous, diverse, and poorly characterized. Kepler has discovered several thousand planet candidates with radii intermediate between the Earth and Neptune, yet to date only one nearby super-Earth, GJ 1214b, has been studied in detail. We propose to measure the atmospheric scale height of HD 97658b, a recently detected close analogue of GJ 1214b in bulk mass and radius. HD 97658b is the only other super-Earth aside from GJ 1214b that can be easily characterized with HST, and is likely to be the target of multiple observing proposals in Cycle 22. By investing a small amount of telescope time now, we can ensure that the proposing teams and the HST TAC are able to make informed decisions about how best to use scarce observing resources. Our WFC3 measurement will cleanly distinguish a large scale-height, hydrogen-dominated atmosphere from a compact, water steam atmosphere. The measurement will also be the first and most important step toward characterizing the planet's bulk composition. Currently, the mass and radius measurements of HD 97658 are compatible with widely divergent interior compositions: a water world of half rock and half water, a mini-Neptune, or a planet of terrestrial composition with outgassed hydrogen. The detection of a low scale-height water atmosphere would strongly suggest a water world bulk composition, and a birth near or beyond the ice line of the protoplanetary disk. We will directly compare the atmospheres of HD 97658b and GJ 1214b, providing the first measure of the diversity of super-Earth atmospheres prior to the era of JWST.

  4. Super-Earth Atmospheres: Self-consistent Gas Accretion and Retention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginzburg, Sivan; Schlichting, Hilke E.; Sari, Re’em

    2016-07-01

    Some recently discovered short-period Earth- to Neptune-sized exoplanets (super-Earths) have low observed mean densities that can only be explained by voluminous gaseous atmospheres. Here, we study the conditions allowing the accretion and retention of such atmospheres. We self-consistently couple the nebular gas accretion onto rocky cores and the subsequent evolution of gas envelopes following the dispersal of the protoplanetary disk. Specifically, we address mass-loss due to both photo-evaporation and cooling of the planet. We find that planets shed their outer layers (dozens of percent in mass) following the disk's dispersal (even without photo-evaporation), and their atmospheres shrink in a few Myr to a thickness comparable to the radius of the underlying rocky core. At this stage, atmospheres containing less particles than the core (equivalently, lighter than a few percent of the planet's mass) can be blown away by heat coming from the cooling core, while heavier atmospheres cool and contract on a timescale of Gyr at most. By relating the mass-loss timescale to the accretion time, we analytically identify a Goldilocks region in the mass-temperature plane in which low-density super-Earths can be found: planets have to be massive and cold enough to accrete and retain their atmospheres, but not too massive or cold, such that they do not enter runaway accretion and become gas giants (Jupiters). We compare our results to the observed super-Earth population and find that low-density planets are indeed concentrated in the theoretically allowed region. Our analytical and intuitive model can be used to investigate possible super-Earth formation scenarios.

  5. Application of the DSMC Method in Modeling Earth's Rarefied Upper Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoey, W.; Walker, A. C.; Goldstein, D. B.; Varghese, P. L.; Trafton, L. M.

    2014-12-01

    Improving the accuracy and robustness of simulations of Earth's upper atmosphere is a priority for satellite drag and space weather applications. The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo [DSMC] method is well-suited to modeling the dynamics of such rarefied and non-equilibrium regimes, where continuum techniques break down. Here, we apply DSMC in three-dimensional, transient, and self-consistent neutral density simulations of Earth's rarefied upper atmosphere.An existing planetary-science code base, established in the modeling of the lunar and Ionian environs, is extended to reflect the physics of Earth's upper atmosphere. Comprehensive atmospheric simulations are computed in parallel on a domain extending from the mid-thermosphere, below the continuum-rarefied transition, through 1000 km altitude. The simulation code includes multi-species neutral- and photo-chemistry, tracking of particle rotational and vibrational states, and non-equilibrium radiation transport. Substantial model development is demonstrated in application to the Earth's atmosphere, including the incorporation of lower-boundary conditions consistent with the NRLMSISE-00 semi-empirical model, ultraviolet radiation and photo-chemistry rates modeled with reference to space weather indices, and radiative absorption attenuated by integrated column density.Comparisons with results drawn from existing upper atmospheric models and from indirect satellite mass density measurements are employed in benchmarking model accuracy. Avenues for further development include hybridization with continuum global circulation models in the mid-thermosphere, and the extension of the planetary code's magnetic field and charged-particle models to the Earth case.Research supported by the Los Alamos Space Weather Summer School, LANL Institutional Computing, and the Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics, and Signatures (IGPPS) at LANL.

  6. The State of the Earth's Atmosphere 3.5 Ga Ago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marty, B.; Avice, G.; Kuga, M.

    2014-12-01

    The atmosphere evolved through time upon escape to space and exchange of volatile elements with the Earth's solid reservoirs (mantle, crust). We are currently investigating the composition of the ancient atmosphere by analyzing gases trapped in Archean chemical sedimentary rocks, including fluid inclusions in Archean hydrothermal quartz. The rationale of the study is that trapped noble gases, as well as nitrogen for some of the samples, represent ancient atmospheric gases that were dissolved in surface fluids (seawater, freshwater), so that their isotope compositions and elemental ratios reflect those of the Archean atmosphere at the time of trapping. Particular care was given to select samples for which fluids did not exchange significantly since the epoch of trapping. Data show that: (i) the felsic continental crust grew up mostly during the time interval 3.5-2.7 Ga ago [1]; (ii) the atmospheric nitrogen isotope composition and density were comparable to the modern one, implying the existence of a significant terrestrial magnetic field at that time [2]; (iii) Archean neon and krypton isotopic ratios were similar to their modern ones; but (iv) the xenon isotopic composition was isotopically fractionated and intermediate between those of potential cosmochemical (chondritic, solar) end-members and of the present-day atmosphere[3,4]. These differences are attributed to different ionization efficiencies for atmospheric species, and subsequent escape to space for Xe [3-5]. Together with the constant Ne, Kr and N isotope compositions, they shed strong constraints on the nature of the solar UV flux 1Ga after Earth's formation. [1] Pujol. M. et al. (2013), Nature 498, 87-90. [2] Marty B. et al. (2013), Science 342, 101-104. [3] Pujol M. et al. (2011), Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 308, 298-306. [4] Avice G. & Marty B. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A, In press. [5] Hébrard E. & Marty B. (2014), Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 385, 40-48.

  7. A Special Assignment from NASA: Understanding Earth's Atmosphere through the Integration of Science and Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Justine E.; Glen, Nicole J.

    2012-01-01

    Have your students ever wondered what NASA scientists do? Have they asked you what their science and mathematics lessons have to do with the real world? This unit about Earth's atmosphere can help to answer both of those questions. The unit described here showcases "content specific integration" of science and mathematics in that the lessons meet…

  8. Heterogeneous Chemical Transformation of Incident Exogenous Organic Material in Earth's Upper Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belle, C. L.; Kress, M. E.; Iraci, L. T.

    2009-12-01

    On average, 10^8 g of solar system debris impinges on the Earth system each day. It is estimated that a few percent of this material is carbonaceous in nature, yet the fate of this organic material once it enters our atmosphere is unexplored. Much of this incoming material arrives in the form of micrometeoroids which are large enough to suffer drag heating and volatilize their organic material. Preliminary work shows that the organic material contained in particles with diameters on the order of 10-100 um is expected to be volatilized at altitudes of 100-120 km. Observed species include aromatic compounds such as alkybenzenes, phenol, benzonitrile, naphthalene, and styrene. Once liberated, these molecules may be transformed by processes at the boundary of space, or may survive to be mixed throughout the atmosphere. Sulfuric acid particles exist in Earth's upper atmosphere, and organic compounds often react strongly with this acid. We will report the results of laboratory and theoretical investigations of the interaction of aromatic compounds with surrogate matrices which mimic upper atmospheric particles. These studies will explore how exogenous organic compounds are altered after liberation at altitudes near 100 km and will determine if they survive to reach the surface of the Earth, where they may have provided the starting materials for the evolution of life on Earth or on other bodies.

  9. Comparing Unique Title Coverage of Web of Science and Scopus in Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Philip; Lascar, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    The current journal titles in earth and atmospheric sciences, that are unique to each of two databases, Web of Science and Scopus, were identified using different methods. Comparing by subject category shows that Scopus has hundreds of unique titles, and Web of Science just 16. The titles unique to each database have low SCImago Journal Rank…

  10. Effects of atmospheric aerosols on scattering reflected visible light from earth resource features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, K. E.; Tschantz, B. A.; Davis, W. T.

    1972-01-01

    The vertical variations in atmospheric light attenuation under ambient conditions were identified, and a method through which aerial photographs of earth features might be corrected to yield quantitative information about the actual features was provided. A theoretical equation was developed based on the Bouguer-Lambert extinction law and basic photographic theory.

  11. Introduction to simulation of upper atmosphere oxygen satellite exposed to atomic oxygen in low Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peplinski, D. R.; Arnold, G. S.; Borson, E. N.

    1984-01-01

    A brief review of atmospheric composition in low Earth orbit is presented. The flux of ambient atomic oxygen incident on a surface orbiting in this environment is described. Estimates are presented of the fluence of atomic oxygen to which satellite surfaces in various orbits are exposed.

  12. Runaway and moist greenhouse atmospheres and the evolution of Earth and Venus.

    PubMed

    Kasting, J F

    1988-01-01

    A one-dimensional climate model is used to study the response of an Earth-like atmosphere to large increases in solar flux. For fully saturated, cloud-free conditions, the critical solar flux at which a runaway greenhouse occurs, that is, the oceans evaporate entirely, is found to be 1.4 times the present flux at Earth's orbit (S0). This value is close to the flux expected at Venus' orbit early in solar system history. Is is nearly independent of the amount of CO2 present in the atmosphere, but is sensitive to the H2O absorption coefficient in the 8- to 12-micrometers window region. Clouds should tend to depress the surface temperature on a warm, moist planet; thus, Venus may originally have had oceans if its initial water endowment was close to that of Earth. It lost them early in its history, however, because of rapid photodissociation of water vapor followed by escape of hydrogen to space. The critical solar flux above which water is rapidly lost could be as low as 1.1S0. The surface temperature of a runaway greenhouse atmosphere containing a full ocean's worth of water would have been in excess of 1500 degrees K--above the solidus for silicate rocks. The presence of such a steam atmosphere during accretion may have significantly influenced the early thermal evolution of both Earth and Venus. PMID:11538226

  13. The composition of the primitive atmosphere and the synthesis of organic compounds on the early Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bada, J. L.; Miller, S. L.

    1985-01-01

    The generally accepted theory for the origin of life on the Earth requires that a large variety of organic compounds be present to form the first living organisms and to provide the energy sources for primitive life either directly or through various fermentation reactions. This can provide a strong constraint on discussions of the formation of the Earth and on the composition of the primitive atmosphere. In order for substantial amounts of organic compounds to have been present on the prebiological Earth, certain conditions must have existed. There is a large body of literature on the prebiotic synthesis of organic compounds in various postulated atmospheres. In this mixture of abiotically synthesized organic compounds, the amino acids are of special interest since they are utilized by modern organisms to synthesize structural materials and a large array of catalytic peptides.

  14. A Reducing Atmosphere From Out-gassing of the Early Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, L.; Fegley, B., Jr.

    2005-08-01

    Earth's present atmosphere originated from out-gassing of volatile-bearing grains. We calculated the composition of volatiles out-gassed from chondritic planetary bodies. We present results for average CI, CM, CV, H, L, and EH chondrites, which are the building blocks of the Earth. From the oxygen-isotope mixing (OIM) model, we calculated a composition of 70% EH, 21% H, 5% CV, and 4% CI chondritic matter for the early Earth. The major out-gassed volatiles for these starting compositions are CH4, N2, NH3, H2, and H2O. The Miller-Urey experiment demonstrated that a reducing atmosphere like this generates amino acids and other organic compounds that are essential for the formation of life. This work is supported by the NASA Astrobiology Program. \\leavevmode \\epsfxsize=0.9\\hsize \\epsfbox{49.eps}

  15. Potential biosignatures in super-Earth atmospheres. I. Spectral appearance of super-Earths around M dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauer, H.; Gebauer, S.; Paris, P. V.; Cabrera, J.; Godolt, M.; Grenfell, J. L.; Belu, A.; Selsis, F.; Hedelt, P.; Schreier, F.

    2011-05-01

    Atmospheric temperature and mixing ratio profiles of terrestrial planets vary with the spectral energy flux distribution for different types of M-dwarf stars and the planetary gravity. We investigate the resulting effects on the spectral appearance of molecular absorption bands, which are relevant as indicators for potential planetary habitability during primary and secondary eclipse for transiting terrestrial planets with Earth-like biomass emissions. Atmospheric profiles are computed using a plane-parallel, 1D climate model coupled with a chemistry model. We then calculate simulated spectra using a line-by-line radiative transfer model. We find that emission spectra during secondary eclipse show increasing absorption of methane, water, and ozone for planets orbiting quiet M0-M3 dwarfs and the active M-type star AD Leo compared with solar-type central stars. However, for planets orbiting very cool and quiet M dwarfs (M4 to M7), increasing temperatures in the mid-atmosphere lead to reduced absorption signals, which impedes the detection of molecules in these scenarios. Transmission spectra during primary eclipse show strong absorption features of CH4, N2O and H2O for planets orbiting quiet M0-M7 stars and AD Leo. The N2O absorption of an Earth-sized planet orbiting a quiet M7 star can even be as strong as the CO2 signal. However, ozone absorption decreases for planets orbiting these cool central stars owing to chemical effects in the atmosphere. To investigate the effect on the spectroscopic detection of absorption bands with potential future satellite missions, we compute signal-to-noise-ratios (SNR) for a James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)-like aperture telescope.

  16. Earth history. Low mid-Proterozoic atmospheric oxygen levels and the delayed rise of animals.

    PubMed

    Planavsky, Noah J; Reinhard, Christopher T; Wang, Xiangli; Thomson, Danielle; McGoldrick, Peter; Rainbird, Robert H; Johnson, Thomas; Fischer, Woodward W; Lyons, Timothy W

    2014-10-31

    The oxygenation of Earth's surface fundamentally altered global biogeochemical cycles and ultimately paved the way for the rise of metazoans at the end of the Proterozoic. However, current estimates for atmospheric oxygen (O2) levels during the billion years leading up to this time vary widely. On the basis of chromium (Cr) isotope data from a suite of Proterozoic sediments from China, Australia, and North America, interpreted in the context of data from similar depositional environments from Phanerozoic time, we find evidence for inhibited oxidation of Cr at Earth's surface in the mid-Proterozoic (1.8 to 0.8 billion years ago). These data suggest that atmospheric O2 levels were at most 0.1% of present atmospheric levels. Direct evidence for such low O2 concentrations in the Proterozoic helps explain the late emergence and diversification of metazoans. PMID:25359975

  17. Differential radiometry for measuring the net radiative flux in the earth`s atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    La Delfe, P.C.; Love, S.P.; Weber, P.G.

    1996-11-01

    The Hemispheric Optimized NEt Radiometer (HONER) is very briefly described. HONER was developed to resolve technical issues impeding the accurate measurement of atmospheric radiative flux. HONER uses differential radiometry, chopping the signal from upwelling and downwelling fluxes onto a single AC detector system, allowing true optical differencing as well as measurements of the individual fluxes. Wavelength coverage encompasses ultraviolet to more than 50 micrometers. HONER has been used in a ground-based version and will be tested on the Perseus B Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle.

  18. A new way to Estimate the Earth's Radiation Budget at the top-of-atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ping; Karatekin, Ozgur; van Ruymbeke, Michel; Dewitte, Steven; Meftah, Mustapha

    2014-05-01

    The Earth's Radiation Budget at the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) is investigated by combining remote sensing data from different Earth observing satellites and the solar radiation monitoring from dedicated missions. Despite the relatively high precision of each individual instruments, the uncertainties in the current net radiation derived at the TOA is still too large to track small energy imbalance associated with forced climate change. A new method to estimate the net energy balance at the TOA is introduced based on nearly three years space experiments from the Bolometric Oscillation Sensor (BOS) onboard PICARD satellite. PICARD satellite is circling the Earth on a heliocentric orbit, the descending and the ascending nodes of the PICARD are around 6 a.m. and 6 p.m. local time, respectively. The BOS sensor onboard PICARD satellite is sensitive to the radiation coming from both the sun and the Earth. Besides solar shortwave electromagnetic radiation, the black-coated BOS sensor measures also the reflected (visible) and reemitted (infrared) terrestrial radiation. The net radiation of the Earth is described as: fnet = fin - (fvis +fir) (1) Where fnet, the net radiation of the Earth at the TOA, fin, the incoming solar irradiance, fvis, the reflected solar radiation at the TOA, fir infrared radiation of the Earth. The energy absorbed by the main detector of the BOS can be approximately written as: fbos = fsun + (fvis + fir) (2) Where fbos, the measurements of the BOS instruments, fvis, the reflected solar radiation at the TOA, fir infrared radiation of the Earth. Frome equation (1) and (2), we can found a new method to estimate the net radiation: fnet = fsun +fin - fbos (3) BOS/PICARD experiment allows us to employ this new approach to study the Earth's Radiation Budget from a single remote sensing instrument. Here we discuss the BOS data between July 2010 and October 2013 and their implication on Earth's Radiation Budget estimate.

  19. Application of Spaceborne Infrared Atmospheric Sounder for Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (SIRAS-G) technology to future Earth science missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampe, Thomas U.

    2008-04-01

    The Spaceborne Infrared Sounder for Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (SIRAS-G) was developed by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp (BATC) under NASA's 2002 Instrument Incubator Program. SIRAS-G was a technology development program focused on next-generation IR imaging spectrometers for sounding of the atmosphere. SIRAS-G demonstrated that the dispersive grating spectrometer is a suitable instrument architecture for this application. In addition to providing atmospheric temperature and water vapor profiles, SIRAS-G can provide trace gases concentrations, land and ocean surface temperatures and the IR mineral dust aerosol signature from satellite. The 3-year SIRAS-G IIP development effort included the successful cryogenic testing of the SIRAS-G laboratory demonstration spectrometer operating in the 2083 to 2994 cm -1 frequency range. The performance of the demonstration instrument has been quantified including measurement of keystone distortion, spectral smile, MTF, and the spectral response function (SRF). Development efforts associated with this advanced infrared spectrometer technology provides the basis for instrumentation to support future Earth science missions.

  20. Contributions of high-altitude winds and atmospheric moment of inertia to the atmospheric angular momentum-earth rotation relationship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, H. A., Jr.; Mayr, H. G.; Kramer, L.

    1985-01-01

    For many years it has been recognized that recurrent modulations occur in the time series of the earth's rotation rate or, alternatively, the change in the length of the day (Delta-LOD). Studies relating Delta-LOD to global patterns of zonal winds have confirmed that the variability of atmospheric angular momentum (M) is of sufficient magnitude to account for a large portion of the gross periodicities observed in the earth rotation. The present investigation is concerned with the importance of the contributions of the moment of inertia and high-altitude winds to the angular momentum budget. On the basis of an analysis of the various factors, it is found that within the available data, contributions of high-altitude winds and atmospheric moment of inertia reach levels detectable in the atmospheric angular momentum budget. Nevertheless, for the period December 1978 to December 1979 these contributions are not sufficient to resolve the apparent short-term discrepancies which are evident between Delta-LOD and M.

  1. Photochemical consequences of enhanced CO2 levels in earth's early atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasting, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    Greatly enhanced atmospheric CO2 concentrations are the most likely mechanism for offsetting the effects of reduced solar luminosity early in the earth's history. CO2 levels of 80 to 600 times the present value could have maintained a mean surface temperature of 0 C to 15 C, given a 25 percent decrease in solar output. Such high CO2 levels are at least qualitatively consistent with the present understanding of the carbonate-silicate geochemical cycle. The presence of large amounts of CO2 has important implications for the composition of the earth's prebiotic atmosphere. The hydrogen budget of a high-CO2 primitive atmosphere would have been strongly influenced by rainout of H2O2 and H2CO. The reaction of H2O2 with dissolved ferrous iron in the early oceans could have been a major sink for atmospheric oxygen. The requirement that this loss of oxygen be balanced by a corresponding loss of hydrogen (by escape to space and rainout of H2CO) implies that the atmospheric H2 mixing ratio was greater than 2 x 10 to the -5th and the ground level O2 mixing ratio was below 10 to the -12th, even if other surface sources of H2 were small. These results are only weakly dependent on changes in solar UV flux, rainout rates, and vertical mixing rates in the primitive atmosphere.

  2. The Impact of Solar Activity on the Earth Upper Atmosphere as Inferred from the CORONAS-F Scientific Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldyrev, S. I.; Egorov, I. A.; Zhitnik, I. A.; Ivanov-Kholodny, G. S.; Ignat'yev, S. P.; Ishkov, V. N.; Kolomiitsev, O. P.; Kuzin, S. V.; Kuznetsov, V. D.; Osin, A. I.

    The chapter is devoted to the first results of processing and analysis of data on the absorption of solar XUV radiation in the Earth upper atmosphere measured onboard the CORONAS-F space mission. The variability of the Earth's upper atmosphere associated with solar activity has been studied by analyzing the orbital evolution of the CORONAS-F satellite. Experimental data have been compared with model calculations of the parameters of the upper atmosphere. The mathematical model of the Earth upper atmosphere (WMA01) developed at IZMIRAN is described in general terms. A list of active events on the Sun and associated processes in the Earth magnetosphere recorded during the CORONAS-F flight time (2001-2005) is presented. The comparison of model calculations with the experimental satellite data shows that the Earth atmosphere models available need updating. The possible ways to attack this problem are discussed.

  3. Global Reference Atmospheric Models, Including Thermospheres, for Mars, Venus and Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, C. G.; Keller, Vernon W.

    2006-01-01

    This document is the viewgraph slides of the presentation. Marshall Space Flight Center's Natural Environments Branch has developed Global Reference Atmospheric Models (GRAMs) for Mars, Venus, Earth, and other solar system destinations. Mars-GRAM has been widely used for engineering applications including systems design, performance analysis, and operations planning for aerobraking, entry descent and landing, and aerocapture. Preliminary results are presented, comparing Mars-GRAM with measurements from Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) during its aerobraking in Mars thermosphere. Venus-GRAM is based on the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) Venus International Reference Atmosphere (VIRA), and is suitable for similar engineering applications in the thermosphere or other altitude regions of the atmosphere of Venus. Until recently, the thermosphere in Earth-GRAM has been represented by the Marshall Engineering Thermosphere (MET) model. Earth-GRAM has recently been revised. In addition to including an updated version of MET, it now includes an option to use the Naval Research Laboratory Mass Spectrometer Incoherent Scatter Radar Extended Model (NRLMSISE-00) as an alternate thermospheric model. Some characteristics and results from Venus-GRAM and Earth-GRAM thermospheres are also presented.

  4. L2 Earth Atmosphere Observatory: Formation Guidance, Metrology and Control Synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acikmese, Ahmet Behcet; Mettler, Edward; Breckenridge, William G.; Macenka, Steven A.; Tubbs, Eldred F.

    2004-01-01

    The Earth Observatory Formation at L2, a Lagrange libration point, is a unique large aperture (25 m diameter) space telescope concept that will improve the knowledge and understanding of dynamic, chemical and radiative mechanisms that cause changes in the atmosphere, and can lead to the development of models and techniques to predict short and long-term climate changes. The results of this concept definition study show that the telescope concept is feasible, and can have technology readiness in the 2020 time frame. Further advanced development in several subsystems is needed, such as higher efficiency Xenon ion thrusters with throttling, and optical quality large membrane mirror with active shape control. It presents an analysis and solution of guidance, sensing, control, and propulsion problems for a formation of two spacecraft on the Sun-Earth line in the neighborhood of the Sun-Earth L2 point, that observes Earth s atmosphere during continuous solar occultation by the Earth. A system architecture is described for the observatory, and its components that include unique mission specific metrology. The formation must follow a powered trajectory with strictly limited fuel use to observe solar occultation. A configuration of ion thrusters and reaction wheels for translation and attitude control is designed along with algorithms for orbit following and formation control. Simulation results of the orbital and formation dynamics are presented that verify performance of the control systems.

  5. Solution of Time-dependent Hydrodynamic Equations and application in Early Earth's Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, F.; Toon, O. B.; Pavlov, A. A.; Sterck, H. D.

    2003-12-01

    Hydrodynamic escape has important applications in the formation and evolution of planetary atmospheres. Watson et. al. (1981) treated the time-independent hydrodynamic equations by assuming single layer heating and this approach has been followed by researches in this field since then. Solutions to the time-independent hydrodynamic equations are difficult to find due to the existence of a singularity point. In our work, the Lax-Friedrichs scheme is used to solve the 1D time-dependent hydrodynamic equations without the single layer heating approximation. Our results show that variables such as energy input rate at the top of the atmosphere, density and temperature at the homopause have a non-linear impact on the escape flux. In our preliminary calculations, for the same hydrogen mixing ratio near homopause in Earth's atmosphere, hydrodynamic escape flux driven by intense solar EUV heating is much smaller than the diffusion limited escape flux. This escape rate suggests that the huge amount of H2 outgassing from interior of the Earth to compensate the previously assumed large scale escape may not be necessary to support substantial CH4 mixing ratios in the early Earth's atmosphere. FT is supported by the CU Astrobiology Institute.

  6. Earth-Atmospheric Coupling During Strong Earthquakes by Analyzing MODIS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ouzounov, Dimitar; Williams, Robin G.; Freund, Friedemann

    2001-01-01

    Interactions between the Earth and the atmosphere during major earthquakes (M greater than 5) are the subject of this investigation. Recently a mechanism has been proposed predicting the build-up of positive ground potentials prior to strong earthquake activity. Connected phenomena include: transient conductivity of rocks, injection of currents, possibly also electromagnetic emission and light emission from high points at the surface of the Earth. To understand this process we analyze vertical atmospheric profiles, land surface and brightness (temperature) data, using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) onboard NASA's Terra satellite launched in December 1999. MODIS covers the entire Earth every 1-2 days in 36 wavelength bands (20 visible and 16 infrared) at different spatial resolutions (250 m, 500 m, and 1 km). Using MODIS data we look for correlations between the atmospheric dynamics and solid Earth processes for the January 2001 strong earthquakes in San Salvador and India. As part of the build-up of positive grounds potential, an IR luminescence is predicted to occur in the 8-12 micrometer band. We use the MODIS data to differentiate between true "thermal" signals and IR luminescence. Indeed, on the basis of a temporal and spatial distribution analysis, a thermal anomaly pattern is found that appears to be related to the seismic activity. Aerosol content and atmospheric instability parameters also change when ground charges build up causing ion emission and leading to a thin aerosol layer over land. We analyze the aerosol content, atmospheric pressure, moisture profile and lifted index. Anomalous trends have been identified in few days prior to the main shocks. The significance of this observation should be explored further using other data sets.

  7. LASA (Lidar Atmospheric Sounder and Altimeter) Earth Observing System. Volume 2D: Instrument Panel Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (Eos) will provide an ideal forum in which the stronly synergistic characteristics of the lidar systems can be used in concert with the characteristics of a number of other sensors to better understand the Earth as a system. Progress in the development of more efficient and long-lasting laser systems will insure their availability in the Eos time frame. The necessary remote-sensing techniques are being developed to convert the Lidar Atmospheric Sounder and Altimeter (LASA) observations into the proper scientific parameters. Each of these activities reinforces the promise that LASA and GLRS will be a reality in the Eos era.

  8. Teaching about the Early Earth: Evolution of Tectonics, Life, and the Early Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogk, D. W.; Manduca, C. A.; Kirk, K.; Williams, M. L.

    2007-12-01

    The early history of the Earth is the subject of some of the most exciting and innovative research in the geosciences, drawing evidence from virtually all fields of geoscience and using a variety of approaches that include field, analytical, experimental, and modeling studies. At the same time, the early Earth presents unique opportunities and challenges in geoscience education: how can we best teach "uncertain science" where the evidence is either incomplete or ambiguous? Teaching about early Earth provides a great opportunity to help students understand the nature of scientific evidence, testing, and understanding. To explore the intersection of research and teaching about this enigmatic period of Earth history, a national workshop was convened for experts in early Earth research and undergraduate geoscience education. The workshop was held in April, 2007 at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst as part of the On the Cutting Edge faculty professional development program. The workshop was organized around three scientific themes: evolution of global tectonics, life, and the early atmosphere. The "big scientific questions" at the forefront of current research about the early Earth were explored by keynote speakers and follow-up discussion groups: How did plate tectonics as we know it today evolve? Were there plates in the Hadean Eon? Was the early Earth molten? How rapidly did it cool? When and how did the atmosphere and hydrosphere evolve? How did life originate and evolve? How did all these components interact at the beginning of Earth's history and evolve toward the Earth system we know today? Similar "big questions" in geoscience education were addressed: how to best teach about "deep time;" how to help students make appropriate inferences when geologic evidence is incomplete; how to engage systems thinking and integrate multiple lines of evidence, across many scales of observation (temporal and spatial), and among many disciplines. Workshop participants

  9. Stratospheric Temperatures and Water Loss from Moist Greenhouse Atmospheres of Earth-like Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasting, James F.; Chen, Howard; Kopparapu, Ravi K.

    2015-11-01

    A radiative-convective climate model is used to calculate stratospheric temperatures and water vapor concentrations for ozone-free atmospheres warmer than that of modern Earth. Cold, dry stratospheres are predicted at low surface temperatures, in agreement with recent 3D calculations. However, at surface temperatures above 350 K, the stratosphere warms and water vapor becomes a major upper atmospheric constituent, allowing water to be lost by photodissociation and hydrogen escape. Hence, a moist greenhouse explanation for loss of water from Venus, or some exoplanet receiving a comparable amount of stellar radiation, remains a viable hypothesis. Temperatures in the upper parts of such atmospheres are well below those estimated for a gray atmosphere, and this factor should be taken into account when performing inverse climate calculations to determine habitable zone boundaries using 1D models.

  10. Infrared limb-darkening effects for the earth-atmosphere system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, S. K.; Suttles, J. T.; Tiwari, S. N.; Vemuru, C. S.

    1983-01-01

    An infrared radiative transfer model has been developed for evaluating anisotropic functions in the longwave region (5-50 microns) due to limb-darkening effects in the earth's atmosphere. An accurate narrow-band model of absorption has been used for computing transmission functions of the atmosphere. Absorption due to all major and minor atmospheric constituents has been taken into account including the continuum absorption due to water vapor. Anisotropic functions have been calculated for several latitudinal and seasonal climatological-average model atmospheres. The effects of the variability of various meteorological parameters, e.g. surface temperature, surface relative humidity, and cloud-top height have been examined. It has been found that the variability of cloud parameters has the largest effect on the infrared anisotropic functions.

  11. A parallel Atmosphere-Ocean Global Circulation Model of intermediate complexity for Earth system climate research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, T. A.; Schmittner, A.

    2007-12-01

    We present the evolution of an Earth System model of intermediate complexity featuring an ocean global circulation model to include a fully coupled 3D primitive equations atmospheric model. The original Earth System climate model, UVic ESCM (Weaver et al. 2001), uses an ocean global circulation model coupled to a one layer atmospheric energy-moisture balance model. It also comprises a viscous-plastic rheology sea ice model, a mechanical land ice model, land surface, oceanic and terrestrial carbon models and a simple 3D marine ecosystem model (Schmittner et al. 2005). A spectral atmospheric, model, PUMA (Fraedrich et al. 2005), was coupled to the UVic ESCM to provide an atmosphere with nonlinear dynamics in target resolutions of T21, T31 and T42, as required. The coupling with the atmosphere, which involves data transfer, preprocessing and interpolation, is done through the OASIS3 coupler. During a run there are 2 + 2N parallel processes: the UVic ESCM, the Oasis3 coupler and the PUMA model with its domain split across 2N processes. The choice of N allows to balance more or less complex configurations of UVic model (e.g. higher level marine ecosystem model or number of biogeochemical tracers) with the atmospheric model at different resolutions, in order to maintain computational efficiency. The relatively simple parameterizations make this new atmosphere-ocean global circulation model much faster than a state-of-the-art Atmosphere-Ocean Global Circulation Model, and so optimally geared for decadal to millennial scale integrations. The latter require special care with the conservation of fluxes during coupling. A second order conservative interpolation method was applied (Jones 1999) and this is compared with the use of typical non-conservative methods.

  12. Study of the dynamics of meteoroids through the Earth's atmosphere and retrieval of meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guadalupe Cordero Tercero, Maria; Farah-Simon, Alejandro; Velázquez-Villegas, Fernando

    2016-07-01

    When a comet , asteroid or meteoroid impact with a planet several things can happen depending on the mass, velocity and composition of the impactor, if the planet or moon has an atmosphere or not, and the angle of impact. On bodies without an atmosphere like Mercury or the Moon, every object that strikes their surfaces produces impact craters with sizes ranging from centimeters to hundreds and even thousands of kilometers across. On bodies with an atmosphere, this encounter can produce impact craters, meteorites, meteors and fragmentation. Each and every one of these phenomena is interesting because they provide information about the surfaces and the geological evolution of solar system bodies. Meteors (shooting stars) are luminous wakes on the sky due to the interaction between the meteoroid and the Earth's atmosphere. A meteoroid is asteroidal or cometary material ranging in size from 2 mm to a few tens of meters. The smallest tend to evaporate at heights between 80 and 120 km. Objects of less than 2 mm are called micrometeorites. If the meteor brightness exceeds the brightness of Venus, the phenomenon is called a bolide or fireball. If a meteoroid, or a fragment of it, survives atmospheric ablation and it can be recovered on the ground, that piece is called a meteorite. Most meteoroids 2 meters long fragment suddenly into the atmosphere, it produces a shock wave that can affect humans and their environment like the Chelyabinsk event occurred on February 15, 2013 an two less energetic events in Mexico in 2010 and 2011. To understand the whole phenomenon, we proposed a video camera network for observing meteors. The objectives of this network are to: a) contribute to the study of the fragmentation of meteoroids in the Earth's atmosphere, b) determine values of important physical parameters; c ) study seismic waves produced by atmospheric shock waves, d) study the dynamics of meteoroids and f ) recover and study meteorites. During this meeting, the academic

  13. Loss of Water in Early Earth's Atmosphere and Its Effects on Habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airapetian, Vladimir; Glocer, Alex; Khazanov, George

    2015-08-01

    The short wavelength emission from the Sun has a profound impact on the Earth’s atmosphere. High energy photons ionize the atmosphere and produce photoelectrons. This process provides a major contribution to the acceleration of atmospheric ions due to the vertical separation of ions and electrons, and the formation of the resulting ambipolar electric field. Observations and theory suggest that even a relatively small fraction of super-thermal electrons (photoelectrons) produced due to photoionization can drive the ”polar wind” that is responsible for the transport of ionospheric constituents to the Earth’s magnetosphere.The young Sun was a magnetically active star generating powerful radiative output from its chromosphere, transition region and corona which was a few hundred times greater than that observed today. What effects would the photoionization processes due to the X-ray-UV solar flux from early Sun have on the loss of water from the early Earth?We use the Fokker-Plank code coupled with 1D hydrodynamic code to model the effect of intensive short-wavelength (X-rays to UV band) emission from the young Sun (3.8 and 4.4 Ga) on Earth's atmosphere. Our simulations include the photoionization processes of the Earth’s atmosphere forming a population of photoelectrons (E<600 eV), the kinetic effects of their propagation associated and their contribution in ionosphere - magnetosphere energy redistribution. Our coupled simulations show that the ambipolar electric field can drag atmospheric ions of oxygen and hydrogen to the magnetosphere and produce significant mass loss that can affect the loss of water from the early Earth in the first half a billion years. This process became less efficient in the next 0.2-0.3 Ga that could have provided a window of opportunity for origin of life.

  14. Theoretical Emission Spectra of Atmospheres of Hot Rocky Super-Earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Yuichi; Ikoma, Masahiro; Kawahara, Hajime; Nagahara, Hiroko; Kawashima, Yui; Nakamoto, Taishi

    2015-03-01

    Motivated by recent detection of transiting high-density super-Earths, we explore the detectability of hot rocky super-Earths orbiting very close to their host stars. In an environment hot enough for their rocky surfaces to be molten, they would have an atmosphere composed of gas species from the magma oceans. In this study, we investigate the radiative properties of the atmosphere that is in gas/melt equilibrium with the underlying magma ocean. Our equilibrium calculations yield Na, K, Fe, Si, SiO, O, and O2 as the major atmospheric species. We compile the radiative absorption line data of those species available in the literature and calculate their absorption opacities in the wavelength region of 0.1-100 μm. Using them, we integrate the thermal structure of the atmosphere. Then, we find that thermal inversion occurs in the atmosphere because of the UV absorption by SiO. In addition, we calculate the ratio of the planetary to stellar emission fluxes during secondary eclipse, and we find prominent emission features induced by SiO at 4 μm detectable by Spitzer, and those at 10 and 100 μm detectable by near-future space telescopes.

  15. INFLAME: In-situ net flux within the atmosphere of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlynczak, M. G.; Johnson, D. G.

    2006-12-01

    The In-situ Net FLux within the AtMosphere of the Earth (INFLAME) instrument is designed to make direct measurements of the net radiative flux within the Earth's atmosphere. Deployed on an uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV) the INFLAME instruments will record vertical profiles of net radiative flux separately for the visible and infrared streams of radiation within the atmosphere. Upon differentiation of these vertical profiles the divergence of the net flux is obtained, which combined with the atmospheric density yields the rate of radiative heating (Kelvin per day) within the atmosphere. INFLAME offers the advantage of using a Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) to directly measure the net flux, thereby avoiding potentially large errors in the derived heating rate associated with differencing separate measurements of the upwelling and downwelling fluxes of radiation. INFLAME is a new project in NASA's Instrument Incubator Program (IIP). We will describe the science motivating the measurements, the historical background to the measurements, and the INFLAME instrument now under development at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  16. The Solubility of Rock in Steam Atmospheres of the Early Earth and Hot Rocky Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fegley, Bruce

    2016-07-01

    Extensive experimental studies show all major rock-forming elements (e.g., Si, Mg, Fe, Ca, Al, Na, K) dissolve in steam to a greater or lesser extent. We use these results to compute chemical equilibrium abundances of rocky element - bearing gases in steam atmospheres equilibrated with silicate magma oceans. Rocky elements partition into steam atmospheres as volatile hydroxide gases (e.g., Si(OH)4, Mg(OH)2, Fe(OH)2, Ni(OH)2, Al(OH)3, Ca(OH)2, NaOH, KOH) and via reaction with HF and HCl as volatile halide gases (e.g., NaCl, KCl, CaFOH, CaClOH, FAl(OH)2) in much larger amounts than expected from their vapor pressures over volatile-free solid or molten rock at high temperatures expected for steam atmospheres on the early Earth and hot rocky exoplanets. We quantitatively compute the extent of fractional vaporization by defining gas/magma distribution coefficients and show Earth's sub-solar Si/Mg ratio may be due to loss of a primordial steam atmosphere. We conclude hot rocky exoplanets that are undergoing or have undergone escape of steam-bearing atmospheres may experience fractional vaporization and loss of Si, Mg, Fe, Ni, Al, Ca, Na, and K. This loss can modify their bulk composition, density, heat balance, and interior structure. This work was supported by NSF Astronomy Program Grant AST-1412175.

  17. Composition of the earth's atmosphere by shock-layer radiometry during the PAET entry probe experiment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiting, E. E.; Arnold, J. O.; Page, W. A.; Reynolds, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    A determination of the composition of the earth's atmosphere obtained from onboard radiometer measurements of the spectra emitted from the bow shock layer of a high-speed entry probe is reported. The N2, O2, CO2, and noble gas concentrations in the earth's atmosphere were determined to good accuracy by this technique. The results demonstrate unequivocally the feasibility of determining the composition of an unknown planetary atmosphere by means of a multichannel radiometer viewing optical emission from the heated atmospheric gases in the region between the bow shock wave and the vehicle surface. The spectral locations in this experiment were preselected to enable the observation of CN violet, N2(+) first negative and atomic oxygen emission at 3870, 3910, and 7775 A, respectively. The atmospheric gases were heated and compressed by the shock wave to a peak temperature of about 6100 K and a corresponding pressure of 0.4 atm. Complete descriptions of the data analysis technique and the onboard radiometer and its calibration are given.

  18. Prebiotic chemistry and atmospheric warming of early Earth by an active young Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airapetian, V. S.; Glocer, A.; Gronoff, G.; Hébrard, E.; Danchi, W.

    2016-06-01

    Nitrogen is a critical ingredient of complex biological molecules. Molecular nitrogen, however, which was outgassed into the Earth’s early atmosphere, is relatively chemically inert and nitrogen fixation into more chemically reactive compounds requires high temperatures. Possible mechanisms of nitrogen fixation include lightning, atmospheric shock heating by meteorites, and solar ultraviolet radiation. Here we show that nitrogen fixation in the early terrestrial atmosphere can be explained by frequent and powerful coronal mass ejection events from the young Sun--so-called superflares. Using magnetohydrodynamic simulations constrained by Kepler Space Telescope observations, we find that successive superflare ejections produce shocks that accelerate energetic particles, which would have compressed the early Earth’s magnetosphere. The resulting extended polar cap openings provide pathways for energetic particles to penetrate into the atmosphere and, according to our atmospheric chemistry simulations, initiate reactions converting molecular nitrogen, carbon dioxide and methane to the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide as well as hydrogen cyanide, an essential compound for life. Furthermore, the destruction of N2, CO2 and CH4 suggests that these greenhouse gases cannot explain the stability of liquid water on the early Earth. Instead, we propose that the efficient formation of nitrous oxide could explain a warm early Earth.

  19. Possible cometary origin of heavy noble gases in the atmospheres of Venus, Earth and Mars

    PubMed

    Owen, T; Bar-Nun, A; Kleinfeld, I

    1992-07-01

    Models that trace the origin of noble gases in the atmospheres of the terrestrial planets (Venus, Earth and Mars) to the 'planetary component' in chondritic meteorites confront several problems. The 'missing' xenon in the atmospheres of Mars and Earth is one of the most obvious; this gas is not hidden or trapped in surface materials. On Venus, the absolute abundances of neon and argon per gram of rock are higher even than those in carbonaceous chondrites, whereas the relative abundances of argon and krypton are closer to solar than to chondritic values (there is only an upper limit on xenon). Pepin has developed a model that emphasizes hydrodynamic escape of early, massive hydrogen atmospheres to explain the abundances and isotope ratios of noble gases on all three planets. We have previously suggested that the unusual abundances of heavy noble gases on Venus might be explained by the impact of a low-temperature comet. Further consideration of the probable history of the martian atmosphere, the noble-gas data from the (Mars-derived) SNC meteorites and laboratory experiments on the trapping of noble gases in ice lead us to propose here that the noble gases in the atmospheres of all of the terrestrial planets are dominated by a mixture of an internal component and contribution from impacting icy planetesimals (comets). If true, this hypothesis illustrates the importance of impacts in determining the volatile inventories of these planets. PMID:11536499

  20. Observational and Modeling Studies of Radiative, Chemical, and Dynamical Interactions in the Earth''s Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salby, Murry

    1998-01-01

    A 3-dimensional model was developed to support mechanistic studies. The model solves the global primitive equations in isentropic coordinates, which directly characterize diabatic processes forcing the Brewer-Dobson circulation of the middle atmosphere. It's numerical formulation is based on Hough harmonics, which partition horizontal motion into its rotational and divergent components. These computational features, along with others, enable 3D integrations to be performed practically on RISC computer architecture, on which they can be iterated to support mechanistic studies. The model conserves potential vorticity quite accurately under adiabatic conditions. Forced by observed tropospheric structure, in which integrations are anchored, the model generates a diabatic circulation that is consistent with satellite observations of tracer behavior and diabatic cooling rates. The model includes a basic but fairly complete treatment of gas-phase photochemistry that represents some 20 chemical species and 50 governing reactions with diurnally-varying shortwave absorption. The model thus provides a reliable framework to study transport and underlying diabatic processes, which can then be compared against chemical and dynamical structure observed and in GCM integrations. Integrations with the Langley GCM were performed to diagnose feedback between simulated convection and the tropical circulation. These were studied in relation to tropospheric properties controlling moisture convergence and environmental conditions supporting deep convection, for comparison against mechanistic integrations of wave CISK that successfully reproduce the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) of the tropical circulation. These comparisons were aimed at identifying and ultimately improving aspects of the convective simulation, with the objective of recovering a successful simulation of the MJO in the Langley GCM, behavior that should be important to budgets of upper-tropospheric water vapor and

  1. Atmospheric Constituents in GEOS-5: Components for an Earth System Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawson, Steven; Douglass, Anne; Duncan, Bryan; Nielsen, Eric; Ott, Leslie; Strode, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    The GEOS-S model is being developed for weather and climate processes, including the implementation of "Earth System" components. While the stratospheric chemistry capabilities are mature, we are presently extending this to include predictions of the tropospheric composition and chemistry - this includes CO2, CH4, CO, nitrogen species, etc. (Aerosols are also implemented, but are beyond the scope of this paper.) This work will give an overview of our chemistry modules, the approaches taken to represent surface emissions and uptake of chemical species, and some studies of the sensitivity of the atmospheric circulation to changes in atmospheric composition. Results are obtained through focused experiments and multi-decadal simulations.

  2. Possible cometary origin of heavy noble gases in the atmospheres of Venus, earth, and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Tobias; Bar-Nun, Akiva; Kleinfeld, Idit

    1992-01-01

    Due consideration of the probable history of the Martian atmosphere, as well as noble-gas data from the Mars-derived SNC meteorites and from laboratory tests on the trapping of noble gases in ice, are the bases of the presently hypothesized domination of noble gases in the atmospheres of all terrestrial planets by a mixture of internal components and a contribution from comets. If verified, this hypothesis would underscore the significance of impacts for these planets' volatile inventories. The sizes of the hypothesized comets are of the order of 120 km for Venus and only 80 km for that which struck the earth.

  3. Early evolution of the earth - Accretion, atmosphere formation, and thermal history

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abe, Yutaka; Matsui, Takafumi

    1986-01-01

    The thermal and atmospheric evolution of the earth growing planetesimal impacts are studied. The generation of an H2O protoatmosphere is examined, and the surface temperatures are estimated. The evolution of an impact-induced H2O atmosphere is analyzed. Consideration is given to the formation time of a 'magma ocean'and internal water budgets. The thermal history of an accreting earth is reviewed. The wet convection and greenhouse effects are discussed, and the role of Fe oxidation on the evolution of an impact-induced H2O atmopshere is described. The relationship between differentiation processes and core segregation, the H2O and FeO content of the mantle, and the origin of the hydrosphere is also examined.

  4. Thermal evolution of the earth - Effects of volatile exchange between atmosphere and interior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgovern, Patrick J.; Schubert, Gerald

    1989-01-01

    The thermal history of the earth is investigated using a parameterized model of mantle convection, that includes the effects of volatile exchange between the mantle and the surface reservoir and the softening of the mantle by the dissolved volatiles. The mantle degassing rate is taken to be directly proportional to the rate of seafloor spreading which depends on the mantle heat flow. It is shown that the dependence of the mantle viscosity on the volatile content has important effects on the thermal evolution of planetary interiors and the evolution of planetary atmospheres. Degassing is compensated by an increase in temperature, while regassing is compensated by a decrease in temperature. Reasonable degassing scenarios can account for an early rapid formation of the earth's atmosphere inferred from noble gas abundances.

  5. Impact-generated atmospheric plumes: The threat to satellites in low-earth orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Boslough, M.B.; Crawford, D.A.

    1996-02-01

    Computational simulations of the impacts of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 (SL9) fragments on Jupiter provide a framework for interpreting the observations. A reasonably consistent picture has emerged, along with a more detailed understanding of atmospheric collisional processes. The knowledge gained from the observations and simulations of SL9 has led us to consider the threat of impact-generated plumes to satellites in low-Earth orbit (LEO). Preliminary simulations suggest that impacts of a size that recur about once per century on Earth generate plumes that rise to nearly 1000 km over an area thousands of km in diameter. Detailed modeling of such plumes is needed to quantify this threat to satellites in LEO. Careful observations of high-energy atmospheric entry events using both satellite and ground- based instruments would provide validation for these computational models.

  6. Atmospheric heating in an irradiated transiting super-Earth and super-Neptune

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Brendan P.; Gallo, Elena; Wright, Jason; Poppenhaeger, Katja

    2016-01-01

    We present new Chandra observations of HD 97658 (13 ks) and HAT-P-11 (8 ks), obtained to determine the high-energy radiation incident upon their short-period transiting planets. HD 97658 b is a hot super-Earth with a density between Earth and ice giants, while HAT-P-11 b is a hot super-Neptune orbiting an active K4 star. Our measurement of the stellar X-ray (and UV, from Swift) luminosities provides a current epoch estimate of atmospheric heating. We discuss whether these planets are likely to have experienced significant mass loss through atmospheric evaporation over their total lifetimes. These observations provide essential empirical input for understanding and modeling the potential evolutionary transformation of hot gas giants into less massive and more dense remnants.

  7. Comment on the paper 'On the influx of small comets into the earth's upper atmosphere'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soter, Steven

    1987-01-01

    The possibility that comets containing up to 100 tons of ice encounter the earth's atmosphere at a rate of one every 20 min is discussed. Cometary 'hail storms' were proposed to explain observed regular transient decreases in the atmospheric UV dayglow intensity. The decreases take the form of dark 'holes' up to 50 km across. The probability that clouds of objects assumed to be as dark as the nucleus of Comet Halley between the earth and moon would be detectable by ground-based electrooptical deep space telescopes is considered. Conflicting projections of the number of objects which would be detected per hour are examined. High correlations are noted between cometary passages (Comets Encke, Tuttle, Tempel) and intervals of meteor showers (Taurids, Leonids, Geminis, etc.). The holes, however, are not correlated or coincident with the showers. It is suggested that dedicated searches for the unclassified dark objects be carried out in November, when cometary fluxes are high.

  8. Concept of a space optoelectronic system for environmental monitoring of the near-earth space, atmosphere, and earth surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eltsov, Anatoli V.; Karasev, Vladimir I.; Kolotkov, Vjacheslav V.; Kondranin, Timothy V.

    1997-06-01

    The sharp increase of the man-induced pressure on the environment and hence the need to predict and monitor natural anomalies makes global monitoring of the ecosphere of planet Earth an issue of vital importance. The notion of the ecosphere covers three basic shells closely interacting with each other: the near-Earth space, the atmosphere and the Earth surface. In the near-Earth space (covering 100 to 2000 km altitudes) the primary objects of monitoring are: functioning artificial space objects, the fragments of their constructions or space rubbish (which by estimation amounts to 3.5 million pieces including 30,000 to 70,000 objects having dimensions sufficient for heavy damaging or even destroying functioning space objects) and objects of space origin (asteroids, meteorites and comets) whose trajectories come closely enough to the Earth. Maximum concentrations of space rubbish observed on orbits with altitudes of 800, 1000 and 1500 km and inclinations of 60 to 100 deg. are related in the first place to spacecraft launch requirements. Taking into account the number of launches implemented by different countries in the framework of their own space programs the probability of collision of functioning spacecraft with space rubbish may be estimation increase from (1.5 - 3.5)% at present to (15 - 40)% by 2020. Besides, registration of space radiation flow intensity and the solar activity is no less important in this space area. Subject to control in the atmosphere are time and space variations in temperature fields, humidity, tracing gas concentrations, first of all ozone and greenhouse gases, the state of the cloud cover, wind velocity, etc. The range of objects to be under environmental management of Earth surface is just as diverse and essentially should include the state of the surface and the near-surface layer of seas and oceans, internal reservoirs, the cryosphere and the land surface along with vegetation cover, natural resources and human activities. No matter

  9. Transmission and total reflection of subhertz electromagnetic waves at the earth-atmosphere interface

    SciTech Connect

    Shiozawa, Toshiyuki

    2010-12-15

    For the purpose of providing for a theoretical background for the study of electromagnetic fields generated by precursory effects of earthquakes, the problem of transmission and total reflection at the earth-atmosphere interface is investigated in detail for a subhertz plane electromagnetic wave incident from the earth's crust. The term ''subhertz'' means 'below 1 Hz'. First, for the special case of normal incidence, the overall power transmission coefficient at the earth-atmosphere interface is found to take a maximum value at a definite frequency f{sub 0} which is inversely proportional to the square of the depth of a virtual hypocenter. A typical value of f{sub 0} falls around 0.01 Hz. For oblique incidence as well, this feature of the overall power transmission coefficient is retained except in the vicinity of the critical angle of incidence for the H-wave. At the critical angle of incidence, the power flow carried by a surface wave along the interface becomes anomalously large for the H-wave. However, over a wide range of angles of incidence greater than the critical angle, the power flow carried by the E-wave exceeds that carried by the H-wave by orders of magnitude. Finally, the energy conservation relations for the incident, reflected, and transmitted waves at the earth-atmosphere interface are discussed. For an incident wave coming from the earth's crust, the interactive power between the incident and reflected waves plays a crucial role for the conservation of energy at the interface.

  10. An analytic study of impact ejecta trajectories in the atmospheres of Venus, Mars, and earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tauber, M. E.; Kirk, D. B.; Gault, D. E.

    1978-01-01

    Calculations have been made to determine the effects of atmospheric drag and gravity on impact ejecta trajectories on Venus, Mars, and earth. The equations of motion were numerically integrated for a broad range of body sizes, initial velocities, and initial elevation angles. A dimensionless parameter was found from approximate analytic solutions which correlated the ejecta range, final impact angle, and final impact velocity for all three planets.

  11. Mapping the downwelling atmospheric radiation at the Earth's surface: A research strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raschke, E.

    1986-01-01

    A strategy is presented along with background material for determining downward atmospheric radiation at the Earth's surface on a regional scale but over the entire globe, using available information on the temperature and humidity of the air near the ground and at cloud base altitudes. Most of these parameters can be inferred from satellite radiance measurements. Careful validation of the derived radiances will be required using ground-based direct measurements of radiances, to avoid systematic biases of these derived field quantities.

  12. Temporal trends in earth-atmosphere system reflectance factor for sagebrush steppe vegetation communities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, Laurence L.

    1987-01-01

    Four consecutive Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper acquisitions were used to examine trends in earth-atmosphere system reflectance factors of sagebrush steppe vegetation communities following soil moisture recharge from snow melt. Significant differences in trends between vegetation communities correspond to known differences in the initiation and duration of active vegetation growth. Information on short-term vegetation processes are a valuable supplement to estimates of total vegetation cover which can be obtained using satellite brightness images at less frequent temporal intervals.

  13. A new software tool for computing Earth's atmospheric transmission of near- and far-infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lord, Steven D.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes a new software tool, ATRAN, which computes the transmittance of Earth's atmosphere at near- and far-infrared wavelengths. We compare the capabilities of this program with others currently available and demonstrate its utility for observational data calibration and reduction. The program employs current water-vapor and ozone models to produce fast and accurate transmittance spectra for wavelengths ranging from 0.8 microns to 10 mm.

  14. Atmospheric circulation modeling of super Earths and terrestrial extrasolar planets using the SPARC/MITgcm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataria, T.; Showman, A. P.; Haberle, R. M.; Marley, M. S.; Fortney, J. J.; Freedman, R. S.

    2013-12-01

    The field of exoplanets continues to be a booming field of research in astronomy and planetary science, with numerous ground-based (e.g., SuperWASP, HARPS-N and S) and space-based surveys (e.g., Kepler) that detect and characterize planets ranging from hot Jupiters, Jovian-sized planets orbiting less than 0.1 AU from their star, to super Earths and terrestrial exoplanets, planets that have masses equal to or less than 10 times that of Earth with a range of orbital distances. Atmospheric circulation modeling plays an important role in the characterization of these planets, helping to constrain observations that probe their atmospheres. These models have proven successful in understanding observations of transiting exoplanets (when the planet passes in front of the star along our line of sight) particularly when the planet is passing through secondary eclipse (when the planet's dayside is visible). In modeling super Earths and terrestrial exoplanets, we must consider not only planets with thick fluid envelopes, but also traditional terrestrial planets with solid surfaces and thinner atmospheres. To that end, we present results from studies investigating the atmospheric circulation of these classes of planets using the SPARC/MITgcm, a state-of-the-art model which couples the MIT General Circulation Model with a plane-parallel, two-stream, non-gray radiative transfer model. We will present results from two studies, the first focusing on the circulation of GJ 1214b, a super-Earth detected by the MEarth ground-based survey, and a second study which explores the circulation of terrestrial exoplanets orbiting M-dwarfs.

  15. Effect of the shrinking dipole on solar-terrestrial energy input to the Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPherron, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    The global average temperature of the Earth is rising rapidly. This rise is primarily attributed to the release of greenhouse gases as a result of human activity. However, it has been argued that changes in radiation from the Sun might play a role. Most energy input to the Earth is light in the visible spectrum. Our best measurements suggest this power input has been constant for the last 40 years (the space age) apart from a small 11-year variation due to the solar cycle of sunspot activity. Another possible energy input from the Sun is the solar wind. The supersonic solar wind carries the magnetic field of the Sun into the solar system. As it passes the Earth it can connect to the Earth's magnetic field whenever it is antiparallel t the Earth's field. This connection allows mass, momentum, and energy from the solar wind to enter the magnetosphere producing geomagnetic activity. Ultimately much of this energy is deposited at high latitudes in the form of particle precipitation (aurora) and heating by electrical currents. Although the energy input by this process is miniscule compared to that from visible radiation it might alter the absorption of visible radiation. Two other processes affected by the solar cycle are atmospheric entry of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar energetic protons (SEP). A weak solar magnetic field at sunspot minimum facilitates GCR entry which has been implicated in creation of clouds. Large coronal mass ejections and solar flares create SEP at solar maximum. All of these alternative energy inputs and their effects depend on the strength of the Earth's magnetic field. Currently the Earth's field is decreasing rapidly and conceivably might reverse polarity in 1000 years. In this paper we describe the changes in the Earth's magnetic field and how this might affect GCR, SEP, electrical heating, aurora, and radio propagation. Whether these effects are important in global climate change can only be determined by detailed physical models.

  16. A new software package for detailed study of cosmic rays transport trough the Earth atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurchev, Eugene; Vashenyuk, Eduard; Balabin, Yury

    To study cosmic rays (CR) in the Earth atmosphere there are great number of methods both experimental and numerical. As an example, for the first can give balloon measurements, a neutron monitor research, a muon telescope research, etc. All of these experiments provide information about a particle fluxes in a given field space and have several limitations. For example, CR intensity can be estimated with using different tube counters, but in some problems it is needed to know the spectral and angular characteristics of particles in depend on altitude. This problem can be solved by numerical models of the cosmic rays propagation through the Earth atmosphere. At the present day, there are a many variations of models for a CR characteristic study, with each has its highs and lows. This paper describes a software package created in the Apatity CR laboratory. A comparison of one with similar programs and a usage examples are carried out. The important point here is result verification. As mentioned above, the experimental and numerical methods in this case only complement each other. For example, to verify the calculation results of galactic CR propagation through the Earth atmosphere a balloon experiment data is used. Another way is using a comparison with a neutron monitor data. In this work we consider this possibility, and make results.

  17. An impact-induced terrestrial atmosphere and iron-water reactions during accretion of the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, M. A.; Ahrens, T. J.

    1985-01-01

    Shock wave data and theoretical calculations were used to derive models of an impact-generated terrestrial atmosphere during accretion of the Earth. The models showed that impacts of infalling planetesimals not only provided the entire budget of terrestrial water but also led to a continuous depletion of near-surface layers of water-bearing minerals of their structural water. This resulted in a final atmospheric water reservoir comparable to the present day total water budget of the Earth. The interaction of metallic iron with free water at the surface of the accreting Earth is considered. We carried out model calcualtions simulating these processes during accretion. It is assumed that these processes are the prime source of the terrestrial FeO component of silicates and oxides. It is demonstrated that the iron-water reaction would result in the absence of atmospheric/hydrospheric water, if homogeneous accretion is assumed. In order to obtain the necessary amount of terrestrial water, slightly heterogeneous accretion with initially 36 wt% iron planetesimals, as compared with a homogeneous value of 34 wt% is required.

  18. Dynamics of Space Particles and Spacecrafts Passing by the Atmosphere of the Earth

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Antonio Fernando Bertachini de Almeida; Golebiewska, Justyna

    2013-01-01

    The present research studies the motion of a particle or a spacecraft that comes from an orbit around the Sun, which can be elliptic or hyperbolic, and that makes a passage close enough to the Earth such that it crosses its atmosphere. The idea is to measure the Sun-particle two-body energy before and after this passage in order to verify its variation as a function of the periapsis distance, angle of approach, and velocity at the periapsis of the particle. The full system is formed by the Sun, the Earth, and the particle or the spacecraft. The Sun and the Earth are in circular orbits around their center of mass and the motion is planar for all the bodies involved. The equations of motion consider the restricted circular planar three-body problem with the addition of the atmospheric drag. The initial conditions of the particle or spacecraft (position and velocity) are given at the periapsis of its trajectory around the Earth. PMID:24396298

  19. Oxygen dynamics in the aftermath of the Great Oxidation of Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canfield, Donald E.; Ngombi-Pemba, Lauriss; Hammarlund, Emma U.; Bengtson, Stefan; Chaussidon, Marc; Gauthier-Lafaye, François; Meunier, Alain; Riboulleau, Armelle; Rollion-Bard, Claire; Rouxel, Olivier; Asael, Dan; Pierson-Wickmann, Anne-Catherine; El Albani, Abderrazak

    2013-10-01

    The oxygen content of Earth's atmosphere has varied greatly through time, progressing from exceptionally low levels before about 2.3 billion years ago, to much higher levels afterward. In the absence of better information, we usually view the progress in Earth's oxygenation as a series of steps followed by periods of relative stasis. In contrast to this view, and as reported here, a dynamic evolution of Earth's oxygenation is recorded in ancient sediments from the Republic of Gabon from between about 2,150 and 2,080 million years ago. The oldest sediments in this sequence were deposited in well-oxygenated deep waters whereas the youngest were deposited in euxinic waters, which were globally extensive. These fluctuations in oxygenation were likely driven by the comings and goings of the Lomagundi carbon isotope excursion, the longest-lived positive δ13C excursion in Earth history, generating a huge oxygen source to the atmosphere. As the Lomagundi event waned, the oxygen source became a net oxygen sink as Lomagundi organic matter became oxidized, driving oxygen to low levels; this state may have persisted for 200 million years.

  20. Oxygen dynamics in the aftermath of the Great Oxidation of Earth's atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Canfield, Donald E; Ngombi-Pemba, Lauriss; Hammarlund, Emma U; Bengtson, Stefan; Chaussidon, Marc; Gauthier-Lafaye, François; Meunier, Alain; Riboulleau, Armelle; Rollion-Bard, Claire; Rouxel, Olivier; Asael, Dan; Pierson-Wickmann, Anne-Catherine; El Albani, Abderrazak

    2013-10-15

    The oxygen content of Earth's atmosphere has varied greatly through time, progressing from exceptionally low levels before about 2.3 billion years ago, to much higher levels afterward. In the absence of better information, we usually view the progress in Earth's oxygenation as a series of steps followed by periods of relative stasis. In contrast to this view, and as reported here, a dynamic evolution of Earth's oxygenation is recorded in ancient sediments from the Republic of Gabon from between about 2,150 and 2,080 million years ago. The oldest sediments in this sequence were deposited in well-oxygenated deep waters whereas the youngest were deposited in euxinic waters, which were globally extensive. These fluctuations in oxygenation were likely driven by the comings and goings of the Lomagundi carbon isotope excursion, the longest-lived positive δ(13)C excursion in Earth history, generating a huge oxygen source to the atmosphere. As the Lomagundi event waned, the oxygen source became a net oxygen sink as Lomagundi organic matter became oxidized, driving oxygen to low levels; this state may have persisted for 200 million years. PMID:24082125

  1. The role of artificial atmospheric CO2 removal in stabilizing Earth's climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zickfeld, K.; Tokarska, K.

    2014-12-01

    The current CO2 emission trend entails a risk that the 2°C target will be missed, potentially causing "dangerous" changes in Earth's climate system. This research explores the role of artificial atmospheric CO2 removal (also referred to as "negative emissions") in stabilizing Earth's climate after overshoot. We designed a range of plausible CO2 emission scenarios, which follow a gradual transition from a fossil fuel driven economy to a zero-emission energy system, followed by a period of negative emissions. The scenarios differ in peak emissions rate and, accordingly, the amount of negative emissions, to reach the same cumulative emissions compatible with the 2°C temperature stabilization target. The climate system components' responses are computed using the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model of intermediate complexity. Results suggest that negative emissions are effective in reversing the global mean temperature and stabilizing it at a desired level (2°C above pre-industrial) after overshoot. Also, changes in the meridional overturning circulation and sea ice are reversible with the artificial removal of CO2 from the atmosphere. However, sea level continues to rise and is not reversible for several centuries, even under assumption of large amounts of negative emissions. For sea level to decline, atmospheric CO2 needs to be reduced to pre-industrial levels in our simulations. During the negative emission phase, outgassing of CO2 from terrestrial and marine carbon sinks offsets the artificial removal of atmospheric CO2, thereby reducing its effectiveness. On land, the largest CO2 outgassing occurs in the Tropics and is partially compensated by CO2 uptake at northern high latitudes. In the ocean, outgassing occurs mostly in the Southern Ocean, North Atlantic and tropical Pacific. The strongest outgassing occurs for pathways entailing greatest amounts of negative emissions, such that the efficiency of CO2 removal - here defined as the change in

  2. Galactic cosmic rays on extrasolar Earth-like planets. II. Atmospheric implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grießmeier, J.-M.; Tabataba-Vakili, F.; Stadelmann, A.; Grenfell, J. L.; Atri, D.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Theoretical arguments indicate that close-in terrestial exoplanets may have weak magnetic fields. As described in the companion article (Paper I), a weak magnetic field results in a high flux of galactic cosmic rays to the top of the planetary atmosphere. Aims: We investigate effects that may result from a high flux of galactic cosmic rays both throughout the atmosphere and at the planetary surface. Methods: Using an air shower approach, we calculate how the atmospheric chemistry and temperature change under the influence of galactic cosmic rays for Earth-like (N2-O2 dominated) atmospheres. We evaluate the production and destruction rate of atmospheric biosignature molecules. We derive planetary emission and transmission spectra to study the influence of galactic cosmic rays on biosignature detectability. We then calculate the resulting surface UV flux, the surface particle flux, and the associated equivalent biological dose rates. Results: We find that up to 20% of stratospheric ozone is destroyed by cosmic-ray protons. The effect on the planetary spectra, however, is negligible. The reduction of the planetary ozone layer leads to an increase in the weighted surface UV flux by two orders of magnitude under stellar UV flare conditions. The resulting biological effective dose rate is, however, too low to strongly affect surface life. We also examine the surface particle flux: For a planet with a terrestrial atmosphere (with a surface pressure of 1033 hPa), a reduction of the magnetic shielding efficiency can increase the biological radiation dose rate by a factor of two, which is non-critical for biological systems. For a planet with a weaker atmosphere (with a surface pressure of 97.8 hPa), the planetary magnetic field has a much stronger influence on the biological radiation dose, changing it by up to two orders of magnitude. Conclusions: For a planet with an Earth-like atmospheric pressure, weak or absent magnetospheric shielding against galactic cosmic

  3. The Breath of Planet Earth: Atmospheric Circulation. Assimilation of Surface Wind Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atlas, Robert; Bloom, Stephen; Otterman, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    Differences in air pressure are a major cause of atmospheric circulation. Because heat excites the movement of atoms, warm temperatures cause, air molecules to expand. Because those molecules now occupy a larger space, the pressure that their weight exerts is decreased. Air from surrounding high-pressure areas is pushed toward the low-pressure areas, creating circulation. This process causes a major pattern of global atmosphere movement known as meridional circulation. In this form of convection, or vertical air movement, heated equatorial air rises and travels through the upper atmosphere toward higher latitudes. Air just above the equator heads toward the North Pole, and air just below the equator moves southward. This air movement fills the gap created where increased air pressure pushes down cold air. The ,cold air moves along the surface back toward the equator, replacing the air masses that rise there. Another influence on atmospheric. circulation is the Coriolis force. Because of the Earth's rotation, large-scale wind currents move in the direction of this axial spin around low-pressure areas. Wind rotates counterclockwise in the Northern Hemisphere and clockwise in the Southern Hemisphere. just as the Earth's rotation affects airflow, so too does its surface. In the phenomenon of orographic lifting, elevated topographic features such as mountain ranges lift air as it moves up their surface.

  4. Estimation of the cosmic ray ionization in the Earth's atmosphere during GLE71

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, Dorman

    2016-07-01

    DYASTIMA is an application, based on Geant4, which simulates the cascades of particles that are generated due to the interactions of cosmic ray particles with the atmospheres of the planets. The first version of DYASTIMA has been successfully applied to the Earth's atmosphere, providing results that are in accordance with the publications of other models. Since then, important improvements and extensions have been made to this application, including a graphical user interface environment that allows the more effective management of the configuration parameters. Also, the actual modeling of the atmosphere has been changed allowing the definition of more complex cases and at the same time providing, in a more efficient way (with respect to the program's previous version) enhanced outputs. In this work, we combine the new version of DYASTIMA with the NMBANGLE PPOLA model, that estimates the spectrum of SEPs during relativistic proton events using ground level neutron monitor data from the worldwide network. Such a joint model has as a primary scope the simulation of a SEP event and of its secondary products at different altitudes in the Earth's atmosphere, providing at the same time an estimation of the respective ionization rates and of their spatial and temporal dependence. We apply this joint model to GLE 71, on 17 May 2012, and we discuss the results.

  5. On the average temperature of airless spherical bodies and the magnitude of Earth's atmospheric thermal effect.

    PubMed

    Volokin, Den; ReLlez, Lark

    2014-01-01

    The presence of atmosphere can appreciably warm a planet's surface above the temperature of an airless environment. Known as a natural Greenhouse Effect (GE), this near-surface Atmospheric Thermal Enhancement (ATE) as named herein is presently entirely attributed to the absorption of up-welling long-wave radiation by greenhouse gases. Often quoted as 33 K for Earth, GE is estimated as a difference between planet's observed mean surface temperature and an effective radiating temperature calculated from the globally averaged absorbed solar flux using the Stefan-Boltzmann (SB) radiation law. This approach equates a planet's average temperature in the absence of greenhouse gases or atmosphere to an effective emission temperature assuming ATE ≡ GE. The SB law is also routinely employed to estimating the mean temperatures of airless bodies. We demonstrate that this formula as applied to spherical objects is mathematically incorrect owing to Hölder's inequality between integrals and leads to biased results such as a significant underestimation of Earth's ATE. We derive a new expression for the mean physical temperature of airless bodies based on an analytic integration of the SB law over a sphere that accounts for effects of regolith heat storage and cosmic background radiation on nighttime temperatures. Upon verifying our model against Moon surface temperature data provided by the NASA Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment, we propose it as a new analytic standard for evaluating the thermal environment of airless bodies. Physical evidence is presented that Earth's ATE should be assessed against the temperature of an equivalent airless body such as the Moon rather than a hypothetical atmosphere devoid of greenhouse gases. Employing the new temperature formula we show that Earth's total ATE is ~90 K, not 33 K, and that ATE = GE + TE, where GE is the thermal effect of greenhouse gases, while TE > 15 K is a thermodynamic enhancement independent of the

  6. On atmospheric loss of oxygen ions from earth through magnetospheric processes.

    PubMed

    Seki, K; Elphic, R C; Hirahara, M; Terasawa, T; Mukai, T

    2001-03-01

    In Earth's environment, the observed polar outflow rate for O(+) ions, the main source of oxygen above gravitational escape energy, corresponds to the loss of approximately 18% of the present-day atmospheric oxygen over 3 billion years. However, part of this apparent loss can actually be returned to the atmosphere. Examining loss rates of four escape routes with high-altitude spacecraft observations, we show that the total oxygen loss rate inferred from current knowledge is about one order of magnitude smaller than the polar O(+) outflow rate. This disagreement suggests that there may be a substantial return flux from the magnetosphere to the low-latitude ionosphere. Then the net oxygen loss over 3 billion years drops to approximately 2% of the current atmospheric oxygen content. PMID:11239148

  7. Characteristics of energetic electron precipitation into the earth's polar atmosphere and geomagnetic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhmutov, V. S.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Krainev, M. B.

    A number of energetic electron precipitation events (EPEs) were observed in the Earth's polar atmosphere (Murmansk region, geographical coordinates 68.57 N, 33.03 E and Mirny, Antarctica, 66.34 S, 92.55 E) during the long-term cosmic ray balloon experiment from 1957 up to now. During geomagnetic storms significant X-ray fluxes caused by precipitating electrons at the top of the atmosphere sometimes penetrated to the atmospheric depth of 60 gcm-2. We show that (1) there is a quasi-11-year cycle in EPE occurrence shifted with respect to solar activity cycle, and (2) the yearly rate of EPE occurrence has an ascending trend during the period 1965-1999. The EPE characteristics evaluated from the balloon experiment are compared with the available data on geomagnetic activity and the possible relations between the features of EPE events and geomagnetic conditions are discussed.

  8. Degree and plane of polarization of multiple scattered light. 2: Earth's atmosphere with aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plass, G. N.; Kattawar, G. W.

    1972-01-01

    The degree of polarization, as well as the direction of the plane of polarization, were calculated by a Monte Carlo method for the reflected and transmitted photons from the earth's atmosphere. The solar photons were observed during multiple collisions with aerosols and the Rayleigh scattering centers in the atmosphere. The aerosol number density, as well as the ratio of aerosol to Rayleigh scattering, varies with height. The proportion of aerosol to Rayleigh scattering was appropriately chosen at each wavelength 0.4 microns and 0.7 microns; ozone absorption was included where appropriate. Three different aerosol number densities were used to study the effects of aerosol variations. Results are given for a solar zenith angle of 81.37 deg and a surface albedo of zero. The polarization of the reflected and transmitted photons was found to be sensitive to the amount of aerosols in the atmosphere at certain angles of observation.

  9. Spectral Invariant Approximation within Atmospheric Radiative Transfer; Applications to EarthCare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Certain algebraic combinations of single-scattering albedo and solar radiation reflected from, or transmitted through, vegetation canopies do not vary with wavelength. These "spectrally-invariant relationships" are the consequence of wavelength independence of the extinction coefficient and scattering phase function in vegetation. In general, this wavelength-independence does not hold in the atmosphere, but in cloud-dominated atmospheres the total extinction and total scattering phase function vary only weakly with wavelength. We identify the conditions under which the spectrally-invariant approximation can accurately describe the extinction and scattering properties of cloudy atmospheres. Validity of the assumptions and accuracy of the approximation is tested with radiative transfer calculations. We discuss the physics behind this phenomenon and possible applications to remote sensing, climate, and the EarthCare, mission in particular.

  10. New Atmospheric and Oceanic Angular Momentum Datasets for Predictions of Earth Rotation/Polar Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salstein, D. A.; Stamatakos, N.

    2014-12-01

    We are reviewing the state of the art in available datasets for both atmospheric angular momentum (AAM) and oceanic angular momentum (OAM) for the purposes of analysis and prediction of both polar motion and length of day series. Both analyses and forecasts of these quantities have been used separately and in combination to aid in short and medium range predictions of Earth rotation parameters. The AAM and OAM combination, with the possible addition of hydrospheric angular momentum can form a proxy index for the Earth rotation parameters themselves due to the conservation of angular momentum in the Earth system. Such a combination of angular momentum of the geophysical fluids has helped in forecasts within periods up to about 10 days, due to the dynamic models, and together with extended statistical predictions of Earth rotation parameters out even as far as 90 days, according to Dill et al. (2013). We assess other dataset combinations that can be used in such analysis and prediction efforts for the Earth rotation parameters, and demonstrate the corresponding skill levels in doing so.

  11. EUV-VUV photochemistry in the upper atmospheres of Titan and the early Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imanaka, H.; Smith, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    Titan, the organic-rich moon of Saturn, possesses a thick atmosphere of nitrogen, globally covered with organic haze layers. The recent Cassini’s INMS and CAPS observations clearly demonstrate the importance of complex organic chemistry in the ionosphere. EUV photon radiation is the major driving energy source there. Our previous laboratory study of the EUV-VUV photolysis of N2/CH4 gas mixtures demonstrates a unique role of nitrogen photoionization in the catalytic formation of complex hydrocarbons in Titan’s upper atmosphere (Imanaka and Smith, 2007, 2009). Such EUV photochemistry could also have played important roles in the formation of complex organic molecules in the ionosphere of the early Earth. It has been suggested that the early Earth atmosphere may have contained significant amount of reduced species (CH4, H2, and CO) (Kasting, 1990, Pavlov et al., 2001, Tian et al., 2005). Recent experimental study, using photon radiation at wavelengths longer than 110 nm, demonstrates that photochemical organic haze could have been generated from N2/CO2 atmospheres with trace amounts of CH4 or H2 (Trainer et al., 2006, Dewitt et al., 2009). However, possible EUV photochemical processes in the ionosphere are not well understood. We have investigated the effect of CO2 in the possible EUV photochemical processes in simulated reduced early Earth atmospheres. The EUV-VUV photochemistry using wavelength-tunable synchrotron light between 50 - 150 nm was investigated for gas mixtures of 13CO2/CH4 (= 96.7/3.3) and N2/13CO2/CH4 (= 90/6.7/3.3). The onsets of unsaturated hydrocarbon formation were observed at wavelengths shorter than the ionization potentials of CO2 and N2, respectively. This correlation indicates that CO2 can play a similar catalytic role to N2 in the formation of heavy organic species, which implies that EUV photochemistry might have significant impact on the photochemical generation of organic haze layers in the upper atmosphere of the early Earth.

  12. Dynamic model constraints on oxygen-17 depletion in atmospheric O2 after a snowball Earth

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xiaobin; Bao, Huiming

    2013-01-01

    A large perturbation in atmospheric CO2 and O2 or bioproductivity will result in a drastic pulse of 17O change in atmospheric O2, as seen in the Marinoan Oxygen-17 Depletion (MOSD) event in the immediate aftermath of a global deglaciation 635 Mya. The exact nature of the perturbation, however, is debated. Here we constructed a coupled, four-box, and quick-response biosphere–atmosphere model to examine both the steady state and dynamics of the MOSD event. Our model shows that the ultra-high CO2 concentrations proposed by the “snowball’ Earth hypothesis produce a typical MOSD duration of less than 106 y and a magnitude of 17O depletion reaching approximately −35‰. Both numbers are in remarkable agreement with geological constraints from South China and Svalbard. Moderate CO2 and low O2 concentration (e.g., 3,200 parts per million by volume and 0.01 bar, respectively) could produce distinct sulfate 17O depletion only if postglacial marine bioproductivity was impossibly low. Our dynamic model also suggests that a snowball in which the ocean is isolated from the atmosphere by a continuous ice cover may be distinguished from one in which cracks in the ice permit ocean–atmosphere exchange only if partial pressure of atmospheric O2 is larger than 0.02 bar during the snowball period and records of weathering-derived sulfate are available for the very first few tens of thousands of years after the onset of the meltdown. In any case, a snowball Earth is a precondition for the observed MOSD event. PMID:23898167

  13. Dynamic model constraints on oxygen-17 depletion in atmospheric O2 after a snowball Earth.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaobin; Bao, Huiming

    2013-09-01

    A large perturbation in atmospheric CO2 and O2 or bioproductivity will result in a drastic pulse of (17)O change in atmospheric O2, as seen in the Marinoan Oxygen-17 Depletion (MOSD) event in the immediate aftermath of a global deglaciation 635 Mya. The exact nature of the perturbation, however, is debated. Here we constructed a coupled, four-box, and quick-response biosphere-atmosphere model to examine both the steady state and dynamics of the MOSD event. Our model shows that the ultra-high CO2 concentrations proposed by the "snowball' Earth hypothesis produce a typical MOSD duration of less than 10(6) y and a magnitude of (17)O depletion reaching approximately -35‰. Both numbers are in remarkable agreement with geological constraints from South China and Svalbard. Moderate CO2 and low O2 concentration (e.g., 3,200 parts per million by volume and 0.01 bar, respectively) could produce distinct sulfate (17)O depletion only if postglacial marine bioproductivity was impossibly low. Our dynamic model also suggests that a snowball in which the ocean is isolated from the atmosphere by a continuous ice cover may be distinguished from one in which cracks in the ice permit ocean-atmosphere exchange only if partial pressure of atmospheric O2 is larger than 0.02 bar during the snowball period and records of weathering-derived sulfate are available for the very first few tens of thousands of years after the onset of the meltdown. In any case, a snowball Earth is a precondition for the observed MOSD event. PMID:23898167

  14. Bolide impacts and the oxidation state of carbon in the Earth's early atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasting, J. F.

    1992-01-01

    A one-dimensional photochemical model was used to examine the effect of bolide impacts on the oxidation state of Earth's primitive atmosphere. The impact rate should have been high prior to 3.8 Ga before present, based on evidence derived from the Moon. Impacts of comets or carbonaceous asteroids should have enhanced the atmospheric CO/CO2 ratio by bringing in CO ice and/or organic carbon that can be oxidized to CO in the impact plume. Ordinary chondritic impactors would contain elemental iron that could have reacted with ambient CO2 to give CO. Nitric oxide (NO) should also have been produced by reaction between ambient CO2 and N2 in the hot impact plumes. High NO concentrations increase the atmospheric CO/CO2 ratio by increasing the rainout rate of oxidized gases. According to the model, atmospheric CO/CO2 ratios of unity or greater are possible during the first several hundred million years of Earth's history, provided that dissolved CO was not rapidly oxidized to bicarbonate in the ocean. Specifically, high atmospheric CO/CO2 ratios are possible if either: (1) the climate was cool (like today's climate), so that hydration of dissolved CO to formate was slow, or (2) the formate formed from CO was efficiently converted into volatile, reduced carbon compounds, such as methane. A high atmospheric CO/CO2 ratio may have helped to facilitate prebiotic synthesis by enhancing the production rates of hydrogen cyanide and formaldehyde. Formaldehyde may have been produced even more efficiently by photochemical reduction of bicarbonate and formate in Fe(++)-rich surface waters.

  15. Bolide impacts and the oxidation state of carbon in the Earth's early atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Kasting, J F

    1992-01-01

    A one-dimensional photochemical model was used to examine the effect of bolide impacts on the oxidation state of Earth's primitive atmosphere. The impact rate should have been high prior to 3.8 Ga before present, based on evidence derived from the Moon. Impacts of comets or carbonaceous asteroids should have enhanced the atmospheric CO/CO2 ratio by bringing in CO ice and/or organic carbon that can be oxidized to CO in the impact plume. Ordinary chondritic impactors would contain elemental iron that could have reacted with ambient CO2 to give CO. Nitric oxide (NO) should also have been produced by reaction between ambient CO2 and N2 in the hot impact plumes. High NO concentrations increase the atmospheric CO/CO2 ratio by increasing the rainout rate of oxidized gases. According to the model, atmospheric CO/CO2 ratios of unity or greater are possible during the first several hundred million years of Earth's history, provided that dissolved CO was not rapidly oxidized to bicarbonate in the ocean. Specifically, high atmospheric CO/CO2 ratios are possible if either: (1) the climate was cool (like today's climate), so that hydration of dissolved CO to formate was slow, or (2) the formate formed from CO was efficiently converted into volatile, reduced carbon compounds, such as methane. A high atmospheric CO/CO2 ratio may have helped to facilitate prebiotic synthesis by enhancing the production rates of hydrogen cyanide and formaldehyde. Formaldehyde may have been produced even more efficiently by photochemical reduction of bicarbonate and formate in Fe(++)-rich surface waters. PMID:11537523

  16. Kinetic Theory of Meteor Plasma in the Earth's atmosphere: Implications for Radar Head Echo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimant, Y. S.; Oppenheim, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    Every second millions of tiny meteoroids hit the Earth from space, vast majority too small to be observed visually. However, radars detect the plasma they generate and use the collected data to characterize the incoming meteoroids and the atmosphere in which they disintegrate. This diagnostics requires a detailed quantitative understanding of formation of the meteor plasma and how it interacts with the Earth's atmosphere. Fast-descending meteoroids become detectable to radars after they heat due to collisions with atmospheric molecules sufficiently and start ablating. The ablated material then collides into atmospheric molecules and forms plasma around the meteoroid. Reflection of radar pulses from this plasma produces a localized signal called a head echo often accompanied by a much longer non-specular trail (see the Figure). Using first principles, we have developed a consistent collisional kinetic theory of the near-meteoroid plasma responsible for the radar head echo. This theory produces analytic expressions describing the ion and neutral velocity distributions along with the detailed 3-D spatial structure of the near-meteoroid plasma. These expressions predict a number of unexpected features such as shell-like velocity distributions. This theory shows that the meteoroid plasma develops over a length-scale close to the ion mean free path with a strongly non-Maxwellian velocity distribution. The spatial distribution of the plasma density shows significant deviations from a Gaussian law usually employed in head-echo modeling. This analytical model will serve as a basis for a more accurate quantitative interpretation of radar measurements, estimates of the ionization efficiency, and should help calculate meteoroid and atmosphere parameters from radar head-echo observations. This theory could also help clarify the physical nature of electromagnetic pulses observed during recent meteor showers and associated with the passage of fast-moving meteors through the

  17. Defining Top-of-Atmosphere Flux Reference Level for Earth Radiation Budget Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeb, N. G.; Kato, S.; Wielicki, B. A.

    2002-01-01

    To estimate the earth's radiation budget at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) from satellite-measured radiances, it is necessary to account for the finite geometry of the earth and recognize that the earth is a solid body surrounded by a translucent atmosphere of finite thickness that attenuates solar radiation differently at different heights. As a result, in order to account for all of the reflected solar and emitted thermal radiation from the planet by direct integration of satellite-measured radiances, the measurement viewing geometry must be defined at a reference level well above the earth s surface (e.g., 100 km). This ensures that all radiation contributions, including radiation escaping the planet along slant paths above the earth s tangent point, are accounted for. By using a field-of- view (FOV) reference level that is too low (such as the surface reference level), TOA fluxes for most scene types are systematically underestimated by 1-2 W/sq m. In addition, since TOA flux represents a flow of radiant energy per unit area, and varies with distance from the earth according to the inverse-square law, a reference level is also needed to define satellite-based TOA fluxes. From theoretical radiative transfer calculations using a model that accounts for spherical geometry, the optimal reference level for defining TOA fluxes in radiation budget studies for the earth is estimated to be approximately 20 km. At this reference level, there is no need to explicitly account for horizontal transmission of solar radiation through the atmosphere in the earth radiation budget calculation. In this context, therefore, the 20-km reference level corresponds to the effective radiative top of atmosphere for the planet. Although the optimal flux reference level depends slightly on scene type due to differences in effective transmission of solar radiation with cloud height, the difference in flux caused by neglecting the scene-type dependence is less than 0.1%. If an inappropriate

  18. How do we solve the Faint Young Sun Paradox? Examining diverse proposed atmospheres for Early Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldblatt, C.

    2010-12-01

    The canonical problem in Early Earth climatology is the Faint Young Sun Paradox (FYSP): despite receiving much less energy from the Sun than today, the Earth was at least as warm during the Archean Eon as it is today. Clearly, Early Earth had stronger greenhouse effect or lower albedo, yet despite four decades of study, there is no consensus on the solution. The FYSP requires consideration of very different climate regimes to the present day, so provides a great learning tool for diverse and undiscovered climates in Earth's past and future. I will discuss old and new ideas of enhanced greenhouse gas solutions, present a recent proposal that pressure broadening by a thicker nitrogen atmosphere contributed to the solution [1], and a new analysis of what role clouds could have in resolving the FYSP [2]. Various strong greenhouse gas enhancements have been suggested, but all are subject to some problems. A nitrogen inventory greater than the present level was likely in the Archean atmosphere. This would have given a temperature increase of 3 to 8°C by pressure broadening the absorption lines of greenhouse gases. Cloud changes are evaluated relative to the required radiative forcing of +50 Wm-2 to resolve the FYSP. Plausible changes to low clouds (reducing albedo) or high cloud (strengthening the greenhouse effect) could both contribute at most +15Wm-2, so neither fewer low clouds nor more high clouds can provide enough forcing to resolve the FYSP. Decreased surface albedo can contribute no more than +5 Wm-2 forcing. [1] Goldblatt, C. et al., 2009, Nitrogen-enhanced greenhouse warming on early Earth, Nature Geosci., 2, 891 - 896. doi:10.1038/ngeo692 [2] Goldblatt, C. and Zahnle, K. J., 2010, Clouds and the Faint Young Sun Paradox, Clim. Past Discuss., 6, 1337-1350. doi:10.5194/cpd-6-1337-2010

  19. Aura Atmospheric Data Products and Their Availability from NASA Goddard Earth Sciences DAAC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, S.; Johnson, J.; Gopalan, A.; Smith, P.; Leptoukh, G.; Kempler, S.

    2004-01-01

    NASA's EOS-Aura spacecraft was launched successfully on July 15, 2004. The four instruments onboard the spacecraft are the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS), the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES), and the High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HBDLS). The Aura instruments are designed to gather earth sciences measurements across the ultraviolet, visible, infra-red, thermal and microwave regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Aura will provide over 70 distinct standard atmospheric data products for use in ozone layer and surface UV-B monitoring, air quality forecast, and atmospheric chemistry and climate change studies (http://eosaura.gsfc.nasa.gov/). These products include earth-atmosphere radiances and solar spectral irradiances; total column, tropospheric, and profiles of ozone and other trace gases, surface W-B flux; clouds and aerosol characteristics; and temperature, geopotential height, and water vapor profiles. The MLS, OMI, and HIRDLS data products will be archived at the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences (GES) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC), while data from TES will be archived at NASA Langley Research Center DAAC. Some of the standard products which have gone through quick preliminary checks are already archived at the GES DAAC (http://daac.nsfc.nasa.gov/) and are available to the Aura science team and data validation team members for data validation; and to the application and visualization software developers, for testing their application modules. Once data are corrected for obvious calibration problems and partially validated using in-situ observations, they would be made available to the broader user community. This presentation will provide details of the whole suite of Aura atmospheric data products, and the time line of the availability of the rest of the preliminary products and of the partially validated provisional products. Software and took available for data access, visualization, and data

  20. Connecting the dots: a versatile model for the atmospheres of tidally locked Super-Earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carone, L.; Keppens, R.; Decin, L.

    2014-11-01

    Radiative equilibrium temperatures are calculated for the troposphere of a tidally locked Super-Earth based on a simple greenhouse model, using Solar system data as a guideline. These temperatures provide in combination with a Newtonian relaxation scheme thermal forcing for a 3D atmosphere model using the dynamical core of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology global circulation model. Our model is of the same conceptional simplicity than the model of Held & Suarez and is thus computationally fast. Furthermore, because of the coherent, general derivation of radiative equilibrium temperatures, our model is easily adaptable for different planets and atmospheric scenarios. As a case study relevant for Super-Earths, we investigate a Gl581g-like planet with Earth-like atmosphere and irradiation and present results for two representative rotation periods of Prot = 10 d and Prot = 36.5 d. Our results provide proof of concept and highlight interesting dynamical features for the rotating regime 3 < Prot < 100 d, which was shown by Edson et al. to be an intermediate regime between equatorial superrotation and divergence. We confirm that the Prot = 10 d case is more dominated by equatorial superrotation dynamics than the Prot = 36.5 d case, which shows diminishing influence of standing Rossby-Kelvin waves and increasing influence of divergence at the top of the atmosphere. We argue that this dynamical regime change relates to the increase in Rossby deformation radius, in agreement with previous studies. However, we also pay attention to other features that are not or only in partial agreement with other studies, like, e.g. the number of circulation cells and their strength, the role and extent of thermal inversion layers, and the details of heat transport.

  1. Observations of the Earth's Radiation Budget in relation to atmospheric hydrology. 4: Atmospheric column radiative cooling over the world's oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Graeme L.; Slingo, Anthony; Webb, Mark J.; Minnett, Peter J.; Daum, Peter H.; Kleinman, Lawrence; Wittmeyer, Ian; Randall, David A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper introduces a simple method for deriving climatological values of the longwave flux emitted from the clear sky atmosphere to the ice-free ocean surface. It is shown using both theory and data from simulations how the ratio of the surface to top-of-atmosphere (TOA) flux is a simple function of water vapor (W) and a validation of the simple relationship is presented based on a limited set of surface flux measurements. The rms difference between the retrieved surface fluxes and the simulated surface fluxes is approximately 6 W/sq m. The clear sky column cooling rate of the atmosphere is derived from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) values of the clear sky TOA flux and the surface flux retrieved using Special Scanning Microwave Imager (SSM/I) measurements of w together with ERBE clear sky fluxes. The relationship between this column cooling rate, w, and the sea surface temperature (SST) is explored and it is shown how the cooling rate systematically increases as both w and SST increase. The uncertainty implied in these estmates of cooling are approximately +/- 0.2 K/d. The effects of clouds on this longwave cooling are also explored by placing bounds on the possible impact of clouds on the column cooling rate based on certain assumptions about the effect of clouds on the longwave flux to the surface. It is shown how the longwave effects of clouds in a moist atmosphere where the column water vapor exceeds approximately 30 kg/sq m may be estimated from presently available satellite data with an uncertainty estimated to be approximately 0.2 K/d. Based on an approach described in this paper, we show how clouds in these relatively moist regions decrease the column cooling by almost 50% of the clear sky values and the existence of significant longitudinal gradients in column radiative heating across the equatorial and subtropical Pacific Ocean.

  2. About the Influence of the initial Atmosphere on the Earth's Temperature Distribution during it's Accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachay, Y.; Anfilogov, V.; Antipin, A.

    2012-04-01

    We suggested a new model for accumulation of planets of the Earth's group [1], which is based on the contemporary results of geochemical analyses, which allow to obtain the concentrations of short living radioactive isotopes of 26Al in the matter of the pre planet cloud [2]. With use of that data new estimations of temperature distribution into the growing planetary pre planetary bodies into the Earth's nebular zone had been obtained. For the further Earth's temperature evolution, as it had been showed by the results of numerical modeling, the main role belongs to the temperature distribution in the forming Earth's core and the existence of a dense and transparent atmosphere. The shadow influence of the initial atmosphere had been researched in the paper [3]. We shall give the main consideration to these problems in that paper. It had been shown in [1], that on the earliest accumulation stage the heat release by the decay of 26Al it is sufficient for forming a central melted area and solid relatively thin mainly silicate upper envelope in the pre planetary body, with dimensions, larger than (50-100) km. The impact velocities on that stage are yet not large, therefore by the bodies impact with these or near dimensions liquid and mainly iron their parts merge, but the masses of the pre planetary bodies are not sufficient to gravitational keeping of silicate parts of the cold solid envelope. On that stage they remain into the nebular zone of the proto planet and the mechanism of matter differentiation for the future core and mantle reservoirs realizes. The process takes place yet in small bodies and is in time to finish during less than 10 million years. The next forming of the core and mantle structure continues according to all known estimations about 100 million years. Because of the merging of inner liquid parts of impacting bodies occur due to inelastic impact, the main part of potential energy transforms into heat. That continues up to that time when the iron

  3. Noble Gas Isotopic Evidence for Primordial Evolution of the Earth's Atmosphere in Three Distinct Stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, C. L., Jr.; Jacobsen, S. B.

    1995-09-01

    The deep Earth is the key to understanding the primordial evolution of the Earth's atmosphere. However the atmosphere was not derived by degassing of the Earth, as widely held. Isotopic characterization of mantle noble gases and modeling based on this information [1] suggests the atmosphere experienced a 3-stage early history. This follows from 5 basic observations: (i) Ne in the mantle is solar-like, with light (high) 20Ne/22Ne relative to the atmosphere [2]; (ii) mantle Xe has higher 128Xe/130Xe than the atmosphere [3], which carries an extreme heavy isotope enriched mass fractionation signature of >3%/amu (iii) most of the radiogenic Xe from l29I and 244Pu decay in the Earth is not present either in the mantle or in the atmosphere; (iv) the inferred abundances of noble gases in the deep Earth "plume source" are insufficient to generate the present atmospheric abundances, even for whole mantle degassing; and (v) mantle noble gases indicate a 2 component structure, with solar light gases (He and Ne) and planetary heavy gases [4]. The present day noble gas budgets (and likely also N2) must derive from late accretion of a volatile-rich "veneer." This is stage III. Stage II is a naked (no atmosphere) epoch indicated by evidence for Hadean degassing of 244Pu (T1/2 = 80 Ma) fission Xe from the whole mantle, which was not retained in the present atmosphere. The naked stage must have lasted for more than ~200 Ma, and was supported by the early intense solar EUV luminosity. Stage I, a massive solar-composition protoatmosphere, occurred during the Earth's early accretion phase. Its existence is indicated by the presence of the solar gas component in the Earth. This is not attributable to subduction of solar wind rich cosmic dust, or solar wind irradiation of coagulating objects. It is best explained by accretion of a solar composition atmosphere from the nebula. This provided a thermal blanket supporting a magma ocean in which solar gases dissolved. Under these conditions

  4. Ultraviolet Polarimeter for Studying the Aerosol Component in the Earth Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevodovskyi, P. V.; Morozhenko, A. V.; Vidmachenko, A. P.; Geraimchuk, M.; Zbrutskyi, A.; Kureniov, Yu.; Sergunin, V.; Hirniak, Yu.; Ivakhiv, O.

    2013-06-01

    The changes of the weather and climate on the Earth depend on the temperature balance of the planet, i.e., on the flow of radiation coming from the Sun and emitted by the Earth into cosmic space. The changes of transparency coefficients (i.e., optical thickness of the atmosphere) and reflection coefficients (i.e., Earth surface) turn out to be decisive factors disrupting this balance. Variations of the gaseous and aerosol components of the atmosphere make an essential contribution into the changeability of the existing balance. The stratosphere and the ozone layer which protects the Earth from a severe ultraviolet radiation are of special importance in the atmosphere. Stratospheric aerosol plays an important role in the formation of a heat regime and in providing a powerful ozone layer (at the altitude of over 30 km). Spectrophotometer investigations made it possible to obtain certain data on the thickness of aerosols on these altitudes. However, its nature (i.e., a real part of the refraction index) and size distribution functions have not be studied so far. Polarization measurements enable one to most correctly determine these characteristics. The leading astronomical observatory of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine in collaboration with the National Technical University of Ukraine "Kyiv Polytechnic Institute" have been carrying out research since 2005 till nowadays on the development of on-board polarimeters for the purpose of studying the stratospheric aerosol from the orbit of Earth satellites [1, 2]. Based on this research, an experimental small sized polarimeter for investigation of a stratospheric aerosol from the orbit of the satellite was created. It is a dot one-channel ultraviolet polarimeter with a rotated polarization element. Glen prism is used as a polarization element which is initiated into motion by a miniature piezoelectric motor. "Sun-blind" low-sized photomultiplier R 1893 made by "Hamamatsu" Co. serves as a radiation receiver that

  5. Equilibrium Chemistry of the Atmospheres of Hot Earth-like Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Laura; Lodders, K.; Fegley, B.

    2010-10-01

    The Kepler and COROT missions and Earth-based observations have discovered putative rocky exoplanets and at least some of these are very hot because they orbit their stars at close distance, e.g., CoRot-7b. Here we discuss atmospheric chemistry for an Earth-like planet hot enough to vaporize its crust. We computed the chemical equilibrium composition of a system with elemental abundances of the terrestrial continental crust from 500 - 4000 K as a function of pressure from 10-6 to 10+2.5 bars. Calculations were done with a Gibbs energy minimization code. We will present results for the major volatile elements H, C, N, O, and S, and the lithophile elements Na, K, Fe, Si, Mg, Al, Ca, and Ti at a nominal pressure of 100 bars as a function of temperature. The major gases are H2O and CO2 at low temperatures, and SiO, O, H, and O2 at high temperatures. We also present condensation temperatures for major compounds as a function of pressure, which will be useful in determining cloud composition. These results should be useful in planning spectroscopic studies of the atmospheres of hot Earth-like exoplanets. This work was supported by the NSF Astronomy Program and the NASA Astrobiology Program.

  6. Excitation of Earth's continuous free oscillations by atmosphere-ocean-seafloor coupling.

    PubMed

    Rhie, Junkee; Romanowicz, Barbara

    2004-09-30

    The Earth undergoes continuous oscillations, and free oscillation peaks have been consistently identified in seismic records in the frequency range 2-7 mHz (refs 1, 2), on days without significant earthquakes. The level of daily excitation of this 'hum' is equivalent to that of magnitude 5.75 to 6.0 earthquakes, which cannot be explained by summing the contributions of small earthquakes. As slow or silent earthquakes have been ruled out as a source for the hum (except in a few isolated cases), turbulent motions in the atmosphere or processes in the oceans have been invoked as the excitation mechanism. We have developed an array-based method to detect and locate sources of the excitation of the hum. Our results demonstrate that the Earth's hum originates mainly in the northern Pacific Ocean during Northern Hemisphere winter, and in the Southern oceans during Southern Hemisphere winter. We conclude that the Earth's hum is generated by the interaction between atmosphere, ocean and sea floor, probably through the conversion of storm energy to oceanic infragravity waves that interact with seafloor topography. PMID:15457256

  7. Displacements of the earth's surface due to atmospheric loading - Effects of gravity and baseline measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Dam, T. M.; Wahr, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    Atmospheric mass loads and deforms the earth's crust. By performing a convolution sum between daily, global barometric pressure data and mass loading Green's functions, the time dependent effects of atmospheric loading, including those associated with short-term synoptic storms, on surface point positioning measurements and surface gravity observations are estimated. The response for both an oceanless earth and an earth with an inverted barometer ocean is calculated. Load responses for near-coastal stations are significantly affected by the inclusion of an inverted barometer ocean. Peak-to-peak vertical displacements are frequently 15-20 mm with accompanying gravity perturbations of 3-6 micro Gal. Baseline changes can be as large as 20 mm or more. The perturbations are largest at higher latitudes and during winter months. These amplitudes are consistent with the results of Rabbel and Zschau (1985), who modeled synoptic pressure disturbances as Gaussian functions of radius around a central point. Deformation can be adequately computed using real pressure data from points within about 1000 km of the station. Knowledge of local pressure, alone, is not sufficient. Rabbel and Zschau's hypothesized corrections for these displacements, which use local pressure and the regionally averaged pressure, prove accurate at points well inland but are, in general, inadequate within a few hundred kilometers of the coast.

  8. Modeling the Entry of Micrometeoroids into the Atmospheres of Earth-like Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pevyhouse, A. R.; Kress, M. E.

    2011-01-01

    The temperature profiles of micrometeors entering the atmospheres of Earth-like planets are calculated to determine the altitude at which exogenous organic compounds may be released. Previous experiments have shown that flash-heated micrometeorite analogs release organic compounds at temperatures from roughly 500 to 1000 K [1]. The altitude of release is of great importance because it determines the fate of the compound. Organic compounds that are released deeper in the atmosphere are more likely to rapidly mix to lower altitudes where they can accumulate to higher abundances or form more complex molecules and/or aerosols. Variables that are explored here are particle size, entry angle, atmospheric density profiles, spectral type of the parent star, and planet mass. The problem reduces to these questions: (1) How much atmosphere does the particle pass through by the time it is heated to 500 K? (2) Is the atmosphere above sufficient to attenuate stellar UV such that the mixing timescale is shorter than the photochemical timescale for a particular compound? We present preliminary results that the effect of the planetary and particle parameters have on the altitude of organic release.

  9. A new means for observation of small comets and other water-laden bodies entering earth's upper atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Peter M.

    1989-01-01

    This paper shows that the infrared radiance of comet-associated water vapor clouds described by Frank et al. (1986b) is large relative to natural background emissions. This IR emission arises from scattering of solar radiation and earth-shine and from excitation by upper atmospheric atomic oxygen. As a consequence, observations in space or from high-altitude platforms should provide an unambiguous signature of the entry of such objects into earth's atmosphere.

  10. Rare earth element components in atmospheric particulates in the Bayan Obo mine region.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingqing; Liang, Tao; Zhang, Qian; Li, Kexin

    2014-05-01

    The Bayan Obo mine, located in Inner Mongolia, China, is the largest light rare earth body ever found in the world. The research for rare earth elements (REEs) enrichment in atmospheric particulates caused by mining and ore processing is fairly limited so far. In this paper, atmospheric particulates including total suspended particulate (TSP) matter and particles with an equivalent aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm (PM10) were collected around the Bayan Obo mine region, in August 2012 and March 2013, to analyze the levels and distributions of REEs in particles. The total concentrations of REEs for TSP were 149.8 and 239.6 ng/m(3), and those for PM10 were 42.8 and 68.9 ng/m(3), in August 2012 and March 2013, respectively. Enrichment factor was calculated for all 14 REEs in the TSP and PM10 and the results indicated that REEs enrichment in atmosphere particulates was caused by anthropogenic sources and influenced by the strong wind in springtime. The spatial distribution of REEs in TSP showed a strong gradient concentration in the prevailing wind direction. REE chondrite normalized patterns of TSP and PM10 were similar and the normalized curves inclined to the right side, showing the conspicuous fractionation between the light REEs and heavy REE, which supported by the chondrite normalized concentration ratios calculated for selected elements (La(N)/Yb(N), La(N)/Sm(N), Gd(N)/Yb(N)). PMID:24657942

  11. Noble gas patterns in the atmospheres of Mars and Earth: A comparison via the SNC meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepin, R. O.; Becker, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    Noble gas and nitrogen compositions in the glassy phase of the EETA 79001 shergottite correspond closely with Viking measurements. This direct evidence for the origin of the SNC meteorites on Mars, and for trapping of an unfractionated sample of Martian atmospheric gases in the 79001 glass, provides a reasonable basis for comparing the Martian and terrestrial atmospheres with more precision than that afforded by the Viking data set. Results are that, with one exception, elemental and isotopic compositions of nonradiogenic Martian noble gases are similar to those in the Earth's atmosphere; relatively small isotopic discrepancies in Kr and perhaps Xe may be attributable to different degrees of mass fractionation of a common parent reservoir. The anomaly is in Ar composition, where Martian Ar-36/AR-38 approx. 4 is strikingly lower than the values near 5.3 that characterize both the Earth and major meteoritic gas carriers. Although a primordial Martian ratio of 5.3 could in principle be altered by some planet specific process (e.g., cosmic ray spallation of surface materials) operating over geologic time, one has not been found that works.

  12. Simultaneous Precipitation of Solar Protons and Relativistic Electrons as a New Factor Affecting the Earth's Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirochkov, A. V.; Sokolov, S. N.

    In the field of solar - terrestrial physics during the last decade there has been renewed interest in the effects produced in the Earth atmosphere and ionosphere by fluxes of precipitated highly relativistic electrons. A series of investigation on the subject (preferably by means of satellite measurements) was performed recently, which discussed different aspects of these phenomena called HRE events. More careful study of the HRE events revealed previously unnoticed geophysical phenomenon: a great majority of the solar proton events (SPE) were accompanied by simultaneous precipitation of relativistic electron fluxes. The studies of previous SPE events attributed their atmospheric and ionospheric effects entirely to the solar proton fluxes. It turned out that such an assumption is wrong. Therefore we have actually a new class of geophysical phenomena when the Earth's atmosphere and ionosphere experience combined impact of simultaneously precipitating fluxes of solar protons and relativistic electrons. If one takes into accounts effect of enhanced density of the solar wind during the SPEs (i.e. its dynamic pressure) the real situation during these combined events became more complicated. In this paper the effects during the storm of May 1992 are analyzed as an example of such unusual combination. The methods of separation of the effects produced by different precipitation particles are presented. Other similar events are considered to demonstrate that such complex events are not unique geophysical phenomena.

  13. The interaction of the cretaceous-tertiary extinction bolide with the atmosphere, ocean, and solid earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okeefe, J. D.; Ahrens, T. J.

    1981-01-01

    A number of investigations, including those reported by Orth et al. (1981), have provided physical evidence for the impact of an extraterrestrial object on earth 65 million years ago. This time corresponds to the end of the cretaceous period. This impact could, therefore, be responsible for the observed extinction of biological species at the end of the Mesozoic era. Among the species becoming extinct are found also flying and walking dinosaurs, which include all land animals that had masses greater than 25 kg. The present investigation is concerned with a study of the possibilities for the collision of earth with 10 km-size object, and the consequences produced by such a collision. It is found that the penetration of the atmosphere by the bolide creates a temporary hole in the atmosphere. The resulting flow fields can inject melt droplets and finely commuted solid particles into the atmosphere. Short-term effects of heating, followed by dust induced worldwide cooling, may provide several mechanisms for the observed extinction of the species.

  14. Early stages in the evolution of the atmosphere and climate on the Earth-group planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moroz, V. I.; Mukhin, L. M.

    1977-01-01

    The early evolution of the atmospheres and climate of the Earth, Mars and Venus is discussed, based on a concept of common initial conditions and main processes (besides known differences in chemical composition and outgassing rate). It is concluded that: (1) liquid water appeared on the surface of the earth in the first few hundred million years; the average surface temperature was near the melting point for about the first two eons; CO2 was the main component of the atmosphere in the first 100-500 million years; (2) much more temperate outgassing and low solar heating led to the much later appearance of liquid water on the Martian surface, only one to two billion years ago; the Martian era of rivers, relatively dense atmosphere and warm climate ended as a result of irreversible chemical bonding of CO2 by Urey equilibrium processes; (3) a great lack of water in the primordial material of Venus is proposed; liquid water never was present on the surface of the planet, and there was practically no chemical bonding of CO2; the surface temperature was over 600 K four billion years ago.

  15. Earth System Data Microsets for Education From the Atmospheric Sciences Data Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelps, C. S.; Chambers, L. H.; Oots, P. C.; Moore, S. W.; Lorentz, K. E.; Dalton, A. J.

    2004-12-01

    The Atmospheric Sciences Data Center (ASDC) at NASA's Langley Research Center houses over 700 data sets related to Earth's radiation budget, clouds, aerosols and tropospheric chemistry. These data sets were produced to increase academic understanding of the natural and anthropogenic perturbations that influence global climate change. Scientists have been analyzing the extensive data to discover and quantify the complex interactions and feedbacks in the Earth system, communicating conclusions frequently with colleagues, policy makers and the general public. NASA's Science Mission Directorate aims to stimulate public interest in the understanding of these Earth system science findings and to encourage young scholars to consider careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. However, barriers still exist to the use of actual satellite observations in the classroom to energize the educational process. NASA is sponsoring the "Mentoring and inquirY using NASA Data on Atmospheric and earth science for Teachers and Amateurs" (MY NASA DATA) project to systematically support educational activities at all levels of formal and informal education by reducing the ASDC data holdings to `microsets' that will be easily accessible and explored by the K-12 and the citizen scientist communities. The microsets are available via Web site (http://mynasadata.larc.nasa.gov) with associated lesson plans, computer tools, data information pages, and a science glossary. Teacher workshops will be held each summer for five years to help teachers learn about incorporating the microsets in their curriculum. Additionally, a Live Access Server (LAS) has been populated with ASDC data holdings such that users can create custom microsets for desired time series, parameters and geographical regions. Currently, parameters from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES), the Surface Radiation Budget (SRB), Tropospheric Ozone Residual (TOR) and the International Satellite Cloud

  16. Archean Earth Atmosphere Fractal Haze Aggregates: Light Scattering Calculations and the Faint Young Sun Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boness, D. A.; Terrell-Martinez, B.

    2010-12-01

    As part of an ongoing undergraduate research project of light scattering calculations involving fractal carbonaceous soot aggregates relevant to current anthropogenic and natural sources in Earth's atmosphere, we have read with interest a recent paper [E.T. Wolf and O.B Toon,Science 328, 1266 (2010)] claiming that the Faint Young Sun paradox discussed four decades ago by Carl Sagan and others can be resolved without invoking heavy CO2 concentrations as a greenhouse gas warming the early Earth enough to sustain liquid water and hence allow the origin of life. Wolf and Toon report that a Titan-like Archean Earth haze, with a fractal haze aggregate nature due to nitrogen-methane photochemistry at high altitudes, should block enough UV light to protect the warming greenhouse gas NH3 while allowing enough visible light to reach the surface of the Earth. To test this hypothesis, we have employed a rigorous T-Matrix arbitrary-particle light scattering technique, to avoid the simplifications inherent in Mie-sphere scattering, on haze fractal aggregates at UV and visible wavelenths of incident light. We generate these model aggregates using diffusion-limited cluster aggregation (DLCA) algorithms, which much more closely fit actual haze fractal aggregates than do diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) algorithms.

  17. The Afternoon Constellation: A Formation of Earth Observing Systems for the Atmosphere and Hydrosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, Mark R.

    2002-01-01

    Two of the large EOS observatories, Aqua (formerly EOS-PM) and Aura (formerly EOS-CHEM) will fly is nearly the same inclination with 1:30 PM -15 min ascending node equatorial crossing times. Between Aura and Aqua a series of smaller satellites will be stationed: Cloudsat, CALYPSO (formerly PICASSO-CENA), and PARASOL. This constellation of low earth orbit satellites will provide an unprecedented opportunity to make near simultaneous atmospheric cloud and aerosol observations. This paper will provide details of the science opportunity and describe the sensor types for the afternoon constellation. This constellation by accretion provides a prototype for the Earth Science Vision sensor web and represent the building books for a future web structure.

  18. Dust storms and their impact on ocean and human health: dust in Earth's atmosphere

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffin, Dale W.; Kellog, Christina A.

    2004-01-01

    Satellite imagery has greatly influenced our understanding of dust activity on a global scale. A number of different satellites such as NASA's Earth-Probe Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) and Se-viewing Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) acquire daily global-scale data used to produce imagery for monitoring dust storm formation and movement. This global-scale imagery has documented the frequent transmission of dust storm-derived soils through Earth's atmosphere and the magnitude of many of these events. While various research projects have been undertaken to understand this normal planetary process, little has been done to address its impact on ocean and human health. This review will address the ability of dust storms to influence marine microbial population densities and transport of soil-associated toxins and pathogenic microorganisms to marine environments. The implications of dust on ocean and human health in this emerging scientific field will be discussed.

  19. The Due Innovators II Apollo Project: Monitoring Atmospheric Pollution with Earth Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellitto, P.; Del Frate, F.; Di Noia, A.; Sambucini, V.; Bojkov, B. R.

    2010-12-01

    In this paper we present the Innovators II - APOLLO (monitoring Atmospheric POLLution with earth Observation) project which has been carried out in the framework of the ESA Data User Element programme (http://www.esa.int/due). The projects aims at the development of an innovative service for the monitoring of the air quality from ground based measurements and by means of satellite data e.g. provided by the OMI mission. The core of the APOLLO project is the OMI-TOC NN (neural networks) algorithm.

  20. Calculations of neutron flux spectra induced in the earth's atmosphere by galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.; Chandler, K. C.; Barish, J.

    1972-01-01

    Calculations have been carried out to determine the neutron flux induced in the earth's atmosphere by galactic protons and alpha particles at solar minimum for a geomagnetic latitude of 42 N. Neutron flux spectra were calculated using Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates methods, and various comparisons with experimental data are presented. The magnitude and shape of the calculated neutron-leakage spectrum at the particular latitude considered support the theory that the cosmic-ray-albedo-neutron-decay mechanism is the source of the protons and electrons trapped in the Van Allen belts.

  1. A satellite data processing and analysis software system for earth's atmosphere and surface research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dealy, B.; Gautier, C.; Frouin, R.; Bates, J.; Lingner, D.

    1988-01-01

    The OASIS (Oceanic and Atmospheric Satellite Imaging System) is a satellite data processing and analysis software system being developed by the California Space Institute (Cal Space) for support of interdisciplinary and integrated earth sciences research programs. The system's software applications are integrated under a common executive, NASA's Transportable Application Executive (TAE). In this paper, TAE and the system software and hardware are described, and specific techniques used for ingesting, processing, analyzing, and graphically displaying data from many of the sensors presently being flown are presented. Scientific uses of these capabilities that are, or will shortly be, running under TAE at Cal Space are described.

  2. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder on the Earth Observing System - In-orbit spectral calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, H. H.

    1991-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a facility instrument on the Earth Observing System (EOS). The ability of AIRS to provide accurate temperature and moisture soundings with high vertical resolution depends critically on a very accurate spectral calibration. The routine in-orbit spectral calibration is accomplished with a Fabry-Perot plate with a fixed spacing of 360 microns. This paper discusses design, Signal-to-Noise, and temperature and alignment stability constraints which have to be met to achieve the required spectral calibration accuracy.

  3. Runaway and moist greenhouse atmospheres and the evolution of earth and Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasting, James F.

    1988-01-01

    For the case of fully moisture-saturated and cloud-free conditions, the present one-dimensional climate model for the response of an earthlike atmosphere to large solar flux increases notes the critical solar flux at which runaway greenhouse (total evaporation of oceans) occurs to be 1.4 times the present flux at the earth's orbit, almost independently of the CO2 content of the atmophere. The value is, however, sensitive to the H2O absorption coefficient in the 8-12 micron window. Venus oceans may have been lost early on due to rapid water vapor photodissociation, followed by hydrogen escape into space.

  4. Thermal Characteristics of Air in the Problem of Hypersonic Motion of Bodies in the Earth's Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhussan, K.; Morozov, D. O.; Stankevich, Yu. A.; Stanchits, L. K.; Stepanov, K. L.

    2014-07-01

    The thermal properties of hot air needed for describing the hypersonic motion of bodies in the Earth's atmosphere have been considered. Such motion, as is known, is accompanied by the propagation of strong shock waves analogous to waves generated by powerful explosions. Calculations have been made and data banks have been created for the equations of state and thermal characteristics of air in the temperature and density ranges corresponding to velocities of motion of bodies of up to 10 km/s at altitudes of 0-100 km. The formulation of the problem of hypersonic motion in the absence of thermodynamic equilibrium is discussed.

  5. Effective hydrodynamic hydrogen escape from an early Earth atmosphere inferred from high-accuracy numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuramoto, Kiyoshi; Umemoto, Takafumi; Ishiwatari, Masaki

    2013-08-01

    Hydrodynamic escape of hydrogen driven by solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation heating is numerically simulated by using the constrained interpolation profile scheme, a high-accuracy scheme for solving the one-dimensional advection equation. For a wide range of hydrogen number densities at the lower boundary and solar EUV fluxes, more than half of EUV heating energy is converted to mechanical energy of the escaping hydrogen. Less energy is lost by downward thermal conduction even giving low temperature for the atmospheric base. This result differs from a previous numerical simulation study that yielded much lower escape rates by employing another scheme in which relatively strong numerical diffusion is implemented. Because the solar EUV heating effectively induces hydrogen escape, the hydrogen mixing ratio was likely to have remained lower than 1 vol% in the anoxic Earth atmosphere during the Archean era.

  6. The variations of geomagnetic energy and solar irradiance and their impacts on Earth's upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yanshi

    2012-10-01

    It is important to understand and estimate the energy inputs to the upper atmosphere, in order to provide accurate calculation and prediction of the thermospheric neutral density, which is important for satellite orbital determination. The primary energy sources of Earth's upper atmosphere are the solar irradiance and geomagnetic energy including Joule heating and particle precipitation. Various data (OMNI2, CHAMP, DMSP) and models (SOLAR2000, FISM, Weimer05, AMIE, NCAR TIE-GCM) are utilized to investigate the variations of energy inputs and their influences on the coupled thermosphere-ionosphere system, with focus on the wavelength dependence of solar irradiance enhancement during are events, the geomagnetic energy associated with high-speed solar wind streams, the altitudinal distribution of Joule heating in different solar conditions, and the variation of solar irradiance and geomagnetic energy inputs during last solar cycle.

  7. Detecting Industrial Pollution in the Atmospheres of Earth-like Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Henry W.; Gonzalez Abad, Gonzalo; Loeb, Abraham

    2014-09-01

    Detecting biosignatures, such as molecular oxygen in combination with a reducing gas, in the atmospheres of transiting exoplanets has been a major focus in the search for alien life. We point out that in addition to these generic indicators, anthropogenic pollution could be used as a novel biosignature for intelligent life. To this end, we identify pollutants in the Earth's atmosphere that have significant absorption features in the spectral range covered by the James Webb Space Telescope. We focus on tetrafluoromethane (CF4) and trichlorofluoromethane (CCl3F), which are the easiest to detect chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) produced by anthropogenic activity. We estimate that ~1.2 days (~1.7 days) of total integration time will be sufficient to detect or constrain the concentration of CCl3F (CF4) to ~10 times the current terrestrial level.

  8. DETECTING INDUSTRIAL POLLUTION IN THE ATMOSPHERES OF EARTH-LIKE EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Henry W.; Abad, Gonzalo Gonzalez; Loeb, Abraham E-mail: ggonzalezabad@cfa.harvard.edu

    2014-09-01

    Detecting biosignatures, such as molecular oxygen in combination with a reducing gas, in the atmospheres of transiting exoplanets has been a major focus in the search for alien life. We point out that in addition to these generic indicators, anthropogenic pollution could be used as a novel biosignature for intelligent life. To this end, we identify pollutants in the Earth's atmosphere that have significant absorption features in the spectral range covered by the James Webb Space Telescope. We focus on tetrafluoromethane (CF{sub 4}) and trichlorofluoromethane (CCl{sub 3}F), which are the easiest to detect chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) produced by anthropogenic activity. We estimate that ∼1.2 days (∼1.7 days) of total integration time will be sufficient to detect or constrain the concentration of CCl{sub 3}F (CF{sub 4}) to ∼10 times the current terrestrial level.

  9. Earth-atmosphere system and surface reflectivities in arid regions from LANDSAT multispectral scanner measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otterman, J.; Fraser, R. S.

    1976-01-01

    Programs for computing atmospheric transmission and scattering solar radiation were used to compute the ratios of the Earth-atmosphere system (space) directional reflectivities in the vertical direction to the surface reflectivity, for the four bands of the LANDSAT multispectral scanner (MSS). These ratios are presented as graphs for two water vapor levels, as a function of the surface reflectivity, for various sun elevation angles. Space directional reflectivities in the vertical direction are reported for selected arid regions in Asia, Africa and Central America from the spectral radiance levels measured by the LANDSAT MSS. From these space reflectivities, surface vertical reflectivities were computed applying the pertinent graphs. These surface reflectivities were used to estimate the surface albedo for the entire solar spectrum. The estimated albedos are in the range 0.34-0.52, higher than the values reported by most previous researchers from space measurements, but are consistent with laboratory measurements.

  10. Transient Luminous Events: optical emissions from high altitudes to probe the Earth's upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luque, A.; Gordillo-Vázquez, F. J.

    2012-04-01

    Transient Luminous Events are short but intense optical emissions from the upper terrestrial atmosphere, driven by the electric fields generated by a tropospheric electric storm. They were first observed in 1989 [1] but they had been predicted by C.T.R. Wilson already in 1925 [2]. Wilson argued that the electric field needed to initiate a discharge (the breakdown field) is proportional to the atmospheric density and therefore decreases exponentially with altitude; meanwhile the electric field created by a charged cloud is roughly dipolar and decays slower. Therefore there exists an altitude where the cloud field surpasses the breakdown field and an electric discharge is initiated. The combination of modeling and observations of TLEs allows us to quantify their influence in the global atmospheric chemistry and the global electric circuit that connects the surface of the Earth with the ionosphere. But, equally importantly, TLEs serve as natural probes to remotely investigate the atmosphere that surrounds them. In this talk we will survey some recent results on the modelling of TLEs. 1. Sprite beads provide an example of a possible use of TLEs to remotely probe the Earth's mesosphere. Sprites are filamentary discharges, some tens of kilometers wide, appearing at altitudes from about 50 to about 85 km. Sometimes, in the wake of a sprite, luminous spots (beads) persist much longer than the main emissions. These sprite beads reveal underlying inhomogeneities in the atmospheric conductivity [4] whose precise origin is still uncertain. 2. Another path to investigate the mesosphere through TLE observations is to compare observed spectra with kinetic models [5] combined with electrodynamic simulations [6]. For that purpose, we have modeled emissions from terrestrial TLEs: we calculated the expected emissions in the ultraviolet (Lyman-Birge-Hopfield band of molecular nitrogen), in the near UV and visible blue (second positive system of N2) and in the red and near infrared

  11. Earth-Atmosphere Angular Momentum Exchange and ENSO: The Rotational Signature of the 1997-98 Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, J.; Gegout, P.; Marcus, S.

    1999-01-01

    The impact of the 1997-1998 ENSO event is presented in context of Earth-atmosphere angular momentum exchange utilizing length of day (LOD), Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) and atmospheric angular momentum (AAM) data from 1970 to 1998; comparisons are made with previous events.

  12. SPITZER TRANSITS OF THE SUPER-EARTH GJ1214b AND IMPLICATIONS FOR ITS ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Fraine, Jonathan D.; Deming, Drake; Gillon, Michaeel; Jehin, Emmanueel; Demory, Brice-Olivier; Benneke, Bjoern; Seager, Sara; Lewis, Nikole K.; Knutson, Heather; Desert, Jean-Michel

    2013-03-10

    We observed the transiting super-Earth exoplanet GJ1214b using warm Spitzer at 4.5 {mu}m wavelength during a 20 day quasi-continuous sequence in 2011 May. The goals of our long observation were to accurately define the infrared transit radius of this nearby super-Earth, to search for the secondary eclipse, and to search for other transiting planets in the habitable zone of GJ1214. We here report results from the transit monitoring of GJ1214b, including a reanalysis of previous transit observations by Desert et al. In total, we analyze 14 transits of GJ1214b at 4.5 {mu}m, 3 transits at 3.6 {mu}m, and 7 new ground-based transits in the I+z band. Our new Spitzer data by themselves eliminate cloudless solar composition atmospheres for GJ1214b, and methane-rich models from Howe and Burrows. Using our new Spitzer measurements to anchor the observed transit radii of GJ1214b at long wavelengths, and adding new measurements in I+z, we evaluate models from Benneke and Seager and Howe and Burrows using a {chi}{sup 2} analysis. We find that the best-fit model exhibits an increase in transit radius at short wavelengths due to Rayleigh scattering. Pure water atmospheres are also possible. However, a flat line (no atmosphere detected) remains among the best of the statistically acceptable models, and better than pure water atmospheres. We explore the effect of systematic differences among results from different observational groups, and we find that the Howe and Burrows tholin-haze model remains the best fit, even when systematic differences among observers are considered.

  13. Rare earth element components in atmospheric particulates in the Bayan Obo mine region

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lingqing Liang, Tao Zhang, Qian; Li, Kexin

    2014-05-01

    The Bayan Obo mine, located in Inner Mongolia, China, is the largest light rare earth body ever found in the world. The research for rare earth elements (REEs) enrichment in atmospheric particulates caused by mining and ore processing is fairly limited so far. In this paper, atmospheric particulates including total suspended particulate (TSP) matter and particles with an equivalent aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm (PM{sub 10}) were collected around the Bayan Obo mine region, in August 2012 and March 2013, to analyze the levels and distributions of REEs in particles. The total concentrations of REEs for TSP were 149.8 and 239.6 ng/m{sup 3}, and those for PM{sub 10} were 42.8 and 68.9 ng/m{sup 3}, in August 2012 and March 2013, respectively. Enrichment factor was calculated for all 14 REEs in the TSP and PM{sub 10} and the results indicated that REEs enrichment in atmosphere particulates was caused by anthropogenic sources and influenced by the strong wind in springtime. The spatial distribution of REEs in TSP showed a strong gradient concentration in the prevailing wind direction. REE chondrite normalized patterns of TSP and PM{sub 10} were similar and the normalized curves inclined to the right side, showing the conspicuous fractionation between the light REEs and heavy REE, which supported by the chondrite normalized concentration ratios calculated for selected elements (La{sub N}/Yb{sub N}, La{sub N}/Sm{sub N}, Gd{sub N}/Yb{sub N}). - Highlights: • TSP and PM{sub 10} samples were collected to analyze the levels and distributions of REE. • Enrichment factors indicated that REE enrichment was caused by anthropogenic sources. • The distribution of REEs showed a strong gradient in the prevailing wind direction. • Obvious fractionation between LREEs and HREEs is observed in atmospheric particulates.

  14. The Role of Remote Sensing Displays in Earth Climate and Planetary Atmospheric Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DelGenio, Anthony D.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The communities of scientists who study the Earth's climate and the atmospheres of the other planets barely overlap, but the types of questions they pose and the resulting implications for the use and interpretation of remote sensing data sets have much in common. Both seek to determine the characteristic behavior of three-dimensional fluids that also evolve in time. Climate researchers want to know how and why the general patterns that define our climate today might be different in the next century. Planetary scientists try to understand why circulation patterns and clouds on Mars, Venus, or Jupiter are different from those on Earth. Both disciplines must aggregate large amounts of data covering long time periods and several altitudes to have a representative picture of the rapidly changing atmosphere they are studying. This emphasis separates climate scientists from weather forecasters, who focus at any one time on a limited number of images. Likewise, it separates planetary atmosphere researchers from planetary geologists, who rely primarily on single images (or mosaics of images covering the globe) to study two-dimensional planetary surfaces that are mostly static over the duration of a spacecraft mission yet reveal dynamic processes acting over thousands to millions of years. Remote sensing displays are usually two-dimensional projections that capture an atmosphere at an instant in time. How scientists manipulate and display such data, how they interpret what they see, and how they thereby understand the physical processes that cause what they see, are the challenges I discuss in this chapter. I begin by discussing differences in how novices and experts in the field relate displays of data to the real world. This leads to a discussion of the use and abuse of image enhancement and color in remote sensing displays. I then show some examples of techniques used by scientists in climate and planetary research to both convey information and design research

  15. NOx in the Atmosphere of Early Earth as Electron Acceptors for Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, M. L.; Charnay, B.; Gao, P.; Yung, Y. L.; Russell, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    We quantify the amount of NOx produced in the Hadean atmosphere and available in the Hadean ocean for the emergence of life. Atmospherically generated nitrate (NO3-) and nitrite (NO2-) are the most attractive high-potential electron acceptors for driving the highly endergonic reactions at the entry points to autotrophic metabolic pathways at submarine alkaline hydrothermal vents (Ducluzeau, 2008; Russell, 2014). The Hadean atmosphere, dominated by CO2 and N2, will produce nitric oxide (NO) when shocked by lightning and impacts (Ducluzeau, 2008; Nna Mvondo, 2001). Photochemical reactions involving NO and H2O vapor will then produce acids such as HNO3 and HNO2 that rain into the ocean and dissociate into NO3- and NO2-. Previous work suggests that 1018 g of NOx can be produced in a million years or so, satisfying the need for micromolar concentrations of NO3- and NO2- in the ocean (Ducluzeau, 2008). But because this number is controversial, we present new calculations based on a novel combination of early-Earth GCM and photochemical modeling, calculating the sources and sinks for fixed nitrogen. Finally, it is notable that lightning has been detected on Venus and Mars along with evidence of atmospheric NO; in the distant past, could NOx have been created and available for the emergence of life on numerous wet, rocky worlds?

  16. MECA Workshop on Atmospheric H2O Observations of Earth and Mars. Physical Processes, Measurements and Interpretations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clifford, Stephen M. (Editor); Haberle, Robert M. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The workshop was held to discuss a variety of questions related to the detection and cycling of atmospheric water. Among the questions addressed were: what factors govern the storage and exchange of water between planetary surfaces and atmospheres; what instruments are best suited for the measurement and mapping of atmospheric water; do regolith sources and sinks of water have uniquely identifiable column abundance signatures; what degree of time and spatial resolution in column abundance data is necessary to determine dynamic behavior. Of special importance is the question, does the understanding of how atmospheric water is cycled on Earth provide any insights for the interpretation of Mars atmospheric data.

  17. Entry-probe studies of the atmospheres of earth, Mars, and Venus - A review (Von Karman Lecture)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiff, Alvin

    1990-01-01

    This paper overviews the history (since 1963) of the exploration of planetary atmospheres by use of entry probes. The techniques used to measure the compositions of the atmospheres of the earth, Mars, and Venus are described together with the key results obtained. Attention is also given to the atmosphere-structure experiment aboard the Galileo Mission, launched on October 17, 1989 and now under way on its 6-yr trip to Jupiter, and to future experiments.

  18. [Study on the modeling of earth-atmosphere coupling over rugged scenes for hyperspectral remote sensing].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hui-Jie; Jiang, Cheng; Jia, Guo-Rui

    2014-01-01

    Adjacency effects may introduce errors in the quantitative applications of hyperspectral remote sensing, of which the significant item is the earth-atmosphere coupling radiance. However, the surrounding relief and shadow induce strong changes in hyperspectral images acquired from rugged terrain, which is not accurate to describe the spectral characteristics. Furthermore, the radiative coupling process between the earth and the atmosphere is more complex over the rugged scenes. In order to meet the requirements of real-time processing in data simulation, an equivalent reflectance of background was developed by taking into account the topography and the geometry between surroundings and targets based on the radiative transfer process. The contributions of the coupling to the signal at sensor level were then evaluated. This approach was integrated to the sensor-level radiance simulation model and then validated through simulating a set of actual radiance data. The results show that the visual effect of simulated images is consistent with that of observed images. It was also shown that the spectral similarity is improved over rugged scenes. In addition, the model precision is maintained at the same level over flat scenes. PMID:24783559

  19. Comment on “What Is the Atmosphere's Effect on Earth's Surface Temperature?”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanhill, Gerald

    2010-11-01

    A recent Forum pointed out an important, widespread error in the calculation of the atmosphere's role in raising the surface temperature of the Earth above its radiative equilibrium [Zeng, 2010]. Unfortunately, by using the inaccurate and misleading terms “greenhouse effect” and “greenhouse gases,” this Forum continues to spread an even more widespread and ancient error. The error in using the greenhouse as a model for the Earth's atmosphere is that heating of the air within a greenhouse is caused by the structure's suppression of convective heat exchange with the outside air and not by the structure's reduction of longwave radiation exchange with space. There is evidence that Joseph Fourier, to whom the phrase “greenhouse effect” is often attributed, realized this in 1827 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Fourier). The correct explanation of the heating of the air within a greenhouse was experimentally demonstrated a century ago [Wood, 1909] and by quantitative analysis a half century later [Businger, 1963].

  20. Bloon: high-altitude balloon platforms for exploring the Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariano López Urdiales, José

    2012-07-01

    High-altitude balloons have been used for stratospheric research since the 1960s. After the rocket-based space race, balloons have lost their momentum and satellites have been more widely used for scientific research of the Earth's atmosphere. High-altitude balloon facilities still exist, but are usually government-run, not very flexible and costly. This paper will describe the fleet of near-space vehicles, microbloon, minibloon, and bloon, that zero2infinity is currently developing for exploring the Earth's atmosphere and conducting scientific experiments. As a privately-held company based in Spain, launches will eventually be available from several locations both in Europe and internationally, and will be available to all types of customers, governmental and non-governmental, on a first-come first-served basis. After 5 successful test flight with nanobloons, zero2infinity is currently testing microbloon, while a minibloon should be flown by the end of 2012. Test flights can also give rise to an opportunity to fly scientific experiments into near-space. Come and fly your experiment with us, in an efficient manner, without political agenda!

  1. From Sub-Neptunes to Earth-like Exoplanets: Modeling Optically Thick and Thin Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Howard; Rogers, Leslie; Kasting, James

    2016-01-01

    Exoplanet surveys have revealed a wide diversity of planet properties in the Milky Way. Here, we present the results from two projects modeling planet atmospheres; one considering the hydrogen/helium envelopes of sub-Neptune-mass planets, and the other, the climate of Earth-like planets.First, we modify the state-of-the-art stellar evolution code Modules for Experimental Astrophysics (MESA) to model the thermal evolution of gaseous Sub-Neptune sized planets. Including photo-evaporation, we find a resulting convergent evolution trend that could potentially imprint itself on the close-in planet population as a preferred H/He mass fraction of 0.5-3%.We also use an updated version of a radiative-convective climate model to calculate the upper atmospheric conditions of planets warmer than the present Earth. In our simulations, cold, dry stratospheres are predicted at lower surface temperatures. However, onset of moist greenhouse water-loss limit to habitability emerges when the surface temperature reaches above 350 K. This result places constraint on a more accurate calculation of the inner edge of the habitable zone around Sun-like stars.

  2. Gamma-Ray Bursts and the Earth: Exploration of Atmospheric, Biological, Climatic, and Biogeochemical Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Brian C.; Melott, Adrian L.; Jackman, Charles H.; Laird, Claude M.; Medvedev, Mikhail V.; Stolarski, Richard S.; Gehrels, Neil; Cannizzo, John K.; Hogan, Daniel P.; Ejzak, Larissa M.

    2005-11-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are likely to have made a number of significant impacts on the Earth during the last billion years. The gamma radiation from a burst within a few kiloparsecs would quickly deplete much of the Earth's protective ozone layer, allowing an increase in solar UVB radiation reaching the surface. This radiation is harmful to life, damaging DNA and causing sunburn. In addition, NO2 produced in the atmosphere would cause a decrease in visible sunlight reaching the surface and could cause global cooling. Nitric acid rain could stress portions of the biosphere, but the increased nitrate deposition could be helpful to land plants. We have used a two-dimensional atmospheric model to investigate the effects on the Earth's atmosphere of GRBs delivering a range of fluences, at various latitudes, at the equinoxes and solstices, and at different times of day. We have estimated DNA damage levels caused by increased solar UVB radiation, reduction in solar visible light due to NO2 opacity, and deposition of nitrates through rainout of HNO3. For the ``typical'' nearest burst in the last billion years, we find globally averaged ozone depletion up to 38%. Localized depletion reaches as much as 74%. Significant global depletion (at least 10%) persists up to about 7 yr after the burst. Our results depend strongly on time of year and latitude over which the burst occurs. The impact scales with the total fluence of the GRB at the Earth but is insensitive to the time of day of the burst and its duration (1-1000 s). We find DNA damage of up to 16 times the normal annual global average, well above lethal levels for simple life forms such as phytoplankton. The greatest damage occurs at mid- to low latitudes. We find reductions in visible sunlight of a few percent, primarily in the polar regions. Nitrate deposition similar to or slightly greater than that currently caused by lightning is also observed, lasting several years. We discuss how these results support the

  3. Implications of solar irradiance variability upon long-term changes in the Earth's atmospheric temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Robert B., III

    1992-01-01

    From 1979 through 1987, it is believed that variability in the incoming solar energy played a significant role in changing the Earth's climate. Using high-precision spacecraft radiometric measurements, the incoming total solar irradiance (total amount of solar power per unit area) and the Earth's mean, global atmospheric temperatures were found to vary in phase with each other. The observed irradiance and temperature changes appeared to be correlated with the 11-year cycle of solar magnetic activity. During the period from 1979 through 1985, both the irradiance and temperature decreased. From 1985 to 1987, they increased. The irradiance changed approximately 0.1 percent, while the temperature varied as much as 0.6 C. During the 1979-1987 period, the temperatures were forecasted to rise linearly because of the anthropogenic build-up of carbon dioxide and the hypothesized 'global warming', 'greenhouse effect', scenarios. Contrary to these scenarios, the temperatures were found to vary in a periodic manner in phase with the solar irradiance changes. The observed correlations between irradiance and temperature variabilily suggest that the mean, global temperature of the Earth may decline between 1990 and 1997 as solar magnetic activity decreases.

  4. Study of strong interaction between atmosphere and solid Earth by using hurricane data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, Toshiro

    2016-04-01

    The original energy of seismic noise is in the atmosphere although the most well-known seismic noise (microseism) gets excited through the ocean, i.e. the atmosphere (winds) excites ocean waves that in turn generate seismic noise in the solid earth. The oceans work as an intermediary in this case. But there is some seismic noise that is directly caused by the atmosphere-solid earth interactions. An extreme example for such a direct interaction can be found in the case of hurricanes (tropical cyclones) when they landfall and move on land. If we had such data, we could study the process of atmosphere-solid earth interactions directly. The Earthscope TA (Transportable Array) provided a few examples of such landfallen hurricanes which moved through the TA that had both seismometers and barometers. This data set allows us to study how ground motions changed as surface pressure (i.e., the source strength) varied over time. Because effects of surface pressure show up at short distances more clearly, we first examine the correlation between pressure and ground motion for the same stations. Plots of vertical ground velocity PSD (Power Spectral Density) vs. surface pressure PSD show that there are no significant ground motions unless pressure PSD becomes larger than 10 (Pa^2/s). Above this threshold, ground motion increases as P**1.69 (P is pressure and 1.69 is close to 5/3). Horizontal ground motions are larger than vertical ground motions (in seismic data), approximately by a factor of 10-30. But we note that the variations of horizontal motions with pressure show a linear relationship. Considering the instrumental design of TA stations, this is more likely due to the tilt of the whole recording system as (lateral) strong winds apply horizontal force on it. This linear trend exists for the whole range of the observed pressure PSD data, extending to small pressure values. We interpret that tilt signals overwhelmed other seismic signals in horizontal seismograms for

  5. The oxidation state of Hadean magmas and implications for early Earth's atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Trail, Dustin; Watson, E Bruce; Tailby, Nicholas D

    2011-12-01

    Magmatic outgassing of volatiles from Earth's interior probably played a critical part in determining the composition of the earliest atmosphere, more than 4,000 million years (Myr) ago. Given an elemental inventory of hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and sulphur, the identity of molecular species in gaseous volcanic emanations depends critically on the pressure (fugacity) of oxygen. Reduced melts having oxygen fugacities close to that defined by the iron-wüstite buffer would yield volatile species such as CH(4), H(2), H(2)S, NH(3) and CO, whereas melts close to the fayalite-magnetite-quartz buffer would be similar to present-day conditions and would be dominated by H(2)O, CO(2), SO(2) and N(2) (refs 1-4). Direct constraints on the oxidation state of terrestrial magmas before 3,850 Myr before present (that is, the Hadean eon) are tenuous because the rock record is sparse or absent. Samples from this earliest period of Earth's history are limited to igneous detrital zircons that pre-date the known rock record, with ages approaching ∼4,400 Myr (refs 5-8). Here we report a redox-sensitive calibration to determine the oxidation state of Hadean magmatic melts that is based on the incorporation of cerium into zircon crystals. We find that the melts have average oxygen fugacities that are consistent with an oxidation state defined by the fayalite-magnetite-quartz buffer, similar to present-day conditions. Moreover, selected Hadean zircons (having chemical characteristics consistent with crystallization specifically from mantle-derived melts) suggest oxygen fugacities similar to those of Archaean and present-day mantle-derived lavas as early as ∼4,350 Myr before present. These results suggest that outgassing of Earth's interior later than ∼200 Myr into the history of Solar System formation would not have resulted in a reducing atmosphere. PMID:22129728

  6. How large is the cosmic dust flux into the Earth's atmosphere?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plane, John; Janches, Diego; Gomez-Martin, Juan Carlos; Bones, David; Diego Carrillo-Sanchez, Juan; James, Sandy; Nesvorny, David; Pokorny, Petr

    2016-07-01

    Cosmic dust particles are produced in the solar system from the sublimation of comets as they orbit close to the sun, and also from collisions between asteroids in the belt between Mars and Jupiter. Current estimates of the magnitude of the cosmic dust input rate into the Earth's atmosphere range from 2 to well over 100 tons per day, depending on whether the measurements are made in space, in the middle atmosphere, or at the surface in polar ice cores. This nearly 2 order-of-magnitude discrepancy indicates that there are serious flaws in the interpretation of observations that have been used to make the estimates. Dust particles enter the atmosphere at hyperthermal velocities (11 - 72 km s ^{-1}), and mostly ablate at heights between 80 and 120 km in a region of the atmosphere known as the mesosphere/lower thermosphere (MLT). The resulting metal vapours (Fe, Mg, Si and Na etc.) then oxidize and recondense to form nm-size particles, termed "meteoric smoke". These particles are too small to sediment downwards. Instead, they are transported by the general circulation of the atmosphere, taking roughly 5 years to reach the surface. There is great interest in the role smoke particles play as condensation nuclei of noctilucent ice clouds in the mesosphere, and polar stratospheric clouds in the lower stratosphere. Various new estimates of the dust input will be discussed. The first is from a zodiacal dust cloud model which predicts that more than 90% of the dust entering the atmosphere comes from Jupiter Family Comets; this model is constrained by observations of the zodiacal cloud using the IRAS, COBE and Planck satellites. The cometary dust is predicted to mostly be in a near-prograde orbit, entering the atmosphere with an average velocity around 14 km s ^{-1}. The total dust input should then be about 40 t d ^{-1}. However, relatively few of these particles are observed, even by the powerful Arecibo 430 MHz radar. Coupled models of meteoroid differential ablation

  7. Coupled noble gas-hydrocarbon evolution of the early Earth atmosphere upon solar UV irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hébrard, E.; Marty, B.

    2014-01-01

    Using a new photochemical model of the Earth's early atmosphere, the relationship between noble gas photoionization and organic photochemistry has been investigated from the Archean eon to the present day. We have found that the enhanced UV emission of the young Sun triggered a peculiar atmospheric chemistry in a CH4-rich early atmosphere that resulted in the increased formation of an organic haze, similar to the preliminary results of a previous study (Ribas et al., 2010). We have investigated the interaction between this haze and noble gases photoionized by the UV light from the younger Sun. Laboratory experiments have shown indeed that ionized xenon trapping into organics (1) is more efficient that other ionized noble gases trapping and (2) results in a significant enrichment of heavy xenon isotopes relative to the light ones (e.g., Frick et al., 1979; Marrocchi et al., 2011). We find moreover preferential photoionization of xenon that peaks at an altitude range comparable to that of the organic haze formation, in contrast to other noble gases. Trapping and fractioning of ionized xenon in the organic haze could therefore have been far more efficient than for other noble gases, and could have been particularly effective throughout the Archean eon, since the UV irradiation flux from the young Sun was expected to be substantially higher than today (Ribas et al., 2010; Claire et al., 2012). Thus we suspect that the unique isotopic fractionation of atmospheric xenon and its elemental depletion in the atmosphere relative to other noble gases, compared to potential cosmochemical components, could have resulted from a preferential incorporation of the heaviest xenon isotopes into organics. A fraction of atmospheric xenon could have been continuously trapped in the forming haze and enriched in its heavy isotopes, while another fraction would have escaped from the atmosphere to space, with, or without isotope selection of the lightest isotopes. The combination of these

  8. The spaceborne infrared atmospheric sounder for geosynchronous earth orbit (SIRAS-G): pathfinder to space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampe, Thomas U.; Chase, Holden

    2007-09-01

    The Spaceborne Infrared Sounder for Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (SIRAS-G) was developed by Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corp (BATC) under NASA's 2002 Instrument Incubator Program. SIRAS-G is a technology development program focused on next-generation IR imaging spectrometers for sounding of the atmosphere. SIRAS-G is ideally suited for measuring atmospheric temperature and water vapor profiles, trace gases concentrations, land and ocean surface temperatures and the IR mineral dust aerosol signature from satellite, providing high-spectral resolution imaging spectroscopy over a broad IR spectral range and extended field of view. Instrument concepts for future mission in LEO and GEO are discussed, including an instrument concept to be flown in low earth orbit having the potential to provide high spatial resolution, comparable to that of MODIS, along with the high spectral resolution currently being demonstrated by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS). This capability would dramatically improve the yield of cloud-free pixels scenes that can be assimilated into Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models. The SIRAS-G dispersive spectrometer module is readily adaptable for missions in LEO, GEO and MEO orbits and can be optimized for spectral resolution over subsets of the total spectral range. We have completed the 3-year SIRAS-G IIP development effort, including successful testing of the SIRAS-G laboratory demonstration spectrometer that utilized the Hawaii 1RG MWIR FPA. Performance testing was conducted at cryogenic temperatures and the performance of the demo instrument has been quantified including measurement of keystone distortion, spectral smile, MTF, and the spectral response function (SRF) to high accuracy. We present the results of the laboratory instrument development including characterization of the demonstration instrument performance. We discuss instrument concepts utilizing SIRAS-G technology for potential future missions including an anticipated

  9. Characterizing the Atmospheres of Super-Earths and Hot-Jupiters with Narrow-Band Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colon, Knicole D.; Gaidos, E.; Wilson, P. A.; Ford, E. B.; Sing, D. K.; Ballester, G. E.; Desert, J.; Ehrenreich, D.; Fortney, J. J.; Lecavelier des Etangs, A.; Lopez-Morales, M.; Morley, C.; Pettitt, A.; Pont, F.; Vidal-Madjar, A.

    2014-01-01

    Nearly one thousand extrasolar planets have been discovered, but none are considered true analogs to solar system planets. Instead, we characterize some planets as “super-Earths” or “hot-Jupiters.” It has been possible to characterize the atmospheres of some of these planets via transit observations, which is a crucial stepping stone towards future studies of true solar system analogs. We present narrow-band photometry of several transiting planets, including the super-Earth GJ 1214b and the hot-Jupiters XO-2b and TrES-2b. For GJ 1214b, most studies find that the transmission spectrum is flat, which favors either a high mean molecular weight or cloudy/hazy hydrogen (H) rich atmosphere model. We observed seven transits of GJ 1214b through a narrow K-band (2.141 micron) filter with the Wide Field Camera on the 3.8 meter United Kingdom Infrared Telescope. We observed another five transits at 800-900 nm using tunable filters with the Optical System for Imaging and low Resolution Integrated Spectroscopy (OSIRIS) on the 10.4 meter Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC). Our observations support a flat transmission spectrum for GJ 1214b, but we also find that a hydrogen-dominated upper atmosphere cannot be excluded. For hot-Jupiters, potassium has been predicted to be one of the strongest sources of opacity at optical wavelengths and has been previously detected in the atmospheres of XO-2b and TrES-2b. Using OSIRIS on the GTC, we observed three transits of XO-2b and two transits of TrES-2b in multiple bandpasses around the potassium absorption feature at 770 nm. Our technique is somewhat different than in previous studies, and we use our observations to constrain the amount of potassium in these exoplanet atmospheres. We consider how our studies set the stage for future investigations of true Earth and Jupiter analogs that have not yet been discovered.

  10. Helium escape from the Earth's atmosphere - The charge exchange mechanism revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lie-Svendsen, O.; Rees, M. H.; Stamnes, K.

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the escape of neutral helium from the terrestrial atmosphere through exothermic charge exchange reactions between He(+) ions and the major atmospheric constituents N2, O2 and O. Elastic collisions with the neutral background particles were treated quantitatively using a recently developed kinetic theory approach. An interhemispheric plasma transport model was employed to provide a global distribution of He(+) ions as a function of altitude, latitude and local solar time and for different levels of solar ionization. Combining these ion densities with neutral densities from an MSIS model and best estimates for the reaction rate coefficients of the charge exchange reactions, we computed the global distribution of the neutral He escape flux. The escape rates show large diurnal and latitudinal variations, while the global average does not vary by more than a factor of three over a solar cycle. We find that this escape mechanism is potentially important for the overall balance of helium in the Earth's atmosphere. However, more accurate values for the reaction rate coefficients of the charge exchange reactions are required to make a definitive assessment of its importance.

  11. CAM-chem: description and evaluation of interactive atmospheric chemistry in the Community Earth System Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lamarque, J.-F.; Emmons, L.; Hess, Peter; Kinnison, Douglas E.; Tilmes, S.; Vitt, Francis; Heald, C. L.; Holland, Elisabeth A.; Lauritzen, P. H.; Neu, J.; Orlando, J. J.; Rasch, Philip J.; Tyndall, G. S.

    2012-03-27

    We discuss and evaluate the representation of atmospheric chemistry in the global Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) version 4, the atmospheric component of the Community Earth System Model (CESM). We present a variety of configurations for the representation of tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry, wet removal, and online and offline meteorology. Results from simulations illustrating these configurations are compared with surface, aircraft and satellite observations. Major biases include a negative bias in the high-latitude CO distribution, a positive bias in upper-tropospheric/lower-stratospheric ozone, and a positive bias in summertime surface ozone (over the United States and Europe). The tropospheric net chemical ozone production varies significantly between configurations, partly related to variations in stratosphere-troposphere exchange. Aerosol optical depth tends to be underestimated over most regions, while comparison with aerosol surface measurements over the United States indicate reasonable results for sulfate, especially in the online simulation. Other aerosol species exhibit significant biases. Overall, the model-data comparison indicates that the offline simulation driven by GEOS5 meteorological analyses provides the best simulation, possibly due in part to the increased vertical resolution (52 levels instead of 26 for online dynamics). The CAM-chem code as described in this paper, along with all the necessary datasets needed to perform the simulations described here, are available for download at www.cesm.ucar.edu.

  12. The atmosphere of the primitive earth and the prebiotic synthesis of organic compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, S. L.; Schlesinger, G.

    1983-01-01

    The prebiotic synthesis of organic compounds is investigated using a spark discharge on various simulated prebiotic atmospheres at 25 C. It is found that glycine is almost the only amino acid produced from the model atmospheres containing CO and CO2. These results show that the maximum yield is about the same for the three carbon sources (CO, CO2, and CH4) at high H2/carbon ratios, but that CH4 is superior at low H2/carbon ratios. CH4 is found to yield a much greater variety of amino acids than either CO or CO2. If it is assumed that amino acids more complex than glycine were required for the origin of life, then these findings indicate the need for CH4 in the primitive atmosphere. The yields of cyanide and formaldehyde are shown to parallel the amino acid results, with yields of HCN and H2CO as high as 13 percent based on carbon. Ammonia is also found to be produced from N2 in experiments with no added NH3 in yields as high as 4.9 percent. These results indicate that large amounts of NH3 would have been synthesized on the primitive earth by electric discharges.

  13. Formation of nitrogen oxides in the Earth's atmosphere by solar proton flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komitov, B.; Dechev, M.; Duchlev, P.

    2016-01-01

    The results from the study of daily average values of the background concentrations of nitrogen oxides (NO and NO_{2}) in the terrestrial atmosphere are presented. The study aim was to reveal some aspects of the relation between the solar flares, as sources of solar energetic protons (SEP-Solar Energetic Protons), and the nitrogen oxides formation in the Earth's atmosphere. For this aim, except the time series of the nitrogen oxides for the period Oct 15, 2004 - Sept 1, 2009, the total daily fluxes of the solar protons for the energy diapasons E ≥ 10 MeV and E ≥ 100 MeV, registered by GOES-11 and GOES-13 satellites, were used.The obtained results suggest that the significant peaks in the time series of the nitrogen oxides should be explained with 'volley' effect of NO and NO_{2} formations in the middle atmosphere. Such formation processes take place in the time interval from one month to about one year before the peaks registration at the ground-level station of the Rozhen National Astronomical Observatory. In view of the short period with continuous time series, to give a certain answer of the question whether and how the solar protons affect the NO and NO_{2} formation it is necessary to prolong the study in future.

  14. Response of the water level in a well to Earth tides and atmospheric loading under unconfined conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rojstaczer, S.; Riley, F.S.

    1990-01-01

    The response to Earth tides is strongly governed by a dimensionless aquifer frequency Q???u. The response to atmospheric loading is strongly governed by two dimensionless vertical fluid flow parameters: a dimensionless unsaturated zone frequency, R, and a dimensionless aquifer frequency Qu. The differences between Q???u and Qu are generally small for aquifers which are highly sensitive to Earth tides. When Q???u and Qu are large, the response of the well to Earth tides and atmospheric loading approaches the static response of the aquifer under confined conditions. At small values of Q???u and Qu, well response to Earth tides and atmospheric loading is strongly influenced by water table drainage. When R is large relative to Qu, the response to atmospheric loading is strongly influenced by attenuation and phase shift of the pneumatic pressure signal in the unsaturated zone. The presence of partial penetration retards phase advance in well response to Earth tides and atmospheric loading. -from Authors

  15. Causes and Implications of Persistent Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Biases in Earth System Models

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, Forrest M; Randerson, James T.; Arora, Vivek K.; Bao, Qing; Cadule, Patricia; Ji, Duoying; Jones, Chris D.; Kawamiya, Michio; Khatiwala, Samar; Lindsay, Keith; Obata, Atsushi; Shevliakova, Elena; Six, Katharina D.; Tjiputra, Jerry F.; Volodin, Evgeny M.; Wu, Tongwen

    2014-01-01

    The strength of feedbacks between a changing climate and future CO2 concentrations are uncertain and difficult to predict using Earth System Models (ESMs). We analyzed emission-driven simulations--in which atmospheric CO2 levels were computed prognostically--for historical (1850-2005) and future periods (RCP 8.5 for 2006-2100) produced by 15 ESMs for the Fifth Phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). Comparison of ESM prognostic atmospheric CO2 over the historical period with observations indicated that ESMs, on average, had a small positive bias in predictions of contemporary atmospheric CO2. Weak ocean carbon uptake in many ESMs contributed to this bias, based on comparisons with observations of ocean and atmospheric anthropogenic carbon inventories. We found a significant linear relationship between contemporary atmospheric CO2 biases and future CO2 levels for the multi-model ensemble. We used this relationship to create a contemporary CO2 tuned model (CCTM) estimate of the atmospheric CO2 trajectory for the 21st century. The CCTM yielded CO2 estimates of 600 {plus minus} 14 ppm at 2060 and 947 {plus minus} 35 ppm at 2100, which were 21 ppm and 32 ppm below the multi-model mean during these two time periods. Using this emergent constraint approach, the likely ranges of future atmospheric CO2, CO2-induced radiative forcing, and CO2-induced temperature increases for the RCP 8.5 scenario were considerably narrowed compared to estimates from the full ESM ensemble. Our analysis provided evidence that much of the model-to-model variation in projected CO2 during the 21st century was tied to biases that existed during the observational era, and that model differences in the representation of concentration-carbon feedbacks and other slowly changing carbon cycle processes appear to be the primary driver of this variability. By improving models to more closely match the long-term time series of CO2 from Mauna Loa, our analysis suggests uncertainties in

  16. Causes and implications of persistent atmospheric carbon dioxide biases in Earth System Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, F. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Arora, V. K.; Bao, Q.; Cadule, P.; Ji, D.; Jones, C. D.; Kawamiya, M.; Khatiwala, S.; Lindsay, K.; Obata, A.; Shevliakova, E.; Six, K. D.; Tjiputra, J. F.; Volodin, E. M.; Wu, T.

    2014-02-01

    The strength of feedbacks between a changing climate and future CO2 concentrations is uncertain and difficult to predict using Earth System Models (ESMs). We analyzed emission-driven simulations—in which atmospheric CO2levels were computed prognostically—for historical (1850-2005) and future periods (Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 8.5 for 2006-2100) produced by 15 ESMs for the Fifth Phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). Comparison of ESM prognostic atmospheric CO2 over the historical period with observations indicated that ESMs, on average, had a small positive bias in predictions of contemporary atmospheric CO2. Weak ocean carbon uptake in many ESMs contributed to this bias, based on comparisons with observations of ocean and atmospheric anthropogenic carbon inventories. We found a significant linear relationship between contemporary atmospheric CO2 biases and future CO2levels for the multimodel ensemble. We used this relationship to create a contemporary CO2 tuned model (CCTM) estimate of the atmospheric CO2 trajectory for the 21st century. The CCTM yielded CO2estimates of 600±14 ppm at 2060 and 947±35 ppm at 2100, which were 21 ppm and 32 ppm below the multimodel mean during these two time periods. Using this emergent constraint approach, the likely ranges of future atmospheric CO2, CO2-induced radiative forcing, and CO2-induced temperature increases for the RCP 8.5 scenario were considerably narrowed compared to estimates from the full ESM ensemble. Our analysis provided evidence that much of the model-to-model variation in projected CO2 during the 21st century was tied to biases that existed during the observational era and that model differences in the representation of concentration-carbon feedbacks and other slowly changing carbon cycle processes appear to be the primary driver of this variability. By improving models to more closely match the long-term time series of CO2from Mauna Loa, our analysis suggests that

  17. Average capacity for PCB propagation in atmospheric turbulence on Earth-space path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Rui-ke; Hou, Jie; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Hui

    2013-08-01

    In order to analyze the effect of atmospheric turbulence along Earth-space path on the performance of laser communication system, the change of Kolmogorov spectrum with altitude is taken into account on the basis of the relation of turbulence structure constant with altitude. The scintillation index under the condition of the different coherent degree for optical source are discussed from weak to strong turbulence regime for a partially coherent Gaussian beam (PCB) propagating through turbulent atmosphere. The relation of the scintillation index with elevation is analyzed on Earth-space path. The expressions for the Log-normal and the Gamma-Gamma turbulence channel of irradiance fluctuations are given. The mathematical expression for the evaluation of the average capacity is shown for a Kolmogorov turbulent atmosphere channel. The average capacity of a PCB is calculated under the condition of different coherent length, aperture, on the horizontal and Earth-space path, respectively. The results of scintillation index show that the difference among plane, spherical, and beam wave are obvious from weak to moderate turbulence regime, at strong regime, the results tend to saturation. The degradation of optical source coherence causes scintillation depression at weak turbulence regime. At moderate regime, the scintillation is little increase. The effect of source partially coherence on scintillation is disappear at stronger regime. Based on the Log-normal model in weak turbulent fade channel and the Gamma-Gamma model from weak to strong turbulence fade channel, the average capacities for different initial Gaussian beam radius, partially coherent degree beam are estimated, respectively. The results show that at weak turbulence, the difference between the capacities by Log-normal and Gamma-Gamma distribution is small, and from moderate to strong regime, the difference is gradually increase. At weak regime, the average capacity of partially coherent beam is greater than the

  18. A High Performance Computing approach to model multiple Rayleigh scattering in the Earth atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franssens, Ghislain; Dekemper, Emmanuel; Mateshivili, Nina; Vanhellemont, filip; fussen, didier; pieroux, didier

    2016-04-01

    The retrieval of atmospheric trace gases and aerosols in the Earth atmosphere from light scattering measurements typically involves an iterative inversion algorithm. A key part of this algorithm is its forward model, which takes care of calculating the amount of light that the remote sensing instrument will see, for any assumed atmosphere composition. The forward model is usually an atmospheric radiative transfer code. It is a serious challenge for a radiative transfer code to be, at the same time, sufficiently accurate and sufficiently fast, so that it can be included in the iterative retrieval loop of an operational service. An accurate code must be able to calculate multiple Rayleigh scattering (important in the UV and/or at lower altitudes) by the air in a spherical atmosphere. This is something that currently only a Monte Carlo algorithm can do. However, any Monte Carlo code is far too slow to be included in the retrieval loop, even if we make use of the currently available HPC power. We report some first results that were obtained by a new solution to this old problem. We first use a HPC cluster to tabulate multiple Rayleigh scattering in a standard Earth atmosphere, using a Monte Carlo code, as function of 6 parameters (albedo, view zenith angle, solar zenith angle, relative azimuth angle, altitude and wavelength). Then, a well chosen empirical function is fitted on the tabulated data. From this function, correction factors are derived and appropriately inserted in a fast single scattering algorithm, which so effectively becomes a multiple scattering algorithm. Since the evaluation of the empirical function is also very fast, we end up with a radiative transfer code that is both accurate and sufficiently fast for operational data production. Our conclusion is that commonly available and affordable HPC systems can still not directly solve the retrieval problem with sufficient accuracy in real time. However, the above described two step approach now becomes

  19. Carbon Observations from Geostationary Earth Orbit as Part of an Integrated Observing System for Atmospheric Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    This presentation describes proposed satellite carbon measurements from the CHRONOS mission. The primary goal of this experiment is to measure the atmospheric pollutants carbon monoxide (CO) and methane (CH4) from geostationary orbit, with hourly observations of North America at high spatial resolution. CHRONOS observations would provide measurements not currently available or planned as part of a surface, suborbital and satellite integrated observing system for atmospheric composition over North America. Carbon monoxide is produced by combustion processes such as urban activity and wildfires, and serves as a proxy for other combustion pollutants that are not easily measured. Methane has diverse anthropogenic sources ranging from fossil fuel production, animal husbandry, agriculture and waste management. The impact of gas exploration in the Western States of the USA and oil extraction from the Canadian tar sands will be particular foci of the mission, as will the poorly-quantified natural CH4 emissions from wetlands and thawing permafrost. In addition to characterizing pollutant sources, improved understanding of the domestic CH4 budget is a priority for policy decisions related to short-lived climate forcers. A primary motivation for targeting CO is its value as a tracer of atmospheric pollution, and CHRONOS measurements will provide insight into local and long-range transport across the North American continent, as well as the processes governing the entrainment and venting of pollution in and out of the planetary boundary layer. As a result of significantly improved characterization of diurnal changes in atmospheric composition, CHRONOS observations will find direct societal applications for air quality regulation and forecasting. We present a quantification of this expected improvement in the prediction of near-surface concentrations when CHRONOS measurements are used in Observation System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs). If CHRONOS and the planned NASA Earth

  20. Atmospheric Torques on the Solid Earth and Oceans Based on the GEOS-1 General Circulation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez, Braulio V.; Au, Andrew Y.

    1998-01-01

    The GEOS-1 general circulation model has been used to compute atmospheric torques on the oceans and solid Earth for the period 1980-1995. The time series for the various torque components have been analyzed by means of Fourier transform techniques. It was determined that the wind stress torque over land is more powerful than the wind stress torque over water by 55%, 42%, and 80% for the x, y, and z components respectively. This is mainly the result of power in the high frequency range. The pressure torques due to polar flattening, equatorial ellipticity, marine geoid, and continental orography were computed. The orographic or "mountain torque" components are more powerful than their wind stress counterparts (land plus ocean) by 231% (x), 191% (y), and 77% (z). The marine pressure torques due to geoidal undulations are much smaller than the orographic ones, as expected. They are only 3% (x), 4% (y), and 5% (z) of the corresponding mountain torques. The geoidal pressure torques are approximately equal in magnitude to those produced by the equatorial ellipticity of the Earth. The pressure torque due to polar flattening makes the largest contributions to the atmospheric torque budget. It has no zonal component, only equatorial ones. Most of the power of the latter, between 68% and 69%, is found in modes with periods under 15 days. The single most powerful mode has a period of 361 days. The gravitational torque ranks second in power only to the polar flattening pressure torque. Unlike the former, it does produce a zonal component, albeit much smaller (1%) than the equatorial ones. The gravitational and pressure torques have opposite signs, therefore, the gravitational torque nullifies 42% of the total pressure torque. Zonally, however, the gravitational torque amounts to only 6% of the total pressure torque. The power budget for the total atmospheric torque yields 7595 and 7120 Hadleys for the equatorial components and 966 Hadleys for the zonal. The x-component exhibits

  1. Atmospheric Torques on the Solid Earth and Oceans Based on the GEOS-1 General Circulation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez, Braulio

    1999-01-01

    The GEOS-1 general circulation model has been used to compute atmospheric torques on the oceans and solid Earth for the period 1980-1995. The time series for the various torque components have been analyzed by means of Fourier transform techniques. It was determined that the wind stress torque over land is more powerful than the wind stress torque over water by 55\\%, 42\\%, and 80\\t for the x, y, and z components respectively. This is mainly the result of power in the high frequency range. The pressure torques due to polar flattening, equatorial ellipticity, marine geoid, and continental orography were computed. The orographic or "mountain torque" components are more powerful than their wind stress counterparts (land plus ocean) by 231\\% (x), 191\\% (y), and 77\\% (z). The marine pressure torques due to geoidal undulations are much smaller than the orographic ones, as expected. They are only 3\\% (x), 4\\% (y), and 5\\% (z) of the corresponding mountain torques. The geoidal pressure torques are approximately equal in magnitude to those produced by the equatorial ellipticity of the Earth. The pressure torque due to polar flattening makes the largest contributions to the atmospheric'torque budget. It has no zonal component, only equatorial ones. Most of the power of the latter, between 68\\% and 69 %, is found in modes with periods under 15 days. The single most powerful mode has a period of 361 days. The gravitational torque ranks second in power only to the polar flattening pressure torque. Unlike the former, it does produce a zonal component, albeit much smaller (1\\ ) than the equatorial ones. The gravitational and pressure torques have opposite signs, therefore, the gravitational torque nullifies 42\\% of the total pressure torque. Zonally, however, the gravitational torque amounts to only 6\\% of the total pressure torque. The power budget for the total atmospheric torque yields 7595 and 7120 Hadleys for the equatorial components and 966 Hadleys for the

  2. The Atmospheres of the Terrestrial Planets:Clues to the Origins and Early Evolution of Venus, Earth, and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baines, Kevin H.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Bullock, Mark A.; Grinspoon, David H,; Mahaffy, Paul; Russell, Christopher T.; Schubert, Gerald; Zahnle, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    We review the current state of knowledge of the origin and early evolution of the three largest terrestrial planets - Venus, Earth, and Mars - setting the stage for the chapters on comparative climatological processes to follow. We summarize current models of planetary formation, as revealed by studies of solid materials from Earth and meteorites from Mars. For Venus, we emphasize the known differences and similarities in planetary bulk properties and composition with Earth and Mars, focusing on key properties indicative of planetary formation and early evolution, particularly of the atmospheres of all three planets. We review the need for future in situ measurements for improving our understanding of the origin and evolution of the atmospheres of our planetary neighbors and Earth, and suggest the accuracies required of such new in situ data. Finally, we discuss the role new measurements of Mars and Venus have in understanding the state and evolution of planets found in the habitable zones of other stars.

  3. Nitric oxide delta band emission in the earth's atmosphere - Comparison of a measurement and a theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rusch, D. W.; Sharp, W. E.

    1981-01-01

    Attention is given to the altitude dependent emission rate in the delta-bands of nitric oxide as measured in the earth's atmosphere at night by a scanning ultraviolet spectrometer. It is noted that the reaction responsible is the two-body association of nitrogen and oxygen atoms. The measurements show a vertical intensity beneath the layer for the delta-band system of 19 R. The horizontal emission rate is found to increase from 70 R at 117 km to 140 R at 150 km. The data are analyzed with a one-dimensional, time-dependent, vertical-transport model of odd nitrogen photochemistry. The calculated and measured intensities agree so long as the quenching of N(2D) by atomic oxygen is near 5 x 10 to the -13 cu cm/sec.

  4. A new code SORD for simulation of polarized light scattering in the Earth atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkin, Sergey; Lyapustin, Alexei; Sinyuk, Aliaksandr; Holben, Brent

    2016-05-01

    We report a new publicly available radiative transfer (RT) code for numerical simulation of polarized light scattering in plane-parallel Earth atmosphere. Using 44 benchmark tests, we prove high accuracy of the new RT code, SORD (Successive ORDers of scattering1, 2). We describe capabilities of SORD and show run time for each test on two different machines. At present, SORD is supposed to work as part of the Aerosol Robotic NETwork3 (AERONET) inversion algorithm. For natural integration with the AERONET software, SORD is coded in Fortran 90/95. The code is available by email request from the corresponding (first) author or from ftp://climate1.gsfc.nasa.gov/skorkin/SORD/ or ftp://maiac.gsfc.nasa.gov/pub/SORD.zip

  5. Design of a high precision microwave reflector. [for earth upper atmosphere study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noller, E. W.; Bauer, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    Development of a high accuracy spherical microwave reflector to support contour RMS and pointing requirements for a new series of space instruments is reported. The reflector system is composed of precision machined aluminum tile reflectors supported from a eutectic coated graphite epoxy structure by flexures. Several basic technologies have been integrated into a manufacturing process that accommodates fabrication techniques of both optical and composite constraints. The optical figure and its change due to thermal gradient was measured in a thermal vacuum environment with a Ronchi system. The radiometer system is in support of the Microwave Limb Sounder, an experiment to measure emissions from earth's atmospheric limb thus obtaining wind, temperature, pressure and chemical composition measurements.

  6. Terrestrial microorganisms at an altitude of 20,000 m in Earth's atmosphere

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffin, Dale W.

    2004-01-01

    A joint effort between the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Global Desert Dust and NASA's Stratospheric and Cosmic Dust Programs identified culturable microbes from an air sample collected at an altitude of 20,000 m. A total of 4 fungal (Penicillium sp.) and 71 bacteria colonyforming units (70 colonies of Bacillus luciferensis believed to have originated from a single cell collected at altitude and one colony of Bacillus sphaericus) were enumerated, isolated and identified using a morphological key and 16S rDNA sequencing respectively. All of the isolates identified were sporeforming pigmented fungi or bacteria of terrestrial origin and demonstrate that the presence of viable microorganisms in Earth's upper atmosphere may not be uncommon.

  7. Environmental networks for large-scale monitoring of Earth and atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurodimou, Olga; Kolios, Stavros; Konstantaras, Antonios; Georgoulas, George; Stylios, Chrysostomos

    2013-04-01

    Installation and operation of instrument/sensor networks are proven fundamental in the monitoring of the physical environment from local to global scale. The advances in electronics, wireless communications and informatics has led to the development of a huge number of networks at different spatial scales that measure, collect and store a wide range of environmental parameters. These networks have been gradually evolved into integrated information systems that provide real time monitoring, forecasts and different products from the initial collected datasets. Instrument/sensor networks have nowadays become important solutions for environmental monitoring, comprising a basic component of fully automated systems developing worldwide that contribute in the efforts for a sustainable Earth's environment (e.g. Hart et al., 2006, Othman et al., 2012). They are also used as a source of data for models parameterization and as verification tools for accuracy assessment techniques of the satellite imagery. Environmental networks can be incorporated into decision support systems (e.g Rizzi et al., 2012) providing informational background along with data from satellites for decision making, manage problems, suggest solutions and best practices for a sustainable management of the environment. This is a comparative study aiming to examine and highlight the significant role of existing instrument/sensor networks for large-scale monitoring of environmental issues, especially atmospheric and marine environment as well as weather and climate. We provide characteristic examples of integrated systems based on large scale instrument/sensor networks along with other sources of data (like satellite datasets) as informational background to measure, identify, monitor, analyze and forecast a vast series of atmospheric parameters (like CO2, O3, particle matter and solar irradiance), weather, climate and their impacts (e.g., cloud systems, lightnings, rainfall, air and surface temperature

  8. Ammonia photolysis and the greenhouse effect in the primordial atmosphere of the earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, W. R.; Atreya, S. K.

    1979-01-01

    Photochemical calculations indicate that in the prebiotic atmosphere of earth ammonia would have been irreversibly converted to N2 in less than 40 years if the ammonia surface mixing ratio were no more than 0.0001. However, if a continuous outgassing of ammonia were maintained, radiative-equilibrium calculations indicate that a surface mixing ratio of ammonia of 0.0001 or greater would provide a sufficient greenhouse effect to keep the surface temperature above freezing. With a 0.0001 mixing ratio of ammonia, 60% to 70% of the present-day solar luminosity would be adequate to maintain surface temperatures above freezing. A lower limit to the time constant for accumulation of an amount of nitrogen equivalent to the present day value is 10 my if the outgassing were such as to provide a continuous surface mixing ratio of ammonia of at least 0.00001.

  9. A New Code SORD for Simulation of Polarized Light Scattering in the Earth Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korkin, Sergey; Lyapustin, Alexei; Sinyuk, Aliaksandr; Holben, Brent

    2016-01-01

    We report a new publicly available radiative transfer (RT) code for numerical simulation of polarized light scattering in plane-parallel atmosphere of the Earth. Using 44 benchmark tests, we prove high accuracy of the new RT code, SORD (Successive ORDers of scattering). We describe capabilities of SORD and show run time for each test on two different machines. At present, SORD is supposed to work as part of the Aerosol Robotic NETwork (AERONET) inversion algorithm. For natural integration with the AERONET software, SORD is coded in Fortran 90/95. The code is available by email request from the corresponding (first) author or from ftp://climate1.gsfc.nasa.gov/skorkin/SORD/.

  10. Photochemical reactions of water and carbon monoxide in earth's primitive atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Nun, A.; Chang, S.

    1983-01-01

    The gas-phase photolysis of H2O at 1849 A in the presence of CO yields mainly CO2 and H2 and a variety of organic compounds, including C1-C3 hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, acetone, and acetic acid. The overall quantum yield for conversion of CO to organic compounds varies between 0.23 and 0.03 as a function of the CO abundance. These results indicate that even if primitive earth's atmosphere initially contained no molecular hydrogen and contained carbon only in the form of CO or a mixture of CO and CO2, the prebiotic environment would have become enriched with a variety of organic compounds produced by photochemical processes.

  11. Excitation of earth's polar motion by atmospheric angular momentum variations, 1980-1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Benjamin F.

    1993-01-01

    We compute the polar-motion excitation function due to the atmospheric angular momentum (AAM) for both IB (inverted-barometer) and non-IB cases, as well as the excitation function from geodetically observed Earth orientation data for the period 1980-1990. The two are then compared in studying the AAM contribution to the polar motion excitation. The polar drifts with periods longer than about two years have similar characteristics, but the comparison is inconclusive because of data uncertainties. For the seasonal wobble excitation, the agreement is poor except for the prograde annual wobble, indicating the influence of other geophysical excitations than AAM. For the Chandler wobble excitation, a correlation coefficient of 0.53 for non-IB and 0.58 for IB are found for 1986-1990. Together with a coherence spectral analysis, they clearly demonstrate a strong contribution of AAM to the Chandler wobble excitation.

  12. Polarisation of the auroral red line in the Earth's upper atmosphere: a review (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamy, H.; Barthelemy, M.; Lilensten, J.; Bommier, V.; Simon Wedlund, C.

    2013-12-01

    Polarisation of light is a key observable to provide information about asymmetry or anisotropy within a radiative source. Polarimetry of auroral emission lines in the Earth's upper atmosphere has been overlooked for decades. However, the bright red auroral line (6300Å) produced by collisional impact with electrons precipitating along magnetic field lines is a good candidate to search for polarisation. This problem was investigated recently with observations obtained by Lilensten et al (2008), Barthélemy et al (2011) and Lilensten et al (2013) with a photopolarimeter. Analysis of the data indicates that the red auroral emission line is polarised at a level of a few percent. The results are compared to theoretical predictions of Bommier et al (2011) that were obtained for a collimated beam. The comparison suggests the existence of depolarization processes whose origin will be discussed. A new dedicated spectropolarimeter currently under development will also be presented. This instrument will cover the optical spectrum from approximately 400 to 700 nm providing simultaneously the polarisation of the red line and of other interesting auroral emission lines such as N2+ 1NG (4278Å), other N2 bands, etc... The importance of these polarisation measurements in the context of upper atmosphere modelling and geomagnetic activity will be discussed. Lilensten, J. et al, Polarization in aurorae: A new dimension for space environments studies, Geophys. Res. Lett., 26, 269, 2008 Barthélemy M. et al, Polarisation in the auroral red line during coordinated EISCAT Svalbard Radar/optical experiments, Annales Geophysicae, Volume 29, Issue 6, 2011, 1101-1112, 2011. Bommier V. et al, The Theoretical Impact Polarization of the O I 6300 Å Red Line of Earth Auroræ, Annales Geophysicae, Volume 29, Issue 1, 2011, 71-79, 2011 Lilensten, J. et al, The thermospheric auroral red line polarization: confirmation of detection and first quantitative analysis, Journal of Space Weather and Space

  13. Thermal destruction calculation method and its results for Fregat Versatile Space Tug during entry into the Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finchenko, V. S.; Ustinov, S. N.; Ivankov, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    The article briefly describes a design of the Versatile Space Tug (VST) Fregat, analyses the processes occurring during its descent in the Earth's atmosphere after performing its primary function, a thermal destruction scenario of the VST Fregat is developed, a procedure and results of the calculation of heat loads, impacting the VST, and the remaining mass of its structural components reaching the Earth's surface, are presented.

  14. Rapid oxygenation of Earth's atmosphere 2.33 billion years ago.

    PubMed

    Luo, Genming; Ono, Shuhei; Beukes, Nicolas J; Wang, David T; Xie, Shucheng; Summons, Roger E

    2016-05-01

    Molecular oxygen (O2) is, and has been, a primary driver of biological evolution and shapes the contemporary landscape of Earth's biogeochemical cycles. Although "whiffs" of oxygen have been documented in the Archean atmosphere, substantial O2 did not accumulate irreversibly until the Early Paleoproterozoic, during what has been termed the Great Oxygenation Event (GOE). The timing of the GOE and the rate at which this oxygenation took place have been poorly constrained until now. We report the transition (that is, from being mass-independent to becoming mass-dependent) in multiple sulfur isotope signals of diagenetic pyrite in a continuous sedimentary sequence in three coeval drill cores in the Transvaal Supergroup, South Africa. These data precisely constrain the GOE to 2.33 billion years ago. The new data suggest that the oxygenation occurred rapidly-within 1 to 10 million years-and was followed by a slower rise in the ocean sulfate inventory. Our data indicate that a climate perturbation predated the GOE, whereas the relationships among GOE, "Snowball Earth" glaciation, and biogeochemical cycling will require further stratigraphic correlation supported with precise chronologies and paleolatitude reconstructions. PMID:27386544

  15. The radiation balance of the earth-atmosphere system from Nimbus 3 radiation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raschke, E.; Vonderhaar, T. H.; Pasternak, M.; Bandeen, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    The radiation balance of the earth-atmosphere system and its components was computed from global measurements of radiation reflected and emitted from the earth to space. These measurements were made from the meteorological satellite Nimbus 3 during the periods from April 16 to August 15, 1969; October 3 to 17, 1969; and January 21 to February 3, 1970. Primarily the method of evaluation, its inherent assumptions, and possible error sources were discussed. Results are presented by various methods: (1) global, hemispherical, and zonal averages obtained from measurements in all semimonthly periods and (2) global maps of the absorbed solar radiation, the albedo, the outgoing longwave radiation, and the radiation balance obtained from measurements during semimonthly periods in each season (May 1 to 15, July 16 to 31, and October 3 to 17, 1969, and January 21 to February 3, 1970). Annual global averages of the albedo and of the outgoing longwave radiation were determined. These values balance to within 1 percent the annual global energy input by solar radiation that was computed for a solar constant.

  16. Thermal Infrared Spectroscopy of Atmospheric Species Critical to Radiative Forcing of Earth's Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasunas, J. C., Jr.; Kostiuk, T.; Livengood, T. A.; Hewagama, T.; Kolasinski, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Thermal-infrared (from about 6 to 100 or more microns wavelength), emission-mode Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) systems acquire radiometric spectra for diurnal diagnostics of atmospheric properties. We have been funded through NASA's Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program (PIDDP) to develop CIRS-lite as a lightweight successor to the Goddard-developed Cassini CIRS FTS currently operating in Saturn orbit. CIRS-lite also has promise for Earth science due to its modest mass, power and volume requirements and novel technical capabilities. For Earth, CIRS-lite supports the characterization of climate radiative forcing, including trace species measurements such as methane. Detection capability beyond the typical limit of HgCdTe focal planes (about 16 microns wavelength) enables a more complete characterization of the greenhouse effect. As for trace-species quantification, a beyond-HgCdTe focal plane permits characterization of water without overlapping lines from other species, enabling better measurements of these other species such as methane at wavelengths reachable by HgCdTe.

  17. Our contaminated atmosphere: The danger of climate change, phases 1 and 2. [effect of atmospheric particulate matter on surface temperature and earth's radiation budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cimorelli, A. J.; House, F. B.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of increased concentrations of atmospheric particulate matter on average surface temperature and on the components of the earth's radiation budget are studied. An atmospheric model which couples particulate loading to surface temperature and to changes in the earth's radiation budget was used. A determination of the feasibility of using satellites to monitor the effect of increased atmospheric particulate concentrations is performed. It was found that: (1) a change in man-made particulate loading of a factor of 4 is sufficient to initiate an ice age; (2) variations in the global and hemispheric weighted averages of surface temperature, reflected radiant fluz and emitted radiant flux are nonlinear functions of particulate loading; and (3) a black satellite sphere meets the requirement of night time measurement sensitivity, but not the required day time sensitivity. A nonblack, spherical radiometer whose external optical properties are sensitive to either the reflected radiant fluz or the emitted radiant flux meets the observational sensitivity requirements.

  18. Improving estimations of greenhouse gas transfer velocities by atmosphere-ocean couplers in Earth-System and regional models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, V. M. N. C. S.; Sahlée, E.; Jurus, P.; Clementi, E.; Pettersson, H.; Mateus, M.

    2015-09-01

    Earth-System and regional models, forecasting climate change and its impacts, simulate atmosphere-ocean gas exchanges using classical yet too simple generalizations relying on wind speed as the sole mediator while neglecting factors as sea-surface agitation, atmospheric stability, current drag with the bottom, rain and surfactants. These were proved fundamental for accurate estimates, particularly in the coastal ocean, where a significant part of the atmosphere-ocean greenhouse gas exchanges occurs. We include several of these factors in a customizable algorithm proposed for the basis of novel couplers of the atmospheric and oceanographic model components. We tested performances with measured and simulated data from the European coastal ocean, having found our algorithm to forecast greenhouse gas exchanges largely different from the forecasted by the generalization currently in use. Our algorithm allows calculus vectorization and parallel processing, improving computational speed roughly 12× in a single cpu core, an essential feature for Earth-System models applications.

  19. The dynamics of a rapidly escaping atmosphere - Applications to the evolution of earth and Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, A. J.; Donahue, T. M.; Walker, J. C. G.

    1981-01-01

    A simple model for the rapid escape of a hydrogen thermosphere is presented in order to establish the energy-limited flux of escaping particles. The model assumes that the atmosphere is tightly bound by gravity at the lower boundary, that all the EUV is absorbed in a narrow region where the optical depth is unity, and that the main source of heating is solar EUV. The flux is limited by the amount of EUV energy absorbed, which is in turn controlled by the radial extent of the thermosphere. It is found that, regardless of the amount of hydrogen in the thermosphere, the low temperatures which accompany rapid escape limit its extent and thus constrain the flux. The results are applied to the earth and Venus, showing that the escape of hydrogen from these planets would have been energy-limiting if their primordial atmospheres contained total hydrogen mixing ratios exceeding only a few percent. This conclusion places a constraint on the theory of the origin and evolution of the planets.

  20. Earth's early atmosphere as seen from carbon and nitrogen isotopic analysis of Archean sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Carr, L. P.; Gilmour, I.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1986-01-01

    The origin and evolution of the Earth's early atmosphere has long been a topic of great interest but determination of actual compositions over geologic time is a difficult problem. However, recent systematic studies of stromatolite deposits (Precambrian Paleobiology Research Group) has extended our knowledge of Archean ecosystems. It has been shown that many stromatolite deposits have undergone negligible alteration since their time of formation. The discovery of primary fluid inclusions within unaltered 3.5 b.y. old Archiean sediments and the observation that the 3.3 b.y. old Barberton cherts have remained closed to argon loss and have not been subjected to thermal metamorphism suggests that an opportunity exists for the direct measurement of the volatile constituents present at their time of formation. Of primary interest to this study was the possibility that the stromatolites and other Archean sediments might retain a vestige of the atmosphere and thus afford an indication of the variations in carbon dioxide and nitrogen isotopic compositions with time. A suite of essentially unaltered Archean stromatolites and the cherts of different ages and geologic sites have been analyzed for their trapped carbon dioxide and nitrogen compositions by the stepped combustion extraction tech nique utilizing static mass spectrometers for the isotope measurements.

  1. Observing Infrasound and Atmospheric Pressure with the NSF EarthScope USArray Transportable Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernon, F. L.; Hedlin, M. A.; Busby, R. W.; Woodward, R.

    2010-12-01

    We are creating a real-time infrasound array whose sensing elements are co-located with the 400 seismic stations in the USArray Transportable Array component of the NSF EarthScope program. This continuously sampled array, of an unprecedented scale, will provide opportunities for groundbreaking and interdisciplinary research in atmospheric acoustics, atmospheric science, and seismology. Such an array will sample mean (absolute) values and fluctuations of the surface air pressure with nominal 70 km station spacing, with a dynamic range of about 7 orders of magnitude, and with a sampling frequency of up to 40 Hz. All samples will be synchronized to UTC. This dense network of infrasound sensors will permit us to study the nature of long-range infrasound propagation from regional to continental distances, and study the sources of infrasound signals, using actual acoustic data, free of concerns about seismic-to-acoustic coupling. All new TA stations deployed starting this fall will have a Quanterra Environmental Processor with internal VTI SCP1000 MEMS barometric pressure gauge, Setra 278 absolute microbarometer, and NCPA Infrasound Microphone. We will present data from field tests and from the newly deployed instrumentation.

  2. Hydrostatic Simulation of Earth's Atmospheric Gas Using Multi-particle Collision Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattisahusiwa, Asis; Purqon, Acep; Viridi, Sparisoma

    2016-01-01

    Multi-particle collision dynamics (MPCD) is a mesoscopic simulation method to simulate fluid particle-like flows. MPCD has been widely used to simulate various problems in condensed matter. In this study, hydrostatic behavior of gas in the Earth's atmospheric layer is simulated by using MPCD method. The simulation is carried out by assuming the system under ideal state and is affected only by gravitational force. Gas particles are homogeneous and placed in 2D box. Interaction of the particles with the box is applied through implementation of boundary conditions (BC). Periodic BC is applied on the left and the right side, specular reflection on the top side, while bounce-back on the bottom side. Simulation program is executed in Arch Linux and running in notebook with processor Intel i5 @2700 MHz with 10 GB DDR3 RAM. The results show behaviors of the particles obey kinetic theory for ideal gas when gravitational acceleration value is proportional to the particle mass. Density distribution as a function of altitude also meets atmosphere's hydrostatic theory.

  3. The budget of biologically active ultraviolet radiation in the earth-atmosphere system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, John E.; Lubin, Dan

    1988-01-01

    This study applies the concept of a budget to describe the interaction of solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation with the earth-atmosphere system. The wavelength ranges of interest are the biologically relevant UV-B between 280 and 320 nm and the UV-A from 32000 to 400 nm. The Nimbus 7 solar backscattered ultraviolet (SBUV) instrument provides measurements of total column ozone and information concerning cloud cover which, in combination with a simple model of radiation transfer, define the fractions of incident solar irradiance absorbed in the atmosphere, reflected to space, and absorbed at the ground. Results for the month of July quantify the contribution of fractional cloud cover and cloud optical thickness to the radiation budget's three components. Scattering within a thick cloud layer makes the downward radiation field at the cloud base more isotropic than is the case for clear skies. For small solar zenith angles, typical of summer midday conditions, the effective pathlength of this diffuse irradiance through tropospheric ozone is greater than that under clear-sky conditions. The result is an enhanced absorption of UV-B radiation in the troposphere during cloud-covered conditions. Major changes in global cloud cover or cloud optical thicknesses could alter the ultraviolet radiation received by the biosphere by an amount comparable to that predicted for long-term trends in ozone.

  4. Correlations and linkages between the sun and the earth's atmosphere: Needed measurements and observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellogg, W. W.

    1974-01-01

    A summary of needed measurements and observations is reported to identify the sequence of processes leading from change in solar input to change in tropospheric circulation and weather. Changes in the solar electromagnetic radiation have to be carefully monitored since variations over the solar cycle are small (less than one percent). It is suggested that changes in the ionization at the Pfotzer maximum could influence the formation of thunderstorms by changing the electric potential gradient. This could be checked by measuring the global atmospheric electric field. As an example of spacecraft observations, a worldwide distribution plot of nocturnal thunderstorms compiled from OSO-5 data shown; no obvious correlation with solar data had been found, but the time span of the data is rather limited and more sophisticated observation techniques could be used. Continuous and careful monitoring is recommended of the input of electromagnetic and particle radiation into the earth's atmosphere ozone distributions in the region above 30 km, and wind systems in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. In addition, special phenomena suspected to be important in the causal chain, such as cirrus cloud formation at high latitudes and thunderstorm activity, should be monitored on a global basis.

  5. Land and Atmosphere Near-Real-Time Capability for Earth Observing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Kevin J.

    2011-01-01

    The past decade has seen a rapid increase in availability and usage of near-real-time data from satellite sensors. The EOSDIS (Earth Observing System Data and Information System) was not originally designed to provide data with sufficiently low latency to satisfy the requirements for near-real-time users. The EOS (Earth Observing System) instruments aboard the Terra, Aqua and Aura satellites make global measurements daily, which are processed into higher-level 'standard' products within 8-40 hours of observation and then made available to users, primarily earth science researchers. However, applications users, operational agencies, and even researchers desire EOS products in near-real-time to support research and applications, including numerical weather and climate prediction and forecasting, monitoring of natural hazards, ecological/invasive species, agriculture, air quality, disaster relief and homeland security. These users often need data much sooner than routine science processing allows, usually within 3 hours, and are willing to trade science product quality for timely access. While Direct Broadcast provides more timely access to data, it does not provide global coverage. In 2002, a joint initiative between NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration), NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration), and the DOD (Department of Defense) was undertaken to provide data from EOS instruments in near-real-time. The NRTPE (Near Real Time Processing Effort) provided products within 3 hours of observation on a best-effort basis. As the popularity of these near-real-time products and applications grew, multiple near-real-time systems began to spring up such as the Rapid Response System. In recognizing the dependence of customers on this data and the need for highly reliable and timely data access, NASA's Earth Science Division sponsored the Earth Science Data and Information System Project (ESDIS)-led development of a new near-real-time system called

  6. Nonlinear acoustic-gravity waves and dust particle redistribution in earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izvekova, Yu. N.; Popel, S. I.; Chen, B. B.

    2015-11-01

    A continuously stratified model of nonadiabatic terrestrial atmosphere with taking into account the temperature profile is developed to study a possibility of instability development of acoustic-gravity (AG-) waves. It is shown that the existence of the regions in the atmosphere where the instability conditions are satisfied is due to the cooperation of thermal flow of solar radiation, infrared emission of the atmosphere, water vapor condensation, as well as thermal conductivity. Large-amplitude vortices in Earth's troposphere and ionosphere and their possible structure as well as redistribution of dust particles in the ionosphere as a result of vortical motions are discussed. The following possibilities for the dust particle redistribution are studied: capture and evolution of dust particles in AG-vortices, formation of dust vortices as a result of involving a great number of dust particles into vortex motions, and formation of vertical and horizontal dust flows (streamers and zonal flows). It is shown that excitation of AG-vortices at the ionospheric altitudes as a result of development of AG-wave instability leads to a substantial transportation of dust particles and their mixing. Layers of dust particles with a thickness of about a kilometer, forming at the altitudes less than 120 km, distribute within the region of the existence of AG-vortical structures. As a result, at altitudes of 110-120 km, dust vortices can appear, and transportation of particles up to altitudes of 130 km becomes possible. One of the ways of transportation of dust particles in the ionosphere is dust flows, which are generated by dust vortices as a result of development of parametric instability.

  7. Atmospheric effects of stellar cosmic rays on Earth-like exoplanets orbiting M-dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabataba-Vakili, F.; Grenfell, J. L.; Grießmeier, J.-M.; Rauer, H.

    2016-01-01

    M-dwarf stars are generally considered favourable for rocky planet detection. However, such planets may be subject to extreme conditions due to possible high stellar activity. The goal of this work is to determine the potential effect of stellar cosmic rays on key atmospheric species of Earth-like planets orbiting in the habitable zone of M-dwarf stars and show corresponding changes in the planetary spectra. We build upon the cosmic rays model scheme of previous works, who considered cosmic ray induced NOx production, by adding further cosmic ray induced production mechanisms (e.g. for HOx) and introducing primary protons of a wider energy range (16 MeV-0.5 TeV). Previous studies suggested that planets in the habitable zone that are subject to strong flaring conditions have high atmospheric methane concentrations, while their ozone biosignature is completely destroyed. Our current study shows, however, that adding cosmic ray induced HOx production can cause a decrease in atmospheric methane abundance of up to 80%. Furthermore, the cosmic ray induced HOx molecules react with NOx to produce HNO3, which produces strong HNO3 signals in the theoretical spectra and reduces NOx-induced catalytic destruction of ozone so that more than 25% of the ozone column remains. Hence, an ozone signal remains visible in the theoretical spectrum (albeit with a weaker intensity) when incorporating the new cosmic ray induced NOx and HOx schemes, even for a constantly flaring M-star case. We also find that HNO3 levels may be high enough to be potentially detectable. Since ozone concentrations, which act as the key shield against harmful UV radiation, are affected by cosmic rays via NOx-induced catalytic destruction of ozone, the impact of stellar cosmic rays on surface UV fluxes is also studied.

  8. The Significance of Land-Atmosphere Processes in the Earth System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suni, T.; Kulmala, M. T.; Guenther, A. B.

    2012-12-01

    The land-atmosphere interface is where humans primarily operate. Humans modify the land surface in many ways that influence the fluxes of energy and trace gases between land and atmosphere. Their emissions change the chemical composition of the atmosphere and anthropogenic aerosols change the radiative balance of the globe directly by scattering sunlight back to space and indirectly by changing the properties of clouds. Feedback loops among all these processes, land, the atmosphere, and biogeochemical cycles of nutrients and trace gases extend the human influence even further. Over the last decade, the importance of land-atmosphere processes and feedbacks in the Earth System has been shown on many levels and with multiple approaches, and a number of publications have shown the crucial role of the terrestrial ecosystems as regulators of climate [1-6]. Modellers have clearly shown the effect of missing land cover changes and other feedback processes and regional characteristics in current climate models and recommended actions to improve them [7-11]. Unprecedented insights of the long-term net impacts of aerosols on clouds and precipitation have also been provided [12-14]. Land-cover change has been emphasized with model intercomparison projects that showed that realistic land-use representation was essential in land surface modelling [11, 15]. Crucially important tools in this research have been the networks of long-term flux stations and large-scale land-atmosphere observation platforms that are also beginning to combine remote sensing techniques with ground observations [16-20]. Human influence has always been an important part of land-atmosphere science but in order to respond to the new challenges of global sustainability, closer ties with social science and economics groups will be necessary to produce realistic estimates of land use and anthropogenic emissions by analysing future population increase, migration patterns, food production allocation, land

  9. Exploring Earth's Atmospheric Biology using a Platform-Extensible Sampling Payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentry, D.; Rothschild, L.

    2012-12-01

    The interactions between Earth's atmosphere and its biosphere, or aerobiology, remain a significant unknown. What few studies have been done conclusively show that Earth's atmosphere has a rich and dynamic microbial presence[Bowers et al., 2010]; that microbes suspended in air survive over long times (1-2 weeks)[Smith et al., 2010] and travel great distances (>5000 km)[Kellogg and Griffin, 2006]; that some airborne bacteria actively nucleate ice crystals, affecting meteorology[Delort et al., 2010]; and that the presence of microbes in the atmosphere has other planetary-scale effects[Delort et al., 2010]. Basic questions, however, such as the number of microbes present, their activity level and state, the different species present and their variance over time and space, remain largely unquantified. Compounding the significant physical and environmental challenges of reliable aerobiological sampling, collection and analysis of biological samples at altitudes above ~10-20 km has traditionally used ad hoc instrumentation and techniques, yielding primarily qualitative analytical results that lack a common basis for comparison[Bowers et al., 2010]. There is a strong need for broad-basis, repeatable, reliably comparable data about aerobiological basics. We describe here a high-altitude environmental and biological sampling project designed specifically to address these issues. The goal is a robust, reliable, re-usable sampling system, with open reproducibility and adaptability for multiple low-cost flight platforms (including ground-tethered systems, high-altitude balloons, and suborbital sounding rockets); by establishing a common modular payload structure for high-altitude sampling with appeal to a broad user base, we hope to encourage widespread collection of comparable aerobiological data. We are on our third prototype iteration, with demonstrated function of two sample capture modules, a support backbone (tracking, data logging, event response, etc.), a simple ground

  10. Satellite-tracking and earth-dynamics research programs. [geodetic and geophysical investigations and atmospheric research using satellite drag data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Satellite tracking and earth dynamics research programs are discussed. Geodetic and geophysical investigations are reported along with atmospheric research using satellite drag data. Satellite tracking network functions and support groups which are discussed include: network operations, communications, data-services division, moonwatch, and programming group.

  11. Detection of an Atmosphere Around the Super-Earth 55 Cancri e

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiaras, A.; Rocchetto, M.; Waldmann, I. P.; Venot, O.; Varley, R.; Morello, G.; Damiano, M.; Tinetti, G.; Barton, E. J.; Yurchenko, S. N.; Tennyson, J.

    2016-04-01

    We report the analysis of two new spectroscopic observations in the near-infrared of the super-Earth 55 Cancri e, obtained with the WFC3 camera on board the Hubble Space Telescope. 55 Cancri e orbits so close to its parent star that temperatures much higher than 2000 K are expected on its surface. Given the brightness of 55 Cancri, the observations were obtained in scanning mode, adopting a very long scanning length and a very high scanning speed. We use our specialized pipeline to take into account systematics introduced by these observational parameters when coupled with the geometrical distortions of the instrument. We measure the transit depth per wavelength channel with an average relative uncertainty of 22 ppm per visit and find modulations that depart from a straight line model with a 6σ confidence level. These results suggest that 55 Cancri e is surrounded by an atmosphere, which is probably hydrogen-rich. Our fully Bayesian spectral retrieval code, { T }-REx, has identified HCN to be the most likely molecular candidate able to explain the features at 1.42 and 1.54 μm. While additional spectroscopic observations in a broader wavelength range in the infrared will be needed to confirm the HCN detection, we discuss here the implications of such a result. Our chemical model, developed with combustion specialists, indicates that relatively high mixing ratios of HCN may be caused by a high C/O ratio. This result suggests this super-Earth is a carbon-rich environment even more exotic than previously thought.

  12. Application of locality principle to radio occultation studies of the Earth's atmosphere and ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavelyev, A. G.; Liou, Y. A.; Matyugov, S. S.; Pavelyev, A. A.; Gubenko, V. N.; Zhang, K.; Kuleshov, Y.

    2015-01-01

    A new formulation of previously introduced principle of locality is presented. The principle can be applied for modernization of the radio occultation (RO) remote sensing of the atmospheres and ionospheres of the Earth and planets. The principle states that significant contributions to variations of the amplitude and phase of the radio waves passing through a layered medium are connected with influence of the vicinities of tangential points where the refractivity gradient is perpendicular to the radio ray trajectory. The RO method assumes spherical symmetry of the investigated medium. In this case if location of a tangent point relative to the spherical symmetry center is known, the derivatives on time of the RO signal phase and Doppler frequency variations can be recalculated into the refractive attenuation. Several important findings are consequences of the locality principle: (i) if position of the center of symmetry is known, the total absorption along the ray path can be determined at a single frequency, (ii) in the case of low absorption the height, displacement from the radio ray perigee, and tilt of the inclined ionospheric (atmospheric) layers can be evaluated, (iii) the contributions of the layered and irregular structures in the RO signal can be separated and parameters of layers and turbulence can be measured at a single frequency using joint analysis of the amplitude and phase variations. Specially for the Earth's troposphere, the altitude distributions of the weak total absorption (about of 1-4 db) of the radio waves at GPS frequencies corresponding to possible influence of the oxygen and water vapor can be measured with accuracy of about 0.1 db at a single frequency. According with the locality principle, a new index of ionospheric activity is introduced. This index is measured from the phase variations of radio waves passing through the ionosphere. Its high correlation with S4 scintillation index is established. This correlation indicates the

  13. Application of the locality principle to radio occultation studies of the Earth's atmosphere and ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavelyev, A. G.; Liou, Y. A.; Matyugov, S. S.; Pavelyev, A. A.; Gubenko, V. N.; Zhang, K.; Kuleshov, Y.

    2015-07-01

    A new formulation of the previously introduced principle of locality is presented. The principle can be applied for modernization of the radio occultation (RO) remote sensing of the atmospheres and ionospheres of the Earth and other planets. The principle states that significant contributions to variations of the intensity and phase of the radio waves passing through a layered medium are connected with influence of the vicinities of tangential points where the refractivity gradient is perpendicular to the radio ray trajectory. The RO method assumes spherical symmetry of the investigated medium. In this case, if location of a tangent point relative to the spherical symmetry centre is known, the time derivatives of the RO signal phase and Doppler frequency variations can be recalculated into the refractive attenuation. Several important findings are consequences of the locality principle: (i) if position of the centre of symmetry is known, the total absorption along the ray path can be determined at a single frequency; (ii) in the case of low absorption the height, displacement from the radio ray perigee, and tilt of the inclined ionospheric (atmospheric) layers can be evaluated; (iii) the contributions of the layered and irregular structures in the RO signal can be separated and parameters of layers and turbulence can be measured at a single frequency using joint analysis of the intensity and phase variations. Specially for the Earth's troposphere, the altitude distributions of the weak total absorption (about of 1-4 db) of the radio waves at GPS frequencies corresponding to possible influence of the oxygen, water vapour, and hydrometeors can be measured with accuracy of about 0.1 db at a single frequency. In accordance with the locality principle, a new index of ionospheric activity is introduced. This index is measured from the phase variations of radio waves passing through the ionosphere. Its high correlation with the S4 scintillation index is established. This

  14. The Tropical Cyclones as the Possible Sources of Gamma Emission in the Earth's Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimov, S. I.; Sharkov, E. A.; Zelenyi, L. M.

    2009-12-01

    [*S. I. Klimov*] (Space Research Institute [IKI] of RAS; Profsoyuznaya 84/32, 117997 GSP-7 Moscow, Russia; Tel: +7 (495) 333-1100; Fax: +7 (495) 333-1248; e-mail: sklimov@iki.rssi.ru)): E. A. Sharkov (Space Research Institute [IKI] of RAS; Profsoyuznaya 84/32, 117997 GSP-7 Moscow, Russia; Tel: +7 (495) 333-1366; Fax: +7 (495) 333-1248; e-mail: e.sharkov@mail.ru): L. M. Zelenyi (Space Research Institute [IKI] of RAS; Profsoyuznaya 84/32, 117997 GSP-7 Moscow, Russia; Tel: +7 (495) 333-2588; Fax: +7 (495) 333-3311; e-mail: lzelenyi@iki.rssi.ru ): The tropical cyclones (TC) are the strongest sources of thunderstorm activity (and, correspondingly, electromagnetic activity in the wide frequency range) in the Earth's atmosphere. The area dimensions of active region comprise to 1000 km and they achieve vertical development to 16-20 km with speeds of the displacement of the charged drops of water of up to 30 m/s. In the work are evaluated the physical mechanisms of the possibility of generation by TC of gamma emission (TCGE), which can be fixed from the low-orbital spacecraft of the type of the potential Russian micro-satellite Chibis-M (MS) [Zelenyi, et al, Walter de Gruter, Berlin, New York, p. 443-451, 2005]. The study of the new physical mechanisms of the electrical discharges in the atmosphere is basic scientific task Chibis- M [Angarov et al. Wissenschaft und Technik Verlag, Berlin, 2009, p. 69-72]. Complex of scientific instruments of the Chibis-M (overall mass of 12,5 kg) including the instruments: - X-ray - gamma detector (range of X-ray and gamma emission - 50-500 keV), - UV detector (range UV - emission - 300-450 nm), - radiofrequency analyzer (20 - 50 MHz). - digital camber of optical range (spatial resolution 300 m). - plasma-wave complex (0.1-40 kHz), it can be used also for the TCGE study. Delivery Chibis-M into orbit, close to the ISS orbit is intended to carry out in second-half 2010. Micro-satellite "Chibis-M" now designed in IKI. Total mass "Chibis

  15. Sensitivity of elastic surface deformations caused by atmospheric, hydrologic, and oceanic loads to the Earth's crust and mantle properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dill, Robert; Klemann, Volker; Kaban, Mikhail; Dobslaw, Henryk; Thomas, Maik

    2016-04-01

    The elastic deformation of the Earth's surface due to atmospheric surface pressure, terrestrial water storage, and ocean bottom pressure on seasonal or shorter time scales is usually represented by a set of elastic load Love numbers or the corresponding Green's function, determined from a radial Earth structure like PREM. Thereby, the influence of local deviations of the Earth's crustal and mantle properties is assumed to be negligible. However, local Green's functions derived individually for 1° grid cells from the 3D crustal structure model CRUST1 show large variations for in particular smaller distance angles. The loading response due to small-scale surface loads extending over less than 2500km2 significantly depends on the heterogeneous shallow structure of the Earth. In this contribution, we discuss the influence of lateral variations in the crust and mantle structure on atmospheric, hydrologic, and oceanic surface loads with regard to their spatial scales and distribution. Non-tidal atmospheric loading is calculated from an atmospheric surface pressure time series covering four decades (1976 - 2015) based on 3-hourly atmospheric data of ECMWF that has been homogenized by mapping surface pressure to a common reference orography. Hydrological loading is calculated for daily terrestrial water storage from LSDM over the same time period, where the surface water compartment is mapped from the 0.5° model resolution to a 0.125° GIS-based river network. Ocean tidal loading is exemplarily calculated based on the FES2014 ocean tidal model (0.0625°). Especially along the coasts of the oceans; in regions with steep orographic gradients; and in areas with thick crustal layers or sediments we will show the significant influence of the Earth's structure on small-scale deformation features caused by surface loads.

  16. GPS Sounding of the Atmosphere from Low Earth Orbit: Preliminary Results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, R.; Rocken, C.; Solheim, F.; Exner, M.; Schreiner, W.; Anthes, R.; Feng, D.; Herman, B.; Gorbunov, M.; Sokolovskiy, S.; Hardy, K.; Kuo, Y.; Zou, X.; Trenberth, K.; Meehan, T.; Melbourne, W.; Businger, S.

    1996-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the methodology of and describes preliminary results from an experiment called GPS/MET (Global Positioning System/Meteorology), in which temperature soundings are obtained from a low Earth-orbiting satellite using the radio occultation technique. Launched into a circular orbit of about 750-km altitude and 70° inclination on 3 April 1995, a small research satellite, MicroLab 1, carried a laptop-sized radio receiver. Each time this receiver rises and sets relative to the 24 operational GPS satellites, the GPS radio waves transect successive layers of the atmosphere and are bent (refracted) by the atmosphere before they reach the receiver, causing a delay in the dual-frequency carrier phase observations sensed by the receiver. During this occultation, GPS limb sounding measurements are obtained from which vertical profiles of atmospheric refractivity can be computed. The refractivity is a function of pressure, temperature, and water vapor and thus provides information on these variables that has the potential to be useful in weather prediction and weather and climate research.Because of the dependence of refractivity on both temperature and water vapor, it is generally impossible to compute both variables from a refractivity sounding. However, if either temperature or water vapor is known from independent measurements or from model predictions, the other variable may be calculated. In portions of the atmosphere where moisture effects are negligible (typically above 5-7 km), temperature may be estimated directly from refractivity.This paper compares a representative sample of 11 temperature profiles derived from GPS/MET soundings (assuming a dry atmosphere) with nearby radiosonde and high-resolution balloon soundings and the operational gridded analysis of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (formerly the National Meteorological Center). One CPS/MET profile was obtained at a location where a temperature profile from the

  17. Geostationary Spectrograph (GeoSpec) for Earth and Atmospheric Science Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janz, Scott J.

    2003-01-01

    GeoSpec will support several possible future mission concepts in the Atmospheric Sciences and in Land and Ocean Sciences by measurement of both chemically linked atmospheric trace gas concentrations and profiles of important molecules such as OS, N02, CH20 and SO2 and at the same time coastal and ocean pollution events, tidal effects, and the origin and evolution of aerosol plumes. The instrument design concept we will describe is a dual spectrograph covering the WMS wavelength region of 310- 481 nm and the VIS/NIR wavelength region of 500-900 nm. A third channel in the short- wave infrared (SWIR) region between 2.2 p and 2.4 pn for total column measurements of CO, CH4, and N20 will also be described. The goal is to design a system capable of making moderate spatial resolution (750 meters at nadir) hyperspectral measurements (0.2 to 1.2 nm resolution) from a geostationary orbit. This would enable studies of time- varying pollution and coastal change processes with a temporal resolution of 5 minutes on a regional scale to 1 hour on a continental scale. Technological advances in the design and fabrication of convex holographic gratings and large format, high dynamic range PIN/CMOS detectors at the focal plane will be exploited. By simply changing the focal length of the front-end telescope GeoSpec can accommodate different orbital altitudes, including low Earth orbit, the Sun-side Lagrangian point L1, and/or different spatial resolutions.

  18. Climate variability and relationships between top-of-atmosphere radiation and temperatures on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenberth, Kevin E.; Zhang, Yongxin; Fasullo, John T.; Taguchi, Shoichi

    2015-05-01

    The monthly global and regional variability in Earth's radiation balance is examined using correlations and regressions between atmospheric temperatures and water vapor with top-of-atmosphere outgoing longwave (OLR), absorbed shortwave (ASR), and net radiation (RT = ASR - OLR). Anomalous global mean monthly variability in the net radiation is surprisingly large, often more than ±1 W m-2, and arises mainly from clouds and transient weather systems. Relationships are strongest and positive between OLR and temperatures, especially over land for tropospheric temperatures, except in the deep tropics where high sea surface temperatures are associated with deep convection, high cold cloud tops and thus less OLR but also less ASR. Tropospheric vertically averaged temperatures (surface = 150 hPa) are thus negatively correlated globally with net radiation (-0.57), implying 2.18 ± 0.10 W m-2 extra net radiation to space for 1°C increase in temperature. Water vapor is positively correlated with tropospheric temperatures and thus also negatively correlated with net radiation; however, when the temperature dependency of water vapor is statistically removed, a significant positive feedback between water vapor and net radiation is revealed globally with 0.87 W m-2 less OLR to space per millimeter of total column water vapor. The regression coefficient between global RT and tropospheric temperature becomes -2.98 W m-2 K-1 if water vapor effects are removed, slightly less than expected from blackbody radiation (-3.2 W m-2 K-1), suggesting a positive feedback from clouds and other processes. Robust regional structures provide additional physical insights. The observational record is too short, weather noise too great, and forcing too small to make reliable estimates of climate sensitivity.

  19. OBSERVATIONAL EVIDENCE FOR A METAL-RICH ATMOSPHERE ON THE SUPER-EARTH GJ1214b

    SciTech Connect

    Desert, Jean-Michel; Jacob Bean; Berta, Zachory K.; Charbonneau, David; Irwin, Jonathan; Burke, Christopher J.; Kempton, Eliza Miller-Ricci; Fortney, Jonathan; Nutzman, Philip

    2011-04-20

    We report observations of two consecutive transits of the warm super-Earth exoplanet GJ 1214b at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m with the Infrared Array Camera instrument on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. The two transit light curves allow for the determination of the transit parameters for this system. We find these parameters to be consistent with the previously determined values and no evidence for transit timing variations. The main investigation consists of measuring the transit depths in each bandpass to constrain the planet's transmission spectrum. Fixing the system scale and impact parameters, we measure R{sub p} /R{sub *} = 0.1176{sup +0.0008}{sub -0.0009} and 0.1163{sup +0.0010}{sub -0.0008} at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m, respectively. Combining these data with the previously reported MEarth Observatory measurements in the red optical allows us to rule out a cloud-free, solar composition (i.e., hydrogen-dominated) atmosphere at 4.5{sigma} confidence. This independently confirms a recent finding that was based on a measurement of the planet's transmission spectrum using the Very Large Telescope (VLT). The Spitzer, MEarth, and VLT observations together yield a remarkably flat transmission spectrum over the large wavelength domain spanned by the data. Consequently, cloud-free atmospheric models require more than 30% metals (assumed to be in the form of H{sub 2}O) by volume to be consistent with all the observations.

  20. Atmospheric influences on infrared-laser signals used for occultation measurements between Low Earth Orbit satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, S.; Kirchengast, G.; Proschek, V.

    2011-10-01

    LEO-LEO infrared-laser occultation (LIO) is a new occultation technique between Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites, which applies signals in the short wave infrared spectral range (SWIR) within 2 μm to 2.5 μm. It is part of the LEO-LEO microwave and infrared-laser occultation (LMIO) method that enables to retrieve thermodynamic profiles (pressure, temperature, humidity) and altitude levels from microwave signals and profiles of greenhouse gases and further variables such as line-of-sight wind speed from simultaneously measured LIO signals. Due to the novelty of the LMIO method, detailed knowledge of atmospheric influences on LIO signals and of their suitability for accurate trace species retrieval did not yet exist. Here we discuss these influences, assessing effects from refraction, trace species absorption, aerosol extinction and Rayleigh scattering in detail, and addressing clouds, turbulence, wind, scattered solar radiation and terrestrial thermal radiation as well. We show that the influence of refractive defocusing, foreign species absorption, aerosols and turbulence is observable, but can be rendered small to negligible by use of the differential transmission principle with a close frequency spacing of LIO absorption and reference signals within 0.5%. The influences of Rayleigh scattering and terrestrial thermal radiation are found negligible. Cloud-scattered solar radiation can be observable under bright-day conditions, but this influence can be made negligible by a close time spacing (within 5 ms) of interleaved laser-pulse and background signals. Cloud extinction loss generally blocks SWIR signals, except very thin or sub-visible cirrus clouds, which can be addressed by retrieving a cloud layering profile and exploiting it in the trace species retrieval. Wind can have a small influence on the trace species absorption, which can be made negligible by using a simultaneously retrieved or a moderately accurate background wind speed profile. We conclude that

  1. Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) Acceleration of the Goddard Earth Observing System Atmospheric Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, Williama

    2011-01-01

    The Goddard Earth Observing System 5 (GEOS-5) is the atmospheric model used by the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) for a variety of applications, from long-term climate prediction at relatively coarse resolution, to data assimilation and numerical weather prediction, to very high-resolution cloud-resolving simulations. GEOS-5 is being ported to a graphics processing unit (GPU) cluster at the NASA Center for Climate Simulation (NCCS). By utilizing GPU co-processor technology, we expect to increase the throughput of GEOS-5 by at least an order of magnitude, and accelerate the process of scientific exploration across all scales of global modeling, including: The large-scale, high-end application of non-hydrostatic, global, cloud-resolving modeling at 10- to I-kilometer (km) global resolutions Intermediate-resolution seasonal climate and weather prediction at 50- to 25-km on small clusters of GPUs Long-range, coarse-resolution climate modeling, enabled on a small box of GPUs for the individual researcher After being ported to the GPU cluster, the primary physics components and the dynamical core of GEOS-5 have demonstrated a potential speedup of 15-40 times over conventional processor cores. Performance improvements of this magnitude reduce the required scalability of 1-km, global, cloud-resolving models from an unfathomable 6 million cores to an attainable 200,000 GPU-enabled cores.

  2. Spatial characteristics of airglow and solar scatter radiance from the earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huguenin, R.; Wohlers, R.; Weinberg, M.; Huffman, R. E.; Eastes, R. W.; Delgreco, F. P.

    1989-08-01

    Data measured by the Polar BEAR/AIRS UV Experiment were processed to extract spatial radiance characteristics. Photometer mode 1304A dayside data measured on Julian Day 219, 1897, near mid-day were analysed. The spatial structure of thermospheric dayside radiance at 1304A appeared to be controlled principally by turbulence over spatial scales of 10 million to 100 meters, with modifications imposed by Rayleigh scattering effects and magnetospherically forced phenomena. Spatial structure can be adequately modeled fractally, using dimensions based on Kolmogorov formalism modified by the Rayleigh scattering phase function. Mean radiance can be modeled using existing models of radiant intensity, resonance scattering, and absorption combined with thermospheric composition and general circulation models, such as MSIS-83, scaled to the mean and RHS intensities measured by Polar BEAR. The results can be incorporated in a background radiance simulation model that will provide a means for testing and refining phenomenological models of the structured earth background. This will be important not only for improving physical and chemical models of atmospheric features and processes, but it will allow parametric predictions of spatial structure and clutter to be developed for sensor applications.

  3. Composition of LHB Comets and Their Influence on the Early Earth Atmosphere Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tornow, C.; Kupper, S.; Ilgner, M.; Kuehrt, E.; Motschmann, U.

    2011-01-01

    Two main processes were responsible for the composition of this atmosphere: chemical evolution of the volatile fraction of the accretion material forming the planet and the delivery of gasses to the planetary surface by impactors during the late heavy bombardment (LHB). The amount and composition of the volatile fraction influences the outgassing of the Earth mantle during the last planetary formation period. A very weakened form of outgassing activity can still be observed today by examining the composition of volcanic gasses. An enlightenment of the second process is based on the sparse records of the LHB impactors resulting from the composition of meteorites, observed cometary comas, and the impact material found on the Moon. However, for an assessment of the influence of the outgassing on the one hand and the LHB event on the other, one has to supplement the observations with numerical simulations of the formation of volatiles and their incorporation into the accretion material which is the precursors of planetary matter, comets and asteroids. These simulations are performed with a combined hydrodynamic-chemical model of the solar nebula (SN). We calculate the chemical composition of the gas and dust phase of the SN. From these data, we draw conclusions on the upper limits of the water content and the amount of carbon and nitrogen rich volatiles incorporated later into the accretion material. Knowing these limits we determine the portion of major gas compounds delivered during the LHB and compare it with the related quantities of the outgassed species.

  4. Analytical yield spectrum approach to electron energy degradation in earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, S. A.; Singhal, R. P.

    1983-09-01

    The analytical yield spectrum approach developed by Green et al. (1977) and Jackman and Green (1979) and extended by Singhal et al. (1980) and Singhal and Green (1981) is used to calculate the electron flux, excitation, and ionization profiles. The method, as applied in its full detail to the earth's atmosphere, is introduced, and the results it yields are compared with those obtained by Banks et al. (1974) and Mantas and Walker (1976). With regard to excitation, good agreement with the results of Mantas and Walker is found as far as the position of the peak is concerned. At low altitudes, the results obtained here show a gradual fall off of the excitation rate; this is in contrast to the sharp cutoff obtained by Mantas and Walker. A possible reason for this is that the present results are based on Monte Carlo studies in which the electrons are followed down to the lowest excitation threshold. This leads to more straggling. Another reason for the low altitude tail may involve the use of smooth analytical functions.

  5. Spatial characteristics of airglow and solar-scatter radiance from the earth's atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Huguenin, R.; Wohlers, R.; Weinberg, M.; Huffman, R.; Eastes, R.

    1989-08-09

    Data measured by the Polar BEAR/AIRS UV Experiment were processed to extract spatial-radiance characteristics. Photometer-mode 1304A dayside data measured on Julian Day 219, 1987, near mid-day were analyzed. The spatial structure of thermospheric dayside radiance at 1304A appeared to be controlled principally by turbulence over spatial scales of 10 million - 100 meters, with modifications imposed by Rayleigh-scattering effects and magnetospherically forced phenomena. Spatial structure can be adequately modeled fractally, using dimensions based on Kolmogorov formalism modified by the Rayleigh scattering phase function. Mean radiance can be modeled using existing models of radiant intensity, resonance scattering, and absorption combined with thermospheric composition and general circulation models, such as MSIS-83, scaled to the mean and RHS intensities measured by Polar BEAR. The results can be incorporated in a background radiance simulation model that will provide a means for testing and refining phenomenological models of the structured earth background. This will be important not only for improving physical and chemical models of atmospheric features and processes, but it will allow parametric predictions of spatial structure and clutter to be developed for sensor applications.

  6. The distribution of solar proton energy on electronic states of molecules in the atmospheres of Earth and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillov, Andrey S.; Werner, Rolf; Guineva, Veneta

    Precipitations of intensive fluxes of high-energy solar protons in the atmospheres of terrestrial planets cause electronic excitation of main molecular components of the atmospheres. Electronically excited molecules play very important role in chemical balances of the atmospheres. Recent investigations of Seppala et al. [2008, J. Geophys. Res., v.113, A11311] and Lillis et al. [2012, J. Geophys. Res., v.117, E03004] consider the precipitations of solar energetic particles in the atmospheres of Earth and Mars, consequently. The main aim of our studies is the development of a model of electronic and vibrational kinetics of molecular components in the atmospheres of terrestrial planets. The calculated quenching rate coefficients of electronically excited molecules are applied in the simulations of vibrational populations of N2, CO, O2 electronic states in the mixture of N2, O2, CO, CO2 gases. We consider electronic kinetics of triplet states of N2 and CO and the kinetics of Herzberg states of O2. The calculations are made for the altitudes of the atmospheres of Earth and Mars.

  7. In-flight measurement of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)-10 static Earth sensor error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvie, E.; Filla, O.; Baker, D.

    1993-01-01

    Analysis performed in the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Flight Dynamics Division (FDD) measures error in the static Earth sensor onboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)-10 spacecraft using flight data. Errors are computed as the difference between Earth sensor pitch and roll angle telemetry and reference pitch and roll attitude histories propagated by gyros. The flight data error determination illustrates the effect on horizon sensing of systemic variation in the Earth infrared (IR) horizon radiance with latitude and season, as well as the effect of anomalies in the global IR radiance. Results of the analysis provide a comparison between static Earth sensor flight performance and that of scanning Earth sensors studied previously in the GSFC/FDD. The results also provide a baseline for evaluating various models of the static Earth sensor. Representative days from the NOAA-10 mission indicate the extent of uniformity and consistency over time of the global IR horizon. A unique aspect of the NOAA-10 analysis is the correlation of flight data errors with independent radiometric measurements of stratospheric temperature. The determination of the NOAA-10 static Earth sensor error contributes to realistic performance expectations for missions to be equipped with similar sensors.

  8. Accumulation and fractionation of rare earth elements in atmospheric particulates around a mine tailing in Baotou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lingqing; Liang, Tao

    2014-05-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) have been increasingly emitted into the atmosphere with a worldwide increase in use of these metals. However, the research on REEs in atmospheric particulates is fairly limited. In this paper, atmospheric particulates including total suspended particulate (TSP) matter and particles with an equivalent aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm (PM10) were collected around a rare earth mine tailing in Baotou, the largest rare earth industrial base in China, in August 2012 and March 2013, for the analyses of REE levels and distributions. The total concentrations of REEs for TSP were 172.91 and 297.49 ng/m3, and those for PM10 were 63.23 and 105.52 ng/m3, in August 2012 and March 2013, respectively. Enrichment factors for all 14 analyzed REEs in the TSP and PM10 indicated that the REE enrichment in atmosphere particulates was caused by anthropogenic sources and influenced by the strong wind in spring season. The spatial distribution of REEs in TSP showed a strong gradient in the prevailing wind direction. The chondrite-normalized patterns of REEs in TSP and PM10 were similar with the conspicuous fractionation between light REEs and heavy REEs.

  9. The annual radiation balance of the earth-atmosphere system during 1969-70 from Nimbus 3 measurements.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raschke, E.; Vonder Haar, T. H.; Bandeen, W. R.; Pasternak , M.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements of reflected solar radiation and emitted thermal radiation taken with a radiometer on the meteorological satellite Nimbus 3 during 10 semi-monthly periods (April-15 August, 3-17 October, 1969; 21 January-3 February, 1970) provided for the first time high-resolution data on the earth's annual global radiation budget. Results on the planetary albedo, the amount of absorbed solar radiation, the infrared radiation loss to space, and the radiation balance of the earth-atmosphere system are discussed at various scales: global, hemispherical, and zonal averages; as well as global and polar maps with a spatial resolution of about synoptic scale.

  10. Impact features tracing hypervelocity airbursts on earth from the atmosphere to the ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courty, M. M.

    2012-12-01

    In the absence of deep craters, impact features have been debated to possibly tracing proximal ejecta from yet undetected structure or airburst debris from a meteorite collision with the terrestrial atmosphere or lithosphere. We examine the possibility for impact features to have originated from the shock layer formed ahead of a hypervelocity collider in the earth atmosphere. This hypothesis is approached by comparing impact features from controlled materials to puzzling geological ones: (1) debris collected at the ground from a high altitude meteor airburst recorded on 2011 August 2nd in Southern France; (2) laboratory experiments performed for defense purposes at the CEA Gramat Center (France) with the Persephone hypervelocity light gas gun; (3) the Zhamanshin impact breccia, the Lybian glass, the Egyptian Dakhleh glass, the Tasmanian Darwin glass, the Australasian tektite strewnfield and the Australian Henbury crater field. The Persephone experiments include collisions from 4.1 to 7.9 km/s by a steel projectile embedded into a polycarbonate holder with a polystyrene separator on to a 40 mm thick aluminum target. The impact features been characterized by coupling Environmental SEM with EDS, Raman micro-spectrometry, XRD, TEM, Tof-SIMS, ICP-MS and isotope analyses. Similar carbonaceous polymorphs that are closely imbricated at meso to nano-scales to the crystallized components (including the metal blebs) and to the glass phases (spherules or matrix) are present in all the impact features studied. They dominantly consist of aliphatic polymers, rare aromatic compounds, with graphite-lonsdaleite inclusions. The Persephone experiments help relating the graphite-lonsdaleite couple to transformed organic residues by the transient high pressure shock (a few tens MPa) and the transient heating (ca 100°C) and the aliphatic polymers to new hydrocarbons that formed from the pulverized polycarbonate and polystyrene. The Persephone experiments provide the controlled situation

  11. Atmospheric influences on infrared-laser signals used for occultation measurements between Low Earth Orbit satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, S.; Kirchengast, G.; Proschek, V.

    2011-05-01

    LEO-LEO infrared-laser occultation (LIO) is a new occultation technique between Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites, which applies signals in the short wave infrared spectral range (SWIR) within 2 μm to 2.5 μm. It is part of the LEO-LEO microwave and infrared-laser occultation (LMIO) method, recently introduced by Kirchengast and Schweitzer (2011), that enables to retrieve thermodynamic profiles (pressure, temperature, humidity) and accurate altitude levels from microwave signals and profiles of greenhouse gases and further variables such as line-of-sight wind speed from simultaneously measured LIO signals. For enabling trace species retrieval based on differential transmission, the LIO signals are spectrally located as pairs, one in the centre of a suitable absorption line of a target species (absorption signal) and one close by but outside of any absorption lines (reference signal). Due to the novelty of the LMIO method, detailed knowledge of atmospheric influences on LIO signals and of their suitability for accurate trace species retrieval did not yet exist. Here we discuss the atmospheric influences on the transmission and differential transmission of LIO signals. Refraction effects, trace species absorption (by target species, and cross-sensitivity to foreign species), aerosol extinction and Rayleigh scattering are studied in detail. The influences of clouds, turbulence, wind, scattered solar radiation and terrestrial thermal radiation are discussed as well. We show that the influence of defocusing, foreign species absorption, aerosols and turbulence is observable, but can be rendered small to negligible by use of the differential transmission principle and by a design with close frequency spacing of absorption and reference signals within 0.5 %. The influences of Rayleigh scattering and thermal radiation on the received signal intensities are found negligible. Cloud-scattered solar radiation can be observable under bright-day conditions but this influence can

  12. Trajectory Control for Vehicles Entering the Earth's Atmosphere at Small Flight Path Angles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggleston, John M.

    1959-01-01

    Methods of controlling the trajectories of high-drag-low-lift vehicles entering the earth's atmosphere at angles of attack near 90 deg and at initial entry angles up to 3 deg are studied. The trajectories are calculated for vehicles whose angle of attack can be held constant at some specified value or can be perfectly controlled as a function of some measured quantity along the trajectory. The results might be applied in the design of automatic control systems or in the design of instruments which will give the human pilot sufficient information to control his trajectory properly during an atmospheric entry. Trajectory data are compared on the basis of the deceleration, range, angle of attack, and, in some cases, the rate of descent. The aerodynamic heat-transfer rate and skin temperature of a vehicle with a simple heat-sink type of structure are calculated for trajectories made with several types of control functions. For the range of entry angles considered, it is found that the angle of attack can be controlled to restrict the deceleration down to an arbitrarily chosen level of 3g. All the control functions tried are successful in reducing the maximum deceleration to the desired level. However, in order to avoid a tendency for the deceleration to reach an initial peak decrease, and then reach a second peak, some anticipation is required in the control function so that the change in angle of attack will lead the change in deceleration. When the angle of attack is controlled in the aforementioned manner, the maximum rate of aerodynamic heat transfer to the skin is reduced, the maximum skin temperature of the vehicle is virtually unaffected, and the total heat absorbed is slightly increased. The increase in total heat can be minimized, however, by maintaining the maximum desired deceleration for as much of the trajectory as possible. From an initial angle of attack of 90 deg, the angle-of-attack requirements necessary to maintain constant values of deceleration (1g

  13. Numerical estimates of seismic effects after collisions of small bodies with the Earth atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svetsov, Vladimir; Shuvalov, Valery

    Small bodies - meteoroids, asteroids or cometary objects of moderate size (10 - 100 m) every so often do not survive the entry through the planetary atmosphere and release their energy at some altitudes. Then the aerial blast waves reach the ground and generate Rayleigh seismic surface waves. The magnitude of the following earthquake can be significant as in the cases of the Tunguska event of 30 June 1908 or the Chelyabinsk airburst of 15 February 2013. If the pressure on the ground is known as a function of coordinates and time, the energy of seismic waves can be calculated using a solution of Lamb’s problem of the response to vertical load acting on the surface of an elastic half-space. The numerical procedure includes calculations of pressure spectra and integrals which are proportional to the energy of seismic waves. The final formula for the calculation of earthquake magnitudes was calibrated using published results of measurements made during nuclear tests on Novaya Zemlya in 1961 - 1962. We carried out numerical simulations of the aerial shock waves in Chelyabinsk event of 15 February 2013, using hydrodynamic codes. The energy input along the atmospheric trajectory inclined at 19° to the Earth surface was assumed to be proportional to the radiation intensity derived from numerous video records. The calculated magnitude of the seismic source proved to be 3.85 on the assumption that the initial kinetic energy of the asteroid was 300 kt TNT. For the energy of 500 kt TNT the magnitude was 4.0. These values are in agreement with the results of magnitude records within the measurement errors. We also calculated the magnitudes of earthquakes caused by spherical explosions with the energies from 30 kt to 30 Mt TNT (bodies from ~7 to 70 m in size) at altitudes from 5 to 45 km. The earthquake magnitude of the Chelyabinsk event corresponds to a spherical explosion at an altitude of about 35 km. For the Tunguska event of 1908, we obtained the earthquake magnitudes

  14. The fate of the hydroxyl radical in the earth's primitive atmosphere and implications for the production of molecular oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vander Wood, T. B.; Thiemens, M. H.

    1980-01-01

    Behavior of the hydroxyl radical produced by the photolysis of water vapor in the earth's early atmosphere is examined. Because of the substantial OH radical reactivity with trace species (CO, HCl, SO2, H2S, NH3, and CH4) the formation of molecular oxygen may be prevented, even at a trace species mixing ratio. The photolysis rate of H2O, with corrections for hydrogen exospheric escape, is capable of describing the oxidation of the atmosphere and crust but may not be used to determine the rate of molecular oxygen generation without consideration of the various OH-trace species reactions.

  15. Comment on the letter 'On the influx of small comets into the earth's upper atmosphere. II - Interpretation'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Yosio; Oberst, Jurgen; Clifford, Stephen M.; Bills, Bruce G.

    1986-01-01

    A critical comment is made on the proposal by Frank et al. (1986) that a flux of small comets constantly impacts the earth's atmosphere. It is argued that the interpretation of the 'atmospheric holes' in terms of such an influx is difficult to reconcile with the fact that the lunar seismic network set up during the Apollo project did not detect such an influx. Frank et al. reply that this discrepancy may be traced to the insensitivity of the lunar seismic stations for the detection of the impacts of tenuous, weakly bound comets relative to those of dense, stony meteoroids.

  16. THE HABITABLE ZONE OF EARTH-LIKE PLANETS WITH DIFFERENT LEVELS OF ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE

    SciTech Connect

    Vladilo, Giovanni; Murante, Giuseppe; Silva, Laura; Provenzale, Antonello; Ferri, Gaia; Ragazzini, Gregorio

    2013-04-10

    As a contribution to the study of the habitability of extrasolar planets, we implemented a one-dimensional energy balance model (EBM), the simplest seasonal model of planetary climate, with new prescriptions for most physical quantities. Here we apply our EBM to investigate the surface habitability of planets with an Earth-like atmospheric composition but different levels of surface pressure. The habitability, defined as the mean fraction of the planet's surface on which liquid water could exist, is estimated from the pressure-dependent liquid water temperature range, taking into account seasonal and latitudinal variations of surface temperature. By running several thousands of EBM simulations we generated a map of the habitable zone (HZ) in the plane of the orbital semi-major axis, a, and surface pressure, p, for planets in circular orbits around a Sun-like star. As pressure increases, the HZ becomes broader, with an increase of 0.25 AU in its radial extent from p = 1/3 to 3 bar. At low pressure, the habitability is low and varies with a; at high pressure, the habitability is high and relatively constant inside the HZ. We interpret these results in terms of the pressure dependence of the greenhouse effect, the efficiency of horizontal heat transport, and the extent of the liquid water temperature range. Within the limits discussed in the paper, the results can be extended to planets in eccentric orbits around non-solar-type stars. The main characteristics of the pressure-dependent HZ are modestly affected by variations of planetary properties, particularly at high pressure.

  17. Atmospheric pressure forced oceans and their effects on Earth's Rotation: a TOPEX data approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, N.; Dickman, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    Dey & Dickman [2010] showed (using a theoretical model) that the oceanic response to atmospheric pressure forcing depends on the frequency and spatial pattern of the forcing. We have developed an observational Green's function approach to determine the frequency- and spatially dependent sea-level response using satellite altimetric data. We applied it to 12 years of TOPEX sea-surface height (SSH) observations smoothed over a 4° × 8° grid at 3 day intervals and corrected for tides, winds, annual signals and secular trends. Wiener filtering, generalized for complex time series, was used to isolate pressure forced SSH within each gridbox. In most of the gridboxes, that SSH, after accounting for the forcing, showed a spatial and spectral dependence - a significant departure from the "inverted barometer" response. The oceanic currents associated with the response were calculated from a spherical harmonic relation between current velocities and SSH [Dickman 1991]. The rotational effects (polar motion and change in Earth's spin rate) of the pressure forced SSH & associated currents - with the pressure forcing accounted for, these are essentially Green's functions - were calculated at specific periods and interpolated to other periods. The rotational effects calculated here are dominated by the pressure-forced SSH and show a strong frequency dependence & significant departures from an inverted barometer excitation. The pressure forced SSH is effective in exciting both prograde & retrograde polar motion at periods of ~ 6 days, and prograde polar motion at periods of 10 - 15 days. Compared to the theoretical approach, our work finds that the prograde component shows higher amplitude and less spatial variability, whereas the other components are ~ similar in amplitude & spatial variability. When these Green's functions are combined with any time span of pressure data, they generate the total excitation for that time span. We will discuss the results for various spans of

  18. Study of Earth and Jupiter-like plasmas for atmospheric entries using a non-transferred arc torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menecier, S.; Gouy, P. A.; Duffour, E.; Perisse, F.; Vacher, D.; Cerqueira, N.; Dudeck, M.; Reynier, Ph; Marraffa, L.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents the results obtained by a 100 kW non-transferred arc plasma torch dedicated to the studies of plasmas characteristics of atmospheric entries of spatial probes, especially Earth and Jupiter entries. Spectra acquisition of the produced plasmas is achieved using optical emission spectroscopy. For Earth entry conditions, air plasma was obtained with a maximal temperature around 6800 K with a good agreement using atomic lines of oxygen and nitrogen (and also copper coming from electrode’s ablation) and molecular bands of N2, CN and \\text{N}2+ , testifying to a good thermal equilibrium. As the first step in the study of Jupiter atmospheric entry, pure helium plasma was produced with the same maximal temperature of about 7500 K. Helium plasma was achieved for the first time using the plasma torch. Recorded spectra show a continuum, He I lines as well as copper. He II lines are not detected.

  19. Dielectric Properties of Rare-Earth-Oxide-Doped BaTiO3 Ceramics Fired in Reducing Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okino, Yoshikazu; Shizuno, Hisamitsu; Kusumi, Shinya; Kishi, Hiroshi

    1994-09-01

    In order to gain an understanding of highly reliable electrical characteristics for the Ho-doped multilayer ceramic capacitors with Ni electrodes, dielectric properties of various rare-earth-oxide-doped BaTiO3 ceramics were studied. The smaller ionic radius rare-earth-oxide (Dy, Ho, Er)-doped samples showed lower resistivity in reducing atmosphere, but higher resistivity in oxidizing atmosphere at the cooling stage, compared with the larger-ion (La, Sm, Gd)-doped samples. Multilayer ceramic capacitors with Ni electrodes using the smaller-ion-doped materials showed smaller aging rate and longer lifetime. We developed Ni-electrode MLCs with X7R specification as 1 µ F in the 2125 type.

  20. Influence of Space Weather Effects on the Upper Atmosphere According to the Drag of Artificial Earth Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komendant, V. H.; Koshkin, N. I.; Ryabov, M. I.; Sukharev, A. L.

    The applying of the method of timefrequency analysis allows to reveal the detailed structure of the manifestations of the influence of the space weather's state on the upper atmosphere of the Earth. The sensitive indicator of such changes are low-orbit satellites. The drag dynamics of five low-orbit satellites was viewed as indicators manifestations of the influence of space weather on the Earth upper atmosphere. The study period includes phases of decay and a long minimum of 23-rd solar cycle, phases of growth and maximum of 24-th solar cycle. In drag dynamics of all the analyzed satellites strongly marked regular drag effects with long periods (2-4 years) and short-period effects with periods less than one year. The satellites with orbital inclinations close to the equator shows periods with trend from 25 days to 1,3 months.

  1. Cloud Effects on Meridional Atmospheric Energy Budget Estimated from Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kato, Seiji; Rose, Fred G.; Rutan, David A.; Charlock, Thomas P.

    2008-01-01

    The zonal mean atmospheric cloud radiative effect, defined as the difference of the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) and surface cloud radiative effects, is estimated from three years of Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) data. The zonal mean shortwave effect is small, though it tends to be positive (warming). This indicates that clouds increase shortwave absorption in the atmosphere, especially in midlatitudes. The zonal mean atmospheric cloud radiative effect is, however, dominated by the longwave effect. The zonal mean longwave effect is positive in the tropics and decreases with latitude to negative values (cooling) in polar regions. The meridional gradient of cloud effect between midlatitude and polar regions exists even when uncertainties in the cloud effect on the surface enthalpy flux and in the modeled irradiances are taken into account. This indicates that clouds increase the rate of generation of mean zonal available potential energy. Because the atmospheric cooling effect in polar regions is predominately caused by low level clouds, which tend to be stationary, we postulate that the meridional and vertical gradients of cloud effect increase the rate of meridional energy transport by dynamics in the atmosphere from midlatitude to polar region, especially in fall and winter. Clouds then warm the surface in polar regions except in the Arctic in summer. Clouds, therefore, contribute in increasing the rate of meridional energy transport from midlatitude to polar regions through the atmosphere.

  2. A study of the motion and aerodynamic heating of missiles entering the earth's atmosphere at high supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Julian H; Eggers, A J , Jr

    1957-01-01

    A simplified analysis of the velocity and deceleration history of missiles entering the earth's atmosphere at high supersonic speeds is presented. The results of this motion analysis are employed to indicate means available to the designer for minimizing aerodynamic heating. The heating problem considered involves not only the total heat transferred to a missile by convection, but also the maximum average and local time rates of convective heat transfer.

  3. Experimental validation of a millimeter wave radar technique to remotely sense atmospheric pressure at the Earth's surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, D. A.; Peckham, G. E.; Bradford, W. J.

    1984-01-01

    Experiments with a millimeter wave radar operating on the NASA CV-990 aircraft which validate the technique for remotely sensing atmospheric pressure at the Earth's surface are described. Measurements show that the precise millimeter wave observations needed to deduce pressure from space with an accuracy of 1 mb are possible, that sea surface reflection properties agree with theory and that the measured variation of differential absorption with altitude corresponds to that expected from spectroscopic models.

  4. A study of the motion and aerodynamic heating of ballistic missiles entering the earth's atmosphere at high supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, H Julian; Eggers, A J , Jr

    1958-01-01

    A simplified analysis of the velocity and deceleration history of ballistic missiles entering the earth's atmosphere at high supersonic speeds is presented. The results of this motion analysis are employed to indicate means available to the designer for minimizing aerodynamic heating. The heating problem considered involves not only the total heat transferred to a missile by convection, but also the maximum average and local time rates of convective heat transfer.

  5. Temperature dependence of molecular atmospheric transmission function in field of 2--400 {micro}m and the earth radiation balance

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharov, V.I.; Gribanov, K.G.; Falko, M.V.; Golovko, V.F.; Chursin, A.A.; Nikitin, A.V.; Husson, N.; Scott, N.A.; Tyuterev, V.G.

    1996-12-31

    The global climate change problem becomes actual by the end of the 20th century. Its many important aspects are: the change of molecular composition of the earth`s atmosphere (in particular, the accumulation of CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, SO{sub 2} in the atmosphere), and the problem of ozone layer depletion. This paper is devoted to the investigation of fundamental mechanisms of the atmospheric transmission function influence, in the field of 2--400 mm and especially in the range of windows 8--13 mm and 3--4 mm, on the thermal balance of the earth`s atmosphere. The negative and positive feedbacks between the absorption of the outgoing heat radiation in the atmosphere and the heating of the earth`s surface have been considered. All the simulations of the infrared radiation transfer are based on spectral data from GEISA-92 data bank. Temperature dependence of molecular transmission function has been obtained and three steady states for earth`s radiation balance were shown to exist. A radiation balance regime, leading to closing of the atmospheric window 8--13 mm and development of the explosive greenhouse effect has been obtained and discussed in this paper.

  6. Fermi large area telescope observations of the cosmic-ray induced γ-ray emission of the Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B. M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burnett, T. H.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; de Palma, F.; Digel, S. W.; Do Couto E Silva, E.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Focke, W. B.; Fortin, P.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, T. J.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kawai, N.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Makeev, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Meurer, C.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Rochester, L. S.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Roth, M.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sander, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Sgrò, C.; Share, G. H.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; Vasileiou, V.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.

    2009-12-01

    We report on measurements of the cosmic-ray induced γ-ray emission of Earth’s atmosphere by the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The Large Area Telescope has observed the Earth during its commissioning phase and with a dedicated Earth limb following observation in September 2008. These measurements yielded ˜6.4×106 photons with energies >100MeV and ˜250 hours total live time for the highest quality data selection. This allows the study of the spatial and spectral distributions of these photons with unprecedented detail. The spectrum of the emission—often referred to as Earth albedo gamma-ray emission—has a power-law shape up to 500 GeV with spectral index Γ=2.79±0.06.

  7. A Study of Oceans and Atmospheric Interactions Associated with Tropical Cyclone Activity using Earth Observing Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Warith; Reddy, Remata

    From October 22nd to 30th, 2012 Hurricane Sandy was a huge storm of many abnormalities causing an estimated 50 billion dollars in damage. Tropical storm development states systems’ energy as product of warm sea surface temperatures (SST’s) and tropical cyclone heat potential (TCHP). Advances in Earth Observing (EO) technology, remote sensing and proxy remote sensing have allowed for accurate measurements of SST and TCHP information. In this study, we investigated rapid intensification of Sandy through EO applications for precipitable water vapor (PWAT), SST’s and TCHP during the period of October 27th. These data were obtained from NASA and NOAA satellites and NOAA National Buoy data center (NDBC). The Sensible Heat (Qs) fluxes were computed to determine available energy resulting from ocean-atmosphere interface. Buoy 41010, 120 NM east of Cape Canaveral at 0850 UTC measured 22.3 °C atmospheric temperatures and 27 °C SST, an interface of 4.7 °C. Sensible heat equation computed fluxes of 43.7 W/m2 at 982.0 mb central pressure. Sandy formed as late-season storm and near-surface air temperatures averaged > 21 °C according to NOAA/ESRL NCEP/NCAR reanalysis at 1000 mb and GOES 13 (EAST) geostationary water vapor imagery shows approaching cold front during October 27th. Sandy encountered massive dry air intrusion to S, SE and E quadrants of storm while travelling up U.S east coast but experienced no weakening. Cool, dry air intrusion was considered for PWAT investigation from closest sounding station during Oct. 27th 0900 - 2100 UTC at Charleston, SC station 72208. Measured PWAT totaled 42.97 mm, indicating large energy potential supply to the storm. The Gulf Stream was observed using NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition Center (SPoRT) MODIS SST analysis. The results show 5 °C warmer above average than surrounding cooler water, with > 25 °C water extent approximately 400 NM east of Chesapeake Bay and eddies > 26 °C. Results from sensible heat

  8. Transition to an oxygen-rich atmosphere with an extensive overshoot triggered by the Paleoproterozoic snowball Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Mariko; Tajika, Eiichi; Sekine, Yasuhito

    2015-06-01

    The Earth is thought to have multiple stable, steady-states regarding climate modes and atmospheric oxygen levels. The Paleoproterozoic is a remarkable period in Earth's history because of the simultaneous occurrence of large climatic and redox transitions between steady states; i.e., snowball Earth glaciation and the rise of oxygen. Geochemical evidence suggests that the oxygen rise was a dynamic transition with an extensive, long-term overshoot. However, previous models have not explained the dynamics of the oxygen rise, leaving its causal mechanism poorly understood. In the present study, we suggest that the oxygen transition with an overshoot occurred in response to a climatic transition at the termination of the snowball glaciation. Biogeochemical cycle modelling indicates that prolonged super-greenhouse conditions and effective nutrient input to the ocean after the glaciation lead to high levels of primary productivity and burial of organic carbon. This causes an abrupt jump of oxygen levels within ∼104 yr after the glaciation and an extensive oxygen overshoot to the present atmospheric level. The overshoot persists for ∼108 yr because net consumption of oxygen in the atmosphere-ocean system is inefficient. We show that the post-glacial jump of oxygen levels occurred in biologically short timescale, which may have stimulated the ecological shift and/or biological innovations toward the prosperity of oxygen-dependent life.

  9. Research on Earth's rotation and the effect of atmospheric pressure on vertical deformation and sea level variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahr, John

    1993-01-01

    The work done under NASA grant NAG5-485 included modelling the deformation of the earth caused by variations in atmospheric pressure. The amount of deformation near coasts is sensitive to the nature of the oceanic response to the pressure. The PSMSL (Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level) data suggest the response is inverted barometer at periods greater than a couple months. Green's functions were constructed to describe the perturbation of the geoid caused by atmospheric and oceanic loading and by the accompanying load-induced deformation. It was found that perturbation of up to 2 cm are possible. Ice mass balance data was used for continental glaciers to look at the glacial contributions to time-dependent changes in polar motion, the lod, the earth's gravitational field, the position of the earth's center-of-mass, and global sea level. It was found that there can be lateral, non-hydrostatic structure inside the fluid core caused by gravitational forcing from the mantle, from the inner core, or from topography at the core/mantle or inner core/outer core boundaries. The nutational and tidal response of a non-hydrostatic earth with a solid inner core was modeled. Monthly, global tide gauge data from PSMSL was used to look at the 18.6-year ocean tide, the 14-month pole tide, the oceanic response to pressure, the linear trend and inter-annual variability in the earth's gravity field, the global sea level rise, and the effects of post glacial rebound. The effects of mantle anelasticity on nutations, earth tides, and tidal variation in the lod was modeled. Results of this model can be used with Crustal Dynamics observations to look at the anelastic dissipation and dispersion at tidal periods. The effects of surface topography on various components of crustal deformation was also modeled, and numerical models were developed of post glacial rebound.

  10. Research on Earth's rotation and the effect of atmospheric pressure on vertical deformation and sea level variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahr, John

    1993-03-01

    The work done under NASA grant NAG5-485 included modelling the deformation of the earth caused by variations in atmospheric pressure. The amount of deformation near coasts is sensitive to the nature of the oceanic response to the pressure. The PSMSL (Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level) data suggest the response is inverted barometer at periods greater than a couple months. Green's functions were constructed to describe the perturbation of the geoid caused by atmospheric and oceanic loading and by the accompanying load-induced deformation. It was found that perturbation of up to 2 cm are possible. Ice mass balance data was used for continental glaciers to look at the glacial contributions to time-dependent changes in polar motion, the lod, the earth's gravitational field, the position of the earth's center-of-mass, and global sea level. It was found that there can be lateral, non-hydrostatic structure inside the fluid core caused by gravitational forcing from the mantle, from the inner core, or from topography at the core/mantle or inner core/outer core boundaries. The nutational and tidal response of a non-hydrostatic earth with a solid inner core was modeled. Monthly, global tide gauge data from PSMSL was used to look at the 18.6-year ocean tide, the 14-month pole tide, the oceanic response to pressure, the linear trend and inter-annual variability in the earth's gravity field, the global sea level rise, and the effects of post glacial rebound. The effects of mantle anelasticity on nutations, earth tides, and tidal variation in the lod was modeled. Results of this model can be used with Crustal Dynamics observations to look at the anelastic dissipation and dispersion at tidal periods. The effects of surface topography on various components of crustal deformation was also modeled, and numerical models were developed of post glacial rebound.

  11. Toward the influence of clouds on the shortwave radiation budget of the earth-atmosphere system estimated from satellite data

    SciTech Connect

    Rieland, M. ); Stuhlmann, R. )

    1993-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of cloudiness on the shortwave radiation budget at the top of the atmosphere, at the surface, and, as a residual, for the atmosphere itself. The data used for this study are derived exclusively from satellite measurements. Calculations for the top of the atmosphere are based entirely on measurements of the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE). For the solar radiation budget at the surface, the incoming surface solar radiation is derived from Meteosat data and the surface albedo is calculated from ERBE clear-sky planetary albedo measurements by applying an atmospheric correction scheme. As a result, maps of absorbed solar radiation for the total earth-atmosphere system, the surface, and for the atmosphere are presented for the area of investigation, [+-]60[degrees] longitude and latitude. To infer the contribution of clouds, the concept of cloud radiative forcing is applied to these different datasets. It is shown that the solar cloud forcing at the top of the atmosphere (CF[sub TOA]), and at the surface (CF[sub SUR]), are of the same order of magnitude and well correlated with cloud cover (R = 0.83). On the contrary, the solar cloud forcing of the atmosphere itself, CF[sub ATM], is about one order of magnitude less and not very highly correlated with cloud cover (R = 0.37). The mean value of the annual averaged solar cloud forcing for the area of investigation is calculated for the top of the atmosphere to be CF[sub TOA] = 50 [+-] 4 W m[sup [minus]2], for the surface to be CF[sub SUR] = 55 [+-] 6 W m[sup [minus]2], and for the atmosphere to be CF[sub ATM] = [minus]5 [+-] 10 W m[sup [minus]2]. Related to the annual mean solar insolation, the CF[sub ATM] corresponds to an additional contribution of the clouds to atmospheric solar absorption of 1.4%. The uncertainty range for this additional absorption is calculated to be [minus]1.4% to +4.2%. 41 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Climate and atmospheric modeling studies. Climate applications of Earth and planetary observations. Chemistry of Earth and environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The research conducted during the past year in the climate and atmospheric modeling programs concentrated on the development of appropriate atmospheric and upper ocean models, and preliminary applications of these models. Principal models are a one-dimensional radiative-convective model, a three-dimensional global climate model, and an upper ocean model. Principal applications have been the study of the impact of CO2, aerosols and the solar 'constant' on climate. Progress was made in the 3-D model development towards physically realistic treatment of these processes. In particular, a map of soil classifications on 1 degree x 1 degree resolution has been digitized, and soil properties have been assigned to each soil type. Using this information about soil properties, a method was developed to simulate the hydraulic behavior of soils of the world. This improved treatment of soil hydrology, together with the seasonally varying vegetation cover, will provide a more realistic study of the role of the terrestrial biota in climate change. A new version of the climate model was created which follows the isotopes of water and sources of water (or colored water) throughout the planet. Each isotope or colored water source is a fraction of the climate model's water. It participates in condensation and surface evaporation at different fractionation rates and is transported by the dynamics. A major benefit of this project has been to improve the programming techniques and physical simulation of the water vapor budget of the climate model.

  13. New Instrumental Facilities to study High Energy Processes in the Sun, Interplanetary Space and their Effects in the Earth Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raulin, Jean-Pierre; Makhmutov, Vladimir

    We present a new instrumental facility to study the physical mechanisms of high-energy releases taking place in solar quiet and explosive active regions, and their signatures in the Earth's atmosphere. These facilities will be installed in the CASLEO (2550 m asl) observatory, and complement solar flare diagnostic obtained there at millimeter waves (45 and 90 GHZ), submillimeter waves (212 and 405 GHz), IR (30 THz), as well as X-ray radiation imprints in the ionosphere (VLF subionospheric propagation), and of energetic charged particles in Earth's atmosphere (Cosmic Ray CARPET sensor).Specifically, we propose to complement these existing instrumental facilities with a new detector of solar and atmospheric neutrons, a gamma-ray scintillation device, and ELF/VLF wave sensors. The main objectives are: (i) to better characterize the high-frequency radio and high-energy photon flare spectra, in order to provide new clues on the emission mechanism resulting in submillimeter and THz radiation which are still unexplained; (ii) to provide a continuous monitoring of solar energetic phenomena and investigate if they are more frequent than what we do observe nowadays; (iii) to investigate the causal relationship between atmospheric phenomena as lightning occurrence, high-energy photon and neutron production, Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes, and cosmic ray fluxes.

  14. The Earth's Middle Atmosphere: COSPAR Plenary Meeting, 29th, Washington, DC, 28 Aug.-5 Sep., 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosse, W. L. (Editor); Ghazi, A. (Editor); Geller, M. A. (Editor); Shepherd, G. G. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The conference presented the results from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) in the areas of wind, temperature, composition, and energy input into the upper atmosphere. Also presented is the current status of validation of the UARS temperature and wind instruments measuring at and above the menopause. The two UARS instruments involved were the High Resolution Doppler Imager (HRDI) and the WIND Imaging Interferometer (WINDII). Papers are presented covering almost all aspects of middle atmospheric science, including dynamics, layering in the middle atmosphere, atmospheric composition, solar and geomagnetic effects, electrodynamics, and the ionosphere.

  15. Experiment on the Vernov satellite: Transient energetic processes in the Earth's atmosphere and magnetosphere. Part I: Description of the experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panasyuk, M. I.; Svertilov, S. I.; Bogomolov, V. V.; Garipov, G. K.; Barinova, V. O.; Bogomolov, A. V.; Veden'kin, N. N.; Golovanov, I. A.; Iyudin, A. F.; Kalegaev, V. V.; Klimov, P. A.; Kovtyukh, A. S.; Kuznetsova, E. A.; Morozenko, V. S.; Morozov, O. V.; Myagkova, I. N.; Petrov, V. L.; Prokhorov, A. V.; Rozhkov, G. V.; Sigaeva, E. A.; Khrenov, B. A.; Yashin, I. V.; Klimov, S. I.; Vavilov, D. I.; Grushin, V. A.; Grechko, T. V.; Khartov, V. V.; Kudryashov, V. A.; Bortnikov, S. V.; Mzhel'skiy, P. V.; Papkov, A. P.; Krasnopeev, S. V.; Krug, V. V.; Korepanov, V. E.; Belyaev, S.; Demidov, A.; Ferenz, Ch.; Bodnar, L.; Szegedi, P.; Rotkel, H.; Moravskiy, M.; Park, Il; Jeon, Jin-A.; Kim, Ji-In; Lee, Jik

    2016-07-01

    The program of physical studies on the Vernov satellite launched on July 8, 2014 into a polar (640 × 830 km) solar-synchronous orbit with an inclination of 98.4° is presented. We described the complex of scientific equipment on this satellite in detail, including multidirectional gamma-ray detectors, electron spectrometers, red and ultra-violet detectors, and wave probes. The experiment on the Vernov satellite is mainly aimed at a comprehensive study of the processes of generation of transient phenomena in the optical and gamma-ray ranges in the Earth's atmosphere (such as high-altitude breakdown on runaway relativistic electrons), the study of the action on the atmosphere of electrons precipitated from the radiation belts, and low- and high-frequency electromagnetic waves of both space and atmospheric origin.

  16. Global measurements of wind fields using the Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) on the Earth Observing System (EOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzjarrald, Daniel E.

    1988-01-01

    The technology for measuring global wind fields in space by the Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) to be flown on the Earth Observing System (EOS) is discussed. Studies initiated by NASA to determine the feasibility of using Doppler lidar from a platform in space to measure the wind globally have shown the general feasibility of the technique and have identified the technological problems that need to be resolved. Among the lidar systems being evaluated, CO2 coherent detection lidar is given special consideration. A comprehensive research program, the Global Backscatter Experiment, has been established to study global distribution of naturally occurring atmospheric aerosols that provide signal return at the wavelengths used by the techniques under consideration. Wind profiles from space will provide essential information for advancing the skill of numerical weather prediction, furthering the present knowledge of the large-scale atmospheric circulation and climate dynamics, and of global biogeochemical and hydrologic cycles.

  17. Photochemistry of CO and H2O - Analysis of laboratory experiments and applications to the prebiotic earth's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, Jun-Shan; Pinto, Joseph P.; Yung, Yuk L.

    1989-01-01

    The role photochemical reactions in the early earth's atmosphere played in the prebiotic synthesis of simple organic molecules was examined, extending an earlier calculation of formaldehyde production rates to more reduced carbon species, such as methanol, methane, and acetaldehyde. The experimental results of Bar-Nun and Chang (1983) are simulated as an aid in the construction of the photochemical scheme and as a way of validating the model. The results indicate that some fraction of CO2 and H2 present in the primitive atmosphere could have been converted to simple organic molecules. The exact amount is dependent on the partial pressure of CO2 and H2 in the atmosphere and on what assumptions are made concerning the shape of the absorption spectra of CO2 and H2O.

  18. Wind and Temperature Spectrometry of the Upper Atmosphere in Low-Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrero, Federico

    2011-01-01

    Wind and Temperature Spectrometry (WATS) is a new approach to measure the full wind vector, temperature, and relative densities of major neutral species in the Earth's thermosphere. The method uses an energy-angle spectrometer moving through the tenuous upper atmosphere to measure directly the angular and energy distributions of the air stream that enters the spectrometer. The angular distribution gives the direction of the total velocity of the air entering the spectrometer, and the energy distribution gives the magnitude of the total velocity. The wind velocity vector is uniquely determined since the measured total velocity depends on the wind vector and the orbiting velocity vector. The orbiting spectrometer moves supersonically, Mach 8 or greater, through the air and must point within a few degrees of its orbital velocity vector (the ram direction). Pointing knowledge is critical; for example, pointing errors 0.1 lead to errors of about 10 m/s in the wind. The WATS method may also be applied without modification to measure the ion-drift vector, ion temperature, and relative ion densities of major ionic species in the ionosphere. In such an application it may be called IDTS: Ion-Drift Temperature Spectrometry. A spectrometer-based coordinate system with one axis instantaneously pointing along the ram direction makes it possible to transform the Maxwellian velocity distribution of the air molecules to a Maxwellian energy-angle distribution for the molecular flux entering the spectrometer. This implementation of WATS is called the gas kinetic method (GKM) because it is applied to the case of the Maxwellian distribution. The WATS method follows from the recognition that in a supersonic platform moving at 8,000 m/s, the measurement of small wind velocities in the air on the order of a few 100 m/s and less requires precise knowledge of the angle of incidence of the neutral atoms and molecules. The same is true for the case of ion-drift measurements. WATS also

  19. Design of a Slab Waveguide Multiaperture Fourier Spectrometer for Water Vapor Measurements in Earth's Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, Kenneth; Florjańczyk, Mirosław; Solheim, Brian; Scott, Alan; Quine, Ben; Cheben, Pavel

    Concept, theory and design of a new type of waveguide device, a multiaperture Fourier-transform planar waveguide spectrometer[1], implemented as a prototype instrument is pre-sented. The spectrometer's objective is to demonstrate the ability of the new slab waveguide technology for application in remote sensing instruments[2]. The spectrometer will use a limb viewing configuration to detect the 1.36um waveband allowing concentrations of water vapor in earth's atmosphere to be measured[3]. The most challenging aspects of the design, assembly and calibration are presented. Focus will be given to the effects of packaging the spectrometer and interfacing to the detector array. Stress-induced birefringence will affect the performance of the waveguides, therefore the design of a stress-free mounting over a range of temperatures is important. Spectral retrieval algo-rithms will have to correct for expected fabrication errors in the waveguides. Data processing algorithms will also be developed to correct for non-uniformities of input brightness through the array, making use of MMI output couplers to capture both the in-phase and anti-phase interferometer outputs. A performance assessment of an existing breadboard spectrometer will demonstrate the capability of the instrument. REFERENCES 1. M. Florjáczyk, P. Cheben, S. Janz, A. Scott, B. Solheim, and D.-X. Xu, "Multiaper-n ture planar waveguide spectrometer formed by arrayed Mach-Zehnder interferometers," Opt. Expr. 15(26), 18176-18189 (2007). 2. M. Florjáczyk, P. Cheben, S. Janz, B. Lamontagne, J. n Lapointe, A. Scott, B. Solheim, and D.-X. Xu, "Slab waveguiode spatial heterodyne spectrom-eters for remote sensing from space," Optical sensors 2009. Proceedings of the SPIE, Volume 7356 (2009)., pp. 73560V-73560V-7 (2009). 3. A. Scott, M. Florjáczyk, P. Cheben, S. Janz, n B. Solheim, and D.-X. Xu, "Micro-interferometer with high throughput for remote sensing." MOEMS and Miniaturized Systems VIII. Proceedings of the SPIE

  20. A TEOM (tm) particulate monitor for comet dust, near Earth space, and planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Scientific missions to comets, near earth space, and planetary atmospheres require particulate and mass accumulation instrumentation for both scientific and navigation purposes. The Rupprecht & Patashnick tapered element oscillating microbalance can accurately measure both mass flux and mass distribution of particulates over a wide range of particle sizes and loadings. Individual particles of milligram size down to a few picograms can be resolved and counted, and the accumulation of smaller particles or molecular deposition can be accurately measured using the sensors perfected and toughened under this contract. No other sensor has the dynamic range or sensitivity attained by these picogram direct mass measurement sensors. The purpose of this contract was to develop and implement reliable and repeatable manufacturing methods; build and test prototype sensors; and outline a quality control program. A dust 'thrower' was to be designed and built, and used to verify performance. Characterization and improvement of the optical motion detection system and drive feedback circuitry was to be undertaken, with emphasis on reliability, low noise, and low power consumption. All the goals of the contract were met or exceeded. An automated glass puller was built and used to make repeatable tapered elements. Materials and assembly methods were standardized, and controllers and calibrated fixtures were developed and used in all phases of preparing, coating and assembling the sensors. Quality control and reliability resulted from the use of calibrated manufacturing equipment with measurable working parameters. Thermal and vibration testing of completed prototypes showed low temperature sensitivity and high vibration tolerance. An electrostatic dust thrower was used in vacuum to throw particles from 2 x 10(exp 6) g to 7 x 10(exp -12) g in size. Using long averaging times, particles as small as 0.7 to 4 x 10(exp 11) g were weighted to resolutions in the 5 to 9 x 10(exp -13) g range

  1. Distribution of N2O in the atmosphere under global warming - a simulation study with the MPI Earth System Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kracher, Daniela; Manzini, Elisa; Reick, Christian H.; Schultz, Martin; Stein, Olaf

    2014-05-01

    Climate change is driven by an increasing release of anthropogenic greenhouse gases (GHGs) such as carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide (N2O). Besides fossil fuel burning, also land use change and land management are anthropogenic sources of GHGs. Especially inputs of reactive nitrogen via fertilizer and deposition lead to enhanced emissions of N2O. One effect of a drastic future increase in surface temperature is a modification of atmospheric circulation, e.g. an accelerated Brewer Dobson circulation affecting the exchange between troposphere and stratosphere. N2O is inert in the troposphere and decayed only in the stratosphere. Thus, changes in atmospheric circulation, especially changes in the exchange between troposphere and stratosphere, will affect the atmospheric transport, decay, and distribution of N2O. In our study we assess the impact of global warming on atmospheric circulation and implied effects on the distribution and lifetime of atmospheric N2O. As terrestrial N2O emissions are highly determined by inputs of reactive nitrogen - the location of which being determined by human choice - we examine in particular the importance of latitudinal source regions of N2O for its global distribution. For this purpose we apply the Max Planck Institute Earth System Model, MPI-ESM. MPI-ESM consists of the atmospheric general circulation model ECHAM, the land surface model JSBACH, and MPIOM/HAMOCC representing ocean circulation and ocean biogeochemistry. Prognostic atmospheric N2O concentrations in MPI-ESM are determined by land N2O emissions, ocean N2O exchange and atmospheric tracer transport. As stratospheric chemistry is not explicitly represented in MPI-ESM, stratospheric decay rates of N2O are prescribed from a MACC MOZART simulation.

  2. Angular radiation models for Earth-atmosphere system. Volume 1: Shortwave radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suttles, J. T.; Green, R. N.; Minnis, P.; Smith, G. L.; Staylor, W. F.; Wielicki, B. A.; Walker, I. J.; Young, D. F.; Taylor, V. R.; Stowe, L. L.

    1988-01-01

    Presented are shortwave angular radiation models which are required for analysis of satellite measurements of Earth radiation, such as those fro the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE). The models consist of both bidirectional and directional parameters. The bidirectional parameters are anisotropic function, standard deviation of mean radiance, and shortwave-longwave radiance correlation coefficient. The directional parameters are mean albedo as a function of Sun zenith angle and mean albedo normalized to overhead Sun. Derivation of these models from the Nimbus 7 ERB (Earth Radiation Budget) and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) data sets is described. Tabulated values and computer-generated plots are included for the bidirectional and directional modes.

  3. Angular radiation models for earth-atmosphere system. Volume 2: Longwave radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suttles, J. T.; Green, R. N.; Smith, G. L.; Wielicki, B. A.; Walker, I. J.; Taylor, V. R.; Stowe, L. L.

    1989-01-01

    The longwave angular radiation models that are required for analysis of satellite measurements of Earth radiation, such as those from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) are presented. The models contain limb-darkening characteristics and mean fluxes. Limb-darkening characteristics are the longwave anisotropic factor and the standard deviation of the longwave radiance. Derivation of these models from the Nimbus 7 ERB (Earth Radiation Budget) data set is described. Tabulated values and computer-generated plots are included for the limb-darkening and mean-flux models.

  4. The study of turbulence and optical instability in stably stratified Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovadlo, P. G.; Shihovtsev, A. Y.

    2015-11-01

    It is shown that atmospheric turbulence is not suppressed completely in strongly stably stratified conditions when Richardson's number exceeds its critical value. It is worth to note that airflow is laminar according classical ideas of the turbulence theory when Richardson's number values are supercritical. It is shown that in the stably stratified atmospheric surface layer under conditions of large vertical temperature gradients and low wind speeds, atmospheric turbulence is often characterized by intermittent structure and in some parts of space intensity of fluctuations can reach high values. The results of experimental investigations of optical instability conducted out along the horizontal path in the stably stratified atmospheric surface layer are discussed.

  5. The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Earth Global Reference Atmospheric Model-2010 Version

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leslie, F. W.; Justus, C. G.

    2011-01-01

    Reference or standard atmospheric models have long been used for design and mission planning of various aerospace systems. The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Global Reference Atmospheric Model was developed in response to the need for a design reference atmosphere that provides complete global geographical variability and complete altitude coverage (surface to orbital altitudes), as well as complete seasonal and monthly variability of the thermodynamic variables and wind components. In addition to providing the geographical, height, and monthly variation of the mean atmospheric state, it includes the ability to simulate spatial and temporal perturbations.

  6. Ongoing Efforts to Analyze and Use Atmospheric and Oceanic Angular Momentum Datasets for Predictions of Earth Orientation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamatakos, Nicholas; Salstein, David; McCarthy, Dennis; Eubanks, Marshall

    2016-04-01

    We present our ongoing investigation of the use of U.S-produced atmospheric and oceanic angular momentum (AAM and OAM) estimates to improve the determination of near real-time Earth rotation and polar motion parameters and their short-term predictions. Previous investigations provided evidence that the use of AAM and OAM data sets could improve short-term EOP predictions for polar motion and possibly for UT1-UTC. The longer AAM and OAM time series created from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) reanalysis and the Estimating the Climate and Circulation of the Ocean (ECCO) models respectively are considered and used to determine a baseline (best-case) improvement in Earth rotation predictions. The shorter sets of data supplied by the Navy Global Environmental Model (NAVGEM) AAM and Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) OAM are then compared to the NCEP and ECCO data to estimate how well these models might be used to aid Earth Orientation predictions. The combination of NAVGEM and HYCOM model series should be internally consistent as the NAVGEM atmospheric analyses are used as forcing for the Navy HYCOM model.

  7. Preliminary Results From Observing The Fast Stardust Sample Return Capsule Entry In Earth's Atmosphere On January 15, 2006.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenniskens, P.; Jordan, D.; Kontinos, D.; Wright, M.; Olejniczak, J.; Raiche, G.; Wercinski, P.; Schilling, E.; Taylor, M.; Rairden, R.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H.; McHarg, M. G.; Abe, S.; Winter, M.

    2006-08-01

    In order for NASA's Stardust mission to return a comet sample to Earth, the probe was put in an orbit similar to that of Near Earth Asteroids. As a result, the reentry in Earth's atmosphere on January 15, 2006, was the fastest entry ever for a NASA spacecraft, with a speed of 12.8 km/s, similar to that of natural fireballs. A new thermal protection material, PICA, was used to protect the sample, a material that may have a future as thermal protection for the Crew Return Vehicle or for future planetary missions. An airborne and ground-based observing campaign, the "Stardust Hyperseed MAC", was organized to observe the reentry under good observing conditions, with spectroscopic and imaging techniques commonly used for meteor observations (http:// reentry.arc.nasa.gov). A spectacular video of the reentry was obtained. The spectroscopic observations measure how much light was generated in the shock wave, how that radiation added to heating the surface, how the PICA ablated as a function of altitude, and how the carbon reacted with the shock wave to form CN, a possible marker of prebiotic chemistry in natural meteors. In addition, the observations measured a transient signal of zinc and potassium early in the trajectory, from the ablation of a white paint layer that had been applied to the heat shield for thermal control. Implications for sample return and the exploration of atmospheres in future planetary missions will be discussed.

  8. Measurements by Mail: Satellite-Controlled Balloons for Making Real-Time Atmospheric Observations Anywhere on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, P. B.

    2008-12-01

    While most of the atmosphere is only a few tens of kilometers overhead, gaining access to this critical region of the earth system is notoriously difficult. Aircraft have been highly successful as atmospheric research platforms but their use can be limited by high costs, complex logistics, and need for ground-support infrastructure. While small Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) carry far fewer instruments, they promise to overcome some of these limitations, especially if regulatory and air safety issues can be resolved. Here we describe five years of development on a new type of unmanned platform that can be flown with far fewer restrictions than current UAS. This altitude-controlled balloon can be mailed to collaborators almost anywhere in the world, launched within hours, and flown remotely from our laboratory via satellite link. It can be commanded to perform soundings, track atmospheric layers, or navigate divergent wind fields over periods ranging from days to potentially weeks; meteorological and chemical observations from the balloon are processed on the ground and distributed via the internet in near real time. These controlled balloons have been used in several recent atmospheric research campaigns and are now providing new possibilities for long-distance collaboration, low-cost deployments, and research in previously inaccessible parts of the lower atmosphere.

  9. Seasonal Variations of the Earth's Gravitational Field: An Analysis of Atmospheric Pressure, Ocean Tidal, and Surface Water Excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dong, D,; Gross, R.S.; Dickey, J.

    1996-01-01

    Monthly mean gravitational field parameters (denoted here as C(sub even)) that represent linear combinations of the primarily even degree zonal spherical harmonic coefficients of the Earth's gravitational field have been recovered using LAGEOS I data and are compared with those derived from gridded global surface pressure data of the National meteorological center (NMC) spanning 1983-1992. The effect of equilibrium ocean tides and surface water variations are also considered. Atmospheric pressure and surface water fluctuations are shown to be the dominant cause of observed annual C(sub even) variations. Closure with observations is seen at the 1sigma level when atmospheric pressure, ocean tide and surface water effects are include. Equilibrium ocean tides are shown to be the main source of excitation at the semiannual period with closure at the 1sigma level seen when both atmospheric pressure and ocean tide effects are included. The inverted barometer (IB) case is shown to give the best agreement with the observation series. The potential of the observed C(sub even) variations for monitoring mass variations in the polar regions of the Earth and the effect of the land-ocean mask in the IB calculation are discussed.

  10. Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite (UARS) ground data system - The first operational data system for the Mission to Planet Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, Ellen L.; Smith, Janice K.; Taylor, K. D.

    1993-01-01

    The initiation of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Mission to Planet Earth was realized with the activation of the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (LIARS) in mid-September 1991 following deployment from the Shuttle Transport System (STS) - 48. The UARS provides the first comprehensive study of the chemistry and dynamics of the upper atmosphere. The UARS ground data system provides the capabilities required to support upper atmospheric studies in a timely and flexible manner. The UARS ground data system policy and implementation plan incorporated by the UARS Project team provided the flexibility necessary to be able to respond to changing priorities and requirements and to permit the ground data system to evolve far beyond initial expectations. This paper describes the policies and plans in place during the initial design and implementation phases and provides an overview of the UARS ground data system. The paper then addresses the changing UARS ground data system design and implementation priorities, the early mission experiences instrumental in the achievement of higher than expected goals, and a brief look at the future for UARS, the first Mission to Planet Earth.

  11. Validation of Earth atmosphere models using solar EUV observations from the CORONAS and PROBA2 satellites in occultation mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slemzin, Vladimir; Ulyanov, Artyom; Gaikovich, Konstantin; Kuzin, Sergey; Pertsov, Andrey; Berghmans, David; Dominique, Marie

    2016-02-01

    Aims: Knowledge of properties of the Earth's upper atmosphere is important for predicting the lifetime of low-orbit spacecraft as well as for planning operation of space instruments whose data may be distorted by atmospheric effects. The accuracy of the models commonly used for simulating the structure of the atmosphere is limited by the scarcity of the observations they are based on, so improvement of these models requires validation under different atmospheric conditions. Measurements of the absorption of the solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation in the upper atmosphere below 500 km by instruments operating on low-Earth orbits (LEO) satellites provide efficient means for such validation as well as for continuous monitoring of the upper atmosphere and for studying its response to the solar and geomagnetic activity. Method: This paper presents results of measurements of the solar EUV radiation in the 17 nm wavelength band made with the SPIRIT and TESIS telescopes on board the CORONAS satellites and the SWAP telescope on board the PROBA2 satellite in the occulted parts of the satellite orbits. The transmittance profiles of the atmosphere at altitudes between 150 and 500 km were derived from different phases of solar activity during solar cycles 23 and 24 in the quiet state of the magnetosphere and during the development of a geomagnetic storm. We developed a mathematical procedure based on the Tikhonov regularization method for solution of ill-posed problems in order to retrieve extinction coefficients from the transmittance profiles. The transmittance profiles derived from the data and the retrieved extinction coefficients are compared with simulations carried out with the NRLMSISE-00 atmosphere model maintained by Naval Research Laboratory (USA) and the DTM-2013 model developed at CNES in the framework of the FP7 project ATMOP. Results: Under quiet and slightly disturbed magnetospheric conditions during high and low solar activity the extinction coefficients

  12. ArgusE: Design and Development of a Micro-Spectrometer used for Remote Earth and Atmospheric Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsouvaltsidis, C.; Bernari, G.; Salem, N.; Quine, B.; Lee, R.

    In this paper we will discuss the design and development of the ArgusE. The ArgusE is a micro-spectrometer which has been developed for Earth and atmospheric monitoring purposes. The project is primarily focused on using the ArgusE micro-spectrometer in order to ascertain whether it is possible to obtain surface soil moisture content measurements from space using its short-wave infrared detector. The secondary objective of the project is to quantify greenhouse gases that could be studied within new spectral range. The ArgusE is built on Argus 1000 micro-spectrometer design and spaceflight heritage. Currently, on the CanX-2 mission launched in 2008, the Argus 1000 micro-spectrometer observes the infrared solar radiation reflected by Earth surface targets as small as 1.5 km2 and the atmosphere (aerosols, clouds, and constituents). Over the past five years that Argus 1000 has been in operation, we have accumulated more than 200 observations from a series of land and ocean targets. It was followed by the SRMSAT, launched in 2011 (India). Currently all space-based Argus 1000s are collecting Earth and atmospheric observation data within the 0.9-1.7 micrometers spectral range, with special focus on CO2 and other greenhouse gases, and cloud and coastline detection. GENSPECT, a line-by-line radiative Matlab-based toolbox is used to calculate gas absorption and emissivity for a custom grouping of atmospheric gases. Given gas types and amounts, temperature, pressure, path length and frequency range for an atmosphere or laboratory cell, GENSPECT computes the spectral characteristics of the gas mixture. The resulting models used to discover the potential monitoring of atmospheric greenhouse gases and topical soil moisture content will be discussed and displayed graphically. In addition, this paper will showcase the chassis redesign and change of electronics which allow the ArgusE to now showcase the spectral region of 1.7 to 2.2 micrometers. It will also discuss the laboratory

  13. Techniques for computing regional radiant emittances of the earth-atmosphere system from observations by wide-angle satellite radiometers, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pina, J. F.; House, F. B.

    1975-01-01

    Radiometers on earth orbiting satellites measure the exchange of radiant energy between the earth-atmosphere (E-A) system and space at observation points in space external to the E-A system. Observations by wideangle, spherical and flat radiometers are analyzed and interpreted with regard to the general problem of the earth energy budget (EEB) and to the problem of determining the energy budget of regions smaller than the field of view (FOV) of these radiometers.

  14. Influence of interplanetary trajectory selection on Earth atmospheric entry velocity of Mars missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Striepe, Scott A.; Braun, Robert D.; Powell, Richard W.; Fowler, Wallace T.

    1993-01-01

    Many current manned Mars mission studies are using low lift-to-drag ratio vehicles to aerobrake at both Mars and Earth. This paper will demonstrate that if entry velocity constraints are incorporated into the interplanetary analysis of aerobraking Mars missions, more opportunities can be achieved for only a small increase in initial mass in low-Earth orbit (IMLEO). These additional opportunities result from varying the initial launch date and the encounter dates and possibly using a powered Venus swingby on either the inbound or outbound transfer. This paper not only presents unconstrained entry velocity missions but also includes results for entry velocities below 12.5 and 14 km/s on Earth return and between 6.0-8.5 km/s at Mars arrival. The results indicate that, regardless of the Mars entry velocity range selected, an Earth entry velocity below 14 km/s is easily attainable for a minimal IMLEO increase. Although there are fewer 12.5 km/s Earth entry velocity missions possible, both Mars entry velocity constraint cases have over 50 percent of their missions requiring a negligible IMLEO increase.

  15. Rare earths: atmospheric signatures for oil-fired power plants and refineries

    SciTech Connect

    Olmez, I.; Gordon, G.E.

    1985-09-06

    The concentration pattern of rare earth elements on fine airborne particles (less than 2.5 micrometers in diameter) is distorted from the crustal abundance pattern in areas influenced by emissions from oil-fired plants and refineries. For example, the ratio of lanthanum to samarium is often greater than 20 compared to a crustal ratio less than 6. The unusual pattern apparently results from the distribution of rare earths in zeolite catalysts used in refining oil. Oil industry emissions perturb the rare earth pattern even at remote locations such as the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii. Rare earth ratios are probably better for long-range tracing of oil emissions than vanadium and nickel concentrations because the ratios of rare earths on fine particles are probably not influenced by deposition and other fractionating processes. Emissions from oil-fired plants can be differentiated from those of refineries on an urban scale by the much smaller amounts of vanadium in the latter. 30 references, 1 figure, 3 tables.

  16. Rare earths: atmospheric signatures for oil-fired power plants and refineries.

    PubMed

    Olmez, I; Gordon, G E

    1985-09-01

    The concentration pattern of rare earth elements on fine airborne particles (less than 2.5 micrometers in diameter) is distorted from the crustal abundance pattern in areas influenced by emissions from oil-fired plants and refineries. For example, the ratio of lanthanum to samarium is often greater than 20 compared to a crustal ratio less than 6. The unusual pattern apparently results from the distribution of rare earths in zeolite catalysts used in refining oil. Oil industry emissions perturb the rare earth pattern even at remote locations such as the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii. Rare earth ratios are probably better for long-range tracing of oil emissions than vanadium and nickel concentrations because the ratios of rare earths on fine particles are probably not influenced by deposition and other fractionating processes. Emissions from oil-fired plants can be differentiated from those of refineries on an urban scale by the much smaller amounts of vanadium in the latter. PMID:17782528

  17. Miniature Tunable Laser Spectrometers for Quantifying Atmospheric Trace Gases, Water Resources, Earth Back-Contamination, and In Situ Resource Utilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, Chris; Blacksberg, Jordana; Flesch, Greg; Keymeulen, Didier; Christensen, Lance; Forouhar, Siamak

    2012-01-01

    The Tunable Laser Spectrometers (TLS) technique has seen wide applicability in gas measurement and analysis for atmospheric analysis, industrial, commercial and health monitoring and space applications. In Earth science using balloons and aircraft over 2 decades, several groups (JPL, NASA Langley & Ames, NOAA, Harvard U., etc) have demonstrated the technique for ozone hole studies, lab kinetics measurements, cloud physics and transport, climate change in the ice record. The recent availability of high-power (mW) room temperature lasers (TDL, IC, QC) has enabled miniaturized, high-sensitivity spectrometers for industry and space (1) Mars, Titan, Venus, Saturn, Moon (2) Commercial isotope ratio spectrometers are replacing bulkier, complex isotope ratio mass spectrometers.

  18. Comment on the paper 'On the influx of small comets into the earth's upper atmosphere. I - Observations'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, T. A.

    1986-01-01

    The observations of transient decreases or holes in the EUV dayglow reported by Frank et al. (1986) and attributed to an influx of small comets into the earth atmosphere are discussed critically. The techniques used in acquiring and analyzing the observational data are examined, and it is argued that the decreases are probably instrument artifacts. A critique of the geophysical basis of the comet hypothesis is also included. In a reply by Frank et al., the instrument-artifact argument is rejected, in part on the basis of the statistical properties of the holes observed. Additional observational data are presented in graphs and dynamics Explorer 1 images are analyzed in detail.

  19. Estimate of Top-of-Atmosphere Albedo for a Molecular Atmosphere over Ocean using Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kato, S.; Loeb, N. G.; Rutledge, C. K.

    2002-01-01

    The shortwave broadband albedo at the top of a molecular atmosphere over ocean between 40deg N and 40deg S is estimated using radiance measurements from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument and the Visible Infrared Scanner (VIRS) aboard the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. The albedo monotonically increases from 0.059 at a solar zenith angle of 10deg to 0.107 at a solar zenith angle of 60deg. The estimated uncertainty in the albedo is 3.5 x 10(exp -3) caused by the uncertainty in CERES-derived irradiances, uncertainty in VIRS-derived aerosol optical thicknesses, variations in ozone and water vapor, and variations in surface wind speed. The estimated uncertainty is similar in magnitude to the standard deviation of 0.003 that is derived from 72 areas divided by 20deg latitude by 20deg longitude grid boxes. The empirically estimated albedo is compared with the modeled albedo using a radiative transfer model combined with an ocean surface bidirectional reflectivity model. The modeled albedo with standard tropical atmosphere is 0.061 and 0.111 at the solar zenith angles of 10deg and 60deg, respectively. This empirically estimated albedo can be used to estimate the direct radiative effect of aerosols at the top of the atmosphere over oceans.

  20. Temporal variation of the earth's low-degree zonal gravitational field caused by atmospheric mass redistribution - 1980-1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, B. Fong; Au, Andrew Y.

    1991-01-01

    Temporal variations in the low-degree zonal harmonics of the earth's gravitational field have recently been observed by satellite laser ranging. A host of geophysical processes contribute to these variations. The present paper studies quantitatively a prime contributor, atmospheric mass redistribution, using ECMWF global surface pressure data for the period of 1980-1988. The annual and semiannual amplitudes and phases of the zonal J(l) coefficient with degree l = 2-6 with and without the oceanic inverted-barometer (IB) effect are computed to obtain the predicted effects on the orbit nodal residuals of Lageos and Starlette. These predicted values are then compared with observations. It is found that the atmospheric influence, combined with the hydrological influence agree well with the Lageos observation for the annual term. The corresponding match appears poorer for Starlette.

  1. A Massively Parallel Particle Code for Rarefied Ionized and Neutral Gas Flows in Earth and Planetary Atmospheres, Ionospheres and Magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Combi, Michael R.

    2004-01-01

    In order to understand the global structure, dynamics, and physical and chemical processes occurring in the upper atmospheres, exospheres, and ionospheres of the Earth, the other planets, comets and planetary satellites and their interactions with their outer particles and fields environs, it is often necessary to address the fundamentally non-equilibrium aspects of the physical environment. These are regions where complex chemistry, energetics, and electromagnetic field influences are important. Traditional approaches are based largely on hydrodynamic or magnetohydrodynamic MHD) formulations and are very important and highly useful. However, these methods often have limitations in rarefied physical regimes where the molecular collision rates and ion gyrofrequencies are small and where interactions with ionospheres and upper neutral atmospheres are important.

  2. The influence of formation material properties on the response of water levels in wells to Earth tides and atmospheric loading

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rojstaczer, S.; Agnew, D.C.

    1989-01-01

    The water level in an open well can change in response to deformation of the surrounding material, either because of applied strains (tidal or tectonic) or surface loading by atmospheric pressure changes. Under conditions of no vertical fluid flow and negligible well bore storage (static-confined conditions), the sensitivities to these effects depend on the elastic properties and porosity which characterize the surrounding medium. The hydraulic diffusivity which governs pressure diffusion in response to surface loading is slightly smaller than that which governs fluid flow in response to applied strain. Analysis of the static-confined response of five wells to atmospheric loading and Earth tides gives generally reasonable estimates for material properties. -from Authors

  3. SPEAM-I (sunphotometer earth atmosphere measurement) observations of high-altitude ozone from STS 41-G

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElroy, C. T.; Kerr, J. B.; Wardle, D. I.; McArthur, L. J. B.; Shah, G. M.; Garneau, M.; Maclean, S. G.; Thirsk, R.; Davies, J. A.; Evans, W. F. J.

    1991-09-01

    The sunphotometer earth atmosphere measurement (SPEAM-I) experiment was flown on the United States space shuttle Challenger in October, 1984 as part of a group of Canadian experiments referred to as CANEX-I. Measurements of the solar intensity were made through the orbiter side-hatch window at various wavelengths in the visible and near-ultraviolet during a number of terminator crossings using a hand-held, interference filter photometer. Observations at 315 and 324 nm were analyzed to give vertical profiles of ozone at 63.34 deg S, 91.96 deg E. These profiles are compared with data from the literature. The success of this experiment points the way to the use of small instruments to make accurate but inexpensive observations of the composition of the upper atmosphere.

  4. Optical atmospheric scattering and absorption limitations on offset pointing from Earth Observatory Satellite /EOS/ sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, W. G.; Fischbein, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    The Braslau-Dave atmospheric model which calculates the upward monochromatic light fluxes leaving the top of the atmosphere as a function of viewing angle, sun angle, and ground reflectance was employed to study the effect of atmospheric scattering and attenuation on universal apparent contrast for two EOS remote sensors operated at very large offset or pointing angles: the Thematic Mapper (TM) and the High Resolution Pointable Imager (HRPI). The TM offset off nadir could be plus or minus 20 degrees with an 11 degree scan angle and the HRPI pointing angle off nadir could be plus or minus 45 degrees with a 3 degree scan angle. The reduction of universal apparent contrast of EOS imagery is studied as a function of sun elevation angle, atmospheric aerosol loading, radiation wavelength and sensor look angles.

  5. Effect of aerosol variation on radiance in the earth's atmosphere-ocean system.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plass, G. N.; Kattawar, G. W.

    1972-01-01

    Calculation of the radiance at the top and bottom of the atmosphere with a realistic model of both the atmosphere and ocean. It is found that the upward flux at the top of the atmosphere, as well as the angular distribution of the radiation, changes appreciably as the aerosol amount increases from normal to ten times normal. At the same time, the upward and downward radiance just above the ocean surface undergoes important changes. The radiance does not change appreciably with variations in the aerosol distribution with height so long as the total aerosol amount remains constant. Similarly, changes in the ozone amount cause only small changes in the radiance at the wavelengths considered (0.7, 0.9, and 1.67 micron). Very little radiation returns to the atmosphere from the ocean at 0.9 and 1.67 micron because of the high absorption of water at these wavelengths.

  6. Earth Science Data and Applications for K-16 Education from the NASA Langley Atmospheric Science Data Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelps, C. S.; Chambers, L. H.; Alston, E. J.; Moore, S. W.; Oots, P. C.

    2005-05-01

    NASA's Science Mission Directorate aims to stimulate public interest in Earth system science and to encourage young scholars to consider careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. NASA's Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) at Langley Research Center houses over 700 data sets related to Earth's radiation budget, clouds, aerosols and tropospheric chemistry that are being produced to increase academic understanding of the natural and anthropogenic perturbations that influence global climate change. However, barriers still exist in the use of these actual satellite observations by educators in the classroom to supplement the educational process. Thus, NASA is sponsoring the "Mentoring and inquirY using NASA Data on Atmospheric and earth science for Teachers and Amateurs" (MY NASA DATA) project to systematically support educational activities by reducing the ASDC data holdings to `microsets' that can be easily accessible and explored by the K-16 educators and students. The microsets are available via Web site (http://mynasadata.larc.nasa.gov) with associated lesson plans, computer tools, data information pages, and a science glossary. A MY NASA DATA Live Access Server (LAS) has been populated with ASDC data such that users can create custom microsets online for desired time series, parameters and geographical regions. The LAS interface is suitable for novice to advanced users, teachers or students. The microsets may be visual representations of data or text output for spreadsheet analysis. Currently, over 148 parameters from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES), Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), Surface Radiation Budget (SRB), Tropospheric Ozone Residual (TOR) and the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) are available and provide important information on clouds, fluxes and cycles in the Earth system. Additionally, a MY NASA DATA OPeNDAP server has been established to facilitate file transfer of

  7. Goose Bay radar observations of Earth-reflected, atmospheric gravity waves in the high-latitude ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Samson, J.C.; Greenwald, R.A.; Ruohoniemi, J.M.; Frey, A.; Baker, K.B. )

    1990-06-01

    In the late fall and early winter, The Johns Hopkins University HF radar at Goose Bay, Labrador, observes the effects of atmospheric gravity waves on radar transmissions that are obliquely reflected from the ionosphere and subsequently backscattered from the Earth's surface. The waves exist under a wide variety of geomagnetic conditions; however, they are particularly noticeable under quiet conditions (O {le} Kp {le} 1 +). The clearest signatures of the waves are spatially localized enhancements in the backscattered power and quasi-periodic fluctuations in the backscatter powers, Doppler velocities, and reflection heights. The waves are generally observed during daylight hours and propagate equatorward from regions of high-latitude ionospheric backscatter that are located near the ionospheric convection reversal boundary. The gravity waves appear to be generated just equatorward of the dayside flow-reversal boundary in the vicinity of the auroral electrojet at altitudes of 115 to 135 km and propagate approximately perpendicular to the boundary along azimuths ranging from 156{degree} to 180{degree}. The waves propagate obliquely downward through the lower atmosphere until they are reflected by the Earth's surface back into the upper atmosphere. The frequencies associated with these gravity waves cover the range of 0.3 to 0.6 mHz, with wavelengths of 300 to 500 km, and with average phase velocities of 110 to 180 m/s. The maximum phase speeds are 270 to 300 m/s, which is slightly less than the speed of sound in the lower atmosphere. Poleward-propagating gravity waves are sometimes observed under disturbed conditions when the polar cap and convection reversal boundary have expanded equatorward.

  8. A simple method to compute the change in earth-atmosphere radiative balance due to a stratospheric aerosol layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenoble, J.; Tanre, D.; Deschamps, P. Y.; Herman, M.

    1982-01-01

    A computer code was developed in terms of a three-layer model for the earth-atmosphere system, using a two-stream approximation for the troposphere and stratosphere. The analysis was limited to variable atmosphere loading by solar radiation over an unperturbed section of the atmosphere. The scattering atmosphere above a Lambertian ground layer was considered in order to derive the planar albedo and the spherical albedo. Attention was given to the influence of the aerosol optical thickness in the stratosphere, the single scattering albedo and asymmetry factor, and the sublayer albedo. Calculations were performed of the zonal albedo and the planetary radiation balance, taking into account a stratospheric aerosol layer containing H2SO4 droplets and volcanic ash. The resulting ground temperature disturbance was computed using a Budyko (1969) climate model. Local decreases in the albedo in the summer were observed in high latitudes, implying a heating effect of the aerosol. An accompanying energy loss of 23-27 W/sq m was projected, which translates to surface temperature decreases of either 1.1 and 0.45 C, respectively, for background and volcanic aerosols.

  9. Correlations and linkages between the sun and the earth's atmosphere: Needed measurements and observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellogg, W. W.

    1975-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify the sequence of processes that lead from some change in solar input to the earth to a change in tropospheric circulation and weather. Topics discussed include: inputs from the sun, the solar wind, and the magnetosphere; bremsstrahlung, ionizing radiation, cirrus clouds, thunderstorms, wave propagation, and gravity waves.

  10. Modulation of the Seasonal Cycle in the Earth's Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Mantle Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, R. S.; Marcus, S. L.; Dickey, J. O.

    2001-05-01

    Global warming, by definition, changes the atmospheric temperature field. Since this temperature change is not expected to occur uniformly, either geographically, or with height in the atmosphere, changes can be expected in the pole-to-equator temperature gradient which, by the thermal wind equation, will cause changes in the atmospheric zonal wind field and hence in the wind-driven axial component of the atmospheric angular momentum (AAM). Since length-of-day (LOD) changes are known to be largely caused by changes in the angular momentum of the atmospheric winds, concomitant changes in LOD can also be expected to occur. On interannual time scales numerous studies have shown that AAM and LOD variations are correlated with the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI). Here, observed changes in the strengths of the annual and semiannual AAM and LOD signals are analyzed and are also shown to be significantly correlated with the SOI. This correlation between the SOI and the modulation of the seasonal AAM and LOD signals demonstrates a linkage between seasonal AAM and LOD (and hence seasonal zonal wind) variability and the El Nino / Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon, a linkage that can only arise through non-linear interactions. Results for the modulation of the seasonal cycle in oceanic angular momentum will also be reported and discussed.

  11. E-CANES: A Research Network dedicated to Electromagnetic Coupling of the Atmosphere With Near-Earth Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanuise, C.; Blanc, E.; Crosby, N.; Ebert, U.; Mareev, E.; Neubert, T.; Rothkaehl, H.; Santolik, O.; Yair, Y.; Gille, P.

    2008-12-01

    Transient luminous events in the stratosphere and mesosphere, the sprites, elves, blue jets and gigantic jets, are observed above intense thunderstorms in association with particularly intense lightning discharges. Their recent discovery (1989) offers an opportunity to study the fundamental process of the electric discharge under the different conditions of the troposphere (lightning), stratosphere (blue jets) and the mesosphere (sprites) and the coupling between these regions by electric and magnetic fields. It further facilitates studies of the more general questions of thunderstorm effects on the atmosphere and the role of thunderstorms in a changing climate. New space missions will be launched in the coming years to study the various effects of thunderstorms. They will focus on transient luminous events, the generation of relativistic electron beams in discharges, and the perturbation to the atmosphere, ionosphere and magnetosphere of lightning, transient luminous events, water vapour transport and gravity waves. The missions are the French micro-satellite TARANIS, the ESA ASIM payload on board the International Space Station and the Japanese Sprite Sat mission. These highly interdisciplinary missions will result in a wealth of new data, which require knowledge based capacity building to underpin the observations with improved statistical data analysis and theoretical modelling. We are therefore establishing a global framework for research on thunderstorm processes and their effect on the atmosphere, in particular (1) the fundamental process of the electric discharge as manifested in the stratosphere and mesosphere as sprites and jets, (2) the relationship between cosmic rays, lightning discharges, transient luminous events and terrestrial gamma ray flashes, and (3) the environmental impact of the above physical processes, and thunderstorms in general, on the atmosphere and near-Earth space. The first step has been the creation of the European research group

  12. The Guara Campaign: Rocket-Radar Investigations of the Earth's Upper Atmosphere at the Magnetic and Geographic Equators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, Robert F., Jr.; Goldberg, Richard A.; Schmidlin, F. J.; Sobral, J. H. A.; Abdu, M.; Trivedi, N.; Swartz, W. E.; LaBelle, J. W.; Larsen, M. F.

    1999-01-01

    The Guara Campaign consisted of a series of sounding rockets that were launched from August to October, 1994 at a new launch facility at Alcantara, Brazil, which is within one degree of the Earth's magnetic equator. The campaign was based on focused scientific experiments designed to investigate the electrodynamics and irregularities in the ionosphere and mesosphere at the Earth's magnetic equator and to study their relationship with neutral upper atmosphere motions. In all, 13 large sounding rockets and 20 small meteorological rockets were launched as part of four different experiment groups designed to investigate: (1) the daytime equatorial electrojet, (2) very high altitude Spread-F processes, (3) sunset electrodynamics, and (4) middle atmosphere-thermosphere coupling at the equator. The instrumentation on the sounding rockets varied with each investigation, but primarily included experiments to measure electric fields, currents, plasma densities,- neutral winds, neutral densities and temperatures, and ionospheric instabilities. All of the experiments utilized ground-based scientific instruments including a VHF backscatter radar interferometer, magnetometers, ionosondes, and scintillation receivers. An overview of each investigation is provided, along with a description of the launch site and the ground-based experiments. Scientific highlights of the campaign are provided.

  13. Stochastic atmospheric perturbations in the EC-Earth3 global coupled model: impact of SPPT on seasonal forecast quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batté, Lauriane; Doblas-Reyes, Francisco J.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric model uncertainties at a seasonal time scale can be addressed by introducing stochastic perturbations in the model formulation. In this paper the stochastically perturbed parameterization tendencies (SPPT) technique is activated in the atmospheric component of the EC-Earth global coupled model and the impact on seasonal forecast quality is assessed, both at a global scale and focusing on the Tropical Pacific region. Re-forecasts for winter and summer seasons using two different settings for the perturbation patterns are evaluated and compared to a reference experiment without stochastic perturbations. We find that SPPT tends to increase the systematic error of the model sea-surface temperature over most regions of the globe, whereas the impact on precipitation and sea-level pressure is less clear. In terms of ensemble spread, larger-scale perturbation patterns lead to a greater increase in spread and in the model spread-skill ratio in a system that is overconfident. Over the Tropical Pacific, improvements in the representation of key processes associated with ENSO are highlighted. The evaluation of probabilistic re-forecasts shows that SPPT improves their reliability. Finally, we discuss the limitations to this study and future prospects with EC-Earth.

  14. An analytic model of the neutral cloud evolution in the earth's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruskin, L. G.; Khazanov, G. V.

    1992-01-01

    An analytic model for the expansion of a chemically reacting gas in the upper atmosphere is discussed. The spatial-temporal distribution of released particles in the initial regime is described on the basis of self-similar solutions of Euler's equations. In the case of transition to the diffusion regime an approximate solution of the kinetic equation with the collision integral in the form of BGK is performed. Gravitation and the atmospheric inhomogeneity are taken into account, The diffusion regime is described by an analytic solution of the diffusion equation in an exponential atmosphere taking account of possible losses of the gas due to chemical reactions. Some peculiarities of the expansion of various gases as well as the possibility of applying the model for describing ionospheric 'holes' are discussed.

  15. Dynamic phenomena in the Earth's atmosphere during January-May 1994

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhmutov, Vladimir; Svirzhevskaya, Albina; Svirzhevsky, Nikolai; Stozhkov, Yuri; Bazilevskaya, Galina

    The long-term measurements of cosmic ray fluxes in the atmosphere by radiosound-detector are carried out by the Lebedev Physical Institute RAS since 1957 till now at several geomagnetic locations including northern and southern polar regions and mid latitudes. We concentrate on energetic electron precipitation events observed in the Earth’s polar atmosphere in January-May 1994. During this time very extended transequatorial coronal holes were observed at the Sun. They produced the high-speed solar wind streams which caused the recurrent interplanetary disturbances and geomagnetic storms. We present the energetic and temporal characteristics of precipitating electron events recorded in the atmosphere during this period. We discuss the origin of these events and their relation to the interplanetary and geomagnetic disturbances.

  16. Rapid change of atmosphere on the Hadean Earth: Beyond Habitable Trinity on a tightrope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, T.; Maruyama, S.

    2014-12-01

    Surface environment of Hadean Earth is a key to bear life on the Earth. All of previous works assumed that high pCO2 has been decreased to a few bars in the first a few hundreds millions of years (e.g., Zhanle et al., 2011). However, this process is not easy because of material and process barriers as shown below. Four barriers are present. First, the ultra-acidic pH (<0.1) of 4.4Ga ocean prevented the precipitation of carbonates at mid-oceanic ridge through water-rock interaction after the birth of primordial ocean driven by plate tectonics or pseudo-plate tectonics system. To overcome this barrier, primordial (anorthosite + KREEP) continents must have been above sea-level to increase pH rapidly through hydrological process. Second, major cap rocks on the Hadean oceanic crust must have been komatiite with minor basaltic rocks to precipitate carbonates through water-rock interaction and transport them into mantle through subduction at higher than the intermediate P/T geotherm on the Benioff plane. If not, carbonate minerals are all decarbonated at shallower depths than the Moho plane. Komatiite production depends on mantle potential temperature which must have been rapidly decreased to yield only Fe-enriched MORB by 3.8Ga. Third, the primordial continents composed of anorthosite with subordinate amounts of KREEP basalts must have been annihilated by 4.0Ga to alter pH to be possible to precipitate carbonates by hydrothermal process. The value of pCO2 must have been decreased down to a few bars from c.a. 50 bars at TSI (total surface irradiance) = 75% under the restricted time limit. If failed, the Earth must have been Venus state which is impossible to bear life on the planet. Fourth is the role of tectonic erosion to destroy and transport the primordial continent of anorthosite into deep mantle by subduction. Anorthosite + KREEP was the mother's milk grow life on the Earth, but disappeared by 4.0Ga or even earlier, but alternatively granites were formed and

  17. Remote sensing of the earth's biosphere - A tool for studies of the global atmospheric environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, David S.; Harriss, Robert C.; Bartlett, Karen B.

    1987-01-01

    Recent advances in remote sensing technology and its use for global studies of the biospheric processes are described. Special consideration is given to research related to two issues: (1) quantifying the impacts of natural vegetation and its changing patterns of occurrence on the atmospheric CO2 budget and (2) assessing wetlands (such as the swamps and marshes of Florida's Everglades) as sources of atmospheric CH4. The results include the data from NOAA-AVHRR sensors and from experiments in remote detection of plant growth rate.

  18. Photochemistry of methane and the formation of hydrocyanic acid (HCN) in the earth's early atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, K. J.

    1986-01-01

    A one-dimensional photochemical model is used to analyze the photochemistries of CH4 and HCN in the primitive terrestrial atmosphere. CH4, N2, and HCN photolysis are examined. The background atmosphere and boundary conditions applied in the analysis are described. The formation of HCN as a by-product of N2 and CH4 photolysis is investigated; the effects of photodissociation and rainfall on HCN is discussed. The low and high CH4 mixing ratios and radical densities are studied.

  19. Critical Evaluation of Chemical Reaction Rates and Collision Cross Sections of Importance in the Earth's Upper Atmosphere and the Atmospheres of Other Planets, Moons, and Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huestis, D. L.

    2005-05-01

    We recommend establishment of a long-term program of critical evaluation by domain experts of the rates and cross sections of atomic and molecular processes that are needed for understanding and modeling the atmospheres in the solar system. We envision products resembling those from the ongoing JPL/NASA Panel for Data Evaluation and the efforts of the international combustion modeling community funded by US DOE and its European counterpart. Both of these endeavors already provide some important inputs for modeling the atmospheres of the Earth, planets, moons, and comets. However, their applications restrict the choice of which processes to evaluate and the temperature and pressure ranges to cover, thus leaving large gaps that need to be filled. Interestingly, an older evaluation program once filled some of these gaps. Funded by the US DoD in the 1960s-1980s, the DNA Reaction Rate Handbook provided a thorough treatment of numerous types of collisions and reactions that are important in the Earth's lower ionosphere, and the program even provided funding for new laboratory measurements. Other examples could be given, with the on-line resources at NIST being among the best, but most provide a narrower scope or less critical evaluation. What is needed is not a just a list of processes and numbers (i.e., a "database"), but rather serious comparison of the available information and specific statements from independent expert laboratory/theory data providers about what should be believed, what uncertainty to assign, and what is most in need of redetermination. The major topic areas would include the following: 1. Chemical reactions of neutral atoms and molecules in their ground electronic states 2. Ion-molecule reactions 3. Chemistry, relaxation, and radiation of electronically excited atoms and molecules 4. Vibrational and rotational relaxation and radiation 5. Photoabsorption, photodissociation, and photoionization 6. Electron-impact excitation, dissociation, ionization

  20. Comparisons of Atmospheric Chemistry Models and Observational Data in Google Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burek, M.; Nackowicz, M.

    2007-12-01

    We have developed a set of tools to enable Google Earth to support the scientific analysis of a chemistry and air quality field campaign in Mexico during spring of 2006. Using a variety of information types (gridded three- dimensional model results, surface observations and aircraft-based observations) we are able to provide the scientists with additional information on the overall structure of the chemical conditions at the time and location of the observations. Because the visualization is performed using Goggle Earth, the KML files produced can easily be distributed to the community. It is our goal that the tools we are building will enable the overall community (research and education) to access and visualize significant portions of the information available at the NCAR Community Data Portal.

  1. Research Spotlight: Ozone recovery and climate change will affect the atmosphere near Earth's surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mohi; Tretkoff, Ernie

    Ozone in the stratosphere (˜10-50 kilometers in altitude) helps protect life on Earth from harmful solar ultraviolet radiation. But at the lower altitudes in the troposphere, (0-10 kilometers in altitude), ozone is a major constituent of smog and has detrimental health effects. The stratospheric ozone layer had been depleted but recently has started to recover due to efforts to limit emissions of ozone- depleting chemicals.

  2. A Genesis breakup and burnup analysis in off-nominal Earth return and atmospheric entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Ahmed; Ling, Lisa; McRonald, Angus

    2005-01-01

    The Genesis project conducted a detailed breakup/burnup analysis before the Earth return to determine if any spacecraft component could survive and reach the ground intact in case of an off-nominal entry. In addition, an independent JPL team was chartered with the responsibility of analyzing several definitive breakup scenarios to verify the official project analysis. This paper presents the analysis and results of this independent team.

  3. A two-dimensional atmospheric chemistry modeling investigation of Earth's Phanerozoic O3 and near-surface ultraviolet radiation history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harfoot, Michael B. J.; Beerling, David J.; Lomax, Barry H.; Pyle, John A.

    2007-04-01

    We use the Cambridge two-dimensional (2-D) chemistry-radiation transport model to investigate the implications for column O3 and near-surface ultraviolet radiation (UV), of variations in atmospheric O2 content over the Phanerozoic (last 540 Myr). Model results confirm some earlier 1-D model investigations showing that global annual mean O3 column increases monotonically with atmospheric O2. Sensitivity studies indicate that changes in temperature and N2O exert a minor influence on O3 relative to O2. We reconstructed Earth's O3 history by interpolating the modeled relationship between O3 and O2 onto two Phanerozoic O2 histories. Our results indicate that the largest variation in Phanerozoic column O3 occurred between 400 and 200 Myr ago, corresponding to a rise in atmospheric O2 to ˜1.5 times the present atmospheric level (PAL) and subsequent fall to ˜0.5 PAL. The O3 response to this O2 decline shows latitudinal differences, thinning most at high latitudes (30-40 Dobson units (1 DU = 0.001 atm cm) at 66°N) and least at low latitudes (5-10 DU at 9°N) where a "self-healing" effect is evident. This O3 depletion coincides with significant increases in the near-surface biologically active UV radiation at high latitudes, +28% as weighted by the Thimijan spectral weighting function. O3 and UV changes were exacerbated when we incorporated a direct feedback of the terrestrial biosphere on atmospheric chemistry, through enhanced N2O production as the climate switched from an icehouse to a greenhouse mode. On the basis of a summary of field and laboratory experimental evidence, we suggest that these UV radiation increases may have exerted subtle rather than catastrophic effects on ecosystem processes.

  4. An impulse response function for the "long tail" of excess atmospheric CO2 in an Earth system model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lord, N. S.; Ridgwell, A.; Thorne, M. C.; Lunt, D. J.

    2016-01-01

    The ultimate fate of (fossil fuel) CO2 emitted to the atmosphere is governed by a range of sedimentological and geological processes operating on timescales of up to the ca. hundred thousand year response of the silicate weathering feedback. However, how the various geological CO2 sinks might saturate and feedbacks weaken in response to increasing total emissions is poorly known. Here we explore the relative importance and timescales of these processes using a 3-D ocean-based Earth system model. We first generate an ensemble of 1 Myr duration CO2 decay curves spanning cumulative emissions of up to 20,000 Pg C. To aid characterization and understanding of the model response to increasing emission size, we then generate an impulse response function description for the long-term fate of CO2 in the model. In terms of the process of carbonate weathering and burial, our analysis is consistent with a progressively increasing fraction of total emissions that are removed from the atmosphere as emissions increase, due to the ocean carbon sink becoming saturated, together with a lengthening of the timescale of removal from the atmosphere. However, we find that in our model the ultimate CO2 sink—silicate weathering feedback—is approximately invariant with respect to cumulative emissions, both in terms of its importance (it removes the remaining excess ~7% of total emissions from the atmosphere) and timescale (~270 kyr). Because a simple pulse-response description leads to initially large predictive errors for a realistic time-varying carbon release, we also develop a convolution-based description of atmospheric CO2 decay which can be used as a simple and efficient means of making long-term carbon cycle perturbation projections.

  5. Perfluorocarbons (PFCs), Some of the Immortal Molecules in the Earth's Atmosphere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shallcross, Dudley E.; Martin, Damien

    2011-01-01

    Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are fully fluorinated hydrocarbons that are used as blood plasma substitutes, in medical imaging and in the cosmetics industry. Most are inert and can also be used as tracers for applications such as air flow. However, because of their C-F bonds and their longevity in the atmosphere, PFCs have large global warming…

  6. Atmospheric effect in day-time laser ranging of artificial Earth's satellites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, M. T.; Kablak, N. I.

    Radiosounding data were used to investigate the refraction effect on laser ranging of artificial satellites. The Marini-Murray formula used by IERS as a standard is shown to overestimate the correction for the atmospheric effect, The Marini-Murray model is refined with regional peculiarities taken into account.

  7. The mysterious atmosphere of the Earth. ATLAS: Instruction guide with activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This teacher's guide presents lesson plans addressing various aspects of atmospheric physics and chemistry; the interactions between land, air, and sea; air pollution; and the mechanisms of climate change. The science concepts in this guide have been designed to complement the middle school curriculum. However, many activities can be used with younger or older students.

  8. Discovery and measurement of an isotopically distinct source of sulfate in Earth's atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Gerardo; Jackson, Terri; Brothers, Lauren; Barnett, Burton; Nguyen, Bryan; Thiemens, Mark H

    2008-09-01

    Sulfate (SO(4)) and its precursors are significant components of the atmosphere, with both natural and anthropogenic sources. Recently, our triple-isotope ((16)O, (17)O, (18)O) measurements of atmospheric sulfate have provided specific insights into the oxidation pathways leading to sulfate, with important implications for models of the sulfur cycle and global climate change. Using similar isotopic measurements of aerosol sulfate in a polluted marine boundary layer (MBL) and primary sulfate (p-SO(4)) sampled directly from a ship stack, we quantify the amount of p-SO(4) found in the atmosphere from ships. We find that ships contribute between 10% and 44% of the non-sea-salt sulfate found in fine [diameter (D) < 1.5 microm) particulate matter in coastal Southern California. These fractions are surprising, given that p-SO(4) constitutes approximately 2-7% of total sulfur emissions from combustion sources [Seinfed JH, Pandis SN (2006) Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (Wiley-Interscience, New York)]. Our findings also suggest that the interaction of SO(2) from ship emissions with coarse hydrated sea salt particles may lead to the rapid removal of SO(2) in the MBL. When combined with the longer residence time of p-SO(4) emissions in the MBL, these findings suggest that the importance of p-SO(4) emissions in marine environments may be underappreciated in global chemical models. Given the expected increase of international shipping in the years to come, these findings have clear implications for public health, air quality, international maritime law, and atmospheric chemistry. PMID:18753618

  9. Discovery and measurement of an isotopically distinct source of sulfate in Earth's atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Gerardo; Jackson, Terri; Brothers, Lauren; Barnett, Burton; Nguyen, Bryan; Thiemens, Mark H.

    2008-01-01

    Sulfate (SO4) and its precursors are significant components of the atmosphere, with both natural and anthropogenic sources. Recently, our triple-isotope (16O, 17O, 18O) measurements of atmospheric sulfate have provided specific insights into the oxidation pathways leading to sulfate, with important implications for models of the sulfur cycle and global climate change. Using similar isotopic measurements of aerosol sulfate in a polluted marine boundary layer (MBL) and primary sulfate (p-SO4) sampled directly from a ship stack, we quantify the amount of p-SO4 found in the atmosphere from ships. We find that ships contribute between 10% and 44% of the non-sea-salt sulfate found in fine [diameter (D) < 1.5 μm) particulate matter in coastal Southern California. These fractions are surprising, given that p-SO4 constitutes ≈2–7% of total sulfur emissions from combustion sources [Seinfed JH, Pandis SN (2006) Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (Wiley–Interscience, New York)]. Our findings also suggest that the interaction of SO2 from ship emissions with coarse hydrated sea salt particles may lead to the rapid removal of SO2 in the MBL. When combined with the longer residence time of p-SO4 emissions in the MBL, these findings suggest that the importance of p-SO4 emissions in marine environments may be underappreciated in global chemical models. Given the expected increase of international shipping in the years to come, these findings have clear implications for public health, air quality, international maritime law, and atmospheric chemistry. PMID:18753618

  10. Global pollution aerosol monitoring (GPAM) in the atmospheric boundary layer using future earth observing satellite remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Jianhe; Kafatos, Menas; Yang, Ruixin; Chiu, Long S.; Riebau, Allen R.

    2003-04-01

    Global pollution aerosol monitoring is a very important climatic and environmental problem. It affects not only human health but also ecological systems. Because most pollution aerosols are concentrated in the atmospheric boundary layer where human, animal and vegetation live, global pollution aerosol stuides have been an important topic since about a decade ago. Recently, many new chemistry remote sensing satellite systems, such as NASA's Aura (EOS-CHEM), have been established. However, pollution aerosols in the atmospheric boundary layer cannot be detected using current remote sensing technologies. George Mason University (GMU) proposes to design scientific algorithms and technologies to monitor the atmospheric boundary layer pollution aerosols, using both satellite remote sensing measurements and ground measurements, collaborating with NASA and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)/Forest Services (FS). Boundary layer pollution aerosols result from industrial pollution, desert dust storms, smoke from wildfires and biomass burning, volcanic eruptions, and from other trace gases. The current and next generation satellite instruments, such as The Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS), Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES), and High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) can be used for this study. Some surface measurements from USDA/FS and other agencies may also be used in this study. We will discuss critical issues for GPAM in the boundary layer using Earth observing satellite remote sensing in detail in this paper.

  11. Signatures of troposphere-stratosphere momentum coupling Implications for global atmospheric angular momentum and earth rotation budgets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, H. A.; Mayr, H. G.; Hartle, R. E.; Kramer, L.; Stirling, R.

    1984-01-01

    During January-August 1978, the global atmospheric angular momentum (M) exhibits distinct patterns of short term momentum interchange across latitudes. In the Northern Hemisphere winter-spring season, 30-50 day modulations of M are present in which momentum enhancements at mid-latitudes (20-30 deg) are closely matched by momentum depressions at high latitudes (50-60 deg). During the same interval there are no corresponding variations in M evident in the Southern Hemisphere. Conversely, during Southern Hemisphere fall-winter, similar anti-correlations in monthly scale momentum excursions are evident between mid and high latitudes. In the Northern Hemisphere, the winter-spring momentum signatures are detected throughout the atmosphere, from the lower troposphere to the stratosphere. During the Southern Hemisphere fall-winter, the modulation patterns are not evident at the higher altitudes. Structural details of the momentum signatures indicate that the coupling is sometimes effective on very short time scales, e.g., 1-2 days, or less. The evidence of distinct anti-correlation between large regions has interesting implications for studies of global atmospheric circulation, and also for studies of the excitation of variations in earth rotation in response to short term modulations of M.

  12. Using the EC-Earth atmospheric model to quantify the impact of recent thinning of Arctic sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Andreas Michael; Yang, Shuting; Kaas, Eigil

    2016-04-01

    The atmospheric general circulation model EC-EARTH has been employed to investigate the influence of a realistic change in recent Arctic sea ice thickness on local and remote climate. To investigate the atmospheric response of a realistically thinning sea ice compared to a uniform ice thickness of 1.5 m, two 32-year-long sets of simulations have been performed covering the period 1982-2013 and driven by observed SST and SIC which are only differing by the description of the sea ice thickness. Thickness data is taken from the GIOMAS dataset, which assimilates observed sea ice conditions. The results suggest that the atmospheric impact of recent declining thickness compared to a uniform thickness shows a higher warming trend over the central Arctic, consistent with the observed sea ice thinning, and a less strong warming trend over continental Europe. The influence of a variable thickness is most pronounced in winter and in the lowermost troposphere. Overall, the Arctic SAT response to a realistic sea ice loss including its thinning is in better agreement with the one seen in the reanalysis product ERA-Interim. Precipitation and cloud cover responses do not show a significant reponse to a realistic thickness change. Further analysis of potential remote responses to Arctic sea ice thinning is currently being performed.

  13. IN SITU ACCRETION OF HYDROGEN-RICH ATMOSPHERES ON SHORT-PERIOD SUPER-EARTHS: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE KEPLER-11 PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Ikoma, M.; Hori, Y. E-mail: yasunori.hori@nao.ac.jp

    2012-07-01

    Motivated by recent discoveries of low-density super-Earths with short orbital periods, we have investigated in situ accretion of H-He atmospheres on rocky bodies embedded in dissipating warm disks, by simulating quasi-static evolution of atmospheres that connect to the ambient disk. We have found that the atmospheric evolution has two distinctly different outcomes, depending on the rocky body's mass: while the atmospheres on massive rocky bodies undergo runaway disk-gas accretion, those on light rocky bodies undergo significant erosion during disk dispersal. In the atmospheric erosion, the heat content of the rocky body that was previously neglected plays an important role. We have also realized that the atmospheric mass is rather sensitive to disk temperature in the mass range of interest in this study. Our theory is applied to recently detected super-Earths orbiting Kepler-11 to examine the possibility that the planets are rock-dominated ones with relatively thick H-He atmospheres. The application suggests that the in situ formation of the relatively thick H-He atmospheres inferred by structure modeling is possible only under restricted conditions, namely, relatively slow disk dissipation and/or cool environments. This study demonstrates that low-density super-Earths provide important clues to understanding of planetary accretion and disk evolution.

  14. Ionization of the Earth's Upper Atmosphere in Large Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, E.; Burrows, J.; Kallenrode, M.; von Koenig, M.; Kuenzi, K. F.; Quack, M.

    2001-12-01

    Energetic charged particles ionize the upper terrestrial atmosphere. Sofar, chemical consequences of precipitating particles have been discussed for solar protons with energies up to a few hundred MeV. We present a refined model for the interaction of energetic particles with the atmosphere based on a Monte-Carlo simulation. The model includes higher energies and other particle species, such as energetic solar electrons. Results are presented for well-known solar events, such as July 14, 2000, and are extrapolated to extremely large events, such as Carrington's white light flare in 1859, which from ice cores has been identified ass the largest impulsive NO3 event in the interval 1561 -- 1994 (McCracken et al., 2001).

  15. Earth-based remote sensing of planetary surfaces and atmospheres at radio wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickel, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    Two reasons for remote sensing from the Earth are given: (1) space exploration, particularly below the surfaces or underneath cloud layers, is limited to only a very few planets; and (2) a program of regular monitoring, currently impractical with a limited number of space probes, is required. Reflected solar and nonthermal radiation are discussed. Relativistic electrons, trapped in large magnetospheres on Saturn and Jupiter, are discussed. These electrons produce synchrotron radiation and also interact with the ionosphere to produce bursts of low frequency emission. Because most objects are black-bodies, continuum radiometry is emphasized. Spectroscopic techniques and the measurement of nonthermal emission are also discussed.

  16. Spatial characteristics of airglow and solar scatter radiance from the earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huguenin, R.; Wohlers, M.; Weinberg, M.; Huffman, R.; Eastes, R.

    1989-12-01

    Spatial characteristics of UV radiance were extracted from Polar BEAR/AIRS UV Imager Experiment data, and photometer mode 1304 A dayside data for a specific day were analyzed. This thermospheric dayside radiance's spatial structure seems to be principally controlled by turbulence, which can be adequately modeled fractally. Mean radiance can be modeled using current understandings of radiant intensity, resonance scattering, and absorption, in conjunction with general circulation and thermospheric composition models. Results may be incorporated in a background radiance simulation model for testing and refining phenomenological models of the structured earth background.

  17. Photographic coronagraph, Skylab particulate experiment T025. [earth atmospheric pollution and Kohoutek Comet monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giovane, F.; Schuerman, D. W.; Greenberg, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    A photographic coronagraph, built to monitor Skylab's extravehicular contamination, is described. This versatile instrument was used to observe the earth's vertical aerosol distribution and Comet Kohoutek (1973f) near perihelion. Although originally designed for deployment from the solar airlock, the instrument was modified for EVA operation when the airlock was rendered unusable. The results of the observations made in four EVA's were almost completely ruined by the failure of a Skylab operational camera used with the coronagraph. Nevertheless, an aerosol layer at 48 km was discovered in the southern hemisphere from the few useful photographs.

  18. Doppler lidar atmospheric wind sensors - A comparative performance evaluation for global measurement applications from earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, R. T.

    1986-01-01

    A comparison is made of four prominent Doppler lidar systems, ranging in wavelength from the near UV to the middle IR, which are presently being studied for their potential in an earth-orbiting global tropospheric wind field measurement application. The comparison is restricted to relative photon efficiencies, i.e., the required number of transmitted photons per pulse is calculated for each system for midtropospheric velocity estimate uncertainties ranging from + or - 1 to + or - 4 m/s. The results are converted to laser transmitter pulse energy and power requirements. The analysis indicates that a coherent CO2 Doppler lidar operating at 9.11-micron wavelength is the most efficient.

  19. Near-global distribution of CO isotopic fractionation in the Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beale, C. A.; Buzan, E. M.; Boone, C. D.; Bernath, P. F.

    2016-05-01

    The first near-global (-85° to 85°) measurements of the isotopic fractionation of 13CO relative to 12CO have been obtained from 5 to 90 km using the ACE-FTS (Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer). These observations have been compared to predictions from WACCM (Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model). The highest positive fractionation (i.e. relatively more 13CO) values of over 100‰ are observed in the lower thermosphere during winter in both hemispheres, whereas the highest negative fractionation (i.e. relatively more 12CO) is observed in the mesosphere in the summer at high latitudes (due to the highly fractionating effect that UV light has on CO2) and year round in the tropics. Agreement between measurements and model results is generally good at high altitude, although ACE shows a stronger fractionation effect from CO2 photolysis than predicted by WACCM. In the lower atmosphere, agreement is qualitatively good, although there is a distinct discrepancy at 40 km in all seasons, which is likely a retrieval artifact.

  20. Application of Solar Spectral Irradiance Variability in a Earth Atmospheric Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harder, J. W.; Merkel, A.; Fontenla, J.; Marsh, D.; Woods, T. N.

    2010-12-01

    The Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) measures solar spectral variability in the 200-2400 nm range, accounting for about 97% of the total solar irradiance (TSI). SIM monitored the descending phase of solar cycle 23 and is now continuing these observations into the rising phase of cycle 24. The SIM observations indicate a slower evolutionary trend in solar spectral irradiance (SSI) over solar cycle times periods that are both in and out of phase with the TSI. To estimate the atmospheric response to the solar variability implied by these observations, quiet sun and active solar reference spectra were created as input into the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM). The SIM observations were combined with the SORCE SOLSTICE instrument in the 110-240 nm range and SRPM (Solar Radiation Physical Modeling) estimates in the infrared beyond the 2400 nm measurement limit of SIM to generate the reference spectra. The model output suggest a very different response in ozone than from atmospheric forcing from semi-empirical models of SSI. The model predicts a reduction in lower mesosphere at higher solar activity and a large increase in mid- to upper stratosphere. This structure can be explained by enhanced production of HOx,, and O3 self-healing effect. This structure is commensurate with contemporaneous observations of O3 from AURA-MLS and SABER.

  1. Radiance, polarization, and ellipticity of the radiation in the earth's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hitzfelder, S. J.; Plass, G. N.; Kattawar, G. W.

    1976-01-01

    The complete radiation field including polarization is calculated for a model of the real atmosphere by the matrix operator method. The radiance, direction and amount of polarization, and ellipticity are obtained at the top and bottom of the atmosphere for three values of the surface albedo (0; 0.15 0.90) and five solar zenith angles. Scattering and absorption by molecules (including ozone) and by aerosols are taken into account together with the variation of the number density of these substances with height. All results are calculated for both a normal aerosol number and a distribution which is one-third of the normal amount at all heights. The calculated values show general qualitative agreement with the available experimental measurements. The position of the neutral points of the polarization in the principal plane is a sensitive indicator of the characteristics of the aerosol particles in the atmosphere, since it depends on the sign and value of the single scattered polarization for scattering angles around 20 deg and 160 deg for transmitted and reflected photons respectively.

  2. Behaviour of the high-energy neutrino flux in the Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochanov, Aleksey; Sinegovskiy, Sergey; Sinegovskaya, Tatyana; Morozova, Anna

    2015-12-01

    The processing of the IceCube experiment data obtained during 988 days (2010-2013) revealed 37 high-energy neutrino-induced events with deposited energies of 30 TeV - 2 PeV. The hypothesis of an astrophysical origin of these neutrinos is confirmed at the statistical confidence level of 5.7σ. To identify reliably the neutrino events, a thorough calculation of the atmospheric neutrino background is required. In this work we calculate the atmospheric neutrino spectra in the energy range of 100 GeV - 10 PeV with usage of several hadronic models and a few parametrizations of cosmic ray spectra supported by experimental data which take into account the knee. It is shown that rare decays of short-lived neutral ka ns K_S^0 contribute more than a third of the total ν_e +(ν)_e flux at the energies above 100 eV. The account for kaons production in pion-nucleus collisions increases the ν_e +(ν)_e flux by 5-7% in the energy range of 102-104 GeV. Calculated neutrino spectra agree on the whole with the measurement data. The neutrino flavor ratio extracted from the IceCube data possibly indicates that the conventional atmospheric electron neutrino flux obtained in the IceCube experiment contains an admixture of the astrophysical neutrinos in the range of 20-50 TeV.

  3. Advantages of a Unified Earth and Space Science Approach for Geoscience Education: Perspectives from the National Center for Atmospheric Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. M.; Barnes, T.; Bergman, J.; Carbone, L.; Eastburn, T.; Foster, S.; Gardiner, L.; Genyuk, J.; Henderson, S.; Lagrave, M.; Munoz, R.; Russell, R.; Araujo-Pradere, E.; Metcalfe, T.; Mastie, D.; Pennington, P.

    2005-05-01

    The intellectual divisions common among scientists involved in research in specific disciplines are frequently not shared by the broader community of learners. For example, in K-12 education, the Earth sciences and the space sciences have generally been taught in an integrated approach, until opportunities for more advanced courses become available at the higher grade levels in some fortunate school districts. When scientists involved in EPO activities retain a perspective limited to their particular science mission, rather than stepping back to a broader perspective that places the research in a larger context, they risk limiting the usefulness of these activities to a broad cross-section of learners that seek to learn in a contextual framework. The re-integration of Earth and space sciences within NASA's Science Mission Directorate provides an opportunity to more systematically take advantage of the fact that Earth is one of many examples of possible planetary evolution scenarios presented in our solar system and beyond. This development should encourage integration of research across the SMD into a broader context that encourages the development of higher learning skills and a systems thinking approach. At the National Center for Atmospheric Research, the interdisciplinary nature of the research problems we address requires an approach that integrates Earth and space science, and we parallel this in our education and outreach activities, ranging from our exhibits on climate change to our professional development workshops and online courses to our websites and curriculum development efforts. The Windows to the Universe project (http://www.windows.ucar.edu), initiated at the University of Michigan with support from NASA in 1995 and now developed and maintained at the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, has maintained this integrated approach from its inception with great success - leading to over 6 million users of our English and Spanish language

  4. On the Size of the Cosmic Dust Input to the Earth's Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plane, J. M. C.; Feng, W.; Carrillo-Sánchez, J. D.; Janches, D.; Nesvorny, D.; Gardner, C. S.; Marsh, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    Current estimates of the magnitude of the cosmic dust input range from 2 to over 100 tons per day (t d-1), depending on whether the measurements are made in space, in the middle atmosphere, or in polar ice cores. This nearly 2 order-of-magnitude discrepancy indicates that there are flaws in perhaps both the interpretation of the experimental observations and the atmospheric models that have been used to make the estimates. This paper will describe three new estimates of the dust input, and attempt to reconcile them. The first is a zodiacal dust cloud model which predicts that more than 90% of the dust entering the atmosphere comes from Jupiter Family Comets, and that the dust is mostly in a near-prograde orbit and should enter the atmosphere with an average velocity around 14 km s-1. However, relatively few of these slow particles are observed, even by the powerful Arecibo 430 MHz radar. Using coupled models of meteoroid differential ablation, ionization and radar detection to compute the probability of detecting a specified meteoroid in the Arecibo beam, an upper limit to the cosmic dust input of 16 t d-1 has been obtained from the radar obsevations. The second method is to use lidar measurements of the vertical Na atom flux at the Starfire Optical Range, combined with predictions of the relative geographic variations of the key wave-induced vertical transport processes from the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM). The estimated global influx of cosmic dust is then 50 ± 13 t d-1. The final method is to model several of the mesospheric metal layers - Na, Fe, K and Ca - using WACCM with a full treatment of the gas-phase chemistry of these metals, together with the explicit formation and growth of meteoric smoke particles. The absolute densities of the metal layers can be satisfactorily modelled with a dust input of up to 25 t d-1 if the dust mass and velocity distribution is that predicted by the zodiacal dust cloud model referred to above.

  5. Free and Forced Convection in High Permeability Porous Media: Impact on Gas Flux at the Earth-atmosphere Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisbrod, N.; Levintal, E.; Dragila, M. I.; Kamai, T.

    2015-12-01

    Gas movement within the earth's subsurface and its exchange with the atmosphere is one of the principal elements contributing to soil and atmospheric function. As the soil permeability increases, gas circulation by convective mechanisms becomes significantly greater than the diffusion. Two of the convective mechanisms, which can be of great importance, are being explored in this research. The first one is thermal convection venting (TCV), which develops when there are unstable density gradients. The second mechanism is wind induced convection (WIC), which develops due to surface winds that drive air movement. Here, we report the results of a study on the relationships between the porous media permeability and particle size, and the development and magnitude of TCV and WIC with the development of thermal differences and surface winds. The research included large high-permeability column experiments carried out under highly controlled laboratory conditions, using well-defined single-sized spherical particles while surface winds and thermal differences were forced and monitored. CO2 enriched air, functioned as a tracer, was used to quantify the impact of TCV and WIC on gas migration in the porous media. Results show that in homogenous porous media a permeability range of 10-7 to 10-6 m2 is the threshold value for TCV onset under standard atmospheric conditions. Adding surface wind with an average velocity of 1.5 m s-1 resulted in WIC effect to a depth of -0.3 m in most experimental settings; however, it did not caused additional air circulation at the reference depth of -0.9 m. Furthermore, given the appropriate conditions, a combined effect of TCV and WIC did significantly increase the overall media ventilation. Simulations of temperature profiles in soil under that permeability, showed that as the thermal gradient changes with depth and is a continuous function, TCV cells can be developed in local sections of the profile, not necessarily reaching the atmosphere.

  6. The Sub-bureau for Atmospheric Angular Momentum of the International Earth Rotation Service - A meteorological data center with geodetic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salstein, David A.; Kann, Deirdre M.; Miller, Alvin J.; Rosen, Richard D.

    1993-01-01

    By exchanging angular momentum with the solid portion of the earth, the atmosphere plays a vital role in exciting small but measurable changes in the rotation of our planet. Recognizing this relationship, the International Earth Rotation Service invited the U.S. National Meteorological Center to organize a Sub-bureau for Atmospheric Angular Momentum (SBAAM) for the purpose of collecting, distributing, archiving, and analyzing atmospheric parameters relevant to earth rotation/polar motion. These functions of wind and surface pressure are being computed with data from several of the world's weather services, and they are being widely applied to the research and operations of the geodetic community. The SBAAM began operating formally in October 1989, and this article highlights its development, operations, and significance.

  7. SPECIAL ISSUE DEVOTED TO THE 80TH ANNIVERSARY OF ACADEMICIAN N G BASOV'S BIRTH: The efficiency of propagation of radiation from different lasers through the turbulent Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashkin, A. S.; Beznozdrev, V. N.; Pirogov, N. A.

    2003-01-01

    A simplified model of the propagation of intense laser beams in the turbulent Earth's atmosphere along horizontal and oblique paths is improved. The model takes into account the basic mechanisms of interaction of laser radiation with the Earth's atmosphere (molecular absorption, aerosol extinction, turbulence-induced beam spread and wander). The application of this model demonstrates a general approach to determining the optimal radiation wavelengths for attaining the maximum intensity of focused laser radiation at a stationary object depending on the path length, angle of the path inclination, weather conditions, and diameter of the laser output beam. A simple physical interpretation of the dependences obtained is presented. The efficiencies of propagation of various high-power laser beams through the turbulent Earth's atmosphere are compared. Specific features of the energy transfer from various lasers to moving objects are analysed. It is shown that, when weather conditions change over a wide range, it is expedient to use radiation from a cw chemical DF laser.

  8. 40Ar/39Ar systematics and argon diffusion in amber: implications for ancient earth atmospheres

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landis, G.P.; Snee, L.W.

    1991-01-01

    Argon isotope data indicate retained argon in bulk amber (matrix gas) is radiogenic [40Ar/39Ar ???32o] than the much more abundant surface absorbed argon [40Ar/39Ar ???295.5]. Neutron-induced 39Ar is retained in amber during heating experiments to 150?? -250??C, with no evidence of recoiled 39Ar found after irradiation. A maximum permissible volume diffusion coefficient of argon in amber (at ambient temperature) D???1.5 x 10-17 cm2S-1 is calculated from 39Ar retention. 40Ar/39Ar age calculations indicate Dominican Republic amber is ??? 45 Ma and North Dakota amber is ??? 89 Ma, both at least reasonable ages for the amber based upon stratigraphic and paleontological constraints and upon the small amount of radiogenic 40Ar. To date, over 300 gas analyses of ambers and resins of Cretaceous to Recent age that are geographically distributed among fifteen noted world locations identify mixtures of gases in different sites within amber (Berner and Landis, 1988). The presence of multiple mixing trends between compositionally distinct end-members gases within the same sample and evidence for retained radiogenic argon within the amber argue persuasivley against rapid exchange by diffusion of amber-contained gases with moder air. Only gas in primary bubbles entrapped between successive flows of tree resin has been interpreted as original "ancient air", which is an O2-rich end-member gas with air-like N2/Ar ratios. Gas analyses of these primary bubbles indicate atmospheric O2 levels in the Late Cretaceous of ??? 35%, and that atmospheric O2 dropped by early Tertiary time to near a present atmospheric level of 21% O2. A very low argon diffusion coefficient in amber persuasively argues for a gas in primary bubbles trapped in amber being ancient air (possibly modified only by O2 reaction with amber). ?? 1991.

  9. Inorganic aerosol formation and growth in the Earth's lower and upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, R. W.; Plane, J. M. C.

    2006-12-01

    This chapter describes the photo-chemical production of aerosol particles in two very different regions of the atmosphere: iodine oxide particles in the marine boundary layer (MBL), and meteoric smoke particles that form in the upper mesosphere from the ablation of interplanetary dust. These two systems are surprisingly analogous the source of the condensable inorganic vapours is external to the atmosphere, being injected into the atmosphere from the ocean or from space and the particles are formed by homogeneous nucleation. The purpose of the chapter is to describe a laboratory and modelling study to understand at a fundamental level how the nucleation and growth of the particles occurs. Iodine oxide particles were produced from the photo-oxidation of gaseous I{2} with O{3}, which is most likely the primary photo-chemical route to produce the bursts of new particles observed in the MBL at seaweed-rich coastal locations. The captured particles were observed to be fractal-like (i.e., with open or non-compact structures), and to be composed of the stable oxide I{2}O{5}. Meteoric smoke analogues of iron oxide, silicon oxide, and iron silicate composition were similarly formed from the photo-oxidation of iron- and silicon-containing gas-phase precursors in the presence of O{3}. Imaging of the iron-containing particles showed them to be extended, fractal aggregates. For each system, models were developed to elucidate the growth kinetics of the particles and to characterise them in terms of standard fractal parameters. I{2}O{5} particles were found to have a fractal dimension (Df) value of 2.5 at long growth times, consistent with a particle-cluster diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) mechanism, whereas smoke analogues had lower Df values (1.75) which appear to result from a magnetic aggregation process.

  10. New Broadband LIDAR for Greenhouse Carbon Dioxide Gas Sensing in the Earth's Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgieva, Elena; Heaps, William S.; Huang,Wen

    2011-01-01

    We present demonstration of a novel broadband lidar technique capable of dealing with the atmospherically induced variations in CO2 absorption using a Fabry-Perot based detector and a broadband laser. The Fabry-Perot solid etalon in the receiver part is tuned to match the wavelength of several CO2 absorption lines simultaneously. The broadband technique tremendously reduces the requirement for source wavelength stability, instead putting this responsibility on the Fabry- Perot based receiver. The instrument technology we are developing has a clear pathway to space and realistic potential to become a robust, low risk space measurement system.

  11. Collaborative Project. A Flexible Atmospheric Modeling Framework for the Community Earth System Model (CESM)

    SciTech Connect

    Gettelman, Andrew

    2015-10-01

    In this project we have been upgrading the Multiscale Modeling Framework (MMF) in the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM), also known as Super-Parameterized CAM (SP-CAM). This has included a major effort to update the coding standards and interface with CAM so that it can be placed on the main development trunk. It has also included development of a new software structure for CAM to be able to handle sub-grid column information. These efforts have formed the major thrust of the work.

  12. The Chlorine Abundance of Earth: Evidence for Early Atmospheric Loss and Creation of a Life-Supporting Planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, Z. D.; Draper, D. S.

    2009-12-01

    The Earth abundance of the heavier halogens, Cl, Br and I, are significantly depleted relative to expected values based on CI chondrites and solar abundances. The cause of these ‘selective’ depletions may be related to 1) far greater volatility than previously assumed; 2) a hidden reservoir on Earth; 3) selective loss of the halogens during planetary accretion. The volatility of an element is related to its temperature of condensation from the cooling solar nebula. The high condensation temperature of Cl is based on sodalite crystallization at ~800 K (10-4 bar), but even if sodalite formation is kinetically impeded at such low pressures, NaCl (g) should condense to NaCl (s) at only slightly lower temperatures. An unreasonably low condensation temperature of ~200 K would be needed to explain Earth’s concentration of halogens. A second possibility for the apparent Earth depletion is that Cl is strongly partitioned into the core. We tested this hypothesis by experimentally measuring Cl partitioning between basalt and Fe (and Fe95.5S4.5) at high pressures and temperatures. Samples were doped with trace FeCl2 as a Cl source. The measured D (Cl) metal-basalt is less than 0.01 under all conditions, ruling out the possibility of a Cl sink in the core. We propose instead that the halogens were lost during the late giant bombardment stage of planetary accretion. The selective loss of the halogens relative to other elements with similar condensation temperatures is explained by their unique hydrophilic character. Early in Earth’s history, halogens were strongly partitioned into the ocean/surficial environment. They were then removed by atmospheric erosion associated with giant impacts towards the end of planetary accretion. Our results provide independent evidence for multiple atmospheric-loss events, a controversial conclusion that is at odds with some geophysical studies. Over 90% of Cl was lost in early Earth history. Today, the oceans host nearly half of Earth

  13. Assessing the habitability of planets with Earth-like atmospheres with 1D and 3D climate modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godolt, M.; Grenfell, J. L.; Kitzmann, D.; Kunze, M.; Langematz, U.; Patzer, A. B. C.; Rauer, H.; Stracke, B.

    2016-07-01

    Context. The habitable zone (HZ) describes the range of orbital distances around a star where the existence of liquid water on the surface of an Earth-like planet is in principle possible. The applicability of one-dimensional (1D) climate models for the estimation of the HZ boundaries has been questioned by recent three-dimensional (3D) climate studies. While 3D studies can calculate the water vapor, ice albedo, and cloud feedback self-consistently and therefore allow for a deeper understanding and the identification of relevant climate processes, 1D model studies rely on fewer model assumptions and can be more easily applied to the large parameter space possible for extrasolar planets. Aims: We evaluate the applicability of 1D climate models to estimate the potential habitability of Earth-like extrasolar planets by comparing our 1D model results to those of 3D climate studies in the literature. We vary the two important planetary properties, surface albedo and relative humidity, in the 1D model. These depend on climate feedbacks that are not treated self-consistently in most 1D models. Methods: We applied a cloud-free 1D radiative-convective climate model to calculate the climate of Earth-like planets around different types of main-sequence stars with varying surface albedo and relative humidity profile. We compared the results to those of 3D model calculations available in the literature and investigated to what extent the 1D model can approximate the surface temperatures calculated by the 3D models. Results: The 1D parameter study results in a large range of climates possible for an Earth-sized planet with an Earth-like atmosphere and water reservoir at a certain stellar insolation. At some stellar insolations the full spectrum of climate states could be realized, i.e., uninhabitable conditions due to surface temperatures that are too high or too low as well as habitable surface conditions, depending only on the relative humidity and surface albedo assumed. When

  14. Comparison of Regression Methods to Compute Atmospheric Pressure and Earth Tidal Coefficients in Water Level Associated with Wenchuan Earthquake of 12 May 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Anhua; Singh, Ramesh P.; Sun, Zhaohua; Ye, Qing; Zhao, Gang

    2016-05-01

    The earth tide, atmospheric pressure, precipitation and earthquake fluctuations, especially earthquake greatly impacts water well levels, thus anomalous co-seismic changes in ground water levels have been observed. In this paper, we have used four different models, simple linear regression (SLR), multiple linear regression (MLR), principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares (PLS) to compute the atmospheric pressure and earth tidal effects on water level. Furthermore, we have used the Akaike information criterion (AIC) to study the performance of various models. Based on the lowest AIC and sum of squares for error values, the best estimate of the effects of atmospheric pressure and earth tide on water level is found using the MLR model. However, MLR model does not provide multicollinearity between inputs, as a result the atmospheric pressure and earth tidal response coefficients fail to reflect the mechanisms associated with the groundwater level fluctuations. On the premise of solving serious multicollinearity of inputs, PLS model shows the minimum AIC value. The atmospheric pressure and earth tidal response coefficients show close response with the observation using PLS model. The atmospheric pressure and the earth tidal response coefficients are found to be sensitive to the stress-strain state using the observed data for the period 1 April-8 June 2008 of Chuan 03# well. The transient enhancement of porosity of rock mass around Chuan 03# well associated with the Wenchuan earthquake (Mw = 7.9 of 12 May 2008) that has taken its original pre-seismic level after 13 days indicates that the co-seismic sharp rise of water well could be induced by static stress change, rather than development of new fractures.

  15. Comparison of Regression Methods to Compute Atmospheric Pressure and Earth Tidal Coefficients in Water Level Associated with Wenchuan Earthquake of 12 May 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Anhua; Singh, Ramesh P.; Sun, Zhaohua; Ye, Qing; Zhao, Gang

    2016-07-01

    The earth tide, atmospheric pressure, precipitation and earthquake fluctuations, especially earthquake greatly impacts water well levels, thus anomalous co-seismic changes in ground water levels have been observed. In this paper, we have used four different models, simple linear regression (SLR), multiple linear regression (MLR), principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares (PLS) to compute the atmospheric pressure and earth tidal effects on water level. Furthermore, we have used the Akaike information criterion (AIC) to study the performance of various models. Based on the lowest AIC and sum of squares for error values, the best estimate of the effects of atmospheric pressure and earth tide on water level is found using the MLR model. However, MLR model does not provide multicollinearity between inputs, as a result the atmospheric pressure and earth tidal response coefficients fail to reflect the mechanisms associated with the groundwater level fluctuations. On the premise of solving serious multicollinearity of inputs, PLS model shows the minimum AIC value. The atmospheric pressure and earth tidal response coefficients show close response with the observation using PLS model. The atmospheric pressure and the earth tidal response coefficients are found to be sensitive to the stress-strain state using the observed data for the period 1 April-8 June 2008 of Chuan 03# well. The transient enhancement of porosity of rock mass around Chuan 03# well associated with the Wenchuan earthquake (Mw = 7.9 of 12 May 2008) that has taken its original pre-seismic level after 13 days indicates that the co-seismic sharp rise of water well could be induced by static stress change, rather than development of new fractures.

  16. Dust of Orionid meteor shower in the Earth atmosphere before and after Halley's Comet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mateshvili, G.; Mateshvili, YU.

    1989-01-01

    Among the interesting questions concerning meteor streams associated with Comet Halley is the question of whether or not the activity of a meteor stream was connected with the approach of the comet to the terrestrial orbit in 1985 to 1986. Meteoric aerosols getting to the upper atmosphere can be detected by twilight sounding, as has been done previously. It turns out that not only parameters describing some properties of aerosol can be obtained by twilight sounding, but also characteristics concerning the structure of the stream can be derived. Among the yearly active streams, the Orionides have always attracted the attention of scientists. The period of activity of the Orionides is October 18 to 26, and the maximum stream activity is October 21. In detecting aerosol layers in the terrestrial atmosphere, a notion of the logarithmic intensity gradient of scattered twilight light is used, d log I/dH, where I is intensity and H is the real twilight beam height, which is a function of the wavelength observed. A photoelectric photometer with an interference filter at the wavelength of 610 nm is used. The observation were carried out in two points of the solar vertical; the zenith angle of the observation points was + or - 60 degrees. The recording was carried on continuously in each direction during a minute, then the system was switched to the other direction. A calibration standard was recorded before each observation. The observation dates in the Orionid periods of 1984, 1986, and 1987 are given.

  17. Atmospheric response to Ice Age conditions: Climatology near the Earth's surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lautenschlager, M.; Herterich, K.

    1990-12-01

    We present a 6-year simulation of the ice age atmosphere using the T21 Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM) of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). The lower boundary conditions (18 kyr B.P.) were taken from CLIMAP Project Members (1981). The analysis is restricted to the surface climatology for two reasons: The surface fields are the test data derived from the geological record on land, and they define the upper boundary conditions for simulating the glacial ocean. Model results are shown for the mean annual surface fields of temperature, wind, and precipitation. In the global average the surface temperature was 4.7°C cooler compared to the present temperature. The wind strength increased in mid-latitudes and decreased in tropical trade wind regions. Precipitation did not change significantly in the global average; however, precipitation decreased over land and increased over the ocean. Most of the difference patterns between the present conditions and the ice age climate were statistically significant. The simulated surface climatology is roughly consistent with the paleogeological evidence and with numerical AGCM simulations of other authors. This suggests that presently available AGCMs, including the ECMWF model (T21), are able to describe climates far away from the present, although internal parameterizations were tuned to present data sets.

  18. Earth observation and atmospheric sounding based on a high spectral resolution lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanyang; Luo, Haiying; Liu, Dong; Yang, Yongying

    2015-10-01

    Obtain accurate detection data on the distribution of water vapor and aerosol is the basis for researches on numerical weather prediction and dynamic meteorology. It also has great importance for finding haze formation and digestion mechanism. In this paper, the high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) is employed to obtain the optical properties of the atmosphere such as optical depth and backscatter coefficient which are very helpful to get the accurate detection data on distribution and Interaction of water vapor and aerosol continuously. A forward simulation model is established to simulate the typical atmospheric conditions and aerosol distribution, and considered the presence of sunlight during the day and the background noise. The simulation result shows that the HSRL proposed here can perform well with satisfactory measurement accuracy for the altitudes below 8km, which is better than 10%, so that HSRL is very helpful to the improvement of the accuracy of weather forecasts and to the study on the prevention and control measures of haze and other weather disasters.

  19. Status of the Geostationary Spectrograph (GeoSpec) for Earth and Atmospheric Science Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janz, Scott; Hilsenrath, Ernest; Mount, G.; Brune, W.; Heath, D.

    2004-01-01

    GeoSpec will support future satellite mission concepts in the Atmospheric Sciences and in Land and Ocean Sciences by providing time-resolved measurements of both chemically linked atmospheric trace gas concentrations of important molecules such as O3, NO2, CH2O and SO2 and at the same time coastal and ocean pollution events, tidal effects, and the origin and evolution of aerosol plumes. The instrument design concept in development is a dual spectrograph covering the WMS wavelength region of 310-500 nm