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1

Clouds and the earth's radiant energy system (CERES) - Instrument design and development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Measurements of the earth's reflected shortwave and emitted longwave energy and of the effect of clouds on these quantities are planned using a refined version of the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) scanning instrument. The CERES instruments are being designed to accumulate earth radiance measurements with a repeatability of better than 0.5 percent over their five year life. Beginning in 1996, flights are planned on both polar and low earth orbit satellites to obtain the required temporal and spatial coverage. The design and development of CERES are discussed.

Kopia, Leonard P.

1991-01-01

2

Earth's Energy Budget Poster  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This poster includes an energy budget diagram on the front depicting our best understanding of energy flows into and away from the Earth. It is based on the work of many scientists over more than 100 years, with the most recent measurements from NASA'S Clouds and the Earth鈙 Radiant Energy System (CERES) satellite instrument, which provide high accuracy data of Earth's reflected solar and emitted infrared radiation fluxes.

3

BSR/CSA C448-201x, Design and Installation of Earth Energy Bi  

E-print Network

to Date 路 Manitoba Hydro 路 R. Mancini & Associates 路 NRCan 路 Geoflex Systems 路 WaterFurnace 路 Earth 路 Pretech 路 GEO 路 Geothermal NII 路 Groundheat International 路 Ewbank Geo Testing 路 Geo-Xergy Systems Inc 路 CM Engineering 路 HRAI 路 City of Calgary 路 Geo-Flo Products 路 Heat-Line Corporation 路 Government

4

Earth Port-Moon Port design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A pair of compatible transfer stations or Space Ports and associated transfer vehicles was designed in order to support permanent manned lunar facilities. One of the Space Ports was placed in earth orbit (not necessarily Low Earth Orbit - LEO), and the other in lunar orbit. The primary purposes of the Space Ports was to support the lunar surface facility, the return of lunar manufactured items to the earth, and the transfer of lunar manufactured items to space vehicles and earth orbital space stations. The design was constrained by the following: (1) The orbital altitudes and inclinations of the Earth Port and Moon Port were chosen to minimize the overall cost of transporting materials to and from the moon. The ETO (Earth-to-Orbit) costs were considered separately to allow consideration of initiating planetary missions, etc., from the Earth Port. (2) A new earth launch point was chosen to facilitate the support of the lunar facility. This launch point was chosen to minimize overall costs, maximize overall safety, and to avoid political problems. To this end, it was mandatory the launch site be owned by the United States or one of its close allies. In addition, the launch would take place over water and expendable stages would drop into the ocean. Space shuttle type vehicles could be used if appropriate provisions were made for aborts, SRB and ET impact, etc. The ground track and impact point studies included space shuttle type vehicles, current ELV's (expendable launch vehicles, and HLLV's (heavy lift launch vehicles). (3) The Earth Port and Moon Port orbits were selected so that transfer trajectories between the two facilities could be initiated often without major plane change penalties. The amount of these penalties was calculated. Families of Earth Port to Moon Port and Moon Port to Earth Port trajectories were calculated to document the energy requirements and penalties. (4) Space Port module designs included module systems definitions, module masses, system masses, module and system volumes, module and system power requirements, etc. (5) The Space Port designs included specifications and justification for: Permanent crew size; Warehousing capacity; Assembly, assembly support, and repair; Unsupported operational capability; Nominal resupply intervals; Contingency resupply options; Transient personnel support capability; Costing, based on the Space Station Cost Model.

1987-01-01

5

Design of low-energy transfer from lunar orbit to asteroid in the Sun-Earth-Moon system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Asteroid exploration trajectories which start from a lunar orbit are investigated in this work. It is assumed that the probe departs from lunar orbit and returns to the vicinity of Earth, then escapes from the Earth by performing a perigee maneuver. A low-energy transfer in Sun-Earth-Moon system is adopted. First, the feasible region of low-energy transfer from lunar orbit to perigee within 5 000 km height above the Earth surface in Sun-Earth-Moon system is calculated and analyzed. Three transfer types are found, i.e., large maneuver and fast transfers, small maneuver and fast transfers, and disordered and slow transfers. Most of feasibility trajectories belong to the first two types. Then, the low-energy trajectory leg from lunar orbit to perigee and a heliocentric trajectory leg from perigee to asteroid are patched by a perigee maneuver. The optimal full-transfer trajectory is obtained by exploiting the differential evolution algorithm. Finally, taking 4179 Toutatis asteroid as the target, some low-energy transfer trajectories are obtained and analyzed.

Wang, Ya-Min; Qiao, Dong; Cui, Ping-Yuan

2014-12-01

6

Modeling Earth's Energy Balance  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners use the STELLA box modeling software to determine Earth's temperature based on incoming solar radiation and outgoing terrestrial radiation. Starting with a simple black body model, the exercise gradually adds complexity by incorporating albedo, then a 1-layer atmosphere, then a 2-layer atmosphere, and finally a complex atmosphere with latent and sensible heat fluxes. With each step, students compare the modeled surface temperature to Earth's actual surface temperature, thereby providing a check on how well each increasingly complex model captures the physics of the actual system.

Menking, Kirsten; College, Vassar; Science Education Resource Center, On T.

7

Earth's Energy Imbalance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

'Global warming' from increased greenhouse gases really refers to a global energy imbalance at the top-of-atmosphere (TOA). TOA measurements of radiation from space can track changes over time but lack absolute accuracy. An inventory of energy shows that over 90% of the imbalance is manifested as ocean heat content (OHC). Here we use ORAS4 ocean reanalysis data and other OHC estimates to compare the OHC rates of change with model-based estimates of TOA energy imbalance (from CCSM4), and with TOA satellite measurements for the year 2000 onwards. Most of the ocean-only OHC analyses extend to only 700 m depth, have large discrepancies among the rates of change of OHC, and do not resolve interannual variability adequately to capture ENSO and volcanic eruption effects. For the first time we show that ORAS4 OHC quantitatively agrees with the radiative forcing estimates of impacts of the 3 major volcanic eruptions since 1960 (Mt. Agung 1963, El Chich髇 1982, and Mt. Pinatubo 1991). The natural variability of the energy imbalance is substantial from month-to-month associated with cloud and weather variations, and interannually mainly associated with ENSO, while the sun affects 15% of the climate change signal on decadal timescales. All estimates (OHC and TOA) show that over the past decade the energy imbalance ranges between about 0.5 and 1 W m-2. By using the full-depth ocean, there is a better overall accounting for energy, but discrepancies remain at interannual timescales between OHC and TOA radiation measurements, notably in 2008-09.

Trenberth, K. E.; Fasullo, J.

2013-12-01

8

CSM: Earth, Energy, Environment 2013 Annual Faculty  

E-print Network

CSM: Earth, Energy, Environment 2013 Annual Faculty Conference Campus Update Terry Parker, Provost August 19, 2013 #12;CSM: Earth, Energy, Environment In Previous Years, we have discussed: 路 Campus budget on space overall and space location 路 Accreditation #12;CSM: Earth, Energy, Environment For this year, we

9

An earth station design for rural telecommunications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A design for an earth station intended specifically for rural telephony applications is described with a discussion of overall system and satellite parameters. It is noted that higher satellite transfer gain and reduced receiver noise figure allow the use of more economical combinations of antenna size and HPA power in the rural terminal. Small-aperture earth terminals employing 3-meter antennas, 0.2 Watt transmitters, and 100-K low-noise amplifiers, designed using the integrated common equipment SCPC approach, provide substantial cost and power consumption savings over conventional designs. Specific objectives for a prototype development program are established. The integration of a satellite DAMA control system with a telephone exchange specifically designed for a small number of subscribers in a rural environment provides additional cost reduction.

Tustison, G. F.

10

CERES Detects Earth's Heat and Energy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System, CERES, monitors solar energy reflected from the Earth and heat energy emitted from the Earth. In this image, heat energy radiated from the earth is shown in varying shades of yellow, red, blue and white. The brightest yellow areas, such as the Sahara Desert and Arabian Peninsula, are emitting the most energy out to space, while the dark blue polar regions and bright white clouds are the coldest areas on Earth, and are emitting the least energy. The animation (1.5MB) (high-res (4MB)) shows roughly a week of CERES data. For more information: CERES images through Visible Earth. CERES web site Image courtesy of the CERES instrument team

2002-01-01

11

The Sun: Source of the Earth's Energy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Sun is the primary source of the Earth's energy. However, due to the complexity in the way the energy affects Earth, the various solar sources of the energy, and the variation exhibited by the Sun it is difficult to understand and predict the Earth's response to solar drivers. In addition to visible light the radiant energy of the Sun can exhibit variation in nearly all wavelengths, which can vary over nearly all timescales. Depending on the wavelength of the incident radiation the light can deposit energy in a wide variety or locations and drive processes from below Earth's surface to interplanetary space. Other sources of energy impacting Earth include energetic particles, magnetic fields, and mass and flow variations in the solar wind. Many of these variable energetic processes cannot be coupled and recent results continue to demonstrate that the complex dynamics of the Sun can have a great range of measurable impacts on Earth.

Thompson, Barbara J.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

12

Designing sustainable soils in Earth's critical zone  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The demographic drivers of increasing human population and wealth are creating tremendous environmental pressures from growing intensity of land use, resulting in soil and land degradation worldwide. Environmental services are provided through multiple soil functions that include biomass production, water storage and transmission, nutrient transformations, contaminant attenuation, carbon and nitrogen storage, providing habitat and maintaining the genetic diversity of the land environment. One of the greatest challenges of the 21st century is to identify key risks to soil, and to design mitigation strategies to manage these risks and to enhance soil functions that can last into the future. The scientific study of Earth's Critical Zone (CZ), the thin surface layer that extends vertically from the top of the tree canopy to the bottom of aquifers, provides an essential integrating scientific framework to study, protect and enhance soil functions. The research hypothesis is that soil structure, the geometric architecture of solids, pores and biomass, is a critical indicator and essential factor of productive soil functions. The experimental design selects a network of Critical Zone Observatories (CZOs) as advanced field research sites along a gradient of land use intensity in order to quantify soil structure and soil processes that dictate the flows and transformations of material and energy as soil functions. The CZOs focus multidisciplinary expertise on soil processes, field observation and data interpretation, management science and ecological economics. Computational simulation of biophysical processes provides a quantitative method of integration for the range of theory and observations that are required to quantify the linkages between changes in soil structure and soil functions. Key results demonstrate that changes in soil structure can be quantified through the inputs of organic carbon and nitrogen from plant productivity and microbial activity, coupled with particle aggregation dynamics and organic matter mineralization. Simulation results show that soil structure is highly dynamic and is sensitive to organic matter production and minearlisation rates as influenced by vegetation, tillage and organic carbon amendments. These results point to a step-change in the capability to design soil management and land use through computational simulation. This approach of "sustainability by design" describes the mechanistic process linkages that exist between the above-ground inputs to the CZ and the internal processes that produce soil functions. This approach provides a rational, scientific approach to selecting points of intervention with the CZ in order to design methods to mitigate soil threats and to enhance and sustain vital soil functions. Furthermore, this approach provides a successful pilot study to the use of international networks of CZOs as a planetary-scale laboratory to test the response of CZ process rates along gradients of global environmental change - and to test adaptation strategies to manage the risks arising from the CZ impacts. Acknowledgements. The authors acknowledge the substantial contributions of the entire team of investigators and funding of the SoilTrEC project (EC FP7, agreement no. 244118; www.soiltrec.eu).

Banwart, Steven Allan; de Souza, Danielle Maia; Menon, Manoj; Nikolaidis, Nikolaos; Panagos, Panos; Vala Ragnardsdottir, Kristin; Rousseva, Svelta; van Gaans, Pauline

2014-05-01

13

Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) experiment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) experiment will play a major role in NASA's planned multi-instrument multi-satellite Earth Observing System (EOS) program to observe and study the total Earth System on a global scale. The CERES experiment will provide EOS with a consistent data base of accurately known fields of radiation and of clouds; and will investigate the important question of the impact of clouds upon the radiative energy flow through the earth-atmosphere system. The CERES instruments will be an improved version of the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) broadband scanning radiometer instruments flown by NASA in the 1980s. This paper describes the CERES experiment approach and the current CERES instrument design status.

Cooper, John E.; Barkstrom, Bruce R.; Kopia, Leonard P.

1992-01-01

14

Orbit Design of Earth-Observation Satellite  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this study is to design a reliable orbit for a medium-resolution scientific satellite to observe Earth for developmental issues such as water resources, agricultural, and industrial. To meet this objective this study firstly, defines the mission, secondly, determines mission constraints, thirdly, design the attitude and orbit control system. As for the observation requirements, and the revisit time are provided as a function of the orbital parameters. Initial orbital parameters are obtained by optimal analysis between observation characteristics and attitude and orbit maintenance costs. Long term station-keeping strategies will be provided for the proposed solutions. Impulsive control will be investigated to provide a reliable and affordable attitude and orbit control system.

Owis, Ashraf

15

Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The CERES (Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System) experiment will play a major role in NASA's multi-platform Earth Observing System (EOS) program to observe and study the global climate. The CERES instruments will provide EOS scientists with a consistent data base of accurately known fields of radiation and of clouds. CERES will investigate the important question of cloud forcing and its influence on the radiative energy flow through the Earth's atmosphere. The CERES instrument is an improved version of the ERBE (Earth Radiation Budget Experiment) broadband scanning radiometer flown by NASA from 1984 through 1989. This paper describes the science of CERES, presents an overview of the instrument preliminary design, and outlines the issues related to spacecraft pointing and attitude control.

Carman, Stephen L.; Cooper, John E.; Miller, James; Harrison, Edwin F.; Barkstrom, Bruce R.

1992-01-01

16

Earth integrated design: office dormitory facility  

SciTech Connect

The generation process of the design of the Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research is described. Architectural and energy considerations are discussed. The facility will contain living quarters for guest scientists who come to Oak Ridge to conduct short experiments and sleeping alcoves for local researchers on long experimental shifts as well as office space. (MHR)

Shapira, H.B.; Barnes, P.R.

1980-01-01

17

Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) is a key component of the Earth Observing System (EOS) program. The CERES instrument provides radiometric measurements of the Earth's atmosphere from three broadband channels. The CERES missions are a follow-on to the successful Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) mission. The first CERES instrument (PFM) was launched on November 27, 1997, as part of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). Two CERES instruments (FM1 and FM2) were launched into polar orbit on board the EOS flagship Terra on December 18, 1999, and two additional CERES instruments (FM3 and FM4) were launched on board EOS Aqua on May 4,2002. [Mission Objectives] The scientific justification for the CERES measurements can be summarized by three assertions: (1) changes in the radiative energy balance of the Earth-atmosphere system can cause long-term climate changes (e.g., carbon dioxide inducing global warming); (2) besides the systematic diurnal and seasonal cycles of incoming solar energy, changes in cloud properties (amount, height, optical thickness) cause the largest changes of the Earth's radiative energy balance; and (3) cloud physics is one of the weakest components of current climate models used to predict potential global climate change. CERES has four main objectives: 1) For climate change analysis, provide a continuation of the ERBE record of radiative fluxes at the top of the atmosphere (TOA), analyzed using the same algorithms that produced the ERBE data. 2) Double the accuracy of estimates of radiative fluxes at TOA and the Earth's surface. 3) Provide the first long-term global estimates of the radiative fluxes within the Earth's atmosphere. 4) Provide cloud property estimates that are consistent with the radiative fluxes from surface to TOA. [Temporal_Coverage: Start_Date=1997-12-27; Stop_Date=] [Spatial_Coverage: Southernmost_Latitude=-90; Northernmost_Latitude=90; Westernmost_Longitude=-180; Easternmost_Longitude=180].

Wielicki, Bruce A. (Principal Investigator); Barkstrom, Bruce R. (Principal Investigator)

18

Compact earth stations, hubs for energy industry expanding  

SciTech Connect

That paper reports that advances in gallium arsenide (GaAs) technology, monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC) and large scale integrated (VLSF) circuits, have contributed to the mass production of very reliable small aperture terminals (VSATs). Less publicized, but equally important to multinational energy organizations, are recent developments in compact earth station design and solid-state hubs for VSAT networks made possible by the new technology. Many applications are suited for the energy industry that involve compact earth station terminals and hubs. The first group of applications describes the use of GTE's ACES earth station for the Zaire Gulf Oil Co. in Zaire and for AMOCO in Trinidad. The second group of applications describes the compact hub for VSAT networks, which could potentially have a number of data communication uses in the energy industry, such as, IBM/SNA, X.25, or supervisory control an data acquisition (SCADA) applications.

Shimabukuro, T. (Telecommunications Systems and Analysis, GTE Spacenet Corp., McLean, VA (US))

1992-02-01

19

Earth radiation budget measurement from a spinning satellite: Conceptual design of detectors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The conceptual design, sensor characteristics, sensor performance and accuracy, and spacecraft and orbital requirements for a spinning wide-field-of-view earth energy budget detector were investigated. The scientific requirements for measurement of the earth's radiative energy budget are presented. Other topics discussed include the observing system concept, solar constant radiometer design, plane flux wide FOV sensor design, fast active cavity theory, fast active cavity design and error analysis, thermopile detectors as an alternative, pre-flight and in-flight calibration plane, system error summary, and interface requirements.

Sromovsky, L. A.; Revercomb, H. E.; Suomi, V. E.

1975-01-01

20

Energy design for architects  

SciTech Connect

This book contains techniques for energy efficiency in architectural design. Many aspects are covered including: cost; comfort and health; energy use; the design process; and analytical techniques. 202 figs. (JF)

Shaw, A. (ed.)

1989-01-01

21

Energy Systems Design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

PRESTO, a COSMIC program, handles energy system specifications and predicts design efficiency of cogeneration systems. These systems allow a company to use excess energy produced to generate electricity. PRESTO is utilized by the Energy Systems Division of Thermo Electron Corporation in the custom design of cogeneration systems.

1986-01-01

22

Discover Earth: Earth's Energy Budget or Can You Spare a Sun?  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Discover Earth is a NASA-sponsored project for teachers of grades 5-12, designed to: enhance understanding of the Earth as an integrated system enhance the interdisciplinary approach to science instruction, and provide classroom materials that focus on those goals. Discover Earth is conducted by the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies in collaboration with Dr. Eric Barron, Director, Earth System Science Center, The Pennsylvania State University; and Dr. Robert Hudson, Chair, the Department of Meteorology, University of Maryland at College Park.

Gates, Tom; Peters, Dale E.; Steeley, Jeanne

1999-01-01

23

Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System Data Management System  

E-print Network

Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Data Management System DRAFT ES-8 Collection The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Data Management System supports the data processing needs of the CERES Science Team research to increase understanding of the Earth's climate and radiant

24

Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System Data Management System  

E-print Network

Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Data Management System Single Satellite 2/1/2006 iii Preface The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Data Management System of the Earth's climate and radiant environment. The CERES Data Management Team works with the CERES Science

25

Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) - An Earth Observing System experiment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An overview is presented of the CERES experiment that is designed not only to monitor changes in the earth's radiant energy system and cloud systems but to provide these data with enough accuracy and simultaneity to examine the critical climate/cloud feedback mechanisms which may play a major role in determining future changes in the climate system. CERES will estimate not only the flow of radiation at the top of the atmosphere, but also more complete cloud properties that will permit determination of radiative fluxes within the atmosphere and at the surface. The CERES radiation budget data is also planned for utilization in a wide range of other Earth Observing System interdisciplinary science investigations, including studies of land, biological, ocean and atmospheric processes.

Wielicki, Bruce A.; Barkstrom, Bruce R.

1991-01-01

26

Harvesting renewable energy from Earth's mid-infrared emissions.  

PubMed

It is possible to harvest energy from Earth's thermal infrared emission into outer space. We calculate the thermodynamic limit for the amount of power available, and as a case study, we plot how this limit varies daily and seasonally in a location in Oklahoma. We discuss two possible ways to make such an emissive energy harvester (EEH): A thermal EEH (analogous to solar thermal power generation) and an optoelectronic EEH (analogous to photovoltaic power generation). For the latter, we propose using an infrared-frequency rectifying antenna, and we discuss its operating principles, efficiency limits, system design considerations, and possible technological implementations. PMID:24591604

Byrnes, Steven J; Blanchard, Romain; Capasso, Federico

2014-03-18

27

Spacecraft design project: Low Earth orbit communications satellite  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This is the final product of the spacecraft design project completed to fulfill the academic requirements of the Spacecraft Design and Integration 2 course (AE-4871) taught at the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School. The Spacecraft Design and Integration 2 course is intended to provide students detailed design experience in selection and design of both satellite system and subsystem components, and their location and integration into a final spacecraft configuration. The design team pursued a design to support a Low Earth Orbiting (LEO) communications system (GLOBALSTAR) currently under development by the Loral Cellular Systems Corporation. Each of the 14 team members was assigned both primary and secondary duties in program management or system design. Hardware selection, spacecraft component design, analysis, and integration were accomplished within the constraints imposed by the 11 week academic schedule and the available design facilities.

Moroney, Dave; Lashbrook, Dave; McKibben, Barry; Gardener, Nigel; Rivers, Thane; Nottingham, Greg; Golden, Bill; Barfield, Bill; Bruening, Joe; Wood, Dave

1991-12-01

28

Spacecraft design project: Low Earth orbit communications satellite  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This is the final product of the spacecraft design project completed to fulfill the academic requirements of the Spacecraft Design and Integration 2 course (AE-4871) taught at the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School. The Spacecraft Design and Integration 2 course is intended to provide students detailed design experience in selection and design of both satellite system and subsystem components, and their location and integration into a final spacecraft configuration. The design team pursued a design to support a Low Earth Orbiting (LEO) communications system (GLOBALSTAR) currently under development by the Loral Cellular Systems Corporation. Each of the 14 team members was assigned both primary and secondary duties in program management or system design. Hardware selection, spacecraft component design, analysis, and integration were accomplished within the constraints imposed by the 11 week academic schedule and the available design facilities.

Moroney, Dave; Lashbrook, Dave; Mckibben, Barry; Gardener, Nigel; Rivers, Thane; Nottingham, Greg; Golden, Bill; Barfield, Bill; Bruening, Joe; Wood, Dave

1991-01-01

29

Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES): algorithm overview  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) is part of NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS), CERES objectives include the following. (1) For climate change analysis, provide a continuation of the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) record of radiative fluxes at the top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA), analyzed using the same techniques as the existing ERBE data. (2) Double the accuracy of

Bruce A. Wielicki; Bruce R. Barkstrom; Bryan A. Baum; Thomas P. Charlock; Richard N. Green; David P. Kratz; Robert B. Lee; Patrick Minnis; G. Louis Smith; Takmeng Wong; David F. Young; Robert D. Cess; James A. Coakley; Dominique A. H. Crommelynck; Leo Donner; Robert Kandel; Michael D. King; Alvin J. Miller; Veerabhadran Ramanathan; David A. Randall; Larry L. Stowe; Ronald M. Welch

1998-01-01

30

Design requirements for operational earth resources ground data processing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Realistic tradeoff data and evaluation techniques were studied that permit conceptual design of operational earth resources ground processing systems. Methodology for determining user requirements that utilize the limited information available from users is presented along with definitions of sensor capabilities projected into the shuttle/station era. A tentative method is presented for synthesizing candidate ground processing concepts.

Baldwin, C. J.; Bradford, L. H.; Burnett, E. S.; Hutson, D. E.; Kinsler, B. A.; Kugle, D. R.; Webber, D. S.

1972-01-01

31

Interplanetary Mission Design Handbook: Earth-to-Mars Mission Opportunities 2026 to 2045  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The purpose of this Mission Design Handbook is to provide trajectory designers and mission planners with graphical information about Earth to Mars ballistic trajectory opportunities for the years of 2026 through 2045. The plots, displayed on a departure date/arrival date mission space, show departure energy, right ascension and declination of the launch asymptote, and target planet hyperbolic arrival excess speed, V(sub infinity), for each launch opportunity. Provided in this study are two sets of contour plots for each launch opportunity. The first set of plots shows Earth to Mars ballistic trajectories without the addition of any deep space maneuvers. The second set of plots shows Earth to Mars transfer trajectories with the addition of deep space maneuvers, which further optimize the determined trajectories. The accompanying texts explains the trajectory characteristics, transfers using deep space maneuvers, mission assumptions and a summary of the minimum departure energy for each opportunity.

Burke, Laura M.; Falck, Robert D.; McGuire, Melissa L.

2010-01-01

32

Alternative energy design toolkit  

E-print Network

This thesis concerns the concepts, structure, and applications of the Alternative Energy Design Toolkit. The toolkit is aimed to provide a widely accessible, easy to use, flexible, yet powerful modeling environment for ...

Sukkasi, Sittha

2004-01-01

33

Energy Budget: Earth's Most Important and Least Appreciated Planetary Attribute  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The energy budget involves more than one kind of energy. People can sense this energy in different ways, depending on what type of energy it is. We see visible light using our eyes. We feel infrared energy using our skin (such as around a campfire). We know some species of animals can see ultraviolet light and portions of the infrared spectrum. NASA satellites use instruments that can "see" different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum to observe various processes in the Earth system, including the energy budget. The Sun is a very hot ball of plasma emitting large amounts of energy. By the time it reaches Earth, this energy amounts to about 340 Watts for every square meter of Earth on average. That's almost 6 60-Watt light bulbs for every square meter of Earth! With all of that energy shining down on the Earth, how does our planet maintain a comfortable balance that allows a complex ecosystem, including humans, to thrive? The key thing to remember is the Sun - hot though it is - is a tiny part of Earth's environment. Earth's energy budget is a critical but little understood aspect of our planetary home. NASA is actively studying this important Earth system feature, and sharing data and knowledge about it with the education community.

Chambers, Lin; Bethea, Katie

2013-01-01

34

Lab Activity: Earth's Energy Budget and the Greenhouse Effect  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

"Earth's Energy Budget and the Greenhouse Effect" is a lab activity in which students use computers and scientific applications software to access, display, describe, analyze, and interpret global, climate-related data sets related to the earth's energy budget and the greenhouse effect.

Dave Dempsey

35

Interplanetary Mission Design Handbook: Earth-to-Mars Mission Opportunities and Mars-to-Earth Return Opportunities 2009-2024  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper provides information for trajectory designers and mission planners to determine Earth-Mars and Mars-Earth mission opportunities for the years 2009-2024. These studies were performed in support of a human Mars mission scenario that will consist of two cargo launches followed by a piloted mission during the next opportunity approximately 2 years later. "Porkchop" plots defining all of these mission opportunities are provided which include departure energy, departure excess speed, departure declination arrival excess speed, and arrival declinations for the mission space surrounding each opportunity. These plots are intended to be directly applicable for the human Mars mission scenario described briefly herein. In addition, specific trajectories and several alternate trajectories are recommended for each cargo and piloted opportunity. Finally, additional studies were performed to evaluate the effect of various thrust-to-weight ratios on gravity losses and total time-of-flight tradeoff, and the resultant propellant savings and are briefly summarized.

George, L. E.; Kos, L. D.

1998-01-01

36

Acquisition/expulsion system for earth orbital propulsion system study. Volume 5: Earth storable design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A comprehensive analysis and parametric design effort was conducted under the earth-storable phase of the program. Passive Acquisition/expulsion system concepts were evaluated for a reusable Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS) application. The passive surface tension technique for providing gas free liquid on demand was superior to other propellant acquisition methods. Systems using fine mesh screens can provide the requisite stability and satisfy OMS mission requirements. Both fine mesh screen liner and trap systems were given detailed consideration in the parametric design, and trap systems were selected for this particular application. These systems are compatible with the 100- to 500-manned mission reuse requirements.

1973-01-01

37

Research Development of Rare Earth Permanent Magnetism Energy-Conserved Appliance  

Microsoft Academic Search

The design optimizes, the oil-saving rate of the rare earth permanent magnetism energy conservation strengthened by the electric field is higher than domestic similar ones not adding the electric field and not to optimize the design magnetization. The gantry empirical datum indicated that on the condition that the power is under 4252 horsepower condition, does not add electric field, saving

Shu-ming PAN; Wen-ke LI; Min LUO; Lei YUAN; Chang-e JI; Fu-biao LAN; Wei-xiong ZHAO

2006-01-01

38

Optimization of space orbits design for Earth orbiting missions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In Earth orbiting space missions, the orbit selection dictates the mission parameters like the ground resolution, the area coverage, and the frequency of coverage parameters. To achieve desired mission parameters, usually Earth regions of interest are identified and the spacecraft is maneuvered continuously to visit only these regions. This method is expensive, it requires a propulsion system onboard the spacecraft, working throughout the mission lifetime. It also requires a longer time to cover all the regions of interest, due to the very weak thrust forces compared to that of the Earth's gravitational field. This paper presents a methodology to design natural orbits, in which the regions of interest are visited without the use of propulsion systems, depending only on the gravitational forces. The problem is formulated as an optimization problem. A genetic algorithm along with a second order gradient method is implemented for optimization. The design process takes into consideration the gravitational second zonal harmonic, and hence allows for the design of repeated Sun-synchronous orbits. The field of view of the payload is also taken into consideration in the optimization process. Numerical results are presented that demonstrates the efficiency of the proposed method.

Abdelkhalik, Ossama; Gad, Ahmed

2011-04-01

39

The mini-prototype solar energy earth storage system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A one-tenth scale model of solar energy earth storage (SEES) system was tested under an artificial condition during the first winter season. The earth storage was heated by house hot water heaters and heat was then extracted with a high performance heat exchanger which was exposed to an open air environment under subfreezing temperatures. The results of these preliminary tests show that the thermal performance of the earth storage heat exchanger (polybutylene plastic coils) and the wet soil medium is quite satisfactory. Furthermore, the response rate of the earth storage to a large heat demand over a short-time duration is more than adequate.

Yuan, S. W.; Majdi, M. M.

1981-07-01

40

Earth Science Markup Language: Transitioning From Design to Application  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The primary objective of the proposed Earth Science Markup Language (ESML) research is to transition from design to application. The resulting schema and prototype software will foster community acceptance for the "define once, use anywhere" concept central to ESML. Supporting goals include: 1. Refinement of the ESML schema and software libraries in cooperation with the user community. 2. Application of the ESML schema and software libraries to a variety of Earth science data sets and analysis tools. 3. Development of supporting prototype software for enhanced ease of use. 4. Cooperation with standards bodies in order to assure ESML is aligned with related metadata standards as appropriate. 5. Widespread publication of the ESML approach, schema, and software.

Moe, Karen; Graves, Sara; Ramachandran, Rahul

2002-01-01

41

Design of a 35-kilowatt bipolar nickel-hydrogen battery for low Earth orbit application  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The needs of multikilowatt storage for low Earth orbit applications are featured. The modular concept, with projected energy densities of 20-24 W-hr/lb and 700-900 W-hr/ft3, has significant improvements over state of the art capabilities. Other design features are; active cooling, a new scheme for H2-O2 recombination, and pore size engineering of all cell components.

Cataldo, R. L.; Smithrick, J. J.

1982-01-01

42

Determination of Unfiltered Radiances from the Clouds and the Earth抯 Radiant Energy System Instrument  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT A new method for determining unfiltered shortwave (SW), longwave (LW), and window radiances from filtered radiances measured,by the Clouds and the Earth抯 Radiant Energy System (CERES) satellite instrument is presented. The method,uses theoretically derived regression coefficients between filtered and unfiltered radiances that are a function of viewing geometry, geotype, and whether cloud is present. Relative errors in instantaneous unfiltered

Norman G. Loeb; Kory J. Priestley; David P. Kratz; Erika B. Geier; Richard N. Green; Bruce A. Wielicki; Patricia O扲awe Hinton; Sandra K. Nolan

2001-01-01

43

Designing Medical Support for a Near-Earth Asteroid Mission  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This panel will discuss the design of medical support for a mission to a near-Earth asteroid (NEA) from a variety of perspectives. The panelists will discuss the proposed parameters for a NEA mission, the NEA medical condition list, recommendations from the NASA telemedicine workshop, an overview of the Exploration Medical System Demonstration planned for the International Space Station, use of predictive models for mission planning, and mission-related concerns for behavioral health and performance. This panel is intended to make the audience aware of the multitude of factors influencing medical support during a NEA mission.

Watkins, S. D.; Charles, J. B.; Kundrot, C. E.; Barr, Y. R.; Barsten, K. N.; Chin, D. A.; Kerstman, E. L.; Otto, C.

2011-01-01

44

The energy balance of the earth' surface : a practical approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study is devoted to the energy balance of the earth's surface with a special emphasis on practical applications. A simple picture of the energy exchange processes that take place at the ground is the following. Per unit time and area an amount of radiant energy is supplied to the surface. This radiation originates partly from the sun, but an~

Bruin de H. A. R

1982-01-01

45

Design and Implementation of the Web-Enabled Sun, Earth, and Moon Systems (SEMS)  

E-print Network

Design and Implementation of the Web-Enabled Sun, Earth, and Moon Systems (SEMS) By Rahul Singh................................................................ 9 2.6 Background for the Sun, Earth, and Moon Systems (SEMS)........................... 14 III

Hu, Wen-Chen

46

Mother Earth's Museum for Children, Boulder Colorado : harmounious design, an identity with setting  

E-print Network

Natural phenomenons are conceived of the Earth and appropriate to their setting. Architecture designed harmoniously with its setting belong. to the Earth and, through this association, appropriately contributes to the ...

Williams, Charlotte Grojean

1996-01-01

47

On the gravitational energy associated with Earth's changing oblateness  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Relative to the gravitational potential energy of the Earth's monopole, the multipole energy has received far less attention. In this paper, we recapitulate the basic physics from first principles and derive the formulas for multipole energies in analogy to classical electrostatic theory. We focus on the zonal quadrupole energy associated with the Earth's oblateness, the dominant term in Earth's gravity field apart from the monopole. We find the gravitational energy Eoblateness ? 10-6 |Emonopole| = +2.5 1026 J. We examine the implications of Eoblateness and its changes associated with long-term `secular' decreases in the oblateness parameter J2. We find the rate of loss of Eoblateness due to the Earth rounding induced by the present-day GIA is about -200 GW, an amount quite significant in the kinetic energy budget of the mantle heat engine that drives the plate tectonics that has been estimated to be 1 TW. We also assert that the tidal braking and the global earthquake dislocations, both resulting in Earth rounding on long-term geological timescales, are accompanied with a secular decrease of Eoblateness at nearly the same rate of several GW.

Chao, B. F.

2014-11-01

48

Interplanetary mission design handbook. Volume 1, Part 5: Mars-to-Earth ballistic mission opportunities, 1992-2007  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This document contains graphical data necessary for the preliminary design of ballistic missions returning from Mars. Contours of Mars-departure energy requirements, as well as many other launch and Earth-arrival parameters are presented in arrival-date/launch-date space for all departure opportunities from 1992 through 2007. In addition, an extensive companion document (Part 2) is available; it contains Earth-Mars graphical data and explains mission design methods, using the graphical data as well as numerous equations relating various parameters. This is one of a planned series of mission design handbooks.

Sergeyevsky, Andrey; Cunniff, Ross

1987-01-01

49

Elastic energy of a deformable earth - General expression  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The production of energy in the earth's elastic mantle as it is deformed by lunar and solar attraction is investigated analytically, extending and refining the results of Getino and Ferrandiz (1991). The derivation is given in detail, and it is shown that the energy expression obtained is valid for any order of the development in spherical harmonics of the perturbing tidal potential and independent of the earth model employed. As an example, the total elastic energy for Model 2 of Takeuchi (1950) is calculated as 5.813114 x 10 exp 49 in cgs units.

Getino, Juan

1992-03-01

50

Directed energy active illumination for near-Earth object detection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

On 15 February 2013, a previously unknown ~20 m asteroid struck Earth near Chelyabinsk, Russia, releasing kinetic energy equivalent to ~570 kt TNT. Detecting objects like the Chelyabinsk impactor that are orbiting near Earth is a difficult task, in part because such objects spend much of their own orbits in the direction of the Sun when viewed from Earth. Efforts aimed at protecting Earth from future impacts will rely heavily on continued discovery. Ground-based optical observatory networks and Earth-orbiting spacecraft with infrared sensors have dramatically increased the pace of discovery. Still, less than 5% of near-Earth objects (NEOs) >=100 m/~100 Mt TNT have been identified, and the proportion of known objects decreases rapidly for smaller sizes. Low emissivity of some objects also makes detection by passive sensors difficult. A proposed orbiting laser phased array directed energy system could be used for active illumination of NEOs, enhancing discovery particularly for smaller and lower emissivity objects. Laser fiber amplifiers emit very narrow-band energy, simplifying detection. Results of simulated illumination scenarios are presented based on an orbiting emitter array with specified characteristics. Simulations indicate that return signals from small and low emissivity objects is strong enough to detect. The possibility for both directed and full sky blind surveys is discussed, and the resulting diameter and mass limits for objects in different observational scenarios. The ability to determine both position and speed of detected objects is also discussed.

Riley, Jordan; Lubin, Philip; Hughes, Gary B.; O'Neill, Hugh; Meinhold, Peter; Suen, Jonathan; Bible, Johanna; Johansson, Isabella E.; Griswold, Janelle; Cook, Brianna

2014-09-01

51

National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Science Research for Energy Management. Part 1; Overview of Energy Issues and an Assessment of the Potential for Application of NASA Earth Science Research  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Effective management of energy resources is critical for the U.S. economy, the environment, and, more broadly, for sustainable development and alleviating poverty worldwide. The scope of energy management is broad, ranging from energy production and end use to emissions monitoring and mitigation and long-term planning. Given the extensive NASA Earth science research on energy and related weather and climate-related parameters, and rapidly advancing energy technologies and applications, there is great potential for increased application of NASA Earth science research to selected energy management issues and decision support tools. The NASA Energy Management Program Element is already involved in a number of projects applying NASA Earth science research to energy management issues, with a focus on solar and wind renewable energy and developing interests in energy modeling, short-term load forecasting, energy efficient building design, and biomass production.

Zell, E.; Engel-Cox, J.

2005-01-01

52

Electrical energy sources for organic synthesis on the early earth  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1959, Miller and Urey (Science130, 245) published their classic compilation of energy sources for indigenous prebiotic organic synthesis on the early Earth. Much contemporary origins of life research continues to employ their original estimates for terrestrial energy dissipation by lightning and coronal discharges, 2 1019 J yr-1 and 6 1019 J yr-1, respectively. However, more recent work

Christopher Chyba; Carl Sagan

1991-01-01

53

Near-Earth object intercept trajectory design for planetary defense  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Tracking the orbit of asteroids and planning for asteroid missions have ceased to be a simple exercise, and become more of a necessity, as the number of identified potentially hazardous near-Earth asteroids increases. Several software tools such as Mystic, MALTO, Copernicus, SNAP, OTIS, and GMAT have been developed by NASA for spacecraft trajectory optimization and mission design. However, this paper further expands upon the development and validation of an Asteroid Mission Design Software Tool (AMiDST), through the use of approach and post-encounter orbital variations and analytic keyhole theory. Combining these new capabilities with that of a high-precision orbit propagator, this paper describes fictional mission trajectory design examples of using AMiDST as applied to a fictitious asteroid 2013 PDC-E. During the 2013 IAA Planetary Defense Conference, the asteroid 2013 PDC-E was used for an exercise where participants simulated the decision-making process for developing deflection and civil defense responses to a hypothetical asteroid threat.

Vardaxis, George; Wie, Bong

2014-08-01

54

ENERGY-NET (Energy, Environment and Society Learning Network): Enhancing opportunities for learning using an Earth systems science framework  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We describe a newly funded collaborative NSF initiative, ENERGY-NET (Energy, Environment and Society Learning Network), that brings together the Carnegie Museum of Natural History (CMNH) with the Learning Science and Geoscience research strengths at the University of Pittsburgh. ENERGY-NET aims to create rich opportunities for participatory learning and public education in the arena of energy, the environment, and society using an Earth systems science framework. We build upon a long-established teen docent program at CMNH and to form Geoscience Squads comprised of underserved teens. Together, the ENERGY-NET team, including museum staff, experts in informal learning sciences, and geoscientists spanning career stage (undergraduates, graduate students, faculty) provides inquiry-based learning experiences guided by Earth systems science principles. Together, the team works with Geoscience Squads to design "Exploration Stations" for use with CMNH visitors that employ an Earth systems science framework to explore the intersecting lenses of energy, the environment, and society. The goals of ENERGY-NET are to: 1) Develop a rich set of experiential learning activities to enhance public knowledge about the complex dynamics between Energy, Environment, and Society for demonstration at CMNH; 2) Expand diversity in the geosciences workforce by mentoring underrepresented teens, providing authentic learning experiences in earth systems science and life skills, and providing networking opportunities with geoscientists; and 3) Institutionalize ENERGY-NET collaborations among geosciences expert, learning researchers, and museum staff to yield long-term improvements in public geoscience education and geoscience workforce recruiting.

Elliott, E. M.; Bain, D. J.; Divers, M. T.; Crowley, K. J.; Povis, K.; Scardina, A.; Steiner, M.

2012-12-01

55

Design of Earthing System for New Substation Project (Shwe Sar Yan) in Myanmar  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the design of earthing system for 230 kV substation and simulation for calculation of required parameters. In substation, earthing system is essential not only to provide the protection of people working or walking in the vicinity of earthed facilities and equipments against the danger of electric shock but also to maintain the proper function of the electrical

Ei Ei Cho; Marlar Thein Oo

2008-01-01

56

Earth  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The following aspects of the planet Earth are discussed: plate tectonics, the interior of the planet, the formation of the Earth, and the evolution of the atmosphere and hydrosphere. The Earth's crust, mantle, and core are examined along with the bulk composition of the planet.

Carr, M. H.

1984-01-01

57

Gravitational potential energy of the earth - A spherical harmonic approach  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A spherical harmonic equation for the gravitational potential energy of the earth is derived for an arbitrary density distribution by conceptually bringing in mass-elements from infinity and building up the earth shell upon spherical shell. The zeroth degree term in the spherical harmonic expansion agrees with the usual expression for the energy of a radial density distribution. The second degree terms give a maximum nonhydrostatic energy in the crust and mantle of -2.77 x 10 to the 29th ergs, an order of magnitude below McKenzie's (1966) estimate. McKenzie's result stems from mathematical error. Our figure is almost identical with Kaula's (1963) estimate of the minimum shear strain energy in the mantle, a not unexpected result on the basis of the virial theorem. If the earth is assumed to be a homogeneous viscous oblate spheroid relaxing to an equilibrium shape, then a lower limit to the mantle viscosity of 1.3 x 10 to the 20th P is found by assuming that the total geothermal flux is due to viscous dissipation of energy. This number is almost six orders of magnitude below MacDonald's (1966) estimate of the viscosity and removes his objection to convection. If the nonequilibrium figure is dynamically maintained by the earth acting as a heat engine at 1% efficiency, then the viscosity is 10 to the 22nd P, a number preferred by Cathles (1975) and Peltier and Andrew (1976) as the viscosity of the mantle.

Rubincam, D. P.

1979-01-01

58

Clouds and Earth radiant energy system: an overview  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Clouds and Earth radiant energy system (CERES) instrument was first flown aboard the TRMM spacecraft whose 35 inclination orbit allowed for the collection of radiation budget data over all local times, i.e. all solar zenith angles for the latitude range. Moreover, this instrument has gathered the only bidirectional radiance data covering all local times. An additional quartet of CERES

G. Louis Smith; Bruce A. Wielicki; Bruce R. Barkstrom; Robert B. Lee; Kory J. Priestley; Thomas P. Charlock; Patrick Minnis; David P. Kratz; Norman Loeb; David F. Young

2004-01-01

59

CERES: Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This brochure gives a brief description of the science research that is being done with data from the Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument flying onboard NASA's Terra satellite. It also contains information about some of the data products and technical specifications.

1999-04-01

60

General Atmospheric Sciences Energy: Warming the Earth and the Atmosphere  

E-print Network

25 #12;Enhancement of Greenhouse effect CO2 Ch4 H2O 颅 N2O CFC #12;Air in the lower atmosphere 颅 Absorption, Emission, and Equilibrium #12; #12; #12;(greenhouse effect) (a) (b) 33 #12; #12; 15 10 20General Atmospheric Sciences Energy: Warming the Earth and the Atmosphere Reference Meteorology

Chen, Yang-Yuan

61

Geothermal Energy--Clean Power From the Earth's Heat  

E-print Network

the economies of both the developed and developing world. Fossil fuels--coal, oil, and natural gas of fossil fuels, increased demand, and environmen- tal constraints will challenge human ingenuity of the Earth's heat, thereby reducing dependence on fossil fuels. Geothermal energy currently supplies less

62

High efficient numerical techniques for the earthing design and the analysis of grounded phenomena  

E-print Network

High efficient numerical techniques for the earthing design and the analysis of grounded phenomena for the computational design of grounding systems of electrical installations in uniform and layered soils" or "earthing" system of an electrical substation comprises all interconnected grounding fa- cilities

Colominas, Ignasi

63

Gamma rays made on Earth have unexpectedly high energies  

SciTech Connect

Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are the source of the highest-energy nonanthropogenic photons produced on Earth. Associated with thunder-storms - and in fact, with individual lightning discharges - they are presumed to be the bremsstrahlung produced when relativistic electrons, accelerated by the storms' strong electric fields, collide with air molecules some 10-20 km above sea level. The TGFs last up to a few milliseconds and contain photons with energies on the order of MeV.

Miller, Johanna

2011-01-15

64

Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES): An Earth Observing System Experiment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) is an investigation to examine the role of cloud/radiation feedback in the Earth's climate system. The CERES broadband scanning radiometers are an improved version of the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) radiometers. The CERES instruments will fly on several National Aeronautics and Space Administration Earth Observing System (EOS) satellites starting in 1998 and extending over at least 15 years. The CERES science investigations will provide data to extend the ERBE climate record of top-of-atmosphere shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) radiative fluxes CERES will also combine simultaneous cloud property data derived using EOS narrowband imagers to provide a consistent set of cloud/radiation data, including SW and LW radiative fluxes at the surface and at several selected levels within the atmosphere. CERES data are expected to provide top-of-atmosphere radiative fluxes with a factor of 2 to 3 less error than the ERBE data Estimates of radiative fluxes at the surface and especially within the atmosphere will be a much greater challenge but should also show significant improvements over current capabilities.

Wielicki, Bruce A.; Barkstrom, Bruce R.; Harrison, Edwin F.; Lee, Robert B., III; Smith, G. Louis; Cooper, John E.

1996-01-01

65

How Does the Earth's Energy Budget Relate to Polar Ice?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Sun heats the Earth, but the Earth also emits some of the heat back into space. The net amount of energy determines not only seasonal weather, but also climate trends. According to NOAA, monthly snow and ice amounts have declined over the past decade. By matching maps of snow and ice amounts with maps of net radiation flux for the same time frame, this lesson will give students the opportunity to explore how the net radiation flux has affected the snow and ice amounts in the Northern Hemisphere, as well as how the presence of snow can affect the net radiation flux due to surface reflection.

66

The Sun: Earth's Primary Energy Source  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article provides elementary school teachers with background knowledge about science concepts needed to understand the first of seven essential principles of climate literacy--the sun is the primary source of energy for our climate system. Graphs, diagrams, and oneline resources provide more background for the teacher. The article appears in a free online magazine that focuses on the seven essential princples of the climate sciences.

Lightle, Kimberly

2011-02-01

67

Earth's Energy Out of Balance: The Smoking Gun for Global Warming April, 2005  

E-print Network

Earth's Energy Out of Balance: The Smoking Gun for Global Warming April, 2005 Scientists at Columbia University, NASA, and the Department of Energy have found that the Earth is out of energy balance: the Earth is absorbing more energy from sunlight than it is emitting back to space in the form of heat

Hansen, James E.

68

Gravitational potential energy of the earth: A spherical harmonic approach  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A spherical harmonic equation for the gravitational potential energy of the earth is derived for an arbitrary density distribution by conceptually bringing in mass-elements from infinity and building up the earth shell upon spherical shell. The zeroth degree term in the spherical harmonic equation agrees with the usual expression for the energy of a radial density distribution. The second degree terms give a maximum nonhydrostatic energy in the mantle and crust of -2.77 x 10 to the twenty-ninth power ergs, an order of magnitude. If the earth is assumed to be a homogeneous viscous oblate spheroid relaxing to an equilibrium shape, then a lower limit to the mantle viscosity of 1.3 x 10 to the twentieth power poises is found by assuming the total geothermal flux is due to viscous dissipation. If the nonequilibrium figure is dynamically maintained by the earth acting as a heat engine at one per cent efficiency, then the viscosity is ten to the twenty second power poises, a number preferred by some as the viscosity of the mantle.

Rubincam, D. P.

1977-01-01

69

Impact Test and Simulation of Energy Absorbing Concepts for Earth Entry Vehicles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Nonlinear dynamic finite element simulations have been performed to aid in the design of an energy absorbing concept for a highly reliable passive Earth Entry Vehicle (EEV) that will directly impact the Earth without a parachute. EEV's are designed to return materials from asteroids, comets, or planets for laboratory analysis on Earth. The EEV concept uses an energy absorbing cellular structure designed to contain and limit the acceleration of space exploration samples during Earth impact. The spherical shaped cellular structure is composed of solid hexagonal and pentagonal foam-filled cells with hybrid graphite- epoxy/Kevlar cell walls. Space samples fit inside a smaller sphere at the center of the EEV's cellular structure. Comparisons of analytical predictions using MSC,Dytran with test results obtained from impact tests performed at NASA Langley Research Center were made for three impact velocities ranging from 32 to 40 m/s. Acceleration and deformation results compared well with the test results. These finite element models will be useful for parametric studies of off-nominal impact conditions.

Billings, Marcus D.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Kellas, Sotiris

2001-01-01

70

Energy-conserving site design  

Microsoft Academic Search

Information useful to landscape architects, architects, planners, engineers, students, and homeowners is presented. The concepts and examples needed to create more energy-efficient landscapes are described. The book is organized into five sections, including: an overview and history of energy-efficient design research; detailed information and new strategies on site analysis and planning; energy-efficient landscape design of clustered and single residences; alternative

McPherson

1984-01-01

71

Time and Energy, Exploring Trajectory Options Between Nodes in Earth-Moon Space  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Global Exploration Roadmap (GER) was released by the International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) in September of 2011. It describes mission scenarios that begin with the International Space Station and utilize it to demonstrate necessary technologies and capabilities prior to deployment of systems into Earth-Moon space. Deployment of these systems is an intermediate step in preparation for more complex deep space missions to near-Earth asteroids and eventually Mars. In one of the scenarios described in the GER, "Asteroid Next", there are activities that occur in Earth-Moon space at one of the Earth-Moon Lagrange (libration) points. In this regard, the authors examine the possible role of an intermediate staging point in an effort to illuminate potential trajectory options for conducting missions in Earth-Moon space of increasing duration, ultimately leading to deep space missions. This paper will describe several options for transits between Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and the libration points, transits between libration points, and transits between the libration points and interplanetary trajectories. The solution space provided will be constrained by selected orbital mechanics design techniques and physical characteristics of hardware to be used in both crewed missions and uncrewed missions. The relationships between time and energy required to transfer hardware between these locations will provide a better understanding of the potential trade-offs mission planners could consider in the development of capabilities, individual missions, and mission series in the context of the ISECG GER.

Martinez, Roland; Condon, Gerald; Williams, Jacob

2012-01-01

72

75 FR 34515 - American Energy Services, Inc., Dynacore Patent Litigation Trust, Earth Sciences, Inc., Empiric...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Energy Services, Inc., Dynacore Patent Litigation Trust, Earth Sciences, Inc., Empiric Energy, Inc., Future Carz, Inc...current and accurate information concerning the securities of Earth Sciences, Inc. because it has not filed any periodic...

2010-06-17

73

Designing to Save Energy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While tripling the campus size of Alvin Community College in Texas, architects and engineers cut back on nonessential lighting, recaptured waste heat, insulated everything possible, and let energy considerations dictate the size and shape of the building. (Author/MLF)

Santamaria, Joseph W.

1977-01-01

74

Electrical energy sources for organic synthesis on the early earth  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

It is pointed out that much of the contemporary origin-of-life research uses the original estimates of Miller and Urey (1959) for terrestrial energy dissipation by lightning and coronal discharges being equal to 2 x 10 to the 19th J/yr and 6 x 10 to the 19th J/yr, respectively. However, data from experiments that provide analogues to naturally-occurring lightning and coronal discharges indicate that lightning energy yields for organic synthesis (nmole/J) are about one order of magnitude higher than the coronal discharge yields. This suggests that, on early earth, organic production by lightning may have dominated that due to coronal emission. New values are recommended for lightning and coronal discharge dissipation rates on the early earth, 1 x 10 to the 18th J/yr and 5 x 10 to the 17th J/yr, respectively.

Chyba, Christopher; Sagan, Carl

1991-01-01

75

Earth Science Contexts for Teaching Physics. Part 2: Contexts Relating to the Teaching of Energy, Earth and Beyond and Radioactivity.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explains how physics teaching can be more relevant for elementary and secondary students by integrating physics and earth science content that students can relate to and understand. Identifies and explains Earth contexts that can be appropriately implemented into the physics curriculum such as energy resources and radioactivity. (Author/YDS)

King, Chris; Kennett, Peter

2002-01-01

76

Energy Efficient Industrial Building Design  

E-print Network

' - developed by Albert Kahn Associates in designing industrial buildings for more than 80 years - sheds some light on how technologies can be combined to promote greater energy conservation. This approach looks at the entire building and production operations...

Holness, G. V. R.

1983-01-01

77

Earth  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

With three levels to choose from on each page - beginner, intermediate or advanced - this site provides information on our plant Earth. There is a section about water on earth and its many different varities, like freshwater, groundwater, and frozen water. There is information about the chemical make-up of water and many images showing the different water anvironments. There is a section about life in water, such as animals, plants, and plankton.

2008-10-03

78

The Design and Evaluation of a HighPerformance Earth Science Carter T. Shock, Chialin Chang, Bongki Moon, Anurag Acharya,  

E-print Network

The Design and Evaluation of a High颅Performance Earth Science Database Carter T. Shock, Chialin the design of an earth science database as well as our early experiences with it. The primary design goal amount of earth science research is devoted to developing correlations between raw sensor readings from

Moon, Bongki

79

Functional design for operational earth resources ground data processing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The author has identified the following significant results. Study emphasis was on developing a unified concept for the required ground system, capable of handling data from all viable acquisition platforms and sensor groupings envisaged as supporting operational earth survey programs. The platforms considered include both manned and unmanned spacecraft in near earth orbit, and continued use of low and high altitude aircraft. The sensor systems include both imaging and nonimaging devices, operated both passively and actively, from the ultraviolet to the microwave regions of the electromagnetic spectrum.

Baldwin, C. J. (principal investigator); Bradford, L. H.; Hutson, D. E.; Jugle, D. R.

1972-01-01

80

A 37.5-kW point design comparison of the nickel-cadmium battery, bipolar nickel-hydrogen battery, and regenerative hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell energy storage subsystems for low Earth orbit  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Nickel-cadmium batteries, bipolar nickel-hydrogen batteries, and regenerative fuel cell storage subsystems were evaluated for use as the storage subsystem in a 37.5 kW power system for space station. Design requirements were set in order to establish a common baseline for comparison purposes. The storage subsystems were compared on the basis of effective energy density, round trip electrical efficiency, total subsystem weight and volume, and life.

Manzo, M. A.; Hoberecht, M. A.

1984-01-01

81

New retaining wall design criteria based on lateral earth pressure measurements  

E-print Network

NEW RETAINING WALL DESIGN CRITERIA BASED ON LATERAL EARTH PRESSURE MEASUREMENTS A Thesis by William V. ' Wright Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A & M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1975 Major Subject: Civil Engineering NEW RETAINING WALL DESIGN CRITERIA BASED ON LATERAL EARTH PRESSURE MEASUREMENTS A thesi s by William V. Wright (Chairman of Commi ttee) (M ber) (Head of Department) 0'( (Member) August 1975...

Wright, William Vincent

2012-06-07

82

Earth  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) planet profile provides data and images of the planet Earth. These data include planet size, orbit facts, distance from the Sun, rotation and revolution times, temperature, atmospheric composition, density, surface materials and albedo. Images with descriptions show Earth features such as the Ross Ice Shelf in Antarctica, Simpson Desert in Australia, Mt. Etna in Sicily, the Cassiar Mountains in Canada, the Strait of Gibraltar, Mississippi River, Grand Canyon, Wadi Kufra Oasis in Libya, and Moon images such as Hadley Rille, Plum Crater, massifs and Moon rocks. These images were taken with the Galileo Spacecraft and by the Apollo missions.

83

Earth's Energy Imbalance and Implications James Hansen, Makiko Sato, Pushker Kharecha  

E-print Network

1 Earth's Energy Imbalance and Implications James Hansen, Makiko Sato, Pushker Kharecha NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York, NY 10025, USA Columbia University Earth Institute, New York that Earth is absorbing more energy from the sun than it is radiating to space as heat, even during

Hansen, James E.

84

Linking Humans to Data: Designing an Enterprise Architecture for EarthCube  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

National Science Foundation (NSF)'s EarthCube is a strategic initiative towards a grand enterprise that holistically incorporates different geoscience research domains. The EarthCube as envisioned by NSF is a community-guided cyberinfrastructure (NSF 2011). The design of EarthCube enterprise architecture (EA) offers a vision to harmonize processes between the operations of EarthCube and its information technology foundation, the geospatial cyberinfrastructure. (Yang et al. 2010). We envision these processes as linking humans to data. We report here on fundamental ideas that would ultimately materialize as a conceptual design of EarthCube EA. EarthCube can be viewed as a meta-science that seeks to advance knowledge of the Earth through cross-disciplinary connections made using conventional domain-based earth science research. In order to build capacity that enables crossing disciplinary chasms, a key step would be to identify the cornerstones of the envisioned enterprise architecture. Human and data inputs are the two key factors to the success of EarthCube (NSF 2011), based upon which three hypotheses have been made: 1) cross disciplinary collaboration has to be achieved through data sharing; 2) disciplinary differences need to be articulated and captured in both computer and human understandable formats; 3) human intervention is crucial for crossing the disciplinary chasms. We have selected the Federal Enterprise Architecture Framework (FEAF, CIO Council 2013) as the baseline for the envisioned EarthCube EA, noting that the FEAF's deficiencies can be improved upon with inputs from three other popular EA frameworks. This presentation reports the latest on the conceptual design of an enterprise architecture in support of EarthCube.

Xu, C.; Yang, C.; Meyer, C. B.

2013-12-01

85

10 CFR 434.508 - Determination of the design energy consumption and design energy cost.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Determination of the design energy consumption and design energy cost. 434.508 Section 434.508 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW...

2011-01-01

86

10 CFR 434.508 - Determination of the design energy consumption and design energy cost.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Determination of the design energy consumption and design energy cost. 434.508 Section 434.508 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW...

2010-01-01

87

Planet Earth  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

How does the Earth work? What is its relationship to the other planets? These are but a few important questions answered by this creative instructional series created by WQED in Pittsburgh, in association with the National Academy of Sciences. The series was designed to present information about "our solar system and Earth's oceans, climate, and mineral and energy sources." The Annenberg Media group has placed this entire series online, and visitors can view all seven installments here. The programs include "The Climate Puzzle", "Gifts from the Earth", and "The Solar Sea". Teachers will note that the site also contains links to other educational resources, reviews, and related resources from the Annenberg Media organization.

1986-01-01

88

Solar Photoelectrochemical Energy Conversion using Earth-Abundant Nanomaterials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although the vast majority of energy consumed worldwide is derived from fossil fuels, the growing interest in making cleaner alternative energies more economically viable has motivated recent research efforts aimed to improve photovoltaic, wind, and biomass power generation. Clean power generation also requires clean burning fuels, such as H2 and O2, so that energy can still be provided on demand at all times, despite the intermittent nature inherent to solar or wind power. My research has focused on the rational approach to synthesizing earth-abundant nanomaterials with applications in the generation of clean alternative fuels and understanding the structure-property relationships which directly influence their performance. Herein, we describe the development of low-cost, earth-abundant layered metal chalcogenides as high-performance electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution, and hematite photoanodes for photoelectrochemical oxygen evolution. This work has revealed a particularly interesting concept where catalytic performance can be enhanced by controlling the phase behavior of the material and taking advantage of previously unexploited properties to overcome the challenges traditionally limiting the performance of these layered materials for hydrogen evolution catalysis.

Lukowski, Mark A.

89

Earth resources shuttle imaging radar. [systems analysis and design analysis of pulse radar for earth resources information system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A report is presented on a preliminary design of a Synthetic Array Radar (SAR) intended for experimental use with the space shuttle program. The radar is called Earth Resources Shuttle Imaging Radar (ERSIR). Its primary purpose is to determine the usefulness of SAR in monitoring and managing earth resources. The design of the ERSIR, along with tradeoffs made during its evolution is discussed. The ERSIR consists of a flight sensor for collecting the raw radar data and a ground sensor used both for reducing these radar data to images and for extracting earth resources information from the data. The flight sensor consists of two high powered coherent, pulse radars, one that operates at L and the other at X-band. Radar data, recorded on tape can be either transmitted via a digital data link to a ground terminal or the tape can be delivered to the ground station after the shuttle lands. A description of data processing equipment and display devices is given.

1975-01-01

90

Magnetic energy transfer at the top of the Earth's core  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We introduce a formalism to track magnetic energy transfer between spherical harmonic degrees due to the interaction of fluid flow and radial magnetic field at the top of the Earth's core. Large-scale synthetic single harmonic flows are characterized by a fixed difference between harmonics participating in the transfer. Large-scale toroidal flows result in more local energy transfer than small-scale poloidal flows. Axisymmetric poloidal flows are most efficient in producing energy transfer and dipole changes. The azimuthal phase relation between the field and the flow may play a major role in the energy transfer. Geomagnetic energy transfer induced by core flow models exhibit a striking transfer spectrum pattern of alternating extrema suggestive of energy cascade, but the detailed transfer spectrum matrix reveals rich behaviour with both local Kolmogorov-like transfer and non-local transfer, the latter about twice larger. The transfer spectrum reverses from even maxima and odd minima between 1840 and 1910 to odd maxima and even minima between 1955 and 1990. The transfer spectrum matrix shows geomagnetic energy cascade from low to high degrees as well as non-local transfer from the dipole directly to higher degrees, explaining the simultaneous dipole decrease and non-dipole increase during the historical period.

Huguet, Ludovic; Amit, Hagay

2012-08-01

91

Magnetic energy transfer at the top of the Earth's core  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We introduce a formalism to track magnetic energy transfer between spherical harmonic degrees due to the interaction of fluid flow and radial magnetic field at the top of the Earth's core. Large-scale synthetic single harmonic flows are characterized by a fixed difference between harmonics participating in the transfer. Large-scale toroidal flows result in more local energy transfer than small-scale poloidal flows. Axisymmetric poloidal flows are most efficient in producing energy transfer and dipole changes. The azimuthal phase relation between the field and the flow may play a major role in the energy transfer. Geomagnetic energy transfer induced by core flow models exhibit a striking transfer spectrum pattern of alternating extrema suggestive of energy cascade, but the detailed transfer spectrum matrix reveals rich behaviour with both local Kolmogorov-like transfer and non-local transfer, the latter about twice larger. The transfer spectrum reverses from even maxima and odd minima between 1840 and 1910 to odd maxima and even minima between 1955 and 1990. The transfer spectrum matrix shows geomagnetic energy cascade from low to high degrees as well as non-local transfer from the dipole directly to higher degrees, explaining the simultaneous dipole decrease and non-dipoleincrease during the historical period.

Huguet, L.; Amit, H.

2012-12-01

92

Skylab Earth Resource Experiment Package critical design review. [conference  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An outline of the conference for reviewing the design of the EREP is presented. Systems design for review include: tape recorder, support equipment, view finder/tracking, support hardware, and control and display panel.

1973-01-01

93

10 CFR 434.508 - Determination of the design energy consumption and design energy cost.  

...DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND...RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Building Energy Cost Compliance Alternative 434.508 Determination of the design energy consumption and design energy...

2014-01-01

94

10 CFR 434.508 - Determination of the design energy consumption and design energy cost.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND...RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Building Energy Cost Compliance Alternative 434.508 Determination of the design energy consumption and design energy...

2013-01-01

95

10 CFR 434.508 - Determination of the design energy consumption and design energy cost.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND...RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Building Energy Cost Compliance Alternative 434.508 Determination of the design energy consumption and design energy...

2012-01-01

96

Imaging high-energy astrophysical sources using Earth occultation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

HIGH-ENERGY astrophysical sources can be difficult to image. Photons with energies above ~5 keV are hard to focus, so experiments usually employ coded masks1-4 or moving collimators5-9 to modulate the flux received by the detectors; the resulting signals are then deconvolved to form the images. Here we demonstrate a new approach which makes use of the large-area, non-collimated detectors of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory. As the spacecraft moves in its orbit, the Earth itself acts as a stable occulting disk. Changes in the measured signal during a single occultation correspond to the integrated intensity of sources positioned along the arc described by the Earth's edge (limb). The low-altitude, moderately inclined orbit of the spacecraft ensures that the angle at which the limb traverses a source region varies between occultations, and thus data from a series of occultations can be transformed into an image. This imaging process is conceptually and mathematically similar to those used in fan-beam aperture-synthesis radio-astronomy10 and medical computer-assisted tomography11, and holds great promise for all-sky imaging with relatively simple (and hence inexpensive) detectors.

Zhang, S. N.; Fishman, G. J.; Harmon, B. A.; Paciesas, W. S.

1993-11-01

97

Ultrahigh energy tau neutrino flux regeneration while skimming the Earth  

SciTech Connect

The detection of Earth-skimming tau neutrinos has turned into a very promising strategy for the observation of ultra-high-energy cosmic neutrinos. The sensitivity of this channel crucially depends on the parameters of the propagation of the tau neutrinos through the terrestrial crust, which governs the flux of emerging tau leptons that can be detected. One of the characteristics of this propagation is the possibility of regeneration through multiple {nu}{sub {tau}}{r_reversible}{tau} conversions, which are often neglected in the standard picture. In this paper, we solve the transport equations governing the {nu}{sub {tau}} propagation and compare the flux of emerging tau leptons obtained allowing regeneration or not. We discuss the validity of the approximation of neglecting the {nu}{sub {tau}} regeneration using different scenarios for the neutrino-nucleon cross sections and the tau energy losses.

Bigas, Oscar Blanch [LPNHE, CNRS/IN2P3 and Universite Paris VI-VIIbb, Paris (France); Deligny, Olivier [IPN, CNRS/IN2P3 and Universite Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Payet, Kevin [LPSC, Universite Joseph Fourier Grenoble 1, CNRS/IN2P3, INPG, Grenoble (France); Van Elewyck, Veronique [IPN, CNRS/IN2P3 and Universite Paris Sud, Orsay (France); AstroParticules et Cosmologie (UMR 7165) and Universite Paris 7, Paris (France)

2008-09-15

98

The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Sensors and Preflight Calibration Plans  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) spacecraft sensors are designed to measure broadband earth-reflected solar shortwave (0.3-5 microns) and earth-emitted longwave (5- > 100 microns) radiances at the top of the atmosphere as part of the Mission to Planet Earth program. The scanning thermistor bolometer sensors respond to radiances in the broadband shortwave (0.3-5 microns) and total-wave (0.3- > 100 microns) spectral regions, as well as to radiances in the narrowband water vapor window (8-12 microns) region. 'ne sensors are designed to operate for a minimum of 5 years aboard the NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission and Earth Observing System AM-1 spacecraft platforms that are scheduled for launches in 1997 and 1998, respectively. The flight sensors and the in-flight calibration systems will be calibrated in a vacuum ground facility using reference radiance sources, tied to the international temperature scale of 1990. The calibrations will be used to derive sensor gains, offsets, spectral responses, and point spread functions within and outside of the field of view. The shortwave, total-wave, and window ground calibration accuracy requirements (1 sigma) are +/-0.8, +/-0.6, and +/-0.3 W /sq m/sr, respectively, while the corresponding measurement precisions are +/-O.5% and +/-1.0% for the broadband longwave and shortwave radiances, respectively. The CERES sensors, in-flight calibration systems, and ground calibration instrumentation are described along with outlines of the preflight and in-flight calibration approaches.

Lee, Robert B., III; Barkstrom, Bruce R.; Smith, G. Louis; Cooper, John E.; Kopia, Leonard P.; Lawrence, R. Wes; Thomas, Susan; Pandey, Dhirendra K.; Crommelynck, Dominique A. H.

1996-01-01

99

Concept design, modeling and station-keeping attitude control of an earth observation platform  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The stratosphere airship provides a unique and promising platform for earth observation. Researches on the project design and control scheme for earth observation platforms are still rarely documented. Nonlinear dynamics, model uncertainties, and external disturbances contribute to the difficulty in maneuvering the stratosphere airship. A key technical challenge for the earth observation platform is station keeping, or the ability to remain fixed over a geo-location. This paper investigates the conceptual design, modeling and station-keeping attitude control of the near-space earth observation platform. A conceptual design of the earth observation platform is presented. The dynamics model of the platform is derived from the Newton-Euler formulation, and the station-keeping control system of the platform is formulated. The station-keeping attitude control approach for the platform is proposed. The multi-input multi-output nonlinear control system is decoupled into three single-input single-output linear subsystems via feedback linearization, the attitude controller design is carried out on the new linear systems using terminal sliding mode control, and the global stability of the closed-loop system is proven by using the Lyapunov theorem. The performance of the designed control system is simulated by using the variable step Runge-Kutta integrator. Simulation results show that the control system tracks the commanded attitude with an error of zero, which verify the effectiveness and robustness of the designed control system in the presence of parametric uncertainties. The near-space earth observation platform has several advantages over satellites, such as high resolution, fast to deploy, and convenient to retrieve, and the proposed control scheme provides an effective approach for station-keeping attitude control of the earth observation platform.

Yang, Yueneng; Wu, Jie; Zheng, Wei

2012-11-01

100

Distributed Space Mission Design for Earth Observation Using Model-Based Performance Evaluation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Distributed Space Missions (DSMs) are gaining momentum in their application to earth observation missions owing to their unique ability to increase observation sampling in multiple dimensions. DSM design is a complex problem with many design variables, multiple objectives determining performance and cost and emergent, often unexpected, behaviors. There are very few open-access tools available to explore the tradespace of variables, minimize cost and maximize performance for pre-defined science goals, and therefore select the most optimal design. This paper presents a software tool that can multiple DSM architectures based on pre-defined design variable ranges and size those architectures in terms of predefined science and cost metrics. The tool will help a user select Pareto optimal DSM designs based on design of experiments techniques. The tool will be applied to some earth observation examples to demonstrate its applicability in making some key decisions between different performance metrics and cost metrics early in the design lifecycle.

Nag, Sreeja; LeMoigne-Stewart, Jacqueline; Cervantes, Ben; DeWeck, Oliver

2015-01-01

101

Temporal Interpolation Methods for the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Experiment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) is a NASA multisatellite measurement program for monitoring the radiation environment of the earth-atmosphere system. The CERES instrument was flown on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite in late 1997, and will be flown on the Earth Observing System morning satellite in 1998 and afternoon satellite in 2000. To minimize temporal

D. F. Young; P. Minnis; D. R. Doelling; G. G. Gibson; T. Wong

1998-01-01

102

Earth's Energy Imbalance and Implications James Hansen, Makiko Sato, Pushker Kharecha  

E-print Network

1 Earth's Energy Imbalance and Implications James Hansen, Makiko Sato, Pushker Kharecha NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York, NY 10025, USA Columbia University Earth Institute, New York, hosted by Ifremer, Brest, France Abstract. Improving observations of ocean heat content show that Earth

Hansen, James E.

103

Elemental processes of transport and energy conversion in Earth's magnetosphere  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the last 5 years observations from several missions and ground based observatories have honed in on the most elemental aspects of flux transport and energy conversion. Dipolarization fronts and their counterpart in the distant magnetotail "anti-dipolarization" fronts, which together are refered to herein as "reconnection fronts", usher the recently reconnected flux tubes from the near-Earth X-points and in the process convert magnetic energy to particle energy and wave radiation. On the tailward side they are responsible for plasmoid formation and acceleration. On the earthward side they result in elemental substorm current wedges or wedglets, which were initially postulated from ground observations alone. Recent observations have revealed how the interaction of wedgelets and the inner magnetosphere takes place. Questions remain with regards to the physics of the energy transfer process from global magnetic energy to local heating and waves, and with regards to the initiation of the X-point activations in space. Observations indicate that the latter may be induced by polar cap or dayside activity, suggesting a direct link between dayside reconnection and nightside phenomena. The likely causal sequence of events and open questions in light of these recent observations, and the field's outlook in anticipation of upcoming coordinated observations from the international Heliophysics System Observatory will be discussed.

Angelopoulos, Vassilis

104

Tracking Earth's Energy: From El Nin~o to Global Warming  

E-print Network

the climate system to enable this to happen on a global basis. Incoming radiant energy may be scattered absorbed or reflected at the Earth's surface. Radiant solar (shortwave) energy is transformed into sensibleTracking Earth's Energy: From El Nin~o to Global Warming Kevin E. Trenberth 路 John T. Fasullo

Fasullo, John

105

The optical antenna system design research on earth integrative network laser link in the future  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Earth integrated information network can be real-time acquisition, transmission and processing the spatial information with the carrier based on space platforms, such as geostationary satellites or in low-orbit satellites, stratospheric balloons or unmanned and manned aircraft, etc. It is an essential infrastructure for China to constructed earth integrated information network. Earth integrated information network can not only support the highly dynamic and the real-time transmission of broadband down to earth observation, but the reliable transmission of the ultra remote and the large delay up to the deep space exploration, as well as provide services for the significant application of the ocean voyage, emergency rescue, navigation and positioning, air transportation, aerospace measurement or control and other fields.Thus the earth integrated information network can expand the human science, culture and productive activities to the space, ocean and even deep space, so it is the global research focus. The network of the laser communication link is an important component and the mean of communication in the earth integrated information network. Optimize the structure and design the system of the optical antenna is considered one of the difficulty key technologies for the space laser communication link network. Therefore, this paper presents an optical antenna system that it can be used in space laser communication link network.The antenna system was consisted by the plurality mirrors stitched with the rotational paraboloid as a substrate. The optical system structure of the multi-mirror stitched was simulated and emulated by the light tools software. Cassegrain form to be used in a relay optical system. The structural parameters of the relay optical system was optimized and designed by the optical design software of zemax. The results of the optimal design and simulation or emulation indicated that the antenna system had a good optical performance and a certain reference value in engineering. It can provide effective technical support to realize interconnection of earth integrated laser link information network in the future.

Liu, Xianzhu; Fu, Qiang; He, Jingyi

2014-11-01

106

Modified motor designs save energy  

SciTech Connect

The capital cost of a motor is low compared with the cost of the electricity used to run it. A $2,000 motor, for example, might consume $50,000 worth of electricity over its lifetime. Because electricity is such a significant expense, energy-efficient motors make the most economic sense, even though such premium motors also cost more. However, a variety factors, such as the user`s tendency to specify a higher-horsepower motor than needed to avoid the possibility of burnout, mitigate some of the economic advantages of an energy-saving design. Also, even relatively inefficient motors are good enough for most applications. As a result, most motors purchased are of standard efficiency. Reconfigured components such as rotors and fan blades plus a new generation of superconducting materials are resulting in more-energy-efficient motors.

Paula, G.

1997-01-01

107

Design of an unmanned, reusable vehicle to de-orbit debris in Earth orbit  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The space debris problem is becoming more important because as orbital missions increase, the amount of debris increases. It was the design team's objective to present alternative designs and a problem solution for a deorbiting vehicle that will alleviate the problem by reducing the amount of large debris in earth orbit. The design team was asked to design a reusable, unmanned vehicle to de-orbit debris in earth orbit. The design team will also construct a model to demonstrate the system configuration and key operating features. The alternative designs for the unmanned, reusable vehicle were developed in three stages: selection of project requirements and success criteria, formulation of a specification list, and the creation of alternatives that would satisfy the standards set forth by the design team and their sponsor. The design team selected a Chain and Bar Shot method for deorbiting debris in earth orbit. The De-orbiting Vehicle (DOV) uses the NASA Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) as the propulsion and command modules with the deorbiting module attached to the front.

Aziz, Shahed; Cunningham, Timothy W.; Moore-Mccassey, Michelle

1990-01-01

108

Design and field testing of solar-assisted earth coils. Final report, August 1, 1978-January 31, 1981  

SciTech Connect

Two types of earth coils were designed, constructed, and are operational on the Oklahoma State University campus. A nominal 1000-foot, 4-inch, PVC coil buried in a serpentine pattern is the heat source/sink for two commercial heat pump systems. This system is vented which allows the easy placement of thermocouples down its length to measure changes in temperature as well as changes in overall U values as a function of length. Integral to the earth coil is a 1000-gallon uninsulated water storage tank in which solar energy from 210 ft/sup 2/ of solar collectors (single-glazed, metal absorber) can be added directly to the heat pump, circulated through the 1000-foot earth coil system, or added to an insulated storage tank for direct transfer. Temperature ranges for this type of system at the four-foot level are from a nominal range of 78/sup 0/F in mid-September to a low of 42/sup 0/F in mid-February in the absence of heat rejection or absorption. The second type of earth coil under study was a vertical coil approximately 240 feet in length. Placement of the coil is with a conventional water well drilling machine. The vertical heat exchanger consists of a 5-inch PVC pipe which is capped at both ends and pressurized at approximately 15 PSIG. This sealed and pressurized heat exchanger allows a low power pump to circulate water through both the heat pump and vertical heat exchanger system.

Bose, J E

1981-01-01

109

Various Ways of the Solar Energy Impact on the Earth's Climate and Weather  

Microsoft Academic Search

The role and place of the solar wind energy in the whole spectra of the solar emissions which could influence the Earth's climate dynamic was investigated during the last years. Obtained results show that the Space originated energy could be considered as a factor capable to influence the Earth's climate dynamics together with the solar EUV radiation. As the first

110

Design of ballistic three-body trajectories for continuous polar earth observation in the Earth-Moon system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper investigates orbits and transfer trajectories for continuous polar Earth observation in the Earth-Moon system. The motivation behind this work is to complement the services offered by polar-orbiting spacecraft, which offer high resolution imaging but poor temporal resolution, due to the fact that they can only capture one narrow swath at each polar passage. Conversely, a platform for high-temporal resolution imaging can enable a number of applications, from accurate polar weather forecasting to Aurora study, as well as direct-link telecommunications with high-latitude regions. Such a platform would complement polar orbiters. In this work, we make use of resonant gravity swing-by manoeuvres at the Moon in order to design trajectories that are suitable for quasi-continuous polar observation. In particular, it is shown that the Moon can flip the line of apsides of a highly eccentric, highly inclined orbit from north to south, without the need for thrust. In this way, a spacecraft can alternatively loiter for an extended period of time above the two poles. In addition, at the lunar encounter it is possible to change the period of time spent on each pole. In addition, we also show that the lunar swing-by can be exploited for transfer to a so-called pole-sitter orbit, i.e. a spacecraft that constantly hovers above one of the Earth's poles using continuous thrust. It is shown that, by using the Moon's gravity to change the inclination of the transfer trajectory, the total ?v is less than using a trajectory solely relying on high-thrust or low-thrust, therefore enabling the launchers to inject more mass into the target pole-sitter position.

Ceriotti, Matteo; McInnes, Colin R.

2014-09-01

111

Recent advances in the Lesser Antilles observatoriesRecent advances in the Lesser Antilles observatories Part 1 : Seismic Data Acquisition Design based on EarthWorm andPart 1 : Seismic Data Acquisition Design based on EarthWorm and  

E-print Network

observatories Part 1 : Seismic Data Acquisition Design based on EarthWorm andPart 1 : Seismic Data Acquisition Design based on EarthWorm and SeisComPSeisComP Jean-Marie SAUREL (2,1), Fr茅d茅ric RANDRIAMORA (3 observatories community : EarthWorm and SeisComP. The first is renowned for its ability to process real time

Beauducel, Fran莽ois

112

Advanced Energy Conversion Technologies and Architectures for Earth and Beyond  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Research, development and studies of novel space-based solar power systems, technologies and architectures for Earth and beyond are needed to reduce the cost of clean electrical power for terrestrial use and to provide a stepping stone for providing an abundance of power in space, i.e., manufacturing facilities, tourist facilities, delivery of power between objects in space, and between space and surface sites. The architectures, technologies and systems needed for space to Earth applications may also be used for in-space applications. Advances in key technologies, i.e., power generation, power management and distribution, power beaming and conversion of beamed power are needed to achieve the objectives of both terrestrial and extraterrestrial applications. There is a need to produce "proof-ofconcept" validation of critical WPT technologies for both the near-term, as well as far-term applications. Investments may be harvested in near-term beam safe demonstrations of commercial WPT applications. Receiving sites (users) include ground-based stations for terrestrial electrical power, orbital sites to provide power for satellites and other platforms, future space elevator systems, space vehicle propulsion, and space surface sites. Space surface receiving sites of particular interest include the areas of permanent shadow near the moon s North and South poles, where WPT technologies could enable access to ice and other useful resources for human exploration. This paper discusses work addressing a promising approach to solar power generation and beamed power conversion. The approach is based on a unique high-power solar concentrator array called Stretched Lens Array (SLA) applied to both solar power generation and beamed power conversion. Since both versions (solar and laser) of SLA use many identical components (only the photovoltaic cells need to be different), economies of manufacturing and scale may be realized by using SLA on both ends of the laser power beaming system in a space solar power application. Near-term uses of this SLA-laser-SLA system may include terrestrial and space exploration in near Earth space. Later uses may include beamed power for bases or vehicles on Mars. Strategies for developing energy infrastructures in space which utilize this technology are presented. This dual use system produces electrical energy efficiently from either coherent light, such as from a highly coherent laser, or from conventional solar illumination. This allows, for example, supplementing solar energy with energy provided by highly coherent laser illumination during periods of low solar illumination or no illumination. This reduces the need for batteries and alternate sources of power. The capability of using laser illumination in a lowest order Gaussian laser mode provides means for transmitting power optically with maximum efficiency and precision over the long distances characteristic of space. A preliminary receiving system similar to that described here, has been produced and tested under solar and laser illumination. A summary of results is given.

Howell, Joe T.; Fikes, John C.; Phillips, Dane J.; Laycock, Rustin L.; ONeill, Mark; Henley, Mark W.; Fork, Richard L.

2006-01-01

113

Analytical Simulations of Energy-Absorbing Impact Spheres for a Mars Sample Return Earth Entry Vehicle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Nonlinear dynamic finite element simulations were performed to aid in the design of an energy-absorbing impact sphere for a passive Earth Entry Vehicle (EEV) that is a possible architecture for the Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission. The MSR EEV concept uses an entry capsule and energy-absorbing impact sphere designed to contain and limit the acceleration of collected samples during Earth impact without a parachute. The spherical shaped impact sphere is composed of solid hexagonal and pentagonal foam-filled cells with hybrid composite, graphite-epoxy/Kevlar cell walls. Collected Martian samples will fit inside a smaller spherical sample container at the center of the EEV's cellular structure. Comparisons were made of analytical results obtained using MSC.Dytran with test results obtained from impact tests performed at NASA Langley Research Center for impact velocities from 30 to 40 m/s. Acceleration, velocity, and deformation results compared well with the test results. The correlated finite element model was then used for simulations of various off-nominal impact scenarios. Off-nominal simulations at an impact velocity of 40 m/s included a rotated cellular structure impact onto a flat surface, a cellular structure impact onto an angled surface, and a cellular structure impact onto the corner of a step.

Billings, Marcus Dwight; Fasanella, Edwin L. (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

114

Education, energy, toilets, and Earth: The Operators' Manual  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Solid science shows the unsustainability of relying on fossil fuels for long-term future energy supply, with increasingly strong evidence that a measured shift to renewable sources will be economically beneficial while improving employment and national security, providing insurance against catastrophes, and more. Yet despite notable advances in renewable energy and related issues, the transition does not appear to be occurring at the economically optimal rate. Analogy may be useful. In biological evolution and business, successful innovation is met by competitors, but also by predators, parasites, and diseases. Trees must handle the competition, but also termites, bark beetles, fungal diseases, strangling vines, and more, while new software meets competitors plus viruses, worms, Trojan horses and other malware. By analogy, the emergence of a "denialsphere" as well as competitors may be a predictable response to the threat posed to business-as-usual by the success of the National Academies and the IPCC in defining the climate-energy problem with the best science, and the growing success of inventors and policy-makers in developing advantageous and increasingly cost-effective solutions. Real questions exist about the best way forward, but the discussion of the important issues is sometimes confused by arguments that are not especially forward-going. Success of beneficial innovations against such problems is not guaranteed but surely has occurred, with transitions as large as that to a low-carbon energy system-we did switch from chamber pots and night-soil haulers to modern sanitation and clean water, for example. Analogy suggests that education and outreach are integral in such a transition, not a job to be completed but a process to be continued. Our attempt to contribute to this large effort, the NSF-supported Earth: The Operators' Manual, emphasizes diverse, interlocking approaches to show the large benefits that are ultimately available, relying on assessed science and not recommending particular policies.

Alley, R. B.; Haines-stiles, G.; Akuginow, E.

2011-12-01

115

MiTEP's Collaborative Field Course Design Process Based on Earth Science Literacy Principles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Michigan Technological University has developed a collaborative process for designing summer field courses for teachers as part of their National Science Foundation funded Math Science Partnership program, called the Michigan Teacher Excellence Program (MiTEP). This design process was implemented and then piloted during two two-week courses: Earth Science Institute I (ESI I) and Earth Science Institute II (ESI II). Participants consisted of a small group of Michigan urban science teachers who are members of the MiTEP program. The Earth Science Literacy Principles (ESLP) served as the framework for course design in conjunction with input from participating MiTEP teachers as well as research done on common teacher and student misconceptions in Earth Science. Research on the Earth Science misconception component, aligned to the ESLP, is more fully addressed in GSA Abstracts with Programs Vol. 42, No. 5. 揜ecognizing Earth Science Misconceptions and Reconstructing Knowledge through Conceptual-Change-Teaching. The ESLP were released to the public in January 2009 by the Earth Science Literacy Organizing Committee and can be found at http://www.earthscienceliteracy.org/index.html. Each day of the first nine days of both Institutes was focused on one of the nine ESLP Big Ideas; the tenth day emphasized integration of concepts across all of the ESLP Big Ideas. Throughout each day, Michigan Tech graduate student facilitators and professors from Michigan Tech and Grand Valley State University consistantly focused teaching and learning on the day's Big Idea. Many Earth Science experts from Michigan Tech and Grand Valley State University joined the MiTEP teachers in the field or on campus, giving presentations on the latest research in their area that was related to that Big Idea. Field sites were chosen for their unique geological features as well as for the 搒ense of place each site provided. Preliminary research findings indicate that this collaborative design process piloted as ESI I and ESI II was successful in improving MiTEP teacher understanding of Earth Science content and that it was helpful to use the ESLP framework. Ultimately, a small sample of student scores will look at the impact on student learning in the MiTEP teacher classrooms.

Engelmann, C. A.; Rose, W. I.; Huntoon, J. E.; Klawiter, M. F.; Hungwe, K.

2010-12-01

116

Designing dark energy afterglow experiments  

E-print Network

Chameleon fields, which are scalar field dark energy candidates, can evade fifth force constraints by becoming massive in high-density regions. However, this property allows chameleon particles to be trapped inside a vacuum chamber with dense walls. Afterglow experiments constrain photon-coupled chameleon fields by attempting to produce and trap chameleon particles inside such a vacuum chamber, from which they will emit an afterglow as they regenerate photons. Here we discuss several theoretical and systematic effects underlying the design and analysis of the GammeV and CHASE afterglow experiments. We consider chameleon particle interactions with photons, Fermions, and other chameleon particles, as well as with macroscopic magnetic fields and matter. The afterglow signal in each experiment is predicted, and its sensitivity to various properties of the experimental apparatus is studied. Finally, we use CHASE data to exclude a wide range of photon-coupled chameleon dark energy models.

Amol Upadhye; Jason H. Steffen; Aaron S. Chou

2012-04-24

117

Preparing Teachers to Design Instruction for Deep Understanding in Middle School Earth Science  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study compared the efficacy of 3 approaches to professional development in middle school Earth science organized around the principles of Understanding by Design (Wiggins & McTighe, 1998) in a sample of 53 teachers from a large urban district. Teachers were randomly assigned to a control group or to 1 of 3 conditions that varied with respect

Penuel, William R.; Gallagher, Lawrence P.

2009-01-01

118

System design and specifications. Earth Observatory Satellite system definition study (EOS)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A design summary of the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) is presented. The systems considered in the summary are: (1) the spacecraft structure, (2) electrical power modules, (3) communications and data handling module, (4) attitude determination module, (5) actuation module, and (6) solar array and drive module. The documents which provide the specifications for the systems and the equipment are identified.

1974-01-01

119

Design of the Skylab MDA window. [Multiple Docking Adapter window for remote sensing of earth resources  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Description of the optical and structural design requirements, mechanical and thermal response analyses, final design features, and testing procedures employed in the development of a large window mounted on the earth-facing side of the multiple docking adapter (MDA) of the Skylab manned space vehicle. This window was designed for the S190 earth resources multispectral camera and was protected from the space environment during nonuse periods by a hinged cover operated from within the MDA. The camera required a viewing area approximately 43 by 58 cm. A single glass pane 4.1 cm thick was selected to minimize optical distortions. Heaters on the glass and frame were designed to control distortions caused by thermal gradients in the glass.

Trent, D. J.; Rothermel, L. J.

1974-01-01

120

Design Concepts for a Small Space-Based GEO Relay Satellite for Missions Between Low Earth and near Earth Orbits  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The main purpose of the Small Space-Based Geosynchronous Earth orbiting (GEO) satellite is to provide a space link to the user mission spacecraft for relaying data through ground networks to user Mission Control Centers. The Small Space Based Satellite (SSBS) will provide services comparable to those of a NASA Tracking Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) for the same type of links. The SSBS services will keep the user burden the same or lower than for TDRS and will support the same or higher data rates than those currently supported by TDRS. At present, TDRSS provides links and coverage below GEO; however, SSBS links and coverage capability to above GEO missions are being considered for the future, especially for Human Space Flight Missions (HSF). There is also a rising need for the capability to support high data rate links (exceeding 1 Gbps) for imaging applications. The communication payload on the SSBS will provide S/Ka-band single access links to the mission and a Ku-band link to the ground, with an optical communication payload as an option. To design the communication payload, various link budgets were analyzed and many possible operational scenarios examined. To reduce user burden, using a larger-sized antenna than is currently in use by TDRS was considered. Because of the SSBS design size, it was found that a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket could deliver three SSBSs to GEO. This will greatly reduce the launch costs per satellite. Using electric propulsion was also evaluated versus using chemical propulsion; the power system size and time to orbit for various power systems were also considered. This paper will describe how the SSBS will meet future service requirements, concept of operations, and the design to meet NASA users' needs for below and above GEO missions. These users' needs not only address the observational mission requirements but also possible HSF missions to the year 2030. We will provide the trade-off analysis of the communication payload design in terms of the number of links looking above and below GEO; the detailed design of a GEO SSBS spacecraft bus and its accommodation of the communication payload, and a summary of the trade study that resulted in the selection of the Falcon 9 launch vehicle to deploy the SSBS and its impact on cost reductions per satellite. ======================================================================== Several initiatives have taken place within NASA1 and international space agencies2 to create a human exploration strategy for expanding human presence into the solar system; these initiatives have been driven by multiple factors to benefit Earth. Of the many elements in the strategy one stands out: to send robotic and human missions to destinations beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO), including cis-lunar space, Near-Earth Asteroids (NEAs), the Moon, and Mars and its moons.3, 4 The time frame for human exploration to various destinations, based on the public information available,1,4 is shown in Figure 1. Advance planning is needed to define how future space communications services will be provided in the new budget environment to meet future space communications needs. The spacecraft for these missions can be dispersed anywhere from below LEO to beyond GEO, and to various destinations within the solar system. NASA's Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) program office provides communication and tracking services to space missions during launch, in-orbit testing, and operation phases. Currently, SCaN's space networking relay satellites mainly provide services to users below GEO, at Near Earth Orbit (NEO), below LEO, and in deep space. The potential exists for using a space-based relay satellite, located in the vicinity of various solar system destinations, to provide communication space links to missions both below and above its orbit. Such relays can meet the needs of human exploration missions for maximum connectivity to Earth locations and for reduced latency. In the past, several studies assessed the ability of satellite-based relays working above GEO in conjunction with Earth gro

Bhasin, Kul B.; Warner, Joseph D.; Oleson, Steven; Schier, James

2014-01-01

121

Earth Observatory Satellite system definition study. Report no. 3: Design/cost tradeoff studies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The key issues in the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) program which are subject to configuration study and tradeoff are identified. The issue of a combined operational and research and development program is considered. It is stated that cost and spacecraft weight are the key design variables and design options are proposed in terms of these parameters. A cost analysis of the EOS program is provided. Diagrams of the satellite configuration and subsystem components are included.

1974-01-01

122

A design optimization tool of earth-to-air heat exchanger using a genetic algorithm  

Microsoft Academic Search

Advancement in genetic algorithm (GA) optimization tools for design applications, coupled with techniques of soft computing, have led to new possibilities in the way computers interact with the optimization process. In this paper, the concept of goal-oriented GA has been used to design a tool for evaluating and optimizing various aspects of earth-to-air heat exchanger behavior. A new optimization method

Rakesh Kumar; A. R. Sinha; B. K. Singh; U. Modhukalya

2008-01-01

123

Acquisition/expulsion system for earth orbital propulsion system study. Volume 2: Cryogenic design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Detailed designs were made for three earth orbital propulsion systems; (1) the space shuttle (integrated) OMS/RCS, (2) the space shuttle (dedicated) OMS (LO2), and (3) the space tug. The preferred designs from the integrated OMS/RCS were used as the basis for the flight test article design. A plan was prepared that outlines the steps, cost, and schedule required to complete the development of the prototype DSL tank and feedline (LH2 and LO2) systems. Ground testing of a subscale model using LH2 verified the expulsion characteristics of the preferred DSL designs.

1973-01-01

124

Measurements of earth pressures for the design modification of cantilever retaining walls  

E-print Network

the angle of friction of the soil on the wall. This will satisfy the no slip condition. 3. Since it is not likely for a structure to be built which would be of such form as to produce two planes of rupture in the passive state, there is no actual... retaining walls are designed to resist active earth pressure rather than the higher at rest pressure. Passive Earth Pressure. - The soil placed in front of the retaining wall undergoes compression as the retaining wall translates 17 in the direction...

Prikryl, William

1979-01-01

125

Elastic energy of a deformable earth: General expression  

Microsoft Academic Search

This work is the first in the second part of a project dedicated to elaborating a Hamiltonian theory for the rotational motion of a deformable Earth. In the four works which make up the first part the basis of this theory is laid down, studying the effects produced when the Earth's elastic mantle is deformed by lunisolar attraction. More specifically,

Juan Getino; Facultad Ciencias

1992-01-01

126

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 36, NO. 4, JULY 1998 1127 Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy  

E-print Network

and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES): Algorithm Overview Bruce A. Wielicki, Bruce R. Barkstrom, Bryan A. Randall, Larry L. Stowe, and Ronald M. Welch Abstract-- The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System

Randall, David A.

127

Earth and Planetary Science 120/Energy and Resources 130 Fall 2005 Analysis of Environmental Data Organizational Information  

E-print Network

Earth and Planetary Science 120/Energy and Resources 130 Fall 2005 Analysis of Environmental Data Organizational Information Registration: Earth and Planetary Science C120 -- or -- Energy and Resources C130

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

128

The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System Elevation Bearing Assembly Life Test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) elevation scan bearings lubricated with Pennzane SHF X2000 and 2% lead naphthenate (PbNp) were life tested for a seven-year equivalent Low Earth Orbit (LEO) operation. The bearing life assembly was tested continuously at an accelerated and normal rate using the scanning patterns developed for the CERES Earth Observing System AM-1 mission. A post-life-test analysis was performed on the collected data, bearing wear, and lubricant behavior.

Brown, Phillip L.; Miller, James B.; Jones, William R., Jr.; Rasmussen, Kent; Wheeler, Donald R.; Rana, Mauro; Peri, Frank

1999-01-01

129

Solar Sailing Kinetic Energy Interceptor (KEI) Mission for Impacting/Deflecting Near-Earth Asteroids  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A solar sailing mission architecture, which requires a t least ten 160-m, 300-kg solar sail spacecraft with a characteristic acceleration of 0.5 mm/sqs, is proposed as a realistic near- term option for mitigating the threat posed by near-Earth asteroids (NEAs). Its mission feasibility is demonstrated for a fictional asteroid mitigation problem created by AIAA. This problem assumes that a 200-m asteroid, designated 2004WR, was detected on July 4, 2004, and that the expected impact will occur on January 14, 2015. The solar sailing phase of the proposed mission for the AIAA asteroid mitigation problem is comprised of the initial cruise phase from 1 AU t o 0.25 AU (1.5 years), the cranking orbit phase (3.5 years), and the retrograde orbit phase (1 year) prior to impacting the target asteroid at its perihelion (0.75 AU from the sun) on January 1, 2012. The proposed mission will require at least ten kinetic energy interceptor (KEI) solar sail spacecraft. Each KEI sailcraft consists of a 160- m, 150-kg solar sail and a 150-kg microsatellite impactor. The impactor is to be separated from a large solar sail prior to impacting the 200-m target asteroid at its perihelion. Each 150-kg microsatellite impactor, with a relative impact velocity of at least 70 km/s, will cause a conservatively estimated AV of 0.3 cm/s in the trajectory of the 200-m target asteroid, due largely to the impulsive effect of material ejected from the newly-formed crater. The deflection caused by a single impactor will increase the Earth-miss-distance by 0.45Re (where Re denotes the Earth radius of 6,378 km). Therefore, at least ten KEI sailcraft will be required for consecutive impacts, but probably without causing fragmentation, to increase the total Earth-miss-distance by 4.5Re. This miss-distance increase of 29,000 km is outside of a typical uncertainty/error of about 10,000 km in predicting the Earth-miss- distance. A conventional Delta I1 2925 launch vehicle is capable of injecting at least two KEI sailcraft into an Earth escaping orbit. A 40-m solar sail is currently being developed by NASA and industries for a possible flight validation experiment within 10 years, and a 160-m solar sail is expected to be available within 20 years.

Wie, Bong

2005-01-01

130

Atmospheric radiative flux divergence from Clouds and Earth Radiant Energy System (CERES)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A major objective of the Clouds and Earth Radiant Energy System (CERES) is the computation of vertical profiles through the atmosphere of the divergence of radiation flux, with global coverage. This paper discusses the need for radiation divergence and presents some options for its inference from CERES measurements and other data from the Earth Observating System.

Smith, Louis G.; Charlock, Thomas P.; Crommelynk, D.; Rutan, David; Gupta, Shashi

1990-01-01

131

External Resource: How Volcanoes Work: The Earth's Internal Heat Energy and Interior Structure  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A web page with background information about how volcanoes work. The Earth's internal heat source provides the energy for our dynamic planet, supplying it with the driving force for plate-tectonic motion, and for on-going catastrophic events such as earth

1900-01-01

132

Solar Influences Light from the Sun is the largest source of energy for Earth's  

E-print Network

Solar Influences Light from the Sun is the largest source of energy for Earth's atmosphere. The Solar Influences group at LASP studies the light from the Sun and how it interacts with the Earth) 路 How and why light from the Sun varies in time from seconds to months to years to centuries 路 How solar

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

133

Optimization methods for alternative energy system design  

Microsoft Academic Search

An electric vehicle heating system and a solar thermal coffee dryer are presented as case studies in alternative energy system design optimization. Design optimization tools are compared using these case studies, including linear programming, integer programming, and fuzzy integer programming. Although most decision variables in the designs of alternative energy systems are generally discrete (e.g., numbers of photovoltaic modules, thermal

Michael Henry Reinhardt

2000-01-01

134

Design a Net-Zero Energy Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students create a concept design of their very own net-zero energy classroom by pasting renewable energy and energy-efficiency items into and around a pretend classroom on a sheet of paper. They learn how these items (such as solar panels, efficient lights, computers, energy meters, etc.) interact to create a learning environment that produces as much energy as it uses.

Integrated Teaching And Learning Program

135

Alternative Natural Energy Sources in Building Design.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication provides a discussion of various energy conserving building systems and design alternatives. The information presented here covers alternative space and water heating systems, and energy conserving building designs incorporating these systems and other energy conserving techniques. Besides water, wind, solar, and bio conversion

Davis, Albert J.; Schubert, Robert P.

136

Navigation Design and Analysis for the Orion Earth-Moon Mission  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper details the design of the cislunar optical navigation system being proposed for the Orion Earth-Moon (EM) missions. In particular, it presents the mathematics of the navigation filter. The unmodeled accelerations and their characterization are detailed. It also presents the analysis that has been performed to understand the performance of the proposed system, with particular attention paid to entry flight path angle constraints and the delta-V performance.

DSouza, Christopher; Zanetti, Renato

2014-01-01

137

Design of transfer trajectories between resonant orbits in the Earth-Moon restricted problem  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The application of dynamical systems techniques to mission design has demonstrated that employing invariant manifolds and resonant flybys enables previously unknown trajectory options and potentially reduces the ?V requirements. In this investigation, planar and three-dimensional resonant orbits are analyzed and cataloged in the Earth-Moon system and the associated invariant manifold structures are computed and visualized with the aid of higher-dimensional Poincar maps. The relationship between the manifold trajectories associated with multiple resonant orbits is explored through the maps with the objective of constructing resonant transfer arcs. As a result, planar and three-dimensional homoclinic- and heteroclinic-type trajectories between unstable periodic resonant orbits are identified in the Earth-Moon system. To further illustrate the applicability of 2D and 3D resonant orbits in preliminary trajectory design, planar transfers to the vicinity of L5 and an out-of-plane transfer to a 3D periodic orbit, one that tours the entire Earth-Moon system, are constructed. The design process exploits the invariant manifolds associated with orbits in resonance with the Moon as transfer mechanisms.

Vaquero, Mar; Howell, Kathleen C.

2014-01-01

138

Designating Earth's Moon as a United Nations World Heritage Site - Permanently Protected from Commercial or Military Uses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper proposes that Earth's Moon, in its entirety, be designated a United Nations World Heritage Site (WHS), permanently protected from any and all commercial or military utilization and reserved exclusively for scientific and aesthetic purposes. The paper discusses: 1) the extraordinary importance of the Moon for science, culture, and religion - past, present and future; 2) the history of proposals to exploit the Moon for commercial and military purposes and the shortcomings of this colonial, exploitation paradigm; and 3) the necessity, policy mechanisms, and political dynamics of designating the Moon as a World Heritage Site, permanently protected from commercial and/or military uses. The first part of the paper discusses the extraordinary importance of the Moon as it exists today - as a scientific laboratory, a source of beauty and inspiration throughout human evolution, a source for artistic expression, and as an object that is considered sacred by many cultures. Next, the paper traces the history of specific proposals for the exploitation of the Moon for commercial and/or military purposes - including plans by the U.S. Air Force in 1959 to detonate a nuclear explosion on the Moon, proposals to strip-mine the lunar regolith for helium-3 and rocket-fuel hydrogen; construction of solar power plants to transmit energy to Earth, and proposals to use the lunar surface as a billboard upon which to project commercial advertisements visible from Earth. The profound ethical, legal, and scientific shortcomings of this exploitation paradigm are described as an emerging Extraterrestrial Manifest Destiny that we have a collective obligation to challenge and constrain. The paper proposes that space exploration be infused with an ethical commitment to compassion, reverence, conservation, and non-interference to abiotic and biotic systems alike; as opposed to the expansion and extraterrestrial imposition of the colonization, exploitation, domination, and despoliation paradigm that has characterized 19th and 20th century western civilization on Earth. The World Heritage process, and how Earth's Moon clearly satisfies necessary criteria, is described, as are the political challenges this proposal presents, including the 'national sovereignty' issue. The 1972 United Nations World Heritage Convention (signed by 167 countries), provides for the protection of cultural and natural properties deemed to be of "outstanding universal value", including value "from the point of view of science, conservation, or natural beauty" and places them under "a collective responsibility." The Moon clearly meets several criteria for WHS designation, as follow: a. "be outstanding examples representing major stages of Earth's history...significant on-going geological processes in the development of landforms, or significant geomorphic or physiographic features"; b. "contain superlative natural phenomena or areas of exceptional natural beauty and aesthetic importance"; and c. the Moon qualifies within the Convention as an "associative cultural landscape" which designates areas "by virtue of their powerful religious, artistic or cultural associations of the natural element." To facilitate WHS site designation for the Moon, it is proposed that the 1979 "Moon Treaty" (Agreement Governing the Activities of States on the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies, entered into force 7/11/84) be amended and broadly ratified internationally. Specifically, Article 11 - which presently provides for 'the establishment of an international regime to govern the exploitation of the natural resources of the moon, encourage the development of the natural resources of the moon, the management and expansion of opportunities in the use of those resources' - should be amended to provide a clear and unequivocal declaration of the extraordinary, irreplaceable cultural and natural value of the Moon, and designation of the Moon in its entirety as an inviolate World Heritage Site reserved exclusively for scient

Steiner, R. G.

2002-01-01

139

Dynamic earth-contact building: A sustainable low-energy technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sustainable development includes low-energy buildings, which reduce energy consumption, green house gases emission, water usage, etc. The choice of subsurface wall at varying depths for construction of buildings has a direct impact on energy consumption and the environment. This paper includes in its scope all building structures in which a significant area is in direct contact with the earth, and

Rakesh Kumar; Shweta Sachdeva; S. C. Kaushik

2007-01-01

140

Energy conversion at the Earth's magnetopause using single and multispacecraft methods  

E-print Network

Energy conversion at the Earth's magnetopause using single and multispacecraft methods C. R a small statistical data set, where we investigate energy conversion at the magnetopause using Cluster density and magnetopause orientation are needed to infer the energy conversion at the magnetopause

Bergen, Universitetet i

141

Energy position of 4f levels in rare-earth metals  

Microsoft Academic Search

The energy position of the occupied and unoccupied 4f levels relative to the Fermi energy is studied for the rare-earth metals. This is done by treating the excited state as an impurity in an otherwise perfect crystal. This picture is first considered in the complete screening approximation. In this approximation thermochemical data can be used directly to give energy values

B鰎je Johansson

1979-01-01

142

Geothermal Energy: Harnessing the Power of the Earth  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This video describes how geothermal heat resources in California have been tapped to supply 850 MW of electricity. Images and animations show how the area known as The Geysers has been developed to capture steam, produced from trapped rainwater and heated by the earth. Major challenges include finding suitable geothermal resources to develop, and ensuring that underground water is replenished.

Kqed; Domain, Teachers'

143

Earth-sheltered housing: an evaluation of energy-conservation potential  

SciTech Connect

The Innovative Structures Program (ISP) began an evaluation of the energy conservation potential of earth-sheltered houses in late 1979. Since that time, several projects have been undertaken as part of this evaluation. The findings of these projects, plus a discussion of the work of others in the field, form the body of this report. Although a comprehensive evaluation of earth-sheltered housing has not been completed, this report presents a compendium of knowledge on the subject. The conclusions are more qualitative than quantitative in nature because of the limited information on which to base projections. The major conclusions to date are as follows: Earth-sheltered houses are capable of very good energy performance. Earth-sheltered houses, as a passive means to conserve energy, perform significantly better in some climatic regins than in others. Earth-sheltered houses are not the optimum passive concept in several major housing growth regions of the country. Earth-sheltered houses, including their land and site improvements, will cost an estimated 10 to 35% more than comparable aboveground houses, and this additional cost may not be justified on a life cycle cost basis, given 1981 market conditions. The use of earth sheltering will probably grow in some parts of the country; however, broad-scale national or regional utilization is not likely to occur in the next 20 to 30 years.

Wendt, R.L.

1982-04-01

144

Energy Design Reviews: The End of the Energy Audit?  

E-print Network

It is much more cost effective to design an industrial plant upfront for optimum energy efficiency rather than retrofit an existing plant, yet typically design engineers and project managers continue to focus on capital costs, not lifecycle costs...

Corthat, E. T.; Griesbach, R.

2013-01-01

145

Designing for Space, on Earth: Creating More Livable Extraterrestrial Habitats Through Architectural Design.  

E-print Network

?? Traditionally, space exploration and habitation have existed primarily within the domain of the engineering field. This has proven sufficiently effective for space-related design challenges, (more)

Badger, Jeffrey R.

2012-01-01

146

Design description report for a photovoltaic power system for a remote satellite earth terminal  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A photovoltaic (PV) power system has been installed as an adjunct to an agricultural school at Wawatobi on the large northern island of the Republic of Indonesia. Its purpose is to provide power for a satellite earth station and a classroom. The renewable energy developed supports the video and audio teleconferencing systems as well as the facility at large. The ground station may later be used to provide telephone service. The installation was made in support of the Agency for International Development's Rural Satellite Program, whose purpose is to demonstrate the use of satellite communications for rural development assistance applications. The objective of this particular PV power system is to demonstrate the suitability of a hybrid PV engine-generator configuration for remote satellite earth stations.

Marshall, N. A.; Naff, G. J.

1987-01-01

147

50% Advanced Energy Design Guides: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the process, methodology, and assumptions for the development of the 50% Energy Savings Advanced Energy Design Guides (AEDGs), a design guidance document that provides specific recommendations for achieving 50% energy savings above the requirements of ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004 in four building types: (1) Small to medium office buildings, (2) K-12 school buildings, (3) Medium to big box retail buildings, (4) Large hospital buildings.

Bonnema, E.; Leach, M.; Pless, S.; Liu, B.; Wang, W.; Thornton, B.; Williams, J.

2012-07-01

148

A study on diffusion coefficient and diffusion activation energy of rare earth atoms in surface layer of steel rare earth nitrocarburized  

SciTech Connect

Steels, 20CrMnTi and 30CrMnSi, were nitrocarburized at 600 C and 650 C for 5h with rare earths (RE). The experimental results show that the rare earth elements can diffuse into the treated surface layer, in which the concentration profiles of the rare earth La were measured by chemical analysis and ion probe. The diffusion coefficient and activation energy of La have been calculated based on the experimental results mentioned above. The rare earth atoms diffuse mainly along the grain boundaries according to thermodynamic theory and analysis of the calculated data.

Mufu, Y.; Qun, L.; Teqiang, Z.; Yang, C.; Fayi, Z.; Zhiru, L. [Harbin Inst. of Tech. (China)

1995-12-31

149

Prompt analysis of rare earths by high-energy PIXE  

Microsoft Academic Search

Thin targets of rare earth fluorides were bombarded with 66 and 85 MeV protons. Measured cross sections for X-ray production agreed with PWBA calculations. Satellite X-rays from nuclear reactions were obtained for both (Z-1) and (Z+1) products from the bombardment of element Z. Interference-free sensitivities were of the order of tens of nanograms under bombardment with 1 mC of integrated

C. A. Pineda; M. Peisach

1991-01-01

150

Automated Job Controller for Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Production Processing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) is one of NASA's highest priority Earth Observing System (EOS) scientific instruments. The CERES science team will integrate data from the CERES Flight Model 5 (FM5) on the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) in addition to the four CERES scanning instrument on Terra and Aqua. The CERES production system consists of over 75 Product Generation Executives (PGEs) maintained by twelve subsystem groups. The processing chain fuses CERES instrument observations with data from 19 other unique sources. The addition of FM5 to over 22 instrument years of data to be reprocessed from flight models 1-4 creates a need for an optimized production processing approach. This poster discusses a new approach, using JBoss and Perl to manage job scheduling and interdependencies between PGEs and external data sources. The new optimized approach uses JBoss to serve handler servlets which regulate PGE-level job interdependencies and job completion notifications. Additional servlets are used to regulate all job submissions from the handlers and to interact with the operator. Perl submission scripts are used to build Process Control Files and to interact directly with the operating system and cluster scheduler. The result is a reduced burden on the operator by algorithmically enforcing a set of rules that determine the optimal time to produce data products with the highest integrity. These rules are designed on a per PGE basis and periodically change. This design provides the means to dynamically update PGE rules at run time and increases the processing throughput by using an event driven controller. The immediate notification of a PGE's completion (an event) allows successor PGEs to launch at the proper time with minimal start up latency, thereby increasing computer system utilization.

Gleason, J. L.; Hillyer, T. N.

2011-12-01

151

Designing Energy-Efficient Fetch Engines  

E-print Network

Designing Energy-Efficient Fetch Engines Michele Co Department of Computer Science University 路 Results 路 Summary #12;3 Introduction 路 Energy efficiency 颅 Balance power and performance (runtime) 路 Fetch & Ranganathan] #12;7 Why Study Fetch Engine Energy Efficiency? 路 High fetch bandwidth mechanisms 颅 Rotenberg, et

Co, Michele

152

Constraining the gravitational wave energy density of the Universe using Earth's ring  

E-print Network

The search for gravitational waves is one of today's major scientific endeavors. A gravitational wave can interact with matter by exciting vibrations of elastic bodies. Earth itself is a large elastic body whose so-called normal-mode oscillations ring up when a gravitational wave passes. Therefore, precise measurement of vibration amplitudes can be used to search for the elusive gravitational-wave signals. Earth's free oscillations that can be observed after high-magnitude earthquakes have been studied extensively with gravimeters and low-frequency seismometers over many decades leading to invaluable insight into Earth's structure. Making use of our detailed understanding of Earth's normal modes, numerical models are employed for the first time to accurately calculate Earth's gravitational-wave response, and thereby turn a network of sensors that so far has served to improve our understanding of Earth, into an astrophysical observatory exploring our Universe. In this article, we constrain the energy density of gravitational waves to values in the range 0.035 - 0.15 normalized by the critical energy density of the Universe at frequencies between 0.3mHz and 5mHz, using 10 years of data from the gravimeter network of the Global Geodynamics Project that continuously monitors Earth's oscillations. This work is the first step towards a systematic investigation of the sensitivity of gravimeter networks to gravitational waves. Further advance in gravimeter technology could improve sensitivity of these networks and possibly lead to gravitational-wave detection.

Michael Coughlin; Jan Harms

2014-06-04

153

Low-earth-orbit Satellite Internet Protocol Communications Concept and Design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report presents a design concept for a low-Earth-orbit end-to-end Internet-Protocol- (IP-) based mission. The goal is to maintain an up-to-date communications infrastructure that makes communications seamless with the protocols used in terrestrial computing. It is based on the premise that the use of IPs will permit greater interoperability while also reducing costs and providing users the ability to retrieve data directly from the satellite. However, implementing an IP-based solution also has a number of challenges, since wireless communications have different characteristics than wired communications. This report outlines the design of a low-Earth-orbit end-to-end IP-based mission; the ideas and concepts of Space Internet architectures and networks are beyond the scope of this document. The findings of this report show that an IP-based mission is plausible and would provide benefits to the user community, but the outstanding issues must be resolved before a design can be implemented.

Slywezak, Richard A.

2004-01-01

154

Solar Electric Propulsion Vehicle Design Study for Cargo Transfer to Earth-moon L1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A design study for a cargo transfer vehicle using solar electric propulsion was performed for NASA's Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts program. Targeted for 2016, the solar electric propulsion (SEP) transfer vehicle is required to deliver a propellant supply module with a mass of approximately 36 metric tons from Low Earth Orbit to the first Earth-Moon libration point (LL1) within 270 days. Following an examination of propulsion and power technology options, a SEP transfer vehicle design was selected that incorporated large-area (approx. 2700 sq m) thin film solar arrays and a clustered engine configuration of eight 50 kW gridded ion thrusters mounted on an articulated boom. Refinement of the SEP vehicle design was performed iteratively to properly estimate the required xenon propellant load for the out-bound orbit transfer. The SEP vehicle performance, including the xenon propellant estimation, was verified via the SNAP trajectory code. Further efforts are underway to extend this system model to other orbit transfer missions.

Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.; Kerslake, Thomas W.; Rawlin, Vincent K.; Falck, Robert D.; Dudzinski, Leonard J.; Oleson, Steven R.

2002-01-01

155

Human factors analysis of workstation design: Earth Radiation Budget Satellite Mission Operations Room  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A human factors analysis addressed three related yet distinct issues within the area of workstation design for the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) mission operation room (MOR). The first issue, physical layout of the MOR, received the most intensive effort. It involved the positioning of clusters of equipment within the physical dimensions of the ERBS MOR. The second issue for analysis was comprised of several environmental concerns, such as lighting, furniture, and heating and ventilation systems. The third issue was component arrangement, involving the physical arrangement of individual components within clusters of consoles, e.g., a communications panel.

Stewart, L. J.; Murphy, E. D.; Mitchell, C. M.

1982-01-01

156

Energy manager design for microgrids  

SciTech Connect

On-site energy production, known as distributed energy resources (DER), offers consumers many benefits, such as bill savings and predictability, improved system efficiency, improved reliability, control over power quality, and in many cases, greener electricity. Additionally, DER systems can benefit electric utilities by reducing congestion on the grid, reducing the need for new generation and transmission capacity, and offering ancillary services such as voltage support and emergency demand response. Local aggregations of distributed energy resources (DER) that may include active control of on-site end-use energy devices can be called microgrids. Microgrids require control to ensure safe operation and to make dispatch decisions that achieve system objectives such as cost minimization, reliability, efficiency and emissions requirements, while abiding by system constraints and regulatory rules. This control is performed by an energy manager (EM). Preferably, an EM will achieve operation reasonably close to the attainable optimum, it will do this by means robust to deviations from expected conditions, and it will not itself incur insupportable capital or operation and maintenance costs. Also, microgrids can include supervision over end-uses, such as curtailing or rescheduling certain loads. By viewing a unified microgrid as a system of supply and demand, rather than simply a system of on-site generation devices, the benefits of integrated supply and demand control can be exploited, such as economic savings and improved system energy efficiency.

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01

157

Earth-Science Research for Addressing the Water-Energy Nexus  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the coming decades, the United States will face two significant and sometimes competing challenges: preserving sustainable supplies of fresh water for humans and ecosystems, and ensuring available sources of energy. This presentation provides an overview of the earth-science data collection and research needed to address these challenges. Uncertainty limits our understanding of many aspects of the water-energy nexus. These aspects include availability of water, water requirements for energy development, energy requirements for treating and delivering fresh water, effects of emerging energy development technologies on water quality and quantity, and effects of future climates and land use on water and energy needs. Uncertainties can be reduced with an integrated approach that includes assessments of water availability and energy resources; monitoring of surface water and groundwater quantity and quality, water use, and energy use; research on impacts of energy waste streams, hydraulic fracturing, and other fuel-extraction processes on water quality; and research on the viability and environmental footprint of new technologies such as carbon capture and sequestration and conversion of cellulosic material to ethanol. Planning for water and energy development requires consideration of factors such as economics, population trends, human health, and societal values; however, sound resource management must be grounded on a clear understanding of the earth-science aspects of the water-energy nexus. Information gained from an earth-science data-collection and research program can improve our understanding of water and energy issues and lay the ground work for informed resource management.

Healy, R. W.; Alley, W. M.; Engle, M.; McMahon, P. B.; Bales, J. D.

2013-12-01

158

Design of a Representative Low Earth Orbit Satellite to Improve Existing Debris Models  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper summarizes the process and methodologies used in the design of a small-satellite, DebriSat, that represents materials and construction methods used in modern day Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites. This satellite will be used in a future hypervelocity impact test with the overall purpose to investigate the physical characteristics of modern LEO satellites after an on-orbit collision. The major ground-based satellite impact experiment used by DoD and NASA in their development of satellite breakup models was conducted in 1992. The target used for that experiment was a Navy Transit satellite (40 cm, 35 kg) fabricated in the 1960 s. Modern satellites are very different in materials and construction techniques from a satellite built 40 years ago. Therefore, there is a need to conduct a similar experiment using a modern target satellite to improve the fidelity of the satellite breakup models. The design of DebriSat will focus on designing and building a next-generation satellite to more accurately portray modern satellites. The design of DebriSat included a comprehensive study of historical LEO satellite designs and missions within the past 15 years for satellites ranging from 10 kg to 5000 kg. This study identified modern trends in hardware, material, and construction practices utilized in recent LEO missions, and helped direct the design of DebriSat.

Clark, S.; Dietrich, A.; Werremeyer, M.; Fitz-Coy, N.; Liou, J.-C.

2012-01-01

159

Ground Calibrations of the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Spacecraft Thermistor Bolometers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) spacecraft scanning thermistor bolometers will measure earth-reflected solar and earth-emmitted,longwave radiances, at the top-of-the-atmosphere. The measurements are performed in the broadband shortwave (0.3-5.0 micron) and longwave (5.0 - >100 micron) spectral regions as well as in the 8 -12 micron water vapor window over geographical footprints as small as 10 kilometers at the nadir. The CERES measurements are designed to improve our knowledge of the earth's natural climate processes, in particular those related to clouds, and man's impact upon climate as indicated by atmospheric temperature. November 1997, the first set of CERES bolometers is scheduled for launch on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Spacecraft. The CERES bolometers were calibrated radiometrically in a vacuum ground facility using absolute reference sources, tied to the International Temperature Scale of 1990. Accurate bolometer calibrations are dependent upon the derivations of the radiances from the spectral properties [reflectance, transmittance, emittance, etc.] of both the sources and bolometers. In this paper, the overall calibration approaches are discussed for the longwave and shortwave calibrations. The spectral responses for the TRMM bolometer units are presented and applied to the bolometer ground calibrations in order to determine pre-launch calibration gains.

Lee, Robert B., III; Smith, G. Lou; Barkstrom, Bruce R.; Priestley, Kory J.; Thomas, Susan; Paden, Jack; Pandey, Direndra K.; Thornhill, K. Lee; Bolden, William C.; Wilson, Robert S.

1997-01-01

160

NASA Advanced Concepts Office, Earth-To-Orbit Team Design Process and Tools  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Earth to Orbit (ETO) Team of the Advanced Concepts Office (ACO) at NASA Marshal Space Flight Center (MSFC) is considered the preeminent group to go to for prephase A and phase A concept definition. The ACO team has been at the forefront of a multitude of launch vehicle studies determining the future direction of the Agency as a whole due, in part, to their rapid turnaround time in analyzing concepts and their ability to cover broad trade spaces of vehicles in that limited timeframe. Each completed vehicle concept includes a full mass breakdown of each vehicle to tertiary subsystem components, along with a vehicle trajectory analysis to determine optimized payload delivery to specified orbital parameters, flight environments, and delta v capability. Additionally, a structural analysis of the vehicle based on material properties and geometries is performed as well as an analysis to determine the flight loads based on the trajectory outputs. As mentioned, the ACO Earth to Orbit Team prides themselves on their rapid turnaround time and often need to fulfill customer requests within limited schedule or little advanced notice. Due to working in this fast paced environment, the ETO team has developed some finely honed skills and methods to maximize the delivery capability to meet their customer needs. This paper will describe the interfaces between the 3 primary disciplines used in the design process; weights and sizing, trajectory, and structural analysis, as well as the approach each discipline employs to streamline their particular piece of the design process.

Waters, Eric D.; Garcia, Jessica; Beers, Benjamin; Philips, Alan; Holt, James B.; Threet, Grady E., Jr.

2013-01-01

161

Earth, water, wind, and sun: our energy alternatives  

Microsoft Academic Search

The author does not see any of the alternative energy sources as magic substitutes for fossil fuels like oil, coal, and gas. Instead, these alternatives--geothermal power, water power, wind and solar energy-- together can help provide an energy solution. For each alternative, a history of its development and use is presented; its actual power contribution as well as its potential,

Halacy; D. S. Jr

1977-01-01

162

Design of rare-earth-ion doped chalcogenide photonic crystals for enhancing the fluorescence emission  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rare-earth-ion doped chalcogenide glass is a promising material for developing mid-infrared light sources. In this work, Tm3+-doped chalcogenide glass was prepared and photonic crystal structures were designed to enhance its fluorescence emission at approximately 3.8 ?m. By employing the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation, the emission characteristics of the luminescent centers in the bulk material and in the photonic crystals were worked out. Utilizing analysis of the photon excitation inside the sample and the photon extraction on the sample surface, it was found that fluorescence emission can be significantly enhanced 260-fold with the designed photonic crystal structure. The results of this work can be used to realize high-efficiency mid-infrared light sources.

Zhang, Peiqing; Dai, Shixun; Niu, Xueke; Xu, Yinsheng; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Yuehao; Xu, Tiefeng; Nie, Qiuhua

2014-07-01

163

Power inversion design for ocean wave energy harvesting  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The needs for energy sources are increasing day by day because of several factors, such as oil depletion, and global climate change due to the higher level of CO2, so the exploration of various renewable energy sources is very promising area of study. The available ocean waves can be utilized as free source of energy as the water covers 70% of the earth surface. This thesis presents the ocean wave energy as a source of renewable energy. By addressing the problem of designing efficient power electronics system to deliver 5 KW from the induction generator to the grid with less possible losses and harmonics as possible and to control current fed to the grid to successfully harvest ocean wave energy. We design an AC-DC full bridge rectifier converter, and a DC-DC boost converter to harvest wave energy from AC to regulated DC. In order to increase the design efficiency, we need to increase the power factor from (0.5-0.6) to 1. This is accomplished by designing the boost converter with power factor correction in continues mode with RC circuit as an input to the boost converter power factor correction. This design results in a phase shift between the input current and voltage of the full bridge rectifier to generate a small reactive power. The reactive power is injected to the induction generator to maintain its functionality by generating a magnetic field in its stator. Next, we design a single-phase pulse width modulator full bridge voltage source DC-AC grid-tied mode inverter to harvest regulated DC wave energy to AC. The designed inverter is modulated by inner current loop, to control current injected to the grid with minimal filter component to maintain power quality at the grid. The simulation results show that our design successfully control the current level fed to the grid. It is noteworthy that the simulated efficiency is higher than the calculated one since we used an ideal switch in the simulated circuit.

Talebani, Anwar N.

164

Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) reprocessing using Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) angular distribution models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

NASA's Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) scanning broadband radiometers flew on board the NOAA 9 (Feb 1985 to Jan 1987) and NOAA 10 (Jan 1987 to May 1989) and measured broadband shortwave (0.2 ?m to 5 ?m), longwave (5 ?m to 50 ?m) and total radiances. While the observations provided solid evidence of the cooling effect on the Earth system by clouds, the uncertainty of cloud radiative effects by region or by cloud type is large compared to those derived more recently from NASA's Clouds and the Earth Radiant Energy System (CERES) observations. In ERBE, top-of-atmosphere (TOA) irradiances were derived by applying 12 scene-type dependent angular distribution models (ADMs). Scene type viewed by ERBE scanners was estimated from broadband radiances using a maximum likelihood estimate method [1]. In this study, we use data taken by Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on board the NOAA-9 satellite to derive cloud properties similar to those produced by the CERES cloud algorithm that utilizes Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) data collocated with CERES footprints. This allows direct application of newer CERES ADMs to ERBE scanner radiances, which in turn reduces the uncertainty in the TOA irradiances. We describe the process of applying CERES ADMs and a comparison of the reprocessed data with original ERBE data. The reprocessing of 4 months of NOAA-9 measurements indicated increase in the global monthly mean shortwave TOA irradiance by 4%, while longwave TOA irradiance decreased by 0.5%, compared to irradiances derived from ERBE ADMs. These differences are largely caused by the pixel sizes of AVHRR and MODIS that yield different cloud type probability distributions.

Shrestha, A. K.; Kato, S.; Bedka, K. M.; Miller, W. F.; Wong, T.; Rutan, D. A.; Smith, G. L.; Fernandez, J. R.; Loeb, N.; Minnis, P.; Doelling, D. R.

2013-05-01

165

Energy Conscious Design in Schools of Architecture  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Major findings are summarized of an investigation of energy design teaching in schools of architecture, which led to recommendations described in this article addressed to theoretical and inspirational models of design teaching, rather than to technical courses. Available from: ACSA, 1735 New York Ave., Washington, D.C. 20006. (Author/LBH)

Villecco, Marguerite

1977-01-01

166

Systematic approach in designing rare-Earth-free hybrid semiconductor phosphors for general lighting applications.  

PubMed

As one of the most rapidly evolving branches of solid-state lighting technologies, light emitting diodes (LEDs) are gradually replacing conventional lighting sources due to their advantages in energy saving and environmental protection. At the present time, commercially available white light emitting diodes (WLEDs) are predominantly phosphor based (e.g., a yellow-emitting phosphor, such as cerium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet or (YAG):Ce(3+), coupled with a blue-emitting InGaN/GaN diode), which rely heavily on rare-earth (RE) metals. To avoid potential supply risks of these elements, we have developed an inorganic-organic hybrid phosphor family based on I-VII binary semiconductors. The hybrid phosphor materials are totally free of rare-earth metals. They can be synthesized by a simple, low-cost solution process and are easily scalable. Their band gap and emission energy, intensity, and color can be systematically tuned by incorporating ligands with suitable electronic properties. High quantum efficiency is achieved for some of these compounds. Such features make this group of materials promising candidates as alternative phosphors for use in general lighting devices. PMID:25216125

Zhang, Xiao; Liu, Wei; Wei, George Z; Banerjee, Debasis; Hu, Zhichao; Li, Jing

2014-10-01

167

Designing the Nuclear Energy Attitude Scale.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a refined method for designing a valid and reliable Likert-type scale to test attitudes toward the generation of electricity from nuclear energy. Discusses various tests of validity that were used on the nuclear energy scale. Reports results of administration and concludes that the test is both reliable and valid. (CW)

Calhoun, Lawrence; And Others

1988-01-01

168

The measurement of the earth's radiation budget as a problem in information theory - A tool for the rational design of earth observing systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The measurement of the earth's radiation budget has been chosen to illustrate the technique of objective system design. The measurement process is an approximately linear transformation of the original field of radiant exitances, so that linear statistical techniques may be employed. The combination of variability, measurement strategy, and error propagation is presently made with the help of information theory, as suggested by Kondratyev et al. (1975) and Peckham (1974). Covariance matrices furnish the quantitative statement of field variability.

Barkstrom, B. R.

1983-01-01

169

Co-Seismic Energy Changes Induced by Earthquakes on a Rotating, Gravitating Earth  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Besides operating its own energy budget, an earthquake acts as an agent transferring a much greater amount of energy among the Earth's rotation, elastic field, gravitational field and internal heat. We compute the co-seismic, globally integrated gravitational and rotation changes induced by some 20,000 large earthquakes that occurred in the last quarter century, according to Chao et al. (1995, GJI, 122,776- 783,784-789) and using the Harvard CMT catalog. The result confirms an extremely strong tendency for the earthquakes to decrease the global gravitational energy and to increase the spin energy. It is found that energy is being extracted from the Earth's gravitational field by the action of earthquakes at an average rate of about approx. 2 TeraW during the studied period, larger by far than the approx. 7 GigaW for the average rate of the earthquake-induced rotational energy increase and the approx. 5 GigaW for the seismic energy release. Based on energetics considerations and assuming the inability of the Earth to build up elastic energy continuously over time, it is argued that earthquakes, by converting gravitational energy, may make a significant contribution to the global hedflow.

Chao, Benjamin F.; Gross, Richard S.

2003-01-01

170

Clouds and Earth Radiant Energy System (CERES), a review: Past, present and future  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Clouds and Earth Radiant Energy System (CERES) project's objectives are to measure the reflected solar radiance (shortwave) and Earth-emitted (longwave) radiances and from these measurements to compute the shortwave and longwave radiation fluxes at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) and the surface and radiation divergence within the atmosphere. The fluxes at TOA are to be retrieved to an accuracy of 2%. Improved bidirectional reflectance distribution functions (BRDFs) have been developed to compute the fluxes at TOA from the measured radiances with errors reduced from ERBE by a factor of two or more. Instruments aboard the Terra and Aqua spacecraft provide sampling at four local times. In order to further reduce temporal sampling errors, data are used from the geostationary meteorological satellites to account for changes of scenes between observations by the CERES radiometers. A validation protocol including in-flight calibrations and comparisons of measurements has reduced the instrument errors to less than 1%. The data are processed through three editions. The first edition provides a timely flow of data to investigators and the third edition provides data products as accurate as possible with resources available. A suite of cloud properties retrieved from the MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) by the CERES team is used to identify the cloud properties for each pixel in order to select the BRDF for each pixel so as to compute radiation fluxes from radiances. Also, the cloud information is used to compute radiation at the surface and through the atmosphere and to facilitate study of the relationship between clouds and the radiation budget. The data products from CERES include, in addition to the reflected solar radiation and Earth emitted radiation fluxes at TOA, the upward and downward shortwave and longwave radiation fluxes at the surface and at various levels in the atmosphere. Also at the surface the photosynthetically active radiation and ultraviolet radiation (total, UVA and UVB) are computed. The CERES instruments aboard the Terra and Aqua spacecraft have served well past their design life times. A CERES instrument has been integrated onto the NPP platform and is ready for launch in 2011. Another CERES instrument is being built for launch in 2014, and plans are being made for a series of follow-on missions.

Smith, G. L.; Priestley, K. J.; Loeb, N. G.; Wielicki, B. A.; Charlock, T. P.; Minnis, P.; Doelling, D. R.; Rutan, D. A.

2011-07-01

171

Clouds and Earth Radiant Energy System (CERES), a Review: Past, Present and Future  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Clouds and Earth Radiant Energy System (CERES) project s objectives are to measure the reflected solar radiance (shortwave) and Earth-emitted (longwave) radiances and from these measurements to compute the shortwave and longwave radiation fluxes at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) and the surface and radiation divergence within the atmosphere. The fluxes at TOA are to be retrieved to an accuracy of 2%. Improved bidirectional reflectance distribution functions (BRDFs) have been developed to compute the fluxes at TOA from the measured radiances with errors reduced from ERBE by a factor of two or more. Instruments aboard the Terra and Aqua spacecraft provide sampling at four local times. In order to further reduce temporal sampling errors, data are used from the geostationary meteorological satellites to account for changes of scenes between observations by the CERES radiometers. A validation protocol including in-flight calibrations and comparisons of measurements has reduced the instrument errors to less than 1%. The data are processed through three editions. The first edition provides a timely flow of data to investigators and the third edition provides data products as accurate as possible with resources available. A suite of cloud properties retrieved from the MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) by the CERES team is used to identify the cloud properties for each pixel in order to select the BRDF for each pixel so as to compute radiation fluxes from radiances. Also, the cloud information is used to compute radiation at the surface and through the atmosphere and to facilitate study of the relationship between clouds and the radiation budget. The data products from CERES include, in addition to the reflected solar radiation and Earth emitted radiation fluxes at TOA, the upward and downward shortwave and longwave radiation fluxes at the surface and at various levels in the atmosphere. Also at the surface the photosynthetically active radiation and ultraviolet radiation (total, UVA and UVB) are computed. The CERES instruments aboard the Terra and Aqua spacecraft have served well past their design life times. A CERES instrument has been integrated onto the NPP platform and is ready for launch in 2011. Another CERES instrument is being built for launch in 2014, and plans are being made for a series of follow-on missions.

Smith, G. L.; Priestley, K. J.; Loeb, N. G.; Wielicki, B. A.; Charlock, T. P.; Minnis, P.; Doelling, D. R.; Rutan, D. A.

2011-01-01

172

The opto-mechanical design of the GMT-consortium large earth finder (G-CLEF)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The GMT-Consortium Large Earth Finder (G-CLEF) is a fiber fed, optical echelle spectrograph that has been selected as a first light instrument for the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) currently under construction at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile's Atacama desert region. We designed G-CLEF as a general-purpose echelle spectrograph with precision radial velocity (PRV) capability used for exoplanet detection. The radial velocity (RV) precision goal of GCLEF is 10 cm/sec, necessary for detection of Earth-sized planets orbiting stars like our Sun in the habitable zone. This goal imposes challenging stability requirements on the optical mounts and the overall spectrograph support structures. Stability in instruments of this type is typically affected by changes in temperature, orientation, and air pressure as well as vibrations caused by telescope tracking. For these reasons, we have chosen to enclose G-CLEF's spectrograph in a thermally insulated, vibration isolated vacuum chamber and place it at a gravity invariant location on GMT's azimuth platform. Additional design constraints posed by the GMT telescope include: a limited space envelope, a thermal emission ceiling, and a maximum weight allowance. Other factors, such as manufacturability, serviceability, available technology and budget are also significant design drivers. All of the previously listed considerations must be managed while ensuring that performance requirements are achieved. In this paper, we discuss the design of G-CLEF's optical mounts and support structures including technical choices made to minimize the system's sensitivity to thermal gradients. A more general treatment of the properties of G-CLEF can be found elsewhere in these proceedings1. We discuss the design of the vacuum chamber which houses the irregularly shaped optical bench and optics while conforming to a challenging space envelope on GMT's azimuth platform. We also discuss the design of G-CLEF's insulated enclosure and thermal control systems which maintain the spectrograph at milli-Kelvin level stability while simultaneously limiting the maximum thermal emission into the telescope dome environment. Finally, we discuss G-CLEF's front-end assembly and fiber-feed system as well as other interface challenges presented by the telescope, enclosure and neighboring instrumentation.

Mueller, Mark; Baldwin, Daniel; Bean, Jacob; Bergner, Henry; Bigelow, Bruce; Chun, Moo-Young; Crane, Jeffrey; Foster, Jeff; F?r閟z, Gabor; Gauron, Thomas; Guzman, Dani; Hertz, Edward; Jord醤, Andr閟.; Kim, Kang-Min; McCracken, Kenneth; Norton, Timothy; Ordway, Mark; Park, Chan; Park, Sang; Podgorski, William A.; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Uomoto, Alan; Yuk, In-Soo

2014-08-01

173

High Energy Output Marx Generator Design  

SciTech Connect

High Energy Output Marx Generator Design a design of a six stage Marx generator that has a unipolar pulse waveform of 200 kA in a 50500 microsecond waveform is presented. The difficulties encountered in designing the components to withstand the temperatures and pressures generated during the output pulse are discussed. The unique methods and materials used to successfully overcome these problems are given. The steps necessary to increase the current output of this Marx generator design to the meg-ampere region or higher are specified.

Monty Lehmann

2011-07-01

174

On-orbit solar calibrations using the Aqua Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) in-flight calibration system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) spacecraft scanning thermistor bolometers were used to measure earth-reflected solar and earth-emitted longwave radiances, at satellite altitude. The bolometers measured the earth radiances in the broadband shortwave solar (0.3 - 5.0 micrometers) and total (0.3->100 micrometers) spectral bands as well as in the (8 - 12 micrometers) water vapor window spectral band over geographical footprints as small as 10 kilometers at nadir. In May 2002, the fourth and fifth sets of CERES bolometers were launched aboard the Aqua spacecraft. Ground vacuum calibrations defined the initial count conversion coefficients that were used to convert the bolometer output voltages into filtered earth radiances. The mirror attenuator mosaic (MAM), a solar diffuser plate, was built into the CERES instrument package calibration system in order to define in-orbit shifts or drifts in the sensor responses. The shortwave and total sensors are calibrated using the solar radiances reflected from the MAM's. Each MAM consists of baffle-solar diffuser plate systems, which guide incoming solar radiances into the instrument fields-of-view of the shortwave and total sensor units. The MAM diffuser reflecting type surface consists of an array of spherical aluminum mirror segments, which are separated by a Merck Black A absorbing surface, overcoated with silicon dioxide. Temperature sensors are located in each MAM plate and baffle. The CERES MAM is designed to yield calibration precisions approaching .5 percent for the total and shortwave detectors. In this paper, the MAM solar calibration procedures are presented along with on-orbit results. Comparisons are also made between the Aqua, Terra and the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) CERES MAM solar calibrations.

Wilson, Robert S.; Lee, Robert B., III; Paden, Jack; Pandey, Dhirendra K.; Priestley, Kory J.; Thomas, Susan; Al-Hajjah, Aiman

2003-11-01

175

On-orbit solar calibrations using the Aqua Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) in-flight calibration system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) spacecraft scanning thermistor bolometers were used to measure earth-reflected solar and earth-emitted longwave radiances, at satellite altitude. The bolometers measured the earth radiances in the broadband shortwave solar (0.3 - 5.0 micrometers) and total (0.3->100 micrometers) spectral bands as well as in the (8 - 12 micrometers) water vapor window spectral band over geographical footprints as small as 10 kilometers at nadir. In May 2002, the fourth and fifth sets of CERES bolometers were launched aboard the Aqua spacecraft. Ground vacuum calibrations defined the initial count conversion coefficients that were used to convert the bolometer output voltages into filtered earth radiances. The mirror attenuator mosaic (MAM), a solar diffuser plate, was built into the CERES instrument package calibration system in order to define in-orbit shifts or drifts in the sensor responses. The shortwave and total sensors are calibrated using the solar radiances reflected from the MAM's. Each MAM consists of baffle-solar diffuser plate systems, which guide incoming solar radiances into the instrument fields-of-view of the shortwave and total wave sensor units. The MAM diffuser reflecting type surface consists of an array of spherical aluminum mirror segments, which are separated by a Merck Black A absorbing surface, overcoated with silicon dioxide. Temperature sensors are located in each MAM plate and baffle. The CERES MAM wass designed to yield calibration precisions approaching .5 percent for the total and shortwave detectors. In this paper, the MAM solar calibration procedures are presented along with on-orbit results. Comparisons are also made between the Aqua,Terra and the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) CERES MAM solar calibrations.

Wilson, Robert S.; Priestley, Kory J.; Thomas, Susan; Hess, Phillip

2009-08-01

176

The use of high energy rare earth magnets in inertial quality accelerometers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The development of high energy rare earth element permanent magnets for strapdown and reentry applications is considered. In stapdown systems where scale factor temperature sensitivity is crucial, substitution of heavier rare earth for the conventional samarium resulted in second order fit rms errors of 20 ppm and third order fit rms errors of 10 ppm between -65 and +200 deg F. In reentry applications, where Hi-G capture capability with minimum power dissipation is important, rare earth cobalt permanent magnets with energy products of 27 million Gauss-Oersteds were employed in a fluid filled version of the strapdown accelerometer. For a volume of 1-in diameter x 1/2-in high, a + or - 250 G capability was found with 2.2 watts input at 68 deg F.

Hanna, Samuel C.

177

Earth Science Week 2010 - Hurricane Energy - Duration: 3:04.  

NASA Video Gallery

NASA hurricane scientist Dr. Jeff Halverson explains how hurricanes draw energy from the ocean surface. The video also provides an example of a classroom activity that allows students to map the ch...

178

Star Power on Earth: Path to Clean Energy Future  

ScienceCinema

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's "Science on Saturday" lecture series presents Ed Moses, Director of the National Ignition Facility, discussing the world's largest laser system and its potential impact on society's upcoming energy needs.

Ed Moses

2010-09-01

179

Surface heat flux histories from inversion of geothermal data: Energy balance at the Earth's surface  

Microsoft Academic Search

Past changes in the Earth's surface energy balance propagate into the subsurface and appear as perturbations of the subsurface thermal regime. This paper presents a singular value decomposition inversion method used to reconstruct surface heat flux histories (SHFH) from the heat flux anomalies detected in the shallow subsurface. Synthetic tests were used to assess the robustness of the inversion procedure.

Hugo Beltrami

2001-01-01

180

Novel nanostructured rare-earth-free magnetic materials with high energy products.  

PubMed

Novel nanostructured Zr2 Co11 -based magnetic materials are fabricated in a single step process using cluster-deposition method. The composition, atomic ordering, and spin structure are precisely controlled to achieve a substantial magnetic remanence and coercivity, as well as the highest energy product for non-rare-earth and Pt-free permanent-magnet alloys. PMID:24038456

Balasubramanian, Balamurugan; Das, Bhaskar; Skomski, Ralph; Zhang, Wenyong Y; Sellmyer, David J

2013-11-13

181

Design + energy: results of a national student design competition  

SciTech Connect

A national competition for students in schools of architecture was conducted during the Spring of 1980. The competition was the first of a series of competitions that emphasized the integration of architectural design and energy considerations in medium-scale building projects, and specifically applying passive solar design strategies and the appropriate use of brick masonry materials. Some 300 faculty members and over 2200 students representing 80 of the 92 US architecture schools participated in the program. A summary is presented of the program and the range of submissions grouped by problem types and general climatic region.

Not Available

1980-01-01

182

Preliminary Downlink Design and Performance Assessment for Advanced Radio Interferometry Between Space and Earth (ARISE)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Advanced Radio Interferometry Between Space and Earth (ARISE) is a space very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) mission with a nominal launch date of 2008. It consists of an inflatable 25-m radio telescope circulating in a highly elliptical Earth orbit with a perigee of 5,000 km and an apogee of 40,000 km. The objective is to observe in conjunction with Earth-based telescopes to obtain high-resolution maps of quasars and active galactic nuclei for science investigations. ARISE requires an 8-Gb/s downlink of science data, which is a challenge using today's technology. In this article, 8-Gb/s systems using both traditional radio frequency (RF) and laser communication are proposed with the goal of minimizing both the cost and the risk of the design. Either option requires appropriate technology investments. The RF system requires the use of dual polarization, high-order modulations such as 32-quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM), and spectrally efficient square-root raised-cosine (SRRC) filters to meet the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) spectral allocation. If additional bandwidth is allocated by the FCC, constant-envelope modulations such as cross-correlated trellis-coded quadrature modulation (XTCQM) can be used in place of SRRC filters and QAM to reduce the power required on the spacecraft. The proposed laser communication system uses on-off keying (OOK) and wavelength division multiplexing (WDM). The wavelength of 1550 nm has the advantage of lower background light subtended at the ground receiver for downlink communications. The critical components of the system are based on mature fiber-optic technologies. The downlink transceiver terminal will be a modified Optical Communications Demonstrator (OCD) that has been in development at JPL over the past 3 years. This article includes a road map on how the 8-Gb/s RF and laser communication systems can be developed with a series of demonstrations between now and the launch date. The demonstrations are needed to verify technologies and to raise the confidence level of the designs. With the completion of the demonstrations, both the RF system and the laser communication systems can be deployed with relatively low risk.

Yan, T.-Y.; Wang, C. C.; Gray, A.; Hemmati, H.; Mittskus, A.; Golshan, N.; Noca, M.

1998-10-01

183

ESAS-Derived Earth Departure Stage Design for Human Mars Exploration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Vision for Space Exploration has set the nation on a course to have humans on Mars as early as 2030. To reduce the cost and risk associated with human Mars exploration, NASA is planning for the Mars architecture to leverage the lunar architecture as fully as possible. This study takes the defined launch vehicles and system capabilities from ESAS and extends their application to DRM 3.0 to design an Earth Departure Stage suitable for the cargo and crew missions to Mars. The impact of a propellant depot in LEO was assessed and sLzed for use with the EDS. To quantitatively assess and compare the effectiveness of alternative designs, an initial baseline architecture was defined using the ESAS launch vehicles and DRM 3.0. The baseline architecture uses three NTR engines, LH2 propellant, no propellant depot in LEO, and launches on the Ares I and Ares V. The Mars transfer and surface elements from DRM 3.0 were considered to be fixed payloads in the design of the EDS. Feasible architecture alternatives were identified from previous architecture studies and anticipated capabilities and compiled in a morphological matrix. ESAS FOMs were used to determine the most critical design attributes for the effectiveness of the EDS. The ESAS-derived FOMs used in this study to assess alternative designs are effectiveness and performance, affordability, reliability, and risk. The individual FOMs were prioritized using the AHP, a method for pairwise comparison. All trades performed were evaluated with respect to the weighted FOMs, creating a Pareto frontier of equivalently ideal solutions. Additionally, each design on the frontier was evaluated based on its fulfillment of the weighted FOMs using TOPSIS, a quantitative method for ordinal ranking of the alternatives. The designs were assessed in an integrated environment using physics-based models for subsystem analysis where possible. However, for certain attributes such as engine type, historical, performance-based mass estimating relations were more easily employed. The elements from the design process were integrated into a single loop, allowing for rapid iteration of subsystem analyses and compilation of resulting designs.

Flaherty, Kevin; Grant, Michael; Korzun, Ashley; Malo-Molina, Faure; Steinfeldt, Bradley; Stahl, Benjamin; Wilhite, Alan

2007-01-01

184

Training the next generation of Space and Earth Science Engineers and Scientists through student design and development of an Earth Observation Nanosatellite, AlbertaSat-1  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This presentation addresses the design and developmental process of a Nanosatellite by an interdisciplinary team of undergraduate and graduate students at the University of Alberta. The Satellite, AlbertaSat-1, is the University of Alberta's entry in the Canadian Satellite Design Challenge (CDSC); an initiative to entice Canadian students to contribute to space and earth observation technologies and research. The province of Alberta, while home to a few companies, is very limited in its space industry capacity. The University of Alberta reflects this fact, where one of the major unifying foci of the University is oil, the provinces greatest resource. For students at the U of A, this lack of focus on astronautical, aerospace and space/earth observational research limits their education in these industries/disciplines. A fully student operated project such as AlbertaSat-1 provides this integral experience to almost every discipline. The AlbertaSat-1 team is comprised of students from engineering, physics, chemistry, earth and atmospheric science, business, and computer science. While diverse in discipline, the team is also diverse in experience, spanning all levels from 1st year undergraduate to experienced PhD. Many skill sets are required and the diverse group sees that this is covered and all opinions voiced. Through immersion in the project, students learn quickly and efficiently. The necessity for a flawless product ensures that only the highest quality of work is presented. Students participating must research and understand their own subsystem as well as all others. This overall system view provides the best educational tool, as students are able to see the real impacts of their work on other subsystems. As the project is completely student organized, the participants gain not only technical engineering, space and earth observational education, but experience in operations and financial management. The direct exposure to all aspects of the space and earth science industry through a student satellite development program is one of the best methods of developing the next generation of space and earth science engineers and scientists.

Lange, B. A.; Bottoms, J.

2011-12-01

185

Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Visualization Single Satellite Footprint (SSF) Plot Generator  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The first Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument will be launched in 1997 to collect data on the Earth's radiation budget. The data retrieved from the satellite will be processed through twelve subsystems. The Single Satellite Footprint (SSF) plot generator software was written to assist scientists in the early stages of CERES data analysis, producing two-dimensional plots of the footprint radiation and cloud data generated by one of the subsystems. Until the satellite is launched, however, software developers need verification tools to check their code. This plot generator will aid programmers by geolocating algorithm result on a global map.

Barsi, Julia A.

1995-01-01

186

Global Change Research Related in the Earth's Energy and Hydrologic Cycle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The mission of the Global Change Research Related to the Earth's Energy and Hydrologic Cycle is to enhance the scientific knowledge and educational benefits obtained from NASA's Earth Science Enterprise and the U.S. Global Change Research Program, University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH). This paper presents the final technical report on this collaborative effort. Various appendices include: A) Staff Travel Activities years one through three; B) Publications and Presentations years one through three; C) Education Activities; D) Students year one through three; E) Seminars year one through three; and F) Center for Applied Optics Projects.

Berry, Linda R.

2002-01-01

187

Computational efficiences for calculating rare earth f^n energies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

RecentlyootnotetextD. R. Beck and E. J. Domeier, Can. J. Phys. Walter Johnson issue, Jan. 2009., we have used new computational strategies to obtain wavefunctions and energies for Gd IV 4f^7 and 4f^65d levels. Here we extend one of these techniques to allow efficent inclusion of 4f^2 pair correlation effects using radial pair energies obtained from much simpler calculationsootnotetexte.g. K. Jankowski et al., Int. J. Quant. Chem. XXVII, 665 (1985). and angular factors which can be simply computedootnotetextD. R. Beck and C. A. Nicolaides, Excited States in Quantum Chemistry, C. A. Nicolaides and D. R. Beck (editors), D. Reidel (1978), p. 105ff.. This is a re-vitalization of an older ideaootnotetextI. Oksuz and O. Sinanoglu, Phys. Rev. 181, 54 (1969).. We display relationships between angular factors involving the exchange of holes and electrons (e.g. f^6 vs f^8, f^13d vs fd^9). We apply the results to Tb IV and Gd IV, whose spectra is largely unknown, but which may play a role in MRI medicine as endohedral metallofullerenes (e.g. Gd3N-C80ootnotetextM. C. Qian and S. N. Khanna, J. Appl. Phys. 101, 09E105 (2007).). Pr III results are in good agreement (910 cm-1) with experiment. Pu I 5f^2 radial pair energies are also presented.

Beck, Donald R.

2009-05-01

188

An enhanced model of land water and energy for global hydrologic and earth-system studies  

USGS Publications Warehouse

LM3 is a new model of terrestrial water, energy, and carbon, intended for use in global hydrologic analyses and as a component of earth-system and physical-climate models. It is designed to improve upon the performance and to extend the scope of the predecessor Land Dynamics (LaD) and LM3V models by better quantifying the physical controls of climate and biogeochemistry and by relating more directly to components of the global water system that touch human concerns. LM3 includes multilayer representations of temperature, liquid water content, and ice content of both snowpack and macroporous soil朾edrock; topography-based description of saturated area and groundwater discharge; and transport of runoff to the ocean via a global river and lake network. Sensible heat transport by water mass is accounted throughout for a complete energy balance. Carbon and vegetation dynamics and biophysics are represented as in LM3V. In numerical experiments, LM3 avoids some of the limitations of the LaD model and provides qualitatively (though not always quantitatively) reasonable estimates, from a global perspective, of observed spatial and/or temporal variations of vegetation density, albedo, streamflow, water-table depth, permafrost, and lake levels. Amplitude and phase of annual cycle of total water storage are simulated well. Realism of modeled lake levels varies widely. The water table tends to be consistently too shallow in humid regions. Biophysical properties have an artificial stepwise spatial structure, and equilibrium vegetation is sensitive to initial conditions. Explicit resolution of thick (>100 m) unsaturated zones and permafrost is possible, but only at the cost of long (?300 yr) model spinup times.

Milly, Paul C.; Malyshev, Sergey L.; Shevliakova, Elena; Dunne, Krista A.; Findell, Kirsten L.; Gleeson, Tom; Liang, Zhi; Phillips, Peter; Stouffer, Ronald J.; Swenson, Sean

2014-01-01

189

Teaching Earth Sciences as an interdisciplinary subject: Novel module design involving research literature  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The study of Earth Sciences requires an interdisciplinary approach as it involves understanding scientific knowledge originating from a wide spectrum of research areas. Not only does it include subjects ranging from, for instance, hydrogeology to deep crustal seismology and from climate science to oceanography, but it also has many direct applications in closely related disciplines such as environmental engineering and natural resources management. While research crossing traditional disciplinary boundaries in geosciences is becoming increasingly common, there is only limited integration of interdisciplinary research in the teaching of the subject. Given that the transition from undergraduate education based on subject modules to postgraduate interdisciplinary research is never easy, such integration is a highly desirable pedagogical approach at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. My presentation is based on a recent teaching project involving novel design of an undergraduate course. The course is implemented in order to address the synergy between research and teaching (Tong, 2009). This project has been shown to be effective and successful in teaching geosciences undergraduates at the University of London. The module consists of studying core geophysical principles and linking them directly to a selection of recently published research papers in a wide range of interdisciplinary applications. Research reviewing and reporting techniques are systematically developed, practised and fully integrated into teaching of the core scientific theories. A fully-aligned assignment with a feedback website invites the students to reflect on the scientific knowledge and the study skills related to research literature they have acquired in the course. This teaching project has been recognized by a teaching award (http://www.clpd.bbk.ac.uk/staff/BETA). In this presentation, I will discuss how undergraduate teaching with a focus on research literature in Earth Sciences can be addressed through careful module design with aligned assessments and feedback. By providing an overview of the teaching project, I will highlight the importance of introducing interdisciplinary research at undergraduate levels (Tong, Nature, 2010). Main project outcomes with student feedback will also be assessed and explored for better teaching practices. References: Tong, C. H., Let interdisciplinary research begin in undergraduate years, Nature, v. 463, p. 157, 2010. Tong, C. H., Approaching research literature: Module design with Electronic feedback package on written assignment (Project report), 2009. (http://www.clpd.bbk.ac.uk/staff/BETA/vtong)

Tong, Vincent C. H.

2010-05-01

190

Spacecraft Formation Design Near the Sun-Earth L(sub 2) Point  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Over the next two decades international space agencies including the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the European Space Agency are proposing space missions which employ distributed spacecraft technologies to enable vast improvements in remote sensing performance as compared to fundamental performance limitations associated with fairing sizes of even the largest launch vehicles. A key initial step towards enabling such challenging missions is the development of processes and algorithms for designing the desired motion of the spacecraft formation subject to simultaneous gravitational and fuel constraints. In this paper we develop analogous methodologies for designing trajectories of relative motion near the L(sub 2) point as have been thoroughly developed for the Earth-orbiting regime. In this preliminary study, we confine ourselves to the basic assumptions of the Circular Restricted Three-Body Problem where disturbances, non-gravitational effects, and fourth and greater body affects are ignored. The focus is on determining formations that are defined primarily by the natural gravitational effects on the vehicles, such that maintenance over long-term will not require significant fuel consumption.

Collange, Guillaume; Leitner, Jesse

2003-01-01

191

Analysis of The Anomalous Orbital-Energy Changes Observed in Spacecraft Flybys of Earth  

E-print Network

In March 2008 anomalous behavior in spacecraft flybys of Earth was reported in Physical Review Letters, Volume 100, Issue 9, March 7, 2008, in an article entitled "Anomalous Orbital-Energy Changes Observed during Spacecraft Flybys of Earth". The data indicate unaccounted for changes in spacecraft speed, both increases and decreases, for six different spacecraft involved in Earth flybys from December 8, 1990 to August 2, 2005. The article states that, "All ... potential sources of systematic error .... [have been] modeled. None can account for the observed anomalies.... Like the Pioneer anomaly ... the Earth flybys anomaly is a real effect .... Its source is unknown." In the present article it is shown that the Earth flybys anomaly would be caused by a very small acceleration [in addition to that of natural gravitation], centrally directed and independent of distance, the same effect as that which the Pioneer anomaly exhibits. How that effect operates to produce the observed results is analyzed. A cause of the centrally directed accelerations is presented.

Roger Ellman

2008-12-01

192

Teaching About Energy: Designing a Roller Coaster  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This student activity is designed to explore the concept of work. Using inclined planes with different slopes, students are lead to discover the invariance of force times distance for objects starting at the same height. Included are notes for instructors wishing to use this material. This activity is part of a PTRA manual on Energy.

Roeder, John

2006-01-17

193

Differential neutron energy spectra measured on spacecraft low Earth orbit  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Two methods for measuring neutrons in the range from thermal energies to dozens of MeV were used. In the first method, alpha-particles emitted from the (sup 6) Li(n.x)T reaction are detected with the help of plastic nuclear track detectors, yielding results on thermal and resonance neutrons. Also, fission foils are used to detect fast neutrons. In the second method, fast neutrons are recorded by nuclear photographic emulsions (NPE). The results of measurements on board various satellites are presented. The neutron flux density does not appear to correlate clearly with orbital parameters. Up to 50% of neutrons are due to albedo neutrons from the atmosphere while the fluxes inside the satellites are 15-20% higher than those on the outside. Estimates show that the neutron contribution to the total equivalent radiation dose reaches 20-30%.

Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.; Dudkin, E. V.; Potapov, Yu. V.; Akopova, A. B.; Melkumyan, L. V.

1995-01-01

194

Design and analysis of an extended mission of CE-2: From lunar orbit to Sun-Earth L2 region  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Chang'E-2 (CE-2) has firstly successfully achieved the exploring mission from lunar orbit to Sun-Earth L2 region. In this paper, we discuss the design problem of transfer trajectory and at the same time analyze the visible segment of Tracking, Telemetry & Control (TT&C) system for this mission. Firstly, the four-body problem of Sun-Earth-Moon and Spacecraft can be decoupled in two different three-body problems (Sun-Earth + Moon Restricted Three-Body Problems (RTBPs) and Earth-Moon ephemeris model). Then, the transfer trajectory segments in different model are computed, respectively, and patched by Poincar sections. The full-flight trajectory including transfer trajectory from lunar orbit to Sun-Earth L2 region and target Lissajous orbit is obtained by the differential correction method. Finally, the visibility of TT&C system at the key time is analyzed. Actual execution of CE-2 extended mission shows that the trajectory design of CE-2 mission is feasible.

Qiao, Dong; Cui, Pingyuan; Wang, Yamin; Huang, Jiangchuan; Meng, Linzhi; Jie, Degang

2014-11-01

195

Solar axions as an energy source and modulator of the Earth magnetic field  

E-print Network

We show existence of strong negative correlation between the temporal variations of magnetic field toroidal component of the solar tachocline (the bottom of convective zone) and the Earth magnetic field (Y-component). The possibility that hypothetical solar axions, which can transform into photons in external electric or magnetic fields (the inverse Primakoff effect), can be the instrument by which the magnetic field of convective zone of the Sun modulates the magnetic field of the Earth is considered. We propose the axion mechanism of "solar dynamo-geodynamo" connection, where an energy of axions, which form in the Sun core, is modulated at first by the magnetic field of the solar tachocline zone (due to the inverse coherent Primakoff effect) and after that is absorbed in the liquid core of the Earth under influence of the terrestrial magnetic field, thereby playing the role of an energy source and a modulator of the Earth magnetic field. Within the framework of this mechanism new estimations of the strength of an axion coupling to a photon (ga_gamma about 5*10^-9 GeV^-1) and the axion mass (ma ~ 30 eV) have been obtained.

V. D. Rusov; E. P. Linnik; K. Kudela; S. Cht. Mavrodiev; T. N. Zelentsova; V. P. Smolyar; K. K. Merkotan

2010-08-16

196

On-orbit Solar Calibrations Using the Terra Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) In-flight Calibrations System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) spacecraft scanning thermistor bolometers measure earth-reflected solar and earth-emitted longwave radiances, at the top- of-the-atmosphere. The bolometers measure the earth radiances in the broadband shortwave solar (0.3 -5.0 microns) and total (0.3 ->100 microns) spectral bands as well as in the 8 - 12 microns water vapor window spectral band over geographical footprints as small as 10 kilometers at nadir. December 1999, the second and third sets of CERES bolometers were launched on the Earth Observing Mission Terra Spacecraft. Ground vacuum calibrations define the initial count conversion coefficients that are used to convert the bolometer output voltages into filtered earth radiances. The mirror attenuator mosaic (MAM), a solar diffuser plate, was built into the CERES instrument package calibration system in order to define on-orbit shifts or drifts in the sensor responses. The shortwave and total sensors are calibrated using the solar radiances reflected from the MAM's. Each MAM consists of baffle-solar diffuser plate systems, which guide incoming solar radiances into the instrument fields of view of the shortwave and total wave sensor units. The MAM diffuser reflecting type surface consists of an array of spherical aluminium mirror segments, which are separated by a Merck Black A absorbing surface, overcoated with silicon dioxide. Thermistors are located in each MAM plate and baffle. The CERES MAM is designed to yield calibration precisions approaching 1 percent for the total and shortwave detectors. However, in their first year of operation the Terra FM1 and FM2 shortwave and the FM1 and FM2 total MAMs showed shifts in their solar calibrations of 1.5, 2.5, 1.5 and 6 percent respectively. In the subsequent year of operation all instruments begin to stabilize within the .5 percent precision range. Correspondingly, the FM1, FM2 shortwave and the FM1 and FM2 total MAMs showed shifts in their internal blackbody calibrations of 0.2, 0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 percent respectively over the 2 year period. This suggests that the reason for the solar calibration's larger shifts is due to changes in the MAM itself and not to instrument changes. In this paper, the MAM solar calibration procedures are presented along with on-orbit measurements for the 2000-2002 period of operation. Comparisons are also made between the Terra CERES instruments and the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) instrument during their MAM solar calibrations.

Wilson, R. S.; Lee, R. B.; Al-Hajjah, A. Y.; Paden, J.; Pandey, D. K.; Priestley, K. J.; Thomas, S.

2002-05-01

197

On-orbit solar calibration methods using the Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) in-flight calibration system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) scanning thermistor bolometers measure earth-reflected solar and earth-emitted longwaveradiances, at the top- of-the-atmosphere. The bolometers measure the earthradiances in the broadband shortwave solar (0.3-5.0 microns) and total (0.3-<100 microns) spectral bands as well as in the 8-<12 microns water vapor window spectral band over geographical footprints as small as 10 kilometers at nadir. December 1999, the second and third set of CERES bolometers was launchedon the Earth Observing Mission Terra Spacecraft. May 2003, the fourth and fifth set of bolometers was launched on the Earth Observing Mission Aqua Spacecraft. Recently, (October 2011) the sixth instrument was launched on the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System Preparatory Project (Suomi NPP) Spacecraft. Ground vacuum calibrations define the initial count conversion coefficients that are used to convert the bolometer output voltages into filtered earth radiances. The mirror attenuator mosaic (MAM), a solar diffuser plate, was built into the CERES instrument package calibration system in order to define in-orbit shifts or drifts in the sensor responses. The shortwave and shortwave part of the total sensors are calibrated using the solar radiances reflected from the MAM's. Each MAM consists of baffle-solar diffuser plate systems, which guide incoming solar radiances into the instrument fields of view of the shortwave and total wave sensor units. The MAM diffuser reflecting type surface consists of an array of spherical aluminum mirror segments, which are separated by a Merck Black A absorbing surface, overcoated with SIOx (SIO2 for PFM). Thermistors are located in each MAM plate and the total channel baffle. The CERES MAM is designed to yield calibration precisions approaching .5 percent for the total and shortwave detectors. In this presentation, the MAM solar calibration contrasting procedures will be presented along with on-orbit measurements for the eleven years the CERES instruments have been on-orbit. A switch to an azimuth rotation raster scan of the Sun rather than a fixed azimuth rotating elevation scan will be discussed. Comparisons are also made between the Terra, Aqua, and Suomi NPP CERES instruments during their MAM solar calibrations and total solar irradiance experimental results to determine how precise the CERES solar calibration facilities are at tracking the sun's irradiance.

Wilson, Robert S.; Priestley, Kory J.; Thomas, Susan; Hess, Phillip

2012-09-01

198

Advanced Spacecraft Designs in Support of Human Missions to Earth's Neighborhood  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's strategic planning for technology investment draws on engineering studies of potential future missions. A number of hypothetical mission architectures have been studied. A recent study completed by The NASA/JSC Advanced Design Team addresses one such possible architecture strategy for missions to the moon. This conceptual study presents an overview of each of the spacecraft elements that would enable such missions. These elements include an orbiting lunar outpost at lunar L1 called the Gateway, a lunar transfer vehicle (LTV) which ferries a crew of four from the ISS to the Gateway, a lunar lander which ferries the crew from the Gateway to the lunar surface, and a one-way lunar habitat lander capable of supporting the crew for 30 days. Other supporting elements of this architecture discussed below include the LTV kickstage, a solar-electric propulsion (SEP) stage, and a logistics lander capable of re-supplying the 30-day habitat lander and bringing other payloads totaling 10.3 mt in support of surface mission activities. Launch vehicle infrastructure to low-earth orbit includes the Space Shuttle, which brings up the LTV and crew, and the Delta-IV Heavy expendable launch vehicle which launches the landers, kickstage, and SEP.

Fletcher, David

2002-01-01

199

Experimental Tests of UltraFlex Array Designs in Low Earth Orbital and Geosynchronous Charging Environments  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The present ground based investigations give the first definitive look describing the expected on-orbit charging behavior of Orion UltraFlex array coupons in the Low Earth Orbital and Geosynchronous Environments. Furthermore, it is important to note that the LEO charging environment also applies to the International Space Station as well as to the lunar mission charging environments. The GEO charging environment includes the bounding case for all lunar orbital and lunar surface mission environments. The UltraFlex thin film photovoltaic array technology has been targeted to become the sole power system for life support and on-orbit power for the manned Aires Crew Exploration Vehicle. It is therefore, crucial to gain an understanding of the complex charging behavior to answer some of the basic performance and survivability issues in an attempt to ascertain that a single UltraFlex array design will be able to cope with the projected worst case LEO and GEO charging environments. Testing was limited to four array coupons, two coupons each from two different array manufactures, Emcore and Spectrolab. The layout of each array design is identical and varies only in the actual cell technology used. The individual array cells from each manufacturer have an antireflection layered coating and come in two different varieties either uncoated (only AR coating) or coated with a thin conducting ITO layer. The LEO Plasma tests revealed that all four coupons passed the arc threshold -120 V bias tests. GEO electron gun charging tests revealed that only front side area of ITO coated coupons passed tests. Only the Emcore AR array passed backside Stage 2 GEO Tests.

Galofaro, Joel T.; Vayner, Boris V.; Hillard, Grover B.

2011-01-01

200

NASA Advanced Concepts Office, Earth-To-Orbit Team Design Process and Tools  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Earth-to-Orbit Team (ETO) of the Advanced Concepts Office (ACO) at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is considered the pre-eminent go-to group for pre-phase A and phase A concept definition. Over the past several years the ETO team has evaluated thousands of launch vehicle concept variations for a significant number of studies including agency-wide efforts such as the Exploration Systems Architecture Study (ESAS), Constellation, Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle (HLLV), Augustine Report, Heavy Lift Propulsion Technology (HLPT), Human Exploration Framework Team (HEFT), and Space Launch System (SLS). The ACO ETO Team is called upon to address many needs in NASA s design community; some of these are defining extremely large trade-spaces, evaluating advanced technology concepts which have not been addressed by a large majority of the aerospace community, and the rapid turn-around of highly time critical actions. It is the time critical actions, those often limited by schedule or little advanced warning, that have forced the five member ETO team to develop a design process robust enough to handle their current output level in order to meet their customer s needs. Based on the number of vehicle concepts evaluated over the past year this output level averages to four completed vehicle concepts per day. Each of these completed vehicle concepts includes a full mass breakdown of the vehicle to a tertiary level of subsystem components and a vehicle trajectory analysis to determine optimized payload delivery to specified orbital parameters, flight environments, and delta v capability. A structural analysis of the vehicle to determine flight loads based on the trajectory output, material properties, and geometry of the concept is also performed. Due to working in this fast-paced and sometimes rapidly changing environment, the ETO Team has developed a finely tuned process to maximize their delivery capabilities. The objective of this paper is to describe the interfaces between the three disciplines used in the design process: weights and sizing, trajectory, and structural analysis. The tools used to perform such analysis are INtegrated Rocket Sizing (INTROS), Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories (POST), and Launch Vehicle Analysis (LVA) respectively. The methods each discipline uses to streamline their particular part of the design process will also be discussed.

Waters, Eric D.; Creech, Dennis M.; Garcia, Jessica; Threet, Grady E., Jr.; Phillips, Alan

2012-01-01

201

NASA Advanced Concepts Office, Earth-To-Orbit Team Design Process and Tools  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Earth-to-Orbit Team (ETO) of the Advanced Concepts Office (ACO) at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is considered the pre-eminent "go-to" group for pre-phase A and phase A concept definition. Over the past several years the ETO team has evaluated thousands of launch vehicle concept variations for a significant number of studies including agency-wide efforts such as the Exploration Systems Architecture Study (ESAS), Constellation, Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle (HLLV), Augustine Report, Heavy Lift Propulsion Technology (HLPT), Human Exploration Framework Team (HEFT), and Space Launch System (SLS). The ACO ETO Team is called upon to address many needs in NASA's design community; some of these are defining extremely large trade-spaces, evaluating advanced technology concepts which have not been addressed by a large majority of the aerospace community, and the rapid turn-around of highly time critical actions. It is the time critical actions, those often limited by schedule or little advanced warning, that have forced the five member ETO team to develop a design process robust enough to handle their current output level in order to meet their customer's needs. Based on the number of vehicle concepts evaluated over the past year this output level averages to four completed vehicle concepts per day. Each of these completed vehicle concepts includes a full mass breakdown of the vehicle to a tertiary level of subsystem components and a vehicle trajectory analysis to determine optimized payload delivery to specified orbital parameters, flight environments, and delta v capability. A structural analysis of the vehicle to determine flight loads based on the trajectory output, material properties, and geometry of the concept is also performed. Due to working in this fast-paced and sometimes rapidly changing environment, the ETO Team has developed a finely tuned process to maximize their delivery capabilities. The objective of this paper is to describe the interfaces between the three disciplines used in the design process: weights and sizing, trajectory, and structural analysis. The tools used to perform such analysis are INtegrated Rocket Sizing (INTROS), Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories (POST), and Launch Vehicle Analysis (LVA) respectively. The methods each discipline uses to streamline their particular part of the design process will also be discussed.

Waters, Eric D.; Garcia, Jessica; Threet, Grady E., Jr.; Phillips, Alan

2013-01-01

202

A REVISED SOLAR TRANSFORMITY FOR TIDAL ENERGY RECEIVED BY THE EARTH AND DISSIPATED GLOBALLY: IMPLICATIONS FOR EMERGY ANALYSIS  

EPA Science Inventory

Solar transformities for the tidal energy received by the earth and the tidal energy dissipated globally can be calculated because both solar energy and the gravitational attraction of the sun and moon drive independent processes that produce an annual flux of geopotential energy...

203

The Design and Evaluation of a High-Performance Earth Science Database  

Microsoft Academic Search

Earth scientists have encountered two major obstacles in their attempts to use remotely sensed imageryto analyze the earth's land cover dynamics. First, the volume of data involved is very large and second,significant preprocessing is needed before the data can be used. This is particularly so for studies that analyzeglobal trends using data sets that cover multiple years. In this paper,

Carter T. Shock; Chialin Chang; Bongki Moon; Anurag Acharya; Larry S. Davis; Joel H. Saltz; Alan Sussman

1998-01-01

204

Design and Manufacture of Energy Absorbing Materials  

ScienceCinema

Learn about an ordered cellular material that has been designed and manufactured using direct ink writing (DIW), a 3-D printing technology being developed at LLNL. The new material is a patterned cellular material that can absorb mechanical energy-a cushion-while also providing protection against sheering. This material is expected to find utility in application spaces that currently use unordered foams, such as sporting and consumer goods as well as defense and aerospace.

Duoss, Eric

2014-05-30

205

Low Energy Office: Design and Evaluation  

E-print Network

LOW ENERGY OFFICE: DESIGN AND EVALUATION Dr. Ing. Tobias Schrag Prof. (FH) for Building Service Engineering, Dep. of Facility Management, University of Applied Science Kufstein A-6330 Kufstein, tobias.schrag@fh-kufstein.ac.at Dipl... are displayed. The temperatures are clearly always Figure 2 Green Appearance of the eastern atrium Photo: Tobias Schrag Figure 3: Variation of the Airflow into an Atrium ESL-IC-08-10-73 Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference for Enhanced...

Schrag, T.; Waldhoff, C.; Radler, J.; Lenzen, B.

206

Design and Implementation of Low-Energy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Turbo codes have been chosen in the third gen- eration cellular standard for high-throughput data communi- cation. These codes achieve remarkably low bit error rates at the expense of high-computational complexity. Thus for hand held communication devices, designing energy efficient Turbo de- coders is of great importance. In this paper, we present a suite of MAP-based Turbo decoding algorithms with

Turbo Decoders

207

Design and Manufacture of Energy Absorbing Materials  

SciTech Connect

Learn about an ordered cellular material that has been designed and manufactured using direct ink writing (DIW), a 3-D printing technology being developed at LLNL. The new material is a patterned cellular material that can absorb mechanical energy-a cushion-while also providing protection against sheering. This material is expected to find utility in application spaces that currently use unordered foams, such as sporting and consumer goods as well as defense and aerospace.

Duoss, Eric

2014-05-28

208

TRUST: A Successful Formal-Informal Teacher Education Partnership Designed to Improve and Promote Urban Earth Science Education  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present an NSF-funded collaborative formal-informal partnership for urban Earth science teacher preparation and professional development. This model brings together The American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) and Brooklyn and Lehman College of the City University of New York (CUNY) to address science-impoverished classrooms that lack highly qualified teachers by focusing on Earth science teacher certification. Project design was based on identified needs in the local communities and schools, careful analysis of content knowledge mastery required for Earth science teacher certification, and existing impediments to certification. The problem-based approach required partners to push policy envelopes and to invent new ways of articulating content and pedagogy at both intra- and inter-institutional levels. One key element of the project is involvement of the local board of education, teachers, and administrators in initial design and ongoing assessment. Project components include formal Earth systems science courses, a summer institute primarily led and delivered by AMNH scientists through an informal series of lectures coupled to workshops led by AMNH educators, a mechanism for assigning course credit for informal experiences, development of new teaching approaches that include teacher action plans and an external program of evaluation. The principal research strand of this project focuses on the resulting model for formal-informal teacher education partnership, the project's impact on participating teachers, policy issues surrounding the model and the changes required for its development and implementation, and its potential for Earth science education reform. As the grant funded portion of the project draws to a close we begin to analyze data collected over the past 3 years. Third-year findings of the project's external evaluation indicate that the problem-based approach has been highly successful, particularly its impact on participating teachers. In addition to presenting these results, participating teachers from the 2004 and 2006 cohorts discuss their TRUST experiences and the subsequent impact the program has had on their respective Earth science teaching practices and professional lives.

Sloan, H.; Drantch, K.; Steenhuis, J.

2006-12-01

209

Low energy anomalous cosmic rays trapped in the Earth's magnetosphere: 6 years of SAMPEX observations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We summarize over 6 years of observations of ~1-4 MeV/nucleon heavy ions trapped in the Earth's magnetosphere on L shells of 1.7 to 3. We obtained these new results in low-Earth orbit with the SAMPEX spacecraft; they extend the observations of trapped ACR species to much lower energies than previously examined in detail. The low energy O and Ne originate from continual energy loss of higher energy trapped anomalous cosmic rays in the residual atmosphere, producing energy spectra that level-off below a few MeV/nucleon. We find that the trapped anomalous Ar flux is ~200 times more intense than interplanetary Ar at ~3 MeV/nucleon; this is an enhancement ~2 times greater than that of the trapped anomalous O or Ne. We have also detected trapped ions with low first ionization potential (Mg-S and Fe) in addition to the anomalous species C, O, Ne, and Ar, although at much lower intensities. The presence of these rare elements in the low energy trapped population is consistent with an interplanetary component of energetic Mg-S and Fe that is singly charged.

Mazur, Joseph

210

Geology and Earth Sciences Sourcebook for Elementary and Secondary Schools, Second Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This earth science resource book, designed for use by elementary and secondary school teachers, presents aspects of earth science which illustrate the significance of matter, energy, forces, motion, time, and space in the dynamics and history of the earth. The major content of this resource manual consists of authoritative information about earth

Heller, Robert L.

211

Initial observations of low energy charged particles near the earth's bow shock on ISEE-1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Initial measurements from the ULECA sensor of the Max-Planck-Institut/University of Maryland experiment on ISEE 1 are reported. ULECA is an electrostatic deflection - total energy sensor consisting of a collimator, a deflection analyzer, and an array of solid-state detectors. The position of a given detector, which determines the energy per charge of an incident particle, together with the measured energy, determines the particle's charge state. It is found that a rich variety of phenomena are operative in the transthermal energy regime (about 10 keV/Q to 100 keV/Q) covered by ULECA. Specifically, observations are presented of locally accelerated protons, alpha particles, and heavier ions in the magnetosheath and upstream of earth's bow shock. Preliminary analysis indicates that the behavior of these locally accelerated particles is most similar at the same energy per charge.

Ipavich, F. M.; Gloeckler, G.; Fan, C. Y.; Fisk, L. A.; Hovestadt, D.; Klecker, B.; Scholer, M.; Ogallagher, J. J.

1979-01-01

212

Design approaches to more energy efficient engines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In 1976 NASA initiated the Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) Program to assist in the development of technology for more fuel-efficient aircraft for commercial airline use. The Energy Efficient Engine (EEE) Project of the ACEE program is intended to lay the advanced-technology foundation for a new generation of turbofan engines. This project, planned as a seven-year cooperative government-industry effort, is aimed at developing and demonstrating advanced component and systems technologies for engines that could be introduced into airline service by the late 1980s or early 1990s. In addition to fuel savings, new engines must offer potential for being economically attractive to the airline users and environmentally acceptable. A description is presented of conceptual energy-efficient engine designs which offer potential for achieving all of the goals established for the EEE Project.

Saunders, N. T.; Colladay, R. S.; Macioce, L. E.

1978-01-01

213

Surface interactions with compartmentalized cellular phosphates explain rare earth oxide nanoparticle hazard and provide opportunities for safer design.  

PubMed

Growing international exploitation of rare earth oxides (REOs) for commercial and biological use has increased the possibility of human exposure and adverse health effects. Occupational exposure to rare earth materials in miners and polishers leads to a severe form of pneumoconiosis, while gadolinium-containing MRI contrast agents cause nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in patients with renal impairment. The mechanisms for inducing these adverse pro-fibrogenic effects are of considerable importance for the safety assessment of REO particles as well as presenting opportunities for safer design. In this study, using a well-prepared REO library, we obtained a mechanistic understanding of how REOs induce cellular and pulmonary damage by a compartmentalized intracellular biotransformation process in lysosomes that results in pro-fibrogenic growth factor production and lung fibrosis. We demonstrate that rare earth oxide ion shedding in acidifying macrophage lysosomes leads to biotic phosphate complexation that results in organelle damage due to stripping of phosphates from the surrounding lipid bilayer. This results in nanoparticle biotransformation into urchin shaped structures and setting in motion a series of events that trigger NLRP3 inflammasome activation, IL-1? release, TGF-?1 and PDGF-AA production. However, pretreatment of REO nanoparticles with phosphate in a neutral pH environment prevents biological transformation and pro-fibrogenic effects. This can be used as a safer design principle for producing rare earth nanoparticles for biological use. PMID:24417322

Li, Ruibin; Ji, Zhaoxia; Chang, Chong Hyun; Dunphy, Darren R; Cai, Xiaoming; Meng, Huan; Zhang, Haiyuan; Sun, Bingbing; Wang, Xiang; Dong, Juyao; Lin, Sijie; Wang, Meiying; Liao, Yu-Pei; Brinker, C Jeffrey; Nel, Andre; Xia, Tian

2014-02-25

214

Design and development considerations for SIRAS-G, the Spaceborne Infrared Atmospheric Sounder for Geosynchronous Earth Orbit  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

BATC is developing the Spaceborne Atmospheric Infrared Sounder for Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (SIRAS-G) under NASA's 2002 Instrument Incubator Program. SIRAS-G represents a new approach to infrared imaging spectrometry suitable for Earth observation from geosynchronous orbit. SIRAS-G is an instrument concept with lower mass and power requirements than contemporary instruments that offers enhanced capabilities for measuring atmospheric temperature, water vapor, and trace gas column abundances in a compact package. In addition, the SIRAS-G concept is adaptable to airborne, low-Earth orbit and geosynchronous deployment. SIRAS-G employs a wide field-of-view hyperspectral infrared optical system that splits the incoming radiation to four separate grating spectrometer channels. Combined with large 2-D focal planes, this system provides simultaneous spectral and high-resolution spatial imaging designed to measure infrared radiation in 2048 spectral channels with a nominal spectral resolution (l/Dl) of between 700 and 1400. Design parameters and the associated basic design trades for a SIRAS-G laboratory demonstration instrument are presented in this paper. Results of completed instrument design analyses along with instrument performance predictions are included. Using these performance predictions, we offer a comparison of current technology with SIRAS-G's capabilities for measuring atmospheric temperature, water vapor profiles, and trace gas column abundances.

Michaels, Dan L.; Kampe, Thomas U.; Hendershott, Paul; Mills, Gary L.; Miecznik, Grzegorz; Johnson, Peter

2005-01-01

215

Advanced Technology Display House. Volume 2: Energy system design concepts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The preliminary design concept for the energy systems in the Advanced Technology Display House is analyzed. Residential energy demand, energy conservation, and energy concepts are included. Photovoltaic arrays and REDOX (reduction oxidation) sizes are discussed.

Maund, D. H.

1981-01-01

216

NASA Earth Observations Informing Renewable Energy Management and Policy Decision Making  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Applied Sciences Program partners with domestic and international governmental organizations, universities, and private entities to improve their decisions and assessments. These improvements are enabled by using the knowledge generated from research resulting from spacecraft observations and model predictions conducted by NASA and providing these as inputs to the decision support and scenario assessment tools used by partner organizations. The Program is divided into eight societal benefit areas, aligned in general with the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) themes. The Climate Application of the Applied Sciences Program has as one of its focuses, efforts to provide for improved decisions and assessments in the areas of renewable energy technologies, energy efficiency, and climate change impacts. The goals of the Applied Sciences Program are aligned with national initiatives such as the U.S. Climate Change Science and Technology Programs and with those of international organizations including the Group on Earth Observations (GEO) and the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS). Activities within the Program are funded principally through proposals submitted in response to annual solicitations and reviewed by peers.

Eckman, Richard S.; Stackhouse, Paul W., Jr.

2008-01-01

217

Investigation of Alternative Return Strategies for Orion Trans-earth Injection Design Options  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The purpose of this study is to investigate alternative return strategies for the Orion trans-Earth injection (TEI) phase. A dynamical systems analysis approach considers the structure of the stable and unstable Sun perturbed Earth-Moon manifolds near the Earth-Moon interface region. A hybrid approach, then, combines the results from this analysis with classical two-body methods in a targeting process that seeks to expand the window of return opportunities in a precision entry scenario. The resulting startup arcs can be used, for instance, to enhance the block set of solutions available onboard during an autonomous targeting process.

Marchand, Belinda G.; Scarritt, Sara K.; Howell, Kathleen C.; Weeks, Michael W.

2010-01-01

218

Photovoltaic power system for satellite Earth stations in remote areas: Project status and design description  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A photovoltaic power system which will be installed at a remote location in Indonesia to provide power for a satellite Earth station and a classroom for video and audio teleconferences are described. The Earth station may also provide telephone service to a nearby village. The use of satellite communications for development assistance applications and the suitability of a hybrid photovoltaic engine generator power system for remote satellite Earth stations are demonstrated. The Indonesian rural satellite project is discussed and the photovoltaic power system is described.

Delombard, R.

219

The chemistry of the light rare-earth elements as determined by electron energy loss spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

The energy loss spectra of the rare earths are characterized by sharp {ital M}{sub 4,5} edges, the relative intensities of which are characteristic of the 4{ital f}-shell occupancy of the excited ion. For the light rare earths, the dependence of these relative peak heights on 4{ital f}-shell occupancy is quite pronounced. Thus they may be used to determine the oxidation state of the multivalent elements Ce and Pr. The second derivative of the spectrum is shown to be extremely sensitive to the chemical environment. Modern instrumentation and detection techniques allow the oxidation state of Ce and Pr to be determined even when they are present as only minor constituents. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Fortner, J.A.; Buck, E.C. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)] [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

1996-06-01

220

Global Change Research Related to the Earth's Energy and Hydrologic Cycle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Institute for Global Change Research and Education (IGCRE) is a joint initiative of the Universities Space Research Association (USRA) and the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) for coordinating and facilitating research and education relevant to global environmental change. Created in 1992 with primary support from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), IGCRE fosters participation by university, private sector and government scientists who seek to develop long-term collaborative research in global change science, focusing on the role of water and energy in the Earth's atmosphere and physical climate system. IGCRE is also chartered to address educational needs of Earth system and global change science, including the preparation of future scientists and training of primary and secondary education teachers.

1998-01-01

221

Monitoring the Low-Energy Gamma-Ray Sky Using Earth Occultation with GLAST GBM  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Long term all-sky monitoring of the 20 keV - 2 MeV gamma-ray sky using the Earth occultation technique was demonstrated by the BATSE instrument on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. The principles and techniques used for the development of an end-to-end earth occultation data analysis system for BATSE can be extended to the GLAST Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), resulting in multiband light curves and time-resolved spectra in the energy range 8 keV to above 1 MeV for known gamma-ray sources and transient outbursts, as well as the discovery of new sources of gamma-ray emission. In this paper we describe the application of the technique to the GBM. We also present the expected sensitivity for the GBM.

Case, G.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Cherry, M.; Kippen, M.; Ling, J.; Radocinski, R.; Wheaton, W.

2007-01-01

222

Monitoring the Low-Energy Gamma-Ray Sky Using Earth Occultation with GLAST GBM  

SciTech Connect

Long term all-sky monitoring of the 20 keV - 2 MeV gamma-ray sky using the Earth occultation technique was demonstrated by the BATSE instrument on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. The principles and techniques used for the development of an end-to-end earth occultation data analysis system for BATSE can be extended to the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM), resulting in multiband light curves and time-resolved spectra in the energy range 8 keV to above 1 MeV for known gamma-ray sources and transient outbursts, as well as the discovery of new sources of gamma-ray emission. In this paper we describe the application of the technique to the GBM. We also present the expected sensitivity for the GBM.

Case, G. L. [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Southern University, Baton Rouge, LA 70813 (United States); Wilson-Hodge, C. A. [Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Cherry, M. L. [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Kippen, R. M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Ling, J. C.; Radocinski, R. G. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Wheaton, W. A. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2007-07-12

223

Spectral Characterizations of the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Thermistor Bolometers using Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) Techniques  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) techniques are being used to characterize the relative spectral response, or sensitivity, of scanning thermistor bolometers in the infrared (IR) region (2 - >= 100-micrometers). The bolometers are being used in the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) program. The CERES measurements are designed to provide precise, long term monitoring of the Earth's atmospheric radiation energy budget. The CERES instrument houses three bolometric radiometers, a total wavelength (0.3- >= 150-micrometers) sensor, a shortwave (0.3-5-micrometers) sensor, and an atmospheric window (8-12-micrometers) sensor. Accurate spectral characterization is necessary for determining filtered radiances for longwave radiometric calibrations. The CERES bolometers spectral response's are measured in the TRW FTS Vacuum Chamber Facility (FTS - VCF), which uses a FTS as the source and a cavity pyroelectric trap detector as the reference. The CERES bolometers and the cavity detector are contained in a vacuum chamber, while the FTS source is housed in a GN2 purged chamber. Due to the thermal time constant of the CERES bolometers, the FTS must be operated in a step mode. Data are acquired in 6 IR spectral bands covering the entire longwave IR region. In this paper, the TRW spectral calibration facility design and data measurement techniques are described. Two approaches are presented which convert the total channel FTS data into the final CERES spectral characterizations, producing the same calibration coefficients (within 0.1 percent). The resulting spectral response curves are shown, along with error sources in the two procedures. Finally, the impact of each spectral response curve on CERES data validation will be examined through analysis of filtered radiance values from various typical scene types.

Thornhill, K. Lee; Bitting, Herbert; Lee, Robert B., III; Paden, Jack; Pandey, Dhirendra K.; Priestley, Kory J.; Thomas, Susan; Wilson, Robert S.

1998-01-01

224

Design for minimum energy in interstellar communication  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Microwave digital communication at interstellar distances is the foundation of extraterrestrial civilization (SETI and METI) communication of information-bearing signals. Large distances demand large transmitted power and/or large antennas, while the propagation is transparent over a wide bandwidth. Recognizing a fundamental tradeoff, reduced energy delivered to the receiver at the expense of wide bandwidth (the opposite of terrestrial objectives) is advantageous. Wide bandwidth also results in simpler design and implementation, allowing circumvention of dispersion and scattering arising in the interstellar medium and motion effects and obviating any related processing. The minimum energy delivered to the receiver per bit of information is determined by cosmic microwave background alone. By mapping a single bit onto a carrier burst, the Morse code invented for the telegraph in 1836 comes closer to this minimum energy than approaches used in modern terrestrial radio. Rather than the terrestrial approach of adding phases and amplitudes increases information capacity while minimizing bandwidth, adding multiple time-frequency locations for carrier bursts increases capacity while minimizing energy per information bit. The resulting location code is simple and yet can approach the minimum energy as bandwidth is expanded. It is consistent with easy discovery, since carrier bursts are energetic and straightforward modifications to post-detection pattern recognition can identify burst patterns. Time and frequency coherence constraints leading to simple signal discovery are addressed, and observations of the interstellar medium by transmitter and receiver constrain the burst parameters and limit the search scope.

Messerschmitt, David G.

2015-02-01

225

Opportunities and limitations in low earth subsonic testing for qualification of extraterrestrial supersonic parachute designs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Parachutes for Mars and other planetary missions often need to operate at supersonic speeds in very low density atmospheres. Flight testing of such parachutes at appropriate conditions in the Earth's atmosphere is possible at high altitudes.

Steltzner, A.; Cruz, J.; Bruno, R.; Mitcheltree, R.

2003-01-01

226

The EarthCARE multispectral imager thermal infrared optical unit detection system design  

Microsoft Academic Search

The EarthCARE satellite mission objective is the observation of clouds and aerosols from low Earth orbit. The key spatial context providing instrument within the payload suite of 4 instruments is the Multi-Spectral Imager (MSI).The MSI will take data at 500m ground sample distance (GSD) over a swath width of 150 km via pushbroom imaging. One part of the MSI instrument

Luis Gomez Rojas; Mark Chang; Guy Baister; Gordon Hopkinson; Matthew Maher; Matthew Price; Mark Skipper; Trevor Wood; David Woods

2010-01-01

227

Analyses of On-orbit Determinations of the Clouds and the Earth Radiant Energy System (CERES) Thermistor Bolometer Sensor Zero-radiance Effects  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) missions were designed to measure broadband earth-reflected shortwave solar (0.3 micrometers to less than 5.0 micrometers) and earth-emitted longwave (5.0 micrometers to greater than 100 micrometers) radiances as well as earth-emitted narrow-band radiances in the water vapor window region between 8 micrometers and 12 micrometers. However, the CERES scanning thermistor bolometer sensor zero-radiance offsets were found to vary as much as 1.0 Wm (exp -2) sr (exp -1) with the scan angle measurement geometry due to gravitational forces and systematic electronic noise. To minimize the gravitational effects, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Spacecraft CERES sensors' offsets were derived on-orbit as functions of scan elevation and azimuth angles from the January 7-8, 1998 radiometric observations of deep cold space, representative of a 3 K blackbody. In this paper, the TRMM/CERES six orbit data base of on-orbit derived offsets is presented and analyzed to define the sampling requirements for the CERES sensors located on the Earth Science Enterprise (ESE) Terra Spacecraft and on the Earth Observing System (EOS) Afternoon (PM-1) Spacecraft, scheduled for launches in 1999 and 2000, respectively. Analyses of the TRMM/CERES shortwave sensor earth radiance measurements indicate that offsets can be determined on-orbit at the plus or minus 0.02 Wm (exp -2) sr (exp -1) precision level. Offset measuring techniques and sampling requirements are discussed for the TRMM and ESE missions. Ground, pre-launch Terra CERES cross-track scan offsets are presented and described which were measured as a function of scan angle.

Lee, Robert B., III; Thomas, Susan; Priestley, Kory J.; Barkstrom, Bruce R.; Paden, Jack; Pandey, Dhirendra K.; Smith, G. Louis; Al-hajjah, Aiman; Wilson, Robert S.

1999-01-01

228

Coloration Determination of Spectral Darkening Occurring on a Broadband Earth Observing Radiometer: Application to Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

It is estimated that in order to best detect real changes in the Earth s climate system, space based instrumentation measuring the Earth Radiation Budget (ERB) must remain calibrated with a stability of 0.3% per decade. Such stability is beyond the specified accuracy of existing ERB programs such as the Clouds and the Earth s Radiant Energy System (CERES, using three broadband radiometric scanning channels: the shortwave 0.3 - 5microns, total 0.3. > 100microns, and window 8 - 12microns). It has been shown that when in low earth orbit, optical response to blue/UV radiance can be reduced significantly due to UV hardened contaminants deposited on the surface of the optics. Since typical onboard calibration lamps do not emit sufficient energy in the blue/UV region, this darkening is not directly measurable using standard internal calibration techniques. This paper describes a study using a model of contaminant deposition and darkening, in conjunction with in-flight vicarious calibration techniques, to derive the spectral shape of darkening to which a broadband instrument is subjected. Ultimately the model uses the reflectivity of Deep Convective Clouds as a stability metric. The results of the model when applied to the CERES instruments on board the EOS Terra satellite are shown. Given comprehensive validation of the model, these results will allow the CERES spectral responses to be updated accordingly prior to any forthcoming data release in an attempt to reach the optimum stability target that the climate community requires.

Matthews, Grant; Priestley, Kory; Loeb, Norman G.; Loukachine, Konstantin; Thomas, Susan; Walikainen, Dale; Wielicki, Bruce A.

2006-01-01

229

Assessment of the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Flight Model 5 (FM5) instrument performance and stability  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) scanning radiometer is designed to measure the solar radiation reflected by the Earth and thermal radiation emitted by the Earth. Four CERES instruments are supporting the EOS missions; two aboard the Terra spacecraft, launched in 1999 and two aboard the Aqua spacecraft, launched in 2002. A fifth instrument, Flight Model 5 (FM5), launched in October 2011 aboard the S-NPP satellite, began taking radiance measurements on January 27th, 2012. The CERES FM5 instrument uses three scanning thermistor bolometers to make broadband radiance measurements in the shortwave (0.3 - 5.0 micrometers), total (0.3 - <100 micrometers) and water vapor window (8 - 12 micrometer) regions. An internal calibration module (ICM) used for in-flight calibration is built into the CERES instrument package consisting of an anodized aluminum blackbody source for calibrating the total and window sensors, and a shortwave internal calibration source (SWICS) for the shortwave sensor. The ICM sources, along with a solar diffusor called the Mirror Attenuator Mosaic (MAM), are used to define shifts or drifts in the sensor response over the life of the mission. In addition, validation studies are conducted to assess the pointing accuracy of the instrument and understand any spectral changes that may occur with the sensors allowing for corrections to be made to the radiance calculations in later CERES data products. This paper summarizes the on-orbit behavior of the CERES FM5 instrument by outlining trends in the internal calibration data and discussing the various validation studies used to assess the performance and stability of the instrument.

Smith, Nathaniel P.; Thomas, Susan; Shankar, Mohan; Szewczyk, Z. P.; Wilson, Robert S.; Walikainen, Dale R.; Daniels, Janet L.; Hess, Phillip C.; Priestley, Kory J.

2014-09-01

230

Earth occultation imaging of the low energy gamma-ray sky with GBM  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Aims: The Earth Occultation Technique (EOT) has been applied to Fermi's Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) to perform all-sky monitoring for a predetermined catalog of hard X-ray/soft ?-ray sources. In order to search for sources not in the catalog, thus completing the catalog and reducing a source of systematic error in EOT, an imaging method has been developed - Imaging with a Differential filter using the Earth Occultation Method (IDEOM). Methods: IDEOM is a tomographic imaging method that takes advantage of the orbital precession of the Fermi satellite. Using IDEOM, all-sky reconstructions have been generated for ~4 years of GBM data in the 12-50 keV, 50-100 keV and 100-300 keV energy bands in search of sources otherwise unmodeled by the GBM occultation analysis. Results: IDEOM analysis resulted in the detection of 57 sources in the 12-50 keV energy band, 23 sources in the 50-100 keV energy band, and 7 sources in the 100-300 keV energy band. Seventeen sources were not present in the original GBM-EOT catalog and have now been added. We also present the first joined averaged spectra for four persistent sources detected by GBM using EOT and by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on Fermi: NGC 1275, 3C 273, Cen A, and the Crab.

Rodi, J.; Cherry, M. L.; Case, G. L.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Chaplin, V.; Finger, M. H.; Jenke, P.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.

2014-02-01

231

Earth Occultation Imaging of the Low Energy Gamma-Ray Sky with GBM  

E-print Network

The Earth Occultation Technique (EOT) has been applied to Fermi's Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) to perform all-sky monitoring for a predetermined catalog of hard X-ray/soft gamma-ray sources. Imaging with a Differential filter using the Earth Occultation Method (IDEOM) has been developed to search for sources not in the catalog, thus completing the catalog and reducing a source of systematic error in EOT. IDEOM is a tomographic imaging method that takes advantage of the orbital precession of the Fermi satellite. Using IDEOM, all-sky images have been generated for ~4 years of GBM data in the 12-50 keV, 50-100 keV and 100-300 keV energy bands in search of sources otherwise unmodeled by the GBM occultation analysis. Analysis resulted in the detection of 43 sources in the 12-50 keV energy band, 23 sources in the 50-100 keV energy band, and 7 sources in the 100-300 keV energy band. IDEOM analysis has resulted in the addition of 16 sources to the GBM-EOT catalog. We also present the first joined averaged spectra fo...

Rodi, J; Case, G L; Camero-Arranz, A; Chaplin, C; Finger, M H; Jenke, P; Wilson-Hodge, C A

2013-01-01

232

The impact of passive design factors on house energy efficiency  

Microsoft Academic Search

The energy consumption of a house can be affected simultaneously by many building design factors related to its main architectural features, building elements and materials. The relationship between the building design data and energy consumption data of houses can still be identified. This study focuses on the impact of building design factors on the extra winter energy consumption of houses.

Bin Su

2011-01-01

233

Earth Occultation Imaging of the Low Energy Gamma-ray Sky with GBM  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Earth Occultation Technique (EOT) has been applied to the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) to perform all-sky monitoring of a predetermined catalog of hard X-ray/soft gamma-ray sources. Imaging with a Differential filter using the Earth Occultation Method (IDEOM) has been developed to search for sources absent from the GBM catalog in order to complete the catalog and reduce a source of systematic error in the EOT analysis. With IDEOM, projections of the Earth's limb on the sky from the occultation of a source can be combined. These projections add constructively over the course of Fermi's orbital precession and thus localized a source. We present all-sky images that have been generated with IDEOM for ~ 4 years of GBM in the 12-50 keV, 50-100, and 100-300 keV energy ranges and the ~ 20 sources that have been added to the input source catalog through this method.

Rodi, James; Cherry, M. L.; Case, G. L.; Finger, M. H.; Jenke, P.; Wilson, C.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Chaplin, V.

2013-04-01

234

Spatial sampling considerations of the CERES (Clouds and Earth Radiant Energy System) instrument  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The CERES (Clouds and Earth Radiant Energy System) instrument is a scanning radiometer with three channels for measuring Earth radiation budget. At present CERES models are operating aboard the Terra, Aqua and Suomi/NPP spacecraft and flights of CERES instruments are planned for the JPSS-1 spacecraft and its successors. CERES scans from one limb of the Earth to the other and back. The footprint size grows with distance from nadir simply due to geometry so that the size of the smallest features which can be resolved from the data increases and spatial sampling errors increase with nadir angle. This paper presents an analysis of the effect of nadir angle on spatial sampling errors of the CERES instrument. The analysis performed in the Fourier domain. Spatial sampling errors are created by smoothing of features which are the size of the footprint and smaller, or blurring, and inadequate sampling, that causes aliasing errors. These spatial sampling errors are computed in terms of the system transfer function, which is the Fourier transform of the point response function, the spacing of data points and the spatial spectrum of the radiance field.

Smith, G. L.; Manalo-Smith, Natividdad; Priestley, Kory

2014-10-01

235

Earth Observatory Satellite system definition study. Report 5: System design and specifications. Volume 1: Baseline system description  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A system baseline design oriented to the requirements of the next generation of Earth Observatory Satellite missions is presented. The first mission (EOS-A) is envisioned as a two-fold mission which (1) provides a continuum of data of the type being supplied by ERTS for the emerging operational applications and also (2) expands the research and development activities for future instrumentation and analysis techniques. The baseline system specifically satisfies the requirements of this first mission. However, EOS-A is expected to be the first of a series of earth observation missions. Thus the baseline design has been developed so as to accommodate these latter missions effectively as the transition is made from conventional, expendable launch vehicles and spacecraft to the Shuttle Space Transportation System era. Further, a subset of alternative missions requirements including Seasat, SEOS, SMM and MSS-5 have been analyzed to verify that the spacecraft design to serve a multi-mission role is economically sound. A key feature of the baseline system design is the concept of a modular observatory system whose elements are compatible with varying levels of launch vehicle capability. The design configuration can be used with either the Delta or Titan launch vehicles and will adapt readily to the space shuttle when that system becomes available in the early 1980's.

1974-01-01

236

Top-of-Atmosphere Direct Radiative Effect of Aerosols over the Tropical Oceans from the Clouds and the Earth?s Radiant Energy System (CERES) Satellite Instrument  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nine months of the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES)\\/Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) broadband fluxes combined with the TRMM visible infrared scanner (VIRS) high-resolution imager measurements are used to estimate the daily average direct radiative effect of aerosols for clear-sky conditions over the tropical oceans. On average, aerosols have a cooling effect over the Tropics of 4.6

Norman G. Loeb; Seiji Kato

2002-01-01

237

Theoretical dissociation energies for the alkali and alkaline-earth monofluorides and monochlorides  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Spectroscopic parameters are accurately determined for the alkali and alkaline-earth monofluorides and monochlorides by means of ab initio self-consistent field and correlated wave function calculations. Numerical Hartree-Fock calculations are performed on selected systems to ensure that the extended Slater basis sets employed are near the Hartree-Fock limit. Since the bonding is predominantly electrostatic in origin, a strong correlation exists between the dissociation energy (to ions) and the spectroscopic parameter r(e). By dissociating to the ionic limits, most of the differential correlation effects can be embedded in the accurate experimental electron affinities and ionization potentials.

Langhoff, S. R.; Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.; Partridge, H.

1986-01-01

238

Apollo-Soyuz pamphlet no. 5: The earth from orbit. [experimental design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronaut training in the recognition of various geological features from space is described as well as the cameras, lenses and film used in experiment MA-136 to measure their effectiveness in photographing earth structural features from orbit. Aerosols that affect climate and weather are discussed in relation to experiment Ma-007 which relied on infrared observations of the setting or rising sun, as seen from Apollo, to measure the amount of dust and droplets in the lower 150 km of earth's atmosphere. The line spectra of atomic oxygen and nitrogen and their densities at 22 km above the earth's surface are examined along with experiment MA-059 which measured ultraviolet absorption at that altitude.

Page, L. W.; From, T. P.

1977-01-01

239

Energy Mobility Network : system design, interfaces, and future interactions  

E-print Network

The Energy Mobility Network is a mobile, networked energy production, consumption and sharing system that is designed to motivate users to be more aware of their energy consumption. In particular, the system provides a ...

Cheung, Natalie Wen Yua

2011-01-01

240

Pairing Essential Climate Science with Sustainable Energy Information: the "EARTH-The Operators' Manual" experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Social science research on the effective communication of climate science suggests that today's audiences may be effectively engaged by presenting information about Earth's climate in the context of individual and community actions that can be taken to increase energy efficiency and to reduce carbon emissions. "EARTH-The Operators' Manual" (ETOM) is an informal science education and outreach project supported by NSF, comprising three related components: a 3-part broadcast television mini-series; on-site outreach at 5 major science centers and natural history museums strategically located across the USA; and a website with innovative social networking tools. A companion tradebook, written by series presenter and Penn State glaciologist Richard Alley, is to be published by W. W. Norton in spring 2011. Program 1, THE BURNING QUESTION, shows how throughout human history our need for energy has been met by burning wood, whale oil and fossil fuels, but notes that fossil fuels produce carbon dioxide which inevitably change the composition of Earth's atmosphere. The program uses little known stories (such as US Air Force atmospheric research immediately after WW2, looking at the effect of CO2 levels on heat-seeking missiles, and Abraham Lincoln's role in the founding of the National Academy of Sciences and the Academy's role in solving navigation problems during the Civil War) to offer fresh perspectives on essential but sometimes disputed aspects of climate science: that today's levels of CO2 are unprecedented in the last 400,000 and more years; that human burning of fossil fuel is the scientifically-proven source, and that multiple lines of evidence show Earth is warming. Program 2, TEN WAYS TO KEEP TEN BILLION SMILING, offers a list of appealing strategies (such as "Get Rich and Save the World": Texas & wind energy, and "Do More with Less": how glow worms make cool light without waste heat, suggesting a role for organic LEDs) to motivate positive responses to the considerable challenge of supplying clean energy to a growing population. Additional scenes have been filmed in Brazil, Spain, China, Morocco, Scotland, and across America, including at the National Renewable Energy Lab. in Denver, CO, and New Orleans. Program 3 (presently untitled and targeted for 2012) will feature American communities seeking to increase energy efficiency and minimize carbon emissions. The Fall 2010 AGU presentation will include video clips from the series, initial findings from focus groups (coordinated by project evaluator, Rockman Et Al) as to what information has been found most compelling to potential audiences, and a description of plans being developed by the project's science center partners in San Diego CA, Portland OR, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Fort Worth TX and Raleigh NC. "EARTH-The Operators' Manual" is an experiment to determine the effectiveness of these activities to reach audiences who, according to surveys, have actually become less convinced of anthropogenic climate change, while remaining supportive of investments in advancing clean energy opportunities.

Akuginow, E.; Alley, R. B.; Haines-Stiles, G.

2010-12-01

241

Engineering theory of slide processes in the design of earth dams on a soft ground foundation  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the slope stability and landslide propensity of several hydroelectric plant earth dams throughout the Soviet Union from the standpoint of slide theory and compares the research of several Soviet institutions into this problem with existing standards and recommendations on dam stability and reliability. The comparisons are made for earth dams having a soft ground foundation under static loading conditions. Applicable properties are discussed for a wide range of soils and rocks including clays, loams, sands, alluvials, and soft and hard gravels. Seismic effects are not discussed.

Krasil'nikov, N.A.

1987-11-01

242

Compensation for spectral darkening of short wave optics occurring on the cloud's and the Earth's radiant energy system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cloud's and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) is an investigation into the role of clouds and radiation in the Earth's climate system. Four CERES scanning thermistor bolometer instruments are currently in orbit. Flight model 1 (FM1) and 2 (FM2) are aboard the Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra satellite and FM3 and FM4 are aboard the EOS Aqua satellite. Each CERES instrument measures in three broadband radiometric regions: the shortwave (SW 0.3-5?m), total (0.3- > 100?m), and window (8-12?m). It has been found that both CERES instruments on the Terra platform imply that the SW flux scattered from the Earth had dropped by up to 2% from 2000 to 2004. No climatological explanation for this drop could be found, suggesting the cause was a drift in both the Terra instruments. However, the onboard calibration lamps for the SW channels do not show a change in gain of this magnitude. Experience from other satellite missions has shown that optics in the orbital environment can become contaminated, severely reducing their transmission of ultra-violet (UV) radiation. Since the calibration lamps emit little radiance in the UV spectral region it was suggested that contaminates could be responsible for an undetectable 'spectral darkening' of the CERES SW channel optics and hence the apparent drop in SW flux. Further evidence for this was found by looking at the comparison between simultaneous measurements made by FM1 and FM2. The proposed mechanisms for contaminant build up would not apply to a CERES instrument operating in the normal cross track scan mode. Indeed it was found from the comparison between CERES instruments on Terra that the response of the instrument operating in rotating azimuth plane (RAPS) mode consistently dropped relative to the other cross track instrument. Since at all times one of the instruments operates in cross track mode, where it is not subject to spectral darkening, it allowed that unit to be used as a calibration standard from which the darkening of the other RAPS instrument can be measured. A table of adjustment coefficients to compensate for this spectral darkening are therefore derived in this paper. These figures are designed to be multiplied by SW fluxes or radiances produced in the climate community using Edition 2 CERES data. SW CERES measurements that have been revised using these coeffcients are therefore to be referred to as ERBE-like Edition2_Rev1 or SSF Edition2B_Rev1 data in future literature. Current work to fully characterize the effect of spectral darkening on the instrument spectral response before the release of Edition 3 data is also described.

Matthews, Grant; Priestley, Kory; Spence, Peter; Cooper, Denise; Walikainen, Dale

2005-08-01

243

Energy transfer in rare earth ion clusters and fluorescence from rare-earth-doped La sub 1. 85 Sr sub 0. 15 CuO sub 4 superconductors  

SciTech Connect

Laser spectroscopy of rare earth ions in solids was used to study mechanisms of non-resonant energy transfer within rare earth clusters, and to detect insulating, impurity phases in rare-earth-doped La{sub 1.85}Sr{sub 0.15}CuO{sub 4} superconductors. The mechanisms of phonon-assisted, non-resonant energy transfer were studied in well-defined dimer sites in Er{sup 3+}:SrF{sub 2} and Pr{sup 3+}:CaF{sub 2}. Application of a magnetic field to Er{sup 3+}:SrF{sub 2} greatly increased the energy-transfer rate. The magnetic field dependence in Er{sup 3+}:SrF{sub 2} indicates that the mechanism of non-resonant energy transfer is a two-phonon, resonant process (Orbach process). Application of a magnetic field to Pr{sup 3+}:CaF{sub 2} had no effect on the energy-transfer rate because no significant Zeeman splittings occurred. The temperature dependence of the energy-transfer rate in Pr{sup 3+}:CaF{sub 2} showed the mechanism to be a one-phonon-assisted process at low temperatures and predominantly an Orbach process above 10 K. In the second part of this thesis, laser spectroscopy of a Eu{sup 3+} probe ion is developed to detect impurity phases in La{sub 1.85}Sr{sub 0.15}CuO{sub 4} superconductors. Two impurity phases were found in polycrystalline La{sub 1.85}Sr{sub 0.15}CuO{sub 4}: unreacted La{sub 2}O{sub 3} starting material, and a La-silicate phase, which formed from contamination during sintering.

Tissue, B.M.

1988-01-01

244

Comparison of Earth Science Achievement between Animation-Based and Graphic-Based Testing Designs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study developed two testing devices, namely the animation-based test (ABT) and the graphic-based test (GBT) in the area of earth sciences covering four domains that ranged from astronomy, meteorology, oceanography to geology. Both the students' achievements of and their attitudes toward ABT compared to GBT were investigated. The purposes of

Wu, Huang-Ching; Chang, Chun-Yen; Chen, Chia-Li D.; Yeh, Ting-Kuang; Liu, Cheng-Chueh

2010-01-01

245

Conceptual design of rotary magnetostrictive energy harvester  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents the conceptual design of a rotary magnetostrictive energy harvester (RMEH), which consists of one coil-wound Galfenol cantilever, with two PMs adhered onto the each end, and one permanent magnet (PM) array sandwiched between two wheels. Modeling and simulation are used to validate the concept. The proof-of-concept RMEH is fabricated by using the simulation results, and subjected to the experimental characterization. The experimental setup for the simulated characterization uses the motor-driven PM array to induce a forced vibration. It can be concluded that the theoretical prediction on the induced voltage agrees well with the experimental results and that induced voltage increases with rpm and with number of PMs. Future work includes optimization of RMEH performance via PM array configuration and development of prototype.

Park, Young-Woo; Kang, Han-Sam; Wereley, Norman M.

2014-05-01

246

Teaching for Understanding in Earth Science: Comparing Impacts on Planning and Instruction in Three Professional Development Designs for Middle School Science Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper compares and contrasts the impacts of three professional development designs aimed at middle school Earth science teachers on how teachers plan and enact instruction. The designs were similar in their alignment to research-based practices in science professional development: each design was of an extended duration and time span,

Penuel, William R.; McWilliams, Harold; McAuliffe, Carla; Benbow, Ann E.; Mably, Colin; Hayden, Margaret M.

2009-01-01

247

Design studies of large aperture, high-resolution Earth science microwave radiometers compatible with small launch vehicles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

High-spatial-resolution microwave radiometer sensing from space with reasonable swath widths and revisit times favors large aperture systems. However, with traditional precision antenna design, the size and weight requirements for such systems are in conflict with the need to emphasize small launch vehicles. This paper describes tradeoffs between the science requirements, basic operational parameters, and expected sensor performance for selected satellite radiometer concepts utilizing novel lightweight compactly packaged real apertures. Antenna, feed, and radiometer subsystem design and calibration are presented. Preliminary results show that novel lightweight real aperture coupled with state-of-the-art radiometer designs are compatible with small launch systems, and hold promise for high-resolution earth science measurements of sea ice, precipitation, soil moisture, sea surface temperature, and ocean wind speeds.

Schroeder, Lyle C.; Bailey, M. C.; Harrington, Richard F.; Kendall, Bruce M.; Campbell, Thomas G.

1994-01-01

248

On-orbit solar calibrations using the Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) in-flight calibration system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) scanning thermistor bolometers measure earth-reflected solar and earth-emitted longwaveradiances, at the top- of-the-atmosphere. The bolometers measure the earthradiances in the broadband shortwave solar (0.3-5.0 microns) and total (0.3->100 microns) spectral bands as well as in the 8->12 microns water vapor window spectral band over geographical footprints as small as 10 kilometers at nadir. December 1999, the second and third set of CERES bolometers was launchedon the Earth Observing Mission Terra Spacecraft. May 2003, the fourth and fifth set of bolometers was launched on the Earth Observing Mission Aqua Spacecraft. Ground vacuum calibrations define the initial count conversion coefficients that are used to convert the bolometer output voltages into filtered earth radiances. The mirror attenuator mosaic (MAM), a solar diffuser plate, was built into the CERES instrument package calibration system in order to define in-orbit shifts or drifts in the sensor responses. The shortwave and shortwave part of total sensors are calibrated using the solar radiances reflected from the MAM's. Each MAM consists of baffle-solar diffuser plate systems, which guide incoming solar radiances into the instrument fields of view of the shortwave and total wave sensor units. The MAM diffuser reflecting type surface consists of an array of spherical aluminum mirror segments, which are separated by a Merck Black A absorbing surface, overcoated with SIOx. Thermistors are located in each MAM plate and the total channel baffle. The CERES MAM is designed to yield calibration precisions approaching .5 percent for the total and shortwave detectors. However, in their first year of operation the Terra and Aqua MAMs showed shifts in their calibrations larger than expected. Shifts of this nature have been seen in other Solar viewing instruments in the past. A possible explanation has attributed the changes to pre-orbit or on-orbit contamination combined with solar ultraviolet/atomic oxygen induced chemical changes to the contaminant during solar exposure. In the subsequent year of operation all instruments begin to stabilize within the .5 percent precision range. In this presentation, the MAM solar calibration procedures will be presented along with on-orbit measurements for the nine years the CERES instruments have been on-orbit. A switch to an azimuth rotation raster scan of the Sun rather than an elevation scan will be discussed. The implementation of a thermal correction to the shortwave channel will also be discussed. Comparisons are also made between the Terra CERES instruments and the Aqua instruments during their MAM solar calibrations and total solar irradiance experimental results to determine how precise the CERES solar calibration facilities are at tracking the sun's irradiance.

Wilson, Robert S.; Priestley, Kory J.; Thomas, Susan; Hess, Phillip

2010-09-01

249

Ion distribution dynamics near the Earth's bow shock: first measurements with the 2D ion energy spectrometer CORALL on the INTERBALL/Tail-probe satellite  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The dynamics of the ion distribution function near the Earth's bow shock is studied on the basis of quasi-3D measurements of ion energy spectra in the range of 30-24200 eV/q with the Russian-Cuban CORALL instrument on the INTERBALL/Tail-probe satellite. The instrument was designed for observations of magnetospheric plasma and measures ions, in an angular range of 36-144 from the Earth-Sun direction. Ion populations generated by the Earth bow shock are often observed upstream from the bow shock. In the solar-wind stream compressed and heated by the passing of very dense magnetic cloud (CME), two types of these ion populations were measured upstream and before the bow shock crossing on 25 August 1995 at 07:37 UT. Both populations were observed in the energy range above 2 keV. At sim06:20 UT, when the angle between the direction of the interplanetary magnetic field and normal to the bow shock Bn was simeq43 the instrument observed a narrow, fast (sim800 km/s) field-aligned beam moving from the Earth. At sim07:30, when Bnsimeq28, the wide ion pitch-angle distribution was observed. A similar suprathermal ion population is observed in the magnetosheath simultaneously with the solar-wind ion population being heated and deflected from the Sun-Earth direction. The similarity of observations during the mentioned time-interval and under usual solar-wind conditions allows us to conclude that types of suprathermal ion populations upstream and downstream from the bow shock do not depend on the solar-wind disturbance generated by magnetic cloud.

Yermolaev, Yu. I.; Fedorov, A. O.; Vaisberg, O. L.; Balebanov, V. M.; Obod, Yu. A.; Jimenez, R.; Fleites, J.; Llera, L.; Omelchenko, A. N.

1997-05-01

250

Energy-Efficient Design for Florida Educational Facilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This manual provides a detailed simulation analysis of a variety of energy conservation measures (ECMs) with the intent of giving educational facility design teams in Florida a basis for decision making. The manual's three sections cover energy efficiency design considerations that appear throughout the following design processes: schematic

Florida Solar Energy Center, Cape Canaveral.

251

Design/cost tradeoff studies. Appendix A. Supporting analyses and tradeoffs, book 2. Earth Observatory Satellite system definition study (EOS)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Attitude reference systems for use with the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) are described. The systems considered are fixed and gimbaled star trackers, star mappers, and digital sun sensors. Covariance analyses were performed to determine performance for the most promising candidate in low altitude and synchronous orbits. The performance of attitude estimators that employ gyroscopes which are periodically updated by a star sensor is established by a single axis covariance analysis. The other systems considered are: (1) the propulsion system design, (2) electric power and electrical integration, (3) thermal control, (4) ground data processing, and (5) the test plan and cost reduction aspects of observatory integration and test.

1974-01-01

252

Earth Observatory Satellite system definition study. Report no. 3: Design/cost tradeoff studies. Appendix C: EOS program requirements document  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An analysis of the requirements for the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) system specifications is presented. The analysis consists of requirements obtained from existing documentation and those derived from functional analysis. The requirements follow the hierarchy of program, mission, system, and subsystem. The code for designating specific requirements is explained. Among the subjects considered are the following: (1) the traffic model, (2) space shuttle related performance, (3) booster related performance, (4) the data collection system, (5) spacecraft structural tests, and (6) the ground support requirements.

1974-01-01

253

Clouds and Earth Radiant Energy System (CERES), A Review: Past, Present and Future  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Clouds and earth Radiant Energy System (CERES) project's objectives are to measure the reflected solar radiance (shortwave) and Earth-emitted (longwave) radiances and from these measurements to compute the shortwave and longwave radiation fluxes at the top of the atmo-sphere (TOA) and the surface and radiation divergence within the atmosphere. The fluxes at TOA are to be retrieved to an accuracy of 2The data products from CERES include, in addition to the reflected solar radiation and Earth emitted radiation fluxes at TOA, the upward and downward surface shortwave and longwave radiation fluxes, the radiation fluxes 500 mb and 250 mb altitude. Also at the surface the photosynthetically active radiation and ultraviolet radiation (total, UVA and UVB) are computed. Another application of the CERES scanning radiometers is special operations in which the azimuth of the scan plane of a CERES instrument is programmed in order to line up with ground stations or other spacecraft instruments. This capability has been used to compare radiances with those of other spacecraft instruments and with ground stations. One use of this ability has been to rotate a CERES instrument so as to scan in the same plane as a second instrument, as was done with a CERES instrument on both the Terra and Aqua spacecraft in order to compare radiance measurements. These compar-isons are needed in order to assure that any changes in the radiation budget record due to the change of instruments is understood and quantified and not attributed to a climate shift. The CEREinstrumentsaboardtheT erraandAquaspacecraf thaveservedwellpasstheirdesignlif etimes.ACERE onmissions.

Smith, G. Louis

254

Onsite solar energy systems - Economics and system design  

Microsoft Academic Search

On-site solar energy systems are discussed with reference to scale considerations, costs and ownership, costs of competing energy, risk, and net costs to society. A method for evaluating the quantitative worth of solar energy is presented, and attention is given to the design of solar equipment and to basic issues in solar design.

H. C. Kelly

1979-01-01

255

Evaluation of the clouds and the Earth's radiant energy system (CERES) scanner pointing accuracy using a coastline detection system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) is a NASA investigation to examine the role of clouds in the radiative energy flow through the Earth-atmosphere system. The first CERES scanning radiometer was launched on November 27, 1997 into a 35 degree inclination, 350 km altitude orbit, on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) spacecraft. The CERES instrument consists of a three channel scanning broadband radiometer. The spectral bands measure shortwave, window and total radiation reflected or emitted from the Earth-atmosphere system. Each Earth viewing measurement is geolocated to the Earth fixed coordinate system using satellite ephemeris, Earth rotation and geoid, and instrument pointing data. The interactive CERES coastline detection system is used to assess the accuracy of the CERES geolocation process. By analyzing radiative flux gradients at the boundaries of ocean and land masses, the accuracy of the scanner measurement locations may be derived for the CERES/TRMM instrument/satellite system. The resulting CERES measurement location errors are within 10 percent of the nadir footprint size. Precise pointing knowledge of the Visible and IR scanner is required for convolution of cloud properties onto the CERES footprint; initial VIRS coastline results are included.

Currey, Jon C.; Smith, G. Louis; Neely, Bob

1998-10-01

256

Evaluation of Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Scanner Pointing Accuracy using a Coastline Detection System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) is a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) investigation to examine the role of clouds in the radiative energy flow through the Earth-atmosphere system. The first CERES scanning radiometer was launched on November 27, 1997 into a 35 inclination, 350 km altitude orbit, on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) spacecraft. The CERES instrument consists of a three channel scanning broadband radiometer. The spectral bands measure shortwave (0.3 - 5 microns), window (8 - 12 microns), and total (0.3 - 100 microns) radiation reflected or emitted from the Earth-atmosphere system. Each Earth viewing measurement is geolocated to the Earth fixed coordinate system using satellite ephemeris, Earth rotation and geoid, and instrument pointing data. The interactive CERES coastline detection system is used to assess the accuracy of the CERES geolocation process. By analyzing radiative flux gradients at the boundaries of ocean and land masses, the accuracy of the scanner measurement locations may be derived for the CERES/TRMM instrument/satellite system. The resulting CERES measurement location errors are within 10% of the nadir footprint size. Precise pointing knowledge of the Visible and Infrared Scanner (VIRS) is required for convolution of cloud properties onto the CERES footprint; initial VIRS coastline results are included.

Currey, Chris; Smith, Lou; Neely, Bob

1998-01-01

257

Material Characterization and Design Recommendations for Mechanically Stabilized Earth Retaining Walls  

E-print Network

the Federal Highway Administration and American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) guidelines for design of MSE walls. The research addresses three main issues expressed by TxDOT in their design and material selection process...

Dantal, Vishal

2013-12-04

258

The quiet-time low energy nucleon spectrum in the vicinity of earth  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Observations of the low energy quiet-time interplanetary nucleon spectrum obtained by Explorer 47 are examined for March 9-12, 1973, the quietest period from Sept. 26, 1972 through Feb. 15, 1975. The quiet-time energy spectrum may be represented by a power law with an index of about -3.1. The H/He ratio below 2 MeV is about 10. The ratio of antisunward to sunward intensities is about 2.6, increasing to about 8.55 in a frame moving with the solar wind. The angular distributions show that in the 0.3-0.5 MeV range most of the proton intensity originates in the earth's magnetosphere. The spectral behavior and enhancement of proton counting rates during microbursts suggest that the magnetosphere is a significant source at energies up to 2 MeV. The observed intensities are lower than those reported by Simpson and Tuzzolino (1973) by factors of 3 to 10. It is suggested that the low energy upturn in the quiet-time interplanetary proton spectrum may be related to particle emissions from planetary magnetospheres, such as that of Jupiter.

Krimigis, S. M.; Kohl, J. W.; Armstrong, T. P.

1975-01-01

259

DESIGNING ENVIRONMENTAL, ECONOMIC AND ENERGY EFFICIENT CHEMICAL PROCESSES  

EPA Science Inventory

The design and improvement of chemical processes can be very challenging. The earlier energy conservation, process economics and environmental aspects are incorporated into the process development, the easier and less expensive it is to alter the process design. Process emissio...

260

Designing for Energy Conservation - The Cypress Fairbanks Medical Center Hospital  

E-print Network

efficient and economically constructed has the winning combination. This paper details the design concepts of a 1984 Grand Award winner, the Cypress Fairbanks Medical Center Hospital, in the Fourth Annual Energy Conservation Design Award Competition....

Wiernik, L. B.; Ranzau, P. A.

1984-01-01

261

Design Drivers of Energy-Efficient Transport Aircraft  

E-print Network

The fuel energy consumption of subsonic air transportation is examined. The focus is on identification and quantification of fundamental engineering design tradeoffs which drive the design of subsonic tube and wing transport ...

Drela, Mark

262

Hydrogeologic Controls on the Deep Terrestrial Biosphere - Chemolithotrophic Energy for Subsurface Life on Earth and Mars  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As exploration for gold, diamonds and base metals expand mine workings to depths of almost 3 km below the Earth's surface, the mines of the Canadian Shield provide a window into the deep biosphere as diverse, but to date less well-explored than the South African Gold Mines. To date investigations of the deep biosphere have, in most cases, focused on the marine subsurface, including deep sea sediments, hydrothermal vents, off-axis spreading centers and cold seeps. Yet the deep terrestrial subsurface hosted in the fracture waters of Archean Shield rocks provides an important analog and counterpoint to studies of the deep marine biosphere. Depending on the particular geologic and hydrogeologic setting, sites vary from those dominated by paleometeoric waters and microbial hydrocarbon production, to those in which H2 and hydrocarbon gases have been suggested to be a function of long-term accumulation of the products of water-rock interaction in the deepest, most saline fracture waters with residence times on the order of tens of millions of years. The hydrogeologically isolated fracture-controlled ground water system periodically generates steep redox gradients and chemical disequilibrium due to fracture opening, and episodic release of mM levels of H2 that support a redox driven microbial community of H2-utilizing sulfate reducers and methanogens. Exploration of these systems may provide information about the limits of the deep terrestrial biosphere, controls on the distribution of deep subsurface life, and the diversity of geochemical reactions that produce substrates on which microbiological communities at great depths survive. The geologically stable Precambrian cratons of Earth are arguably the closest analogs available to single-plate planets such as Mars. Studies of these Earth analogs imply that the habitability of the Martian crust might similarly not be restricted to sites of localized hydrothermal activity. While the presence of the Martian cryosphere and potential clathrates will affect the porosity and permeability, and net flux of gases from the Martian crust, the underlying principles of fracture-controlled energy sequestration and episodic release remain. Furthermore understanding the origin and distribution of biogenic and geologic sources of CH4 at these analog Earth sites will inform models and strategies for deciphering the origin of CH4 recently reported in the Martian atmosphere.

Sherwood Lollar, B.; Moran, J.; Tille, S.; Voglesonger, K.; Lacrampe-Couloume, G.; Onstott, T.; Pratt, L.; Slater, G.

2009-05-01

263

Angular Distribution Models for Top-of-Atmosphere Radiative Flux Estimation from the Clouds and the Earth抯 Radiant Energy System Instrument on the Terra Satellite. Part I: Methodology  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT The Clouds and Earth抯 Radiant Energy System (CERES) provides coincident global cloud and aerosol properties together with reflected solar, emitted terrestrial longwave, and infrared window radiative fluxes. These data are needed to improve the understanding and modeling of the interaction between clouds, aerosols, and radiation at the top of the atmosphere, surface, and within the atmosphere. This paper describes,the

Norman G. Loeb; Seiji Kato; Konstantin Loukachine; Natividad Manalo-Smith

2005-01-01

264

Towards an Earth System Knowledge Environment Designed to Promote More Usable Science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is abundantly clear that fundamental decisions about how to manage future human society will need to be informed by quantitative scientific analyses of processes, options, impacts, and responses. In fact, one could argue that the human experience into the foreseeable future will increasingly be tied to the integrating of information, understanding, and experiences to create knowledge and with it solutions to emerging problems as well as opportunities for further progress. This is particularly true for the Geosciences. Our scientific field, and by extension our Union, has a special responsibility for informing policy makers and the public about how the earth system functions and about the relationship between environmental stressors and human activities. In this regard, a greatly improved working interface between natural and social scientists is needed. In this talk, I argue that something like an "Earth System Knowledge Environment" or "Earth System Collaboratory" should be developed using modern information technologies to encapsulate and make accessible existing and emerging interdisciplinary knowledge of particular use to decision makers. Such a "work place" should be open to all and could provide access to observations, models and theories in ways that more easily allow for credible scientific understanding to be translated into policy options at all levels. Examples of fledgling efforts along these lines will be cited in areas such as severe weather impacts and climate change. The challenges involved in creating more usable scientific knowledge are, of course, quite significant and include major issues such as: institutional impediments to interdisciplinary research, the role of proprietary interests, the difficulties involved in working across the natural/social science boundary, and the challenge of developing the kind of human capital needed to effectively close the gap between good science and public policy.

Killeen, T. L.

2006-12-01

265

Determination of Unfiltered Radiances from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Instrument  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new method for determining unfiltered shortwave (SW), longwave (LW) and window (W) radiances from filtered radiances measured by the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) satellite instrument is presented. The method uses theoretically derived regression coefficients between filtered and unfiltered radiances that are a function of viewing geometry, geotype and whether or not cloud is present. Relative errors in insta.ntaneous unfiltered radiances from this method are generally well below 1% for SW radiances (approx. 0.4% 1(sigma) or approx.l W/sq m equivalent flux), < 0.2% for LW radiances (approx. 0.1% 1(sigma) or approx.0.3 W/sq m equivalent flux) and < 0.2% (approx. 0.1% 1(sigma) for window channel radiances.

Loeb, N. G.; Priestley, K. J.; Kratz, D. P.; Geier, E. B.; Green, R. N.; Wielicki, B. A.; Hinton, P. OR.; Nolan, S. K.

2001-01-01

266

Wavelength-stable rare earth-free green light-emitting diodes for energy efficiency.  

PubMed

Solid state lighting seeks to replace both, incandescent and fluorescent lighting by energy efficient light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Just like compact fluorescent tubes, current white LEDs employ costly rare earth-based phosphors, a drawback we propose to overcome with direct emitting LEDs of all colors. We show the benefits of homoepitaxial LEDs on bulk GaN substrate for wavelength-stable green spectrum LEDs. By use of non-polar growth orientation we avoid big color shifts with drive current and demonstrate polarized light emitters that prove ideal for pairing with liquid crystal display modulators in back light units of television monitors. We further offer a comparison of the prospects of non-polar a- and m-plane growth over conventional c-plane growth. PMID:21747568

Wetzel, Christian; Detchprohm, Theeradetch

2011-07-01

267

Constraints on Energy Dissipation in the Earth's Body Tide From Satellite Tracking and Altimetry  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The phase lag by which the earth's body tide follows the tidal potential is estimated for the principal lunar semidiurnal tide M(sub 2). The estimate results from combining recent tidal solutions from satellite tracking data and from Topex/Poseidon satellite altimeter data. Each data type is sensitive to the body-tide lag: gravitationally for the tracking data, geometrically for the altimetry. Allowance is made for the lunar atmospheric tide. For the tidal potential Love number kappa(sub 2) we obtain a lag epsilon of 0.20 deg +/- 0.05 deg, implying an effective body-tide Q of 280 and body-tide energy dissipation of 110 +/- 25 gigawatts.

Ray, Richard D.; Eanes, Richard J.; Lemoine, Frank G.

1992-01-01

268

Linear energy transfer (LET) spectra of cosmic radiation in low Earth orbit  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Integral linear energy transfer (LET) spectra of cosmic radiation (CR) particles were measured on five Cosmos series spacecraft in low Earth orbit (LEO). Particular emphasis is placed on results of the Cosmos 1887 biosatellite which carried a set of joint U.S.S.R.-U.S.A. radiation experiments involving passive detectors that included thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs), plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTDs), fission foils, nuclear photo-emulsions, etc. which were located both inside and outside the spacecraft. Measured LET spectra are compared with those theoretically calculated. Results show that there is some dependence of LET spectra on orbital parameters. The results are used to estimate the CR quality factor (QF) for the Cosmos 1887 mission.

Akopova, A. B.; Magradze, N. V.; Dudkin, V. E.; Kovalev, E. E.; Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.; Benton, E. R.; Parnell, T. A.; Watts, J. W. Jr

1990-01-01

269

The MIT Design Advisor : simple and rapid energy simulation of early-stage building designs  

E-print Network

Simulation tools, when applied early in the design process, can considerably reduce the energy demand of newly constructed buildings. For a simulation tool to assist with design, it must be easy to use, provide feedback ...

Urban, Bryan J. (Bryan James)

2007-01-01

270

Design Enhancements of the Fourier Kelvin Stellar Interferometer to Enable Detection of Earth Twins  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During the last few years, considerable effort has been directed towards very large-scale (> $5 billion) missions to detect and characterize Mars-radius to Earth-radius planets around nearby stars; such as the Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer and Darwin missions. However, technological issues such as formation flying and control of systematic noise sources will likely prevent these missions from entering Phase A until at least the end of the next decade. Presently more than 350 planets have been discovered by a variety of techniques, and little is known about the majority of them other than their approximate mass. However, a simplified nulling interferometer operating in the near- to mid-infrared (e.g. approx. 5-15 microns), like the enhanced version of the Fourier Kelvin Stellar Interferometer (FKSI), can characterize the atmospheres of a large sample of the known planets - including Earth twins. Many other scientific problems can be addressed with a system like FKSI, including the studies of debris disks, active galactic nuclei, and low mass companions around nearby stars. We report results of a recent engineering study on an enhanced version of FKSI that includes 1-meter primary mirrors, 20-meter boom length, and an advanced sun shield that will provide a 45-degree FOR and 40K operating temperature for all optics including siderostats.

Barry, Richard K.; Danchi, William C.; Lopez, Bruno; Rinehart, Stephan; Augereau, Jean-Charles; Beust, Herve; Bonfils, Xavier; Borde, Pascal; Kern, Pierre; Leger, Alain; Monin, Jean-Louis; Mourard, Denis; Ollivier, Marc; Petrov, Roman; Vakhili, Farrokh

2009-01-01

271

Cloud Effects on Meridional Atmospheric Energy Budget Estimated from Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The zonal mean atmospheric cloud radiative effect, defined as the difference of the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) and surface cloud radiative effects, is estimated from three years of Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) data. The zonal mean shortwave effect is small, though it tends to be positive (warming). This indicates that clouds increase shortwave absorption in the atmosphere, especially in midlatitudes. The zonal mean atmospheric cloud radiative effect is, however, dominated by the longwave effect. The zonal mean longwave effect is positive in the tropics and decreases with latitude to negative values (cooling) in polar regions. The meridional gradient of cloud effect between midlatitude and polar regions exists even when uncertainties in the cloud effect on the surface enthalpy flux and in the modeled irradiances are taken into account. This indicates that clouds increase the rate of generation of mean zonal available potential energy. Because the atmospheric cooling effect in polar regions is predominately caused by low level clouds, which tend to be stationary, we postulate that the meridional and vertical gradients of cloud effect increase the rate of meridional energy transport by dynamics in the atmosphere from midlatitude to polar region, especially in fall and winter. Clouds then warm the surface in polar regions except in the Arctic in summer. Clouds, therefore, contribute in increasing the rate of meridional energy transport from midlatitude to polar regions through the atmosphere.

Kato, Seiji; Rose, Fred G.; Rutan, David A.; Charlock, Thomas P.

2008-01-01

272

Interplanetary mission design handbook. Volume 1, part 4: Earth to Saturn ballistic mission opportunities, 1985-2005  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Graphical data necessary for the preliminary design of ballistic missions to Saturn are provided. Contours of launch energy requirements as well as many other launch and Saturn arrival parameters, are presented in launch date/arrival date space for all launch opportunities from 1985 through 2005. In addition, an extensive text is included which explains mission design methods, from launch window development to Saturn probe and orbiter arrival design, utilizing the graphical data in this volume as well as numerous equations elating various parameters. This is the first of a planned series of mission design documents which will apply to all planets and some other bodies in the solar system.

Sergeyevsky, A. B.; Snyder, G. C.

1981-01-01

273

Earth-model discrimination method  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Investigation of the earth's interior is attempted via gravimetric terrestrial spectroscopy from superconducting gravimeter (SG) records containing all medium and large earthquakes that affected the SG. I introduce a general (single station, all-type earthquakes; no pre- or post-processing) method that enables discrimination amongst geophysical earth models by establishing if and when there exist high direct functional correlation values between the oscillations of the earth gravity field taken at a model's low eigenfrequencies, and the earth seismicity expressed in seismic energies and seismic magnitudes. I demonstrate for the first time in geophysics the negative effect that the generating of input-data, for the purpose of completing the time-series, has on the Fourier spectral analyses. To accommodate the problem on existing computers and to create nondistorted 8-sec and 32-sec filtered records from the original one-second data, I design a non-equidistant filter that applies Gaussian weights while accounting for missing data within the filtering step. So filtered, the records are then used in computing the least-squares spectra. Earthquakes are the most common source of abrupt releases of kinetic energy on earth. I then exploit the Jeffreys's rule of thumb: in many earthquakes observations of only the horizontal earth movements during the passage of shear (S) waves cart be ccsed to estimate the order of the total released energy. From here I infer that the ratios of kinetic energy EK traveling throughout the earth and displacing the inner masses, vs. seismic energy ES as that part of kinetic energy, which is transmitted mostly through the lithosphere in the form of surface-waves and measured by the seismographs, ought to bc constant in most earthquakes. I then hypothesize that the measure of the earth gravity field oscillations, as deduced in the form of median magnitudes of gravity spectra, stands in a direct correlation with earth seismicity along the low characteristic frequencies. In order to prove the hypothesis I process some 10.1 billion observations and compute the diurnal averages of non-reduced-gravity oscillation magnitudes for the last decade and for each long normal mode for three different earth models. I then directly correlate three series against the series containing seismic energies, as well as agamst the series containing seismic magnitudes of 381, M > 6.3 earthquakes for each day in the [-30, +30] days interval. Direct cross-correlation values as high as 0.97 were obtained, and the hypothesis thus proven. The direct functional correlation values between diurnal average magnitudes of the earth gravity field and all medium-to-large earthquakes from one decade are proposed as a tool for discriminatmg amongst earth models. If high functional correlation values can be obtained using this method, a tested earth model is to be considered a successful one. The functional correlation values computed from variance-spectra are shown to possess an absolute high for periods of 821 s, which could be used as a refinement constraint in earth-model design. For all three earth models the functional correlation values are higher when seismic energies are used rather than seismic magnitudes, as well as when variance-spectra are used rather than power-spectra. The method is unique in its rigor, since it enables assessments of earth models from single-station (gravity) measurements, by using all global earthquakes above certain strength, i.e., regardless of their type, faulting mechanism, etc., and without preprocessing or post-processing to enhance and correct either raw gravity data or their spectra. As such, the method serves as a basis for a definition of different discriminatory criteria.

Omerbashich, Mensur

274

A synthetic Earth Gravity Model Designed Specifically for Testing Regional Gravimetric Geoid Determination Algorithms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A synthetic [simulated] Earth gravity model (SEGM) of the geoid, gravity and topography has been constructed over Australia specifically for validating regional gravimetric geoid determination theories, techniques and computer software. This regional high-resolution (1-arc-min by 1-arc-min) Australian SEGM (AusSEGM) is a combined source and effect model. The long-wavelength effect part (up to and including spherical harmonic degree and order 360) is taken from an assumed errorless EGM96 global geopotential model. Using forward modelling via numerical Newtonian integration, the short-wavelength source part is computed from a high-resolution (3-arc-sec by 3-arc-sec) synthetic digital elevation model (SDEM), which is a fractal surface based on the GLOBE v1 DEM. All topographic masses are modelled with a constant mass-density of 2,670 kg/m3. Based on these input data, gravity values on the synthetic topography (on a grid and at arbitrarily distributed discrete points) and consistent geoidal heights at regular 1-arc-min geographical grid nodes have been computed. The precision of the synthetic gravity and geoid data (after a first iteration) is estimated to be better than 30 ? Gal and 3 mm, respectively, which reduces to 1 ? Gal and 1 mm after a second iteration. The second iteration accounts for the changes in the geoid due to the superposed synthetic topographic mass distribution. The first iteration of AusSEGM is compared with Australian gravity and GPS-levelling data to verify that it gives a realistic representation of the Earth抯 gravity field. As a by-product of this comparison, AusSEGM gives further evidence of the north south-trending error in the Australian Height Datum. The freely available AusSEGM-derived gravity and SDEM data, included as Electronic Supplementary Material (ESM) with this paper, can be used to compute a geoid model that, if correct, will agree to in 3 mm with the AusSEGM geoidal heights, thus offering independent verification of theories and numerical techniques used for regional geoid modelling.

Baran, I.; Kuhn, M.; Claessens, S. J.; Featherstone, W. E.; Holmes, S. A.; Van?ek, P.

2006-04-01

275

Fuzzy Logic Trajectory Design and Guidance for Terminal Area Energy Management  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The second generation reusable launch vehicle will leverage many new technologies to make flight to low earth orbit safer and more cost effective. One important capability will be completely autonomous flight during reentry and landing, thus making it unnecessary to man the vehicle for cargo missions with stringent weight constraints. Implementation of sophisticated new guidance and control methods will enable the vehicle to return to earth under less than favorable conditions. The return to earth consists of three phases--Entry, Terminal Area Energy Management (TAEM), and Approach and Landing. The Space Shuttle is programmed to fly all three phases of flight automatically, and under normal circumstances the astronaut-pilot takes manual control only during the Approach and Landing phase. The automatic control algorithms used in the Shuttle for TAEM and Approach and Landing have been developed over the past 30 years. They are computationally efficient, and based on careful study of the spacecraft's flight dynamics, and heuristic reasoning. The gliding return trajectory is planned prior to the mission, and only minor adjustments are made during flight for perturbations in the vehicle energy state. With the advent of the X-33 and X-34 technology demonstration vehicles, several authors investigated implementing advanced control methods to provide autonomous real-time design of gliding return trajectories thus enhancing the ability of the vehicle to adjust to unusual energy states. The bulk of work published to date deals primarily with the approach and landing phase of flight where changes in heading angle are small, and range to the runway is monotonically decreasing. These benign flight conditions allow for model simplification and fairly straightforward optimization. This project focuses on the TAEM phase of flight where mathematically precise methods have produced limited results. Fuzzy Logic methods are used to make onboard autonomous gliding return trajectory design robust to a wider energy envelope, and the possibility of control surface failures, thus increasing the flexibility of unmanned gliding recovery and landing.

Burchett, Bradley

2003-01-01

276

Design of a high precision microwave reflector. [for earth upper atmosphere study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Development of a high accuracy spherical microwave reflector to support contour RMS and pointing requirements for a new series of space instruments is reported. The reflector system is composed of precision machined aluminum tile reflectors supported from a eutectic coated graphite epoxy structure by flexures. Several basic technologies have been integrated into a manufacturing process that accommodates fabrication techniques of both optical and composite constraints. The optical figure and its change due to thermal gradient was measured in a thermal vacuum environment with a Ronchi system. The radiometer system is in support of the Microwave Limb Sounder, an experiment to measure emissions from earth's atmospheric limb thus obtaining wind, temperature, pressure and chemical composition measurements.

Noller, E. W.; Bauer, J. L.

1980-01-01

277

The distribution of solar energy at the earth's surface as calculated in the ECMWF Re-analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Knowledge of the distribution of solar energy at the earth's surface is required for various practical and theoretical purposes. The solar fluxes calculated in Re-Analysis projects are promising since their radiative transfer calculations take into account the best current estimates of the humidity and temperature structure in the atmosphere. The present study assesses the quality of the insolation climatology of

Martin Wild; Atsumu Ohmura; Hans Gilgen; Jean-Jacques Morcrette

1998-01-01

278

On the Earth's surface energy exchange determination from ERS satellite ATSR data: Part 3. Turbulent heat flux on open sea  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is the third in a series of papers which discusses determination of the Earth's surface energy exchange from ERS satellite Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR) data. This paper focuses on estimation of turbulence heat flux exchange by using ATSR data in areas of open sea. In this paper, we present results of net longwave radiation, latent heat flux and sensible

Yong Xue; D. T. Llewellyn-Jones; S. P. Lawrence; C. T. Mutlow

2000-01-01

279

Design Concepts for Optimum Energy Use in HVAC Systems.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Much of the innovative work in the design and application of heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems is concentrated on improving the cost effectiveness of such systems through optimizing energy use. One approach to the problem is to reduce a building's HVAC energy demands by designing it for lower heat gains and losses in the

Electric Energy Association, New York, NY.

280

MS PHD'S PDP: Vision, Design, Implementation, and Outcomes of a Minority-Focused Earth System Sciences Program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As minorities are predicted to comprise at least 33% of the US population by the year 2010, their representation in the STEM fields, including the ocean sciences, is still poorly established. In order to advance the goal of better decision making, the Ocean Sciences community must achieve greater levels of diversity in membership. To achieve this objective of greater diversity in the sciences, the Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success in Earth System Science Professional Development Program (MS PHD'S PDP), which was launched in 2003, is supported via grants from NASA's Office of Earth Science, and NSF's Directorate for Geosciences. The MS PHD'S PDP is designed to provide professional and mentoring experiences that facilitate the advancement of minorities committed to achieving outstanding Earth System Science careers. The MS PHD'S PDP is structured in three phases, connected by engagement in a virtual community, continuous peer and mentor to mentee interactions, and the professional support necessary for ensuring the educational success of the student participants. Since the pilot program in 2003, the MSPHD'S PDP, housed at the University of South Florida's College of Marine Science, has produced 4 cohorts of students. Seventy-five have completed the program; of those 6 have earned their doctoral degrees. Of the 45 current participants 10 are graduate students in Marine Science and 15 are still undergraduates, the remaining 10 participants are graduate students in other STEM fields. Since the implementation of the MSPHD'S PDP a total of 87 students and 33 scientist mentors have become part of the MSPHD'S virtual community, helping to improve the learning environment for current and future participants as well as build a community of minority students that encourages each other to pursue their academic degrees.

Habtes, S. Y.; Mayo, M.; Ithier-Guzman, W.; Pyrtle, A. J.; Williamson Whitney, V.

2007-05-01

281

The BATSE Earth Occultation Catalog of Low Energy Gamma Ray Sources  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), provided a record of the hard X-ray/low energy gamma ray sky between April 1991 and June 2000. During that time, a catalog of known sources was derived from existing catalogs such as HEAO A-4 (Levine et al. 1984), as well as new transient sources discovered with BATSE and other X-ray monitors operating in the CGRO era. The Earth Occultation Technique (Harmon et al. 2001, astro-ph/0109069) was used to monitor a combination of these sources, mostly galactic, totaling to about 175 objects. The catalog will present the global properties of these sources and their probability of detection (greater than 10 mCrab, 20-100 keV) with BATSE. Systematic errors due to unknown sources or background components are included. Cursory analyses to search for new transients (35-80 mCrab in the 20-100 keV band) and super-orbital periods in known binary sources are also presented. Whole mission light curves and associated data production/analysis tools are being delivered to the High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC) for public use.

Harmon, B. A.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Paciesas, W. S.; Zhang, S. N.; Finger, M. H.; Connaughton, V.; Koshut, T. M.; Henze, W.; McCollough, M. L.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

282

Influences of energy economy on steam turbine design  

SciTech Connect

The pulp and paper industry uses condensing, backpressure, and automatic extraction types of steam turbines. Small drive turbines have better efficiency with multiple stages. The author presents a summary of some alternate steam turbine designs and shows the impact on operating energy costs. There is a summary of operating parameters for various cogeneration design options with illustration of the relative energy cost of each of the various designs.

Garner, J.W. (BE and K Engineering, Morrisville, NC (United States))

1993-11-01

283

Investigation of design options for improving the energy efficiency of conventionally designed refrigerator-freezers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several design options for improving the energy efficiency of conventionally-designed, domestic refrigerator freezers (RFs) were incorporated into two 1990 production RF cabinets and refrigeration systems. The baseline performance of the original units and unit components were extensively documented to provide a firm basis for experimentally measured energy savings. A detailed refrigerator system computer model which could simulate cycling behavior was

J. R. Sand; E. A. Vineyard; R. H. Bohman

1993-01-01

284

A general design for energy test procedures  

SciTech Connect

Appliances are increasingly controlled by microprocessors. Unfortunately, energy test procedures have not been modified to capture the positive and negative contributions of the microprocessor to the appliance's energy use. A new test procedure is described which captures both the mechanical and logical features present in many new appliances. We developed an energy test procedure for refrigerators that incorporates most aspects of the proposed new approach. Some of the strengths and weaknesses of the new test are described.

Meier, Alan

2000-06-15

285

Initial results from ground-based testing of an atomic oxygen sensor designed for use in earth orbit  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Many sensors have been applied to the problem of measuring neutral atomic oxygen fluxes in low Earth orbit. The techniques used to date tend to suffer from several key disadvantages, variously: large mass and power budgets, large size, high cost, the ability to make only one measurement and poor time resolution. In this article preliminary results from ground-based testing of a novel atomic oxygen sensor based on a semiconducting metal oxide are reported. Such sensors are simple and relatively cheap while also requiring small power and mass budgets and, most importantly, are reusable. The sensors have been used in laboratory experiments to investigate the axial variation of atomic oxygen flux in a pulsed laser atomic oxygen source; the results compare well with readings taken with a carbon-coated quartz crystal microbalance. A small instrument based on these sensors has been designed and built for application on the UK's STRV-1c microsatellite.

Osborne, J. J.; Roberts, G. T.; Chambers, A. R.; Gabriel, S. B.

1999-05-01

286

Evaluating the design of satellite scanning radiometers for earth radiation budget measurements with system simulations. Part 1: Instantaneous estimates  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A set of system simulations was performed to evaluate candidate scanner configurations to fly as a part of the Earth Radiation Budget Instrument (ERBI) on the polar platforms during the 1990's. The simulation is considered of instantaneous sampling (without diurnal averaging) of the longwave and shortwave fluxes at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). After measurement and subsequent inversion to the TOA, the measured fluxes were compared to the reference fluxes for 2.5 deg lat/long resolution targets. The reference fluxes at this resolution are obtained by integrating over the 25 x 25 = 625 grid elements in each target. The differences between each of these two resultant spatially averaged sets of target measurements (errors) are taken and then statistically summarized. Five instruments are considered: (1) the Conically Scanning Radiometer (CSR); (2) the ERBE Cross Track Scanner; (3) the Nimbus-7 Biaxial Scanner; (4) the Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System Instrument (CERES-1); and (5) the Active Cavity Array (ACA). Identical studies of instantaneous error were completed for many days, two seasons, and several satellite equator crossing longitudes. The longwave flux errors were found to have the same space and time characteristics as for the shortwave fluxes, but the errors are only about 25 pct. of the shortwave errors.

Stowe, Larry; Ardanuy, Philip; Hucek, Richard; Abel, Peter; Jacobowitz, Herbert

1991-01-01

287

Total energy control system autopilot design with constrained parameter optimization  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A description is given of the application of a multivariable control design method (SANDY) based on constrained parameter optimization to the design of a multiloop aircraft flight control system. Specifically, the design method is applied to the direct synthesis of a multiloop AFCS inner-loop feedback control system based on total energy control system (TECS) principles. The design procedure offers a structured approach for the determination of a set of stabilizing controller design gains that meet design specifications in closed-loop stability, command tracking performance, disturbance rejection, and limits on control activities. The approach can be extended to a broader class of multiloop flight control systems. Direct tradeoffs between many real design goals are rendered systematic by proper formulation of the design objectives and constraints. Satisfactory designs are usually obtained in few iterations. Performance characteristics of the optimized TECS design have been improved, particularly in the areas of closed-loop damping and control activity in the presence of turbulence.

Ly, Uy-Loi; Voth, Christopher

1990-01-01

288

Designing and Managing Datacenters Powered by Renewable Energy  

E-print Network

Designing and Managing Datacenters Powered by Renewable Energy 麓I~nigo Goiri, William Katsak, Kien,wkatsak,lekien,tdnguyen,ricardob}@cs.rutgers.edu Abstract On-site renewable energy has the potential to reduce data- centers' carbon footprint and power. These datacenters will either generate their own renewable energy (self-generation) or draw it directly from

289

Total energy calculations using DFT+DMFT: Computing the pressure phase diagram of the rare earth nickelates  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A full implementation of the ab initio density functional plus dynamical mean field theory (DFT+DMFT) formalism to perform total energy calculations and structural relaxations is proposed and implemented. The method is applied to the structural and metal-insulator transitions of the rare earth nickelate perovskites as a function of rare earth ion, pressure, and temperature. In contrast to previous DFT and DFT+U theories, the present method accounts for the experimentally observed structure of LaNiO3 and the insulating nature of the other perovskites, and quantitatively reproduces the metal-insulator and structural phase diagram in the plane of pressure and rare earth element. The temperature dependence of the energetics of the phase transformation indicates that the thermal transition is driven by phonon entropy effects.

Park, Hyowon; Millis, Andrew J.; Marianetti, Chris A.

2014-06-01

290

Revisiting the Earth's sea-level and energy budgets from 1961 to 2008  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We review the sea-level and energy budgets together from 1961, using recent and updated estimates of all terms. From 1972 to 2008, the observed sea-level rise (1.8 0.2 mm yr-1 from tide gauges alone and 2.1 0.2 mm yr -1 from a combination of tide gauges and altimeter observations) agrees well with the sum of contributions (1.8 0.4 mm yr-1) in magnitude and with both having similar increases in the rate of rise during the period. The largest contributions come from ocean thermal expansion (0.8 mm yr-1) and the melting of glaciers and ice caps (0.7 mm yr -1), with Greenland and Antarctica contributing about 0.4 mm yr -1. The cryospheric contributions increase through the period (particularly in the 1990s) but the thermosteric contribution increases less rapidly. We include an improved estimate of aquifer depletion (0.3 mm yr -1), partially offsetting the retention of water in dams and giving a total terrestrial storage contribution of-0.1 mm yr-1. Ocean warming (90% of the total of the Earth's energy increase) continues through to the end of the record, in agreement with continued greenhouse gas forcing. The aerosol forcing, inferred as a residual in the atmospheric energy balance, is estimated as-0.8 0.4 W m-2 for the 1980s and early 1990s. It increases in the late 1990s, as is required for consistency with little surface warming over the last decade. This increase is likely at least partially related to substantial increases in aerosol emissions from developing nations and moderate volcanic activity. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

Church, John A.; White, Neil J.; Konikow, Leonard F.; Domingues, Catia M.; Cogley, J. Graham; Rignot, Eric; Gregory, Jonathan M.; van den Broeke, Michiel R.; Monaghan, Andrew J.; Velicogna, Isabella

2011-01-01

291

Probabilistic Design of a Mars Sample Return Earth Entry Vehicle Thermal Protection System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The driving requirement for design of a Mars Sample Return mission is to assure containment of the returned samples. Designing to, and demonstrating compliance with, such a requirement requires physics based tools that establish the relationship between engineer's sizing margins and probabilities of failure. The traditional method of determining margins on ablative thermal protection systems, while conservative, provides little insight into the actual probability of an over-temperature during flight. The objective of this paper is to describe a new methodology for establishing margins on sizing the thermal protection system (TPS). Results of this Monte Carlo approach are compared with traditional methods.

Dec, John A.; Mitcheltree, Robert A.

2002-01-01

292

Application and design of inexpensive small earth terminals for satellite communications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Different applications of miniearth terminals (MET) for various satellite communication networks are discussed, and then the steps that must be taken to design a reliable satellite system using METs are specified. The main emphasis of the paper is on the various applications of the METs, selection of access method, modulation scheme, power requirement, and performance analysis. Depending on the application, the miniearth terminals may be designed to be used in the networks with any of the following access techniques: SCPC, MC-TDMA, TDM, satellite switch TDMA, random multiple access or some forms of hybrid demand assignment multiple access methods constituted of frequency time or spatial separation.

Hossein Sharifi, M.; Pourmand, B.

293

Five year research plan, 1988--1992: Energy from the earth: Geothermal energy program  

SciTech Connect

Consistent with national energy policy guidance, the plan concentrates on research and development (R and D) and limits system experiments to only those necessary to stimulate industrial confidence in the validity of research findings. A key strategy element is the continuation of the government/industry partnership which is critical to successful development of geothermal technology. The primary near-term research emphasis is the extension of hydrothermal technology options for reservoir identification, reservoir analysis, hard rock penetration, and flash and binary electric plants. The advanced geothermal resources--geopressured, hot dry rock, and magma--are longer-term and higher-risk focal points, and research in these areas centers on establishing a technology base that will allow industry to make prudent and timely investment decisions with respect to the use of these resources. 13 figs.

Not Available

1988-10-01

294

ERTS-B (Earth Resources Technology Satellite). [spacecraft design remote sensor description, and technology utilization  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Mission plans and objectives of the ERTS 2 Satellite are presented. ERTS 2 follow-on investigations in various scientific disciplines including agriculture, meteorology, land-use, geology, water resources, oceanography, and environment are discussed. Spacecraft design and its sensors are described along with the Delta launch vehicle and launch operations. Applications identified from ERTS 1 investigations are summarized.

1975-01-01

295

A Design Based Research of an Earth Systems Based Environmental Curriculum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents a model for the development of an environmentally oriented unit designed to be implemented as an integral part of the science core curriculum. The program's main goal is encouraging students at the junior high-school level to develop systems-thinking and environmental insight as a basis for environmental literacy. A

Assaraf, Orit Ben-Zvi; Orion, Nir

2009-01-01

296

Design of a recurve actuator for maximum energy efficiency  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper we study the optimal design of recurve arrays. An analytic model of the static response of the recurve actuator with energy flow in the system is derived. Two optimization problems for the recurve array are formulated with material, packaging, and performance constraints. One formulation is based on minimum weight. The second formulation is based on energy efficiency. A genetic algorithm is used to find the optimum designs. Recurve arrays designed for maximum energy conversion efficiency are compared to those designed for minimum weight. Parametric studies are conducted to investigate the effect of the stiffness of the driven structure and the maximum deliverable voltage on the optimized designs. These optimization formulations are effective design tools for a relatively complex actuator.

Seresta, Omprakash; Ragon, Scott; Abdalla, Mostafa M.; G黵dal, Zafer; Lindner, Douglas K.

2006-12-01

297

MATLAB and Design Recipes for Earth Sciences: How to Collect, Process and Present Geoscientific Information  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The overall aim of the class was to introduce undergraduate students to the typical course of a project. The project starts with searching of the relevant literature, reviewing and ranking of the published books and journal articles, extracting the relevant information as text, data or graphs from the literature, searching, processing and visualizing data, and compiling and presenting the results as posters, abstracts and oral presentations. In the first lecture, an unexpectedly-large number (ca. 65) of students subscribed to the course urging us to teach the course in a lecture hall with a projector, microphone and speaker system, a table for the teacher's laptop and equipment, private laptops of the students and wireless Internet. We used a MOODLE eLearning environment to handle the large number of participants in a highly interactive, tutorial-style course environment. Moreover, the students were organized in five GOOGLE groups not accessed by the course instructor, but led by elected student group leaders and their deputies. During the course, the instructor defined three principle topics for each of the groups within the overall theme Past Climate Changes. After having defined sub-themes within the groups for each student, the course culminated in the presentation of the project work as conference-style posters, 200-word abstracts and one-hour sessions with 10-15 two-minute presentations, chaired by the project leaders and their deputies. The course inspired a new textbook that will appear later this year, using a similar concept as its sister book MATLAB Recipes for Earth Sciences-3rd Edition (Trauth, Springer 2010).

Trauth, M.; Sillmann, E.

2012-04-01

298

Architecture and Design of Storage and Data Management for the NASA Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mission to Planet Earth (MTPE) is a long-term NASA research mission to study the processes leading to global climate change. The EOS Data and Information System (EOSDIS) is the component within MTPE that will provide the Earth science community with easy, affordable, and reliable access to Earth science data. EOSDIS is a distributed system, with major facilities at eight Distributed

Ben Kobler; John Berbert; Parris Caulk; P. C. Hariharan

1995-01-01

299

Energy Efficient School Designed for the Future  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When completed, the planned Greeley Elementary School will be able to accommodate any future changes in enrollment and technological developments, while maintaining a constant energy efficient heating and cooling operation. (Author/MLF)

Modern Schools, 1977

1977-01-01

300

The BATSE Earth Occultation Catalog of Low Energy Gamma-Ray Sources  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE),aboard the COmptOn Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), provided a record of the hard X-ray/low energy gamma ray sky between April 1991 and June 2000. During that time, a catalog of known sources was derived from existing catalogs such as HEAO A-4 (Levine et al. 19841, as well as new transient sources discovered with RATSE and other X-ray monitors operating in the CGRO era. The Earth Occultation Technique (Harmon et al. 2001, astro-ph/0109069) was used to monitor a combination of these sources, mostly galactic, totaling about 175 objects. The catalog will present the global properties of these sources and their probability of detection (>lO mCrab, 20-100 keV) with BATSE. Systematic errors due to unknown sources or background components are included. Cursory analyses to search for new transients (35-80 mCrab in the 20-100 keV band) and super-orbital periods in known binary sources are also presented. Whole mission light curves and associated data production/analysis tools are being delivered to the HEASARC for public use.

Harmon, B. A.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Paciesas, W. S.; Zhang, S. N.; Finger, M. H.; Connaughton, V.; Koshut, T. M.; Henze, W.; McCollough, M. L.

2004-01-01

301

The BATSE Earth Occultation Catalog of Low Energy Gamma Ray Sources  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), provided a record of the hard X-ray/low energy gamma ray sky between April 1991 and June 2000. During that time, a catalog of known sources was derived from existing catalogs such as HEAO A-4, as well as new transient sources discovered with BATSE and other X-ray monitors operating in the CGRO era. The Earth Occultation Technique was used to monitor a combination of these sources, mostly galactic, totaling to about 175 objects. The catalog will present the global properties of these sources and their probability of detection (> 10 mCrab, 20-100 keV) with BATSE. Systematic errors due to unknown sources or background components are included. Cursory analyses to search for new transients (35-80 mCrab in the 20-100 keV band) and super-orbital periods in known binary sources are also presented. Whole mission light curves and associated data production/analysis tools are being delivered to the HEASARC for public use.

Harmon, B. A.; WilsonHodge, C. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Paciesas, W.

2002-01-01

302

Design of a 12-GHz multicarrier earth-terminal for satellite-CATV interconnection  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The design and development of the front-end for a multi-carrier system that allows multiplex signal transmission from satellite-borne transponders is described. Detailed systems analyses provided down-converter specifications. The 12 GHz carrier down-converter uses waveguide, coaxial, and microstrip transmission line elements in its implementation. Mixing is accomplished in a single-ended coaxial mixer employing a field-replacable cartridge style diode.

Newman, B. A.; Singh, J. P.; Rosenbaum, F. J.

1971-01-01

303

Design of a K-Band Transmit Phased Array For Low Earth Orbit Satellite Communications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The design of a light weight, low cost phased array antenna is presented. Multilayer printed wiring board (PWB) technology is utilized for Radio Frequencies (RF) and DC/Logic manifold distribution. Transmit modules are soldered on one side and patch antenna elements are on the other, allowing the use of automated assembly processes. The 19 GHz antenna has two independently steerable beams, each capable of transferring data at 622 Mbps. A passive, self-contained phase change thermal management system is also presented.

Watson, Thomas; Miller, Stephen; Kershner, Dennis; Anzic, Godfrey

2000-01-01

304

Advanced earth observation spacecraft computer-aided design software: Technical, user and programmer guide  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The IDEAS computer of NASA is a tool for interactive preliminary design and analysis of LSS (Large Space System). Nine analysis modules were either modified or created. These modules include the capabilities of automatic model generation, model mass properties calculation, model area calculation, nonkinematic deployment modeling, rigid-body controls analysis, RF performance prediction, subsystem properties definition, and EOS science sensor selection. For each module, a section is provided that contains technical information, user instructions, and programmer documentation.

Farrell, C. E.; Krauze, L. D.

1983-01-01

305

Waste-to-Energy Design Proposal for  

E-print Network

York. The design utilizes space located near the Gowanus Canal that currently houses an abandoned grain municipal solid waste combustion power plant on this site would process 949,000 tons of New York City and the amount of waste exported out of New York City by truck, train or barge to out-of-state landfills would

Columbia University

306

Design of a 3 ?m pixel linear CMOS sensor for earth observation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A visible wavelength linear photosensor featuring a pixel size of 3 ?m has been designed for fabrication using commercial 0.25 ?m CMOS technology. For the photo-sensing element, the design uses a special "deep N-well" in P-epi diode offered by the foundry for imaging devices. Pixel reset is via an adjacent p-FET, thus allowing high reset voltages for a wide pixel voltage swing. The pixel voltage is buffered using a voltage-follower op-amp and a sampling scheme is used to allow correlated double sampling (CDS) for removal of reset noise. Reset and signal levels are buffered through a 16:1 multiplexer to a switched capacitor amplifier which performs the CDS function. Incorporated in the CDS circuit is a programmable gain of 1-8 for increased signal-to-noise ratio at low signal levels. Data output is via 4 analogue output drivers for off-chip conversion. Each driver supplies a differential output voltage with a 1 V swing for improved power supply noise rejection. The readout circuitry is designed for 12 bit accuracy at frame rates of up to 6.25 kHz. This gives a peak data rate at each output driver of 10 M samples/s. The device will operate on a 3.3 V supply and will dissipate approximately 950 mW. Simulations indicate an equivalent noise charge at the pixel of 66.3 e - for a full well capacity of 255,000 e -, giving a dynamic range of 71.7 dB.

Morrissey, Q. R.; Waltham, N. R.; Turchetta, R.; French, M. J.; Bagnall, D. M.; Al-Hashimi, B. M.

2003-10-01

307

Design and "As Flown" Radiation Environments for Materials in Low Earth Orbits  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The design estimate for the materials for the International Space Station (ISS) specified in SSP 30512 was a conservative estimate. The environment dose was over estimated. The materials originally qualified for approximately 10-15 years are anticipated to be acceptable for periods of up to 20-30 years based on SSP-30512 or 40-60 years based on 2x SSP-30512. This viewgraph presentation shows charts and graphs that review the altitude, the solar minimum and maximum, and the radiation exposure of other satellite, among other graphics.

Minow, Joseph I.; Altstatt, Richard L.; McWilliams, Brett; Koontz, Steven L.

2006-01-01

308

Implications of solar energy alternatives for community design  

SciTech Connect

A graduate-level studio at the Harvard School of Design explored how a policy of solar-based energy independence will influence the design of a new community of approximately 4500 housing units and other uses. Three large sites outside Tucson (a cooling problem), Atlanta (a humidity problem), and Boston (a heating problem) were selected. Each is typical of its region. A single program was assumed and designed for. Each site had two teams, one following a compact approach and one following a more dispersed approach. Each was free to choose the most appropriate mix of (solar) technology and scale, and was free to integrate energy and community in the design as it saw fit. These choice and integration issues are key areas where our experience may be of interest to those involved in community design and solar energy.

Santos, A.; Steinitz, C.

1980-06-01

309

Design of test bench apparatus for piezoelectric energy harvesters  

E-print Network

This thesis presents the design and analysis of an experimental test bench for the characterization of piezoelectric microelectromechanical system (MEMS) energy harvester being developed by the Micro & Nano Systems Laboratory ...

Yoon, You C. (You Chang)

2013-01-01

310

Design of a Computerized Energy Management System for Marine Applications  

E-print Network

A computer-based energy management system for marine applications is presented. The problem of fuel-management for large diesel engines on board ship is discussed. The design of the computer hardware and software are presented including...

Russell, B. D.; Perry, L. W.; Gerloff, G. W.; Heller, R. P.; Pankonien, G.

1982-01-01

311

Process Integration: Designing for Energy, Capital and Operability  

E-print Network

Over the last five years, significant energy savings have been achieved by several international companies using the pinch concept for heat integration. New concepts are now being added to help the designer deal with capital cost minimization...

Linnhoff, B.

312

Design New Buildings To Save Energy -- and Money  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Buildings should be designed so that energy systems function with maximum efficiency. Re-evaluation of standards for ventilation and lighting is recommended. Heat recovery techniques and topography can reduce heating loads. (MF)

Rittelmann, Richard

1974-01-01

313

Initial Investigation of Reaction Control System Design on Spacecraft Handling Qualities for Earth Orbit Docking  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A program of research, development, test, and evaluation is planned for the development of Spacecraft Handling Qualities guidelines. In this first experiment, the effects of Reaction Control System design characteristics and rotational control laws were evaluated during simulated proximity operations and docking. Also, the influence of piloting demands resulting from varying closure rates was assessed. The pilot-in-the-loop simulation results showed that significantly different spacecraft handling qualities result from the design of the Reaction Control System. In particular, cross-coupling between translational and rotational motions significantly affected handling qualities as reflected by Cooper-Harper pilot ratings and pilot workload, as reflected by Task-Load Index ratings. This influence is masked but only slightly by the rotational control system mode. While rotational control augmentation using Rate Command Attitude Hold can reduce the workload (principally, physical workload) created by cross-coupling, the handling qualities are not significantly improved. The attitude and rate deadbands of the RCAH introduced significant mental workload and control compensation to evaluate when deadband firings would occur, assess their impact on docking performance, and apply control inputs to mitigate that impact.

Bailey, Randall E.; Jackson, E. Bruce; Goodrich, Kenneth H.; Ragsdale, W. Al; Neuhaus, Jason; Barnes, Jim

2008-01-01

314

Prelaunch calibrations of the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission and Earth Observing System morning (EOS-AM1) spacecraft thermistor bolometer sensors  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) spacecraft scanning thermistor bolometer sensors measure Earth radiances in the broadband shortwave solar (0.3-5.0 ?m) and total (0.3->100 ?m) spectral bands as well as in the 8-12-?m water vapor window spectral band. On November 27, 1997, the launch of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) spacecraft placed the first set of

Robert B. Lee; Bruce R. Barkstrom; Herbert C. Bitting; Dominique A. H. Crommelynck; Jack Paden; Dhirendra K. Pandey; Kory J. Priestley; G. Louis Smith; Susan Thomas; K. Lee Thornhill; Robert S. Wilson

1998-01-01

315

Angular Distribution Models for Top-of-Atmosphere Radiative Flux Estimation from the Clouds and the Earth抯 Radiant Energy System Instrument on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Satellite  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative fluxes from ,the Clouds and the Earth抯 Radiant Energy System (CERES) are estimated by applying empirical Angular Distribution Models (ADMs) that convert instantaneous radiance measurements to TOA fluxes. This paper evaluates the accuracy of CERES TOA fluxes from ,a new ,set of ADMs ,developed ,for the CERES instrument on board ,the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM).

Norman G. Loeb; Konstantin Loukachine; Natividad Manalo-smith; Bruce A. Wielicki; David F. Young

316

Cogeneration Plant is Designed for Total Energy  

E-print Network

; HRSG auxiliary fires in service; steam turbine in service; and turbine ex tractions feeding the process. This is the design operating configuration for the cogeneration plant. Under these operating condi tions, the maximum attainable generation... for dumping steam; and process steam supplied via the extraction bypass valves. For any of these configurations the gas turbines are maintained at base load. The HRSG fires are used to maintain the HP header pressure, if auxiliary fires are required...

Howell, H. D.; Vera, R. L.

317

Combustor design tool for a gas fired thermophotovoltaic energy converter  

SciTech Connect

Recently, there has been a renewed interest in thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion. A TPV device converts radiant energy from a high temperature incandescent emitter directly into electricity by photovoltaic cells. The current Department of Energy sponsored research involves the design, construction and demonstration of a prototype TPV converter that uses a hydrocarbon fuel (such as natural gas) as the energy source. As the photovoltaic cells are designed to efficiently convert radiant energy at a prescribed wavelength, it is important that the temperature of the emitter be nearly constant over its entire surface. The US Naval Academy has been tasked with the development of a small emitter (with a high emissivity) that can be maintained at 1,756 K (2,700 F). This paper describes the computer spreadsheet model that was developed as a tool to be used for the design of the high temperature emitter.

Lindler, K.W.; Harper, M.J. [Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD (United States). Naval Architecture, Ocean and Marine Engineering Dept.

1995-07-01

318

Combustor design tool for a gas fired thermophotovoltaic energy converter  

SciTech Connect

Recently, there has been a renewed interest in thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion. A TPV device converts radiant energy from a high temperature incandescent emitter directly into electricity by photovoltaic cells. The current Department of Energy sponsored research involves the design, construction and demonstration of a prototype TPV converter that uses a hydrocarbon fuel (such as natural gas) as the energy source. As the photovoltaic cells are designed to efficiently convert radiant energy at a prescribed wavelength, it is important that the temperature of the emitter be nearly constant over its entire surface. The U. S. Naval Academy has been tasked with the development of a small emitter (with a high emissivity) that can be maintained at 1756 K (2700 F). This paper describes the computer spreadsheet model that was developed as a tool to be used for the design of the high temperature emitter.

Lindler, K.W.; Harper, M.J. [Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD (United States). Naval Architecture, Ocean and Marine Engineering Dept.

1995-12-31

319

Use of thulium-sensitized rare earth-doped low phonon energy crystalline hosts for IR sources  

PubMed Central

Crystalline hosts with low phonon energies enable novel energy transfer processes when doped with rare earth ions. Two applications of energy transfer for rare earth ions in thulium-sensitized low phonon energy crystals that result in infrared luminescence are discussed. One application is an endothermic, phonon-assisted cross-relaxation process in thulium-doped yttrium chloride that converts lattice phonons to infrared emission, which raises the possibility of a fundamentally new method for achieving solid-state optical cooling. The other application is an optically pumped mid-IR phosphor using thulium-praseodymium-doped potassium lead chloride that converts 805-nm diode light to broadband emission from 4,000 to 5,500爊m. These two applications in chloride crystals are discussed in terms of critical radii calculated from Forster-Dexter energy transfer theory. It is found that the critical radii for electric dipole-dipole interactions in low phonon energy chloride crystals are comparable to those in conventional oxide and fluoride crystals. It is the reduction in multi-phonon relaxation rates in chloride crystals that enable these additional energy transfer processes and infrared luminescence. PMID:24180684

2013-01-01

320

Novel High Energy Synthetic Jet Actuator Conceptual Design and Tendency  

Microsoft Academic Search

An idea of designing novel high energy synthetic jet actuator is put forward in this paper. The cavity pressure of the synthetic jet actuator can be rising by three methods, compressing volume, rising temperature, and increasing mass. The novel synthetic jet actuators can be designed by using the three methods and a novel hybrid method. The temperature actuator and hybrid

Z. B. Luo; Z. X. Xia; L. Wang; D. P. Wang

2011-01-01

321

Energy efficient engine fan component detailed design report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The fan component which was designed for the energy efficient engine is an advanced high performance, single stage system and is based on technology advancements in aerodynamics and structure mechanics. Two fan components were designed, both meeting the integrated core\\/low spool engine efficiency goal of 84.5%. The primary configuration, envisioned for a future flight propulsion system, features a shroudless, hollow

J. E. Halle; C. J. Michael

1981-01-01

322

Sub-Threshold Design: The Challenges of Minimizing Circuit Energy  

E-print Network

, especially for circuits with parallel leakage paths [11]. A 0.18碌m CMOS FFT processor uses circuitsSub-Threshold Design: The Challenges of Minimizing Circuit Energy B. H. Calhoun1 , A. Wang2 , N identify the key challenges that oppose sub- threshold circuit design and describe fabricated chips

Calhoun, Benton H.

323

The Earth-Moon CR3BP: A full Atlas of low-energy fast periodic transfer orbits  

E-print Network

In the framework of the planar CR3BP for mass parameter mu=0.0121505, corresponding to the Earth-Moon system, we identify and describe 80 families of periodic orbits encircling both the Earth and the Moon ("transfer" orbits). All the orbits in these families have very low energies, most of them corresponding to values of the Jacobi constant C for which the Hill surface is closed at the Lagrangian point L2. All of these orbits have also short period T, generally under six months. Most of the families are composed of orbits that are asymmetric with respect to the Earth-Moon axis. The main results presented for each family are: (i) the characteristic curves T(h), y(h), v_y(h), and v_x(h) on the Poincare section Sigma_1={x=0.836915310,y,v_x>0,v_y} normal to the Earth-Moon axis at the Lagrangian point L1, parameterized by their energy h=-C/2 in the synodic coordinate system; (ii) the stability parameter along each family; (iii) the intersections x_i(h) of the orbits with the Earth-Moon axis, on the Poincare section Sigma_2={x,y=0,v_x},v_y>0}; (iv) plots of some selected orbits and details of their circumlunar region; and (v) numerical data for the intersection of an orbit with Sigma_1 at a reference value of h. Some possible extensions and applications of this work are also discussed.

Alejandro M. Leiva; Carlos B. Briozzo

2006-12-14

324

On-orbit solar calibration methods using the Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) in-flight calibration system: lessons learned  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) scanning thermistor bolometers measure earth-reflected solar and earth-emitted long-wave radiances, at the top- of-the-atmosphere. The bolometers measure the earth radiances in the broadband shortwave solar (0.3-5.0 microns) and total (0.3->100 microns) spectral bands as well as in the 8->12 microns water vapor window spectral band over geographical footprints as small as 10 kilometers at nadir. December 1999, the second and third set of CERES bolometers was launched on the Earth Observing Mission Terra Spacecraft. May 2003, the fourth and fifth set of bolometers was launched on the Earth Observing Mission Aqua Spacecraft. Recently, (October 2011) the sixth instrument was launched on the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System Preparatory Project (Suomi NPP) Spacecraft. Ground vacuum calibrations define the initial count conversion coefficients that are used to convert the bolometer output voltages into filtered earth radiances. The mirror attenuator mosaic (MAM), a solar diffuser plate, was built into the CERES instrument package calibration system in order to define on-orbit shifts or drifts in the sensor responses. It followed a similar design as the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) scanners with improvements from lessons learned. The shortwave and shortwave part of the total-wave sensors are calibrated using the solar radiances reflected from the MAM's. Each MAM consists of baffle-solar diffuser plate systems, which guide incoming solar radiances into the instrument fields of view of the shortwave and total wave sensor units. The MAM diffuser reflecting type surface consists of an array of spherical aluminum mirror segments, which are separated by a Merck Black A absorbing surface, over-coated with SIOx (SIO2 for PFM). Thermistors are located within each MAM plate and the total channel baffle. The CERES MAM is designed to yield calibration precisions approaching .5 percent for the total and shortwave detectors. The Terra FM1 and FM2 shortwave channels and the FM1 and FM2 total channels MAM calibration systems showed shifts in their solar calibrations of 1.5, 2.5, 1.5 and 6 percent, respectively within the first year. The Aqua FM3, and FM4 shortwave channels and the FM3 and FM4 total channels MAM calibration systems showed shifts in their solar calibrations of 1.0, 1.2, 2.1 and .8 percent, respectively within the first year. A possible explanation has attributed the MAM reflectance change to on-orbit solar ultraviolet/atomic oxygen/out-gassing induced chemical changes to the SIOx coated MAM assembly during ram and solar exposure. There is also changes to the sensor telescope shortwave filters as well as the Total channel mirrors and/or sensors. The Soumi NPP FM5 is still after 2.5 years displaying a stability of less than .5 percent. In this presentation, lessons learned from the ERBE MAM and application of knowledge of how the space environment affected the CERES FM1-4 solar calibrations will be presented along with on-orbit measurements for the thirteen years the CERES instruments have been on-orbit.

Wilson, Robert S.; Priestley, Kory J.; Thomas, Susan; Hess, Phillip; Shankar, Mohan; Smith, Nathaniel; Szewczyk, Peter

2013-09-01

325

28th European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference and Exhibition 1.BO11.2 DOWN CONVERTER DEVICE COMBINING RARE-EARTH DOPED THIN LAYER AND PHOTONIC  

E-print Network

28th European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference and Exhibition 1.BO11.2 DOWN CONVERTER DEVICE COMBINING RARE-EARTH DOPED THIN LAYER AND PHOTONIC CRYSTAL FOR C-SI BASED SOLAR CELL Thierry Deschamps1 structure combines rare-earths doped thin layer allowing the down-conversion process with a photonic crystal

Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

326

A design guide for energy-efficient research laboratories  

SciTech Connect

This document--A Design Guide for Energy-Efficient Research Laboratories--provides a detailed and holistic framework to assist designers and energy managers in identifying and applying advanced energy-efficiency features in laboratory-type environments. The Guide fills an important void in the general literature and compliments existing in-depth technical manuals. Considerable information is available pertaining to overall laboratory design issues, but no single document focuses comprehensively on energy issues in these highly specialized environments. Furthermore, practitioners may utilize many antiquated rules of thumb, which often inadvertently cause energy inefficiency. The Guide helps its user to: introduce energy decision-making into the earliest phases of the design process, access the literature of pertinent issues, and become aware of debates and issues on related topics. The Guide does focus on individual technologies, as well as control systems, and important operational factors such as building commissioning. However, most importantly, the Guide is intended to foster a systems perspective (e.g. right sizing) and to present current leading-edge, energy-efficient design practices and principles.

Wishner, N.; Chen, A.; Cook, L. [eds.; Bell, G.C.; Mills, E.; Sartor, D.; Avery, D.; Siminovitch, M.; Piette, M.A.

1996-09-24

327

Process Design and Operation for Energy Efficiency  

E-print Network

. However, such methods provide no guidance on the extent to which energy usage can be reduced economically, nor do they ensure that all options for heat recovery are properly evaluated. Further, they offer no practical means of determining optimum operating... conservation, but also in environmental abatement, capacity debottlenecking, improving plant flexibility and reducing capital costs. Pinch Technology provides a fundamental way to analyze the flow of heat through an industrial process. The essence...

Rossiter, A. P.; Nath, R.; Yell, M. D.

328

High energy density rechargeable magnesium battery using earth-abundant and non-toxic elements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rechargeable magnesium batteries are poised to be viable candidates for large-scale energy storage devices in smart grid communities and electric vehicles. However, the energy density of previously proposed rechargeable magnesium batteries is low, limited mainly by the cathode materials. Here, we present new design approaches for the cathode in order to realize a high-energy-density rechargeable magnesium battery system. Ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 demonstrates a high reversible capacity exceeding 300 mAh.g-1 at a voltage of approximately 2.4 V vs. Mg. Further, the electronic and crystal structure of ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 changes during the charging and discharging processes, which demonstrates the (de)insertion of magnesium in the host structure. The combination of ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 with a magnesium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide-triglyme electrolyte system proposed in this work provides a low-cost and practical rechargeable magnesium battery with high energy density, free from corrosion and safety problems.

Orikasa, Yuki; Masese, Titus; Koyama, Yukinori; Mori, Takuya; Hattori, Masashi; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Okado, Tetsuya; Huang, Zhen-Dong; Minato, Taketoshi; Tassel, C閐ric; Kim, Jungeun; Kobayashi, Yoji; Abe, Takeshi; Kageyama, Hiroshi; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu

2014-07-01

329

High energy density rechargeable magnesium battery using earth-abundant and non-toxic elements  

PubMed Central

Rechargeable magnesium batteries are poised to be viable candidates for large-scale energy storage devices in smart grid communities and electric vehicles. However, the energy density of previously proposed rechargeable magnesium batteries is low, limited mainly by the cathode materials. Here, we present new design approaches for the cathode in order to realize a high-energy-density rechargeable magnesium battery system. Ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 demonstrates a high reversible capacity exceeding 300?mAh穏?1 at a voltage of approximately 2.4?V vs. Mg. Further, the electronic and crystal structure of ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 changes during the charging and discharging processes, which demonstrates the (de)insertion of magnesium in the host structure. The combination of ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 with a magnesium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide杢riglyme electrolyte system proposed in this work provides a low-cost and practical rechargeable magnesium battery with high energy density, free from corrosion and safety problems. PMID:25011939

Orikasa, Yuki; Masese, Titus; Koyama, Yukinori; Mori, Takuya; Hattori, Masashi; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Okado, Tetsuya; Huang, Zhen-Dong; Minato, Taketoshi; Tassel, C閐ric; Kim, Jungeun; Kobayashi, Yoji; Abe, Takeshi; Kageyama, Hiroshi; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu

2014-01-01

330

NASA Now: Earth Science Week: Exploring Energy - Duration: 7:32.  

NASA Video Gallery

During this installment of NASA Now, you??ll see some of the ways NASA studies Earth. You??ll meet Eric Brown de Colstoun, a physical scientist at NASA??s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbel...

331

Building energy calculator : a design tool for energy analysis of residential buildings in Developing countries  

E-print Network

Buildings are one of the world's largest consumers of energy, yet measures to reduce energy consumption are often ignored during the building design process. In developing countries, enormous numbers of new residential ...

Smith, Jonathan Y. (Jonathan York), 1979-

2004-01-01

332

Energy codes and the building design process: Opportunities for improvement  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Policy Act (EPAct), passed by Congress in 1992, requires states to adopt building energy codes for new commercial buildings that meet or exceed the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) and Illuminating Engineers Society of North America (IES) Standard 90.1-1989 by October 24, 1994. In response to EPAct many states will be adopting a state-wide energy code for the first time. Understanding the role of stakeholders in the building design process is key to the successful implementation of these codes. In 1993, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted a survey of architects and designers to determine how much they know about energy codes, to what extent energy-efficiency concerns influence the design process, and how they convey information about energy-efficient designs and products to their clients. Findings of the PNL survey, together with related information from a survey by the American Institute of Architects (AIA) and other reports, are presented in this report. This information may be helpful for state and utility energy program managers and others who will be involved in promoting the adoption and implementation of state energy codes that meet the requirements of EPAct.

Sandahl, L.J.; Shankle, D.L.; Rigler, E.J.

1994-05-01

333

Energy Management Method for solar race car design and application  

Microsoft Academic Search

The energy management method for designing a solar-cell supplied electrical vehicle is described and its implementation on Istanbul Technical University (ITU) race cars is discussed. The effectiveness of the method has been tested and proved during the 2006, 2007 and 2008 races organized by the Scientific and Technical Council of Turkey. The ldquoenergy management model (EMS)rdquo, which computes the energy

O. Ustun; M. Yilmaz; C. Gokce; U. Karakaya; R. N. Tuncay

2009-01-01

334

Design considerations for solar energy harvesting wireless embedded systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sustainable operation of battery powered wireless embed- ded systems (such as sensor nodes) is a key challenge, and considerable research effort has been devoted to energy optimization of such systems. Environmental energy harvesting, in particular solar based, has emerged as a viable technique to supplement battery supplies. However, designing an efficient solar harvesting system to realize the potential benefits of

Vijay Raghunathan; Aman Kansal; Jason Hsu; Jonathan Friedman; Mani B. Srivastava

2005-01-01

335

Using binding free energy to guide ligand design  

Microsoft Academic Search

The molecular distributions obtained from canonical Monte Carlo simulations\\u000acan be used to find an approximate interaction energy. This serves as the basis\\u000aof a method for estimating the binding free energy for a ligand to a protein\\u000awhich enables the free energy to be used to direct the design of ligands which\\u000abind to a protein with high affinity.

Charles F. F. Karney; Jason E. Ferrara; Clay D. Spence

2005-01-01

336

Design and applications of a versatile HF radar calibration target in low Earth orbit  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High frequency (HF) radars are used to detect ionospheric irregularities, meteor trails, and moving targets. The Precision Expandable Radar Calibration Sphere (PERCS) is a simple radar target in space to help determine the operational parameters of ground HF radars. PERCS will have a known radar cross section that is independent of observation direction within 0.5 dB. The PERCS satellite can be launched in a stowed configuration that has about 1 m in diameter. After launch, the PERCS will expand to a diameter of almost 10 m. Upon expansion, a stable wire frame is formed to act as a radar scatter target in the form of a polyhedral sphere. The simplest version of the sphere has 60 vertices (V60) that are joined to 90 rigid segments. Each segment is hinged so that the PERCS can be folded into a compact package for launch. Analysis of the V60 wire frame with a 10 m diameter shows that the radar cross section (RCS) is nearly independent of viewing angle up to 30 MHz. Another design with 240 vertices produces even better performance. Radar systems will be calibrated using the radar echo data and the precise knowledge of the target RCS, position, and velocity. The PERCS can reflect radar signals from natural targets such as field aligned and current driven irregularities not presently accessible from ground-based radars. The wire frame structure has several advantages over a metalized spheroid "balloon" with (1) much less drag, (2) larger radar cross section, and (3) lower fabrication cost.

Bernhardt, Paul A.; Siefring, Carl L.; Thomason, Joe F.; Rodriquez, Serafin P.; Nicholas, Andrew C.; Koss, Steven M.; Nurnberger, Mike; Hoberman, Chuck; Davis, Matthew; Hysell, David L.; Kelley, Michael C.

2008-02-01

337

The Dark Energy Survey instrument design  

SciTech Connect

We describe a new project, the Dark Energy Survey (DES), aimed at measuring the dark energy equation of state parameter, w, to a statistical precision of {approx}5%, with four complementary techniques. The survey will use a new 3 sq. deg. mosaic camera (DECam) mounted at the prime focus of the Blanco 4m telescope at the Cerro-Tololo International Observatory (CTIO). DECam includes a large mosaic camera, a five element optical corrector, four filters (g,r,i,z), and the associated infrastructure for operation in the prime focus cage. The focal plane consists of 62 2K x 4K CCD modules (0.27''/pixel) arranged in a hexagon inscribed within the 2.2 deg. diameter field of view. We plan to use the 250 micron thick fully-depleted CCDs that have been developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). At Fermilab, we will establish a packaging factory to produce four-side buttable modules for the LBNL devices, as well as to test and grade the CCDs. R&D is underway and delivery of DECam to CTIO is scheduled for 2009.

Flaugher, B.; /Fermilab

2006-05-01

338

Calculation of the Band Gap Energy and Study of Cross Luminescence in Alkaline-Earth Dihalide Crystals  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The band gap energy as well as the possibility of cross luminescence processesin alkaline-earth dihalide crystals have been calculated using the ab initio Perturbed-Ion (PI) model.The gap is calculated in several ways: as adifference between one-electron energy eigenvalues and as adifference between total energies of appropriate electronic states of thecrystal, both at the HF level and with inclusion of Coulomb correlation effects.In order to study the possibility of ocurrence of cross luminescence in thesematerials, the energy differencebetween the valence band and the outermost core band for somerepresentative crystals has been calculated.Both calculated band gap energies and cross luminescence predictions comparevery well with the available experimental and theoretical results.

Aguado, Andr閟; Ayuela, Andr閟; L髉ez, Jos; Alonso, Julio

1999-08-01

339

HELIPLAT: design of high altitude very-long endurance solar powered platform for telecommunication and earth observation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A research is being carried out at the Turin Polytechnic University aiming at the design of an HAVE/UAV (High Altitude Very-long Endurance/Uninhabited Air Vehicle) and manufacturing of a scale-sized solar-powered prototype. The vehicle should climg to 17-20 km by taking advantage, mainly, of direct sun radiation and maintaining; electric energy not requeired for propulsion and payload operation is pumped back into the fuel cells energy storage system for the night. A computer program has been developed for carrying out a parametric study for the platform design, by taking into account the solar radiation change over one year, the altitude, masses and efficiencies of solar cells and fuel cells, aerodynamic performances, etc. A parametric study shows as fuel cells and solar cells efficiency and mass give the most influence on the platform dimensions. A wide use of high modulus CFRP has been made in designing the structure in order to minimise the airframe weight. The whole mass resulted of 70 kg. The classical hydraulic loading rig was designed for applying the ultimate shear-bending-torsion load to the structure and to verify the theoretical behaviour. A finite element analysis has been carried out by using the MSC/PATRAN/NASTRAN code in order to predict th static and dynamic behaviour. A good correlation has been obtained between the theoretical, numerical and experimental results up to a load corresponding to 5g.

Romeo, Giulio; Frulla, Giacomo

2002-07-01

340

Satellite Collectors of Solar Energy for Earth and Colonized Planet Habitats  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Summary An array of 55,000 40-foot antennas can generate from the rays of the Sun enough electrical power to replace 50 The economic potential is huge. There are new industries that will only grow and there are different ways to collect solar energy, including wind power. The energy sources we rely on for the most part are finite - fossil fuels, coal, oil and natural gas are all limited in supply. The cost will only continue to rise as demand increases. The time of global economic crossover between the EU, Asia Pacific and North America is coming within less than five years. The biggest opportunity for solar energy entrepreneurs would seem to be in municipal contracting where 1500 40-foot stacking antennas can be hooked into a grid to power an entire city. The antenna can generate 45 kilowatts of energy, enough to satisfy the electrical needs 7x24 of ten to twenty homes. It is possible to design and build 35-by-80-foot pedestals that track the sun from morning until night to provide full efficiency. A normal solar cell looks in the sky for only four or five hours of direct sunlight. Fabrication of these pedestals would sell for USD 50, 000-70,000 each. The solar heat collected by the antennas can be bounced into a Stirling engine, creating electricity at a focal point. Water can be heated by running through that focal point. In addition, salt water passing through the focal point can be desalinated, and since the antenna can generate up to 2,000 degrees of heat at the focal point. The salt water passing through the focal point turns to steam, which separates the salt and allows the steam to be turned into fresh drinking water. Collector energy can be retained in betavoltaics which uses semiconductors to capture energy from radioactive materials and turn it into usable electricity for automobiles. In a new battery, the silicon wafers in the battery are etched with a network of deep pores. These pores vastly increase the exposure surface area of the silicon, allowing it to absorb more energy and making the antenna collector 20 times more efficient than planar designs. A tracking pedestal powered by betavoltaics can follow the sun. With a 500-sun photovoltaic cell underneath a Fresnal lens magnifies and distributes the sun's energy at 500 times. Primary results and the main conclusions This idea is revolutionary and utilizes satellite tracking abilities to follow the sun, maintaining a constant energy source that can reach 700 to 800 degrees. This technology will have many applications, from instant fresh water in the form of steam to the use of fiber optics to filter natural light through a building. With the direction of the oil and energy costs continuing to spiral upward, there has been recent emphasis on alternative energy that is transmitted from space. Satellite antenna manufacturers can move quickly to production and create a revolution in sustainable energy that was never thought of before. The efforts of the United States, Russia, China, and India to colonize the Moon and Mars would be greatly enhanced by use of satellite solar collectors and betavoltaics electrical energy technologies for the colonies' habitats. Introduction This study was undertaken for the Global environment is in a crisis. The rich oil producing countries of Russia, Saudi Arabia, Venezuela, and Africa, have been at war to gain monopoly power and to restrict the space based explorations of the solar system. The physics of solar energy transmission to electrical mechanical energy is unique in improving the economies of the entire community of Nations. It is easy to produce satellite antennas, thus, satellite antennas can now be used as solar panels which can generate free power from the sun by converting sunlight to electricity. Solar Panels require no moving parts; have zero emissions, and no maintenance. These antennas will revolutionize the use of solar rays from the sun to benefit a global grid. These "collectors of free energy" are able to harness solar energy for thermal heating, desalination, lighting, and electricity. Further,

Kusiolek, Richard

341

Earth Day  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Wow! Endagered species are everywhere! Just understanding the needs of animals will help them to survive longer. Find out how much your use of energy leaves a 'carbon' footprint on the earth. We all need to use our limited resources wisely. Reduce your footprint! Find out how and take the carbon footrpint quiz here. Carbon Footprint Watch the following YouTube video to hear a special message from Carl Hiaasen, the ...

Mrs. Datwyler

2010-04-19

342

Relationship Between the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Measurements and Surface Temperatures of Selected Ocean Regions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Clear sky longwave radiances and fluxes are compared with the sea surface temperatures for three oceanic regions: Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific. The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) measurements were obtained by the three thermistor bolometers: total channel which measures the radiation arising from the earth-atmosphere system between 0.3 - greater than 100 micrometers; the window channel which measures the radiation from 8-12 micrometers; and the shortwave channel which measures the reflected energy from 0.3 - less than 5.0 micrometers. These instruments have demonstrated measurement precisions of approximately 0.3% on the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90) between ground and on-orbit sensor calibrations. In this work we have used eight months of clear sky earth-nadir-view radiance data starting from January 1998 through August 1998. We have found a very strong correlation of 0.97 between the CERES window channel's weekly averaged unfiltered spectral radiance values at satellite altitude (350 km) and the corresponding weekly averaged sea surface temperature (SST) data covering all the oceanic regions. Such correlation can be used in predicting the sea surface temperatures using the present CERES Terra's window channel radiances at satellite altitude very easily.

Pandey, Dhirendra, K.; Lee, Robert B., III; Brown, Shannon B.; Paden, Jack; Spence, Peter L.; Thomas, Susan; Wilson, Robert S.; Al-Hajjah, Aiman

2001-01-01

343

Energy density of ionospheric and solar wind origin ions in the near-Earth magnetotail during substorms  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Comprehensive energy density studies provide an important measure of the participation of various sources in energization processes and have been relatively rare in the literature. We present a statistical study of the energy density of the near-Earth magnetotail major ions (H(+), O(+), He(++), He(+)) during substorm expansion phase and discuss its implications for the solar wind/magnetosphere/ionosphere coupling. Our aim is to examine the relation between auroral activity and the particle energization during substorms through the correlation between the AE indices and the energy density of the major magnetospheric ions. The data we used here were collected by the charge-energy-mass (CHEM) spectrometer on board the Active Magnetospheric Particle Trace Explorer (AMPTE)/Charge Composition Explorer (CCE) satellite in the near-equatorial nightside magnetosphere, at geocentric distances approximately 7 to 9 R(sub E). CHEM provided the opportunity to conduct the first statistical study of energy density in the near-Earth magnetotail with multispecies particle data extending into the higher energy range (greater than or equal to 20 keV/E). the use of 1-min AE indices in this study should be emphasized, as the use (in previous statistical studies) of the (3-hour) Kp index or of long-time averages of AE indices essentially smoothed out all the information on substorms. Most distinct feature of our study is the excellent correlation of O(+) energy density with the AE index, in contrast with the remarkably poor He(++) energy density - AE index correlation. Furthermore, we examined the relation of the ion energy density to the electrojet activity during substorm growth phase. The O(+) energy density is strongly correlated with the pre-onset AU index, that is the eastward electrojet intensity, which represents the growth phase current system. Our investigation shows that the near-Earth magnetotail is increasingly fed with energetic ionospheric ions during periods of enhanced dissipation of auroral currents. The participation of the ionosphere in the substorm energization processes seems to be closely, although not solely, associated with the solar wind/magnetosphere coupling. That is, the ionosphere influences actively the substorm energization processes by responding to the increased solar wind/magnetosphere coupling as well as to the unloading dissipation of stored energy, with the increased feeding of new material into the magnetosphere.

Daglis, Loannis A.; Livi, Stefano; Sarris, Emmanuel T.; Wilken, Berend

1994-01-01

344

Axial focusing of impact energy in the Earth's interior: Proof-of-principle tests of a new hypothesis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A causal link between major impact events and global processes would probably require a significant change in the thermal state of the Earth's interior, presumably brought about by coupling of impact energy. One possible mechanism for such energy coupling from the surface to the deep interior would be through focusing due to axial symmetry. Antipodal focusing of surface and body waves from earthquakes is a well-known phenomenon which has previously been exploited by seismologists in studies of the Earth's deep interior. Antipodal focusing from impacts on the Moon, Mercury, and icy satellites has also been invoked by planetary scientists to explain unusual surface features opposite some of the large impact structures on these bodies. For example, 'disrupted' terrains have been observed antipodal to the Caloris impact basis on Mercury and Imbrium Basin on the Moon. Very recently there have been speculations that antipodal focusing of impact energy within the mantle may lead to flood basalt and hotspot activity, but there has not yet been an attempt at a rigorous model. A new hypothesis was proposed and preliminary proof-of-principle tests for the coupling of energy from major impacts to the mantle by axial focusing of seismic waves was performed. Because of the axial symmetry of the explosive source, the phases and amplitudes are dependent only on ray parameter (or takeoff angle) and are independent of azimuthal angle. For a symmetric and homogeneous Earth, all the seismic energy radiated by the impact at a given takeoff angle will be refocused (minus attenuation) on the axis of symmetry, regardless of the number of reflections and refractions it has experienced. Mantle material near the axis of symmetry will experience more strain cycles with much greater amplitude than elsewhere and will therefore experience more irreversible heating. The situation is very different than for a giant earthquake, which in addition to having less energy, has an asymmetric focal mechanism and a larger area. Two independent proof-of-principle approaches were used. The first makes use of seismic simulations, which are being performed with a realistic Earth model to determine the degree of focusing along the axis and to estimate the volume of material, if any, that experiences significant irreversible heating. The second involves two-dimensional hydrodynamic code simulations to determine the stress history, internal energy, and temperature rise as a function of radius along the axis.

Boslough, M. B.; Chael, E. P.; Trucano, T. G.; Kipp, M. E.; Crawford, D. A.

1994-01-01

345

Design of low energy bunch compressors with space charge effects  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we explore a method to manipulate low energy electron bunches in a space charge dominated regime, and we use this method to design low energy linac bunch compressors to compress electron bunches in a space charge dominated regime. In the method, we use the space charge effects instead of avoiding them; i.e., we use the space charge forces to generate the required energy chirp instead of the ordinary method which uses the rf accelerating system to generate the chirp. We redefine the concepts of the dispersion function and beta functions in a space charge dominated regime to guide the optimization. Using this method, we study the low energy (5-22 MeV) linac bunch compressor design to produce short (150 fs ) and small size (30 ? m ) bunches for the electron beam slicing project. The low energy linac bunch compressors work in a space charge dominated regime, and the bunches at the downstream of the gun have a negative energy chirp due to the space charge effects. To provide compression for the negative energy chirped bunch, we design a positive R56 dispersive section using a four-dipole chicane with several quadrupole magnets. We have designed low energy linac bunch compressors with different photocathode rf guns. For example, one linac bunch compressor with the BNL photocathode electron rf gun has achieved a low energy bunch with the 166 fs rms bunch length, 28 and 31 ? m rms beam size in the vertical and horizontal directions, respectively, at 5 MeV with 50 pC charge. Another example with LBNL's very-high frequency gun has achieved a low energy bunch with the 128 fs rms bunch length, 42 and 25 ? m rms beam size in the vertical and horizontal directions, respectively, at 22 MeV with 200 pC charge.

He, A.; Willeke, F.; Yu, L. H.; Yang, L.; Shaftan, T.; Wang, G.; Li, Y.; Hidaka, Y.; Qiang, J.

2015-01-01

346

Studies of earth simulation experiments  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The low gravity environment of earth orbit offers the potential for performing experiments involving baroclinic Geophysical Fluid Dynamics (GFD) on spherical surfaces. These experiments in turn have the potential for providing deeper understanding of large scale planetary and solar circulations. However, to perform these experiments, one requires an experimental technique whereby a radially directed body force can be generated to simulate a radial gravitational force field. One viable technique is the use of dielectric fluids with temperature dependent dielectric permittivity in a radially directed electric field. Application of the Boussinesq approximation to the equations of motion for this system and restrictions on the size of certain electrodynamic terms in the energy equations yields a set of equations which are analogous to the equations of motions of geophysical systems like the earth's atmosphere on term by term basis. The theoretical design of GFD experiments for performance in earth orbit are described along with results of preliminary tests of a prototype.

Hart, J. E.

1976-01-01

347

Design for Manufacturing for Energy Absorption Systems  

SciTech Connect

In the typical scenario of a helicopter crash, impact with the ground is preceded by a substantially vertical drop, with the result that a seated occupant of a helicopter experiences high spinal loads and pelvic deceleration during such crash due to the sudden arresting of vertical downward motion. It has long been recognized that spinal injuries to occupants of helicopters in such crash scenario can be minimized by seat arrangements which limit the deceleration to which the seated occupant is subjected, relative to the helicopter, to a predetermined maximum, by allowing downward movement of the seated occupant relative to the helicopter, at the time of impact with the ground, under a restraining force which, over a limited range of such movement, is limited to a predetermined maximum. In practice, significant benefits, in the way of reduced injuries and reduced seriousness of injuries, can be afforded in this way in such crash situations even where the extent of such controlled vertical movement permitted by the crashworthy seat arrangement is quite limited. Important increase of accident safety is reached with the installation of crashworthy shock absorbers on the main landing gear, but this solution is mostly feasible on military helicopters with long fixed landing gear. Seats can then give high contribution to survivability. Commonly, an energy absorber is a constant load device, if one excludes an initial elastic part of the load-stroke curve. On helicopter seats, this behavior is obtained by plastic deformation of a metal component or scraping of material. In the present work the authors have studied three absorption systems, which differ in relation to their shape, their working conditions and their constructive materials. All the combinations have been analyzed for applications in VIP helicopter seats.

Del Prete, A.; Primo, T.; Papadia, G.; Manisi, B. [Department of Engineering for Innovation, University of Salento, Via per Arnesano, Building 'O', Lecce (Italy)

2011-05-04

348

Design for Manufacturing for Energy Absorption Systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the typical scenario of a helicopter crash, impact with the ground is preceded by a substantially vertical drop, with the result that a seated occupant of a helicopter experiences high spinal loads and pelvic deceleration during such crash due to the sudden arresting of vertical downward motion. It has long been recognized that spinal injuries to occupants of helicopters in such crash scenario can be minimized by seat arrangements which limit the deceleration to which the seated occupant is subjected, relative to the helicopter, to a predetermined maximum, by allowing downward movement of the seated occupant relative to the helicopter, at the time of impact with the ground, under a restraining force which, over a limited range of such movement, is limited to a predetermined maximum. In practice, significant benefits, in the way of reduced injuries and reduced seriousness of injuries, can be afforded in this way in such crash situations even where the extent of such controlled vertical movement permitted by the crashworthy seat arrangement is quite limited. Important increase of accident safety is reached with the installation of crashworthy shock absorbers on the main landing gear, but this solution is mostly feasible on military helicopters with long fixed landing gear. Seats can then give high contribution to survivability. Commonly, an energy absorber is a constant load device, if one excludes an initial elastic part of the load-stroke curve. On helicopter seats, this behavior is obtained by plastic deformation of a metal component or scraping of material. In the present work the authors have studied three absorption systems, which differ in relation to their shape, their working conditions and their constructive materials. All the combinations have been analyzed for applications in VIP helicopter seats.

Del Prete, A.; Primo, T.; Papadia, G.; Manisi, B.

2011-05-01

349

The concepts of energy, environment, and cost for process design  

SciTech Connect

The process industries (specifically, energy and chemicals) are characterized by a variety of reactors and reactions to bring about successful process operations. The design of energy-related and chemical processes and their evolution is a complex process that determines the competitiveness of these industries, as well as their environmental impact. Thus, we have developed an Enviro-Energy Concept designed to facilitate sustainable industrial development. The Complete Onion Model represents a complete methodology for chemical process design and illustrates all of the requirements to achieve the best possible design within the accepted environmental standards. Currently, NOx emissions from industrial processes continue to receive maximum attention, therefore the issue problem of NOx emissions from industrial sources such as power stations and nitric acid plants is considered. The Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) is one of the most promising and effective commercial technologies. It is considered the Best Available Control Technology (BACT) for NOx reduction. The solution of NOx emissions problem is either through modifying the chemical process design and/or installing an end-of-pipe technology. The degree of integration between the process design and the installed technology plays a critical role in the capital cost evaluation. Therefore, integrating process units and then optimizing the design has a vital effect on the total cost. Both the environmental regulations and the cost evaluation are the boundary constraints of the optimum solution.

Abu-Khader, M.M.; Speight, J.G. [CD & W Inc., Laramie, WY (United States)

2004-05-01

350

Achieving 50% Energy Savings in Office Buildings, Advanced Energy Design Guides: Office Buildings (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet summarizes recommendations for designing new office buildings that result in 50% less energy use than conventional designs meeting minimum code requirements. The recommendations are drawn from the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Small to Medium Office Buildings, an ASHRAE publication that provides comprehensive recommendations for designing low-energy-use office buildings with gross floor areas up to 100,000 ft2 (see sidebar). Designed as a stand-alone document, this fact sheet provides key principles and a set of prescriptive design recommendations appropriate for smaller office buildings with insufficient budgets to fully implement best practices for integrated design and optimized performance. The recommendations have undergone a thorough analysis and review process through ASHRAE, and have been deemed the best combination of measures to achieve 50% savings in the greatest number of office buildings.

Not Available

2014-09-01

351

Department of Energy's team's analyses of Soviet designed VVERs  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to summarize the results of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Analysis Team's analyses of Soviet designed VVERs (Water-cooled, Water-moderated Energy Reactor). The principle objective of this undertaking is to provide a basis to better understand the safety related features of the Soviet designed VVERs to be better prepared to respond domestically in the event of an accident at such a unit. The USDOE Team's analyses are presented together with supporting and background information. The report is structured to allow the reader to develop an understanding of safety related features of Soviet designed VVERs (as well as the probable behavior of these units under a variety of off normal conditions), to understand the USDOE Team's analyses of Soviet designed VVERs, and to formulate informed opinions.

Not Available

1989-09-01

352

Hydrogeologic Controls on the Deep Terrestrial Biosphere - Chemolithotrophic Energy for Subsurface Life on Earth and Mars  

Microsoft Academic Search

As exploration for gold, diamonds and base metals expand mine workings to depths of almost 3 km below the Earth's surface, the mines of the Canadian Shield provide a window into the deep biosphere as diverse, but to date less well-explored than the South African Gold Mines. To date investigations of the deep biosphere have, in most cases, focused on

B. Sherwood Lollar; J. Moran; S. Tille; K. Voglesonger; G. Lacrampe-Couloume; T. Onstott; L. Pratt; G. Slater

2009-01-01

353

Synergico: a new "Design for Energy Efficiency" Method enhancing the Design of more environmentally friendly Electr(on)ic Equipments  

E-print Network

efficient products and infrastructures. For the electr(on)ic industry, in-use energy consumption to the Design for Energy Efficiency of electr(on)ic equipments focusing on the use phase. This paper presentsSynergico: a new "Design for Energy Efficiency" Method enhancing the Design of more environmentally

Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

354

Modeling and design of energy concentrating laser weld joints  

SciTech Connect

The application of lasers for welding and joining has increased steadily over the past decade with the advent of high powered industrial laser systems. Attributes such as high energy density and precise focusing allow high speed processing of precision assemblies. Other characteristics of the process such as poor coupling of energy due to highly reflective materials and instabilities associated with deep penetration keyhole mode welding remain as process limitations and challenges to be overcome. Reflective loss of laser energy impinging on metal surfaces can in some cases exceed ninety five percent, thus making the process extremely inefficient. Enhanced coupling of the laser beam can occur when high energy densities approach the vaporization point of the materials and form a keyhole feature which can trap laser energy and enhance melting and process efficiency. The extreme temperature, pressure and fluid flow dynamics of the keyhole make control of the process difficult in this melting regime. The authors design and model weld joints which through reflective propagation and concentration of the laser beam energy significantly enhance the melting process and weld morphology. A three dimensional computer based geometric optical model is used to describe the key laser parameters and joint geometry. Ray tracing is used to compute the location and intensity of energy absorption within the weld joint. Comparison with experimentation shows good correlation of energy concentration within the model to actual weld profiles. The effect of energy concentration within various joint geometry is described. This method for extending the design of the laser system to include the weld joint allows the evaluation and selection of laser parameters such as lens and focal position for process optimization. The design of narrow gap joints which function as energy concentrators is described. The enhanced laser welding of aluminum without keyhole formation has been demonstrated.

Milewski, J.O. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Sklar, E. [OptiCad Corp., Santa Fe, NM (United States)

1997-04-01

355

Tribological design constraints of marine renewable energy systems.  

PubMed

Against the backdrop of increasing energy demands, the threat of climate change and dwindling fuel reserves, finding reliable, diverse, sustainable/renewable, affordable energy resources has become a priority for many countries. Marine energy conversion systems are at the forefront of providing such a resource. Most marine renewable energy conversion systems require tribological components to convert wind or tidal streams to rotational motion for generating electricity while wave machines typically use oscillating hinge or piston within cylinder geometries to promote reciprocating linear motion. This paper looks at the tribology of three green marine energy systems, offshore wind, tidal and wave machines. Areas covered include lubrication and contamination, bearing and gearbox issues, biofouling, cavitation erosion, tribocorrosion, condition monitoring as well as design trends and loading conditions associated with tribological components. Current research thrusts are highlighted along with areas needing research as well as addressing present-day issues related to the tribology of offshore energy conversion technologies. PMID:20855321

Wood, Robert J K; Bahaj, AbuBakr S; Turnock, Stephen R; Wang, Ling; Evans, Martin

2010-10-28

356

Design and implementation of low-energy turbo decoders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Turbo codes have been chosen in the third generation cellular standard for high-throughput data communication. These codes achieve remarkably low bit error rates at the expense of high-computational complexity. Thus for hand held communication devices, designing energy efficient Turbo decoders is of great importance. In this paper, we present a suite of MAP-based Turbo decoding algorithms with energy-quality tradeoffs for

Jagadeesh Kaza; Chaitali Chakrabarti

2004-01-01

357

International Solar Centre, Berlin - A Comprehensive Energy Design  

E-print Network

ESL-IC-10/05-06 1 INTERNATIONAL SOLAR CENTRE BERLIN - A COMPREHENSIVE ENERGY DESIGN Robert Himmler M. Norbert Fisch Technical University Braunschweig Institute of Building and Solar Technology (IGS) M黨lenpfordtstr. 23 38106 Braunschweig... / Germany ABSTRACT The International Solar Centre is a unique development in Berlin, combining a historic building and contemporary architecture to create 20 700 m of customised office workspace. The building promotes a sustainable energy economy...

Fisch, M. N.; Himmler, R.

2005-01-01

358

Student Lead Nanosatellite Design/Build Projects: making a cost effective approach to Earth and Space Observational Science even more cost efficient  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With the advancement of technologies and the miniaturization of sensors and electrical/computational components satellites are also undergoing miniaturization. With lower manufacturing cost and a decreased design/build cycle (~2 years from start to launch), compared to conventional large scale satellites, nanosatellites have become a cost effective alternative for satellite Earth and Space Observations. The University of Alberta student nanosatellite (10x10x30cm; <4kg) design/build team, AlbertaSat-1, is a participant in the Canadian Satellite Design Challenge (CSDC) implemented by the CSA and Geocentrix Ltd. in addition to 15 other Universities from across Canada. AlbertaSat-1 will be launched in early 2013, after a 2 year design/build process and environmental testing. AlbertaSat-1 will be an Earth Observation satellite monitoring GHG (CO2, H2O & CH4) concentrations over many regions of the earth with the use of a NIR spectrometer. Here we present the planning, design and future manufacturing of AlbertaSat-1 with a focus on budget and cost effective solutions. Since this is a student project, AlbertaSat-1 will incur certain benefits making them exempt from certain financial requirements and obtaining services and equipment at very low or no cost. The largest cost benefit of AlbertaSat-1 is the virtual elimination of labor costs by having a team consisting of only unpaid students. Labor costs of typical satellite missions can be a very costly component. The educational components of such projects offer more indirect benefits to effective development of this industry/discipline, nevertheless just as important, by developing skills and knowledge that can only be learned through realistic hands on design/build projects. Student lead projects and student design/build initiatives such as CSDC (among many others in the U.S. and Europe lead by NASA and ESA, respectively) will have a major impact on shaping the future of Space and Earth Observational Sciences. We will present the future implications of such student projects and initiatives for the development of research and engineering in Space and Earth Observational Sciences.

Bottoms, J.; Lange, B. A.; AlbertaSat

2011-12-01

359

Energy Efficient Neural Stimulation: Coupling Circuit Design and Membrane Biophysics  

PubMed Central

The delivery of therapeutic levels of electrical current to neural tissue is a well-established treatment for numerous indications such as Parkinson抯 disease and chronic pain. While the neuromodulation medical device industry has experienced steady clinical growth over the last two decades, much of the core technology underlying implanted pulse generators remain unchanged. In this study we propose some new methods for achieving increased energy-efficiency during neural stimulation. The first method exploits the biophysical features of excitable tissue through the use of a centered-triangular stimulation waveform. Neural activation with this waveform is achieved with a statistically significant reduction in energy compared to traditional rectangular waveforms. The second method demonstrates energy savings that could be achieved by advanced circuitry design. We show that the traditional practice of using a fixed compliance voltage for constant-current stimulation results in substantial energy loss. A portion of this energy can be recuperated by adjusting the compliance voltage to real-time requirements. Lastly, we demonstrate the potential impact of axon fiber diameter on defining the energy-optimal pulse-width for stimulation. When designing implantable pulse generators for energy efficiency, we propose that the future combination of a variable compliance system, a centered-triangular stimulus waveform, and an axon diameter specific stimulation pulse-width has great potential to reduce energy consumption and prolong battery life in neuromodulation devices. PMID:23272188

Kilgore, Kevin L.; McIntyre, Cameron C.

2012-01-01

360

Thermochemical Energy Storage Systems: Modelling, Analysis and Design  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Thermal energy storage (TES) is an advanced technology for storing thermal energy that can mitigate environmental impacts and facilitate more efficient and clean energy systems. Thermochemical TES is an emerging method with the potential for high energy density storage. Where space is limited, therefore, thermochemical TES has the highest potential to achieve the required compact TES. Principles of thermochemical TES are presented and thermochemical TES is critically assessed and compared with other TES types. The integration of TES systems with heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) applications is examined and reviewed accounting for various factors, and recent advances are discussed. Thermodynamics assessments are presented for general closed and open thermochemical TES systems. Exergy and energy analyses are applied to assess and compare the efficiencies of the overall thermochemical TES cycle and its charging, storing and discharging processes. Examples using experimental data are presented to illustrate the analyses. Some important factors related to design concepts of thermochemical TES systems are considered and preliminary design conditions for them are investigated. Parametric studies are carried out for the thermochemical storage systems to investigate the effects of selected parameters on the efficiency and behavior of thermochemical storage systems. Keywords: Thermal Energy Storage; Thermochemical Energy Storage; Energy Efficiency; Exergy Efficiency, First Law Efficiency; Second Law Efficiency; Exergy

Haji Abedin, Ali

361

Energy Efficient Engine combustor test hardware detailed design report  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Energy Efficient Engine (E3) Combustor Development effort was conducted as part of the overall NASA/GE E3 Program. This effort included the selection of an advanced double-annular combustion system design. The primary intent was to evolve a design which meets the stringent emissions and life goals of the E3 as well as all of the usual performance requirements of combustion systems for modern turbofan engines. Numerous detailed design studies were conducted to define the features of the combustion system design. Development test hardware was fabricated, and an extensive testing effort was undertaken to evaluate the combustion system subcomponents in order to verify and refine the design. Technology derived from this development effort will be incorporated into the engine combustion system hardware design. This advanced engine combustion system will then be evaluated in component testing to verify the design intent. What is evolving from this development effort is an advanced combustion system capable of satisfying all of the combustion system design objectives and requirements of the E3. Fuel nozzle, diffuser, starting, and emissions design studies are discussed.

Burrus, D. L.; Chahrour, C. A.; Foltz, H. L.; Sabla, P. E.; Seto, S. P.; Taylor, J. R.

1984-01-01

362

Achieving 50% Energy Savings in New Schools, Advanced Energy Design Guides: K-12 Schools (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet summarizes recommendations for designing elementary, middle, and high school buildings that will result in 50% less energy use than conventional new schools built to minimum code requirements. The recommendations are drawn from the Advanced Energy Design Guide for K-12 School Buildings, an ASHRAE publication that provides comprehensive recommendations for designing low-energy-use school buildings (see sidebar). Designed as a stand-alone document, this fact sheet provides key principles and a set of prescriptive design recommendations appropriate for smaller schools with insufficient budgets to fully implement best practices for integrated design and optimized performance. The recommendations have undergone a thorough analysis and review process through ASHRAE, and have been deemed the best combination of measures to achieve 50% savings in the greatest number of schools.

Not Available

2014-09-01

363

Multi objective decision making in hybrid energy system design  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The design of grid-connected photovoltaic wind generator system supplying a farmstead in Nebraska has been undertaken in this dissertation. The design process took into account competing criteria that motivate the use of different sources of energy for electric generation. The criteria considered were 'Financial', 'Environmental', and 'User/System compatibility'. A distance based multi-objective decision making methodology was developed to rank design alternatives. The method is based upon a precedence order imposed upon the design objectives and a distance metric describing the performance of each alternative. This methodology advances previous work by combining ambiguous information about the alternatives with a decision-maker imposed precedence order in the objectives. Design alternatives, defined by the photovoltaic array and wind generator installed capacities, were analyzed using the multi-objective decision making approach. The performance of the design alternatives was determined by simulating the system using hourly data for an electric load for a farmstead and hourly averages of solar irradiation, temperature and wind speed from eight wind-solar energy monitoring sites in Nebraska. The spatial variability of the solar energy resource within the region was assessed by determining semivariogram models to krige hourly and daily solar radiation data. No significant difference was found in the predicted performance of the system when using kriged solar radiation data, with the models generated vs. using actual data. The spatial variability of the combined wind and solar energy resources was included in the design analysis by using fuzzy numbers and arithmetic. The best alternative was dependent upon the precedence order assumed for the main criteria. Alternatives with no PV array or wind generator dominated when the 'Financial' criteria preceded the others. In contrast, alternatives with a nil component of PV array but a high wind generator component, dominated when the 'Environment' objective or the 'User/System compatibility' objectives were more important than the 'Financial' objectives and they also dominated when the three criteria were considered equally important.

Merino, Gabriel Guillermo

364

Earth Institute  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The mission of the Earth Institute at Columbia University is to help the world achieve sustainability by expanding understanding of the Earth as one integrated system. Through research, education, and the practical application of research to real-world challenges, the Institute addresses nine interconnected global issues: climate and society, water, energy, poverty, ecosystems, public health, food and nutrition, and hazards and urbanization. The Institute's site offers a collection of videotaped events, including the biannual "State of the Planet" conferences, 2002-08, a Distinguished Lecture series, and the Sustainable Development seminar series, as well as e-seminars and e-briefings, information about funding opportunities, and information about educational opportunities at Columbia.

365

Parameter Design and Optimal Control of an Open Core Flywheel Energy Storage System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In low earth orbit (LEO) satellite applications spacecraft power is provided by photovoltaic cells and batteries. To overcome battery shortcomings the University of Maryland, working in cooperation with NASA/GSFC and NASA/LeRC, has developed a magnetically suspended flywheel for energy storage applications. The system is referred to as an Open Core Composite Flywheel (OCCF) energy storage system. Successful application of flywheel energy storage requires integration of several technologies, viz. bearings, rotor design, motor/generator, power conditioning, and system control. In this paper we present a parameter design method which has been developed for analyzing the linear SISO model of the magnetic bearing controller for the OCCF. The objective of this continued research is to principally analyze the magnetic bearing system for nonlinear effects in order to increase the region of stability, as determined by high speed and large air gap control. This is achieved by four tasks: (1) physical modeling, design, prototyping, and testing of an improved magnetically suspended flywheel energy storage system, (2) identification of problems that limit performance and their corresponding solutions, (3) development of a design methodology for magnetic bearings, and (4) design of an optimal controller for future high speed applications. Both nonlinear SISO and MIMO models of the magnetic system were built to study limit cycle oscillations and power amplifier saturation phenomenon observed in experiments. The nonlinear models include the inductance of EM coils, the power amplifier saturation, and the physical limitation of the flywheel movement as discussed earlier. The control program EASY5 is used to study the nonlinear SISO and MIMO models. Our results have shown that the characteristics and frequency responses of the magnetic bearing system obtained from modeling are comparable to those obtained experimentally. Although magnetic saturation is shown in the bearings, there are good correlations between the theoretical model and experimental data. Both simulation and experiment confirm large variations of the magnetic bearing characteristics due to air gap growth. Therefore, the gap growth effect should be considered in the magnetic bearing system design. Additionally, the magnetic bearing control system will be compared to other design methods using not only parameter design but H-infinity optimal control and mu synthesis.

Pang, D.; Anand, D. K.; Kirk, J. A.

1996-01-01

366

Earth Observatory Satellite system definition study. Report 5: System design and specifications. Volume 3: General purpose spacecraft segment and module specifications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The specifications for the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) general purpose aircraft segment are presented. The satellite is designed to provide attitude stabilization, electrical power, and a communications data handling subsystem which can support various mission peculiar subsystems. The various specifications considered include the following: (1) structures subsystem, (2) thermal control subsystem, (3) communications and data handling subsystem module, (4) attitude control subsystem module, (5) power subsystem module, and (6) electrical integration subsystem.

1974-01-01

367

New Instrumental Facilities to study High Energy Processes in the Sun, Interplanetary Space and their Effects in the Earth Atmosphere  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a new instrumental facility to study the physical mechanisms of high-energy releases taking place in solar quiet and explosive active regions, and their signatures in the Earth's atmosphere. These facilities will be installed in the CASLEO (2550 m asl) observatory, and complement solar flare diagnostic obtained there at millimeter waves (45 and 90 GHZ), submillimeter waves (212 and 405 GHz), IR (30 THz), as well as X-ray radiation imprints in the ionosphere (VLF subionospheric propagation), and of energetic charged particles in Earth's atmosphere (Cosmic Ray CARPET sensor).Specifically, we propose to complement these existing instrumental facilities with a new detector of solar and atmospheric neutrons, a gamma-ray scintillation device, and ELF/VLF wave sensors. The main objectives are: (i) to better characterize the high-frequency radio and high-energy photon flare spectra, in order to provide new clues on the emission mechanism resulting in submillimeter and THz radiation which are still unexplained; (ii) to provide a continuous monitoring of solar energetic phenomena and investigate if they are more frequent than what we do observe nowadays; (iii) to investigate the causal relationship between atmospheric phenomena as lightning occurrence, high-energy photon and neutron production, Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes, and cosmic ray fluxes.

Raulin, Jean-Pierre; Makhmutov, Vladimir

368

A modeling methodology for energy-conserving site design  

SciTech Connect

This dissertation presents a computerized simulation model that analyzes the energy interactions between built-up sites and patterns of wind flows and solar radiation. The model computes the wind and solar exposure of the various buildings that make up a typical urban site, under alternative climate conditions, while accounting for sun and wind shadowing impacts among buildings. The methodology for computing sun and wind shadows, and the resulting site energy budget, is presented. The model is applied to assess the energy budget of layouts of the same structures on the same site and an improved site is designed.

Sadoun, B.I.

1992-01-01

369

Design challenges for energy-constrained ad hoc wireless networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ad hoc wireless networks enable new and exciting applications, but also pose significant technical challenges. In this article we give a brief overview of ad hoc wireless networks and their applications with a particular emphasis on energy constraints. We then discuss advances in the link, multiple access, network, and application protocols for these networks. We show that cross-layer design of

ANDREA J. GOLDSMITH; STEPHEN B. WICKER

2002-01-01

370

Geothermal Energy Utilization via Effective Design of Ground-Coupled  

E-print Network

Geothermal Energy Utilization via Effective Design of Ground-Coupled Heat Exchange System Charlie and condensers, piping systems 路 Research subjects 颅 3D developing turbulent flows 颅 Heat transfer in near Efficiency (Data Center Thermal Management and Air Flow) 颅 Waste Heat Recovery in Industrial Processes

Tennessee, University of

371

A System Design Approach for Unattended Solar Energy Harvesting Supply  

Microsoft Academic Search

Remote devices, such as sensors and communications devices, require continuously available power. In many applications, conventional approaches are too expensive, too large, or unreliable. For short-term needs, primary batteries may be used. However, they do not scale up well for long-term installations. Instead, energy harvesting methods must be used. Here, a system design approach is introduced that results in a

Jonathan W. Kimball; Brian T. Kuhn; Robert S. Balog

2009-01-01

372

RESIDENTIAL BUILDING ADAPTIVE ENERGY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (R-BAEMS) DESIGN  

EPA Science Inventory

The expected outcomes from Phase I included 1) a set of guidelines for implementing R-BAEMS in residential structures from both a retrofit and original design perspective and 2) a cost and energy analysis of R-BAEMS impact on the environment. The status of each of the outcomes...

373

Energy Efficient Engine core design and performance report  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Energy Efficient Engine (E3) is a NASA program to develop fuel saving technology for future large transport aircraft engines. Testing of the General Electric E3 core showed that the core component performance and core system performance necessary to meet the program goals can be achieved. The E3 core design and test results are described.

Stearns, E. Marshall

1982-01-01

374

International update of the Renewable Energy Design Assistance Center  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ever since the US DOE created Sandia`s Design Assistance Center (DAC) in 1984, its mission has been to accelerate the acceptance and appropriate use of renewable energy technologies, thereby expanding markets for US industry. The DAC strives to remove obstacles that impede the use of the technologies, such as a lack of awareness of appropriate applications, misperceptions of cost, lack

B. Richards; M. Harcourt; A. Van Arsdall; D. Menicucci

1994-01-01

375

Power flow analysis for amplifier design and energy harvesting  

E-print Network

Power flow analysis for amplifier design and energy harvesting Nikola Vujica, Donald J. Leoa flow, state-space control, power harvesting, optimization 1. INTRODUCTION Active material systems on active and combined active and passive (hybrid) vibration suppression systems have shown a good

Lindner, Douglas K.

376

Design of energy-based terrain following flight control system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Historically, aircraft longitudinal control has been realized by means of two loops: flight path (the control variable is elevator displacement) and speed control (the control variable is propulsive thrust or engine power). Both the elevator and throttle control cause coupled altitude and speed response, which exerts negative effects on longitudinal flight performance of aircraft, especially for Terrain Following(TF) flight. Energy-based method can resolve coupled problem between flight speed and path by controlling total energy rate and energy distribution rate between elevator and throttle. In this paper, energy-based control method is applied to design a TF flight control system for controlling flight altitude directly. An error control method of airspeed and altitude is adopted to eliminate the stable error of the total energy control system when decoupling control. Pitch loop and pitch rate feedback loop are designed for the system to damp the oscillatory response produced by TF system. The TF flight control system structure diagram and an aircraft point-mass energy motion model including basic control loops are given and used to simulate decoupling performance of the TF fight control system. Simulation results show that the energy-based TF flight control system can decouple flight velocity and flight path angle, exactly follow planned flight path, and greatly reduce altitude error, which is between +10m and -8m.

Wang, Wei; Li, Aijun; Xie, Yanwu; Tan, Jian

2006-11-01

377

Observations of low-energy electrons upstream of the earth's bow shock  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Observations of electron fluxes with a lunar-based electron spectrometer when the moon was upstream of the earth have shown that a subset of observed fluxes are strongly controlled by the interplanetary magnetic field direction. The fluxes occur only when the IMF lines connect back to the earth's bow shock. Observed densities and temperatures were in the ranges 2-4 x 0,001/cu cm and 1.7-2.8 x 1,000,000 K. It is shown that these electrons can account for increases in effective solar wind electron temperatures on bow-shock connected field lines which have been observed previously by other investigators. It is further shown that if a model of the bow shock with an electrostatic potential barrier is assumed, the potential can be estimated to be 500 volts.

Reasoner, D. L.

1974-01-01

378

Energy efficient engine combustor test hardware detailed design report  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The combustor for the Energy Efficient Engine is an annular, two-zone component. As designed, it either meets or exceeds all program goals for performance, safety, durability, and emissions, with the exception of oxides of nitrogen. When compared to the configuration investigated under the NASA-sponsored Experimental Clean Combustor Program, which was used as a basis for design, the Energy Efficient Engine combustor component has several technology advancements. The prediffuser section is designed with short, strutless, curved-walls to provide a uniform inlet airflow profile. Emissions control is achieved by a two-zone combustor that utilizes two types of fuel injectors to improve fuel atomization for more complete combustion. The combustor liners are a segmented configuration to meet the durability requirements at the high combustor operating pressures and temperatures. Liner cooling is accomplished with a counter-parallel FINWALL technique, which provides more effective heat transfer with less coolant.

Zeisser, M. H.; Greene, W.; Dubiel, D. J.

1982-01-01

379

Shielding design for multiple-energy linear accelerators.  

PubMed

The introduction of medical linear accelerators (linacs) capable of producing three different x-ray energies has complicated the process of designing shielding for these units. The conventional approach for the previous generation of dual-energy linacs relied on the addition of some amount of supplementary shielding to that calculated for the higher-energy beam, where the amount of that supplement followed the historical "two-source" rule, also known as the "add one HVL rule," a practice derived from other two-source shielding considerations. The author describes an iterative approach that calculates shielding requirements accurately for any number of multiple beam energies assuming the workload at each energy can be specified at the outset. This method is particularly useful when considering the requirements for possible modifications to an existing vault when new equipment is to be installed as a replacement for a previous unit. PMID:24670911

Barish, Robert J

2014-05-01

380

"Gaa-Noodin-Oke" (Alternative Energy/Wind Power): A Curriculum Implementation on the White Earth Reservation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A wind energy focused curriculum for grades 4-8 was designed and implemented to promote the understanding of wind energy concepts with American Indian students. 57 students who participated in the 2009 summer program of the "Reach for the Sky" (RFTS) Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) received the curriculum. The

Guzey, Siddika Selcen; Nyachwaya, James; Moore, Tamara J.; Roehrig, Gillian H.

2014-01-01

381

Optimal design of thermal energy storage for space power  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper considers the problem of optimization of high-temperature thermal energy storage (TES) in space, using encapsulated phase-change material (PCM). The PCM considered is lithium hydride, with Li assumed to be the heat transport fluid. A total orbit time of 6000 sec is assumed with a sprint period of 600 sec. The goal of the optimization is to minimize the volume of the TES for a given operating condition. A one-dimensional model, based on the constant-temperature approach, is used to calculate the temperature distribution of the fluid and the PCM. This temperautre distribution (and, therefore, the total energy in the TES) is influenced by the particle size and relative dimensions of the TES. Optimal design variables can be chosen, depending on the design constraints, to maximize the energy density in the TES.

Torab, Hamid

382

The Woodlands Metro Center energy study. Case studies of project planning and design for energy conservation  

SciTech Connect

Appendix I for The Woodlands Metro Center Energy Study near Houston consists of a computer model (Program ENERCALC) for parcel level analysis (data sources and definitions, ENERCALC Program description, assumptions, and variables evaluated for Energy Plan); computer model results of Program ENERCALC (conventional plan and energy plan); life cycle cost analysis and energy savings by building type; summary of energy savings and costs; application of building envelope and site design modifications (strategies and parcel-by-parcel application and estimated savings); and energy supply system payback calculations.

Not Available

1980-03-01

383

Earth's Atmosphere  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This problem set is about the methods scientists use to compare the abundance of the different elements in Earth's atmosphere. Answer key is provided. This is part of Earth Math: A Brief Mathematical Guide to Earth Science and Climate Change.

384

Earth's Three  

E-print Network

Broadcast Transcript: From Mongolia, land of fermented mare's milk, comes this beguiling morsel of nomadic oral tradition. It's called yertonciin gorav or Earth's Three. Earth's three what? Well, Earth's three top things in a number of categories...

Hacker, Randi

2010-11-17

385

Technical Support Document: Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Grocery Stores--50% Energy Savings  

SciTech Connect

This report provides recommendations that architects, designers, contractors, developers, owners, and lessees of grocery store buildings can use to achieve whole-building energy savings of at least 50% over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004.

Hale, E. T.; Macumber, D. L.; Long, N. L.; Griffith, B. T.; Benne, K. S.; Pless, S. D.; Torcellini, P. A.

2008-09-01

386

Earth Sciences Environmental Earth Sciences,  

E-print Network

84 Earth Sciences颅 Environmental Earth Sciences, Geology MGeol (Single Honours Degrees) Earth Sciences BSc (Single Honours Degrees) Environmental Earth Sciences Geology BSc (Joint Honours Degrees) and among the most research-intensive in Europe. Features * The Department of Earth and Environmental

Brierley, Andrew

387

Earth Sciences Environmental Earth Sciences,  

E-print Network

94 Earth Sciences颅 Environmental Earth Sciences, Geology Degree options MGeol (Single Honours Degrees) Earth Sciences BSc (Single Honours Degrees) Environmental Earth Sciences Geology BSc (Joint placement. * The Geology and Environmental Earth Sciences degrees are accredited by the Geological Society

Brierley, Andrew

388

Trajectories and energy transfer of saltating particles onto rock surfaces : application to abrasion and ventifact formation on Earth and Mars  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The interaction between saltating sand grains and rock surfaces is assessed to gauge relative abrasion potential as a function of rock shape, wind speed, grain size, and planetary environment. Many kinetic energy height profiles for impacts exhibit a distinctive increase, or kink, a few centimeters above the surface, consistent with previous field, wind tunnel, and theoretical investigations. The height of the kink observed in natural and wind tunnel settings is greater than predictions by a factor of 2 or more, probably because of enhanced bouncing off hard ground surfaces. Rebounded grains increase the effective flux and relative kinetic energy for intermediate slope angles. Whether abrasion occurs, as opposed to simple grain impact with little or no mass lost from the rock, depends on whether the grain kinetic energy (EG) exceeds a critical value (EC), as well as the flux of grains with energies above EC. The magnitude of abrasion and the shape change of the rock over time depends on this flux and the value of EG > EC. Considering the potential range of particle sizes and wind speeds, the predicted kinetic energies of saltating sand hitting rocks overlap on Earth and Mars. However, when limited to the most likely grain sizes and threshold conditions, our results agree with previous work and show that kinetic energies are about an order of magnitude greater on Mars.

Bridges, Nathan T.; Phoreman, James; White, Bruce R.; Greeley, Ronald; Eddlemon, Eric E.; Wilson, Gregory R.; Meyer, Christine J.

2005-01-01

389

Design of a super-insulated energy education center  

SciTech Connect

The Syracuse Research Corporation has designed a passively solar heated Energy Education Center for Syracuse, New York. In spite of the fact that Syracuse has severe winters (6,700 heating degree days and average snowfall of 103 inches) and very poor insolation (20% possible in December and January), the 55,000 square foot building is expected to achieve superior energy performance. The predicted energy totals for heating, cooling, lighting, and fan power are less than 10,000 Btu's per square foot per year. The design makes full use of the concepts of super insulation: R-40 insulation in the walls from the roof to below the frost level, R-80 ceiling insulation, berming where appropriate, insulating shutters, and a positive heat exchange system for ventilation. A comparatively small amount of south-facing glazing is requided to add cyclical heat by insolation. The super insulation design concept requires that infiltration be kept at a minimum. Thus, the design calls for double entry ways, careful construction techniques, and a total heat exchanger to control humidity, as well as save sensible heat for the ventilation air system.

Kinney, L.F. (Syracuse Research Corp., NY); Ashley, D.C.; Ashley, C.M.

1980-01-01

390

Integrated Circuit Design in US High-Energy Physics  

E-print Network

This whitepaper summarizes the status, plans, and challenges in the area of integrated circuit design in the United States for future High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments. It has been submitted to CPAD (Coordinating Panel for Advanced Detectors) and the HEP Community Summer Study 2013(Snowmass on the Mississippi) held in Minnesota July 29 to August 6, 2013. A workshop titled: US Workshop on IC Design for High Energy Physics, HEPIC2013 was held May 30 to June 1, 2013 at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). A draft of the whitepaper was distributed to the attendees before the workshop, the content was discussed at the meeting, and this document is the resulting final product. The scope of the whitepaper includes the following topics: Needs for IC technologies to enable future experiments in the three HEP frontiers Energy, Cosmic and Intensity Frontiers; Challenges in the different technology and circuit design areas and the related R&D needs; Motivation for using different fabrication technologies; Outlook of future technologies including 2.5D and 3D; Survey of ICs used in current experiments and ICs targeted for approved or proposed experiments; IC design at US institutes and recommendations for collaboration in the future.

G. De Geronimo; D. Christian; C. Bebek; M. Garcia-Sciveres; H. Von der Lippe; G. Haller; A. A. Grillo; M. Newcomer

2013-07-15

391

Earth System Science Project  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For several decades, science teachers have used bottles for classroom projects designed to teach students about biology. Bottle projects do not have to just focus on biology, however. These projects can also be used to engage students in Earth science topics. This article describes the Earth System Science Project, which was adapted and developed

Rutherford, Sandra; Coffman, Margaret

2004-01-01

392

Deflection of Hazardous Near-Earth Objects by High Concentrated Sunlight and Adequate Design of Optical Collector  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Some detailed astronomical and applied aspects deflection of hazardous near-Earth objects (NEO) by direct high concentrated sunlight, causing intensive local ablation of their surfaces, are considered. The major requirements to solar concentrating optics within a single collector (a large mirror) approach, along with the asteroid properties being most substantial in achieving the predetermined effect for the period less than a year (mid-thrust action), are discussed. Such a hastened strategy may become topical in the case of late detection of potential danger, and also, if required, in providing the possibility for some additional action. It is also more acceptable in the public perception and keeping the peace for mankind rather than a long-run expectation of the incorrigible deflection resulting shortly ahead of the predicted hazard. The conventional concave reflectors have been graved to be practically inapplicable within the high concentrating geometry. This is primarily because of the dramatic spread of their focal spots at needful inclinations of optical axis from the direction toward the Sun, as well as of problematic use of the secondary optics. An alternative design of a mirrored ring-array collector is presented (as a tested and approved point-focus version of innovative reflective lenses for sunlight concentration within this approach), and comparative analysis was made. The assessment argues in favor of such a type of high-aperture optics having more capabilities than conventional devices. Mainly, this is because of the underside position (as respects the entrance aperture) of its focal area that allows avoidance of target shadowing the reflecting surfaces and minimizes their coating by the ejected debris. By using the modern asteroids database, some key estimations have been obtained. The surface irradiance around 4-5 MW/m2 (average across the focal spot concentration level ~5 103) for the ring-array collector size ~0.5 of asteroid diameter might suffice to deflect a 0.5-km-diameter NEO during several months. For the larger diameter NEOs, to 1.3-2.2 km, the required collector sizes are about the asteroid diameters, and they are even greater for more massive objects.

Vasylyev, V. P.

2013-02-01

393

Solar Energy: Energy Conservation and Passive Design Concepts: Student Material. First Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Designed for student use in "Energy Conservation and Passive Design Concepts," one of 11 courses in a 2-year associate degree program in solar technology, this manual provides readings, bibliographies, and illustrations for seven course modules. The manual, which corresponds to an instructor guide for the same course, covers the following topics:

Younger, Charles; Orsak, Charles G., Jr.

394

The effect of atmospheric drag on the design of solar-cell power systems for low Earth orbit  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The feasibility of reducing the atmospheric drag of low orbit solar powered satellites by operating the solar-cell array in a minimum-drag attitude, rather than in the conventional Sun pointing attitude was determined. The weights of the solar array, the energy storage batteries, and the fuel required to overcome the drag of the solar array for a range of design life times in orbit were considered. The drag of the array was estimated by free molecule flow theory, and the system weights were calculated from unit weight estimates for 1990 technology. The trailing, minimum drag system was found to require 80% more solar array area, and 30% more battery capacity, the system weights for reasonable life times were dominated by the thruster fuel requirements.

Kyser, A. C.

1983-01-01

395

Department of Earth and Mineral Engineering Spring 2011 Electromagnetically Enhanced Hydrocyclone for Magnetite Separation  

E-print Network

PENNSTATE Department of Earth and Mineral Engineering Spring 2011 Electromagnetically Enhanced Hydrocyclone for Magnetite Separation during Coal Beneficiation Overview Consol Energy uses magnetite to design a lab-scale electromagnetically enhanced hydrocyclone and test the separation efficiency

Demirel, Melik C.

396

Sample design for the residential energy consumption survey  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide detailed information about the multistage area-probability sample design used for the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). It is intended as a technical report, for use by statisticians, to better understand the theory and procedures followed in the creation of the RECS sample frame. For a more cursory overview of the RECS sample design, refer to the appendix entitled ``How the Survey was Conducted,`` which is included in the statistical reports produced for each RECS survey year.

Not Available

1994-08-01

397

Earth Observatory Satellite system definition study. Report 5: System design and specifications. Volume 2: EOS-A system specification  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objectives of the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) program are defined. The system specifications for the satellite payload are examined. The broad objectives of the EOS-A program are as follows: (1) to develop space-borne sensors for the measurement of land resources, (2) to evolve spacecraft systems and subsystems which will permit earth observation with greater accuracy, coverage, spatial resolution, and continuity than existing systems, (3) to develop improved information processing, extraction, display, and distribution systems, and (4) to use space transportation systems for resupply and retrieval of the EOS.

1974-01-01

398

The Energy Balance Study: The Design and Baseline Results for a Longitudinal Study of Energy Balance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The Energy Balance Study (EBS) was a comprehensive study designed to determine over a period of 12 months the associations of caloric intake and energy expenditure on changes in body weight and composition in a population of healthy men and women. Method: EBS recruited men and women aged 21 to 35 years with a body mass index between 20

Hand, Gregory A.; Shook, Robin P.; Paluch, Amanda E.; Baruth, Meghan; Crowley, E. Patrick; Jaggers, Jason R.; Prasad, Vivek K.; Hurley, Thomas G.; Hebert, James R.; O'Connor, Daniel P.; Archer, Edward; Burgess, Stephanie; Blair, Steven N.

2013-01-01

399

Energy efficient engine high-pressure turbine detailed design report  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The energy efficient engine high-pressure turbine is a single stage system based on technology advancements in the areas of aerodynamics, structures and materials to achieve high performance, low operating economics and durability commensurate with commercial service requirements. Low loss performance features combined with a low through-flow velocity approach results in a predicted efficiency of 88.8 for a flight propulsion system. Turbine airfoil durability goals are achieved through the use of advanced high-strength and high-temperature capability single crystal materials and effective cooling management. Overall, this design reflects a considerable extension in turbine technology that is applicable to future, energy efficient gas-turbine engines.

Thulin, R. D.; Howe, D. C.; Singer, I. D.

1982-01-01

400

Energy storage and thermal control system design status  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Station Freedom electric power system (EPS) will initially rely on photovoltaics for power generation and Ni/H2 batteries for electrical energy storage. The current design for and the development status of two major subsystems in the PV Power Module is discussed. The energy storage subsystem comprised of high capacity Ni/H2 batteries and the single-phase thermal control system that rejects the excess heat generated by the batteries and other components associated with power generation and storage is described.

Simons, Stephen N.; Willhoite, Bryan C.; Vanommering, Gert

1989-01-01

401

Variable Sun-Earth energy coupling function: dependence on solar cycle strength  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Correlation between monthly geomagnetic activity and monthly sunspot numbers for more than 50 years revealed that the geomagnetic activity during the current solar maximum is lower than what can be expected from the sunspot numbers. This is valid for both one station (Kiruna K index, since 1962) and world-wide average (Kp index, since 1932). The Kp data with more than 80 years record also revealed that monthly Kp for given sunspot numbers are lower during solar cycles with small amplitude than those with large amplitude when we define the cycle from the end of solar maximum to the end of next solar maximum. The result suggests that the Sun-Earth coupling function itself (including the multiplication constant) might be different between different solar cycles when the amplitude is different, and therefore that there might be unknown solar parameter that should contribute to the Sun-Earth coupling. Such a hidden parameter might bridge missing physical link between the solar effect and the terrestrial environment such as the global temperature. Acknowledgement: Kp is an official IAGA endorsed index that is provided by GFZ, Adolf-Schmidt-Observatory Niemegk, Germany. The sunspot numbers are provided by Royal Observatory of Belgium, Brussels.

Yamauchi, Masatoshi

2014-05-01

402

Lateral density variations in elastic Earth models from an extended minimum energy approach  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Kaula's minimum energy approach was extended to include the nonhydrostatic gravitational potential energy and the density perturbation field was obtained to degree and order eight. The depth profiles for the density perturbation show a stratification with density excesses and deficiencies alternating with depth. The addition of the gravitational potential energy in the minimization process does not change significantly the conclusions based on results for the minimum shear strain energy case, concerning the inability of the mantle to withstand the lateral loading elastically.

Sanchez, B. V.

1980-01-01

403

Chamber Design for the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) Engine  

SciTech Connect

The Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) concept is being designed to operate as either a pure fusion or hybrid fusion-fission system. The present work focuses on the pure fusion option. A key component of a LIFE engine is the fusion chamber subsystem. It must absorb the fusion energy, produce fusion fuel to replace that burned in previous targets, and enable both target and laser beam transport to the ignition point. The chamber system also must mitigate target emissions, including ions, x-rays and neutrons and reset itself to enable operation at 10-15 Hz. Finally, the chamber must offer a high level of availability, which implies both a reasonable lifetime and the ability to rapidly replace damaged components. An integrated design that meets all of these requirements is described herein.

Latkowski, J F; Abbott, R P; Aceves, S; Anklam, T; Badders, D; Cook, A W; DeMuth, J; Divol, L; El-Dasher, B; Farmer, J C; Flowers, D; Fratoni, M; ONeil, R G; Heltemes, T; Kane, J; Kramer, K J; Kramer, R; Lafuente, A; Loosmore, G A; Morris, K R; Moses, G A; Olson, B; Pantano, C; Reyes, S; Rhodes, M; Roe, K; Sawicki, R; Scott, H; Spaeth, M; Tabak, M; Wilks, S

2010-11-30

404

An Earth-Moon Transfer Trajectory Design and Analysis Considering Spacecraft's Visibility from Daejeon Ground Station at TLI and LOI Maneuvers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The optimal Earth-Moon transfer trajectory considering spacecraft's visibility from the Daejeon ground station visibility at both the trans lunar injection (TLI) and lunar orbit insertion (LOI) maneuvers is designed. Both the TLI and LOI maneuvers are assumed to be impulsive thrust. As the successful execution of the TLI and LOI maneuvers are crucial factors among the various lunar mission parameters, it is necessary to design an optimal lunar transfer trajectory which guarantees the visibility from a specified ground station while executing these maneuvers. The optimal Earth-Moon transfer trajectory is simulated by modifying the Korean Lunar Mission Design Software using Impulsive high Thrust Engine (KLMDS-ITE) which is developed in previous studies. Four different mission scenarios are established and simulated to analyze the effects of the spacecraft's visibility considerations at the TLI and LOI maneuvers. As a result, it is found that the optimal Earth-Moon transfer trajectory, guaranteeing the spacecraft's visibility from Daejeon ground station at both the TLI and LOI maneuvers, can be designed with slight changes in total amount of delta-Vs. About 1% difference is observed with the optimal trajectory when none of the visibility condition is guaranteed, and about 0.04% with the visibility condition is only guaranteed at the time of TLI maneuver. The spacecraft's mass which can delivered to the Moon, when both visibility conditions are secured is shown to be about 534 kg with assumptions of KSLV-2's on-orbit mass about 2.6 tons. To minimize total mission delta-Vs, it is strongly recommended that visibility conditions at both the TLI and LOI maneuvers should be simultaneously implemented to the trajectory optimization algorithm.

Woo, Jin; Song, Young-Joo; Park, Sang-Young; Kim, Hae-Dong; Sim, Eun-Sup

2010-09-01

405

Direct conversion of infrared radiant energy for space power applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A proposed technology to convert the earth radiant energy (infrared albedo) for spacecraft power is presented. The resultant system would eliminate energy storage requirements and simplify the spacecraft design. The design and performance of a infrared rectenna is discussed.

Finke, R. C.

1982-01-01

406

Earth Exploration Toolbook Chapter: Investigating Renewable Energy Data from Photovoltaic (PV) Solar Panels  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

DATA: Soltrex Online Data. TOOL: Microsoft Excel. SUMMARY: Examine solar energy generation; explore websites that monitor and report solar energy production from panels at many different locations; and consider how much of a school's or home's energy needs could be supplied by solar power.

407

GEOTHERMAL ENERGY FROM THE EARTH:Its Potential Impact as an Environmentally Sustainable Resource  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Geothermal energy technology is reviewed in terms of its current impact and future potential as an energy source. In general, the geothermal energy resource base is large and well distributed globally. Geothermal systems have a number of positive social characteristics (they are simple, safe, and adaptable systems with modular 1-50 MW [thermal (t) or electric (e)] plants capable of

John E. Mock; Jefferson W. Tester; P. Michael Wright

1997-01-01

408

Earth Observatory Satellite system definition study. Report no. 5: System design and specifications. Part 2: Ground system element specifications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Ground System requirements for the Land Resources Management (LRM) type-A and type-B missions of the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) program are presented. Specifications for the Thematic Mapper data processing are provided (LRM A mission). The specifications also cover the R and D instruments (Thematic Mapper and High Resolution Pointable Imager) data processing for the LRM type-B mission.

1974-01-01

409

Initial results from ground-based testing of an atomic oxygen sensor designed for use in earth orbit  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many sensors have been applied to the problem of measuring neutral atomic oxygen fluxes in low Earth orbit. The techniques used to date tend to suffer from several key disadvantages, variously: large mass and power budgets, large size, high cost, the ability to make only one measurement and poor time resolution. In this article preliminary results from ground-based testing of

J. J. Osborne; G. T. Roberts; A. R. Chambers; S. B. Gabriel

1999-01-01

410

Physical Science Earth Science  

E-print Network

Navigation Front Page Physical Science Earth Science Biology Medicine Neuroscience Culture Applied removes the template and converts the resulting copper oxide structures to pure metal, retaining Medicine Neurosciences Culture Search Featured Articles More Open Collaboration for Drug Design Camphor

Bennett, Gisele

411

Earth Science Online Resources  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

These resources are designed to accompany the textbook 'Earth Science' by Pearson Prentice Hall. Materials include quizzes, online field trips, Powerpoint presentations, study guides, animations, and links to online resources.

412

Energy-Absorbing Car Seat Designs for Reducing Whiplash  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: This study presents an investigation of anti-whiplash features that can be implemented in a car seat to reduce whiplash injuries in the case of a rear impact. The main emphasis is on achieving a seat design with good energy absorption properties.Methods: A biofidelic 50th percentile male multi-body human model for rear impact is developed to evaluate the performance of

S. Himmetoglu; M. Acar; K. Bouazza-Marouf; A. J. Taylor

2008-01-01

413

Designing an Adaptive Fuzzy Controller for Maximum Wind Energy Extraction  

Microsoft Academic Search

The wind power production spreading, also aided by the transition from constant to variable speed operation, involves the development of efficient control systems to improve the effectiveness of power production systems. This paper presents a data-driven design methodology able to generate a Takagi-Sugeno-Kang (TSK) fuzzy model for maximum energy extraction from variable speed wind turbines. In order to obtain the

Vincenzo Galdi; Antonio Piccolo; Pierluigi Siano

2008-01-01

414

Design and operation of the high energy physics information server  

SciTech Connect

HEPIC an information {open_quotes}center of centers{close_quotes} for the HEP community, is a 24 hour online location where a HEP researcher can start her/his search for information. Operated by the HEP Network Research Center, HEPIC is accessible via WWW, gopher, anonymous FTP, DECnet, and AFS. This paper describes HEPIC`s design and future plans, and the HEPNRC`s efforts to collect information and link high energy physics researchers world-wide.

Dingbaum, J.J.; Martin, D.E. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)

1994-12-31

415

Ammonia plant designers talk of big energy savings  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ammonia plant that Pullman Kellogg has designed for Sherritt-Gordon Mines Ltd. in Alberta will require < 27 million Btu\\/ton of ammonia, and save $8.10\\/ton in energy costs because of improvements involving increased pressure in the primary reformer; more efficient use of the heat from the secondary reformer; carbon dioxide recovery by Allied Chemical Corp.'s Selexol process; the reduction of

Axelrod

1980-01-01

416

The Earth's Dynamic Magnetotail  

Microsoft Academic Search

Geomagnetic field lines that are stretched on the nightside of the Earth due to reconnection with the interplanetary magnetic field constitute the Earth's magnetotail. The magnetotail is a dynamic entity where energy imparted from the solar wind is stored and then released to generate disturbance phenomena such as substorms. This paper gives an updated overview on the physics of the

A. Nishida

2000-01-01

417

Cool Earth Solar  

ScienceCinema

In a public-private partnership that takes full advantage of the Livermore Valley Open Campus (LVOC) for the first time, Sandia National Laboratories and Cool Earth Solar have signed an agreement that could make solar energy more affordable and accessible. In this piece, representatives from Sandia, Cool Earth Solar, and leaders in California government all discuss the unique partnership and its expected impact.

Lamkin, Rob; McIlroy, Andy; Swalwell, Eric; Rajan, Kish

2014-02-26

418

Cool Earth Solar  

SciTech Connect

In a public-private partnership that takes full advantage of the Livermore Valley Open Campus (LVOC) for the first time, Sandia National Laboratories and Cool Earth Solar have signed an agreement that could make solar energy more affordable and accessible. In this piece, representatives from Sandia, Cool Earth Solar, and leaders in California government all discuss the unique partnership and its expected impact.

Lamkin, Rob; McIlroy, Andy; Swalwell, Eric; Rajan, Kish

2013-04-22

419

Design for energy efficiency: Energy efficient industrialized housing research program. Progress report  

SciTech Connect

Since 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy has sponsored the Energy Efficient Industrialized Housing research program (EEIH) to improve the energy efficiency of industrialized housing. Two research centers share responsibility for this program: The Center for Housing Innovation at the University of Oregon and the Florida Solar Energy Center, a research institute of the University of Central Florida. Additional funding is provided through the participation of private industry, state governments and utilities. The program is guided by a steering committee comprised of industry and government representatives. This report summarizes Fiscal Year (FY) 1990 activities and progress, and proposed activities for FY 1991 in Task 2.1 Design for Energy Efficiency. This task establishes a vision of energy conservation opportunities in critical regions, market segments, climate zones and manufacturing strategies significant to industrialized housing in the 21st Century. In early FY 1990, four problem statements were developed to define future housing demand scenarios inclusive of issues of energy efficiency, housing design and manufacturing. Literature surveys were completed to assess seven areas of influence for industrialized housing and energy conservation in the future. Fifty-five future trends were identified in computing and design process; manufacturing process; construction materials, components and systems; energy and environment; demographic context; economic context; and planning policy and regulatory context.

Kellett, R.; Berg, R.; Paz, A.; Brown, G.Z.

1991-03-01

420

Design optimization of superconducting magnetic energy storage coil  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An optimization formulation has been developed for a superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) solenoid-type coil with niobium titanium (Nb-Ti) based Rutherford-type cable that minimizes the cryogenic refrigeration load into the cryostat. Minimization of refrigeration load reduces the operating cost and opens up the possibility to adopt helium re-condensing system using cryo-cooler especially for small-scale SMES system. Dynamic refrigeration load during charging or discharging operational mode of the coil dominates over steady state load. The paper outlines design optimization with practical design constraints like actual critical characteristics of the superconducting cable, maximum allowable hoop stress on winding, etc., with the objective to minimize refrigeration load into the SMES cryostat. Effect of design parameters on refrigeration load is also investigated.

Bhunia, Uttam; Saha, Subimal; Chakrabarti, Alok

2014-05-01

421

Earth Exploration Toolbook Chapter: Investigating Renewable Energy Data from Photovoltaic (PV) Solar Panels  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Using renewable sources of energy benefits the environment and contributes to more sustainable energy use. The burning of fossil fuels generates air pollution and increased CO2 in the atmosphere. CO2 is the major greenhouse gas warming our planet. Using more renewable sources of energy not only reduces pollution, but also conserves the current limited supply of fossil fuels. This chapter looks at how much solar energy is generated using photovoltaic panels on rooftops or exposed ground locations at installations around the U.S. The focus is on three different websites that monitor and report solar energy production from panels at a few hundred locations.

422

State Energy Efficiency Resource Standards: Design, Status, and Impacts  

SciTech Connect

An energy efficiency resource standard (EERS) is a policy that requires utilities or other entities to achieve a specified amount of energy savings through customer energy efficiency programs within a specified timeframe. EERSs may apply to electricity usage, natural gas usage, or both. This paper provides an overview of the key design features of EERSs for electricity, reviews the variation in design of EERSs across states, and provides an estimate of the amount of savings required by currently specified EERSs in each state. As of December, 2013, 23 states have active and binding EERSs for electricity. We estimate that state EERSs will require annual electricity savings of approximately 8-11% of total projected demand by 2020 in states with EERSs, however the level of savings targeted by the policies varies significantly across states. In addition to the variation in targeted savings, the design of EERSs varies significantly across states leading to differences in the suite of incentives created by the policy, the flexibility of compliance with the policy, the balance of benefits and costs of the policy between producers and consumers, and the certainty with which the policy will drive long-term savings.

Steinberg, D.; Zinaman, O.

2014-05-01

423

Nanoscale Design to Enable the Revolution in Renewable Energy  

SciTech Connect

The creation of a sustainable energy generation, storage, and distribution infrastructure represents a global grand challenge that requires massive transnational investments in the research and development of energy technologies that will provide the amount of energy needed on a sufficient scale and timeframe with minimal impact on the environment and have limited economic and societal disruption during implementation. In this opinion paper, we focus on an important set of solar, thermal, and electrochemical energy conversion, storage, and conservation technologies specifically related to recent and prospective advances in nanoscale science and technology that offer high potential in addressing the energy challenge. We approach this task from a two-fold perspective: analyzing the fundamental physicochemical principles and engineering aspects of these energy technologies and identifying unique opportunities enabled by nanoscale design of materials, processes, and systems in order to improve performance and reduce costs. Our principal goal is to establish a roadmap for research and development activities in nanoscale science and technology that would significantly advance and accelerate the implementation of renewable energy technologies. In all cases we make specific recommendations for research needs in the near-term (2-5 years), mid-term (5-10 years) and long-term (>10 years), as well as projecting a timeline for maturation of each technological solution. We also identify a number of priority themes in basic energy science that cut across the entire spectrum of energy conversion, storage, and conservation technologies. We anticipate that the conclusions and recommendations herein will be of use not only to the technical community, but also to policy makers and the broader public, occasionally with an admitted emphasis on the US perspective.

Baxter, J.; Bian, Z. X.; Chen, G.; Danielson, D.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Fedorov, A. G.; Fisher, T. S.; Jones, C. W.; Maginn, E.; Kortshagen, U.; Manthiram, A.; Nozik, A.; Rolison, D. R.; Sands, T.; Shi, L.; Sholl, D.; Wu, Y. Y.

2009-01-01

424

Energy Use Intensity and its Influence on the Integrated Daylighting Design of a Large Net Zero Energy Building: Preprint  

Microsoft Academic Search

Net-zero energy buildings generate as much energy as they consume and are significant in the sustainable future of building design and construction. The role of daylighting (and its simulation) in the design process becomes critical. In this paper we present the process the National Renewable Energy Laboratory embarked on in the procurement, design, and construction of its newest building, the

R. Guglielmetti; J. Scheib; S. D. Pless; P. Torcellini; R. Petro

2011-01-01

425

Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) algorithm theoretical basis document. Volume 1; Overviews (subsystem 0)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The theoretical bases for the Release 1 algorithms that will be used to process satellite data for investigation of the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) are described. The architecture for software implementation of the methodologies is outlined. Volume 1 provides both summarized and detailed overviews of the CERES Release 1 data analysis system. CERES will produce global top-of-the-atmosphere shortwave and longwave radiative fluxes at the top of the atmosphere, at the surface, and within the atmosphere by using the combination of a large variety of measurements and models. The CERES processing system includes radiance observations from CERES scanning radiometers, cloud properties derived from coincident satellite imaging radiometers, temperature and humidity fields from meteorological analysis models, and high-temporal-resolution geostationary satellite radiances to account for unobserved times. CERES will provide a continuation of the ERBE record and the lowest error climatology of consistent cloud properties and radiation fields. CERES will also substantially improve our knowledge of the Earth's surface radiation budget.

Wielicki, Bruce A. (Principal Investigator); Barkstrom, Bruce R. (Principal Investigator); Baum, Bryan A.; Cess, Robert D.; Charlock, Thomas P.; Coakley, James A.; Green, Richard N.; Lee, Robert B., III; Minnis, Patrick; Smith, G. Louis

1995-01-01

426

Amplified energy harvester from footsteps: design, modeling, and experimental analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents the design, modeling and experimental analysis of an amplified footstep energy harvester. With the unique design of amplified piezoelectric stack harvester the kinetic energy generated by footsteps can be effectively captured and converted into usable DC power that could potentially be used to power many electric devices, such as smart phones, sensors, monitoring cameras, etc. This doormat-like energy harvester can be used in crowded places such as train stations, malls, concerts, airport escalator/elevator/stairs entrances, or anywhere large group of people walk. The harvested energy provides an alternative renewable green power to replace power requirement from grids, which run on highly polluting and global-warming-inducing fossil fuels. In this paper, two modeling approaches are compared to calculate power output. The first method is derived from the single degree of freedom (SDOF) constitutive equations, and then a correction factor is applied onto the resulting electromechanically coupled equations of motion. The second approach is to derive the coupled equations of motion with Hamilton's principle and the constitutive equations, and then formulate it with the finite element method (FEM). Experimental testing results are presented to validate modeling approaches. Simulation results from both approaches agree very well with experimental results where percentage errors are 2.09% for FEM and 4.31% for SDOF.

Wang, Ya; Chen, Wusi; Guzman, Plinio; Zuo, Lei

2014-04-01

427

Baltic Earth - Earth System Science for the Baltic Sea Region  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Baltic Sea region, defined as its river catchment basin, spans different climate and population zones, from a temperate, highly populated, industrialized south with intensive agriculture to a boreal, rural north. It encompasses most of the Scandinavian Peninsula in the west; most of Finland and parts of Russia, Belarus, and the Baltic states in the east; and Poland and small parts of Germany and Denmark in the south. The region represents an old cultural landscape, and the Baltic Sea itself is among the most studied sea areas of the world. Baltic Earth is the new Earth system research network for the Baltic Sea region. It is the successor to BALTEX, which was terminated in June 2013 after 20 years and two successful phases. Baltic Earth stands for the vision to achieve an improved Earth system understanding of the Baltic Sea region. This means that the research disciplines of BALTEX continue to be relevant, i.e. atmospheric and climate sciences, hydrology, oceanography and biogeochemistry, but a more holistic view of the Earth system encompassing processes in the atmosphere, on land and in the sea as well as in the anthroposphere shall gain in importance in Baltic Earth. Specific grand research challenges have been formulated, representing interdisciplinary research questions to be tackled in the coming years. A major means will be scientific assessments of particular research topics by expert groups, similar to the BACC approach, which shall help to identify knowledge gaps and develop research strategies. Preliminary grand challenges and topics for which Working Groups have been installed include: Salinity dynamics in the Baltic Sea Land-Sea biogeochemical feedbacks in the Baltic Sea region Natural hazards and extreme events in the Baltic Sea region Understanding sea level dynamics in the Baltic Sea Understanding regional variability of water and energy exchange Utility of Regional Climate Models Assessment of Scenario Simulations for the Baltic Sea 1960-2100 Outreach and Communication Education The issue of anthropogenic changes and impacts on the Earth system of the Baltic Sea region is recognized as a major topic, and shall receive special attention. The intention of the "Outreach and Communication" and "Education" groups will be to initiate and design potential outreach activities and to provide an arena for scientific exchange and discussion around the Baltic Sea, to communicate findings and exchange views within the Baltic Earth research community internally and to other researchers and society, both professionals and non-professionals. A regular international Baltic Earth Summer School shall be established from 2015. There will be a strong continuity related to BALTEX in infrastructure (secretariat, conferences, publications) and the network (people and institutions).

Meier, Markus; Rutgersson, Anna; Lehmann, Andreas; Reckermann, Marcus

2014-05-01

428

MY NASA DATA: How Does the Earth's Energy Budget Relate to Polar Ice?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

By matching maps of snow and ice amounts with maps of net radiation flux for the same time frame, students will use the Live Access Server to explore how the net radiation flux has affected the snow and ice amounts in the Northern Hemisphere, as well as how the presence of snow can affect the net radiation flux due to surface reflection. The lesson includes detailed procedures, related links and sample graphs, follow-up questions, extensions, and teacher notes. This lesson is from the MY NASA DATA project, which has created microsets from large scientific data sets, and wrapped them with tools, lesson plans, and supporting documentation so that a teacher, or anyone in the interested public, can use authentic NASA Earth system science data.

429

Energy transfer kinetics in oxy-fluoride glass and glass-ceramics doped with rare-earth ions  

SciTech Connect

An investigation of donor-acceptor energy transfer kinetics in dual rare earths doped precursor oxy-fluoride glass and its glass-ceramics containing NaYF{sub 4} nano-crystals is reported here, using three different donor-acceptor ion combinations such as Nd-Yb, Yb-Dy, and Nd-Dy. The precipitation of NaYF{sub 4} nano-crystals in host glass matrix under controlled post heat treatment of precursor oxy-fluoride glasses has been confirmed from XRD, FESEM, and transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis. Further, the incorporation of dopant ions inside fluoride nano-crystals has been established through optical absorption and TEM-EDX analysis. The noticed decreasing trend in donor to acceptor energy transfer efficiency from precursor glass to glass-ceramics in all three combinations have been explained based on the structural rearrangements that occurred during the heat treatment process. The reduced coupling phonon energy for the dopant ions due to fluoride environment and its influence on the overall phonon assisted contribution in energy transfer process has been illustrated. Additionally, realization of a correlated distribution of dopant ions causing clustering inside nano-crystals has also been reported.

Sontakke, Atul D.; Annapurna, K. [Glass Science and Technology Section, CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, 196, Raja S. C. Mullick Road, Kolkata - 700 032 (India)

2012-07-01

430

Earth\\'s Surface  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

You have already learned about the four major parts of Earth\\'s system: atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and geosphere. Go to the following sites to learn more about rocks and minerals, continental drift, and geologic time. When you finish viewing all the sites, you will participate in a problem-based learning activity, \\"The Case of the Disappearing Dirt.\\" Topographic Maps All About Geology Answer the questions on the handout. Erosion and Weathering Summarize what your learned about erosion and weathering. Examine a landscape formed by erosion Observe the effects of mechanical weathering Plate Tectonics FAQ s About Rocks and Fossils Igneous Rocks Rocks and Minerals Slide Show Rock Cycle Observe an animation of metamorphic rocks forming Continental Drift Mineralogy 4 kids : rockin Internet site : the best place to learn about rocks and minerals Draw a picture of the rock cycle. Coasting Away ...

Mathis, Ms.

2008-01-11

431

NREL Highlights SCIENCE Use of Earth-abundant materials in solar absorber films  

E-print Network

NREL Highlights SCIENCE Use of Earth-abundant materials in solar absorber films is critical for expanding the reach of photovoltaic (PV) technologies. The use of Earth-abundant and inexpensive Fe in PV collaboratively in the Center for Inverse Design, an Energy Frontier Research Center, have uncovered several new

432

Reliability of passive earth pressure  

Microsoft Academic Search

Passive earth pressure calculations in geotechnical analysis are usually performed with the aid of the Rankine or Coulomb theories of earth pressure based on uniform soil properties. These traditional earth pressure theories assume that the soil is uniform. The fact that soils are spatially variable leads to two potential problems in design: do sampled soil properties adequately reflect the effective

D. V. Griffiths; Gordon A. Fenton; Heidi R. Ziemann

2008-01-01

433

Earth's magnetic field as a radiator to detect cosmic ray electrons of energy greater than 10 to the 12th power eV  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The synchrotron emission by electrons of energy greater than a few TeV in Earth's magnetic field was examined. An omnidirectional detector, it is shown, can be satisfactorily used to estimate the energy. The collecting power of the detector, it is also shown, is a sensitive function of the area of the detector, the energy of electron, and the number of photons required to identify an electron. The event rate expected was calculated using an ideal balloon-borne detector.

Stephens, S. A.; Balasubrahmanyan, V. K.

1983-01-01

434

Integration of energy analyses in design through the use of microcomputers  

E-print Network

Social, economic, and professional forces are compelling architectural designers to evaluate the effects of design decisions upon environmental comfort and energy efficiency in buildings. Siting, massing, locations of ...

Krinkel, David L

1983-01-01

435

Investigation of design options for improving the energy efficiency of conventionally designed refrigerator-freezers  

SciTech Connect

Several design options for improving the energy efficiency of conventionally-designed, domestic refrigerator freezers (RFs) were incorporated into two 1990 production RF cabinets and refrigeration systems. The baseline performance of the original units and unit components were extensively documented to provide a firm basis for experimentally measured energy savings. A detailed refrigerator system computer model which could simulate cycling behavior was used to evaluate the daily energy use impacts for each modification, and modeled versus experimental results are compared. The model was shown to track measured RF performance improvement sufficiently well that it was used with some confidence to investigate additional options that could not be experimentally investigated. Substantial improvements in RF efficiency were demonstrated with relatively minor changes in system components and refrigeration circuit design. However, each improvement exacts a penalty in terms of increased cost or system complexity/reliability. For RF sizes typically sold in the United States (18-22 ft{sup 3} [510--620 1]), alternative, more-elaborate, refrigeration cycles may be required to achieve the program goal (1.00 Kilowatt-hour per day for a 560 l, top mount RF.

Sand, J.R.; Vineyard, E.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Bohman, R.H. [Consulting Engineer, Cedar Rapids, IA (United States)

1993-11-01

436

Optimal constellation design of low earth orbit (LEO) EO\\/IR sensor platforms for space situational awareness  

Microsoft Academic Search

Constellations of EO\\/IR space based sensors can be extremely valuable for space situational awareness. In this paper, we present trade-off analysis and comparisons of different Low Earth Orbit (LEO) EO\\/IR sensor platform constellations for space situational awareness tasks. These tasks include early observation of changing events, and localization and tracking of changing LEO orbits. We derive methods and metrics for

A. Zatezalo; A. El-Fallah; R. Mahler; R. K. Mehra; K. Pham

2009-01-01

437

Energy Partition in Magnetic Reconnection in Earth's Magnetotail J. P. Eastwood,1,* T. D. Phan,2  

E-print Network

, with smaller contributions from the electron enthalpy and heat flux and the ion kinetic energy flux. However of these studies, in addition to neglecting heat fluxes, is that the outward Poynting flux is negligible, in part (Received 15 October 2012; published 31 May 2013) The partition of energy flux in magnetic reconnection

Shay, Michael

438

Satellite Collectors of Solar Energy for Earth and Colonized Planet Habitats  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary An array of 55,000 40-foot antennas can generate from the rays of the Sun enough electrical power to replace 50 The economic potential is huge. There are new industries that will only grow and there are different ways to collect solar energy, including wind power. The energy sources we rely on for the most part are finite - fossil

Richard Kusiolek

2008-01-01

439

On-orbit stability and performance of the Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument sensors onboard the Aqua and Terra Spacecraft  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments onboard the Terra and Aqua spacecraft are part of the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) constellation to make long-term observations of the earth. CERES measures the earth-reflected shortwave energy as well as the earth-emitted thermal energy, which are two components of the earth's radiation energy budget. These measurements are made by five instruments- Flight Models (FM) 1 and 2 onboard Terra, FMs 3 and 4 onboard Aqua and FM5 onboard Suomi NPP. Each instrument comprises three sensors that measure the radiances in different wavelength bands- a shortwave sensor that measures in the 0.3 to 5 micron band, a total sensor that measures all the incident energy (0.3-200 microns) and a window sensor that measures the water-vapor window region of 8 to 12 microns. The stability of the sensors is monitored through on-orbit calibration and validation activities. On-orbit calibration is carried out using the Internal Calibration Module (ICM) that consists of a tungsten lamp, blackbodies, and a solar diffuser known as the Mirror Attenuator Mosaic (MAM). The ICM calibration provides information about the stability of the sensors' broadband radiometric gains on-orbit. Several validation studies are conducted in order to monitor the behavior of the instruments in various spectral bands. The CERES Edition-4 data products for FM1-FM4 incorporate the latest corrections to the sensor responses using the calibration techniques. In this paper, we present the on-orbit performance stability as well as some validation studies used in deriving the CERES Edition-4 data products from all four instruments.

Shankar, Mohan; Priestley, Kory; Smith, Nitchie; Thomas, Susan; Walikainen, Dale

2014-09-01

440

Conceptual design and engineering studies of adiabatic compressed air energy storage (CAES) with thermal energy storage  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to perform a conceptual engineering design and evaluation study and to develop a design for an adiabatic CAES system using water-compensated hard rock caverns for compressed air storage. The conceptual plant design was to feature underground containment for thermal energy storage and water-compensated hard rock caverns for high pressure air storage. Other design constraints included the selection of turbomachinery designs that would require little development and would therefore be available for near-term plant construction and demonstration. The design was to be based upon the DOE/EPRI/PEPCO-funded 231 MW/unit conventional CAES plant design prepared for a site in Maryland. This report summarizes the project, its findings, and the recommendations of the study team; presents the development and optimization of the plant heat cycle and the selection and thermal design of the thermal energy storage system; discusses the selection of turbomachinery and estimated plant performance and operational capability; describes the control system concept; and presents the conceptual design of the adiabatic CAES plant, the cost estimates and economic evaluation, and an assessment of technical and economic feasibility. Particular areas in the plant design requiring further development or investigation are discussed. It is concluded that the adiabatic concept appears to be the most attractive candidate for utility application in the near future. It is operationally viable, economically attractive compared with competing concerns, and will require relatively little development before the construction of a plant can be undertaken. It is estimated tha