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Sample records for earth metal ions

  1. Significant thermal conductivity enhancement in graphene oxide papers modified with alkaline earth metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wei; Xie, Huaqing; Li, Fengxian; Zhao, Junchang; Zhang, Zhenhai

    2013-09-01

    The thermal conductivities of graphene oxide paper (GOP) and the alkaline earth metal ions (Mg2+, Ca2+) modified analogues, prepared by a facile vacuum filtration method, were measured by a laser flash method. The thermal conductivities of GOP, Mg-modified GOP, and Ca-modified GOP are 3.91 W/(m × K), 32.05 W/(m × K), and 61.38 W/(m × K), respectively, which indicate the modification of GOP with metal ions has resulted in significant enhancement in thermal conduction properties compared with unmodified GOP. The crosslink between graphene oxide sheet and metal ions, the neat stacking of graphene oxide sheets in modified GOP, together with the intercalation of metal ions into the gallery spaces between the graphene oxide sheet basal planes, result in a decrease of thermal resistance of the boundary and an increase of contact surface, thus increases the thermal conductivity of modified graphene oxide paper.

  2. Coherent spectroscopy of rare-earth-metal-ion-doped whispering-gallery-mode resonators

    SciTech Connect

    McAuslan, D. L.; Korystov, D.; Longdell, J. J.

    2011-06-15

    We perform an investigation into the properties of Pr{sup 3+}:Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} whispering-gallery-mode resonators as a first step toward achieving the strong coupling regime of cavity QED with rare-earth-metal-ion-doped crystals. Direct measurement of cavity QED parameters are made using photon echoes, giving good agreement with theoretical predictions. By comparing the ions at the surface of the resonator to those in the center, it is determined that the physical process of making the resonator does not negatively affect the properties of the ions. Coupling between the ions and resonator is analyzed through the observation of optical bistability and normal-mode splitting.

  3. Colorless transparent fluorescence material: Sintered porous glass containing rare-earth and transition-metal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Danping; Miyoshi, Hiroshi; Akai, Tomoko; Yazawa, Tetsuo

    2005-06-06

    Transparent fluorescence oxide glass with high emission yields has been prepared. Porous glass was impregnated with rare-earth and transition-metal ions and consequently sintered at 1100 deg. C into a compact nonporous glass. Reduction sintering is indispensable for obtaining fluorescence glass with high emission yield. Sintering of glass impregnated with Eu ions in a reducing atmosphere enhances the emission intensity by about 15 times than that sintered in air. The Eu{sup 2+} and Ce{sup 3+} ions and Sn{sup 2+} and Cu{sup +} ions incorporated in SiO{sub 2} glass obtained by reduction sintering exhibit intense fluorescence in the near-ultraviolet and visible ranges, their emission yields are 97%, 70%, 100%, and 90%, respectively.

  4. The adsorption kinetics of metal ions onto different microalgae and siliceous earth.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, D; Müller, A; Csögör, Z; Frimmel, F H; Posten, C

    2001-03-01

    In the present work the adsorption kinetics of the six metal ions aluminum, zinc, mercury, lead, copper, and cadmium onto living microalgae were measured. The freshwater green microalga Scenedesmus subspicatus, the brackish water diatom Cyclotella cryptica, the seawater diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, and the seawater red alga Porphyridium purpureum were the subject of investigation. In most cases the adsorption rate of the metals could be well described by using the equation of the Langmuir adsorption rate expression. Inverse parameter estimation allowed the determination of the rate constants of the adsorption process and the maximum metal content of the algae. The highest values for the rate constant were obtained for Porphyridium purpureum followed by Phaeodactylum tricornutum. High values for the maximum content were obtained for Cyclotella cryptica and Scenedesmus subspicatus. The maximum rate constant was 24.21 h-1 for the adsorption of Hg to Porphyridium purpureum whereas the maximum metal content (0.243 g g-1) was obtained for Zn on Cyclotella cryptica. A comparison of these values with those obtained for the mineral siliceous earth exhibiting low maximum content and high adsorption rates reveals that the mechanism of adsorption onto the algae is a mixture of adsorption and accumulation. PMID:11228977

  5. Sol-gel-derived hybrid materials multi-doped with rare-earth metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelazowska, E.; Rysiakiewicz-Pasek, E.; Borczuch-Laczka, M.; Cholewa-Kowalska, K.

    2012-06-01

    Four different hybrid organic-inorganic materials based on TiO2-SiO2 matrices with organic additives and doped with rare-earth metal ions (III) from the group of europium, cerium, terbium, neodymium, dysprosium and samarium, were synthesized by sol-gel method. Tetraethyl orthosilicate, titanium (IV) isopropoxide and organic compounds, such as butyl acrylate, butyl methacrylate, ethyl acetoacetate, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate, ethyl acetate, propylene carbonate, organic solvents and certain inorganic salts were used in the synthesis. The inorganic part of the sols, which were used in the synthesis of all the hybrid materials, was prepared separately and then the organic parts were added. The materials obtained were aged for three weeks at room temperature and then heated in an electric oven for three hours at temperatures of 80 °C-150 °C. Scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX); X-ray diffraction (XRD); Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (KBr technique); 29Si magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance; and fluorescence spectroscopy were used for the examination of morphology, microstructure and luminescence properties, respectively. Photoluminescence properties with relatively intense narrow emission lines of Tb, Eu, Dy, Nd, Sm respectively to the RE-ions doping, were observed for all the hybrid materials.

  6. Self-propelled droplets for extracting rare-earth metal ions.

    PubMed

    Ban, Takahiko; Tani, Kentaro; Nakata, Hiroki; Okano, Yasunori

    2014-09-01

    We have developed self-propelled droplets having the abilities to detect a chemical gradient, to move toward a higher concentration of a specific metal ion (particularly the dysprosium ion), and to extract it. Such abilities rely on the high surface activity of di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (DEHPA) in response to pH and the affinity of DEHPA for the dysprosium ion. We used two external stimuli as chemical signals to control droplet motion: a pH signal to induce motility and metal ions to induce directional sensing. The oil droplets loaded with DEHPA spontaneously move around beyond the threshold of pH even in a homogeneous pH field. In the presence of a gel block containing metal ions, the droplets show directional sensing and their motility is biased toward higher concentrations. The metal ions investigated can be arranged in decreasing order of directional sensing as Dy(3+)? Nd(3+) > Y(3+) > Gd(3+). Furthermore, the analysis of components by using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer reveals that the metal ions can be extracted from the environmental media to the interiors of the droplets. This system may offer alternative self-propelled nano/microscale machines to bubble thrust engines powered by asymmetrical catalysts. PMID:25029997

  7. Rare-earth neutral metal injection into an electron beam ion trap plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, E. W. Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Hell, N.

    2014-11-15

    We have designed and implemented a neutral metal vapor injector on the SuperEBIT high-energy electron beam ion trap at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A horizontally directed vapor of a europium metal is created using a thermal evaporation technique. The metal vapor is then spatially collimated prior to injection into the trap. The source's form and quantity constraints are significantly reduced making plasmas out of metal with vapor pressures ≤10{sup −7} Torr at ≥1000 °C more obtainable. A long pulsed or constant feed metal vapor injection method adds new flexibility by varying the timing of injection and rate of material being introduced into the trap.

  8. Rare-earth neutral metal injection into an electron beam ion trap plasma.

    PubMed

    Magee, E W; Beiersdorfer, P; Brown, G V; Hell, N

    2014-11-01

    We have designed and implemented a neutral metal vapor injector on the SuperEBIT high-energy electron beam ion trap at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A horizontally directed vapor of a europium metal is created using a thermal evaporation technique. The metal vapor is then spatially collimated prior to injection into the trap. The source's form and quantity constraints are significantly reduced making plasmas out of metal with vapor pressures ≤10(-7) Torr at ≥1000 °C more obtainable. A long pulsed or constant feed metal vapor injection method adds new flexibility by varying the timing of injection and rate of material being introduced into the trap. PMID:25430385

  9. Radiative properties of few F- and Cl- like alkali and alkaline-earth metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandy, D. K.; Singh, Sukhjit; Sahoo, B. K.

    2015-09-01

    We present high-accuracy calculations of radiative properties such as oscillator strengths and transition probabilities, of the allowed ns 2S1/2 → np 2P1/2, 3/2 transitions and of the forbidden np 2P1/2 → np 2P3/2 transitions in the F- and Cl-like alkali and alkaline-earth ions with the ground state principal quantum number n of the respective ion. For this purpose, we have employed the Dirac-Fock, relativistic second-order many-body perturbation theory and an all-order perturbative relativistic method in the coupled-cluster (CC) theory framework. To test the validity of these methods for giving accurate results, we first evaluated the ionization potentials in the creation processes of these ions and compare them with their experimental values listed in the National Institute of Science and Technology data base. Moreover, both the allowed and forbidden transition amplitudes are estimated using the above three methods and a comparative analysis is made to follow-up the electron correlation trends in order to demonstrate the need of using a sophisticated method like the CC theory for their precise determination. For astrophysical use, we provide the most precise values of the transition properties by combining the experimental energies, which suppresses uncertainties from the calculated energies, using the transition amplitudes from the CC method. These data will be useful in the abundance analysis of the considered ions in the astronomical objects and for the diagnostic processes of astrophysical plasmas.

  10. Properties of alkali-metal atoms and alkaline-earth-metal ions for an accurate estimate of their long-range interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Jasmeet; Nandy, D. K.; Arora, Bindiya; Sahoo, B. K.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of interaction potentials among the alkali-metal atoms and alkaline-earth ions is very useful in the studies of cold atom physics. Here we carry out theoretical studies of the long-range interactions among the Li, Na, K, and Rb alkali-metal atoms with the Ca+, Ba+, Sr+, and Ra+ alkaline-earth ions systematically, which are largely motivated by their importance in a number of applications. These interactions are expressed as a power series in the inverse of the internuclear separation R . Both the dispersion and induction components of these interactions are determined accurately from the algebraic coefficients corresponding to each power combination in the series. Ultimately, these coefficients are expressed in terms of the electric multipole polarizabilities of the above-mentioned systems, which are calculated using the matrix elements obtained from a relativistic coupled-cluster method and core contributions to these quantities from the random-phase approximation. We also compare our estimated polarizabilities with the other available theoretical and experimental results to verify accuracies in our calculations. In addition, we also evaluate the lifetimes of the first two low-lying states of the ions using the above matrix elements. Graphical representations of the dispersion coefficients versus R are given among all the alkaline ions with Rb.

  11. Dispersion coefficients for the interactions of the alkali-metal and alkaline-earth-metal ions and inert-gas atoms with a graphene layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Kiranpreet; Arora, Bindiya; Sahoo, B. K.

    2015-09-01

    Largely motivated by a number of applications, the van der Waals dispersion coefficients C3 of the alkali-metal ions Li+,Na+,K+, and Rb+, the alkaline-earth-metal ions Ca+,Sr+,Ba+, and Ra+, and the inert-gas atoms He, Ne, Ar, and Kr with a graphene layer are determined precisely within the framework of the Dirac model. For these calculations, we evaluate the dynamic polarizabilities of the above atomic systems very accurately by evaluating the transition matrix elements employing relativistic many-body methods and using the experimental values of the excitation energies. The dispersion coefficients are given as functions of the separation distance of an atomic system from the graphene layer and the ambiance temperature during the interactions. For easy extraction of these coefficients, we give a logistic fit to the functional forms of the dispersion coefficients in terms of the separation distances at room temperature.

  12. Iminodiacetic acid functionalised monolithic silica chelating ion exchanger for rapid determination of alkaline earth metal ions in high ionic strength samples.

    PubMed

    Sugrue, Edel; Nesterenko, Pavel; Paull, Brett

    2003-05-01

    Iminodiacetic acid has been covalently bonded to a bare silica monolith to produce the first reported high-performance monolithic chelating ion exchange column. Using the new column, separation and determination of traces of alkaline earth metal ions (low ppm) in high ionic strength samples (up to 2 M NaCl and KCl brines), could be achieved in under 40 s. At an eluent flow rate of 4 mL min(-1) retention time precision was < 1.2% (n = 9) for Mg(II) and Ca(II), with detector linearity (n = 5) over the range 2-10 mg L(-1) of between R2 = 0.985 and R2 = 0.995. In 1 M KCl and NaCl brine samples, detection limits of 0.2 mg L(-1) were possible. PMID:12790190

  13. 1H and 23Na MAS NMR spectroscopy of cationic species in CO2 selective alkaline earth metal porous silicoaluminophosphates prepared via liquid and solid state ion exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arévalo-Hidalgo, Ana G.; Dugar, Sneha; Fu, Riqiang; Hernández-Maldonado, Arturo J.

    2012-07-01

    The location of extraframework cations in Sr2+ and Ba2+ ion-exchanged SAPO-34 was estimated by means of 1H and 23Na MAS NMR spectroscopy and spectral deconvolution. Incorporation of the alkaline earth metal cations onto the SAPO framework was achieved via liquid state ion exchange, coupled partial detemplation/solid-state ion exchange, and combination of both techniques. MAS NMR revealed that the level of ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations near hexagonal prisms (site SI), which are relatively difficult to exchange with the alkaline earth metal due to steric and charge repulsion criteria. In addition, the presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange of otherwise tenacious hydrogen as corroborated by unit cell compositional data as well as enhanced CO2 adsorption at low partial pressures. The extraframework ammonium species were produced from partial detemplation of the structure-directing agent employed for the SAPO-34 synthesis, tetraethylammonium.

  14. Mutual influence of trivalent rare-earth metal ions at their extraction from nitrate solutions by mixtures of tributyl phosphate and diisooctyl methylphosphonate

    SciTech Connect

    Pyartman, A.K.; Puzikov, E.A.; Kopyrin, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    Extraction of yttrium-group lanthanide(III) and yttrium nitrates from multicomponent solutions by mixtures of tri-n-butyl phosphate and diisooctyl methylphosphonate has been examined at 298.15 K and pH 2. A physiocochemical and mathematical model has been developed to describe distribution and mutual influence of rare-earth metal ions in multicomponent solutions as influenced by the total concentration of rare-earth metals in aqueous phase and compositions of the concentrate and of organic phase.

  15. Parity nonconservation in Fr-like actinide and Cs-like rare-earth-metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, B. M.; Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2013-07-01

    Parity-nonconservation (PNC) amplitudes are calculated for the 7s-6d3/2 transitions of the francium isoelectronic sequence (Fr, Ra+, Ac2+, Th3+, Pa4+, U5+, and Np6+) and for the 6s-5d3/2 transitions of the cesium isoelectronic sequence (Cs, Ba+, La2+, Ce3+, and Pr4+). We show in particular that isotopes of La2+, Ac2+, and Th3+ ions have strong potential in the search for new physics beyond the standard model: The PNC amplitudes are large, the calculations are accurate, and the nuclei are practically stable. In addition, 232Th3+ ions have recently been trapped and cooled [Campbell , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.102.233004 102, 233004 (2009)]. We also extend previous works by calculating the s-s PNC transitions in Ra+ and Ba+ and provide calculations of several energy levels, and electric dipole and quadrupole transition amplitudes for the Fr-like actinide ions.

  16. Extractive properties towards rare-earth metal ions of calix[4]arenes substituted at the narrow rim by phosphoryl and amide groups

    SciTech Connect

    Yaftian, M.R.; Burgard, M.; Wieser, C.; Dieleman, C.B.; Matt, D.

    1998-08-01

    The extractive properties of the cone and partial-cone isomers of 5,11,17,23-tetra-tert-butyl-25,27-bis(diethylcarbamoylmethoxy)-26,28-bis(diphenylphosphinoylmethoxy)calix[4]arene (cone-1 and partial-cone-1) in 1,2-dichloroethane towards rare-earth metal ions in nitrate media at 25 C were investigated. The analysis of the extraction equilibrium obtained from a mixture of four rare-earths (La, Eu, Er and Y) revealed that the extracted species have a 1:1 metal/ligand ratio for both ligands. The intra-group separation efficiencies of the ligands have been evaluated in a competitive extraction process of 11 rare-earth metal ions (La, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb and Y). Significantly higher extractive properties were found for cone-1 with respect to partial-cone-1, suggesting the crucial role of the phosphoryl groups in the complexation of the rare-earth ions.

  17. Structural diversity in binuclear complexes of alkaline earth metal ions with 4,6-diacetylresorcinol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shebl, Magdy; Khalil, Saied M. E.; Taha, A.; Mahdi, M. A. N.

    2012-11-01

    A new series of binuclear and mixed-ligand complexes with the general formula: [M 2(LO)yClz]; where M = Mg(II), Ca(II), Sr(II) and Ba(II); H2L = 4,6-diacetylresorcinol, the secondary ligand L' = acetylacetone (acac), 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) or 2,2'-bipyridyl (Bipy), n = 0-2, m = 1, 2, x = 0, 1, 2, 4, y = 0, 2, 4, 5 and z = 0-2; have been synthesized. They have been characterized by the analytical and spectral methods (IR, 1H NMR and mass) as well as TGA and molar conductivity measurements. The spectroscopic and conductance data suggested that the H2L ligand behaves as a neutral, monobasic or dibasic tetradentate ligand, depending on the basicity of the secondary ligand, through the two phenolic and two carbonyl groups. Binuclear octahedral geometry has been assigned to all of the prepared complexes in various molar ratios 2:2; 2:2:2; 1:2:1 and 1:2:4 (L:M:L'). Molecular orbital calculations were performed for the ligands and their complexes using Hyperchem 7.52 program on the bases of PM3 level and the results were correlated with the experimental data. The ligand and some of its alkaline metal(II) complexes showed antibacterial activity towards some of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeast (Candida albicans) and fungus (Aspergillus fumigatus).

  18. Chelation ion chromatography of alkaline earth and transition metals a using monolithic silica column with bonded N-hydroxyethyliminodiacetic acid functional groups.

    PubMed

    McGillicuddy, Nicola; Nesterenko, Ekaterina P; Nesterenko, Pavel N; Jones, Phil; Paull, Brett

    2013-02-01

    A commercially available porous silica monolithic column (Onyx Monolithic Si, 100 mm×4.6 mm I.D.) was 'in-column' covalently functionalised with 2-hydroxyethyliminodiacetic acid (HEIDA) groups, and applied to the simultaneous and rapid separation of alkaline earth and transition metal ions, using high-performance chelation ion chromatography (HPCIC). With a 0.3mM dipicolinic acid (DPA) containing eluent, the baseline separation of various common transition and heavy metal ions and the four alkaline earth metal ions could be achieved in under 14 min with a flow rate of just 0.8 mL/min. Detection was achieved using spectrophotometric detection at 540 nm after post-column reaction (PCR) with 4-(2-pyridylazo)-resorcinol (PAR). Significant effects from variation of eluent nature, concentration and temperature upon selectivity and retention were demonstrated with the new monolithic silica chelating phase. Under optimised conditions (0.165 M LiNO(3) eluent, pH 2.5), peak efficiencies of 54,000, 60,000 and 64,000 N/m, for Zn(2+), Mn(2+) and Cd(2+), respectively, were recorded, far exceeding that previously reported for IDA based chelation ion exchange columns. PMID:23298846

  19. Metal Ion Sources for Ion Beam Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, W. J.; Zhao, Z. Q.; Ren, X. T.

    2008-11-03

    In this paper a theme touched upon the progress of metal ion sources devoted to metal ion beam implantation (MIBI) will be reviewed. A special emphasis will be given to some kinds of ion sources such as ECR, MEVVA and Cluster ion sources. A novel dual hollow cathode metal ion source named DUHOCAMIS will be introduced and discussed.

  20. Metal Ions in Unusual Valency States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sellers, Robin M.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses reactivity of metal ions with the primary products of water radiolysis, hyper-reduced metal ions, zero-valent metal ions, unstable divalent ions from the reduction of bivalent ions, hyper-oxidized metal ions, and metal complexes. (CS)

  1. Effect of crown ethers on the ion-exchange behavior of alkaline earth metals. Toward improved ion-exchange methods for the separation and preconcentration of radium.

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, M. L.; Chiarizia, R.; Horwitz, E. P.; Bartsch, R. A.; Talanov, V.; Chemistry; Texas Tech Univ.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of selected crown ethers on the uptake of alkaline earth cations by sulfonic acid and diphosphonic acid-based cation-exchange resins from hydrochloric acid media is examined. The effect observed is shown to vary with the hydrophobicity of the crown ether. Water-soluble crown ethers enhance the sorption of certain cations, thereby improving the selectivity of the resin for other alkaline earths over calcium ion, an apparent result of a synergistic interaction between crown ether present in the resin phase and the ionic functional groups of the resin. In the presence of more hydrophobic crown ethers, a decrease in cation sorption is often observed, a result of the exclusion of the crown ether from the resin phase and the formation of cation-crown complexes in the solution phase. The result can be a reversal of the selectivity sequence ordinarily exhibited by the resin.

  2. Comet Encke: Meteor metallic ion identification by mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, R. A.; Aikin, A. C.

    1973-01-01

    Positive metallic ions have been measured in the earth's atmosphere between 85 and 120 km, during the period of the beta Taurids meteor shower, which is associated with Comet Encke. The ions originate during and following ablation of extraterrestrial debris by the earth's atmosphere. The enhancement of metal ion density during meteor showers is primary evidence for their extraterrestrial origin. The present results were obtained from a rocket-borne ion mass spectrometer.

  3. Bioavailability of Metal Ions and Evolutionary Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Hong Enriquez, Rolando P.; Do, Trang N.

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of life on earth has been a long process that began nearly 3.5 × 109 years ago. In their initial moments, evolution was mainly influenced by anaerobic environments; with the rise of O2 and the corresponding change in bioavailability of metal ions, new mechanisms of survival were created. Here we review the relationships between ancient atmospheric conditions, metal ion bioavailability and adaptation of metals homeostasis during early evolution. A general picture linking geochemistry, biochemistry and homeostasis is supported by the reviewed literature and is further illustrated in this report using simple database searches. PMID:25371266

  4. Bioavailability of metal ions and evolutionary adaptation.

    PubMed

    Hong Enriquez, Rolando P; Do, Trang N

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of life on earth has been a long process that began nearly 3,5 x 109 years ago. In their initial moments, evolution was mainly influenced by anaerobic environments; with the rise of O2 and the corresponding change in bioavailability of metal ions, new mechanisms of survival were created. Here we review the relationships between ancient atmospheric conditions, metal ion bioavailability and adaptation of metals homeostasis during early evolution. A general picture linking geochemistry, biochemistry and homeostasis is supported by the reviewed literature and is further illustrated in this report using simple database searches. PMID:25371266

  5. {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectroscopy of cationic species in CO{sub 2} selective alkaline earth metal porous silicoaluminophosphates prepared via liquid and solid state ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Arevalo-Hidalgo, Ana G.; Dugar, Sneha; Fu, Riqiang; Hernandez-Maldonado, Arturo J.

    2012-07-15

    The location of extraframework cations in Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} ion-exchanged SAPO-34 was estimated by means of {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectroscopy and spectral deconvolution. Incorporation of the alkaline earth metal cations onto the SAPO framework was achieved via liquid state ion exchange, coupled partial detemplation/solid-state ion exchange, and combination of both techniques. MAS NMR revealed that the level of ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations near hexagonal prisms (site SI), which are relatively difficult to exchange with the alkaline earth metal due to steric and charge repulsion criteria. In addition, the presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange of otherwise tenacious hydrogen as corroborated by unit cell compositional data as well as enhanced CO{sub 2} adsorption at low partial pressures. The extraframework ammonium species were produced from partial detemplation of the structure-directing agent employed for the SAPO-34 synthesis, tetraethylammonium. - Graphical abstract: MAS NMR was used to elucidate the position the cationic species in alkaline earth metal exchanged silicoaluminophosphates. These species played a significant role during the ion exchange process and, therefore, the materials ultimate CO{sub 2} adsorption performance. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Location of extraframework Sr{sup 2+} or Ba{sup 2+} cations was estimated by means of {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Level of Sr{sup 2+} or Ba{sup 2+} ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} ion exchanged SAPOs are outstanding CO{sub 2} adsorbents.

  6. Rare Earth Metals: Resourcefulness and Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shijie

    2013-10-01

    When we appreciate the digital revolution carried over from the twentieth century with mobile communication and the Internet, and when we enjoy our high-tech lifestyle filled with iDevices, hybrid cars, wind turbines, and solar cells in this new century, we should also appreciate that all of these advanced products depend on rare earth metals to function. Although there are only 136,000 tons of annual worldwide demand, (Cho, Rare Earth Metals, Will We Have Enough?)1 rare earth metals are becoming such hot commodities on international markets, due to not only to their increasing uses, including in most critical military hardware, but also to Chinese growth, which accounts for 95% of global rare earth metal production. Hence, the 2013 technical calendar topic, planned by the TMS/Hydrometallurgy and Electrometallurgy Committee, is particularly relevant, with four articles (including this commentary) contributed to the JOM October Issue discussing rare earth metals' resourcefulness and recovery.

  7. Recycling of rare earth metals from rare earth-transition metal alloy scrap by liquid metal extraction

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, T.W.; Schmidt, F.A.

    1995-08-01

    A method is described for treating rare earth metal-bearing scrap, waste or other material (e.g. Nd--Fe--B or Dy--Tb--Fe scrap) to recover the rare earth metal comprising melting the rare earth metal-bearing material, melting a Group IIA metal extractant, such as Mg, Ca, or Ba, in which the rare earth is soluble in the molten state, and contacting the melted material and melted extractant at a temperature and for a time effective to extract the rare earth from the melted material into the melted extractant. The rare earth metal is separated from the extractant metal by vacuum sublimation or distillation. 2 figs.

  8. Recycling of rare earth metals from rare earth-transition metal alloy scrap by liquid metal extraction

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Timothy W.; Schmidt, Frederick A.

    1995-08-01

    Method of treating rare earth metal-bearing scrap, waste or other material (e.g. Nd--Fe--B or Dy--Tb--Fe scrap) to recover the rare earth metal comprising melting the rare earth metal-bearing material, melting a Group IIA metal extractant, such as Mg, Ca, or Ba, in which the rare earth is soluble in the molten state, and contacting the melted material and melted extractant at a temperature and for a time effective to extract the rare earth from the melted material into the melted extractant. The rare earth metal is separated from the extractant metal by vacuum sublimation or distillation.

  9. Metal ions in the atmosphere of Neptune.

    PubMed

    Lyons, J R

    1995-02-01

    Microwave propagation experiments performed with Voyager 2 at Neptune revealed sharp layers of electrons in Neptune's lower ionosphere with densities of approximately 10(4) per cubic centimeter. These layers are reminiscent of the sporadic-E layers in the Earth's ionosphere, and when taken together with data from the other giant planets, these data confirm the importance of the magnetic field in layer formation. A photochemical model that incorporates species produced by meteoroid ablation predicts that singly ionized magnesium is the most likely metal to be found in the layers, although laboratory data on the kinetics of metallic atoms and ions in a reducing environment are lacking. The metal chemistry discussed here is directly relevant to the abundant metals observed at the impact site of the G fragment of comet Shoemaker Levy 9 on Jupiter. PMID:7839139

  10. Rare-earth-metal nitridophosphates through high-pressure metathesis.

    PubMed

    Kloss, Simon David; Schnick, Wolfgang

    2015-09-14

    Developing a synthetic method to target an broad spectrum of unknown phases can lead to fascinating discoveries. The preparation of the first rare-earth-metal nitridophosphate LiNdP4 N8 is reported. High-pressure solid-state metathesis between LiPN2 and NdF3 was employed to yield a highly crystalline product. The in situ formed LiF is believed to act both as the thermodynamic driving force and as a flux to aiding single-crystal formation in dimensions suitable for crystal structure analysis. Magnetic properties stemming from Nd(3+) ions were measured by SQUID magnetometry. LiNdP4 N8 serves as a model system for the exploration of rare-earth-metal nitridophosphates that may even be expanded to transition metals. High-pressure metathesis enables the systematic study of these uncharted regions of nitride-based materials with unprecedented properties. PMID:26352033

  11. Binding to Redox-Inactive Alkali and Alkaline Earth Metal Ions Strongly Deactivates the C-H Bonds of Tertiary Amides toward Hydrogen Atom Transfer to Reactive Oxygen Centered Radicals.

    PubMed

    Salamone, Michela; Carboni, Giulia; Mangiacapra, Livia; Bietti, Massimo

    2015-09-18

    The effect of alkali and alkaline earth metal ions on the reactions of the cumyloxyl radical (CumO(•)) with N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA) was studied by laser flash photolysis. In acetonitrile, a >2 order of magnitude decrease in the rate constant for hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) from the C-H bonds of these substrates (kH) was measured after addition of Li(+). This behavior was explained in terms of a strong interaction between Li(+) and the oxygen atom of both DMF and DMA that increases the extent of positive charge on the amide, leading to C-H bond deactivation toward HAT to the electrophilic radical CumO(•). Similar effects were observed after addition of Ca(2+), which was shown to strongly bind up to four equivalents of the amide substrates. With Mg(2+), weak C-H deactivation was observed for the first two substrate equivalents followed by stronger deactivation for two additional equivalents. No C-H deactivation was observed in DMSO after addition of Li(+) and Mg(2+). These results point toward the important role played by metal ion Lewis acidity and solvent Lewis basicity, indicating that C-H deactivation can be modulated by varying the nature of the metal cation and solvent and allowing for careful control over the HAT reactivity of amide substrates. PMID:26322929

  12. Miniature high current metal ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.G.; Galvin, J.E.; MacGill, R.A.; Wright, R.T.

    1986-04-01

    A small, simple ion source for the production of high brightness beams of metal ions is described. A metal vapor vacuum arc discharge is used to establish the high density plasma from which the ion beam is extracted. The source is finger-sized, and can produce pulsed metal ion beams with current up to the 10 ma range. 9 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Synthesis, characterization and cytotoxicity of rare earth metal ion complexes of N,N‧-bis-(2-thiophenecarboxaldimine)-3,3‧-diaminobenzidene, Schiff base ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakir, Mohammad; Abbasi, Ambreen; Faraz, Mohammad; Sherwani, Asif

    2015-12-01

    Lanthanide complexes of La3+, Pr3+, Nd3+, Gd3+, Er3+ of general formula [Ln2 L(H2O)4(NO3)4](NO3)2·2H2O have been synthesized from Schiff base, N,N‧-bis-(2-thiophenecarboxaldimine)-3,3‧-diaminobenzidene. The complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, UV-Vis, fluorescence, FT-IR,1H NMR, mass spectroscopy, EDX, SEM and thermal analysis. FT-IR spectral data suggested that ligand coordinate with metal ions through azomethine nitrogen and uncondensed amino group. Molar conductance data revealed 1:2 electrolytic nature of complexes. From the analytical data, the stoichiometry of the complexes was found to be 1:2 (ligand:metal). Thephysico-chemical data suggested eight coordination number for Ln(III)Schiffbase complexes. SEM analysis shows morphological changes in the surfaces of complexes as compared to free ligand. Thermal decomposition profiles were consistent with proposed formulations. The anticancer activity of the complexes and theSchiffbase ligand has been studied towards human cervical cancer celllines (HeLa) and human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7) and it was found that complexes exhibited greater activity than theSchiffbase.

  14. Alkaline Earth Metal Zirconate Perovskites MZrO3 (M=Ba(2+) , Sr(2+) , Ca(2+) ) Derived from Molecular Precursors and Doped with Eu(3+) Ions.

    PubMed

    Drąg-Jarząbek, Anna; John, Łukasz; Petrus, Rafał; Kosińska-Klähn, Magdalena; Sobota, Piotr

    2016-03-24

    The effect of alkaline earth metal alkoxides on the protonation of zirconocene dichloride was investigated. This approach enabled the design of compounds with preset molecular structures for generating high-purity binary metal oxide perovskites MZrO3 (M=Ba(2+) , Sr(2+) , Ca(2+) ). Single-source molecular precursors [Ba4 Zr2 (μ6 -O)(μ3 ,η(2) -OR)8 (OR)2 (η(2) -HOR)2 (HOR)2 Cl4 ], [Sr4 Zr2 (μ6 -O)(μ3 ,η(2) -OR)8 (OR)2 (HOR)4 Cl4 ], [Ca4 Zr2 (μ6 -O)(μ3 ,η(2) -OR)8 (OR)2 Cl4 ], and [Ca6 Zr2 (μ2 ,η(2) -OR)12 (μ-Cl)2 (η(2) -HOR)4 Cl6 ]⋅8 CH2 Cl2 were prepared via elimination of the cyclopentadienyl ring from Cp2 ZrCl2 as CpH in the presence of M(OR)2 and alcohol ROH (ROH=CH3 OCH2 CH2 OH) as a source of protons. The resulting complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, IR and NMR spectroscopy, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The compounds were then thermally decomposed to MCl2 /MZrO3 mixtures. Leaching of MCl2 from the raw powder with deionized water produced highly pure perovskite-like oxide particles of 40-80 nm in size. Luminescence studies on Eu(3+) -doped MZrO3 revealed that the perovskites are attractive host lattices for potential applications in display technology. PMID:26891039

  15. Metal ion-containing epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St.clair, A. K.

    1982-01-01

    A variety of metallic and organometallic complexes to be used as potential additives for an epoxy used by the aerospace industry as a composite matrix resin were investigated. A total of 9 complexes were screened for compatibility and for their ability to accelerate or inhibit the cure of a highly crosslinkable epoxy resin. Methods for combining the metallic complexes with the resin were investigated, gel times recorded, and cure exotherms studied by differential scanning calorimetry. Glass transition temperatures of cured metal ion containing epoxy castings were determined by thermomechanical analysis. Thermal stabilities of the castings were determined by thermogravimetric analysis. Mechanical strength and stiffness of these doped epoxies were also measured.

  16. Catalysis using hydrous metal oxide ion exchanges

    DOEpatents

    Dosch, Robert G.; Stephens, Howard P.; Stohl, Frances V.

    1985-01-01

    In a process which is catalyzed by a catalyst comprising an active metal on a carrier, said metal being active as a catalyst for the process, an improvement is provided wherein the catalyst is a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal titanate, zirconate, niobate or tantalate wherein alkali or alkaline earth metal cations have been exchanged with a catalytically effective amount of cations of said metal.

  17. Catalysis using hydrous metal oxide ion exchangers

    DOEpatents

    Dosch, R.G.; Stephens, H.P.; Stohl, F.V.

    1983-07-21

    In a process which is catalyzed by a catalyst comprising an active metal on a carrier, said metal being active as a catalyst for the process, an improvement is provided wherein the catalyst is a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal titanate, zirconate, niobate or tantalate wherein alkali or alkaline earth metal cations have been exchanged with a catalytically effective amount of cations of said metal.

  18. A set of alkali and alkaline-earth coordination polymers based on the ligand 2-(1H-benzotriazol-1-yl) acetic acid: Effects the radius of metal ions on structures and properties

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jin-Hua; Tang, Gui-Mei; Qin, Ting-Xiao; Yan, Shi-Chen; Wang, Yong-Tao; Cui, Yue-Zhi; Weng Ng, Seik

    2014-11-15

    Four new metal coordination complexes, namely, [Na(BTA)]{sub n} (1), [K{sub 2}(BTA){sub 2}(μ{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O)]{sub n} (2), and [M(BTA){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub n} (M=Ca(II) and Sr(II) for 3 and 4, respectively) [BTA=2-(1H-benzotriazol-1-yl) acetic anion], have been obtained under hydrothermal condition, by reacting the different alkali and alkaline-earth metal hydroxides with HBTA. Complexes 1–4 were structurally characterized by X-ray single-crystal diffraction, EA, IR, PXRD, and thermogravimetry analysis (TGA). These complexes display low-dimensional features displaying various two-dimensional (2D) and one-dimensional (1D) coordination motifs. Complex 1 displays a 2D layer with the thickness of 1.5 nm and possesses a topologic structure of a 11 nodal net with Schläfli symbol of (3{sup 18}). Complex 2 also shows a thick 2D sheet and its topologic structure is a 9 nodes with Schläfli symbol of (3{sup 11}×4{sup 2}). Complexes 3 and 4 possess a 1D linear chain and further stack via hydrogen bonding interactions to generate a three-dimensional supramolecular architecture. These results suggest that both the coordination preferences of the metal ions and the versatile nature of this flexible ligand play a critical role in the final structures. The luminescent spectra show strong emission intensities in complexes 1–4, which display violet photoluminescence. Additionally, ferroelectric, dielectric and nonlinear optic (NLO) second-harmonic generation (SHG) properties of 2 are discussed in detail. - Graphical abstract: A set of alkali and alkaline-earth metal coordination polymers were hydrothermally synthesized by 2-(1H-benzotriazol-1-yl)acetic acid, displaying interesting topologic motifs from two-dimension to one-dimension and specific physical properties. - Highlights: • Alkali and alkaline-earth metal coordination polymers have been obtained. • The ligand 2-(1H-benzotriazol-1-yl)acetic acid has been adopted. • The two-dimensional and one-dimensional structures have been observed. • The properties of second harmonic generation and ferroelectricity for complex 2.

  19. Mechanistic Enzyme Models: Pyridoxal and Metal Ions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, S. E.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Background information, procedures, and results are presented for experiments on the pyridoxal/metal ion model system. These experiments illustrate catalysis through Schiff's base formation between aldehydes/ketones and primary amines, catalysis by metal ions, and the predictable manner in which metal ions inhibit or catalyze reactions. (JN)

  20. Reversible photodeposition and dissolution of metal ions

    DOEpatents

    Foster, Nancy S.; Koval, Carl A.; Noble, Richard D.

    1994-01-01

    A cyclic photocatalytic process for treating waste water containing metal and organic contaminants. In one embodiment of the method, metal ions are photoreduced onto the photocatalyst and the metal concentrated by resolubilization in a smaller volume. In another embodiment of the method, contaminant organics are first oxidized, then metal ions removed by photoreductive deposition. The present invention allows the photocatalyst to be recycled until nearly complete removal of metal ions and organic contaminants is achieved.

  1. Poisoning of liquid membrane carriers in extraction of metal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuchun; Wang, Dexian )

    1992-03-01

    As means of effective separation and preconcentration, emulsion liquid membranes (ELMs) have found application in many fields including biochemical separation, wastewater treatment, hydrometallurgy, and preconcentration in analytical chemistry. In the extraction of desired metal (scandium, mixed rare earths) ions using chelating extractants (TTA, HDEHP) as liquid membrane carriers, the carriers will become poisoned owing to the presence of even minute quantity of certain high ionic potential ions in the feed solution. The reason for the poisoning of carriers is that those ions have so much greater affinity than the desired ions for the membrane carrier that the ion-carrier coordination compound cannot be stripped at the interior interface of the membrane and gradually no more free carrier transports any metal ions across the membrane. The calculated results are in agreement with the experiments, and methods to avoid the poisoning are given in the paper.

  2. Correlations in rare-earth transition-metal permanent magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skomski, R.; Manchanda, P.; Kashyap, A.

    2015-05-01

    It is investigated how electron-electron correlations affect the intrinsic properties of rare-earth transition-metal magnets. Focusing on orbital moment and anisotropy, we perform model calculations for 3d-4f alloys and density-functional theory (DFT) calculations for NdCo5. On an independent-electron level, the use of a single Slater determinant with broken spin symmetry introduces Hund's rule correlations, which govern the behavior of rare-earth ions and of alloys described by the local spin density approximation (LSDA) and LSDA + U approximations to DFT. By contrast, rare-earth ions in intermetallics involve configuration interactions between two or more Slater determinants and lead to phenomena such as spin-charge distribution. Analyzing DFT as a Legendre transformation and using Bethe's crystal-field theory, we show that the corresponding density functionals are very different from familiar LSDA-type expressions and outline the effect of spin-charge separation on the magnetocrystalline anisotropy.

  3. Correlations in rare-earth transition-metal permanent magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Skomski, R. Manchanda, P.; Kashyap, A.

    2015-05-07

    It is investigated how electron-electron correlations affect the intrinsic properties of rare-earth transition-metal magnets. Focusing on orbital moment and anisotropy, we perform model calculations for 3d-4f alloys and density-functional theory (DFT) calculations for NdCo{sub 5}. On an independent-electron level, the use of a single Slater determinant with broken spin symmetry introduces Hund's rule correlations, which govern the behavior of rare-earth ions and of alloys described by the local spin density approximation (LSDA) and LSDA + U approximations to DFT. By contrast, rare-earth ions in intermetallics involve configuration interactions between two or more Slater determinants and lead to phenomena such as spin-charge distribution. Analyzing DFT as a Legendre transformation and using Bethe's crystal-field theory, we show that the corresponding density functionals are very different from familiar LSDA-type expressions and outline the effect of spin-charge separation on the magnetocrystalline anisotropy.

  4. Protein-Transition Metal Ion Networks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins obtained from agricultural sources were blended with divalent metal ions. Feather keratin, egg albumin, and wheat gluten showed increases of 2-3 times in modulus with addition of divalent transition metal ions Cu2+ and Zn2+. Increasing concentrations of ions resulted in increased stiffnes...

  5. METHOD OF MAKING ALLOYS OF SECOND RARE EARTH SERIES METALS

    DOEpatents

    Baker, R.D.; Hayward, B.R.

    1963-01-01

    >This invention relates to a process for alloying the second rare earth series metals with Mo, Nb, or Zr. A halide of the rare earth metal is mixed with about 1 to 20 at.% of an oxide of Mo, Nb, or Zr. Iodine and an alkali or alkaline earth metal are added, and the resulting mixture is heated in an inert atmosphere to 350 deg C. (AEC)

  6. A set of alkali and alkaline-earth coordination polymers based on the ligand 2-(1H-benzotriazol-1-yl) acetic acid: Effects the radius of metal ions on structures and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin-Hua; Tang, Gui-Mei; Qin, Ting-Xiao; Yan, Shi-Chen; Wang, Yong-Tao; Cui, Yue-Zhi; Weng Ng, Seik

    2014-11-01

    Four new metal coordination complexes, namely, [Na(BTA)]n (1), [K2(BTA)2(μ2-H2O)]n (2), and [M(BTA)2(H2O)2]n (M=Ca(II) and Sr(II) for 3 and 4, respectively) [BTA=2-(1H-benzotriazol-1-yl) acetic anion], have been obtained under hydrothermal condition, by reacting the different alkali and alkaline-earth metal hydroxides with HBTA. Complexes 1-4 were structurally characterized by X-ray single-crystal diffraction, EA, IR, PXRD, and thermogravimetry analysis (TGA). These complexes display low-dimensional features displaying various two-dimensional (2D) and one-dimensional (1D) coordination motifs. Complex 1 displays a 2D layer with the thickness of 1.5 nm and possesses a topologic structure of a 11 nodal net with Schläfli symbol of {318}. Complex 2 also shows a thick 2D sheet and its topologic structure is a 9 nodes with Schläfli symbol of {311×42}. Complexes 3 and 4 possess a 1D linear chain and further stack via hydrogen bonding interactions to generate a three-dimensional supramolecular architecture. These results suggest that both the coordination preferences of the metal ions and the versatile nature of this flexible ligand play a critical role in the final structures. The luminescent spectra show strong emission intensities in complexes 1-4, which display violet photoluminescence. Additionally, ferroelectric, dielectric and nonlinear optic (NLO) second-harmonic generation (SHG) properties of 2 are discussed in detail.

  7. Instability of some divalent rare earth ions and photochromic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egranov, A. V.; Sizova, T. Yu.; Shendrik, R. Yu.; Smirnova, N. A.

    2016-03-01

    It was shown that the divalent rare earth ions (La, Ce, Gd, Tb, Lu, and Y) in cubic sites in alkaline earth fluorides are unstable with respect to electron autodetachment since its d1(eg) ground state is located in the conduction band which is consistent with the general tendency of these ions in various compounds. The localization of doubly degenerate d1(eg) level in the conduction band creates a configuration instability around the divalent rare earth ion that leading to the formation of anion vacancy in the nearest neighborhood, as was reported in the previous paper [A. Egranov, T. Sizova, Configurational instability at the excited impurity ions in alkaline earth fluorites, J. Phys. Chem. Solids 74 (2013) 530-534]. Thus, the formation of the stable divalent ions as La, Ce, Gd, Tb, Lu, and Y (PC+ centers) in CaF2 and SrF2 crystals during x-ray irradiation occurs via the formation of charged anion vacancies near divalent ions (Re2+va), which lower the ground state of the divalent ion relative to the conductivity band. Photochromic effect occurs under thermally or optically stimulated electron transition from the divalent rare earth ion to the neighboring anion vacancy and reverse under ultraviolet light irradiation. It is shown that the optical absorption of the PC+ centers due to d → d and d → f transitions of the divalent rare-earth ion.

  8. Liquid metal ion source and alloy

    DOEpatents

    Clark, Jr., William M.; Utlaut, Mark W.; Behrens, Robert G.; Szklarz, Eugene G.; Storms, Edmund K.; Santandrea, Robert P.; Swanson, Lynwood W.

    1988-10-04

    A liquid metal ion source and alloy, wherein the species to be emitted from the ion source is contained in a congruently vaporizing alloy. In one embodiment, the liquid metal ion source acts as a source of arsenic, and in a source alloy the arsenic is combined with palladium, preferably in a liquid alloy having a range of compositions from about 24 to about 33 atomic percent arsenic. Such an alloy may be readily prepared by a combustion synthesis technique. Liquid metal ion sources thus prepared produce arsenic ions for implantation, have long lifetimes, and are highly stable in operation.

  9. Different Adsorption Behavior of Rare Earth and Metallic Ion Complexes on Langmuir Mono layers Probed by Sum-Frequency Generation Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Woongmo; Vaknin, David; Kim, Doseok

    2013-02-25

    Adsorption behavior of counterions under a Langmuir monolayer was investigated by sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy. By comparing SFG spectra of arachidic acid (AA) Langmuir monolayer/water interface with and without added salt, it was found that the simple trivalent cation La3+ adsorbed on AA monolayer only when the carboxylic headgroups are charged (deprotonated), implying that counterion adsorption is induced by Coulomb interaction. On the other hand, metal hydroxide complex Fe(OH)3 adsorbed even on a charge-neutral AA monolayer, indicating that the adsorption of iron hydroxide is due to chemical interaction such as covalent or hydrogen bonding to the headgroup of the molecules at the monolayer.

  10. Low specificity of metal ion binding in the metal ion core of a folded RNA

    PubMed Central

    Travers, Kevin J.; Boyd, Nathan; Herschlag, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    The structure and activity of nucleic acids depend on their interactions with metal ions. Fundamental to these interactions is the degree of specificity observed between the metal ions and nucleic acids, and a complete description of nucleic acid folding requires that we understand the nature of the interactions with metal ions, including specificity. The prior demonstration that high concentrations of monovalent cations prevent nonspecific association of divalent ions with nucleic acids provides a novel and powerful means to examine site-specific metal ion binding isolated from complicating effects of the ion atmosphere. Using these high monovalent cation solution conditions we have monitored the affinity of a series of divalent metal ions for two site-specific metal ion binding sites in the P4-P6 domain of the Tetrahymena group I intron ribozyme. The metal ion core of this highly structured RNA binds two divalent metal ions under these conditions. Despite multiple metal ion–RNA interactions observed in the X-ray crystallographic structure of P4-P6 RNA at the metal ion binding sites, these sites exhibit low specificity among Mn2+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Ni2+, and Zn2+. Nevertheless, the largest divalent metal ions tested, Sr2+ and Ba2+, were excluded from binding, exhibiting affinities at least two orders of magnitude weaker than observed for the other metal ions. Thus, a picture emerges of two metal ion binding sites, each with a high tolerance for metal ions with different properties but also with limits to accommodation. These limits presumably arise from steric or electrostatic features of the metal ion binding sites. PMID:17616553

  11. PROTEIN-TRANSITION METAL ION NETWORKS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins obtained from agricultural sources were blended with divalent metal ions. Feather keratin, egg albumin, and wheat gluten had low, medium, and high levels of aspartic and glutamic acid, respectively, and FT-IR showed that the divalent transition metal ions Mn2+, Cu2+, and Zn2+ were tightly ...

  12. [Advances in heavy metal ions immunoassay].

    PubMed

    Liu, Gong-Liang; Wang, Ju-Fang; Li, Zhi-Yong; Liang, Shi-Zhong

    2006-11-01

    Heavy metal leftover on farm and stock products has become a big threat to human. It is necessary to develop some fast and efficient detection methods. Heavy metal immunoassays are new methods for detection of heavy metal ions. Compared to the traditional chemical methods, immunoassays are not only fast, cheap, simple, but also reasonably portable, highly sensitive and selective. It can be used as preliminary screening for rapid determination of heavy metal ions. Except chemical chelators, phytochelatin and metallothionein can also be used for preparing immunogen, both of them can chelate heavy metal ions to carrier protein. There are two prototype assays: polyclonal antibody immunoassay and monoclonal antibody immunoassay. The former includes fluorescence polarization immunoassay; the latter includes indirectly competitive ELISA, one-step competitive immunoassay and KinExA immunoassay. Among these assays, indirectly competitive ELISA which was used for determining heavy metal ions in the early days was easy to be interfered and showed false positive. Fluorescence polarization immunoassay which used polyclonal antibody for determining heavy metal ions was simple and cheap. KinExA instrument could be functioned as an immunosensor for environmental samples. One-step immunoassay which avoided to the addition of second antibody and chromogenic substrate was simple and sensitive. Colloidal gold enhanced immunochromatography assay is a semi-quantitation for determining heavy metal ions. As an adjunctive way for chemical methods, it has the potential application in rapid determination of heavy metal ions. PMID:17168306

  13. Separation of metal ions from aqueous solutions

    DOEpatents

    Almon, Amy C.

    1994-01-01

    A process and apparatus for quantitatively and selectively separating metal ions from mixtures thereof in aqueous solution. The apparatus includes, in combination, a horizontal electrochemical flow cell containing flow bulk electrolyte solution and an aqueous, metal ion-containing solution, the cell containing a metal mesh working electrode, a counter electrode positioned downstream from the working electrode, an independent variable power supply/potentiostat positioned outside of the flow cell and connected to the electrodes, and optionally a detector such as a chromatographic detector, positioned outside the flow cell. This apparatus and its operation has significant application where trace amounts of metal ions are to be separated.

  14. Pseudo ribbon metal ion beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Stepanov, Igor B. Ryabchikov, Alexander I.; Sivin, Denis O.; Verigin, Dan A.

    2014-02-15

    The paper describes high broad metal ion source based on dc macroparticle filtered vacuum arc plasma generation with the dc ion-beam extraction. The possibility of formation of pseudo ribbon beam of metal ions with the parameters: ion beam length 0.6 m, ion current up to 0.2 A, accelerating voltage 40 kV, and ion energy up to 160 kV has been demonstrated. The pseudo ribbon ion beam is formed from dc vacuum arc plasma. The results of investigation of the vacuum arc evaporator ion-emission properties are presented. The influence of magnetic field strength near the cathode surface on the arc spot movement and ion-emission properties of vacuum-arc discharge for different cathode materials are determined. It was shown that vacuum-arc discharge stability can be reached when the magnetic field strength ranges from 40 to 70 G on the cathode surface.

  15. Methods and devices for the separation of radioactive rare earth metal isotopes from their alkaline earth metal precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Wai, Chein M.

    1993-07-06

    A method is described for the separation of a radioactive rare earth metal isotope or a radioactive isotope of yttrium or scandium from its alkaline earth metal precursor comprising contacting a sample containing at least one of said isotopes and said precursor with an ionizable dibenzo ether derivative.

  16. Heavy ion circulation in the earth's magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, J. W.; Hills, H. K.; Hill, T. W.; Reiff, P. H.; Hardy, D. A.

    1977-01-01

    A mechanism for heavy ion circulation in the magnetosphere is proposed. Singly charged ions heavy ions from the plasmasphere are convected intermittently to the dayside magnetopause, accelerated there, swept into the distant tail lobes and boundary layer, and convected earthward in the plasma sheet to reenter the magnetosphere.

  17. Theoretical study of metal noble-gas positive ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R.

    1989-01-01

    Theoretical calculations have been performed to determine the spectroscopic constant for the ground and selected low-lying electronic states of the transition-metal noble-gas ions Var(+), FeAr(+), CoAr(+), CuHe(+), CuAr(+), and CuKr(+). Analogous calculations have been performed for the ground states of the alkali noble-gas ions LiAr(+), LiKr(+), NaAr(+), and KAr(+) and the alkaline-earth noble-gas ion MgAr(+) to contrast the difference in binding energies between the simple and transition-metal noble-gas ions. The binding energies increase with increasing polarizability of the noble-gas ions, as expected for a charge-induced dipole bonding mechanism. It is found that the spectroscopic constants of the X 1Sigma(+) states of the alkali noble-gas ions are well described at the self-consistent field level. In contrast, the binding energies of the transition-metal noble-gas ions are substantially increased by electron correlation.

  18. Immobilized calcein for metal ion preconcentration

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-04-01

    A technique is demonstrated for the preparation of immobilized calcein, (2',7',((bis(carboxymethyl)amino)methyl)-fluorescein), to be used for metal ion preconcentration. The calcein is of particular interest as a reagent for transition metals. The preconcentration is demonstrated for cobalt, copper, and nickel ions. Fluorescence spectra of the calcein at various pH values were obtained. Values were determined for the conditional binding constants of immobilized and dissolved calcein with the transition metal ions as a function of pH.

  19. Near-Earth asteroids: Metals occurrence, extraction, and fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westfall, Richard

    1991-01-01

    Near-earth asteroids occur in three principle types of orbits: Amor, Apollo, and Aten. Amor asteroids make relatively close (within 0.3 AU) approaches to the earth's orbit, but do not actually overlap it. Apollo asteroids spend most of their time outside the earth's orbital path, but at some point of close approach to the sun, they cross the orbit of the earth. Aten asteroids are those whose orbits remain inside the earth's path for the majority of their time, with semi-major axes less than 0.1 AU. Near-earth orbit asteroids include: stones, stony-irons, irons, carbonaceous, and super-carbonaceous. Metals within these asteroids include: iron, nickel, cobalt, the platinum group, aluminum, titanium, and others. Focus is on the extraction of ferrous and platinum group metals from the stony-iron asteroids, and the iron asteroids. Extraction of the metal fraction can be accomplished through the use of tunnel-boring-machines (TBM) in the case of the stony-irons. The metals within the story-iron asteroids occur as dispersed granules, which can be separated from the stony fraction through magnetic and gaseous digestion separation techniques. The metal asteroids are processes by drilling and gaseous digestion or by gaseous digestion alone. Manufacturing of structures, housings, framing networks, pressure vessels, mirrors, and other products is accomplished through the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of metal coating on advanced composites and on the inside of contour-defining inflatables (CDI). Metal coatings on advanced composites provide: resistance to degradation in the hostile environments of space; superior optical properties; superior heat dissipation; service as wear coatings; and service as evidential coatings. Metal coatings on the inside of CDI produce metal load-bearing products. Fibers such as graphite, kevlar, glass, ceramic, metal, etc., can be incorporated in the metal coatings on the inside of CDI producing metal matrix products which exhibit high strength and resist crack propagation.

  20. Novel syntergistic agent for selective separation of yttrium from other rare earth metals

    SciTech Connect

    Miyata, Terufumi; Goto, Masahiro; Nakashio, Fumiyuki

    1995-06-01

    An oil-soluble synergistic agent has been developed for the selective separation of yttrium (Y) from the other rare earth metals. The synergistic agent is a polyaminocarboxylic acid alkylderivative and has interfacial activity like that of surfactants. Separation of yttrium from heavy rare earth metals (erbium (Er) and holmium (Ho)) in the presence of the synergistic agent was carried out with a 2-ethylhexyl phosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester as a carrier using a hollow-fiber membrane extractor. The new agent shows a synergistic effect on the permeation rate of rare earth metals at the oil-water interface. By the addition of a small amount of the agent, the selectivity for yttrium from the two rare earth metals was enhanced remarkably, because of the permeation rate of Y was selectively decreased compared with those of Er and Ho. The synergistic effect is discussed from the viewpoint of the stability constant for rare earth metals and the interfacial activity of the synergistic agent. The difference in interaction between the synergistic agent and rare earth ions at the oil-water interface results in an increase in the separation efficiency.

  1. Engineering closed optical transitions in rare-earth ion crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartholomew, John G.; Ahlefeldt, Rose L.; Sellars, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a protocol to preserve the spin state of rare-earth ions when they are optically cycled. This technique uses large magnetic fields to increase the probability of an optically excited ion returning to its initial spin state. This Zeeman enhanced cyclicity is shown to be applicable to non-Kramers ions in various crystals irrespective of the site symmetry. The specific example of Pr3 +:Y2SiO5 is investigated to demonstrate that the protocol can create closed optical transitions even where the point group symmetry of the site is C1. In this example, the predicted cyclicity exceeds 104. This high level of cyclicity extends the usefulness of rare-earth ion crystals for applications in quantum and classical information processing. We explore the use of this technique to enable single-ion, spin-state optical readout and the creation of ensemble-based spectral features that are robust against optical cycling.

  2. Uptake of metal ions on humic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Pehlivan, E.; Arslan, G.

    2006-09-15

    The kinetics, the sorption capacities, pH and temperature dependence of sorption of humic acids (HAs) of Turkish brown coals with respect to Zn(II), Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II) and Pb(II) ions were investigated, and the roles of the carboxylic and phenolic groups in the adsorption of metals ion on HAs were searched in this work. These metal ions are able to form complex compounds with carboxylic and phenolic groups of HAs. Adsorption equilibrium was achieved in between 50 and 60 min for all studied cations. HAs extracted from different brown coals have been characterized by chemical and physical methods. The chemical properties of HAs showed differences depending on the source from which they were obtained. The sorption of metals on the surface of HAs depends strongly on the pH, and sorption decreases with decreasing pH. Maximum removal of metal ions was demonstrated at pH values of 4.1-5.0. The Langmuir adsorption isotherm was used to describe observed sorption phenomena. The {Delta}G{sup 0} became negative as the temperature increased, and so the equilibrium constant decreased slightly. The investigation proved that the HAs are suitable materials for the studied heavy metal ion removal from aqueous solution and could be considered as potential material for purification of effluent polluted with toxic metal ions.

  3. Bioinorganic Chemistry of the Alkali Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsam; Nguyen, Thuy-Tien T; Churchill, David G

    2016-01-01

    The common Group 1 alkali metals are indeed ubiquitous on earth, in the oceans and in biological systems. In this introductory chapter, concepts involving aqueous chemistry and aspects of general coordination chemistry and oxygen atom donor chemistry are introduced. Also, there are nuclear isotopes of importance. A general discussion of Group 1 begins from the prevalence of the ions, and from a comparison of their ionic radii and ionization energies. While oxygen and water molecule binding have the most relevance to biology and in forming a detailed understanding between the elements, there is a wide range of basic chemistry that is potentially important, especially with respect to biological chelation and synthetic multi-dentate ligand design. The elements are widely distributed in life forms, in the terrestrial environment and in the oceans. The details about the workings in animal, as well as plant life are presented in this volume. Important biometallic aspects of human health and medicine are introduced as well. Seeing as the elements are widely present in biology, various particular endogenous molecules and enzymatic systems can be studied. Sodium and potassium are by far the most important and central elements for consideration. Aspects of lithium, rubidium, cesium and francium chemistry are also included; they help in making important comparisons related to the coordination chemistry of Na(+) and K(+). Physical methods are also introduced. PMID:26860297

  4. Metal-ion recycle technology for metal electroplating waste waters

    SciTech Connect

    Sauer, N.N.; Smith, B.F.

    1993-06-01

    As a result of a collaboration with Boeing Aerospace, the authors have begun a program to identify suitable treatments or to develop new treatments for electroplating baths. The target baths are mixed-metal or alloy baths that are being integrated into the Boeing electroplating complex. These baths, which are designed to replace highly toxic chromium and cadmium baths, contain mixtures of two metals, either nickel-tungsten, nickel-zinc, or zinc-tin. This report reviews the literature and details currently available on emerging technologies that could affect recovery of metals from electroplating baths under development by Boeing Aerospace. This literature survey summarizes technologies relevant to the recovery of metals from electroplating processes. The authors expanded the scope to investigate single metal ion recovery technologies that could be applied to metal ion recovery from alloy baths. This review clearly showed that the electroplating industry has traditionally relied on precipitation and more recently on electrowinning as its waste treatment methods. Despite the almost ubiquitous use of precipitation to remove contaminant metal ions from waste electroplating baths and rinse waters, this technology is clearly no longer feasible for the electroplating industry for several reasons. First, disposal of unstabilized sludge is no longer allowed by law. Second, these methods are no longer adequate as metal-removal techniques because they cannot meet stringent new metal discharge limits. Third, precious resources are being wasted or discarded because these methods do not readily permit recovery of the target metal ions. As a result, emerging technologies for metal recovery are beginning to see application to electroplating waste recycle. This report summarizes current research in these areas. Included are descriptions of various membrane technologies, such as reverse osmosis and ultrafiltration, ion exchange and chelating polymer technology, and electrodialysis.

  5. ION EXCHANGE SOFTENING: EFFECTS ON METAL CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A corrosion control pipe loop study to evaluate the effect of ion exchange water softening on metal leaching from household plumbing materials was conducted on two different water qualities having different pH's and hardness levels. The results showed that removing hardness ions ...

  6. Alkali and alkali-earth ions in 4He systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, M.; Verona, M.; Galli, D. E.; Reatto, L.

    2004-06-01

    We study with variational Monte Carlo simulations a single ion impurity in nanodroplets and in liquid 4He . Within the shadow wave function (SWF) approach we have studied alkali-earth ion doped 4He systems ( Be+ and Mg+ ) and we have also improved our previous variational results for alkali ion impurities ( Na+ , K+ , and Cs+ ). The new SWF allows for anisotropic correlations between 4He atoms and the ion. The first shell of 4He atoms around the ions has always a well defined solidlike structure, which is remarkably different for each ion but it does not depend on the 4He system (bulk liquid or cluster). We also give results for the chemical potential, the single particle excitation spectrum, and the effective mass of the ions in the bulk.

  7. Characteristics of solar and heliospheric ion populations observed near earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloeckler, G.

    1984-01-01

    The composition and spectra of ions in solar-energetic-particle and energetic-storm-particle events, of diffuse ions upstream of the earth bow shock, and of ions in deep-geomagnetic-tail plasmoids are characterized in a summary of in situ observations. Data are presented in graphs and tables, and remarkable similarities are noted in the distribution functions of the heliospheric ion populations. The solar wind, acting through acceleration mechanisms associated with shocks and turbulence, is identified as the major plasma source of suprathermal and energetic particles.

  8. Ion-acoustic-like waves excited by the reflected ions at the earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akimoto, K.; Winske, D.

    1985-01-01

    Some model distributions based on recent observations and simulations of the plasma at the earth's bow shock are found to be unstable to obliquely propagating electrostatic instabilities. The model distributions consist of either an ion beam or an ion velocity ring accompanied by a bi-Maxwellian background ion distribution and a flattop electron distribution. Ion anisotropies and nonthermal electrons are capable of significantly lowering the threshold of the ion beam instability. The generated waves share many properties in common with the ion acoustic waves that have been observed at the earth's bow shock. The results also indicate the importance of an anisotropy in the background ion velocity distribution in identifying sources of the ion-acoustic-like waves observed in the ion foreshock and the solar wind.

  9. Metal vapor arc ion plating

    DOEpatents

    Bertram, L.A.; Fisher, R.W.; Mattox, D.M.; Zanner, F.J.

    1986-09-09

    A method and apparatus for ion plating are described. The apparatus uses more negative than a first electrode voltage in a vacuum arc remelt system to attract low energy ions from the anode electrode to the article to be plated. 2 figs.

  10. Energetic ion acceleration during magnetic reconnection in the Earth's magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imada, Shinsuke; Hirai, Mariko; Hoshino, Masahiro

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we present a comprehensive study of the energetic ion acceleration during magnetic reconnection in the Earth's magnetosphere using the Geotail data. A clear example of the energetic ion acceleration up to 1 MeV around an X-type neutral line is shown. We find that the energetic ions are localized at far downstream of reconnection outflow. The time variation of energetic ion and electron is almost the same. We observe ˜100 keV ions over the entire observation period. We study ten events in which the Geotail satellite observed in the vicinity of diffusion region in order to understand the reconnection characteristics that determine the energetic ion acceleration efficiency. We find that the reconnection electric field, total amount of reduced magnetic energy, reconnection rate, satellite location in the Earth's magnetosphere (both X GSM and Y GSM) show high correlation with energetic ion acceleration efficiency. Also, ion temperature, electron temperature, ion/electron temperature ratio, current sheet thickness, and electric field normal to the neutral sheet show low correlation. We do not find any correlation with absolute value of outflow velocity and current density parallel to magnetic field. The energetic ion acceleration efficiency is well correlated with large-scale parameters (e.g., total amount of reduced magnetic energy and satellite location), whereas the energetic electron acceleration efficiency is correlated with small-scale parameters (e.g., current sheet thickness and electric field normal to the neutral sheet). We conclude that the spatial size of magnetic reconnection is important for energetic ion acceleration in the Earth's magnetotail.

  11. Earth's polar cap ionization patches lead to ion upflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q. H.; Zong, Q.; Lockwood, M. M.; Liang, J.; Zhang, B.; Moen, J. I.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Y.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Thomas, E. G.; Liu, R.; Dunlop, M. W.; Yang, H. G.; Hu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lester, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Earth constantly losses matter through ions escaping from the polar ionosphere. This makes the ionosphere as an important source of plasma for the magnetosphere and could modulate atmospheric isotope abundances on geological timescales, depending on what fraction of the upflowing ions subsequently return to the ionosphere and what fraction are ejected into interplanetary space. It has been proposed that the magnetosphere is dynamically modulated by the presence of the ionospheric ions, particularly heavy ions O+, during magnetic substorms and storms. The origin and formation mechanism of ionospheric ion upflow is, however, poorly understood, particularly under disturbed space weather conditions. We report simultaneous direct observations of ion upflow and a patch of ionization at the center of the polar cap region during a geomagnetic storm. Our observations indicate enhanced fluxes of upwelling O+ ions originate from the patch and were accelerated by the enhanced ambipolar electric field. This enhancement is caused by soft electron precipitations. Polar cap patches therefore provide an important source of upwelling ions for accelerations mechanisms at greater altitudes which can eject the ions. These observations give new insight into the processes of ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling and the potential loss of terrestrial water dissociation products into space which, although extremely slow in the case of Earth, may be significant for other planets and moons.

  12. Intense metal ion beam source for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.G.

    1986-05-01

    We have developed an ion source which can produce high current beams of metal ions. The source uses a metal vapor vacuum arc discharge as the plasma medium from which the ions are extracted, so we have called this source the MEVVA ion source. The metal plasma is created simply and efficiently and no carrier gas is required. Beams have been produced from metallic elements spanning the periodic table from lithium through uranium, at extraction voltages from 10 to 60 kV and with beam currents as high as 1.1 Amperes (electrical current in all charge states). A brief description of the source is given and its possible application as an ion source for heavy ion fusion is considered. Beams such as C/sup +/ (greater than or equal to99% of the beam in this species and charge state), Cr/sup 2 +/ (80%), and Ta/sup 3+,4+,5+/ (mixed charge states) have been produced. Beam emittance measurements and ways of increasing the source brightness are discussed.

  13. Computational Design of Metal Ion Sequestering Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, Benjamin P.; Rapko, Brian M.

    2006-06-01

    Organic ligands that exhibit a high degree of metal ion recognition are essential precursors for developing separation processes and sensors for metal ions. Since the beginning of the nuclear era, much research has focused on discovering ligands that target specific radionuclides. Members of the Group 1A and 2A cations (e.g., Cs, Sr, Ra) and the f-block metals (actinides and lanthanides) are of primary concern to DOE. Although there has been some success in identifying ligand architectures that exhibit a degree of metal ion recognition, the ability to control binding affinity and selectivity remains a significant challenge. The traditional approach for discovering such ligands has involved lengthy programs of organic synthesis and testing that, in the absence of reliable methods for screening compounds before synthesis, have resulted in much wasted research effort.

  14. Computational Design of Metal Ion Sequestering Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, Benjamin P.; Rapko, Brian M.

    2005-06-15

    Organic ligands that exhibit a high degree of metal ion recognition are essential precursors for developing separation processes and sensors for metal ions. Since the beginning of the nuclear era, much research has focused on discovering ligands that target specific radionuclides. Members of the Group 1A and 2A cations (e.g., Cs, Sr, Ra) and the f-block metals (actinides and lanthanides) are of primary concern to DOE. Although there has been some success in identifying ligand architectures that exhibit a degree of metal ion recognition, the ability to control binding affinity and selectivity remains a significant challenge. The traditional approach for discovering such ligands has involved lengthy programs of organic synthesis and testing that, in the absence of reliable methods for screening compounds before synthesis, have resulted in much wasted research effort.

  15. Metal ions as inflammatory initiators of osteolysis.

    PubMed

    Magone, Kevin; Luckenbill, Daniel; Goswami, Tarun

    2015-05-01

    Osteolysis and aseptic loosening currently contribute 75 % of implant failures. Furthermore, with over four million joint replacements projected to be performed in the United States annually, osteolysis and aseptic loosening may continue to pose a significant morbidity. This paper reviews the osteolysis cascade leading to osteoclast activation and bone resorption at the biochemical level. Additionally, the metal ion release mechanism from metallic implants is elucidated. Even though metal ions are not the predominating initiator of osteolysis, they do increase the concentration of key inflammatory cytokines that stimulate osteoclasts and prove to be a contributor to osteolysis and aseptic loosening. Osteolysis is a competitive mechanism among a number of biological reactions, which includes debris release, macrophage and osteoclast activation, an inflammatory response as well as metal ion release. Pharmacological therapy for component loosening has also been reviewed. A non-surgical treatment of osteolysis has not been found in the literature and thus may become an area of future research. Even though this research is warranted, comprehensively understanding the immune response to orthopedic implants and their metallic ions, and thus, creating improved prostheses appears to be the most cost-effective approach to decrease the morbidity related to osteolysis and to design implants with greater longevity. The ionic forms, cytokines, toxicity, gene expression, biological effects, and hypersensitivity responses of metallic elements from metal implants are summarized as well. PMID:25795427

  16. Solar heavy ion Heinrich fluence spectrum at low earth orbit.

    PubMed

    Croley, D R; Spitale, G C

    1998-01-01

    Solar heavy ions from the JPL Solar Heavy Ion Model have been transported into low earth orbit using the Schulz cutoff criterion for L-shell access by ions of a specific charge to mass ratio. The NASA Brouwer orbit generator was used to get L values along the orbit at 60 second time intervals. Heavy ion fluences of ions 2 < or = Z < or = 92 have been determined for the LET range 1 to 130 MeV-cm2/mg by 60, 120 or 250 mils of aluminum over a period of 24 hours in a 425 km circular orbit inclined 51 degrees. The ion fluence is time dependent in the sense that the position of the spacecraft in the orbit at the flare onset time fixes the relationship between particle flux and spacecraft passage through high L-values where particles have access to the spacecraft. PMID:11542887

  17. 40 CFR 421.270 - Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... primary rare earth metals subcategory. 421.270 Section 421.270 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Rare Earth Metals Subcategory § 421.270 Applicability: Description of the primary rare... production of rare earth metals and mischmetal by primary rare earth metals facilities......

  18. 40 CFR 421.270 - Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... primary rare earth metals subcategory. 421.270 Section 421.270 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Rare Earth Metals Subcategory § 421.270 Applicability: Description of the primary rare... production of rare earth metals and mischmetal by primary rare earth metals facilities......

  19. 40 CFR 421.270 - Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... primary rare earth metals subcategory. 421.270 Section 421.270 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Rare Earth Metals Subcategory § 421.270 Applicability: Description of the primary rare... production of rare earth metals and mischmetal by primary rare earth metals facilities......

  20. Computational Design of Metal Ion Sequestering Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, Benjamin P.; Rapko, Brian M.

    2005-06-15

    Organic ligands that exhibit a high degree of metal ion recognition are essential precursors for developing separation processes and sensors for metal ions. Since the beginning of the nuclear era, much research has focused on discovering ligands that target specific radionuclides. Members of the Group 1A and 2A cations (e.g., Cs, Sr, Ra) and the f-block metals (actinides and lanthanides) are of primary concern to DOE. Although there has been some success in identifying ligand architectures that exhibit a degree of metal ion recognition, the ability to control binding affinity and selectivity remains a significant challenge. The traditional approach for discovering such ligands has involved lengthy programs of organic synthesis and testing that, in the absence of reliable methods for screening compounds before synthesis, have resulted in much wasted research effort. This project seeks to enhance and strengthen the traditional approach through computer-aided design of new and improved host molecules. Accurate electronic structure calculations are coupled with experimental data to provide fundamental information about ligand structure and the nature of metal-donor group interactions (design criteria). This fundamental information then is used in a molecular mechanics model (MM) that helps us rapidly screen proposed ligand architectures and select the best members from a set of potential candidates. By using combinatorial methods, molecule building software has been developed that generates large numbers of candidate architectures for a given set of donor groups. The specific goals of this project are: • further understand the structural and energetic aspects of individual donor group- metal ion interactions and incorporate this information within the MM framework • further develop and evaluate approaches for correlating ligand structure with reactivity toward metal ions, in other words, screening capability • use molecule structure building software to generate large numbers of candidate ligand architectures for given sets of donor groups • screen candidates and identify ligand architectures that will exhibit enhanced metal ion recognition. These new capabilities are being applied to ligand systems identified under other DOEsponsored projects where studies have suggested that modifying existing architectures will lead to dramatic enhancements in metal ion binding affinity and selectivity. With this in mind, we are collaborating with Professors R. T. Paine (University of New Mexico), K. N. Raymond (University of California, Berkeley), and J. E. Hutchison (University of Oregon), and Dr. B. A. Moyer (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) to obtain experimental validation of the predicted new ligand structures. Successful completion of this study will yield molecular-level insight into the role that ligand architecture plays in controlling metal ion complexation and will provide a computational approach to ligand design.

  1. Structure of a piperidine-modified calix[4]arene derivative and spectral resolution of its interaction with rare earth metals with chemometric methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li; Wang, Xiaoya; Wang, Yanmei

    2013-03-01

    A piperidine-modified calix[4]arene derivative was synthesized and its structure was confirmed with X-ray diffraction data. UV-visible spectroscopy was used to study its molecular recognition of rare earth ions. The results revealed the calix[4]arene derivative could separate tight metal picrate ion pairs by complexation with the rare earth metal ions in tetrahydrofuran. Resolution of the UV-visible spectra with chemometric methods revealed that the derivative and the rare earth ions Eu3+, Dy3+, and Tb3+ formed ML2 complexes with stability constants of 108.26, 108.29, and 107.41 respectively.

  2. Fluorescent ion indicators for detecting heavy metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Michael A.; Hoyland, Brian; Carter, Scott; Zhang, Cailan; Haugland, Richard P.

    1995-05-01

    A series of fluorescent ion indicators were tested for their spectral response to submicromolar levels of 13 divalent and trivalent metal ions in aqueous solution. Upon binding their target ions, these fluorescent compounds exhibit changes in fluorescence emission intensity that are easily detectable, making them useful for direct the detection of soluble heavy metal ions including Hg2+, Cu2+, Ni2+ and Cd2+. The fluorescence response of these indicators to ion binding results from photoinduced electron transfer effects, fluorophore/quencher interactions, fluorescence quenching by heavy metal ions or a combination of these processes. The majority of the indicators we tested bind their target ions reversibly with dissociation constants (Kd) near 1 (mu) M (approximately 1 ppm) and detection limits near 100 nM (approximately 100 ppb) at pH 7. However, several indicators exhibit very high affinity for their target ion; for example, Magnesium GreenTM binds Zn2+ with a Kd near 20 nM. All the indicators synthesized and tested are based on water-soluble fluorophores that have high fluorescence quantum yields (from 0.3 to 0.7) and can be excited with an Ar laser, fluorometer or hand- held UV lamp. Furthermore, the excitation and emission spectra of these indicators are insensitive to pH changes over the range of 5 to 10, as well as to high concentrations of K+, Na+, Ca2+ and Mg2+. These properties make the indicators useful for the direct measurement of metal ions in solutions, such as biological fluids, sea water and waste streams, that contain high concentrations of salts.

  3. Metal ions affecting the skin and eyes.

    PubMed

    Lansdown, Alan B G

    2011-01-01

    The skin and eyes remain in constant exposure to the surrounding environment and are subject to accidental, occupational, and biological risks at all times, Normal development, homeostasis, and repair following injury depend upon appropriate levels of calcium, zinc, magnesium, copper, iron, and minute amounts of other trace metals. Both tissues exist in a permanent state of dynamic equilibrium with the environment whereby cells lost through natural wear and tear are replaced through genetically regulated mitotic patterns. Normal functional requirements of the constituent tissues depend on critical balances between trace metals, metal ion gradients, and specific carrier proteins which are modulated by upregulation of growth factors, cytokines, hormones, and subcellular regulators acting by autocrine, paracrine, and endocrine mechanisms. Metal ion gradients in epidermal tissues serve critical functions in basal cell proliferation, post-mitotic migration, and functional differentiation in normal homeostasis and in repair following injury. Toxic mechanisms reflect imbalances in trace metals or interaction between xenobiotic and trace metals through competitive binding key carrier proteins and metabolic pathways leading to trace metal imbalances and functional impairment. Alternatively, toxic injuries result through direct cytotoxic action of metal ions on cell membranes, intercellular communication, RNA and DNA damage, and mutagenic change. Arsenic is the only primary carcinogen in the skin following ingestion or topical exposure; beryllium, aluminum, and zirconium are a cause of granuloma. Aluminum as a cause for breast cancer is equivocal. Metal toxicities in the eye result from direct accidental or occupational exposure and systemic uptake of neurotoxic metals and their action on the retina and optic nerve. Calcium, zinc, magnesium, and iron are essential trace elements in eye development and physiology but silver, gold, lead, and mercury are absorbed through optic membranes or from the circulation to accumulate in the vitreous leading to local or systemic action. Lead, mercury, cadmium, aluminum, and other xenobiotic metals are implicated in structural and physiological damage in the mammalian eye. Thallium shows an affinity for melanin. PMID:21473382

  4. Selective extraction and recovery of rare earth metals from phosphor powders in waste fluorescent lamps using an ionic liquid system.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Kubota, Fukiko; Baba, Yuzo; Kamiya, Noriho; Goto, Masahiro

    2013-06-15

    The recycling of rare earth metals from phosphor powders in waste fluorescent lamps by solvent extraction using ionic liquids was studied. Acid leaching of rare earth metals from the waste phosphor powder was examined first. Yttrium (Y) and europium (Eu) dissolved readily in the acid solution; however, the leaching of other rare earth metals required substantial energy input. Ionization of target rare earth metals from the waste phosphor powders into the leach solution was critical for their successful recovery. As a high temperature was required for the complete leaching of all rare earth metals, ionic liquids, for which vapor pressure is negligible, were used as an alternative extracting phase to the conventional organic diluent. An extractant, N, N-dioctyldiglycol amic acid (DODGAA), which was recently developed, showed a high affinity for rare earth metal ions in liquid-liquid extraction although a conventional commercial phosphonic extractant did not. An effective recovery of the rare earth metals, Y, Eu, La and Ce, from the metal impurities, Fe, Al and Zn, was achieved from the acidic leach solution of phosphor powders using an ionic liquid containing DODGAA as novel extractant system. PMID:23587931

  5. Metallic ion implantation by using a MEVVA ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chengzhou, Ji; Tonghe, Zhang; Huixing, Zhang; Jindong, Xie; Anmin, Wang

    1994-06-01

    Metallic ions (Ti, Mo, W, V, Ni, Y, Fe and Al) extracted from a MEVVA source have been implanted up to high doses (>1 ? 1017 cm?2) into Al and H13 steel. Because of beam heating, rather low energy ions could penetrate quite deeper in the substrates than predicted, stable intermetallic compounds appear as fine precipitates in the doped region, and hence the retained concentration of implants even exceeds the sputter-limited maximum. Multiply charged beam, enhanced diffusion and chemical reaction give great influences to the concentration distribution of implants. All these features are strongly dependent on the chosen ion-target combination.

  6. New Proton-Ionizable, Calixarene-Based Ligands for Selective Metal Ion Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Bartsch, Richard A.

    2012-06-04

    The project objective was the discovery of new ligands for performing metal ion separations. The research effort entailed the preparation of new metal ion complexing agents and polymers and their evaluation in metal ion separation processes of solvent extraction, synthetic liquid membrane transport, and sorption. Structural variations in acyclic, cyclic, and bicyclic organic ligands were used to probe their influence upon the efficiency and selectivity with which metal ion separations can be performed. A unifying feature of the ligand structures is the presence of one (or more) side arm with a pendent acidic function. When a metal ion is complexed within the central cavity of the ligand, ionization of the side arm(s) produces the requisite anion(s) for formation of an overall electroneutral complex. This markedly enhances extraction/transport efficiency for separations in which movement of aqueous phase anions of chloride, nitrate, or sulfate into an organic medium would be required. Through systematic structural variations, new ligands have been developed for efficient and selective separations of monovalent metal ions (e.g., alkali metal, silver, and thallium cations) and of divalent metal ion species (e.g., alkaline earth metal, lead, and mercury cations). Research results obtained in these fundamental investigations provide important insight for the design and development of ligands suitable for practical metal ion separation applications.

  7. Method for treating rare earth-transition metal scrap

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Peterson, David T.; Wheelock, John T.; Jones, Lawrence L.

    1992-12-29

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g., iron) scrap (e.g., Nd-Fe-B scrap) is flux (slag) remelted to reduce tramp non-metallic impurities, such as oxygen and nitrogen, and metallic impurities, such as Li, Na, Al, etc., picked up by the scrap from previous fabrication operations. The tramp impurities are reduced to concentrations acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets. The scrap is electroslag or inductoslag melted using a prefused, rare earth fluoride-bearing flux of CaF.sub.2, CaCl.sub.2 or mixtures thereof or the slag resulting from practice of the thermite reduction process to make a rare earth-iron alloy.

  8. Method for treating rare earth-transition metal scrap

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, F.A.; Peterson, D.T.; Wheelock, J.T.; Jones, L.L.

    1992-12-29

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g., iron) scrap (e.g., Nd-Fe-B scrap) is flux (slag) remelted to reduce tramp non-metallic impurities, such as oxygen and nitrogen, and metallic impurities, such as Li, Na, Al, etc., picked up by the scrap from previous fabrication operations. The tramp impurities are reduced to concentrations acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets. The scrap is electroslag or inductoslag melted using a rare earth fluoride-bearing flux of CaF[sub 2], CaCl[sub 2] or mixtures thereof or the slag resulting from practice of the thermite reduction process to make a rare earth-iron alloy. 3 figs.

  9. [Development of trace metal ion analysis].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, J

    2000-09-01

    Analyses of trace biologically essential or toxic ionic compounds found in the environment are very important. However, the lack of sensitivity and interference caused by coexisting components are often serious problems. To determine trace levels of metal ions without the above problems, new preconcentration and analytical methods have been developed. Firstly, three methods for the selective preconcentration of metal ions are shown below: 1) 3-Chloropyridazine-6-carbohydrazide was immobilized on glass beads supports to be used as a column packing material. Multi-metal ions were concentrated on the column and eluted selectively with several buffers and hydrochloric acid. The eluate was analyzed off-line by flame atomized-atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). This method was able to determine sub-ppb levels of cupper- and cadmium-ions in environmental samples. 2) Salicylideneamino-2-thiophenol was immobilized on the supports. Aluminum ion was concentrated selectively on the column and eluted with nitric acid. The eluate was analyzed off-line by flameless-AAS or on-line by flow injection analysis using pyrocatechol violet for a post-column colorimetric reagent. These methods were able to determine ppb-ppt levels of aluminium in environmental samples and were suitable for its state-analysis. 3) Bathocuproinesulfonic acid was immobilized on the supports. Copper ion was concentrated selectively on the column and eluted with nitric acid. The eluate was analyzed on-line by flow injection analysis using bathocuproinesulfonic acid. This method was able to determine sub-ppb levels of copper in environmental samples. On the other hand, to analyze simultaneously trace metal ions and anions, capillary electrophoresis was performed using ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid as an electrolyte component. Simultaneous determination of several ions in mineral waters was achieved by the system. PMID:11019646

  10. Multiheteromacrocycles that Complex Metal Ions. Sixth Progress Report, 1 May 1979-30 April 1980

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Cram, D. J.

    1980-01-15

    Objective is to design synthesize, and evaluate cyclic and polycyclic host organic compounds for their abilities to complex and lipophilize guest metal ions, their complexes, and their clusters. Host organic compounds consist of strategically placed solvating, coordinating, and ion-pairing sites tied together by covalent bonds through hydrocarbon units around cavities shaped to be occupied by guest metal ions or by metal ions plus their ligands. Specificity in complexation is sought by matching the following properties of host and guest: cavity and metal ion sizes; geometric arrangements of binding sites; number of binding sites; character of binding sites; and valences. During this period, hemispherands based on an aryloxy or cyclic urea unit, spherands based on aryloxyl units only, and their complexes with alkali metals and alkaline earths were investigated. An attempt to separate {sup 6}Li and {sup 7}Li by gel permeation chromatography of lithiospherium chloride failed. (DLC)

  11. Trace metal and rare earth content of black precipitation events

    SciTech Connect

    Landsberger, S. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Davies, T.D. . School of Environmental Sciences); Tranter, M. )

    1990-01-01

    The authors have used the techniques of non-destructive neutron activation analysis to determine trace metal and rare earth content of black precipitation events occurring in the Cairngorm Mountains in remote areas of Scotland. Thirty-one elements were determined in the particulate matter of snowpack cores that were sliced into sections. An additional analysis was performed for a black acidic snow event. Based on these results and on wind trajectories, increased loadings of many of the heavy metals and rare earth elements appeared to have originated from central Europe. Enrichment factor calculations show anthropogenic emissions for indium, arsenic, zinc, and selenium.

  12. Symmetric charge-transfer cross sections of IIIa rare-earth-metal elements

    SciTech Connect

    Hashida, Masaki; Sakabe, Shuji; Izawa, Yasukazu

    2011-03-15

    Symmetric charge-transfer cross sections of IIIa rare-earth-metal elements (Sc, Y, and Gd) in the impact energy range of 30 to 1000 eV were measured for the first time. The experiments were performed with a crossed-beam apparatus that featured primary ion production by photoionization with a tunable dye laser. Comparing the cross sections of IIIa rare-earth-metal elements ({sigma}{sub Sc}, {sigma}{sub Y}, and {sigma}{sub Gd}) with those of alkali metals or helium {sigma}{sub 0}, we found that {sigma}{sub 0{approx_equal}{sigma}Sc}<{sigma}{sub Y}<{sigma}{sub Gd{approx_equal}}2{sigma}{sub 0}at an impact energy of 1000 eV.

  13. IMMUNOASSAYS FOR METAL IONS. (R824029)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Antibodies that recognize chelated forms of metal ions have been used to construct immunoassays for Cd(II), Hg(II), Pb(II), and Ni(II). In this paper, the format of these immunoassays is described and the binding properties of three monoclonal antibodies direc...

  14. Material Removes Heavy Metal Ions From Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, Warren H., Jr.; Street, Kenneth W.; Hill, Carol; Savino, Joseph M.

    1995-01-01

    New high capacity ion-exchange polymer material removes toxic metal cations from contaminated water. Offers several advantages. High sensitivities for such heavy metals as lead, cadmium, and copper and capable of reducing concentrations in aqueous solutions to parts-per-billion range. Removes cations even when calcium present. Material made into variety of forms, such as thin films, coatings, pellets, and fibers. As result, adapted to many applications to purify contaminated water, usually hard wherever found, whether in wastewater-treatment systems, lakes, ponds, industrial plants, or homes. Another important feature that adsorbed metals easily reclaimed by either destructive or nondestructive process. Other tests show ion-exchange polymer made inexpensively; easy to use; strong, flexible, not easily torn; and chemically stable in storage, in aqueous solutions, and in acidic or basic solution.

  15. Origins of energetic ions in the Earth's magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This final report describes activities under NASA contract NAS5-31213 to Lockheed Missiles and Space Company. The report covers the entire contract period from 8 May 1991 to 7 Jun. 1994. This is a contract under the NASA Guest Investigator Program for the analysis and interpretation of the combined scientific data from the Hot Plasma Composition Experiment (HPCE) and the Charge Energy Mass (CHEM) spectrometer on the AMPTE/Charge Composition Explorer (CCE) spacecraft. These combined data sets have been used to survey the energetic ion environment in the earth's magnetosheath to determine the origins and relative strengths of the energetic ion populations found there.

  16. Metal ions affecting reproduction and development.

    PubMed

    Apostoli, Pietro; Catalani, Simona

    2011-01-01

    Many metal ions (lead, mercury, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, nickel, vanadium, copper, lithium) exert a wide variety of adverse effects on reproduction and development, including influence on male and female subfertility or fertility, abortions, malformations, birth defects, and effects on the central nervous system. The effects produced by metal ions depend on several factors, such as timing and duration of exposure, their distribution and accumulation in various organs (e.g., the nervous system), and on the interference with specific developmental processes. Neonatal and early postnatal periods are lifespan segments during which sensitivity to metals is high; e.g., lead toxicity on the developing organism is paradigmatic of related well known and still open questions. In more recent decades, important mechanisms of action have been suggested: the endocrine disruption via impact of metal ions on reproductive hormones and the oxidative stress. While experimental data provide clear evidence of effects of many metals, human data are scant and traditionally limited to high levels of a few metal ions, like lead on male fertility. Less documented are reproductive effects for mercury, manganese, chromium, nickel, and arsenic for the same gender. More complex is the demonstration of effects on female reproduction and on pregnancy. The action of lead, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, and mercury may in fact be relevant in several stages, beginning in fetal life, during early development or maturity, and is characterized by subfertility, infertility, intrauterine growth retardation, spontaneous abortions, malformations, birth defects, postnatal death, learning and behavior deficits, and premature aging. Also, for females the evidences of specific aspects such as fertility or abortions are usually higher and clearer from animal experiments than from human studies. PMID:21473384

  17. High-current pulsed ion source for metallic ions

    SciTech Connect

    Gavin, B.; Abbott, S.; MacGill, R.; Sorensen, R.; Staples, J.; Thatcher, R.

    1981-03-01

    A new sputter-ion PIG source and magnet system, optimized for intermediate charge states, q/A of 0.02 to 0.03, is described. This source will be used with the new Wideroe-based injector for the SuperHILAC. Pulsed electrical currents of several emA of heavy metal ions have been produced in a normalized emittance area of .05..pi.. cm-mr. The source system is comprised of two electrically separate anode chambers, one in operation and one spare, which can be selected by remote control. The entire source head is small and quickly removable.

  18. Acceleration of energetic ions at the earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. A.; Fisk, L. A.; Skadron, G.

    1981-01-01

    A simple analytical solution is presented which incorporates many of the processes believed to be important in the acceleration of the 'diffuse' component of energetic ions at the earth's bow shock, and which can account for many of the characteristics observed for these events. The solution can account for the observed spectral shape, the observed spatial dependence of the intensity, and the observed magnitude and spatial dependence of the anisotropy.

  19. Persistent luminescence phenomena in materials doped with rare earth ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitasalo, T.; Dereń, P.; Hölsä, J.; Jungner, H.; Krupa, J.-C.; Lastusaari, M.; Legendziewicz, J.; Niittykoski, J.; Stręk, W.

    2003-02-01

    The luminescent efficiency of rare earth ions is usually drastically lowered when defects are present in the host lattice. Persistent luminescence is the most recent rare earth application based on lattice defects. Typical materials are the Eu 2+-doped alkaline earth aluminates, MAl 2O 4:Eu 2+ ( M=Ca and Sr). The trivalent R 3+ ions as co-dopants enhance greatly the duration and intensity of persistent luminescence. As a result of very slow thermal bleaching of the excitation energy from the lattice defects acting as traps, the new persistent luminescent materials yield luminescence still visible to naked eye for more than 10 h. Despite the seemingly simple stoichiometry and structure of these materials, the determination of persistent luminescence mechanism(s) presents a very complicated problem. This report presents in detail some of the factors affecting the luminescence properties of the Eu 2+-, R 3+-doped MAl 2O 4. The possible mechanisms involved with different defect centers and interactions between them and the emitting Eu 2+ ion are discussed based on the results of systematic investigations carried out on the preparation, composition, structure and different luminescence properties.

  20. The role of metal ion-ligand interactions during divalent metal ion adsorption.

    PubMed

    Eldridge, Daniel S; Crawford, Russell J; Harding, Ian H

    2015-09-15

    A suite of seven different divalent metal ions (Ca(II), Cd(II), Cu(II), Mg(II), Ni(II), Pb(II), Zn(II)) was adsorbed from solution onto two Fe2O3 samples, quartz SiO2 and three different amphoteric polystyrene latices (containing amine and carboxyl functional groups). For the metal oxides, a high correlation was observed between the pH at which 50% of the metal was removed from solution (pH50) and the first hydrolysis constant for the metal ion (pK1). For the polystyrene latices, a much higher correlation was observed between the pH50 and pKc (equilibrium constant describing metal-carboxyl affinity) as opposed to pK1. These observations provide evidence of a strong relationship that exists between a metal's affinity for a particular ligand in solution and for that metal ion's affinity for the same ligand present as part of an adsorbing surface. The isoelectric point of the amphoteric latex surface can be increased by decreasing the carboxyl content of the latex surface. For all 7 metal ions, this resulted in a substantial decrease, for any given pH, in adsorption. We suggest that this may be partly due to the decreased carboxyl content, but is dominantly attributable to the presence of less favorable electrostatic conditions. This, in turn, demonstrates that electrostatics play a controlling role in metal ion adsorption onto amphoteric latex surfaces and, in addition to the nature of the metal ion, also controls the pH at which adsorption takes place. PMID:26001134

  1. Ion irradiation effects on metallic nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kluth, P.; Johannessen, B.; Giulian, R.; Schnohr, C.S.; Foran, G.J.; Cookson, D.J.; Byrne, A.P.; Ridgway, M.C.

    2008-04-02

    We have investigated structural and morphological properties of metallic nanocrystals (NCs) exposed to ion irradiation. NCs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy in combination with advanced synchrotron-based analytical techniques, in particular X-ray absorption spectroscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering. A number of different effects were observed depending on the irradiation conditions. At energies where nuclear stopping is predominant, structural disorder/amorphization followed by inverse Ostwald ripening/dissolution due to ion beam mixing was observed for Au and Cu NCs embedded in SiO{sub 2}. The ion-irradiation-induced crystalline to amorphous transition in the NCs, which cannot be achieved in the corresponding bulk metals, was attributed to their initially higher structural energy as compared to bulk material and possibly preferential nucleation of the amorphous phase at the NC/SiO{sub 2} interface. At very high irradiation energies (swift heavy ion irradiation), where the energy loss is nearly entirely due to electronic stopping, a size-dependent shape transformation of the NCs from spheres to rod like shapes was apparent in Au NCs. Our preliminary results are in good agreement with considerations on melting of the NCs in the ion track as one mechanism involved in the shape transformation.

  2. Engineering of microorganisms towards recovery of rare metal ions.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2010-06-01

    The bioadsorption of metal ions using microorganisms is an attractive technology for the recovery of rare metal ions as well as removal of toxic heavy metal ions from aqueous solution. In initial attempts, microorganisms with the ability to accumulate metal ions were isolated from nature and intracellular accumulation was enhanced by the overproduction of metal-binding proteins in the cytoplasm. As an alternative, the cell surface design of microorganisms by cell surface engineering is an emerging strategy for bioadsorption and recovery of metal ions. Cell surface engineering was firstly applied to the construction of a bioadsorbent to adsorb heavy metal ions for bioremediation. Cell surface adsorption of metal ions is rapid and reversible. Therefore, adsorbed metal ions can be easily recovered without cell breakage, and the bioadsorbent can be reused or regenerated. These advantages are suitable for the recovery of rare metal ions. Actually, the cell surface display of a molybdate-binding protein on yeast led to the enhanced adsorption of molybdate, one of the rare metal ions. An additional advantage is that the cell surface display system allows high-throughput screening of protein/peptide libraries owing to the direct evaluation of the displayed protein/peptide without purification and concentration. Therefore, the creation of novel metal-binding protein/peptide and engineering of microorganisms towards the recovery of rare metal ions could be simultaneously achieved. PMID:20393699

  3. Anion-exchange separations of metal ions in thiocyanate media.

    PubMed

    Fritz, J S; Kaminski, E E

    1971-05-01

    The analytical potential of a weak-base macroreticular anion-exchange resin for the quantitative separation of metal ions in thiocyanate media is investigated and demonstrated. Distribution data are given for the sorption of some 25 metal ions from aqueous mixtures of potassium thiocyanate (1.0M or less) and 0.5M hydrochloric acid. The magnitude of the distribution data suggests many possible separations, some of which were quantitatively performed by procedures which are fast, simple and require only mild conditions. Representative separations are removal of traces of iron(III) and copper(II) from water samples prior to the determination of water hardness (calcium and magnesium), separation of nickel(II) from vanadium(IV) and the separation of thorium(IV) from titanium(IV). Some multicomponent separations are the separation of rare earths(III) and thorium(IV) from scandium(III) and the separation of rare earths(III) from iron(III) and uranium(VI). PMID:18960914

  4. New developments in metal ion implantation by vacuum arc ion sources and metal plasma immersion

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.G.; Anders, A.; Anders, S.

    1996-12-31

    Ion implantation by intense beams of metal ions can be accomplished using the dense metal plasma formed in a vacuum arc discharge embodied either in a vacuum arc ion source or in a metal plasma immersion configuration. In the former case high energy metal ion beams are formed and implantation is done in a more-or-less conventional way, and in the latter case the substrate is immersed in the plasma and repetitively pulse-biased so as to accelerate the ions at the high voltage plasma sheath formed at the substrate. A number of advances have been made in the last few years, both in plasma technology and in the surface modification procedures, that enhance the effectiveness and versatility of the methods, including for example: controlled increase of the in charge states produced; operation in a dual metal-gaseous ion species mode; very large area beam formation; macroparticle filtering; and the development of processing regimes for optimizing adhesion, morphology and structure. These complementary ion processing techniques provide the plasma tools for doing ion surface modification over a very wide parameter regime, from pure ion implantation at energies approaching the MeV level, through ion mixing at energies in the {approximately}1 to {approximately}100 keV range, to IBAD-like processing at energies from a few tens of eV to a few keV. Here the authors review the methods, describe a number of recent developments, and outline some of the surface modification applications to which the methods have been put. 54 refs., 9 figs.

  5. Rare Earth Metal/semiconductor Interfaces and Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogami, Jun

    Interfaces formed at room temperature by incremental deposition of rare earth metals onto semiconductor substrates have been studied with surface sensitive soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The trends in core level lineshape and intensity with increasing metal coverage have been used to deduce an outline of the evolution and the final morphology of the interfacial region on a microscopic scale. Measurements were taken for Ytterbium (Yb) on Silicon (Si), Germanium, and Gallium Arsenide, and for Gadolinium (Gd) and Europium (Eu) on Silicon. The Yb/Si interface work was supported by comparable measurements of bulk Yb silicide samples of known composition and crystal structure. In a general sense, the behavior of all the systems studied is similar. At very low metal coverages, the metal atoms chemisorb and are weakly bonded to the substrate. The 4f core levels indicate that the metal-metal atom coordination is relatively low at this stage. The interaction with the substrate strengthens with increasing coverage, culminating in the formation of a strongly reacted phase at between 1 and 3 monolayers (ML). The strong reaction is limited to a narrow region at room temperature. At less than 10 ML coverage, the surface of the sample is almost indistinguishable from the pure metal. Details of the behavior such as the reactivity at low coverage, the compounds formed at the interface, the morphology at the surface at intermediate coverages, the final interfacial width, and the amount of substrate atom outdiffusion and surface segregation can all vary from system to system. It is in explaining the causes of some of these differences that insight about what governs the behavior of all of these rare earth metal/semiconductor systems has been obtained. The divalent metals (Yb, Eu) are significantly less reactive than trivalent Gd at sub-monolayer coverages. For the divalent metals the formation of a metal-rich phase is strongly favored in the reaction at the interface, whereas for Gd there is no single well-defined interfacial phase formed. Both the metal valence and the size of the rare earth atom appear to play a significant role in determining the reaction behavior at all stages of interface formation.

  6. Rare earth-transition metal scrap treatment method

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Peterson, David T.; Wheelock, John T.; Jones, Lawrence L.; Lincoln, Lanny P.

    1992-02-11

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g. iron) scrap (e.g. Nd-Fe-B scrap) is melted to reduce the levels of tramp oxygen and nitrogen impurities therein. The tramp impurities are reduced in the melt by virtue of the reaction of the tramp impurities and the rare earth to form dross on the melt. The purified melt is separated from the dross for reuse. The oxygen and nitrogen of the melt are reduced to levels acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets.

  7. Rare earth-transition metal scrap treatment method

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, F.A.; Peterson, D.T.; Wheelock, J.T.; Jones, L.L.; Lincoln, L.P.

    1992-02-11

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g. iron) scrap (e.g. Nd-Fe-B scrap) is melted to reduce the levels of tramp oxygen and nitrogen impurities therein. The tramp impurities are reduced in the melt by virtue of the reaction of the tramp impurities and the rare earth to form dross on the melt. The purified melt is separated from the dross for reuse. The oxygen and nitrogen of the melt are reduced to levels acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets. 3 figs.

  8. Complexing of metal ions by humic substances

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, N.D.; Zhang, Y.; Jones, M.N.

    1995-12-31

    The interaction of metal ions with humic substances is being studied using two different techniques. UV-scanning ultracentrifugation is being used to determine molecular weights and to investigate changes in aggregation brought about by metal ion complexation. The relationship between cation charge and conformation of the humic ligands is also being investigated. The complexation of actinide elements (U, Np, Pu, Am) by humic substances from soils contaminated by both natural processes and by low-level effluent releases is also being studied. Gel permeation chromatography has been used to show both that different fractions of humic substances vary greatly in their effectiveness as ligands and that different actinide elements associate with different fractions. These studies have also shown that uranium desorption is kinetically controlled by humic substances.

  9. Interplay of metal ions and urease

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Eric L.; Flugga, Nicholas; Boer, Jodi L.; Mulrooney, Scott B.; Hausinger, Robert P.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Urease, the first enzyme to be crystallized, contains a dinuclear nickel metallocenter that catalyzes the decomposition of urea to produce ammonia, a reaction of great agricultural and medical importance. Several mechanisms of urease catalysis have been proposed on the basis of enzyme crystal structures, model complexes, and computational efforts, but the precise steps in catalysis and the requirement of nickel versus other metals remain unclear. Purified bacterial urease is partially activated via incubation with carbon dioxide plus nickel ions; however, in vitro activation also has been achieved with manganese and cobalt. In vivo activation of most ureases requires accessory proteins that function as nickel metallochaperones and GTP-dependent molecular chaperones or play other roles in the maturation process. In addition, some microorganisms control their levels of urease by metal ion-dependent regulatory mechanisms. PMID:20046957

  10. Metal hydrides for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oumellal, Y.; Rougier, A.; Nazri, G. A.; Tarascon, J.-M.; Aymard, L.

    2008-11-01

    Classical electrodes for Li-ion technology operate via an insertion/de-insertion process. Recently, conversion electrodes have shown the capability of greater capacity, but have so far suffered from a marked hysteresis in voltage between charge and discharge, leading to poor energy efficiency and voltages. Here, we present the electrochemical reactivity of MgH2 with Li that constitutes the first use of a metal-hydride electrode for Li-ion batteries. The MgH2 electrode shows a large, reversible capacity of 1,480mAhg-1 at an average voltage of 0.5V versus Li+/Li∘ which is suitable for the negative electrode. In addition, it shows the lowest polarization for conversion electrodes. The electrochemical reaction results in formation of a composite containing Mg embedded in a LiH matrix, which on charging converts back to MgH2. Furthermore, the reaction is not specific to MgH2, as other metal or intermetallic hydrides show similar reactivity towards Li. Equally promising, the reaction produces nanosized Mg and MgH2, which show enhanced hydrogen sorption/desorption kinetics. We hope that such findings can pave the way for designing nanoscale active metal elements with applications in hydrogen storage and lithium-ion batteries.

  11. Metal hydrides for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Oumellal, Y; Rougier, A; Nazri, G A; Tarascon, J-M; Aymard, L

    2008-11-01

    Classical electrodes for Li-ion technology operate via an insertion/de-insertion process. Recently, conversion electrodes have shown the capability of greater capacity, but have so far suffered from a marked hysteresis in voltage between charge and discharge, leading to poor energy efficiency and voltages. Here, we present the electrochemical reactivity of MgH(2) with Li that constitutes the first use of a metal-hydride electrode for Li-ion batteries. The MgH(2) electrode shows a large, reversible capacity of 1,480 mAh g(-1) at an average voltage of 0.5 V versus Li(+)/Li(o) which is suitable for the negative electrode. In addition, it shows the lowest polarization for conversion electrodes. The electrochemical reaction results in formation of a composite containing Mg embedded in a LiH matrix, which on charging converts back to MgH(2). Furthermore, the reaction is not specific to MgH(2), as other metal or intermetallic hydrides show similar reactivity towards Li. Equally promising, the reaction produces nanosized Mg and MgH(2), which show enhanced hydrogen sorption/desorption kinetics. We hope that such findings can pave the way for designing nanoscale active metal elements with applications in hydrogen storage and lithium-ion batteries. PMID:18849978

  12. Luminescence of rare-earth ions in epitaxial fluoride layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Nikolai S.; Yakovlev, Nikolai L.

    1996-01-01

    Epitaxial fluoride layers (CaF2, SrF2 and CdF2) were grown and doped with rare- earth ions by means of molecular beam epitaxy. This technique allows creation of new fluoride heterostructures (including superlattices) with high level and controlled profile of doping. Photoluminescence spectra of divalent ions (Eu2+ and Sm2+) were used to study strains and stress relaxation in the films. In the structures grown by MBE one can observe effects which are not actual in bulk crystals. They are crossing of 4f6 and 4f55d levels of Sm2+ ions in CaF2 layers with tensile strain as high as 2%, new shape of inhomogeneously broadened Sm2+ zero phonon emission line in very thin CaF2 layers arising from modification of strain fields of defects near the surface, bleaching of photoluminescence of RE ions in thin CaF2:Sm2+ layers on Si(111) and in CdF2-CaF2:Eu2+ superlattices. Luminescence of trivalent ions (Nd3+ and Er3+) in CaF2 films is quenched at much higher concentration of the dopants than in bulk crystals. It makes these films very attractive for potential optoelectronic applications.

  13. Metal ion homeostasis and intracellular parasitism.

    PubMed

    Agranoff, D D; Krishna, S

    1998-05-01

    Bacteria possess multiple mechanisms for the transport of metal ions. While many of these systems may have evolved in the first instance to resist the detrimental effects of toxic environmental heavy metals, they have since become adapted to a variety of important homeostatic functions. The 'P'-type ATPases play a key role in metal ion transport in bacteria. A Cu+-ATPase from the intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes is implicated in pathogenesis, and similar pumps in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. leprae may play a comparable role. Intracellular bacteria require transition metal cations for the synthesis of superoxide dismutases and catalases, which constitute an important line of defence against macrophage-killing mechanisms. The macrophage protein Nramp1, which confers resistance to a variety of intracellular pathogens, has also been shown recently to be a divalent amphoteric cation transporter. Mycobacterial homologues have recently been identified by genomic analysis. These findings suggest a model in which competition for divalent cations plays a pivotal role in the interaction between host and parasite. PMID:9632246

  14. Analysis of metallic pigments by ion microbeam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelicon, P.; Klanjšek-Gunde, M.; Kunaver, M.; Simčič, J.; Budnar, M.

    2002-05-01

    Metallic paints consist of metallic flakes dispersed in a resinous binder, i.e. a light-element polymer matrix. The spatial distribution and orientation of metallic flakes inside the matrix determines the covering efficiency of the paint, glossiness, and its angular-dependent properties such as lightness flop or color flop (two-tone). Such coatings are extensively used for a functional (i.e. security) as well as decorative purpose. The ion microbeam analysis of two types of silver paint with imbedded metallic flakes has been performed to determine the spatial distribution of the aluminum flakes in paint layer. The average sizes of the aluminum flakes were 23 μm (size distribution 10-37) and 49 μm (size distribution 34-75), respectively. The proton beam with the size of 2×2 μm 2 at Ljubljana ion microprobe has been used to scan the surface of the pigments. PIXE mapping of Al Kα map shows lateral distribution of the aluminum flakes, whereas the RBS slicing method reveals tomograms of the flakes in uppermost 7 μm of the pigment layer. The series of point analysis aligned over the single flake reveal the flake angle in respect to the polymer matrix surface. The angular sensitivity is well below 1 angular degree.

  15. Transparent monolithic metal ion containing nanophase aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Risen, W. M., Jr.; Hu, X.; Ji, S.; Littrell, K.

    1999-12-01

    The formation of monolithic and transparent transition metal containing aerogels has been achieved through cooperative interactions of high molecular weight functionalized carbohydrates and silica precursors, which strongly influence the kinetics of gelation. After initial gelation, subsequent modification of the ligating character of the system, coordination of the group VIII metal ions, and supercritical extraction afford the aerogels. The structures at the nanophase level have been probed by photon and electron transmission and neutron scattering techniques to help elucidate the basis for structural integrity together with the small entity sizes that permit transparency in the visible range. They also help with understanding the chemical reactivities of the metal-containing sites in these very high surface area materials. These results are discussed in connection with new reaction studies.

  16. On the Metal Ion Selectivity of Oxoacid Extractants

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, Benjamin; Chagnes, Alexandre; Cote, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    Relationships between metal chelate stability, ligand basicity, and metal ion acidity are reviewed and the general applicability is illustrated by linear correlations between aqueous stability constants and ligand pKa values for 35 metals with 26 ligands. The results confirm that most individual ligands of this type exhibit a stability ordering that correlates with the Lewis acidity of the metal ion. It is concluded that the general metal ion selectivity exhibited by liquid-liquid oxoacid extractants such as carboxylic acids, -diketones, and alkylphosphoric acids reflects the intrinsic affinity of the metal ion for the negative oxygen donor ligand.

  17. Dynamical Correlation In Some Liquid Alkaline Earth Metals Near Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakore, B. Y.; Suthar, P. H.; Khambholja, S. G.; Gajjar, P. N.; Jani, A. R.

    2010-12-01

    The study of dynamical variables: velocity autocorrelation function (VACF) and power spectrum of liquid alkaline earth metals (Ca, Sr, and Ba) have been presented based on the static harmonic well approximation. The effective interatomic potential for liquid metals is computed using our well recognized model potential with the exchange correlation functions due to Hartree, Taylor, Ichimaru and Utsumi, Farid et al. and Sarkar et al. It is observed that the VACF computed using Sarkar et al. gives the good agreement with available molecular dynamics simulation (MD) results [Phys Rev. B 62, 14818 (2000)]. The shoulder of the power spectrum depends upon the type of local field correlation function used.

  18. Liquid metal alloy ion source based metal ion injection into a room-temperature electron beam ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, A.; Ritter, E.; Zschornack, G.; Ullmann, F.; Pilz, W.; Bischoff, L.

    2012-02-15

    We have carried out a series of measurements demonstrating the feasibility of using the Dresden electron beam ion source (EBIS)-A, a table-top sized, permanent magnet technology based electron beam ion source, as a charge breeder. Low charged gold ions from an AuGe liquid metal alloy ion source were injected into the EBIS and re-extracted as highly charged ions, thereby producing charge states as high as Au{sup 60+}. The setup, the charge breeding technique, breeding efficiencies as well as acceptance and emittance studies are presented.

  19. Liquid metal alloy ion source based metal ion injection into a room-temperature electron beam ion sourcea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorn, A.; Ritter, E.; Ullmann, F.; Pilz, W.; Bischoff, L.; Zschornack, G.

    2012-02-01

    We have carried out a series of measurements demonstrating the feasibility of using the Dresden electron beam ion source (EBIS)-A, a table-top sized, permanent magnet technology based electron beam ion source, as a charge breeder. Low charged gold ions from an AuGe liquid metal alloy ion source were injected into the EBIS and re-extracted as highly charged ions, thereby producing charge states as high as Au60 +. The setup, the charge breeding technique, breeding efficiencies as well as acceptance and emittance studies are presented.

  20. Liquid metal alloy ion source based metal ion injection into a room-temperature electron beam ion source.

    PubMed

    Thorn, A; Ritter, E; Ullmann, F; Pilz, W; Bischoff, L; Zschornack, G

    2012-02-01

    We have carried out a series of measurements demonstrating the feasibility of using the Dresden electron beam ion source (EBIS)-A, a table-top sized, permanent magnet technology based electron beam ion source, as a charge breeder. Low charged gold ions from an AuGe liquid metal alloy ion source were injected into the EBIS and re-extracted as highly charged ions, thereby producing charge states as high as Au(60 +). The setup, the charge breeding technique, breeding efficiencies as well as acceptance and emittance studies are presented. PMID:22380207

  1. Isotopic fractionation of alkali earth metals during carbonate precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yotsuya, T.; Ohno, T.; Muramatsu, Y.; Shimoda, G.; Goto, K. T.

    2014-12-01

    The alkaline earth metals such as magnesium, calcium and strontium play an important role in a variety of geochemical and biological processes. The element ratios (Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca) in marine carbonates have been used as proxies for reconstruction of the past environment. Recently several studies suggested that the study for the isotopic fractionation of the alkaline earth metals in marine carbonates has a potentially significant influence in geochemical research fields (e.g. Eisenhauer et al., 2009). The aim of this study is to explore the influence of carbonate polymorphs (Calcite and Aragonite) and environmental factors (e.g., temperature, precipitation rate) on the level of isotopic fractionation of the alkaline earth metals. We also examined possible correlations between the level of isotopic fractionation of Ca and that of other alkaline earth metals during carbonate precipitation. In order to determine the isotope fractionation factor of Mg, Ca and Sr during carbonate precipitation, calcite and aragonite were synthesized from calcium bicarbonate solution in which the amount of magnesium was controlled based on Kitano method. Calcium carbonates were also prepared from the mixture of calcium chlorite and sodium hydrogen carbonate solutions. The isotope fractionation factors were measured by MC-ICPMS. Results suggested that the level of isotopic fractionation of Mg during carbonate precipitation was correlated with that of Sr and that the change of the carbonate crystal structure could make differences of isotopic fractionations of Mg and Ca, however no difference was found in the case of Sr. In this presentation, the possible mechanism will be discussed.

  2. Steady-state superradiance with alkaline-earth-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Meiser, D.; Holland, M. J.

    2010-03-15

    Alkaline-earth-metal-like atoms with ultranarrow transitions open the door to a new regime of cavity quantum electrodynamics. That regime is characterized by a critical photon number that is many orders of magnitude smaller than what can be achieved in conventional systems. We show that it is possible to achieve superradiance in steady state with such systems. We discuss the basic underlying mechanisms as well as the key experimental requirements.

  3. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. (a... hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions (PMN P-94-1557) is subject to reporting...

  4. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. (a... hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions (PMN P-94-1557) is subject to reporting...

  5. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. (a... hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions (PMN P-94-1557) is subject to reporting...

  6. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. (a... hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions (PMN P-94-1557) is subject to reporting...

  7. 40 CFR 421.270 - Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... primary rare earth metals subcategory. 421.270 Section 421.270 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Rare Earth Metals Subcategory § 421.270 Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from...

  8. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. (a... hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions (PMN P-94-1557) is subject to reporting...

  9. 40 CFR 421.270 - Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... primary rare earth metals subcategory. 421.270 Section 421.270 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Rare Earth Metals Subcategory § 421.270 Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from...

  10. Liquid metal ion source assembly for external ion injection into an electron string ion source (ESIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segal, M. J.; Bark, R. A.; Thomae, R.; Donets, E. E.; Donets, E. D.; Boytsov, A.; Ponkin, D.; Ramsdorf, A.

    2016-02-01

    An assembly for a commercial Ga+ liquid metal ion source in combination with an ion transportation and focusing system, a pulse high-voltage quadrupole deflector, and a beam diagnostics system has been constructed in the framework of the iThemba LABS (Cape Town, South Africa)—JINR (Dubna, Russia) collaboration. First, results on Ga+ ion beam commissioning will be presented. Outlook of further experiments for measurements of charge breeding efficiency in the electron string ion source with the use of external injection of Ga+ and Au+ ion beams will be reported as well.

  11. Liquid metal ion source assembly for external ion injection into an electron string ion source (ESIS).

    PubMed

    Segal, M J; Bark, R A; Thomae, R; Donets, E E; Donets, E D; Boytsov, A; Ponkin, D; Ramsdorf, A

    2016-02-01

    An assembly for a commercial Ga(+) liquid metal ion source in combination with an ion transportation and focusing system, a pulse high-voltage quadrupole deflector, and a beam diagnostics system has been constructed in the framework of the iThemba LABS (Cape Town, South Africa)-JINR (Dubna, Russia) collaboration. First, results on Ga(+) ion beam commissioning will be presented. Outlook of further experiments for measurements of charge breeding efficiency in the electron string ion source with the use of external injection of Ga(+) and Au(+) ion beams will be reported as well. PMID:26931974

  12. Electric Double-Layer Effects Induce Separation of Aqueous Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Ji, Qinghua; An, Xiaoqiang; Liu, Huijuan; Guo, Lin; Qu, Jiuhui

    2015-11-24

    Metal ion separation is crucial to environmental decontamination, chromatography, and metal recovery and recycling. Theoretical studies have suggested that the ion distributions in the electric double-layer (EDL) region depend on the nature of the ions and the characteristics of the charged electrode surface. We believe that rational design of the electrode material and device structure will enable EDL-based devices to be utilized in the separation of aqueous metal ions. On the basis of this concept, we fabricate an EDL separation (EDLS) device based on sandwich-structured N-functionalized graphene sheets (CN-GS) for selective separation of aqueous toxic heavy metal ions. We demonstrate that the EDLS enables randomly distributed soluble ions to form a coordination-driven layer and electrostatic-driven layer in the interfacial region of the CN-GS/solution. Through tuning the surface potential of the CN-GS, the effective separation of heavy metal ions (coordination-driven layer) from alkali or alkaline earth metal ions (electrostatic-driven layer) can be achieved. PMID:26481603

  13. Coherent optical ultrasound detection with rare-earth ion dopants.

    PubMed

    Tay, Jian Wei; Ledingham, Patrick M; Longdell, Jevon J

    2010-08-10

    We describe theoretical and experimental demonstration for optical detection of ultrasound using a spectral hole engraved in cryogenically cooled rare-earth ion-doped solids. Our method utilizes the dispersion effects due to the spectral hole to perform phase-to-amplitude modulation conversion. Like previous approaches using spectral holes, it has the advantage of detection with large étendue. The method also has the benefit that high sensitivity can be obtained with moderate absorption contrast for the spectral holes. PMID:20697433

  14. Metal ion binding to iron oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponthieu, M.; Juillot, F.; Hiemstra, T.; van Riemsdijk, W. H.; Benedetti, M. F.

    2006-06-01

    The biogeochemistry of trace elements (TE) is largely dependent upon their interaction with heterogeneous ligands including metal oxides and hydrous oxides of iron. The modeling of TE interactions with iron oxides has been pursued using a variety of chemical models. The objective of this work is to show that it is possible to model the adsorption of protons and TE on a crystallized oxide (i.e., goethite) and on an amorphous oxide (HFO) in an identical way. Here, we use the CD-MUSIC approach in combination with valuable and reliable surface spectroscopy information about the nature of surface complexes of the TE. The other objective of this work is to obtain generic parameters to describe the binding of the following elements (Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) onto both iron oxides for the CD-MUSIC approach. The results show that a consistent description of proton and metal ion binding is possible for goethite and HFO with the same set of model parameters. In general a good prediction of almost all the collected experimental data sets corresponding to metal ion binding to HFO is obtained. Moreover, dominant surface species are in agreement with the recently published surface complexes derived from X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) data. Until more detailed information on the structure of the two iron oxides is available, the present option seems a reasonable approximation and can be used to describe complex geochemical systems. To improve our understanding and modeling of multi-component systems we need more data obtained at much lower metal ion to iron oxide ratios in order to be able to account eventually for sites that are not always characterized in spectroscopic studies.

  15. Metal Based Synthetic Strategies and the Examination of Structure Determining Factors in Alkaline Earth Metal Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yuriko

    Last decades have witnessed a large expansion of the organometallic heavier alkaline earth metal species. However, continued growth of this promising area of chemistry has been slowed by severe restrictions and limitations in viable synthetic methodologies leading to difficulties in preparing and characterizing the target compounds. There is clearly a need for the further development of synthetic methodologies and detailed structure function analysis that will promote the further advancement of organoalkaline earth metal chemistry in applications as diverse as materials chemistry and catalysis. This thesis work greatly extends the synthetic options currently available towards organoalkaline earth metal species by introducing redox transmetallation protolysis (RTP), a reaction based on the readily available Ph3Bi as a non-toxic transmetallation agent. Based on a straightforward one-pot procedure and work-up, Ph3Bi based RTP presents a powerful synthetic alternative for the facile preparation of a large variety of heavy alkaline earth metal compounds. The second part of the thesis explores the effect of secondary non covalent interactions on the coordination chemistry as well as thermal properties of a series of novel alkali, alkaline earth, rare earth as well as heterobimetallic alkali/alkaline earth fluoroalkoxides. These compounds showcase the significance of non-covalent M···F-C and agostic interactions on metal stabilization and structural features, providing critical input on ligand design for the design of advanced metal organic vapor deposition (MOCVD) precursor materials. This work also showcases the impact of M···F-C interactions over M---co-ligand coordination, a critical precursor design element as well.

  16. Rational Design of Metal Ion Sequestering Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2000-09-30

    The discriminate bonding of metal ions is a challenge to the synthetic chemist and a phenomenon of considerable practical importance.1 An important feature of many technical applications is the specific or preferential binding of a single metal ion in the presence of many metals. Examples range from large-volume uses (e.g. ferric EDTA as a plant food, calcium complexing agents as water softeners or anticaking formulations) to very high technology applications (technetium complexation in radiopharmaceuticals, synthetic metalloenzymes). We are interested in efficient and discriminate binding of actinides for waste stream remediation. Actinides represent a major and long-lived contaminant in nuclear waste. While the separation of actinides from other radioactive components of waste, such as Sr and Cs, is relatively well established, the separation of actinides from each other and in complex solutions (e.g. those found in tank wastes) is not as well resolved. The challenge of designing metal-specific (actinide) ligands is facilitated by examples from nature. Bacteria synthesize Fe(III)-specific ligands, called siderophores, to sequester Fe(III) from the environment and return it to the cell. The similarities between Fe(III) and Pu(IV) (their charge-to-size ratios and acidity), make the siderophores prototypical for designing actinide-specific ligands. The chelating groups present in siderophores are usually hydroxamic acids and catecholamides. We have developed derivatives of these natural products which have improved properties. The catechol derivatives are the 2,3-dihydroxyterephthalamides (TAMs), and 3,4-dihydroxysulfonamides (SFAMs), and the hydroxamic acid derivatives are three isomers of hydroxypyridinones, 1,2- HOPO, 3,2-HOPO, and 3,4-HOPO. All of these ligands are attached to molecular backbones by amides and a very important feature of HOPO and CAM ligands is a strong hydrogen bonds formed between the amide proton and the adjacent phenolic oxygen in the metal complex, thereby enhancing the stability (Figure 1).

  17. Substrate Profile and Metal-ion Selectivity of Human Divalent Metal-ion Transporter-1*

    PubMed Central

    Illing, Anthony C.; Shawki, Ali; Cunningham, Christopher L.; Mackenzie, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    Divalent metal-ion transporter-1 (DMT1) is a H+-coupled metal-ion transporter that plays essential roles in iron homeostasis. DMT1 exhibits reactivity (based on evoked currents) with a broad range of metal ions; however, direct measurement of transport is lacking for many of its potential substrates. We performed a comprehensive substrate-profile analysis for human DMT1 expressed in RNA-injected Xenopus oocytes by using radiotracer assays and the continuous measurement of transport by fluorescence with the metal-sensitive PhenGreen SK fluorophore. We provide validation for the use of PhenGreen SK fluorescence quenching as a reporter of cellular metal-ion uptake. We determined metal-ion selectivity under fixed conditions using the voltage clamp. Radiotracer and continuous measurement of transport by fluorescence assays revealed that DMT1 mediates the transport of several metal ions that were ranked in selectivity by using the ratio Imax/K0.5 (determined from evoked currents at −70 mV): Cd2+ > Fe2+ > Co2+, Mn2+ ≫ Zn2+, Ni2+, VO2+. DMT1 expression did not stimulate the transport of Cr2+, Cr3+, Cu+, Cu2+, Fe3+, Ga3+, Hg2+, or VO+. 55Fe2+ transport was competitively inhibited by Co2+ and Mn2+. Zn2+ only weakly inhibited 55Fe2+ transport. Our data reveal that DMT1 selects Fe2+ over its other physiological substrates and provides a basis for predicting the contribution of DMT1 to intestinal, nasal, and pulmonary absorption of metal ions and their cellular uptake in other tissues. Whereas DMT1 is a likely route of entry for the toxic heavy metal cadmium, and may serve the metabolism of cobalt, manganese, and vanadium, we predict that DMT1 should contribute little if at all to the absorption or uptake of zinc. The conclusion in previous reports that copper is a substrate of DMT1 is not supported. PMID:22736759

  18. Magnetism of perovskite cobaltites with Kramers rare-earth ions

    SciTech Connect

    Jirák, Z. Hejtmánek, J.; Knížek, K.; Novák, P.; Šantavá, E.; Fujishiro, H.

    2014-05-07

    The band-gap insulators RECoO{sub 3} (RE = Nd{sup 3+}, Sm{sup 3+}, and Dy{sup 3+}) with Co{sup 3+} ions stabilized in the non-magnetic low-spin state have been investigated by specific heat measurements. The experiments evidence an antiferromagnetic ordering of the rare earths with Néel temperature of T{sub N} = 1.25, 1.50, and 3.60 K for NdCoO{sub 3}, SmCoO{sub 3}, and DyCoO{sub 3}, respectively. With increasing external field, the lambda peak in specific heat, indicative of the transition, shifts to lower temperatures and vanishes for field of about 3 T. Starting from this point, a broader Schottky peak is formed, centered in 1 K range, and its position is moved to higher temperatures proportionally to applied field. The origin of the peak is in Zeeman splitting of the ground Kramers doublet, and the gradual shift with field defines effective g-factors for the rare-earth pseudospins in studied compounds. The results obtained are confronted with the calculations of crystal field splitting of the rare-earth multiplets.

  19. Metal Ion Intercalated graphitic as Transparent Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Jiayu; Bao, Wenzhong; Gu, Feng; Fuhrer, Michael; Hu, Liangbing; UMD Team

    To best utilize the performance of graphene based transparent electrodes, we novelized Li-ion intercalation in graphene, and achieved highest performance of carbon based transparent electrodes. Transmission as high as 91.7% with a sheet resistance of 3.0 ohm/sq is achieved for 19-layer LiC6, significantly higher than any other continuous transparent electrodes. The unconventional modification of ultrathin graphite optoelectronic properties is explained by the suppression of interband optical transitions and a small intraband Drude conductivity near the interband edge. To achieve low cost, large scale graphene-based transparent electrodes, we further developed Na-ion intercalated printed reduced graphene oxide (RGO) film. The larger layer-layer distance of RGO allows Na-ion intercalation, leading to simultaneously much higher DC conductivity and higher optical transmittance. Typical increase of transmittance from 36% to 79% and decrease of sheet resistance from 83 kohms/sq to 311 ohms/sq in the printed network was observed. This study demonstrated the great potential of metal-ion intercalation to improve the performance of graphene-based materials for transparent conductor applications.

  20. Structures and energetics of complexation of metal ions with ammonia, water, and benzene: A computational study.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bhaskar; Neela, Y Indra; Narahari Sastry, G

    2016-04-30

    Quantum chemical calculations have been performed at CCSD(T)/def2-TZVP level to investigate the strength and nature of interactions of ammonia (NH3 ), water (H2 O), and benzene (C6 H6 ) with various metal ions and validated with the available experimental results. For all the considered metal ions, a preference for C6 H6 is observed for dicationic ions whereas the monocationic ions prefer to bind with NH3 . Density Functional Theory-Symmetry Adapted Perturbation Theory (DFT-SAPT) analysis has been employed at PBE0AC/def2-TZVP level on these complexes (closed shell), to understand the various energy terms contributing to binding energy (BE). The DFT-SAPT result shows that for the metal ion complexes with H2 O electrostatic component is the major contributor to the BE whereas, for C6 H6 complexes polarization component is dominant, except in the case of alkali metal ion complexes. However, in case of NH3 complexes, electrostatic component is dominant for s-block metal ions, whereas, for the d and p-block metal ion complexes both electrostatic and polarization components are important. The geometry (M(+) -N and M(+) -O distance for NH3 and H2 O complexes respectively, and cation-π distance for C6 H6 complexes) for the alkali and alkaline earth metal ion complexes increases down the group. Natural population analysis performed on NH3 , H2 O, and C6 H6 complexes shows that the charge transfer to metal ions is higher in case of C6 H6 complexes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26833683

  1. Alkaline earth metal doped tin oxide as a novel oxygen storage material

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Qiang; Yin, Shu; Yoshida, Mizuki; Wu, Xiaoyong; Liu, Bin; Miura, Akira; Takei, Takahiro; Kumada, Nobuhiro; Sato, Tsugio

    2015-09-15

    Alkaline earth metal doped tin oxide (SnO{sub 2}) hollow nanospheres with a diameter of 50 nm have been synthesized successfully via a facial solvothermal route in a very simple system composed of only ethanol, acetic acid, SnCl{sub 4}·5H{sub 2}O and A(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·xH{sub 2}O (A = Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba). The synthesized undoped SnO{sub 2} and A-doped SnO{sub 2} hollow nanospheres were characterized by the oxygen storage capacity (OSC), X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and the Brunauer–Emmet–Teller (BET) technique. The OSC values of all samples were measured using thermogravimetric-differential thermal analysis. The incorporation of alkaline earth metal ion into tin oxide greatly enhanced the thermal stability and OSC. Especially, Ba-doped SnO{sub 2} hollow nanospheres calcined at 1000 °C for 20 h with a BET surface area of 61 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} exhibited the considerably high OSC of 457 μmol-O g{sup −1} and good thermal stability. Alkaline earth metal doped tin oxide has the potential to be a novel oxygen storage material.

  2. Origins of energetic ions in the Earth's magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuselter, S. A.; Shelley, E. G.; Klumpar, D. M.

    1992-01-01

    The analysis and interpretation of the combined scientific data from the Hot Plasma Composition Experiment (HPCE) and the Charge Energy Mass (CHEM) spectrometer on the Active Mesospheric Particle Tracer Experiment (AMPTE) Charge Composition Explorer (CCE) spacecraft are discussed. These combined data sets have and will be used to survey the energetic ion environment in the Earth's magnetosheath to determine the origins and relative strengths of the energetic ion populations found there. A computer code was developed to analyze and interpret the data sets. The focus of the first year was on the determination of the contribution of leaked magnetospheric protons to the total energetic proton population. Emphasis was placed on intervals when the AMPTE spacecraft was in the plasma depletion layer because it was argued that in this region, only the leaked population contributes to the energetic ion population. Manipulation of the CHEM data and comparison of the CHEM and HPCE data over their common energy range near the magnetopause also contributed directly to a second study of that region.

  3. Alkaline and alkaline earth metal phosphate halides and phosphors

    DOEpatents

    Lyons, Robert Joseph; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Cleaver, Robert John

    2012-11-13

    Compounds, phosphor materials and apparatus related to nacaphite family of materials are presented. Potassium and rubidium based nacaphite family compounds and phosphors designed by doping divalent rare earth elements in the sites of alkaline earth metals in the nacaphite material families are descried. An apparatus comprising the phosphors based on the nacaphite family materials are presented herein. The compounds presented is of formula A.sub.2B.sub.1-yR.sub.yPO.sub.4X where the elements A, B, R, X and suffix y are defined such that A is potassium, rubidium, or a combination of potassium and rubidium and B is calcium, strontium, barium, or a combination of any of calcium, strontium and barium. X is fluorine, chlorine, or a combination of fluorine and chlorine, R is europium, samarium, ytterbium, or a combination of any of europium, samarium, and ytterbium, and y ranges from 0 to about 0.1.

  4. Behavior of metal ions in bioelectrochemical systems: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhihao; Chang, Dingming; Ma, Jingxing; Huang, Guangtuan; Cai, Lankun; Zhang, Lehua

    2015-02-01

    Bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) have been focused on by many researchers to treat wastewater and recover energy or valuable chemicals from wastes. In BESs, metal ions play an important role in the conductivity of solution, reactors' internal resistance, power generation, chemical production and activity of microorganisms. Additionally, the metal ions are also involved in anodic or cathodic reaction processes directly or indirectly in BESs. This paper reviews the behavior of metal ions in BESs, including (1) increase of the conductivity of electrolyte and decrease of internal resistance, (2) transfer for desalination, (3) enhancement or inhibition of the biocatalysis in anode, (4) improvement of cathodic performance by metal ions through electron acceptance or catalysis in cathodic process and (5) behavior of metal ions on membranes. Moreover, the perspectives of BESs removing heavy metal ions in wastewater or solid waste are discussed to realize recovery, reduction and detoxification simultaneously.

  5. Metal ion cooperativity in ribozyme cleavage of RNA

    PubMed Central

    Brännvall, Mathias; Kirsebom, Leif A.

    2001-01-01

    Combinations of chemical and genetic approaches were used to study the function of divalent metal ions in cleavage of RNA by the ribozyme RNase P RNA. We show that different divalent metal ions have differential effects on cleavage site recognition and rescue of cleavage activity by mixing divalent metal ions that do not promote cleavage by themselves. We conclude that efficient and correct cleavage is the result of cooperativity between divalent metal ions bound at different sites in the RNase P RNA-substrate complex. Complementation of a mutant RNase P RNA phenotype as a result of divalent metal ion replacement is demonstrated also. This finding together with other data indicate that one of the metal ions involved in this cooperativity is positioned near the cleavage site. The possibility that the Mg2+/Ca2+ ratio might regulate the activity of biocatalysts that depend on RNA for activity is discussed. PMID:11606743

  6. Extraction characteristics of a high current metal ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inouchi, Yutaka; Yamashita, Takatoshi; Fujiwara, Shuichi; Matsuda, Yasuhiro; Inami, Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Kouzi; Matsuda, Koji

    1992-04-01

    A metal ion source has been developed for extracting high current ion beams of high melting point metals. In the discharge chamber, metal vapor was confined in high-temperature shields, and the pure metal plasma was produced by the arc discharge. In order to prevent the vapor deposits, the extraction electrodes were also required to be high temperature. Thus, multislit electrodes were improved to maintain fine beam optics even if they were heated. To investigate the metal ion extraction characteristics, Al ion beams were extracted and compared with Ar ion beams. Furthermore, high current Al, Cr, Si, and Ti ion beams were extracted, and the extracted current ≳100 mA was obtained for each metal.

  7. Fluorescence enhancement aided by metal ion displacement.

    PubMed

    Susini, Vanessa; Ienco, Andrea; Lucia Rossi, Veronica; Paolicchi, Aldo; Sanesi, Antonio

    2016-06-15

    Immunosensors are one of the most common platform used in clinical laboratories, in particular the class based on Enzyme Linked Fluorescent Assays (ELFA) takes advantage of the amplification step of the enzyme, usually the alkaline phosphatase, that catalyzes the hydrolysis of a fluorescent substrate leading it to fluoresce. Anyway, they suffer in sensitivity if compared to molecular diagnostic or more modern in vitro diagnostic devices. In our work, a simple and effective mechanism to enhance the fluorescent signal, and hence the sensitivity of the system, is presented. It is based on the metal ion displacement principle in which a second fluorophore, in our case Calcein Blue, quenched by a cobalt ion is add to the first one (4-MUP), and, in presence of inorganic phosphate, it will be progressively activated by the inorganic phosphate itself leading to the metal displacement. In this way Calcein Blue, newly free to fluoresce, contributes to global fluorescent signal generated by 4-MU. We have tested our proof of principle on a currently used immunoanalyzer, that is VIDAS® system (bioMérieux, Marcy l'Etoile, France) obtaining a fluorescence enhancement of about 50% for each concentration of hydrolyzed 4-MUP tested. PMID:26851581

  8. Predicting relative toxicity of metal ions to bacteria (Microtox{reg_sign}) using ion characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    McCloskey, J.T.; Newman, M.C.; Clark, S.B.

    1995-12-31

    The use of predictive effects models with metals has received little attention in toxicology. The purpose of this study was to predict the relative toxicity of individual metal ions and metal mixtures using ion characteristics. The concentration of metal resulting in a 50% reduction in light output (EC50) in marine bacteria (Vibrio fischeri) was determined for several metals using the Microtox{reg_sign} Toxicity Analyzer. Trends in metal toxicity were predicted by combining metal speciation calculations with empirical models based on metal ion characteristics. These trends were consistent for nine divalent metals (Ca{prime} Cd, Cu, Hg, Mg, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn) whether the media mimicked salt water (NaC, medium) or freshwater (NaNO{sub 3} medium). When expanding the study to include an additional 14 mono-, di-, and trivalent metal ions, ion characteristics were still useful for predicting the relative toxicity of metal ions to bacteria. The prediction of nonadditive toxic effects using metal mixtures was also possible based on ion characteristics. Overall, models based on ion characteristics show much promise for predicting the relative toxicity of metal ions using the Microtox{reg_sign} assay.

  9. The Transport of Solar Ions Through the Earth's Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennartsson, O. W.

    1999-01-01

    This report covers the initial phase of an investigation that was originally selected by NASA Headquarters for funding by a grant but was later transferred to NASA GSFC for continued funding under a new and separate contract. The principal objective of the investigation, led by Dr. O.W. Lennartsson, is to extract information about the solar origin plasma in Earth's magnetosphere, specifically about the entry and transport of this plasma, using energetic (10 eV/e to 18 keV/e) ion composition data from the Lockheed Plasma Composition Experiment on the NASA/ESA International Sun-Earth Explorer One (ISEE 1) satellite. These data were acquired many years ago, from November 1977 through March of 1982, but, because of subsequent failures of similar experiments on several other spacecraft, they are still the only substantial ion composition data available from Earth's magnetotail, beyond 10 RE, in the critically important sub-kev to keV energy range. All of the Lockheed data now exist in a compacted scientific format, suitable for large-scale statistical investigations, which has been archived both at Lockheed Martin in Palo Alto and at the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) in Greenbelt. The completion of the archiving, by processing the remaining half of the data, was made possible by separate funding through a temporary NASA program for data restoration and was given priority over the data analysis by a no-cost extension of the subject grant. By chance, the period of performance coincided with an international study of source and loss processes of magnetospheric plasma, sponsored by the International Space Science Institute (ISSI) in Bern, Switzerland, for which Dr. Lennartsson was invited to serve as one of 12 co-chairs. This study meshed well with the continued analysis of the NASA/Lockheed ISEE ion composition data and provided a natural forum for a broader discussion of the results from this unique experiment. What follows is arranged, for the most part, in the context of the ISSI project.

  10. The Transport of Solar Ions Through the Earth's Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lennartsson, O. W.

    1999-01-01

    This report covers the initial phase of an investigation that was originally selected by NASA Headquarters for funding by a grant but was later transferred to NASA GSFC for continued funding under a new and separate contract. The principal objective of the investigation, led by Dr. O.W. Lennartsson, is to extract information about the solar origin plasma in Earth's magnetosphere, specifically about the entry and transport of this plasma, using energetic (10 eV/e to 18 keV/e) ion composition data from the Lockheed Plasma Composition Experiment on the NASA/ESA International Sun-Earth Explorer One (ISEE 1) satellite. These data were acquired many years ago, from November 1977 through March of 1982, but, because of subsequent failures of similar experiments on several other spacecraft, they are still the only substantial ion composition data available from Earth's magnetotail, beyond 10 R(sub E), in the critically important sub-kev to keV energy range. All of the Lockheed data now exist in a compacted scientific format, suitable for large-scale statistical investigations, which has been archived both at Lockheed Martin in Palo Alto and at the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) in Greenbelt. The completion of the archiving, by processing the remaining half of the data, was made possible by separate funding through a temporary NASA program for data restoration and was given priority over the data analysis by a no-cost extension of the subject grant. By chance, the period of performance coincided with an international study of source and loss processes of magnetospheric plasma, sponsored by the International Space Science Institute (ISSI) in Bern, Switzerland, for which Dr. Lennartsson was invited to serve as one of 12 co-chairs. This study meshed well with the continued analysis of the NASA/Lockheed ISEE ion composition data and provided a natural forum for a broader discussion of the results from this unique experiment. What follows is arranged, for the most part, in the context of the ISSI project.

  11. Separation of traces of metal ions from sodium matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korkisch, J.; Orlandini, K. A.

    1969-01-01

    Method for isolating metal ion traces from sodium matrices consists of two extractions and an ion exchange step. Extraction is accomplished by using 2-thenoyltrifluoracetone and dithizone followed by cation exchange.

  12. Biosorption of metal ions from aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jiaping; Yiacoumi, Sotira

    1997-01-01

    Copper biosorption from aqueous solutions by calcium alginate is reported in this paper. The experimental section includes potentiometric titrations of biosorbents, batch equilibrium and kinetic studies of copper biosorption, as well as fixed-bed biosorption experiments. The potentiometric titration results show that the surface charge increases with decreasing pH. The biosorption of copper strongly depends on solution pH; the metal ion binding increases from 0 to 90 percent in pH ranging from 1.5 to 5.0. In addition, a decrease in ionic strength results in an increase of copper ion removal. Kinetic studies indicate that mass transfer plays an important role in the biosorption rate. Furthermore, a fixed-bed biosorption experiment shows that calcium alginate has a significant capacity for copper ion removal. The two-pK Basic Stem model successfully represents the surface charge and equilibrium biosorption experimental data. The calculation results demonstrate that the copper removal may result from the binding of free copper and its hydroxide with surface functional groups of the biosorbents.

  13. Numerical simulations of the optical gain of crystalline fiber doped by rare earth and transition ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daoui, A. K.; Boubir, B.; Adouane, A.; Demagh, N.; Ghoumazi, M.

    2015-02-01

    A fiber laser is a laser whose gain medium is a doped fiber, although lasers whose cavity is made wholly of fibers have also been called fiber lasers. The gain media in a fiber laser is usually fiber doped with rare-earth ions, such as erbium (Er), neodymium (Nd), ytterbium (Yb), thulium (Tm), or praseodymium (Pr), which is doped into the core of the optical fiber, similar to those used to transmit telecommunications signals. Fiber lasers find many applications in materials processing, including cutting, welding, drilling, and marking metal. To maximize their market penetration, it is necessary to increase their output power. In this work, we present a detailed study based on the numerical simulation using MATLAB, of one of the principal characteristics of a fiber laser doped with rare earth ions and transition ion. The gain depends on several parameters such as the length of the doped fiber, the density, the pump power, noise, etc.). The used program resolves the state equations in this context together with those governing the light propagation phenomena. The developed code can also be used to study the dynamic operating modes of a doped fiber laser.

  14. Phisicochemistry of alkaline-earth metals oxides surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekimova, Irina; Minakova, Tamara; Ogneva, Tatyana

    2016-01-01

    The surface state of alkaline-earth metals and magnesium oxides obtained by means of commercial and laboratory ways has been studied in this paper. A complex of methods has been used for identification, determination of a phase composition and morphology of the samples. The high basic character of surface centres has been shown with the help of pH-metry and adsorption of indicators methods. Acid-basic parameters (pHt, pHiis, etc.) can be used for the estimation of a general acid-basic state of metal oxides samples surface and for the supposition about different nature and strength of acid-basic centres as well as for the initial control in the process of acid basic properties of solid oxides surface properties evaluation.

  15. Magnetic Collapse in Transition Metal Oxides at High Pressure: Implications for the Earth

    PubMed

    Cohen; Mazin; Isaak

    1997-01-31

    Magnetic collapse in transition metal ions is predicted from first-principles computations at pressures reached in the Earth's lower mantle and core. Magnetic collapse would lead to marked changes in geophysically important properties, such as elasticity and conductivity, and also to different geochemical behavior, such as element partitioning, than estimated by extrapolating low-pressure data, and thus change the understanding of Earth's structure and evolution. Magnetic collapse results from band widening rather than from changes in crystal field splitting under pressure. Seismic anomalies in the outer core and the lowermost mantle may be due to magnetic collapse of ferrous iron, dissolved in iron liquid in the outer core, and in solution in magnesiowustite in the lowermost mantle. PMID:9005849

  16. Plasma immersion ion implantation for reducing metal ion release

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, C.; Garcia, J. A.; Maendl, S.; Pereiro, R.; Fernandez, B.; Rodriguez, R. J.

    2012-11-06

    Plasma immersion ion implantation of Nitrogen and Oxygen on CoCrMo alloys was carried out to improve the tribological and corrosion behaviors of these biomedical alloys. In order to optimize the implantation results we were carried experiments at different temperatures. Tribocorrosion tests in bovine serum were used to measure Co, Cr and Mo releasing by using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry analysis after tests. Also, X-ray Diffraction analysis were employed in order to explain any obtained difference in wear rate and corrosion tests. Wear tests reveals important decreases in rate of more than one order of magnitude for the best treatment. Moreover decreases in metal release were found for all the implanted samples, preserving the same corrosion resistance of the unimplanted samples. Finally this paper gathers an analysis, in terms of implantation parameters and achieved properties for industrial implementation of these treatments.

  17. Plasma immersion ion implantation for reducing metal ion release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, C.; García, J. A.; Mändl, S.; Pereiro, R.; Fernández, B.; Rodríguez, R. J.

    2012-11-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation of Nitrogen and Oxygen on CoCrMo alloys was carried out to improve the tribological and corrosion behaviors of these biomedical alloys. In order to optimize the implantation results we were carried experiments at different temperatures. Tribocorrosion tests in bovine serum were used to measure Co, Cr and Mo releasing by using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry analysis after tests. Also, X-ray Diffraction analysis were employed in order to explain any obtained difference in wear rate and corrosion tests. Wear tests reveals important decreases in rate of more than one order of magnitude for the best treatment. Moreover decreases in metal release were found for all the implanted samples, preserving the same corrosion resistance of the unimplanted samples. Finally this paper gathers an analysis, in terms of implantation parameters and achieved properties for industrial implementation of these treatments.

  18. Proposal for laser cooling of rare-earth ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepers, Maxence; Hong, Ye; Wyart, Jean-François; Dulieu, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The efficiency of laser cooling relies on the existence of an almost closed optical-transition cycle in the energy spectrum of the considered species. In this respect, rare-earth elements exhibit many transitions which are likely to induce noticeable leaks from the cooling cycle. In this work, to determine whether laser cooling of singly ionized erbium Er+ is feasible, we have performed accurate electronic-structure calculations of energies and spontaneous-emission Einstein coefficients of Er+, using a combination of ab initio and least-squares-fitting techniques. We identify five weak closed transitions suitable for laser cooling, the broadest of which is in the kilohertz range. For the strongest transitions, by simulating the cascade dynamics of spontaneous emission, we show that repumping is necessary, and we discuss possible repumping schemes. We expect our detailed study on Er+ to give good insight into the laser cooling of neighboring ions such as Dy+.

  19. Ion implantation of krypton in sputter-deposited metal matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Tingey, G.L.; McClanahan, E.D.; Nesbitt, J.F.

    1980-06-01

    Krypton 85 has been successfully stored in a metal matrix by bombarding the metal surface with krypton ions while the metal is being deposited by sputtering. The krypton is thus incorporated into the metal in concentrations approaching 200 cm/sup 3/ of Kr(STP)cm/sup 3/ of deposit. Cost estimates of a facility to perform this work are given. (GHT)

  20. Separation of rare earths from transition metals by liquid-liquid extraction from a molten salt hydrate to an ionic liquid phase.

    PubMed

    Rout, Alok; Binnemans, Koen

    2014-02-28

    The solvent extraction of trivalent rare-earth ions and their separation from divalent transition metal ions using molten salt hydrates as the feed phase and an undiluted fluorine-free ionic liquid as the extracting phase were investigated in detail. The extractant was tricaprylmethylammonium nitrate, [A336][NO3], and the hydrated melt was calcium nitrate tetrahydrate, Ca(NO3)2·4H2O. The extraction behavior of rare-earth ions was studied for solutions of individual elements, as well as for mixtures of rare earths in the hydrated melt. The influence of different extraction parameters was investigated: the initial metal loading in the feed phase, percentage of water in the feed solution, equilibration time, and the type of hydrated melt. The extraction of rare earths from Ca(NO3)2·4H2O was compared with extraction from CaCl2·4H2O by [A336][Cl] (Aliquat 336). The nitrate system was found to be the better one. The extraction and separation of rare earths from the transition metals nickel, cobalt and zinc were also investigated. Remarkably high separation factors of rare-earth ions over transition metal ions were observed for extraction from Ca(NO3)2·4H2O by the [A336][NO3] extracting phase. Furthermore, rare-earth ions could be separated efficiently from transition metal ions, even in melts with very high concentrations of transition metal ions. Rare-earth oxides could be directly dissolved in the Ca(NO3)2·4H2O phase in the presence of small amounts of Al(NO3)3·9H2O or concentrated nitric acid. The efficiency of extraction after dissolving the rare-earth oxides in the hydrated nitrate melt was identical to extraction from solutions with rare-earth nitrates dissolved in the molten phase. The stripping of the rare-earth ions from the loaded ionic liquid phase and the reuse of the recycled ionic liquid were also investigated in detail. PMID:24352299

  1. Preparation of decarboxylic-functionalized weak cation exchanger and application for simultaneous separation of alkali, alkaline earth and transition metals.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yahui; Gan, Yihui; He, Chengxia; Yang, Bingcheng; Guo, Zhimou; Liang, Xinmiao

    2016-06-01

    A novel weak cation exchanger (WCX) with dicarboxyl groups functionalized has been developed by clicking mercaptosuccinic acid onto silica gel. The simple synthesis starts with modification of silica gel with triethoxyvinylsilane, followed by efficient coupling vinyl-bonded silica with mercaptosuccinic acid via a "thiol-ene" click reaction. The obtained WCX demonstrated good separation and high selectivity towards common metals. Simultaneous separation of 10 alkali, alkaline earth and transition metals was achieved within 12min. Ion exchange and complex mechanism dominates the separation process. Its utility was demonstrated for determination of metals in tap water. PMID:27130093

  2. Conformational thermodynamics of metal-ion binding to a protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Amit; Chakrabarti, J.; Ghosh, Mahua

    2013-08-01

    Conformational changes in proteins induced by metal-ions play extremely important role in various cellular processes and technological applications. Dihedral angles are suitable conformational variables to describe microscopic conformations of a biomacromolecule. Here, we use the histograms of the dihedral angles to study the thermodynamics of conformational changes of a protein upon metal-ion binding. Our method applied to Ca2+ ion binding to an important metalloprotein, Calmodulin, reveals different thermodynamic changes in different metal-binding sites. The ligands coordinating to Ca2+ ions also play different roles in stabilizing the metal-ion coordinated protein-structure. Metal-ion binding induce remarkable thermodynamic changes in distant part of the protein via modification of secondary structural elements.

  3. A biosystem for removal of metal ions from water

    SciTech Connect

    Kilbane, J.J. II.

    1990-01-01

    The presence of heavy metal ions in ground and surface waters constitutes a potential health risk and is an environmental concern. Moreover, processes for the recovery of valuable metal ions are of interest. Bioaccumulation or biosorption is not only a factor in assessing the environmental risk posed by metal ions; it can also be used as a means of decontamination. A biological system for the removal and recovery of metal ions from contaminated water is reported here. Exopolysaccharide-producing microorganisms, including a methanotrophic culture, are demonstrated to have superior metal binding ability, compared with other microbial cultures. This paper describes a biosorption process in which dried biomass obtained from exopolysaccharide-producing microorganisms is encapsulated in porous plastic beads and is used for metal ion binding and recovery. 22 refs., 13 figs.

  4. Fluorescence imaging of metal ions implicated in diseases.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xuhong; Xu, Zhaochao

    2015-07-21

    Metal ions play an important role in various biological processes, their abnormal homeostasis in cells is related to many diseases, such as neurodegenerative disease, cancer and diabetes. Fluorescent imaging offers a unique route to detect metal ions in cells via a contactless and damage-free way with high spatial and temporal fidelity. Consequently, it represents a promising method to advance the understanding of physiological and pathological functions of metal ions in cell biology. In this highlight article, we will discuss recent advances in fluorescent imaging of metal ions by small-molecule sensors for understanding the role of metals in related diseases. We will also discuss challenges and opportunities for the design of small-molecule sensors for fluorescent detection of cellular metal ions as a potential method for disease diagnosis. PMID:25556818

  5. Molten metal containment vessel with rare earth oxysulfide protective coating thereon and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Krikorian, Oscar H.; Curtis, Paul G.

    1992-01-01

    An improved molten metal containment vessel is disclosed in which wetting of the vessel's inner wall surfaces by molten metal is inhibited by coating at least the inner surfaces of the containment vessel with one or more rare earth oxysulfide or rare earth sulfide compounds to inhibit wetting and or adherence by the molten metal to the surfaces of the containment vessel.

  6. Metal Ion Capture Mechanism of a Copper Metallochaperone.

    PubMed

    Chakravorty, Dhruva K; Li, Pengfei; Tran, Trang T; Bayse, Craig A; Merz, Kenneth M

    2016-01-26

    A novel cation-π interaction between the bound Cu(+) metal ion and Trp44 in the periplasmic Cu(+)/Ag(+) metallochaperone Escherichia coli CusF protects Cu(+) from the oxidative influence of the periplasm. In a popular model of metal ion transfer, a conformational change in the metal binding loop disrupts the cation-π interaction and moves Trp44 aside to provide access to the occluded metal ion binding site in an "open" conformation. In this study, our molecular dynamics simulations support this putative mechanism of metal ion transfer. We find that the apoprotein undergoes a transition back and forth from the crystallographically observed "closed" state to the hypothesized open conformation over multiple microseconds. In agreement with nuclear magnetic resonance data, our simulations show that similar transitions are prohibited in Cu(+)·CusF, suggesting that the conformational transitions are gated by a metal ion-mediated second-shell hydrogen bond between metal binding residue His36 and Asp37 of the metal binding loop region. Ab initio quantum mechanical calculations indicate that metal ion binding strengthens this interaction significantly, much like what is found in the case of other metalloproteins. The study builds toward a common evolutionary role of metal ion-mediated second-shell hydrogen bonds in metalloprotein structure and function. PMID:26690586

  7. Retrieval of heavy metal ions from solution via ferritisation.

    PubMed

    Mandaokar, S S; Dharmadhikari, D M; Dara, S S

    1994-01-01

    The paper summarises the results of the studies on retrieval of heavy metal ions in solution by ferritisation and its potential application in waste-water treatment. The optimum procedure for ferritisation of heavy metal ions in solution has been evolved with respect to pH, concentration of Fe2+, rate and time of aeration and temperature. The recommended procedure consists of controlled aeration of the solution containing heavy metal ions and ferrous ions at pH 9.5-10.5 at about 50 degrees C, until the black, granular, magnetic ferrite separates out. The metal ferrites can also be formed, even without heating or forced aeration, by ageing the mixed metal hydroxide precipitate at pH 10 to 11. The metal ferrites formed have been characterised by X-ray diffractometry. The laboratory-scope experiments conducted with synthetic heavy metal solutions as well as actual wastewater from a tanning industry showed that heavy metal ions can be effectively removed from solution to sub-ppm levels. The metal ferrites thus recovered may find commercial application as microwave absorbers, catalysts, metal scavengers, etc. This technique seems to have potential application in simultaneous, one step removal of different heavy metal ions from industrial wastewaters. PMID:15091732

  8. Preparation and structure of carbonated calcium hydroxyapatite substituted with heavy rare earth ions

    SciTech Connect

    Yasukawa, Akemi; Kandori, Kazuhiko; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Gotoh, Keiko

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LnCaHap solid solution particles were prepared using five types of heavy rare earth ions by a precipitation method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The length and the crystallinity of the LnCaHap particles first increased and then decreased with increasing Ln{sup 3+} contents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A series of YCaHap solid solution particles formed with Y/(Y + Ca) = 0-0.10 were investigated using various methods in detail. -- Abstract: Calcium hydroxyapatite (CaHap) particles substituted five types of heavy rare earth ions (Ln: Y{sup 3+}, Gd{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+}) were synthesized using a precipitation method and characterized using various means. These Ln ions strongly affected the crystal phases and the structures of the products. With increasing Ln/(Ln + Ca) in the starting solution ([X{sub Ln}]), the length and the crystallinity of the particles first increased and then decreased. The rare earth metal-calcium hydroxyapatite (LnCaHap) solid solution particles were obtained at [X{sub Y}] {<=} 0.10 for substituting Y system and at [X{sub Ln}] {<=} 0.01-0.03 for substituting the other Ln systems. LnPO{sub 4} was mixed with LnCaHap at higher [X{sub Ln}] for all Ln systems. A series of yttrium-calcium hydroxyapatite (YCaHap) solid solutions with [X{sub Y}] = 0-0.10 were investigated using XRD, TEM, ICP-AES, IR and TG-DTA in detail.

  9. Polyphosphazene membranes for metal ion separations

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M.L.

    1996-05-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), under sponsorship by the Bureau of Mines, evaluated the use of polyphosphazene-based polymer membranes for chemical separations. Synthetic membranes based on phosphazene inorganic polymers offer the promise of new industrial chemical separation technologies that are more energy efficient and economical than traditional phase change separation processes and extraction techniques. The research focused on the separation of metal ions from aqueous solutions. The polyphosphazene membranes were also tested for gaseous separations, results of which are presented in a separate Report of Investigation. Historically, membranes used for chemical separation have been prepared from organic polymers. In general, these membranes are stable only at temperatures less than 100{degrees}C, within narrow pH ranges, and in a very limited number of organic media. As a result, many organic- based membranes are unsuitable for industrial applications, which often involve harsh environments. In recent years, membrane research has focused on ceramic and metal membranes for use in the adverse environments of separation applications. These membranes are suitable for gas and liquid sieve separation applications, where molecules may be separated based on their molecular size. These membranes are not effective where additional selectivity is needed. A membrane that separates on the basis of solubility and that can perform separations in adverse environments is needed, and this need motivated the investigation of polyphosphazene membranes.

  10. Electron Capture Dissociation of Trivalent Metal Ion-Peptide Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flick, Tawnya G.; Donald, William A.; Williams, Evan R.

    2013-02-01

    With electrospray ionization from aqueous solutions, trivalent metal ions readily adduct to small peptides resulting in formation of predominantly (peptide + MT - H)2+, where MT = La, Tm, Lu, Sm, Ho, Yb, Pm, Tb, or Eu, for peptides with molecular weights below ~1000 Da, and predominantly (peptide + MT)3+ for larger peptides. ECD of (peptide + MT - H)2+ results in extensive fragmentation from which nearly complete sequence information can be obtained, even for peptides for which only singly protonated ions are formed in the absence of the metal ions. ECD of these doubly charged complexes containing MT results in significantly higher electron capture efficiency and sequence coverage than peptide-divalent metal ion complexes that have the same net charge. Formation of salt-bridge structures in which the metal ion coordinates to a carboxylate group are favored even for (peptide + MT)3+. ECD of these latter complexes for large peptides results in electron capture by the protonation site located remotely from the metal ion and predominantly c/ z fragments for all metals, except Eu3+, which undergoes a one electron reduction and only loss of small neutral molecules and b/ y fragments are formed. These results indicate that solvation of the metal ion in these complexes is extensive, which results in the electrochemical properties of these metal ions being similar in both the peptide environment and in bulk water.

  11. The possible role of metal ions and clays in prebiotic chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, J. G.; Edelson, E. H.

    1980-01-01

    Eight homoionic bentonites were prepared using alkali, alkaline earth, and transition metal ions as counterions. The interaction of the clays with 5'-AMP was studied and it was found that the alkali metal-substituted clays did not remove any nucleotide from dilute solution, and that zinc-bentonite adsorbed the most (98%). In addition, study of the interaction of seven other nucleotides with zinc-bentonite showed that the purine nucleotides were more strongly absorbed than the pyrimidine nucleotides. Langmuir isotherms were obtained for these systems and the adsorption data were explained by the adsorption coefficient and the accessibility of metal for binding.

  12. Molecular rare-earth-metal hydrides in non-cyclopentadienyl environments.

    PubMed

    Fegler, Waldemar; Venugopal, Ajay; Kramer, Mathias; Okuda, Jun

    2015-02-01

    Molecular hydrides of the rare-earth metals play an important role as homogeneous catalysts and as counterparts of solid-state interstitial hydrides. Structurally well-characterized non-metallocene-type hydride complexes allow the study of elementary reactions that occur at rare-earth-metal centers and of catalytic reactions involving bonds between rare-earth metals and hydrides. In addition to neutral hydrides, cationic derivatives have now become available. PMID:25413985

  13. Effect of rare earth metal oxide additions to tungsten electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadek, Alber A.; Ushio, Masao; Matsuda, Fukuhisa

    1990-12-01

    A comparative study has been made on the operating characteristics of gas-tungsten arc (GTA) welding for several types of electrodes. The work was carried out with a pure tungsten electrode and tungsten electrodes activated with a small quantity of the rare earth metal oxides, La2O3, Y2O3, CeO2, and with ZrO2, ThO2, and MgO. Their behaviors during arcing were analyzed and compared from the points of view of arc starting characteristics, electrode consumption, change in shape due to long-term operation, and incompleteness of insert gas shielding and electrode temperature. The results indicated that W-La2O3 electrodes have superior characteristics among those tested. Metallographic studies of the electrodes indicate that the superiority of operating characteristics strongly depends on the behavior of the rare earth metal oxides during arc burning. It is observed that the rare earth metal oxides form tungstate or oxytungstate during arc burning. These newly formed compounds have low melting points and migrate from the low temperature zones to the high temperature zones throughout the electrode tip, while ThO2 reacts with tungsten, forming pure Th. Also, the investigation demonstrates good stability of La2O3 during arc burning compared with the other oxides. Particular attention was also paid to the electrode temperature measurement and the important phenomena concerning the emissivity of a particular surface as one of the thermal properties. The investigation reveals the effects of temperature and oxide distribution on the spectral emissivity of the electrode in addition to the main different effect of oxides added to tungsten. Observations of the cathode tip microstructure during and after arc burning were made, and important phenomena concerning the formation of a tungsten “rim” at the periphery of the cathode area, which governs the durability of the electrode and the stability of the arc, are discussed theoretically and experimentally based on the temperature measurement of the tip and the oxidation of tungsten.

  14. Metal Ion Sensors Based on DNAzymes and Related DNA Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Rong-Mei

    2011-01-01

    Metal ion sensors are an important yet challenging field in analytical chemistry. Despite much effort, only a limited number of metal ion sensors are available for practical use because sensor design is often a trial-and-error-dependent process. DNAzyme-based sensors, in contrast, can be developed through a systematic selection that is generalizable for a wide range of metal ions. Here, we summarize recent progress in the design of DNAzyme-based fluorescent, colorimetric, and electrochemical sensors for metal ions, such as Pb2+, Cu2+, Hg2+, and UO22+ In addition, we also describe metal ion sensors based on related DNA molecules, including T-T or C-C mismatches and G-quadruplexes. PMID:21370984

  15. Multiply stripped ion generation in the metal vapor vacuum arc

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.G.; Feinberg, B.; Galvin, J.E.

    1986-08-01

    We consider the charge state distribution of ions produced in the metal vapor vacuum arc plasma discharge. A high current metal ion source, the MEVVA ion source, in which the ion beam is extracted from a metal vapor vacuum arc plasma, has been used to obtain the spectra of multiple charged ions produced within the cathode spots. A computer calculation of the charge state distribution that evolves within the spots via stepwide ionization of ions by electron impact provides a theoretical basis for comparison of the data. In this paper we report on the measured charge state distributions for a wide variety of metallic species and compare these results with the predictions of this theory. 55 refs.

  16. Colorimetric method for determining Pb2+ ions in water enhanced with non-precious-metal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jeffrey; Indra, Erik M

    2012-07-17

    Sulfur anions and their derivatives have long been recognized for their high selectivity and reactivity toward Pb(2+) ions and formation of highly absorptive yet water-insoluble compounds with both acid and base media. This phenomenon has been used for qualitative analysis of lead ions in water. We demonstrate a new method to quantitatively determine the Pb(2+) concentration in the range of 0.5-500 ppm in water using colorimetric measurement, based on forming "soluble" lead sulfide in water enhanced with non-precious-metal nanoparticles. This method has inherent high selectivity for lead over other alkali-metal and alkaline-earth-metal ions. The colorimetric measurements of the absorptive solutions provide accurate determination of the lead concentration in water comparable to that measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. To our knowledge, this is the simplest, lowest cost, and easiest-to-use method for detecting and determining the lead concentration in water. PMID:22686469

  17. Alkali metal ion battery with bimetallic electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Boysen, Dane A; Bradwell, David J; Jiang, Kai; Kim, Hojong; Ortiz, Luis A; Sadoway, Donald R; Tomaszowska, Alina A; Wei, Weifeng; Wang, Kangli

    2015-04-07

    Electrochemical cells having molten electrodes having an alkali metal provide receipt and delivery of power by transporting atoms of the alkali metal between electrode environments of disparate chemical potentials through an electrochemical pathway comprising a salt of the alkali metal. The chemical potential of the alkali metal is decreased when combined with one or more non-alkali metals, thus producing a voltage between an electrode comprising the molten the alkali metal and the electrode comprising the combined alkali/non-alkali metals.

  18. Metal sulfide and rare-earth phosphate nanostructures and methods of making same

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Stanislaus; Zhang, Fen

    2014-05-13

    The present invention provides a method of producing a crystalline metal sulfide nanostructure. The metal is a transitional metal or a Group IV metal. In the method, a porous membrane is placed between a metal precursor solution and a sulfur precursor solution. The metal cations of the metal precursor solution and sulfur ions of the sulfur precursor solution react, thereby producing a crystalline metal sulfide nanostructure.

  19. A self-sputtering ion source: A new approach to quiescent metal ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Oks, Efim M.; Anders, Andre

    2009-09-03

    A new metal ion source is presented based on sustained self-sputtering plasma in a magnetron discharge. Metals exhibiting high self-sputtering yield like Cu, Ag, Zn, and Bi can be used in a high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) discharge such that the plasma almost exclusively contains singly charged metal ions of the target material. The plasma and extracted ion beam are quiescent. The ion beams consist mostly of singly charged ions with a space-charge limited current density which reached about 10 mA/cm2 at an extraction voltage of 45 kV and a first gap spacing of 12 mm.

  20. Metal ion adsorption at the ionic liquid-mica interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Samila; Elbourne, Aaron; Warr, Gregory G.; Atkin, Rob

    2015-12-01

    Mica has been employed in many studies of ionic liquid (IL) interfaces on account of its atomic smoothness and well defined surface properties. However, until now it has been unclear whether ions dissolved in ILs can compete with the IL cation and adsorb to mica charge sites. In this work amplitude modulated atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM) has been used to probe metal ion adsorption at the interface of mica with propylammonium nitrate (PAN), a room temperature IL. Lithium, sodium, potassium, magnesium and calcium nitrate salts were added to PAN at a concentration of ~60 mM. Aluminum nitrate was also investigated, but only at 5 mM because its solubility in PAN is much lower. The AM-AFM images obtained when the metal ions were present are strikingly different to that of pure PAN, indicating that the ions compete effectively with the propylammonium cation and adsorb to negatively charged sites on the mica surface despite their much lower concentration. This is a consequence of electrostatic attractions between the mica charge sites and the metal ions being significantly stronger than for the propylammonium cation; compared to the metal ions the propylammonium charged group is relatively constrained sterically. A distinct honeycomb pattern is noted for the PAN + Al3+ system, less obviously for the divalent ions and not at all for monovalent ions. This difference is attributed to the strength of electrostatic interactions between metal ions and mica charge sites increasing with the ion charge, which means that divalent and (particularly) trivalent ions are located more precisely above the charged sites of the mica lattice. The images obtained allow important distinctions between metal ion adsorption at mica-water and mica-PAN interfaces to be made.Mica has been employed in many studies of ionic liquid (IL) interfaces on account of its atomic smoothness and well defined surface properties. However, until now it has been unclear whether ions dissolved in ILs can compete with the IL cation and adsorb to mica charge sites. In this work amplitude modulated atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM) has been used to probe metal ion adsorption at the interface of mica with propylammonium nitrate (PAN), a room temperature IL. Lithium, sodium, potassium, magnesium and calcium nitrate salts were added to PAN at a concentration of ~60 mM. Aluminum nitrate was also investigated, but only at 5 mM because its solubility in PAN is much lower. The AM-AFM images obtained when the metal ions were present are strikingly different to that of pure PAN, indicating that the ions compete effectively with the propylammonium cation and adsorb to negatively charged sites on the mica surface despite their much lower concentration. This is a consequence of electrostatic attractions between the mica charge sites and the metal ions being significantly stronger than for the propylammonium cation; compared to the metal ions the propylammonium charged group is relatively constrained sterically. A distinct honeycomb pattern is noted for the PAN + Al3+ system, less obviously for the divalent ions and not at all for monovalent ions. This difference is attributed to the strength of electrostatic interactions between metal ions and mica charge sites increasing with the ion charge, which means that divalent and (particularly) trivalent ions are located more precisely above the charged sites of the mica lattice. The images obtained allow important distinctions between metal ion adsorption at mica-water and mica-PAN interfaces to be made. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Ion diameter distribution (grain size analysis) for the PAN + metal ion solutions. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05833c

  1. Reusable chelating resins concentrate metal ions from highly dilute solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, A. J.; Weetal, H. H.; Weliky, N.

    1966-01-01

    Column chromatographic method uses new metal chelating resins for recovering heavy-metal ions from highly dilute solutions. The absorbed heavy-metal cations may be removed from the chelating resins by acid or base washes. The resins are reusable after the washes are completed.

  2. Thermodynamics and pair structures of liquid alkali and alkaline-earth metals from the perturbative hypernetted-chain equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seok Kang, Hong

    1999-09-01

    We have theoretically studied liquid alkali and alkaline-earth metals by combining the second-order pseudopotential (PP) theory of ion-electron interaction and a statistical mechanical method for calculating ionic thermal motion. The latter is done by utilizing the perturbative hypernetted-chain equation recently proposed by the author. The PP is modelled through an ab initio method presented by Shaw, i.e., through the use of the optimized nonlocal model potential (OMP). Calculations are carried out with two different methods for extracting parameters in the OMP. They are due to Animalu and Heine (AH), and Ballentine and Gupta (BG). Results show that both of thermodynamic properties and pair structures are in good agreements with experimental data for alkali metals with the AH set of parameters. For alkaline-earth metals other than Ba, calculations with the BG set give the radial distributions and structure factors in good agreement with experimental data.

  3. Structural resolution of 4-substituted proline diastereomers with ion mobility spectrometry via alkali metal ion cationization.

    PubMed

    Flick, Tawnya G; Campuzano, Iain D G; Bartberger, Michael D

    2015-03-17

    The chirality of substituents on an amino acid can significantly change its mode of binding to a metal ion, as shown here experimentally by traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (TWIMS-MS) of different proline isomeric molecules complexed with alkali metal ions. Baseline separation of the cis- and trans- forms of both hydroxyproline and fluoroproline was achieved using TWIMS-MS via metal ion cationization (Li(+), Na(+), K(+), and Cs(+)). Density functional theory calculations indicate that differentiation of these diastereomers is a result of the stabilization of differing metal-complexed forms adopted by the diastereomers when cationized by an alkali metal cation, [M + X](+) where X = Li, Na, K, and Cs, versus the topologically similar structures of the protonated molecules, [M + H](+). Metal-cationized trans-proline variants exist in a linear salt-bridge form where the metal ion interacts with a deprotonated carboxylic acid and the proton is displaced onto the nitrogen atom of the pyrrolidine ring. In contrast, metal-cationized cis-proline variants adopt a compact structure where the carbonyl of the carboxylic acid, nitrogen atom, and if available, the hydroxyl and fluorine substituent solvate the metal ion. Experimentally, it was observed that the resolution between alkali metal-cationized cis- and trans-proline variants decreases as the size of the metal ion increases. Density functional theory demonstrates that this is due to the decreasing stability of the compact charge-solvated cis-proline structure with increased metal ion radius, likely a result of steric hindrance and/or weaker binding to the larger metal ion. Furthermore, the unique structures adopted by the alkali metal-cationized cis- and trans-proline variants results in these molecules having significantly different quantum mechanically calculated dipole moments, a factor that can be further exploited to improve the diastereomeric resolution when utilizing a drift gas with a higher polarizability constant. PMID:25664640

  4. Oligomeric rare-earth metal cluster complexes with endohedral transition metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, Simon; Zimmermann, Sina; Brühmann, Matthias; Meyer, Eva; Rustige, Christian; Wolberg, Marike; Daub, Kathrin; Bell, Thomas; Meyer, Gerd

    2014-11-15

    Comproportionation reactions of rare-earth metal trihalides (RX{sub 3}) with the respective rare-earth metals (R) and transition metals (T) led to the formation of 22 oligomeric R cluster halides encapsulating T, in 19 cases for the first time. The structures of these compounds were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and are composed of trimers ((T{sub 3}R{sub 11})X{sub 15}-type, P6{sub 3}/m), tetramers ((T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 28}(R{sub 4}) (P-43m), (T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 20} (P4{sub 2}/nnm), (T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 24}(RX{sub 3}){sub 4} (I4{sub 1}/a) and (T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 23} (C2/m) types of structure) and pentamers ((Ru{sub 5}La{sub 14}){sub 2}Br{sub 39}, Cc) of (TR{sub r}){sub n} (n=2–5) clusters. These oligomers are further enveloped by inner (X{sup i}) as well as outer (X{sup a}) halido ligands, which possess diverse functionalities and interconnect like oligomers through i–i, i–a and/or a–i bridges. The general features of the crystal structures for these new compounds are discussed and compared to literature entries as well as different structure types with oligomeric T centered R clusters. Dimers and tetramers originating from the aggregation of (TR{sub 6}) octahedra via common edges are more frequent than trimers and pentamers, in which the (TR{sub r}) clusters share common faces. - Graphical abstract: Rare earth-metal cluster complexes with endohedral transition metal atoms (TR{sub 6}) may connect via common edges or faces to form dimers, trimers, tetramers and pentamers of which the tetramers are the most prolific. Packing effects and electron counts play an important role. - Highlights: • Rare-earth metal cluster complexes encapsulate transition metal atoms. • Oligomers are built via connection of octahedral clusters via common edges or faces. • Dimers through pentamers with closed structures are known. • Tetramers including a tetrahedron of endohedral atoms are the most prolific.

  5. Solvent extraction of rare-earth metals by carboxylic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Preez, A.C. du; Preston, J.S.

    1992-04-01

    The solvent extraction of the trivalent lanthanides and yttrium from nitrate media by solutions of carboxylic acids in xylene has been studied. Commercially available carboxylic acids such as Versatic 10 and naphthenic acids were used, as well as model compounds of known structure, such as 2-ethylhexanoic and 3-cyclohexylpropanoic acids. In a few cases, extraction of the metals from sulphate and chloride solutions was also investigated. The dependence of the extraction properties of the carboxylic acids on the atomic number of the lanthanide shows a definite relationship to the steric bulk of the carboxylic acid molecule quantified by means of the steric parameter, E{sub s}{prime} of the substituent alkyl group. The stoichiometries of the extracted complexes for representative light (La), middle (Gd) and heavy (Lu) rare-earth metals were investigated by the slope-analysis technique for a sterically hindered acid (Versatic 10 acid; -E{prime}{sub s} = 3.83) and an acid with low steric hindrance (3-cyclohexylpropanoic acid; -E{prime}{sub s} = 0.28). 14 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Metal ion sensing solution containing double crossover DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Byeongho; Dugasani, Sreekantha R.; Cho, Youngho; Oh, Juyeong; Kim, Chulki; Seo, Min Ah; Lee, Taikjin; Jhon, Young Miin; Woo, Deok Ha; Lee, Seok; Jun, Seong Chan; Park, Sung Ha; Kim, Jae Hun

    2015-07-01

    The current study describes metal ion sensing with double crossover DNAs (DX1 and DX2), artificially designed as a platform of doping. The sample for sensing is prepared by a facile annealing method to grow the DXs lattice on a silicon/silicon oxide. Adding and incubating metal ion solution with the sensor substrate into the micro-tube lead the optical property change. Photoluminescence (PL) is employed for detecting the concentration of metal ion in the specimen. We investigated PL emission for sensor application with the divalent copper. In the range from 400 to 650 nm, the PL features of samples provide significantly different peak positions with excitation and emission detection. Metal ions contribute to modify the optical characteristics of DX with structural and functional change, which results from the intercalation of them into hydrogen bonding positioned at the center of double helix. The PL intensity is decreased gradually after doping copper ion in the DX tile on the substrate.

  7. Adhesive bonding of ion beam textured metals and fluoropolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Sovey, J. S.

    1978-01-01

    An electron bombardment argon ion source was used to ion etch various metals and fluoropolymers. The metal and fluoropolymers were exposed to (0.5 to 1.0) keV Ar ions at ion current densities of (0.2 to 1.5) mA/sq cm for various exposure times. The resulting surface texture is in the form of needles or spires whose vertical dimensions may range from tenths to hundreds of micrometers, depending on the selection of beam energy, ion current density, and etch time. The bonding of textured surfaces is accomplished by ion beam texturing mating pieces of either metals or fluoropolymers and applying a bonding agent which wets in and around the microscopic cone-like structures. After bonding, both tensile and shear strength measurements were made on the samples. Also tested, for comparison's sake, were untextured and chemically etched fluoropolymers. The results of these measurements are presented.

  8. Fluorescent probes and bioimaging: alkali metals, alkaline earth metals and pH.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun; Hu, Ying; Yoon, Juyoung

    2015-07-21

    All living species and life forms have an absolute requirement for bio-functional metals and acid-base equilibrium chemistry owing to the critical roles they play in biological processes. Hence, a great need exists for efficient methods to detect and monitor biometals and acids. In the last few years, great attention has been paid to the development of organic molecule based fluorescent chemosensors. The availability of new synthetic fluorescent probes has made fluorescence microscopy an indispensable tool for tracing biologically important molecules and in the area of clinical diagnostics. This review highlights the recent advances that have been made in the design and bioimaging applications of fluorescent probes for alkali metals and alkaline earth metal cations, including lithium, sodium and potassium, magnesium and calcium, and for pH determination within biological systems. PMID:25317749

  9. Metal ion adsorption at the ionic liquid-mica interface.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Samila; Elbourne, Aaron; Warr, Gregory G; Atkin, Rob

    2016-01-14

    Mica has been employed in many studies of ionic liquid (IL) interfaces on account of its atomic smoothness and well defined surface properties. However, until now it has been unclear whether ions dissolved in ILs can compete with the IL cation and adsorb to mica charge sites. In this work amplitude modulated atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM) has been used to probe metal ion adsorption at the interface of mica with propylammonium nitrate (PAN), a room temperature IL. Lithium, sodium, potassium, magnesium and calcium nitrate salts were added to PAN at a concentration of ∼60 mM. Aluminum nitrate was also investigated, but only at 5 mM because its solubility in PAN is much lower. The AM-AFM images obtained when the metal ions were present are strikingly different to that of pure PAN, indicating that the ions compete effectively with the propylammonium cation and adsorb to negatively charged sites on the mica surface despite their much lower concentration. This is a consequence of electrostatic attractions between the mica charge sites and the metal ions being significantly stronger than for the propylammonium cation; compared to the metal ions the propylammonium charged group is relatively constrained sterically. A distinct honeycomb pattern is noted for the PAN + Al(3+) system, less obviously for the divalent ions and not at all for monovalent ions. This difference is attributed to the strength of electrostatic interactions between metal ions and mica charge sites increasing with the ion charge, which means that divalent and (particularly) trivalent ions are located more precisely above the charged sites of the mica lattice. The images obtained allow important distinctions between metal ion adsorption at mica-water and mica-PAN interfaces to be made. PMID:26661934

  10. An Animal Model Using Metallic Ions to Produce Autoimmune Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Sandoval, Roxana; Luévano-Rodríguez, Nayeli; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Mayra; Pérez-Pérez, María Elena; Saldívar-Elias, Sergio; Gurrola-Carlos, Reinaldo; Avalos-Díaz, Esperanza; Bollain-y-Goytia, Juan José

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune nephritis triggered by metallic ions was assessed in a Long-Evans rat model. The parameters evaluated included antinuclear autoantibody production, kidney damage mediated by immune complexes detected by immunofluorescence, and renal function tested by retention of nitrogen waste products and proteinuria. To accomplish our goal, the animals were treated with the following ionic metals: HgCl2, CuSO4, AgNO3, and Pb(NO3)2. A group without ionic metals was used as the control. The results of the present investigation demonstrated that metallic ions triggered antinuclear antibody production in 60% of animals, some of them with anti-DNA specificity. Furthermore, all animals treated with heavy metals developed toxic glomerulonephritis with immune complex deposition along the mesangium and membranes. These phenomena were accompanied by proteinuria and increased concentrations of urea. Based on these results, we conclude that metallic ions may induce experimental autoimmune nephritis. PMID:26064998

  11. An Animal Model Using Metallic Ions to Produce Autoimmune Nephritis.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Sandoval, Roxana; Luévano-Rodríguez, Nayeli; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Mayra; Pérez-Pérez, María Elena; Saldívar-Elias, Sergio; Gurrola-Carlos, Reinaldo; Avalos-Díaz, Esperanza; Bollain-y-Goytia, Juan José; Herrera-Esparza, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune nephritis triggered by metallic ions was assessed in a Long-Evans rat model. The parameters evaluated included antinuclear autoantibody production, kidney damage mediated by immune complexes detected by immunofluorescence, and renal function tested by retention of nitrogen waste products and proteinuria. To accomplish our goal, the animals were treated with the following ionic metals: HgCl2, CuSO4, AgNO3, and Pb(NO3)2. A group without ionic metals was used as the control. The results of the present investigation demonstrated that metallic ions triggered antinuclear antibody production in 60% of animals, some of them with anti-DNA specificity. Furthermore, all animals treated with heavy metals developed toxic glomerulonephritis with immune complex deposition along the mesangium and membranes. These phenomena were accompanied by proteinuria and increased concentrations of urea. Based on these results, we conclude that metallic ions may induce experimental autoimmune nephritis. PMID:26064998

  12. Progress in metal ion separation and preconcentration : an overview.

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, A. H.

    1998-05-19

    A brief historical perspective covering the most mature chemically-based metal ion separation methods is presented, as is a summary of the recommendations made in the 1987 National Research Council (NRC) report entitled ''Separation and Purification: Critical Needs and Opportunities''. A review of Progress in Metal Ion Separation and Preconcentration shows that advances are occurring in each area of need cited by the NRC. Following an explanation of the objectives and general organization of this book, the contents of each chapter are briefly summarized and some future research opportunities in metal ion separations are presented.

  13. Rechargeable dual-metal-ion batteries for advanced energy storage.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hu-Rong; You, Ya; Yin, Ya-Xia; Wan, Li-Jun; Guo, Yu-Guo

    2016-04-14

    Energy storage devices are more important today than any time before in human history due to the increasing demand for clean and sustainable energy. Rechargeable batteries are emerging as the most efficient energy storage technology for a wide range of portable devices, grids and electronic vehicles. Future generations of batteries are required to have high gravimetric and volumetric energy, high power density, low price, long cycle life, high safety and low self-discharge properties. However, it is quite challenging to achieve the above properties simultaneously in state-of-the-art single metal ion batteries (e.g. Li-ion batteries, Na-ion batteries and Mg-ion batteries). In this contribution, hybrid-ion batteries in which various metal ions simultaneously engage to store energy are shown to provide a new perspective towards advanced energy storage: by connecting the respective advantages of different metal ion batteries they have recently attracted widespread attention due to their novel performances. The properties of hybrid-ion batteries are not simply the superposition of the performances of single ion batteries. To enable a distinct description, we only focus on dual-metal-ion batteries in this article, for which the design and the benefits are briefly discussed. We enumerate some new results about dual-metal-ion batteries and demonstrate the mechanism for improving performance based on knowledge from the literature and experiments. Although the search for hybrid-ion batteries is still at an early age, we believe that this strategy would be an excellent choice for breaking the inherent disadvantages of single ion batteries in the near future. PMID:26996438

  14. Silica-polyamine composite materials for heavy metal ion removal, recovery, and recycling. 2. Metal ion separations from mine wastewater and soft metal ion extraction efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, R.J.; Pang, D.; Beatty, S.T.; Rosenberg, E.

    1999-12-01

    Silica-polyamine composites have been synthesized which have metal ion capacities as high as 0.84 mmol/g for copper ions removed from aqueous solutions. In previous reports it has been demonstrated that these materials survive more than 3,000 cycles of metal ion extraction, elution, and regeneration with almost no loss of capacity (less than 10%). This paper describes two modified silica-polyamine composite materials and reveals the results of tests designed to determine the effectiveness of these materials for extracting and separating metal ions from actual mining wastewater samples. Using these materials, the concentration of copper, aluminum, and zinc in Berkeley Pit mine wastewater is reduced to below allowable discharge limits. The recovered copper and zinc solutions were greater than 90% pure, and metal ion concentration factors of over 20 for copper were realized. Further, the ability of one of these materials to decrease low levels of the soft metals cadmium, mercury, and lead from National Sanitation Foundation recommended challenge levels to below Environmental Protection Agency allowable limits is also reported.

  15. Metal ion acquisition in Staphylococcus aureus: overcoming nutritional immunity

    PubMed Central

    Cassat, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Transition metals are essential nutrients to virtually all forms of life, including bacterial pathogens. In Staphylococcus aureus, metal ions participate in diverse biochemical processes such as metabolism, DNA synthesis, regulation of virulence factors, and defense against oxidative stress. As an innate immune response to bacterial infection, vertebrate hosts sequester transition metals in a process that has been termed “nutritional immunity.” To successfully infect vertebrates, S. aureus must overcome host sequestration of these critical nutrients. The objective of this review is to outline the current knowledge of staphylococcal metal ion acquisition systems, as well as to define the host mechanisms of nutritional immunity during staphylococcal infection. PMID:22048835

  16. Catalytic metal ions and enzymatic processing of DNA and RNA.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Giulia; Cavalli, Andrea; Klein, Michael L; Alfonso-Prieto, Mercedes; Dal Peraro, Matteo; De Vivo, Marco

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: Two-metal-ion-dependent nucleases cleave the phosphodiester bonds of nucleic acids via the two-metal-ion (2M) mechanism. Several high-resolution X-ray structures portraying the two-metal-aided catalytic site, together with mutagenesis and kinetics studies, have demonstrated a functional role of the ions for catalysis in numerous metallonucleases. Overall, the experimental data confirm the general mechanistic hypothesis for 2M-aided phosphoryl transfer originally reported by Steitz and Steitz ( Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 1993 , 90 ( 14 ), 6498 - 6502 ). This seminal paper proposed that one metal ion favors the formation of the nucleophile, while the nearby second metal ion facilitates leaving group departure during RNA hydrolysis. Both metals were suggested to stabilize the enzymatic transition state. Nevertheless, static X-ray structures alone cannot exhaustively unravel how the two ions execute their functional role along the enzymatic reaction during processing of DNA or RNA strands when moving from reactants to products, passing through metastable intermediates and high-energy transition states. In this Account, we discuss the role of multiscale molecular simulations in further disclosing mechanistic insights of 2M-aided catalysis for two prototypical enzymatic targets for drug discovery, namely, ribonuclease H (RNase H) and type II topoisomerase (topoII). In both examples, first-principles molecular simulations, integrated with structural data, emphasize a cooperative motion of the bimetal motif during catalysis. The coordinated motion of both ions is crucial for maintaining a flexible metal-centered structural architecture exquisitely tailored to accommodate the DNA or RNA sugar-phosphate backbone during phosphodiester bond cleavage. Furthermore, our analysis of RNase H and the N-terminal domain (PAN) of influenza polymerase shows that classical molecular dynamics simulations coupled with enhanced sampling techniques have contributed to describe the modulatory effect of metal ion concentration and metal uptake on the 2M mechanism and efficiency. These aspects all point to the emerging and intriguing role of additional adjacent ions potentially involved in the modulation of phosphoryl transfer reactions and enzymatic turnover in 2M-catalysis, as recently observed experimentally in polymerase ? and homing endonuclease I-DmoI. These computational results, integrated with experimental findings, describe and reinforce the nascent concept of a functional and cooperative dynamics of the catalytic metal ions during the 2M-dependent enzymatic processing of DNA and RNA. Encouraged by the insights provided by computational approaches, we foresee further experiments that will feature the functional and joint dynamics of the catalytic metal ions for nucleic acid processing. This could impact the de novo design of artificial metallonucleases and the rational design of potent metal-chelating inhibitors of pharmaceutically relevant enzymes. PMID:25590654

  17. SEPARATION OF PLUTONYL IONS

    DOEpatents

    Connick, R.E.; McVey, Wm.H.

    1958-07-15

    A process is described for separating plutonyl ions from the acetate ions with which they are associated in certaln carrier precipitation methods of concentrating plutonium. The method consists in adding alkaline earth metal ions and subsequently alkalizing the solution, causing formation of an alkaltne earth plutonate precipitate. Barium hydroxide is used in a preferred embodiment since it provides alkaline earth metal ion and alkalizes the solution in one step forming insoluble barium platonate.

  18. Rare-earth metal prices in the USA ca. 1960 to 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedrick, J.B.

    1997-01-01

    Rare-earth metal prices were compiled from the late 1950s and early 1960s through 1994. Although commercial demand for rare-earth metals began in 1908, as the alloy mischmetal, commercial quantities of a wide range of individual rare-earth metals were not available until the late 1950s. The discovery of a large, high-grade rare-earth deposit at Mountain Pass, CA, USA, in 1949, was significant because it led to the production of commercial quantities of rare-earth elements that reduced prices and encouraged wider application of the materials. The availability of ore from Mountain Pass, and other large rare-earth deposits, especially those in Australia and China, has provided the world with abundant resources for rare-earth metal production. This availability, coupled with improved technology from Government and private-sector metallurgical research, has resulted in substantial decreases in rare-earth metal prices since the late 1950s and early 1960s. Price series for the individual rare-earth metals (except promethium) are quoted on a kilogram basis from the late 1950s and early 1960s through 1994. Prices are given in US dollars on an actual and constant dollar basis. Industrial and economic factors affecting prices during this time period are examined.

  19. Rare-earth metal prices in the USA ca. 1960 to 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedrick, James B.

    1997-01-01

    Rare-earth metal prices were compiled from the late 1950s and early 1960s through 1994. Although commercial demand for rare-earth metals began in 1908, as the alloy mischmetal, commercial quantities of a wide range of individual rare-earth metals were not available until the late 1950s. The discovery of a large, high-grade rare-earth deposit at Mountain Pass. CA, USA, in 1949, was significant because it led to the production of commercial quantities or rare-earth elements that reduced prices and encouraged wider application of the materials. The availability of ore from Mountain Pass, and other large rare-earth deposits, especially those in Australia and China, has provided the world with abundant resources for rare-earth metal production. This availability, coupled with improved technology from Government and private-sector metallurgical research, has resulted in substantial decreases in rare-earth metal prices since the late 1950s and early 1960s. Price series for the individual rare-earth metals (except promethium) are quoted on a kilogram basis from the late 1950s and early 1960s through 1994. Prices are given in US dollars on an actual and constant dollar basis. Industrial and economic factors affecting prices during this time period are examined.

  20. Ion plating seals microcracks or porous metal components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.; Buckley, D. H.; Brainard, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    Description of ion plating process is given. Advantage of this process is that any plating metal or alloy can be selected, whereas, for conventional welding, material selection is limited by compatability.

  1. Extracting metal ions with diphosphonic acid, or derivative thereof

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, Earl P.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Nash, Kenneth L.

    1994-01-01

    Thermodynamically-unstable complexing agents which are diphosphonic acids and diphosphonic acid derivatives (or sulphur containing analogs), like carboxyhydroxymethanediphosphonic acid and vinylidene-1,1-diphosphonic acid, are capable of complexing with metal ions, and especially metal ions in the II, III, IV, V and VI oxidation states, to form stable, water-soluble metal ion complexes in moderately alkaline to highly-acidic media. However, the complexing agents can be decomposed, under mild conditions, into non-organic compounds which, for many purposes are environmentally-nondamaging compounds thereby degrading the complex and releasing the metal ion for disposal or recovery. Uses for such complexing agents as well as methods for their manufacture are also described.

  2. Extracting metal ions with diphosphonic acid, or derivative thereof

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Gatrone, R.C.; Nash, K.L.

    1994-07-26

    Thermodynamically-unstable complexing agents which are diphosphonic acids and diphosphonic acid derivatives (or sulfur containing analogs), like carboxyhydroxymethanediphosphonic acid and vinylidene-1,1-diphosphonic acid, are capable of complexing with metal ions, and especially metal ions in the II, III, IV, V and VI oxidation states, to form stable, water-soluble metal ion complexes in moderately alkaline to highly-acidic media. However, the complexing agents can be decomposed, under mild conditions, into non-organic compounds which, for many purposes are environmentally-nondamaging compounds thereby degrading the complex and releasing the metal ion for disposal or recovery. Uses for such complexing agents as well as methods for their manufacture are also described. 1 fig.

  3. Ion exchange extraction of heavy metals from wastewater sludges.

    PubMed

    Al-Enezi, G; Hamoda, M F; Fawzi, N

    2004-01-01

    Heavy metals are common contaminants of some industrial wastewater. They find their way to municipal wastewaters due to industrial discharges into the sewerage system or through household chemicals. The most common heavy metals found in wastewaters are lead, copper, nickel, cadmium, zinc, mercury, arsenic, and chromium. Such metals are toxic and pose serious threats to the environment and public health. In recent years, the ion exchange process has been increasingly used for the removal of heavy metals or the recovery of precious metals. It is a versatile separation process with the potential for broad applications in the water and wastewater treatment field. This article summarizes the results obtained from a laboratory study on the removal of heavy metals from municipal wastewater sludges obtained from Ardhiya plant in Kuwait. Data on heavy metal content of the wastewater and sludge samples collected from the plant are presented. The results obtained from laboratory experiments using a commercially available ion exchange resin to remove heavy metals from sludge were discussed. A technique was developed to solubilize such heavy metals from the sludge for subsequent treatment by the ion exchange process. The results showed high efficiency of extraction, almost 99.9%, of heavy metals in the concentration range bound in wastewater effluents and sludges. Selective removal of heavy metals from a contaminated wastewater/sludge combines the benefits of being economically prudent and providing the possibility of reuse/recycle of the treated wastewater effluents and sludges. PMID:15027828

  4. The heavy ion diffusion region in magnetic reconnection in the Earth's magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y. H.; Mouikis, C. G.; Kistler, L. M.; Wang, S.; Roytershteyn, V.; Karimabadi, H.

    2015-05-01

    While the plasma in the Earth's magnetotail predominantly consists of protons and electrons, there are times when a significant amount of oxygen is present. When magnetic reconnection occurs, the behavior of these heavy ions can be significantly different from that of the protons, due to their larger gyroradius. In this study, we investigate the heavy ion distribution functions in the reconnection ion diffusion region from a 2.5D three-species particle-in-cell numerical simulation and compare those with Cluster observations from the near-Earth magnetotail. From the simulation results, we find that the heavy ions are demagnetized and accelerated in a larger diffusion region, the heavy ion diffusion region. The ion velocity distribution functions show that, inside the heavy ion diffusion region, heavy ions appear as counterstreaming beams along z in the GSM x-z plane, while drifting in y, carrying cross-tail current. We compare this result with Cluster observations in the vicinity of reconnection regions in the near-Earth magnetotail and find that the simulation predictions are consistent with the observed ion distribution functions in the ion diffusion region, as well as the inflow, exhaust, and separatrix regions. Based on the simulation and observation results, the presence of a multiscale diffusion region model, for O+ abundant reconnection events in the Earth's magnetotail, is demonstrated. A test particle simulation shows that in the diffusion region, the H+ gains energy mainly through Ex, while the O+ energy gain comes equally from Ex and Ey.

  5. Metallic glass as a temperature sensor during ion plating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Spalvins, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    The temperature of the interface and/or a superficial layer of a substrate during ion plating was investigated using a metallic glass of the composition Fe67Co18B14Si1 as the substrate and as the temperature sensor. Transmission electron microscopy and diffraction studies determined the microstructure of the ion-plated gold film and the substrate. Results indicate that crystallization occurs not only in the film, but also in the substrate. The grain size of crystals formed during ion plating was 6 to 60 nm in the gold film and 8 to 100 nm in the substrate at a depth of 10 to 15 micrometers from the ion-plated interface. The temperature rise of the substrate during ion plating was approximately 500 C. Discontinuous changes in metallurgical microstructure, and physical, chemical, and mechanical properties during the amorphous to crystalline transition in metallic glasses make metallic glasses extremely useful materials for temperature sensor applications in coating processes.

  6. Metallic glass as a temperature sensor during ion plating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Spalvins, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    The temperature of the interface and/or a superficial layer of a substrate during ion plating was investigated using a metallic glass of the composition Fe67Co18B14Si1 as the substrate and as the temperature sensor. Transmission electron microscopy and diffraction studies determined the microstructure of the ion-plated gold film and the substrate. Results indicate that crystallization occurs not only in the film, but also in the substrate. The grain size of crystals formed during ion plating was 6 to 60 nm in the gold film and 8 to 100 nm in the substrate at a depth of 10 to 15 micrometers from the ion-plated interface. The temperature rise of the substrate during ion plating was approximately 500 C. Discontinuous changes in metallurgical microstructure, and physical, chemical, and mechanical properties during the amorphous to crystalline transition in metallic glasses make metallic glasses extremely useful materials for temperature sensor applications in coating processes.

  7. An Engineered Palette of Metal Ion Quenchable Fluorescent Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaozhen; Strub, Marie-Paule; Barnard, Travis J.; Noinaj, Nicholas; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Buchanan, Susan K.; Taraska, Justin W.

    2014-01-01

    Many fluorescent proteins have been created to act as genetically encoded biosensors. With these sensors, changes in fluorescence report on chemical states in living cells. Transition metal ions such as copper, nickel, and zinc are crucial in many physiological and pathophysiological pathways. Here, we engineered a spectral series of optimized transition metal ion-binding fluorescent proteins that respond to metals with large changes in fluorescence intensity. These proteins can act as metal biosensors or imaging probes whose fluorescence can be tuned by metals. Each protein is uniquely modulated by four different metals (Cu2+, Ni2+, Co2+, and Zn2+). Crystallography revealed the geometry and location of metal binding to the engineered sites. When attached to the extracellular terminal of a membrane protein VAMP2, dimeric pairs of the sensors could be used in cells as ratiometric probes for transition metal ions. Thus, these engineered fluorescent proteins act as sensitive transition metal ion-responsive genetically encoded probes that span the visible spectrum. PMID:24752441

  8. Predicting the relative toxicity of metal ions using ion characteristics: Microtox{reg_sign} bioluminescence assay

    SciTech Connect

    McCloskey, J.T.; Newman, M.C.; Clark, S.B.

    1996-10-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships have been used to predict the relative toxicity of organic compounds. Although not as common, ion characteristics have also proven useful for predicting the relative toxicity of metal ions. The purpose of this study was to determine if the relative toxicity of metal ions using the Microtox{reg_sign} bioassay was predictable using ion characteristics. Median effect concentrations (EC50s) were determined for 20 metals in a NaNO{sub 3} medium, which reflected freshwater speciation conditions, using the Microtox bacterial assay. The log of EC50 values was modeled using several ion characteristics, and Akaike`s Information Criterion was calculated to determine which ion characteristics provided the best fit. Whether modeling total ion or free ion EC50 values, the one variable which best modeled EC50s was the softness index, while a combination of {chi}{sub m}{sup 2}r ({chi}{sub m} = electronegativity, r = Pauling ionic radius) and {vert_bar}log K{sub OH}{vert_bar} was the best two-variable model. Other variables, including {Delta}E{sub 0} and {chi}{sub m}{sup 2}r (one-variable models) and (AN/{Delta}IP, {Delta}E{sub 0}) and ({chi}{sub m}{sup 2}r, Z{sup 2}/r) (two-variable models), also gave adequate fits. Modeling with speciated (free ion) versus unspeciated (total ion) EC50 values did not improve fits. Modeling mono-, di-, and trivalent metal ions separately improved the models. The authors conclude that ion characteristics can be used to predict the relative toxicity of metal ions whether in freshwater (NaNO{sub 3} medium) or saltwater (NaCl medium) speciation conditions and that this approach can be applied to metal ions varying widely in both valence and binding tendencies.

  9. Potentiometric and spectroscopic study of the interaction of 3d transition metal ions with inositol hexakisphosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiga, Nicolás; Macho, Israel; Gómez, Kerman; González, Gabriel; Kremer, Carlos; Torres, Julia

    2015-10-01

    Among myo-inositol phosphates, the most abundant in nature is the myo-inositol hexakisphosphate, InsP6. Although it is known to be vital to cell functioning, the biochemical research into its metabolism needs chemical and structural analysis of all the protonation, complexation and precipitation processes that it undergoes in the biological media. In view of its high negative charge at physiological level, our group has been leading a thorough research into the InsP6 chemical and structural behavior in the presence of the alkali and alkaline earth metal ions essential for life. The aim of this article is to extend these studies, dealing with the chemical and structural features of the InsP6 interaction with biologically relevant 3d transition metal ions (Fe(II), Fe(III), Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II)), in a non-interacting medium and under simulated physiological conditions. The metal-complex stability constants were determined by potentiometry, showing under ligand-excess conditions the formation of mononuclear species in different protonation states. Under metal ion excess, polymetallic species were detected for Fe(II), Fe(III), Zn(II) and Cu(II). Additionally, the 31P NMR and UV-vis spectroscopic studies provided interesting structural aspects of the strong metal ion-InsP6 interaction.

  10. Smart textile device using ion polymer metal compound.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Taro; Ihara, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a smart textile device that detects angular displacement of attached surface using ion polymer metal compound. The device was composed of ion polymer metal compound (IPMC) which was fabricated from Nafion resin by heat-press and chemical gold plating. The generated voltage from IPMC was measured as a function of bending angle. Fabricated IPMC device was weaved into a cotton cloth and multidirectional movements were detected. PMID:24109750

  11. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry Measurements of Metal Ions Binding to Proteins.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Colette F; Carpenter, Margaret C; Croteau, Molly L; Wilcox, Dean E

    2016-01-01

    ITC measurements involving metal ions are susceptible to a number of competing reactions (oxidation, precipitation, and hydrolysis) and coupled reactions involving the buffer and protons. Stabilization and delivery of the metal ion as a well-defined and well-characterized complex with the buffer, or a specific ligand, can suppress undesired solution chemistry and, depending on the stability of the metal complex, allow accurate measurements of higher affinity protein-binding sites. This requires, however, knowledge of the thermodynamics of formation of the metal complex and accounting for its contribution to the experimentally measured values (KITC and ?HITC) through a post hoc analysis that provides the condition-independent binding thermodynamics (K, ?G(o), ?H, ?S, and ?CP). This analysis also quantifies the number of protons that are displaced when the metal ion binds to the protein. PMID:26794348

  12. Volume-Collapse Transitions in the Rare Earth Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahan, A. K.

    2000-03-01

    A number of the rare earth metals (Ce, Pr, Gd) exhibit pressure-induced phase transitions characterized by unusually large volume changes (5--15%), which are believed to be driven by f electron correlation effects. The present talk will review attempts to calculate these transitions by realistic methods which include all valence orbitals. It is suggested that while corrected local density methods (orbital polarization, self-interaction correction, LDA+U) can approximate these transitions, such solutions bear similarities to Hartree-Fock mean field, raising worries about incorrect temperature dependence of the total energy and entropy in the low-pressure ``localized'' regimes, and too-large predicted temperature-pressure domains for the localized phases, among other concerns [A.K. McMahan et. al., J. Comp.-Aided Mat. Des. 5, 131 (1998)]. These points are made by comparing Hartree-Fock and self-energy based solutions of all-valence-orbital effective Hamiltonians, as well as Hartree-Fock and correlated solutions of simpler model Hamiltonians [C. Huscroft et. al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 2342 (1999); K. Held et. al., cond-mat/9905011].

  13. Metal ion implantation for large scale surface modification

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.G.

    1992-10-01

    Intense energetic beams of metal ions can be produced by using a metal vapor vacuum arc as the plasma discharge from which the ion beam is formed. We have developed a number of ion sources of this kind and have built a metal ion implantation facility which can produce repetitively pulsed ion beams with mean ion energy up to several hundred key, pulsed beam current of more than an ampere, and time averaged current of several tens of milliamperes delivered onto a downstream target. We've also done some preliminary work on scaling up this technology to very large size. For example, a 50-cm diameter (2000 cm[sup 2]) set of beam formation electrodes was used to produce a pulsed titanium beam with ion current over 7 amperes at a mean ion energy of 100 key. Separately, a dc embodiment has been used to produce a dc titanium ion beam with current over 600 mA, power supply limited in this work, and up to 6 amperes of dc plasma ion current was maintained for over an hour. In a related program we've developed a plasma immersion method for applying thin metallic and compound films in which the added species is atomically mixed to the substrate. By adding a gas flow to the process, well-bonded compound films can also be formed; metallic films and multilayers as well as oxides and nitrides with mixed transition zones some hundreds of angstroms thick have been synthesized. Here we outline these parallel metal-plasma-based research programs and describe the hardware that we've developed and some of the surface modification research that we've done with it.

  14. Production of negative hydrogen ions on metal grids

    SciTech Connect

    Oohara, W.; Maetani, Y.; Takeda, Takashi; Takeda, Toshiaki; Yokoyama, H.; Kawata, K.

    2015-03-15

    Negative hydrogen ions are produced on a nickel grid with positive-ion irradiation. In order to investigate the production mechanism, a copper grid without the chemisorption of hydrogen atoms and positive helium ions without negative ionization are used for comparison. Positive hydrogen ions reflected on the metal surface obtain two electrons from the surface and become negatively ionized. It is found that the production yield of negative ions by desorption ionization of chemisorbed hydrogen atoms seems to be small, and the production is a minor mechanism.

  15. Quantum ion-acoustic wave oscillations in metallic nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Moradi, Afshin

    2015-05-15

    The low-frequency electrostatic waves in metallic nanowires are studied using the quantum hydrodynamic model, in which the electron and ion components of the system are regarded as a two-species quantum plasma system. The Poisson equation as well as appropriate quantum boundary conditions give the analytical expressions of dispersion relations of the surface and bulk quantum ion-acoustic wave oscillations.

  16. Structural metals in the group I intron: a ribozyme with a multiple metal ion core.

    PubMed

    Stahley, Mary R; Adams, Peter L; Wang, Jimin; Strobel, Scott A

    2007-09-01

    Metal ions play key roles in the folding and function for many structured RNAs, including group I introns. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of the Azoarcus bacterial group I intron in complex with its 5' and 3' exons. In addition to 222 nucleotides of RNA, the model includes 18 Mg(2+) and K(+) ions. Five of the metals bind within 12 A of the scissile phosphate and coordinate the majority of the oxygen atoms biochemically implicated in conserved metal-RNA interactions. The metals are buried deep within the structure and form a multiple metal ion core that is critical to group I intron structure and function. Eight metal ions bind in other conserved regions of the intron structure, and the remaining five interact with peripheral structural elements. Each of the 18 metals mediates tertiary interactions, facilitates local bends in the sugar-phosphate backbone or binds in the major groove of helices. The group I intron has a rich history of biochemical efforts aimed to identify RNA-metal ion interactions. The structural data are correlated to the biochemical results to further understand the role of metal ions in group I intron structure and function. PMID:17612557

  17. Structural Metals in the Group I Intron: A Ribozyme with a Multiple Metal Ion Core

    SciTech Connect

    Stahley,M.; Adams, P.; Wang, J.; Strobel, S.

    2007-01-01

    Metal ions play key roles in the folding and function for many structured RNAs, including group I introns. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of the Azoarcus bacterial group I intron in complex with its 5' and 3' exons. In addition to 222 nucleotides of RNA, the model includes 18 Mg2+ and K+ ions. Five of the metals bind within 12 Angstroms of the scissile phosphate and coordinate the majority of the oxygen atoms biochemically implicated in conserved metal-RNA interactions. The metals are buried deep within the structure and form a multiple metal ion core that is critical to group I intron structure and function. Eight metal ions bind in other conserved regions of the intron structure, and the remaining five interact with peripheral structural elements. Each of the 18 metals mediates tertiary interactions, facilitates local bends in the sugar-phosphate backbone or binds in the major groove of helices. The group I intron has a rich history of biochemical efforts aimed to identify RNA-metal ion interactions. The structural data are correlated to the biochemical results to further understand the role of metal ions in group I intron structure and function.

  18. Environmentally relevant metal and transition metal ions enhance Fc epsilon RI-mediated mast cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Walczak-Drzewiecka, Aurelia; Wyczlkowska, Janina; Dastych, Jaroslaw

    2003-01-01

    Upon contact with allergen, sensitized mast cells release highly active proinflammatory mediators. Allergen-mediated mast cell activation is an important mechanism in the pathogenesis of atopic asthma. Asthmatic patients are especially susceptible to air pollution. Epidemiologic studies found a positive correlation between severity of symptoms among asthmatic patients and the level of particulate matter (PM) in the air. Among the constituents of PM are metals and transition metals, which could mediate some of its adverse effects on human health. We sought to determine the effect of metal and transition metal ions on allergen-mediated mast cell activation. We observed that several metal and transition metal ions activated mast cells and enhanced allergen-mediated mast cell activation. Thus, Al(3+), Cd(2+), and Sr(2+) induced release of granule-associated N-acetyl-ss-d-hexosaminidase, and Al(3+) and Ni(2+) enhanced antigen-mediated release. Metal and transition metal ions also induced significant secretion of interleukin (IL)-4 and increased antigen-mediated IL-4 secretion in mast cells. These effects of metal and transition metal ions on mast cells were observed at concentrations that do not result in direct cytotoxicity and might be relevant for environmental exposure. Thus, metals and transition metals could increase the level of allergen-mediated mast cell activation, which might be one of the mechanisms mediating exacerbation of allergen-driven asthma symptoms by air pollution. PMID:12727598

  19. Comparative study of metal and non-metal ion implantation in polymers: Optical and electrical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resta, V.; Quarta, G.; Farella, I.; Maruccio, L.; Cola, A.; Calcagnile, L.

    2014-07-01

    The implantation of 1 MeV metal (63Cu+, 107Ag+, 197Au+) and non-metal (4He+, 12C+) ions in a polycarbonate (PC) matrix has been studied in order to evaluate the role of ion species in the modification of optical and electrical properties of the polymer. When the ion fluence is above ∼1 × 1013 ions cm-2, the threshold for latent tracks overlapping is overcome and π-bonded carbon clusters grow and aggregate forming a network of conjugated Cdbnd C bonds. For fluences around 1 × 1017 ions cm-2, the aggregation phenomena induce the formation of amorphous carbon and/or graphite like structures. At the same time, nucleation of metal nanoparticles (NPs) from implanted species can take place when the supersaturation threshold is overcome. The optical absorption of the samples increases in the visible range and the optical band gap redshifts from 3.40 eV up to 0.70 eV mostly due to the carbonization process and the formation of C0x clusters and cluster aggregates. Specific structures in the extinction spectra are observed when metal ions are selected in contrast to the non-metal ion implanted PC, thus revealing the possible presence of noble metal based NPs interstitial to the C0x cluster network. The corresponding electrical resistance decreases much more when metal ions are implanted with at least a factor of 2 orders of magnitude difference than the non-metal ions based samples. An absolute value of ∼107 Ω/sq has been measured for implantation with metals at doses higher than 5 × 1016 ions cm-2, being 1017 Ω/sq the corresponding sheet resistance for pristine PC.

  20. Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, Paul J.; Delhaize, Emmanuel; Robinson, Nigel J.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Furlong, Clement

    1990-11-13

    A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat unit for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heayv metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

  1. Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, Paul J.; Delhaize, Emmanuel; Robinson, Nigel J.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Furlong, Clement

    1990-01-01

    A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat units for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heavy metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

  2. Neutralization by Metal Ions of the Toxicity of Sodium Selenide

    PubMed Central

    Dauplais, Marc; Lazard, Myriam; Blanquet, Sylvain; Plateau, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Inert metal-selenide colloids are found in animals. They are believed to afford cross-protection against the toxicities of both metals and selenocompounds. Here, the toxicities of metal salt and sodium selenide mixtures were systematically studied using the death rate of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells as an indicator. In parallel, the abilities of these mixtures to produce colloids were assessed. Studied metal cations could be classified in three groups: (i) metal ions that protect cells against selenium toxicity and form insoluble colloids with selenide (Ag+, Cd2+, Cu2+, Hg2+, Pb2+ and Zn2+), (ii) metal ions which protect cells by producing insoluble metal-selenide complexes and by catalyzing hydrogen selenide oxidation in the presence of dioxygen (Co2+ and Ni2+) and, finally, (iii) metal ions which do not afford protection and do not interact (Ca2+, Mg2+, Mn2+) or weakly interact (Fe2+) with selenide under the assayed conditions. When occurring, the insoluble complexes formed from divalent metal ions and selenide contained equimolar amounts of metal and selenium atoms. With the monovalent silver ion, the complex contained two silver atoms per selenium atom. Next, because selenides are compounds prone to oxidation, the stabilities of the above colloids were evaluated under oxidizing conditions. 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB), the reduction of which can be optically followed, was used to promote selenide oxidation. Complexes with cadmium, copper, lead, mercury or silver resisted dissolution by DTNB treatment over several hours. With nickel and cobalt, partial oxidation by DTNB occurred. On the other hand, when starting from ZnSe or FeSe complexes, full decompositions were obtained within a few tens of minutes. The above properties possibly explain why ZnSe and FeSe nanoparticles were not detected in animals exposed to selenocompounds. PMID:23342137

  3. Metal ion induced-assembly of amylose in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinhui; Lin, Shudong; Hu, Jiwen; Liu, Guojun; Zhang, Gangwei; Tu, Yuanyuan; Luo, Hongsheng; Li, Wei

    2014-02-15

    Cu(2+)/amylose assemblies of various sizes were prepared through the Cu(2+) ion induced-assembly of amylose. These assembly structures were characterized via transmission electronic microscopy (TEM), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), (1)H NMR analysis, fluorescence spectroscopy (FL) and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy (UV-vis). The results from these characterizations revealed the existence of a complexation effect and/or a bridging effect between the hydroxyl groups of amylose and Cu(2+) ions, and that the formation of the hydrophobic domains promoted the formation of Cu(2+)/amylose assemblies. The use of other metal ions to induce the formation of spherical, flower- and wire-like amylose assemblies was investigated as well. A preliminary investigation on the ability of amylose to capture various metal ions was also performed, and the results of this work demonstrated that amylose could bind quantitatively metal ions that were at low concentrations. This work provided an alternative strategy for the recovery of precious metals from metal ion-containing aqueous solutions and the reduction of water pollution. PMID:24507310

  4. Metal Vapour Ion Lasers: Kinetic Processes and Gas Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Christopher E.

    1996-09-01

    Metal vapour ion lasers are a mature class of gas laser for which a number of applications has developed in recent years. This is the first book to appear in the English language on this topic, and concentrates on the physical processes which occur in the laser, in particular the kinetic processes which are responsible for the pumping of excited ion levels, and the production of population inversion. The most important types of electrical discharges used in this class of laser are discussed in detail, and all the major types of metal vapour ion laser are examined. A highly useful appendix tabulates all the known transitions used in metal vapour ion lasers. Metal Vapour Ion Lasers: Kinetic Processes and Gas Discharges provides a much needed review of this important field. It identifies current problem areas, and points to future research directions. It is an invaluable source for all those, both in industry and academia, working on the development or applications of metal vapour ion lasers, and for all those involved in gas laser research. It will also be of great interest to all those interested in the physics of gas discharges. The authors and translators have been involved with some of the key advances in the field over recent years.

  5. METHOD OF SEPARATING RARE EARTHS BY ION EXCHANGE

    DOEpatents

    Spedding, F.H.; Powell, J.E.

    1960-10-18

    A process is given for separating yttrium and rare earth values having atomic numbers of from 57 through 60 and 68 through 71 from an aqueous solution whose pH value can range from 1 to 9. All rare earths and yttrium are first adsorbed on a cation exchange resin, and they are then eluted with a solution of N-hydroxyethylethylenediaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA) in the order of decreasing atomic number, yttrium behaving like element 61; the effluents are collected in fractions. The HEDTA is recovered by elution with ammonia solution and the resin is regenerated with sulfuric acid. Rare earths are precipitated from the various effluents with oxalic acid, and each supernatant is passed over cation exchange resin for adsorption of HEDTA and nonprecipitated rare earths: the oxalic acid is not retained by the resin.

  6. Metal ion implantation in inert polymers for strain gauge applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Girolamo, Giovanni; Massaro, Marcello; Piscopiello, Emanuela; Tapfer, Leander

    2010-10-01

    Metal ion implantation in inert polymers may produce ultra-thin conducting films below the polymer surface. These subsurface films are promising structures for strain gauge applications. To this purpose, polycarbonate substrates were irradiated at room temperature with low-energy metal ions (Cu + and Ni +) and with fluences in the range between 1 × 10 16 and 1 × 10 17 ions/cm 2, in order to promote the precipitation of dispersed metal nanoparticles or the formation of a continuous thin film. The nanoparticle morphology and the microstructural properties of polymer nanocomposites were investigated by glancing-incidence X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements. At lower fluences (<5 × 10 16 ions/cm 2) a spontaneous precipitation of spherical-shaped metal nanoparticles occurred below the polymer top-surface (˜50 nm), whereas at higher fluences the aggregation of metal nanoparticles produced the formation of a continuous polycrystalline nanofilm. Furthermore, a characteristic surface plasmon resonance peak was observed for nanocomposites produced at lower ion fluences, due to the presence of Cu nanoparticles. A reduced electrical resistance of the near-surface metal-polymer nanocomposite was measured. The variation of electrical conductivity as a function of the applied surface load was measured: we found a linear relationship and a very small hysteresis.

  7. Luminometric Label Array for Quantification and Identification of Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Pihlasalo, Sari; Montoya Perez, Ileana; Hollo, Niklas; Hokkanen, Elina; Pahikkala, Tapio; Härmä, Harri

    2016-05-17

    Quantification and identification of metal ions has gained interest in drinking water and environmental analyses. We have developed a novel label array method for the quantification and identification of metal ions in drinking water. This simple ready-to-go method is based on the nonspecific interactions of multiple unstable lanthanide chelates and nonantenna ligands with sample leading to a luminescence signal profile, unique to the sample components. The limit of detection at ppb concentration level and average coefficient of variation of 10% were achieved with the developed label array. The identification of 15 different metal ions including different oxidation states Cr(3+)/Cr(6+), Cu(+)/Cu(2+), Fe(2+)/Fe(3+), and Pb(2+)/Pb(4+) was demonstrated. Moreover, a binary mixture of Cu(2+) and Fe(3+) and ternary mixture of Cd(2+), Ni(2+), and Pb(2+) were measured and individual ions were distinguished. PMID:27086705

  8. Hall transport of divalent metal ion modified DNA lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Dugasani, Sreekantha Reddy; Lee, Keun Woo; Yoo, Sanghyun; Gnapareddy, Bramaramba; Bashar, Saima; Park, Sung Ha; Kim, Si Joon; Jung, Joohye; Jung, Tae Soo; Kim, Hyun Jae

    2015-06-29

    We investigate the Hall transport characteristics of double-crossover divalent metal ion (Cu{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, and Co{sup 2+})-modified DNA (M-DNA) lattices grown on silica via substrate-assisted growth. The electronic characteristics of the M-DNA lattices are investigated by varying the concentration of the metal ions and then conducting Hall measurements, including resistivity, Hall mobility, carrier concentration, and magneto resistance. The tendency of the resistivity and Hall mobility was to initially decrease as the ion concentration increased, until reaching the saturation concentration (C{sub s}) of each metal ion, and then to increase as the ion concentration increased further. On the other hand, the carrier concentration revealed the opposite tendency as the resistivity and Hall mobility. The specific binding (≤C{sub s}) and the nonspecific aggregates (>C{sub s}) of the ions into the DNA lattices were significantly affected by the Hall characteristics. The numerical ranges of the Hall parameters revealed that the M-DNA lattices with metal ions had semiconductor-like characteristics. Consequently, the distinct characteristics of the electrical transport through M-DNA lattices will provide useful information on the practical use of such structures in physical devices and chemical sensors.

  9. Hall transport of divalent metal ion modified DNA lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugasani, Sreekantha Reddy; Lee, Keun Woo; Kim, Si Joon; Yoo, Sanghyun; Gnapareddy, Bramaramba; Jung, Joohye; Jung, Tae Soo; Bashar, Saima; Kim, Hyun Jae; Park, Sung Ha

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the Hall transport characteristics of double-crossover divalent metal ion (Cu2+, Ni2+, Zn2+, and Co2+)-modified DNA (M-DNA) lattices grown on silica via substrate-assisted growth. The electronic characteristics of the M-DNA lattices are investigated by varying the concentration of the metal ions and then conducting Hall measurements, including resistivity, Hall mobility, carrier concentration, and magneto resistance. The tendency of the resistivity and Hall mobility was to initially decrease as the ion concentration increased, until reaching the saturation concentration (Cs) of each metal ion, and then to increase as the ion concentration increased further. On the other hand, the carrier concentration revealed the opposite tendency as the resistivity and Hall mobility. The specific binding (?Cs) and the nonspecific aggregates (>Cs) of the ions into the DNA lattices were significantly affected by the Hall characteristics. The numerical ranges of the Hall parameters revealed that the M-DNA lattices with metal ions had semiconductor-like characteristics. Consequently, the distinct characteristics of the electrical transport through M-DNA lattices will provide useful information on the practical use of such structures in physical devices and chemical sensors.

  10. One year variations in the near earth solar wind ion density and bulk flow velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolton, Scott J.

    1990-01-01

    One-year periodic variations in the near earth solar wind ion density and bulk flow velocity are reported. The variations show an inverse relationship between the ion velocity and density. The peak strength of the observed density variation ranges from 50-100 percent over the background. These variations imply either large scale mass loading inside the earth's orbit or intrinsic solar modulations. Analyses of both near earth and Pioneer Venus Orbiter spacecraft data provide a comparison at two different heliocentric distances. Several explanations for these variations are discussed.

  11. Multiple DNA architectures with the participation of inorganic metal ions.

    PubMed

    Wei, Guangcheng; Dong, Renhao; Gao, Xuedong; Wang, Dong; Feng, Lei; Song, Shasha; Dong, Shuli; Song, Aixin; Hao, Jingcheng

    2014-09-10

    Here we develop a synthetic protocol for assembling DNA with participating metal ions into multiple shapes. DNA molecules first form coordination complexes with metal ions and these coordination complexes become nucleation sites for primary crystals of metal inorganic salt, and then elementary units of space-filling architectures based on specific geometry form, and finally elementary units assemble into variously larger multiple architectures according to different spatial configurations. We anticipate that our strategy for self-assembling various custom architectures is applicable to most biomolecules possessing donor atoms that can form coordination complexes with metal ions. These multiple architectures provide a general platform for the engineering and assembly of advanced materials possessing features on the micrometer scale and having novel activity. PMID:25133761

  12. Metallic dental material biocompatibility in osteoblastlike cells: correlation with metal ion release.

    PubMed

    Cortizo, María C; De Mele, Mónica Fernández L; Cortizo, Ana M

    2004-08-01

    Ions released from metallic dental materials used in orthodontic appliances could induce undesirable effects on cells and tissues. This study evaluates the biocompatibility of two of the most labile components of metallic dental alloys on osteoblastlike cells. The influence of protein and ions on metal dissolution properties is also investigated using different electrolyte solutions. Morphological alterations, cell growth, and differentiation of osteoblasts were assessed after exposure to pure metals (Ag, Cu, Pd, Au) and Ni-Ti alloy and correlated with the kinetics of elements released into the culture media. Results showed that Cu and Ag were the most cytotoxic elements and the other metals were biocompatible with the osteoblasts. The parameters of biocompatibility were correlated with the levels of ions detected into the culture media. Metal ions induced cell death through early mitosis arrest, apoptotic phenomena, and necrotic processes. Voltammograms showed that anions and proteins interfered in the corrosion process. Fetal bovine serum (FBS) strongly affected the electrochemical process, decreasing the oxidation rate of the metals. In conclusion, copper and silver ions showed a time-dependent low biocompatibility, which correlated with the concentration of released ions. The dissolution of the metallic materials was dependent on the composition of the simulated biological media. PMID:15326364

  13. Means for obtaining a metal ion beam from a heavy-ion cyclotron source

    DOEpatents

    Hudson, E.D.; Mallory, M.L.

    1975-08-01

    A description is given of a modification to a cyclotron ion source used in producing a high intensity metal ion beam. A small amount of an inert support gas maintains the usual plasma arc, except that it is necessary for the support gas to have a heavy mass, e.g., xenon or krypton as opposed to neon. A plate, fabricated from the metal (or anything that can be sputtered) to be ionized, is mounted on the back wall of the ion source arc chamber and is bombarded by returning energetic low-charged gas ions that fail to cross the initial accelerating gap between the ion source and the accelerating electrode. Some of the atoms that are dislodged from the plate by the returning gas ions become ionized and are extracted as a useful beam of heavy ions. (auth)

  14. Metal ion complexation by ionizable crown ethers. Final report, January 1, 1988--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Bartsch, R.A.

    1994-12-31

    During the report period a variety of new lipophilic ionizable crown ethers with pendent proton-ionizable groups has been synthesized. The ligands possess one or more ionizable group (carboxylic acid, phosphonic acid monoethyl ester, para-nitrophenol, phosphonic acid) attached to crown ether, monoazacrown ether or diazacrown ether frameworks. These novel chelating agents have either pendent or inward-facing proton-ionizable groups. Such lipophilic proton-ionizable crown ethers are designed for use in multiphase metal ion separations (solvent extraction, liquid membrane transport). In addition a series of proton-ionizable crown ethers without lipophilic groups was prepared to study how structural variations within the ligand influence metal ion complexation in homogeneous media as assessed by NMR spectroscopy or titration calorimetry. A third class of new metal ion-complexing agents is a series of lipophilic acyclic polyether dicarboxylic acids. Competitive solvent extractions of alkali metal and alkaline earth cations and of the mixed species have been conducted to reveal the influence of ring size, nature and attachment site of the lipophilic group, sidearm length, and proton-ionizable group identity and location upon the selectivity and efficiency of metal ion complexation. In addition to such studies of structural variation within the lipophilic proton-ionizable crown ether, the effect of changing the organic solvent and variation of the stripping conditions have been assessed. The influence of structural variations within lipophilic acyclic polyether dicarboxylic acids upon competitive solvent extraction of alkaline earth cations has been probed. Also a new chromogenic, di-ionizable crown ether with extremely high selectivity for Hg{sup 2+} has been discovered.

  15. A vacuum spark ion source: High charge state metal ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yushkov, G. Yu.; Nikolaev, A. G.; Oks, E. M.; Frolova, V. P.

    2016-02-01

    High ion charge state is often important in ion beam physics, among other reasons for the very practical purpose that it leads to proportionately higher ion beam energy for fixed accelerating voltage. The ion charge state of metal ion beams can be increased by replacing a vacuum arc ion source by a vacuum spark ion source. Since the voltage between anode and cathode remains high in a spark discharge compared to the vacuum arc, higher metal ion charge states are generated which can then be extracted as an ion beam. The use of a spark of pulse duration less than 10 μs and with current up to 10 kA allows the production of ion beams with current of several amperes at a pulse repetition rate of up to 5 pps. We have demonstrated the formation of high charge state heavy ions (bismuth) of up to 15 + and a mean ion charge state of more than 10 +. The physics and techniques of our vacuum spark ion source are described.

  16. A vacuum spark ion source: High charge state metal ion beams.

    PubMed

    Yushkov, G Yu; Nikolaev, A G; Oks, E M; Frolova, V P

    2016-02-01

    High ion charge state is often important in ion beam physics, among other reasons for the very practical purpose that it leads to proportionately higher ion beam energy for fixed accelerating voltage. The ion charge state of metal ion beams can be increased by replacing a vacuum arc ion source by a vacuum spark ion source. Since the voltage between anode and cathode remains high in a spark discharge compared to the vacuum arc, higher metal ion charge states are generated which can then be extracted as an ion beam. The use of a spark of pulse duration less than 10 μs and with current up to 10 kA allows the production of ion beams with current of several amperes at a pulse repetition rate of up to 5 pps. We have demonstrated the formation of high charge state heavy ions (bismuth) of up to 15 + and a mean ion charge state of more than 10 +. The physics and techniques of our vacuum spark ion source are described. PMID:26931966

  17. Highly Charged Ions in Rare Earth Permanent Magnet Penning Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guise, Nicholas D.; Brewer, Samuel M.; Tan, Joseph N.

    A newly constructed apparatus at the United States National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is designed for the isolation, manipulation, and study of highly charged ions. Highly charged ions are produced in the NIST electron-beam ion trap (EBIT), extracted through a beamline that selects a single mass/charge species, then captured in a compact Penning trap. The magnetic field of the trap is generated by cylindrical NdFeB permanent magnets integrated into its electrodes. In a room-temperature prototype trap with a single NdFeB magnet, species including Ne10+ and N7+ were confined with storage times of order 1 second, showing the potential of this setup for manipulation and spectroscopy of highly charged ions in a controlled environment. Ion capture has since been demonstrated with similar storage times in a more-elaborate Penning trap that integrates two coaxial NdFeB magnets for improved B-field homogeneity. Ongoing experiments utilize a second-generation apparatus that incorporates this two-magnet Penning trap along with a fast time-of-flight MCP detector capable of resolving the charge-state evolution of trapped ions. Holes in the two-magnet Penning trap ring electrode allow for optical and atomic beam access. Possible applications include spectroscopic studies of one-electron ions in Rydberg states, as well as highly charged ions of interest in atomic physics, metrology, astrophysics, and plasma diagnostics.

  18. Metal ions potentiate microglia responsiveness to endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Rachmawati, Dessy; Peferoen, Laura A N; Vogel, Daphne Y S; Alsalem, Inás W A; Amor, Sandra; Bontkes, Hetty J; von Blomberg, B Mary E; Scheper, Rik J; van Hoogstraten, Ingrid M W

    2016-02-15

    Oral metal exposure has been associated with diverse adverse reactions, including neurotoxicity. We showed previously that dentally applied metals activate dendritic cells (MoDC) via TLR4 (Ni, Co, Pd) and TLR3 (Au). It is still unknown whether the low levels of dental metals reaching the brain can trigger local innate cells or prime them to become more responsive. Here we tested whether dentally applied metals (Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Au, Hg) activate primary human microglia in vitro and, as a model, monocytic THP-1-cells, in high non-toxic as well as near-physiological concentrations. In addition the effects of 'near-physiological' metal exposure on endotoxin (LPS) responsiveness of these cells were evaluated. IL-8 and IL-6 production after 24h was used as read out. In high, non-toxic concentrations all transition metals except Cr induced IL-8 and IL-6 production in microglia, with Ni and Co providing the strongest stimulation. When using near-physiological doses (up to 10× the normal plasma concentration), only Zn and Cu induced significant IL-8 production. Of note, the latter metals also markedly potentiated LPS responsiveness of microglia and THP-1 cells. In conclusion, transition metals activate microglia similar to MoDCs. In near-physiological concentrations Zn and Cu are the most effective mediators of innate immune activation. A clear synergism between innate responses to Zn/Cu and LPS was observed, shedding new light on the possible relation between oral metal exposure and neurotoxicity. PMID:26857501

  19. A study of the formation and dynamics of the Earth's plasma sheet using ion composition data

    SciTech Connect

    Lennartsson, O.W.

    1994-04-01

    Over two years of data from the Lockheed Plasma Composition Experiment on the ISEE 1 spacecraft, covering ion energies between 100 eV/e and about 16 keV/e, have been analyzed in an attempt to extract new information about three geophysical issues: (1) solar wind penetration of the Earth's magnetic tail; (2) relationship between plasma sheet and tail lobe ion composition; and (3) possible effects of heavy terrestrial ions on plasma sheet stability.

  20. A study of the formation and dynamics of the Earth's plasma sheet using ion composition data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lennartsson, O. W.

    1994-01-01

    Over two years of data from the Lockheed Plasma Composition Experiment on the ISEE 1 spacecraft, covering ion energies between 100 eV/e and about 16 keV/e, have been analyzed in an attempt to extract new information about three geophysical issues: (1) solar wind penetration of the Earth's magnetic tail; (2) relationship between plasma sheet and tail lobe ion composition; and (3) possible effects of heavy terrestrial ions on plasma sheet stability.

  1. Batch sorption of divalent metal ions onto brown coal

    SciTech Connect

    Pehlivan, E.; Gode, F.

    2006-12-15

    Brown coal, a relatively abundant and inexpensive material is currently being investigated as an adsorbent to remove some contaminants from aqueous solution. The adsorption of some heavy metals from aqueous solutions on the brown coals was studied as a function of pH, contact time, adsorbent dosage and concentration of metal solutions. A carboxyl, phenolic hydroxyl, and metoxyl functional group present on the coal surface was the adsorption site to remove metal ions from solution by means of ion exchange and hydrogen bonding. Effective removal of heavy metals was achieved at pH values of 4.0-5.0. The experimental data have been analyzed using the Langmuir isotherm models. Under optimized conditions, the percentage of metal removal by brown coal adsorption was over 80%.

  2. Metallic ion release in artificial saliva of titanium oral implants coupled with different metal superstructures.

    PubMed

    Cortada, M; Giner, L; Costa, S; Gil, F J; Rodríguez, D; Planell, J A

    1997-01-01

    In this work the metallic ion release in oral implants with superstructures of different metals and alloys used in clinical dentistry has been determined. This study has been realized in a saliva environment at 37 degrees C. The measurements of the ion release were carried out by means of the Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry technique. The titanium oral implant coupled with a chromium-nickel alloy releases a high quantity of ions and the implant coupled with the titanium superstructure presents a low value of ion release. PMID:9262834

  3. Does Ion Release Differ Between Hip Resurfacing and Metal-on-metal THA?

    PubMed Central

    Moroni, Antonio; Cadossi, Matteo; Baldini, Nicola; Giannini, Sandro

    2008-01-01

    Modern metal-on-metal hip resurfacing was introduced as a bone-preserving method of joint reconstruction for young and active patients; however, the large diameter of the bearing surfaces is of concern for potential increased metal ion release. We hypothesized there were no differences in serum concentrations of chromium, cobalt, and molybdenum between patients who had metal-on-metal hip resurfacing (Group A; average head diameter, 48 mm; median followup, 24 months) and patients who had 28-mm metal-on-metal THA (Group B; median followup, 25 months). Serum concentrations also were compared with concentrations in healthy subjects. We identified no differences in ion levels between Groups A and B. A distinction was made according to gender. Women showed a higher chromium release in Group A whereas men had a higher cobalt release in Group B. Values obtained from Group A were higher than those of the control subjects. Our data suggest metal-on-metal bearings for THA should not be rejected because of concern regarding potential increased metal ion release; however, patients with elevated ion levels, even without loosening or toxicity, could be at higher risk and should be followed up periodically. Level of Evidence: Level III, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18196364

  4. Membranes Remove Metal Ions Fron Industrial Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, W. P. L.; May, C.

    1983-01-01

    Use of membrane films affords convenient and economical alternative for removing and recovering metal cations present in low concentrations from large quantities of liquid solutions. Possible applications of membrane films include use in analytical chemistry for determination of small amounts of toxic metallic impurities in lakes, streams, and municipal effluents. Also suitable for use as absorber of certain pollutant gases and odors present in confined areas.

  5. A multiscale study of ion heating in Earth's magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Ashour-Abdalla, Maha; Walker, Raymond J.; El Alaoui, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Ion heating during a substorm on 15 February 2008, starting at 0348 UT, is studied with a new approach recently described in Ashour-Abdalla et al. (2015). The general conditions of the magnetotail are obtained from a global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model and are used to drive a full kinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation of a 3-D region of the tail. Within the kinetic box, the ions, the electrons, and the fields evolve self-consistently. The large scales are captured by the MHD model and the small scales by the PIC model based on the MHD state. This approach is used to study ion heating. Different heating mechanisms were analyzed by examining the velocity distributions at different locations. In the x direction heating occurs as the reconnection-generated ion jet interacts with the environment in which it propagates. The heating is found mostly in the separatrices and increases downstream of the reconnection region. In the y direction the heating is less intense and is found near the dipolarization fronts. It occurs as ions become magnetized and gyrotropize the distribution function. In addition, ions can be heated in the y direction by the reconnection electric field near the reconnection site. In the z direction the ions are heated by the formation of beams moving along z between the separatrices.

  6. Catalytic mechanisms of metallohydrolases containing two metal ions.

    PubMed

    Miti?, Nataa; Miraula, Manfredi; Selleck, Christopher; Hadler, Kieran S; Uribe, Elena; Pedroso, Marcelo M; Schenk, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    At least one-third of enzymes contain metal ions as cofactors necessary for a diverse range of catalytic activities. In the case of polymetallic enzymes (i.e., two or more metal ions involved in catalysis), the presence of two (or more) closely spaced metal ions gives an additional advantage in terms of (i) charge delocalisation, (ii) smaller activation barriers, (iii) the ability to bind larger substrates, (iv) enhanced electrostatic activation of substrates, and (v) decreased transition-state energies. Among this group of proteins, enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of ester and amide bonds form a very prominent family, the metallohydrolases. These enzymes are involved in a multitude of biological functions, and an increasing number of them gain attention for translational research in medicine and biotechnology. Their functional versatility and catalytic proficiency are largely due to the presence of metal ions in their active sites. In this chapter, we thus discuss and compare the reaction mechanisms of several closely related enzymes with a view to highlighting the functional diversity bestowed upon them by their metal ion cofactors. PMID:25458355

  7. Metal ion coupled protein folding and allosteric motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei

    2014-03-01

    Many proteins need the help of cofactors for their successful folding and functioning. Metal ions, i.e., Zn2+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ etc., are typical biological cofactors. Binding of metal ions can reshape the energy landscapes of proteins, thereby modifying the folding and allosteric motions. For example, such binding may make the intrinsically disordered proteins have funneled energy landscapes, consequently, ensures their spontaneous folding. In addition, the binding may activate certain biological processes by inducing related conformational changes of regulation proteins. However, how the local interactions involving the metal ion binding can induce the global conformational motions of proteins remains elusive. Investigating such question requires multiple models with different details, including quantum mechanics, atomistic models, and coarse grained models. In our recent work, we have been developing such multiscale methods which can reasonably model the metal ion binding induced charge transfer, protonation/deprotonation, and large conformational motions of proteins. With such multiscale model, we elucidated the zinc-binding induced folding mechanism of classical zinc finger and the calcium-binding induced dynamic symmetry breaking in the allosteric motions of calmodulin. In addition, we studied the coupling of folding, calcium binding and allosteric motions of calmodulin domains. In this talk, I will introduce the above progresses on the metal ion coupled protein folding and allosteric motions. We thank the finacial support from NSFC and the 973 project.

  8. Metal ion binding and the folding of the hairpin ribozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Timothy J; Lilley, David M J

    2002-01-01

    The hairpin ribozyme comprises two formally unpaired loops carried on two arms of a four-way helical RNA junction. Addition of divalent metal ions brings about a conformational transition into an antiparallel structure in which there is an intimate association between the loops to generate the active form of the ribozyme. In this study, we have used fluorescence resonance energy transfer to analyze the global folding of the complete ribozyme, and the simple four-way junction derived from it, over a wide concentration range of divalent and monovalent metal ions. The simple junction undergoes an ion-induced rotation into an antiparallel form. In the presence of a constant background concentration of sodium ions, the magnesium-ion-induced transition is characterized by noncooperative binding with a Hill coefficient n = 1. By contrast, the magnesium-ion-induced folding of the complete ribozyme is more complex, involving two distinct binding phases. The first phase occurs in the micromolar range, and involves the cooperative binding of at least three magnesium ions. This can also be achieved by high concentrations of sodium ions, and is therefore likely to be due to diffuse binding of cations at the junction and the interface of the loop-loop interaction. The second phase occurs in the millimolar range, and can only be induced by divalent metal ions. This transition occurs in response to the noncooperative, site-specific binding of magnesium ions. We observe a good correlation between the extent of ion-induced folding and cleavage activity. PMID:12022226

  9. Process optimization and kinetics for leaching of rare earth metals from the spent Ni-metal hydride batteries.

    PubMed

    Meshram, Pratima; Pandey, B D; Mankhand, T R

    2016-05-01

    Nickel-metal hydride batteries (Ni-MH) contain not only the base metals, but valuable rare earth metals (REMs) viz. La, Sm, Nd, Pr and Ce as well. In view of the importance of resource recycling and assured supply of the contained metals in such wastes, the present study has focussed on the leaching of the rare earth metals from the spent Ni-MH batteries. The conditions for the leaching of REMs from the spent batteries were optimized as: 2M H2SO4, 348K temperature and 120min of time at a pulp density (PD) of 100g/L. Under this condition, the leaching of 98.1% Nd, 98.4% Sm, 95.5% Pr and 89.4% Ce was achieved. Besides the rare earth metals, more than 90% of base metals (Ni, Co, Mn and Zn) were also leached out in this condition. Kinetic data for the dissolution of all the rare earth metals showed the best fit to the chemical control shrinking core model. The leaching of metals followed the mechanism involving the chemical reaction proceeding on the surface of particles by the lixiviant, which was corroborated by the XRD phase analysis and SEM-EDS studies. The activation energy of 7.6, 6.3, 11.3 and 13.5kJ/mol was acquired for the leaching of neodymium, samarium, praseodymium and cerium, respectively in the temperature range 305-348K. From the leach liquor, the mixed rare earth metals were precipitated at pH∼1.8 and the precipitated REMs was analyzed by XRD and SEM studies to determine the phases and the morphological features. PMID:26746588

  10. Process for modifying the metal ion sorption capacity of a medium

    DOEpatents

    Lundquist, Susan H.

    2002-01-01

    A process for modifying a medium is disclosed that includes treating a medium having a metal ion sorption capacity with a solution that includes: A) an agent capable of forming a complex with metal ions; and B) ions selected from the group consisting of sodium ions, potassium ions, magnesium ions, and combinations thereof, to create a medium having an increased capacity to sorb metal ions relative to the untreated medium.

  11. Experimental determination of the partitioning of gallium between solid iron metal and synthetic basaltic melt Electron and ion microprobe study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, M. J.; Newsom, H. E.; Reed, S. J. B.; Enright, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    The distribution of Ga between solid Fe metal and synthetic basaltic melt is investigated experimentally at temperatures of 1190 and 1330 C, and over a narrow range of oxygen fugacities. Metal-silicate reversal experiments were conducted, indicating a close approach to equilibrium. The analysis of the partitioned products was performed using electron and ion microprobes. At one bar total pressure, the solid metal/silicate melt partition coefficient D(Ga) is used to evaluate metal-silicate fractionation processes in the earth, moon, and Eucrite Parent Body (EPB). It is found that the depletion of Ga abundances in the EPB is due to the extraction of Ga into a metallic core. Likewise, the depletion of Ga in the lunar mantle is consistent with the extraction of Ga into a smaller lunar core if Ga was originally present in a subchondritic concentration. The relatively high Ga abundances in the earth's mantle are discussed, with reference to several theoretical models.

  12. Process for preparing higher oxides of the alkali and alkaline earth metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadhukhan, P.; Bell, A. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    High purity inorganic higher oxides of the alkali and alkaline earth metals are prepared by subjecting the hydroxide of the alkali and alkaline earth metal to a radio frequency discharge sustained in oxygen. The process is particulary adaptable to the production of high purity potassium superoxide by subjecting potassium hydroxide to glow discharge sustained in oxygen under the pressure of about 0.75 to 1.00 torr.

  13. Towards the ionic limit of two-dimensional materials: monolayer alkaline earth and transition metal halides.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shi-Hsin; Kuo, Jer-Lai

    2014-10-14

    We theoretically explored new two-dimensional materials near the ionic instability (three-dimensional structures are favored), with covalent bonded systems (graphene) sitting at the opposite end of the spectrum. Accordingly, monolayer alkaline earth and transition metal halides, many of their bulk forms being layered structures, were investigated by density functional calculations. We thus predicted a new class of two-dimensional materials by performing structure relaxation, cohesive/formation energy and full phonon dispersion calculations. These materials exhibit strong ionic bonding character, as revealed by significant charge transfers. The superior charge donating/accepting abilities and the large specific area make these new materials promising for adsorption and catalytic reactions. We demonstrated adsorption and diffusion of Li on these materials, which are relevant for Li ion battery electrodes and hydrogen storage. Also the new materials with varied charge donating abilities and their nanostructures can enhance and tune catalytic reactions, such as Ziegler-Natta catalysts. Moreover, they exhibit diverse electronic properties that can be of great application interest, ranging from insulators to metals, and even spin-polarized semiconductors. PMID:25163641

  14. Minerals yearbook, 1988. Rare-earth minerals and metals

    SciTech Connect

    Hedrick, J.B.; Templeton, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Domestic production of rare-earth concentrates decreased in 1988. Foreign sources of processed rare earths obtained a slightly larger share of the U.S. market, while domestic exports saw a marked increase compared to 1987 levels. Rare earths were used in high-technology applications such as laser crystals, high-strength permanent magnets, optical fibers, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners, and high-temperature superconductors. Topics discussed in the report include domestic data coverage, legislation and government programs, environmental issues, domestic production, consumption and uses, stocks, prices, foreign trade, world capacity, world review--Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Egypt, Greenland, Japan, Madagascar, Malaysia, Mozambique, Sri Lanka, Thailand--and technology.

  15. Metal ion modulated electron transfer in photosynthetic proteins.

    SciTech Connect

    Utschig, L. M.; Thurnauer, M. C.; Chemistry

    2004-07-01

    Photosynthetic purple bacterial reaction center (RC) proteins are ideal native systems for addressing basic questions regarding the nature of biological electron transfer because both the protein structure and the electron-transfer reactions are well-characterized. Metal ion binding to the RC can affect primary photochemistry and provides a probe for understanding the involvement of local protein environments in electron transfer. The RC has two distinct transition metal ion binding sites, the well-known non-heme Fe{sup 2+} site buried in the protein interior and a recently discovered Zn{sup 2+} site located on the surface of the protein. Fe{sup 2+} removal and Zn{sup 2+} binding systematically affect different electron-transfer steps in the RC. Factors involved in the metal ion alteration of RC electron transfer may provide a paradigm for other biological systems involved in electron transfer.

  16. Low coefficient of thermal expansion polyimides containing metal ion additives

    SciTech Connect

    Stoakley, D.M.; St.Clair, A.K. )

    1992-07-01

    Polyimides have become widely used as high performance polymers as a result of their excellent thermal stability and toughness. However, lowering their coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) would increase their usefulness for aerospace and electronic applications where dimensional stability is a requirement. The CTE's of conventional polyimides range from 30 to 60 ppm/C. Approaches that have been reported to lower their CTE's include linearizing the polymer molecular structure and orienting the polyimide film. This current study involves the incorporation of metal ion-containing additives into polyimides and has resulted in significantly lowered CTE's. Various metal ion additives have been added to both polyamic acid resins and soluble polyimide solutions in the concentration range of 4-23 weight percent. The incorporation of these metal ions has resulted in reductions in the CTE's of the control polyimides of 12% to over 100% depending on the choice of additive and its concentration.

  17. High Pressure Phase Transformations in Heavy Rare Earth Metals and Connections to Actinide Crystal Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Vohra, Yogesh K.; Sangala, Bagvanth Reddy; Stemshorn, Andrew K.; Hope, Kevin M.

    2008-07-01

    High-pressure studies have been performed on heavy rare earth metals Terbium (Tb) to 155 GPa and Holmium (Ho) to 134 GPa in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature. The following crystal structure sequence was observed in both metals hcp {yields} Sm-type {yields} dhcp {yields} distorted fcc (hR-24) {yields} monoclinic (C2/m) with increasing pressure. The last transformation to a low symmetry monoclinic phase is accompanied by a volume collapse of 5 % for Tb at 51 GPa and a volume collapse of 3 % for Ho at 103 GPa. This volume collapse under high pressure is reminiscent of f-shell delocalization in light rare earth metal Cerium (Ce), Praseodymium (Pr), and heavy actinide metals Americium (Am) and Curium (Cm). The orthorhombic Pnma phase that has been reported in Am and Cm after f-shell delocalization is not observed in heavy rare earth metals under high pressures. (authors)

  18. Detection of singly ionized energetic lunar pick-up ions upstream of earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilchenbach, M.; Hovestadt, D.; Klecker, B.; Moebius, E.

    1992-01-01

    Singly ionized suprathermal ions upstream of the earth's bow shock have been detected by using the time-of-flight spectrometer SULEICA on the AMPTE/IRM satellite. The data were collected between August and December 1985. The flux of the ions in the mass range between 23 and 37 amu is highly anisotropic towards the earth. The ions are observed with a period of about 29 days around new moon (+/- 3 days). The correlation of the energy of the ions with the solar wind speed and the interplanetary magnetic field orientation indicates the relation to the pick-up process. We conclude that the source of these pick-up ions is the moon. We argue that due to the impinging solar wind, atoms are sputtered off the lunar surface, ionized in the sputtering process or by ensuing photoionization and picked up by the solar wind.

  19. Metal plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, A.

    1996-09-01

    Metal Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation and Deposition (MePIIID) is a hybrid process combining cathodic arc deposition and plasma immersion ion implantation. The properties of metal plasma produced by vacuum arcs are reviewed and the consequences for MePIIID are discussed. Different version of MePIIID are described and compared with traditional methods of surface modification such as ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD). MePIIID is a very versatile approach because of the wide range of ion species and energies used. In one extreme case, films are deposited with ions in the energy range 20--50 eV, and at the other extreme, ions can be implanted with high energy (100 keV or more) without film deposition. Novel features of the technique include the use of improved macroparticle filters; the implementation of several plasma sources for multi-element surface modification; tuning of ion energy during implantation and deposition to tailor the substrate-film intermixed layer and structure of the growing film; simultaneous pulsing of the plasma potential (positive) and substrate bias (negative) with a modified Marx generator; and the use of high ion charge states.

  20. Metal ion levels and revision rates in metal-on-metal hip resurfacing arthroplasty: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Patrick G; Wilkinson, Andrew J; Meek, Robert M D

    2014-01-01

    Metal-on-metal (MoM) bearings in hip surgery are related to increased blood levels of metal ions. The nature of the relationship between ion levels and failure is still not fully understood. This study compares three cohorts of patients, 120 patients in each cohort, treated with a hip resurfacing arthroplasty, grouped by brand and diameter of femoral component on average four years postoperatively: Birmingham Hip Resurfacing ?50 mm, Durom resurfacing ?50 mm and Durom resurfacing <50 mm. The median blood ion levels of cobalt and chromium were significantly lower in the cohort with the large Durom resurfacing than the other two cohorts (P<0.05). The large BHR and large Durom HRA had revision rates of 3.3%. The small Durom HRA had a revision rate of 8.3%. Elevated blood ion levels can indicate a failing MoM bearing. The large BHR and large Durom HRA have similar revision rates yet the large Durom HRA had significantly lower metal ion levels. When similar ion levels were reported for BHR and small Durom the latter had significantly higher revision rates. This suggests ion levels do not absolutely predict the rate of HRA failure. Since MoM generation of metal ions is not the sole reason of failure, regular clinical and radiographic follow-up should also be in place for patients with these joints. PMID:24500833

  1. Comet Encke: Meteor metallic ion identification by mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, R. A.; Aikin, A. C.

    1972-01-01

    Metal ions including Na-40(+), Mg-24(+), Si-28(+), K-39(+), Ca-40(+), Sc-45(+), Cr-52(+), Fe-56(+), and Ni-58(+) were detected in the upper atmosphere during the beta Taurids meteor shower. Abundances of these ions relative to Si(+) show agreement in most instances with chondrites. A notable exception is 45(+), which is Sc(+), is 100 times more abundant than neutral scandium found in chondrites.

  2. Comet encke: meteor metallic ion identification by mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, R A; Aikin, A C

    1973-04-20

    Metal ions including 23(+) (Na(+)), 24(+) (Mg(+)) 28(+) (Si(+)), 39(+) (K(+)), 40(+) (Ca(+)), 45(+) (Sc(+)), 52(+) Cr(+)). 56(+) (Fe(+)), and 58(+) (Ni(+)) have been detected in the upper atmosphere during the period of the Beta Taurids meteor shower. The abundances of these ions relative to Si(+) show, agreement in most instances with abundances in chondrites. A notable exception is 45(+), which, if it is Sc(+), is 100 times more abundant than neutral scandium found in chondrites. PMID:17816288

  3. Nonlinear Screening and Electron Capture Processes of Ions in Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dez Muio, R.; Arnau, A.

    Slow ions interacting with metals introduce a strong rearrangement of electronic charge in their vicinity. We show the way in which density functional theory can be used to describe such displacement of charge and the subsequent modification of the screening properties of the medium. We also discuss some of the electron capture processes that lead to the eventual neutralization of the ions. We particularly focus into the Auger and radiative processes and review some theoretical calculations of the rates for these processes.

  4. Adsorbent for metal ions and method of making and using

    DOEpatents

    White, L.R.; Lundquist, S.H.

    1999-08-10

    A method comprises the step of spray-drying a solution or slurry comprising (alkali metal or ammonium) (metal) hexacyanoferrate particles in a liquid, to provide monodisperse, substantially spherical particles in a yield of at least 70 percent of theoretical yield and having a particle size in the range of 1 to 500 micrometers, said particles being active towards Cs ions. The particles, which can be of a single salt or a combination of salts, can be used free flowing, in columns or beds, or entrapped in a nonwoven, fibrous web or matrix or a cast porous membrane, to selectively remove Cs ions from aqueous solutions. 2 figs.

  5. Adsorbent for metal ions and method of making and using

    DOEpatents

    White, Lloyd R.; Lundquist, Susan H.

    2000-01-01

    A method comprises the step of spray-drying a solution or slurry comprising (alkali metal or ammonium) (metal) hexacyanoferrate particles in a liquid, to provide monodisperse, substantially spherical particles in a yield of at least 70 percent of theoretical yield and having a particle size in the range of 1 to 500 micrometers, said particles being active towards Cs ions. The particles, which can be of a single salt or a combination of salts, can be used free flowing, in columns or beds, or entrapped in a nonwoven, fibrous web or matrix or a cast porous membrane, to selectively remove Cs ions from aqueous solutions.

  6. Adsorbent for metal ions and method of making and using

    DOEpatents

    White, Lloyd R.; Lundquist, Susan H.

    1999-01-01

    A method comprises the step of spray-drying a solution or slurry comprising (alkali metal or ammonium) (metal) hexacyanoferrate particles in a liquid, to provide monodisperse, substantially spherical particles in a yield of at least 70 percent of theoretical yield and having a particle size in the range of 1 to 500 micrometers, said particles being active towards Cs ions. The particles, which can be of a single salt or a combination of salts, can be used free flowing, in columns or beds, or entrapped in a nonwoven, fibrous web or matrix or a cast porous membrane, to selectively remove Cs ions from aqueous solutions.

  7. Biocombinatorial Selection of Metal Ion-Chelating Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, Teruhiko; Hiura, Yuko; Kawashiro, Katsuhiro

    A phage-displayed library selection was performed to obtain metal ion-chelating peptides. A dodecamer (12-mer) random peptide library was displayed on the surface of filamentous bacterial phage and subjected to an affinity selection. Four rounds of the selection gave fourteen Zn2+-positive phage clones. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that the selected clones specifically bound to Zn2+ and Ni2+, but not to Cu2+ and Fe3+. Deduced amino acid sequences of the clones had histidine-rich consensus motifs. These chelating peptides should be applied to designing for metal ion-trapping biomaterials.

  8. Energization of Ions in near-Earth current sheet disruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taktakishvili, A.; Lopez, R. E.; Goodrich, C. C.

    1995-01-01

    In this study we examine observations made by AMPTE/CCE of energetic ion bursts during seven substorm periods when the satellite was located near the neutral sheet, and CCE observed the disruption cross-tail current in situ. We compare ion observations to analytic calculations of particle acceleration. We find that the acceleration region size, which we assume to be essentially the current disruption region, to be on the order of 1 R(sub E). Events exhibiting weak acceleration had either relatively small acceleration regions (apparently associated with pseudobreakup activity on the ground) or relatively small changes in the local magnetic field (suggesting that the magnitude of the local current disruption region was limited). These results add additional support for the view that the particle bursts observed during turbulent current sheet disruptions are due to inductive acceleration of ions.

  9. Modelling the negative chlorine ion chemistry of the Earth's mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Holger; Notholt, Justus

    2013-04-01

    An ion chemistry model is used to investigate the negative chlorine ion chemistry of the mesosphere for quiet ionospheric conditions. Model results are presented for high latitudes in February as well as for the equator in Summer. For nighttime, Cl-, Cl-(HCl), and NO3-(HCl) are the most abundant chlorine anions in the mesosphere. The concentration of ClO3- depends significantly on its stability against collision-induced dissociation. In contrast to previous model predictions, the abundance of Cl-(H2O) is small. For daytime, photoelectron detachment and photodissociation have pronounced impact on the negative chlorine ion chemsitry in the mesosphere. The abundance of all anion cluster is considerably smaller than at night. While Cl- decreases in the upper mesosphere, its abundance increases at lower altitudes.

  10. Smart responsive microcapsules capable of recognizing heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Pi, Shuo-Wei; Ju, Xiao-Jie; Wu, Han-Guang; Xie, Rui; Chu, Liang-Yin

    2010-09-15

    Smart responsive microcapsules capable of recognizing heavy metal ions are successfully prepared with oil-in-water-in-oil double emulsions as templates for polymerization in this study. The microcapsules are featured with thin poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-benzo-18-crown-6-acrylamide) (P(NIPAM-co-BCAm)) membranes, and they can selectively recognize special heavy metal ions such as barium(II) or lead(II) ions very well due to the "host-guest" complexation between the BCAm receptors and barium(II) or lead(II) ions. The stable BCAm/Ba(2+) or BCAm/Pb(2+) complexes in the P(NIPAM-co-BCAm) membrane cause a positive shift of the volume phase transition temperature of the crosslinked P(NIPAM-co-BCAm) hydrogel to a higher temperature, and the repulsion among the charged BCAm/Ba(2+) or BCAm/Pb(2+) complexes and the osmotic pressure within the P(NIPAM-co-BCAm) membranes result in the swelling of microcapsules. Induced by recognizing barium(II) or lead(II) ions, the prepared microcapsules with P(NIPAM-co-BCAm) membranes exhibit isothermal and significant swelling not only in outer and inner diameters but also in the membrane thickness. The proposed microcapsules in this study are highly attractive for developing smart sensors and/or carriers for detection and/or elimination of heavy metal ions. PMID:20656104

  11. Substrate and Metal Ion Promiscuity in Mannosylglycerate Synthase*

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Morten M.; Suits, Michael D. L.; Yang, Min; Barry, Conor S.; Martinez-Fleites, Carlos; Tailford, Louise E.; Flint, James E.; Dumon, Claire; Davis, Benjamin G.; Gilbert, Harry J.; Davies, Gideon J.

    2011-01-01

    The enzymatic transfer of the sugar mannose from activated sugar donors is central to the synthesis of a wide range of biologically significant polysaccharides and glycoconjugates. In addition to their importance in cellular biology, mannosyltransferases also provide model systems with which to study catalytic mechanisms of glycosyl transfer. Mannosylglycerate synthase (MGS) catalyzes the synthesis of α-mannosyl-d-glycerate using GDP-mannose as the preferred donor species, a reaction that occurs with a net retention of anomeric configuration. Past work has shown that the Rhodothermus marinus MGS, classified as a GT78 glycosyltransferase, displays a GT-A fold and performs catalysis in a metal ion-dependent manner. MGS shows very unusual metal ion dependences with Mg2+ and Ca2+ and, to a lesser extent, Mn2+, Ni2+, and Co2+, thus facilitating catalysis. Here, we probe these dependences through kinetic and calorimetric analyses of wild-type and site-directed variants of the enzyme. Mutation of residues that interact with the guanine base of GDP are correlated with a higher kcat value, whereas substitution of His-217, a key component of the metal coordination site, results in a change in metal specificity to Mn2+. Structural analyses of MGS complexes not only provide insight into metal coordination but also how lactate can function as an alternative acceptor to glycerate. These studies highlight the role of flexible loops in the active center and the subsequent coordination of the divalent metal ion as key factors in MGS catalysis and metal ion dependence. Furthermore, Tyr-220, located on a flexible loop whose conformation is likely influenced by metal binding, also plays a critical role in substrate binding. PMID:21288903

  12. Data mining of metal ion environments present in protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Heping; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Lasota, Piotr; Lebioda, Lukasz; Minor, Wladek

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of metal-protein interaction distances, coordination numbers, B-factors (displacement parameters), and occupancies of metal binding sites in protein structures determined by X-ray crystallography and deposited in the PDB shows many unusual values and unexpected correlations. By measuring the frequency of each amino acid in metal ion binding sites, the positive or negative preferences of each residue for each type of cation were identified. Our approach may be used for fast identification of metal-binding structural motifs that cannot be identified on the basis of sequence similarity alone. The analysis compares data derived separately from high and medium resolution structures from the PDB with those from very high resolution small-molecule structures in the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD). For high resolution protein structures, the distribution of metal-protein or metal-water interaction distances agrees quite well with data from CSD, but the distribution is unrealistically wide for medium (2.0 – 2.5 Å) resolution data. Our analysis of cation B-factors versus average B-factors of atoms in the cation environment reveals substantial numbers of structures contain either an incorrect metal ion assignment or an unusual coordination pattern. Correlation between data resolution and completeness of the metal coordination spheres is also found. PMID:18614239

  13. How do energetic ions damage metallic surfaces?

    SciTech Connect

    Osetskiy, Yury N.; Calder, Andrew F.; Stoller, Roger E.

    2015-02-20

    Surface modification under bombardment by energetic ions observed under different conditions in structural and functional materials and can be either unavoidable effect of the conditions or targeted modification to enhance materials properties. Understanding basic mechanisms is necessary for predicting properties changes. The mechanisms activated during ion irradiation are of atomic scale and atomic scale modeling is the most suitable tool to study these processes. In this paper we present results of an extensive simulation program aimed at developing an understanding of primary surface damage in iron by energetic particles. We simulated 25 keV self-ion bombardment of Fe thin films with (100) and (110) surfaces at room temperature. A large number of simulations, ~400, were carried out allow a statistically significant treatment of the results. The particular mechanism of surface damage depends on how the destructive supersonic shock wave generated by the displacement cascade interacts with the free surface. Three basic scenarios were observed, with the limiting cases being damage created far below the surface with little or no impact on the surface itself, and extensive direct surface damage on the timescale of a few picoseconds. In some instances, formation of large <100> vacancy loops beneath the free surface was observed, which may explain some earlier experimental observations.

  14. How do energetic ions damage metallic surfaces?

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Osetskiy, Yury N.; Calder, Andrew F.; Stoller, Roger E.

    2015-02-20

    Surface modification under bombardment by energetic ions observed under different conditions in structural and functional materials and can be either unavoidable effect of the conditions or targeted modification to enhance materials properties. Understanding basic mechanisms is necessary for predicting properties changes. The mechanisms activated during ion irradiation are of atomic scale and atomic scale modeling is the most suitable tool to study these processes. In this paper we present results of an extensive simulation program aimed at developing an understanding of primary surface damage in iron by energetic particles. We simulated 25 keV self-ion bombardment of Fe thin films withmore » (100) and (110) surfaces at room temperature. A large number of simulations, ~400, were carried out allow a statistically significant treatment of the results. The particular mechanism of surface damage depends on how the destructive supersonic shock wave generated by the displacement cascade interacts with the free surface. Three basic scenarios were observed, with the limiting cases being damage created far below the surface with little or no impact on the surface itself, and extensive direct surface damage on the timescale of a few picoseconds. In some instances, formation of large <100> vacancy loops beneath the free surface was observed, which may explain some earlier experimental observations.« less

  15. Heavy metal ions are potent inhibitors of protein folding

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Sandeep K.; Goloubinoff, Pierre; Christen, Philipp

    2008-07-25

    Environmental and occupational exposure to heavy metals such as cadmium, mercury and lead results in severe health hazards including prenatal and developmental defects. The deleterious effects of heavy metal ions have hitherto been attributed to their interactions with specific, particularly susceptible native proteins. Here, we report an as yet undescribed mode of heavy metal toxicity. Cd{sup 2+}, Hg{sup 2+} and Pb{sup 2+} proved to inhibit very efficiently the spontaneous refolding of chemically denatured proteins by forming high-affinity multidentate complexes with thiol and other functional groups (IC{sub 50} in the nanomolar range). With similar efficacy, the heavy metal ions inhibited the chaperone-assisted refolding of chemically denatured and heat-denatured proteins. Thus, the toxic effects of heavy metal ions may result as well from their interaction with the more readily accessible functional groups of proteins in nascent and other non-native form. The toxic scope of heavy metals seems to be substantially larger than assumed so far.

  16. Quantum CPF gates between rare earth ions through measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yun-Feng; Han, Zheng-Fu; Yang, Yong; Guo, Guang-Can

    2004-09-01

    We propose a method to realize quantum controlled phase flip (CPF) through interaction between a single-photon pulse and two microsphere cavities with a single three-level ion respectively and final photonic measurement. Our CPF gates are scalable with extremely high fidelity and low error rate, and are more applicable based on current laboratory cavity-QED technology.

  17. DUHOCAMIS: a dual hollow cathode ion source for metal ion beams.

    PubMed

    Zhao, W J; Müller, M W O; Janik, J; Liu, K X; Ren, X T

    2008-02-01

    In this paper we describe a novel ion source named DUHOCAMIS for multiply charged metal ion beams. This ion source is derived from the hot cathode Penning ion gauge ion source (JINR, Dubna, 1957). A notable characteristic is the modified Penning geometry in the form of a hollow sputter electrode, coaxially positioned in a compact bottle-magnetic field along the central magnetic line of force. The interaction of the discharge geometry with the inhomogeneous but symmetrical magnetic field enables this device to be operated as hollow cathode discharge and Penning discharge as well. The main features of the ion source are the very high metal ion efficiency (up to 25%), good operational reproducibility, flexible and efficient operations for low charged as well as highly charged ions, compact setup, and easy maintenance. For light ions, e.g., up to titanium, well-collimated beams in the range of several tens of milliamperes of pulsed ion current (1 ms, 10/s) have been reliably performed in long time runs. PMID:18315181

  18. Ion beam sputter-deposited thin film coatings for protection of spacecraft polymers in low earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.; Mirtich, M. J.; Rutledge, S. K.; Swec, D. M.; Nahra, H. K.

    1985-01-01

    Ion beam sputter-deposited thin films at Al2O3, SiO2, and a codeposited mixture of predominantly SiO2 with small amounts of fluoropolymer were evaluated both in laboratory plasma ashing tests and in space on board Shuttle flight STS-8 for effectiveness in preventing oxidation of polyimide Kapton. Measurements of mass loss and optical performance of coated and uncoated polyimide samples exposed to the low earth orbital environment are presented. Optical techniques were used to measure loss rates of protective films exposed to atomic oxygen. Results of the analysis of the space flight exposed samples indicate that thin film metal oxide coatings are very effective in protecting the polyimide. Metal oxide coatings with a small amount of fluoropolymer codeposited have the additional benefit of great flexibility.

  19. Ion beam sputter-deposited thin film coatings for protection of spacecraft polymers in low Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.; Mirtich, M. J.; Rutledge, S. K.; Swec, D. M.; Nahra, H. K.

    1985-01-01

    Ion beam sputter-deposited thin films of Al2O3, SiO2, and a codeposited mixture of predominantly SiO2 with small amounts of a fluoropolymer were evaluated both in laboratory plasma ashing tests and in space on board shuttle flight STS-8 for effectiveness in preventing oxidation of polyimide Kapton. Measurements of mass loss and optical performance of coated and uncoated polyimide samples exposed to the low Earth orbital environment are presented. Optical techniques were used to measure loss rates of protective films exposed to atomic oxygen. Results of the analysis of the space flight exposed samples indicate that thin film metal oxide coatings are very effective in protecting the polyimide. Metal oxide coatings with a small amount of fluoropolymer codeposited have the additional benefit of great flexibility.

  20. The Sol-Gel Synthesis of Rare-Earth Ions Substituted Barium Hexaferrites and Magnetic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, S.; Xin, P. H.; Wang, P. F.; Zhang, B. B.; Han, Y. B.; Peng, X. L.; Hong, B.; Jin, H. X.; Gong, J.; Jin, D. F.; Ge, H. L.; Wang, X. Q.; Zhang, J.

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, a series of rare-earth-doped barium hexaferrite powders (Ba0.95Re0.05-Fe12O19 and Ba0.95Re0.05M0.05Fe11.95O19: Re = La, Pr, Sm, Nd, Gd, Dy, Yb; M = Zn2+, Mn2+, Mn0.52+Zn2+0.5) were synthesized by the sol-gel self-combustion technology. The phase composition and the magnetic properties of the as-prepared barium hexaferrites were characterized and discussed with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The results showed that the barium hexaferrites exhibited the magnetoplumbite phase structure with the average diameter of 45 nm. Magnetic properties study revealed that the variation of the saturation magnetization (Ms) was similar with the change of the rare-earth ions radius, but the change of Ms was low. This indicated that the magnetic moments of rare-earth ions could not affect Ms. The magnetocrystalline anisotropy field mainly influenced the anisotropism of hexaferrites, and the coercivity (Hc) of the rare-earth ions doped barium hexaferrites basically decreased with the increasing orbital quantum numbers (except Sm3+ and Gd3+). Further study showed the co-addition of Zn2+ and Mn2+ did not change the trend of Ms and Hc. Thus, it is concluded that the rare-earth ions played an important role for the anisotropy field of barium hexaferrites.

  1. Metal ions affecting the gastrointestinal system including the liver.

    PubMed

    Naughton, Declan P; Nepusz, Tamás; Petroczi, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    In the present context, metal ions can be categorized into several classes including those that are essential for life and those that have no known biological function and thus can be considered only as potentially hazardous. Many complexities arise with regard to metal toxicity and there is a paucity of studies relating to many metals which are frequent components of the diet. For many people ingestion of mineral supplements is considered a risk-free health choice despite growing evidence to the contrary. Numerous approaches have been developed to assess risk associated with ingestion of metal ions. These include straightforward estimation of safe limits such as oral reference dose which are often based on data derived from animal experiments. More convoluted approaches such as the Target Hazard Quotient involve assessment of hazard with frequent exposure over long durations such as a lifetime. The latter calculation also affords facile consideration of the effects of many metals together. In many cases, rigorous data are unavailable, hence, large factors of uncertainty are employed to relate risk to humans. Owing to the nature of metal toxicity, data pertaining to the gastrointestinal tract and liver are often acquired from diseases of metal homeostasis or episodes of considerable metal overload. Whilst these studies provide evidence for mechanisms of metal-induced toxicity such as enhancing oxidative stress, extrapolation of these results to healthy individuals or patients with chronic inflammatory diseases is not straightforward. In summary, the diverse nature of metals and their effects on human tissues along with a paucity of studies on the full range of their effects, warrant further in-depth studies on the association of metals to ageing, chronic inflammatory diseases, and cancer. PMID:21473378

  2. Architectural design criteria for f-block metal ion sequestering agents. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, B.P.; Dixon, D.A.; Roundhill, D.M.; Rogers, R.D.; Paine, R.T.; Raymond, K.N.

    1998-12-31

    'The objective of this project is to provide a means to optimize ligand architecture for f-block metal recognition. The authors strategy builds on an innovative and successful molecular modeling approach in developing polyether ligand design criteria for the alkali and alkaline earth cations. The hypothesis underlying this proposal is that differences in metal ion binding with multidentate ligands bearing the same number and type of donor groups are primarily attributable to intramolecular steric factors. They propose quantifying these steric factors through the application of molecular mechanics models. The research involves close integration of theoretical and experimental chemistry. The experimental work entails synthesizing novel ligands and experimentally determining structures and binding constants for metal ion complexation by series of ligands in which architecture is systematically varied. The theoretical work entails using electronic structure calculations to parameterize a molecular mechanics force field for a range of metal ions and ligand types. The resulting molecular mechanics force field will be used to predict low energy structures for unidentate, bidentate, and multidentate ligands and their metal complexes through conformational searches. Results will be analyzed to assess the relative importance of several steric factors including optimal M-L length, optimal geometry at the metal center, optimal geometry at the donor atoms (complementarity), and conformation prior to binding (preorganization). An accurate set of criteria for the design of ligand architecture will be obtained from these results. These criteria will enable researchers to target ligand structures for synthesis and thereby dramatically reduce the time and cost associated with metal-specific ligand development.'

  3. Yttrium and rare earth stabilized fast reactor metal fuel

    DOEpatents

    Guon, Jerold; Grantham, LeRoy F.; Specht, Eugene R.

    1992-01-01

    To increase the operating temperature of a reactor, the melting point and mechanical properties of the fuel must be increased. For an actinide-rich fuel, yttrium, lanthanum and/or rare earth elements can be added, as stabilizers, to uranium and plutonium and/or a mixture of other actinides to raise the melting point of the fuel and improve its mechanical properties. Since only about 1% of the actinide fuel may be yttrium, lanthanum, or a rare earth element, the neutron penalty is low, the reactor core size can be reduced, the fuel can be burned efficiently, reprocessing requirements are reduced, and the nuclear waste disposal volumes reduced. A further advantage occurs when yttrium, lanthanum, and/or other rare earth elements are exposed to radiation in a reactor, they produce only short half life radioisotopes, which reduce nuclear waste disposal problems through much shorter assured-isolation requirements.

  4. Adsorption characteristics of metal ions on chitosan chemically modified by D-galactose

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Kazuo; Sumi, Hisaharu; Matsumoto, Michiaki

    1996-07-01

    The adsorption characteristics of metal ions on chitosan chemically modified by D-galactose were examined. The pH dependency on the distribution ratio was found to be affected by the valency of the metal ion, and the apparent adsorption equilibrium constants of the metal ions were determined. The order of adsorption of the metal ions is Ga > In > Nd > Eu for the trivalent metal ions and Cu > Ni > Co for the divalent metal ions. It is believed that amino and hydroxyl groups in the chitosan act as a chelating ligand.

  5. Production yield of rare-earth ions implanted into an optical crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornher, Thomas; Xia, Kangwei; Kolesov, Roman; Kukharchyk, Nadezhda; Reuter, Rolf; Siyushev, Petr; Stöhr, Rainer; Schreck, Matthias; Becker, Hans-Werner; Villa, Bruno; Wieck, Andreas D.; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2016-02-01

    Rare-earth (RE) ions doped into desired locations of optical crystals might enable a range of novel integrated photonic devices for quantum applications. With this aim, we have investigated the production yield of cerium and praseodymium by means of ion implantation. As a measure, the collected fluorescence intensity from both implanted samples and single centers was used. With a tailored annealing procedure for cerium, a yield up to 53% was estimated. Praseodymium yield amounts up to 91%. Such high implantation yield indicates a feasibility of creation of nanopatterned rare-earth doping and suggests strong potential of RE species for on-chip photonic devices.

  6. Metal ion bombardment of onion skin cell wall

    SciTech Connect

    Sangyuenyongpipat, S.; Vilaithong, T.; Yu, L.D.; Verdaguer, A.; Ratera, I.; Ogletree, D.F.; Monteiro, O.R.; Brown, I.G.

    2004-05-10

    Ion bombardment of living cellular material is a novel subfield of ion beam surface modification that is receiving growing attention from the ion beam and biological communities. Although it has been demonstrated that the technique is sound, in that an adequate fraction of the living cells can survive both the vacuum environment and energetic ion bombardment, there remains much uncertainty about the process details. Here we report on our observations of onion skin cells that were subjected to ion implantation, and propose some possible physical models that tend to support the experimental results. The ion beams used were metallic (Mg, Ti, Fe, Ni, Cu), mean ion energy was typically 30keV, and the implantation fluence was in the range 1014 1016 ions/cm2. The cells were viewed using Atomic Force Microscopy, revealing the formation of microcrater-like structures due to ion bombardment. The implantation depth profile was measured with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and compared to the results of the TRIM, T-DYN and PROFILE computer codes.

  7. Uptake of Metal Ions by Rhizopus arrhizus Biomass

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, J. M.; Cooper, D. G.; Neufeld, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    Rhizopus arrhizus biomass was found to absorb a variety of different metal cations and anions but did not absorb alkali metal ions. The amount of uptake of the cations was directly related to ionic radii of La3+, Mn2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, Ba2+, Hg2+, Pb2+, UO22+, and Ag+. The uptake of all the cations is consistent with absorption of the metals by sites in the biomass containing phosphate, carboxylate, and other functional groups. The uptake of the molybdate and vanadate anions was strongly pH dependent, and it is proposed that the uptake mechanism involves electrostatic attraction to positively charged functional groups. PMID:16346521

  8. A study of the structural properties of GaN implanted by various rare-earth ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackova, A.; Malinsk, P.; Sofer, Z.; imek, P.; Sedmidubsk, D.; Mikulics, M.; Wilhelm, R. A.

    2013-07-01

    GaN layers with <0 0 0 1> crystallographic orientation, grown by low-pressure metal-organic vapour-phase epitaxy (MOVPE) on c-plane sapphire substrates, were implanted with 200 and 400 keV Sm+, Tm+, Eu+, Tb+ and Ho+ ions at fluencies of 1 1015-1 1016 cm-2. The composition of the ion-implanted layers and concentration profiles of the implanted atoms were studied by Rutherford Back-Scattering spectrometry (RBS). The profiles were compared to SRIM 2008 simulations. The structural properties of the ion-implanted layers were characterised by RBS-channelling and Raman spectroscopy. Changes in the surface morphology caused by the ion implantation were examined by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). A structural analysis showed a high disorder of the atoms close to the amorphised structure at the surface layer above an implantation fluence of 5 1015 cm-2 while lower disorder density was observed in the bulk according to the projected range of 400 keV ions. The post-implantation annealing induced significant changes only in the Sm and Eu depth profiles; a diffusion of rare-earths implanted at a fluence of 5 1015 cm-2 to the surface was observed. The annealing caused the reconstruction of the surface layer accompanied by surface-roughness enhancement.

  9. The chemistry of meteoric metals in the Earth's upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plane, John M. C.

    The presence of thin layers of free metal atoms at around 90 km in the upper atmosphere has been known for about fifty years. Layers of the alkali metals Na, K and Li, as well as Ca and Fe, have been observed. This discovery has posed two important questions. First, what is the source of the metals: interplanetary or terrestrial? Secondly, what is the nature of the chemistry that causes reactive metals such as sodium to exist in their atomic form in the atmosphere? The first part of this review covers the techniques that have been developed to observe the metal layers, including ground-, rocket- and space-based photometers, and in particular metal lidars. The many curious phenomena that have been observed are then described, such as the small scale-heights of the layers, the quite different seasonal variations of the three alkali metals, the large depletions of Ca and Fe relative to Na, and the dramatic appearance of sporadic Na layers. The second part of the review describes the recent advances that have been made in laboratory kinetic studies of metal reactions of atmospheric interest. A number of specialized techniques for making low-temperature measurements are compared, and a compilation of recommended rate coefficients is given. The history of modelling of the chemistry of metals in the mesosphere is then reviewed, and the evidence that their major source is meteoric ablation is presented. A current model of sodium is then described and evaluated with sensitivity tests. This section ends by discussing the possible impact of these meteoric metals on the chlorine-catalysed removal of ozone in the stratosphere. The final part of the review summarizes the active current state of the field and identifies some of its future directions.

  10. Investigation of metal ion accumulation in Euglena gracilis by fluorescence methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, H.; Ren, Q. G.; Mi, Y.; Shi, X. F.; Yao, H. Y.; Jin, C. Z.; Huang, Y. Y.; He, W.; Zhang, J.; Liu, B.

    2002-04-01

    Single cell synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microprobe measurements as well as X-ray absorption near edge structure experiments have been done at Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility on Euglena Gracilis cells. Concentrations of the metal ions Mn 2+, Nd 3+, Ce 3+ and other trace elements, such as Ca, Fe, Zn, etc. have been measured both by single cell SXRF and bulk PIXE technique. It was found that the content of Ca, Fe and Zn was lower after the uptake of rare earths or Mn by the cells, while the valence states of Mn 2+, Ce 3+ and Nd 3+ were unaltered. The results related to cytochemistry are also discussed.

  11. Observations of nonadiabatic acceleration of ions in Earth's magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, L. A.; Paterson, W. R.; Kivelson, M. G.

    1994-01-01

    We present observations of the three-dimensional velocity distributions of protons in the energy range 20 eV to 52 keV at locations within and near the current sheet of Earth's magnetotail at geocentric radial distances 35 to 87 R(sub E). These measurements were acquired on December 8, 1990, with a set of electrostatic analyzers on board the Galileo spacecraft during its approach to Earth in order to obtain one of its gravitational assists to Jupiter. It is found that the velocity distributions are inadequately described as quasi-Maxwellian distributions such as those found in the central plasma sheet at positions nearer to Earth. Instead the proton velocity distributions can be categorized into two major types. The first type is the 'lima bean' shaped distribution with high-speed bulk flows and high temperatures that are similar to those found nearer to Earth in the plasma sheet boundary layer. The second type consists of colder protons with considerably lesser bulk flow speeds. Examples of velocity distributions are given for the plasma mantle, a region near the magnetic neutral line, positions earthward and tailward of the neutral line, and the plasma sheet boundary layer. At positions near the neutral line, only complex velocity distributions consisting of the colder protons are found, whereas both of the above types of distributions are found in and near the current sheet at earthward and tailward locations. Bulk flows are directed generally earthward and tailward at positions earthward and tailward of the neutral line, respectively. Only the high-speed, hot distribution is present in the plasma sheet boundary layer. The observations are interpreted in terms of the nonadiabatic acceleration of protons that flow into the current sheet from the plasma mantle. For this interpretation the hot, 'lima bean' shaped distributions are associated with meandering, or Speiser, orbits in the current sheet. It is suggested that the colder, lower-speed proton velocity distributions are the result of fractional or few gyromotions before ejection out of the current sheet, but this speculation must be further investigated with appropriate kinetic simulation of trajectories.

  12. Laser-driven ion sources for metal ion implantation for the reduction of dry friction

    SciTech Connect

    Boody, F. P.; Juha, L.; Kralikova, B.; Krasa, J.; Laska, L.; Masek, K.; Pfeifer, M.; Rohlena, K.; Skala, J.; Straka, P.; Perina, V.; Woryna, E.; Giersch, D.; Hoepfl, R.; Kelly, J. C.; Hora, H.

    1997-04-15

    The anomalously high ion currents and very high ionization levels of laser-produced plasmas give laser-driven ion sources significant advantages over conventional ion sources. In particular, laser-driven ion sources should provide higher currents of metal ions at lower cost, for implantation into solids in order to improve their material properties such as friction. The energy and charge distributions for Pb and Sn ions produced by ablation of solid targets with {approx}25 J, {approx}300 ps iodine laser pulses, resulting in up to 48-times ionized MeV ions, as well as the optimization of focus position, are presented. Implantation of these ions into Ck-45 steel, without electrostatic acceleration, produced profiles with two regions. Almost all of the ions were implanted in a near surface region a few nm deep. However, a small but significant number of ions were implanted as deep as could be measured with Rutherford backscattering (RBS), here 150 nm for Sn and 250 nm for Pb. For the implanted ion densities and profiles achieved, no change in the coefficient of friction was measured for either ion.

  13. Electropositive bivalent metallic ion unsaturated polyester complexed polymer concrete

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.; Horn, W.H.

    1981-11-04

    Quick setting polymer concrete compositions which are mixtures of unsaturated polyesters and crosslinking monomers together with appropriate initiators and promoters in association with aggregate which may be wet and a source of bivalent metallic ions which will set to polymer concrete with excellent structural properties.

  14. Electropositive bivalent metallic ion unsaturated polyester complexed polymer concrete

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi; Kukacka, Lawrence E.; Horn, William H.

    1985-01-01

    Quick setting polymer concrete compositions with excellent structural properties are disclosed; these polymer concrete compositions are mixtures of unsaturated polyesters and crosslinking monomers together with appropriate initiators and promoters in association with aggregate, which may be wet, and with a source of bivalent metallic ions.

  15. Electropositive bivalent metallic ion unsaturated polyester complexed polymer concrete

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.; Horn, W.H.

    1983-05-13

    Quick setting polymer concrete compositions are described which are mixtures of unsaturated polyesters and crosslinking monomers together with appropriate initiators and promoters in association with aggregate which may be wet and a source of bivalent metallic ions which will set to polymer concrete with excellent structural properties.

  16. Impact of metal ions on netilmicin-melanin interaction.

    PubMed

    Wrześniok, Dorota; Buszman, Ewa; Grzegorczyk, Magdalena; Grzegorczyk, Aneta; Hryniewicz, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Netilmicin, which is mainly used as the sulfate, is a semisynthetic, water soluble aminoglycoside antibiotic obtained by chemical modification of sisomicin. It is active against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including strains which are resistant to other aminoglycosides. Netilmicin form complexes with melanin. The aim of the presented work was to examine the effect of Cu2+, Zn2+, Ca2+ and Mg2+ on netilmicin binding to synthetic DOPA-melanin. It has been demonstrated that metal ions decrease the amount of antibiotic bound to melanin as compared with netilmicin-melanin complexes obtained in the absence of metals. It has been also shown that only one class of binding sites participates in netilmicin-[melanin-metal ion] complexes formation with the association constant K approximately 10(3) M(-1). The obtained results demonstrate that Cu2+, Zn2+, Ca2+ and Mg2+ ions modify the interaction between netilmicin and melanin biopolymer. The blocking of some active centers in melanin molecules by metal ions, which potentially exist in living systems, may influence the clinical therapeutic efficiency as well as the undesirable side effects of netilmicin. PMID:22574505

  17. COAGULATION AND PRECIPITATION OF SELECTED METAL IONS FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of laboratory jar tests to develop data on the removal from aqueous solution of 12 metal ions of environmental concern. The project, of very limited scope, provides initial screening data only: coagulants were evaluated at only two dose levels (1.1 and 1....

  18. Principles Governing Metal Ion Selectivity in Ion Channel Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Carmay

    2014-03-01

    Our research interests are to (i) unravel the principles governing biological processes and use them to identify novel drug targets and guide drug design, and (ii) develop new methods for studying macromolecular interactions. This talk will provide an overview of our work in these two areas and an example of how our studies have helped to unravel the principles underlying the conversion of Ca2+-selective to Na+-selective channels. Ion selectivity of four-domain voltage-gated Ca2+(Cav) and sodium (Nav) channels, which is controlled by the selectivity filter (SF, the narrowest region of an open pore), is crucial for electrical signaling. Over billions of years of evolution, mutation of the Glu from domain II/III in the EEEE/DEEA SF of Ca2+-selective Cav channels to Lys made these channels Na+-selective. This talk will delineate the physical principles why Lys is sufficient for Na+/Ca2+selectivity and why the DEKA SF is more Na+-selective than the DKEA one.

  19. Changes in blood ion levels after removal of metal-on-metal hip replacements

    PubMed Central

    Durrani, Salim K; Sampson, Barry; Panetta, Therese; Liddle, Alexander D; Sabah, Shiraz A; Chan, Newton K; Skinner, John A; Hart, Alister J

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose In patients with metal-on-metal (MoM) hip prostheses, pain and joint effusions may be associated with elevated blood levels of cobalt and chromium ions. Since little is known about the kinetics of metal ion clearance from the body and the rate of resolution of elevated blood ion levels, we examined the time course of cobalt and chromium ion levels after revision of MoM hip replacements. Patients and methods We included 16 patients (13 female) who underwent revision of a painful MoM hip (large diameter, modern bearing) without fracture or infection, and who had a minimum of 4 blood metal ion measurements over an average period of 6.1 (0–12) months after revision. Results Average blood ion concentrations at the time of revision were 22 ppb for chromium and 43 ppb for cobalt. The change in ion levels after revision surgery varied extensively between patients. In many cases, over the second and third months after revision surgery ion levels decreased to 50% of the values measured at revision. Decay of chromium levels occurred more slowly than decay of cobalt levels, with a 9% lag in return to normal levels. The rate of decay of both metals followed second-order (exponential) kinetics more closely than first-order (linear) kinetics. Interpretation The elimination of cobalt and chromium from the blood of patients who have undergone revision of painful MoM hip arthroplasties follows an exponential decay curve with a half-life of approximately 50 days. Elevated blood levels of cobalt and chromium ions can persist for at least 1 year after revision, especially in patients with high levels of exposure. PMID:24758321

  20. Ion reflection and transmission during reconnection at the earth's subsolar magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuselier, S. A.; Klumpar, D. M.; Shelley, E. G.

    1991-01-01

    Composition measurements in an accelerated flow event at the earth's dayside magnetopause show evidence for reflection and transmission of magnetospheric and magnetosheath ion species. Furthermore, a single velocity transformation approximately tangent to the magnetopause surface orders the individual transmitted and reflected ion distributions on both sides of the magnetopause into field-aligned flow at V(A), the local Alfven speed. These observations provide strong evidence for a kinetic description of magnetic reconnection at the magnetopause.

  1. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: From Cluster Ions to Toxic metal Ions in Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas B. Lentz

    2007-12-01

    This dissertation focused on using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to study cluster ions and toxic metal ions in biology. In Chapter 2, it was shown that primary, secondary and quarternary amines exhibit different clustering characteristics under identical instrument conditions. Carbon chain length also played a role in cluster ion formation. In Chapters 3 and 4, the effects of solvent types/ratios and various instrumental parameters on cluster ion formation were examined. It was found that instrument interface design also plays a critical role in the cluster ion distribution seen in the mass spectrum. In Chapter 5, ESI-MS was used to investigate toxic metal binding to the [Gln{sup 11}]-amyloid {beta}-protein fragment (1-16). Pb and Cd bound stronger than Zn, even in the presence of excess Zn. Hg bound weaker than Zn. There are endless options for future work on cluster ions. Any molecule that is poorly ionized in positive ion mode can potentially show an increase in ionization efficiency if an appropriate anion is used to produce a net negative charge. It is possible that drug protein or drug/DNA complexes can also be stabilized by adding counter-ions. This would preserve the solution characteristics of the complex in the gas phase. Once in the gas phase, CID could determine the drug binding location on the biomolecule. There are many research projects regarding toxic metals in biology that have yet to be investigated or even discovered. This is an area of research with an almost endless future because of the changing dynamics of biological systems. What is deemed safe today may show toxic effects in the future. Evolutionary changes in protein structures may render them more susceptible to toxic metal binding. As the understanding of toxicity evolves, so does the demand for new toxic metal research. New instrumentation designs and software make it possible to perform research that could not be done in the past. What was undetectable yesterday will become routine tomorrow.

  2. [Spectroscopic studies on transition metal ions in colored diamonds].

    PubMed

    Meng, Yu-Fei; Peng, Ming-Sheng

    2004-07-01

    Transition metals like nickel, cobalt and iron have been often used as solvent catalysts in high pressure high temperature (HPHT) synthesis of diamond, and nickel and cobalt ions have been found in diamond lattice. Available studies indicated that nickel and cobalt ions could enter the lattice as interstitial or substitutional impurities and form complexes with nitrogen. Polarized microscopy, SEM-EDS, EPR, PL and FTIR have been used in this study to investigate six fancy color natural and synthetic diamonds in order to determine the spectroscopic characteristics and the existing forms of transition metal ions in colored diamond lattice. Cobalt-related optical centers were first found in natural chameleon diamonds, and some new nickel and cobalt-related optical and EPR centers have also been detected in these diamond samples. PMID:15766067

  3. Ions upstream of the earth's bow shock - A theoretical comparison of alternative source populations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, S. J.; Thomsen, M. F.; Gosling, J. T.

    1983-01-01

    The trajectories of ions reflected or leaked upstream from the earth's bow shock and subject solely to the Lorentz force in a steady interplanetary magnetic field B and the V x B electric field are studied theoretically. Expressions are obtained for the guiding center motion and gyromotion in a frame (the Hoffman-Teller frame) moving parallel to the shock surface with sufficient speed to transform the incident solar wind velocity into motion entirely along the interplanetary magnetic field. Equations are derived which transform these motions back to the observer's frame. The predicted upstream motions for four different source models for upstream ions are compared using these expressions: magnetic moment-conserving reflection of solar wind ions, specular reflection of solar wind ions, magnetic moment-conserving leakage of magnetosheath ions, and leakage of magnetosheath ions parallel to the shock normal.

  4. Method for removing metal ions from solution with titanate sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Lundquist, Susan H.; White, Lloyd R.

    1999-01-01

    A method for removing metal ions from solution comprises the steps of providing titanate particles by spray-drying a solution or slurry comprising sorbent titanates having a particle size up to 20 micrometers, optionally in the presence of polymer free of cellulose functionality as binder, said sorbent being active towards heavy metals from Periodic Table (CAS version) Groups IA, IIA, IB, IIB, IIIB, and VIII, to provide monodisperse, substantially spherical particles in a yield of at least 70 percent of theoretical yield and having a particle size distribution in the range of 1 to 500 micrometers. The particles can be used free flowing in columns or beds, or entrapped in a nonwoven, fibrous web or matrix or a cast porous membrane, to selectively remove metal ions from aqueous or organic liquid.

  5. Metal ion influence on eumelanin fluorescence and structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutter, Jens-Uwe; Birch, David J. S.

    2014-06-01

    Melanin has long been thought to have an unworkably weak and complex fluorescence, but here we study its intrinsic fluorescence in order to demonstrate how metal ions can be used to control the rate of formation, constituents and structure of eumelanin formed from the well-known laboratory auto-oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (L-DOPA). The effect on eumelanin absorption and fluorescence of a range of solvated metal ions is reported including Cu, Zn, Ni, Na and K. Monovalent cations and Zn have little effect, but the effect of transition metal cations can be considerable. For example, at pH 10, copper ions are shown to accelerate the onset of eumelanin formation, but not the rate of formation once it commences, and simplify the usual complex structure and intrinsic fluorescence of eumelanin in a way that is consistent with an increased abundance of 5,5-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid (DHICA). The presence of a dominant 6 ns fluorescence decay time at 480 nm, when excited at 450 nm describes a distinct photophysical species, which we tentatively assign to small oligomers. Copper is well-known to normally quench fluorescence, but increasing amounts of copper surprisingly leads to an increase in the fluorescence decay time of eumelanin, while reducing the fluorescence intensity, suggesting copper modification of the excited state. Such results have bearing on diverse areas. The most accepted morphology for melanin is that of a graphite-like sheet structure, and one which readily binds metal ions, an interaction that is thought to have an important, though as yet unclear bearing on several areas of medicine including neurology. There is also increasing interest in bio-mimicry by preparing and labelling sheet structures with metal ions for new electronic and photonic materials.

  6. Chitosan removes toxic heavy metal ions from cigarette mainstream smoke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wen; Xu, Ying; Wang, Dongfeng; Zhou, Shilu

    2013-09-01

    This study investigated the removal of heavy metal ions from cigarette mainstream smoke using chitosan. Chitosan of various deacetylation degrees and molecular weights were manually added to cigarette filters in different dosages. The mainstream smoke particulate matter was collected by a Cambridge filter pad, digested by a microwave digestor, and then analyzed for contents of heavy metal ions, including As(III/V), Pb(II), Cd(II), Cr(III/VI) and Ni(II), by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The results showed that chitosan had a removal effect on Pb(II), Cd(II), Cr(III/VI) and Ni(II). Of these, the percent removal of Ni(II) was elevated with an increasing dosage of chitosan. Chitosan of a high deace tylation degree exhibited good binding performance toward Cd(II), Cr(III/VI) and Ni(II), though with poor efficiency for Pb(II). Except As(III/V), all the tested metal ions showed similar tendencies in the growing contents with an increasing chitosan molecular weight. Nonetheless, the percent removal of Cr(III/VI) peaked with a chitosan molecular weight of 200 kDa, followed by a dramatic decrease with an increasing chitosan molecular weight. Generally, chitosan had different removal effects on four out of five tested metal ions, and the percent removal of Cd(II), Pb(II), Cr(III/VI) and Ni(II) was approximately 55%, 45%, 50%, and 16%, respectively. In a word, chitosan used in cigarette filter can remove toxic heavy metal ions in the mainstream smoke, improve cigarette safety, and reduce the harm to smokers.

  7. Modification of medical metals by ion implantation of copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Y. Z.; Xiong, G. Y.; Liang, H.; Raman, S.; He, F.; Huang, Y.

    2007-10-01

    The effect of copper ion implantation on the antibacterial activity, wear performance and corrosion resistance of medical metals including 317 L of stainless steels, pure titanium, and Ti-Al-Nb alloy was studied in this work. The specimens were implanted with copper ions using a MEVVA source ion implanter with ion doses ranging from 0.5 × 10 17 to 4 × 10 17 ions/cm 2 at an energy of 80 keV. The antibacterial effect, wear rate, and inflexion potential were measured as a function of ion dose. The results obtained indicate that copper ion implantation improves the antibacterial effect and wear behaviour for all the three medical materials studied. However, corrosion resistance decreases after ion implantation of copper. Experimental results indicate that the antibacterial property and corrosion resistance should be balanced for medical titanium materials. The marked deteriorated corrosion resistance of 317 L suggests that copper implantation may not be an effective method of improving its antibacterial activity.

  8. Long-lived artificial ion clouds in the earth's ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Milinevsky, G.P. ); Kashirin, A.I. ); Romanovsky, Yu.A. ); Stenbaek-Nielson, H.C. ); Kelley, M.C. )

    1993-06-07

    The authors report on two observations made over the Caribbean during the summer of 1991 of barium ion cloud releases, ten hours after the clouds were released. One release was made in the morning twilight, and one in the evening twilight, and each was observed again in the following twilight period by a low light level TV imager and a TV spectrograph onboard a Russian research vessel. These observations were very surprising at the time, but the authors present arguments as to why in retrospect they may not be so unusual in practise. Such cloud releases may provide very sensitive tests of ionspheric convection models.

  9. Solution NMR refinement of a metal ion bound protein using metal ion inclusive restrained molecular dynamics methods.

    PubMed

    Chakravorty, Dhruva K; Wang, Bing; Lee, Chul Won; Guerra, Alfredo J; Giedroc, David P; Merz, Kenneth M

    2013-06-01

    Correctly calculating the structure of metal coordination sites in a protein during the process of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure determination and refinement continues to be a challenging task. In this study, we present an accurate and convenient means by which to include metal ions in the NMR structure determination process using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations constrained by NMR-derived data to obtain a realistic and physically viable description of the metal binding site(s). This method provides the framework to accurately portray the metal ions and its binding residues in a pseudo-bond or dummy-cation like approach, and is validated by quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) MD calculations constrained by NMR-derived data. To illustrate this approach, we refine the zinc coordination complex structure of the zinc sensing transcriptional repressor protein Staphylococcus aureus CzrA, generating over 130 ns of MD and QM/MM MD NMR-data compliant sampling. In addition to refining the first coordination shell structure of the Zn(II) ion, this protocol benefits from being performed in a periodically replicated solvation environment including long-range electrostatics. We determine that unrestrained (not based on NMR data) MD simulations correlated to the NMR data in a time-averaged ensemble. The accurate solution structure ensemble of the metal-bound protein accurately describes the role of conformational sampling in allosteric regulation of DNA binding by zinc and serves to validate our previous unrestrained MD simulations of CzrA. This methodology has potentially broad applicability in the structure determination of metal ion bound proteins, protein folding and metal template protein-design studies. PMID:23609042

  10. Metal negative ion beam extraction from a radio frequency ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Kanda, S.; Yamada, N.; Kasuya, T.; Romero, C. F. P.; Wada, M.

    2015-04-08

    A metal ion source of magnetron magnetic field geometry has been designed and operated with a Cu hollow target. Radio frequency power at 13.56 MHz is directly supplied to the hollow target to maintain plasma discharge and induce self-bias to the target for sputtering. The extraction of positive and negative Cu ion beams have been tested. The ion beam current ratio of Cu{sup +} to Ar{sup +} has reached up to 140% when Ar was used as the discharge support gas. Cu{sup −} ion beam was observed at 50 W RF discharge power and at a higher Ar gas pressure in the ion source. Improvement of poor RF power matching and suppression of electron current is indispensable for a stable Cu{sup −} ion beam production from the source.

  11. Liquid metal ion source and alloy for ion emission of multiple ionic species

    DOEpatents

    Clark, Jr., William M.; Utlaut, Mark W.; Wysocki, Joseph A.; Storms, Edmund K.; Szklarz, Eugene G.; Behrens, Robert G.; Swanson, Lynwood W.; Bell, Anthony E.

    1987-06-02

    A liquid metal ion source and alloy for the simultaneous ion evaporation of arsenic and boron, arsenic and phosphorus, or arsenic, boron and phosphorus. The ionic species to be evaporated are contained in palladium-arsenic-boron and palladium-arsenic-boron-phosphorus alloys. The ion source, including an emitter means such as a needle emitter and a source means such as U-shaped heater element, is preferably constructed of rhenium and tungsten, both of which are readily fabricated. The ion sources emit continuous beams of ions having sufficiently high currents of the desired species to be useful in ion implantation of semiconductor wafers for preparing integrated circuit devices. The sources are stable in operation, experience little corrosion during operation, and have long operating lifetimes.

  12. Determination of uranium and rare-earth metals separation coefficients in LiCl KCl melt by electrochemical transient techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, S. A.; Hayashi, H.; Minato, K.; Gaune-Escard, M.

    2005-09-01

    The main step in the pyrometallurgical process of spent nuclear fuel recycling is a molten salt electrorefining. The knowledge of separation coefficients of actinides (U, Np, Pu and Am) and rare-earth metals (Y, La, Ce, Nd and Gd) is very important for this step. Usually the separation coefficients are evaluated from the formal standard potentials of metals in melts containing their own ions, values obtained by potentiometric method. Electrochemical experiments were carried out at 723-823 K in order to estimate separation coefficients in LiCl-KCl eutectic melt containing uranium and lanthanum trichlorides. It was shown that for the calculation of uranium and lanthanum separation coefficients it is necessary to determine the voltammetric peak potentials of U(III) and La(III), their concentration in the melt and the kinetic parameters relating to U(III) discharge such as transfer and diffusion coefficients, and standard rate constants of charge transfer.

  13. Ion burst event in the earth's dayside magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paschalidis, N. P.; Krimigis, S. M.; Sibeck, D. G.; Mcentire, R. W.; Sarris, E. T.

    1991-01-01

    The Medium Energy Particle Analizer instrument on the AMPTE/CCE Spacecraft provided ion angular distributions as rapidly as every 6 sec for H, He, and O at energies of 10 keV to 2 MeV in the dayside magnetosheath whenever the solar wind pressure compressed the magnetopause within 8.75 R(E), the CCE apogee. This paper discusses a burst of energetic particles in the subsolar magnetosheath and its association with rapid changes in the local magnetic field direction in such a way the magnetic field connected the spacecraft to the magnetopause during the enhancement. It is found that magnetosheath angular distributions outside the burst peaked at 90 deg pitch angles, whereas during the burst they exhibited field-aligned streaming either parallel or antiparallel to the magnetic-field combined with a clear earthward gradient. The clear earthward gradients at E not smaller than 10 KeV, the streaming, and the slope change in the burst-time magnetosheath spectrum at about 10 KeV suggest magnetospheric source for the burst-time not smaller than 10 KeV ions and heated solar wind for E less than 10 KeV.

  14. Serum metal ion exposure after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Luetzner, Joerg; Krummenauer, Frank; Lengel, Attila Michael; Ziegler, Joerg; Witzleb, Wolf-Christoph

    2007-08-01

    All metal implants release metal ions because of corrosion. This has been studied and debated, especially in metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasties. Total knee arthroplasty implants have large metal surface areas and therefore substantial potential for corrosion. We determined changes in serum levels of metal ions in 41 patients after cemented unconstrained total knee arthroplasty without patellar resurfacing, 18 with unilateral total knee arthroplasty (median, 66 months after surgery) and 23 patients with bilateral total knee arthroplasties (75 and 50 months after first and second surgeries, respectively). Serum concentrations of chromium, cobalt, and molybdenum were analyzed and related to the number of total knee arthroplasties and compared with those of 130 control patients without implants. The median chromium, cobalt, and molybdenum concentrations were 0.92, 3.28, and 2.55 microg/L, respectively, in the unilateral total knee arthroplasty sample and 0.98, 4.28, and 2.40 microg/L, respectively, in the bilateral total knee arthroplasty sample. We observed no difference between the serum levels in patients with unilateral and bilateral arthroplasties, but the serum levels of chromium and cobalt of both study groups were greater than those of the control group (less than 0.25 microg/L). The patients who had total knee arthroplasty had molybdenum profiles that were similar to those of the control group (median, 2.11 microg/L). PMID:17438467

  15. Interaction of metal ions with cadmium-induced cellular toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, N.H.; Klaassen, C.D.

    1981-01-01

    Interactions between Cd and other metal ions are important from both nutritional and toxicological aspects. As Cd is toxic to isolated hepatocytes, these cells can be used to investigate the effects of other metals on Cd-induced cellular injury. Isolated hepatocytes were incubated at 37/sup 0/C with vehicle (saline); Cd (200 or 400 ..mu..M); or Cd plus Cr, Mn, Zn, Ni, Pb, Se, or Fe (200 to 1000 ..mu..M). Evidence of cellular injury was assessed by loss of intracellular K/sup +/ and aspartate aminotransferase from the hepatocytes. Effects on lipid peroxidation, as measured by concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactants, were assessed. Uptake of /sup 109/Cd and interaction of the other metal ions with this accumulation were also quantitated. Cell injury due to Cd was consistently reduced by Cr, Mn, Zn, Pb, and Fe. Lipid peroxidation due to Cd was inhibited by Cr, Mn, and Zn. All the metals except Ni produced an increase in the amount of Cd accumulated by hepatocytes. There was no consistent relation between reduction of cellular toxicity and either inhibition of lipid peroxidation or uptake of Cd. These experiments show that (1) protective properties of some metals seen in vivo can be demonstrated at the cellular level and (2) protective effects of metals in general on Cd-induced cellular toxicity are not due to a decrease in either Cd uptake or lipid peroxidation.

  16. In vitro cytotoxicity of metallic ions released from dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Milheiro, Ana; Nozaki, Kosuke; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J; Muris, Joris; Miura, Hiroyuki; Feilzer, Albert J

    2016-05-01

    The cytotoxicity of a dental alloy depends on, but is not limited to, the extent of its corrosion behavior. Individual ions may have effects on cell viability that are different from metals interacting within the alloy structure. We aimed to investigate the cytotoxicity of individual metal ions in concentrations similar to those reported to be released from Pd-based dental alloys on mouse fibroblast cells. Metal salts were used to prepare seven solutions (concentration range 100 ppm-1 ppb) of the transition metals, such as Ni(II), Pd(II), Cu(II), and Ag(I), and the metals, such as Ga(III), In(III), and Sn(II). Cytotoxicity on mouse fibroblasts L929 was evaluated using the MTT assay. Ni, Cu, and Ag are cytotoxic at 10 ppm, Pd and Ga at 100 ppm. Sn and In were not able to induce cytotoxicity at the tested concentrations. Transition metals were able to induce cytotoxic effects in concentrations similar to those reported to be released from Pd-based dental alloys. Ni, Cu, and Ag were the most cytotoxic followed by Pd and Ga; Sn and In were not cytotoxic. Cytotoxic reactions might be considered in the etiopathogenesis of clinically observed local adverse reactions. PMID:25549610

  17. The ligand-promoted mobilisation of metal ions from mineral surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putnis, C. V.

    2003-04-01

    Many metals such as Fe, Mo, Cu, Zn etc have been identified as essential micronutrients for plants and microorganisms. These metals have to be mobilised from mineral surfaces in contact with crustal fluids in order to be available to living cells. Many studies have shown the importance of chelation in the mobilisation of metal ions into these fluids. The ligand-promoted dissolution of minerals enables elements essential to life to be accessible. Organic acids with chelating properties are widely present on the surface of the earth (both anthropogenic and those produced naturally such as siderophores) and as well as releasing metal ions into solution for bioavailability, they control processes such as metal ion transport and adsorption and thereby are important in the understanding of toxicity and contamination. In this study we have compared mineral dissolution using a strong industrial chelator (DTPA -- diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid) and dissoluton using a synthetically produced naturally occurring siderophore, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid produced by Azotobacter vinelandii. The dissolution kinetics of a number of minerals (barite, chalcopyrite, malachite) by DTPA solution has been studied as a function of DTPA concentration in the range 0.001--0.5 M. Batch experiments were carried out at pH 12 where the DTPA is effectively de-protonated and over a range of temperatures (22--90C^o) to investigate the factors controlling the dissolution rate.. Although the dissolution mechanism involves the chelation of one metal ion by each molecule of DTPA, the dissolution rate was found to be inversely related to the DTPA concentration in solution and not dependent on the initial grain size of the mineral. The high activation energy for the dissolution process suggests that the rate is controlled by a surface desorption process rather than diffusion in the solution. The inverse dependence on the DTPA concentration suggests steric hindrance associated with the metal-DTPA surface complex formation. Dissolution kinetics of the natural siderophore, known to be specfic to Fe chelation, was observed under similar conditions and comparisons made with the strong industrial chelator in an attempt to understand the dissolution process. The results have important applications to many aspects of mineral dissolution and therefore metal ion mobility as well as raising fundamental questions regarding the nature of the crystal-solution interface at an atomic level.

  18. Performance and Comparison of Lithium-Ion Batteries Under Low-Earth-Orbit Mission Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Concha M.; Smart, Marshall C.; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Manzo, Michelle A.; Miller, Thomas B.; Gitzendanner, Rob

    2007-01-01

    The performance of two 28 V, 25 Ah lithium-ion batteries is being evaluated under low-Earth-orbit mission profiles for satellite and orbiter applications. The batteries are undergoing life testing and have achieved over 12,000 cycles to 40 percent depth-of-discharge.

  19. Investigations of hyperfine and isotope structures in optical spectra of crystals with rare-earth ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, M. N.

    2015-10-01

    This is a review of works on hyperfine and isotope structures in the spectra of rare-earth ions in crystals that have been performed at the Laboratory of Fourier Spectroscopy of the Institute for Spectroscopy, Russian Academy of Sciences. The applicability of these studies to the development of optical quantum memory is discussed.

  20. Engineering rare-earth-doped heavy metal oxide glasses for 2-5 ?m lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Billy D. O.; Jha, Animesh; Dorofeev, Vitaly; Manzur, Tariq

    2010-04-01

    The electronic states in trivalent rare-earth ions offer an excellent opportunity for designing efficient fibre and bulk lasers for atmospheric remote sensing and LIDAR technology. The first part of this review article focuses on engineering passive fibres for 2-5 ?m transmission. The fabrication of single-mode tungsten tellurite optical fibres from high purity bulk glass rods is described. Fibres with a numerical aperture of 0.1 and core diameter of 10+/-2 ?m have been drawn using suction and rod-in-tube techniques of fibre preform fabrication. Losses of 2.3 dBm-1 at 974 nm have been measured. These fibres are of interest for use as passive transmission fibre or active fibres for lasing in the 2-5 ?m spectral region. The use of heavy metal oxides in the fabrication of glass leads to extended infrared transmission. In the 2nd part of the review we compare the slope efficiencies of Tm3+ and Tm3+/Ho3+ doped glasses and fibres for 1950-2080 nm lasers using a range of pumping schemes in tellurite and germanium oxide hosts. We also explain the importance of choosing 1950-2080 nm tunable lasers as a pump source for stimulated emission at longer wavelengths.

  1. Formation of ion acoustic solitary waves upstream of the earth's bow shock. [in solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pangia, M. J.; Lee, N. C.; Parks, G. K.

    1985-01-01

    The turbulent plasma development of Lee and Parks is applied to the solar wind approaching the earth's bow shock region. The ponderomotive force contribution is due to ion acoustic waves propagating in the direction of the ambient magnetic field. In this case, the envelope of the ion acoustic wave is shown to satisfy the cubic Schroedinger equation. Modulational instabilities exist for waves in the solar wind, thereby predicting the generation of solitary waves. This analysis further identifies that the ion acoustic waves which exhibit this instability have short wavelengths.

  2. Structure and ionic diffusion of alkaline-earth ions in mixed cation glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinou, Konstantinos; Sushko, Petr; Duffy, Dorothy M.

    2015-08-15

    A series of mixed cation silicate glasses of the composition A2O – 2MO – 4SiO2, with A=Li,Na,K and M=Ca,Sr,Ba has been investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulations in order to understand the effect of the nature of the cations on the mobility of the alkaline-earth ions within the glass network. The size of the alkaline-earth cation was found to affect the inter-atomic distances, the coordination number distributions and the bond angle distributions , whereas the medium-range order was almost unaffected by the type of the cation. All the alkaline-earth cations contribute to lower vibrational frequencies but it is observed that that there is a shift to smaller frequencies and the vibrational density of states distribution gets narrower as the size of the alkaline-earth increases. The results from our modeling for the ionic diffusion of the alkaline-earth cations are in a qualitative agreement with the experimental observations in that there is a distinct correlation between the activation energy for diffusion of alkaline earth-ions and the cation radii ratio. An asymmetrical linear behavior in the diffusion activation energy with increasing size difference is observed. The results can be described on the basis of a theoretical model that relates the diffusion activation energy to the electrostatic interactions of the cations with the oxygens and the elastic deformation of the silicate network.

  3. Origin of uranium and rare earth minerals in bone detritus from rare metal deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baturin, G. N.; Dubinchuk, V. T.

    2011-06-01

    In order to ascertain the forms in which uranium is present in ores of the Melovoe rare metal sedimentary deposit of uranium and rare earth minerals (South Mangyshlak), we investigated a series of typical ore samples that were collected earlier; both the uranium content and the total content of rare earth metals in them lay within 0.1-0.3%. The study was carried out by analytical electron microscopy using transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, electron microdiffraction, and microprobing. It was ascertained that both uranium and rare earth elements are present in ore mostly associated with biogenic phosphate in the form of natural minerals, such as uraninite, ningyoite, coffinite, autenite, and churchite. Iron hydroxides and graphitized organic matter are present in some samples. It is assumed that the co-occurrence of uranium and rare earth elements, which is nontypical for the sedimentary process, resulted from secondary epigenetic processes and alternation of reducing and oxidizing environmental conditions.

  4. Excitation of Pr3+ ions in alkaline-earth fluorides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radzhabov, E.; Nagirnyi, V.

    2010-11-01

    Emission and excitation spectra of CaF2, SrF2, BaF2 doped by PrF3 were measured in vacuum ultraviolet region at 11 K. Emission spectra of several 5d-4f bands of CaF2 and BaF2 show evident vibronic structure with apparent line separated by 400 cm-1 from the main zero phonon line. No such structure was observed in SrF2-Pr. The absence of vibronic structure in SrF2 is assumed to be caused by the closeness of a local vibronic frequency to the lattice phonon one. Excitation spectra of 4f-4f and 5d-4f transitions are substantially different pointing on to the different excitation mechanisms of both groups of lines. The 4f-4f lines show an intense excitation peak adjacent to the exciton peak. This infers that excitons created near to Pr3+ ions can feed the 4f-4f transitions. The efficiency of excitation of the 4f-4f and 5d-4f emission bands is quite low in the region of band-to-band transitions. An apparent peak at 19 eV in the excitation spectrum of the BaF2-Pr 5d-4f emission (230 nm) coincides well with that of the crossluminescence. No similar peaks were observed in CaF2 or SrF2 excitation spectra. We conclude that the main channel of energy transfer from the host to Pr3+ ions is realized resonantly through crossluminescence in BaF2-Pr.

  5. Optical studies of ion-beam synthesized metal alloy nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Magudapathy, P. Srivatsava, S. K.; Gangopadhyay, P.; Amirthapandian, S.; Sairam, T. N.; Panigrahi, B. K.

    2015-06-24

    Au{sub x}Ag{sub 1-x} alloy nanoparticles with tunable surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have been synthesized on a silica glass substrate. A small Au foil on an Ag foil is irradiated as target substrates such that ion beam falls on both Ag foil and Au foils. Silica slides are kept at an angle ∼45° with respect to the metallic foils. While irradiating the metallic foils with 100 keV Ar{sup +} ions, sputtered Au and Ag atoms get deposited on the silica-glass. In this configuration the foils have been irradiated by Ar{sup +} ions to various fluences at room temperature and the sputtered species are collected on silica slides. Formation of Au{sub x}Ag{sub 1-x} nanoparticles has been confirmed from the optical absorption measurements. With respect to the exposure area of Au and Ag foils to the ion beam, the SPR peak position varies from 450 to 500 nm. Green photoluminescence has been observed from these alloy metal nanoparticles.

  6. Peptide immobilisation on porous silicon surface for metal ions detection

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In this work, a Glycyl-Histidyl-Glycyl-Histidine (GlyHisGlyHis) peptide is covalently anchored to the porous silicon PSi surface using a multi-step reaction scheme compatible with the mild conditions required for preserving the probe activity. In a first step, alkene precursors are grafted onto the hydrogenated PSi surface using the hydrosilylation route, allowing for the formation of a carboxyl-terminated monolayer which is activated by reaction with N-hydroxysuccinimide in the presence of a peptide-coupling carbodiimide N-ethyl-N'-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide and subsequently reacted with the amino linker of the peptide to form a covalent amide bond. Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are used to investigate the different steps of functionalization. The property of peptides to form stable complexes with metal ions is exploited to achieve metal-ion recognition by the peptide-modified PSi-based biosensor. An electrochemical study of the GlyHisGlyHis-modified PSi electrode is achieved in the presence of copper ions. The recorded cyclic voltammograms show a quasi-irreversible process corresponding to the Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple. The kinetic factors (the heterogeneous rate constant and the transfer coefficient) and the stability constant of the complex formed on the porous silicon surface are determined. These results demonstrate the potential role of peptides grafted on porous silicon in developing strategies for simple and fast detection of metal ions in solution. PMID:21711937

  7. Multiply stripped ion generation in the metal vapor vacuum arc

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.G.; Feinberg, B.; Galvin, J.E.

    1987-09-01

    We consider the charge state distribution of ions produced in the metal vapor vacuum arc plasma discharge. A new kind of high current metal ion source in which the ion beam is extracted from a metal vapor vacuum arc plasma has been used to obtain the spectra of multiply charged ions produced within the cathode spots. The cathode materials used and the species reportetd on here are: C, Mg, Al, Si, Ti, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Zr, Nb, Mo, Rh, Pd, Ag, In, Sn, Gd, Ho, Ta, W, Pt, Au, Pb, Th, and U; the arc current was 200 A for all measurements. Charge state spectra were measured using a time-of-flight method. The arc voltage was also measured. In this paper we report on the measured charge state distributions and arc voltages and compare the distributions with the predictions of a theory in which ionization occurs in the cathode spots via stepwise ionization by electron impact. 64 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. [Applications of metal ions and their complexes in medicine I].

    PubMed

    Nagy, László; Csintalan, Gabriella; Kálmán, Eszter; Sipos, Pál; Szvetnik, Attila

    2003-01-01

    The "inorganic medical chemistry" is a rapidly developing field with enormous potential for applications, which offers new possibilities to the pharmaceutical industry. For example, the titanocene dichloride is already in clinical use, and antimetastatic activity of a range of Ru(III) complexes is also well established. There are ways to minimize the toxicity of Gd(III) complexes and therefore they can be safely injected as MRI contrast agents. The so called "ligand design" allows paramagnetic ions to be targeted to specific organs. Such designed ligands also enable the targeting of radiodiagnostic (99mTc) and radiotherapeutic (186Re) isotopes. There is a significant progress in understanding the coordination chemistry and biochemistry of metal ion(s) containing complexes such as Au antiarthritic and Bi antiulcer drugs. Further, currently developing areas include Mn (SOD mimics), V (insulin mimics), Ru (NO scavengers), Ln-based photosensitizers, metal-targeted organic agents and the Fe overload. The expanding knowledge of the role of metals in biochemistry is expected to provide scope for the design of new drugs in many other areas too, for example neuropharmaceutical and antiaffective agents. Progress in coordination chemistry is strongly dependent on understanding not only the thermodynamics of reactions, but also the kinetics of metal complexes under biologically relevant conditions. PMID:15279035

  9. Degradation of Anthracycline Antitumor Compounds Catalysed by Metal Ions

    PubMed Central

    Haj, Hayet Tayeb-Bel; Garnier-Suillerot, Arlette

    1994-01-01

    The influence of some metal ions on the degradation of anthracyclines was examined. One of the degradation products is the 7,8-dehydro-9,10-desacetyldoxorubicinone, D* (¥), usually formed by hydrolysis at slightly basic pH. D* is a lipophilic compound with no cytostatic properties. Its formation could be responsible for the lack of antitumor activity of the parent compound. The coordination of metal ions to anthracycline derivatives is required to have degradation products. Cations such as Na+, K+, or Ca2+ do not induce the D* formation however metals which can form stable complexes with doxorubicin afford D*. Iron(III) and copper(II) form appreciable amount of D* at slightly acidic pH. Terbium(III) forms D* but its complex is stable only at slightly basic pH. Palladium(II) which does not form D*. The influence of the coordination mode of metal ions to anthracycline on the D* formation is discussed. PMID:18476230

  10. New Catalytic DNA Biosensors for Radionuclides and Metal ion

    SciTech Connect

    Yi Lu

    2008-03-01

    We aim to develop new DNA biosensors for simultaneous detection and quantification of bioavailable radionuclides, such as uranium, technetium, and plutonium, and metal contaminants, such as lead, chromium, and mercury. The sensors will be highly sensitive and selective. They will be applied to on-site, real-time assessment of concentration, speciation, and stability of the individual contaminants before and during bioremediation, and for long-term monitoring of DOE contaminated sites. To achieve this goal, we have employed a combinatorial method called “in vitro selection” to search from a large DNA library (~ 1015 different molecules) for catalytic DNA molecules that are highly specific for radionuclides or other metal ions through intricate 3-dimensional interactions as in metalloproteins. Comprehensive biochemical and biophysical studies have been performed on the selected DNA molecules. The findings from these studies have helped to elucidate fundamental principles for designing effective sensors for radionuclides and metal ions. Based on the study, the DNA have been converted to fluorescent or colorimetric sensors by attaching to it fluorescent donor/acceptor pairs or gold nanoparticles, with 11 part-per-trillion detection limit (for uranium) and over million fold selectivity (over other radionuclides and metal ions tested). Practical application of the biosensors for samples from the Environmental Remediation Sciences Program (ERSP) Field Research Center (FRC) at Oak Ridge has also been demonstrated.

  11. The Structure of the Metal Transporter Tp34 and its Affinity for Divalent Metal Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knutsen, Gregory; Deka, Ranjit; Brautigam, Chad; Tomchick, Diana; Machius, Mischa; Norgard, Michael

    2007-10-01

    Tp34 is periplasmic membrane protein of the nonculitvatable spirochete Treponema pallidum, the pathogen of syphillis. It was proposed that Tp34 is a divalent metal transporter, but the identity of the preferred metal ion(s) was unclear. In this study we investigated the ability of divalent metal ions to induce rTp34 dimerization using hydrodynamic techniques and determine the crystal structure of metal bound forms. Using analytical ultracentrifugation sedimentation velocity experiments, we determined that cobalt is superior to nickel at inducing the dimerization of rTp34. rTp34 was crystallized and selected crystals were incubated at a pH 7.5 with CuSO4 and NiSO4. Diffraction experiments were conducted and the processed electron density maps showed that copper was bound to the major metal binding site as well as to three additional minor binding sites. By contrast nickel was only bound to the major metal binding site in one monomer and to three additional minor sites. These results along with previous findings support evidence of Tp34 being involved with metal transport and/or iron utilization.

  12. Development of a four-zone carousel process packed with metal ion-imprinted polymer for continuous separation of copper ions from manganese ions, cobalt ions, and the constituent metal ions of the buffer solution used as eluent.

    PubMed

    Jo, Se-Hee; Park, Chanhun; Yi, Sung Chul; Kim, Dukjoon; Mun, Sungyong

    2011-08-19

    A three-zone carousel process, in which Cu(II)-imprinted polymer (Cu-MIP) and a buffer solution were employed as adsorbent and eluent respectively, has been developed previously for continuous separation of Cu²⁺ (product) from Mn²⁺ and Co²⁺ (impurities). Although this process was reported to be successful in the aforementioned separation task, the way of using a buffer solution as eluent made it inevitable that the product stream included the buffer-related metal ions (i.e., the constituent metal ions of the buffer solution) as well as copper ions. For a more perfect recovery of copper ions, it would be necessary to improve the previous carousel process such that it can remove the buffer-related metal ions from copper ions while maintaining the previous function of separating copper ions from the other 2 impure heavy-metal ions. This improvement was made in this study by proposing a four-zone carousel process based on the following strategy: (1) the addition of one more zone for performing the two-step re-equilibration tasks and (2) the use of water as the eluent of the washing step in the separation zone. The operating conditions of such a proposed process were determined on the basis of the data from a series of single-column experiments. Under the determined operating conditions, 3 runs of carousel experiments were carried out. The results of these experiments revealed that the feed-loading time was a key parameter affecting the performance of the proposed process. Consequently, the continuous separation of copper ions from both the impure heavy-metal ions and the buffer-related metal ions could be achieved with a purity of 91.9% and a yield of 92.8% by using the proposed carousel process based on a properly chosen feed-loading time. PMID:21764065

  13. Liquid metal alloy ion sources—An alternative for focussed ion beam technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischoff, Lothar; Mazarov, Paul; Bruchhaus, Lars; Gierak, Jacques

    2016-06-01

    Today, Focused Ion Beam (FIB) processing is nearly exclusively based on gallium Liquid Metal Ion Sources (LMIS). But, many applications in the μm- or nm range could benefit from ion species other than gallium: local ion implantation, ion beam mixing, ion beam synthesis, or Focused Ion Beam Lithography (IBL). Therefore, Liquid Metal Alloy Ion Sources (LMAIS) represent a promising alternative to expand the remarkable application fields for FIB. Especially, the IBL process shows potential advantages over, e.g., electron beam or other lithography techniques: direct, resistless, and three-dimensional patterning, enabling a simultaneous in-situ process control by cross-sectioning and inspection. Taking additionally into account that the used ion species influences significantly the physical and chemical nature of the resulting nanostructures—in particular, the electrical, optical, magnetic, and mechanic properties leading to a large potential application area which can be tuned by choosing a well suited LMAIS. Nearly half of the elements of the periodic table are recently available in the FIB technology as a result of continuous research in this area during the last forty years. Key features of a LMAIS are long life-time, high brightness, and stable ion current. Recent developments could make these sources feasible for nano patterning issues as an alternative technology more in research than in industry. The authors will review existing LMAIS, LMIS other than Ga, and binary and ternary alloys. These physical properties as well as the fabrication technology and prospective domains for modern FIB applications will similarly be reviewed. Other emerging ion sources will be also presented and their performances discussed.

  14. Yttrium and rare earth stabilized fast reactor metal fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Guon, J.; Grantham, L.F.; Specht, E.R.

    1992-05-12

    This patent describes an improved metal alloy reactor fuel consisting essentially of uranium, plutonium, and at least one element from the group consisting of yttrium, lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, neodymium, promethium, samarium, europium, gadolinium, terbium, dysprosium, holmium, erbium, thulium, ytterbium and lutetium.

  15. Polymer filtration systems for dilute metal ion recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, B.F.; Robison, T.W.; Jarvinen, G.D.

    1998-12-01

    Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a metal recovery system that meets the global treatment demands for all kinds of industrial and metal-processing streams. The Polymer Filtration (PF) System--a process that is easily operated and robust--offers metal-finishing businesses a convenient and inexpensive way to recover and recycle metal ions in-house, thus reducing materials costs, waste removal costs, and industrial liability. As a valuable economic and environmental asset, the PF System has been named a winner of a 1995 R and D 100 Award. These awards are presented annually by R and D Magazine to the one hundred most significant technical innovations of the year. The PF System is based on the use of water-soluble metal-binding polymers and on advanced ultrafiltration membranes. Customers for this technology will receive new soluble polymers, especially formulated for their waste stream, and the complete PF processing unit: a reaction reservoir, pumps, plumbing, controls, and the advanced ultrafiltration membranes, all in a skid mounted frame. Metal-bearing waste water is treated in the reaction reservoir, where the polymer binds with the metal ions under balanced acid/base conditions. The reservoir fluid is then pumped through the ultrafiltration system--a cartridge packed with ultrafiltration membranes shaped in hollow fibers. As the fluid travels inside the fiber, water and other small molecules--simple salts such as calcium and sodium, for example--pass through the porous membrane walls of the fibers and are discharged through the outlet as permeate. The polymer-bound metal, which is too large to pass through the pores, is both purified and concentrated inside the hollow fibers and is returned to the fluid reservoir for further waste water treatment.

  16. Coupling of a locally implanted rare-earth ion ensemble to a superconducting micro-resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Wisby, I. Tzalenchuk, A. Ya.; Graaf, S. E. de; Adamyan, A.; Kubatkin, S. E.; Gwilliam, R.; Meeson, P. J.; Lindström, T.

    2014-09-08

    We demonstrate the coupling of rare-earth ions locally implanted in a substrate (Gd{sup 3+} in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) to a superconducting NbN lumped-element micro-resonator. The hybrid device is fabricated by a controlled ion implantation of rare-earth ions in well-defined micron-sized areas, aligned to lithographically defined micro-resonators. The technique does not degrade the internal quality factor of the resonators which remain above 10{sup 5}. Using microwave absorption spectroscopy, we observe electron-spin resonances in good agreement with numerical modelling and extract corresponding coupling rates of the order of 1 MHz and spin linewidths of 50–65 MHz.

  17. Ab initio calculations on the positive ions of the alkaline-earth oxides, fluorides, and hydroxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, H.; Langhoff, S. R.; Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical dissociation energies are presented for the alkaline-earth fluoride, hydroxide, and oxide positive ions that are considered to be accurate to 0.1-0.2 eV. The r(e) for the positive ions are found to be consistently shorter than the corresponding neutrals by 0.07 + or -0.02 A. The bonding in the ground states is demonstrated to be of predominantly M + 2 X - character. The a 3 Pi and A 1 Pi are found to lie considerably above the X 1 Sigma + ground states of the alkaline-earth fluoride and hydroxide positive ions. The overall agreement of the theoretical ionization potentials with the available experimental appearance potentials is satisfactory; these values should represent the most accurate and consistent set available.

  18. Maternal exposure to alkali, alkali earth, transition and other metals: Concentrations and predictors of exposure.

    PubMed

    Hinwood, A L; Stasinska, A; Callan, A C; Heyworth, J; Ramalingam, M; Boyce, M; McCafferty, P; Odland, J Ø

    2015-09-01

    Most studies of metals exposure focus on the heavy metals. There are many other metals (the transition, alkali and alkaline earth metals in particular) in common use in electronics, defense industries, emitted via combustion and which are naturally present in the environment, that have received limited attention in terms of human exposure. We analysed samples of whole blood (172), urine (173) and drinking water (172) for antimony, beryllium, bismuth, cesium, gallium, rubidium, silver, strontium, thallium, thorium and vanadium using ICPMS. In general most metals concentrations were low and below the analytical limit of detection with some high concentrations observed. Few factors examined in regression models were shown to influence biological metals concentrations and explained little of the variation. Further study is required to establish the source of metals exposures at the high end of the ranges of concentrations measured and the potential for any adverse health impacts in children. PMID:25984984

  19. Synthesis of DNA duplexes containing complexes of 5-modified pyrimidine bases and metal ions.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Kenji; Hayashi, Kosei; Watanabe, Yuko; Okamoto, Itaru; Ono, Akira

    2007-01-01

    DNA duplexes carrying metal ions at the 5-position of uracil residues were synthesized by mixing oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ODNs) containing 5-formyl uracils, metal ions, and amines. A metal ion binding site may form from the 5-formyl residue and amines. PMID:18029646

  20. Origins of bad-metal conductivity and the insulator-metal transition in the rare-earth nickelates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaramillo, R.; Ha, Sieu D.; Silevitch, D. M.; Ramanathan, Shriram

    2014-04-01

    For most metals, increasing temperature (T) or disorder hastens electron scattering. The electronic conductivity (σ) decreases as T rises because electrons are more rapidly scattered by lattice vibrations. The value of σ decreases as disorder increases because electrons are more rapidly scattered by imperfections in the material. This is the scattering rate hypothesis, which has guided our understanding of metal conductivity for over a century. However, for so-called bad metals with very low σ this hypothesis predicts scattering rates so high as to conflict with Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. Bad-metal conductivity has remained a puzzle since its initial discovery in the 1980s in high-temperature superconductors. Here we introduce the rare-earth nickelates (RNiO3, R = rare-earth) as a class of bad metals. We study SmNiO3 thin films using infrared spectroscopy while varying T and disorder. We show that the interaction between lattice distortions and Ni-O covalence explains bad-metal conductivity and the insulator-metal transition. This interaction shifts spectral weight over the large energy scale established by the Ni-O orbital interaction, thus enabling very low σ without violating the uncertainty principle.

  1. Chloride Ion Mediated Synthesis of Metal/Semiconductor Hybrid Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Hinrichs, Dominik; Galchenko, Michael; Kodanek, Torben; Naskar, Suraj; Bigall, Nadja C; Dorfs, Dirk

    2016-05-01

    A synthetic route to prepare metal-semiconductor hybrid nanoparticles is presented, along with the possibility to tune the ratio of primary to secondary nucleation and the morphology of the semiconductor material grown on the metal nanoparticle seeds. Gold and cobalt-platinum nanoparticles are employed as metal seeds, on which CdS or CdSe is grown. Using transmission electron microscopy, absorption spectroscopy (UV-vis), and powder X-ray diffraction as characterization techniques, a significant influence of chloride ions on the type of nucleation (that is, secondary or primary nucleation) as well as on the shape of the resulting heterostructures is observed. Partially replacing the commonly used cadmium precursor CdO by varying amounts of CdCl2 opens access to rod-like, multiarmed, flower-like, and bullet-like structures. The results suggest that neither pure CdO nor pure CdCl2 as precursors but only a mixture of both make these structures obtainable. In this article, the influence of the chloride ion concentration during semiconductor growth on metal seeds is investigated in depth. The morphology of the resulting heterostructures is characterized carefully, and a growth mechanism is suggested. Furthermore, it is shown that this synthetic approach can be transferred to seeds of various metals such as platinum, gold, and cobalt platinum. PMID:27031048

  2. Effect on uptake of heavy metal ions by phosphate grafting of allophane.

    PubMed

    Okada, Kiyoshi; Nishimuta, Koji; Kameshima, Yoshikazu; Nakajima, Akira

    2005-06-15

    The effect of phosphate grafting on the uptake of various heavy metal ions was investigated using allophane, a clay mineral having a chemical composition of 1-2SiO2Al2O3.5-6H2O with hollow nanoparticles 3.5-5 nm in size. Phosphate grafting was performed on allophane with an atomic ratio Si/Al=0.85 using the orthophosphates (NH4)2HPO4, Na2HPO4 and CaHPO4 and the triphosphate Na5P3O10. The cations in the phosphates were partially retained in the samples, along with the grafted phosphate. Uptake experiments were performed with various heavy metal ions (Cu2+, Zn2+, Ni2+, Co2+, and Mn2+) and alkaline earth ions (Mg2+ and Ca2+) using a batch method. With increasing amounts of grafted phosphate, the Cu2+ uptake capacity increases to about double of that of ungrafted allophane. Although part of the grafted phosphate is released during the uptake experiments, this can be largely suppressed by heat-treating the samples at 200-500 degrees C. The Cu2+ uptake ability of the (NH4)2HPO4-grafted sample showed a steep decrease with higher heating temperature according to the thermal decomposition of NH4+. The ratios of cations released from the samples to cations removed from solution (2Na/Cu and Ca/Cu) are close to unity. From these results, the replacement reaction is thought to be the main uptake mechanism of heavy metal ions in the present samples. The uptake abilities of the present samples for various cations are explained with respect to the solubilities of the corresponding metal phosphates. PMID:15897056

  3. The Corrosion Protection of Metals by Ion Vapor Deposited Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1993-01-01

    A study of the corrosion protection of substrate metals by ion vapor deposited aluminum (IVD Al) coats has been carried out. Corrosion protection by both anodized and unanodized IVD Al coats has been investigated. Base metals included in the study were 2219-T87 Al, 7075-T6 Al, Titanium-6 Al-4 Vanadium (Ti-6Al-4V), 4130 steel, D6AC steel, and 4340 steel. Results reveal that the anodized IVD Al coats provide excellent corrosion protection, but good protection is also achieved by IVD Al coats that have not been anodized.

  4. The corrosion protection of metals by ion vapor deposited aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Danford, M.D.

    1993-10-01

    A study of the corrosion protection of substrate metals by ion vapor deposited aluminum (IVD Al) coats has been carried out. Corrosion protection by both anodized and unanodized IVD Al coats has been investigated. Base metals included in the study were 2219-T87 Al, 7075-T6 Al, Titanium-6 Al-4 Vanadium (Ti-6Al-4V), 4130 steel, D6AC steel, and 4340 steel. Results reveal that the anodized IVD Al coats provide excellent corrosion protection, but good protection is also achieved by IVD Al coats that have not been anodized.

  5. Statistical evaluation of biogeochemical variables affecting spatiotemporal distributions of multiple free metal ion concentrationsin an urban estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    Free metal ion concentrations have been recognized as a better indicator of metal bioavailability in aquatic environments than total dissolved metal concentrations. However, our understanding of the determinants of free ion concentrations, especially in a metal mixture, is limite...

  6. Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, M. H.

    1984-01-01

    The following aspects of the planet Earth are discussed: plate tectonics, the interior of the planet, the formation of the Earth, and the evolution of the atmosphere and hydrosphere. The Earth's crust, mantle, and core are examined along with the bulk composition of the planet.

  7. Chelating Agents and the Regulation of Metal Ions

    PubMed Central

    Bulman, Robert A.

    1994-01-01

    Up to about the early 1980s it was perhaps still possible to summarize in a review of a moderate length the development of the medicinal applications of chelation chemistry and the exploitation of such chemistry in regulating the metal ion concentrations in the body. However, in the last few years there has a great surge in the development of chelation chemistry and its usage in medicine and related areas of life sciences research. It is no longer the case that such a review primarily concentrates upon the use of chelating agents in removing toxic metals from the body but it must now cover the use of chelating agents in the imaging procedures nuclear medicine and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the use of chelating agents in unravelling the biochemistry of reactive oxidative species (ROS) and the control and measurement of intracellular calcium ions. It is in the recent applications that there have been the greatest developments over the last ten years. PMID:18476223

  8. Nanomagnetic chelators for removal of toxic metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sarika; Barick, K. C.; Bahadur, D.

    2013-02-01

    Ethylenediamine trtraaceteic acid (EDTA) functionalized Fe3O4 nanomagnetic chelators (NMCs) were synthesized by co-precipitation method followed by in-situ grafting of EDTA. XRD and TEM analyses reveal the formation of highly crystalline single-phase Fe3O4 nanoparticles of size about 10 nm. Surface functionalization of Fe3O4 with EDTA was evident from FTIR spectroscopy, TGA analysis and zeta-potential measurement. These NMCs exhibit superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature with strong field dependent magnetic responsivity. It has been observed that NMCs have strong tendency for adsorption of various toxic metal ions (Ni2+, Cr3+, Cu2+, Cd2+, Co2+ and Pb2+) from waste-water. Furthermore, these magnetic chelators can be used as highly efficient separable and reusable material for removal of toxic metal ions.

  9. Photoelectric properties in metal ion modified DNA nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Atul; Dugasani, Sreekantha Reddy; Jang Ah Kim; Kim; Sung Ha Park; Taesung Kim

    2015-08-01

    Due to specific or as designed self-assembly, DNA nanostructures gaining popularity in various nanoscale electronic applications. Herein, a novel divalent metal ion-DNA complex known as M-DNA have been investigated for its photoelectric characteristics. The increased conductivity of M-DNA thin films is attributed to the metal ion electrical and optical properties. The gate voltage effect along with illumination on the conductivity of M-DNA demonstrates that M-DNA can be used as an active element of a field-effect transistor. The Zn DNA shows maximum conductivity of 300μS/cm at 480 nm light illumination suggest that M-DNA can be utilized in nano-opto-electronics and bio-sensing applications. PMID:26737260

  10. Production of intense metal ion beams from ECR ion sources using the MIVOC method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogomolov, S. L.; Bondarchenko, A. E.; Efremov, A. A.; Kuzmenkov, K. I.; Lebedev, A. N.; Lebedev, K. V.; Lebedev, V. Ya.; Loginov, V. N.; Mironov, V. E.; Yazvitsky, N. Yu.

    2015-12-01

    The production of metal ion beams by electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources using the MIVOC (Metal Ions from Volatile Compounds) method is described. The method is based on the use of metal compounds which have high vapor pressure at room temperature, e.g., C2B10H12, Fe(C5H5)2, etc. Intense ion beams of B and Fe were produced using this method at the FLNR JINR cyclotrons. Experiments on the production of cobalt, chromium, vanadium, germanium, and hafnium ion beams were performed at the test bench of ECR ion sources. Main efforts were put into production and acceleration of 50Ti ion beams at the U-400 cyclotron. The experiments on the production of 50Ti ion beams were performed at the test bench using natural and enriched compounds of titanium (CH3)5C5Ti(CH3)3. In these experiments, 80 μA 48Ti5+ and 70 μA 48Ti11+ beam currents were obtained at different settings of the source. Following successful tests, two 3-week runs were performed with 50Ti beams at the U-400 cyclotron aimed to perform experiments on the spectroscopy of superheavy elements. The intensity of the injected 50Ti5+ beam was 50-60 μA. The source worked stably during experiments. The compound consumption rate was determined at about 2.4 mg/h, which corresponded to the 50Ti consumption of 0.6 mg/h.

  11. Selective extraction of metal ions with polymeric extractants by ion exchange/redox

    DOEpatents

    Alexandratos, Spiro D.

    1987-01-01

    The specification discloses a method for the extraction of metal ions having a reduction potential of above about +0.3 from an aqueous solution. The method includes contacting the aqueous solution with a polymeric extractant having primary phosphinic acid groups, secondary phosphine oxide groups, or both phosphinic acid and phosphine oxide groups.

  12. Metal ion transport and regulation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Agranoff, Daniel; Krishna, Sanjeev

    2004-09-01

    The regulation of metal ion concentrations is central to the physiology of the interaction between pathogenic bacteria and their hosts. Apart from the NRAMP orthologue, MntH, metal ion transporters in Mycobacterium tuberculosis have not been studied. Mn, the physiological substrate of MntH in other bacteria, may play an important role as a structural and redox-active cofactor in a wide range of metabolic processes. Fe, Cu and Zn play structural and catalytic roles in metalloenzymes involved in oxidative stress responses. Fe and Mg are required for growth in macrophages. Genomic analyses reveal 28 sequences encoding a broad repertoire of putative metal ion transporters (or transporter subunits), representing 24% of all transporters in this organism. These comprise 8 families of secondary active transporters and 3 families of primary active transporters, including 12,P, type ATPases. Potential metal ion specificities include K+, Na+, Cu2+, Cd2+, Zn2+, Mn2+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Fe2+/3+, Hg2+, AsO2- and AsO4(2-). 17 of these transporters are also encoded as complete open reading frames in Mycobacterium leprae, suggesting a role in intracellular survival. Iron transcriptionally regulates a diverse set of genes via the iron-dependent DNA-binding proteins, Fur and IdeR. Changes in Fe and Mg concentrations signal entry into the intracellular compartment and potentially trigger up-regulation of virulence determinants. The plethora of putative transport systems encoded by the M. tuberculosis genome contrasts strikingly with the paucity of experimental data on these systems. The detailed analysis of the temporal pattern of M. tuberculosis transporter gene expression during infection will provide important insights into the basic biology of intracellular parasitism and may help to shape novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:15353332

  13. Metal ions: supporting actors in the playbook of small ribozymes.

    PubMed

    Johnson-Buck, Alexander E; McDowell, Sarah E; Walter, Nils G

    2011-01-01

    Since the 1980s, several small RNA motifs capable of chemical catalysis have been discovered. These small ribozymes, composed of between approximately 40 and 200 nucleotides, have been found to play vital roles in the replication of subviral and viral pathogens, as well as in gene regulation in prokaryotes, and have recently been discovered in noncoding eukaryotic RNAs. All of the known natural small ribozymes - the hairpin, hammerhead, hepatitis delta virus, Varkud satellite, and glmS ribozymes--catalyze the same self-cleavage reaction as RNase A, resulting in two products, one bearing a 2'-3' cyclic phosphate and the other a 5'-hydroxyl group. Although originally thought to be obligate metalloenzymes like the group I and II self-splicing introns, the small ribozymes are now known to support catalysis in a wide variety of cations that appear to be only indirectly involved in catalysis. Nevertheless, under physiologic conditions, metal ions are essential for the proper folding and function of the small ribozymes, the most effective of these being magnesium. Metal ions contribute to catalysis in the small ribozymes primarily by stabilizing the catalytically active conformation, but in some cases also by activating RNA functional groups for catalysis, directly participating in catalytic acid-base chemistry, and perhaps by neutralizing the developing negative charge of the transition state. Although interactions between the small ribozymes and cations are relatively nonspecific, ribozyme activity is quite sensitive to the types and concentrations of metal ions present in solution, suggesting a close evolutionary relationship between cellular metal ion homeostasis and cation requirements of catalytic RNAs, and perhaps RNA in general. PMID:22010272

  14. Metal Ions: Supporting Actors in the Playbook of Small Ribozymes

    PubMed Central

    Johnson-Buck, Alexander E.; McDowell, Sarah E.; Walter, Nils G.

    2012-01-01

    Since the 1980s, several small RNA motifs capable of chemical catalysis have been discovered. These small ribozymes, composed of between approximately 40 and 200 nucleotides, have been found to play vital roles in the replication of subviral and viral pathogens, gene regulation in prokaryotes, and have recently been discovered in noncoding eukaryotic RNAs. All of the known natural small ribozymes – the hairpin, hammerhead, hepatitis delta virus, Varkud satellite, and glmS ribozymes – catalyze the same self-cleavage reaction as RNAse A, resulting in two products, one bearing a 2′–3′ cyclic phosphate and the other a 5′-hydroxyl group. Although originally thought to be obligate metalloenzymes like the group I and II self-splicing introns, the small ribozymes are now known to support catalysis in a wide variety of cations that appear to be only indirectly involved in catalysis. Nevertheless, under physiologic conditions, metal ions are essential for the proper folding and function of the small ribozymes, the most effective of these being magnesium. Metal ions contribute to catalysis in the small ribozymes primarily by stabilizing the catalytically active conformation, but in some cases also by activating RNA functional groups for catalysis, directly participating in catalytic acid-base chemistry, and perhaps by neutralizing the developing negative charge of the transition state. Although interactions between the small ribozymes and cations are relatively nonspecific, ribozyme activity is quite sensitive to the types and concentrations of metal ions present in solution, suggesting a close evolutionary relationship between cellular metal ion homeostasis and cation requirements of catalytic RNAs, and perhaps RNA in general. PMID:22010272

  15. NOVEL APPROACH TO METAL-HUMIC COMPLEXATION STUDIES BY LANTHANID ION PROBE SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Naturally occurring humic substances are known to be potentially strong binders of metals in the environment. ensitive spectroscopic technique, based on the unique luminescence properties of the tripositive lanthanide metal ions, has been developed to selectively probe metal bind...

  16. New technology of extracting the amount of rare earth metals from the red mud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martoyan, G. A.; Karamyan, G. G.; Vardan, G. A.

    2016-01-01

    The paper outlined the environmental and economic problems associated with red mud - the waste generated in processing of bauxite ore for aluminum production. The chemical analysis of red mud has identified a number of useful elements including rare earth metals. The electromembrane technology of red mud processing with extraction of valuable elements is described. A possible scheme of separation of these metals through electrolysis is also given.

  17. First-principles study of He point-defects in HCP rare-earth metals

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yang; Chen, Ru; Peng, SM; Long, XG; Wu, Z.; Gao, Fei; Zu, Xiaotao

    2011-05-01

    He defect properties in Sc, Y, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er and Lu were studied using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. The results indicate that the formation energy of an interstitial He atom is smaller than that of a substitutional He atom in all hcp rare-earth metals considered. Furthermore, the tetrahedral interstitial position is more favorable than an octahedral position for He defects. The results are compared with those from bcc and fcc metals.

  18. Nanostructure operations by means of the liquid metal ion sources.

    PubMed

    Gasanov, I S; Gurbanov, I I

    2012-02-01

    Characteristics of a disperse phase of liquid metal ion source on the basis of various working substances are investigated. It is revealed that generation of the charged particles occurs in the threshold image and is simultaneously accompanied by excitation of capillary instability on a surface of the emitter. The majority of particles has the size about 2 nm (Sn) and a specific charge of 5 × 10(4) C∕kg. If the working liquid possesses high viscosity (Ni), generation of nanodroplets does not occur. Gold nanoparticles are used for deposition on a surface of quartz cantilevers with the purpose of increase in sensitivity of biosensors and on an external surface of carbon nanotubes for creation pressure sensors. By means of an ion source nanostructures can be etched on a flat surface of conductive materials without difficult ion optics. PMID:22380338

  19. Aluminum/alkaline earth metal composites and method for producing

    DOEpatents

    Russell, Alan M; Anderson, Iver E; Kim, Hyong J; Freichs, Andrew E

    2014-02-11

    A composite is provided having an electrically conducting Al matrix and elongated filaments comprising Ca and/or Sr and/or Ba disposed in the matrix and extending along a longitudinal axis of the composite. The filaments initially comprise Ca and/or Sr and/or Ba metal or allow and then may be reacted with the Al matrix to form a strengthening intermetallic compound comprising Al and Ca and/or Sr and/or Ba. The composite is useful as a long-distance, high voltage power transmission conductor.

  20. Adsorption of heavy metal ions by immobilized phytic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Tsao, G.T.; Zheng, Yizhou; Lu, J.; Gong, Cheng S.

    1997-12-31

    Phytic acid (myoinositol hexaphosphate) or its calcium salt, phytate, is an important plant constituents. It accounts for up to 85% of total phosphorus in cereals and legumes. Phytic acid has 12 replaceable protons in the phytic molecule rendering it the ability to complex with multivalent cations and positively charged proteins. Poly 4-vinyl pyridine (PVP) and other strong-based resins have the ability to adsorb phytic acid. PVP has the highest adsorption capacity of 0.51 phytic acid/resins. The PVP resin was used as the support material for the immobilization of phytic acid. The immobilized phytic acid can adsorb heavy metal ions, such as cadmium, copper, lead, nickel, and zinc ions, from aqueous solutions. Adsorption isotherms of the selected ions by immobilized phytic acid were conducted in packed-bed column at room temperature. Results from the adsorption tests showed 6.6 mg of Cd{sup 2+}, 7 mg of Cu{sup 2+}, 7.2 mg of Ni{sup 2+}, 7.4 mg of Pb{sup 2+}, and 7.7 mg of Zn{sup 2+} can be adsorbed by each gram of PVP-phytic acid complex. The use of immobilized phytic acid has the potential for removing metal ions from industrial or mining waste water. 15 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Metal ion-complexing polyphosphazene-interpenetrating polymer networks

    SciTech Connect

    Visscher, K.B.; Allcock, H.R.

    1994-11-01

    The synthesis of interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs) composed of the polyphosphazenes [NP(OCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OCH{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub n} (MEEP), or [NP(OC{sub 6}H{sub 4}COOPr){sub 2}]{sub n} and acidic, ion-complexing organic polymers is reported. These latter polymers included poly(acrylic acid), poly(vinylsulfonic acid sodium salt), poly[bis(undecenyl phosphate)], and poly[(p-methyliminodiacetoxy)styrene]. Several of these IPN systems are capable of selective coordination of specific ions and are prototypes for ion-selective membranes. Full, sequential IPNs were prepared, and these materials were characterized by NMR spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). After metal complexation, the conjugate IPNs were analyzed by electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis. The metal coordination was used to enhance domain contrast in these systems for electron microscopy studies. Because the IPNs based on MEEP are of particular interest for ion-selective membrane applications, the stability of MEEP in acidic, neutral, and basic aqueous media and the response of the polymer to aqueous salt solutions was also examined. 33 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Template-directed synthesis of oligoguanylic acids - Metal ion catalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridson, P. K.; Fakhrai, H.; Lohrmann, R.; Orgel, L. E.; Van Roode, M.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of Zn(2+), Pb(2+) and other metal ions on the efficiency and stereo-selectivity of the template-directed oligomerization of guanosine 5'-phosphorimidazolide are investigated. Reactions were run in the presence of a polyC template in a 2,6-lutidine buffer, and products analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography on an RPC-5 column. The presence of the Pb(2+) ion is found to lead to the formation of 2'-5' linked oligomers up to the 40-mer, while Zn(2+) favors the formation of predominantly 3'-5' linked oligomers up to the 35-mer. When amounts of uracil, cytidine or adenosine 5'-phosphorimidazole equal to those of the guanosine derivative are included in the reaction mixture, the incorrect base is incorporated into the oligomer about 10% of the time with a Pb(2+) catalyst, but less than 0.5% of the time with Zn(2+). The Sn(2+), Sb(3+) and Bi(3+) ions are also found to promote the formation of 2'-5' oligomers, although not as effectively as Pb(2+), while no metal ions other than Zn(2+) promote the formation of the 3'-5' oligomers. The results may be important for the understanding of the evolution of nucleic acid replication in the absence of enzymes.

  3. Activation energy for alkaline-earth ion transport in low alkali aluminoborosilicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, Priyanka; Furman, Eugene; Pantano, Carlo G.; Lanagan, Michael T.

    2013-02-01

    Activation energies (Ea) for ionic conduction in low-alkali boroaluminosilicate glasses due to alkaline-earth (Ba, Ca) and alkali (Na) ion transport have been estimated using thermally stimulated depolarization current (TSDC) and AC impedance spectroscopy techniques. The TSDC plot showed distinct relaxation peaks which shifted to higher temperatures with increasing ramp rates, and the dielectric dispersion plot showed individual low frequency relaxation peaks indicating space charge polarization due to transport of cations with different Ea (0.93, 1.83, and 3.5 eV for Na, Ba, and Ca, respectively). The higher value of Ea for Ca transport is attributed to mixed alkaline earth effect.

  4. Note: An ion source for alkali metal implantation beneath graphene and hexagonal boron nitride monolayers on transition metals

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, L. H. de; Cun, H. Y.; Hemmi, A.; Kälin, T.; Greber, T.

    2013-12-15

    The construction of an alkali-metal ion source is presented. It allows the acceleration of rubidium ions to an energy that enables the penetration through monolayers of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride. Rb atoms are sublimated from an alkali-metal dispenser. The ionization is obtained by surface ionization and desorption from a hot high work function surface. The ion current is easily controlled by the temperature of ionizer. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy measurements confirm ion implantation.

  5. Rare earth zirconium oxide buffer layers on metal substrates

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Robert K.; Paranthaman, Mariappan; Chirayil, Thomas G.; Lee, Dominic F.; Goyal, Amit; Feenstra, Roeland

    2001-01-01

    A laminate article comprises a substrate and a biaxially textured (RE.sub.x A.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.2-(x/2) buffer layer over the substrate, wherein 0metal-organic decomposition. The laminate article can include a layer of YBCO over the (RE.sub.x A.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.2-(x/2) buffer layer. A layer of CeO.sub.2 between the YBCO layer and the (RE.sub.x A.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.2-(x/2) buffer layer can also be include. Further included can be a layer of YSZ between the CeO.sub.2 layer and the (RE.sub.x A.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.2-(x/2) buffer layer. The substrate can be a biaxially textured metal, such as nickel. A method of forming the laminate article is also disclosed.

  6. Molecular designs for controlling the local environments around metal ions.

    PubMed

    Cook, Sarah A; Borovik, A S

    2015-08-18

    The functions of metal complexes are directly linked to the local environment in which they are housed; modifications to the local environment (or secondary coordination sphere) are known to produce changes in key properties of the metal centers that can affect reactivity. Noncovalent interactions are the most common and influential forces that regulate the properties of secondary coordination spheres, which leads to complexities in structure that are often difficult to achieve in synthetic systems. Using key architectural features from the active sites of metalloproteins as inspiration, we have developed molecular systems that enforce intramolecular hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) around a metal center via incorporation of H-bond donors and acceptors into rigid ligand scaffolds. We have utilized these molecular species to probe mechanistic aspects of biological dioxygen activation and water oxidation. This Account describes the stabilization and characterization of unusual M-oxo and heterobimetallic complexes. These types of species have been implicated in a range of oxidative processes in biology but are often difficult to study because of their inherent reactivity. Our H-bonding ligand systems allowed us to prepare an Fe(III)-oxo species directly from the activation of O2 that was subsequently oxidized to form a monomeric Fe(IV)-oxo species with an S = 2 spin state, similar to those species proposed as key intermediates in non-heme monooxygenases. We also demonstrated that a single Mn(III)-oxo center that was prepared from water could be converted to a high-spin Mn(V)-oxo species via stepwise oxidation, a process that mimics the oxidative charging of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II. Current mechanisms for photosynthetic O-O bond formation invoke a Mn(IV)-oxyl species rather than the isoelectronic Mn(V)-oxo system as the key oxidant based on computational studies. However, there is no experimental information to support the existence of a Mn-oxyl radical. We therefore probed the amount of spin density on the oxido ligand of our complexes using EPR spectroscopy in conjunction with oxygen-17 labeling. Our findings showed that there is a significant amount of spin on the oxido ligand, yet the M-oxo bonds are best described as highly covalent and there is no indication that an oxyl radical is formed. These results offer the intriguing possibility that high-spin M-oxo complexes are involved in O-O bond formation in biology. Ligand redesign to incorporate H-bond accepting units (sulfonamido groups) simultaneously provided a metal ion binding pocket, adjacent H-bond acceptors, and an auxiliary binding site for a second metal ion. These properties allowed us to isolate a series of heterobimetallic complexes of Fe(III) and Mn(III) in which a group II metal ion was coordinated within the secondary coordination sphere. Examination of the influence of the second metal ion on the electron transfer properties of the primary metal center revealed unexpected similarities between Ca(II) and Sr(II) ions, a result with relevance to the OEC. In addition, the presence of a second metal ion was found to prevent intramolecular oxidation of the ligand with an O atom transfer reagent. PMID:26181849

  7. Ion velocity distributions in the vicinity of the current sheet in Earth's distant magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, L. A.; Paterson, W. R.; Ackerson, K. L.; Kokubun, S.; Kivelson, M. G.; Yamamoto, T.; Fairfield, D. H.

    1994-01-01

    Observations of the three-dimensional velocity distributions of positive ions and electrons have been recently gained for the first time in Earth's distant magnetotail with the Galileo and Geotail spacecraft. For this brief discussion of these exciting results the focus is on the overall character of the ion velocity distributions during substorm activity. The ion velocity distributions within and near the magnetotail current sheet are not accurately described as convecting, isotropic Maxwellians. The observed velocity distributions are characterized by at least two robust types. The first type is similar to the 'lima bean'-shaped velocity distributions that are expected from the nonadiabatic acceleration of ions which execute Speiser-type trajectories in the current sheet. The second distribution is associated with the presence of cold ion beams that presumably also arise from the acceleration of plasma mantle ions in the electric and weak magnetic fields in the current sheet. The ion velocity distributions in a magnetic field structure that is similar to that for plasmoids are also examined. Again the velocity distributions are not Maxwellian but are indicative of nonadiabatic acceleration. An example of the pressure tensor within the plasmoid-like event is also presented because it is anticipated that the off-diagonal elements are important in a description of magnetotail dynamics. Thus our concept of magnetotail dynamics must advance from the present assumption of co-moving electron and ion Maxwellian distributions into reformulations in terms of global kinematical models and nonadiabatic particle motion.

  8. Adsorption of alkali, alkaline-earth, and 3d transition metal atoms on silicene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, H.; Peeters, F. M.

    2013-02-01

    The adsorption characteristics of alkali, alkaline-earth, and transition metal adatoms on silicene, a graphene-like monolayer structure of silicon are analyzed by means of first-principles calculations. In contrast to graphene, interaction between the metal atoms and the silicene surface is quite strong due to its highly reactive buckled hexagonal structure. In addition to structural properties, we also calculate the electronic band dispersion, net magnetic moment, charge transfer, work function, and dipole moment of the metal adsorbed silicene sheets. Alkali metals, Li, Na, and K, adsorb to hollow sites without any lattice distortion. As a consequence of the significant charge transfer from alkalis to silicene, metalization of silicene takes place. Trends directly related to atomic size, adsorption height, work function, and dipole moment of the silicene/alkali adatom system are also revealed. We found that the adsorption of alkaline-earth metals on silicene is entirely different from their adsorption on graphene. The adsorption of Be, Mg, and Ca turns silicene into a narrow gap semiconductor. Adsorption characteristics of eight transition metals Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Mo, and W are also investigated. As a result of their partially occupied d orbital, transition metals show diverse structural, electronic, and magnetic properties. Upon the adsorption of transition metals, depending on the adatom type and atomic radius, the system can exhibit metal, half-metal, and semiconducting behavior. For all metal adsorbates, the direction of the charge transfer is from adsorbate to silicene, because of its high surface reactivity. Our results indicate that the reactive crystal structure of silicene provides a rich playground for functionalization at nanoscale.

  9. Electromagnetic ion beam instabilities. II. [as source of magnetic fluctuations upstream of shocks in Earth's magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, S. P.; Madland, C. D.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1985-01-01

    The results of Gary et al. (1984) on the properties of the right-hand resonant and nonresonant electromagnetic ion beam instabilities for relatively cool beam temperatures are extended. In particular, the parametric dependence of the real frequency at maximum growth of these modes is examined. It is demonstrated that the right-hand resonant ion beam instability can have maximum growth at frequencies near the ion-cyclotron frequency if the beam main component relative drift speed is about twice the Alfven speed and at least one of two conditions holds: that the ion beta or the beam main component relative temperature are sufficiently small, or the perpendicular-to-parallel beam temperature ratio is sufficiently large. These results support the identification of the right-hand resonant instability as the source of the large amplitude magnetic fluctuations observed upstream of slow shocks in the earth's magnetotail.

  10. Nonthermal ions and associated magnetic field behavior at a quasi-parallel earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, W. P.; Pardaens, A. K.; Schwartz, S. J.; Burgess, D.; Luehr, H.; Kessel, R. L.; Dunlop, M.; Farrugia, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    Attention is given to ion and magnetic field measurements at the earth's bow shock from the AMPTE-UKS and -IRM spacecraft, which were examined in high time resolution during a 45-min interval when the field remained closely aligned with the model bow shock normal. Dense ion beams were detected almost exclusively in the midst of short-duration periods of turbulent magnetic field wave activity. Many examples of propagation at large elevation angles relative to the ecliptic plane, which is inconsistent with reflection in the standard model shock configuration, were discovered. The associated waves are elliptically polarized and are preferentially left-handed in the observer's frame of reference, but are less confined to the maximum variance plane than other previously studied foreshock waves. The association of the wave activity with the ion beams suggests that the former may be triggered by an ion-driven instability, and possible candidates are discussed.

  11. Estimation of Heavy Ion Densities From Linearly Polarized EMIC Waves At Earth

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Eun-Hwa; Johnson, Jay R.; Lee, Dong-Hun

    2014-02-24

    Linearly polarized EMIC waves are expected to concentrate at the location where their wave frequency satisfies the ion-ion hybrid (IIH) resonance condition as the result of a mode conversion process. In this letter, we evaluate absorption coefficients at the IIH resonance in the Earth geosynchronous orbit for variable concentrations of helium and azimuthal and field-aligned wave numbers in dipole magnetic field. Although wave absorption occurs for a wide range of heavy ion concentration, it only occurs for a limited range of azimuthal and field-aligned wave numbers such that the IIH resonance frequency is close to, but not exactly the same as the crossover frequency. Our results suggest that, at L = 6.6, linearly polarized EMIC waves can be generated via mode conversion from the compressional waves near the crossover frequency. Consequently, the heavy ion concentration ratio can be estimated from observations of externally generated EMIC waves that have polarization.

  12. Rare-earth metal π-complexes of reduced arenes, alkenes, and alkynes: bonding, electronic structure, and comparison with actinides and other electropositive metals.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenliang; Diaconescu, Paula L

    2015-09-21

    Rare-earth metal complexes of reduced π ligands are reviewed with an emphasis on their electronic structure and bonding interactions. This perspective discusses reduced carbocyclic and acyclic π ligands; in certain categories, when no example of a rare-earth metal complex is available, a closely related actinide analogue is discussed. In general, rare-earth metals have a lower tendency to form covalent interactions with π ligands compared to actinides, mainly uranium. Despite predominant ionic interactions in rare-earth chemistry, covalent bonds can be formed with reduced carbocyclic ligands, especially multiply reduced arenes. PMID:26247323

  13. Experimentally determined Si isotope fractionation between silicate and Fe metal and implications for Earth's core formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahar, Anat; Ziegler, Karen; Young, Edward D.; Ricolleau, Angele; Schauble, Edwin A.; Fei, Yingwei

    2009-10-01

    Stable isotope fractionation amongst phases comprising terrestrial planets and asteroids can be used to elucidate planet-forming processes. To date, the composition of the Earth's core remains largely unknown though cosmochemical and geophysical evidence indicates that elements lighter than iron and nickel must reside there. Silicon is often cited as a light element that could explain the seismic properties of the core. The amount of silicon in the core, if any, can be deduced from the difference in 30Si/ 28Si between meteorites and terrestrial rocks if the Si isotope fractionation between silicate and Fe-rich metal is known. Recent studies (e.g., [Georg R.B., Halliday A.N., Schauble E.A., Reynolds B.C., 2007. Silicon in the Earth's core. Nature 447 (31), 1102-1106.]; [Fitoussi, C., Bourdon, B., Kleine, T., Oberli, F., Reynolds, B. C., 2009. Si isotope systematics of meteorites and terrestrial peridotites: implications for Mg/Si fractionation in the solar nebula and for Si in the Earth's core. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 287, 77-85.]) showing (sometimes subtle) differences between 30Si/ 28Si in meteorites and terrestrial rocks suggest that Si missing from terrestrial rocks might be in the core. However, any conclusion based on Earth-meteorite comparisons depends on the veracity of the 30Si/ 28Si fractionation factor between silicates and metals at appropriate conditions. Here we present the first direct experimental evidence that silicon isotopes are not distributed uniformly between iron metal and rock when equilibrated at high temperatures. High-precision measurements of the silicon isotope ratios in iron-silicon alloy and silicate equilibrated at 1 GPa and 1800 °C show that Si in silicate has higher 30Si/ 28Si than Si in metal, by at least 2.0‰. These findings provide an experimental foundation for using isotope ratios of silicon as indicators of terrestrial planet formation processes. They imply that if Si isotope equilibrium existed during segregation of Earth's core-forming metal and silicate mantle, there should be an isotopic signature of Si in the core. Our experiments, combined with previous measurements of Si isotope ratios in meteorites and rocks representing the bulk silicate Earth, suggest that the formation of the Earth's core imparted a high 30Si/ 28Si signature to the bulk silicate Earth due to dissolution of ~ 6 wt% Si into the early core.

  14. Surface energetics of alkaline-earth metal oxides: Trends in stability and adsorption of small molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajdich, Michal; Nørskov, Jens K.; Vojvodic, Aleksandra

    2015-04-01

    We present a systematic theoretical investigation of the surface properties, stability, and reactivity of rocksalt type alkaline-earth metal oxides including MgO, CaO, SrO, and BaO. The accuracy of commonly used exchange-correlation density functionals (LDA, PBE, RPBE, PBEsol, BEEF-vdW, and hybrid HSE) and random-phase approximation (RPA) is evaluated and compared to existing experimental values. Calculated surface energies of the four most stable surface facets under vacuum conditions, the (100) surface, the metal and oxygen terminated octopolar (111), and the (110) surfaces, exhibit a monotonic increase in stability from MgO to BaO. On the MgO(100) surface, adsorption of CO, NO, and CH4 is characterized by physisorption while H2O chemisorbs, which is in agreement with experimental findings. We further use the on-top metal adsorption of CO and NO molecules to map out the surface energetics of each alkaline-earth metal oxide surface. The considered functionals all qualitatively predict similar adsorption energy trends. The ordering between the adsorption energies on different surface facets can be attributed to differences in the local geometrical surface structure and the electronic structure of the metal constituent of the alkaline-earth metal oxide. The striking observation that CO adsorption strength is weaker than NO adsorption on the (100) terraces as the period of the alkaline-earth metal in the oxide increases is analyzed in detail in terms of charge redistribution within the σ and π channels of adsorbates. Finally, we also present oxygen adsorption and oxygen vacancy formation energies in these oxide systems.

  15. Iron atoms and metallic species in the Earth's upper atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Granier, C.; Jegou, J.P.; Megie, G. )

    1989-03-01

    Resonant lidar detection of iron atoms have been performed at the Observatoire de Haute Provence (France) during 4 nights in November 1986 and in April 1987. The average iron atoms abundance is 3.6 x 10{sup 9} cm{sup {minus}2} in November, and 2.6 x 10{sup 9{minus}} cm{sup {minus}2} in April. Iron atoms density profiles are compared to the atomic sodium ones, obtained simultaneously by lidar and indicating an average sodium abundance of 4 x 10{sup 9} cm{sup {minus}2}. The relative abundance of the sum of the atomic and ionic forms is compared for several metallic species with their abundance ratios in the incoming meteorites. Finally, similar comparisons using lidar and mass spectrometer data are made for the ratio of the atomic and the ionic forms in the atmosphere.

  16. Two distinct modes of metal ion binding in the nuclease active site of a viral DNA-packaging terminase: insight into the two-metal-ion catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haiyan; Lin, Zihan; Lynn, Anna Y; Varnado, Brittany; Beutler, John A; Murelli, Ryan P; Le Grice, Stuart F J; Tang, Liang

    2015-12-15

    Many dsDNA viruses encode DNA-packaging terminases, each containing a nuclease domain that resolves concatemeric DNA into genome-length units. Terminase nucleases resemble the RNase H-superfamily nucleotidyltransferases in folds, and share a two-metal-ion catalytic mechanism. Here we show that residue K428 of a bacteriophage terminase gp2 nuclease domain mediates binding of the metal cofactor Mg(2+). A K428A mutation allows visualization, at high resolution, of a metal ion binding mode with a coupled-octahedral configuration at the active site, exhibiting an unusually short metal-metal distance of 2.42 Å. Such proximity of the two metal ions may play an essential role in catalysis by generating a highly positive electrostatic niche to enable formation of the negatively charged pentacovalent phosphate transition state, and provides the structural basis for distinguishing Mg(2+) from Ca(2+). Using a metal ion chelator β-thujaplicinol as a molecular probe, we observed a second mode of metal ion binding at the active site, mimicking the DNA binding state. Arrangement of the active site residues differs drastically from those in RNase H-like nucleases, suggesting a drifting of the active site configuration during evolution. The two distinct metal ion binding modes unveiled mechanistic details of the two-metal-ion catalysis at atomic resolution. PMID:26450964

  17. Two distinct modes of metal ion binding in the nuclease active site of a viral DNA-packaging terminase: insight into the two-metal-ion catalytic mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Haiyan; Lin, Zihan; Lynn, Anna Y.; Varnado, Brittany; Beutler, John A.; Murelli, Ryan P.; Le Grice, Stuart F. J.; Tang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Many dsDNA viruses encode DNA-packaging terminases, each containing a nuclease domain that resolves concatemeric DNA into genome-length units. Terminase nucleases resemble the RNase H-superfamily nucleotidyltransferases in folds, and share a two-metal-ion catalytic mechanism. Here we show that residue K428 of a bacteriophage terminase gp2 nuclease domain mediates binding of the metal cofactor Mg2+. A K428A mutation allows visualization, at high resolution, of a metal ion binding mode with a coupled-octahedral configuration at the active site, exhibiting an unusually short metal-metal distance of 2.42 Å. Such proximity of the two metal ions may play an essential role in catalysis by generating a highly positive electrostatic niche to enable formation of the negatively charged pentacovalent phosphate transition state, and provides the structural basis for distinguishing Mg2+ from Ca2+. Using a metal ion chelator β-thujaplicinol as a molecular probe, we observed a second mode of metal ion binding at the active site, mimicking the DNA binding state. Arrangement of the active site residues differs drastically from those in RNase H-like nucleases, suggesting a drifting of the active site configuration during evolution. The two distinct metal ion binding modes unveiled mechanistic details of the two-metal-ion catalysis at atomic resolution. PMID:26450964

  18. Isotope fractionation in surface ionization ion source of alkaline-earth iodides

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, T.; Kanzaki, C.; Nomura, M.; Fujii, Y.

    2012-02-15

    The relationship between the isotope fractionation of alkaline-earth elements in the surface ionization ion source and the evaporation filament current, i.e., filament temperature, was studied. It was confirmed that the isotope fractionation depends on the evaporation filament temperature; the isotope fractionation in the case of higher temperature of filament becomes larger. The ionization and evaporation process in the surface ionization ion source was discussed, and it was concluded that the isotope fractionation is suppressed by setting at the lower temperature of evaporation filament because the dissociations are inhibited on the evaporation filament.

  19. Source Distributions of Substorm Ions Observed in the Near-Earth Magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashour-Abdalla, M.; El-Alaoui, M.; Peroomian, V.; Walker, R. J.; Raeder, J.; Frank, L. A.; Paterson, W. R.

    1999-01-01

    This study employs Geotail plasma observations and numerical modeling to determine sources of the ions observed in the near-Earth magnetotail near midnight during a substorm. The growth phase has the low-latitude boundary layer as its most important source of ions at Geotail, but during the expansion phase the plasma mantle is dominant. The mantle distribution shows evidence of two distinct entry mechanisms: entry through a high latitude reconnection region resulting in an accelerated component, and entry through open field lines traditionally identified with the mantle source. The two entry mechanisms are separated in time, with the high-latitude reconnection region disappearing prior to substorm onset.

  20. Ion engine propelled Earth-Mars cycler with nuclear thermal propelled transfer vehicle, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Rudolf X.; Baker, Myles; Melko, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this project was to perform a preliminary design of a long term, reusable transportation system between earth and Mars which would be capable of providing both artificial gravity and shelter from solar flare radiation. The heart of this system was assumed to be a Cycler spacecraft propelled by an ion propulsion system. The crew transfer vehicle was designed to be propelled by a nuclear-thermal propulsion system. Several Mars transportation system architectures and their associated space vehicles were designed.

  1. NIR persistent luminescence of lanthanide ion-doped rare-earth oxycarbonates: the effect of dopants.

    PubMed

    Caratto, Valentina; Locardi, Federico; Costa, Giorgio Andrea; Masini, Roberto; Fasoli, Mauro; Panzeri, Laura; Martini, Marco; Bottinelli, Emanuela; Gianotti, Enrica; Miletto, Ivana

    2014-10-22

    A series of luminescent rare-earth ion-doped hexagonal II-type Gd oxycarbonate phosphors Gd2-xRExO2CO3 (RE = Eu(3+), Yb(3+), Dy(3+)) have been successfully synthesized by thermal decomposition of the corresponding mixed oxalates. The Yb(3+) doped Gd-oxycarbonate has evidenced a high persistent luminescence in the NIR region, that is independent from the temperature and makes this materials particular attractive as optical probes for bioimaging. PMID:25285437

  2. Effects of inherent alkali and alkaline earth metallic species on biomass pyrolysis at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Hu, Song; Jiang, Long; Wang, Yi; Su, Sheng; Sun, Lushi; Xu, Boyang; He, Limo; Xiang, Jun

    2015-09-01

    This work aimed to investigate effects of inherent alkali and alkaline earth metallic species (AAEMs) on biomass pyrolysis at different temperatures. The yield of CO, H2 and C2H4 was increased and that of CO2 was suppressed with increasing temperature. Increasing temperature could also promote depolymerization and aromatization reactions of active tars, forming heavier polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, leading to decrease of tar yields and species diversity. Diverse performance of inherent AAEMs at different temperatures significantly affected the distribution of pyrolysis products. The presence of inherent AAEMs promoted water-gas shift reaction, and enhanced the yield of H2 and CO2. Additionally, inherent AAEMs not only promoted breakage and decarboxylation/decarbonylation reaction of thermally labile hetero atoms of the tar but also enhanced thermal decomposing of heavier aromatics. Inherent AAEMs could also significantly enhance the decomposition of levoglucosan, and alkaline earth metals showed greater effect than alkali metals. PMID:26005925

  3. Rare earth element complexation behavior in circumneutral pH groundwaters: Assessing the role of carbonate and phosphate ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannesson, Kevin H.; Stetzenbach, Klaus J.; Hodge, Vernon F.; Berry Lyons, W.

    1996-03-01

    Rare earth element (REE) concentrations were determined in circumneutral pH (7 ≤ pH ≤ 9) groundwaters from south-central Nevada and the Mojave Desert in eastern California, U.S.A. The inorganic speciation of the REEs in these water were evaluated primarily to assess the relative importance of carbonate (LnHCO32+, LnCO3+ and Ln(CO3)2-) and phosphate (LnH2PO42+, LnHPO4+, Ln(HPO4)2- and LnPO40) complexes. Other REE complexes with sulfate, hydroxyl, chloride, and fluoride ions were also assessed, as was the significance of the free metal ion species (i.e., Ln3+). Our speciation calculations indicate that REE-carbonate complexes dominate and typically account for more than 99% of each REE in solution. Moreover, carbonato complexes (LnCO3+) were predicted to be the dominant species for the light REEs and dicarbonato complexes (Ln(CO3)2-) were predicted to increase in importance with increasing atomic number. All other complexes were predicted to be negligible. Furthermore, the combined percentage of all REE-phosphate complexes never accounted for more than 0.1% of the dissolved REEs, and generally much less than 0.1%. Phosphate complexes can not compete with carbonate complexes in these groundwaters because of the low ∑PO43- concentrations (< 0.3-1.58 μmol/kg), the much lower concentrations of the free phosphate ion (i.e., [PO43-]F = 10-9-10-6 μmol/kg), due to ion pair formation with Ca2+ and Mg2+, and the much higher free carbonate ion concentrations ([CO32-]F = 0.32-87 μmol/kg).

  4. No association between serum metal ions and implant fixation in large-head metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Søballe, Kjeld; Jakobsen, Stig Storgaard; Lorenzen, Nina Dyrberg; Mechlenburg, Inger; Stilling, Maiken

    2014-01-01

    Background The mechanism of failure of metal-on-metal (MoM) total hip arthroplasty (THA) has been related to a high rate of metal wear debris, which is partly generated from the head-trunnion interface. However, it is not known whether implant fixation is affected by metal wear debris. Patients and methods 49 cases of MoM THA in 41 patients (10 women) with a mean age of 52 (28–68) years were followed with stereoradiographs after surgery and at 1, 2, and 5 years to analyze implant migration by radiostereometric analysis (RSA). Patients also participated in a 5- to 7-year follow-up with measurement of serum metal ions, questionnaires (Oxford hip score (OHS) and Harris hip score (HHS)), and measurement of cup and stem positions and systemic bone mineral density. Results At 1–2 years, mean total translation (TT) was 0.04 mm (95% CI: –0.07 to 0.14; p = 0.5) for the stems; at 2–5 years, mean TT was 0.13 mm (95% CI: –0.25 to –0.01; p = 0.03), but within the precision limit of the method. For the cups, there was no statistically significant TT or total rotation (TR) at 1–2 and 2–5 years. At 2–5 years, we found 4 cups and 5 stems with TT migrations exceeding the precision limit of the method. There was an association between cup migration and total OHS < 40 (4 patients, 4 hips; p = 0.04), but there were no statistically significant associations between cup or stem migration and T-scores < –1 (n = 10), cup and stem positions, or elevated serum metal ion levels (> 7µg/L (4 patients, 6 hips)). Interpretation Most cups and stems were well-fixed at 1–5 years. However, at 2–5 years, 4 cups and 5 stems had TT migrations above the precision limits, but these patients had serum metal ion levels similar to those of patients without measurable migrations, and they were pain-free. Patients with serum metal ion levels > 7 µg/L had migrations similar to those in patients with serum metal ion levels < 7 µg/L. Metal wear debris does not appear to influence the fixation of hip components in large-head MoM articulations at medium-term follow-up. PMID:24847790

  5. Growth and Evolution of Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves in the Presence of Multiple Ion Species in the Earth's Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Justin Hao

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are generated by a fundamental plasma instability and interact with multiple particle populations in the Earth's magnetosphere. This dissertation describes the application of spacecraft data and linear theory of electromagnetic waves to investigating the evolution of EMIC wave properties in the presence of multiple magnetospheric ion species. In particular, the role of the low-energy heavy ion species on the wave properties is explored. A case study describes spacecraft measurements of EMIC wave activity, the multiple ion species (hot protons, cold protons, and cold He+) present during the wave activity, and the methods for performing thorough characterization and analysis of the wave observations. I show that the observed wave characteristics are not typical of such waves as established from linear cold plasma theory. By using the full range of the observations and applying them to modeling of linear wave growth, I then show that wave properties evolve in the presence of sufficient free energy (low density hot protons), high density cold protons, and warm He+ (~10 eV). Parametric study of linear wave growth using the observed multiple ion properties as a reference point implies that EMIC waves evolve due to these warm plasma effects of the heavier ion species, and may also evolve due to non-local generation and propagation. This motivates a global multi-spacecraft magnetospheric study of the dominant cold/warm ions (H+, He+, and O+) to establish their typical properties (composition, densities, and temperatures) at different magnetospheric locations and to determine where such cold/warm ions can lead to similar evolution of warm plasma EMIC waves assuming the hot proton free energy is available. I then apply these results to successfully explain typical growth rates and properties of EMIC waves observed in each MLT sector. The results show how our findings on cold/warm ion properties can be used in future studies of EMIC wave generation and properties, including the effect of the waves on scattering of relativistic radiation belt electrons, cold ion heating, and hot ion precipitation to the ionosphere resulting in the proton aurora.

  6. Trivalent rare earth ion conduction in the rare earth tungstates with the Sc{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3}-type structure

    SciTech Connect

    Imanaka, Nobuhito; Kobayashi, Yasuyuki; Fujiwara, Kazuyasu; Asano, Takuya; Okazaki, Yusuke; Adachi, Gin-ya

    1998-07-01

    To realize a trivalent ion conduction in solids, the Sc{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3}-type structure was chosen on the basis of the mobile trivalent ions and the structure which reduces the electrostatic interaction between the framework and the mobile trivalent ionic species as much as possible. The typical conductivity of the rare earth tungstates R{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3} (R = Sc, Y, and Er-Lu) with the Sc{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3}-type structure was found to be on the order of 10{sup {minus}5} S cm{sup {minus}1} at 600 C. Among the rare earth tungstates, Sc{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3} ({sigma}{sub 600 C} = 6.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} S cm{sup {minus}1}, E{sub a} = 44.1 kJ mol{sup {minus}1}) was found to be the most suitable size for the ionic conduction with regard to the relation between the mobile ion radius and the lattice size. The rare earth ion conducting characteristics were investigated by means of the rare earth concentration cell measurements and dc electrolysis. The electromotive force measurements with the Sc-Y binary alloy and the yttrium tungsten bronze as the electrodes strongly suggest the possibility of the trivalent ion conduction of rare earths such as Sc{sup 3+} and Y{sup 3+}. Furthermore, by the dc electrolysis, the mobile species was clarified to be the rare earth ions Sc{sup 3+} and Y{sup 3+} in the rare earth tungstates with the Sc{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3}-type structure.

  7. Optical detection of a single rare-earth ion in a crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesov, R.; Xia, K.; Reuter, R.; Stöhr, R.; Zappe, A.; Meijer, J.; Hemmer, P. R.; Wrachtrup, J.

    2012-08-01

    Rare-earth-doped laser materials show strong prospects for quantum information storage and processing, as well as for biological imaging, due to their high-Q 4f↔4f optical transitions. However, the inability to optically detect single rare-earth dopants has prevented these materials from reaching their full potential. Here we detect a single photostable Pr3+ ion in yttrium aluminium garnet nanocrystals with high contrast photon antibunching by using optical upconversion of the excited state population of the 4f↔4f optical transition into ultraviolet fluorescence. We also demonstrate on-demand creation of Pr3+ ions in a bulk yttrium aluminium garnet crystal by patterned ion implantation. Finally, we show generation of local nanophotonic structures and cell death due to photochemical effects caused by upconverted ultraviolet fluorescence of praseodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet in the surrounding environment. Our study demonstrates versatile use of rare-earth atomic-size ultraviolet emitters for nanoengineering and biotechnological applications.

  8. Laser polarization and phase control of up-conversion fluorescence in rare-earth ions

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yunhua; Zhang, Shian; Zhang, Hui; Ding, Jingxin; Jia, Tianqing; Qiu, Jianrong; Sun, Zhenrong

    2014-01-01

    We theoretically and experimentally demonstrate the up-conversion fluorescence control via resonance-mediated two-photon absorption in rare-earth ions by varying both the laser polarization and phase. We show that both the laser polarization and phase can control the up-conversion fluorescence, and the up-conversion fluorescence intensity is decreased when the laser polarization changes from linear through elliptical to circular. We also show that the laser polarization will affect the control efficiency of the up-conversion fluorescence by varying the laser phase, and the circular polarization will reduce the control efficiency. Furthermore, we suggest that the control efficiency by varying the laser polarization and the effect of the laser polarization on the control efficiency by varying the laser phase can be artificially manipulated by controlling the laser spectral bandwidth. This optical control method opens a new opportunity to control the up-conversion fluorescence of rare-earth ions, which may have significant impact on the related applications of rare-earth ions. PMID:25465401

  9. The electron-transfer based interaction between transition metal ions and photoluminescent graphene quantum dots (GQDs): a platform for metal ion sensing.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hongduan; Liao, Lei; Xu, Xiao; Zou, Mingjian; Liu, Feng; Li, Na

    2013-12-15

    The electron-transfer based quenching effect of commonly encountered transition metal ions on the photoluminescence of grapheme quantum dots (GQDs) was for the first time investigated, and was found to be associated with electron configuration of the individual metal ion. Ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), the metal ion chelator, can competitively interact with metal ions to recover the quenched photoluminescence of GQDs. Basically, metal ions with empty or completely filled d orbits could not quench the photoluminescence of GQDs, but this quenching effect was observed for the metal ions with partly filled d orbits. Based on the quenching-recovering strategy, a simple optical metal sensing platform was established by taking Ni(2+) as an example. Using the nickel ion-specific chelating reagent, dimethylglyoxime (DMG), to replace EDTA, a detection limit of 4.1 ?M was obtained in standard solution. This proposed strategy does not need further functionalization of GQDs, facilitating the application for simple, fast and cost-effective screening of metal ions. PMID:24209324

  10. Headgroup interactions and ion flotation efficiency in mixtures of a chelating surfactant, different foaming agents, and divalent metal ions.

    PubMed

    Svanedal, Ida; Boija, Susanne; Norgren, Magnus; Edlund, Håkan

    2014-06-10

    The correlation between interaction parameters and ion flotation efficiency in mixtures of chelating surfactant metal complexes and different foaming agents was investigated. We have recently shown that chelating surfactant 2-dodecyldiethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (4-C12-DTPA) forms strong coordination complexes with divalent metal ions, and this can be utilized in ion flotation. Interaction parameters for mixed micelles and mixed monolayer formation for Mg(2+) and Ni(2+) complexes with the chelating surfactant 4-C12-DTPA and different foaming agents were calculated by Rubingh's regular solution theory. Parameters for the calculations were extracted from surface tension measurements and NMR diffusometry. The effects of metal ion coordination on the interactions between 4-C12-DTPA and the foaming agents could be linked to a previously established difference in coordination chemistry between the examined metal ions. As can be expected from mixtures of amphoteric surfactants, the interactions were strongly pH-dependent. Strong correlation was found between interaction parameter β(σ) for mixed monolayer formation and the phase-transfer efficiency of Ni(2+) complexes with 4-C12-DTPA during flotation in a customized flotation cell. In a mixture of Cu(2+) and Zn(2+), the significant difference in conditional stability constants (log K) between the metal complexes was utilized to selectively recover the metal complex with the highest log K (Cu(2+)) by ion flotation. Flotation experiments in an excess concentration of metal ions confirmed the coordination of more than one metal ion to the headgroup of 4-C12-DTPA. PMID:24824327

  11. Accumulation of alkaline earth metals by the green macroalga Bryopsis maxima.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Shigekazu; Aizawa, Kyoko; Nakamura, Saki; Nakayama, Katsumi; Fujisaki, Shingo; Watanabe, Soichiro; Satoh, Hiroyuki

    2015-04-01

    Twenty-five days after the disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in 2011, we collected samples of the green macroalga Bryopsis maxima from the Pacific coast of Japan. Bryopsis maxima is a unicellular, multinuclear, siphonous green macroalga. Radiation analysis revealed that B. maxima emitted remarkably high gamma radiation of (131)I, (134)Cs, (137)Cs, and (140)Ba as fission products of (235)U. Interestingly, B. maxima contained naturally occurring radionuclides derived from (226)Ra and (228)Ra. Analysis of element content revealed that B. maxima accumulates many ocean elements, especially high quantities of the alkaline earth metals Sr (15.9 g per dry-kg) and Ba (3.79 g per dry-kg), whereas Ca content (12.5 g per dry-kg) was lower than that of Sr and only 61 % of the mean content of 70 Japanese seaweed species. Time-course analysis determined the rate of radioactive (85)Sr incorporation into thalli to be approximately 0.13 g Sr per dry-kg of thallus per day. Subcellular fractionation of B. maxima cells showed that most of the (85)Sr was localized in the soluble fraction, predominantly in the vacuole or cytosol. Given that (85)Sr radioactivity was permeable through a dialysis membrane, the (85)Sr was considered to be a form of inorganic ion and/or bound with a small molecule. Precipitation analysis with sodium sulfate showed that more than 70% of the Sr did not precipitate as SrSO4, indicating that a proportion of the Sr may bind with small molecules in B. maxima. PMID:25744028

  12. Metal ion binding to phospholipid bilayers evaluated by microaffinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ross, Eric E; Hoag, Christian; Pfeifer, Zach; Lundeen, Christopher; Owens, Sarah

    2016-06-17

    Group I and II ion binding to phospholipid membranes was evaluated by affinity chromatography utilizing a new stationary phase system based on lipid bilayers supported within large-pore particles composed of Stöber silica spheres. Using an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer for detection, robust determination of binding selectivity within group II ions is achieved with capillary columns containing nanomole quantities of lipid and using picomoles of metal analyte. Columns with a unique lipid formulation can be prepared within three hours using a solvent-casting assembly method. The observable thermotropic phase behavior of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine has a significant effect on alkaline metal binding and demonstrates the dynamic nature of the supported bilayers. Of the group I ions, only lithium exhibits retention with neutral phosphatidylcholine bilayer stationary phases. A comparison of Stöber-based supports with two commercially available large-pore silicas reveals the effect that particle structure has on analyte accessibility to the bilayer surface as evaluated by retention per supported lipid mass. PMID:27189434

  13. New Catalytic DNA Biosensors for Radionuclides and Metal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yi

    2002-06-01

    The goals of the project are to develop new catalytic DNA biosensors for simultaneous detection and quantification of bioavailable radionuclides and metal ions, and apply the sensors for on-site, real-time assessment of concentration, speciation and stability of the individual contaminants during and after bioremediation. A negative selection strategy was tested and validated. In vitro selection was shown to yield highly active and specific transition metal ion-dependent catalytic DNA/RNA. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) study of in vitro selected DNA demonstrated that the trifluorophore labeled system is a simple and powerful tool in studying complex biomolecules structure and dynamics, and is capable of revealing new sophisticated structural changes. New fluorophore/quenchers in a single fluorosensor yielded improved signal to noise ratio in detection, identification and quantification of metal contaminants. Catalytic DNA fluorescent and colorimetric sensors were shown useful in sensing lead in lake water and in leaded paint. Project results were described in two papers and two patents, and won an international prize.

  14. New Catalytic DNA Biosensors for Radionuclides and Metal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yi

    2003-06-01

    The goals of the project are to develop new catalytic DNA biosensors for simultaneous detection and quantification of bioavailable radionuclides and metal ions, and apply the sensors for on-site, real-time assessment of concentration, speciation and stability of the individual contaminants during and after bioremediation. A negative selection strategy was tested and validated. In vitro selection was shown to yield highly active and specific transition metal ion-dependent catalytic DNA/RNA. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) study of in vitro selected DNA demonstrated that the trifluorophore labeled system is a simple and powerful tool in studying complex biomolecules structure and dynamics, and is capable of revealing new sophisticated structural changes. New fluorophore/quenchers in a single fluorosensor yielded improved signal to noise ratio in detection, identification and quantification of metal contaminants. Catalytic DNA fluorescent and colorimetric sensors were shown useful in sensing lead in lake water and in leaded paint. Project results were described in two papers and two patents, and won an international prize.

  15. Hierarchically imprinted sorbents for the separation of metal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, S.; Burleigh, M.C.; Ju, Y.H.; Gao, H.J.; Lin, J.S.; Pennycook, S.J.; Barnes, C.E.; Xue, Z.L.

    2000-02-09

    Molecular imprinting involves arranging monomers of polymerization synthesis around a template molecule so that complexes between the monomer and template molecules are formed. Subsequent polymerization of the monomer molecules results in trapping template molecules in a highly cross-linked amorphous polymer matrix. Extraction of the imprint molecules leaves a predetermined arrangement of ligands and a tailored binding pocket. Such imprinted polymers have been used to mimic antibody functions to resolve racemates, and to separate mixtures of metal cations. Thus far, the organization of precursor monomers has been achieved mainly in inhomogeneous organic polymer matrices, with little control over structural parameters, such as pore sizes and surface areas. The authors report the first synthesis of imprinted hybrid sorbent materials with precise control of not only adsorption sites but also pore structures. The concepts behind multilevel imprinting are as follows. Surfactant micelles and metal ions both act as templates in these hierarchically imprinted sorbents. The metal ion and the surfactant are removed from the silica matrix via acid leaching and ethanol extraction, respectively. This results in the formation of different-sized imprints within the silica matrix, each with a specific function.

  16. Extraordinary rates of transition metal ion-mediated ribozyme catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Roychowdhury-Saha, Manami; Burke, Donald H.

    2006-01-01

    In pre-steady-state, fast-quench kinetic analysis, the tertiary-stabilized hammerhead ribozyme “RzB” cleaves its substrate RNA with maximal measured k obs values of ∼3000 min−1 in 1 mM Mn2+ and ∼780 min−1 in 1 mM Mg2+ at 37°C (pH 7.4). Apparent pKa for the catalytic general base is ∼7.8–8.5, independent of the corresponding metal hydrate pKa, suggesting potential involvement of a nucleobase as general base as suggested previously from nucleobase substitution studies. The pH-rate profile is bell-shaped for Cd2+, for which the general catalytic acid has a pKa of 7.3 ± 0.1. Simulations of the pH-rate relation suggest a pKa for the general catalytic acid to be ∼9.5 in Mn2+ and >9.5 in Mg2+. The acid pKa's follow the trend in the pKa of the hydrated metal ions but are displaced by ∼1–2 pH units in the presence of Cd2+ and Mn2+. One possible explanation for this trend is direct metal ion coordination with a nucleobase, which then acts as general acid. PMID:16912216

  17. Barcoded materials based on photoluminescent hybrid system of lanthanide ions-doped metal organic framework and silica via ion exchange.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiang; Yan, Bing

    2016-04-15

    A multicolored photoluminescent hybrid system based on lanthanide ions-doped metal organic frameworks/silica composite host has potential in display and barcode applications. By controlling the stoichiometry of the lanthanides via cation exchange, proportional various lanthanide ions are successfully introduced into metal organic frameworks, whose emission intensity is correspondingly proportional to its amount. The resulting luminescent barcodes depend on the lanthanide ions ratios and compositions. Subsequently, the lanthanide ions located in the channels of metal organic frameworks are protected from any interaction with the environment after the modification of silica on the surface. The optical and thermal stability of the hybrid materials are improved for technological application. PMID:26852345

  18. Solid Phase Luminescence of Several Rare Earth Ions on Ion-Exchange Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, Stephen P.; Street, Kenneth W., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The development and characterization of a novel ion-exchange film for solid-phase fluorometry and phosphorimetry is reported. This new cation-exchange material is suitable for spectroscopic applications in the ultraviolet and visible regions. It is advantageous because it, as a single entity, is easily recovered from solution and mounted in the spectrofluorometers. After preconcentration on the film, the luminescence intensity of lanthanide ions is several orders of magnitude greater than that of the corresponding solution, depending on the volume of solution and the amount of film. This procedure allows emission spectral measurements and determination of lanthanide ions at solution concentrations of < 5 (micro)g/L. The film may be stored for subsequent reuse or as a permanent record of the analysis. The major drawback to the use of the film is slow uptake of analyte due to diffusion limitations.

  19. Earth magnetic field as analyzer of the cosmic ray ion charge in MONICA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakaldin, A. V.; Voronov, S. A.

    2015-08-01

    The future onboard experiment MONICA (monitor of cosmic ray nuclei and ions) is aimed for studying the cosmic ray ion fluxes from H to Ni in the energy range 10-300 MeV/n in vicinity of Earth. It's main scientific objective is the measurement of ion ionization states, as well as elemental, isotope composition and energy spectra of Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) fluxes. The method of the ion ionization state measurement based on the usage of Earth magnetic field as a separator of particle charge will be utilized in this experiment. The present contribution is dedicated to investigate the possibilities and features of this method for the MONICA experiment. The real time dependences of inverse square of cut-off geomagnetic L-shell (LC-2) on magnetic rigidity (R) in rigidity range 640-2780 MV were studied experimentally during powerful SEP events December 13-15 2006. The possibility to simulate these dependences using the modern geomagnetic field models is analyzed as well.

  20. The Effect of Complex Formation upon the Redox Potentials of Metallic Ions. Cyclic Voltammetry Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibanez, Jorge G.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes experiments in which students prepare in situ soluble complexes of metal ions with different ligands and observe and estimate the change in formal potential that the ion undergoes upon complexation. Discusses student formation and analysis of soluble complexes of two different metal ions with the same ligand. (CW)

  1. The titration curve of insulin in the presence of various bivalent metal ions

    PubMed Central

    Graae, John

    1968-01-01

    1. Titration curves of insulin in the presence and absence of various metal ions are reported. 2. The difference in base consumption with and without the metal ions is compared with calculated curves. 3. These experiments suggest that in dilute solutions Zn2+ and Cu2+ ions are bound to α-amino groups. PMID:5637362

  2. High-resolution mass spectrometer for liquid metal ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Wortmann, Martin; Ludwig, Arne; Reuter, Dirk; Wieck, Andreas D.; Meijer, Jan

    2013-09-15

    Recently, a mass spectrometer for liquid metal ion sources (LMIS) has been built and set into operation. This device uses an E×B-filter as mass dispersive element and provides sufficient resolution to analyse the emission of clusters from LMIS to much higher mass ranges (>2000 amu) than commercially available mass filters for focused ion beam systems. It has also been shown that for small masses the composition of clusters from different isotopes can be resolved. Furthermore, a rather high fluence of monodisperse clusters in the range of 10{sup 6}–10{sup 7} clusters/s can be achieved with this setup. This makes it a promising tool for the preparation of mass selected clusters. In this contribution, theoretical considerations as well as technical details and the results of first measurements are presented.

  3. Helium and argon ion damage in metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, A. K.; Nandedkar, R. V.; Krishan, K.

    1984-05-01

    Metallic glasses Ni 60Nb 40 , Ni 64Zr 36, Ni 33Zr 67, Fe 40Ni 40P 14B 6, Fe 40Ni 40B 20, Fe 80B 20 and Fe 40Ni 38Mo 4B 18 were bombarded at room temperature with helium ions in trie energy range 50-150 keV. Bubble formation, blistering, flaking and repeated exfoliation was observed. Amongst these glasses Ni 60Nb 40 and Ni 64Zr 36 which have good neutronic properties and thermal stability, have also shown higher resistance against blistering and stability under irradiation. The surface damage due to 100 keV argon ion irradiation is also discussed.

  4. Metal-organic frameworks for lithium ion batteries and supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Fu-Sheng; Wu, Yu-Shan; Deng, Hexiang

    2015-03-01

    Porous materials have been widely used in batteries and supercapacitors attribute to their large internal surface area (usually 100-1000 m2 g-1) and porosity that can favor the electrochemical reaction, interfacial charge transport, and provide short diffusion paths for ions. As a new type of porous crystalline materials, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have received huge attention in the past decade due to their unique properties, i.e. huge surface area (up to 7000 m2 g-1), high porosity, low density, controllable structure and tunable pore size. A wide range of applications including gas separation, storage, catalysis, and drug delivery benefit from the recent fast development of MOFs. However, their potential in electrochemical energy storage has not been fully revealed. Herein, the present mini review appraises recent and significant development of MOFs and MOF-derived materials for rechargeable lithium ion batteries and supercapacitors, to give a glimpse into these potential applications of MOFs.

  5. Metal-organic frameworks for lithium ion batteries and supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Ke, Fu-Sheng; Wu, Yu-Shan; Deng, Hexiang

    2015-03-15

    Porous materials have been widely used in batteries and supercapacitors attribute to their large internal surface area (usually 100–1000 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}) and porosity that can favor the electrochemical reaction, interfacial charge transport, and provide short diffusion paths for ions. As a new type of porous crystalline materials, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have received huge attention in the past decade due to their unique properties, i.e. huge surface area (up to 7000 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}), high porosity, low density, controllable structure and tunable pore size. A wide range of applications including gas separation, storage, catalysis, and drug delivery benefit from the recent fast development of MOFs. However, their potential in electrochemical energy storage has not been fully revealed. Herein, the present mini review appraises recent and significant development of MOFs and MOF-derived materials for rechargeable lithium ion batteries and supercapacitors, to give a glimpse into these potential applications of MOFs. - Graphical abstract: MOFs with large surface area and high porosity can offer more reaction sites and charge carriers diffusion path. Thus MOFs are used as cathode, anode, electrolyte, matrix and precursor materials for lithium ion battery, and also as electrode and precursor materials for supercapacitors. - Highlights: • MOFs have potential in electrochemical area due to their high porosity and diversity. • We summarized and compared works on MOFs for lithium ion battery and supercapacitor. • We pointed out critical challenges and provided possible solutions for future study.

  6. Temperature Dependence On The Emission Characteristics Of A AuGe Liquid Metal Alloy Ion Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganetsos, Theodore; Bischoff, Lothar; Pilz, Wolfgang; Akhmadaliev, Chavkat; Laskaris, Nikos; Kotsos, Bill

    2007-04-01

    Focused ion beam systems employing liquid metal ion sources have become of increasing importance in the microelectronics industry. Maskless ion implantation as a modern patterning technique is one of the most attractive application of Focused Ion Beams. In spite of the fact that a great deal of research has been carried out on liquid metal ion sources, surprisingly few results exist on the temperature dependence of their emission characteristics. In this article we study a AuGe liquid metal alloy ion source. The unusual results are explained in terms of the abnormal behavior of the surface tension of the alloy with temperature.

  7. Bleaching effects in photoluminescence of rare-earth ions in fluoride heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastev, S. V.; Alvarez, J. C.; Vitvinsky, V. V.; Sokolov, Nikolai S.; Khilko, A. Y.

    1996-01-01

    Bleaching effects in photoluminescence (PL) of rare earth Sm2+ ions in CaF2:Sm/Si(111) heterostructures and Eu2+ ions in [CdF2/CaF2:EU]n/Si(111) superlattices have been observed for the first time. The PL was excited by He-Ne ((lambda) equals 633 nm) and N2 ((lambda) $equals 337 nm) lasers respectively. It was found that illumination of wavelength (lambda) ions through CaF2 conduction band is suggested to explain the phenomenon.

  8. Evidence for solar wind origin of energetic heavy ions in the earth's radiation belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovestadt, D.; Klecker, B.; Scholer, M.; Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F. M.; Fan, C. Y.; Fisk, L. A.; Ogallagher, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    Analysis of data from our energetic ion composition experiment on ISEE-1 has revealed the presence of substantial fluxes of carbon, oxygen, and heavier ions above 400 keV/nucleon at L values between approximately 2.5 and 4 earth radii. The measured C/O ratio varies systematically from 1.3 at 450 keV/nucleon to 4.1 at 1.3 MeV/nucleon, and no iron is observed above 200 keV/nucleon. These results provide strong evidence for a solar wind origin for energetic ions in the outer radiation belt. The absence of iron and the increase of the carbon-to-oxygen ratio with energy suggest that the condition for the validity of the first adiabatic invariant may have a strong influence on the trapping of these particles.

  9. Photoluminescence properties of the rare-earth ions in the TiO{sub 2} host nanofibers prepared via electrospinning

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Haiying; Wang Yu; Yang Yang; Li Xiang; Wang Ce

    2009-02-04

    Luminescent rare-earth (RE) ions doped TiO{sub 2} nanofibers have been prepared by electrospinning of a mixture solution of rare-earth acetylacetone (RE(C{sub 5}H{sub 7}O{sub 2}){sub 3})/titanium tetraisopropoxide (Ti (OiPr){sub 4})/poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) (RE = Eu, Er, Ce, Pr), followed by calcination at high temperature. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses demonstrated the morphology and the structure of the rare-earth doped TiO{sub 2} nanofibers. Exciting the nanofibers results in an energy transfer from surface states of TiO{sub 2} to that of the rare-earth ions and the photoluminescence is observed from the crystal field states of the rare-earth ions.

  10. Theoretical study of transition-metal ions bound to benzene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R.

    1992-01-01

    Theoretical binding energies are reported for all first-row and selected second-row transition metal ions (M+) bound to benzene. The calculations employ basis sets of at least double-zeta plus polarization quality and account for electron correlation using the modified coupled-pair functional method. While the bending is predominantly electrostatic, the binding energies are significantly increased by electron correlation, because the donation from the metal d orbitals to the benzene pi* orbitals is not well described at the self-consistent-field level. The uncertainties in the computed binding energies are estimated to be about 5 kcal/mol. Although the calculated and experimental binding energies generally agree to within their combined uncertainties, it is likely that the true binding energies lie in the lower portion of the experimental range. This is supported by the very good agreement between the theoretical and recent experimental binding energies for AgC6H6(+).

  11. Electrolyte materials containing highly dissociated metal ion salts

    DOEpatents

    Lee, H.S.; Geng, L.; Skotheim, T.A.

    1996-07-23

    The present invention relates to metal ion salts which can be used in electrolytes for producing electrochemical devices, including both primary and secondary batteries, photoelectrochemical cells and electrochromic displays. The salts have a low energy of dissociation and may be dissolved in a suitable polymer to produce a polymer solid electrolyte or in a polar aprotic liquid solvent to produce a liquid electrolyte. The anion of the salts may be covalently attached to polymer backbones to produce polymer solid electrolytes with exclusive cation conductivity. 2 figs.

  12. Electrolyte materials containing highly dissociated metal ion salts

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Hung-Sui; Geng, Lin; Skotheim, Terje A.

    1996-07-23

    The present invention relates to metal ion salts which can be used in electrolytes for producing electrochemical devices, including both primary and secondary batteries, photoelectrochemical cells and electrochromic displays. The salts have a low energy of dissociation and may be dissolved in a suitable polymer to produce a polymer solid electrolyte or in a polar aprotic liquid solvent to produce a liquid electrolyte. The anion of the salts may be covalently attached to polymer backbones to produce polymer solid electrolytes with exclusive cation conductivity.

  13. Low jitter metal vapor vacuum arc ion source for electron beam ion trap injections

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, Glenn E.; Boyer, Craig N.; Seely, John F.; Tan, J.N.; Pomeroy, J.M.; Gillaspy, J.D.

    2005-07-15

    We describe a metal vapor vacuum arc (MeVVA) ion source containing eight different cathodes that are individually selectable via the control electronics which does not require moving components in vacuum. Inside the vacuum assembly, the arc plasma is produced by means of a 30 {mu}s pulse (26 kV,125 A) delivering 2.4 mC of charge to the cathode sample material. The trigger jitter is minimized (<200 ns) to improve the capture efficiency of the ions which are injected into an ion trap. During a single discharge, the over-damped pulse produces an ion flux of 8.4x10{sup 9} ions/cm{sup 2}, measured by an unbiased Faraday cup positioned 20 cm from the extractor grid, at discharge rates up to 5 Hz. The electronic triggering of the discharge is via a fiber optic interface. We present the design, fabrication details, and performance of this MeVVA, recently installed on the National Institute of Standards and Technology electron beam ion trap (EBIT)

  14. Kinetic theory for the ion humps at the foot of the Earth's bow shock

    SciTech Connect

    Jovanovic, D.; Krasnoselskikh, V. V.

    2009-10-15

    The nonlinear kinetic theory is presented for the ion acoustic perturbations at the foot of the Earth's quasiperpendicular bow shock, that is characterized by weakly magnetized electrons and unmagnetized ions. The streaming ions, due to the reflection of the solar wind ions from the shock, provide the free energy source for the linear instability of the acoustic wave. In the fully nonlinear regime, a coherent localized solution is found in the form of a stationary ion hump, which is traveling with the velocity close to the phase velocity of the linear mode. The structure is supported by the nonlinearities coming from the increased population of the resonant beam ions, trapped in the self-consistent potential. As their size in the direction perpendicular to the local magnetic field is somewhat smaller that the electron Larmor radius and much larger that the Debye length, their spatial properties are determined by the effects of the magnetic field on weakly magnetized electrons. These coherent structures provide a theoretical explanation for the bipolar electric pulses, observed upstream of the shock by Polar and Cluster satellite missions.

  15. Low-energy ions dominate the space environments of Earth, Mars, and Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2012-03-01

    Stretching from the top of the ionosphere to out into space, the terrestrial space environment is packed with low-energy ions, populated when ultraviolet radiation emanating from the Sun ionizes atmospheric gases in the ionosphere below. These ions, with energies of a few electron volts, play an important role in modifying dynamics within the magnetosphere. Though this view of the space environment is well grounded in theory, the actual detection and quantification of low-energy ion densities have been more elusive. The difficulty stems from the environmental conditions within which sensors seeking to measure these low-energy ions must operate. Satellites high above the Earth accumulate surface charges giving positive potentials of tens to hundreds of volts when exposed to sunlight and end up repelling the low-velocity, low-energy, positively charged ions that researchers hoped to detect. Using an array of techniques, including a recently developed approach whereby onboard sensors look for distortions in the electric field in the satellite's own wake, André and Cully estimate the density of low-energy ions.

  16. Investigation of the Transport of Solar Ions Through the Earth's Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lennartsson, O. W.; Evans, David (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study has been to infer, by statistical means, the most probable mode of entry of solar wind plasma into Earth's magnetotail, using a particular set of archived data from the Lockheed Plasma Composition Experiment on the International Sun-Earth Explorer One (ISEE-1) satellite, jointly sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the European Space Agency (ESA) in the 1970's and 80's. Despite their considerable age, the Lockheed ISEE-1 data are still, at the time of this report, the only substantial ion composition data in the sub-keV to keV energy range available from the magnetotail beyond 9 R(sub E), because of various technical problems with ion mass spectrometers on later missions, and are therefore a unique source of information about the mixing of solar and terrestrial origin plasmas in the tail, within the ISEE-1 apogee of almost 23 R(sub E). The entire set of archived data used in this study, covering the 4.5 years of operation of the instrument and comprising not only tail measurements but also data from the inner magnetosphere as well as data from outside the magnetopause, is now available to the public via the WorldWideWeb at the address: http://cis.spasci.com/ISEE_ions The fundamental assumption of this and other studies of magnetosphere ion composition is that He++ and O+ ions are virtually certain "tags" of solar and terrestrial origins, respectively. This is an assumption with strong theoretical basis and it is corroborated by observational evidence, including the often substantial differences between the velocity distribution functions of those two species. The H+ ions can have a dual origin, in principle, but the close resemblance in the ISEE-1 data between the dynamics of H+ and He++ ions indicates a predominantly solar origin of the H+ ions in the tail, at least. By the same token, the usually minor He+ ions are probably almost entirely of terrestrial origin, because of their similarity to the O+ ions.

  17. Expected modulation of heavy neutral interstellar species and pick-up ions at Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokol, J. M.; Bzowski, M.; Kubiak, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Neutral interstellar species are modulated in the inner heliosphere by the attractive force of solar gravity and ionization by the solar output. The modulation by ionization processes includes ionization losses by charge exchange with solar wind protons, solar EUV radiation, and collisions with solar wind electrons. It is a function of the distance to the Sun and follows the solar activity cycle. We developed a model of ionization processes based on in-situ measurements, remote-sensing observations, and a set of proxies, and calculated densities of neutral interstellar He, Ne, and O in the vicinity of Earth during the past solar cycle using the Warsaw Test Particle Model. Based on these densities and the model of ionization rates, we calculated the source function (production rate) of pick-up ions of He, Ne, and O at Earth. We present the expected distribution of density and production rate of pick-up ions as a function of Earth longitude and the phase of solar cycle. Our results show, among others, that the density of oxygen may be higher in the upwind direction than in the downwind direction, while helium and neon do not show this feature. The source function of pick-up ions shows year-to-year shifts in ecliptic longitude relative to the neutral gas cone. Additionally, it shows asymmetry in comparison to a Gaussian function, even though the density distribution is symmetric. This is because the time scale of the crossing of the neutral gas cone by Earth is longer than the time scale of the variation in the ionization rate.

  18. Removal and recovery of metal ions from process and waste streams using polymer filtration

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvinen, G.D.; Smith, B.F.; Robison, T.W.; Kraus, K.M.; Thompson, J.A.

    1999-06-13

    Polymer Filtration (PF) is an innovative, selective metal removal technology. Chelating, water-soluble polymers are used to selectively bind the desired metal ions and ultrafiltration is used to concentrate the polymer-metal complex producing a permeate with low levels of the targeted metal ion. When applied to the treatment of industrial metal-bearing aqueous process streams, the permeate water can often be reused within the process and the metal ions reclaimed. This technology is applicable to many types of industrial aqueous streams with widely varying chemistries. Application of PF to aqueous streams from nuclear materials processing and electroplating operations will be described.

  19. Rare earth element recycling from waste nickel-metal hydride batteries.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiuli; Zhang, Junwei; Fang, Xihui

    2014-08-30

    With an increase in number of waste nickel-metal hydride batteries, and because of the importance of rare earth elements, the recycling of rare earth elements is becoming increasingly important. In this paper, we investigate the effects of temperature, hydrochloric acid concentration, and leaching time to optimize leaching conditions and determine leach kinetics. The results indicate that an increase in temperature, hydrochloric acid concentration, and leaching time enhance the leaching rate of rare earth elements. A maximum rare earth elements recovery of 95.16% was achieved at optimal leaching conditions of 70°C, solid/liquid ratio of 1:10, 20% hydrochloric acid concentration, -74μm particle size, and 100min leaching time. The experimental data were best fitted by a chemical reaction-controlled model. The activation energy was 43.98kJ/mol and the reaction order for hydrochloric acid concentration was 0.64. The kinetic equation for the leaching process was found to be: 1-(1-x)(1/3)=A/ρr0[HCl](0.64)exp-439,8008.314Tt. After leaching and filtration, by adding saturated oxalic solution to the filtrate, rare earth element oxalates were obtained. After removing impurities by adding ammonia, filtering, washing with dilute hydrochloric acid, and calcining at 810°C, a final product of 99% pure rare earth oxides was obtained. PMID:25089667

  20. Investigation of thermophysical characteristics of SrMoO4 crystals, nominally pure and doped with rare earth ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, P. A.; Skrobov, S. A.; Matovnikov, A. V.; Ivleva, L. I.; Dunaeva, E. E.; Shekhovtsov, A. N.; Kosmyna, M. B.

    2015-11-01

    Thermophysical characteristics of SrMoO4 crystals (grown by the Czochralski method from intrinsic melts), nominally pure and doped with rare earth ions, have been investigated. The temperature and concentration dependences of the thermal conductivity are obtained for SrMoO4 samples containing Nd3+ (0.28, 0.56, 0.84, and 1.33 at %), Pr3+ (0.01 and 0.41 at %), Ho3+ (0.01 and 0.06 at %), and Ho3+ (0.13 at %) + Tm3+ (0.13 at %) in a temperature range of 50-300 K. The thermal conductivities are measured in the directions parallel and/or perpendicular to the crystal optical axis. The thermal conductivity of nominally pure SrMoO4 at 300 K in the direction perpendicular to the c axis has been found to be 4.2 W/(m K). The introduction of impurities of rare earth metals reduces the thermal conductivity of SrMoO4 crystals. The anisotropy of the thermal conductivity is weak. The measured molar specific heat C P ( T) of a nominally pure SrMoO4 crystal is 116.2 J/(mol K) at 300 K. The temperature dependence of the phonon mean free path l( T) in a SrMoO4 crystal is calculated for the temperature range of 80-300 K based on experimental data.

  1. Polymer hybrid thin films based on rare earth ion-functionalized MOF: photoluminescence tuning and sensing as a thermometer.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiang; Yan, Bing

    2015-01-28

    A series of photofunctional polymer hybrid thin films based on rare earth ion functionalized metal organic frameworks (MOFs, 1 for zinc complexes bio-MOF-1 (Zn8(ad)4(BPDC)6O·2Me2NH2) and 2 for rare earth complexes RE(BPDC)(Ad) (BPDC = biphenyl-4,4'-dicarboxylic acid, Ad = adenine) have been prepared via polymerization reaction of ethyl methacrylate (EMA) and 4-vinylpyridine (VPD). The as-obtained hybrid films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, FT-IR, and SEM, especially for the luminescence performance and sensing ability. These hybrid polymer thin films are dense and transparent and display multi-colors, including blue, red and blue-green. Among them, Y0.9Tb0.0999Eu(0.0001)-2 fabricated hybrid thin film displays a white light output. More significantly and interestingly, the Tb0.999Eu(0.001)-2 fabricated hybrid thin film can be used as luminescent ratiometric thermometer based on the energy transfer from Tb(3+) to Eu(3+), whose color will change from blue-green to pink from 100 K to 320 K. PMID:25485621

  2. Alkaline-earth metal cations as structure building blocks for molecular cages with entrapment and controlled release of quintuple ionic aggregates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chi-Tsang; Shiu, Ler-Chun; Shiu, Kom-Bei

    2015-05-01

    Currently, main-group metal cations are totally neglected as the structure-building blocks for the self-assembly of supramolecular coordination metallocages due to the lack of directional bonding. However, here we show that a common Arrhenius acid-base neutralization allows the alkaline-earth metal cations to act as charged binders, easily connecting two or more highly directional anionic transition-metal-based metalloligands to coordination polymers. With a metal salt such as K(+) PF6 (-) added during the neutralization, the main-group metal-connected skeleton can be templated by the largest yet reported ionic-aggregate anion, K2 (PF6 )3 (-) , formed from KPF6 in solution, into molecular metallocages, encapsulating the ion. Crystal-structure details, DFT-calculation results, and controlled-release behavior support the presence of K2 (PF6 )3 (-) as a guest in the cage. Upon removal of PF6 (-) ions, the cage stays intact. Other ions like BF4 (-) can be put back in. PMID:25786666

  3. The two faces of metal ions: From implants rejection to tissue repair/regeneration.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Daniel M; Santos, Susana G; Lamghari, Meriem; Barbosa, Mário A

    2016-04-01

    The paradigm of metallic ions as exclusive toxic agents is changing. During the last 60 years, knowledge about toxicological and immunological reactions to metal particles and ions has advanced considerably. Hip prostheses, namely metal-on-metal bearings, have prompted studies about excessive and prolonged exposure to prosthetic debris. In that context, the interactions of metal particles and ions with cells and tissues are mostly harmful, inducing immune responses that lead to osteolysis and implant failure. However, in the last decade, new strategies to promote immunomodulation and healing have emerged based on the unique properties of metallic ions. The atom-size and charge enable ions to interact with key macromolecules (e.g. proteins, nucleic acids) that affect cellular function. Moreover, these agents are inexpensive, stable and can be integrated in biomaterials, which may open new avenues for a novel generation of medical devices. Herein, orthopedic devices are discussed as models for adverse responses to metal ions, and debated together with the potential to use metal ions-based therapies, thus bridging the gap between unmet clinical needs and cutting-edge research. In summary, this review addresses the two "faces" of metallic ions, from pathological responses to innovative research strategies that use metal ions for regenerative medicine. PMID:26851391

  4. Removal and selective recovery of heavy-metal ions from industrial waste waters. Technical completion report

    SciTech Connect

    Darnall, D.W.; Gardea-Torresdey, J.

    1989-02-01

    Accumulation of toxic metal ions in water supplies is a matter of increasingly grave concern. Primarily the undesirable by-products of mining and industrial activity, these ions can cause acute and chronic illnesses in humans and other animals. In an effort to limit further contamination, development of efficient, widely applicable, low-cost methods for removal of heavy-metal ions from waters deserves high priority. One new method that has allowed both the removal and recovery of metal ions from water has been the utilization of microorganisms such as algae. This metal-ion sorption process is based upon the natural, very strong affinity of the cell walls of algae for heavy metal ions. There appear to be distinct advantages of the immobilized algal system over other technology currently used for heavy-metal-ion cleanup from waste waters. The goals of the project were (1) to examine the effects of calcium(II) and magnesium(II) on transition metal binding to the algae, (2) to test the immobilized silica-algal polymers for removal of metal ions from electroplating plant waste waters, (3) to evaluate the effects of culturing conditions on the metal binding capacity of the resulting biomass, and (4) to investigate the mechanism of metal-ion binding to different algae.

  5. Interaction of calcium with the human divalent metal-ion transporter-1

    SciTech Connect

    Shawki, Ali; Mackenzie, Bryan

    2010-03-12

    Iron deficiency is the most prevalent micronutrient deficiency worldwide. Whereas dietary calcium is known to reduce the bioavailability of iron, the molecular basis of this interaction is not understood. We tested the hypothesis that divalent metal-ion transporter-1 (DMT1)-the principal or only mechanism by which nonheme iron is taken up at the intestinal brush border-is shared also by calcium. We expressed human DMT1 in RNA-injected Xenopus oocytes and examined its activity using radiotracer assays and the voltage clamp. DMT1 did not mediate {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} uptake. Instead, we found that Ca{sup 2+} blocked the Fe{sup 2+}-evoked currents and inhibited {sup 55}Fe{sup 2+} uptake in a noncompetitive manner (K{sub i} {approx} 20 mM). The mechanism of inhibition was independent of voltage and did not involve intracellular Ca{sup 2+} signaling. The alkaline-earth metal ions Ba{sup 2+}, Sr{sup 2+}, and Mg{sup 2+} also inhibited DMT1-mediated iron-transport activity. We conclude that Ca{sup 2+} is a low-affinity noncompetitive inhibitor-but not a transported substrate-of DMT1, explaining in part the effect of high dietary calcium on iron bioavailability.

  6. Blood metal ion testing is an effective screening tool to identify poorly performing metal-on-metal bearing surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Sidaginamale, R. P.; Joyce, T. J.; Lord, J. K.; Jefferson, R.; Blain, P. G.; Nargol, A. V. F.; Langton, D. J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aims of this piece of work were to: 1) record the background concentrations of blood chromium (Cr) and cobalt (Co) concentrations in a large group of subjects; 2) to compare blood/serum Cr and Co concentrations with retrieved metal-on-metal (MoM) hip resurfacings; 3) to examine the distribution of Co and Cr in the serum and whole blood of patients with MoM hip arthroplasties; and 4) to further understand the partitioning of metal ions between the serum and whole blood fractions. Methods A total of 3042 blood samples donated to the local transfusion centre were analysed to record Co and Cr concentrations. Also, 91 hip resurfacing devices from patients who had given pre-revision blood/serum samples for metal ion analysis underwent volumetric wear assessment using a coordinate measuring machine. Linear regression analysis was carried out and receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed to assess the reliability of metal ions to identify abnormally wearing implants. The relationship between serum and whole blood concentrations of Cr and Co in 1048 patients was analysed using Bland-Altman charts. This relationship was further investigated in an in vitro study during which human blood was spiked with trivalent and hexavalent Cr, the serum then separated and the fractions analysed. Results Only one patient in the transfusion group was found to have a blood Co > 2 g/l. Blood/Serum Cr and Co concentrations were reliable indicators of abnormal wear. Blood Co appeared to be the most useful clinical test, with a concentration of 4.5 g/l showing sensitivity and specificity for the detection of abnormal wear of 94% and 95%, respectively. Generated metal ions tended to fill the serum compartment preferentially in vivo and this was replicated in the in vitro study when blood was spiked with trivalent Cr and bivalent Co. Conclusions Blood/serum metal ion concentrations are reliable indicators of abnormal wear processes. Important differences exist however between elements and the blood fraction under study. Future guidelines must take these differences into account. PMID:23836464

  7. An easy access to nanocrystalline alkaline earth metal fluorides - just by shaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreger, M.; Scholz, G.; Kemnitz, E.

    2012-04-01

    High energy ball milling as fast, direct and solvent free method allows an easy access to nanocrystalline alkaline earth metal fluorides MF2 (M: Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba). Comparable metal sources (acetates, carbonates, hydroxides, alkoxides) were used for the reaction with NH4F as fluorinating agent. Even very simple manual shaking experiments between NH4F and the corresponding hydroxides in the stoichiometric ratio (M:F = 1:2, M: Ca, Sr, Ba) give phase pure fluorides. Moreover, comparable classical thermal reactions in closed crucibles at higher temperatures provide phase pure crystalline fluorides in nearly all cases as well.

  8. Kondo effect in alkaline-earth-metal atomic gases with confinement-induced resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ren; Zhang, Deping; Cheng, Yanting; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Peng; Zhai, Hui

    2016-04-01

    Alkaline-earth-metal atoms have a long-lived electronic excited state, and when atoms in this excited state are localized in the Fermi sea of ground-state atoms by an external potential, they serve as magnetic impurities, due to the spin-exchange interaction between the excited- and the ground-state atoms. This can give rise to the Kondo effect. However, in order to achieve this effect in current atomic gas experiments, it requires the Kondo temperature to be increased to a sizable portion of the Fermi temperature. In this paper we calculate the confinement-induced resonance (CIR) for the spin-exchanging interaction between the ground and the excited states of the alkaline-earth-metal atoms and propose that the spin-exchange interaction can be strongly enhanced by utilizing the CIR. We analyze this system by the renormalization-group approach and show that near a CIR, the Kondo temperature can be significantly enhanced.

  9. Metal ion sorption by untreated and chemically treated biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Kilbane, J.J.; Xie, J.

    1992-12-31

    The metal-binding ability of biosorbents is well known; however, in comparison with commercial ion-exchange resins the capacity of biosorbents is low. The purpose of this research was to examine chemically modified biosorbents and biosorbents prepared from microorganisms isolated from extreme environments to determine if significant improvements in metal-binding capacity or biosorbents with unique capabilities could be produced. Chemical treatments examined included acid, alkali, carbon disulfide, phosphorus oxychloride, anhydrous formamide, sodium thiosulfate, sodium chloroacetic acid, and phenylsulfonate. Biosorbents were prepared from microorganisms isolated from pristine and acid mine drainage impacted sites and included heterotrophs, methanotrophs, algae, and sulfate reducers. Chemical modification with carbon disulfide, phosphorous oxychloride, and sodium thiosulfate yielded biosorbents with such as much as 74%, 133%, and 155% improvements, respectively, in metal-binding capacity, but the performance of these chemically modified biosorbents deteriorated upon repeated use. A culture isolated from an acid mine drainage impacted site, IGTM17, exhibits about 3-fold higher metal-binding capacity in comparison with other biosorbents examined in this study. IGTM17 also exhibits superior metal-binding ability at decreased pH or in the presence of interfering common cations in comparison with other biosorbents or some commercially available cation exchange resins. Some biosorbents, such as IGTM5, can bind anions. To our knowledge this is the first demonstration of the ability of biosorbents to bind anions. Moreover, preliminary data indicate that the chemical modification of biosorbents may be capable of imparting the ability to selectively bind certain anions. Further research is needed to optimize conditions for the chemical modification and stabilization of biosorbents.

  10. Selective exchange of divalent transition metal ions in cryptomelane-type manganic acid with tunnel structure

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuji, M. ); Komarneni, S. )

    1993-03-01

    The ion-exchange selectivity of divalent transition metal ions on cryptomelane-type manganic acid (CMA) with tunnel structure has been studied using the distribution coefficients ([ital K][sub [ital d

  11. Polaronic Transport in Phosphate Glasses Containing Transition Metal Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Mark

    The goal of this dissertation is to characterize the basic transport properties of phosphate glasses containing various amounts of TIs and to identify and explain any electronic phase transitions which may occur. The P2 O5-V2O5-WO3 (PVW) glass system will be analyzed to find the effect of TI concentration on conduction. In addition, the effect of the relative concentrations of network forming ions (SiO2 and P2O5) on transport will be studied in the P2O5-SiO2-Fe2O 3 (PSF) system. Also presented is a numerical study on a tight-binding model adapted for the purposes of modelling Gaussian traps, mimicking TI's, which are arranged in an extended network. The results of this project will contribute to the development of fundamental theories on the electronic transport in glasses containing mixtures of transition oxides as well as those containing multiple network formers without discernible phase separation. The present study on the PVW follows up on previous investigation into the effect on mixed transition ions in oxide glasses. Past research has focused on glasses containing transition metal ions from the 3d row. The inclusion of tungsten, a 5d transition metal, adds a layer of complexity through the mismatch of the energies of the orbitals contributing to localized states. The data have indicated that a transition reminiscent of a metal-insulator transition (MIT) occurs in this system as the concentration of tungsten increases. As opposed to some other MIT-like transitions found in phosphate glass systems, there seems to be no polaron to bipolaron conversion. Instead, the individual localization parameter for tungsten noticeably decreases dramatically at the transition point as well as the adiabaticity. Another distinctive feature of this project is the study of the PSF system, which contains two true network formers, phosphorous pentoxide (P2O 5) and silicon dioxide (SiO2). It is not usually possible to do a reliable investigation of the conduction properties of such glasses because the two network formers will tend to separate into different phases, making it difficult to obtain homogenous samples. The PSF system proved easier to study than other systems. The hopping in this system seems to be dominated by the Greaves mid-range mechanism. In addition, in samples containing the same proportion of iron, conductivities were found to not depend noticeably on composition, supporting the use of models focusing on the transition metal ions in calculating conductivity. Despite ostensibly changing the structural and metrical properties of the network, the ratio of the concentration of the network formers only appears to have an effect on the conductivity through changing the inter-atomic distance of iron. The numerical model adds to the evidence for the dominating contribution on the nearest-neighbor ordering of TI ions on the electrical properties of a glass; especially interesting is the reproducibility of the mixed-transition ion effect (MTE) in a numerical model where ensemble averages are taken over possible arrangements. It was also determined that the disorder arising from the spread between two types of traps can lead to a MIT as function of population. Finally, an outline of the notion of invariance in TI glasses is extended from work done by other authors, creating an opportunity for further research.

  12. Neutral binuclear rare-earth metal complexes with four μ₂-bridging hydrides.

    PubMed

    Rong, Weifeng; He, Dongliang; Wang, Meiyan; Mou, Zehuai; Cheng, Jianhua; Yao, Changguang; Li, Shihui; Trifonov, Alexander A; Lyubov, Dmitrii M; Cui, Dongmei

    2015-03-25

    The first neutral rare-earth metal dinuclear dihydrido complexes [(NPNPN)LnH2]2 (2-Ln; Ln = Y, Lu; NPNPN: N[Ph2PNC6H3((i)Pr)2]2) bearing μ2-bridging hydride ligands have been synthesized. In the presence of THF, 2-Y undergoes intramolecular activation of the sp(2) C-H bond to form dinuclear aryl-hydride complex 3-Y containing three μ2-bridging hydride ligands. PMID:25713818

  13. Properties of the triplet metastable states of the alkaline-earth-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Mitroy, J.; Bromley, M.W.J.

    2004-11-01

    The static and dynamic properties of the alkaline-earth-metal atoms in their metastable state are computed in a configuration interaction approach with a semiempirical model potential for the core. Among the properties determined are the scalar and tensor polarizabilities, the quadrupole moment, some of the oscillator strengths, and the dispersion coefficients of the van der Waals interaction. A simple method for including the effect of the core on the dispersion parameters is described.

  14. Optimization of film synthesized rare earth transition metal permanent magnet systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cadieu, F.J.

    1992-01-01

    Progress is reported in three areas: high coercivity Sm-Fe-Ti-V, Sm-Fe-Zr, and two element Sm-Fe Sm{sub 5}(Fe,T){sub 17} type crystalline phases; ThMn{sub 12} type pseudobinary SmFe{sub 12-x}T{sub x}(0{le}{times}{le}1.5); and sputter process control for the synthesis of precisely textured rare earth-transition metal magnetic films. (DLC)

  15. Formation of an integrated holding company to produce rare-earth metal articles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, S. V.; Grishaev, S. I.

    2013-12-01

    The possibility of formation of a Russian holding company for the production of rare-earth metal articles under conditions of its increasing demand on the world market is considered. It is reasonable to ensure stable business operation on the market under conditions of state-private partnership after the fraction of soled products is determined and supported by the competitive advantages of Russian products.

  16. State promotion and neutralization оf ions near metal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinoviev, A. N.

    2011-05-01

    When a multiply charged ion with charge Z approaches the metal surface, a dipole is formed by the multiply charged ion and the charge induced in the metal. The states for such a dipole are promoted into continuum with decreasing ion-surface distance and cross the states formed from metal atom. The model proposed explains the dominant population of deep bound states in collisions considered.

  17. Triboelectrification-Enabled Self-Powered Detection and Removal of Heavy Metal Ions in Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaoling; Chen, Jun; Guo, Hengyu; Fan, Xing; Wen, Zhen; Yeh, Min-Hsin; Yu, Chongwen; Cao, Xia; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-04-01

    A fundamentally new working principle into the field of self-powered heavy-metal-ion detection and removal using the triboelectrification effect is introduced. The as-developed tribo-nanosensors can selectively detect common heavy metal ions. The water-driven triboelectric nanogenerator is taken as a sustainable power source for heavy-metal-ion removal by recycling the kinetic energy from flowing wastewater. PMID:26913810

  18. GYROSURFING ACCELERATION OF IONS IN FRONT OF EARTH's QUASI-PARALLEL BOW SHOCK

    SciTech Connect

    Kis, Arpad; Lemperger, Istvan; Wesztergom, Viktor; Agapitov, Oleksiy; Krasnoselskikh, Vladimir; Dandouras, Iannis E-mail: Kis.Arpad@csfk.mta.hu

    2013-07-01

    It is well known that shocks in space plasmas can accelerate particles to high energies. However, many details of the shock acceleration mechanism are still unknown. A critical element of shock acceleration is the injection problem; i.e., the presence of the so called seed particle population that is needed for the acceleration to work efficiently. In our case study, we present for the first time observational evidence of gyroresonant surfing acceleration in front of Earth's quasi-parallel bow shock resulting in the appearance of the long-suspected seed particle population. For our analysis, we use simultaneous multi-spacecraft measurements provided by the Cluster spacecraft ion (CIS), magnetic (FGM), and electric field and wave instrument (EFW) during a time period of large inter-spacecraft separation distance. The spacecraft were moving toward the bow shock and were situated in the foreshock region. The results show that the gyroresonance surfing acceleration takes place as a consequence of interaction between circularly polarized monochromatic (or quasi-monochromatic) transversal electromagnetic plasma waves and short large amplitude magnetic structures (SLAMSs). The magnetic mirror force of the SLAMS provides the resonant conditions for the ions trapped by the waves and results in the acceleration of ions. Since wave packets with circular polarization and different kinds of magnetic structures are very commonly observed in front of Earth's quasi-parallel bow shock, the gyroresonant surfing acceleration proves to be an important particle injection mechanism. We also show that seed ions are accelerated directly from the solar wind ion population.

  19. Most spin-1/2 transition-metal ions do have single ion anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jia; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan E-mail: mike-whangbo@ncsu.edu; Koo, Hyun-Joo; Xiang, Hongjun E-mail: mike-whangbo@ncsu.edu; Kremer, Reinhard K.

    2014-09-28

    The cause for the preferred spin orientation in magnetic systems containing spin-1/2 transition-metal ions was explored by studying the origin of the easy-plane anisotropy of the spin-1/2 Cu{sup 2+} ions in CuCl{sub 2}·2H{sub 2}O, LiCuVO{sub 4}, CuCl{sub 2}, and CuBr{sub 2} on the basis of density functional theory and magnetic dipole-dipole energy calculations as well as a perturbation theory treatment of the spin-orbit coupling. We find that the spin orientation observed for these spin-1/2 ions is not caused by their anisotropic spin exchange interactions, nor by their magnetic dipole-dipole interactions, but by the spin-orbit coupling associated with their crystal-field split d-states. Our study also predicts in-plane anisotropy for the Cu{sup 2+} ions of Bi{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} and Li{sub 2}CuO{sub 2}. The results of our investigations dispel the mistaken belief that magnetic systems with spin-1/2 ions have no magnetic anisotropy induced by spin-orbit coupling.

  20. Ground-state properties of rare-earth metals: an evaluation of density-functional theory.

    PubMed

    Söderlind, Per; Turchi, P E A; Landa, A; Lordi, V

    2014-10-15

    The rare-earth metals have important technological applications due to their magnetic properties, but are scarce and expensive. Development of high-performance magnetic materials with less rare-earth content is desired, but theoretical modeling is hampered by complexities of the rare earths electronic structure. The existence of correlated (atomic-like) 4f electrons in the vicinity of the valence band makes any first-principles theory challenging. Here, we apply and evaluate the efficacy of density-functional theory for the series of lanthanides (rare earths), investigating the influence of the electron exchange and correlation functional, spin-orbit interaction, and orbital polarization. As a reference, the results are compared with those of the so-called 'standard model' of the lanthanides in which electrons are constrained to occupy 4f core states with no hybridization with the valence electrons. Some comparisons are also made with models designed for strong electron correlations. Our results suggest that spin-orbit coupling and orbital polarization are important, particularly for the magnitude of the magnetic moments, and that calculated equilibrium volumes, bulk moduli, and magnetic moments show correct trends overall. However, the precision of the calculated properties is not at the level of that found for simpler metals in the Periodic Table of Elements, and the electronic structures do not accurately reproduce x-ray photoemission spectra. PMID:25237839

  1. A Low Temperature Route for the Synthesis of Rare Earth Transition Metal Borides and Their Hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramp, S.; Febri, M.; Joubert, J. C.

    1997-10-01

    Synthesis of rare earth-based alloys by the ORD technique consists in the reduction of rare earth oxides in a melt of calcium under argon, and simultaneous diffusion-reaction of the just formed rare earth metal with the other elements. This method has been applied with success to numerous ternary borides containing transition metals such as the magnetic alloys Y2Co14B, LnCo4B, and YCo3B2. By using a small excess of Ca, boride particles grow in a viscous slurry media containing unreacted (melted) Ca and nanosize CaO particles. Single phase boride alloys can be obtained at 1000°C as loose micrometer-size particles of very high crystal quality as confirmed by the sharp diffraction peaks on the corresponding X-ray diagrams. Particles can be easily recovered by gentle washing in diluted weak acid solution, and dried under vacuum at room temperature. This rather low temperature technique is particularly adapted to the synthesis of incongruent melting phases, as well as for the alloys containing volatile rare earth elements (Sm, Yb, Tb,…).

  2. Rare earth element complexation by PO sub 4 sup 3 minus ions in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, R.H.; Lee, Jong Hyeon; Bingler, L.S. )

    1991-10-01

    Complexation of trivalent rare earths by PO{sub 4}{sup 3{minus}} ions has been assessed at t = 25C by examining the influence of aqueous phosphate concentrations on the distributions of {sup 144}Ce and {sup 153}Gd between 0.68 molar NaClO{sub 4} and tributyl phosphate (TBP). The authors estimates of these formation constants at zero ionic strength are approximately seven to eight orders of magnitude lower than previously reported estimates for lanthanide and actinide PO{sub 4}{sup 3{minus}} complexation. Linear free energy relationships relating the complexation of Ca{sup 2+} and lanthanides (Ln{sup 3+}) by a variety of organic ligands, in conjunction with previous direct observations of CaPO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} formation, are consistent with the experimentally derived CePO{sub 4}{sup 0} and GdPO{sub 4}{sup 0} formation constants reported in this work. Gadolinium speciation calculations indicate that the PO{sub 4}{sup 3{minus}} ion can effectively compete with the CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}} ion for free Gd{sup 3+} in model groundwater at pH 7-9. Rare earth element phosphate complexation is a significant process in natural freshwater systems which are neutral to mildly basic when the concentration ratio (HPO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}})/(HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}) is greater than approximately 1 {times} 10{sup 3{minus}}.

  3. Color-tunable heat-resistant polyaryletherketones co-coordinated with various rare earth ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dan; Shi, Qirong; Wang, Zhonggang

    2012-09-01

    Europium (Eu3+) and terbium (Tb3+) ions coordinated with 1,10-phenantroline (Phen), N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and carboxyl-containing polyaryletherketone (PEK) represent new luminescent materials (PEK-Eux3+Tb1-x3+-Phens, x = 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, 0.7, 0.8, 0.9, 1). The results of FTIR, elemental analysis and XRD confirm that the coordination reaction indeed occurs and the rare earth ions are homogeneously dispersed in the PEK matrix. The polyarylethertone rare earth complexes exhibit high glass transition temperature and good thermal stability because of their wholly aromatic structures. The luminescence measurements indicate that the relative emission intensities of Tb3+ to Eu3+ ions depend on their ratio in the system, and the color of PEK-Eux3+Tb1-x3+-Phens under UV excitation can be tuned by changing the x value. The materials thus prepared show promising potential in the full color large area display field.

  4. Coupled hydromagnetic wave excitation and ion acceleration upstream of the earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    A self-consistent theory is set forth for the excitation of hydromagnetic waves and the acceleration of 'diffuse' ions upstream of the earth's bow shock in the quasi-equilibrium that results when the solar wind velocity and the interplanetary magnetic field are nearly parallel. For the waves, the quasi-equilibrium derives from a balance between excitation by the ions, which stream relative to the solar wind plasma, and convective loss to the magnetosheath. For the diffuse ions, the quasi-equilibrium derives from a balance between injection at the shock front, confinement to the foreshock by pitch angle scattering on the waves, and acceleration by compression at the shock front. It also results from loss to the magnetosheath, loss due to escape upstream of the foreshock, and loss via diffusion perpendicular to the average magnetic field onto field lines that do not connect to the shock front. Diffusion equations describing the ion transport and wave kinetic equations describing the hydromagnetic wave transport are solved self-consistently to give analytical expressions. These describe (1) the differential wave intensity spectrum as a function of frequency and distance from the bow shock and (2) the ion omnidirectional distribution functions and anisotropies as functions of energy and distance from the bow shock.

  5. Ligational behavior of Schiff bases towards transition metal ion and metalation effect on their antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, Jai; Batra, Nisha; Malhotra, Rajesh

    2012-11-01

    New Schiff bases pyrazine-2-carboxylicacid (phenyl-pyridin-2-yl-methylene)-hydrazide (Hpch-bp) HL1 and pyrazine-2-carboxylicacid (pyridin-2-ylmethylene)-hydrazide (Hpch-pc) HL2 derived from condensation of pyrazine carboxylic hydrazide (Hpch) with 2-benzoyl pyridine (bp) or pyridine 2-carbaldehyde (pc) and their transition metal complexes of type ML(1-2)2 have been synthesized, where M = Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II). Characterization of ligands and their metal complexes was carried out by elemental analysis, conductimetric studies, magnetic susceptibility, spectroscopic techniques (IR, UV-VIS, NMR, ESR, Mass) and thermogravimetric analysis. The physico-chemical studies revealed octahedral geometry or distorted octahedral geometry around metal ion. These azomethine Schiff base ligands acted as tridentate ? coordinating through carbonyl, azomethine and pyridine nitrogen present in the ligand. The thermodynamic and thermal properties of the complexes have been investigated and it was observed on the basis of these studies that thermal stability of complexes follows the order Mn < Zn < Cu < Co < Ni. The ligands and their complexes were tested for in vitro antibacterial activity at different concentrations against bacteria viz. Gram positive Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus luteus and Gram negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas mendocina. A marked enhancement in biocidal activity of the ligands under similar experimental conditions was observed as a consequence of coordination with metal ions. The trend of growth inhibition in the complexes was found to be in the order: Cu > Mn > Ni > Co > Zn.

  6. Chemical and thermal stability of isotypic metal-organic frameworks: effect of metal ions.

    PubMed

    Kang, In Joong; Khan, Nazmul Abedin; Haque, Enamul; Jhung, Sung Hwa

    2011-05-27

    Chemical and thermal stabilities of isotypic metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) like Al-BDC (Al-benzenedicarboxylate called MIL-53-Al), Cr-BDC (MIL-53-Cr) and V-BDC (MIL-47-V), after purification to remove uncoordinated organic linkers, have been compared to understand the effect of the central metal ions on the stabilities of the porous MOF-type materials. Chemical stability to acids, bases, and water decreases in the order of Cr-BDC>Al-BDC>V-BDC, suggesting stability increases with increasing inertness of the central metal ions. However, thermal stability decreases in the order of Al-BDC>Cr-BDC> V-BDC, and this tendency may be explained by the strength of the metal-oxygen bond in common oxides like Al(2)O(3), Cr(2)O(3), and V(2)O(5). In order to evaluate precisely the stability of a MOF, it is necessary to remove uncoordinated organic linkers that are located in the pores of the MOF, because a filled MOF may be more stable than the same MOF after purification. PMID:21547968

  7. Structure of the alkali-metal-atom + strontium molecular ions: Towards photoassociation and formation of cold molecular ions

    SciTech Connect

    Aymar, M.; Dulieu, O.; Guerout, R.

    2011-08-14

    The potential energy curves, permanent and transition dipole moments, and the static dipolar polarizability, of molecular ions composed of one alkali-metal atom and a strontium ion are determined with a quantum chemistry approach. The molecular ions are treated as effective two-electron systems and are treated using effective core potentials including core polarization, large gaussian basis sets, and full configuration interaction. In the perspective of upcoming experiments aiming at merging cold atom and cold ion traps, possible paths for radiative charge exchange, photoassociation of a cold lithium or rubidium atom and a strontium ion are discussed, as well as the formation of stable molecular ions.

  8. Hydrated alkali metal ions: spectroscopic evidence for clathrates.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Richard J; Chang, Terrence M; Williams, Evan R

    2013-08-01

    The origin of enhanced abundances for some hydrated alkali metal ions, M(+)(H2O)n, where M = Cs, Rb, K, Na, and Li with between 17 and 21 water molecules attached was investigated with infrared photodissociation (IRPD) spectroscopy and by blackbody infrared radiative dissociation (BIRD) at 133 K. The abundances of clusters of Cs(+), Rb(+), and K(+) with 18 and 20 water molecules are anomalously high compared to the corresponding clusters of Na(+), and Li(+) with 20 water molecules has only a slightly enhanced abundance. BIRD results indicate that the anomalous abundance at n = 20 for the larger ions is due to the high stability of this cluster, and the significant instability of the next largest cluster, consistent with a stable core structure with 20 water molecules. IRPD spectra in the free-OH region (∼3600-3800 cm(-1)) for Cs(+), Rb(+), and K(+) with 18 and 20 water molecules indicates that water molecules with a free-OH stretch accept two hydrogen bonds and donate one hydrogen bond (acceptor-acceptor-donor water) to other water molecules. No acceptor-donor (AD) bands are observed, consistent with clathrate structures for these ions. In contrast, the AD band is significant for Na(+), indicating that these clusters adopt different structures. Results for Li(+) indicate a contribution from clathrate structures at n = 20, but not at other cluster sizes. This analysis is supported by the relative intensities of bands in the hydrogen-bonding region for n = 20. PMID:23808387

  9. Nanoparticles reduce nickel allergy by capturing metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vemula, Praveen Kumar; Anderson, R. Rox; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2011-05-01

    Approximately 10% of the population in the USA suffer from nickel allergy, and many are unable to wear jewellery or handle coins and other objects that contain nickel. Many agents have been developed to reduce the penetration of nickel through skin, but few formulations are safe and effective. Here, we show that applying a thin layer of glycerine emollient containing nanoparticles of either calcium carbonate or calcium phosphate on an isolated piece of pig skin (in vitro) and on the skin of mice (in vivo) prevents the penetration of nickel ions into the skin. The nanoparticles capture nickel ions by cation exchange, and remain on the surface of the skin, allowing them to be removed by simple washing with water. Approximately 11-fold fewer nanoparticles by mass are required to achieve the same efficacy as the chelating agent ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid. Using nanoparticles with diameters smaller than 500 nm in topical creams may be an effective way to limit the exposure to metal ions that can cause skin irritation.

  10. Rare Earth Metal-Mediated Precision Polymerization of Vinylphosphonates and Conjugated Nitrogen-Containing Vinyl Monomers.

    PubMed

    Soller, Benedikt S; Salzinger, Stephan; Rieger, Bernhard

    2016-02-24

    This review focuses on introducing and explaining the rare earth metal-mediated group transfer polymerization (REM-GTP) of polar monomers and is composed of three main sections: poly(vinylphosphonate)s, surface-initiated group transfer polymerization (SI-GTP), and extension to N-coordinating Michael-type monomers (2-vinylpridine (2VP), 2-isopropenyl-2-oxazoline (IPOx)). The poly(vinylphosphonate)s section is divided into two parts: radical, anionic, and silyl ketene acetal group transfer polymerization (SKA-GTP) of vinylphosphonates in comparison to REM-GTP, and properties of poly(vinylphosphonate)s. The mechanism of vinylphosphonate REM-GTP is discussed in detail for initiation and propagation including activation enthalpies ΔH(‡) and entropies ΔS(‡) according to the Eyring equation. SI-GTP is presented as a method for surface functionalization, and recent trends for 2VP and IPOx polymerization are summarized. This review will serve as a good resource or guideline for researchers who are currently working in the field of rare earth metal mediated polymerization catalysis as well as for those who are interested in beginning to employ rare earth metal complexes for the synthesis of new materials from polar monomers. PMID:26718632

  11. Prostate cancer outcome and tissue levels of metal ions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sarafanov, A.G.; Todorov, T.I.; Centeno, J.A.; MacIas, V.; Gao, W.; Liang, W.-M.; Beam, C.; Gray, Michael A.; Kajdacsy-Balla, A.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND There are several studies examining prostate cancer and exposure to cadmium, iron, selenium, and zinc. Less data are available on the possible influence of these metal ions on prostate cancer outcome. This study measured levels of these ions in prostatectomy samples in order to examine possible associations between metal concentrations and disease outcome. METHODS We obtained formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue blocks of prostatectomy samples of 40 patients with PSA recurrence, matched 1:1 (for year of surgery, race, age, Gleason grading, and pathology TNM classification) with tissue blocks from 40 patients without recurrence (n = 80). Case-control pairs were compared for the levels of metals in areas adjacent to tumors. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used for quantification of Cd, Fe, Zn, and Se. RESULTS Patients with biochemical (PSA) recurrence of disease had 12% lower median iron (95 ??g/g vs. 111 ??g/g; P = 0.04) and 21% lower zinc (279 ??g/g vs. 346 ??g/g; P = 0.04) concentrations in the normal-appearing tissue immediately adjacent to cancer areas. Differences in cadmium (0.489 ??g/g vs. 0.439 ??g/g; 4% higher) and selenium (1.68 ??g/g vs. 1.58 ??g/g; 5% higher) levels were not statistically significant in recurrence cases, when compared to non-recurrences (P = 0.40 and 0.21, respectively). CONCLUSIONS There is an association between low zinc and low iron prostate tissue levels and biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer. Whether these novel findings are a cause or effect of more aggressive tumors, or whether low zinc and iron prostatic levels raise implications for therapy, remains to be investigated. Copyright ?? 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. The Role of the Ion Microprobe in Solid-Earth Geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauri, E. H.

    2002-12-01

    Despite the early success of the electron microprobe in taking petrology to the micron scale, and the widespread use of mass spectrometers in geochemistry and geochronology, it was not until the mid-1970s that the ion microprobe came into its own as an in situ analytical tool in the Earth sciences. Despite this inauspicious beginning, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) was widely advertised as a technology that would eventually eclipse thermal ion mass spectrometry (TIMS) in isotope geology. However this was not to happen. While various technical issues in SIMS such as interferences and matrix effects became increasingly clear, an appreciation grew for the complimentary abilities of SIMS and TIMS that, even with the advent of ICP-MS, continues to this day. Today the ion microprobe is capable of abundance measurements in the parts-per-billion range across nearly the entire periodic table, and SIMS stable isotope data quality is now routinely crossing the 1 per mil threshold, all at the micron scale. Much of this success is due to the existence of multi-user community facilities for SIMS research, and the substantial efforts of interested scientists to understand the fundamentals of sputtered ion formation and their application to geochemistry. Recent discoveries of evidence for the existence of ancient crust and oceans, the emergence of life on Earth, the large-scale cycling of surficial materials into the deep Earth, and illumination of fundamental high-pressure phenomena have all been made possible by SIMS, and these (and many more) discoveries owe a debt to the vision of creating and supporting multi-user community facilities for SIMS. The ion microprobe remains an expensive instrument to purchase and maintain, yet it is also exceedingly diverse in application. Major improvements in SIMS, indeed in all mass spectrometry, are visible on the near horizon. Yet the geochemical community cannot depend on commercial manufacturers alone to design and build the next generation of instrumentation for geochemistry. Such will be the role of instrument-minded scientists asking questions that simply cannot be answered by extant means. And it will be multi-user facilities that will make such advancements available to the wider geochemical community.

  13. Lithium-Ion Batteries Being Evaluated for Low-Earth-Orbit Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKissock, Barbara I.

    2005-01-01

    The performance characteristics and long-term cycle life of aerospace lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries in low-Earth-orbit applications are being investigated. A statistically designed test using Li-ion cells from various manufacturers began in September 2004 to study the effects of temperature, end-of-charge voltage, and depth-of-discharge operating conditions on the cycle life and performance of these cells. Performance degradation with cycling is being evaluated, and performance characteristics and failure modes are being modeled statistically. As technology improvements are incorporated into aerospace Li-ion cells, these new designs can be added to the test to evaluate the effect of the design changes on performance and life. Cells from Lithion and Saft have achieved over 2000 cycles under 10 different test condition combinations and are being evaluated. Cells from Mine Safety Appliances (MSA) and modules made up of commercial-off-the-shelf 18650 Li-ion cells connected in series/parallel combinations are scheduled to be added in the summer of 2005. The test conditions include temperatures of 10, 20, and 30 C, end-of-charge voltages of 3.85, 3.95, and 4.05 V, and depth-of-discharges from 20 to 40 percent. The low-Earth-orbit regime consists of a 55 min charge, at a constant-current rate that is 110 percent of the current required to fully recharge the cells in 55 min until the charge voltage limit is reached, and then at a constant voltage for the remaining charge time. Cells are discharged for 35 min at the current required for their particular depth-of-discharge condition. Cells are being evaluated in four-cell series strings with charge voltage limits being applied to individual cells by the use of charge-control units designed and produced at the NASA Glenn Research Center. These charge-control units clamp the individual cell voltages as each cell reaches its end-of-charge voltage limit, and they bypass the excess current from that cell, while allowing the full current flow to the remaining cells in the pack. The goal of this evaluation is to identify conditions and cell designs for Li-ion technology that can achieve more than 30,000 low-Earth-orbit cycles. Testing is being performed at the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane Division, in Crane, Indiana.

  14. Influence of other rare earth ions on the optical refrigeration efficiency in Yb:YLF crystals.

    PubMed

    Di Lieto, Alberto; Sottile, Alberto; Volpi, Azzurra; Zhang, Zhonghan; Seletskiy, Denis V; Tonelli, Mauro

    2014-11-17

    We investigated the effect of rare earth impurities on the cooling efficiency of Yb³⁺:LiYF₄ (Yb:YLF). The refrigeration performance of two single crystals, doped with 5%-at. Yb and with identical history but with different amount of contaminations, have been compared by measuring the cooling efficiency curves. Spectroscopic and elemental analyses of the samples have been carried out to identify the contaminants, to quantify their concentrations and to understand their effect on the cooling efficiencies. A model of energy transfer processes between Yb and other rare earth ions is suggested, identifying Erbium and Holmium as elements that produce a detrimental effect on the cooling performance. PMID:25402099

  15. First-order Fermi acceleration of the diffuse ion population near the earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, M. A.

    1981-01-01

    The flux of 30-65 keV particles observed by the ISEE-3 200 earth radii upstream is shown to be an upstream escape of the energetic ions in the earth's bow shock. A formal solution to the transport equation for the distribution function of energetic particles upstream from an isotropic monoenergetic source of particles/sq cm at a plane shock where the plasma changes speed is found, and escape conditions are defined. The efficiency of the acceleration is calculated to depend on the charge/particle, and fluxes near and far upstream of the shock are described analytically. Any model which takes into account shock acceleration by diffusive scattering with significant escape losses produces the observed spectrum close to the shock. The escape loss upstream is demonstrated to control the spectrum and the variation of flux and anisotropy with distance from the shock.

  16. Predicted pressure-induced spin and electronic transition in double perovskite R2CoMnO6 (R = rare-earth ion).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong Jian; Zhou, Haiyang; Chen, Xiang Ming; Bellaiche, L

    2015-06-10

    Specific first-principles calculations are performed to predict structural, magnetic and electronic properties of seven double perovskite R2CoMnO6 materials, with R being a rare-earth ion, under hydrostatic pressure. All these compounds are found to undergo a first-order transition from a high spin (HS) to low spin (LS) state at a critical pressure (whose value is dependent on the R ion). Such transition not only results in a significant volume collapse but also yields a dramatic change in electronic structure. More precisely, the HS-to-LS transition is accompanied by a transition from an insulator to a half-metallic state in the R2CoMnO6 compounds having the largest rare-earth ionic radius (i.e., Nd, Sm, Gd and Tb) while it induces a change from an insulator to a semiconductor having a narrow band gap for the smallest rare-earth ions (i.e., R = Dy, Ho and Er). Experiments are called for to confirm these predictions. PMID:25984752

  17. Towards metals analysis using corona discharge ionization ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Mohammad T; Saraji, Mohammad; Sherafatmand, Hossein

    2016-02-25

    For the first time, the capability of corona discharge ionization ion mobility spectrometry (CD-IMS) in the determination of metal complex was evaluated. The extreme simplicity of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) coupled to the high sensitivity of CD-IMS measurement could make this combination really useful for simple, rapid, and sensitive determination of metals in different samples. In this regard, mercury, as a model metal, was complexed with diethyldithiocarbamate (DEDTC), and then extracted into the carbon tetrachloride using DLLME. Some parameters affecting the extraction efficiency, including the type and volume of the extraction solvent, the type and volume of the disperser solvent, the concentration of the chelating agent, salt addition and, pH were exhaustively investigated. Under the optimized condition, the enrichment factor was obtained to be 142. The linear range of 0.035-10.0 μg mL(-1) with r(2) = 0.997 and the detection limit of 0.010 μg mL(-1) were obtained. The relative standard deviation values were calculated to be lower than 4% and 8% for intra-day and inter-day, respectively. Finally, the developed method was successfully applied for the extraction and determination of mercury in various real samples. The satisfactory results revealed the capability of the proposed method in trace analysis without tedious derivatization or hydride generation. PMID:26851088

  18. Peroxide Stress Elicits Adaptive Changes in Bacterial Metal Ion Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Faulkner, Melinda J.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Exposure to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and other reactive oxygen species is a universal feature of life in an aerobic environment. Bacteria express enzymes to detoxify H2O2 and to repair the resulting damage, and their synthesis is typically regulated by redox-sensing transcription factors. The best characterized bacterial peroxide-sensors are Escherichia coli OxyR and Bacillus subtilis PerR. Analysis of their regulons has revealed that, in addition to inducible detoxification enzymes, adaptation to H2O2 is mediated by modifications of metal ion homeostasis. Analogous adaptations appear to be present in other bacteria as here reviewed for Deinococcus radiodurans, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Bradyrhizobium japonicum. As a general theme, peroxide stress elicits changes in cytosolic metal distribution with the net effect of reducing the damage caused by reactive ferrous iron. Iron levels are reduced by repression of uptake, sequestration in storage proteins, and incorporation into metalloenzymes. In addition, peroxide-inducible transporters elevate cytosolic levels of Mn(II) and/or Zn(II) that can displace ferrous iron from sensitive targets. Although bacteria differ significantly in the detailed mechanisms employed to modulate cytosolic metal levels, a high Mn:Fe ratio has emerged as one key correlate of reactive oxygen species resistance. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 175–189. PMID:20977351

  19. Sensitivity of FRDA lymphoblasts to salts of transition metal ions.

    PubMed

    Wong, A; Yang, J; Danielson, S; Gellera, C; Taroni, F; Cortopassi, G

    2000-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease resulting from decreased expression of the nuclear-encoded mitochondrial protein, frataxin. FRDA patients have characteristic iron deposits and dysfunction of mitochondrial enzymes in the heart. Inactivation of the frataxin homologue in yeast causes dysregulation of both mitochondrial iron levels and iron export. Previously, we have observed sensitivity of FRDA fibroblasts to FeCl3 and hydrogen peroxide, results consistent with the hypothesis that FRDA cells may experience increased Fenton chemistry. To determine whether the sensitivity of FRDA cells to transition metal ions is a general or specific property, we have compared the sensitivity of lymphoblasts from FRDA patients and healthy controls to the transition metal salts CoCl2, CuSO4 FeCl3 FeSO4, MnCl2, and ZnCl2. FRDA lymphoblasts were significantly more sensitive to FeCl3 and MnCl2 than control cells. However, there were no significant differences observed in sensitivity to CoCl2, CuSO4, FeSO4 and ZnCl2 in the concentration ranges studied. Thus, the sensitivity of FRDA lymphoblasts exposed to transition metals appears to be specific, and could be relevant to the pathophysiological mechanism, which is discussed. PMID:11229359

  20. Previously hidden low-energy ions: a better map of near-Earth space and the terrestrial mass balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Mats

    2015-12-01

    This is a review of the mass balance of planet Earth, intended also for scientists not usually working with space physics or geophysics. The discussion includes both outflow of ions and neutrals from the ionosphere and upper atmosphere, and the inflow of meteoroids and larger objects. The focus is on ions with energies less than tens of eV originating from the ionosphere. Positive low-energy ions are complicated to detect onboard sunlit spacecraft at higher altitudes, which often become positively charged to several tens of volts. We have invented a technique to observe low-energy ions based on the detection of the wake behind a charged spacecraft in a supersonic ion flow. We find that low-energy ions usually dominate the ion density and the outward flux in large volumes in the magnetosphere. The global outflow is of the order of 1026 ions s-1. This is a significant fraction of the total number outflow of particles from Earth, and changes plasma processes in near-Earth space. We compare order of magnitude estimates of the mass outflow and inflow for planet Earth and find that they are similar, at around 1 kg s-1 (30 000 ton yr-1). We briefly discuss atmospheric and ionospheric outflow from other planets and the connection to evolution of extraterrestrial life.

  1. Stochastic Growth of Ion Cyclotron And Mirror Waves In Earth's Magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.; Grubits, K. A.

    2001-01-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron and mirror waves in Earth's magnetosheath are bursty, have widely variable fields, and are unexpectedly persistent, properties difficult to reconcile with uniform secular growth. Here it is shown for specific periods that stochastic growth theory (SGT) quantitatively accounts for the functional form of the wave statistics and qualitatively explains the wave properties. The wave statistics are inconsistent with uniform secular growth or self-organized criticality, but nonlinear processes sometimes play a role at high fields. The results show SGT's relevance near marginal stability and suggest that it is widely relevant to space and astrophysical plasmas.

  2. Rare earth elements and critical metal content of extracted landfilled material and potential recovery opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Gutiérrez-Gutiérrez, Silvia C.; Coulon, Frédéric; Jiang, Ying; Wagland, Stuart

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Samples from multiple core drills were obtained from 4× landfill sites in the UK. • Each sample analysed for rare earth elements, critical metals and valuable metals. • Two stage microwave digestion method ensuring high yield. • High quantities of copper and aluminium were observed in the soil layers of landfill. • Across 4× landfills aluminium and copper present has a value of around $400 million. - Abstract: Rare earth elements (REEs), Platinum group metals (PGMs) and other critical metals currently attract significant interest due to the high risks of supply shortage and substantial impact on the economy. Their uses in many applications have made them present in municipal solid waste (MSW) and in commercial and industrial waste (C&I), since several industrial processes produce by-products with high content of these metals. With over 4000 landfills in the UK alone, the aim of this study was to assess the existence of these critical metals within landfills. Samples collected from four closed landfills in UK were subjected to a two-step acid digestion to extract 27 metals of interest. Concentrations across the four landfill sites were 58 ± 6 mg kg{sup −1} for REEs comprising 44 ± 8 mg kg{sup −1} for light REEs, 11 ± 2 mg kg{sup −1} for heavy REEs and 3 ± 1 mg kg{sup −1} for Scandium (Sc) and 3 ± 1.0 mg kg{sup −1} of PGMs. Compared to the typical concentration in ores, these concentrations are too low to achieve a commercially viable extraction. However, content of other highly valuable metals (Al and Cu) was found in concentrations equating to a combined value across the four landfills of around $400 million, which increases the economic viability of landfill mining. Presence of critical metals will mainly depend on the type of waste that was buried but the recovery of these metals through landfill mining is possible and is economically feasible only if additional materials (plastics, paper, metallic items and other) are also recovered for reprocessing.

  3. Metal Ions, Not Metal-Catalyzed Oxidative Stress, Cause Clay Leachate Antibacterial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Caitlin C.; Koehl, Jennifer L.; Solanky, Dipesh; Haydel, Shelley E.

    2014-01-01

    Aqueous leachates prepared from natural antibacterial clays, arbitrarily designated CB-L, release metal ions into suspension, have a low pH (3.4–5), generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and H2O2, and have a high oxidation-reduction potential. To isolate the role of pH in the antibacterial activity of CB clay mixtures, we exposed three different strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7 to 10% clay suspensions. The clay suspension completely killed acid-sensitive and acid-tolerant E. coli O157:H7 strains, whereas incubation in a low-pH buffer resulted in a minimal decrease in viability, demonstrating that low pH alone does not mediate antibacterial activity. The prevailing hypothesis is that metal ions participate in redox cycling and produce ROS, leading to oxidative damage to macromolecules and resulting in cellular death. However, E. coli cells showed no increase in DNA or protein oxidative lesions and a slight increase in lipid peroxidation following exposure to the antibacterial leachate. Further, supplementation with numerous ROS scavengers eliminated lipid peroxidation, but did not rescue the cells from CB-L-mediated killing. In contrast, supplementing CB-L with EDTA, a broad-spectrum metal chelator, reduced killing. Finally, CB-L was equally lethal to cells in an anoxic environment as compared to the aerobic environment. Thus, ROS were not required for lethal activity and did not contribute to toxicity of CB-L. We conclude that clay-mediated killing was not due to oxidative damage, but rather, was due to toxicity associated directly with released metal ions. PMID:25502790

  4. Metal cation/anion adsorption on calcium carbonate: Implications to metal ion concentrations in groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Zachara, J.M.; Cowan, C.E.; Resch, C.T.

    1990-05-01

    This chapter evaluates the sorption behavior of metallic ions on specimen calcite as a basis for determining the importance of calcite relative to other subsurface sorbents, such as layer silicates and oxides, in controlling metal ion concentration in calcareous groundwaters. A review of the literature shows the sorption of both metallic cations and anions on calcite over ranges in pH and CO{sub 2} partial pressure to be consistent with a surface-exchange process where cations exchange with surface Ca and anions exchange with surface CO{sub 3}. A general surface-exchange model was developed to account for the effects of Ca and CO{sub 3} concentrations, pH, and calcite surface area on cation and anion sorption onto calcite. The model was applied to recently developed experimental sorption data of Zn and SeO{sub 3} on specimen calcite in equilibrium CaCO{sub 3}(aq) suspensions. The surface-exchange model was able to describe the effects of pH on both cation and anion sorption, and provided good predictions of the effects of variable CO{sub 2}(g) pressure on Zn sorption and of PO{sub 4} on SeO{sub 3} sorption. The surface-exchange model, combined with sorption constants for other phases, was used to calculate Cd sorption to a hypothetical aquifer material containing a mixture of sorbents. The sorbent concentrations were fixed to those expected in groundwater zones. The multi-sorbent calculation documented the importance of calcite as a sorbent for metallic ions in groundwater.93 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Local structure around rare-earth ions in B2O3 glass at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funabiki, Fuji; Matsuishi, Satoru; Hosono, Hideo

    2013-06-01

    Melt quenching of B2O3 with less than 25 mol. % rare-earth oxide (RE2O3) at ambient pressure results in a milky white glass because of liquid-liquid phase separation into B2O3 and RE2O3.3B2O phases. In contrast, we have found that melt quenching under GPa-order pressure realizes a transparent RE-doped B2O3 glass. This study investigates the local structure around the RE ions in the B2O3 glass prepared at 3 GPa using optical measurements and electron-spin-echo envelope modulation spectroscopy. It is shown that the RE-rich microparticles disappear and the RE ions are isolated from each other in a highly symmetric crystal field formed by triangular and tetrahedral boron units. This result is consistent with that extrapolated from the data for RE-doped sodium borate glasses.

  6. Transition metal and rare earth quad-doped photovoltaic phosphate glasses toward raising a-SiC:H solar cell performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, P.; Zhang, C. M.; Zhu, P. F.

    2016-01-01

    Efficiency enhancement of a hydrogenated amorphous-silicon carbide (a-SiC:H) solar cell using downshifting and upconversion of photovoltaic (PV) glasses doped with transition metal (TM) ions and rare earth (RE) ions are investigated. P2O5-Li2O-Al2O3-Sb2O3-MnO-Yb2O3-Er2O3 glass doped with Sb3+-Mn2+-Yb3+-Er3+ ions is prepared and the PV glass is placed on an a-SiC:H solar cell. The performance of the cell in combination with the PV glass is simulated and measured, and the results show that the theoretical and experimental efficiencies are both enhanced compared to the bare one. The potential of TM-RE quad-doped glasses for improving the efficiency of a-SiC:H PV modules are explored.

  7. A Study on Removal of Rare Earth Elements from U.S. Coal Byproducts by Ion Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozelle, Peter L.; Khadilkar, Aditi B.; Pulati, Nuerxida; Soundarrajan, Nari; Klima, Mark S.; Mosser, Morgan M.; Miller, Charles E.; Pisupati, Sarma V.

    2016-01-01

    Rare earth elements are known to occur in low concentrations in U.S. coals and coal byproducts. These low concentrations may make rare earth element recovery from these materials unattractive, using only physical separation techniques. However, given the significant production of rare earths through ion exchange extraction in China, two U.S. coal byproducts were examined for ion extraction, using ammonium sulfate, an ionic liquid, and a deep eutectic solvent as lixiviants. Extraction of rare earth elements in each case produced high recoveries of rare earth elements to the solution. This suggests that in at least the cases of the materials examined, U.S. coal byproducts may be technically suitable as REE ores. More work is required to establish economic suitability.

  8. A Study on Removal of Rare Earth Elements from U.S. Coal Byproducts by Ion Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozelle, Peter L.; Khadilkar, Aditi B.; Pulati, Nuerxida; Soundarrajan, Nari; Klima, Mark S.; Mosser, Morgan M.; Miller, Charles E.; Pisupati, Sarma V.

    2016-03-01

    Rare earth elements are known to occur in low concentrations in U.S. coals and coal byproducts. These low concentrations may make rare earth element recovery from these materials unattractive, using only physical separation techniques. However, given the significant production of rare earths through ion exchange extraction in China, two U.S. coal byproducts were examined for ion extraction, using ammonium sulfate, an ionic liquid, and a deep eutectic solvent as lixiviants. Extraction of rare earth elements in each case produced high recoveries of rare earth elements to the solution. This suggests that in at least the cases of the materials examined, U.S. coal byproducts may be technically suitable as REE ores. More work is required to establish economic suitability.

  9. 5 d-4 f luminescence of Nd3+, Gd3+, Er3+, Tm3+, and Ho3+ ions in crystals of alkaline earth fluorides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radzhabov, E. A.; Prosekina, E. A.

    2011-09-01

    The vacuum ultraviolet emission spectra of alkaline-earth fluoride (CaF2, SrF2, BaF2) crystals with rare earth impurity ions (Nd, Gd, Er, Tm, Ho) have been investigated. The main luminescence bands are described well by the transitions from the lowest excited 5 d state to different 4 f levels of rare earth ions.

  10. Dispersion coefficients for H and He interactions with alkali-metal and alkaline-earth-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Mitroy, J.; Bromley, M.W.J.

    2003-12-01

    The van der Waals coefficients C{sub 6}, C{sub 8}, and C{sub 10} for H and He interactions with the alkali-metal (Li, Na, K, and Rb) and alkaline-earth-metal (Be, Mg, Ca, and Sr) atoms are determined from oscillator strength sum rules. The oscillator strengths were computed using a combination of ab initio and semiempirical methods. The dispersion parameters generally agree with close to exact variational calculations for Li-H and Li-He at the 0.1% level of accuracy. For larger systems, there is agreement with relativistic many-body perturbation theory estimates of C{sub 6} at the 1% level. These validations for selected systems attest to the reliability of the present dispersion parameters. About half the present parameters lie within the recommended bounds of the Standard and Certain compilation [J. Chem. Phys. 83, 3002 (1985)].

  11. Source of seed fluctuations for electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves in Earth's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamayunov, K. V.; Engebretson, M. J.; Zhang, M.; Rassoul, H. K.

    2015-06-01

    We consider a nonlinear wave energy cascade from the low frequency range into the higher frequency domain of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave generation as a possible source of seed fluctuations for EMIC wave growth due to the ion cyclotron instability in Earth's magnetosphere. The presented theoretical analysis shows that energy cascade from the Pc 4-5 frequency range (2-22 mHz) into the range of Pc 1-2 pulsations (0.1-5 Hz), i.e. into the frequency range of EMIC waves, is able to supply the needed level of seed fluctuations that guarantees growth of EMIC waves up to the observable level during one pass through the near equatorial region where the ion cyclotron instability takes place. We also analyze the magnetic field data from the Polar and Van Allen Probes spacecraft to test the suggested nonlinear mechanism. In this initial study we restrict our analysis to magnetic fluctuation spectra only. We do not analyze the third-order structure function, but judge whether a nonlinear energy cascade is present or whether it is not by only analyzing the appearance of power-law distributions in the low-frequency part of the magnetic field spectra. While the power-law spectrum alone does not guarantee that a nonlinear cascade is present, the power-law distribution is a strong indication of the possible development of a nonlinear cascade. Our analysis shows that a nonlinear energy cascade is indeed observed in both the outer and inner magnetosphere data, and EMIC waves are growing from this nonthermal background. All the analyzed data are in good agreement with the theoretical model presented in this study. Overall, the results of this study support a nonlinear energy cascade in Earth's magnetosphere as a mechanism which is responsible for supplying seed fluctuating energy in the higher frequency domain where EMIC waves grow due to the ion cyclotron instability.

  12. Measurement of Two-Photon Absorption Cross Section of Metal Ions by a Mass Sedimentation Approach.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhuo-Chen; Chen, Qi-Dai; Han, Bing; Liu, Xue-Qing; Song, Jun-Feng; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2015-01-01

    The photo-reduction of metal ions in solution induced by femtosecond laser is an important and novel method for fabricating three-dimensional metal microstructures. However, the nonlinear absorption cross section of metal ions remains unknown because its measurement is difficult. In the present study, a method based on Two-Photon Excited Sedimentation (TPES) is proposed to measure the two-photon absorption cross section (TPACS) of metal ions in solution. The power-squared dependence of the amount of sediment on the excitation intensity was confirmed, revealing that 800 nm femtosecond laser induced reduction of metal ions was a two photon absorption process. We believe that the proposed method may be applied to measure the TPACS of several metal ions, thereby opening a new avenue towards future analysis of two-photon absorption materials. PMID:26657990

  13. Measurement of Two-Photon Absorption Cross Section of Metal Ions by a Mass Sedimentation Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhuo-Chen; Chen, Qi-Dai; Han, Bing; Liu, Xue-Qing; Song, Jun-Feng; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2015-01-01

    The photo-reduction of metal ions in solution induced by femtosecond laser is an important and novel method for fabricating three-dimensional metal microstructures. However, the nonlinear absorption cross section of metal ions remains unknown because its measurement is difficult. In the present study, a method based on Two-Photon Excited Sedimentation (TPES) is proposed to measure the two-photon absorption cross section (TPACS) of metal ions in solution. The power-squared dependence of the amount of sediment on the excitation intensity was confirmed, revealing that 800 nm femtosecond laser induced reduction of metal ions was a two photon absorption process. We believe that the proposed method may be applied to measure the TPACS of several metal ions, thereby opening a new avenue towards future analysis of two-photon absorption materials. PMID:26657990

  14. Transition metal ions at the crossroads of mucosal immunity and microbial pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Ochoa, Vladimir E.; Jellbauer, Stefan; Klaus, Suzi; Raffatellu, Manuela

    2013-01-01

    Transition metal ions are essential micronutrients for all living organisms. In mammals, these ions are often protein-bound and sequestered within cells, limiting their availability to microbes. Moreover, in response to infection, mammalian hosts further reduce the availability of metal nutrients by activating epithelial cells and recruiting neutrophils, both of which release metal-binding proteins with antimicrobial function. Microorganisms, in turn, have evolved sophisticated systems to overcome these limitations and acquire the metal ions essential for their growth. Here we review some of the mechanisms employed by the host and by pathogenic microorganisms to compete for transition metal ions, with a discussion of how evading “nutritional immunity” benefits pathogens. Furthermore, we provide new insights on the mechanisms of host-microbe competition for metal ions in the mucosa, particularly in the inflamed gut. PMID:24478990

  15. Alkali or alkaline earth metal promoted catalyst and a process for methanol synthesis using alkali or alkaline earth metals as promoters

    DOEpatents

    Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.; Palekar, V.M.

    1995-01-31

    The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a heterogeneous catalyst comprising reduced copper chromite impregnated with an alkali or alkaline earth metal. There is thus no need to add a separate alkali or alkaline earth compound. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100--160 C and the pressure range of 40--65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H[sub 2]/CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

  16. Alkali or alkaline earth metal promoted catalyst and a process for methanol synthesis using alkali or alkaline earth metals as promoters

    DOEpatents

    Tierney, John W.; Wender, Irving; Palekar, Vishwesh M.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a heterogeneous catalyst comprising reduced copper chromite impregnated with an alkali or alkaline earth metal. There is thus no need to add a separate alkali or alkaline earth compound. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100.degree.-160.degree. C. and the pressure range of 40-65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H.sub.2 /CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

  17. Some aspects of metallic ion chemistry and dynamics in the mesosphere and thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathews, J. D.

    1987-01-01

    The relationship between the formation of sporadic layers of metallic ion and the dumping of these ions into the upper mesosphere is discussed in terms of the tidal wind, classical (i.e., windshear) and other more complex, perhaps highly nonlinear layer formation mechanisms, and a possible circulation mechanism for these ions. Optical, incoherent scatter radar, rocket, and satellite derived evidence for various layer formation mechanisms and for the metallic ion circulation system is reviewed. The results of simple one dimensional numerical model calculations of sporadic E and intermediate layer formation are presented along with suggestions for more advanced models of intense or blanketing sporadic E. The flux of metallic ions dumped by the tidal wind system into the mesosphere is estimated and compared with estimates of total particle flux of meteoric origin. Possible effects of the metallic ion flux and of meteoric dust on D region ion chemistry are discussed.

  18. Sample-free control of the mechanical properties of aluminum-based alloys with rare-earth metal additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matyunin, V. M.; Agafonov, R. Yu.; Zarubin, A. L.; Danilin, V. V.; Popkova, O. G.

    2015-12-01

    A technique is developed for sample-free control of the 0.2 offset yield strength and the ultimate tensile strength of aluminum alloys with rare-earth metal additions using indentation with a spherical indenter.

  19. The Effect of Alkaline Earth Metal on the Cesium Loading of Ionsiv(R) IE-910 and IE-911

    SciTech Connect

    Fondeur, F.F.

    2001-01-16

    This study investigated the effect of variances in alkaline earth metal concentrations on cesium loading of IONSIV(R) IE-911. The study focused on Savannah River Site (SRS) ''average'' solution with varying amounts of calcium, barium and magnesium.

  20. Rare earth elements and critical metal content of extracted landfilled material and potential recovery opportunities.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Gutiérrez, Silvia C; Coulon, Frédéric; Jiang, Ying; Wagland, Stuart

    2015-08-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs), Platinum group metals (PGMs) and other critical metals currently attract significant interest due to the high risks of supply shortage and substantial impact on the economy. Their uses in many applications have made them present in municipal solid waste (MSW) and in commercial and industrial waste (C&I), since several industrial processes produce by-products with high content of these metals. With over 4000 landfills in the UK alone, the aim of this study was to assess the existence of these critical metals within landfills. Samples collected from four closed landfills in UK were subjected to a two-step acid digestion to extract 27 metals of interest. Concentrations across the four landfill sites were 58±6mgkg(-1) for REEs comprising 44±8mgkg(-1) for light REEs, 11±2mgkg(-1) for heavy REEs and 3±1mgkg(-1) for Scandium (Sc) and 3±1.0mgkg(-1) of PGMs. Compared to the typical concentration in ores, these concentrations are too low to achieve a commercially viable extraction. However, content of other highly valuable metals (Al and Cu) was found in concentrations equating to a combined value across the four landfills of around $400 million, which increases the economic viability of landfill mining. Presence of critical metals will mainly depend on the type of waste that was buried but the recovery of these metals through landfill mining is possible and is economically feasible only if additional materials (plastics, paper, metallic items and other) are also recovered for reprocessing. PMID:25957938

  1. Ion distributions in the Earth's foreshock: Hybrid-Vlasov simulation and THEMIS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempf, Yann; Pokhotelov, Dimitry; Gutynska, Olga; Wilson, Lynn B., III; Walsh, Brian M.; Alfthan, Sebastian von; Hannuksela, Otto; Sibeck, David G.; Palmroth, Minna

    2015-05-01

    We present the ion distribution functions in the ion foreshock upstream of the terrestrial bow shock obtained with Vlasiator, a new hybrid-Vlasov simulation geared toward large-scale simulations of the Earth's magnetosphere (http://vlasiator.fmi.fi). They are compared with the distribution functions measured by the multispacecraft Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) mission. The known types of ion distributions in the foreshock are well reproduced by the hybrid-Vlasov model. We show that Vlasiator reproduces the decrease of the backstreaming beam speed with increasing distance from the foreshock edge, as well as the beam speed increase and density decrease with increasing radial distance from the bow shock, which have been reported before and are visible in the THEMIS data presented here. We also discuss the process by which wave-particle interactions cause intermediate foreshock distributions to lose their gyrotropy. This paper demonstrates the strength of the hybrid-Vlasov approach which lies in producing uniformly sampled ion distribution functions with good resolution in velocity space, at every spatial grid point of the simulation and at any instant. The limitations of the hybrid-Vlasov approach are also discussed.

  2. Ion-neutral coupling in Earth's thermosphere, estimated from concurrent radar and optical observations above Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, C.; Kosch, M. J.; Nicolls, M. J.; Conde, M.

    2013-12-01

    During March-April 2011 a campaign of coordinated observations was undertaken between the Poker Flat Advanced Modular Incoherent Scatter Radar and the Poker Flat Scanning Doppler Imager. These instruments provide horizontally resolved maps of plasma and neutral parameters in Earth's thermosphere. We report on data collected during the campaign, and use these data to investigate two key aspects of ion-neutral coupling, namely Joule heating and the ion-neutral collision frequency. Volumetric Joule heating rates were often well correlated with measured ion temperature enhancements. The contribution of the neutral wind dynamo to the observed heating rates was positive when the absolute horizontal magnetic field perturbation (|ΔH|) was less than approximately 40 nT, and negative above that level. The total momentum-transfer ion-neutral collision frequency was estimated to be 1.02-0.152+0.179 s-1 at an altitude of 260 km, which, for a neutral composition of 75% atomic oxygen, yielded an estimate of the O+-O collision frequency of 0.766-0.114+0.134 s-1.

  3. Heavy ion layer in the Earth's stratosphere and its influence on the middle atmosphere processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarova, L. N.; Shirochkov, A. V.

    Various experimental data prove existence of a layer of charged particles preferably ions of both polarities in the Earth s stratosphere altitudes 15-30 km Data of atmospheric balloon lidar and rocket measurements performed at different latitudes of the both hemispheres during various seasons are considered Results of the mass-spectrometer rocket measurements show that this layer consists mostly of complex ion-clusters whose mass numbers exceed sim 200 units and rates of formation are comparatively slow Origin of this layer is thought to be energetic particles capable to penetrate to stratospheric heights The most probable candidate is the galactic cosmic rays -- a permanent source of the middle atmosphere ionization Sometimes solar protons and relativistic electrons of very high energy contribute to a level of ionization of this layer In this paper the main photo-chemical processes determining long-live existence of the stratospheric layer of charged particles are considered in details Interactions of these processes with dynamics of the main ozone layer and formation of aerosol concentration in the middle atmosphere are analyzed also A direct connection of stratospheric ion layer with such atmospheric processes like heating of the stratosphere by electric currents induced by the solar wind disturbances formation of the stratospheric clouds etc is demonstrated also A suggestion is made that under definite circumstances the stratospheric ion layer could be a conducting parameter of the global electric circuit playing important role in

  4. Investigation of thermal diffusivity dependence on temperature in a group of optical single crystals doped with rare earth ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trefon-Radziejewska, D.; Bodzenta, J.

    2015-07-01

    The group of YAG, YVO4 and GdCOB single crystals was examined to determine the thermal diffusivity as a function of temperature in range from 30 °C to 300 °C. Further investigations concerned on analysis of the influence of dopants on these dependencies. The experimental setup based on thermal wave method with mirage detection was used. The samples represented different crystallographic systems such as cubic (YAG) tetragonal (YVO4) and monoclinic (GdCOB). The anisotropy of thermal conductivity of investigated samples was taken into account in the investigations. The crystals were doped with calcium ions, rare earth ions such as ytterbium, neodymium, and thulium, and also with transition metal vanadium. The results confirmed that influence of doping on the thermal diffusivity of investigated materials strongly depends on temperature. In general the thermal diffusivity decreases with increasing of sample temperature from 30 °C to 300 °C, however the drop in thermal diffusivity is the highest for pure single crystals. Doping is another factor reducing the heat transport in single crystals. Introduction of dopant ions into a crystal lattice leads to a significant decrease in the thermal diffusivity at lower temperatures in comparison with pure crystals. However, the influence of dopants becomes less pronounced with increasing temperature, and in case of weakly doped crystals it becomes negligible at higher temperatures. The interpretation of thermal diffusivity dependence on temperature for single crystals was based on the Debye model of lattice thermal conductivity of solids. The results allowed to conclude that the decrease of thermal diffusivity with temperature and increasing concentration of impurities is caused by shortening of the phonons mean free path due to phonon-phonon and phonon-point defect scatterings.

  5. Statistical analysis of diffuse ion events upstream of the Earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trattner, K. J.; Mobius, E.; Scholer, M.; Klecker, B.; Hilchenbach, M.; Luehr, H.

    1994-01-01

    A statistical study of diffuse energetic ion events and their related waves upstream of the Earth's bow shock was performed using data from the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers/Ion Release Module (AMPTE/IRM) satellite over two 5-month periods in 1984 and 1985. The data set was used to test the assumption in the self-consistent model of the upstream wave and particle populations by Lee (1982) that the particle acceleration through hydromagnetic waves and the wave generation are directly coupled. The comparison between the observed wave power and the wave power predicted on the observed energetic particle energy density and solar wind parameters results in a high correlation coefficient of about 0.89. The intensity of diffuse ions falls off approximately exponentially with the distance upstream from the bow shock parallel to the magnetic field with e-folding distances which vary from approximately 3.3 R(sub E) to approximately 11.7 R(sub E) over the energy range from 10 keV/e to 67.3 keV/e for both protons and alpha particles. After normalizing the upstream particle densities to zero bow shock distance by using these exponential variations, a good correlation (0.7) of the density of the diffuse ions with the solar wind density was found. This supports the suggestion that the solar wind is the source of the diffuse ions. Furthermore, the spectral slope of the diffuse ions correlates well with the solar wind velocity component in the direction of the interplanetary magnetic field (0.68 and 0.66 for protons and alpha particles) which concurs with the notion that the solar wind plays an important role in the acceleration of the upstream particles.

  6. How Does Boiling in the Earth's Crust Influence Metal Speciation and Transport?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kam, K.; Lemke, K.

    2014-12-01

    The presence of large quantities of precious metals, such as gold and copper, near the Earth's surface (upper crust) is commonly attributed to transport in aqueous solution and precipitation upon variations in temperature and pressure. As a consequence, gold exploration is closely linked to solution chemistry, i.e. hydrothermal processes involving aqueous fluids with densities of around unity. However, as crustal fluids buoyantly ascend, boiling produces a coexisting low-density aqueous liquid with fundamentally different physical and chemical properties, and a, most importantly, a high affinity for coinage metals (Heinrich et al., Econ Geol., 1992, 87, 1566). From recent experimental studies of Au (Hurtig and Williams-Jones, 2014, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta,, 127, 304), we know that metal speciation in this low-density phase differs fundamentally from that observed in bulk solution, clearly, with important implications for Au, and metal speciation in general, transport and ore concentrations processes (these processes would also be operable in industrial geothermal plants given the quite special solvent properties of steam). In brief, this study focuses on the speciation of select metal halides in bulk solution as well as in water vapor, and is driven by our need to understand the solvent properties of around 2.0x109 cubic kilometers of free water (or 2,500 times as much water as stored in all lakes and rivers) present in the Earth's crust. The scope of this study has particular applications in the geothermal and oil industries, as both deal with high temperature low-density aqueous fluids. Understanding how metal halide species behave upon boiling can also provide insight into how metals, such as copper and silver, coat turbine equipment and steam piping in geothermal plants, ultimately rendering these components inoperable. This study will also provide preliminary results from mass spectrometric experiments of transition metal halides, and will be augmented with results from molecular simulations of metal halides that are aimed at characterizing the nature (i.e. relativistic structures and energies) of metal clusters in water vapor.

  7. Process for the displacement of cyanide ions from metal-cyanide complexes

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Barbara F.; Robinson, Thomas W.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to water-soluble polymers and the use of such water-soluble polymers in a process for the displacement of the cyanide ions from the metal ions within metal-cyanide complexes. The process waste streams can include metal-cyanide containing electroplating waste streams, mining leach waste streams, mineral processing waste streams, and related metal-cyanide containing waste streams. The metal ions of interest are metals that give very strong complexes with cyanide, mostly iron, nickel, and copper. The physical separation of the water-soluble polymer-metal complex from the cyanide ions can be accomplished through the use of ultrafiltration. Once the metal-cyanide complex is disrupted, the freed cyanide ions can be recovered for reuse or destroyed using available oxidative processes rendering the cyanide nonhazardous. The metal ions are released from the polymer, using dilute acid, metal ion oxidation state adjustment, or competing chelating agents, and collected and recovered or disposed of by appropriate waste management techniques. The water-soluble polymer can then be recycled. Preferred water-soluble polymers include polyethyleneimine and polyethyleneimine having a catechol or hydroxamate group.

  8. MeRNA: a Database of Metal Ion Binding Sites in RNAStructures

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan, Liliana R.; Zhang, Rui; Levitan, Aaron G.; Hendrix, DonnaF.; Brenner, Steven E.; Holbrook, Stephen R.

    2005-10-05

    Metal ions are essential for the folding of RNA into stable tertiary structures and for the catalytic activity of some RNA enzymes. To aid in the study of the roles of metal ions in RNA structural biology, we have created MeRNA (Metals in RNA), a comprehensive compilation of all metal binding sites identified in RNA three-dimensional structures available from the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and Nucleic Acid Database (NDB). Currently, our database contains information relating to binding of 9764 metal ions corresponding to 23 distinct elements; in 256 RNA structures. The metal ion locations were confirmed and ligands characterized using original literature references. MeRNA includes eight manually identified metal-ion binding motifs, which are described in the literature. MeRNA is searchable by PDB identifier, metal ion, method of structure determination, resolution and R-values for X-ray structure, and distance from metal to any RNA atom or to water. New structures with their respective binding motifs will be added to the database as they become available. The MeRNA database will further our understanding of the roles of metal ions in RNA folding and catalysis and have applications in structural and functional analysis, RNA design and engineering.

  9. Caging Metal Ions with Visible Light-Responsive Nanopolymersomes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Polymersomes are bilayer vesicles that self-assemble from amphiphilic diblock copolymers, and provide an attractive system for the delivery of biological and nonbiological molecules due to their environmental compatibility, mechanical stability, synthetic tunability, large aqueous core, and hyperthick hydrophobic membrane. Herein, we report a nanoscale photoresponsive polymersome system featuring a meso-to-meso ethyne-bridged bis[(porphinato)zinc] (PZn2) fluorophore hydrophobic membrane solute and dextran in the aqueous core. Upon 488 nm irradiation in solution or in microinjected zebrafish embryos, the polymersomes underwent deformation, as monitored by a characteristic red-shifted PZn2 emission spectrum and confirmed by cryo-TEM. The versatility of this system was demonstrated through the encapsulation and photorelease of a fluorophore (FITC), as well as two different metal ions, Zn2+ and Ca2+. PMID:25518002

  10. Pressure effects on hydrogen atoms near the metal plane in the HCP phase of rare-earth metal trihydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunghathaithip, N.; Pakornchote, T.; Phaisangittisakul, N.; Bovornratanaraks, T.; Pinsook, U.

    2016-04-01

    Rare-earth metal trihydrides, REH3 (RE=Sc, Y, La), in the hcp phase were investigated under high pressure by the ab initio method. We concentrated on the behavior of hydrogen atoms which is affected by pressure. Two-thirds of the hydrogen atoms near the metal plane (Hm) were found to displace away from the metal plane as pressure increases. The trajectory of these squeezed hydrogen atoms is from a site near the metal plane, and moves past the plane of the tetragonal sites, and heads toward the nearest octahedral site. However, the rate of displacement depends on the local environment. LaH3 exhibits the least impediment on the Hm displacement while YH3 and ScH3 exhibit stronger impediment. Furthermore, our calculated Raman and IR active modes are in general agreement with the experimental data. The displacement of Hm can be used to explain the behavior of the Ov peak in Raman spectra, where it exists at low pressure and disappears at higher pressure in YH3 and ScH3.

  11. Clustering of nitrogen ions in weakly ionized gas mixtures Physical chemistry of planetary atmospheres (Titan, earth)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speller, C. V.

    The formation of N2 clusters in N2/CH4, N2/C2H2, and N2/O2 mixtures is investigated experimentally, and the implications of the results for the chemistry of the Titan and earth atmospheres are considered. The ions produced in a reaction chamber at pressure 1-700 torr and temperature 100-300 K by alpha irradiation (40 microcurie/sq cm from Am-241) are bled through a 50-micron-diameter hole, focused and accelerated by three plane electrostatic lenses to an injection energy of about 3 eV, and analyzed in a 4-pole mass spectrometer operating at pressures between 1 ntorr and 100 microtorr. The thermochemical constants of the association reactions are computed, and the results are presented in graphs, diagrams, and tables. The results are shown to support the hypothesis of Capone et al. (1981), that H2CN(+)N2 may play an intermediary role in the formation of the Titan atmosphere, and a similar role for H2CN(+)(N2)2 is suggested. The contribution of O4(+)N2 to the formation of hydrated ions in the earth stratosphere is estimated as negligible.

  12. Optical probes for the detection of protons, and alkali and alkaline earth metal cations.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Graham R C; Sahoo, Suban K; Kamila, Sukanta; Singh, Narinder; Kaur, Navneet; Hyland, Barry W; Callan, John F

    2015-07-01

    Luminescent sensors and switches continue to play a key role in shaping our understanding of key biochemical processes, assist in the diagnosis of disease and contribute to the design of new drugs and therapies. Similarly, their contribution to the environment cannot be understated as they offer a portable means to undertake field testing for hazardous chemicals and pollutants such as heavy metals. From a physiological perspective, the Group I and II metal ions are among the most important in the periodic table with blood plasma levels of H(+), Na(+) and Ca(2+) being indicators of several possible disease states. In this review, we examine the progress that has been made in the development of luminescent probes for Group I and Group II ions as well as protons. The potential applications of these probes and the mechanism involved in controlling their luminescent response upon analyte binding will also be discussed. PMID:25742963

  13. Direct evidence of the anisotropy of magnetization in rare-earth metals and rare-earth/Fe2 alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benito, L.; Dumesnil, K.; Ward, R. C. C.

    2014-08-01

    We report on the genuine origin of the anisotropy of the magnetization M in rare-earth (RE) metals and RE-based alloys. Taking Ho-based layered nanostructures as testing ground, we prove that the anisotropy of M is substantial despite that the sixfold magnetic anisotropy constant K66 vanishes, which contradicts the established wisdom [E. R. Callen and H. B. Callen, J. Phys. Chem. Solids 16, 310 (1960), 10.1016/0022-3697(60)90161-X]. Furthermore, we show that the symmetric anisotropic contributions to M and K66 vary with temperature distinctively from one another, which indicates that both anisotropic effects are unrelated and stem from dissimilar microscopic sources. Our findings are discussed according to the theory [R. J. Elliott and M. F. Thorpe, J. Appl. Phys. 39, 802 (1968), 10.1063/1.2163622] that predicts the emergence of symmetric anisotropic indirect-exchange terms under the presence of orbital moments. We show evidence that the anisotropy of M is caused by the indirect-exchange coupling among localized 4f magnetic moments mediated by spin-orbit coupled conduction electrons, which ultimately generates a spatially nonuniform spin polarization that replicates the lattice symmetry.

  14. Surface Modification of Nanoclays by Catalytically Active Transition Metal Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Nawani,P.; Gelfer, M.; Hsiao, B.; Frenkel, A.; Gilman, J.; Khalid, S.

    2007-01-01

    A unique class of nanoclays was prepared by modification of pristine clays or organoclays (Cloisite C20A) with transition metal ions (TMIs). The composition, structure, morphology and thermal properties of TMI-modified nanoclays were investigated by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), elemental analysis (EA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The content of TMIs in modified clays was found to be close to the limiting value of ion exchange capacity. SEM and X-ray results confirmed that TMIs were located between the mineral layers instead of being adsorbed on the surface of clay particles. TGA results indicated that the TMI treatment of organoclays could significantly increase the thermal stability, which was more pronounced in air than in nitrogen. Temperature-resolved SAXS measurements revealed that the presence of TMIs increased the onset temperature of structural degradation. The higher thermal stability of TMI-modified organoclays can be attributed to the change in the thermal degradation mechanism, resulting in a decrease in the yield of volatile products and the formation of char facilitated by the presence of catalytically active TMIs.

  15. Surface modification of nanoclays by catalytically active transition metal ions.

    PubMed

    Nawani, Pranav; Gelfer, Mikhail Y; Hsiao, Benjamin S; Frenkel, Anatoly; Gilman, Jeffrey W; Khalid, Syed

    2007-09-11

    A unique class of nanoclays was prepared by modification of pristine clays or organoclays (Cloisite C20A) with transition metal ions (TMIs). The composition, structure, morphology and thermal properties of TMI-modified nanoclays were investigated by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), elemental analysis (EA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The content of TMIs in modified clays was found to be close to the limiting value of ion exchange capacity. SEM and X-ray results confirmed that TMIs were located between the mineral layers instead of being adsorbed on the surface of clay particles. TGA results indicated that the TMI treatment of organoclays could significantly increase the thermal stability, which was more pronounced in air than in nitrogen. Temperature-resolved SAXS measurements revealed that the presence of TMIs increased the onset temperature of structural degradation. The higher thermal stability of TMI-modified organoclays can be attributed to the change in the thermal degradation mechanism, resulting in a decrease in the yield of volatile products and the formation of char facilitated by the presence of catalytically active TMIs. PMID:17705406

  16. Rare-Earth Transition-Metal Intermetallics: Structure-bonding-Property Relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Mi-Kyung Han

    2006-05-01

    Our explorations of rare-earth, transition metal intermetallics have resulted in the synthesis and characterization, and electronic structure investigation, as well as understanding the structure-bonding-property relationships. Our work has presented the following results: (1) Understanding the relationship between compositions and properties in LaFe{sub 13-x}Si{sub x} system: A detailed structural and theoretical investigation provided the understanding of the role of a third element on stabilizing the structure and controlling the transformation of cubic NaZn{sub 13}-type structures to the tetragonal derivative, as well as the relationship between the structures and properties. (2) Synthesis of new ternary rare-earth iron silicides RE{sub 2-x}Fe{sub 4}Si{sub 14-y} and proposed superstructure: This compound offers complex structural challenges such as fractional occupancies and their ordering in superstructure. (3) Electronic structure calculation of FeSi{sub 2}: This shows that the metal-semiconductor phase transition depends on the structure. The mechanism of band gap opening is described in terms of bonding and structural distortion. This result shows that the electronic structure calculations are an essential tool for understanding the relationship between structure and chemical bonding in these compounds. (4) Synthesis of new ternary rare-earth Zinc aluminides Tb{sub 3}Zn{sub 3.6}Al{sub 7.4}: Partially ordered structure of Tb{sub 3}Zn{sub 3.6}Al{sub 7.4} compound provides new insights into the formation, composition and structure of rare-earth transition-metal intermetallics. Electronic structure calculations attribute the observed composition to optimizing metal-metal bonding in the electronegative (Zn, Al) framework, while the specific ordering is strongly influenced by specific orbital interactions. (5) Synthesis of new structure type of Zn{sub 39}(Cr{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}){sub 81}: These layered structures are similar to icosahedral Mn-Al quasicrystalline compounds. Therefore, this compound may provide new insights into the formation, composition and structure of quasicrystalline materials.

  17. Rare-earth transition-metal intermetallics: Structure-bonding-property relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Han, M.K.

    2006-05-06

    The explorations of rare-earth, transition metal intermetallics have resulted in the synthesis and characterization, and electronic structure investigation, as well as understanding the structure-bonding property relationships. The work has presented the following results: (1) Understanding the relationship between compositions and properties in LaFe{sub 13-x}Si{sub x} system: A detailed structural and theoretical investigation provided the understanding of the role of a third element on stabilizing the structure and controlling the transformation of cubic NaZn{sub 13}-type structures to the tetragonal derivative, as well as the relationship between the structures and properties. (2) Synthesis of new ternary rare-earth iron silicides Re{sub 2-x}Fe{sub 4}Si{sub 14-y} and proposed superstructure: This compound offers complex structural challenges such as fractional occupancies and their ordering in superstructure. (3) Electronic structure calculation of FeSi{sub 2}: This shows that the metal-semiconductor phase transition depends on the structure. The mechanism of band gap opening is described in terms of bonding and structural distortion. This result shows that the electronic structure calculations are an essential tool for understanding the relationship between structure and chemical bonding in these compounds. (4) Synthesis of new ternary rare-earth Zinc aluminides Tb{sub 3}Zn{sub 3.6}Al{sub 7.4}: Partially ordered structure of Tb{sub 3}Zn{sub 3.6}Al{sub 7.4} compound provides new insights into the formation, composition and structure of rare-earth transition-metal intermetallics. Electronic structure calculations attribute the observed composition to optimizing metal-metal bonding in the electronegative (Zn, Al) framework, while the specific ordering is strongly influenced by specific orbital interactions. (5) Synthesis of new structure type of Zn{sub 39}(Cr{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}){sub 81}: These layered structures are similar to icosahedral Mn-Al quasicrystalline compounds. Therefore, this compound may provide new insights into the formation, composition and structure of quasicrystalline materials.

  18. Porous metal oxide microspheres from ion exchange resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picart, S.; Parant, P.; Caisso, M.; Remy, E.; Mokhtari, H.; Jobelin, I.; Bayle, J. P.; Martin, C. L.; Blanchart, P.; Ayral, A.; Delahaye, T.

    2015-07-01

    This study is devoted to the synthesis and the characterization of porous metal oxide microsphere from metal loaded ion exchange resin. Their application concerns the fabrication of uranium-americium oxide pellets using the powder-free process called Calcined Resin Microsphere Pelletization (CRMP). Those mixed oxide ceramics are one of the materials envisaged for americium transmutation in sodium fast neutron reactors. The advantage of such microsphere precursor compared to classical oxide powder is the diminution of the risk of fine dissemination which can be critical for the handling of highly radioactive powders such as americium based oxides and the improvement of flowability for the filling of compaction chamber. Those millimetric oxide microspheres incorporating uranium and americium were synthesized and characterizations showed a very porous microstructure very brittle in nature which occurred to be adapted to shaping by compaction. Studies allowed to determine an optimal heat treatment with calcination temperature comprised between 700-800 °C and temperature rate lower than 2 °C/min. Oxide Precursors were die-pressed into pellets and then sintered under air to form regular ceramic pellets of 95% of theoretical density (TD) and of homogeneous microstructure. This study validated thus the scientific feasibility of the CRMP process to prepare bearing americium target in a powder free manner.

  19. Metal/silicon Interface Analysis Using Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonn, Daniel Grant

    Atomic mixing of metal/silicon interfaces has been investigated using secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). In our first set of experiments, profiles of thin markers of Al, Ti, Mo, and Ag were compared to diffusion theory predictions. The diffusivity D was taken to be depth-dependent and proportional to the nuclear stopping power F(,D). Except for Mo, experimental values obtained for D could be explained by collisional mixing augmented by intra-cascade defect enhanced diffusion. In our second set of experiments, SIMS depth profiles were obtained for multilayer structures of Mg, Al, Ti, Ge, Mo, Ag, and W over the temperature range of 80-775K. At elevated temperatures, enhanced mixing was observed for Al, Ge, Mo, Ag, and W. In the Al and Ag systems, mixing was attributed to intrusion of Si into the thicker metal layers. In the Mo and W systems, the mixing could be attributed to interaction of oversized solute atoms with long range Si vacancy flux produced by the irradiation. Evidence of Mo and W silicide formation was also observed. Increased diffusivity in Ge was attributable to increased interstitial mobility. Mg showed evidence of silicide formation and a peculiar resistance to mixing at elevated temperatures.

  20. Selective Removal of Alkali Metal Cations from Multiply-Charged Ions via Gas-Phase Ion/Ion Reactions Using Weakly Coordinating Anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luongo, Carl A.; Bu, Jiexun; Burke, Nicole L.; Gilbert, Joshua D.; Prentice, Boone M.; Cummings, Steven; Reed, Christopher A.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2015-03-01

    Selective removal of alkali metal cations from mixed cation multiply-charged peptide ions is demonstrated here using gas-phase ion/ion reactions with a series of weakly coordinating anions (WCAs), including hexafluorophosphate (PF6 -), tetrakis[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]borate (BARF), tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)borate (TPPB), and carborane (CHB11Cl11 -). In all cases, a long-lived complex is generated by dication/anion condensation followed by ion activation to compare proton transfer with alkali ion transfer from the peptide to the anion. The carborane anion was the only anion studied to undergo dissociation exclusively through loss of the metallated anion, regardless of the studied metal adduct. All other anions studied yield varying abundances of protonated and metallated peptide depending on the peptide sequence and the metal identity. Density functional theory calculations suggest that for the WCAs studied, metal ion transfer is most strongly favored thermodynamically, which is consistent with the experimental results. The carborane anion is demonstrated to be a robust reagent for the selective removal of alkali metal cations from peptide cations with mixtures of excess protons and metal cations.