Sample records for earth metal ions

  1. Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Polymer Systems Doped with Rare-Earth Metal Ions and Their Complexes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. S. V. Krishna Rao; Hong-Guo Liu; Yong-Ill Lee

    2010-01-01

    There has been an increased attention to explore the possibility of using polymer materials with rare-earth (RE) metal ions and their complexes as potential optical materials due to their capability of exhibiting novel and unusual properties. The fluorescence characteristics of polymer systems doped with RE metal ions and\\/or their complexes were analyzed and the effects of the doping metal ion\\/metal

  2. Coherent spectroscopy of rare-earth-metal-ion-doped whispering-gallery-mode resonators

    SciTech Connect

    McAuslan, D. L.; Korystov, D.; Longdell, J. J. [Jack Dodd Centre for Photonics and Ultra-Cold Atoms, Department of Physics, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand. (New Zealand)

    2011-06-15

    We perform an investigation into the properties of Pr{sup 3+}:Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} whispering-gallery-mode resonators as a first step toward achieving the strong coupling regime of cavity QED with rare-earth-metal-ion-doped crystals. Direct measurement of cavity QED parameters are made using photon echoes, giving good agreement with theoretical predictions. By comparing the ions at the surface of the resonator to those in the center, it is determined that the physical process of making the resonator does not negatively affect the properties of the ions. Coupling between the ions and resonator is analyzed through the observation of optical bistability and normal-mode splitting.

  3. The adsorption kinetics of metal ions onto different microalgae and siliceous earth.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, D; Müller, A; Csögör, Z; Frimmel, F H; Posten, C

    2001-03-01

    In the present work the adsorption kinetics of the six metal ions aluminum, zinc, mercury, lead, copper, and cadmium onto living microalgae were measured. The freshwater green microalga Scenedesmus subspicatus, the brackish water diatom Cyclotella cryptica, the seawater diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, and the seawater red alga Porphyridium purpureum were the subject of investigation. In most cases the adsorption rate of the metals could be well described by using the equation of the Langmuir adsorption rate expression. Inverse parameter estimation allowed the determination of the rate constants of the adsorption process and the maximum metal content of the algae. The highest values for the rate constant were obtained for Porphyridium purpureum followed by Phaeodactylum tricornutum. High values for the maximum content were obtained for Cyclotella cryptica and Scenedesmus subspicatus. The maximum rate constant was 24.21 h-1 for the adsorption of Hg to Porphyridium purpureum whereas the maximum metal content (0.243 g g-1) was obtained for Zn on Cyclotella cryptica. A comparison of these values with those obtained for the mineral siliceous earth exhibiting low maximum content and high adsorption rates reveals that the mechanism of adsorption onto the algae is a mixture of adsorption and accumulation. PMID:11228977

  4. Luminescence properties of rare earth and transition metal ions doped potassium lead borophosphate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leong, P. M.; Eeu, T. Y.; Leow, T. Q.; Hussin, R.; Ibrahim, Z.

    2013-05-01

    A series of potassium lead borophosphate glass doped with rare earth and transition metal ions were fabricated using melt-quenching method without annealing process. With the composition of glass 0.15K2O-0.15PbO-0.35B2O3-0.5P2O5 as host doped with 0.01 mole % of neodymium oxide, iron oxide, yttrium oxide, and titanium oxide as activator and different composition were used to investigate the luminescence effect by using Photoluminescence Spectroscopy and UV-Vis (Ultraviolet-Visible) spectrophotometer. By exciting the samples at different wavelength (200-900 nm), the excitation and emission profile were obtained and analyzed to study the energy transfer process. By referring to the spectra obtained, selected samples were also codoped among each other to obtain desired luminescence properties. UV-Visible spectroscopy results revealed the absorption and transmission wavelength of samples for targeted application as a selected band filter. Physical properties such as chemical stability and color of the samples were also recorded to correlate with PL and UV-Vis result. Certain rare earth activated samples displayed slight coloring under the visible wavelength especially Nd2+ ions doped samples displayed slight purplish.

  5. Alkali metal, alkaline earth metal, and ammonium ion selectivities of dibenzo-16-crown-5 compounds with functional side arms in ion-selective electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Ohki, Akira; Lu, J.P.; Huang, X.; Bartsch, R.A. (Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States))

    1994-12-01

    Potentiometric selectivities of 11 dibenzo-16-crown-5 compounds for alkali metal, alkaline earth metal, and ammonium ions have been determined in solvent polymeric membrane electrodes. The ionophores bear one or two pendent groups on the central carbon of the three-carbon bridge in the polyether ring. Side-arm variation includes OCH[sub 3], OCH[sub 2]CH[sub 2]OCH[sub 3], OCH[sub 2]CO[sub 2]C[sub 2]H[sub 5], OCH[sub 2]C(O)N(C[sub 2]H[sub 5])[sub 2], and OCH[sub 2]C(O)N(C[sub 5]H[sub 11])[sub 2] units. Attachment of a propyl group to the ring carbon that bears an extended, oxygen-containing side arm increases the selectivity for Na[sup +] relative to larger alkali metal and alkaline earth metal cations. For a given side arm, a linear relationship is obtained when the enhancement in Na[sup +] selectivity produced by attachment of a geminal propyl group is plotted against the diameter of the interference ion. Potentiometric responses of the dibenzo-16-crown-5 compounds are rationalized in terms of the crown ether ring size and the oxygen basicity, conformational positioning, and rigidity of the side arm. 22 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Sol-gel-derived hybrid materials multi-doped with rare-earth metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelazowska, E.; Rysiakiewicz-Pasek, E.; Borczuch-Laczka, M.; Cholewa-Kowalska, K.

    2012-06-01

    Four different hybrid organic-inorganic materials based on TiO2-SiO2 matrices with organic additives and doped with rare-earth metal ions (III) from the group of europium, cerium, terbium, neodymium, dysprosium and samarium, were synthesized by sol-gel method. Tetraethyl orthosilicate, titanium (IV) isopropoxide and organic compounds, such as butyl acrylate, butyl methacrylate, ethyl acetoacetate, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate, ethyl acetate, propylene carbonate, organic solvents and certain inorganic salts were used in the synthesis. The inorganic part of the sols, which were used in the synthesis of all the hybrid materials, was prepared separately and then the organic parts were added. The materials obtained were aged for three weeks at room temperature and then heated in an electric oven for three hours at temperatures of 80 °C-150 °C. Scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX); X-ray diffraction (XRD); Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (KBr technique); 29Si magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance; and fluorescence spectroscopy were used for the examination of morphology, microstructure and luminescence properties, respectively. Photoluminescence properties with relatively intense narrow emission lines of Tb, Eu, Dy, Nd, Sm respectively to the RE-ions doping, were observed for all the hybrid materials.

  7. Spin-orbit thermal entanglement in a rare-earth-metal ion: Susceptibility witness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, O. S.; Castro, C. S.; Reis, M. S.

    2013-07-01

    In the present work, we explore the thermal entanglement between spin and orbital angular momentum in a rare-earth ion. A witness, based on the magnetic susceptibility and capable of revealing entanglement between these two angular momenta of different nature, is introduced. We found entanglement temperatures of 322 K for promethium and 715 K for samarium. These high temperatures make interesting the use of rare-earth in applications of quantum-information processes at room temperature.

  8. Rare-earth neutral metal injection into an electron beam ion trap plasmaa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, E. W.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Hell, N.

    2014-11-01

    We have designed and implemented a neutral metal vapor injector on the SuperEBIT high-energy electron beam ion trap at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A horizontally directed vapor of a europium metal is created using a thermal evaporation technique. The metal vapor is then spatially collimated prior to injection into the trap. The source's form and quantity constraints are significantly reduced making plasmas out of metal with vapor pressures ?10-7 Torr at ?1000 °C more obtainable. A long pulsed or constant feed metal vapor injection method adds new flexibility by varying the timing of injection and rate of material being introduced into the trap.

  9. Rare-earth neutral metal injection into an electron beam ion trap plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, E. W., E-mail: magee1@llnl.gov; Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Hell, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Dr. Remeis-Sternwarte and ECAP, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, 96049 Bamberg (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    We have designed and implemented a neutral metal vapor injector on the SuperEBIT high-energy electron beam ion trap at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A horizontally directed vapor of a europium metal is created using a thermal evaporation technique. The metal vapor is then spatially collimated prior to injection into the trap. The source's form and quantity constraints are significantly reduced making plasmas out of metal with vapor pressures ?10{sup ?7} Torr at ?1000?°C more obtainable. A long pulsed or constant feed metal vapor injection method adds new flexibility by varying the timing of injection and rate of material being introduced into the trap.

  10. Interaction of alkali, alkaline earth and transition metal ions with a ketocyanine dye: A comparative electronic spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardar, Sanjib Kr.; Srikanth, Kambalapalli; Mandal, Prasun K.; Bagchi, Sanjib

    2012-12-01

    Interaction of a dye which is structurally similar to a ketocyanine dye with metal ions (alkali, alkaline earth and transition metal) has been studied by monitoring the electronic absorption, steady state and time resolved fluorescence parameters of the dye. The dye (S0 state) forms a 1:1 complex with cations as indicated by the appearance of a new band at a longer wavelength. Equilibrium constant and other thermodynamic parameters for complexation have been determined. The interaction between the dye and the cation is mostly electrostatic in nature. Spectroscopic results have been supplemented by DFT calculation. For very low concentration of cations, where complexation is insignificant, the absorption band of the dye undergoes a slight blue shift. Enhancement of fluorescence intensity has been observed in the same concentration range. Both phenomena have been explained in terms of formation of a weak association complex where one/more cation replace equivalent solvent molecules in the cybotatic region around the dye. The binding constant of the weak association complex involving cation and the dye (S1 state) has been determined and has been found to depend on the charge-to-size ratio of the cations. Measurement of fluorescence lifetime of the dye indicates that the association complex is slowly decaying relative to solvated dye. At higher concentration of metal ions, however, fluorescence of the dye is quenched by the metal ions. A red shift of fluorescence maximum has also been observed in this concentration range.

  11. Method for separating rare earth metal

    SciTech Connect

    Asami, T.; Ichijo, H.; Ogawa, S.; Suehiro, T.; Suzuki, M.; Uzumaki, M.; Yamauchi, A.

    1985-04-30

    Rare earth metals are adsorbed on an ion exchanger fiber comprising an ion exchanger having a strong cation exchange group and a weak cation exchange group, and the adsorbed metals are fractionally eluted with an aqueous solution of a chelating agent, whereby the respective rare earth metals can be separated at high efficiency in a short time. According to this method, elution can be accomplished at an elution rate of 5.0 or above in terms of space velocity.

  12. Properties of alkali-metal atoms and alkaline-earth-metal ions for an accurate estimate of their long-range interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Jasmeet; Nandy, D. K.; Arora, Bindiya; Sahoo, B. K.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of interaction potentials among the alkali-metal atoms and alkaline-earth ions is very useful in the studies of cold atom physics. Here we carry out theoretical studies of the long-range interactions among the Li, Na, K, and Rb alkali-metal atoms with the Ca+, Ba+, Sr+, and Ra+ alkaline-earth ions systematically, which are largely motivated by their importance in a number of applications. These interactions are expressed as a power series in the inverse of the internuclear separation R . Both the dispersion and induction components of these interactions are determined accurately from the algebraic coefficients corresponding to each power combination in the series. Ultimately, these coefficients are expressed in terms of the electric multipole polarizabilities of the above-mentioned systems, which are calculated using the matrix elements obtained from a relativistic coupled-cluster method and core contributions to these quantities from the random-phase approximation. We also compare our estimated polarizabilities with the other available theoretical and experimental results to verify accuracies in our calculations. In addition, we also evaluate the lifetimes of the first two low-lying states of the ions using the above matrix elements. Graphical representations of the dispersion coefficients versus R are given among all the alkaline ions with Rb.

  13. Spin-Orbit Qubits of Rare-Earth-Metal Ions in Axially Symmetric Crystal Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertaina, S.; Shim, J. H.; Gambarelli, S.; Malkin, B. Z.; Barbara, B.

    2009-11-01

    Contrary to the well-known spin qubits, rare-earth-metal qubits are characterized by a strong influence of crystal field due to large spin-orbit coupling. At low temperature and in the presence of resonance microwaves, it is the magnetic moment of the crystal-field ground state which nutates (for several ?s) and the Rabi frequency ?R is anisotropic. Here, we present a study of the variations of ?R(H?0) with the magnitude and direction of the static magnetic field H?0 for the odd Er167 isotope in a single crystal CaWO4:Er3+. The hyperfine interactions split the ?R(H?0) curve into eight different curves which are fitted numerically and described analytically. These “spin-orbit qubits” should allow detailed studies of decoherence mechanisms which become relevant at high temperature and open new ways for qubit addressing using properly oriented magnetic fields.

  14. Complexation of metal ions, including alkali-earth and lanthanide(III) ions, in aqueous solution by the ligand 2,2',6',2''-terpyridyl.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Joanna M; Anhorn, Michael J; Oscarson, Karen A; Reibenspies, Joseph H; Hancock, Robert D

    2011-04-01

    Some metal-ion-complexing properties of the ligand 2,2',6',2''-terpyridyl (terpy) in aqueous solution are determined by following the ?-?* transitions of 2 × 10(-5) M terpy by UV-visible spectroscopy. It is found that terpy forms precipitates when present as the neutral ligand above pH ?5, in the presence of electrolytes such as NaClO(4) or NaCl added to control the ionic strength, as evidenced by large light-scattering peaks. The protonation constants of terpy are thus determined at the ionic strength (?) = 0 to avoid precipitation and found to be 4.32(3) and 3.27(3). The log K(1) values were determined for terpy with alkali-earth metal ions Mg(II), Ca(II), Sr(II), and Ba(II) and Ln(III) (Ln = lanthanide) ions La(III), Gd(III), and Lu(III) by titration of 2 × 10(-5) M free terpy at pH >5.0 with solutions of the metal ion. Log K(1)(terpy) was determined for Zn(II), Cd(II), and Pb(II) by following the competition between the metal ions and protons as a function of the pH. Complex formation for all of these metal ions was accompanied by marked sharpening of the broad ?-?* transitions of free terpy, which was attributed to complex formation affecting ligand vibrations, which in the free ligand are coupled to the ?-?* transitions and thus broaden them. It is shown that log K(1)(terpy) for a wide variety of metal ions correlates well with log K(1)(NH(3)) values for the metal ions. The latter include both experimental log K(1)(NH(3)) values and log K(1)(NH(3)) values predicted previously by density functional theory calculation. The structure of [Ni(terpy)(2)][Ni(CN)(4)]·CH(3)CH(2)OH·H(2)O (1) is reported as follows: triclinic, P1, a = 8.644(3) Å, b = 9.840(3) Å, c = 20.162(6) Å, ? = 97.355(5)°, ? = 97.100(5)°, ? = 98.606(5)°, V = 1663.8(9) Å(3), Z = 4, and final R = 0.0319. The two Ni-N bonds to the central N donors of the terpy ligands in 1 average 1.990(2) Å, while the four peripheral Ni-N bonds average 2.107(10) Å. This difference in the M-N bond length for terpy complexes is typical of the complexes of smaller metal ions, while for larger metal ions, the difference is reversed. The significance of the metal-ion size dependence of the selectivity of polypyridyl ligands, and the greater rigidity of ligands based on aromatic groups such as pyridyl groups, is discussed. PMID:21366261

  15. Effective interaction potentials for alkali and alkaline earth metal ions in SPC/E water and prediction of mean ion activity coefficients.

    PubMed

    Gavryushov, Sergei; Linse, Per

    2006-06-01

    The potential of mean force (PMF) acting between two simple ions surrounded by SPC/E water have been determined by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using a spherical cavity approach. Such effective ion-ion potentials were obtained for Me-Me, Me-Cl-, and Cl(-)-Cl- pairs, where Me is a Li+, Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Sr2+, and Ba2+ cation. The ionic sizes estimated from the effective potentials are not pairwise additive, a feature in the frequently used primitive model for electrolytes. The effective potentials were used in Monte Carlo (MC) simulations with implicit water to calculate mean ion activity coefficients of LiCl, NaCl, KCl, MgCl2, CaCl2, SrCl2, and BaCl2. Predicted activities were compared with experimental ones in the electrolyte concentration range 0.1-1 M. A qualitative agreement for LiCl and a satisfactory agreement for NaCl were found, whereas the predictions for KCl by two K+ models were less coherent. In the case of alkaline earth metal ions, all experimental activities were successfully reproduced at c = 0.1 M. However, at higher concentrations, similar deviations occurred for all divalent cations, suggesting that the dependence of the permittivity on the salt concentration and the polarization deficiency arising from the ordering of water molecules in the ion hydration shells are important in such systems. PMID:16771340

  16. Electric dipole polarizabilities of doubly ionized alkaline-earth-metal ions from perturbed relativistic coupled-cluster theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, S.; Mani, B. K.; Angom, D.

    2013-06-01

    Using perturbed relativistic coupled-cluster (PRCC) theory we compute the ground-state electric dipole polarizability, ?, of doubly ionized alkaline earth metal ions Mg2+, Ca2+, Sr2+, Ba2+, and Ra2+. In the present work we use the Dirac-Coulomb-Breit atomic Hamiltonian and we also include the Uehling potential, which is the leading-order term in the vacuum polarization corrections. We examine the correction to the orbital energies arising from the Uehling potential in the self-consistent field calculations as well as perturbatively. Our results for ? are in very good agreement with the experimental data, and we observe a change in the nature of the orbital energy corrections arising from the vacuum polarization as we go from Mg2+ to Ra2+.

  17. Mutual influence of trivalent rare-earth metal ions at their extraction from nitrate solutions by mixtures of tributyl phosphate and diisooctyl methylphosphonate

    SciTech Connect

    Pyartman, A.K.; Puzikov, E.A.; Kopyrin, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    Extraction of yttrium-group lanthanide(III) and yttrium nitrates from multicomponent solutions by mixtures of tri-n-butyl phosphate and diisooctyl methylphosphonate has been examined at 298.15 K and pH 2. A physiocochemical and mathematical model has been developed to describe distribution and mutual influence of rare-earth metal ions in multicomponent solutions as influenced by the total concentration of rare-earth metals in aqueous phase and compositions of the concentrate and of organic phase.

  18. Rare earth metal borocarbides

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Josef Bauer; Jean-François Halet; Jean-Yves Saillard

    1998-01-01

    A variety of structural types of solid-state rare earth metal borocarbide materials containing infinite two-dimensional layers, infinite one-dimensional chains, or finite groups of boron and carbon are reviewed. Although the solid-state language of Zintl–Klemm concept, band structures, and density of states is necessary to rationalize this kind of compound, they are governed by the laws that guide most molecular and

  19. Physical properties of rare-earth metal-ion vermiculite intercalation compounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Itsuko S. Suzuki; Jaime Morrilo; Charles R. Burr; Masatsugu Suzuki

    1994-01-01

    The structural and magnetic properties of vermiculite intercalation compounds (VIC's) with two-water-layer hydration states having Ce3+, Pr3+, Nd3+, Sm3+, Eu3+, Gd3+, Tb3+, Dy3+, Ho3+, and Er3+ ions in the interlamellar space between the host silicate layers have been studied by means of (00L) x-ray scattering, dc magnetic susceptibility, and thermogravimetric measurements. The intercalate layer sandwiched between two water layers consists

  20. Parity nonconservation in Fr-like actinide and Cs-like rare-earth-metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, B. M.; Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2013-07-01

    Parity-nonconservation (PNC) amplitudes are calculated for the 7s-6d3/2 transitions of the francium isoelectronic sequence (Fr, Ra+, Ac2+, Th3+, Pa4+, U5+, and Np6+) and for the 6s-5d3/2 transitions of the cesium isoelectronic sequence (Cs, Ba+, La2+, Ce3+, and Pr4+). We show in particular that isotopes of La2+, Ac2+, and Th3+ ions have strong potential in the search for new physics beyond the standard model: The PNC amplitudes are large, the calculations are accurate, and the nuclei are practically stable. In addition, 232Th3+ ions have recently been trapped and cooled [Campbell , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.102.233004 102, 233004 (2009)]. We also extend previous works by calculating the s-s PNC transitions in Ra+ and Ba+ and provide calculations of several energy levels, and electric dipole and quadrupole transition amplitudes for the Fr-like actinide ions.

  1. EXTRACTIVE PROPERTIES TOWARDS RARE-EARTH METAL IONS OF CALIX[ 4] ARENES SUBSTITUTED AT THE NARROW RIM BY PHOSPHORYL AND AMIDE GROUPS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. R. Yaftian; M. Burgard; C. Wieseir; C. B. Dieleman; D. Matt

    1998-01-01

    The extractive properties of the cone and partial-cone isomers of 5,11,17,23-tetra-?ert-butyl-25,27-bis( diethylcarbamoylmethoxy)-26,28-bisi( diphenylphospninoylmethoxy) calyx[ 4] arene ( cone-1 and partial-cone -1) in 1,2-dichloroethane towards rare-earth metal ions in nitrate media at 25 ° C were investigated. The analysis of the extraction equilibrium obtained from a mixture of four rare-earths ( La, Eu, Er and Y) revealed that the extracted species

  2. Structural diversity in binuclear complexes of alkaline earth metal ions with 4,6-diacetylresorcinol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shebl, Magdy; Khalil, Saied M. E.; Taha, A.; Mahdi, M. A. N.

    2012-11-01

    A new series of binuclear and mixed-ligand complexes with the general formula: [M 2(LO)yClz]; where M = Mg(II), Ca(II), Sr(II) and Ba(II); H2L = 4,6-diacetylresorcinol, the secondary ligand L' = acetylacetone (acac), 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) or 2,2'-bipyridyl (Bipy), n = 0-2, m = 1, 2, x = 0, 1, 2, 4, y = 0, 2, 4, 5 and z = 0-2; have been synthesized. They have been characterized by the analytical and spectral methods (IR, 1H NMR and mass) as well as TGA and molar conductivity measurements. The spectroscopic and conductance data suggested that the H2L ligand behaves as a neutral, monobasic or dibasic tetradentate ligand, depending on the basicity of the secondary ligand, through the two phenolic and two carbonyl groups. Binuclear octahedral geometry has been assigned to all of the prepared complexes in various molar ratios 2:2; 2:2:2; 1:2:1 and 1:2:4 (L:M:L'). Molecular orbital calculations were performed for the ligands and their complexes using Hyperchem 7.52 program on the bases of PM3 level and the results were correlated with the experimental data. The ligand and some of its alkaline metal(II) complexes showed antibacterial activity towards some of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeast (Candida albicans) and fungus (Aspergillus fumigatus).

  3. Rare-earth metal-ion separation using a supported liquid membrane mediated by a narrow rim phosphorylated calix[4]arene

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. R Yaftian; M Burgard; C. B Dieleman; D Matt

    1998-01-01

    The transport of rare-earth metal ions through a supported liquid membrane mediated by 5,11,17,23-tetra-tert-butyl-25,26,27,28-tetrakis(diphenylphosphinoylmethoxy)calix[4]arene (1) (cone conformation) in o-nitrophenyl hexyl ether (NPHE) has been investigated. The effect of the initial metal concentration, salting-out agent concentration in the feed phase and temperature as well as the carrier concentration on the flux was studied. The separation ability of ligand 1 was tested

  4. Strong-coupling cavity QED using rare-earth-metal-ion dopants in monolithic resonators: What you can do with a weak oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    McAuslan, D. L.; Longdell, J. J.; Sellars, M. J. [Jack Dodd Centre for Photonics and Ultra-Cold Atoms, Department of Physics, University of Otago, Dunedin (New Zealand); Laser Physics Centre, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2009-12-15

    We investigate the possibility of achieving the strong coupling regime of cavity quantum electrodynamics using rare-earth-metal-ions as impurities in monolithic optical resonators. We conclude that due to the weak oscillator strengths of the rare-earth-metals, it may be possible but difficult to reach the regime where the single photon Rabi frequency is large compared to both the cavity and atom decay rates. However, reaching the regime where the saturation photon and atom numbers are less than one should be much more achievable. We show that in this 'bad cavity' regime, transfer of quantum states and an optical phase shift conditional on the state of the atom is still possible and suggest a method for coherent detection of single dopants.

  5. Effect of sodium ions on the extraction of rare earth metals by liquid surfactant membranes containing a calix[4]arene carboxyl derivative

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Takahiko Kakoi; Tatsuya Oshima; Takayuki Nishiyori; Fukiko Kubota; Masahiro Goto; Seiji Shinkai; Fumiyuki Nakashio

    1998-01-01

    A novel host compound calixarene has been applied as a mobile carrier for the separation and concentration of rare earth metals by liquid surfactant membranes (LSMs). Using the novel carrier, extraction of rare earth metals (Ho, Er and Y) by LSMs was systematically studied in a stirred cell. Extraction behavior of rare earth metals by the carboxyl derivative of calix[4]arene

  6. Intermultiplet transitions in rare-earth metals

    SciTech Connect

    Stirling, W.G.; McEwen, K.A.; Loong, C.K.

    1985-01-01

    We report here on direct observations of intermultiplet (IM) transitions in the rare-earth metals, Pr, Nd and Tb, made using the chopper spectrometers at the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source of Argonne National Laboratory. Despite hydrogen contamination of the polycrystalline samples, we have observed inelastic peaks at small Q arising from IM transitions in Pr (approx.260 MeV), Nd (approx.242 MeV) and Tb (approx.256 MeV) although the latter has not yet been observed unambiguously. Future work will investigate the energy level structure and dynamical properties of rare-earth ions in stoichiometric metallic systems. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Forward and reverse ion-exchange kinetics for some alkali and alkaline earth metal ions on amorphous zirconium(IV) aluminophosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Varshney, K.G.; Pandith, A.H.

    1999-10-26

    The Nernst-Planck equations are applied to study the ion-exchange kinetics on the surface of zirconium(IV) aluminophosphate for Li{sup +}/H{sup +}, Na{sup +}/H{sup +}, K{sup +}/H{sup +}, Mg{sup 2+}/H{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+}/H{sup +}, and Sr{sup 2+}/H{sup +} exchanges in the forward and reverse directions under the conditions favoring particle diffusion. On the basis of these studies, various physical parameters such as the self-diffusion coefficient (D{sub 0}), the energy of activation (E{sub a}), and the entropy of activation ({Delta}S*) have been determined and a correlation has been made of these parameters with the ion-exchange characteristics of the material. The study gives an insight into the ion-exchange processes going on in the exchanger phase and its potential use in metal ion separations.

  8. Effect of crown ethers on the ion-exchange behavior of alkaline earth metals. Toward improved ion-exchange methods for the separation and preconcentration of radium.

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, M. L.; Chiarizia, R.; Horwitz, E. P.; Bartsch, R. A.; Talanov, V.; Chemistry; Texas Tech Univ.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of selected crown ethers on the uptake of alkaline earth cations by sulfonic acid and diphosphonic acid-based cation-exchange resins from hydrochloric acid media is examined. The effect observed is shown to vary with the hydrophobicity of the crown ether. Water-soluble crown ethers enhance the sorption of certain cations, thereby improving the selectivity of the resin for other alkaline earths over calcium ion, an apparent result of a synergistic interaction between crown ether present in the resin phase and the ionic functional groups of the resin. In the presence of more hydrophobic crown ethers, a decrease in cation sorption is often observed, a result of the exclusion of the crown ether from the resin phase and the formation of cation-crown complexes in the solution phase. The result can be a reversal of the selectivity sequence ordinarily exhibited by the resin.

  9. The rare-earth metals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. N. R. Taylor

    1970-01-01

    A brief survey is given of the physical properties of the rare earth metals. In doing this their characteristic structural and magnetic behaviour is described first and this is then followed by an examination of the ways in which these features affect the other properties.

  10. Imestigation ol" Maenons in Rare Earth Metals

    E-print Network

    Imestigation ol" Maenons in Rare Earth Metals b\\ Inelastic Neutron Scattering tL Bjerrum Moiler #12;BLANK PAGE #12;Riso Report No. 178 Investigation of Magnons in Rare Earth Metals by Inelastic NeutronN LANGF h. a. dec. #12;Contents Page PREFACE 7 I. INTRODUCTION *> 1. Magnetism of Rare Earth Metals 10 2

  11. Dialing in color with rare earth metals: facile photoluminescent production of true white light

    E-print Network

    Tew, Gregory N.

    Dialing in color with rare earth metals: facile photoluminescent production of true white light of lanthanide ions which is the focus of this report. Rare earth metal complexes have relatively good Combining polymeric architectures with metal ions produces hybrid materials with extremely rich properties

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance in rare earth metals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. A. H. McCausland; I. S. Mackenzie

    1979-01-01

    This article describes the study, by nuclear magnetic resonance, of both static and dynamical aspects of the hyperfine interaction in rare earth metals, and illustrates the categories of information that can be obtained by using nuclei as microscopic probes in metallic media. The systems discussed include not only the pure rare earth metals but also their alloys and their metallic

  13. The electric field gradient in heavy rare earth metals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Pelzl; Fachbereich Physik

    1972-01-01

    Estimates of the electric field gradient in heavy rare earth metals have been evaluated from experimental hyperfine interaction data. In addition, the magnetic hyperfine fields are analyzed. In the metals the effective radial integrals r-3>4f of the magnetic and quadrupole hyperfine interaction are reduced at most by 10% compared with the free ion values. The electric field gradients due to

  14. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF THE RARE-EARTH METAL IONS BY A CONE-SHAPED CALDC[4]ARENE SUBSTITUTED AT THE LOWER RTM BY FOUR CH2P(O)Ph2 LIGANDS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. R. Yaftian; M. Burgard; D. Matt; C. B. Dieleman; F. Rastegar

    1997-01-01

    The extraction properties of cone-5,11,17,23-tetra-t-butyl-25,26,27,28-tetrakis(diphenylphosphinoylmethoxy)calix[4]arene (1) in 1,2-dichloroethane towards rare-earth metal ions at 25 °C have been investigated. The slope analysis showed a 1:1 metal\\/ligand ratio for the extracted species (La, Eu, Er and Y). The distribution coefficients increase with the polarity of the diluents : chloroform ? dichioromethane ? 1,2-dichloroethane ? nitrobenzene. In the competitive extraction of 11 rare-earth

  15. Metals ions and neurodegeneration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Francisco Molina-Holgado; Robert C. Hider; Alessandra Gaeta; Robert Williams; Paul Francis

    2007-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders include a variety of pathological conditions, which share similar critical metabolic processes\\u000a such as protein aggregation and oxidative stress, both of which are associated with the involvement of metal ions. In this\\u000a review Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease are mainly discussed, with the aim of identifying common trends underlying\\u000a these neurological conditions. Chelation therapy could be a valuable

  16. RARE-EARTH METALS--1997 61.1 RARE-EARTH METALS

    E-print Network

    RARE-EARTH METALS--1997 61.1 RARE-EARTH METALS By James B. Hedrick The rare earths are a relatively million, to thulium and lutetium, the least abundant rare-earth elements at about 0.5 parts per million. Scandium, atomic number 21, is the lightest rare-earth element. It is the 31st most abundant element

  17. Ecotoxicity of rare earth elements Rare earth elements (REEs) or rare earth metals is the

    E-print Network

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    Ecotoxicity of rare earth elements Info Sheet Rare earth elements (REEs) or rare earth metals isolated. Actually, most rare earth elements exist in the Earth's crust in higher concentrations than though most people have never heard of rare earth elements, sev- eral of them govern mankind's modern

  18. Advances in metal ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.G.

    1988-05-01

    Beams of metallic ion species can be produced by the ECR (electron cyclotron resonance) ion source and by the MEVVA (metal vapor vacuum arc) ion source. Although the ECR source is fundamentally a gaseous ion source, metal ion beams can be produced by introducing metallic feed material into the plasma discharge using a number of techniques. The ion charge states can be very high, which is a significant advantage to most applications. The MEVVA ion source, on the other hand, is specifically a metal ion source. It has produced metallic ion beams from virtually all the solid metallic elements at a current of typically hundreds of milliamperes; the ions produced are in general multiply ionized, but not as highly stripped as those generated in the ECR source. Although the MEVVA source at present operates in a pulsed mode with a low duty cycle (less than or equal to 1%), work is in progress to increase the duty cycle significantly. In this paper the operation and performance of the LBL ECR and MEVVA ion sources, with respect to metal ion generation, are described.

  19. Calculation of Spin-Hamiltonian Parameters for Gadolinium Ion Doping Isostructural Series of Rare-Earth Metal Trichloride Hexahydrates and Trifluorides.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Norman Robert

    1982-03-01

    Spin-Hamiltonian parameters are calculated for Gd('3+) doping the isostructural rare-earth metal series RCl(,3)(.)6H(,2)O (R = Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm) and RF(,3) (R = La, Ce, Pr, Nd). The theory of spin-Hamiltonian parameters (SHPs) and of crystal-field parameters (CFPs) is presented, and the relationship between them is discussed. Consideration is given to the question of the validity of the crystal -field parameterization scheme and to the question of whether or not the SHPs arise soley from terms which are linear in the crystal field. The SHPs for the two series are calculated on the basis of the super-position model (SM) of Newman using a newly developed method which exploits the consistency of the model to determine distortions in the ionic positions. It is also shown how the SM may be reformulated so as to decouple the model parameter values from metal-ligand distance effects. In addition, the SHPs are calculated for the same two series using a model original to this work, called the point-charge plus induced-dipole model (PCID). This is based on the use of polarizability tensors whose symmetry conforms to that of the host crystal. These tensors are required in order to calculate the induced dipole moments at the various ion sites. Thus, the SHPs are expressed in terms of point-charge sums and induced -dipole sums over the crystal, all sums being evaluated by Ewald's method. Although different polarizability values are found for each ion type for each host, these values are not arbitrary parameters as would arise in a purely empirical model. This is because they are subject to various physical constraints, as is discussed. Also, the polarizability values predicted by the model are found to vary with the host-ion radius in a way consistent with that predicted by the exchange charge model of Dick and Overhauser. Both the SM and the PCID model give results for the SHPs within experimental error. A review is given of existing polarizable dipole models. It is shown that all of these neither provide a rigorous treatment of the polarizability problem, nor do they agree well with experiment. Also there is presented a detailed treatment of Ewald's method including a newly developed technique for the evaluation of correction terms which occur in the theory. Conclusions are made regarding the validity and utility of the PCID model.

  20. Experimental demonstration of efficient and selective population transfer and qubit distillation in a rare-earth-metal-ion-doped crystal

    E-print Network

    Suter, Dieter

    . Quantum computer hardware is presently being developed based on liquids, atoms, or ions or other particles June 2005 In optically controlled quantum computers it may be favorable to address different qubits computing I. Roos and K. Molmer, Phys. Rev. A 69, 022321 2004 --e.g., for use in quantum computers based

  1. Coordination chemistry of the alkaline earth metal ions with Zwitterionic forms of the Schift bases. X-Ray studies and other spectroscopic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajmir-Riahi, H. A.; Lotfipoor, M.

    The non-ionized forms of tetradentate Schiff bases NN'-ethylenebis(salicylideneimine), H 2L and NN'-propane-1,3-diylbis(salicylideneimine), H 2L' react with hydrated alkaline earth halide and nitrate to give complexes of the type: M(H 2L)Cl 2· nH 2O [M = Mg(II), Ca(II), Sr(II); n = 0-4], M(H 2L) 2Cl 2 [M = Ca(II), Sr(II), M(H 2L) nBr 2 [M = Ca(II), Sr(II); n = 2, 3 and Mg 2(H 2L) 3Br 4], M(H 2L) nI 2 [M = Mg(II), Ca(II), Sr(II), Ba(II); n = 2, 3)], M(H 2L) n(NO 3) 2 and M(H 2L') n(NO 1) 2[M = Mg(II), Ca(II); n = 1, 2)]. Because of distinct spectral similarities with structurally known Ca(H 2L')(NO 3) 2 compound, the Schiff bases are coordinated through the negatively charged phenolic oxygen atoms and not the nitrogen atoms of the azomethine groups, which carry the protons transferred from phenolic groups on complexation. Halide and nitrate are coordinated to the central metal ion except in 2:1 nitrato complexes where the presence of both ionic and coordinated nitrate groups are evident and also in 3:1 halide complexes where the presence of non-coordinated halide cannot be excluded. X-Ray powder photographs showed no marked similarities between Ca(H 2L')(NO 3) 2 and Mg(H 2L')(NO 3) 2 while there are some isomorphic features between the same types of halide complexes. Infrared spectra and other structural information revealed the polymeric nature of the complexes. Therefore the coordination numbers exhibited by the alkaline earth metal cations would be 4, 6 or 8 in these series of Schiff base complexes.

  2. {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectroscopy of cationic species in CO{sub 2} selective alkaline earth metal porous silicoaluminophosphates prepared via liquid and solid state ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Arevalo-Hidalgo, Ana G. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico-Mayagueez Campus, Mayagueez, PR 00681-9000 (Puerto Rico); Dugar, Sneha; Fu, Riqiang [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Hernandez-Maldonado, Arturo J., E-mail: arturoj.hernandez@upr.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico-Mayagueez Campus, Mayagueez, PR 00681-9000 (Puerto Rico)

    2012-07-15

    The location of extraframework cations in Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} ion-exchanged SAPO-34 was estimated by means of {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectroscopy and spectral deconvolution. Incorporation of the alkaline earth metal cations onto the SAPO framework was achieved via liquid state ion exchange, coupled partial detemplation/solid-state ion exchange, and combination of both techniques. MAS NMR revealed that the level of ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations near hexagonal prisms (site SI), which are relatively difficult to exchange with the alkaline earth metal due to steric and charge repulsion criteria. In addition, the presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange of otherwise tenacious hydrogen as corroborated by unit cell compositional data as well as enhanced CO{sub 2} adsorption at low partial pressures. The extraframework ammonium species were produced from partial detemplation of the structure-directing agent employed for the SAPO-34 synthesis, tetraethylammonium. - Graphical abstract: MAS NMR was used to elucidate the position the cationic species in alkaline earth metal exchanged silicoaluminophosphates. These species played a significant role during the ion exchange process and, therefore, the materials ultimate CO{sub 2} adsorption performance. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Location of extraframework Sr{sup 2+} or Ba{sup 2+} cations was estimated by means of {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Level of Sr{sup 2+} or Ba{sup 2+} ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} ion exchanged SAPOs are outstanding CO{sub 2} adsorbents.

  3. Effective interaction potentials for alkali and alkaline earth metal ions in SPC/E water and polarization model of hydrated ions.

    PubMed

    Gavryushov, Sergei

    2006-06-01

    In the first paper (J. Phys. Chem. B, 2006, 110, 10878), effective ion-ion potentials in SPC/E water were obtained for Me-Me, Me-Cl-, and Cl(-)-Cl- pairs, where Me is Li+, Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Sr2+, and Ba2+ cations. In this second part of the study of effective interionic potentials, ion-ion distribution functions obtained from implicit-water Monte Carlo simulations of electrolyte solution with these potentials have been explored. This analysis verifies the range of applicability of the primitive model of electrolyte. It is shown that this approximation can be applied to monovalent electrolyte solutions in a wide range of concentrations, whereas the nature of ion-ion interactions is notably different for 2:1 electrolytes. An improved model of ions is discussed. The model includes approximations of the ion hydration shell polarization and specific short-range ion-ion interaction. It allows approximation of the potential of mean force acting on ions in strong electric fields of highly charged macromolecules and bilayers. PMID:16771341

  4. Rare-earth ions doped heavy metal germanium tellurite glasses for fiber lighting in minimally invasive surgery.

    PubMed

    Yang, D L; Gong, H; Pun, E Y B; Zhao, X; Lin, H

    2010-08-30

    In Er(3+)/Yb(3+) codoped Na(2)O-ZnO-PbO-GeO(2)-TeO(2) (NZPGT) glass fiber, a clear and compact green upconversion amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) trace is observed, and the NZPGT glasses are proved to be a desirable candidate in fabricating low-phonon energy fiber. Intense green upconversion luminescence of Er(3+), balanced green and red upconversion emissions of Ho(3+), and dominant three-photon blue upconversion fluorescence of Tm(3+) have been represented. By varying the excitation power of 974 nm wavelength laser diode, a series of green and white fluorescences have been achieved in Tm(3+)/Er(3+)/Yb(3+) and Tm(3+)/Ho(3+)/Yb(3+) triply doped glass systems, respectively. These results reveal that high-intensity blue, green, and white upconversion ASE fluorescences, which can be adopted for lighting in minimally invasive photodynamic therapy and minimally invasive surgery, are reasonable to be expected in rare-earth doped NZPGT glass fibers. PMID:20940794

  5. Rare earth metals for automotive exhaust catalysts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hirohumi Shinjoh

    2006-01-01

    The usage of rare earth metals for automotive exhaust catalysts is demonstrated in this paper. Rare earth metals have been widely used in automotive catalysts. In particular, three-way catalysts require the use of ceria compounds as oxygen storage materials, and lanthana as both a stabilizer of alumina and a promoter. The application for diesel catalysts is also illustrated. Effects of

  6. Rare Earth Metals: Resourcefulness and Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shijie

    2013-10-01

    When we appreciate the digital revolution carried over from the twentieth century with mobile communication and the Internet, and when we enjoy our high-tech lifestyle filled with iDevices, hybrid cars, wind turbines, and solar cells in this new century, we should also appreciate that all of these advanced products depend on rare earth metals to function. Although there are only 136,000 tons of annual worldwide demand, (Cho, Rare Earth Metals, Will We Have Enough?)1 rare earth metals are becoming such hot commodities on international markets, due to not only to their increasing uses, including in most critical military hardware, but also to Chinese growth, which accounts for 95% of global rare earth metal production. Hence, the 2013 technical calendar topic, planned by the TMS/Hydrometallurgy and Electrometallurgy Committee, is particularly relevant, with four articles (including this commentary) contributed to the JOM October Issue discussing rare earth metals' resourcefulness and recovery.

  7. Recycling of rare earth metals from rare earth-transition metal alloy scrap by liquid metal extraction

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, T.W.; Schmidt, F.A.

    1995-08-01

    A method is described for treating rare earth metal-bearing scrap, waste or other material (e.g. Nd--Fe--B or Dy--Tb--Fe scrap) to recover the rare earth metal comprising melting the rare earth metal-bearing material, melting a Group IIA metal extractant, such as Mg, Ca, or Ba, in which the rare earth is soluble in the molten state, and contacting the melted material and melted extractant at a temperature and for a time effective to extract the rare earth from the melted material into the melted extractant. The rare earth metal is separated from the extractant metal by vacuum sublimation or distillation. 2 figs.

  8. Recycling of rare earth metals from rare earth-transition metal alloy scrap by liquid metal extraction

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Timothy W. (Ames, IA); Schmidt, Frederick A. (Ames, IA)

    1995-08-01

    Method of treating rare earth metal-bearing scrap, waste or other material (e.g. Nd--Fe--B or Dy--Tb--Fe scrap) to recover the rare earth metal comprising melting the rare earth metal-bearing material, melting a Group IIA metal extractant, such as Mg, Ca, or Ba, in which the rare earth is soluble in the molten state, and contacting the melted material and melted extractant at a temperature and for a time effective to extract the rare earth from the melted material into the melted extractant. The rare earth metal is separated from the extractant metal by vacuum sublimation or distillation.

  9. Rare-Earth-metal methylidene complexes.

    PubMed

    Kratsch, Jochen; Roesky, Peter W

    2014-01-01

    Transition-metal carbene complexes have been known for about 50?years and widely applied as reagents and catalysts in organic transformations. In contrast, the carbene chemistry of the rare-earth metals is much less developed, but has attracted the research interest in the recent years. In this field rare-earth-metal alkylidene, especially methylidene, compounds are an emerging class of compounds with a high synthetic potential for organometallic chemistry and maybe in the future also for organic chemistry. PMID:24395606

  10. Magnetic properties of oxide glasses containing iron and rare-earth ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akamatsu, Hirofumi; Kawabata, Jun; Fujita, Koji; Murai, Shunsuke; Tanaka, Katsuhisa

    2011-10-01

    Measurements of fundamental magnetic properties including not only dc and ac susceptibilities but also magnetic aging effects have been performed for aluminoborate glasses with high concentrations of iron and rare-earth R3+ ions (R=Sm, Gd, and Tb) in order to give an insight into the magnetic structures and interactions in amorphous oxides containing both 3d transition metal and 4f rare-earth ions, which manifest magnetic interactions that differ from each other. We demonstrate that the antiferromagnetic interactions between iron and rare-earth ions as well as those between iron ions play a significant role for their magnetic properties, while those between rare-earth ions are of little importance. Most of the rare-earth ions remain paramagnetic even below the spin-freezing temperatures under the strong molecular field caused by the spin-glass freezing of the iron ions, as in the case of rare-earth garnet ferrites.

  11. Rare Earth Metal Silicides and exotic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriske, Richard

    2009-11-01

    The use of Rare Earth Metal Silicides has been seen in thermal detection since World War II. What results can be expected when Rare Earths are used with certain isotopes? More to the point can exotic isotopes of Rare Earths be made from what is known more recently about Hadrons and their construction? What if anything can be gained from manipulating isotopes with a more recent theory than that known around World War II?

  12. Metal ions in the atmosphere of Neptune.

    PubMed

    Lyons, J R

    1995-02-01

    Microwave propagation experiments performed with Voyager 2 at Neptune revealed sharp layers of electrons in Neptune's lower ionosphere with densities of approximately 10(4) per cubic centimeter. These layers are reminiscent of the sporadic-E layers in the Earth's ionosphere, and when taken together with data from the other giant planets, these data confirm the importance of the magnetic field in layer formation. A photochemical model that incorporates species produced by meteoroid ablation predicts that singly ionized magnesium is the most likely metal to be found in the layers, although laboratory data on the kinetics of metallic atoms and ions in a reducing environment are lacking. The metal chemistry discussed here is directly relevant to the abundant metals observed at the impact site of the G fragment of comet Shoemaker Levy 9 on Jupiter. PMID:7839139

  13. Gas-Phase Reactions of Hydrated Alkaline Earth Metal Ions, M2+ (H2O)n (M = Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba and n = 4–7), With Benzene

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Cruz, Sandra E.; Williams, Evan R.

    2005-01-01

    Gas-phase reactions of hydrated divalent alkaline earth metal ions and benzene were investigated by electrospray ionization Fourier-transform mass spectrometry. Rate constants for solvent-exchange reactions were determined as a function of hydration extent for Mg2+, Ca2+, Sr2+, and Ba2+ clusters containing four to seven water molecules each. All of the strontium and barium clusters react quickly with benzene. Barium reacts slightly faster than the corresponding strontium cluster with the same number of water molecules attached. For calcium, clusters with four and five water molecules react quickly, whereas those with six and seven water molecules do not. Magnesium with four water molecules reacts quickly, but not when five through seven water molecules are attached. The slow reactivity observed for some of these clusters indicates that the cation–? interaction between the metal ion and benzene is partially screened by the surrounding water molecules. The reactivity of magnesium with seven water molecules is intermediate that of the hexa- and pentahydrate and the tetrahydrate. This result is consistent with the seventh water molecule being in the outer shell and much more weakly bound. The unusual trend in reactivity observed for magnesium may be due to the presence of mixed shell structures observed previously. These results are the first to provide information about the relative importance of cation–? interactions in divalent metal ions as a function of metal hydration extent. Such studies should also provide a model and some insight into the relative binding affinities of divalent metal ions to aromatic residues on peptides and proteins. PMID:11281600

  14. Anticoagulant action of rare earth metals.

    PubMed

    Funakoshi, T; Furushima, K; Shimada, H; Kojima, S

    1992-10-01

    Some of the lanthanides, the rare earth metals, lanthanum (La), cerium (Ce), neodymium (Nd), samarium (Sm), terbium (Tb), dysprosium (Dy), erbium (Er) and ytterbium (Yb) prolonged the clotting time of normal human plasma in a dose-dependent manner when clotting was induced either by thromboplastin or by kaolin in the presence of cephalin and Ca2+. They also prolonged the activated factor X induced clotting time of platelet-rich plasma. The amidolytic activities of activated factor X and thrombin progressively decreased with increasing amount of rare earth metals. These results suggested that the rare earth metals appear to show their anticoagulant effect with mechanisms in part the inhibition of the enzymatic activities of both activated factor X and thrombin. PMID:1445385

  15. Miniature high current metal ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.G.; Galvin, J.E.; MacGill, R.A.; Wright, R.T.

    1986-04-01

    A small, simple ion source for the production of high brightness beams of metal ions is described. A metal vapor vacuum arc discharge is used to establish the high density plasma from which the ion beam is extracted. The source is finger-sized, and can produce pulsed metal ion beams with current up to the 10 ma range. 9 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Catalysis using hydrous metal oxide ion exchangers

    DOEpatents

    Dosch, R.G.; Stephens, H.P.; Stohl, F.V.

    1983-07-21

    In a process which is catalyzed by a catalyst comprising an active metal on a carrier, said metal being active as a catalyst for the process, an improvement is provided wherein the catalyst is a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal titanate, zirconate, niobate or tantalate wherein alkali or alkaline earth metal cations have been exchanged with a catalytically effective amount of cations of said metal.

  17. Metal ion-containing epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St.clair, A. K.

    1982-01-01

    A variety of metallic and organometallic complexes to be used as potential additives for an epoxy used by the aerospace industry as a composite matrix resin were investigated. A total of 9 complexes were screened for compatibility and for their ability to accelerate or inhibit the cure of a highly crosslinkable epoxy resin. Methods for combining the metallic complexes with the resin were investigated, gel times recorded, and cure exotherms studied by differential scanning calorimetry. Glass transition temperatures of cured metal ion containing epoxy castings were determined by thermomechanical analysis. Thermal stabilities of the castings were determined by thermogravimetric analysis. Mechanical strength and stiffness of these doped epoxies were also measured.

  18. Pressure-Induced Electronic Phase Transitions Transition Metal Oxides and Rare Earth Metals

    E-print Network

    Islam, M. Saif

    Pressure-Induced Electronic Phase Transitions in Transition Metal Oxides and Rare Earth Metals Metal Oxides and Rare Earth Metals by Brian Ross Maddox Electron correlation can affect profound changes transition in a transition metal monoxide. iv #12;The lanthanides (the 4f metals also known as rare-earths

  19. Rare earth transition metal sulfides, LnMS 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugesan, T.; Ramesh, S.; Gopalakrishnan, J.; Rao, C. N. R.

    1981-07-01

    Ternary rare earth transition metal sulfides LnMS 3 with Ln = La, Nd, and Gd, and M = V and Cr; as well as Ln = La and M = Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni have been prepared and characterized. The vanadium and chromium sulfides crystallize in a monoclinic layer structure isotypic with LaCrS 3, while the other LnMS 3 sulfides crystallize in a hexagonal structure. Chemical shifts of the metal K-absorption edge and XPS binding energies of core levels indicate that the transition metal is trivalent in the V and Cr sulfides, while it is divalent in the Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni sulfides. Electrical and magnetic properties of the sulfides are discussed in terms of their structures and the electronic configurations of the transition metal ions.

  20. METAL-NON METAL TRANSITIONS /N RARE EARTH COMPOUNDS. EXPERIMENT AND THEORK /.

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    METAL-NON METAL TRANSITIONS /N RARE EARTH COMPOUNDS. EXPERIMENT AND THEORK /. VALENCE INSTABILITIES, superconductivity, electron-phonon and band theory, to name a few. 2. Properties of normal rare earth metals. - Before discussing rare earth valence instabilities, three relevant general features of rare earth metals

  1. Reversible photodeposition and dissolution of metal ions

    DOEpatents

    Foster, Nancy S. (Boulder, CO); Koval, Carl A. (Golden, CO); Noble, Richard D. (Boulder, CO)

    1994-01-01

    A cyclic photocatalytic process for treating waste water containing metal and organic contaminants. In one embodiment of the method, metal ions are photoreduced onto the photocatalyst and the metal concentrated by resolubilization in a smaller volume. In another embodiment of the method, contaminant organics are first oxidized, then metal ions removed by photoreductive deposition. The present invention allows the photocatalyst to be recycled until nearly complete removal of metal ions and organic contaminants is achieved.

  2. Upconversion Processes in Transition Metal and Rare Earth Metal Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel R. Gamelin; Hans U. Güdel

    The design and characterization of new luminescent materials is an active area of research. Here we present several current\\u000a topics in the area of upconversion by transition-metal and rare-earth-metal doped halide lattices. Following introduction\\u000a to the necessary background material related to upconversion mechanisms and kinetics, a series of topics are discussed which\\u000a illustrate some key areas of developing interest in

  3. ONDES DE SPIN MAGNETISM IN THE LIGHT RARE EARTH 'METALS

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    ONDES DE SPIN MAGNETISM IN THE LIGHT RARE EARTH 'METALS A. R. MACKINTOSH H. C. Mrsted Institute terres rares Ikgeres. Abstract. -The magnetic properties of the light rare earth metals are reviewed the last decade, the magnetism of the heavy rare earth metals is now rather well understood. The magnetic

  4. Metallic ions in the equatorial ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, A. C.; Goldberg, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    Four positive ion composition measurements of the equatorial E region made at Thumba, India, are presented. During the day, the major ions between 90 and 125 km are NO(+) and O2(+). A metallic ion layer centered at 92 km is observed, and found to contain Mg(+), Fe(+), Ca(+), K(+), Al(+), and Na(+) ions. The layer is explained in terms of a similarly shaped latitude distribution of neutral atoms which are photoionized and charge-exchanged with NO(+) and O2(+). Three body reactions form molecular metallic ions which are rapidly lost by dissociative ion-electron recombination. Nighttime observations show downward drifting of the metallic ion layer caused by equatorial dynamo effects. These ions react and form neutral metals which exchange charges with NO(+) and O2(+) to produce an observed depletion of those ions within the metallic ion region.

  5. Impulsive ion acceleration in earth's outer magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.N.; Belian, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    Considerable observational evidence is found that ions are accelerated to high energies in the outer magnetosphere during geomagnetic disturbances. The acceleration often appears to be quite impulsive causing temporally brief (10's of seconds), very intense bursts of ions in the distant plasma sheet as well as in the near-tail region. These ion bursts extend in energy from 10's of keV to over 1 MeV and are closely associated with substorm expansive phase onsets. Although the very energetic ions are not of dominant importance for magnetotail plasma dynamics, they serve as an important tracer population. Their absolute intensity and brief temporal appearance bespeaks a strong and rapid acceleration process in the near-tail, very probably involving large induced electric fields substantially greater than those associated with cross-tail potential drops. Subsequent to their impulsive acceleration, these ions are injected into the outer trapping regions forming ion ''drift echo'' events, as well as streaming tailward away from their acceleration site in the near-earth plasma sheet. Most auroral ion acceleration processes occur (or are greatly enhanced) during the time that these global magnetospheric events are occurring in the magnetotail. A qualitative model relating energetic ion populations to near-tail magnetic reconnection at substorm onset followed by global redistribution is quite successful in explaining the primary observational features. Recent measurements of the elemental composition and charge-states have proven valuable for showing the source (solar wind or ionosphere) of the original plasma population from which the ions were accelerated.

  6. Photophysical properties of metal ion functionalized NaY zeolite.

    PubMed

    Duan, Tian-Wei; Yan, Bing

    2014-01-01

    A series of luminescent ion exchanged zeolite are synthesized by introducing various ions into NaY zeolite. Monometal ion (Eu(3+), Tb(3+), Ce(3+), Y(3+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Cu(2+)) exchanged zeolite, rare-earth ion (Eu(3+), Tb(3+), Ce(3+)) exchanged zeolite modified with Y(3+) and rare-earth ion (Eu(3+), Tb(3+), Ce(3+)) exchanged zeolite modified with Zn(2+) are discussed here. The resulting materials are characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectrum radiometer (FTIR), XRD, scanning electronic microscope (SEM), PLE, PL and luminescence lifetime measurements. The photoluminescence spectrum of NaY indicates that emission band of host matrix exhibits a blueshift of about 70 nm after monometal ion exchange process. The results show that transition metal ion exchanged zeolites possess a similar emission band due to dominant host luminescence. A variety of luminescence phenomenon of rare-earth ion broadens the application of zeolite as a luminescent host. The Eu(3+) ion exchanged zeolite shows white light luminescence with a great application value and Ce(3+) exchanged zeolite steadily exhibits its characteristic luminescence in ultraviolet region no matter in monometal ion exchanged zeolite or bimetal ions exchanged zeolite. PMID:24392790

  7. Magnetic properties of oxide glasses containing iron and rare-earth ions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hirofumi Akamatsu; Jun Kawabata; Koji Fujita; Shunsuke Murai; Katsuhisa Tanaka

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of fundamental magnetic properties including not only dc and ac susceptibilities but also magnetic aging effects have been performed for aluminoborate glasses with high concentrations of iron and rare-earth R3+ ions (R=Sm, Gd, and Tb) in order to give an insight into the magnetic structures and interactions in amorphous oxides containing both 3d transition metal and 4f rare-earth ions,

  8. Liquid metal ion source and alloy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Clark Jr. William M; Mark W. Utlaut; Robert G. Behrens; Eugene G. Szklarz; Edmund K. Storms; Robert P. Santandrea; Lynwood W. Swanson

    1988-01-01

    A liquid metal ion source and alloy, wherein the species to be emitted from the ion source is contained in a congruently vaporizing alloy. In one embodiment, the liquid metal ion source acts as a source of arsenic, and in a source alloy the arsenic is combined with palladium, preferably in a liquid alloy having a range of compositions from

  9. Protein-Transition Metal Ion Networks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins obtained from agricultural sources were blended with divalent metal ions. Feather keratin, egg albumin, and wheat gluten showed increases of 2-3 times in modulus with addition of divalent transition metal ions Cu2+ and Zn2+. Increasing concentrations of ions resulted in increased stiffnes...

  10. Characteristics of thermal decomposition products of rare earth, alkali earth metal and transition metal p -toluenesulfonates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Z.-L. Sun

    2005-01-01

    Summary A series of alkali earth (Ca, Ba), lanthanide (La, Ce, Pr, Nd,) and transition metal (Fe, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd) p-toluenesulfonates were synthesized. Thermal analysis, infrared spectrophotometry, and XRD powder diffraction patterns were employed to characterize the final thermal decomposition products. By heating in dynamic air atmosphere at 30-850°C, it has been found that the alkali earth

  11. Liquid metal ion source and alloy

    DOEpatents

    Clark, Jr., William M. (Thousand Oaks, CA); Utlaut, Mark W. (Saugus, CA); Behrens, Robert G. (Los Alamos, NM); Szklarz, Eugene G. (Los Alamos, NM); Storms, Edmund K. (Los Alamos, NM); Santandrea, Robert P. (Santa Fe, NM); Swanson, Lynwood W. (McMinnville, OR)

    1988-10-04

    A liquid metal ion source and alloy, wherein the species to be emitted from the ion source is contained in a congruently vaporizing alloy. In one embodiment, the liquid metal ion source acts as a source of arsenic, and in a source alloy the arsenic is combined with palladium, preferably in a liquid alloy having a range of compositions from about 24 to about 33 atomic percent arsenic. Such an alloy may be readily prepared by a combustion synthesis technique. Liquid metal ion sources thus prepared produce arsenic ions for implantation, have long lifetimes, and are highly stable in operation.

  12. ZnS nanocrystals co-activated by transition metals and rare-earth metals—a new class of luminescent materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ping Yang; Mengkai Lü; Dong Xü; Duolong Yuan; Guangjun Zhou

    2001-01-01

    We report on the unique luminescent properties of ZnS nanoparticles co-activated by Cu2+ and rare-earth metallic ions. The co-activated ZnS nanocrystals with varying sizes from 20 to 30Å have been prepared by using a chemical coprecipitation at room temperature. The nanoparticles can be co-doped with copper and rare-earth metallic ions during synthesis without altering X-ray diffraction patterns. However, the doping

  13. Metal enhanced fluorescence in rare earth doped plasmonic core-shell nanoparticles

    E-print Network

    Derom, S; Pillonnet, A; Benamara, O; Jurdyc, A M; Girard, C; Francs, G Colas des

    2013-01-01

    We theoretically and numerically investigate metal enhanced fluorescence of plasmonic core-shell nanoparticles doped with rare earth (RE) ions. Particle shape and size are engineered to maximize the average enhancement factor (AEF) of the overall doped shell. We show that the highest enhancement (11 in the visible and 7 in the near-infrared) are achieved by tuning either the dipolar or quadrupolar particle resonance to the rare earth ions excitation wavelength. Additionally, the calculated AEFs are compared to experimental data reported in the literature, obtained in similar conditions (plasmon mediated enhancement) or when a metal-RE energy transfer mechanism is involved.

  14. Metal enhanced fluorescence in rare earth doped plasmonic core-shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Derom, S; Berthelot, A; Pillonnet, A; Benamara, O; Jurdyc, A M; Girard, C; Colas des Francs, G

    2013-12-13

    We theoretically and numerically investigate metal enhanced fluorescence of plasmonic core-shell nanoparticles doped with rare earth (RE) ions. Particle shape and size are engineered to maximize the average enhancement factor (AEF) of the overall doped shell. We show that the highest enhancement (11 in the visible and 7 in the near-infrared) is achieved by tuning either the dipolar or the quadrupolar particle resonance to the rare earth ion's excitation wavelength. Additionally, the calculated AEFs are compared to experimental data reported in the literature, obtained in similar conditions (plasmon mediated enhancement) or when a metal-RE energy transfer mechanism is involved. PMID:24231223

  15. A set of alkali and alkaline-earth coordination polymers based on the ligand 2-(1H-benzotriazol-1-yl) acetic acid: Effects the radius of metal ions on structures and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin-Hua; Tang, Gui-Mei; Qin, Ting-Xiao; Yan, Shi-Chen; Wang, Yong-Tao; Cui, Yue-Zhi; Weng Ng, Seik

    2014-11-01

    Four new metal coordination complexes, namely, [Na(BTA)]n (1), [K2(BTA)2(?2-H2O)]n (2), and [M(BTA)2(H2O)2]n (M=Ca(II) and Sr(II) for 3 and 4, respectively) [BTA=2-(1H-benzotriazol-1-yl) acetic anion], have been obtained under hydrothermal condition, by reacting the different alkali and alkaline-earth metal hydroxides with HBTA. Complexes 1-4 were structurally characterized by X-ray single-crystal diffraction, EA, IR, PXRD, and thermogravimetry analysis (TGA). These complexes display low-dimensional features displaying various two-dimensional (2D) and one-dimensional (1D) coordination motifs. Complex 1 displays a 2D layer with the thickness of 1.5 nm and possesses a topologic structure of a 11 nodal net with Schläfli symbol of {318}. Complex 2 also shows a thick 2D sheet and its topologic structure is a 9 nodes with Schläfli symbol of {311×42}. Complexes 3 and 4 possess a 1D linear chain and further stack via hydrogen bonding interactions to generate a three-dimensional supramolecular architecture. These results suggest that both the coordination preferences of the metal ions and the versatile nature of this flexible ligand play a critical role in the final structures. The luminescent spectra show strong emission intensities in complexes 1-4, which display violet photoluminescence. Additionally, ferroelectric, dielectric and nonlinear optic (NLO) second-harmonic generation (SHG) properties of 2 are discussed in detail.

  16. PROTEIN-TRANSITION METAL ION NETWORKS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins obtained from agricultural sources were blended with divalent metal ions. Feather keratin, egg albumin, and wheat gluten had low, medium, and high levels of aspartic and glutamic acid, respectively, and FT-IR showed that the divalent transition metal ions Mn2+, Cu2+, and Zn2+ were tightly ...

  17. Practical hardness scales for metal ion complexes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Bruce Martin

    2002-01-01

    Experimentally determined log stability constant differences for substitution reactions of one ligand for another on a metal ion are used to derive practical metal ion hardness–softness scales applicable to aqueous solutions. These scales probably correspond to what most investigators imply when they use the terms hardness and softness. The correlation between the halide scale for fluoride minus bromide and the

  18. COMPUTATIONAL DESIGN OF METAL ION SEQUESTERING AGENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organic ligands that exhibit a high degree of metal ion recognition are essential precursors for developing separation processes and sensors for metal ions. Since the beginning of the nuclear era, much research has focused on discovering ligands that target specific radionuclides...

  19. Rare-Earth Ion Relaxation in Ferrimagnetic Resonance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. H. Clarke; R. F. Pearson; R. W. Teale; K. Tweedale

    1963-01-01

    The linewidths in ferrimagnetic resonance ?H and the frequency dependence of the anisotropy field for iron garnets containing rare-earth ions are explained on the basis of a model for relaxation which was used by Clogston for nickel ferrous ferrite. It is assumed that the population of the rare-earth ion energy levels relaxes towards equilibrium with a finite relaxation time ?.

  20. Pseudo ribbon metal ion beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Stepanov, Igor B., E-mail: stepanovib@tpu.ru; Ryabchikov, Alexander I.; Sivin, Denis O.; Verigin, Dan A. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenina Avenue, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation)] [Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenina Avenue, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2014-02-15

    The paper describes high broad metal ion source based on dc macroparticle filtered vacuum arc plasma generation with the dc ion-beam extraction. The possibility of formation of pseudo ribbon beam of metal ions with the parameters: ion beam length 0.6 m, ion current up to 0.2 A, accelerating voltage 40 kV, and ion energy up to 160 kV has been demonstrated. The pseudo ribbon ion beam is formed from dc vacuum arc plasma. The results of investigation of the vacuum arc evaporator ion-emission properties are presented. The influence of magnetic field strength near the cathode surface on the arc spot movement and ion-emission properties of vacuum-arc discharge for different cathode materials are determined. It was shown that vacuum-arc discharge stability can be reached when the magnetic field strength ranges from 40 to 70 G on the cathode surface.

  1. Pseudo ribbon metal ion beam source.

    PubMed

    Stepanov, Igor B; Ryabchikov, Alexander I; Sivin, Denis O; Verigin, Dan A

    2014-02-01

    The paper describes high broad metal ion source based on dc macroparticle filtered vacuum arc plasma generation with the dc ion-beam extraction. The possibility of formation of pseudo ribbon beam of metal ions with the parameters: ion beam length 0.6 m, ion current up to 0.2 A, accelerating voltage 40 kV, and ion energy up to 160 kV has been demonstrated. The pseudo ribbon ion beam is formed from dc vacuum arc plasma. The results of investigation of the vacuum arc evaporator ion-emission properties are presented. The influence of magnetic field strength near the cathode surface on the arc spot movement and ion-emission properties of vacuum-arc discharge for different cathode materials are determined. It was shown that vacuum-arc discharge stability can be reached when the magnetic field strength ranges from 40 to 70 G on the cathode surface. PMID:24593634

  2. Multiferroism in rare earth metals-doped BiFeO3 nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotey, Gurmeet Singh; Verma, N. K.

    2013-08-01

    Nanowires are the key multifunctional materials for the development towards device miniaturization and high-density data storage systems for future nanoelectronics. In the present report, multifunctional undoped and rare earth metals ions (Gd3+, Tb3+, Dy3+)-doped BiFeO3 nanowires with 20 nm diameter, have been synthesized by template-assisted colloidal dispersion technique. The effect of the size of synthesized nanowires, as well as, the doping of rare earth ions on the structural, magnetic, dielectric and magnetodielectric properties have been studied. The doping of rare earth metals ions leads to structural transition from rhombohedral to orthorhombic BiFeO3 nanowires. The synthesized nanowires exhibit ferromagnetic nature with high value of saturation magnetization, dielectric constant and magnetodielectric coefficient.

  3. ChemTeacher: Alkaline Earth Metals = Group 2 (IIA)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-07-20

    ChemTeacher compiles background information, videos, articles, demonstrations, worksheets and activities for high school teachers to use in their classrooms. The Alkaline Earth Metals page includes resources for teaching students about the discovery, properties, and uses of the alkaline earth metals.

  4. Sorption of metal ions on alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgarten, E.; Kirchhausen-Duesing, U. [Heinrich-Heine Univ. Duesseldorf (Germany). Inst. fuer Physikalische Chemie und Elektrochemie] [Heinrich-Heine Univ. Duesseldorf (Germany). Inst. fuer Physikalische Chemie und Elektrochemie

    1997-10-01

    The adsorption of metal ions on aluminas is of great interest in different fields such as geochemistry, oceanography, limnology, and pollution control. Precipitation and adsorption of metal ions (Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), and Cr(III)) on {gamma}-alumina were investigated experimentally. A surface chemical reaction model to calculate concentrations of aluminum ions, metal ions, and pH as variables depending on amount of alumina, volume of liquid and gas phase, initial metal concentration, and amount of acid or base added is presented. In the case of Co(II) the pH dependence of rest concentrations with and without alumina is equal; adsorption may be disregarded. For the other ions adsorption is important. Considering the charge of the surface does not improve the fit. In the pH region, where adsorption leads to lower rest concentrations than precipitation, adsorption may be described by a Henry isotherm.

  5. Metal ion coordination, conditional stability constants, and solution behavior of chelating surfactant metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Svanedal, Ida; Boija, Susanne; Almesåker, Ann; Persson, Gerd; Andersson, Fredrik; Hedenström, Erik; Bylund, Dan; Norgren, Magnus; Edlund, Håkan

    2014-04-29

    Coordination complexes of some divalent metal ions with the DTPA (diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid)-based chelating surfactant 2-dodecyldiethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (4-C12-DTPA) have been examined in terms of chelation and solution behavior. The headgroup of 4-C12-DTPA contains eight donor atoms that can participate in the coordination of a metal ion. Conditional stability constants for five transition metal complexes with 4-C12-DTPA were determined by competition measurements between 4-C12-DTPA and DTPA, using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Small differences in the relative strength between the coordination complexes of DTPA and 4-C12-DTPA indicated that the hydrocarbon tail only affected the chelating ability of the headgroup to a limited extent. The coordination of Cu(2+) ions was investigated in particular, using UV-visible spectroscopy. By constructing Job's plots, it was found that 4-C12-DTPA could coordinate up to two Cu(2+) ions. Surface tension measurements and NMR diffusometry showed that the coordination of metal ions affected the solution behavior of 4-C12-DTPA, but there were no specific trends between the studied divalent metal complexes. Generally, the effects of the metal ion coordination could be linked to the neutralization of the headgroup charge of 4-C12-DTPA, and the resulting reduced electrostatic repulsions between adjacent surfactants in micelles and monolayers. The pH vs concentration plots, on the other hand, showed a distinct difference between 4-C12-DTPA complexes of the alkaline earth metals and the transition metals. This was explained by the difference in coordination between the two groups of metal ions, as predicted by the hard and soft acid and base (HSAB) theory. PMID:24702119

  6. Kinetic approach to evaluate the energy and entropy of activation for the exchange of alkaline earth metal ions on tin(IV) tungstate cation exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Varshney, K.G.; Khan, A.A.; Varshney, K.; Agrawal, S.

    1984-01-01

    A new approach based on the Nernst-Planck equations has been applied to study the reaction kinetics on the surface of tin(IV) tungstate for the Mg(II)-H(I), Ca(II)-H(I), Sr(II)-H(I) and Ba(II)-H(I) exchanges under the conditions favouring a particle diffusion phenomenon. On the basis of these studies the various physical parameters such as the effective diffusion coefficients, activation energies and entropies of activation have been evaluated which give some informations regarding the mechanism of ion-exchange on the surface of inorganic materials. 25 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  7. Different Adsorption Behavior of Rare Earth and Metallic Ion Complexes on Langmuir Mono layers Probed by Sum-Frequency Generation Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Woongmo [Sogang University, Seoul; Vaknin, David [Ames Laboratory; Kim, Doseok [Sogang University, Seoul

    2013-02-25

    Adsorption behavior of counterions under a Langmuir monolayer was investigated by sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy. By comparing SFG spectra of arachidic acid (AA) Langmuir monolayer/water interface with and without added salt, it was found that the simple trivalent cation La3+ adsorbed on AA monolayer only when the carboxylic headgroups are charged (deprotonated), implying that counterion adsorption is induced by Coulomb interaction. On the other hand, metal hydroxide complex Fe(OH)3 adsorbed even on a charge-neutral AA monolayer, indicating that the adsorption of iron hydroxide is due to chemical interaction such as covalent or hydrogen bonding to the headgroup of the molecules at the monolayer.

  8. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. ...Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. ...substance identified as hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid...

  9. 40 CFR 421.270 - Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory. 421.270 Section...MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Primary Rare Earth Metals Subcategory § 421.270 Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory. The...

  10. 40 CFR 421.270 - Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory. 421.270 Section...MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Primary Rare Earth Metals Subcategory § 421.270 Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory. The...

  11. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. ...Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. ...substance identified as hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid...

  12. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. ...Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. ...substance identified as hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid...

  13. 40 CFR 421.270 - Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory. 421.270 Section...MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Primary Rare Earth Metals Subcategory § 421.270 Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory. The...

  14. 40 CFR 421.270 - Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory. 421.270 Section...MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Primary Rare Earth Metals Subcategory § 421.270 Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory. The...

  15. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. ...Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. ...substance identified as hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid...

  16. 40 CFR 421.270 - Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory. 421.270 Section...MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Primary Rare Earth Metals Subcategory § 421.270 Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory. The...

  17. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. ...Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. ...substance identified as hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid...

  18. Adsorption behaviour of metal ions on hydroximate resins.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, M; Rai, A K; Mathur, P N

    1996-11-01

    Some new chelating ion-exchange resins containing a hydroxamic acid moiety attached to a divinylbenzene styrene (DVBS) copolymer, i.e. glycine hydroximate in DVBS (GH-DVBS). anthranilic acid hydroximate in DVBS (AAHDVBS), malonic acid dihydroximate in DVBS (MAH-DVBS) and iminodiacetic acid dihydroximate in DVBS (IDAAH-DVBS). have been synthesized and their various physicochemical characteristics studied. The degree of retention of metal ions by the resins at equilibrium has been determined in terms of the molar distribution coefficient (k(d)). In general, the resins having a dihydroximate moiety are found to be more efficient compared to monohydroximate resins. However, it is of interest to note that the monohydroximate derivative of amino acid (GH-DVBS) showed better metal retention capability than the dihydroximate of carboxylic acid (MAH-DVBS). The selectivity of the resins for transition and highly charged metal ions is quite high compared to that for alkaline earth metals. All the synthesized resins can be utilized for the separation of a mixture of metal ions because the differences in the distribution coefficient values are large enough to permit good separations on columns. However, the GH-DVBS resin was tried for the separation of copper cobalt and copper nickel mixtures at pH 5.5 using the column mode of operation. PMID:18966686

  19. Valence state at the surface of rare-earth metals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Börje Johansson

    1979-01-01

    The valence state of a rare-earth metal surface is investigated by using general properties of the surface tension of metals. Thereby it is concluded that samarium is likely to have a divalent or partly divalent surface on top of its trivalent bulk phase, which agrees with recent spectroscopic observations. Also californium metal is discussed from this point of view. Finally,

  20. Ion-Ion Oscillatory Potentials in Liquid Metals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. D. Johnson; P. Hutchinson; N. H. March

    1964-01-01

    Radial distribution functions obtained by X-ray and neutron measurements have been analyzed for eight liquid metals, Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, Hg, Al and Pb, and for the liquid insulator Ar. It is shown that pair potentials between the ions in liquid metals can be obtained from the data, and that the general features of these curves are similar on

  1. Liquid metal ion source and alloy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. M. Jr. Clark; M. W. Utlaut; E. K. Storms; R. G. Behrens; E. G. Szklarz; L. W. Swanson; R. P. Santandrea

    1988-01-01

    A liquid metal ion source is described comprising: emission means for emitting positively charged ions of an elemental chemical species; and source means for supplying the species to be emitted to the emission means, the species being supplied in a congruently vaporizing non-eutectic alloy of the elemental chemical species and at least one other element.

  2. ION EXCHANGE SOFTENING: EFFECTS ON METAL CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A corrosion control pipe loop study to evaluate the effect of ion exchange water softening on metal leaching from household plumbing materials was conducted on two different water qualities having different pH's and hardness levels. The results showed that removing hardness ions ...

  3. Novel syntergistic agent for selective separation of yttrium from other rare earth metals

    SciTech Connect

    Miyata, Terufumi; Goto, Masahiro; Nakashio, Fumiyuki [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)

    1995-06-01

    An oil-soluble synergistic agent has been developed for the selective separation of yttrium (Y) from the other rare earth metals. The synergistic agent is a polyaminocarboxylic acid alkylderivative and has interfacial activity like that of surfactants. Separation of yttrium from heavy rare earth metals (erbium (Er) and holmium (Ho)) in the presence of the synergistic agent was carried out with a 2-ethylhexyl phosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester as a carrier using a hollow-fiber membrane extractor. The new agent shows a synergistic effect on the permeation rate of rare earth metals at the oil-water interface. By the addition of a small amount of the agent, the selectivity for yttrium from the two rare earth metals was enhanced remarkably, because of the permeation rate of Y was selectively decreased compared with those of Er and Ho. The synergistic effect is discussed from the viewpoint of the stability constant for rare earth metals and the interfacial activity of the synergistic agent. The difference in interaction between the synergistic agent and rare earth ions at the oil-water interface results in an increase in the separation efficiency.

  4. Detection of Heavy Metal Ions Based on Quantum Point Contacts

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Yanchao

    Detection of Heavy Metal Ions Based on Quantum Point Contacts Vasanth Rajagopalan, Salah Boussaad. The ability to detect trace amounts of metal ions is important because of the toxicity of heavy metal ions on many living organisms and the consequence of heavy metal ions not being biodegradable. To date, heavy

  5. Metal-ion rescue revisited: Biochemical detection of site-bound metal ions important for RNA folding

    E-print Network

    Das, Rhiju

    Metal-ion rescue revisited: Biochemical detection of site-bound metal ions important for RNA-dimensional architectures of RNA molecules, divalent metal ions populate specific locations, shedding their water molecules make essential contributions to function. Defining the locations of these site-bound metal ions remains

  6. Computational Design of Metal Ion Sequestering Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, Benjamin P.; Rapko, Brian M.

    2005-06-15

    Organic ligands that exhibit a high degree of metal ion recognition are essential precursors for developing separation processes and sensors for metal ions. Since the beginning of the nuclear era, much research has focused on discovering ligands that target specific radionuclides. Members of the Group 1A and 2A cations (e.g., Cs, Sr, Ra) and the f-block metals (actinides and lanthanides) are of primary concern to DOE. Although there has been some success in identifying ligand architectures that exhibit a degree of metal ion recognition, the ability to control binding affinity and selectivity remains a significant challenge. The traditional approach for discovering such ligands has involved lengthy programs of organic synthesis and testing that, in the absence of reliable methods for screening compounds before synthesis, have resulted in much wasted research effort.

  7. Computational Design of Metal Ion Sequestering Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, Benjamin P.; Rapko, Brian M.

    2006-06-01

    Organic ligands that exhibit a high degree of metal ion recognition are essential precursors for developing separation processes and sensors for metal ions. Since the beginning of the nuclear era, much research has focused on discovering ligands that target specific radionuclides. Members of the Group 1A and 2A cations (e.g., Cs, Sr, Ra) and the f-block metals (actinides and lanthanides) are of primary concern to DOE. Although there has been some success in identifying ligand architectures that exhibit a degree of metal ion recognition, the ability to control binding affinity and selectivity remains a significant challenge. The traditional approach for discovering such ligands has involved lengthy programs of organic synthesis and testing that, in the absence of reliable methods for screening compounds before synthesis, have resulted in much wasted research effort.

  8. Mutagenicity of metal ions in bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Arlauskas, A.; Baker, R.S.U.; Bonin, A.M.; Tandon, R.K.; Crisp, P.T.; Ellis, J.

    1985-04-01

    The mutagenicity of 24 metal salts was investigated in plate incorporation and fluctuation assays with Salmonella TA strains or Escherichia coli WP2 uvrA pKm 101. Chromate(VI) and selenate(VI) ions were found to be mutagenic in plate incorporation assays employing conventional media. On the other hand, cadmium(II), beryllium(II), chromate(VI), and metavanadate(V) ions were detected in conventional fluctuation assays, indicating the importance of this technique in detection of metal mutagens. Modified culture media, with trimetaphosphate ions in place of orthophosphate as the sole phosphate source for bacterial growth, were also used in this study. The media modifications prevented precipitation of metals such as nickel and cadmium as their insoluble phosphates, and allowed detection of the mutagenicity of metavanadate ions in plate incorporation assays. However, the fluctuation technique using standard media was shown to detect a wider range of mutagenic metal ions than tests with modified media. It is notable that metaarsenite(III), arsenate(V), and nickel(II) ions were not found to be mutagenic in any of the assays although they are known to be carcinogenic and are mutagenic in other test systems. Their lack of mutagenicity in the modified media indicates that precipitation of these ions as orthophosphates is not the reason for their lack of activity in standard bacterial assays.

  9. Metal vapor arc ion plating

    DOEpatents

    Bertram, L.A.; Fisher, R.W.; Mattox, D.M.; Zanner, F.J.

    1986-09-09

    A method and apparatus for ion plating are described. The apparatus uses more negative than a first electrode voltage in a vacuum arc remelt system to attract low energy ions from the anode electrode to the article to be plated. 2 figs.

  10. New Proton-Ionizable, Calixarene-Based Ligands for Selective Metal Ion Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Bartsch, Richard A.

    2012-06-04

    The project objective was the discovery of new ligands for performing metal ion separations. The research effort entailed the preparation of new metal ion complexing agents and polymers and their evaluation in metal ion separation processes of solvent extraction, synthetic liquid membrane transport, and sorption. Structural variations in acyclic, cyclic, and bicyclic organic ligands were used to probe their influence upon the efficiency and selectivity with which metal ion separations can be performed. A unifying feature of the ligand structures is the presence of one (or more) side arm with a pendent acidic function. When a metal ion is complexed within the central cavity of the ligand, ionization of the side arm(s) produces the requisite anion(s) for formation of an overall electroneutral complex. This markedly enhances extraction/transport efficiency for separations in which movement of aqueous phase anions of chloride, nitrate, or sulfate into an organic medium would be required. Through systematic structural variations, new ligands have been developed for efficient and selective separations of monovalent metal ions (e.g., alkali metal, silver, and thallium cations) and of divalent metal ion species (e.g., alkaline earth metal, lead, and mercury cations). Research results obtained in these fundamental investigations provide important insight for the design and development of ligands suitable for practical metal ion separation applications.

  11. Structure of a piperidine-modified calix[4]arene derivative and spectral resolution of its interaction with rare earth metals with chemometric methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li; Wang, Xiaoya; Wang, Yanmei

    2013-03-01

    A piperidine-modified calix[4]arene derivative was synthesized and its structure was confirmed with X-ray diffraction data. UV-visible spectroscopy was used to study its molecular recognition of rare earth ions. The results revealed the calix[4]arene derivative could separate tight metal picrate ion pairs by complexation with the rare earth metal ions in tetrahydrofuran. Resolution of the UV-visible spectra with chemometric methods revealed that the derivative and the rare earth ions Eu3+, Dy3+, and Tb3+ formed ML2 complexes with stability constants of 108.26, 108.29, and 107.41 respectively.

  12. Crystallographic phases in heavy rare earth metals under megabar pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samudrala, G. K.; Vohra, Y. K.

    2012-07-01

    Experiments aimed at understanding the crystallographic phases of heavy rare earth metals were carried out in a diamond anvil cell at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. Heavy rare earth metals dysprosium (Dy), holmium (Ho), erbium (Er) and thulium (Tm) were compressed to multi-megabar pressures. The rare earth crystal sequence hcp?Sm-type?dhcp?distorted-fcc (dfcc) is observed in all four elements. Upon further compression, a structural transformation to a monoclinic C2/m phase has been observed. We summarize the results from these experiments and present Rietveld structural refinements on high pressure phases for the specific case of dysprosium.

  13. Permeation behavior of rare earth metals with a calix[4]arene carboxyl derivative in a hollow-fiber membrane

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fukiko Kubota; Takahiko Kakoi; Masahiro Goto; Shintaro Furusaki; Fumiyuki Nakashio; Tadashi Hano

    2000-01-01

    Extraction of three rare earth metals (Er, Ho and Y) was performed by a microporous hydrophobic hollow-fiber membrane extractor using a novel calix[4]arene carboxyl derivative in toluene. It was found that the permeation rate through the membrane of metal ions with calix[4]arene carboxyl derivative was relatively slow, while the addition of a small amount of sodium ion into the aqueous

  14. Effect of rare earth ions on the properties of glycine phosphite single crystals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Senthilkumar; S. Moorthy Babu; Binay Kumar; G. Bhagavannarayana

    Optically transparent glycine phosphite (GPI) single crystals doped with rare earth metal ions (Ce, Nd and La) were grown from aqueous solution by employing the solvent evaporation and slow cooling methods. Co-ordination of dopants with GPI was confirmed by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopic analysis. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis was carried out to determine the lattice parameters and to analyze the

  15. Multiphonon relaxation of rare-earth ions in oxide glasses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. B. Layne; W. H. Lowdermilk; M. J. Weber

    1977-01-01

    Nonradiative decay of excited rare-earth ions by multiphonon emission has been investigated in a series of oxide glasses. Various rare-earth electronic levels were selectively excited by short-duration laser pulses and multiphonon relaxation rates were determined from measurements of fluorescence rise and decay times. Time resolution for fluorescence measurements was 3 nsec, so excited states were probed for which the decay

  16. Distribution of thermal oxygen ions in the near earth magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Cao, J.

    2013-12-01

    Based on eleven years of Cluster particle observations, we investigate the distribution of thermal oxygen ions in the near earth magnetosphere with full spatial coverage between 4 to 20 Re. Averaged oxygen ion fluxes are calculated for three energy ranges (E1: 25-136eV; E2: 136eV-3keV; E3 3-35keV) based on measurements from CIS instrument. In a preliminary analysis, we found that oxygen ions of E1 energy are observed mostly in the Polar Regions flowing toward the nightside with average speed of ~20 km/s at 5 Re. They are accelerated to E2 energy range before they arrive at plasmasheet. Clear dawn-dusk asymmetry is observed in the plasmasheet for oxygen ions of the E1 and E2 energy that they are distributed beyond 10 Re on the duskside and beyond 15 Re on the dawnside, suggesting the transportation from ionosphere to plasmasheet is asymmetric for dawn and dusk sides. These oxygen ions are further accelerated in the plasmasheet to E3 energy range and are transported toward the Earth, while they drift westward. These oxygen ions finally reach the dayside, and then either return to the ionosphere or escape from the dayside magnetopause to magnetosheeth. This study provides background knowledge on complete distribution of thermal oxygen ions in the near earth magnetosphere for the modelling and simulation studies on ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling.

  17. METAL IONS: Physiological function and Pathological rle

    E-print Network

    Morante, Silvia

    COMPONENTS At least one-third of all proteins encoded in the human genome contain metal ions They can easily Bombastus von Hohenheim) (1493-1541) "...The dosage makes it either a poison or a remedy" ,,Alle Ding sind from the cell is continuously controlled by specific proteins #12;Metabolismo del Ferro nei macrofagi

  18. Separation and microdetermination of rare earth metals with N-phenylbenzohydroxamic acid and Xylenol Orange

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. T. Thomaskutty; Y. K. Agrawal

    1987-01-01

    A simple, sensitive and selective method for solvent extraction and spectrophotometric determination of lanthanum(III), praseodymium(III), neodymium(III) and samarium(III) is described. The rare earth metals are extractable into chloroform solution of N-phenylbenzohydroxamic acid (PBHA) at pH9–10. Various parameters are studied to optimize the extraction conditions. Stoichiometry of the complexes and the effect of various ions is discussed. The molar absorptivity is

  19. Material Removes Heavy Metal Ions From Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, Warren H., Jr.; Street, Kenneth W.; Hill, Carol; Savino, Joseph M.

    1995-01-01

    New high capacity ion-exchange polymer material removes toxic metal cations from contaminated water. Offers several advantages. High sensitivities for such heavy metals as lead, cadmium, and copper and capable of reducing concentrations in aqueous solutions to parts-per-billion range. Removes cations even when calcium present. Material made into variety of forms, such as thin films, coatings, pellets, and fibers. As result, adapted to many applications to purify contaminated water, usually hard wherever found, whether in wastewater-treatment systems, lakes, ponds, industrial plants, or homes. Another important feature that adsorbed metals easily reclaimed by either destructive or nondestructive process. Other tests show ion-exchange polymer made inexpensively; easy to use; strong, flexible, not easily torn; and chemically stable in storage, in aqueous solutions, and in acidic or basic solution.

  20. Method for treating rare earth-transition metal scrap

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, F.A.; Peterson, D.T.; Wheelock, J.T.; Jones, L.L.

    1992-12-29

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g., iron) scrap (e.g., Nd-Fe-B scrap) is flux (slag) remelted to reduce tramp non-metallic impurities, such as oxygen and nitrogen, and metallic impurities, such as Li, Na, Al, etc., picked up by the scrap from previous fabrication operations. The tramp impurities are reduced to concentrations acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets. The scrap is electroslag or inductoslag melted using a rare earth fluoride-bearing flux of CaF[sub 2], CaCl[sub 2] or mixtures thereof or the slag resulting from practice of the thermite reduction process to make a rare earth-iron alloy. 3 figs.

  1. Method for treating rare earth-transition metal scrap

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frederick A. (Ames, IA); Peterson, David T. (Ames, IA); Wheelock, John T. (Nevada, IA); Jones, Lawrence L. (Des Moines, IA)

    1992-12-29

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g., iron) scrap (e.g., Nd-Fe-B scrap) is flux (slag) remelted to reduce tramp non-metallic impurities, such as oxygen and nitrogen, and metallic impurities, such as Li, Na, Al, etc., picked up by the scrap from previous fabrication operations. The tramp impurities are reduced to concentrations acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets. The scrap is electroslag or inductoslag melted using a prefused, rare earth fluoride-bearing flux of CaF.sub.2, CaCl.sub.2 or mixtures thereof or the slag resulting from practice of the thermite reduction process to make a rare earth-iron alloy.

  2. Metal ions affecting reproduction and development.

    PubMed

    Apostoli, Pietro; Catalani, Simona

    2011-01-01

    Many metal ions (lead, mercury, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, nickel, vanadium, copper, lithium) exert a wide variety of adverse effects on reproduction and development, including influence on male and female subfertility or fertility, abortions, malformations, birth defects, and effects on the central nervous system. The effects produced by metal ions depend on several factors, such as timing and duration of exposure, their distribution and accumulation in various organs (e.g., the nervous system), and on the interference with specific developmental processes. Neonatal and early postnatal periods are lifespan segments during which sensitivity to metals is high; e.g., lead toxicity on the developing organism is paradigmatic of related well known and still open questions. In more recent decades, important mechanisms of action have been suggested: the endocrine disruption via impact of metal ions on reproductive hormones and the oxidative stress. While experimental data provide clear evidence of effects of many metals, human data are scant and traditionally limited to high levels of a few metal ions, like lead on male fertility. Less documented are reproductive effects for mercury, manganese, chromium, nickel, and arsenic for the same gender. More complex is the demonstration of effects on female reproduction and on pregnancy. The action of lead, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, and mercury may in fact be relevant in several stages, beginning in fetal life, during early development or maturity, and is characterized by subfertility, infertility, intrauterine growth retardation, spontaneous abortions, malformations, birth defects, postnatal death, learning and behavior deficits, and premature aging. Also, for females the evidences of specific aspects such as fertility or abortions are usually higher and clearer from animal experiments than from human studies. PMID:21473384

  3. Diffraction studies of rare earth metals and superlattices

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Bohr; Doon Gibbs; J. D. Axe; D. E. Moncton; K. L. D'Amico; C. F. Majkrzak; J. Kwo; M. Hong; C. L. Chien; J. Jensen

    1989-01-01

    We review the results of X-ray scattering studies of the rare earth metals and present related new results for superlattices and thin slabs. In rare earth crystals we have observed weak structural modulations which accompany the magnetic ordering. The wave length of this modulation can be derived from a spin-slip model in accordance with symmetry considerations. X-ray scattering of both

  4. Symmetric charge-transfer cross sections of IIIa rare-earth-metal elements

    SciTech Connect

    Hashida, Masaki; Sakabe, Shuji; Izawa, Yasukazu [ARCBS, Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan) and Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan) and Institute for Laser Technology, 2-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2011-03-15

    Symmetric charge-transfer cross sections of IIIa rare-earth-metal elements (Sc, Y, and Gd) in the impact energy range of 30 to 1000 eV were measured for the first time. The experiments were performed with a crossed-beam apparatus that featured primary ion production by photoionization with a tunable dye laser. Comparing the cross sections of IIIa rare-earth-metal elements ({sigma}{sub Sc}, {sigma}{sub Y}, and {sigma}{sub Gd}) with those of alkali metals or helium {sigma}{sub 0}, we found that {sigma}{sub 0{approx_equal}{sigma}Sc}<{sigma}{sub Y}<{sigma}{sub Gd{approx_equal}}2{sigma}{sub 0}at an impact energy of 1000 eV.

  5. Substrate Profile and Metal-ion Selectivity of Human Divalent Metal-ion Transporter-1*

    PubMed Central

    Illing, Anthony C.; Shawki, Ali; Cunningham, Christopher L.; Mackenzie, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    Divalent metal-ion transporter-1 (DMT1) is a H+-coupled metal-ion transporter that plays essential roles in iron homeostasis. DMT1 exhibits reactivity (based on evoked currents) with a broad range of metal ions; however, direct measurement of transport is lacking for many of its potential substrates. We performed a comprehensive substrate-profile analysis for human DMT1 expressed in RNA-injected Xenopus oocytes by using radiotracer assays and the continuous measurement of transport by fluorescence with the metal-sensitive PhenGreen SK fluorophore. We provide validation for the use of PhenGreen SK fluorescence quenching as a reporter of cellular metal-ion uptake. We determined metal-ion selectivity under fixed conditions using the voltage clamp. Radiotracer and continuous measurement of transport by fluorescence assays revealed that DMT1 mediates the transport of several metal ions that were ranked in selectivity by using the ratio Imax/K0.5 (determined from evoked currents at ?70 mV): Cd2+ > Fe2+ > Co2+, Mn2+ ? Zn2+, Ni2+, VO2+. DMT1 expression did not stimulate the transport of Cr2+, Cr3+, Cu+, Cu2+, Fe3+, Ga3+, Hg2+, or VO+. 55Fe2+ transport was competitively inhibited by Co2+ and Mn2+. Zn2+ only weakly inhibited 55Fe2+ transport. Our data reveal that DMT1 selects Fe2+ over its other physiological substrates and provides a basis for predicting the contribution of DMT1 to intestinal, nasal, and pulmonary absorption of metal ions and their cellular uptake in other tissues. Whereas DMT1 is a likely route of entry for the toxic heavy metal cadmium, and may serve the metabolism of cobalt, manganese, and vanadium, we predict that DMT1 should contribute little if at all to the absorption or uptake of zinc. The conclusion in previous reports that copper is a substrate of DMT1 is not supported. PMID:22736759

  6. POLAR spacecraft observations of helium ion angular anisotropy in the Earth’s radiation belts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. N. Spjeldvik; T. A. Fritz; J. Chen; R. B. Sheldon

    1999-01-01

    New observations of energetic helium ion fluxes in the Earth’s radiation belts have been obtained with the CAMMICE\\/HIT instrument on the ISTP\\/GGS POLAR spacecraft during the extended geomagnetically low activity period April through October 1996. POLAR executes a high inclination trajectory that crosses over both polar cap regions and passes over the geomagnetic equator in the heart of the radiation

  7. MAGNETISM AND SUPERCONDUCTIVITY OF ANOMALOUS RARE-EARTH METALS AND ALLOYS

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    MAGNETISM AND SUPERCONDUCTIVITY OF ANOMALOUS RARE-EARTH METALS AND ALLOYS B. COQBLIN Laboratoire de impurities. 1. Introduction. -The rare-earth metals can be divided in two groups : - The (( normal )) rare-earths lantha- num are (( anomalous )) rare-earths metals. The same duality exists in alloys with rareearth

  8. High-current pulsed ion source for metallic ions

    SciTech Connect

    Gavin, B.; Abbott, S.; MacGill, R.; Sorensen, R.; Staples, J.; Thatcher, R.

    1981-03-01

    A new sputter-ion PIG source and magnet system, optimized for intermediate charge states, q/A of 0.02 to 0.03, is described. This source will be used with the new Wideroe-based injector for the SuperHILAC. Pulsed electrical currents of several emA of heavy metal ions have been produced in a normalized emittance area of .05..pi.. cm-mr. The source system is comprised of two electrically separate anode chambers, one in operation and one spare, which can be selected by remote control. The entire source head is small and quickly removable.

  9. Detection of Heavy Metal Ions in Drinking Water Using a

    E-print Network

    Chen, Wilfred

    Detection of Heavy Metal Ions in Drinking Water Using a High-Resolution Differential Surface-resolution differential surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor for heavy metal ion detection. The sensor surface using this sensor. Introduction The detection and quantification of heavy metal ions are important

  10. Magnetic and Electronic Properties of Rare-Earth - Metallic Glasses.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelison, Steven G.

    1982-03-01

    Results of magnetic measurements are presented on the new metallic glass systems (R(,80)G(,20))(,100-x)Fe(,x) and (R(,80)Ga(,20))(,90)B(,10), where R is a rare-earth (i.e., La, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Tb and Er) and G is Ga or Au for 0 (LESSTHEQ) x (LESSTHEQ) 30. High-field magnetization (to 80 kOe) and A.C. and D.C. susceptibility measurements were made from 1.4 K to 300 K. High-field magnetization data are analyzed by an Arrott plot technique and some Gd-based glasses show results consistent with the presence of the recently predicted infinite susceptibility phase of Aharony and Pytte. The magnetic hardness properties of most of these glasses (not containing S-state ions) are discussed in terms of the 'microdomain' model of Callen et al. In many glasses the magnetization reversal seems consistent with a coherent rotation mechanism as is suggested from the thermal variation of the coercivity. The glasses (R(,80)Ga(,20))(,70)Fe(,30) where R is Er and Tb are more complex and show behavior consistent with the presence of domain walls. Magnetic saturation was not obtained (at 80 kOe) on any glass containing an anisotropic rare -earth while glasses based on S-state rare-earths were fairly easily saturated. Giant intrinsic magnetic hardness is observed in the glasses (R(,80)G(,20))(,100-x)Fe(,x) where R is Nd or Pr and G is Ga or Au for 15 (LESSTHEQ) x (LESSTHEQ) 30. An unusual thermal variation of the coercive field is observed showing peaks at intermediate temperatures ((DBLTURN) 90 K). A phase separation into different amorphous stoichiometries is shown to exist by Fe('57) Mossbauer effect and other measurements. These results are consistent with a recent theory by Paul predicting that magnetic hardness can result from the presence of site-to-site variations in magnetic properties. Electrical resistivity measurements were made on the above glasses as well as the series (Pr(,80)Ga(,20))(,80)T(,20), where T = Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu and Ga. These show negative temperature coefficients of resistivity at higher temperatures in most cases as well as structure in the resistivity below magnetic ordering temperatures. These results are shown to be consistent with some recent theories (for instance the extended Ziman theory) predicting negative slopes of the resistivity as well as to some theories predicting a magnetic contribution to the resistivity from coherent exchange scattering.

  11. Fluorescence polarization immunoassays for metal ions.

    PubMed

    Johnson, David K

    2003-05-01

    Antibodies raised against a given metal ion complex of a polyaminopolycarboxylate chelating agent can display specificity for the immunizing chelate and, when used in conjunction with a fluorophore-labeled analog of that chelate, can form the basis for highly sensitive and specific methods for detecting that metal ion by competitive inhibition fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA). Chelate complexes of ethylenediamine-N,N,N',N'- tetraacetic acid (EDTA) and of a hetrocyclic ring-substituted derivative of diethylenetriamine-N, N', N"-triacetic acid (DTTA) have been used to configure such assays for the heavy metal ions lead(II) and cadmium(II) respectively. Limits of detection for the 1:1 metal chelates under ideal conditions are 20 ppt for lead(II) and below 100 ppt for cadmium(II). Standard curves for 0 - 100 nM cadmium (II) chelate can be constructed in the presence of fixed 250 nM concentrations of the corresponding, potentially cross-reactive chelates of zinc(II), copper(II) and mercury(II). Cross-reactivity of the lead (II) FPIA with 15 non-target metals is below 0.2% in all cases except for mercury(II) (0.37%). These characteristics have allowed the development of FPIA methods for the quantitative analysis of lead in a variety of samples relevant to environmental monitoring, including soil, dust, solid wastes and drinking water. Although applied thus far to heavy metals that are of concern as toxic contaminants in the environment, anti-chelate FPIA methods are also in principle applicable to a wide variety of other metal ions, including precious metals and various transition and main group elements used or monitored in a range of industrial applications. As conventional methods for trace metal analysis based on atomic spectroscopy are relatively slow, expensive and cumbersome, anti-chelate FPIA methods have the potential to supplant many existing techniques and in so doing extend the use of immunoassay technology beyond the biomedical, veterinary and agricultural spheres in which it has historically found use. PMID:12678703

  12. Anion-exchange separations of metal ions in thiocyanate media.

    PubMed

    Fritz, J S; Kaminski, E E

    1971-05-01

    The analytical potential of a weak-base macroreticular anion-exchange resin for the quantitative separation of metal ions in thiocyanate media is investigated and demonstrated. Distribution data are given for the sorption of some 25 metal ions from aqueous mixtures of potassium thiocyanate (1.0M or less) and 0.5M hydrochloric acid. The magnitude of the distribution data suggests many possible separations, some of which were quantitatively performed by procedures which are fast, simple and require only mild conditions. Representative separations are removal of traces of iron(III) and copper(II) from water samples prior to the determination of water hardness (calcium and magnesium), separation of nickel(II) from vanadium(IV) and the separation of thorium(IV) from titanium(IV). Some multicomponent separations are the separation of rare earths(III) and thorium(IV) from scandium(III) and the separation of rare earths(III) from iron(III) and uranium(VI). PMID:18960914

  13. Quantitative aspects of rare earth metal determinations using capillary electrophoresis with indirect absorbance detection

    SciTech Connect

    Colburn, B.A.; Starnes, S.D.; Sepaniak, M.J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-04-01

    The practical utility of capillary zone electrophoresis with indirect absorbance detection is examined for the separation and quantitation of rare earth metals. Various imidazole derivatives are investigated as to their suitability as running buffer (displaceable) detection ions with {alpha}-hydroxyisobutyric acid functioning as a chelating agent to enhance separations. Parameters important for quantitative analysis, such as limits of detection, relative standard deviation of peak areas, efficiency, resolution, peak shape and linear dynamic range are presented. The influence of sample matrix, method of injection, and background ion identity on these parameters are investigated and discussed.

  14. Structure of liquid transition and rare earth metals S. N. Khanna and F. Cyrot-Lackmann

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    L-45 Structure of liquid transition and rare earth metals S. N. Khanna and F. Cyrot-Lackmann Groupe It is shown that the observed structure factors of transition and rare earth liquid metals can be reaso- nably. The difference is particularly large for V, Ti, and rare earth metals which are precisely the metals where

  15. Ion velocity distributions in the vicinity of the current sheet in Earth`s distant magnetotail

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, L.A.; Paterson, W.R.; Ackerson, K.L.; Kokubun, S.; Kivelson, M.G.; Yamamoto, T.; Fairfield, D.H.

    1994-04-01

    Observations of the three-dimensional velocity distributions of positive ions and electrons have been recently gained for the first time in Earth`s distant magnetotail with the Galileo and Geotail spacecraft. For this brief discussion of these exciting results the focus is on the overall character of the ion velocity distributions during substorm activity. The ion velocity distributions within and near the magnetotail current sheet are not accurately described as convecting, isotropic Maxwellians. The observed velocity distributions are characterized by at least two robust types. The first type is similar to the `lima bean`-shaped velocity distributions that are expected from the nonadiabatic acceleration of ions which execute Speiser-type trajectories in the current sheet. The second distribution is associated with the presence of cold ion beams that presumably also arise from the acceleration of plasma mantle ions in the electric and weak magnetic fields in the current sheet. The ion velocity distributions in a magnetic field structure that is similar to that for plasmoids are also examined. Again the velocity distributions are not Maxwellian but are indicative of nonadiabatic acceleration. An example of the pressure tensor within the plasmoid-like event is also presented because it is anticipated that the off-diagonal elements are important in a description of magnetotail dynamics. Thus the concept of magnetotail dynamics must advance from the present assumption of co-moving electron and ion Maxwellian distributions into reformulations in terms of global kinematical models and nonadiabatic particle motion.

  16. Arc discharge ion source for europium and other refractory metals implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turek, M.; Prucnal, S.; Dro?dziel, A.; Pyszniak, K.

    2009-04-01

    The best method for the impurity doping to the host material is the ion implantation. Due to high melting point of the rare earth standard metal ion sources are useless. One of the solution is to use chemical compounds of rare earths characterized by low melting point. In this paper we describe the novel design of the ion source suitable for refractory metal (e.g., rare earths) ion implantation. The dependencies of Eu+ current on cathode and arc currents as well as on hydrogen flow are presented. Europium (III) chloride as the source of the europium atoms was used. Europium ions were produced during collisions of evaporated and decomposed EuCl3 molecules with fast electrons. The typical current of the europium ion beam extracted from the ion source was 25 ?A for the extraction voltage of 25 kV. The ion source works without maintenance breaks for approximately 50 h, which enables high dose implantation. The presented ion source needs neither advanced high power supplies nor high vacuum regime.

  17. Developments of rare earth metal catalysts for olefin polymerization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yuushou Nakayama; Hajime Yasuda

    2004-01-01

    This review article describes recent developments in rare earth metal complexes as polymerization catalysts, focusing on the polymerization of ethylene and ?-olefins. Most of this kind of catalysts had been based on metallocene type complexes, and their catalytic behaviors are surveyed. Advanced series of half-metallocene and non-Cp type catalyst systems are also summarized.

  18. Theory of the Resistance of the Rare Earth Metals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. J. Elliott; F. A. Wedgwood

    1963-01-01

    The electrical resistance of the heavy rare earth metals shows strong anomalies at the temperatures where the magnetic order changes. These are most marked in measurements made along the hexagonal axis. A simple theory of the effect is given on the basis of two mechanisms. The spiral spin structures found in these materials cause an exchange field at the conduction

  19. The structure of rare earth metals in the liquid state

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. Waseda; S. Tamaki

    1977-01-01

    The structure of liquid rare earth metals (So, La, Ce, Pr, Eu, Gd, Tb and Yb) have been systematically examined by X-ray diffraction at temperatures above their melting points. The structure factors of liquid La, Ce, Pr, Eu and Yb were temperature insensitive in the presently available experimental temperature range. In terms of the usual Fourier analysis, the atomic radial

  20. Effects of Metal Ion Adduction on the Gas-Phase Conformations of Protein Ions

    PubMed Central

    Flick, Tawnya G.; Merenbloom, Samuel I.; Williams, Evan R.

    2013-01-01

    Changes in protein ion conformation as a result of nonspecific adduction of metal ions to the protein during electrospray ionization (ESI) from aqueous solutions were investigated using traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS). For all proteins examined, protein cations (and in most cases anions) with nonspecific metal ion adducts are more compact than the fully protonated (or deprotonated) ions with the same charge state. Compaction of protein cations upon nonspecific metal ion binding is most significant for intermediate charge state ions, and there is a greater reduction in collisional cross section with increasing number of metal ion adducts and increasing ion valency, consistent with an electrostatic interaction between the ions and the protein. Protein cations with the greatest number of adducted metal ions are no more compact than the lowest protonated ions formed from aqueous solutions. These results show that smaller collisional cross sections for metal-attached protein ions are not a good indicator of a specific metal-protein interaction in solution, because nonspecific metal ion adduction also results in smaller gaseous protein cation cross sections. In contrast, the collisional cross section of ?-lactalbumin, which specifically binds one Ca2+, is larger for the holo-form compared to the apo-form, in agreement with solution-phase measurements. Because compaction of protein cations occurs when metal ion adduction is nonspecific, elongation of a protein cation may be a more reliable indicator that a specific metal ion-protein interaction occurs in solution. PMID:23733259

  1. Effects of Metal Ion Adduction on the Gas-Phase Conformations of Protein Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flick, Tawnya G.; Merenbloom, Samuel I.; Williams, Evan R.

    2013-11-01

    Changes in protein ion conformation as a result of nonspecific adduction of metal ions to the protein during electrospray ionization (ESI) from aqueous solutions were investigated using traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS). For all proteins examined, protein cations (and in most cases anions) with nonspecific metal ion adducts are more compact than the fully protonated (or deprotonated) ions with the same charge state. Compaction of protein cations upon nonspecific metal ion binding is most significant for intermediate charge state ions, and there is a greater reduction in collisional cross section with increasing number of metal ion adducts and increasing ion valency, consistent with an electrostatic interaction between the ions and the protein. Protein cations with the greatest number of adducted metal ions are no more compact than the lowest protonated ions formed from aqueous solutions. These results show that smaller collisional cross sections for metal-attached protein ions are not a good indicator of a specific metal-protein interaction in solution because nonspecific metal ion adduction also results in smaller gaseous protein cation cross sections. In contrast, the collisional cross section of ?-lactalbumin, which specifically binds one Ca2+, is larger for the holo-form compared with the apo-form, in agreement with solution-phase measurements. Because compaction of protein cations occurs when metal ion adduction is nonspecific, elongation of a protein cation may be a more reliable indicator that a specific metal ion-protein interaction occurs in solution.

  2. Potentiometric titration of metal ions in ethanol.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Graham T T; Mohamed, Mark F; Neverov, Alexei A; Brown, R S

    2006-09-18

    The potentiometric titrations of Zn2+, Cu2+ and 12 Ln3+ metal ions were obtained in ethanol to determine the titration constants (defined as the at which the [-OEt]/[Mx+]t ratios are 0.5, 1.5, and 2.5) and in two cases (La3+ and Zn2+) a complete speciation diagram. Several simple monobasic acids and aminium ions were also titrated to test the validity of experimental titration measurements and to establish new constants in this medium that will be useful for the preparation of buffers and standard solutions. The dependence of the titration constants on the concentration and type of metal ion and specific counterion effects is discussed. In selected cases, the titration profiles were analyzed using a commercially available fitting program to obtain information about the species present in solution, including La3+ for which a dimer model is proposed. The fitting provides the microscopic values for deprotonation of one to four metal-bound ethanol molecules. Kinetics for the La3+-catalyzed ethanolysis of paraoxon as a function of are presented and analyzed in terms of La3+ speciation as determined by the analysis of potentiometric titration curves. The stability constants for the formation of Zn2+ and Cu2+ complexes with 1,5,9-triazacyclododecane as determined by potentiometric titration are presented. PMID:16961382

  3. Dysregulation of transition metal ion homeostasis is the molecular basis for cadmium toxicity in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Begg, Stephanie L.; Eijkelkamp, Bart A.; Luo, Zhenyao; Couñago, Rafael M.; Morey, Jacqueline R.; Maher, Megan J.; Ong, Cheryl-lynn Y.; McEwan, Alastair G.; Kobe, Bostjan; O’Mara, Megan L.; Paton, James C.; McDevitt, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium is a transition metal ion that is highly toxic in biological systems. Although relatively rare in the Earth’s crust, anthropogenic release of cadmium since industrialization has increased biogeochemical cycling and the abundance of the ion in the biosphere. Despite this, the molecular basis of its toxicity remains unclear. Here we combine metal-accumulation assays, high-resolution structural data and biochemical analyses to show that cadmium toxicity, in Streptococcus pneumoniae, occurs via perturbation of first row transition metal ion homeostasis. We show that cadmium uptake reduces the millimolar cellular accumulation of manganese and zinc, and thereby increases sensitivity to oxidative stress. Despite this, high cellular concentrations of cadmium (~17?mM) are tolerated, with negligible impact on growth or sensitivity to oxidative stress, when manganese and glutathione are abundant. Collectively, this work provides insight into the molecular basis of cadmium toxicity in prokaryotes, and the connection between cadmium accumulation and oxidative stress. PMID:25731976

  4. Spectroscopic investigations of fluoroquinolones metal ion complexes.

    PubMed

    Urbaniak, Bartosz; Kokot, Zenon J

    2013-01-01

    The complex formation reaction, between fluoroquinolones (FQ): ciprofloxacin (CPX), enoxacin (ENX), enrofloxacin (ENRX), lomefloxacin (LOMX), levofloxacin (LEVX), ofloxacin (OFX), norfloxacin (NFX), sparfloxacin (SPRX) and aluminum(III), iron(III), copper(II) and zinc(II) ions were investigated. The spectrophotometic titration method in a wide range of pH was utilized for estimation of complex formation equilibrium. The application of Bjerrum method allowed to estimate the complex equilibrium of analyzed species in the reaction mixture. The overall stability constants (logbeta(pqr)) of fluoroquinolones complexes with metal ions were calculated using HYPRERQUAD program. The most stable complexes FQ were created with iron(III) and aluminum(III) and than copper(II) and zinc(II) ions, respectively. The highest values of calculated logbeta(pqr) were obtained for the Me(FQ)3H3 species and the lowest for the Me(FQ)2OH forms. Furthermore, an additional studies have been performed. The effect of the polyvalent metal ions on the complex structure has been investigated. The IR and 1H, 13C and 19F NMR spectroscopy methods were used for the confirmation of the structure of the FQ-Me complex formations. The most significant shifts of signals of 1H NMR spectra of the fluoroquinolones and their complexes were found for the protons substituted in the positions 2, 5 and 8, whereas the 13C NMR spectra showed up the shifts changes for carbon atoms in positions 2, 3, 3a and 4. PMID:23923386

  5. Magnetic Exchange Interaction between Rare-Earth and Mn Ions in Multiferroic Hexagonal Manganites

    E-print Network

    Magnetic Exchange Interaction between Rare-Earth and Mn Ions in Multiferroic Hexagonal Manganites D the magnetic exchange coupling between the rare-earth and Mn ions. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.101.247601 PACS the rare-earth and Mn ions is respon- sible for the strong ME coupling that allows the control

  6. Modeling Multi-Metal Ion Exchange in Biosorption

    E-print Network

    Volesky, Bohumil

    Modeling Multi-Metal Ion Exchange in Biosorption S I L K E S C H I E W E R A N D B O H U M I L V O heavy metals often through ion exchange. This biosorption can be used for purification of metal Biosorption, the passive non-metabolically mediated pro- cess of metal ion binding by living or dead biomass

  7. Liquid metal alloy ion source based metal ion injection into a room-temperature electron beam ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, A.; Ritter, E.; Zschornack, G. [Fachrichtung Physik, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Helmholtzstrasse 10, D-01069 Dresden (Germany); Ullmann, F. [DREEBIT GmbH, Zur Wetterwarte 50, D-01109 Dresden (Germany); Pilz, W.; Bischoff, L. [Helmholtzzentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstrasse 400, D-01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    We have carried out a series of measurements demonstrating the feasibility of using the Dresden electron beam ion source (EBIS)-A, a table-top sized, permanent magnet technology based electron beam ion source, as a charge breeder. Low charged gold ions from an AuGe liquid metal alloy ion source were injected into the EBIS and re-extracted as highly charged ions, thereby producing charge states as high as Au{sup 60+}. The setup, the charge breeding technique, breeding efficiencies as well as acceptance and emittance studies are presented.

  8. Metal ion levels in maternal and placental blood after metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Novak, Clifford C; Hsu, Andrew R; Della Valle, Craig J; Skipor, Anastasia K; Campbell, Patricia; Amstutz, Harlan C; Jiranek, William A; Onyike, Aham; Pombar, Xavier F; Jacobs, Joshua J

    2014-12-01

    There is concern regarding elevated metal ion levels in the blood during pregnancy and the potential fetal effects in women with metal-on-metal (MOM) implants. We obtained maternal and umbilical cord blood samples from 3 patients with a MOM hip arthroplasty and 7 control subjects without any metallic implants. Serum metal ion levels including chromium, cobalt, titanium, and nickel were tested using high-resolution sector-field inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Mothers with MOM-bearing implants had significantly elevated levels of serum cobalt and chromium compared with control-group mothers, and umbilical cord blood from mothers with MOM implants also had significantly higher serum metal ion levels compared with control-group mothers. The results of this study show that circulating serum levels of metal ion degradation products from MOM bearings cross the placenta and expose the fetus to metal ions. However, the placenta exerts a modulatory effect on cord blood, resulting in decreased levels compared with maternal samples (approximately 15% of maternal chromium and 50% of maternal cobalt). Physicians and women of child-bearing age should be aware of this potential effect when considering the use of MOM-bearing implants. PMID:25490017

  9. Metal ion binding to iron oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponthieu, M.; Juillot, F.; Hiemstra, T.; van Riemsdijk, W. H.; Benedetti, M. F.

    2006-06-01

    The biogeochemistry of trace elements (TE) is largely dependent upon their interaction with heterogeneous ligands including metal oxides and hydrous oxides of iron. The modeling of TE interactions with iron oxides has been pursued using a variety of chemical models. The objective of this work is to show that it is possible to model the adsorption of protons and TE on a crystallized oxide (i.e., goethite) and on an amorphous oxide (HFO) in an identical way. Here, we use the CD-MUSIC approach in combination with valuable and reliable surface spectroscopy information about the nature of surface complexes of the TE. The other objective of this work is to obtain generic parameters to describe the binding of the following elements (Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) onto both iron oxides for the CD-MUSIC approach. The results show that a consistent description of proton and metal ion binding is possible for goethite and HFO with the same set of model parameters. In general a good prediction of almost all the collected experimental data sets corresponding to metal ion binding to HFO is obtained. Moreover, dominant surface species are in agreement with the recently published surface complexes derived from X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) data. Until more detailed information on the structure of the two iron oxides is available, the present option seems a reasonable approximation and can be used to describe complex geochemical systems. To improve our understanding and modeling of multi-component systems we need more data obtained at much lower metal ion to iron oxide ratios in order to be able to account eventually for sites that are not always characterized in spectroscopic studies.

  10. Rare earth-transition metal scrap treatment method

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, F.A.; Peterson, D.T.; Wheelock, J.T.; Jones, L.L.; Lincoln, L.P.

    1992-02-11

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g. iron) scrap (e.g. Nd-Fe-B scrap) is melted to reduce the levels of tramp oxygen and nitrogen impurities therein. The tramp impurities are reduced in the melt by virtue of the reaction of the tramp impurities and the rare earth to form dross on the melt. The purified melt is separated from the dross for reuse. The oxygen and nitrogen of the melt are reduced to levels acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets. 3 figs.

  11. Rare earth-transition metal scrap treatment method

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frederick A. (Ames, IA); Peterson, David T. (Ames, IA); Wheelock, John T. (Nevada, IA); Jones, Lawrence L. (Des Moines, IA); Lincoln, Lanny P. (Woodward, IA)

    1992-02-11

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g. iron) scrap (e.g. Nd-Fe-B scrap) is melted to reduce the levels of tramp oxygen and nitrogen impurities therein. The tramp impurities are reduced in the melt by virtue of the reaction of the tramp impurities and the rare earth to form dross on the melt. The purified melt is separated from the dross for reuse. The oxygen and nitrogen of the melt are reduced to levels acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets.

  12. Metal ion transporters in mammals: structure, function and pathological implications

    PubMed Central

    Rolfs, Andreas; Hediger, Matthias A

    1999-01-01

    Despite the importance of metal ions in several catalytic functions, there has been, until recently, little molecular information available on the mechanisms whereby metal ions are actively taken up by mammalian cells. The classical concept for iron uptake into mammalian cells has been the endocytosis of transferrin-bound Fe3+ by the transferrin receptor. Studies with hypotransferrinaemic mice revealed that in the intestine mucosal transferrin is derived from the plasma and that its presence is not required in the intestinal lumen for dietary iron absorption. This suggests that, at least in the intestine, other non-receptor-mediated uptake systems exist. The molecular identification of metal ion transporters is of great importance, in particular since an increasing number of human diseases are thought to be related to disturbances in metal ion homeostasis, including metal ion overload and deficiency disorders (i.e. anaemia, haemochromatosis, Menkes disease, Wilson's disease), and neurodegenerative diseases (i.e. Alzheimer's, Friedreich's ataxia and Parkinson's diseases). Furthermore, susceptibilities to mycobacterial infections are caused by metal ion transporter defects. The pathological implications of disturbed metal ion homeostasis confirm the vital roles these metal ions play in the catalytic function of many enzymes, in gene regulation (zinc-finger proteins), and in free radical homeostasis. Recent insights have significantly advanced our knowledge of how metal ions are taken up or released by mammalian cells. The purpose of this review is to summarize these advances and to give an overview on the growing number of mammalian metal ion transporters. PMID:10373684

  13. Valence, coordination number, and PAV cells in metallic rare earth compounds F. L. Carter

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Valence, coordination number, and PAV cells in metallic rare earth compounds F. L. Carter Naval, generalized coordination numbers, and Pauling's metallic valences are given for 24 intermetallic rare earth self-consistently it was necessary to increase the rare earth metal (/-character and hence decrease

  14. Potential use of IR dyes for metal ion sensors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Olaf J. Rolinski; I. R. Downie; A. Sheila Holmes-Smith; David J. Birch

    1995-01-01

    The fluorescence quenching of molecules by analytes of interest, is a widely employed phenomenon in fluorescence sensing technology. Forster type dipole-dipole energy transfer from dye molecules to transition metal ions, provides a method of monitoring the concentration of these ions with some degree of selectivity. Each metal ion has a different absorption spectrum, hence, in principle it is possible to

  15. Accumulation of metal ions by pectinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deiana, S.; Deiana, L.; Palma, A.; Premoli, A.; Senette, C.

    2009-04-01

    The knowledge of the mechanisms which regulate the interactions of metal ions with partially methyl esterified linear polymers of ?-1,4 linked D-galacturonic acid units (pectinates), well represented in the root inner and outer apoplasm, is of great relevance to understand the processes which control their accumulation at the soil-root interface as well as their mobilization by plant metabolites. Accumulation of a metal by pectinates can be affected by the presence of other metals so that competition or distribution could be expected depending on the similar or different affinity of the metal ions towards the binding sites, mainly represented by the carboxylate groups. In order to better understand the mechanism of accumulation in the apoplasm of several metal ions, the sorption of Cd(II), Zn(II), Cu(II), Pb(II) and Cr(III) by a Ca-polygalacturonate gel, used as model of the soil-root interface, with a degree of esterification of 18% (PGAE1) and 65% (PGAE2) was studied at pH 3.0, 4.0, 5.0 and 6.0 in the presence of CaCl2 2.5 mM.. The results show that sorption increases with increasing both the initial metal concentration and pH. A similar sorption trend was evidenced for Cu(II) and Pb(II) and for Zn(II) and Cd(II), indicating that the mechanism of sorption for these two ionic couples is quite different. As an example, at pH 6.0 and an initial metal concentration equal to 2.0 mM, the amount of Cu(II) and Pb(II) sorbed was about 1.98 mg-1 of PGAE1 while that of Cd(II) and Zn(II) was about 1.2 mg-1. Cr(III) showed a rather different sorption trend and a much higher amount (2.8 mg-1of PGAE1 at pH 6.0) was recorded. The higher affinity of Cr(III) for the polysaccharidic matrix is attributable to the formation of Cr(III) polynuclear species in solution, as shown by the distribution diagrams obtained through the MEDUSA software. On the basis of these findings, the following affinity towards the PGAE1 can be assessed: Cr(III) > Cu(II) ? Pb(II) > Zn (II) ? Cd(II). Surprisingly, simultaneous sorption tests and SEM analyses indicate that a different mechanism regulates the sorption of Cu(II) and Pb(II) by PGAE1. In fact, the amount of Pb(II) sorbed (0.92 moles mg-1of PGAE1) by PGAE1 was nearly independent by the presence of Cu(II) ions, at least at the three different concentrations tested, that indicates a higher affinity of Pb(II). Such an aspect was further confirmed by exchange experiments. Samples of PGAE1 saturated with 1.96 moles mg-1of Cu(II) or 2.01 moles mg-1of Pb(II) were put in contact with 100 mL of solutions containing 97.3 moles of Pb(II) or 99.4 moles Cu(II), respectively. The exchange kinetics show that about 80% of Cu(II) was stochiometrically exchanged by Pb(II). In contrast, only about 10% of Pb(II) complexed by PGAE1 was exchanged by Cu(II). The kinetics of simultaneous sorption of all the metal ions tested indicate that Pb(II) is selectively sorbed by the PGAE1 gels. Cd(II) and Zn(II) show a similar affinity towards PGAE1. Thus, in the simultaneous presence of these ions, their selectivity towards this matrix follows the order: Pb > Cu > Cd ? Zn. Sorption of Cr(III) in the presence of the ions considered was not possible to carry out due to interference phenomena. The sorption of the same ions by 50 mg of PGAE2 evidences that the amount of Cu(II), Pb(II), and Cr(III) sorbed is markedly lower than that found for PGAE1. By considering that two carboxylic groups are involved in the complexation of a metal ion, the data show that such a stoichiometry is respected only for Pb(II). The amount of Cu(II) sorbed is about 50% lower than that of Pb(II) at all the pH values tested whereas those of Zn(II) and Cd(II) are negligible whereas that of Cr(III) is the highest. The different behaviour of Cu(II) compared to Pb(II) can be explained taking into account for both hydrophobic and steric effects of the methyl groups as well as to their different charge density. Thus, it can be concluded that the accumulation of metals at the soil-root interface strictly depends on the esterification degree of the root p

  16. Metal Based Synthetic Strategies and the Examination of Structure Determining Factors in Alkaline Earth Metal Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yuriko

    Last decades have witnessed a large expansion of the organometallic heavier alkaline earth metal species. However, continued growth of this promising area of chemistry has been slowed by severe restrictions and limitations in viable synthetic methodologies leading to difficulties in preparing and characterizing the target compounds. There is clearly a need for the further development of synthetic methodologies and detailed structure function analysis that will promote the further advancement of organoalkaline earth metal chemistry in applications as diverse as materials chemistry and catalysis. This thesis work greatly extends the synthetic options currently available towards organoalkaline earth metal species by introducing redox transmetallation protolysis (RTP), a reaction based on the readily available Ph3Bi as a non-toxic transmetallation agent. Based on a straightforward one-pot procedure and work-up, Ph3Bi based RTP presents a powerful synthetic alternative for the facile preparation of a large variety of heavy alkaline earth metal compounds. The second part of the thesis explores the effect of secondary non covalent interactions on the coordination chemistry as well as thermal properties of a series of novel alkali, alkaline earth, rare earth as well as heterobimetallic alkali/alkaline earth fluoroalkoxides. These compounds showcase the significance of non-covalent M···F-C and agostic interactions on metal stabilization and structural features, providing critical input on ligand design for the design of advanced metal organic vapor deposition (MOCVD) precursor materials. This work also showcases the impact of M···F-C interactions over M---co-ligand coordination, a critical precursor design element as well.

  17. Metal-ion rescue revisited: Biochemical detection of site-bound metal ions important for RNA folding

    PubMed Central

    Frederiksen, John K.; Li, Nan-Sheng; Das, Rhiju; Herschlag, Daniel; Piccirilli, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    Within the three-dimensional architectures of RNA molecules, divalent metal ions populate specific locations, shedding their water molecules to form chelates. These interactions help the RNA adopt and maintain specific conformations and frequently make essential contributions to function. Defining the locations of these site-bound metal ions remains challenging despite the growing database of RNA structures. Metal-ion rescue experiments have provided a powerful approach to identify and distinguish catalytic metal ions within RNA active sites, but the ability of such experiments to identify metal ions that contribute to tertiary structure acquisition and structural stability is less developed and has been challenged. Herein, we use the well-defined P4–P6 RNA domain of the Tetrahymena group I intron to reevaluate prior evidence against the discriminatory power of metal-ion rescue experiments and to advance thermodynamic descriptions necessary for interpreting these experiments. The approach successfully identifies ligands within the RNA that occupy the inner coordination sphere of divalent metal ions and distinguishes them from ligands that occupy the outer coordination sphere. Our results underscore the importance of obtaining complete folding isotherms and establishing and evaluating thermodynamic models in order to draw conclusions from metal-ion rescue experiments. These results establish metal-ion rescue as a rigorous tool for identifying and dissecting energetically important metal-ion interactions in RNAs that are noncatalytic but critical for RNA tertiary structure. PMID:22539523

  18. Ion acoustic solitons in Earth's upward current region

    SciTech Connect

    Main, D. S.; Scholz, C. [Department of Physics, John Brown University, Siloam Springs, Arkansas 72761 (United States); Newman, D. L. [Center for Integrated Plasma Studies, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Ergun, R. E. [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    The formation and evolution of ion acoustic solitons in Earth's auroral upward current region are studied using one- and two-dimensional (2D) electrostatic particle-in-cell simulations. The one-dimensional simulations are confined to processes that occur in the auroral cavity and include four plasma populations: hot electrons, H{sup +} and O{sup +} anti-earthward ion beams, and a hot H{sup +} background population. Ion acoustic solitons are found to form for auroral-cavity ion beams consistent with acceleration through double-layer (DL) potentials measured by FAST. A simplified one-dimensional model simulation is then presented in order to isolate the mechanisms that lead to the formation of the ion acoustic soliton. Results of a two-dimensional simulation, which include both the ionosphere and the auroral cavity, separated by a low-altitude DL, are then presented in order to confirm that the soliton forms in a more realistic 2D geometry. The 2D simulation is initialized with a U-shaped potential structure that mimics the inferred shape of the low altitude transition region based on observations. In this simulation, a soliton localized perpendicular to the geomagnetic field is observed to form and reside next to the DL. Finally, the 2D simulation results are compared with FAST data and it is found that certain aspects of the data can be explained by assuming the presence of an ion acoustic soliton.

  19. Steady-state superradiance with alkaline-earth-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Meiser, D.; Holland, M. J. [JILA and Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0440 (United States)

    2010-03-15

    Alkaline-earth-metal-like atoms with ultranarrow transitions open the door to a new regime of cavity quantum electrodynamics. That regime is characterized by a critical photon number that is many orders of magnitude smaller than what can be achieved in conventional systems. We show that it is possible to achieve superradiance in steady state with such systems. We discuss the basic underlying mechanisms as well as the key experimental requirements.

  20. Behavior of metal ions in bioelectrochemical systems: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhihao; Chang, Dingming; Ma, Jingxing; Huang, Guangtuan; Cai, Lankun; Zhang, Lehua

    2015-02-01

    Bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) have been focused on by many researchers to treat wastewater and recover energy or valuable chemicals from wastes. In BESs, metal ions play an important role in the conductivity of solution, reactors' internal resistance, power generation, chemical production and activity of microorganisms. Additionally, the metal ions are also involved in anodic or cathodic reaction processes directly or indirectly in BESs. This paper reviews the behavior of metal ions in BESs, including (1) increase of the conductivity of electrolyte and decrease of internal resistance, (2) transfer for desalination, (3) enhancement or inhibition of the biocatalysis in anode, (4) improvement of cathodic performance by metal ions through electron acceptance or catalysis in cathodic process and (5) behavior of metal ions on membranes. Moreover, the perspectives of BESs removing heavy metal ions in wastewater or solid waste are discussed to realize recovery, reduction and detoxification simultaneously.

  1. Magnetic Structures and Excitations in Rare-Earth Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Jens

    2000-09-01

    The recent development within the studies of magnetic structures and excitations in the rare-earth metals is reviewed. The fine resolution obtainable in x-ray synchrotron experiments led to the discovery of a number of commensurable magnetic structures in Ho and Er which helped renew interest in these long-period helically or cycloidally modulated structures. Shortly after, the helifan phases in Ho were established and effects due to trigonal couplings were detected in Er and Ho. The development of the technique of molecular-beam epitaxy has allowed the fabrication of superlattices and alloys of rare-earth metals. One of the important discoveries made possible by the use of this technique is the isolation of a pentacritical point in the magnetic phase diagram of the Ho-Er and Hc-Tm alloys. The investigation of the magnetic structures in the two light rare-earth metals Nd and Pr gives rise to a number of challenging problems, because of the complexity of the different structures and, in Pr, because of the low value of the Néel temperature (50 mK). The extra excitation branch observed a couple of years ago, in the paramagnetic phase of the singlet-ground-state system Pr at small wave vectors, still awaits a full explanation.

  2. Separation of traces of metal ions from sodium matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korkisch, J.; Orlandini, K. A.

    1969-01-01

    Method for isolating metal ion traces from sodium matrices consists of two extractions and an ion exchange step. Extraction is accomplished by using 2-thenoyltrifluoracetone and dithizone followed by cation exchange.

  3. Observation of a rare earth ion-extractant complex arrested at the oil-water interface during solvent extraction.

    PubMed

    Bu, Wei; Yu, Hao; Luo, Guangming; Bera, Mrinal K; Hou, Binyang; Schuman, Adam W; Lin, Binhua; Meron, Mati; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Antonio, Mark R; Soderholm, L; Schlossman, Mark L

    2014-09-11

    Selective extraction of metal ions from a complex aqueous mixture into an organic phase is used to separate toxic or radioactive metals from polluted environments and nuclear waste, as well as to produce industrially relevant metals, such as rare earth ions. Selectivity arises from the choice of an extractant amphiphile, dissolved in the organic phase, which interacts preferentially with the target metal ion. The extractant-mediated process of ion transport from an aqueous to an organic phase takes place at the aqueous-organic interface; nevertheless, little is known about the molecular mechanism of this process despite its importance. Although state-of-the-art X-ray scattering is uniquely capable of probing molecular ordering at a liquid-liquid interface with subnanometer spatial resolution, utilizing this capability to investigate interfacial dynamical processes of short temporal duration remains a challenge. We show that a temperature-driven adsorption transition can be used to turn the extraction on and off by controlling adsorption and desorption of extractants at the oil-water interface. Lowering the temperature through this transition immobilizes a supramolecular ion-extractant complex at the interface during the extraction of rare earth erbium ions. Under the conditions of these experiments, the ion-extractant complexes condense into a two-dimensional inverted bilayer, which is characterized on the molecular scale with synchrotron X-ray reflectivity and fluorescence measurements. Raising the temperature above the transition leads to Er ion extraction as a result of desorption of ion-extractant complexes from the interface into the bulk organic phase. XAFS measurements of the ion-extractant complexes in the bulk organic phase demonstrate that they are similar to the interfacial complexes. PMID:25134605

  4. Evaluation of dry ashing in conjunction with ion chromatographic determination of transition metal ions in pig feed samples.

    PubMed

    Van paemel, Marleen R; De Rycke, Herman; Millet, Sam; Hesta, Myriam; Janssens, Geert P J

    2005-03-23

    The contents of transition metal ions iron, copper, zinc, and manganese were simultaneously determined in pig feed using an ion chromatographic technique (IC) preceded by dry ashing. Employing ion exchange, the ions were separated on an IonPac CS5A column used in combination with a pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid based eluent. The separation was followed by spectrophotometric detection after postcolumn reaction with 4-(2-pyridylazo)resorcinol. Dry ashing parameters were varied to assess their role in potential analyte loss. Quantitative recoveries (>95%) were obtained for all analytes with a dry ashing method that included a moderate temperature-time regime and ash leaching support in the form of sonication and heat treatment. The use of HCl as leaching acid and the presence of alkaline earths in the matrix solution did not interfere with the chromatographic separation. PMID:15769106

  5. High-current metal ion implantation for industrial applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W.L.; Ding, X.J. (Beijing Normal Univ. (China). Inst. of Low Energy Nuclear Physics); Sang, J.M.; Xu, J.; Yuan, X.M. (Beijing General Research Inst. of Non-Ferrous Metals (China))

    1994-10-01

    Ion implantation, as an efficient surface processing technique, has developed to include the implantation of various metallic ions for improving not only wear properties, but also such other surface properties as solid lubrication, fatigue, chemical stability, and engineering reliability. The high-dose metal ion implantation that can be accumulated in a short time over a relatively large implanting area makes metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) source ion implantation well suited to practical surface engineering modification applications. This paper presents some experimental results and successful examples of critical tools and sophisticated components implanted by using MEVVA source ion implantation.

  6. Multiheteromacrocycles that complex metal ions. Sixth progress report, 1 May 1979-30 April 1980. [Hemispherands; spherands

    SciTech Connect

    Cram, D.J.

    1980-01-15

    Objective is to design synthesize, and evaluate cyclic and polycyclic host organic compounds for their abilities to complex and lipophilize guest metal ions, their complexes, and their clusters. Host organic compounds consist of strategically placed solvating, coordinating, and ion-pairing sites tied together by covalent bonds through hydrocarbon units around cavities shaped to be occupied by guest metal ions or by metal ions plus their ligands. Specificity in complexation is sought by matching the following properties of host and guest: cavity and metal ion sizes; geometric arrangements of binding sites; number of binding sites; character of binding sites; and valences. During this period, hemispherands based on an aryloxy or cyclic urea unit, spherands based on aryloxyl units only, and their complexes with alkali metals and alkaline earths were investigated. An attempt to separate /sup 6/Li and /sup 7/Li by gel permeation chromatography of lithiospherium chloride failed. (DLC)

  7. Biosorption of metal ions from aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jiaping; Yiacoumi, Sotira [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Copper biosorption from aqueous solutions by calcium alginate is reported in this paper. The experimental section includes potentiometric titrations of biosorbents, batch equilibrium and kinetic studies of copper biosorption, as well as fixed-bed biosorption experiments. The potentiometric titration results show that the surface charge increases with decreasing pH. The biosorption of copper strongly depends on solution pH; the metal ion binding increases from 0 to 90 percent in pH ranging from 1.5 to 5.0. In addition, a decrease in ionic strength results in an increase of copper ion removal. Kinetic studies indicate that mass transfer plays an important role in the biosorption rate. Furthermore, a fixed-bed biosorption experiment shows that calcium alginate has a significant capacity for copper ion removal. The two-pK Basic Stem model successfully represents the surface charge and equilibrium biosorption experimental data. The calculation results demonstrate that the copper removal may result from the binding of free copper and its hydroxide with surface functional groups of the biosorbents.

  8. A biosystem for removal of metal ions from water

    SciTech Connect

    Kilbane, J.J. II.

    1990-01-01

    The presence of heavy metal ions in ground and surface waters constitutes a potential health risk and is an environmental concern. Moreover, processes for the recovery of valuable metal ions are of interest. Bioaccumulation or biosorption is not only a factor in assessing the environmental risk posed by metal ions; it can also be used as a means of decontamination. A biological system for the removal and recovery of metal ions from contaminated water is reported here. Exopolysaccharide-producing microorganisms, including a methanotrophic culture, are demonstrated to have superior metal binding ability, compared with other microbial cultures. This paper describes a biosorption process in which dried biomass obtained from exopolysaccharide-producing microorganisms is encapsulated in porous plastic beads and is used for metal ion binding and recovery. 22 refs., 13 figs.

  9. Plasma immersion ion implantation for reducing metal ion release

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, C.; Garcia, J. A.; Maendl, S.; Pereiro, R.; Fernandez, B.; Rodriguez, R. J. [Centro de Ingenieria Avanzada de Superficies AIN, 31191, Cordovilla-Pamplona (Spain); Leibniz-Institut fuer Oberflaechenmodifizierung, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Universidad de Oviedo, Departamento Quimica Fisica y Analitica (Spain); Centro de Ingenieria Avanzada de Superficies AIN, 31191, Cordovilla-Pamplona (Spain)

    2012-11-06

    Plasma immersion ion implantation of Nitrogen and Oxygen on CoCrMo alloys was carried out to improve the tribological and corrosion behaviors of these biomedical alloys. In order to optimize the implantation results we were carried experiments at different temperatures. Tribocorrosion tests in bovine serum were used to measure Co, Cr and Mo releasing by using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry analysis after tests. Also, X-ray Diffraction analysis were employed in order to explain any obtained difference in wear rate and corrosion tests. Wear tests reveals important decreases in rate of more than one order of magnitude for the best treatment. Moreover decreases in metal release were found for all the implanted samples, preserving the same corrosion resistance of the unimplanted samples. Finally this paper gathers an analysis, in terms of implantation parameters and achieved properties for industrial implementation of these treatments.

  10. Separation of rare earths from transition metals by liquid-liquid extraction from a molten salt hydrate to an ionic liquid phase.

    PubMed

    Rout, Alok; Binnemans, Koen

    2014-02-28

    The solvent extraction of trivalent rare-earth ions and their separation from divalent transition metal ions using molten salt hydrates as the feed phase and an undiluted fluorine-free ionic liquid as the extracting phase were investigated in detail. The extractant was tricaprylmethylammonium nitrate, [A336][NO3], and the hydrated melt was calcium nitrate tetrahydrate, Ca(NO3)2·4H2O. The extraction behavior of rare-earth ions was studied for solutions of individual elements, as well as for mixtures of rare earths in the hydrated melt. The influence of different extraction parameters was investigated: the initial metal loading in the feed phase, percentage of water in the feed solution, equilibration time, and the type of hydrated melt. The extraction of rare earths from Ca(NO3)2·4H2O was compared with extraction from CaCl2·4H2O by [A336][Cl] (Aliquat 336). The nitrate system was found to be the better one. The extraction and separation of rare earths from the transition metals nickel, cobalt and zinc were also investigated. Remarkably high separation factors of rare-earth ions over transition metal ions were observed for extraction from Ca(NO3)2·4H2O by the [A336][NO3] extracting phase. Furthermore, rare-earth ions could be separated efficiently from transition metal ions, even in melts with very high concentrations of transition metal ions. Rare-earth oxides could be directly dissolved in the Ca(NO3)2·4H2O phase in the presence of small amounts of Al(NO3)3·9H2O or concentrated nitric acid. The efficiency of extraction after dissolving the rare-earth oxides in the hydrated nitrate melt was identical to extraction from solutions with rare-earth nitrates dissolved in the molten phase. The stripping of the rare-earth ions from the loaded ionic liquid phase and the reuse of the recycled ionic liquid were also investigated in detail. PMID:24352299

  11. Magnetism of the rare earth, 3d --Theoretical review Abstract. --Compounds of rare earth and transition metals exhibit unusual and quite different behaviour. In

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and secondly those determined mainly by rare earth metals. The first group are those rich in transition metal except TCo2, TNi5, T2Ni7, TNi3, TNi2. When the transition metal is magnetic, the coupling between rare-earth temperature are much smaller, and magnetic properties bear resemblances with rare earth metals. Thus we

  12. The possible role of metal ions and clays in prebiotic chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, J. G.; Edelson, E. H.

    1980-01-01

    Eight homoionic bentonites were prepared using alkali, alkaline earth, and transition metal ions as counterions. The interaction of the clays with 5'-AMP was studied and it was found that the alkali metal-substituted clays did not remove any nucleotide from dilute solution, and that zinc-bentonite adsorbed the most (98%). In addition, study of the interaction of seven other nucleotides with zinc-bentonite showed that the purine nucleotides were more strongly absorbed than the pyrimidine nucleotides. Langmuir isotherms were obtained for these systems and the adsorption data were explained by the adsorption coefficient and the accessibility of metal for binding.

  13. Metal cation\\/anion adsorption on calcium carbonate: Implications to metal ion concentrations in groundwater

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. M. Zachara; C. E. Cowan; C. T. Resch

    1990-01-01

    This chapter evaluates the sorption behavior of metallic ions on specimen calcite as a basis for determining the importance of calcite relative to other subsurface sorbents, such as layer silicates and oxides, in controlling metal ion concentration in calcareous groundwaters. A review of the literature shows the sorption of both metallic cations and anions on calcite over ranges in pH

  14. Alkaline and alkaline earth metal phosphate halides and phosphors

    DOEpatents

    Lyons, Robert Joseph; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Cleaver, Robert John

    2012-11-13

    Compounds, phosphor materials and apparatus related to nacaphite family of materials are presented. Potassium and rubidium based nacaphite family compounds and phosphors designed by doping divalent rare earth elements in the sites of alkaline earth metals in the nacaphite material families are descried. An apparatus comprising the phosphors based on the nacaphite family materials are presented herein. The compounds presented is of formula A.sub.2B.sub.1-yR.sub.yPO.sub.4X where the elements A, B, R, X and suffix y are defined such that A is potassium, rubidium, or a combination of potassium and rubidium and B is calcium, strontium, barium, or a combination of any of calcium, strontium and barium. X is fluorine, chlorine, or a combination of fluorine and chlorine, R is europium, samarium, ytterbium, or a combination of any of europium, samarium, and ytterbium, and y ranges from 0 to about 0.1.

  15. Dysregulation of transition metal ion homeostasis is the molecular basis for cadmium toxicity in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Begg, Stephanie L; Eijkelkamp, Bart A; Luo, Zhenyao; Couñago, Rafael M; Morey, Jacqueline R; Maher, Megan J; Ong, Cheryl-Lynn Y; McEwan, Alastair G; Kobe, Bostjan; O'Mara, Megan L; Paton, James C; McDevitt, Christopher A

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium is a transition metal ion that is highly toxic in biological systems. Although relatively rare in the Earth's crust, anthropogenic release of cadmium since industrialization has increased biogeochemical cycling and the abundance of the ion in the biosphere. Despite this, the molecular basis of its toxicity remains unclear. Here we combine metal-accumulation assays, high-resolution structural data and biochemical analyses to show that cadmium toxicity, in Streptococcus pneumoniae, occurs via perturbation of first row transition metal ion homeostasis. We show that cadmium uptake reduces the millimolar cellular accumulation of manganese and zinc, and thereby increases sensitivity to oxidative stress. Despite this, high cellular concentrations of cadmium (~17?mM) are tolerated, with negligible impact on growth or sensitivity to oxidative stress, when manganese and glutathione are abundant. Collectively, this work provides insight into the molecular basis of cadmium toxicity in prokaryotes, and the connection between cadmium accumulation and oxidative stress. PMID:25731976

  16. Spectroscopic detection of metals ions using a novel selective sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta-Domínguez, D.; Ramos-Ortiz, G.; Maldonado, J. L.; Rodriguez, M.; Meneses-Nava, M. A.; Barbosa-Garcia, O.; Santillan, R.; Farfan, N.

    2011-09-01

    Colorimetric chemosensors are simple, economical and practical optical approach for detecting toxic metal ions (Hg2+, Pb2+, Ni2+, etc.) in the environment. In this work, we present a simple but highly specific organic compound 4-chloro-2-((E)-((E)-3-(4-(dimethylamino)phenyl)allylidene)amino)phenol (L1) that acts as a colorimetric sensor for divalent metal ions in H2O. The mechanism of the interaction between L1 and various metal-ions has been established by UV-vis absorption and emission spectroscopic experiments that indicate favorable coordination of metal ions with L1 in different solvents. Experimental results indicate that the shape of the electronic transition band of L1 (receptor compound) changed after the interaction with divalent metal-ions, such as Hg2+, Pb2+, Mn2+, Co2+, Cu2+, and Ni2+ in aqueous solution. We found that L1 have a considerable selectivity for Ni2+ ions, even in presence of other metals ions when mixtures of DMSO/H2O as are used as solvents. L1, which has been targeted for sensing transition metal ions, exhibits binding-induced color changes from yellow to pink observed even by the naked eye in presence of Ni2+ ions.

  17. Succinylated machined corncobs: Titration and heavy metal ion binding characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    McCall, R.C.; Getman, T.D.; Hunsley, J.R. [Southern Illinois Univ., Edwardsville, IL (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The use of inexpensive natural materials for waste water treatment is economically attractive. In this study chemical modifications of an agricultural by-product, Lite-R-Cobs, were explored to increase its utility for reduction of metal ions in waste water effluent. Corn cob particles have been succinylated to increase their capacity for binding heavy metal ions. The carboxyl groups introduced into this cellulosic material were quantitated by base titration. Equilibrium metal ion binding characteristics of the material was studied for Cu{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, and Ni{sup 2+} ions.

  18. Effect of rare earth metal oxide additions to tungsten electrodes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alber A. Sadek; Masao Ushio; Fukuhisa Matsuda

    1990-01-01

    A comparative study has been made on the operating characteristics of gas-tungsten arc (GTA) welding for several types of\\u000a electrodes. The work was carried out with a pure tungsten electrode and tungsten electrodes activated with a small quantity\\u000a of the rare earth metal oxides, La2O3, Y2O3, CeO2, and with ZrO2, ThO2, and MgO. Their behaviors during arcing were analyzed and

  19. Magnetism of perovskite cobaltites with Kramers rare-earth ions

    SciTech Connect

    Jirák, Z., E-mail: jirak@fzu.cz; Hejtmánek, J.; Knížek, K.; Novák, P.; Šantavá, E. [Institute of Physics ASCR, Cukrovarnická 10, 162 00 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Fujishiro, H. [Faculty of Engineering, Iwate University, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan)

    2014-05-07

    The band-gap insulators RECoO{sub 3} (RE?=?Nd{sup 3+}, Sm{sup 3+}, and Dy{sup 3+}) with Co{sup 3+} ions stabilized in the non-magnetic low-spin state have been investigated by specific heat measurements. The experiments evidence an antiferromagnetic ordering of the rare earths with Néel temperature of T{sub N}?=?1.25, 1.50, and 3.60?K for NdCoO{sub 3}, SmCoO{sub 3}, and DyCoO{sub 3}, respectively. With increasing external field, the lambda peak in specific heat, indicative of the transition, shifts to lower temperatures and vanishes for field of about 3?T. Starting from this point, a broader Schottky peak is formed, centered in 1?K range, and its position is moved to higher temperatures proportionally to applied field. The origin of the peak is in Zeeman splitting of the ground Kramers doublet, and the gradual shift with field defines effective g-factors for the rare-earth pseudospins in studied compounds. The results obtained are confronted with the calculations of crystal field splitting of the rare-earth multiplets.

  20. METALLIC HYDRIDES. Magnetic properties of laves-phase rare earth hydrides

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    METALLIC HYDRIDES. Magnetic properties of laves-phase rare earth hydrides J. J. Rhyne and G. E on the rare earth site. The rare earth spins disorder at a temperature lower than the bulk Tc in ErFe2 H3 5 per formula unit assuming complete occupation of 3 tetrahedral sites. The heavy rare earth (RFe2

  1. Molten metal containment vessel with rare earth oxysulfide protective coating thereon and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Krikorian, Oscar H. (Danville, CA); Curtis, Paul G. (Tracy, CA)

    1992-01-01

    An improved molten metal containment vessel is disclosed in which wetting of the vessel's inner wall surfaces by molten metal is inhibited by coating at least the inner surfaces of the containment vessel with one or more rare earth oxysulfide or rare earth sulfide compounds to inhibit wetting and or adherence by the molten metal to the surfaces of the containment vessel.

  2. Microstructural characterisation of metal ion implanted silicon nitride

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Huaxia Ji; Peter J. Evans; Masoud Samandi

    2000-01-01

    The microstructure of silicon nitride after metal ion implantation at different dosages has been studied. A metal vapour vacuum arc (MEVVA) ion source was employed to implant Ni, Ti and Ni+Ti ions into silicon nitride. Characterisation of the implanted surfaces was carried out by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM), in conjunction with nano-beam electron diffraction

  3. Mechanism of metal ion biosorption by fungal biomass

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Sivarama Sastry; P. Maruthi Mohan

    1996-01-01

    Alkali extracted mycelial biomass from Aspergillus niger, referred to as Biosorb, was found to sequester metal ions (Cd2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Ni2+ and Co2+) efficiently both from dilute and concentrated solutions upto 10% of its weight (w\\/w). Sequestration of metal ions from a mixture was also efficient but with attendant antagonisms. The kinetics of metal binding by Biosorb indicated that it

  4. Bimetallic cleavage of aromatic C-H bonds by rare-earth-metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenliang; Dulong, Florian; Khan, Saeed I; Cantat, Thibault; Diaconescu, Paula L

    2014-12-17

    A new type of C-H bond activation mediated by rare-earth metals under reducing conditions is reported. The synergy between reductants and rare-earth-metal complexes allows the cleavage of unactivated aromatic C-H bonds. The reaction between rare-earth-metal iodides supported by a 1,1'-ferrocenediamide ligand and potassium graphite in benzene leads to the formation of a 1:1 metal molar ratio of the corresponding metal hydride and metal phenyl complex. A proposed mechanism involving an inverse sandwich arene bimetallic intermediate is supported by experimental and computational studies. PMID:25431837

  5. A self-sputtering ion source: A new approach to quiescent metal ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Oks, Efim M.; Anders, Andre

    2009-09-03

    A new metal ion source is presented based on sustained self-sputtering plasma in a magnetron discharge. Metals exhibiting high self-sputtering yield like Cu, Ag, Zn, and Bi can be used in a high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) discharge such that the plasma almost exclusively contains singly charged metal ions of the target material. The plasma and extracted ion beam are quiescent. The ion beams consist mostly of singly charged ions with a space-charge limited current density which reached about 10 mA/cm2 at an extraction voltage of 45 kV and a first gap spacing of 12 mm.

  6. Reusable chelating resins concentrate metal ions from highly dilute solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, A. J.; Weetal, H. H.; Weliky, N.

    1966-01-01

    Column chromatographic method uses new metal chelating resins for recovering heavy-metal ions from highly dilute solutions. The absorbed heavy-metal cations may be removed from the chelating resins by acid or base washes. The resins are reusable after the washes are completed.

  7. Metal ion-induced lateral aggregation of filamentous viruses fd and M13.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jay X; Janmey, Paul A; Lyubartsev, Alexander; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2002-01-01

    We report a detailed comparison between calculations of inter-filament interactions based on Monte-Carlo simulations and experimental features of lateral aggregation of bacteriophages fd and M13 induced by a number of divalent metal ions. The general findings are consistent with the polyelectrolyte nature of the virus filaments and confirm that the solution electrostatics account for most of the experimental features observed. One particularly interesting discovery is resolubilization for bundles of either fd or M13 viruses when the concentration of the bundle-inducing metal ion Mg(2+) or Ca(2+) is increased to large (>100 mM) values. In the range of Mg(2+) or Ca(2+) concentrations where large bundles of the virus filaments are formed, the optimal attractive interaction energy between the virus filaments is estimated to be on the order of 0.01 kT per net charge on the virus surface when a recent analytical prediction to the experimentally defined conditions of resolubilization is applied. We also observed qualitatively distinct behavior between the alkali-earth metal ions and the divalent transition metal ions in their action on the charged viruses. The understanding of metal ions-induced reversible aggregation based on solution electrostatics may lead to potential applications in molecular biology and medicine. PMID:12080143

  8. Structural Resolution of 4-Substituted Proline Diastereomers with Ion Mobility Spectrometry via Alkali Metal Ion Cationization.

    PubMed

    Flick, Tawnya G; Campuzano, Iain D G; Bartberger, Michael D

    2015-03-17

    The chirality of substituents on an amino acid can significantly change its mode of binding to a metal ion, as shown here experimentally by traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (TWIMS-MS) of different proline isomeric molecules complexed with alkali metal ions. Baseline separation of the cis- and trans- forms of both hydroxyproline and fluoroproline was achieved using TWIMS-MS via metal ion cationization (Li(+), Na(+), K(+), and Cs(+)). Density functional theory calculations indicate that differentiation of these diastereomers is a result of the stabilization of differing metal-complexed forms adopted by the diastereomers when cationized by an alkali metal cation, [M + X](+) where X = Li, Na, K, and Cs, versus the topologically similar structures of the protonated molecules, [M + H](+). Metal-cationized trans-proline variants exist in a linear salt-bridge form where the metal ion interacts with a deprotonated carboxylic acid and the proton is displaced onto the nitrogen atom of the pyrrolidine ring. In contrast, metal-cationized cis-proline variants adopt a compact structure where the carbonyl of the carboxylic acid, nitrogen atom, and if available, the hydroxyl and fluorine substituent solvate the metal ion. Experimentally, it was observed that the resolution between alkali metal-cationized cis- and trans-proline variants decreases as the size of the metal ion increases. Density functional theory demonstrates that this is due to the decreasing stability of the compact charge-solvated cis-proline structure with increased metal ion radius, likely a result of steric hindrance and/or weaker binding to the larger metal ion. Furthermore, the unique structures adopted by the alkali metal-cationized cis- and trans-proline variants results in these molecules having significantly different quantum mechanically calculated dipole moments, a factor that can be further exploited to improve the diastereomeric resolution when utilizing a drift gas with a higher polarizability constant. PMID:25664640

  9. Molecular rare-earth-metal hydrides in non-cyclopentadienyl environments.

    PubMed

    Fegler, Waldemar; Venugopal, Ajay; Kramer, Mathias; Okuda, Jun

    2015-02-01

    Molecular hydrides of the rare-earth metals play an important role as homogeneous catalysts and as counterparts of solid-state interstitial hydrides. Structurally well-characterized non-metallocene-type hydride complexes allow the study of elementary reactions that occur at rare-earth-metal centers and of catalytic reactions involving bonds between rare-earth metals and hydrides. In addition to neutral hydrides, cationic derivatives have now become available. PMID:25413985

  10. Rare earth focused ion beam implantation utilizing Er and Pr liquid alloy ion sources

    E-print Network

    Steckl, Andrew J.

    procedures for the fabrication of Er­Ni and Pr­Pt liquid alloy ion sources LAIS . Er2 beam with target write implantation. © 1999 American Vacuum Society. S0734-211X 99 08306-7 I. INTRODUCTION Rare earth solubility of Er in Si 1018 atoms/cm3 ) and the thermal quenching effect.4 The thermal quenching effect could

  11. The Transport of Solar Ions Through the Earth's Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lennartsson, O. W.

    1999-01-01

    This report covers the initial phase of an investigation that was originally selected by NASA Headquarters for funding by a grant but was later transferred to NASA GSFC for continued funding under a new and separate contract. The principal objective of the investigation, led by Dr. O.W. Lennartsson, is to extract information about the solar origin plasma in Earth's magnetosphere, specifically about the entry and transport of this plasma, using energetic (10 eV/e to 18 keV/e) ion composition data from the Lockheed Plasma Composition Experiment on the NASA/ESA International Sun-Earth Explorer One (ISEE 1) satellite. These data were acquired many years ago, from November 1977 through March of 1982, but, because of subsequent failures of similar experiments on several other spacecraft, they are still the only substantial ion composition data available from Earth's magnetotail, beyond 10 R(sub E), in the critically important sub-kev to keV energy range. All of the Lockheed data now exist in a compacted scientific format, suitable for large-scale statistical investigations, which has been archived both at Lockheed Martin in Palo Alto and at the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) in Greenbelt. The completion of the archiving, by processing the remaining half of the data, was made possible by separate funding through a temporary NASA program for data restoration and was given priority over the data analysis by a no-cost extension of the subject grant. By chance, the period of performance coincided with an international study of source and loss processes of magnetospheric plasma, sponsored by the International Space Science Institute (ISSI) in Bern, Switzerland, for which Dr. Lennartsson was invited to serve as one of 12 co-chairs. This study meshed well with the continued analysis of the NASA/Lockheed ISEE ion composition data and provided a natural forum for a broader discussion of the results from this unique experiment. What follows is arranged, for the most part, in the context of the ISSI project.

  12. Saturation magnetic moments, magnetic hyperfine fields and electric field gradients at nuclei in the heavy rare earth metals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. M. Eagles

    1975-01-01

    The contributions of 4f, 5d and 6s electrons to the saturation magnetic moments and magnetic hyperfine fields in the heavy rare earth metals are calculated using the model described in the previous paper. It is found that 4f shell moments are reduced from their free ion values by amounts varying from 0.05µB in Gd to several tenths of a Bohr

  13. Microbial controls on metal ion mobility

    E-print Network

    Leslie, Karla Louise

    2012-12-31

    In this dissertation, the biogeochemical controls on metal mobility in the subsurface are examined; specifically, the release of metals from buried mineralization, the transport of metals through overburden, and the ...

  14. Coloration of Sapphire by Metal-Ion Implantation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yukinori Saito; Hideo Kumagai; Shinji Suganomata

    1985-01-01

    Relations between the coloration of synthetic sapphire and impure elements introduced by ion implantation were investigated. Ion species used for implantation were Nb+, Fe+, Cu+, Co+, Ti+, Cr+. Doses of metal ions were 1× 1017˜ 3× 1017 ions\\/cm2. The color of the parts implanted with Fe+ or Co+ and subsequently annealed at 1000°C for 3 h was yellowish-brown or light

  15. Metal sulfide and rare-earth phosphate nanostructures and methods of making same

    DOEpatents

    Wong, Stanislaus; Zhang, Fen

    2014-05-13

    The present invention provides a method of producing a crystalline metal sulfide nanostructure. The metal is a transitional metal or a Group IV metal. In the method, a porous membrane is placed between a metal precursor solution and a sulfur precursor solution. The metal cations of the metal precursor solution and sulfur ions of the sulfur precursor solution react, thereby producing a crystalline metal sulfide nanostructure.

  16. Distributions of rare earths and heavy metals in field-grown maize after application of rare earth-containing fertilizer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xingkai Xu; Wangzhao Zhu; Zijian Wang; Geert-Jan Witkamp

    2002-01-01

    Rare earths are widely applied in Chinese agriculture to improve crop nutrition through the use of fertilizers, yet little is known of their accumulation in field-grown crops. We have studied the distribution of 16 rare earths (Sc, Y and 14 lanthanide elements) in field-grown maize and the concentration of heavy metals in the grains after application of rare earth-containing fertilizer.

  17. STUDY OF INDUSTRIAL ION EXCHANGE SEPARATION OF RARE EARTH ELEMENTS BY EDTA COPPER METHOD. 3. MANUFACTURE OF ION EXCHANGE EQUIPMENT

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Nishigori; T. Ishiyama; T. Kuroda

    1961-01-01

    Ion exchange equipment was manufactured for trial. The equipment has ; five ion exchange towers, and the total capacity is 100 liters of strong acid ; type ion exchange resin. The equipment purifies 2.2 kg of rare earth into an ; oxide. In the case of refining of 2.2 kg of cerium oxide, 79% in purity, 1.37 kg ; of

  18. Contents of heavy alkaline-earth (Sr, Ba) and rare-earth (Y, La, Ce) metals in technogenically contaminated soils

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yu. N. Vodyanitskii; A. T. Savichev; A. A. Vasil'Ev; E. S. Lobanova; A. N. Chashchin; E. V. Prokopovich

    2010-01-01

    The contents of heavy alkaline-earth (Sr and Ba) and rare-earth (Y, La, and Ce) metals have been studied in two technogeochemical anomalies and in the soils of Perm and Chusovoi. The soils are contaminated with barium, lanthanum, and cerium in the territory of the Cherepovets technogeochemical anomaly formed due to the atmospheric emissions from the Severstal metallurgical works. Strontium, barium,

  19. Adhesive bonding of ion beam textured metals and fluoropolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Sovey, J. S.

    1978-01-01

    An electron bombardment argon ion source was used to ion etch various metals and fluoropolymers. The metal and fluoropolymers were exposed to (0.5 to 1.0) keV Ar ions at ion current densities of (0.2 to 1.5) mA/sq cm for various exposure times. The resulting surface texture is in the form of needles or spires whose vertical dimensions may range from tenths to hundreds of micrometers, depending on the selection of beam energy, ion current density, and etch time. The bonding of textured surfaces is accomplished by ion beam texturing mating pieces of either metals or fluoropolymers and applying a bonding agent which wets in and around the microscopic cone-like structures. After bonding, both tensile and shear strength measurements were made on the samples. Also tested, for comparison's sake, were untextured and chemically etched fluoropolymers. The results of these measurements are presented.

  20. Adhesive bonding of ion beam textured metals and fluoropolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Sovey, J. S.

    1978-01-01

    An electron-bombardment argon ion source was used to ion-etch various metals and fluoropolymers. The metal and fluoropolymers were exposed to (0.5 to 1.0)-keV Ar ions at ion current densities of 0.2 to 1.5 mA/sq cm for various exposure times. The resulting surface texture is in the form of needles or spires whose vertical dimensions may range from tenths to hundreds of micrometers, depending on the selection of beam energy, ion current density, and etch time. The bonding of textured surfaces is accomplished by ion-beam texturing mating pieces of either metals or fluoropolymers and applying a bonding agent which wets in and around the microscopic conelike structures. After bonding, both tensile and shear strength measurements were made on the samples. Also tested, for comparison's sake, were untextured and chemically etched fluoropolymers. The results of these measurements are presented in this paper.

  1. The role of metal ions in oxygen activation.

    PubMed

    Veprek-Siska, J

    1979-01-01

    The reaction of oxygen with a common organic molecule is a spin-forbidden process catalyzed by transition metal ions. Some reactions of this type were proved to be trace metal catalyzed. It is therefore reasonable to assume that all reactions of molecular oxygen with organic molecules are induced by trace metals; in the absolute absence of transition metal ions these reactions would not proceed at all. Based on detailed studies of two well known oxygen reactions the mechanism of trace metal catalysis was formulated. The experimental results are consistent with the conception that transition metal ions associate with all species present in the system to form complexes or clusters of various composition and stability. Some of them are redox reactive and represent true intermediates of the catalyzed reaction. PMID:517007

  2. Generation of cationic or neutral rare earth metal alkoxides in the gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Geribaldi, S.; Breton, S.; Decouzon, M.; Azzaro, M. [Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis (France)

    1995-12-31

    In recent years, the studies concerning chemical, structural and applied aspects of alkoxo and aryloxo chemistry of lanthanoids, yttrium, and scandium have been greatly boosted, not only because of the exploitation of these metal alkoxides or oxides in new synthetic reactions, but also because of their application in high-tech materials often using gas phase processes. In this work, the cell of a Fourier transform mass spectrometer is used as a vapour chemical reactor in order to test a new concept for gas phase preparation of rare earth metal alkoxides from reactions between alcohols, ROH, or trialkylorthoformates, HC(OR){sub 3}, and laser generated metal ions M{sup +}. The experiments are carried out with M = Sc, Y, Lu, and on the one hand with methanol, ethanol, propan-1-ol, propan-2-ol and 2-methylproapan-2-ol, and on the other hand with trimethyl, triethyl and tripropylorthoformates. In any case, the exothermic gas phase reactions with alcohols lead to dialkoxymetal cations solvated with alcohol molecules, M{sup +}(OR){sub 2}(ROH){sub n}, as final products. On the other hand, the reactions with orthoformates lead to a M(OR){sub 2}{sup +} species which in turn gives the HC(OR){sub 2}{sup +} ion and the neutral trialkoxide M(OR){sub 3} in a subsequent reaction with orthoformates.

  3. Separation of platinum group metal ions by Donnan dialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Brajter, K.; Slonawska, K.; Cox, J.A.

    1985-10-01

    Separations of metal ions on the basis of Donnan dialysis across anion-exchange membranes should be possible if the receiver electrolyte composition favors the formation of selected anionic complexes of the sample metal ions. Moreover, such a separation has the possibility of being better suited from some applications than batch or column experiments with anion-exchange resins. The above hypothesis are tested on the platinum-group metal ions, Pt(IV), Rh(III), Pd(II), Ir(III), and Ir(IV). 13 references, 4 tables.

  4. Progress in metal ion separation and preconcentration : an overview.

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, A. H.

    1998-05-19

    A brief historical perspective covering the most mature chemically-based metal ion separation methods is presented, as is a summary of the recommendations made in the 1987 National Research Council (NRC) report entitled ''Separation and Purification: Critical Needs and Opportunities''. A review of Progress in Metal Ion Separation and Preconcentration shows that advances are occurring in each area of need cited by the NRC. Following an explanation of the objectives and general organization of this book, the contents of each chapter are briefly summarized and some future research opportunities in metal ion separations are presented.

  5. Preparation and structure of carbonated calcium hydroxyapatite substituted with heavy rare earth ions

    SciTech Connect

    Yasukawa, Akemi, E-mail: yasukawa@cc.hirosaki-u.ac.jp [School of Home Economics, Faculty of Education, Hirosaki University, 1-bunkyo, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8560 (Japan)] [School of Home Economics, Faculty of Education, Hirosaki University, 1-bunkyo, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8560 (Japan); Kandori, Kazuhiko [School of Chemistry, Osaka University of Education, 4-698-1 Asahigaoka, Kashiwara, Osaka 582-8582 (Japan)] [School of Chemistry, Osaka University of Education, 4-698-1 Asahigaoka, Kashiwara, Osaka 582-8582 (Japan); Tanaka, Hidekazu [Department of Material Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Shimane University, 1060 Nishikawatsu, Matsue, Shimane 690-8504 (Japan)] [Department of Material Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Shimane University, 1060 Nishikawatsu, Matsue, Shimane 690-8504 (Japan); Gotoh, Keiko [Faculty of Human Life and Environment, Nara Women's University, Kita-uoya-nishi, Nara 630-8506 (Japan)] [Faculty of Human Life and Environment, Nara Women's University, Kita-uoya-nishi, Nara 630-8506 (Japan)

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LnCaHap solid solution particles were prepared using five types of heavy rare earth ions by a precipitation method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The length and the crystallinity of the LnCaHap particles first increased and then decreased with increasing Ln{sup 3+} contents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A series of YCaHap solid solution particles formed with Y/(Y + Ca) = 0-0.10 were investigated using various methods in detail. -- Abstract: Calcium hydroxyapatite (CaHap) particles substituted five types of heavy rare earth ions (Ln: Y{sup 3+}, Gd{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+}) were synthesized using a precipitation method and characterized using various means. These Ln ions strongly affected the crystal phases and the structures of the products. With increasing Ln/(Ln + Ca) in the starting solution ([X{sub Ln}]), the length and the crystallinity of the particles first increased and then decreased. The rare earth metal-calcium hydroxyapatite (LnCaHap) solid solution particles were obtained at [X{sub Y}] {<=} 0.10 for substituting Y system and at [X{sub Ln}] {<=} 0.01-0.03 for substituting the other Ln systems. LnPO{sub 4} was mixed with LnCaHap at higher [X{sub Ln}] for all Ln systems. A series of yttrium-calcium hydroxyapatite (YCaHap) solid solutions with [X{sub Y}] = 0-0.10 were investigated using XRD, TEM, ICP-AES, IR and TG-DTA in detail.

  6. Metal ion levels decrease after revision for metallosis arising from large-diameter metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ebreo, Darren; Khan, Abdul; El-Meligy, Mohammed; Armstrong, Catherine; Peter, Viju

    2011-12-01

    Concerns have been renewed regarding the possible long-term effects of elevated circulating levels of cobalt and chromium as a direct result of implantation of large femoral head diameter metal-on-metal bearings. In order to establish whether metal ion levels remain persistently elevated, we compared metal ion levels before and after revision surgery in patients with large head diameter (greater than 38 mm) metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty or hip resurfacing arthroplasty. At greater than one year post removal of a large-diameter metal-on-metal hip implant for the indication of symptomatic metallosis, metal ion levels were found to fall to almost normal levels. PMID:22308623

  7. Witnessing spin-orbit thermal entanglement in rare-earth ions

    E-print Network

    O. S. Duarte; C. S. Castro; D. O. Soares-Pinto; M. S. Reis

    2013-08-07

    We explore spin-orbit thermal entanglement in rare-earth ions, based on a witness obtained from mean energies. The entanglement temperature $T_{E}$, below which entanglement emerges, is found to be thousands of kelvin above room temperature for all light rare earths. This demonstrate the robustness to environmental fluctuations of entanglement between internal degrees of freedom of a single ion.

  8. Metal ion levels: how can they help us?

    PubMed

    Griffin, William L

    2014-04-01

    Ion levels have been shown to reliably predict abnormal function of the bearing surface with increased wear, but ion levels should not be used alone as a trigger for when to proceed with revision surgery with metal-metal articulations. Risk stratification strategies help determine which patients should be monitored more closely with serial ion levels, cross-sectional imaging with a MARS MRI, or proceed on to revision. Based on the current data available, an ion level greater than 4.5 ppb (Cr or Co) may serve as a threshold for when abnormal wear is occurring, and is suggested as a trigger for a MARS MRI scan. PMID:24655610

  9. Metal ion acquisition in Staphylococcus aureus: overcoming nutritional immunity

    PubMed Central

    Cassat, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Transition metals are essential nutrients to virtually all forms of life, including bacterial pathogens. In Staphylococcus aureus, metal ions participate in diverse biochemical processes such as metabolism, DNA synthesis, regulation of virulence factors, and defense against oxidative stress. As an innate immune response to bacterial infection, vertebrate hosts sequester transition metals in a process that has been termed “nutritional immunity.” To successfully infect vertebrates, S. aureus must overcome host sequestration of these critical nutrients. The objective of this review is to outline the current knowledge of staphylococcal metal ion acquisition systems, as well as to define the host mechanisms of nutritional immunity during staphylococcal infection. PMID:22048835

  10. Silica-polyamine composite materials for heavy metal ion removal, recovery, and recycling. 2. Metal ion separations from mine wastewater and soft metal ion extraction efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, R.J.; Pang, D.; Beatty, S.T.; Rosenberg, E.

    1999-12-01

    Silica-polyamine composites have been synthesized which have metal ion capacities as high as 0.84 mmol/g for copper ions removed from aqueous solutions. In previous reports it has been demonstrated that these materials survive more than 3,000 cycles of metal ion extraction, elution, and regeneration with almost no loss of capacity (less than 10%). This paper describes two modified silica-polyamine composite materials and reveals the results of tests designed to determine the effectiveness of these materials for extracting and separating metal ions from actual mining wastewater samples. Using these materials, the concentration of copper, aluminum, and zinc in Berkeley Pit mine wastewater is reduced to below allowable discharge limits. The recovered copper and zinc solutions were greater than 90% pure, and metal ion concentration factors of over 20 for copper were realized. Further, the ability of one of these materials to decrease low levels of the soft metals cadmium, mercury, and lead from National Sanitation Foundation recommended challenge levels to below Environmental Protection Agency allowable limits is also reported.

  11. Metal ion removal from aqueous solution using physic seed hull.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Masita; Maitra, Saikat; Ahmad, Naveed; Bustam, Azmi; Sen, T K; Dutta, Binay K

    2010-07-15

    The potential of physic seed hull (PSH), Jantropha curcas L. as an adsorbent for the removal of Cd(2+) and Zn(2+) metal ions from aqueous solution has been investigated. It has been found that the amount of adsorption for both Cd(2+) and Zn(2+) increased with the increase in initial metal ions concentration, contact time, temperature, adsorbent dosage and the solution pH (in acidic range), but decreased with the increase in the particle size of the adsorbent. The adsorption process for both metal ions on PSH consists of three stages-a rapid initial adsorption followed by a period of slower uptake of metal ions and virtually no uptake at the final stage. The kinetics of metal ions adsorption on PSH followed a pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption equilibrium data were fitted in the three adsorption isotherms-Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherms. The data best fit in the Langmuir isotherm indication monolayer chemisorption of the metal ions. The adsorption capacity of PSH for both Zn(2+) and Cd(2+) was found to be comparable with other available adsorbents. About 36-47% of the adsorbed metal could be leached out of the loaded PSH using 0.1M HCl as the eluting medium. PMID:20362390

  12. Metal Ion Substrate Inhibition of Ferrochelatase*S?

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Gregory A.; Sampson, Matthew P.; Ferreira, Gloria C.

    2008-01-01

    Ferrochelatase catalyzes the insertion of ferrous iron into protoporphyrin IX to form heme. Robust kinetic analyses of the reaction mechanism are complicated by the instability of ferrous iron in aqueous solution, particularly at alkaline pH values. At pH 7.00 the half-life for spontaneous oxidation of ferrous ion is approximately 2 min in the absence of metal complexing additives, which is sufficient for direct comparisons of alternative metal ion substrates with iron. These analyses reveal that purified recombinant ferrochelatase from both murine and yeast sources inserts not only ferrous iron but also divalent cobalt, zinc, nickel, and copper into protoporphyrin IX to form the corresponding metalloporphyrins but with considerable mechanistic variability. Ferrous iron is the preferred metal ion substrate in terms of apparent kcat and is also the only metal ion substrate not subject to severe substrate inhibition. Substrate inhibition occurs in the order Cu2+ > Zn2+ > Co2+ > Ni2+ and can be alleviated by the addition of metal complexing agents such as ?-mercaptoethanol or imidazole to the reaction buffer. These data indicate the presence of two catalytically significant metal ion binding sites that may coordinately regulate a selective processivity for the various potential metal ion substrates. PMID:18593702

  13. Synthesis, characterization and reactivity of heteroleptic rare earth metal bis(phenolate) complexes.

    PubMed

    Qi, Ruipeng; Liu, Bao; Xu, Xiaoping; Yang, Zijian; Yao, Yingming; Zhang, Yong; Shen, Qi

    2008-10-01

    The synthesis, characterization and reactivity of heteroleptic rare earth metal complexes supported by the carbon-bridged bis(phenolate) ligand 2,2'-methylene-bis(6-tert-butyl-4-methyl-phenoxo) (MBMP2-) are described. Reaction of (C5H5)3Ln(THF) with MBMPH2 in a 1:1.5 molar ratio in THF at 50 degrees C produced the heteroleptic rare earth metal bis(phenolate) complexes (C5H5)Ln(MBMP)(THF)n (Ln=La, n=3 (); Ln=Yb (), Y (), n=2) in nearly quantitative yields. The residual C5H5- groups in complexes to can be substituted by the bridged bis(phenolate) ligands at elevated temperature to give the neutral rare earth metal bis(phenolate) complexes, and the ionic radii have a profound effect on the structures of the final products. Complex reacted with MBMPH2 in a 1:0.5 molar ratio in toluene at 80 degrees C to produce a dinuclear complex (MBMP)La(THF)(micro-MBMP)2La(THF)2 () in good isolated yield; whereas complexes and reacted with MBMPH2 under the same conditions to give (MBMP)Ln(MBMPH)(THF)2 (Ln=Yb (), Y ()) as the final products, in which one hydroxyl group of the phenol is coordinated to the rare earth metal in a neutral fashion. The reactivity of complexes and with some metal alkyls was explored. Reaction of complex with 1 equiv. of AlEt3 in toluene at room temperature afforded unexpected ligand redistributed products, and a discrete ion pair ytterbium complex [(MBMP)Yb(THF)2(DME)][(MBMP)2Yb(THF)2] () was isolated in moderate yield. Furthermore, reaction of complex with 1 equiv. of ZnEt2 in toluene gave a ligand redistributed complex [(micro-MBMP)Zn(THF)]2 () in reasonable isolated yield. Similar reaction of complex with ZnEt2 also afforded complex ; whereas the reaction of complex with 1 equiv. of n-BuLi in THF afforded the heterodimetallic complex [(THF)Yb(MBMP)2Li(THF)2] (). All of these complexes were well characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectra, and single-crystal structure determination, in the cases of complexes , and -. PMID:18802614

  14. Effects of metal ions on fibroblasts and spiral ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Paasche, G; Ceschi, P; Löbler, M; Rösl, C; Gomes, P; Hahn, A; Rohm, H W; Sternberg, K; Lenarz, T; Schmitz, K-P; Barcikowski, S; Stöver, T

    2011-04-01

    Degeneration of spiral ganglion cells (SGC) after deafness and fibrous tissue growth around the electrode carrier after cochlear implantation are two of the major challenges in current cochlear implant research. Metal ions are known to possess antimicrobial and antiproliferative potential. The use of metal ions could therefore provide a way to reduce tissue growth around the electrode array after cochlear implantation. Here, we report on in vitro experiments with different concentrations of metal salts with antiproliferative and toxic effects on fibroblasts, PC-12 cells, and freshly isolated spiral ganglion cells, the target cells for electrical stimulation by a cochlear implant. Standard cell lines (NIH/3T3 and L-929 fibroblasts and PC-12 cells) and freshly isolated SGC were incubated with concentrations of metal ions between 0.3 ?mol/liter and 10 mmol/liter for 48 hr. Cell survival was investigated by neutral red uptake, CellQuantiBlue assay, or counting of stained surviving neurons. Silver ions exhibited distinct thresholds for proliferating and confluent cells. For zinc ions, the effective concentration was lower for fibroblasts than for PC-12 cells. SGC showed comparable thresholds for reduced cell survival not only for silver and zinc ions but also for copper(II) ions, indicating that these ions might be promising for reducing tissue growth on the surface of CI electrode arrays. These effects were also observed when combinations of two of these ions were investigated. PMID:21312225

  15. Ion exchange extraction of heavy metals from wastewater sludges.

    PubMed

    Al-Enezi, G; Hamoda, M F; Fawzi, N

    2004-01-01

    Heavy metals are common contaminants of some industrial wastewater. They find their way to municipal wastewaters due to industrial discharges into the sewerage system or through household chemicals. The most common heavy metals found in wastewaters are lead, copper, nickel, cadmium, zinc, mercury, arsenic, and chromium. Such metals are toxic and pose serious threats to the environment and public health. In recent years, the ion exchange process has been increasingly used for the removal of heavy metals or the recovery of precious metals. It is a versatile separation process with the potential for broad applications in the water and wastewater treatment field. This article summarizes the results obtained from a laboratory study on the removal of heavy metals from municipal wastewater sludges obtained from Ardhiya plant in Kuwait. Data on heavy metal content of the wastewater and sludge samples collected from the plant are presented. The results obtained from laboratory experiments using a commercially available ion exchange resin to remove heavy metals from sludge were discussed. A technique was developed to solubilize such heavy metals from the sludge for subsequent treatment by the ion exchange process. The results showed high efficiency of extraction, almost 99.9%, of heavy metals in the concentration range bound in wastewater effluents and sludges. Selective removal of heavy metals from a contaminated wastewater/sludge combines the benefits of being economically prudent and providing the possibility of reuse/recycle of the treated wastewater effluents and sludges. PMID:15027828

  16. Noble metal ion bombardment of polycrystalline metal surfaces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. G. Burrow; R. B. Burtt

    1972-01-01

    Measurements have been made of electron ejection and positive ion reflection from clean and contaminated vacuum-deposited films of silver, gold and aluminium by positive ions of nitrogen, sodium, copper, silver and gold with incident kinetic energies between 20 and 500 eV. An attempt has been made to account for the experimental results by calculating the effects of ion neutralization.

  17. Extracting metal ions with diphosphonic acid, or derivative thereof

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Gatrone, R.C.; Nash, K.L.

    1994-07-26

    Thermodynamically-unstable complexing agents which are diphosphonic acids and diphosphonic acid derivatives (or sulfur containing analogs), like carboxyhydroxymethanediphosphonic acid and vinylidene-1,1-diphosphonic acid, are capable of complexing with metal ions, and especially metal ions in the II, III, IV, V and VI oxidation states, to form stable, water-soluble metal ion complexes in moderately alkaline to highly-acidic media. However, the complexing agents can be decomposed, under mild conditions, into non-organic compounds which, for many purposes are environmentally-nondamaging compounds thereby degrading the complex and releasing the metal ion for disposal or recovery. Uses for such complexing agents as well as methods for their manufacture are also described. 1 fig.

  18. Ion plating seals microcracks or porous metal components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.; Buckley, D. H.; Brainard, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    Description of ion plating process is given. Advantage of this process is that any plating metal or alloy can be selected, whereas, for conventional welding, material selection is limited by compatability.

  19. Extracting metal ions with diphosphonic acid, or derivative thereof

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, Earl P. (Argonne, IL); Gatrone, Ralph C. (Argonne, IL); Nash, Kenneth L. (Argonne, IL)

    1994-01-01

    Thermodynamically-unstable complexing agents which are diphosphonic acids and diphosphonic acid derivatives (or sulphur containing analogs), like carboxyhydroxymethanediphosphonic acid and vinylidene-1,1-diphosphonic acid, are capable of complexing with metal ions, and especially metal ions in the II, III, IV, V and VI oxidation states, to form stable, water-soluble metal ion complexes in moderately alkaline to highly-acidic media. However, the complexing agents can be decomposed, under mild conditions, into non-organic compounds which, for many purposes are environmentally-nondamaging compounds thereby degrading the complex and releasing the metal ion for disposal or recovery. Uses for such complexing agents as well as methods for their manufacture are also described.

  20. An Engineered Palette of Metal Ion Quenchable Fluorescent Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaozhen; Strub, Marie-Paule; Barnard, Travis J.; Noinaj, Nicholas; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Buchanan, Susan K.; Taraska, Justin W.

    2014-01-01

    Many fluorescent proteins have been created to act as genetically encoded biosensors. With these sensors, changes in fluorescence report on chemical states in living cells. Transition metal ions such as copper, nickel, and zinc are crucial in many physiological and pathophysiological pathways. Here, we engineered a spectral series of optimized transition metal ion-binding fluorescent proteins that respond to metals with large changes in fluorescence intensity. These proteins can act as metal biosensors or imaging probes whose fluorescence can be tuned by metals. Each protein is uniquely modulated by four different metals (Cu2+, Ni2+, Co2+, and Zn2+). Crystallography revealed the geometry and location of metal binding to the engineered sites. When attached to the extracellular terminal of a membrane protein VAMP2, dimeric pairs of the sensors could be used in cells as ratiometric probes for transition metal ions. Thus, these engineered fluorescent proteins act as sensitive transition metal ion-responsive genetically encoded probes that span the visible spectrum. PMID:24752441

  1. Development of compact cluster ion sources using metal cluster complexes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Mizota; H. Nonaka; T. Fujimoto; A. Kurokawa; S. Ichimura

    2004-01-01

    In order to develop a new compact cluster ion source as a low damage sputtering source for SIMS to analyze ultra-shallow dopant state we have studied the possibility of using a metal cluster complex as an ion beam source. Metal cluster complexes such as Os3(CO)12 and Ir4(CO)12 have been studied from the view point of their stability in high vacuum

  2. Metal ion implantation for large scale surface modification

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.G.

    1992-10-01

    Intense energetic beams of metal ions can be produced by using a metal vapor vacuum arc as the plasma discharge from which the ion beam is formed. We have developed a number of ion sources of this kind and have built a metal ion implantation facility which can produce repetitively pulsed ion beams with mean ion energy up to several hundred key, pulsed beam current of more than an ampere, and time averaged current of several tens of milliamperes delivered onto a downstream target. We've also done some preliminary work on scaling up this technology to very large size. For example, a 50-cm diameter (2000 cm[sup 2]) set of beam formation electrodes was used to produce a pulsed titanium beam with ion current over 7 amperes at a mean ion energy of 100 key. Separately, a dc embodiment has been used to produce a dc titanium ion beam with current over 600 mA, power supply limited in this work, and up to 6 amperes of dc plasma ion current was maintained for over an hour. In a related program we've developed a plasma immersion method for applying thin metallic and compound films in which the added species is atomically mixed to the substrate. By adding a gas flow to the process, well-bonded compound films can also be formed; metallic films and multilayers as well as oxides and nitrides with mixed transition zones some hundreds of angstroms thick have been synthesized. Here we outline these parallel metal-plasma-based research programs and describe the hardware that we've developed and some of the surface modification research that we've done with it.

  3. Novel Synergistic Agent for Selective Separation of Yttrium from Other Rare Earth Metals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Terufumi Miyata; Masahiro Goto; Fumiyuki Nakashio

    1995-01-01

    An oil-soluble synergistic agent has been developed for the selective separation of yttrium (Y) from the other rare earth metals. The synergistic agent is a polyaminocarboxylic acid alkylderivative and has interfacial activity like that of surfactants. Separation of yttrium from heavy rare earth metals [erbium (Er) and holmium (Ho)] in the presence of the synergistic agent was carried out with

  4. Correlation between volatility of rare-earth metals and encapsulation of their carbides in carbon nanocapsules

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yahachi Saito; Mitsumasa Okuda; Tadanobu Yoshikawa; Atsuo Kasuya; Yuichiro Nishina

    1994-01-01

    Encapsulation of metals in multilayered graphitic capsules has been studied for all the rare-earth elements (Sc, Y, and Ln = La, Ce, ..., Lu) excluding Pm by using electric arc discharge. Electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction of carbonaceous products revealed that most of rare-earth metals (Sc, Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, and Lu) were encapsulated

  5. Tris(pyrazolyl)methanides of the alkaline earth metals: influence of the substitution pattern on stability and degradation.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christoph; Koch, Alexander; Görls, Helmar; Krieck, Sven; Westerhausen, Matthias

    2015-01-20

    Trispyrazolylmethanides commonly act as strong tridentate bases toward metal ions. This expected coordination behavior has been observed for tris(3,4,5-trimethylpyrazolyl)methane (1a), which yields the alkaline-earth-metal bis[tris(3,4,5-trimethylpyrazolyl)methanides] of magnesium (1b), calcium (1c), strontium (1d), and barium (1e) via deprotonation of 1a with dibutylmagnesium and [Ae{N(SiMe3)2}2] (Ae = Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba, respectively). Barium complex 1e degrades during recrystallization that was attempted from aromatic hydrocarbons and ethers. In these scorpionate complexes, the metal ions are embedded in distorted octahedral coordination spheres. Contrarily, tris(3-thienylpyrazolyl)methane (2a) exhibits a strikingly different reactivity. Dibutylmagnesium is unable to deprotonate 2a, whereas [Ae{N(SiMe3)2}2] (Ae = Ca, Sr, and Ba) smoothly metalates 2a. However, the primary alkaline-earth-metal bis[tris(3-thienylpyrazolyl)methanides] of Ca (2c), Sr (2d), and Ba (2e) represent intermediates and degrade under the formation of the alkaline-earth-metal bis(3-thienylpyrazolates) of calcium (3c), strontium (3d), and barium (3e) and the elimination of tetrakis(3-thienylpyrazolyl)ethene (4). To isolate crystalline compounds, 3-thienylpyrazole has been metalated, and the corresponding derivatives [(HPz(Tp))4Mg(Pz(Tp))2] (3b), dinuclear [(tmeda)Ca(Pz(Tp))2]2 (3c), mononuclear [(pmdeta)Sr(Pz(Tp))2] (3d), and [(hmteta)Ba(Pz(Tp))2] (3e) have been structurally characterized. Regardless of the applied stoichiometry, magnesiation of thienylpyrazole 3a with dibutylmagnesium yields [(HPz(Tp))4Mg(Pz(Tp))2] (3b), which is stabilized in the solid state by intramolecular N-H···N···H-N hydrogen bridges. The degradation of [Ae{C(Pz(R))3}2] (R = Ph and Tp) has been studied by quantum chemical methods, the results of which propose an intermediate complex of the nature [{(Pz(R))2C}2Ca{Pz(R)}2]; thereafter, the singlet carbenes ([:C(Pz(R))2]) dimerize in the vicinity of the alkaline earth metal to tetrapyrazolylethene, which is liberated from the coordination sphere as a result of it being a very poor ligand for an s-block metal ion. PMID:25563345

  6. Ion beam mixing of metals and ceramics--material considerations

    SciTech Connect

    McHargue, C.J.

    1988-01-01

    Most studies on ion beam mixing have been concerned with metal-metal or metal-silicon systems. The great activity in this field is attested by the fact that a 1983 review tabulated data for 38 bilayer and 25 multilayer systems. The initial models for mixing focused on the dynamics of ion-solid interactions and produced models based on direct recoils, cascades, and enhanced diffusion due to radiation-produced defects. An earlier chapter contains a description of ion beam mixing processes and the mechanisms that have been proposed to describe material transport across the layer/substrate interface. In this chapter, the issues raised by the application of ion beam mixing to a system where at least one component is an insulating compound, e.g., a ceramic, are discussed. In order to narrow the subject, this chapter will deal with some of the questions arising from ion bombardment of thin metal films and insulator substrate systems. Much of the interest in ion beam mixing as applied to metal-insulator couples arises from the observation that bombardment with an ion beam often increases the adhesion of the film to the substrate. However, this chapter will not address that issue but will discuss the role of the materials properties that influence the microstructures so produced. 56 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Erosion yield of metal surface under ion pulsed irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivobokov, Valery; Stepanova, Olga; Yuryeva, Alena

    2013-11-01

    The paper is devoted to the study of erosion processes on a metal surface (Ag, Ni, Cu, W) under argon ion bombardment. The erosion yields including the sputtered and evaporated particles have been calculated for a wide range of the initial ion energy (1-1000 keV). They are revealed to reach the values from units to 104 atom/ion under a pulsed ion beam with the power density of 102-1010 W/cm2. The ion beam and target parameters are shown to influence on the erosion intensity.

  8. Production of negative hydrogen ions on metal grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oohara, W.; Maetani, Y.; Takeda, Takashi; Takeda, Toshiaki; Yokoyama, H.; Kawata, K.

    2015-03-01

    Negative hydrogen ions are produced on a nickel grid with positive-ion irradiation. In order to investigate the production mechanism, a copper grid without the chemisorption of hydrogen atoms and positive helium ions without negative ionization are used for comparison. Positive hydrogen ions reflected on the metal surface obtain two electrons from the surface and become negatively ionized. It is found that the production yield of negative ions by desorption ionization of chemisorbed hydrogen atoms seems to be small, and the production is a minor mechanism.

  9. Rare earth-transition metal alloy permanent magnet materials: 1960–1985

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. M. T. Velu; E. C. Subbarao

    1986-01-01

    Rare earths, primarily light rare earths, either alone or in combination with other rare earths, as in misch metal, alloyed with cobalt or iron, constitute a unique new class of permanent magnet materials with outstanding coercivity and other magnetic properties. These materials represent the first serious alternative to the alnicos and ferrites, discovered earlier. The intensity of interest in this

  10. ANALYSIS OF THE ELECTRON EXCITATION SPECTRA IN HEAVY RARE EARTH METALS, HYDRIDES AND OXIDES

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    397 ANALYSIS OF THE ELECTRON EXCITATION SPECTRA IN HEAVY RARE EARTH METALS, HYDRIDES AND OXIDES C thin evaporated foils of heavy rare earths (Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu) in three different chemical of high energy incident electrons (75 keV) transmitted through thin foils of yttric rare earth elements

  11. Solvent extraction of rare-earth metals by carboxylic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Preez, A.C. du; Preston, J.S. [Mintek, Randburg (South Africa)

    1992-04-01

    The solvent extraction of the trivalent lanthanides and yttrium from nitrate media by solutions of carboxylic acids in xylene has been studied. Commercially available carboxylic acids such as Versatic 10 and naphthenic acids were used, as well as model compounds of known structure, such as 2-ethylhexanoic and 3-cyclohexylpropanoic acids. In a few cases, extraction of the metals from sulphate and chloride solutions was also investigated. The dependence of the extraction properties of the carboxylic acids on the atomic number of the lanthanide shows a definite relationship to the steric bulk of the carboxylic acid molecule quantified by means of the steric parameter, E{sub s}{prime} of the substituent alkyl group. The stoichiometries of the extracted complexes for representative light (La), middle (Gd) and heavy (Lu) rare-earth metals were investigated by the slope-analysis technique for a sterically hindered acid (Versatic 10 acid; -E{prime}{sub s} = 3.83) and an acid with low steric hindrance (3-cyclohexylpropanoic acid; -E{prime}{sub s} = 0.28). 14 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Structural metals in the group I intron: a ribozyme with a multiple metal ion core

    PubMed Central

    Stahley, Mary R.; Adams, Peter L.; Wang, Jimin; Strobel, Scott A.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Metal ions play key roles in the folding and function for many structured RNAs, including group I introns. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of the Azoarcus bacterial group I intron in complex with its 5’ and 3’ exons. In addition to 222 nucleotides of RNA, the model includes eighteen Mg2+ and K+ ions. Five of the metals bind within 12 Å of the scissile phosphate and coordinate the majority of the oxygens biochemically implicated in conserved metal-RNA interactions. The metals are buried deep within the structure and form a multiple metal ion core that is critical to group I intron structure and function. Eight metal ions bind in other conserved regions of the intron structure, and the remaining five interact with peripheral structural elements. Each of the eighteen metals mediates tertiary interactions, facilitates local bends in the sugar-phosphate backbone or binds in the major groove of helices. The group I intron has a rich history of biochemical efforts aimed to identify RNA-metal ion interactions. The structural data are correlated to the biochemical results to further understand the role of metal ions in group I intron structure and function. PMID:17612557

  13. Structural metals in the group I intron: a ribozyme with a multiple metal ion core.

    PubMed

    Stahley, Mary R; Adams, Peter L; Wang, Jimin; Strobel, Scott A

    2007-09-01

    Metal ions play key roles in the folding and function for many structured RNAs, including group I introns. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of the Azoarcus bacterial group I intron in complex with its 5' and 3' exons. In addition to 222 nucleotides of RNA, the model includes 18 Mg(2+) and K(+) ions. Five of the metals bind within 12 A of the scissile phosphate and coordinate the majority of the oxygen atoms biochemically implicated in conserved metal-RNA interactions. The metals are buried deep within the structure and form a multiple metal ion core that is critical to group I intron structure and function. Eight metal ions bind in other conserved regions of the intron structure, and the remaining five interact with peripheral structural elements. Each of the 18 metals mediates tertiary interactions, facilitates local bends in the sugar-phosphate backbone or binds in the major groove of helices. The group I intron has a rich history of biochemical efforts aimed to identify RNA-metal ion interactions. The structural data are correlated to the biochemical results to further understand the role of metal ions in group I intron structure and function. PMID:17612557

  14. Enhancement of metal bioleaching from contaminated sediment using silver ion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shen-Yi Chen; Jih-Gaw Lin

    2009-01-01

    A silver-catalyzed bioleaching process was used to remove heavy metals from contaminated sediment in this study. The effects of silver concentration added on the performance of bioleaching process were investigated. High pH reduction rate was observed in the bioleaching process with silver ion. The silver ion added in the bioleaching process was incorporated into the lattice of the initial sulfide

  15. Influence of rare-earth metals on the physicomechanical properties of steel in thermomechanical working

    SciTech Connect

    Kotrechko, A.A.; Opal'chuk, A.S.; Kozyrskii, O.I.; Semenovskii, A.A.; Khrunik, R.A.; Katsov, K.B.; Kokotailo, I.V.

    1987-07-01

    The authors study the stabilizing influence of rare-earth metals on the structural condition of thermomechanically worked steels. 45, 60, U8A, 50KhGA, and 70S2KhA steels were used for the investigation. The rare-earth metals used were lanthanum, cerium, and a mixture of rare-earth metals called mischmetal. Impact strength tests of Mesnager specimens at room temperature showed that the favorable influence of high-temperature thermomechanical working is strengthened with an increase in carbon content in the steel. Results are shown of investigations at sub-zero temperatures of Charpy specimens with an initiated fatigue crack. Rare-earth metal microadditions are shown to have a good influence on the structurally sensitive characteristics of the steel, the contact strength and the corrosion resistance. Rare-earth metals also retard the development of the recrystallization processes of the deformed austenite.

  16. Metal ion stabilities correlate with electron affinity rather than hardness or softness

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Bruce Martin

    1998-01-01

    Quantitative metal ion hardness values allow a test of their correlation with aqueous metal ion stability constants of four hard ligands: hydroxide, fluoride, acetate and ammonia. For all four ligands the correlation is weak and dependent on the metal ion charge. For all but fluoride the correlation is in the wrong direction. Metal ion electron affinity correlates much better than

  17. Modification of medical metals by ion implantation of copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Y. Z.; Xiong, G. Y.; Liang, H.; Raman, S.; He, F.; Huang, Y.

    2007-10-01

    The effect of copper ion implantation on the antibacterial activity, wear performance and corrosion resistance of medical metals including 317 L of stainless steels, pure titanium, and Ti-Al-Nb alloy was studied in this work. The specimens were implanted with copper ions using a MEVVA source ion implanter with ion doses ranging from 0.5 × 10 17 to 4 × 10 17 ions/cm 2 at an energy of 80 keV. The antibacterial effect, wear rate, and inflexion potential were measured as a function of ion dose. The results obtained indicate that copper ion implantation improves the antibacterial effect and wear behaviour for all the three medical materials studied. However, corrosion resistance decreases after ion implantation of copper. Experimental results indicate that the antibacterial property and corrosion resistance should be balanced for medical titanium materials. The marked deteriorated corrosion resistance of 317 L suggests that copper implantation may not be an effective method of improving its antibacterial activity.

  18. Comparative study of metal and non-metal ion implantation in polymers: Optical and electrical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resta, V.; Quarta, G.; Farella, I.; Maruccio, L.; Cola, A.; Calcagnile, L.

    2014-07-01

    The implantation of 1 MeV metal (63Cu+, 107Ag+, 197Au+) and non-metal (4He+, 12C+) ions in a polycarbonate (PC) matrix has been studied in order to evaluate the role of ion species in the modification of optical and electrical properties of the polymer. When the ion fluence is above ?1 × 1013 ions cm-2, the threshold for latent tracks overlapping is overcome and ?-bonded carbon clusters grow and aggregate forming a network of conjugated Cdbnd C bonds. For fluences around 1 × 1017 ions cm-2, the aggregation phenomena induce the formation of amorphous carbon and/or graphite like structures. At the same time, nucleation of metal nanoparticles (NPs) from implanted species can take place when the supersaturation threshold is overcome. The optical absorption of the samples increases in the visible range and the optical band gap redshifts from 3.40 eV up to 0.70 eV mostly due to the carbonization process and the formation of C0x clusters and cluster aggregates. Specific structures in the extinction spectra are observed when metal ions are selected in contrast to the non-metal ion implanted PC, thus revealing the possible presence of noble metal based NPs interstitial to the C0x cluster network. The corresponding electrical resistance decreases much more when metal ions are implanted with at least a factor of 2 orders of magnitude difference than the non-metal ions based samples. An absolute value of ?107 ?/sq has been measured for implantation with metals at doses higher than 5 × 1016 ions cm-2, being 1017 ?/sq the corresponding sheet resistance for pristine PC.

  19. Oxidative mechanisms in the toxicity of metal ions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. J. Stohs; D. Bagchi

    1995-01-01

    The role of reactive oxygen species, with the subsequent oxidative deterioration of biological macromolecules in the toxicities associated with transition metal ions, is reviewed. Recent studies have shown that metals, including iron, copper, chromium, and vanadium undergo redox cycling, while cadmium, mercury, and nickel, as well as lead, deplete glutathione and protein-bound sulfhydryl groups, resulting in the production of reactive

  20. Current and prospective applications of metal ion–protein binding

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. K. M Ueda; P. W Gout; L Morganti

    2003-01-01

    Since immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) was first introduced, several variants of this method and many other metal affinity-based techniques have been devised. IMAC quickly established itself as a highly reliable purification procedure, showing rapid expansion in the number of preparative and analytical applications while not remaining confined to protein separation. It was soon applied to protein refolding (matrix-assisted

  1. Ion beam mixing of metal\\/fluoropolymer interfaces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. L. Dennis; R. E. Giedd; Y. Q. Wang; G. A. Glass

    1999-01-01

    Ion beam mixing of metals and polymers with very low dielectric constants such as Teflon can provide many applications in the area of electronic materials. This work is a study of the “mixing” effect of 50 keV nitrogen implanted thin metal layers on Teflon PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) substrates. RBS analysis shows that the distribution of thin layers of copper and chromium

  2. Ion beam mixing of metal\\/fluoropolymer interfaces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. L. Dennis; R. E. Giedd; Y. Q. Wang; G. A. Glass

    1999-01-01

    Ion beam mixing of metals and polymers with very low dielectric constants such as Teflon can provide many applications in the area of electronic materials. This work is a study of the ``mixing'' effect of 50 keV nitrogen implanted thin metal layers on Teflon PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) substrates. RBS analysis shows that the distribution of thin layers of copper and chromium

  3. Coprecipitation of trace metal ions during the synthesis of hectorite

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matteo Spagnuolo; Carmen Enid Mart??nez; Astrid R. Jacobson; Philippe Baveye; Murray B. McBride; Jeffrey Newton

    2004-01-01

    Physicochemical sequestration of transition metal ions is increasingly promoted as a cost-effective remediation technique for heavily contaminated soils and sediments. In enhanced stabilization\\/solidification strategies, this sequestration is hypothesized to result from the neoformation of various oxides, hydroxides and silicate minerals. However, more detailed information on the conditions that facilitate these neoformations or on the resulting metal sequestration is needed. In

  4. Surface Precipitation of Hydrolyzable Metal Ions on Oxide Surfaces

    E-print Network

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Surface Precipitation of Hydrolyzable Metal Ions on Oxide Surfaces S. E. Fendorf Heavy metalO2 and TiO2 near and beyond monolayer coverage. Surface precipitation of Al(III) and La(III) was observed on MnO2, but was not apparent on TiO2 nor in bulk solution. Al(III) formed a surface precipitate

  5. Energy distribution properties of focused ion beams from liquid metal ion sources

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. S. Uhm; E. H. Choi; G. S. Cho; S. O. Kang

    1995-01-01

    Summary form only given, as follows. The field-emitted electron and ion beams in a high-voltage diode are found to be sources of very high brightness. For example, liquid metal ion sources (LMIS) produce ion beams of 5 ?A current from a source size estimated to 10-7 cm. This is why the focused ion beams are often used in the direct

  6. Guided ion beam studies of reactions of alkaline earth ions with O2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalleska, N. F.; Armentrout, P. B.

    1994-06-01

    The endothermic reactions of Mg+ and Sr+ with O2 are studied in a guided ion beam mass spectrometer. Analysis of the reaction thresholds are used to obtain 0 K bond dissociation energies of MgO+ (2.50 ± 0.10 eV) and SrO+ (3.47 ± 0.06 eV), which are compared with other literature values. Analysis of these reaction cross sections and those previously published for the reaction of Ca+ with O2 [E.R. Fisher, J.L. Elkind, D.E. Clemmer, R. Georgiadis, S.K. Loh, N. Aristov, L.S. Sunderlin, and P.B. Armentrout, J. Chem. Phys., 93 (1990) 2676] suggests that there are both thermodynamic and impulsive reaction pathways. The latter play an increasingly important role in the reaction dynamics as the mass of the alkaline earth ion increases.

  7. PROTIC SOLVATION EFFECT IN ANIONEXCHANGE EXTRACTION OF METAL COMPLEX IONS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Akira OHKI; Shunsuke IDE; Makoto TAKAGI

    1986-01-01

    The influence of organic solvent was studied in the anion-exchange extraction of metal-chloride complexes, typically, 2(Q·C1)O + (M)W + 2(Cl)W? (Q2·MCl4)O (Q : liquid anion-exchanger; M: divalent metal ion; subscripts o and w denote organic and aqueous phases, respectively). When protic solvents such as chloroform, pentanol, octanol, and p-nonylphenol, were used as diluent, a large depression in the metal extraction

  8. Rare-earth metal prices in the USA ca. 1960 to 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedrick, J.B.

    1997-01-01

    Rare-earth metal prices were compiled from the late 1950s and early 1960s through 1994. Although commercial demand for rare-earth metals began in 1908, as the alloy mischmetal, commercial quantities of a wide range of individual rare-earth metals were not available until the late 1950s. The discovery of a large, high-grade rare-earth deposit at Mountain Pass, CA, USA, in 1949, was significant because it led to the production of commercial quantities of rare-earth elements that reduced prices and encouraged wider application of the materials. The availability of ore from Mountain Pass, and other large rare-earth deposits, especially those in Australia and China, has provided the world with abundant resources for rare-earth metal production. This availability, coupled with improved technology from Government and private-sector metallurgical research, has resulted in substantial decreases in rare-earth metal prices since the late 1950s and early 1960s. Price series for the individual rare-earth metals (except promethium) are quoted on a kilogram basis from the late 1950s and early 1960s through 1994. Prices are given in US dollars on an actual and constant dollar basis. Industrial and economic factors affecting prices during this time period are examined.

  9. Rare-earth metal prices in the USA ca. 1960 to 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedrick, James B.

    1997-01-01

    Rare-earth metal prices were compiled from the late 1950s and early 1960s through 1994. Although commercial demand for rare-earth metals began in 1908, as the alloy mischmetal, commercial quantities of a wide range of individual rare-earth metals were not available until the late 1950s. The discovery of a large, high-grade rare-earth deposit at Mountain Pass. CA, USA, in 1949, was significant because it led to the production of commercial quantities or rare-earth elements that reduced prices and encouraged wider application of the materials. The availability of ore from Mountain Pass, and other large rare-earth deposits, especially those in Australia and China, has provided the world with abundant resources for rare-earth metal production. This availability, coupled with improved technology from Government and private-sector metallurgical research, has resulted in substantial decreases in rare-earth metal prices since the late 1950s and early 1960s. Price series for the individual rare-earth metals (except promethium) are quoted on a kilogram basis from the late 1950s and early 1960s through 1994. Prices are given in US dollars on an actual and constant dollar basis. Industrial and economic factors affecting prices during this time period are examined.

  10. Plasma spectroscopy of metal ions for hyper-electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muto, Hideshi; Ohshiro, Yukimitsu; Yamaka, Shoichi; Watanabe, Shin-ichi; Oyaizu, Michihiro; Kubono, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Hidetoshi; Kase, Masayuki; Hattori, Toshiyuki; Shimoura, Susumu

    2014-02-01

    In this research, the optical line spectra of metal ions from ECR plasma were observed using a grating monochromator with a photomultiplier. The light intensity of line spectrum from the ECR plasma had a strong correlation with ion beam intensity measured by a magnetic mass analyzer. This correlation is a significant information for the beam tuning process, because it allows to conduct the extraction of the desired metal ion species from the ECR plasma. Separation of ion species of the same charge to mass ratio with an electromagnetic mass analyzer is known to be an exceptionally complex process, but this research provides a new approach for its simplification. In this paper the grating monochromator method for metal ion beam tuning such as 40Ca12+, 56Fe15+, and 85Rb20+ of hyper-ECR ion source as an injector for RIKEN Azimuthal Varying Field cyclotron is described.

  11. Fabrication of metal’s nanoparticles in silicon and sapphire by low energy ion implantation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Kh. Mirkarimov; T. D. Radjabov; A. I. Kamardin; Z. T. Khakimov

    2007-01-01

    This work devoted to the fabrication of metal nanoparticles in silicon and sapphire by ion implantation and their modification by laser annealing. This approach is promising for the development of optical composite materials in the optoelectronics production technology. Composite layers were fabricated in silicon by implantation of 40-keV Cu+ ions at a dose of 1017 ion\\/cm2 and an ion beam

  12. Surgical Variables Influence Metal Ion Levels After Hip Resurfacing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicholas M. Desy; Stephane G. Bergeron; Alain Petit; Olga L. Huk; John Antoniou

    2011-01-01

    Background  Metal-on-metal bearings in surface arthroplasty are associated with prolonged periods of elevated ion circulation. However,\\u000a there exists some controversy regarding the effect of different surgical variables on the concentration of metal ions in whole\\u000a blood of patients after hip resurfacing.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Questions\\/purposes  We sought to confirm which clinical and radiographic parameters are associated with elevated levels of cobalt, chromium, and\\u000a molybdenum after

  13. Metal ion induced-assembly of amylose in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinhui; Lin, Shudong; Hu, Jiwen; Liu, Guojun; Zhang, Gangwei; Tu, Yuanyuan; Luo, Hongsheng; Li, Wei

    2014-02-15

    Cu(2+)/amylose assemblies of various sizes were prepared through the Cu(2+) ion induced-assembly of amylose. These assembly structures were characterized via transmission electronic microscopy (TEM), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), (1)H NMR analysis, fluorescence spectroscopy (FL) and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy (UV-vis). The results from these characterizations revealed the existence of a complexation effect and/or a bridging effect between the hydroxyl groups of amylose and Cu(2+) ions, and that the formation of the hydrophobic domains promoted the formation of Cu(2+)/amylose assemblies. The use of other metal ions to induce the formation of spherical, flower- and wire-like amylose assemblies was investigated as well. A preliminary investigation on the ability of amylose to capture various metal ions was also performed, and the results of this work demonstrated that amylose could bind quantitatively metal ions that were at low concentrations. This work provided an alternative strategy for the recovery of precious metals from metal ion-containing aqueous solutions and the reduction of water pollution. PMID:24507310

  14. Oligomeric rare-earth metal cluster complexes with endohedral transition metal atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, Simon; Zimmermann, Sina; Brühmann, Matthias; Meyer, Eva; Rustige, Christian; Wolberg, Marike; Daub, Kathrin; Bell, Thomas; Meyer, Gerd

    2014-11-01

    Comproportionation reactions of rare-earth metal trihalides (RX3) with the respective rare-earth metals (R) and transition metals (T) led to the formation of 22 oligomeric R cluster halides encapsulating T, in 19 cases for the first time. The structures of these compounds were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and are composed of trimers ({T3R11}X15-type, P63/m), tetramers ({T4R16}X28{R4} (P-43m), {T4R16}X20 (P42/nnm), {T4R16}X24(RX3)4 (I41/a) and {T4R16}X23 (C2/m) types of structure) and pentamers ({Ru5La14}2Br39, Cc) of {TRr}n (n=2-5) clusters. These oligomers are further enveloped by inner (Xi) as well as outer (Xa) halido ligands, which possess diverse functionalities and interconnect like oligomers through i-i, i-a and/or a-i bridges. The general features of the crystal structures for these new compounds are discussed and compared to literature entries as well as different structure types with oligomeric T centered R clusters. Dimers and tetramers originating from the aggregation of {TR6} octahedra via common edges are more frequent than trimers and pentamers, in which the {TRr} clusters share common faces.

  15. Extraction of rare earth metals by calix[4]arene solubilized in AOT reversed micellar solution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F Kubota; K Shinohara; K Shimojo; T Oshima; M Goto; S Furusaki; T Hano

    2001-01-01

    Extraction of rare earth metals (europium and yttrium) and their separation from zinc were investigated using a novel host compound, p-tert-octylcalix[4]arene carboxyl derivative as an extractant. Extraction behavior of the metals with a typical commercial extractant PC-88A or Versatic 10 was also examined. The cyclic ligand calixarene showed a high selectivity towards rare earth metals compared with PC-88A and Versatic

  16. Multiply stripped ion generation in the metal vapor vacuum arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, I. G.; Feinberg, B.; Galvin, J. E.

    1987-09-01

    We consider the charge state distribution of ions produced in the metal vapor vacuum arc plasma discharge. A new kind of high current metal ion source in which the ion beam is extracted from a metal vapor vacuum arc plasma has been used to obtain the spectra of multiply charged ions produced within the cathode spots. The cathode materials used and the species reported on here are: C, Mg, Al, Si, Ti, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Zr, Nb, Mo, Rh, Pd, Ag, In, Sn, Gd, Ho, Ta, W, Pt, Au, Pb, Th, and U; the arc current was 200 A for all measurements. Charge state spectra were measured using a time-of-flight method. The arc voltage was also measured. In this paper we report on the measured charge state distributions and arc voltages and compare the distributions with the predictions of a theory in which ionization occurs in the cathode spots via stepwise ionization by electron impact.

  17. Adsorption study of metal ions onto crosslinked seaweed Laminaria japonica.

    PubMed

    Ghimire, Kedar Nath; Inoue, Katsutoshi; Ohto, Keisuke; Hayashida, Takehiro

    2008-01-01

    An efficient and cost effective non-conventional adsorbent has been prepared from seaweed Laminaria japonica by crosslinking with epichlorohydrin. Its adsorption behavior for trivalent and divalent metal ions was studied and it was found to exhibit excellent selectivity towards several metal ions. As a typical example, binary mixture of Pb(II) and Zn(II) was studied by using a packed column, indicating that the Pb(II) ion can be easily separated from its mixture with a concentration factor of 74 times. The maximum adsorption capacity for Pb(II), Cd(II), Fe(III) was found to be 1.35, 1.1, 1.53 mol kg(-1), respectively, while 0.8 7 mol kg(-1) for both La(III) and Ce(III) from the single metal ion solution according to the adsorption isotherm. The obtained values are comparable to the commercially available synthetic chelating resins. PMID:17267212

  18. Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, Paul J. (both Los Alamos, NM); Delhaize, Emmanuel (both Los Alamos, NM); Robinson, Nigel J. (Durham, GB2); Unkefer, Clifford J. (Los Alamos, NM); Furlong, Clement (Seattle, WA)

    1990-11-13

    A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat unit for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heayv metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

  19. Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, Paul J. (Los Alamos, NM); Delhaize, Emmanuel (Los Alamos, NM); Robinson, Nigel J. (Durham, GB2); Unkefer, Clifford J. (Los Alamos, NM); Furlong, Clement (Seattle, WA)

    1990-01-01

    A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat units for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heavy metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

  20. Metal-Ion-Mediated Assemblies of Thiazole Orange with Cucurbit[7]uril: A Photophysical Study.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Meenakshi N; Dutta Choudhury, Sharmistha; Barooah, Nilotpal; Pal, Haridas; Bhasikuttan, Achikanath C; Mohanty, Jyotirmayee

    2015-03-01

    The formation of molecular superstructures by metal-ion-mediated noncovalent self-assembly has been demonstrated using the macrocycle, cucurbit[7]uril (CB7), and the dye, thiazole orange (TO), as building blocks. Interestingly, the association of these molecular building blocks can be tuned by the chemical environment, leading to self-assembled structures of different stoichiometries, which is supported by absorption, fluorescence, (1)H NMR, and AFM measurements. Most importantly, the self-assembly process of the CB7/TO/metal ion system is observed to be remarkably different for alkali (Na(+)) and alkaline earth (Ca(2+)) metal ions. Fluorescence enhancement is observed in the presence of Ca(2+) ions, which is attributed to the formation of short dimeric structures composed of two 1:1 CB7-TO complexes. Solution turbidity is detected in the presence of Na(+) ions, which is proposed to be due to the formation of extended structures by the assembly of many 1:1 CB7-TO complexes. PMID:25658219

  1. Sorption of Heavy Metal Ions on New Metal-Ligand Complexes Chemically Derived from Lycopodium clavatum

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erol Pehlivan; Mustafa Ersoz; Salih Yildiz; Harry J. Duncan

    1994-01-01

    Sorption of heavy metal ions from aqueous solution has been investigated as a function of pH using a novel exchanger system whereby Lycopodium clavatum is functionalized with carboxylate and glyoxime metal-ligand complexes. The new ligand exchangers were prepared using a reaction of diaminosporopollenin with various metal-ligand complexes of glyoxime and monocarboxylic acid. The sorptive behavior of these metal-ligand exchangers and

  2. Metal ions affecting the neurological system.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Hana R; Roney, Nickolette; Abadin, Henry G

    2011-01-01

    Several individual metals including aluminum, arsenic, cadmium, lead, manganese, and mercury were demonstrated to affect the neurological system. Metals are ubiquitous in the environment. Environmental and occupational exposure to one metal is likely to be accompanied by exposure to other metals, as well. It is, therefore, expected that interactions or "joint toxic actions" may occur in populations exposed to mixtures of metals or to mixtures of metals with other chemicals. Some metals seem to have a protective role against neurotoxicity of other metals, yet other interactions may result in increased neurotoxicity. For example, zinc and copper provided a protective role in cases of lead-induced neurotoxicity. In contrast, arsenic and lead co-exposure resulted in synergistic effects. Similarly, information is available in the current literature on interactions of metals with some organic chemicals such as ethanol, polychlorinated biphenyls, and pesticides. In depth understanding of the toxicity and the mechanism of action (including toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics) of individual chemicals is important for predicting the outcomes of interactions in mixtures. Therefore, plausible mechanisms of action are also described. PMID:21473383

  3. Complexation-induced supramolecular assembly drives metal-ion extraction.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Ross J; Meridiano, Yannick; Muller, Julie; Berthon, Laurence; Guilbaud, Philippe; Zorz, Nicole; Antonio, Mark R; Demars, Thomas; Zemb, Thomas

    2014-09-26

    Combining experiment with theory reveals the role of self-assembly and complexation in metal-ion transfer through the water-oil interface. The coordinating metal salt Eu(NO3)3 was extracted from water into oil by a lipophilic neutral amphiphile. Molecular dynamics simulations were coupled to experimental spectroscopic and X-ray scattering techniques to investigate how local coordination interactions between the metal ion and ligands in the organic phase combine with long-range interactions to produce spontaneous changes in the solvent microstructure. Extraction of the Eu(3+)-3(NO3(-)) ion pairs involves incorporation of the "hard" metal complex into the core of "soft" aggregates. This seeds the formation of reverse micelles that draw the water and "free" amphiphile into nanoscale hydrophilic domains. The reverse micelles interact through attractive van der Waals interactions and coalesce into rod-shaped polynuclear Eu(III) -containing aggregates with metal centers bridged by nitrate. These preorganized hydrophilic domains, containing high densities of O-donor ligands and anions, provide improved Eu(III) solvation environments that help drive interfacial transfer, as is reflected by the increasing Eu(III) partitioning ratios (oil/aqueous) despite the organic phase approaching saturation. For the first time, this multiscale approach links metal-ion coordination with nanoscale structure to reveal the free-energy balance that drives the phase transfer of neutral metal salts. PMID:25169678

  4. Transition Metal Speciation in the Cell: Insights from the Chemistry of Metal Ion Receptors

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Lydia Finney (Northwestern University; Department of Chemistry, Molecular Biology and Cell Biology)

    2003-05-09

    The essential transition metal ions are avidly accumulated by cells, yet they have two faces: They are put to use as required cofactors, but they also can catalyze cytotoxic reactions. Several families of proteins are emerging that control the activity of intracellular metal ions and help confine them to vital roles. These include integral transmembrane transporters, metalloregulatory sensors, and diffusible cytoplasmic metallochaperone proteins that protect and guide metal ions to targets. It is becoming clear that many of these proteins use atypical coordination chemistry to accomplish their unique goals. The different coordination numbers, types of coordinating residues, and solvent accessibilities of these sites are providing insight into the inorganic chemistry of the cytoplasm.

  5. Contents of heavy alkaline-earth (Sr, Ba) and rare-earth (Y, La, Ce) metals in technogenically contaminated soils

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yu. N. Vodyanitskii; A. T. Savichev; A. A. Vasil’ev; E. S. Lobanova; A. N. Chashchin; E. V. Prokopovich

    2010-01-01

    The contents of heavy alkaline-earth (Sr and Ba) and rare-earth (Y, La, and Ce) metals have been studied in two technogeochemical\\u000a anomalies and in the soils of Perm and Chusovoi. The soils are contaminated with barium, lanthanum, and cerium in the territory\\u000a of the Cherepovets technogeochemical anomaly formed due to the atmospheric emissions from the Severstal metallurgical works.\\u000a Strontium, barium,

  6. Does Ion Release Differ Between Hip Resurfacing and Metal-on-metal THA?

    PubMed Central

    Moroni, Antonio; Cadossi, Matteo; Baldini, Nicola; Giannini, Sandro

    2008-01-01

    Modern metal-on-metal hip resurfacing was introduced as a bone-preserving method of joint reconstruction for young and active patients; however, the large diameter of the bearing surfaces is of concern for potential increased metal ion release. We hypothesized there were no differences in serum concentrations of chromium, cobalt, and molybdenum between patients who had metal-on-metal hip resurfacing (Group A; average head diameter, 48 mm; median followup, 24 months) and patients who had 28-mm metal-on-metal THA (Group B; median followup, 25 months). Serum concentrations also were compared with concentrations in healthy subjects. We identified no differences in ion levels between Groups A and B. A distinction was made according to gender. Women showed a higher chromium release in Group A whereas men had a higher cobalt release in Group B. Values obtained from Group A were higher than those of the control subjects. Our data suggest metal-on-metal bearings for THA should not be rejected because of concern regarding potential increased metal ion release; however, patients with elevated ion levels, even without loosening or toxicity, could be at higher risk and should be followed up periodically. Level of Evidence: Level III, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18196364

  7. Refinement of Cast Microstructure of Hypereutectic Al-Si Alloys Through the Addition of Rare Earth Metals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joonyeon Chang; Inge Moon; Chongsool Choi

    1998-01-01

    Microstructural observation and thermal analysis of Al-21 wt % Si alloys with different rare earth metals were performed to examine the effect of rare earth metal on the refinement of primary silicon phase. Simultaneous refinement of both primary and eutectic silicon morphology is achieved with the addition of rare earth and its effect increases with the amount of rare earth

  8. Metal chelates of N,N'-dihydroxyethyl-N,N'-ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid and selected metal ions

    E-print Network

    Hampton, Joan Martiner

    1972-01-01

    , "Elementary Coord. ination Chemistry, " Prentice Hall, Inc. , Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, 1964, 2. L, G, Sillen and A. E. Martell, "Stability Constants of Metal-Ion Complexes, " The Chemical Society, London, 1964. 3. P, Job, Ann. Chim, , (France) & 9, 113...(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Ni (I I), and Fe(I II) are the metal ions employed in this study. Metal chelate formation constants were deter- mined from potentiometric equilibrium data obtained at 25' C and at an ionic strength of 0. 10 (0. 10 M KN03). Metal...

  9. Recently, crown ethers have become very popular extractants for metal ions separation from aqueous solution. Crown ethers form complex with metal ion.

    E-print Network

    Singh, Jayant K.

    Recently, crown ethers have become very popular extractants for metal ions separation from aqueous solution. Crown ethers form complex with metal ion. Selection of suitable crown ether and metal ion depends on various factors such as proper spatial orientation of the crown ether oxygen dipole in the direction

  10. Metal ions affect neuronal membrane fluidity of rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Ohba, S; Hiramatsu, M; Edamatsu, R; Mori, I; Mori, A

    1994-03-01

    The effect of various metal ions on neuronal membrane fluidity was examined using 2-(14-carboxypropyl)-2-ethyl-4,4-dimethyl-3-oxazolidinyloxy, which has been used for the examination of membrane fluidity in hydrophobic areas by electron spin resonance spectrometry. Potassium, cobalt, calcium, magnesium, nickel, copper, ferric, and aluminium ions decreased the membrane fluidity while ferrous ions increased it at each high concentration. Sodium and zinc ions had no effect. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid decreased membrane fluidity at high concentrations. Nicardipine lowered membrane fluidity and flunarizine elevated it at each high concentration. There was no change in membrane fluidity by other calcium antagonists, nimodipine and nifedipine. PMID:8177364

  11. Process for modifying the metal ion sorption capacity of a medium

    DOEpatents

    Lundquist, Susan H. (White Bear Township, MN)

    2002-01-01

    A process for modifying a medium is disclosed that includes treating a medium having a metal ion sorption capacity with a solution that includes: A) an agent capable of forming a complex with metal ions; and B) ions selected from the group consisting of sodium ions, potassium ions, magnesium ions, and combinations thereof, to create a medium having an increased capacity to sorb metal ions relative to the untreated medium.

  12. Dynamic polarizabilities of rare-earth-metal atoms and dispersion coefficients for their interaction with helium atoms

    E-print Network

    Chu, Xi

    Dynamic polarizabilities of rare-earth-metal atoms and dispersion coefficients; published 29 March 2007 The dynamic scalar and tensor polarizabilities of the rare-earth-metal atoms coefficients for the interactions of the rare-earth-metal atoms with helium atoms. The static polarizabilities

  13. MATERIALS WORLD January 201216 Dr Steve Barrett from the University of Liverpool, UK, has been studying rare earth metals for

    E-print Network

    Barrett, Steve D.

    studying rare earth metals for 20 years. Here he explains how preparation of the surface layer is crucial to the functionality of these scarce elements. S tudies into the properties of rare earth metals have been active since of the geometric and electronic structure of single crystal rare earth metal surfaces were published. Studies

  14. [Electric current around dental metals as a factor producing allergenic metal ions in the oral cavity].

    PubMed

    Nogi, N

    1989-11-01

    Allergy to dental metal alloys has been reported to occasionally cause dermatitis, stomatitis, lichen planus and pustulosis palmaris et plantaris. According to Faraday's law of electrolysis, when electric current flows into an anode, cationic metal ions dissolve in parallel with the amount of the electric current. Therefore, when patients hypersensitive to metals have suffered from the above mentioned persistent dermatoses, measurement of voltages and electric currents around the dental alloys of the patient's oral cavities was deemed necessary, in order to investigate whether or not such dental metals have been supplied causative metal ions to the patients. For the investigation of electrochemical dissolution of metal ions; firstly, voltages and electric currents between the mucous membrane and standard dental alloy tips placed in the oral cavities of each 15 healthy volunteers and patients were measured. Secondly, the same study was performed with the mucous membrane and actually installed dental metals with 158 patients who showed positive reactions to dental metal series patch test allergens composed of 19 reagents. The results were as follows: 1) Voltages between the mucous membranes and standard metal plates placed in the oral cavities varied depending on the composition of the dental metal. 2) The above-mentioned voltages changed when various food were present in the oral cavity. 3) With the dental metals actually present in the metal-hypersensitive patient's oral cavities, the voltages between the adjacent mucous membrane and dental metals varied greatly, depending on the individual patient rather than on the types of metal. Certain alloys acted as cathodes with some patients, but as anodes with others. 4) Amalgam and silver alloys showed higher voltages and more electric current with the smaller ranges of variation than other kinds of alloys. Both of these alloys tended to act as anodes, therefore, the electrochemical dissolution of metal ions was expected to be higher than with other metals. 5) The voltages and electric currents were often higher between mucous membrane and metals than between metals. These findings indicate that the patient's own mucous membrane acts as cathode for the electrochemical dissolution rather than the dental metals. 6) Measuring the voltage and electric current in the patient's oral cavities is technically easy, and is considered to be valuable since the tendancy of electrochemical dissolution of metal ions from the dental metals is clearly demonstrated. PMID:2622059

  15. Synthesis and structural characterization of amido scorpionate rare earth metals complexes.

    PubMed

    Márquez-Segovia, Isabel; Lara-Sánchez, Agustín; Otero, Antonio; Fernández-Baeza, Juan; Castro-Osma, José Antonio; Sánchez-Barba, Luis F; Rodríguez, Ana M

    2014-07-01

    The reactivity of hybrid scorpionate/cyclopentadienyl ligands in the form of the protio derivatives as a mixture of two regioisomers, namely bpzcpH [1-{2,2-bis(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)-1,1-diphenylethyl}-1,3-cyclopentadiene and 2-{2,2-bis(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)-1,1-diphenylethyl}-1,3-cyclopentadiene] and bpztcpH [1-{2,2-bis(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)-1-tert-butylethyl}-1,3-cyclopentadiene and 2-{2,2-bis(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)-1-tert-butylethyl}-1,3-cyclopentadiene], with the tris(silylamide) precursors [M{N(SiHMe2)2}3(thf)x] of rare earth metals (including the group 3 metals scandium and yttrium) is related to the atomic radii of the metal centres. The reaction with the precursor containing the smallest ion, [Sc{N(SiHMe2)2}3(thf)], did not proceed even heating at reflux temperature in toluene. The reaction with the precursors that contain a medium-sized metal ion, i.e., [M{N(SiHMe2)2}3(thf)2] (M = Y, Lu), proceeded only at high temperature and gave good yields of the silylenediamide-containing derivatives [M{?(2)-NN-Me2Si(NSiHMe2)2}(bpzcp)] (M = Y , Lu ) and [M{?(2)-NN-Me2Si(NSiHMe2)2}(bpztcp)] (M = Y , Lu ) by an double activation of Si-H and Si-N bonds. However, the reaction with the precursors that contained the largest metal ions, i.e., [M{N(SiHMe2)2}3(thf)2] (M = Nd, Sm), proceeded rapidly at room temperature to afford the bis(silylamide) complexes [M{N(SiHMe2)2}2(bpzcp)] (M = Nd , Sm ) and [M{N(SiHMe2)2}2(bpztcp)] (M = Nd , Sm ). Additionally, the alkyl heteroscorpionate yttrium and lutetium complexes [M(CH2SiMe3)2(NNCp)] (M = Y, Lu) reacted with an excess of HN(SiHMe2)2 to give the mixed alkyl/amide derivatives [M{N(SiHMe2)2}(CH2SiMe3)(bpzcp)] (M = Y , Lu ) and [M{N(SiHMe2)2}(CH2SiMe3)(bpztcp)] (M = Y , Lu ). The structures of the complexes were determined by spectroscopic methods and the X-ray crystal structures of , and were also established. PMID:24829057

  16. Effect of metal ions on the hydrolytic and transesterification activities of Candida rugosa lipase.

    PubMed

    Katiyar, Madhu; Ali, Amjad

    2013-01-01

    In order to study the effect of metal ions on lipase activity, hydrolytic and transesterification activities of Candida rugosa lipase were investigated in presence of alkali (Na? and K?), alkaline earth (Ca?² and Ba?²) and transition (Cr?³, Fe?³, Co?², Cu?² and Ni?²) metal ions. Maximum enhancement in hydrolytic activity of lipase was observed by Ca?², and in transesterification activity by Cr?³ and Co?². The kinetics of the lipase catalyzed transesterification (methanolysis and ethanolysis) reactions were also studied, and the activation energies of methanolysis and ethanolysis were reduced from 10.16 and 10.24 kcal mol?¹, respectively, to 5.41 and 7.55 kcal mol?¹, respectively, when reactions were performed in presence of Co?². Thus, in lipase catalyzed transesterification Cr?³ or Co?² could be added to the assay in order to produce the biodiesel in relatively shorter reaction duration. PMID:24200940

  17. In vitro and in vivo metal ion release.

    PubMed

    Brown, S A; Farnsworth, L J; Merritt, K; Crowe, T D

    1988-04-01

    A series of experiments was conducted to study in vitro and in vivo metal ion release and the urine excretion of metal ions. Metal salts were injected and urine analyzed. Anodic potentials were applied to stainless steel and cobalt-chromium-molybdenum (CCM) specimens to cause an acceleration of corrosion rates. Corrosion experiments were done in saline, 10% serum and in a subcutaneous space in hamsters. Corrosion rates were determined by measurements of weight loss and calculations of net charge transfer. Metal ion concentrations were determined with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy, and were calculated from total charge using Faraday's law. The results with stainless steel showed that the weight loss and metal ion release from stainless steel in vitro and in vivo can be calculated using Faraday's Law, assuming release in proportion to alloy composition. The results with CCM indicated that release rates in vitro can be used to determine the proportionality of release in vivo. All the nickel and most of the cobalt was rapidly excreted, while less than 50% of the chromium was excreted. The excretion of metals following salt injection or in vivo corrosion were very similar. PMID:3372552

  18. Metal ion release kinetics from nanoparticle silicone composites.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Anne; Brandes, Gudrun; Wagener, Philipp; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2011-09-01

    Metal ion release kinetics from silver and copper nanoparticle silicone composites generated by laser ablation in liquids are investigated. The metal ion transport mechanism is studied by using different model equations and their fit to experimental data. Results indicate that during the first 30 days of immersion, Fickian diffusion is the dominant transport mechanism. After this time period, the oxidation and dissolution of nanoparticles from the bulk determine the ion release. This second mechanism is very slow since the dissolution of the nanoparticle is found to be anisotropic. Silver ion release profile is best described by pseudo-first order exponential equation. Copper ion release profile is best described by a second order exponential equation. For practical purposes, the in vitro release characteristics of the bioactive metal ions are evaluated as a function of nanoparticle loading density, the chemistry and the texture of the silicone. Based on the proposed two-step release model, a prediction of the release characteristics over a time course of 84 days is possible and a long-term ion release could be demonstrated. PMID:21645564

  19. Membranes Remove Metal Ions Fron Industrial Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, W. P. L.; May, C.

    1983-01-01

    Use of membrane films affords convenient and economical alternative for removing and recovering metal cations present in low concentrations from large quantities of liquid solutions. Possible applications of membrane films include use in analytical chemistry for determination of small amounts of toxic metallic impurities in lakes, streams, and municipal effluents. Also suitable for use as absorber of certain pollutant gases and odors present in confined areas.

  20. Coordination of Alkaline Earth Metal Ions in the Inverted Cucurbit[7]uril Supramolecular Assemblies Formed in the Presence of [ZnCl4 ](2-) and [CdCl4 ](2.).

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Zhang, Yun-Qian; Zhu, Qian-Jiang; Xue, Sai-Feng; Tao, Zhu; Xiao, Xin

    2015-05-01

    A convenient method to isolate inverted cucurbit[7]uril (iQ[7]) from a mixture of water-soluble Q[n]s was established by eluting the soluble mixture of Q[n]s on a Dowex (H(+) form) column so that iQ[7] could be selected as a ligand for coordination and supramolecular assembly with alkaline earth cations (AE(2+) ) in aqueous HCl solutions in the presence of [ZnCl4 ](2-) and [CdCl4 ](2-) anions as structure-directing agents. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that both iQ[7]-AE(2+) -[ZnCl4 ](2-) -HCl and iQ[7]-AE(2+) -[CdCl4 ](2-) -HCl interaction systems yielded supramolecular assemblies, in which the [ZnCl4 ](2-) and [CdCl4 ](2-) anions presented a honeycomb effect, and this resulted in the formation of linear iQ[7]/AE(2+) coordination polymers through outer-surface interactions of Q[n]s. PMID:25627326

  1. Low coefficient of thermal expansion polyimides containing metal ion additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St. Clair, A. K.

    1992-01-01

    Polyimides have become widely used as high performance polymers as a result of their excellent thermal stability and toughness. However, lowering their coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) would increase their usefulness for aerospace and electronic applications where dimensional stability is a requirement. The incorporation of metal ion-containing additives into polyimides, resulting in significantly lowered CTE's, has been studied. Various metal ion additives have been added to both polyamic acid resins and soluble polyimide solutions in the concentration range of 4-23 weight percent. The incorporation of these metal ions has resulted in reductions in the CTE's of the control polyimides of 12 percent to over 100 percent depending on the choice of additive and its concentration.

  2. Refractory metal silicides synthesized by metal vapor vacuum arc ion source implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, D. H.; Liu, B. X.

    1995-04-01

    Refractory metal silicides, namely NbSi2, TaSi2, WSi2, and MoSi2, were successfully synthesized by using a metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) ion source to implant the respective metal ions with high current density into Si(111) and Si(100) wafers. The implantation was conducted at room temperature with an extracted voltage of 40 kV. When the current densities of the refractory metal ions were up to 65 ?A/cm2, the equilibrium hexagonal NbSi2 and TaSi2 phases were formed at an implantation dose of 3×1017 ions/cm2, while the hexagonal WSi2 and MoSi2 phases were formed at a dose of 5×1017 ions/cm2. With increasing the current density up to 90 ?A/cm2, the transition of the hexagonal WSi2 and MoSi2 phases to their most stable tetragonal structures was observed. Postannealing at 750 and 950 °C resulted in the formation of the unique tetragonal WSi2 and MoSi2 phases, respectively. The electrical property of the MEVVA-synthesized refractory metal silicides was measured for both as-implanted and postannealed wafers. In addition, the formation of the refractory metal silicides by MEVVA implantation is discussed in terms of the beam heating effect caused by high current ion implantation.

  3. Oxygen and hydrogen ion abundance in the near-Earth magnetosphere: Statistical results on the response

    E-print Network

    Bergen, Universitetet i

    Oxygen and hydrogen ion abundance in the near-Earth magnetosphere: Statistical results plays a crucial role for the fundamental plasma properties in the terrestrial magnetosphere. We investigate the oxygen-to-hydrogen ratio in the near-Earth magnetosphere from Ã?10 RE

  4. Detection of Heavy Metal Ions in Water by High-Resolution Surface Plasmon Resonance

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Yanchao

    Detection of Heavy Metal Ions in Water by High-Resolution Surface Plasmon Resonance Spectroscopy voltammetry (ASV) capability has been demonstrated for detecting heavy metal ions in water. Metal ions in water from part-per-million to sub-part-per-billion levels with good linearity. Heavy metal poisoning

  5. Liquid metal ion source and alloy for ion emission of multiple ionic species

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Clark Jr. William M; Mark W. Utlaut; Joseph A. Wysocki; Edmund K. Storms; Eugene G. Szklarz; Robert G. Behrens; Lynwood W. Swanson; Anthony E. Bell

    1987-01-01

    A liquid metal ion source and alloy for the simultaneous ion evaporation of arsenic and boron, arsenic and phosphorus, or arsenic, boron and phosphorus. The ionic species to be evaporated are contained in palladium-arsenic-boron and palladium-arsenic-boron-phosphorus alloys. The ion source, including an emitter means such as a needle emitter and a source means such as U-shaped heater element, is preferably

  6. Sorption of heavy metal ions on new metal-ligand complexes chemically derived from Lycopodium clavatum

    SciTech Connect

    Pehlivan, E.; Ersoz, M.; Yildiz, S. [Univ. of Selcuk, Konya (Turkey); Duncan, H.J. [Univ. of Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    1994-08-01

    Sorption of heavy metal ions from aqueous solution has been investigated as a function of pH using a novel exchanger system whereby Lycopodium clavatum is functionalized with carboxylate and glyoxime metal-ligand complexes. The new ligand exchangers were prepared using a reaction of diaminosporopollenin with various metal-ligand complexes of glyoxime and monocarboxylic acid. The sorptive behavior of these metal-ligand exchangers and the possibilities to remove and to recover selectively heavy metal cations using these systems are discussed on the basis of their chemical natures and their complexing properties.

  7. 2008 John Charnley Award: Metal Ion Levels After Metal-on-Metal Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Engh, C. Anderson; MacDonald, Steven J.; Thompson, Abigail; Naudie, Douglas; Engh, Charles A.

    2008-01-01

    Metal-on-metal bearing total hip arthroplasty is performed more commonly than in the past. There may be manufacturing differences such as clearance, roughness, metallurgy, and head size that affect performance. In a prospective, randomized trial, we compared 2-year postoperative ion levels for a 28-mm metal-on-polyethylene bearing with 28-mm and 36-mm metal-on-metal bearings. We measured serum, erythrocyte, and urine ion levels. We observed no difference in the ion levels for the 28-mm and 36-mm metal-on-metal bearings. The ion levels in these patients were lower than reported for most other metal-on-metal bearings. Although both erythrocyte and serum cobalt increased, erythrocyte chromium and erythrocyte titanium did not increase despite a four- to sixfold serum chromium and a three- to fourfold serum titanium increase. This may represent a threshold level for serum chromium and serum titanium below which erythrocytes are not affected. Level of Evidence: Level I, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18855089

  8. In vivo liberation of silver ions from metallic silver surfaces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gorm Danscher; Linda Jansons Locht

    2010-01-01

    In vivo liberation of electrically charged silver atoms\\/silver ions from metallic silver pellets, silver grids and silver\\u000a threads placed in the brain, skin and abdominal cavity was proved by way of the histochemical technique autometallography\\u000a (AMG). A bio-film or “dissolution membrane” inserted between the metallic surface and macrophages was recognized on the surface\\u000a of the implanted silver after a short

  9. Metal-Ion Additives Reduce Thermal Expansion Of Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, Diane M.; St. Clair, Anne K.; Emerson, Burt R., Jr.; Willis, George L.

    1994-01-01

    Polyimides widely used as high-performance polymers because of their excellent thermal stability and toughness. However, their coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE's) greater than those of metals, ceramics, and glasses. Decreasing CTE's of polyimides increase usefulness for aerospace and electronics applications in which dimensional stability required. Additives containing metal ions reduce coefficients of thermal expansion of polyimides. Reductions range from 11 to over 100 percent.

  10. Heavy metal ions are potent inhibitors of protein folding

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Sandeep K. [Biochemisches Institut, Universitaet Zuerich, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland); Departement de Biologie Moleculaire Vegetale, Universite de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Goloubinoff, Pierre [Departement de Biologie Moleculaire Vegetale, Universite de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Christen, Philipp [Biochemisches Institut, Universitaet Zuerich, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland)], E-mail: christen@bioc.uzh.ch

    2008-07-25

    Environmental and occupational exposure to heavy metals such as cadmium, mercury and lead results in severe health hazards including prenatal and developmental defects. The deleterious effects of heavy metal ions have hitherto been attributed to their interactions with specific, particularly susceptible native proteins. Here, we report an as yet undescribed mode of heavy metal toxicity. Cd{sup 2+}, Hg{sup 2+} and Pb{sup 2+} proved to inhibit very efficiently the spontaneous refolding of chemically denatured proteins by forming high-affinity multidentate complexes with thiol and other functional groups (IC{sub 50} in the nanomolar range). With similar efficacy, the heavy metal ions inhibited the chaperone-assisted refolding of chemically denatured and heat-denatured proteins. Thus, the toxic effects of heavy metal ions may result as well from their interaction with the more readily accessible functional groups of proteins in nascent and other non-native form. The toxic scope of heavy metals seems to be substantially larger than assumed so far.

  11. Metal ion binding to iron oxides

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Ponthieu; F. Juillot; T. Hiemstra; W. H. van Riemsdijk; M. F. Benedetti

    2006-01-01

    The biogeochemistry of trace elements (TE) is largely dependent upon their interaction with heterogeneous ligands including metal oxides and hydrous oxides of iron. The modeling of TE interactions with iron oxides has been pursued using a variety of chemical models. The objective of this work is to show that it is possible to model the adsorption of protons and TE

  12. Cationic rare earth metal alkyls as novel catalysts for olefin polymerization and copolymerization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhaomin Hou; Yunjie Luo; Xiaofang Li

    2006-01-01

    Cationic rare earth metal alkyl species, generated by the treatment of mono(cyclopentadienyl) bis(alkyl) rare earth metal complexes with 1 equiv. of a borate compound such as [Ph3C][B(C6F5)4], act as an excellent catalyst for the polymerization and copolymerization of various olefins such as ethylene, 1-hexene, styrene, norbornene, dicyclopentadiene, and isoprene. These catalysts show unprecedented activity and regio- and stereo-selectivity and afford

  13. Non-metallocene rare earth metal catalysts for the diastereoselective and enantioselective hydroamination of aminoalkenes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kai C. Hultzsch; Denis V. Gribkov; Frank Hampel

    2005-01-01

    In this short review we summarize our work on new cyclopentadienyl-free rare earth metal catalysts for the diastereoselective and enantioselective hydroamination of aminoalkenes. Non-metallocene rare earth metal catalysts based on diamidoamine, biphenolate and binaphtholate ligands are readily available through alkane and amine elimination procedures. Diamidoamine yttrium complexes are efficient catalysts for the highly diastereoselective cyclization of 1-methyl-pent-4-enylamine to yield trans-2,5-dimethyl-pyrroldine

  14. Extraction and separation of rare earth metals using microcapsules containing bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphinic acid

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Syouhei Nishihama; Nobuya Sakaguchi; Takayuki Hirai; Isao Komasawa

    2002-01-01

    The separation of rare earth metals using microcapsules (MC) consisting styrene (St)–divinylbenzene (DVB) copolymer and containing bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphinic acid (PIA-226) has been investigated. Microcapsules containing PIA-226 can be prepared by adding PIA-226 to the dispersed phase during the preparation process. The extraction of rare earth metals with the microcapsules progresses via the same scheme, as proposed in the conventional liquid–liquid extraction

  15. Process for preparing higher oxides of the alkali and alkaline earth metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadhukhan, P.; Bell, A. (inventors)

    1978-01-01

    High purity inorganic higher oxides of the alkali and alkaline earth metals are prepared by subjecting the hydroxide of the alkali and alkaline earth metal to a radio frequency discharge sustained in oxygen. The process is particulary adaptable to the production of high purity potassium superoxide by subjecting potassium hydroxide to glow discharge sustained in oxygen under the pressure of about 0.75 to 1.00 torr.

  16. EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS ON THE QUENCHING OF THE MAGNETIC MOMENT OF THE RARE EARTH ION IN GARNETS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pauthenet

    1959-01-01

    One is led to assume that the orbital magnetic moment of the rare earth ; ions in ferrimagnetie garnets is quenched at low temperature. By comparing the ; experimental results on gallates and ferrites with the behavior of the Gd\\/sup 3+\\/ ; ion, the importance of this effect for Dy\\/sup 3+\\/, Er\\/sup 3+\\/, and Yb\\/sup 3+\\/ and ; its dependence

  17. Energization of solar wind ions by reflection from the earth's bow shock

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Paschmann; N. Sckopke; J. R. Asbridge; S. J. Bame; J. T. Gosling

    1980-01-01

    The existence of ion beams with energies a few times the solar wind energy and streaming outward from the earth's bow shock has been known for some time. To explain the observed ion energies, a simple reflection model has been proposed in which the particles gain energy by displacement parallel to the interplanetary electric field. In this model the energy

  18. Observational evidence on the origin of ions upstream of the earth's bow shock

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. F. Thomsen; S. J. Schwartz; J. T. Gosling

    1983-01-01

    The energies predicted by four different source hypotheses for ions observed upstream of the earth's bow shock are compared with observations of upstream field-aligned beams and gyrating ion events. A kinematic formalism in a frame of reference in which the motional electric field vanishes is used. Specular reflection of a fraction of the incident solar wind is found to be

  19. Superconductivity in Metal-mixed Ion-Implanted Polymer Films

    E-print Network

    A. P. Micolich; E. Tavenner; B. J. Powell; A. R. Hamilton; M. T. Curry; R. E. Giedd; P. Meredith

    2006-03-15

    Ion-implantation of normally insulating polymers offers an alternative to depositing conjugated organics onto plastic films to make electronic circuits. We used a 50 keV nitrogen ion beam to mix a thin 10 nm Sn/Sb alloy film into the sub-surface of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and report the low temperature properties of this material. We observed metallic behavior, and the onset of superconductivity below 3 K. There are strong indications that the superconductivity does not result from a residual thin-film of alloy, but instead from a network of alloy grains coupled via a weakly conducting, ion-beam carbonized polymer matrix.

  20. Superconductivity in metal-mixed ion-implanted polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micolich, A. P.; Tavenner, E.; Powell, B. J.; Hamilton, A. R.; Curry, M. T.; Giedd, R. E.; Meredith, P.

    2006-10-01

    Ion implantation of normally insulating polymers offers an alternative to depositing conjugated organics onto plastic films to make electronic circuits. We used a 50keV nitrogen ion beam to mix a thin 10nm Sn /Sb alloy film into the subsurface of polyetheretherketone and report the low temperature properties of this material. We observed metallic behavior, and the onset of superconductivity below 3K. There are strong indications that the superconductivity does not result from a residual thin film of alloy, but instead from a network of alloy grains coupled via a weakly conducting, ion-beam carbonized polymer matrix.

  1. Producing large-aperture metal-ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Aksenov, A.I.; Bugaev, S.P.; Emel'yanov, V.A.; Erokhin, G.P.; Pankovets, N.G.; Tolopa, A.M.; Chesnokov, S.M.

    1987-12-01

    A description is given of a pulsed source providing large-aperture beams of ions of various metals with pulse lengths of 100-500 ..mu..sec, repetition frequency 10-50 Hz, ion energy 20-150 keV, and beam current of a few amperes. The source is intended for research in implantation metallurgy. A time of 5-15 min is required to provide about 10/sup 17/ ions/cm/sup 3/ over an area of up to 300 cm/sup 2/.

  2. Rare earth-transition metal alloy permanent magnet materials: 1960–1985

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. M. T. Velu; E. C. Subbarao

    1986-01-01

    Rare earths, primarily light rare earths, either alone or in combination with other rare earths, as in misch metal, alloyed\\u000a with cobalt or iron, constitute a unique new class of permanent magnet materials with outstanding coercivity and other magnetic\\u000a properties. These materials represent the first serious alternative to the alnicos and ferrites, discovered earlier. The intensity\\u000a of interest in this

  3. Catalytic asymmetric carbon-carbon bond-forming reaction utilizing rare earth metal complexes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Masakatsu Shibasaki; Hiroaki Sasai

    1996-01-01

    Novel optically active rare earth complexes have made possible a catalytic asymmetric nitroaldol reaction for the first time. Structural elucidation reveals that the complexes consist of one rare earth metal, three lithium atoms, and three BINOL units. Applications of the catalytic asymmetric nitroaldol reaction to syntheses of several p-blockers and erythro-AYA have been also achieved. Although the lithium containing rare

  4. DUHOCAMIS: A dual hollow cathode ion source for metal ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, W. J.; Mueller, M. W. O.; Janik, J.; Liu, K. X.; Ren, X. T. [Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing, 100871 (China); GSI, D64291 Darmstadt (Germany) and Sentastr. 12, D68199, Mannheim (Germany); Institute of Microelectronics, Slovak Technical University, Bratislava, Llcovicova 3 (Slovakia); Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University, Beijing, 100871 (China) and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing, 100871 (China)

    2008-02-15

    In this paper we describe a novel ion source named DUHOCAMIS for multiply charged metal ion beams. This ion source is derived from the hot cathode Penning ion gauge ion source (JINR, Dubna, 1957). A notable characteristic is the modified Penning geometry in the form of a hollow sputter electrode, coaxially positioned in a compact bottle-magnetic field along the central magnetic line of force. The interaction of the discharge geometry with the inhomogeneous but symmetrical magnetic field enables this device to be operated as hollow cathode discharge and Penning discharge as well. The main features of the ion source are the very high metal ion efficiency (up to 25%), good operational reproducibility, flexible and efficient operations for low charged as well as highly charged ions, compact setup, and easy maintenance. For light ions, e.g., up to titanium, well-collimated beams in the range of several tens of milliamperes of pulsed ion current (1 ms, 10/s) have been reliably performed in long time runs.

  5. Crystallographic analysis of metal-ion binding to human ubiquitin.

    PubMed

    Arnesano, Fabio; Belviso, Benny Danilo; Caliandro, Rocco; Falini, Giuseppe; Fermani, Simona; Natile, Giovanni; Siliqi, Dritan

    2011-02-01

    The metal-binding ability of human ubiquitin (hUb) towards a selection of biologically relevant metal ions and complexes has been probed. Different techniques have been used to obtain crystals suitable for crystallographic analysis. In the first type of experiments, crystals of hUb have been soaked in solutions containing copper(II) acetate and two metallodrugs, Zeise salt (K[PtCl(3)(?(2)-C(2)H(4))]·H(2)O) and cisplatin (cis-[PtCl(2)(NH(3))(2)]). The Zeise salt is used in a test for hepatitis, whereas cisplatin is one of the most powerful anticancer drugs in clinical use. The Zeise salt readily reacts with hUb crystals to afford an adduct with three platinum residues per protein molecule, Pt(3)-hUb. In contrast, copper(II) acetate and cisplatin were found to be unreactive for contact times up to one hour and to cause degradation of the hUb crystals for longer times. In the second type of experiments, hUb was cocrystallized with a solution of copper(II) or zinc(II) acetate or cisplatin. Zinc(II) acetate gives, at low metal-to-protein molar ratios (8:1), crystals containing one metal ion per three molecules of protein, Zn-hUb(3) (already reported in previous work), whereas at high metal-to-protein ratios (70:1) gives crystals containing three Zn(II) ions per protein molecule, Zn(3)-hUb. In contrast, once again, copper(II) acetate and cisplatin, even at low metal-to-protein ratios, do not give crystalline material. In the soaking experiment, the Zeise anion leads to simultaneous platination of His68, Met1, and Lys6. Present and previous results of cocrystallization experiments performed with Zn(II) and other Group 12 metal ions allow a comprehensive understanding of the metal-ion binding properties of hUb with His68 as the main anchoring site, followed by Met1 and carboxylic groups of Glu16, Glu18, Glu64, Asp21, and Asp32, to be reached. In the case of platinum, Lys6 can also be a binding site. The amount of bound metal ion, with respect to that of the protein, appears to be a relevant parameter influencing crystal packing. PMID:21268159

  6. High Pressure Phase Transformations in Heavy Rare Earth Metals and Connections to Actinide Crystal Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Vohra, Yogesh K.; Sangala, Bagvanth Reddy; Stemshorn, Andrew K. [Physics, University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), 310 Campbell Hall, 1300 University Boulevard, Birmingham, AL, 35294-1170 (United States); Hope, Kevin M. [Biology, Chemistry, and Mathematics, University of Montevallo, Harman Hall, Station 6480, Montevallo, AL, 35115 (United States)

    2008-07-01

    High-pressure studies have been performed on heavy rare earth metals Terbium (Tb) to 155 GPa and Holmium (Ho) to 134 GPa in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature. The following crystal structure sequence was observed in both metals hcp {yields} Sm-type {yields} dhcp {yields} distorted fcc (hR-24) {yields} monoclinic (C2/m) with increasing pressure. The last transformation to a low symmetry monoclinic phase is accompanied by a volume collapse of 5 % for Tb at 51 GPa and a volume collapse of 3 % for Ho at 103 GPa. This volume collapse under high pressure is reminiscent of f-shell delocalization in light rare earth metal Cerium (Ce), Praseodymium (Pr), and heavy actinide metals Americium (Am) and Curium (Cm). The orthorhombic Pnma phase that has been reported in Am and Cm after f-shell delocalization is not observed in heavy rare earth metals under high pressures. (authors)

  7. Metal ion bombardment of onion skin cell wall

    SciTech Connect

    Sangyuenyongpipat, S.; Vilaithong, T.; Yu, L.D.; Verdaguer, A.; Ratera, I.; Ogletree, D.F.; Monteiro, O.R.; Brown, I.G.

    2004-05-10

    Ion bombardment of living cellular material is a novel subfield of ion beam surface modification that is receiving growing attention from the ion beam and biological communities. Although it has been demonstrated that the technique is sound, in that an adequate fraction of the living cells can survive both the vacuum environment and energetic ion bombardment, there remains much uncertainty about the process details. Here we report on our observations of onion skin cells that were subjected to ion implantation, and propose some possible physical models that tend to support the experimental results. The ion beams used were metallic (Mg, Ti, Fe, Ni, Cu), mean ion energy was typically 30keV, and the implantation fluence was in the range 1014 1016 ions/cm2. The cells were viewed using Atomic Force Microscopy, revealing the formation of microcrater-like structures due to ion bombardment. The implantation depth profile was measured with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and compared to the results of the TRIM, T-DYN and PROFILE computer codes.

  8. Analysis of rare-earth ion spatial distribution in fluorophosphate glasses in terms of segregation phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocharova, T. V.; Adam, J. L.; Karapetyan, G. O.; Smektala, F.; Mironov, A. M.; Tagil'Tseva, N. O.

    2007-05-01

    The study deals with complex investigation of segregation phenomenon of Eu (1.0mol%EuF3) and Tb ions (1.2mol%TbF3) in Ba(PO3) MgCaSrBaAl2F14 glasses, by using photoluminescence methods, followed by Rayleigh and Mandelstam Brillouin scattering (RMBS) measurements. It is shown that the local environment of rare-earth ions depends on the ratio of rare-earth concentration and phosphate component content. The results are interpreted in terms of doping-ion segregation model.

  9. Changes in blood ion levels after removal of metal-on-metal hip replacements

    PubMed Central

    Durrani, Salim K; Sampson, Barry; Panetta, Therese; Liddle, Alexander D; Sabah, Shiraz A; Chan, Newton K; Skinner, John A; Hart, Alister J

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose In patients with metal-on-metal (MoM) hip prostheses, pain and joint effusions may be associated with elevated blood levels of cobalt and chromium ions. Since little is known about the kinetics of metal ion clearance from the body and the rate of resolution of elevated blood ion levels, we examined the time course of cobalt and chromium ion levels after revision of MoM hip replacements. Patients and methods We included 16 patients (13 female) who underwent revision of a painful MoM hip (large diameter, modern bearing) without fracture or infection, and who had a minimum of 4 blood metal ion measurements over an average period of 6.1 (0–12) months after revision. Results Average blood ion concentrations at the time of revision were 22 ppb for chromium and 43 ppb for cobalt. The change in ion levels after revision surgery varied extensively between patients. In many cases, over the second and third months after revision surgery ion levels decreased to 50% of the values measured at revision. Decay of chromium levels occurred more slowly than decay of cobalt levels, with a 9% lag in return to normal levels. The rate of decay of both metals followed second-order (exponential) kinetics more closely than first-order (linear) kinetics. Interpretation The elimination of cobalt and chromium from the blood of patients who have undergone revision of painful MoM hip arthroplasties follows an exponential decay curve with a half-life of approximately 50 days. Elevated blood levels of cobalt and chromium ions can persist for at least 1 year after revision, especially in patients with high levels of exposure. PMID:24758321

  10. Stable alkali metal ion intercalation compounds as optimized metal oxide nanowire cathodes for lithium batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunlong; Han, Chunhua; Yang, Junwei; Su, Jie; Xu, Xiaoming; Li, Shuo; Xu, Lin; Fang, Ruopian; Jiang, Hong; Zou, Xiaodong; Song, Bo; Mai, Liqiang; Zhang, Qingjie

    2015-03-11

    Intercalation of ions in electrode materials has been explored to improve the rate capability in lithium batteries and supercapacitors, due to the enhanced diffusion of Li(+) or electrolyte cations. Here, we describe a synergistic effect between crystal structure and intercalated ion by experimental characterization and ab initio calculations, based on more than 20 nanomaterials: five typical cathode materials together with their alkali metal ion intercalation compounds A-M-O (A = Li, Na, K, Rb; M = V, Mo, Co, Mn, Fe-P). Our focus on nanowires is motivated by general enhancements afforded by nanoscale structures that better sustain lattice distortions associated with charge/discharge cycles. We show that preintercalation of alkali metal ions in V-O and Mo-O yields substantial improvement in the Li ion charge/discharge cycling and rate, compared to A-Co-O, A-Mn-O, and A-Fe-P-O. Diffraction and modeling studies reveal that preintercalation with K and Rb ions yields a more stable interlayer expansion, which prevents destructive collapse of layers and allow Li ions to diffuse more freely. This study demonstrates that appropriate alkali metal ion intercalation in admissible structure can overcome the limitation of cyclability as well as rate capability of cathode materials, besides, the preintercalation strategy provides an effective method to enlarge diffusion channel at the technical level, and more generally, it suggests that the optimized design of stable intercalation compounds could lead to substantial improvements for applications in energy storage. PMID:25654208

  11. Interaction of copper metallization with rare-earth metals and silicides

    SciTech Connect

    Molnar, G. L.; Peto, G.; Zsoldos, E.; Horvath, Z. E.

    2001-07-01

    Solid-phase reactions of copper films with underlying gadolinium, erbium, and erbium{endash}silicide layers on Si(100) substrates were investigated. For the phase analysis, x-ray diffraction and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy were used. In the case of Cu/Gd/Si(100), an orthorhombic GdSi{sub 2} formed, and, at higher temperatures, copper aggregated into islands. Annealed Cu/Er/Si(100) samples resulted in a hexagonal Er{sub 5}Si{sub 3} phase. In the Cu/ErSi{sub 2{minus}x}/Si system, the copper catalyzes the transformation of the highly oriented hexagonal ErSi{sub 2{minus}x} phase into hexagonal Er{sub 5}Si{sub 3}. Diverse phase developments of the samples with Gd and Er are based on reactivity differences of the two rare-earth metals. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  12. Electropositive bivalent metallic ion unsaturated polyester complexed polymer concrete

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.; Horn, W.H.

    1983-05-13

    Quick setting polymer concrete compositions are described which are mixtures of unsaturated polyesters and crosslinking monomers together with appropriate initiators and promoters in association with aggregate which may be wet and a source of bivalent metallic ions which will set to polymer concrete with excellent structural properties.

  13. Electropositive bivalent metallic ion unsaturated polyester complexed polymer concrete

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.; Horn, W.H.

    1981-11-04

    Quick setting polymer concrete compositions which are mixtures of unsaturated polyesters and crosslinking monomers together with appropriate initiators and promoters in association with aggregate which may be wet and a source of bivalent metallic ions which will set to polymer concrete with excellent structural properties.

  14. COAGULATION AND PRECIPITATION OF SELECTED METAL IONS FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of laboratory jar tests to develop data on the removal from aqueous solution of 12 metal ions of environmental concern. The project, of very limited scope, provides initial screening data only: coagulants were evaluated at only two dose levels (1.1 and 1....

  15. A new method for modifying metallic materials by ion irradiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Davit Danielyan

    A new method of radiation surface modification of metal materials is proposed. The method permits to apply the equipment, which is usually employed for ion implantation or plasma treatment with minimum and cheap constructive changes. But the substantially more high characteristics of materials can be obtained as compared with other radiation hardening methods due to the different base principles. The

  16. Electropositive bivalent metallic ion unsaturated polyester complexed polymer concrete

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi (Mastic Beach, NY); Kukacka, Lawrence E. (Port Jefferson, NY); Horn, William H. (Brookhaven, NY)

    1985-01-01

    Quick setting polymer concrete compositions with excellent structural properties are disclosed; these polymer concrete compositions are mixtures of unsaturated polyesters and crosslinking monomers together with appropriate initiators and promoters in association with aggregate, which may be wet, and with a source of bivalent metallic ions.

  17. Accumulation of heavy-metal ions by Zoogloea ramigera

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anders B. Norberg; Hans Persson

    1984-01-01

    Biomass has been produced from glucose using the organism Zoogloea ramigera 115. This biomass has been used to remove copper, cadmium, and uranyl ions from water solutions. The metal uptake was studied with two different methods: either by spectrophotometric measurements on the solutions after flocculation or by potentiometric measurements with amalgam electrodes in order to follow the entire complex formation.

  18. Effects of Rare Earth Ions on the Quality and the Magnetic Propertes of Ag-FERRITES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M. A.; Okasha, N.

    2011-06-01

    A set of compounds with the formula MgAg0.4R0.2Fe1.4O4 where R is Lanthanum (La3+), Terbium (Tb3+), and Yttrium (Y3+), were prepared by the flash combustion technique. The effect of rare earths ions on some properties of silver doped was investigated. The obtained data indicated that, by introducing a relatively small amount of rare earths ions instead of Fe2O3 ions, an important modification of both the structure and the magnetic properties can be obtained. The Curie temperature, effective magnetic moment and exchange interaction are affected by these substitutions. The effect of rare earth ions were explained both by their partial diffusion in the spinel lattice and by the formation of the crystalline secondary phase on the grain boundaries.

  19. The chemistry of meteoric metals in the Earth's upper atmosphere

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John M. C. Plane

    1991-01-01

    The presence of thin layers of free metal atoms at around 90 km in the upper atmosphere has been known for about fifty years. Layers of the alkali metals Na, K and Li, as well as Ca and Fe, have been observed. This discovery has posed two important questions. First, what is the source of the metals: interplanetary or terrestrial?

  20. [Spectroscopic studies on transition metal ions in colored diamonds].

    PubMed

    Meng, Yu-Fei; Peng, Ming-Sheng

    2004-07-01

    Transition metals like nickel, cobalt and iron have been often used as solvent catalysts in high pressure high temperature (HPHT) synthesis of diamond, and nickel and cobalt ions have been found in diamond lattice. Available studies indicated that nickel and cobalt ions could enter the lattice as interstitial or substitutional impurities and form complexes with nitrogen. Polarized microscopy, SEM-EDS, EPR, PL and FTIR have been used in this study to investigate six fancy color natural and synthetic diamonds in order to determine the spectroscopic characteristics and the existing forms of transition metal ions in colored diamond lattice. Cobalt-related optical centers were first found in natural chameleon diamonds, and some new nickel and cobalt-related optical and EPR centers have also been detected in these diamond samples. PMID:15766067

  1. Quadrupole ion trap studies of the structure and reactivity of transition metal ion pair complexes

    PubMed

    Vachet; Callahan

    2000-03-01

    Ion pairs are common species observed in the electrospray mass spectra of transition metal coordination complexes. To understand the nature of these ion pairs, a systematic study of the gas-phase chemistry of these species using ion-molecule reactions and collision-induced dissociation (CID) was carried out. Ion pair complexes of the type MLnX+ (where M is Mn(II), Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) or Zn(II), L is 1,10-phenanthroline, 2,2'-bipyridine, ethylenediamine, diethylenetriamine or 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane and X is Cl-, NO3-, acetylacetonate, ClO4-, acetate or SCN-) were studied. Ion-molecule reactions can distinguish whether the counterion in an ion pair is an inner- or outer-sphere ligand and can determine the coordination mode of the counterion. In addition, CID and ion-molecule reactions reveal some interesting chemistry of these complexes and unique coordination modes for some of the anions studied here were inferred from the ion-molecule reactions. For example, the thiocyanate ion is found to coordinate in a bidentate fashion in Zn(II) and Ni(II) complexes, contrasting behavior typically observed in solution. Also, certain Co(II) and Fe(II) ion pair complexes undergo oxidation reactions in which species such as dioxygen and nitric oxide from the counterions ClO4- and NO3- are transferred to the Co(II) and Fe(II) complexes, showing the inherent affinity of these metals for these molecules. These complexes were also studied by ion-molecule reactions and CID. Dioxygen in complexes formed by CID is demonstrated to be bidentate, suggesting the formation of a peroxo ligand with concurrent oxidation of the metal. PMID:10767759

  2. Method for removing metal ions from solution with titanate sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Lundquist, Susan H. (White Bear Township, MN); White, Lloyd R. (Minneapolis, MN)

    1999-01-01

    A method for removing metal ions from solution comprises the steps of providing titanate particles by spray-drying a solution or slurry comprising sorbent titanates having a particle size up to 20 micrometers, optionally in the presence of polymer free of cellulose functionality as binder, said sorbent being active towards heavy metals from Periodic Table (CAS version) Groups IA, IIA, IB, IIB, IIIB, and VIII, to provide monodisperse, substantially spherical particles in a yield of at least 70 percent of theoretical yield and having a particle size distribution in the range of 1 to 500 micrometers. The particles can be used free flowing in columns or beds, or entrapped in a nonwoven, fibrous web or matrix or a cast porous membrane, to selectively remove metal ions from aqueous or organic liquid.

  3. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: From Cluster Ions to Toxic metal Ions in Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas B. Lentz

    2007-12-01

    This dissertation focused on using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to study cluster ions and toxic metal ions in biology. In Chapter 2, it was shown that primary, secondary and quarternary amines exhibit different clustering characteristics under identical instrument conditions. Carbon chain length also played a role in cluster ion formation. In Chapters 3 and 4, the effects of solvent types/ratios and various instrumental parameters on cluster ion formation were examined. It was found that instrument interface design also plays a critical role in the cluster ion distribution seen in the mass spectrum. In Chapter 5, ESI-MS was used to investigate toxic metal binding to the [Gln{sup 11}]-amyloid {beta}-protein fragment (1-16). Pb and Cd bound stronger than Zn, even in the presence of excess Zn. Hg bound weaker than Zn. There are endless options for future work on cluster ions. Any molecule that is poorly ionized in positive ion mode can potentially show an increase in ionization efficiency if an appropriate anion is used to produce a net negative charge. It is possible that drug protein or drug/DNA complexes can also be stabilized by adding counter-ions. This would preserve the solution characteristics of the complex in the gas phase. Once in the gas phase, CID could determine the drug binding location on the biomolecule. There are many research projects regarding toxic metals in biology that have yet to be investigated or even discovered. This is an area of research with an almost endless future because of the changing dynamics of biological systems. What is deemed safe today may show toxic effects in the future. Evolutionary changes in protein structures may render them more susceptible to toxic metal binding. As the understanding of toxicity evolves, so does the demand for new toxic metal research. New instrumentation designs and software make it possible to perform research that could not be done in the past. What was undetectable yesterday will become routine tomorrow.

  4. Chitosan removes toxic heavy metal ions from cigarette mainstream smoke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wen; Xu, Ying; Wang, Dongfeng; Zhou, Shilu

    2013-09-01

    This study investigated the removal of heavy metal ions from cigarette mainstream smoke using chitosan. Chitosan of various deacetylation degrees and molecular weights were manually added to cigarette filters in different dosages. The mainstream smoke particulate matter was collected by a Cambridge filter pad, digested by a microwave digestor, and then analyzed for contents of heavy metal ions, including As(III/V), Pb(II), Cd(II), Cr(III/VI) and Ni(II), by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The results showed that chitosan had a removal effect on Pb(II), Cd(II), Cr(III/VI) and Ni(II). Of these, the percent removal of Ni(II) was elevated with an increasing dosage of chitosan. Chitosan of a high deace tylation degree exhibited good binding performance toward Cd(II), Cr(III/VI) and Ni(II), though with poor efficiency for Pb(II). Except As(III/V), all the tested metal ions showed similar tendencies in the growing contents with an increasing chitosan molecular weight. Nonetheless, the percent removal of Cr(III/VI) peaked with a chitosan molecular weight of 200 kDa, followed by a dramatic decrease with an increasing chitosan molecular weight. Generally, chitosan had different removal effects on four out of five tested metal ions, and the percent removal of Cd(II), Pb(II), Cr(III/VI) and Ni(II) was approximately 55%, 45%, 50%, and 16%, respectively. In a word, chitosan used in cigarette filter can remove toxic heavy metal ions in the mainstream smoke, improve cigarette safety, and reduce the harm to smokers.

  5. Metal ion influence on eumelanin fluorescence and structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutter, Jens-Uwe; Birch, David J. S.

    2014-06-01

    Melanin has long been thought to have an unworkably weak and complex fluorescence, but here we study its intrinsic fluorescence in order to demonstrate how metal ions can be used to control the rate of formation, constituents and structure of eumelanin formed from the well-known laboratory auto-oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (L-DOPA). The effect on eumelanin absorption and fluorescence of a range of solvated metal ions is reported including Cu, Zn, Ni, Na and K. Monovalent cations and Zn have little effect, but the effect of transition metal cations can be considerable. For example, at pH 10, copper ions are shown to accelerate the onset of eumelanin formation, but not the rate of formation once it commences, and simplify the usual complex structure and intrinsic fluorescence of eumelanin in a way that is consistent with an increased abundance of 5,5-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid (DHICA). The presence of a dominant 6 ns fluorescence decay time at 480 nm, when excited at 450 nm describes a distinct photophysical species, which we tentatively assign to small oligomers. Copper is well-known to normally quench fluorescence, but increasing amounts of copper surprisingly leads to an increase in the fluorescence decay time of eumelanin, while reducing the fluorescence intensity, suggesting copper modification of the excited state. Such results have bearing on diverse areas. The most accepted morphology for melanin is that of a graphite-like sheet structure, and one which readily binds metal ions, an interaction that is thought to have an important, though as yet unclear bearing on several areas of medicine including neurology. There is also increasing interest in bio-mimicry by preparing and labelling sheet structures with metal ions for new electronic and photonic materials.

  6. Solution NMR Refinement of a Metal Ion Bound Protein Using Metal Ion Inclusive Restrained Molecular Dynamics Methods

    PubMed Central

    Chakravorty, Dhruva K.; Wang, Bing; Lee, Chul Won; Guerra, Alfredo J.; Giedroc, David P.; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2013-01-01

    Correctly calculating the structure of metal coordination sites in a protein during the process of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure determination and refinement continues to be a challenging task. In this study, we present an accurate and convenient means by which to include metal ions in the NMR structure determination process using molecular dynamics (MD) constrained by NMR-derived data to obtain a realistic and physically viable description of the metal binding site(s). This method provides the framework to accurately portray the metal ions and its binding residues in a pseudo-bond or dummy-cation like approach, and is validated by quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) MD calculations constrained by NMR-derived data. To illustrate this approach, we refine the zinc coordination complex structure of the zinc sensing transcriptional repressor protein Staphylococcus aureus CzrA, generating over 130 ns of MD and QM/MM MD NMR-data compliant sampling. In addition to refining the first coordination shell structure of the Zn(II) ion, this protocol benefits from being performed in a periodically replicated solvation environment including long-range electrostatics. We determine that unrestrained (not based on NMR data) MD simulations correlated to the NMR data in a time-averaged ensemble. The accurate solution structure ensemble of the metal-bound protein accurately describes the role of conformational dynamics in allosteric regulation of DNA binding by zinc and serves to validate our previous unrestrained MD simulations of CzrA. This methodology has potentially broad applicability in the structure determination of metal ion bound proteins, protein folding and metal template protein-design studies. PMID:23609042

  7. MAGNETIC ORDERING AND THE ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE OF RARE-EARTH METALS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Mackintosh

    1962-01-01

    The effects of magnetic ordering of the localized 4f electrons in rare ; earth metals on the structure of the Brillouin zones in these metals, and hence ; on the conduction-electron characteristics, are studied by means of a ; magneticsuperlattice model. The model takes into account the exchange ; interaction between the 4f and conduction electrons, and effects of spin-orbit

  8. Extraction of rare-earth metals by liquid surfactant membranes containing a novel cyclic carrier

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Takahiko Kakoi; Takayuki Nishiyori; Tatsuya Oshima; Fukiko Kubota; Masahiro Goto; Seiji Shinkai; Fumiyuki Nakashio

    1997-01-01

    Extraction behavior of three rare-earth metals (Ho, Er and Y), was systematically studied by liquid surfactant membranes (LSMs) containing a novel host compound, a calixarene carboxyl derivative, which is a cyclic compound connected to some phenol rings, as a mobile carrier in a stirred cell. Using the host compound, the extraction equilibrium of the metals in liquid-liquid extraction was also

  9. Comparison of oxygen ion outflow on Earth and Mars during space weather events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Y.; Fraenz, M.; Dubinin, E.; Barabash, S.; Dandouras, I. S.; Lundin, R. N.

    2012-12-01

    Solar wind controls non-thermal escape of planetary atmospheric volatiles, regardless of the strength of planetary magnetic fields. For both Earth with a strong dipole and Mars with weak remnant fields, the oxygen ion (O+) outflow has been separately found to be enhanced during corotating interaction region (CIR) passage. To discern the role of terrestrial dipole in protecting planetary volatiles, here for the first time, we compared the enhancements of O+ outflow on Earth and Mars to a CIR which passed by in January, 2008 when Sun, Earth and Mars were approximately aligned. The CIR propagation was recorded by STEREO, ACE, Cluster and Mars Express (MEX). During the CIR passage, Cluster observed enhanced flux of upwelling oxygen ions above the Earth's polar region, while MEX detected increased escape flux of oxygen ions in the Martian magnetosphere. We found that, under a solar wind dynamic pressure increase by 2-3 nPa, the rate of increase in Martian O+ outflow flux was one order higher than those on Earth, thus the dipole effectively prevents coupling of solar wind kinetic energy to planetary ions. Surprisingly, as response to the same part of the CIR body, the rate of increase in Martian O+ outflow flux was on the same order as for Earth. We suggest that, besides existence of a dipole field, the distance to the Sun is also crucially important for planetary volatile loss in our inner solar system.

  10. Liquid metal ion source and alloy for ion emission of multiple ionic species

    DOEpatents

    Clark, Jr., William M. (Thousand Oaks, CA); Utlaut, Mark W. (Saugus, CA); Wysocki, Joseph A. (Oxnard, CA); Storms, Edmund K. (Los Alamos, NM); Szklarz, Eugene G. (Los Alamos, NM); Behrens, Robert G. (Los Alamos, NM); Swanson, Lynwood W. (McMinnville, OR); Bell, Anthony E. (McMinnville, OR)

    1987-06-02

    A liquid metal ion source and alloy for the simultaneous ion evaporation of arsenic and boron, arsenic and phosphorus, or arsenic, boron and phosphorus. The ionic species to be evaporated are contained in palladium-arsenic-boron and palladium-arsenic-boron-phosphorus alloys. The ion source, including an emitter means such as a needle emitter and a source means such as U-shaped heater element, is preferably constructed of rhenium and tungsten, both of which are readily fabricated. The ion sources emit continuous beams of ions having sufficiently high currents of the desired species to be useful in ion implantation of semiconductor wafers for preparing integrated circuit devices. The sources are stable in operation, experience little corrosion during operation, and have long operating lifetimes.

  11. Correlation between volatility of rare-earth metals and encapsulation of their carbides in carbon nanocapsules

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Yahachi; Okuda, Mitsumasa; Yoshikawa, Tadanobu (Mie Univ., Tsu (Japan)); Kasuya, Atsuo; Nishina, Yuichiro (Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan))

    1994-07-07

    Encapsulation of metals in multilayered graphitic capsules has been studied for all the rare-earth elements (Sc, Y, and Ln = La, Ce, ..., Lu) excluding Pm by using electric arc discharge. Electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction of carbonaceous products revealed that most of rare-earth metals (Sc, Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, and Lu) were encapsulated in the form of carbides, but the others, Sm, Eu, and Yb, were not. The metals in the former group that were encapsulated had vapor pressures definitely lower than those in the latter group. In the case of thulium (Tm), whose vapor pressure is intermediate between the two groups, only a trace amount of encapsulated carbide was formed. Correlation of volatility of metals with encapsulation was clearly found, suggesting that the volatility of a metal plays an important role in a process of the metal encapsulation. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. The Structure of the Metal Transporter Tp34 and its Affinity for Divalent Metal Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knutsen, Gregory; Deka, Ranjit; Brautigam, Chad; Tomchick, Diana; Machius, Mischa; Norgard, Michael

    2007-10-01

    Tp34 is periplasmic membrane protein of the nonculitvatable spirochete Treponema pallidum, the pathogen of syphillis. It was proposed that Tp34 is a divalent metal transporter, but the identity of the preferred metal ion(s) was unclear. In this study we investigated the ability of divalent metal ions to induce rTp34 dimerization using hydrodynamic techniques and determine the crystal structure of metal bound forms. Using analytical ultracentrifugation sedimentation velocity experiments, we determined that cobalt is superior to nickel at inducing the dimerization of rTp34. rTp34 was crystallized and selected crystals were incubated at a pH 7.5 with CuSO4 and NiSO4. Diffraction experiments were conducted and the processed electron density maps showed that copper was bound to the major metal binding site as well as to three additional minor binding sites. By contrast nickel was only bound to the major metal binding site in one monomer and to three additional minor sites. These results along with previous findings support evidence of Tp34 being involved with metal transport and/or iron utilization.

  13. Ion beam sputter-deposited thin film coatings for protection of spacecraft polymers in low Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.; Mirtich, M. J.; Rutledge, S. K.; Swec, D. M.; Nahra, H. K.

    1985-01-01

    Ion beam sputter-deposited thin films of Al2O3, SiO2, and a codeposited mixture of predominantly SiO2 with small amounts of a fluoropolymer were evaluated both in laboratory plasma ashing tests and in space on board shuttle flight STS-8 for effectiveness in preventing oxidation of polyimide Kapton. Measurements of mass loss and optical performance of coated and uncoated polyimide samples exposed to the low Earth orbital environment are presented. Optical techniques were used to measure loss rates of protective films exposed to atomic oxygen. Results of the analysis of the space flight exposed samples indicate that thin film metal oxide coatings are very effective in protecting the polyimide. Metal oxide coatings with a small amount of fluoropolymer codeposited have the additional benefit of great flexibility.

  14. Ion beam sputter-deposited thin film coatings for protection of spacecraft polymers in low earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.; Mirtich, M. J.; Rutledge, S. K.; Swec, D. M.; Nahra, H. K.

    1985-01-01

    Ion beam sputter-deposited thin films at Al2O3, SiO2, and a codeposited mixture of predominantly SiO2 with small amounts of fluoropolymer were evaluated both in laboratory plasma ashing tests and in space on board Shuttle flight STS-8 for effectiveness in preventing oxidation of polyimide Kapton. Measurements of mass loss and optical performance of coated and uncoated polyimide samples exposed to the low earth orbital environment are presented. Optical techniques were used to measure loss rates of protective films exposed to atomic oxygen. Results of the analysis of the space flight exposed samples indicate that thin film metal oxide coatings are very effective in protecting the polyimide. Metal oxide coatings with a small amount of fluoropolymer codeposited have the additional benefit of great flexibility.

  15. Peptide immobilisation on porous silicon surface for metal ions detection.

    PubMed

    Sam, Sabrina S; Chazalviel, Jean-Noël Jn; Gouget-Laemmel, Anne Chantal Ac; Ozanam, François F; Etcheberry, Arnaud A; Gabouze, Nour-Eddine N

    2011-01-01

    In this work, a Glycyl-Histidyl-Glycyl-Histidine (GlyHisGlyHis) peptide is covalently anchored to the porous silicon PSi surface using a multi-step reaction scheme compatible with the mild conditions required for preserving the probe activity. In a first step, alkene precursors are grafted onto the hydrogenated PSi surface using the hydrosilylation route, allowing for the formation of a carboxyl-terminated monolayer which is activated by reaction with N-hydroxysuccinimide in the presence of a peptide-coupling carbodiimide N-ethyl-N'-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide and subsequently reacted with the amino linker of the peptide to form a covalent amide bond. Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are used to investigate the different steps of functionalization.The property of peptides to form stable complexes with metal ions is exploited to achieve metal-ion recognition by the peptide-modified PSi-based biosensor. An electrochemical study of the GlyHisGlyHis-modified PSi electrode is achieved in the presence of copper ions. The recorded cyclic voltammograms show a quasi-irreversible process corresponding to the Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple. The kinetic factors (the heterogeneous rate constant and the transfer coefficient) and the stability constant of the complex formed on the porous silicon surface are determined. These results demonstrate the potential role of peptides grafted on porous silicon in developing strategies for simple and fast detection of metal ions in solution. PMID:21711937

  16. Peptide immobilisation on porous silicon surface for metal ions detection

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In this work, a Glycyl-Histidyl-Glycyl-Histidine (GlyHisGlyHis) peptide is covalently anchored to the porous silicon PSi surface using a multi-step reaction scheme compatible with the mild conditions required for preserving the probe activity. In a first step, alkene precursors are grafted onto the hydrogenated PSi surface using the hydrosilylation route, allowing for the formation of a carboxyl-terminated monolayer which is activated by reaction with N-hydroxysuccinimide in the presence of a peptide-coupling carbodiimide N-ethyl-N'-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide and subsequently reacted with the amino linker of the peptide to form a covalent amide bond. Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are used to investigate the different steps of functionalization. The property of peptides to form stable complexes with metal ions is exploited to achieve metal-ion recognition by the peptide-modified PSi-based biosensor. An electrochemical study of the GlyHisGlyHis-modified PSi electrode is achieved in the presence of copper ions. The recorded cyclic voltammograms show a quasi-irreversible process corresponding to the Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple. The kinetic factors (the heterogeneous rate constant and the transfer coefficient) and the stability constant of the complex formed on the porous silicon surface are determined. These results demonstrate the potential role of peptides grafted on porous silicon in developing strategies for simple and fast detection of metal ions in solution. PMID:21711937

  17. New Catalytic DNA Biosensors for Radionuclides and Metal ion

    SciTech Connect

    Yi Lu

    2008-03-01

    We aim to develop new DNA biosensors for simultaneous detection and quantification of bioavailable radionuclides, such as uranium, technetium, and plutonium, and metal contaminants, such as lead, chromium, and mercury. The sensors will be highly sensitive and selective. They will be applied to on-site, real-time assessment of concentration, speciation, and stability of the individual contaminants before and during bioremediation, and for long-term monitoring of DOE contaminated sites. To achieve this goal, we have employed a combinatorial method called “in vitro selection” to search from a large DNA library (~ 1015 different molecules) for catalytic DNA molecules that are highly specific for radionuclides or other metal ions through intricate 3-dimensional interactions as in metalloproteins. Comprehensive biochemical and biophysical studies have been performed on the selected DNA molecules. The findings from these studies have helped to elucidate fundamental principles for designing effective sensors for radionuclides and metal ions. Based on the study, the DNA have been converted to fluorescent or colorimetric sensors by attaching to it fluorescent donor/acceptor pairs or gold nanoparticles, with 11 part-per-trillion detection limit (for uranium) and over million fold selectivity (over other radionuclides and metal ions tested). Practical application of the biosensors for samples from the Environmental Remediation Sciences Program (ERSP) Field Research Center (FRC) at Oak Ridge has also been demonstrated.

  18. Effect of ion implantation on the tribology of metal-on-metal hip prostheses.

    PubMed

    Bowsher, John G; Hussain, Azad; Williams, Paul; Nevelos, Jim; Shelton, Julia C

    2004-12-01

    Nitrogen ion implantation (which considerably hardens the surface of the bearing) may represent one possible method of reducing the wear of metal-on-metal (MOM) hip bearings. Currently there are no ion-implanted MOM bearings used clinically. Therefore a physiological hip simulator test was undertaken using standard test conditions, and the results compared to previous studies using the same methods. N2-ion implantation of high carbon cast Co-Cr-Mo-on-Co-Cr-Mo hip prostheses increased wear by 2-fold during the aggressive running-in phase compared to untreated bearing surfaces, plus showing no wear reductions during steady-state conditions. Although 2 specimens were considered in the current study, it would appear that ion implantation has no clinical benefit for MOM. PMID:15578563

  19. Finite Tunneling Spin Polarization at the Compensation Point of Rare-Earth-Metal Transition-Metal Alloys

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christian Kaiser; Alex F. Panchula; Stuart S. Parkin

    2005-01-01

    We show, using superconducting tunneling spectroscopy and tunneling magnetoresistance measurements, that ferrimagnetic alloys of Co and Gd can exhibit both positive and negative spin polarization depending on temperature and composition. These observations can be understood by considering the relative contributions of independent spin-polarized tunneling currents from the rare-earth-metal and transition-metal subnetwork magnetizations, which are coupled antiferromagnetically. At the compensation point

  20. Polymer filtration systems for dilute metal ion recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, B.F.; Robison, T.W.; Jarvinen, G.D.

    1998-12-01

    Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a metal recovery system that meets the global treatment demands for all kinds of industrial and metal-processing streams. The Polymer Filtration (PF) System--a process that is easily operated and robust--offers metal-finishing businesses a convenient and inexpensive way to recover and recycle metal ions in-house, thus reducing materials costs, waste removal costs, and industrial liability. As a valuable economic and environmental asset, the PF System has been named a winner of a 1995 R and D 100 Award. These awards are presented annually by R and D Magazine to the one hundred most significant technical innovations of the year. The PF System is based on the use of water-soluble metal-binding polymers and on advanced ultrafiltration membranes. Customers for this technology will receive new soluble polymers, especially formulated for their waste stream, and the complete PF processing unit: a reaction reservoir, pumps, plumbing, controls, and the advanced ultrafiltration membranes, all in a skid mounted frame. Metal-bearing waste water is treated in the reaction reservoir, where the polymer binds with the metal ions under balanced acid/base conditions. The reservoir fluid is then pumped through the ultrafiltration system--a cartridge packed with ultrafiltration membranes shaped in hollow fibers. As the fluid travels inside the fiber, water and other small molecules--simple salts such as calcium and sodium, for example--pass through the porous membrane walls of the fibers and are discharged through the outlet as permeate. The polymer-bound metal, which is too large to pass through the pores, is both purified and concentrated inside the hollow fibers and is returned to the fluid reservoir for further waste water treatment.

  1. A study of the structural properties of GaN implanted by various rare-earth ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackova, A.; Malinský, P.; Sofer, Z.; Šimek, P.; Sedmidubský, D.; Mikulics, M.; Wilhelm, R. A.

    2013-07-01

    GaN layers with <0 0 0 1> crystallographic orientation, grown by low-pressure metal-organic vapour-phase epitaxy (MOVPE) on c-plane sapphire substrates, were implanted with 200 and 400 keV Sm+, Tm+, Eu+, Tb+ and Ho+ ions at fluencies of 1 × 1015-1 × 1016 cm-2. The composition of the ion-implanted layers and concentration profiles of the implanted atoms were studied by Rutherford Back-Scattering spectrometry (RBS). The profiles were compared to SRIM 2008 simulations. The structural properties of the ion-implanted layers were characterised by RBS-channelling and Raman spectroscopy. Changes in the surface morphology caused by the ion implantation were examined by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). A structural analysis showed a high disorder of the atoms close to the amorphised structure at the surface layer above an implantation fluence of 5 × 1015 cm-2 while lower disorder density was observed in the bulk according to the projected range of 400 keV ions. The post-implantation annealing induced significant changes only in the Sm and Eu depth profiles; a diffusion of rare-earths implanted at a fluence of 5 × 1015 cm-2 to the surface was observed. The annealing caused the reconstruction of the surface layer accompanied by surface-roughness enhancement.

  2. Measurements of positive ions and air-earth current density at Maitri, Antarctica

    E-print Network

    Siingh, Devendraa; Kamra, A K; 10.1029/2006JD008101

    2009-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements of the small-, intermediate- and large- positive ions and air earth current density made at a coastal station, Maitri at Antarctica during January to February 2005, are reported. Although, small and large positive ion concentrations do not show any systematic diurnal variations, variations in them are almost similar to each other. On the other hand, variations in intermediate positive ion concentrations are independent of variations in the small/large positive ions and exhibit a diurnal variation which is similar to that in atmospheric temperature on fair weather days with a maximum during the day and minimum during the night hours. No such diurnal variation in intermediate positive ion concentration is observed on cloudy days when variations in them are also similar to those insmall/large positive ion concentrations. Magnitude of diurnal variation in intermediate positive ion concentration on fair weather days increases with the lowering of atmospheric temperature in this season. Sc...

  3. Magnetic exchange interaction between rare-earth and Mn ions in multiferroic hexagonal manganites

    SciTech Connect

    Talbayev, Diyar [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Trugman, Stuart A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Taylor, Antoinette J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Averitt, Richard D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Namjung, Hur [INHA UNIV; Andrew, Laforge D [UCSD; Dimitri, Basov N [UCSD

    2008-01-01

    The authors report a study of magnetic dynamics in multiferroic hexagonal manganite HoMnO{sub 3} by far-infrared spectroscopy. Low-temperature magnetic excitation spectrum of HoMnO{sub 3} consists of magnetic-dipole transitions of Ho ions within the crystal-field split J = 8 manifold and of the triangular antiferromagnetic resonance of Mn ions. They determine the effective spin Hamiltonian for the Ho ion ground state. The magnetic-field splitting of the Mn antiferromagnetic resonance allows us to measure the magnetic exchange coupling between the rare-earth and Mn ions.

  4. Charge state distribution of anomalous oxygen ions in low Earth orbit during solar quiescence.

    PubMed

    Marenny, A M; Guertzen, G P; Nymmik, R A

    1990-01-01

    A new method of evaluating the charge state distribution of cosmic ray heavy ions, using a measured ratio of particle fluxes observed in two different satellite orbits passing through the Earth's magnetosphere, is described. The measurements of heavy ions were performed simultaneously on the Cosmos 1882 (orbital inclination 82 degrees) and Cosmos 1887 (inclination 62.3 degrees) satellites during September-October 1987. Solid state nuclear track detector stacks were used for the registration of C, N, O and heavier ions. After comparing the data of the two experiments with theoretical calculations, the charge state of galactic and anomalous heavy ions was derived. PMID:11537510

  5. Initial experiments concerning quantum information processing in rare-earth-ion doped crystals

    E-print Network

    M. Nilsson; L. Levin; N. Ohlsson; T. Christiansson; S. Kroll

    2002-01-30

    In this paper initial experiments towards constructing simple quantum gates in a solid state material are presented. Instead of using specially tailored materials, the aim is to select a subset of randomly distributed ions in the material, which have the interaction necessary to control each other and therefore can be used to do quantum logic operations. The experimental results demonstrate that part of an inhomogeneously broadened absorption line can be selected as a qubit and that a subset of ions in the material can control the resonance frequency of other ions. This opens the way for the construction of quantum gates in rare-earth-ion doped crystals.

  6. Determination of uranium and rare-earth metals separation coefficients in LiCl KCl melt by electrochemical transient techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, S. A.; Hayashi, H.; Minato, K.; Gaune-Escard, M.

    2005-09-01

    The main step in the pyrometallurgical process of spent nuclear fuel recycling is a molten salt electrorefining. The knowledge of separation coefficients of actinides (U, Np, Pu and Am) and rare-earth metals (Y, La, Ce, Nd and Gd) is very important for this step. Usually the separation coefficients are evaluated from the formal standard potentials of metals in melts containing their own ions, values obtained by potentiometric method. Electrochemical experiments were carried out at 723-823 K in order to estimate separation coefficients in LiCl-KCl eutectic melt containing uranium and lanthanum trichlorides. It was shown that for the calculation of uranium and lanthanum separation coefficients it is necessary to determine the voltammetric peak potentials of U(III) and La(III), their concentration in the melt and the kinetic parameters relating to U(III) discharge such as transfer and diffusion coefficients, and standard rate constants of charge transfer.

  7. Ion beam mixing of metal/fluoropolymer interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, D. L.; Giedd, R. E.; Wang, Y. Q.; Glass, G. A.

    1999-06-01

    Ion beam mixing of metals and polymers with very low dielectric constants such as Teflon can provide many applications in the area of electronic materials. This work is a study of the "mixing" effect of 50 keV nitrogen implanted thin metal layers on Teflon PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) substrates. RBS analysis shows that the distribution of thin layers of copper and chromium (approximately 300-400 Å thick) through the implant layer of the Teflon depends on the reactivity of the metal. As the implant fluence is increased, the distribution of metal atoms in the polymer matrix becomes concentrated over smaller ranges near the bottom of the implant layer. In situ RGA analysis during the implantation shows the liberation of an abundance of fluorine in many different forms. This is supported by results from a NRA experiment that shows the non-uniform concentration profile of fluorine throughout the implant layer. During the implantation process, the fluorine is released through the incident ion track leaving a carbon and metal rich region near the surface of the implant layer. The fluorine density increases with depth through the implant layer making a smooth transition to the undamaged bulk Teflon below. Low dielectric materials with highly conductive surfaces, such as this one, may provide an opportunity for a broad range of new microelectronic applications.

  8. Ion beam mixing of metal/fluoropolymer interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, D. L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Giedd, R. E. [Southwest Missouri State University, Springfield, Missouri 65804 (United States); Wang, Y. Q. [Center for Interfacial Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Glass, G. A. [Acadiana Research Laboratory, University of Southwestern Louisiana, Lafayette, Louisiana 70504 (United States)

    1999-06-10

    Ion beam mixing of metals and polymers with very low dielectric constants such as Teflon can provide many applications in the area of electronic materials. This work is a study of the 'mixing' effect of 50 keV nitrogen implanted thin metal layers on Teflon PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) substrates. RBS analysis shows that the distribution of thin layers of copper and chromium (approximately 300-400 A thick) through the implant layer of the Teflon depends on the reactivity of the metal. As the implant fluence is increased, the distribution of metal atoms in the polymer matrix becomes concentrated over smaller ranges near the bottom of the implant layer. In situ RGA analysis during the implantation shows the liberation of an abundance of fluorine in many different forms. This is supported by results from a NRA experiment that shows the non-uniform concentration profile of fluorine throughout the implant layer. During the implantation process, the fluorine is released through the incident ion track leaving a carbon and metal rich region near the surface of the implant layer. The fluorine density increases with depth through the implant layer making a smooth transition to the undamaged bulk Teflon below. Low dielectric materials with highly conductive surfaces, such as this one, may provide an opportunity for a broad range of new microelectronic applications.

  9. Ion beam mixing of metal/fluoropolymer interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, D.L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Giedd, R.E. [Southwest Missouri State University, Springfield, Missouri 65804 (United States); Wang, Y.Q. [Center for Interfacial Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Glass, G.A. [Acadiana Research Laboratory, University of Southwestern Louisiana, Lafayette, Louisiana 70504 (United States)

    1999-06-01

    Ion beam mixing of metals and polymers with very low dielectric constants such as Teflon can provide many applications in the area of electronic materials. This work is a study of the {open_quotes}mixing{close_quotes} effect of 50 keV nitrogen implanted thin metal layers on Teflon PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) substrates. RBS analysis shows that the distribution of thin layers of copper and chromium (approximately 300-400 {Angstrom} thick) through the implant layer of the Teflon depends on the reactivity of the metal. As the implant fluence is increased, the distribution of metal atoms in the polymer matrix becomes concentrated over smaller ranges near the bottom of the implant layer. {ital In situ} RGA analysis during the implantation shows the liberation of an abundance of fluorine in many different forms. This is supported by results from a NRA experiment that shows the non-uniform concentration profile of fluorine throughout the implant layer. During the implantation process, the fluorine is released through the incident ion track leaving a carbon and metal rich region near the surface of the implant layer. The fluorine density increases with depth through the implant layer making a smooth transition to the undamaged bulk Teflon below. Low dielectric materials with highly conductive surfaces, such as this one, may provide an opportunity for a broad range of new microelectronic applications. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. NOVEL APPROACH TO METAL-HUMIC COMPLEXATION STUDIES BY LANTHANID ION PROBE SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Naturally occurring humic substances are known to be potentially strong binders of metals in the environment. ensitive spectroscopic technique, based on the unique luminescence properties of the tripositive lanthanide metal ions, has been developed to selectively probe metal bind...

  11. Novel synthetic phytochelatin-based capacitive biosensor for heavy metal ion detection

    E-print Network

    Chen, Wilfred

    Novel synthetic phytochelatin-based capacitive biosensor for heavy metal ion detection Ibolya on synthetic phytochelatins for sensitive detection of heavy metals is described. Synthetic phytochelatin (Glu: Biosensors; Heavy metals; Phytochelatins; Capacitance 1. Introduction Evolution of our society has lead

  12. Novel luminescent hybrids by incorporating rare earth ?-diketonates into polymers through ion pairing with an imidazolium counter ion.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiu-Ping; Yan, Bing

    2013-09-01

    A series of luminescent polymers are synthesized by incorporating rare earth complex units into polymer matrices. Firstly, we functionalize the selected polymer matrices with the imidazolium moieties, and then introduce the rare earth tetrakis(?-diketonate) complexes into polymer matrices through a mild anion exchange method. The resulting materials are characterized by FTIR, XRD, EDAX, SEM, thermogravimetric analysis, luminescence excitation spectra and emission spectra, luminescence lifetime measurements and diffuse reflectance UV-Vis spectra. The photoluminescence measurements indicate that all these rare earth complex functionalized polymers exhibit a characteristic luminescence emission originating from the corresponding rare earth ions. Among the hybrids, the europium tetrakis(TTA) complex functionalized polymers show remarkable luminescence quantum yields and relatively long (5)D0 lifetimes at room temperature. PMID:23719771

  13. Spectroscopic in situ examination of interactions of rare earth ions with humic substances.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao; Fabbricino, Massimiliano; Benedetti, Marc F; Korshin, Gregory V

    2015-01-01

    This study utilized the methods of fluorescence quenching and differential absorbance to probe in situ the extent and the nature of the interactions between rare earth ions (REIs) and humic substances. Experiments were conducted with the standard Suwannee river humic acid (SRHA) in the presence of varying amount of lanthanum, europium and terbium. The data of differential absorbance showed that the mechanism of SRHA-metal complexation was largely the same for all the examined REIs. In all cases several discrete bands whose properties were discerned via numerical decomposition of the differential spectra absorbance were observed. Their nature was examined based on the comparison of the experimental data and those of NICA-Donnan modeling carried out for Eu³?. The observed effects suggested that the changes of SRHA absorbance induced by REIs binding are likely to be caused by a bathochromic shift of the absorbance bands associated with such chromophores. The intensity of the Gaussian band with a maximum at 387 nm was observed to be proportional to the total concentration of SRHA-bound REIs. The data obtained in this study demonstrate the existence of complex yet quantifiable changes of the spectroscopic properties of humic species in the presence of REIs and their utility to quantify modes of interactions in such systems. PMID:25462735

  14. The Corrosion Protection of Metals by Ion Vapor Deposited Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1993-01-01

    A study of the corrosion protection of substrate metals by ion vapor deposited aluminum (IVD Al) coats has been carried out. Corrosion protection by both anodized and unanodized IVD Al coats has been investigated. Base metals included in the study were 2219-T87 Al, 7075-T6 Al, Titanium-6 Al-4 Vanadium (Ti-6Al-4V), 4130 steel, D6AC steel, and 4340 steel. Results reveal that the anodized IVD Al coats provide excellent corrosion protection, but good protection is also achieved by IVD Al coats that have not been anodized.

  15. Transport toward earth of ions sputtered from the moon's surface by the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cladis, J. B.; Francis, W. E.; Vondrak, R. R.

    1994-01-01

    The transport of typical ions from the surface of the Moon to the vicinity of Earth was calculated using a test particle approach. It was assumed that the ions were sputtered from the surface by the solar wind, with fluxes in the range determined experimentally by Elphic et al. (1991), and were accelerated initially to 10 eV by the potential of the Moon on its sunlit side. Si(+) and Ca(+) ions were selected for this transport analysis because their masses are within two prominent ion mass groups that have high sputtering yields. In the solar wind the ion trajectories were traced in the following superimposed fields: (1) a steady magnetic field B0 at an angle of 45 deg to the solar wind velocity VSW, (2) the motional electric field Ezero = -V(sub SW x B0, and (3) turbulent magnetic and electric fields generated by hydromagnetic waves with a k-space power spectrum of absolute value of k-5/3 propagating along both directions of the magnetic field B0. Interactions with Earth's bow shock and magnetosphere were included. Case histories of the ions were recorded in the XGSM, YGSM plane and in various planes perpendicular to the E0 x B0 drift direction of the ions between the Moon and Earth. The number density, energy and angular distributions, and directional and omnidirectional fluxes of the ions were constructed from the case histories. It was found that the diffusion of the ions increases rapidly as the amplitude of the turbulence delta Brms increases beyond the value 0.04 B0. Recent measurements of lunar ions upstream of the bow shock by Hilchenbach et al. (1992) generally confirm the predicted behavior of the ions.

  16. Yttrium and rare earth stabilized fast reactor metal fuel

    DOEpatents

    Guon, Jerold (Woodland Hills, CA); Grantham, LeRoy F. (Calabasas, CA); Specht, Eugene R. (Simi Valley, CA)

    1992-01-01

    To increase the operating temperature of a reactor, the melting point and mechanical properties of the fuel must be increased. For an actinide-rich fuel, yttrium, lanthanum and/or rare earth elements can be added, as stabilizers, to uranium and plutonium and/or a mixture of other actinides to raise the melting point of the fuel and improve its mechanical properties. Since only about 1% of the actinide fuel may be yttrium, lanthanum, or a rare earth element, the neutron penalty is low, the reactor core size can be reduced, the fuel can be burned efficiently, reprocessing requirements are reduced, and the nuclear waste disposal volumes reduced. A further advantage occurs when yttrium, lanthanum, and/or other rare earth elements are exposed to radiation in a reactor, they produce only short half life radioisotopes, which reduce nuclear waste disposal problems through much shorter assured-isolation requirements.

  17. The Morphology of Ring Current He-Ions in Earth’s Inner Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerrard, Andrew; Cusanelli, Jessie; Lanzerotti, Louis

    2015-04-01

    The Radiation Belt Storm Probe Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) instrument on the Van Allan Probes makes unique measurements of, among other ring current species, He-ions in the ~65-keV to ~520-keV energy range. In this paper we report on the spatial “double belt” structure of ring current He-ions as measured on both spacecraft during quiet and active magnetic conditions. Specifically, we show the 3D structures of both the low L-shell, high energy and high L-shell, low energy populations at all magnetic local times. We also present the first ring current measurements of He-ions above ~520-keV, which were obtained in a modified RBSPICE operation mode. These high energy He-ions appear to be modulated by ionospheric-controlled electric field variability, as was suggested in earlier modeling efforts.

  18. The Sol-Gel Synthesis of Rare-Earth Ions Substituted Barium Hexaferrites and Magnetic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, S.; Xin, P. H.; Wang, P. F.; Zhang, B. B.; Han, Y. B.; Peng, X. L.; Hong, B.; Jin, H. X.; Gong, J.; Jin, D. F.; Ge, H. L.; Wang, X. Q.; Zhang, J.

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, a series of rare-earth-doped barium hexaferrite powders (Ba0.95Re0.05-Fe12O19 and Ba0.95Re0.05M0.05Fe11.95O19: Re = La, Pr, Sm, Nd, Gd, Dy, Yb; M = Zn2+, Mn2+, Mn0.52+Zn2+0.5) were synthesized by the sol-gel self-combustion technology. The phase composition and the magnetic properties of the as-prepared barium hexaferrites were characterized and discussed with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The results showed that the barium hexaferrites exhibited the magnetoplumbite phase structure with the average diameter of 45 nm. Magnetic properties study revealed that the variation of the saturation magnetization (Ms) was similar with the change of the rare-earth ions radius, but the change of Ms was low. This indicated that the magnetic moments of rare-earth ions could not affect Ms. The magnetocrystalline anisotropy field mainly influenced the anisotropism of hexaferrites, and the coercivity (Hc) of the rare-earth ions doped barium hexaferrites basically decreased with the increasing orbital quantum numbers (except Sm3+ and Gd3+). Further study showed the co-addition of Zn2+ and Mn2+ did not change the trend of Ms and Hc. Thus, it is concluded that the rare-earth ions played an important role for the anisotropy field of barium hexaferrites.

  19. Collision cross sections and equilibrium fractions of ions and atoms in metal vapor targets. Project progress report, June 1, 1979-May 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, T J

    1980-01-01

    The objective of this program is to measure atomic collision cross sections and equilibrium fractions of ions and atoms in metal vapor targets. The goal is to obtain experimental information on atomic collision processes relevant to the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program. In particular, in connection with the development of double charge exchange D/sup -/ ion sources, we are measuring D/sup -/ formation cross sections in alkaline-earth metal vapor targets. During the period covered in this report we have measured electron transfer cross sections for 3-40 keV D/sup +/ ions and D/sup 0/ atoms in collision with calcium vapor.

  20. Interactions of metal ions with ? synuclein and amyloid ? peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valensin, Daniela; Kozlowski, Henryk; Tessari, Isabella; Dell'Acqua, Simone; Bubacco, Luigi; Casella, Luigi; Gaggelli, Elena; Valensin, Gianni

    2014-10-01

    Amyloid ? (A?) and alfa synuclein (?S) share the ability to selectively bind copper ions (Cu(II) and Cu(I)). During the last decade large efforts have been directed to fully characterize Cu(II) binding domains in A? and ?S. On the other hand, the corresponding Cu(I) sites have been less considered. In this study we have analyzed Cu(I) interactions with peptides derived from A? and ?S, by means of CD and NMR spectroscopy. Beyond Cu(I), we have also used Ag(I) as a probe. By monitoring the metal induced effects on ?S and A? systems, the Cu(I)/Ag(I) binding domains have been identified. The corresponding protein structural rearrangements induced by the metal ions have been investigated as well. The Cu(I) coordination spheres are discussed with a particular emphasis to the role played by Met and His residues.

  1. Nanomagnetic chelators for removal of toxic metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sarika; Barick, K. C.; Bahadur, D.

    2013-02-01

    Ethylenediamine trtraaceteic acid (EDTA) functionalized Fe3O4 nanomagnetic chelators (NMCs) were synthesized by co-precipitation method followed by in-situ grafting of EDTA. XRD and TEM analyses reveal the formation of highly crystalline single-phase Fe3O4 nanoparticles of size about 10 nm. Surface functionalization of Fe3O4 with EDTA was evident from FTIR spectroscopy, TGA analysis and zeta-potential measurement. These NMCs exhibit superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature with strong field dependent magnetic responsivity. It has been observed that NMCs have strong tendency for adsorption of various toxic metal ions (Ni2+, Cr3+, Cu2+, Cd2+, Co2+ and Pb2+) from waste-water. Furthermore, these magnetic chelators can be used as highly efficient separable and reusable material for removal of toxic metal ions.

  2. A metallic room-temperature oxide ion conductor.

    PubMed

    Heise, Martin; Rasche, Bertold; Isaeva, Anna; Baranov, Alexey I; Ruck, Michael; Schäfer, Konrad; Pöttgen, Rainer; Eufinger, Jens-Peter; Janek, Jürgen

    2014-07-01

    Nanoparticles of Bi3 Ir, obtained from a microwave-assisted polyol process, activate molecular oxygen from air at room temperature and reversibly intercalate it as oxide ions. The closely related structures of Bi3 Ir and Bi3 IrOx (x?2) were investigated by X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and quantum-chemical modeling. In the topochemically formed metallic suboxide, the intermetallic building units are fully preserved. Time- and temperature-dependent monitoring of the oxygen uptake in an oxygen-filled chamber shows that the activation energy for oxide diffusion (84?meV) is one order of magnitude smaller than that in any known material. Bi3 IrOx is the first metallic oxide ion conductor and also the first that operates at room temperature. PMID:24866268

  3. MRI findings following metal on metal hip arthroplasty and their relationship with metal ion levels and acetabular inclination angles.

    PubMed

    Fox, Ciara M; Bergin, Karen M; Kelly, Gabrielle E; McCoy, Gerry F; Ryan, Anthony G; Quinlan, John F

    2014-08-01

    Following the global recall of all ASR metal on metal hip products, our aim was to correlate MRI findings with acetabular inclination angles and metal ion levels in patients with these implants. Both cobalt and chromium levels were significantly higher in the presence of a periprosthetic fluid collection. There was no association between the presence of a periprosthetic mass, bone marrow oedema, trochanteric bursitis or greater levels of abductor muscle destruction for cobalt or chromium. There was no association between the level of periprosthetic tissue reaction and the acetabular inclination angle with any of the pathologies identified on MRI. The relationship between MRI pathology, metal ion levels and acetabular inclination angles in patients with ASR implants remains unclear adding to the complexity of managing patients. PMID:24793890

  4. Equilibrium sorption isotherm for metal ions on tree fern

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. S. Ho; C. T. Huang; H. W. Huang

    2002-01-01

    A new sorbent system for removing heavy metal ions, such as Zn(II), Cu(II) and Pb(II), from aqueous solutions has been investigated. This new sorbent is tree fern, an agriculture product. Variables of the system include solution temperature and sorbent particle size. The experimental results were fitted to the Langmuir, Freundlich and Redlich–Peterson isotherms to obtain the characteristic parameters of each

  5. Selective extraction of metal ions with polymeric extractants by ion exchange/redox

    DOEpatents

    Alexandratos, Spiro D. (Knoxville, TN)

    1987-01-01

    The specification discloses a method for the extraction of metal ions having a reduction potential of above about +0.3 from an aqueous solution. The method includes contacting the aqueous solution with a polymeric extractant having primary phosphinic acid groups, secondary phosphine oxide groups, or both phosphinic acid and phosphine oxide groups.

  6. Acetabular bone density and metal ions after metal-on-metal versus metal-on-polyethylene total hip arthroplasty; short-term results.

    PubMed

    Zijlstra, Wierd P; van der Veen, Hugo C; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; Zee, Mark J M; Bulstra, Sjoerd K; van Raay, Jos J A M

    2014-01-01

    Information on periprosthetic acetabular bone density is lacking for metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasties. These bearings use cobalt-chromium instead of titanium acetabular components, which could lead to stress shielding and hence periprosthetic bone loss. Cobalt and chromium ions have detrimental effects on bone. It is unknown whether serum metal ion levels affect bone density clinically. We compared cementless large femoral head (mean 48 mm) metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasties (M2a-Magnum, Biomet) to cementless 28 mm metal-on-polyethylene total hip arthroplasties (Mallory-Head, Biomet) in a randomised clinical trial. We evaluated periprosthetic acetabular bone density and serum metal ion levels at 1 year postoperatively. Acetabular bone density was analyzed with dual energy x-ray absorptiometry in four horizontal regions of interest in 70 patients. After one year, acetabular bone density decreased (-3.5% to -7.8%) in three of four regions of interest in metal-on-polyethylene patients, but was retained in metal-on-metal patients. Bone density preservation was most pronounced superior to the metal-on-metal cup (+1% versus -3.7%). Serum cobalt, chromium and titanium ion levels were not related to bone density, nor to acetabular inclination or femoral head size. Oxford and Harris hip scores were similar in both groups. Contrary to our hypothesis, acetabular bone density was retained with metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty, compared to metal-on-polyethylene arthroplasty. Bone preservation was most pronounced in the area superior to the cup. This could be a benefit during future revision surgery. PMID:24186673

  7. Liquid metal batteries : ambipolar electrolysis and alkaline earth electroalloying cells

    E-print Network

    Bradwell, David (David Johnathon)

    2011-01-01

    Three novel forms of liquid metal batteries were conceived, studied, and operated, and their suitability for grid-scale energy storage applications was evaluated. A ZnlITe ambipolar electrolysis cell comprising ZnTe dissolved ...

  8. Superhydrogels of nanotubes capable of capturing heavy-metal ions.

    PubMed

    Song, Shasha; Wang, Haiqiao; Song, Aixin; Hao, Jingcheng

    2014-01-01

    Self-assembly regulated by hydrogen bonds was successfully achieved in the system of lithocholic acid (LCA) mixed with three organic amines, ethanolamine (EA), diethanolamine (DEA), and triethanolamine (TEA), in aqueous solutions. The mixtures of DEA/LCA exhibit supergelation capability and the hydrogels consist of plenty of network nanotubes with uniform diameters of about 60 nm determined by cryogenic TEM. Interestingly, the sample with the same concentration in a system of EA and LCA is a birefringent solution, in which spherical vesicles and can be transformed into nanotubes as the amount of LCA increases. The formation of hydrogels could be driven by the delicate balance of diverse noncovalent interactions, including electrostatic interactions, hydrophobic interactions, steric effects, van der Waals forces, and mainly hydrogen bonds. The mechanism of self-assembly from spherical bilayer vesicles into nanotubes was proposed. The dried hydrogels with nanotubes were explored to exhibit the excellent capability for capturing heavy-metal ions, for example, Cu(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Pb(2+), and Hg(2+). The superhydrogels of nanotubes from the self-assembly of low-molecular-weight gelators mainly regulated by hydrogen bonds used for the removal of heavy-metal ions is simple, green, and high efficiency, and provide a strategic approach to removing heavy-metal ions from industrial sewage. PMID:24136830

  9. New half-metallic materials with an alkaline earth element

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Koichi Kusakabe; Masaaki Geshi; Hidekazu Tsukamoto; Naoshi Suzuki

    2004-01-01

    New candidates for half-metallic materials were theoretically designed recently by Geshi et al. The materials are calcium pnictides, i.e. CaP, CaAs and CaSb. When the zinc-blende structure was assumed, these compounds showed half-metallic electronic band-structure, in which a curious flat band was found. To explain this magnetism, we investigated characters of orbitals on this flat band of CaAs. The hybridization

  10. Ion-driven deuterium retention in high-Z metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogorodnikova, O. V.

    2009-06-01

    The candidate armour material must provide high temperature resistance and accommodate the operation conditions with minimal erosion and acceptable tritium retention. Refractory metals such as tungsten and molybdenum can provide these capabilities and accommodate the high energy deposition. However, a major concern is the possible tritium and helium inventories from ion implantation. The deuterium retention in polycrystalline tungsten (W) and molybdenum (Mo) has been investigated for various irradiation temperatures, incident ion energies and fluences at Garching ion beam facility by means of thermal desorption spectroscopy. Lower deuterium retention in Mo compared to W was observed at moderated temperatures. Model including the deuterium implantation, diffusion, trapping and second order of desorption was used to understand deuterium inventory and release kinetics. The mechanism of the deuterium retention in W and Mo is discussed.

  11. MAGNETOOPTICAL PROPERTIES OF RARE-EARTH IONS IN FERROMAGNETIC CRYSTALS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Krinchik

    1963-01-01

    ABS>A quantitative calculation was made of the frequency dependence of ; the Faraday effect in europium ferrite garnet caused by exchange interaction ; between the rareearth and iron sublattices of the ferrite garnet. Assuming cubic ; symmetry of the crystal field, the peculiarities of the polarized absorption ; spectra and luminescence of rareearth ions in the ferromagnetic crystal were ;

  12. Template-directed synthesis of oligoguanylic acids - Metal ion catalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridson, P. K.; Fakhrai, H.; Lohrmann, R.; Orgel, L. E.; Van Roode, M.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of Zn(2+), Pb(2+) and other metal ions on the efficiency and stereo-selectivity of the template-directed oligomerization of guanosine 5'-phosphorimidazolide are investigated. Reactions were run in the presence of a polyC template in a 2,6-lutidine buffer, and products analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography on an RPC-5 column. The presence of the Pb(2+) ion is found to lead to the formation of 2'-5' linked oligomers up to the 40-mer, while Zn(2+) favors the formation of predominantly 3'-5' linked oligomers up to the 35-mer. When amounts of uracil, cytidine or adenosine 5'-phosphorimidazole equal to those of the guanosine derivative are included in the reaction mixture, the incorrect base is incorporated into the oligomer about 10% of the time with a Pb(2+) catalyst, but less than 0.5% of the time with Zn(2+). The Sn(2+), Sb(3+) and Bi(3+) ions are also found to promote the formation of 2'-5' oligomers, although not as effectively as Pb(2+), while no metal ions other than Zn(2+) promote the formation of the 3'-5' oligomers. The results may be important for the understanding of the evolution of nucleic acid replication in the absence of enzymes.

  13. Low Temperature Resistivity of Yttrium-Based Alloys Containing Small Amounts of Rare Earth Metals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tadashi Sugawara

    1965-01-01

    The resistivity of the dilute alloys of rare earth metals with yttrium has been measured at low temperatures. The result is in qualitative agreement with the recent theories due to Kondo and others on the s--d or s--f scattering. The effective s--f exchange integrals for various rare-earth solutes have been derived from the analysis of the resistivity data and compared

  14. Diastereoselective pinacol coupling of alkyl aryl ketones with rare earth metals in the presence of chlorosilanes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Akiya Ogawa; Hiroki Takeuchi; Toshikazu Hirao

    1999-01-01

    Rare earth metals (Ln) are found to act as useful reducing agents for the pinacol coupling reaction of alkyl aryl ketones in the presence of chlorosilanes. Although the hitherto known pinacol coupling reaction using rare earth reducing agents generally exhibits very low diastereoselectivities, the present pinacol coupling by use of a LnR3SiCl system usually indicates higher diastereoselectivities. In particular, a

  15. Reexamination of the ORAC assay: effect of metal ions.

    PubMed

    Nkhili, E; Brat, P

    2011-05-01

    The oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay method has been employed extensively in the field of antioxidant and oxidative stress. It uses fluorescein as probe for oxidation by peroxyl radical. Hundreds of reports have been published on the use of this method to determine antioxidant capacity in food and biological samples. The question is whether the results of all these reports are influenced by antioxidant autoxidation, which occurs during the ORAC test. Indeed, the presence of metal ions in the studied matrix will influence antioxidant stability, thereby leading to the underestimation of their antioxidant properties. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid hydrate (EDTA) can be used as a metal complexation agent. This paper examines the effect of the addition of EDTA on the ORAC values of pure compounds (quercetin, ascorbic, and dehydroascorbic acid) and five food juices (kiwi, orange, tomato, red grape, and apple). Metal complexation by EDTA (80 ?M) clearly increased the ORAC values, given that the antioxidant was protected against rapid autoxidation incited by trace metal ions within samples and then by free radicals. Our finding also undoubtedly demonstrated that the number of literature values is potentially underestimated. PMID:21512895

  16. Metal loading effect on rare earth element binding to humic acid: Experimental and modelling evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsac, Rémi; Davranche, Mélanie; Gruau, Gérard; Dia, Aline

    2010-03-01

    The effect of metal loading on the binding of rare earth elements (REE) to humic acid (HA) was studied by combining ultrafiltration and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry techniques. REE-HA complexation experiments were performed at pH 3 for REE/C molar ratios ranging from ca 4 × 10 -4 to 2.7 × 10 -2. Results show that the relative amount of REE bound to HA strongly increases with decreasing REE/C. A middle-REE (MREE) downward concavity is shown by patterns at high metal loading, whereas patterns at low metal loading display a regular increase from La to Lu. Humic Ion Model VI modelling are close to the experimental data variations, provided that (i) the ?LK 2 parameter (i.e. the Model VI parameter taken into account the presence of strong but low density binding sites) is allowed to increase regularly from La to Lu (from 1.1 to 2.1) and (ii) the published log KMA values (i.e. the REE-HA binding constants specific to Model VI) are slightly modified, in particular with respect to heavy REE. Modelling approach provided evidence that logKdREE patterns with varying REE/C likely arises because REE binding to HA occurs through two types of binding sites in different density: (i) a few strong sites that preferentially complex the heavy REE and thus control the logKdREE atterns at low REE/C; (ii) a larger amount of weaker binding sites that preferentially complex the middle-REE and thus control the logKdREE pattern at high REE/C. Hence, metal loading exerts a major effect on HA-mediated REE binding, which could explain the diversity of published conditional constants for REE binding with HA. A literature survey suggests that the few strong sites activated at low REE/C could be multidentate carboxylic sites, or perhaps N-, or P-functional groups. Finally, an examination of the literature field data proposed that the described loading effect could account for much of the variation in REE patterns observed in natural organic-rich waters (DOC > 5 mg L -1 and 4 ? pH ? 7).

  17. Interactions between metal ions and carbohydrates. The coordination behavior of neutral erythritol to neodymium ion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Limin; Xie, Datao; Xu, Yizhuang; Wang, Yalei; Zhang, Shiwei; Weng, Shifu; Zhao, Kui; Wu, Jinguang

    2005-05-01

    A single crystal of a coordinated complex of neutral erythritol (C4H10O4,E) with a neodymium ion, NdE(II), was synthesized and studied using FT-IR and X-ray diffraction analysis. In NdE(II) (NdCl3.2.5C4H10O4.C2H5OH) the Nd3+ coordinates with one chloride ion and eight OH groups from three erythritol molecules. There are two neodymium centers linked by one erythritol molecule with same coordination structure in the molecule. Two erythritol molecules provide 1,3,4-hydroxyl groups to coordinate with a neodymium ion; another erythritol molecule coordinates to two Nd ions via its 1,2-hydroxyl groups and 3,4-hydroxyl groups, respectively. The OH groups of erythritol act as ligand to coordinate to neodymium ions, and OH groups of erythritol form hydrogen bond networks that link chain and layer together to build three-dimensional structures. The ratio of metal to ligand is 1:2.5. The structure of NdE(II) is more complicated than the previously reported NdE(I), which is NdCl3.C4H10O4.6H2O; in NdE(I), Nd3+ is coordinated to four hydroxyl groups from two erythritol molecules, four water molecules and one chloride ion. The results indicate the complexity of metal-sugar interaction. PMID:15833332

  18. Observations of nonadiabatic acceleration of ions in Earth`s magnetotail

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, L.A.; Paterson, W.R. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)] [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Kivelson, M.G. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1994-08-01

    The authors present observations of the three-dimensional velocity distributions of protons in the energy range 20 eV to 52 keV at locations within and near the current sheet of Earth`s magnetotail at geocentric radial distances 35 to 87 R{sub E}. These measurements were acquired on December 8, 1990, with a set of electrostatic analyzers on board the Galileo spacecraft during its approach to Earth in order to obtain one of its gravitational assists to Jupiter. It is found that the velocity distributions are inadequately described as quasi-Maxwellian distributions such as those found in the central plasma sheet at positions nearer to Earth. Instead the proton velocity distributions can be categorized into two major types. The first type is the `lima bean` shaped distribution with high-speed bulk flows and high temperatures that are similar to those found nearer to Earth in the plasma sheet boundary layer. The second type consists of colder protons with considerably lesser bulk flow speeds. Examples of velocity distributions are given for the plasma mantle, a region near the magnetic neutral line, positions earthward and tailward of the neutral line, and the plasma sheet boundary layer. At positions near the neutral line, only complex velocity distributions consisting of the colder protons are found, whereas both of the above types of distributions are found in and near the current sheet at earthward and tailward locations. Bulk flows are directed generally earthward and tailward at positions earthward and tailward of the neutral line, respectively. Only the high-speed, hot distribution is present in the plasma sheet boundary layer. The observations are interpreted in terms of the nonadiabatic acceleration of protons that flow into the current sheet from the plasma mantle. For this interpretation the hot, {open_quotes}lima bean{close_quotes} shaped distributions are associated with meandering, or Speiser, orbits in the current sheet. 31 refs., 13 figs.

  19. Binding of hard and soft metal ions to Rhizopus arrhizus biomass

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph M. Brady; John M. Tobin

    1995-01-01

    The greater the covalent index value of a metal ion, the greater its potential to form covalent bonds with biological ligands. In this study, freeze-dried Rhizopus arrhizus biomass was tested for its potential to adsorb the hard metal ion Sr2+ and the borderline metal ions Mn2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, Cu2+, and Pb2+ from aqueous solutions. Equilibrium metal uptake values increased in

  20. Structure Determination of Noble Metal Clusters by Trapped Ion Electron Diffraction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Detlef Schooss

    2006-01-01

    The structures of noble metal cluster ions have been studied by the recently developed technique of trapped ion electron diffraction (TIED)^1. In brief, cluster ions are generated by a magnetron sputter source and injected into a cooled (95 K) quadrupole ion trap. After mass selection and thermalization, the trapped ions are irradiated with a 40 keV electron beam. The resulting

  1. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF METAL IONS AND SEPARATION OF NICKEL(II) FROM OTHER METAL IONS BY ORGANOPHOSPHORUS ACIDS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yao Binghua; Yukio Nagaosa; Masatada Satake; Akihiko Nomura; Kiyoshi Horita

    1996-01-01

    Such physicochemical properties of bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphinic acid, 2-ethylhexylphosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester and bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid as the solubilities and the dissociation constants in water, the dimerization constants in organic solvent and distribution constants in organic solvent-water were examined by a potentiometric two-phase titration. The solvent extraction of seven kinds of transition metal ions and magnesium(II) from aqueous sulfate media was studied with

  2. THE HEATS OF FUSION AND TRANSITION OF ALKALINE EARTH AND RARE EARTH METAL HALIDES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. S. Dworkin; M. A. Bredig

    1963-01-01

    The heats of fusion of fifteen rare earth and alkaline earth halides ; were measured by means of a copper block drop calorimeter. The salts and their ; heats of fusion in kcal mole⁻¹ are LaClâ, 13.0; PrClâ, 12.1; ; NdClâ, 12.0; C eIâ, 12.4; PrIâ, 12.7; NdIâ, 9.7; CaCl\\/sub ; 2\\/, 6.78; CaBrâ, 6.95; C aIâ, 10.0; SrClâ, 3.88;

  3. Observations of nonadiabatic acceleration of ions in Earth's magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, L. A.; Paterson, W. R.; Kivelson, M. G.

    1994-08-01

    We present observations of the three-dimensional velocity distributions of protons in the energy range 20 eV to 52 keV at locations within and near the current sheet of Earth's magnetotail at geocentric radial distances 35 to 87 RE. These measurements were acquired on December 8, 1990, with a set of electrostatic analyzers on board the Galileo spacecraft during its approach to Earth in order to obtain one of its gravitational assists to Jupiter. It is found that the velocity distributions are inadequately described as quasi-Maxwellian distributions such as those found in the central plasma sheet at positions nearer to Earth. Instead the proton velocity distributions can be categorized into two major types. The first type is the ``lima bean'' shaped distribution with high-speed bulk flows and high temperatures that are similar to those found nearer to Earth in the plasma sheet boundary layer. The second type consists of colder protons with considerably lesser bulk flow speeds. Examples of velocity distributions are given for the plasma mantle, a region near the magnetic neutral line, positions earthward and tailward of the neutral line, and the plasma sheet boundary layer. At positions near the neutral line, only complex velocity distributions consisting of the colder protons are found, whereas both of the above types of distributions are found in and near the current sheet at earthward and tailward locations. Bulk flows are directed generally earthward and tailward at positions earthward and tailward of the neutral line, respectively. Only the high-speed, hot distribution is present in the plasma sheet boundary layer. The observations are interpreted in terms of the nonadiabatic acceleration of protons that flow into the current sheet from the plasma mantle. For this interpretation the hot, ``lima bean'' shaped distributions are associated with meandering, or Speiser, orbits in the current sheet. It is suggested that the colder, lower-speed proton velocity distributions are the result of fractional or few gyromotions before ejection out of the current sheet, but this speculation must be further investigated with appropriate kinetic simulation of trajectories.

  4. Observations of nonadiabatic acceleration of ions in Earth's magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, L. A.; Paterson, W. R.; Kivelson, M. G.

    1994-01-01

    We present observations of the three-dimensional velocity distributions of protons in the energy range 20 eV to 52 keV at locations within and near the current sheet of Earth's magnetotail at geocentric radial distances 35 to 87 R(sub E). These measurements were acquired on December 8, 1990, with a set of electrostatic analyzers on board the Galileo spacecraft during its approach to Earth in order to obtain one of its gravitational assists to Jupiter. It is found that the velocity distributions are inadequately described as quasi-Maxwellian distributions such as those found in the central plasma sheet at positions nearer to Earth. Instead the proton velocity distributions can be categorized into two major types. The first type is the 'lima bean' shaped distribution with high-speed bulk flows and high temperatures that are similar to those found nearer to Earth in the plasma sheet boundary layer. The second type consists of colder protons with considerably lesser bulk flow speeds. Examples of velocity distributions are given for the plasma mantle, a region near the magnetic neutral line, positions earthward and tailward of the neutral line, and the plasma sheet boundary layer. At positions near the neutral line, only complex velocity distributions consisting of the colder protons are found, whereas both of the above types of distributions are found in and near the current sheet at earthward and tailward locations. Bulk flows are directed generally earthward and tailward at positions earthward and tailward of the neutral line, respectively. Only the high-speed, hot distribution is present in the plasma sheet boundary layer. The observations are interpreted in terms of the nonadiabatic acceleration of protons that flow into the current sheet from the plasma mantle. For this interpretation the hot, 'lima bean' shaped distributions are associated with meandering, or Speiser, orbits in the current sheet. It is suggested that the colder, lower-speed proton velocity distributions are the result of fractional or few gyromotions before ejection out of the current sheet, but this speculation must be further investigated with appropriate kinetic simulation of trajectories.

  5. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C1, supplPment au no 4, Tome 38, Avril 1977, page Cl-147 ANISOTROPY AND MAGNETOSTRICTION OF 4d AND 5d TRANSITION-METAL

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of the 3d transition-metal ions and rare earth ions except for some studies in the recent past concerning that ferrimagnetism of magnetic oxides essentially is based on 3d transition-metal ions and rare earth ions. However AND MAGNETOSTRICTION OF 4d AND 5d TRANSITION-METAL IONS IN GARNETS AND SPINEL FERRITES P. HANSEN Philips Gmb

  6. No association between serum metal ions and implant fixation in large-head metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Søballe, Kjeld; Jakobsen, Stig Storgaard; Lorenzen, Nina Dyrberg; Mechlenburg, Inger; Stilling, Maiken

    2014-01-01

    Background The mechanism of failure of metal-on-metal (MoM) total hip arthroplasty (THA) has been related to a high rate of metal wear debris, which is partly generated from the head-trunnion interface. However, it is not known whether implant fixation is affected by metal wear debris. Patients and methods 49 cases of MoM THA in 41 patients (10 women) with a mean age of 52 (28–68) years were followed with stereoradiographs after surgery and at 1, 2, and 5 years to analyze implant migration by radiostereometric analysis (RSA). Patients also participated in a 5- to 7-year follow-up with measurement of serum metal ions, questionnaires (Oxford hip score (OHS) and Harris hip score (HHS)), and measurement of cup and stem positions and systemic bone mineral density. Results At 1–2 years, mean total translation (TT) was 0.04 mm (95% CI: –0.07 to 0.14; p = 0.5) for the stems; at 2–5 years, mean TT was 0.13 mm (95% CI: –0.25 to –0.01; p = 0.03), but within the precision limit of the method. For the cups, there was no statistically significant TT or total rotation (TR) at 1–2 and 2–5 years. At 2–5 years, we found 4 cups and 5 stems with TT migrations exceeding the precision limit of the method. There was an association between cup migration and total OHS < 40 (4 patients, 4 hips; p = 0.04), but there were no statistically significant associations between cup or stem migration and T-scores < –1 (n = 10), cup and stem positions, or elevated serum metal ion levels (> 7µg/L (4 patients, 6 hips)). Interpretation Most cups and stems were well-fixed at 1–5 years. However, at 2–5 years, 4 cups and 5 stems had TT migrations above the precision limits, but these patients had serum metal ion levels similar to those of patients without measurable migrations, and they were pain-free. Patients with serum metal ion levels > 7 µg/L had migrations similar to those in patients with serum metal ion levels < 7 µg/L. Metal wear debris does not appear to influence the fixation of hip components in large-head MoM articulations at medium-term follow-up. PMID:24847790

  7. POLAR spacecraft observations of helium ion angular anisotropy in the Earth's radiation belts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. N. Spjeldvik; T. A. Fritz; J. Chen; R. B. Sheldon

    1999-01-01

    New observations of energetic helium ion fluxes in the Earth's radiation belts have been obtained with the CAMMICE\\/HIT instrument on the ISTP\\/GGS POLAR spacecraft during the extended geomagnetically low activity period April through October 1996. PO- LAR executes a high inclination trajectory that crosses over both polar cap regions and passes over the geomagnetic equator in the heart of the

  8. POLAR spacecraft observations of helium ion angular anisotropy in the Earth's radiation belts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. N. Spjeldvik; T. A. Fritz; J. Chen; R. B. Sheldon

    1999-01-01

    New observations of energetic helium ion fluxes in the Earth's radiation belts have been obtained with the CAMMICE\\/HIT instrument on the ISTP\\/GGS POLAR spacecraft during the extended geomagnetically low activity period April through October 1996. POLAR executes a high inclination trajectory that crosses over both polar cap regions and passes over the geomagnetic equator in the heart of the radiation

  9. Performance and Comparison of Lithium-Ion Batteries Under Low-Earth-Orbit Mission Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Concha M.; Smart, Marshall C.; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Manzo, Michelle A.; Miller, Thomas B.; Gitzendanner, Rob

    2007-01-01

    The performance of two 28 V, 25 Ah lithium-ion batteries is being evaluated under low-Earth-orbit mission profiles for satellite and orbiter applications. The batteries are undergoing life testing and have achieved over 12,000 cycles to 40 percent depth-of-discharge.

  10. Scintillation of Sol-Gel derived Lutetium orthophosphate doped with rare earth ions.

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Scintillation of Sol-Gel derived Lutetium orthophosphate doped with rare earth ions. C. Mansuy1. Because of the required high density, lutetium based oxides materials are very interesting candidates Section Materials preparation Sol-Gel derived samples In a first step, a mixture of Lutetium and Ln

  11. Ion engine propelled Earth-Mars cycler with nuclear thermal propelled transfer vehicle, volume 2

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rudolf X. Meyer; Myles Baker; Joseph Melko

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this project was to perform a preliminary design of a long term, reusable transportation system between earth and Mars which would be capable of providing both artificial gravity and shelter from solar flare radiation. The heart of this system was assumed to be a Cycler spacecraft propelled by an ion propulsion system. The crew transfer vehicle was

  12. Quantum computer hardware based on rare-earth-ion-doped inorganic crystals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicklas Ohlsson; R Krishna Mohan; Stefan Kröll

    2002-01-01

    We present a scheme for generating multiple, strongly interacting qubits in rare-earth-ion-doped inorganic crystals at cryogenic temperatures. Two ground state hyperfine levels, with hour long lifetimes and ms decoherence times are chosen as qubit states. Controlled logic between the qubits is accomplished using the change in permanent dipole moment induced by an optical transition between the ground and excited state

  13. Ions upstream of the earth's bow shock: a theoretical comparison of alternative source populations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven J. Schwartz; Michelle F. Thomsen; John T. Gosling

    1983-01-01

    A theoretical framework is developed for studying trajectories of ions reflected or leaked upstream from the earth's bow shock and subject solely to the Lorentz force in a steady interplanetary magnetic field B and the V x B electric field. We include the effects of a sharp shock potential rise. Expressions are derived for the guiding center motion and gyromotion

  14. Influence of the Size of Rare Earth Ions on the Surface Crystallization of Complexes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Guolun Zhong; Binying Pu; Yu Feng; Kongzhang Yang

    1999-01-01

    ?-A isotherms of RE(TTA)3Phen (RE = La, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb and Y; TTA = thenoyltrifluoroacetone; Phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) mixing with arachidic acid (AA) in molar ratio of 1:1 and influence of rare earth ions in complexes on the surface crystallization of monolayers were studied in this paper.

  15. Decay times of radiative and non-radiative transitions in rare-earth ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kustov, E. F.; Loschenov, V. B.; Basieva, I. T.

    2014-12-01

    We present a theoretical method for evaluation of decay times of both radiative and non-radiative transitions in rare-earth ions in crystals and glasses. Relying on one experimentally known lifetime and known parameters of electrostatic and spin–orbit interaction, the fluorescence spectra can be modelled for various pumping wavelengths providing new insights into dynamical processes of fluorescence.

  16. Matrix Elements and Operator Equivalents Connected with the Magnetic Properties of Rare Earth Ions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K W H Stevens; K. W. H

    1952-01-01

    An account is given of the methods used to determine the matrix elements of crystal field potentials with particular reference to rare earth ions. Emphasis is laid on the importance of Wigner coefficients in such problems and the idea of using equivalent angular momentum operators is developed. For convenience in applying the results tables of matrix elements are included.

  17. Metal-ion Absorption in Conductively Evaporating Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnat, Orly; Sternberg, Amiel; McKee, Christopher F.

    2010-08-01

    We present computations of the ionization structure and metal-absorption properties of thermally conductive interface layers that surround evaporating warm spherical clouds embedded in a hot medium. We rely on the analytical steady-state formalism of Dalton and Balbus to calculate the temperature profile in the evaporating gas, and we explicitly solve the time-dependent ionization equations for H, He, C, N, O, Si, and S in the conductive interface. We include photoionization by an external field. We estimate how departures from equilibrium ionization affect the resonance-line cooling efficiencies in the evaporating gas, and determine the conditions for which radiative losses may be neglected in the solution for the evaporation dynamics and temperature profile. Our results indicate that nonequilibrium cooling significantly increases the value of the saturation parameter ?0 at which radiative losses begin to affect the flow dynamics. As applications, we calculate the ion fractions and projected column densities arising in the evaporating layers surrounding dwarf-galaxy-scale objects that are also photoionized by metagalactic radiation. We compare our results to the UV metal-absorption column densities observed in local highly ionized metal absorbers, located in the Galactic corona or intergalactic medium. Conductive interfaces significantly enhance the formation of high ions such as C3+, N4+, and O5+ relative to purely photoionized clouds, especially for clouds embedded in a high-pressure corona. However, the enhanced columns are still too low to account for the O VI columns (~1014 cm-2) observed in the local high-velocity metal-ion absorbers. We find that column densities larger than ~1013 cm-2 cannot be produced in evaporating clouds. Our results do support the conclusion of Savage and Lehner that absorption due to evaporating O VI likely occurs in the local interstellar medium, with characteristic columns of ~1013 cm-2.

  18. Probing the Role of Metal Ions in RNA Catalysis: Kinetic and Thermodynamic Characterization of a Metal Ion Interaction with the 2-Moiety of the Guanosine

    E-print Network

    Herschlag, Dan

    of a Metal Ion Interaction with the 2-Moiety of the Guanosine Nucleophile in the Tetrahymena Group I Ribozyme2+ rescues the deleterious effect of replacing the 2-OH of the guanosine nucleophile (G) by -NH2 in the coupled binding of the oligonucleotide substrate and the guanosine nucleophile. This metal ion may be used

  19. Charge instabilities in ion-metal cluster collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergen, T.; Biquard, X.; Bjørnholm, S.; Blundell, S.; Brenac, A.; Chandezon, F.; Guet, C.; Huber, B. A.; Jalabert, D.; Plagne, L.

    1997-06-01

    Collisions of ions with metal clusters offer the possibility to study the onset and development of Coulomb instabilities in an as yet unexplored regime. Soft peripheral collisions with highly charged ions (Ar8+ or Xe25+ for example) allow to resonantly strip a few hundred atom sodium cluster of a number of delocalized weakly bound electrons without strong additional excitation and subsequent heating. This number can be large enough (of the order of 10) to reach the Rayleigh stability limit. Beyond this limit the cluster experiences long range instabilities that lead to fission. Theoretical and experimental data that emphasize the specific phenomenology associated with ion-cluster collisions are reported. A theoretical model, based on the Vlasov equation, provides new insight on the stopping power of protons in jellium clusters. In good agreement with theory, experimental results showed that clusters of size about 200 can be ionized up to a 5+ charge state in collisions with 19 keV H+ ions. Much higher ionization states are experimentally observed in collisions with a highly charged ion beam. Old and new experimental data are discussed in terms of stability criteria and preferred decay channels. Coincidence data that associate the heavy charged residue with singly charged light fragments contain much information in that respect.

  20. Radiation damage from single heavy ion impacts on metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, S.E. [Univ. of Salford, Manchester (United Kingdom); Birtcher, R.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Materials Science Div.

    1998-06-01

    The effects of single ion impacts on the surfaces of films of Au, Ag, In and Pb have been studied using in-situ transmission electron microscopy. On all of these materials, individual ion impacts produce surface craters, in some cases, with associated expelled material. The cratering efficiency scales with the density of the irradiated metal. For very thin Au foils ({approx} 20--50 nm), in some cases individual ions are seen to punch small holes completely through the foil. Continued irradiation results in a thickening of the foil. The process giving rise to crater and hole formation and other changes observed in the thin foils has been found to be due to pulsed localized flow--i.e. melting and flow due to the thermal spikes arising from individual ion impacts. Experiments carried out on thin films of silver sandwiched between SiO{sub 2} layers have indicated that pulsed localized flow also occurs in this system and contributes to the formation of Ag nanoclusters in SiO{sub 2}--a system of interest for its non-linear optical properties. Calculation indicates that, when ion-induced, collision cascades occur near surfaces (within {approx} 5 nm) with energy densities sufficient to cause melting, craters are formed. Crater formation occurs as a result of the explosive outflow of material from the hot molten core of the cascade. Processes occurring in the sandwiched layer are less well understood.

  1. Metal-silicate silicon isotope fractionation in enstatite meteorites and constraints on Earth's core formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Karen; Young, Edward D.; Schauble, Edwin A.; Wasson, John T.

    2010-07-01

    Silicon has long been considered a possible light element in Earth 's core. If differences in 30Si/ 28Si ratios between metal (core) and silicate (mantle and crust) can be quantified, silicon isotopes may be used to constrain the amount of this element in the core, and in so doing elucidate the conditions that attended Earth 's differentiation. We investigate Si-isotope fractionation between metal and silicate in metal-rich enstatite meteorites as an analogue for Earth 's differentiation. We report here a 5 to 6‰ difference in the 30Si/ 28Si ratio between Si in metal and Si in silicate in the aubrites (enstatite achondrites) Mount Egerton and Norton County. The meteorites are believed to have derived from enstatite chondrites by melting and thermal metamorphism with final equilibration at 1200 and 1130 ± 80 K, respectively. Using the measured silicate-metal Si-isotope fractionation in these rocks we obtain a temperature dependence for fractionation of ?Si={7.64×10±0.471?T, in agreement with independent experimental and theoretical determinations. The measured silicate-metal fractionation suggests a ˜ 0.8‰ difference in the 30Si/ 28Si ratio between Earth 's core and mantle at P/ T conditions relevant to core formation. Our results, based on thermodynamic calculations for Si solubility in iron-rich metal and the measured Si-isotopic silicate-metal fractionation, imply at least ˜ 6 wt.% Si in the core (depending on the exact ?30Si BSE-chondrite value). The Si-isotope data also require that oxygen fugacity in the lower mantle increased during or after the process of core segregation by 1 to 2 log units.

  2. First-principles study of He point-defects in HCP rare-earth metals

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yang; Chen, Ru; Peng, SM; Long, XG; Wu, Z.; Gao, Fei; Zu, Xiaotao

    2011-05-01

    He defect properties in Sc, Y, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er and Lu were studied using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. The results indicate that the formation energy of an interstitial He atom is smaller than that of a substitutional He atom in all hcp rare-earth metals considered. Furthermore, the tetrahedral interstitial position is more favorable than an octahedral position for He defects. The results are compared with those from bcc and fcc metals.

  3. Studies on Thorium Phosphate Ion Exchanger. Part III. Paper Chromatographic Behavior and Separations of Metal Ions on Thorium Phosphate Papers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anil K. De; Kailas Chowdhury

    1975-01-01

    Thorium phosphate papers have been prepared by treatment with thorium nitrate and phosphoric acid solutions. Several metal ions have been chromatographed on thorium phosphate paper. The effect of pH on RF values has been investigated. Some useful analytical separations of metal ions have been achieved by using only dilute mineral acid and a mixed solvent system.

  4. Probing the Metal Ion Selectivity in Methionine Aminopeptidase via Changes in the Luminescence Properties of the Enzyme Bound Europium Ion

    PubMed Central

    Sule, Nitesh; Singh, Raushan K.; Zhao, Pinjing; Srivastava, D. K.

    2011-01-01

    We report herein, for the first time, that Europium ion (Eu3+) binds to the “apo” form of E. coli methionine aminopeptidase (EcMetAP), and such binding results in the activation of the enzyme as well as enhancement in the luminescence intensity of the metal ion. Due to competitive displacement of the enzyme-bound Eu3+ by different metal ions, we could determine the binding affinities of both “activating” and “non-activating” metal ions for the enzyme via fluorescence spectroscopy. The experimental data revealed that among all metal ions, Fe2+ exhibited the highest binding affinity for the enzyme, supporting the notion that it serves as the physiological metal ion for the enzyme. However, the enzyme-metal binding data did not adhere to the Irving-William series. On accounting for the binding affinity vis a vis the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme for different metal ions, it appears evident that that the “coordination states” and the relative softness” of metal ions are the major determinants in facilitating the EcMetAP catalyzed reaction. PMID:22112844

  5. Headgroup interactions and ion flotation efficiency in mixtures of a chelating surfactant, different foaming agents, and divalent metal ions.

    PubMed

    Svanedal, Ida; Boija, Susanne; Norgren, Magnus; Edlund, Håkan

    2014-06-10

    The correlation between interaction parameters and ion flotation efficiency in mixtures of chelating surfactant metal complexes and different foaming agents was investigated. We have recently shown that chelating surfactant 2-dodecyldiethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (4-C12-DTPA) forms strong coordination complexes with divalent metal ions, and this can be utilized in ion flotation. Interaction parameters for mixed micelles and mixed monolayer formation for Mg(2+) and Ni(2+) complexes with the chelating surfactant 4-C12-DTPA and different foaming agents were calculated by Rubingh's regular solution theory. Parameters for the calculations were extracted from surface tension measurements and NMR diffusometry. The effects of metal ion coordination on the interactions between 4-C12-DTPA and the foaming agents could be linked to a previously established difference in coordination chemistry between the examined metal ions. As can be expected from mixtures of amphoteric surfactants, the interactions were strongly pH-dependent. Strong correlation was found between interaction parameter ?(?) for mixed monolayer formation and the phase-transfer efficiency of Ni(2+) complexes with 4-C12-DTPA during flotation in a customized flotation cell. In a mixture of Cu(2+) and Zn(2+), the significant difference in conditional stability constants (log K) between the metal complexes was utilized to selectively recover the metal complex with the highest log K (Cu(2+)) by ion flotation. Flotation experiments in an excess concentration of metal ions confirmed the coordination of more than one metal ion to the headgroup of 4-C12-DTPA. PMID:24824327

  6. Probing the metal ion selectivity in methionine aminopeptidase via changes in the luminescence properties of the enzyme bound europium ion.

    PubMed

    Sule, Nitesh; Singh, Raushan K; Zhao, Pinjing; Srivastava, D K

    2012-01-01

    We report herein, for the first time, that Europium ion (Eu(3+)) binds to the "apo" form of Escherichia coli methionine aminopeptidase (EcMetAP), and such binding results in the activation of the enzyme as well as enhancement in the luminescence intensity of the metal ion. Due to competitive displacement of the enzyme-bound Eu(3+) by different metal ions, we could determine the binding affinities of both "activating" and "non-activating" metal ions for the enzyme via fluorescence spectroscopy. The experimental data revealed that among all metal ions, Fe(2+) exhibited the highest binding affinity for the enzyme, supporting the notion that it serves as the physiological metal ion for the enzyme. However, the enzyme-metal binding data did not adhere to the Irving-William series. On accounting for the binding affinity vis a vis the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme for different metal ions, it appears evident that that the "coordination states" and the relative softness" of metal ions are the major determinants in facilitating the EcMetAP catalyzed reaction. PMID:22112844

  7. Noncovalent interaction or chemical bonding between alkaline earth cations and benzene? A quantum chemistry study using

    E-print Network

    Sussman, Joel L.

    Noncovalent interaction or chemical bonding between alkaline earth cations and benzene? A quantum earth metal ion±benzene complexes were performed using the density-functional theory (DFT) B3LYP and ab of the al- kaline earth metal ions to benzene may be attributed to s±p and p±p interactions, which are signi

  8. Magnetic studies of nickel ferrite doped with rare earth ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahalakshmi, S.; Srinivasa Manja, K.; Nithiyanantham, S.; Rajah, Mohan

    2013-11-01

    The magnetic properties nickel ferrites having general chemical formula Ni x Fe(3 - x)O4 have been studied. The X-ray diffraction measurements confirmed the formation of a cubic spinel structure. The magnetic properties were studied by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). It exhibited lower coercivity and higher saturation magnetization due to high crystallinity. The saturation magnetization ( M s) and coercivity ( H c) for Nd and Gd are different ions since the magnetic moment of Gd3+ is greater than Nd3+.

  9. Enhancement of hypersensitive transitions of rare-earth ions in the near field of nanoobjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pukhov, K. K.; Sekatskii, S. K.

    2014-05-01

    The change of intensities of optical transitions of atoms, molecules, and their ions in the near field of nanoobjects is of interest for researchers from both basic and applied points of view. The concept of a near field was used as early as the 1960s to study the mechanisms of hypersensitive transitions of rare-earth (RE) ions. In this work, it is once more emphasized that, precisely for these transitions, changes in characteristics under the action of local properties of the medium are especially strong and, correspondingly, these transitions are especially promising for use. The Judd method for the calculation of the intensities of hypersensitive transitions of RE ions taking into account the inhomogeneous ligand field is extended to RE ions in the near field of nanoobjects. A simple analytical expression for the Judd-Ofelt intensity parameter ?2 for RE ions in the field of spherical nanoparticles of a subwavelength size is derived.

  10. Coupling of a locally implanted rare-earth ion ensemble to a superconducting micro-resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Wisby, I., E-mail: ilana.wisby@npl.co.uk; Tzalenchuk, A. Ya. [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham TW20 0EX (United Kingdom); Graaf, S. E. de; Adamyan, A.; Kubatkin, S. E. [Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, MC2, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296, Gothenburg (Sweden); Gwilliam, R. [Advanced Technology Institute, Faculty of Electronics and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Meeson, P. J. [Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham TW20 0EX (United Kingdom); Lindström, T. [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-08

    We demonstrate the coupling of rare-earth ions locally implanted in a substrate (Gd{sup 3+} in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) to a superconducting NbN lumped-element micro-resonator. The hybrid device is fabricated by a controlled ion implantation of rare-earth ions in well-defined micron-sized areas, aligned to lithographically defined micro-resonators. The technique does not degrade the internal quality factor of the resonators which remain above 10{sup 5}. Using microwave absorption spectroscopy, we observe electron-spin resonances in good agreement with numerical modelling and extract corresponding coupling rates of the order of 1?MHz and spin linewidths of 50–65?MHz.

  11. High current metal ion implantation to synthesize some conducting metal-silicides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B. X.; Gao, K. Y.

    1999-06-01

    High current metal-ion implantation by a metal vapor vacuum arc ion source was conducted to synthesize some conducting metal-silicides. It was found that C54-TiSi2, ZrSi2, NiSi2, CoSi2, ?-FeSi2, NbSi2 and TaSi2 layers on Si wafers with good electric properties could be obtained directly after implantation. In comparison, the formation of some other silicides like ?-FeSi2, NbSi2, TaSi2, tetragonal-WSi2 and tetragonal-MoSi2 required an additional post-annealing to improve their crystallinity and thus their electric properties. Interestingly, the NiSi2 layers of superior electric properties were obtained at a selected Ni-ion current density of 35 ?A/cm2. At this current, a beam heating raised the Si wafer to a specific temperature of 380 °C, at which the size difference between NiSi2 and Si lattices was nil. The resistivity of the NiSi2 layers so obtained was much lower than that of the Ni-disilicide formed by solid-state reaction at >750 °C. The formation mechanism of the above metal-silicides and the associated electric properties will also be discussed.

  12. A metal plasma source ion implantation and deposition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Li, B.; Sun, M.; Jiang, B. Y.; Ren, Y. F.; Yang, Si-Ze

    1999-03-01

    This article presents a metal plasma source ion implantation and deposition system, which is a qualitative extension of plasma source ion implantation by combining pulsed metal plasma and steady-state gas plasma. The pulsed metal plasma is produced by pulsed cathodic arc discharge and the steady-state gas plasma by magnetic multipole filament discharge. The existence of gas plasma greatly facilitates the breakdown of the pulsed cathodic arc plasma source, which does not need the conventional trigger system. Some operation characteristics of this system were measured. It was shown that the cathodic arc plasma parameters depend strongly on gas pressure. 0.45% C steel was modified in nitrogen plasma and pulsed aluminum plasma. The corrosion resistance ability of the treated 0.45% C steel sample was increased by about 30 times over that of the untreated sample. AlN/Al2O3/Al composite film was deposited on 0.45% C steel using a glow-arc technique.

  13. Adsorption of alkali, alkaline-earth, and 3d transition metal atoms on silicene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, H.; Peeters, F. M.

    2013-02-01

    The adsorption characteristics of alkali, alkaline-earth, and transition metal adatoms on silicene, a graphene-like monolayer structure of silicon are analyzed by means of first-principles calculations. In contrast to graphene, interaction between the metal atoms and the silicene surface is quite strong due to its highly reactive buckled hexagonal structure. In addition to structural properties, we also calculate the electronic band dispersion, net magnetic moment, charge transfer, work function, and dipole moment of the metal adsorbed silicene sheets. Alkali metals, Li, Na, and K, adsorb to hollow sites without any lattice distortion. As a consequence of the significant charge transfer from alkalis to silicene, metalization of silicene takes place. Trends directly related to atomic size, adsorption height, work function, and dipole moment of the silicene/alkali adatom system are also revealed. We found that the adsorption of alkaline-earth metals on silicene is entirely different from their adsorption on graphene. The adsorption of Be, Mg, and Ca turns silicene into a narrow gap semiconductor. Adsorption characteristics of eight transition metals Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Mo, and W are also investigated. As a result of their partially occupied d orbital, transition metals show diverse structural, electronic, and magnetic properties. Upon the adsorption of transition metals, depending on the adatom type and atomic radius, the system can exhibit metal, half-metal, and semiconducting behavior. For all metal adsorbates, the direction of the charge transfer is from adsorbate to silicene, because of its high surface reactivity. Our results indicate that the reactive crystal structure of silicene provides a rich playground for functionalization at nanoscale.

  14. ION IMPLANTATION AND HYPERFINE INTERACTIONS IN METALS Institut de Physique Nuclaire, BP 1, 91406 Orsay, France

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    575 ION IMPLANTATION AND HYPERFINE INTERACTIONS IN METALS H. BERNAS Institut de Physique Nucléaire is given, with a view to presenting their applications in ion-implantation studies of metals. Some typical in hyperfine interaction studies after ion-implantation. REVUE DE PHYSIQUE APPLIQUÉE TOME 9, MAI 1974, PAGE

  15. Temperature Dependence On The Emission Characteristics Of A AuGe Liquid Metal Alloy Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Ganetsos, Theodore; Laskaris, Nikos; Kotsos, Bill [TEI of Lamia, Department of Electronics, 3rd Km O.N.R. Lamia-Athens, 35100, Lamia (Greece); Bischoff, Lothar; Pilz, Wolfgang; Akhmadaliev, Chavkat [Research Center Rossendorf Inc., Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, P.O. Box 510119, D-01314, Dresden (Germany)

    2007-04-23

    Focused ion beam systems employing liquid metal ion sources have become of increasing importance in the microelectronics industry. Maskless ion implantation as a modern patterning technique is one of the most attractive application of Focused Ion Beams. In spite of the fact that a great deal of research has been carried out on liquid metal ion sources, surprisingly few results exist on the temperature dependence of their emission characteristics. In this article we study a AuGe liquid metal alloy ion source. The unusual results are explained in terms of the abnormal behavior of the surface tension of the alloy with temperature.

  16. Metal ions and protein aggregation: the case fo Prion protein and -amyloids

    E-print Network

    Morante, Silvia

    , metals high chemical reactivity can easily become harmful. Metals are essential cell components in allMetal ions and protein aggregation: the case fo Prion protein and -amyloids Silvia Morante macromolecules and the cloud of surrounding small molecules (solvent, ions, membrane components, etc

  17. The kinetics of sorption of divalent metal ions onto sphagnum moss peat

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. S. Ho; G. McKay

    2000-01-01

    A pseudo-second order rate equation describing the kinetics of sorption of divalent metal ions onto sphagnum moss peat at different initial metal ion concentrations and peat doses has been developed. The kinetics of sorption were followed based on the amounts of metal sorbed at various time intervals. Results show that sorption (chemical bonding) might be rate-limiting in the sorption of

  18. Morphologies of oriented alginate gels crosslinked with various divalent metal ions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Yokoyama; C. E. Achife; K. Takahira; Y. Yamashita; K. Monobe; F. Kusano; K. Nishi

    1992-01-01

    Optically anisotropic cylinder-shaped alginate gels crosslinked with various divalent metal ions such as Ca, Cu, Zn, and Pb were prepared by the flow-gelation method in which semidilute sodium alginate solution was extruded through a tube into metal nitrate salt solutions. Effects of metal ions on the morphological and structural features of the gels were examined mainly by polarized optical microscopy.

  19. Quadrupole resonances in the rare-earth metals

    SciTech Connect

    Liberman, D.; Zangwill, A.

    1989-01-01

    Calculations that employ a relativistic time-dependent local-density approximation to atomic absorption are used to examine a recent claim to the observation of giant quadrupolar resonances in the electron-energy-loss spectrum of Ce metal near the 4p edge. We confirm the existence of 4p..-->..4f resonances in this energy range but find the polarization effects much smaller than in typical giant dipole resonances.

  20. Effects of rare earth metals addition on the resistance to pitting corrosion of super duplex stainless steel – Part 1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Soon-Tae Kim; Soon-Hyeok Jeon; In-Sung Lee; Yong-Soo Park

    2010-01-01

    To elucidate the effects of rare earth metals addition on the resistance to pitting corrosion of super duplex stainless steel, a metallographic examination, potentiodynamic and potentiostatic polarization tests, a SEM-EDS and a SAM analysis of inclusion, austenite phase and ferrite phase were conducted. The addition of rare earth metals to the base alloy led to the formation of (Mn, Cr,

  1. Effects of rare earth oxide on hardfacing metal microstructure of medium carbon steel and its refinement mechanism

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ligang LIU

    2011-01-01

    The electrodes for hardfacing medium carbon steel with six additions of rare earth oxide were developed in this work. By means of optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, the microstructure, inclusion and the fractograph of the hardfacing metal were observed. Then, the effects of rare earth oxide on microstructure and inclusions in hardfacing metal were analyzed. The effectiveness of rare

  2. Behaviour of zirconium, niobium, yttrium and the rare earth elements in the Thor Lake rare-metal

    E-print Network

    Behaviour of zirconium, niobium, yttrium and the rare earth elements in the Thor Lake rare-metal © Emma Rebecca Sheard, 2010 #12;i ABSTRACT The Thor Lake rare-metal (Zr, Nb, Y, REE, Ta, Be, Ga) deposit and the heavy rare earth elements in the world. Much of the potentially economic mineralization was concentrated

  3. Fluoride technology for obtaining high-energy magnetic alloys and ligatures based on rare-earth metals

    SciTech Connect

    Buinovskii, A.S.; Sofronov, V.L.; Chizhikov, V.S.; Shtefan, Yu.P. [and others

    1995-10-20

    Unique specific properties of rare-earth metals (REMs) are to a large extent responsible for the technical progress in many branches of industry, science, and technology. A new fluoride procedure for obtaining high-energy magnetic alloys and ligatures based on rare-earth and transition metals has been proposed.

  4. Point-defect properties in HCP rare earth metals with analytic modified embedded atom potentials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wangyu Hu; Huiqiu Deng; Xiaojian Yuan; Masahiro Fukumoto

    2003-01-01

    The analytic embedded atom method (EAM) type many-body potentials of hcp rare earth metals (Dy, Er, Gd, Ho, Nd, Pr, and Tb) have been constructed. The hcp lattice is shown to be energetically most stable when compared with the fcc and bcc structure, and the hcp lattice with ideal c\\/a. The mechanical stability of the corresponding hcp lattice with respect

  5. SOME EFFECTS OF ANISOTROPY ON SPIRAL SPIN-CONFIGURATIONS WITH APPLICATION TO RARE-EARTH METALS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Kaplan

    1961-01-01

    A theoretical study of effects of anisotropy on spiral spin-; configurations is presented, emphasizing the problem of the magnetic ordering in ; rare-earth metals. It is shown that the ferromagnetic spiral observed at low ; temperatures by Wilkinson, Koehler, Wollan, and Cable in erbium can be the ; classical ground state of a spin Hamiltonian containing exchange and anisotropy ;

  6. Rare earth metal oxides: formation, characterization and catalytic activity Thermoanalytical and applied pyrolysis review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gamal A. M. Hussein

    1996-01-01

    This review provides a guide to the recent literature on the characterization of the decomposition routes of different precursors, especially carboxylates of rare earth metals (La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, Y and Th), and the formation of the final oxide products. It also discusses the effects of 1.(1) the nature of

  7. Energy position of 4f levels in rare-earth metals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Börje Johansson

    1979-01-01

    The energy position of the occupied and unoccupied 4f levels relative to the Fermi energy is studied for the rare-earth metals. This is done by treating the excited state as an impurity in an otherwise perfect crystal. This picture is first considered in the complete screening approximation. In this approximation thermochemical data can be used directly to give energy values

  8. Study of double layer rare earth metal conversion coating on aluminum alloy LY12

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yu Xingwen; Cao Chunan; Yao Zhiming; Zhou Derui; Yin Zhongda

    2001-01-01

    The process of the double layer rare earth metal (REM) conversion coating on aluminum alloy LY12 (2024) was introduced in this paper. The corrosion resistance of REM conversion coating was examined by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results showed that the coating increased the corrosion resistance (Rp) of the alloy surface, thus reducing the driving force of corrosion. The morphologies of

  9. Corrosion behavior of rare earth metal (REM) conversion coatings on aluminum alloy LY12

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yu Xingwen; Cao Chunan; Yao Zhiming; Zhou Derui; Yin Zhongda

    2000-01-01

    The processes of the double layer rare earth metal (REM) conversion coating on aluminum alloy LY12 (2024) were introduced. The results of polarization tests showed that the corrosion resistance of the double layer REM conversion coating was superior to that of chromate conversion coating. The corrosion behavior of REM conversion coatings on LY12 alloy was studied with optical microscopy and

  10. Shaping of diamond films by etching with molten rare-earth metals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Jin; J. E. Graebner; M. McCormack; T. H. Tiefel; A. Katz; W. C. Dautremont-Smith

    1993-01-01

    A method is presented for shaping and thinning of CVD diamond films which does not involve high pressures of hydrogen atmospheres; it instead makes use of such molten rare-earth metals as Ce or La to etch away the surface of the diamond film. The process yields appreciable results over periods of a few hours, and may render diamond film applications

  11. Magnetic and structural properties of some amorphous rare earth-transition metal thin films

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Dirks; H. Leamy

    1978-01-01

    With a transmission electron microscope (TEM) we have studied various amorphous rare earth (RE) - transition metal (TM) and (Fe, Co)-B thin films. The greater part of the films has been produced by ultra high vacuum (UHV) vapour deposition. A series of amorphous Gd-Co films are made by sputter deposition as well. All films show an anisotropic microstructure. It consists

  12. Influence of rare-earth metals on electrophysical properties of glassy films, deposited from solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Sechenov, D.A.; Savitskii, E.M.; Chupryakov, Yu.A.; Chistyakov, O.D.

    1986-12-01

    The possibility of altering the properties of solution-deposited, boron-doped, glassy films is demonstrated by the addition of rare-earth metals. The use of sublimated r.e.m.'s during the formation of the doped films improves the properties of the films considerably on the account of the decrease in the nonferrous-impurity contents in them.

  13. Depolarization theory of. mu. /sup +/-mesons in rare earth metals near the NEEL point

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanter, I.G.; Fomichev, S.V.

    1980-06-01

    The depolarization of ..mu../sup +/-mesons in heavy rare earth metals near the NEEL point is studied. A relationship between the depolarization rate and the temporal correlation functions is found for the varying magnetic field of the medium in the meson localization point. Equations for the polarization characteristics per unit of time in single crystals and in polycrystals are established.

  14. Experimentally determined Si isotope fractionation between silicate and Fe metal and implications for Earth's core formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahar, Anat; Ziegler, Karen; Young, Edward D.; Ricolleau, Angele; Schauble, Edwin A.; Fei, Yingwei

    2009-10-01

    Stable isotope fractionation amongst phases comprising terrestrial planets and asteroids can be used to elucidate planet-forming processes. To date, the composition of the Earth's core remains largely unknown though cosmochemical and geophysical evidence indicates that elements lighter than iron and nickel must reside there. Silicon is often cited as a light element that could explain the seismic properties of the core. The amount of silicon in the core, if any, can be deduced from the difference in 30Si/ 28Si between meteorites and terrestrial rocks if the Si isotope fractionation between silicate and Fe-rich metal is known. Recent studies (e.g., [Georg R.B., Halliday A.N., Schauble E.A., Reynolds B.C., 2007. Silicon in the Earth's core. Nature 447 (31), 1102-1106.]; [Fitoussi, C., Bourdon, B., Kleine, T., Oberli, F., Reynolds, B. C., 2009. Si isotope systematics of meteorites and terrestrial peridotites: implications for Mg/Si fractionation in the solar nebula and for Si in the Earth's core. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 287, 77-85.]) showing (sometimes subtle) differences between 30Si/ 28Si in meteorites and terrestrial rocks suggest that Si missing from terrestrial rocks might be in the core. However, any conclusion based on Earth-meteorite comparisons depends on the veracity of the 30Si/ 28Si fractionation factor between silicates and metals at appropriate conditions. Here we present the first direct experimental evidence that silicon isotopes are not distributed uniformly between iron metal and rock when equilibrated at high temperatures. High-precision measurements of the silicon isotope ratios in iron-silicon alloy and silicate equilibrated at 1 GPa and 1800 °C show that Si in silicate has higher 30Si/ 28Si than Si in metal, by at least 2.0‰. These findings provide an experimental foundation for using isotope ratios of silicon as indicators of terrestrial planet formation processes. They imply that if Si isotope equilibrium existed during segregation of Earth's core-forming metal and silicate mantle, there should be an isotopic signature of Si in the core. Our experiments, combined with previous measurements of Si isotope ratios in meteorites and rocks representing the bulk silicate Earth, suggest that the formation of the Earth's core imparted a high 30Si/ 28Si signature to the bulk silicate Earth due to dissolution of ~ 6 wt% Si into the early core.

  15. Ion anisotropy driven waves in the earth`s magnetosheath and plasma depletion layer

    SciTech Connect

    Denton, R.E.; Hudson, M.K. [Dartmouth Coll., Hanover, NH (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Anderson, B.J. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD (United States). Applied Physics Lab.; Fuselier, S.A. [Lockheed Palo Alto Research Labs., CA (United States); Gary, S.P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1993-05-01

    Recent studies of low frequency waves ({omega}{sub r} {le} {Omega}{sub p}, where {Omega}{sub p} is the proton gyrofrequency) observed by AMPTE/CCE in the plasma depletion layer and magnetosheath proper arereviewed. These waves are shown to be well identified with ion cyclotron and mirror mode waves. By statistically analyzing the transitions between the magnetopause and time intervals with ion cyclotron and mirror mode waves, it is established that the regions in which ion cyclotron waves occur are between the magnetopause and the regions where the mirror mode is observed. This result is shown to follow from the fact that the wave spectral properties are ordered with respect to the proton parallel beta, {beta}{sub {parallel}p}. The later result is predicted by linear Vlasov theory using a simple model for the magnetosheath and plasma depletion layer. Thus, the observed spectral type can be associated with relative distance from the magnetopause. The anisotropy-beta relation, A{sub p} {triple_bond} (T{perpendicular}/T{sub {parallel}}){sub p} {minus} 1 = 0.50{beta}{sub {parallel}p}{sup {minus}0.48} results from the fact that the waves pitch angle scatter the particles so that the plasma is near marginal stability, and is a fundamental constraint on the plasma.

  16. High-resolution mass spectrometer for liquid metal ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Wortmann, Martin; Ludwig, Arne; Reuter, Dirk; Wieck, Andreas D. [Lehrstuhl für Angewandte Festkörperphysik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universitätsstr. 150, 44780 Bochum (Germany)] [Lehrstuhl für Angewandte Festkörperphysik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universitätsstr. 150, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Meijer, Jan [Institut für Experimentelle Physik II, Universität Leipzig, Linnestr. 5, 04103 Leipzig (Germany)] [Institut für Experimentelle Physik II, Universität Leipzig, Linnestr. 5, 04103 Leipzig (Germany)

    2013-09-15

    Recently, a mass spectrometer for liquid metal ion sources (LMIS) has been built and set into operation. This device uses an E×B-filter as mass dispersive element and provides sufficient resolution to analyse the emission of clusters from LMIS to much higher mass ranges (>2000 amu) than commercially available mass filters for focused ion beam systems. It has also been shown that for small masses the composition of clusters from different isotopes can be resolved. Furthermore, a rather high fluence of monodisperse clusters in the range of 10{sup 6}–10{sup 7} clusters/s can be achieved with this setup. This makes it a promising tool for the preparation of mass selected clusters. In this contribution, theoretical considerations as well as technical details and the results of first measurements are presented.

  17. Printed disposable colorimetric array for metal ion discrimination.

    PubMed

    Ariza-Avidad, M; Salinas-Castillo, A; Cuéllar, M P; Agudo-Acemel, M; Pegalajar, M C; Capitán-Vallvey, L F

    2014-09-01

    One of the main limiting factors in optical sensing arrays is the reproducibility in the preparation, typically by spin coating and drop casting techniques, which produce membranes that are not fully homogeneous. In this paper, we increase the discriminatory power of colorimetric arrays by increasing the reproducibility in the preparation by inkjet printing and measuring the color from the image of the array acquired by a digital camera, using the H coordinate of the HSV color space as the analytical parameter, which produces robust and precise measurements. A disposable 31 mm × 19 mm nylon membrane with 35 sensing areas with 7 commercial chromogenic reagents makes it possible to identify 13 metal ions and to determine mixtures with up to 5 ions using a two-stage neural network approach with higher accuracy than with previous approaches. PMID:25088790

  18. Metallic atoms and ions in comets: Comet Halley 1986 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibadov, S.

    1992-01-01

    The origin of metallic atoms and ions in the cometary comae is investigated theoretically. Two effects are revealed in the comas of bright comets: (1) the Na anomalous type effect is possible within the gas-dust jets of comet P/Halley 1986 3 due to cooling cometary dust by cryogenic gas flow from the nucleus; and (2) the production of ions of refractory elements (Fe(+), Si(+), etc.) at large heliocentric distances is possible in the comas of the Halley type dusty comets due to high-velocity impacts between cometary and zodiacal dust particles. Spectral observations of comets with high sensitivity and spatial resolution are important for studying both comets and interplanetary dust.

  19. Theoretical study of transition-metal ions bound to benzene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R.

    1992-01-01

    Theoretical binding energies are reported for all first-row and selected second-row transition metal ions (M+) bound to benzene. The calculations employ basis sets of at least double-zeta plus polarization quality and account for electron correlation using the modified coupled-pair functional method. While the bending is predominantly electrostatic, the binding energies are significantly increased by electron correlation, because the donation from the metal d orbitals to the benzene pi* orbitals is not well described at the self-consistent-field level. The uncertainties in the computed binding energies are estimated to be about 5 kcal/mol. Although the calculated and experimental binding energies generally agree to within their combined uncertainties, it is likely that the true binding energies lie in the lower portion of the experimental range. This is supported by the very good agreement between the theoretical and recent experimental binding energies for AgC6H6(+).

  20. Metal-ion metathesis in metal-organic frameworks: a synthetic route to new metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yonghwi; Das, Sunirban; Bhattacharya, Saurav; Hong, Soonsang; Kim, Min Gyu; Yoon, Minyoung; Natarajan, Srinivasan; Kim, Kimoon

    2012-12-21

    A porous metal-organic framework, Mn(H(3)O)[(Mn(4)Cl)(3)(hmtt)(8)] (POST-65), was prepared by the reaction of 5,5',10,10',15,15'-hexamethyltruxene-2,7,12-tricarboxylic acid (H(3)hmtt) with MnCl(2) under solvothermal conditions. POST-65(Mn) was subjected to post-synthetic modification with Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu according to an ion-exchange method that resulted in the formation of three isomorphous frameworks, POST-65(Co/Ni/Cu), as well as a new framework, POST-65(Fe). The ion-exchanged samples could not be prepared by regular solvothermal reactions. The complete exchange of the metal ions and retention of the framework structure were verified by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface-area analysis. Single-crystal X-ray diffractions studies revealed a single-crystal-to-single-crystal (SCSC)-transformation nature of the ion-exchange process. Hydrogen-sorption and magnetization measurements showed metal-specific properties of POST-65. PMID:23154964

  1. Electrolyte materials containing highly dissociated metal ion salts

    DOEpatents

    Lee, H.S.; Geng, L.; Skotheim, T.A.

    1996-07-23

    The present invention relates to metal ion salts which can be used in electrolytes for producing electrochemical devices, including both primary and secondary batteries, photoelectrochemical cells and electrochromic displays. The salts have a low energy of dissociation and may be dissolved in a suitable polymer to produce a polymer solid electrolyte or in a polar aprotic liquid solvent to produce a liquid electrolyte. The anion of the salts may be covalently attached to polymer backbones to produce polymer solid electrolytes with exclusive cation conductivity. 2 figs.

  2. Electrolyte materials containing highly dissociated metal ion salts

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Hung-Sui (East Setauket, NY); Geng, Lin (Coram, NY); Skotheim, Terje A. (Shoreham, NY)

    1996-07-23

    The present invention relates to metal ion salts which can be used in electrolytes for producing electrochemical devices, including both primary and secondary batteries, photoelectrochemical cells and electrochromic displays. The salts have a low energy of dissociation and may be dissolved in a suitable polymer to produce a polymer solid electrolyte or in a polar aprotic liquid solvent to produce a liquid electrolyte. The anion of the salts may be covalently attached to polymer backbones to produce polymer solid electrolytes with exclusive cation conductivity.

  3. Aluminum/alkaline earth metal composites and method for producing

    DOEpatents

    Russell, Alan M; Anderson, Iver E; Kim, Hyong J; Freichs, Andrew E

    2014-02-11

    A composite is provided having an electrically conducting Al matrix and elongated filaments comprising Ca and/or Sr and/or Ba disposed in the matrix and extending along a longitudinal axis of the composite. The filaments initially comprise Ca and/or Sr and/or Ba metal or allow and then may be reacted with the Al matrix to form a strengthening intermetallic compound comprising Al and Ca and/or Sr and/or Ba. The composite is useful as a long-distance, high voltage power transmission conductor.

  4. Ternary rare earth and actinoid transition metal carbides viewed as carbometalates

    SciTech Connect

    Dashjav, Enkhtsetseg [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, D-01187 Dresden (Germany); Kreiner, Guido [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, D-01187 Dresden (Germany); Schnelle, Walter [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, D-01187 Dresden (Germany); Wagner, Frank R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, D-01187 Dresden (Germany); Kniep, Ruediger [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, D-01187 Dresden (Germany)], E-mail: Kniep@cpfs.mpg.de; Jeitschko, Wolfgang [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, Universitaet Muenster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Strasse 8, D-48149 Muenster (Germany)], E-mail: jeitsch@uni-muenster.de

    2007-02-15

    Ternary carbides A{sub x}T{sub y}C{sub z} (A=rare earth metals and actinoids; T=transition metals) with monoatomic species C{sup 4-} as structural entities are classified according to the criteria (i) metal to carbon ratio, (ii) coordination number of the transition metal by carbon atoms, and (iii) the dimensionality of the anionic network [T{sub y}C{sub z}]{sup n-}. Two groups are clearly distinguishable, depending on the metal to carbon ratio. Those where this ratio is equal to or smaller than 2 may be viewed as carbometalates, thus extending the sequence of complex anions from fluoro-, oxo-, and nitridometalates to carbometalates. The second group, metal-rich carbides with metal to carbon ratios equal to or larger than 4 is better viewed as typical intermetallics (''interstitial carbides''). The chemical bonding properties have been investigated by analyzing the Crystal Orbital Hamilton Population (COHP). The chemical bonding situation with respect to individual T-C bonds is similar in both classes. The main difference is the larger number of metal-metal bonds in the crystal structures of the metal-rich carbides.

  5. Features of the formation of magnetic moments of Tm3+ and Yb3+ rare-earth ions in LuB12 cage glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sluchanko, N. E.; Azarevich, A. N.; Anisimov, M. A.; Bogach, A. V.; Voronov, V. V.; Gavrilkin, S. Yu.; Glushkov, V. V.; Demishev, S. V.; Kuznetsov, A. V.; Mitsen, K. V.; Filippov, V. B.; Shitsevalova, N. Yu.; Gabani, S.; Flachbart, K.

    2014-12-01

    The features of the formation of the magnetic moments of Tm3+ and Yb3+ ions in a metallic matrix of LuB12 cage glass have been studied in measurements of the magnetization and specific heat in the temperature range of 1.9-300 K in magnetic fields up to 90 kOe. It has been shown that a paramagnetic response from the localized moments of isolated ions Tm3+ (7.6?B) and Yb3+ (4.5?B) is observed at temperatures of 150-300 K. A transition to the cage glass phase at low temperatures ( T ? T* ˜ 60 K) is accompanied by disordering in the system of rare-earth ions and by formation of many-body states near Tm3+ and Yb3+ ions. At low temperatures near T m in low magnetic fields, the appearance of an additional spin polarization, which is suppressed with an increase in the field, has been observed. The effective moments and g-factors of Tm and Yb obtained in high fields imply both the binding of a small fraction of magnetic ions to antiferromagnetic dimers and the ?6 ground state of the 2 F 7/2 multiplet of the ytterbium ion. A scenario alternative to the Kondo-type behavior has been proposed to explain the nature of many-body states and the appearance of the spin polarization in rare-earth dodecaborides.

  6. Rare earth zirconium oxide buffer layers on metal substrates

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Robert K. (Knoxville, TN); Paranthaman, Mariappan (Knoxville, TN); Chirayil, Thomas G. (Knoxville, TN); Lee, Dominic F. (Knoxville, TN); Goyal, Amit (Knoxville, TN); Feenstra, Roeland (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-01-01

    A laminate article comprises a substrate and a biaxially textured (RE.sub.x A.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.2-(x/2) buffer layer over the substrate, wherein 0metal-organic decomposition. The laminate article can include a layer of YBCO over the (RE.sub.x A.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.2-(x/2) buffer layer. A layer of CeO.sub.2 between the YBCO layer and the (RE.sub.x A.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.2-(x/2) buffer layer can also be include. Further included can be a layer of YSZ between the CeO.sub.2 layer and the (RE.sub.x A.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.2-(x/2) buffer layer. The substrate can be a biaxially textured metal, such as nickel. A method of forming the laminate article is also disclosed.

  7. Interaction of calcium with the human divalent metal-ion transporter-1

    SciTech Connect

    Shawki, Ali [Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, P.O. Box 670576, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0576 (United States)] [Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, P.O. Box 670576, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0576 (United States); Mackenzie, Bryan, E-mail: bryan.mackenzie@uc.edu [Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, P.O. Box 670576, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0576 (United States)] [Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, P.O. Box 670576, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0576 (United States)

    2010-03-12

    Iron deficiency is the most prevalent micronutrient deficiency worldwide. Whereas dietary calcium is known to reduce the bioavailability of iron, the molecular basis of this interaction is not understood. We tested the hypothesis that divalent metal-ion transporter-1 (DMT1)-the principal or only mechanism by which nonheme iron is taken up at the intestinal brush border-is shared also by calcium. We expressed human DMT1 in RNA-injected Xenopus oocytes and examined its activity using radiotracer assays and the voltage clamp. DMT1 did not mediate {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} uptake. Instead, we found that Ca{sup 2+} blocked the Fe{sup 2+}-evoked currents and inhibited {sup 55}Fe{sup 2+} uptake in a noncompetitive manner (K{sub i} {approx} 20 mM). The mechanism of inhibition was independent of voltage and did not involve intracellular Ca{sup 2+} signaling. The alkaline-earth metal ions Ba{sup 2+}, Sr{sup 2+}, and Mg{sup 2+} also inhibited DMT1-mediated iron-transport activity. We conclude that Ca{sup 2+} is a low-affinity noncompetitive inhibitor-but not a transported substrate-of DMT1, explaining in part the effect of high dietary calcium on iron bioavailability.

  8. Blood metal ion testing is an effective screening tool to identify poorly performing metal-on-metal bearing surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Sidaginamale, R. P.; Joyce, T. J.; Lord, J. K.; Jefferson, R.; Blain, P. G.; Nargol, A. V. F.; Langton, D. J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aims of this piece of work were to: 1) record the background concentrations of blood chromium (Cr) and cobalt (Co) concentrations in a large group of subjects; 2) to compare blood/serum Cr and Co concentrations with retrieved metal-on-metal (MoM) hip resurfacings; 3) to examine the distribution of Co and Cr in the serum and whole blood of patients with MoM hip arthroplasties; and 4) to further understand the partitioning of metal ions between the serum and whole blood fractions. Methods A total of 3042 blood samples donated to the local transfusion centre were analysed to record Co and Cr concentrations. Also, 91 hip resurfacing devices from patients who had given pre-revision blood/serum samples for metal ion analysis underwent volumetric wear assessment using a coordinate measuring machine. Linear regression analysis was carried out and receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed to assess the reliability of metal ions to identify abnormally wearing implants. The relationship between serum and whole blood concentrations of Cr and Co in 1048 patients was analysed using Bland-Altman charts. This relationship was further investigated in an in vitro study during which human blood was spiked with trivalent and hexavalent Cr, the serum then separated and the fractions analysed. Results Only one patient in the transfusion group was found to have a blood Co > 2 µg/l. Blood/Serum Cr and Co concentrations were reliable indicators of abnormal wear. Blood Co appeared to be the most useful clinical test, with a concentration of 4.5 µg/l showing sensitivity and specificity for the detection of abnormal wear of 94% and 95%, respectively. Generated metal ions tended to fill the serum compartment preferentially in vivo and this was replicated in the in vitro study when blood was spiked with trivalent Cr and bivalent Co. Conclusions Blood/serum metal ion concentrations are reliable indicators of abnormal wear processes. Important differences exist however between elements and the blood fraction under study. Future guidelines must take these differences into account. PMID:23836464

  9. [Effect of bivalent metal ions on the fluctuations of ion currents in rat liver mitochondria].

    PubMed

    Kholmukhamedov, E L; Chukhlova, E A

    1985-01-01

    Ions of bivalent metals are shown to arrange in the Sr2+ greater than Ca2+ greater than Ba2+ greater than Mn2+ series as to their ability to induce ion flow vibration in the rat liver mitochondria. Application of Sr2+ results in the most stable prolonged vibrations of ion flows in mitochondria. Ca2+, Ba2+ and Mn2+ induce slightly pronounced and intensively damped vibrations. The studied Mg2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Pb2+ Fe2+ cations have effect on valinomycin-induced K+ transport in mitochondria and do not induce vibrations. It is established that the ability of bivalent cations to induce vibrations is associated with the possibility of their transfer through the mitochondrion membrane and accumulation in the matrix. Inhibitors of the electrogenic Ca2+ transport in mitochondria produce the similar effect on vibrations induced by Sr2+, Ca2+, Ba2+ and Mn2+. PMID:2412325

  10. Selective exchange of divalent transition metal ions in cryptomelane-type manganic acid with tunnel structure

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuji, M. (Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1, O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152 (Japan)); Komarneni, S. (Materials Research Laboratory and Department of Agronomy, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802-4801 (United States))

    1993-03-01

    The ion-exchange selectivity of divalent transition metal ions on cryptomelane-type manganic acid (CMA) with tunnel structure has been studied using the distribution coefficients ([ital K][sub [ital d

  11. Accumulation of alkaline earth metals by the green macroalga Bryopsis maxima.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Shigekazu; Aizawa, Kyoko; Nakamura, Saki; Nakayama, Katsumi; Fujisaki, Shingo; Watanabe, Soichiro; Satoh, Hiroyuki

    2015-04-01

    Twenty-five days after the disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in 2011, we collected samples of the green macroalga Bryopsis maxima from the Pacific coast of Japan. Bryopsis maxima is a unicellular, multinuclear, siphonous green macroalga. Radiation analysis revealed that B. maxima emitted remarkably high gamma radiation of (131)I, (134)Cs, (137)Cs, and (140)Ba as fission products of (235)U. Interestingly, B. maxima contained naturally occurring radionuclides derived from (226)Ra and (228)Ra. Analysis of element content revealed that B. maxima accumulates many ocean elements, especially high quantities of the alkaline earth metals Sr (15.9 g per dry-kg) and Ba (3.79 g per dry-kg), whereas Ca content (12.5 g per dry-kg) was lower than that of Sr and only 61 % of the mean content of 70 Japanese seaweed species. Time-course analysis determined the rate of radioactive (85)Sr incorporation into thalli to be approximately 0.13 g Sr per dry-kg of thallus per day. Subcellular fractionation of B. maxima cells showed that most of the (85)Sr was localized in the soluble fraction, predominantly in the vacuole or cytosol. Given that (85)Sr radioactivity was permeable through a dialysis membrane, the (85)Sr was considered to be a form of inorganic ion and/or bound with a small molecule. Precipitation analysis with sodium sulfate showed that more than 70 % of the Sr did not precipitate as SrSO4, indicating that a proportion of the Sr may bind with small molecules in B. maxima. PMID:25744028

  12. Ion velocity distributions in the vicinity of the current sheet in Earth's distant magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, L. A.; Paterson, W. R.; Ackerson, K. L.; Kokubun, S.; Kivelson, M. G.; Yamamoto, T.; Fairfield, D. H.

    1994-01-01

    Observations of the three-dimensional velocity distributions of positive ions and electrons have been recently gained for the first time in Earth's distant magnetotail with the Galileo and Geotail spacecraft. For this brief discussion of these exciting results the focus is on the overall character of the ion velocity distributions during substorm activity. The ion velocity distributions within and near the magnetotail current sheet are not accurately described as convecting, isotropic Maxwellians. The observed velocity distributions are characterized by at least two robust types. The first type is similar to the 'lima bean'-shaped velocity distributions that are expected from the nonadiabatic acceleration of ions which execute Speiser-type trajectories in the current sheet. The second distribution is associated with the presence of cold ion beams that presumably also arise from the acceleration of plasma mantle ions in the electric and weak magnetic fields in the current sheet. The ion velocity distributions in a magnetic field structure that is similar to that for plasmoids are also examined. Again the velocity distributions are not Maxwellian but are indicative of nonadiabatic acceleration. An example of the pressure tensor within the plasmoid-like event is also presented because it is anticipated that the off-diagonal elements are important in a description of magnetotail dynamics. Thus our concept of magnetotail dynamics must advance from the present assumption of co-moving electron and ion Maxwellian distributions into reformulations in terms of global kinematical models and nonadiabatic particle motion.

  13. Novel Ferroelectric Candidates in a Series of ABi4Ti4O15 (A: Alkaline Earth Metals) Thin Films

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kazumi Kato; Kazuyuki Suzuki; Desheng Fu; Kaori Nishizawa; Takeshi Miki

    2003-01-01

    ABi4Ti4O15 (A: alkaline earth metals) thin films were prepared on Pt-passivated Si substrates by using the precursor solution of metal alkoxides. As-deposited thin films initiated crystallization below 550°C and enhanced the crystallinity at higher temperature via rapid thermal annealing in oxygen. The crystallinity of the ABi4Ti4O15 thin films depended on the A-site cation of the alkaline earth metals but the

  14. Estimation of Heavy Ion Densities From Linearly Polarized EMIC Waves At Earth

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Eun-Hwa; Johnson, Jay R.; Lee, Dong-Hun

    2014-02-24

    Linearly polarized EMIC waves are expected to concentrate at the location where their wave frequency satisfies the ion-ion hybrid (IIH) resonance condition as the result of a mode conversion process. In this letter, we evaluate absorption coefficients at the IIH resonance in the Earth geosynchronous orbit for variable concentrations of helium and azimuthal and field-aligned wave numbers in dipole magnetic field. Although wave absorption occurs for a wide range of heavy ion concentration, it only occurs for a limited range of azimuthal and field-aligned wave numbers such that the IIH resonance frequency is close to, but not exactly the same as the crossover frequency. Our results suggest that, at L = 6.6, linearly polarized EMIC waves can be generated via mode conversion from the compressional waves near the crossover frequency. Consequently, the heavy ion concentration ratio can be estimated from observations of externally generated EMIC waves that have polarization.

  15. Orbital and spin contributions to magnetic hyperfine fields of tri-positive rare earth ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayuel, K.; de Châtel, P. F.; El Hag, A.

    2015-01-01

    An alternative approach in the estimation of the magnetic field generated by atomic current densities is presented and applied to both the orbital and spin magnetic hyperfine fields of tri-positive rare earth ions. The application of the formulae offered is tested on the free ions Dy3+, Er3+ and Yb3+ in their ground states. The estimated magnetic hyperfine fields are in full agreement with those found in the literature. Our calculated magnetic hyperfine fields produced in the ground states of Er3+ ion in Er2Ge2O7 and Yb3+ ion in YbNi5 are also in good agreement with experimental and estimated data found in the literature.

  16. Photoluminescence properties of Jahn-Teller transition-metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz-Ortiz, Marta N.; Rodríguez, Fernando

    2009-09-01

    This work investigates the influence of electron-phonon coupling associated with E ?e and T ?e Jahn-Teller (JT) effect in different transition-metal (TM) ions on de-excitation phenomena through nonradiative multiphonon relaxation, i.e., photoluminescence (PL) quenching. We developed a configurational curve model which is able to predict from the absorption spectrum whether a given JT-TM ion is PL or quenched. The prediction is made on the basis of an adapted Dexter-Klick-Russell parameter for JT systems, defined in terms of spectroscopic parameters through ?JT=??eabs/Eabs, where ?eabs refers to the splitting of the parent octahedral Eg states by the JT distortion in E ?e (? =3/4) or T ?e (? =1/4), and Eabs is the energy of the first absorption band involving electronic transition between Eg and T2g. We show that PL in any JT-TM ion occurs whenever ?JT<0.1 or is quenched if ?JT>0.2. This result is noteworthy since it allows us to establish structural requirements for the JT-TM ion and the host crystal to be PL. Although PL properties of materials containing TM ions depend on a variety of structural factors such as the electronic configuration, the site symmetry, and the crystal field produced by neighboring atoms, the present model achieves this goal through a simple spectroscopic parameter: ?JT. In this work we correlated the PL properties of different sixfold-coordinated JT systems such as Ti3+, Cu2+, Mn3+, Cr2+, Fe2+, Co3+, and Ni3+ in halides and oxides with ?JT obtained from their respective absorption spectra. From this analysis we conclude that depending on the nature of the JT coupling and its strength, PL is either strongly favored or quenched in T ?e while it is mostly quenched in E ?e systems due to the larger JT distortion.

  17. Amorphous Metallic Glass as New High Power and Energy Density Anodes For Lithium Ion Rechargeable Batteries

    E-print Network

    Meng, Shirley Y.

    We have investigated the use of aluminum based amorphous metallic glass as the anode in lithium ion rechargeable batteries. Amorphous metallic glasses have no long-range ordered microstructure; the atoms are less closely ...

  18. Electrospray droplet exposure to organic vapors: metal ion removal from proteins and protein complexes.

    PubMed

    DeMuth, J Corinne; McLuckey, Scott A

    2015-01-20

    The exposure of aqueous nanoelectrospray droplets to various organic vapors can dramatically reduce sodium adduction on protein ions in positive ion mass spectra. Volatile alcohols, such as methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol lead to a significant reduction in sodium ion adduction but are not as effective as acetonitrile, acetone, and ethyl acetate. Organic vapor exposure in the negative ion mode, on the other hand, has essentially no effect on alkali ion adduction. Evidence is presented to suggest that the mechanism by which organic vapor exposure reduces alkali ion adduction in the positive mode involves the depletion of alkali metal ions via ion evaporation of metal ions solvated with organic molecules. The early generation of metal/organic cluster ions during the droplet desolvation process results in fewer metal ions available to condense on the protein ions formed via the charged residue mechanism. These effects are demonstrated with holomyoglobin ions to illustrate that the metal ion reduction takes place without detectable protein denaturation, which might be revealed by heme loss or an increase in charge state distribution. No evidence is observed for denaturation with exposure to any of the organic vapors evaluated in this work. PMID:25517019

  19. Ions originating from the Moon surface / exosphere observed in the Earth's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Y.; Yokota, S.; Nishino, M. N.; Yamamoto, T.; Uemura, K.; Tsunakawa, H.

    2012-04-01

    MAgnetic field and Plasma experiment - Plasma energy Angle and Composition Experiment (MAP-PACE) on Kaguya (SELENE) measured lunar plasmas in a polar orbit with an altitude of 100km, 50km, and in an elliptical orbit with perilune altitude as low as 10km. When Kaguya stayed in the Earth's magnetosphere, one of the MAP-PACE sensors IMA (Ion Mass Analyzer) detected ions from the Moon surface [Tanaka et al., GRL 36, L22106, 2009]. These ions were observed when the Moon was in the magnetospheric lobe, on the dayside of the Moon, especially when the solar zenith angle was below 40 degrees. IMA detected peaks for the heavy ions including C+, O+, Na+, K+, and Ar+ that indicated that these ions were originating from the Moon surface / exosphere. When these ions were discovered, they were considered to be accelerated by the potential difference between the lunar surface and Kaguya. Both the lunar surface and Kaguya were positively charged on the dayside of the Moon since photoelectron and electron currents are the major current sources and the photoelectron current dominates the current balance. Since the Debye length was larger than the spacecraft and much smaller than the Moon, it might be possible for the Moon surface to be positively charged to a higher potential than Kaguya. However, the recent detailed study on the ion flow direction with respect to the magnetic field revealed that the ion flow direction was mostly perpendicular to the magnetic field. It suggests that these ions were mostly accelerated by the convection electric field in the Earth's magnetotail. This hypothesis was proved by investigating an example that lobe cold ions were detected by another MAP-PACE ion sensor IEA while ions originating from the Moon surface / exosphere were detected by IMA. The ions originating from the Moon surface / exosphere also showed characteristic variation of the flux intensity that presumably related with the lunar surface structure or composition. Understanding the lunar plasmas will contribute to our understanding of the interaction between solar wind / magnetosphere and numerous non-magnetized airless bodies.

  20. SORPTION OF TRIVALENT METAL ION ON FIBROUS CERIUM(IV) HYDROGENPHOSPHATE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. HAYASHI; T. EBINA; T. NAGASE; Y. ONODERA; T. IWASAKI

    1999-01-01

    Thermodynamics of trivalent metal ions\\/hydrogen ions exchange on a fibrous cerium(IV) hydrogenphosphate have been investigated by the micro-amount uptake. Selectivities for trivalent metal ions increase in the order; La ion exchange reaction increase in the order of Eu

  1. Alkaline-Earth metal cations as structure building blocks for molecular cages with entrapment and controlled release of quintuple ionic aggregates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chi-Tsang; Shiu, Ler-Chun; Shiu, Kom-Bei

    2015-05-01

    Currently, main-group metal cations are totally neglected as the structure-building blocks for the self-assembly of supramolecular coordination metallocages due to the lack of directional bonding. However, here we show that a common Arrhenius acid-base neutralization allows the alkaline-earth metal cations to act as charged binders, easily connecting two or more highly directional anionic transition-metal-based metalloligands to coordination polymers. With a metal salt such as K(+) PF6 (-) added during the neutralization, the main-group metal-connected skeleton can be templated by the largest yet reported ionic-aggregate anion, K2 (PF6 )3 (-) , formed from KPF6 in solution, into molecular metallocages, encapsulating the ion. Crystal-structure details, DFT-calculation results, and controlled-release behavior support the presence of K2 (PF6 )3 (-) as a guest in the cage. Upon removal of PF6 (-) ions, the cage stays intact. Other ions like BF4 (-) can be put back in. PMID:25786666

  2. Metal ion sorption by untreated and chemically treated biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Kilbane, J.J.; Xie, J.

    1992-12-31

    The metal-binding ability of biosorbents is well known; however, in comparison with commercial ion-exchange resins the capacity of biosorbents is low. The purpose of this research was to examine chemically modified biosorbents and biosorbents prepared from microorganisms isolated from extreme environments to determine if significant improvements in metal-binding capacity or biosorbents with unique capabilities could be produced. Chemical treatments examined included acid, alkali, carbon disulfide, phosphorus oxychloride, anhydrous formamide, sodium thiosulfate, sodium chloroacetic acid, and phenylsulfonate. Biosorbents were prepared from microorganisms isolated from pristine and acid mine drainage impacted sites and included heterotrophs, methanotrophs, algae, and sulfate reducers. Chemical modification with carbon disulfide, phosphorous oxychloride, and sodium thiosulfate yielded biosorbents with such as much as 74%, 133%, and 155% improvements, respectively, in metal-binding capacity, but the performance of these chemically modified biosorbents deteriorated upon repeated use. A culture isolated from an acid mine drainage impacted site, IGTM17, exhibits about 3-fold higher metal-binding capacity in comparison with other biosorbents examined in this study. IGTM17 also exhibits superior metal-binding ability at decreased pH or in the presence of interfering common cations in comparison with other biosorbents or some commercially available cation exchange resins. Some biosorbents, such as IGTM5, can bind anions. To our knowledge this is the first demonstration of the ability of biosorbents to bind anions. Moreover, preliminary data indicate that the chemical modification of biosorbents may be capable of imparting the ability to selectively bind certain anions. Further research is needed to optimize conditions for the chemical modification and stabilization of biosorbents.

  3. High pressure phase transitions in the rare earth metal erbium to 151 GPa.

    PubMed

    Samudrala, Gopi K; Thomas, Sarah A; Montgomery, Jeffrey M; Vohra, Yogesh K

    2011-08-10

    High pressure x-ray diffraction studies have been performed on the heavy rare earth metal erbium (Er) in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature to a pressure of 151 GPa and Er has been compressed to 40% of its initial volume. The rare earth crystal structure sequence hcp ? Sm type ? dhcp ? distorted fcc (hcp: hexagonal close packed; fcc: face centered cubic; dhcp: double hcp) is observed in Er below 58 GPa. We have carried out Rietveld refinement of crystal structures in the pressure range between 58 GPa and 151 GPa. We have examined various crystal structures that have been proposed for the distorted fcc (dfcc) phase and the post-dfcc phase in rare earth metals. We find that the hexagonal hR 24 structure is the best fit between 58 and 118 GPa. Above 118 GPa, a structural transformation from hR 24 phase to a monoclinic C 2/m phase is observed with a volume change of - 1.9%. We have also established a clear trend for the pressure at which a post-dfcc phase is formed in rare earth metals and show that there is a monotonic increase in this pressure with the filling of 4f shell. PMID:21753243

  4. High pressure phase transitions in the rare earth metal erbium to 151 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samudrala, Gopi K.; Thomas, Sarah A.; Montgomery, Jeffrey M.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2011-08-01

    High pressure x-ray diffraction studies have been performed on the heavy rare earth metal erbium (Er) in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature to a pressure of 151 GPa and Er has been compressed to 40% of its initial volume. The rare earth crystal structure sequence {hcp} \\to {Sm}~ {type} \\to {dhcp} \\to {distorted} fcc (hcp: hexagonal close packed; fcc: face centered cubic; dhcp: double hcp) is observed in Er below 58 GPa. We have carried out Rietveld refinement of crystal structures in the pressure range between 58 GPa and 151 GPa. We have examined various crystal structures that have been proposed for the distorted fcc (dfcc) phase and the post-dfcc phase in rare earth metals. We find that the hexagonal hR 24 structure is the best fit between 58 and 118 GPa. Above 118 GPa, a structural transformation from hR 24 phase to a monoclinic C 2/m phase is observed with a volume change of - 1.9%. We have also established a clear trend for the pressure at which a post-dfcc phase is formed in rare earth metals and show that there is a monotonic increase in this pressure with the filling of 4f shell.

  5. Insight into the Interaction of Metal Ions with TroA from Streptococcus suis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Beiwen Zheng; Qiangmin Zhang; Jia Gao; Huiming Han; Ming Li; Jingren Zhang; Jianxun Qi; Jinghua Yan; George F. Gao

    2011-01-01

    BackgroundThe scavenging ability of sufficient divalent metal ions is pivotal for pathogenic bacteria to survive in the host. ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-type metal transporters provide a considerable amount of different transition metals for bacterial growth. TroA is a substrate binding protein for uptake of multiple metal ions. However, the function and structure of the TroA homologue from the epidemic Streptococcus suis

  6. Research in and industrial application of metal source ion implantation at Beijing Normal University

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Huixing Zhang; Xiaoji Zhang; Fengsheng Zhou; Qiang Li; Xanying Wu; Wenlian Lin; Tonghe Zhang

    1998-01-01

    High-current metal-ion sources for the surface modification of materials have been under development at Beijing Normal University since 1988. The present paper discusses both a large-scale metal source ion implanter installed at this Institute at the end of 1995 for research and industrial applications, and a metal plasma deposition\\/implantation system with three filtered vacuum-arc plasma sources. The metal source implanter

  7. Structure of the alkali-metal-atom + strontium molecular ions: Towards photoassociation and formation of cold molecular ions

    SciTech Connect

    Aymar, M.; Dulieu, O. [Laboratoire Aime Cotton, CNRS, UPR3321, Ba circumflex t. 505, Univ Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Guerout, R. [Laboratoire Kastler-Brossel, CNRS, ENS, Univ Pierre et Marie Curie case 74, Campus Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2011-08-14

    The potential energy curves, permanent and transition dipole moments, and the static dipolar polarizability, of molecular ions composed of one alkali-metal atom and a strontium ion are determined with a quantum chemistry approach. The molecular ions are treated as effective two-electron systems and are treated using effective core potentials including core polarization, large gaussian basis sets, and full configuration interaction. In the perspective of upcoming experiments aiming at merging cold atom and cold ion traps, possible paths for radiative charge exchange, photoassociation of a cold lithium or rubidium atom and a strontium ion are discussed, as well as the formation of stable molecular ions.

  8. Prostate cancer outcome and tissue levels of metal ions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sarafanov, A.G.; Todorov, T.I.; Centeno, J.A.; MacIas, V.; Gao, W.; Liang, W.-M.; Beam, C.; Gray, Michael A.; Kajdacsy-Balla, A.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND There are several studies examining prostate cancer and exposure to cadmium, iron, selenium, and zinc. Less data are available on the possible influence of these metal ions on prostate cancer outcome. This study measured levels of these ions in prostatectomy samples in order to examine possible associations between metal concentrations and disease outcome. METHODS We obtained formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue blocks of prostatectomy samples of 40 patients with PSA recurrence, matched 1:1 (for year of surgery, race, age, Gleason grading, and pathology TNM classification) with tissue blocks from 40 patients without recurrence (n = 80). Case-control pairs were compared for the levels of metals in areas adjacent to tumors. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used for quantification of Cd, Fe, Zn, and Se. RESULTS Patients with biochemical (PSA) recurrence of disease had 12% lower median iron (95 ??g/g vs. 111 ??g/g; P = 0.04) and 21% lower zinc (279 ??g/g vs. 346 ??g/g; P = 0.04) concentrations in the normal-appearing tissue immediately adjacent to cancer areas. Differences in cadmium (0.489 ??g/g vs. 0.439 ??g/g; 4% higher) and selenium (1.68 ??g/g vs. 1.58 ??g/g; 5% higher) levels were not statistically significant in recurrence cases, when compared to non-recurrences (P = 0.40 and 0.21, respectively). CONCLUSIONS There is an association between low zinc and low iron prostate tissue levels and biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer. Whether these novel findings are a cause or effect of more aggressive tumors, or whether low zinc and iron prostatic levels raise implications for therapy, remains to be investigated. Copyright ?? 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Cooperative thermodynamic control of selectivity in the self-assembly of rare earth metal-ligand helices.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Amber M; Young, Michael C; Zhang, Xing; Julian, Ryan R; Hooley, Richard J

    2013-11-27

    Metal-selective self-assembly with rare-earth cations is possible with suitable rigid, symmetrical bis-tridentate ligands. Kinetically controlled formation is initially observed, with smaller cations preferentially incorporated. Over time, the more thermodynamically favorable complexes with larger metals are formed. This thermodynamic control is a cooperative supramolecular phenomenon and only occurs upon multiple-metal-based self-assembly: single-metal ML3 analogues do not show reversible selectivity. The selectivity is dependent on small variations in lanthanide ionic radius and occurs despite identical coordination-ligand coordination geometries and minor size differences in the rare-earth metals. PMID:24206215

  10. Most spin-1/2 transition-metal ions do have single ion anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jia; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan, E-mail: hxiang@fudan.edu.cn, E-mail: mike-whangbo@ncsu.edu [Department of Chemistry, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Koo, Hyun-Joo [Department of Chemistry and Research Institute for Basic Sciences, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Xiang, Hongjun, E-mail: hxiang@fudan.edu.cn, E-mail: mike-whangbo@ncsu.edu [Key Laboratory of Computational Physical Sciences (Ministry of Education), State Key Laboratory of Surface Physics, and Department of Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Kremer, Reinhard K. [Max-Planck-Institut für Festkörperforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 1, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2014-09-28

    The cause for the preferred spin orientation in magnetic systems containing spin-1/2 transition-metal ions was explored by studying the origin of the easy-plane anisotropy of the spin-1/2 Cu{sup 2+} ions in CuCl{sub 2}·2H{sub 2}O, LiCuVO{sub 4}, CuCl{sub 2}, and CuBr{sub 2} on the basis of density functional theory and magnetic dipole-dipole energy calculations as well as a perturbation theory treatment of the spin-orbit coupling. We find that the spin orientation observed for these spin-1/2 ions is not caused by their anisotropic spin exchange interactions, nor by their magnetic dipole-dipole interactions, but by the spin-orbit coupling associated with their crystal-field split d-states. Our study also predicts in-plane anisotropy for the Cu{sup 2+} ions of Bi{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} and Li{sub 2}CuO{sub 2}. The results of our investigations dispel the mistaken belief that magnetic systems with spin-1/2 ions have no magnetic anisotropy induced by spin-orbit coupling.

  11. Serum metal ion concentrations after unilateral vs bilateral large-head metal-on-metal primary total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Pelt, Christopher E; Bergeson, Adam G; Anderson, Lucas A; Stoddard, Gregory J; Peters, Christopher L

    2011-12-01

    It is unknown if the presence of bilateral well-functioning large-head metal-on-metal (MOM) total hip arthroplasties (THAs) leads to higher serum metal ion concentrations than unilateral MOM THA. Elevated levels (chromium, 17 ?g/L; cobalt, 19 ?g/L) have been associated with poorly functioning MOM THA with metallosis. Fourteen patients having undergone bilateral and 25 patients having undergone unilateral large-head primary MOM THA were compared. Harris Hip Scores, University of California Los Angeles activity scores, radiographs, serum creatinine, and serum cobalt and chromium levels were obtained. Only cobalt ion levels were significantly higher in the bilateral group than in the unilateral group (1.8 ?g/L vs 1.0 ?g/L, P = .029). Comparatively, this magnitude is clinically rather low because ion levels did not approach those associated with metallosis in either group. We conclude that although patients with well-functioning bilateral MOM THA may have slightly higher cobalt levels, neither cobalt nor chromium levels approach those seen in poorly functioning MOM THA with metallosis. PMID:21570800

  12. Effects of the rare-earth ions on some properties of a nickel-zinc ferrite

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Rezlescu; E. Rezlescu; C. Pasnicu; M. L. Craus

    1994-01-01

    The effect of Fe substitutions by rare-earth ions on magnetic and electrical properties of a Ni-Zn ferrite prepared by the classical method is investigated. A set of seven compounds with formula Ni0.7Zn0.3Fe1.98R0.02O4, where R identical to Yb, Er, Dy, Tb, Gd, Sm or Ce, was prepared. Emphasis is placed on current experimental results of bulk magnetic measurements and transport phenomena.

  13. Mössbauer study of Cu–Zn ferrite substituted with rare earth ions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. H. Mahmoud; A. A. Sattar

    2004-01-01

    Mössbauer spectroscopy at low temperature and in the presence of high magnetic field was used to investigate the cation distribution and spin canting angles in Cu0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 samples substituted with the rare earth ions Sm and Nd. Observed variations in saturation magnetization and Curie temperature in the samples have been explained on the basis of site distributions and the strength of

  14. Ion engine propelled Earth-Mars cycler with nuclear thermal propelled transfer vehicle, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Rudolf X.; Baker, Myles; Melko, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this project was to perform a preliminary design of a long term, reusable transportation system between earth and Mars which would be capable of providing both artificial gravity and shelter from solar flare radiation. The heart of this system was assumed to be a Cycler spacecraft propelled by an ion propulsion system. The crew transfer vehicle was designed to be propelled by a nuclear-thermal propulsion system. Several Mars transportation system architectures and their associated space vehicles were designed.

  15. A new ion source for fission-yield measurements of rare-earth isotopes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. H. Pilzer; G. Engler

    1987-01-01

    A new integrated target-ion source for fission-yield measurements of rare-earth isotopes has been developed for the Soreq on-line isotope separator (SOLIS). The source is heated by electron bombardment to a temperature of 2400° C and ionization takes place in a rhenium hot cavity. To overcome the problem of impurities which reduce the ionization efficiency, a ZrC disk was inserted in

  16. On the nonadiabatic precipitation of ions from the near-Earth plasma sheet

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. C. Delcourt; J.-A. Sauvaud; R. F. Martin Jr; T. E. Moore

    1996-01-01

    We examine the precipitation of ions which result from nonadiabatic pitch angle scattering in the near-Earth magnetotail. We focus on dynamical situations between the adiabatic limit where the particle magnetic moment is conserved and the current sheet limit where particles experience meandering motion about the midplane. Defining the : parameter as the square root of the minimum curvature-radius-to-maximum Larmor radius

  17. A THEORETICAL INVESTIGATION OF SOME MAGNETIC AND SPECTROSCOPIC PROPERTIES OF RARE-EARTH IONS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. J. Freeman; R. E. Watson

    1962-01-01

    Investigations of some magnetic and spectroscopic properties of rare-; earths ions based on approximate HartreeFock calculations are reported. A set of ; convertional, nonrelativistic Hartree-Fock wave functions were obtained for Ce\\/; sup 3+\\/, Pr\\/sup 3+\\/, Nd\\/sup 3+\\/, Sm\\/sup 8+\\/, Eu\\/sup 2+\\/, Gd\\/sup 3+\\/, Dy\\/sup 3+\\/, ; Er\\/sup 3+\\/, and Yb\\/sup 3+\\/. After these calculations for Ce\\/sup 3+\\/ were carried ;

  18. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C5, suppliment au no 5, Tome 40, Mai 1979,page C5-46 High-temperature Hall effect in rare earth metals

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -temperature Hall effect in rare earth metals M. V. Vedernikov, V. G. Dvunitkin and N. I. Moreva A. F. Ioffe. Abstract. - Up to date the Hall effect in rare earth metals (REM) was studied rather extensively below at http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/jphyscol:1979518 #12;HIGH-TEMPERATURE HALL EFFECT IN RARE EARTH METALS C5

  19. Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, M. H.

    1984-01-01

    The following aspects of the planet Earth are discussed: plate tectonics, the interior of the planet, the formation of the Earth, and the evolution of the atmosphere and hydrosphere. The Earth's crust, mantle, and core are examined along with the bulk composition of the planet.

  20. Source and Acceleration of Energetic He(+) Ions at the Earth's Bow Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kemei

    1998-12-01

    This thesis have presented the first detailed study of the sources and the acceleration of energetic He+ ions in front of the Earth's bow shock, using data from AMPTE/IRM and AMPTE/CCE. the bow shock was an almost perfect perpendicular shock, we compared the results of a simulation to the observed event. The model provides a good quantitative description of the phase space distribution of the gyrating ions. A large portion (approximately 63%) of the incident pickup ions are reflected and gain energy in the interaction. It is also consistent with their spatial distribution in front of the shock. It is shown that a significant fraction of the upstream ions undergo more than one reflection at the bow shock, and gain substantial energy in this interaction. distributions of H+,/ He2+,/ He+ and O+ ions upstream of the shock, as well as a comparison of the observed spectra upstream of the shock and m the magnetosphere with results from the calculations, we concluded that He+ is locally accelerated. The subsequent modeling of the injection and diffusive acceleration at the shock presented evidence that pickup ions can be injected and accelerated more efficiently than solar wind plasma. pickup ions and anomalous cosmic rays.

  1. Neutral atomic oxygen beam produced by ion charge exchange for Low Earth Orbital (LEO) simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce; Rutledge, Sharon; Brdar, Marko; Olen, Carl; Stidham, Curt

    1987-01-01

    A low energy neutral atomic oxygen beam system was designed and is currently being assembled at the Lewis Research Center. The system utilizes a 15 cm diameter Kaufman ion source to produce positive oxygen ions which are charge exchange neutralized to produce low energy (variable from 5 to 150 eV) oxygen atoms at a flux simulating real time low Earth orbital conditions. An electromagnet is used to direct only the singly charged oxygen ions from the ion source into the charge exchange cell. A retarding potential grid is used to slow down the oxygen ions to desired energies prior to their charge exchange. Cryogenically cooled diatomic oxygen gas in the charge exchange cell is then used to transfer charge to the oxygen ions to produce a neutral atomic oxygen beam. Remaining non-charge exchanged oxygen ions are then swept from the beam by electromagnetic or electrostatic deflection depending upon the desired experiment configuration. The resulting neutral oxygen beam of 5 to 10 cm in diameter impinges upon target materials within a sample holder fixture that can also provide for simultaneous heating and UV exposure during the atomic oxygen bombardment.

  2. Metal cation/anion adsorption on calcium carbonate: Implications to metal ion concentrations in groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Zachara, J.M.; Cowan, C.E.; Resch, C.T.

    1990-05-01

    This chapter evaluates the sorption behavior of metallic ions on specimen calcite as a basis for determining the importance of calcite relative to other subsurface sorbents, such as layer silicates and oxides, in controlling metal ion concentration in calcareous groundwaters. A review of the literature shows the sorption of both metallic cations and anions on calcite over ranges in pH and CO{sub 2} partial pressure to be consistent with a surface-exchange process where cations exchange with surface Ca and anions exchange with surface CO{sub 3}. A general surface-exchange model was developed to account for the effects of Ca and CO{sub 3} concentrations, pH, and calcite surface area on cation and anion sorption onto calcite. The model was applied to recently developed experimental sorption data of Zn and SeO{sub 3} on specimen calcite in equilibrium CaCO{sub 3}(aq) suspensions. The surface-exchange model was able to describe the effects of pH on both cation and anion sorption, and provided good predictions of the effects of variable CO{sub 2}(g) pressure on Zn sorption and of PO{sub 4} on SeO{sub 3} sorption. The surface-exchange model, combined with sorption constants for other phases, was used to calculate Cd sorption to a hypothetical aquifer material containing a mixture of sorbents. The sorbent concentrations were fixed to those expected in groundwater zones. The multi-sorbent calculation documented the importance of calcite as a sorbent for metallic ions in groundwater.93 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Metal Ions, Not Metal-Catalyzed Oxidative Stress, Cause Clay Leachate Antibacterial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Caitlin C.; Koehl, Jennifer L.; Solanky, Dipesh; Haydel, Shelley E.

    2014-01-01

    Aqueous leachates prepared from natural antibacterial clays, arbitrarily designated CB-L, release metal ions into suspension, have a low pH (3.4–5), generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and H2O2, and have a high oxidation-reduction potential. To isolate the role of pH in the antibacterial activity of CB clay mixtures, we exposed three different strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7 to 10% clay suspensions. The clay suspension completely killed acid-sensitive and acid-tolerant E. coli O157:H7 strains, whereas incubation in a low-pH buffer resulted in a minimal decrease in viability, demonstrating that low pH alone does not mediate antibacterial activity. The prevailing hypothesis is that metal ions participate in redox cycling and produce ROS, leading to oxidative damage to macromolecules and resulting in cellular death. However, E. coli cells showed no increase in DNA or protein oxidative lesions and a slight increase in lipid peroxidation following exposure to the antibacterial leachate. Further, supplementation with numerous ROS scavengers eliminated lipid peroxidation, but did not rescue the cells from CB-L-mediated killing. In contrast, supplementing CB-L with EDTA, a broad-spectrum metal chelator, reduced killing. Finally, CB-L was equally lethal to cells in an anoxic environment as compared to the aerobic environment. Thus, ROS were not required for lethal activity and did not contribute to toxicity of CB-L. We conclude that clay-mediated killing was not due to oxidative damage, but rather, was due to toxicity associated directly with released metal ions. PMID:25502790

  4. Transition metal ions at the crossroads of mucosal immunity and microbial pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Ochoa, Vladimir E.; Jellbauer, Stefan; Klaus, Suzi; Raffatellu, Manuela

    2013-01-01

    Transition metal ions are essential micronutrients for all living organisms. In mammals, these ions are often protein-bound and sequestered within cells, limiting their availability to microbes. Moreover, in response to infection, mammalian hosts further reduce the availability of metal nutrients by activating epithelial cells and recruiting neutrophils, both of which release metal-binding proteins with antimicrobial function. Microorganisms, in turn, have evolved sophisticated systems to overcome these limitations and acquire the metal ions essential for their growth. Here we review some of the mechanisms employed by the host and by pathogenic microorganisms to compete for transition metal ions, with a discussion of how evading “nutritional immunity” benefits pathogens. Furthermore, we provide new insights on the mechanisms of host-microbe competition for metal ions in the mucosa, particularly in the inflamed gut. PMID:24478990

  5. Optical detection of a single rare-earth ion in a crystal

    PubMed Central

    Kolesov, R.; Xia, K.; Reuter, R.; Stöhr, R.; Zappe, A.; Meijer, J.; Hemmer, P.R.; Wrachtrup, J.

    2012-01-01

    Rare-earth-doped laser materials show strong prospects for quantum information storage and processing, as well as for biological imaging, due to their high-Q 4f?4f optical transitions. However, the inability to optically detect single rare-earth dopants has prevented these materials from reaching their full potential. Here we detect a single photostable Pr3+ ion in yttrium aluminium garnet nanocrystals with high contrast photon antibunching by using optical upconversion of the excited state population of the 4f?4f optical transition into ultraviolet fluorescence. We also demonstrate on-demand creation of Pr3+ ions in a bulk yttrium aluminium garnet crystal by patterned ion implantation. Finally, we show generation of local nanophotonic structures and cell death due to photochemical effects caused by upconverted ultraviolet fluorescence of praseodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet in the surrounding environment. Our study demonstrates versatile use of rare-earth atomic-size ultraviolet emitters for nanoengineering and biotechnological applications. PMID:22929786

  6. Laser polarization and phase control of up-conversion fluorescence in rare-earth ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yunhua; Zhang, Shian; Zhang, Hui; Ding, Jingxin; Jia, Tianqing; Qiu, Jianrong; Sun, Zhenrong

    2014-12-01

    We theoretically and experimentally demonstrate the up-conversion fluorescence control via resonance-mediated two-photon absorption in rare-earth ions by varying both the laser polarization and phase. We show that both the laser polarization and phase can control the up-conversion fluorescence, and the up-conversion fluorescence intensity is decreased when the laser polarization changes from linear through elliptical to circular. We also show that the laser polarization will affect the control efficiency of the up-conversion fluorescence by varying the laser phase, and the circular polarization will reduce the control efficiency. Furthermore, we suggest that the control efficiency by varying the laser polarization and the effect of the laser polarization on the control efficiency by varying the laser phase can be artificially manipulated by controlling the laser spectral bandwidth. This optical control method opens a new opportunity to control the up-conversion fluorescence of rare-earth ions, which may have significant impact on the related applications of rare-earth ions.

  7. Some aspects of metallic ion chemistry and dynamics in the mesosphere and thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathews, J. D.

    1987-01-01

    The relationship between the formation of sporadic layers of metallic ion and the dumping of these ions into the upper mesosphere is discussed in terms of the tidal wind, classical (i.e., windshear) and other more complex, perhaps highly nonlinear layer formation mechanisms, and a possible circulation mechanism for these ions. Optical, incoherent scatter radar, rocket, and satellite derived evidence for various layer formation mechanisms and for the metallic ion circulation system is reviewed. The results of simple one dimensional numerical model calculations of sporadic E and intermediate layer formation are presented along with suggestions for more advanced models of intense or blanketing sporadic E. The flux of metallic ions dumped by the tidal wind system into the mesosphere is estimated and compared with estimates of total particle flux of meteoric origin. Possible effects of the metallic ion flux and of meteoric dust on D region ion chemistry are discussed.

  8. Observations of energetic helium ions in the Earth's radiation belts during a sequence of geomagnetic storms

    SciTech Connect

    Spjeldvik, W.N.; Fritz, T.A.

    1981-04-01

    Every year a significant number of magnetic storms disturb the earth's magnetosphere and the trapped particle populations. In this paper, we present observations of energetic (MeV) helium ions made with Explorer 45 during a sequence of magnetic storms during June through December of 1972. The first of these storms started on June 17 and had a Dst index excursion to approx.190 gamma, and the MeV helium ions were perturbed primarily beyond 3 earth radii in the equatorial radiation belts with a typical flux increase of an order of magnitude at L = 4. The second storm period took place during August and was associated with very major solar flare activity. Although the Dst extremum was at best 35 gamma less than the June storm, this period can be characterized as irregular (or multi-storm) with strong compression of the magnetosphere and very large (order of magnitude) MeV helium ion flux enhancements down to Lapprox.2. Following this injection the trapped helium ion fluxes showed positive spectral slope with the peak beyond 3.15 MeV at L = 2.5; and at the lowest observable L shells (Lapprox.2--3) little flux decay (tau>100 days) was seen during the rest of the year. Any effects of two subsequent major magnetic storms in September and November were essentially undetectable in the prolonged after-effect of the August solar flare associated MeV helium ion injection. The helium ion radial profile of the phase space density showed a significant negative slope during this period, and we infer that radial diffusion constitutes a significant loss of helium ions on L shells above Lapprox. =4 during the aftermath of the August 1972 magnetic storm(s).

  9. Selective factor VIII and V inactivation by iminodiacetate ion exchange resin through metal ion adsorption.

    PubMed

    Takeyama, Masahiro; Nogami, Keiji; Okuda, Masahiro; Sakurai, Yoshihiko; Matsumoto, Tomoko; Tanaka, Ichiro; Yoshioka, Akira; Shima, Midori

    2008-09-01

    The procoagulant activity of factors VIII and V depends on the presence of metal ion(s). We examined the effect of cation-exchange resins with different functional groups on both factors, of which only reaction with iminodiacetate resin resulted in the complete loss of their activity levels in plasma. However, the antigen level of factor VIII was preserved by >95%. This resin reduced divalent cations content present in factor VIII preparations, indicating that it inactivated this factor by direct deprivation of predominant Ca(2+) (>Mn(2+)>Cu(2+)), rather than adsorption of the factor itself. The antigen level of recombinant factor VIII alone was decreased by >95% by reaction with resin, whilst that complexed with von Willebrand factor was preserved by >95%. Iminodiacetate resin-treated plasma was evaluated by measuring factor VIII and V activity in plasma with various levels of either activity. These were significantly correlated to the values obtained using factor VIII- or V-deficient plasma prepared commercially by immunodepletion. We demonstrated that iminodiacetate resin-induced factors VIII and V inactivation is because of direct deprivation of metal ions, predominantly Ca(2+), which is more essential for the functional structure of their molecules. Furthermore, iminodiacetate resin-treated plasma would be useful as a substrate for measuring the activity of these factors. PMID:18643923

  10. Process for the displacement of cyanide ions from metal-cyanide complexes

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Barbara F. (Los Alamos, NM); Robinson, Thomas W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to water-soluble polymers and the use of such water-soluble polymers in a process for the displacement of the cyanide ions from the metal ions within metal-cyanide complexes. The process waste streams can include metal-cyanide containing electroplating waste streams, mining leach waste streams, mineral processing waste streams, and related metal-cyanide containing waste streams. The metal ions of interest are metals that give very strong complexes with cyanide, mostly iron, nickel, and copper. The physical separation of the water-soluble polymer-metal complex from the cyanide ions can be accomplished through the use of ultrafiltration. Once the metal-cyanide complex is disrupted, the freed cyanide ions can be recovered for reuse or destroyed using available oxidative processes rendering the cyanide nonhazardous. The metal ions are released from the polymer, using dilute acid, metal ion oxidation state adjustment, or competing chelating agents, and collected and recovered or disposed of by appropriate waste management techniques. The water-soluble polymer can then be recycled. Preferred water-soluble polymers include polyethyleneimine and polyethyleneimine having a catechol or hydroxamate group.

  11. MeRNA: a Database of Metal Ion Binding Sites in RNAStructures

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan, Liliana R.; Zhang, Rui; Levitan, Aaron G.; Hendrix, DonnaF.; Brenner, Steven E.; Holbrook, Stephen R.

    2005-10-05

    Metal ions are essential for the folding of RNA into stable tertiary structures and for the catalytic activity of some RNA enzymes. To aid in the study of the roles of metal ions in RNA structural biology, we have created MeRNA (Metals in RNA), a comprehensive compilation of all metal binding sites identified in RNA three-dimensional structures available from the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and Nucleic Acid Database (NDB). Currently, our database contains information relating to binding of 9764 metal ions corresponding to 23 distinct elements; in 256 RNA structures. The metal ion locations were confirmed and ligands characterized using original literature references. MeRNA includes eight manually identified metal-ion binding motifs, which are described in the literature. MeRNA is searchable by PDB identifier, metal ion, method of structure determination, resolution and R-values for X-ray structure, and distance from metal to any RNA atom or to water. New structures with their respective binding motifs will be added to the database as they become available. The MeRNA database will further our understanding of the roles of metal ions in RNA folding and catalysis and have applications in structural and functional analysis, RNA design and engineering.

  12. MeRNA: a Database of Metal Ion Binding Sites in RNAStructures

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan, Liliana R.; Zhang, Rui; Levitan, Aaron G.; Hendrix, DonnaF.; Brenner, Steven E.; Holbrook, Stephen R.

    2005-10-05

    Metal ions are essential for the folding of RNA into stable tertiary structures and for the catalytic activity of some RNA enzymes. To aid in the study of the roles of metal ions in RNA structural biology, we have created MeRNA (Metals in RNA), a comprehensive compilation of all metal binding sites identified in RNA 3D structures available from the PDB and Nucleic Acid Database. Currently, our database contains information relating to binding of 9764 metal ions corresponding to 23 distinct elements, in 256 RNA structures. The metal ion locations were confirmed and ligands characterized using original literature references. MeRNA includes eight manually identified metal-ion binding motifs, which are described in the literature. MeRNA is searchable by PDB identifier, metal ion, method of structure determination, resolution and R-values for X-ray structure and distance from metal to any RNA atom or to water. New structures with their respective binding motifs will be added to the database as they become available. The MeRNA database will further our understanding of the roles of metal ions in RNA folding and catalysis and have applications in structural and functional analysis, RNA design and engineering. The MeRNA database is accessible at http://merna.lbl.gov.

  13. Columinescence of dye molecules in nanostructures of metal ion complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudar', S. S.; Sveshnikova, E. B.; Ermolaev, V. L.; Mamonchikov, E. V.; Gulyaev, A. V.

    2009-07-01

    The mechanism of columinescence (fluorescence sensitization) of dyes incorporated in nanostructures of metal complexes is studied. It is shown for the first time that the columinescence of dyes is due to the transfer of excitation energy from ligands and metal ions of complexes that form nanostructures. It is proven that the dye columinescence of rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules incorporated into nanostructures of Al(DBM)3phen, Al(DBM) n (OH)6 - 2 n , and Eu(DBM)3phen (DBM is dibenzoylmethane) nanostructures is completely determined by the singlet excitation energy migration from ligands to R6G molecules. It is shown that, at small concentrations of R6G, the R6G columinescence intensity is lower in nanostructures of metal complexes with a high probability of S-T conversion and that this difference disappears at large concentrations of R6G. In the case of Nile blue (whose S 1 level lies below the 5 D 0 level of Eu(III)) incorporated in nanostructures of Eu(DBM)3phen complexes, as well as in nanostructures of Al(DBM)3phen and Gd(DBM)3phen complexes with admixture of Eu complexes, we observed the S-S energy transfer from DBM to NB in addition to the delayed sensitized fluorescence of NB previously observed in nanostructures of Eu complexes, which was caused by the energy transfer from the 5 D 0 level of Eu(III) to NB. At dye concentrations below 100 nM, the efficiency of NB sensitization due to the migration of singlet excitation energy from DBM is lower than in the case of the energy transfer from Eu(III) ions, while, at large concentrations of the dye, the S-S energy transfer successfully competes with the sensitization of NB by Eu(III) ions. The use of dye columinescence makes it possible to easily determine dye concentrations of 2-100 nM in solutions with standard spectrofluorimeters.

  14. Highly Isoselective Coordination Polymerization of ortho-Methoxystyrene with ?-Diketiminato Rare-Earth-Metal Precursors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongtao; Yao, Changguang; Wang, Rong; Wang, Meiyan; Wang, Zichuan; Wu, Chunji; Lin, Fei; Li, Shihui; Wan, Xinhua; Cui, Dongmei

    2015-04-20

    Stereoselective coordination/insertion polymerization of the polar ortho-methoxystyrene has been achieved for the first time by using the cationic ?-diketiminato rare-earth-metal species. High activity and excellent isoselectivity (mmmm>99?%) were acheived. The unmasked Lewis-basic methoxy group does not poison the Lewis-acidic metal center, but instead activates the polymerization through ?-? chelation to the active species together with the vinyl group, thus lower the coordination and activation energies as compared with those of styrene derivatives lacking the methoxy group. PMID:25728133

  15. Solvent extraction of rare-earth metals with bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphinic acid

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yukio Nagaosa; Yao Binghua

    1997-01-01

    The extraction behavior of tervalent rare-earth metals (Ln) using a heptane solution containing bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphinic\\u000a acid (PIA-8, HR) from 0.1?mol\\/dm3 sodium perchlorate media was studied. The pH0.5 values and separation factors obtained were compared among the metals. The stoichiometry of the extracted species and the\\u000a extraction constants for the present aqueous\\/heptane system were determined by slope analysis. It is demonstrated that

  16. Lattice vibrations and electronic transitions in the rare-earth metals: yttrium, gadolinium and lutetium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olijnyk, Helmut

    2005-01-01

    Lattice vibrations in high-pressure phases of Y, Gd and Lu were studied by Raman spectroscopy. The observed phonon frequencies decrease towards the transitions to the dhcp and fcc phases. There is evidence that the entire structural sequence {\\mathrm {hcp \\to Sm\\mbox {-}type \\to dhcp \\to fcc}} under pressure for the individual regular rare-earth metals and along the lanthanide series at ambient pressure involve softening of certain acoustic and optical phonon modes and of the elastic shear modulus C44. Comparison is made to transitions between close-packed lattices in other metals, and possible correlations to s-d electron transfer are discussed.

  17. Lattice vibrations and electronic transitions in the rare-earth metals: yttrium, gadolinium and lutetium.

    PubMed

    Olijnyk, Helmut

    2005-01-12

    Lattice vibrations in high-pressure phases of Y, Gd and Lu were studied by Raman spectroscopy. The observed phonon frequencies decrease towards the transitions to the dhcp and fcc phases. There is evidence that the entire structural sequence [Formula: see text] under pressure for the individual regular rare-earth metals and along the lanthanide series at ambient pressure involve softening of certain acoustic and optical phonon modes and of the elastic shear modulus C(44). Comparison is made to transitions between close-packed lattices in other metals, and possible correlations to s-d electron transfer are discussed. PMID:21690667

  18. Polymer hybrid thin films based on rare earth ion-functionalized MOF: photoluminescence tuning and sensing as a thermometer.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiang; Yan, Bing

    2015-01-28

    A series of photofunctional polymer hybrid thin films based on rare earth ion functionalized metal organic frameworks (MOFs, 1 for zinc complexes bio-MOF-1 (Zn8(ad)4(BPDC)6O·2Me2NH2) and 2 for rare earth complexes RE(BPDC)(Ad) (BPDC = biphenyl-4,4'-dicarboxylic acid, Ad = adenine) have been prepared via polymerization reaction of ethyl methacrylate (EMA) and 4-vinylpyridine (VPD). The as-obtained hybrid films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, FT-IR, and SEM, especially for the luminescence performance and sensing ability. These hybrid polymer thin films are dense and transparent and display multi-colors, including blue, red and blue-green. Among them, Y0.9Tb0.0999Eu(0.0001)-2 fabricated hybrid thin film displays a white light output. More significantly and interestingly, the Tb0.999Eu(0.001)-2 fabricated hybrid thin film can be used as luminescent ratiometric thermometer based on the energy transfer from Tb(3+) to Eu(3+), whose color will change from blue-green to pink from 100 K to 320 K. PMID:25485621

  19. High-temperature electrical resistivity of rare-earth metals with variable valence

    SciTech Connect

    Povzner, A.A.; Abel'skii, S.S.

    1986-11-01

    The electrical resistivity of compounds of rare-earth metals at high temperatures is calculated on the basis of allowance for the background mechanism of scattering and the hybridization of local electron states with the states of conduction electrons. An analytic expression is obtained for resistivity in a strong hybridization approximation. It follows from the expression that electrical resistivity may have a negative temperature coefficient within a broad range of high temperatures. The use of a three-band (s, d, f) model makes it possible to explain experimental data on the resistivity of certain rare-earth metals, particularly the connection between the sign of the temperature coefficient of electrical resistivity and the curvature of the relation (T).

  20. Analysis of data on the densities of liquid rare-earth metals from thermodynamic parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Kiselev, A.I.; Kononenko, V.I.

    1987-05-01

    Calculations have been performed on the pseudopotential parameters and packing coefficients in hard-sphere reference system for rare-earth metals near their melting points on the basis of minimum Helmholz free energy if the calculated and observed values for the resistivity agree. The results have been used in calculating the thermodynamic parameters in the liquid state. Theory is in satisfactory agreement with experiment. A method is proposed for analyzing measurements on the temperature coefficient of the density, where there are sometimes substantial differences in the data. Calculated values for the thermodynamic parameters have been used in examining the reliability of the data on the temperature coefficients of density for rare-earth metals; recommendations are made.