Science.gov

Sample records for earth probe toms

  1. Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) Derived Data, Global Earth Coverage (GEC) from NASA's Earth Probe Satellite

    DOE Data Explorer

    This is data from an external datastream processed through the ARM External Data Center (XDC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The XDC identifies sources and acquires data, called "external data", to augment the data being generated within the ARM program. The external data acquired are usually converted from native format to either netCDF or HDF formats. The GEC collection contains global data derived from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instrument on the Earth Probe satellite, consisting of daily values of aerosol index, ozone and reflectivity remapped into a regular 1x1.25 deg grid. Data are available from July 25, 1996 - December 31, 2005, but have been updated or replaced as of September 2007. See the explanation on the ARM web site at http://www.arm.gov/xds/static/toms.stm and the information at the NASA/TOMS web site: http://toms.gsfc.nasa.gov/ (Registration required)

  2. Earth Probe Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) Data Product User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPeters, R.; Bhartia, P. K.; Krueger, A.; Herman, J.; Wellemeyer, C.; Seftor, C.; Jaross, G.; Torres, O.; Moy, L.; Labow, G.; Byerly, W.; Taylor, S.; Swissler, T.; Cebula, R.

    1998-01-01

    Two data products from the Earth Probe Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (EP/TOMS) have been archived at the Distributed Active Archive Center, in the form of Hierarchical Data Format files. The EP/ TOMS began taking measurements on July 15, 1996. The instrument measures backscattered Earth radiance and incoming solar irradiance; their ratio is used in ozone retrievals. Changes in the reflectivity of the solar diffuser used for the irradiance measurement are monitored using a carousel of three diffusers, each exposed to the degrading effects of solar irradiation at different rates. The algorithm to retrieve total column ozone compares measured Earth radiances at sets of three wavelengths with radiances calculated for different total ozone values. The initial error in the absolute scale for TOMS total ozone is 3 percent, the one standard deviation random error is 2 percent, and the drift is less than 0.5 percent over the first year of data. The Level-2 product contains the measured radiances, the derived total ozone amount, and reflectivity information for each scan position. The Level-3 product contains daily total ozone and reflectivity in a 1-degree latitude by 1.25 degrees longitude grid. Level-3 files containing estimates of LTVB at the Earth surface and tropospheric aerosol information are also available, Detailed descriptions of both HDF data-files and the CD-ROM product are provided.

  3. Contingency maneuver strategies for the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer-Earth Probe (TOMS-EP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kestler, James; Walls, Donna

    1995-01-01

    The Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer-Earth Probe (TOMS-EP) is a polar-orbiting spacecraft designed to measure total ozone levels in the Earth's atmosphere. The nominal mission orbit is a 955-kilometer circular Sun-synchronous orbit with an ascending node mean local crossing time (MLT) between 11:02 a.m. and 11:25 a.m. These two mean local ascending node times constitute the boundaries of the MLT box for this mission. The MLT boundaries were chosen to maintain the Sun-to-Earth-to-vehicle orbit-normal (SVN) angle within a preselected set of seasonally independent boundaries. Because the SVN angle is seasonally dependent, but the MLT is not, contingency options for correcting the MLT of orbital states that fall outside of the required MLT range become time dependent. This paper focuses on contingency orbit adjustment strategies developed at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Flight Dynamics Division (FDD) during the mission planning phase of TOMS-EP. Time-dependent delta-V strategies are presented for correcting mission orbit states lying outside of the MLT range. Typically, passive control of the MLT drift rate can be used to restore the orbit state to the required MLT before a seasonal violation of SVN angle constraints can occur. Passive control of the MLT drift rate is obtained through adjustment of the semimajor axis and/or the inclination. The time between initial arrival on orbit at an 'out-of-the box' MLT state and violation of the SVN angle constraints is always less than or equal to 1 year. The choice of which parameter(s) to adjust is dictated by the duration of this time period, the desired mission lifetime, the delta-V cost, and operational constraints.

  4. Tropical Tropospheric Ozone (TTO) Maps from Nimbus 7 and Earth-Probe TOMS by the Modified-Residual Method. 1; Validation, Evaluation and Trends based on Atlantic Regional Time Series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Anne M.; Hudson, Robert D.

    1998-01-01

    The well-known wave-one pattern seen in tropical total ozone [Shiotani, 1992; Ziemke et al., 1996, 1998] has been used to develop a modified-residual (MR) method for retrieving time-averaged stratospheric ozone and tropospheric ozone column amount from TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) over the 14 complete calendar years of Nimbus 7 observations (1979-1992) and from TOMS on the Earth-Probe (1996-present) and ADEOS platforms (1996- 1997). Nine- to sixteen-day averaged tropical tropospheric ozone (TTO) maps, validated with ozonesondes, show a seasonality expected from dynamical and chemical influences. The maps may be viewed on a homepage: http://metosrv2.umd.edu/tropo. Stratospheric column ozone, which is also derived by the modified-residual method, compares well with sondes (to within 6-7 DU) and with stratospheric ozone column derived from other satellites (within 8-10 DU). Validation of the TTO time-series is presently limited to ozonesonde comparisons with Atlantic stations and sites on the adjacent continents (Ascension Island, Natal, Brazil; Brazzaville); for the sounding periods, TTO at all locations agrees with the sonde record to +/-7 DU. TTO time-series and the magnitude of the wave-one pattern show ENSO signals in the strongest El Nifio periods from 1979-1998. From 12degN and 12degS, zonally averaged tropospheric ozone shows no significant trend from 1980-1990. Trends are also not significant during this period in localized regions, e.g. from just west of South America across to southern Africa. This is consistent with the ozonesonde record at Natal, Brazil (the only tropical ozone data publicly available for the 1980's), which shows a not statistically significant increase. The lack of trend in tropospheric ozone agrees with a statistical analysis based on another method for deriving TTO from TOMS, the so-called Convective-Cloud-Differential approach of Ziemke et al. [1998].

  5. Contribution of TOMS to Earth Science - An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhartia, P. K.

    2003-12-01

    The TOMS instrument was launched on the Nimbus-7 satellite in Oct 1978 with the goal of understanding the meteorological influences on the ozone column. The nominal lifetime of the instrument was 1 year. However, in response to the concern over possible man-made influences on the ozone layer NASA continued to nurse the instrument for 13.5 years and launched a major program to produce accurate trend quality dataset of ozone. Despite severe optical degradation and other significant anomalies that developed in the instrument over its lifetime, the effort turned out to be a tremendous success. In 1984, TOMS took center stage as the primary provider of Antarctic ozone hole maps to the world community; it continues to play that role until today. An unexpected benefit of the close attention paid to improving the TOMS data quality was that several atmospheric constituents that interfere with ozone measurement were also identified and meticulously converted into long-term datasets of their own. These constituents include clouds, volcanic SO2, aerosols, and ocean phytoplankton. In addition, the high quality of the basic datasets made it possible to produce global maps of surface UV and tropospheric ozone. In most cases there are no other sources of these data sets. Advanced UV instruments currently under development in the US and Europe will continue to exploit the TOMS-developed techniques for several decades.

  6. Contribution of TOMS to Earth Science- An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhartia, P. K.

    2004-01-01

    The TOMS instrument was launched on the Nimbus-7 satellite in Oct 1978 with the goal of understanding the meteorological influences on the ozone column. The nominal lifetime of the instrument was 1 year. However, in response to the concern over possible man-made influences on the ozone layer NASA continued to nurse the instrument for 13.5 years and launched a major program to produce accurate trend quality dataset of ozone. Despite severe optical degradation and other significant anomalies that developed in the instrument over its lifetime, the effort turned out to be a tremendous success. In 1984, TOMS took center stage as the primary provider of Antarctic ozone hole maps to the world community; it continues to play that role until today. An unexpected benefit of the close attention paid to improving the TOMS data quality was that several atmospheric constituents that interfere with ozone measurement were also identified and meticulously converted into long-term datasets of their own. These constituents include clouds, volcanic S02, aerosols, and ocean phytoplankton. In addition, the high quality of the basic datasets made it possible to produce global maps of surface UV and tropospheric ozone. In most cases there are no other sources of these data sets. Advanced UV instruments currently under development in the US and Europe will continue to exploit the TOMS-developed techniques for several decades.

  7. Data Validation for Earth Probe-Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, John L.

    1995-01-01

    This presentation represents the final report for the NASA grant project. The goal of this project was to provide scientific analysis to aid in validation fo data sets used in detection of long term global trends of total ozone. Ozone data from the Earth Probe Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer instrument was compared for validation purposes with features in previous TOMS data. Atmospheric dynamic concepts were used in the analysis. The publications sponsored by the grant are listed along with abstracts.

  8. Direct Communication to Earth from Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolton, Scott J.; Folkner, William M.; Abraham, Douglas S.

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on outer planetary probe communications to Earth is shown. The topics include: 1) Science Rational for Atmospheric Probes to the Outer Planets; 2) Controlling the Scientific Appetite; 3) Learning more about Jupiter before we send more probes; 4) Sample Microwave Scan From Juno; 5) Jupiter s Deep Interior; 6) The Square Kilometer Array (SKA): A Breakthrough for Radio Astronomy; 7) Deep Space Array-based Network (DSAN); 8) Probe Direct-to-Earth Data Rate Calculations; 9) Summary; and 10) Enabling Ideas.

  9. Small-Scale Tropopause Dynamics and TOMS Total Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, John L.

    2002-01-01

    This project used Earth Probe Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (EP TOMS) along-track ozone retrievals, in conjunction with ancillary meteorological fields and modeling studies, for high resolution investigations of upper troposphere and lower stratosphere dynamics. Specifically, high resolution along-track (Level 2) EP TOMS data were used to investigate the beautiful fine-scale structure in constituent and meteorological fields prominent in the evolution of highly non-linear baroclinic storm systems. Comparison was made with high resolution meteorological models. The analyses provide internal consistency checks and validation of the EP TOMS data which are vital for monitoring ozone depletion in both polar and midlatitude regions.

  10. The Antarctic Ozone Hole: Initial Results from Aura / OMI Compared with TOMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPeters, R.; Bhartia, P. K.; Newman, P.

    2004-01-01

    A series of TOMS instruments (on November 7 , Meteor 3, and Earth Probe) has been monitoring the annual development of the Antarctic ozone hole since the 1980s. The ozone mapping instrument on Aura, OMI, is expected to take over this record of observation from the aging Earth Probe TOMS instrument. The area of the ozone hole can be taken as a sensitive indicator of the magnitude of ozone destruction each year. The timing of initial formation of the ozone hole and its duration are sensitive to the atmospheric dynamics of the southern polar regions. The entire TOMS data record (1978 - 2004) has recently been reprocessed with the new version 8 algorithm, which includes a revised calibration. The effect has been to slightly increase ozone hole area over earlier estimates, but only by 23%. OMI (ozone monitoring instrument) on Aura is a hyperspectral imaging instrument that operates in a pushbroom mode to measure solar backscattered radiation in the ultraviolet and visible. OMI has higher spatial resolution than TOMS - 14 x 24 km versus 38 km x 38 km from TOMS. OMI has now begin mapping total column ozone on a global basis in a measurement similar to TOMS. The ozone hole measurements for 2003 are compared with those from Earth Probe TOMS.

  11. A Comparison of TOMS Version 8 Total Column Ozone Data with Data from Groundstations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labow, G. J.; McPeters, R. D.; Bhartia, P. K.

    2004-01-01

    The Nimbus-7 and Earth Probe Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) data have been reprocessed with a new retrieval algorithm, (Version 8) and an updated calibration procedure. These data have been systematically compared to total ozone data from Brewer and Dobson spectrophotometers for 73 individual ground stations. The comparisons were made as a function of latitude, solar zenith angle, reflectivity and total ozone. Results show that the accuracy of the TOMS retrieval'is much improved when aerosols are present in the atmosphere, when snow/ice and sea glint are present, and when ozone in the northern hemisphere is extremely low. TOMS overpass data are derived from the single TOMS best match measurement, almost always located within one degree of the ground station and usually made within an hour of local noon. The version 8 Earth Probe TOMS ozone values have decreased by an average of about 1% due to a much better understanding of the calibration of the instrument. The remaining differences between TOMS and ground stations suggest that there are still small errors in the TOMS retrievals. But if TOMS is used as a transfer standard to compare ground stations, the large station-to-station differences suggest the possibility of significant instrument errors at some ground stations.

  12. Twenty five years of TOMS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, A.

    The Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) was conceived as a satellite instrument to measure the contiguous, daily, global horizontal distribution of the total ozone field. Prior information about spatial variations in total ozone from the Dobson spectrophotometer network was limited by station density and calibration errors. TOMS uses the methods of UV radiative transfer and retrieval pioneered by J.V. Dave and C.L. Mateer and an instrument design patterned after the Nimbus 4 BUV, developed by D.F. Heath. The first TOMS was launched on Nimbus 7 in October 1978 and continued to take data for 14.5 years. The data record was extended to the present with new launches in 1991on Meteor-3, and in 1996 on ADEOS I and Earth Probe spacecraft. The TOMS ozone data precision is comparable to Dobson spectrophotometers. Thus, it became possible to observe the full effect of meteorological processes on total ozone. TOMS is noted for its images of the Antarctic Ozone Hole that when combined with ozone trend data from TOMS, persuaded the public of the damaging effects of CFC's on ozone, thus leading to the Montreal Protocol. The ozone trends from TOMS are accepted as definitive due, in part, to the lack of sampling error in its global coverage. TOMS' contiguous spatial coverage produced unexpected products, namely images of sulfur dioxide clouds from volcanic eruptions and maps of absorbing aerosol clouds. A 25-year inventory of SO2 from all eruption sizes greater than 10 ktons is now available. Aerosols are measured over land and ocean by contrast with Rayleigh scattering. Thus, dust clouds from African and Asian deserts can now be tracked from their sources and smoke from fires identified as it is lofted to the free troposphere. Another important product from TOMS is tropospheric ozone, inferred by subtracting the stratospheric overburden measured by other instruments, such as SBUV or MLS, from the total ozone. This permits ozone from air pollution or from biomass

  13. Tom Finery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverstein, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    It is always interesting to observe a wide range of creative results when students begin a project with the same subject and materials. The lesson described in this article on stitching challenges students to design a turkey on burlap using colorful yarns and a small variety of materials. Each feathered Tom emerges with a unique personality, which…

  14. Deep drilling; Probing beneath the earth's surface

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, J.250

    1991-06-01

    This paper reports on boreholes from 4.5 to greater than 10 kilometers deep that are pushing back the boundaries of earth science as they yield information that is used to refine seismic surveys, chart the evolution of sedimentary basins and shield volcanos, and uncover important clues on the origin and migration of mantle-derived water and gas.

  15. Electromagnetic wave probing of Earth's environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kong, Jin AU

    1988-01-01

    Polarimetric radar backscattering from anisotropic Earth terrain such as snow-covered ice fields and vegetation fields with row structures provides a challenging modeling problem from the electromagnetic wave point of view. Earth terrain covers are modeled as random media characterized by different dielectric constants and correlation functions. A three-layer model will be used to simulate a vegetation field or a snow-covered ice field with the top layer being snow or leaves, the middle layer being ice of trunks, and the bottom layer being sea water or ground. The volume scattering effects of snow-covered sea ice are studied with a three-layer random medium model for microwave remote sensing. The strong fluctuation theory and the bilocal approximation are applied to calculate the effective permittivities for snow and sea ice. The wave scattering theory in conjunction with the distorted Born approximation is then used to compute bistatic coefficients and backscattering cross sections. Theoretical results are illustrated by matching experimental data for dry snow-covered thick first-year sea ice at Point Barrow. The results derived can also be applied to the passive remote sensing by calculating the emissivity from the bistatic scattering coefficients.

  16. Merged Long-Term Data Sets from TOMS and SBUV Total Ozone Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, Richard; McPeters, Richard; Labow, Gordon J.; Hollandsworth, Stacey; Flynn, Larry; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Total ozone has been measured by a series of nadir-viewing satellite instruments. These measurements begin with the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) and Solar Backscatter UltraViolet (SBUV) instruments on Nimbus 7, launched in late 1978. The measurements have continued with the Meteor 3 TOMS, Earth Probe TOMS, and NOAA 9,11,14 SBUV/2 instruments. The problem for producing a long-term data set is establishing the relative calibration of the various instruments to better than 1%. There was a nearly two year gap between the Meteor 3 TOMS and the Earth Probe TOMS. This gap is filled by the NOAA 9 and 11 SBUV/2 instruments, but they were in drifting orbits that result in effective gaps in the record when the equator crossing time occurs at large solar zenith angle. We have used recently re-derived calibrations of the SBUV instruments using the D-pair (306/313 nm wavelengths) data at the equator. These equatorial D-pair measurements should maintain the internal calibration of each instrument better than previous approaches. We then use the comparisons between instruments during their overlap periods to establish a consistent calibration over the entire data set. The resulting merged ozone data set is independent of the ground-based Dobson/Brewer network.

  17. TOMS Tropical Tropospheric Ozone Data Sets at the University of Maryland Website

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kochhar, A. K.; Thompson, A. M.; Hudson, R. D.; Frolov, A. D.; Witte, J. C.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Since 1997, shortly after the launch of the Earth-Probe TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) satellite instrument, we have been processing data in near-real time to post maps of tropical tropospheric ozone at a website: metosrv2.umd.edu/-tropo. Daily, 3-day and 9-day averages of tropical tropospheric ozone column depth (TTO) are viewable from 10N to 10S. Data can be downloaded (running 9-day means) from 20N-30S. Pollution events are trackable along with dynamically-induced variations in tropospheric ozone column. TOMS smoke aerosol (toms.gsfc.nasa.gov) can be used to interpret biomass burning ozone, as for example, during the extreme ozone and smoke pollution period during the ENSO-related fires of August November 1997. During that time plumes of ozone and smoke were frequently decoupled and ozone from Indonesian fires and from Africa merged in one large feature by late October 1997. In addition to the Earth-Probe TOMS record, data as half-month averages and as daily 9-day means from the Nimbus 7 TOMS instrument are at the metosrv2.umd.edu/-tropo website. A guide to the website and examples of ozone time-series and maps will be shown.

  18. Comparison of TOMS, SBW & SBUV/2 Version 8 Total Column Ozone Data with Data from Groundstations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labow, G. J.; McPeters, R. D.; Bhartia, P. K.

    2004-01-01

    The Nimbus-7 and Earth Probe Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) data as well as SBUV and SBUV/2 data have been reprocessed with a new retrieval algorithm (Version 8) and an updated calibration procedure. An overview will be presented systematically comparing ozone values to an ensemble of Brewer and Dobson spectrophotometers. The comparisons were made as a function of latitude, solar zenith angle, reflectivity and total ozone. Results show that the accuracy of the TOMS retrieval has been improved when aerosols are present in the atmosphere, when snow/ice and sea glint are present, and when ozone in the northern hemisphere is extremely low. TOMS overpass data are derived from the single TOMS best match measurement, almost always located within one degree of the ground station and usually made within an hour of local noon. The Version 8 Earth Probe TOMS ozone values have decreased by an average of about 1% due to a much better understanding of the calibration of the instrument. N-7 SBUV as well as the series of NOAA SBUV/2 column ozone values have also been processed with the Version 8 algorithm and have been compared to values from an ensemble of groundstations. Results show that the SBW column ozone values agree well with the groundstations and the datasets are useful for trend studies.

  19. The Tom Core Complex

    PubMed Central

    Ahting, Uwe; Thun, Clemens; Hegerl, Reiner; Typke, Dieter; Nargang, Frank E.; Neupert, Walter; Nussberger, Stephan

    1999-01-01

    Translocation of nuclear-encoded preproteins across the outer membrane of mitochondria is mediated by the multicomponent transmembrane TOM complex. We have isolated the TOM core complex of Neurospora crassa by removing the receptors Tom70 and Tom20 from the isolated TOM holo complex by treatment with the detergent dodecyl maltoside. It consists of Tom40, Tom22, and the small Tom components, Tom6 and Tom7. This core complex was also purified directly from mitochondria after solubilization with dodecyl maltoside. The TOM core complex has the characteristics of the general insertion pore; it contains high-conductance channels and binds preprotein in a targeting sequence-dependent manner. It forms a double ring structure that, in contrast to the holo complex, lacks the third density seen in the latter particles. Three-dimensional reconstruction by electron tomography exhibits two open pores traversing the complex with a diameter of ∼2.1 nm and a height of ∼7 nm. Tom40 is the key structural element of the TOM core complex. PMID:10579717

  20. Geo-Neutrinos as Probes for Deep Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavatarelli, Sandra

    2015-03-01

    The knowledge of the radiogenic heat contribution to the total Earth surface heat flux is essential to understand processes such as the plate tectonics, the mantle convection, the geo-dynamo as well as the Earth formation itself. The electron antineutrinos released in the decays of radioactive elements inside the Earth are unique probes to constrain this quantity since their fluxes are in a well fixed ratio with the total mass of radiogenic heat producing elements (HPE). The geo-neutrino signal has now been robustly detected (at ˜4.8σ C.L.) by two experiments, KamLAND in Japan and Borexino in Italy and a new generation of scintillator detectors having geo-neutrinos among their goals is incoming. The status-of-art in this field is overviewed and the future perspectives discussed.

  1. Combined Characterisation of GOME and TOMS Total Ozone Using Ground-Based Observations from the NDSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, J.-C.; VanRoozendael, M.; Simon, P. C.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Goutail, F.; Andersen, S. B.; Arlander, D. W.; BuiVan, N. A.; Claude, H.; deLaNoee, J.; DeMaziere, M.; Dorokhov, V.; Eriksen, P.; Gleason, J. F.; Tornkvist, K. Karlsen; Hoiskar, B. A. Kastad; Kyroe, E.; Leveau, J.; Merienne, M.-F.; Milinevsky, G.

    1998-01-01

    Several years of total ozone measured from space by the ERS-2 GOME, the Earth Probe Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), and the ADEOS TOMS, are compared with high-quality ground-based observations associated with the Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Change (NDSC), over an extended latitude range and a variety of geophysical conditions. The comparisons with each spaceborne sensor are combined altogether for investigating their respective solar zenith angle (SZA) dependence, dispersion, and difference of sensitivity. The space- and ground-based data are found to agree within a few percent on average. However, the analysis highlights for both Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) and TOMS several sources of discrepancies, including a dependence on the SZA at high latitudes and internal inconsistencies.

  2. Probing the Compositions of Two Habitable Zone Super-Earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benneke, Bjorn; Knutson, Heather; Crossfield, Ian; Deck, Katherine; Greene, Tom; Rogers, Leslie; Vanderburg, Andrew; Barman, Travis; Morley, Caroline; Lothringer, Josh; Werner, Michael; Beichman, Charles

    2015-10-01

    The recent discovery of two super-Earths orbiting in the habitable zones of nearby M stars have provided us with an unprecedented new opportunity to characterize the properties of small and potentially habitable planets outside of the solar system. Here, we propose to probe their atmospheric compositions, search for escaping hydrogen, and obtain the first bulk mass and densities estimate of a habitable zone super-Earth. The proposed observations will complement our approved HST WFC3 observations of K2-18b (15-orbits, GO13665, PI Benneke) as well as the approved HST STIS/MAMA observations of K2-18b by PI Ehrenreich. These observations will determine whether or not these two planets have primarily rocky or volatile-rich compositions, and in the volatile-rich case would enable the first studies of atmospheric chemistry in this regime. Mass loss also plays a critical role in the evolution of hydrogen-rich atmospheres on small planets, and our obsevations will provide the first constraints on the stability of these atmospheres.

  3. Probing the Earth's core with magnetic field observations from Swarm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlay, Christopher; Olsen, Nils; Kotsiaros, Stavros; Gillet, Nicolas; Tøffner-Clausen, Lars

    2016-07-01

    By far the largest part of the Earth's magnetic field is generated by motions taking place within our planet's liquid metal outer core. Variations of this core-generated field thus provide a unique means of probing the dynamics taking place in the deepest reaches of the Earth. In this contribution we present a new high resolution model of the core-generated magnetic field, and its recent time changes, derived from a dataset that includes more two years of observations from the Swarm mission. Resulting inferences regarding the underlying core flow, its dynamics, and the nature of the geodynamo process will be discussed. The CHAOS-6 geomagnetic field model, covering the interval 1999-2016, is derived from magnetic data collected by the three Swarm missions, as well as the earlier CHAMP and Oersted satellites, and monthly means data collected from 160 ground observatories. Advantage is taken of the constellation aspect of the Swarm mission by ingesting both scalar and vector field differences along-track and across track between the lower pair of Swarm satellites. The internal part of the model consists of a spherical harmonic (SH) expansion, time-dependent for degrees 20 and below. The model coefficients are estimated using a regularized, iteratively reweighted, least squares scheme involving Huber weights. At Earth's surface, CHAOS-6 shows evidence for positive acceleration of the field intensity in 2015 over a broad area around longitude 90deg E that is also seen at ground observatories such as Novosibirsk. At the core surface, we are able to map the secular variation (linear trend in the magnetic field) up to SH degree 16. The radial field acceleration at the core surface in 2015 is found be largest at low latitudes under the India-South East Asia region and under the region of northern South America, as well as at high northern latitudes under Alaska and Siberia. Surprisingly, there is also evidence for some acceleration in the central Pacific region, for example

  4. The Recovery of TOMS-EP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Brent; Sabelhaus, Phil; Mendenhall, Todd; Fesq, Lorraine

    1998-01-01

    On December 13th 1998, the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer - Earth Probe (TOMS-EP) spacecraft experienced a Single Event Upset which caused the system to reconfigure and enter a Safe Mode. This incident occurred two and a half years after the launch of the spacecraft which was designed for a two year life. A combination of factors, including changes in component behavior due to age and extended use, very unfortunate initial conditions and the safe mode processing logic prevented the spacecraft from entering its nominal long term storage mode. The spacecraft remained in a high fuel consumption mode designed for temporary use. By the time the onboard fuel was exhausted, the spacecraft was Sun pointing in a high rate flat spin. Although the uncontrolled spacecraft was initially in a power and thermal safe orientation, it would not stay in this state indefinitely due to a slow precession of its momentum vector. A recovery team was immediately assembled to determine if there was time to develop a method of despinning the vehicle and return it to normal science data collection. A three stage plan was developed that used the onboard magnetic torque rods as actuators. The first stage was designed to reduce the high spin rate to within the linear range of the gyros. The second stage transitioned the spacecraft from sun pointing to orbit reference pointing. The final stage returned the spacecraft to normal science operation. The entire recovery scenario was simulated with a wide range of initial conditions to establish the expected behavior. The recovery sequence was started on December 28th 1998 and completed by December 31st. TOMS-EP was successfully returned to science operations by the beginning of 1999. This paper describes the TOMS-EP Safe Mode design and the factors which led to the spacecraft anomaly and loss of fuel. The recovery and simulation efforts are described. Flight data are presented which show the performance of the spacecraft during its return to science

  5. Assembly of Tom6 and Tom7 into the TOM core complex of Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Dembowski, M; Kunkele, K P; Nargang, F E; Neupert, W; Rapaport, D

    2001-05-25

    Translocation of preproteins across the mitochondrial outer membrane is mediated by the translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM) complex. We report the molecular identification of Tom6 and Tom7, two small subunits of the TOM core complex in the fungus Neurospora crassa. Cross-linking experiments showed that both proteins were found to be in direct contact with the major component of the pore, Tom40. In addition, Tom6 was observed to interact with Tom22 in a manner that depends on the presence of preproteins in transit. Precursors of both proteins are able to insert into the outer membrane in vitro and are assembled into authentic TOM complexes. The insertion pathway of these proteins shares a common binding site with the general import pathway as the assembly of both Tom6 and Tom7 was competed by a matrix-destined precursor protein. This assembly was dependent on the integrity of receptor components of the TOM machinery and is highly specific as in vitro-synthesized yeast Tom6 was not assembled into N. crassa TOM complex. The targeting and assembly information within the Tom6 sequence was found to be located in the transmembrane segment and a flanking segment toward the N-terminal, cytosolic side. A hybrid protein composed of the C-terminal domain of yeast Tom6 and the cytosolic domain of N. crassa Tom6 was targeted to the mitochondria but was not taken up into TOM complexes. Thus, both segments are required for assembly into the TOM complex. A model for the topogenesis of the small Tom subunits is discussed. PMID:11278536

  6. Tropical Tropospheric Ozone: A Multi-Satellite View From TOMS and Other Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Anne M.; Hudson, Robert D.; Guo, Hua; Witte, Jacquelyn C.; Kucsera, Tom L.; Seybold, Matthew G.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    New tropospheric ozone and aerosol products from the TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) satellite instrument can resolve episodic pollution events in the tropics and interannual and seasonal variability. Modified-residual (MR) Nimbus 7 tropical tropospheric ozone (TTO), two maps/month (1979-1992, 1-deg latitude by 2-deg longitude) within the region in which total ozone displays a tropical wave-one pattern (maximum 20S to 20N), are available in digital form at http://metosrv2.umd.edu/tropo. Also available are preliminary 1996-1999 MR-TTO maps based on real-time Earth-Probe (EP)/TOMS observations. Examples of applications are given.

  7. Earth-Based Radio Tracking of the Galileo Probe for Jupiter Wind Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folkner, W. M.; Preston, R. A.; Border, J. S.; Navarro, J.; Wilson, W. E.; Oestreich, M.

    1997-01-01

    Although the Galileo probe was designed to communicate only to the orbiter, the probe radio signal was detected at two Earth-based radio observatories where the signal was a billion times weaker. The measured signal frequency was used to derive a vertical profile of the jovian zonal wind speed. Due to the mission geometry, the Earth-based wind estimates are less sensitive to descent trajectory errors than estimates based on probe-orbiter Doppler measurements. The two estimates of wind profiles agree qualitatively; both show high wind speeds at all depths sampled.

  8. Earth-Based Radio Tracking of the Galileo Probe for Jupiter Wind Estimation

    PubMed

    Folkner; Preston; Border; Navarro; Wilson; Oestreich

    1997-01-31

    Although the Galileo probe was designed to communicate only to the orbiter, the probe radio signal was detected at two Earth-based radio observatories where the signal was a billion times weaker. The measured signal frequency was used to derive a vertical profile of the jovian zonal wind speed. Due to the mission geometry, the Earth-based wind estimates are less sensitive to descent trajectory errors than estimates based on probe-orbiter Doppler measurements. The two estimates of wind profiles agree qualitatively; both show high wind speeds at all depths sampled. PMID:9005845

  9. Depth Probing Soft X-ray Microprobe (DPSXRM) for High Resolution Probing of Earth's Microstructural Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikedi, P. N.

    2015-12-01

    The Cambrian explosion; occurrence of landslides in very dry weather conditions; rockslides; dead, shriveled-up and crumbled leaves possessing fossil records with the semblance of well preserved, flat leaves; abundance of trilobite tracks in lower and higher rock layers; and sailing stones are enigmas demanding demystifications. These enigmas could be elucidated when data on soil structure, texture and strength are provided by some device with submicrometre accuracy; for these and other reasons, the design of a Depth Probing Soft X-ray Microprobe (DPSXRM), is being proposed; it is expected to deliver soft X-rays, at spatial resolution, ϛ≥600nm and to probe at the depth of 0.5m in 17s. The microprobe is portable compared to a synchrotron radiation facility (Diamond Light Source has land size of 43,300m2); spatial resolution,ϛ , of the DPSXRM surpasses those of the X-ray Fluorescence microanalysis (10µm), electron microprobe (1-3µm) and ion microprobe (5->30µm); the DPSXRM has allowance for multiple targets. Vanadium and Manganese membranes are proposed owing to respective 4.952KeV VKα1 and 5.899KeV MnKα1 X-rays emitted, which best suits micro-probing of Earth's microstructural samples. Compound systems like the Kirk-Patrick and Baez and Wolter optics, aspheric mirrors like elliptical and parabolic optics, small apertures and Abbe sine condition are employed to reduce or remove astigmatism, obliquity, comatic and spherical aberrations—leading to good image quality. Results show that 5.899KeV MnKα1 and 4.952KeV VKα1 soft X-rays will travel a distance of 2.75mm to form circular patches of radii 2.2mm and 2.95mm respectively. Zone plate with nth zone radius of 1.5mm must be positioned 1.5mm and 2mm from the electron gun if circular patches must be formed from 4.952KeV VKα1 and 5.899KeV MnKα1 soft X-rays respectively. The focal lengths of 0.25μm≤ƒ≤1.50μm and 0.04μm≤ƒ≤0.2μm covered by 4.952KeV VKα1 and 5.899KeV Mn Kα1 soft X-Rays, will

  10. Probing iron at Super-Earth core conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Amadou, N.; Brambrink, E.; Vinci, T.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Huser, G.; Brygoo, S.; Morard, G.; Guyot, F.; Resseguier, T. de; Mazevet, S.; Miyanishi, K.; Ozaki, N.; Kodama, R.; Henry, O.; Raffestin, D.; Boehly, T.; and others

    2015-02-15

    In this paper, we report on the quasi-isentropic compression of an iron sample using ramp shaped laser irradiation. This technique allows us to quasi-isentropically compress iron up to 700 GPa and 8500 K. To our knowledge, these data are the highest pressures reached on iron in off-Hugoniot conditions and the closest to the thermodynamic states thought to exist in Earth-like planetary cores. The experiment was performed on the Ligne d'Intégration laser facility at CESTA, Bordeaux, France.

  11. Probing Geomagnetic Jerks combining Geomagnetic and Earth Rotation Observations (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holme, R. T.; de Viron, O.

    2013-12-01

    Geomagnetic jerks, first observed in the late 1970s, are the most rapid variations in the observed geomagnetic field that are believed to be of internal origin. Their occurence has been correlated with a number of different geophysical phenomena. Here we consider simultaneous features in variations in Earth's length of day. Recently, we have provided a simple description of non-atmospheric variations in length of day (LOD), consisting of 3 components: a slowly varying decadal trend, a 5.9-year oscillation, and occasional sudden jumps. Both of the shorter period parts of this correlate with geomagnetic jerks, with peaks in the LOD oscillation being contemporaneous with well-known jerk occurances (for example in 1969, 1972, 1978 and 1982), and jumps in the LOD fitting a jerk observed in satellite data in 2003.5. The simultaneous observation of these two features constrains Earth structure, in particular limiting the electric conductivity of the deep mantle. However, the nature of the LOD changes also may change the paradigm for the study of jerk timings. it is customarily assumed that the jerks represent features in the geomagnetic field that are continuous in the secular variation, but discontinuous in its derivative, the secular acceleration. However, a jump in LOD suggested by the modelling of the data would correspond also to a jump in SV, thus invalidating standard methods for temporal location of a jerk (which will consider the intersection of best-fit straight lines to the secular variation before and after). Olsen and Mandea have localised a jerk in satellite virtual observatory data using flow modelling; this seems the most promising method to investigate whether jerks could have discontinuous secular variation. We apply similar methods to time series of virtual geomagnetic obseratories from satellite data to further explore geomagnetic jerks and their rotational links in the geomagnetic satellite era.

  12. Long-Term Variability of Airborne Asian Dust Observed from TOMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, J. R.; Hsu, N. C.; Seftor, C. J.; Holben, B. N.; Holben, B. N.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that airborne Asian dust may not only play an important role in the regional radiation budget, but also influence the air quality over North America through long-range transport. In this paper, we use satellite data to investigate the long-term variability of airborne Asian dust as well as the daily variation of the dust aerosol distribution. By combining the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) aerosol index with National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) wind data, our analysis shows a strong correlation between the generation of dust storms in the region and the passage of springtime weather fronts. This is consistent with earlier studies performed by other researchers. According to both the Nimbus-7 and Earth-Probe TOMS data the Takla Makan desert, the Gobi desert, and the and region of Inner Mongolia are major sources of the eastward-flowing airborne Asian dust. Heavily populated areas in eastern China (e.g., Beijing) are often on the primary path of the dust storms originating in these desert regions. The increasing desertification north of the Beijing region has served to exacerbate problems stemming from these storms. The time series derived from 20 years of TOMS aerosol index data shows the first significant satellite evidence of the atmospheric effect of increasing desertification, indicating that the amount of dust blown eastward has increased strongly during the past few years including the year 2000.

  13. The Ozone Hole of 2002 as Measured by TOMS.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolarski, Richard S.; McPeters, Richard D.; Newman, Paul A.

    2005-03-01

    Since its discovery in 1985, the ozone hole has been regularly mapped using the data from Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instruments on several satellites. The current TOMS, on the Earth Probe satellite, has been taking measurements since 1996. The ozone hole first appeared during the 1980s. Since 1990, the hole has consistently developed during each Antarctic spring over a broad area with the minimum total ozone value reaching about 100 Dobson units (DU; 1 DU = 2.69 × 1016 molecules cm-2) in late September or early October. The year 2002 was markedly different from the past 12 years. A series of strong wave events weakened the South Polar vortex. In late September, a major stratospheric warming took place, reversing the direction of the polar flow and the latitudinal temperature gradient. This warming resulted in a division of the ozone hole into two pieces, one that migrated to lower latitudes and disappeared and one that reformed over the Pole in a weakened form. The development of this year's unusual ozone hole is shown here and is contrasted to a climatology of the years since 1990. Minimum daily values of total ozone barely reached 150 DU in contrast to values nearer to 100. The area of the ozone hole briefly reached 18 × 106 km2, then dropped rapidly to only 2 × 106 km2, and finally recovered to about 8 × 106 km2 before disappearing in early November. The positive anomaly compared with the last 12 yr near the Pole was accompanied by a smaller negative anomaly north of 45°S.

  14. Tropospheric Ozone Pollution from Space: New Views from the TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Anne M.; Hudson, Robert D.; Frolov, Alexander D.; Witte, Jacquelyn C.; Kucsera, Tom L.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    New products from the TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) >satellite instrument can resolve pollution events in tropical and mid-latitudes, Over the past several years, we have developed tropospheric ozone data sets by two methods. The modified-residual technique [Hudson and Thompson, 1998; Thompson and Hudson, 1999] uses v. 7 TOMS total ozone and is applicable to tropical regimes in which the wave-one pattern in total ozone is observed. The TOMSdirect method [Hudson et at., 2000] represents a new algorithm that uses TOMS radiances to extract tropospheric ozone in regions of constant stratospheric ozone and tropospheric ozone displaying high mixing ratios and variability characteristic of pollution, Absorbing aerosols (dust and smoke; Herman et at., 1997 Hsu et al., 1999), a standard TOMS product, provide transport and/or source marker information to interpret tropospheric ozone. For the Nimbus 7/TOMS observing period (1979-1992), modified-residual TTO (tropical tropospheric ozone) appears as two maps/month at I-degree latitude 2-degree longitude resolution at a homepage and digital data are available (20S to 20N) by ftp at http://metosrv2. umd.edu/tropo/ 14y_data.d. Preliminary modified-residual TTO data from the operational Earth-Probe/TOMS (1996- present) are posted in near-real-time at the same website. Analyses with the new tropospheric ozone and aerosol data are illustrated by the following (I)Signals in tropical tropospheric ozone column and smoke amount during ENSO (El Nino-Southern Oscillation) events, e.g. 1982-1983 and the intense ENSO induced biomass fires of 1997-1998 over the Indonesian region [Thompson et a[, 2000a, Thompson and Hudson, 1999]. (2) Trends in tropospheric ozone and smoke aerosols in various tropical regions (Atlantic, Pacific, Africa, Brazil). No significant trends were found for ozone from1980-1990 [Thompson and Hudson, 19991 although smoke aerosols increased during the period [Hsu et al.,1999]. (3) Temporal and spatial offsets

  15. A video atlas of TOMS ozone data, 1978-88

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chesters, D.; Krueger, A. J.

    1989-01-01

    The Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), on-board NASA's Nimbus-7 weather satellite, has been observing ozone over the earth once daily for the last 10 yr. A time-lapse atlas of 3440 color-coded images drawn from the TOMS archive from 1978 to 1988 has been visualized on a standard VHS videotape that is now available from NASA. The rapid and complex ozone variations presented demonstrate the difficulty of separating man-induced climate changes from natural variability. This article presents a few images from the atlas and describes interesting features in the animation, such as the correlation between ozone and 'the weather', and the recent deepening of the annual ozone hole over the South Pole. Originally intended as a browsing tool for the TOMS digital database, the videotape is a vivid presentation of the earth's atmospheric dynamics and chemistry that is recommended for scientists, educators, policy makers, and citizens concerned about the global environment.

  16. A video atlas of TOMS ozone data, 1978-88

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesters, D.; Krueger, A. J.

    1989-12-01

    The Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), on-board NASA's Nimbus-7 weather satellite, has been observing ozone over the earth once daily for the last 10 yr. A time-lapse atlas of 3440 color-coded images drawn from the TOMS archive from 1978 to 1988 has been visualized on a standard VHS videotape that is now available from NASA. The rapid and complex ozone variations presented demonstrate the difficulty of separating man-induced climate changes from natural variability. This article presents a few images from the atlas and describes interesting features in the animation, such as the correlation between ozone and 'the weather', and the recent deepening of the annual ozone hole over the South Pole. Originally intended as a browsing tool for the TOMS digital database, the videotape is a vivid presentation of the earth's atmospheric dynamics and chemistry that is recommended for scientists, educators, policy makers, and citizens concerned about the global environment.

  17. The magnetospheric disturbance ring current as a source for probing the deep earth electrical conductivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, W.H.

    1990-01-01

    Two current rings have been observed in the equatorial plane of the earth at times of high geomagnetic activity. An eastward current exists between about 2 and 3.5 earth radii (Re) distant, and a larger, more variable companion current exists between about 4 and 9 Re. These current regions are loaded during geomagnetic substorms. They decay, almost exponentially, after the cessation of the particle influx that attends the solar wind disturbance. This review focuses upon characteristics needed for intelligent use of the ring current as a source for induction probing of the earth's mantle. Considerable difficulties are found with the assumption that Dst is a ring-current index. ?? 1990 Birkha??user Verlag.

  18. Tom20 and Tom22 share the common signal recognition pathway in mitochondrial protein import.

    PubMed

    Yamano, Koji; Yatsukawa, Yoh-Ichi; Esaki, Masatoshi; Hobbs, Alyson E Aiken; Jensen, Robert E; Endo, Toshiya

    2008-02-15

    Precise targeting of mitochondrial precursor proteins to mitochondria requires receptor functions of Tom20, Tom22, and Tom70 on the mitochondrial surface. Tom20 is a major import receptor that recognizes preferentially mitochondrial presequences, and Tom70 is a specialized receptor that recognizes presequence-less inner membrane proteins. The cytosolic domain of Tom22 appears to function as a receptor in cooperation with Tom20, but how its substrate specificity differs from that of Tom20 remains unclear. To reveal possible differences in substrate specificities between Tom20 and Tom22, if any, we deleted the receptor domain of Tom20 or Tom22 in mitochondria in vitro by introducing cleavage sites for a tobacco etch virus protease between the receptor domains and transmembrane segments of Tom20 and Tom22. Then mitochondria without the receptor domain of Tom20 or Tom22 were analyzed for their abilities to import various mitochondrial precursor proteins targeted to different mitochondrial subcompartments in vitro. The effects of deletion of the receptor domains on the import of different mitochondrial proteins for different import pathways were quite similar between Tom20 and Tom22. Therefore Tom20 and Tom22 are apparently involved in the same step or sequential steps along the same pathway of targeting signal recognition in import. PMID:18063580

  19. Ultrafast pump-probe dynamics of iron oxide based earth pigments for applications to ancient pottery manufacture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villafana, Tana E.; Brown, William; Warren, Warren S.; Fischer, Martin

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate that ultrafast pump-probe microscopy provides unique dynamics for natural iron oxide and iron hydroxide earth pigments, despite their chemical similarity. First, we conducted a pump-probe spectroscopy study on heat-treated hematite (the pure red iron oxide mineral) and found the pump-probe dynamics to be temperature dependent. Second, we investigated pottery fired under known conditions and observed firing dependent pump-probe dynamics. Finally, we imaged a New World potshard from the North Carolina Museum of Art. Our results indicate that pump-probe microscopy could be a useful tool in elucidating pottery manufacture.

  20. Fluorescent probes and bioimaging: alkali metals, alkaline earth metals and pH.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun; Hu, Ying; Yoon, Juyoung

    2015-07-21

    All living species and life forms have an absolute requirement for bio-functional metals and acid-base equilibrium chemistry owing to the critical roles they play in biological processes. Hence, a great need exists for efficient methods to detect and monitor biometals and acids. In the last few years, great attention has been paid to the development of organic molecule based fluorescent chemosensors. The availability of new synthetic fluorescent probes has made fluorescence microscopy an indispensable tool for tracing biologically important molecules and in the area of clinical diagnostics. This review highlights the recent advances that have been made in the design and bioimaging applications of fluorescent probes for alkali metals and alkaline earth metal cations, including lithium, sodium and potassium, magnesium and calcium, and for pH determination within biological systems. PMID:25317749

  1. Volcanic eruption detection with TOMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Arlin J.

    1987-01-01

    The Nimbus 7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) is designed for mapping of the atmospheric ozone distribution. Absorption by sulfur dioxide at the same ultraviolet spectral wavelengths makes it possible to observe and resolve the size of volcanic clouds. The sulfur dioxide absorption is discriminated from ozone and water clouds in the data processing by their spectral signatures. Thus, the sulfur dioxide can serve as a tracer which appears in volcanic eruption clouds because it is not present in other clouds. The detection limit with TOMS is close to the theoretical limit due to telemetry signal quantization of 1000 metric tons (5-sigma threshold) within the instrument field of view (50 by 50 km near the nadir). Requirements concerning the use of TOMS in detection of eruptions, geochemical cycles, and volcanic climatic effects are discussed.

  2. SinoProbe - A Multidisciplinary Research Program of Earth Sciences in China (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, S.; Li, T.

    2010-12-01

    China occupies a large region of central and eastern Asia and holds keys to resolving several first-order problems in Earth Sciences. Besides the importance in Earth Science research, the rapid growth of Chinese economy also demands a comprehensive and systematic evaluation of its natural resources and the impacts of geohazards on its societal development. In order to address the above issues, the Chinese government had initiated a new multidisciplinary research project in Earth Sciences - the SinoProbe Program. Its fundamental goal is to determine the three-dimensional structure, composition distribution, and geological evolution of the Chinese continental lithosphere. The results of the SinoProbe Program are expected to have broad impacts on the Chinese society and economy. In particular, the program will greatly enhance our current understanding on (1) the forming and distribution of mineral resources in the nation, (2) the locations and recurrence histories of major active fault zones capable of generating large earthquakes in highly populated regions, and (3) the distribution of major hazard-prone regions induced by geological processes. In 2009, more than 720 investigators and 70 engineers from Chinese institutions are currently involved with the research program. Sinoprobe hope that the joint forces by Chinese and international researchers will bring in modern approaches, new analytical tools, and advanced exploration technology into the successful operation of the program. In past year, 1,960km long seismic reflection profiling with broadband seismological studies and MT surveys separated from 6 profiles in China continent have completed. MT array coved the North China craton by 1°×1° network and 3-D exploration in larger ore deposits in selected area were carried out. A scientific drilling area operated in Tibet. We started to establish a geochemical reference framework for the values of 76 elements in a grid network with data-point spacing of 160 km in

  3. Plasma Wave Measurements in Earth's Magnetosphere by Juno, Van Allen Probes, and Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Bolton, S. J.; Gurnett, D. A.; Santolik, O.; Kletzing, C.; Thorne, R. M.; Pickett, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    On October 9, 2013, Juno will fly within about 550 km of Earth in the process of executing a gravity assist on its way to its eventual arrival at Jupiter in July 2016. Since this will be the only magnetospheric plasma regime Juno will sample prior to arrival at Jupiter, it presents both engineering and scientific opportunities. One of the scientific opportunities is to make observations in the inner magnetosphere at the same time as the twin Van Allen Probes and Cluster. During the Juno flyby, which is on the dusk side at closest approach, the Van Allen Probes' apoapsis is also in the dusk sector. The Cluster orbits favor comparisons on the nightside after Juno's closest approach. Models of the radiation belts suggest that Juno will traverse both the inner and outer belts, albeit at higher latitudes than the low-inclination Van Allen Probes while the Cluster spacecraft are in a rather high inclination orbit. The Waves instrument on Juno utilizes a single electric dipole antenna and a single search coil sensor for measurements of the electric and magnetic components of plasma waves, consequently it will provide wave spectra and brief bursts of waveforms. The Waves instrument on Van Allen Probes, on the other hand makes triaxial electric and magnetic measurements of plasma waves, hence, can determine the propagation characteristics of waves such as the wave-normal angle, Poynting flux, and polarization characteristics of the waves. The Wideband Instrument on Cluster can be configured to capture single axis (electric or magnetic) waveforms at selected times to coincide with Juno and Van Allen Probes burst observations. We will compare observations of whistler-mode emissions and electron cyclotron harmonic emissions in and near the radiation belts from the vantage points of these spacecraft.

  4. An Interview with Tom Wessels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pryor, Patrick K.; Wessels, Tom

    2002-01-01

    Author and environmental educator Tom Wessels discusses how to infer a landscape's history from plants and other clues found on site. Reading the landscape enables people to develop a stronger connection to place. Understanding historic landscape changes is essential to understanding current environmental issues. He also discusses his teaching…

  5. Q&A with Tom Snyder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLester, Susan

    2005-01-01

    In this article, an interview with Tom Snyder, founder of Tom Snyder Productions in 1980, is presented. One of the topics discussed here is Snyder's biggest turning point in education technology over the past 25 years.

  6. GOCE satellite gravity gradients: a new probe into the Earth's mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panet, I.; Pajot-Métivier, G.; Greff-Lefftz, M.; Métivier, L.; Diament, M.; Mandea, M.; Romanowicz, B. A.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the dynamics of the Earth's mantle requires to elucidate its internal structure and composition. Because density anomalies drive mantle flows, information on the mass distribution within the mantle is needed in order to model the deep dynamics. The measurements obtained from the ESA's GOCE satellite mission allow us to determine the tensor of second-order derivatives of the gravity potential as viewed from space, thus providing a new class of observations to probe our planet's deep directional mass structure: gravity gradients. We built the first global anomaly maps of the Earth's gravity gradients along the orbit, and demonstrate their unprecedented capability to image the geometry of mass distribution down to mid-mantle depths. In our maps, we identify signals that reflect the effect of subduction processes and convective instabilities between 1000 and 2500 km depth on mantle structure, also consistent with the distribution of shear-velocities anomalies in global seismic tomographic models. Such a clear detection arises from the correspondence between the directions along which the gradients are computed, and the North-South/East-West global structure of the Earth's deep masses. In particular, along the former Tethyan margin, the gradients maps suggest a stronger East-West directionality of the upper mantle structure than predicted by global seismic tomography. The joint analysis of these new data together with other geophysical data and models thus opens new perspectives to enhance the geometric description of mantle heterogeneities, and decipher their nature.

  7. Functional network macroscopes for probing past and present Earth system dynamics (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donges, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    probing past and present Earth system dynamics: Complex hierarchical interactions, tipping points, and beyond" by J.F. Donges, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany, 2012. URL: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:kobv:11-100207126.

  8. Measurements of the RF characteristics of earth lightning with the Galileo probe lightning experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinnert, K.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Dehmel, G.; Gliem, F. O.; Krider, E. P.; Uman, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    The results of some measurements of earth lightning made with the functional unit of the Galileo probe RF lightning experiment are presented. The frequency range used is about 100 Hz to 100 kHz. The measurements were carried out in conjunction with simultaneous studies of lightning sources made by the University of Florida lightning research group. It is found that the typical RF pulse duration times are less than 30 microsec, independent of lightning source distance (less than 250 km). It is also found that the time between successive pulses is either quite short (less than 64 microsec), corresponding to the time between intracloud pulses and to the time between bipolar pulses, or occur around 100 ms, corresponding to the time between return strokes in ground discharges. The RF spectra are found to become less steep (relatively more power at the higher frequencies) during an interval of intense, nearby (less than 150 km) storms.

  9. The Radiation Belt Storm Probes Mission: Advancing Our Understanding of the Earth's Radiation Belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibeck, David; Kanekal, Shrikanth; Kessel, Ramona; Fox, Nicola; Mauk, Barry

    2012-01-01

    We describe NASA's Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) mission, whose primary science objective is to understand, ideally to the point of predictability, the dynamics of relativistic electrons and penetrating ions in the Earth's radiation belts resulting from variable solar activity. The overarching scientific questions addressed include: 1. the physical processes that produce radiation belt enhancement events, 2. the dominant mechanisms for relativistic electron loss, and 3. how the ring current and other geomagnetic processes affect radiation belt behavior. The RBSP mission comprises two spacecraft which will be launched during Fall 2012 into low inclination lapping equatorial orbits. The orbit periods are about 9 hours, with perigee altitudes and apogee radial distances of 600 km and 5.8 RE respectively. During the two-year primary mission, the spacecraft orbits precess once around the Earth and lap each other twice in each local time quadrant. The spacecraft are each equipped with identical comprehensive instrumentation packages to measure, electrons, ions and wave electric and magnetic fields. We provide an overview of the RBSP mission, onboard instrumentation and science prospects and invite scientific collaboration.

  10. Composition of the earth's atmosphere by shock-layer radiometry during the PAET entry probe experiment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiting, E. E.; Arnold, J. O.; Page, W. A.; Reynolds, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    A determination of the composition of the earth's atmosphere obtained from onboard radiometer measurements of the spectra emitted from the bow shock layer of a high-speed entry probe is reported. The N2, O2, CO2, and noble gas concentrations in the earth's atmosphere were determined to good accuracy by this technique. The results demonstrate unequivocally the feasibility of determining the composition of an unknown planetary atmosphere by means of a multichannel radiometer viewing optical emission from the heated atmospheric gases in the region between the bow shock wave and the vehicle surface. The spectral locations in this experiment were preselected to enable the observation of CN violet, N2(+) first negative and atomic oxygen emission at 3870, 3910, and 7775 A, respectively. The atmospheric gases were heated and compressed by the shock wave to a peak temperature of about 6100 K and a corresponding pressure of 0.4 atm. Complete descriptions of the data analysis technique and the onboard radiometer and its calibration are given.

  11. Recognition of mitochondrial targeting sequences by the import receptors Tom20 and Tom22.

    PubMed

    Rimmer, Kieran A; Foo, Jung Hock; Ng, Alicia; Petrie, Emma J; Shilling, Patrick J; Perry, Andrew J; Mertens, Haydyn D T; Lithgow, Trevor; Mulhern, Terrence D; Gooley, Paul R

    2011-01-21

    The Tom20 and Tom22 receptor subunits of the TOM (translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane) complex recognize N-terminal presequences of proteins that are to be imported into the mitochondrion. In plants, Tom20 is C-terminally anchored in the mitochondrial membrane, whereas Tom20 is N-terminally anchored in animals and fungi. Furthermore, the cytosolic domain of Tom22 in plants is smaller than its animal/fungal counterpart and contains fewer acidic residues. Here, NMR spectroscopy was used to explore presequence interactions with the cytosolic regions of receptors from the plant Arabidopsis thaliana and the fungus Saccharomyces cerevisiae (i.e., AtTom20, AtTom22, and ScTom22). It was found that AtTom20 possesses a discontinuous bidentate hydrophobic binding site for presequences. The presequences on plant mitochondrial proteins comprise two or more hydrophobic binding regions to match this bidentate site. NMR data suggested that while these presequences bind to ScTom22, they do not bind to AtTom22. AtTom22, however, binds to AtTom20 at the same binding site as presequences, suggesting that this domain competes with the presequences of imported proteins, thereby enabling their progression along the import pathway. PMID:21087612

  12. Mitochondrial import receptors Tom20 and Tom22 have chaperone-like activity.

    PubMed

    Yano, Masato; Terada, Kazutoyo; Mori, Masataka

    2004-03-12

    Mitochondrial preproteins are synthesized in the cytosol with N-terminal signal sequences (presequences) or internal targeting signals. Generally, preproteins with presequences are initially recognized by Tom20 (translocase of the outer membrane) and, subsequently, by Tom22, whereas hydrophobic preproteins with internal targeting signals are first recognized by Tom70. Recent studies suggest that Tom70 associates with molecular chaperones, thereby maintaining their substrate preproteins in an import-competent state. However, such a function has not been reported for other Tom component(s). Here, we investigated a role for Tom20 in preventing substrate preproteins from aggregating. In vitro binding assays showed that Tom20 binds to guanidinium chloride unfolded substrate proteins regardless of the presence or absence of presequences. This suggests that Tom20 functions as a receptor not only for presequences but also for mature portions exposed in unfolded preproteins. Aggregation suppression assays on citrate synthase showed that the cytosolic domain of Tom20 has a chaperone-like activity to prevent this protein from aggregating. This activity was inhibited by a presequence peptide, suggesting that the binding site of Tom20 for presequence is identical or close to the active site for the chaperone-like activity. The cytosolic domain of Tom22 also showed a similar activity for citrate synthase, whereas Tom70 did not. These results suggest that the cytosolic domains of Tom20 and Tom22 function to maintain their substrate preproteins unfolded and prevent them from aggregating on the mitochondrial surface. PMID:14699115

  13. ADEOS Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) Data Products User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, A.; Bhartia, P. K.; McPeters, R.; Herman, J.; Wellemeyer, C.; Jaross, G.; Seftor, C.; Torres, O.; Labow, G.; Byerly, W.; Moy, L.; Taylor, S.; Swissler, T.; Cebula, R.

    1998-01-01

    Two data products from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (ADEOS/TOMS) have been archived at the Distributed Active Archive Center, in the form of Hierarchical Data Format files. The ADEOS/ TOMS began taking measurements on September 11, 1996, and ended on June 29, 1997. The instrument measured backscattered Earth radiance and incoming solar irradiance; their ratio was used in ozone retrievals. Changes in the reflectivity of the solar diffuser used for the irradiance measurement were monitored using a carousel of three diffusers, each exposed to the degrading effects of solar irradiation at different rates. The algorithm to retrieve total column ozone compares measured Earth radiances at sets of three wavelengths with radiances calculated for different total ozone values, solar zenith angles, and optical paths. The initial error in the absolute scale for TOMS total ozone is 3 percent, the one standard deviation random error is 2 percent, and the drift is less than 0.5 percent over the 9-month data record. The Level 2 product contains the measured radiances, the derived total ozone amount, and reflectivity information for each scan position. The Level 3 product contains daily total ozone and reflectivity in a 1-degree latitude by 1.25 degrees longitude grid. The Level 3 files containing estimates of UVB at the Earth surface and tropospheric aerosol information will also be available. Detailed descriptions of both HDF data files and the CDROM product are provided.

  14. An energy balance simulation tool for TOMS-EP

    SciTech Connect

    Mackowski, M.J.; Martin, D.K.

    1996-12-31

    A computer analysis tool has been developed to perform energy balance simulations of a spacecraft power subsystem. The purpose of the tool is to predict the battery state-of-charge as a function of time for different mission scenarios, particularly during the first few orbits. The load profile (power use versus time) and the solar array power available for charging the battery were both time-varying functions that were different for each scenario. Therefore an analysis tool was needed that could easily make changes to the load profile and select different levels of solar array power. This was accomplished by developing a simple spreadsheet that defined the load profiles, which would then be imported into another spreadsheet that performed the energy balance calculations, including the adjustments to the solar array output. The development of these relatively simple spreadsheets replaced a laborious manual process of defining the load profiles which were then sued in a less sophisticated spreadsheet.The improved version also added a capability to include loads prior to satellite separation from the launch vehicle. A more elaborate simulation program had also been used in the past, but it was inconvenient to use and was not as precise as the new spreadsheet. In summary, the new tool made it easy to quickly develop and evaluate many different operational scenarios. This process has been used to evaluate responses to various failure modes and to develop contingency plans for the first few orbits of the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer--Earth Probe (TOMS-EP) mission.

  15. Transient Luminous Events: optical emissions from high altitudes to probe the Earth's upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luque, A.; Gordillo-Vázquez, F. J.

    2012-04-01

    Transient Luminous Events are short but intense optical emissions from the upper terrestrial atmosphere, driven by the electric fields generated by a tropospheric electric storm. They were first observed in 1989 [1] but they had been predicted by C.T.R. Wilson already in 1925 [2]. Wilson argued that the electric field needed to initiate a discharge (the breakdown field) is proportional to the atmospheric density and therefore decreases exponentially with altitude; meanwhile the electric field created by a charged cloud is roughly dipolar and decays slower. Therefore there exists an altitude where the cloud field surpasses the breakdown field and an electric discharge is initiated. The combination of modeling and observations of TLEs allows us to quantify their influence in the global atmospheric chemistry and the global electric circuit that connects the surface of the Earth with the ionosphere. But, equally importantly, TLEs serve as natural probes to remotely investigate the atmosphere that surrounds them. In this talk we will survey some recent results on the modelling of TLEs. 1. Sprite beads provide an example of a possible use of TLEs to remotely probe the Earth's mesosphere. Sprites are filamentary discharges, some tens of kilometers wide, appearing at altitudes from about 50 to about 85 km. Sometimes, in the wake of a sprite, luminous spots (beads) persist much longer than the main emissions. These sprite beads reveal underlying inhomogeneities in the atmospheric conductivity [4] whose precise origin is still uncertain. 2. Another path to investigate the mesosphere through TLE observations is to compare observed spectra with kinetic models [5] combined with electrodynamic simulations [6]. For that purpose, we have modeled emissions from terrestrial TLEs: we calculated the expected emissions in the ultraviolet (Lyman-Birge-Hopfield band of molecular nitrogen), in the near UV and visible blue (second positive system of N2) and in the red and near infrared

  16. In Their Own Words: Tom Simon

    NASA Video Gallery

    Tom Simon, a contracting officer's representative for NASA's Commercial Crew Program, discusses the importance of certifying commercial transportation systems are safe to carry NASA astronauts to t...

  17. Protein import channel of the outer mitochondrial membrane: a highly stable Tom40-Tom22 core structure differentially interacts with preproteins, small tom proteins, and import receptors.

    PubMed

    Meisinger, C; Ryan, M T; Hill, K; Model, K; Lim, J H; Sickmann, A; Müller, H; Meyer, H E; Wagner, R; Pfanner, N

    2001-04-01

    The preprotein translocase of the yeast mitochondrial outer membrane (TOM) consists of the initial import receptors Tom70 and Tom20 and a approximately 400-kDa (400 K) general import pore (GIP) complex that includes the central receptor Tom22, the channel Tom40, and the three small Tom proteins Tom7, Tom6, and Tom5. We report that the GIP complex is a highly stable complex with an unusual resistance to urea and alkaline pH. Under mild conditions for mitochondrial lysis, the receptor Tom20, but not Tom70, is quantitatively associated with the GIP complex, forming a 500K to 600K TOM complex. A preprotein, stably arrested in the GIP complex, is released by urea but not high salt, indicating that ionic interactions are not essential for keeping the preprotein in the GIP complex. Under more stringent detergent conditions, however, Tom20 and all three small Tom proteins are released, while the preprotein remains in the GIP complex. Moreover, purified outer membrane vesicles devoid of translocase components of the intermembrane space and inner membrane efficiently accumulate the preprotein in the GIP complex. Together, Tom40 and Tom22 thus represent the functional core unit that stably holds accumulated preproteins. The GIP complex isolated from outer membranes exhibits characteristic TOM channel activity with two coupled conductance states, each corresponding to the activity of purified Tom40, suggesting that the complex contains two simultaneously active and coupled channel pores. PMID:11259583

  18. Van Allen Probes Mission Space Academy: Educating middle school students about Earth's mysterious radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, L.; Turney, D.; Matiella Novak, A.; Smith, D.; Simon, M.

    2013-12-01

    How's the weather in space? Why on Earth did NASA send two satellites above Earth to study radiation belts and space weather? To learn the answer to questions about NASA's Van Allen Probes mission, 450 students and their teachers from Maryland middle schools attended Space Academy events highlighting the Van Allen Probes mission. Sponsored by the Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) and Discovery Education, the events are held at the APL campus in Laurel, MD. Space Academies take students and teachers on behind-the-scenes exploration of how spacecraft are built, what they are designed to study, and introduces them to the many professionals that work together to create some of NASA's most exciting projects. Moderated by a public relations representative in the format of an official NASA press conference, the daylong event includes a student press conference with students as reporters and mission experts as panelists. Lunch with mission team members gives students a chance to ask more questions. After lunch, students don souvenir clean room suits, enjoy interactive science demonstrations, and tour APL facilities where the Van Allen Probes were built and tested before launch. Students may even have an opportunity to peek inside a clean room to view spacecraft being assembled. Prior to the event, teachers are provided with classroom activities, lesson plans, and videos developed by APL and Discovery Education to help prepare students for the featured mission. The activities are aligned to National Science Education Standards and appropriate for use in the classroom. Following their visit, student journalists are encouraged to write a short article about their field trip; selections are posted on the Space Academy web site. Designed to engage, inspire, and influence attitudes about space science and STEM careers, Space Academies provide an opportunity to attract underserved populations and emphasize that space science is for everyone. Exposing students to a diverse group of

  19. Toms Creek IGCC Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Virr, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    The Toms Creek Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Demonstration Project was selected by DOE in September 1991 to participate in Round Four of the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. The project will demonstrate a simplified IGCC process consisting of an air-blown, fluidized-bed gasifier (Tampella U-Gas), a gas cooler/steam generator, and a hot gas cleanup system in combination with a gas turbine modified for use with a low-Btu content fuel and a conventional steam bottoming cycle. The demonstration plant will be located at the Toms Creek coal mine near Coeburn, Wise County, Virginia. Participants in the project are Tampella Power Corporation and Coastal Power Production Company. The plant will use 430 tons per day of locally mined bituminous coal to produce 55 MW of power from the gasification section of the project. A modern pulverized coal fired unit will be located adjacent to the Demonstration Project producing an additional 150 MW. A total 190 MW of power will be delivered to the electric grid at the completion of the project. In addition, 50,000 pounds per hour of steam will be exported to be used in the nearby coal preparation plant. Dolomite is used for in-bed gasifier sulfur capture and downs cleanup is accomplished in a fluidized-bed of regenerative zinc titanate. Particulate clean-up, before the gas turbine, will be performed by high temperature candle filters (1020[degree]F). The demonstration plant heat rate is estimated to be 8,700 Btu/kWh. The design of the project goes through mid 1995, with site construction activities commencing late in 1995 and leading to commissioning and start-up by the end of 1997. This is followed by a three year demonstration period.

  20. Toms Creek IGCC Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Virr, M.J.

    1992-11-01

    The Toms Creek Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Demonstration Project was selected by DOE in September 1991 to participate in Round Four of the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. The project will demonstrate a simplified IGCC process consisting of an air-blown, fluidized-bed gasifier (Tampella U-Gas), a gas cooler/steam generator, and a hot gas cleanup system in combination with a gas turbine modified for use with a low-Btu content fuel and a conventional steam bottoming cycle. The demonstration plant will be located at the Toms Creek coal mine near Coeburn, Wise County, Virginia. Participants in the project are Tampella Power Corporation and Coastal Power Production Company. The plant will use 430 tons per day of locally mined bituminous coal to produce 55 MW of power from the gasification section of the project. A modern pulverized coal fired unit will be located adjacent to the Demonstration Project producing an additional 150 MW. A total 190 MW of power will be delivered to the electric grid at the completion of the project. In addition, 50,000 pounds per hour of steam will be exported to be used in the nearby coal preparation plant. Dolomite is used for in-bed gasifier sulfur capture and downs cleanup is accomplished in a fluidized-bed of regenerative zinc titanate. Particulate clean-up, before the gas turbine, will be performed by high temperature candle filters (1020{degree}F). The demonstration plant heat rate is estimated to be 8,700 Btu/kWh. The design of the project goes through mid 1995, with site construction activities commencing late in 1995 and leading to commissioning and start-up by the end of 1997. This is followed by a three year demonstration period.

  1. Entry-probe studies of the atmospheres of earth, Mars, and Venus - A review (Von Karman Lecture)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiff, Alvin

    1990-01-01

    This paper overviews the history (since 1963) of the exploration of planetary atmospheres by use of entry probes. The techniques used to measure the compositions of the atmospheres of the earth, Mars, and Venus are described together with the key results obtained. Attention is also given to the atmosphere-structure experiment aboard the Galileo Mission, launched on October 17, 1989 and now under way on its 6-yr trip to Jupiter, and to future experiments.

  2. Impact of atmospheric refraction: how deeply can we probe exo-earth's atmospheres during primary eclipse observations?

    SciTech Connect

    Bétrémieux, Yan; Kaltenegger, Lisa

    2014-08-10

    Most models used to predict or fit exoplanet transmission spectra do not include all the effects of atmospheric refraction. Namely, the angular size of the star with respect to the planet can limit the lowest altitude, or highest density and pressure, probed during primary eclipses as no rays passing below this critical altitude can reach the observer. We discuss this geometrical effect of refraction for all exoplanets and tabulate the critical altitude, density, and pressure for an exoplanet identical to Earth with a 1 bar N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmosphere as a function of both the incident stellar flux (Venus, Earth, and Mars-like) at the top of the atmosphere and the spectral type (O5-M9) of the host star. We show that such a habitable exo-Earth can be probed to a surface pressure of 1 bar only around the coolest stars. We present 0.4-5.0 μm model transmission spectra of Earth's atmosphere viewed as a transiting exoplanet, and show how atmospheric refraction modifies the transmission spectrum depending on the spectral type of the host star. We demonstrate that refraction is another phenomenon that can potentially explain flat transmission spectra over some spectral regions.

  3. A Long-term Record of Saharan Dust Aerosol Properties from TOMS Observations: Optical Depth and Single Scattering Albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, Omar; Bhartia, P. K.; Herman, J. R.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The interaction between the strong Rayleigh scattering in the near UV spectral region (330-380 nm) and the processes of aerosol absorption and scattering, produce a clear spectral signal in the upwelling radiance at the top of the atmosphere. This interaction is the basis of the TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) aerosol retrieval technique that can be used for their characterization and to differentiate non-absorbing sulfates from strongly UV-absorbing aerosols such as mineral dust. For absorbing aerosols, the characterization is in terms of the optical depth and single scattering albedo with assumptions about the aerosol plume height. The results for non-absorbing aerosols are not dependent on plume height. Although iron compounds represent only between 5% to 8% of desert dust aerosol mass, hematite (Fe2O3) accounts for most of the near UV absorption. Because of the large ultraviolet absorption characteristic of hematite, the near UV method of aerosol sensing is especially suited for the detection and characterization of desert dust aerosols. Using the combined record of near UV measurements by the Nimbus7 (1978-1992) and Earth Probe (1996-present) TOMS instruments, a global longterm climatology of near UV optical depth and single scattering albedo has been produced. The multi-year long record of mineral aerosol properties over the area of influence of the Saharan desert, will be discussed.

  4. Updating the Micro-Tom TILLING platform.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Yoshihiro; Ariizumi, Tohru; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2013-03-01

    The dwarf tomato variety Micro-Tom is regarded as a model system for functional genomics studies in tomato. Various tomato genomic tools in the genetic background of Micro-Tom have been established, such as mutant collections, genome information and a metabolomic database. Recent advances in tomato genome sequencing have brought about a significant need for reverse genetics tools that are accessible to the larger community, because a great number of gene sequences have become available from public databases. To meet the requests from the tomato research community, we have developed the Micro-Tom Targeting-Induced Local Lesions IN Genomes (TILLING) platform, which is comprised of more than 5000 EMS-mutagenized lines. The platform serves as a reverse genetics tool for efficiently identifying mutant alleles in parallel with the development of Micro-Tom mutant collections. The combination of Micro-Tom mutant libraries and the TILLING approach enables researchers to accelerate the isolation of desirable mutants for unraveling gene function or breeding. To upgrade the genomic tool of Micro-Tom, the development of a new mutagenized population is underway. In this paper, the current status of the Micro-Tom TILLING platform and its future prospects are described. PMID:23641180

  5. Nimbus/TOMS Science Data Operations Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, Jeff

    1998-01-01

    1. Participate in and provide analysis of laboratory and in-flight calibration of UV sensors used for space observations of backscattered UV radiation. 2. Provide support to the TOMS Science Operations Center, including generating instrument command lists and analysis of TOMS health and safety data. 3. Develop and maintain software and algorithms designed to capture and process raw spacecraft and instrument data, convert the instrument output into measured radiance and irradiances, and produce scientifically valid products. 4. Process the TOMS data into Level 1, Level 2, and Level 3 data products. 5. Provide analysis of the science data products in support of NASA GSFC Code 916's research.

  6. Chemistry Experiments — For Comparative Analyses for Demonstrating Environmental Differences on Venus, Earth, Mars and Titan, — Built on Educational Space Probes Hunveyor and Husar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bérczi, Sz.; Róka, A.; Nyíri, Z.; Varga, T.; Fabriczy, A. Sz.; Peták, Cs.; Hudoba, Gy.; Hegyi, S.; Lang, A.; Gyollai, I.; Gucsik, A.

    2014-11-01

    We compared chemical environments of Venus, Earth, Mars and Titan by experiments planned for selection to realize them on educational space probe landers and rovers (Hunveyor and Husar) built by Hungarian universities and high schools.

  7. Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) Level-3 Data Products User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPeters, Richard D.; Bhartia, P. K.; Krueger, Arlin J.; Herman, Jay R.; Wellemeyer, Charles G.; Seftor, Colin J.; Byerly, William; Celarier, Edward A.

    2000-01-01

    Data from the TOMS series of instruments span the time period from November 1978, through the present with about a one and a-half year gap from January 1994 through July 1996. A set of four parameters derived from the TOMS measurements have been archived in the form of daily global maps or Level-3 data products. These products are total column ozone, effective surface reflectivity, aerosol index, and erythermal ultraviolet estimated at the Earth surface. A common fixed grid of I degree latitude by 1.25 degree longitude cells over the entire globe is provided daily for each parameter. These data are archived at the Goddard Space Flight Center Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAQ in Hierarchical Data Format (HDF). They are also available in a character format through the TOMS web site at http://toms.gsfc.nasa.gov. The derivations of the parameters, the mapping algorithm, and the data formats are described. The trend uncertainty for individual TOMS instruments is about 1% decade, but additional uncertainty exists in the combined data record due to uncertainty in the relative calibrations of the various TOMS.

  8. Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, M. H.

    1984-01-01

    The following aspects of the planet Earth are discussed: plate tectonics, the interior of the planet, the formation of the Earth, and the evolution of the atmosphere and hydrosphere. The Earth's crust, mantle, and core are examined along with the bulk composition of the planet.

  9. Effect of marine stratocumulus in TOMS ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, A. M.; Mcnamara, D. P.; Pickering, K. E.; Mcpeters, R. D.

    1993-01-01

    The algorithm used to correct total O3 from the total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) for cloud effects is based on the measured reflectivity, a climatological cloud top height, and an assumed tropospheric O3 column amount below clouds. In regions of persistent subtropical marine stratocumulus it is assumed that this introduces a positive error into total O3 because these clouds are lower than the assumed mean cloud height used in the algorithm. This appears to be confirmed by high correlation between Nimbus 7 TOMS total O3 and reflectivity data for typical regimes of persistent stratus, as identified by the international satellite cloud climatology project (ISCCP) observations. The TOMS total O3 overestimate has been computed using Nimbus 7/solar backscattered ultraviolet total O3 derived using temperature humidity infrared radiometer (THIR) data for years 1979-1984. A functional relationship between the THIR/non-THIR total O3 difference and reflectivity is used with TOMS reflectivity to modify Nimbus 7 TOMS O3 data for selected regions and periods. The correction diminishes or eliminates a number of apparent O3 maxima, with reductions of up to 20 Dobson units (DU) in total O3 on daily maps and approximately 5 DU on monthly mean O3 maps. Significant correlation between corrected TOMS O3 and reflectivity data remains because low-altitude O3 is retrieved more efficiently over a high-albedo surface. It is also possible that dynamical influences leading to stratocumulus formation bring O3-enriched air into the area. These results imply that although good arguments can be made for the use of TOMS total O3 as a proxy for tropospheric O3 in the tropics, caution must be exercised in the use of daily and even monthly O3 maps in the vicinity of clouds. Further research into the TOMS algorithm in cloudy regions is required to derive reliable estimates of tropospheric O3.

  10. TOMS UV Algorithm: Problems and Enhancements. 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krotkov, Nickolay; Herman, Jay; Bhartia, P. K.; Seftor, Colin; Arola, Antti; Kaurola, Jussi; Kroskinen, Lasse; Kalliskota, S.; Taalas, Petteri; Geogdzhaev, I.

    2002-01-01

    Satellite instruments provide global maps of surface ultraviolet (UV) irradiance by combining backscattered radiance measurements with radiative transfer models. The models are limited by uncertainties in input parameters of the atmosphere and the surface. We evaluate the effects of possible enhancements of the current Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) surface UV irradiance algorithm focusing on effects of diurnal variation of cloudiness and improved treatment of snow/ice. The emphasis is on comparison between the results of the current (version 1) TOMS UV algorithm and each of the changes proposed. We evaluate different approaches for improved treatment of pixel average cloud attenuation, with and without snow/ice on the ground. In addition to treating clouds based only on the measurements at the local time of the TOMS observations, the results from other satellites and weather assimilation models can be used to estimate attenuation of the incident UV irradiance throughout the day. A new method is proposed to obtain a more realistic treatment of snow covered terrain. The method is based on a statistical relation between UV reflectivity and snow depth. The new method reduced the bias between the TOMS UV estimations and ground-based UV measurements for snow periods. The improved (version 2) algorithm will be applied to re-process the existing TOMS UV data record (since 1978) and to the future satellite sensors (e.g., Quik/TOMS, GOME, OMI on EOS/Aura and Triana/EPIC).

  11. Global Surface Ultraviolet Radiation Climatology from TOMS and ERBE Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubin, Dan

    1998-01-01

    The overall goal of this project has been to develop a method for calculating the distribution of solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) over most of the earth's surface using NASA's Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) and Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) data, and to use this method to develop a UVR climatology that is useful in the context of the global ozone depletion issue. The research carried out with this support has resulted the following accomplishments: (1) a radioactive transfer method. based on the delta-Eddington approximation, was successfully developed; (2) the method was applied to the five years of overlapping TOMS and ERBE Monthly-Hourly data to examine the impact of global variability in cloud cover on trends in surface UVR; (3) a presentation was made on effects of stratospheric ozone depletion; (4) the radioactive transfer model was finally applied to all daylight hours to make a through study of the global effect of cloud cover;and (6) a five-year global climatology of surface UVR based on all of the research has been prepared for general distribution.

  12. Changes in Cloud and Aerosol Cover (1980-2006) from Reflectivity Time Series Using SeaWiFS, N7-TOMS, EP-TOMS, SBUV-2, and OMI Radiance Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, J. R.; Labow, G.; Hsu, N. C.; Larko, D.

    2009-01-01

    The amount of solar radiation reflected back to space or reaching the Earth's surface is primarily governed by the amount of cloud cover and, to a much lesser extent, by Rayleigh scatteri ng, aerosols, and various absorbing gases (e.g., O3, NO2, H2O). A useful measure of the effect of cloud plus aerosol cover is given by the amount that the 331 run Lambert Equivalent Reflectivity (LER) ofa scene exceeds the surfuce reflectivity for snow/ice-free scenes after Rayleigh scattering has been removed. Twenty-eight years of reflectivity data are available by overlapping data from several satellites: N7 (Nimbus 7, TOMS; 331 nm) from 1979 to 1992, SBUV-2 series (Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet, NOAA; 331 nm) 1985 to 2007, EP (Earth-Probe, TOMS; 331 nm) 1997 to 2006, SW (SeaWiFS; 412 nm) 1998 to 2006, and OMI (Ozone Measuring Instrument; 331 nm) 2004-2007. Only N7 and SW have a sufficiently long data record, Sun-synchronous orbits, and are adequately calibrated for long-term reflectivity trend estimation. Reflectivity data derived from these instruments and the SBUV-2 series are compared during the overlapping years. Key issues in determining long-term reflecti vity changes that have occurred during the N7 and SW operating periods are discussed. The largest reflectivity changes in the 412 nm SW LER and 331 nm EP LER are found to occur near the equator and are associated with a large EI Nino-Southern Oscillation event. Most other changes that have occurred are regional, such as the apparent cloud decrease over northern Europe since 1998. The fractional occurrence (fraction of days) of high reflectivity values over Hudson Bay, Canada (snow/ice and clouds) appears to have decreased when comparing reflectivity data from 1980 to 1992 to 1997-2006, suggesting shorter duration of ice in Hudson Bay since 1980.

  13. Comparison of Galileo Probe and Earth-Based Translation Rates of Jupiter's Equatorial Clouds

    PubMed

    Beebe; Simon; Huber

    1996-05-10

    The Doppler wind speeds derived from Galileo probe data are comparable with the maximum translation speeds observed in the equatorial zone by Voyager 1 and the Hubble Space Telescope. Slower published values of east-west winds are based on measurements of larger features and should be interpreted as translation rates of large weather systems interacting with the wind. The nature of the hot-spot region that the Galileo probe entered is compatible with a high-speed jet at 6 degrees north. The hot spot is associated with an equatorial weather system that spans 5 degrees of latitude and translates at 103 meters per second. PMID:8662572

  14. Tom40, the pore-forming component of the protein-conducting TOM channel in the outer membrane of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Ahting, U; Thieffry, M; Engelhardt, H; Hegerl, R; Neupert, W; Nussberger, S

    2001-06-11

    Tom40 is the main component of the preprotein translocase of the outer membrane of mitochondria (TOM complex). We have isolated Tom40 of Neurospora crassa by removing the receptor Tom22 and the small Tom components Tom6 and Tom7 from the purified TOM core complex. Tom40 is organized in a high molecular mass complex of approximately 350 kD. It forms a high conductance channel. Mitochondrial presequence peptides interact specifically with Tom40 reconstituted into planar lipid membranes and decrease the ion flow through the pores in a voltage-dependent manner. The secondary structure of Tom40 comprises approximately 31% beta-sheet, 22% alpha-helix, and 47% remaining structure as determined by circular dichroism measurements and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Electron microscopy of purified Tom40 revealed particles primarily with one center of stain accumulation. They presumably represent an open pore with a diameter of approximately 2.5 nm, similar to the pores found in the TOM complex. Thus, Tom40 is the core element of the TOM translocase; it forms the protein-conducting channel in an oligomeric assembly. PMID:11402060

  15. A simple method for verifying the deployment of the TOMS-EP solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koppersmith, James R.; Ketchum, Eleanor

    1995-01-01

    The Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer-Earth Probe (TOMS-EP) mission relies upon a successful deployment of the spacecraft's solar arrays. Several methods of verification are being employed to ascertain the solar array deployment status, with each requiring differing amounts of data. This paper describes a robust attitude-independent verification method that utilizes telemetry from the coarse Sun sensors (CSS's) and the three-axis magnetometers (TAM's) to determine the solar array deployment status - and it can do so with only a few, not necessarily contiguous, points of data. The method developed assumes that the solar arrays are deployed. Telemetry data from the CSS and TAM are converted to the Sun and magnetic field vectors in spacecraft body coordinates, and the angle between them is calculated. Deployment is indicated if this angle is within a certain error tolerance of the angle between the reference Sun and magnetic field vectors. Although several other methods can indicate a non-deployed state, with this method there is a 70% confidence level in confirming deployment as well as a nearly 100% certainty in confirming a non-deployed state. In addition, the spacecraft attitude (which is not known during the first orbit after launch) is not needed for this algorithm because the angle between the Sun and magnetic field vectors is independent of the spacecraft attitude. This technique can be applied to any spacecraft with a TAM and with CSS's mounted on the solar array(s).

  16. LILBID-mass spectrometry of the mitochondrial preprotein translocase TOM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mager, Frauke; Sokolova, Lucie; Lintzel, Julia; Brutschy, Bernhard; Nussberger, Stephan

    2010-11-01

    In the present work we applied a novel mass spectrometry method termed laser-induced liquid bead ion desorption mass spectrometry (LILBID-MS) to the outer mitochondrial membrane protein translocon TOM to analyze its subunit composition and stoichiometry. With TOM core complex, purified at high pH, we demonstrate that a TOM core complex of Neurospora crassa is composed of at least two Tom40 and Tom22 molecules, respectively, and more than five small Tom subunits between 5.5 and 6.4 kDa. We show that the multiprotein complex has a total molecular mass higher than 170 depending on the number of Tom5, Tom6 and Tom7 molecules bound.

  17. Nimbus-7 TOMS Version 7 Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wellemeyer, C. G.; Taylor, S. L.; Jaross, G.; DeLand, M. T.; Seftor, C. J.; Labow, G.; Swissler, T. J.; Cebula, R. P.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes an improved instrument characterization used for the Version 7 processing of the Nimbus-7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) data record. An improved internal calibration technique referred to as spectral discrimination is used to provide long-term calibration precision of +/- 1%/decade in total column ozone amount. A revised wavelength scale results in a day one calibration that agrees with other satellite and ground-based measurements of total ozone, while a wavelength independent adjustment of the initial radiometric calibration constants provides good agreement with surface reflectivity measured by other satellite-borne ultraviolet measurements. The impact of other aspects of the Nimbus-7 TOMS instrument performance are also discussed. The Version 7 data should be used in all future studies involving the Nimbus-7 TOMS measurements of ozone. The data are available through the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Distributive Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  18. Nimbus/TOMS Science Data Operations Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Projected goals include the following: (1) Participate in and provide analysis of laboratory and in-flight calibration of LTV sensors used for space observations of backscattered LTV radiation; (2) Provide support to the TOMS Science Operations Center, including generating instrument command lists and analysis of TOMS health and safety data; (3) Develop and maintain software and algorithms designed to capture and process raw spacecraft and instrument data, convert the instrument output into measured radiance and irradiances, and produce scientifically valid products; (4) Process the TOMS data into Level 1, Level 2, and Level 3 data products; (5) Provide analysis of the science data products in support of NASA GSFC Code 916's research.

  19. Swept-frequency UHF radiometer for deep probes of earth - A concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koppl, W.

    1970-01-01

    Radiometer, developed for use on moon or planets, could be used to - determine layering and structure as deep as 100 feet below earth surface, determine physical properties of subsurface by variation of dielectric constants, identify types of materials including ore bodies and oil, and locate subsurface deposits of moisture.

  20. Recent near-Earth supernovae probed by global deposition of interstellar radioactive (60)Fe.

    PubMed

    Wallner, A; Feige, J; Kinoshita, N; Paul, M; Fifield, L K; Golser, R; Honda, M; Linnemann, U; Matsuzaki, H; Merchel, S; Rugel, G; Tims, S G; Steier, P; Yamagata, T; Winkler, S R

    2016-04-01

    The rate of supernovae in our local Galactic neighbourhood within a distance of about 100 parsecs from Earth is estimated to be one every 2-4 million years, based on the total rate in the Milky Way (2.0 ± 0.7 per century). Recent massive-star and supernova activity in Earth's vicinity may be traced by radionuclides with half-lives of up to 100 million years, if trapped in interstellar dust grains that penetrate the Solar System. One such radionuclide is (60)Fe (with a half-life of 2.6 million years), which is ejected in supernova explosions and winds from massive stars. Here we report that the (60)Fe signal observed previously in deep-sea crusts is global, extended in time and of interstellar origin from multiple events. We analysed deep-sea archives from all major oceans for (60)Fe deposition via the accretion of interstellar dust particles. Our results reveal (60)Fe interstellar influxes onto Earth at 1.5-3.2 million years ago and at 6.5-8.7 million years ago. The signal measured implies that a few per cent of fresh (60)Fe was captured in dust and deposited on Earth. Our findings indicate multiple supernova and massive-star events during the last ten million years at distances of up to 100 parsecs. PMID:27078565

  1. Scientific and Operational Requirements for TOMS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Arlin J. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    Global total ozone and sulfur dioxide data from the Nimbus 7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instrument have applications in a broad range of disciplines. The presentations of 29 speakers who are using the data in research or who have operational needs for the data are summarized. Five sessions addressed topics in stratospheric processes, tropospheric dynamics and chemistry, remote sensing, volcanology, and future instrument requirements. Stratospheric and some volcanology requirements can be met by a continuation of polar orbit satellites using a slightly modified TOMS but weather related research, tropospheric sulfur budget studies, and most operational needs require the time resolution of a geostationary instrument.

  2. TOMS Near Realtime System design document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puccinelli, E. F.

    1981-01-01

    The System Design Document for the TOMS (Total Mapping Spectrometer) Near Realtime System provides detailed definition of the system functions and records the system history from a data processing and development point-of-view. The system was designed to produce map products displaying ozone concentrations over the United States as measured by the TOMS flown on the NIMBUS 7 satellite. The maps were produced and delivered to the user within six hours of round receipt of the satellite data for the period March 1, 1981 through May 15, 1981 on a daily basis. Sample system products are shown and data archival locations are listed.

  3. GeoSystems: Probing Climate and Linked Systems of Earth's Deep-Time Dark Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soreghan, G. S.

    2004-12-01

    GeoSystems is a developing community-based initiative that focuses on the importance of the deep-time perspective for understanding the complexities of Earth's atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere and surficial lithosphere using climate as the focus. Earth's climate operates on a continuum of temporal, spatial and parametric scales. The deep-time geologic record preserves the results of multiple large-scale experiments in climate and broader environmental change, many of which are far more extreme than those archived in instrumental, historical, or Quaternary records, but are potentially repeatable on human time scales. Indeed, aspects of our modern climate are now returning to a state last known from "deep" time. Understanding the ranges, rates, and processes responsible for these "alternative Earth" extremes in global systems behavior is critical for developing a holistic knowledge of our planet's climate system and constraining predictions of future scenarios. Processes such as extinction and evolution of species, orogenic and magmatic events, sea-level change, and the like operate over a variety of time scales and are complexly entwined with climatic trends, many of which also operate over a variety of time scales and must be viewed within the context of the deep-time perspective. Recent research on Earth's climate and linked systems behavior in deep time is shattering previous preconceptions and interpretations by reconstructing, with increasing rigor and resolution, key parameters such as atmospheric CO2, sea-surface temperatures, rates and modes of ocean circulation, ocean state (anoxia, nutrient status, biological productivity), winds, seasonality, and even diurnal terrestrial temperatures from records dating from millions of years in the past. Beyond this, these same records are simultaneously teaching us how the climate system interacted with Earth's biosphere, lithosphere, and hydrosphere in ways previously unimagined.

  4. The long-term global record on Aerosol Absorption Optical Depth from TOMS and OMI observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, O.; Bhartia, P.; Ahn, C.; Veefkind, P.

    2006-12-01

    Carbonaceous aerosols from biomass burning and boreal forest fires, and desert dust lofted by the winds from the world major arid and semi-arid areas are among the most long-lived aerosol types in the Earth's atmosphere, since they often reach the free troposphere and are sometimes transported thousands of kilometers from their original sources. A lot has been learned about the global distribution of aerosol sources, and the transport patterns of these aerosol types since the development of the near-UV methods of aerosol detection and characterization using data from the TOMS series of instruments. Because both smoke and desert dust aerosols absorb UV-radiation, the TOMS aerosol sensing technique is specially suited for tracking these aerosol types over variety of surfaces including clouds and snow. TOMS aerosol observations, for instance, have been fundamental in discovering that carbonaceous aerosols associated with wild fires at mid and high latitudes often reach the lower stratosphere, and travel as far as the remote polar regions. We have recently completed the development of an improved algorithm to derive quantitative information about aerosol absorption optical depth using near-UV data. We will discuss the multi- decadal global record on aerosol absorption optical depth produced using TOMS and OMI sensors, and review the multiple contributions of the TOMS-OMI record to the current understanding of the factors that govern the observed temporal and spatial distribution of smoke and desert dust aerosols.

  5. Optical probes for the detection of protons, and alkali and alkaline earth metal cations.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Graham R C; Sahoo, Suban K; Kamila, Sukanta; Singh, Narinder; Kaur, Navneet; Hyland, Barry W; Callan, John F

    2015-07-01

    Luminescent sensors and switches continue to play a key role in shaping our understanding of key biochemical processes, assist in the diagnosis of disease and contribute to the design of new drugs and therapies. Similarly, their contribution to the environment cannot be understated as they offer a portable means to undertake field testing for hazardous chemicals and pollutants such as heavy metals. From a physiological perspective, the Group I and II metal ions are among the most important in the periodic table with blood plasma levels of H(+), Na(+) and Ca(2+) being indicators of several possible disease states. In this review, we examine the progress that has been made in the development of luminescent probes for Group I and Group II ions as well as protons. The potential applications of these probes and the mechanism involved in controlling their luminescent response upon analyte binding will also be discussed. PMID:25742963

  6. Ion probe determinations of the rare earth concentrations of individual meteoritic phosphate grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crozaz, G.; Zinner, E.

    1985-01-01

    A new ion probe method for quantitative measurements of the concentrations of all the REE down to the ppm level in 5-20 micron spots is presented. The first application of the method is the determination of REE abundances in meteoritic phosphates. Results are shown to be in good agreement with previous INAA and ion probe determinations. The merrillites in the St. Severin amphoterite are richer in REE than the apatites (the enrichment factors, for various REE, range from 2.3 to 14.2) in contradiction with the results of Ebihara and Honda (1983). Provided good standards for other mineral phases are found or implanted marker ion techniques are used, the method should find a wide range of applications for the study of both terrestrial and extraterrestrial crystals at the microscopic level.

  7. Changes in Earth 360 380 nm Reflectivity: 1980 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, J. R.; Ziemke, G.; Larko, D.

    2002-01-01

    The Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) reflectivity time series 1980 to 1992 and 1997 to 2000 have been combined to estimate change that have occurred over a 21 year period. The relative calibration of the two TOMS (Nimbus-7, N7 and Earth-Probe, EP) has been adjusted using the measured minimum reflectivity over mid-latitude ocean and land locations (50o). The result is that the N7 reflectivity has been decreased by 0.02 to match the better-calibrated Earth-Probe/TOMS. Most of the local trend features seen in the N7 time series (1980 to 1992) have been continued in the combined time series, but the overall zonal average and global trends have changed. The correlation of cloud cover with solar activity (measured by the 10.7 cm solar radiation) that was present during the Nimbus-7 period (1980 to 1992) is no longer evident for the period 1980 to 2000. The UV reflectivity data are compared with changes in the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Outgoing Long-wavelength Radiation (OLR) and show an expected anti-correlation with cloud-cover changes over the same period for many, but not all, features. The key results include a continuing decrease in cloud cover over Europe and North America and an increase in reflectivity near climatology should be reduced by 0.02. The TOMS reflectivity time series 1980 to 1992 and 1997 to 2000 have been Antarctica. This also means that the previously published N7 UV surface reflectivity.

  8. Recognition of preproteins by the isolated TOM complex of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Stan, T; Ahting, U; Dembowski, M; Künkele, K P; Nussberger, S; Neupert, W; Rapaport, D

    2000-09-15

    A multisubunit complex in the mitochondrial outer membrane, the TOM complex, mediates targeting and membrane translocation of nuclear-encoded preproteins. We have isolated the TOM holo complex, containing the preprotein receptor components Tom70 and Tom20, and the TOM core complex, which lacks these receptors. The interaction of recombinant mitochondrial preproteins with both types of soluble TOM complex was analyzed. Preproteins bound efficiently in a specific manner to the isolated complexes in the absence of chaperones and lipids in a bilayer structure. Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, a dissociation constant in the nanomolar range was determined. The affinity was lower when the preprotein was stabilized in its folded conformation. Following the initial binding, the presequence was transferred into the translocation pore in a step that required unfolding of the mature part of the preprotein. This translocation step was also mediated by protease-treated TOM holo complex, which contains almost exclusively Tom40. Thus, the TOM core complex, consisting of Tom40, Tom22, Tom6 and Tom7, is a molecular machine that can recognize and partially translocate mitochondrial precursor proteins. PMID:10990453

  9. Probing the absolute density of the Earth's core using a vertical neutrino beam

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, Walter

    2005-08-01

    We demonstrate that one could measure the absolute matter density of the Earth's core with a vertical neutrino factory baseline at the per cent level for sin{sup 2}2{theta}{sub 13} > or approx. 0.01, where we include all correlations with the oscillation parameters in the analysis. We discuss the geographical feasibility of such an approach, and illustrate how the results change as a function of the detector location. We point out the complementarity to geophysics.

  10. Characterization of Neurospora crassa Tom40-deficient mutants and effect of specific mutations on Tom40 assembly.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Rebecca D; McHale, Bryan J; Nargang, Frank E

    2003-01-10

    The TOM complex (Translocase of the Outer mitochondrial Membrane) is responsible for the recognition of mitochondrial preproteins synthesized in the cytosol and for their translocation across or into the outer mitochondrial membrane. Tom40 is the major component of the TOM complex and forms the translocation pore. We have created a tom40 mutant of Neurospora crassa and have demonstrated that the gene is essential for the viability of the organism. Mitochondria with reduced levels of Tom40 were deficient for import of mitochondrial preproteins and contained reduced levels of the TOM complex components Tom22 and Tom6, suggesting that the import and/or stability of these proteins is dependent on the presence of Tom40. Mutant Tom40 preproteins were analyzed for their ability to be assembled into the TOM complex. In vitro import assays revealed that conserved regions near the N terminus (residues 51-60) and the C terminus (residues 321-323) of the 349-amino acid protein were required for assembly beyond a 250-kDa intermediate form. Mutant strains expressing Tom40 with residues 51-60 deleted were viable but exhibited growth defects. Slow growing mutants expressing Tom40, where residues 321-323 were changed to Ala residues, were isolated but showed TOM complex defects, whereas strains in which residues 321-323 were deleted could not be isolated. Analysis of the assembly of mutant Tom40 precursors in vitro supported a previous model in which Tom40 precursors progress from the 250-kDa intermediate to a 100-kDa form and then assemble into the 400-kDa TOM complex. Surprisingly, when wild type mitochondria containing Tom40 precursors arrested at the 250-kDa intermediate were treated with sodium carbonate, further assembly of intermediates into the TOM complex occurred, suggesting that disruption of protein-protein interactions may facilitate assembly. Import of wild type Tom40 precursor into mitochondria containing a mutant Tom40 lacking residues 40-48 revealed an alternate

  11. Antiferromagnetic Spin Coupling between Rare Earth Adatoms and Iron Islands Probed by Spin-Polarized Tunneling.

    PubMed

    Coffey, David; Diez-Ferrer, José Luis; Serrate, David; Ciria, Miguel; de la Fuente, César; Arnaudas, José Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    High-density magnetic storage or quantum computing could be achieved using small magnets with large magnetic anisotropy, a requirement that rare-earth iron alloys fulfill in bulk. This compelling property demands a thorough investigation of the magnetism in low dimensional rare-earth iron structures. Here, we report on the magnetic coupling between 4f single atoms and a 3d magnetic nanoisland. Thulium and lutetium adatoms deposited on iron monolayer islands pseudomorphically grown on W(110) have been investigated at low temperature with scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. The spin-polarized current indicates that both kind of adatoms have in-plane magnetic moments, which couple antiferromagnetically with their underlying iron islands. Our first-principles calculations explain the observed behavior, predicting an antiparallel coupling of the induced 5d electrons magnetic moment of the lanthanides with the 3d magnetic moment of iron, as well as their in-plane orientation, and pointing to a non-contribution of 4f electrons to the spin-polarized tunneling processes in rare earths. PMID:26333417

  12. Antiferromagnetic Spin Coupling between Rare Earth Adatoms and Iron Islands Probed by Spin-Polarized Tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffey, David; Diez-Ferrer, José Luis; Serrate, David; Ciria, Miguel; Fuente, César De La; Arnaudas, José Ignacio

    2015-09-01

    High-density magnetic storage or quantum computing could be achieved using small magnets with large magnetic anisotropy, a requirement that rare-earth iron alloys fulfill in bulk. This compelling property demands a thorough investigation of the magnetism in low dimensional rare-earth iron structures. Here, we report on the magnetic coupling between 4f single atoms and a 3d magnetic nanoisland. Thulium and lutetium adatoms deposited on iron monolayer islands pseudomorphically grown on W(110) have been investigated at low temperature with scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. The spin-polarized current indicates that both kind of adatoms have in-plane magnetic moments, which couple antiferromagnetically with their underlying iron islands. Our first-principles calculations explain the observed behavior, predicting an antiparallel coupling of the induced 5d electrons magnetic moment of the lanthanides with the 3d magnetic moment of iron, as well as their in-plane orientation, and pointing to a non-contribution of 4f electrons to the spin-polarized tunneling processes in rare earths.

  13. Recent near-Earth supernovae probed by global deposition of interstellar radioactive 60Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallner, A.; Feige, J.; Kinoshita, N.; Paul, M.; Fifield, L. K.; Golser, R.; Honda, M.; Linnemann, U.; Matsuzaki, H.; Merchel, S.; Rugel, G.; Tims, S. G.; Steier, P.; Yamagata, T.; Winkler, S. R.

    2016-04-01

    The rate of supernovae in our local Galactic neighbourhood within a distance of about 100 parsecs from Earth is estimated to be one every 2-4 million years, based on the total rate in the Milky Way (2.0 ± 0.7 per century). Recent massive-star and supernova activity in Earth’s vicinity may be traced by radionuclides with half-lives of up to 100 million years, if trapped in interstellar dust grains that penetrate the Solar System. One such radionuclide is 60Fe (with a half-life of 2.6 million years), which is ejected in supernova explosions and winds from massive stars. Here we report that the 60Fe signal observed previously in deep-sea crusts is global, extended in time and of interstellar origin from multiple events. We analysed deep-sea archives from all major oceans for 60Fe deposition via the accretion of interstellar dust particles. Our results reveal 60Fe interstellar influxes onto Earth at 1.5-3.2 million years ago and at 6.5-8.7 million years ago. The signal measured implies that a few per cent of fresh 60Fe was captured in dust and deposited on Earth. Our findings indicate multiple supernova and massive-star events during the last ten million years at distances of up to 100 parsecs.

  14. Antiferromagnetic Spin Coupling between Rare Earth Adatoms and Iron Islands Probed by Spin-Polarized Tunneling

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, David; Diez-Ferrer, José Luis; Serrate, David; Ciria, Miguel; Fuente, César de la; Arnaudas, José Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    High-density magnetic storage or quantum computing could be achieved using small magnets with large magnetic anisotropy, a requirement that rare-earth iron alloys fulfill in bulk. This compelling property demands a thorough investigation of the magnetism in low dimensional rare-earth iron structures. Here, we report on the magnetic coupling between 4f single atoms and a 3d magnetic nanoisland. Thulium and lutetium adatoms deposited on iron monolayer islands pseudomorphically grown on W(110) have been investigated at low temperature with scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. The spin-polarized current indicates that both kind of adatoms have in-plane magnetic moments, which couple antiferromagnetically with their underlying iron islands. Our first-principles calculations explain the observed behavior, predicting an antiparallel coupling of the induced 5d electrons magnetic moment of the lanthanides with the 3d magnetic moment of iron, as well as their in-plane orientation, and pointing to a non-contribution of 4f electrons to the spin-polarized tunneling processes in rare earths. PMID:26333417

  15. Toms River Drivers Manual 1984-1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Patricia

    The procedures in this manual are designed to establish stability and continuity within the student transportation department of the Toms River Regional Schools in New Jersey. The manual is divided into three sections. Section 1 provides driver and aide specific information. It includes directives related to time clock, spare buses, and…

  16. 05-NIF Dedication: Tom D'Agostino

    SciTech Connect

    Tom D'Agostino,

    2009-07-02

    The National Ignition Facility, the world's largest laser system, was dedicated at a ceremony on May 29, 2009 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These are the remarks by Tom D'Agostino, the administrator of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration.

  17. Tom Wolfe and the Uses of Argument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kallan, Richard A.

    Tom Wolfe is widely regarded as the leading theorist and practitioner of New Journalism, the journalistic genre that combines the stylistic features of fiction and the reportorial obligations of journalism to produce a "novelistic sounding" but nonetheless factual literature. The saliency of Wolfe's stylistic boldness has prompted many to conclude…

  18. Tropospheric Ozone from the TOMS TDOT (TOMS-Direct-Ozone-in-Troposphere) Technique During SAFARI-2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, J. B.; Thompson, A. M.; Frolov, A. D.; Hudson, R. D.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    There are a number of published residual-type methods for deriving tropospheric ozone from TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer). The basic concept of these methods is that within a zone of constant stratospheric ozone, the tropospheric ozone column can be computed by subtracting stratospheric ozone from the TOMS Level 2 total ozone column, We used the modified-residual method for retrieving tropospheric ozone during SAFARI-2000 and found disagreements with in-situ ozone data over Africa in September 2000. Using the newly developed TDOT (TOMS-Direct-Ozone-in-Troposphere) method that uses TOMS radiances and a modified lookup table based on actual profiles during high ozone pollution periods, new maps were prepared and found to compare better to soundings over Lusaka, Zambia (15.5 S, 28 E), Nairobi and several African cities where MOZAIC aircraft operated in September 2000. The TDOT technique and comparisons are described in detail.

  19. Probing Core Processes in the Earth and Small Bodies Using Paleomagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, R. R.; Weiss, B. P.; Lima, E. A.; Glenn, D. R.; Kehayias, P.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2015-12-01

    Convective motion in the cores of differentiated metal-silicate bodies may sustain a global dynamo magnetic field. Progressive crystallization in a dynamo-generating core is expected to play a central role in determining the observable properties of the hosted magnetic field. Importantly, the release of light elements and latent heat during core crystallization is a key source of entropy for sustaining core convection. Therefore, the persistence and intensity of a dynamo magnetic field depend directly on the extent and style of core crystallization. We present and discuss paleomagnetic data from the Earth and asteroid-sized bodies to characterize internally generated magnetic fields during the early histories of these objects. In the case of the Earth, recent and ongoing paleomagnetic experiments of zircons from the Jack Hills of Australia can potentially constrain the existence and intensity of the geodynamo before 3.5 Ga. If robust, such measurements hold strong implications for the energy budget of the Earth's early core and the dynamics of the early mantle. We will discuss both recently published and preliminary results and assess carefully the challenges and uncertainties of paleomagnetic experimentation on ancient zircon samples. In the case of small bodies, several classes of meteorites record ancient magnetic fields likely produced by core dynamos on their parent bodies. Data from the CV carbonaceous chondrites and pallasites indicate that dynamos in planetesimal-sized bodies persisted for a broad range of timescales between ~10 My and >100 My. Meanwhile, measurements of the angrite group of achondrites show that their earliest-forming members crystallized in an almost non-magnetic environment, suggesting a delayed onset of the planetesimal dynamo until several My after initial differentiation. We will discuss the possible causes for this observed diversity of small body dynamo properties, including the role of core crystallization and the distribution of

  20. Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) 1998-2000 tropical ozone climatology 1. Comparison with Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) and ground-based measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Anne M.; Witte, Jacquelyn C.; McPeters, Richard D.; Oltmans, Samuel J.; Schmidlin, Francis J.; Logan, Jennifer A.; Fujiwara, Masatomo; Kirchhoff, Volker W. J. H.; Posny, FrançOise; Coetzee, Gert J. R.; Hoegger, Bruno; Kawakami, Shuji; Ogawa, Toshihiro; Johnson, Bryan J.; VöMel, Holger; Labow, Gordon

    2003-01-01

    A network of 10 southern hemisphere tropical and subtropical stations, designated the Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) project and established from operational sites, provided over 1000 ozone profiles during the period 1998-2000. Balloon-borne electrochemical concentration cell (ECC) ozonesondes, combined with standard radiosondes for pressure, temperature, and relative humidity measurements, collected profiles in the troposphere and lower to midstratosphere at: Ascension Island; Nairobi, Kenya; Irene, South Africa; Réunion Island; Watukosek, Java; Fiji; Tahiti; American Samoa; San Cristóbal, Galapagos; and Natal, Brazil. The archived data are available at: . In this paper, uncertainties and accuracies within the SHADOZ ozone data set are evaluated by analyzing: (1) imprecisions in profiles and in methods of extrapolating ozone above balloon burst; (2) comparisons of column-integrated total ozone from sondes with total ozone from the Earth-Probe/Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) satellite and ground-based instruments; and (3) possible biases from station to station due to variations in ozonesonde characteristics. The key results are the following: (1) Ozonesonde precision is 5%. (2) Integrated total ozone column amounts from the sondes are usually to within 5% of independent measurements from ground-based instruments at five SHADOZ sites and overpass measurements from the TOMS satellite (version 7 data). (3) Systematic variations in TOMS-sonde offsets and in ground-based-sonde offsets from station to station reflect biases in sonde technique as well as in satellite retrieval. Discrepancies are present in both stratospheric and tropospheric ozone. (4) There is evidence for a zonal wave-one pattern in total and tropospheric ozone, but not in stratospheric ozone.

  1. Calibration and postlaunch performance of the Meteor 3/TOMS instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Jaross, G.; Krueger, A.; Cebula, R.P.; Seftor, C.; Hartmann, U.; Haring, R.; Burchfield, D. ||

    1995-02-01

    Prelaunch and postlaunch calibration results for the Meteor 3/total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) instrument are presented here. Ozone amounts are retrieved from measurements of Earth albedo in the 312- to 380-nm range. The accuracy of albedo measurements is primarily tied to knowledge of the reflective properties of diffusers used in the calibrations and to the instrument`s wavelength selection. These and other important prelaunch calibrations are presented. Their estimated accuracies are within the bounds necessary to determine column ozone to better than 1%. However, postlaunch validation results indicate some prelaunch calibration uncertainties may be larger than originally estimated. Instrument calibrations have been maintained postlaunch to within a corresponding 1% error in retrieved ozone. Onboard calibrations, including wavelength monitoring and a three-diffuser solar measurement system, are described and specific results are presented. Other issues, such as the effects of orbital precession on calibration and recent chopper wheel malfunctions, are also discussed.

  2. Origin and cycle of water on Earth as determined by Ion probe H and D/H measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deloule, E.

    2009-12-01

    The question of the origin of water on Earth, and of its abundance has been the object of numerous debates, as well as for the other terrestrial planets. Furthermore the presence and amount of water, or more commonly fluids, in the mantle and continental crust are crucial issues for determining their nature and evolution. Ion probe have been a major tool during the last 3 decades to measure in situ water content, D/H ratio and other elements in various terrestrial and extraterrestrial samples of both hydrous and nominally anhydrous minerals. In a first step, the set up of D/H ratio measurements by ion probe on hydrous minerals [1], often to scarce in peridotite samples to be measurable by conventional mass spectrometry, pointed out variations of δD values in mantle peridotite [2,3] larger than expected (from 0 to -140), both at the mineral grain or regional scales. Such variations point out surface water recycling in the mantle, water exchange during metasomatic reaction and D-H fractionation during mantle processes, and a possible evolution of the Earth mantle D/H ratio through geological time. The determination of D/H ratio in the silicate phases of the matrix and chondrules of primitive meteorites provides new evidences for the source of water in the solar system: the high dD values recorded, up to 3500, implies the uptake of water ice formed in the interstellar media, during the protosolar nebula accretion [3-4]. The D-H budget suggests that up to 10% of Earth and meteorite water originated from interstellar media. The measurements of Martian meteorites [5-6] show contrasted results, with D enriched values associated to the interaction with the Martian surface water and D poor values interpreted as initial values. The development of in situ water content measurements in glasses and nominally anhydrous minerals (NAMs) [7-8] allows a more comprehensive study of the water behavior in the depth Earth. The characterization of its distribution in between the

  3. Changes in Earth 360 to 380 nm Reflectivity: 1980 to 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, J. R.; Ziemke, G.; Larko, D.

    2002-01-01

    The TOMS reflectivity time series 1980 to 1992 and 1997 to 2000 have been combined to estimate change that have occurred over a 21 year period. The relative calibration of the two TOMS (Nimbus-7, N7 and Earth-Probe, EP) has been adjusted using the measured minimum reflectivity over mid-latitude ocean and land locations (50 deg.). The result is that the N7 reflectivity has been decreased by 0.02 to match the better-calibrated Earth-Probe/TOMS. Most of the local trend features seen in the N7 time series (1980 to 1992) have been continued in the combined time series, but the overall zonal average and global trends have changed. The correlation of cloud cover with solar activity (measured by the 10.7 cm solar radiation) that was present during the Nimbus-7 period (1980 to 1992) is no longer evident for the period 1980 to 2000. The UV reflectivity data are compared with changes in the AVHRR outgoing long-wavelength radiation (OLR) and show an expected anti-correlation with cloud-cover changes over the same period for many, but not all, features. The key results include a continuing decrease in cloud cover over Europe and North America and an increase in reflectivity near Antarctica. This also means that the previously published N7 UV surface reflectivity climatology should be reduced by 0.02.

  4. Dr. Tom Lawrence: a life in chiropractic

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Joseph C

    2005-01-01

    He dwelt within the chiropractic orbit from the cradle to the grave. Second-generation chiropractor Tom Lawrence was a successful professional and family man who followed in his father’s footsteps and fought the good fight to improve chiropractic within his state and nation. His passing closes a chapter of living memory of the middle years of the first chiropractic century. PMID:17549212

  5. ACM TOMS replicated computational results initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Heroux, Michael Allen

    2015-06-03

    In this study, the scientific community relies on the peer review process for assuring the quality of published material, the goal of which is to build a body of work we can trust. Computational journals such as The ACM Transactions on Mathematical Software (TOMS) use this process for rigorously promoting the clarity and completeness of content, and citation of prior work. At the same time, it is unusual to independently confirm computational results.

  6. ACM TOMS replicated computational results initiative

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Heroux, Michael Allen

    2015-06-03

    In this study, the scientific community relies on the peer review process for assuring the quality of published material, the goal of which is to build a body of work we can trust. Computational journals such as The ACM Transactions on Mathematical Software (TOMS) use this process for rigorously promoting the clarity and completeness of content, and citation of prior work. At the same time, it is unusual to independently confirm computational results.

  7. TOMS as a monitor of the ultraviolet radiation environment: Applications to photobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, John E.

    1987-01-01

    The flux of biologically relevant ultraviolet radiation that reaches the surface of the Earth varies with the ozone amount, surface reflectivity, and cloudcover. The Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) provides information relevant to all three items. A recent application of satellite-based ozone measurements has been to develop climatologies of the biologically significant UV-B radiation reaching the Earth's surface. A growing body of research suggests that UV-B radiation tends to suppress the immune system of laboratory mice. At tropical latitudes, it is likely that parasitical diseases develop most readily in people who have experienced immune system suppression from UV-B exposure. The computed distribution of surface radiation combined with information on disease incidence may clarify the role of UV-B as a suppressor of the human immune system. TOMS used in conjunction with radiative transfer calculations can provide information of relevance in photobiology.

  8. Van Allen Probe Observations: Near-Earth injections of Mev Electrons Associated with Intense Substorm Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, L.; Wygant, J. R.; Bonnell, J. W.; Cattell, C. A.; Kletzing, C.; Baker, D. N.; Li, X.; Malaspina, D.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Takahashi, K.; Funsten, H. O.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.; Angelopoulos, V.; Glassmeier, K. H.; Turner, D. L.; Thaller, S. A.; Breneman, A. W.; Kersten, K.; Tang, X.; Tao, X.

    2014-12-01

    With their unique orbit, the Van Allen Probes (RBSP) spacecraft are well suited to investigate near-Earth substorm injections that penetrate into the heart of outer radiation belts. Substorms are generally conceived to inject 10s-100s keV electrons but intense substorm electric fields have been shown capable of injecting ~MeV electrons as well at the geosynchronous altitude. An intriguing question is whether such MeV electron injections can penetrate to lower L shells and directly contribute to the relativistic electron population of the outer radiation belt. In this talk, we present RBSP observations of near-Earth substorm injection of MeV relativistic particles and associated intense dipolarization electric field at L ~5.5. The substorm injection occurred during a moderate storm (DST~-30 to -20) with steady solar wind conditions. RBSP-A observed dispersionless injection of electrons from 10s keV up to 3 MeV in the pre-mid night sector (MLT=22UT). The injection was associated with unusually large (60mV/m) dipolarization electric fields that lasted 1 minute. At about the same time, THEMIS-D observed energy-dispersive injection of electrons at energies as high as at least 720keV at L~6.8 in the pre-dawn sector. Injection of energetic protons (~1MeV) and proton drift echos were observed at RBSP-A as well. RBSP-A observed a broad spectrum of nonlinear electric field structures but no whistler waves at the injection. The properties of the observed dipolarization electric field constrain the acceleration mechanism responsible for the MeV electron injection. We will discuss the implications of these observations on the direct impact of substorms on the outer radiation belt.

  9. A comprehensive mission to planet Earth: Woods Hole Space Science and Applications Advisory Committee Planning Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The NASA program Mission to Planet Earth (MTPE) is described in this set of visuals presented in Massachusetts on July 29, 1991. The problem presented in this document is that the earth system is changing and that human activity accelerates the rate of change resulting in increased greenhouse gases, decreasing levels of stratospheric ozone, acid rain, deforestation, decreasing biodiversity, and overpopulation. Various national and international organizations are coordinating global change research. The complementary space observations for this activity are sun-synchronous polar orbits, low-inclination, low altitude orbits, geostationary orbits, and ground measurements. The Geostationary Earth Observatory is the major proposed mission of MTPE. Other proposed missions are EOS Synthetic Aperture Radar, ARISTOTELES Magnetic Field Experiment, and the Global Topography Mission. Use of the NASA DC-8 aircraft is outlined as carrying out the Airborne Science and Applications Program. Approved Earth Probes Program include the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS). Other packages for earth observation are described.

  10. The application of GNSS in the near-Earth navigation of China’s lunar probe CE-5T1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong; Fan, Min; Hu, Xiaogong; Li, Peijia

    2015-08-01

    After CE-1, CE-2 and CE-3, China’s fourth lunar probe CE-5T1 was launched on 23 Oct., 2014, which goal is to test the returning capability of the lunar probe. On 31 Oct., the landing portion of CE-5T1 successfully landed in the North China. CE-5T1 is a high eccentricity orbit with apogee of about 413 thousand km. A GNSS receiver was installed in CE-5T1 to test the ability of GNSS navigation for a High Earth Orbit (HEO) spacecraft. The receiver performed well and GPS side lobe signals have been tracked when the probe was at an altitude from 10000 to 60000 km during about two 3-hours periods, and most of time it is above the altitude of the GPS constellation. In these two periods, the average GPS satellites tracked is about 8-9, and the GDOP is from 1 to 30. We processed these GNSS data after the mission, and the noise level of the differenced pseudo-range is less than 10 m. We used the GNSS data to determine the orbit of CE-5T1, compared with the use of ground based tracking data including range, Doppler and VLBI. The results are encouraging, and the position difference between orbit determination (OD) with GNSS data and ground based data is less than 100 m. In CE-5T1 mission, the separation point is about 5000 km altitude, where the lander will separate from the orbiter then return to the ground. The separation point prediction accuracy directly affects the landing position. As plan there is a maneuver about 5 hours before the separation (canceled in fact), so there is only 3-4 hours tracking data to be used to predict the separation point. Analysis shows that combination of two types of data can improve the orbit accuracy as well as the accuracy of the predicted orbit. CE-5T1 made a successful test of the GNSS using for HEO spacecraft. Obviously, GNSS can be used as a low-cost OD sensor and the use of GNSS technique can reduce the observing pressure of the ground antenna in the lunar and deep space exploration.

  11. Nimbus-7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) data products user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpeters, Richard D.; Krueger, Arlin J.; Bhartia, P. K.; Herman, Jay R.; Oaks, Arnold; Ahmad, Ziuddin; Cebula, Richard P.; Schlesinger, Barry M.; Swissler, Tom; Taylor, Steven L.

    1993-01-01

    Two tape products from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) aboard the Nimbus-7 have been archived at the National Space Science Data Center. The instrument measures backscattered Earth radiance and incoming solar irradiance; their ratio -- the albedo -- is used in ozone retrievals. In-flight measurements are used to monitor changes in the instrument sensitivity. The algorithm to retrieve total column ozone compares the observed ratios of albedos at pairs of wavelengths with pair ratios calculated for different ozone values, solar zenith angles, and optical paths. The initial error in the absolute scale for TOMS total ozone is 3 percent, the one standard-deviation random error is 2 percent, and the drift is +/- 1.5 percent over 14.5 years. The High Density TOMS (HDTOMS) tape contains the measured albedos, the derived total ozone amount, reflectivity, and cloud-height information for each scan position. It also contains an index of SO2 contamination for each position. The Gridded TOMS (GRIDTOMS) tape contains daily total ozone and reflectivity in roughly equal area grids (110 km in latitude by about 100-150 km in longitude). Detailed descriptions of the tape structure and record formats are provided.

  12. Structural insights into proapoptotic signaling mediated by MTCH2, VDAC2, TOM40 and TOM22.

    PubMed

    Veresov, Valery G; Davidovskii, Alexander I

    2014-02-01

    Mitochondrial Outer Membrane (MOM) Permeabilization (MOMP) is a critical step in the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis and is regulated by the Bcl-2 family of proteins. In vitro studies using cardiolipin-containing liposomes as a MOM model have suggested that a mitochondria-specific phospholipid, cardiolipin, is of crucial importance in MOMP. However, recently it has been found that the MOM contains much less cardiolipin than it is required for liposome permeabilization. Shortly thereafter, several MOM proteins, such as VDAC2, MTCH2, TOM22 and TOM40, have been identified as the Bax, Bak and tBid receptors that are indispensable in MOMP, but the underlying mechanisms are elusive. Here, proapoptotic signaling mediated by these MOM receptors was explored in terms of 3D-structures of interacting proteins using computational modeling. The formation under apoptotic conditions of the TOM40/TOM22/tBid protein complex possessing a fairly high binding affinity towards Bax is predicted, suggesting the recruitment of Bax to mitochondria by this complex in apoptotic cells. Our simulations predict the displacement of Bax from the TOM40/TOM22/tBid/Bax complex by another Bax in auto-catalytic manner and explain, in terms of structure, the tBid-mediated displacement of Bak from the VDAC2/Bak complex. Computational modeling revealed high-affinity binding of Bid to MTCH2 suggesting both a quasi-constitutive residence of Bid in MTCH2-bound state in healthy cells and its caspase-8-mediated cleavage there under apoptotic conditions. Overall, our results provide structural details for important stages of apoptotic signaling mediated by MOM receptors and enrich its mechanistic understanding. PMID:24269536

  13. Solar EUV index for aeronomical studies at earth from Langmuir probe photoelectron measurements on the Pioneer Venus orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoegy, W. R.; Mahajan, K. K.

    1992-01-01

    A solar EUV index for aeronomical studies at earth, obtained from the Langmuir probe measurement of photoelectron current on the Pioneer Venus orbiter, is presented. To examine the potential of E sub EUV as a solar EUV flux index, the behavior of ionospheric parameters f sub 0 E, f sub 0 F1, and f sub 0 F2 are studied at midlatitude stations, and their relationship with E sub EUV and with the 10.7-cm solar radio flux is compared. f sub 0 F1 and f sub 0 F2 are found to be better correlated with E sub EUV than with the 10.7-cm flux. F sub 0 E is better correlated with the 10.7-cm flux, because the 10.7-cm flux is also a proxy for soft X-rays, which are an important ionizing source in the E region. A table is also presented for the EUV index, E sub EUV, for the period February 12, 1979, through most of 1991.

  14. Evolution of the Southern Hemisphere ozone hole as seen by TOMS from August 1979 to December 1991. (Videotape)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    The computerized color images of the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) showed the ozone distribution and levels in the Earth's southern hemisphere from August 1979 to December 1991 in this video. The annual variations were presented in a monthly format and the ozone levels were measured in Dobson units.

  15. Hydrodynamic Aspects of the Toms Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strel‧nikova, S. A.; Tkachenko, G. V.; Uryukov, B. A.

    2015-11-01

    The physicomathematical model of migration of polymers in a liquid turbulent flow in a pipe is based on a comparison of forces transverse to the motion of the mainstream flow: the Saffman, Magnus, and turbophoresis forces. It has been shown that the polymer particles are grouped near a certain boundary within the limits of the boundary layer. On this basis, the authors have made assumptions on the mechanism of suppression of turbulent pulsations and decrease in the viscous friction near the wall, which makes up the Toms effect. The proposed model satisfies, at least, qualitatively, various actually observed manifestations of the effect.

  16. The 1991 Antarctic ozone hole - TOMS observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Arlin; Schoeberl, Mark; Newman, Paul; Stolarski, Richard

    1992-01-01

    The 1991 Antarctic springtime ozone decline, as measured by the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), was similar to those of earlier deep ozone hole years, 1987, 1989, and 1990. The minimum total ozone value was recorded on October 5, 1991 at 108 Dobson units near the South Pole. This was 8 DU lower than in any of the earlier years. Four of the last five years have exhibited an extensive, deep ozone hole. The area of the hole was about the same as in 1987, 1989, and 1990. The recovery of the low total ozone values occurred in mid-November as the polar vortex broke up.

  17. Solar UV irradiance measured at ground and compared with satellite TOMS/NASA derived data at different locations in Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfram, W.; Quel, E.; Paladini, A.; Orce, V.; Piacentini, R. D.

    The solar UV radiation incident on different and distant places of Argentina (Ushuaia, Puerto Madryn, Buenos Aires and Jujuy) obtained at 305, 320, 340 and 380 nm with a GUV-511/Biospherical narrowband radiometer of the CONICET Latitudinal UV-PAR radiation monitoring network, were compared with TUV model calculations in order to derive the effective aerosol optical depths in the locations indicated above. The adjusted spectral curve is employed in order to determine, -with the inclusion of the erythemal action spectrum, the corresponding integrated dose for each day. This value, usually called exposure, is compared with the data derived at noon from those taken by the satellite instrument TOMS/NASA on board of Earth Probe. Other biological UV irradiances like carcinogenesis and ADN and plant damages are also analyzed. In particular, the signals produced by the ozone hole and minihole events (with values lowers or equal to 220 DU) are clearly distinguished in the biological actions that depend strongly on the most energetic UVB radiations.

  18. Nonphotochemical hole burning of organic dyes and rare earth ions in polymers and glasses: a probe of the amorphous state

    SciTech Connect

    Fearey, B.L.

    1986-01-01

    New and in depth studies of amorphous materials (e.g., glasses and polymers) probed via the low temperature optical technique of nonphotochemical hole burning (NPHB) are presented. An extensive review of the phenomena itself, along with selected topics involving the use of persistent hole burning techniques, is given. In addition, a semi-complete tabulation of essentially all hole burning systems to date is included. The deuteration dependence in an amorphous host is examined for the system of tetracene in an ethanol/methanol mixture. The results illustrate the importance of hydrogen bonding in the hole burning process. The discovery of a highly efficient (or facile) class of hole burning systems, i.e., ionic dyes in hydroxylated polymers (i.e., poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVOH) and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA)), is presented and discussed. Ultrafast relaxation processes (i.e., dephasing) are studied for the system of cresyl violet perchlorate (CV) in PVOH. Further, for the first time, NPHB of rare earth ions, specifically Pr/sup +3/ and Nd/sup +3/, in a soft organic glass (i.e., PVOH) is discussed briefly. Detailed experimental results of two related phenomena, spontaneous hole filling (SPHF) and laser induced hole filling (LIHF), are presented and discussed for several systems: rhodamine 560 perchlorate (R560), rhodamine 640 perchlorate (R640), CV, Pr/sup +3/ and Nd..mu../sup 3/ in either PVOH or PAA. A theoretical model is developed for SPHF. The model invokes a correlated feedback mechanism from the anti-hole, which is able to account for the fact that no line broadening is observed. A tentative model is also presented for the phenomenon of LIHF.

  19. Estimation of errors in the TOMS total ozone measurement during the Antarctica ozone campaign of August/September 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhartia, P. K.; Krueger, Arlin J.; Taylor, S.; Wellemeyer, C.

    1988-01-01

    The Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instrument on the Nimbus-7 satellite provides the primary source of total ozone data for the study of total ozone in the polar regions of the earth. There are two types of instrument related errors: a slowly developing drift in the instrument calibration since the launch of the instrument in October 1978 and an increase in the measurement noise beginning April, 1984. It is estimated that by October 1987, the accumulated error in the TOMS total ozone measurement due to instrument drift is about 6 m-atm-cm. The sign of the error is such that the TOMS is slightly overpredicting the long-term decrease of the Antarctica ozone. The increase in the measurement noise is more difficult to quantify, affecting some measurements by as much as 10 D.U. and others not at all. A detailed analysis of this error and its potential impact on the studies of total ozone from TOMS will be provided. There are three categories of algorithmic errors: (1) error due the unusual shape of the ozone profile in the ozone hole; (2) error caused by very low atmospheric temperatures in the ozone hole affecting the ozone absorption cross-sections at the TOMS wavelengths; and (3) errors resulting from occasionally thick stratospheric clouds that sometimes reach to 20 km in the ozone hole.

  20. 78 FR 12307 - Taylor, G. Tom; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Taylor, G. Tom; Notice of Filing Take notice that on February 14, 2013, G. Tom Taylor filed an application to hold interlocking positions pursuant to section 305(b) of...

  1. Targeting and assembly of rat mitochondrial translocase of outer membrane 22 (TOM22) into the TOM complex.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Sakaguchi, Masao; Mihara, Katsuyoshi

    2004-05-14

    Tom22 is a preprotein receptor and organizer of the mitochondrial outer membrane translocase complex (TOM complex). Rat Tom22 (rTOM22) is a 142-residue protein, embedded in the outer membrane through the internal transmembrane domain (TMD) with 82 N-terminal residues in the cytosol and 41 C-terminal residues in the intermembrane space. We analyzed the signals that target rTOM22 to the mitochondrial outer membrane and assembly into the TOM complex in cultured mammalian cells. Deletions or mutations were systematically introduced into the molecule, and the intracellular localization of the mutant constructs in HeLa cells was examined by confocal microscopy and cell fractionation. Their assembly into the TOM complex was also examined using blue native gel electrophoresis. These experiments revealed three separate structural elements: a cytoplasmic 10-residue segment with an acidic alpha-helical structure located 30 residues upstream of the TMD (the import sequence), TMD with an appropriate hydrophobicity, and a 20-residue C-terminal segment located 22 residues downstream of the TMD (C-tail signal). The import sequence and TMD were both essential for targeting and integration into the TOM complex, whereas the C-tail signal affected the import efficiency. The import sequence combined with foreign TMD functioned as a mitochondrial targeting and anchor signal but failed to integrate the construct into the TOM complex. Thus, the mitochondrial-targeting and TOM integration signal could be discriminated. A yeast two-hybrid assay revealed that the import sequence interacted with two intramolecular elements, the TMD and C-tail signal, and that it also interacted with the import receptor Tom20. PMID:14985332

  2. BOREAS RSS-10 TOMS Circumpolar One-Degree PAR Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, Dennis G.; Holben, Brent; Nickeson, Jaime (Editor); Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Remote Sensing Science (RSS)-10 team investigated the magnitude of daily, seasonal, and yearly variations of Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR) from ground and satellite observations. This data set contains satellite estimates of surface-incident PAR (400-700 nm, MJ/sq m) at one-degree spatial resolution. The spatial coverage is circumpolar from latitudes of 41 to 66 degrees north. The temporal coverage is from May through September for years 1979 through 1989. Eleven-year statistics are also provided: (1) mean, (2) standard deviation, and (3) coefficient of variation for 1979-89. The PAR estimates were derived from the global gridded ultraviolet reflectivity data product (average of 360, 380 nm) from the Nimbus-7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS). Image mask data are provided for identifying the boreal forest zone, and ocean/land and snow/ice-covered areas. The data are available as binary image format data files. The PAR data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  3. Probes to the Inferior Planets - A New Dawn for NEO and IEO Detection Technology Demonstration from Heliocentric Orbits Interior to the Earth's?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundmann, J. T.; Mottola, S.; Drentschew, M.; Drobczyk, M.; Kahle, R.; Maiwald, V.; Quantius, D.; Zabel, P.; Van Zoest, T.

    2011-11-01

    With the launch of MESSENGER and VENUS EXPRESS, a new wave of exploration of the inner solar system has begun. Noting the growing number of probes to the inner solar system, it is proposed to connect the expertise of the respective spacecraft teams and the NEO and IEO survey community to best utilize the extended cruise phases and to provide additional data return in support of pure science as well as planetary defence. Several missions to Venus and Mercury are planned to follow in this decade. Increased interest in the inferior planets is accompanied by several missions designed to study the Sun and the interplanetary medium (IPM) from a position near or in Earth orbit, such as the STEREO probes and SDO. These augment established solar observation capabilities at the Sun-Earth L1 Lagrangian point such as the SOHO spacecraft. Thus, three distinct classes of spacecraft operate or observe interior to Earth's orbit. All these spacecraft carry powerful multispectral cameras optimized for their respective primary targets. MESSENGER is scheduled to end its six-year interplanetary cruise in March 2011 to enter Mercury orbit, but a similarly extended cruise with several gravity-assists awaits the European Mercury mission BEPICOLOMBO. Unfortunately, the automatic abort of the orbit insertion manoeuvre has also left AKATSUKI (a.k.a. Venus Climate Orbiter (VCO), Planet-C) stranded in heliocentric orbit. After an unintended fly-by, the probe will catch up with Venus in approximately six years. Meanwhile, it stays mostly interior to Venus in a planet-leading orbit. In addition to the study of comets and their interaction with the IPM, observations of small bodies akin to those carried out by outer solar system probes are occasionally attempted with the equipment available. The study of structures in the interplanetary dust (IPD) cloud has been a science objective during the cruise phase of the Japanese Venus probe AKATSUKI from Earth to Venus. IPD observations in the

  4. Climatology of the Earth's inner magnetosphere as observed by the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) instrument on the Van Allen Probes spacecraft.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manweiler, J. W.; Patterson, J. D.; Manweiler, R. M.; Gerrard, A. J.; Mitchell, D. G.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) instrument on the Van Allen Probes spacecraft measures energetic ion and electron particle populations in a species dependent energy range of 10's of KeV up to an MeV. The instrument separates the ion population into component species of protons, helium, and oxygen. This paper presents a climatological survey of RBSPICE measurements over the life of the mission to date. A comparison of spectrographs of the energetic particle populations (e, p, He, and O) is shown against key standard geomagnetic indices. Also shown is a summary of key electron and ion lower energy events based upon a systematic characterization of the type of event. The analyses of these events provide verification of the difference between electron and ion drift orbits and, based upon characterization schemes, show how the different event categories can vary as a function of L and MLT.

  5. Synergic use of TOMS and Aeronet Observations for Characterization of Aerosol Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, O.; Bhartia, P. K.; Dubovik, O.; Holben, B.; Siniuk, A.

    2003-01-01

    The role of aerosol absorption on the radiative transfer balance of the earth-atmosphere system is one of the largest sources of uncertainty in the analysis of global climate change. Global measurements of aerosol single scattering albedo are, therefore, necessary to properly assess the radiative forcing effect of aerosols. Remote sensing of aerosol absorption is currently carried out using both ground (Aerosol Robotic Network) and space (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) based observations. The satellite technique uses measurements of backscattered near ultraviolet radiation. Carbonaceous aerosols, resulting from the combustion of biomass, are one of the most predominant absorbing aerosol types in the atmosphere. In this presentation, TOMS and AERONET retrievals of single scattering albedo of carbonaceous aerosols, are compared for different environmental conditions: agriculture related biomass burning in South America and Africa and peat fires in Eastern Europe. The AERONET and TOMS derived aerosol absorption information are in good quantitative agreement. The most absorbing smoke is detected over the African Savanna. Aerosol absorption over the Brazilian rain forest is less absorbing. Absorption by aerosol particles resulting from peat fires in Eastern Europe is weaker than the absorption measured in Africa and South America. This analysis shows that the near UV satellite method of aerosol absorption characterization has the sensitivity to distinguish different levels of aerosol absorption. The analysis of the combined AERONET-TOMS observations shows a high degree of synergy between satellite and ground based observations.

  6. Near-Real-Time Detection and Monitoring of Dust Events by Satellite (SeaWIFS, MODIS, and TOMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, N. Christina; Tsay, Si-Chee; Herman, Jay R.; Kaufman, Yoram

    2002-01-01

    Over the last few years satellites have given us increasingly detailed information on the size, location, and duration of dust events around the world. These data not only provide valuable feedback to the modelling community as to the fidelity of their aerosol models but are also finding increasing use in near real-time applications. In particular, the ability to locate and track the development of aerosol dust clouds on a near real-time basis is being used by scientists and government to provide warning of air pollution episodes over major urban area. This ability has also become a crucial component of recent coordinated campaigns to study the characteristics of tropospheric aerosols such as dust and their effect on climate. One such recent campaign was ACE-Asia, which was designed to obtain the comprehensive set of ground, aircraft, and satellite data necessary to provide a detailed understanding of atmospheric aerosol particles over the Asian-Pacific region. As part of ACE-Asia, we developed a near real-time data processing and access system to provide satellite data from the polar-orbiting instruments Earth Probe TOMS (in the form of absorbing aerosol index) and SeaWiFS (in the form of aerosol optical thickness, AOT, and Angstrom exponent). The results were available via web access. The location and movement information provided by these data were used both in support of the day-to-day flight planning of ACE-Asia and as input into aerosol transport models. While near real-time SeaWiFS data processing can be performed using either the normal global data product or data obtained via direct broadcast to receiving stations close to the area of interest, near real-time MODIS processing of data to provide aerosol retrievals is currently only available using its direct broadcast capability. In this paper, we will briefly discuss the algorithms used to generate these data. The retrieved aerosol optical thickness and Angstrom exponent from SeaWiFS will be compared with

  7. Feasibility study of a swept frequency electromagnetic probe (SWEEP) using inductive coupling for the determination of subsurface conductivity of the earth and water prospecting in arid regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latorraca, G. A.; Bannister, L. H.

    1974-01-01

    Techniques developed for electromagnetic probing of the lunar interior, and techniques developed for the generation of high power audio frequencies were combined to make practical a magnetic inductive coupling system for the rapid measurement of ground conductivity profiles which are helpful when prospecting for the presence and quality of subsurface water. A system which involves the measurement of the direction, intensity, and time phase of the magnetic field observed near the surface of the earth at a distance from a horizontal coil energized so as to create a field that penetrates the earth was designed and studied to deduce the conductivity and stratification of the subsurface. Theoretical studies and a rudimentary experiment in an arid region showed that the approach is conceptually valid and that this geophysical prospecting technique can be developed for the economical exploration of subterranean water resources.

  8. ISS Update: Progress 50 Launch and Docking with Tom Erkenswick

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Rob Navias conducts an interview with Visiting Vehicle Officer Tom Erkenswick about the launch of the ISS Progress 50 resupply ship and its docking to the International ...

  9. Whitewashing the Fence: Revisiting "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griswold, Jerry

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the story lines in "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer," how the characters in the book reflected people in Twain's childhood, the famous whitewashing scene, and Twain's racial attitudes. Appends suggestions for stimulating student response to the novel. (RS)

  10. ISS Update: Orion Recovery and Rescue Lead Tom Walker

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Brandi Dean talks with Tom Walker, Orion Recovery and Rescue Lead, about how the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) is being used to train rescue and recovery personnel f...

  11. What on Earth is D”?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnero, Ed; Wysession, Michael

    Studied in earnest for 50 years time Is Earth's deep layer called Dee Double Prime. Exotic hypotheses new papers chime, But evasive big pictures halt reason or rhyme.Even before the first nuclear bomb, People like Gutenberg, Bullen, and Dahm And probably others: Dick, Harry, and Tom Proposed this new layer to address a qualm.

  12. Nimbus-7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) Data Products User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPeters, Richard D.; Bhartia, P. K.; Krueger, Arlin J.; Herman, Jay R.; Schlesinger, Barry M.; Wellemeyer, Charles G.; Seftor, Colin J.; Jaross, Glen; Taylor, Steven L.; Swissler, Tom; Torres, Omar; Labow, Gordon; Byerly, William; Cebula, Richard P.

    1996-01-01

    Two data products from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) onboard Nimbus-7 have been archived at the Distributed Active Archive Center, in the form of Hierarchical Data Format files. The instrument measures backscattered Earth radiance and incoming solar irradiance; their ratio is used in ozone retrievals. Changes in the instrument sensitivity are monitored by a spectral discrimination technique using measurements of the intrinsically stable wavelength dependence of derived surface reflectivity. The algorithm to retrieve total column ozone compares measured Earth radiances at sets of three wavelengths with radiances calculated for different total ozone values, solar zenith angles, and optical paths. The initial error in the absolute scale for TOMS total ozone is 3 percent, the one standard deviation random error is 2 percent, and drift is less than 1.0 percent per decade. The Level-2 product contains the measured radiances, the derived total ozone amount, and reflectivity information for each scan position. The Level-3 product contains daily total ozone amount and reflectivity in a I - degree latitude by 1.25 degrees longitude grid. The Level-3 product also is available on CD-ROM. Detailed descriptions of both HDF data files and the CD-ROM product are provided.

  13. Nimbus-7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) Data Products User`s Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Mcpeters, R.D.; Bhartia, P.K.; Krueger, A.J.; Herman, J.R.; Schlesinger, B.M.; Wellemeyer, C.G.; Seftor, C.J.; Jaross, G.; Taylor, S.L.; Swissler, T.

    1996-04-01

    Two data products from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) onboard Nimbus-7 have been archived at the Distributed Active Archive Center, in the form of Hierarchical Data Format files. The instrument measures backscattered Earth radiance and incoming solar irradiance; their ratio is used in ozone retrievals. Changes in the instrument sensitivity are monitored by a spectral discrimination technique using measurements of the intrinsically stable wavelength dependence of derived surface reflectivity. The algorithm to retrieve total column ozone compares measured Earth radiances at sets of three wavelengths with radiances calculated for different total ozone values, solar zenith angles, and optical paths. The initial error in the absolute scale for TOMS total ozone is 3 percent, the one standard deviation random error is 2 percent, and drift is less than 1.0 percent per decade. The Level-2 product contains the measured radiances, the derived total ozone amount, and reflectivity information for each scan position. The Level-3 product contains daily total ozone amount and reflectivity in a 1 - degree latitude by 1.25 degrees longitude grid. The Level-3 product also is available on CD-ROM. Detailed descriptions of both HDF data files and the CD-ROM product are provided.

  14. Tom70 Is Essential for PINK1 Import into Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Rapaport, Doron; Kozjak-Pavlovic, Vera

    2013-01-01

    PTEN induced kinase 1 (PINK1) is a serine/threonine kinase in the outer membrane of mitochondria (OMM), and known as a responsible gene of Parkinson's disease (PD). The precursor of PINK1 is synthesized in the cytosol and then imported into the mitochondria via the translocase of the OMM (TOM) complex. However, a large part of PINK1 import mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we examined using cell-free system the mechanism by which PINK1 is targeted to and assembled into mitochondria. Surprisingly, the main component of the import channel, Tom40 was not necessary for PINK1 import. Furthermore, we revealed that the import receptor Tom70 is essential for PINK1 import. In addition, we observed that although PINK1 has predicted mitochondrial targeting signal, it was not processed by the mitochondrial processing peptidase. Thus, our results suggest that PINK1 is imported into mitochondria by a unique pathway that is independent of the TOM core complex but crucially depends on the import receptor Tom70. PMID:23472196

  15. Analysis of error in TOMS total ozone as a function of orbit and attitude parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, W. W.; Ardanuy, P. E.; Braun, W. C.; Vallette, B. J.; Bhartia, P. K.; Ray, S. N.

    1991-01-01

    Computer simulations of orbital scenarios were performed to examine the effects of orbital altitude, equator crossing time, attitude uncertainty, and orbital eccentricity on ozone observations by future satellites. These effects were assessed by determining changes in solar and viewing geometry and earth daytime coverage loss. The importance of these changes on ozone retrieval was determined by simulating uncertainties in the TOMS ozone retrieval algorithm. The major findings are as follows: (1) Drift of equator crossing time from local noon would have the largest effect on the quality of ozone derived from TOMS. The most significant effect of this drift is the loss of earth daytime coverage in the winter hemisphere. The loss in coverage increases from 1 degree latitude for + or - 1 hour from noon, 6 degrees for + or - 3 hours from noon, to 53 degrees for + or - 6 hours from noon. An additional effect is the increase in ozone retrieval errors due to high solar zenith angles. (2) To maintain contiguous earth coverage, the maximum scan angle of the sensor must be increased with decreasing orbital altitude. The maximum scan angle required for full coverage at the equator varies from 60 degrees at 600 km altitude to 45 degrees at 1200 km. This produces an increase in spacecraft zenith angle, theta, which decreases the ozone retrieval accuracy. The range in theta was approximately 72 degrees for 600 km to approximately 57 degrees at 1200 km. (3) The effect of elliptical orbits is to create gaps in coverage along the subsatellite track. An elliptical orbit with a 200 km perigee and 1200 km apogee produced a maximum earth coverage gap of about 45 km at the perigee at nadir. (4) An attitude uncertainty of 0.1 degree in each axis (pitch, roll, yaw) produced a maximum scan angle to view the pole, and maximum solar zenith angle).

  16. An unusual TOM20/TOM22 bypass mechanism for the mitochondrial targeting of cytochrome P450 proteins containing N-terminal chimeric signals.

    PubMed

    Anandatheerthavarada, Hindupur K; Sepuri, Naresh Babu V; Biswas, Gopa; Avadhani, Narayan G

    2008-07-11

    Previously we showed that xenobiotic-inducible cytochrome P450 (CYP) proteins are bimodally targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism of delivery of chimeric signal-containing CYP proteins to the peripheral and channel-forming mitochondrial outer membrane translocases (TOMs). CYP+33/1A1 and CYP2B1 did not require peripheral TOM70, TOM20, or TOM22 for translocation through the channel-forming TOM40 protein. In contrast, CYP+5/1A1 and CYP2E1 were able to bypass TOM20 and TOM22 but required TOM70. CYP27, which contains a canonical cleavable mitochondrial signal, required all of the peripheral TOMs for its mitochondrial translocation. We investigated the underlying mechanisms of bypass of peripheral TOMs by CYPs with chimeric signals. The results suggested that interaction of CYPs with Hsp70, a cytosolic chaperone involved in the mitochondrial import, alone was sufficient for the recognition of chimeric signals by peripheral TOMs. However, sequential interaction of chimeric signal-containing CYPs with Hsp70 and Hsp90 resulted in the bypass of peripheral TOMs, whereas CYP27 interacted only with Hsp70 and was not able to bypass peripheral TOMs. Our results also show that delivery of chimeric signal-containing client proteins by Hsp90 required the cytosol-exposed N-terminal 143 amino acids of TOM40. TOM40 devoid of this domain was unable to bind CYP proteins. These results suggest that, compared with the unimodal mitochondria-targeting signals, the chimeric mitochondria-targeting signals are highly evolved and dynamic in nature. PMID:18480056

  17. Mitochondrial targeting of cytochrome P450 proteins containing NH2-terminal chimeric signals involves an unusual TOM20/TOM22 bypass mechanism.

    PubMed

    Anandatheerthavarada, Hindupur K; Sepuri, Naresh Babu V; Avadhani, Narayan G

    2009-06-19

    Previously we showed that xenobiotic inducible cytochrome P450 (CYP) proteins are bimodally targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of delivery of chimeric signal containing CYP proteins to the peripheral and channel-forming mitochondrial outer membrane translocases (TOMs). CYP+33/1A1 and CYP2B1 did not require peripheral TOM70, TOM20, or TOM22 for translocation through the channel-forming TOM40 protein. In contrast, CYP+5/1A1 and CYP2E1 were able to bypass TOM20 and TOM22 but required TOM70. CYP27, which contains a canonical cleavable mitochondrial signal, required all of the peripheral TOMs for its mitochondrial translocation. We investigated the underlying mechanisms of bypass of peripheral TOMs by CYPs with chimeric signals. The results suggested that interaction of CYPs with Hsp70, a cytosolic chaperone involved in the mitochondrial import, alone was sufficient for the recognition of chimeric signals by peripheral TOMs. However, sequential interaction of chimeric signal containing CYPs with Hsp70 and Hsp90 resulted in the bypass of peripheral TOMs, whereas CYP27A1 interacted only with Hsp70 and was not able to bypass peripheral TOMs. Our results also show that delivery of a chimeric signal containing client protein by Hsp90 required the cytosol-exposed NH(2)-terminal 143 amino acids of TOM40. TOM40 devoid of this domain was unable to import CYP proteins. These results suggest that compared with the unimodal mitochondrial targeting signals, the chimeric mitochondrial targeting signals are highly evolved and dynamic in nature. PMID:19401463

  18. A presequence-binding groove in Tom70 supports import of Mdl1 into mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Melin, Jonathan; Kilisch, Markus; Neumann, Piotr; Lytovchenko, Oleksandr; Gomkale, Ridhima; Schendzielorz, Alexander; Schmidt, Bernhard; Liepold, Thomas; Ficner, Ralf; Jahn, Olaf; Rehling, Peter; Schulz, Christian

    2015-08-01

    The translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM complex) is the general entry gate into mitochondria for almost all imported proteins. A variety of specific receptors allow the TOM complex to recognize targeting signals of various precursor proteins that are transported along different import pathways. Aside from the well-characterized presequence receptors Tom20 and Tom22 a third TOM receptor, Tom70, binds proteins of the carrier family containing multiple transmembrane segments. Here we demonstrate that Tom70 directly binds to presequence peptides using a dedicated groove. A single point mutation in the cavity of this pocket (M551R) reduces the presequence binding affinity of Tom70 ten-fold and selectively impairs import of the presequence-containing precursor Mdl1 but not the ADP/ATP carrier (AAC). Hence Tom70 contributes to the presequence import pathway by recognition of the targeting signal of the Mdl1 precursor. PMID:25958336

  19. Hyperfine local probe study of alkaline-earth manganites SrMnO₃ and BaMnO₃.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, J N; Amaral, V S; Correia, J G; Lopes, A M L; Araújo, J P; Tavares, P B

    2014-05-28

    We report perturbed angular correlation measurements with (111m)Cd/(111)Cd and (111)In/(111)Cd probes, at the ISOLDE-CERN facility, in the manganite compounds BaMnO3, with the 6H and 15R polymorphs, and SrMnO3, with the 4H polymorph. The electric field gradient (EFG) is measured, and found approximately constant in a large temperature range for all the compounds. The EFG is also calculated from first principles with density functional theory, and compared with experimental results by considering diluted substitutional Cd impurities. Based on the results, we assign as sites for the probes the Ba (for BaMnO3-6H, 15R) and Sr (for SrMnO3-4H) sites, apart from fractions of undetermined origin in the case of BaMnO3-6H. We predict the hyperfine parameters in the recently synthesized multiferroic manganite Sr(0.5)Ba(0.5)MnO3, and its variation with the structure and electric polarization, which is found to be very small. PMID:24787139

  20. Near-earth injection of MeV electrons associated with intense dipolarization electric fields: Van Allen Probes observations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dai, Lei; Wang, Chi; Duan, Suping; He, Zhaohai; Wygant, John R.; Cattell, Cynthia A.; Tao, Xin; Su, Zhenpeng; Kletzing, Craig; Baker, Daniel N.; et al

    2015-08-10

    Substorms generally inject tens to hundreds of keV electrons, but intense substorm electric fields have been shown to inject MeV electrons as well. An intriguing question is whether such MeV electron injections can populate the outer radiation belt. Here we present observations of a substorm injection of MeV electrons into the inner magnetosphere. In the premidnight sector at L~5.5, Van Allen Probes (Radiation Belt Storm Probes)-A observed a large dipolarization electric field (50 mV/m) over ~40 s and a dispersionless injection of electrons up to ~3 MeV. Pitch angle observations indicated betatron acceleration of MeV electrons at the dipolarization front.more » Corresponding signals of MeV electron injection were observed at LANL-GEO, THEMIS-D, and GOES at geosynchronous altitude. Through a series of dipolarizations, the injections increased the MeV electron phase space density by 1 order of magnitude in less than 3 h in the outer radiation belt (L > 4.8). Our observations provide evidence that deep injections can supply significant MeV electrons.« less

  1. Near-earth injection of MeV electrons associated with intense dipolarization electric fields: Van Allen Probes observations

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Lei; Wang, Chi; Duan, Suping; He, Zhaohai; Wygant, John R.; Cattell, Cynthia A.; Tao, Xin; Su, Zhenpeng; Kletzing, Craig; Baker, Daniel N.; Li, Xinlin; Malaspina, David; Blake, J. Bernard; Fennell, Joseph; Claudepierre, Seth; Turner, Drew L.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Funsten, Herbert O.; Spence, Harlan E.; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Fruehauff, Dennis; Chen, Lunjin; Thaller, Scott; Breneman, Aaron; Tang, Xiangwei

    2015-08-10

    Substorms generally inject tens to hundreds of keV electrons, but intense substorm electric fields have been shown to inject MeV electrons as well. An intriguing question is whether such MeV electron injections can populate the outer radiation belt. Here we present observations of a substorm injection of MeV electrons into the inner magnetosphere. In the premidnight sector at L~5.5, Van Allen Probes (Radiation Belt Storm Probes)-A observed a large dipolarization electric field (50 mV/m) over ~40 s and a dispersionless injection of electrons up to ~3 MeV. Pitch angle observations indicated betatron acceleration of MeV electrons at the dipolarization front. Corresponding signals of MeV electron injection were observed at LANL-GEO, THEMIS-D, and GOES at geosynchronous altitude. Through a series of dipolarizations, the injections increased the MeV electron phase space density by 1 order of magnitude in less than 3 h in the outer radiation belt (L > 4.8). Our observations provide evidence that deep injections can supply significant MeV electrons.

  2. Near-Earth injection of MeV electrons associated with intense dipolarization electric fields: Van Allen Probes observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Lei; Wang, Chi; Duan, Suping; He, Zhaohai; Wygant, John R.; Cattell, Cynthia A.; Tao, Xin; Su, Zhenpeng; Kletzing, Craig; Baker, Daniel N.; Li, Xinlin; Malaspina, David; Blake, J. Bernard; Fennell, Joseph; Claudepierre, Seth; Turner, Drew L.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Funsten, Herbert O.; Spence, Harlan E.; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Fruehauff, Dennis; Chen, Lunjin; Thaller, Scott; Breneman, Aaron; Tang, Xiangwei

    2015-08-01

    Substorms generally inject tens to hundreds of keV electrons, but intense substorm electric fields have been shown to inject MeV electrons as well. An intriguing question is whether such MeVelectron injections can populate the outer radiation belt. Here we present observations of a substorm injection of MeV electrons into the inner magnetosphere. In the premidnight sector at L ˜ 5.5, Van Allen Probes (Radiation Belt Storm Probes)-A observed a large dipolarization electric field (50 mV/m) over ˜40 s and a dispersionless injection of electrons up to ˜3 MeV. Pitch angle observations indicated betatron acceleration of MeV electrons at the dipolarization front. Corresponding signals of MeV electron injection were observed at LANL-GEO, THEMIS-D, and GOES at geosynchronous altitude. Through a series of dipolarizations, the injections increased the MeV electron phase space density by 1 order of magnitude in less than 3 h in the outer radiation belt (L > 4.8). Our observations provide evidence that deep injections can supply significant MeV electrons.

  3. Direct measurements of tropospheric ozone from TOMS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Robert D.

    1993-01-01

    In the past year, we have made measurements of the tropospheric total column of ozone during the biomass burning season in Africa (August to October). Fishman et. al. had reported previously that by taking a time average of the low spatial resolution data from TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) on Nimbus-7 (referred to as the Grid-T data set), during the biomass burning season in Africa, a plume of ozone extends from the East coast of Africa into the Atlantic. In this report, we present an analysis that we have made using the measured TOMS radiances taken from the High Density TOMS data set (referred as the HDT data set), which examines this plume in more detail.

  4. TOMS total ozone trends in potential vorticity coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randel, William J.; Wu, Fei

    1995-01-01

    Global total ozone measurements from the Nimbus 7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) are analyzed using potential vorticity (PV) as an approximate vortex-following coordinate. We analyze the time period November 1978-May 1991, prior to the volcanic eruption of Mt. Pinatubo. The TOMS data are remapped into PV coordinates and trends are calculated, thereby characterizing ozone losses inside and outside the winter polar vortices. These analyses show large regions of ozone loss outside of the vortex in both hemispheres. Furthermore, these data suggest that midlatitude losses in the NH during winter-spring do not result solely from the transport of ozone depleted air from inside to outside the vortex.

  5. Tropospheric Chemistry Studies using Observations from GOME and TOMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chance, Kelly; Spurr, Robert J. D.; Kurosu, Thomas P.; Jacob, Daniel J.; Gleason, James F.

    2003-01-01

    Studies to quantitatively determine trace gas and aerosol amounts from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) and the Total Ozone Monitoring Experiment (TOMS) and to perform chemical modeling studies which utilize these results are given. This includes: 1. Analysis of measurements from the GOME and TOMS instruments for troposphere distributions of O3 and HCHO; troposphere enhancements of SO2, NO2 and aerosols associated with major sources; and springtime events of elevated BrO in the lower Arctic troposphere. 2. Application of a global 3-dimensional model of troposphere chemistry to interpret the GOME observations in terms of the factors controlling the abundances of troposphere ozone and OH.

  6. MIDL: A Demonstration of Multi-Mission Analysis of Charged Particle Data From Van Allen Probes and the Juno Earth Flyby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, L. E.; Mitchell, D. G.; Paranicas, C.; Mauk, B.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Vandegriff, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    At the present time, a fleet of heliosphere spacecraft is producing an unprecedented number of measurements of charged particles and magnetic fields throughout the solar system - from Mercury to the local interstellar medium. It is vital to have a flexible and efficient data browsing, discovery, and analysis environment to navigate this wealth of information. We present a multi-mission tool for quick look data viewing and analysis. In addition to a rich tool and feature set, MIDL3 (Mission Independent Data Layer - 3rd version) provides environments to cater to different user classes from instrument team engineers, to team scientists, to the general science community. Furthermore, MIDL3 adds a new, highly interactive, end-user visualization environment for rapid browsing and exploration of science and engineering data. Like AMDA and MAPSVIEW, MIDL has functioned for Cassini plasma and particle data as a highly successful platform for inter-comparing different instruments/sensors with minimal preparation work on the part of the user. We present a demonstration of simultaneous analysis of the JUNO Earth flyby (October 9, 2013) data from the JEDI instruments and Van Allen Probes data from the RBSPICE instruments. Since these two instrument sets share a very similar design (see presentations by C Paranicas, et al. and J Manwiler, et al. at this conference for details) we anticipate important results from this unique opportunity to compare measurements of energetic electrons and ions made by six telescopes each for the five similar instruments on three spacecraft within Earth's magnetosphere.

  7. Single molecule tracking fluorescence microscopy in mitochondria reveals highly dynamic but confined movement of Tom40

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmenko, Anton; Tankov, Stoyan; English, Brian P.; Tarassov, Ivan; Tenson, Tanel; Kamenski, Piotr; Elf, Johan; Hauryliuk, Vasili

    2011-01-01

    Tom40 is an integral protein of the mitochondrial outer membrane, which as the central component of the Translocase of the Outer Membrane (TOM) complex forms a channel for protein import. We characterize the diffusion properties of individual Tom40 molecules fused to the photoconvertable fluorescent protein Dendra2 with millisecond temporal resolution. By imaging individual Tom40 molecules in intact isolated yeast mitochondria using photoactivated localization microscopy with sub-diffraction limited spatial precision, we demonstrate that Tom40 movement in the outer mitochondrial membrane is highly dynamic but confined in nature, suggesting anchoring of the TOM complex as a whole. PMID:22355710

  8. Single molecule tracking fluorescence microscopy in mitochondria reveals highly dynamic but confined movement of Tom40

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmenko, Anton; Tankov, Stoyan; English, Brian P.; Tarassov, Ivan; Tenson, Tanel; Kamenski, Piotr; Elf, Johan; Hauryliuk, Vasili

    2011-12-01

    Tom40 is an integral protein of the mitochondrial outer membrane, which as the central component of the Translocase of the Outer Membrane (TOM) complex forms a channel for protein import. We characterize the diffusion properties of individual Tom40 molecules fused to the photoconvertable fluorescent protein Dendra2 with millisecond temporal resolution. By imaging individual Tom40 molecules in intact isolated yeast mitochondria using photoactivated localization microscopy with sub-diffraction limited spatial precision, we demonstrate that Tom40 movement in the outer mitochondrial membrane is highly dynamic but confined in nature, suggesting anchoring of the TOM complex as a whole.

  9. The cytosolic domain of human Tom22 modulates human Bax mitochondrial translocation and conformation in yeast.

    PubMed

    Renault, Thibaud T; Grandier-Vazeille, Xavier; Arokium, Hubert; Velours, Gisèle; Camougrand, Nadine; Priault, Muriel; Teijido, Oscar; Dejean, Laurent M; Manon, Stéphen

    2012-01-20

    The role of the mitochondrial protein receptor Tom22p in the interaction of pro-apoptotic protein Bax with yeast mitochondria was investigated. Co-immunoprecipitation assays showed that human Bax interacted with different TOM subunits, including Tom22p. Expression of the cytosolic receptor domain of human Tom22 increased Bax mitochondrial localization, but decreased the proportion of active Bax. BN-PAGE showed that the cytosolic domain of Tom22 interfered with the oligomerization of Bax. These data suggest that the interaction with the cytosolic domain of Tom22 helps Bax to acquire a conformation able to interact with the outer mitochondrial membrane. PMID:22198199

  10. Dust storms and their impact on ocean and human health: dust in Earth's atmosphere

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffin, Dale W.; Kellog, Christina A.

    2004-01-01

    Satellite imagery has greatly influenced our understanding of dust activity on a global scale. A number of different satellites such as NASA's Earth-Probe Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) and Se-viewing Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) acquire daily global-scale data used to produce imagery for monitoring dust storm formation and movement. This global-scale imagery has documented the frequent transmission of dust storm-derived soils through Earth's atmosphere and the magnitude of many of these events. While various research projects have been undertaken to understand this normal planetary process, little has been done to address its impact on ocean and human health. This review will address the ability of dust storms to influence marine microbial population densities and transport of soil-associated toxins and pathogenic microorganisms to marine environments. The implications of dust on ocean and human health in this emerging scientific field will be discussed.

  11. Probing the maximally deformed light rare-earth region around the drip-line nucleus 130Sm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petri, M.; Paul, E. S.; Nolan, P. J.; Boston, A. J.; Cooper, R. J.; Dimmock, M. R.; Gros, S.; McGuirk, B. M.; Scraggs, H. C.; Turk, G.; Rossé, B.; Meyer, M.; Redon, N.; Schmitt, Ch; Stézowski, O.; Guinet, D.; Lautesse, Ph; DeFrance, G.; Bhattachasyya, S.; Mukherjee, G.; Rejmund, F.; Rejmund, M.; Savajols, H.; Scheurer, J. N.; Astier, A.; Deloncle, I.; Prévost, A.; Nyakó, B. M.; Gál, J.; Molnár, J.; Timár, J.; Zolnai, L.; Juhász, K.; Pucknell, V. F. E.; Wadsworth, R.; Joshi, P.; La Rana, G.; Moro, R.; Trotta, M.; Vardaci, E.; Hackman, G.; Ball, G.

    2006-07-01

    The neutron deficient rare-earth nuclei of the A~130 region are of particular interest since highly deformed prolate ground states are expected. Indeed these nuclei are predicted to show maximal ground-state deformations of β2 ~ 0.40 (axis ratio of 3:2), comparable to the deformation deduced for superdeformed cerium isotopes at high spin. A fusion-evaporation experiment was performed with radioactive ion beams at GANIL in October 2004 which had the goal to reach very proton-rich exotic nuclei located near the proton drip-line. A radioactive 76Kr beam, delivered by the SPIRAL facility, was used to bombard a thin 58Ni target. Emitted γ-rays were detected by the EXOGAM γ-ray spectrometer which was, for the first time, coupled with both the DIAMANT charged-particle array and the VAMOS spectrometer.

  12. The TOM core complex: the general protein import pore of the outer membrane of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Ahting, U; Thun, C; Hegerl, R; Typke, D; Nargang, F E; Neupert, W; Nussberger, S

    1999-11-29

    Translocation of nuclear-encoded preproteins across the outer membrane of mitochondria is mediated by the multicomponent transmembrane TOM complex. We have isolated the TOM core complex of Neurospora crassa by removing the receptors Tom70 and Tom20 from the isolated TOM holo complex by treatment with the detergent dodecyl maltoside. It consists of Tom40, Tom22, and the small Tom components, Tom6 and Tom7. This core complex was also purified directly from mitochondria after solubilization with dodecyl maltoside. The TOM core complex has the characteristics of the general insertion pore; it contains high-conductance channels and binds preprotein in a targeting sequence-dependent manner. It forms a double ring structure that, in contrast to the holo complex, lacks the third density seen in the latter particles. Three-dimensional reconstruction by electron tomography exhibits two open pores traversing the complex with a diameter of approximately 2.1 nm and a height of approximately 7 nm. Tom40 is the key structural element of the TOM core complex. PMID:10579717

  13. Tom Green County Library Literacy Project. Final Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vavricka, D. Karen

    The final report of the Tom Green Country Library System (Texas) literacy project details progress toward achievement of 11 objectives. Objectives of the literacy outreach program were to: (1) increase Hispanic enrollment; (2) increase Black enrollment; (3) provide free child care for 4 students to attend 50 tutoring sessions; (4) provide…

  14. Good Guys Finish Last: "Tom Brown's School Days" and "Flashman."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riga, Frank P.

    Instructors and students of literature should look to George McDonald Fraser's "Flashman: From the Flashman Papers, 1839-1842" for a clever critique of 19th-century notions of character, virtue, and moral teleology. Written to criticize Thomas Hughes's famous 19th-century novel, "Tom Brown's School Days," Fraser's 20th-century novel turns on end…

  15. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Tom Walsh & Co.

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-02-01

    Tom Walsh & Company’s homes in an urban infill project in Portland achieved meets 2012 IECC insulation requirements in the marine climate with R-21 fiberglass batt walls, R-25 slab insulation and R-49 spray foam and cellulose attic floors.

  16. Aerosol Absorption Effects in the TOMS UV Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, O.; Krotkov, N.; Bhartia, P. K.

    2004-01-01

    The availability of global long-term estimates of surface UV radiation is very important, not only for preventive medicine considerations, but also as an important tool to monitor the effects of the stratospheric ozone recovery expected to occur in the next few decades as a result of the decline of the stratospheric chlorine levels. In addition to the modulating effects of ozone and clouds, aerosols also affect the levels of UV-A and W-B radiation reaching the surface. Oscillations in surface W associated with the effects of aerosol absorption may be comparable in magnitude to variations associated with the stratospheric ozone recovery. Thus, the accurate calculation of surface W radiation requires that both the scattering and absorption effects of tropospheric aerosols be taken into account. Although absorption effects of dust and elevated carbonaceous aerosols are already accounted for using Aerosol Index technique, this approach does not work for urban/industrial aerosols in the planetary boundary layer. The use of the new TOMS long-term global data record on UV aerosol absorption optical depth, can improve the accuracy of TOMS spectral UV products, by properly including the spectral attenuation effects of carbonaceous, urban/industrial and mineral aerosols. The TOMS data set on aerosol properties will be discussed, and results of its use in the TOMS surface W algorithm will be presented.

  17. Team Leader: Tom Peters--TAP Information Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Tom Peters packs 36 hours of work into the confines of a 24-hour day. Without breaking a sweat, he juggles multiple collaborative projects, which currently include an Illinois academic library shared storage facility; a multistate virtual reference and instruction service for blind and visually impaired individuals (InfoEyes); a virtual meeting…

  18. Challenge without Threat: An Interview with Tom Dewell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stork, Steve

    2005-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Tom Dewell, a professional physical educator with 28 years of experience and a fixture in Dallas physical education. Dewell has melded a background in movement education and adapted physical education with early childhood theory, including Montessori. The bulk of his experience has been in private, parochial…

  19. Alpha-particle and proton probes of nuclear shapes in the rare earth and mass 80 regions

    SciTech Connect

    Sarantites, D.G.; Nicolis, N.G.; Abenante, V.; Majka, Z.; Semkow, T.M.; Baktash, C.; Beene, J.R.; Garcia-Bermudez, G.; Halbert, M.L.; Hensley, D.C.; Johnson, N.R.; Lee, I.Y.; McGowan, F.K.; Riley, M.A.; Virtanen, A.; Griffin, H.C.; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN; Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI )

    1989-01-01

    Low emission barriers and large subbarrier anisotropies in the alpha-particle decay with respect to the spin direction, of Sn and rare earth compound nuclei, are examined in the light of recent calculations incorporating deformation. To explore the possibility of a correlation between the proton emission barriers and nuclear deformation, we studied proton spectra from the {sup 52}Cr({sup 34}S,2p2n){sup 82}Sr reaction. The proton spectra were observed with the Dwarf-Ball 4{pi} CsI(Tl) array, in coincidence with 18 Compton suppressed Ge detectors operated in conjunction with the Spin Spectrometer, a 4{pi} NaI(Tl) array. We found significant changes and shifts in the proton energy spectra as we selected gating transitions from bands of different moments of inertia or transitions from states of different spin in the same band. Substantial differences were also seen as a function of the {gamma}-ray multiplicity. These results are discussed in terms of statistical model calculations incorporating deformation and structure effects of the emitting system. 20 refs., 9 figs.

  20. Modeling Loss and Rebuilding of the Earth's Outer Zone Electrons and Comparison with Van Allen Probes Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, M. K.; Kress, B. T.; Li, Z.; Paral, J.; Wiltberger, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Quantifying the competition between radiation belt electron energization due to radial transport and loss to the magnetopause and to the atmosphere is critical to understanding the dynamic changes in outer zone radiation belt electron flux response to solar wind drivers. Plasmasheet electron injection, both due to enhanced convection and substorm dipolarization, provides a source population for generation of whistler mode chorus and seed population for local acceleration. We now have available ~22 months of unprecedented measurements in energy and pitch angle resolution of electrons spanning the energy range from injected plasmasheet to multi-MeV electrons from the twin Van Allen Probes spacecraft in near-equatorial plane elliptical orbits, with apogee at 5.8 Re; and two Balloon Array for Relativistic Radiation Belt Electron Losses (BARREL) campaigns during January-February 2013 and 2014, each establishing a longitudinal array of precipitation measurements extending to relativistic energies via measured Bremsstrahlung x-rays. In addition to this arsenal of data, a set of modeling tools has been developed to examine dynamics of electrons in the magnetosphere. These tools calculate electron trajectories in time-dependent magnetohydrodyanmic (MHD) fields using the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry global MHD model coupled with the Rice Convection Model to determine the E and B field response to solar wind drivers. With these tools we can follow electron dynamics including response to Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) waves which cause radial transport and energization for inward radial gradient as well as enhanced loss to the magnetopause for outward gradient. These tools have been applied to date to the large equinoctial storms of fall 2012, spring and fall 2013, in addition to moderate storms during BARREL balloon campaigns in both winters 2013 and 2014. Isolated substorm response can clearly be identified for the latter, while plasmasheet injection of electrons during periods of strong

  1. Biogenesis of mitochondria: dual role of Tom7 in modulating assembly of the preprotein translocase of the outer membrane.

    PubMed

    Becker, Thomas; Wenz, Lena-Sophie; Thornton, Nicolas; Stroud, David; Meisinger, Chris; Wiedemann, Nils; Pfanner, Nikolaus

    2011-01-01

    Biogenesis of the translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM complex) involves the assembly of the central β-barrel forming protein Tom40 with six different subunits that are embedded in the membrane via α-helical transmembrane segments. The sorting and assembly machinery (SAM complex) of the outer membrane plays a central role in this process. The SAM complex mediates the membrane integration of β-barrel precursor proteins including Tom40. The small Tom proteins Tom5 and Tom6 associate with the precursor of Tom40 at the SAM complex at an early stage of the assembly process and play a stimulatory role in the formation of the mature TOM complex. A fraction of the SAM components interacts with the outer membrane protein mitochondrial distribution and morphology protein 10 (Mdm10) to form the SAM-Mdm10 machinery; however, different views exist on the function of the SAM-Mdm10 complex. We report here that the third small Tom protein, Tom7, plays an inhibitory role at two distinct steps in the biogenesis of the TOM complex. First, Tom7 plays an antagonistic role to Tom5 and Tom6 at the early stage of Tom40 assembly at the SAM complex. Second, Tom7 interacts with Mdm10 that is not bound to the SAM complex, and thus promotes dissociation of the SAM-Mdm10 complex. Since the SAM-Mdm10 complex is required for the biogenesis of Tom22, Tom7 delays the assembly of Tom22 with Tom40 at a late stage of assembly of the TOM complex. Thus, Tom7 modulates the biogenesis of topologically different proteins, the β-barrel forming protein Tom40 and Tom22 that contains a transmembrane α-helix. PMID:21059357

  2. Probing a highly efficient dual mode: down-upconversion luminescence and temperature sensing performance of rare-earth oxide phosphors.

    PubMed

    Singh, A K; Singh, S K; Gupta, Bipin Kumar; Prakash, Rajiv; Rai, S B

    2013-01-28

    A dual mode rare-earth based oxide phosphor (Y(0.977)Yb(0.02)Er(0.003)NbO(4)), demonstrating both down conversion (DC) and upconversion (UC) emission, has been developed using a facile solid state reaction method which can be easily scaled-up for large quantities. In the DC studies, the material exhibits a strong blue emission with a long decay time (4.36 μs), corresponding to the charge transfer band of [NbO(4)](3-) under UV excitation (262 nm), and a green emission of the Er(3+) ions under blue (379 nm) excitation. Furthermore, it has been noticed that under infrared (976 nm) excitation, this phosphor shows strong green and red emission along with relatively weak emission bands in the UV-blue and IR regions, which confirm the compatibility of this phosphor for UC too. In the UC emission, the (2)H(11/2) → (4)I(15/2) and (4)S(3/2) → (4)I(15/2) transitions of the Er(3+) ion portray a temperature dependent behaviour and have been used for temperature sensing (optical thermometry) using the fluorescence intensity ratio (FIR) method. The maximum sensitivity is found to be 0.0073 K(-1) at 473 K, which is better in comparison with other host matrixs reported so far. The results suggest that this dual mode phosphor could be an exceptional choice for next generation luminescence-based temperature sensing devices as well as in advanced display devices. PMID:23114691

  3. The relationship between growth of commercial toms and linear skeletal development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An experiment was conducted to study the relationship between the growth of commercial toms (Nicholas) and linear skeletal development. All toms were fed a commercial turkey starter diet for the entire experiment. At two week intervals, 10 toms were randomly selected and weighed. The right half of t...

  4. Measuring Theory of Mind in Children. Psychometric Properties of the ToM Storybooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blijd-Hoogewys, E. M. A.; van Geert, P. L. C.; Serra, M.; Minderaa, R. B.

    2008-01-01

    Although research on Theory-of-Mind (ToM) is often based on single task measurements, more comprehensive instruments result in a better understanding of ToM development. The ToM Storybooks is a new instrument measuring basic ToM-functioning and associated aspects. There are 34 tasks, tapping various emotions, beliefs, desires and mental-physical…

  5. Alternative function for the mitochondrial SAM complex in biogenesis of alpha-helical TOM proteins.

    PubMed

    Stojanovski, Diana; Guiard, Bernard; Kozjak-Pavlovic, Vera; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Meisinger, Chris

    2007-12-01

    The mitochondrial outer membrane contains two preprotein translocases: the general translocase of outer membrane (TOM) and the beta-barrel-specific sorting and assembly machinery (SAM). TOM functions as the central entry gate for nuclear-encoded proteins. The channel-forming Tom40 is a beta-barrel protein, whereas all Tom receptors and small Tom proteins are membrane anchored by a transmembrane alpha-helical segment in their N- or C-terminal portion. Synthesis of Tom precursors takes place in the cytosol, and their import occurs via preexisting TOM complexes. The precursor of Tom40 is then transferred to SAM for membrane insertion and assembly. Unexpectedly, we find that the biogenesis of alpha-helical Tom proteins with a membrane anchor in the C-terminal portion is SAM dependent. Each SAM protein is necessary for efficient membrane integration of the receptor Tom22, whereas assembly of the small Tom proteins depends on Sam37. Thus, the substrate specificity of SAM is not restricted to beta-barrel proteins but also includes the majority of alpha-helical Tom proteins. PMID:18039934

  6. Protein translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane: role of import receptors in the structural organization of the TOM complex.

    PubMed

    Model, Kirstin; Prinz, Thorsten; Ruiz, Teresa; Radermacher, Michael; Krimmer, Thomas; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Meisinger, Chris

    2002-02-22

    The mitochondrial outer membrane contains a multi-subunit machinery responsible for the specific recognition and translocation of precursor proteins. This translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) consists of three receptor proteins, Tom20, Tom22 and Tom70, the channel protein Tom40, and several small Tom proteins. Single-particle electron microscopy analysis of the Neurospora TOM complex has led to different views with two or three stain-filled centers resembling channels. Based on biochemical and electron microscopy studies of the TOM complex isolated from yeast mitochondria, we have discovered the molecular reason for the different number of channel-like structures. The TOM complex from wild-type yeast contains up to three stain-filled centers, while from a mutant yeast selectively lacking Tom20, the TOM complex particles contain only two channel-like structures. From mutant mitochondria lacking Tom22, native electrophoresis separates an approximately 80 kDa subcomplex that consists of Tom40 only and is functional for accumulation of a precursor protein. We conclude that while Tom40 forms the import channels, the two receptors Tom22 and Tom20 are required for the organization of Tom40 dimers into larger TOM structures. PMID:11866524

  7. Comparison of daily UV doses estimated from Nimbus 7/TOMS measurements and ground-based spectroradiometric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalliskota, Sari; Kaurola, Jussi; Taalas, Petteri; Herman, Jay R.; Celarier, Edward A.; Krotkov, Nikolay A.

    2000-02-01

    During recent years, methods have been developed for estimating UV irradiance reaching the Earth's surface using satellite-measured backscattered UV radiances. The NASA-developed method is based on radiative transfer calculations and satellite measurements of parameters affecting UV radiation: extraterrestrial solar irradiance, atmospheric ozone, cloud reflectivity, aerosol amounts, and ground albedo. In this work a comparison is made between daily UV erythemal doses estimated from Nimbus-7/TOMS measurements (from 1991 to May 1993) and those calculated from ground-based spectroradiometer data. Three stations operated by the National Science Foundation were chosen for this comparison: Ushuaia, Argentina (for 573 days), Palmer, Antarctica (for 450 days), and San Diego, California, (for 149 days). These stations were selected to illustrate the differences between ground-based measurements using the same type of instrument, SUV-100 double monochromator spectroradiometers, and satellite estimates of surface UV irradiance under three different environmental conditions (mountains and snow, nearly continuous snow cover, and midlatitude urban sea level conditions). Averaging the measured and TOMS-estimated doses over periods from 1 week to 1 month improves the agreement. The daily or monthly mean bias increases during months when there is snow/ice on the surface. TOMS has a larger estimate of the UV irradiance by 25% at San Diego (no snow), in agreement with the summer-month analysis of Toronto irradiances [Herman et al., 1999]. TOMS underestimates the average daily-UV dose at Ushuaia (monthly mean bias of -13%) and at Palmer (-35%) consistent with snow/ice with cloud effects not being properly accounted for in the TOMS algorithm. When the reflectivity at all three sites is low (no snow), the TOMS irradiance estimate is larger than the SUV-100 measurements consistent with previously analyzed Brewer data at Toronto. The effects of local fog or clouds smaller than the

  8. Hindered rotations probed by rare earths in crystals: Er3+ and Tm3+ in BaY2F8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraldi, A.; Buffagni, E.; Capelletti, R.; Mazzera, M.; Magnani, N.; Carini, G., Jr.; D'Angelo, G.

    2009-10-01

    The sharpness of absorption lines induced by crystal-field (CF) transitions of rare earths (RE) can be exploited to disclose the rotational structure usually hidden under the more common broad electronic absorptions. In the present work the effectiveness of such an approach is proved by the analysis of the fine structure (FS) accompanying the Er3+ and Tm3+ CF lines in BaY2F8 single crystals. Sequences of weak, very narrow (0.03-0.1cm-1) , closely spaced (˜0.2-0.8cm-1) lines were monitored in high-resolution (as fine as 0.01cm-1 ), low-temperature (9 K) absorption spectra in the 2000-24000cm-1 range. The FS covers a few cm-1 on both sides of the narrowest among the RE-CF lines and is tightly associated with them, as proved by the amplitude dependence on the RE concentration (in the 0.5-20at.% range) and by linear dichroism measurements. The FS lines vanishing at temperatures as low as 40-60 K and the close spacing suggest that they may be ascribed to the simultaneous excitation of both RE-CF electronic transition and hindered rotation (or libration) mode of RE3+-F- group. The attribution is supported both by the specific structure of the host matrix which allows some F- mobility and by the very small line spacing which is in excellent agreement with the RE3+-F- rotational constant (2B=0.39cm-1) . Complementary specific-heat measurements in the temperature range 1.5-25 K show that Er3+ -doped samples display contributions, in addition to the vibrational one of a pure sample, which scale with the Er3+ concentration. The extra specific heat is interpreted in terms of Schottky anomalies; that peaking at ˜17K accounts for electronic transitions between the lowest sublevels of the I415/2 ground manifold, in agreement with the CF spectroscopy results while those occurring below 3.5 K are consistent with level pairs separated by 0.55 and 0.36cm-1 , in agreement with the FS line spacing.

  9. Biogenesis of the mitochondrial TOM complex: Mim1 promotes insertion and assembly of signal-anchored receptors.

    PubMed

    Becker, Thomas; Pfannschmidt, Sylvia; Guiard, Bernard; Stojanovski, Diana; Milenkovic, Dusanka; Kutik, Stephan; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Meisinger, Chris; Wiedemann, Nils

    2008-01-01

    The translocase of the outer membrane (TOM complex) is the central entry gate for nuclear-encoded mitochondrial precursor proteins. All Tom proteins are also encoded by nuclear genes and synthesized as precursors in the cytosol. The channel-forming beta-barrel protein Tom40 is targeted to mitochondria via Tom receptors and inserted into the outer membrane by the sorting and assembly machinery (SAM complex). A further outer membrane protein, Mim1, plays a less defined role in assembly of Tom40 into the TOM complex. The three receptors Tom20, Tom22, and Tom70 are anchored in the outer membrane by a single transmembrane alpha-helix, located at the N terminus in the case of Tom20 and Tom70 (signal-anchored) or in the C-terminal portion in the case of Tom22 (tail-anchored). Insertion of the precursor of Tom22 into the outer membrane requires pre-existing Tom receptors while the import pathway of the precursors of Tom20 and Tom70 is only poorly understood. We report that Mim1 is required for efficient membrane insertion and assembly of Tom20 and Tom70, but not Tom22. We show that Mim1 associates with SAM(core) components to a large SAM complex, explaining its role in late steps of the assembly pathway of Tom40. We conclude that Mim1 is not only required for biogenesis of the beta-barrel protein Tom40 but also for membrane insertion and assembly of signal-anchored Tom receptors. Thus, Mim1 plays an important role in the efficient assembly of the mitochondrial TOM complex. PMID:17974559

  10. The Gravity Probe B `Niobium bird' experiment: Verifying the data reduction scheme for estimating the relativistic precession of Earth-orbiting gyroscopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uemaatsu, Hirohiko; Parkinson, Bradford W.; Lockhart, James M.; Muhlfelder, Barry

    1993-01-01

    Gravity Probe B (GP-B) is a relatively gyroscope experiment begun at Stanford University in 1960 and supported by NASA since 1963. This experiment will check, for the first time, the relativistic precession of an Earth-orbiting gyroscope that was predicted by Einstein's General Theory of Relativity, to an accuracy of 1 milliarcsecond per year or better. A drag-free satellite will carry four gyroscopes in a polar orbit to observe their relativistic precession. The primary sensor for measuring the direction of gyroscope spin axis is the SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) magnetometer. The data reduction scheme designed for the GP-B program processes the signal from the SQUID magnetometer and estimates the relativistic precession rates. We formulated the data reduction scheme and designed the Niobium bird experiment to verify the performance of the data reduction scheme experimentally with an actual SQUID magnetometer within the test loop. This paper reports the results from the first phase of the Niobium bird experiment, which used a commercially available SQUID magnetometer as its primary sensor, and adresses the issues they raised. The first phase resulted in a large, temperature-dependent bias drift in the insensitive design and a temperature regulation scheme.

  11. Structure of the GAT domain of the endosomal adapter protein Tom1.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shuyan; Ellena, Jeffrey F; Armstrong, Geoffrey S; Capelluto, Daniel G S

    2016-06-01

    Cellular homeostasis requires correct delivery of cell-surface receptor proteins (cargo) to their target subcellular compartments. The adapter proteins Tom1 and Tollip are involved in sorting of ubiquitinated cargo in endosomal compartments. Recruitment of Tom1 to the endosomal compartments is mediated by its GAT domain's association to Tollip's Tom1-binding domain (TBD). In this data article, we report the solution NMR-derived structure of the Tom1 GAT domain. The estimated protein structure exhibits a bundle of three helical elements. We compare the Tom1 GAT structure with those structures corresponding to the Tollip TBD- and ubiquitin-bound states. PMID:26977434

  12. Structure of the GAT domain of the endosomal adapter protein Tom1

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Shuyan; Ellena, Jeffrey F.; Armstrong, Geoffrey S.; Capelluto, Daniel G.S.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular homeostasis requires correct delivery of cell-surface receptor proteins (cargo) to their target subcellular compartments. The adapter proteins Tom1 and Tollip are involved in sorting of ubiquitinated cargo in endosomal compartments. Recruitment of Tom1 to the endosomal compartments is mediated by its GAT domain’s association to Tollip’s Tom1-binding domain (TBD). In this data article, we report the solution NMR-derived structure of the Tom1 GAT domain. The estimated protein structure exhibits a bundle of three helical elements. We compare the Tom1 GAT structure with those structures corresponding to the Tollip TBD- and ubiquitin-bound states. PMID:26977434

  13. The mitochondrial TOM complex modulates bax-induced apoptosis in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Colin, J; Garibal, J; Mignotte, B; Guénal, I

    2009-02-20

    Bax is a pro-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family proteins involved in the release of apoptogenic factors from mitochondria to the cytosol. Recently, it has been shown both in mammals and yeast that Bax insertion in the mitochondrial outer membrane involves at least two distinct mechanisms, one of which uses the TOM complex. Here, we show that in Drosophila, heterozygous loss of function mutations of Tom22 or Tom70, two receptors of the TOM complex, attenuates bax-induced phenotypes in vivo. These results argue that the TOM complex may be used as a mitochondrial Bax receptor in Drosophila. PMID:19138672

  14. Plasticity of TOM complex assembly in skeletal muscle mitochondria in response to chronic contractile activity.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Anna-Maria; Hood, David A

    2012-03-01

    We investigated the assembly of the TOM complex within skeletal muscle under conditions of chronic contractile activity-induced mitochondrial biogenesis. Tom40 import into mitochondria was increased by chronic contractile activity, as was its time-dependent assembly into the TOM complex. These changes coincided with contractile activity-induced augmentations in the expression of key protein import machinery components Tim17, Tim23, and Tom22, as well as the cytosolic chaperone Hsp90. These data indicate the adaptability of the TOM protein import complex and suggest a regulatory role for the assembly of this complex in exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:22142511

  15. Insertion and assembly of human tom7 into the preprotein translocase complex of the outer mitochondrial membrane.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Amelia J; Hoogenraad, Joan; Dougan, David A; Truscott, Kaye N; Yano, Masato; Mori, Masataka; Hoogenraad, Nicholas J; Ryan, Michael T

    2002-11-01

    Tom7 is a component of the translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM) and assembles into a general import pore complex that translocates preproteins into mitochondria. We have identified the human Tom7 homolog and characterized its import and assembly into the mammalian TOM complex. Tom7 is imported into mitochondria in a nucleotide-independent manner and is anchored to the outer membrane with its C terminus facing the intermembrane space. Unlike studies in fungi, we found that human Tom7 assembles into an approximately 120-kDa import intermediate in HeLa cell mitochondria. To detect subunits within this complex, we employed a novel supershift analysis whereby mitochondria containing newly imported Tom7 were incubated with antibodies specific for individual TOM components prior to separation by blue native electrophoresis. We found that the 120-kDa complex contains Tom40 and lacks receptor components. This intermediate can be chased to the stable approximately 380-kDa mammalian TOM complex that additionally contains Tom22. Overexpression of Tom22 in HeLa cells results in the rapid assembly of Tom7 into the 380-kDa complex indicating that Tom22 is rate-limiting for TOM complex formation. These results indicate that the levels of Tom22 within mitochondria dictate the assembly of TOM complexes and hence may regulate its biogenesis. PMID:12198123

  16. Global ozone data from the meteor-3/TOMS ultraviolet spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, J. R.; Krueger, Arlin; Cote, C.; Ahmad, Zia; Forman, M.; Wellemeyer, C.; Byerly, W.; Pan, L.; Jaross, Glen; Hudson, R.

    1994-01-01

    A new TOMS instrument (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) was launched from the Plesetsk Cosomodrome, Russia on August 15, 1991. The purpose of the joint project between the U.S. and Russia was to continue the long-term record of ozone measurements from Nimbus-7/TOMS (launched in October 1978). Ozone data from the two satellites compare very closely. When the orbital positions were nearly the same, the comparison over the entire globe showed an offset of 2 percent with a standard deviation of 5 percent. Comparisons were made with several ground based M124 and Dobson stations showing good agreement in absolute value and with the day-to-day variations seen by the ground stations.

  17. Highlights of TOMS Version 9 Total Ozone Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhartia, Pawan; Haffner, David

    2012-01-01

    The fundamental basis of TOMS total ozone algorithm was developed some 45 years ago by Dave and Mateer. It was designed to estimate total ozone from satellite measurements of the backscattered UV radiances at few discrete wavelengths in the Huggins ozone absorption band (310-340 nm). Over the years, as the need for higher accuracy in measuring total ozone from space has increased, several improvements to the basic algorithms have been made. They include: better correction for the effects of aerosols and clouds, an improved method to account for the variation in shape of ozone profiles with season, latitude, and total ozone, and a multi-wavelength correction for remaining profile shape errors. These improvements have made it possible to retrieve total ozone with just 3 spectral channels of moderate spectral resolution (approx. 1 nm) with accuracy comparable to state-of-the-art spectral fitting algorithms like DOAS that require high spectral resolution measurements at large number of wavelengths. One of the deficiencies of the TOMS algorithm has been that it doesn't provide an error estimate. This is a particular problem in high latitudes when the profile shape errors become significant and vary with latitude, season, total ozone, and instrument viewing geometry. The primary objective of the TOMS V9 algorithm is to account for these effects in estimating the error bars. This is done by a straightforward implementation of the Rodgers optimum estimation method using a priori ozone profiles and their error covariances matrices constructed using Aura MLS and ozonesonde data. The algorithm produces a vertical ozone profile that contains 1-2.5 pieces of information (degrees of freedom of signal) depending upon solar zenith angle (SZA). The profile is integrated to obtain the total column. We provide information that shows the altitude range in which the profile is best determined by the measurements. One can use this information in data assimilation and analysis. A side

  18. Nimbus-7 TOMS Antarctic ozone atlas: August through November, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Arlin J.; Penn, Lanning M.; Larko, David E.; Doiron, Scott D.; Guimaraes, Patricia T.

    1990-01-01

    Because of the great environmental significance of ozone and to support continuing research at the Antarctic and other Southern Hemisphere stations, the development of the 1989 ozone hole was monitored using data from the Nimbus-7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instrument, produced in near-real-time. This Atlas provides a complete set of daily polar orthographic projections of the TOMS total ozone measurements over the Southern Hemisphere for the period August 1 through November 30, 1989. The 1989 ozone hole developed in a manner similar to that of 1987, reaching a comparable depth in early October. This was in sharp contrast to the much weaker hole of 1988. The 1989 ozone hole remained at polar latitudes as it filled in November, in contrast to other recent years when the hole drifted to mid-latitudes before disappearing. Daily ozone values above selected Southern Hemisphere stations are presented, along with comparisons of the 1989 ozone distribution to that of other years.

  19. Protein Translocation through Tom40: Kinetics of Peptide Release

    PubMed Central

    Mahendran, Kozhinjampara R.; Romero-Ruiz, Mercedes; Schlösinger, Andrea; Winterhalter, Mathias; Nussberger, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial proteins are almost exclusively imported into mitochondria from the cytosol in an unfolded or partially folded conformation. Regardless of whether they are destined for the outer or inner membrane, the intermembrane space, or the matrix, proteins begin the importation process by crossing the mitochondrial outer membrane via a specialized protein import machinery whose main component is the Tom40 channel. High-resolution ion conductance measurements through the Tom40 channel in the presence of the mitochondrial presequence peptide pF1β revealed the kinetics of peptide binding. Here we show that the rates for association kon and dissociation koff strongly depend on the applied transmembrane voltage. Both kinetic constants increase with an increase in the applied voltage. The increase of koff with voltage provides strong evidence of peptide translocation. This allows us to distinguish quantitatively between substrate blocking and permeation. PMID:22225796

  20. Preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of yeast mitochondrial protein Tom70p

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yunkun; McCombs, Debbie; Nagy, Lisa; DeLucas, Lawrence; Sha, Bingdong

    2006-03-01

    Tom70p is an important translocase of the outer membrane complex member and a major surface receptor of the protein-translocation machinery in the outer mitochondrial membrane. To investigate the mechanism by which Tom70p functions to deliver the mitochondrial protein precursors, the cytosolic fragment of yeast Tom70p (cTom70p) has been crystallized. Protein translocations across mitochondrial membranes play critical roles in mitochondrion biogenesis. Protein transport from the cell cytosol to the mitochondrial matrix is carried out by the translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) complex and the translocase of the inner membrane (TIM) complexes. Tom70p is an important TOM-complex member and a major surface receptor of the protein-translocation machinery in the outer mitochondrial membrane. To investigate the mechanism by which Tom70p functions to deliver the mitochondrial protein precursors, the cytosolic fragment of yeast Tom70p (cTom70p) was crystallized. The crystals diffract to 3.2 Å using a synchrotron X-ray source and belong to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 44.89, b = 168.78, c = 83.41 Å, α = 90.00, β = 102.74, γ = 90.00°. There are two Tom70p molecules in one asymmetric unit, which corresponds to a solvent content of approximately 51%. Structure determination by MAD methods is under way.

  1. Identification and functional analysis of human Tom22 for protein import into mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Yano, M; Hoogenraad, N; Terada, K; Mori, M

    2000-10-01

    Mitochondria have a receptor complex in the outer membrane which recognizes and translocates mitochondrial proteins synthesized in the cytosol. We report here the identification and functional analysis of human Tom22 (hTom22). hTom22 has an N-terminal negatively charged region exposed to the cytosol, a putative transmembrane region, and a C-terminal intermembrane space region with little negative charge. Tom22 forms a complex with Tom20, and its cytosolic domain functions as an import receptor as in fungi. An import inhibition assay, using pre-ornithine transcarbamylase (pOTC) derivatives and a series of hTom22 deletion mutants, showed that the C-terminal segment of the cytosolic domain is important for presequence binding, whereas the N-terminal domain is important for binding to the mature portion of pOTC. No evidence for pOTC interaction with the Tom22 intermembrane space domain was obtained. Binding studies revealed that the presequence is critical for pOTC binding to Tom20, whereas both the presequence and mature portion are important for binding to Tom22. A cell-free immunoprecipitation assay indicated that an internal segment of the Tom22 cytosolic domain is important for interaction with Tom20. PMID:10982837

  2. Biogenesis of yeast mitochondrial cytochrome c: a unique relationship to the TOM machinery.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Nils; Kozjak, Vera; Prinz, Thorsten; Ryan, Michael T; Meisinger, Chris; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Truscott, Kaye N

    2003-03-21

    The import of cytochrome c into the mitochondrial intermembrane space is not understood at a mechanistic level. While the precursor apocytochrome c can insert into protein-free lipid bilayers, the purified translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) complex supports the translocation of apocytochrome c into proteoliposomes. We report an in organello analysis of cytochrome c import into yeast mitochondria from wild-type cells and different mutants cells, each defective in one of the seven Tom proteins. The import of cytochrome c is not affected by removal of the receptor Tom20 or Tom70. Moreover, neither the transfer protein Tom5 nor the assembly factors Tom6 and Tom7 are needed for import of cytochrome c. When the general import pore (GIP)-protein Tom40 is blocked, the import of cytochrome c is moderately affected. Mitochondria lacking the central receptor and organizing protein Tom22 contain greatly reduced levels of cytochrome c. We conclude that up to two components of the TOM complex, Tom22 and possibly the GIP, are involved in the biogenesis of cytochrome c. PMID:12628251

  3. Derivation of Tropospheric Ozone Climatology and Trends from TOMS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newchurch, Michael J.; McPeters, Rich; Logan, Jennifer; Kim, Jae-Hwan

    2002-01-01

    This research addresses the following three objectives: (1) Derive tropospheric ozone columns from the TOMS instruments by computing the difference between total-ozone columns over cloudy areas and over clear areas in the tropics; (2) Compute secular trends in Nimbus-7 derived tropospheric Ozone column amounts and associated potential trends in the decadal-scale tropical cloud climatology; (3) Explain the occurrence of anomalously high ozone retrievals over high ice clouds.

  4. Heterometallic Alkaline Earth-Lanthanide Ba(II)-La(III) Microporous Metal-Organic Framework as Bifunctional Luminescent Probes of Al(3+) and MnO4(.).

    PubMed

    Ding, Bin; Liu, Shi Xin; Cheng, Yue; Guo, Chao; Wu, Xiang Xia; Guo, Jian Hua; Liu, Yuan Yuan; Li, Yan

    2016-05-01

    In this work a rigid asymmetrical tricarboxylate ligand p-terphenyl-3,4″,5-tricarboxylic acid (H3L) has been employed, and a unique heterometallic alkaline earth-lanthanide microporous luminescent metal-organic framework (MOF) {[Ba3La0.5(μ3-L)2.5(H2O)3(DMF)]·(3DMF)}n (1·3DMF) (DMF = dimethylformamide) has been isolated under solvothermal conditions. Single-crystal X-ray structural analysis demonstrates that 2D inorganic Ba-O-La connectivity can be observed in 1, which are further bridged via rigid terphenyl backbones of L(3-), forming a unique I(2)O(1)-type microporous luminescent framework. A 1D microporous channel with dimensionality of 9.151(3) Å × 10.098(1) Å can be observed along the crystallographic a axis. PXRD patterns have been investigated indicating pure phases of 1. The luminescence explorations demonstrated that 1 exhibits highly selective and sensitive sensing for Al(3+) over other cations with high quenching efficiency Ksv value of 1.445 × 10(4) L·mol(-1) and low detection limit (1.11 μM (S/N = 3)). Meanwhile 1 also exhibits highly selective and sensitive sensing for MnO4(-) over other anions with quenching efficiency Ksv = 7.73 × 10(3) L·mol(-1) and low detection limit (0.28 μM (S/N = 3)). It is noted that, when different concentrations of MnO4(-) solutions (0.5 to 100 μM) were dropped into the suspension of 1, the bright blue luminescence of the suspension observed under UV light can gradually change into pink color, indicating visually luminescent sensing, which makes the detection process of MnO4(-) more convenient in practical. The result also reveals that 1 represents the first example of bifunctional heterometallic alkaline earth-lanthanide MOF-based luminescent probes for selectively detecting Al(3+) and MnO4(-) in the water solutions. PMID:27088966

  5. Tom22 is a multifunctional organizer of the mitochondrial preprotein translocase.

    PubMed

    van Wilpe, S; Ryan, M T; Hill, K; Maarse, A C; Meisinger, C; Brix, J; Dekker, P J; Moczko, M; Wagner, R; Meijer, M; Guiard, B; Hönlinger, A; Pfanner, N

    1999-09-30

    Mitochondrial preproteins are imported by a multisubunit translocase of the outer membrane (TOM), including receptor proteins and a general import pore. The central receptor Tom22 binds preproteins through both its cytosolic domain and its intermembrane space domain and is stably associated with the channel protein Tom40 (refs 11-13). Here we report the unexpected observation that a yeast strain can survive without Tom22, although it is strongly reduced in growth and the import of mitochondrial proteins. Tom22 is a multifunctional protein that is required for the higher-level organization of the TOM machinery. In the absence of Tom22, the translocase dissociates into core complexes, representing the basic import units, but lacks a tight control of channel gating. The single membrane anchor of Tom22 is required for a stable interaction between the core complexes, whereas its cytosolic domain serves as docking point for the peripheral receptors Tom20 and Tom70. Thus a preprotein translocase can combine receptor functions with distinct organizing roles in a multidomain protein. PMID:10519552

  6. The Phytosiderophore Efflux Transporter TOM2 Is Involved in Metal Transport in Rice.

    PubMed

    Nozoye, Tomoko; Nagasaka, Seiji; Kobayashi, Takanori; Sato, Yuki; Uozumi, Nobuyuki; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Nishizawa, Naoko K

    2015-11-13

    Iron is an essential metal element for all living organisms. Graminaceous plants produce and secrete mugineic acid family phytosiderophores from their roots to acquire iron in the soil. Phytosiderophores chelate and solubilize insoluble iron hydroxide in the soil. Subsequently, plants take up iron-phytosiderophore complexes through specific transporters on the root cell membrane. Phytosiderophores are also thought to be important for the internal transport of various transition metals, including iron. In this study, we analyzed TOM2 and TOM3, rice homologs of transporter of mugineic acid family phytosiderophores 1 (TOM1), a crucial efflux transporter directly involved in phytosiderophore secretion into the soil. Transgenic rice analysis using promoter-β-glucuronidase revealed that TOM2 was expressed in tissues involved in metal translocation, whereas TOM3 was expressed only in restricted parts of the plant. Strong TOM2 expression was observed in developing tissues during seed maturation and germination, whereas TOM3 expression was weak during seed maturation. Transgenic rice in which TOM2 expression was repressed by RNA interference showed growth defects compared with non-transformants and TOM3-repressed rice. Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing TOM2 released (14)C-labeled deoxymugineic acid, the initial phytosiderophore compound in the biosynthetic pathway in rice. In onion epidermal and rice root cells, the TOM2-GFP fusion protein localized to the cell membrane, indicating that the TOM2 protein is a transporter for phytosiderophore efflux to the cell exterior. Our results indicate that TOM2 is involved in the internal transport of deoxymugineic acid, which is required for normal plant growth. PMID:26432636

  7. Tom70 serves as a molecular switch to determine pathological cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Qi, Man; Li, Changming; Shi, Dan; Zhang, Dasheng; Xie, Duanyang; Yuan, Tianyou; Feng, Jing; Liu, Yi; Liang, Dandan; Xu, Xinran; Chen, Jinjin; Xu, Liang; Zhang, Hong; Ye, Jiangchuan; Lv, Fei; Huang, Jian; Peng, Luying; Chen, Yi-Han

    2014-01-01

    Pathological cardiac hypertrophy is an inevitable forerunner of heart failure. Regardless of the etiology of cardiac hypertrophy, cardiomyocyte mitochondrial alterations are always observed in this context. The translocases of mitochondrial outer membrane (Tom) complex governs the import of mitochondrial precursor proteins to maintain mitochondrial function under pathophysiological conditions; however, its role in the development of pathological cardiac hypertrophy remains unclear. Here, we showed that Tom70 was downregulated in pathological hypertrophic hearts from humans and experimental animals. The reduction in Tom70 expression produced distinct pathological cardiomyocyte hypertrophy both in vivo and in vitro. The defective mitochondrial import of Tom70-targeted optic atrophy-1 triggered intracellular oxidative stress, which led to a pathological cellular response. Importantly, increased Tom70 levels provided cardiomyocytes with full resistance to diverse pro-hypertrophic insults. Together, these results reveal that Tom70 acts as a molecular switch that orchestrates hypertrophic stresses and mitochondrial responses to determine pathological cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:25022898

  8. Implementation of the TOMS contamination control requirements in the former USSR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, Eve M.

    1992-01-01

    The American Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) was integrated with the Russian Meteor-3 spacecraft and launched on August 15, 1991. Although the TOMS instrument was sensitive to both particulate and molecular contamination, the program for Meteor-3 had not formerly addressed contamination control in ground operations. In order to accommodate the TOMS cleanliness requirements, a contamination control program was successfully established from inception at both the Meteor-3 spacecraft plant near Moscow and at the launch site in Plesetsk.

  9. Presequence Recognition by the Tom40 Channel Contributes to Precursor Translocation into the Mitochondrial Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Melin, Jonathan; Schulz, Christian; Wrobel, Lidia; Bernhard, Olaf; Chacinska, Agnieszka; Jahn, Olaf; Schmidt, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    More than 70% of mitochondrial proteins utilize N-terminal presequences as targeting signals. Presequence interactions with redundant cytosolic receptor domains of the translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM) are well established. However, after the presequence enters the protein-conducting Tom40 channel, the recognition events that occur at the trans side leading up to the engagement of the presequence with inner membrane-bound receptors are less well defined. Using a photoaffinity-labeling approach with modified presequence peptides, we identified Tom40 as a presequence interactor of the TOM complex. Utilizing mass spectrometry, we mapped Tom40's presequence-interacting regions to both sides of the β-barrel. Analysis of a phosphorylation site within one of the presequence-interacting regions revealed altered translocation kinetics along the presequence pathway. Our analyses assess the relation between the identified presequence-binding region of Tom40 and the intermembrane space domain of Tom22. The identified presequence-interacting region of Tom40 is capable of functioning independently of the established trans-acting TOM presequence-binding domain during matrix import. PMID:25002531

  10. Presequence recognition by the tom40 channel contributes to precursor translocation into the mitochondrial matrix.

    PubMed

    Melin, Jonathan; Schulz, Christian; Wrobel, Lidia; Bernhard, Olaf; Chacinska, Agnieszka; Jahn, Olaf; Schmidt, Bernhard; Rehling, Peter

    2014-09-15

    More than 70% of mitochondrial proteins utilize N-terminal presequences as targeting signals. Presequence interactions with redundant cytosolic receptor domains of the translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM) are well established. However, after the presequence enters the protein-conducting Tom40 channel, the recognition events that occur at the trans side leading up to the engagement of the presequence with inner membrane-bound receptors are less well defined. Using a photoaffinity-labeling approach with modified presequence peptides, we identified Tom40 as a presequence interactor of the TOM complex. Utilizing mass spectrometry, we mapped Tom40's presequence-interacting regions to both sides of the β-barrel. Analysis of a phosphorylation site within one of the presequence-interacting regions revealed altered translocation kinetics along the presequence pathway. Our analyses assess the relation between the identified presequence-binding region of Tom40 and the intermembrane space domain of Tom22. The identified presequence-interacting region of Tom40 is capable of functioning independently of the established trans-acting TOM presequence-binding domain during matrix import. PMID:25002531

  11. Korea Earth Observation Satellite Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Myung-Jin; Kim, Zeen-Chul

    via Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI) as the prime contractor in the area of Korea earth observation satellite program to enhance Korea's space program development capability. In this paper, Korea's on-going and future earth observation satellite programs are introduced: KOMPSAT- 1 (Korea Multi Purpose Satellite-1), KOMPSAT-2 and Communication, Broadcasting and Meteorological Satellite (CBMS) program. KOMPSAT-1 satellite successfully launched in December 1999 with Taurus launch vehicle. Since launch, KOMPSAT-1 is downlinking images of Korea Peninsular every day. Until now, KOMPSAT-1 has been operated more than 2 and half years without any major hardware malfunction for the mission operation. KOMPSAT-1 payload has 6.6m panchromatic spatial resolution at 685 km on-orbit and the spacecraft bus had NASA TOMS-EP (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer-Earth Probe) spacecraft bus heritage designed and built by TRW, U.S.A.KOMPSAT-1 program was international co-development program between KARI and TRW funded by Korean Government. be launched in 2004. Main mission objective is to provide geo-information products based on the multi-spectral high resolution sensor called Multi-Spectral Camera (MSC) which will provide 1m panchromatic and 4m multi-spectral high resolution images. ELOP of Israel is the prime contractor of the MSC payload system and KARI is the total system prime contractor including spacecraft bus development and ground segment. KARI also has the contract with Astrium of Europe for the purpose of technical consultation and hardware procurement. Based on the experience throughout KOMPSAT-1 and KOMPSAT-2 space system development, Korea is expecting to establish the infrastructure of developing satellite system. Currently, KOMPSAT-2 program is in the critical design stage. are scheduled to launch in 2008 and in 2014, respectively. The mission of CBMS consists of two areas. One is of space technology test for the communications mission, and the other is of a real

  12. Nimbus-7 TOMS Antarctic ozone atlas: August - December 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Arlin J.; Penn, Lanning M.; Guimaraes, Patricia T.; Scott, Courtney J.; Larko, David E.; Doiron, Scott D.

    1991-01-01

    Because of the great environmental significance of ozone and to support continuing research at the Antarctic and other Southern Hemisphere stations, the development of the 1990 ozone hole was monitored using data from the Nimbus-7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instrument, produced in near-real-time. This Atlas provides a complete set of daily polar orthographic projections of the TOMS total ozone measurements over the Southern Hemisphere for the period 1 Aug. through 31 Dec. 1990. The 1990 ozone hole developed in a manner similar to that of 1987 and 1989, reaching a comparable depth in early October. This was in sharp contrast to the much weaker hold of 1988. The 1990 ozone hole remained at polar latitudes as it filled in Nov., in contrast to other recent years when the hold drifted to mid-latitudes before disappearing. Daily ozone values above selected Southern Hemisphere stations are presented, along with comparisons of the 1990 ozone distribution to that of other years. A new calibration scheme (Version 6) was used to process 1990 ozone values, as well as to reprocess those of previous years.

  13. The 1988 Antarctic ozone monitoring Nimbus-7 TOMS data atlas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Arlin J.; Penn, Lanning M.; Larko, David E.; Doiron, Scott D.; Guimaraes, Patricia T.

    1989-01-01

    Because of the great environmental significance of ozone and to support continuing research at McMurdo, Syowa, and other Southern Hemisphere stations, the development of the 1988 ozone hole was monitored using data from the Nimbus-7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instrument, produced in near-real-time. This Atlas provides a complete set of daily polar orthographic projections of the TOMS total ozone measurements over the Southern Hemisphere for the period August 1 through November 17, 1988. Although total ozone in mini-holes briefly dropped below 150 DU in late August, the main ozone hole is seen to be much less pronounced than in 1987. Minimum values, observed in late September and early October 1988, were seldom less than 175 DU. Compared with the same period in 1987, when a pronounced ozone hole whose minimum value of 109 Dobson Units (DU) was the lowest total ozone ever observed, the 1988 ozone hole is displaced from the South Pole, opposing a persistent maximum with values consistently above 500 DU. Daily ozone values above selected Southern Hemisphere stations are presented, along with comparisons of the 1988 ozone distribution to that of other years.

  14. Molecular Chaperone Hsp70/Hsp90 Prepares the Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Translocon Receptor Tom71 for Preprotein Loading

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jingzhi; Qian, Xinguo; Hu, Junbin; Sha, Bingdong

    2010-11-03

    The preproteins targeted to the mitochondria are transported through the translocase of the outer membrane complex. Tom70/Tom71 is a major surface receptor of the translocase of the outer membrane complex for mitochondrial preproteins. The preproteins are escorted to Tom70/Tom71 by molecular chaperones Hsp70 and Hsp90. Here we present the high resolution crystal structures of Tom71 and the protein complexes between Tom71 and the Hsp70/Hsp90 C terminus. The crystal structures indicate that Tom70/Tom71 may exhibit two distinct states. In the closed state, the N-terminal domain of Tom70/Tom71 partially blocks the preprotein-binding pocket. In the open state, the N-terminal domain moves away, and the preprotein-binding pocket is fully exposed. The complex formation between the C-terminal EEVD motif of Hsp70/Hsp90 and Tom71 could lock Tom71 in the open state where the preprotein-binding pocket of Tom71 is ready to receive preproteins. The interactions between Hsp70/Hsp90 and Tom71 N-terminal domain generate conformational changes that may increase the volume of the preprotein-binding pocket. The complex formation of Hsp70/Hsp90 and Tom71 also generates significant domain rearrangement within Tom71, which may position the preprotein-binding pocket closer to Hsp70/Hsp90 to facilitate the preprotein transfer from the molecular chaperone to Tom71. Therefore, molecular chaperone Hsp70/Hsp90 may function to prepare the mitochondrial outer membrane receptor Tom71 for preprotein loading.

  15. The Impact of Withholding Observations from TOMS or SBUV Instruments on the GEOS Ozone Data Assimilation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stajner, Ovanka; Riishojgaard, Lars Peter; Rood, Richard B.

    2000-01-01

    In a data assimilation system (DAS), model forecast atmospheric fields, observations and their respective statistics are combined in an attempt to produce the best estimate of these fields. Ozone observations from two instruments are assimilated in the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) ozone DAS: the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) and the Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV) instrument. The assimilated observations are complementary; TOMS provides a global daily coverage of total column ozone, without profile information, while SBUV measures ozone profiles and total column ozone at nadir only. The purpose of this paper is to examine the performance of the ozone assimilation system in the absence of observations from one of the instruments as it can happen in the event of a failure of an instrument or when there are problems with an instrument for a limited time. Our primary concern is for the performance of the GEOS ozone DAS when it is used in the operational mode to provide near real time analyzed ozone fields in support of instruments on the Terra satellite. In addition, we are planning to produce a longer term ozone record by assimilating historical data. We want to quantify the differences in the assimilated ozone fields that are caused by the changes in the TOMS or SBUV observing network. Our primary interest is in long term and large scale features visible in global statistics of analysis fields, such as differences in the zonal mean of assimilated ozone fields or comparisons with independent observations, While some drifts in assimilated fields occur immediately, after assimilating just one day of different observations, the others develop slowly over several months. Thus, we are also interested in the length of time, which is determined from time series, that is needed for significant changes to take place.

  16. 33 CFR 80.170 - Sandy Hook, NJ to Tom's River, NJ.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sandy Hook, NJ to Tom's River, NJ. 80.170 Section 80.170 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Atlantic Coast § 80.170 Sandy Hook, NJ to Tom's...

  17. 33 CFR 80.170 - Sandy Hook, NJ to Tom's River, NJ.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sandy Hook, NJ to Tom's River, NJ. 80.170 Section 80.170 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Atlantic Coast § 80.170 Sandy Hook, NJ to Tom's...

  18. Tom Stewart Interview (Part II): A Little Bit About the Man Behind SPEEDE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winarski, Kathy

    2004-01-01

    Although admittedly shy and more comfortable as an attentive listener, Tom Stewart is also friendly and accommodating. He graciously agreed to share his thoughts about some of the important experiences in his life. Tom is that rare bird, a native Floridian, from West Palm Beach, 68 miles north of his Miami home. He received a Bachelor of Chemical…

  19. The protein import pore Tom40 in the microsporidian Nosema bombycis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lipeng; Pan, Guoqing; Li, Tian; Dang, Xiaoqun; Deng, Yuanhong; Ma, Cheng; Chen, Jie; Luo, Jie; Zhou, Zeyang

    2012-01-01

    Microsporidia, an unusual group of unicellular parasites related to fungi, possess a highly reduced mitochondrion known as the mitosome. Since mitosomes lack an organellar genome, their proteins must be translated in the cytosol before being imported into the mitosome via translocases. We have identified a Tom40 gene (NbTom40), the main component of the translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane, in the genome of the microsporidian Nosema bombycis. NbTom40 is reduced in size, but it is predicted to form a β-barrel structure composed of 19 β-strands. Phylogenetic analysis confirms that NbTom40 forms a clade with Tom40 sequences from other species, distinct from a related clade of voltage-dependent anion channels (VDACs). The NbTom40 contains a β-signal motif that the polar residue is substituted by glycine. Furthermore, we show that expression of NbTom40, as a GFP fusion protein within yeast cells, directs GFP to mitochondria of yeast. These findings suggest that NbTom40 may serve as an import channel of the microsporidian mitosome and facilitate protein translocation into this organelle. PMID:22486892

  20. The TOM Complex of Amoebozoans: the Cases of the Amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii and the Slime Mold Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Wojtkowska, Małgorzata; Buczek, Dorota; Stobienia, Olgierd; Karachitos, Andonis; Antoniewicz, Monika; Slocinska, Małgorzata; Makałowski, Wojciech; Kmita, Hanna

    2015-07-01

    Protein import into mitochondria requires a wide variety of proteins, forming complexes in both mitochondrial membranes. The TOM complex (translocase of the outer membrane) is responsible for decoding of targeting signals, translocation of imported proteins across or into the outer membrane, and their subsequent sorting. Thus the TOM complex is regarded as the main gate into mitochondria for imported proteins. Available data indicate that mitochondria of representative organisms from across the major phylogenetic lineages of eukaryotes differ in subunit organization of the TOM complex. The subunit organization of the TOM complex in the Amoebozoa is still elusive, so we decided to investigate its organization in the soil amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii and the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. They represent two major subclades of the Amoebozoa: the Lobosa and Conosa, respectively. Our results confirm the presence of Tom70, Tom40 and Tom7 in the A. castellanii and D. discoideum TOM complex, while the presence of Tom22 and Tom20 is less supported. Interestingly, the Tom proteins display the highest similarity to Opisthokonta cognate proteins, with the exception of Tom40. Thus representatives of two major subclades of the Amoebozoa appear to be similar in organization of the TOM complex, despite differences in their lifestyle. PMID:26074248

  1. User's guide for SBUV/TOMS ozone derivative products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleig, A. J.; Wellemeyer, C.; Oslik, N.; Lee, D.; Miller, J.; Magatani, R.

    1984-01-01

    A series of products are available derived from the total-ozone and ozone vertical profile results for the Solar Backscattered Ultraviolet/Total-Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (SBUV/TOMS) Nimbus-7 operation. Products available are (1) orbital height-latitude cross sections of the SBUV profile data, (2) daily global total ozone contours in polar coordinates, (3) daily averages of total ozone in global 5x5 degree latitude-longitude grid, (4) daily, monthly and quarterly averages of total ozone and profile data in 10 degree latitude zones, (5) tabular presentation of zonal means, (6) daily global total ozone and profile contours in polar coordinates. The ""Derivative Products User's Guide'' describes each of these products in detail, including their derivation and presentation format. Information is provided on how to order the tapes and microfilm from the National Space Science Data Center.

  2. How does the TOM complex mediate insertion of precursor proteins into the mitochondrial outer membrane?

    PubMed Central

    Rapaport, Doron

    2005-01-01

    A multisubunit translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM complex) mediates both the import of mitochondrial precursor proteins into the internal compartments of the organelle and the insertion of proteins residing in the mitochondrial outer membrane. The proposed β-barrel structure of Tom40, the pore-forming component of the translocase, raises the question of how the apparent uninterrupted β-barrel topology can be compatible with a role of Tom40 in releasing membrane proteins into the lipid core of the bilayer. In this review, I discuss insertion mechanisms of proteins into the outer membrane and present alternative models based on the opening of a multisubunit β-barrel TOM structure or on the interaction of outer membrane precursors with the outer face of the Tom40 β-barrel structure. PMID:16260501

  3. Electromagnetic deep-probing (100-1000 kms) of the Earth's interior from artificial satellites: Constraints on the regional emplacement of crustal resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermance, J. F.

    1983-01-01

    The reconnaissance phase of using satellite observtions to studying electromagnetic induction in the solid earth is summarized. Several points are made: (1) satellite data apparently suffer far less from the effects of near surface lateral heterogeneities in the earth than do ground-based data; (2) zonal ionospheric currents during the recovery phase of major magnetic storms appear to be minimal, at least in the dawn and dusk sectors wher MAGSAT was flown; hence the internal contributions that satellites observe during these times is in fact due primarily to induction in the Earth with little or no contribution from ionospheric currents; and (3) the interpretation of satellite data in terms of primitive electromagnetic response functions, while grossly over-simplified, results in a surprisingly well-resolved radius for an equivalent super-conductor representing the conductivity region of the Earth's interior (5,370 + or - 120 km).

  4. Electromagnetic deep-probing (100-1000 KMS) of the Earth's interior from artificial satellites: Constraints on the regional emplacement of crustal resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermance, J. F. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    Model simulations show that induction in a spherical Earth by distant magnetospheric sources can contribute magnetic field fluctuations at MAGSAT altitudes which are 30 to 40 percent of the external field amplitudes. When the characteristic dimensions (e.g. depth of penetration, etc) of a particular situations are small compared with the Earth's radius, the Earth can be approximated by a plane horizontal half space. In this case, electromagnetic energy is reflected with close to 100 percent efficiency from the Earth's surface. This implies that the total horizontal field is twice the source field when the source is above the satellite, but is reduced to values which are much smaller than the source field when the source is below the satellite. This latter effect tends to enhance the signature of gross electrical discontinuities in the lithosphere when observed at satellite altitudes.

  5. Preliminary Results from an Assimilation of Saharan Dust Using TOMS Radiances and the GOCART Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, C. J.; daSilva, Arlindo; Ginoux, Paul; Torres, Omar; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    At NASA Goddard we are developing a global aerosol data assimilation system that combines advances in remote sensing and modeling of atmospheric aerosols. The goal is to provide high resolution, 3-D aerosol distributions to the research community. Our first step is to develop a simple assimilation system for Saharan mineral aerosol. The Goddard Chemistry and Aerosol Radiation model (GOCART) provides accurate 3-D mineral aerosol size distributions. Surface mobilization, wet and dry deposition, convective and long-range transport are all driven by assimilated fields from the Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System, GEOS-DAS. Our version of GOCART transports sizes from .08-10 microns and only simulates Saharan dust. We draw the assimilation to two observables in this study: the TOMS aerosol index (Al) which is directly related to the ratio of the 340 and 380 radiances and the 380 radiance alone. The forward model that simulates the observables requires the aerosol optical thickness, the single scattering albedo and the height of the aerosol layer from the GOCART fields. The forward model also requires a refractive index for the dust. We test three index values to see which best fits the TOMS observables. These are 1) for Saharan dust reported by Patterson, 2) for a mixture of Saharan dust and a highly reflective material (sea salt or sulfate) and 3) for pure illite. The assimilation works best assuming either pure illite or the dust mixture. Our assimilation cycle first determines values of the aerosol index (Al) and the radiance at 380 nm based on the GOCART aerosol fields. Differences between the observed and GOCART model calculated Al and 380 nm radiance are first analyzed horizontally using the Physical-space Statistical Analysis System (PSAS). A quasi-Newton iteration is then performed to produce analyzed 3D aerosol fields according to parameterized background and observation error covariances. We only assimilate observations into the the GOCART

  6. Global and Seasonal Aerosol Optical Depths Derived From Ultraviolet Observations by Satellites (TOMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, J. R.; Torres, O.

    1999-01-01

    North America and Europe. Comparisons of the estimated TOMS aerosol optical depths show good agreement in magnitude and seasonal dependence with sun-photometer optical depths obtained at Goddard Space Flight Center (39degN 76.88degW) in the U.S. and in Lille (50.63degN 3.07degE) in France. The study of these aerosols is important for detecting the sources of industrial pollution and its redistribution by winds on a global basis, as well as its effect on reducing the UV irradiance at the Earth's surface.

  7. Mitochondrial protein import: recognition of internal import signals of BCS1 by the TOM complex.

    PubMed

    Stan, Tincuta; Brix, Jan; Schneider-Mergener, Jens; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Neupert, Walter; Rapaport, Doron

    2003-04-01

    BCS1, a component of the inner membrane of mitochondria, belongs to the group of proteins with internal, noncleavable import signals. Import and intramitochondrial sorting of BCS1 are encoded in the N-terminal 126 amino acid residues. Three sequence elements were identified in this region, namely, the transmembrane domain (amino acid residues 51 to 68), a presequence type helix (residues 69 to 83), and an import auxiliary region (residues 84 to 126). The transmembrane domain is not required for stable binding to the TOM complex. The Tom receptors (Tom70, Tom22 and Tom20), as determined by peptide scan analysis, interact with the presequence-like helix, yet the highest binding was to the third sequence element. We propose that the initial recognition of BCS1 precursor at the surface of the organelle mainly depends on the auxiliary region and does not require the transmembrane domain. This essential region represents a novel type of signal with targeting and sorting functions. It is recognized by all three known mitochondrial import receptors, demonstrating their capacity to decode various targeting signals. We suggest that the BCS1 precursor crosses the TOM complex as a loop structure and that once the precursor emerges from the TOM complex, all three structural elements are essential for the intramitochondrial sorting to the inner membrane. PMID:12640110

  8. Analysis of individual mitochondria via fluorescent immunolabeling with Anti-TOM22 antibodies.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Thane H; Frost, Nicholas W; Bowser, Michael T; Arriaga, Edgar A

    2014-02-01

    Mitochondria are responsible for maintaining a variety of cellular functions. One such function is the interaction and subsequent import of proteins into these organelles via the translocase of outer membrane (TOM) complex. Antibodies have been used to analyze the presence and function of proteins comprising this complex, but have not been used to investigate variations in the abundance of TOM complex in mitochondria. Here, we report on the feasibility of using capillary cytometry with laser-induced fluorescence to detect mitochondria labeled with antibodies targeting the TOM complex and to estimate the number of antibodies that bind to these organelles. Mitochondria were fluorescently labeled with DsRed2, while antibodies targeting the TOM22 protein, one of nine proteins comprising the TOM complex, were conjugated to the Atto-488 fluorophore. At typical labeling conditions, 94% of DsRed2 mitochondria were also immunofluorescently labeled with Atto-488 Anti-TOM22 antibodies. The calculated median number of Atto-488 Anti-TOM22 antibodies bound to the surface of mitochondria was ∼2,000 per mitochondrion. The combination of fluorescent immunolabeling and capillary cytometry could be further developed to include multicolor labeling experiments, which enable monitoring several molecular targets at the same time in the same or different organelle types. PMID:24481619

  9. Electromagnetic deep-probing (100-1000 KMS) of the Earth's interior from artificial satellites: Constraints on the regional emplacement of crustal resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermance, J. F. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    An algorithm was developed to address the problem of electromagnetic coupling of ionospheric current systems to both a homogeneous Earth having finite conductivity, and to an Earth having gross lateral variations in its conductivity structure, e.g., the ocean-land interface. Typical results from the model simulation for ionospheric currents flowing parallel to a representative geologic discontinuity are shown. Although the total magnetic field component at the satellite altitude is an order of magnitude smaller than at the Earth's surface (because of cancellation effects from the source current), the anomalous behavior of the satellite observations as the vehicle passes over the geologic contact is relatively more important pronounced. The results discriminate among gross lithospheric structures because of difference in electrical conductivity.

  10. Contributions of Nimbus 7 TOMS Data to Volcanic Study and Hazard Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Arlin J.; Bluth, G. J. S.; Schaefer, S. A.

    1998-01-01

    Nimbus TOMS data have led to advancements among many volcano-related scientific disciplines, from the initial ability to quantify SO2 clouds leading to derivations of eruptive S budgets and fluxes, to tracking of individual clouds, assessing global volcanism and atmospheric impacts. Some of the major aspects of TOMS-related research, listed below, will be reviewed and updated: (1) Measurement of volcanic SO2 clouds: Nimbus TOMS observed over 100 individual SO2 clouds during its mission lifetime; large explosive eruptions are now routinely and reliably measured by satellite. (2) Eruption processes: quantification of SO2 emissions have allowed assessments of eruption sulfur budgets, the evaluation of "excess" sulfur, and inferences of H2S emissions. (3) Detection of ash: TOMS data are now used to detect volcanic particulates in the atmosphere, providing complementary analyses to infrared methods of detection. Paired TOMS and AVHRR studies have provided invaluable information on volcanic cloud compositions and processes. (4) Cloud tracking and hazard mitigation: volcanic clouds can be considered gigantic tracers in the atmosphere, and studies of the fates of these clouds have led to new knowledge of their physical and chemical dispersion in the atmosphere for predictive models. (5) Global trends: the long term data set has provided researchers an unparalleled record of explosive volcanism, and forms a key component in assessing annual to decadal trends in global S emissions. (6) Atmospheric impacts: TOMS data have been linked to independent records of atmospheric change, in order to compare cause and effect processes following a massive injection of SO2 into the atmosphere. (7) Future TOMS instruments and applications: Nimbus TOMS has given way to new satellite platforms, with several wavelength and resolution modifications. New efforts to launch a geostationary TOMS could provide unprecedented observations of volcanic activity.

  11. The Broad Impact of TOM40 on Neurodegenerative Diseases in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Gottschalk, William K.; Lutz, Michael W.; He, Yu Ting; Saunders, Ann M.; Burns, Daniel K.; Roses, Allen D.; Chiba-Falek, Ornit

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is an important factor in the pathogenesis of age-related diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s spectrum disorders. A polymorphism in Translocase of the Outer Mitochondrial Membrane – 40 kD (TOMM40) is associated with risk and age-of onset of late-onset AD, and is the only nuclear- encoded gene identified in genetic studies to date that presumably contributes to LOAD-related mitochondria dysfunction. In this review, we describe the TOM40-mediated mitochondrial protein import mechanism, and discuss the evidence linking TOM40 with Alzheimer’s (AD) and Parkinson’s (PD) diseases. All but 36 of the >~1,500 mitochondrial proteins are encoded by the nucleus and are synthesized on cytoplasmic ribosomes, and most of these are imported into mitochondria through the TOM complex, of which TOM40 is the central pore, mediating communication between the cytoplasm and the mitochondrial interior. APP enters and obstructs the TOM40 pore, inhibiting import of OXPHOS-related proteins and disrupting the mitochondrial redox balance. Other pathogenic proteins, such as Aβ and alpha-synuclein, readily pass through the pore and cause toxic effects by directly inhibiting mitochondrial enzymes. Healthy mitochondria normally import and degrade the PD-related protein Pink1, but Pink1 exits mitochondria if the membrane potential collapses and initiates Parkin-mediated mitophagy. Under normal circumstances, this process helps clear dysfunctional mitochondria and contributes to cellular health, but PINK1 mutations associated with PD exit mitochondria with intact membrane potentials, disrupting mitochondrial dynamics, leading to pathology. Thus, TOM40 plays a central role in the mitochondrial dysfunction that underlies age-related neurodegenerative diseases. Learning about the factors that control TOM40 levels and activity, and how TOM40, specifically, and the TOM complex, generally, interacts with potentially pathogenic

  12. Meteor 3/TOMS launch of 15 August 1991 in Plesetsk, USSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-08-01

    The TOMS launch of August 15, 1991, was a joint effort between the U.S.S.R. and the United States. The pre-launch briefing, a tour of the TOMS storage site, it's delivery and setup at the launch site, and the actual launch were viewed in this video, along with a post-launch conference and a dinner. The launch occurred in Plesetsk, U.S.S.R., with the TOMS payload being launched on a Soviet Meteor. Officials from NASA were present for the launch.

  13. Electromagnetic deep-probing (100-1000 kms) of the Earth's interior from artificial satellites: Constraints on the regional emplacement of crustal resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermance, J. F. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    Efforts continue in the development of a computer program for looking at the coupling of finite dimensioned source fields with a laterally heterogeneous Earth. An algorithm for calculating a time-varying reference field using ground-based magnetic observatory data is also under development as part of the production of noise-free estimates of global electromagnetic response functions using Magsat data.

  14. Biogenesis of the preprotein translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane: protein kinase A phosphorylates the precursor of Tom40 and impairs its import.

    PubMed

    Rao, Sanjana; Schmidt, Oliver; Harbauer, Angelika B; Schönfisch, Birgit; Guiard, Bernard; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Meisinger, Chris

    2012-05-01

    The preprotein translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM) functions as the main entry gate for the import of nuclear-encoded proteins into mitochondria. The major subunits of the TOM complex are the three receptors Tom20, Tom22, and Tom70 and the central channel-forming protein Tom40. Cytosolic kinases have been shown to regulate the biogenesis and activity of the Tom receptors. Casein kinase 2 stimulates the biogenesis of Tom22 and Tom20, whereas protein kinase A (PKA) impairs the receptor function of Tom70. Here we report that PKA exerts an inhibitory effect on the biogenesis of the β-barrel protein Tom40. Tom40 is synthesized as precursor on cytosolic ribosomes and subsequently imported into mitochondria. We show that PKA phosphorylates the precursor of Tom40. The phosphorylated Tom40 precursor is impaired in import into mitochondria, whereas the nonphosphorylated precursor is efficiently imported. We conclude that PKA plays a dual role in the regulation of the TOM complex. Phosphorylation by PKA not only impairs the receptor activity of Tom70, but it also inhibits the biogenesis of the channel protein Tom40. PMID:22419819

  15. Straight talk with... Tom Inglesby. Interview by Kevin Jiang.

    PubMed

    Inglesby, Tom

    2013-06-01

    When letters containing anthrax spores were mailed to several US senators and media offices in September 2001, just one week after the 9/11 attacks, bioterrorism catapulted to the national stage. Political leaders and public health officials, desperate for guidance on this once-theoretical scenario, turned to experts including Tom Inglesby, then deputy director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Civilian Biodefense Strategies, a bioterrorism research and analysis think tank in Baltimore. In the years that followed, Inglesby and his colleagues ran exercises to simulate bioterror incidents, established a peer-reviewed journal on biodefense and advised government agencies on how to reduce the public health impact of biological threats.Today, he continues his work with the think tank, which moved to the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) in 2003 (although it stayed headquartered in Baltimore) and which was recently renamed the UPMC Center for Health Security. As director and chief executive officer for the past four years, Inglesby has expanded the center's focus toward preventing public health crises arising from infectious diseases, pandemics and major natural disasters, in addition to biological, chemical and nuclear accidents or threats. Inglesby spoke with Kevin Jiang about how responses to bioterrorism, pandemics and natural disasters aren't all that different. PMID:23744137

  16. Nanoscale distribution of mitochondrial import receptor Tom20 is adjusted to cellular conditions and exhibits an inner-cellular gradient.

    PubMed

    Wurm, Christian A; Neumann, Daniel; Lauterbach, Marcel A; Harke, Benjamin; Egner, Alexander; Hell, Stefan W; Jakobs, Stefan

    2011-08-16

    The translocase of the mitochondrial outer membrane (TOM) complex is the main import pore for nuclear-encoded proteins into mitochondria, yet little is known about its spatial distribution within the outer membrane. Super-resolution stimulated emission depletion microscopy was used to determine quantitatively the nanoscale distribution of Tom20, a subunit of the TOM complex, in more than 1,000 cells. We demonstrate that Tom20 is located in clusters whose nanoscale distribution is finely adjusted to the cellular growth conditions as well as to the specific position of a cell within a microcolony. The density of the clusters correlates to the mitochondrial membrane potential. The distributions of clusters of Tom20 and of Tom22 follow an inner-cellular gradient from the perinuclear to the peripheral mitochondria. We conclude that the nanoscale distribution of the TOM complex is finely adjusted to the cellular conditions, resulting in distribution gradients both within single cells and between adjacent cells. PMID:21799113

  17. Investigating geomagnetic activity dependent sources of 100s of keV electrons in Earth's inner radiation belt using Van Allen Probes observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, D. L.; O'Brien, T. P., III; Fennell, J. F.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Blake, J. B.; Baker, D. N.; Henderson, M. G.; Reeves, G. D.

    2015-12-01

    By providing an unprecedented level of reliability in particle flux observations at low L-shells, NASA's Van Allen Probes mission has yielded a series of discoveries and unanswered questions concerning the inner electron radiation belt. Two such discoveries are: 1) a sharp cutoff in the energy distribution of electrons at ~900 keV, such that fluxes of electrons with energies greater than ~900 keV are below the detectability threshold of the Van Allen Probes' MagEIS instruments and consistent with upper flux limits of multi-MeV electrons calculated using the Van Allen Probes' REPT instruments, and 2) that impulsive injections of up to several hundred keV electrons may act as an activity-dependent source of electrons in the slot and inner radiation belt. In this presentation, we discuss results from phase space density (PSD) analysis of inner zone electrons. Such analysis, which examines PSD as a function of the three adiabatic invariants, effectively removes adiabatic variations in the particle observations allowing one to better identify source and loss processes ongoing in the system. We demonstrate that impulsive injections do indeed act as a source of inner radiation belt electrons and, when combined with losses in the slot region, can result in peaked radial distributions of electron PSD in the inner zone. We briefly discuss the nature of these low-L injections, which penetrate inside the plasmasphere and display strong energy and species dependencies. By examining such injections throughout the Van Allen Probes era, we also i) determine the occurrence rate of injections as a function of electron energy (and first adiabatic invariant), geomagnetic activity level, and L-shell; ii) estimate the contribution of such injections to the inner belt population; and iii) investigate how such injections disrupt coherent banded flux structures in the inner zone known as "zebra stripes".

  18. America's Prosperity: The Academic Success of Hispanics. Tomás Rivera Lecture Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donado, Yvette

    2014-01-01

    In the 2014 Tomás Rivera lecture, Yvette Donado, Senior Vice President and Chief Administrative Officer of Educational Testing Service, discusses the need to create educational opportunities for Hispanic Americans in order to create prosperity for all Americans.

  19. Alpha-particles as probes of nuclear shape in the rare earths and structure effects on proton emission in the mass 80 region

    SciTech Connect

    Sarantites, D.G.; Nicolis, N.G.; Abenante, V.; Majka, Z.; Semkow, T.M. . Dept. of Internal Medicine); Baktash, C.; Beene, J.R.; Garcia-Bermudez, G.; Halbert, M.L.; Hensley, D.C.; Johnson, N.R.; Lee, I.Y.; McGowan, F.K.; Riley, M.A.; Virtanen, A. ); Griffin, H.C. )

    1989-01-01

    Low emission barriers and large subbarrier anisotropies in the alpha-particle decay with respect to the spin direction, of Sn and rare earth compound nuclei, are examined in the light of recent calculations incorporating deformation. For the rare earth systems deformation which increases with spin is necessary to explain the data. Energy spectra and angular correlations of evaporated protons from the {sup 52}Cr({sup 34}S, 2p2n){sup 82}Sr reaction were measured in coincidence with discrete transition. Large changes in the shape of the proton spectra were observed when high spin states in different rotation al bands are populated. These effects cannot be explained by phase space arguments in the deexcitation process. They are interpreted as due to near-yrast to near-yrast stretched proton emission, which preferentially populates the yrast band by subbarrier protons. 20 refs., 8 figs.

  20. Electromagnetic deep-probing (100-1000 KMS) of the Earth's interior from artificial satellites: Constraints on the regional emplacement of crustal resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermance, J. F. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The applicability of electromagnetic deep sounding experiments using natural sources in the magnetosphere by incorporating Magsat data with other geophysical data was evaluated. Magsat satellite data, ground based magnetic observations, appropriate reference field models, and other satellite data was analyzed. The optimal combination of observations which lead first to a global and then to a regional characterization of the conductivity of the Earth's upper mantle is sought.

  1. Using PlayDoh Astronomy for Understanding the Size and Scale of the Earth-Moon System and as a Probe for Spatial Translation Ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundstrom, Erika

    2013-01-01

    To help students love science more and to help them understand the vast distances that pervade astronomy, we use kinesthetic modeling of the Earth-Moon system using PlayDoh. When coupled with discussion, we found (in a pilot study) that students of all ages (children up through adults) acquired a more accurate mental representation of the Earth-Moon system. During early September 2012, we devised and implemented a curriculum unit that focused on the Earth-Moon system and how that relates to eclipses for six middle-Tennessee 6th grade public school classrooms. For this unit, we used PlayDoh as the kinesthetic modeling tool. First, we evaluated what the students knew about the size and scale prior to this intervention using paper and model pre-tests. Second, we used the PlayDoh to model the Earth-Moon system and when possible, conducted an immediate post-test. The students then engaged with the PlayDoh model to help them understand eclipses. Third, we conducted a one-month-later delayed post-test. One thing to note is that about half of the students had experienced the PlayDoh modeling part of a 5th grade pilot lesson during May 2012 therefore the pre-test acted as a four-month-later delayed post-test for these students. We find, among other things, that students retain relative size information more readily than relative distance information. We also find differences in how consistent students are when trying to translate the size/scale they have in their heads to the different modes of assessment utilized.

  2. GOME Total Ozone and Calibration Error Derived Usign Version 8 TOMS Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleason, J.; Wellemeyer, C.; Qin, W.; Ahn, C.; Gopalan, A.; Bhartia, P.

    2003-01-01

    The Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) is a hyper-spectral satellite instrument measuring the ultraviolet backscatter at relatively high spectral resolution. GOME radiances have been slit averaged to emulate measurements of the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) made at discrete wavelengths and processed using the new TOMS Version 8 Ozone Algorithm. Compared to Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) techniques based on local structure in the Huggins Bands, the TOMS uses differential absorption between a pair of wavelengths including the local stiucture as well as the background continuum. This makes the TOMS Algorithm more sensitive to ozone, but it also makes the algorithm more sensitive to instrument calibration errors. While calibration adjustments are not needed for the fitting techniques like the DOAS employed in GOME algorithms, some adjustment is necessary when applying the TOMS Algorithm to GOME. Using spectral discrimination at near ultraviolet wavelength channels unabsorbed by ozone, the GOME wavelength dependent calibration drift is estimated and then checked using pair justification. In addition, the day one calibration offset is estimated based on the residuals of the Version 8 TOMS Algorithm. The estimated drift in the 2b detector of GOME is small through the first four years and then increases rapidly to +5% in normalized radiance at 331 nm relative to 385 nm by mid 2000. The lb detector appears to be quite well behaved throughout this time period.

  3. Immunolocalization of Tom1 in relation to protein degradation systems in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Makioka, Kouki; Yamazaki, Tsuneo; Takatama, Masamitsu; Ikeda, Masaki; Murayama, Shigeo; Okamoto, Koichi; Ikeda, Yoshio

    2016-06-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder. Its pathological hallmarks are senile plaques (SPs), which contain extracellular deposits of amyloid β (Aβ) protein fibrils and dystrophic neurites (DNs), and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) containing hyperphosphorylated tau. Impairment of protein-degradation systems, including the ubiquitin-proteasome and the autophagy-lysosome systems, has been proposed as one of the causes of the accumulation of these aberrant proteins in AD brains. Tom1 (target of Myb1) was originally identified by the induction of its expression by the v-Myb oncogene and is a part of two major protein-degradation systems. The present study was conducted by immunohistochemical and immunofluorescent stainings to show that Tom1 was localized in DNs, perisomatic granules (PSGs), and NFTs in AD brains. Moreover, in DNs, Tom1 colocalized with ubiquitin, lysosomal proteins, and Tom1-related proteins (Tollip and myosin VI), which act in both protein-degradation systems via Tom1. These results indicate that Tom1 plays important roles in protein-degradation systems in AD pathogenesis. PMID:27206884

  4. Highlights of the Version 8 SBUV and TOMS Datasets Released at this Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhartia, Pawan K.; McPeters, Richard D.; Flynn, Lawrence E.; Wellemeyer, Charles G.

    2004-01-01

    Last October was the 25th anniversary of the launch of the SBUV and TOMS instruments on NASA's Nimbus-7 satellite. Total Ozone and ozone profile datasets produced by these and following instruments have produced a quarter century long record. Over time we have released several versions of these datasets to incorporate advances in UV radiative transfer, inverse modeling, and instrument characterization. In this meeting we are releasing datasets produced from the version 8 algorithms. They replace the previous versions (V6 SBUV, and V7 TOMS) released about a decade ago. About a dozen companion papers in this meeting provide details of the new algorithms and intercomparison of the new data with external data. In this paper we present key features of the new algorithm, and discuss how the new results differ from those released previously. We show that the new datasets have better internal consistency and also agree better with external datasets. A key feature of the V8 SBUV algorithm is that the climatology has no influence on inter-annual variability and trends; it only affects the mean values and, to a limited extent, the seasonal dependence. By contrast, climatology does have some influence on TOMS total O3 trends, particularly at large solar zenith angles. For this reason, and also because TOMS record has gaps, md EP/TOMS is suffering from data quality problems, we recommend using SBUV total ozone data for applications where the high spatial resolution of TOMS is not essential.

  5. Tom22', an 8-kDa trans-site receptor in plants and protozoans, is a conserved feature of the TOM complex that appeared early in the evolution of eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Maćasev, Diana; Whelan, James; Newbigin, Ed; Silva-Filho, Marcio C; Mulhern, Terrence D; Lithgow, Trevor

    2004-08-01

    One of the earliest events in the evolution of mitochondria was the development a means to translocate proteins made in the cytosol into the "protomitochondrion." How this was achieved remains uncertain, and the nature of the earliest version of the protein translocation machinery is not known. Comparative sequence analysis suggests three subunits, Tom40, Tom7, and Tom22 as common elements of the protein translocase in the mitochondrial outer membrane in diverse extant eukaryotes. Tom22, the 22-kDa subunit, plays a critical role in the function of this complex in fungi and animals, and we show that an 8-kDa subunit of the plant translocase is a truncated form of Tom22. It has a single transmembrane segment conforming in sequence to the same region of Tom22 from other eukaryotic lineages and a short carboxy-terminal trans domain located in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. The trans domain from the Arabidopsis thaliana protein functions in yeast lacking their own Tom22 by complementing protein import defects and restoring cell growth. Moreover, we have identified orthologs of Tom22, Tom7, and Tom40 in diverse eukaryotes such as the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, the amoebic slime Dictyostelium discoideum, and the protozoan parasite Plasmodium falciparum. This finding strongly suggests these subunits as the core of the protein translocase in the earliest mitochondria. PMID:15155803

  6. Probe assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Avera, C.J.

    1981-01-06

    A hand-held probe assembly, suitable for monitoring a radioactive fibrinogen tracer, is disclosed comprising a substantially cylindrically shaped probe handle having an open end. The probe handle is adapted to be interconnected with electrical circuitry for monitoring radioactivity that is sensed or detected by the probe assembly. Mounted within the probe handle is a probe body assembly that includes a cylindrically shaped probe body inserted through the open end of the probe handle. The probe body includes a photomultiplier tube that is electrically connected with a male connector positioned at the rearward end of the probe body. Mounted at the opposite end of the probe body is a probe head which supports an optical coupler therewithin. The probe head is interconnected with a probe cap which supports a detecting crystal. The probe body assembly, which consists of the probe body, the probe head, and the probe cap is supported within the probe handle by means of a pair of compressible o-rings which permit the probe assembly to be freely rotatable, preferably through 360*, within the probe handle and removable therefrom without requiring any disassembly.

  7. The Radiation Belt Storm Probes

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Radiation Belt Storm Probe mission (RBSP) will explore the Van Allen Radiation Belts in the Earth's magnetosphere. The charge particles in these regions can be hazardous to both spacecraft and ...

  8. Coordination and ion-ion interactions of chromium centers in alkaline earth zinc borate glasses probed by electron paramagnetic resonance and optical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumalatha, B.; Omkaram, I.; Rajavardana Rao, T.; Linga Raju, Ch

    2013-05-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), optical absorption and FT-IR studies have been carried out on chromium ions incorporated in alkaline earth zinc borate glasses. The EPR spectra exhibit two resonance signals with effective g values at g ≈ 1.99 and ≈1.97. The resonance signal at g ≈ 1.99 is attributed to the contribution from both the exchange coupled Cr3+-Cr3+ ion pairs and the isolated Cr3+ ions and the resonance signal at g ≈ 1.97 is due to Cr5+ ions. The paramagnetic susceptibility (χ) was calculated from the EPR data at various (123-303 K) temperatures and the Curie temperature (θp) was calculated from the 1/χ-T graph. The optical absorption spectra exhibit three bands at ˜360 nm, ˜440 nm and a broad band at ˜615 nm characteristic of Cr3+ ions in an octahedral symmetry. From the observed band positions, the crystal-field splitting parameter Dq and the Racah parameters (B and C) have been evaluated. From the ultraviolet edges, the optical band gap energies (Eopt) and Urbach energy (ΔE) are calculated. The theoretical optical basicity (Λth) of these glasses has also been evaluated. Chromium ions doped alkaline earth zinc borate glasses show BO3 and BO4 structural units in the FT-IR studies.

  9. The 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment: the Nimbus-7 TOMS Data Atlas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Arlin J.; Ardanuy, Philip E.; Sechrist, Frank S.; Penn, Lanning M.; Larko, David E.; Doiron, Scott D.; Galimore, Reginald N.

    1988-01-01

    Total ozone data taken by the Nimbus-7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) played a central role in the successful outcome of the 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment. The near-real-time TOMS total ozone observations were suppled within hours of real time to the operations center in Punta Arenas, Chile, over a telecommunications network designed specifically for this purpose. The TOMS data preparation and method of transfer over the telecommunications links are reviewed. This atlas includes a complete set of the near-real-time TOMS orbital overpass data over regions around the Palmer Peninsula of Antarctica for the period of August 8 through September 29, 1987. Also provided are daily polar orthographic projections of TOMS total ozone measurements over the Southern Hemisphere from August through November 1987. In addition, a chronology of the salient points of the experiment, along with some latitudinal cross sections and time series at locations of interest of the TOMS total ozone observations are presented. The TOMS total ozone measurements are evaluated along the flight tracks of each of the ER-2 and DC-8 missions during the experiment. The ozone hole is shown here to develop in a monotonic progression throughout late August and September. The minimum total ozone amount was found on 5 October, when its all-time lowest value of 109 DU is recorded. The hole remains well defined, but fills gradually from mid-October through mid-November. The hole's dissolution is observed here to begin in mid-November, when it elongates and begins to rotate. By the end of November, the south pole is no longer located within the ozone hole.

  10. Probing the Solar System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, John

    2013-01-01

    Humans have always had the vision to one day live on other planets. This vision existed even before the first person was put into orbit. Since the early space missions of putting humans into orbit around Earth, many advances have been made in space technology. We have now sent many space probes deep into the Solar system to explore the planets and…

  11. Three dimensional data-assimilative VERB-code simulations of the Earth's radiation belts: Reanalysis during the Van Allen Probe era, and operational forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellerman, Adam; Shprits, Yuri; Podladchikova, Tatiana; Kondrashov, Dmitri

    2016-04-01

    The Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) code 2.0 models the dynamics of radiation-belt electron phase space density (PSD) in Earth's magnetosphere. Recently, a data-assimilative version of this code has been developed, which utilizes a split-operator Kalman-filtering approach to solve for electron PSD in terms of adiabatic invariants. A new dataset based on the TS07d magnetic field model is presented, which may be utilized for analysis of past geomagnetic storms, and for initial and boundary conditions in running simulations. Further, a data-assimilative forecast model is introduced, which has the capability to forecast electron PSD several days into the future, given a forecast Kp index. The model assimilates an empirical model capable of forecasting the conditions at geosynchronous orbit. The model currently runs in real time and a forecast is available to view online http://rbm.epss.ucla.edu.

  12. Training preschoolers on first-order false belief understanding: transfer on advanced ToM skills and metamemory.

    PubMed

    Lecce, Serena; Bianco, Federica; Demicheli, Patrizia; Cavallini, Elena

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the relation between theory of mind (ToM) and metamemory knowledge using a training methodology. Sixty-two 4- to 5-year-old children were recruited and randomly assigned to one of two training conditions: A first-order false belief (ToM) and a control condition. Intervention and control groups were equivalent at pretest for age, parents' education, verbal ability, inhibition, and ToM. Results showed that after the intervention children in the ToM group improved in their first-order false belief understanding significantly more than children in the control condition. Crucially, the positive effect of the ToM intervention was stable over 2 months and generalized to more complex ToM tasks and metamemory. PMID:25040788

  13. Bcl-2 and porin follow different pathways of TOM-dependent insertion into the mitochondrial outer membrane.

    PubMed

    Motz, Christian; Martin, Heiko; Krimmer, Thomas; Rassow, Joachim

    2002-11-01

    The bcl-2 gene encodes a 26kDa protein which functions as a central regulator of apoptosis. Here we investigated the pathway of Bcl-2alpha into the mitochondrial outer membrane using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism. We found that interactions of Bcl-2alpha with the mitochondrial import receptor Tom20 are dependent on two positively charged lysine residues in the immediate vicinity of the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic membrane anchor. The targeting function of these residues is independent of Tom22. Subsequent insertion of Bcl-2alpha into the mitochondrial outer membrane does not require Tom5 or Tom40, indicating that Bcl-2alpha bypasses the general import pore (GIP). Bcl-2alpha shows a unique pattern of interactions with the components of the mitochondrial TOM complex, demonstrating that at least two different pathways lead from the import receptor Tom20 into the mitochondrial outer membrane. PMID:12419260

  14. α-Synuclein binds to TOM20 and inhibits mitochondrial protein import in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Di Maio, Roberto; Barrett, Paul J; Hoffman, Eric K; Barrett, Caitlyn W; Zharikov, Alevtina; Borah, Anupom; Hu, Xiaoping; McCoy, Jennifer; Chu, Charleen T; Burton, Edward A; Hastings, Teresa G; Greenamyre, J Timothy

    2016-06-01

    α-Synuclein accumulation and mitochondrial dysfunction have both been strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD), and the two appear to be related. Mitochondrial dysfunction leads to accumulation and oligomerization of α-synuclein, and increased levels of α-synuclein cause mitochondrial impairment, but the basis for this bidirectional interaction remains obscure. We now report that certain posttranslationally modified species of α-synuclein bind with high affinity to the TOM20 (translocase of the outer membrane 20) presequence receptor of the mitochondrial protein import machinery. This binding prevented the interaction of TOM20 with its co-receptor, TOM22, and impaired mitochondrial protein import. Consequently, there were deficient mitochondrial respiration, enhanced production of reactive oxygen species, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Examination of postmortem brain tissue from PD patients revealed an aberrant α-synuclein-TOM20 interaction in nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons that was associated with loss of imported mitochondrial proteins, thereby confirming this pathogenic process in the human disease. Modest knockdown of endogenous α-synuclein was sufficient to maintain mitochondrial protein import in an in vivo model of PD. Furthermore, in in vitro systems, overexpression of TOM20 or a mitochondrial targeting signal peptide had beneficial effects and preserved mitochondrial protein import. This study characterizes a pathogenic mechanism in PD, identifies toxic species of wild-type α-synuclein, and reveals potential new therapeutic strategies for neuroprotection. PMID:27280685

  15. Correlations of TOMS total ozone data (Nimbus-7 satellite) with tropopause height

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munteanu, Marie-Jeanne

    1987-01-01

    Two correlation studies of Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) data with tropopause height from radiosondes performed over Europe showed a correlation coefficient of 0.94 and 0.96. As a result, the rms error in the prediction of tropopause height from total ozone was found to be 20 mb. Correlation between tropopause height and TOMS data was the highest of all the other correlations with variables directly derived from radiosondes or simulated thermal radiances over the location of radiosondes. Comparing the two dimensional fields of TOMS, tropopause height from radiosondes and tropopause height field from TIROS-N retrievals, we can say that the first field is much closer to the true field from radiosondes than the third. The correlation coefficient for a ten-day study between TOMS data and tropopause height from radiosondes is between 0.85 and 0.9 for 30-70N. Tropopause analysis provided by GLA model also shows a very high correlation with TOMS data.

  16. TOM40 mediates mitochondrial dysfunction induced by α-synuclein accumulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bender, Andreas; Desplats, Paula; Spencer, Brian; Rockenstein, Edward; Adame, Anthony; Elstner, Matthias; Laub, Christoph; Mueller, Sarina; Koob, Andrew O; Mante, Michael; Pham, Emily; Klopstock, Thomas; Masliah, Eliezer

    2013-01-01

    Alpha-synuclein (α-Syn) accumulation/aggregation and mitochondrial dysfunction play prominent roles in the pathology of Parkinson's disease. We have previously shown that postmortem human dopaminergic neurons from PD brains accumulate high levels of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions. We now addressed the question, whether alterations in a component of the mitochondrial import machinery--TOM40--might contribute to the mitochondrial dysfunction and damage in PD. For this purpose, we studied levels of TOM40, mtDNA deletions, oxidative damage, energy production, and complexes of the respiratory chain in brain homogenates as well as in single neurons, using laser-capture-microdissection in transgenic mice overexpressing human wildtype α-Syn. Additionally, we used lentivirus-mediated stereotactic delivery of a component of this import machinery into mouse brain as a novel therapeutic strategy. We report here that TOM40 is significantly reduced in the brain of PD patients and in α-Syn transgenic mice. TOM40 deficits were associated with increased mtDNA deletions and oxidative DNA damage, and with decreased energy production and altered levels of complex I proteins in α-Syn transgenic mice. Lentiviral-mediated overexpression of Tom40 in α-Syn-transgenic mice brains ameliorated energy deficits as well as oxidative burden. Our results suggest that alterations in the mitochondrial protein transport machinery might contribute to mitochondrial impairment in α-Synucleinopathies. PMID:23626796

  17. TOMS total ozone data compared with northern latitude Dobson ground stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heese, B.; Barthel, K.; Hov, O.

    1994-01-01

    Ozone measurements from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer on the Nimbus 7 satellite are compared with ground-based measurements from five Dobson stations at northern latitudes to evaluate the accuracy of the TOMS data, particularly in regions north of 50 deg N. The measurements from the individual stations show mean differences from -2.5 percent up to plus 8.3 percent relative to TOMS measurements and two of the ground stations, Oslo and Longyearbyen, show a significant drift of plus 1.2 percent and plus 3.7 percent per year, respectively. It can be shown from nearly simultaneous measurements in two different wavelength double pairs at Oslo that at least 2 percent of the differences result from the use of the CC' wavelength double pair instead of the standard AD wavelength double pair. Since all Norwegian stations used the CC' wavelength double pair exclusively a similar error can be assumed for Tromso and Longyearbyren. A comparison between the tropospheric ozone content in TOMS data and from ECC ozonesonde measurements at Ny-Alesund and Bear Island shows that the amount of tropospheric ozone in the standard profiles used in the TOMS algorithm is too low, which leads to an error of about 2 percent in total ozone. Particularly at high solar zenith angles (greater than 80 deg), Dobson measurements become unreliable. They are up to 20 percent lower than TOMS measurements averaged over solar zenith angles of 88 deg to 89 deg.

  18. TOM40 Mediates Mitochondrial Dysfunction Induced by α-Synuclein Accumulation in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rockenstein, Edward; Adame, Anthony; Elstner, Matthias; Laub, Christoph; Mueller, Sarina; Koob, Andrew O.; Mante, Michael; Pham, Emily; Klopstock, Thomas; Masliah, Eliezer

    2013-01-01

    Alpha-synuclein (α-Syn) accumulation/aggregation and mitochondrial dysfunction play prominent roles in the pathology of Parkinson’s disease. We have previously shown that postmortem human dopaminergic neurons from PD brains accumulate high levels of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions. We now addressed the question, whether alterations in a component of the mitochondrial import machinery -TOM40- might contribute to the mitochondrial dysfunction and damage in PD. For this purpose, we studied levels of TOM40, mtDNA deletions, oxidative damage, energy production, and complexes of the respiratory chain in brain homogenates as well as in single neurons, using laser-capture-microdissection in transgenic mice overexpressing human wildtype α-Syn. Additionally, we used lentivirus-mediated stereotactic delivery of a component of this import machinery into mouse brain as a novel therapeutic strategy. We report here that TOM40 is significantly reduced in the brain of PD patients and in α-Syn transgenic mice. TOM40 deficits were associated with increased mtDNA deletions and oxidative DNA damage, and with decreased energy production and altered levels of complex I proteins in α-Syn transgenic mice. Lentiviral-mediated overexpression of Tom40 in α-Syn-transgenic mice brains ameliorated energy deficits as well as oxidative burden. Our results suggest that alterations in the mitochondrial protein transport machinery might contribute to mitochondrial impairment in α-Synucleinopathies. PMID:23626796

  19. Cooperation of TOM and TIM23 complexes during translocation of proteins into mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Waegemann, Karin; Popov-Čeleketić, Dušan; Neupert, Walter; Azem, Abdussalam; Mokranjac, Dejana

    2015-03-13

    Translocation of the majority of mitochondrial proteins from the cytosol into mitochondria requires the cooperation of TOM and TIM23 complexes in the outer and inner mitochondrial membranes. The molecular mechanisms underlying this cooperation remain largely unknown. Here, we present biochemical and genetic evidence that at least two contacts from the side of the TIM23 complex play an important role in TOM-TIM23 cooperation in vivo. Tim50, likely through its very C-terminal segment, interacts with Tom22. This interaction is stimulated by translocating proteins and is independent of any other TOM-TIM23 contact known so far. Furthermore, the exposure of Tim23 on the mitochondrial surface depends not only on its interaction with Tim50 but also on the dynamics of the TOM complex. Destabilization of the individual contacts reduces the efficiency of import of proteins into mitochondria and destabilization of both contacts simultaneously is not tolerated by yeast cells. We conclude that an intricate and coordinated network of protein-protein interactions involving primarily Tim50 and also Tim23 is required for efficient translocation of proteins across both mitochondrial membranes. PMID:25083920

  20. Glucose-induced regulation of protein import receptor Tom22 by cytosolic and mitochondria-bound kinases.

    PubMed

    Gerbeth, Carolin; Schmidt, Oliver; Rao, Sanjana; Harbauer, Angelika B; Mikropoulou, Despina; Opalińska, Magdalena; Guiard, Bernard; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Meisinger, Chris

    2013-10-01

    Most mitochondrial proteins are imported by the translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM). Tom22 functions as central receptor and transfers preproteins to the import pore. Casein kinase 2 (CK2) constitutively phosphorylates the cytosolic precursor of Tom22 at Ser44 and Ser46 and, thus, promotes its import. It is unknown whether Tom22 is regulated under different metabolic conditions. We report that CK1, which is involved in glucose-induced signal transduction, is bound to mitochondria. CK1 phosphorylates Tom22 at Thr57 and stimulates the assembly of Tom22 and Tom20. In contrast, protein kinase A (PKA), which is also activated by the addition of glucose, phosphorylates the precursor of Tom22 at Thr76 and impairs its import. Thus, PKA functions in an opposite manner to CK1 and CK2. Our results reveal that three kinases regulate the import and assembly of Tom22, demonstrating that the central receptor is a major target for the posttranslational regulation of mitochondrial protein import. PMID:24093680

  1. Some Long-Standing Issues Arising From Comparisons Between TOMS and The Ground-Based Ozone Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labow, Gordon J.; McPeters, Richard; Stolarski, Richard; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Data from the series of Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometers (TOMS) have been compared to column ozone measurements taken by ground-based systems (Dobsons, Brewers and Filtermeters). On average, the comparisons show good agreement, with approximately 80% of the ground stations having less than a 2.5% standard deviation when compared to TOMS on a monthly mean basis. There are, however, differences that imply possible errors either in the TOMS ozone retrieval algorithm or in the basic assumptions used by the ground-based instruments. Some of the issues arising from these differences are: What are the relative calibrations of TOMS instruments? Why do the calibrations of the ground-based stations vary as much as they do with respect to TOMS as a transfer standard? Why are the TOMS data so much larger (approximately 6%) than the ground-based data in Antarctica and other ice-covered locations? Why is there seasonality in the difference between TOMS and ground-based stations in the Southern Hemisphere? Why are the differences a function of total ozone? Where and why are the differences a function of reflectivity? Why do some terrain and land-sea boundary features appear in the TOMS ozone data? The above issues will be highlighted by using data from TOMS and the ground stations. Plots of the individual station differences will be available.

  2. Electromagnetic deep-probing (100-1000 kms) of the Earth's interior from artificial satellites: Constraints on the regional emplacement of crustal resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermance, J. F. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    A spherical harmonic analysis program is being tested which takes magnetic data in universal time from a set of arbitrarily space observatories and calculates a value for the instantaneous magnetic field at any point on the globe. The calculation is done as a least mean-squares value fit to a set of spherical harmonics up to any desired order. The program accepts as a set of input the orbit position of a satellite coordinates it with ground-based magnetic data for a given time. The output is a predicted time series for the magnetic field on the Earth's surface at the (r, theta) position directly under the hypothetically orbiting satellite for the duration of the time period of the input data set. By tracking the surface magnetic field beneath the satellite, narrow-band averages crosspowers between the spatially coordinated satellite and the ground-based data sets are computed. These crosspowers are used to calculate field transfer coefficients with minimum noise distortion. The application of this technique to calculating the vector response function W is discussed.

  3. The Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope (REPT) Instrument on Board the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) Spacecraft: Characterization of Earth's Radiation Belt High-Energy Particle Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D. N.; Kanekal, S. G.; Hoxie, V. C.; Batiste, S.; Bolton, M.; Li, X.; Elkington, S. R.; Monk, S.; Reukauf, R.; Steg, S.; Westfall, J.; Belting, C.; Bolton, B.; Braun, D.; Cervelli, B.; Hubbell, K.; Kien, M.; Knappmiller, S.; Wade, S.; Lamprecht, B.; Stevens, K.; Wallace, J.; Yehle, A.; Spence, H. E.; Friedel, R.

    2013-11-01

    Particle acceleration and loss in the million electron Volt (MeV) energy range (and above) is the least understood aspect of radiation belt science. In order to measure cleanly and separately both the energetic electron and energetic proton components, there is a need for a carefully designed detector system. The Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope (REPT) on board the Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) pair of spacecraft consists of a stack of high-performance silicon solid-state detectors in a telescope configuration, a collimation aperture, and a thick case surrounding the detector stack to shield the sensors from penetrating radiation and bremsstrahlung. The instrument points perpendicular to the spin axis of the spacecraft and measures high-energy electrons (up to ˜20 MeV) with excellent sensitivity and also measures magnetospheric and solar protons to energies well above E=100 MeV. The instrument has a large geometric factor ( g=0.2 cm2 sr) to get reasonable count rates (above background) at the higher energies and yet will not saturate at the lower energy ranges. There must be fast enough electronics to avert undue dead-time limitations and chance coincidence effects. The key goal for the REPT design is to measure the directional electron intensities (in the range 10-2-106 particles/cm2 s sr MeV) and energy spectra (Δ E/ E˜25 %) throughout the slot and outer radiation belt region. Present simulations and detailed laboratory calibrations show that an excellent design has been attained for the RBSP needs. We describe the engineering design, operational approaches, science objectives, and planned data products for REPT.

  4. The 1989 Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition Nimbus-7 TOMS data atlas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Arlin J.; Penn, Lanning M.; Larko, David E.; Doiron, Scott D.; Guimaraes, Patricia T.

    1989-01-01

    Over the past several years, world scientific attention was focused on the rapid and unanticipated decrease in the abundance of ozone over Antarctica during the Austral spring. A major aircraft campaign was conducted from December 1988 to February 1989 in response to the recently published Ozone Trends Panel Report which found that the largest decreases in Arctic ozone occurred during January to February at latitudes near the edge of the Arctic vortex. This atlas provides a complete set of TOMS ozone measurements over Europe and the North Atlantic for the duration of the experiment. These were the orbital TOMS measurements provided to the experimenters in near-real-time. In addition, a set of Northern Hemisphere TOMS ozone measurements for the period December 26, 1988 to March 20, 1989 is presented. A comparison of January and February 1989 mean ozone values to prior years is also presented.

  5. The Application of TOMS Ozone, Aerosol and UV-B Data to Madagascar Air Quality Determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, A.C.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) data products for the area of Madagascar are presented. In addition to total ozone, aerosols and UV-B tropospheric ozone results are shown from 1979 to the present. Tropospheric ozone over Africa and Madagascar is enhanced by 10 to 15 DU in October. This maximum coincides with the time of maximum biomass area burning in Africa and Madagascar. Ozone observations were made from 1979 to 1999 using the TOMS tropospheric ozone convective cloud differential method. As a result of easterly trade winds, ozone originating on Madagascar is transported to the west over the Mozambique Channel. In El Nino years higher level westerly winds descend to transport low level ozone easterly. This results in African continental ozone being transported east of Madagascar. Long range transport of African ozone is observed during El Nino periods. The potential of TOMS and other space data for use in public education and research on Madagascar air quality is demonstrated.

  6. Seven years of total ozone from the TOMS instrument - A report on data quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleig, Albert J.; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Wellemeyer, Charles G.; Silberstein, David S.

    1986-01-01

    Seven years of TOMS total ozone data are currently available. Recently a new ozone retrieval algorithm based on improved ozone absorption cross section was implemented that has introduced 6-7 percent discontinuity in the archived data sets at the end of the fifth year of instrument operation. Until all data are reprocessed with the new algorithm users can use a table of correction factors given in this paper to make the data set internally consistent. This paper also presents a comparison of TOMS results with Amundsen Scott Dobson station. Though the agrement in most years is good, in 1983-84 the Dobson station reported unusually high values of ozone while TOMS saw the very low ozone values associated with the Antarctica ozone hole.

  7. The pro-apoptotic BH3-only protein Bim interacts with components of the translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM).

    PubMed

    Frank, Daniel O; Dengjel, Jörn; Wilfling, Florian; Kozjak-Pavlovic, Vera; Häcker, Georg; Weber, Arnim

    2015-01-01

    The pro-apoptotic Bcl-2-family protein Bim belongs to the BH3-only proteins known as initiators of apoptosis. Recent data show that Bim is constitutively inserted in the outer mitochondrial membrane via a C-terminal transmembrane anchor from where it can activate the effector of cytochrome c-release, Bax. To identify regulators of Bim-activity, we conducted a search for proteins interacting with Bim at mitochondria. We found an interaction of Bim with Tom70, Tom20 and more weakly with Tom40, all components of the Translocase of the Outer Membrane (TOM). In vitro import assays performed on tryptically digested yeast mitochondria showed reduced Bim insertion into the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) indicating that protein receptors may be involved in the import process. However, RNAi against components of TOM (Tom40, Tom70, Tom22 or Tom20) by siRNA, individually or in combination, did not consistently change the amount of Bim on HeLa mitochondria, either at steady state or upon de novo-induction. In support of this, the individual or combined knock-downs of TOM receptors also failed to alter the susceptibility of HeLa cells to Bim-induced apoptosis. In isolated yeast mitochondria, lack of Tom70 or the TOM-components Tom20 or Tom22 alone did not affect the import of Bim into the outer mitochondrial membrane. In yeast, expression of Bim can sensitize the cells to Bax-dependent killing. This sensitization was unaffected by the absence of Tom70 or by an experimental reduction in Tom40. Although thus the physiological role of the Bim-TOM-interaction remains unclear, TOM complex components do not seem to be essential for Bim insertion into the OMM. Nevertheless, this association should be noted and considered when the regulation of Bim in other cells and situations is investigated. PMID:25875815

  8. The Pro-Apoptotic BH3-Only Protein Bim Interacts with Components of the Translocase of the Outer Mitochondrial Membrane (TOM)

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Daniel O.; Dengjel, Jörn; Wilfling, Florian; Kozjak-Pavlovic, Vera; Häcker, Georg; Weber, Arnim

    2015-01-01

    The pro-apoptotic Bcl-2-family protein Bim belongs to the BH3-only proteins known as initiators of apoptosis. Recent data show that Bim is constitutively inserted in the outer mitochondrial membrane via a C-terminal transmembrane anchor from where it can activate the effector of cytochrome c-release, Bax. To identify regulators of Bim-activity, we conducted a search for proteins interacting with Bim at mitochondria. We found an interaction of Bim with Tom70, Tom20 and more weakly with Tom40, all components of the Translocase of the Outer Membrane (TOM). In vitro import assays performed on tryptically digested yeast mitochondria showed reduced Bim insertion into the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) indicating that protein receptors may be involved in the import process. However, RNAi against components of TOM (Tom40, Tom70, Tom22 or Tom20) by siRNA, individually or in combination, did not consistently change the amount of Bim on HeLa mitochondria, either at steady state or upon de novo-induction. In support of this, the individual or combined knock-downs of TOM receptors also failed to alter the susceptibility of HeLa cells to Bim-induced apoptosis. In isolated yeast mitochondria, lack of Tom70 or the TOM-components Tom20 or Tom22 alone did not affect the import of Bim into the outer mitochondrial membrane. In yeast, expression of Bim can sensitize the cells to Bax-dependent killing. This sensitization was unaffected by the absence of Tom70 or by an experimental reduction in Tom40. Although thus the physiological role of the Bim-TOM-interaction remains unclear, TOM complex components do not seem to be essential for Bim insertion into the OMM. Nevertheless, this association should be noted and considered when the regulation of Bim in other cells and situations is investigated. PMID:25875815

  9. Study of Air Pollution from Space Using TOMS: Challenges and Promises for Future Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhartia, Pawan K.

    2002-01-01

    A series of TOMS instruments built by NASA has flown on US, Russian, and Japanese satellites in the last 24 years. These instruments are well known for producing spectacular maps of the ozone hole that forms over Antarctica each spring. However, it is less well known that these instruments also provided first evidence that space-based measurements in UV of sufficiently high precision and accuracy can provide valuable information to study global air quality. We will use the TOMS experience to highlight the promises and challenges of future space-based missions designed specifically for air quality studies.

  10. Effect of stratospheric aerosol layers on the TOMS/SBUV ozone retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, O.; Ahmad, Zia; Pan, L.; Herman, J. R.; Bhartia, P. K.; Mcpeters, R.

    1994-01-01

    An evaluation of the optical effects of stratospheric aerosol layers on total ozone retrieval from space by the TOMS/SBUV type instruments is presented here. Using the Dave radiative transfer model we estimate the magnitude of the errors in the retrieved ozone when polar stratospheric clouds (PSC's) or volcanic aerosol layers interfere with the measurements. The largest errors are produced by optically thick water ice PSC's. Results of simulation experiments on the effect of the Pinatubo aerosol cloud on the Nimbus-7 and Meteor-3 TOMS products are presented.