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Sample records for earth quadrupolar effects

  1. Quadrupolar Kondo effect in uranium heavy-electron materials?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, D. L.

    1987-01-01

    The possibility of an electric quadrupole Kondo effect for a non-Kramers doublet on a uranium (U) ion is a cubic metallic host is demonstrated by model calculations showing a Kondo upturn in the resistivity, universal quenching of the quadrupolar moment, and a heavy-electron anomaly in the electronic specific heat. With inclusion of excited crystal-field levels, some of the unusual magnetic-response data in the heavy-electron superconductor UBe13 may be understood. Structural phase transitions at unprecedented low temperatures may occur in U-based heavy-electron materials.

  2. Quadrupolar and anisotropy effects on dephasing in two-electron spin qubits in GaAs

    PubMed Central

    Botzem, Tim; McNeil, Robert P. G.; Mol, Jan-Michael; Schuh, Dieter; Bougeard, Dominique; Bluhm, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the decoherence of electron spins in semiconductors due to their interaction with nuclear spins is of fundamental interest as they realize the central spin model and of practical importance for using them as qubits. Interesting effects arise from the quadrupolar interaction of nuclear spins with electric field gradients, which have been shown to suppress diffusive nuclear spin dynamics and might thus enhance electron spin coherence. Here we show experimentally that for gate-defined GaAs quantum dots, quadrupolar broadening of the nuclear Larmor precession reduces electron spin coherence by causing faster decorrelation of transverse nuclear fields. However, this effect disappears for appropriate field directions. Furthermore, we observe an additional modulation of coherence attributed to an anisotropic electronic g-tensor. These results complete our understanding of dephasing in gated quantum dots and point to mitigation strategies. They may also help to unravel unexplained behaviour in self-assembled quantum dots and III–V nanowires. PMID:27079269

  3. Quadrupolar and anisotropy effects on dephasing in two-electron spin qubits in GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botzem, Tim; McNeil, Robert P. G.; Mol, Jan-Michael; Schuh, Dieter; Bougeard, Dominique; Bluhm, Hendrik

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the decoherence of electron spins in semiconductors due to their interaction with nuclear spins is of fundamental interest as they realize the central spin model and of practical importance for using them as qubits. Interesting effects arise from the quadrupolar interaction of nuclear spins with electric field gradients, which have been shown to suppress diffusive nuclear spin dynamics and might thus enhance electron spin coherence. Here we show experimentally that for gate-defined GaAs quantum dots, quadrupolar broadening of the nuclear Larmor precession reduces electron spin coherence by causing faster decorrelation of transverse nuclear fields. However, this effect disappears for appropriate field directions. Furthermore, we observe an additional modulation of coherence attributed to an anisotropic electronic g-tensor. These results complete our understanding of dephasing in gated quantum dots and point to mitigation strategies. They may also help to unravel unexplained behaviour in self-assembled quantum dots and III-V nanowires.

  4. Quadrupolar and anisotropy effects on dephasing in two-electron spin qubits in GaAs.

    PubMed

    Botzem, Tim; McNeil, Robert P G; Mol, Jan-Michael; Schuh, Dieter; Bougeard, Dominique; Bluhm, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the decoherence of electron spins in semiconductors due to their interaction with nuclear spins is of fundamental interest as they realize the central spin model and of practical importance for using them as qubits. Interesting effects arise from the quadrupolar interaction of nuclear spins with electric field gradients, which have been shown to suppress diffusive nuclear spin dynamics and might thus enhance electron spin coherence. Here we show experimentally that for gate-defined GaAs quantum dots, quadrupolar broadening of the nuclear Larmor precession reduces electron spin coherence by causing faster decorrelation of transverse nuclear fields. However, this effect disappears for appropriate field directions. Furthermore, we observe an additional modulation of coherence attributed to an anisotropic electronic g-tensor. These results complete our understanding of dephasing in gated quantum dots and point to mitigation strategies. They may also help to unravel unexplained behaviour in self-assembled quantum dots and III-V nanowires. PMID:27079269

  5. Solid Effect Between Quadrupolar Transitions in Dilute Cu-Pd Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konzelmann, K.; Majer, G.; Seeger, A.

    1996-06-01

    The paper investigates the Dynamic Solid Effect (DSE) in Nuclear Quadrupole Double Reso-nance (NQDOR) on a system (dilute alloys of CuPd with 8, 42, 210, or 1000 at.ppm Pd) chosen for its simplicity and the possibility to test the theoretical concepts on which the experimental tech-niques (in particular the so-called Berthier-Minier technique for exhibiting the DSE) are based. NQDOR allows to observe the transitions between the Cu nuclear energy levels split by the quadrupolar interaction with the electric field gradients generated by nearby Pd atoms even in dilute alloys, in which the fraction of Cu nuclei experiencing a given field gradient is very small. The DSE permits transitions at frequencies corresponding to the sums or differences of quadrupolar level splittings at neighbouring nuclei and thus gives access to information on the spatial correlation of nuclei accessible to NQDOR studies. The DSE information is shown to be in full accord with the conclusions drawn earlier, on the basis of line-intensity arguments, on the assignment of quadrupo-lar transitions to the first four shells of Cu nuclei surrounding isolated Pd atoms but, in addition, allows to identify the low-frequency NQDOR lines associated with Cu nuclei in the fifth and sixth shells.

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of quadrupolar nuclei and dipolar field effects

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Jeffry Todd

    2004-12-21

    Experimental and theoretical research conducted in two areas in the field of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is presented: (1) studies of the coherent quantum-mechanical control of the angular momentum dynamics of quadrupolar (spin I > 1/2) nuclei and its application to the determination of molecular structure; and (2) applications of the long-range nuclear dipolar field to novel NMR detection methodologies.The dissertation is organized into six chapters. The first two chapters and associated appendices are intended to be pedagogical and include an introduction to the quantum mechanical theory of pulsed NMR spectroscopy and the time dependent theory of quantum mechanics. The third chapter describes investigations of the solid-state multiple-quantum magic angle spinning (MQMAS) NMR experiment applied to I = 5/2 quadrupolar nuclei. This work reports the use of rotary resonance-matched radiofrequency irradiation for sensitivity enhancement of the I = 5/2 MQMAS experiment. These experiments exhibited certain selective line narrowing effects which were investigated theoretically.The fourth chapter extends the discussion of multiple quantum spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei to a mostly theoretical study of the feasibility of enhancing the resolution of nitrogen-14 NMR of large biomolecules in solution via double-quantum spectroscopy. The fifth chapter continues to extend the principles of multiple quantum NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei to make analogies between experiments in NMR/nuclear quadrupolar resonance (NQR) and experiments in atomic/molecular optics (AMO). These analogies are made through the Hamiltonian and density operator formalism of angular momentum dynamics in the presence of electric and magnetic fields.The sixth chapter investigates the use of the macroscopic nuclear dipolar field to encode the NMR spectrum of an analyte nucleus indirectly in the magnetization of a sensor nucleus. This technique could potentially serve as an

  7. Off-resonance effects on 2D NMR nutation spectra of I = 3/2 quadrupolar nuclei in static samples.

    PubMed

    Xia, Y; Deng, F; Ye, C

    1995-12-01

    The off-resonance effects on 2D NMR nutation of I = 3/2 quadrupolar nuclei are demonstrated with perturbation theory and numerical calculation in static samples. The off-resonant (delta omega) rf field (omega 1) enlarges a nutation frequency and consequently increases the measurement range of nuclear quadrupolar interaction parameters. When omega e > omega Qmax, and arctg(omega 1/delta omega) = +/- 54.7 degrees (magic angle), the satellite lines (produced by coherence transfers) in a nutation spectrum are superimposed with the line of central transition, and hence the nutation spectrum is simplified and its sensitivity is enhanced. The nuclear quadrupolar interaction parameters of 23Na nuclei in Na omega molecular sieve are obtained using 2D NMR nutation. PMID:9053113

  8. Interaction of Strain and Nuclear Spins in Silicon: Quadrupolar Effects on Ionized Donors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, David P.; Hrubesch, Florian M.; Künzl, Markus; Becker, Hans-Werner; Itoh, Kohei M.; Stutzmann, Martin; Hoehne, Felix; Dreher, Lukas; Brandt, Martin S.

    2015-07-01

    The nuclear spins of ionized donors in silicon have become an interesting quantum resource due to their very long coherence times. Their perfect isolation, however, comes at a price, since the absence of the donor electron makes the nuclear spin difficult to control. We demonstrate that the quadrupolar interaction allows us to effectively tune the nuclear magnetic resonance of ionized arsenic donors in silicon via strain and determine the two nonzero elements of the S tensor linking strain and electric field gradients in this material to S11=1.5 ×1022 V /m2 and S44=6 ×1022 V /m2 . We find a stronger benefit of dynamical decoupling on the coherence properties of transitions subject to first-order quadrupole shifts than on those subject to only second-order shifts and discuss applications of quadrupole physics including mechanical driving of magnetic resonance, cooling of mechanical resonators, and strain-mediated spin coupling.

  9. Alkaline earth chloride hydrates: chlorine quadrupolar and chemical shift tensors by solid-state NMR spectroscopy and plane wave pseudopotential calculations.

    PubMed

    Bryce, David L; Bultz, Elijah B

    2007-01-01

    A series of alkaline earth chloride hydrates has been studied by solid-state (35/37)Cl NMR spectroscopy in order to characterize the chlorine electric field gradient (EFG) and chemical shift (CS) tensors and to relate these observables to the structure around the chloride ions. Chlorine-35/37 NMR spectra of solid powdered samples of pseudopolymorphs (hydrates) of magnesium chloride (MgCl(2).6H(2)O), calcium chloride (CaCl(2).2H(2)O), strontium chloride (SrCl(2), SrCl(2).2H(2)O, and SrCl(2).6H(2)O), and barium chloride (BaCl(2).2H(2)O) have been acquired under stationary and magic-angle spinning conditions in magnetic fields of 11.75 and 21.1 T. Powder X-ray diffraction was used as an additional tool to confirm the purity and identity of the samples. Chlorine-35 quadrupolar coupling constants (C(Q)) range from essentially zero in cubic anhydrous SrCl(2) to 4.26+/-0.03 MHz in calcium chloride dihydrate. CS tensor spans, Omega, are between 40 and 72 ppm, for example, Omega= 45+/-20 ppm for SrCl(2).6H(2)O. Plane wave-pseudopotential density functional theory, as implemented in the CASTEP program, was employed to model the extended solid lattices of these materials for the calculation of their chlorine EFG and nuclear magnetic shielding tensors, and allowed for the assignment of the two-site chlorine NMR spectra of barium chloride dihydrate. This work builds upon our current understanding of the relationship between chlorine NMR interaction tensors and the local molecular and electronic structure, and highlights the particular sensitivity of quadrupolar nucleus solid-state NMR spectroscopy to the differences between various pseudopolymorphic structures in the case of strontium chloride. PMID:17385204

  10. (39)K NMR of solid potassium salts at 21 T: effect of quadrupolar and chemical shift tensors.

    PubMed

    Moudrakovski, Igor L; Ripmeester, John A

    2007-01-25

    39K Solid State NMR spectra (static and magic angle spinning (MAS)) on a set of potassium salts measured at 21.14 T show that the chemical shift range for K(+) ions in diamagnetic salts is well in excess of 100 ppm contrary to previous assumptions that it was quite small. Inequivalent potassium sites in crystals can be resolved through differences in chemical shifts, with chemically similar sites showing differences of over 10 ppm. The quadrupolar coupling constants obtained from MAS and solid echo experiments on powders cover the range from zero for potassium in cubic environments in halides to over 3 MHz for the highly asymmetric sites in K2CO3. Although the quadrupolar effects generally dominate the 39K spectra, in several instances, we have observed subtle but significant contributions of chemical shift anisotropy with values up to 45 ppm, a first such observation. Careful analysis of static and MAS spectra allows the observation of the various chemical shift and quadrupole coupling tensor components as well as their relative orientations, thereby demonstrating that high-field 39K NMR spectroscopy in the solid state has a substantial sensitivity to the local environment with parameters that will be of considerable value in materials characterization and electronic structure studies. PMID:17228903

  11. Earth's magnetic field enabled scalar coupling relaxation of 13C nuclei bound to fast-relaxing quadrupolar 14N in amide groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiavazza, Enrico; Kubala, Eugen; Gringeri, Concetta V.; Düwel, Stephan; Durst, Markus; Schulte, Rolf F.; Menzel, Marion I.

    2013-02-01

    Scalar coupling relaxation, which is usually only associated with closely resonant nuclei (e.g., 79Br-13C), can be a very effective relaxation mechanism. While working on hyperpolarized [5-13C]glutamine, fast liquid-state polarization decay during transfer to the MRI scanner was observed. This behavior could hypothetically be explained by substantial T1 shortening due to a scalar coupling contribution (type II) to the relaxation caused by the fast-relaxing quadrupolar 14N adjacent to the 13C nucleus in the amide group. This contribution is only effective in low magnetic fields (i.e., less than 800 μT) and prevents the use of molecules bearing the 13C-amide group as hyperpolarized MRS/MRI probes. In the present work, this hypothesis is explored both theoretically and experimentally. The results show that high hyperpolarization levels can be retained using either a 15N-labeled amide or by applying a magnetic field during transfer of the sample from the polarizer to the MRI scanner.

  12. Two-Photon Absorption and Fluorescence with Quadrupolar and Branched CHROMOPHORES—EFFECT of Structure and Branching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porrès, Laurent; Mongin, Olivier; Katan, Claudine; Charlot, Marina; Bhatthula, Bharath Kumar Goud; Jouikov, Viatcheslav; Pons, Thomas; Mertz, Jerome; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille

    The photophysical and two-photon absorption (TPA) properties of three homologous quadrupolar and one related three-branched chromophores were investigated. Design of the quadrupoles is based on the symmetrical functionalization of a biphenyl core. Modulation of the nonlinear absorptivity/transparency/photostability trade-off can be achieved by playing with the twist angle of the core and on the spacers (phenylene-vinylene versus phenylene-ethynylene). The quadrupolar chromophores combine high TPA cross-sections, high fluorescence quantum yield and solvent sensitive photoluminescence properties. The branched structure exhibits spectrally broadened TPA in the NIR region (up to 3660 GM at 740 nm measured in the femtosecond regime) but reduced sensitivity to the environment.

  13. Quadrupolar effects on nuclear spins of neutral arsenic donors in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, David P.; Pflüger, Moritz P. D.; Mortemousque, Pierre-André; Itoh, Kohei M.; Brandt, Martin S.

    2016-04-01

    We present electrically detected electron nuclear double resonance measurements of the nuclear spins of ionized and neutral arsenic donors in strained silicon. In addition to a reduction of the hyperfine coupling, we find significant quadrupole interactions of the nuclear spin of the neutral donors of the order of 10 kHz. By comparing these to the quadrupole shifts due to crystal fields measured for the ionized donors, we identify the effect of the additional electron on the electric field gradient at the nucleus. This extra component is expected to be caused by the coupling to electric field gradients created due to changes in the electron wave function under strain.

  14. Quantifying the Sensitivity of Multipolar (Dipolar, Quadrupolar, and Octapolar) Surface Plasmon Resonances in Silver Nanoparticles: The Effect of Size, Composition, and Surface Coating.

    PubMed

    Bastús, Neus G; Piella, Jordi; Puntes, Víctor

    2016-01-12

    The effect of composition, size, and surface coating on the sensitivity of localized multipolar surface plasmon resonances has been spectroscopically investigated in high-quality silver colloidal solutions with precisely controlled sizes from 10 to 220 nm and well-defined surface chemistry. Surface plasmon resonance modes have been intensively characterized, identifying the size-dependence of dipolar, quadrupolar, and octapolar modes. Modifications of the NP's surface chemistry revealed the higher sensitivity of large sizes, long molecules, thiol groups, and low-order resonance modes. We also extend this study to gold nanoparticles, aiming to compare the sensitivity of both materials, quantifying the higher sensitivity of silver. PMID:26649600

  15. Quantum phases of quadrupolar Fermi gases in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhongale, Satyan; Mathey, Ludwig; Zhao, Erhai; Yellin, Susanne; Lemeshko, Mikhail

    2013-05-01

    We introduce a new platform for quantum simulation of many-body systems based on nonspherical atoms or molecules with zero dipole moment but possessing a significant value of electric quadrupole moment. We consider a quadrupolar Fermi gas trapped in a 2D square optical lattice, and show that the peculiar symmetry and broad tunability of the quadrupole-quadrupole interaction results in a rich phase diagram encompassing unconventional BCS and charge density wave phases, and opens up a perspective to create topological superfluid. Quadrupolar species, such as metastable alkaline-earth atoms and homonuclear molecules, are stable against chemical reactions and collapse and are readily available in experiment at high densities.

  16. Quantum Phases of Quadrupolar Fermi Gases in Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhongale, S. G.; Mathey, L.; Zhao, Erhai; Yelin, S. F.; Lemeshko, Mikhail

    2013-04-01

    We introduce a new platform for quantum simulation of many-body systems based on nonspherical atoms or molecules with zero dipole moments but possessing a significant value of electric quadrupole moments. We consider a quadrupolar Fermi gas trapped in a 2D square optical lattice, and show that the peculiar symmetry and broad tunability of the quadrupole-quadrupole interaction results in a rich phase diagram encompassing unconventional BCS and charge density wave phases, and opens up a perspective to create a topological superfluid. Quadrupolar species, such as metastable alkaline-earth atoms and homonuclear molecules, are stable against chemical reactions and collapse and are readily available in experiment at high densities.

  17. Dynamic effects in MAS and MQMAS NMR spectra of half-integer quadrupolar nuclei: calculations and an application to the double perovskite cryolite.

    PubMed

    Kotecha, Mrignayani; Chaudhuri, Santanu; Grey, Clare P; Frydman, Lucio

    2005-11-30

    Dynamic processes such as chemical exchange or rotations between inequivalent orientations can affect the magic-angle spinning (MAS) and the multiple-quantum (MQ) MAS NMR spectra of half-integer quadrupolar nuclei. The present paper discusses such dynamic multisite MAS and MQMAS effects and applies them to study the dynamic processes that occur in the double perovskite cryolite, Na3AlF6. Dynamic line shape simulations invoking a second-order broadening of the central transition and relying on the semiclassical Bloch-McConnell formalism for chemical exchange were performed for a variety of exchange models possessing different symmetries. Fitting experimental variable-temperature cryolite 23Na NMR data with this formalism revealed that the two inequivalent sodium sites in this mineral undergo an exchange characterized by a broad distribution of rates. To further assess this dynamic process a variety of 27Al and 19F MAS NMR studies were also undertaken; quantitative 27Al-19F dipolar coupling measurements then revealed a dynamic motion of the AlF6 octahedra that were qualitatively consistent with predictions stemming from molecular dynamic simulations on this double perovskite. PMID:16305261

  18. Quantum phases of quadrupolar Fermi gases in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Bhongale, S G; Mathey, L; Zhao, Erhai; Yelin, S F; Lemeshko, Mikhail

    2013-04-12

    We introduce a new platform for quantum simulation of many-body systems based on nonspherical atoms or molecules with zero dipole moments but possessing a significant value of electric quadrupole moments. We consider a quadrupolar Fermi gas trapped in a 2D square optical lattice, and show that the peculiar symmetry and broad tunability of the quadrupole-quadrupole interaction results in a rich phase diagram encompassing unconventional BCS and charge density wave phases, and opens up a perspective to create a topological superfluid. Quadrupolar species, such as metastable alkaline-earth atoms and homonuclear molecules, are stable against chemical reactions and collapse and are readily available in experiment at high densities. PMID:25167282

  19. Converse effect of pressure on the quadrupolar and magnetic transition in Ce3Pd20Si6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larrea J., J.; Strydom, A. M.; Martelli, V.; Prokofiev, A.; Lorenzer, K.-A.; Rønnow, H. M.; Paschen, S.

    2016-03-01

    The heavy fermion compound Ce3Pd20Si6 displays unconventional quantum criticality as the lower of two consecutive phase transitions is fully suppressed by magnetic field. Here we report on the effects of pressure as an additional tuning parameter. Specific heat and electrical resistivity measurements reveal a converse effect of pressure on the two transitions, leading to the merging of both transitions at 6.2 kbars. The field-induced quantum criticality is robust under pressure tuning. We rationalize our findings within an extended version of the global phase diagram for antiferromagnetic heavy fermion quantum criticality.

  20. Understanding Earth's Albedo Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fidler, Chuck

    2012-01-01

    Earth and space science in the middle school classroom are composed of intricately intertwined sets of conceptual systems (AAAS 1993; NRC 1996). Some systems of study, such as the water and rock cycles, are quite explicit and often found as stand-alone middle school science units. Other phenomena are not so apparent, yet they play an extremely…

  1. Probing Quadrupolar Nuclei by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy: Recent Advances

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, Christian; Pruski, Marek

    2011-06-08

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of quadrupolar nuclei has recently undergone remarkable development of capabilities for obtaining structural and dynamic information at the molecular level. This review summarizes the key achievements attained during the last couple of decades in solid-state NMR of both integer spin and half-integer spin quadrupolar nuclei. We provide a concise description of the first- and second-order quadrupolar interactions, and their effect on the static and magic angle spinning (MAS) spectra. Methods are explained for efficient excitation of single- and multiple-quantum coherences, and acquisition of spectra under low- and high-resolution conditions. Most of all, we present a coherent, comparative description of the high-resolution methods for half-integer quadrupolar nuclei, including double rotation (DOR), dynamic angle spinning (DAS), multiple-quantum magic angle spinning (MQMAS), and satellite transition magic angle spinning (STMAS). Also highlighted are methods for processing and analysis of the spectra. Finally, we review methods for probing the heteronuclear and homonuclear correlations between the quadrupolar nuclei and their quadrupolar or spin-1/2 neighbors.

  2. Simple model for coupled magnetic and quadrupolar instabilities in uranium heavy-fermion materials

    SciTech Connect

    Libero, V.L. ); Cox, D.L. )

    1993-08-01

    We present a mean-field calculation of the phase diagram of a simple model of localized moments, in the hexagonal uranium heavy-fermion compounds. The model considers a non-Kramers quadrupolar doublet ground state magnetically coupled with a singlet excited state, favoring in-plane van Vleck magnetism, as has been conjectured for UPt[sub 3]. The Hamiltonian that defines the model is Heisenberg-like in both magnetic and quadrupolar moments. No Kondo-effect physics is included in the calculations. Among our main results are (i) for zero intersite quadrupolar coupling, the magnetic order is achieved by a first-order transition above a critical intersite magnetic coupling value, which becomes second order at higher coupling strengths (ii) for finite intersite quadrupolar coupling, at temperatures below a second-order quadrupolar ordering transition, the minimal magnetic coupling value is increased, but (a) the magnetic ordering temperature is enhanced above this value, and (b) the ordering of first- and second-order transitions in the phase diagram is reversed. By considering the general structure of the Ginsburg-Landau free energy, we argue that the Kondo effect will not modify the shape of the phase diagram, but will modify the quantitative values at which transitions occur.

  3. New methods and applications in solid-state NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei.

    PubMed

    Ashbrook, Sharon E; Sneddon, Scott

    2014-11-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has long been established as offering unique atomic-scale and element-specific insight into the structure, disorder, and dynamics of materials. NMR spectra of quadrupolar nuclei (I > (1)/2) are often perceived as being challenging to acquire and to interpret because of the presence of anisotropic broadening arising from the interaction of the electric field gradient and the nuclear electric quadrupole moment, which broadens the spectral lines, often over several megahertz. Despite the vast amount of information contained in the spectral line shapes, the problems with sensitivity and resolution have, until very recently, limited the application of NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei in the solid state. In this Perspective, we provide a brief overview of the quadrupolar interaction, describe some of the basic experimental approaches used for acquiring high-resolution NMR spectra, and discuss the information that these spectra can provide. We then describe some interesting recent examples to showcase some of the more exciting and challenging new applications of NMR spectra of quadrupolar nuclei in the fields of energy materials, microporous materials, Earth sciences, and biomaterials. Finally, we consider the possible directions that this highly informative technique may take in the future. PMID:25296129

  4. Resonant Auger for the detection of quadrupolar transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Danger, J.; Le Fevre, P.; Chandesris, D.; Magnan, H.; Jupille, J.; Bourgeois, S.; Eickhoff, T.; Drube, W.

    2003-01-24

    Quadrupolar transitions can play an important role in X-ray absorption spectroscopy, especially when it is used for magnetic measurements, like in X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism or Resonant Magnetic Scattering. We show here that resonantly excited Ti KL2,3L2,3 Auger spectra of TiO2 (110) carry a clear signature of quadrupolar transitions from the 1s to localized eg and t2g d-like states. The quadrupolar nature of the observed additional spectator lines are clearly demonstrated by their angular dependence, and their intensity is used to locate and quantify the quadrupolar transitions in the absorption spectrum.

  5. Earth albedo effects in the motion of artificial earth satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lala, P.

    Different models of the earth albedo values and geographical distribution are compared. Effects of the local cloud cover on the satellite perturbing acceleration are investigated. Resulting changes of the satellite orbit obtained by the method of numerical integration in the spherical coordinate system are given. It is shown that a sufficiently sensitive microaccelerometer on board a special satellite could significantly improve existing models of the earth albedo.

  6. SIMPRE1.2: Considering the hyperfine and quadrupolar couplings and the nuclear spin bath decoherence.

    PubMed

    Cardona-Serra, Salvador; Escalera-Moreno, Luis; Baldoví, José J; Gaita-Ariño, Alejandro; Clemente-Juan, Juan M; Coronado, Eugenio

    2016-05-15

    SIMPRE is a fortran77 code which uses an effective electrostatic model of point charges to predict the magnetic behavior of rare-earth-based mononuclear complexes. In this article, we present SIMPRE1.2, which now takes into account two further phenomena. First, SIMPRE now considers the hyperfine and quadrupolar interactions within the rare-earth ion, resulting in a more complete and realistic set of energy levels and wave functions. Second, and to widen SIMPRE's predictive capabilities regarding potential molecular spin qubits, it now includes a routine that calculates an upper-bound estimate of the decoherence time considering only the dipolar coupling between the electron spin and the surrounding nuclear spin bath. Additionally, SIMPRE now allows the user to introduce the crystal field parameters manually. Thus, we are able to demonstrate the new features using as examples (i) a Gd-based mononuclear complex known for its properties both as a single ion magnet and as a coherent qubit and (ii) an Er-based mononuclear complex. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26833799

  7. Quadrupolar Spin Orders in FeSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhentao; Nevidomskyy, Andriy

    Motivated by the absence of long-range magnetic order and the strong spin fluctuations observed in the Fe-based superconductor FeSe, we study spin-1 model on a square lattice up to next-nearest neighbor Heisenberg and biquadratic spin exchanges. The zero-temperature variational phase diagram gives the conventional antiferromagnetic order and also more exotic quadrupolar spin phases. These quadrupolar phases do not host long-range magnetic order and preserve time-reversal symmetry, but break the spin SU(2) symmetry. In particular, we observe a robust ferroquadrupolar order (FQ) in immediate proximity to the columnar AFM phase. We envision that FeSe may be positioned within the FQ phase close to the phase boundary. Using the flavor-wave technique, we calculate the structure factor inside the FQ phase and find a Goldstone mode emerging from Q = (0 , 0) , which however bears zero spectral weight at ω = 0 due to time reversal symmetry. At the same time, we observe strong spin fluctuations near (π , 0) / (0 , π) , which agrees with the recent neutron scattering experiments. Further, we calculate the higher order interactions between the (π , 0) and (0 , π) spin fluctuations inside the FQ phase, which may shed light on the C4 symmetry breaking in the nematic phase of FeSe.

  8. Nonclassical correlation in NMR quadrupolar systems

    SciTech Connect

    Soares-Pinto, D. O.; Auccaise, R.; Azevedo, E. R. de; Bonagamba, T. J.; Celeri, L. C.; Maziero, J.; Serra, R. M.; Fanchini, F. F.

    2010-06-15

    The existence of quantum correlation (as revealed by quantum discord), other than entanglement and its role in quantum-information processing (QIP), is a current subject for discussion. In particular, it has been suggested that this nonclassical correlation may provide computational speedup for some quantum algorithms. In this regard, bulk nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been successfully used as a test bench for many QIP implementations, although it has also been continuously criticized for not presenting entanglement in most of the systems used so far. In this paper, we report a theoretical and experimental study on the dynamics of quantum and classical correlations in an NMR quadrupolar system. We present a method for computing the correlations from experimental NMR deviation-density matrices and show that, given the action of the nuclear-spin environment, the relaxation produces a monotonic time decay in the correlations. Although the experimental realizations were performed in a specific quadrupolar system, the main results presented here can be applied to whichever system uses a deviation-density matrix formalism.

  9. The polarized interface between quadrupolar insulators: Maxwell stress tensor, surface tension, and potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavchov, Radomir I.; Dimitrova, Iglika M.; Ivanov, Tzanko

    2015-10-01

    The quadrupolar Maxwell electrostatic equations predict several qualitatively different results compared to Poisson's classical equation in their description of the properties of a dielectric interface. All interfaces between dielectrics possess surface dipole moment which results in a measurable surface potential jump. The surface dipole moment is conjugated to the bulk quadrupole moment density (the quadrupolarization) similarly to Gauss's relation between surface charge and bulk polarization. However, the classical macroscopic Maxwell equations completely neglect the quadrupolarization of the medium. Therefore, the electrostatic potential distribution near an interface of intrinsic dipole moment can be correctly described only within the quadrupolar macroscopic equations of electrostatics. They predict that near the polarized interface a diffuse dipole layer exists, which bears many similarities to the diffuse charge layer near a charged surface, in agreement with existing molecular dynamics simulation data. It turns out that when the quadrupole terms are kept in the multipole expansion of the laws of electrostatics, the solutions for the potential and the electric field are continuous functions at the surface. A well-defined surface electric field exists, interacting with the adsorbed dipoles. This allows for a macroscopic description of the surface dipole-surface dipole and the surface dipole-bulk quadrupole interactions. They are shown to have considerable contribution to the interfacial tension—of the order of tens of mN/m! To evaluate it, the Maxwell stress tensor in quadrupolar medium is deduced, including the electric field gradient action on the quadrupoles, as well as quadrupolar image force and quadrupolar electrostriction. The dependence of the interfacial tension on the external normal electric field (the dielectrocapillary curve) is predicted and the dielectric susceptibility of the dipolar double layer is related to the quadrupolarizabilities of

  10. Dynamic-angle spinning and double rotation of quadrupolar nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, K.T. California Univ., Berkeley, CA . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1991-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei is complicated by the coupling of the electric quadrupole moment of the nucleus to local variations in the electric field. The quadrupolar interaction is a useful source of information about local molecular structure in solids, but it tends to broaden resonance lines causing crowding and overlap in NMR spectra. Magic- angle spinning, which is routinely used to produce high resolution spectra of spin-{1/2} nuclei like carbon-13 and silicon-29, is incapable of fully narrowing resonances from quadrupolar nuclei when anisotropic second-order quadrupolar interactions are present. Two new sample-spinning techniques are introduced here that completely average the second-order quadrupolar coupling. Narrow resonance lines are obtained and individual resonances from distinct nuclear sites are identified. In dynamic-angle spinning (DAS) a rotor containing a powdered sample is reoriented between discrete angles with respect to high magnetic field. Evolution under anisotropic interactions at the different angles cancels, leaving only the isotropic evolution of the spin system. In the second technique, double rotation (DOR), a small rotor spins within a larger rotor so that the sample traces out a complicated trajectory in space. The relative orientation of the rotors and the orientation of the larger rotor within the magnetic field are selected to average both first- and second-order anisotropic broadening. The theory of quadrupolar interactions, coherent averaging theory, and motional narrowing by sample reorientation are reviewed with emphasis on the chemical shift anisotropy and second-order quadrupolar interactions experienced by half-odd integer spin quadrupolar nuclei. The DAS and DOR techniques are introduced and illustrated with application to common quadrupolar systems such as sodium-23 and oxygen-17 nuclei in solids.

  11. Dynamic-angle spinning and double rotation of quadrupolar nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, K. T.

    1991-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei is complicated by the coupling of the electric quadrupole moment of the nucleus to local variations in the electric field. The quadrupolar interaction is a useful source of information about local molecular structure in solids, but it tends to broaden resonance lines, causing crowding and overlap in NMR spectra. Magic-angle spinning, which is routinely used to produce high resolution spectra of spin-1/2 nuclei like carbon-13 and silicon-29, is incapable of fully narrowing resonances from quadrupolar nuclei when anisotropic second-order quadrupolar interactions are present. Two new sample-spinning techniques are introduced here that completely average the second-order quadrupolar coupling. Narrow resonance lines are obtained and individual resonances from distinct nuclear sites are identified. In dynamic-angle spinning (DAS) a rotor containing a powdered sample is reoriented between discrete angles with respect to high magnetic field. Evolution under anisotropic interactions at the different angles cancels, leaving only the isotropic evolution of the spin system. In the second technique, double rotation (DOR), a small rotor spins within a larger rotor so that the sample traces out a complicated trajectory in space. The relative orientation of the rotors and the orientation of the larger rotor within the magnetic field are selected to average both first- and second-order anisotropic broadening. The theory of quadrupolar interactions, coherent averaging theory, and motional narrowing by sample reorientation are reviewed with emphasis on the chemical shift anisotropy and second-order quadrupolar interactions experienced by half-odd integer spin quadrupolar nuclei. The DAS and DOR techniques are introduced and illustrated with application to common quadrupolar systems such as sodium-23 and oxygen-17 nuclei in solids.

  12. Development of a deformation-tunable quadrupolar microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Juhee; Moon, Songky; Lee, Sang-Bum; Lee, Jai-Hyung; An, Kyungwon; Shim, Jeong-Bo; Lee, Hai-Woong; Kim, Sang-Wook

    2006-08-01

    We have developed a technique for realizing a two-dimensional quadrupolar microcavity with its deformation variable from 0% to 20% continuously. We employed a microjet ejected from a noncircular orifice in order to generate a stationary column with modulated quadrupolar deformation in its cross section. Wavelength redshifts of low-order cavity modes due to shape deformation were measured and were found to be in good agreement with the wave calculation for the same deformation, indicating that the observed deformation is quadrupolar in nature.

  13. High-resolution multiple quantum MAS NMR spectroscopy of half-integer quadrupolar nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Gang; Rovnyank, David; Sun, Boqin; Griffin, Robert G.

    1996-02-01

    We demonstrate the utility of a two-pulse sequence in obtaining high-resolution solid state NMR spectra of half-integer quadrupolar nuclei with magic-angle-spinning (MAS). The experiment, which utilizes multiple/single-quantum correlation, was first described in a different form by Frydman and Harwood [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 117 (1995) 5367] and yields high-resolution isotropic NMR spectra where shifts are determined by the sum of resonance offset (chemical shift) and second-order quadrupolar effects. The two-pulse sequence described here is shown to provide a higher and more uniform excitation of multiple-quantum coherence than the three-pulse sequence used previously.

  14. Ocean tidal effects on Earth rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Richard S.

    2009-12-01

    Tidal forces due to the tide-raising potential deform the solid and fluid regions of the Earth, causing the Earth's inertia tensor to change, and hence causing the Earth's rate of rotation and length-of-day to change. Because both the tide-raising potential and the solid Earth's elastic response to the tidal forces caused by this potential are well-known, accurate models for the effects of the elastic solid body tides on the Earth's rotation are available. However, models for the effect of the ocean tides on the Earth's rotation are more problematic because of the need to model the dynamic response of the oceans to the tidal forces. Hydrodynamic ocean tide models that have recently become available are evaluated here for their ability to account for long-period ocean tidal signals in length-of-day observations. Of the models tested here, the older altimetric data-constrained model of Kantha et al. (1998) is shown to still do the best job of accounting for ocean tidal effects in length-of-day, particularly at the fortnightly tidal frequency. The model currently recommended by the IERS is shown to do the worst job.

  15. High-Resolution NMR of Quadrupolar Nuclei in the Solid State

    SciTech Connect

    Gann, Sheryl Lee

    1995-11-30

    This dissertation describes recent developments in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), for the most part involving the use of dynamic-angle spinning (DAS) NMR to study quadrupolar nuclei. Chapter 1 introduces some of the basic concepts and theory that will be referred to in later chapters, such as the density operator, product operators, rotations, coherence transfer pathways, phase cycling, and the various nuclear spin interactions, including the quadrupolar interaction. Chapter 2 describes the theory behind motional averaging experiments, including DAS, which is a technique where a sample is spun sequentially about two axis oriented at different angles with respect to the external magnetic field such that the chemical shift and quadrupolar anisotropy are averaged to zero. Work done on various rubidium-87 salts is presented as a demonstration of DAS. Chapter 3 explains how to remove sidebands from DAS and magic-angle spinning (MAS) experiments, which result from the time-dependence of the Hamiltonian under sample spinning conditions, using rotor-synchronized {pi}-pulses. Data from these experiments, known as DAH-180 and MAH-180, respectively, are presented for both rubidium and lead salts. In addition, the applicability of this technique to double rotation (DOR) experiments is discussed. Chapter 4 concerns the addition of cross-polarization to DAS (CPDAS). The theory behind spin locking and cross polarizing quadrupolar nuclei is explained and a method of avoiding the resulting problems by performing cross polarization at 0{sup o} (parallel) with respect to the magnetic field is presented. Experimental results are shown for a sodium-23 compound, sodium pyruvate, and for oxygen-17 labeled L-akmine. In Chapter 5, a method for broadening the Hartmann-Hahn matching condition under MAS, called variable effective field cross-polarization (VEFCI?), is presented, along with experimental work on adamantane and polycarbonate.

  16. Using tensor light shifts to measure and cancel a cell's quadrupolar frequency shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peck, S. K.; Lane, N.; Ang, D. G.; Hunter, L. R.

    2016-02-01

    We have developed a technique that uses the tensor light shift to measure and cancel the frequency shift produced by the quadrupolar anisotropy of a vapor cell. We demonstrate the technique on the 6 S1 /2 ,F =4 level of Cs using the D1 transition. The method extends our ability to study quadrupolar wall interactions beyond diamagnetic atoms. We have deduced the twist angle per wall adhesion for cesium on an alkene coating to be θCs -alkene=1.4 mrad . This value is about 37 times larger than the twist angle observed in 131Xe, suggesting that it is not produced by the interaction of the nuclear quadrupole moment with a collisional electric-field gradient. Alternative mechanisms that may be responsible for the observed quadrupolar frequency shifts are discussed. By canceling the cell-induced quadrupole shift we have extended our cells' effective spin-relaxation times by as much as a factor of 2. This cancellation improves magnetometer sensitivity in highly anisotropic cells and could reduce systematic uncertainties in some precision measurements.

  17. Solution deuterium NMR quadrupolar relaxation study of heme mobility in myoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.D.; La Mar, G.N.; Smith, K.M.; Parish, D.W.; Langry, K.C. )

    1989-01-18

    NMR spectroscopy has been used to monitor the quadrupolar relaxation and motional dynamics of {sup 2}H selectively incorporated into skeletal and side chain positions of the heme in sperm whale myoglobin. The hyperfine shifts of the heme resonances in paramagnetic states of myoglobin allow resolution of the signals of interest, and paramagnetic contributions to the observed line widths are shown to be insignificant. The {sup 2}H line widths for the skeletal positions of deuterohemin-reconstituted myoglobin yield a correlation time identical with that of overall protein tumbling (9 ns at 30{degree}C) and hence reflect an immobile heme group. The {sup 2}H NMR line widths of heme methyl groups exhibit motional narrowing indicative of very rapid internal rotation. Hence the methyl rotation is effectively decoupled from the overall protein tumbling, and the residual quadrupolar line width can be used directly to determine the protein tumbling rate. The {sup 2}H NMR lines from heme vinyl groups were found narrower than those from the heme skeleton. However, the range of quadrupolar coupling constants for sp{sup 2} hybridized C-{sup 2}H bonds does not permit an unequivocal interpretation in terms of mobility. 48 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Second harmonic generation from small gold metallic particles: from the dipolar to the quadrupolar response.

    PubMed

    Nappa, J; Russier-Antoine, I; Benichou, E; Jonin, Ch; Brevet, P F

    2006-11-14

    Hyper Raleigh scattering, a common technique to investigate the second harmonic light scattered from a liquid suspension of molecular compounds and to determine their quadratic hyperpolarizability, has been used for aqueous suspensions of gold nanoparticles, the diameter of which ranges from 20 up to 150 nm. The hyper Rayleigh signal intensity was recorded as a function of the angle of polarization of the incident fundamental wave. For the particles with a diameter smaller than 50 nm, the response is dominated by the dipolar contribution arising from the deviation of the particle shape from that of a perfect sphere. For larger diameter particles, retardation effects in the interaction of the electromagnetic fields with the particles cannot be neglected any longer and the response deviates from the pure dipolar response, exhibiting a strong quadrupolar contribution. It is then shown that in order to quantify the relative magnitude of these two dipolar and quadrupolar contributions, a weighting parameter zeta(V) which equals unity for a pure quadrupolar contribution and vanishes for a pure dipolar response, can be introduced. PMID:17115784

  19. Anomalous temperature dependence of the lattice parameters in HoPO{sub 4} and HoVO{sub 4}: Rare earth quadrupolar effects

    SciTech Connect

    Skanthakumar, S.; Loong, C.K.; Soderholm, L.; Nipko, J.; Richardson, J.W. Jr.; Abraham, M.M.; Boatner, L.A.

    1994-07-01

    The temperature dependence of the lattice parameters in tetragonal HoPO{sub 4} and HoVO{sub 4} was measured using neutron powder-diffraction techniques. Below about 100K, the lattice parameter a of HoPO{sub 4} increases with decreasing temperature while c decreases. In HoVO{sub 4}, the above behavior is reversed, that is, a decreases with decreasing temperature while c increases. Similar measurements on nonmagnetic LUP0{sub 4} and LuVO{sub 4} do not show any anomaly. This observation indicates that the unusual temperature dependence of the lattice constants is magnetic in origin. It can be explained in terms of a Ho{sup 3+} quadrupole interaction with the crystalline lattice. In particular, the calculated electronically-generated quadrupole moment of the Ho{sup 3+} in HoPO{sub 4} and HoVO{sub 4} exhibits a temperature dependence similar to that observed in the lattice parameters.

  20. Quantitative structure parameters from the NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Perras, Frederic A.

    2015-12-15

    Here, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most important characterization tools in chemistry, however, 3/4 of the NMR active nuclei are underutilized due to their quadrupolar nature. This short review centers on the development of methods that use solid-state NMR of quadrupolar nuclei for obtaining quantitative structural information. Namely, techniques using dipolar recoupling as well as the resolution afforded by double-rotation are presented for the measurement of spin–spin coupling between quadrupoles, enabling the measurement of internuclear distances and connectivities.

  1. Quantitative structure parameters from the NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Perras, Frédéric A.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most important characterization tools in chemistry, however, 3/4 of the NMR active nuclei are underutilized due to their quadrupolar nature. This short review centers on the development of methods that use solid-state NMR of quadrupolar nuclei for obtaining quantitative structural information. Namely, techniques using dipolar recoupling as well as the resolution afforded by double-rotation are presented for the measurement of spin–spin coupling between quadrupoles, enabling the measurement of internuclear distances and connectivities. Two-dimensional

  2. On the microscopic fluctuations driving the NMR relaxation of quadrupolar ions in water

    SciTech Connect

    Carof, Antoine; Salanne, Mathieu; Rotenberg, Benjamin; Charpentier, Thibault

    2015-11-21

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) relaxation is sensitive to the local structure and dynamics around the probed nuclei. The Electric Field Gradient (EFG) is the key microscopic quantity to understand the NMR relaxation of quadrupolar ions, such as {sup 7}Li{sup +}, {sup 23}Na{sup +}, {sup 25}Mg{sup 2+}, {sup 35}Cl{sup −}, {sup 39}K{sup +}, or {sup 133}Cs{sup +}. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the statistical and dynamical properties of the EFG experienced by alkaline, alkaline Earth, and chloride ions at infinite dilution in water. Specifically, we analyze the effect of the ionic charge and size on the distribution of the EFG tensor and on the multi-step decay of its auto-correlation function. The main contribution to the NMR relaxation time arises from the slowest mode, with a characteristic time on the picosecond time scale. The first solvation shell of the ion plays a dominant role in the fluctuations of the EFG, all the more that the ion radius is small and its charge is large. We propose an analysis based on a simplified charge distribution around the ion, which demonstrates that the auto-correlation of the EFG, hence the NMR relaxation time, reflects primarily the collective translational motion of water molecules in the first solvation shell of the cations. Our findings provide a microscopic route to the quantitative interpretation of NMR relaxation measurements and open the way to the design of improved analytical theories for NMR relaxation for small ionic solutes, which should focus on water density fluctuations around the ion.

  3. Quadrupolar, Triple [Delta]-Function Potential in One Dimension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patil, S. H.

    2009-01-01

    The energy and parity eigenstates for quadrupolar, triple [delta]-function potential are analysed. Using the analytical solutions in specific domains, simple expressions are obtained for even- and odd-parity bound-state energies. The Heisenberg uncertainty product is observed to have a minimum for a specific strength of the potential. The…

  4. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance of quadrupolar systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shuanhu

    1997-09-17

    This dissertation describes two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance theory and experiments which have been developed to study quadruples in the solid state. The technique of multiple-quantum magic-angle spinning (MQMAS) is extensively reviewed and expanded upon in this thesis. Specifically, MQMAS is first compared with another technique, dynamic-angle spinning (DAS). The similarity between the two techniques allows us to extend much of the DAS work to the MQMAS case. Application of MQMAS to a series of aluminum containing materials is then presented. The superior resolution enhancement through MQMAS is exploited to detect the five- and six-coordinated aluminum in many aluminosilicate glasses. Combining the MQMAS method with other experiments, such as HETCOR, greatly expands the possibility of the use of MQMAS to study a large range of problems and is demonstrated in Chapter 5. Finally, the technique switching-angle spinning (SAS) is applied to quadrupolar nuclei to fully characterize a quadrupolar spin system in which all of the 8 NMR parameters are accurately determined. This dissertation is meant to demonstrate that with the combination of two-dimensional NMR concepts and new advanced spinning technologies, a series of multiple-dimensional NMR techniques can be designed to allow a detailed study of quadrupolar nuclei in the solid state.

  5. Population transfer HMQC for half-integer quadrupolar nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qiang; Xu, Jun; Feng, Ningdong; Deng, Feng E-mail: jean-paul.amoureux@univ-lille1.fr; Li, Yixuan; Trébosc, Julien; Lafon, Olivier; Hu, Bingwen; Chen, Qun; Amoureux, Jean-Paul E-mail: jean-paul.amoureux@univ-lille1.fr

    2015-03-07

    This work presents a detailed analysis of a recently proposed nuclear magnetic resonance method [Wang et al., Chem. Commun. 49(59), 6653-6655 (2013)] for accelerating heteronuclear coherence transfers involving half-integer spin quadrupolar nuclei by manipulating their satellite transitions. This method, called Population Transfer Heteronuclear Multiple Quantum Correlation (PT-HMQC), is investigated in details by combining theoretical analyses, numerical simulations, and experimental investigations. We find that compared to instant inversion or instant saturation, continuous saturation is the most practical strategy to accelerate coherence transfers on half-integer quadrupolar nuclei. We further demonstrate that this strategy is efficient to enhance the sensitivity of J-mediated heteronuclear correlation experiments between two half-integer quadrupolar isotopes (e.g., {sup 27}Al-{sup 17}O). In this case, the build-up is strongly affected by relaxation for small T{sub 2}′ and J coupling values, and shortening the mixing time makes a huge signal enhancement. Moreover, this concept of population transfer can also be applied to dipolar-mediated HMQC experiments. Indeed, on the AlPO{sub 4}-14 sample, one still observes experimentally a 2-fold shortening of the optimum mixing time albeit with no significant signal gain in the {sup 31}P-({sup 27}Al) experiments.

  6. Population transfer HMQC for half-integer quadrupolar nuclei.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Li, Yixuan; Trébosc, Julien; Lafon, Olivier; Xu, Jun; Hu, Bingwen; Feng, Ningdong; Chen, Qun; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Deng, Feng

    2015-03-01

    This work presents a detailed analysis of a recently proposed nuclear magnetic resonance method [Wang et al., Chem. Commun. 49(59), 6653-6655 (2013)] for accelerating heteronuclear coherence transfers involving half-integer spin quadrupolar nuclei by manipulating their satellite transitions. This method, called Population Transfer Heteronuclear Multiple Quantum Correlation (PT-HMQC), is investigated in details by combining theoretical analyses, numerical simulations, and experimental investigations. We find that compared to instant inversion or instant saturation, continuous saturation is the most practical strategy to accelerate coherence transfers on half-integer quadrupolar nuclei. We further demonstrate that this strategy is efficient to enhance the sensitivity of J-mediated heteronuclear correlation experiments between two half-integer quadrupolar isotopes (e.g., (27)Al-(17)O). In this case, the build-up is strongly affected by relaxation for small T2' and J coupling values, and shortening the mixing time makes a huge signal enhancement. Moreover, this concept of population transfer can also be applied to dipolar-mediated HMQC experiments. Indeed, on the AlPO4-14 sample, one still observes experimentally a 2-fold shortening of the optimum mixing time albeit with no significant signal gain in the (31)P-{(27)Al} experiments. PMID:25747074

  7. Magnetic alignment and quadrupolar/paramagnetic cross-correlation in complexes of Na with LnDOTP5-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliav, Uzi; Chandra shekar, S.; Ling, Wen; Navon, Gil; Jerschow, Alexej

    2012-03-01

    The observation of a double-quantum filtered signal of quadrupolar nuclei (e.g. 23Na) in solution has been traditionally interpreted as a sign for anisotropic reorientational motion. Ling and Jerschow (2007) [23] have found that a 23Na double-quantum signal is observed also in solutions of TmDOTPNa5. Interference effects between the quadrupolar and the paramagnetic interactions have been reported to lead to the appearance of double-quantum coherences even in the absence of a residual quadrupolar interaction. In addition, such processes lead to differential linebroadening effects between the satellite transitions, akin to effects that are well known for dipolar-CSA cross-correlation. Here, we report experiments on sodium in the presence of LnDOTP compounds, where it is shown that these cross-correlation effects correlate well with the pseudo-contact shift. In addition, anisotropic g-values of the lanthanide compounds in question, can also lead to alignment within the magnetic field, and consequently to the appearance of line splitting and double-quantum coherences. The two competing effects are demonstrated and it is concluded that both cross-correlated relaxation and alignment in the magnetic field must be at work in the systems described here.

  8. Molecular engineering of nanoscale quadrupolar chromophores for two-photon absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porres, Laurent; Mongin, Olivier; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille H.; Ventelon, Lionel; Barzoukas, Marguerite; Moreaux, Laurent; Pons, Thomas; Mertz, Jerome

    2003-02-01

    Our aim has been the design of optimized NLO-phores with very high two-photon absorption (TPA) cross-sections (s2) in the red-NIR region, while maintaining high linear transparency and high fluorescence quantum yield. Our molecular engineering strategy is based on the push-push or pull-pull functionalization of semi-rigid nanoscale conjugated systems. The central building blocks were selected as rigid units that may assist quadrupolar intramolecular charge transfer by acting either as a (weak) donor or acceptor core. Quadrupolar molecules derived either from a phenyl unit, a rigidified biphenyl moiety or a fused bithiophene unit have been considered. Conjugated oligomers made of phenylene-vinylene and/or phenylene-ethynylene units were selected as connecting spacers between the core and the electroactive end groups to ensure effective electronic conjugation while maintaining suitable transparency/fluorescence. The TPA cross-sections were determined by investigating the two-photon-excited fluorescence properties using a Ti:sapphire laser delivering fs pulses. Both the nature of the end groups and of the core moiety play an important role in determining the TPA spectra. In addition, by adjusting the length and nature of the conjugated extensor, both amplification and spectral tuning of TPA cross-sections can be achieved. As a result, push-push fluorophores which demonstrate giant TPA cross-sections (up to 3000 GM) in the visible red, high fluorescence quantum yields and good transparency in the visible range have been obtained.

  9. Simulation of NMR powder line shapes of quadrupolar nuclei with half-integer spin at low-symmetry sites

    SciTech Connect

    Power, W.P.; Wasylishen, R.E. ); Mooibroek, S. Ltd., Milton, Ontario ); Pettitt, B.A.; Danchura, W. )

    1990-01-25

    At crystallographic sites of low symmetry it is possible for the interactions governing the NMR powder line shape of half-integer spin quadrupolar nuclei to have different orientation dependences. In such cases, it is found that the NMR line shape is sensitive to the relative orientation of the quadrupolar (Q) and chemical shielding (CS) tensors. An analysis of the {sup 133}Cs NMR powder pattern of cesium chromate illustrates the importance of considering such orientation effects. For systems where second-order quadrupolar interactions influence the central (m{sub I} = 1/2 {leftrightarrow} 1/2) transition, the line shape arising from this transition also depends critically on the relative orientation of the Q and CS tensors. It is anticipated that such effects will be important for pin n/2 nuclei (n = 3,5,7, or 9) with large chemical shift ranges and quadrupole moments larger than that of {sup 133}Cs (e.g., {sup 17}O, {sup 51}V, {sup 59}Co, and {sup 63}Cu).

  10. Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, M. H.

    1984-01-01

    The following aspects of the planet Earth are discussed: plate tectonics, the interior of the planet, the formation of the Earth, and the evolution of the atmosphere and hydrosphere. The Earth's crust, mantle, and core are examined along with the bulk composition of the planet.

  11. A spherical cavity model for quadrupolar dielectrics.

    PubMed

    Dimitrova, Iglika M; Slavchov, Radomir I; Ivanov, Tzanko; Mosbach, Sebastian

    2016-03-21

    The dielectric properties of a fluid composed of molecules possessing both dipole and quadrupole moments are studied based on a model of the Onsager type (molecule in the centre of a spherical cavity). The dielectric permittivity ε and the macroscopic quadrupole polarizability αQ of the fluid are related to the basic molecular characteristics (molecular dipole, polarizability, quadrupole, quadrupolarizability). The effect of αQ is to increase the reaction field, to bring forth reaction field gradient, to decrease the cavity field, and to bring forth cavity field gradient. The effects from the quadrupole terms are significant in the case of small cavity size in a non-polar liquid. The quadrupoles in the medium are shown to have a small but measurable effect on the dielectric permittivity of several liquids (Ar, Kr, Xe, CH4, N2, CO2, CS2, C6H6, H2O, CH3OH). The theory is used to calculate the macroscopic quadrupolarizabilities of these fluids as functions of pressure and temperature. The cavity radii are also determined for these liquids, and it is shown that they are functions of density only. This extension of Onsager's theory will be important for non-polar solutions (fuel, crude oil, liquid CO2), especially at increased pressures. PMID:27004882

  12. A spherical cavity model for quadrupolar dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrova, Iglika M.; Slavchov, Radomir I.; Ivanov, Tzanko; Mosbach, Sebastian

    2016-03-01

    The dielectric properties of a fluid composed of molecules possessing both dipole and quadrupole moments are studied based on a model of the Onsager type (molecule in the centre of a spherical cavity). The dielectric permittivity ɛ and the macroscopic quadrupole polarizability αQ of the fluid are related to the basic molecular characteristics (molecular dipole, polarizability, quadrupole, quadrupolarizability). The effect of αQ is to increase the reaction field, to bring forth reaction field gradient, to decrease the cavity field, and to bring forth cavity field gradient. The effects from the quadrupole terms are significant in the case of small cavity size in a non-polar liquid. The quadrupoles in the medium are shown to have a small but measurable effect on the dielectric permittivity of several liquids (Ar, Kr, Xe, CH4, N2, CO2, CS2, C6H6, H2O, CH3OH). The theory is used to calculate the macroscopic quadrupolarizabilities of these fluids as functions of pressure and temperature. The cavity radii are also determined for these liquids, and it is shown that they are functions of density only. This extension of Onsager's theory will be important for non-polar solutions (fuel, crude oil, liquid CO2), especially at increased pressures.

  13. On the relationship between quadrupolar magnetic field and collisionless reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Smets, R. Belmont, G.; Aunai, N.; Boniface, C.

    2014-06-15

    Using hybrid simulations, we investigate the onset of fast reconnection between two cylindrical magnetic shells initially close to each other. This initial state mimics the plasma structure in High Energy Density Plasmas induced by a laser-target interaction and the associated self-generated magnetic field. We clearly observe that the classical quadrupolar structure of the out-of-plane magnetic field appears prior to the reconnection onset. Furthermore, a parametric study reveals that, with a non-coplanar initial magnetic topology, the reconnection onset is delayed and possibly suppressed. The relation between the out-of-plane magnetic field and the out-of-plane electric field is discussed.

  14. High-field QCPMG NMR of large quadrupolar patterns using resistive magnets.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ivan; Shetty, Kiran; Ellis, Paul D; Brey, William W; Gan, Zhehong

    2009-12-01

    Spectroscopy in a high magnetic field reduces second-order quadrupolar shift while increasing chemical shift. It changes the scale between quadrupolar and chemical shift of half-integer quadrupolar spins. The application of QCPMG multiple echo for acquiring large quadrupolar pattern under the high magnetic field of a 25 T resistive magnet is presented for acquiring large quadrupolar patterns. It shows that temporal field fluctuations and spatial homogeneity of the Keck magnet at the NHMFL contribute about +/- 20 ppm in line broadening. NMR patterns which have breadths of hundreds to thousands of kilohertz can be efficiently recorded using a combination of QCPMG and magnetic field stepping with negligible hindrance from the inhomogeneity and field fluctuations of powered magnets. PMID:19913391

  15. SCAM-STMAS: satellite-transition MAS NMR of quadrupolar nuclei with self-compensation for magic-angle misset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashbrook, Sharon E.; Wimperis, Stephen

    2003-06-01

    -order quadrupolar effects or second-order quadrupole-CSA cross-terms, are present. Finally, we show that the sensitivity of the experiment can be improved through the use of amplitude-modulated pulses.

  16. Testing the Effect of Life on Earth's Functioning: How Gaian is the Earth System?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleidon, A.

    2002-05-01

    The Gaia hypothesis of Lovelock attempts to describe the emergent effects of life on Earth system properties and functioning at the planetary scale. It states that the resulting effects of life are such that it maintains habitable, or even optimal, conditions throughout Earth?s history. But what is habitable, or optimal? What is good for one species, may be bad for another. Problems associated with this important, but ill-defined hypothesis make it difficult to test. In order to address these problems and make the concept of Gaia testable, I give a precise definition of terms. Since carbon is the basic building block for life on Earth, I define the benefit of environmental conditions for life by their effect on the long-term mean global gross uptake of carbon by the biota. With this definition, environmental conditions which are more favorable to life or enhance life are those that lead to a higher value of GPP. Based on these definitions, I put forward four null hypotheses, describing increasing beneficial effects of life on the conditions of Earth, ranging from an ?Antigaian? to an ?optimising Gaian? null hypothesis. I use climate model simulations of a ?Desert World? and present day conditions to evaluate these hypotheses. I list some indications for rejection of all but one hypothesis, and conclude that life has indeed a strong tendency to affect Earth in a way which enhances the overall benefit, that is, carbon uptake.

  17. Effects of spraying rare earths on contents of rare Earth elements and effective components in tea.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongfeng; Wang, Changhong; Ye, Sheng; Qi, Hongtao; Zhao, Guiwen

    2003-11-01

    Rare earth (RE) fertilizer is widely applied in China to increase the yield and the quality of crops including tea. However, the effects of spraying RE fertilizer on the contents of rare earth elements (REE) and effective components in tea are unknown. The results from basin and field experiments show that the values of the REE concentrations in new shoots of tea plants and the concentration of REE in the soil (REE/REEs) either from control basins or from treatment basins were smaller than those in other parts of tea plant and similar between control and treatment. The longer the interval between spraying RE fertilizer and picking the shoots of tea plants, the less the effects from spraying. About 80% summation operator REE (the sum of the concentrations of 15 REE) in tea, whether it came from spraying or not, was insoluble in the infusion. About 10% the soluble REE of summation operator REE in tea infusion was bound to polysaccharide, and the amount of REE bound polysaccharide decreased over time. At least a 25 day safety interval is needed between spraying and picking if the microelement fertilizer is used, in order to enhance tea output and to ensure tea safety. PMID:14582968

  18. Method to determine the optimal layer number for the quadrupolar fiber coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhongxing; Zhang, Yonggang; Gao, Wei

    2014-08-01

    For a high precision interferometric fiber optic gyroscope (IFOG) under temperature control, a short start-up time and small temperature drift are important for its applications. The start-up time and the temperature drift of IFOG with the same fiber length but with a different fiber coil layer number are investigated and compared. Simulation by finite difference time domain method is done to illustrate the existence of optimal layer number for the fiber coil wound by the quadrupolar method. Theoretical analysis is then provided and a closed-form formulation is given to calculate the optimal layer number of the fiber coil, which can effectively reduce both the start-up time and temperature drift of IFOG. Our study is meaningful in improving the thermal performance of the fiber coil.

  19. Structure and orientational ordering in a fluid of elongated quadrupolar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ram Chandra

    2013-01-01

    A second-order density-functional theory is used to study the effect of quadrupolar interactions on the isotropic-nematic transition in a system of fluids of elongated molecules interacting via the Gay-Berne potential. The direct pair-correlation functions of the coexisting isotropic fluid that enter in the theory as input information are obtained by solving the Ornstein-Zernike equation using the Percus-Yevick integral equation theory in the (reduced) temperature range of 1.6≤T∗≤3.0 for different densities, temperatures and quadrupole moments. Using the harmonic coefficients of the direct pair-correlation functions, isotropic-nematic phase coexistence and thermodynamic parameters have been calculated. The theoretical results have been compared with the available computer simulation results.

  20. Spin squeezing in a quadrupolar nuclei NMR system.

    PubMed

    Auccaise, R; Araujo-Ferreira, A G; Sarthour, R S; Oliveira, I S; Bonagamba, T J; Roditi, I

    2015-01-30

    We have produced and characterized spin-squeezed states at a temperature of 26 °C in a nuclear magnetic resonance quadrupolar system. The experiment was carried out on 133Cs nuclei of spin I=7/2 in a sample of lyotropic liquid crystal. The source of spin squeezing was identified as the interaction between the quadrupole moment of the nuclei and the electric field gradients present within the molecules. We use the spin angular momentum representation to describe formally the nonlinear operators that produce the spin squeezing on a Hilbert space of dimension 2I+1=8. The quantitative and qualitative characterization of this spin-squeezing phenomenon is expressed by a squeezing parameter and squeezing angle developed for the two-mode Bose-Einstein condensate system, as well as by the Wigner quasiprobability distribution function. The generality of the present experimental scheme points to potential applications in solid-state physics. PMID:25679893

  1. The Percus-Yevick approximation for quadrupolar molecular fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ram Chandra; Mohan Singh, Braj; Ram, Jokhan

    2009-03-01

    The Percus-Yevick integral equation theory has been solved to study the equilibrium and structural properties of quadrupolar Gay-Berne fluids. The method used involves an expansion of angle-dependent functions appearing in the integral equations in terms of spherical harmonics and the harmonic coefficients are obtained by an iterative algorithm. All the terms of harmonic coefficients which involve l indices up to less than or equal to 6 have been considered. Molecules with length-to-breadth ratios 3.0 and 4.0 have been considered and results are reported for different densities, temperatures, and quadrupole moments. The values of pair correlation functions have been compared with the available computer simulation results.

  2. The Percus-Yevick approximation for quadrupolar molecular fluids.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ram Chandra; Singh, Braj Mohan; Ram, Jokhan

    2009-03-18

    The Percus-Yevick integral equation theory has been solved to study the equilibrium and structural properties of quadrupolar Gay-Berne fluids. The method used involves an expansion of angle-dependent functions appearing in the integral equations in terms of spherical harmonics and the harmonic coefficients are obtained by an iterative algorithm. All the terms of harmonic coefficients which involve l indices up to less than or equal to 6 have been considered. Molecules with length-to-breadth ratios 3.0 and 4.0 have been considered and results are reported for different densities, temperatures, and quadrupole moments. The values of pair correlation functions have been compared with the available computer simulation results. PMID:21693907

  3. Radiofrequency quadrupolar NMR stark spectroscopy: steady state response calibration and tensorial mapping.

    PubMed

    Tarasek, Matthew R; Kempf, James G

    2010-10-01

    Radiofrequency electric (E) fields oscillating at twice the usual NMR frequency (2ω(0)) can induce double-quantum transitions in quadrupolar nuclei, an NMR Stark effect. Characterization of such is of interest to aid understanding of electrostatic effects in NMR spectra. Calibration of Stark responses to an applied electric field may also be used to assess native fields within molecules and materials. We present high-field (14.1 T), room-temperature NMR experiments to calibrate the 2ω(0) Stark response in crystalline GaAs. This system presents an important test of current techniques and conditions, as historical studies at low field (500-900 mT) and low temperature (77 K) provide a basis for comparison. Our measurements of steady state response reveal the quadrupolar Stark tuning rate for (69)Ga in this material. The value, β(Q) = (11.5 ± 0.1) × 10(12) m(-1), is 3.6 times larger than the most-reliable prior result. In the process, we also uncovered a previously unobserved double-quantum steady state coherence. It appears as a completely separable dispersive signal component in quadrature-detected presaturation spectra versus offset from 2ω(0). The new component may eventually afford an independent route to calibrating β(Q). Finally, we demonstrated exceptional agreement with theory of the orientation-dependent Stark response for rotation of the sample relative to B(0) over a range of 90° and for E-field amplitudes from 30-180 V/cm. PMID:20839890

  4. DFT-D study of 14N nuclear quadrupolar interactions in tetra-n-alkyl ammonium halide crystals.

    PubMed

    Dib, Eddy; Alonso, Bruno; Mineva, Tzonka

    2014-05-15

    The density functional theory-based method with periodic boundary conditions and addition of a pair-wised empirical correction for the London dispersion energy (DFT-D) was used to study the NMR quadrupolar interaction (coupling constant CQ and asymmetry parameter ηQ) of (14)N nuclei in a homologous series of tetra-n-alkylammonium halides (C(x)H(2x+1))4N(+)X(-) (x = 1-4), (X = Br, I). These (14)N quadrupolar properties are particularly challenging for the DFT-D computations because of their very high sensitivity to tiny geometrical changes, being negligible for other spectral property calculations as, for example, NMR (14)N chemical shift. In addition, the polarization effect of the halide anions in the considered crystal mesophases combines with interactions of van der Waals type between cations and anions. Comparing experimental and theoretical results, the performance of PBE-D functional is preferred over that of B3LYP-D. The results demonstrated a good transferability of the empirical parameters in the London dispersion formula for crystals with two or more carbons per alkyl group in the cations, whereas the empirical corrections in the tetramethylammonium halides appeared to be inappropriate for the quadrupolar interaction calculation. This is attributed to the enhanced cation-anion attraction, which causes a strong polarization at the nitrogen site. Our results demonstrated that the (14)N CQ and ηQ are predominantly affected by the molecular structures of the cations, adapted to the symmetry of the anion arrangements. The long-range polarization effect of the surrounding anions at the target nitrogen site becomes more important for cells with lower spatial symmetry. PMID:24758512

  5. Detrimental Effects of Extreme Solar Activity on Life on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airapetian, Vladimir; Glocer, Alex; Jackman, Charles

    2015-07-01

    Solar Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), the most energetic eruptions in the Solar System, represent large-scale disturbances forming with the solar corona and are associated with solar flares and Solar Energetic Particles (SEP) events. Current Kepler data from solar-like stars suggest that the frequency of occurrence of energetic flares and associated CMEs from the Sun can be as high as 1 per 1500 years. What effects would CME and associated SEPs have on Earth's habitability? We have performed a three-dimensional time-dependent global magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the magnetic interaction of such a CME cloud with the Earth's magnetosphere. We calculated the global structure of the perturbed magnetosphere and derive the latitude of the open-closed magnetic field boundary. We used a 2D GSFC atmospheric code to calculate the efficiency of ozone depletion in the Earth's atmosphere due to SEP events and its effects on our society and life on Earth.

  6. Quadrupolar transients, cosine correlation functions, and two-dimensional exchange spectra of non-selectively excited spin-3/2 nuclei: A 7Li NMR study of the superionic conductor lithium indium phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storek, M.; Böhmer, R.

    2015-11-01

    Cos-cos stimulated echoes of non-selectively excited spin-3/2 nuclei were not exploited in studies of slow motional processes in solids and solid-like samples, so far. Based on a theoretical analysis of the quadrupolar transients which hitherto obviously precluded the application of such echoes, their utility is demonstrated for the example of 7Li NMR on the polycrystalline fast ion conductor lithium indium phosphate. Quadrupolar transients can adversely affect the shape of two- and three-pulse echo spectra and strategies are successfully tested that mitigate their impact. Furthermore, by means of suitably adapted cos-cos echo sequences an effective suppression of central-line contributions to the NMR spectra is achieved. By combining cos-cos and sin-sin datasets static two-dimensional exchange spectra were recorded that display quadrupolarly modulated off-diagonal intensity indicative of ionic motion.

  7. Exotic Quadrupolar Phenomena in Non-Kramers Doublet Systems — The Cases of PrT2Zn20 (T = Ir, Rh) and PrT2Al20 (T = V, Ti) —

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onimaru, Takahiro; Kusunose, Hiroaki

    2016-08-01

    This paper reviews experimental evidence and the related theoretical background on exotic phenomena arising from local quadrupolar degrees of freedom. Recent extensive studies on praseodymium-based cubic systems, PrT2X20, have revealed that the active quadrupoles in the non-Kramers doublet ground state play a vital role in exhibiting quadrupole orders and superconductivity with underlying peculiar normal paramagnetic electronic states. We focus on four prototype compounds of PrT2X20 (T = Ir, Rh, X = Zn; T = V, Ti, X = Al). Detailed comprehensive comparisons of these compounds have revealed a universal feature of the non-Fermi liquid state emerging from a lattice quadrupolar Kondo effect, and the commonality and individuality of the quadrupolar and superconducting phases. It may be possible to develop a new class of heavy-fermion systems beyond the classic view of heavy fermions on the basis of a concrete understanding of these phenomena.

  8. Effects of Earth Encounters on the Rotational Properties of Near-Earth Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chit Siu, Ho; Keane, James T.; Moskovitz, Nicholas; Binzel, Richard P.

    2015-11-01

    The effects of Earth encounters on the physical properties of near-Earth objects (NEOs) have been shown to be significant factors in their evolution. Previous studies have examined the effects of these encounters on reflectance spectra, and effects such as spin state and shape changes have been studied for specific asteroids and through simulation. In this study, archive data from previous NEO surveys were used to investigate rotational frequencies as a function of minimum orbit intersection distance (MOID), which we use as a proxy for Earth encounter likelihood.When comparing objects of similar sizes, we find a highly significant difference in the dispersion of rotational frequency (p < 0.01; significant at a >99% confidence level) between NEO populations that were likely to have had an Earth encounter and those that are less likely to have had such an encounter. The encounter/non-encounter distinction is found at a dividing MOID value of 1 lunar distance (LD). These results were robust to changes in the size of the moving average window, as well as to removal of the smallest objects from the encounter population and the largest objects from the non-encounter population, which would be most strongly affected by a known size/spin period bias where smaller objects tend to have shorter periods. There was no statistically significant difference in the mean rotation rates of encounter and non-encounter objects, however, indicating that encounters cause greater dispersion, but do not preferentially spin objects up or down at a detectable level. Recent modeling work also lends credibility to the idea that NEO interactions with the Earth-Moon system as a whole may be leading to the dispersion difference boundary at 1 LD (Keane et al. 2015, DPS).

  9. Effect of equinoctial precession on geosynchronous earth satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurfil, P.

    The long-periodic effects of the equinoctial precession on geosynchronous Earth orbit satellites are investigated. The equations of motion in a reference frame that coprecesses with the Earth are developed, and the resulting variational equations are derived using mean classical orbital elements. The Earth gravitational model includes the J_2 and J_3 zonal harmonics, which induce the equinoctial precession due to the lunisolar gravitational torque. It is shown that the ever-growing lifetime and mass of geosynchronous Earth orbit satellites render the equinoctial precession a significant factor, which should be taken into account during mission design, as it affects north-south stationkeeping maneuvers. The equilibria of the variational equations including the zonal harmonics and the equinoctial precession are investigated and a class of stable frozen orbits which are equinoctial precession invariant is derived.

  10. Influence of Earth's Shadowing Effects on Space Debris Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubaux, C.

    2013-08-01

    In this work, we present results about the stability of near geosynchronous space debris characterized by high area-to-mass ratios. We extend previous studies by considering the influence of the Earth's shadow on the short-and long-term time evolutions. To assess the orbits stability, we use the Global Symplectic Integrator (GSI) [18] which consists in the symplectic integration of both Hamiltonian equations of motion and variational equations. The solution of the variational equations is then used to compute the Mean Exponential Growth factor of Nearby Orbits (MEGNO) chaos indicator. The effects of the Earth's shadow are analyzed using the adapted conical and cylindrical Earth's shadowing models introduced by [10]. Our stability study shows that the Earth's shadow greatly affects the global behaviour of space debris orbits by increasing the size of chaotic regions around the geostationary altitude.

  11. Forbush Effects on the Martian Surface and Earth's Poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posner, A.; Guo, J.; Heber, B.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Zeitlin, C.; Zheng, Y.; MacNeice, P. J.; Odstrcil, D.; Rastaetter, L.; Steigies, C. T.; Andrews, J. P.; Appel, J. K.; Beaujean, R.; Berger, L.; Boettcher, S. I.; Brinza, D. E.; Bullock, M.; Burmeister, S.; Cucinotta, F.; Dresing, N.; Drews, C.; Ehresmann, B.; Epperly, M. E.; Hassler, D.; Herbst, K.; Kim, M. H. Y.; Kohler, J.; Kühl, P.; Lohf, H.; Martin-Garcia, C.; Müller-Mellin, R.; Neal, K.; Rafkin, S. C.; Reitz, G.; Smith, K. D.; Tyler, Y.; weigle, G., II

    2015-12-01

    We analyzed MSL/RAD observation of Forbush effects on the surface of Mars over a full Mars year from landing through the Mars opposition period in 2014. For the extended Mars opposition phase we compared the observed Forbush effects with those identified at Earth's south pole utilizing observations of the South Pole neutron monitor. Identification of the drivers of Forbush effects, recurrent and transient solar wind structures in the inner heliosphere, is aided by WSA-ENLIL simulations. We show that a remarkable correlations of count rates of (secondary) cosmic rays at Mars' surface and at the Earth's south pole is established for a minimum duration of 6 months around the Mars opposition, in particular when time shifted with propagation and/or corotation delays of the drivers of cosmic ray decreases in the solar wind. Moreover, the magnitude of Forbush effects on Mars is larger statistically than the equivalent near Earth's poles.

  12. Instability of some divalent rare earth ions and photochromic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egranov, A. V.; Sizova, T. Yu.; Shendrik, R. Yu.; Smirnova, N. A.

    2016-03-01

    It was shown that the divalent rare earth ions (La, Ce, Gd, Tb, Lu, and Y) in cubic sites in alkaline earth fluorides are unstable with respect to electron autodetachment since its d1(eg) ground state is located in the conduction band which is consistent with the general tendency of these ions in various compounds. The localization of doubly degenerate d1(eg) level in the conduction band creates a configuration instability around the divalent rare earth ion that leading to the formation of anion vacancy in the nearest neighborhood, as was reported in the previous paper [A. Egranov, T. Sizova, Configurational instability at the excited impurity ions in alkaline earth fluorites, J. Phys. Chem. Solids 74 (2013) 530-534]. Thus, the formation of the stable divalent ions as La, Ce, Gd, Tb, Lu, and Y (PC+ centers) in CaF2 and SrF2 crystals during x-ray irradiation occurs via the formation of charged anion vacancies near divalent ions (Re2+va), which lower the ground state of the divalent ion relative to the conductivity band. Photochromic effect occurs under thermally or optically stimulated electron transition from the divalent rare earth ion to the neighboring anion vacancy and reverse under ultraviolet light irradiation. It is shown that the optical absorption of the PC+ centers due to d → d and d → f transitions of the divalent rare-earth ion.

  13. Population and coherence transfer induced by double frequency sweeps in half-integer quadrupolar spin systems.

    PubMed

    Iuga, D; Schäfer, H; Verhagen, R; Kentgens, A P

    2000-12-01

    We have recently shown that the sensitivity of single- and multiple-quantum NMR experiments of half-integer (N/2) quadrupolar nuclei can be increased significantly by introducing so-called double frequency sweeps (DFS) in various pulse schemes. These sweeps consist of two sidebands generated by an amplitude modulation of the RF carrier. Using a time-dependent amplitude modulation the sidebands can be swept through a certain frequency range. Inspired by the work of Vega and Naor (J. Chem. Phys. 75, 75 (1981)), this is used to manipulate +/-(m - 1) <--> +/-m (3/2 < or = m < or = N/2) satellite transitions in half-integer spin systems simultaneously. For (23)Na (I = 3/2) and (27)Al (I = 5/2) spins in single crystals it proved possible to transfer the populations of the outer +/-m spin levels to the inner +/-1/2 spin levels. A detailed analysis shows that the efficiency of this process is a function of the adiabaticity with which the various spin transitions are passed during the sweep. In powders these sweep parameters have to be optimized to satisfy the appropriate conditions for a maximum of spins in the powder distribution. The effects of sweep rate, sweep range, and RF field strength are investigated both numerically and experimentally. Using a DFS as a preparation period leads to significantly enhanced central transition powder spectra under both static and MAS conditions, compared to single pulse excitation. DFSs prove to be very efficient tools not only for population transfer, but also for coherence transfer. This can be exploited for the multiple- to single-quantum transfer in MQMAS experiments. It is demonstrated, theoretically and experimentally, that DFSs are capable of transferring both quintuple-quantum and triple-quantum coherence into single-quantum coherence in I = 5/2 spin systems. This leads to a significant enhancement in signal-to-noise ratio and strongly reduces the RF power requirement compared to pulsed MQMAS experiments, thus extending their

  14. Low-earth-orbit effects on strength of glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedlocher, David E.; Tucker, Dennis S.; Nichols, Ron; Kinser, Donald L.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of a 5.8-y exposure to low-earth-orbit environment upon the mechanical properties of five commercial glasses and a low-expansion-coefficient glass-ceramic have been examined. The radiation components of the earth-orbit environment did not degrade the mechanical strength of the samples examined within the limits of experimental error. Statistical problems arising from the low frequency of micrometeorite or space debris impacts upon the samples precluded statistically valid measurement of impacted sample strengths. Upper bounds for the magnitude of the impact event damage upon the strengths for impacted samples have been determined.

  15. The Runaway Greenhouse Effect on Earth and other Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabbette, Maura; Pilewskie, Peter; McKay, Christopher; Young, Robert

    2001-01-01

    Water vapor is an efficient absorber of outgoing longwave infrared radiation on Earth and is the primary greenhouse gas. Since evaporation increases with increasing sea surface temperature, and the increase in water vapor further increases greenhouse warming, there is a positive feedback. The runaway greenhouse effect occurs if this feedback continues unchecked until all the water has left the surface and enters the atmosphere. For Mars and the Earth the runaway greenhouse was halted when water vapor became saturated with respect to ice or liquid water respectively. However, Venus is considered to be an example of a planet where the runaway greenhouse effect did occur, and it has been speculated that if the solar luminosity were to increase above a certain limit, it would also occur on the Earth. Satellite data acquired during the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) under clear sky conditions shows that as the sea surface temperature (SST) increases, the rate of outgoing infrared radiation at the top of the atmosphere also increases, as expected. Over the pacific warm pool where the SST exceeds 300 K the outgoing radiation emitted to space actually decreases with increasing SST, leading to a potentially unstable system. This behavior is a signature of the runaway greenhouse effect on Earth. However, the SST never exceeds 303K, thus the system has a natural cap which stops the runaway. According to Stefan-Boltzmann's law the amount of heat energy radiated by the Earth's surface is proportional to (T(sup 4)). However, if the planet has a substantial atmosphere, it can absorb all infrared radiation from the lower surface before the radiation penetrates into outer space. Thus, an instrument in space looking at the planet does not detect radiation from the surface. The radiation it sees comes from some level higher up. For the earth#s atmosphere the effective temperature (T(sub e)) has a value of 255 K corresponding to the middle troposphere, above most of the

  16. Recent Earth Oblateness Variations: Unraveling Climate and Postglacial Rebound Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickey, Jean O.; Marcus, Steven L.; de Viron, Olivier; Fukumori, Ichiro

    2002-12-01

    Earth's dynamic oblateness (J2) has been decreasing due to postglacial rebound (PGR). However, J2 began to increase in 1997, indicating a pronounced global-scale mass redistribution within Earth's system. We have determined that the observed increases in J2 are caused primarily by a recent surge in subpolar glacial melting and by mass shifts in the Southern, Pacific, and Indian oceans. When these effects are removed, the residual trend in J2 (-2.9 x 10-11 year-1) becomes consistent with previous estimates of PGR from satellite and eclipse data. The climatic significance of these rapid shifts in glacial and oceanic mass, however, remains to be investigated.

  17. The effects of general relativity on near-earth satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ries, J. C.; Watkins, M. M.; Tapley, B. D.; Huang, C.

    1990-01-01

    Whether one uses a solar system barycentric frame or a geocentric frame when including the general theory of relativity in orbit determination for near-earth satellites, the results should be equivalent to some limiting accuracy. The purpose of this paper is to clarify the effects of relativity in each frame and to demonstrate their equivalence through the analysis of three years of laser tracking data taken on the Lageos satellite. It is demonstrated that the simpler formulation in the geocentric frame is adequate for the purpose of near-earth satellite orbit determination. A correction to the conventional barycentric equations of motion is shown to be required.

  18. A review of ionospheric effects on Earth-space propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klobuchar, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    A short description is given of each ionospheric total electron content (TEC) effect upon radio waves, along with a representative value of the magnitude of each of these effects under normal ionospheric conditions. A discussion is given of the important characteristics of average ionospheric TEC behavior and the temporal and spatial variability of TEC. Radio waves undergo several effects when they pass through the Earth's ionosphere. One of the most important of these effects is a retardation, or group delay, on the modulation or information carried on the radio wave that is due to its encounter with the free, thermal electrons in the Earth's ionosphere. Other effects the ionosphere has on radio waves include: radio frequency (RF) carrier phase advance; Doppler shift of the RF carrier of the radio wave; Faraday rotation of the plane of polarization of linearly polarized waves; angular refraction or bending of the radio wave path as it travels through the ionosphere; and amplitude and phase scintillations.

  19. NMR quadrupolar system described as Bose-Einstein-condensate-like system

    SciTech Connect

    Auccaise, R.; Oliveira, I. S.; Sarthour, R. S.; Teles, J.; Bonagamba, T. J.; Azevedo, E. R. de

    2009-04-14

    This paper presents a description of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of quadrupolar systems using the Holstein-Primakoff (HP) formalism and its analogy with a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) system. Two nuclear spin systems constituted of quadrupolar nuclei I=3/2 ({sup 23}Na) and I=7/2 ({sup 133}Cs) in lyotropic liquid crystals were used for experimental demonstrations. Specifically, we derived the conditions necessary for accomplishing the analogy, executed the proper experiments, and compared with quantum mechanical prediction for a Bose system. The NMR description in the HP representation could be applied in the future as a workbench for BEC-like systems, where the statistical properties may be obtained using the intermediate statistic, first established by Gentile. The description can be applied for any quadrupolar systems, including new developed solid-state NMR GaAS nanodevices.

  20. PRESTO polarization transfer to quadrupolar nuclei: implications for dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Perras, Frédéric A; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek

    2015-09-21

    We show both experimentally and numerically on a series of model systems that in experiments involving transfer of magnetization from (1)H to the quadrupolar nuclei under magic-angle-spinning (MAS), the PRESTO technique consistently outperforms traditionally used cross polarization (CP), affording more quantitative intensities, improved lineshapes, better overall sensitivity, and straightforward optimization. This advantage derives from the fact that PRESTO circumvents the convoluted and uncooperative spin dynamics during the CP transfer under MAS, by replacing the spin-locking of quadrupolar nuclei with a single central transition selective 90° pulse and using a symmetry-based recoupling sequence in the (1)H channel. This is of particular importance in the context of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR of quadrupolar nuclei, where the efficient transfer of enhanced (1)H polarization is desired to obtain the highest sensitivity. PMID:26266874

  1. PRESTO polarization transfer to quadrupolar nuclei: Implications for dynamic nuclear polarization

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Perras, Frederic A.; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek

    2015-08-04

    In this study, we show both experimentally and numerically on a series of model systems that in experiments involving transfer of magnetization from 1H to the quadrupolar nuclei under magic-angle-spinning (MAS), the PRESTO technique consistently outperforms traditionally used cross polarization (CP), affording more quantitative intensities, improved lineshapes, better overall sensitivity, and straightforward optimization. This advantage derives from the fact that PRESTO circumvents the convoluted and uncooperative spin dynamics during the CP transfer under MAS, by replacing the spin-locking of quadrupolar nuclei with a single central transition selective 90° pulse and using a symmetry-based recoupling sequence in the 1H channel. Thismore » is important in the context of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR of quadrupolar nuclei, where the efficient transfer of enhanced 1H polarization is desired to obtain the highest sensitivity.« less

  2. PRESTO polarization transfer to quadrupolar nuclei: Implications for dynamic nuclear polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Perras, Frederic A.; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek

    2015-08-04

    In this study, we show both experimentally and numerically on a series of model systems that in experiments involving transfer of magnetization from 1H to the quadrupolar nuclei under magic-angle-spinning (MAS), the PRESTO technique consistently outperforms traditionally used cross polarization (CP), affording more quantitative intensities, improved lineshapes, better overall sensitivity, and straightforward optimization. This advantage derives from the fact that PRESTO circumvents the convoluted and uncooperative spin dynamics during the CP transfer under MAS, by replacing the spin-locking of quadrupolar nuclei with a single central transition selective 90° pulse and using a symmetry-based recoupling sequence in the 1H channel. This is important in the context of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR of quadrupolar nuclei, where the efficient transfer of enhanced 1H polarization is desired to obtain the highest sensitivity.

  3. Dynamic ocean-tide effects on Earth's rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, S. R.

    1993-01-01

    This article develops 'broad-band' Liouville equations which are capable of determining the effects on the rotation of the Earth of a periodic excitation even at frequencies as high as semi-diurnal; these equations are then used to predict the rotational effects of altimetric, numerical and 32-constituent spherical harmonic ocean-tide models. The rotational model includes a frequency-dependent decoupled core, the effects of which are especially marked near retrograde diurnal frequencies; and a fully dynamic oceanic response, whose effects appear to be minor despite significant frequency dependence. The model also includes solid-earth effects which are frequency dependent as the result of both anelasticity at long periods and the fluid-core resonance at nearly diurnal periods. The effects of both tidal inertia and relative angular momentum on Earth rotation (polar motion, length of day, 'nutation' and Universal Time) are presented for 32 long- and short-period ocean tides determined as solutions to the author's spherical harmonic tide theory. The lengthening of the Chandler wobble period by the pole tide is also re-computed using the author's full theory. Additionally, using the spherical harmonic theory, tidal currents and their effects on rotation are determined for available numerical and altimetric tide height models. For all models, we find that the effects of tidal currents are at least as important as those of tide height for diurnal and semi-diurnal constituents.

  4. Electrical Nuclear Quadrupolar Interaction of ZINC-67 in a Single Crystal of Zinc.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyette, Jacques

    The nuclear quadrupolar coupling of ('67)Zn in a single crystal of zinc has been studied using the techniques of nuclear acoustic resonance (NAR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) at low temperatures. NAR, which is an attractive way of doing resonance experiments, is analogous to NMR except in the fact that we use phonons instead of photons to induce transitions thereby avoiding the skin -depth problems met when we do NMR in single metallic crystal. While our NAR experiments were unfruitful mainly due to the large magnetoresistance effects shown by zinc at low temperatures, we were able to circumvent these problems in our NMR experiments by using a time-sharing spectrometer which did not require modulation of the magnetic field. This way, we studied the I(,z) = 1/2 to I(,z) = -1/2 magnetic resonance transition of the I = 5/2 ground state of ('67)Zn in a single crystal of zinc metal as a function of crystal orientation in a magnetic field of 72 kilogauss. The small frequency deviation versus crystal orientation has been used to evaluate the electric quadrupole interaction e('2)qQ/h as 12.19(2) Mhz, the isotropic Knight shift as 0.236(6)% and the anisotropic Knight shift as 0.013(2)% at 4.2(DEGREES)K.

  5. Relativistic effects for low Earth orbit satellites using GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spallicci, A.; Jimenez, C.; Prisco, G.; Ashby, N.

    1992-06-01

    The relativistic corrections for a low Earth orbit satellite are evaluated. The GPS (Global Positioning System) satellite clock rate is slowed before launch by 4.465 x 10(exp -10), called the 'factory offset', for time dilation and gravitational frequency shift. This offset cancels the main constant relativistic effects for terrestrial users, which in order to operate in coordinate time have only to process the GPS orbital eccentricities, a sinusoidal function whose peaks are in the order of tens of ns, and the Sagnac effect. For a space user the situation greatly differs, because a large part of the relativistic effects are still present due to the high velocity of the satellite and its location in the Earth gravitational field. Past tests and proposals for future measurements with GPS--perigee advance, Shapiro time delay, preferred frame independence, Lense Thirring effect, light bending and gravitational waves--are reviewed.

  6. Effects of megascale eruptions on Earth and Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thordarson, T.; Rampino, M.; Keszthelyi, L.P.; Self, S.

    2009-01-01

    Volcanic features are common on geologically active earthlike planets. Megascale or "super" eruptions involving >1000 Gt of magma have occurred on both Earth and Mars in the geologically recent past, introducing prodigious volumes of ash and volcanic gases into the atmosphere. Here we discuss felsic (explosive) and mafi c (flood lava) supereruptions and their potential atmospheric and environmental effects on both planets. On Earth, felsic supereruptions recur on average about every 100-200,000 years and our present knowledge of the 73.5 ka Toba eruption implies that such events can have the potential to be catastrophic to human civilization. A future eruption of this type may require an unprecedented response from humankind to assure the continuation of civilization as we know it. Mafi c supereruptions have resulted in atmospheric injection of volcanic gases (especially SO2) and may have played a part in punctuating the history of life on Earth. The contrast between the more sustained effects of flood basalt eruptions (decades to centuries) and the near-instantaneous effects of large impacts (months to years) is worthy of more detailed study than has been completed to date. Products of mafi c supereruptions, signifi cantly larger than known from the geologic record on Earth, are well preserved on Mars. The volatile emissions from these eruptions most likely had global dispersal, but the effects may not have been outside what Mars endures even in the absence of volcanic eruptions. This is testament to the extreme variability of the current Martian atmosphere: situations that would be considered catastrophic on Earth are the norm on Mars. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  7. Effects of Long Period Ocean Tides on the Earth's Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Richard S.; Chao, Ben F.; Desai, Shailen D.

    1996-01-01

    The spectra of polar motion excitation functions exhibit enhanced power in the fortnightly tidal band. This enhanced power is attributed to ocean tidal excitation. Ocean tide models predict polar motion excitation effects that differ with each other, and with observations, by factors as large as 2-3. There is a need for inproved models for the effect of long-period ocean tides on Earth's rotation.

  8. Design of Scalable and Effective Earth Science Collaboration Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maskey, M.; Ramachandran, R.; Kuo, K. S.; Lynnes, C.; Niamsuwan, N.; Chidambaram, C.

    2014-12-01

    Collaborative research is growing rapidly. Many tools including IDEs are now beginning to incorporate new collaborative features. Software engineering research has shown the effectiveness of collaborative programming and analysis. In particular, drastic reduction in software development time resulting in reduced cost has been highlighted. Recently, we have witnessed the rise of applications that allow users to share their content. Most of these applications scale such collaboration using cloud technologies. Earth science research needs to adopt collaboration technologies to reduce redundancy, cut cost, expand knowledgebase, and scale research experiments. To address these needs, we developed the Earth science collaboration workbench (CWB). CWB provides researchers with various collaboration features by augmenting their existing analysis tools to minimize learning curve. During the development of the CWB, we understood that Earth science collaboration tasks are varied and we concluded that it is not possible to design a tool that serves all collaboration purposes. We adopted a mix of synchronous and asynchronous sharing methods that can be used to perform collaboration across time and location dimensions. We have used cloud technology for scaling the collaboration. Cloud has been highly utilized and valuable tool for Earth science researchers. Among other usages, cloud is used for sharing research results, Earth science data, and virtual machine images; allowing CWB to create and maintain research environments and networks to enhance collaboration between researchers. Furthermore, collaborative versioning tool, Git, is integrated into CWB for versioning of science artifacts. In this paper, we present our experience in designing and implementing the CWB. We will also discuss the integration of collaborative code development use cases for data search and discovery using NASA DAAC and simulation of satellite observations using NASA Earth Observing System Simulation

  9. Earth Impact Effects Program: Estimating the Regional Environmental Consequences of Impacts On Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, G. S.; Melosh, H. J.; Marcus, R. A.

    2009-12-01

    The Earth Impact Effects Program (www.lpl.arizona.edu/impacteffects) is a popular web-based calculator for estimating the regional environmental consequences of a comet or asteroid impact on Earth. It is widely used, both by inquisitive members of the public as an educational device and by scientists as a simple research tool. It applies a variety of scaling laws, based on theory, nuclear explosion test data, observations from terrestrial and extraterrestrial craters and the results of small-scale impact experiments and numerical modelling, to quantify the principal hazards that might affect the people, buildings and landscape in the vicinity of an impact. The program requires six inputs: impactor diameter, impactor density, impact velocity prior to atmospheric entry, impact angle, and the target type (sedimentary rock, crystalline rock, or a water layer above rock), as well as the distance from the impact at which the environmental effects are to be calculated. The program includes simple algorithms for estimating the fate of the impactor during atmospheric traverse, the thermal radiation emitted by the impact plume (fireball) and the intensity of seismic shaking. The program also approximates various dimensions of the impact crater and ejecta deposit, as well as estimating the severity of the air blast in both crater-forming and airburst impacts. We illustrate the strengths and limitations of the program by comparing its predictions (where possible) against known impacts, such as Carancas, Peru (2007); Tunguska, Siberia (1908); Barringer (Meteor) crater, Arizona (ca 49 ka). These tests demonstrate that, while adequate for large impactors, the simple approximation of atmospheric entry in the original program does not properly account for the disruption and dispersal of small impactors as they traverse Earth's atmosphere. We describe recent improvements to the calculator to better describe atmospheric entry of small meteors; the consequences of oceanic impacts; and

  10. The effects of the solid inner core and nonhydrostatic structure on the earth's forced nutations and earth tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Vries, Dan; Wahr, John M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper computes the effects of the solid inner core (IC) on the forced nutations and earth tides, and on certain of the earth's rotational normal modes. The theoretical results are extended to include the effects of a solid IC and of nonhydrostatic structure. The presence of the IC is responsible for a new, almost diurnal, prograde normal mode which involves a relative rotation between the IC and fluid outer core about an equatorial axis. It is shown that the small size of the IC's effects on both nutations and tides is a consequence of the fact that the IC's moments of inertia are less than 1/1000 of the entire earth's.

  11. Magnetostatic Effects in the Nucleation of Rare Earth Ferromagnetic Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durfee, C. S.; Flynn, C. P.

    2001-07-01

    It has been reported that superheating, supercooling, and explosive kinetics coupled to other degrees of freedom occur at the ferromagnetic transitions of Er and Dy, and that metastable phases occur during the transition kinetics of Er. We explain these observations in terms of magnetostatic energy, which requires highly eccentric nuclei in the homogeneous nucleation of magnetic transitions in heavy rare earths. The magnetostatics favor transitions through ferrimagnetic intermediaries. The unusual kinetics derive from effective spin lattice relaxation.

  12. Earth matter effect on active-sterile neutrino oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acero, Mario A.; Aguilar-Arevalo, Alexis A.; D'Olivo, J. C.

    2011-08-01

    Oscillations between active and sterile neutrinos remain as an open possibility to explain some experimental observations. In a four-neutrino mixing scheme, we use the Magnus expansion of the evolution operator to study the evolution of neutrino flavor amplitudes within the Earth. We apply this formalism to calculate the transition probabilities from active to sterile neutrinos taking into account the matter effect for a varying terrestrial density.

  13. Influence of Earth's shadowing effects on space debris stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubaux, Ch.; Libert, A.-S.; Delsate, N.; Carletti, T.

    2013-01-01

    Solar radiation pressure affects the evolution of high area-to-mass geostationary space debris. In this work, we extend the stability study of Valk et al. (2009) by considering the influence of Earth's shadows on the short- and long-term time evolutions of space debris. To assess the orbits stability, we use the Mean Exponential Growth factor of Nearby Orbits (MEGNO), which is an efficient numerical tool to distinguish between regular and chaotic behaviors. To reliably compute long-term space debris motion, we resort to the Global Symplectic Integrator (GSI) of Libert et al. (2011) which consists in the symplectic integration of both Hamiltonian equations of motion and variational equations. We show how to efficiently compute the MEGNO indicator in a complete symplectic framework, and we also discuss the choice of a symplectic integrator, since propagators adapted to the structure of the Hamiltonian equations of motion are not necessarily suited for the associated variational equations. The performances of our method are illustrated and validated through the study of the Arnold diffusion problem. We then analyze the effects of Earth's shadows, using the adapted conical and cylindrical Earth's shadowing models introduced by Hubaux et al. (2012) as the smooth shadow function deriving from these models can be easily included into the variational equations. Our stability study shows that Earth's shadows greatly affect the global behaviour of space debris orbits by increasing the size of chaotic regions around the geostationary altitude. We also emphasize the differences in the results given by conical or cylindrical Earth's shadowing models. Finally, such results are compared with a non-symplectic integration scheme.

  14. Efficient Excited-State Symmetry Breaking in a Cationic Quadrupolar System Bearing Diphenylamino Donors.

    PubMed

    Carlotti, Benedetta; Benassi, Enrico; Fortuna, Cosimo G; Barone, Vincenzo; Spalletti, Anna; Elisei, Fausto

    2016-01-01

    We report a joint experimental and theoretical investigation of a quadrupolar D-π-A(+) -π-D system, the electron donors being diphenylamino groups and the electron acceptor being a methylpyridinium, in comparison with the dipolar D-π-A(+) system. The emission spectra of the two compounds overlap in all the investigated solvents. This finding could be rationalized by TD-DFT calculations: the LUMO-HOMO molecular orbitals involved in the emission transition are localized on the same branch of the quadrupolar structure that becomes the fluorescent portion, corresponding to that of the single-arm compound. Excited-state symmetry breaking has been rarely observed for quadrupolar systems showing negative solvatochromism and is here surprisingly revealed, even in low polarity solvents. Femtosecond transient absorption measurements revealed that an efficient photoinduced intramolecular charge transfer takes place in the quadrupolar chromophore, more efficient than in its dipolar analogue. This result is promising in view of the application of these compounds as novel two-photon absorbing materials. PMID:26510394

  15. On the tidal effects in the motion of earth satellites and the love parameters of the earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musen, P.; Estes, R.

    1972-01-01

    The tidal effects in the motion of artificial satellites are studied to determine the elastic properties of the earth as they are observed from extraterrestrial space. Considering Love numbers, the disturbing potential is obtained as the analytical continuation of the tidal potential from the surface of the earth into-outer space, with parameters which characterize the earth's elastic response to tidal attraction by the moon and the sun. It is concluded that the tidal effects represent a superposition of a large number of periodic terms, and the rotation of the lunar orbital plane produces a term of 18 years period in tidal perturbations of the ascending node of the satellite's orbit.

  16. Three-Dimensional Orbits of Earth Satellites, Including Effects of Earth Oblateness and Atmospheric Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Jack N.; Goodwin, Frederick K.; Mersman, William A.

    1958-01-01

    The principal purpose of the present paper is to present sets of equations which may be used for calculating complete trajectories of earth satellites from outer space to the ground under the influence of air drag and gravity, including oblateness effects, and to apply these to several examples of entry trajectories starting from a circular orbit. Equations of motion, based on an "instantaneous ellipse" technique, with polar angle as independent variable, were found suitable for automatic computation of orbits in which the trajectory consists of a number of revolutions. This method is suitable as long as the trajectory does not become nearly vertical. In the terminal phase of the trajectories, which are nearly vertical, equations of motion in spherical polar coordinates with time as the independent variable were found to be more suitable. In the first illustrative example the effects of the oblateness component of the earth's gravitational field and of atmospheric rotation were studied for equatorial orbits. The satellites were launched into circular orbits at a height of 120 miles, an altitude sufficiently high that a number of revolutions could be studied. The importance of the oblateness component of the earth's gravitational field is shown by the fact that a satellite launched at circular orbital speed, neglecting oblateness, has a perigee some 67,000 feet lower when oblateness forces are included in the equations of motion than when they are not included. Also, the loss in altitude per revolution is double that of a satellite following an orbit not subject to oblateness. The effect of atmospheric rotation on the loss of altitude per revolution was small. As might be surmised, the regression of the line of nodes as predicted by celestial mechanics is unchanged when drag is included. It is clear that the inclination of the orbital plane to the equator will be relatively unaffected by drag for no atmospheric rotation since the drag lies in the orbital plane in

  17. Recent Earth oblateness variations: unraveling climate and postglacial rebound effects.

    PubMed

    Dickey, Jean O; Marcus, Steven L; de Viron, Olivier; Fukumori, Ichiro

    2002-12-01

    Earth's dynamic oblateness (J2) has been decreasing due to postglacial rebound (PGR). However, J2 began to increase in 1997, indicating a pronounced global-scale mass redistribution within Earth's system. We have determined that the observed increases in J2 are caused primarily by a recent surge in subpolar glacial melting and by mass shifts in the Southern, Pacific, and Indian oceans. When these effects are removed, the residual trend in J2 (-2.9 x 10(-11) year-1) becomes consistent with previous estimates of PGR from satellite and eclipse data. The climatic significance of these rapid shifts in glacial and oceanic mass, however, remains to be investigated. PMID:12471253

  18. Anomalous Hall Effect in a Feromagnetic Rare-Earth Cobalite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoilov, A. V.; Yeh, N. C.; Vasquez, R. P.

    1996-01-01

    Rare-Earth manganites and cobalites with the perovskite structure have been a subject of great recent interest because their electrical resistance changes significantly when a magnetic field is applied...we have studied the Hall effect in thin film La(sub 0.5)Ca(sub 0.5)CoO(sub 3) material and have obtained convincing evidence fo the so called anomalous Hall effect, typical for magnetic metals...Our results suggest that near the ferromagnetic ordering temperature, the dominant electron scattering mechanism is the spin fluctuation.

  19. Effects of Solar Flares on Earth and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendillo, M.; Withers, P.

    2006-05-01

    Flares on the Sun have long been known to cause changes in the Earth's ionosphere. At other planets, ionospheric observations are far less common, and certainly not continuous, making the detection of short-lived flare effects not easy to demonstrate. The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) radio science experiment has now made 4896 measurements of the electron density profiles at Mars since 1998; recent analyses have shown large electron density enhancements to be due unambiguously to flares. In this paper, we will review briefly the types of flare effects seen in the Earth's ionosphere, and relate them to the EUV and X-ray flare emissions that cause enhancements to the F-layer's total electron content (TEC) and to the E-layer's peak density, respectively. We will contrast these with effects now being seen at Mars, assessing both TEC variations and changes in Mars' secondary ionospheric layer. The different roles of ionization by photo-electrons at the two planets are major factors in understanding solar-terrestrial-martian relationships.

  20. Line shapes in CP/MAS NMR spectra of half-integer quadrupolar nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Shigenobu; Hayamizu, Kikuko

    1993-02-01

    Cross polarization (CP) from 1H to quadrupolar nuclei with S = 3/2 has been carried out under magic-angle-spinning (MAS) conditions for powder samples of Na 2B 4O 7·10H 2O and H 3BO 3. The line shapes in the CP/MAS NMR spectra are different from those in the spectra measured with the single pulse sequence combined with 1H dipolar decoupling. Furthermore, the line shapes are found to be dependent on the measuring conditions such as the pulse amplitude for the quadrupolar nuclei. The spin-locking experiments demonstrate that line shapes in CP/MAS NMR spectra are largely dependent on the spin-locking efficiency.

  1. Indirect measurement of N-14 quadrupolar coupling for NH3 intercalated in potassium graphite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, T.; Fronko, R. M.; Resing, H. A.

    1987-01-01

    A method for indirect measurement of the nuclear quadrupolar coupling was developed and applied to NH3 molecules in the graphite intercalation compound K(NH3)4.3C24, which has a layered structure with alternating carbon and intercalant layers. Three triplets were observed in the H-1 NMR spectra of the compound. The value of the N-14 quadrupolar coupling constant of NH3 (3.7 MHz), determined indirectly from the H-1 NMR spectra, was intermediate between the gas value of 4.1 MHz and the solid-state value of 3.2 MHz. The method was also used to deduce the (H-1)-(H-1) and (N-14)-(H-1) dipolar interactions, the H-1 chemical shifts, and the molecular orientations and motions of NH3.

  2. Fate of Earth Microbes on Mars -- UV Radiation Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockell, Charles

    2000-01-01

    A radiative transfer model is used to quantitatively investigate aspects of the martian ultraviolet radiation environment. Biological action spectra for DNA inactivation are used to estimate biologically effective irradiances for the martian surface under cloudless skies. Although the present-day martian UV flux is similar to early earth and thus may not be a limitation to life in the evolutionary context, it is a constraint to an unadapted biota and will rapidly kill spacecraft-borne microbes not covered by a martian dust layer. Here calculations for loss of microbial viability on the Pathfinder and Polar lander spacecraft are presented and the effects of martian dust on loss of viability are discussed. Details of the radiative transfer model are presented.

  3. Fate of Earth Microbes on Mars: UV Radiation Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockell, Charles

    2000-01-01

    A radiative transfer model is used to quantitatively investigate aspects of the martian ultraviolet radiation environment. Biological action spectra for DNA inactivation are used to estimate biologically effective irradiances for the martian surface under cloudless skies. Although the present-day martian UV flux is similar to early earth and thus may not be a limitation to life in the evolutionary context, it is a constraint to an unadapted biota and will rapidly kill spacecraft-borne microbes not covered by a martian dust layer. Here calculations for loss of microbial viability on the Pathfinder and Polar lander spacecraft are presented and the effects of martian dust on loss of viability are discussed. Details of the radiative transfer model are presented.

  4. Quantum phases of quadrupolar Fermi gases in coupled one-dimensional systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wen-Min; Lahrz, M.; Mathey, L.

    2014-01-01

    Following the recent proposal to create quadrupolar gases [Bhongale et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 155301 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.155301], we investigate what quantum phases can be created in these systems in one dimension. We consider a geometry of two coupled one-dimensional (1D) systems, and derive the quantum phase diagram of ultracold fermionic atoms interacting via quadrupole-quadrupole interactions within a Tomonaga-Luttinger-liquid framework. We map out the phase diagram as a function of the distance between the two tubes and the angle between the direction of the tubes and the quadrupolar moments. The latter can be controlled by an external field. We show that there are two magic angles θB,1c and θB,2c between 0 and π /2, where the intratube quadrupolar interactions vanish and change signs. Adopting a pseudospin language with regard to the two 1D systems, the system undergoes a spin-gap transition and displays a zigzag density pattern, above θB,2c and below θB,1c. Between the two magic angles, we show that polarized triplet superfluidity and a planar spin-density-wave order compete with each other. The latter corresponds to a bond-order solid in higher dimensions. We demonstrate that this order can be further stabilized by applying a commensurate periodic potential along the tubes.

  5. Atomic oxygen effects on POSS polyimides in low earth orbit.

    PubMed

    Minton, Timothy K; Wright, Michael E; Tomczak, Sandra J; Marquez, Sara A; Shen, Linhan; Brunsvold, Amy L; Cooper, Russell; Zhang, Jianming; Vij, Vandana; Guenthner, Andrew J; Petteys, Brian J

    2012-02-01

    Kapton polyimde is extensively used in solar arrays, spacecraft thermal blankets, and space inflatable structures. Upon exposure to atomic oxygen in low Earth orbit (LEO), Kapton is severely eroded. An effective approach to prevent this erosion is to incorporate polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) into the polyimide matrix by copolymerizing POSS monomers with the polyimide precursor. The copolymerization of POSS provides Si and O in the polymer matrix on the nano level. During exposure of POSS polyimide to atomic oxygen, organic material is degraded, and a silica passivation layer is formed. This silica layer protects the underlying polymer from further degradation. Laboratory and space-flight experiments have shown that POSS polyimides are highly resistant to atomic-oxygen attack, with erosion yields that may be as little as 1% those of Kapton. The results of all the studies indicate that POSS polyimide would be a space-survivable replacement for Kapton on spacecraft that operate in the LEO environment. PMID:22188314

  6. Effects of Fe spin transition in the Earth's lower mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speziale, S.; Lee, V. E.; Clark, S. M.; Pasternak, M. P.; Jeanloz, R.

    2005-12-01

    Knowing the properties of the Earth's lower-mantle minerals is crucial for interpreting seismological and other geophysical observations, and hence understanding the constitution, state and evolution of this region that makes up the bulk of our planet's interior. The behavior of Fe, the most abundant transition element, is especially important at deep-Earth conditions, with past work predicting that it should collapse in size due to a transition from high-spin (HS) to low-spin (LS) configurations at mantle pressures. Recent experimental observations of the Fe spin transition in both (Mg,Fe)SiO3-perovskite and ferropericlase (Mg,Fe)O at high-pressure impact our understanding of the stability, chemical partitioning and transport properties of the two most abundant minerals of the Earth's mantle. We focus on the structural and density effect of the high-spin to low-spin transition in ferropericlase (Mg1-x,Fex)O by performing high-pressure x-ray diffraction experiments on compositions (x < 0.25) relevant to the lower mantle. We obtain high-resolution measurements by simultaneously monitoring the unit-cell volumes of our target sample along with those of a different composition of (Mg,Fe)O that shows the spin transition at higher pressures. Our new results, compared with previous Mossbauer data on a large range of (Mg,Fe)O compositions, confirm that the transition is gradual with pressure at room temperature, and it involves an overall 3 ± 1% volume decrease over a pressure range starting at 40 GPa and extending up to as much as 80 GPa. By combining our results with those of independent studies of comparable compositions [Lin et al., Science, 2005], we infer a 6 ± 1% increase of the bulk sound velocity, which could cause visible seismic anomalies in regions of the lower mantle. In addition to the change in density at the spin transition, more fundamental issues emerge from our and other groups' results. The coexistence of HSFe and LSFe species poses questions about

  7. Oxidation Effects in Rare Earth Doped Topological Insulator Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, A I; van der Laan, G; Harrison, S E; Cibin, G; Hesjedal, T

    2016-01-01

    The breaking of time-reversal symmetry (TRS) in topological insulators is a prerequisite for unlocking their exotic properties and for observing the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE). The incorporation of dopants which exhibit magnetic long-range order is the most promising approach for TRS-breaking. REBiTe3, wherein 50% of the Bi is substitutionally replaced by a RE atom (RE = Gd, Dy, and Ho), is a predicted QAHE system. Despite the low solubility of REs in bulk crystals of a few %, highly doped thin films have been demonstrated, which are free of secondary phases and of high crystalline quality. Here we study the effects of exposure to atmosphere of rare earth-doped Bi2(Se, Te)3 thin films using x-ray absorption spectroscopy. We demonstrate that these RE dopants are all trivalent and effectively substitute for Bi(3+) in the Bi2(Se, Te)3 matrix. We find an unexpected high degree of sample oxidation for the most highly doped samples, which is not restricted to the surface of the films. In the low-doping limit, the RE-doped films mostly show surface oxidation, which can be prevented by surface passivation, encapsulation, or in-situ cleaving to recover the topological surface state. PMID:26956771

  8. Oxidation Effects in Rare Earth Doped Topological Insulator Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa, A. I.; van der Laan, G.; Harrison, S. E.; Cibin, G.; Hesjedal, T.

    2016-03-01

    The breaking of time-reversal symmetry (TRS) in topological insulators is a prerequisite for unlocking their exotic properties and for observing the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE). The incorporation of dopants which exhibit magnetic long-range order is the most promising approach for TRS-breaking. REBiTe3, wherein 50% of the Bi is substitutionally replaced by a RE atom (RE = Gd, Dy, and Ho), is a predicted QAHE system. Despite the low solubility of REs in bulk crystals of a few %, highly doped thin films have been demonstrated, which are free of secondary phases and of high crystalline quality. Here we study the effects of exposure to atmosphere of rare earth-doped Bi2(Se, Te)3 thin films using x-ray absorption spectroscopy. We demonstrate that these RE dopants are all trivalent and effectively substitute for Bi3+ in the Bi2(Se, Te)3 matrix. We find an unexpected high degree of sample oxidation for the most highly doped samples, which is not restricted to the surface of the films. In the low-doping limit, the RE-doped films mostly show surface oxidation, which can be prevented by surface passivation, encapsulation, or in-situ cleaving to recover the topological surface state.

  9. Oxidation Effects in Rare Earth Doped Topological Insulator Thin Films

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, A. I.; van der Laan, G.; Harrison, S. E.; Cibin, G.; Hesjedal, T.

    2016-01-01

    The breaking of time-reversal symmetry (TRS) in topological insulators is a prerequisite for unlocking their exotic properties and for observing the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE). The incorporation of dopants which exhibit magnetic long-range order is the most promising approach for TRS-breaking. REBiTe3, wherein 50% of the Bi is substitutionally replaced by a RE atom (RE = Gd, Dy, and Ho), is a predicted QAHE system. Despite the low solubility of REs in bulk crystals of a few %, highly doped thin films have been demonstrated, which are free of secondary phases and of high crystalline quality. Here we study the effects of exposure to atmosphere of rare earth-doped Bi2(Se, Te)3 thin films using x-ray absorption spectroscopy. We demonstrate that these RE dopants are all trivalent and effectively substitute for Bi3+ in the Bi2(Se, Te)3 matrix. We find an unexpected high degree of sample oxidation for the most highly doped samples, which is not restricted to the surface of the films. In the low-doping limit, the RE-doped films mostly show surface oxidation, which can be prevented by surface passivation, encapsulation, or in-situ cleaving to recover the topological surface state. PMID:26956771

  10. Modulation of Symmetry-Breaking Intramolecular Charge-Transfer Dynamics Assisted by Pendant Side Chains in π-Linkers in Quadrupolar Diketopyrrolopyrrole Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kim, Woojae; Sung, Jooyoung; Grzybowski, Marek; Gryko, Daniel T; Kim, Dongho

    2016-08-01

    The effect of the length of pendant side chains in centrosymmetric quadrupolar molecules on dynamics of their most perplexing photophysical phenomenon, i.e., symmetry-breaking intramolecular charge transfer, has been discovered. Unexpectedly, considerable influence of length of these pendant side chains in π-linkers arose as a structural factor enabling the control of the degree of fluorescence solvatochromism. The symmetry-breaking intramolecular charge-transfer dynamics has been described on quadrupolar diketopyrrolopyrrole derivatives possessing fluorene moieties as π-linkers and diarylamino groups as electron donors. On the basis of the evolution of transient fluorescence spectra obtained by a femtosecond broadband fluorescence up-conversion spectroscopy, it was found that the relative contribution of diffusive solvation and torsional relaxation in overall spectral relaxation can be modulated by the length of pendant side chain in π-linkers. Consequently, we demonstrated that this modulation plays a significant role in determining the photophysical properties of diketopyrrolopyrroles in a polar medium. PMID:27455383

  11. Effects of the low Earth orbital environment on spacecraft materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leger, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    It is evident from space flights during the last three years that the low Earth orbital (LEO) environment interacts with spacecraft surfaces in significant ways. One manifestation of these interactions is recession of, in particular, organic-polymer-based surfaces presumably due to oxidation by atomic oxygen, the major component of the LEO environment. Three experiments have been conducted on Space Shuttle flights 5, 8 and 41-G to measure reaction rates and the effects of various parameters on reaction rates. Surface recession on these flights indicates reaction efficiencies approximately 3 x 10(-24) cu cm/atoms for unfilled organic polymers. Of the metals, silver and osmium are very reactive. Effects on spacecraft or experiment surfaces can be evaluated using the derived reaction efficiencies and a definition of the total exposure to atomic oxygen. This exposure is obtained using an ambient density model, solar activity data and spacecraft parameters of altitude, attitude and operational date. Oxygen flux on a given surface is obtained from the ambient density and spacecraft velocity and can then be integrated to provide the total exposure or fluence. Such information can be generated using simple computational programs and can be converted to various formats. Overall, the extent of damage is strongly dependent on the type of surface and total exposure time.

  12. Laboratory simulation of Low Earth Orbit (LEO) atomic oxygen effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caledonia, George E.; Krech, Robert H.; Oakes, David B.

    1994-01-01

    A pulsed fast oxygen atom source has been used extensively over the last 7 years to investigate the effects of ambient oxygen atoms impacting materials placed in low Earth orbit. In this period, we irradiated well over 2000 material samples with 8 km/s oxygen atoms generated in our source. Typical irradiance level is 3 x 10(exp 20) O atoms/sq cm although some materials have been irradiated to fluence levels as high as 6 x 10(exp 21) O atoms/sq cm. The operating principles and characteristics of our source are reviewed along with diagnostic and handling procedures appropriate to material testing. Representative data is presented on the velocity dependence of oxygen atom erosion rates (the PSI source provides oxygen atoms tunable over the velocity range of 5 to 12 km/s) as well as the dependence on material temperature. Specific examples of non-linear oxidative effects related to surface contamination and test duration are also be provided.

  13. Quadrupolar second-harmonic generation by helical beams and vectorial vortices with radial or azimuthal polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandujano, Miguel G.; Maytorena, Jesús A.

    2013-08-01

    We study the optical second-harmonic radiation (SHG) generated by scattering from a homogeneous centrosymmetric thin composite material illuminated by higher-order Gaussian laser beams. The induced second-order source polarization is taken as of quadrupolar type (E·∇)E, which depends on the inhomogeneity of the incident electric field E. This nonlinear source has the same form as that responsible of the SH signal observed in a composite made of Si nanocrystals embedded uniformly in a SiO2 matrix and that calculated for a thin disordered array of nanospheres. We calculate the SH radiation angular patterns generated by several incident combinations of spatial modes and states of polarizations. In particular, excitation with radially and azimuthally polarized doughnut modes and helical beams carrying orbital angular momentum with linear or circular polarization are considered. We found that this quadrupolar SHG depends sensitively on the transverse structure and polarization of the driving field. The response to ∇E introduces a factor E(E·K) in the Fourier component of the SH scattering amplitude, absent in electric-dipole-allowed SHG, that can give additional nodal lines or rings in the SH angular patterns, changes of the state of polarization, or additional azimuthal phases in the harmonic radiation. For circularly polarized beams with helical phase wave front, we found a selection rule according to which the nonlinear scattering of an optical vortex with charge lω and spin σ=±1 induces a SH vortex field with a spin-dependent charge doubling l2ω=2lω+σ. These features may be useful to identify SHG processes of quadrupolar nature and suggest a way to produce scattered SH radiation with a desired angular pattern and state of polarization.

  14. Effects of differentiation on the geodynamics of the early Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccolo, Andrea; Kaus, Boris; White, Richard; Johnson, Tim

    2016-04-01

    Archean geodynamic processes are not well understood, but there is general agreement that the mantle potential temperature was higher than present, and that as a consequence significant amounts of melt were produced both in the mantle and any overlying crust. This has likely resulted in crustal differentiation. An early attempt to model the geodynamic effects of differentiation was made by Johnson et al. (2014), who used numerical modeling to investigate the crust production and recycling in conjunction with representative phase diagrams (based on the inferred chemical composition of the primary melt in accordance with the Archean temperature field). The results of the simulations show that the base of the over-thickened primary basaltic crust becomes gravitational unstable due to the mineral assemblage changes. This instability leads to the dripping of dense material into the mantle, which causes an asthenospheric return flow, local partial melting and new primary crust generation that is rapidly recycled in to mantle. Whereas they gave important insights, the previous simulations were simplified in a number of aspects: 1) the rheology employed was viscous, and both elasticity and pressure-dependent plasticity were not considered; 2) extracted mantle melts were 100% transformed into volcanic rocks, whereas on the present day Earth only about 20-30% are volcanic and the remainder is plutonic; 3) the effect of a free surface was not studied in a systematic manner. In order to better understand how these simplifications affect the geodynamic models, we here present additional simulations to study the effects of each of these parameters. Johnson, T.E., Brown, M., Kaus, B., and VanTongeren, J.A., 2014, Delamination and recycling of Archaean crust caused by gravitational instabilities: Nature Geoscience, v. 7, no. 1, p. 47-52, doi: 10.1038/NGEO2019.

  15. Satellite Motion Effects on Current Collection in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, T. X.; Hwang, K. S.; Wu, S. T.; Stone, N. H.; Chang, C. L.; Drobot, A.; Wright, K. H., Jr.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Results from the Tethered Satellite System (TSS) missions unambiguously show that the electrodynamic tether system produced 2 to 3 times the predicted current levels in the tether. The pre-mission predictions were based on the well-known Parker-Murphy (PM) model, which describes the collection of current by an electrically biased satellite in the ionospheric plasma. How the TSS satellite was able to collect 2-3 times the PM current has remained an open question. In the present study, self-consistent potential and motional effects are introduced into the Thompson and Dobrowolny sheath models. As a result, the magnetic field aligned sheath-an essential variable in determining current collection by a satellite-is derived and is shown to be explicitly velocity dependent. The orientation of the satellite's orbital motion relative to the geomagnetic field is also considered in the derivation and a velocity dependent expression for the collected current is obtained. The resulting model provides a realistic treatment of current collection by a satellite in low earth orbit. Moreover, the predictions, using the appropriate parameters for TSS, are in good agreement with the tether currents measured during the TSS-1R mission.

  16. Effects of simulated rare earth recycling wastewaters on biological nitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Yoshiko; Barnes, Joni; Eslamimanesh, Ali; Lencka, Malgorzata M.; Anderko, Andrzej; Riman, Richard E.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-07-16

    Current efforts to increase domestic availability of rare-earth element (REE) supplies by recycling and expanded ore processing efforts will result in increased generation of associated wastewaters. In some cases disposal to a sewage treatment plant may be favored but plant performance must be maintained. To assess the potential effects of such wastewaters on biological wastewater treatment, model nitrifying organisms Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter winogradskyi were exposed to simulated wastewaters containing varying levels of yttrium or europium (10, 50 and 100 ppm), and the REE extractant tributyl phosphate (TBP, at 0.1 g/L). Y and Eu additions above 10 ppm inhibited N. europaea activity, even when initially virtually all of the REE was insoluble. The provision of TBP together with Eu increased inhibition of nitrite production by the N. europaea, although TBP alone did not substantially alter nitrifying activity N. winogradskyi was more sensitive to the stimulated wastewaters, with even 10 ppm Eu or Y inducing significant inhibition, and a complete shutdown of nitrifying activity occurred in the presence of the TBP. To analyze the availability of REEs in aqueous solutions, REE solubility has been calculated using the previously developed MSE (Mixed-Solvent Electrolyte) thermodynamic model. The model calculations reveal a strong pH dependence of solubility, which is typically controlled by the precipitation of REE hydroxides but may also be influenced by the formation of a phosphate phase.

  17. Effects of simulated rare earth recycling wastewaters on biological nitrification

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fujita, Yoshiko; Barnes, Joni; Eslamimanesh, Ali; Lencka, Malgorzata M.; Anderko, Andrzej; Riman, Richard E.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-07-16

    Current efforts to increase domestic availability of rare-earth element (REE) supplies by recycling and expanded ore processing efforts will result in increased generation of associated wastewaters. In some cases disposal to a sewage treatment plant may be favored but plant performance must be maintained. To assess the potential effects of such wastewaters on biological wastewater treatment, model nitrifying organisms Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter winogradskyi were exposed to simulated wastewaters containing varying levels of yttrium or europium (10, 50 and 100 ppm), and the REE extractant tributyl phosphate (TBP, at 0.1 g/L). Y and Eu additions above 10 ppm inhibited N.more » europaea activity, even when initially virtually all of the REE was insoluble. The provision of TBP together with Eu increased inhibition of nitrite production by the N. europaea, although TBP alone did not substantially alter nitrifying activity N. winogradskyi was more sensitive to the stimulated wastewaters, with even 10 ppm Eu or Y inducing significant inhibition, and a complete shutdown of nitrifying activity occurred in the presence of the TBP. To analyze the availability of REEs in aqueous solutions, REE solubility has been calculated using the previously developed MSE (Mixed-Solvent Electrolyte) thermodynamic model. The model calculations reveal a strong pH dependence of solubility, which is typically controlled by the precipitation of REE hydroxides but may also be influenced by the formation of a phosphate phase.« less

  18. Effects of Simulated Rare Earth Recycling Wastewaters on Biological Nitrification.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yoshiko; Barnes, Joni; Eslamimanesh, Ali; Lencka, Malgorzata M; Anderko, Andrzej; Riman, Richard E; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-08-18

    Increasing rare earth element (REE) supplies by recycling and expanded ore processing will result in generation of new wastewaters. In some cases, disposal to a sewage treatment plant may be favored, but plant performance must be maintained. To assess the potential effects of such wastewaters on biological treatment, model nitrifying organisms Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter winogradskyi were exposed to simulated wastewaters containing varying levels of yttrium or europium (10, 50, and 100 ppm), and the extractant tributyl phosphate (TBP, at 0.1 g/L). Y and Eu additions at 50 and 100 ppm inhibited N. europaea, even when virtually all of the REE was insoluble. Provision of TBP with Eu increased N. europaea inhibition, although TBP alone did not substantially alter activity. For N. winogradskyi cultures, Eu or Y additions at all tested levels induced significant inhibition, and nitrification shut down completely with TBP addition. REE solubility was calculated using the previously developed MSE (Mixed-Solvent Electrolyte) thermodynamic model. The model calculations reveal a strong pH dependence of solubility, typically controlled by the precipitation of REE hydroxides but also likely affected by the formation of unknown phosphate phases, which determined aqueous concentrations experienced by the microorganisms. PMID:26132866

  19. Observations and Effects of Dipolarization Fronts Observed in Earth's Magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2011-01-01

    Dipolarization fronts in Earth's magnetotail are characterized by sharp jumps in magnetic field, a drop in density, and often follow earthward fast plasma flow. They are commonly detected near the equatorial plane of Earth s tail plasma sheet. Sometimes, but not always, dipolarization fronts are associated with global substorms and auroral brightenings. Both Cluster, THEMIS, and other spacecraft have detected dipolarization fronts in a variety of locations in the magnetotail. Using multi-spacecraft analyses together with simulations, we have investigated the propagation and evolution of some dipolarization events. We have also investigated the acceleration of electrons and ions that results from such magnetic-field changes. In some situations, the velocities of fast earthward flows are comparable to the Alfven speed, indicating that the flow bursts might have been generated by bursty reconnection that occurred tailward of the spacecraft. Based on multi-spacecraft timing analysis, dipolarization fronts are found to propagate mainly earthward at 160-335 km/s and have thicknesses of 900-1500 km, which corresponds to the ion inertial length or gyroradius scale. Following the passage of dipolarization fronts, significant fluctuations are observed in the x and y components of the magnetic field. These peaks in the magnetic field come approximately 1-2 minutes after passage of the dipolarization front. These Bx and By fluctuations propagate primarily dawnward and earthward. Field-aligned electron beams are observed coincident with those magnetic field fluctuations. Non-Maxwellian electron and ion distributions are observed that are associated with the dipolarization that may be unstable to a range of electrostatic and/or whistler instabilities. Enhanced electrostatic broadband noise at frequencies below and near the lower-hybrid frequency is also observed at or very close to these fronts. This broadband noise is thought to play a role in further energizing the particles

  20. Effects of Low Earth Orbit on Docking Seal Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imka, Emily C.; Asmar, Olivia C.; deGroh, Henry C., III; Banks, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft docking seals are typically made of silicone elastomers. When such seals are exposed to low Earth orbit (LEO) conditions, they can suffer damage from ultraviolet (UV) radiation and atomic oxygen (AO, or monoatomic oxygen, the predominant oxygen species in LEO). An experiment flew on the International Space Station (ISS) to measure the effects of LEO on seal materials S0383-70 and ELA-SA-401 and various mating counterface materials which included anodized aluminum. Samples flown in different orientations received different amounts of UV and AO. The hypotheses were that most of the damage would be from UV, and 10 days or more of exposure in LEO would badly damage the seals. Eighteen seals were exposed for 543 days in ram (windward), zenith (away from Earth), or wake (leeward) orientations, and 15 control samples (not flown) provided undamaged baseline leakage. To determine post-flight leak rates, each of the 33 seals were placed in an O-ring groove of a leak test fixture and pressure tested over time. Resistance temperature detectors (RTDs), pressure transducers, and LabVIEW (National Instruments) programs were used to measure and analyze the temperature and pressure and calculate leakage. Average leakage of control samples was 2.6 x 10(exp -7) lbs/day. LEO exposure did not considerably damage ELA-SA-401. The S0383-70 flight samples leaked at least 10 times more than ELA-SA-401 in all cases except one, demonstrating that ELA-SA-401 may be a more suitable sealing material in LEO. AO caused greater damage than UV; samples in ram orientation (receiving an AO fluence of 4.3 x 10(exp 21) atoms/(sq cm) and in wake (2.9x 10(exp 20) atoms/(sq cm)) leaked more than those in zenith orientation (1.58 x 10(exp 20) atoms/(sq cm)), whereas variations in UV exposure did not seem to affect the samples. Exposure to LEO did less damage to the seals than hypothesized, and the data did not support the conjecture that UV causes more damage than AO.

  1. Atmospheric effects on measurements of distance to Earth artificial satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kablak, N.; Klimyk, V.; Shvalagin, I.; Kablak, U.

    2005-06-01

    This paper is devoted to the problem of accuracy increasing in allowing for Earth's atmosphere influences on results of daily ranging observations of the Earth artificial satellites (ASE). Atmosphere delays and their spatial-timely variations for spherical-symmetrical and nonspherical models of atmosphere were determined radiosounding data gathered during a year in Ukraine region using, developed valuing and analysis of models reductions to over of atmosphere, which recommended of IERS for processing distance-ranging observations of the Earth artificial satellites. Investigated and improved models of reductions to over of the atmosphere on the basis of discovered regional and local peculiarity's of influence atmosphere on the laser and radio ranging observations of the Earth artificial satellites.

  2. Earth curvature and atmospheric refraction effects on radar signal propagation.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2013-01-01

    The earth isn't flat, and radar beams don't travel straight. This becomes more noticeable as range increases, particularly at shallow depression/grazing angles. This report explores models for characterizing this behavior.

  3. Directed Transformation from Quadrupolar to Dipolar Nematic Colloids by an In-Plane Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagashira, Kenji; Asakura, Keita; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Ozaki, Masanori

    2013-02-01

    We demonstrate direction-controlled transformation from quadrupolar to dipolar nematic colloids using an in-plane electric field. When the electric field is applied in the direction perpendicular to the rubbing direction, a splay-bend wall is induced, which traps colloidal particles. Above the applied electric field of 0.14 V/µm, a Saturn-ring defect shrinks into a hedgehog defect due to the symmetric reorientation of the liquid crystal molecules around the particle. The direction of the shrinking is determined by the pretilt angle of the liquid crystal and the field direction near the edge of the electrode.

  4. Magnetic dipolar and quadrupolar transitions in two-electron atoms under exponential-cosine-screened Coulomb potential

    SciTech Connect

    Modesto-Costa, Lucas; Canuto, Sylvio; Mukherjee, Prasanta K.

    2015-03-15

    A detailed investigation of the magnetic dipolar and quadrupolar excitation energies and transition probabilities of helium isoelectronic He, Be{sup 2+}, C{sup 4+}, and O{sup 6+} have been performed under exponential cosine screened Coulomb potential generated in a plasma environment. The low-lying excited states 1s{sup 2}:{sup 1}S{sup e} → 1sns:{sup 3}S{sup e}{sub 0}, and 1snp:{sup 3}P{sup o}{sub 2} (n = 2, 3, 4, and 5) are considered. The variational time-dependent coupled Hartree-Fock scheme has been used. The effect of the confinement produced by the potential on the structural properties is investigated for increasing coupling strength of the plasma. It is noted that there is a gradual destabilization of the energy of the system with the reduction of the ionization potential and the number of excited states. The effect of the screening enhancement on the excitation energies and transition probabilities has also been investigated and the results compared with those available for the free systems and under the simple screened Coulomb potential.

  5. Comparison of relativistic effects in barycentric and Earth-centered coordinates and implications for determination of GM for Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, Neil

    1987-01-01

    The results of an investigation of relativistic effects which have an influence on the determination of GM sub E (M sub E is the mass of the Earth, G is the Newtonian gravitaional constant) are summarized. The detailed arguments and derivations are discussed. The Parametrized Post-Newtonian (PPN) coordinates; Eddington-Clark (EC) coordinates; a coordinate system based on barycentric dynamical time (TBC coordinates); and Local Inertial coordinates are discussed.

  6. Spin and quadrupolar orders in the spin-1 bilinear-biquadratic model for iron-based superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Cheng; Datta, Trinanjan; Yao, Dao-Xin

    2016-06-01

    Motivated by the recent experimental and theoretical progress of the magnetic properties in iron-based superconductors, we provide a comprehensive analysis of the extended spin-1 bilinear-biquadratic (BBQ) model on the square lattice. Using a variational approach at the mean-field level, we identify the existence of various magnetic phases, including conventional spin dipolar orders (ferro- and antiferromagnet), novel quadrupolar orders (spin nematic), and mixed dipolar-quadrupolar orders. In contrast to the regular Heisenberg model, the elementary excitations of the spin-1 BBQ model are described by the SU(3) flavor-wave theory. By fitting the experimental spin-wave dispersion, we determine the refined exchange couplings corresponding to the collinear antiferromagnetic iron pnictides. We also present the dynamic structure factors of both spin dipolar and quadrupolar components with connections to the future experiments.

  7. From crystalline to glassy gallium fluoride materials: an NMR study of 69Ga and 71Ga quadrupolar nuclei.

    PubMed

    Bureau, B; Silly, G; Buzaré, J Y; Legein, C; Massiot, D

    1999-11-01

    Owing to the implementation of acquisition techniques specific for nuclei with very large quadrupolar interaction (full shifted echo and variable offset cumulative spectra (VOCS)), NMR spectra of 69Ga and 71Ga are obtained in crystallised (PbGaF5, Pb3Ga2F12, Pb9Ga2F24 and CsZnGaF6) and glassy (PbF2-ZnF2-GaF3) gallium fluorides. Simulations of both static (full echo or VOCS) and 15 kHz MAS spectra allow to obtain consistent determinations of isotropic chemical shifts and very large quadrupolar parameters (nuQ up to 14 MHz). In the crystalline compounds whose structures are unknown, the number and the local symmetry of the different gallium sites are tentatively worked out. For the glassy systems, a continuous Czjzek's distribution of the NMR quadrupolar parameters accounts for the particular shape of the NMR spectrum. PMID:10670905

  8. From crystalline to glassy gallium fluoride materials: an NMR study of 69Ga and 71Ga quadrupolar nuclei.

    PubMed

    Bureau, B; Silly, G; Buzaré, J Y; Legein, C; Massiot, D

    1999-09-01

    Owing to the implementation of acquisition techniques specific for nuclei with very large quadrupolar interaction (full shifted echo and variable offset cumulative spectra (VOCS)), NMR spectra of 69Ga and 71Ga are obtained in crystallised (PbGaF5, Pb3Ga2F12, Pb9Ga2F24 and CsZnGaF6) and glassy (PbF2-ZnF2-GaF3) gallium fluorides. Simulations of both static (full echo or VOCS) and 15 kHz MAS spectra allow to obtain consistent determinations of isotropic chemical shifts and very large quadrupolar parameters (nu(Q) up to 14 MHz). In the crystalline compounds whose structures are unknown, the number and the local symmetry of the different gallium sites are tentatively worked out. For the glassy systems, a continuous Czjzek's distribution of the NMR quadrupolar parameters accounts for the particular shape of the NMR spectrum. PMID:10499664

  9. 5f delocalization-induced suppression of quadrupolar order in U(Pd1-xPtx)₃

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Walker, H. C.; Le, M. D.; McEwen, K. A.; Bleckmann, M.; Süllow, S.; Mazzoli, C.; Wilkins, S. B.; Fort, D.

    2011-12-27

    We present bulk magnetic and transport measurements and x-ray resonant scattering measurements on U(Pd1-xPtx)₃ for x=0.005 and 0.01, which demonstrate the high sensitivity of the quadrupolar order in the canonical antiferroquadrupolar ordered system UPd₃ to doping with platinum. Bulk measurements for x=0.005 reveal behavior similar to that seen in UPd₃, albeit at a lower temperature, and x-ray resonant scattering provides evidence of quadrupolar order described by the Qxy order parameter. In contrast, bulk measurements reveal only an indistinct transition in x=0.01, consistent with the observation of short-range quadrupolar order in our x-ray resonant scattering results.

  10. Atmospheric attenuation relative to earth-viewing orbital sensors. [atmospheric moisture effects on microwaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, S. C.; Jayroe, R. R., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Earth viewing space missions offer exciting new possibilities in several earth resources disciplines - geography, hydrology, agriculture, geology, and oceanography, to name a few. A most useful tool in planning experiments and applying space technology to earth observation is a statistical description of atmospheric parameters. Four dimensional atmospheric models and a world wide cloud model are used to produce atmospheric attenuation models to predict degradation effects for all classes of sensors for application to earth sensing experiments from spaceborne platforms. To insure maximum utility and application of these products, the development of an interaction model of microwave energy and atmospheric variables provides a complete description of the effects of atmospheric moisture upon microwaves.

  11. A study of isotropic-nematic transition of quadrupolar Gay-Berne fluid using density-functional theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ram Chandra; Ram, Jokhan

    2011-11-01

    The effects of quadrupole moments on the isotropic-nematic (IN) phase transitions are studied using the density-functional theory (DFT) for a Gay-Berne (GB) fluid for a range of length-to-breadth parameters ? in the reduced temperature range ? . The pair-correlation functions of the isotropic phase, which enter into the DFT as input parameters are found by solving the Percus-Yevick integral equation theory. The method used involves an expansion of angle-dependent functions appearing in the integral equations in terms of spherical harmonics and the harmonic coefficients are obtained by an iterative algorithm. All the terms of harmonic coefficients which involve l indices up to less than or equal to 6 are considered. The numerical accuracy of the results depends on the number of spherical harmonic coefficients considered for each orientation-dependent function. As the length-to-breadth ratio of quadrupolar GB molecules is increased, the IN transition is seen to move to lower density (and pressure) at a given temperature. It has been observed that the DFT is good to study the IN transitions in such fluids. The theoretical results have also been compared with the computer simulation results wherever they are available.

  12. A two excited state model to explain the peculiar photobehaviour of a flexible quadrupolar D-π-D anthracene derivative.

    PubMed

    Carlotti, B; Cesaretti, A; Gentili, P L; Marrocchi, A; Elisei, F; Spalletti, A

    2016-08-17

    The peculiar photobehaviour of a symmetrical arylenevinylene anthracene derivative bearing mild electron donors (alkoxy groups) at the sides of its structure has been fully comprehended through this study. An investigation into the effect of solvent polarity and temperature on the stationary fluorescence spectrum allowed a clear dual emission to be revealed. A further valuable insight was obtained, thanks to the employment of ultrafast spectroscopies. Fluorescence up-conversion measurements and the Time Resolved Area Normalised Spectra analysis provided a clear-cut proof of the presence of two distinct fluorescent states ((1)A* and (1)B*), with (1)A* being responsible for the steady-state emission in highly polar and viscous media. Femtosecond transient absorption spectra were acquired in several organic solvents of different polarity and viscosity. Interestingly, the lifetime of (1)A* was found to be dependent on solvent viscosity whereas the lifetime of (1)B* showed a trend which matches the change in solvent polarity. Indeed, the Density functional theory calculations predicted a structural rearrangement in the fully relaxed lowest excited singlet state. The (1)A* → (1)B* transition is thus likely accompanied by large amplitude motions of the molecular structure, with the (1)B* state also exhibiting a small intramolecular charge transfer character. The investigated flexible quadrupolar D-π-D system arouses therefore great interest as a novel material for applications in organic electronics and photonics. PMID:27499254

  13. ISS Charging Hazards and Low Earth Orbit Space Weather Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph; Parker, L.; Coffey, V.; Wright K.; Koontz, S.; Edwards, D.

    2008-01-01

    Current collection by high voltage solar arrays on the International Space Station (ISS) drives the vehicle to negative floating potentials in the low Earth orbit daytime plasma environment. Pre-flight predictions of ISS floating potentials Phi greater than |-100 V| suggested a risk for degradation of dielectric thermal control coatings on surfaces in the U.S. sector due to arcing and an electrical shock hazard to astronauts during extravehicular activity (EVA). However, hazard studies conducted by the ISS program have demonstrated that the thermal control material degradation risk is effectively mitigated during the lifetime of the ISS vehicle by a sufficiently large ion collection area present on the vehicle to balance current collection by the solar arrays. To date, crew risk during EVA has been mitigated by operating one of two plasma contactors during EVA to control the vehicle potential within Phi less than or equal to |-40 V| with a backup process requiring reorientation of the solar arrays into a configuration which places the current collection surfaces into wake. This operation minimizes current collection by the solar arrays should the plasma contactors fail. This paper presents an analysis of F-region electron density and temperature variations at low and midlatitudes generated by space weather events to determine what range of conditions represent charging threats to ISS. We first use historical ionospheric plasma measurements from spacecraft operating at altitudes relevant to the 51.6 degree inclination ISS orbit to provide an extensive database of F-region plasma conditions over a variety of solar cycle conditions. Then, the statistical results from the historical data are compared to more recent in-situ measurements from the Floating Potential Measurement Unit (FPMU) operating on ISS in a campaign mode since its installation in August, 2006.

  14. A NON-RADIAL ERUPTION IN A QUADRUPOLAR MAGNETIC CONFIGURATION WITH A CORONAL NULL

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Xudong; Hoeksema, J. Todd; Liu Yang; Hayashi, Keiji; Chen Qingrong

    2012-10-01

    We report one of the several homologous non-radial eruptions from NOAA active region (AR) 11158 that are strongly modulated by the local magnetic field as observed with the Solar Dynamic Observatory. A small bipole emerged in the sunspot complex and subsequently created a quadrupolar flux system. Nonlinear force-free field extrapolation from vector magnetograms reveals its energetic nature: the fast-shearing bipole accumulated {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 31} erg free energy (10% of AR total) over just one day despite its relatively small magnetic flux (5% of AR total). During the eruption, the ejected plasma followed a highly inclined trajectory, over 60 Degree-Sign with respect to the radial direction, forming a jet-like, inverted-Y-shaped structure in its wake. Field extrapolation suggests complicated magnetic connectivity with a coronal null point, which is favorable of reconnection between different flux components in the quadrupolar system. Indeed, multiple pairs of flare ribbons brightened simultaneously, and coronal reconnection signatures appeared near the inferred null. Part of the magnetic setting resembles that of a blowout-type jet; the observed inverted-Y structure likely outlines the open field lines along the separatrix surface. Owing to the asymmetrical photospheric flux distribution, the confining magnetic pressure decreases much faster horizontally than upward. This special field geometry likely guided the non-radial eruption during its initial stage.

  15. Unusual locations of Earth`s bow shock on September 24-25, 1987: Mach number effects

    SciTech Connect

    Cairns, I.H.; Anderson, R.R.; Fairfield, D.H.; Carlton, V.E.H.; Paularena, K.I.; Lazarus, A.J.

    1995-01-01

    ISEE 1 and IMP 8 data are used to identify 19 crossings of Earth`s bow shock during a 30-hour period following 0000 UT on September 24, 1987. Apparent standoff distances for the shock are calculated for each crossing using two methods and the spacecraft location; one method assumes the average shock shape, while the other assumes a ram pressure-dependent shock shape. The shock`s apparent standoff distance normally {approximately}14 R{sub E}, is shown to increase from near 10 R{sub E} initially to near 19 R{sub E}. The Alfven M{sub A} and fast magnetosonic M{sub ms} Mach numbers remain above 2 and the number density above 4 cm{sup {minus}3} for almost the entire period. Ram pressure effects produce the initial near-Earth shock location, whereas expansions and contractions of the bow shock due to low Mach number effects account, qualitatively and semiquantitatively, for the timing and existence of almost all the remaining ISEE crossings and both IMP 8 crossings. Ram pressure-induced changes in the shock`s shape are discussed but found to be quantitatively unimportant for the shock crossings analyzed. Approximate estimates of both the deviation of the shock`s standoff distance from the standard model and of the shock`s shape are determined independently (but not consistently) for M{sub ms}{approximately}2.4. The estimates imply substantial changes in standoff distance and/or shock shape at low M{sub A} and M{sub ms}. Mach number effects can therefore be quantitatively important in determining and predicting the shape and location of the bow shock, even when M{sub A} and M{sub ms} remain above 2. This study confirms and generalizes previous studies of Mach number effects on Earth`s bow shock. Statistical studies and simulations of the bow shock`s shape and location should be performed as a function of Mach number, magnetic field orientation, and ram pressure. 25 refs., 12 figs.

  16. Best Mitigation Paths To Effectively Reduce Earth's Orbital Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegman, Bruce M.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some ways to reduce the problem posed by debris in orbit around the Earth. It reviews the orbital debris environment, the near-term needs to minimize the Kessler syndrome, also known as collisional cascading, a survey of active orbital debris mitigation strategies, the best paths to actively remove orbital debris, and technologies that are required for active debris mitigation.

  17. Tidal effects on Earth, Planets, Sun by far visiting moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargion, Daniele

    2016-07-01

    The Earth has been formed by a huge mini-planet collision forming our Earth surface and our Moon today. Such a central collision hit was statistically rare. A much probable skimming or nearby encounter by other moons or planets had to occur. Indeed Recent observations suggest that many planetary-mass objects may be present in the outer solar system between the Kuiper belt and the Oort cloud. Gravitational perturbations may occasionally bring them into the inner solar system. Their passage near Earth could have generated gigantic tidal waves, large volcanic eruptions, sea regressions, large meteoritic impacts and drastic changes in global climate. They could have caused the major biological mass extinctions in the past in the geological records. For instance a ten times a terrestrial radius nearby impact scattering by a peripherical encounter by a small moon-like object will force huge tidal waves (hundred meter height), able to lead to huge tsunami and Earth-quake. Moreover the historical cumulative planet hits in larger and wider planets as Juppiter, Saturn, Uranus will leave a trace, as observed, in their tilted spin axis. Finally a large fraction of counter rotating moons in our solar system probe and test such a visiting mini-planet captur origination. In addition the Earth day duration variability in the early past did show a rare discountinuity, very probably indebt to such a visiting planet crossing event. These far planets in rare trajectory to our Sun may, in thousands event capture, also explain sudden historical and recent temperature changes.

  18. Effect of Earth's rotation on thermal convection in the mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozoki, Tamas; Herein, Mátyás; Galsa, Attila

    2016-04-01

    Numerical model calculations have been carried out to study the effect of the centrifugal force on the thermal convection in the mantle. With the help of a simple dimensional analysis it can be shown that among the inertial forces generated by Earth's rotation, only the centrifugal force might have a detectable effect on the thermal convection in the mantle. A new non-dimensional parameter, RaCF was introduced to characterize the thermal buoyancy caused by the centrifugal force compared to the viscous force. Two-dimensional cylindrical shell geometry was applied with stationary value of angular velocity. The models started from the same non-rotated, quasi-stationary convection and 10 Gyr temporal evolution was observed. In the different models the magnitude of angular velocity varied from the recent value of Ω0 = 7.29E-5 1/s to the extreme value of 100 Ω0. The temporal and spatial variation of the surface heat flux (qs) and the root-mean-square velocity (vRMS) depending on the rotation velocity were investigated systematically in the model. Velocity was decomposed to tangential (vφ) and radial (vr) velocity to analyze the effect of the rotation on the flow system. The rotation arranges the convection to polar up- and equatorial downwellings, which structure is more peculiar at higher angular velocities and by the progress of time. Three main regimes can be identified based on the monitoring parameters (qs, vRMS). At low angular velocities (Ω = 0 - 4 Ω0) the convection pattern and the surface heat flux are slightly influenced by the centrifugal force. The most specific effect appears in the middle transitional regime (Ω = 4 - 15 Ω0) where the monotonic decrease of the heat flux separates from the unvarying average velocity. In this regime the constant vRMS is maintained by the enhanced tangential and reduced radial velocity component which is in accordance with the decrease in the number of plumes. vφ and vr shows an intensive decrease from the angular

  19. Analysis of earth albedo effect on sun sensor measurements based on theoretical model and mission experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasoveanu, Dan; Sedlak, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    Analysis of flight data from previous missions indicates that anomalous Sun sensor readings could be caused by Earth albedo interference. A previous Sun sensor study presented a detailed mathematical model of this effect. The model can be used to study the effect of both diffusive and specular reflections and to improve Sun angle determination based on perturbed Sun sensor measurements, satellite position, and an approximate knowledge of attitude. The model predicts that diffuse reflected light can cause errors of up to 10 degrees in Coarse Sun Sensor (CSS) measurements and 5 to 10 arc sec in Fine Sun Sensor (FSS) measurements, depending on spacecraft orbit and attitude. The accuracy of these sensors is affected as long as part of the illuminated Earth surface is present in the sensor field of view. Digital Sun Sensors (DSS) respond in a different manner to the Earth albedo interference. Most of the time DSS measurements are not affected, but for brief periods of time the Earth albedo can cause errors which are a multiple of the sensor least significant bit and may exceed one degree. This paper compares model predictions with Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) CSS measurements in order to validate and refine the model. Methods of reducing and mitigating the impact of Earth albedo are discussed. ne CSS sensor errors are roughly proportional to the Earth albedo coefficient. Photocells that are sensitive only to ultraviolet emissions would reduce the effective Earth albedo by up to a thousand times, virtually eliminating all errors caused by Earth albedo interference.

  20. Signal enhancement of J-HMQC experiments in solid-state NMR involving half-integer quadrupolar nuclei.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Trébosc, Julien; Li, Yixuan; Xu, Jun; Hu, Bingwen; Feng, Ningdong; Chen, Qun; Lafon, Oliver; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Deng, Feng

    2013-07-28

    We show that for half-integer quadrupolar nuclei, the manipulation of the satellite transitions can accelerate and enhance coherence transfer to other isotopes. This novel strategy is demonstrated to improve the sensitivity of (31)P-{(27)Al} J-HMQC experiments for a layered aluminophosphate Mu-4. PMID:23770976

  1. Quantum simulation of interaction blockade in a two-site Bose-Hubbard system with solid quadrupolar crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Xinfang; Li, Jun; Cui, Jiangyu; Luo, Zhihuang; Huang, Jiahao; Chen, Hongwei; Lee, Chaohong; Peng, Xinhua; Du, Jiangfeng

    2015-05-01

    The Bose-Hubbard model provides an excellent platform for exploring exotic quantum coherence. Interaction blockade is an important fundamental phenomenon in the two-site Bose-Hubbard system (BHS), which gives a full quantum description for the atomic Bose-Josephson junction. Using the analogy between the two-site BHS and the quadrupolar nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) crystal, we experimentally simulate a two-site Bose-Hubbard system in a NMR quantum simulator composed of the quadrupolar spin-3/2 sodium nuclei of a NaNO3 single crystal, and observe the interesting phenomenon of interaction blockade via adiabatic dynamics control. To our best knowledge, this is the first experimental implementation of the quantum simulation of the interaction blockade using quadrupolar nuclear system. Our work exhibits important applications of quadrupolar NMR in the quantum information science, i.e. a spin-3/2 system can be used as a full 2-qubit su(4) system, if the quadrupole moment is not fully averaged out by fast tumbling in the liquid phase.

  2. Geomagnetic Variations and Their Possible Effects on System Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glassmeier, K.

    2003-12-01

    The Earth magnetic field exhibits a variety of temporal variations with time scales ranging from a few seconds up to millions of years. The most pronounced variation is certainly a polarity transition during which the geomagnetic field strength decays down to about 10-20 % of its current value. A question of immediate interest is whether and in which way System Earth reacts on such a dramatic event. First the magnetosphere changes its size and shape. Due to the decreasing geomagnetic field the magnetopause is located much closer to the surface of the Earth. If the field exhibits strong quadrupole components magnetic reconnection can happen in the northern dayside magnetosphere with the southern hemisphere featuring a closed magnetosphere. Also the magnetotail structure changes drastically. Energetic particle entry occurs not only in dipolar cap regions but over much enlarged areas. As the ionospheric conductivity depends on the geomagnetic field strength first estimates furthermore indicate that externally driven geomagnetic variations are stronger during times of a polarity transition. The weaker field also makes the middle atmosphere much more sensitive to energetic particle events and large natural ozone holes are very likely during polarity transitions as first model calculations indicate.

  3. From bipolar to quadrupolar - The collimation processes of the Cepheus A outflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torrelles, Jose M.; Verdes-Montenegro, Lourdes; Ho, Paul T. P.; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Canto, Jorge

    1993-01-01

    Results of new K-band observations of the (1, 1) and (2, 2) ammonia lines toward Cepheus A are reported. The lines are mapped with approximately 2 arcsec of angular resolution and 0.3 km/s of velocity resolution. A sensitivity of 10 mJy has been achieved. The observations reveal details of the spatial and kinematics structure of the ambient high-density gas. It is suggested that the interstellar high-density gas is diverting and redirecting the outflow in the sense that the quadrupolar structure of the molecular outflow is produced by the interaction with the ammonia condensationss, with Cep A-1 and Cep A-3 splitting in two halves, respectively the blue- and redshifted lobes of an east-west bipolar molecular outflow.

  4. Bis-pyridinium quadrupolar derivatives. High Stokes shift selective probes for bio-imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salice, Patrizio; Versari, Silvia; Bradamante, Silvia; Meinardi, Francesco; Macchi, Giorgio; Pagani, Giorgio A.; Beverina, Luca

    2013-11-01

    We describe the design, synthesis and characterization of five high Stokes shift quadrupolar heteroaryl compounds suitable as fluorescent probes in bio-imaging. In particular, we characterize the photophysical properties and the intracellular localization in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVEC) and Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (HMSCs) for each dye. We show that, amongst all of the investigated derivatives, the 2,5-bis[1-(4-N-methylpyridinium)ethen-2-yl)]- N-methylpyrrole salt is the best candidates as selective mitochondrial tracker. Finally, we recorded the full emission spectrum of the most performing - exclusively mitochondrial selective - fluorescent probe directly from HUVEC stained cells. The emission spectrum collected from the stained mitochondria shows a remarkably more pronounced vibronic structure with respect to the emission of the free fluorophore in solution.

  5. Low temperature transport properties of the quadrupolar Kondo lattice system PrTi2Al20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Akito; Nakatsuji, Satoru

    2013-08-01

    We have investigated the low temperature transport properties of the cubic Γ3 compound PrTi2Al20. This is a quadrupolar Kondo lattice system where the nongmagnetic quadrupoles, which form a long-range order at low temperatures, have strong hybridization with the conduction electrons. A sharp drop of the resistivity due to a ferroquadrupole ordering is observed at T Q = 2.0 K. The T 2 dependence of the resistivity and the large Sommerfeld coefficient γ above T Q suggest the formation of a heavy-fermion state. The temperature dependence of the resistivity below T Q does not show a power law but exponential law behavior, indicating the emergence of an anisotropy gap Δ in the collective mode associated with the ferroquadrupole order below T Q. The Fisher-Langer relation holds around T Q, suggesting the higher order scattering processes than those in Born approximation are not dominant for this ferroquadrupole ordering.

  6. Single Event Effects Testing For Low Earth Orbit Missions with Neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddell, Brandon; O'Neill, Pat; Bailey, Chuck; Nguyen, Kyson

    2015-01-01

    Neutrons can effectively be used to screen electronic parts intended to be used in Low Earth Orbit. This paper compares neutron with proton environments in spacecraft and discusses recent comparison testing.

  7. Materials resistance to low earth orbit environmental effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pippin, H. G.; Torre, L. P.; Linton, R. G.; Whitaker, A. F.

    1989-01-01

    A number of flexible polymeric materials have been considered as condidates for protective coatings on Kapton film. These coatings have been tested under a variety of environments, each of which simulates one or more aspects of the low earth orbit space environment. Mass loss rates vs fluence and temperatue, optical properties, and surface characteristics under exposure to the various environments will be presented. Kinetics data on Kapton and other materials is interpreted in terms of bond strengths and relative thermodynamic stabilities of potential products. Activation energy for degradation of Kapton by oxygen atoms was determined to be 30 + or - 5 kJ/mol. Materials tested include silicones, fluorosilicones, fluorophosphazenes, fluorocarbons, and hydrocarbons.

  8. Nonequilibrium effects on shock-layer radiometry during earth entry.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, J. O.; Whiting, E. E.

    1973-01-01

    Radiative enhancement factors for the CN violet and N2(+) first negative band systems caused by nonequilibrium thermochemistry in the shock layer of a blunt-nosed vehicle during earth entry are reported. The results are based on radiometric measurements obtained with the aid of a combustion-driven shock tube. The technique of converting the shock-tube measurements into predictions of the enhancement factors for the blunt-body case is described, showing it to be useful for similar applications of other shock-tube measurements.

  9. Study of effects of space power satellites on life support functions of the earth's magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, M.; Laquey, R.; Deforest, S. E.; Lindsey, C.; Warshaw, H.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of the Satellite Solar Power System (SSPS) on the life support functions of the earth's magnetosphere were investigated. Topics considered include: (1) thruster effluent effects on the magnetosphere; (2) biological consequences of SSPS reflected light; (3) impact on earth bound astronomy; (4) catastrophic failure and debris; (5) satellite induced processes; and (6) microwave power transmission. Several impacts are identified and recommendations for further studies are provided.

  10. The effect of EarthPulse on learning of declarative knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinney, Heather E.

    The purpose of this double-blind, bio-medical research study was to investigate the effect of EarthPulse, a brainwave entrainment and pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) device, on learning of declarative knowledge. Currently, PEMF research explores physiological and psychological effects but a gap exists in the potential effects of PEMF on learning. The study explored whether a relationship existed between receiving a thirty minute EarthPulse treatment on the "Entrain Up" setting and learning of declarative knowledge; whether the relationship remained over time; whether EarthPulse had an effect on sleep; and whether EarthPulse had an effect on attrition. Ninety-eight, randomly assigned, undergraduate students participated in this double-blind, experimental design study, of which 87 remained after attrition. After receiving a thirty minute EarthPulse or placebo treatment, experimental and control groups read identical passages and completed identical instruments to test learning and retention of declarative knowledge. Participants completed the same test in two intervals: an immediate (learning) and delayed (retention) posttest. Assumptions for normality and reliability were met. One-way ANOVA revealed no statistically significant effects on learning or retention at the 0.05 level. However, Chi square analysis revealed those who received the EarthPulse treatment were significantly less likely to fall asleep than those who received the control treatment (p=0.022) and very closely approached significance for attrition (p=0.051).

  11. The Effect of Rare Earth on the Structure and Performance of Laser Clad Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Ruiliang; Yu, Huijun; Chen, Chuanzhong; Dong, Qing

    Laser cladding is one kind of advanced surface modification technology and has the abroad prospect in making the wear-resistant coating on metal substrates. However, the application of laser cladding technology does not achieve the people's expectation in the practical production because of many defects such as cracks, pores and so on. The addiction of rare earth can effectively reduce the number of cracks in the clad coating and enhance the coating wear-resistance. In the paper, the effects of rare earth on metallurgical quality, microstructure, phase structure and wear-resistance are analyzed in turns. The preliminary discussion is also carried out on the effect mechanism of rare earth. At last, the development tendency of rare earth in the laser cladding has been briefly elaborated.

  12. Chemical effects of large impacts on the earth's primitive atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegley, B., Jr.; Prinn, R. G.; Hartman, H.; Watkins, G. H.

    1986-01-01

    The production of HCN and H2CO by large impacts on the earth's primitive atmosphere is modelled using thermochemical equilibrium and chemical kinetic calculations of the composition of shocked air parcels for a wide range of temperatures, pressures, and initial compositions. For atmospheres with C/O of one or more, the results suggest that bolide impacts cause HCN volume mixing ratios of approximately 10 to the -3rd to -5th in the impact region and global average ratios of 10 to the -5th to the -12th. The corresponding H2CO mixing ratios in the impact region are 10 to the -7th to -9th; nonglobal mixing can occur, however, as H2CO is rapidly destroyed or rained out of the atmosphere within days to hours. Rainout to the oceans of 3-15 percent of the HCN produced can provide 3-14 x 10 to the 11th mol HCN per year.

  13. Large Magnetoresistance Effects in Novel Layered Rare Earth Halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremer, R. K.; Ryazanov, M.; Simon, A.

    We give a survey of the structures, electric, magnetic and magnetoresistance properties of the two novel low dimensional rare-earth halide systems, GdI2 and GdIHy (2/3 < y ≤ 1). The large magnetoresistance e.ect observed for GdI2 can be understood on the basis of a conventional spin disorder scattering mechanism, however, strongly magni.ed by the structural anisotropy and the special topology of the Fermi surface. Bound magnetic polarons are formed in GdIHy leading to a metal insulator transition below ~ 30 K. The mobility of the magnetic polarons can be e.ectively modi.ed by external magnetic .fields resulting in the large experimentally found magnetoresistance.

  14. Solar eruptions - the effects on the Earth's environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brekke, P.

    The response of our space environment to the constantly changing Sun is known as "Space Weather". The Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) has obtained significant new information about coronal mass ejections (CMEs), the source of the most severe disturbances in the Earth's environment. Most of the time space weather is of little concern in our everyday lives. However, when the space environment is disturbed by the variable outputs of the Sun, technologies that we depend on both in orbit and on the ground can be affected. The increasing deployment of radiation-, current-, and field-sensitive technological systems over the last few decades and the increasing presence of complex systems in space combine to make society more vulnerable to solar-terrestrial disturbances. Thus, our society is much more sensitive to space weather activity today compared to the last solar maximum. By observing the Sun 24 hours per day, SOHO has proved to be an important "space weather watchdog". The importance of real-time monitoring of the Sun will be pointed out and a number of enterprises affected by space weather will be discussed.

  15. Solar Eruptions-the effects on the Earth's environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brekke, P.

    The response of our space environment to the constantly changing Sun is known as "Space Weather". The Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) has obtained significant new information about coronal mass ejections (CME's), the source to the most severe disturbances in the Earth's environment. Most of the time space weather is of little concern in our everyday lives. However, when the space environment is disturbed by the variable outputs of the Sun, technologies that we depend on both in orbit and on the ground can be affected. The increasing deployment of radiation-, current-, and field-sensitive technological systems over the last few decades and the increasing presence of complex systems in space combine to make society more vulnerable to solar-terrestrial disturbances. Thus, our society is much more sensitive to space weather activity today compared to the last solar maximum. By observing the Sun 24 hours per day SOHO has proved to be an important ``space weather watchdog''. The importance of real-time monitoring of the Sun will be pointed out and a number of enterprises affected by space weather will be discussed.

  16. The effect of clouds on the earth's radiation budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziskin, Daniel; Strobel, Darrell F.

    1991-01-01

    The radiative fluxes from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) and the cloud properties from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) over Indonesia for the months of June and July of 1985 and 1986 were analyzed to determine the cloud sensitivity coefficients. The method involved a linear least squares regression between co-incident flux and cloud coverage measurements. The calculated slope is identified as the cloud sensitivity. It was found that the correlations between the total cloud fraction and radiation parameters were modest. However, correlations between cloud fraction and IR flux were improved by separating clouds by height. Likewise, correlations between the visible flux and cloud fractions were improved by distinguishing clouds based on optical depth. Calculating correlations between the net fluxes and either height or optical depth segregated cloud fractions were somewhat improved. When clouds were classified in terms of their height and optical depth, correlations among all the radiation components were improved. Mean cloud sensitivities based on the regression of radiative fluxes against height and optical depth separated cloud types are presented. Results are compared to a one-dimensional radiation model with a simple cloud parameterization scheme.

  17. Effect of rare earth substitution in cobalt ferrite bulk materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulai, G.; Diamandescu, L.; Dumitru, I.; Gurlui, S.; Feder, M.; Caltun, O. F.

    2015-09-01

    The study was focused on the influence of small amounts of rare earth (RE=La, Ce, Sm, Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb) addition on the microstructure, phase content and magnetic properties of cobalt ferrite bulk materials. The X-Ray diffraction measurements confirmed the formation of the spinel structure but also the presence of secondary phases of RE oxides or orthoferrite in small percentages (up to 3%). Density measurements obtained by Archimedes method revealed a ~1 g cm-3 decrease for the RE doped cobalt ferrite samples compared with stoichiometric one. Both the Mössbauer and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrocopy analysis results confirmed the formation of the spinel phase. The saturation magnetization and coercive field values of the doped samples obtained by Vibrating Sample Magnetometry were close to those of the pure cobalt ferrite. For magnetostrictive property studies the samples were analyzed using the strain gauge method. Higher maximum magnetostriction coefficients were found for the Ho, Ce, Sm and Yb doped cobalt ferrite bulk materials as related to the stoichiometric CoFe2O4 sample. Moreover, improved strain derivative was observed for these samples but at higher magnetic fields due to the low increase of the coercive field values for doped samples.

  18. NMR of group 2 element quadrupolar nuclei and some applications in materials science and biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaohua

    1999-11-01

    For many years, NMR has provided an easy access for chemists to perform structural and kinetic studies on a whole variety of systems. To a great extent, these investigations have been restricted to non-quadrupolar nuclei. The study of quadrupolar nuclei (I > 1/2) offers the potential to gain insight into important problems in material science and biology. In addition to the large quadrupole moment associated with the spin active nuclei of interest, several of the most interesting species also possess an extremely low natural abundance. My recent research focuses on 87Sr NMR, which has been cited by earlier workers as being limited to only ionic species. Several strontium-containing compounds have been synthesized and characterized by single crystal x-ray diffraction. 87Sr NMR signals were determined for these compounds in a series of aprotic polar solvents. The chemical shift variation was found to be consistent with linen free energy relationship, which can be very useful in helping to elucidate mechanism, in predicting reaction rates, and the extent of reaction at equilibrium, and in discovering under what conditions a change in mechanism occurs. Control over symmetry of the compound was found to be the key to obtain the good NMR signals. One application of the new technique that has been developed was in the area of material science. An observation relative to sol-gel derived ionic conductors (La0.8Sr0.2Co0.8Fe0.2O 3.2) was that films often formed cracks upon pyrolysis. By careful examination of the sol-gel process by 87Sr NMR, a model for the structure of the sol was developed. Through the relaxation rate study of the strontium sites, the polymerization mechanism was determined to be predominantly bimolecular within the concentration region studied. The kinetic study of the fast cation exchange between two strontium sites indicated that the inhomogeneity of the polymeric network lads to the film cracking during pyrolysis. As a consequence of understanding the

  19. Discover Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, Colleen

    1998-01-01

    Discover Earth is a NASA-sponsored project for teachers of grades 5-12, designed to: (1) enhance understanding of the Earth as an integrated system; (2) enhance the interdisciplinary approach to science instruction; and (3) provide classroom materials that focus on those goals. Discover Earth is conducted by the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies in collaboration with Dr. Eric Barron, Director, Earth System Science Center, The Pennsylvania State University; and Dr. Robert Hudson, Chair, the Department of Meteorology, University of Maryland at College Park. The enclosed materials: (1) represent only part of the Discover Earth materials; (2) were developed by classroom teachers who are participating in the Discover Earth project; (3) utilize an investigative approach and on-line data; and (4) can be effectively adjusted to classrooms with greater/without technology access. The Discover Earth classroom materials focus on the Earth system and key issues of global climate change including topics such as the greenhouse effect, clouds and Earth's radiation balance, surface hydrology and land cover, and volcanoes and climate change. All the materials developed to date are available on line at (http://www.strategies.org) You are encouraged to submit comments and recommendations about these materials to the Discover Earth project manager, contact information is listed below. You are welcome to duplicate all these materials.

  20. Using the Earth as an Effective Model for Integrating Space Science Into Education Outreach Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, P. A.; Allen, J.; Galindo, C.; McKay, G.; Obot, V.; Reiff, P.

    2005-05-01

    Our methods of teaching Earth and space science as two disciplines do not represent the spirit of earlier scientists such as Aristotle, da Vinci, and Galileo. We need to re-evaluate these methods and take advantage of the excitement created in the general public over the recent space science exploration programs. The information that we are obtaining from both the Mars missions and Cassini-Huygens focuses on interpreting geomorphology, mineral compositions and gas identification based on Earth as a baseline for data evaluation. This type of evaluation is an extension of Hutton's 18th century principle of Uniformitarianism, the present is the key to the past, or Earth is the key for understanding extraterrestrial bodies. Geomorphological examples are volcanic activity, meteoritic impacts, and evidence of water altering surface features. The Hawaiian, or shield, type volcanoes are analogues for Olympus Mons and the other volcanoes on Mars. Other examples include comparing sand dunes on Earth with possible Martian dunes, known stream patterns on Earth with potential stream patterns on Mars, and even comparing meteoritic impact features on Mars, the Earth, Moon and Mercury. All of these comparisons have been developed into inquiry-based activities and are available through NASA publications. Each of these activities is easily adapted to emphasize either Earth science or space science or both. Beyond geomorphology, solar storms are an excellent topic for integrating Earth and space science. Solar storms are traditionally part of space science studies, but most students do not understand their effect on Earth or the intense effects they could have on humans, whether traveling through space or exploring the surfaces of the Moon or Mars. Effects are not only limited to space travel and other planetary surfaces but also include Earth's magnetosphere, which in turn, affect radio transmission and potentially climate. Like geomorphology courses, there are extensive NASA

  1. Effects of selective fusion on the thermal history of the earth's mantle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, W.H.K.

    1968-01-01

    A comparative study on the thermal history of the earth's mantle was made by numerical solutions of the heat equation including and excluding selective fusion of silicates. Selective fusion was approximated by melting in a multicomponent system and redistribution of radioactive elements. Effects of selective fusion on the thermal models are (1) lowering (by several hundred degrees centigrade) and stabilizing the internal temperature distribution, and (2) increasing the surface heat-flow. It was found that models with selective fusion gave results more compatible with observations of both present temperature and surface heat-flow. The results therefore suggest continuous differentiation of the earth's mantle throughout geologic time, and support the hypothesis that the earth's atmosphere, oceans, and crust have been accumulated throughout the earth's history by degassing and selective fusion of the mantle. ?? 1968.

  2. Effect of limb darkening on earth radiation incident on a spherical satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katzoff, S.; Smith, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    The thermal radiation from the earth incident on a spherical satellite depends on the angular distribution of earth-emitted radiation. An analysis is presented of this dependency, and calculated results are given, based on a published limb-darkening curve for the earth. The curve was determined from Tiros data, and is a statistical average over the entire globe between 75 deg latitude. The computed effect of limb darkening was 1.8 percent at 900 km altitude, 2.5 percent at 500 km altitude, and 3.0 percent at 300 km altitude. Below 300 km, it increased rapidly with decreasing altitude. Discussion is included of various other problems inherent in the use of orbiting spheres and stabilized flat plates to measure the heat radiated from the earth.

  3. 2H 2O quadrupolar splitting used to measure water exchange in erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchel, Philip W.; Naumann, Christoph

    2008-05-01

    The 2H NMR resonance from HDO (D = 2H) in human red blood cells (RBCs) suspended in gelatin that was held stretched in a special apparatus was distinct from the two signals that were symmetrically arranged on either side of it, which were assigned to extracellular HDO. The large extracellular splitting is due to the interaction of the electric quadrupole moment of the 2H nuclei with the electric field gradient tensor of the stretched, partially aligned gelatin. Lack of resolved splitting of the intracellular resonance indicated greatly diminished or absent ordering of the HDO inside RBCs. The separate resonances enabled the application of a saturation transfer method to estimate the rate constants of transmembrane exchange of water in RBCs. However both the theory and the practical applications needed modifications because even in the absence of RBCs the HDO resonances were maximally suppressed when the saturating radio-frequency radiation was applied exactly at the central frequency between the two resonances of the quadrupolar HDO doublet. More statistically robust estimates of the exchange rate constants were obtained by applying two-dimensional exchange spectroscopy (2D EXSY), with back-transformation analysis. A monotonic dependence of the estimates of the efflux rate constants on the mixing time, tmix, used in the 2D EXSY experiment were seen. Extrapolation to tmix = 0, gave an estimate of the efflux rate constant at 15 °C of 31.5 ± 2.2 s -1 while at 25 °C it was ˜50 s -1. These values are close to, but less than, those estimated by an NMR relaxation-enhancement method that uses Mn 2+ doping of the extracellular medium. The basis for this difference is thought to include the high viscosity of the extracellular gel. At the abstract level of quantum mechanics we have used the quadrupolar Hamiltonian to provide chemical shift separation between signals from spin populations across cell membranes; this is the first time, to our knowledge, that this has been

  4. In vivo observation of quadrupolar splitting in (39)K magnetic resonance spectroscopy of human muscle tissue.

    PubMed

    Rösler, M B; Nagel, A M; Umathum, R; Bachert, P; Benkhedah, N

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this work was to explore the origin of oscillations of the T(*)2 decay curve of (39)K observed in studies of (39)K magnetic resonance imaging of the human thigh. In addition to their magnetic dipole moment, spin-3/2 nuclei possess an electric quadrupole moment. Its interaction with non-vanishing electrical field gradients leads to oscillations in the free induction decay and to splitting of the resonance. All measurements were performed on a 7T whole-body MRI scanner (MAGNETOM 7T, Siemens AG, Erlangen, Germany) with customer-built coils. According to the theory of quadrupolar splitting, a model with three Lorentzian-shaped peaks is appropriate for (39)K NMR spectra of the thigh and calf. The frequency shifts of the satellites depend on the angle between the calf and the static magnetic field. When the leg is oriented parallel to the static magnetic field, the satellites are shifted by about 200 Hz. In the thigh, rank-2 double quantum coherences arising from anisotropic quadrupolar interaction are observed by double-quantum filtration with magic-angle excitation. In addition to the spectra, an image of the thigh with a nominal resolution of (16 × 16 × 32) mm(3) was acquired with this filtering technique in 1:17 h. From the line width of the resonances, (39)K transverse relaxation time constants T(*)2, fast  = (0.51 ± 0.01) ms and T(*)2, slow  = (6.21 ± 0.05) ms for the head were determined. In the thigh, the left and right satellite, both corresponding to the short component of the transverse relaxation time constant, take the following values: T(*)2, fast  = (1.56 ± 0.03) ms and T(*)2, fast  = (1.42 ± 0.03) ms. The centre line, which corresponds to the slow component, is T(*)2, slow  = (9.67 ± 0.04) ms. The acquisition time of the spectra was approximately 10 min. Our results agree well with a non-vanishing electrical field gradient interacting with (39)K nuclei in the intracellular space of

  5. Perceived Barriers and Strategies to Effective Online Earth and Space Science Instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pottinger, James E.

    With the continual growth and demand of online courses, higher education institutions are attempting to meet the needs of today's learners by modifying and developing new student centered services and programs. As a result, faculty members are being forced into teaching online, including Earth and Space science faculty. Online Earth and Space science courses are different than typical online courses in that they need to incorporate an inquiry-based component to ensure students fully understand the course concepts and science principles in the Earth and Space sciences. Studies have addressed the barriers in other inquiry-based online science courses, including biology, physics, and chemistry. This holistic, multiple-case qualitative study investigated perceived barriers and strategies to effective online Earth and Space science instruction through in-depth interviews with six experienced post-secondary online science instructors. Data from this study was analyzed using a thematic analysis approach and revealed four common themes when teaching online Earth and Space science. A positive perception and philosophy of online teaching is essential, the instructor-student interaction is dynamic, course structure and design modification will occur, and online lab activities must make science operational and relevant. The findings in this study demonstrated that online Earth and Space science instructors need institutional support in the form of a strong faculty development program and support staff in order to be as effective as possible. From this study, instructors realize that the instructor-student relationship and course structure is paramount, especially when teaching online science with labs. A final understanding from this study was that online Earth and Space science lab activities must incorporate the use and application of scientific skills and knowledge. Recommendations for future research include (a) qualitative research conducted in specific areas within the

  6. Relativity mission with two counter-orbiting polar satellites. [nodal dragging effect on earth orbiting satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Patten, R. A.; Everitt, C. W. F.

    1975-01-01

    In 1918, J. Lense and H. Thirring calculated that a moon in orbit around a massive rotating planet would experience a nodal dragging effect due to general relativity. We describe an experiment to measure this effect with two counter-orbiting drag-free satellites in polar earth orbit. For a 2 1/2 year experiment, the measurement accuracy should approach 1%. In addition to precision tracking data from existing ground stations, satellite-to-satellite Doppler ranging data are taken at points of passing near the poles. New geophysical information on both earth harmonics and tidal effects is inherent in the polar ranging data.

  7. Effect of the shrinking dipole on solar-terrestrial energy input to the Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPherron, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    The global average temperature of the Earth is rising rapidly. This rise is primarily attributed to the release of greenhouse gases as a result of human activity. However, it has been argued that changes in radiation from the Sun might play a role. Most energy input to the Earth is light in the visible spectrum. Our best measurements suggest this power input has been constant for the last 40 years (the space age) apart from a small 11-year variation due to the solar cycle of sunspot activity. Another possible energy input from the Sun is the solar wind. The supersonic solar wind carries the magnetic field of the Sun into the solar system. As it passes the Earth it can connect to the Earth's magnetic field whenever it is antiparallel t the Earth's field. This connection allows mass, momentum, and energy from the solar wind to enter the magnetosphere producing geomagnetic activity. Ultimately much of this energy is deposited at high latitudes in the form of particle precipitation (aurora) and heating by electrical currents. Although the energy input by this process is miniscule compared to that from visible radiation it might alter the absorption of visible radiation. Two other processes affected by the solar cycle are atmospheric entry of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar energetic protons (SEP). A weak solar magnetic field at sunspot minimum facilitates GCR entry which has been implicated in creation of clouds. Large coronal mass ejections and solar flares create SEP at solar maximum. All of these alternative energy inputs and their effects depend on the strength of the Earth's magnetic field. Currently the Earth's field is decreasing rapidly and conceivably might reverse polarity in 1000 years. In this paper we describe the changes in the Earth's magnetic field and how this might affect GCR, SEP, electrical heating, aurora, and radio propagation. Whether these effects are important in global climate change can only be determined by detailed physical models.

  8. Quadrupolar and polar anisotropy in end-grafted α-helical poly(γ-benzyl-L-glutamate) on solid substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ying Chih; Frank, Curtis W.; Forstmann, Gerd G.; Johannsmann, Diethelm

    1999-10-01

    Using grazing incidence reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (GIR-FTIR) and electro-optic (EO) measurements, we have determined the degree of quadrupolar and polar anisotropy in end-grafted α-helical poly(γ-benzyl-L-glutamate) (PBLG) chains. The results are compared to data obtained on spin-cast and on Langmuir-Blodgett-Kuhn (LBK) films. End-grafted films were prepared by a vapor-deposition-polymerization (VDP) scheme and have thicknesses of up to 70 nm. The quadrupolar order of VDP films, as estimated by the nematic order parameter S, is higher than in spin-cast and LBK films. This result indicates a preferentially perpendicular alignment of PBLG chains in VDP films. Furthermore, after the removal of the physisorbed chains from the grafted films by intensive washing with solvent, the quadrupolar order is lowered while the polar order increases significantly, suggesting that the physisorbed chains might form anti-parallel pairs with the surface-grafted chains.

  9. The effect of SST emissions on the earth's ozone layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitten, R. C.; Turco, R. P.

    1974-01-01

    The work presented here is directed toward assessment of environmental effects of the supersonic transport (SST). The model used for the purpose includes vertical eddy transport and the photochemistry of the O-H-N system. It is found that the flight altitude has a pronounced effect on ozone depletion. The largest ozone reduction occurs for NO deposition above an altitude of 20 km.

  10. Effect of earth's precession on geosynchronous satellites under lunisolar perturbations and tesseral resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyanin, S.; Gurfil, P.

    2008-06-01

    In this study, we investigate the effect of Earth's precession on the orbital dynamics of geostationary satellites. Our astrodynamical model includes second-order zonal and tesseral harmonics, and lunisolar gravitation. We show that the equinoctial precession induces secular inclination growth and thus bares a non-negligible effect on north-south stationkeeping for long mission lifetimes.

  11. Effect of earth's precession on geosynchronous satellites under lunisolar perturbations and tesseral resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyanin, S.; Gurfil, P.

    2008-02-01

    In this study, we investigate the effect of Earth's precession on the orbital dynamics of geostationary satellites. Our astrodynamical model includes second-order zonal and tesseral harmonics, and lunisolar gravitation. We show that the equinoctial precession induces secular inclination growth and thus bares a non-negligible effect on north-south stationkeeping for long mission lifetimes.

  12. Beneficial Effect of Microalloyed Rare Earth on S Segregation in High-Purity Duplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lei; Ma, Xiaocong; Jin, Miao; Wang, Jianfeng; Long, Hongjun; Mao, Tianqiao

    2016-01-01

    S segregation at the α/ γ interface remains in duplex stainless steel with only 10 ppm S. The interfacial brittle tearing appears during hot deformation due to S segregation. Minor rare earth additions can effectively eliminate the S contamination. In particular, RE enrichment at the α/ γ interface indicating its microalloying effect is an important cause.

  13. Climatic effects due to halogenated compounds in the earth's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, W.-C.; Pinto, J. P.; Yung, Y. L.

    1980-01-01

    Using a one-dimensional radiative-convective model, a sensitivity study is performed of the effect of ozone depletion in the stratosphere on the surface temperature. There could be a cooling of the surface temperature by approximately 0.2 K due to chlorofluoromethane-induced ozone depletion at steady state (assuming 1973 release rates). This cooling reduces significantly the greenhouse effect due to the presence of chlorofluoromethanes. Carbon tetrafluoride has a strong nu sub 3 band at 7.8 microns, and the atmospheric greenhouse effect is shown to be 0.07 and 0.12 K/ppbv with and without taking into account overlap with CH4 and N2O bands. At concentrations higher than 1 ppbv, absorption by the nu sub 3 band starts to saturate and the greenhouse effect becomes less efficient.

  14. Modeling for IFOG Vibration Error Based on the Strain Distribution of Quadrupolar Fiber Coil

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhongxing; Zhang, Yonggang; Zhang, Yunhao

    2016-01-01

    Improving the performance of interferometric fiber optic gyroscope (IFOG) in harsh environment, especially in vibrational environment, is necessary for its practical applications. This paper presents a mathematical model for IFOG to theoretically compute the short-term rate errors caused by mechanical vibration. The computational procedures are mainly based on the strain distribution of quadrupolar fiber coil measured by stress analyzer. The definition of asymmetry of strain distribution (ASD) is given in the paper to evaluate the winding quality of the coil. The established model reveals that the high ASD and the variable fiber elastic modulus in large strain situation are two dominant reasons that give rise to nonreciprocity phase shift in IFOG under vibration. Furthermore, theoretical analysis and computational results indicate that vibration errors of both open-loop and closed-loop IFOG increase with the raise of vibrational amplitude, vibrational frequency and ASD. Finally, an estimation of vibration-induced IFOG errors in aircraft is done according to the proposed model. Our work is meaningful in designing IFOG coils to achieve a better anti-vibration performance. PMID:27455257

  15. Modeling for IFOG Vibration Error Based on the Strain Distribution of Quadrupolar Fiber Coil.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhongxing; Zhang, Yonggang; Zhang, Yunhao

    2016-01-01

    Improving the performance of interferometric fiber optic gyroscope (IFOG) in harsh environment, especially in vibrational environment, is necessary for its practical applications. This paper presents a mathematical model for IFOG to theoretically compute the short-term rate errors caused by mechanical vibration. The computational procedures are mainly based on the strain distribution of quadrupolar fiber coil measured by stress analyzer. The definition of asymmetry of strain distribution (ASD) is given in the paper to evaluate the winding quality of the coil. The established model reveals that the high ASD and the variable fiber elastic modulus in large strain situation are two dominant reasons that give rise to nonreciprocity phase shift in IFOG under vibration. Furthermore, theoretical analysis and computational results indicate that vibration errors of both open-loop and closed-loop IFOG increase with the raise of vibrational amplitude, vibrational frequency and ASD. Finally, an estimation of vibration-induced IFOG errors in aircraft is done according to the proposed model. Our work is meaningful in designing IFOG coils to achieve a better anti-vibration performance. PMID:27455257

  16. Earth's stopping effect in directional dark matter detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouvaris, Chris

    2016-02-01

    We explore the stopping effect that results from interactions between dark matter and nuclei as the dark matter particles travel underground towards the detector. Although this effect is negligible for heavy dark matter particles, there is parameter phase space where the underground interactions of the dark matter particles with the nuclei can create observable differences in the spectrum. Dark matter particles that arrive on the detector from below can have less energy from the ones arriving from above. These differences can be potentially detectable by upcoming directional detectors. This can unveil a large amount of information regarding the type and strength of interactions between nuclei and light dark matter candidates.

  17. Thulium anomalies and rare earth element patterns in meteorites and Earth: Nebular fractionation and the nugget effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauphas, Nicolas; Pourmand, Ali

    2015-08-01

    This study reports the bulk rare earth element (REEs, La-Lu) compositions of 41 chondrites, including 32 falls and 9 finds from carbonaceous (CI, CM, CO and CV), enstatite (EH and EL) and ordinary (H, L and LL) groups, as well as 2 enstatite achondrites (aubrite). The measurements were done in dynamic mode using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometers (MC-ICPMS), allowing precise quantification of mono-isotopic REEs (Pr, Tb, Ho and Tm). The CI-chondrite-normalized REE patterns (LaN/LuN; a proxy for fractionation of light vs. heavy REEs) and Eu anomalies in ordinary and enstatite chondrites show more scatter in more metamorphosed (petrologic types 4-6) than in unequilibrated (types 1-3) chondrites. This is due to parent-body redistribution of the REEs in various carrier phases during metamorphism. A model is presented that predicts the dispersion of elemental and isotopic ratios due to the nugget effect when the analyzed sample mass is limited and elements are concentrated in minor grains. The dispersion in REE patterns of equilibrated ordinary chondrites is reproduced well by this model, considering that REEs are concentrated in 200 μm-size phosphates, which have high LaN/LuN ratios and negative Eu anomalies. Terrestrial rocks and samples from ordinary and enstatite chondrites display negative Tm anomalies of ∼-4.5% relative to CI chondrites. In contrast, CM, CO and CV (except Allende) show no significant Tm anomalies. Allende CV chondrite shows large excess Tm (∼+10%). These anomalies are similar to those found in group II refractory inclusions in meteorites but of much smaller magnitude. The presence of Tm anomalies in meteorites and terrestrial rocks suggests that either (i) the material in the inner part of the solar system was formed from a gas reservoir that had been depleted in refractory dust and carried positive Tm anomalies or (ii) CI chondrites are enriched in refractory dust and are not representative of solar composition for

  18. Biogeophysical Effects and the Production of Entropy by the Earth System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleidon, A.

    2002-12-01

    The Earth is an open thermodynamic system. Incoming solar radiation of low entropy is subsequently converted by diabatic processes into a flux of terrestrial radiation associated with relatively higher entropy. It has been suggested that physical processes within the climate system, such as polar heat transport or vertical exchange processes in the atmosphere, act to maximize entropy production. Here I apply these thermodynamic considerations to the overall climatic effect of terrestrial vegetation. Terrestrial vegetation directly affects land surface functioning, such as the absorption of solar radiation and the rate of evapotranspiration. With climate model simulations of extreme vegetation settings, a "green planet" and a "desert world", I investigate how terrestrial vegetation affects the entropy production budget of the Earth and whether the overall biogeophysical effect can be described as such an entropy-maximizing process. The results are discussed in the context of the Gaia hypothesis, which states that the Earth system is regulated by and for the biosphere.

  19. Effects of atmospheric breakup on crater field formation. [on earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Passey, Q. R.; Melosh, H. J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper investigates the physics of meteoroid breakup in the atmosphere and its implications for the observed features of strewn fields. There are several effects which cause dispersion of the meteoroid fragments: gravity, differential lift of the fragments, bow shock interaction just after breakup, centripetal separation by a rotating meteroid, and possibly a dynamical transverse separation resulting from the crushing deceleration in the atmosphere. Of these, it is shown that gravity alone can produce the common pattern in which the largest crater occurs at the downrange end of the scatter ellipse. The average lift-to-drag ratio of the tumbling fragments must be less than about 0.001, otherwise small fragments would produce small craters downrange of the main crater, and this is not generally observed. The cross-range dispersion is probably due to the combined effects of bow shock interaction, crushing deceleration, and possibly spinning of the meteoroid. A number of terrestrial strewn fields are discussed in the light of these ideas, which are formulated quantitatively for a range of meteoroid velocities, entry angles, and crushing strengths. It is found that when the crater size exceeds about 1 km, the separation between the fragments upon landing is a fraction of their own diameter, so that the crater formed by such a fragmented meteoroid is almost indistinguishable from that formed by a solid body of the same total mass and velocity.

  20. Imaging the earth's magnetosphere - Effects of plasma flow and temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrido, D. E.; Smith, R. W.; Swift, D. S.; Akasofu, S.-I.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of Doppler shifting on the line centers of the magnetospheric O(+) cross section are investigated, and the resulting structure of the scattering rate as a function of bulk density is explained. Whereas the Doppler shifting frequently results in a decrease of the scattering rate, it is demonstrated that for certain drift speeds the overlap of the cross section and the solar intensity profile can lead to an increased rate, thus enhancing the relative brightness of the image above that obtained when v(p) is zero. Simulated images of the magnetosphere are obtained which are used to show quantitively how the magnetospheric image responds to variations in plasma drift speed and temperature. Changes in the brightness of the magnetospheric images also depend on the variability of the solar flux at 83.4 nm. In regions where there are plasma drifts, the brightness in the image is governed by the structure of the scattering rate, assuming a fixed temperature.

  1. Low Earth Orbit Environmental Effects on Space Tether Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finckernor, Miria M.; Gitlemeier, Keith A.; Hawk, Clark W.; Watts, Ed

    2005-01-01

    Atomic oxygen (AO) and ultraviolet (UV) radiation erode and embrittle most polymeric materials. This research was designed to test several different materials and coatings under consideration for their application to space tethers, for resistance to these effects. The samples were vacuum dehydrated, weighed and then exposed to various levels of AO or UV radiation at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. They were then re-weighed to determine mass loss due to atomic oxygen erosion, inspected for damage and tensile tested to determine strength loss. The experiments determined that the Photosil coating process, while affording some protection, damaged the tether materials worse than the AO exposure. TOR-LM also failed to fully protect the materials, especially from UV radiation. The POSS and nickel coatings did provide some protection to the tethers, which survived the entire test regime. M5 was tested, uncoated, and survived AO exposure, though its brittleness prevented any tensile testing.

  2. Effects of dynamic long-period ocean tides on changes in Earth's rotation rate

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Y.S.; Dickman, S.R. )

    1990-05-10

    As a generalization of the zonal response coefficient first introduced by Agnew and Farrell (1978), the authors define the zonal response function k of the solid earth-ocean system as the ratio, in the frequency domain, of the tidal change in Earth's rotation rate to the tide-generating potential. Amplitudes and phases of k for the monthly, fortnightly, and 9-day lunar tides are estimated from 2 1/2 years of very long baseline interferometry UTI observations (both 5-day and daily time series), corrected for atmospheric angular momentum effects using NMC wind and pressure series. Using the dynamic ocean tide model of Dickman (1988a, 1989a), the authors predict amplitudes and phases of k for an elastic earth-ocean system. The predictions confirm earlier results which found that dynamic effects of the longer-period ocean tides reduce the amplitude of k by about 1%. However, agreement with the observed k is best achieved for all three tides if the predicted tide amplitudes are combined with the much larger satellite-observed ocean tide phases; in these cases the dynamic tidal effects reduce k by up to 8%. Finally, comparison between the observed and predicted amplitudes of k implies that anelastic effects on Earth's rotation at periods less than fortnightly cannot exceed 2%.

  3. Relativistic effects of the rotation of the earth on remote clock synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, V.

    1974-01-01

    A treatment is given of relativistic clock synchronization effects due to the rotation of the earth. Unlike other approaches, the point of view of an earth fixed coordinate system is used which offers insight to many problems. An attempt is made to give the reader an intuitive grasp of the subject as well as to provide formulae for his use. Specific applications to global timekeeping, navigation, VLBI, relativistic clock experiments, and satellite clock synchronization are discussed. The question of whether atomic clocks are ideal clocks is also treated.

  4. Removal of earth's magnetic field effect on magnetoelastic resonance sensors by an antisymmetric bias field

    PubMed Central

    Bergmair, Bernhard; Huber, Thomas; Bruckner, Florian; Vogler, Christoph; Suess, Dieter

    2012-01-01

    Magnetoelastic sensors are used in a wide field of wireless sensing applications. The sensing element is a low-cost magnetostrictive ribbon whose resonant frequency depends on the measured quantity. The accuracy of magnetoelastic sensors is limited by the fact that the resonant frequency is also affected by the earth's magnetic field. In this paper we present a technique to minimize this effect by applying an antisymmetric magnetic bias field to the ribbon. The ribbon's response to external perturbation fields was measured and compared to a conventional sensor design. Our results show that the influence of the earth's magnetic field could be reduced by 77%. PMID:23565035

  5. The Effect of Rare Earth Dopants on UO2 Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Brady D.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Scheele, Randall D.; Sell, Rachel L.

    2003-06-01

    Recent work by Hanson [1] has demonstrated a clear dependence of the oxidation of Light Water Reactor spent fuel on burnup. Oxidation of spent fuel was shown to proceed via the two-step reaction UO2?UO2.4?UO2.67+x, where the U3O8-like phase does not form until conversion to UO2.4 is complete. The temperature-dependent activation energy (Ea) of the transition from UO2.4 to the hyperstoichiometric U3O8 was found to be {approx}150 kJ mol-1. Each MWD/kg M burnup added {approx}1.0 kJ mol-1. The work of McEachern et.al. [2], Choi et. al. [3], and You et. al. [4] have all verified this oxidation dependence on SIMFUEL or unirradiated doped-UO2. All present work agrees that the soluble actinides or fission products that substitute in the U matrix act to delay the onset of U3O8. However, no single model exists to explain the observed behavior, including the fact that most dopants actually allow an earlier onset for UO2.4 formation. The present work is part of a Nuclear Energy Research Initiative project attempting to develop a UO2-based matrix capable of achieving extended burnups by including soluble dopants. The resulting fuel should be highly oxidation and dissolution resistant, which will be beneficial during accident scenarios or for disposal in a geologic repository. In addition, the stabilized matrix may help delay the onset of fuel restructuring that occurs at higher burnups. Initial results of the oxidation tests to quantify effects as a function of ionic radii and charge of the dopant are presented.

  6. Assessing the Effectiveness and Side-Effects of Ocean Alkalinity Enhancement in an Earth System Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, S. E.; Ridgwell, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    At present, the potential to decrease atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations by manipulating the carbon cycle (carbon geoengineering) is being considered as a fourth possible option for addressing anthropogenic climate change, alongside emissions reductions, adaptation and solar geoengineering. This study sets out to assess the effectiveness and potential side-effects of ocean alkalinity enhancement, or ';liming the ocean', as a means to slow the current increase in atmospheric CO2. In order to achieve this, an Earth system model (cGENIE) was used to run both individual simulations as well as a number of 934-member ensembles, to assess each surface ocean grid cell individually, for effectiveness and side-effects of ocean alkalinity enhancement. Effectiveness and side-effects were considered both temporally and spatially and under both steady-state scenarios (of 1x, 2x and 4x pre-industrial pCO2), and using RCP scenarios 4.5 and 8.5. Some consideration of the amount of lime potentially required to have a useful impact on atmospheric CO2 concentration and ocean acidification has also been carried out and compared to current mining capabilities, as an initial step towards considering the feasibility of such an intervention. This research aims to inform the emerging debate around geoengineering by providing an initial insight into where, when and how frequently lime could be used to most efficiently contribute to efforts to slow the rate of increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations, as well as insights into the caveats and side-effects that may accompany ocean alkalinity enhancement interventions.

  7. The effects of solar Reimers η on the final destinies of Venus, the Earth, and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jianpo; Lin, Ling; Bai, Chunyan; Liu, Jinzhong

    2016-04-01

    Our Sun will lose sizable mass and expand enormously when it evolves to the red giant branch phase and the asymptotic giant branch phase. The loss of solar mass will push a planet outward. On the contrary, solar expansion will enhance tidal effects, and tidal force will drive a planet inward. Will our Sun finally engulf Venus, the Earth, and Mars? In the literature, one can find a large number of studies with different points of view. A key factor is that we do not know how much mass the Sun will lose at the late stages. The Reimers η can describe the efficiency of stellar mass-loss and greatly affect solar mass and solar radius at the late stages. In this work, we study how the final destinies of Venus, the Earth, and Mars can be depending on Reimers η chosen. In our calculation, the Reimers η varies from 0.00 to 0.75, with the minimum interval 0.0025. Our results show that Venus will be engulfed by the Sun and Mars will most probably survive finally. The fate of the Earth is uncertain. The Earth will finally be engulfed by the Sun while η <0.4600, and it will finally survive while η ≥ 0.4600. New observations indicate that the average Reimers η for solar-like stars is 0.477. This implies that Earth may survive finally.

  8. Earth tides

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    Nineteen papers on gravity, tilt, and strain tides are compiled into this volume. Detailed chapters cover the calculation of the tidal forces and of the Earth's response to them, as well as actual observations of earth tides. Partial Contents: On Earth tides. The tidal forces: Tidal Forces. New Computations of the Tide-Generating Potential. Corrected Tables of Tidal Harmonics. The Theory of Tidal Deformations. Body Tides on an Elliptical, Rotating, Elastic and Oceanless Earth, Deformation of the Earth by Surface Loads. Gravimetric Tidal Loading Computed from Integrated Green's Functions. Tidal Friction in the Solid Earth. Loading Tides Versus Body Tides. Lunar Tidal Acceleration from Earth Satellite Orbit Analysis. Observations: gravity. Tidal Gravity in Britain: Tidal Loading and the Spatial Distribution of the Marine Tide. Tidal Loading along a Profile Europe-East Africa-South Asia-Australia and the Pacific Ocean. Detailed Gravity-Tide Spectrum between One and Four Cycles per Day. Observations: tilt and strain. Cavity and Topographic Effects in Tilt and Strain Measurement. Observations of Local Elastic Effects on Earth Tide Tilts and Strains.

  9. Activated charcoal is as effective as fuller's earth or bentonite in paraquat poisoning.

    PubMed

    Okonek, S; Setyadharma, H; Borchert, A; Krienke, E G

    1982-02-15

    In vitro investigations have shown that the adsorption capacity of activated charcoal ('Kohle-Compretten', 'Ultracarbon', E. Merck, Darmstadt, FRG) is just as high as that of 'Fuller's earth' (Surrey powder, Laporte Industries Ltd., Luton, GB) or 'Bentonite BP W.B. (Steetley Minerals Ltd., Milton Keynes, GB). Fuller's earth ('Fullererde') from another manufacturer has had very poor adsorption properties and is thus not suitable for the treatment of paraquat poisoning. Animal experiments have shown that the curative effect of activated charcoal given 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 h after ingestion of 200 and 300 mg paraquat/kg body weight is equally as good or even better than that of 'Fuller's earth' or 'Bentonite BP W.B' Activated charcoal is a substitute of equal value to these mineral soils. PMID:7070010

  10. The Study of Effects of Time Variations in the Earth's Gravity Field on Geodetic Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shum, C. K.

    1998-01-01

    The temporal variations in the Earth's gravity field are the consequences of complex interactions between atmosphere, ocean, solid Earth, hydrosphere and cryosphere. The signal ranges from several hours to 18.6 years to geological time scale. The direct and indirect consequences of these variations are manifested in such phenomena as changes in the global sea level and in the global climate pattern. These signals produce observable geodetic satellites. The primary objectives of the proposed effects on near-Earth orbiting investigation include (1) the improved determination of the time-varying gravity field parameters (scale from a few hour to 18.6 year and secular) using long-term satellite laser rs ranging (SLR) observations to multiple geodetic satellites, and (2) the enhanced understanding of these variations with their associated meteorological and geophysical consequences.

  11. Formation of a White-Light Jet Within a Quadrupolar Magnetic Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, Boris; Koutchmy, Serge; Tavabi, Ehsan

    2013-08-01

    We analyze multi-wavelength and multi-viewpoint observations of a large-scale event viewed on 7 April 2011, originating from an active-region complex. The activity leads to a white-light jet being formed in the outer corona. The topology and evolution of the coronal structures were imaged in high resolution using the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). In addition, large field-of-view images of the corona were obtained using the Sun Watcher using Active Pixel System detector and Image Processing (SWAP) telescope onboard the PRoject for Onboard Autonomy (PROBA2) microsatellite, providing evidence for the connectivity of the coronal structures with outer coronal features that were imaged with the Large Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) C2 on the S olar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). The data sets reveal an Eiffel-tower type jet configuration extending into a narrow jet in the outer corona. The event starts from the growth of a dark area in the central part of the structure. The darkening was also observed in projection on the disk by the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory-Ahead (STEREO-A) spacecraft from a different point of view. We assume that the dark volume in the corona descends from a coronal cavity of a flux rope that moved up higher in the corona but still failed to erupt. The quadrupolar magnetic configuration corresponds to a saddle-like shape of the dark volume and provides a possibility for the plasma to escape along the open field lines into the outer corona, forming the white-light jet.

  12. The effect of the earth's and stray magnetic fields on mobile mass spectrometer systems.

    PubMed

    Bell, Ryan J; Davey, Nicholas G; Martinsen, Morten; Short, R Timothy; Gill, Chris G; Krogh, Erik T

    2015-02-01

    Development of small, field-portable mass spectrometers has enabled a rapid growth of in-field measurements on mobile platforms. In such in-field measurements, unexpected signal variability has been observed by the authors in portable ion traps with internal electron ionization. The orientation of magnetic fields (such as the Earth's) relative to the ionization electron beam trajectory can significantly alter the electron flux into a quadrupole ion trap, resulting in significant changes in the instrumental sensitivity. Instrument simulations and experiments were performed relative to the earth's magnetic field to assess the importance of (1) nonpoint-source electron sources, (2) vertical versus horizontal electron beam orientation, and (3) secondary magnetic fields created by the instrument itself. Electron lens focus effects were explored by additional simulations, and were paralleled by experiments performed with a mass spectrometer mounted on a rotating platform. Additionally, magnetically permeable metals were used to shield (1) the entire instrument from the Earth's magnetic field, and (2) the electron beam from both the Earth's and instrument's magnetic fields. Both simulation and experimental results suggest the predominant influence on directionally dependent signal variability is the result of the summation of two magnetic vectors. As such, the most effective method for reducing this effect is the shielding of the electron beam from both magnetic vectors, thus improving electron beam alignment and removing any directional dependency. The improved ionizing electron beam alignment also allows for significant improvements in overall instrument sensitivity. PMID:25527328

  13. Site-resolved multiple-quantum filtered correlations and distance measurements by magic-angle spinning NMR: Theory and applications to spins with weak to vanishing quadrupolar couplings.

    PubMed

    Eliav, U; Haimovich, A; Goldbourt, A

    2016-01-14

    We discuss and analyze four magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR methods that can be used to measure internuclear distances and to obtain correlation spectra between a spin I = 1/2 and a half-integer spin S > 1/2 having a small quadrupolar coupling constant. Three of the methods are based on the heteronuclear multiple-quantum and single-quantum correlation experiments, that is, high rank tensors that involve the half spin and the quadrupolar spin are generated. Here, both zero and single-quantum coherence of the half spins are allowed and various coherence orders of the quadrupolar spin are generated, and filtered, via active recoupling of the dipolar interaction. As a result of generating coherence orders larger than one, the spectral resolution for the quadrupolar nucleus increases linearly with the coherence order. Since the formation of high rank tensors is independent of the existence of a finite quadrupolar interaction, these experiments are also suitable to materials in which there is high symmetry around the quadrupolar spin. A fourth experiment is based on the initial quadrupolar-driven excitation of symmetric high order coherences (up to p = 2S, where S is the spin number) and subsequently generating by the heteronuclear dipolar interaction higher rank (l + 1 or higher) tensors that involve also the half spins. Due to the nature of this technique, it also provides information on the relative orientations of the quadrupolar and dipolar interaction tensors. For the ideal case in which the pulses are sufficiently strong with respect to other interactions, we derive analytical expressions for all experiments as well as for the transferred echo double resonance experiment involving a quadrupolar spin. We show by comparison of the fitting of simulations and the analytical expressions to experimental data that the analytical expressions are sufficiently accurate to provide experimental (7)Li-(13)C distances in a complex of lithium, glycine, and water. Discussion

  14. Effects of rare-earth co-doping on the local structure of rare-earth phosphate glasses using high and low energy X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Alisha J; Cole, Jacqueline M; FitzGerald, Vicky; Honkimaki, Veijo; Roberts, Mark A; Brennan, Tessa; Martin, Richard A; Saunders, George A; Newport, Robert J

    2013-06-14

    Rare-earth co-doping in inorganic materials has a long-held tradition of facilitating highly desirable optoelectronic properties for their application to the laser industry. This study concentrates specifically on rare-earth phosphate glasses, (R2O3)x(R'2O3)y(P2O5)(1-(x+y)), where (R, R') denotes (Ce, Er) or (La, Nd) co-doping and the total rare-earth composition corresponds to a range between metaphosphate, RP3O9, and ultraphosphate, RP5O14. Thereupon, the effects of rare-earth co-doping on the local structure are assessed at the atomic level. Pair-distribution function analysis of high-energy X-ray diffraction data (Q(max) = 28 Å(-1)) is employed to make this assessment. Results reveal a stark structural invariance to rare-earth co-doping which bears testament to the open-framework and rigid nature of these glasses. A range of desirable attributes of these glasses unfold from this finding; in particular, a structural simplicity that will enable facile molecular engineering of rare-earth phosphate glasses with 'dial-up' lasing properties. When considered together with other factors, this finding also demonstrates additional prospects for these co-doped rare-earth phosphate glasses in nuclear waste storage applications. This study also reveals, for the first time, the ability to distinguish between P-O and P[double bond, length as m-dash]O bonding in these rare-earth phosphate glasses from X-ray diffraction data in a fully quantitative manner. Complementary analysis of high-energy X-ray diffraction data on single rare-earth phosphate glasses of similar rare-earth composition to the co-doped materials is also presented in this context. In a technical sense, all high-energy X-ray diffraction data on these glasses are compared with analogous low-energy diffraction data; their salient differences reveal distinct advantages of high-energy X-ray diffraction data for the study of amorphous materials. PMID:23518599

  15. Precambrian climate: The effects of land area and earth's rotation rate

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, G.S. ); Marshall, H.G.; Kuhn, W.R. )

    1993-05-20

    The authors present results of model studies using general circulation models of climatic effects of variations in the rotation rate of the earth. These studies are of relevance for the Precambrian times, when the rotation period of the earth was considerably shorter. The authors include in their model studies a number of factors which were left out in previous studies. The rotation rate has a strong effect on atmospheric circulation, as evidenced in the theory of geostrophic turbulence, mid-latitude baroclinic instability, and the Hadley cell. One can expect the contraction of circulation patterns, both horizontally and vertically. This should also impact heat transport, though questions of mean temperature effects are more open, unless one allows cloud cover to vary. The authors put more realistic starting conditions into the model, and also allow clouds and hydrology to have a feedback role to see what impact rotation rates will have on global climate.

  16. Effect of rare earth metal on the spin-orbit torque in magnetic heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Kohei; Pai, Chi-Feng; Tan, Aik Jun; Mann, Maxwell; Beach, Geoffrey S. D.

    2016-06-01

    We report the effect of the rare earth metal Gd on current-induced spin-orbit torques (SOTs) in perpendicularly magnetized Pt/Co/Gd heterostructures, characterized using harmonic measurements and spin-torque ferromagnetic resonance (ST-FMR). By varying the Gd metal layer thickness from 0 nm to 8 nm, harmonic measurements reveal a significant enhancement of the effective fields generated from the Slonczewski-like and field-like torques. ST-FMR measurements confirm an enhanced effective spin Hall angle and show a corresponding increase in the magnetic damping constant with increasing Gd thickness. These results suggest that Gd plays an active role in generating SOTs in these heterostructures. Our finding may lead to spin-orbitronics device application such as non-volatile magnetic random access memory, based on rare earth metals.

  17. Low earth orbit environmental effects on the Space Station photovoltaic power generation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, H. K.

    1988-01-01

    A summary of the low earth orbital environment, its impact on the photovoltaic power systems of the Space Station and the solutions implemented to resolve the environmental concerns or issues are described. Low earth orbital environment (LEO) presents several concerns to the photovoltaic power systems of the Space Station. These concerns include atomic oxygen interaction with the polymeric substrate of the solar arrays, ionized environment effects on the array operating voltage, the effects of the meteoroids and debris impacts and penetration through the different layers of the solar cells and their circuits, and the high energy particle and radiation effects on the overall solar array performance. Potential solutions to some of the degrading environmental interactions that will provide the photovoltaic power system of the Space Station with the desired life are also summarized.

  18. Low Earth orbit environmental effects on the space station photovoltaic power generation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.

    1987-01-01

    A summary of the Low Earth Orbital Environment, its impact on the Photovoltaic Power systems of the space station and the solutions implemented to resolve the environmental concerns or issues are described. Low Earth Orbital Environment (LEO) presents several concerns to the Photovoltaic power systems of the space station. These concerns include atomic oxygen interaction with the polymeric substrate of the solar arrays, ionized environment effects on the array operating voltage, the effects of the meteoroids and debris impacts and penetration through the different layers of the solar cells and their circuits, and the high energy particle and radiation effects on the overall solar array performance. Potential solutions to some of the degrading environmental interactions that will provide the photovoltaic power system of the space station with the desired life are also summarized.

  19. What Is the Atmosphere’s Effect on Earth's Surface Temperature?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xubin

    2010-04-01

    It is frequently stated in textbooks and scholarly articles that the surface temperature of Earth is 33°C warmer than it would be without the atmosphere and that this difference is due to the greenhouse effect. This Forum shows that the atmosphere effect leads to warming of only 20°C. This new conclusion requires a revision to all of the relevant literature in K-12, undergraduate, and graduate education material and to science papers and reports. The greenhouse effect on Earth's surface temperature is well understood qualitatively and is regarded as basic knowledge about Earth's climate and climate change. The 33°C warming has been used to quantify the greenhouse effect of greenhouse gases, or of greenhouse gases and clouds, in K-12 educational material (e.g., http://epa.gov/climatechange/kids/greenhouse.html), undergraduate freshman introductory textbooks on weather and climate [e.g., Ahrens, 2008], and graduate textbooks on climate [e.g., Peixoto and Oort, 1992]. Some textbooks and various other publications have less stringently attributed the warming to the greenhouse effect [e.g., Wallace and Hobbs, 2006; Le Treut et al., 2007; American Meteorological Society, 2000].

  20. Co-Seismic Mass Displacement and its Effect on Earth's Rotation and Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, B. F.; Gross, R. S.

    2004-01-01

    Mantle processes often involve large-scale mass transport, ranging from mantle convection, tectonic motions, glacial isostatic adjustment, to tides, atmospheric and oceanic loadings, volcanism and seismicity. On very short time scale of less than an hour, co-seismic event, apart from the "shaking" that is the earthquake, leaves behind permanent (step-function-like) displacements in the crust and mantle. This redistribution of mass changes the Earth's inertia tensor (and hence Earth's rotation in both length-of-day and polar motion), and the gravity field. The question is whether these effects are large enough to be of any significance. In this paper we report updated calculation results based on Chao & Gross. The calculation uses the normal mode summation scheme, applied to over twenty thousand major earthquakes that occurred during 1976-2002, according to source mechanism solutions given by the Harvard Centroid Moment Tensor catalog. Compared to the truly large ones earlier in the century, the earthquakes we study are individually all too small to have left any discernible signature in geodetic records of Earth rotation or global gravity field. However, their collective effects continue to exhibit an extremely strong statistical tendencies, conspiring to decrease J2 and J22 while shortening LOD, resulting in a rounder and more compact Earth. Strong tendency is also seen in the earthquakes trying to "nudge" the Earth rotation pole towards approx. 140 deg.E, roughly opposite to the observed polar drift direction. Currently, the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) is measuring the time-variable gravity to high degree and order with unprecedented accuracy. Our results show that great earthquakes such as the 1960 Chilean or 1964 Alaskan events cause gravitational field changes that are large enough to be detected by GRACE.

  1. The Effects of Refraction on Transit Transmission Spectroscopy: Application to Earth-like Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Amit; Meadows, Victoria; Crisp, Dave

    2014-09-01

    We quantify the effects of refraction in transit transmission spectroscopy on spectral absorption features and on temporal variations that could be used to obtain altitude-dependent spectra for planets orbiting stars of different stellar types. We validate our model against altitude-dependent transmission spectra of the Earth from ATMOS and against lunar eclipse spectra from Pallé et al. We perform detectability studies to show the potential effects of refraction on hypothetical observations of Earth analogs with the James Webb Space Telescope NIRSPEC. Due to refraction, there will be a maximum tangent pressure level that can be probed during transit for each given planet-star system. We show that because of refraction, for an Earth-analog planet orbiting in the habitable zone of a Sun-like star only the top 0.3 bars of the atmosphere can be probed, leading to a decrease in the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of absorption features by 60%, while for an Earth-analog planet orbiting in the habitable zone of an M5V star it is possible to probe almost the entire atmosphere with minimal decreases in S/N. We also show that refraction can result in temporal variations in the transit transmission spectrum which may provide a way to obtain altitude-dependent spectra of exoplanet atmospheres. Additionally, the variations prior to ingress and subsequent to egress provide a way to probe pressures greater than the maximum tangent pressure that can be probed during transit. Therefore, probing the maximum range of atmospheric altitudes, and in particular the near-surface environment of an Earth-analog exoplanet, will require looking at out-of-transit refracted light in addition to the in-transit spectrum.

  2. Co-Seismic Mass Dislocation and Its Effect on Earth's Rotation and Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Benjamin F.

    1999-01-01

    Mantle processes often involve large-scale mass transport, ranging from mantle convection, tectonic motions, glacial isostatic adjustment, to tides, atmospheric and oceanic loadings, volcanism and seismicity. On very short time scale of less than an hour, co-seismic event, apart from the "shaking" that is the earthquake, leaves behind permanent (step-function-like) dislocations in the crust and mantle. This redistribution of mass changes the Earth's inertia tensor (and hence Earth's rotation in both length-of-day and polar motion), and the gravity field (in terms of spherical harmonic Stokes coefficients). The question is whether these effects are large enough to be of any significance. In this paper we report updated calculation results. The calculation uses the normal mode summation scheme, applied to 15,814 major earthquakes that occurred during 1976-1998, according to source mechanism solutions given by the Harvard Central Moment Tensor catalog. Compared to the truly large ones earlier in the century, the earthquakes we study are individually all too small to have left any discernible signature in geodetic records of Earth rotation or global gravity field. However, their collective effects continue to exhibit an extremely strong statistical tendencies. For example, earthquakes conspire to decrease J(sub 2) and J(sub 22) while shortening LOD, resulting in a rounder and more compact Earth. Strong tendency is also seen in the earthquakes trying to "nudge" the Earth rotation pole towards about 140 degree E, roughly opposite to the observed polar drift direction. The geophysical significance and implications will be further studied.

  3. Co-Seismic Mass Dislocation and its Effect on Earth's Rotation and Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, B. F.; Gross, R. S.

    2002-01-01

    Mantle processes often involve large-scale mass transport, ranging from mantle convection, tectonic motions, glacial isostatic adjustment, to tides, atmospheric and oceanic loadings, volcanism and seismicity. On very short time scale of less than an hour, co-seismic event, apart from the shaking that is the earthquake, leaves behind permanent (step-function-like) dislocations in the crust and mantle. This redistribution of mass changes the Earth's inertia tensor (and hence Earth's rotation in both length-of-day and polar motion), and the gravity field (in terms of spherical harmonic Stokes coefficients). The question is whether these effects are large enough to be of any significance. In this paper we report updated calculation results based on Chao & Gross (1987). The calculation uses the normal mode summation scheme, applied to nearly twenty thousand major earthquakes that occurred during 1976-2002, according to source mechanism solutions given by the Harvard Central Moment Tensor catalog. Compared to the truly large ones earlier in the century, the earthquakes we study are individually all too small to have left any discernible signature in geodetic records of Earth rotation or global gravity field. However, their collective effects continue to exhibit an extremely strong statistical tendencies. For example, earthquakes conspire to decrease J2 and J22 while shortening LOD, resulting in a rounder and more compact Earth. Strong tendency is also seen in the earthquakes trying to nudge the Earth rotation pole towards approximately 140 degrees E, roughly opposite to the observed polar drift direction. The geophysical significance and implications will be further studied.

  4. The effects of refraction on transit transmission spectroscopy: application to Earth-like exoplanets

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, Amit; Meadows, Victoria; Crisp, Dave

    2014-09-01

    We quantify the effects of refraction in transit transmission spectroscopy on spectral absorption features and on temporal variations that could be used to obtain altitude-dependent spectra for planets orbiting stars of different stellar types. We validate our model against altitude-dependent transmission spectra of the Earth from ATMOS and against lunar eclipse spectra from Pallé et al. We perform detectability studies to show the potential effects of refraction on hypothetical observations of Earth analogs with the James Webb Space Telescope NIRSPEC. Due to refraction, there will be a maximum tangent pressure level that can be probed during transit for each given planet-star system. We show that because of refraction, for an Earth-analog planet orbiting in the habitable zone of a Sun-like star only the top 0.3 bars of the atmosphere can be probed, leading to a decrease in the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of absorption features by 60%, while for an Earth-analog planet orbiting in the habitable zone of an M5V star it is possible to probe almost the entire atmosphere with minimal decreases in S/N. We also show that refraction can result in temporal variations in the transit transmission spectrum which may provide a way to obtain altitude-dependent spectra of exoplanet atmospheres. Additionally, the variations prior to ingress and subsequent to egress provide a way to probe pressures greater than the maximum tangent pressure that can be probed during transit. Therefore, probing the maximum range of atmospheric altitudes, and in particular the near-surface environment of an Earth-analog exoplanet, will require looking at out-of-transit refracted light in addition to the in-transit spectrum.

  5. 5f delocalization-induced suppression of quadrupolar order in U(Pd1-xPtx)₃

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, H. C.; Le, M. D.; McEwen, K. A.; Bleckmann, M.; Süllow, S.; Mazzoli, C.; Wilkins, S. B.; Fort, D.

    2011-12-27

    We present bulk magnetic and transport measurements and x-ray resonant scattering measurements on U(Pd1-xPtx)₃ for x=0.005 and 0.01, which demonstrate the high sensitivity of the quadrupolar order in the canonical antiferroquadrupolar ordered system UPd₃ to doping with platinum. Bulk measurements for x=0.005 reveal behavior similar to that seen in UPd₃, albeit at a lower temperature, and x-ray resonant scattering provides evidence of quadrupolar order described by the Qxy order parameter. In contrast, bulk measurements reveal only an indistinct transition in x=0.01, consistent with the observation of short-range quadrupolar order in our x-ray resonant scattering results.

  6. Possible Effect of the Earth's Inertial Induction on the Orbital Decay of LAGEOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Ujjal; Kar, Samanwita; Ghosh, Amitabha

    2016-09-01

    The theory of velocity dependent inertial induction, based upon extended Mach's principle, has been able to generate many interesting results related to celestial mechanics and cosmological problems. Because of the extremely minute magnitude of the effect its presence can be detected through the motion of accurately observed bodies like Earth satellites. LAGEOS I and II are medium altitude satellites with nearly circular orbits. The motions of these satellites are accurately recorded and the past data of a few decades help to test many theories including the general theory of relativity. Therefore, it is hoped that the effect of the Earth's inertial induction can have any detectable effect on the motion of these satellites. It is established that the semi-major axis of LAGEOS I is decreasing at the rate of 1.3 mm/d. As the atmospheric drag is negligible at that altitude, a proper explanation of the secular change has been wanting, and, therefore, this paper examines the effect of the Earth's inertial induction effect on LAGEOS I. Past researches have established that Yarkovsky thermal drag, charged and neutral particle drag might be the possible mechanisms for this orbital decay. Inertial induction is found to generate a perturbing force that results in 0.33 mm/d decay of the semi major axis. Some other changes are also predicted and the phenomenon also helps to explain the observed changes in the orbits of a few other satellites. The results indicate the feasibility of the theory of inertial induction i.e. the dynamic gravitation phenomenon of the Earth on its satellites as a possible partial cause for orbital decay.

  7. Earth remote sensing as an effective tool for the development of advanced innovative educational technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayorova, Vera; Mayorov, Kirill

    2009-11-01

    Current educational system is facing a contradiction between the fundamentality of engineering education and the necessity of applied learning extension, which requires new methods of training to combine both academic and practical knowledge in balance. As a result there are a number of innovations being developed and implemented into the process of education aimed at optimizing the quality of the entire educational system. Among a wide range of innovative educational technologies there is an especially important subset of educational technologies which involve learning through hands-on scientific and technical projects. The purpose of this paper is to describe the implementation of educational technologies based on small satellites development as well as the usage of Earth remote sensing data acquired from these satellites. The increase in public attention to the education through Earth remote sensing is based on the concern that although there is a great progress in the development of new methods of Earth imagery and remote sensing data acquisition there is still a big question remaining open on practical applications of this kind of data. It is important to develop the new way of thinking for the new generation of people so they understand that they are the masters of their own planet and they are responsible for its state. They should desire and should be able to use a powerful set of tools based on modern and perspective Earth remote sensing. For example NASA sponsors "Classroom of the Future" project. The Universities Space Research Association in United States provides a mechanism through which US universities can cooperate effectively with one another, with the government, and with other organizations to further space science and technology, and to promote education in these areas. It also aims at understanding the Earth as a system and promoting the role of humankind in the destiny of their own planet. The Association has founded a Journal of Earth System

  8. Effect of Earth and Mars departure delays on human missions to Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Prasun N.; Tartabini, Paul V.

    1993-08-01

    This study determines the impact on the initial mass in low-Earth orbit (IMLEO) for delaying departure from Mars and Earth by 5, 15, and 30 days, once a nominal mission to Mars has been selected. Additionally, the use of a deep space maneuver (DSM) is attempted to alleviate the IMLEO penalties. Three different classes of missions are analyzed using chemical and nuclear thermal propulsion systems in the 2000-2025 time-frame: opposition, conjunction, and fast-transfer conjunction. The results indicate that Mars and Earth delays can lead to large IMLEO penalties. Opposition and fast-transfer conjunction class missions have the highest IMLEO penalties, upwards of 432.4 mt and 1977.3 mt, respectively. Conjunction class missions, on the other hand, tend to be insensitive to Mars and Earth delays having IMLEO penalties under 103.5 mt. As expected, nuclear thermal propulsion had significantly lower IMLEO penalties as compared to chemical propulsion. The use of a DSM is found not to have a significant impact on reducing the IMLEO penalties. Through this investigation, the effect of off-nominal departure conditions on the overall mission (i.e., IMLEO) can be gained, enabling mission designers to incorporate the influence of off-nominal departure conditions of the interplanetary trajectory in the overall conceptual design process of a Mars transfer vehicle.

  9. Effect of Earth and Mars departure delays on human missions to Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Prasun N.; Tartabini, Paul V.

    1993-01-01

    This study determines the impact on the initial mass in low-Earth orbit (IMLEO) for delaying departure from Mars and Earth by 5, 15, and 30 days, once a nominal mission to Mars has been selected. Additionally, the use of a deep space maneuver (DSM) is attempted to alleviate the IMLEO penalties. Three different classes of missions are analyzed using chemical and nuclear thermal propulsion systems in the 2000-2025 time-frame: opposition, conjunction, and fast-transfer conjunction. The results indicate that Mars and Earth delays can lead to large IMLEO penalties. Opposition and fast-transfer conjunction class missions have the highest IMLEO penalties, upwards of 432.4 mt and 1977.3 mt, respectively. Conjunction class missions, on the other hand, tend to be insensitive to Mars and Earth delays having IMLEO penalties under 103.5 mt. As expected, nuclear thermal propulsion had significantly lower IMLEO penalties as compared to chemical propulsion. The use of a DSM is found not to have a significant impact on reducing the IMLEO penalties. Through this investigation, the effect of off-nominal departure conditions on the overall mission (i.e., IMLEO) can be gained, enabling mission designers to incorporate the influence of off-nominal departure conditions of the interplanetary trajectory in the overall conceptual design process of a Mars transfer vehicle.

  10. Effectiveness of Geowall Technology in Conceptualizing the Earth-Moon System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, N. E.; Lopez, R. E.; Hamed, K. M.

    2003-12-01

    One persistent difficulty many students of earth and planetary science face is the lack of 3-dimensional mental model of the Earth-Moon system. Students without such a mental model can have a very hard time conceptualizing the geometric relationships that cause the cycle of lunar phases. We present results from a study using a 3-D Geowall with a simulated sunlit Earth-Moon system on undergraduate students' ability to understand the origins of lunar phases. We test three groups of students: some with traditional in-class instruction, some with a laboratory exercise using the Geowall Earth-Moon simulation, and some students who were exposed to both. Students are given pre and post tests using the Lunar Phase Concept Inventory (LPCI) diagnostic. In addition to the diagnostic tests, free response comments are solicited from the students, and their responses are presented as well. We will discuss the effectiveness of this technology as a teaching tool and explore student reactions to the experience.

  11. The Earth's magnetic field is primarily dipolar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besse, J.; Cogne, J. P.; Courtillot, V.; Gilder, S.

    2003-04-01

    desirable. (b) There were early suggestions that low Cenozoic and Mesozoic inclinations in Central Asia might reveal non dipole fields (ref. 3). Recent work (ref. 4) has shown that tectonic problems or inclination shallowing due to original syn-sedimentary effects were the likely cause of widespread Asian low inclinations. In central Asia, for many times and locations, no significant difference in paleolatitude is found between the Eurasian reference curve and Cretaceous to Present volcanics, whereas paleolatitudes derived from sediments are 10 to 25 degrees shallower. Thus, an analysis of the sedimentary data may be interpreted to indicate a significant octupole component whereas an analysis of the volcanic data from the same region will show no significant octupolar signature. There are however a few cases when the volcanics may not match the Eurasian reference (e.g. Hankard et al, this meeting). (c) Ongoing work on the global data base and some new data from the Permian should provide further constraints on the geometry of the field at that time and the extent to which non-dipolar terms may be required. In (of course only provisionnal) conclusion, we believe that there is as yet not sufficiently detailed and robust evidence to reject the basic hypothesis that the Earth's field has remained on (geological, i.e. Ma durations) average close to an axial dipole, with a quadrupolar component in general no larger than 5%, throughout the Phanerozoic, and as yet ill-constrained higher order (octupolar?) components probably not in excess of a few percent. Ref.: (1) Si and Van der Voo, Terra Nova, 13, 471-478, 2001; (2) J. Besse and V. Courtillot, JGR, 107, doi:10.1029/2000JB000050, 2002; (3) M. Westphal, EPSL, 117, 15-28, 1993; (4) S. Gilder et al., JGR, 106, 30,505-30,521, 2001 and EPSL in press, 2003; J.P. Cogné et al, JGR, 104, 17,715-17,734, 1999.

  12. Neutron Monitors as a Tool for Specifying Solar Energetic Particle Effects on Earth and in Near-Earth Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieber, J. W.; Clem, J.; Evenson, P.; Kuwabara, T.; Pyle, R.; Ruffolo, D.; Saiz, A.

    2007-12-01

    Neutron monitors are ground-based instruments that record the byproducts of collisions between cosmic rays and molecules in Earth's atmosphere. When linked together in real-time coordinated arrays, these instruments can make valuable contributions to the specification of major solar energetic particle events. Neutron monitors can provide the earliest alert of elevated radiation levels in Earth's atmosphere caused by the arrival of relativistic solar particles (Ground Level Enhancement or GLE). Early detection of GLE is of interest to the aviation industry because of the associated radiation hazard for pilots and air crews, especially for those flying polar routes. Network observations can also be used to map, in principle in real time, the distribution of radiation in Earth's atmosphere, taking into account the particle anisotropy which can be very large in early phases of the event. Observations from the large GLE of January 20, 2005 and December 13, 2006 will be used to illustrate these applications of neutron monitors. Supported by NSF grant ATM-0527878, the Thailand Research Fund, and the Mahidol University Postdoctoral Fellowship Program.

  13. Thermal evolution of the earth - Effects of volatile exchange between atmosphere and interior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgovern, Patrick J.; Schubert, Gerald

    1989-01-01

    The thermal history of the earth is investigated using a parameterized model of mantle convection, that includes the effects of volatile exchange between the mantle and the surface reservoir and the softening of the mantle by the dissolved volatiles. The mantle degassing rate is taken to be directly proportional to the rate of seafloor spreading which depends on the mantle heat flow. It is shown that the dependence of the mantle viscosity on the volatile content has important effects on the thermal evolution of planetary interiors and the evolution of planetary atmospheres. Degassing is compensated by an increase in temperature, while regassing is compensated by a decrease in temperature. Reasonable degassing scenarios can account for an early rapid formation of the earth's atmosphere inferred from noble gas abundances.

  14. Effects of inherent alkali and alkaline earth metallic species on biomass pyrolysis at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Hu, Song; Jiang, Long; Wang, Yi; Su, Sheng; Sun, Lushi; Xu, Boyang; He, Limo; Xiang, Jun

    2015-09-01

    This work aimed to investigate effects of inherent alkali and alkaline earth metallic species (AAEMs) on biomass pyrolysis at different temperatures. The yield of CO, H2 and C2H4 was increased and that of CO2 was suppressed with increasing temperature. Increasing temperature could also promote depolymerization and aromatization reactions of active tars, forming heavier polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, leading to decrease of tar yields and species diversity. Diverse performance of inherent AAEMs at different temperatures significantly affected the distribution of pyrolysis products. The presence of inherent AAEMs promoted water-gas shift reaction, and enhanced the yield of H2 and CO2. Additionally, inherent AAEMs not only promoted breakage and decarboxylation/decarbonylation reaction of thermally labile hetero atoms of the tar but also enhanced thermal decomposing of heavier aromatics. Inherent AAEMs could also significantly enhance the decomposition of levoglucosan, and alkaline earth metals showed greater effect than alkali metals. PMID:26005925

  15. Kondo effect in alkaline-earth-metal atomic gases with confinement-induced resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ren; Zhang, Deping; Cheng, Yanting; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Peng; Zhai, Hui

    2016-04-01

    Alkaline-earth-metal atoms have a long-lived electronic excited state, and when atoms in this excited state are localized in the Fermi sea of ground-state atoms by an external potential, they serve as magnetic impurities, due to the spin-exchange interaction between the excited- and the ground-state atoms. This can give rise to the Kondo effect. However, in order to achieve this effect in current atomic gas experiments, it requires the Kondo temperature to be increased to a sizable portion of the Fermi temperature. In this paper we calculate the confinement-induced resonance (CIR) for the spin-exchanging interaction between the ground and the excited states of the alkaline-earth-metal atoms and propose that the spin-exchange interaction can be strongly enhanced by utilizing the CIR. We analyze this system by the renormalization-group approach and show that near a CIR, the Kondo temperature can be significantly enhanced.

  16. Preliminary Results on the Gravitational Slingshot Effect and the Population of Hyperbolic Meteoroids at Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegert, P. A.

    2011-01-01

    Interstellar meteoroids, solid particles arriving from outside our Solar System, are not easily distinguished from local meteoroids. A velocity above the escape velocity of the Sun is often used as an indicator of a possible interstellar origin. We demonstrate that the gravitational slingshot effect, resulting from the passage of local meteoroid near a planet, can produce hyperbolic meteoroids at the Earth s orbit with excess velocities comparable to those expected of interstellar meteoroids.

  17. The effect of cloud type on Earth's energy balance - Global analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Dennis L.; Ockert-Bell, Maureen E.; Michelsen, Marc L.

    1992-01-01

    The role of fractional area coverage by cloud types in the energy balance of the earth is investigated through joint use of International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) C1 cloud data and Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) broadband energy flux data for the one-year period March 1985 through February 1986. Multiple linear regression is used to relate the radiation budget data to the cloud data. Comparing cloud forcing estimates obtained from the ISCCP-ERBE regression with those derived from the ERBE scene identification shows generally good agreement except over snow, in tropical convective regions, and in regions that are either nearly cloudless or always overcast. It is suggested that a substantial fraction of the disagreement in longwave cloud forcing in tropical convective regions is associated with the fact that the ERBE scene identification does not take into account variations in upper-tropospheric water vapor. On a global average basis, low clouds make the largest contribution to the net energy balance of the Earth, because they cover such a large area and because their albedo effect dominates their effect on emitted thermal radiation. High, optically thick clouds can also very effectively reduce the energy balance, however, because their very high albedos overcome their low emission temperatures.

  18. The Role of Stereo Projection in Developing an Effective Concluding Earth Science Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkby, K. C.; Morin, P. J.; Finley, F.

    2003-12-01

    Remarkably few students enrolled in introductory earth science courses have any intention of continuing in earth science, and for most students, these classes are often the last science course they will take in their academic careers. These students would be better served, if the course was instead designed to be a 'concluding' science course. One that explicitly provided students with the knowledge they need to become more informed citizens in the global community. The University of Minnesota is attempting to develop a national model of an effective 'concluding' earth science course by integrating three essential approaches: use of regional case studies to increase student comprehension; a comprehensive evaluation of students' prior knowledge, misconceptions and post-instructional knowledge that is woven throughout the project; and, an ambitious use of 'GeoWall' stereo projection systems to facilitate the students' use of maps and data sets and level the classroom playing field with regard to spatial conceptualization. In every discipline there are some critical skills or assessments that serve as conscious or unconscious 'gate-keepers' for progress in that field. In earth science, map interpretation is probably the critical restriction curtailing students' ability to access and explore course concepts. So much of our discipline's information is encoded in maps, that students who are not innately predisposed to understanding maps find it difficult to understand much of the course content and methodology. GeoWall stereo projection systems can reduce the efficiency of this 'gate-keeping' process, allowing students of diverse backgrounds and abilities to understand map data and succeed in the course. In doing so, these systems will not only help increase students' scientific literacy, but may also greatly increase the diversity of students who do go on to consider earth science as a potential career.

  19. Effect of UV Radiation on the Spectral Fingerprints of Earth-like Planets Orbiting M Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rugheimer, S.; Kaltenegger, L.; Segura, A.; Linsky, J.; Mohanty, S.

    2015-08-01

    We model the atmospheres and spectra of Earth-like planets orbiting the entire grid of M dwarfs for active and inactive stellar models with Teff = 2300 K to Teff = 3800 K and for six observed MUSCLES M dwarfs with UV radiation data. We set the Earth-like planets at the 1 AU equivalent distance and show spectra from the visible to IR (0.4-20 μm) to compare detectability of features in different wavelength ranges with the James Webb Space Telescope and other future ground- and spaced-based missions to characterize exo-Earths. We focus on the effect of UV activity levels on detectable atmospheric features that indicate habitability on Earth, namely, H2O, O3, CH4, N2O, and CH3Cl. To observe signatures of life—O2/O3 in combination with reducing species like CH4—we find that early and active M dwarfs are the best targets of the M star grid for future telescopes. The O2 spectral feature at 0.76 μm is increasingly difficult to detect in reflected light of later M dwarfs owing to low stellar flux in that wavelength region. N2O, another biosignature detectable in the IR, builds up to observable concentrations in our planetary models around M dwarfs with low UV flux. CH3Cl could become detectable, depending on the depth of the overlapping N2O feature. We present a spectral database of Earth-like planets around cool stars for directly imaged planets as a framework for interpreting future light curves, direct imaging, and secondary eclipse measurements of the atmospheres of terrestrial planets in the habitable zone to design and assess future telescope capabilities.

  20. Geodesic and Lense-Thirring precessions effects on the near earth artificial satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radwan, M.; El-Salam, F. A. A.; El-Bar, S. E. A.

    2013-02-01

    The present work deals with the effect of the geodesic and Lense-Thirring precessions in a near Earth artificial satellite orbit. The effects of the geodesic and Lense-Thirring precessions on the orbit evolution are surveyed. The Picard method of successive approximation is described. The canonical equations of motion including forces non-derivable from a potential are presented. The acceleration components coming from the geodesic and Lense-Thirring precessions are first obtained, then, the images of these accelerations are evaluated. The integrations are effected using the method of Picard successive iteration.

  1. The Effects of Adopting the Revised New York State Regents Earth Science Syllabus on Selected Teacher and Student Variables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orgren, James; Doran, Rodney L.

    This study investigated the effect voluntary or mandatory adoption of the Earth Science curriculum had on instructional procedures, teacher educational opinion, student achievement in earth science, and student ability to employ the processes of science. Selection of teachers resulted in three groups: (A) those forced to adopt the new syllabus,…

  2. An Investigation into the Effectiveness of Science Reform Strategies in Teaching Earth Science at the University Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieck, William A.; And Others

    This study investigates the effectiveness of traditional and reform approaches in teaching earth science to future elementary school teachers. The research team was interested in whether reform strategies produce more content knowledge and a more positive change in attitude toward earth science among elementary education students when compared to…

  3. The Earth Exploration Toolbook: Scaffolding Access and Use of Earth Science Data to Promote Effective Inquiry Investigations by Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledley, T. S.; Dahlman, L.; McAuliffe, C.; Haddad, N.

    2007-12-01

    The Earth Exploration Toolbook (EET, http://serc.carleton.edu/eet) is an online collection of computer-based Earth science activities. Each activity, or chapter, introduces one or more data sets and an analysis tool that enables users to explore some aspect of the Earth system. Series of step-by-step instructions show users how to 1) access the data and analysis tool and install it if necessary, 2) examine, visualize, and interpret the data, and 3) conduct a data-based investigation using the data and analysis tool. Step-by-step instructions walk users through valid scientific inquiries of the data to produce a map, graph, or other data product. The implicit goal of each chapter though, is to build the skills and confidence of teachers and students to enable them to learn and teach with data. When educators become familiar enough with data and analysis tools, they can adapt the use of data to match their curriculum and their students" abilities. This enables educators to promote a greater use of inquiry into students learning of scientific concepts. EET chapters are rich launching points for inquiry. Embedded open-ended questions ask users to consider various aspects of the data. These questions can begin the process of guided inquiry. The "Going Further" section of each EET chapter provides ideas for independent investigations, using another dataset or employing the same analysis strategy with a different analysis tool. At least one chapter inspired an award-winning high school science fair project. In this session we will examine the components of EET chapters that promote inquiry, describe the use of EET chapters in our teacher professional development programs, and give examples of how these programs have impacted participating teachers" use of data, analysis tools, and inquiry in their teaching.

  4. On the average temperature of airless spherical bodies and the magnitude of Earth's atmospheric thermal effect.

    PubMed

    Volokin, Den; ReLlez, Lark

    2014-01-01

    The presence of atmosphere can appreciably warm a planet's surface above the temperature of an airless environment. Known as a natural Greenhouse Effect (GE), this near-surface Atmospheric Thermal Enhancement (ATE) as named herein is presently entirely attributed to the absorption of up-welling long-wave radiation by greenhouse gases. Often quoted as 33 K for Earth, GE is estimated as a difference between planet's observed mean surface temperature and an effective radiating temperature calculated from the globally averaged absorbed solar flux using the Stefan-Boltzmann (SB) radiation law. This approach equates a planet's average temperature in the absence of greenhouse gases or atmosphere to an effective emission temperature assuming ATE ≡ GE. The SB law is also routinely employed to estimating the mean temperatures of airless bodies. We demonstrate that this formula as applied to spherical objects is mathematically incorrect owing to Hölder's inequality between integrals and leads to biased results such as a significant underestimation of Earth's ATE. We derive a new expression for the mean physical temperature of airless bodies based on an analytic integration of the SB law over a sphere that accounts for effects of regolith heat storage and cosmic background radiation on nighttime temperatures. Upon verifying our model against Moon surface temperature data provided by the NASA Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment, we propose it as a new analytic standard for evaluating the thermal environment of airless bodies. Physical evidence is presented that Earth's ATE should be assessed against the temperature of an equivalent airless body such as the Moon rather than a hypothetical atmosphere devoid of greenhouse gases. Employing the new temperature formula we show that Earth's total ATE is ~90 K, not 33 K, and that ATE = GE + TE, where GE is the thermal effect of greenhouse gases, while TE > 15 K is a thermodynamic enhancement independent of the

  5. Compact High Current Rare-Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode for Hall Effect Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofer, Richard R. (Inventor); Goebel, Dan M. (Inventor); Watkins, Ronnie M. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An apparatus and method for achieving an efficient central cathode in a Hall effect thruster is disclosed. A hollow insert disposed inside the end of a hollow conductive cathode comprises a rare-earth element and energized to emit electrons from an inner surface. The cathode employs an end opening having an area at least as large as the internal cross sectional area of the rare earth insert to enhance throughput from the cathode end. In addition, the cathode employs a high aspect ratio geometry based on the cathode length to width which mitigates heat transfer from the end. A gas flow through the cathode and insert may be impinged by the emitted electrons to yield a plasma. One or more optional auxiliary gas feeds may also be employed between the cathode and keeper wall and external to the keeper near the outlet.

  6. Seismic effects on the rotational dynamics of the earth and its gravitational field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez, B. V.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of earthquakes on the rotational motion of the earth were studied. The connection between the fault parameters and the corresponding changes in the moments and products of inertia were analytically developed. The reciprocal theorem of elasticity and Volterra's formula were applied as well as the displacement and stress fields for the second degree static response of the earth model being used. The numerical results of the investigation yield the magnitude and direction of the pole shift as well as the change in the length of the day. The changes in the second degree coefficients of the geopotential were computed. Source parameters corresponding to the Alaskan earthquake on March 28, 1964 were used to generate numerical results.

  7. Rotational Spectrum of Dichloromethane-Ne: Internal Dynamics and Cl Quadrupolar Hyperfine Effects.

    PubMed

    Favero, Laura B; Maris, Assimo; Paltrinieri, Laura; Caminati, Walther

    2015-12-10

    The rotational spectra of three isotopologues, CH2(35)Cl2···(20)Ne, CH2(35)Cl(37)Cl···(20)Ne, and CH2(35)Cl2···(22)Ne, of the complex dichloromethane-neon have been assigned and measured by molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. The corresponding tunnelling splittings-due to the motion of Ne from above to below the ClCCl plane-have been determined as ΔE0+0- = 6.8900(5), 6.6630(4), and 6.3724(7) MHz, respectively. From these data the barrier to planarity has been obtained, B2 = 68.7 cm(-1). In addition, the structure and the (35)Cl (or (37)Cl) quadrupole coupling constants have been determined. PMID:26566085

  8. The Pale Orange Dot: Spectral Effects of a Hazy Early Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arney, G. N.; Meadows, V. S.; Domagal-Goldman, S. D.; Claire, M.; Schwieterman, E.

    2014-12-01

    Increasing evidence suggests Archean Earth had a photochemical hydrocarbon haze similar to Titan's (Zerkle et al. 2012), with important climate implications (Pavlov et al. 2001, Trainer et al. 2006, Haqq-Misra et al. 2008, Domagal-Goldman et al. 2008, Wolf and Toon 2012). Observations also suggest hazy exoplanets are common (Sing et al. 2011, Kreidberg et al 2014), so hazy planet spectra will be relevant to future exoplanet spectral characterization missions. Here, we consider the implications of hydrocarbon aerosols on the spectrum of Archean Earth, examining the effect of a haze layer on the detectability of spectral features from putative biosignatures and the Rayleigh scattering slope. We also examine haze's impact on the spectral energy distribution at the planetary surface, which may be important to the co-evolution of life with its environment. Because the atmospheric pressure and haze particle composition of the Archean Earth are poorly constrained, we test the impact of atmospheric pressure and particle density on haze formation. Our study uses a modified version of the 1-D photochemical code developed originally by Kasting et al. (1979) to generate a fractal haze in the model Archean atmosphere. The 1-D line-by-line fully multiple scattering Spectral Mapping Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Model (SMART) (Meadows and Crisp 1996) is then used to generate synthetic spectra of early Earth with haze. We find (Fig 1) that haze scattering significantly depletes the radiation at short wavelengths, strongly affecting the spectral region of the Rayleigh slope, a broadband change in spectral shape detectable at low spectral resolution. At the surface, the spectral energy distribution is shifted towards longer wavelengths, which may be important to photosynthetic life. Thus, the haze may have significant effects on biology, which in turn produces the methane that leads to haze formation, creating feedback loops between biology and the planet.

  9. Effects on optical systems from interactions with oxygen atoms in low earth orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, P. N.; Swann, J. T.; Gregory, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    Modifications of material surface properties due to interactions with ambient atomic oxygen have been observed on surfaces facing the orbital direction in low earth orbits. Some effects are very damaging to surface optical properties while some are more subtle and even beneficial. Most combustible materials are heavily etched, and some coatings, such as silver and osmium, are seriously degraded or removed as volatile oxides. The growth of oxide films on metals and semiconductors considered stable in dry air was measured. Material removal, surface roughness, reflectance, and optical densities are reported. Effects of temperature, contamination, and overcoatings are noted.

  10. Solar and terrestrial physics. [effects of solar activities on earth environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The effects of solar radiation on the near space and biomental earth, the upper atmosphere, and the magnetosphere are discussed. Data obtained from the OSO satellites pertaining to the solar cycle variation of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation are analyzed. The effects of solar cycle variation of the characteristics of the solar wind are examined. The fluid mechanics of shock waves and the specific relationship to the characteristics of solar shock waves are investigated. The solar and corpuscular heating of the upper atmosphere is reported based on the findings of the AEROS and NATE experiments. Seasonal variations of the upper atmosphere composition are plotted based on OGO-6 mass spectrometer data.

  11. ON THE EFFECTS OF THE EVOLUTION OF MICROBIAL MATS AND LAND PLANTS ON THE EARTH AS A PLANET. PHOTOMETRIC AND SPECTROSCOPIC LIGHT CURVES OF PALEO-EARTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Sanroma, E.; Palle, E.; Garcia Munoz, A.

    2013-04-01

    Understanding the spectral and photometric variability of the Earth and the rest of the solar system planets has become of utmost importance for the future characterization of rocky exoplanets. As this is not only interesting at present times but also along the planetary evolution, we studied the effect that the evolution of microbial mats and plants over land has had on the way our planet looks from afar. As life evolved, continental surfaces changed gradually and non-uniformly from deserts through microbial mats to land plants, modifying the reflective properties of the ground and most likely the distribution of moisture and cloudiness. Here, we used a radiative transfer model of the Earth, together with geological paleo-records of the continental distribution and a reconstructed cloud distribution, to simulate the visible and near-IR radiation reflected by our planet as a function of Earth's rotation. We found that the evolution from deserts to microbial mats and to land plants produces detectable changes in the globally averaged Earth's reflectance. The variability of each surface type is located in different bands and can induce reflectance changes of up to 40% in period of hours. We conclude that by using photometric observations of an Earth-like planet at different photometric bands it would be possible to discriminate between different surface types. While recent literature proposes the red-edge feature of vegetation near 0.7 {mu}m as a signature for land plants, observations in near-IR bands can be equally or even better suited for this purpose.

  12. On the Effects of the Evolution of Microbial Mats and Land Plants on the Earth as a Planet. Photometric and Spectroscopic Light Curves of Paleo-Earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanromá, E.; Pallé, E.; García Munõz, A.

    2013-04-01

    Understanding the spectral and photometric variability of the Earth and the rest of the solar system planets has become of utmost importance for the future characterization of rocky exoplanets. As this is not only interesting at present times but also along the planetary evolution, we studied the effect that the evolution of microbial mats and plants over land has had on the way our planet looks from afar. As life evolved, continental surfaces changed gradually and non-uniformly from deserts through microbial mats to land plants, modifying the reflective properties of the ground and most likely the distribution of moisture and cloudiness. Here, we used a radiative transfer model of the Earth, together with geological paleo-records of the continental distribution and a reconstructed cloud distribution, to simulate the visible and near-IR radiation reflected by our planet as a function of Earth's rotation. We found that the evolution from deserts to microbial mats and to land plants produces detectable changes in the globally averaged Earth's reflectance. The variability of each surface type is located in different bands and can induce reflectance changes of up to 40% in period of hours. We conclude that by using photometric observations of an Earth-like planet at different photometric bands it would be possible to discriminate between different surface types. While recent literature proposes the red-edge feature of vegetation near 0.7 μm as a signature for land plants, observations in near-IR bands can be equally or even better suited for this purpose.

  13. Sunlight effects on the 3D polar current system determined from low Earth orbit measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laundal, Karl M.; Finlay, Christopher C.; Olsen, Nils

    2016-08-01

    Interaction between the solar wind and the Earth's magnetosphere is associated with large-scale currents in the ionosphere at polar latitudes that flow along magnetic field lines (Birkeland currents) and horizontally. These current systems are tightly linked, but their global behaviors are rarely analyzed together. In this paper, we present estimates of the average global Birkeland currents and horizontal ionospheric currents from the same set of magnetic field measurements. The magnetic field measurements, from the low Earth orbiting Swarm and CHAMP satellites, are used to co-estimate poloidal and toroidal parts of the magnetic disturbance field, represented in magnetic apex coordinates. The use of apex coordinates reduces effects of longitudinal and hemispheric variations in the Earth's main field. We present global currents from both hemispheres during different sunlight conditions. The results show that the Birkeland currents vary with the conductivity, which depends most strongly on solar EUV emissions on the dayside and on particle precipitation at pre-midnight magnetic local times. In sunlight, the horizontal equivalent current flows in two cells, resembling an opposite ionospheric convection pattern, which implies that it is dominated by Hall currents. By combining the Birkeland current maps and the equivalent current, we are able to calculate the total horizontal current, without any assumptions about the conductivity. We show that the total horizontal current is close to zero in the polar cap when it is dark. That implies that the equivalent current, which is sensed by ground magnetometers, is largely canceled by the horizontal closure of the Birkeland currents.

  14. Diatomaceous earth and oil enhance effectiveness of Metarhizium anisopliae against Triatoma infestans.

    PubMed

    Luz, Christian; Rodrigues, Juscelino; Rocha, Luiz F N

    2012-04-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi, especially Metarhizium anisopliae, have potential for integrated control of peridomestic triatomine bugs. However, the high susceptibility of these vectors to fungal infection at elevated ambient humidities decreases in the comparatively dry conditions that often prevail in their microhabitats. A formulation adapted to this target pest that induces high and quick mortality can help to overcome these drawbacks. In the present study diatomaceous earth, which is used against pests of stored grains or as an additive to mycoinsecticides, delayed but did not reduce in vitro germination of M. anisopliae s.l. IP 46 conidia after >24h agitation without affecting viability, and did not hamper the survival of Triatoma infestans nymphs exposed to treated surfaces. The settling behavior of nymphs on a treated surface in choice tests depended on the concentration of diatomaceous earth and ambient light level. Conidia formulated with diatomaceous earth and a vegetable oil synergized the insecticidal effect of the fungus in nymphs, and quickly killed all treated insects, even at 75% relative humidity (LT(90) 8.3 days) where unformulated conidia caused only 25% mortality after a 25 days exposure. The improved performance of a combined oil and desiccant dust formulation of this Metarhizium isolate raises the likelihood for its successful mycoinsecticidal use for triatomine control and, apparently, against other domestic insect pests. PMID:22155570

  15. Effectiveness of GeoWall Visualization Technology for Conceptualization of the Sun-Earth-Moon System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, N. E.; Gray, C.; Mitchell, E. J.

    2004-12-01

    One persistent difficulty many introductory astronomy students face is the lack of a 3-dimensional mental model of the Earth-Moon system. Students without such a mental model can have a very hard time conceptualizing the geometric relationships that cause the cycle of lunar phases. The GeoWall is a recently developed and affordable projection mechanism for three-dimensional stereo visualization which is becoming a popular tool in classrooms and research labs. We present results from a study using a 3-D GeoWall with a simulated sunlit Earth-Moon system on undergraduate students' ability to understand the origins of lunar phases. We test students exposed to only in-class instruction, some with a laboratory exercise using the GeoWall Earth-Moon simulation, some students who were exposed to both, and some with an alternate activity involving lunar observations. Students are given pre and post tests using the a diagnostic test called the Lunar Phase Concept Inventory (LPCI). We discuss the effectiveness of this technology as a teaching tool for lunar phases.

  16. Displacements of the earth's surface due to atmospheric loading - Effects of gravity and baseline measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Dam, T. M.; Wahr, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    Atmospheric mass loads and deforms the earth's crust. By performing a convolution sum between daily, global barometric pressure data and mass loading Green's functions, the time dependent effects of atmospheric loading, including those associated with short-term synoptic storms, on surface point positioning measurements and surface gravity observations are estimated. The response for both an oceanless earth and an earth with an inverted barometer ocean is calculated. Load responses for near-coastal stations are significantly affected by the inclusion of an inverted barometer ocean. Peak-to-peak vertical displacements are frequently 15-20 mm with accompanying gravity perturbations of 3-6 micro Gal. Baseline changes can be as large as 20 mm or more. The perturbations are largest at higher latitudes and during winter months. These amplitudes are consistent with the results of Rabbel and Zschau (1985), who modeled synoptic pressure disturbances as Gaussian functions of radius around a central point. Deformation can be adequately computed using real pressure data from points within about 1000 km of the station. Knowledge of local pressure, alone, is not sufficient. Rabbel and Zschau's hypothesized corrections for these displacements, which use local pressure and the regionally averaged pressure, prove accurate at points well inland but are, in general, inadequate within a few hundred kilometers of the coast.

  17. Effect of thermospheric contraction on remediation of the near-Earth space debris environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Hugh G.; Saunders, Arrun; Swinerd, Graham; Newland, Rebecca J.

    2011-08-01

    Historically, computer simulations of the near-Earth space debris environment have provided a basis for international debris mitigation guidelines and, today, continue to influence international debate on debris environment remediation and active debris removal. Approximately 22,500 objects larger than 10 cm are known to exist in Earth orbit, and less than 5% of these are operational payloads, with the remaining population classed as space debris. These objects represent a significant risk to satellite operations because of the possibility of damaging or catastrophic collisions, as demonstrated by the collision between Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251 in February 2009. Indeed, recent computer simulations have suggested that the current population in low Earth orbit (LEO) has reached a sufficient density at some altitudes for collision activity there to continue even in the absence of new launches. Even with the widespread adoption of debris mitigation guidelines, the growth of the LEO population, in particular, is expected to result in eight or nine collisions among cataloged objects in the next 40 years. With a new study using the University of Southampton's space debris model, entitled DAMAGE, we show that the effectiveness of debris mitigation and removal strategies to constrain the growth of the LEO debris population could be more than halved because of a long-term future decline in global thermospheric density. However, increasing debris remediation efforts can reverse the impact of this negative density trend.

  18. High-Accuracy Ring Laser Gyroscopes: Earth Rotation Rate and Relativistic Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beverini, N.; Di Virgilio, A.; Belfi, J.; Ortolan, A.; Schreiber, K. U.; Gebauer, A.; Klügel, T.

    2016-06-01

    The Gross Ring G is a square ring laser gyroscope, built as a monolithic Zerodur structure with 4 m length on all sides. It has demonstrated that a large ring laser provides a sensitivity high enough to measure the rotational rate of the Earth with a high precision of ΔΩE < 10-8. It is possible to show that further improvement in accuracy could allow the observation of the metric frame dragging, produced by the Earth rotating mass (Lense-Thirring effect), as predicted by General Relativity. Furthermore, it can provide a local measurement of the Earth rotational rate with a sensitivity near to that provided by the international system IERS. The GINGER project is intending to take this level of sensitivity further and to improve the accuracy and the long-term stability. A monolithic structure similar to the G ring laser is not available for GINGER. Therefore the preliminary goal is the demonstration of the feasibility of a larger gyroscope structure, where the mechanical stability is obtained through an active control of the geometry. A prototype moderate size gyroscope (GP-2) has been set up in Pisa in order to test this active control of the ring geometry, while a second structure (GINGERino) has been installed inside the Gran Sasso underground laboratory in order to investigate the properties of a deep underground laboratory in view of an installation of a future GINGER apparatus. The preliminary data on these two latter instruments are presented.

  19. Solar cycle effects on near-earth plasmas and space systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorney, D. J.

    1989-12-01

    Recently, solar physicists have predicted with ever-increasing confidence that the upcoming maximum of solar activity, scheduled to occur near 1990, might be the most extreme ever recorded. Unfortunately, because of the complex and sometimes direct interactions between the sun and the plasma environment in near-earth space, very few firm quantitative predictions can be made regarding the expected effects of an extreme solar maximum on the near-earth environment or on the complex systems operating in that environment. However, a number of qualitative predictions can be made with high confidence. Satellite communications links in the vhf/uhf range will suffer signal fades more often and with greater severity. Short-wave and airline communications will be sporadically disrupted. Satellites will experience electrical charging of their surface and internal dielectric components, resulting in disruptive electrostatic discharges, and microelectronic devices on satellites will experience upsets more often. The purpose of this paper is to review the direct and indirect influences of solar activity on the near-earth plasma environment and on systems that operate within that environment.

  20. A laser gyroscope system to detect the gravito-magnetic effect on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allegrini, M.; Belfi, J.; Beverini, N.; Bosi, F.; Bouhadef, B.; Carelli, G.; Cella, G.; Cerdonio, M.; Di Virgilio, A. D.; Gebauer, A.; Maccioni, E.; Ortolan, A.; Porzio, A.; Ruggiero, M. L.; Schreiber, U. K.; Solimeno, S.; Stefani, F.; Tartaglia, A.; Zendri, J.-P.; Wells, J.-P.

    2012-07-01

    Ring lasers are inertial sensors for angular velocity based on the Sagnac effect. In recent years they have reached a very high sensitivity and accuracy; the best performing one, the ring Laser G in Wettzell (Germany), a square ring with 16 m perimeter, has reached a sensitivity of 12prad/s very close to the shot noise limit inferred from ring-down time measurements. On this basis it is expected that an array of six square ring lasers of 36 m perimeter, can perform a 1% accuracy test for the measurement of the Lense-Thirring frame dragging after 2 years of integration time. Essential for this measurement is the comparison between the Earth angular velocity and orientation in space measured with the ring array and compared to the measurement series maintained by the International Earth Rotation and Reference System Service (IERS), which measures Earth Rotation and pole position with respect to remote quasars. It has been shown that the accuracy of G in Wettzell is limited by the low frequency motion of the near surface laboratory, which is of the order of several prad/s, roughly 100 times larger than the Lense-Thirring contribution. For this reason the entire experiment should be placed in a quite underground laboratory, where these perturbations are reduced. The feasibility to properly place such a device inside the GranSasso INFN National Laboratory has been investigated.

  1. Effects of three-dimensional Earth structure on CMT earthquake parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjörleifsdóttir, Vala; Ekström, Göran

    2010-04-01

    We investigate errors in centroid earthquake parameters due to unmodeled structural heterogeneity. We generate a simulated dataset consisting of synthetic seismograms for 50 earthquakes and 150 stations distributed globally. To generate the synthetic seismograms we use a spectral-element wave-propagation package (SPECFEM3D_GLOBE) that accounts for the Earth's three-dimensional structure. An established centroid-moment-tensor inversion algorithm from the Global CMT project is used to invert the synthetic dataset, with and without added noise, for earthquake source parameters. This algorithm uses a one-dimensional earth structure, together with approximate corrections for three-dimensional structure, to model the seismograms. We interpret the differences between the estimated source parameters and the parameters used to compute the synthetic dataset as errors due to unmodeled structural heterogeneity and the presence of noise. We expect that the errors obtained in this study are representative of the errors in the Global CMT catalogue. We find that the errors in scalar moment, moment-tensor elements and location are small on average. The depth and centroid time are, however, biased by a small amount. We find that the error in depth can be reduced significantly by applying corrections for the difference in the velocity structure at the source and receiver locations from the Earth's average structure in the CMT inversions. This modification has a minimal effect on the errors in centroid time. We do not find large errors in scalar moments, even where the crustal thickness at the source is very different from the Earth's average crustal thickness.

  2. Solar cycle effects on the near-earth plasmas and space systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorney, David J.

    1990-08-01

    Solar physicists have predicted that the upcoming maximum of solar activity, scheduled to occur near 1990, might be the most extreme ever recorded. Based on the observed rate of increase in solar activity starting with the most recent minimum in 1986 the upcoming solar maximum will be the most severe of those which have occurred during the space age. Correlations between solar activity and disturbances in the near-earth magnetospheric and ionospheric plasmas which adversely affect communications and space systems are well documented. The implementation of larger, more complex (and perhaps more susceptible) space systems over the last decade, has led to concern and speculation about the expected performance and survivability of these space systems over the next decade. Unfortunately, because of the complex and sometimes indirect interactions between the sun and the plasma environment in near-earth space, very few firm quantitative predictions can be made regarding the expected effects of an extreme solar maximum on the near-earth environment or on the complex systems operating in that environment. A number of qualitative predictions can be made with high confidence. Satellite communications links in the VHF/UHF range will suffer signal fades more often and with greater severity. Short wave and airline communications will be sporadically disrupted. Satellites will experience electrical charging of their surface and internal dielectric components, resulting in disruptive electrostatic discharges (ESDs), and microelectronic devices on satellites will experience upsets more often. The direct and indirect influences of solar activity on the near-Earth plasma environment and on systems which operate within that environment are reviewed.

  3. Efficient rotational echo double resonance recoupling of a spin-1/2 and a quadrupolar spin at high spinning rates and weak irradiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimerovsky, Evgeny; Goldbourt, Amir

    2010-09-01

    A modification of the rotational echo (adiabatic passage) double resonance experiments, which allows recoupling of the dipolar interaction between a spin-1/2 and a half integer quadrupolar spin is proposed. We demonstrate efficient and uniform recoupling at high spinning rates ( ν r), low radio-frequency (RF) irradiation fields ( ν1), and high values of the quadrupolar interaction ( ν q) that correspond to values of α=ν12/νqνr, the adiabaticity parameter, which are down to less than 10% of the traditional adiabaticity limit for a spin-5/2 (α = 0.55). The low-alpha rotational echo double resonance curve is obtained when the pulse on the quadrupolar nucleus is extended to full two rotor periods and beyond. For protons (spin-1/2) and aluminum (spin-5/2) species in the zeolite SAPO-42, a dephasing curve, which is significantly better than the regular REAPDOR experiment (pulse length of one-third of the rotor period) is obtained for a spinning rate of 13 kHz and RF fields down to 10 and even 6 kHz. Under these conditions, α is estimated to be approximately 0.05 based on an average quadrupolar coupling in zeolites. Extensive simulations support our observations suggesting the method to be robust under a large range of experimental values.

  4. The Effect of Alkaline Earth Metal on the Cesium Loading of Ionsiv(R) IE-910 and IE-911

    SciTech Connect

    Fondeur, F.F.

    2001-01-16

    This study investigated the effect of variances in alkaline earth metal concentrations on cesium loading of IONSIV(R) IE-911. The study focused on Savannah River Site (SRS) ''average'' solution with varying amounts of calcium, barium and magnesium.

  5. Necessity of using heterogeneous ellipsoidal Earth model with terrain to calculate co-seismic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Huihong; Zhang, Bei; Zhang, Huai; Huang, Luyuan; Qu, Wulin; Shi, Yaolin

    2016-04-01

    Co-seismic deformation and stress changes, which reflect the elasticity of the earth, are very important in the earthquake dynamics, and also to other issues, such as the evaluation of the seismic risk, fracture process and triggering of earthquake. Lots of scholars have researched the dislocation theory and co-seismic deformation and obtained the half-space homogeneous model, half-space stratified model, spherical stratified model, and so on. Especially, models of Okada (1992) and Wang (2003, 2006) are widely applied in the research of calculating co-seismic and post-seismic effects. However, since both semi-infinite space model and layered model do not take the role of the earth curvature or heterogeneity or topography into consideration, there are large errors in calculating the co-seismic displacement of a great earthquake in its impacted area. Meanwhile, the computational methods of calculating the co-seismic strain and stress are different between spherical model and plane model. Here, we adopted the finite element method which could well deal with the complex characteristics (such as anisotropy, discontinuities) of rock and different conditions. We use the mash adaptive technique to automatically encrypt the mesh at the fault and adopt the equivalent volume force replace the dislocation source, which can avoid the difficulty in handling discontinuity surface with conventional (Zhang et al., 2015). We constructed an earth model that included earth's layered structure and curvature, the upper boundary was set as a free surface and the core-mantle boundary was set under buoyancy forces. Firstly, based on the precision requirement, we take a testing model - - a strike-slip fault (the length of fault is 500km and the width is 50km, and the slippage is 10m) for example. Because of the curvature of the Earth, some errors certainly occur in plane coordinates just as previous studies (Dong et al., 2014; Sun et al., 2012). However, we also found that: 1) the co

  6. Unusual locations of Earth's bow shock on September 24 - 25, 1987: Mach number effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.; Fairfield, Donald H.; Anderson, Oger R.; Carlton, Victoria E. H.; Paularena, Karolen I.; Lazarus, Alan J.

    1995-01-01

    International Sun Earth Explorer 1 (ISEE 1) and Interplanetary Monitoring Platform 8 (IMP 8) data are used to identify 19 crossings of Earth's bow shock during a 30-hour period following 0000 UT on September 24, 1987. Apparent standoff distances for the shock are calculated for each crossing using two methods and the spacecraft location; one method assumes the average shock shape, while the other assumes a ram pressure-dependent shock shape. The shock's apparent standoff distance, normally approximately 14 R(sub E), is shown to increase from near 10 R(sub E) initially to near 19 R(sub E) during an 8-hour period, followed by an excursion to near 35 R(sub E) (where two IMP 8 shock crossings occur) and an eventual return to values smaller than 19 R(sub E). The Alfven M(sub A) and fast magnetosonic M(sub ms). Mach numbers remain above 2 and the number density above 4/cu cm for almost the entire period. Ram pressure effects produce the initial near-Earth shock location, whereas expansions and contractions of the bow shock due to low Mach number effects account, qualitatively and semiquantitatively, for the timing and existence of almost all the remaining ISEE crossings and both IMP 8 crossings. Significant quantitative differences exist between the apparent standoff distances for the shock crossings and those predicted using the observed plasma parameters and the standard model based on Spreiter et al.'s (1966) gasdynamic equation. These differences can be explained in terms of either a different dependence of the standoff distance on Mach number at low M(sub A) and M(sub ms), or variations in shock shape with M(sub A) and M(sub ms) (becoming increasingly "puffed up" with decreasing M(sub A) and M(sub ms), as expected theoretically), or by a combination of both effects.

  7. Loss of Water in Early Earth's Atmosphere and Its Effects on Habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airapetian, Vladimir; Glocer, Alex; Khazanov, George

    2015-08-01

    The short wavelength emission from the Sun has a profound impact on the Earth’s atmosphere. High energy photons ionize the atmosphere and produce photoelectrons. This process provides a major contribution to the acceleration of atmospheric ions due to the vertical separation of ions and electrons, and the formation of the resulting ambipolar electric field. Observations and theory suggest that even a relatively small fraction of super-thermal electrons (photoelectrons) produced due to photoionization can drive the ”polar wind” that is responsible for the transport of ionospheric constituents to the Earth’s magnetosphere.The young Sun was a magnetically active star generating powerful radiative output from its chromosphere, transition region and corona which was a few hundred times greater than that observed today. What effects would the photoionization processes due to the X-ray-UV solar flux from early Sun have on the loss of water from the early Earth?We use the Fokker-Plank code coupled with 1D hydrodynamic code to model the effect of intensive short-wavelength (X-rays to UV band) emission from the young Sun (3.8 and 4.4 Ga) on Earth's atmosphere. Our simulations include the photoionization processes of the Earth’s atmosphere forming a population of photoelectrons (E<600 eV), the kinetic effects of their propagation associated and their contribution in ionosphere - magnetosphere energy redistribution. Our coupled simulations show that the ambipolar electric field can drag atmospheric ions of oxygen and hydrogen to the magnetosphere and produce significant mass loss that can affect the loss of water from the early Earth in the first half a billion years. This process became less efficient in the next 0.2-0.3 Ga that could have provided a window of opportunity for origin of life.

  8. Effects of the observed J2 variations on the Earth's precession and nutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrándiz, José M.; Baenas, Tomás; Belda, Santiago

    2016-04-01

    The Earth's oblateness parameter J2 is closely related to the dynamical ellipticity H, which factorizes the main components of the precession and the different nutation terms. In most theoretical approaches to the Earth's rotation, with IAU2000 nutation theory among them, H is assumed to be constant. The precession model IAU2006 supposes H to have a conventional linear variation, based on the J2 time series derived mainly from satellite laser ranging (SLR) data for decades, which gives rise to an additional quadratic term of the precession in longitude and some corrections of the nutation terms. The time evolution of J2 is, however, too complex to be well approximated by a simple linear model. The effect of more general models including periodic terms and closer to the observed time series, although still unable to reproduce a significant part of the signal, has been seldom investigated. In this work we address the problem of deriving the effect of the observed J2 variations without resorting to such simplified models. The Hamiltonian approach to the Earth rotation is extended to allow the McCullagh's term of the potential to depend on a time-varying oblateness. An analytical solution is derived by means of a suitable perturbation method in the case of the time series provided by the Center for Space Research (CSR) of the University of Texas, which results in non-negligible contributions to the precession-nutation angles. The presentation focuses on the main effects on the longitude of the equator; a noticeable non-linear trend is superimposed to the linear main precession term, along with some periodic and decadal variations.

  9. Cost-effective technology advancement directions for electric propulsion transportation systems in earth-orbital missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regetz, J. D., Jr.; Terwilliger, C. H.

    1979-01-01

    The directions that electric propulsion technology should take to meet the primary propulsion requirements for earth-orbital missions in the most cost effective manner are determined. The mission set requirements, state of the art electric propulsion technology and the baseline system characterized by it, adequacy of the baseline system to meet the mission set requirements, cost optimum electric propulsion system characteristics for the mission set, and sensitivities of mission costs and design points to system level electric propulsion parameters are discussed. The impact on overall costs than specific masses or costs of propulsion and power systems is evaluated.

  10. Large Superconducting Spin Valve Effect and Ultrasmall Exchange Splitting in Epitaxial Rare-Earth-Niobium Trilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yuanzhou; Halász, Gábor B.; Robinson, J. W. A.; Blamire, M. G.

    2015-08-01

    Epitaxial Ho /Nb /Ho and Dy /Nb /Dy superconducting spin valves show a reversible change in the zero-field critical temperature (Δ Tc 0 ) of ˜400 mK and an infinite magnetoresistance on changing the relative magnetization of the Ho or Dy layers. Unlike transition-metal superconducting spin valves, which show much smaller Δ Tc 0 values, our results can be quantitatively modeled. However, the fits require an extraordinarily low induced exchange splitting which is dramatically lower than known values for rare-earth Fermi-level electrons, implying that new models for the magnetic proximity effect may be required.