Science.gov

Sample records for earthquake engineering research

  1. Earthquake engineering research needs in light of lessons learned from the 2011 Tohoku earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Masayoshi; Lavan, Oren; Kurata, Masahiro; Luo, Yunbiao

    2014-08-01

    Earthquake engineering research and development have received much attention since the first half of the twentieth century. This valuable research presented a huge step forward in understanding earthquake hazard mitigation, which resulted in appreciable reduction of the effects of past earthquakes. Nevertheless, the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and the subsequent tsunami resulted in major damage. This paper presents the timeline of earthquake mitigation and recovery, as seen by the authors. Possible research directions where the authors think that many open questions still remain are identified. These are primarily based on the important lessons learned from the 2011 Tohoku earthquake.

  2. Overview of the Multidisciplinary Center for Earthquake Engineering Research (MCEER)

    E-print Network

    Bruneau, Michel

    operational after an earthquake--namely hospitals, lifeline systems (water and power distribution networks Research, University at Buffalo, 105 Red Jacket Quad, Buffalo, NY 14261, USA #12;INTRODUCTION at the University at Buffalo, the Center was established in 1986 by the National Science Foundation (NSF

  3. Tenth U.S. National Conference on Earthquake Engineering Frontiers of Earthquake Engineering

    E-print Network

    Baker, Jack W.

    " or "ground motions") resulting from (or attempting to simulate) real earthquakes must be obtained. GroundTenth U.S. National Conference on Earthquake Engineering Frontiers of Earthquake Engineering July National Conference in Earthquake Engineering, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute, Anchorage, AK

  4. Potential utilization of the NASA/George C. Marshall Space Flight Center in earthquake engineering research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholl, R. E. (editor)

    1979-01-01

    Earthquake engineering research capabilities of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) facilities at George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), Alabama, were evaluated. The results indicate that the NASA/MSFC facilities and supporting capabilities offer unique opportunities for conducting earthquake engineering research. Specific features that are particularly attractive for large scale static and dynamic testing of natural and man-made structures include the following: large physical dimensions of buildings and test bays; high loading capacity; wide range and large number of test equipment and instrumentation devices; multichannel data acquisition and processing systems; technical expertise for conducting large-scale static and dynamic testing; sophisticated techniques for systems dynamics analysis, simulation, and control; and capability for managing large-size and technologically complex programs. Potential uses of the facilities for near and long term test programs to supplement current earthquake research activities are suggested.

  5. Promoting reuse of Earthquake Engineering data through the

    E-print Network

    ). "Small Scale Testing Phase 1", Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (database), DatasetPromoting reuse of Earthquake Engineering data through the NEEShub Professor JoAnn Browning, University of Kansas SERIES Concluding Workshop Joint with USNEES "Earthquake Engineering Research

  6. University Ss. Cyril and Methodius Institute of Earthquake Engineering

    E-print Network

    University Ss. Cyril and Methodius Institute of Earthquake Engineering and Engineering Seismology-Skopje SERIES Concluding Workshop, NEES "Earthquake Engineering Research Infrastructures" JRC-Ispra, May 28: Vlatko Sesov Kemal Edip and Julijana Cvetanovska #12;SERIES Concluding Workshop, NEES "Earthquake

  7. Tenth U.S. National Conference on Earthquake Engineering Frontiers of Earthquake Engineering

    E-print Network

    Baker, Jack W.

    Tenth U.S. National Conference on Earthquake Engineering Frontiers of Earthquake Engineering July hazards, such as earthquakes, is a critical attribute that impacts the magnitude and extent of direct on the ground motion intensity simulation aspect of the research, which utilizes current rupture forecasts

  8. Geotechnical, Geological and Earthquake Engineering 33 Gian Paolo Cimellaro Satish Nagarajaiah Sashi K. Kunnath Editors

    E-print Network

    1 Geotechnical, Geological and Earthquake Engineering 33 Gian Paolo Cimellaro · Satish Nagarajaiah in Earthquake Engineering ATribute to the Research Contribution of Prof. Andrei Reinhorn Geotechnical

  9. World Conference on Earthquake Engineering Vancouver, B.C., Canada

    E-print Network

    Hamann, Bernd

    . Brown, Jr., Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation. This four-year upgrade project represents13th World Conference on Earthquake Engineering Vancouver, B.C., Canada August 1-6, 2004 Paper No-hydraulic shaking table. This equipment has been used in geotechnical earthquake engineering research since 1994

  10. 4th International Conference on Earthquake Engineering Taipei, Taiwan

    E-print Network

    Bruneau, Michel

    4th International Conference on Earthquake Engineering Taipei, Taiwan October 12-13, 2006 Paper No Center for Research on Earthquake Engineering. The paper focuses on the design procedures, experimental accelerations, which were recorded in the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake and scaled up to represent seismic hazards

  11. Earthquakes and Earthquake Engineering. LC Science Tracer Bullet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buydos, John F., Comp.

    An earthquake is a shaking of the ground resulting from a disturbance in the earth's interior. Seismology is the (1) study of earthquakes; (2) origin, propagation, and energy of seismic phenomena; (3) prediction of these phenomena; and (4) investigation of the structure of the earth. Earthquake engineering or engineering seismology includes the…

  12. The Challenge of Centennial Earthquakes to Improve Modern Earthquake Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Saragoni, G. Rodolfo

    2008-07-08

    The recent commemoration of the centennial of the San Francisco and Valparaiso 1906 earthquakes has given the opportunity to reanalyze their damages from modern earthquake engineering perspective. These two earthquakes plus Messina Reggio Calabria 1908 had a strong impact in the birth and developing of earthquake engineering. The study of the seismic performance of some up today existing buildings, that survive centennial earthquakes, represent a challenge to better understand the limitations of our in use earthquake design methods. Only Valparaiso 1906 earthquake, of the three considered centennial earthquakes, has been repeated again as the Central Chile, 1985, Ms = 7.8 earthquake. In this paper a comparative study of the damage produced by 1906 and 1985 Valparaiso earthquakes is done in the neighborhood of Valparaiso harbor. In this study the only three centennial buildings of 3 stories that survived both earthquakes almost undamaged were identified. Since for 1985 earthquake accelerogram at El Almendral soil conditions as well as in rock were recoded, the vulnerability analysis of these building is done considering instrumental measurements of the demand. The study concludes that good performance of these buildings in the epicentral zone of large earthquakes can not be well explained by modern earthquake engineering methods. Therefore, it is recommended to use in the future of more suitable instrumental parameters, such as the destructiveness potential factor, to describe earthquake demand.

  13. Tenth U.S. National Conference on Earthquake Engineering Frontiers of Earthquake Engineering

    E-print Network

    Baker, Jack W.

    Tenth U.S. National Conference on Earthquake Engineering Frontiers of Earthquake Engineering July earthquakes, utilizing physics-based models of earthquake rupture and wave propagation, is an area of active between earthquake scientists and engineering users, and testing/rating methodologies for simulated ground

  14. 4th International Conference on Earthquake Engineering Taipei, Taiwan

    E-print Network

    Lynch, Jerome P.

    Center for Research on Earthquake Engineering (NCREE) in Taiwan. Emphasis is placed on using simulation4th International Conference on Earthquake Engineering Taipei, Taiwan October 12-13, 2006 Paper No. 175 EXPERIMENTS AND SIMULATION OF REINFORCED CONCRETE BUILDINGS SUBJECTED TO REVERSED CYCLIC

  15. Tenth U.S. National Conference on Earthquake Engineering Frontiers of Earthquake Engineering

    E-print Network

    Baker, Jack W.

    Tenth U.S. National Conference on Earthquake Engineering Frontiers of Earthquake Engineering July and earthquake source characteristics (e.g. source type, magnitude, and distance) obtained from seismic hazard the contribution of interface earthquakes in subduction zones that are known to produce long duration ground

  16. Ninth Canadian Conference on Earthquake Engineering

    E-print Network

    Masud, Arif

    Ninth Canadian Conference on Earthquake Engineering Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 26-29 June 2007 EARTHQUAKE DESIGN CODES FOR PAKISTAN: AN OPTION OR A NECESSITY? Masud1 , A. and Elnashai2 , A. S. ABSTRACT The Kashmir earthquake of October 8, 2005 which had a magnitude of 7.6 inflicted a heavy toll on lives

  17. Tenth U.S. National Conference on Earthquake Engineering Frontiers of Earthquake Engineering

    E-print Network

    Bruneau, Michel

    Tenth U.S. National Conference on Earthquake Engineering Frontiers of Earthquake Engineering July 21-25, 2014 Anchorage, Alaska10NCEE POST-EARTHQUAKE FIRE RESISTANCE OF DUCTILE CONCRETE FILLED DOUBLE to examine the behavior of concrete filled double-skin tube (CFDST) columns exposed to fire after being

  18. EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING AND STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS Earthquake Engng Struct. Dyn. 2002; 31:18551877 (DOI: 10.1002/eqe.193)

    E-print Network

    Michalak, Anna M.

    EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING AND STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS Earthquake Engng Struct. Dyn. 2002; 31 H. Law; Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering; The John A. Blume Earthquake Engineering are designed to limit their response to various external disturbances such as earthquakes and winds

  19. Tenth U.S. National Conference on Earthquake Engineering Frontiers of Earthquake Engineering

    E-print Network

    Baker, Jack W.

    10NCEE Tenth U.S. National Conference on Earthquake Engineering Frontiers of Earthquake Engineering methods, including Monte Carlo simulations, First- Order Second-Moment, response surface and artificial, depending on the size and other characteristics of the problem. Simulation-based methods are explored

  20. CEE 431 / ESS 465 Winter 2006 Seismology and Earthquake Engineering

    E-print Network

    Eberhard, Marc O.

    CEE 431 / ESS 465 Winter 2006 1 Seismology and Earthquake Engineering Instructor: M.O. Eberhard an introduction to seismology and earthquake engineering. The course covers a wide range of topics. For each topic

  1. EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING AND STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS Earthquake Engng Struct. Dyn. 2013; 00:120

    E-print Network

    Baker, Jack W.

    -based methods: primarily by modeling the seismic hazard using simulated scenario earthquakes [e.g., 1, 5, 6] or using Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) of various earthquake events (defined by source and magnitudeEARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING AND STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS Earthquake Engng Struct. Dyn. 2013; 00

  2. USING THE EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING INTENSITY SCALE TO IMPROVE URBAN AREA EARTHQUAKE EMERGENCY RESPONSE

    E-print Network

    Irfanoglu, Ayhan

    USING THE EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING INTENSITY SCALE TO IMPROVE URBAN AREA EARTHQUAKE EMERGENCY distribution estimation of earthquake damage in building stocks is presented. The purpose is to start a strong urban area earthquake. We used a pair of ground motion and building-tag color databases

  3. THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE NETWORK FOR EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING SIMULATION (NEES)

    E-print Network

    Pancake, Cherri M.

    THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE NETWORK FOR EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING SIMULATION (NEES) Stephen Mahin1 , Robert technology (IT). The program is the George E. Brown, Jr. Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES. Brown, Jr. Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES), however, which date from the late 1990s

  4. Earthquake Engineering Mitigation of Blast Loading

    E-print Network

    Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    Earthquake Engineering Mitigation of Blast Loading Health Monitoring & Condition Assessment-structural building components, and visual sensing for dy- namic testing. Associate Professor Hyonny Kim comes to UC-fluidics and protective/energy absorbing materials provides synergy with the Department's ongoing work in blast mitigation

  5. Istanbul Technical University Earthquake Engineering and Disaster Management Institute

    E-print Network

    , 2012 Evaluate the earthquake resistance of the structure Estimate the seismic hazard at the siteIstanbul Technical University Earthquake Engineering and Disaster Management Institute Post-earthquake Risk-based Decision Making Methodology for Turkish School Buildings Ufuk Yazgan, Reat Oyguç Earthquake

  6. Introduction: seismology and earthquake engineering in Mexico and Central and South America.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Espinosa, A.F.

    1982-01-01

    The results from seismological studies that are used by the engineering community are just one of the benefits obtained from research aimed at mitigating the earthquake hazard. In this issue of Earthquake Information Bulletin current programs in seismology and earthquake engineering, seismic networks, future plans and some of the cooperative programs with different internation organizations are described by Latin-American seismologists. The article describes the development of seismology in Latin America and the seismological interest of the OAS. -P.N.Chroston

  7. SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES

    E-print Network

    OF THE EUROPEAN COMMUNITIES FP7- INFRASTRUCTURES-2008-1 SP4-Capacities Experimental Earthquake Engineering of Research Infrastructures in Performance-based Earthquake Engineering" , Ohrid (MK), Sept 2., 2010 #12 and study of techniques for seismic protection and rehabilitation · Support to the development of seismic

  8. Ninth Canadian Conference on Earthquake Engineering

    E-print Network

    Bruneau, Michel

    , Plastic and Rotation Limits for Buildings and on Shear Links and Truss Piers for Bridges. That research earthquake. Large steel truss bridges were evaluated and in some cases retrofitted in most states where on innovations recently developed as design strategies for large steel bridges, but that can also have important

  9. Real-time earthquake monitoring using a search engine method

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Haijiang; Chen, Enhong; Zheng, Yi; Kuang, Wenhuan; Zhang, Xiong

    2014-01-01

    When an earthquake occurs, seismologists want to use recorded seismograms to infer its location, magnitude and source-focal mechanism as quickly as possible. If such information could be determined immediately, timely evacuations and emergency actions could be undertaken to mitigate earthquake damage. Current advanced methods can report the initial location and magnitude of an earthquake within a few seconds, but estimating the source-focal mechanism may require minutes to hours. Here we present an earthquake search engine, similar to a web search engine, that we developed by applying a computer fast search method to a large seismogram database to find waveforms that best fit the input data. Our method is several thousand times faster than an exact search. For an Mw 5.9 earthquake on 8 March 2012 in Xinjiang, China, the search engine can infer the earthquake’s parameters in <1?s after receiving the long-period surface wave data. PMID:25472861

  10. An Online Platform for Resources and Collaborative Research on Earthquake Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thingbaijam, K. S.; Mai, P. M.

    2013-12-01

    We develop the online platform http://equake-rc.info for collaborative research on earthquake sources. The platform has three main features: (1) finite-fault earthquake source models (SRCMOD) database, (2) Source Inversion Validation (SIV) Benchmarks and its Wiki, and (3) software Codes for Earthquake Rupture and ground-motion Simulation (CERS). SRCMOD collects and disseminates source models of past earthquakes. SIV aims at benchmarking the current state-of-the-art in earthquake source inversions and developing robust approaches to quantify uncertainties in the source models. CERS currently has three software packages. These include 'RupGen' for generating synthetic earthquake rupture models, 'Stress2Slip' for computing on-fault static stress changes corresponding to a slip distribution, and 'BB-Simulation' for computing and integrating high frequency synthetics with low frequency waveforms to generate hybrid broadband seismograms. We envision that this online platform will be useful in advancing research on earthquake source processes and earthquake engineering.

  11. Proceedings of the third U. S. national conference on earthquake engineering. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    During the past quarter century the North American continent has experienced a number of damaging earthquakes, among which were the 1964 Alaska earthquake, the 1971 San Fernando, California, earthquake, and most recently the 1985 Mexico City earthquake. A large number of smaller earthquakes have occurred during this period, all of which, along with large earthquakes that have occurred in other parts of the world, serve to remind one that the earthquake hazard is real. In view of potential loss of life and the economic losses that could result from large earthquakes, it is important that the United States continue its vigorous efforts towards mitigating the hazards of earthquakes including developing and implementing safe and economic methods of earthquake-resistant design and construction. In the light of the foregoing observations it it fitting that this Third U.S. National Conference on Earthquake Engineering be held in 1986 at Charleston, South Carolina, on the one-hundred-year anniversary of the 1886 Charleston earthquake. Although intended primarily for participation by U.S. practitioners and researchers, participants from many other parts of the world are also present. From the more than 300 papers offered for publication and presentation, over 200 papers are published in the three volumes of Proceedings and the single volume of Post-Conference Proceedings.

  12. Tenth U.S. National Conference on Earthquake Engineering Frontiers of Earthquake Engineering

    E-print Network

    Baker, Jack W.

    Earthquake engineering design requires an evaluation of the structure's reliability over future seismic loads more accurate seismic demand values than those obtained with current design spectra, which approximate is developed. Introduction The objective of seismic design is to ensure that structures will sustain future

  13. World Conference on Earthquake Engineering Vancouver, B.C., Canada

    E-print Network

    Stanford University

    13 th World Conference on Earthquake Engineering Vancouver, B.C., Canada August 1-6, 2004 Paper No. 1129 A MODULAR FRAMEWORK FOR EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING ANALYSIS AND SIMULATIONS Jun PENG1 , Frank MCKENNA2 of finite element analysis (FEA) programs. The framework allows users easy access to the FEA program

  14. Cooperative earthquake research between the United States and the People's Republic of China

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, D.P.; Johnson, L.E.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes cooperative research by scientists of the US and the People's Republic of China (PRC) which has resulted in important new findings concerning the fundamental characteristics of earthquakes and new insight into mitigating earthquake hazards. There have been over 35 projects cooperatively sponsored by the Earthquake Studies Protocol in the past 5 years. The projects are organized into seven annexes, including investigations in earthquake prediction, intraplate faults and earthquakes, earthquake engineering and hazards investigation, deep crustal structure, rock mechanics, seismology, and data exchange. Operational earthquake prediction experiments are currently being developed at two primary sites: western Yunnan Province near the town of Xiaguan, where there are several active faults, and the northeast China plain, where the devastating 1976 Tangshan earthquake occurred.

  15. Real-time earthquake monitoring using a search engine method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Haijiang; Chen, Enhong; Zheng, Yi; Kuang, Wenhuan; Zhang, Xiong

    2014-01-01

    When an earthquake occurs, seismologists want to use recorded seismograms to infer its location, magnitude and source-focal mechanism as quickly as possible. If such information could be determined immediately, timely evacuations and emergency actions could be undertaken to mitigate earthquake damage. Current advanced methods can report the initial location and magnitude of an earthquake within a few seconds, but estimating the source-focal mechanism may require minutes to hours. Here we present an earthquake search engine, similar to a web search engine, that we developed by applying a computer fast search method to a large seismogram database to find waveforms that best fit the input data. Our method is several thousand times faster than an exact search. For an Mw 5.9 earthquake on 8 March 2012 in Xinjiang, China, the search engine can infer the earthquake's parameters in <1 s after receiving the long-period surface wave data. PMID:25472861

  16. ABSTRACT: This paper discusses the long experience of past US-Japan cooperative research programs in earthquake engineering and highlights some of the keys to the success of the collaboration. The discussion

    E-print Network

    Spencer Jr., Billie F.

    to ensuring the future success of earthquake engi- neering requires enhanced international collaboration basis. As global urbanization increases, the likelihood of earthquake catastrophes increases in all in earthquake engineering and highlights some of the keys to the success of the collaboration. The discussion

  17. Reconfiguring practice: the interdependence of experimental procedure and computing infrastructure in distributed earthquake engineering.

    PubMed

    De La Flor, Grace; Ojaghi, Mobin; Martínez, Ignacio Lamata; Jirotka, Marina; Williams, Martin S; Blakeborough, Anthony

    2010-09-13

    When transitioning local laboratory practices into distributed environments, the interdependent relationship between experimental procedure and the technologies used to execute experiments becomes highly visible and a focal point for system requirements. We present an analysis of ways in which this reciprocal relationship is reconfiguring laboratory practices in earthquake engineering as a new computing infrastructure is embedded within three laboratories in order to facilitate the execution of shared experiments across geographically distributed sites. The system has been developed as part of the UK Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation e-Research project, which links together three earthquake engineering laboratories at the universities of Bristol, Cambridge and Oxford. We consider the ways in which researchers have successfully adapted their local laboratory practices through the modification of experimental procedure so that they may meet the challenges of coordinating distributed earthquake experiments. PMID:20679123

  18. EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING AND STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS Earthquake Engng Struct. Dyn. 2010; 39:11091131

    E-print Network

    Baker, Jack W.

    EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING AND STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS Earthquake Engng Struct. Dyn. 2010; 39 simulation (MCS) and its variants are well suited for characterizing ground motions and computing resulting losses to lifelines. This paper proposes a simulation-based framework for developing a small

  19. Theory and application of experimental model analysis in earthquake engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moncarz, P. D.

    The feasibility and limitations of small-scale model studies in earthquake engineering research and practice is considered with emphasis on dynamic modeling theory, a study of the mechanical properties of model materials, the development of suitable model construction techniques and an evaluation of the accuracy of prototype response prediction through model case studies on components and simple steel and reinforced concrete structures. It is demonstrated that model analysis can be used in many cases to obtain quantitative information on the seismic behavior of complex structures which cannot be analyzed confidently by conventional techniques. Methodologies for model testing and response evaluation are developed in the project and applications of model analysis in seismic response studies on various types of civil engineering structures (buildings, bridges, dams, etc.) are evaluated.

  20. New research and tools lead to improved earthquake alerting protocols

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wald, David J.

    2009-01-01

    What’s the best way to get alerted about the occurrence and potential impact of an earthquake? The answer to that question has changed dramatically of late, in part due to improvements in earthquake science, and in part by the implementation of new research in the delivery of earthquake information

  1. Use Of Scenario Ground Motion Maps In Earthquake Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somerville, P. G.

    2001-12-01

    Design ground motions are defined probabilistically in building codes used in the United States. However, ground motion maps of scenario earthquakes have some important applications. One is the development of emergency response plans by government agencies. Another is modeling the response of lifeline systems, which depends on the geographical distribution of shaking and of the elements of the lifeline system. A third is the estimation of maximum loss for a portfolio of structures that are owned or insured by a single organization. In all of these cases, the required seismic hazard information relates to the occurrence of a single event. In all of these applications, it may be important to know the likelihood of occurrence of the earthquake event and of the ensuing ground motions. This kind of information is provided by probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA), which considers the effects of a large number of earthquake scenarios that involve earthquakes of different magnitudes occurring on different seismic sources. Because the PSHA involves a large number of earthquake scenarios, it is usually impractical to use the detailed earthquake source and ground motion models that are used to generate the ground motions of a single earthquake scenario. Instead, simple earthquake source and ground motion models are used. By deaggregating the probabilistic seismic hazard, it is possible to identify the magnitude-distance combinations that dominate the seismic hazard at a specified annual frequency of occurrence. These magnitude-distance combinations can then be used to identify the most relevant earthquake scenarios. However, differences in the level of detail in the earthquake source and ground motion models used by PSHA and scenario calculations will in general lead to discrepancy between the ground motions of the scenario earthquake and the ground motions of an equivalent earthquake scenario as represented in the PSHA, potentially leading to misidentification of the dominant magnitude-distance combination. The design ground motions in current building codes correspond to a single annual probability of occurrence, so a single earthquake scenario may be used to approximate the design ground motion. However, the next generation of building codes will be based on the concept of performance based earthquake engineering. PBEE requires that ground motions be specified for several different annual frequencies of occurrence that correspond to different levels of building performance, with increasing ground motion levels (corresponding to decreasing annual probability of occurrence) causing increasingly unacceptable damage states. Thus ground motions for a set of different earthquake scenarios may be required to approximate the ground motions needed for use in PBEE.

  2. Limited Submission Funding Opportunity NSF Natural Hazards Engineering Research Infrastructure (2015 -2019) (NHERI)

    E-print Network

    Chisholm, Rex L.

    Limited Submission Funding Opportunity NSF Natural Hazards Engineering Research Infrastructure-605 NHERI will be a distributed, multi-user, national facility and will provide the natural hazards engineering community with access to research infrastructure (earthquake and wind engineering experimental

  3. Lifeline earthquake engineering: Proceedings of the fourth U.S. conference

    SciTech Connect

    O`Rourke, M.J.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of the conference was to provide a forum for advances in research, practice, investigation and public policy in lifeline earthquake engineering as a discipline and as a component of infrastructure rehabilitation. As such, it recognizes the growing awareness that interaction among lifelines influences losses, community response and recovery. Papers at the conference were presented in sessions on the following topics: bridge analysis and rehabilitation, bridge earthquake damage assessment, bridge hazard assessment and prioritization methods, case studies, electric power and communications, gas and liquid fuels, infrastructure rehabilitation, lifeline interaction, Northridge earthquake, post earthquake investigations, seismic hazards, socio-economic effects, water and sewerage. Paper relating to energy transport and energy distribution systems have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  4. Viterbi School of Engineering Research Innovation Fund Report COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE WORKSHOP FOR UNDERREPRESENTED GROUPS

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Chongwu

    )--Solar Power Satellites · Andrea Armani (Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, USC)--Nanotechnology #12)--Quantum-level Simulations of Materials · Philip Maechling (Southern California Earthquake Center)--Earthquake Research

  5. 10 CFR Appendix S to Part 50 - Earthquake Engineering Criteria for Nuclear Power Plants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Earthquake Engineering Criteria for Nuclear Power...App. S Appendix S to Part 50—Earthquake Engineering Criteria for Nuclear Power...issued before January 10, 1997, the earthquake engineering criteria in Section...

  6. 10 CFR Appendix S to Part 50 - Earthquake Engineering Criteria for Nuclear Power Plants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Earthquake Engineering Criteria for Nuclear Power...App. S Appendix S to Part 50—Earthquake Engineering Criteria for Nuclear Power...issued before January 10, 1997, the earthquake engineering criteria in Section...

  7. 10 CFR Appendix S to Part 50 - Earthquake Engineering Criteria for Nuclear Power Plants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Earthquake Engineering Criteria for Nuclear Power...App. S Appendix S to Part 50—Earthquake Engineering Criteria for Nuclear Power...issued before January 10, 1997, the earthquake engineering criteria in Section...

  8. Introduction: seismology and earthquake engineering in Central and South America.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Espinosa, A.F.

    1983-01-01

    Reports the state-of-the-art in seismology and earthquake engineering that is being advanced in Central and South America. Provides basic information on seismological station locations in Latin America and some of the programmes in strong-motion seismology, as well as some of the organizations involved in these activities.-from Author

  9. First European Conference on Earthquake Engineering and Seismology (a joint event of the 13th

    E-print Network

    Southern California, University of

    activity, the effects of possible large earthquakes are usually explored through earthquake scenarios. One1 First European Conference on Earthquake Engineering and Seismology (a joint event of the 13th an earthquake. This fast and low-cost method is well-adapted to large-scale studies for which a large amount

  10. Earthquakes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Health Matters What's New Preparation & Planning Disasters & Severe Weather Earthquakes Extreme Heat Floods Hurricanes Landslides Tornadoes Tsunamis ... during an earthquake. Be Ready! Earthquakes Disasters & Severe Weather Earthquakes Extreme Heat Floods Hurricanes Landslides Tornadoes Tsunamis ...

  11. One research from turkey on groundwater- level changes related earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirmizitas, H.; Göktepe, G.

    2003-04-01

    Groundwater levels are recorded by limnigraphs in drilling wells in order to determine groundwater potential accurately and reliable under hydrogeological studies in Turkey State Haydraulic Works (DSI) set the limnigraphs to estimate mainly groundwater potential. Any well is drilled to determine and to obtain data on water level changes related earthquake up today. The main purpose of these studies are based on groundwater potential and to expose the hydrodynamic structure of an aquifer. In this study, abnormal oscillations, water rising and water drops were observed on graphs which is related with water level changes in groundwater. These observations showed that, some earthquakes has been effective on water level changes. There is a distance ranging to 2000 km between this epicentral and water wells. Water level changes occur in groundwater bearing layers that could be consisting of grained materials such as, alluvium or consolidated rocks such as, limestones. The biggest water level change is ranging to 1,48 m on diagrams and it is recorded as oscillation movement. Water level changes related earthquake are observed in different types of movements below in this research. 1-Rise-drop oscillation changes on same point. 2-Water level drop in certain periods or permanent periods after earthquakes. 3-Water level rise in certain periods or permanent periods after earthquakes. (For example, during Gölcük Earthquake with magnitude of 7.8 on August, 17, 1999 one artesian occured in DSI well ( 49160 numbered ) in Adapazari, Dernekkiri Village. Groundwater level changes might easily be changed because of atmosferic pressure that comes in first range, precipitation, irrigation or water pumping. Owing to relate groundwater level changes with earthquake on any time, such changes should be observed accurately, carefully and at right time. Thus, first of all, the real reason of this water level changes must be determined From 1970 to 2001 many earthquakes occured in Turkey ( Kütahya-Gediz Earthquake on March, 28, 1970, Diyarbakir-Lice Earthquake on September, 6, 1975, Van-Muradiye Earthquake on November, 24, 1976, Erzurum-Kars Earthquake on October, 30, 1983, Gölcük Earthquake on August, 17, 1999 , Afyon-Sultanhisar Earthquake on February, 3, 2002). Furthermore, Iran Earthquake on November, 27, 1979 has been measured and recorded from thousands kilometeres away in drilling wells in Turkey. Altough there are a lot of studies and researches on earthquake prediction and groundwater level changes related earthquake, it is still difficult to say certain results are obtained on this subject. Nowadays, it is well known the importance of these researches on earthquakes. Due to take certain results on earthqauke-water level changes relations, studies must be carried out on this way.

  12. Engineering Seismic Base Layer for Defining Design Earthquake Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Nozomu

    2008-07-08

    Engineer's common sense that incident wave is common in a widespread area at the engineering seismic base layer is shown not to be correct. An exhibiting example is first shown, which indicates that earthquake motion at the ground surface evaluated by the analysis considering the ground from a seismic bedrock to a ground surface simultaneously (continuous analysis) is different from the one by the analysis in which the ground is separated at the engineering seismic base layer and analyzed separately (separate analysis). The reason is investigated by several approaches. Investigation based on eigen value problem indicates that the first predominant period in the continuous analysis cannot be found in the separate analysis, and predominant period at higher order does not match in the upper and lower ground in the separate analysis. The earthquake response analysis indicates that reflected wave at the engineering seismic base layer is not zero, which indicates that conventional engineering seismic base layer does not work as expected by the term 'base'. All these results indicate that wave that goes down to the deep depths after reflecting in the surface layer and again reflects at the seismic bedrock cannot be neglected in evaluating the response at the ground surface. In other words, interaction between the surface layer and/or layers between seismic bedrock and engineering seismic base layer cannot be neglected in evaluating the earthquake motion at the ground surface.

  13. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing for Earthquake Engineering Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh; Rohay, Alan C.

    2008-10-17

    Downhole seismic testing is one field test that is commonly used to determine compression-wave (P) and shear-wave (S) velocity profiles in geotechnical earthquake engineering investigations. These profiles are required input in evaluations of the responses to earthquake shaking of geotechnical sites and structures at these sites. In the past, traditional downhole testing has generally involved profiling in the 30- to 150-m depth range. As the number of field seismic investigations at locations with critical facilities has increased, profiling depths have also increased. An improved downhole test that can be used for wave velocity profiling to depths of 300 to 600 m or more is presented.

  14. Earthquakes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pakiser, Louis C.

    One of a series of general interest publications on science topics, the booklet provides those interested in earthquakes with an introduction to the subject. Following a section presenting an historical look at the world's major earthquakes, the booklet discusses earthquake-prone geographic areas, the nature and workings of earthquakes, earthquake

  15. Performance-based seismic design of nonstructural building components: The next frontier of earthquake engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filiatrault, Andre; Sullivan, Timothy

    2014-08-01

    With the development and implementation of performance-based earthquake engineering, harmonization of performance levels between structural and nonstructural components becomes vital. Even if the structural components of a building achieve a continuous or immediate occupancy performance level after a seismic event, failure of architectural, mechanical or electrical components can lower the performance level of the entire building system. This reduction in performance caused by the vulnerability of nonstructural components has been observed during recent earthquakes worldwide. Moreover, nonstructural damage has limited the functionality of critical facilities, such as hospitals, following major seismic events. The investment in nonstructural components and building contents is far greater than that of structural components and framing. Therefore, it is not surprising that in many past earthquakes, losses from damage to nonstructural components have exceeded losses from structural damage. Furthermore, the failure of nonstructural components can become a safety hazard or can hamper the safe movement of occupants evacuating buildings, or of rescue workers entering buildings. In comparison to structural components and systems, there is relatively limited information on the seismic design of nonstructural components. Basic research work in this area has been sparse, and the available codes and guidelines are usually, for the most part, based on past experiences, engineering judgment and intuition, rather than on objective experimental and analytical results. Often, design engineers are forced to start almost from square one after each earthquake event: to observe what went wrong and to try to prevent repetitions. This is a consequence of the empirical nature of current seismic regulations and guidelines for nonstructural components. This review paper summarizes current knowledge on the seismic design and analysis of nonstructural building components, identifying major knowledge gaps that will need to be filled by future research. Furthermore, considering recent trends in earthquake engineering, the paper explores how performance-based seismic design might be conceived for nonstructural components, drawing on recent developments made in the field of seismic design and hinting at the specific considerations required for nonstructural components.

  16. Earthquake!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markle, Sandra

    1987-01-01

    A learning unit about earthquakes includes activities for primary grade students, including making inferences and defining operationally. Task cards are included for independent study on earthquake maps and earthquake measuring. (CB)

  17. Earthquakes

    MedlinePLUS

    An earthquake happens when two blocks of the earth suddenly slip past one another. Earthquakes strike suddenly, violently, and without warning at any time of the day or night. If an earthquake occurs in a populated area, it may cause ...

  18. Reduction of earthquake risk in the united states: Bridging the gap between research and practice

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hays, W.W.

    1998-01-01

    Continuing efforts under the auspices of the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program are under way to improve earthquake risk assessment and risk management in earthquake-prone regions of Alaska, California, Nevada, Washington, Oregon, Arizona, Utah, Wyoming, and Idaho, the New Madrid and Wabash Valley seismic zones in the central United States, the southeastern and northeastern United States, Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands, Guam, and Hawaii. Geologists, geophysicists, seismologists, architects, engineers, urban planners, emergency managers, health care specialists, and policymakers are having to work at the margins of their disciplines to bridge the gap between research and practice and to provide a social, technical, administrative, political, legal, and economic basis for changing public policies and professional practices in communities where the earthquake risk is unacceptable. ?? 1998 IEEE.

  19. American Society of Civil Engineers Geo-Institute Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics IV

    E-print Network

    Horvath, John S.

    - 1 - American Society of Civil Engineers Geo-Institute Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering-cell synthetic materials used in geotechnical applications and is not limited to one material or product product geometry and performance are distinctly three-dimensional in nature. Some of the geotechnically

  20. S E R I E S SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR

    E-print Network

    with US-NEES "Earthquake Engineering Research Infrastructures", May 28-30, 2013 JRC, Ispra, Italy Institute of Earthquake Engineering and Engineering Seismology (IZIIS) Skopje, R. Macedonia Prof. Zoran values : activity of process module · real time · power supply · battery charging · number of satellites

  1. First European Conference on Earthquake Engineering and Seismology (a joint event of the 13th

    E-print Network

    Gupta, Vinay Kumar

    to the disruption of commercial activity during the post-earthquake repairs. This addition of new performance levels1 First European Conference on Earthquake Engineering and Seismology (a joint event of the 13th. GUPTA2 and R. Pradeep KUMAR3 SUMMARY The earthquake-resistant design methodology in most existing codes

  2. World Conference on Earthquake Engineering October 12-17, 2008, Beijing, China

    E-print Network

    Southern California, University of

    EARTHQUAKE MOTIONS ­ INTERNATIONAL WORKING GROUP AND ITS ACTIVITIES M.I. Todorovska 1 , H. Igel 2 , MThe 14 th World Conference on Earthquake Engineering October 12-17, 2008, Beijing, China ROTATIONAL-Maximilians-University, 80333 Munich, Germany 3 U.S. Geological Survey, Earthquake Hazards Team, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo

  3. Bulletin of Earthquake Engineering (DOI 10.1007/s10518-013-9495-7)

    E-print Network

    Rau-Chaplin, Andrew

    Bulletin of Earthquake Engineering (DOI 10.1007/s10518-013-9495-7) Developing and Testing the Automated Post-Event Earthquake Loss Estimation and Visualisation (APE-ELEV) Technique Anthony Astoul source relying and globally applicable earthquake loss model and visualiser is desirable for post

  4. Geoscience and Engineering Information For Earthquake Risk Mitigation Plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roca, A.; Oliveira, C. S.

    Many developments in the fields of Geophysics and Engineering have been undertaken in the recent years with the purpose of understanding the different mechanisms involved in the entire seismic process, from the seismic source, ground shaking, site effects, etc., to the damage caused to buildings, other engineering structures, infra-structures, population and social organizations An important issue is the increasing collaboration among scientists, engineers and decision makers for building up information systems and for establishing communication protocols which allow the scientific and technical knowledge to be transferred in the appropriate form to the key organizations and persons responsible for risk mitigation, through planning and emergency management. With the aid of geographical information systems and other, at present, available tools, damage scenarios generation can easily include many pieces of information, and most of the relevant aspects of the process can be considered. They can serve not only to help decision makers to design their policies for earthquake mitigation in the mid-long run, but also as an on-line tool for helping in the event of an earthquake, speeding up the rescue operations. In this sense, some examples taken from approaches carried out in Catalonia (NE Spain) Spain and Portugal, in particular for the cities of Barcelona and Lisbon are presented and discussed. New avenues will be also presented.

  5. Multi-disciplinary Hazard Reduction from Earthquakes and Volcanoes in Indonesia - International Research Cooperation Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Teruyuki

    2010-05-01

    Indonesian and Japanese researchers started a three-year (2009-2011) multi-disciplinary cooperative research project as a part of "Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development" supported by the Japanese government. The ultimate goal of this project is to reduce disaster from earthquakes, tsunamis and volcanoes by enhancing capability of forecasting hazards, reducing social vulnerability, and education and outreach activity of research outcomes. We plan to provide platform of collaboration among researchers in natural science, engineering and social sciences, as well as officials in national and local governments. Research activities are grouped into: (1) geological and geophysical surveys of past earthquakes, monitoring current crustal activity, and simulation of future ground motion or tsunamis, (2) short-term and long-term prediction of volcanic eruptions by monitoring Semeru, Guntur and other volcanoes, and development of their evaluation method, (3) studies to establish social infrastructure based on engineering technologies and hazard maps, (4) social, cultural and religious studies to reduce vulnerability of local communities, and (5) studies on education and outreach on disaster reduction and restoration of community. In addition, to coordinate these research activities and to utilize the research results, (6) application of the research and establishment of collaboration mechanism between researchers and the government officials is planned. In addition to mutual visits and collaborative field studies, it is planned to hold annual joint seminars (in Indonesia in 2009 and 2011, in Japan in 2010) that will be broadcasted through internet. Meetings with Joint Coordinating Committee, composed of representatives of relevant Indonesian ministries and institutions as well as project members, will be held annually to oversee the activities. The kick-off workshop was held in Bandung in April 2009 and the research plans from 22 different themes were explained and panel discussion was conducted. Then, the project officially started in June 2009. The first plenary workshop was held in October 11-14 in Aceh, Indonesia, at the occasion of Indian Ocean-wide tsunami evacuation drill of IOC (Inter-governmental Oceanographic Commission). Considering that disastrous earthquakes occurred on 2nd September 2009 (Mw7.0) in the south of Java and on 30th September 2009 (Mw7.5) nearby Padang, central Sumatra, special reports for these earthquakes were presented. In particular, the latter earthquake that devastated the city of Padang was of great interest because its epicenter is located in a seismic gap called "Mentawai gap" where a large interplate earthquake is expected to occur in the near future. Research teams from our project were urgently deployed to the area for investigating disasters due to the September 2009 earthquake and trying to find effective countermeasures to the coming larger event.

  6. Earthquakes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roper, Paul J.; Roper, Jere Gerard

    1974-01-01

    Describes the causes and effects of earthquakes, defines the meaning of magnitude (measured on the Richter Magnitude Scale) and intensity (measured on a modified Mercalli Intensity Scale) and discusses earthquake prediction and control. (JR)

  7. GEOL 489Z/789Z Faulting and Earthquake Mechanics GEOL 456 Engineering Geology

    E-print Network

    Zeng, Ning

    GEOL 489Z/789Z Faulting and Earthquake Mechanics 1 GEOL 456 Engineering Geology Syllabus Instructor An overview of engineering geology with an emphasis on physical understanding of natural hazards and natural in porous media and poroelasticity are introduced. Quantitative approaches on earthquakes, landslides, land

  8. Source: Proceedings of International Conference on Advances and New Challenges in Earthquake Engineering Research (ICANCEER02), Hong Kong, China, August 19-20, 2002.

    E-print Network

    Lynch, Jerome P.

    Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University Stanford, CA, USA ABSTRACT A complex wireless as accelerometers) wired to a centralized data acquisition system. The use of wires as the sole medium for data to serve as the fundamental building block of wireless modular #12;monitoring systems (WiMMS). Key features

  9. Chemical engineering Research !!

    E-print Network

    Chemical engineering Research !! www.chemeng.lth.se Updated August 2012 #12;WWT Fermentation hydrolysis Improved fermentation Yeast Fermentation technology Hydrolysis Process integration Consider a changed reactivity #12;Feedstock Pretreatment Hydrolysis Fermentation Separation Ethanol Lignin & other

  10. Earthquake Forecast Science Research with a Small Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jason, Susan; da Silva Curiel, Alex; Pulinets, Sergey; Sweeting, Martin, , Sir

    Reliable, repeatable Earthquake forecast is a subject surrounded by controversy and scepticism. What is clear, is that reliable forecast could be the single most effective tool for earthquake disaster management. Roughly a third of the world's population live in areas that are at risk and, every year since the beginning of the twentieth century earthquakes have caused an average of 20,000 deaths [1]. The economic loss in the 1995 Kobe, Japan earthquake was greater than US100 billion [2]. Substantial progress has been made on the development of methods for earthquake hazard analysis on a timescale of a few decades. However, the forecast of specific earthquakes on timescales of a few years to a few days is a difficult problem. It has been proposed that satellites and ground-based facilities may detect earthquake precursors in the ionosphere a few hours or days before the main shock. This hypothesis is now backed by a physical model, derived by the Russian Academy of Sciences from statistical studies and an understanding of the main morphological features of seismo-ionospheric precursors, which allows them to be separated from background ionospheric variability. The main problems now are lack of regular global data and limited funding for what is considered to be financially risky research. Low-cost, small satellites offer a solution to these problems. A 100 kg class SSTL enhanced microsatellite, carrying a RAS topside sounder and complimentary payload, will be used to make regular measurements over seismically active zones around the globe. The low cost of the spacecraft offers a financially low-risk approach to the next step in this invaluable research. The spacecraft will make ionospheric measurements for systematic research into the proposed precursors. The aims will be to confirm or refute the hypothesis; define their reliability and reproducibility; and enable further scientific understanding of their mechanisms. In addition, forecasting of the magnitude of the events, as well as an indication of the seismic centre may also be possible. These mission data should also lead to improved knowledge of the physics of earthquakes, improved accuracy for GPS-based navigation models, and could be used to study the reaction of the global ionosphere during magnetic storms and other solar-terrestrial events. The poster presents an overview of the scientific basis, goals, and proposed platform for this research mission.

  11. Accessibility of geotechnical earthquake Engineering data and the need for data storage and dissemination standards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tarr, Arthur C.

    1993-01-01

    Ease of data access and data standards are two issues critical to the success of GIS technology when applied to earthquake hazards research problems that require geotechnical engineering and related data. Efforts to reduce data accession costs and to streamline the data exchange process will result in short-term cost and time saving and will add long-term value to the data sets themselves. Such efforts might include centralized data centers, standardized data base designs and formats, cooperative efforts to fill data gaps, and standardized distribution methods and media.

  12. World Conference on Earthquake Engineering Vancouver, B.C., Canada

    E-print Network

    Stanford University

    that causes many damages during earthquakes. The use of finite element methods for the simulations. Large-scale earthquake simulations often exceed the capacity of current single-processor computers program for the simulation of earthquake ground response and liquefaction effects. The implementation

  13. COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING RESEARCH REPORT

    E-print Network

    Saskatchewan, University of

    #12;i COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING RESEARCH REPORT 2002-03 Table of Contents Executive Summary 1 - Engineering Physics 8. Department of Mechanical Engineering #12;i Executive Summary The College of Engineering/03 academic year, faculty at the College of Engineering have attracted over $9.5 million of external research

  14. Reflections from the interface between seismological research and earthquake risk reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargeant, S.

    2012-04-01

    Scientific understanding of earthquakes and their attendant hazards is vital for the development of effective earthquake risk reduction strategies. Within the global disaster reduction policy framework (the Hyogo Framework for Action, overseen by the UN International Strategy for Disaster Reduction), the anticipated role of science and scientists is clear, with respect to risk assessment, loss estimation, space-based observation, early warning and forecasting. The importance of information sharing and cooperation, cross-disciplinary networks and developing technical and institutional capacity for effective disaster management is also highlighted. In practice, the degree to which seismological information is successfully delivered to and applied by individuals, groups or organisations working to manage or reduce the risk from earthquakes is variable. The challenge for scientists is to provide fit-for-purpose information that can be integrated simply into decision-making and risk reduction activities at all levels of governance and at different geographic scales, often by a non-technical audience (i.e. people without any seismological/earthquake engineering training). The interface between seismological research and earthquake risk reduction (defined here in terms of both the relationship between the science and its application, and the scientist and other risk stakeholders) is complex. This complexity is a function of a range issues that arise relating to communication, multidisciplinary working, politics, organisational practices, inter-organisational collaboration, working practices, sectoral cultures, individual and organisational values, worldviews and expectations. These factors can present significant obstacles to scientific information being incorporated into the decision-making process. The purpose of this paper is to present some personal reflections on the nature of the interface between the worlds of seismological research and risk reduction, and the implications for scientists and information delivery.

  15. World Conference on Earthquake Engineering Vancouver, B.C., Canada

    E-print Network

    Yim, Solomon C.

    . 1517 A SHARED-USE LARGE-SCALE MULTIDIRECTIONAL WAVE BASIN FOR TSUNAMI RESEARCH Solomon YIM1 , Harry YEH to test and validate both analytical and numerical models of tsunami phenomena induced by sub-sea. Email: solomon.yim@orst.edu 2 Professor of Civil Engineering and Computer Science, Oregon State

  16. Stress-forecasting Earthquakes In recent Opinions in Seismological ResearchLetters Paul Sil-

    E-print Network

    OPINION Stress-forecasting Earthquakes In recent Opinions in Seismological ResearchLetters Paul Sil- ver has suggested that earthquake prediction is not possible, whereas Lowell S. Whiteside suggests that it is. Earthquake prediction means many things. There are at least three types of (conventional

  17. A Wavelet Toolkit for Visualization and Analysis of Large Data Sets In Earthquake Research

    E-print Network

    Erlebacher, Gordon

    A Wavelet Toolkit for Visualization and Analysis of Large Data Sets In Earthquake Research G in earthquake physics and other nonlinear problems in the solid earth geosciences. Keywords: wavelets, visualization, grid computing, collaboration, web-based maps, earthquakes 1 Introduction As in many other fields

  18. Seismological Research Letters, 74, 3, May/June 2003, 271-273 Speculations on Earthquake Forecasting

    E-print Network

    Seismological Research Letters, 74, 3, May/June 2003, 271-273 OPINION Speculations on Earthquake of stress- monitoring sites could lead to earthquake forecasting analogous to the way networks to be a major advance that offers more hope for forecasting earthquakes than was envisioned in the survey Living

  19. Systems Engineering Advancement Research Initiative

    E-print Network

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Systems Engineering Advancement Research Initiative INFORMATION for VISITORS About SEAri http://seari.mit.edu The Systems Engineering Advancement Research Initiative (SEAri) brings together a set of sponsored research projects and a consortium of systems engineering leaders from industry, government, and academia. SEAri

  20. Concurrent engineering research center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, John R.

    1995-01-01

    The projects undertaken by The Concurrent Engineering Research Center (CERC) at West Virginia University are reported and summarized. CERC's participation in the Department of Defense's Defense Advanced Research Project relating to technology needed to improve the product development process is described, particularly in the area of advanced weapon systems. The efforts committed to improving collaboration among the diverse and distributed health care providers are reported, along with the research activities for NASA in Independent Software Verification and Validation. CERC also takes part in the electronic respirator certification initiated by The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, as well as in the efforts to find a solution to the problem of producing environment-friendly end-products for product developers worldwide. The 3M Fiber Metal Matrix Composite Model Factory Program is discussed. CERC technologies, facilities,and personnel-related issues are described, along with its library and technical services and recent publications.

  1. Earthquake research for the safer siting of critical facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Cluff, J.L.

    1980-01-01

    The task of providing the necessities for living, such as adequate electrical power, water, and fuel, is becoming more complicated with time. Some of the facilities that provide these necessities would present potential hazards to the population if serious damage were to occur to them during earthquakes. Other facilities must remain operable immediately after an earthquake to provide life-support services to people who have been affected. The purpose of this report is to recommend research that will improve the information available to those who must decide where to site these critical facilities, and thereby mitigate the effects of the earthquake hazard. The term critical facility is used in this report to describe facilities that could seriously affect the public well-being through loss of life, large financial loss, or degradation of the environment if they were to fail. The term critical facility also is used to refer to facilities that, although they pose a limited hazard to the public, are considered critical because they must continue to function in the event of a disaster so that they can provide vital services.

  2. COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING RESEARCH REPORT

    E-print Network

    Saskatchewan, University of

    1 #12;2 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING RESEARCH REPORT 2000-2001 Executive Summary 1. Division and in some cases new products. The College of Engineering is actively engaged in research in its constituent Engineering are interdisciplinary activities under the auspices of the College of Graduate Studies

  3. WEGENER: World Earthquake GEodesy Network for Environmental Hazard Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozener, Haluk; Zerbini, Susanna; Bastos, Luisa; Becker, Matthias; Meghraoui, Mustapha; Reilinger, Robert

    2013-04-01

    WEGENER is originally the acronym for Working Group of European Geoscientists for the Establishment of Networks for Earth-science Research. It was founded in March 1981 in response to an appeal delivered at the Journées Luxembourgeoises de Geodynamique in December 1980 to respond with a coordinated European proposal to a NASA Announcement of Opportunity inviting participation in the Crustal Dynamics and Earthquake Research Program. WEGENER, during the past 32 years, has always kept a close contact with the Agencies and Institutions responsible for the development and maintenance of the global space geodetic networks with the aim to make them aware of the scientific needs and outcomes of the project which might have an influence on the general science policy trends. WEGENER was serving as Inter-commission Project 3.2, between Commission 1 and Commission 3, of the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) until 2012. Since then, WEGENER project has became the Sub-commission 3.5 of IAG commission 3, namely Tectonics and Earthquake Geodesy. In this study, we briefly review the accomplishments of WEGENER as originally conceived and outline and justify the new focus of the WEGENER consortium. The remarkable and rapid evolution of the present state of global geodetic monitoring in regard to the precision of positioning capabilities (and hence deformation) and global coverage, the development of InSAR for monitoring strain with unprecedented spatial resolution, and continuing and planned data from highly precise satellite gravity and altimetry missions, encourage us to shift principal attention from mainly monitoring capabilities by a combination of space and terrestrial geodetic techniques to applying existing observational methodologies to the critical geophysical phenomena that threaten our planet and society. Our new focus includes developing an improved physical basis to mitigate earthquake, tsunami, and volcanic risks, and the effects of natural and anthropogenic climate change (sea level, ice degradation). In addition, expanded applications of space geodesy to atmospheric studies will remain a major focus with emphasis on ionospheric and tropospheric monitoring to support forecasting extreme events. Towards these ends, we will encourage and foster interdisciplinary, integrated initiatives to develop a range of case studies for these critical problems. Geological studies are needed to extend geodetic deformation studies to geologic time scales, and new modeling approaches will facilitate full exploitation of expanding geodetic databases. In light of this new focus, the WEGENER acronym now represents, "World Earthquake GEodesy Network for Environmental Hazard Research".

  4. Researchers demonstrate existence of earthquake supershear phenomenon PASADENA, Calif.--As if folks living in earthquake country didn't already have enough to worry about, scientists

    E-print Network

    Researchers demonstrate existence of earthquake supershear phenomenon PASADENA, Calif.--As if folks living in earthquake country didn't already have enough to worry about, scientists have now identified another rupture phenomenon that can occur during certain types of large earthquakes. The only question now

  5. Earthquake.

    PubMed

    Cowen, A R; Denney, J P

    1994-04-01

    On January 25, 1 week after the most devastating earthquake in Los Angeles history, the Southern California Hospital Council released the following status report: 928 patients evacuated from damaged hospitals. 805 beds available (136 critical, 669 noncritical). 7,757 patients treated/released from EDs. 1,496 patients treated/admitted to hospitals. 61 dead. 9,309 casualties. Where do we go from here? We are still waiting for the "big one." We'll do our best to be ready when Mother Nature shakes, rattles and rolls. The efforts of Los Angeles City Fire Chief Donald O. Manning cannot be overstated. He maintained department command of this major disaster and is directly responsible for implementing the fire department's Disaster Preparedness Division in 1987. Through the chief's leadership and ability to forecast consequences, the city of Los Angeles was better prepared than ever to cope with this horrendous earthquake. We also pay tribute to the men and women who are out there each day, where "the rubber meets the road." PMID:10133439

  6. Integrated Program of Multidisciplinary Education and Research in Mechanics and Physics of Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapusta, N.

    2011-12-01

    Studying earthquake source processes is a multidisciplinary endeavor involving a number of subjects, from geophysics to engineering. As a solid mechanician interested in understanding earthquakes through physics-based computational modeling and comparison with observations, I need to educate and attract students from diverse areas. My CAREER award has provided the crucial support for the initiation of this effort. Applying for the award made me to go through careful initial planning in consultation with my colleagues and administration from two divisions, an important component of the eventual success of my path to tenure. Then, the long-term support directed at my program as a whole - and not a specific year-long task or subject area - allowed for the flexibility required for a start-up of a multidisciplinary undertaking. My research is directed towards formulating realistic fault models that incorporate state-of-the-art experimental studies, field observations, and analytical models. The goal is to compare the model response - in terms of long-term fault behavior that includes both sequences of simulated earthquakes and aseismic phenomena - with observations, to identify appropriate constitutive laws and parameter ranges. CAREER funding has enabled my group to develop a sophisticated 3D modeling approach that we have used to understand patterns of seismic and aseismic fault slip on the Sunda megathrust in Sumatra, investigate the effect of variable hydraulic properties on fault behavior, with application to Chi-Chi and Tohoku earthquake, create a model of the Parkfield segment of the San Andreas fault that reproduces both long-term and short-term features of the M6 earthquake sequence there, and design experiments with laboratory earthquakes, among several other studies. A critical ingredient in this research program has been the fully integrated educational component that allowed me, on the one hand, to expose students from different backgrounds to the multidisciplinary knowledge required for research in my group and, on the other hand, to communicate the field insights to a broader community. Newly developed course on Dynamic Fracture and Frictional Faulting has combined geophysical and engineering knowledge at the forefront of current research activities relevant to earthquake studies and involved students in these activities through team-based course projects. The course attracts students from more than ten disciplines and received a student rating of 4.8/5 this past academic year. In addition, the course on Continuum Mechanics was enriched with geophysical references and examples. My group has also been visiting physics classrooms in a neighboring public school that serve mostly underrepresented minorities. The visits were beneficial not only to the high school students but also for graduate students and postdocs in my group, who got experience in presenting their field in a way accessible for the general public. Overall, the NSF CAREER award program through the Geosciences Directorate (NSF official Eva E. Zanzerkia) has significantly facilitated my development as a researcher and educator and should be either maintained or expanded.

  7. World Conference on Earthquake Engineering Vancouver, B.C., Canada

    E-print Network

    Todorovska, Maria I.

    vibration monitoring data, of ground or structural response, for possible application in data mining in mining large data sets of ground and structural response vibration data under earthquake excitation. One IN DATA MINING Maria I. TODOROVSKA1 and Tzong-Ying HAO2 SUMMARY This paper explores the advantages

  8. Engineering-geological model of the landslide of Güevejar (S Spain) reactivated by historical earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, José; García-Tortosa, Francisco J.; Garrido, Jesús; Giner, José; Lenti, Luca; López-Casado, Carlos; Martino, Salvatore; Peláez, José A.; Sanz de Galdeano, Carlos; Soler, Juan L.

    2015-04-01

    Landslides are a common ground effect induced by earthquakes of moderate to large magnitude. Most of them correspond to first-time instabilities induced by the seismic event, being the reactivation of pre-existing landslides less frequent in practice. The landslide of Güevejar (Granada province, S Spain) represents a case study of landslide that was reactivated, at least, two times by far field earthquakes: the Mw 8.7, 1755, Lisbon earthquake (with estimated epicentral distance of 680 km), and the Mw 6.5, 1884, Andalucia event (estimated epicentral distance of 45 km), but not by near field events of moderate magnitude (Mw < 6.0 and epicentral distances lower than 25 km). To study the seismic response of this landslide, a study has been conducted to elaborate an engineering-geological model. For this purpose, field work done included the elaboration of a detailed geological map (1:1000) of the landslide and surrounding areas, drilling of deep boreholes (80 m deep), down-hole measurement of both P and S wave velocities in the boreholes drilled, piezometric control of water table, MASW and ReMi profiles for determining the underlying structure of the sites tested (soil profile stratigraphy and the corresponding S-wave velocity of each soil level) and undisturbed sampling of the materials affected by the landslide. These samples were then tested in laboratory according to standard procedures for determination of both static (among which soil density, soil classification and shear strength) and dynamic properties (degradation curves for shear modulus and damping ratio with shear strain) of the landslide-involved materials. The model proposed corresponds to a complex landslide that combines a rototranslational mechanism with an earth-flow at its toe, which is characterized by a deep (> 50 m) sliding surface. The engineering-geological model constitutes the first step in an ongoing research devoted to understand how it could be reactivated during far field events. The authors would like to thank the ERDF of European Union for financial support via project "Monitorización sísmica de deslizamientos. Criterios de reactivación y alerta temprana" of the "Programa Operativo FEDER de Andalucía 2007-2015". We also thank all Public Works Agency and Ministry of Public Works and Housing of the Regional Government of Andalusia.

  9. 4th International Conference on Earthquake Engineering Taipei, Taiwan

    E-print Network

    Stanford University

    . The 1 Ph.D. Candidate, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford Univ., USA, wyang98@stanford.edu 2 Ph.D. Candidate, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Univ. of Michigan, USA, USA, jerlynch@engin.umich.edu 4 Professor, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford Univ

  10. Road Surfaces And Earthquake Engineering: A Theoretical And Experimental Study

    SciTech Connect

    Pratico, Filippo Giammaria

    2008-07-08

    As is well known, road surfaces greatly affect vehicle-road interaction. As a consequence, road surfaces have a paramount influence on road safety and pavement management systems. On the other hand, earthquakes produce deformations able to modify road surface structure, properties and performance. In the light of these facts, the main goal of this paper has been confined into the modelling of road surface before, during and after the seismic event. The fundamentals of road surface texture theory have been stated in a general formulation. Models in the field of road profile generation and theoretical properties, before, during and after the earthquake, have been formulated and discussed. Practical applications can be hypothesised in the field of vehicle-road interaction as a result of road surface texture derived from deformations and accelerations caused by seismic or similar events.

  11. Advanced Real-time Monitoring System and Simulation Researches for Earthquakes and Tsunamis in Japan -Towards Disaster Mitigation on Earthquakes and Tsunamis-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyodo, M.; Kaneda, Y.; Takahashi, N.; Baba, T.; Hori, T.; Kawaguchi, K.; Araki, E.; Matsumoto, H.; Nakamura, T.; Kamiya, S.; Ariyoshi, K.; Nakano, M.; Choi, J. K.; Nishida, S.

    2014-12-01

    How to mitigate and reduce damages by Earthquakes and Tsunamis? This is very important and indispensable problem for Japan and other high seismicity countries.Based on lessons learned from the 2004 Sumatra Earthquake/Tsunamis and the 2011 East Japan Earthquake/Tsunami, we recognized the importance of real-time monitoring of these natural hazards. As real-time monitoring system, DONET1 (Dense Ocean floor Network for Earthquakes and Tsunamis) was deployed and DONET2 is being developed around the Nankai trough Southwestern Japan for Seismology and Earthquake/Tsunami Early Warning. Based on simulation researches, DONET1 and DONET2 with multi-kinds of sensors such as broadband seismometers and precise pressure gauges will be expected to monitor slow events such as low frequency tremors and slow earthquakes for the estimation of seismic stage which is the inter-seismic or pre-seismic stage. In advanced simulation researches such as the recurrence cycle of mega thrust earthquakes, the data assimilation is very powerful tool to improve the reliability. Furthermore, tsunami inundations, seismic responses on buildings/city and agent simulations are very important towards future disaster mitigation programs and related measures. Finally, real-time monitoring data and advanced simulations will be integrated for precise Earthquake/Tsunami Early Warning and Estimation of damages in future compound disasters on Earthquakes and Tsunamis. We will introduce the present progress of advanced researches and future scope for disaster mitigation researches on earthquakes and Tsunamis.

  12. 76 FR 11821 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Survey of Principal Investigators on Earthquake...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-03

    ... Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Survey of Principal Investigators on Earthquake Engineering... Investigators on Earthquake Engineering Research Awards Made by the National Science Foundation, 2003-2009. Type... George E. Brown, Jr. Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES). The purpose of the...

  13. 4th International Conference on Earthquake Engineering Taipei, Taiwan

    E-print Network

    Lynch, Jerome P.

    desired 1 Ph.D. Candidate, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford Univ., USA, wyang98@stanford.edu 2 Ph.D. Candidate, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Univ. of Michigan, USA, USA, jerlynch@umich.edu 4 Professor, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford Univ., USA

  14. World Conference on Earthquake Engineering Vancouver, B.C., Canada

    E-print Network

    Eberhard, Marc O.

    to demonstrate and challenge the new NEES 1 Department of Civil Engineering, University of Texas, Austin, TX, USA 2 Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, San Jose State University, San Jose, CA, USA 3 Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA 4 Department

  15. Power Systems Engineering Research Center Empowering Minds to Engineer

    E-print Network

    information about this project, contact: Lizhi Wang Industrial and Manufacturing Systems EngineeringPower Systems Engineering Research Center Empowering Minds to Engineer the Future Electric Energy@iastate.edu Power Systems Engineering Research Center The Power Systems Engineering Research Center (PSERC

  16. Fusion Ignition Research Experiment Engineering Status Report

    E-print Network

    Fusion Ignition Research Experiment -FIRE- Engineering Status Report For Fiscal Year 2000 Issued on the Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE), a tokamak designed for burning plasma research. Engineering news, FIRE physics and engineering, international collaborations, FIRE reports, Snowmass and NSO

  17. Research on Earthquake Precursor in E-TEC: A Study on Land Surface Thermal Anomalies Using MODIS LST Product in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, W. Y.; Wu, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    Taiwan has been known as an excellent natural laboratory characterized by rapid active tectonic rate and high dense seismicity. The Eastern Taiwan Earthquake Research Center (E-TEC) is established on 2013/09/24 in National Dong Hwa University and collaborates with Central Weather Bureau (CWB), National Center for Research on Earthquake Engineering (NCREE), National Science and Technology Center for Disaster Reduction (NCDR), Institute of Earth Science of Academia Sinica (IES, AS) and other institutions (NCU, NTU, CCU) and aims to provide an integrated platform for researchers to conduct the new advances on earthquake precursors and early warning for seismic disaster prevention in the eastern Taiwan, as frequent temblors are most common in the East Taiwan rift valley. E-TEC intends to integrate the multi-disciplinary observations and is equipped with stations to monitor a wide array of factors of quake precursors, including seismicity, GPS, strain-meter, ground water, geochemistry, gravity, electromagnetic, ionospheric density, thermal infrared remote sensing, gamma radiation etc, and will maximize the value of the data for researches with the range of monitoring equipment that enable to predict where and when the next devastated earthquake will strike Taiwan and develop reliable earthquake prediction models. A preliminary study on earthquake precursor using monthly Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Land Surface Temperature (LST) data before 2013/03/27 Mw6.2 Nantou earthquake in Taiwan is presented. Using the statistical analysis, the result shows the peak of the anomalous LST that exceeds a standard deviation of LST appeared on 2013/03/09 and became less or none anomalies observed on 2013/03/16 before the main-shock, which is in consist with the phenomenon observed by other researchers. This preliminary experimental result shows that the thermal anomalies reveal the possibility to associate surface thermal phenomena before the strong earthquakes.

  18. Sarah Widder Research Engineer

    E-print Network

    -pane windows, and examine the impacts of grid-smart appliances and electric vehicle charging on energy demand measured. Lab Homes is a research platform for PNNL and its research partners to achieve highly energy-efficient-6396 sarah.widder@pnnl.gov Visit us at: http://labhomes.pnnl.gov Demonstrating tomorrow's efficient and smart

  19. Earthquake research: Premonitory models and the physics of crustal distortion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitcomb, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    Seismic, gravity, and electrical resistivity data, believed to be most relevent to development of earthquake premonitory models of the crust, are presented. Magnetotellurics (MT) are discussed. Radon investigations are reviewed.

  20. QESST Engineering Research Center: Revolutionizing

    E-print Network

    health care system logistics information assurance production logistics artificial intelligenceQESST Engineering Research Center: Revolutionizing energy for the world Power Systems Energy Research Center investigates new energy system grid ASU LightWorks: Putting light to work page 12 page 16

  1. Structural engineering for northern Pakistan : indigenous architecture and earthquake resistance

    E-print Network

    Su, Jimmy Chi-yi

    1995-01-01

    In the Fall of 1993, a joint project began between architectural designers and engineers, for the design of houses in Karimabad, located in the Northern Areas of Pakistan. This thesis records the author's involvement as ...

  2. Earthquake and Tsunami Disaster Mitigation in The Marmara Region and Disaster Education in Turkey. (SATREPS Project: Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development by JICA-JST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneda, Y.; Erdik, M. O.; Takahashi, N.; Meral Ozel, N.; Hori, T.; Hori, M.; Kumamoto, K.; Kalafat, D.; Pinar, A.; Ozel, A. O.; Yalciner, A. C.; Nurlu, M.; Tanircan, G.; Citak, S.; Ariyoshi, K.; Necmioglu, O.

    2014-12-01

    Since 1900, around 90,000 people have lost their lives in 76 earthquakes occurred in Turkey, with a total affected population of ~7 million and direct estimated losses of ~25 billion USD. About half the lives lost were due to two earthquakes associated with the North Anatolian Fault in 1939 and 1999. During this time, seven large westward-migrating earthquakes created a 900-km-long continuous surface rupture along the fault zone from Erzincan to the Marmara Sea, stopping just short of Istanbul. Based on a time-dependent model that includes coseismic and postseismic effects of the 1999 Kocaeli earthquake with moment magnitude (Mw) = 7.4, Parsons concluded that the probability of an earthquake with Mw >7 in the Sea of Marmara near Istanbul is 35% to 70% in the next 30 years. This high probability is shared by Tokyo and San Francisco; however, the earthquake fragility of the pre-2000 building stock in Turkey is much higher than that of California or Japan. (Erdik, 2013). All of the arguments described above provide a sound basis for a Japanese-Turkish partnership enabling each partner to share experiences gained from past destructive earthquakes and prepare for expected large earthquakes. The SATREPS project aims to address this need, also focusing on the tsunami hazard. The project's main objectives are i) to develop disaster mitigation policies and strategies based on multidisciplinary research activities; ii) to provide decision makers with newly found knowledge for its implementation to the current regulations; iii) to organize disaster education programs in order to increase disaster awareness in Turkey; iv) to contribute the evaluation of active fault studies in Japan. To achieve successfully these objectives, 4 research groups have been set specializing on observations, simulations, civil engineering and disaster education and the results will be integrated for disaster mitigation in the Marmara region and disaster education in Turkey.

  3. Research of Hydro-Geological Precursors of Earthquakes in Armenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashayan, R.

    2007-12-01

    The observations of hydro-geological regime of underground waters in observed boreholes began in Armenia in 1986. Now these work is concentrated in National Seismic Service. For a long time observations are carried out studying several parameters (debit, temperature, chemical and gas composition) in several deposits of carbon mineral waters of Armenia. The interpretation of materials shows that that a number of strong and medium-strength earthquakes are accompanied by anomal changes in the level of underground waters. Regarding mineral waters, in connection with earthquakes some parameters are immediately changed: debit, temperature, chemical and gas composition. The study of hydrogeodynamic characteristics of precursors specify that the quantity of registered hydrogeodynamic precursors decreases with the increase of epicentrical distance. The majority of precursors is registered at the distance of 200 km from epicenter. There is a tendency of gradual increase of time and amplitude of a precursor of an earthquake depending on the rise of magnitude and epicentral distance. The behaviour of hydrogeodynamic precursors depends on the angle between the faults, to which this or that borehole reaches; with increase of this angle the deformation in the zone of the fault during the preparation of earthquakes is stronger, than in terms of small angles. 1. S1 2. Earthquake processes, Precursors and Forecasts 3. Garni Geophysical Observatory of the National Academy of Sciences of Armenia, 375019, Yerevan, Republic of Armenia, email: hakhleon@sci.am 4. O 5. 10808801 6. Artavazd Payment Type: select 'Purchase Order' PO Number: AGU WAIVER Billing Address: Enter Your Institution City: Enter Your City Country Code: Enter Your Country Name: Enter Your Name Phone: Enter Your Telephone Number

  4. Applications of research from the U.S. Geological Survey program, assessment of regional earthquake hazards and risk along the Wasatch Front, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gori, Paula L., (Edited By)

    1993-01-01

    INTERACTIVE WORKSHOPS: ESSENTIAL ELEMENTS OF THE EARTHQUAKE HAZARDS RESEARCH AND REDUCTION PROGRAM IN THE WASATCH FRONT, UTAH: Interactive workshops provided the forum and stimulus necessary to foster collaboration among the participants in the multidisciplinary, 5-yr program of earthquake hazards reduction in the Wasatch Front, Utah. The workshop process validated well-documented social science theories on the importance of interpersonal interaction, including interaction between researchers and users of research to increase the probability that research will be relevant to the user's needs and, therefore, more readily used. REDUCING EARTHQUAKE HAZARDS IN UTAH: THE CRUCIAL CONNECTION BETWEEN RESEARCHERS AND PRACTITIONERS: Complex scientific and engineering studies must be translated for and transferred to nontechnical personnel for use in reducing earthquake hazards in Utah. The three elements needed for effective translation, likelihood of occurrence, location, and severity of potential hazards, and the three elements needed for effective transfer, delivery, assistance, and encouragement, are described and illustrated for Utah. The importance of evaluating and revising earthquake hazard reduction programs and their components is emphasized. More than 30 evaluations of various natural hazard reduction programs and techniques are introduced. This report was prepared for research managers, funding sources, and evaluators of the Utah earthquake hazard reduction program who are concerned about effectiveness. An overview of the Utah program is provided for those researchers, engineers, planners, and decisionmakers, both public and private, who are committed to reducing human casualties, property damage, and interruptions of socioeconomic systems. PUBLIC PERCEPTIONS OF THE IMPLEMENTATION OF EARTHQUAKE MITIGATION POLICIES ALONG THE WASATCH FRONT IN UTAH: The earthquake hazard potential along the Wasatch Front in Utah has been well defined by a number of scientific and engineering studies. Translated earthquake hazard maps have also been developed to identify areas that are particularly vulnerable to various causes of damage such as ground shaking, surface rupturing, and liquefaction. The implementation of earthquake hazard reduction plans are now under way in various communities in Utah. The results of a survey presented in this paper indicate that technical public officials (planners and building officials) have an understanding of the earthquake hazards and how to mitigate the risks. Although the survey shows that the general public has a slightly lower concern about the potential for economic losses, they recognize the potential problems and can support a number of earthquake mitigation measures. The study suggests that many community groups along the Wasatch Front, including volunteer groups, business groups, and elected and appointed officials, are ready for action-oriented educational programs. These programs could lead to a significant reduction in the risks associated with earthquake hazards. A DATA BASE DESIGNED FOR URBAN SEISMIC HAZARDS STUDIES: A computerized data base has been designed for use in urban seismic hazards studies conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey. The design includes file structures for 16 linked data sets, which contain geological, geophysical, and seismological data used in preparing relative ground response maps of large urban areas. The data base is organized along relational data base principles. A prototype urban hazards data base has been created for evaluation in two urban areas currently under investigation: the Wasatch Front region of Utah and the Puget Sound area of Washington. The initial implementation of the urban hazards data base was accomplished on a microcomputer using dBASE III Plus software and transferred to minicomputers and a work station. A MAPPING OF GROUND-SHAKING INTENSITIES FOR SALT LAKE COUNTY, UTAH: This paper documents the development of maps showing a

  5. The New Madrid earthquakes; an engineering-geologic interpretation of relict liquefaction features

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Obermeier, Stephen F.

    1989-01-01

    Earthquake-induced sand blows and sand-filled fissures are present in a belt 40 to 60 km. wide that extends from near Charleston, Mo., southward to about 20 km. south of Marked Tree, Ark. This region of earthquake-induced sand blows and other liquefaction-related features is almost exclusively in the St. Francis Basin, an alluvial lowland that typically has a thin (2 to 8 m thick), clay-bearing topstratum underlain by about 30 to 60 m of unconsolidated sand (the substratum). Liquefaction of the substratum sands has made the sand blows. The sand blows and other liquefaction-related features on the ground surface in the St. Francis Basin are almost certainly results of the New Madrid earthquakes of 1811-12. In this report, geologic and engineering properties of the alluvium are used in combination with a map showing the bounds of the liquefaction-related features to locate approximately the epicentral zones for two of the major shocks: the earthquakes of December 16,1811, and February 7,1812. Properties used for the analysis included the Standard Penetration Resistance of the substratum sands, characteristics of the sand's grain size, thickness of the topstratum, and the thickness of the post-Tertiary alluvium. The method of analysis relies largely on the evaluation of the liquefaction potential of the sands. This is done by using the Standard Penetration Test blow counts and by devising a method that uses all possible combinations of liquefaction potential and a realistic relation between attenuation of earthquake accelerations and distance from the epicenter (or more correctly, energy-release center). Two interpreted 1811-12 energy-release centers generally agree well with zones of seismicity defined by modern, small earthquakes. Bounds on accelerations are placed at the limits of sand blows that were generated by the 1811-12 earthquakes in the St. Francis Basin. Conclusions show how the topstratum thickness, sand size of the substratum, and thickness of alluvium affected the distribution of sand blows in the St. Francis Basin.

  6. MIT Space Engineering Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawley, Edward F.; Miller, David W.

    1990-01-01

    The Space Engineering Research Center (SERC) at MIT, started in Jul. 1988, has completed two years of research. The Center is approaching the operational phase of its first testbed, is midway through the construction of a second testbed, and is in the design phase of a third. We presently have seven participating faculty, four participating staff members, ten graduate students, and numerous undergraduates. This report reviews the testbed programs, individual graduate research, other SERC activities not funded by the Center, interaction with non-MIT organizations, and SERC milestones. Published papers made possible by SERC funding are included at the end of the report.

  7. Introducing Students to Structural Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anthoine, Armelle; Marazzi, Francesco; Tirelli, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The European Laboratory for Structural Assessment (ELSA) is one of the world's main laboratories for seismic studies. Besides its research activities, it also aims to bring applied science closer to the public. This article describes teaching activities based on a demonstration shaking table which is used to introduce the structural dynamics of…

  8. Earthquakes, Cities, and Lifelines: lessons integrating tectonics, society, and engineering in middle school Earth Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toke, N.; Johnson, A.; Nelson, K.

    2010-12-01

    Earthquakes are one of the most widely covered geologic processes by the media. As a result students, even at the middle school level, arrive in the classroom with preconceptions about the importance and hazards posed by earthquakes. Therefore earthquakes represent not only an attractive topic to engage students when introducing tectonics, but also a means to help students understand the relationships between geologic processes, society, and engineering solutions. Facilitating understanding of the fundamental connections between science and society is important for the preparation of future scientists and engineers as well as informed citizens. Here, we present a week-long lesson designed to be implemented in five one hour sessions with classes of ~30 students. It consists of two inquiry-based mapping investigations, motivational presentations, and short readings that describe fundamental models of plate tectonics, faults, and earthquakes. The readings also provide examples of engineering solutions such as the Alaskan oil pipeline which withstood multi-meter surface offset in the 2002 Denali Earthquake. The first inquiry-based investigation is a lesson on tectonic plates. Working in small groups, each group receives a different world map plotting both topography and one of the following data sets: GPS plate motion vectors, the locations and types of volcanoes, the location of types of earthquakes. Using these maps and an accompanying explanation of the data each group’s task is to map plate boundary locations. Each group then presents a ~10 minute summary of the type of data they used and their interpretation of the tectonic plates with a poster and their mapping results. Finally, the instructor will facilitate a class discussion about how the data types could be combined to understand more about plate boundaries. Using student interpretations of real data allows student misconceptions to become apparent. Throughout the exercise we record student preconceptions and post them to a bulletin board. During the tectonics unit we use these preconceptions as teaching tools. We also archive the misconceptions via a website which will be available for use by the broader geoscience education community. The second student investigation focuses on understanding the impact earthquakes have on nearby cities. We use the example of the 2009 southern San Andreas Fault (SAF) shakeout scenario. Students again break into groups. Each group is given an aspect of urban infrastructure to study relative to the underlying geology and location of nearby faults. Their goal is to uncover potential urban infrastructure issues related to a major earthquake on the SAF. For example students will map transportation ways crossing the fault, the location of hospitals relative to forecasted shaking hazards, the location of poverty-stricken areas relative to shaking hazards, and utilities relative to fault crossings. Again, students are tasked with explaining their investigation and analyses to the class with ample time for discussion about potential ways to solve problems identified through their investigations.

  9. ERTS Applications in earthquake research and mineral exploration in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdel-Gawad, M.; Silverstein, J.

    1973-01-01

    Examples that ERTS imagery can be effectively utilized to identify, locate, and map faults which show geomorphic evidence of geologically recent breakage are presented. Several important faults not previously known have been identified. By plotting epicenters of historic earthquakes in parts of California, Sonora, Mexico, Arizona, and Nevada, we found that areas known for historic seismicity are often characterized by abundant evidence of recent fault and crustal movements. There are many examples of seismically quiet areas where outstanding evidence of recent fault movements is observed. One application is clear: ERTS-1 imagery could be effectively utilized to delineate areas susceptible to earthquake recurrence which, on the basis of seismic data alone, may be misleadingly considered safe. ERTS data can also be utilized in planning new sites in the geophysical network of fault movement monitoring and strain and tilt measurements.

  10. The Role of Science and Engineering in Response and Reconstruction Following the 2010 Haiti Earthquake (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennington, W. D.

    2010-12-01

    The 12 January 2010 Haiti earthquake (M7) provoked a strong interest in assistance, from people worldwide. Scientists and engineers offered their assistance in many forms, including the inspection of buildings and infrastructure to determine their safety for occupancy, and the monitoring of aftershock activity to better locate the causal fault and improve hazard analysis. Disaster specialists usually refer to four phases of emergency management: mitigation; preparedness; response; and recovery (or reconstruction). Mitigation and preparedness had been given low priority, given other challenges in the country, and the tasks associated with those phases must now be part of the recovery or reconstruction phase. At the same time as the humanitarian response effort was underway, the scientific and engineering communities developed plans for two general tasks: (1) assisting the community in their immediate needs; and (2) studying the effects and properties of the earthquake and its aftershocks. Some of the scientists and engineers had personal connections within Haiti, and organized their self-funded efforts through them; others followed a more formal route through funding agencies and international governmental protocol. The funded scientific studies and formal engineering analyses form the basis of this discussion. The engineering efforts spawned an independent review of damaged buildings, labeling them as appropriate either for occupancy, for occupancy after repairs, or for demolition. The scientific efforts led to a number of new observations and concerns over the actual causative fault and possible implications for future hazard. Both the scientific and engineering efforts are providing valuable information that is, and will continue to be, useful in improving our understanding of risk mitigation in Haiti and other places facing similar hazards. As the response phase gradually evolved into the recovery or reconstruction phase, the scientific and engineering communities united with the policy community in the USA to try to influence the reconstruction of Haiti using sound scientific and engineering practices. A workshop was held in late March in Miami on the subject of “Rebuilding for Resilience: How Science and Engineering Can Inform Haiti’s Reconstruction”. Details, including the key findings and presentations from the workshop, are available at http://www.iris.edu/hq/haiti_workshop/ . The scientific and engineering communities are becoming more aware of the relationship of their work to the needs of stricken or vulnerable communities, and many scientists and engineers have become personally and professionally involved improving the interaction with the humanitarian community. This work is not easy, and will fail unless individual scientists and engineers assume personal responsibility for continuing to promote good practices while assisting the capacity-building within recovering countries and those at risk.

  11. AERODYNAMICS RESEARCH CENTER MECHANICAL AND AEROSPACE ENGINEERING

    E-print Network

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    for a compressor stage found in turbofan, turbojet engines. Thisurbojet engines. This reduces complexity of engine08/03/2007 16:39 1 AERODYNAMICS RESEARCH CENTER MECHANICAL AND AEROSPACE ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT Associate, ARC, MAE, UT Arlington Co-authors: Daniel T. H. New, Lecturer, Department of Engineering

  12. The Mechanics of Earthquake Rupture. Division of Engine~'ring, Brown University -Providence, R. I. 02912

    E-print Network

    ) with the inelastic response of fault regions to this loading and area i) with the resulting radiation of elastic in geological materials. Earthquakes result from catastrophic reductions in ,the capacity of material to sustain mechanics to shear rupture. Also of interest is the inelastic and, ultimately, strain-softening response

  13. UNLV’s environmentally friendly Science and Engineering Building is monitored for earthquake shaking

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kalkan, Erol; Savage, Woody; Reza, Shahneam; Knight, Eric; Tian, Ying

    2013-01-01

    The University of Nevada Las Vegas’ (UNLV) Science and Engineering Building is at the cutting edge of environmentally friendly design. As the result of a recent effort by the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Strong Motion Project in cooperation with UNLV, the building is now also in the forefront of buildings installed with structural monitoring systems to measure response during earthquakes. This is particularly important because this is the first such building in Las Vegas. The seismic instrumentation will provide essential data to better understand the structural performance of buildings, especially in this seismically active region.

  14. Principles for selecting earthquake motions in engineering design of large dams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krinitzsky, E.L.; Marcuson, William F.

    1983-01-01

    This report gives a synopsis of the various tools and techniques used in selecting earthquake ground motion parameters for large dams. It presents 18 charts giving newly developed relations for acceleration, velocity, and duration versus site earthquake intensity for near- and far-field hard and soft sites and earthquakes having magnitudes above and below 7. The material for this report is based on procedures developed at the Waterways Experiment Station. Although these procedures are suggested primarily for large dams, they may also be applicable for other facilities. Because no standard procedure exists for selecting earthquake motions in engineering design of large dams, a number of precautions are presented to guide users. The selection of earthquake motions is dependent on which one of two types of engineering analyses are performed. A pseudostatic analysis uses a coefficient usually obtained from an appropriate contour map; whereas, a dynamic analysis uses either accelerograms assigned to a site or specified respunse spectra. Each type of analysis requires significantly different input motions. All selections of design motions must allow for the lack of representative strong motion records, especially near-field motions from earthquakes of magnitude 7 and greater, as well as an enormous spread in the available data. Limited data must be projected and its spread bracketed in order to fill in the gaps and to assure that there will be no surprises. Because each site may have differing special characteristics in its geology, seismic history, attenuation, recurrence, interpreted maximum events, etc., as integrated approach gives best results. Each part of the site investigation requires a number of decisions. In some cases, the decision to use a 'least ork' approach may be suitable, simply assuming the worst of several possibilities and testing for it. Because there are no standard procedures to follow, multiple approaches are useful. For example, peak motions at a site may be obtained from several methods that involve magnitude of earthquake, distance from source, and corresponding motions; or, alternately, peak motions may be assigned from other correlations based on earthquake intensity. Various interpretations exist to account for duration, recurrence, effects of site conditions, etc. Comparison of the various interpretations can be very useful. Probabilities can be assigned; however, they can present very serious problems unless appropriate care is taken when data are extrapolated beyond their data base. In making deterministic judgments, probabilistic data can provide useful guidance in estimating the uncertainties of the decision. The selection of a design ground motion for large dams is based in the end on subjective judgments which should depend, to an important extent, on the consequences of failure. Usually, use of a design value of ground motion representing a mean plus one standard deviation of possible variation in the mean of the data puts one in a conservative position. If failure presents no hazard to life, lower values of design ground motion may be justified, providing there are cost benefits and the risk is acceptable to the owner. Where a large hazard to life exists (i.e., a dam above an urbanized area) one may wish to use values of design ground motion that approximate the very worst case. The selection of a design ground motion must be appropriate for its particular set of circumstances.

  15. Proceedings of the third U. S. national conference on earthquake engineering. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This book compiles the papers presented in the conference on the subject of earthquake damage and its detection. The topics discussed are: Buckling of pipelines in seismic environments; earthquake hazards mitigation and emergency planning; study of earthquake effects in San Francisco; Seismic effects on storage tanks; earthquake hazard reduction techniques at petroleum-facilities in Japan; seismic effects of power distribution systems in Eastern United States; Mexico Earthquake and public policy regarding earthquakes.

  16. QANU Research Review Chemical Engineering 3TU

    E-print Network

    Theune, Mariët

    QANU Research Review Chemical Engineering 3TU QANU, November 2009 #12;2 QANU / Research Review Chemical Engineering 3TU Quality Assurance Netherlands Universities (QANU) Catharijnesingel 56 PO Box 8035 / Research Review Chemical Engineering 3TU Contents Foreword 5 Preface 7 1. The review Committee

  17. QANU Research Review Industrial Design (Engineering)

    E-print Network

    Theune, Mariët

    QANU Research Review Industrial Design (Engineering) TUE & UT QANU, March 2011 #12;QANU / Research review Industrial Design (Engineering) TUE & UT2 Quality Assurance Netherlands Universities (QANU and if the source is mentioned. #12;QANU / Research review Industrial Design (Engineering) TUE & UT 3 Contents

  18. Chapter D. The Loma Prieta, California, Earthquake of October 17, 1989 - Earth Structures and Engineering Characterization of Ground Motion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holzer, Thomas L.

    1998-01-01

    This chapter contains two papers that summarize the performance of engineered earth structures, dams and stabilized excavations in soil, and two papers that characterize for engineering purposes the attenuation of ground motion with distance during the Loma Prieta earthquake. Documenting the field performance of engineered structures and confirming empirically based predictions of ground motion are critical for safe and cost effective seismic design of future structures as well as the retrofitting of existing ones.

  19. Earthquakes in Arkansas and vicinity 1699-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dart, Richard L.; Ausbrooks, Scott M.

    2011-01-01

    This map summarizes approximately 300 years of earthquake activity in Arkansas. It is one in a series of similar State earthquake history maps. Work on the Arkansas map was done in collaboration with the Arkansas Geological Survey. The earthquake data plotted on the map are from several sources: the Arkansas Geological Survey, the Center for Earthquake Research and Information, the National Center for Earthquake Engineering Research, and the Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality. In addition to earthquake locations, other materials presented include seismic hazard and isoseismal maps and related text. Earthquakes are a legitimate concern in Arkansas and parts of adjacent states. Arkansas has undergone a number of significant felt earthquakes since 1811. At least two of these events caused property damage: a magnitude 4.7 earthquake in 1931, and a magnitude 4.3 earthquake in 1967. The map shows all historical and instrumentally located earthquakes in Arkansas and vicinity between 1811 and 2010. The largest historic earthquake in the vicinity of the State was an intensity XI event, on December 16, 1811; the first earthquake in the New Madrid sequence. This violent event and the earthquakes that followed caused considerable damage to the then sparsely settled region.

  20. Comment on ``Coupling Semantics and Science in Earthquake Research''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lay, Thorne; Schwartz, Susan Y.

    2004-09-01

    Kelin Wang and Timothy Dixon (Eos, 85(18), 4 May 2004, p. 180) thoughtfully advocate paying close attention to semantics in descriptions of fault zone properties and kinematics, an increasingly important issue given the distinct usages of terms such as ``coupling'' by separate disciplines involved in the multidisciplinary study of earthquake faulting. We are in full accord with their advocacy of unambiguous language, such as the description of a nonsliding fault segment as being ``not slipping'' rather than ``strongly coupled'' in the absence of any information about the frictional or stress state of that segment. While several of Wang and Dixon's recommended ``simple expressions'' have clear merits, we feel that their advocacy of ``locked'' to equate to ``not slipping'' is not an improvement, and that their accompanying illustration of dislocation models of subduction zone megathrusts is potentially misleading. Wang and Dixon critique a simple, one-dimensional dislocation model for an interplate thrust event, for which conventional thinking is that the principle seismogenic zone is not sliding between earthquake ruptures but that there is steady sliding occurring along the shallow and deep extensions of the thrust plane. These stable sliding portions of the fault plane are assumed to be regions of velocity-strengthening frictional conditions; they accommodate relative plate motions without earthquake failure, although portions may be conditionally stable, driven to failure by the high strain rates (large changes in slip velocity) that accompany rupture of the main seismogenic zone. Wang and Dixon argue that this model is ``incorrect'' and that the updip region is not slipping steadily, and should be viewed as ``locked,'' along with the unstable sliding region. They invoke an analogy involving a book on a level table with no shear stress being applied; and it is correctly asserted that this stable equilibrium state does not allow strength or nature of frictional coupling to be deduced. However, this analogy seems irrelevant to the situation of interplate thrust faults, which are not in a state of stable equilibrium and are being continuously loaded by forces associated with slab-pull, ridge-push, and lateral loading by slip of adjacent segments both along the strike and dip of the megathrust.

  1. RICARDO DOBRY Professor, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    E-print Network

    Briaud, Jean Louis

    of the Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES), one of 15 electronically interconnected experimental at Rensselaer, where he currently serves as Director of the Center for Earthquake Engineering Research which, geotechnical earthquake engineering and geotechnical dynamic centrifuge testing. He was a participant

  2. Scientific Publications of M.D. Trifunac 1. Analysis of Accelerograms-Parkfield Earthquake, with G.W. Housner, Bull. Seism. Soc. Amer., 57(6), 1193-

    E-print Network

    Southern California, University of

    . Analysis of the Station No.2, Seismoscope Record-1966 Parkfield, California Earthquake, with D.E. Hudson Mechanism of Earthquakes in Southern California, Earthquake Engineering Research Laboratory, EERL 70 Accelerogram, San Fernando, California Earthquake of 1971, with D.E. Hudson, Bull. Seism. Soc. Amer., 61

  3. Scientific Research Database of the 2008 Ms8.0 Wenchuan Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yu, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Nearly 5 years after the 2008 Ms8.0 Wenchuan Earthquake, the Ms7.0 Lushan earthquake stroke 70km away along the same fault system. Given the tremendous life loss and property damages as well as the short time and distance intervals between the two large magnitude events, the scientific probing into their causing factors and future seismic activities in the nearby region will continue to be in the center of earthquake research in China and even the world for years to come. In the past five years, scientists have made significant efforts to study the Wenchuan earthquake from various aspects using different datasets and methods. Their studies cover a variety of topics including seismogenic environment, earthquake precursors, rupture process, co-seismic phenomenon, hazard relief, reservoir induced seismicity and more. These studies have been published in numerous journals in Chinese, English and many other languages. In addition, 54 books regarding to this earthquake have been published. The extremely diversified nature of all publications makes it very difficult and time-consuming, if not impossible, to sort out information needed by individual researcher in an efficient way. An information platform that collects relevant scientific information and makes them accessible in various ways can be very handy. With this mission in mind, the Earthquake Research Group in the Chengdu University of Technology has developed a website www.wceq.org to attack this target: (1) articles published by major journals and books are recorded into a database. Researchers will be able to find articles by topics, journals, publication dates, authors and keywords e.t.c by a few clicks; (2) to fast track the latest developments, researchers can also follow upon updates in the current month, last 90days, 180 days and 365 days by clicking on corresponding links; (3) the modern communication tools such as Facebook, Twitter and their Chinese counterparts are accommodated in this site to share favorite research information with friends; (4) This site also serves as a bridge between readers and authors by providing messaging boards in many forms; (5) we also track relevant meeting presentations, ongoing researches as well as earthquake-related news; (6) furthermore, we also collect publications of earthquakes in the eastern Tibetan plateau and selected ones from other regions for comparison purpose. After nearly one year of operation, the database has been growing steadily with time and the major functionalities have been well developed and stabilized. Up to August 6 2013, totally 847 papers have been collected in our database. Among them 673, 21 and 153 papers are of Wenchuan, Lushan and Tohoko earthquake in interest, respectively. For the Wenchuan earthquake articles, nearly 10%, 20%, 25%,15%, 15% are of studies in seismogenic environment, precursors, rupture process, hazard relief and aftershocks & coseismic events, respectively. Built upon the ever growing database, the next move would be to do more analysis. One ongoing project would be to collect figures from articles that are of special interest to people in the field. A parallel project will also start to extend the database to include Tibetan Plateau studies.

  4. Feminist Methodologies and Engineering Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beddoes, Kacey

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces feminist methodologies in the context of engineering education research. It builds upon other recent methodology articles in engineering education journals and presents feminist research methodologies as a concrete engineering education setting in which to explore the connections between epistemology, methodology and theory.…

  5. Fusion Ignition Research Experiment Engineering Status Report

    E-print Network

    Fusion Ignition Research Experiment -FIRE- Engineering Status Report For Fiscal Year 2001 Issued. Rathke (AES) Report No. 81_010202_FireFYRpt_FT.doc #12;FIRE FY 01 Engineering Report Update Table.0 Research and Development (R&D) #12;FIRE Engineering Report FY01 Update 1.0 Introduction The Next Step

  6. Stirling Laboratory Research Engine: Preprototype configuration report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoehn, F. W.

    1982-01-01

    The concept of a simple Stirling research engine that could be used by industrial, university, and government laboratories was studied. The conceptual and final designs, hardware fabrication and the experimental validation of a preprototype stirling laboratory research engine (SLRE) were completed. Also completed was a task to identify the potential markets for research engines of this type. An analytical effort was conducted to provide a stirling cycle computer model. The versatile engine is a horizontally opposed, two piston, single acting stirling engine with a split crankshaft drive mechanism; special instrumentation is installed at all component interfaces. Results of a thermodynamic energy balance for the system are reported. Also included are the engine performance results obtained over a range of speeds, working pressures, phase angles and gas temperatures. The potential for a stirling research engine to support the laboratory requirements of educators and researchers was demonstrated.

  7. Soil Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering 26 (2006) 694707 Plain strain soilstructure interaction model for a building supported by

    E-print Network

    Southern California, University of

    2006-01-01

    Soil Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering 26 (2006) 694­707 Plain strain soil­structure interaction, CA 90089-2531, USA Accepted 3 January 2006 Abstract A simple theoretical model for soil­structure interaction in water saturated poroelastic soils is presented, developed to explore if the apparent building­foundation­soil

  8. Soil Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering 26 (2006) 708717 Effects of rainfall on soilstructure system frequency: Examples based

    E-print Network

    Southern California, University of

    2006-01-01

    Soil Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering 26 (2006) 708­717 Effects of rainfall on soil Angeles, CA 90089-2531, USA Accepted 3 January 2006 Abstract In this paper, a simple two-dimensional soil. The postulated hypothesis is that the observed increases in frequency are due to the water saturation of the soil

  9. 2001 Bhuj, India, earthquake engineering seismoscope recordings and Eastern North America ground-motion attenuation relations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cramer, C.H.; Kumar, A.

    2003-01-01

    Engineering seismoscope data collected at distances less than 300 km for the M 7.7 Bhuj, India, mainshock are compatible with ground-motion attenuation in eastern North America (ENA). The mainshock ground-motion data have been corrected to a common geological site condition using the factors of Joyner and Boore (2000) and a classification scheme of Quaternary or Tertiary sediments or rock. We then compare these data to ENA ground-motion attenuation relations. Despite uncertainties in recording method, geological site corrections, common tectonic setting, and the amount of regional seismic attenuation, the corrected Bhuj dataset agrees with the collective predictions by ENA ground-motion attenuation relations within a factor of 2. This level of agreement is within the dataset uncertainties and the normal variance for recorded earthquake ground motions.

  10. Earthquakes in Mississippi and vicinity 1811-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dart, Richard L.; Bograd, Michael B.E.

    2011-01-01

    This map summarizes two centuries of earthquake activity in Mississippi. Work on the Mississippi map was done in collaboration with the Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality, Office of Geology. The earthquake data plotted on the map are from several sources: the Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality, the Center for Earthquake Research and Information, the National Center for Earthquake Engineering Research, and the Arkansas Geological Survey. In addition to earthquake locations, other materials include seismic hazard and isoseismal maps and related text. Earthquakes are a legitimate concern in Mississippi and parts of adjacent States. Mississippi has undergone a number of felt earthquakes since 1811. At least two of these events caused property damage: a magnitude 4.7 earthquake in 1931, and a magnitude 4.3 earthquake in 1967. The map shows all historical and instrumentally located earthquakes in Mississippi and vicinity between 1811 and 2010. The largest historic earthquake in the vicinity of the State was an intensity XI event, on December 16, 1811; the first earthquake in the New Madrid sequence. This violent event and the earthquakes that followed caused considerable damage to the then sparsely settled region.

  11. First European Conference on Earthquake Engineering and Seismology (a joint event of the 13th

    E-print Network

    Bruneau, Michel

    Engineering Research, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14260, USA. Tel.: 716-645-3391 2 Professor, Department of Civil, Structural, and Environmental Engineering, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14260, USA designed to provide a standardized service, such as a power grid, or a water distribution network

  12. Defeating Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, R. S.

    2012-12-01

    The 2004 M=9.2 Sumatra earthquake claimed what seemed an unfathomable 228,000 lives, although because of its size, we could at least assure ourselves that it was an extremely rare event. But in the short space of 8 years, the Sumatra quake no longer looks like an anomaly, and it is no longer even the worst disaster of the Century: 80,000 deaths in the 2005 M=7.6 Pakistan quake; 88,000 deaths in the 2008 M=7.9 Wenchuan, China quake; 316,000 deaths in the M=7.0 Haiti, quake. In each case, poor design and construction were unable to withstand the ferocity of the shaken earth. And this was compounded by inadequate rescue, medical care, and shelter. How could the toll continue to mount despite the advances in our understanding of quake risk? The world's population is flowing into megacities, and many of these migration magnets lie astride the plate boundaries. Caught between these opposing demographic and seismic forces are 50 cities of at least 3 million people threatened by large earthquakes, the targets of chance. What we know for certain is that no one will take protective measures unless they are convinced they are at risk. Furnishing that knowledge is the animating principle of the Global Earthquake Model, launched in 2009. At the very least, everyone should be able to learn what his or her risk is. At the very least, our community owes the world an estimate of that risk. So, first and foremost, GEM seeks to raise quake risk awareness. We have no illusions that maps or models raise awareness; instead, earthquakes do. But when a quake strikes, people need a credible place to go to answer the question, how vulnerable am I, and what can I do about it? The Global Earthquake Model is being built with GEM's new open source engine, OpenQuake. GEM is also assembling the global data sets without which we will never improve our understanding of where, how large, and how frequently earthquakes will strike, what impacts they will have, and how those impacts can be lessened by our actions. Using these global datasets will help to make the model as uniform as possible. The model must be built by scientists in the affected countries with GEM's support, augmented by their insights and data. The model will launch in 2014; to succeed it must be open, international, independent, and continuously tested. But the mission of GEM is not just the likelihood of ground shaking, but also gaging the economic and social consequences of earthquakes, which greatly amplify the losses. For example, should the municipality of Istanbul retrofit schools, or increase its insurance reserves and recovery capacity? Should a homeowner in a high-risk area move or strengthen her building? This is why GEM is a public-private partnership. GEM's fourteen public sponsors and eight non-governmental organization members are standing for the developing world. To extend GEM into the financial world, we draw upon the expertise of companies. GEM's ten private sponsors have endorsed the acquisition of public knowledge over private gain. In a competitive world, this is a courageous act. GEM is but one link in a chain of preparedness: from earth science and engineering research, through groups like GEM, to mitigation, retrofit or relocate decisions, building codes and insurance, and finally to prepared hospitals, schools, and homes. But it is a link that our community can make strong.

  13. Tohoku Earthquake-associated Marine Sciences: the research project for the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitazato, Hiroshi; Kijima, Akihiro; Kogure, Kazuhiro; Hara, Motoyuki; Nagata, Toshi; Fujikura, Kasunori; Sonoda, Akira

    2015-04-01

    At 2:46 pm on March 11, 2011, a huge earthquake (M 9.0) occurred off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Region, Japan. The subsequent Tsunamis hit the coasts and seriously damaged fishing villages and towns in the area. Tohoku Region faces Northwestern Pacific where is one of the most productive oceans on the Earth. Then, what happened to the marine ecosystems in the Tohoku Region? What happened to the fishery bioresources? What is the mechanism to sustain high productivity in the Region? Is the ecosystem restoring after 4 years? What is required for the recovery of fisheries in the area? In order to answer these questions, the 10 years research project, TEAMS (Tohoku Ecosystem-Associated Marine Sciences) was launched in January 2012 funded by MEXT (Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan) to conduct comprehensive research on the area. Tohoku University (TU), Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, the University of Tokyo (AORIUT), Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC), and 25 other institutions are conducting research for this project in close association with local government and fishery people. Currently, approximately 400 people (200 scientists, 160 students and others) covering physical, chemical, biological, and geological sciences including modeling take part in the project from all over Japan. MEXT also supports TEAMS by constructing R/V Shinsei Maru in 2013 for the oceanic investigations in the region. In this report, the overview of the ecosystem before and after the disaster, major findings and challenges of TEAMS will be described.

  14. Engineering Research in Irish Economic Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, John

    2011-01-01

    This article summarizes the main findings and recommendations of a report published in December 2010 by the Irish Academy of Engineering (IAE). The report, representing the views of a committee of distinguished Irish engineers from a wide range of disciplines, addresses the role of engineering research in Ireland's economic development and the…

  15. Nuclear Engineering 2013-2014 Research Projects

    E-print Network

    Bahler, Dennis R.

    Nuclear Engineering 2013-2014 Research Projects Faculty Hany S. Abdel-Khalik, Associate Professor (919/ 749-9717); PhD, Nuclear Engineering, NC State University (2004); computational methods@ncsu.edu] Yousry Azmy, Professor and Head (919/ 515-3385); PhD, Nuclear Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana

  16. Research Trends with Cross Tabulation Search Engine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Chengjiu; Hirokawa, Sachio; Yau, Jane Yin-Kim; Hashimoto, Kiyota; Tabata, Yoshiyuki; Nakatoh, Tetsuya

    2013-01-01

    To help researchers in building a knowledge foundation of their research fields which could be a time-consuming process, the authors have developed a Cross Tabulation Search Engine (CTSE). Its purpose is to assist researchers in 1) conducting research surveys, 2) efficiently and effectively retrieving information (such as important researchers,…

  17. Petroleum Engineering Research Building Naming Opportunities

    E-print Network

    Cooke, Daniel E.

    Petroleum Engineering Research Building Naming Opportunities Area Naming of the Building Upstream Apache Occidental Petroleum Anadarko Chevron Pioneer Natural Resources Terry and Linda Fuller & James by the Texas Tech Board of Regents. #12;Petroleum Engineering Research Building Floor Plans UP UP 2'-7" 14'-2 1

  18. RESEARCH & INNOVATION Faculty of Science & Engineering

    E-print Network

    Waikato, University of

    RESEARCH & INNOVATION Faculty of Science & Engineering #12;Introducing Our Research #12;1FACULTY OF SCIENCE & ENGINEERING Title Approx. 21 words to come Occus ut fugit fugias soluptatur aut quatur Titanium alloys and 3D printing 25 The good oil 26 Forces at work 27 Nurturing innovators for the future 28

  19. Engineering Research Centers: A Partnership for Competitiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA.

    This publication consists of colorful data sheets on the National Science Foundation's Engineering Research Centers (ERC) Program, a program designed to strengthen the competitiveness of U.S. industries by bringing new approaches and goals to academic engineering research and education. The main elements of the ERC mission are cross-disciplinary…

  20. Engineering Research Centers Quantum Energy and Sustainable

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Junshan

    Engineering Research Centers (ERCs) Quantum Energy and Sustainable Solar Technologies (QESST) an NSF-DOE Engineering Research Center Center for Bio-mediated and Bio-inspired Geotechnics (CBBG, Materials and Systems (AIMS) Advanced Technology Innovation Center (ATIC) Algae Testbed Public

  1. Proceedings of the 9th U.S.-Japan natural resources panel for earthquake research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2015-01-01

    The Panel strongly urges that the appropriate agencies in the U.S. and Japan that are represented on this panel work together with the academic sector to support and coordinate scientific work in these areas of cooperation. The Panel recognizes the importance of promoting the exchange of scientific personnel, exchange of data, and fundamental studies to advance progress in earthquake research. The U.S. and Japan should promote these exchanges throughout the world. The Panel endorses continuation of these activities.

  2. CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING RESEARCH LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    Heaton, Thomas H.

    -S fundamental mode), 2.38 Hz (Torsional fundamental mode), 4.93 Hz (1st E-W overtone), 6.57 Hz (1st Torsional bending beam. The higher modes are more complex and not well represented by a simple structural system

  3. 1 INTRODUCTION The earthquake engineering research in China

    E-print Network

    Spencer Jr., Billie F.

    and spectral accelerations being as independent variables in seismic hazard analysis. Working in this way and methodology of seismic design; 2) The characteristics of strong ground motion and attenuation law; 3) Seismic hazard and probabilistic level of seismic design criterion; 4) Seismic performance and reliability

  4. 2011 TOHOKUCHIHOTAIHEIYOU OKI EARTHQUAKE

    E-print Network

    Guillas, Serge

    2011 TOHOKUCHIHOTAIHEIYOU OKI EARTHQUAKE M. HORI Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo Seminar on the Honshu Earthquake & Tsunami UCL Institute for Risk & Disaster Reduction March 24, 2011 #12;Earthquake Details · Magnitude in Richter scale 9.0 · Moment Magnitude 9.0 · Location 38.03N, 143.15E · Depth

  5. Journal of the Chinese Institute of Engineers. Special Issue: Commemoration of Chi-Chi Earthquake (II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-09-01

    Contents include the following: Deep Electromagnetic Images of Seismogenic Zone of the Chi-Chi (Taiwan) Earthquake; New Techniques for Stress-Forecasting Earthquakes; Aspects of Characteristics of Near-Fault Ground Motions of the 1999 Chi-Chi (Taiwan) Earthquake; Liquefaction Damage and Related Remediation in Wufeng after the Chi-Chi Earthquake; Fines Content Effects on Liquefaction Potential Evaluation for Sites Liquefied during Chi-Chi Earthquake 1999; Damage Investigation and Liquefaction Potential Analysis of Gravelly Soil; Dynamic Characteristics of Soils in Yuan-Lin Liquefaction Area; A Preliminary Study of Earthquake Building Damage and Life Loss Due to the Chi-Chi Earthquake; Statistical Analyses of Relation between Mortality and Building Type in the 1999 Chi-Chi Earthquake; Development of an After Earthquake Disaster Shelter Evaluation Model; Posttraumatic Stress Reactions in Children and Adolescents One Year after the 1999 Taiwan Chi-Chi Earthquake; Changes or Not is the Question: the Meaning of Posttraumatic Stress Reactions One Year after the Taiwan Chi-Chi Earthquake.

  6. 78 FR 16357 - Research, Engineering and Development Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-14

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Research, Engineering and Development Advisory Committee AGENCY: Federal... Research, Engineering and Development (R,E&D) Advisory Committee. Name: Research, Engineering & Development... agenda will include receiving from the Committee guidance for FAA's research and development...

  7. NASA Propulsion Engineering Research Center, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    On 8-9 Sep. 1993, the Propulsion Engineering Research Center (PERC) at The Pennsylvania State University held its Fifth Annual Symposium. PERC was initiated in 1988 by a grant from the NASA Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology as a part of the University Space Engineering Research Center (USERC) program; the purpose of the USERC program is to replenish and enhance the capabilities of our Nation's engineering community to meet its future space technology needs. The Centers are designed to advance the state-of-the-art in key space-related engineering disciplines and to promote and support engineering education for the next generation of engineers for the national space program and related commercial space endeavors. Research on the following areas was initiated: liquid, solid, and hybrid chemical propulsion, nuclear propulsion, electrical propulsion, and advanced propulsion concepts.

  8. A Bibliometric Analysis of Climate Engineering Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belter, C. W.; Seidel, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    The past five years have seen a dramatic increase in the number of media and scientific publications on the topic of climate engineering, or geoengineering, and some scientists are increasingly calling for more research on climate engineering as a possible supplement to climate change mitigation and adaptation strategies. In this context, understanding the current state of climate engineering research can help inform policy discussions and guide future research directions. Bibliometric analysis - the quantitative analysis of publications - is particularly applicable to fields with large bodies of literature that are difficult to summarize by traditional review methods. The multidisciplinary nature of the published literature on climate engineering makes it an ideal candidate for bibliometric analysis. Publications on climate engineering are found to be relatively recent (more than half of all articles during 1988-2011 were published since 2008), include a higher than average percentage of non-research articles (30% compared with 8-15% in related scientific disciplines), and be predominately produced by countries located in the Northern Hemisphere and speaking English. The majority of this literature focuses on land-based methods of carbon sequestration, ocean iron fertilization, and solar radiation management and is produced with little collaboration among research groups. This study provides a summary of existing publications on climate engineering, a perspective on the scientific underpinnings of the global dialogue on climate engineering, and a baseline for quantitatively monitoring the development of climate engineering research in the future.

  9. Summaries of FY 1994 engineering research

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    This report documents the Basic Energy Sciences Engineering Research Program for fiscal year 1994; it provides a summary of each of the program projects in addition to a brief program overview. The report is intended to provide staff of Congressional committees, other executive departments, and other DOE offices with substantive program information so as to facilitate governmental overview and coordination of Federal research programs. Of equal importance, its availability facilitates communication of program information to interested research engineers and scientists.

  10. Seismic Safety Margins Research Program, Phase I. Project II: seismic input. Compilation, assessment and expansion of the strong earthquake ground motion data base

    SciTech Connect

    Crouse, C B; Hileman, J A; Turner, B E; Martin, G R

    1980-04-01

    A catalog has been prepared which contains information for: (1) world-wide, ground-motion accelerograms, (2) the accelerograph sites where these records were obtained, and (3) the seismological parameters of the causative earthquakes. The catalog is limited to data for those accelerograms which have been digitized and published. In addition, the quality and completeness of these data are assessed. This catalog is unique because it is the only publication which contains comprehensive information on the recording conditions of all known digitized accelerograms. However, information for many accelerograms is missing. Although some literature may have been overlooked, most of the missing data has not been published. Nevertheless, the catalog provides a convenient reference and useful tool for earthquake engineering research and applications.

  11. Application of space technology to crustal dynamics and earthquake research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    In cooperation with other Federal government agencies, and the governments of other countries, NASA is undertaking a program of research in geodynamics. The present program activities and plans for extension of these activities in the time period 1979-1985 are described. The program includes operation of observatories for laser ranging to the Moon and to artificial satellites, and radio observatories for very long baseline microwave interferometry (VLBI). These observatories are used to measure polar motion, earth rotation, and tectonic plate movement, and serve as base stations for mobile facilities. The mobile laser ranging and VLBI facilities are used to measure crustal deformation in tectonically active areas.

  12. 75 FR 62113 - Board on Coastal Engineering Research

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-07

    ...Corps of Engineers Board on Coastal Engineering Research AGENCY: Department of the...Name of Committee: Board on Coastal Engineering Research. Date of Meeting: October...consonance with the needs of the coastal engineering field and the objectives of the...

  13. 77 FR 52701 - Board on Coastal Engineering Research

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-30

    ...Corps of Engineers Board on Coastal Engineering Research AGENCY: Department of the...Name of Committee: Board on Coastal Engineering Research. Date of Meeting: September...consonance with the needs of the coastal engineering field and the objectives of the...

  14. 77 FR 3240 - Board on Coastal Engineering Research

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-23

    ...Corps of Engineers Board on Coastal Engineering Research AGENCY: Department of the...Name of Committee: Board on Coastal Engineering Research. DATES: Date of Meeting...consonance with the needs of the coastal engineering field and the objectives of the...

  15. earthquake warning earthquake strikes

    E-print Network

    Emergency earthquake warning When an earthquake strikes Immediately after the earthquake Several-8550 For Students LargeLaargege Earthquake #12;According to tables explaining the JMA (Japan Meteorological Agency situation Wooden houses Ground situation Lifelines Slopes, etc. situation In preparation for an earthquake

  16. earthquake warning earthquake strikes

    E-print Network

    Emergency earthquake warning When an earthquake strikes Immediately after the earthquake Several, Kanagawa 226-8503 For Students LargeLaargege Earthquake #12;According to tables explaining the JMA (Japan for an earthquake with a seismic intensity of 5-Lower or greater, this manual summarizes what you should do

  17. FY08 Engineering Research and Technology Report

    SciTech Connect

    Minichino, C; McNichols, D

    2009-02-24

    This report summarizes the core research, development, and technology accomplishments in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Engineering Directorate for FY2008. These efforts exemplify Engineering's more than 50-year history of developing and applying the technologies needed to support the Laboratory's national security missions. A partner in every major program and project at the Laboratory throughout its existence, Engineering has prepared for this role with a skilled workforce and technical resources developed through both internal and external venues. These accomplishments embody Engineering's mission: 'Enable program success today and ensure the Laboratory's vitality tomorrow.' Engineering's mission is carried out through basic research and technology development. Research is the vehicle for creating competencies that are cutting-edge, or require discovery-class groundwork to be fully understood. Our technology efforts are discipline-oriented, preparing research breakthroughs for broader application to a variety of Laboratory needs. The term commonly used for technology-based projects is 'reduction to practice.' As we pursue this two-pronged approach, an enormous range of technological capabilities result. This report combines our work in research and technology into one volume, organized into thematic technical areas: Engineering Modeling and Simulation; Measurement Technologies; Micro/Nano-Devices and Structures; Engineering Systems for Knowledge and Inference; and Energy Manipulation. Our investments in these areas serve not only known programmatic requirements of today and tomorrow, but also anticipate the breakthrough engineering innovations that will be needed in the future.

  18. ISET Journal of Earthquake Technology, Paper No. 500, Vol. 46, No. 1, March 2009, pp. 117 SMOOTH SPECTRA OF HORIZONTALAND VERTICAL GROUND

    E-print Network

    Gupta, Vinay Kumar

    ISET Journal of Earthquake Technology, Paper No. 500, Vol. 46, No. 1, March 2009, pp. 1­17 SMOOTH*** *Seismology Research Center, International Institute of Earthquake Engineering and Seismology, Tehran, Iran **Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan ***Iran Strong Motion Network, Building

  19. Graduate engineering research participation in aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, A. S., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The Aeronautics Graduate Research Program commenced in 1971, with the primary goal of engaging students who qualified for regular admission to the Graduate School of Engineering at Old Dominion University in a graduate engineering research and study program in collaboration with NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. The format and purposes of this program are discussed. Student selection and program statistics are summarized. Abstracts are presented in the folowing areas: aircraft design, aerodynamics, lift/drag characteristics; avionics; fluid mechanics; solid mechanics; instrumentation and measurement techniques; thermophysical properties experiments; large space structures; earth orbital dynamics; and environmental engineering.

  20. 7th U.S. / Japan Natural Resources (UJNR) Panel on Earthquake Research: Abstract Volume and Technical Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Detweiler, Shane T.; Ellsworth, William L.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. / Japan Natural Resources (UJNR) Panel on Earthquake Research promotes advanced study toward a more fundamental understanding of the earthquake process and hazard estimation. The Panel promotes basic and applied research to improve our understanding of the causes and effects of earthquakes and to facilitate the transmission of research results to those who implement hazard reduction measures on both sides of the Pacific and around the world. Meetings are held every other year, and alternate between countries with short presentation on current research and local field trips being the highlights. The 5th Joint Panel meeting was held at Asilomar, California in October, 2004. The technical sessions featured reports on the September 28, 2004 Parkfield, California earthquake, progress on earthquake early warning and rapid post-event assessment technology, probabilistic earthquake forecasting and the newly discovered phenomenon of nonvolcanic tremor. The Panel visited the epicentral region of the M 6.0 Parkfield earthquake and viewed the surface ruptures along the San Andreas Fault. They also visited the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD), which had just completed the first phase of drilling into the fault. The 6th Joint Panel meeting was held in Tokushima, Japan in November, 2006. The meeting included very productive exchanges of information on approaches to systematic observation of earthquake processes. Sixty eight technical papers were presented during the meeting on a wide range of subjects, including interplate earthquakes in subduction zones, slow slip and nonvolcanic tremor, crustal deformation, recent earthquake activity and hazard mapping. Through our discussion, we reaffirmed the benefits of working together to achieve our common goal of reducing earthquake hazard, continued cooperation on issues involving densification of observation networks and the open exchange of data among scientific communities. We also reaffirmed the importance of making information public in a timely manner. The Panel visited sites along the east coast of Shikoku that were inundated by the tsunami caused by the 1946 Nankai earthquake where they heard from survivors of the disaster and saw new tsunami shelters and barriers. They also visited the Median Tectonic Line, a major onshore strike-slip fault on Shikoku. The 7th Joint Panel meeting was held in Seattle, Wash., U.S.A. from October 27-30, 2008.

  1. Electromagnetic earthquake triggering phenomena: State-of-the-art research and future developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeigarnik, Vladimir; Novikov, Victor

    2014-05-01

    Developed in the 70s of the last century in Russia unique pulsed power systems based on solid propellant magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) generators with an output of 10-500 MW and operation duration of 10 to 15 s were applied for an active electromagnetic monitoring of the Earth's crust to explore its deep structure, oil and gas electrical prospecting, and geophysical studies for earthquake prediction due to their high specific power parameters, portability, and a capability of operation under harsh climatic conditions. The most interesting and promising results were obtained during geophysical experiments at the test sites located at Pamir and Northern Tien Shan mountains, when after 1.5-2.5 kA electric current injection into the Earth crust through an 4 km-length emitting dipole the regional seismicity variations were observed (increase of number of weak earthquakes within a week). Laboratory experiments performed by different teams of the Institute of Physics of the Earth, Joint Institute for High Temperatures, and Research Station of Russian Academy of Sciences on observation of acoustic emission behavior of stressed rock samples during their processing by electric pulses demonstrated similar patterns - a burst of acoustic emission (formation of cracks) after application of current pulse to the sample. Based on the field and laboratory studies it was supposed that a new kind of earthquake triggering - electromagnetic initiation of weak seismic events has been observed, which may be used for the man-made electromagnetic safe release of accumulated tectonic stresses and, consequently, for earthquake hazard mitigation. For verification of this hypothesis some additional field experiments were carried out at the Bishkek geodynamic proving ground with application of pulsed ERGU-600 facility, which provides 600 A electric current in the emitting dipole. An analysis of spatio-temporal redistribution of weak regional seismicity after ERGU-600 pulses, as well as a response of geoacoustic emission recorded in the wells at a distance of 7-12 km from the emitting dipole to the ERGU-600 pulses confirmed the effects of an influence of electromagnetic field on the deformation processes in the Earth crust and the real existence of electromagnetic triggering phenomena. For verification of results of field observations laboratory studies of behavior of rock samples under critical stress-strain state and external electric actions were carried out at the spring and lever presses, as well as at the stick-slip models simulated the seismic cycle (stress accumulation and discharge) in the seismogenic geological fault. Various possible mechanisms of weak electrical stimulation (electric current density 10-7-10-8 mA/cm2 at a depth of earthquake epicenters of 5 to10 km) of deformation processes in the Earth crust, including increased fluid pore pressure, electrokinetic phenomena, magnetostriction, electrical stimulation of fluid migration into the fault area are considered. However, the mechanism of electromagnetic earthquake triggering phenomena is still open. Based on the field observations of electromagnetic triggering of weak seismicity resulting in a partial safe release of stresses in the Earth crust a possibility of control of seismic process is considered for risk reduction of catastrophic earthquakes. The results obtained from field and laboratory experiments on electromagnetic initiation of seismic events allow to consider a problem of lithosphere-ionosphere relations from another point of view. Keeping in mind that the current density generated in the Earth crust by artificial electric source is comparable with the density of telluric currents induced during severe ionospheric disturbances (e.g., magnetic storms) it may be possible under certain favorable conditions in lithosphere to initiate earthquakes by electromagnetic disturbances in ionosphere. A possibility of application of these triggering phenomena for short-term earthquake prediction is discussed.

  2. Stirling engine research at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Holtz, R.E.; Daley, J.G.; Roach, P.D.

    1986-06-01

    Stirling engine research at Argonne National Laboratory has been focused at (1) development of mathematical models and analytical tools for predicting component and engine performance, and (2) experimental research into fundamental heat transfer and fluid flow phenomena occurring in Stirling cycle devices. A result of the analytical effort has been the formation of a computer library specifically for Stirling engine researchers and developers. The library contains properties of structural materials commonly used, thermophysical properties of several working fluids, correlations for heat transfer calculations and general specifications of mechanical arrangements (including various drive mechanisms) that can be utilized to model a particular engine. The library also contains alternative modules to perform analysis at different levels of sophistication, including design optimization. A reversing flow heat transfer facility is operating at Argonne to provide data at prototypic Stirling engine operating conditions under controlled laboratory conditions. This information is needed to validate analytical models.

  3. LeadingResearchDukeEngineering13 Duke Engineering

    E-print Network

    ." --PRATT RESEARCH MISSION #12;DATAANALYTICS DATA ANALYTICS 76 DUKE ENGINEERING RESEARCH Big data, big. This publication focuses on three main areas--big data, disease detection and treatment using light, and materials insights We're at a moment in which we seem to have become better at collecting data than understanding it

  4. The effects of earthquake measurement concepts and magnitude anchoring on individuals' perceptions of earthquake risk

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Celsi, R.; Wolfinbarger, M.; Wald, D.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to explore earthquake risk perceptions in California. Specifically, we examine the risk beliefs, feelings, and experiences of lay, professional, and expert individuals to explore how risk is perceived and how risk perceptions are formed relative to earthquakes. Our results indicate that individuals tend to perceptually underestimate the degree that earthquake (EQ) events may affect them. This occurs in large part because individuals' personal felt experience of EQ events are generally overestimated relative to experienced magnitudes. An important finding is that individuals engage in a process of "cognitive anchoring" of their felt EQ experience towards the reported earthquake magnitude size. The anchoring effect is moderated by the degree that individuals comprehend EQ magnitude measurement and EQ attenuation. Overall, the results of this research provide us with a deeper understanding of EQ risk perceptions, especially as they relate to individuals' understanding of EQ measurement and attenuation concepts. ?? 2005, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  5. Health Related Research Expertise Mechanical Engineering Department

    E-print Network

    Van Volkenburgh, Elizabeth

    Health Related Research Expertise Mechanical Engineering Department U. of Washington Scanning-sensors and BioMEMS, artificial organs, nano-technology/nano-fluid/membrane science, tissue engineering and actuators for biomedical applications, electro optic polymers, conductive polymers, electro-optic and MEMS

  6. SUCCESS OF EPA'S STRATOSPHERIC OZONE ENGINEERING RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper summarizes recent successes in, as well as work in progress (with the cooperation of industry) on, EPA's stratospheric ozone engineering research. he Montreal Protocol and U.S. regulations implementing the Protocol necessitate that engineering solutions be found and imp...

  7. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Recurrence Statistics of Great Earthquakes

    E-print Network

    Ben-Naim, Eli

    Earthquakes E. Ben-Naim,1,2 E. G. Daub,2,3,4 and P. A. Johnson3 We investigate the sequence of great earthquakes over the past century. To examine whether the earthquake record includes temporal clustering, we as the time between two consecu- tive earthquakes. We study the variance in the recurrence time

  8. 76 FR 44648 - Research, Engineering and Development Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-26

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Research, Engineering and Development Advisory Committee Pursuant to... given of a meeting of the FAA Research, Engineering and Development (R,E&D) Advisory Committee. AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration, DOT. ACTION: Notice of meeting. Name: Research, Engineering &...

  9. 76 FR 12404 - Research, Engineering and Development Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-07

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Research, Engineering and Development Advisory Committee Pursuant to... given of a meeting of the FAA Research, Engineering and Development (R,E&D) Advisory Committee. AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. Name: Research, Engineering &...

  10. 75 FR 14243 - Research, Engineering And Development Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-24

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Research, Engineering And Development Advisory Committee Pursuant to... given of a meeting of the FAA Research, Engineering and Development (R,E&D) Advisory Committee. Agency: Federal Aviation Administration. Action: Notice of Meeting. Name: Research, Engineering &...

  11. 77 FR 14462 - Research, Engineering and Development Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Research, Engineering and Development Advisory Committee Pursuant to... given of a meeting of the FAA Research, Engineering and Development (R,E&D) Advisory Committee. AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration, DOT. ACTION: Notice of Meeting. Name: Research, Engineering &...

  12. 77 FR 54648 - Research, Engineering and Development Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-05

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Research, Engineering and Development Advisory Committee Pursuant to... given of a meeting of the FAA Research, Engineering and Development (R, E&D) Advisory Committee. AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration. ACTION: Notice of Meeting. NAME: Research, Engineering &...

  13. 78 FR 16357 - Research, Engineering and Development Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-14

    ...Federal Aviation Administration Research, Engineering and Development Advisory Committee AGENCY...given of a meeting of the FAA Research, Engineering and Development (R,E&D) Advisory...Name: Research, Engineering & Development Advisory Committee....

  14. Energy Related Research Expertise Mechanical Engineering Department

    E-print Network

    Van Volkenburgh, Elizabeth

    Energy Related Research Expertise Mechanical Engineering Department U. of Washington Life Cycle Assessment of BioFuels and Energy Technologies (Joyce Cooper) Multiphase Fluid Dynamics: liquid: marine renewable energy, tidal hydrokinetics, environmental effects. Y. (Steve) Shen: vibration

  15. NASA's Hypersonic Research Engine Project: A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Earl H.; Mackley, Ernest A.

    1994-01-01

    The goals of the NASA Hypersonic Research Engine (HRE) Project, which began in 1964, were to design, develop, and construct a high-performance hypersonic research ramjet/scramjet engine for flight tests of the developed concept over the speed range of Mach 4 to 8. The project was planned to be accomplished in three phases: project definition, research engine development, and flight test using the X-15A-2 research airplane, which was modified to carry hydrogen fuel for the research engine. The project goal of an engine flight test was eliminated when the X-15 program was canceled in 1968. Ground tests of full-scale engine models then became the focus of the project. Two axisymmetric full-scale engine models, having 18-inch-diameter cowls, were fabricated and tested: a structural model and combustion/propulsion model. A brief historical review of the project, with salient features, typical data results, and lessons learned, is presented. An extensive number of documents were generated during the HRE Project and are listed.

  16. Charles Darwin's earthquake reports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galiev, Shamil

    2010-05-01

    As it is the 200th anniversary of Darwin's birth, 2009 has also been marked as 170 years since the publication of his book Journal of Researches. During the voyage Darwin landed at Valdivia and Concepcion, Chile, just before, during, and after a great earthquake, which demolished hundreds of buildings, killing and injuring many people. Land was waved, lifted, and cracked, volcanoes awoke and giant ocean waves attacked the coast. Darwin was the first geologist to observe and describe the effects of the great earthquake during and immediately after. These effects sometimes repeated during severe earthquakes; but great earthquakes, like Chile 1835, and giant earthquakes, like Chile 1960, are rare and remain completely unpredictable. This is one of the few areas of science, where experts remain largely in the dark. Darwin suggested that the effects were a result of ‘ …the rending of strata, at a point not very deep below the surface of the earth…' and ‘…when the crust yields to the tension, caused by its gradual elevation, there is a jar at the moment of rupture, and a greater movement...'. Darwin formulated big ideas about the earth evolution and its dynamics. These ideas set the tone for the tectonic plate theory to come. However, the plate tectonics does not completely explain why earthquakes occur within plates. Darwin emphasised that there are different kinds of earthquakes ‘...I confine the foregoing observations to the earthquakes on the coast of South America, or to similar ones, which seem generally to have been accompanied by elevation of the land. But, as we know that subsidence has gone on in other quarters of the world, fissures must there have been formed, and therefore earthquakes...' (we cite the Darwin's sentences following researchspace. auckland. ac. nz/handle/2292/4474). These thoughts agree with results of the last publications (see Nature 461, 870-872; 636-639 and 462, 42-43; 87-89). About 200 years ago Darwin gave oneself airs by the problems which began to discuss only during the last time. Earthquakes often precede volcanic eruptions. According to Darwin, the earthquake-induced shock may be a common mechanism of the simultaneous eruptions of the volcanoes separated by long distances. In particular, Darwin wrote that ‘… the elevation of many hundred square miles of territory near Concepcion is part of the same phenomenon, with that splashing up, if I may so call it, of volcanic matter through the orifices in the Cordillera at the moment of the shock;…'. According to Darwin the crust is a system where fractured zones, and zones of seismic and volcanic activities interact. Darwin formulated the task of considering together the processes studied now as seismology and volcanology. However the difficulties are such that the study of interactions between earthquakes and volcanoes began only recently and his works on this had relatively little impact on the development of geosciences. In this report, we discuss how the latest data on seismic and volcanic events support the Darwin's observations and ideas about the 1835 Chilean earthquake. The material from researchspace. auckland. ac. nz/handle/2292/4474 is used. We show how modern mechanical tests from impact engineering and simple experiments with weakly-cohesive materials also support his observations and ideas. On the other hand, we developed the mathematical theory of the earthquake-induced catastrophic wave phenomena. This theory allow to explain the most important aspects the Darwin's earthquake reports. This is achieved through the simplification of fundamental governing equations of considering problems to strongly-nonlinear wave equations. Solutions of these equations are constructed with the help of analytic and numerical techniques. The solutions can model different strongly-nonlinear wave phenomena which generate in a variety of physical context. A comparison with relevant experimental observations is also presented.

  17. Summaries of FY 1991 engineering research

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    This report documents the BES Engineering Research Program for fiscal year 1991; it provides a summary for each of the program projects in addition to a brief program overview. The report is intended to provide staff of Congressional committees, other executive departments, and other DOE offices with substantive program information so as to facilitate governmental overview and coordination of Federal research programs. Of equal importance, its availability facilitates communication of program information to interested research engineers and scientists. The organizational chart for the DOE Office of Energy Research (OER) delineates the six Divisions within the OER Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES). Each BES Division administers basic, mission oriented research programs in the area indicated by its title. The BES Engineering Research Program is one such program; it is administered by the Engineering and Geosciences Division of BES. In preparing this report we asked the principal investigators to submit summaries for their projects that were specifically applicable to fiscal year 1991. Major topics covered include fluid mechanics, fracture mechanics, chemical engineering and mechanical engineering.

  18. Stirling engine supporting research and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomazic, W. A.

    1985-01-01

    The supporting research and technology effort is intended to provide technical support to the current engine program and also to investigate advanced concepts for the next generation of Stirling engines. Technical areas represented are: seals, materials, engine experiments, combustion, system analysis, cseramics, and tribology. A collage of more recent work in each area is presented. Under seals, analysis and some experimental data on the effect of wear on rod seal performance is presented. The material work described concerns the effect of water content on hydrogen permeation. Results of experiments with the Philips' Advenco engine are presented. A comparison is made of two combustor nozzles, an air atomizing and an ultrasonic atomizing nozzle. A new venture in systems analysis to provide more rigorous Stirling engine simulation is discussed. The results of hydrogen corrosion tests on silicon carbide are presented. Friction and wear tests on candidate materials for engine hot ring tests are discussed.

  19. Nanoscale Science, Engineering and Technology Research Directions

    SciTech Connect

    Lowndes, D. H.; Alivisatos, A. P.; Alper, M.; Averback, R. S.; Jacob Barhen, J.; Eastman, J. A.; Imre, D.; Lowndes, D. H.; McNulty, I.; Michalske, T. A.; Ho, K-M; Nozik, A. J.; Russell, T. P.; Valentin, R. A.; Welch, D. O.; Barhen, J.; Agnew, S. R.; Bellon, P.; Blair, J.; Boatner, L. A.; Braiman, Y.; Budai, J. D.; Crabtree, G. W.; Feldman, L. C.; Flynn, C. P.; Geohegan, D. B.; George, E. P.; Greenbaum, E.; Grigoropoulos, C.; Haynes, T. E.; Heberlein, J.; Hichman, J.; Holland, O. W.; Honda, S.; Horton, J. A.; Hu, M. Z.-C.; Jesson, D. E.; Joy, D. C.; Krauss, A.; Kwok, W.-K.; Larson, B. C.; Larson, D. J.; Likharev, K.; Liu, C. T.; Majumdar, A.; Maziasz, P. J.; Meldrum, A.; Miller, J. C.; Modine, F. A.; Pennycook, S. J.; Pharr, G. M.; Phillpot, S.; Price, D. L.; Protopopescu, V.; Poker, D. B.; Pui, D.; Ramsey, J. M.; Rao, N.; Reichl, L.; Roberto, J.; Saboungi, M-L; Simpson, M.; Strieffer, S.; Thundat, T.; Wambsganss, M.; Wendleken, J.; White, C. W.; Wilemski, G.; Withrow, S. P.; Wolf, D.; Zhu, J. H.; Zuhr, R. A.; Zunger, A.; Lowe, S.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes important future research directions in nanoscale science, engineering and technology. It was prepared in connection with an anticipated national research initiative on nanotechnology for the twenty-first century. The research directions described are not expected to be inclusive but illustrate the wide range of research opportunities and challenges that could be undertaken through the national laboratories and their major national scientific user facilities with the support of universities and industry.

  20. Mechanical Engineering Department engineering research: Annual report, FY 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Denney, R.M.; Essary, K.L.; Genin, M.S.; Highstone, H.H.; Hymer, J.D.; Taft, S.O.

    1986-12-01

    This report provides information on the five areas of research interest in LLNL's Mechanical Engineering Department. In Computer Code Development, a solid geometric modeling program is described. In Dynamic Systems and Control, structure control and structure dynamics are discussed. Fabrication technology involves machine cutting, interferometry, and automated optical component manufacturing. Materials engineering reports on composite material research and measurement of molten metal surface properties. In Nondestructive Evaluation, NMR, CAT, and ultrasound machines are applied to manufacturing processes. A model for underground collapse is developed. Finally, an alternative heat exchanger is investigated for use in a fusion power plant. Separate abstracts were prepared for each of the 13 reports in this publication. (JDH)

  1. Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council CONTRIBUTORS

    E-print Network

    Chandler-Wilde, Simon N.

    SYLLABUS Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council CONTRIBUTORS Day 1: Revision in acoustics. The course aims to revise and strengthen the mathematical framework that underlies research. This includes en-suite accom- modation and meals and refreshments during the week, plus a copy of the book

  2. Role of WEGENER (World Earthquake GEodesy Network for Environmental Hazard Research) in monitoring natural hazards (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozener, H.; Zerbini, S.; Bastos, M. L.; Becker, M. H.; Meghraoui, M.; Reilinger, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    WEGENER was originally the acronym for Working Group of European Geoscientists for the Establishment of Networks for Earth-science Research. It was founded in March 1981 in response to an appeal delivered at the Journées Luxembourgeoises de Geodynamique in December 1980 to respond with a coordinated European proposal to a NASA Announcement of Opportunity inviting participation in the Crustal Dynamics and Earthquake Research Program. WEGENER, during the past 33 years, has always kept a close contact with the Agencies and Institutions responsible for the development and maintenance of the global space geodetic networks with the aim to make them aware of the scientific needs and outcomes of the project which might have an influence on the general science policy trends. WEGENER served as Inter-commission Project 3.2, between Commission 1 and Commission 3, of the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) until 2012. Since then, WEGENER project has become the Sub-commission 3.5 of IAG commission 3, namely Tectonics and Earthquake Geodesy. In this presentation, we briefly review the accomplishments of WEGENER as originally conceived and outline and justify the new focus of the WEGENER consortium. The remarkable and rapid evolution of the present state of global geodetic monitoring in regard to the precision of positioning capabilities (and hence deformation) and global coverage, the development of InSAR for monitoring strain with unprecedented spatial resolution, and continuing and planned data from highly precise satellite gravity and altimetry missions, encourage us to shift principal attention from mainly monitoring capabilities by a combination of space and terrestrial geodetic techniques to applying existing observational methodologies to the critical geophysical phenomena that threaten our planet and society. Our new focus includes developing an improved physical basis to mitigate earthquake, tsunami, and volcanic risks, and the effects of natural and anthropogenic climate change (sea level, ice degradation). In addition, expanded applications of space geodesy to atmospheric studies will remain a major focus with emphasis on ionospheric and tropospheric monitoring to support forecasting extreme events. Towards these ends, we will encourage and foster interdisciplinary, integrated initiatives to develop a range of case studies for these critical problems. Geological studies are needed to extend geodetic deformation studies to geologic time scales, and new modeling approaches will facilitate full exploitation of expanding geodetic databases. In light of this new focus, the WEGENER acronym now represents, 'World Earthquake GEodesy Network for Environmental Hazard Research.

  3. NASA Propulsion Engineering Research Center, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Over the past year, the Propulsion Engineering Research Center at The Pennsylvania State University continued its progress toward meeting the goals of NASA's University Space Engineering Research Centers (USERC) program. The USERC program was initiated in 1988 by the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology to provide an invigorating force to drive technology advancements in the U.S. space industry. The Propulsion Center's role in this effort is to provide a fundamental basis from which the technology advances in propulsion can be derived. To fulfill this role, an integrated program was developed that focuses research efforts on key technical areas, provides students with a broad education in traditional propulsion-related science and engineering disciplines, and provides minority and other under-represented students with opportunities to take their first step toward professional careers in propulsion engineering. The program is made efficient by incorporating government propulsion laboratories and the U.S. propulsion industry into the program through extensive interactions and research involvement. The Center is comprised of faculty, professional staff, and graduate and undergraduate students working on a broad spectrum of research issues related to propulsion. The Center's research focus encompasses both current and advanced propulsion concepts for space transportation, with a research emphasis on liquid propellant rocket engines. The liquid rocket engine research includes programs in combustion and turbomachinery. Other space transportation modes that are being addressed include anti-matter, electric, nuclear, and solid propellant propulsion. Outside funding supports a significant fraction of Center research, with the major portion of the basic USERC grant being used for graduate student support and recruitment. The remainder of the USERC funds are used to support programs to increase minority student enrollment in engineering, to maintain Center infrastructure, and to develop research capability in key new areas. Significant research programs in propulsion systems for air and land transportation complement the space propulsion focus. The primary mission of the Center is student education. The student program emphasizes formal class work and research in classical engineering and science disciplines with applications to propulsion.

  4. MIT Space Engineering Research Center testbed programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawley, Edward F.; Miller, David W.

    1991-01-01

    The Space Engineering Research Center (SERC) at M.I.T., started in July 1988, has completed two and one-half years of research. This Semi-Annual Report presents annotated viewgraph material presented at the January 1991 Steering Committee and Technical Representative Review. The objective of the Space Engineering Research Center is to develop and disseminate a unified technology of controlled structures. There has been continued evolution of the concept of intelligent structures (including in this past year the first successful embedding of a microelectronic component into a structural element).

  5. Cryogenics Research and Engineering Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toro Medina, Jaime A.

    2013-01-01

    Energy efficient storage, transfer and use of cryogens and cryogenic propellants on Earth and in space have a direct impact on NASA, government and commercial programs. Research and development on thermal insulation, propellant servicing, cryogenic components, material properties and sensing technologies provides industry, government and research institutions with the cross-cutting technologies to manage low-temperature applications. Under the direction of the Cryogenic Testing Lab at Kennedy Space Center, the work experience acquired allowed me to perform research, testing, design and analysis of current and future cryogenic technologies to be applied in several projects.

  6. Time-frequency analysis of Transitory/Permanent frequency decrease in civil engineering structures during earthquakes

    E-print Network

    Michel, Clotaire

    2008-01-01

    The analysis of strong motion recordings in structures is crucial to understand the damaging process during earthquakes. A very precise time-frequency representation, the reassigned smoothed pseudo-Wigner-Ville method, allowed us to follow the variation of the Millikan Library (California) and the Grenoble City Hall building (France) resonance frequencies during earthquakes. Under strong motions, a quick frequency drop, attributed to damage of the soil-structure system, followed by a slower increase is found. However, in the case of weak earthquakes, we show that frequency variations come from the ground motion spectrum and cannot be interpreted in terms of change of the soil-structure system.

  7. NASA's new university engineering space research programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadin, Stanley R.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of a newly emerging element of NASA's university engineering programs is to provide a more autonomous element that will enhance and broaden the capabilities in academia, enabling them to participate more effectively in the U.S. civil space program. The programs utilize technical monitors at NASA centers to foster collaborative arrangements, exchange of personnel, and the sharing of facilities between NASA and the universities. The elements include: the university advanced space design program, which funds advanced systems study courses at the senior and graduate levels; the university space engineering research program that supports cross-disciplinary research centers; the outreach flight experiments program that offers engineering research opportunities to universities; and the planned university investigator's research program to provide grants to individuals with outstanding credentials.

  8. APS1005: Operations Research for Engineering Management Summer 2015

    E-print Network

    Toronto, University of

    APS1005: Operations Research for Engineering Management Summer 2015 Lecturer: Daniel Frances, optimal control, production planning, reliability engineering, and operations management. The contents applicable in solving various engineering problems. These techniques are widely used in engineering design

  9. Landslides triggered by the 2004 Niigata Ken Chuetsu, Japan, earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kieffer, D.S.; Jibson, R.; Rathje, E.M.; Kelson, K.

    2006-01-01

    The Niigata Ken Chuetsu earthquake triggered a vast number of lanslides in the epicentral region. Landslide concentrations were among the highest ever measured after an earthquake, and most of the triggered landslides were relatively shallow failures parallel to the steep slope faces. The dense concentration of landslides can be attributed to steep local topography in relatively weak geologic units, adverse hydrologic conditions caused by significant antecedent rainfall, and very strong shaking. Many of the landslides could be discerned from high-resolution satellite imagery acquired immediately after the earthquake. ?? 2006, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  10. S E R I E S SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES

    E-print Network

    DataBase) for wide sharing of data and knowledge across the field of earthquake engineering and between-30, 2013 Exchange Data Format Project Title, Acronym, Sponsor, Focus, Summary, dates, Status Project) Original loading signal (OLS) Mesh model Mesh model images Computer system and software Computation

  11. Aircraft Turbine Engine Control Research at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    This lecture will provide an overview of the aircraft turbine engine control research at NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Glenn Research Center (GRC). A brief introduction to the engine control problem is first provided with a description of the current state-of-the-art control law structure. A historical aspect of engine control development since the 1940s is then provided with a special emphasis on the contributions of GRC. The traditional engine control problem has been to provide a means to safely transition the engine from one steady-state operating point to another based on the pilot throttle inputs. With the increased emphasis on aircraft safety, enhanced performance and affordability, and the need to reduce the environmental impact of aircraft, there are many new challenges being faced by the designers of aircraft propulsion systems. The Controls and Dynamics Branch (CDB) at GRC is leading and participating in various projects in partnership with other organizations within GRC and across NASA, other government agencies, the U.S. aerospace industry, and academia to develop advanced propulsion controls and diagnostics technologies that will help meet the challenging goals of NASA programs under the Aeronautics Research Mission. The second part of the lecture provides an overview of the various CDB technology development activities in aircraft engine control and diagnostics, both current and some accomplished in the recent past. The motivation for each of the research efforts, the research approach, technical challenges and the key progress to date are summarized. The technologies to be discussed include system level engine control concepts, gas path diagnostics, active component control, and distributed engine control architecture. The lecture will end with a futuristic perspective of how the various current technology developments will lead to an Intelligent and Autonomous Propulsion System requiring none to very minimum pilot interface, interfacing directly with the flight management system to determine its mode of operation, and providing personalized engine control to optimize its performance given the current condition and mission objectives.

  12. *jplynch@stanford.edu; phone 1-650-723-6213; fax 1-650-725-9755; The John A. Blume Earthquake Engineering Center, Stanford University; Stanford, CA 94305;

    E-print Network

    Lynch, Jerome P.

    *jplynch@stanford.edu; phone 1-650-723-6213; fax 1-650-725-9755; The John A. Blume Earthquake Engineering Center, Stanford University; Stanford, CA 94305; Validation of a wireless modular monitoring of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University ABSTRACT A wireless sensing unit for use in a Wireless Modular

  13. Delft University of Technology Software Engineering Research Group

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Thomas

    Delft University of Technology Software Engineering Research Group Technical Report Series A Genetic Programming Approach to Automated Test Generation for Object Oriented Software Hans-Gerhard Gross: Software Engineering Research Group Department of Software Technology Faculty of Electrical Engineering

  14. Delft University of Technology Software Engineering Research Group

    E-print Network

    de Weerdt, Mathijs

    Delft University of Technology Software Engineering Research Group Technical Report Series Fire;TUD-SERG-2011-002 Published, produced and distributed by: Software Engineering Research Group Department of Software Technology Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Computer Science Delft

  15. ERHAN KUTANOGLU Graduate Program in Operations Research and Industrial Engineering

    E-print Network

    Kutanoglu, Erhan

    ERHAN KUTANOGLU Graduate Program in Operations Research and Industrial Engineering Department · As a tenured faculty member in the Operations Research and Industrial Engineering Graduate Program, develop School of Engineering Co-Director, Industrial Affiliates Program January 2012 ­ Present Advanced

  16. Delft University of Technology Software Engineering Research Group

    E-print Network

    van Deursen, Arie

    Delft University of Technology Software Engineering Research Group Technical Report Series and distributed by: Software Engineering Research Group Department of Software Technology Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Computer Science Delft University of Technology Mekelweg 4 2628 CD Delft

  17. Topography effects in the 1999 Athens earthquake : engineering issues in seismology

    E-print Network

    Assimaki, Dominic, 1975-

    2004-01-01

    It is well known that irregular topography can substantially affect the amplitude and frequency characteristics of seismic motion. Macroseismic observations of destructive earthquakes often show higher damage intensity at ...

  18. Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. comprehensive earthquake management plan: Engineering survey building damage assessment training manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The training objectives are: differentiate between the various levels of damage caused to buildings and structures by an earthquake and classify them as to their safety of occupancy, extent of damage, and resources needed for recovery/repair.

  19. Council of Energy Engineering Research. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, Richard J.

    2003-08-22

    The Engineering Research Program, a component program of the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), was established in 1979 to aid in resolving the numerous engineering issues arising from efforts to meet U.S. energy needs. The major product of the program became part of the body of knowledge and data upon which the applied energy technologies are founded; the product is knowledge relevant to energy exploration, production, conversion and use.

  20. Electronics Engineering Research. Final report, FY 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Weissenberger, S.

    1980-01-01

    Accomplishments in Electronics Engineering Research (EER) during FY79 spanned a broad range of technologies, from high-speed microelectronics to digital image enhancement; from underground probing with electromagnetic waves to detecting neutrons with a small solid-state device; and from computer systems to aid engineers, to software tools to aid programmers. This report describes the overall EER program and its objectives, summarizes progress made in FY79, and outlines plans for FY80.

  1. Summaries of FY 1993 Engineering Research

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    This report documents the BES Engineering Research Program for fiscal year 1993; it provides a summary for each of the program projects in addition to a brief program overview. The report is intended to provide staff of Congressional committees, other executive departments, and other DOE offices with substantive program information so as to facilitate governmental overview and coordination of Federal research programs. Of equal importance, its availability facilitates communication of program information to interested research engineers and scientists. The organizational chart for the DOE Office of Energy Research (OER) on the next page delineates the six Divisions within the OER Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES). Each BES Division administers basic, mission oriented research programs in the area indicated by its title. The BES Engineering Research Program is one such program; it is administered by the Engineering and Geosciences Division of BES. In preparing this report we asked the principal investigators to submit summaries for their projects that were specifically applicable to fiscal year 1993. The summaries received have been edited if necessary.

  2. Report of Research Center for Urban Safety and Security, Kobe University Surface fault associated with the 2010 Darfield earthquake and disasters by the 2011 Christchurch earthquake,

    E-print Network

    Takiguchi, Tetsuya

    , Akihiko Hokugo Study on global use of integrated earthquake simulation Muneo Hori #12;MULTISCALE DYNAMIC fault associated with the 2010 Darfield earthquake and disasters by the 2011 Christchurch earthquake earthquakes around the Bungo Channel area and its implication for seismic hazard assessment Hitoshi Hirose

  3. The Geology of Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Robert E.

    The Geology of Earthquakes is a major contribution that brings together under one cover the many and complex elements of geology that are fundamental to earthquakes and seismology. Here are described and analyzed the basic causes of earthquakes, the resulting effects of earthquakes and faulting on the surface of the Earth, techniques of analyzing these effects, and engineering and public policy considerations for earthquake hazard mitigation. The three authors have played major roles in developing the fundamentals in both scientific and policy matters; thus they speak with an authority that few others could.

  4. Anomalous record of October 15, 1979, Imperial Valley, California, earthquake from Coachella Canal Engine House No. 4

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bycroft, G.N.

    1981-01-01

    A recording obtained at the Coachella Canal Engine House No. 4 of the October 15, 1979, Imperial Valley earthquake shows a dominant 2 Hz frequency. This feature is very unusual and an attempt has been made to determine if the recording is real or spurious. As the pumping station is a small heavily constructed bunker type of structure located on material of low shear wave velocity it was considered likely that soil-structure interaction might be responsible for the 2 Hz component. However, both an experimental and theoretical investigation fail to establish this. This report describes the theoretical investigation. The experimental investigation is described in a separate open-file report.

  5. Engineering Science Research Opportunities Fund (ESROP) The Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering's Division of Engineering Science at the University

    E-print Network

    Prodiæ, Aleksandar

    Engineering Science Research Opportunities Fund (ESROP) The Faculty of Applied Science for intensive summer research positions. However, Engineering Science are looking for meaningful research Science and Knowledge Media Design Institute to assisting with bioinformatics research in the Banting

  6. The year 2000 marked the 20th anniversary of Cooperative Studies in Earthquake Engineering and Hazard Mitigation between the United States of America and the People's Republic of China under Annex III to the

    E-print Network

    Spencer Jr., Billie F.

    ­U.S. Millennium Symposium on Earthquake Hazard Miti- gation was held in Beijing, P.R. China on November 8-11, 2000 universities in both countries. It brought together leading international researchers in earthquake hazard in supporting and conducting research in earthquake hazard mitigation. It is presented on the page following

  7. Summaries of FY 1996 engineering research

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    This report documents the Basic Energy Sciences (BES) Engineering Research Program for fiscal year 1996; it provides a summary for each of the program projects in addition to a brief program overview. The report is intended to provide staff of Congressional committees, other executive departments, and other DOE offices with substantive program information so as to facilitate governmental overview and coordination of Federal research programs. Of equal importance, its availability facilitates communication of program information to interested research engineers and scientists. Each BES Division administers basic, mission oriented research programs in the area indicated by its title. The BES Engineering Research Program is one such program; it is administered by the Engineering and Geosciences Division of BES. In preparing this report the principal investigators were asked to submit summaries for their projects that were specifically applicable to fiscal year 1996. The summaries received have been edited if necessary, but the press for timely publication made it impractical to have the investigators review and approve the revised summaries prior to publication. For more information about a given project, it is suggested that the investigators be contacted directly.

  8. Special Issue "Impact of Natural Hazards on Urban Areas and Infrastructure" in the Bulletin of Earthquake Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostenaru Dan, M.

    2009-04-01

    This special issue includes selected papers on the topic of earthquake impact from the sessions held in 2004 in Nice, France and in 2005 in Vienna, Austria at the first and respectivelly the second European Geosciences Union General Assembly. Since its start in 1999, in the Hague, Netherlands, the hazard of earthquakes has been the most popular of the session. The respective calls in 2004 was for: Nature's forces including earthquakes, floods, landslides, high winds and volcanic eruptions can inflict losses to urban settlements and man-made structures such as infrastructure. In Europe, recent years have seen such significant losses from earthquakes in south and south-eastern Europe, floods in central Europe, and wind storms in western Europe. Meanwhile, significant progress has been made in understanding disasters. Several scientific fields contribute to a holistic approach in the evaluation of capacities, vulnerabilities and hazards, the main factors on mitigating urban disasters due to natural hazards. An important part of the session is devoted to assessment of earthquake shaking and loss scenarios, including both physical damage and human causalities. Early warning and rapid damage evaluation are of utmost importance for addressing the safety of many essential facilities, for emergency management of events and for disaster response. In case of earthquake occurrence strong motion networks, data processing and interpretation lead to preliminary estimation (scenarios) of geographical distribution of damages. Factual information on inflicted damage, like those obtained from shaking maps or aerial imagery permit a confrontation with simulation maps of damage in order to define a more accurate picture of the overall losses. Most recent developments towards quantitative and qualitative simulation of natural hazard impacts on urban areas, which provide decision-making support for urban disaster management, and success stories of and lessons learned from disaster mitigation will be presented. The session includes contributions showing methodological and modelling approaches from scientists in geophysical/seismological, hydrological, remote sensing, civil engineering, insurance, and urbanism, amongst other fields, as well as presentations from practitioners working on specific case studies, regarding analysis of recent events and their impact on cities as well as re-evaluation of past events from the point of view of long-time recovery. In 2005 it was called for: Most strategies for both preparedness and emergency management in case of disaster mitigation are related to urban planning. While natural, engineering and social sciences contribute to the evaluation of the impact of earthquakes and their secondary events (including tsunamis, earthquake triggered landslides, or fire), floods, landslides, high winds, and volcanic eruptions on urban areas, there are the instruments of urban planning which are to be employed for both visualisation as well as development and implementation of strategy concepts for pre- and postdisaster intervention. The evolution of natural systems towards extreme conditions is taken into consideration so far at it concerns the damaging impact on urban areas and infrastructure and the impact on the natural environment of interventions to reduce such damaging impact.

  9. 77 FR 52701 - Board on Coastal Engineering Research

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-30

    ... Department of the Army; Corps of Engineers Board on Coastal Engineering Research AGENCY: Department of the... Committee: Board on Coastal Engineering Research. Date of Meeting: September 18-20, 2012. Place: Starboard... coastal engineering field and the objectives of the Chief of Engineers. Proposed Agenda: The goal of...

  10. Combustion research for gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mularz, E. J.; Claus, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    Research on combustion is being conducted at Lewis Research Center to provide improved analytical models of the complex flow and chemical reaction processes which occur in the combustor of gas turbine engines and other aeropropulsion systems. The objective of the research is to obtain a better understanding of the various physical processes that occur in the gas turbine combustor in order to develop models and numerical codes which can accurately describe these processes. Activities include in-house research projects, university grants, and industry contracts and are classified under the subject areas of advanced numerics, fuel sprays, fluid mixing, and radiation-chemistry. Results are high-lighted from several projects.

  11. Tissue engineering: from research to dental clinics

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Vinicius; Bona, Alvaro Della; Cavalcanti, Bruno Neves; Nör, Jacques Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Tissue engineering is an interdisciplinary field that combines the principles of engineering, material and biological sciences toward the development of therapeutic strategies and biological substitutes that restore, maintain, replace or improve biological functions. The association of biomaterials, stem cells, growth and differentiation factors have yielded the development of new treatment opportunities in most of the biomedical areas, including Dentistry. The objective of this paper is to present the principles underlying tissue engineering and the current scenario, the challenges and the perspectives of this area in Dentistry. Significance The growth of tissue engineering as a research field have provided a novel set of therapeutic strategies for biomedical applications. The emerging knowledge arisen from studies in the dental area may translate into new methods for caring or improving the alternatives used to treat patients in the daily clinic. PMID:22240278

  12. Federal Funding of Engineering Research and Development, 1980-1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Washington, DC.

    Data on the sources, amounts, and trends of federal funding for engineering research and development (R&D) are presented for 1980-1984. Narrative highlights are provided for: the total federal funding obligations for engineering R&D, mechanical engineering, astronautical engineering, aeronautical engineering, chemical engineering, civil…

  13. Research program on Indonesian active faults to support the national earthquake hazard assesments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natawidjaja, D. H.

    2012-12-01

    In mid 2010 an Indonesian team of earthquake scientists published the new Indonesian probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) map. The new PSHA map replaced the previous version that is published in 2002. One of the major challenges in developing the new map is that data for many active fault zones in Indonesia is sparse and mapped only at regional scale, thus the input fault parameters for the PSHA introduce unavoidably large uncertainties. Despite the fact that most Indonesian islands are torn by active faults, only Sumatra has been mapped and studied in sufficient details. In other areas, such as Java and Bali, the most populated regions as well as in the east Indonesian region, where tectonic plate configurations are far more complex and relative plate motions are generally higher, many major active faults and plate boundaries are not well mapped and studied. In early 2011, we have initiated a research program to study major active faults in Indonesia together with starting a new graduate study program, GREAT (Graduate Research for Earthquake and Active Tectonics), hosted by ITB (Institute of Technology bandung) and LIPI (Indonesian Institute of Sciences) in partnership with the Australia-Indonesia Facility for Disaster Reduction (AIFDR). The program include acquisition of high-resolution topography and images required for detailed fault mapping, measuring geological slip rates and locating good sites for paleoseismological studies. It is also coupled by seismological study and GPS surveys to measure geodetic slip rates. To study submarine active faults, we collect and incorporate bathymetry and marine geophysical data. The research will be carried out, in part, through masters and Ph.D student theses. in the first four year of program we select several sites for active fault studies, particulary the ones that pose greater risks to society.

  14. Engineering Education in Research-Intensive Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alpay, E.; Jones, M. E.

    2012-01-01

    The strengths and weaknesses of engineering education in research-intensive institutions are reported and key areas for developmental focus identified. The work is based on a questionnaire and session summaries used during a two-day international conference held at Imperial College London. The findings highlight several common concerns, such as…

  15. NASA Propulsion Engineering Research Center, Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is the second volume in the 1994 annual report for the NASA Propulsion Engineering Research Center's Sixth Annual Symposium. This conference covered: (1) Combustors and Nozzles; (2) Turbomachinery Aero- and Hydro-dynamics; (3) On-board Propulsion systems; (4) Advanced Propulsion Applications; (5) Vaporization and Combustion; (6) Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics; and (7) Atomization and Sprays.

  16. RESEARCH ARTICLE Integrating Ecosystem Engineering and Food

    E-print Network

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Integrating Ecosystem Engineering and Food Web Ecology: Testing the Effect of Biogenic Reefs on the Food Web of a Soft-Bottom Intertidal Area Bart De Smet1 *, Jérôme Fournier2 and dynamics of food webs has recently been hypothesised from a conceptual point of view. Empirical data

  17. J. Craig Fischenich, PhD, PE Research Civil Engineer

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    J. Craig Fischenich, PhD, PE Research Civil Engineer US Army Engineer Research and Development his BS and MS in Civil and Environmental Engineering, respectively, at South Dakota School of Mines Technical Lead for the ERDC EL. As a senior researcher, he leads teams of engineers and scientists

  18. 76 FR 37084 - Board on Coastal Engineering Research

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... Department of the Army; Corps of Engineers Board on Coastal Engineering Research AGENCY: Department of the... Committee: Board on Coastal Engineering Research. Date of Meeting: July 26-28, 2011. Place: Crowne Jewel.... Wilson, Executive Secretary, U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Waterways...

  19. 75 FR 62113 - Board on Coastal Engineering Research

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-07

    ... Department of the Army; Corps of Engineers Board on Coastal Engineering Research AGENCY: Department of the... Committee: Board on Coastal Engineering Research. Date of Meeting: October 25-26, 2010. Place: Atlanta.... Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Waterways Experiment Station, 3909 Halls Ferry...

  20. 77 FR 3240 - Board on Coastal Engineering Research

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-23

    ... Committee: Board on Coastal Engineering Research. DATES: Date of Meeting: February 7-8, 2012. Place: Hearing... Department of the Army; Corps of Engineers Board on Coastal Engineering Research AGENCY: Department of the.... Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Waterways Experiment Station, 3909 Halls Ferry...

  1. Aircraft Turbine Engine Control Research at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the aircraft turbine engine control research at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). A brief introduction to the engine control problem is first provided with a description of the state-of-the-art control law structure. A historical aspect of engine control development since the 1940s is then provided with a special emphasis on the contributions of GRC. With the increased emphasis on aircraft safety, enhanced performance, and affordability, as well as the need to reduce the environmental impact of aircraft, there are many new challenges being faced by the designers of aircraft propulsion systems. The Controls and Dynamics Branch (CDB) at GRC is leading and participating in various projects to develop advanced propulsion controls and diagnostics technologies that will help meet the challenging goals of NASA Aeronautics Research Mission programs. The rest of the paper provides an overview of the various CDB technology development activities in aircraft engine control and diagnostics, both current and some accomplished in the recent past. The motivation for each of the research efforts, the research approach, technical challenges, and the key progress to date are summarized.

  2. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Constraining Earthquake Source Inversions with GPS Data 1

    E-print Network

    Carlson, Jean

    source, in practice the inverse problem is often Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union. 0148JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Constraining Earthquake Source Inversions with GPS Data 1: Resolution Based Removal of Artifacts Morgan T. Page U.S. Geological Survey

  3. Virtual earthquake engineering laboratory with physics-based degrading materials on parallel computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, In Ho

    For the last few decades, we have obtained tremendous insight into underlying microscopic mechanisms of degrading quasi-brittle materials from persistent and near-saintly efforts in laboratories, and at the same time we have seen unprecedented evolution in computational technology such as massively parallel computers. Thus, time is ripe to embark on a novel approach to settle unanswered questions, especially for the earthquake engineering community, by harmoniously combining the microphysics mechanisms with advanced parallel computing technology. To begin with, it should be stressed that we placed a great deal of emphasis on preserving clear meaning and physical counterparts of all the microscopic material models proposed herein, since it is directly tied to the belief that by doing so, the more physical mechanisms we incorporate, the better prediction we can obtain. We departed from reviewing representative microscopic analysis methodologies, selecting out "fixed-type" multidirectional smeared crack model as the base framework for nonlinear quasi-brittle materials, since it is widely believed to best retain the physical nature of actual cracks. Microscopic stress functions are proposed by integrating well-received existing models to update normal stresses on the crack surfaces (three orthogonal surfaces are allowed to initiate herein) under cyclic loading. Unlike the normal stress update, special attention had to be paid to the shear stress update on the crack surfaces, due primarily to the well-known pathological nature of the fixed-type smeared crack model---spurious large stress transfer over the open crack under nonproportional loading. In hopes of exploiting physical mechanism to resolve this deleterious nature of the fixed crack model, a tribology-inspired three-dimensional (3d) interlocking mechanism has been proposed. Following the main trend of tribology (i.e., the science and engineering of interacting surfaces), we introduced the base fabric of solid particle-soft matrix to explain realistic interlocking over rough crack surfaces, and the adopted Gaussian distribution feeds random particle sizes to the entire domain. Validation against a well-documented rough crack experiment reveals promising accuracy of the proposed 3d interlocking model. A consumed energy-based damage model has been proposed for the weak correlation between the normal and shear stresses on the crack surfaces, and also for describing the nature of irrecoverable damage. Since the evaluation of the consumed energy is directly linked to the microscopic deformation, which can be efficiently tracked on the crack surfaces, the proposed damage model is believed to provide a more physical interpretation than existing damage mechanics, which fundamentally stem from mathematical derivation with few physical counterparts. Another novel point of the present work lies in the topological transition-based "smart" steel bar model, notably with evolving compressive buckling length. We presented a systematic framework of information flow between the key ingredients of composite materials (i.e., steel bar and its surrounding concrete elements). The smart steel model suggested can incorporate smooth transition during reversal loading, tensile rupture, early buckling after reversal from excessive tensile loading, and even compressive buckling. Especially, the buckling length is made to evolve according to the damage states of the surrounding elements of each bar, while all other dominant models leave the length unchanged. What lies behind all the aforementioned novel attempts is, of course, the problem-optimized parallel platform. In fact, the parallel computing in our field has been restricted to monotonic shock or blast loading with explicit algorithm which is characteristically feasible to be parallelized. In the present study, efficient parallelization strategies for the highly demanding implicit nonlinear finite element analysis (FEA) program for real-scale reinforced concrete (RC) structures under cyclic loading are proposed. Quantitat

  4. Final Report: Performance Engineering Research Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Mellor-Crummey, John

    2014-10-27

    This document is a final report about the work performed for cooperative agreement DE-FC02-06ER25764, the Rice University effort of Performance Engineering Research Institute (PERI). PERI was an Enabling Technologies Institute of the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC-2) program supported by the Department of Energy's Office of Science Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) program. The PERI effort at Rice University focused on (1) research and development of tools for measurement and analysis of application program performance, and (2) engagement with SciDAC-2 application teams.

  5. ENGLEKIRK STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING CENTER UCSD Jacobs School When it comes to earthquake safety,

    E-print Network

    Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    for the construction of high-rise office buildings, hospitals and apartment towers using cost-effective precast Francisco's skyline incorporates a new framing system tested at the Powell Labs. Flexible Frames Make High-Rise earthquake in Caracas, Venezuela killed 240 and caused $50 million in property damage. Here, a building tips

  6. Research on Evaluation Models and Empirical Analysis of Earthquake Disaster Losses in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Men, Kepei; Cui, Lei

    2012-11-01

    Earthquake disasters occurred very frequently in China. As a result, to evaluate the losses has important social value and economic effect. This paper focuses on the assessment of economic losses of earthquake disasters which is divided into two parts: direct economic loss and indirect economic loss. First, the Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) test is used to determine the distribution of the earthquake losses per year in China, fitting the frequency of earthquake that happened per month in China. Second, the grey clustering method and principal component analysis (PCA) are applied, respectively, for direct economic loss rating and indirect economic loss rating. Finally, the economic loss generated by the earthquakes which happened from 2006 to 2009 in China is evaluated, and eight earthquakes are rated based on the comprehensive economic loss.

  7. Faculty of Engineering Science and Technology Research Excellence

    E-print Network

    Tufto, Jarle

    Faculty of Engineering Science and Technology Research Excellence research excellence #12;3 r e s e in engineering science and technology. High quality and relevance research based education puts Faculty guiding documents for the management of Faculty of Engineering Science and Technology. Firstly, a research

  8. 2006-2007 Annual Research Report Industrial Engineering

    E-print Network

    2006-2007 Annual Research Report Industrial Engineering Arizona State University #12;Contents Statistics IE@ASU Research at a Glance #12;Industrial Engineering 2007-2008 Research Report The IE Department in industrial statistics and quality engineering, applied op- erations research, production and supply

  9. The Central and Eastern European Earthquake Research Network - CE3RN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragato, Pier Luigi; Costa, Giovanni; Gallo, Antonella; Gosar, Andrej; Horn, Nikolaus; Lenhardt, Wolfgang; Mucciarelli, Marco; Pesaresi, Damiano; Steiner, Rudolf; Suhadolc, Peter; Tiberi, Lara; Živ?i?, Mladen; Zoppé, Giuliana

    2014-05-01

    The region of the Central and Eastern Europe is an area characterised by a relatively high seismicity. The active seismogenic structures and the related potentially destructive events are located in the proximity of the political boundaries between several countries existing in the area. An example is the seismic region between the NE Italy (FVG, Trentino-Alto Adige and Veneto), Austria (Tyrol, Carinthia) and Slovenia. So when a destructive earthquake occurs in the area, all the three countries are involved. In the year 2001 the Agencija Republike Slovenije za Okolje (ARSO) in Slovenia, the Department of Mathematics and Geoscience of the University of Trieste (DMG), the OGS (Istituto Nazionale di Oceanografia e di Geofisica Sperimentale) in Italy and the Zentralanstalt für Meteorologie und Geodynamik (ZAMG) in Austria signed an agreement for the real-time seismological data exchange in the Southeastern Alps region. Soon after the Interreg IIIa Italia-Austria projects "Trans-National Seismological Networks in the South-Eastern Alps" and "FASTLINK" started. The main goal of these projects was the creation of a transfrontier network for the common seismic monitoring of the region for scientific and civil defense purposes. During these years the high quality data recorded by the transfrontier network has been used, by the involved institutions, for their scientific research, for institutional activities and for the civil defense services. Several common international projects have been realized with success. The instrumentation has been continuously upgraded, the installations quality improved as well as the data transmission efficiency. In the 2013 ARSO, DMG, OGS and ZAMG decided to name the cooperative network "Central and Eastern European Earthquake Research Network - CE3RN". The national/regional seismic networks actually involved in the CE3RN network are: • Austrian national BB network (ZAMG - OE) • Friuli Veneto SP network (OGS - FV) • Friuli VG accelerometric network (DMG - RF) • NE Italy BB Network, (OGS & DMG - NI) • Slovene national BB network (ARSO -SL) • South Tyrol BB Network, (ZAMG - SI) • HAREIA strong motion stations, (ZAMG & DMG - HA) Starting from the 2001, the CE3RN represents an excellent example of international high quality research infrastructure and the starting point for the enlargement of the transfrontier network to all countries and their seismological institutions of the Central and Eastern Europe region. Furthermore, one of the main goals of the CE3RN is to intensify the cooperation between these institutions through common research activities and preparation of common international projects. The characteristics of the CE3RN will be described along with the examples of some research results and of common projects realized during the first 13 years of network activity.

  10. Earthquake and Tsunami Disaster Mitigation in The Marmara Region and Disaster Education in Turkey (SATREPS Project: Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development by JICA-JST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneda, Yoshiyuki

    2015-04-01

    Earthquake and Tsunami Disaster Mitigation in The Marmara Region and Disaster Education in Turkey (SATREPS Project: Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development by JICA-JST) Yoshiyuki KANEDA Disaster mitigation center Nagoya University/ Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) Mustafa ELDIK Bo?aziçi University, Kandilli Observatory and ??????Earthquake Researches Institute (KOERI) and Members of SATREPS Japan-Turkey project The target of this project is the Marmara Sea earthquake after the Izmit (Kocaeli) Earthquake 1999 along to the North Anatolian fault. According to occurrences of historical Earthquakes, epicenters have moved from East to West along to the North Anatolian Fault. There is a seismic gap in the Marmara Sea. In Marmara region, there is Istanbul with high populations such as Tokyo. Therefore, Japan and Turkey can share our own experiences during past damaging earthquakes and we can prepare for future large Earthquakes and Tsunamis in cooperation with each other in SATREPS project. This project is composed of Multidisciplinary research project including observation researches, simulation researches, educational researches, and goals are as follows, ? To develop disaster mitigation policy and strategies based on Multidisciplinary research activities. ? To provide decision makers with newly found knowledge for its implementation to the current regulations. ? To organize disaster education programs in order to increase disaster awareness in Turkey. ? To contribute the evaluation of active fault studies in Japan. In this SATREPS project, we will integrate Multidisciplinary research results for disaster mitigation in Marmara region and .disaster education in Turkey.

  11. Postseismic Deformation after the 1964 Great Alaskan Earthquake: Collaborative Research with Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freymueller, Jeffrey T.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to carry out GPS observations on the Kenai Peninsula, southern Alaska, in order to study the postseismic and contemporary deformation following the 1964 Alaska earthquake. All of the research supported in this grant was carried out in collaboration with Dr. Steven Cohen of Goddard Space Flight Center. The research funding from this grant primarily supported GPS fieldwork, along with the acquisition of computer equipment to allow analysis and modeling of the GPS data. A minor amount of salary support was provided by the PI, but the great majority of the salary support was provided by the Geophysical Institute. After the expiration of this grant, additional funding was obtained from the National Science Foundation to continue the work. This grant supported GPS field campaigns in August 1995, June 1996, May-June and September 1997, and May-June 1998. We initially began the work by surveying leveling benchmarks on the Kenai peninsula that had been surveyed after the 1964 earthquake. Changes in height from the 1964 leveling data to the 1995+ GPS data, corrected for the geoid-ellipsoid separation, give the total elevation change since the earthquake. Beginning in 1995, we also identified or established sites that were suitable for long-term surveying using GPS. In the subsequent annual GPS campaigns, we made regular measurements at these GPS marks, and steadily enhanced our set of points for which cumulative postseismic uplift data were available. From 4 years of Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements, we find significant spatial variations in present-day deformation between the eastern and western Kenai peninsula, Alaska. Sites in the eastern Kenai peninsula and Prince William Sound move to the NNW relative to North America, in the direction of Pacific-North America relative plate motion. Velocities decrease in magnitude from nearly the full plate rate in southern Prince William Sound to about 30 mm/yr at Seward and to about 5 mm/yr near Anchorage. In contrast, sites in the western Kenai peninsula move to the SW, in a nearly trenchward direction, with a velocity of about 20 mm/yr. The data are consistent with the shallow plate interface offshore and beneath the eastern Kenai and Prince William Sound being completely locked or nearly so, with elastic strain accumulation resulting in rapid motion in the direction of relative plate motion of sites in the overriding plate. The velocities of sites in the western Kenai, along strike to the southwest, are opposite in sign with those predicted from elastic strain accumulation. These data are incompatible with a significant locked region in this segment of the plate boundary. Trenchward velocities are found also for some sites in the Anchorage area. We interpret the trenchward velocities as being caused by a continuing postseismic transient from the 1964 great Alaska earthquake.

  12. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, The 2011 Mw 7.1 Van (Eastern Turkey) Earthquake -1

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, The 2011 Mw 7.1 Van (Eastern Turkey, 2012, 5:45pm D R A F T #12;X - 2 ELLIOTT ET AL.: 2011 VAN EARTHQUAKE, EASTERN TURKEY moment and source.: 2011 VAN EARTHQUAKE, EASTERN TURKEY X - 3 Interferograms from the ENVISAT satellite were derived from

  13. 76 FR 37084 - Board on Coastal Engineering Research

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ...Corps of Engineers Board on Coastal Engineering Research AGENCY: Department of the...Name of Committee: Board on Coastal Engineering Research. Date of Meeting: July 26-28...consonance with the needs of the coastal engineering field and the objectives of the...

  14. 78 FR 13030 - Board on Coastal Engineering Research

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-26

    ...Corps of Engineers Board on Coastal Engineering Research AGENCY: Department of the...Name of Committee: Board on Coastal Engineering Research. Date of Meeting: March 18-19...consonance with the needs of the coastal engineering field and the objectives of the...

  15. The 1906 earthquake and a century of progress in understanding earthquakes and their hazards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zoback, M.L.

    2006-01-01

    The 18 April 1906 San Francisco earthquake killed nearly 3000 people and left 225,000 residents homeless. Three days after the earthquake, an eight-person Earthquake Investigation Commission composed of 25 geologists, seismologists, geodesists, biologists and engineers, as well as some 300 others started work under the supervision of Andrew Lawson to collect and document physical phenomena related to the quake . On 31 May 1906, the commission published a preliminary 17-page report titled "The Report of the State Earthquake Investigation Commission". The report included the bulk of the geological and morphological descriptions of the faulting, detailed reports on shaking intensity, as well as an impressive atlas of 40 oversized maps and folios. Nearly 100 years after its publication, the Commission Report remains a model for post-earthquake investigations. Because the diverse data sets were so complete and carefully documented, researchers continue to apply modern analysis techniques to learn from the 1906 earthquake. While the earthquake marked a seminal event in the history of California, it served as impetus for the birth of modern earthquake science in the United States.

  16. Revolutionising Engineering Education in the Middle East Region to Promote Earthquake-Disaster Mitigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baytiyeh, Hoda; Naja, Mohamad K.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the high market demands for professional engineers in the Arab oil-producing countries, the appetite of Middle Eastern students for high-paying jobs and challenging careers in engineering has sharply increased. As a result, engineering programmes are providing opportunities for more students to enroll on engineering courses through lenient…

  17. Delft University of Technology Software Engineering Research Group

    E-print Network

    Zaidman, Andy

    Delft University of Technology Software Engineering Research Group Technical Report Series A Systematic Survey of Program Comprehension through Dynamic Analysis Bas Cornelissen, Andy Zaidman, Arie van, produced and distributed by: Software Engineering Research Group Department of Software Technology Faculty

  18. Proceedings of the 2009 Industrial Engineering Research Conference Developing a Curriculum in Service Systems Engineering

    E-print Network

    Onder, Nilufer

    Proceedings of the 2009 Industrial Engineering Research Conference Developing a Curriculum slowly to this change. Although some Industrial Engineering (IE) undergraduate programs have added community has responded slowly to this change. Although some Industrial Engineering undergraduate programs

  19. 28 This arTicle has been peer-reviewed. Computing in SCienCe & engineering E a r t h q u a k e

    E-print Network

    Krishnan, Swaminathan

    in computational seismology and earthquake engineering. Researchers in both fields are using advanced numeric tools-to-end approach promises to significantly advance earthquake damage prediction, preparation, mitigation, and disaster response. Rupture-to-Rafters Simulations: Unifying Science and Engineering for Earthquake Hazard

  20. Students' Changing Images of Engineering and Engineers. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jocuns, Andrew; Stevens, Reed; Garrison, Lari; Amos, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    This study analyzes the images of engineers and engineering that students construct over the course of their undergraduate engineering educations. Students in their first year of study to become engineers knew very little about the work they would be doing as an engineer and their expectations were more specific, hopeful, and high status than…

  1. Earthquakes in Afghanistan Nicholas Ambraseys

    E-print Network

    Bilham, Roger

    1 Earthquakes in Afghanistan Nicholas Ambraseys Dept. of Civil Engineering, Imperial College 80309-0399 We summarize the written history of earthquakes in Afghanistan from 734 AD to the present in the form of a new catalog of more than 1300 earthquakes, and narrative accounts of damage sustained during

  2. Research Review Civil Engineering Delft University of Technology and

    E-print Network

    Theune, Mariët

    Research Review Civil Engineering Delft University of Technology and University of Twente QANU November 2012 #12;QANU report research evaluation Civil Engineering 20122 Quality Assurance Netherlands with the permission of QANU if the source is mentioned. #12;QANU report research evaluation Civil Engineering 2012 3

  3. 78 FR 13030 - Board on Coastal Engineering Research

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-26

    ... Department of the Army; Corps of Engineers Board on Coastal Engineering Research AGENCY: Department of the... Committee: Board on Coastal Engineering Research. Date of Meeting: March 18-19, 2013. Place: Conference Room, Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory Field Research Facility, 1261 Duck Road, Kitty Hawk, NC 27949. Time:...

  4. 78 FR 48659 - Board on Coastal Engineering Research

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-09

    ... Department of the Army; Corps of Engineers Board on Coastal Engineering Research AGENCY: Department of the... advisory committee meeting will take place: Name of Committee: Board on Coastal Engineering Research. Date... of North Atlantic Division and discuss research needs associated with sustaining resilient...

  5. Photonics Research Group School of Engineering & Applied Science

    E-print Network

    Turitsyn, Sergei K.

    Photonics Research Group School of Engineering & Applied Science Research Fellowships in Fibre Lasers and Photonic Bio-Sensing The Photonics Research Group, School of Engineering and Applied Science at Aston University is seeking to appoint several Research Associates/Research Fellows to work

  6. JOINT CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS 7th International Conference on Urban Earthquake Engineering (7CUEE) &

    E-print Network

    Stanford University

    , Houghton, MI, USA 2) Assistant Professor, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Georgia Institute of Tech., Atlanta, GA, USA 3) Associate Professor, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA 4) Professor, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

  7. Commensurability of earthquake occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hui; Han, Yanben; Su, Youjin; Wang, Rui

    2013-07-01

    During recent years huge earthquakes frequently occurred and caused surprise attack on many places of the globe. Frequent exceptional strong disasters of earthquakes remind that we must strengthen our research on cause of formation, mechanism, prediction and forecast of earthquakes, and achieve the goal of advancing the development of Earth science and mitigation of seismic disasters. The commensurability of earthquake occurrences has been studied by means of the commensurability revealed by the Titius-Bode law in the paper. The studied results show that the earthquakes basically all occur at the commensurable point of its time axis, respectively. It also shows that occurrence of the earthquakes is not accidental, showing certain patterns and inevitability, and the commensurable value is different for earthquakes occurring in different areas.

  8. Summaries of FY 1997 engineering research

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    This report documents the Basic Energy Sciences (BES) Engineering Research Program for fiscal year 1997, it provides a summary for each of the program projects in addition to a brief program overview. The report is intended to provide staff of Congressional committees, other executive departments, and other DOE offices with substantive program information so as to facilitate governmental overview and coordination of Federal research programs. Of equal importance, its availability facilitates communication of program information to interested research engineers and scientists. The individual project summaries follow the program overview. The summaries are ordered alphabetically by name of institution; the table of contents lists all the institutions at which projects were sponsored in fiscal year 1997. Each project entry begins with an institutional-departmental heading. The names of investigators are listed immediately below the title. The funding level for fiscal year 1997 appears to the right of address. The summary description of the project completes the entry. A separate index of Principal Investigators includes phone number, fax number and e-main address, where available.

  9. Collaborative Engineering for Research and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jose M.; Keys, L. Ken; Chen, Injazz J.

    2004-01-01

    Research and development (R&D) organizations are being required to be relevant, to be more application-oriented, and to be partners in the strategic management of the business while meeting the same challenges as the rest of the organization, namely: (1) reduced time to market; (2) reduced cost; (3) improved quality; (4) increased reliability; and (5) increased focus on customer needs. Recent advances in computer technology and the Internet have created a new paradigm of collaborative engineering or collaborative product development (CPD), from which new types of relationships among researchers and their partners have emerged. Research into the applicability and benefits of CPD in a low/no production, R&D, and/or government environment is limited. In addition, the supply chain management (SCM) aspects of these relationships have not been studied. This paper presents research conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) investigating the applicability of CPD and SCM in an R&D organization. The study concentrates on the management and implementation of space research activities at GRC. Results indicate that although the organization is engaged in collaborative relationships that incorporate aspects of SCM, a number of areas, such as development of trust and information sharing merit special attention.

  10. An overview of the NASA rotary engine research program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, P. R.; Hady, W. F.

    1984-01-01

    A brief overview and technical highlights of the research efforts and studies on rotary engines over the last several years at the NASA Lewis Research Center are presented. The test results obtained from turbocharged rotary engines and preliminary results from a high performance single rotor engine were discussed. Combustion modeling studies of the rotary engine and the use of a Laser Doppler Velocimeter to confirm the studies were examined. An in-house program in which a turbocharged rotary engine was installed in a Cessna Skymaster for ground test studies was reviewed. Details are presented on single rotor stratified charge rotary engine research efforts, both in-house and on contract.

  11. Session 0575 Suggestions for Teaching the Engineering Research Process

    E-print Network

    Duan, Zhenhai

    , engineering degree programs should make a concerted effort to teach students how to become good researchers with several specific techniques to help teach the basic skills necessary for performing good engineeringSession 0575 Suggestions for Teaching the Engineering Research Process David J. Lilja University

  12. Delft University of Technology Software Engineering Research Group

    E-print Network

    Visser, Eelco

    Delft University of Technology Software Engineering Research Group Technical Report Series Web of Software Technology Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Computer Science Delft University of Technology Mekelweg 4 2628 CD Delft The Netherlands ISSN 1872-5392 Software Engineering Research Group

  13. Recent DOE-sponsored hydropower engineering research

    SciTech Connect

    Chappell, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of DOE Engineering Development research activity since Waterpower 1981. General results of about 11 projects that have been completed since Waterpower 1981 are presented and compared. Continuing efforts are also described briefly. DOE has sponsored four projects dealing with the use of pumps as turbines. This approach results in capital cost savings, shorter time for completing a hydropower plant, wider variety of off-the-shelf equipment available, and better maintenance services. Results are summarized for feasibility studies, laboratory tests, and in-the-field experience surveys of the use of pumps as turbines. Other projects discussed include microhydropower plants (less than 100 kW in capacity), head augmentation devices, Schneider engines, the use of marine thrusters as turbines, low cost cross-flow turbines made of plastic, variable speed constant frequency generators, hydraulic air compressors, scroll motor turbines and modular float-in powerhouses. The paper also discusses some of the technologies where future research may prove fruitful.

  14. Biomedical Engineering 2013-2014 Research Projects

    E-print Network

    Bahler, Dennis R.

    -5242; Ph.D. Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, 2010; Regenerative Medicine; Tissue Engineering@ncsu.edu #12;Elizabeth Loboa, Professor and Associate Chair; Professor, Materials Science and Engineering Medicine, Pharmacoengineering, Tissue Engineering, Wound Healing, Mechanobiology of Human Stem Cells

  15. Engineer at Lehigh University Campaigns for More Construction Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, David L.

    1987-01-01

    A civil engineering professor would like to see civil engineers spend less time looking at broken structures and more time testing construction materials, and has founded a research center for that purpose. (MSE)

  16. Engineering Research Division report on reports: calendar year 1979. [LLL

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, C.L.; Johnston, S.J.

    1980-03-01

    A bibliography of publications of members of the Engineering Research Division of the Electronics Engineering Department is presented for 1979. Abstracts for 148 publications are included, along with author and keywork indexes. (RWR)

  17. Engineering Research Division publication report, calendar year 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, E.K.; Livingston, P.L.; Rae, D.C.

    1980-06-01

    Each year the Engineering Research Division of the Electronics Engineering Department at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory has issued an internal report listing all formal publications produced by the Division during the calendar year. Abstracts of 1980 reports are presented.

  18. Everyday Earthquakes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svec, Michael

    1996-01-01

    Describes methods to access current earthquake information from the National Earthquake Information Center. Enables students to build genuine learning experiences using real data from earthquakes that have recently occurred. (JRH)

  19. Noise reduction in radon monitoring data using Kalman filter and application of results in earthquake precursory process research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namvaran, Mojtaba; Negarestani, Ali

    2014-06-01

    Monitoring the concentration of radon gas is an established method for geophysical analyses and research, particularly in earthquake studies. A continuous radon monitoring station was implemented in Jooshan hotspring, Kerman province, south east Iran. The location was carefully chosen as a widely reported earthquake-prone zone. A common issue during monitoring of radon gas concentration is the possibility of noise disturbance by different environmental and instrumental parameters. A systematic mathematical analysis aiming at reducing such noises from data is reported here; for the first time, the Kalman filter (KF) has been used for radon gas concentration monitoring. The filtering is incorporated based on several seismic parameters of the area under study. A novel anomaly defined as "radon concentration spike crossing" is also introduced and successfully used in the study. Furthermore, for the first time, a mathematical pattern of a relationship between the radius of potential precursory phenomena and the distance between epicenter and the monitoring station is reported and statistically analyzed.

  20. Noise Reduction in Radon Monitoring Data Using Kalman Filter and Application of Results in Earthquake Precursory Process Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namvaran, Mojtaba; Negarestani, Ali

    2015-04-01

    Monitoring the concentration of radon gas is an established method for geophysical analyses and research, particularly in earthquake studies. A continuous radon monitoring station was implemented in Jooshan hotspring, Kerman province, south east Iran. The location was carefully chosen as a widely reported earthquake-prone zone. A common issue during monitoring of radon gas concentration is the possibility of noise disturbance by different environmental and instrumental parameters. A systematic mathematical analysis aiming at reducing such noises from data is reported here; for the first time, the Kalman filter (KF) has been used for radon gas concentration monitoring. The filtering is incorporated based on several seismic parameters of the area under study. A novel anomaly defined as "radon concentration spike crossing" is also introduced and successfully used in the study. Furthermore, for the first time, a mathematical pattern of a relationship between the radius of potential precursory phenomena and the distance between epicenter and the monitoring station is reported and statistically analyzed.

  1. Miller, M., Cortes, S., Ory, D., and Baker, J. W. (2015). "Estimating impacts of catastrophic network damage from earthquakes using an activity-based travel model." Transportation Research Board

    E-print Network

    Baker, Jack W.

    2015-01-01

    network damage from earthquakes using an activity-based travel model." Transportation Research Board 94th of catastrophic network damage from earthquakes using an activity-based travel model Mahalia Miller1 , Samuel risk assessment of catastrophic network damage from earthquakes using a practical activity-based travel

  2. NASA Research Bearing on Jet Engine Reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, S. S.; Ault, G. M.; Pinkel, B.

    1959-01-01

    Turbojet engine reliability has long been an intense interest to the military users of this type of aircraft propulsion. With the recent inauguration of commercial jet transport this subject has assumed a new dimension of importance. In January l96 the Lewis Research Center of the NASA (then the MACA) published the results of an extensive study on the factors that affect the opera- center dot tional reliability of turbojet engines (ref. 1). At that time the report was classified Confidential. In July l98 this report was declassified. It is thus appropriate at this time to present some of the highlights of the studies described in the NASA report. In no way is it intended to outline the complete contents of the report; rather it is hoped to direct attention to it among those who are center dot directly concerned with this problem. Since the publication of our study over three years ago, the NASA has completed a number of additional investigations that bear significantly on this center dot subject. A second object of this paper, therefore, is to summarize the results of these recent studies and to interpret their significance in relation to turbojet operational reliability.

  3. Update on Engine Combustion Research at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Jay Keller; Gurpreet Singh

    2001-05-14

    The objectives of this paper are to describe the research efforts in diesel engine combustion at Sandia National Laboratories' Combustion Research Facility and to provide recent experimental results. We have four diesel engine experiments supported by the Department of Energy, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies: a one-cylinder version of a Cummins heavy-duty engine, a diesel simulation facility, a one-cylinder Caterpillar engine to evaluate combustion of alternative fuels, and a homogeneous-charge, compression ignition (HCCI) engine. Recent experimental results of diesel combustion research will be discussed and a description will be given of our HCCI experimental program and of our HCCI modeling work.

  4. Job Opportunity: Postdoctoral Researcher / Engineer (updated 1 April 2015)

    E-print Network

    Reif, Rafael

    Job Opportunity: Postdoctoral Researcher / Engineer (updated 1 April 2015) The Micro seeking to hire a postdoctoral researcher or engineer in the area of micro/nanofluidics and biochemical or she will carry out cutting-edge research toward integrating microfluidic sample preparation and RNA

  5. ARMA models for earthquake ground motions. Seismic safety margins research program

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, M. K.; Kwiatkowski, J. W.; Nau, R. F.; Oliver, R. M.; Pister, K. S.

    1981-02-01

    Four major California earthquake records were analyzed by use of a class of discrete linear time-domain processes commonly referred to as ARMA (Autoregressive/Moving-Average) models. It was possible to analyze these different earthquakes, identify the order of the appropriate ARMA model(s), estimate parameters, and test the residuals generated by these models. It was also possible to show the connections, similarities, and differences between the traditional continuous models (with parameter estimates based on spectral analyses) and the discrete models with parameters estimated by various maximum-likelihood techniques applied to digitized acceleration data in the time domain. The methodology proposed is suitable for simulating earthquake ground motions in the time domain, and appears to be easily adapted to serve as inputs for nonlinear discrete time models of structural motions. 60 references, 19 figures, 9 tables.

  6. Researches on the Nankai trough mega thrust earthquake seismogenic zones using real time observing systems for advanced early warning systems and predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneda, Yoshiyuki

    2015-04-01

    We recognized the importance of real time monitoring on Earthquakes and Tsunamis Based on lessons learned from 2004 Sumatra Earthquake/Tsunamis and 2011 East Japan Earthquake. We deployed DONET1 and are developing DONET2 as real time monitoring systems which are dense ocean floor networks around the Nankai trough seismogenic zone Southwestern Japan. Total observatories of DONE1 and DONET2 are 51 observatories equipped with multi kinds of sensors such as the accelerometer, broadband seismometer, pressure gauge, difference pressure gauge, hydrophone and thermometer in each observatory. These systems are indispensable for not only early warning of Earthquakes/ Tsunamis, but also researches on broadband crustal activities around the Nankai trough seismogenic zone for predictions. DONET1 detected offshore tsunamis 15 minutes earlier than onshore stations at the 2011 East Japan earthquake/tsunami. Furthermore, DONET1/DONET2 will be expected to monitor slow events such as low frequency tremors and slow earthquakes for the prediction researches. Finally, the integration of observations and simulation researches will contribute to estimate of seismic stage changes from the inter-seismic to pre seismic stage. I will introduce applications of DONET1/DONET2 data and advanced simulation researches.

  7. Earthquakes of the Holocene.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwartz, D.P.

    1987-01-01

    Areas in which significant new data and insights have been obtained are: 1) fault slip rates; 2) earthquake recurrence models; 3) fault segmentation; 4) dating past earthquakes; 5) paleoseismicity in the E and central US; 6) folds and earthquakes, and 7) future earthquake behavior. Summarizes important trends in each of these research areas based on information published between June 1982 and June 1986 and preprints of papers in press. The bibliography for this period contains mainly referred publications in journals and books.-from Author

  8. Seismological Research Letters Volume 82, Number 5 September/October 2011 623 Bad Assumptions or Bad Luck: Why Earthquake

    E-print Network

    Liu, Mian

    or Bad Luck: Why Earthquake Hazard Maps Need Objective Testing During World War II, future Nobel Prize when developing earthquake hazard maps, which ideally describe the level of earthquake hazards occurred in an area shown by the Japanese national earthquake hazard map as one of relatively low hazard

  9. Earthquake Damage Assessment Using Objective Image Segmentation: A Case Study of 2010 Haiti Earthquake

    E-print Network

    Earthquake Damage Assessment Using Objective Image Segmentation: A Case Study of 2010 Haiti Earthquake Thomas Oommen1 , Umaa Rebbapragada2 , and Daniel Cerminaro3 1 Department of Geological Engineering Haiti earthquake provided a new opportunity to analyze earthquake-induced damage. Previous work has

  10. Post-earthquake ignition vulnerability assessment of Küçükçekmece District

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildiz, S. S.; Karaman, H.

    2013-12-01

    In this study, a geographic information system (GIS)-based model was developed to calculate the post-earthquake ignition probability of a building, considering damage to the building's interior gas and electrical distribution system and the overturning of appliances. In order to make our model more reliable and realistic, a weighting factor was used to define the possible existence of each appliance or other contents in the given occupancy. A questionnaire was prepared to weigh the relevance of the different components of post-earthquake ignitions using the analytical hierarchy process (AHP). The questionnaire was evaluated by researchers who were experienced in earthquake engineering and post-earthquake fires. The developed model was implemented to HAZTURK's (Hazards Turkey) earthquake loss assessment software, as developed by the Mid-America Earthquake Center with the help of Istanbul Technical University. The developed post-earthquake ignition tool was applied to Küçükçekmece, Istanbul, in Turkey. The results were evaluated according to structure types, occupancy types, the number of storeys, building codes and specified districts. The evaluated results support the theory that post-earthquake ignition probability is inversely proportional to the number of storeys and the construction year, depending upon the building code.

  11. Post-earthquake ignition vulnerability assessment of Küçükçekmece District

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildiz, S. S.; Karaman, H.

    2013-05-01

    In this study, a Geographic Information System (GIS) based model was developed to calculate the post-earthquake ignition probability of a building, considering damage to the building's interior gas and electrical distribution system and the overturning of appliances. In order to make our model more reliable and realistic, a weighting factor was used to define the possible existence of each appliance or other contents in the given occupancy. A questionnaire was prepared to weigh the relevance of the different components of post-earthquake ignitions using Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP). The questionnaire was evaluated by researchers who were experienced in earthquake engineering and post earthquake fires. The developed model was implemented to HAZTURK (Hazards Turkey) earthquake loss assessment software, as developed by Mid-America Earthquake Center with the help of Istanbul Technical University. The developed post-earthquake ignition tool was applied to Küçükçekmece, Istanbul in Turkey. The results were evaluated according to structure types, occupancy types, the number of storeys, building codes and specified districts. The evaluated results support the theory that post-earthquake ignition probability is inversely proportional to the number of storeys and the construction year, depending upon the building code.

  12. Research review paper Design standards for engineered tissues

    E-print Network

    Parker, Kevin Kit

    into the design process. In tissue engineering, similar manufacturing standards have proven elusive, as the field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 1. Introduction Engineered technologies such as aircraft, bridges, and microelectronic devicesResearch review paper Design standards for engineered tissues Janna C. Nawroth a, , Kevin Kit

  13. Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering 2013-2014 Research Projects

    E-print Network

    Bahler, Dennis R.

    Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering 2013-2014 Research Projects Faculty Chase Beisel, Assistant Professor (919/ 513-2429); PhD, Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology (2009); systems and Coordinator of Undergraduate Advising (919/515-7455); PhD, Chemical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University

  14. Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering 2013-2014 Research Projects

    E-print Network

    Bahler, Dennis R.

    Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering 2013-2014 Research Projects Faculty Sankar, Professor and Department Head (919/515-7212); PhD, Civil and Environmental Engineering, University and anaerobic bioremediation. [barlaz@ncsu.edu] John W. Baugh, Professor (919/515-7697); PhD, Civil Engineering

  15. The Use of Web Search Engines in Information Science Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bar-Ilan, Judit

    2004-01-01

    Reviews the literature on the use of Web search engines in information science research, including: ways users interact with Web search engines; social aspects of searching; structure and dynamic nature of the Web; link analysis; other bibliometric applications; characterizing information on the Web; search engine evaluation and improvement; and…

  16. Delft University of Technology Software Engineering Research Group

    E-print Network

    van Deursen, Arie

    Delft University of Technology Software Engineering Research Group Technical Report Series A Light Department of Software Technology Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Computer Science Delft University of Technology Mekelweg 4 2628 CD Delft The Netherlands ISSN 1872-5392 Software Engineering

  17. Engineering Research, Development and Technology, FY95: Thrust area report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the knowledge base, process technologies, specialized equipment, tools and facilities to support current and future LLNL programs. Engineering`s efforts are guided by a strategy that results in dual benefit: first, in support of Department of Energy missions, such as national security through nuclear deterrence; and second, in enhancing the nation`s economic competitiveness through their collaboration with US industry in pursuit of the most cost-effective engineering solutions to LLNL programs. To accomplish this mission, the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program has two important goals: (1) identify key technologies relevant to LLNL programs where they can establish unique competencies, and (2) conduct high-quality research and development to enhance their capabilities and establish themselves as the world leaders in these technologies. To focus Engineering`s efforts, technology thrust areas are identified and technical leaders are selected for each area. The thrust areas are comprised of integrated engineering activities, staffed by personnel from the nine electronics and mechanical engineering divisions, and from other LLNL organizations. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes Engineering`s activities for fiscal year 1995. The report provides timely summaries of objectives methods, and key results from eight thrust areas: computational electronics and electromagnetics; computational mechanics; microtechnology; manufacturing technology; materials science and engineering; power conversion technologies; nondestructive evaluation; and information engineering.

  18. World Conference on Earthquake Engineering October 12-17, 2008, Beijing, China

    E-print Network

    Bruneau, Michel

    , Dept. of Civil Engineering, Technological University of Panama, Panama 2 Professor, Dept. of Civil would benefit from a systematic and simple design procedure. Such a general procedure is proposed in this paper for designing new or retrofitted structures. The proposed structural fuse design procedure

  19. Research project for increasing pool of minority engineers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Decatur B.

    1995-01-01

    The Tennessee State University (TSU) Research Project for Increasing the Pool of Minority Engineers is designed to develop engineers who have academic and research experiences in technical areas of interest to NASA. These engineers will also have some degree of familiarity with NASA Lewis Research Center as a result of interaction with Lewis engineers, field trips and internships at Lewis. The Research Project has four components, which are: (1) Minority Introduction to Engineering (MITE), a high school precollege program, (2) engineering and technology previews, (3) the NASA LeRC Scholars program which includes scholarships and summer internships, and (4) undergraduate research experiences on NASA sponsored research. MITE is a two-week summer engineering camp designed to introduce minority high school students to engineering by exposing them to: (1) engineering role models (engineering students and NASA engineer), (2) field trips to engineering firms, (3) in addition to introducing youth to the language of the engineer (i.e., science, mathematics, technical writing, computers, and the engineering laboratory). Three MITE camps are held on the campus of TSU with an average of 40 participants. MITE has grown from 25 participants at its inception in 1990 to 118 participants in 1994 with participants from 17 states, including the District of Columbia, and 51 percent of the participants were female. Over the four-year period, 77 percent of the seniors who participated in MITE have gone to college, while 53 percent of those seniors in college are majoring in science, engineering or mathematics (SEM). This first Engineering and Technology Previews held in 1993 brought 23 youths from Cleveland, Ohio to TSU for a two-day preview of engineering and college life. Two previews are scheduled for 1994-1995. The NASA LeRC Scholars program provides scholarships and summer internships for minority engineering students majoring in electrical or mechanical engineering. Presently six (6) engineering students are in the Scholars program. The average GPA for the scholars is 3.239. Each scholar must maintain a minimum GPA of 3.000/4.000. NASA LeRC Fred Higgs has been awarded a GEM Fellowship. In addition, he will be presenting a paper entitled 'Design of Helical Spring Using Probabilistic Design Methodology' at the Middle Tennessee Section ASME Student Design Presentations in Nashville on March 23rd and at the National Conference on Undergraduate Research to be held at Union College, Schenectady, New York on April 20-22, 1995. Each of the scholars is working on one of the three NASA sponsored research projects in the college.

  20. CURRENT STATE OF ART OF THE ROLE OFCURRENT STATE OF ART OF THE ROLE OF RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES ONRESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES ON

    E-print Network

    Engineering (CUREE) and Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES).Earthquake Engineering Simulation ONRESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES ON PERFORMANCE BASED EARTHQUAKEPERFORMANCE BASED EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING Engineering Nigde UniversityNigde University Nigde, TurkeyNigde, Turkey #12;Performance based earthquake

  1. A research agenda for academic petroleum engineering programs

    SciTech Connect

    Calhoun, J.C. Jr.

    1990-03-31

    The development of a research agenda should be a direct way of portraying the scope of petroleum engineering, of identifying the critical technological issues faced by the profession,of elucidating the gaps between the existing research resources and the needs. and of outlining a program of research through which the petroleum engineering departments can be collectively of maximum service. Such an agenda would be of value to the profession of petroleum engineering, to industry and to government agencies, as well as to the faculty and students of the petroleum engineering departments. The purposes of the activity that led to this report, therefore, were to develop a statement to serve as a beginning research agenda for the petroleum engineering academic community; to bring together representatives of the petroleum engineering academic community to recognize the importance of developing a consensus posture with respect to research; and to provide a document that will assist in portraying to industry, government agencies and others the problems and needs of the petroleum engineering departments for conducting research. Contents of this report include; introduction; the background; the scope of petroleum engineering research; priority research topics and technological issues; non-technological research issues; and conclusions and recommendations.

  2. A research agenda for academic petroleum engineering programs. [Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Calhoun, J.C. Jr.

    1990-03-31

    The development of a research agenda should be a direct way of portraying the scope of petroleum engineering, of identifying the critical technological issues faced by the profession,of elucidating the gaps between the existing research resources and the needs. and of outlining a program of research through which the petroleum engineering departments can be collectively of maximum service. Such an agenda would be of value to the profession of petroleum engineering, to industry and to government agencies, as well as to the faculty and students of the petroleum engineering departments. The purposes of the activity that led to this report, therefore, were to develop a statement to serve as a beginning research agenda for the petroleum engineering academic community; to bring together representatives of the petroleum engineering academic community to recognize the importance of developing a consensus posture with respect to research; and to provide a document that will assist in portraying to industry, government agencies and others the problems and needs of the petroleum engineering departments for conducting research. Contents of this report include; introduction; the background; the scope of petroleum engineering research; priority research topics and technological issues; non-technological research issues; and conclusions and recommendations.

  3. ORNL Fuels, Engines, and Emissions Research Center (FEERC)

    SciTech Connect

    2013-04-12

    This video highlights the Vehicle Research Laboratory's capabilities at the Fuels, Engines, and Emissions Research Center (FEERC). FEERC is a Department of Energy user facility located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  4. ORNL Fuels, Engines, and Emissions Research Center (FEERC)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-06-26

    This video highlights the Vehicle Research Laboratory's capabilities at the Fuels, Engines, and Emissions Research Center (FEERC). FEERC is a Department of Energy user facility located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  5. Wind Engineering & Natural Disaster Mitigation

    E-print Network

    Lennard, William N.

    Wind Engineering & Natural Disaster Mitigation For more than 45 years, Western University has been internationally recognized as the leading university for wind engineering and wind- related research. Its of environmental disaster mitigation, with specific strengths in wind and earthquake research. Boundary Layer Wind

  6. Implementation plan for engineering research, development and demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    This document contains information on the planned implementation of the EMF RAPID Program`s engineering activities. It describes the approach and specific projects required to achieve the goals laid out in the EMF Engineering Research component of the Research Agenda and Communication Plan. In addition to efforts funded by the RAPID Program, ongoing quality assurance and dosimetry research currently funded by the DOE EMF Biological Mechanisms Research Program are considered essential to achieving the goals of the RAPID Program.

  7. 2007 Research and Engineering Annual Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoliker, Patrick; Bowers, Albion; Cruciani, Everlyn

    2008-01-01

    Selected research and technology activities at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center are summarized. These following activities exemplify the Center's varied and productive research efforts: Developing a Requirements Development Guide for an Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance System; Digital Terrain Data Compression and Rendering for Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance Systems; Nonlinear Flutter/Limit Cycle Oscillations Prediction Tool; Nonlinear System Identification Using Orthonormal Bases: Application to Aeroelastic/Aeroservoelastic Systems; Critical Aerodynamic Flow Feature Indicators: Towards Application with the Aerostructures Test Wing; Multidisciplinary Design, Analysis, and Optimization Tool Development Using a Genetic Algorithm; Structural Model Tuning Capability in an Object-Oriented Multidisciplinary Design, Analysis, and Optimization Tool; Extension of Ko Straight-Beam Displacement Theory to the Deformed Shape Predictions of Curved Structures; F-15B with Phoenix Missile and Pylon Assembly--Drag Force Estimation; Mass Property Testing of Phoenix Missile Hypersonic Testbed Hardware; ARMD Hypersonics Project Materials and Structures: Testing of Scramjet Thermal Protection System Concepts; High-Temperature Modal Survey of the Ruddervator Subcomponent Test Article; ARMD Hypersonics Project Materials and Structures: C/SiC Ruddervator Subcomponent Test and Analysis Task; Ground Vibration Testing and Model Correlation of the Phoenix Missile Hypersonic Testbed; Phoenix Missile Hypersonic Testbed: Performance Design and Analysis; Crew Exploration Vehicle Launch Abort System-Pad Abort-1 (PA-1) Flight Test; Testing the Orion (Crew Exploration Vehicle) Launch Abort System-Ascent Abort-1 (AA-1) Flight Test; SOFIA Flight-Test Flutter Prediction Methodology; SOFIA Closed-Door Aerodynamic Analyses; SOFIA Handling Qualities Evaluation for Closed-Door Operations; C-17 Support of IRAC Engine Model Development; Current Capabilities and Future Upgrade Plans of the C-17 Data Rack; Intelligent Data Mining Capabilities as Applied to Integrated Vehicle Health Management; STARS Flight Demonstration No. 2 IP Data Formatter; Space-Based Telemetry and Range Safety (STARS) Flight Demonstration No. 2 Range User Flight Test Results; Aerodynamic Effects of the Quiet Spike(tm) on an F-15B Aircraft; F-15 Intelligent Flight Controls-Increased Destabilization Failure; F-15 Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control (IRAC) Improved Adaptive Controller; Aeroelastic Analysis of the Ikhana/Fire Pod System; Ikhana: Western States Fire Missions Utilizing the Ames Research Center Fire Sensor; Ikhana: Fiber-Optic Wing Shape Sensors; Ikhana: ARTS III; SOFIA Closed-Door Flutter Envelope Flight Testing; F-15B Quiet Spike(TM) Aeroservoelastic Flight Test Data Analysis; and UAVSAR Platform Precision Autopilot Flight Results.

  8. Discrimination between NTS explosions, earthquakes and the non-proliferation experiment at the Pinedale Seismic Research Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, D.

    1994-09-01

    As the United States moves into an atmosphere of concern about the spread of nuclear weapons to non-nuclear countries, the focus on monitoring nuclear explosions is changing from looking at specific test sites and yields to looking for tests of large and small yields from anywhere in the world. Discrimination of small events then becomes important and regional seismic monitoring the best method to detect and identify suspicious events. At the Pinedale Seismic Research Facility (PSRF) in Wyoming we have the opportunity to try different regional discriminants with nuclear tests from NTS, western US (W-US) earthquakes and the Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE). Four discriminants that gave the best results in a study by Taylor et al. were tried: m{sub b}:M{sub s}, M{sub b}:M{sub s}{sup h}, log(L{sub g}/P{sub g}) and spectral ratios. The different discriminants were applied to the data (14 NTS explosions, the NPE, one Department of Defense (DOB) explosion and 34 NWS earthquakes) regardless of signal-to-noise. When the NTS explosions and NPE were only compared to four earthquakes located on or near the Test Site, all the discriminants except log(L{sub g}/P{sub g}) worked fairly well at PSRF. When the other WUS earthquakes and DOD explosion are included, only m{sub b}:M{sub s} shows any promise. Because of frequent physical variations in the earth`s crust, regional signals are complex and easily influenced by site and path characteristics. Looking at events from one specific area reduces the effects of the path, which is why three discriminants work well when the data set is restricted to events on or near NTS. The only discriminant not adversely affected from variations in path is m{sub b}:M{sub s}. This is probably because it is believed that source dimension, source time function and/or source mechanism is the cause for the differences between earthquakes and explosions with this discriminant, rather than any path effects.

  9. 78 FR 47049 - Research, Engineering and Development Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-02

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Research, Engineering and Development Advisory Committee Pursuant to... hereby given of a meeting of the FAA Research, Engineering and Development (R,E&D) Advisory Committee... & Development Advisory Committee. Time and Date: September 18--8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Place: Federal...

  10. SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES ENISTAT: Experimental and

    E-print Network

    for thermal insulation at wall-slab connections #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES Thermal break elements The Rutherma element ensures the insulation continuity (SCHOECK company that allows for wall-slab connection to reduce the thermal energy loss. #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH

  11. CENTRE FOR NANO SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING AND MATERIALS RESEARCH CENTRE

    E-print Network

    Pal, Debnath

    CENTRE FOR NANO SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING AND MATERIALS RESEARCH CENTRE INDIAN INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE-system for the Advanced transmission electron microscope facility (TEM- TITAN, Themis 60-300kV) at Centre for Nano Science proof sliding doors #12;CENTRE FOR NANO SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING AND MATERIALS RESEARCH CENTRE INDIAN

  12. Genetic Engineering of Plants. Agricultural Research Opportunities and Policy Concerns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Leslie

    Plant scientists and science policymakers from government, private companies, and universities met at a convocation on the genetic engineering of plants. During the convocation, researchers described some of the ways genetic engineering may be used to address agricultural problems. Policymakers delineated and debated changes in research funding…

  13. Power Systems Engineering Research Center Dennis Ray Ward Jewell

    E-print Network

    Power Systems Engineering Research Center Dennis Ray Ward Jewell Executive Director, Power Systems-Learjet Fellow Madison, WI 53706-1691 Director, Power Quality Laboratory djray@engr.wisc.edu Wichita State an overview of the Power Systems Engineering Research Center (PSERC), a National Science Foundation Industry

  14. Building Damage, Death and Downtime Risk Attenuation in Earthquakes 

    E-print Network

    Huang, Yinghui

    2012-07-16

    Whether it is for pre-event prevention and preparedness or for post-event response and recovery of a catastrophic earthquake, estimates of damage, death and downtime (3d) losses are needed by engineers, owners, and policy makers. In this research, a...

  15. Process Systems Engineering Education: Learning by Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbas, A.; Alhammadi, H. Y.; Romagnoli, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss our approach in teaching the final-year course Process Systems Engineering. Students are given ownership of the course by transferring to them the responsibility of learning. A project-based group environment stimulates learning while solving a real engineering problem. We discuss postgraduate student involvement and how…

  16. ETHICAL ISSUES IN ENGINEERING AND RESEARCH

    E-print Network

    Movileanu, Liviu

    for careers in science and engineering acquire a firm understanding of their fields' professional standards on scientists and engineers to act ethically, maintaining their own integrity and that of their professions in their careers and the professional norms to be applied in resolving those issues. Considerable time

  17. Stirling engine research at national and university laboratories in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Hane, G.J.; Hutchinson, R.A.

    1987-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) reviewed research projects that are related to the development of Stirling engines and that are under way at Japanese national laboratories and universities. The research and development focused on component rather than on whole engine development. PNL obtained the information from a literature review and interviews conducted at the laboratories and universities. The universities have less equipment available and operate with smaller staffs for research than do the laboratories. In particular, the Mechanical Engineering Laboratory and the Aerospace Laboratory conduct high-quality component and fundamental work. Despite having less equipment, some of the researchers at the universities conduct high-quality fundamental research. As is typical in Japan, several of the university professors are very active in consulting and advisory capacities to companies engaged in Stirling engine development, and also with government and association advisory and technical committees. Contacts with these professors and selective examination of their research are good ways to keep abreast of Japanese Stirling developments.

  18. Earthquakes for Kids

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Hazard Maps & Data Seismic Design Hazard Analysis Tools Faults Data & Products Data Products Learn EQ Topics for ... Buildings NSMP – Strong Motion Crustal Deformation Research Characterizing Faults Early Warning Crustal Deformation Earthquake Processes Ground Failure ...

  19. Workshop on continuing actions to reduce potential losses from future earthquakes in the Northeastern United States: proceedings of conference XXI

    SciTech Connect

    Hays, W.W.; Gori, P.L.

    1983-01-01

    This workshop was designed to define the earthquake threat in the eastern United States and to improve earthquake preparedness. Four major themes were addressed: (1) the nature of the earthquake threat in the northeast and what can be done to improve the state of preparedness; (2) increasing public awareness and concern for the earthquake hazard in the northeast; (3) improving the state of preparedness through scientific, engineering, and social science research; and (4) possible functions of one or more seismic safety organizations. Papers have been abstracted separately. (ACR)

  20. Researches on direct injection in internal-combustion engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuscher, Jean E

    1941-01-01

    These researches present a solution for reducing the fatigue of the Diesel engine by permitting the preservation of its components and, at the same time, raising its specific horsepower to a par with that of carburetor engines, while maintaining for the Diesel engine its perogative of burning heavy fuel under optimum economical conditions. The feeding of Diesel engines by injection pumps actuated by engine compression achieves the required high speeds of injection readily and permits rigorous control of the combustible charge introduced into each cylinder and of the peak pressure in the resultant cycle.

  1. Materials Research Science and Engineering Center Dedicated to Excellence in Science and Engineering Education

    E-print Network

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    of Nanoscience program, (2) tell us about any science and math courses you have taken and/or any otherMaterials Research Science and Engineering Center Dedicated to Excellence in Science@umd.edu #12;Materials Research Science and Engineering Center Dedicated to Excellence in Science

  2. Estimating surface faulting impacts from the shakeout scenario earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Treiman, J.A.; Pontib, D.J.

    2011-01-01

    An earthquake scenario, based on a kinematic rupture model, has been prepared for a Mw 7.8 earthquake on the southern San Andreas Fault. The rupture distribution, in the context of other historic large earthquakes, is judged reasonable for the purposes of this scenario. This model is used as the basis for generating a surface rupture map and for assessing potential direct impacts on lifelines and other infrastructure. Modeling the surface rupture involves identifying fault traces on which to place the rupture, assigning slip values to the fault traces, and characterizing the specific displacements that would occur to each lifeline impacted by the rupture. Different approaches were required to address variable slip distribution in response to a variety of fault patterns. Our results, involving judgment and experience, represent one plausible outcome and are not predictive because of the variable nature of surface rupture. ?? 2011, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  3. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 40, 30213025, doi:10.1002/grl.50605, 2013 Recurrence statistics of great earthquakes

    E-print Network

    of great earthquakes E. Ben-Naim,1,2 E. G. Daub,2,3,4 and P. A. Johnson3 Received 9 May 2013; accepted 29 May 2013; published 21 June 2013. [1] We investigate the sequence of great earthquakes over the past century. To examine whether the earthquake record includes temporal clustering, we identify aftershocks

  4. Earthquake prediction comes of age

    SciTech Connect

    Lindth, A. . Office of Earthquakes, Volcanoes, and Engineering)

    1990-02-01

    In the last decade, scientists have begun to estimate the long-term probability of major earthquakes along the San Andreas fault. In 1985, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) issued the first official U.S. government earthquake prediction, based on research along a heavily instrumented 25-kilometer section of the fault in sparsely populated central California. Known as the Parkfield segment, this section of the Sand Andreas had experienced its last big earthquake, a magnitude 6, in 1966. Estimated probabilities of major quakes along the entire San Andreas by a working group of California earthquake experts, using new geologic data and careful analysis of past earthquakes, are reported.

  5. 2007 Plant Metabolic Engineering Gordon Conference and Graduate Research Seminar

    SciTech Connect

    Erich Grotewold

    2008-09-15

    Plant Metabolic Engineering is an emerging field that integrates a diverse range of disciplines including plant genetics, genomics, biochemistry, chemistry and cell biology. The Gordon-Kenan Graduate Research Seminar (GRS) in Plant Metabolic Engineering was initiated to provide a unique opportunity for future researcher leaders to present their work in this field. It also creates an environment allowing for peer-review and critical assessment of work without the intimidation usually associated with the presence of senior investigators. The GRS immediately precedes the Plant Metabolic Engineering Gordon Research Conference and will be for and by graduate students and post-docs, with the assistance of the organizers listed.

  6. EARTHQUAKES POWEROUTAGES

    E-print Network

    TSUNAMI HURRICANES EARTHQUAKES POWEROUTAGES FIRE FOREMERGENCIES PREPAREFOREMERGENCIES Sign up in the event of a widespread disaster, such as a hurricane or earthquake. If a large area is affected, phone

  7. Turkish Compulsory Earthquake Insurance (TCIP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdik, M.; Durukal, E.; Sesetyan, K.

    2009-04-01

    Through a World Bank project a government-sponsored Turkish Catastrophic Insurance Pool (TCIP) is created in 2000 with the essential aim of transferring the government's financial burden of replacing earthquake-damaged housing to international reinsurance and capital markets. Providing coverage to about 2.9 Million homeowners TCIP is the largest insurance program in the country with about 0.5 Billion USD in its own reserves and about 2.3 Billion USD in total claims paying capacity. The total payment for earthquake damage since 2000 (mostly small, 226 earthquakes) amounts to about 13 Million USD. The country-wide penetration rate is about 22%, highest in the Marmara region (30%) and lowest in the south-east Turkey (9%). TCIP is the sole-source provider of earthquake loss coverage up to 90,000 USD per house. The annual premium, categorized on the basis of earthquake zones type of structure, is about US90 for a 100 square meter reinforced concrete building in the most hazardous zone with 2% deductible. The earthquake engineering related shortcomings of the TCIP is exemplified by fact that the average rate of 0.13% (for reinforced concrete buildings) with only 2% deductible is rather low compared to countries with similar earthquake exposure. From an earthquake engineering point of view the risk underwriting (Typification of housing units to be insured, earthquake intensity zonation and the sum insured) of the TCIP needs to be overhauled. Especially for large cities, models can be developed where its expected earthquake performance (and consequently the insurance premium) can be can be assessed on the basis of the location of the unit (microzoned earthquake hazard) and basic structural attributes (earthquake vulnerability relationships). With such an approach, in the future the TCIP can contribute to the control of construction through differentiation of premia on the basis of earthquake vulnerability.

  8. Supporting research and technology for automotive Stirling engine development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomazic, W. A.

    1980-01-01

    The technology advancement topics described are a part of the supporting research and technology (SRT) program conducted to support the major Stirling engine development program. This support focuses on developing alternatives or backups to the engine development in critical areas. These areas are materials, seals control, combustors and system analysis. Specific objectives and planned milestone schedules for future activities as now envisioned are described. These planned SRT activities are related to the timeline of the engine development program that they must support.

  9. Thrust Area Report, Engineering Research, Development and Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Langland, R. T.

    1997-02-01

    The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the knowledge base, process technologies, specialized equipment, tools and facilities to support current and future LLNL programs. Engineering`s efforts are guided by a strategy that results in dual benefit: first, in support of Department of Energy missions, such as national security through nuclear deterrence; and second, in enhancing the nation`s economic competitiveness through our collaboration with U.S. industry in pursuit of the most cost- effective engineering solutions to LLNL programs. To accomplish this mission, the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program has two important goals: (1) identify key technologies relevant to LLNL programs where we can establish unique competencies, and (2) conduct high-quality research and development to enhance our capabilities and establish ourselves as the world leaders in these technologies. To focus Engineering`s efforts technology {ital thrust areas} are identified and technical leaders are selected for each area. The thrust areas are comprised of integrated engineering activities, staffed by personnel from the nine electronics and mechanical engineering divisions, and from other LLNL organizations. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes Engineering`s activities for fiscal year 1996. The report provides timely summaries of objectives, methods, and key results from eight thrust areas: Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics; Computational Mechanics; Microtechnology; Manufacturing Technology; Materials Science and Engineering; Power Conversion Technologies; Nondestructive Evaluation; and Information Engineering. Readers desiring more information are encouraged to contact the individual thrust area leaders or authors. 198 refs., 206 figs., 16 tabs.

  10. Forecasting Earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    In this video there are scenes of damage from the Northridge Earthquake and interviews with Dr. Andrea Donnelan, Geophysics at JPL, and Dr. Jim Dolan, earthquake geologist from Cal. Tech. The interviews discuss earthquake forecasting by tracking changes in the earth's crust using antenna receiving signals from a series of satellites called the Global Positioning System (GPS).

  11. FY10 Engineering Innovations, Research and Technology Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, M A; Aceves, S M; Paulson, C N; Candy, J V; Bennett, C V; Carlisle, K; Chen, D C; White, D A; Bernier, J V; Puso, M A; Weisgraber, T H; Corey, B; Lin, J I; Wheeler, E K; Conway, A M; Kuntz, J D; Spadaccini, C M; Dehlinger, D A; Kotovsky, J; Nikolic, R; Mariella, R P; Foudray, A K; Tang, V; Guidry, B L; Ng, B M; Lemmond, T D; Chen, B Y; Meyers, C A; Houck, T L

    2011-01-11

    This report summarizes key research, development, and technology advancements in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Engineering Directorate for FY2010. These efforts exemplify Engineering's nearly 60-year history of developing and applying the technology innovations needed for the Laboratory's national security missions, and embody Engineering's mission to ''Enable program success today and ensure the Laboratory's vitality tomorrow.'' Leading off the report is a section featuring compelling engineering innovations. These innovations range from advanced hydrogen storage that enables clean vehicles, to new nuclear material detection technologies, to a landmine detection system using ultra-wideband ground-penetrating radar. Many have been recognized with R&D Magazine's prestigious R&D 100 Award; all are examples of the forward-looking application of innovative engineering to pressing national problems and challenging customer requirements. Engineering's capability development strategy includes both fundamental research and technology development. Engineering research creates the competencies of the future where discovery-class groundwork is required. Our technology development (or reduction to practice) efforts enable many of the research breakthroughs across the Laboratory to translate from the world of basic research to the national security missions of the Laboratory. This portfolio approach produces new and advanced technological capabilities, and is a unique component of the value proposition of the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The balance of the report highlights this work in research and technology, organized into thematic technical areas: Computational Engineering; Micro/Nano-Devices and Structures; Measurement Technologies; Engineering Systems for Knowledge Discovery; and Energy Manipulation. Our investments in these areas serve not only known programmatic requirements of today and tomorrow, but also anticipate the breakthrough engineering innovations that will be needed in the future.

  12. Response of a 14-story Anchorage, Alaska, building in 2002 to two close earthquakes and two distant Denali fault earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Celebi, M.

    2004-01-01

    The recorded responses of an Anchorage, Alaska, building during four significant earthquakes that occurred in 2002 are studied. Two earthquakes, including the 3 November 2002 M7.9 Denali fault earthquake, with epicenters approximately 275 km from the building, generated long trains of long-period (>1 s) surface waves. The other two smaller earthquakes occurred at subcrustal depths practically beneath Anchorage and produced higher frequency motions. These two pairs of earthquakes have different impacts on the response of the building. Higher modes are more pronounced in the building response during the smaller nearby events. The building responses indicate that the close-coupling of translational and torsional modes causes a significant beating effect. It is also possible that there is some resonance occurring due to the site frequency being close to the structural frequency. Identification of dynamic characteristics and behavior of buildings can provide important lessons for future earthquake-resistant designs and retrofit of existing buildings. ?? 2004, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  13. Research on groundwater radon as a fluid phase precursor to earthquakes

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, T.; Sun, L.

    1986-11-10

    Groundwater radon monitoring work carried out in southern California by the University of Southern California since 1974 is summarized here. This effort began with a sampling network over a locked segment of the San Andreas fault from Tejon to Cajon and was later expanded to cover part of the southern Transverse Mountain ranges. Groundwater samples were brought back weekly to the laboratory for high precision scintillation counting. Needs for more frequent sampling and less labor prompted the development of an economical and field worthy instrument known as the continuous radon monitor. About 10 have been installed in the network since early 1980. The groundwater radon content was found to show anomalous increases (mostly at a single station) before a number of moderate and nearby earthquakes. Our work is hampered by a lack of large earthquakes that may have a regional impact on radon anomalies and by the complexity of the underground hydrological regime. To circumvent this difficulty, we have chosen to monitor only deep artesian wells or hot spring wells.

  14. ENGINEERING STATUS OF THE FUSION IGNITION RESEARCH EXPERIMENT (FIRE)

    E-print Network

    ENGINEERING STATUS OF THE FUSION IGNITION RESEARCH EXPERIMENT (FIRE) Philip J. Heitzenroeder Dale. AN ISOMETRIC VIEW OF THE FIRE TOKAMAK FIG. 2. AN ELEVATION VIEW OF FIRE #12;II. ENGINEERING SYSTEMS 08543 Cambridge, MA 02139 (609)-243-3043 (609)-243-3301 (617)-253-8155 For the FIRE Project Team

  15. Career Pathways of Science, Engineering and Technology Research Postgraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Marnie; Ski, Chantal; Vrdoljak, Davorin

    2009-01-01

    Suitably qualified scientists and engineers are essential for research and development, innovation and, in turn, the growth of the economy. Science, engineering and technology skills are therefore necessary for Australia to remain competitive in a global market. This article reports findings from a nationwide study investigating the career…

  16. Power Systems Engineering Research Center PSERC Background Paper

    E-print Network

    Power Systems Engineering Research Center PSERC Background Paper What is Reactive Power? Peter W-Champaign September 16, 2003 Engineering talk Reactive power is a quantity that is normally only defined time). In that sense, these are pulsating quantities. Because of this, the power being transmitted down

  17. Engineering therapeutic processes: from research to commodity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, Robert L.

    2014-03-01

    Three of the most important forces driving medical care are: patient specificity, treatment specificity and the move from discovery to design. Engineers while trained in specificity, efficiency, and design are often not trained in either biology or medical processes. Yet they are increasing critical to medical care. For example, modern medical imaging at US hospitals generates 1 exabyte (10^18 bytes) of data per year clearly beyond unassisted human analysis. It is not desirable to involve engineers in the acquisition, storage and analysis of this data, it is essential. While in the past we have nibbled around the edges of medical care, it is time and perhaps past time to insert ourselves more squarely into medical processes, making them more efficient, more specific and more robust. This requires engineers who understand biology and physicians who are willing to step away from classic medical thinking to try new approaches. But once the idea is proven in a laboratory, it must move into use and then into common practice. This requires additional engineering to make the process robust to noisy data and imprecise practices as well as workflow analysis to get the new technique into operating and treatment rooms. True innovation and true translation will require physicians, engineers, other medical stakeholders and even corporate involvement to take a new, important idea and move it not just to a patient but to all patients.

  18. 34 CFR 350.33 - What cooperation requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...cooperation requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet? 350.33 ...CENTERS PROGRAM What Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers Does the Secretary...cooperation requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet? A...

  19. 34 CFR 350.34 - Which Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers must have an advisory committee?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 true Which Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers must have an advisory...CENTERS PROGRAM What Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.34 Which Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers must have an...

  20. 34 CFR 350.30 - What requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...What requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet? 350.30 ...CENTERS PROGRAM What Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers Does the Secretary...What requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet? A...

  1. 34 CFR 350.31 - What collaboration must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center engage in?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...What collaboration must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center engage in? 350...CENTERS PROGRAM What Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers Does the Secretary...What collaboration must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center engage in? A...

  2. 34 CFR 350.31 - What collaboration must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center engage in?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...What collaboration must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center engage in? 350...CENTERS PROGRAM What Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers Does the Secretary...What collaboration must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center engage in? A...

  3. 34 CFR 350.34 - Which Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers must have an advisory committee?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Which Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers must have an advisory...CENTERS PROGRAM What Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.34 Which Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers must have an...

  4. 34 CFR 350.30 - What requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...What requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet? 350.30 ...CENTERS PROGRAM What Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers Does the Secretary...What requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet? A...

  5. 34 CFR 350.33 - What cooperation requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...cooperation requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet? 350.33 ...CENTERS PROGRAM What Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers Does the Secretary...cooperation requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet? A...

  6. Steam engine research for solar parabolic dish

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demler, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    The parabolic dish solar concentrator provides an opportunity to generate high grade energy in a modular system. Most of the capital is projected to be in the dish and its installation. Assurance of a high production demand of a standard dish could lead to dramatic cost reductions. High production volume in turn depends upon maximum application flexibility by providing energy output options, e.g., heat, electricity, chemicals and combinations thereof. Subsets of these options include energy storage and combustion assist. A steam engine design and experimental program is described which investigate the efficiency potential of a small 25 kW compound reheat cycle piston engine. An engine efficiency of 35 percent is estimated for a 700 C steam temperature from the solar receiver.

  7. Heat engine regenerators: Research status and needs

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, R.A.

    1987-08-01

    The rapidly oscillating, variable density flows of regenerative heat engines provide a class of poorly understood unsteady flow and heat transfer problems. These problems are not currently amenable to direct experimental resolution. Experiences in engine development and test programs and efforts to develop analysis tools point to the regenerator as a key area of insufficient understanding. Focusing on flow and heat transfer in regenerators, this report discusses similarity parameters for the flows and reviews the experimental data currently available for Stirling analysis. Then a number of experimental results are presented from recent fundamental fluid mechanical and thermal investigations that shed additional light on the functioning of heat engine regenerators. Suggestions are made for approaches for further measurement and analysis efforts.

  8. Research in Engineering Design: Guidelines Copyright 2011 Yoram Reich

    E-print Network

    Reich, Yoram

    7 Is it a walrus? #12; Research in Engineering Design: Guidelines Copyright 2011 © Yoram Reich 8 8 Copyright 2011 © Yoram Reich 12 12 Eliodinalrus (elephant lion dinosaur walrus) It may be that right now

  9. Maryland Engineering Research Internship Teams (MERIT) Robot Interaction Using Cricket,

    E-print Network

    Positioning System Project by Hosam Haggag University of Maryland, College Park Golbarg Mehraei Virginia Positioning System Page 2 of 45 AbstractMaryland Engineering Research Internship Teams (MERIT) Robot Interaction Using Cricket, an Indoor

  10. Engineering research progress report, October 1983-March 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, H.H.; Cherniak, J.C.; Hymer, J.D.; Kamelgarn, M.B.

    1984-08-01

    Our intent in this progress report is to provide a summary of the activities pursued by members of the Mechanical Engineering (ME) Department's Engineering Research Program. The Program's mission is to do research for specific applications in mechanical-engineering fields that are of immediate or potential interest to the Laboratory. The FY84 Program comprises nine projects in four thrust areas in the ME Department. The thrust areas are: Surface Measurements and Characterization; Fabrication Technology; Materials Characterization and Behavior; and Computer-Aided Engineering. In the past, our research was supported almost exclusively by weapons programs; recently, however, we significantly increased our involvement in other Laboratory programs as well. In response to this change, we have established new procedures and guidelines for the submission, review, and selection of research proposals.

  11. Status of Research in Biomedical Engineering 1968.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of General Medical Sciences (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This status report is divided into eight sections. The first four represent the classical engineering or building aspects of bioengineering and deal with biomedical instrumentation, prosthetics, man-machine systems and computer and information systems. The next three sections are related to the scientific, intellectual and academic influence of…

  12. Water Resources & Environmental Engineering Graduate Research Symposium

    E-print Network

    Frey, H. Christopher

    of the controversies surrounding the potential environmental impacts and benefits of shale gas development, focusing Carolina State University Department of Civil, Construction, & Environmental Engineering The shale gas revolution: green energy or a bridge to nowhere? #12;The shale gas revolution: green energy or a bridge

  13. Software Systems & Engineering Research in ECE

    E-print Network

    Pulfrey, David L.

    (since 2011) Human-computer Interaction Usable Security Software Engineering Processes Distributed Systems Real-Time Systems Fault-Tolerant Computing Software Testing #12;Broad Theme How do we build) VMflock -- Virtual machine migration across clouds (collaboration with Storage Systems at IBM Almaden

  14. Recent Developments in U.S. Engine Noise Reduction Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James; Envia, Edmane; Huff, Dennis

    2001-01-01

    Aircraft engine noise research in the United States has made considerable progress over the past 10 years for both subsonic and supersonic flight applications. The Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) Noise Reduction Program started in 1994 and will be completed in 2001 without major changes to program plans and funding levels. As a result, significant progress has been made toward the goal of reducing engine source noise by 6 EPNdB (Effective Perceived Noise level in decibels). This paper will summarize some of the significant accomplishments from the subsonic engine noise research performed over the past 10 years. The review is by no means comprehensive and only represents a sample of major accomplishments.

  15. Summary of NACA Research on Afterburners for Turbojet Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundin, Bruce T; Gabriel, David S; Fleming, William A

    1956-01-01

    NACA research on afterburners for turbojet engines during the past 5 years is summarized. Although most of this work has been directed toward the development of specific afterburners for various engines rather than toward the accumulation of systematic data, it has, nevertheless, provided a large fund of experimental data and experience in the field. The references cited present over 1000 afterburner configurations and some 3500 hours of operation. In the treatment of the material of this summary, the principal effort has been to convey to the reader the "know-how" acquired by research engineers in the course of the work rather than to formulate a set of design rules.

  16. Research Project for Increasing the Pool of Minority Engineers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gott, Susan F. (Technical Monitor); Rogers, Decatur B.

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) funded the 2001-2002 Tennessee State University (TSU) Research Project for increasing the pool of minority engineers. The NASA GRC/TSU Research Project is designed to develop a cadre of SMET professionals who have academic and research expertise in technical areas of interest to NASA, in addition to having some familiarity with the mission of the NASA Glenn Research Center. The goal of increasing minority participation in SMET disciplines was accomplished by: (1) introducing and exposing 96 minority youth to Science, Math, Engineering, and Technology (SMET) careers and to the required high school preparation necessary to make high school graduation, college attendance and engineering careers a reality through the campus based pre-college SMET program: Minority Introduction to Engineering (MITE); (2) by providing financial support through scholarships for four (4) TSU engineering students to NASA; (3) familiarization with the SMET profession and with NASA through summer internships at NASA GRC for two TSU NASA Glenn Research Scholars; and experiences through research internships at NASA GRC.

  17. Engineering and socioeconomic impacts of earthquakes: An analysis of electricity lifeline disruptions in the New Madrid area

    SciTech Connect

    Shinozuka, M.; Rose, A.; Eguchi, R.T.

    1998-12-31

    This monograph examines the potential effects of a repeat of the New Madrid earthquake to the metropolitan Memphis area. The authors developed a case study of the impact of such an event to the electric power system, and analyzed how this disruption would affect society. In nine chapters and 189 pages, the book traces the impacts of catastrophic earthquakes through a curtailment of utility lifeline services to its host regional economy and beyond. the monographs` chapters include: Modeling the Memphis economy; seismic performance of electric power systems; spatial analysis techniques for linking physical damage to economic functions; earthquake vulnerability and emergency preparedness among businesses; direct economic impacts; regional economic impacts; socioeconomic and interregional impacts; lifeline risk reduction; and public policy formulation and implementation.

  18. Research into the origins of engineering thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Bejan, A.

    1988-09-01

    This paper draws attention to a series of misconceptions and misstatements regarding the origin and meaning of some of the most basic concepts of engineering thermodynamics. The six examples exhibited in the paper relate to the concepts of reversibility, entropy, mechanical equivalent of the calorie, the first law of thermodynamics for open systems, enthalpy and the Diesel cycle. A complete list of the pioneering references concludes the paper.

  19. Istanbul Earthquake Early Warning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcik, H.; Mert, A.; Ozel, O.; Erdik, M.

    2007-12-01

    As part of the preparations for the future earthquake in Istanbul a Rapid Response and Early Warning system in the metropolitan area is in operation. For the Early Warning system ten strong motion stations were installed as close as possible to the fault zone. Continuous on-line data from these stations via digital radio modem provide early warning for potentially disastrous earthquakes. Considering the complexity of fault rupture and the short fault distances involved, a simple and robust Early Warning algorithm, based on the exceedance of specified threshold time domain amplitude levels is implemented. The band-pass filtered accelerations and the cumulative absolute velocity (CAV) are compared with specified threshold levels. When any acceleration or CAV (on any channel) in a given station exceeds specific threshold values it is considered a vote. Whenever we have 2 station votes within selectable time interval, after the first vote, the first alarm is declared. In order to specify the appropriate threshold levels a data set of near field strong ground motions records form Turkey and the world has been analyzed. Correlations among these thresholds in terms of the epicenter distance the magnitude of the earthquake have been studied. The encrypted early warning signals will be communicated to the respective end users. Depending on the location of the earthquake (initiation of fault rupture) and the recipient facility the alarm time can be as high as about 8s. The first users of the early warning signal will be the Istanbul gas company (IGDAS) and the metro line using the immersed tube tunnel (MARMARAY). Other prospective users are power plants and power distribution systems, nuclear research facilities, critical chemical factories, petroleum facilities and high-rise buildings. In this study, different algorithms based on PGA, CAV and various definitions of instrumental intensity will be discussed and triggering threshold levels of these parameters will be studied. More complex algorithms based on artificial neural networks (ANN) can also be used [Boese et al., 2003]. ANN approach considers the problem of earthquake early-warning as a pattern recognition task. The seismic patterns can be defined by the shape and frequency content of the parts of accelerograms that are available at each time step. ANN can extract the engineering parameters PGA, CAV and instrumental intensity from these patterns, and map them to any location in the surrounded area. Boese M., Erdik, M., Wenzel, F. (2003), Artificial Neural Networks for Earthquake Early Warning, Proceedings AGU2003 Abstracts, S42B-0155

  20. Louisville revs up its research engine.

    PubMed

    Pallarito, K

    1998-08-24

    It takes big bucks to attract the best brains in medical research. In Louisville, Ky., healthcare and political leaders are working together to lure research dollars. They include, from left, Alliant Health System CEO Stephen Williams, Louisville Mayor Jerry Abramson, Jewish Hospital HealthCare Services CEO Henry Wagner, Greater Louisville Inc. CEO Douglas Cobb and Kentucky Gov. Paul Patton. PMID:10182789

  1. Daryl B. Simons--Hydraulic Engineer, Researcher, and Educator

    E-print Network

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    FORUM Daryl B. Simons--Hydraulic Engineer, Researcher, and Educator Nani Bhowmik, P.E., M@engr.colostate.edu Introduction Daryl B. Simons is remembered for his hard work, dedication, and perseverance as an hydraulic; and his contributions to the development of research facilities and to the profession of hy- draulic

  2. UncorrectedProof 1Wikis in Design Engineering Research

    E-print Network

    Salustri, Filippo A.

    UncorrectedProof 1Wikis in Design Engineering Research 2Filippo A. Sal AU1ustri and Janaka S. Weerasinghe 3Abstract Wiki technology has been successfully used for collaboration in various 4settings. Wikis design research occurs and how wikis 6can be used to support it. The authors observed, and report on

  3. Programme Grants ENGINEERING AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES RESEARCH COUNCIL

    E-print Network

    Edinburgh, University of

    Programme Grants ENGINEERING AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES RESEARCH COUNCIL Susan Peacock, ICT Portfolio Manager #12;What is a Programme Grant? Programme grants are a flexible mechanism to provide funding grant gives leading researchers the stability of long-term funding allowing them the flexibility

  4. UNIVERSITY INTERNSHIPS Boston University College of Engineering -Research Experience for

    E-print Network

    Sun, Yi

    UNIVERSITY INTERNSHIPS Boston University College of Engineering - Research Experience Internships: http://www.ptei.org/interior.php?pageID=61 Sackler Institute of Graduate Biomedical Sciences-Kettering Institute - Summer Research Internship Program: http://www.mskcc.org/mskcc/html/10150.cfm University

  5. Researchers Dispute Notion that America Lacks Scientists and Engineers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monastersky, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Researchers who track the American labor market told Congress last week that, contrary to conventional wisdom, the United States has more than enough scientists and engineers and that federal agencies and universities should reform the way they train young scientists to better match the supply of scientists with the demand for researchers. At a…

  6. A Dataset Search Engine for the Research Document Corpus

    E-print Network

    Greenberg, Albert

    A Dataset Search Engine for the Research Document Corpus Meiyu Lu # , Srinivas Bangalore , Graham no useful tools for researchers to understand which datasets have been used for what purpose, or in what prior work. Instead, they have to manually browse through papers to find suitable datasets

  7. A Dataset Search Engine for the Research Document Corpus

    E-print Network

    Cormode, Graham

    A Dataset Search Engine for the Research Document Corpus Meiyu Lu # , Srinivas Bangalore , Graham a proposed idea or system is to evaluate over a suitable dataset. However, to this date there have been no useful tools for researchers to understand which datasets have been used for what purpose, or in what

  8. Developing Research Skills for Civil Engineers: A Library Contribution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, C. S.; Brameld, G. H.

    1990-01-01

    A library instruction program has been instituted in civil engineering at the Queensland University of Technology (Australia) in an effort to improve the research skills of fourth year students working on research projects. Students with extended library instruction were found to have better information-seeking behavior than others. (Author/MSE)

  9. An Overview of NASA Engine Ice-Crystal Icing Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Veres, Joseph P.

    2011-01-01

    Ice accretions that have formed inside gas turbine engines as a result of flight in clouds of high concentrations of ice crystals in the atmosphere have recently been identified as an aviation safety hazard. NASA s Aviation Safety Program (AvSP) has made plans to conduct research in this area to address the hazard. This paper gives an overview of NASA s engine ice-crystal icing research project plans. Included are the rationale, approach, and details of various aspects of NASA s research.

  10. Lamper, Karen Teresa From: UM Research Listserv on behalf of Lamper,

    E-print Network

    Shyu, Mei-Ling

    the George E. Brown, Jr. Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES). NEES was established by NSF Coordination Office (NCO), Computational Modeling and Simulation Center (SimCenter), and Post-Disaster, Rapid as a distributed, multi-user, national research infrastructure for earthquake engineering through a facility

  11. The 1868 Hayward Earthquake Alliance: A Case Study - Using an Earthquake Anniversary to Promote Earthquake Preparedness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocher, T. M.; Garcia, S.; Aagaard, B. T.; Boatwright, J. J.; Dawson, T.; Hellweg, M.; Knudsen, K. L.; Perkins, J.; Schwartz, D. P.; Stoffer, P. W.; Zoback, M.

    2008-12-01

    Last October 21st marked the 140th anniversary of the M6.8 1868 Hayward Earthquake, the last damaging earthquake on the southern Hayward Fault. This anniversary was used to help publicize the seismic hazards associated with the fault because: (1) the past five such earthquakes on the Hayward Fault occurred about 140 years apart on average, and (2) the Hayward-Rodgers Creek Fault system is the most likely (with a 31 percent probability) fault in the Bay Area to produce a M6.7 or greater earthquake in the next 30 years. To promote earthquake awareness and preparedness, over 140 public and private agencies and companies and many individual joined the public-private nonprofit 1868 Hayward Earthquake Alliance (1868alliance.org). The Alliance sponsored many activities including a public commemoration at Mission San Jose in Fremont, which survived the 1868 earthquake. This event was followed by an earthquake drill at Bay Area schools involving more than 70,000 students. The anniversary prompted the Silver Sentinel, an earthquake response exercise based on the scenario of an earthquake on the Hayward Fault conducted by Bay Area County Offices of Emergency Services. 60 other public and private agencies also participated in this exercise. The California Seismic Safety Commission and KPIX (CBS affiliate) produced professional videos designed forschool classrooms promoting Drop, Cover, and Hold On. Starting in October 2007, the Alliance and the U.S. Geological Survey held a sequence of press conferences to announce the release of new research on the Hayward Fault as well as new loss estimates for a Hayward Fault earthquake. These included: (1) a ShakeMap for the 1868 Hayward earthquake, (2) a report by the U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics forecasting the number of employees, employers, and wages predicted to be within areas most strongly shaken by a Hayward Fault earthquake, (3) new estimates of the losses associated with a Hayward Fault earthquake, (4) new ground motion simulations of a Hayward Fault earthquake, (5) a new USGS Fact Sheet about the earthquake and the Hayward Fault, (6) a virtual tour of the 1868 earthquake, and (7) a new online field trip guide to the Hayward Fault using locations accessible by car and public transit. Finally, the California Geological Survey and many other Alliance members sponsored the Third Conference on Earthquake Hazards in the East Bay at CSU East Bay in Hayward for the three days following the 140th anniversary. The 1868 Alliance hopes to commemorate the anniversary of the 1868 Hayward Earthquake every year to maintain and increase public awareness of this fault, the hazards it and other East Bay Faults pose, and the ongoing need for earthquake preparedness and mitigation.

  12. NASA Lewis Research Center/University Graduate Research Program on Engine Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center established a graduate research program in support of the Engine Structures Research activities. This graduate research program focuses mainly on structural and dynamics analyses, computational mechanics, mechanics of composites and structural optimization. The broad objectives of the program, the specific program, the participating universities and the program status are briefly described.

  13. Nonlinear processes in earthquakes

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, E.M.; Frohlich, C.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Three-dimensional, elastic-wave-propagation calculations were performed to define the effects of near-source geologic structure on the degree to which seismic signals produced by earthquakes resemble {open_quotes}non-double-couple{close_quotes} sources. Signals from sources embedded in a subducting slab showed significant phase and amplitude differences compared with a {open_quotes}no-slab{close_quotes} case. Modifications to the LANL elastic-wave propagation code enabled improved simulations of path effects on earthquake and explosion signals. These simulations demonstrate that near-source, shallow, low-velocity basins can introduce earthquake-like features into explosion signatures through conversion of compressive (P-wave) energy to shear (S- and R-wave) modes. Earthquake sources simulated to date do not show significant modifications.

  14. Research on lossless detection technology of aero-engine blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wangsheng; Zhai, Xuhua; Zhang, Chijun

    2007-12-01

    The paper presents an Airflow Detection Method to realize detections of aero-engine blades shape, and validates the development technology of engine blade shape, the design method of 3D blade optimizing, distributing rules of parameters for surface airflow and matching between airflow performance and models attaching surface shape, and research and analysis on numerical simulation method. The authors developed the design method of blade shape, and got an important achievement on theory of technology of blade shape design, High-powered blade shape modeling is the key technology of modern aero-engine development. By utilizing airflow detection method, one can perform lossless detection for aero-engine blade shape, offer effective method and key technology of research on high-powered gas compress.

  15. Tissue Engineering Organs for Space Biology Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, H. H.; Shansky, J.; DelTatto, M.; Lee, P.; Meir, J.

    1999-01-01

    Long-term manned space flight requires a better understanding of skeletal muscle atrophy resulting from microgravity. Atrophy most likely results from changes at both the systemic level (e.g. decreased circulating growth hormone, increased circulating glucocorticoids) and locally (e.g. decreased myofiber resting tension). Differentiated skeletal myofibers in tissue culture have provided a model system over the last decade for gaining a better understanding of the interactions of exogenous growth factors, endogenous growth factors, and muscle fiber tension in regulating protein turnover rates and muscle cell growth. Tissue engineering these cells into three dimensional bioartificial muscle (BAM) constructs has allowed us to extend their use to Space flight studies for the potential future development of countermeasures.

  16. Summaries of FY 1995 engineering research

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    The individual engineering project summaries follow the program overview. The summaries are ordered alphabetically by name of institution and so the table of contents lists all the institutions at which projects were sponsored in fiscal year 1995. Each project entry begins with an institutional-departmental heading. The names of investigators are listed immediately below the title. The funding level for fiscal year 1995 appears to the right of title; it is followed by the budget activity number. These numbers categorize the projects for budgetary purposes and the categories are described in the budget number index. A separate index of Principal Investigators includes phone number, fax number and e-mail address, where available. The fiscal year in which either the project began or was renewed and the anticipated duration in years are indicated respectively by the first two and last digits of the sequence directly below the budget activity number. The summary description of the project completes the entry.

  17. Fundamental heat transfer research for gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, D. E. (editor)

    1980-01-01

    Thirty-seven experts from industry and the universities joined 24 NASA Lewis staff members in an exchange of ideas on trends in aeropropulsion research and technology, basic analyses, computational analyses, basic experiments, near-engine environment experiments, fundamental fluid mechanics and heat transfer, and hot technology as related to gas turbine engines. The workshop proceedings described include pre-workshop input from participants, presentations of current activity by the Lewis staff, reports of the four working groups, and a workshop summary.

  18. General aviation internal combustion engine research programs at NASA-Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, E. A.

    1978-01-01

    An update is presented of non-turbine general aviation engine programs underway at the NASA-Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The program encompasses conventional, lightweight diesel and rotary engines. Its three major thrusts are: (a) reduced SFC's; (b) improved fuels tolerance; and (c) reducing emissions. Current and planned future programs in such areas as lean operation, improved fuel management, advanced cooling techniques and advanced engine concepts, are described. These are expected to lay the technology base, by the mid to late 1980's, for engines whose life cycle fuel costs are 30 to 50% lower than today's conventional engines.

  19. Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council Mathematical sciences research

    E-print Network

    Painter, Kevin

    ) commissioned an independent study which has shown that 10 per cent of jobs and 16 per cent of Gross Value Added techniques to maximise the amount of information that can be transmitted · Weather forecasting is based mathematics research that can have an impact. Research from the last century has paved the way for technology

  20. Hypersonic engine seal development at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.

    1994-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center is developing advanced seal concepts and sealing technology for advanced combined cycle ramjet/scramjet engines being designed for the National Aerospace Plane (NASP). Technologies are being developed for both the dynamic seals that seal the sliding interfaces between articulating engine panels and sidewalls, and for the static seals that seal the heat exchanger to back-up structure interfaces. This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of the candidate engine seal concepts, seal material assessments, and unique test facilities used to assess the leakage and thermal performance of the seal concepts.

  1. Hypersonic engine seal development at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.

    1994-07-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center is developing advanced seal concepts and sealing technology for advanced combined cycle ramjet/scramjet engines being designed for the National Aerospace Plane (NASP). Technologies are being developed for both the dynamic seals that seal the sliding interfaces between articulating engine panels and sidewalls, and for the static seals that seal the heat exchanger to back-up structure interfaces. This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of the candidate engine seal concepts, seal material assessments, and unique test facilities used to assess the leakage and thermal performance of the seal concepts.

  2. Sharing Research Models: Using Software Engineering Practices for Facilitation

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Stephanie P.; Solano, Eric; Cantor, Susanna; Cooley, Philip C.; Wagener, Diane K.

    2011-01-01

    Increasingly, researchers are turning to computational models to understand the interplay of important variables on systems’ behaviors. Although researchers may develop models that meet the needs of their investigation, application limitations—such as nonintuitive user interface features and data input specifications—may limit the sharing of these tools with other research groups. By removing these barriers, other research groups that perform related work can leverage these work products to expedite their own investigations. The use of software engineering practices can enable managed application production and shared research artifacts among multiple research groups by promoting consistent models, reducing redundant effort, encouraging rigorous peer review, and facilitating research collaborations that are supported by a common toolset. This report discusses three established software engineering practices— the iterative software development process, object-oriented methodology, and Unified Modeling Language—and the applicability of these practices to computational model development. Our efforts to modify the MIDAS TranStat application to make it more user-friendly are presented as an example of how computational models that are based on research and developed using software engineering practices can benefit a broader audience of researchers. PMID:21687780

  3. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Constructing new seismograms from old earthquakes:1

    E-print Network

    and earthquake seismology settings,13 using both active seismic sources and ambient seismic noise to construct propagation between earthquakes and seismometers. Recent developments in the30 field of seismic or wavefield.: RETROSPECTIVE SEISMOLOGY BY SOURCE-RECEIVER INTERFEROMETRY Abstract. If energy emitted by a seismic source

  4. Earthquake Simulator Finds Tremor Triggers

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Paul

    2015-03-27

    Using a novel device that simulates earthquakes in a laboratory setting, a Los Alamos researcher has found that seismic waves-the sounds radiated from earthquakes-can induce earthquake aftershocks, often long after a quake has subsided. The research provides insight into how earthquakes may be triggered and how they recur. Los Alamos researcher Paul Johnson and colleague Chris Marone at Penn State have discovered how wave energy can be stored in certain types of granular materials-like the type found along certain fault lines across the globe-and how this stored energy can suddenly be released as an earthquake when hit by relatively small seismic waves far beyond the traditional “aftershock zone” of a main quake. Perhaps most surprising, researchers have found that the release of energy can occur minutes, hours, or even days after the sound waves pass; the cause of the delay remains a tantalizing mystery.

  5. 34 CFR 350.34 - Which Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers must have an advisory committee?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Which Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers must... Engineering Research Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.34 Which Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers must have an advisory committee? A Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center conducting...

  6. 34 CFR 350.33 - What cooperation requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Engineering Research Center meet? 350.33 Section 350.33 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department... Engineering Research Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.33 What cooperation requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet? A Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center— (a)...

  7. 34 CFR 350.34 - Which Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers must have an advisory committee?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Which Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers must... Engineering Research Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.34 Which Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers must have an advisory committee? A Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center conducting...

  8. 34 CFR 350.34 - Which Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers must have an advisory committee?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Which Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers must... Engineering Research Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.34 Which Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers must have an advisory committee? A Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center conducting...

  9. 34 CFR 350.34 - Which Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers must have an advisory committee?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Which Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers must... Engineering Research Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.34 Which Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers must have an advisory committee? A Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center conducting...

  10. 34 CFR 350.34 - Which Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers must have an advisory committee?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Which Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers must... Engineering Research Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.34 Which Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers must have an advisory committee? A Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center conducting...

  11. 34 CFR 350.33 - What cooperation requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Engineering Research Center meet? 350.33 Section 350.33 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department... Engineering Research Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.33 What cooperation requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet? A Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center— (a)...

  12. 34 CFR 350.33 - What cooperation requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Engineering Research Center meet? 350.33 Section 350.33 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department... Engineering Research Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.33 What cooperation requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet? A Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center— (a)...

  13. 34 CFR 350.33 - What cooperation requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Engineering Research Center meet? 350.33 Section 350.33 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department... Engineering Research Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.33 What cooperation requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet? A Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center— (a)...

  14. 34 CFR 350.33 - What cooperation requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Engineering Research Center meet? 350.33 Section 350.33 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department... Engineering Research Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.33 What cooperation requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet? A Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center— (a)...

  15. Title: Engineer Technician Intern Organization: Philips Research

    E-print Network

    Salvaggio, Carl

    patient outcomes while lowering the burden on the healthcare system. Philips delivers advanced solutions healthcare whether in hospital or at home. Philips Research North America (PRNA) has a broad range estimation and image registration is required for this position. A thorough understanding of ultrasound image

  16. Chemical Engineering Division research highlights, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Burris, L.; Webster, D. S.; Barney, D. L.; Cafasso, F. A.; Steindler, M. J.

    1980-06-01

    In 1979, CEN conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) high-temperature, rechargeable lithium/iron sulfide batteries for electric vehicles and electric utility load leveling; (2) ambient-temperature batteries - improved lead-acid, nickel/zinc, and nickel/iron - for electric vehicles; (3) molten carbonate fuel cells for use by electric utilities; (4) coal technology - mainly fluidized-bed combustion of coal in the presence of SO/sub 2/ sorbent of limestone; (5) heat- and seed- recovery technology for open-cycle magnetohydrodynamic systems; (6) solar energy collectors and thermal energy storage; (7) fast breeder reactor chemistry research - chemical support of reactor safety studies, chemistry of irradiated fuels, and sodium technology; (8) fuel cycle technology - reprocessing of nuclear fuels, management of nuclear wastes, geologic migration studies, and proof-of-breeding studies for the Light Water Breeder Reactor; (9) magnetic fusion research - lithium processing technology and materials research; and (10) basic energy sciences - homogeneous catalysis, thermodynamics of inorganic and organic materials, environmental chemistry, electrochemistry, and physical properties of salt vapors. Separate abstracts were prepared for each of these areas.

  17. GREMEX update (Goddard research engineering management exercise)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaccaro, M. J.; Denault, M. F.

    1973-01-01

    Management simulation techniques offer training in management problems. Exercise was developed to provide experience in research and development project decision making from management rather than technological perspective. Program and documentation have been revised innumerable times in past. Described report is revised version as it exists to date.

  18. REFERENCE DATA MODELS FOR SUPPORTING THE NETWORK FOR EARTHQUAKE

    E-print Network

    Stanford University

    REFERENCE DATA MODELS FOR SUPPORTING THE NETWORK FOR EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING SIMULATION (NEES) Jun Simulation) is a national, networked resource for next-generation experimental earthquake engineering-infrastructure for earthquake experimentation and simulation. This paper describes an effort in developing reference data models

  19. Engineering Design Thinking and Information Gathering. Final Report. Research in Engineering and Technology Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mentzer, Nathan

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this research was to explore the relationship between information access and design solution quality of high school students presented with an engineering design problem. This objective is encompassed in the research question driving this inquiry: How does information access impact the design process? This question has emerged in…

  20. Initiatives to Reduce Earthquake Risk of Developing Countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, B. E.

    2008-12-01

    The seventeen-year-and-counting history of the Palo Alto-based nonprofit organization GeoHazards International (GHI) is the story of many initiatives within a larger initiative to increase the societal impact of geophysics and civil engineering. GHI's mission is to reduce death and suffering due to earthquakes and other natural hazards in the world's most vulnerable communities through preparedness, mitigation and advocacy. GHI works by raising awareness in these communities about their risk and about affordable methods to manage it, identifying and strengthening institutions in these communities to manage their risk, and advocating improvement in natural disaster management. Some of GHI's successful initiatives include: (1) creating an earthquake scenario for Quito, Ecuador that describes in lay terms the consequences for that city of a probable earthquake; (2) improving the curricula of Pakistani university courses about seismic retrofitting; (3) training employees of the Public Works Department of Delhi, India on assessing the seismic vulnerability of critical facilities such as a school, a hospital, a police headquarters, and city hall; (4) assessing the vulnerability of the Library of Tibetan Works and Archives in Dharamsala, India; (5) developing a seismic hazard reduction plan for a nonprofit organization in Kathmandu, Nepal that works to manage Nepal's seismic risk; and (6) assisting in the formulation of a resolution by the Council of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to promote school earthquake safety among OECD member countries. GHI's most important resource, in addition to its staff and Board of Trustees, is its members and volunteer advisors, who include some of the world's leading earth scientists, earthquake engineers, urban planners and architects, from the academic, public, private and nonprofit sectors. GHI is planning several exciting initiatives in the near future. One would oversee the design and construction of an earthquake- and tsunami-resistant structure in Sumatra to house a tsunami museum, a community training center, and offices of a local NGO that is preparing Padang for the next tsunami. This facility would be designed and built by a team of US and Indonesian academics, architects, engineers and students. Another initiative would launch a collaborative research program on school earthquake safety with the scientists and engineers from the US and the ten Islamic countries that comprise the Economic Cooperation Organization. Finally, GHI hopes to develop internet and satellite communication techniques that will allow earthquake risk managers in the US to interact with masons, government officials, engineers and architects in remote communities of vulnerable developing countries, closing the science and engineering divide.

  1. Preliminary Report of Java Earthquake Disaster on May 27, 2006 Atsushi Iizuka,

    E-print Network

    Takiguchi, Tetsuya

    , in the emergency medical care, and 2) to investigate the earthquake damages from the engineering viewpoint, these damages due to the earthquake are shown using photographs taken at the site. 2006 5 27 Key words: Java earthquake on May 27, 2006, Damages due to the earthquake, Earthquake disaster 2006 5 27 YogyakartaM6.2 5

  2. Performance Engineering Research Center and RECOVERY. Performance Engineering Research Institution SciDAC-e Augmentation. Performance enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Hollingsworth, Jeffrey K.

    2015-10-12

    This project concentrated on various ways to improve the measurement and tuning large-scale parallel applications. This project was supplement to the project DE-FC0206ER25763 (“Performance Engineering Research Center”). The research conducted during this project is summarized in this report. The complete details of the work are available in the ten publications listed at the end of the report. It also supported the Ph.D. studies of three students and one research scientist.

  3. The collaborative program of research in engineering sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Hardt, D.E. . Energy Lab.)

    1992-09-01

    In 1985, the Energy Laboratory of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) began a collaborative program of energy-related engineering research. This program was extended for another three years starting in January 1991. The program continues to pursue three broad goals: to perform quality research on energy-related technologies involved in industrial processes and productivity; to demonstrate the potential of collaborative programs between universities and the national laboratories; and to encourage the transfer of the technology developed to the industrial sector. This annual report describes progress at MIT under the MIT/INEL program during the past year.

  4. Earthquake Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donovan, Neville

    1979-01-01

    Provides a survey and a review of earthquake activity and global tectonics from the advancement of the theory of continental drift to the present. Topics include: an identification of the major seismic regions of the earth, seismic measurement techniques, seismic design criteria for buildings, and the prediction of earthquakes. (BT)

  5. Earthquake prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turcotte, Donald L.

    1991-01-01

    The state of the art in earthquake prediction is discussed. Short-term prediction based on seismic precursors, changes in the ratio of compressional velocity to shear velocity, tilt and strain precursors, electromagnetic precursors, hydrologic phenomena, chemical monitors, and animal behavior is examined. Seismic hazard assessment is addressed, and the applications of dynamical systems to earthquake prediction are discussed.

  6. THE IMPACT OF THERMAL ENGINEERING RESEARCH ON GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Phelan, Patrick; Abdelaziz, Omar; Otanicar, Todd; Phelan, Bernadette; Prasher, Ravi; Taylor, Robert; Tyagi, Himanshu

    2014-01-01

    Global climate change is recognized by many people around the world as being one of the most pressing issues facing our society today. The thermal engineering research community clearly plays an important role in addressing this critical issue, but what kind of thermal engineering research is, or will be, most impactful? In other words, in what directions should thermal engineering research be targeted in order to derive the greatest benefit with respect to global climate change? To answer this question we consider the potential reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, coupled with potential economic impacts, resulting from thermal engineering research. Here a new model framework is introduced that allows a technological, sector-by-sector analysis of GHG emissions avoidance. For each sector, we consider the maximum reduction in CO2 emissions due to such research, and the cost effectiveness of the new efficient technologies. The results are normalized on a country-by-country basis, where we consider the USA, the European Union, China, India, and Australia as representative countries or regions. Among energy supply-side technologies, improvements in coal-burning power generation are seen as having the most beneficial CO2 and economic impacts. The one demand-side technology considered, residential space cooling, offers positive but limited impacts. The proposed framework can be extended to include additional technologies and impacts, such as water consumption.

  7. Global earthquake casualties due to secondary effects: A quantitative analysis for improving rapid loss analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marano, K.D.; Wald, D.J.; Allen, T.I.

    2010-01-01

    This study presents a quantitative and geospatial description of global losses due to earthquake-induced secondary effects, including landslide, liquefaction, tsunami, and fire for events during the past 40 years. These processes are of great importance to the US Geological Survey's (USGS) Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response (PAGER) system, which is currently being developed to deliver rapid earthquake impact and loss assessments following large/significant global earthquakes. An important question is how dominant are losses due to secondary effects (and under what conditions, and in which regions)? Thus, which of these effects should receive higher priority research efforts in order to enhance PAGER's overall assessment of earthquakes losses and alerting for the likelihood of secondary impacts? We find that while 21.5% of fatal earthquakes have deaths due to secondary (non-shaking) causes, only rarely are secondary effects the main cause of fatalities. The recent 2004 Great Sumatra-Andaman Islands earthquake is a notable exception, with extraordinary losses due to tsunami. The potential for secondary hazards varies greatly, and systematically, due to regional geologic and geomorphic conditions. Based on our findings, we have built country-specific disclaimers for PAGER that address potential for each hazard (Earle et al., Proceedings of the 14th World Conference of the Earthquake Engineering, Beijing, China, 2008). We will now focus on ways to model casualties from secondary effects based on their relative importance as well as their general predictability. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009.

  8. Global Earthquake Casualties due to Secondary Effects: A Quantitative Analysis for Improving PAGER Losses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wald, David J.

    2010-01-01

    This study presents a quantitative and geospatial description of global losses due to earthquake-induced secondary effects, including landslide, liquefaction, tsunami, and ?re for events during the past 40 years. These processes are of great importance to the US Geological Survey’s (USGS) Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response (PAGER) system, which is currently being developed to deliver rapid earthquake impact and loss assessments following large/signi?cant global earthquakes. An important question is how dominant are losses due to secondary effects (and under what conditions, and in which regions)? Thus, which of these effects should receive higher priority research efforts in order to enhance PAGER’s overall assessment of earthquakes losses and alerting for the likelihood of secondary impacts? We ?nd that while 21.5% of fatal earthquakes have deaths due to secondary (non-shaking) causes, only rarely are secondary effects the main cause of fatalities. The recent 2004 Great Sumatra–Andaman Islands earthquake is a notable exception, with extraordinary losses due to tsunami. The potential for secondary hazards varies greatly, and systematically, due to regional geologic and geomorphic conditions. Based on our ?ndings, we have built country-speci?c disclaimers for PAGER that address potential for each hazard (Earle et al., Proceedings of the 14th World Conference of the Earthquake Engineering, Beijing, China, 2008). We will now focus on ways to model casualties from secondary effects based on their relative importance as well as their general predictability.

  9. Earthquake Hazard and the Environmental Seismic Intensity (ESI) Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serva, Leonello; Vittori, Eutizio; Comerci, Valerio; Esposito, Eliana; Guerrieri, Luca; Michetti, Alessandro Maria; Mohammadioun, Bagher; Mohammadioun, Georgianna C.; Porfido, Sabina; Tatevossian, Ruben E.

    2015-10-01

    The main objective of this paper was to introduce the Environmental Seismic Intensity scale (ESI), a new scale developed and tested by an interdisciplinary group of scientists (geologists, geophysicists and seismologists) in the frame of the International Union for Quaternary Research (INQUA) activities, to the widest community of earth scientists and engineers dealing with seismic hazard assessment. This scale defines earthquake intensity by taking into consideration the occurrence, size and areal distribution of earthquake environmental effects (EEE), including surface faulting, tectonic uplift and subsidence, landslides, rock falls, liquefaction, ground collapse and tsunami waves. Indeed, EEEs can significantly improve the evaluation of seismic intensity, which still remains a critical parameter for a realistic seismic hazard assessment, allowing to compare historical and modern earthquakes. Moreover, as shown by recent moderate to large earthquakes, geological effects often cause severe damage"; therefore, their consideration in the earthquake risk scenario is crucial for all stakeholders, especially urban planners, geotechnical and structural engineers, hazard analysts, civil protection agencies and insurance companies. The paper describes background and construction principles of the scale and presents some case studies in different continents and tectonic settings to illustrate its relevant benefits. ESI is normally used together with traditional intensity scales, which, unfortunately, tend to saturate in the highest degrees. In this case and in unpopulated areas, ESI offers a unique way for assessing a reliable earthquake intensity. Finally, yet importantly, the ESI scale also provides a very convenient guideline for the survey of EEEs in earthquake-stricken areas, ensuring they are catalogued in a complete and homogeneous manner.

  10. An overview of NASA intermittent combustion engine research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, E. A.; Wintucky, W. T.

    1984-01-01

    This paper overviews the current program, whose objective is to establish the generic technology base for advanced aircraft I.C. engines of the early 1990's and beyond. The major emphasis of this paper is on development of the past two years. Past studies and ongoing confirmatory experimental efforts are reviewed, which show unexpectly high potential when modern aerospace technologies are applied to inherently compact and balanced I.C. engine configurations. Currently, the program is focussed on two engine concepts the stratified-charge, multi-fuel rotary, and the lightweight two-stroke diesel. A review is given of contracted and planned high performance one-rotor and one-cylinder test engine work addressing several levels of technology. Also reviewed are basic supporting efforts, e.g., the development and experimental validation of computerized airflow and combustion process models, being performed in-house at Lewis Research Center and by university grants.

  11. Earthquakes and the urban environment. Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Berlin, G.L.

    1980-01-01

    Because of the complex nature of earthquake effects, current investigations encompass many disciplines, including those of both the physical and social sciences. Research activities center on such diversified topics as earthquake mechanics, earthquake prediction and control, the prompt and accurate detection of tsunamis (seismic sea waves), earthquake-resistant construction, seismic building code improvements, land use zoning, earthquake risk and hazard perception, disaster preparedness, plus the study of the concerns and fears of people who have experienced the effects of an earthquake. This monograph attempts to amalgamate recent research input comprising the vivifying components of urban seismology at a level useful to those having an interest in the earthquake and its effects upon an urban environment. Volume 1 contains chapters on earthquake parameters and hazards.

  12. Earthquakes and the urban environment. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Berlin, G.L.

    1980-01-01

    Because of the complex nature of earthquake effects, current investigations encompass many disciplines, including those of both the physical and social sciences. Research activities center on such diversified topics as earthquake mechanics, earthquake prediction and control, the prompt and accurate detection of tsunamis (seismic sea waves), earthquake-resistant construction, seismic building code improvements, land use zoning, earthquake risk and hazard perception, disaster preparedness, plus the study of the concerns and fears of people who have experienced the effects of an earthquake. This monograph attempts to amalgamate recent research input comprising the vivifying components of urban seismology at a level useful to those having an interest in the earthquake and its effects upon an urban environment. Volume 2 contains chapters on earthquake prediction, control, building design and building response.

  13. Proceedings of 2008 NSF Engineering Research and Innovation Conference, Knoxville, Tennessee Grant # CMMI-0423485 Multiscale Design of Functionally Graded Materials

    E-print Network

    Vel, Senthil

    Proceedings of 2008 NSF Engineering Research and Innovation Conference, Knoxville, Tennessee Grant: Engineering Design #12;Proceedings of 2008 NSF Engineering Research and Innovation Conference, Knoxville Andrew J. Goupee Graduate Research Assistant Department of Mechanical Engineering University of Maine

  14. Research reactor usage at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in support of university research and education

    SciTech Connect

    Woodall, D.M.; Dolan, T.J.; Stephens, A.G. )

    1990-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is a US Department of Energy laboratory which has a substantial history of research and development in nuclear reactor technologies. There are a number of available nuclear reactor facilities which have been incorporated into the research and training needs of university nuclear engineering programs. This paper addresses the utilization of the Advanced Reactivity Measurement Facility (ARMF) and the Coupled Fast Reactivity Measurement Facility (CFRMF) for thesis and dissertation research in the PhD program in Nuclear Science and Engineering by the University of Idaho and Idaho State University. Other reactors at the INEL are also being used by various members of the academic community for thesis and dissertation research, as well as for research to advance the state of knowledge in innovative nuclear technologies, with the EBR-II facility playing an essential role in liquid metal breeder reactor research. 3 refs.

  15. Engineering research, development and technology. Thrust area report, FY93

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the technical staff, tools, and facilities needed to support current and future LLNL programs. The efforts are guided by a dual-benefit research and development strategy that supports Department of Energy missions, such as national security through nuclear deterrence and economic competitiveness through partnerships with U.S. industry. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes the activities for the fiscal year 1993. The report provides timely summaries of objectives, methods, and results from nine thrust areas for this fiscal year: Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics; Computational Mechanics; Diagnostics and Microelectronics; Fabrication Technology; Materials Science and Engineering; Power Conversion Technologies; Nondestructive Evaluation; Remote Sensing, Imaging, and Signal Engineering; and Emerging Technologies. Separate abstracts were prepared for 47 papers in this report.

  16. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 0, NO. 0, PAGES 0-0, M 0, 2001 Slip-length scaling in large earthquakes: Observations

    E-print Network

    Shaw, Bruce E.

    earthquakes: Observations and theory and implications for earthquake physics Bruce E. Shaw and Christopher H there has been a dilemma in earthquake physics, because the observed scaling law for large earthquakes did not appear to be consistent with the stress-drop invariance of small earthquake scaling. Surpris- ingly, slip

  17. 34 CFR 350.32 - What activities must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...activities must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center conduct? 350.32 Section...EDUCATION DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM What Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers Does the Secretary...

  18. 34 CFR 350.32 - What activities must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...activities must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center conduct? 350.32 Section...EDUCATION DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM What Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers Does the Secretary...

  19. 76 FR 37085 - Applications for New Awards; Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers (RERCs)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... Applications for New Awards; Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers (RERCs) AGENCY: Office of Special... Research Projects and Centers Program--Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers (RERCs). Notice inviting... authorized under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended (Rehabilitation Act). Rehabilitation...

  20. Metallurgical Research Engineer AK Steel, a leading producer of carbon, stainless and electrical steels, has an

    E-print Network

    Prodiæ, Aleksandar

    AK STEEL Metallurgical Research Engineer AK Steel, a leading producer of carbon, stainless and electrical steels, has an immediate opening for an Engineer in its Research & Innovation Center located development teams · Performing metallurgical research to support steel product development · Organizing

  1. 1. CHANNEL DIMENSIONS AND ALIGNMENT RESEARCH INSTRUMENTATION. ENGINEERING TECHNICIAN WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. CHANNEL DIMENSIONS AND ALIGNMENT RESEARCH INSTRUMENTATION. ENGINEERING TECHNICIAN WITH VIDEO-CONTROLED MODEL BOAT IN MODEL NAVIGATION CHANNEL. NOTE CONTROL TRAILER IN BACKGROUND. - Waterways Experiment Station, Hydraulics Laboratory, Halls Ferry Road, 2 miles south of I-20, Vicksburg, Warren County, MS

  2. Principal Research Engineer Cooper Tire and Rubber Company,

    E-print Network

    Fatemi, Ali

    W. V. Mars Principal Research Engineer Cooper Tire and Rubber Company, 701 Lima Ave., Findlay, Ohio Natural Rubber Under Monotonic and Cyclic Multiaxial Stress States This work explores the monotonic and cyclic behaviors of filled, natural rubber. Results of stress-strain experiments conducted under stress

  3. Graduate Research in Technology and Engineering Education: 2000-2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, W. Tad

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to amass as comprehensive a collection of dissertations and theses in technology and engineering education as possible, and to conduct a modified meta-analysis of this body of research. The current study was limited to dissertations and theses completed between 2000 and 2009 that were identified using the ProQuest…

  4. The Research Proposal in Biomechanical and Biological Engineering Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Roger G.; Nollert, Matthias U.; Schmidtke, David W.; Sikavitsas, Vassilios I.

    2006-01-01

    Students in four biochemical and biological engineering courses for upper-­level undergraduates and graduate students were required to write a research proposal. Breaking the requirements down into segments (such as a summary with specific aims, rough draft, and final draft) due on different dates helped make the assignment more manageable for the…

  5. Engineering graphics and image processing at Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voigt, Susan J.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of making raster graphics and image processing techniques readily available for the analysis and display of engineering and scientific data is stated. The approach is to develop and acquire tools and skills which are applied to support research activities in such disciplines as aeronautics and structures. A listing of grants and key personnel are given.

  6. 2. CHANNEL DIMENSIONS AND ALIGNMENT RESEARCH INSTRUMENTATION. HYDRAULIC ENGINEER PILOTING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. CHANNEL DIMENSIONS AND ALIGNMENT RESEARCH INSTRUMENTATION. HYDRAULIC ENGINEER PILOTING VIDEO-CONTROLED BOAT MODEL FROM CONTROL TRAILER. NOTE VIEW FROM BOAT-MOUNTED VIDEO CAMERA SHOWN ON MONITOR, AND MODEL WATERWAY VISIBLE THROUGH WINDOW AT LEFT. - Waterways Experiment Station, Hydraulics Laboratory, Halls Ferry Road, 2 miles south of I-20, Vicksburg, Warren County, MS

  7. MEMS Research Lab, EL-104 College of Engineering

    E-print Network

    Kassegne, Samuel Kinde

    MEMS Research Lab, EL-104 College of Engineering 5500 Campanile Drive, San Diego CA 92182-1323 Tel: 619-594-1815 Fax: 619-594-3599 SDSU MEMS CLEANROOM CERTIFICATION PROGRAM Every new student with intention to work in SDSU MEMS cleanroom facility has to complete the SDSU MEMS Lithography certification

  8. Power Systems Engineering Research Center PSERC Background Paper

    E-print Network

    Power Systems Engineering Research Center PSERC Background Paper Analyzing Blackout Events of the disturbance event that were made available in the Bonneville Power #12;2 Administration (BPA) control area. There were three teams mainly in the simulation: 1) BPA, Portland, WA, 2) Powertech Labs, Vancouver, BC

  9. Research paper Engineering of recombinant antibody fragments to methamphetamine

    E-print Network

    Georgiou, George

    Research paper Engineering of recombinant antibody fragments to methamphetamine by anchored November 2005 Abstract The detection of methamphetamine and other chemically related illicit drugs relies extensively on immunoassays. Here we report the cloning and affinity maturation of an anti-methamphetamine

  10. Power Systems Engineering Research Center PSERC Background Paper

    E-print Network

    the shortest route from the generator to the load. Instead, electric power flows through the transmission system based on the relative resistance to power flows of each transmission line across the systemPower Systems Engineering Research Center PSERC Background Paper Power System Operations

  11. Power Systems Engineering Research Center PSERC Background Paper

    E-print Network

    Power Systems Engineering Research Center PSERC Background Paper The New Electric Power Business-tuned, economically efficient, and technically-reliable electric power system. The creation of new information and the flow of that information among the various players is at the heart of restructuring. The power

  12. Entropy, Disease, and New Opportunities for Chemical Engineering Research

    E-print Network

    Deem, Michael W.

    Entropy, Disease, and New Opportunities for Chemical Engineering Research Michael W. Deem Rice, autoimmune disease Executive Summary R andomness, diversity, fluctuations, and correlations play a significant role in disease, disease treatment, and the immune response to disease. I suggest that statistical

  13. ENGINEERING FEATURES OF THE FUSION IGNITION RESEARCH EXPERIMENT (FIRE)

    E-print Network

    ENGINEERING FEATURES OF THE FUSION IGNITION RESEARCH EXPERIMENT (FIRE) R.J. Thomea and P.J. Heitzenroederb for the FIRE Design Team a MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, 185 Albany St, Cambridge, MA, USA Box 451, Princeton, NJ, USA 08543 The FIRE tokamak is an option for the next step in the US magnetic

  14. 75 FR 28593 - Board on Coastal Engineering Research

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-21

    ...In accordance with Section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), announcement is made of the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Board on Coastal Engineering Research. Date of Meeting: June 22-24, 2010. Place: Hudson Ballroom, Hyatt Regency Jersey City on the Hudson, 2 Exchange Place, Jersey City, NJ...

  15. Proceedings of the School of Engineering Nanotechnology Research Forum

    E-print Network

    Chandy, John A.

    #12;Proceedings of the School of Engineering Nanotechnology Research Forum Mehdi Anwar Mun Y. Choi fundamental in their impact on our world, that they are regarded as transformative. Nanotechnology may very-billionth of a meter. Because nanotechnology involves the manipulation of matter at the atomic or cellular level

  16. Formulating a Concept Base for Secondary Level Engineering: A Review and Synthesis. Research in Engineering and Technology Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Custer, Rodney L.; Daugherty, Jenny L.; Meyer, Joseph P.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify and refine a conceptual foundation for secondary school engineering education. Specifically, this study sought to address the following research questions: (1) What engineering concepts are present in literature related to the nature and philosophy of engineering?; (2) What engineering concepts are embedded…

  17. The Solid Earth Research Virtual Observatory: A web-based system for modeling multi-scale earthquake processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnellan, A.; Fox, G.; Rundle, J.; McLeod, D.; Tullis, T.; Grant, L.; Parker, J.; Pierce, M.; Lyzenga, G.; Chen, A.; Lou, J.

    2002-12-01

    We are building a new Problem Solving Environment for use by the seismological, crustal deformation, and tectonics communities for developing an understanding of active tectonic and earthquake processes. The top-level operational architecture of our solid earth research virtual observatory (SERVO) shows science users interacting with interface programs as well as modeling, simulation, and analysis tools. The general architecture follows the "Web Services" model being developed by business interests, but is applied to scientific applications and supporting software resources (such as databases). The system is divided into three tiers: a user interface layer (implemented as a browser interface), a system resource layer, and a middle control layer that maintains proxies (or brokers) to the system resources. The middle tier provides a uniform interface to the resource layer. Following the Web Services approach, we define XML interface abstractions (in WSDL) for basic services (such as File Management) and implement the interface with appropriate technologies (such as with a relational database). Communication between the services is done with an XML messaging architecture (SOAP). Our initial focus is to integrate time-dependent crustal deformation models into the system including both layered analytical and heterogeneous finite element models.

  18. NGO collaboration in community post-disaster reconstruction: field research following the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake in China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi; Xu, Jiuping

    2015-04-01

    The number of communities affected by disasters has been rising. As a result, non-governmental organisations (NGOs) that attend community post-disaster reconstruction are often unable to deliver all requirements and have to develop cooperative approaches. However, this collaboration can cause problems because of the complex environments, the fight for limited resources and uncoordinated management, all of which result in poor service delivery to the communities, adding to their woes. From extensive field research and case studies conducted in the post-Wenchuan earthquake-stricken communities, this paper introduces an integrated collaboration framework for community post-disaster reconstruction with the focus on three types of NGOs: international, government organised and civil. The proposed collaboration framework examines the three interrelated components of organisational structure, operational processes and reconstruction goals/implementation areas. Of great significance in better promoting collaborative participation between NGOs are the crucial concepts of participatory reconstruction, double-layer collaborative networks, and circular review and revision. PMID:25440408

  19. Discussion of the design of satellite-laser measurement stations in the eastern Mediterranean under the geological aspect. Contribution to the earthquake prediction research by the Wegener Group and to NASA's Crustal Dynamics Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paluska, A.; Pavoni, N.

    1983-01-01

    Research conducted for determining the location of stations for measuring crustal dynamics and predicting earthquakes is discussed. Procedural aspects, the extraregional kinematic tendencies, and regional tectonic deformation mechanisms are described.

  20. Having trouble viewing this email? Click here to view online Engineering eNews

    E-print Network

    Subramanian, Venkat

    will be recognized during the Recognition ceremony for undergraduate students on May 15. Read More Seismic Design in the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute's seismic design competition. Read More Left to Right: Alisa Ma

  1. 2015 GRADUATE STUDIES GEOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING

    E-print Network

    geotechnology, geotech- nical analysis and design, natural hazards, engineered geomaterials, sustainable Modeling · Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering · Geotechnical Seepage Analysis · Infrastructure Failure engineering; natural hazards and strong mo

  2. Earthquake impact scale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wald, D.J.; Jaiswal, K.S.; Marano, K.D.; Bausch, D.

    2011-01-01

    With the advent of the USGS prompt assessment of global earthquakes for response (PAGER) system, which rapidly assesses earthquake impacts, U.S. and international earthquake responders are reconsidering their automatic alert and activation levels and response procedures. To help facilitate rapid and appropriate earthquake response, an Earthquake Impact Scale (EIS) is proposed on the basis of two complementary criteria. On the basis of the estimated cost of damage, one is most suitable for domestic events; the other, on the basis of estimated ranges of fatalities, is generally more appropriate for global events, particularly in developing countries. Simple thresholds, derived from the systematic analysis of past earthquake impact and associated response levels, are quite effective in communicating predicted impact and response needed after an event through alerts of green (little or no impact), yellow (regional impact and response), orange (national-scale impact and response), and red (international response). Corresponding fatality thresholds for yellow, orange, and red alert levels are 1, 100, and 1,000, respectively. For damage impact, yellow, orange, and red thresholds are triggered by estimated losses reaching $1M, $100M, and $1B, respectively. The rationale for a dual approach to earthquake alerting stems from the recognition that relatively high fatalities, injuries, and homelessness predominate in countries in which local building practices typically lend themselves to high collapse and casualty rates, and these impacts lend to prioritization for international response. In contrast, financial and overall societal impacts often trigger the level of response in regions or countries in which prevalent earthquake resistant construction practices greatly reduce building collapse and resulting fatalities. Any newly devised alert, whether economic- or casualty-based, should be intuitive and consistent with established lexicons and procedures. Useful alerts should also be both specific (although allowably uncertain) and actionable. In this analysis, an attempt is made at both simple and intuitive color-coded alerting criteria; yet the necessary uncertainty measures by which one can gauge the likelihood for the alert to be over- or underestimated are preserved. The essence of the proposed impact scale and alerting is that actionable loss information is now available in the immediate aftermath of significant earthquakes worldwide on the basis of quantifiable loss estimates. Utilizing EIS, PAGER's rapid loss estimates can adequately recommend alert levels and suggest appropriate response protocols, despite the uncertainties; demanding or awaiting observations or loss estimates with a high level of accuracy may increase the losses. ?? 2011 American Society of Civil Engineers.

  3. NASA Space Engineering Research Center for VLSI systems design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This annual review reports the center's activities and findings on very large scale integration (VLSI) systems design for 1990, including project status, financial support, publications, the NASA Space Engineering Research Center (SERC) Symposium on VLSI Design, research results, and outreach programs. Processor chips completed or under development are listed. Research results summarized include a design technique to harden complementary metal oxide semiconductors (CMOS) memory circuits against single event upset (SEU); improved circuit design procedures; and advances in computer aided design (CAD), communications, computer architectures, and reliability design. Also described is a high school teacher program that exposes teachers to the fundamentals of digital logic design.

  4. Geopotential research mission, science, engineering and program summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keating, T. (editor); Taylor, P. (editor); Kahn, W. (editor); Lerch, F. (editor)

    1986-01-01

    This report is based upon the accumulated scientific and engineering studies pertaining to the Geopotential Research Mission (GRM). The scientific need and justification for the measurement of the Earth's gravity and magnetic fields are discussed. Emphasis is placed upon the studies and conclusions of scientific organizations and NASA advisory groups. The engineering design and investigations performed over the last 4 years are described, and a spacecraft design capable of fulfilling all scientific objectives is presented. In addition, critical features of the scientific requirements and state-of-the-art limitations of spacecraft design, mission flight performance, and data processing are discussed.

  5. An engineer's perspective of the intervention research workshop.

    PubMed

    Gressel, M G

    1996-04-01

    As an engineer practicing in the area of engineering controls for the reduction of occupational exposures to hazardous agents, the Intervention Research Workshop studies appeared to be effective for the studied situations, yet the models may not be applicable across a wide range of intervention possibilities. A more generic model might be more appropriate, perhaps a business model. Dr. W. Edwards Deming has proposed a model for the production of goods and services. If we can view interventions as products which need to be sold to potential customers, perhaps this type of model would be more effective across a wide range of intervention strategies. PMID:8728144

  6. Mehrdad Negahban, Associate Chair for Graduate Studies and Research Mechanical Engineering, Engineering Mechanics, Materials Engineering, Biomedical Engineering

    E-print Network

    Farritor, Shane

    Baesu Kevin Cole Yuris Dzenis Linxia Gu Carl NelsonBenjamin Terry Sangjin Ryu Joseph Turner Jung Yul Lim Kevin Cole Zhaoyan Zhang Yuris Dzenis Mehrdad Negahban Solomon To John Reid Linxia Gu Carl Nelson #12 Carl Nelson #12;Mechanical Engineering, Engineering Mechanics, Materials Engineering, Biomedical

  7. Earthquake Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espinoza, Fernando

    2000-01-01

    Indicates the importance of the development of students' measurement and estimation skills. Analyzes earthquake data recorded at seismograph stations and explains how to read and modify the graphs. Presents an activity for student evaluation. (YDS)

  8. ISET Journal of Earthquake Technology, Paper No. 447, Vol. 41, No. 1, March 2004, pp. 201-222 WHITHER PERFORMANCE-BASED ENGINEERING IN INDIA?

    E-print Network

    Gupta, Vinay Kumar

    ISET Journal of Earthquake Technology, Paper No. 447, Vol. 41, No. 1, March 2004, pp. 201 Institute of Technology Roorkee Roorkee-247667 ABSTRACT The Kutch Earthquake of January 26, 2001 in Gujarat this earthquake, doubts arose about our professional practices, building by-laws, construction materials, building

  9. Towards a portal and search engine to facilitate academic and research collaboration in engineering and education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonilla Villarreal, Isaura Nathaly

    While international academic and research collaborations are of great importance at this time, it is not easy to find researchers in the engineering field that publish in languages other than English. Because of this disconnect, there exists a need for a portal to find Who's Who in Engineering Education in the Americas. The objective of this thesis is to built an object-oriented architecture for this proposed portal. The Unified Modeling Language (UML) model developed in this thesis incorporates the basic structure of a social network for academic purposes. Reverse engineering of three social networks portals yielded important aspects of their structures that have been incorporated in the proposed UML model. Furthermore, the present work includes a pattern for academic social networks..

  10. Signal processing and spectral analysis of the aftershocks of the 1980 El Asnam, Algeria earthquake—engineering application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadioun, G.; Goula, X.; Ferrieux, H.

    1985-04-01

    Seismic recording stations were set up in the El Asnam region of Algeria by the Department of Nuclear Safety of the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA/IPSN) after the severe October 10, 1980 earthquake, to study the aftershocks of this important event. Three of these stations, equipped with SMA-1 instruments, were intended to record strong ground motion and were accordingly installed near the trace of the fault responsible for the main shock. Three other more sensitive stations were placed in such a way as to make up a small network enclosing the central portion of this fault. Over 400 events were thus recorded during October and November 1980, of which certain events presented accelerations of nearly 0.2 g. The SMA-1 recordings were used as a basis for comparing different methods of correcting time histories, demonstrating the influence of the digitization rate, especially upon the high-frequency elements of the ground acceleration and that of the type of low-frequency filtering upon the integrated velocity and displacement time histories. The most significant recordings from both types of station were processed and their response spectra computed. From recordings of the same earthquake obtained on a massive concrete slab and in the free field, a marked filtering effect in the high-frequency range is to be observed.

  11. The California Post-Earthquake Information Clearinghouse: A Plan to Learn From the Next Large California Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyd, R.; Walter, S.; Fenton, J.; Tubbesing, S.; Greene, M.

    2008-12-01

    In the rush to remove debris after a damaging earthquake, perishable data related to a wide range of impacts on the physical, built and social environments can be lost. The California Post-Earthquake Information Clearinghouse is intended to prevent this data loss by supporting the earth scientists, engineers, and social and policy researchers who will conduct fieldwork in the affected areas in the hours and days following the earthquake to study these effects. First called for by Governor Ronald Reagan following the destructive M6.5 San Fernando earthquake in 1971, the concept of the Clearinghouse has since been incorporated into the response plans of the National Earthquake Hazard Reduction Program (USGS Circular 1242). This presentation is intended to acquaint scientists with the purpose, functions, and services of the Clearinghouse. Typically, the Clearinghouse is set up in the vicinity of the earthquake within 24 hours of the mainshock and is maintained for several days to several weeks. It provides a location where field researchers can assemble to share and discuss their observations, plan and coordinate subsequent field work, and communicate significant findings directly to the emergency responders and to the public through press conferences. As the immediate response effort winds down, the Clearinghouse will ensure that collected data are archived and made available through "lessons learned" reports and publications that follow significant earthquakes. Participants in the quarterly meetings of the Clearinghouse include representatives from state and federal agencies, universities, NGOs and other private groups. Overall management of the Clearinghouse is delegated to the agencies represented by the authors above.

  12. IMHOTEP LEGACY ACADEMY FACULTY OF ENGINEERING ENGINEERING SUMMER RESEARCH SCHOLARSHIP AWARD

    E-print Network

    Brownstone, Rob

    , an on-line tutoring program for high school students and summer research internships for post). The ILA offers weekly interactive STEM enrichment activities and homework help for junior high students pursuing post-secondary education in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM

  13. Biological and Agricultural Engineering Research Projects The Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering applies engineering principles to biologically-

    E-print Network

    Bahler, Dennis R.

    phases of agricultural and food production; to design and evaluate structures and environmental control for processing and marketing food and agricultural products; and to design sensor-based instrumentationBiological and Agricultural Engineering Research Projects 2013-14 The Department of Biological

  14. Research & Development 100 (R&D 100) NASA Glenn Research Center, Makel Engineering, Inc,

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Research & Development 100 (R&D 100) NASA Glenn Research Center, Makel Engineering, Inc, Case Western Reserve Univ, Ohio State Univ. for the development of Multi-Parameter, MicroSensor-Based Low False Alarm Fire Detection System (MMFDS) Award Plaque

  15. Does knowledge signify protection? The SEISMOPOLIS centre for improvement of behavior in case of an earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandoulaki, M.; Kourou, A.; Panoutsopoulou, M.

    2009-04-01

    It is vastly accepted that earthquake education is the way to earthquake protection. Nonetheless experience demonstrates that knowing what to do does not necessarily result in a better behaviour in case of a real earthquake. A research project titled: "Seismopolis" - "Pilot integrated System for Public Familiarization with Earthquakes and Information on Earthquake Protection" aimed at the improvement of the behaviour of people through an appropriate amalgamation of knowledge transfer and virtually experiencing an earthquake situation. Seismopolis combines well established education means such as books and leaflets with new technologies like earthquake simulation and virtual reality. It comprises a series of 5 main spaces that the visitor passes one-by-one. Space 1. Reception and introductory information. Visitors are given fundamental information on earthquakes and earthquake protection, as well as on the appropriate behaviour in case of an earthquake. Space 2. Earthquake simulation room Visitors experience an earthquake in a room. A typical kitchen is set on a shake table area (3m x 6m planar triaxial shake table) and is shaken in both horizontal and vertical directions by introducing seismographs of real or virtual earthquakes. Space 3. Virtual reality room Visitors may have the opportunity to virtually move around in the building or in the city after an earthquake disaster and take action as in a real-life situation, wearing stereoscopic glasses and using navigation tools. Space 4. Information and resources library Visitors are offered the opportunity to know more about earthquake protection. A series of means are available for this, some developed especially for Seismopolis (3 books, 2 Cds, a website and an interactive table game). Space 5. De-briefing area Visitors may be subjected to a pedagogical and psychological evaluation at the end of their visit and offered support if needed. For the evaluation of the "Seismopolis" Centre, a pilot application of the complete complex took place with the participation of different groups (schoolchildren, university students, adults, elderly persons, emigrants and persons with special needs). This test period recorded positive impression and reaction from the visitors and indicated the pedagogical and psychological appropriateness of the system. Seismopolis is the outcome of collaboration of public, academic and private partners and of a range of disciplines, namely seismologists, geologists, structural engineers, geographers, sociologists and psycologists. It is actually hosted by the Municipality of Rendis in Athens. More information on Seismopolis can be found in www.seismopolis.org .

  16. Research instrumentation for hot section components of turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englund, D. R.

    1986-01-01

    Programs to develop research instrumentation for use on hot section components of turbine engines are discussed. These programs can be separated into two categories: one category includes instruments which can measure the environment within the combustor and turbine components, the other includes instruments which measure the response of engine components to the imposed environment. Included in the first category are instruments to measure total heat flux and fluctuating gas temperature. High temperature strain measuring systems, thin film sensors (e.g., turbine blade thermocouples) and a system to view the interior of a combustor during engine operation are programs which comprise the second category. The paper will describe the state of development of these sensors and measuring systems and, in some cases, show examples of measurements made with this instrumentation. The discussion will cover work done at NASA Lewis and at various contractor facilities.

  17. Materials Engineering Research ColloquiumMaterials Engineering Research Colloquium December 2, 2005December 2, 2005

    E-print Network

    British Columbia, University of

    Metals Processing Group; T.R. Meadowcroft and P.V. Barr Frank Forward Building, Room 401 Department Troczynski Frank Forward Building, Room 106A Department of Metals and Materials Engineering, University of the artery walls that supply blood to the heart muscle. Fatty deposits or

  18. NASA Glenn's Contributions to Aircraft Engine Noise Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Dennis L.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation reviews engine noise research conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center over the past 70 years. This report includes a historical perspective of the Center and the facilities used to conduct the research. Major noise research programs are highlighted to show their impact on industry and on the development of aircraft noise reduction technology. Noise reduction trends are discussed, and future aircraft concepts are presented. Since the 1960s, research results show that the average perceived noise level has been reduced by about 20 decibels (dB). Studies also show that, depending on the size of the airport, the aircraft fleet mix, and the actual growth in air travel, another 15 to 17 dB reduction will be required to achieve NASAs long-term goal of providing technologies to limit objectionable noise to the boundaries of an average airport.

  19. NASA Glenn's Contributions to Aircraft Engine Noise Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Dennis L.

    2013-01-01

    This report reviews all engine noise research conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center over the past 70 years. This report includes a historical perspective of the Center and the facilities used to conduct the research. Major noise research programs are highlighted to show their impact on industry and on the development of aircraft noise reduction technology. Noise reduction trends are discussed, and future aircraft concepts are presented. Since the 1960s, research results show that the average perceived noise level has been reduced by about 20 decibels (dB). Studies also show that, depending on the size of the airport, the aircraft fleet mix, and the actual growth in air travel, another 15 to 17 dB reduction will be required to achieve NASA's long-term goal of providing technologies to limit objectionable noise to the boundaries of an average airport.

  20. NTRCI Legacy Engine Research and Development Project Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Connie Smith-Holbert; Joseph Petrolino; Bart Watkins; David Irick

    2011-12-31

    The Legacy engine is a completely new design, transitional diesel engine, replacing the reciprocating engine with a rotary engine. The Legacy engine offers significant advances over conventional internal combustion engines in 1) power to weight ratio; 2) multiple fuel acceptance; 3) fuel economy; and 4) environmental compliance. These advances are achieved through a combination of innovative design geometry, rotary motion, aspiration simplicity, and manufacturing/part simplicity. The key technical challenge to the Legacy engineâ??s commercialization, and the focus of this project, was the development of a viable roton tip seal. The PST concept for the roton tip seal was developed into a manufacturable design. The design was evaluated using a custom designed and fabricated seal test fixture and further refined. This design was incorporated into the GEN2.5A prototype and tested for achievable compression pressure. The Decision Point at the end of Phase 1 of the project (described below) was to further optimize the existing tip seal design. Enhancements to the tip seal design were incorporated into the GEN2.5B prototype and tested and evaluated using the iterative research strategy described below. Compression pressures adequate for compression ignition of diesel fuel were achieved, although not consistently in all combustion volumes. The variation in compression pressures was characterized versus design features. As the roton tip seal performance was improved, results pointed toward inadequate performance of the housing side seals. Enhancement of the housing side seal system was accomplished using a custom designed side seal test fixture. The design enhancements developed with the test fixture were also incorporated into the GEN2.5B prototype and tested and evaluated using the iterative research strategy described below. Finally, to simplify the requirements for the roton tip seals and to enhance the introduction and combustion of fuel, a flush-mount fuel injector was designed, manufactured and demonstrated in the GEN2.5B prototype.

  1. The Southern California Earthquake Center/Undergraduate Studies in Earthquake Information Technology (SCEC/UseIT) Internship Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, S.; Jordan, T.

    2006-12-01

    Our undergraduate research program, SCEC/UseIT, an NSF Research Experience for Undergraduates site, provides software for earthquake researchers and educators, movies for outreach, and ways to strengthen the technical career pipeline. SCEC/UseIT motivates diverse undergraduates towards science and engineering careers through team-based research in the exciting field of earthquake information technology. UseIT provides the cross-training in computer science/information technology (CS/IT) and geoscience needed to make fundamental progress in earthquake system science. Our high and increasing participation of women and minority students is crucial given the nation"s precipitous enrollment declines in CS/IT undergraduate degree programs, especially among women. UseIT also casts a "wider, farther" recruitment net that targets scholars interested in creative work but not traditionally attracted to summer science internships. Since 2002, SCEC/UseIT has challenged 79 students in three dozen majors from as many schools with difficult, real-world problems that require collaborative, interdisciplinary solutions. Interns design and engineer open-source software, creating increasingly sophisticated visualization tools (see "SCEC-VDO," session IN11), which are employed by SCEC researchers, in new curricula at the University of Southern California, and by outreach specialists who make animated movies for the public and the media. SCEC-VDO would be a valuable tool for research-oriented professional development programs.

  2. Trends in aeropropulsion research and their impact on engineering education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povinelli, Louis A.; Reichert, Bruce A.; Glassman, Arthur J.

    1992-01-01

    This presentation is concerned with the trends in aeropropulsion both in the U.S. and abroad and the impact of these trends on the educational process in our universities. In this paper, we shall outline the new directions for research which may be of interest to educators in the aeropropulsion field. Awareness of new emphases, such as emission reductions, noise control, maneuverability, speed, etc., will have a great impact on engineering educators responsible for restructuring courses in propulsion. The information presented herein will also provide some background material for possible consideration in the future development of propulsion courses. In describing aeropropulsion, we are concerned primarily with air-breathing propulsion; however many observations apply equally as well to rocket engine systems. Aeropropulsion research needs are primarily motivated by technologies required for advanced vehicle systems and frequently driven by external requirements such as economic competitiveness, environmental concern and national security. In this presentation, vehicle based research is first described, followed by a discussion of discipline and multidiscipline research necessary to implement the vehicle-focused programs. The importance of collaboration in research and the training of future researchers concludes this presentation.

  3. Alcoa Foundation Engineering Research Awards Distinguished = THE ALCOA FOUNDATION DISTINGUISHED ENGINEERING

    E-print Network

    Frey, H. Christopher

    and Biomolecular Engineering, Distinguished #12;David Kaber, Industrial and Systems Engineering, Achievement 2005 Engineering, Achievement 2001 Ruben Carbonell, Chemical Engineering, Distinguished Yuan-Shin Lee, Industrial and Computer Engineering, Distinguished Russell E. King, Industrial Engineering, Achievement 1994 Carol K. Hall

  4. USEMS & GLASS: investigator-driven frontier research in earthquake physics. Ground-breaking research in Europe enhances outreach to the general public

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariano, S.; di Toro, G.; Collettini, C.; Usems Team; Glass Team

    2011-12-01

    USEMS and GLASS are two projects financed by the European Research Council (ERC) as part of the ERC starting grants scheme within the FP7 framework. The rationale behind the funding scheme is to support some of the most promising scientific endeavours in Europe that are being led by young researchers, and to emphasize the excellence of individual ideas rather than specific research areas; in other words, to promote bottom-up frontier research. The general benefits of this rationale are evident in the two ongoing projects that deal with earthquake physics, as these projects are increasingly recognized in their scientific community. We can say that putting excellence at the heart of European Research strongly contributes to the construction of a European knowledge-based society. From a researcher point-of-view one of the most challenging aspects of these projects is to approach and convey the results of the projects to a general public, contributing to the construction of knowledge-based society. Luckily, media interest and the availability of a number of new communication tools facilitate the outreach of scientific achievements. The largest earthquakes during the last ten years (e.g. Sumatra 2004 and Japan 2011) have received widespread attention in the media world (TV, W.W.W., Newspaper and so on) for months, and successful research projects such as those above also become media protagonists, gaining their space in the media bullring. The USEMS principal investigator and his team have participated in several dissemination events in the Mass Media, such as interviews wit Italian and French TV national broadcasts (RAI Due TG2, RAI Uno Unomattina, Rai Tre Geo & Geo, FRANCE 2); interviews in scientific journals: SCIENCE (Sept. 2010), newspapers and web (Corriere della Sera, Il Gazzettino, Il Messagero, La Stampa, Libero, Il Mattino, Yahoo, ANSA, AdnKronos and AGI); radio (RadioRai Uno, RadioRai Tre Scienza); documentary "Die Eroberung der Alpen" produced by Tangram Film (Munchen, Germany). The USEMS project started in June 2008, and the GLASS project in October 2010. For both projects we developed a number of web pages through the official web site of the host institution, the National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology (INGV) in Rome. In these pages we describe the projects, publish pictures and short-movies of the experimental activities and keep the project results up to date. In addition the research teams collaborate within various INGV outreach schemes (school and student visits in the laboratory, writing short news reports for the INGV press office, and interviews with journalists) as well as using WWW channels (Facebook, Youtube) to make the project results available to the general public. Finally, it is notable that the ERC funding agency itself is fully involved in the outreach activities using its own communication channels and its highly skilled resources which promote through brochures, web pages, publications and documentaries the best projects. We are going to improve our effort in this direction up to the end of the projects.

  5. 76 FR 64325 - Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-18

    ...the National Research Council Report on National Earthquake Resilience, and to review NEHRP agency updates on their latest activities...the National Research Council Report on National Earthquake Resilience, and to review NEHRP agency updates on their latest...

  6. The collaborative program of research in engineering science

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    MIT and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory are continuing the program of collaborative research on energy-related engineering. The program involves research in the following areas: (1) mathematical modeling of thermal plasma systems, (2) high-temperature gas-particle reactions, (3) metal transfer in gas-metal arc welding, (4) multivariate control of gas-metal arc welding, (5) fundamentals of elastic-plastic fracture, (6) comminution of energy materials, and (7) synthesis and optimization of integrated chemical processes. A key objective of this collaborative program is to serve as a prototype for other university/laboratory collaborative programs. Another important goal is to enhance the transfer of new technology to the industrial sector.

  7. Peer review, basic research, and engineering: Defining a role for QA professionals in basic research environments

    SciTech Connect

    Bodnarczuk, M.

    1989-02-01

    Within the context of doing basic research, this paper seeks to answer four major questions: (1) What is the authority structure of science. (2) What is peer review. (3) Where is the interface between basic physics research and standard engineering. and (4) Given the conclusions to the first three questions, what is the role of the QA professional in a basic research environment like Fermilab. 23 refs.

  8. Researchers in the faculty of Civil Engineering and

    E-print Network

    Langendoen, Koen

    · Scalable to a global network of stations · Has great benefits to economy, safety and science · Requires. The measurements can be used to predict natural hazards like earthquakes or volcanic eruptions, or to assess

  9. Students Engaged in Research - Young Engineers and Scientists (YES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boice, Daniel C.

    2009-09-01

    During the past 17 years, Young Engineers and Scientists (YES) has been a community partnership between local high schools in San Antonio, Texas (USA), and Southwest Research Institute (SwRI). The goals of YES are to increase the number of high school students, especially those from underrepresented groups, seeking careers in science and engineering and to enhance their success in entering the college and major of their choice. This is accomplished by expanding career awareness, including information on "hot" career areas through seminars and laboratory tours by SwRI staff, and allowing students to interact on a continuing basis with role models at SwRI in a real-world research experiences in physical sciences (including geosciences), information sciences, and a variety of engineering fields. YES consists of two parts: 1) An intensive three-week summer workshop held at SwRI where students experience the research environment and 2) a collegial mentorship where students complete individual research projects under the guidance of SwRI mentors during the academic year. At the end of the school year, students publicly present and display their work, spreading career awareness to other students and teachers. YES students develop a website (yesserver.space.swri.edu) for topics in space science and high school science teachers develop space-related lessons for classroom presentation. Partnerships between research institutes, local high schools, and community foundations, like the YES Program, can positively affect students’ preparation for STEM careers via real-world research experiences with mentorship teams consisting of professional staff and qualified teachers. Acknowledgements. We acknowledge support from the NASA MMS Mission, Texas Space Grant Consortium, SwRI, and local charitable foundations.

  10. Young Engineers and Scientists (YES) -engaging students in research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boice, Daniel; Reiff, Patricia

    Young Engineers and Scientists (YES) has been a community partnership between local high schools in San Antonio, Texas (USA), and Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) during the past 18 years. The goals of YES are to increase the number of high school students, especially those from underrepresented groups, seeking careers in science and engineering and to enhance their success in entering the college and major of their choice. This is accomplished by expanding career awareness, including information on "hot" career areas through seminars and laboratory tours by SwRI staff, and allowing students to interact on a continuing basis with role models at SwRI in a real-world research experiences in physical sciences (including space sciences), information sciences, and a variety of engineering fields. YES consists of two parts: 1) An intensive three-week summer workshop held at SwRI where students experience the research environment and 2) a collegial mentorship where students complete individual research projects under the guidance of SwRI mentors during the academic year. At the end of the school year, students publicly present and display their work, spreading career awareness to other students and teachers. YES students develop a website (yesserver.space.swri.edu) for topics in space science and high school science teachers develop space-related lessons for classroom presentation. Partnerships between research institutes, local high schools, and community foundations, like the YES Program, can positively affect students' preparation for STEM careers via real-world research experiences with mentorship teams consisting of professional staff and qualified teachers. Acknowledgements. We acknowledge support from the NASA MMS Mission, Texas Space Grant Consortium, SwRI, and local charitable foundations.

  11. A global building inventory for earthquake loss estimation and risk management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaiswal, K.; Wald, D.; Porter, K.

    2010-01-01

    We develop a global database of building inventories using taxonomy of global building types for use in near-real-time post-earthquake loss estimation and pre-earthquake risk analysis, for the U.S. Geological Survey's Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response (PAGER) program. The database is available for public use, subject to peer review, scrutiny, and open enhancement. On a country-by-country level, it contains estimates of the distribution of building types categorized by material, lateral force resisting system, and occupancy type (residential or nonresidential, urban or rural). The database draws on and harmonizes numerous sources: (1) UN statistics, (2) UN Habitat's demographic and health survey (DHS) database, (3) national housing censuses, (4) the World Housing Encyclopedia and (5) other literature. ?? 2010, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  12. NASA-HBCU Space Science and Engineering Research Forum Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Yvonne D. (editor); Freeman, Yvonne B. (editor); George, M. C. (editor)

    1989-01-01

    The proceedings of the Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) forum are presented. A wide range of research topics from plant science to space science and related academic areas was covered. The sessions were divided into the following subject areas: Life science; Mathematical modeling, image processing, pattern recognition, and algorithms; Microgravity processing, space utilization and application; Physical science and chemistry; Research and training programs; Space science (astronomy, planetary science, asteroids, moon); Space technology (engineering, structures and systems for application in space); Space technology (physics of materials and systems for space applications); and Technology (materials, techniques, measurements).

  13. Earthquakes and the urban environment. Volume III

    SciTech Connect

    Berlin, G.L.

    1980-01-01

    Because of the complex nature of earthquake effects, current investigations encompass many disciplines, including those of both the physical and social sciences. Research activities center on such diversified topics as earthquake mechanics, earthquake prediction and control, the prompt and accurate detection of tsunamis (seismic sea waves), earthquake-resistant construction, seismic building code improvements, land use zoning, earthquake risk and hazard perception, disaster preparedness, plus the study of the concerns and fears of people who have experienced the effects of an earthquake. This monograph attempts to amalgamate recent research input comprising the vivifying components of urban seismology at a level useful to those having an interest in the earthquake and its effects upon an urban environment. Volume 3 contains chapters on seismic planning, social aspects and future prospects.

  14. 48 CFR 206.302-3 - Industrial mobilization; or engineering, development, or research capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Industrial mobilization; or engineering, development, or research capability...and Open Competition 206.302-3 Industrial mobilization; or engineering, development, or research...

  15. 48 CFR 206.302-3 - Industrial mobilization; or engineering, development, or research capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Industrial mobilization; or engineering, development, or research capability...and Open Competition 206.302-3 Industrial mobilization; or engineering, development, or research...

  16. 48 CFR 206.302-3 - Industrial mobilization; or engineering, development, or research capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Industrial mobilization; or engineering, development, or research capability...and Open Competition 206.302-3 Industrial mobilization; or engineering, development, or research...

  17. 48 CFR 206.302-3 - Industrial mobilization, engineering, developmental, or research capability, or expert services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Industrial mobilization, engineering, developmental, or research capability...and Open Competition 206.302-3 Industrial mobilization, engineering, developmental, or research...

  18. 48 CFR 206.302-3 - Industrial mobilization, engineering, developmental, or research capability, or expert services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Industrial mobilization, engineering, developmental, or research capability...and Open Competition 206.302-3 Industrial mobilization, engineering, developmental, or research...

  19. Road Damage Following Earthquake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Ground shaking triggered liquefaction in a subsurface layer of water-saturated sand, producing differential lateral and vertical movement in a overlying carapace of unliquified sand and slit, which moved from right to left towards the Pajaro River. This mode of ground failure, termed lateral spreading, is a principal cause of liquefaction-related earthquake damage caused by the Oct. 17, 1989, Loma Prieta earthquake. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditons that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Credit: S.D. Ellen, U.S. Geological Survey

  20. Seismological Research Letters Volume 82, Number 2 March/April 2011 227doi: 10.1785/gssrl.82.2.227 A second Opinion on "Operational Earthquake

    E-print Network

    .2.227 A second Opinion on "Operational Earthquake forecasting: some Thoughts on Why and How," by Thomas H. Jordan and recommendations of the International Commission on Earthquake Forecasting (ICEF) for operational earthquake forecasting convened by the Italian government following the 6 April 2009 L'Aquila Mw 6.3 earthquake, which

  1. Earthquake and ambient vibration monitoring of the steel-frame UCLA factor building

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kohler, M.D.; Davis, P.M.; Safak, E.

    2005-01-01

    Dynamic property measurements of the moment-resisting steel-frame University of California, Los Angeles, Factor building are being made to assess how forces are distributed over the building. Fourier amplitude spectra have been calculated from several intervals of ambient vibrations, a 24-hour period of strong winds, and from the 28 March 2003 Encino, California (ML = 2.9), the 3 September 2002 Yorba Linda, California (ML = 4.7), and the 3 November 2002 Central Alaska (Mw = 7.9) earthquakes. Measurements made from the ambient vibration records show that the first-mode frequency of horizontal vibration is between 0.55 and 0.6 Hz. The second horizontal mode has a frequency between 1.6 and 1.9 Hz. In contrast, the first-mode frequencies measured from earthquake data are about 0.05 to 0.1 Hz lower than those corresponding to ambient vibration recordings indicating softening of the soil-structure system as amplitudes become larger. The frequencies revert to pre-earthquake levels within five minutes of the Yorba Linda earthquake. Shaking due to strong winds that occurred during the Encino earthquake dominates the frequency decrease, which correlates in time with the duration of the strong winds. The first shear wave recorded from the Encino and Yorba Linda earthquakes takes about 0.4 sec to travel up the 17-story building. ?? 2005, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  2. Modeling, Forecasting and Mitigating Extreme Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail-Zadeh, A.; Le Mouel, J.; Soloviev, A.

    2012-12-01

    Recent earthquake disasters highlighted the importance of multi- and trans-disciplinary studies of earthquake risk. A major component of earthquake disaster risk analysis is hazards research, which should cover not only a traditional assessment of ground shaking, but also studies of geodetic, paleoseismic, geomagnetic, hydrological, deep drilling and other geophysical and geological observations together with comprehensive modeling of earthquakes and forecasting extreme events. Extreme earthquakes (large magnitude and rare events) are manifestations of complex behavior of the lithosphere structured as a hierarchical system of blocks of different sizes. Understanding of physics and dynamics of the extreme events comes from observations, measurements and modeling. A quantitative approach to simulate earthquakes in models of fault dynamics will be presented. The models reproduce basic features of the observed seismicity (e.g., the frequency-magnitude relationship, clustering of earthquakes, occurrence of extreme seismic events). They provide a link between geodynamic processes and seismicity, allow studying extreme events, influence of fault network properties on seismic patterns and seismic cycles, and assist, in a broader sense, in earthquake forecast modeling. Some aspects of predictability of large earthquakes (how well can large earthquakes be predicted today?) will be also discussed along with possibilities in mitigation of earthquake disasters (e.g., on 'inverse' forensic investigations of earthquake disasters).

  3. 75 FR 48411 - Research, Engineering and Development Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-10

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Research, Engineering and Development Advisory Committee; Notice of... of a meeting of the FAA Research, Engineering and Development (R, E&D) Advisory Committee. Name: Research, Engineering & Development Advisory Committee. Time and Date: September 22, 2010--9:30 a.m. to 4...

  4. Konstantin (Kosta) Beznosov Laboratory for Education and Research in Secure Systems Engineering

    E-print Network

    Konstantin (Kosta) Beznosov Laboratory for Education and Research in Secure Systems Engineering://acsac.org/2008/ Laboratory for Education and Research in Secure Systems Engineering (lersse.ece.ubc.ca) total and Research in Secure Systems Engineering (lersse.ece.ubc.ca) selected papers Monday, November 30, 2009 #12

  5. Konstantin (Kosta) Beznosov Laboratory for Education and Research in Secure Systems Engineering

    E-print Network

    Konstantin (Kosta) Beznosov Laboratory for Education and Research in Secure Systems Engineering Laboratory for Education and Research in Secure Systems Engineering (LERSSE) · US industry (1997-2003): end Language (XACML) v1.0 Laboratory for Education and Research in Secure Systems Engineering (lersse

  6. EL Program: Earthquake Risk Reduction in Buildings and Infrastructure

    E-print Network

    1 EL Program: Earthquake Risk Reduction in Buildings and Infrastructure Program Manager: John R to earthquake engineering, including performance-based tools, guidelines, and standards for designing buildings to resist earthquake effects, improve building safety, and enhance disaster resilience. The program fulfills

  7. CyberNET is a research infrastructure that enables cybersecurity scientists and engineers to rigorously develop,

    E-print Network

    Objective CyberNET is a research infrastructure that enables cybersecurity scientists and engineers Resilient Cybersecurity Initiative Researchers at PNNL are delivering the theory, processes, methodologies

  8. The role of chemical engineering in medicinal research including Alzheimer's.

    PubMed

    Kontogeorgis, Georgios M

    2015-01-01

    Various disciplines of chemical engineering, especially thermodynamics and kinetics, play an important role in medicinal research and this has been particularly recognized during the last 10-15 years (von Stockar and van der Wielen, J Biotechnol 59:25, 1997; Prausnitz, Fluid Phase Equilib 53:439, 1989; Prausnitz, Pure Appl Chem 79:1435, 2007; Dey and Prausnitz, Ind Eng Chem Res 50:3, 2011; Prausnitz, J Chem Thermodynamics 35:21, 2003; Tsivintzelis et al. AIChE J 55:756, 2009). It is expected that during the twenty-first century chemical engineering and especially thermodynamics can contribute as significantly to the life sciences development as it has been done with the oil and gas and chemical sectors in the twentieth century. Moreover, it has during the recent years recognized that thermodynamics can help in understanding diseases like human cataract, sickle-cell anemia, Creuzfeldt-Jacob ("mad cow" disease), and Alzheimer's which are connected to "protein aggregation." Several articles in the Perspectives section of prominent chemical engineering journals have addressed this issue (Hall, AIChE J 54:1956, 2008; Vekilov, AIChE J 54:2508, 2008). This work reviews recent applications of thermodynamics (and other areas of chemical engineering) first in drug development and then in the understanding of the mechanism of Alzheimer's and similar diseases. PMID:25416110

  9. Current Progress of Genetically Engineered Pig Models for Biomedical Research

    PubMed Central

    Gün, Gökhan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The first transgenic pigs were generated for agricultural purposes about three decades ago. Since then, the micromanipulation techniques of pig oocytes and embryos expanded from pronuclear injection of foreign DNA to somatic cell nuclear transfer, intracytoplasmic sperm injection-mediated gene transfer, lentiviral transduction, and cytoplasmic injection. Mechanistically, the passive transgenesis approach based on random integration of foreign DNA was developed to active genetic engineering techniques based on the transient activity of ectopic enzymes, such as transposases, recombinases, and programmable nucleases. Whole-genome sequencing and annotation of advanced genome maps of the pig complemented these developments. The full implementation of these tools promises to immensely increase the efficiency and, in parallel, to reduce the costs for the generation of genetically engineered pigs. Today, the major application of genetically engineered pigs is found in the field of biomedical disease modeling. It is anticipated that genetically engineered pigs will increasingly be used in biomedical research, since this model shows several similarities to humans with regard to physiology, metabolism, genome organization, pathology, and aging. PMID:25469311

  10. From biomedical-engineering research to clinical application and industrialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Tetsushi; Aoyagi, Takao

    2012-12-01

    The rising costs and aging of the population due to a low birth rate negatively affect the healthcare system in Japan. In 2011, the Council for Science and Technology Policy released the 4th Japan's Science and Technology Basic Policy Report from 2011 to 2015. This report includes two major innovations, 'Life Innovation' and 'Green Innovation', to promote economic growth. Biomedical engineering research is part of 'Life Innovation' and its outcomes are required to maintain people's mental and physical health. It has already resulted in numerous biomedical products, and new ones should be developed using nanotechnology-based concepts. The combination of accumulated knowledge and experience, and 'nanoarchitechtonics' will result in novel, well-designed functional biomaterials. This focus issue contains three reviews and 19 original papers on various biomedical topics, including biomaterials, drug-delivery systems, tissue engineering and diagnostics. We hope that it demonstrates the importance of collaboration among scientists, engineers and clinicians, and will contribute to the further development of biomedical engineering.

  11. Social and ethical dimensions of nanoscale science and engineering research.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Aldrin E

    2006-07-01

    Continuing advances in human ability to manipulate matter at the atomic and molecular levels (i.e. nanoscale science and engineering) offer many previously unimagined possibilities for scientific discovery and technological development. Paralleling these advances in the various science and engineering sub-disciplines is the increasing realization that a number of associated social, ethical, environmental, economic and legal dimensions also need to be explored. An important component of such exploration entails the identification and analysis of the ways in which current and prospective researchers in these fields conceptualize these dimensions of their work. Within the context of a National Science Foundation funded Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program in nanomaterials processing and characterization at the University of Central Florida (2002-2004), here I present for discussion (i) details of a "nanotechnology ethics" seminar series developed specifically for students participating in the program, and (ii) an analysis of students' and participating research faculty's perspectives concerning social and ethical issues associated with nanotechnology research. I conclude with a brief discussion of implications presented by these issues for general scientific literacy and public science education policy. PMID:16909148

  12. Is the debate on the sources of large historical tsunamigenic earthquakes along the Italian coasts closed? The tsunami research point of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armigliato, Alberto; Tinti, Stefano; Pagnoni, Gianluca; Zaniboni, Filippo

    2015-04-01

    We present a review on the research regarding the possible sources of the largest historical tsunamis hitting the Italian coasts and following large magnitude earthquakes. Although it is known that tsunamis are rather rare events, especially when compared to earthquakes, we emphasize that 6 out of 10 earthquakes occurred in the last thousand years in Italy, and having equivalent moment magnitude equal or larger than 7 where accompanied by destructive or heavily damaging tsunamis: the percentage is still significant (around 40%) if we extend the lower limit of the equivalent moment magnitude down to 6.5. The most famous of these events are those occurred on 30 July 1627 in Gargano, on 11 January 1693 in eastern Sicily, and on 28 December 1908 in the Messina Straits. Maximum run-ups in the order of 10 m, significant maximum inundation distances, and large (although not precisely quantifiable) numbers of victims are reported, or can be deduced from coeval sources. Analyses carried out on paleo-tsunami deposits in the impacted regions and published over the last decade help to better characterise the tsunami impact, confirming that none of the cited events can be reduced to local or secondary effects. Hence, we point out the importance of including a proper analysis and simulation of tsunami data in the approach to a correct definition of the sources responsible for the largest Italian tsunamigenic earthquakes. Unfortunately, this is not the usual practice, as macroseismic, seismic and geological/geomorphological observations and data typically are assigned much heavier weights; one of the consequences is that in-land faults are often assigned larger credit than the offshore ones, and the tsunami generation is imputed a-priori to only supposed, and sometimes even non-existing, submarine landslides. We try to summarise the tsunami research point of view on the largest Italian historical tsunamigenic earthquakes, having in mind that the different datasets analysed by different disciplines must be reconciled rather than put into contrast with each other: we highlight the open problems, trying to suggest the possible answers that tsunami observations and simulations can contribute towards their solution. This study is funded in the frame of the EU Project called ASTARTE - Assessment, STrategy And Risk Reduction for Tsunamis in Europe. Grant 603839, 7th FP (ENV.2013.6.4-3).

  13. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Earthquake ruptures modulated by waves in damaged fault zones1

    E-print Network

    Ampuero, Jean Paul

    by waves in damaged fault zones1 Yihe Huang1 , Jean-Paul Ampuero1 , Don V. Helmberger1 2 1 Division.22 (yihe@gps.caltech.edu)23 #12;HUANG ET AL: EARTHQUAKE RUPTURE IN DAMAGED FAULT ZONE Key points:24 · Trapped waves in fault zones modulate the kinematic properties of ruptures25 · Relations between fault-zone

  14. Toward ethical norms and institutions for climate engineering research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, David R.; Kopp, Robert E.; Oppenheimer, Michael

    2009-10-01

    Climate engineering (CE), the intentional modification of the climate in order to reduce the effects of increasing greenhouse gas concentrations, is sometimes touted as a potential response to climate change. Increasing interest in the topic has led to proposals for empirical tests of hypothesized CE techniques, which raise serious ethical concerns. We propose three ethical guidelines for CE researchers, derived from the ethics literature on research with human and animal subjects, applicable in the event that CE research progresses beyond computer modeling. The Principle of Respect requires that the scientific community secure the global public's consent, voiced through their governmental representatives, before beginning any empirical research. The Principle of Beneficence and Justice requires that researchers strive for a favorable risk-benefit ratio and a fair distribution of risks and anticipated benefits, all while protecting the basic rights of affected individuals. Finally, the Minimization Principle requires that researchers minimize the extent and intensity of each experiment by ensuring that no experiments last longer, cover a greater geographical extent, or have a greater impact on the climate, ecosystem, or human welfare than is necessary to test the specific hypotheses in question. Field experiments that might affect humans or ecosystems in significant ways should not proceed until a full discussion of the ethics of CE research occurs and appropriate institutions for regulating such experiments are established.

  15. Predicting Iceland's earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovarsson, Reynir; Einarsson, Pall

    A research project involving seismologists from the Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden) started recently. The long-term project goal is to reduce earthquake losses and strengthen the physical basis for earthquake prediction.The project originated in the Council of Europe. In a resolution passed in 1980, the council stressed the importance of concentrating earthquake prediction research in five test areas in Europe, one of which was the South Iceland Seismic Zone (see Figure 1). The resolution led to discussion among Nordic seismologists on cooperative work in the Icelandic test area. They agreed that an appropriate first step would be to establish a digital data acquisition system around which geophysical monitoring and other experiments could be designed. A proposal for a 5 - 6-year project, which was submitted to the Nordic Council and the Council of Nordic Ministers, was approved in 1987. The participants are planning a data acquisition system and geophysical experiments that can give information about changes in physical properties of the crust before large earthquakes.

  16. Characteristics of strong motions and damage implications of M S6.5 Ludian earthquake on August 3, 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Peibin; Wen, Ruizhi; Wang, Hongwei; Ji, Kun; Ren, Yefei

    2015-02-01

    The Ludian County of Yunnan Province in southwestern China was struck by an M S6.5 earthquake on August 3, 2014, which was another destructive event following the M S8.0 Wenchuan earthquake in 2008, M S7.1 Yushu earthquake in 2010, and M S7.0 Lushan earthquake in 2013. National Strong-Motion Observation Network System of China collected 74 strong motion recordings, which the maximum peak ground acceleration recorded by the 053LLT station in Longtoushan Town was 949 cm/s2 in E-W component. The observed PGAs and spectral ordinates were compared with ground-motion prediction equation in China and the NGA-West2 developed by Pacific Earthquake Engineering Researcher Center. This earthquake is considered as the first case for testing applicability of NGA-West2 in China. Results indicate that the observed PGAs and the 5 % damped pseudo-response spectral accelerations are significantly lower than the predicted ones. The field survey around some typical strong motion stations verified that the earthquake damage was consistent with the official isoseismal by China Earthquake Administration.

  17. The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: lessons and conclusions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eckel, Edwin B.

    1970-01-01

    One of the greatest earthquakes of all time struck south-central Alaska on March 27, 1964. Strong motion lasted longer than for most recorded earthquakes, and more land surface was dislocated, vertically and horizontally, than by any known previous temblor. Never before were so many effects on earth processes and on the works of man available for study by scientists and engineers over so great an area. The seismic vibrations, which directly or indirectly caused most of the damage, were but surface manifestations of a great geologic event-the dislocation of a huge segment of the crust along a deeply buried fault whose nature and even exact location are still subjects for speculation. Not only was the land surface tilted by the great tectonic event beneath it, with resultant seismic sea waves that traversed the entire Pacific, but an enormous mass of land and sea floor moved several tens of feet horizontally toward the Gulf of Alaska. Downslope mass movements of rock, earth, and snow were initiated. Subaqueous slides along lake shores and seacoasts, near-horizontal movements of mobilized soil (“landspreading”), and giant translatory slides in sensitive clay did the most damage and provided the most new knowledge as to the origin, mechanics, and possible means of control or avoidance of such movements. The slopes of most of the deltas that slid in 1964, and that produced destructive local waves, are still as steep or steeper than they were before the earthquake and hence would be unstable or metastable in the event of another great earthquake. Rockslide avalanches provided new evidence that such masses may travel on cushions of compressed air, but a widely held theory that glaciers surge after an earthquake has not been substantiated. Innumerable ground fissures, many of them marked by copious emissions of water, caused much damage in towns and along transportation routes. Vibration also consolidated loose granular materials. In some coastal areas, local subsidence was superimposed on regional tectonic subsidence to heighten the flooding damage. Ground and surface waters were measurably affected by the earthquake, not only in Alaska but throughout the world. Expectably, local geologic conditions largely controlled the extent of structural damage, whether caused directly by seismic vibrations or by secondary effects such as those just described. Intensity was greatest in areas underlain by thick saturated unconsolidated deposits, least on indurated bedrock or permanently frozen ground, and intermediate on coarse well-drained gravel, on morainal deposits, or on moderately indurated sedimentary rocks. Local and even regional geology also controlled the distribution and extent of the earthquake's effects on hydrologic systems. In the conterminous United States, for example, seiches in wells and bodies of surface water were controlled by geologic structures of regional dimension. Devastating as the earthquake was, it had many long-term beneficial effects. Many of these were socioeconomic or engineering in nature; others were of scientific value. Much new and corroborative basic geologic and hydrologic information was accumulated in the course of the earthquake studies, and many new or improved investigative techniques were developed. Chief among these, perhaps, were the recognition that lakes can be used as giant tiltmeters, the refinement of methods for measuring land-level changes by observing displacements of barnacles and other sessile organisms, and the relating of hydrology to seismology by worldwide study of hydroseisms in surface-water bodies and in wells. The geologic and hydrologic lessons learned from studies of the Alaska earthquake also lead directly to better definition of the research needed to further our understanding of earthquakes and of how to avoid or lessen the effects of future ones. Research is needed on the origins and mechanisms of earthquakes, on crustal structure, and on the generation of tsunamis and local waves. Better earthquake-hazard maps, based on improved knowledge of regional geology, faul

  18. Success of EPA's stratospheric-ozone engineering research

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, W.J.; Shapiro, P.S.

    1990-01-01

    The paper summarizes recent successes in, as well as work in progress (with the cooperation of industry) on, EPA's stratospheric ozone engineering research. The Montreal Protocol and U.S. regulations implementing the Protocol necessitate that engineering solutions be found and implemented to avoid the use of certain chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and halons. CFCs and halons are used for solvents, refrigerants, aerosol propellants, foams, and fire protection. Nearly all EPA activities in this program involve pollution prevention as the first alternative. This includes alternative processes, alternative chemicals, alternative means of accomplishing the desired service, and recycling. Industry cooperation is needed in order to take advantage of industry's expertise, to get industry to buy into the solution, to conserve valuable time and resources, and to implement results rapidly. Since the problem will be solved only through international efforts, the U.S. is also placing high priority on technical assistance to developing countries.

  19. Aircraft Engine Noise Research and Testing at the NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, Dave

    2015-01-01

    The presentation will begin with a brief introduction to the NASA Glenn Research Center as well as an overview of how aircraft engine noise research fits within the organization. Some of the NASA programs and projects with noise content will be covered along with the associated goals of aircraft noise reduction. Topics covered within the noise research being presented will include noise prediction versus experimental results, along with engine fan, jet, and core noise. Details of the acoustic research conducted at NASA Glenn will include the test facilities available, recent test hardware, and data acquisition and analysis methods. Lastly some of the actual noise reduction methods investigated along with their results will be shown.

  20. NEES Multidirectional Wave Basin for Tsunami Research Solomon C. Yim1

    E-print Network

    Yim, Solomon C.

    NEES Multidirectional Wave Basin for Tsunami Research Solomon C. Yim1 , Harry H. Yeh2 , Daniel T in coastal science and engineering including tsunami phenomena induced by sub-sea earthquakes, spanning

  1. Engine structures: A bibliography of Lewis Research Center's research for 1980-1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes the technical reporting that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Structures Division of the NASA Lewis Research Center from 1980 through 1987. All the publications were announced in the l980 to 1987 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  2. Engineering uses of physics-based ground motion simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baker, Jack W.; Luco, Nicolas; Abrahamson, Norman A.; Graves, Robert W.; Maechling, Phillip J.; Olsen, Kim B.

    2014-01-01

    This paper summarizes validation methodologies focused on enabling ground motion simulations to be used with confidence in engineering applications such as seismic hazard analysis and dynmaic analysis of structural and geotechnical systems. Numberical simullation of ground motion from large erthquakes, utilizing physics-based models of earthquake rupture and wave propagation, is an area of active research in the earth science community. Refinement and validatoin of these models require collaboration between earthquake scientists and engineering users, and testing/rating methodolgies for simulated ground motions to be used with confidence in engineering applications. This paper provides an introduction to this field and an overview of current research activities being coordinated by the Souther California Earthquake Center (SCEC). These activities are related both to advancing the science and computational infrastructure needed to produce ground motion simulations, as well as to engineering validation procedures. Current research areas and anticipated future achievements are also discussed.

  3. Enabling Arctic Research Through Science and Engineering Partnerships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, E. A.; Valentic, T. A.; Stehle, R. H.

    2014-12-01

    Under an Arctic Research Support and Logistics contract from NSF (GEO/PLR), SRI International, as part of the CH2M HILL Polar Services (CPS) program, forms partnerships with Arctic research teams to provide data transfer, remote operations, and safety/operations communications. This teamwork is integral to the success of real-time science results and often allows for unmanned operations which are both cost-effective and safer. The CPS program utilizes a variety of communications networks, services and technologies to support researchers and instruments throughout the Arctic, including Iridium, VSAT, Inmarsat BGAN, HughesNet, TeleGreenland, radios, and personal locator beacons. Program-wide IT and communications limitations are due to the broad categories of bandwidth, availability, and power. At these sites it is essential to conserve bandwidth and power through using efficient software, coding and scheduling techniques. There are interesting new products and services on the horizon that the program may be able to take advantage of in the future such as Iridium NEXT, Inmarsat Xpress, and Omnispace mobile satellite services. Additionally, there are engineering and computer software opportunities to develop more efficient products. We will present an overview of science/engineering partnerships formed by the CPS program, discuss current limitations and identify future technological possibilities that could further advance Arctic science goals.

  4. California earthquake history

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Toppozada, T.; Branum, D.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the advancement in our knowledge of California's earthquake history since ??? 1800, and especially during the last 30 years. We first review the basic statewide research on earthquake occurrences that was published from 1928 through 2002, to show how the current catalogs and their levels of completeness have evolved with time. Then we review some of the significant new results in specific regions of California, and some of what remains to be done. Since 1850, 167 potentially damaging earthquakes of M ??? 6 or larger have been identified in California and its border regions, indicating an average rate of 1.1 such events per year. Table I lists the earthquakes of M ??? 6 to 6.5 that were also destructive since 1812 in California and its border regions, indicating an average rate of one such event every ??? 5 years. Many of these occurred before 1932 when epicenters and magnitudes started to be determined routinely using seismographs in California. The number of these early earthquakes is probably incomplete in sparsely populated remote parts of California before ??? 1870. For example, 6 of the 7 pre-1873 events in table I are of M ??? 7, suggesting that other earthquakes of M 6.5 to 6.9 occurred but were not properly identified, or were not destructive. The epicenters and magnitudes (M) of the pre-instrumental earthquakes were determined from isoseismal maps that were based on the Modified Mercalli Intensity of shaking (MMI) at the communities that reported feeling the earthquakes. The epicenters were estimated to be in the regions of most intense shaking, and values of M were estimated from the extent of the areas shaken at various MMI levels. MMI VII or greater shaking is the threshold of damage to weak buildings. Certain areas in the regions of Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Eureka were each shaken repeatedly at MMI VII or greater at least six times since ??? 1812, as depicted by Toppozada and Branum (2002, fig. 19).

  5. Earthquake Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    During NASA's Apollo program, it was necessary to subject the mammoth Saturn V launch vehicle to extremely forceful vibrations to assure the moonbooster's structural integrity in flight. Marshall Space Flight Center assigned vibration testing to a contractor, the Scientific Services and Systems Group of Wyle Laboratories, Norco, California. Wyle-3S, as the group is known, built a large facility at Huntsville, Alabama, and equipped it with an enormously forceful shock and vibration system to simulate the liftoff stresses the Saturn V would encounter. Saturn V is no longer in service, but Wyle-3S has found spinoff utility for its vibration facility. It is now being used to simulate earthquake effects on various kinds of equipment, principally equipment intended for use in nuclear power generation. Government regulations require that such equipment demonstrate its ability to survive earthquake conditions. In upper left photo, Wyle3S is preparing to conduct an earthquake test on a 25ton diesel generator built by Atlas Polar Company, Ltd., Toronto, Canada, for emergency use in a Canadian nuclear power plant. Being readied for test in the lower left photo is a large circuit breaker to be used by Duke Power Company, Charlotte, North Carolina. Electro-hydraulic and electro-dynamic shakers in and around the pit simulate earthquake forces.

  6. NASA Glenn's Engine Components Research Lab, Cell 2B, Reactivated to Support the U.S. Army Research Laboratory T700 Engine Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beltran, Luis R.; Griffin, Thomas A.

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Army Vehicle Technology Directorate at the NASA Glenn Research Center has been directed by their parent command, the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL), to demonstrate active stall technology in a turboshaft engine as the next step in transitioning this technology to the Army and aerospace industry. Therefore, the Vehicle Technology Directorate requested the reactivation of Glenn's Engine Components Research Lab, Cell 2B, (ECRL 2B). They wanted to test a T700 engine that had been used previously for turboshaft engine research as a partnership between the Army and NASA on small turbine engine research. ECRL 2B had been placed in standby mode in 1997. Glenn's Testing Division initiated reactivation in May 2002 to support the new research effort, and they completed reactivation and improvements in September 2003.

  7. Integrating Global Hydrology Into Graduate Engineering Education and Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffis, V. W.

    2007-12-01

    Worldwide, polluted water affects the health of 1.2 billion people and contributes to the death of 15 million children under five every year. In addition poor environmental quality contributes to 25 per cent of all preventable ill health in the world. To address some of these problems, at the 2002 World Summit on Sustainable Development, the world community set the goal of halving, by the year 2015, the proportion of people without access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation. Solving sanitation and water resource management problems in any part of the world presents an interdisciplinary, complex challenge. However, when we attempt to solve these problems in an international context, our technical approaches must be tempered with cultural sensitivity and extraordinary management strategies. To meet this challenge, Michigan Tech has developed a unique global partnership with the U.S. Peace Corps to address our acknowledgement of the importance of placing engineering solutions in a global context. The program has graduated 30 students. Program enrollment is now over 30 and over 20 countries have hosted our students. The objective of this presentation is to demonstrate how this unique partnership can be integrated with graduate engineering education and research and also show how such a program may attract a more diverse student population into engineering. All graduate students enrolled in our Master's International Program in Civil and Environmental Engineering must complete specific coursework requirements before departing for their international experience. In CE5993 (Field Engineering in the Developing World) students learn to apply concepts of sustainable development and appropriate technology in the developing world. In FW5770 (Rural Community Development Planning and Analysis) students learn how one involves a community in the decision making process. A common theme in both courses is the role of woman in successful development projects. Technical specialization allows a student to take coursework in hydrology, water planning and management, and water quality engineering. The 2-3 semester residence on campus is then followed by three months of cultural, language, and technical training with the Peace Corps. After training students complete two years of service in the Peace Corps, typically working as a water/sanitation engineer while also completing a research project related to their Peace Corps experience. Some unique aspects of the Peace Corps experience is that it provides students with cultural awareness, language proficiency, community organizing skills, skills in consensus building and sustainable development, appreciation for technology that is economically and culturally sensitive, and a long-term field experience to develop an indepth overseas research project. Perhaps one of the greatest aspects of the Peace Corps experience is it provides students a basis to consider the social, economic, and environmental limitations of water projects in the developing world. Some examples of research projects that have been integrated into this program are: (a) culturally appropriate watershed planning and management, (b) technical capacity building of water supply systems, and (c) life cycle thinking approach applied to water and sanitation projects.

  8. Engaging Students in Space Research: Young Engineers and Scientists 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boice, D. C.; Asbell, H. E.; Reiff, P. H.

    2008-12-01

    Young Engineers and Scientists (YES) is a community partnership between Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), and local high schools in San Antonio, Texas (USA) during the past 16 years. The YES program provides talented high school juniors and seniors a bridge between classroom instruction and real world, research experiences in physical sciences (including space science) and engineering. YES consists of an intensive three-week summer workshop held at SwRI and a collegial mentorship where students complete individual research projects under the guidance of their professional mentors during the academic year. During the summer workshop, students experience the research environment first-hand; develop skills and acquire tools for solving scientific problems, attend mini-courses and seminars on electronics, computers and the Internet, careers, science ethics, and other topics; and select individual research projects to be completed during the academic year. At the end of the school year, students publicly present and display their work, acknowledging their accomplishments and spreading career awareness to other students and teachers. YES has developed a website for topics in space science from the perspective of high school students, including NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS) (http://yesserver.space.swri.edu). Student evaluations indicate the effectiveness of YES on their academic preparation and choice of college majors. Over the past 16 years, all YES graduates have entered college, several have worked for SwRI, one business has started, and three scientific publications have resulted. Acknowledgements. We acknowledge funding and support from the NASA MMS Mission, Texas Space Grant Consortium, Northside Independent School District, SwRI, and several local charitable foundations.

  9. NACA's 9th Annual Aircraft Engineering Research Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1934-01-01

    Eight of the twelve members of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics attending the 9th Annual Aircraft Engineering Research Conference posed for this photograph at Langley Field, Virginia, on May 23, 1934. Those pictured are (left to right): Brig. Gen. Charles A. Lindbergh, USAFR Vice Admiral Arthur B. Cook, USN Charles G. Abbot, Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution Dr. Joseph S. Ames, Committee Chairman Orville Wright Edward P. Warner Fleet Admiral Ernest J. King, USN Eugene L. Vidal, Director, Bureau of Air Commerce.

  10. Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Research and Engineering Program - Strategic Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, Leslie A.

    2004-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Research and Engineering (NEM R&E) Program is dedicated to providing knowledge, technical expertise, and products to US agencies responsible for monitoring nuclear explosions in all environments and is successful in turning scientific breakthroughs into tools for use by operational monitoring agencies. To effectively address the rapidly evolving state of affairs, the NNSA NEM R&E program is structured around three program elements described within this strategic plan: Integration of New Monitoring Assets, Advanced Event Characterization, and Next-Generation Monitoring Systems. How the Program fits into the National effort and historical accomplishments are also addressed.

  11. A Second Generation Expert System For Earthquake Risk Zoning Minjie Zhang

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Minjie

    earthquakes and small earthquakes in the statistical area; 2. according to the earthquake structure, Statistics and Computing Science University of New England Armidale, N.S.W. 2351 Australia August 1, 1999 Risk Zoning (ERZ) which is used to determine the dangerous earthquake areas for the engineering design

  12. ISET Journal of Earthquake Technology, Technical Note, Vol. 40, No.1, March 2003, pp. 77-97 ATHENS EARTHQUAKE OF 7 SEPTEMBER 1999

    E-print Network

    Gupta, Vinay Kumar

    ISET Journal of Earthquake Technology, Technical Note, Vol. 40, No.1, March 2003, pp. 77-97 ATHENS EARTHQUAKE OF 7 SEPTEMBER 1999: INTENSITY MEASURES AND OBSERVED DAMAGES A. Elenas Department of Civil Engineering Institute of Structural Mechanics and Earthquake Engineering Democritus University of Thrace GR

  13. Research Challenges in Process Systems Engineering Ignacio E. Grossmann and Arthur W. Westerberg

    E-print Network

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    1 Research Challenges in Process Systems Engineering Ignacio E. Grossmann and Arthur W. Westerberg by tying science to engineering is a compelling aspect of Process Systems Engineering (PSE). Despite of Process Systems Engineering through the introduction of the concept of the "chemical supply chain

  14. I'm Graduating This Year! So What IS an Engineer Anyway? Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matusovich, Holly; Streveler, Ruth; Miller, Ron; Olds, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    It is often assumed that graduating engineering students readily envision what it means to be an engineer and what type of work they will be doing as engineers in the future. How can one know if this is true? This research begins to answer these questions by aiming to understand undergraduate engineering students' perceptions of themselves as…

  15. W. Bollingerfehr Diplom-Bauingenieur (M.Sc.eq) civil engineer, Head of Research and

    E-print Network

    Biography W. Bollingerfehr Diplom-Bauingenieur (M.Sc.eq) ­civil engineer, Head of Research of Hannover in Germany as a civil engineer in 1985 he gained extensive experience in the field of repository design and development of engineered barriers. As project engineer and project manager he developed

  16. Engaging the Global South on climate engineering research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winickoff, David E.; Flegal, Jane A.; Asrat, Asfawossen

    2015-07-01

    The Global South is relatively under-represented in public deliberations about solar radiation management (SRM), a controversial climate engineering concept. This Perspective analyses the outputs of a deliberative exercise about SRM, which took place at the University of California-Berkeley and involved 45 mid-career environmental leaders, 39 of whom were from the Global South. This analysis identifies and discusses four themes from the Berkeley workshop that might inform research and governance in this arena: (1) the 'moral hazard' problem should be reframed to emphasize 'moral responsibility'; (2) climate models of SRM deployment may not be credible as primary inputs to policy because they cannot sufficiently address local concerns such as access to water; (3) small outdoor experiments require some form of international public accountability; and (4) inclusion of actors from the Global South will strengthen both SRM research and governance.

  17. User guide to the Burner Engineering Research Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Fornaciari, N.; Schefer, R.; Paul, P.; Lubeck, C.; Sanford, R.; Claytor, L.

    1994-11-01

    The Burner Engineering Research Laboratory (BERL) was established with the purpose of providing a facility where manufacturers and researchers can study industrial natural gas burners using conventional and laser-based diagnostics. To achieve this goal, an octagonal furnace enclosure with variable boundary conditions and optical access that can accommodate burners with firing rates up to 2.5 MMBtu per hour was built. In addition to conventional diagnostic capabilities like input/output measurements, exhaust gas monitoring, suction pyrometry and in-furnace gas sampling, laser-based diagnostics available at BERL include planar Mie scattering, laser Doppler velocimetry and laser-induced fluorescence. This paper gives an overview of the operation of BERL and a description of the diagnostic capabilities and an estimate of the time required to complete each diagnostic for the potential user who is considering submitting a proposal.

  18. Geoethics and decision science issues in Japan's disaster management system: case study in the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Megumi

    2015-04-01

    The March 11, 2011 Tohoku earthquake and its tsunami killed 18,508 people, including the missing (National Police Agency report as of April 2014) and raise the Level 7 accident at TEPCO's Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station in Japan. The problems revealed can be viewed as due to a combination of risk-management, risk-communication, and geoethics issues. Japan's preparations for earthquakes and tsunamis are based on the magnitude of the anticipated earthquake for each region. The government organization coordinating the estimation of anticipated earthquakes is the "Headquarters for Earthquake Research Promotion" (HERP), which is under the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT). Japan's disaster mitigation system is depicted schematically as consisting of three layers: seismology, civil engineering, and disaster mitigation planning. This research explains students in geoscience should study geoethics as part of their education related Tohoku earthquake and the Level 7 accident at TEPCO's Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station. Only when they become practicing professionals, they will be faced with real geoethical dilemmas. A crisis such as the 2011 earthquake, tsunami, and Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear accident, will force many geoscientists to suddenly confront previously unanticipated geoethics and risk-communication issues. One hopes that previous training will help them to make appropriate decisions under stress. We name it "decision science".

  19. Laboratory for Education and Research in Secure Systems Engineering (lersse.ece.ubc.ca)

    E-print Network

    1 Laboratory for Education and Research in Secure Systems Engineering (lersse.ece.ubc.ca) Rodrigo Systems Engineering (lersse.ece.ubc.ca)2 Malicious software flooding the network Notification external;2 Laboratory for Education and Research in Secure Systems Engineering (lersse.ece.ubc.ca)3 A client sending

  20. Konstantin (Kosta) Beznosov Laboratory for Education and Research in Secure Systems Engineering

    E-print Network

    Konstantin (Kosta) Beznosov Laboratory for Education and Research in Secure Systems Engineering Systems Engineering (lersse.ece.ubc.ca) #12;3 organizations worldwide spent in 2007 $1.55 trillion on IT 7 IT Security is Costly Laboratory for Education and Research in Secure Systems Engineering (lersse